Missouri Freemason Magazine - v66n02 - 2021 Winter

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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI A.F. & A.M

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VOL 66 NUMBER 2 WINTER 2021

aw l e By sp s su e d Du be 2ne 4 w ld ril ag e N ou p ee p a s c u yo


Inside this issue… THE FREEMASON® Vol. 66 No. 2 Winter 2021 Grand Lodge of Missouri A.F. & A.M. The Freemason® (USPS 573-920) is the official publication of the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri, and is published quarterly. ©

OFFICE OF PUBLICATIONS: Grand Lodge of Missouri 6033 Masonic Drive, Suite B Columbia, MO 65202-6535 (573) 474-8561 Published and copyrighted under the direction of the Committee on Masonic Publications. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and Marceline, Missouri.

POSTMASTER: Please send address forms 3579 to Grand Secretary 6033 Masonic Drive, Suite B Columbia, MO 65202-6535 Unless otherwise indicated, the views expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policy of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, A.F. & A.M. The editor reserves the rights to accept, reject, subedit, and rearrange materials submitted for publication. The Freemason® does not accept forms or clippings for publication. It is the policy of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to not publish pictures or personal information about children under the age of 21, without written permission from the child’s parent, guardian or sponsoring group. David W. Haywood, PGM Editor

COMMITTEE ON MASONIC PUBLICATIONS: Barry V. Cundiff Grand Master Ty G. Treutelaar Deputy Grand Master

Page 3 Grand Lodge

• Grand Master’s Message

Page 4 New Dues Bylaw: You Could Be Suspended Apr. 2nd Page 5 Masonic Traverlers: Lewis and Clark Page 8 The Grand Historian: Let There Be Light The Grand Lodge of Missouri First Hundred Years Page 11 Shriners Make a Difference Page 13 Masonic Home of Missouri Page 21 The Bicentennial: Grand Lodge of Missouri 200th Anniversary Plans Page 22 Missouri Masonic Childrens Foundation Page 23 Masonic Scholarship Page 24 Missouri Lodge of Research: 2020: A Challenging Year Page 25 Masonic Youth

• DeMolay • Jobs Daughters • Rainbow for Girls

Page 28 Installations, Dedications, and Special Events Page 32 Calendar of Events “TO AUTHORS:” The editor would like to remind you that photograph submissions should include 40-50 words telling who, what, when, where and why. Pictures should be high resolution jpg from a camera (at least 300 dpi). Phone pictures are unacceptable unless your camera app is set to high resolution.

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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI A.F. & A.M VOL 66 NUMBER 2 WINTER 2021

Richard W. Kaeser Senior Grand Warden Charles F. Wiegert Junior Grand Warden

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Jon B. Broyles, PGM Grand Secretary yo

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Articles to be considered for publication should be emailed to editor@momason.org. The Freemason is published quarterly. The submission deadlines are as follows: Spring Issue: March 26, 2021 Summer Issue: June 25, 2021 On the cover: The Bicentennial Jewel of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, designed by WB Chris Tilley and produced by RWB John Bridegroom. Photo by Jennifer Smith, Grand Lodge staff.


A Message from the Grand Master Brethren, As this article will not be published until after the holiday season, I would like to start by hoping each of you had enjoyable and safe holidays and that your families and friends are well. We have all had to make changes to the way we do things, but I hope you were each able to connect with the ones you love. I also wish each of you health, happiness and success in the New Year. The Grand Lodge office has also had to make changes. Due to the pandemic and its increasing numbers, the office has been closed to the public. The Grand Secretary, MWB Jon Broyles, and his Lady Anna were both afflicted with COVID-19. Fortunately both are on the mend. Because of the technology we have, the office has been able to continue its work with staff working remotely. The Grand Lodge officers will continue to travel and attend events on a careful and select basis. If it is safe to go we will try to be there. We must still keep in mind that the officers come from all over the state and so must also judge whether conditions in their home areas make it unsafe to travel to places that may not have the same level of infection. We want to see you and visit your lodges. Hopefully soon that will become more possible. Most recently, several of us were able to present a 70 year pin at Tyro Lodge in Caledonia. It was a very pleasant evening and we were honored to be there. The ritual committee has now met several times and is very close to setting out a program for reopening. I believe we will be able to release that plan during the first part of January. The plan does not mean that all of the state may open immediately. What ritual can be done will depend upon the rate of infection in a given area. In spite of this, I encourage the District Deputy Grand Masters to continue to make their official The Freemason

visits, but not to be received formally unless an area is safe for ritual under the forthcoming guidelines. Finally, I continue to encourage you to use other means to meet. The internet provides us with a number of tools our ancestors did not have when they faced pandemics. We can and should continue to meet remotely and to attend educational and social programs on line. We are still an ancient and honorable fraternity and should act as such. If you know a brother or sister who has COVID-19, or is otherwise isolated reach out to them and let them know we are thinking of them. May God bless you all and I hope to see you soon,

Barry V. Cundiff Grand Master 2020-2021 Page 3


NEWS

Grand Lodge of Missouri

new dues bylaw You Could Be Suspended April 2nd By Jon Broyles, PGM Grand Secretary “Are you kidding me? I just paid dues!” Every year, lodge secretaries hear the same refrain. Every member should already know that lodge dues are DUE on January 1st. If you do not pay by then, you are considered delinquent, and lose some of your Masonic privileges. Since you do not have a current dues card, technically, you cannot visit any lodge other than your own. This year, there are some important dates and other changes because of the new by-laws approved at the 2020 Grand Lodge Communication. 1. Lodge dues are DUE on January 1st. 2. If you do not pay by February 1st, your lodge is allowed to assess up to a $10.00 late fee to your account, which must be paid to be in good standing. 3. If you do not pay by March 1st, you should receive a delinquent dues notice from your lodge secretary. 4. If you do not pay by April 1st, your membership will either be suspended or withdrawn. 5. If you belong to just one lodge, you will be suspended by that lodge for non-payment of dues on April 2nd.

your multiple lodges that you did not pay. However, simply paying the dues to that lodge late will not reinstate you in any multiple membership lodge. Once withdrawn, the only way to reestablish your membership in that lodge it to submit a Petition for Affiliation, just like when you joined that lodge in the first place. So why were these changes made? The old June 1st deadline got many brothers in the bad habit of not paying until 6 months (or more) of their annual membership had already passed, even though they may have been attending lodge that entire time. Once they regularly started delaying payments, they thought that became their regular payment date, 12 months since they paid last, when it really should have been 6 months earlier. This payment delay has severely impacted the cash flow of many lodges’ operations. Also, the budget process of the Grand Lodge was being hindered by the fact that with final dues paid by June 1st and with the annual reports due on August 1st, this gave the Grand Lodge Committees and the Grand Lodge Officers less than 2 months to prepare a budget for the next year. Moving up the dates made the job easier and more accurate. Why is it important to not get suspended? While any time that you are suspended extends the time before you would qualify for your fifty-year service anniversary and pin, it is also a break in your years of service that is considered for assistance from the Masonic Home. This policy was set by the Freemasons that were members of the Home Board of Directors years ago to discourage someone from joining the fraternity for the sole purpose of getting assistance from the Home.

