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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI A.F. & A.M VOL 65 NUMBER 4 SUMMER 2020


Inside this issue… THE FREEMASON® Vol. 65 No. 4 Summer 2020 Grand Lodge of Missouri A.F. & A.M. The Freemason® (USPS 573-920) is the official publication of the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri, and is published quarterly. ©

OFFICE OF PUBLICATIONS: Grand Lodge of Missouri 6033 Masonic Drive, Suite B Columbia, MO 65202-6535 (571) 474-8561 Published and copyrighted under the direction of the Committee on Masonic Publications. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and Marceline, Missouri.

POSTMASTER:

Page 3 Grand Lodge

• Grand Master’s Message • Caring for the Craft

Page 5 The Masonic Trial Page 6 MLOR – Admiral Robert E. Coontz Page 8 Missouri Masonic Children’s Foundation Page 9 Masonic Scholarships Page 10 Grand Historian’s Corner Page 12 Encourage vs. Criticize Page 13 Masonic Home of Missouri Page 21 The Importance of History Page 23 What Do the Stewarts Really Do?

Please send address forms 3579 to Grand Secretary 6033 Masonic Drive, Suite B Columbia, MO 65202-6535

Page 24 Masonic Youth

Unless otherwise indicated, the views expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policy of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, A.F. & A.M. The editor reserves the rights to accept, reject, subedit, and rearrange materials submitted for publication. The Freemason® does not accept forms or clippings for publication. It is the policy of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to not publish pictures or personal information about children under the age of 21, without written permission from the child’s parent, guardian or sponsoring group.

Page 27 International Web Meeting • International Web Meeting

David W. Haywood PGM, Editor

COMMITTEE ON MASONIC PUBLICATIONS: Stanton T. Brown, II Grand Master Barry V. Cundiff Deputy Grand Master Ty G. Treutelaar Senior Grand Warden Richard W. Kaeser Junior Grand Warden Jeffrey S. Pennington Grand Secretary

• Missouri DeMolay • Missouri Job’s Daughters • Missouri Rainbow for Girls

• International Web Meeting Minutes

Page 29 Installations, Dedications and Special Events Page 32 Calendar of Events “TO AUTHORS:” The editor would like to remind you that photograph submissions should include 40-50 words telling who, what, when, where and why. Pictures should be high resolution jpg from a camera (at least 300 dpi). Phone pictures are unacceptable unless your camera app is set to high resolution.

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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI A.F. & A.M VOL 65 NUMBER 4 SUMMER 2020

Articles to be considered for publication should be emailed to editor@momason.org. The Freemason is published quarterly. The submission deadlines are as follows: Fall Issue: October 1, 2020 Winter Issue: January 1, 2021 On the cover: Solomon Lodge 271 maintains social distancing. See page 29.


A Message from the Grand Master Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the associated economic turmoil, the Grand Lodge has determined that it is unwise to hold a full session of our Grand Lodge for the year 2020. Whether you believe that the response recommended by the CDC and local jurisdictions to the COVID-19 threat is appropriate or not, I cannot risk the health and welfare of our craft. I am sure you understand that the welfare of the 30,000+ Masons in the State of Missouri must take precedence. At the time of this writing, there are increased reporting of new cases of COVID-19 in the state and nationwide. With the uncertainty of the possible imposition of additional restrictions or of extending existing restrictions, it would be impossible to adequately plan events that far in the future. While we all hope and pray that our current situation will end soon, we just do not know. After multiple discussions regarding the topic and considering multiple scenarios, it was unanimously decided that we would hold a 1 day session and do all required tasks of the Grand Lodge. How many and who will be able to attend will be determined by existing restrictions at the time of our Annual Communication. The goal is to have every lodge represented with full participation by Grand Lodge members. Exactly what the session will look like is still to be determined due to the fluidity of the situation, however, there will be no social events, vendors or invited guests from sister jurisdictions. As you can imagine, this decision was extremely difficult for our line and especially for me. Because of my participation in multiple national bodies, I was looking forward to welcoming visitors from all over the country and England whom I have had the privilege to get to know. I have had many inquiries into the possibility of resuming the conferral of degrees and resuming “normal” local lodge functions and activities. I have had multiple conversations with the Grand Lecturer and many others in trying to find a way to safely confer

our degrees and protect our members and candidates. Nothing fits our needs. If you think about it, our degrees were never designed to make a Master Mason in 30 days. There was always a requirement that the person experiencing those degrees had the instruction as to what Freemasonry is and the significance of what he experienced in the preceding degree as well as to prepare him for the next degree. “Wait a time with patience” should sound familiar. Use the “down time” as an opportunity to socialize with the candidate and his family. Make use of the time between degrees to truly educate and impart understanding and excitement. I have seen several posts on Facebook showing lodges having meetings and other gatherings. Most appeared to have followed my edict to social distance and if not, wear a face covering. Several though have not. It is concerning to me because not only did they not follow my edict but chose to put some in attendance at risk. No face covering and no distancing. Some appeared to have compromised health issues. I strongly encourage following CDC and local mandates with regard to safety. It is not a political statement, it is a matter of protecting one another’s health.

Stanton T. Brown II Grand Master 2019-2020


NEWS

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Caring for the Craft By MWB Stanton T. Brown, II Grand Master On June 9, 2020, the Most Worshipful Grand Master of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, F&AM, PHA and I issued a joint statement addressing the social unrest that our country had been experiencing immediately after the death of George Floyd. That joint statement was issued after MWB Malcolm Morris and I consulted for several weeks as to how we should approach the tragedy as Grand Lodges of the State of Missouri. I hope you have had a chance to read the joint statement. Every Missouri Freemason belonging to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, AF&AM knows, or should know, that Freemasonry is apolitical and non-sectarian. Our membership includes people from all races, monotheistic religions, ethnicities, and cultures. Grand Lodges do not endorse any position, candidate, religion or principle other than those found in our ancient landmarks, rituals, established customs and usages. Freemasonry is about self-enlightenment and improvement, and encourages philosophical and ethical conversations on the meaning of our existence on this mortal plane and ways to improve our members’ lives and the welfare of our brotherhood, as well as the world in which we live. In today’s environment, passions run high and it is easy to get caught up in the heat of the moment and allow the lines between Freemasonry and individual beliefs to get blurred. Freemasonry encourages us to be contemplative, and to exercise our thoughts, words, and actions in a way that is constructive and helps us grow spiritually and ethically, by practicing principles found in our Fraternity. Grand Lodges do not tell or encourage their members HOW to vote, only that they should exercise their right, duty and obligation TO vote. The inequitable application of human rights and privileges are profoundly contrary to the principles of our Order. While we recognize that there must be changes made to the application of laws, the true path to restoration, equality, and healing starts with individual mindsets and proper actions. We all know Page 4

that the principles of our Masonic Fraternity can go a long way towards assuring equality and fostering the respect that is due every person of the human family, when properly applied. By practicing Brotherly Love, Relief, and Truth, we can display the ideals of Freemasonry to those around us. The current upheaval has caused some members of our fraternity to somehow say that in the past, Freemasonry has encouraged death, destruction of property and thievery because of some of the actions of some Freemasons during the Revolutionary War. The veracity of those claims may be challenged; however, I can say that if those actions occurred, they were not done in the name of or under auspices of any Masonic body. Some may have been Masons, but they were not practicing Masonic teachings or principles, nor did they represent all of Freemasonry. It is inappropriate and un-Masonic to display the square and compasses when spewing hatred or taking a stance on any position while displaying them. While you can and must be able to express yourself, you just cannot give the impression that you are speaking for the Masonic fraternity by displaying the square and compasses when doing so. Our members are free to make their own decisions as to what should be considered justice in this situation and while we acknowledge that we live in an imperfect world, we stand united in our strong belief that the foundations of our moral system can and must bridge the chasm that divides our state and country right now. Each member of our order is free to vote and express himself without interference from our Grand Lodge and we pray that how you choose to express yourself will be tempered with compassion and understanding for the entire human race. I call upon all peoples of our state not to fall victim to racism or hatred nor to contribute to destructive expressions for the lack of progress; and to our members, be ever mindful that we are one Brotherhood and we should always be our brother’s keeper. The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

