Page 1


BIOGRAPHICAL

II

II HAROLD LOCKE READER Grand Master, 1937-1938

Our ninety-fourth Grand Master, Most 'Vorshipful Brother Harold Locke Reader, son of John J. and S. Emma (Locke) Reader, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts, May 6, 1885. On the maternal side he is descended from the "Locke family," a distinguished member of which was the famous John Locke, the English philosopher. Doctor Reader's father was for over fifty years a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and a Past High Priest of his chapter. 'Vhen our Grand Master was eleven years of age his family moved to East St. Louis, Illinois, where he entered the fifth grade, and went through the grade and high schools, being graduated from the latter in 1903, proceeding to College at Washington University, and Shurtleff College, Illinois, being graduated from the latter with a Degree of Ph.B. At'Vashington University he became a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, and at Shurtleff College he became a member of Sigma Phi Literary Society, of which he was twice president. Doctor Reader was ordained to the ministry of the Baptist Church in 1907, at the age of twenty-two, in 'Vinstanley Baptist Church, East St. Louis, Illinois, and became pastor of 'Vebster Groves church in 1913, which church he has served for twenty-five years, coming to this pastorate when the church "-as only two months old. Incidentally, this is one of two churches in the St. Louis area that has been selfsupporting from the beginning. On June 14, 1928, his Alma Mater, Shurtleff College, recognizing his outstanding gifts and ability, eonferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. He is also a trustee of that distinguished institution of learning. He is a Past President of the St. Louis Baptist Ministers' Conference, member of the Executive Board of the St. Louis Churrh Federation, and past member of the Board of Counselors of the St. Louis Ministerial Alliance. He is also a member of the Executive Committee of the St. Louis Baptist Mission Board. For eighteen years .Doctor Reader has been Select Preacher and Bible Lecturer at the Chautauqua at Piasa, Illinois. Our Grand Master is married and has one daughter, Helen Locke Reader, his wife being the former Miss Blanche Estelle Taylor, of St. Louis.


ii

BIOGRAPHICAL

During the Great \Var the \Yebster Groves Baptist Church granted him leave of absence, and he entered military service as Chaplain of the Fifth Missouri Infantry, the famous "Joffre" Regiment of St. Louis. On the consolidation of the latter with the First Missouri Infantry, to form the 138th, he was transferred to the 110th Engineers, with which regiment he served throughout the war, being at Amiens, in the Vosges Occupation, St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne. He was eommended in a Special Communication to the Adjutant General of the Army by Col. S. A. Cheney, C: O. 110th Engineers; also commended in a letter to the office of Chief-of-Chaplains, G. H. Q., A. E. F., 'by Col. '1'. C. Clark, C. O. 110th Engineers. He is a Past Chaplain of the 35th Division Association; Past Chaplain of the Department of Missouri, the American Legion; Chaplainfor-Life 110th Engineers Association; Chaplain \Yebster Groves Memorial Post No. 172, American Legion. Doctor Reader is a member of the Missouri Athletic Association, and an honorary member of the Lions Club. His name appears in "\Vho's \Yho in St. Louis." From the appended Masonic Record of our Grand Master it will be easily seen that he has given full proof of his devotion and adherence to the principles and teaehings of our ancient Fratel'llity. His outstanding ability as a public speaker and orator is everywhere recognized, and his fame as such has spread to many outstanding foreign jurisdictions, within the boundaries of which he has delivered many inspiring addresses, and upheld the best traditions of the Craft. Needless to say, our Grand Master is held in the highest esteem by his Brethren, and his year of service as Grand Master will go down in our history as one marked by hard and efficient service, and surpassing popularity. It is the sincere hope of his Brethren that his life may long be spared to continue, nay even to extend, the good work in ,vhich he has been engaged for so many years. :\IASO~IC

RECORD

Ancient Craft Ma:sonry: Wellston Lodge No. 613, A. F. & A. M. (St. Louis County, Mo.) Entered Apprentice, Feb. 2, 1911 Fellowcraft, Feb. 16, 1911 Master Mason, Feb. 23, 1911 Junior Deacon, 1914 Senior Warden, 1917 While Senior Warden he entered military service and on his return from France was Worshipful Master, i920 Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Missouri District Deputy Grand Master, 57th District, 1920 Grand Orator, 1924 Grand Pursuivant, 1926 Grand Sword Bearer, 1927 Junior Grand Marshal, 1928 Senior Grand Marshal, 1929 Grand Junior Steward, 1930


BIOGRAPHICAL Grand Senior Steward, 1931 Grand Junior Deacon, 1932 Grand Senior Deacon, 1933 Junior Grand Warden, 1934 Senior Grand Warden, 1935 Deputy Grand Master, 1936 Grand Master, 1937-1938 Capitular Masonry: Kilwinning Chapter No. 50, R. A. M. (St. Louis, Mo.) Mark Master, April 26,1912 Past Master, May 10, 1912 Most Excellent Master, May 10, 1912 Royal Arch, May 18, 1912 Dimitted, January, 1916 Rabboni Chapter No. 131, R. A. M. (Webster Groves, Mo.) Affiliated, January, 1916 Royal Arch Captain, 1920 Principal Sojourner, 1921 Captain of the Host, 1922 Scribe, 1923 King, 1924 High Priest, 1925 Grand Chapter, R. A. M., of Missouri Grand Chaplain, 1924 Grand Master Second Veil, 1925 Grand Master Third Veil, 1926 Grand Royal Arch Captain, 1927 Grand Principal Sojourner, 1928 Grand Scribe, 1929 Grand King, 1930 Deputy Grand High Priest, 1931 Grand High Priest, 1932 Founder of the Grand Royal Arch School of Missouri Order of High Priesthood Anointed, April 28, 1925 M. E. President, J936 Cryptic Masonry: Hiram Council No.1, R. & S. M. (St. Louis, Mo.) Royal, Select, and Super Excellent Master, November 30, 1916 Chivalric Masonry: Ascalon Commandcl'y No. 16, K. T. (St. Louis, Mo.) Red Cross, November 1, 1919 Order of Malta, November 7, 1919 Order of Temple, November Hi, 1919 St. Louis Conclave No. 42, Red Cross of Constantine Initiated, April 9, 1925 Sentinel, November 27, 1928 Herald, October 30, 1929 Prefect, October 30, 1930 Standard Bearer, October 29, 1931 .Tunior General, October 31, 1932 Senior General, 1933 Vice Roy, 1934 M. P. Sovereign, 1935

iii


iv

BIOGRAPHICAL Imperial Council, Red Cross of Constantine Grand Imperial Prelate, 1932 and 1933

Scottish Rite Masonry: Guthrie Consistory (Oklahoma) 4th to 18th illelusive, Dceember 14, 1917 19th to 32nd inclusive, Dee-ember 15, 1917 St. Louis Consistory (St. Louis, Mo.) Affiliated, December 14, 1926 Moolah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. (St. Louis, Missouri) Webster Groves Chapter No. 64, O. E. S.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS of the

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION of the

GRAND LODGE ANCIENT FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS of the

STATE OF MISSOURI Held at

ST. LOUIS

SEPTEMBER 27 AND 28 A. D. 1938


ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION-FIRST DAY

The One Hundred and Eighteenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, at 10 :00 A.M. on Tuesday, September 27, 1938. PRELIMINARY

Prior to the opening of the Grand Lodge, entertainment was rendered by the children of the Masonic Home, and by Brother Falkenhainer and his orchestra. . PRESENT Harold L. Reader, 'Vebster Groves, M. W. Grand Master. J!enry C. Chiles, Lexington, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. Elwyn S. Woods, Springfield, R. W. Senior Grand Warden. Karl M. Vetsburg, St. Louis, R. W. Junior Grand Warden. Edmund E. Morris, Kansas City, R. W. Grand Treasurer. Arthur Mather, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Secretary. Anthony F. Ittner, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Lecturer. Ramuel Thurman, St. Louis, W. Grand Chaplain. 'rhos. B. Mather, Kansas City, W. Grand Chaplain. Emmet L. Robison, St. Joseph, W. Grand Chaplain. Harry S. Truman, Independence, Grand Senior Deacon. Harris C. Johnston, Boonville, Grand Junior Deacon. Forrest C. Donnell, St. Louis, Grand Senior Steward. Grover C. Sparks, Savannah, Grand Junior Steward. Leo H. J ohnson, Neosho, Grand Marshal. Eli S. Haynes, Columbia, Grand Marshal. Wm. F. Woodruff, Kansas City, Grand Sword Bearer. James A. Kinder, Cape Girardeau, Grand Pursuivant. Cassius E. Street, Kansas City, Grand Orator. Fred B. Howarth, St. Louis, Grand Tiler.

OPENING

Promptly at ten o'clock A.M., the Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, Harold L. Reader, opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri in AMPLE FORM in its One Hundred and Eighteenth Annual Communication, assisted by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of representatives. 'V. Brother Emmet L. Robison, Grand Chaplain, offered the following:


4

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

INVOCATION 0, Thou eternal and all wise God, our Heavenly Father, in Thy name we have assembled and in Thy name we desire to proceed in all our doings. We thank Thee for the multitude of Thy mercies and the mallY blessings that have been ours through the year. We thank Thee that it is our privilege and Thy good providence to come again into this Annual Communication, and we pray for wisdom, for 路strength, for courage, and for that direction of Thy Spirit which will enable us to do the right thing and to do it in the right spirit. We thallk 'fhee that during the year Thy blessing has been upon the Grand Master in health, in strength, in body and mind, that he might carryon, and that he might honor the Craft and fulfill his duties as the leader of this great Fraternity. May Thy blessing be upon him and upon us so that when our work is done we may go forth with the satisfaction that it has been well done. We would not forget, our Father, those who were here last year, those who have been in our lodges during these many years but who have gone into that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns. Their memory abides with us as a precious heritage. The service they gave to us, and to the lodges of the State, are deeply appreciated. Now may Thy blessing in all its richness and all its fullness rest upon the homes from which these, our brethren, have gone. May Thy spirit again, we pray Thee, guide us through these days. Bless the interests that arc near and dear to our hearts, represented this morning by these children who came to us out of the Home. Oh, we thank Thee that there is a place to which they can go where they will not be turned out on the streets, nor left to find their own way. We thank Thee for this institution that seeks to guide. Bless those who are in charge of it. And we would remember those who arc in the eventide of life, waiting for the shadows to fall. We thank Thee that in these j'ears there is a place to which they can turn and find the comforts of home and fellowship. Accept again our gratitude for all the blessings that have been ours to enjoy this year. Continue to us these things, and Thy grace and strength, and we will give Thee all the praise and the glory due Thy name. Anwn. CREDENTIALS

THE GRAND SECRETARY: I have the interim report of the Committee on Credentials, which is to the effect that a eonstitutional number of Lodges is represented, and the Grand Lodge is now ready for the dispatch of business. TELEGRAMS, LETTERS AND REGRETS

THE GRAND SECRETARY: Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, I have a telegram from the Grand Lodge of Arkansas reading as follows: "Will you convey to your Grand Master and through him to the fraternity in Missouri the fraternal greetings of the Masons in Arkansas upon the occasion of their annual meeting. The Grand Lodge of Arkansas will celebrate their centennial anniversary on November 21 and 22, 1938, and a ver~' cordial invitation is extended to your Grand Lodge to have a representative join with us in this celebration. By order of the Grand Master.-W. A. TllOmas, Grand Secretary."

I have also a communication from Most \Vorshipful Brother Mike H. Thomas, Past Grand Master of Texas, who was deputized by the


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

5

Grand Master of Texas to make a visit to this Annual Communication. He is unable to attend due to illness, and sends his regrets. THE GRAND MASTER: I am sorry to announce, brethren, that my good friend, the Grand Master of Ohio, Louis B. Blakemore, who had accepted my invitation to be present at this session, met with a very serious automobile accident in New Mexico a few weeks ago, and he is unable to be present at this time. APPROVAL OF MINUTES

The proceedings of the 1937 Annual Communication, having been printed and distributed, were approved. INTRODUCTION OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

The Committee on Credentials reported the presence of several distinguished visitors. l'he following were conducted to the altar, introduced to the Grand Lodge, rendered appropriate honors, and assigned to seats in the Grand East: Grand Lodge of Iowa: M. W. Brother Ralph Otteson, Grand Master; M. \V. Brother Charfes C. Hunt, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary. Grand Lodge of Nebraska: M. W. Brother alter R. Raecke, Grand Master; M. W. Brother Lewis E. Smith, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary. W. Brother Leo H. Johnston, Right Eminent Grand Commander of' the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of Missouri. 'v. Brother Forrest C. Donnell, Illustrious Deputy of the Supreme Council AASR for Missouri. M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, and General Grand Captain of Host of the General Grand Chapter, R. A. M. of the United States of America.

'V

ADDRESS OF GRAND MASTER

At the beginning of this Grand Lodge Session it is fitting that we should publicly acknowledge our thanks to the Supreme Architect for the blessings accruing to us as American Masons. As we survey the world with its chaos, and realize that many of our Brethren in foreign climes have been denied the privilege of meeting in their respective lodges or in any way exercising their prerogatives as Master Masons; as we see the right of suffrage or the liberty to worship God according to one's own conscience forcibly withheld from these same Brethren in foreign jurisdictions, surely we should pause and express our thanks to Almighty God that we continue to meet in our sessions without fear of interference on the part of church or state. The danger confronting American Masonry does not lie in external forces or institu-


6

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

tions; rather the danger which may so easily beset us lurks in that attitude of complacency which leads us to believe that what has been necessarily will be. My brethren, in these days which future historians doubtless will acclaim as the end of one era and the beginning of another, let us be ever watchful lest, like a thief in the night, our ancient liberties become imperilled. STATE OF THE CRAFT

Although the Grand Secretary's tabulation will show a decrease in membership, I am pleased to report that, generally speaking, the Fraternity is in a healthful condition all over this state. Our losses during the past decade have been large, but the economic conditions have been distressing. Undoubtedly many of our Brethren are no longer actively identified with the Craft not through lack of interest, but through actual inability to meet the necessary financial obligations. And this is a time, my Brethren, when Lodges must put forth every effort to assist, as sympathetically as possible, the Brethren who are financially distressed and are thus prone to leave our ranks. It is my opinion that in many instances by brotherly helpfulness on the part of Officers and members, Brethren otherwise inclined to sever their connection with our institution can be persuaded to remain active. No doubt for a few years to come we will show slight losses; but let no one be tempted to think, therefore, that Masonry is a dying Institution. Far from it. \Ve must not fall into the error of gauging our Fraternity by the rule of "quantity." Not "quantity," but "quality" is the proper standard of evaluation. And all over this Grand Jurisdiction I have had contact with groups of faithful Brethren who with zeal and indefatigable efforts are upholding the principles of our Order, and are manifesting to the profane world that Masonry is a way of life-a way of life that adds a plus to life. These faithful Brethren are exemplifying the truth that a real Mason is a good citizen, a good husband, a good father, a good son, a good brother, a good friend, a good man. My Brethren, through the decades the graph of membership will rise and fall; but Masonry will live always. MASONIC LEADERSHIP

It was Ralph 'Valdo Emerson who said in substance that every institution is the elongated shadow of one man. 'Vhether or not we accept this dictum as true, it cannot be questioned that no organization rises higher than its leadership. By the nature of their constitution this is peculiarly true in Masonic Lodges. It is imperative, therefore, that in the selection of Lodge Officers the utmost care be taken to choose wisely and well. By the unwritten law of our system, a man starting at the bottom of a Lodge line is pre-supposed ultimately to be the Master of the Lodge. Therefore, in considering him as a line appointee his fitness to fill the Master's chair must be kept in mind.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

7

It is easily conceivable that a Brother might make an excellent Senior Deacon, for instance, whose lack of initiative and executive ability would totally unfit him to preside over the Lodge. It is a great privilege to be Master of a Lodge; it is also a grave responsibility. The essential characteristics for a successful Master must, unquestionably, include character that commands the respect not only of the Brethren but also of the Community; executive ability as the directing head of an organization of men; and the capacity for indefatigable labor. Especially in these days of economic distress, when many of our Brethren are tempted to drop out of our ranks owing to financial pressure, it is essential that the Master of the Lodge be willing and able to deal patiently and sympathetically with individual Brethren, to the end that their problems may be solved. Such it condition demands exacting effort on the part of the Masters, but to my personal knowledge in this State such effort has resulted in much good. And to such Masters and Officers there accrues the satisfaction of realizing that through their sympathetic helpfulness Brethren have been deterred from leaving our ranks, and have been heartened by the spirit of real brotherliness. NECROLOGY

This Grand Lodge has suffered irreparable loss this past year in the going of two outstanding Past Grand Masters, Doctor John Pickard, and Orestes Mitchell, and the Dean of our District Deputy Grand Masters, G. J. Vaughn. Doctor Pickard was one of the pre-eminent Masons of this State. He had been the head of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter; The Grand Council, Royal and Select Masters; The Imperial Council, Red Cross of Constantine; and had received the 33d and last degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. His dignified bearing, his broad scholarship, his ripe experience, his unusual attainments and his knowledge of all phases of Masonry set him apart as a Brother of rare distinction not only among the Masons of this Grand Jurisdiction, but in other Grand Jurisdictions as well. He was known far and wide as a Mason of unusual ability and accomplishment, and his going was a distinct loss. My personal relations with Doctor Pickard continued over a number of years. I had been his acting Grand Chaplain when he presided over the sessions of our Grand Royal Arch Chapter; he appointed me Imperial Grand Prelate of the Imperial Council, Red Cross of Constantine; and in 1926 he started me in this Grand Lodge Line as Grand Pursuivant. Doctor Pickard passed away on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1937, and his funeral was held Sunday afternoon, November 28,1937, in the Presbyterian Church of Columbia, of which Church he was a member. Accompanied by Doctor Mather, the Grand Secretary, and


8

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Right Worshipful Brother Rex Dewhirst, I journeyed to Columbia and conducted the Masonic Service, assisted by Doctor Mather as Acting Grand Chaplain. A large number of Past Grand Masters and Grand Officers were present. Doctor Pickard's remains were taken to his old home in New Hampshire for interment, and I am glad to note that the Brethren there accorded him every Masonic honor. Most Worshipful Brother Orestes Mitchell passed away at his home in St. Joseph on April 19, 1938. Although he had not been well for two or more years his passing came as a great shock. Most Worshipful Brother Mitchell was active in civic and church affairs, being a devoted member of the Huffman Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church. He engaged successfully in the practice of law and was for two terms president of the St. Joseph Bar Association. He was intensely interested in the educational work of his community, and was a member of the Board of Education of St. Joseph for eight years, two of which he served as President of the Board. He presided as Grand Master of this Grand Lodge in 1925, and immediately thereafter was elected a member of the Masonic Home Board where he labored indefatigably for the best interests of the Institution. Brother MitcheH was Chairman of the Committee which recommended the new building program. It was my privilege to serve Most "\Vorshipful Brother Mitchell and this Grand Lodge as Grand Orator when Brother Mitchell presided over the sessions of the Grand Lodge in St. Joseph in 1925. Accompanied by Doctor Mather, I went to St. Joseph for the funeral services of Most Worshipful Brother Mitchell, conducted by his Pastor, the Rev. E. L. Robison, one of our Grand Chaplains, in which services both Doctor Mather and I had a part. Right Worshipful Brother Granville Joshua Vaughn passed away on Christmas Day, 1937, at his home in Ozark, after an illness of several months. For over forty years he had been an active member of our Fraternity, and for thirty-six years was District Deputy Grand Master of the Fifty-fourth Masonic District. Right Worshipful Brother Vaughn was the Dean of our District Deputy Grand Masters, and his long, faithful and efficient service will not be forgotten. Funeral services were held on Monday, December 27, 1937, in the Community Hall in Ozark, with Doctor Lewis M. Hale, Grand Chaplain, assisted by the Rev. Charles Maples, officiating. The Masonic Lodge was in charge of services at the grave, in the Vaughn Cemetery, south of Ozark. VISITATIONS

My original thought was to write out all visitations in detail, but in as much as such a procedure would consume too much space, I merely record the visits, with the exception of the visit to my own Lodge, and to the Lodge of the community in which I reside.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

9

Sept. 30, 1937; Wellston Lodge No. 613. My first visit as Grand Master was paid to my own Lodge, Wellston Lodge No. 613, of which Worshipful Brother William Hecht was Master. A large number of Brethren sat down to dinner, in the dining hall of the Temple, given in my honor, at which the Rev. Brother Rutledge spoke briefly on the Ministers who had been Grand Masters: At the close of the dinner the Brethren of my Lodge presented me with a beautiful traveling bag, presentation being made on behalf of the Lodge by Worshipful Brother J. J. Denuth, who had been my Junior Warden. Following this, Worshipful Brother Barth on behalf of the Brethren of Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, presented me with a beautiful toilet case. I was then presented with beautiful flowers for my daughter, and a thoughtful gift, by the ladies of the Rob. Morris Chapter Sewing Circle, for Mrs. Reader. In as much as at my installation at the Grand Lodge the Officers of my Lodge had presented me with a beautiful silk hat and a gorgeous boquet of flowers for Mrs. Reader, these gifts given at the dinner quite overwhelmed me. Words fail to convey my appreciation to the members of my own Lodge, and to Brother Barth and the Brethren of his Lodge. Following the dinner, I made an official visit to the Lodge, being accompanied by the Grand Secretary; Right Worshipful Brother Arthur Mather; The Grand Chaplain, Rabbi Samuel Thurman; the Grand Junior Warden Right Worshipful Brother Karl Vetsburg; the Grand Lecturer, Most Worshipful Brother Anthony F. Ittner; Past Grand Masters William R. Gentry, and James W. Skelly; the District Deputy Grand Masters of the Thirty-third District, Right Worshipful Brothers Wilson and Dewhirst; the District Deputy Grand Master of the Fifty-seventh District, Right Worshipful Brother Morrison Rinkel, and the District Lecturers of the Thirty-third and Fifty-seventh Districts, Right Worshipful Brothers Rosenfelder and Zavadil. The address of the evening was delivered by Most Worshipful Brother Wm. R. Gentry. It seemed quite appropriate for Most Worshipful Brother Gentry to be the principal speaker on this occasion inasmuch as he was the first and the only other Grand Master to come from the Fifty-seventh District, and at the dinner given by his Lodge, Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, in his honor when he was elected Grand Master, I had the pleasure of being principal speaker. Addresses were also made, at this visit to my lodge, by Doctor Mather, Doctor Thurman, Most Worshipful Brother Ittner, Right Worshipful Brothers Vetsburg and Rinkel. Right Worshipful Brother Rinkel, also a member of this Lodge, was formally presented to the Lodge as the new District Deputy Grand Master, and was presented with a beautiful bouquet of roses on behalf of the Lodge. Altogether this first official visit to my own Lodge will live as a most happy memory, and I thank Worshipful Brother William Hecht and all the Brethren for their abundant manifestations of lo,e. October 6, Salem lJOdge No. 225, Salem, Missouri. Laid cornerstone of New Post Office Building. October 12, Accompanied by Doctor Arthur Mather, I visited the Grand Lodge of Illinois in Chicago. . October 14, I addressed the Grand Chapter, O. E. S., in St. Louis, and was very heartily received. October 16, Lambskin Lodge No. 460, St. Louis, Seventieth Anniversary of the Lodge. October 19, Salisbury Lodge No. 208, Salisbury, Mo., Fifteenth District Meeting. This is the first District organized in the State.


10

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

October 23, Cache Lodge No. 416, St. Louis. I had performed the marriage ceremony of the Master of this Lodge, Worshipful Brother Fred Nagel, a number of years ago. October 25, Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661, University City. October 26, Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Webster Groves, Mo. One of the most delightful Masonic meetings it has ever been my privilege to attend was held at Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, on Tuesday evening, October 26, 1937. This was the Fortieth Anniversary of the Lodge, and the occasion of my official visit. About two hundred and fifty Brethren sat down to a bountiful dinner at 6: 30 in the Masonic Temple, and about 8: 30 I was received officially in the Lodge by Worshipful Brother Wm. F. Barth, his Officers and Brethren. Mizpah Orchestra of forty pieces rendered a beautiful musical program and after I had addressed the Lodge on ' , The Challenge to Freemasonry" pictures of the Lodge's Masters were shown on the screen. Webster Groves has had a remarkable history, one of which the members may well be proud. There were present that night two of the four living charter members of the Lodge, Worshipful Brother Trembley, the first Master, and Worshipful Brother L. F. Booth, the third Master. My relation to this Lodge has been indeed unique; although not a member of this Lodge I have been most intimately associated with it, and the Brethren of this Lodge are bound to me by unusual ties of friendship. The welcome accorded me by Worshipful Brother Wm. F. Barth and his Brethren, was almost overwhelming, and the occasion will ever be remembered as a green spot in my mind. A feature of the evening, which added much to its joy, was a presentation to me at the dinner by Sister Holland, Worthy Matron of Webster Groves Chapter O. E. S., of which I am a member, of a beautiful desk set consisting of scissors and paper knife. I was greatly surprised, and will ever remember this thoughtfulness. November 1, St. John's Lodge No. 28, Hannibal, Mo. Most Worshipful Brother Lawrence, Grand Master of Illinois, also present. November 3, Royal Arch School, Trenton. November 3, Lexington Lodge No. 149, Lexington, 23d District ASiOciation meeting. November 4, Trenton Lodge No. 111, Trenton. This Lodge has the unusual distinction of having as Master a Past Grand Master, Ray V. Denslow. November 5, Hamilton Lodge No. 224, Hamilton, 12th District Association meeting. November 10, St. Louis Lodge No. 20, St. Louis. Henry A. Steiner night. November 11, Armistice night, Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis. Very large attendance, including many Masters and Wardens. November 13, Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis. November 16, Webster Groves Chapter, O. E. S., Webster Groves. November 18, Missouri Lodge No.1, St. Louis. November 20, Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis, Wm. A. Brockmeier night. November 22, Owensville Lodge No. 624, Owensville. A brother 78 years of age rode fifteen miles on horseback to attend this meeting. November 28, Columbia, Assisted by Doctor Mather, as Acting Grand Chaplain, I conducted Masonic service at funeral of Dr. Pickard. December 2, Grand Lodge of Texas, at Waco. Centennial Meeting. Accompanied by Doctor Mather.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

11

December 6, Riddick Lodge No. 361, Buffalo, 41st District Associ~tion meeting. December 8, Royal Arch School, St. Louis. December 11, Censer Lodge No. 172, Mason, 14th District Association meeting. December 17, Ferguson Lodge No. 542, Ferguson, installed officers. December 20, Itaska Lodge No. 420, St. Louis, installed officers. December 21, Webster Groves Chapter No. 64, O. E. S. December 28, Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Webster Groves, installed officers. December 30, Harmony Lodge No. 499, St. Louis, installed officers. January 3, Kahoka, to visit Right Worshipful Brother James R. McLachlan, on his eightieth birthday. January 5, Wellston Lodge No. 613, St. Louis, installed officers. January 6, Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis, installed officers. January 8, Apollo Lodge No. 529, St. Louis, presented 50-year button to Worshipful Brother Herbert Powers, Apollo's first Master. January 10, Meeting of the District Lecturers, at St. Louis. January 13, Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin, installed officers. January 13, Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Joplin, installed officers. . (The two above were joint meetings.) January 27, 路Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall, 24th District Association meeting. January 28, Wakanda Lodge No. 52, Carrollton, 20th District Meeting. January 29, Meramec Lodge No. 313, Eureka. A very unusual and interesting meeting. Several fathers with a number of sons respectively were presented-one father and seven sons being the climax of the evening. January 31, Annual meeting of the Wardens and Masters of St. Louis. February 5, Gardenville Lodge No. 655, St. Louis County. February 7, Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas City. Febrnary 7, Meeting of District Lecturers in Kansas City. February 8, Westport Lodge No. 340, Kansas City. February 8, Heroine Lodge No. 104, Kansas City. February 8, East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City. February 12, York Rite Meeting, East St. Louis, Illinois. February 21-23, Grand Masters Conference, Washington, D. C. I read a paper before this Conference on "The Social Security Act." February 22, Geo. Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Alexandria, Virginia. March 3, Seaman Lodge No. 136, Milan, 3d District meeting. March 4, Jackson Lodge No. 82, Linneus, 13th District meeting. March 8, Kennedy Lodge No. 329, Elmo, conference with the Brethren. March 8, Nodaway Lodge No. 470, Maryville, 7th District meeting. March 9, Cecile-Daylight Lodge No. 305, Kansas City. March 9, Raytown Lodge No. 391, Raytown, 59th District meeting. March 14, Gallatin Lodge No. 106, Gallatin, 10th District meeting. March 17, Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton. March 21, Richland Lodge No. 385, Richland. March 22, Mizpah Lodge No. 639, St. Louis. March 31, Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, St. Louis. April 1, Marion, Illinois, with Grand Master Lawrence of Illinois. April 5, Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis. I was accompanied by Most Worshipful Brothers Skelly and Walker, and Right Worshipful Brothers Mather, Vetsburg, Thurman, Donnell, Kinder and Howarth. April 7, St. Clair Lodge No.. 273, Osceola, 37th District meeting.