6. If you belong to multiple lodges and do not pay your “home lodge”, you will be suspended in ALL of your lodges, regardless of whether you’ve paid any of the other lodge(s) or not. You must then pay your home lodge and Financially supporting your lodges are part of your all other lodges to be reinstated. responsibility as a Mason. Helping them allows them to support you as a member and the work that we all do for 7. This year, with the new by-law, if you pay your “home others, the community, and the world at large. Always lodge” but fail to pay any of your other “multiple lodge remember that this is a strange and difficult year and if memberships”, you will be “Automatically Withdrawn times are bad for you, contact your lodge secretary to see from Multiple Membership” on April 2nd from any of if assistance is available. Page 4

The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

MASONIC EDUCATION

Masonic Traverlers: Lewis and Clark By Brother Chuck Clampitt Etana Lodge 333, Mt. Etna, Indiana When Thomas Jefferson became the 3rd President in 1801, the United States consisted of everything east of the Mississippi River with the exception of Florida. While most of the area west of the Appalachian Mountains was unsettled, two “western” states, Kentucky and Tennessee, had been admitted into the union. Jefferson, a farmer, plantation owner, and idealist, thought as the population of the United States

Winter 2021

increased, the purest form of republicanism occupationally was the farmer. The farmer in Jefferson’s opinion was hard working, independent, loyal to defend his country, and believer in a small Federal Government. As such, land, and cheap land would be necessary in order for this agrarian society to continue and prosper. As luck would have it, providence knocked at Jefferson’s door. France and England had been engaged in a series of wars going back to the French and Indian War which began in 1754. By the time Jefferson was inaugurated, Napoleon Bonaparte controlled France and it had » become obvious to him that developing the large

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» section of North America that France owned west

of the Mississippi River was impossible. It was therefore decided to offer what would become known as the Louisiana Purchase to the United States for the sum of 15 million dollars. The area comprised all of the Mississippi watershed west of the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains and consisted of 828,000 square miles, all for the price of three cents per acre. Following the purchase, Jefferson was anxious to find out exactly what it was that he had purchased since most of the area had never been explored by white men. Jefferson directed his personal secretary, young Army Captain Meriwether Lewis, to assemble an expedition to find a route to the Pacific Ocean, map the course of its travels, establish a presence with the Native Americans they encountered, determine economic potential, and gather scientific information. While the Louisiana Purchase did not stretch all the way to the Pacific Ocean, Jefferson saw an opportunity to investigate the area and lay claim to the Pacific Northwest in advance of the British. Lewis realized he would need assistance in order to accomplish all these tasks as well as lead the overall expedition. As a result, Lewis contacted a military friend William Clark to join him. Jefferson concurred, and Clark joined the expedition as a co-commander. Much preparation had to be done to organize the expedition and choose the personnel who would accompany them on their trip west. By late fall of 1803, men and material were transported down the Ohio River and a winter camp was built across the river from St Louis. In May 1804 the expedition, consisting of the two officers, 38 enlisted men and several French boatmen, called the “Corps of Discovery” started up the Missouri River by boat. Although seven tons of food stuffs were taken with them, civilian hunters were included in the roster to provide fresh meat and other edibles along the route. When available, the men consumed nine pounds of fresh meat daily. In 1805, Clark wrote “We eat an immensity of meat, it requires 4 deer, or an elk and a deer, or one buffalo to supply us 24 hours.” Tons of Page 6

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other supplies were also required including scientific instruments, medicine, guns, trade goods, tools, clothing, writing material, etc. As the fall of 1804 approached, the “Corps of Discovery” settled into winter quarters they built near what was called the Mandan Indian Village, 30 miles north of present-day Bismarck, North Dakota. The Mandan Indians were friendly to the expedition and traded foods they raised for trade goods that Lewis and Clark had brought along for that purpose. Lewis and Clark spent much time that winter with the Mandan discussing what lay further up the Missouri River and what could be expected in crossing the continental divide in the Rocky Mountains. The Mandan information was reliable to the base of the Rockies since they often traveled west to hunt and raid other tribes but beyond that they had no familiarity. It was at the Mandan village that Lewis and Clark hired Toussaint Charbonneau, a French-Canadian trapper, as an interpreter. Charbonneau’s wife, Sacagawea, was a Shoshone Indian and Lewis and Clark realized they would be traveling through a wide area of the Rockies populated by that tribe. In April 1805, the “Corps of Discovery” continued up the Missouri River as far as what are called the Great Falls while the balance of the crew returned to St Louis. Wheels and axles were built to carry some of their boats past the falls while other boats were hidden to be used on the return journey. When the river was no longer navigable, the expedition traveled by foot until they made contact with the Shoshone and were able to trade for horses. After seven months of terribly difficult travel, the “Corp of Discovery” finally reached the Pacific Ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River on November 15, 1805. A small wood fort was built to spend the winter and effort made to hunt and gather adequate food to sustain the group. After two years of travel, supplies of all sorts had run terribly short and survival became a constant struggle. In the spring of 1806, the expedition headed east

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» on their return trip. By the time they reached the Rockies, the snowpack was still so deep they took a different route in order to shorten the time and the distance. Once successfully over the Rockies, they located their stored boats and traveled quickly down the Missouri River arriving back in St Louis on September 23, 1806. Galas, celebrations, and parties were held to celebrate the successful expedition and word was immediately sent to President Jefferson of their return. Following their return to St Louis, Lewis was appointed the Governor of the Louisiana Territory in 1807 while Clark was appointed the Governor of the Missouri Territory from 1813 to 1820. Clark was also placed in charge of Indian affairs west of the Mississippi River from 1813 to 1838. During the expedition, detailed geographic readings and mappings were made as well as journals kept by both men. Lewis’s records were especially detailed and included weather readings, drawing of plants and animals, language of the various Indian tribes they encountered, and a variety of other information. Jefferson was anxious for Lewis to return east to share the many artifacts that had been collected and see that Lewis’s journal was published before the end of Jefferson’s second presidential term in 1808.

MASONIC EDUCATION delay was that he was editing his own journals, a task he would never complete. Finally, in the fall of 1809 Lewis decided to return east. His initial plan was to travel down the Mississippi River to New Orleans and thus by water to Washington, D.C. Instead while traveling down the Mississippi he disembarked in Tennessee and started overland. On the evening of October 10, 1809 Lewis stopped at an inn on the Natchez Trace south of Nashville. That night gunfire was heard from his cabin and servants found him severely wounded in the chest and head. He died the next morning. Argument still exists as to whether Lewis was murdered or committed suicide. One way or the other, apparently everything that Lewis was carrying with him was not disturbed. History records the great accomplishments of the Lewis and Clark Expedition and would rate it as being one of the most outstanding overland explorations of all time. The records, journals, and observations of both Lewis and Clark provided a vivid picture of the route they traveled and would serve as a road map for later immigrants to follow.

As you might guess, both Lewis and Clark were Masons. Lewis was raised in Door of Virtue Lodge in 1797 in Virginia. He also was a member of Royal Arch Lewis frequently had conflict with others as Territorial Masons and helped establish the first Masonic Lodge Governor, he started drinking heavily, and he in St Louis. He was a member of St Louis Lodge 111. apparently suffered from “melancholia” or depression. Clark was also a member of the St Louis Lodge 111 Efforts by Jefferson to get Lewis to forward the and was buried with military and Masonic honors expedition’s huge collection only resulted in excuses in 1838 in St Louis. Lewis is buried at the site of his from Lewis reason for delay. Lewis’s main reason for death on the Natchez Trace southwest of Nashville.

Editor’s Note: Documentation from “Frederic L. Billon’s Masonic Memoranda” establishes that St. Louis Lodge No. 111 was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in 1808, with Meriwether Lewis serving as Worshipful Master and where William Clark was documented to hold membership on 1809. During the War of 1812, the “members became scattered and the lodge became extinct.” When the men returned from war, they established St. Louis Lodge No. 12 under a charter granted in 1816 from the Grand Lodge of Tennessee and included William Clark as a charter member. Upon the creation of the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1821, St. Louis Lodge No. 12 became Missouri Lodge No. 1 with William Clark as a charter member. William Clark joined St. Louis Lodge No. 20 after it was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1836, and it was St. Louis Lodge No. 20 that performed the Masonic Funeral of William Clark in 1838. Winter 2021