MASONIC EDUCATION

The Masonic Trial

Proceedings - Procedure - Prayer - Penalty RWB & Rev. Jim Fiete Webster Groves 84 Section 28.030 of the Constitution and By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri defines a Masonic Offense: Any act, conduct or neglect of duty tending to impair the good name of the Masonic institution, or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which in any way is contrary to its principles, obligations, or teachings is a Masonic offense. In Article 29, Complaints and Preliminary Proceedings can be found in the Missouri Grand Lodge and By-Laws. Article 30 describes the Trial. Section 30.050 Trial Procedures: Unless otherwise specified, all proceedings under this Article shall be conducted consistent with the Missouri Rules of Civil Procedure. It is not the intent of this writer to challenge or dwell on Articles 29 & 30 (Worshipful Masters and Junior Wardens should read them). It is the intent of the writer to give structure to the Procedure and Prayers for a Masonic Trial. Remember, early in our Masonic career we are taught never to engage in any great or noble purpose without first invoking the aid and blessing of Deity. At times we fall short or just ignore this Basic Principle of our Fraternity. A Masonic Trial is different in that it is based on a Masonic Offense rather than a Civil Offense. As stated in the Trial Procedure, the Masonic Offense could be shown to also be a Civil Offense and therefore sent to the “proper authorities.” We can only hope and pray that the offense is such that the “proper authorities” is our Grand Master.

we thank you for fatih, famlily, friends, fraternity, and freedom, relaizing that all of these are gifts from You. May we understand and be mindful of the fact that we do not always walk upon the high hill or down the straight and narrow path that life presents to us each day. We are human and we stumble. Today or This evening, we ask for direction in our deliberations, truth in our words, knowledge in our thoughts, strength in our action, guidance in our deliberations, firmness in our verdict, tenderness in our judgement and brotherly love towards one another. May justice be rendered based upon knowledge of the law. May justice be served with wisdom and compassion. May justice be rooted in Your Holy writings and the tenets of Freemasonry. May justice be found with fact and truth. May justice and judgement by our judges be accepted by all with forgiveness and peace. May love prevail in our hearts, minds, and Fraternity. In Your Name, dear Heavenly Father, we pray. Amen. CLOSING PRAYER:

Dear Heavenly Father, as we leave this sanctuary of Law, Masonry, and the Holy Scriptures, let us leave with forgiveness for those who have strayed and compassion for those who have suffered. Remember, we are Masons who practice Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth. Let us all extend the hand of friendship Here are suggested Opening and Closing Prayers that and assistance. Let us all remember that we may not could be used in a Masonic Trial. forgive the sin but we will forgive the sinner. Let us OPENING PRAYER: walk out united in faith, brotherhood, and peace. In Dear Heavenly Father, Great Architect of the Universe, Your Name, we pray. Amen. Summer 2020

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CROWN JEWELS

Missouri Lodge of Research

Admiral Robert E. Coontz By RWB Lloyd G. Lyon Missouri Lodge of Research Robert Edward Coontz would enjoy an illustrious 47 years of military service in the United State Navy. Coontz would achieve the rank of Admiral with many accolades during his career. Robert Coontz was born in Hannibal, Missouri and ADM Robert E. Coontz his parents would have the 1864-1935 notoriety of being neighbors and schoolmates of Sam Clemens. His father owned the Hannibal streetcar system and several other businesses. Having been educated in the Hannibal school system, then on to Ingleside College (1878-79) in Palmyra and Hannibal College (1879-80), Coontz would eventually ask a family friend, U.S. Congressman from Missouri, William H. Hatch, for an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. As several were interested, competitive testing was established which Coontz won and was on his way to the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating in 1885. Over the next decade, Coontz would serve at the Navy Department as well as stints on Alaskan waters and the Great Lakes. In late 1894, Coontz returned to the Navy Department to work on updating officer records. He would then be assigned to cruisers USS Philadelphia and USS Charleston as well as the Coast Survey, which was tasked with providing nautical charts that would assist with safe shipping, national defense and maritime boundaries. In 1898, with Coontz aboard, the USS Charleston would seize Guam during the Spanish-American War. The USS Charleston would then join up with George Dewey’s forces during the Philippine-American War from 1899-1902. In 1899, Coontz became a Veteran Companion of the Pennsylvania Society of the Military Order of Foreign Wars. Page 6

By 1907, then a Lieutenant Commander and Executive Officer of the Battleship Nebraska, Coontz was assigned to sail with the “Great White Fleet” from 1907-1909, Roosevelt’s show of the American Naval Force to the world. In 1909, Coontz was promoted to Commander and took the reins as Commandant of Midshipmen at the Naval Academy. From 1912-13, he served as Governor of Guam. After a promotion to Captain, and through 1918, Coontz would serve as Commanding Officer of the battleship Georgia, followed by duty as Commandant of the Puget Sound Navy Yard and the 13th Naval District. Prior to 1919, he was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral. In November 1919, Admiral Coontz assumed the duties of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), the second CNO since the post was established in 1915 and would serve in that capacity until July 1923. He served as CNO during a turbulent time, when Congress was unhappy over base closings, diplomatic efforts to achieve limitations, internal Navy Department conflicts over organization, the best way to manage new technology and the naval fallout from the Teapot Dome scandal. Coontz would prevail, as he established a unified Naval Fleet and strengthened the CNO’s position with the Naval Department. In 1923, Coontz would leave his post as CNO and return to sea as Commander in Chief of the United States Fleet. In 1923, he would also receive the Navy Distinguished Service Award. In 1925, he served as Commandant of the Fifth Naval District and led the fleet on a transPacific visit to New Zealand and Australia. Admiral Coontz was also acknowledged for his key role in the promotion of U.S. Naval aviation whereby battleships were converted to aircraft carriers that would prove vital for training in the inter-war years and as fighting ships during World War II. Coontz would retire in June 1928 after 47 years of

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The Freemason


Missouri Lodge of Research

» service.

He would then embark on a journey of writing his memoir chronicling his early life growing up in Hannibal, Missouri titled From the Mississippi to the Sea and a second book published in 1934 titled True Anecdotes of an Admiral.

CROWN JEWELS

Bremerton, Washington. He is interred at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Hannibal, Missouri.

His book writing would be interrupted when, in 1932, Coontz was recalled to active duty to head an investigation of railroads in Alaska. In 1932, he would represent Alaska at the National Democratic Convention as well as serving as Commander-in-Chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. The following were named in Admiral Coontz’s honor: USS Coontz, a destroyer ship USS Coontz, a transport ship Admiral Coontz Armory in Hannibal, Missouri Admiral Coontz Recreation Center in Hannibal, Missouri Coontz Junior High School in Bremerton, Washington Even though Coontz was not a Missouri Mason, he was a Freemason. As many have done in the past, so did Coontz. He was a member of Naval and Military Lodge No. 206 in Bremerton, Washington, Olympia Chapter No. 27 Royal Arch Masons, Albert Pike Consistory in Washington D.C. and received his 33° in 1931. He was also President of the National Sojourners. After a series of heart attacks, Coontz would pass away on January 1935 at Puget Sound Naval Hospital in

Summer 2020

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Masonic Children’s Foundation