12

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

April 17, Preached the Easter Sermon before the Scottish Rite Bodies in St. Louis. April 21, Charity Lodge No. 331, St. .Joseph. Attended funeral of Most Worshipful Brother Orestes Mitchell. April 21, South Gate Lodge No. 547, Kansas City. April 21, Northeast Lodge No. 643, Kansas City. April 25, Grand Council, R. & S. M., Sedalia. April 26, Grand Chapter, R. A. M., Sedalia. Delivered an address that evening on "The Mission of Masonry in The World of Today." April 27, Meeting of Lodge of Instruction, 57th district, Maplewood. April 28, LaBelle Lodge No. 222, LaBelle. Laid cornerstoiw for new High School Gymnasium. May 2, Purity Lodge No. 658, St. Louis. May 3, United Lodge No.5, Springfield. May 3, Solomon Lodge- No. 271, Springfield. May 3, Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield. (The three above were joint meetings.) May 5, Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City. An outstanding day. Doctor Mather accompanied me. Met at Union Station by a committee of over fifty Brethren, and breakfasted there. Placed wreath at Soldiers' Memorial in the morning. Spoke at tlle Country Plaza dinner at noon. Spoke at banquet meeting at night at Ivanhoe Temple. A great meeting. May 9, Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, Kirkwood. May 10, Geo. Washington Lodge No.9, St. Louis, 89th Anniversary of Lodge. May 16, Grand Commandery K. T., .Jefferson City. May 19, Kirksville Lodge No. 105, Kirksville. Laid cornerstone of new building of Kirksville Teachers'. College. May 21, Magnolia Lodge No. 626, St. Louis. Presented Bibles to several candidates, including son of Right Worshipful Brother Ed. Walsh. ~IaJ 23, Meeting of Lodge of Instruction of 33d District. Spoke at length on "The Seven Attributes of a Masonic Worker." May 24, St. Mark's Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau, 49th District meeting. On behalf of the Lodge, Doctor Mather unveiled portrait of Brother Humphreys, Past Grand Chaplain. May 25, Magnolia Lodge No. 626, St. Louis. May 31, Meeting of Goat's Club, St. Louis. .June 3, Clarksville Lodge No. 17, Clarksville, 16th District meeting. June 4, Laid cornerstone of New Building at Masonic Home. This ceremony was preceded by an outstanding parade, and was witnessed by a large concourse of people. June 7, Spoke at length at Grand Lodge of Nebraska, at Omaha. June 9,·Wellston Lodge No. 613, Past Masters' Night. June 14,. Grand Lodge of Iowa, at Waterloo. June 21, Hebron Lodge No. 354:, Mexico. •Tunc 24, Hannibal. Laid cornerstone of new Admiral Coontz Memorial Armory. His Excellency, Governor Stark, spoke. July 10, 11, 12,13, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Bicentenary of the introduction of Masonry into Canada. I took part in the official ceremonies. August 6, Meeting of the 40th District at Indian Lake. August 18, Neosho Lodge No. 427, Neosho. Every Lodge in the 56th District represented at this meeting. Presented 50-year button to Brother Wm. B. Keller, at his home, morning of August 19. August 19, Osage Lodge No. 303, Nevada. Most every Lodge in 43d District present, and a number of Brethren present from Kansas, including the Deputy Grand Master, Doctor Young.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

13

August 31, Spoke at Banquet meeting of National Federated Crafts (Masonic) at Indianapolis, Indiana. September 1, Spoke at Convention of National Federated Crafts (Masonic) at Indianapolis, Indiana. Grand Master of Kentucky, also present. September 8, Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City. Every Lodge excepting one in the 28th District represented. September 9, Erwin Lodge No. 121, St. Louis. September 14, Palmyra, Spoke at the 100th Anniversary Celebration of Palmyra Royal Arch Chapter. September 16, Wentzville Lodge No. 146, Wentzville. Every Lodge in the 30th District represented. September 19, Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis. 21st Anniversary. September 20, West Gate Lod~e No. 445, St. Louis. Presented 50-year button to Brother Frederick Deibel. September 20, Aurora Lodge No. 267, St. Louis. VISITS TO OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS

On October 12, 1937, accompanied by Doctor Mather, I attended the Grand Lodge of Illinois, in Chicago. We were most hospitably received, and every courtesy accorded us. On December 2,1937, accompanied by the Grand Secretary, Doctor Mather, I visited the Grand Lodge of Texas, at Waeo, in' its Centennial Celebration. There were about fourteen visiting Grand Masters present, and the occasion was one of great interest and enjoyment. We were accorded a hearty welcome and afforded every courtesy. On June 7, 1938, accompanied by the Grand Secretary, Doctor Mather, I visited the Grand Lodge of Nebraska at Omaha. I went to this meeting 110 stranger, for I had spoken to the Brethren of Nebraska on more than one occasion previously. 'Ve greatly enjoyed being with our Nebraska Brethren again. On June 14,1938, accompanied by Most Worshipful Brothers Byrne E. Bigger, and James W. Skelly, and Doctor Mather, I visited the Grand" Lodge of Iowa at Waterloo. I anticipated this visit with unusual pleasure, as it afforded me the opportunity of passing through the Iowa City which holds my earliest recollections, Independence, Iowa. We were most hospitably received. On July 10, 11,12 and 13, 1938, I visited the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, as noted elsewhere. On April 1, 1938, accompanied by Right 'Vorshipful Brothers \Vilson and Walsh, I attended a Masonic meeting at Marion, Illinois, at which the Grand Master of Illinois, Most Worshipful Brother E. L. Lawrence, was also present. Most 'Vorshipful Brother Walker and Right Worshipful Brother Kinder came up from Cape Girardeau. This was a happy occasion, which we all enjoyed. BICENTENARY CELEBRATION IN NOVA SCOTIA

The outstanding Masonic event of the year was the celebration of the Bicentenary of Freemasonry in Canada by the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia on July 10, 11, 12, and 13, at Halifax and Digbey.


14

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

I had received an invitation to this celebration several months previously, and was happy that it was possible for me to be present. On receipt of my letter of acceptance, the Lord Bishop of Nova Scotia, Right 'Yorshipful the Right Reverend John Hackenley, D.D., Grand Chaplain of Nova Scotia, in charge of the official service of Thanksgiving, invited me to have a part in that service, and I gladly consented to do so. Accompanied by Mrs. Reader and our daughter, Helen, I motored to Halifax by way of Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Edmunston and St. ,J ohns, reaching the Hotel Nova Scotian, where we were assigned a beautiful suite of rooms overlooking the harbor, on July 9, and everything possible was done for our comfort and entertainment. The Celebration formally began on Sunday afternoon, July 10, at 3 P. M., with the official service of Thanksgiving in St. Paul's Church, and in which, as noted above, your Grand Master had a part, and over which the Lord Bishop of Nova Scotia, Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, presided. That great old Church, with a remarkable history, and in which the first Masonic meeting in Nova Scotia was held, was thronged with worshippers, including the Governor, Lord Irwin, and Lady Irwin. A lady and gentleman were assigned as the personal escorts of each Grand Master and wife; and on invitation of my escort, Doctor 'Vallace, I occupied his pulpit on Sunday morning. The Emergent Communication of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia was held Monday morning, July 11, and the visiting Brethren were received formall~, with dignified and impressive ceremonies, by countries, Canada first, then the United States, then the distinguished delegation from Great Britain and Ireland. As a special mark of honor, the Distinguished Service Medal of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, previously conferred on less than twelve brethren, was conferred on each Grand Master present. This was an honor greatly appreciated by all the recipients. Following the Emergent Communication of the Grand Lodge, the delegations motored to St. Paul's Cemetery where Most 'Yorshipful Brother J. E. Perry, Grand Master of Massachusetts, assisted by his Grand Officers, dedicated the monument erected there by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts to the memory of Right Worshipful Brother Erasmus James Phillipps, initiated in Boston, Founder and Master of the first Masonic Lodge on Canadian soil at Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, first Provincial Grand Master of Nova Scotia. On Tuesday, July 12, the delegations were taken to Digbey, Nova Scotia (stopping enroute at several interesting points, including Grand Pre, of "Evangeline" fame) where reservations had been made for all at "The Pines"; and the celebration formally closed that night with a banquet for all the Brethren and their ladies, Wednesday, July 13, having been set apart for motor drives and recreation.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

15

There were present officially distinguished delegations, from Great Britain and Ireland, including General Sir Francis Davies, K. C. B., K. C. M. G., K. C. V. 0., V. L., Deputy Grand Master, The United Grand Lodge of England; The Reverend Thomas T. Blockley, M. A., Provincial Grand Master of Oxfordshire; Raymond F. Brooke, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Lodge of Ireland; Lt. Colonel Lord Farnham, D. S. 0., Provincial Grand Master of Meath; Brig. General Sir Norman A. Orr Ewing, Bart., D. S. 0., D. C., V. L., Grand Master Mason of Scotland; six Grand Masters from Canada, seventeen Grand Masters from the United States, as well as many Past Grand Masters, Grand Secretaries, Grand 'Vardens and other distinguished Brethren. The ladies of the delegations were lavishly entertained with banquets, teas, drives, etc. Altogether the regal entertainment provided for all left nothing undone that could add to our comfort and pleasure. This celebration was unique and outstanding. Most 'Vorshipful Brother N. T. Avard, Grand Master, and Most 'Vorshipful Brother R. V. Harris, Chairman of the Celebration Committee, who has labored assiduously for several years to make this occasion the great celebration that it was, deserve the hearty praise and hearty congratulations of all concerned. The days spent with the Brethren of Nova Scotia in the celebration of the Bicentenary of the Introduction of Freemasonry into Canada will remain a most happy memory. BIRTHDAY VISITATION

One of the most delightful experiences of my Grand Lodge year was a visit paid to Right Worshipful Brother J. R. McLachlan, at his home in Kahoka, Missouri, on the occasion of his eightieth birthday. Early Monday morning, January 3, 1938, accompanied by Right Worshipful Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, Right W orshipful Brother James A. Kinder, Grand Pursuivant, Most Worshipful Brother George 'V. 'Valker, and Most Worshipful Brother W. W. Martin, Past Grand Masters, I journeyed to Kahoka to pay my personal respects and the respects of this Grand Lodge to our dearly beloved Grand Lecturer Emeritus, Brother McLachlan. Brother McLachlan was completely surprised by this visit in spite of the fact that his household had prepared a most delectable dinner to which all of us gave ample justice. A delightful time was had with Brother McLachlan, and I count this one of the most pleasurable experiences of my year. This dear Brother became Grand Lecturer in 1906 in the horse and buggy era, and in spite of the fact that there were no hard roads and automobiles in those days, from the very first of his career as Grand Lecturer, he has done a most noteworthy work. It was a real joy to be with him on his eightieth birthday.


16

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

MEETINGS OF DISTRICT LECTURERS

It was my privilege to attend the meetings of the District Lecturers, under the direction of the Grand Lecturer, at St. Louis and Kans,as City. These meetings, in my opinion, are fraught with much good, not only as a medium for ritualistic instruction, but also as a m(lans for the development of helpful fellowship and counsel. DECISIONS

Question: Can a Lodge recall a life membership after having conferred same on a Brother' Decision : No, so long as the Brother remains in good standing. However, a Lodge can cease voting life memberships by proper legislation. Question: Can a Brother be elected Secretary of a Lodge who has not passed his proficiency examination in the third degree' Decision : No. Question: Does a subordinate Lodge require the permission of the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge to lower its fees' Decision: No. However, it cannot lower its fees below the minimum established by Grand Lodge Law. Question: Can the Master of a Lodge receive and entertain an objection to a petition after the petition has been referred to a Committee' Decision : No. Question: Can the petition of a man with a missing right arm be received' Decision: No. Unless by the aid of artificial appliances he could conform to our ceremonies. Question: A Brother was elected Secretary of a Lodge, and afterwards it was discovered that four or five Brethren voted who had 110t passed their proficiency examination in the third Degree. Is the election void' Decision: No. Unless the election was so close that the votes of these four or five Brethren who illegally voted were sufficient to turn the election one way or the other. If the votes of these four or five Brethren did not affect the election, either way, the election may stand. Question: Can a Lodge vote on a petition without requiring the payment of the ten dollars for the Masonic Home' Decision : No. Question: Is a Junior 'Varden, who moves over the line into another state, eligible for the office of Master' Decision: No. Precedent for this decision is the decision of this Grand Lodge in a case of similar import in the Proceedings of 1897, page 15, as noted on page 49 of the 1925 Edition of the Constitution and By-La,,路s.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

17

DISPENSATIO~S

A number of dispensations were granted during the year, as noted in the Grand Secretary's report. Several dispensations were refused, for reasons which were good and sufficient to the Grand Master. CORNERSTONES

On October 6, 1937, I laid the cornerstone of the New Post Office Building at Salem, Missouri. There was a large assembly of Brethren and citizens, and the ceremonies were very favorably received. On April 28, 1938, I laid the cornerstone of the New High School Gymnasium at La Belle, Missouri. There was a large number of Brethren and citizens present, and the ceremonies were well received. The Brethren of the Lodge, who assisted, were well prepared in their various offices, and it was a pleasure to be with them. On May 19, 1938, accompanied by Doctor Mather, the Grand Secretary, I journeyed to Kirksville, where I laid the cornerstone of the New Building on the Teachers' College Campus. The entire faculty and student body marched to the ceremony in caps and gowns, and there was a very large assemblage present. His Excellency, Governor Stark, delivered an address. On June 4, 1938, I laid the cornerstone of the New Building, designated "The \Vomen's Building" at the Masonic Home. I was assisted by the Grand Officers, and the ceremony was carried out with dignity and impressiveness. Preceding the laying of the cornerstone, a large and imposing parade marched from Tuscan Temple to the site, the Grand Lodge being escorted by the Knights Templar of St. Louis under the command of Right Eminent Sir Louis Heger. This occasion was one long to be remembered. On June 24, 1938, assisted by Most Worshipful Brothers Bigger and Skelly, and Doctor Mather, I laid the cornerstone of the new Admiral Coontz Memorial Armory in the City of Hannibal. This was indeed a memorable occasion, and a very large outpouring of the citizens of Hannibal and the surrounding territory gathered for the ceremony. His Excellency, Governor Stark, who delivered an address, and many of the State Officials, together with units of the State National Guard, were present. This was indeed an occasion of historic interest. INSTALLATIONS

I installed Officers in several Lodges as follows: Ferguson Lodge No. 542-Dec. 12, 1937. Itaska Lodge No. 420-Dec. 20, 1937. Webster Groves Lodge No. 84-Dec. 28, 1937. Harmony Lodge No. 499-Dec. 30, 1937. Wellston Lodge No. 613-Jan. 5, 1938. Meridi~n Lodge No.2-Jan. 6, 1938. Joplin Lodge No. 335-Jan. 13, 1938. Fellowship Lodge No. 345-Jan. 13, 1938.


18

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

TRIAL COMMISSIONS

At the request of the respective Lodges, I appointed two Trial Commissions as follows: To meet with Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, A. F. & A. M., at St. Joseph, December 4, 1937, Right Worshipful Brothers Henry C. Chiles, Chairman, \Villinm F. \Yoodruff, and Jolly P. Hurtt. To meet with DeSoto Lodge No. 119, A. F. & A. M., at DeSoto, on May 19, 1938, Right \Yorshipful Brother Karl M. Vetsburg, Chairman, Most \Vorshipful Brother James \V. Skelly, and Right \Vorshipful Brother Ralph V. \Vilson. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES

I have appointed Most Worshipful Brother Herbert S. Murdock, Past Grand Master of New Mexico, as Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri near the Grand Lodge of New Mexico, and have forwarded his Commission. I have also recommended \Vorshipful Brother Cecil A. Tolin, of St. Louis, as Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico, near the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Due to the vacancy caused by the death of Most V\T orshipful Brother Orville A. Andrews, I have appointed and commissioned \Vorshipful Brother Edward E. Carr, of North Platte, as Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, near the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. RELATIVE TO THE GRAND MASTER'S VISITATIONS

On visiting several Lodges this past year I was informed that no Grand Master had previously made them an official visit. One of these Lodges was fifty years old. Now I am fully aware of the fact that it is impossible to regulate visits of Grand Masters, as to times and places. Certainly, however, a condition should not obtain in this Grand Jurisdiction whereby a Lodge goes unvisited by a Grand Master for fifty years. With this in mind, therefore, I make the following recommendations: that Grand Masters see to it that an exact record of their visitations be included in their annual addresses to this Grand Lodge; and that District Deputy Grand Masters, within the first thirty days of each Grand Lodge year, notify the Grand Secretary's office of Lodges within their respective districts which have had no visit from a Grand Master for the ten years preceding. EUROPEAN RELIEF

A tragic situation has arisen in European Masonry. Many of our Brethren there have had their property confiscated, and, with their fnmiltes, have been ordered to leave their native land. Ostracized, persecuted, in dire distress, they have no financial resources on which to subsist, or by which to travel to friendly countries. Under these conditions a Masonic Relief Society has been formed in Europe, and appeal has been made for assistance.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

19

Surely, my Brethren, this is a condition which calls for our sympathetic helpfulness and practical demonstration of Masonic charity. We must not fail these persecuted Brethren in their dire need. Therefore, I recommend that this Grand Lodge donate $500.00 to the Relief of these European Brethren. PROPOSED LODGE OF RESEARCH

There will be submitted to this Grand Lodge at this session a resolution from the Masonic Research Council amending our By-Laws to permit the formation of a Lodge of Research. Such a Lodge, in my opinion, would be of great value to the cause of Masonry, and I recommend the adoption of this proposed resolution. CONCERNING A MASONIC JOURNAL

For a number of years I have been impressed with the fact that an imperative need of the Craft was some medium for the interchange of news and ideas. This has been forcihly impressed upon my mind this past year. During my term of office several outstanding meetings in various parts of the State have been held, but so far as the majority of the Brethren in the State are concerned said meetings were not even heard of. Especially during the campaign for funds for the Masonic Home have I seen the necessity of some way to disseminate to all the Brethren, not spasmodically but regularly, information which the Brethren should have and which information would go far to arouse personal interest in our Home. For instance, I have wished time and again that there might be some way whereby the Brethren generally, in all parts of the State, might come to know the many human interest stories revolving around actual experiences in the daily life of our Home. But there has been no such medium, and consequently I venture the assertion that 50 per cent of the Masons of our State know nothing concerning the Masonic Home of Missouri, save that such an institution exists. Such a medium should be largely and primarily a journal for the dissemination of news and ideas. True, its scope should encompass all sorts of articles of interest to the Craft, historical, philosophical, ethical, biographical, etc., but in my thinking the primary object of such a journal should be kept to the fore. Lawyers, Ministers, Physicians, Business Men, Clubs, Fraternities, Vvomen's Societies, all have their journals of various kinds. But here we have an organization of over ninety thousand men without any regular channel for the interchange of news and deas. I am not without experience which leads me to understand the great difficulties which must be surmounted in the inauguration and proper regulation and functioning of such a journal. However, I believe that there is sufficient intelligence and interest among the Craft in this State to meet these difficulties. At least I think the matter should


20

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

be given adequate consideration. Therefore, I recommend that the incoming Grand Master refer this mattei' to the Committee on Masonic Publications, adding thereto such additional members as he ma:r deem wise; and that said Committee canvass the whole situation relative to such a journal, and report at the next session of this Grand Lodge. GRAND MASTER'S CONFERENCE

On February 21 and 23, 1938, I attended the Grand Masters' Conference in Washington, accompanied by Right Worshipful Brother Henry C. Chiles, Deputy Grand Master; Right Worshipful Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary; and Most \Vorshipful Brother Anthony F. Ittner, Grand Lecturer. It was my privilege to prepare and read before this Conference a paper on "The Social Security Act in Relation to Masonic Lodges and Masonic Homes." These conferences accomplish much good. They enable Grand Masters to become acquainted with Masonic leaders all over the country, and afford a medium for the interchange of ideas and counsel. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

On February 22, 1938, I attended the meeting of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association at Alexandria, Virginia, accompanied by Right \Vorshipful Brother Henry C. Chiles, Deputy Grand Master; Doctor Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary; Most Worshipful Brother Anthony F. Ittner, Grand Lecturer; and Most \Vorshipful Brother Bert S. Lee, a Vice-President of the Association. It was my privilege, on behalf of this Grand Lodge, to present a check for a modest sum, $250.00. This beautiful Memorial is a monument to George Washington, the Mason, and a permanent reminder of the underlying unity of Masonry all over this country. Much labor nmst yet be expended on the Memorial before it is complete, and American Masons must bend every effort to bring to fruition this laudable undertaking. The Association this past year suffered a great loss in the passing of Most Worshipful Brother Louis A. Watres, of Pennsylvania, President of the Association, who for years worked unceasingly in its behalf. Most Worshipful Brother Elmer R. Arn of Ohio, was elected President of the Association. Permit me to remind the Brethren that by action of this Grand Lodge, $1.00 for this Memorial is mandatory with each petition for the Degrees. This fact must not be overlooked. THE MASONIC HOME

The Masonic Home of Missouri is an institution of which every Mason in this Grand Jurisdiction should be justly proud. Such a Home is not merely a by-product of Freemasonry; it is, rather, a crystallization, in mortar and brick, of the teachings of our路 Order.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

21

Given the philosophy on which Freemasonry is posited, and the ethic which dominates it, such an Institution would necessarily follow. Last year, during Doctor Walker's term as Grand Master, as all the members of the Craft are aware, a campaign was undertaken to the end that a new building program at the Home might be inaugurated. This campaign was continued during my term as Grand Master, and all over this State I have spoken in behalf of The Home, and letters have been sent out from the Grand Master stressing this important work. The response of the Brethren has been most gratifying. Sufficient funds have been received which, added to the monies already on hand, enabled the Home Board to proceed with the erection of the beautiful new building, designated "The Women's Building." It was my pleasure to lay the cornerstone of this new building, with appropriate ceremooies, on June 4, 1938, following a large and imposing parade. And right now I desire to express publicly my thanks to Right Worshipful Brothers Wilson and Dewhirst, District Deputies of the Thirty-third District, and Right Worshipful Brother Rinkel, District Deputy of the Fifty-seventh District, and Right Worshipful Brothers Winkelmaier and 'Valsh, Acting Grand Marshals, whose faithful and assiduous labors made the parade the great success that it was. I also desire to thank Eminent Sir Louis Heger and the Commanderies of St. Louis for the large and impressive escort of Knights Templar. I am pleased to add that this new building will be dedicated this afternoon. ST. LOUIS :MASONIC EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

Representation having been made to me of difficulties arising in the St. Louis Masonic Employment Bureau, I asked Right Worshipful Brothers Wilson and Dewhirst, District Deputy Grand Masters of the Thirty-third Masonic District, to make a thorough investigation of the affairs of the Bureau. These Brethren have done so in a most painstaking and efficient manner. Necessarily such an investigation consumed a great deal of time; and as the report reached me late in the Grand Lodge year, I am passing it on to my successor for his consideration. OUR GRAND SECRETARY

This Grand Lodge is to be congratulated on having such a Grand Secretary as Doctor Arthur Mather. For years prior to his acceptance of this office, he went all over this State as Grand Chaplain, performing Masonic duties of various kinds, and working assiduously for the welfare of the Craft. For eleven years now he has been our Grand Secretary, and the faithful, economical and efficient way in which he has conducted the affairs of his office has resulted in a system of great merit.