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GRAND HISTORIAN’S CORNER

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Let there be light: The Grand Lodge of Missouri’s First Hundred Years By MWB John Hess Grand Historian At the turn of the 19th century, America was expanding at a terrific rate. President Jefferson had just negotiated with the French to purchase a significant part of the North American continent west of the Mississippi River. Freemasons Lewis and Clark led the Voyage of Discovery to explore this vast new land. Part of that land became the State of Missouri, with the Grand Lodge of Missouri being founded on April 21, 1821 and the State of Missouri founded August 10, 1821. Early highlights of the first hundred years of the Grand Lodge of Missouri include actions that set the stage for a two hundred year history. Over the first hundred years, 954 Lodges were organized by the Grand Lodge of Missouri with nearly one-third or 303 Lodges having disappeared during the time period. At the time of the founding of the Grand Lodge, the Deputy Grand Master was appointed, and it took until the second decade of the Grand Lodge for that office to become an elected office. In the first half of the century, promotion in line was unknown. Rarely if ever, before the 1860’s, was the Grand Senior Deacon elected to the station of Grand Junior Warden. Even Grand Wardens had no warranty deed on the Grand Mastership. On April 25, 1825, General Lafayette together with his son, George Washington Lafayette, visited Missouri. The Grand Lodge was called up in a special communication to honor this distinguished Mason. While there was some question that General Lafayette was a regular Freemason, the Grand Lodge Page 8

of Pennsylvania appointed a committee to investigate and report on Lafayette’s Masonic regularity. The Committee reported favorably, forever settling the matter. Both General Lafayette and his son were made honorary members of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The period from 1836-1840 was the time of the Morgan Affair. A strong anti-Masonic feeling swept over the country. The anti-Masonic movement caused several Grand and Subordinate Lodges to cease to work. In Vermont, not a single Lodge continued to work. The Grand Lodge of Missouri felt its effects severely. At the end of the Civil War in 1865, Grand Lodge membership was 9,358 with 225 lodges and by 1873 membership was 25,120 with 470 lodges. In six years membership has increased 162%. In May of 1884, the Grand Commandery of Missouri created a Triennial Committee in preparation of hosting the 1886 Grand Encampment session. On September 21, 1886, on Charity Day, the Grand Encampment raised $35,114.00 to be placed at the disposal of the Grand Lodge to aid in the establishing of a Masonic Home. At the closing of the 1886 Grand Lodge session, Grand Master Boyd expressed the hope that “May the time soon come when her widows and orphans find a Home for their torn and bleeding hearts and a sweet resting place for their tired and weary feet.” Over the first hundred years, seventy-six Grand Masters were elected, installed and presided as Grand Master. One Grand Master was not present for his election and was never installed. Due to the Morgan affair, no Grand Lodge communication occurred in 1835. From its beginning, the Grand Lodge of Missouri has faced hardship and prosperity and will continue to do so as it begins its third century of involvement in the lives of Missourians. » The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

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With these historical events over the Grand Lodge of Missouri’s first hundred years, let us take a look at the events that led up to the founding of the Grand Lodge as well as some of the famous and not so famous people who made it all happen. As the fur traders traveled the Mississippi River from the Great Lakes to New Orleans, settlements were established along the river. One of these settlements on the west bank of the Mississippi was Ste. Genevieve, about seventy miles south of the confluence of the Missouri and the Mississippi rivers. Ste. Genevieve’s history dates back to 1763. Merchants from St. Louis and Ste. Genevieve traveled to Philadelphia for supplies and while in Philadelphia were exposed to Freemasonry. They brought that interest back to Ste. Genevieve and eventually requested a warrant to establish a Masonic Lodge in their little hamlet. A Charter was granted to Louisiana Lodge No. 109 by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and the first Lodge west of the Mississippi was established. Due to the advancement of St. Louis in the early 1800’s Ste. Genevieve declined and the Lodge ceased to exist in 1817. One of the early members of Louisiana Lodge No. 109 was Steven Austin, who went on to become the founding father of the State of Texas. With the growth of St. Louis, Freemasons from that city petitioned the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania for a Charter to form a Masonic Lodge in their city. A Warrant was granted to open a Lodge under the name of St. Louis Lodge No. 111 in 1809-1810. As settlers from Tennessee began exploring the new territory of Missouri a dispensation was granted to Joshua Plicher to form a second Lodge in St. Louis, Missouri Lodge No. 12 in 1816. In 1819 the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a Charter to William Roberts to open a Lodge at Herculaneum under the name of Joachim Lodge No 25. In the same year, the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a charter to Benjamin Emmons to form a Lodge in St. Charles, St. Charles Lodge No. 28. In 1820, the Grand Lodge of Indiana granted a Charter in Jackson, Missouri under the name of Unity Lodge No. 6. Past Grand Master Alexander Buckner of the Grand Lodge of Indiana settled in the Jackson Missouri area and was involved in the formation of Unity Lodge No. 6.

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GRAND HISTORIAN’S CORNER

The Grand Lodge of Missouri is in debt to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, Indiana and Tennessee for its Masonic heritage. It is to the Grand Lodge of Tennessee that we look and consider her as the mother of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. From her sprang our original three Lodges, Missouri Lodge No. 12, Joachim Lodge No 25 and St. Charles Lodge No. 28 that founded the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1821. On February 22, 1821, a preliminary convention was held in St. Louis in the hall of Missouri Lodge No. 12 on Elm Street between Maine and Second Streets. Representatives from Missouri Lodge No .12, Joachim Lodge No. 25 and St. Charles Lodge No. 28 were present. The Convention was organized with Edward Bates as Chairman. Brothers William Bates, Nathaniel Simonds and Edward Bates were named to the committee to write a Constitution for the new Grand Lodge of Missouri. Now let us take a look at famous and not so famous Masons who were instrumental in the formation of the State of Missouri as well as the Grand Lodge of Missouri. First let us look at MWB Thomas F. Riddick, who served as the first Grand Master of Masons of the new Grand Lodge of Missouri. He was born at Suffolk, Virginia June 3, 1781 and moved to St. Louis in 1803. He was a member of St Louis Lodge No. 111 under a Charter from the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and at the organization of the Grand Lodge he appeared as a representative of Joachim Lodge No. 25 at Herculaneum. In civil affairs he served as clerk of the Court of Common Pleas and recorder of Land Titles in St Louis as well as a representative of the Territorial Legislature in 1818. He was elected as Grand Master at the age of 40. In later life he served as President of the Board of Directors of the Old Territorial Bank in 1820 and moved to Sulphur Springs in Jefferson County where he died on January 15, 1830 at the age of 49 years. One of the most famous Masons of the early years was Brother Thomas Hart Benton. Brother Benton first joined the Craft in Tennessee and after moving to Missouri transferred his membership first to St. » Page 9


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Grand Lodge of Missouri

» Louis Lodge No. 111 and then to St. Louis Lodge No. 1. He was elected the first senator from the new State of Missouri in 1821 and served for more than thirty years. He can be placed with such great national leaders such as Henry Clay, Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun. He was a supporter of President Andrew Jackson and hard money earning the nickname of “Old Bullion”. Involved with the formation of the Grand Lodge we find Edward Bates. MWB Bates served as our third Grand Master. He served as private in the War of 1812 and in 1814 came to St. Louis. He studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1816. He was made a Master Mason in Missouri Lodge No. 12 and served his Lodge as Master for eight years. Brother Bates served the Grand Lodge as Grand Master in 1825, 1826, 1827 and 1831. He was elected to the Constitutional Convention and served in the State Legislature after Missouri became a state. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives and Chairman of the Whig Party National Convention in 1856 and served as Attorney General in 1860 under President Lincoln. Due to ill health, he resigned his post after two years. A bronze statue of him stands in Forest Park in St. Louis to commemorate his great work in the early history of Missouri. Not a common name but one who should be known to all Missouri Masons is RWB Frederick L. Billion. He served at the fourth Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri serving in 1830, 1831, 1832, 1845 and 1846. He also served as Grand Treasurer in 1843. He was made a Master Mason in Missouri Lodge No. 1 December 23, 1823 and served that Lodge as Master in 1828 and 1844. He wrote the annals of St. Louis in its Territorial days in 1888. Later he served as Secretary and Treasurer of the Missouri Pacific Railroad. In the Transactions of the Missouri Lodge

of Research Volume 2, 1944 edited by MWB Ray V. Denslow, containing the beginnings of Freemasonry in Missouri, historical accounts written by James E. Stiener used the Masonic Memoranda of Frederic L. Billon as the major source of his research. He stated that it was “the most valuable Masonic record in Missouri.” Billon’s Memoranda was published by the Missouri Lodge of Research in 2016. The Missouri Masonic Ritual has always been important to the members of our Craft. MWB Stephen W.B. Carnegy who served as Grand Master in 1836, 1837 and 1838 was an integral part of our ritual’s history. He attended the famous Baltimore Convention in 1843 and wrote of his experiences in his seminal book The New Trestleboard published in 1856. He assisted in forming St. Louis Commandery and was the author of the resolution to organize a Masonic College. He died at the age of nine-five in 1892. The Grand Lodge of Missouri is in debt to MWB John D. Vincil who served two terms as Grand Master in 1866 and 1868 and served as Grand Secretary from 1877-1904. In 1857 he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He received the literary degree of D.D. in 1873 from the University of Missouri. During his last term as Grand Master, Grand Secretary Anthony O’Sullivan died and he appointed George Frank Gouley as Grand Secretary and with the tragic death of Grand Secretary Gouley, John D. Vincil was elected Grand Secretary. Masons in Missouri owe a debt of gratitude to all those who gave countless hours of service to move our Grand Lodge from its formation to its centennial. The next hundred years saw the same dedication. Because of the quality of our membership there is no doubt that our third century will show the same dedication as the past 200 years.