Missouri Masonic Children’s Foundation

Misssouri Child Identification and Protection Program By RWB Mitchell Penn MOChip State Coordinator The toughest decisions are the ones that matter the most. Thus far, 2020 has been a series of tough decisions. From the first appearance of the global pandemic, our leadership has been required to take swift and decisive action. We have had to suspend most of our Masonic activities in an effort to protect the health and wellbeing of our membership and communities. Our fraternity is experiencing a dramatic shift and we will have to adjust our expectations and how we conduct business in the future to remain effective. The various programs that we have developed, and chosen to support, are having to make some adjustments as well. Our Grand Master and the Masonic Children’s Foundation Board of Directors have been working on our go-forward plan. They have given the green light to start hosting MOCHIP events again, just in time for the back to school season.   The plan developed for the return of our MOCHIP events is comprehensive as well as simple. To start, all teams will be equipped with the personal protective equipment required to operate an event in a manner consistent with applicable regulations and CDC recommendations. The number of stations may also vary from event to event based on the space allotted. We will also be limiting our publicizing of events until we are within 4 weeks of the event start. This

is designed to guard against marketing events at the local level, only to be cancelled due to late changes in the region’s health and local regulations. To say our teams are eager to get back to work would be an understatement. They have expressed the willingness to work alongside community agencies that serve as the venues for our events and meet any expectations to keep health and safety at the forefront. I am certain that we are all ready to move forward and hopefully see COVID-19 fade into history. For now, we will be meeting the challenges that come with it head on and keep working to maintain a safe and effective program.   I think it appropriate to share that Brother Timothy Burkett of Jefferson Lodge 43, our Region 5 coordinator, has made the difficult decision to step down from his position. He, his Lady Verna, and his lodge have worked tirelessly getting the program back up and succeeding in the center of the state. He truly regrets that they are not able to keep that momentum going but is ready to help train a new team in that area. If this is something that you feel you would enjoy doing, give me a call and let’s talk about MOCHIP. You’ll be glad you did.   I’d like to add that if your lodge is looking to host an event, don’t hesitate to get in touch with me personally. It would be my pleasure to help you get started and plan for success.

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Masonic Scholarships

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Improving our Communities One Citizen at a Time By RWB Rick Kaeser Junior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, AF and AM The summer issue of the Freemason is usually the time when the Grand Lodge’s Scholarship Selection Committee gets a chance to demonstrate to the Craft the results of their labors over the preceding year and take a well-deserved victory lap of sorts. It’s usually filled with pictures of scholarship presentations from around the state, with lots of smiles on the faces of the recipients, as well as on the faces of the Brethren lucky enough to make the presentations. As is the case with many things, 2020 has been different. The application process was normal enough, as the deadline was before most of the shutdowns and restrictions imposed by the response to COVID-19. The Grand Lodge Office staff, under the leadership of our Grand Secretary, and most especially one of our newest employees, Laura Ludlow, did a great job receiving, collating, and arranging the applications for the committee. Alas, that was to be the end of normalcy in the process this year.

The committee could not meet to make its selections, as it had for many years. So, we found a way for the committee members to access all of the applications securely online and to meet virtually to make the final selections. In previous years, the committee members would then fan out around the state and make the presentations of the scholarships at awards ceremonies held at each recipient’s high school. As you can imagine, this spring, few schools were willing to hold in-person awards ceremonies. There were one or two exceptions, and you’ll find some great pictures of those smiling recipients elsewhere in this issue. But most schools opted for a smaller, virtual presentation to honor their graduates. We were pleased that our scholarship recipients were included in those presentations, but it certainly lacks the personal touch and warm feeling that accompanies an in-person presentation. All of our recipients are exceptional young people who have weathered a difficult Senior year in High School, but who are destined for great things in the future.

Scholarship Recipients Samuel Smith Stewart Scholarship $13,000 a year, up to 4 years, are: Jack Del Vecchio Ivy Liu Mason Miller LeeAnn Nordstrom Ciara Stricker

Springfield Catholic High School Lee’s Summit Senior High School Nixa High School St. Joseph Central High School Cass Midway R-1 High School

Ruth Lutes Bachmann Scholarship $1,000 a year, up to 4 years, are: Bailey Hixson Haleigh McCamy

Summer 2020

Kearney Senior High School St. Joseph Central High School

Masonic Merit Scholarship $1,000 a year, up to 4 years, are: William Blazer Emily Boyd Zarius Buharivala Jacqueline Carlson Garrett Cobb Audrey Duchschere Amanda Eckels Grant Himmelman Abigail Horn Samuel James Myers Dev Patel Emily Schrumpf Alex Springer Colette Strathan Grace Yu

St. Joseph Central High School Sikeston High School Liberty North High School St. Joseph Christian School Strafford High School Parkview High School Nixa High School Fayette High School St. Joseph Central High School Fort Zumwalt East High School Lafayette High School Pattonville High School Kearney High School Lafayette County C-1 High School Park Hill High School

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GRAND HISTORIAN’S CORNER

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Marquis de Lafayette Lost Masonic Words Vol. 6

By MWB John W. Hess Grand Historian The Masonic Constellation, March 1894 (Grand Secretary Vincil’s Department) Marquis de Lafayette It is known by few of our fraternity of the present day that the Marquis Lafayette, the historic and patriotic Frenchman, was a Freemason. The recent observation of Washington’s birthday by thousands of the American people brings to mind the noble and self-sacrificing deeds of the gallant Lafayette. As a friend and compatriot of the “Father of our Country,” the immortal Washington, the name and services of Lafayette must ever remain indissolubly connected with the latter. To mention the name of Washington is to stir thoughts of his companion in arms. And while the countrymen of the former have so lately given strong evidence of their loving appreciation and remembrance to him who “was first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen,” the beneficiaries of the liberty which “Washington fought and freemen died” for should never cease to recall the part the young French patriot played in the bloody drama of the revolution. A strong desire to increase and intensify the spirit of the true “Americanism” prompts this article. Because to the Americanized, Americanism is the most imperative need of old times, and he who contributes anything on this line is in that measure the patriot and the friend of his country and its institutions. If Lafayette, a stranger and foreigner, was willing to sacrifice home, country, and loved ones, to aid the struggling colonies, surely, the beneficiaries of those results, achieved by him, should never cease to prize and cherish the heritage which cost so much. No language can describe the deep and dark criminality of the descendants of the patriotic fathers, both in Cabinet and in the field, if they neglect nor guard not with eternal vigilance, the rich boon that has come to us. That vigilance which is the price of liberty, is never more needed by all true Americans Page 10

Marquis Lafayette

than today. Hate and hell would willingly wreck the fair fabric reared by our fathers if the designs, as dark as they are malignant, can be successfully carried out to make this country the seat and home of a despotism more repellant to Americans than the galling chains of British tyranny. “The friend and companion” of the illustrious Washington, was born in Auvergne, France, on the 6th day of September 1757. When quite young, he was left an orphan but the heir of princely fortune. His father had done much and good service for his King and his country and lost his life in the wars of his times. Young Lafayette married into one of the noblest and most influential families of the Kingdom before he attained his majority. Having entered the army at the young age of nineteen he was a Captain of dragoons. When the news reached France that the American colonies were struggling to throw off the yoke of English slavery, he said, “My heart is » The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

» enrolled in the contest.” In 1776, an arrangement was made by which the young patriot was to enter the service of the colonies with the rank of MajorGeneral in connections with the grand old hero, the Baron DeKalb. The British minister at the French court protested against the arrangement, and the King forbade the going of Lafayette. Although arrested and held for a time, he managed to escape and finally reached this country and offered his services to the Continental Congress, then sitting in Philadelphia. No command being provided for him over which he could exercise his military commission, he proposed to serve without pay as a volunteer. His proposal was accepted and a commission tendered him as Major-General. Though thus commissioned, he never had command of a division, but served largely under the eye and direct control of his Chief, the Great Washington. A most affectionate relationship thus grew up and lasted for life between the two. He made full proof of courage and ability at Monmouth, Brandywine, Barren Hill, Yorktown and elsewhere. At the battle of Brandywine, he was wounded in the leg and shed patriotic blood, with many others, to water the young tree of liberty, freshly planted in the new world. In 1779, the British government having declared war against France for forming an alliance with the American colonies, Lafayette returned to his native land to serve his country and his King. But he was not satisfied to leave Washington and the struggling colonists to contend against the enemy of liberty, and returned to America about six months after his departure, arriving here in 1780. During the closing struggle of the Revolutionary War, Lafayette was assigned to duty in Virginia and there rendered efficient service. To provide for his own command, he drew upon his personal resources, borrowing money from bankers in Baltimore and checking on his own means in beautiful France. At the battle of Yorktown, he was with Washington and joined in the glorious and decisive engagement which resulted in the overthrow of Lord Cornwallis, the English commander. The noble young Frenchman thus aided the Americans to crush British power, so long and so cruelly wielded over them. Returning to his native land, Lafayette figured most conspicuously and efficiently in his country’s history Summer 2020