22

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

It would not be difficult to secure an efficient office Secretary; it would be an easy matter to find a man of sterling Masonic character to fill this position; and it would be merely a matter of choice to secure one who would represent the Grand Lodge among other Grand Jurisdictions with dignity and ability. But to find a man in whom all three of these attributes were equally marked would be difficult indeed. Such a man is Doctor Mather, and I desire to express my appreciation of him thus publicly. I am grateful for his sympathetic helpfulness and his spirit of brothery co-operation. CONCLUSION

I would be less than human, my Brethren, if I did not deeply appreciate the high honor you have conferred upon me by electing me your Grand Master; and I thank you for it. It has been a keen joy to me to meet Brethren all over this State who, with sacrificial efforts, are keeping alive the practices of our Fraternity and are manifesting to the profane world the tenets of our Institution. \Vherever I have gone in this Grand J urisdietion I have been accorded the utmost courtesy and hospitality; and the pleasant experiences of this year will abide with me as a happy memory. The spirit of brotherly co-operation has been evident in all the Districts it has been my privilege to visit, and my contacts with the faithful Brethren have been most heartening. I ,vish to express my thanks to the Grand Officers, the District Deputy Grand Masters, the District Lecturers, and the Brethren everywhere who have so ably assisted with the work. Especially do I wish to mention by name Most 'Vorshipful Brother Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman of the Jurisprudence Committee, for his willing and efficient service. The most imperative need today is the strengthening of man's morale. This strengthening can come only through the principles of religion, which, broadly speaking, lie at the foundation of all worthwhile illlititutions. The greatest medium for the dissemination of these principles is the art of friendship. Therefore, may I close this address with the words of Sam 'Valter Foss, which, I believe, express the aspiration of all true Masons: , 'Let me live in a house by the side of the road, Where the race of men go byThe men who are good and the men who are bad, As good and as bad as 1. I would not sit in the scorner's seat, Or hurl the cynic's banLet me live in a house by the side of the road, And be a friend to man. ' ,


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

23

R. W. BROTHER HENRY C. CHILES: Brethren, you have heard the Grand Master's address. Under the provisions of the Grand Lodge by-laws, it is required that the annual address be referred to the proper committee composed of all Past Grand Masters present, of which M. W. Brother Geo. W. Walker is chairman. The address will be so referred. REPORT OF THE GRAND SECRETARY

R. W. Brothel;' Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, presented his report covering official action in the office of the Grand Secretary for the period Septemter 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938, which was received and ordered printed in the Proceedings. DUPLICATE CHARTERS A Duplicate Charter was issued to the following Lodge: Eminence Lodge No. 607, Charter destroyed by fire; duplicate issued June 1, 1938. PROCEEDINGS DISTRIBUTED The 1937 Proceedings were printed and distributed as soon as possible after the Grand Lodge Session. COMMISSIONS TO D. D. G. M'S By order of M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader, Grand Master, commissions were issued to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters by him appointed in the fifty-nine Masonic Districts; the Thirty-third District having two District Deputy Grand Masters. CHANGES IN D. D. G. M'S R. \V. Brother 'Villiam Ulery, Jr., of the 29th District, being unable to serve, ,V. Brother William C. Martin, was appointed instead. R. 'tV. Brother William C. Deacon, of the 34th District, being unable to serve, 'V. Brother Ernest W. Miller, was appointed instead. R. W. Brother J. Scott 'Valker, of the 44th District, being unable to serve, \Y. Brother George Dillard, was appointed instead. R. W. Brother Buell P. Parks, of the 51st District, being unable to ser:ve, W. Brother Thomas R. 'Yilkins, was appointed instead. R. W. Brother Andrew B. Stanley, of the 58th District, being unable to serve, ,V. Brother George Catron, was appointed instead. REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS Blanks for these reports were sent to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters, and their reports have been turned over to the Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters. COMMISSIONS TO GRAND REPRESENTATIVES M. W. Grand Master Reader appointed the following as Grand Representatives of Missouri near their respective Grand Lodges: New Mexico-Cecil A. Tolin, St. Louis.


24

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

M. ,V. Grand Master Reader also appointed the following as Grand Representatives of their respective Grand Lodges. near the Grand Lodge of Missouri: Nebraska-Edward E. Carr, North Platte. New Mexico--Hcrbert S. Murdock, Springer. BLANKS FOR ANNUAL RETURNS

Two copies were mailed June 15, 1938, with accompanying circular, giving full directions to Secretaries. STATISTICAL

Number of Chartered Lodges as of Sept. 15, 1937. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minus 1 Lodge consolidated (Clever No. 645, with Billings No. 379) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

632

Number of Chartered Lodges as of Sept. 15, 1938................

631

1

MEMBERSHIP RETl;RNS

1937 Membership on 623 Reporting Lodges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To which is added: Initiations 2,084 Passings 2,080

Total Raisings Affiliations Reinstatements

4,164 ,. . .

Gross Total as of Sept. 15, 1938 From which is deducted: Dimissions Deaths Sus. N. P. D Sus. U. M. C Expelled

. . . . .

89,969

2,092 642 1,149

3,883

.

93,852

761 1,490 2,661 4 7

4,923

Net Membership as of Sept. 15, 1938 on 623 Lodges Net Membership on 623 Reporting J.Jodges as of Sept. 15, 1938 . Plus Last Membership Record on 8 Lodges Unreported as of Sept. 15, 1938, as follows: Ashland No. 156 43-(1937) Dayton No. 386 21-(1935) Forest City No. 214 76-(1937) Galena No. 515 57-(1937) Jonathan No. 321 33-(1937) Kingston No. 118 78-(1936) Mt. Ararat No. 382 33-(1937) Pleasant Grove No. 142 59-(1937)

88,929

Actual Net Membership as of Sept. 15, 1938 Net Membership as of Sept. 15, 1937............ Plus Bayou No. 365 adjustment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

89,329

. 90,409 22 90,431

88,929

400


1938

25

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Plus Changes account audit of records of 25 lodges

38 90,469

Minus Memberships of 2 Lodges consolidated and 1 Lodge surrender of Charter as follows: Charter Surrender Wallace Park No. 627. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Consolidated Verona No. 452..................... 29 Clever No. 645...................... 28 Actual Base Figure filled out on 1938 Return Blanks sent out June 15, 1938 Minus Changes made in base figures by Secretaries without authorization :.................

83 90,386

Actual Net Membership for 1937, with all changes made during the year taken into consideration ... Minus Actual Net Membership on 631 Lodges as of September 15, 1938 . Net Loss Per Capita on 88,929 M. M. 's, from 623 Reporting Lodges of September 15, 1938 Arrears for Preceding years

17 90,369

. as . .

Overpaid 1937 Dues Remitted Balances Due 1938 Per Capita

.

Credits Total Per Capita Received to Sept. 15, 1938

. .

89,329 1,040 $186,750.90 2,466.33 189,217.23 138.10 189,079.13 9,427.95 179,651.18 9,188.15 170,463.03 3.40 $170,466.43

LODGES CONSOLIDATED

Clever Lodge No. 645 consolidated with Billings Lodge No. 379, on February 10, 1938, Clever Lodge losing its identity. COURTESIES RECEIVED AND GRANTED

By direction of M. W. Grand Master Reader, 49 requests have beell made to Sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer Degrees for Missouri Lodges, and 18 requests have been received to confer Degrees for Sister Grand Jurisdictions. TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS

Circular letters were mailed out as usual to all Lodges with the information concerning the list of leading hotels and locations and rates. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS

. Dedications C. Earl Armstrong, New Hall for Bayou Lodge No. 365, November 13, 1937, for Masonic purposes.


26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Walter E. Singley, New Hall of Somerset Lodge No. 206, November 15, 1937, for Masonic purposes. Thomas D. Williams, New Hall of Jameson Lodge No. 500, November 29,1937. H. H. Balsiger, New Hall of Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, January 21, 1938. Julius R. Edwards, New Hall of Hallsville Lodge No. 326, January 28,1938. Arthur G. Lynch, New Hall of Salisbury Lodge No. 208, March 15, 1938. Clyde C. Miles, New Hall of Birming Lodge No. 150, May 2, 1938. Thomas D. Williams, New Hall of Earl Lodge No. 285, May 4, 1938. Clyde C. Miles, New Hall of Birming Lodge No. 150, May 6, 1938. George A. Sample, New Hall of Chaffee Lodge No. 615, August 4, 1938.

Election of Officers Moscow Lodge No. 558, December 11, 1937. Livingston Lodge No. 51, January 6, 1937. Rich Hill Lodge No. 479, December 27, 1937. Moscow Lodge No. 558, January 8,1938. Cowgill Lodge No. 561, January 14, 1938. Phoenix Lodge No. 136, January 18, 1938. Queen City Lodge No. 380, January 25, 1938. Installation

Portland Lodge No. 242, February 4, 1938. Hallsville Lodge No. 336, February 4, 1938. Composite Lodge No. 369, January 25, 1938. Madison Lodge No. 91, February 8, 1938. Laddonia Lodge No. 115, FebI'uary 10, 1938. Middle Grove Lodge No. 42, May 7, 1938.

of Officers

Bert S. Lee, to install Lewis M. Hale, as Grand Chaplain, at Springfield, Missouri, at Specific Grand Lodge convened October 18, 1937. Ben Franklin Lodge No. 642, Commandery Hall, New Masonic Temple, December 30, 1937. Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520, Chapter Hall, New Masonic Temple, January 15, 1938. Magnolia. Lodge No. 626, Alhambra Grotto, January 8, 1938, for public installation. Beacon Lodge No.3, Commandery Hall, New Masonic Temple, January 10, 1938, for public installation. Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, public installation in New Hall, January 21, 1938. Meet in Other Halls Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, to meet in Alhambra Grotto for Special Communication, October 29, 1937. Rushville Lodge No. 238, to meet in 1. O. O. F. Hall for Special Communication, April 27, 1938. Eminence Lodge No. 607, to meet in Hall of Winona Lodge, until further notice. Sullivan Lodge No. 69, to meet in 1. O. O. F. Hall, until further notice.

Laying Cornerstones George W. Walker, Charleston, September 30, 1937. Bert S. Lee, New Addition to High School, Willard, October 6, 1937. Karl M. Vetsburg, New Post Office, La Plata, November 4, 1937.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

27

James W. Skelly, New Post Office, Paris, November 6, 1937. J. Clyde Akers, Three Rivers Baptist Church, December 1, 1937. Elwyn S. Woods, Salvation Army Home, January 22, 1938.

Reballots on Petitions Crane Lodge No. 519, Petition of Jesse Wyatt Brown, January 10, 1937. Bloomfield Lodge' No. 153, Petition of Samuel Kent Scism, February 16, 1938. Lowry City Lodge No. 403, Petition of Harry Lester Murray, March 4, 1938. St. John's Lodge No. 28, Petition of James Dale Waller, May 11, 1938. RECOGNITION OF VETERAN MASONS

Fifty-Year Buttons

The following Brethren, whose names have been certified by their respective Lodges and confirmed by the records of the Grand Lodge as eligible, have received buttons in recognition of their long years of Masonic standing as follows: No. mid Lodge 5 United 534 Columbia 208 Salisbury 303 Osage 311 127 550 323 299

381 470 189 40 205 529 331

219 558 287 480 522 144 364 316 220

Name of Brother Number of Years George W. Custer.............. 50 Arnold Schindler............... 50 Lazar Loeb , 50 ,Andrew J. King............... 51 Oliver H. Hoss. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 Kearney .. _ John N. Shouse................ 50 Athens Thomas L. Hardy............ .. 50 Rose Hill Alfred J. Moorshead........... 50 Cornerstone Wm. A. Murphy............... 50 Temple Alfred Hart................... 50 Morris Loewen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 54 Herman E. Pearse. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 55 Elmer E. Pease................ 52 Wm. H. J ennens. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 Ionia W. A. Houston................. 50 Nodaway John P. Price.................. 50 Zeredatha Romulus E. Culver.............. 50 Mt. Moriah Henry J. Behrens.............. 50 Trilumina Matt W. Hall '" 50 Apollo Herb Wm. Powers............. 50 Charity John Abus.................... 50 Albert J. Brunswig, Jr.. . . . . . . .. 52 W m. L. Buechle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Frederick F. Schrader.......... 55 Wm. F. Hartough............. 50 Albert Pike Arnold Shanklin............... 50 Moscow ............•..J ames H. Anderson. . . . . . . . . . • . . 50 Craft Henderson D. Alberty. . . . . . . . . . . 50 Jewel. George Gosch.................. 50 Gate City A. L. Johnston. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 Modern Benton Heaton................ 50 Higginsville Lyman T. Land. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 Rural Henry A. Kelley............... 50 Kansas City Emanuel J. Shughart... . . . . . . .. 50


28

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

192 Frankford 7 0 'Sullivan

0

••••

222 LaBelle 526 Wayne 559 Clarksdale

0

0

•••

•••••••

0

,John Richardson............... John A. Brim................. Andrew McMehen.............. J ohn D. Brooking.. . . . . . . . . . . . . George W. McRae.............. Charles Carter................. Tom Thornton................. John Mann , James W. Baker, Sr Wm. L. Carroll .r ames O. Hess , Geo. A. Dempster.............. Henry T. Matkins Horace Howard.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Edwin Harrison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ,Chas. H. Kirkland. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Edward G. Newman. . . . . . . . . . .. John A. Rich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Com. P. Storts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Philo Lesieur.................. Sam Pikey.................... Millard W. Sitton..... . . . . . . . . . John Roach................... Wm. H. Elder................. John Ferguson Albert S. Duckworth........... ,Alexander Ruth.:.............. ,L. R. Hewitt Wm. B. Kellar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Thomas F. McKee. Louis H. Proske .. W. P. French................. Cllas. S. Ross... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Van F. Boor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Schreiner................ oJackson 1. Fowler. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Wm. C. Parker Lucius A. Richards Frederick Deibel.. Chas. W. Meyer Ludwig Rausch................ Franklin W. Wood. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Edward Bray............ . . . . .. W. W. White........ . . . . . . . . .. Robert R. Kreeger.............

••••

310 Sikeston

0

••••••

0

41 Bismarck 87 Washington

0

244 Middle Fabius 323 Cornerstone 63 Cambridge 176 Pt. Pleasant 558 Moscow 376 King Hill. 410 93 518 534 247 483 578 420 316

Iberia St. Mark's OrientaL Columbia Neosho Fairfax Forest Park Itaska Rural

5 366 188 429 445 558 443 131 230 66 299

United Adair Hannibal New Madrid West Gate Moscow Anchor Potosi. St. James Grant City Temple

••••

•••••

••••

0

0

••

0

••

0

0

••

0

0

0

•••

•••••

53 50 50 52 51 50 50 50 54 54 54 53 60 53 50 50 50 53 50 58 50 53 50 50 62 50 50 50 50 51 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

WELFARE COMMITTEE: (Delinquent 1932 and 1933 Per Capita Tax). RECEIPTS: From September 16, 1933 to September 15, 1937.............. $ 27,008.82 From September 16, 1937 to September 15, 1938.............. 1,784.95 $ 28,793.77 Amount paid out of General Fund in 1936 in accordance with Resolution (see Grand Lodge Pro. 1935, pages 95-97) .

3,005.18


1938

29

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Amount paid out of General Fund in 1937 in aceordanee with Resolution (see Grand Lodge Pro. 1936, page 119) . Amount paid out of General Fund in 1938 in accordanee with Resolution (see Grand Lodge Pro. 1937, page 83, Section II) .

236.00 2,965.05

6,206.23 $ 35,000.00

DISBURSEMENTS: From September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1937 ..... From September 16,1937, to September 15, 1938 .....

$ 30,250.00 4,750.00 $ 35,000.00

Check No. 34, November 8, 1937, Masonie Home, aeeount Welfare Committee. . . . . . .. Check No. 62, January 10, 1938, Masonie Home, aceount Welfare Committee.. . . . . . . Cheek No. 79, February 4, 1938, Masonie Home, account Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . Check No. 92, March 10, 1938, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee.. . . . . . . Check No. 103, April 4, 1938, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee.. . . . . . . Check No. 115, May 2, 1938, Masonie Home, aecount Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 128, June 4, 1938, Masonic Home, aecount Welfare Committee.............. Cheek No. 157, August 6, 1938, Masonie Home account Welfare Committee.............. Check No. 175, September 8, 1938, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee........

$

1,000.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 250.00

$

4,750.00

Total amount paid to Masonic Home, from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1938, on account Welfare Committee .

1934 Per Capita BALANCE due Ma~lOnic Home, this account, to September 15, 1937. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RECEIPTS: From September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 .

$ 35,000.00

$

.00 277.00

277.00

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID Masonic Home, September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 (Check . No. 173, of September 7, 1938)

238.00

BALANCE DUE Masonie Home on 1934 Per Capita, to September 15, 1938 .

1995 Per Capita BALANCE due Masonic Home, this aeeount, to September 15, 1937. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

$

$

125.00

39.00


30

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

RECEIPTS: From September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938, $1,282.49 (Masonic Home Pro Rata Thereof).....................

916.063/7 1,041.063/7

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID Masonic Home, September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 .

1,008.063/7

BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1935 Per Capita, to September 15, 1938 .

1936 Per Capita BALANCE due Masonic Home, this account to September 15, 1937. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. RECEIPTS: From September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938, $808.50 (Masonic Home Pro Rata Thereof) .

$

$

72.89 650.39

577.50

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID Masonic Home, September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 ...

645.24

BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1936 Per Capita, to September 15, 1938 .

1937 Per Capita BALANCE DUE Masonic Home, this account, to September 15, 1937..................... $ RECEIPTS: From September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938, $4,374.58 (Masonic Home Pro Rata Thereof). . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .

33.00

$

5.15

1,069.79 4,194.49

3,124.70

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID Masonic Home on 1937 Per Capita, to September- 15, 1938 .

4,164.49

BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1937 Per Capita, to September 15, 1938 .

$

1938 Per Capita RECEIPTS: From July 1, 1938, to September 15, 1938, $170,466.43 (Masonic Home Pro Rata Thereof) .

$121,761.73

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID Masonic Home, July 1, 1938, to September 15, 1938 .

121,503.73

BALANCE DUE Masonic Home on 1938 Per Capita, to September 15, 1938 .

$

30.00

258.00

SPECIAL INITIATION FUND

Total amount received from October 15, 1920, to September 15, 1937. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. *Total amount received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$507,410.00 12,700.00 $520,110.00

* For amounts paid by individual lodges see Grand Secretary'8 Tabular Statement, 1938 Proceedings.


1938

31

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Total amount paid to Masonic Home on this account from October 15, 1920, to September 15, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. LESS: Bank Service Charges

$519,790.00 $

320.00 19.23

$

300.77

$

190.98

.

BALANCE DUE Masonic Rome to September 15, 1938. . . . . . .. GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Cash Balance, September 16, 1937. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. *Total amount received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LESS: Check No. 28 of February 21, 1938, issued to J. Claude Keiper, Treasurer, George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250.00 16.74 LESS: Bank Service Charges................... BALANCE IN BANK, September 15, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total amount paid to J. Claude Keiper, Treasurer of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Inc. to September 15, 1938........

1,462.00 $

1,652.98

$

266.74

$

1,386.24

$157,267.01

THE DR. WIl.LIAM F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Inaugurated by Donation of $500.00 by Brother Marcus A.. Loevy, at Grand Lodge Sesmon, October 17, 1922. This fund since exchange of bond was made July 18, 1928, consists of: One $500.00 United States Treasury 3% per cent bond held in Grand Lodge safe deposit box, Kansas City, $ 500.00 Mo. CASH, in savings account, First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo...................................... $ 275.97 $ Total Library Fund reported September 15,1937 Interest on Bond ...................... Interest on Savings Account as follows: December, 1937 ............. $1.90 June, 1938 ................. 1.98

775.97

$755.21 $16.88 3.88

20.76

TOTAL FUND, September 15, 1938

775.97 $

775.97

THE JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBR.ARY FUND

Inaugurated by bequest made by the late Joseph S. McIntyre, Past Grand Master, according to the 14th Clause of his Will, dated September 15, 1926:

AMOUNT on deposit in First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo. May 6, 1937 :. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

1,000.00

TOTAL FUND, September 15, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$

1,000.OQ


32

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE . GRAND LODGE FINANCES

CASH in Grand Lodge Depositories, September 15, 1937. . .. Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo. (restricted).. . . . . . . . . . $ 4,300.94 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64,782.58 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 5,000.00 'rotal 1932-1933 Per Capita Tax received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938, from Lodges delinquent in payments (for Welfare Committee) . Total 1934 Per Capita Tax received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 (for Masonic Home) . Total 1935 Per Capita Tax received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 .. Total 1936 Per Capita Tax received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 .. Total 1937 Per Capita Tax received from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 Total 1938 Per Capita Tax received to September 15, 1938 .

$ 74,083.52

74,083.52

1,784.95 277.00 1,282.49 808.50 4,374.58 170,466.43

176,932.00 834.91

Sale of Dues Receipt Cards Sale of Pocket Edition Manuals Sale of Library Edition Manuals

. . .

641.25 4.00

645.25

Sale of 1925 Constitution and By-Laws Sale of 1921 Constitution and By-Laws

. .

51.00 7.00

58.00

Sale of 50-year Veteran Emblem Buttons ..... Refund, Hamilton Lodge No. 224, to replace Checks returned . Refund, Lucerne Lodge 394, Defunct, Cash Balance . Refund, Dues "Defunct" Lodges . Refund, Gower Lodge 497, Fine . Refund, Case, Thomas & Marsh, (3) Fire Insurance . Refund, Union National Bank, 1937 Mileage & Per Diem Account . 10% Dividend of $4,778.82, Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. (restricted) (Second Dividend Check) ..... Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due September 15, 1937 . Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due October 15, 1937 . Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due December 15, 1937 . Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due March 15, 1938 .

120.00 192.15 36.52 16.00 10.00

254.67 48.03 577.90 477.88

128.11 563.75 575.62 128.14


1938

33

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due April 15 1938 . Interest on U. S. Government Bonds due June 15, 1938 .

563.75 2,535.00

575.63

Transfer to Columbia Savings Bank, Columbia, Mo., from Union Nat!. Bank, K. C. Mo..... Transfer to First National Bank, Cape Girarreau, Mo., from Union Nat!. Bank, K. C. Mo.

2.500.00 2,500.00 $263,629;11

TOTAL RECEIPTS to September 15, 1938 .. ANAL YSIS OF DISBURSEMEN'l'S

Total Disbursements to Sept. 15, 1938

.

$186,712.57

Pay Roll, 1937 . Proceeding~ 1937 Salaries and allowances, Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Lecturer, Grand Lodge Office Account. . Grand Lecturer Emeritus . Grand Correspondent . Maintenance, Grand Lodge Offices . Masonic Relief Association, United States and Canada . Past Grand Master'8 J ewe!. . Expenses, Grand Lodge Session, 1937 . Reporter, Grand Lodge Session, 1937 . Telephone, Jefferson 4877 . Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer Contingent Fund, Funerals, etc . Perkins Audit Company . Expenses, Grand Lodge Officers, order Grand Master . Printing, Postage, Stationery and Incidentals District Lecturers' Conferences . Expenses, George Washington Memorial _and Grand Masters' Conference .

$ 20,000.00

Total Budget appropriation for 1937-38 (exclusive of pay roll) Actual disbursements . Unexpended Balance Masonic . Capita Masonic Capita Masonic Capita Masonic Capita Masonic Capita

.

$

1,386.42 16,123.53 1,500.00 500.00 1,800.00 456.67 175.00 500.00 75.00 155.77 300.00 652.02 150.00 132.84 2,492.50 600.00 300.00

27,299.75

$29,041.67 27,299.75 $ 1,741.92

Home: Paid on Account 1934 Per Tax............................. Home: Paid on Account 1935 Per Tax................... . . . . . . . . . . Home: Paid on Account 1936 Per Tax..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home: Paid on Account 1937 Per Tax.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home: Paid on Account 1938 Per Tax........................ .....

238.00 1,008.063/7 645.245/7 4,164.49 121,503.73

127,559.53


34

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Masonic Home: Paid on Account Welfare Committee . Dues Receipt Cards . Social Security: Federal Old Age Pension: Federal Unemployment and Missouri Unemployment Compensation Fund . Transfer of $2,500.00 from Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo., to Columbia Savings Bank, Columbia, Mo . Transfer of $2,500.00 from Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo., to First Nat!. Bank, Cape Girardeau, Mo . Transfer of $477.88 from Fidelity Savings & Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo., to Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo .

4,750.00 942.70 682.71 2,500.00 2,500.00 477.88

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS to September 15, 1938 .

$186,712.57

RECAPITULATION

$263,629.11 186,712.57

Total Receipts to September 15, 1938 . Total Disbursements to September 15, 1938 .. CASH BALANCE, September 15, 1938, General Fund . Cash Balance, September 15, 1938, Fidelity Savings Trust Co., Kansas City, Mo. (restricted) $ 3,823.06 Cash Balance, September 15, 1938, Union 63,093.48 National Bank, Kansas City, Mo . Cash Balance, September 15, 1938, Wood & 5,000.00 Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo . Cash Balance, September 15, 1938, Columbia 2,500.00 Savings Bank, Columbia, Mo . Cash Balance, September 15, 1938, First 2,500.00 National Bank, Cape Girardeau, Mo. . .....

Less: Balances due Masonic Home, account 19341935-1936-1937 and 1938 Per Capita ..... Less: $3,823.06 "Restricted" Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo .

76,916.54

76,916.54

365.15 3,823.06

4,188.21

September 15, 1938, Total Amount Available Cash in General Fund..........................................

$ 72,728.33

Fraternally submitted,

Grand Secretary.