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SHRINERS INTERNATIONAL

Shriners Make a Difference By Victoria Beck Senior Editor and Writer Shriners Hospitals for Children and Shriners International The Shriners fraternity, Shriners International, is a Masonic organization based on service to others, fun, and fellowship whose members are dedicated to the principles of brotherly love, relief, and truth. What began in 1872 with 13 members is now a worldwide organization with 198 temples and thousands of clubs throughout the world. Shriners can be found on six continents.

Moolah Shriners, St. Louis, Missouri

The Shriners fraternity founded Shriners Hospitals for Children® as its official philanthropy, opening its first facility in 1922 in Shreveport, Louisiana. Since then, Shriners Hospitals for Children has grown into one of the finest pediatric specialty health care systems in the world. Thanks to the dedication and hard work of members of the Shriners International fraternity, this unique, compassionate health care system is now a multi-facility system stretching across three countries, and offering pediatric specialty care for orthopedic conditions, burn injuries, spinal cord injuries and cleft lip and palate, regardless of the families’ ability to pay for services. Over time, Shriners Hospitals for Children has provided hope and healing to more than 1.4 million children. There is a Shriners Hospital in St. Louis.

Moolah Shriners was chartered in 1886 and was the 26th temple established. Moolah Shriners had its inception in East St. Louis, Illinois. Ten nobles of Medinah Shriners in Chicago, Illinois, met weekly to dine at the Stockyard Hotel and decided to form a Shriners temple in St. Louis. In the early years, Moolah Shriners’ meetings were held at a variety of locations in the city. In 1912, Potentate Walter Ashton assisted by his officers, acted toward building a home for Moolah Shriners. Groundbreaking took place Sept. 11, 1912, at midnight with a ceremony illuminated by colored lighted torches. The cornerstone laying was at midnight, Oct. 21, 1913, and Moolah held its first meeting in the new building on March 18, 1914, with dedicatory ceremonies held on April 25, 1914, and a class of 133 novices.

Shriners are not only dedicated to their philanthropy; they also enjoy fun and fellowship. Each of the Shriners temples has many units and clubs for members that offer a variety of experiences and activities, including musical performing and parading, leisure activities and recreation, social events and more. Members can also “Build Your Own Experience” - create a club, and ask fellow members to join in. There are four Shrine Temples in Missouri.

In 1988, Moolah sold this building and moved to a West County location on Fee Fee Road. The facility features a ballroom that can accommodate over 500 guests and an Oasis (dining room) that can seat 250. Other meeting and social gathering rooms are available for its 17 units, including Noble Lodge 684 as well as a gymnasium and soccer field for sports activities used by DeMolay and Job’s Daughters. There are 10 clubs in Moolah’s area. »

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Masonic Bodies

erected, costing $65,000. The original obligation was paid in full in 1945. In 1957, two floors were added to the north side of the building, and in 1961, a third floor was added, making the present building size 39,600 square feet. Moila Shriners owned actual live camels in the past. The animals were part of Imperial Session (national convention) parades at various locations in the United States from 1903 to 1914.

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Ararat Shriners, Kansas City, Missouri

Ararat Shriners was chartered in 1888 – the 38th temple established. The first meetings of Ararat Shrine were held in the offices of Mr. Ethelbert F. Allen. Since then, the temple has had various meeting places. Since 1971, the temple has been located at I-435 and Eastwood Trafficway. Four Imperial Potentates (CEOs of the fraternity) have come from Ararat Shrine, including Frank S. Land, the founder of DeMolay International in 195455. President Harry S. Truman was a noble of Ararat Shrine and Harry S. Truman Lodge 1941 is housed there. Ararat’s first Shriners Hospital Transportation van was purchased in 1985, and since then hundreds of thousands of miles have been driven transporting children to the Shriners Hospital in St. Louis. Ararat Shriners continue to be a presence in the community, including ushering in “The Festival of Trees” at a local shopping mall in 2020.

Moila Shriners, St. Joseph, Missouri Moila Shriners was chartered in 1889 – the 45th temple established. Moila purchased their property in 1922, and added more land as needed; the last tract of land was added in 1949. The Moila facility currently consists of 103 acres in midtown St. Joseph and is the home of one of Northwest Missouri’s finest country clubs. In 1934, a three-story brick building was Page 12

Moila has approximately 1200 members and we encourage you to join this great fraternity where “Fun With A Purpose” is experienced regularly.

Abou Ben Adhem Shriners, Springfield, Missouri Abou Ben Adem was chartered in 1903 – the 89th temple established. The first meeting was on October 15, 1903, in the Ararat Shriners temple of Kansas City. Three years later, the members voted to construct an auditorium to serve as the home of the newly created Abou Ben Adhem Shriners. The cost of construction in 1920 was $600,000 – in 2020, that cost would exceed $7.8 million! On November 3, 1923, the Shrine building was dedicated. The auditorium can seat 3,200 and the lower-level event area can hold 1,300 occupants. Over the years, the building has hosted numerous community events including circuses, telethons, concerts, and Presidential visits (Truman, Roosevelt, and Reagan). The building is still used for events and concerts. Abou Ben Adhem Shriners has more than 20 Shrine clubs located in cities throughout the jurisdiction providing members with local events and fellowship, as well as 28 units including bands, clowns, and specialized cars. To learn more about the Shriners fraternity, please visit shrinersinternational.org. To learn about becoming a Shriner, please visit beashrinernow.com. The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

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of Missouri

MASONIC HOME

Leaders in Missouri Freemasonry The Masonic Home of Missouri celebrates the contributions of PGM John D. Vincil, as one of the important founders of the Masonic Home. He is featured in the Masonic Museum and the Masonic Home’s giving society that celebrates lodge and chapter financial support is named in honor of him – The Vincil Society. While we have written articles to honor and commemorate his numerous contributions, this article was recently discovered which we would like to share.

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The following excerpt from the Missouri Grand Lodge Bulletin: The Official Organ of the Masonic Service Association of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, February 1 No. 1, is a historical but also more personal biography of John Davis Vincil written by PGM Corna H. Briggs. John Davis Vincil Grand Master of Missouri 1866 and 1868 And Grand Secretary from 1877 to 1904 John Davis Vincil, who was elected Grand Master in 1866 and again in 1868, was one of the most striking figures in the history of our Grand Lodge. Tall, handsome, eloquent, and with the courage of his convictions, he naturally came to the front in any assembly. He was borne in Taswell county, Virginia, August 24, 1830. But it was in Missouri that he gained distinction in two important fields of service. For twenty years he was a popular and successful pastor of the leading churches of the Missouri Conference of Methodist Episcopal Church, South. In 1877 he was elected Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge and served until his death, October 12, 1904. During his first term as Grand Master, on the death of Anthony O’Sullivan, Grand Secretary, he appointed as his successor the gifted George Frank Gouley, who perished in the Southern Hotel fire in St. Louis in April, 1877. He had in him the stuff out of which martyrs are made. In reconstruction days the Drake Constitution of Missouri prescribed a Test Oath for ministers of the Gospel. It was not a mere oath of loyalty, which Dr. Vincil would have taken, but requirement a man to swear that he had not been concerned in any act of rebellion against the United States Government, and had never sympathized with anyone who had. Without taking this oath he continued his work. Hon. Perry S. Rader, Supreme Court Reporter, and author of a “School History of Missouri”, is my authority for the statement that one hundred and four indictments against him for preaching the Gospel were found in Livingston County, Missouri.