GRAND HISTORIAN’S CORNER

until May 1834, when he closed his grand life, a life without stain. While he was brave to the point of rashness, and led a life of peril, he never shrank from responsibility to sustain law and preserve order. It was said of him that he “never lost his head nor his humanity.” Lafayette entertained a life-long love for Washington and the deepest interest in the country which he helped to free from foreign despotism. These feelings brought him to our shores within a few years after peace had been settled between our country and England. In 1784 he spent five months as the guest of the nation, and the multitudes vied with each other to do him honor. Some thirty years later he visited our country, but its chief charm and strongest attraction had passed away, Washington was gone. On the 29th day of April 1825, General Lafayette was the guest of St. Louis with his son, George Washington Lafayette. On that day, the Grand Lodge of Masons of Missouri being in session, the statement was “made from the chair that General Lafayette, a brother Mason and an officer of the Revolution had arrived in the city.” A ballot was taken on the election of “Brother Lafayette as an honorary member of this Grand Lodge.” Of course, he was elected. A committee composed of three members waited on the distinguished brother and escorted him and his son George Washington Lafayette to the Grand Lodge room where he was welcomed in a fraternal manner. The General replied and was conducted to a seat in the East. A ballot was taken on the “election of Brother George Washington Lafayette as an honorary member of the Grand Lodge.” “He was also duly elected.” “Brother Lafayette again addressed the Grand Lodge and, with his son, withdrew.” Ten years after closing his visit in St. Louis, he was called form labor, and for sixty years has been at rest. This nation of ours has honored that great character known as Columbus, as the discoverer of a continent. It has not done equal and exact justice to the name and deeds of one who helped to redeem this continent from a doom darker and more forbidding than its aboriginal condition when Columbus only got a peep at it. By Dr. John D. Vincil. Page 11


MASONIC EDUCATION

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Encourage vs. Criticize By RWB Aaron M. Shoemaker The Sixth Degree of the Scottish Rite, known as “Intimate Secretary”, has always been one of my favorite degrees. The lesson of “acting the “Peacemaker” is critical to the Freemason interested in making use of the trowel and cement. In Morals & Dogma, Ill. Pike tells us that,    Masons must be kind and affectionate one to another.  ...There needs to be much more of the spirit of ancient fellowship among us; more tenderness for each other’s faults, more forgiveness, more solicitude for each other’s improvement and good fortune; somewhat of a brotherly feeling, that it be not shame to use the word “brother.” This “tenderness for each other’s faults” that Pike speaks of is often sadly missing.  During my time in the Craft I have seen many men come and go. We have each experienced the fact that our personal commitments ebb and flow. We may for a season have copious freetime only to have an unexpected professional or familial need come along.  When these things occur in the lives of our Brethren, we should be supportive. Too often, I see individuals in our Fraternity chastise those who are able to commit less time to some aspect of one of our Masonic organizations.  In talking to those who are no longer active, many have cited this type of criticism as THE REASON that they stopped participating. Brethren, this sort of critical behavior is wrong! Some of the first lessons taught in Freemasonry include the management of our time and the prioritization of our efforts.  There may be periods in a man’s life in which his employer demands longer hours in the office. With work taking more time, a man may be forced to decide between seeing his family or attending a Masonic function. Think about this next time you criticize a young father for missing a meeting.   Often times I see this sort of criticism Page 12

directed even more strongly toward former officers and committee members, particularly when referring to men who have committed significant time, energy and money to our fraternity in the past. While many of them are not active at present, they are likely dealing with unique situations in their own lives. We each face personal and dynamic challenges balancing our time with our families, professionally and yes, commitments to other areas of the Craft.  Unexpected health issues, financial issues, and many other factors also come into play. There are also some who are burnt out and simply don’t “want to” participate at present. Whatever the case may be, the attitudes and critical statements made in meetings and private conversations have a way of working their way back to others.  It is simply counterproductive for us to allow this to occur. I hope that each of you knows the ritual well enough to call to mind portions of our ritual which caution us to not engage in this sort of behavior. I will conclude this brief article with a call to action.  We need to change the culture of our fraternity in regard to how we speak to or about our Brethren.  When someone who has been active doesn’t show up for a meeting or two, we should take a personal interest in them, call them and make sure that they are okay.  When someone hasn’t attended for a while and decides to show up, we should not chastise them about not being around or make disingenuous comments like “Wow. You remembered how to find the Lodge / Temple.” with a critical or insincere tone.  Why not simply (and SINCERELY) say “Hey Brother, it’s great to see you. How are you?” If you can’t do this with a genuine heart, I would suggest to you that it is YOU who has work to do! There is an old quote that goes something like this - “Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some sort of battle.”  We should each strive to be compassionate in our daily dealings with others.  It will not only improve our fraternity, but will improve our individual lives as well The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

CROWN JEWELS

of Missouri

MASONIC HOME

Lodges use CAP to fight increased childhood food insecurity during pandemic COVID-19 had brought many challenges to our communities, and some Lodges are using the Masonic Home of Missouri’s Creating A Partnership program to support their communities with one of those rising challenges – childhood food insecurity. According to Scott Baker, State Director of Feeding Missouri – a coalition of Missouri food banks – food banks across the state have seen increases in demand ranging from 30% to 100%. “Certainly the increase in demand has been significant,” Baker said, “and we are going on three months now with really no end in sight.” Many Lodges and Chapters were already using CAP to support community efforts like backpack programs, but the need for these programs has seriously increased with the economic impacts of the pandemic. According to Feeding Missouri, the reasons for the increased demand for food is multi-faceted. Many people are seeking help for the first time.

Summer 2020

Martha Martin coordinates the backpack program for Lathrop Food Pantry, which received just over $14,000 in CAP funds from Lathrop Lodge and the Masonic Home of Missouri.

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Hourly wage workers and others who suddenly find their incomes negatively impacted are seeking help. These people are needing emergency food assistance in addition to the population already needing services. School closures also contributed. “So many Missouri children get their meals from schools,” Baker said. “We’ve had to get really creative here and find new solutions and new partners.” Also creating additional challenges are cancellation of fundraisers and food drives. Like everyone else, food banks have had to cancel scheduled fundraisers and food drives. That means fewer resources during a time of higher demand. While CAP cannot be used for blanket food pantry donations, it can be a powerful tool in supporting our communities through this challenge as it can be used to specifically address childhood food insecurity. Meaning that if your local food pantry has programs that specifically target children, such as backpack programs or providing meals for children who would otherwise be in school, CAP funds can be used to support these programs. These donations will both feed hungry children in your towns, cities and counties as well as free up other resources for the food bank.

Masonic Home of Missouri

Lathrop Food Pantry received CAP funds to support their backpack program during the COVID-19 pandemic. The food pantry wanted to continue providing this extra bit of food for kids who were already at risk once schools closed in March, but this presented a number of hurdles to overcome. “I don’t know how we would’ve kept it going without the Masons, to be honest,” Lathrop Food Pantry’s Backpack Program coordinator, Martha Martin said. According to Martin, the backpack program is funded solely by private donations, and a combination of rising grocery costs, trying to send more food to help cover days that kids would’ve eaten at school, and increased program participation nearly doubled the cost to run the program. Lathrop Lodge #506 has supported the backpack program with CAP funds for many years now, so when the need arose, the food pantry contacted the Lodge’s Masonic Home Representative, Ed Stark, who also serves on the food pantry’s board, to see if the Lodge could help. Stark said at first, he was worried about the ability of the lodge to raise its portion of the matching funds for the CAP program, as the Lodge would historically put together a fundraising event – something

I don’t know how we would’ve kept it going without the Masons.