1938

35

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

REPORT OF THE GRAND TREASURER

R. W. Brother E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, presented his report covering the period from September 15, 1937, to September 15, 1938, which was received as follows, together. with report of Auditor, and both ordered printed in the Proceedings: 1937 Sept.15 Balance cash on hand in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo. erestricted) . " 15 Balance cash on hand in Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo . " 15 Balance cash on hand in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo . Receipt No. Oct. 1 1090 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 1 1091" " " " " 1 1092 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, Bond Interest . " 16 1093 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 25 1094 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y, Bond Interest . Nov. 3 1095" " " " " " " " 16 1096" Dec. 1 1097" " " " " " " " 16 1098" " 23 1099 Arthur Mather Grand Sec 'y, Bond Interest . " 23 1100 Arthur Mather, Grand See'y, Dividend No.2, Fid. Sav. Tr. Co..... 1938 Jan. 3 1101 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 17 1102" " " " Feb. 1 1103" " " " " 10 1104 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, Transferred from M. & Per D. account " 17 .1105 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary Mar. 1 1106" " " " " " " " 17 1107" " 19 1108 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y, Bond Interest . Apr. 1 1109 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 16 1110" " " " " 20 1111 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y, Bond Interest . May 2 1112 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 16 1113" " " " June 1 1114" " " " " " " " 17 1115" " 17 1116 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y, Bond Interest . " 29 1117 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary

4,300.94 5,000.00 64,782.58

32.64 793.45 128.11 475.87 563.75 542.51 157.50 115.03 54.25 575.62 477.88 427.28 190.75 764.55 577.90 422.50 95.85 462.29 128.14 58.25 598.00 563.75 360.60 122.60 456.52 361.00 575.63 25.30

74,083.52


36

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

July 6 1118 " " " " " 6 1119 " " " " May 13 Columbia Savings Bank, Columbia, . Mo. New account July 7 1120 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary " 7 1121 " " " " " 8 1122 " " " " " 8 1123 " " " " " 9 1124 " " " " " 9 1125 " " " " " 11 1126 " " " " " 11 1127 " " " " " 12 1128 " " " " " 12 1129 " " " " " 13 1130 " " " " " 13 1131 " " " " " 15 1132 " " " " " 15 1133 " " " " " 15 1134 " " " " " 15 1135 " " " " " 16 1136 " " " " " 16 1137 " " " " " 18 1138 " " " " " 18 1139 " " " " " 19 1140 " " " " " 19 1141 " " " " " 20 1142 " " " " " 20 1143 " " " " " 21 1144 " " " " " 21 1145 " " " " " 22 1146 " " " " " 22 1147 " " " " " 23 1148 " " " " " 23 1149 " " " " " 25 1150 " " " " " 25 1151 " " " " " 26 1152 " " " " " 26 1153 " " " " " 27 1154 " " " " " 27 1155 " " " " " 28 1156 " " " " " 28 1157 " " " " " 29 1158 " " " " " 29 1159 " " " " " 30 1160 " " " " " 30 1161 " " " " Aug. 1 1162 " " " " " 1 1163 " " " " " 3 1164 " " " " " 3 1165 " " " " " 3 1166 " " " " " 3 1167 " " " " " 4 1168 " " " " " 4 1169 " " " " . " " 5 1170 " " " " 5 1171 " " " "

89.63 17,624.80 2,500.00 31.23 6,991.50 10.33 2,507.40 27.66 6,415.20 20.35 4,727.25 5,346.00 18.46 16.11 3,735.90 21.86 5,102.40 28.12 6,645.35 36.65 5,836.90 6.67 1,362.90 4,405.90 19.63 25.93 5,205.80 32.49 8,137.25 17.07 3,262.60 22.58 4,814.20 28.98 8,158.60 21.37 5,082.00 15.07 4,357.40 21.74 4,732.00 32.11 6,758.40 44.34 9,781.08 44.61 7,323.20 63.71 11,544.40 22.27 4,378.29 20.71 4,135.15 19.45 3,319.05


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

6 1172 " " " 6 1173 " " " " First National Bank, Cape Gh'ar3 deau, Missouri, New account .... " 9 1174 Arthur Math~r, Grand Secretary 1175 " " " 119 1176 " " " 11 1177 " " " " " " " 17 1178 " " " " 17 1179 " " " " " " 27 1180 " " " " 27 1181 " " " " " " " " Sept. 1 1182 " " " " 1 1183 " " 2 1184 " " " " " " " 2 1185. " " " 14 1186 " " " " " " " " " " " " 14 1187 "

"

" " "

37

9.48 1,351.03 2,500.00 9.83 1,962.20 11.91 2,373.05 45.80 2,360.12 10.81 1,355.44 13.86 917.70 .88 1,045.80 24.51 495.60

189,545.59 $263,629.11

Total

DISBURSEMENTS

Check 1937 No. Sept. 20 1 Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, mileage and per diem $20,000.00 2 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y, ex" 29 pense Grand Lodge sessions ..... 500.00 3 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, print" 29 100.00 ing, postage and stationery .... 4 Ma80nic Temple Assn., maintenance 150.00 " 30 5 Arthur Mather, salary . 424.00 " 30 . 6 Anthony F. Ittner, salary 350.00 " 30 7 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 125.00 " 30 . 8 F. Berger, salary 150.00 " 30 . 9 R. L. Bohle, salary 100.00 " 30 " 30 10 Harold L. Reader, account Grand 500.00 Ma8ter's expense . " 30 11 Anthony F. Ittner, expense, Grand Lecturer . 39.70 Oct. 4 12 Ma80nic Home of Missouri, delinquent per capita tax . 1,267.68 Relief Asso., U. S. and " 4 13 Masonic Canada, year ending Sept. '38 .. 456.67" " 4 14 Van Dyke & Co., Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer . 300.00 . Aug. D. Niederluecke, reporter 75.00 " 44 15 . 150.00 " 4 16 Perkins Audit Co., audit 175.00 " 6 17 Herman Mauch, Jewel P. G. Master 18 Marsh & McLennan, fire insurance 58.50 " " 25 19 Ovid Bell Press, printing Proceedings . 1,386.42 " 25 20 Ovid Bell Press, postage, Proceedings . 104.51


38

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

"

25

21

"

25

22

" "

25 25

23 24

"

25

25

" ,, " " ,, " "

30 30 30 30 30 30 30

26 27 28 29 30 31 32

" 30 Nov. 8

33 34

"

8

35

" "

15 26

36 37

" II

30 26

38 39

"

26

40

" " " " ,, ,, "

30 30 30 30 30 30 30

41 42 43 44 45 46 47

"

30

48

Dec.

6

49

"

6

50

"

6

51

"

15

52

" " " ,, " ,,

24 24 24 24 24 24

53 54 55 56 57 58

"

15

Spalding Stationery Co., stationery and supplies . Menke Printing Co., postage and stationery . Lilley-Ames Co., suppies . Ovid Bell Press, supplies and reports . Arthur Mather, printing, postage and stationery . Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Arthur Mather, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary . J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . R. L. Bohle, salary . F. Berger, salary . Arthur Mathers, expo Grand Lodge of Kentucky . Anthony F. Ittner, expo Gr. Lecturer Masonic Home of Missouri, account Welfare Relief . Karl M. Vetsburg, expense LaPlata, Mo., 11/4 . Union Safe Deposit Co., rental . Royal Typewriter Co., two new typewriters . . S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service Spalding Sta. Co., stationery and supplies . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, printing and postage . Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Arthur Mather, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary . J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . F. Berger, salary . R. L. Bohle, salary . Harold L. Reader, Grand Master's expenses . Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand Lecturer . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, expense funeral J. Pickard . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, Grand Lodge of Texas . Becktold Co., printing, postage and stationery . Spalding Stationery Co., dues receipt cards . Arthur Mather, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary . J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . F. Berger, salary . . R. L. Bohle, salary Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand Lecturer . Fidelity Savings Trust Co., dividend No. 2 on balance .

147.03 30.09 25.27 592.11 100.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 100.00 150.00 17.75 86.62 1,000.00 10.66 8.25 150.00 41.26 74.91 100.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 500.00 98.42 75.53 29.60 35.00 942.70 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 61.64 477.88


1938 31 31

59 60

1938 Jan. 10

61

" "

Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Collector Internal Revenue, excise tax .

"

Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, D. L. School of Instruction ..... 10 62 Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare Relief program . . 17 63 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service 17 64 Journal Printing Co., "In Memoriam" John Pickard . 17 65 Whitehead & Hoag, 50-year emblems 31 66 Masonic Temple Ass 'n, maintenance . 31 67 Arthur Mather, salary . 31 68 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . 31 69 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . 31 70 F. Berger, salary . 31 71 R. L. Bohle, salary 31 72 Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand Leeturer . 31 73 Collector Internal Revenue, excise

"

31

74

Feb. 1

75

" " " " " " " " " " "

tax

"

2

76

"

3

77

"

3

"

10

80

"

14

81

"

14

82

"

14

83

"

23

84

" " " " " " "

28 28 28 28 28 28 28

85 86 87 88 89 90 91

Mar. 10

92

"

" "

39

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

78 4- 79

11 11

93 94

.

Unemployment Compensation Fund of Missouri . Harold L. Reader, expense, Grand Master . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, D. L. School of Inst . Spalding Stationery Co., stationery and supplies . Arthur Mather, postage . Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief . Collector of Internal Revenue, interest on excise tax . Harold L. Reader, expense, George Washington Memorial Conf..... Henry C. Chiles, expense George Washington Memorial Conference Arthur Mather, expense George Washington Memorial Conf..... J. Claude Kieper, account expense Grand Masters Conference . Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Arthur Mather, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, salary . J. R McLachlan, Honorarium . F. Berger, salary . R. L. Bohle, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, expense, Grand Lecturer . Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief program . S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, printing, postage and stationery

150.00 133.82

350.00 500.00 26.54 34.61 130.43 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 59.87 28.24 254.16 500.00 250.00 112.43 22.80 500.00 6.01 100.00 100.00 100.00 50.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 71.48 500.00 22.57 100.00


40

Strauss-Payton, portrait Grand Master . " 31 96 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . " 31 97 Arthur Mather, salary . " 31 98 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . " 31 99 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . " 31 100 F. Berger, salary . " 31 101 R. L. Bohle, salary " 31 102 Anthony F. Ittner, expenses, Grand Lecturer . Apr. 4 103 Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief program . " 13 104 Harold L. Reader, account salary Grand Master . " 18 105 Unemployment Compensation Fund of Missouri . " 18 106 Spalding Stationery Co., stationery and supplies . " 30 107 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . " 30 108 Arthur Mather, salary . " 30 109 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . " 30 110 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . " 30 111 F. Berger, salary . " 30 112 R. L. Bohle, salary " 30 113 Anthony F. Ittner, expenses Grand Lecturer . " 27 114 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, expense account Mitchell funeral May 2 115 Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief program . " 13 116 Columbia Savings Bank, for new ac. count, deposit " 21 117 Spalding Stationery Co., stationery and supplies . " 21 118 O. L. Schmaltz, flowers, Mitchell funeral . " 21 119 Southwestern Bell Tel. Co., service " 31 120 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . " 30 121 Arthur Mather, salary . " 30 122 Anthony F. Ittner, salary . " 30 123 J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium . " 30 124 F. Berger, salary . " 30 125 R. L. Bohle, salary " 30 126 Anthony F. Ittner, expense, Grand Lecturer . June 1 127 E. E. Morris, salary, Grand Treasurer . " 4 128 Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief program . " 6 129 Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, printing, postage and stationery " 17 130 Arthur Mather, expo Grand Lodge officers . . " 17 131 Arthur Mather, postage " 17 132 Arthur Mather, expo Special Com. Intox. Liquor . "

1938

PR.OCEEDINGS OF THE 31

95

40.29 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 71.39 500.00 500.00 82.30 48.92 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 90.82 48.51 500.00 2,500.00 87.12 20.40 29.39 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 99.17 500.00 500.00 100.00 74.83 56.21 19.50


1938 "

17 133

" "

17 134 17 135

"

17 136

"

17 137

"

17 138

Harold L. Reader, account Grand Master's salary S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service Menke Printing Co., printing, postage and stationery Journal Printing Co., Mitchell-Memorial .......•............... Mo. Printing & Stationery Co., Annual report blanks Spalding Stationery Co., stationery and supplies .. Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Arthur Mather, salary Anthony F. Ittner, salary J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium ... F. Berger, salary. R. L. Bohle, salary A. F. Ittner, expo Grand Lecturer Ray V. Denslow, Grand Correspondent Mo. Unemployment Compo Fund. Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax ..... Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Arthur Mather, salary ... Anthony F. Ittner, salary .. J. R. McLachlan, Honorium F. Berger, salary R. L. Bohle, salary Anthony F. Ittner, expo Grand Lecturer . First National Bank, Cape Girardeau, Mo., new account. Masonic Home of Missouri, Welfare Relief .... Masonic Home of Missouri, per capita tax Arthur Mather, Grand Sec 'y, expo Com. Intox. Liquors .. S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service .. Whitehead & Hoag Co., 50-year Veteran Emblems Spalding Sta. Co., stationery and supplies .. Harrison Co., engravers Masonic Home of Missouri, account per capita tax. Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance Arthur Mather, salary .. Anthony F. Ittner, salary .. J. R. McLachlan, Honorarium .. F. Berger, salary . R. L. Bohle, salary . Anthony F. Ittner, expense Grand Lecturer Arthur Mather, Social Security taxes •................•...... 0

0

0

0

0

" " " " " " " July

41

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15

139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146

•••••••••••••••

0

0

0

0

" "

18 147 20 148

" " " " " " "

30 30 30 30 30 30 30

Aug. 1 156

••••••

•••

0

0

•••••

0

••••

0

6 157

II

8 158

II

9 158

0

0

••••••••

0

0"

0

22 160 22 161

"

22 162

" "

22 163 30 164

" " " " " " "

31 31 31 31 31 31 31

0

0

0

0

0

00

••

0

0

••

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••••

0

••••••

••

0

0

0

••

••••••••

0

••••••

0

0

0

0.

•••

0

•••

0

••

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

••••

•••••

0

••

0

••••••

0

••••••

0

0

Sept. 7 172

0

0

••••••••••••••••••

0

165 166 167 168 169 170 171

0

•••••••

0

0

" "

0

••••••••••••

0

II

••

••••

•••••

0

0"

149 150 151 152 153 154 155

0

••

••••••••••••••

500.00 11.61 80.33 37.00 182.54 46.44 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 98.82 500.00 122.80 20,000.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 99.72 2,500.00 500.00 20,000.00 37.35 24.40 130.36 123.63 34.45 60,000.00 150.00 416.00 350.00 125.00 150.00 100.00 45.88 55.38


42

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

"

7 173

"

7 174

"

8 175

Masonic Home of Missouri, account delinquent per capita tax ....... Masonic Home of Missouri, account per capita tax ................. Masonic Home of Missouri, account Welfare Relief .............. :.

4,788.12 21,503.73 250.00 $186,712.57

"

15

Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri (restricted) Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, • Marshall, Mo........... . . . . . . . Balance in Columbia Savings Bank, Columbia, Mo................. Balance in First National Bank, Cape Girardeau, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . ..

3,823.06 5,000.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 63,093.48

Total

76,916.54 $263,629.11

Respectfully submitted

E. MORRIS, Grand Treasurer.

EDMUND

REPORT OF THE GRAND AUDITOR

To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri: Gentlemen: Conforming with your instructions, we have examined and checked the book reeords of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer of the Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri for the period from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938, also the Masonic Home Initiation Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund, the Wm. F. Kuhn Library Fund and the Joseph S. McIntyre Library Fund for the same period and respectfully present the following report: GENERAL FUND--PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS

Balance, September 16, 1937 $ 74,083.52 Receipts Forwarded to Grand Treasurer: Per Capita Tax, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $170,466.43 Back Dues, 1932 $1,544.50 Back Dues, 1933................. 240.45 Back Dues, 1934............. . . . . 277.00 Back Dues, 1935................. 1,282.49 Back Dues, 1936..... . . . . . . . . . . . . 808.50 Back Dues, 1937................. 4,374.58 8,527.52 Dues from Members of Defunct Lodges Sale of Manuals Sale of Dues Receipts Sale of By-Laws Sale of Masonic Veteran Emblems

. . . . .

16.00 645.25 834.91 58.00 120.00


1938

43

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Interest on Permanent Fund Securities . Unexpended Mileage and Per Diem Fund Transferred to General Fund . Penalty for Late Return . . Cash Balance from Defunct Lodge Refunds Fire Insurance Premiums . . Received on Returned Checks of prior year Transfers: 10% Dividend on Deposit in Fidelity Savings Trust Co. in Liquidation, Transferred tq Union National Bank $ Transfers from Union National Bank, Kansas CityTo 9<>lumbia Savings Bank, Columbia Mo. To First National Bank, Cape. Girardeau, Mo .

2,535.00 577.90 10.00 36.52 48.03 192.15

184,067.71

477.88 2,500.00 2,500.00

5,477.88

Balance Carried Forward $263,629.11 Disbursements: Per Cheques Issued. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $181,234.69 Transfers: 10% Dividend on Deposit in Fidelity Savings Trust Co. in Liquidation Transferred to Union National Bank $ 477.88 Transfers from Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.To Columbia Savings Bank, Columbia, Mo. 2,500.00 To First National Bank, Cape Girardeau, Mo. 2,500.00 5,477.88 186,712.57 Balance in Banks, September 15, 1938

$ 76,916.54

Balance, September 15, 1938, per Grand Treasurer's Books .. $ 76,916.54 Consisting of: Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo., in Liquidation, Not Subject to Withdrawal $ 3,823.06 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo. 63,093.48 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 5,000.00 Balance in Columbia Savings Bank, Columbia, Mo. 2,500.00 Balance in First National Bank, Cape Girardeau, Mo. .................... 2,500.00 $ 76,916.54 BONDS

On September 17, 1938, in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri, and a representative designated by the Grand Master, we examined the following securities in the Grand Lodge safe deposit box at the Union National Bank of Kansas City, Mo. All interest income from these securities was accounted for.


44

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE PERMANENT FUND

Bond No. 17037H 17038J

Kind U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

Interest Interest Par Date Rate Value 3-15 & 9-15 2%,% $ 1,000.00 3-15 & 9-15 2%, 1,000.00 $ 2,000.00

60789K 60790L 4394D

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

3-15 & 9-15 3-15 & 9-15 3-15& 9-15

2~ 2~ 2~

$1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00

7,000.00

150022B 150023C

U. S. TreaslIry U. S. Treasury

4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15

314 314

$1,000.00 1,000.00

2,000.00

JOO048489 KOO048490 000013673 DOOO13674 491lA

U. U. U. U. U.

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15

3% 3% 3% 3% 3%

$1,000.00 1,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 5,000.00

27,000.00

000002873 000000803

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15

4 4

$1,000.00 5,000.00

6,000.00

GOO026327 HOO026328 JOO026329 KOO038060

U. S. U. S. U. S. U. S.

4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15

414 414 414 414

$5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

25,000.00

S. S. S. S. S.

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

$69,000.00 W1\I. F. KUHN LIRBARY FUKD

7451A

U. S. Treasury

6-15 & 12-15

3% %

$

500.00

There had been no change in the securities since our previous examination of September 18, 1937. MASONIC HOME INITIATION FUND

Balance in Bank, September 16, 1937 $ 879.00 Received from Masonic Lodges During Period September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12,700.00 $13,579.00 Transferred to Masonic Home During Period September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938 .... $13,260.00 Bank Charges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.23

13,278.23

Balance in First National Bank, St. Louis Mo., September 15, $ 1938

300.77

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Balance in Bank, September 16, 1937 $ 190.98 Received from Masonic Lodges During Period September 16, . . . . .. 1,462.00 1937, to September 15, 1938.. .. .. .. $ 1,652.98


1938

45

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Transferred to George Washington Memorial Association, February 21, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Bank Charges................................

250.00 16.74

266.74

Balance in First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo., September 15, 1938 $ 1,386.24 WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 16, 1937. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Receipts: Interest on Bond.............................. $ 16.88 Interest on Savings Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.88

755.2]

20.76

.Ba.lance, September 15, 1938.......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

775.97

Consisting of: Cash in Savings Account First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo. $275.97 United States Treasury Bond No. 7451A. . . . . . . . . . 500.00 $

775.97

JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 16, 1937............................. $ 1,000.00 No change during year Balance in Savings Account, First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo., September 15, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 1,000.00 MILEAGE AND PER DIEM COMMITTEE

Deposit Payroll Cheques Issued and Paid

. $20,000.00 . 19,442.10 $

577.90 577.90

Balance, September 15, 1938............................. $

.00

Refund to General Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri from September 16, 1937, to September 15, 1938. Respectfully submitted, PERKINS

&

COMPANY,

oertified Public Accountants.


Report of the Masonic Home FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1937, TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1938 MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI, LOCATED AT ST. LOUIS OFFICERS

,v. ,V. Martin,

President. , Robert R. Kreeger, Vice-President Herman Mauch, Treasurer Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old Folks

St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo: Mo. Mo. Mo.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Arch A. Johnson R. R. Kreeger W. W. Martin James R. McLachlan

Springfield, Kansas City, St. Louis, Kahoka,

Mo. } Mo. Term expires 1938 Mo. Mo.

T. W. Cotton Thad B. Landon Thomas H. Reynolds James W. Skelly

Van Buren, Kansas City, Kansas City, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

}

Term expires 1939

St. Louis, St. Louis, Hannibal, Trenton, St. Joseph,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

}

Term expires 1940

Herman Mauch F. H. 'Vielandy Byrne E. Bigger Ray V. Denslow Orestes Mitchell

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS Harold L. Reader, Grand Master Henry C. Chiles, Deputy Grand Master Elwyn S. Woods, Senior Grand Warden Karl M. Vetsburg, Junior Grand Warden

\Vebster Groves, Lexington, Springfield, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

ADVISORY BOARD Mrs. Ella Jean Flanders Mrs. Alta L. Tate Mrs. Edith Ambruster

Excelsior Springs, Mo. Kirkwood, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. 46


1938

47

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI PRESIDENT'S LETTER

To the Most Worshipfu.l Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Brethren: Pursuant to the Constitution and By-Laws of the Masonic Home of Missouri, I submit, as President of its Board of Directors, the Annual Report and request your careful consideration. At the Annual Session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri held on September 28 and 29, 1937, in St. Louis, Mo., the following brethren were elected directors for a term of three years:

Herman Mauch, St. Louis, Mo. F. H. Wielandy, St. Louis, Mo. Byrne E. Bigger, Hannibal, Mo. Ray V. Denslow, Trenton, Mo. Orestes Mitchell, St. Joseph, Mo. At the board meeting held in St. Louis, Mo., September 29, 1937, the following officers were elected: W. W. Martin, President, St. Louis, Mo. R. R. Kreeger, Vice-President, Kansas City, Mo. Herman Mauch, Treasurer, St. Louis, Mo. C. L. Alexander, Secretary, St. Louis, Mo. Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician, St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children, St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old Folks, St. Louis, Mo. The standing committees for the year have been as follows: Trustees of the Endowment Fund-W. W. Martin, R. R. Kreeger, Herman Mauch. Executive Committee-R. R. Kreeger, Chairman, A. A. Johnson, T. W. Cotton, T. H. Reynolds, F. H. Wielandy, J. W. Skelly, Herman Mauch. Finance Committee-To 'V. Cotton, Chairman, Ray V. Denslow, Orestes Mitchell. House Committee-F. H. Wielandy, Chairman, J. ,V. Skelly, Herman Mauch. Legal Committee-A. A. Johnson, Chairman, T. H. Reynolds, Byrne E. Bigger, Thad B. Landon, Orestes Mitchell. Administration Committee-Orestes Mitchell, Chairman, F. H. Wielandy, Byrne E. Bigger, J. R. McLachlan. Hospital Committee-To W. Cotton, Thad B. Landon. MEDICAL STAFF Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Solon Cameron Harry Moore James Forsen C. E. Burford

St. St. St. St.

Louis, Louis, Louis, Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.


48 Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Joseph Glenn Hugo R.eim Carl T. Eber Philip S. Luedde Ralph Cook R. K. Kimmel O. \V. Koch R. J. Payne R. S. Weiss A. H. Conrad L. G. McCutcheon M. L. Klinefelter Wm. R. Bohne Bert O. Owens D. L. Harris Charles L. Klenk James Barrett Brown Val Satterfield Frederick A. Baldwin Hermon S. Major

St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Kansas City,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

OFFICIAL BONDS \V. W. Martin, President, $75,000.00; Herman Mauch, Treasurer, $75,000.00; Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary, $75,000.00; Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron, $2,000.00; Trustees of the Endowment Fund: "IN. W. Martin, $75,000.00; Herman Mauch, $75,000.00; R. R. Kreeger, $10,000.00 APPLICATIONS

During the past year 91 applications for admission to the Home were considered, and the following disposition was made of them: Admitted to the Home 43 Died while application was being investigated. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Referred to Welfare Committee of the Grand Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Rejected because of ineligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 15 Continued for further investigation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 24 MEMBER STATISTICS Men Women Members in the Home September 1, 1937.. 129 134 14 Admitted during the past year. . . . . . . . . . 13 Discharged during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . Deaths during the year................