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Masonic Home of Missouri

A Catholic priest who disregarded the oath carried his case to the Supreme Court of the United States, which declared the oath unconstitutional, and thereupon the indictments against Dr. Vincil were quashed. After being elected Grand Secretary Dr. Vincil organized more than one Methodist Church in St. Louis. Of one of these there is a bit of history, probably without a parallel in Masonry. Immanuel Methodist Church is in the western part of St. Louis. About the time of the World’s Fair, a Lodge Hall in that part of the city was burned. The Trustees tendered the use of a side room of the Church until the Lodge could secure better quarters. The pastor, Dr. Arthur Mather, petitioned the Lodge and received all three degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry in the Church building of which he had charge. In conferring the degrees of Entered Apprentice and Master Mason the three principal stations were filled by three Methodist preachers who were Past Grand Masters. Dr. Vincil acted as Worshipful Master, Dr. C.C. Woods as Senior Warden, and the writer as Junior Warden. He was elected Grand Master in May, 1866. That year the Grand Lodge changed its time of meeting to October, so his first term was seventeen months long. His long service as Grand Master-nearly two and one half years, his prominence in the ministry and his eloquence as a speaker caused him to be in demand for important Masonic occasions. Especially after he became Grand Secretary he was called to various parts of the State to lay corner-stones and deliver Masonic addresses. Next to Allan McDowell, who was Grand Lecturer from 1870 to 1906, he was probably the best known Freemason in the State, and for many years stood out as our most eloquent Masonic orator. Before his election as Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge he had served the Missouri Conference as Secretary, and was continued in that office until his death.

The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

Winter 2021

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His work as Foreign Correspondent for many years brought him prominently before the Freemasonry of the United States, and he was for years the outstanding figure of Missouri Freemasonry. He served the Grand Chapter as Grand Chaplain, and the Grand Commandery as Grand Prelate and Grand Commander. He was the first Grand Patron of the Missouri Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star, and at the formation of the General Grand Chapter in 1876 was elected Most Worthy Grand Patron. He was a great Grand Secretary and a wise and helpful counselor to Grand Masters who needed his knowledge and experience. I have said he had the courage of his convictions. He had convictions, and they were deep and strong. In the face of any odds he stood by them with dauntless courage and an eloquence that was unsurpassed. Two important measures in the history of our Grand Lodge owed their success largely to his eloquent leadership. One is our Masonic Home. He had much to do in securing the legislation which put the adequate support of the Home as a legal claim upon the entire membership of the fraternity in the State. The older members of the Grand Lodge will remember how earnestly and eloquently he pleaded for the legislation which barred saloon keepers from mem-

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Masonic Home of Missouri

bership from the membership of the Fraternity in this State. He and Dr. C.C. Woods were the two conspicuous leaders in that important work. In a striking manner Dr. Vincil showed us how a man can be active in the Church and in Freemasonry. He was unusually successful in both of these great institutions. His vigor of thought and eloquent speech gave him a fame in the pulpit and on the platform to which few men attain. Living half a century in the light of publicity his was a stainless life filled with faithful labors that made the world better. In various Masonic functions such as conferring degrees, laying cornerstones, installing officers and delivering addresses, we doubt if his record has ever been equaled in the history of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. He delivered the address at the laying of the cornerstone of the Masonic Temple on Grand Avenue, St. Louis. To the north are imposing structures belonging to a great ecclesiastical institution which has no enthusiastic regard for Freemasonry. Standing by the cornerstone while his audience had all these buildings in full view, he lifted his right hand to his shoulder and with his thumb pointed due north exclaimed: “The north is the place of Masonic darkness.� We shall not soon have his like among us again.

The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

CROWN JEWELS

Masonic Home receives record donations for

Like so many things in 2020, fundraising for the Masonic Home of Missouri looked very different last year, including our annual Giving Tuesday event. This event, however, was different in a good way. “This was our fourth year participating in Giving Tuesday and our most successful,” said Masonic Home of Missouri Annual Giving Officer Julie Kirchhoff. Going into Giving Tuesday –the Tuesday after Thanksgiving set aside for holiday charitable contributions – the Masonic Home of Missouri was looking at a year in which requests for assistance rose dramatically and donations were falling short. With this in mind, development staff wanted to try something different. They used Giving Tuesday as a launch day for a new campaign – our 12 Days of Christmas campaign, and thanks to the generosity of our supporters and a corporate matching gift from Commerce Trust Company, The Masonic Home of Missouri raised five times its previous record for Giving Tuesday throughout the duration of that campaign. “Our goal was to raise $15,000 online during the campaign, a big goal considering we raised just $1,750 last year,” said Kirchhoff. Not only did the campaign meet that goal, it surpassed it with donations totaling $15,850. $7,500 of that total came from Commerce Trust Company who pledged to match donations up to that amount.

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Masonic Home of Missouri

The campaign started with an email that went to 14,000 Missouri Masons and Masonic Home donors on Giving Tuesday and was paired with daily Facebook posts highlighting the programs that donations help fund. The Masonic Home’s financial assistance, partnership, recognition, and financial education programs were all featured at some point during the campaign. The Masonic Home of Missouri is grateful for each and every person and business who donated, whether it was $5 or $500, these generous donations help the organization continue providing essential financial assistance to your Masonic family in need and needed resources for children in your communities during a time when need is so high. It’s not too late to donate! Make a donation today at mohome.org/donate.

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The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

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Husband, wife team up

for community kids through CAP There are hundreds of Masons and Eastern Star members across the state who work diligently to make the Masonic Home of Missouri’s Creating-A-Partnership program work for kids in their communities, and for two of them in central Missouri, it’s a family affair. Tha and Raylene Kribbs are a married couple who have taken on the responsibility of doing the legwork for the CAP program at their Lodge, Cairo Lodge #486, and Chapter, Cairo Chapter #180, as a team. Tha manages the program for the Lodge, and Raylene manages the program for the Chapter, which both are members of.

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“We can’t do it without each other, and we can’t do it without the members,” Tha said, noting that while they manage the program, it is a wide, group effort to raise funds and find needs in their community. This past year, the couple, along with their Lodge and Chapter, provided funding for things like backpack programs and school supplies to five rural schools in their community. This means kids in rural central Missouri won’t miss meals, have the supplies they need to be successful, have warm clothes this winter, and more.

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Masonic Home of Missouri

“Being a rural area, the resources are a little bit more limited, so that is why we are stepping up,” Raylene said. The CAP program allows their Lodge and Chapter to leverage funds raised in their community for their community with matching funds from the Masonic Home of Missouri, up to $10,000 per year per Lodge or Chapter. Being new to the program,Tha said he thinks it can be intimidating at first, but found that it was very manageable. “People think it’s a lot of paperwork,” he said. “That’s always the drawback, but it turns out it’s pretty simple, and Tish(a) makes it easy to get everything done.” Tisha Woodard is the Masonic Home of Missouri’s Partnership Program Coordinator. She works with Masons and Eastern Star members across the state to help them bring money into their communities through the organization’s two partnership programs – CAP and Partnering to Honor, which helps veterans go on Honor Flights to see their monuments in Washington D.C. She helps Lodges and Chapters find projects in their communities that are eligible for CAP funds and assists with any questions about paperwork.

Woodard said the Kribbs have been great to work with on her end as she values the communication she gets from them. “They are fairly new to working the CAP program, but they always call to ask any questions they have about the program to make sure they are doing it correctly,” Woodard said. Both of the Kribbs said they find that managing the program provides them with personal satisfaction in knowing they are doing good for children in their community. “It’s one of the reasons I joined,” Tha said. CAP provides matching funds for Lodges and Chapters to help children in need within their communities. Each Lodge or Chapter in Missouri may receive up to $10,000 in matching funds each year. In Fiscal Year 2020, the Masonic Home and participating Lodges and Chapters provided $291,924 in assistance to help 14,834 children statewide. If your Lodge or Chapter is interested in using the CAP program to fund a project for children in need in your community, contact Tisha Woodard at twoodard@ mohome.org or by calling 800-434-9804.

2021 Masonic Home Charity Golf Tournament

August 9, 2021

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The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

GRAND HISTORIAN’S CORNER

The Bicentennial

Grand Lodge of Missouri 200th Anniversary Plans

By MWB John Hess Grand Historian

Grand Lodge Portal for further information and to sign up for individual seminars.