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—Martha Martin

The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

that was out of the question in the early days of COVID-19. He was not fully prepared for what would happen next. “I had a lot of sleepless nights,” he said. The Lodge chose to take their fundraising online. They took to social media and educated their community about the need and the ability to match the funds they raised through CAP. It didn’t take long for the Lodge to collect $7,185. This meant Stark was able to present the food pantry with a $14,370 check to help fund the backpack program. This was far more than the Lodge’s typical fundraising results, and Stark was overwhelmed with gratitude toward his community for supporting this cause with so much enthusiasm. “To be able to go into a room of 25 other Masons and be able to tell them that we did this was incredible,” he said. Lathrop Lodge is not the only Lodge to make impressive use of CAP to support backpack programs that fed kids when schools were closed. Laclede Lodge #83 was able to raise $10,000 –the maximum that can be matched through CAP – for the Shepard’s Pack Program.

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“Because of generous donations like yours, we were able to serve 323 children – providing three packaged meals a day each weekend,” Jean Ellen Tarp, Assistant Administrator of the First Christian Church of Lebanon, which administers the program, wrote in a thank you note to the Lodge and the Masonic Home of Missouri. Tarp noted that the program continued when schools closed. While many schools in Missouri are planning to open their doors in the fall, Baker notes that this problem is expected to persist for quite some time, noting that food banks saw increased demand for three to four years after the 2008 recession. “Food insecurity is going to be here – the number we are seeing – are going to be here for a year or more,” he said. CAP is a matching funds program that provides up to $10,000 annually for Lodges or Chapters to assist low-income children in their communities. Other popular CAP program choices include purchasing winter gear such as coats, gloves, boots, and hats and providing school supplies. For more information or to learn how to participate in CAP, email the Masonic Home of Missouri’s Partnership Program Coordinator, Tisha Woodard at twoodard@mohome.org.

Members of Lathrop Lodge #83 learn they raised more than $7,000 to help feed kids in their community through the pandemic.

Summer 2020

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Masonic Home of Missouri

Masonic Home Executive Director named chair of national organization

The Masonic Home of Missouri’s Executive Director, Barbara Ramsey, is now leading the national association for Masonic homes, the Masonic Communities and Services Association (MCSA). Ramsey was installed as MCSA Board of Directors Chairman June 16. “I am extremely proud and honored to be part of the Masonic Home of Missouri, an organization that honors its 130+ years of charitable history while being innovative to reach the needs of its members today and tomorrow,” Ramsey said. “Missouri’s approach to mission fulfillment is different than many of the members of MCSA, but I find that we have far more similarities than differences because we were all created by the Masonic fraternity. I hope that MCSA’s membership will continue to grow during my tenure, as more states learn that MCSA is a valuable resource to connect and learn from each other.” Established in 1932, MCSA provides on-going support, direction, and professional education to executive officers of member communities – serving as a leading resource for best practices among Masonicsponsored human service organizations. This is an honor for Ramsey and for Missouri Masonry. Ramsey is the first person to hold the position of board chair while serving as leader of a Masonic home without facilities. When Ramsey began attending MCSA’s annual conference in 2012, the Masonic Home of Missouri was the only member exclusively providing community-based services, having sold its final Masonic residential living facility in 2011.

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By 2015 Ramsey was elected to the MCSA Board of Directors. Leading up to and during her time on the board, she made enormous strides in getting the organization to recognize and include programming for states entirely devoted to outreach programs. Of course, in the beginning, this meant that she created the conference programming aimed at outreachfocused Masonic homes and presented most of it. Ramsey joined the Masonic Home of Missouri in 2001 where she served as the Director of Outreach Services for 12 years. During this time, she played an integral role in the growth and evolution of the Masonic Home’s Outreach Program, which began as one financial assistance program. In addition, she was a key staff person in the transition of the Masonic Home from bricks and mortar to providing charitable assistance only through community-based Outreach Programs. In 2013, she became Executive Director of the Masonic Home and continued her focus on growing the Outreach Programs, providing a wider range of assistance and resources for Missouri’s Masonic membership, children, and veterans. The Masonic Home currently offers 10 distinct Outreach Programs which do just that. Ramsey has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri and a Master’s in Public Administration from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri. For more information about MCSA, visit www. masoniccharities.org. For more information about the Masonic Home, visit www.mohome.org.

The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

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Masonic Home program honors more than 600 Masonic veterans in first year Last August, the Masonic Home of Missouri, in partnership with Acacia Twilight Lodge, hosted its first ever flag presentation ceremony to honor Masonic veterans. The ceremony is conducted by Masonic Home Ambassadors and consists of a ceremony where each veteran is presented with an official flag of the Grand Lodge of Missouri that was flown over the Masonic Complex in Columbia in their honor, a certificate, and a Masonic veteran’s pin. Later that fall, during Grand Chapter Annual Session, Ambassadors conducted the first Masonic flag ceremony for an Order of the Eastern Star member. The sister was shocked by the surprise ceremony. Since the program began, more than 600 of Missouri’s Masonic veterans have been honored with a flag presentation.

Summer 2020

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Masonic Home of Missouri

The Freemason


Masonic Home of Missouri

Summer 2020

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Masonic Home of Missouri

Masonic Home of Missouri

18th Annual Charity Golf Tournament

Oct. 9

2020

Columbia Country Club Columbia, MO Special sponsorship opportunities available for lodges and chapters.

All proceeds benefit the Masonic Home of Missouri Partnership Programs. Almost 27,000 lives were impacted during FY2019 through these programs.

Call Julie Kirchhoff at 800-434-9804

Annual Communication Events Due to COVID-19, this year's Masonic Home events scheduled around Grand Lodge Annual Communication have been cancelled. We look forward to seeing you next year at the Open House and the Masonic Home Representative Luncheon. More information will be provided regarding the Truman Club. While the Truman Club Dinner cannot be held in-person this year, we are looking at other opportunities to connect with our Truman Club members and recognize new and advancing donors.

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The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

MASONIC EDUCATION

The Importance of History By WB George R. Shelley California Lodge 183 After reading the article on the History of Greenville Lodge in Greenville, Missouri, in the Spring 2020 issue of the Freemason magazine, I was reminded of a four year exercise I went through a number of years ago, which consisted of going through the minute books dating from January 31, 1859, and transcribing what I considered gems of interest from the various minutes. Bear in mind that the handwriting, the writing utensils, and spelling ability of the various secretaries of these old minutes are often suspect. I deciphered the best I could and put a question mark when really in doubt. The history is divided into four sections, the List of Worshipful Masters, information on The Masonic Cemetery, the various Masonic Temples, and the detailed Notes Taken from the Minute Books in chronological order. A special section reports on the death and funeral of MWB Samuel H. Owens by presenting verbatim the minutes of the funeral and the Resolutions of Respect spread upon the minutes. I did not try to recapture the entire minutes, but chose those entries I thought were of special significance. Here are some examples of those gems. For example, in those minutes there is not a single mention, reference, or other indication there was ever a Civil War, although in California there was strong support for both sides. And the following information from the Moniteau County Historical Society is of interest as it relates Summer 2020

to the members of California Lodge. A unit of the CSA, named the California Guard, consisted of Captain Charles Haggerty, 2nd LT Samuel H. Owens, 1st Sgt L.F. Wood, and 1st Corporal Calvin Acres. Wood was wounded at the battle of Wilson’s Creek, left for dead, and recovered by his family. He was tended by them and hidden by them when federal troops were searching for him. One very interesting note from later minutes was that A 2nd Lieutenant in the Confederate Militia, one Samuel Owens, became Grand Master of Masons in Missouri in1873. Also, according to the Moniteau County Historical Society, two doors were put in the Post Office so that Southern supporters could use the South entrance and Northern supporters could use the North entrance. However, at Lodge these differences were “left at the door” and the Lodge conducted its business. During the early days of the Lodge, a ballot was spread for everything from advancing to the next degree, to demitting, to re-joining the Lodge. Frequently in the minutes, petitions for initiation, advancement, a demit, or anything else were rejected. Also, it is evident from the minutes that a Lodge had a jurisdiction which was absolute. Nothing of a Masonic nature could occur within the boundaries of that jurisdiction without the expressed approval of the Lodge. Thus when Hickory Hill Lodge tried to form a Russellville Lodge which was in the »

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MASONIC EDUCATION

Grand Lodge of Missouri

» California jurisdiction, California blocked it.