142 1 16

Boys

55 8

148

63

1

6

Girls 43 8

51 4

15

125 132 57 47 Total Membership September 1, 1938........................... 361 Admitted during the year, but who have not yet arrived. â&#x20AC;˘ .. .. . . 21 Average number in the Home during the year 358


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

49

CONDITIONS IN THE HOME

The membership of our Home Family has changed very little during the year. Whenever there was a vacancy, there was someone waiting to take the place. We have exactly the same number in the Home that we had a year ago. We are still terribly crowded but the time is at hand when the crowded conditions among the old people will be relieved. One-half of our building program is completed and we hope it will be only a question of a short time until the generosity of the Masons of Missouri will enable us to complete the program and build the children's building which is very badly needed. NEW BUILDING

The outstanding event of the year and one of the outstanding events in the history of the Home is the completion of the new Women's Building. It is of fireproof skeleton construction carried on concrete foundations. The exterior walls are of brick with stone or terra cotta trim. The interior partitions are of hollow tile. The floors and base are of terrazzo. It is 135 feet long by 46 feet wide and nearly 110 feet high and contains nine stories and a ground or basement floor. The dining room on the first floor projects 32 feet from the main building and has a frontage of 87 feet. Its roof will be used as a promenade and will be equipped with garden furniture. The first floor contains a loggia with vaulted ceiling, panelled with oak, and a large dining room with a seating capacity of 250 persons. All of the old folks of the Home who are not confined to the hospital will use this dining room. The reception room and elevator lobby are located on the east side. Stairways are located at both ends of the building. The kitchen, with adjoining store rooms, is on the west side. Ample cold storage coolers, mechanically refrigerated, are provided in kitchen and basement. The typical floor contains fifteen single bedrooms with built-in closet and hot and cold water; a parlor and a solarium, and the necessary toilet and service rooms. In addition to kitchen and dining room facilities, the building provides a home for 105 women. The contract price of this building, including kitchen equipment, was $399,406.38. All bills are paid to date and the money is in the bank to make final payment as soon as the building is finally accepted from the contractor, which will probably be around October 1. 1'hrough the years we have been saving money out of the Initiation Fund and these savings and the generosity of the Masons of Missouri in the past two years have made this building possible. We are most


50

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

deeply grateful for the donations we have received and we hope the building will meet with the approval of all the donors, as well as the Lodges of Missouri. COSTS

'Ve are doing our best to take good care of the people living in our Home and to spend the money entrusted to our care as economically as possible. In order to make a fair comparison of the per capita cost with other Homes, it is necessary to know the service rendered. Some Homes do not do very much in the way of education for the children, others do not run a hospital. Comparing our Home with other Masonic Homes in the United States, and considering the work done, our per capita cost is about an average of the better conducted Homes of the country. A comparison of per capita costs for several years is interesting and the difference often represents the difference in the cost of provisions at different times. We are trying to give the children of our Home food and care, good medical service, and a good education as well, and the old people of our Home are given food and care and excellent medical service. We believe this job is being done as economically as possible considering the quality of the work we are doing. Below we give you a comparison of the costs of the Home for the past ten years. 1928-1929 Per 1929-1930 Per 1930-1931 Per 1931-1932 Per 1932-1933 Per 1933-1934 Per 1934-1935 Per 1935-1936 Per 1936-1937 Per 1937-1938 Per

Capita cost Capita cost Capita Cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost Capita cost

of of of of of of of of of of

Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home Home

Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family

. $558.89 . 543.00 . 467.06 . 459.53 . 439.41 . 451.45 . 486.42 . 494.30 . 527.25 . 529.30

EDUCATION

The boys and girls of the Home are vitally interested in getting an education, and school work in the past year has been very satisfactory. We had eight high school graduates; three from business school and one from Ranken Trade School. . During the coming school year, we will have twenty-seven in high school; three in business college; one in Ranken Trade School; three in Harris Teachers College; three in Junior College, and three in Washington University. There are only two in the Home under school age. Weare endeavoring to fit every boy and girl for some useful work and then get them a job and keep them until they are self-supporting. Weare greatly indebted to the Masonic Employment Bureau who are always ready to help any Masonic Home boy or girl get regular employment.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

51

Weare also greatly indebted to the Advisory Board, Order of the Eastern Star, for providing the tuition for the Washington University students. MASONIC INFIRMARY

The following gives an account of the work done during the year: Total patients in hospital at beginning of year.. . .. . . . . . . . . .. . 75 Total patients admitted during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 Total patients discharged during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 . Total number of patients treated during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 Total number of deaths.................. . . . . . . . . .. .. . 31 Total patients in hospital at the end of the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Total patients' days in hospitaL 28,150 A verage patients per day................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Total number of out-patient treatments given during the :.rear .. 27,000 Total visits by out-patients during the year 20,639

ORDER OF EASTERN STAR

At the time this report is written, our new building is not completely furnished. In fact, it was not completed in time to be furnished for the Grand Lodge session, but we have the assurance of the Advisory Board of the Order of Eastern Star that the furniture has been selected and will be placed in the building as rapidly as possible. Five floors of the building are furnished and that will give an idea of the beauty, quality, and good taste which will be used in the entire building. The furnishing of the building has been a big job, and also an expensive one, and we are deeply grateful to the Advisory Board and the individuals, clubs, and Eastern Star Chapters whose generosity has made this big job possible. We have found the Advisory Board most co-operative at all times, and they have always been ready to help the Home in every possible way. ST. LOUIS CHRISTMAS COMMITTEE

This committee, composed of representatives of the Lodges of St. Louis and St. Louis County, has done many lovely things throughout the year to bring joy and happiness to the members of our Home Family. Their funds are provided by the Lodges of St. Louis and St. Louis County. They supply a turkey dinner on Christmas Day and bring presents for every member of the Home Family. In addition to this, they do many other wonderful things for the Home that bring happiness and good cheer to our Family. We express our deepest appreciation for their fine work. MASONIC HOME ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Because of the building program, no solicitation has been made for funds during the past year but the following Lodges and friends


52

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

have made contributions to our Entertainment Fund. This money is used to provide a weekly picture show and other entertainment and pleasure during the year. Ramson A. Breuer Masonic Association of the 32nd District. . $ 20.00 York Lodge No. 563, A. F. & A. M., Kansas City . 20.00 10.00 Gray Summit Lodge No. 173, A. F. & A. M., Gray Summit . Independence Lodge No. 7H, A. F. & A. M., Independence . 5.00 Charity Lodge No. 331, A. F. & A. M., St. Joseph . 10.00 10.00 Shekinah Lodge No. 256, A. F. & A. M., Festus . 5.00 Union Lodge No. 593, A. F. & A. M., Union . Hebron Lodge No. 354, A. F. & A. M., Mexico . 10.00 5.00 United Lodge No.5, A. F. & A. M., Springfield . 10.00 Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642, A. F. & A. M., St. Louis . Buckner Lodge No. 501, A. F. & A. M., Buckner . 5.00 25.00 Chaffee Lodge No. 615, A. F. & A. M., Chaffee . 12.50 Chaffee Chapter, O. E. S., through Chaffee Lodge No. 615 . Columbia Lodge No. 534, A. F. & A. M., Pacific . 10.00 10.00 Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661, A. F. & A. M., St. Louis . 10.00 Kennett Lodge No. 504, A. F. & A. l\f., Kennett . 15.00 H. S. Jamison, St. Louis, Mo . Garrard Strode, St. Louis, Mo . 50.00 5.00 Herman Koopman, Wright City, Mo . Mrs. Julia Lewis, St. Louis, Missouri. . 100.00 2.00 Anonymous .

ORESTES MITCHELL

On April 19, 1938, Brother Orestes Mitchell, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri and a member of our Board for more than thirteen years, passed to his eternal reward. He was raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason in Charity Lodge No. 331 on July 16, 1904. He served as its Master in 1910; in 1913 and 1914 served as District Deputy Grand Master for the Ninth Missouri District. He was appointed Grand Swordbearer in 1914 and regularly advanced in line and in 1921 was elected Grand Junior Warden. In 1924, he was elected Grand Master. He was exalted to the Most Sublime Degree of the Royal Arch in Mitchell Chapter No. 14, March 21, 1909. He passed the Circle in St. Joseph Council No.9, Royal and Select Masters, November 30, 1910. He was knighted in Hugh DePayens Commandery May 3, 19'20. He was initiated in Radiant Chapter No. 88, O. E. S., on May 6, 1909, and served as Worthy Patron during the year 1910. He was a charter member of Zoroaster Grotto, April 9, 1921, and served as Monarch in 1922. He was initiated in Moila Temple A. A. O. N. M. S., April 9, 1909, served as Oriental Guide in 1914, and was Illustrious Potentate during the year 1918. In the Scottish Rite, he took the Lodge of Perfection Degrees in 1905, Chapter of Rose Croix, 1906; Council of Kadosh, 1907, and Consistory in 1908. He was a member of all these bodies in St. Joseph. He was made K. C. C. H. October 19, 1911, and received the 33rd Degree October 24, 1913.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

53

Brother Mitchell became a member of the Masonic Home Board in 1925 and was an active worker, serving on the different committees of the Home until the time of his death. He was especially interested in the building program of the Home and was one of the active promoters of our present building program. His death is a great loss to the Masonic Home and we will greatly miss his advice and counsel, and his untiring efforts in advancing the cause of this Home. â&#x20AC;˘ DR. GEORGE W. WALKER

On June 4, 1938, Dr. George W. Walker of Cape Girardeau was elected to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Brother Orestes Mitchell. His term of office will expire at this Grand Lodge session. ENDOWMENT FUND

Our Endowment Fund has increased in cash $963.44. A steady increase of our Endowment Fund through the years has met a very vital need in the support of the Home. Ever since 1929, the membership of the Grand Lodge has been declining and therefore the Per Capita tax has of necessity been steadily declining. Were it not for the increase in the Endowment Fund, which increases its income, it would have been impossible to have cared for so many people through these years. One person out of every four in the Masonic Home is supported by the income from the Endowment Fund. MRS. MARY HUTHMAKER MEMORIAL

This consists of an eighty-acre tract of land located in Kirkwood, Missouri, and St. Louis County, to be used as a Children's Home. MRS. GUSSIE GRENNER ESTATE

This estate amounts to $202,250.09. It is not handled by the Masonic Home of Missouri but the will provides that the income from this estate shall go to the Masonic Home each year. During the past year the income from this estate amounted to $6,370.43. ESTIMATE VALUE OF ASSETS

Endowment Fund cash and securities Home Grounds Improvements Furnishings

$1,134,395.50 240,000.00 1,000,000.00 165,000.00

INSURANOE

On all buildings and contents $1,166,776.49 Steam. Boiler Insurance.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,000.00


54

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Contingent LiabilityCompensation Public Liability Electric Machinery

$20,000.00-40,000.00 25,000.00-50,000.00 5,000.00 CONCLUSION

The year has been a very successful one and we are most deeply .grateful to Almighty God for the generosity of the Masons of Missouri and for His tender and loving care. Fraternally submitted

W. 'V.

MARTIN,

President.

REPORT OF SECRETARY September 1, 1937, to August 31, 1938 GENERAL FUND

Receipts Grand Lodge Per Capita Tax .... $101,267.68 Grand Chapter O. E. S. Per Capita Tax 14,671.00 Interest on General Fund Securities

$115,938.68 .

571.97

$116,510.65

Provisions . $ 63,810.88 Dry Goods and Clothing . 4,796.20 8,570.92 Laundry . Ice, Light, and Water . 8,859.59 Fuel . 11,114.63 15,993.00 Salaries . 47,103.83 Wages . Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory 1,884.26 Board attending Board Meetings . 3,970.21 Hospital Supplies .... 390.00 Carfare for Members of the Home Family . 497.24 Telephone . 250.00 Legal and Auditing . 1,828.95 Insurance . 1,761.14 Repairs and Maintenance . 9,603.70 Supplies . 866.77 Printing, Stationery and Postage . Miscellaneous Expense, Allowance for Stew3,116.38 ard's Car, Hauling Ashes, Newspapers, etc. 6.40 Bank Charges .

$184,424.10

Excess of Disbursements over Receipts Transfers from Income Fund

. .

$ 67,913.4;') 42,000.00

Net Decrease in General Fund Balance on hand September 1, 1937

. .

$ 25,913.45 137,191.82

Balance on Hand August 31, 1938

.

$111,278.37

Disbursements

4

••••••••••••••••••••


1938

55

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI INCOME FUND

Receipts Interest on Endowment Fund Bonds . $ 22,684.40 Interest on Endowment Fund Real Estate Loans . 35,583.27 Received from Members of Home Family . 2,260.06 Pensions . 425.00 Rent of Farms . 2,311.81 Sale of Cemetery Lots . 100.00 Interest on Income Fund Securities . 2,528.57 Sale of Grease, etc . 256.00 Profit on Sale of Income Fund Securities . 23.42 Miscellaneous Income . 1.50

$ 66,174.03

Disbursements Annuities $ Taxes and other expenses on Real Estate owned, etc . Taxes and other expenses on Estates of Members of Home Family . Bank Charges .

$

2,294.92 2,695.40 586.42 19.70

5,596.44

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements . Transfers to General Fund................. $ 42,000.00 Transfer to Building Fund................. 30,000.00

$ 60,577.59

Net Decrease in Income Fund Balance on Hand September 1, 1937

. .

$ 11,422.41

Balance on Hand August 31, 1938

.

$ 71,145.05

Receipts Initiation Fees............................ $ 13,260.00 Interest on Securities...................... 6,180.18

$ 19,440.18

72,000.00 82,567.46

INITIATION FUND

Disbursements 2.40

Bank Charges Excess of Receipts over Disbursements Transfers to Building Fund

. .

$ 19,437.78

Net Decrease in Initiation Fund Balance on Hand September 1, 1937

. .

$105,022.22 147.311.33

Balance on Hand August 31, 1938

.

$ 42,289.11

124,460.00

IMPROVEMENT FUND

Receipts Interest on Securities Profit on sale of securities Transfers to Building Fund

$

.

3,145.10 956.81 .

$

4,101.91 79,300.00


56

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Net Decrease in Improvement Fund Balance on hand September 1, 1937

. .

$ 75,198.09 76,438.69

Balance on hand August 31, 1938

.

$

1,240.60

BUILDING FUND

Receipts Contributions

$ 17,621.00

Disbursements Architect's Fees General Contractor Plumbing Contractor Electrical Contractor Heating Contractor Elevator Contractor Bank Charges

. $ 14,748.51 . 210,835.26 . 19,577.96 . 13,226.57 . 23,783.04 . 11,835.00 . 12.49

$294,018.83

Excess of Disbursements over Receipts . Transfer from Income Fund....... . . . . . . . .. $ 30,000.00 Transfer from Initiation Fund.. . . . . . . . . . . . . ]24,460.00 Transfer from Improvement Fund.......... 79,300.00

$276,397.83

Net Decrease in Building Fund Balance September 1, 1937

. .

$ 42,637.83 49,218.75

Balance August 31, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 6,580.92 Secretary.

C. L.

ALEXANDER,

233,760.00

TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT GENERAL FUND Balance August 31, 1937.............................. Received from Secretary................... $117,460.28 Received Interest on Treasurer's Funds.... . 571.97 60.41 Recei ved from President's Petty Cash Fund. . Transferred from Income Fund.. . . . . . . . . . . . 42,000.00

160,092.66 $297,033.32 185,811.12

Disbursements Balance August 31, 1938

$136,940.66

'

:...

INCOME FUND Balance August 31, 1937.............................. Recei ved from the Secretary............... $ 68,620.34 Received Interest on Treasurer's Funds..... 1,636.66 Received Profit on securities sold. . . . . . . . . . . 23,42

$111,222.20 $ 78,506.06 70,280.42 $148,786.48

Disbursements $ 7,714.05 Transferred to General Fund............... 42,000.00 Transferred to Building Fund..... . . . . . . . . . 30,000.00

79,714.05

Balance August 31, 1938..............................

$ 69,072.43


1938

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI INITIATION FUND

Balance August 31, 1937.............................. Initiation Fees from Grand Secretary $ 13,260.00 Received Interest on Treasurer's Funds..... 6,180.18

$147,311.33 19,440.18 $166,751.51

Transferred to Building Fund......... . . . .. $124,460.00 Bank Charges 2.40

124,462.40

Balance August 31, 1938..............................

$ 42,289.11

IMPROVEMENT FUND Balance August 31, 1937.............................. Received Interest on Treasurer's Funds ..... $ 3,145.10 Received Profit on sale of securities........ 956.81

$ 76,438.69 4,101.91

Transferred to Building Fund.........................

$ 80,540.60 79,300.00

Balance August 31, 1938..............................

$

1,240.60

BUILDING FUND Balance August 31, 1937............................... Received from Secretary................... $ 17,695.00 Transferred from Income Fund............. 30,000.00 Transferred from Initiation Fund..... . .. .. . 124,460.00 Transferred from Improvement Fund....... 79,300.00

$ 49,218.75

251,455.00

Disbursements

$300,613.15 294,092.83

Balance August 31, 1938.............................

$

6,580.92

RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S BALANCE WITH SECRETARY'S BALANCE AUGUST 31, 1938 GENERAL FUND Balance per Treasurer's Report....................... Deduct: Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding Outstanding

check check check check

No. No. No. No.

25192 $21.00 25214. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26.10 25272. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 40.36 25274. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. . 55.77

$111,222.20

143.83 $111,078.31

Add: Petty Cash not on Treasurer's Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

200.00

Balance per Secretary's Report... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$111,218.31


58

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE INCOME FUND

Balance per Treasurer's Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Add: Cash in First National Bank-President's Account $3,846.79 Accrued Interest on Endowment Fund Securities at time of purchase........................ 260.79

$ 69,072.43

4,107.58 $ 73,180.01

Deduct: Amount due Improvement Fund.............. $ 292.51 Amount due Initiation Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129.66 Amount Received from Huthmaker Estate. . . . . 1,612.79

2,034.96

Balance per Secretary's Report........................

$ 71,145.05

eUTIATION FUND Balance per Treasurer's Report. Balance per Secretary's Report.

. .

$ 42,289.11

. .

$

1,240.60 1,240.60

. .

$

6,580.92 6,580.92

42,289.11

IMPROVEMENT FUND Balance per Treasurer's Report. Balance per Secretary's Report BUILDING FUND Balance per Treasurer's Report. Balance per Secretary's Report. REPORT OF AUDITOR

PERKINS & COMPANY Certified Public Accountants SUITE 851-854 408 PINE STREET, SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI

September 16, 1938. To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, Saint Louis, Missouri. Gentlemen: In accordance with instructions received, we have prepared this report preliminary to our formal detailed report of the Masonic Home of Missouri, to be submitted later, to the Board of Directors. 'Ve examined the books and records of your secretary, Mr. Clarence L. Alexander, for the fiscal year ended August 31, 1938. Our examination covered the General Fund, Income Fund, Initiation Fund, Improvement Fund, Building Fund, and the Endowment Fund. We have prepared the following summaries of assets, comprising these funds as at August 31, 1938:


1938

59

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI GENERAL FUND

Cash in Telegraphers National Bank . $ 19,615.70 55,497.50 Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company , . Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank-Time De20,000.00 posit . Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank-Payroll Ac5,000.00 count ......•..............•........................ Cash in Savings Trust Company-Payroll Account (Bank 565.17 closed January 14, 1933, in liquidation) . 200.00 Cash in Matron's Petty Cash Fund .... 10,000.00 Certificate of Deposit in Mutual Bank and Trust Company 400.00 Securities at Cost . 0 ••••••••••••••••••

Total General Fund................................ $111,278.37 INCOME FUND Cash in First National Bank-President's Account . $ 3,846.79 13,994.31 Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company . 55,078.12 Securities at Cost ..........••........••............... Accrued Interest on Endowment Fund Securities at time 260.79 of purchase . $ 73,180.01 Deduct: Amount due Improvement Fund $ 292.51 Amount due Initiation Fund.... . . . ... .. 129.66 Amount Received from Huthmaker Estate (to be distributed to other Funds)............. 1,612.79

2,034.96

Total Income Fund................................ $ 71,145.05 INITIATION FUND Cash in United Bank and Trust Company Securities at Cost Due fronl Income Fund Total Initiation Fund

$

. . "

6,649.33 35,510.12 129.66

$ 42,289.11

IMPROVEMENT FUND Cash in Telegraphers National Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ Securities at Cost . Due from Income Fund . Total Improvement Fund

748.09 200.00 292.51

$

1,240.60

Cash in Boatmen's National Bank $ United States Treasury Bond...........................

6,080.92 500.00

Total Building Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

6,580.92

BUILDING FUND


60

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

ENDOWMENT FUND Real Estate Loans................................... $ 792,013.44 53,600.00 Real Estate Owned-Farms at Appraised Value . 21,160.00 Federal Land Bank Bonds . 17,194.25 United States Treasury Bonds . 1,000.00 Joint Stock Land Bank Bonds . 100.00 Joint Stock Land Bank Bonds in Default-Market Value 53,450.00 Municipal and Other Bonds . 82.00 Modra Estate Securities . 248.00 Rife Estate Securities in Default . 36,022.51 Comstock Estate Securities . 2,492.00 . Comstock Estate Securities in Default. 500.00 Erdhaus Estate Securities . 10,500.00 . Geo. B. Mills Estate Securities 530.00 Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate Securities . 123,631.00 Hy. C. Grenner Estate Securities . 7,415.00 Hy. C. Grenner Estate Securities in Default . 14,457.30 , . Cash in First National Bank Total Endowment Fund

$1,134,395.50

We verified the recorded bank, balance appearing in these Funds by reconciling certificates received directly from the depositaries with the stated balances. The securities as shown in these Funds were verified by examination of the securities. We have shown the securities listed in the General, Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds at cost. The securities of the Endowment Fund which are not in default are stated at the values placed thereon by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund at the date of acquisition of the securities by the Home. Bonds in default are carried at market or at an appraised value believed by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund to be market. The principal reason for the decrease in the Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds was the transfers made from these funds to finance the construction of the Women's Building at an expenditure to August 31, 1938, of $294,006.34. The following is a summary of the transfers to the Building Fund during the fiscal year ended August 31, 1938: From the Income Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 30,000.00 From the Initiation Fund.......................... . . . . 124,460.00 From the Improvement Fund.......................... 79,300.00 $233,760.00

If you desire any additional information relative to this report, we would be pleased to have you call upon us. Respectfully submitted, PERKINS & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountants.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

61

GIFTS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND AS FOLLOWS Knight Templar Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 35,114.00 James L. Kirkendall................................... 13,150.00 W. S. Smith Fund....... ... ... .. . . . .. ... . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. 11,730.00 5,000.00 T. W. Higgins Fund. .. . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James W. Harris Fund................................. 1,665.74 Masonic Home Certificate Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 1,117.60 Ferdinand Herold Fund................................ 500.00 John B. Croshaw Fund................................. 1,000.00 Jacob F. Gunlich Fund. .. . ... .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal and Selected Masters Fund. . . . . . . . . . 2,500.00 1,000.00 T. W. Cotton Fund..................................... Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 5,000.00 A. M. Hough Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacob Lampert Fund.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,000.00 500.00 Mrs. E. Wurz Fund.................................... Adolph Gluck Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 Parralle Massengale Fund....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 806.60 1,000.00 Mrs. Lillie L. Fletcher Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frederick A. Logan Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 Robert Elliott Black Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 Nathan Schloss Fund.................................. 932.83 2,067.91 A. P.Christianson Fund................................ Rice Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51,096.35 Hugh Hartshorn Fund................................. 2,327.7·5 William Pamprin Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 Morgena Peterson Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 General Fund.... . . .. ... . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128,740.03 Julius C. Garrell Fund.. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000.00 War Relief Loyal Service Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 7,107.50 James W. Boyd Fund.................................. 500.00 Ararat Temple, Kansas City, Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 3,000.00 Mrs. Willie A. Woods Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grotto and Shrine Fund. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,056.95 Morris and Ella Leftwich Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800.00 1,000.00 Mrs. Mary Lynch Fund................................. 1,000.00 A. P. Fletcher Fund.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Beecher Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,442.48 1,000.00 A. M. Dockery Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edward H. Meier Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500.00 William H. Potter Estate Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,305.50 J. C. Jacquith Estate Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,122.61 Initiation Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246,700.00 Nicholas R. Wall Fund................................. 500.00 Abraham Palan Fund.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584.70 Bonds from a friend of the Home sold for................. 52,218.75 Maggie Nicholson Fund................................ 550.36 Louisa Yott Fund..................................... 500.00 Gusta v Bischoff Fun d. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . 500.00 550.00 W. L. Tamme Fund.................................... Erdhaus Estate, secured and unsecured. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,665.32 Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000.00 William A. Hall Fund.................................. 500.00 Henry Siegfried....................................... 1,000.00


62

PROCEEDI:KGS OF THE

Edward Meyer . Charles V. B. Slade . Robert F. Stevenson . Glen Marquis . Frank L. Schofield . D. M. Wilson . Mary E. Clapp . Samuel Rife Estate . E. C. Robinson . B. S. Schwartz . Brockett A. Dickson . George F. Bergfeld . Sarah B. Coffman . Samuel A. Gluck . . Charles Reilly Wellston Lodge No. 613 . Richard Sinclair . Karl Backrow . Robert Lungstrass . June Lee Cotton .....•....•............................ St. Joseph Chapter No. 198, O. E. S . Marcus A. Loevy ...............•...................... Sam Plan . W. J. Scherck . Myrtle Lodge No. 338 . Ludwig Kotany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . Charles E. Koken . Phillip Stremmel, Jr . Boor Fletcher . Alphonzo Whipple . . A. Bolin Fund M. A. Covey Fund . William F. Kier Fund . John T. Short Fund . Paul Keiser Fund . John Oliver Fund . J. M. Darrow Fund . . T. W. Prichett Fund Annie Martin Fund . . Comstock Estate . Comstock Estate (doubtful value) Julia C. Norton Fund . J. M. Darrow Estate . William Latham, Jr., Estate , .. John M. Woodson Estate . Sol E. Waggoner Estate . Jacob C. C. Waldeck Estate . Adam Herold Estate . James Vinyard Estate . George B. Mill Estate, stocks and bonds . John Rehrs Estate .........................•........... William Russell Estate, cash . William Russell Estate, bonds and other securities •....... Joseph Kronacher Estate . William A. Raming Estate . Fred Herket Estate . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, cash .........................•

1938 500.00 9,548.75 14,992.13 1,105.14 1,000.00 528.00 3,405.09 7,518.50 2,500.00 692.83 1,000.00 500.00 465.89 200.00 100.00 100.00 200.00 100.00 286.00 250.00 450.00 70.00 100.00 46.00 310.95 200.00 300.00 137.40 400.00 100.00 400.00 25.00 10,000.00 200.00 2,000.00 371.36 5,000.00 1,000.00 259.98 115,569.31 2,500.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 1,000.00 5,467.91 1,000.00 500.00 211.08 933.24 11,600.00 250.00 1,901.39 4,392.00 431.05 1,000.00 2,000.00 405.86


1938

63

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, stocks and bonds . Edward F. W. Kaiser ...........•...................... Henry W. Hunning Estate . Dr. Louis F. Bode Estate . Fred Segelke Estate . Charles Gietner Estate . William B. Archer Estate . James Ward-Nixon MemoriaL . Henry C. Grenner Estate, market value, stocks, bonds and cash ......•......................................... Berthold Linder Estate . Charles H. Schureman Estate : . Charles A. Brown Estate . Ernest Breuneman . A. S. Hudson Estate . Myrtle Kipp Estate . John Cunningham Estate . Mrs. Pearl Kaiser Annuity . Estate of William Modra . George W. Leeak Gift .•................................ Louis L. Boehmen Gift . Fred D. Gardner Estate . George H. Woltjen Estate . Mrs. Virginia Allen Church Estate (in memory of Ethelbert Forrester Allen) . Irin Levosier Page Estate . Gifts in memory of William T. Coombs . Barbara Seaman Bequest . Isador Mendle Legacy •................................ Estate of Joseph S. McIntyre .

2,780.00 25,000.00 100.00 300.00 214.47 1,000.00 5,085.00 1,000.00 261,152.94 200.00 365.67 1,000.00 100.00 628.56 707.16 9,720.98 5,500.00 4,591.68 500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 1,000.00 1,000.00

ADDITIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND THE PAST YEAR Comstock Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rife Estate.. . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Estate of James R. Anderson... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R. F. Stevenson Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . Modra Estate......................................... A. S. Hudson Estate.......... . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .

191.66 30.00 375.00 10.00 42.50 314.28

VOLUNTARY CONTRmUTIONS TO THE BUILDING FUND OF THE MASONIC HOME. .Amount .Amount Paid 1996-97

Paid 1997-98

FIRST DISTRICT

Revere Lodge No. 167, Revere Fairmont Lodge No. 290, Wyaconda Eldorado Lodge No. 318, Luray Hiram Lodge No. 362, Kahoka Gothic Lodge No. 436, Alexandria St. Francisville Lodge No. 588, Wayland Memphis Lodge No. 16, Memphis Gorin Lodge No. 72, Gorin Rutledge Lodge No. 572, Rutledge Middle Fabius Lodge No. 244, Downing

. . . . . $

. . . .

10.00

20.00 100.00 22.00 14.50

19.00

40.00

$


64

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Lodge of Love No. 259, Lancaster Queen City No. 380, Queen City Glenwood Lodge No. 427, Glenwood Greentop Lodge No. 635, Greentop

Amount

Amount

Paid 1936-37

Paid 1937-38

. . . .