The Grand Lodge of Missouri is celebrating its Bicentennial this year. Several projects are in place or will be in place soon: Bicentennial Lecture Series The last Sunday of every month at 7:00 p.m. Register on your portal or the Grand Lodge website if you are not a Missouri Mason. Upcoming lectures will include: Growing up with Grandpa Harry Truman by Clifton Truman Daniel, The Osage Indians in Missouri by David B. Brown, the Battleship Missouri by Ty Treutelaar, Missouri Masonic Governors by John W. Hess and Early Freemasonry West of the Mississippi by Steve Harrison. All dates and times are subject to change, go to the

The Bicentennial Virtual Lecture Series: Sunday, February 28, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, March 28, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, April 25, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, May 30, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, June 27, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, July 25, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, August 29, 2021

7:00 PM

Sunday, September 26, 2021

7:00 PM

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Missouri Freemasonry Historical Site Tour Passport Book Throughout this booklet you will find places of historical significance for Missouri Freemasonry. Some are Masonic sites, and some are historical sites with Masonic connections. Space is provided so you can log notes on your visit, time, date, and thoughts on the locations. (Available from the Public Relations Committee Mid-January 2021). May be purchased from the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Bicentennial History Book Set A reprint of the Centennial History Book along with the printing of the Bicentennial History Book in a two-box set. (Available Late-January) 2021 at a cost of $50.00 for the two-volume hardback set. Books may be preordered from the Grand Lodge of Missouri beginning January 4, 2021. Order form will be on the Grand Lodge website. Bicentennial Jewel Bicentennial Jewel designed by WB Chris Tilley and produced by RWB John Bridegroom with a leather pocket case. Free with attendance at any Bicentennial event approved by the Grand Master. Area Meeting and Bicentennial Banquets These functions are on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic. More information to come.

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crown jewels

Masonic Children’s Foundation

Missouri Masonic Children’s Foundation

Misssouri Child Identification and Protection Program “What come you here to do?” By RWB Mitchell S. Penn MOCHIP Corrdinator Since joining our fraternity, opportunities for personal growth and fulfillment have been very common. From a gentle nudge to take a Steward’s chair during a degree, to being elected to serve as Worshipful Master, the confidence and support of our peers brings about change in a member. It is always for the better, yet sometimes the responsibilities that accompany our ascension are truly frightening. Our willingness to act responsibly in the face of this fear is a keen indication of what our fraternity has given to us. The questions that come to mind are, “How do we give back?,”, “Where in the grand scheme of things do we fit in?”, and “How can we be of service to our fellow man?” Our great fraternity offers an abundance of ways that we can be a part of something bigger than ourselves. One of these, and my personal favorite, is our very own MOCHIP program. We will always need the help and support of our membership to make it work. Team leaders, event volunteers, Brothers promoting community awareness, and financial support are some of the crucial areas that are always in need. If you are looking to get involved, we currently have openings for Regional coordinators in the central and southeastern parts of the state. Or maybe you would like to volunteer at an event in your area. Start a conversation with your lodge membership about hosting an event. Or you could simply round up your annual dues payment to the next dollar earmarked for MOCHIP. These are just a few suggestions on how you can be of assistance.

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Generally, things have been slow due to the restrictions associated with COVID-19 impacting our ability to do events, but there is a lot going on behind the scenes. We are working to stay current with constantly changing technology. For instance, there has been some discussion on how we could be even more mobile, and versatile with events. It seems a drive thru format is possible and would certainly be effective in our current environment. We have also made the decision to suspend the making of dental impressions at events, and instead are asking parents, who are willing, to make them at home. We will provide the wafer and simple instructions for use in the packet, as this is our most powerful tool in identifying a child. One thing is certain, the need for the peace of mind that we can provide to Missouri families has not waned, nor has our desire to provide it to them. We are working to evolve with our environment to continue to be of service, and as always, would appreciate your help. If you would like to get more involved, give me a call, and let’s talk MOCHIP. You will not regret it. The Freemason


Masonic Scholarships

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Celebrating 20 years of awarding Scholarships A brief history of the Missouri Masonic Scholarships

By RWB Charlie Wiegert Junior Grand Warden Masonic Merit Scholarship Most Worshipful Brother Vern Schneider, in his address at the 1985 Grand Lodge communication, stated the Grand Lodge needs funds to enable us to provide scholarships, and the Masonic Scholarship Fund, Inc. was established with an assessment to each member’s dues, plus donations received. It took until 1991 for sufficient funds to grow large enough to start awarding scholarships, when two $1000/year scholarships for four years were awarded. These scholarships are now called the Masonic Merit Scholarships and are supported by dues paying Missouri Masons. Since 2019, each member contributes $1.00 per year. With 20,000+ dues paying members, we will be able to increase the value of these scholarships or award more per year. Ruth Lutes Bachmann Scholarship The Ruth Lutes Bachmann Scholarship actually started from a trust she left upon her passing in 1975 to benefit the children living in the Masonic Home on Delmar Avenue in St. Louis. As a member of the Tuscan Chapter 69, Order of the Eastern Star in St. Louis, she wanted to provide for those children to have an opportunity to become a nurse or teacher. When the last child left the Masonic Home in 1981, her trust was modified to provide scholarships for Missouri High School students pursuing a career in nursing or teaching, and the Masonic Scholarship Foundation would become the agent to solicit, receive, process and award a $1000/year for each 4-year scholarship. Samuel Smith Stewart Scholarship The Samuel Smith Stewart Fund was established by Dr. Samuel Smith Stewart as a memorial to his

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parents Alphonso Chase Stewart and Elizabeth Smith Stewart, with his desire being to provide for the continuing betterment of mankind through educational purposes. He was an ardent Missouri Freemason coming from notable Scottish Linage. His family records trace back to members of the Stewart Clan who had served as Kings of Scotland. The initial amount that started the scholarship program was $14,149,420. The money was invested so only the interest would be used for scholarships. That same procedure is still in place today, and each year the Samuel Smith Stewart trust committee meets to determine how many new scholarships can be awarded. In 2001 the first four Samuel Smith Stewart scholarships were awarded. They were $2500 each and renewable for 4 years, making them $10,000 scholarships. Due to the diligent stewardship of the committee over the years, these scholarships have grown in number and amount. This past year, five scholarships valued at $53,000 each were awarded! In total last year, 22 scholarships were awarded with a value of $341,000. We’ve come a long way in the last 20 years, and look forward to providing Missouri high school students with the opportunity to do something worthwhile with their lives, and hopefully make the world better for many years in the future. The deadline for applications is March 15, 2021 A copy of the revised application form was included in the November packet sent to every Lodge. It can also be downloaded from our website at www. momason.org under the Programs tab. Please make sure the high school counselors in your area have this form and they encourage their best and brightest students to apply. Page 23


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Missouri Lodge of Research

2020: A Challenging Year By Dr. Douglas Reece, WM Missouri Lodge of Research To say that 2020 has been a challenging year would be an understatement. Masonically, we have seen lodges, subordinate groups, and other functions come to a screeching halt. Some of the groups still have not held a meeting since March due to the age of their membership and “lack of a quorum.” Fortunately, your Missouri Lodge of Research has continued to have officer meetings to further the cause of the LOR. Our officer meetings have been via video conference which has allowed us to explore new avenues for the brethren. One of those new avenues was to start holding our Spring and Fall Truman Lecture series by video conference. We chose to present these in this manner because of two factors. The first is that the Grand York Rite of Missouri had to cancel their annual communication in person which caused them to move to a video conference platform. Our spring lecture had been traditionally scheduled in conjunction with this event or around the same time frame. The second reason was that MWB Brown was forced to hold an abbreviated Grand Lodge session. This caused the Missouri Lodge of Research to reschedule its annual communication and lecture as well.

lectures as we would have holding an in-person lecture. The speakers were also delighted to see the number of participants logged in to the conference. One of the major developments which occurred this year was that the LOR Board of Directors, with the consent of the officers, turned the operation and ownership of the Library over to the Masonic Home of Missouri. Their charter and organizational documents state that they will maintain a museum and a library. Much debate took place before this decision was reached. By taking this action, it frees up the LOR to continue to work in almost the same manner as before and pursue some additional avenues beneficial to the brethren. Due to the COVID restrictions and mandates, the Masonic Home has closed the Library and the Museum for the time being. These are only temporary measures for the safety of all concerned. The Lodge of Research will continue to support the Library as we have done in the past and our new role will evolve as the need arises. We do look forward to supporting the MHM as it begins this new phase of responsibility.