When the Lodge voted to surrender its Charter Later California assisted in forming Tipton Lodge, on May 27,1898, by vote of 27 to 0, they had been trying for years to raise the dues from $2.00 to $3.00 Clarksburg Lodge, High Point Lodge, Russellville Lodge and a Prairie Home Lodge without objection. with no success. In addition, the last petition for initiation was accepted on June 23, 1894 for J.L. This jurisdictional dispute at one time even required members of California 183 and Jamestown Russell and the last degree work was the 3rd Degree for J.L. Russell on September 22, 1894. They had (Moniteau 295) to gather and clearly establish the gone four years without accepting a petition or boundary line. doing any degree work primarily because a member was black balling everything, presumably just Another item of interest involved the Masonic because he could. After consultation with the Grand Cemetery in California, Missouri, which is still Lodge, three months later the Lodge was reinstated functioning. Not only were there two locations, with the same name, number, and members, except bodies and stones were moved from the earlier for that member who tried to join again for 14 years location to the current one, but the following also and was rejected every time. happened over the years: “Fences were built and rebuilt usually after a Missouri Pacific train set fire These are only a few of the highlights of a Lodge to the cemetery; Silver Maple trees were planted, that has been functioning in one way or another removed, and banned for all time; Committees to for over 150 years. I strongly encourage every care for the cemetery were formed and reformed; Lodge in Missouri to find a dedicated, bored, and Plat maps were made, lost, and remade; the entry retired Brother, who also happens to be a glutton was moved from the North to the South side of the for trying to read old calligraphy, to find those old cemetery” minutes books, go through them, pull out relevant or interesting items and convert them to Word documents and PDF documents on a computer. It will take a while, but in the end it will be well worth it. You never know what you will find.

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The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

MASONIC EDUCATION

What Do the Stewards Really Do? By RWB Curt Fulbright Crestwood-Anchor Lodge 443 In the Ceremonies booklet, we find that during the Installation of Officers the Stewards (also termed Masters of Ceremony) are instructed “to assist the Deacons and other officers in performing their respective duties” and that they are expected “to have a regular and early attendance at meetings to best prove your zeal and attachment to the lodge. As far back as 926 AD, in the Old York Constitutions, they are “to provide good cheer against the hour of refreshment and to render a true and correct account of all expenses.” Traditionally their jewel was (and still is) the cornucopia, which is a symbol of plenty, and historically their rods were white, being a symbol of purity. Their early attendance could be very useful to greet members and guests at the door, introducing visitors to members and seeing that the proper members are notified if any visitors need to be investigated prior to a meeting in a tiled lodge. This also gives them the opportunity to direct everyone either to the dining room, if dinner is served before lodge, or to the lodge room. Visitors should be escorted, if possible, so introductions can be made to ensure the comfort level of the visitor. This should all take place, not only at regular meetings, but also at all social and public functions. The Stewards attending to these duties at all functions of the Lodge assures that there is oversight for the lodge in general, to make sure that all attendees have the best experience possible. Some lodges direct the Stewards to assist the Junior Warden in his duties to prepare and serve meals and to fill in for him in relation to these duties if he is absent. This may go as far as picking up sundry supplies in relation to meals if necessary. It is common practice to hold each Steward to the same Summer 2020

standard as other advancing officers and require them to learn at least 2 stations ahead of them for the opening and closing ritual for meetings. This assures that if a Deacon is absent that there is someone qualified to take his place. When it comes to assisting in the degree work, the Stewards are very important. Historically, some lodges expected their Stewards to learn the Charges for each degree, and/or perform the 1st and 2nd ruffian parts for the Master Mason degree! Needless to say, this has been relaxed somewhat in current times! It is, however, very important that the Stewards attend all ritual practices that the lodge holds. This prepares them for their expected advancement through the “chairs” during practices for opening and closing lodge and gives them the opportunity to learn the correct floorwork for their parts in the degrees. The Stewards have very important parts in our degrees. They are the first conductors of the candidate and are therefore responsible for making sure that he is comfortable and at ease so that he may have the best experience during his degree and understand and retain as much as possible due to his comfort level. It is extremely important that they handle the candidate in a respectful and competent manner and that they know where they are going, how to get there, and what to do when they get there! Knowing when to stop, when and how to turn and conduct the candidate, when to step back (and step up), and to synchronize these movements with each other is a beautiful thing to observe, when done properly. The Stewards can literally make or break the quality of the degree depending on their performance. Being a Steward is not an “easy” job if done properly. So brethren, let’s try to remember what a Steward is responsible for and not say “He’s just a Steward”, and give him the respect and accolade he deserves for a job well done. Page 23


youth organizations

Missouri DeMolay

Missouri DeMolay Today’s Leaders, Tomorrow’s Future

Greetings. My name is Conner Westermayer and I am currently serving as the State Master Councilor for Missouri DeMolay, the mother jurisdiction of DeMolay International. I graduated from Affton High School in 2019 and currently will be entering my sophomore year of college at Westminster in Fulton, Missouri. My plans, as of now, are to graduate with a degree in Education with an emphasis on History and to certify to work in the field of Special Education. My best friend and his two brothers, along with a few other family members all fall on the “Special Needs” Spectrum, which is where the inspiration came to help those with Special Needs in a school setting. The emphasis on History is because, from a young age, I have naturally gravitated to learning, reading, and watching anything about history. Ironically, my best friend’s father is also a history teacher, so both were a natural calling. I joined Crestwood Chapter Order of DeMolay in 2013 at our annual state Conclave. Since then, I’ve served my chapter in various capacities, including various committees and rising to the rank of Master Councilor. I would later apply for and join the team of Jurisdictional Officers in 2017, helping DeMolay chapters across the state. The Masonic family has played a large part in my own family. I’m a third-generation DeMolay and in the last year, I’ve pursued following in my family’s footsteps in joining Freemasonry. My grandfather and great uncle were both active in Lodge and Shriners where they were members of the Arab Patrol and The Chanters respectively. My uncle and father were active in DeMolay and both joined Crestwood Anchor Lodge as well. In the last few years, my older brother Christian, who also is a Senior DeMolay, joined Lodge and is a member of the Drum and Bugle Corps in

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Shrine. I have received my first and second degrees at Crestwood-Anchor Lodge 443. Unfortunately, due to the craziness that is the COVID-19 pandemic, I have not been able to be raised to the degree of Master Mason. Not only have I recently become State Master Councilor in mid-June, but I have also been honored with the distinction of being named a Chevalier, the highest honor an active DeMolay may receive, which is unanimously voted upon by DeMolay International. I hope to continue great work for the Order of DeMolay and Freemasonry in the future. Fraternally, Conner Westermayer State Master Councilor, Missouri DeMolay