24.50 10.00

SECOND DISTRICT

Kirksville Lodge No. 105, Kirksville Paulville Lodge No. 319, Brashear Adair Lodge No. 366, Kirksville Novinger Lodge No. 583, Novinger Ark Lodge No.6, Newark Colony Lodge No. 168, Colony Novelty Lodge No. 181, Novelty Edina Lodge No. 291, Edina Greensburg Lodge No. 414, Greensburg

. . . . . . . . .

33.00 1.50 48.25

15.00 66.00

27.25 28.00

8.00

THIRD DIS'fRICT

Hartford Lodge No. 171, Hartford Somerset Lodge No. 206, Powersville Unionville Lodge No. 210, Unionville Lucerne Lodge No. 394, Lucerne Humphreys Lodge No. 32, Humphreys Seaman Lodge No. 126, Milan Green City Lodge No. 159, Green City Putnam Lodge No. 190, Newtown Pollock Lodge No. 349, Pollock Areana Lodge No. 389, Harris Winigan Lodge No. 540, Winigan

. . . . . . . . . . .

25.00 5.00 45.00 16.00 25.00 80.00 58.50

11.00

71.00

FOURTH DISTRICT

Trenton Lodge No. 111, Trenton Laredo Lodge No. 253, Laredo Galt Lodge No. 423, Galt Spickardville Lodge No. 524, Spickard Mercer Lodge No. 35, Princeton

. . . . .

54.00

73.50

FIFTH DISTRICT

Bethany Lodge No. 97, Bethany Lorraine Lodge No. 128, Ridgeway Lodge of Light No. 257, Eagleville Cainsville Lodge No. 328, Cainsville New Hampton Lodge No. 510, New Hampton Prairie Lodge No. 556, Gilman City

. . . . . .

27.50 10.00 32.00

SIXTH DISTRICT

Havana Lodge No. 21, McFall Stanberry Lodge No. 109, Stanberry Gentryville Lodge No. 125, Gentryville Athens Lodge No. 127, Albany Alanthus Lodge No. 252, Alanthus Grove Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377, King City Berlin Lodge No. 378, Berlin Jacoby Lodge No. 447, Darlington Grant City Lodge No. 66, Grant City

. . . . . . . . .

20.00 61.00 51.00 30.00 44.00 25.00

9.00 3.00


1938

65

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Defiance Lodge No. 88, Sheridan Allensville Lodge No. 198, Allensdale Jonathan Lodge No. 321, Denver

Amount

Amount

Paid 1936-37

Paid 1937-38 11.50

. . .

SEVENTH DISTRICT

Xenia Lodge No. 50, Hopkins " Quitman Lodge No. 196, Quitman Ravenwood Lodge No. 201, Ravenwood Graham Lodge No. 289, Graham White Hall Lodge No. 301, Barnard Kennedy Lodge No. 329, Elmo Burlington Lodge No. 442, Burlington Junction Gaynor City Lodge No. 465, Parnell Nodaway Lodge No. 470, Maryville Pickering Lodge No. 472, Pickering Guilford Lodge No. 474, Guilford Clearmont Lodge No. 507, Clearmont. Skidmore Lodge No. 511, Skidmore

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

23.50

EIGHTH DISTRICT

North Star Lodge No. 157, Rockport Sonora Lodge No. 200, Watson Northwest Lodge No. 358, Tarkio Fairfax Lodge No. 483, Fairfax Maitland Lodge No. 112, Maitland Oregon Lodge No. 139, Oregon Forest City Lodge No. 214, Forest City Mound City Lodge No. 294, Mound City Craig Lodge No. 606, Craig

. . . . . . . . .

100.00

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

52.00

31.50 12.00 20.00 18.00

NINTH DISTRICT

Savannah Lodge No. 71, Savannah Helena Lodge No. 117, Rochester Lincoln Lodge No. 138, Fillmore Whitesville Lodge No. 162, Whitesville Rosendale IJodge No. 404, Rosendale Valley Lodge No. 413, Bolckow Cosby Lodge No. 600, Cosby Agency Lodge No. 10, Agency Wellington Lodge No. 22, DeKalb St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, St. Joseph Birming Lodge No. 150, Faucett Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, St. Joseph Rushville Lodge No. 238, Rushville Brotherhood Lodge No. 269, St. Joseph Charity Lodge. No. 331, St. Joseph King Hill Lodge No. 376, St. Louis Saxton Lodge No. 508, Saxton Wallace Park Lodge No. 627, Wallace

50.00

16.00 4.00 50.00 60.00 41.00 394.00 7.00 740.00 50.00 100.00 1,000.00 50.00 26.00

10.00 18.00 106.00

24.00 192.00

TENTH DISTRICT

Union Star Lodge No. 124, Union Star Weatherby Lodge No. 235, Weatherby Parrott Lodge No. 308, Maysville

. . .

10.00 60.00

15.00


66

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Osborn Lodge No. 317, Osborn Continental Lodge No. 454, Stewardsville Clarksdale Lodge No. 559, Clarksdale Western Star Lodge No. 15, Winston Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65, Pattonsburg Gallatin Lodge No. 106, Gallatin Altamont Lodge No. 108, Altamont Earl Lodge No. 285, Coffey Lock Spring Lodge No. 488, Lock Spring Jameson Lodge No. 500, Jameson Jamesport Lodge No. 564, Jamesport

,

. Amount Paid

Amount Paid

1936-37

1937-98

. . . . . . . . . . .

12.00 5.75

ELEVENTH DISTRICT

Liberty Lodge No. 31, Liberty Holt Lodge No. 49, Holt Angerona Lodge No. 193, Missouri City Clay Lodge No. 207, Excelsior Springs Kearney Lodge No. 311, Kearney Temperance Lodge No. 438, Smithville Hemple Lodge No. 37, Hemple Vincel Lodge No.. 62, Cameron Plattsburg Lodge No. 113, Plattsburg Gower Lodge No. 397, Gower Lathrop Lodge No. 506, Lathrop ;

. . . . . . . . . . .

39.00

9.00 5.00

30.00

28.00

120.00 17.00 13.00

18.00 35.00 3.00

TWELFTH DISTRICT

Kingston IJodge No. 118, Kingston Braymer Lodge No. 135, Braymer ' Hamilton Lodge No. 224, Hamilton Polo Lodge No. 232, Polo Breckenridge Lodge No. 334, Breckenridge.' Cowgill Lodge No. 561, Cowgill Friendship Lodge No. 89, Chillicothe Spring Hill Lodge No. 155, Spring Hill Benevolence Lodge No. 170, Utica Chillicothe Lodge No. 333, Chillicothe Chula Lodge No. 388, Chula Wheeling Lodge No. 434, Wheeling Dawn Lodge No. 539, Ludlow

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

9.00 25.00 10.00 36.00 20.00 2.75

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT

Jackson Lodge No. 82, Linneus Brookfield Lodge No. 86, Brookfield Cypress Lodge No. 227, Laclede ' Bucklin Lodge No. 233, Bucklin Dockery Lodge No. 325, Meadville Marceline Lodge No. 481, Marceline

. . . . . .

62.50 63.00

. . .

31.00 50.00

5.00 4.00 5.00

25.00 12.00 50.00

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT

Callao Lodge No. 38, Calloa Bloomington Lodge No. 102, Bevier McGee Lodge No. 146, College Mound

2.00


1938

67

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Censer Lodge No. 172, Macon La Plata Lodge No. 237, La Plata Lodge of Truth No. 268, Atlanta. " Excello Lodge No. 332, Excello Elmer Lodge No. 648, Elmer St. Andrews Lodge No. 96, Shelbyville Shelbina Lodge No. 228, Shelbina Hunnewell Lodge No. 415, Hunnewell Bethel Lodge No. 537, Bethel. Clarence Lodge No. 662, Clarence

Amount Paid

Amount Paid

1936-31

1931-38

54.50

. . . . . . . . . .

52.00 47.00 5.00 84.00

11.00

4.00 6.00

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5.00 18.00

5.00

15.00 38.00

23.00 23.00 23.00

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT

Wyaconda Lodge No. 24, LaGrange Monticello Lodge No. 58, Monticello La Belle Lodge No. 222, La Belle Craft Lodge No. 287, Canton Williamstown Lodge No. 370, Williamstown Lewistown Lodge No. 494, Lewistown Ewing Lodge No. 577, Ewing Palmyra Lodge No. 18, Palmyra St. John's Lo~ge No. 28, Hannibal Hannibal Lodge No. 188, Hannibal Philadelphia Lodge No. 502, Philadelphia Ralls Lodge No. 33, Center Lick Creek Lodge No. 302, Perry New London Lodge No. 307, New London

59.00 115.00 17.00 10.00 30.00

7.50 198.00

353.00 20.00

15.00 10.50

65.00

SIXTEENTH DISTRICT

Eolia Lodge No. 14, Eolia Clarksville Lodge No. 17, Clarksville Perseverance Lodge No. 92, Louisiana Phoenix Lodge No. 136, Bowling Green Frankford Lodge No. 192, Frankford Pike Lodge No. 399, Curryville

. . . . . .

10.00 74.00 2.00 25.00

104.00

SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT

Paris Union Lodge No. 19, Paris Florida Lodge No. 23, Florida Middle Grove Lodge No. 42, Middle Grove Monroe Lodge No. 64, Monroe City Madison Lodge No. 91, Madison Santa Fe Lodge No. 462, Santa Fe Holliday Lodge No. 660, Holliday

. . . . . . .

13.00 67.00

20.00

12.00 20.00

5.00

EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT

Huntsville Lodge No. 30, Huntsville Milton Lodge No. 151, Milton Clifton Hill Lodge No. 161, Clifton Hill Moberly Lodge No. 344, Moberly Cairo Lodge No. 486, Cairo Higbee Lodge No. 527, Higbee Jacksonville Lodge No. 541, Jacksonville Clark Lodge No. 610, Clark

. . . . . . . .

25.40 10.00 16.00 24.00 10.00


68

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Amount

Amount

Paid 1936-37

Paid 1937-38

NINETEENTH DISTRICT

Eureka Lodge No. 73, Brunswick Warren Lodge No. 74, Keytesville Triplett Lodge No. 122, Triplett Westville Lodge No. 202, Westville Salisbury Lodge No. 208, Salisbury Rothville Lodge No. 426, Rothville Pee Dee Lodge No. 498, Musselfork Cunningham Lodge No. 525, Sumner Mendon Lodge No. 628, Mendon

'"

. . . . . . . . .

50.00

1.00

29.00 8.50 11.00 7.00 10.00 50.00

1.00 4.50

. . . . . . .

8.00 285.00 100.00 4.00 84.00

. . . . . . . .

15.00 41.00 25.00 20.00

TWENTIETH DISTRICT

DeWitt Lodge No. 39, DeWitt Wakanda Lodge No. 52, Carrollton Bogard Lodge No. 101, Bogard Hale City Lodge No. 216, Hale City Carroll Lodge No. 249, Norborne Bosworth Lodge No. 597, Bosworth Hardin Lodge No. 322, Hardin

1.00 25.00 5.75 25.00

1.00

TWENTY路FIRST DISTRICT

Rising Sun Lodge No. 13, Barry Weston Lodge No. 53, Weston Compass Lodge No. 120, Parkville Camden Point Lodge No. 169, Camden Point. Rowley Lodge No. 204, Dearborn Fidelity Lodge No. 339, Farley Adelphi Lodge No. 355, Edgerton Platte City Lodge No. 504, Platte City

25.00 4.00 16.00 18.00

17.00

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT

Heroine Lodge No. 104, Kansas City Albert Pike Lodge No. 219, Kansas City Kansas City Lodge No. 220, Kansas City Temple Lodge No. 299, Kansas City Cecile-Daylight Lodge No. 305, Kansas City Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas City Westport Lodge No. 340, KanSM City Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City Gate City Lodge No. 522, Kansas City Orient Lodge No. 546, Kansas City South Gate Lodge No. 547, Kansas City York Lodge No. 563, Kansas City Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Kansas City Sheffield Lodge No. 625, Kansas City East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City Country Club Lodge No. 656, Kansas City Rockhill Lodge No. 663, Kansas City Alpha Lodge No. 659, North Kansas City Northeast Lodge No. 643, Kansas City

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

59.00 188.50 1,475.00 471.00 226.00 1,852.80 674.00 403.50 739.50 270.50 114.00 97.00 268.00 291.22 73.00 10.00 77.00

642.50 8.15 49.50 41.31 7.00 55.00 182.00

14.00 2.00 5.00 .

TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT

Waverly Lodge No. 61, Waverly Lexington Lodge No. 149, Lexington

. .

100.00

50.00


1938

69

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Higginsville Lodge No. 364, Higginsville Lafayette Lodge No. 437, Corder Concordia Lodge No. 464, Concordia Mount Hope Lodge No. 476, Odessa Richmond Lodge No. 57, Richmond Ray Lodge No. 223, Camden Bee Hive Lodge No. 393, Lawson Ada Lodge No. 444, Orrick

. . . . . . . .

Amount Paid

Amount Paid

1936-37

1937-38

10.00 47.00 50.00 25.00

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT

Arrow Rock Lodge No. 55, Arrow Rock Cambridge Lodge No. 63, Slater Miami Lodge No. 85, Miami Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall Barbee Lodge No. 217, Sweet Springs Malta Lodge No. 402, Malta Bend Oriental Lodge No. 518, Blackburn Nelson Lodge No. 560, Nelson

. . . . . . . .

22.00 120.00 7.00 216.50 55.50 59.00 31.00 40.00

TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT

Cooper Lodge No. 36, Boonville Pleasant Grove Lodge No. 142, Otterville Wm. D. Muir Lodge No. 277, Pilot Grove Wallace Lodge No. 456, Bunceton Prairie Home Lodge No. 503, Prairie Home Howard Lodge No. 4, New Franklin Fayette Lodge No. 47, Fayette Livingston Lodge No. 51, Glasgow Armstrong Lodge No. 76, Armstrong

. . . . . . . . .

166.00 23.00 2.00

29.00

36.00

50.00

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT

Centralia Lodge No. 59, Centralia Rocheport Lodge No. 67, Rocheport. Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia Ashland Lodge No. 156, Ashland Sturgeon Lodge No. 174, Sturgeon Hallsville Lodge No. 336, Hallsville Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356, Harrisburg Hinton Lodge No. 455, Hinton Acacia Lodge No. 602, Columbia

. . . . . . . . .

106.00

. . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00

183.00 71.00 8.00 314.00

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT

Central Lodge No. 81. Molino Laddonia Lodge No. 115, Laddonia Social Lodge No. 266, Martinsburg Hebron Lodge No. 354, Mexico Vandalia Lodge No. 491, Vandalia Houston Lodge No. 580, Gant Fulton Lodge No. 48, Fulton New Bloomfield Lodge No. 60, New Bloomfield Portland Lodge No. 242, Readsville Tebbetts Lodge No. 565, Tebbetts Shamrock Lodge No. 585, Shamrock Mokane Lodge No. 612. Mokane

296.50 50.00 12.00 303.00 10.84 10.00 14.00 10.00 91.00

4.00 6.00


70

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Amount Paid

Amount Paid

1936-37

1937·38

TWENTY·EIGHTH DISTRICT

Griswold Lodge No. 178, Liege Wellsville Lodge No. 194, Wellsville Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City Florence Lodge No. 261, New Florence Jonesburg Lodge No. 457, Jonesburg Daggett Lodge No. 492, McKittrick

. . . . . .

116.50 48.00 50.00

. . . . . . .

118.00 15.00 41.00 50.00

. . . . .

25.00 150.00 80.00

. . . . . . . . . .

360.00 12.50

12.50

75.00

TWENTY·NINTH DISTRICT

Troy Lodge No. 34, Troy Silex Lodge No. 75, Silex New Hope Lodge No. 199, Elsberry New Salem Lodge No. 270, Winfield Louisvjlle Lodge No. 409, Louisville Nineveh Lodge No. 473, Olney Moscow Lodge No. 558, Moscow Mills THIRTIETH DISTRICT

Wentzville Lodge No. 46, Wentzville Palestine Lodge No. 241, St. Charles Mechanicsville Lodge No. 260, Howell Pauldingville Lodge No. 11, Wright City Warrenton Lodge No. 609, Warrenton

50.00 150.00 50.00 34.00

26.00

THIRTY·FIRST DISTRICT

Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City Russelville Lodge No. 90, Russelville Hickory Hill Lodge No. 211, Eugene Centertown Lodge No. 611, Centertown Tipton Lodge No. 56, Tipton California Lodge No. 183, California Moniteau Lodge No. 295, Jamestown Clarksburg Lodge No. 553, Clarksburg Chamois Lodge No. 185, Chamois Linn Lodge No. 326, Linn

8.00

112.00 48.00

THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT

Evergreen Lodge No. 27, New Haven Sullivan Lodge No. 69, Sullivan Gray Summit Lodge No. 173, Gray Summit Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington Fraternal Lodge No. 363, Robertsville Columbia Lodge No. 534, Pacific Easter Lodge No. 575, St. Clair Union Lodge No. 593, Union Hermann Lodge No. 123, Hermann Red Bird Lodge No. 584, Red Bird Owensville Lodge No. 624, Owensville

, . . . . . . . . . .

50.00 177.00 79.00 97.00 76.00 104.00 70.00 90.00 133.09

. . . .

309.00 965.50 1,350.00 526.00

1.00

1.00 45.00 25.00

120.00

THIRTY·THIRD DISTRICT (A)

Missouri Lodge No.1, St. Louis George Washington Lodge No.9, St. Louis Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis Pomegranate Lodge No. 95, St. Louis

116.50 83.00 220.99 5.00


]938

71

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Erwin Lodge No. 121, St. Louis . Occidental Lodge No. 163, St. Louis . Pyramid Lodge No. 180, St. Louis . Keystone Lodge No. 243, St. Louis . Aurora Lodge No. 267, St. Louis " Paul Revere Lodge No. 330, St. Louis ....•....... Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis . Itaska Lodge No. 420, St. Louis . Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis •.....•.......... Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520, St. Louis . Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, St. Louis . . Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, St. Louis Magnolia Lodge No. 626, St. Louis . Trinity Lodge No. 641, St. Louis . Triangle Lodge No. 638, St. Louis . Shaveh Lodge No. 646, St. Louis . University Lodge No. 649, St. Louis ..•.......... Commonwealth Lodge No. 654, St. Louis . Purity Lodge No. 658, St. Louis . . Theo. Roosevelt Lodge No. 661, St. Louis

Amount

.Amount

Paid 1936-31

Paid 1931-38

300.00 608.00 236.00 575.00 131.50 221.00 1,976.00 285.00 365.00 332.50 607.50 440.00 1,688.00 124.00 107.50 75.00 576.00 148.50 65.00 150.00

101.00 11.00 58.00 329.00 155.00 114.50 3.00 37.00 15.00 117.40 45.00 80.00

'fHlRTY-THlRD DISTRICT (B)

Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis . Beacon Lodge No.3, St. Louis . St. Louis Lodge No. 20, St. Louis . Naphtali Lodge No. 25, St. Louis .........•...... Polar Star Lodge No. 79, St. Louis " Pride of the West Lodge No. 179, St. Louis . . Good Hope Lodge No. 218, St. Louis . Cosmos Lodge No. 282, St. Louis Cornerstone Lodge No. 323, St. Louis . . America- Lodge No. 347, St. Louis Cache Lodge No. 416, St. Louis . Anchor Lodge No. 443, St. Louis . West Gate Lodge No. 445, St. Louis . Lambskin Lodge No. 460, St. Louis . Harmony Lodge No. 499, St. Louis . Apollo Lodge No. 529, St. Louis •............... Algabil Lodge No. 544, St. Louis . Forest Park Lodge No. 578, St. Louis . Tower Grove Lodge No. 631, St. Louis . Mizpah Lodge No. 639, St. Louis . Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642, St. Louis . Pilgrim Lodge No. 652, St. Louis . Progress Lodge No. 637, St. Louis "

999.00 1,100.00 656.00 217.25 910.52 395.00 500.00 550.00 1,507.18 94.00 712.00 473.00 900.00 400.00 304.00 160.00 149.50 227.00 301.56 541.00 100.00 175.00 284.50

75.00 100.00 5.00 12.00 90.48 504.00 25.38 29.11 14.50 24.00 167.00 242.00

9.00 8.00 329.00 15.00

THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT

Index Lodge No. 54, Garden City . . Cass Lodge No. 147, Harrisonville Grand River Lodge No. 276, Freeman . Wadesburg Lodge No. 348, Creighton . Nonpareil Lodge No. 372, East Lynne . Dayton Lodge No. 386, Dayton . Belton Lodge No. 450, Belton ..........•....••..

73.00

15.00 2.00

23.00


72

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Raymore Lodge No. 451, Raymore Jewel Lodge No. 480, Pleasant Hill Coldwater Lodge No. 485, Drexel. .. ,. " Archie Lodge No. 633, Archie Cleveland Lodge No. 651, Cleveland

. . . . .

Amount

Amount

Paid 1936·37

Paid 1937-38

136.00 15.00

1.50

15.00 5.00 130.00

15.00

70.00

4.00

TIDRTY·FIFTH DISTRICT

Hume Lodge No. 130, Hume Amsterdam Lodge No. 141, Amsterdam Butler Lodge No. 254, Butler Rockville Lodge No. 341, Rockville Tyrian Lodge No. 350, Johnstown Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368, Adrian Rich Hill Lodge No. 479, Rich Hill Foster Lodge No. 554, Foster

. . . . . . . .

,

THIRTY -SIXTH DISTRICT

Cole Camp Lodge No. 595, Cole Camp Shawnee Lodge No. 653, Warsaw Knobnoster Lodge No. 245, Knobnoster Holden Lodge No. 262, Holden Corinthian Lodge No. 265, Warrensburg Cold Spring Lodge No. 274, Leeton Chilhowee Lodge No. 487, Chilhowee Sedalia Lodge No. 236, Sedalia Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia Green Ridge Lodge No. 425, Green Ridge LaMonte Lodge No. 574, LaMonte

20.00

. . . . . . " . . . . .

6.00 113.80 6.50

14.00 4.00

200.00 117.00

14.00

THIRTY'SEVENTH DISTRICT

Windsor Lodge No. 29, Windsor . Urich Lodge No. 286, Urich •.................... Agricola Lodge No. 343, Petersburg . Montrose Lodge No. 408, Montrose . Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton . Calhoun Lodge No. 552, Calhoun . Blairstown Lodge No. 557, Blairstown . Deepwater Lodge No. 562, Deepwater . St. Clair Lodge No. 273, Osceola . Circle Lodge No. 342, Roscoe . Lowry City Lodge No. 403, Lowry City . Appelton City Lodge No. 412, Appleton . Star Lodge No. 419, Taberville .

39.50 25.00 15.00 130.00 5.00

3.00 25.00

THIRTY·EIGHTH DISTRICT

Linn Creek Lodge No. 152, Camdenton Mack's Creek Lodge No. 433, Mack's Creek Laclede Lodge No. 83, Lebanon Competition Lodge No. ;432, Competition Conway Lodge No. 528, Conway Waynesville Lodge No. 375, Waynesville Richland Lodge No. 385, Richland Brumley Lodge No. 203, Brumley Iberia Lodge No. 410, Iberia

. . . . . . . . ..

25.75 100.00 6.00 25.00 61.00 34.00

9.00


1938

73

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Amount

Amount

Paid 1936-37

Paid 1937-38

THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT

Lebanon Lodge No. 77, Steelville . Cuba Lodge No. 312, Cuba . Salem Lodge No. 225, Salem . Vienna Lodge No. 94, Vienna . Belle Lodge No. 373, Belle . Lane's Prairie Lodge No. 531, Vichy . . Rolla Lodge No. 213, Rolla St. James Lodge No. 230, St. James . Equality Lodge No. 497, Newburg . Arlington Lodge No. 346, Dixon . Latimer Lodge No. 145, Licking .....•..........

78.50 119.00

4.00 50.00

25.00 23.00 183.00 105.00

217.00

57.00 63.00 247.00 45.00 58.00 56.00 14.00

34.00 19.00 7.00

FORTIETH DISTRICT

De Soto Lodge No. 119, De Soto .......•........ Joachim Lodge No. 164, Hillsboro . Shekinah Lodge No. 256, Festus . Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, Herculaneum . Tyro Lodge No. 12, Caledonia . Potosi Lodge No. 131, Potosi. . Irondale Lodge No. 143, Irondale •.............. Belgrade Lodge No. 632, Belgrade . Blackwell Lodge No. 535, Blackwell .

3.00

44.00

FORTY-FffiST DISTRICT

Riddick Lodge No. 361, Buffalo . Western Light Lodge No. 396, Louisburg . Urbana Lodge No. 421, Urbana . Hogle's Creek Lodge No. 279, Wheatland . Hermitage Lodge No. 288, Hermitage . Fair Play Lodge No. 44, Fair Play .•............ Modern Lodge No. 144, Humansville .•.•........ Pleasant Lodge No. 160, Morrisville ' . . Bolivar Lodge No. 195, Bolivar Pleasant Hope Lodge No. 467, Pleasant Hope . Aldrich Lodge No. 664, Aldrich .

10.00 25.00 4.00 8.00 14.25 25.00 26.00

FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT

Stockton Lodge No. 283, Stockton ....•.....•... Jerusalem Lodge No. 315, Jerico Springs ...· . Clintonville Lodge No. 482, Eldorado Springs . Washington Lodge No. 87, Greenfield . Garrett Lodge No. 359, Arcola . Everton Lodge No. 405, Everton . Melville Lodge No. 458, Dadesville ..•.......... Lockwood Lodge No. 521, Lockwood .

50.00 50.00 84.00 50.00 20.50 3.00

FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT

Osage Lodge No. 303, Nevada . Sheldon Lodge No. 371, Sheldon ....•........... Schell City Lodge No. 448, Schell City ..•......... Montevallo Lodge No. 490, Montevallo . Vernon Lodge No. 493, Bronaugh ...•........... Unity Lodge No. 495, Richards ....•.............

90.00

59.00

6.00

2.00

27.00

3.00


74

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Walker Lodge No. 605, Walker . Hermon Lodge No. 187, LiberaL . Lamar Lodge No. 292, Lamar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Signal Lodge No. 304, Mindenmines. . . . . . . . . . . . . Golden Lodge No. 475, Golden City . Milford Lodge No. 5]6, Milford .

Amount Paid

Amount Paid

1936-37

1937-38

34.00 29.00

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT

Carthage Lodge No. 197, Carthage Sarcoxie Lodge No. 293, Sarcoxie Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Joplin Jasper Lodge No. 398, Jasper Carterville Lodge No. 401, Carterville Mineral Lodge No. 471, Oronogo Webb City Lodge No. 512, Webb City Carl Junction Lodge No. 549, Carl Junction Criterion Lodge No. 586, Alba LaRussell Lodge No. 592, LaRussell

32.00

. . . . . . . . . . .