2021 will be a year of growth for your Lodge of Research. By the time you read this we should have a new video presentation and a new slide presentation available. The LOR Senior Warden, RWB Dale Roller, has been instrumental in leading this project, and The rescheduling of our annual communication along with other officers, will be visiting lodges making was accomplished by video conference. We had presentations on the Lodge of Research. Exciting times an exceptionally good participation level from the membership of the LOR and since our meetings are not of growth are ahead. We will be working closely with the a “ritual” type of opening/closing but a standard business Grand Lodge as our Bi-centennial events unfold. We will be taking an active part, and this will be at the direction type of opening we were able to conduct the annual of RWB Ty Treutelaar, who happens not only to be the lodge business including the election and installation Deputy Grand Master but your Junior Warden for the of new officers for the 2020-2021 year. Your officers of Lodge of Research also. the Missouri Lodge of Research express their deepest gratitude for those who attended by video conference in As we usher in 2021, let us be mindful about the safety electing the current officers. of our members, our duties to God, our Country and our Families. This next year may prove to be a year of The video platform for the Truman Lecture Series has adjustment and change as we move forward. May you proven to be a great success. We have been fortunate experience continued blessings for your family and enough to have approximately the same number of yourself. visitors, brethren, and other organizations attend these Page 24

The Freemason


Missouri DeMolay

youth organizations

Missouri DeMolay Today’s Leaders, Tomorrow’s Future

Symbolism in DeMolay is very present both physically and metaphorically. Sometimes symbolism in our ritual is represented in both ways at the same time. In all of our ritual, the Councilors or Commanders communicate the importance of each station they are committed to; similarly to the Master and Wardens of a lodge. Each station has its own meaning and prevalence in a young man’s journey on the road of life. The East - the beginning of a young man’s journey before they learn our seven cardinal virtues and a symbol of the rising sun and the morn of life. A young man learns that in the East he has only begun his long voyage on the road of life where he must first lay a foundation where he will build on for his future. The South - the middle of a young man’s journey. In the South is where the sun is at its zenith and metaphorically the young man is in the prime of his life and has just learned the seven precepts our Order holds so dearly. He has taken the lessons he learned from the seven preceptors and has started to build on his foundation. The young man contemplates what he has done and what he can still do, realizing that he still has much of his life ahead of him and aspiring

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to become a better man each and every day. Ideally, making good men better. The West - the end of the young man’s journey and where the sun is setting and the eve of life has come. Here the young man hopes he has lived a life well deserved through the lessons he has learned on his earthly pilgrimage. He looks back on his accomplishments and the good he has done on the way. The young man at this stage is helping those at the beginning of their journey who are about to learn the lessons he has inculcated into his daily life. Here the journey restarts and keeps going. The significance of these three stations is immense and is why they carry such a great importance in our ritual. They follow us on our own journey with the seven cardinal virtues and help guide us on the road of life. Similar to lodge, without the significance of the East, South, and West or the rising and setting sun; we as DeMolays would not be able to exemplify the ideals we carry with us every day. Fraternally, Conner Westermayer State Master Councilor

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youth organizations

Missouri Job’s Daughters

Missouri Job’s Daughters Today’s Leaders, Tomorrow’s Future

Celebrating 100 Years! Happy New Year from Missouri Job’s Daughters! We hope you had a warm and safe holiday season. Since the last article, we have been able to elect a Grand Bethel Junior Princess and fully install the Grand Bethel Officers and Representatives for 20202021. While in-person activities are unfortunately suspended for the time being, there has been a great deal of creativity and flexibility demonstrated by Job’s Daughters both here in Missouri and across the globe! It has been incredible watching Bethels adapt with installing their new officers for the term as well as initiating new members! The Grand Bethel is planning more social events to connect over Zoomwe are hosting a craft party at the end of January and hosted a holiday game night in December! The adaptability continues to stand as a testament to the lessons of our order: patience and faith will bring reward. As spring is just around the corner, the days are getting longer and promises of rebirth and new beginnings do not seem far away. Spring often brings a busy season for Missouri Job’s Daughters- with the warmer weather bringing our annual weekend retreat being held in Osage Beach this year, receptions galore, and ramping excitement for our annual Grand Session in June. It is hard to believe June is as close as it is, but hopefully the spirit and excitement felt during the week will happen in person! Holding on to hope and positivity has admittedly been difficult this past year. 2020 certainly did not go as any of us imagined but each new challenge Page 26

provides an opportunity to grow and improve. By taking that energy to 2021 we can still grow and improve- with the best goal being to be a better person than we were yesterday. Be steadfast, and let the troubles roll off of you like water off a duck’s back. Hoping in 2021 we can be reunited in person, Olivia Van Tine Grand Bethel Honored Queen The Freemason


Missouri Rainbow for Girls

youth organizations

Missouri Rainbow Girls “Faith, Hope and Charity�

The past few months for Missouri Rainbow have been slow ones but we never fail to stick together to celebrate the holidays! This year we opted to cancel our in-person Christmas party and decided to have it over Zoom instead. Even though we would have loved to see each other in person, we decided for the safety of our girls and advisors that online was the best and safest option. The Zoom Christmas party went great I had planned so many fun activities for our girls as well as got prizes for the winners. We played games such as Kahoot Trivia, where the girls got to answer trivia about Christmas movies, music, and fun facts. If was a pretty close competition but in the end, we only had 3 winners and the winners even got a $30 gift card to Walmart. We also had a scavenger hunt from home, I gave them a list of items to find around their house and the winners got ornaments that go along with my theme. After the scavenger hunt, we played a game of dance tag, it gave the girls and adults a chance to vibe with some great Christmas music as well as getting to see all their sisters doing some crazy moves. However, my favorite part of the Christmas party was craft time where we colored in snowmen and even got to make snowflakes. My snowflake did not turn out great, but some girls had great snowflakes to show off. At the end we wrote letters to those in need, the girls had an option of who they wanted to write to, but I wanted a time where the girls could send some kindness to those who needed it, whether it was a nursing home, hospital, or even someone in their house, I really like the opportunity the girls had to spread some cheer

during this crazy year. As the unpredictable year of 2020 draws to a close, I would like to take a moment to thank all of you for your support of Rainbow and the girls. I know we have all had our ups and downs with this year, but your kindness and love shown to Rainbow has not gone unnoticed. Thank you again, I cannot wait to see you all once again! Madisyn Dodson Grand Worthy Advisor

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LOdge & district news

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Hayes 65 Year Pin

Vineyard 70 Year Pin

Brother Perry L Hayes, Sr., a member of Bayou Lodge 365 in Bakersfield, MO since October, 1955, received a 65-year pin and certificate created and presented by his daughter, Tracy Hayes Wood. He is also a member of the Order of Eastern Star. The Lodge previously presented him a 60-year pin by Brother Wayne Calhoun.

On December 19, 2020, Tyro Lodge 12 in Caledonia, MO, honored Brother William (Bill) O. Vineyard for 70 years of service to the Masonic order. Born on July 19, 1927, he was initiated, passed and raised at Paul Revere Lodge 330 in Hazelwood, MO. In 1988, he transferred his membership to the Belgrade Lodge 632 and then, through merger, Tyro Lodge 12. Brother Vineyard was presented with his 70-year service pin and certificate and was pinned by his daughter-in-law Kim Vineyard. He was then presented with a certificate from the 28th District, and a Veterans’ certificate, flag and pin from the Missouri Masonic Home for his service in the navy during WWII.

Solomon Veterans and Awards Night

On November 9, 2020, Solomon Lodge 271 honored all veterans in attendance; Left to Right: RWB Jim McManigle, WB Jerry Rindom, WB Mark Johnson, Brother Les McClelland, WB Charles Dixon, WB Jerry Grace, Brother Charles Koonce, WB Tom Erickson, MWB Tim Thomas, and RWB Bob Detherow. This Stated Communication was the Official Visit of RWB Travis Schnelle, DDGM, who presented WB Greg Walker with the Lodge Achievement Award with Distinction.