The Freemason


Missouri Job’s Daughters

youth organizations

Missouri Job’s Daughters Today’s Leaders, Tomorrow’s Future

Greetings and salutations! COVID- 19 has brought unprecedented times to all of our organizations, and Missouri Job’s Daughters is no exception to this. While we are still unfortunately unable to hold events in person until at least September, we are adapting incredibly and technology is an amazing tool to bring us all together! Bethels across the state and world are having meetings over Zoom, with fun themed meetings to help keep interest. Bethel 44 in Eureka, MO had a costume themed meeting, and Bethel 43 in Fenton, MO has done a silly mask themed meeting! We also held our annual Mini Session virtually in May, with “escape rooms” and groups working together as a team on different challenges. Everyone appeared to have a blast that day! In June, one of our Bethels installed their new officers virtually, and they went all out! The incoming Honored Queen even had a makeshift altar to take the obligation at. We have even just selected our Grand Bethel Officers and Representatives on a virtual draw and streamed it on Youtube for everyone to see, and right after, we virtually installed the new Grand Bethel Honored Queen and Grand Bethel Senior Princess. We also selected our new Queen Bee! Our Queen Bee represents our younger Jobies- to- Bee, the girls who are still active but are not quite 10 just yet. This gives them an amazing opportunity to plan their own activities and keeps their excitement up for when they can join! The theme for this new Grand Bethel year is “finding your own path”, and we are all embracing just that mindset! Girls from many Bethels all hop on to their sister’s Zoom meetings, and we even had a girl compete in Manitoba’s Ritual Competition virtually! While these virtual activities are a first for Job’s Daughters both on the state and international scale, they’ve changed the way we are able to communicate Summer 2020

with each other! In the future we hope to have a variety of virtual communications; including checkins on our Facebook Bulletin Board, potential online game tournaments, and more. This year has just started for Missouri Job’s Daughters, and we are all so excited to get back into the full swing of things and see everyone again! On a personal level, I look forward to getting to know the members of our sponsoring body much better in my travels over this year, meeting members from the other Masonic Bodies, as well as connecting with Rainbow and DeMolay members to give all of Missouri Masonic Youth an amazing experience. It will all happen before we know it! Thank you and sincerely, Olivia Van Tine Grand Bethel Honored Queen Page 25


youth organizations

Missouri Rainbow for Girls

Missouri Rainbow Girls “Faith, Hope and Charity”

ZOOM! Wait! What was that? ZOOM! Oh, that? Missouri Rainbow Girls are just adding another skill to their inventory. A few years ago, our International Marketing Team decided “Rainbow Gets Girls Ready for Life” would be a good, quick definition for us. While memorization, leadership, organizing, giving service and so much more is “us,” now we can add Zoom. From Wentzville to Lee’s Summit, from Columbia to Ozark, and from many other places, Missouri Rainbow Girls spent the last of March through the end of May/first of June meeting via Zoom. We discussed how “home” school was going and if they could share new games. We talked about individual service projects we could do, went over Ritual and began planning for Grand Assembly. We were so excited each time we were able to meet and plan. But, then, Grand Assembly was postponed. Oh no! Some new dates, July 16-July 19, were found and, with the dedication of our Grand Executive Committee, we have a new plan. On April 5, we came together via Zoom to celebrate our Rainbow Sunday. Since then, our members have participated in many Zoom events throughout Missouri – there has been Kahoots, Bingo, a Virtual Game night, FRI-YAY Game night and more— Liberty even held a Pledge meeting via Zoom! Many of our members have also participated in

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similar Zoom events in other Jurisdictions (States/ Countries) around the world! If we missed them, we enjoyed parts of them on Facebook. Now we are coming out of, well: lockdown, isolation, quarantine, “stay home,” etc. We’re learning we’ll need to disinfect Assembly Rooms before/after using them. We’re learning about masks and social distancing. We’re learning about food before/after events and we continue to add to our inventory of skills by reviewing Ritual adjustments we’ll need for, hopefully, a short time. Oh! And, now, our biennial Supreme Assembly (originally scheduled for Reno at the end of July) will be held virtually – via Zoom!! “Rainbow Gets Girls Ready for Life.” Are YOU ready to Zoom?

The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

LOdge & district news

International Web Meeting By WB Curtis Perkins NOTE: THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, THE GRAND MASTER AND THE GRAND LODGE OFFICERS ARE EXCITED ABOUT THE NEW TECHNOLOGIES BEING UTILIZED TO EXPAND OUR REACH THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. INTERACTING WITH OTHER JURISDICTIONS DOES BRING WITH IT CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS.  BEFORE A MISSOURI CRAFT LODGE CAN INTERACT WITH A LODGE OR GRAND LODGE OUTSIDE THE JURISDICTIONAL BOUNDARIES OF MISSOURI, NOTIFICATION, PERMISSION AND DISPENSATION MUST BE GRANTED BY THE GRAND MASTER.  THAT IS TRUE WHETHER OR NOT RITUAL IS DISCUSSED.  MWB Stanton T. Brown II “To enlarge the sphere of social happiness is worthy of the benevolent design of a Masonic institution; ....,” so wrote George Washington. During the quarantine, it was difficult to feel connected and part of a larger sphere, especially Masonically, as it was not safe to meet for many months. While necessary for the safety of the Brethren, it was hard to feel that same sense of Light and camaraderie that we’ve grown to love in the Masonic fraternity. I believe we were able to recreate some of that Light on June 4th, 2020, during an exciting joint Zoom meeting between two lodges: St. Louis Missouri Lodge 1 and ARLS Fraternidade Acadêmica Liberdade de Pensar Lodge 3280 (hereafter referred to as ARLS FALP Loja 3280) of the Grand Orient of Brazil (GOB). Worshipful Master Joey W. Goldman of St. Louis Missouri Lodge 1 and Worshipful Master Luis Guilherme Rezende of ARLS FALP Loja 3280 Summer 2020

coordinated this virtual meeting in order to strengthen fraternal ties and share a dedication to Masonry. Ritual differences, associated appendant bodies, and customary attire for various functions were discussed. It was fascinating to see just how different, yet how alike, our two jurisdictions are. Approximately two dozen Freemasons participated. WB Louis Vetz, PM of King Solomon Lodge 95 was also in attendance. The honored guest of the evening was the Grand Secretary of Foreign Affairs for the Grand Orient of Brazil, RWB Lucas Galeano, who communicated fraternal regards from the Grand Master of the Grand Orient of Brazil, MWB Mucio Bonifácio Guimarães to the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, MWB Stanton T. Brown II. Overall, this night demonstrated not only how far our brotherhood reaches, but also that our craft is able to find unique opportunities for light, even under the limitations of the pandemic. We look forward to strengthening our friendship with ARLS FALP Loja 3280 and hope to have the opportunity to connect with other lodges abroad in the coming years. “.........the grand object of Masonry is to promote the happiness of the human race.” – George Washington Page 27


LOdge & district news

Grand Lodge of Missouri

International Web Meeting Minutes SPEECH REALIZED BY GRAND SECRETARY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS - GRAND ORIENT OF BRAZIL, RW. BRO LUCAS GALDEANO - FRATERNIDADE ACADÊMICA LIBERDADE DE PENSAR LODGE 3280 Worshipful Master, W. Bro. LUIS GUILHERME REZENDE; ST. LOUIS MISSOURI LODGE 1 Worshipful Master, W. Bro. JOEY WILLIAM GOLDMAN; All Masonic Authorities present; BRETHREN all. 1. On behalf of Grand Master of Grand Orient of Brazil, Most Worshipful Bro. MUCIO BONIFÁCIO GUIMARÃES, and in my name, as Grand Secretary of Foreign Affairs, it is a great pleasure to FRATERNALLY COMPLIMENT St. Louis Missouri Lodge #1 Brethren, under the leadership of their Worshipful Master Bro JOEY WILLIAM GOLDMAN, and to EXTEND this compliment to Grand Master of Grand Lodge of Missouri, Most Worshipful Bro. STANTON T. BROWN, II. Please transmit our compliment to him. 2. I would also like to CONGRATULATE the two Lodges for this initiative and for affording this excellent opportunity to strengthen our masonic fraternal tie, attesting that there are no boundaries or frontiers that can stop our fraternity from spreading our principles and values over Earth’s surface. 3. This pandemic period that the world is passing, although it has also been an opportunity for Freemasonry to reevaluate new routes

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to maintain the spirit of our fraternity strong and everlasting. Today is a perfect example of that. 4. Please accept the thanks from my grateful heart, with fraternal respect assurance and best wishes for the honor, happiness, and prosperity of the Craft, and of all the members of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. 5. Finally, I remember the Brethren a Masonic poem’s verse, “The Final Toast”, by David Lester Richardson, so that we may always endeavor to be: “HAPPY TO MEET, SORRY TO PART, HAPPY TO MEET AGAIN!” Good Night to all Brethren! RW Bro LUCAS GALDEANO Grand Secretary of Foreign Affairs Grand Orient of Brazil

The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

LOdge & district news

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Proffitt 50 Year Pin

RWB Bill Siegfried, DDGL for the 15th Masonic District, presented a 50year pin to WB Milton “Mac” Proffitt on January 16, 2020 at Ray Lodge 223 in Camden, MO. His daughter, Lindsey Proffitt King pinned her father while his granddaughter, Hensley, watched.