247.50 568.50

118.50

10.00 77.00

3.00 10.00

409.00

57.50 3.00

FORTY-FIFTH DISTRICT

United Lodge No.5, Springfield O'Sullivan Lodge No.7, Walnut Grove Ash Grove Lodge No. 100, Ash Grove Solomon Lodge No. 271, Springfield Ozark Lodge No. 297, Fair Grove Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield Republic Lodge No. 570, Republic Strafford Lodge No. 608, Strafford Willard Lodge No. 620, Willard Webster Lodge No. 98, Marshfield Doric Lodge No. 300, Elkland Mount Olive Lodge No. 439, Rogersville, R. 3 Hazelwood Lodge No. 459, Seymour Henderson Lodge No. 477, Rogersville

. . . . . . . .

6.00 133.00

. . . . . .

127.25 12.75 14.00 30.00 10.00

89.50 2.00 46.00 9.00 8.00

20.00 10.00 26.00

11.00

FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT

Ava Lodge No. 26, Ava . Pilot Knob Lodge No. 182, Richville . Mt. Ararat Lodge No. 382,Topaz . Barnes Lodge No. 116, CabooL . Texas Lodge No. 177, Houston . Plato Lodge No. 469, Plato ..â&#x20AC;˘.................. Summersville Lodge No. 555, Summersville . Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Mountain Grove .. Joppa Lodge No. 411, Hartville . Mansfield Lodge No. 543, Mansfield . Grovespring Lodge No. 589, Grovespring . Norwood Lodge No. 622, Norwood .

18.00 25.00 25.00

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT

Van Buren Lodge No. 509, Van Buren Grandin Lodge No. 579, Grandin Hopewell Lodge No. 239, Lesterville

. . .

127.00 19.00 50.00


1938

75

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Bunker Lodge No. 275, Bunker Barnesville Lodge No. 353, Ellington Delphian Lodge No. 137, Birch Tree Winona Lodge No. 430, Winona Eminence Lodge No. 601, Eminence

. . . . '.

Amount

Amount

Paid 1936-37

Paid 1997-38

19.00 38.00 51.00

FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT

Star of the West Lodge No. 133, Ironton . . Mosaic Lodge No. 351, Belleview Marcus Lodge No. 110, Fredericktown . Bismarck Lodge No. 41, Bismarck . Farmington Lodge No. 132, Farmington . Ionic Lodge No. 154, Desloge ..........•........ St. Francois Lodge No. 234, Libertyville . Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Bonne Terre . Pendleton Lodge No. 551, Doe Run . . Leadwood Lodge No. 598, Leadwood Elvins Lodge No. 599, Flat River . Saline Lodge No. 226, St. Mary's. ~ .

51.15 112.13 25.00 175.00 56.00 186.00 52.00 21.00

42.25 55.50 21.12 87.00 2.25 182.00

22.00

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT

Trowell Lodge No. 440, Marble Hill Zalma Lodge No. 545, Zalma St. Mark's Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau West View Lodge No. 103, Millersville Wilson Lodge No. 191, Pocahontas Mystic Tie Lodge No. 221, Oak Ridge Whitewater Lodge No. 411, Whitewater Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Jackson

. . . . . . . .

114.00 28.00 624.75 15.00 35.50 83.00 70.56 148.00

East Prairie Lodge No. 384, East Prairie . Charleston Lodge No. 401, Charleston . . Morley Lodge No. 184, Morley Ashlar Lodge No. 306, Commerce . Sikeston Lodge No. 310, Sikeston .. , . Illmo Lodge No. 581, Illmo ....•................ Blodgett Lodge No. 594, Blodgett . Chaffee Lodge No. 615, Chaffee . . Bloomfield Lodge No. 153, Bloomfield Essex Lodge No. 218, Essex ....•............... Lakeville Lodge No. 489, Bell City . Dexter Lodge No. 532, Dexter . Advance Lodge No. 590, Advance . Puxico Lodge No. 596, Puxico . . Morehouse Lodge No. 603, Morehouse

62.00 255.00 35.50 33.00 168.00 150.00 24.00 124.50

6.00 36.50

FIFTIETH DISTRICT

2.00

13.01

35.00 28.50 50.00 8.00

FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT

Kennett Lodge No. 68, Kennett Four Mile Lodge No. 212, Campbell Hornersville Lodge No. 215, Hornersville -,Cardwell Lodge No. 231, Cardwell Malden Lodge No. 406, Malden Senath Lodge No. 513, Senath

. '.. . . . .

91.50 44.00 71.00 19.50

14.00


76

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Amou1tt

Portageville Lodge No. 166, Portageville Point Pleasant Lodge No. 176, Conran New Madrid Lodge No. 429, New Madrid Parma Lodge No. 650, Parma Caruthersville Lodge No. 461, Caruthersville Hayti Lodge No. 571, Hayti Steele Lodge No. 634, Steele Bernie Lodge No. 573, Bernie

. . . . . . . .

Amou1tt

Paid

Paid

1936-37

1937-38

28.00 28.00 36.00 19.00 50.00

18.00

FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT

Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, Poplar Bluff Pine Lodge No. 314, Bardley Composite Lodge No. 369, Doniphan Naylor Lodge No. 568, Naylor Greenville Lodge No. 107, Greenville Wayne Lodge No. 526, Piedmont.

. . . . . .

330.00 100.00 6.50 28.00 78.50

26.00

FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT

Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327, West Plains . Ingomar Lodge No. 536, Willow Springs . Mountain View Lodge No. 637, Mountain View .. Alton Lodge No. 255, Alton . Woodside Lodge No. 387, Thomasville . Clifton Lodge No. 463, Thayer . Koshkonong Lodge No. 582, Koshkonong . Sampson Lodge No. 298, Lutie . Bayou Lodge No. 365, Bakersfield . Rockbridge Lodge No. 435, Rockbridge . Robert Burns Lodge No. 496, Gainesville .

62.00 33.00 10.00 74.00

58.00

111.00 5.00 25.00 6.00

FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT

Sparta Lodge No. 296, Sparta . Friend Lodge No. 352, Ozark . Billings Lodge No. 379, Billings , . Clever Lodge No. 645, Clever . Cl!1-ftin Lodge No. 229, Protem.•................ Kirbyville Lodge No. 264, Hollister . Forsyth Lodge No. 453, Forsyth . Branson Lodge No. 587, Branson . Galena Lodge No. 515, Galena . Crane Lodge No. 519, Crane .

10.00 50.00 10.00 11.00 7.00 8.00

2.00 3.00

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT

Monett Lodge No. 129, Monett . Purdy Lodge No. 148, Purdy . Barry Lodge No. 367, Washburn . Pythagoras Lodge No. 383, Cassville ...•........ Seligman Lodge No. 517, Seligman . Comfort Lodge No. 533, Wheaton . Mount Vernon Lodge No. 99, Mt. Vernon ....•... Canopy Lodge No. 284, Aurora ..••............. Marionville Lodge No. 390, Marionville . Decatur Lodge No. 400, Pierce City . Verona Lodge No. 452, Verona ,

61.50 5.00

50.00 40.00 50.00


1938

77

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Red Oak Lodge No. 468, Red Oak Stinson Lodge No. 523, Stinson Miller Lodge No. 567, Miller

Amount Pa.id

Amoun.t Pa.id

1996-97

1997-98

. . .

12.00

FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT

Southwest Lodge No. 466, Southwest City Anderson Lodge No. 621, Anderson Noel Lodge No. 647, NoeL Racine Lodge No. 478, Seneca Neosho Lodge No. 247, Neosho Granby Lodge No. 514, Granby Stella Lodge No. 538, Stella

. . . . . . .

57.00

6.00

20.00 244.50

30.00

15.00

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT

Bonhomme Lodge No. 45, Baldwin . Bridgeton Lodge No. 80, St. John's Station . Webster Groves Lodge No. 84, Webster Groves . Fenton Lodge No. 281, Fenton . Meramec Lodge No. 313, Eureka . Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, Kirkwood . Ferguson Lodge No. 542, Ferguson .•............ Maplewood Lodge No. 566, Maplewood . Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton . Wellston Lodge No. 613, Wellston . Valley Park Lodge No. 629, Valley Park . Jennings Lodge No. 640, Jennings . Gardenville Lodge No. 655, Gardenville .

53.00 443.00 426.00 140.00 52.00 194.00 125.25 109.50 300.00 538.00 69.00 185.00 130.00

13.00 44.00 65.00

12.00

10.00 9.00 22.00

1.00 24.00 16.00 20.00 66.00

FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT

Glensted Lodge No. 250, Glensted Versailles Lodge No. 320, Versailles Barnett Lodge No. 591, Barnett Olean Lodge No. 134, Olean Ionia Lodge No. 381, Eldon

. . . . .

13.75

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT

Independence Lodge No. 76, Independence . Summit Lodge No. 263, Lee's Summit . McDonald Lodge No. 324, Independence . Blue Springs Lodge No. 337, Blue Springs . Raytown Lodge No. 391, Raytown . Christian Lodge No. 392, Oak Grove . Buckner Lodge No. 501, Buckner . Marlborough Lodge No. 569, Kansas City . Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, Mt. Washington .. Grandview Lodge No. 618, Grandview •......... Grain Valley Lodge No. 644, Grain Valley .

109.75 100.00 57.00 121.00 25.00 75.00 34.50 100.00 24.00

COMMANDERIES, KNIGHTS TEMPLAR

St. John's Commandery No. 20, Springfield...... Ascalon Commandery, St. Louis................. Ivanhoe Commandery No.8, Kansas City. . . . . . . . St. Louis Commandery No.1, St. Louis. . . . . . . . • •

15.00

50.00 50.00 25.00 25.00

26.00


78

1!J38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Amount Paid

Amount Paid

1996-97

1997-98

CHAPTERS, R. A. M.

Springfield Chapter No. 15, Springfield . Bellefontaine Chapter No. 25, St. Louis . . Mexico Chapter No. 27, Mexico Jefferson Chapter No. 34, contributed $50.00 which was credited to Jefferson Lodge No. 43, at the request of the Chapter. Salisbury Chapter No. 133, Salisbury . Liberty Chapter No.3, R. A. M. Liberty .

10.00 25.00 25.00

5.00 25.00

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS

St. Louis Chapter, Order of DeMolay, St. Louis . Ezra Council No. 32, R. & S. M., Jefferson City . Alhambra Grotto Orchestra, St. Louis . Masters & Wardens Club of St. Louis and St. Louis County . Alpha & Omega Club, St. Louis . Alpha & Omega Auxiliary, St. Louis . 14th Masonic District . Temple Charity & Activity Association, Inc., St. Louis ........................••............

25.00 50.00 36.00 2,495.85 5.00 5.00 15.00 100.00

INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTIONS

W. A. Humphreys, Cape Girardeau, Mo . Harry S. Truman, Washington, D. C . . Mrs'. Wilmoth Waller, St. Louis, Mo Paul J. Wielandy, St. Louis, Mo . Frank H. Wielandy, St. Louis, Mo. . . Arthur L. Kramer, St. Louis, Mo. . . Frank C. Barnhill, Marshall, Mo. . . Richter Brothers, St. Louis, Mo. . . J. W. Skelly, St. Louis, Mo .. Francis Wielandy, St. Louis, Mo . Paul R. Wielandy, St. Louis . Frank J. Oechsner, St. Louis, Mo . Ben Raber, St. Louis, Mo . Ray V. Denslow, Trenton . C. W. Alley, St. Louis, Mo . Homer C. Allen, St. Louis, Mo. . . Riechardt Motor Co., Webster Groves, Mo. . . F. B. MeNeely, Atlanta, Mo . .. L. W. Taylor, Ionia, Mo A. G. Verser, Chicago, lllinois . . Leo H. Johnson, Neosho, Mo. . Anthony F. Ittner, St. Louis, Mo . John S. Berry, St. Louis, Mo . . Mrs. Luella McCue, St. Louis, Mo. . Walter Freund, St. Louis, Mo . Daniel C. Kerckhoff, St. Louis, Mo. . . Estate of Louis H. Roemer, Pacific, Mo . U. C. Stauss, St. Louis, Mo . . Oren. Simpson, Richland, Mo. . J. A. Lewis, St. Louis, Mo . Walter H. Petring, St. Louis, Mo.....••...•••••

1.00 25.00 100.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 2.00 5.00 30.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 10.00 1.00 5.00

60.00

25.00 25.00 100.00 50.00 50.00 32.36 1.00 40.00 5.00 5.00


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

79

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow presented the report on foreign correspondence which was adopted and ordered printed in the proceedings. See page 231. REPORT OF OOMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

To the M. W. Grand Loag"...4.. F. 4" ...4... M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on the Grand Master's Address submits this report: We recommend: First: The approval of the activity of the Grand Master in bis visitations to subordinate lodges, and the laying of cornerstones and especially his visits to other Grand Jurisdictions. Second: The reference to the Committee on Necrology of that portion of the address which refers to the deaths of Past Grand Masters, Most Worshipful Brothers Pickard and Mitchell, and R. W. Brother Vaughan. Third: The reference to the Ways and Means Committee of those portions of the address referring to finances, bonds, etc. Fourth: The reference to the Jurisprudence Committee of all decisions and the recommendations which deal with any change or additions to our By-Laws. Fifth: The approval of the appointments of Representatives and Committees. All other acts of the Grand Master are approved and we commend him for his zeal and idealism in handling the affairs of this Grand Lodge, and maintaining the high standard of the Fraternity at all times. . The thanks of this Grand Lodge are given to a true and faithful Craftsman who has performed his task well. (Report adopted.) Respectfully submitted, V AN FREMONT BOOR ANTHONY F. ITTNER T. W. COTTON THAD B. LANDON RAY V. DENSLOW F. C. BARNHILL J. W. SKELLY

GEORGE W. WALKER, Chairman, R. R. KREEGER W. W. MARTIN BERT S. LEE . ARCH A. JOHNSON WM. R. GENTRY DUVAL SMITH

RESOLUTIONS

M. W. BROTHER THAD B. LANDON: I offer two resolutions with reference to funds from the Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge that expire at this time and ask that they be referred to the Committee on Ways and Means when read. (Ordered.) I. " Be It Resolved, That the Directors of the Masonic Home be instructed, if deemed to be advisable, to use 3 per cent of the dues payable to the Masonic Home in accordance with Section 74 of the By-Laws, for relief of indigent Master Masons, their widows and orphans, either at the Masonic Home or elsewhere, and regardless of whether the beneficiary


80

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

would be entitled to admission to the Masonic Home or not, and to transfer such amounts as the board may deem advisable for relief for those not entitled to admission to the Home, to the Welfare Committee."

II. "Be It Resolved, That the Ways and Means Committee, by and with the consent of tIle Grand Master, be authorized, the funds of the Grand Lodge being available, to transfer to the Welfare Committee from time to time, moneys from t~e General Fund for the operation and maintenance of the Welfare Committee, not exceeding, however, the sum of $5,000.00." THAD B. LANDON. PROPOSED LODGE OF RESEARCH

R. W. BROTHER HENRY C. CHILES: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren. You have heard the reference in the Grand Master's address to the desire of the members of the Research Council to organize 째a Lodge of Research. This is the resolution proposing an amendment to the by-laws authorizing such organization. Be It Resolved by the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of the State of Missouri that its by-laws be amended by the enactment of the following new Section, viz: Section 77a. LODGE OF RESEARCH Twenty or more Missouri Master Masons in good standing may form a Lodge of Research for the purpose of promoting, encouraging, conducting and fostering Masonic research and study and for the purpose of spreading Masonic light and knowledge and a charter may be issued to such Lodge of Research without compliance with the usual requirements prescribed for the forming and chartering of regular subordinate Lodges. The Lodge of Research chartered under the provisions of this Section shall not have power or authority to receive petitions for or to confer the craft degrees; its representatives, as such, shall not have a vote in Grand Lodge, nor be entitled to receive mileage or per diem, as such; nor shall the Lodge be liable for or required to pay per capita tax or assessments to the Grand Lodge, and, in lieu of annual returns, it shall make an annual report to the Grand Lodge. The territorial jurisdiction of such Lodge shall be co-extensive with that of the Grand Lodge and it may hold its annual, stated or special communications at such times and in such places as it or its duly authorized officer or officers may determine. Active membership in such Lodge shall not continue unless regular membership in good standing is maintained by such member in a regular subordinate Lodge of this jurisdiction. Honorary, associate, corresponding and/or subscribing memberships in such Lodge may be had and maintained by individual Masons, Masonic Libraries, Masonic Bodies or organizations on such terms and conditions as the Lodge of Research may prescribe. Individual Masons may be elected "fellows" by the Lodge of Research as a recognition of outstanding accomplishment.

S. LEE Henry C. CHILES

BERT

RAY V. DENSLOW I ask that it be referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. (Ordered.)


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

81

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES

The Grand Secretary called attention to the list of committees which had been appointed to serve during the 1938 Communication. They are as follows: -STANDING COMMITTEES

1938

Jurisprudence-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Henri L. Warren, C. Lew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer, Sam Wilcox. Appeals and Grievances-Ray Bond, Chairman; O. H. Swearingen, Edward P. Walsh, John C. Robertson, Harry Baum. Ways and Means-Cecil A. Tolin, 3 years, Chairman; George C. Marquis, 2 years; Edmund E. Morris, 2 years; Ransom A. Breuer, 1 year; Solon Cameron, 1 year. Credentials--Walter A. Webb, Chairman; Jacob Abaecherli, Fred H. Knight, Henry F. Woerther, George A. McKean. Mileage and Per Diem---Walter Shrodes, Chairman; H. A. Magoon, Arthur W. Reiter, George Black, Arthur V. Schopp. Chartered Lodges-Robert C. Duffin, Chairman; George W. Paddock, Caeser Wollman. Lodges U. D.-Louis J. Graue, Chairman; Gus O. Nations, Warren H. May, Fred W. Bendick, Albert Theis, Jr. Welfare-Tolman W. Cotton, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, Arch A. Johnson, Thomas H. Reynolds, Herman Mauch. Reports of D. D. G. M. 's-Nat. D. Jackson, Chairman; David A. Leslie, Fay G. Fulkerson, Charles L. Woods, George A. Sample. Masonic Boards of Relief-Edward H. Loffhagen, 2 years, Chairman; Andrew J. 0 'Reilly, 1 year; Albert Linxwiler, 1 year; Morris E. Ewing, 2 years; Cyril A. Carpenter, 3 years. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, 1 year, Chairman; Theodore C. Teel, 3 years; James A. Kinder, 2 years; Harry P. Hovey, 4 years; John Pickard, 3 years. Masonic Home (Visiting Committee)-A. P. Fletcher, Chairman; Walter A. Phipps, Emsley C. James, Sterling H. McCarthy. Correspondence-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman. N ecrology-J ohn Pick~d, Chairman. Auditing-Perkins AudIt Company. Grand Master's Address--George W. Walker and all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business-Robert L. Dixon, Chairman. Transportation and Hotels-Wm. F. Miller, Chairman. SPECIAL COMMITTEES

1938

Masonic Service Association of Missouri--Robert c. Winkelmaier, Chairman; John R. Davis, Robert R. Wright. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Arthur Mather, Chairman; James R. McLachlan, Frank C. Barnhill, DuVal Smith. Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Edward McGuigan, John Wohradsky, Jr. George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association-Bert S. Lee, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell. Library-William B. Massey, Chairman; Wm. P. Mason, Wm. C. Rese. Printing of Proceedings-Arthur Mather, Chairman; Cecil A. Tolin. Masonic Publications-James W. Skelly, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Frederick M. Smith. Building Supervisory Board--Guy Million, 3 years, Chairman; Curt C. Mack, 2 years; Julius C. Garrell, Jr., 1 year.


82

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Revisions of By-Laws-Henry C. Chiles, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Ray V. Denslow. Trial by Other State Jurisdictions-Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles, J. M. Fisher. Intoxicating Liquors, Lotteries, Gambling, Etc.-Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, James A. Kinder, Leo H. Johnson, Walter A. Higbee. Binger-Galenar-Walter A. Phipps, Chairman; Harry Hightower, Ray Bond. REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER

M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner presented his report as Grand Lecturer, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Andent, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Mi.'l.'wuri: Brethren: As your Grand Lecturer I beg to submit the following report of my work in that office since your last Annual Communication: It has been my happy privilege during the year to visit and impart Masonic instruction in each of the fifty-nine Masonic districts of the State. In approximately two-thirds of the districts my schools of instruction have been held in more than one city or town and in some instances in as many as three or four. In the remainder of the districts the sessions have all been held in one central location. Thâ&#x201A;Źse varying plans have been adopted to comply with the expressed wishes of the officers of the Lodges, and presumably in every instance for the greater convenience of the greater number of the brethren. But although it is difficult to lay down any hard-and-fast rule as to the places where instruction is to be given, I incline more and more to the belief that the greater the area covered the greater will be the benefit that will accrue to the Craft as a whole. In line with this belief I propose during the coming year to visit a large number of Lodges which I have not had the pleasure of visiting before. As has been the case in almost every year of our history there have in the past year been changes in the personnel of our District Lecturers. In the districts where such changes have taken place, I have endeavored to devote a large part of my time to individual work with the new incumbents. If a District Lecturer does not know the work correctly it is selfevident that he cannot make a competent instructor. This policy of giving as much individual instruction as possible to the deputies who need it will be consistently carried out during the coming year. To those of the District Lecturers who have resigned because of removal from the district or for business reasons, I desire to express my regret that they have felt it necessary to retire from our official family and to thank them for the fine service they have rendered during their incumbency in office. In only one instance has death invaded the ranks of our District Lecturers, or more properly speaking of those who have served us in the recent past. Rt. W. Brother Granville J. Vaughan, who had served as District Deputy Grand Master and District Lecturer for about thirtyfive years and had served as District Lecturer under three Grand Lecturers, sent in the request at the time of the last annual communication that he be not reappointed to either office because of serious illness. At High Twelve on Christmas Day, 1937, his immortal spirit passed into the Grand Lodge on High and' , we shall know him on earth no more. " Brother Vaughan exemplified the highest type of Christian gentleman but he was generous and tolerant to those of other faiths. He was also in the highest and best sense a Mason by practice as well as by profession. Those who


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

83

knew him will ever mourn his passing and esteem his life and example as a precious memory. The Grand Lodge, at its last annual communication, appropriated the sum of Six Hundred Dollars to enable the Grand Lecturer to hold Schools of Instruction for his District Lecturers. This wag but the revival of an old and valuable custom which had obtained for a number of years prior to the depression of 1929. Pursuant to this wise provision of the Grand Lodge, two such schools of instruction were held-the first in the New Masonic Temple at St. Louis on Monday, January 10, 1938, and the second in the Ninth and Harrison Masonic Temple in Kansas City on Monday, February 7, 1938. The District Lecturers were divided into two approximately even groups, one of which attended each of these meetings. Both meetings were eminently successful and all in attendance expressed the hope that similar meetings would be held next year. At each of the meetings the local Grand Lodge officers and Past Grand Masters were invited to attend and most of them accepted the invitation. My special thanks are due the Grand Master for his attendance and cooperation at both meetings. His scholarly address on each occasion was highly appreciated. I desire to thank the Grand Secretary for his attendance and for his perfectly ordered business arrangements which enabled the meetings to go off without a hitch. Nor must I forget to thank Rt. W. Brothers Ralph Wilson and IWx E. Dewhirst, D. D. G. M. 's, and Rt. W. Bro. Wm. Zavadil, District Lecturer of the 33d District, for assisting with the arrangements and serving as a reception committee to the visiting brethren. Nor ean I forget the valuable work done in this same capacity at Kansas City by Rt. W. Bro. Charles Kornbrodt, D. D. G. M., and Rt. W. Bro. F. Ernest Carter, District Lecturer of the 22d District. I sincerely thank them for their assistance. May I express the hope that this Grand Lodge will continue the policy of underwriting these invaluable meetings, and that the Grand Master will invite all of his Deputies to attend and get the benefit of his message. A number of his deputies are not acting as District Lecturers. A few of the District Lecturers have vot sent in their reports. I deeply regret this fact as I should like to have reports from all the districts. Another year I shall insist on some kind of a report from each of my deputies. Enough of the deputies have reported however to give me a very clear picture of the situation as regards ritualistic proficiency throughout the State. A marked improvement has taken place in that regard in the last twelve months, though both the Grand Lecturer and his deputies still have an abundance of work to do. From a careful analysis of the reports of my District Lecturers I gather that they have officially visited seventy-five per cent of the Lodges throughout the State. In my opinion this demonstrates a high degree of zeal and efficiency on the part of a great majority of them. They report a growing interest in a correct knowledge of the ritual as well as a very wide, though not universal increase in the number of petitions and the amount of degree work being done. There seems to be a growing tendency among the Deputies to abandon the idea of holding comprehensive schools of instruction covering all the work in each of their lodges. They hold the better plan to be that of selecting one or more central points at which the officers of each of the lodges can be served to far better advantage. I am inclined to favor this plan in many if not all of the districts. The meetings of the District Associations have in many cases proved a valuable help to the Lecturers in disseminating their work. They can certainly reach a much larger audience at such meetings than they eould at meetings called solely for instruction. I trust that none of my Deputies