Strafford Lodge Christmas Parade

Portrait Unveiled

On December 5, 2020, the members of Strafford Lodge 608 participated in the Small Town Christmas Parade for the City of Strafford, MO. WM Rick Headlee (Red Hat) greeted the families and gave candy to the kids. WB Dave Bagdonas (Santa Suit) was Santa and and his Elf’s were RWB Rick Thompson (Elf Suit), WB Craig Dunn (Santa Hat), Mrs. Dunn (Elf Suit), Brother Tony Warnke, and other brethren.

On October 12, 2020, MWB Tim Thomas’s portrait was unveiled in Solomon Lodge 271.

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The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

LOdge & district news

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Unionville Lodge Installs Third Generation Master

On October 21, 2020, MWB Barry Cundiff installed the Officers of Unionville Lodge 210. WB Logan Gatlin will be serving for the first time as Worshipful Master. He is a third generation Master Mason. Pictured L to R: Chad Gatlin, father, Logan Gatlin, son, and Ted Gatlin, grandfather.

Christmas for Children in Care Program

Members of Ivanhoe 446, Kansas City 220, Swope Park 617, Sheffield 625, Temple Gate 299, and East Gate 630 brought their “Christmas for Children in Care” program to children in foster care through the Jackson County Children’s Division of the Missouri, Department of Social Services. The Masons bought gifts, spending $75 on each of the 65 children who were under the supervision of the Jackson County Family Court.

California Christmas Baskets

On December 19, 2020, California Lodge 183 prepared and delivered baskets of staple foods and Christmas presents to eight area families. The Lodge has been doing this event for nearly 30 years. Pictured are members putting together the baskets and presents.

Texas Shop-For-A-Cop

WB Michael Baker and Brother Reese Bucher from Texas Lodge 177 donated $500.00 to Officer and Brother Bennie Cook for Shop-with-aCop on December 18, 2020. The Lodge has been doing this program for three years.

Stewart 50 Year Pin

Brother Thomas Stewart of Acacia-Twilight Lodge 114 received his 50-year pin on December 8, 2020. MWB Brent Stewart had the pleasure of presenting the well-earned recognition to his father before their meeting and enlightening the assembled Brethren with some Masonic history.

Winter 2021

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LOdge & district news

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Smith 80 Year Pin

Bradley 50 Year Pin

On October 22, 2020, Brother David Bradley of LaBelle Lodge 222, was presented his 50 yr pin by DDGM Mike Scott. His grandson, Brother Aaron Olson, gladly pinned his grandfather. Brother Bradley has sat in every chair more than once and has been active his entire Masonic Life.

On Sunday, October 25, 2020, William B. (Burrell) Smith was recognized for 80 years of membership in Monticello Lodge 58. MWB Barry Cundiff, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, presented Brother Smith with an 80-year pin and certificate of recognition. Pictured (Lto R) are: WM Bradley Robertson. Brother William B. (Burrell) Smith, and MWB Barry Cundiff.

Meridian Old Newsboys

Schroeder 25 Year Pin

For over 50 years, the members of Meridian Lodge 2 have stood on corners in the rain, heat, snow, and sunshine to sell newspapers for children’s charities. This year, due to the COVID-19 virus, $440 was collected virtually. Pictured are Bob Fowler, Ken Fischer, Steve Kracht, Kevin Smith and Neil Morrison.

WB John Horton of Webster Lodge 98 in Marshfield, MO, presented Brother Tom Schroeder with his 25 year pin and apron. Tom was raised in July 1991. Tom’s son Michael and grandson David represent three generations of the Schroeder family to be active at Webster 98. Pictured (L to R) are Brothers Michael Schroeder, Tom Schroeder, David Schroeder.

Fenton’s Empty Chair Degree

Humphrey/Prater 50 Year Pin

On Wednesday, November 11, 2020, Fenton Lodge 281 performed the empty chair degree to honor those Brothers who gave their life in defense of our country. The ceremony began with Job’s Daughters Bethel 43’s Bible ceremony and Boy Scout troop 776’s flag presentation. Progression Chapter Order of DeMolay then presented the empty chair. The ceremony concluded with all Master Masons giving the Grand Honors to the departed brethren.

On November 7, 2020, RWB Russ Humphrey and Brother Jerry Prater received their 50-Year Pins and Certificates from MWB Dave Haywood. RWB Humphrey originally joined Wentzville Lodge 46 and transferred to Fraternal when he moved to Lonedell, MO with his wife Judy (Right) and Brother Prater originally joined Zelma Lodge 545 and received courtesy degrees in Crete, IL where he was stationed in the Army. He transferred to Fraternal Lodge in Robertsville, MO, where his wife, Cora, was from (Left).

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The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

LOdge & district news

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Hill 50 Year Pin

On November 19, 2020, Brother Gale F. Hill of Jonesburg Lodge 457 was presented his 50year pin by his lifelong friend & classmate RWB Gene Wescott.

Lathrop Quilt Winner

Fox 50 Year Pin

On November 4, 2020, Lathrop Lodge 506 drew the winning ticket for their charity fund quilt raffle. Pictured are quilt winner Mr. James L. Gerber and WB Marion Coffman.

On June 15, 2020, Brother James Fox traveled north from McAllen Texas to Lathrop Lodge 506, where he was presented his 50-year pin by RWB Gary Henderks. Brother Fox is pictured with his grandson, Brother Michael Anhorn and his daughter, Nancy Horn.

Lincoln County CAP

Wentzville “Lodge of Sorrow”

WB James Urhahn and several other members of Lincoln County Lodge 682 collected money at the four way stop sign in Winfield and, in conjunction with the Masonic Home of Missuri’s Creating-A-Partnership Program, presented a check for $5,000 to the Winfield School District’s Bright Futures Program. Pictured (L to R) are: RWB Larry Kelley, WB Charles McDaniel, WB Hubert Langley, Mrs. Ericka Dixon, Program Coordinator, WB James Urhahn, Brother Phillip Rauch, WB Larry Portwood, and WB Chris Davis.

On the evening of December 30, 2020, the brethren of Wentzville Lodge 46 held a “Lodge of Sorrow” to remember and honor those brothers who had been called from labor in the past year. The ceremony was a modified version from the Louisiana Masonic Monitor and included a funeral procession, the reading of the Masonic record of seven lost brothers with the iron tongue of time tolling twelve times in their memory, and a “skull lecture” reminding us of our own mortality.

Fraternal Lodge CAP

Greenville Fruit Baskets

On November 13, 2020, Fraternal Lodge 363 of Robertsville, MO presented a check for $850 for the Robertsville and Nike schools. The Lodge held a “carry-out-only” chicken dinner and, in cooperation with the Masonic Home of MO’s Creating-A-Partnership Program, provided clothing, shoes, and hygiene items. Pictured (L to R) are: Aubrey Holt, Nike and Robertsville Counselor; David Quanz, Nike Principal; Brother Bob Wors; Brother Ron Poertner; Dan Munson, Robertsville Principal.

Greenville Lodge 107 has a longstanding tradition of delivering fruit baskets to their local Lodge widows and shut-in members at Christmas time. Members of the Lodge delivered baskets on December 16, 2020. The baskets were prepared by Mary Ann Crites at Richard’s Supermarket at Greenville with donations made by McLane Trucking of Poplar Bluff. Those members participating were (L to R) David Bollinger, WM Madison Baker, C.L. McLane and Dennis Osborn.

Winter 2021

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Grand Master’s Calendar of Events All events are subject to possible restrictions. February 2021

April 2021

February 13 Masonic Home Board Meeting Columbia

April 17

Masonic Home Board Meeting St. Louis

February 20

April 18

Grand Master’s Breakfast St. Louis

May 1

Red Cross of Constantine Jefferson City

Masonic Service Assn Meeting, Virtual

February 22-24 Conference of Grand Masters, Virtual

March 2021

March 20 Masonic Home Board Meeting Columbia

May 2021

May 22 Masonic Home Board Meeting Columbia


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