Webster Groves 25 & 50 Year Pin

On March 27, 2018, at Webster Groves Lodge 84, RWB Randy Davis, DDGM of the 27th Masonic District, presented a 50-year pin and certificate to Brother Ronald N. Carter, who was pinned by his son, Ned A. Carter, who received his 25-year certificate on the same night. The lost photos were just found.

1st Wentzville Scholarship

On June 17, 2020, Wentzville Lodge 46 presented the very first $500.00 Albert H. “Sonny” Miller Honorary Scholarship to Mia A. Keegan, a graduating senior from Wentzville Holt High School. The Wentzville brethren established the scholarship for a graduating senior in the Wentzville School District who plans to attend a trade school and to honor RWB Sonny Miller, who is seen making the presentation.

Two Nixa Scholarships

On May 18, 2020, Mason Miller (left), Samuel Smith Stewart Scholarship recipient, and Amanda Eckels (center), Masonic Merit Scholarship recipient, were presented with their scholarships by RWB Chris Nickle, Junior Grand Steward, at Nixa High School in Nixa, Missouri.

Solomon Meets with Social Distancing

On May 11, 2020, the members and officers of Solomon Lodge 271 met in Stated Communication, strictly following the edict of MW Grand Master Stanton Brown II, adhering to the guidelines of city and state and CDC authorities. It was a great meeting with 16 present. It may be confusing and uncertain times. Freemasonry, notwithstanding, will survive.

Summer 2020

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LOdge & district news

Grand Lodge of Missouri

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Steak, Storytelling and Veterans Celebration

Pricilla Howe, Storyteller

Plaque Presentation

RWB Lloyd G. Lyon

Veteran Recipients

By Carroll Iorg Worshipful Master, Rising Sun 13

Lodge with a plaque, a letter from MWB Stanton T. Brown II, and a beautiful chain attached to one of the Grand Master’s coins.

We had a full house at Rising Sun Lodge 13 for a special open event on March 7, 2020, including Masons, family and friends. The evening started with a scrumptious steak dinner with all the trimmings, prepared by WB Bill O’Neil and JD Lou Greenhagen and his wife, Charlotte.

We then moved upstairs for the Veterans Award Ceremony. We were honored to have a total of 14 veterans in attendance from Rising Sun 13, Barry Daylight 17, Alpha 659, Swope Park 617 and Independence 76. The Veterans Ceremony was conducted by RWB Lloyd G. Lyon, Masonic Home Ambassador, with WB Jeff Quibell assisting as Chaplain, and Brother Robert Cornett as Senior Deacon. Each veteran was presented with a certificate and a Masonic flag that had 7 flown over the Masonic complex in Columbia. The Veterans at the altar were Rising Sun members unless otherwise noted. From left to right: Vincent Taibi, Arthur Kinder, Gerry Jennings, Robert Van Vacter, Larry Alvis (Swope Park 617), Erik Collins, Robert Eckerle, Joseph Strobbe, Edgar Chadwick, Matt Turner (Independence 76), Bruce Needhammer (Barry Daylight 17), Lou Greenhagen, and Richard Hanner.

After dinner, internationally acclaimed storyteller, Priscilla Howe, shared a personal story about how she received a scholarship from her father’s Masonic lodge after graduating from high school. It helped immensely with her college expenses and she saw her appearance at our event as a chance to give back, as a token of her appreciation for all she was given from the Masonic fraternity. RWB Chris Marcum, DDGM of the 17th Masonic District, presented the

Ronald E. Wood, Past Preceptor

Truman Barks - Honor Flight

On March 12, 2020, at a Masonic meeting in St. Joseph, Missouri, the Grand Master, MWB Stanton T. Brown II, as a Past Preceptor of the Sovereign Grand Preceptor’s Chapter, and representing the Sovereign Order of Knights Preceptor, presented Sir Knight Ronald E. Wood, Jr. with his jewel as Sovereign Grand Preceptor of the Sovereign Order of Knights Preceptor. He expressed his appreciation and received the Jewel with dignity and honor.

Members of Greenville Lodge 107 presented Brother Truman Barks of Clubb, MO, with gifts and mementos from the Greater St. Louis Honor Flight organization. Brother Barks was scheduled to be a part of the honor flight this summer, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it was canceled. Brother Barks is a 62 year member of Greenville Lodge, and, at age 95, the oldest.  Pictured are Brother Truman Barks (seated) and clockwise: WM Allen Brooks, WB Terance Baker and RWB Ted Marlow.

Page 30

The Freemason


Grand Lodge of Missouri

LOdge & district news

Installations, Dedications & Special Events Billiings Lodge Back Pack CAP

Bryson Receives Fez

On June 10, 2020, the Grand Master, MWB Stanton T. Brown, II attended the cold sands ceremony for 5 new members at Moila Shrine in St. Joseph, Missouri. One of those new members was RWB Emmett Bryson. At the end of the ceremony, the GM was able to invest RWB Emmett with his Fez.

On January 6, 2020, Billings Lodge 379, in conjunction with the Masonic Home of Missouri, presented a check for $1000 for the Billings School Back Pack program. From L to R: Brother Don Wells, Stacy Baker (Back Pack Coordinator), Ben Abramovitz, Cynthia Brandt, and RWB Tom Williams.

Samaritan CAP

Billings Lodge Care To Learn CAP

On June 26, 2020, Samaritan Lodge 424 presented the North St. Francois County School District a check for $2200.00 to cover student lunch debts. The Lodge’s donation was matched by the Masonic Home of Missouri’s Create-A-Partnership Program. From left to right are: WB Michael Stevens, WB Scott Smith, School Counselor Nicole Sprinkles Gregory, School Board member Julie Pratte and RWB Dan Ward.

On January 6, 2020, Billings Lodge 379, in conjunction with the Masonic Home of Missouri, presented a check for $1000 to the Clever School Care to Learn program. From L to R: Brother Don Wells, Benjy Fenske (Superintendent), and RWB Tom Williams.

Clements 50 Year Pin

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, Wayne Lodge 526 presented WB Donald Clements with his 50-year pin. RWB Jason Street presented the pin and WB Clements’ granddaughter, Melissa Foster, pinned it on him. His family was in attendance, including his son-in-law, Brother Paul Manetz and grandson, Brother John Manetz, both members of Wayne Lodge.

Summer 2020

Page 31


Grand Master’s Calendar of Events All events are subject to possible restrictions. July 2020 July 17 July 18 July 21 July 22 July 30

Rainbow Girls Grand Assembly Masonic Home Board meeting Buckner Lodge meeting Kansas City Scottish Rite meeting SRKC Honormans dinner -virtual

September 2020 September 1 Buckner Lodge meeting September 9 Ararat Shrine meeting September 11-12 Red Cross statewide annual meeting September 15 Buckner Lodge meeting September 21 Grand Lodge Annual Communication

August 2020 August 4 August 12 August 15 August 15 August 19 August 25 August 26 August 29 August 31

Buckner Lodge meeting Ararat Shrine meeting Masonic Home Board meeting Install Fenton Lodge Buckner Lodge meeting Buckner Lodge meeting Kansas City Scottish Rite meeting Acon, Rosicrucians, Athelstan meeting-virtual AMD meeting

October 2020 October 17 October 24

Masonic Home Board Meeting Area Meetings, locations TBA

November 2020 November 14

Masonic Home Board Meeting

December 2020 December 12 December 19

Area Meetings, locations TBA Masonic Home Board Meeting

Profile for Missouri Freemasons

Missouri Freemason Magazine - v65n04 - 2020 Summer  

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