84

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

however will fall into the error of regarding the District Association meetings as the sole means of imparting instruction. They are indeed a valuable adjunct but should not be allowed to displace the regular and time-honored school of instruction. One lecturer reports that he has visited every lodge in his district but one and that lodge he has not visited "because it met very seldom and the Lodge is also weak." The report is an excellent one and shows a healthy condition of the Craft throughout Ilis district and a large amount of valuable and efficient work on his part. His reference to the "weak lodge" however brings home to me the fact that very soon the weak Lodges, of which the one referred to is a fair sample, must be made the subject of intelligent and concerted action, by those who bear the brunt of Masonic work and planning throughout the State. Through legitimate help and encouragement many of these weak Lodges can be saved and started once more on careers of great Masonic usefulness. I trust that in this great work the Grand Lecturer and his Deputies may bear at least a humble part. Among the reports received from my deputies I desire to make special mention of those from the 11th, 24th, 33d, 37th, 41st, 48th and 57th Districts. I do not mention these because of their length, nor to make invidious comparisons, but because they evince a fine appreciation of the responsibility a District Lecturer owes to the Grand Lodge, the Grand Lecturer and the Craft in his District and an earnest solicitude for the welfare of his Lodges and their officers and members. Some of my deputies have complained because I have not furnished them with blank questionnaires on which to make their reports. It has not been the custom to furnish the District Lecturers with blank questionnaires. The case of the D. D. G. M.'s report is not properly in point for the District Lecturer. There facts and figures relating to money, insurance and other items of business are called for and a questionnaire lends itself very conveniently to the recording of such facts. Nor do the best D. D. G. M.'s reports confine themselves to the mere jotting down of statistics. They often give in connected narrative form most intensely interesting accounts of splendid Masonic service and fellowship. Another year I may furnish my deputies with slips containing a list of suggested subjects on which to report but not with a blank questionnaire. I cannot begin to mention all of the brethren who have been exceedingly kind and helpful to me in my work during the past year for their number is legion but I want them all to feel that their cooperation is deeply appreciated, and that without it my task would have been an uphill one indeed. I think however that I may be pardoned if I do mention a few stalwart and enthusiastically loyal Past Grand Masters, all of whom are very busy men, who have taken a great interest in my work and have afforded me much aid and encouragement. They are Most Worshipful Brothers Robert R. Kraeger, Arch A. Johnson, Tolman W. Cotton, Bert S. Lee, Byrne E. Bigger, Ray V. Denslow and Frank C. Barnhill. Each of them is a tower of Masonic strength in his community, and a man of whose friendship anyone may be justly proud. Though I shall not mention them by name I want to give special thanks to my deputies for their valuable service and to the officers of the Lodges visited for their earnest cooperation. With the renewed help of all I confidently look forward to another year of even greater and finer achievement. In conclusion, I thank the Grand Master for his manifestations of confidence and his valuable help in a number of undertakings pertaining to my work. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, Grand Lecturer.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

85

ANNOUNCEMENT-NEW WOMEN'S BUILDING AT THE MASONIC HOME

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, I now want to call your attention, please, to a very important announcement which I am going to ask M. W. Brother Martin to make. M. W. BROTHER \V. \V. MARTIN: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren. The Grand Master has asked me to make an announcement concerning the dedication of the new building on the Masonic Home grounds this afternoon at three o'clock. Many of you Brethren have been to the Grand Lodge quite a few times and you have visited the Home often, but we are especially anxious for all of you to come to the Home today. We want you to see this new building, and we sincerely hope it will meet with your approval. As a matter of fact, we are so happy about your coming that we are going to serve a dinner this evening to everyone of you who attends. As soon as the dedication services are over, you will have an opportunity to go through the building. Beginning at four o'clock or shortly thereafter, in the administration building dining room, we will serve dinner, so that you may get back here on time tonight. \Ve are looking for every member of this Grand Lodge to come. I am sorry that the building is not entirely finished, but as a matter of fact we should be happy that it is as far along as it is, because ground was first broken on the 24th day of November, which means that a nine-story building has been practically completed in about ten months' time. There are just a few things about the building which lack completion. It will probably take a matter of two weeks to finish the building itself, and then it will probably take about sixty days, maybe a little longer, to completely furnish the building. It will probably be around December 1 or January 1 before we can move into this building. We certainly want all the Brethren to come out and see it, and take part in the dedication exercises. We also want you to visit with your members who are there. You know, many of our old people get mighty lonesome during the year. They have been moved from their own home environment, and it helps a lot to have you come and visit with them. Again, may I extend an invitation to the entire Grand Lodge to be present this afternoon at the dedication ceremony and to be the guests of the Masonic Home for dinner. THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, I hope you will not forget what Most Worshipful Brother Martin has said. May I remind you that we meet here this afternoon at 1 :30, and immediately upon the opening of the Grand Lodge this afternoon we shall have brief memorial service following the report of the Committee on Necrology, to the memory of those brethren who have passed away this past year. Tonight we have a most interesting session scheduled. I want to present to you Brother O. Wade Fallert, the organist of the Scottish Rite, who is to give a thirty-minute organ recital tonight. Brother


86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Fallert, please stand up. (Applause.) I hope you will be in your places at 7 :30 when this rerital begins. The Grand Orator, Doctor Cassius E. Street, will deliver his oration at eight o'clock, and at 8 :30 we shall have the presentation of 50-year Masonic Veterans Buttons to two of our Past Grand Masters. I know you will want to be present on that occasion. CALLED FROM LABOR

The M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR to refreshment at 12 noon to reconvene at 1 :30 o'clock P.M. of the same day.

FIRST DAY-AFTERNOON SESSION CALLED TO LABOR

At 1 :30 o'clock P.M., the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by M. W.Grand Master Harold L. Reader, th~ Grand Officers being in their respective stations as at the morning session. Prayer by W. Brother Thomas B. Mather, Grand Chaplain. PRESENTATION OF SWORDS TO THE GRAND LODGE

M. W. BRO. JAMES W. SKELLY: Most Worshipful Grand Master, and brethren. I have noted for years the need of this Grand Lodge for a suitable sword for the Grand Sword Bearer. I have secured one which has behind it a history. Years ago we had a faithful worker in this Grand Lodge who became Grand Master in 1916, Most W orshipful Brother Frank P. Jesse. 'He was Grand Secretary from 1921 until his death in 1927. His widow, Mrs. Jesse, asks me to present this sword to you, Most Worshipful Grand Master, for the use of this Grand Lodge, which I do with great pleasure. It is a beautiful sword. He wore it honorably as Commander of the Commandery in Mexico, Missouri, and now I take pleasure in presenting it to you. THE GRAND MASTER: Most Worshipful Brother Skelly, on behalf of this Grand Lodge I accept this sword with our hearty thanks. Most 'Vorshipful Brother Jesse was my friend for very many years, and a member of my church. I also conducted his funeral services. I hope you will convey to Mrs. Jesse our heartfelt thanks. R. W. BROTHER E. E. MORRIS: Most Worshipful Grand Master, few men in the Masonic fraternity in Missouri were ever held in more tender regard than George Coslow of St. Louis. For many years he was Grand Treasurer of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Missouri. 'Vherever he went he attracted the love, tenderness, and the fraternal and affectionate regard of all men with whom he came in contact. He was Master of Tuscan Lodge Number 360 in St. Louis in 1917. He was Commander of Ascalon Commandery Number 16 in


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

87

1924. At his death on July 4, 1937, he gave his Commander's sword to Brother Joseph Singer, Past Master of Clifton Heights Lodge Number 520 A. F. & A. M., who was his close personal friend. Now Brother Singer desires to donate this sword to the Grand Lodge for the use of the Grand Tiler, and at the request of Brother Singer, Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, I present this sword to the Grand Lodge of Missouri. THE GRAND MASTER: Right Worshipful Brother Morris; on behalf of this Grand Lodge I thank you most heartily for the gift of this beautiful sword. Brethren, George Coslow was my personal friend for many, many years. It was my sad duty to conduct his funeral services in this city after his Home-going. I hope, Right W orshipful Brother Morris, that you will convey our thanks to Brother Singer and express to him our deep gratitude for this kindness. W orshipful Grand Pursuivant, you will approach the Grand East. (Brother Kinder does so.) I place in your hand this sword. You will see that it is safely handed to the Grand f)'iler, and explain to him the rich possession for which he must be the custodian. You will say to him he is to guard it well as a sacred trust. I place, too, this sword in your hand. You will see that it is safely given to the Grand Sword Bearer of this Grand Lodge and charge him that during his term of office he is to be its custodian. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

Brethren, R. \\T. Brother Arthur Mather will now read the Report of the Committee on Necrology, following which we will have a brief memorial service in honor of our departed dead. Brethren: From the list of distinguished Brethren who have laid down the working tools of life, we note especially the passing of Thomas Chauncey Humphry, Past Grand Master of Arkansas, who also had the distinction of being Grand Correspondent of the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma, and the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory preceding the same, for the long term of thirty-five years. Brother Humphry occupied a distinguished place in the Masonic world, and reached the ripe age of ninetyone years. Illinois mourns the loss of Alexander Hamilton Bell, Past Grand Master, and Chairman, for many years, of the Committee on Jurisprudence, and perhaps the most distinguished figure in that Grand Lodge. The Brethren in Missouri knew him well, and esteemed him highly. This year Kentucky mourns the death of its Senior Past Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother James D. Black, who died August 5, 1938, at the advanced age of eighty-nine. Governor Black was for more than fifty years a mighty force in the Masonry of his native state, and was greatly revered by his Brethren. Maryland has been bereaved through the passing of Most Worshipful Brother Goorge W. Livingston, Past Grand Master; Nebraska mourns the loss of Past Grand Master William C. Ramsey, and New York will greatly miss Most Worshipful Brother Arthur S. Tompkins.


88

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

No less than six Grand Secretaries and Past Grand Secretaries have answered the summons to higher service during the year, including John Irving Fisher of Kentucky; Edward L. Faucette, Grand Secretary of Mississippi; John A. Perry, Grand Secretary of Pennsylvania, and his successor Harold N. Rust, who was their immediate Past Grand Master. South Dakota is likewise bereaved through the passing of Grand Secretary George A. Pettigrew, who was one of their early Grand Masters, and who wrought long and diligently in the Masonic vineyard. The United Grand Lodge of England is especially bereaved through the passing of R. W. Brother Sir P. Colville Smith, who served as Grand Secretary for a long term of years, with great acceptability, and he was unusually belo,ed by the Craft throughout that Grand Jurisdiction. In our Grand Jurisdiction 1,490 members, good men and true, have passed away during the year. Thus it is that we are called upon to recognize our own mortality, and to remember , 'Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting: The Soul that rises with us, our Life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar; Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory, do we come From God, who is our home." OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS

Arkansas: Thomas Chauncey Humphry, Past Grand Master, died December 3, 1937. A rizO'M: Sidney Sapp, Past Grand Master, died June 26, 1938; Arthur Clyde Taylor, Grand Orator, died December 27, 1937. Czechoslovakia: Constant Pierre, Deputy Grand Master, died January 18, 1938. Delaware: Henry T. Beers, Jr., Past Grand Master, died October 4, 1937; J. Bayard Hearn, Past Grand Master, died September 22, 1937. Englani1: Sir P. Colville Smith, Grand Secretary of The Grand Lodge of England. Florida: Fred M. DeLaney, Past Grand Master, died May 17, 1938. Illinois: Alexander Hamilton Bell, Past Grand Master, died April 14, 1938. Indiana: Thomas J. Wilson, Past Grand Master, died November 13, 1937. Kansas: Elrick Clayton Cole, Past Grand Master, died February 4, 1938; Thomas B. Fitch, Past Grand Master, died March 12, 1938; Giles H. Lamb, Past Grand Master, died November 19, 1937; John McCullagh, Past Grand Master, died December 6, 1937; Owen Jason Wood, Past Grand Master, died October 18, 1937. Kentucky: John Irving Fisher, Past Grand Secretary, died January 12, 1938; James D. Black, Past Grand Master, died August 5, 1938. Maine: Henry Warren Loring, Junior Grand Warden, died October 4, 1937. Manitoba: Lynds Smith Vaughan, Past Grand Master, died August 25, 1937. Marylani1: George W. Livingston, Past Grand Master, died October 16, 1937. Michigan: George Wm. Graves, Past Grand Master, died October 29, 1937.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

89

Mississippi: Edward Lee Faucette, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary, died August 10, 1938. Montana: Rual Vance Brown, Grand Marshal, died October 24, 1937.; Wm. Ray Calvin, Deputy Grand Master, died November 25, 1937; H. Sol Hepner, Past Grand Master, died February 28, 1938; Moses Morris, Past Grand Master, died November 8, 1937. Nebraska: William C. Ramsey, Past Grand Master, died May 19, 1938. New York: Arthur S. Tompkins, Past Grand Master, died January 21, 1938. Nova Scotia: Charles Reynolds Smith, Past Grand Master, died August 7, 1937. Oregon: Oliver Perry Coshow, Past Grand Master, Died December 18, 1937. Pennsylvania: John A. Perry, Grand Secretary, died November 20, 1937; Harold N. Rust, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary, died July 29, 1938. Saskatchewan: Lachlan Taylor McDonald, Past Grand Master, died April 17, 1937. South Dakota: Joseph J. Davenport, Past Grand Master, died October 17, 1937; George Atwood Pettigrew, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary, died April 13, 1938. Tennessee: William Roy Holland, Past Grand Master, died May 26, 1938; Charles Harvey McKinney, Grand Master, died August 24, 1938. West Virginia: Simon Prince Richmond, Past Grand Master, died February 22, 1938; George Summers Laidley, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary, died March 6, 1938 ; Walter Smith Sugden, Senior Grand Warden, died July 7, 1938. Wisconsin: .Tohn Jacobson, Grand Steward, died July 3, 1938. (Adopted.) MEMORIAL SERVICE THE GRAND MASTER:

pay tribute to M.

M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow will now

,V. Bro. John Pickard.

JOHN PICKARD The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour, The paths of glory lead but to the grave. Such was the gloomy outlook of one who wrote his elegy under the eerie influence of a country churchyard. Certainly, not the outlook of the Freemason to whom Death is the port where all may refuge find, The end of labor, entry unto rest. We know the latter view to have been that of our friend, to whom this day we pay our tribute of love and veneration, and to him, death came as gently as the light winds, wandering through the groves of bloom, detaching the delicate blossoms from the tree. For in the late afternoon of the great day set apart for thanksgiving by the American nation, when the shades of night began settling over a busy people, the Angel of Light entered a home, and touched one known to us as John Pickard, and as he sat, midst home and friends, he literally "wrapped the drapery of his couch about lJim, and lay down to pleasant dreams." No word of mine, his friend for forty years, can pay the tribute which


90

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

is his due. Was your conception of John Pickard an austere man, or one who felt himself above the multitude' Then you have erred, for this ~ustere manner was but the covering for a great heart, a heart which recognized the whole world as his brethren. Sympathetic was he to the extreme, but never swayed by prejudice or emotion. His choicest friends were those who knew him best, and Masonry of Missouri suffered because he did not sooner enter our ranks. This should not be the place to recount the story of his life, and what he was, his honors, family, or his hopes, but what he did, of how he lived, his practice and profession. Since custom so demands, so let it be: The Pickards were of Huguenot origin, the family fleeing from religious persecution to England, then to New England, where on October 12, 1858, the son, John, was born. Graduating from Dartmouth College in 1883, he went to Europe, where he attended the Universities of Munich, Berlin and Leipzig, and later the American Schools at Athens and Rome. His great service to the State of Missouri, besides his work as professor in the University of Missouri, was his connection with the Capitol Decoration Commission, to which project he gave nine years of active service. He retired from active teaching duty in 1931, but continued his Masonic 'connections until the end. He was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, Grand Master of the Grand Council, Grand Sovereign of the Red Cross of Constantine, as well as holding many positions in associated societies and auxiliaries. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church and funeral services were conducted in the church at Columbia on Sunday afternoon, November 28, 1937, by Grand Master Reader, assisted by Grand Secretary Mather. The body was interred in the family lot at Portsmouth, N. H. In one of his addresses, he said to us: "And today I am thinking of others who have :filled the highest office in your gift and who are now working back in the ranks. I am thinking, in fact, of all with whom I have been officially connected in the years I have been going through the line. To have known these companions has been an education j to have been friends with them has been a benediction. " Speaking before Grand Lodge in 1930, he said: "The greatest things in the world are not the corn and the wine, not the coal and the iron, not the silver and the gold. The greatest things in the world cannot be weighed in a balance, laid off on a scale, or estimated in the coin of the realm. The greatest things in the world are not the material things; they are the spiritual things. They are the things beyond price; they are the priceless things. The Freemason's faith is in the being and existence of the Eternal God; his loftiest hope is the hope of- immortal life; his divinest love is the love for fellowman." Continuing, he said: "As we read the records of the companions who have passed on, we judge them with a righteous judgment, not by what they accomplished; not by their failures, but by their successes; not by their weaknesses, but by their visions of Eternal Truth." With this brief record, let us close this tribute to one who was my teacher, guide, and friend. His religious and Masonic life had taught him that all who live must die, passing through nature to eternity; he had the Masonic vision of a glorious immortality, and to him the green sprig was indeed nature's proof of life beyond the grave. Death to us, should have no fear, for Death is the privilege of human nature; And life without it were not worth our taking, Thither the poor, the pris 'ner, and the mourner, Fly for relief, and lay their burdens down.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

91

Let us measure Dr. Pickard according to his own standard, "not for his weaknesses, but for his vision 'of Eternal Truth." So be our judgment of Dr. .John Pickard.

THE GRAND MASTER: A tribute to M. W. Bro. Orestes Mitchell will now be given by M. W. Brother W. W. Martin. ORESTES MITCHELL Let us here record the passing of our Brother, Orestes Mitchell, on April 19, 1938, at his home in St. .Joseph, Missouri. This is not the place to enumerate the many Masonic honors which came to him during his lifetime, nor go into the characteristics of the man, for he was one who we all knew, who worked with us, and in whose passing we all feel a common grief. The human race have a common heritage in sorrow and death. Death comes to all of us; "and he died" might well be written as the epitaph of any man, for it is the epitaph of every man. However, there are some compensations that death cannot take away. The deeds that a man does live after him; man's life does not end when he has been placed beneath the sod. To have .had a noble existence and to have performed a mission in life by rendering service to humanity is not to be forgotten so quickly, and is a compensation that even death cannot take away. No life is measured in terms of three score years and ten; this is but the quantity of years. It is the material part of life that passes from our vision. The quality of our lives is what determines good or evil. Character and worth do not fade from our consciousness, but remain in our reflections as the procession of our glorified dead moves on. We do not think of these as having become lost in the lengthening shadows, or who have gone away into the silent impenetrable gloom, nor as those upon whom black night has settled down resistlessly and remorselessly forever. We think of them as having reached the sun-crowned sum路 mit of the hill, or as those who journey on through fairer days and under bluer summer skies. There is yet another compensation of life that death cannot take away and that is our faith in immortality. Man has been made to live in two worlds-the world of material things, and the world of spiritual things. It is the world of material things which is temporary and passes away; the things that remain are the spiritual things, they are the things that abide. It is this faith, this hope of immortality beyond this earthly spirit that makes life endurable here and gives encouragement to hope for better prospects in a celestial life to come. A friend of ours has compared our lives to that of a twisted tree: , 'I never see a twisted treeAll bent by gale and bruised by storm, And yet, who'se torn and twisted form, Still sends its branches, full and free, Toward heaven, as though in prayer to be, Whose roots, deep down in Mother Earth Still grasp the soil that gave them birthThat something doesn't say to me, Here is a lesson you should learn; When storms of life you too, shall smite, And faith and hope seem nearly gone, And doubt your faltering steps would turn, Stand firm for what you think is right, And in God's name, fight on and on.' "


92

PROCEEDINGS

1938

THE GRAND MASTER: M. W. Brother A. F. Ittner will speak in eulogy of R. W. Bro. Granville J. Vaughan. GRANVILLE J. VAUGHAN Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren, I have no specially prepared memorial to Right Worshipful Brother Granville J. Vaughan, and such remarks as I make will have to spring spontaneously from my heart. I esteem it an bonor to be called upon to speak about one who was so widely known and widely loved throughout the State of Missouri as was Right Worshipful Brother Vaughan. It was my good fortune to have known him for upwards of a third of a century. Perhaps thirty-five or thirty-six years ago I became acquainted with him in the Grand Lodge and have sat with him in schools of instruction held by three Grand Lecturers whom he served loyally and efficiently. Under Right Worshipful Brother McDowell he was a young and vigorous man who had learned the work early in his Masonic career, who saw the beauties of Freemasonry and knew the letter of the ritual. Brother Vaughan, I think, might be caUed a one hundred per cent Freemason, because he not only aspired to be one but he exemplified the tenets of Freemasonry in his daily life. I can see Brother Vaughan in my mind's eye, in the days before the automobile, when the old horse and buggy was still in vogue, driving up and down the Ozarks throughout his district attending a meeting perhaps in one of ita larger towns or in a remote hamlet, conferring degrees, delivering lectures, officiating at a Masonic funeral, or perhaps sitting up with a sick or dying brother, for in those days it was the custom for members of lodges to sit up with those who were sick and also to sit up with the dead, and to administer comfort and material assistance to widows and to orphans. Brother Vaughan was called on many times to act in each and all of these capacities and he never shirked his duty a single time. Brother Vaughan was one who was absolutely free from all manner of sham or pretense. He had a sense of humor, but the serious things of life were uppermost in his heart and mind. To be helpful to his fellowman was the cardinal tenet of his life which, of course, was a necessary corollary to his deep and abiding faith of the teachings of his religion. He was a devout Christian, but as I intimated in my report as Grand Lecturer, he was tolerant of all men and saw the good in every human being. To have known Right Worshipful Brother Vaughan at least slightly would be an inspiration to anyone, but to have known him as intimately and as long as I did has been an illumination that cannot fade while life endures. Brother Vaughan never pretended to be a great man. Perhaps, in the common acceptation of the term, he was not, unless we say he was great because of his sterling and rugged honesty, his great heart, his indomitable soul, his devotion, and his loyalty to every cause with which he became affiliated; loyalty to his government, to his church, to his family, and to Freemasonry. And I can assure you that his loyalty to Freemasonry was by no means the least of his loyalties. The Grand Lodge and each of us is deeply indebted to Rt. W. Brother Granville J. Vaughan for a lifetime of distinguished, devoted and never-to-be-forgotten Masonic service.

THE GRAND MASTER: My brethren, please rise with me for a moment of silent prayer in memory of these beloved brethren. (The Grand Lodge stands.) I wish to thank Most Worshipful Brothers Denslow, Martin and Ittner, for the beautiful tributes they have paid to these distinguished and beloved brethren of this Grand Lodge.


JOHN PICKARD OCTOBER 12, 1858

NOVE:MBER 25,1937


94

1938

PROCEEDINGS O:F THE IN MEMORIAM GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. OF MISSOURI

JOHN PICKARD To the Worshipful Master:;, Warden:;, and BretMen of All Lodge:; A. F. tf A. M. in Missouri: Dear BretMen: With deep regret I have to inform you that in the early afternoon of Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1937, our beloved Brother, Most Worshipful John Pickard, Past Grand Master, entered into the "Higher Service" of The Celestial Grand Lodge from his home at Columbia, Missouri. Doctor Pickard presided over the One Hundred Seventh Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, held at Kansas City, Missouri, October 25, 1927, and the Craft in Missouri is bereaved of one of its outstanding characters. However, "he ever lives in the hearts of those who knew him best." John Pickard was born October 12, 1858, near Penacook, New Hampshire, the son of Samuel Chase and Clara H. (Moore) Pickard. His ardent desire to receive a higher education was satisfied when he was permitted to attend the celebrated New England College, Dartmoutb, from which institution he graduated in 1883 with a Degree of A.B., and later, in 1886, with the Degree of A.M. Following his graduation he became principal of the Black River Academy in the City of Ludlow, Vermont, and later principal of the high school in the City of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in which capacity he served for a period of four years. His schooling at Dartmouth onlv whetted his desire for further education and we next find him a student in the old world Universities at Munich, Berlin and Leipzig, receiving his Degree of Ph.D. from the first named of these institutions in 1892. In the fall of that year he came to the University of Missouri as Assistant Professor of Greek and Professor of Classical Archaeology and History of Art. In 1898-99, he served as Dean of the Academic Faculty, and was Acting Dean in 1904-05. In appreciation of his splendid services as a university instructor, and particularly for his work in connection with the decoration of the Missouri Capitol Building, he was the recipient of the Degree of Doctor of Fine Al'ts, conferred upon him, in 1925, by Chancellor Hadley of Washington University. In addition to the schools above mentioned we find him for a time a student at the American School in Rome and in Athens. That he had a reputation for scholarship while in college is evidenced by his election to Phi Beta Kappa in Alpha Chapter in N~w Hampshire. His education and training has led him into many outside activities closely connected with his lifework; he was a member of the American Philological Association and of the Archaeological Institute of America. Elected in 1914, as president of the College Art Association he served continuously for five years. He was also president of the Missouri Society of the Archaeological Institute. One of the greatest services which he has rendered to his adopted state was his work in connection with the Capitol Decoration Commission, to which commission he rendered nine years of service as president. This commission consisted of five members and had complete charge of the decoration of the Missouri State Capitol, said to be one of the most beautiful of its kind in America. Our distinguished brother was the author of numerous articles which have been published in philological, archaelogical and art periodicals of this and other countries; he also wrote and published two well-known

â&#x20AC;˘


JOHN PICKARD OCTOBER 12, 1858

NOVEMBER 25, 1937


94

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

IN MEMORIAM GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. OF MISSOURI JOHN PICKARD

To the Worshipful Masters, Wardens, and Brethren of All Lodges A. F. <t A. M. in Missouri: Dear Brethl'en: With deep regret I have to inform you that in the early afternoon of Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1937, our beloved Brother, Most Worshipful John Pickard, Past Grand Master, entered into the , 'Higher Service" of The Celestial Grand Lodge from his home at Columbia, Missouri. Doctor Pickard presided over the One Hundred Seventh Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, held at Kansas City, Missouri, October 25, 1927, and the Craft in Missouri is bereaved of one of its outstanding characters. However, "he ever lives in the hearts of those who knew him best." John Pickard was born October 12, 1858, near Penacook, New Hampshire, the son of Samuel Chase and Clara H. (Moore) Pickard. His ardent desire to receive a higher education was satisfied when he was permitted to at~end the celebrated New England College, Dartmoutn, from which institution he graduated in 1883 with a Degree of A.B., and later, in 1886, with the Degree of A.M. Following his graduation he became principal of the Black River Academy in the City of Ludlow, Vermont, and later principal of the high school in the City of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in which capacity he served for a period of four years. His schooling at Dartmouth onlv whetted his desire for further education and we next find him a student in the old world Universities at Munich, Berlin and Leipzig, receiving his Degree of Ph.D. from the first named of these institutions in 1892. In the fall of that year he came to the University of Missouri as Assistant Professor of Greek and Professor of Classical Archaeology and History of Art. In 1898-99, he served as Dean of the Academic Faculty, and was Acting Dean in 1904-05. In appreciation of his splendid services as a university instructor, and particularly for his work in connection with the decoration of the Missouri Capitol Building, he was the recipient of the Degree of Doctor of Fine Arts, conferred upon him, in 1925, by Chancellor Hadley of Washington University. In addition to the schools above mentioned we find him for a time a student at the American School in Rome and in Athens. That he had a reputation for scholarship while in college is evidenced by his election to Phi Beta Kappa in Alpha Chapter in N ~w Hampshire. His education and training has led him into many outside activities closely connected with his lifework; he was a member of the American Philological Association and of the Archaeological Institute of America. Elected in 1914, as president of the College Art Association he served continuously for five years. He was also president of the Missouri Society of the Archaeological Institute. One of the greatest services which he has rendered to his adopted state was his work in connection with the Capitol Decoration Co=ission, to which commission he rendered nine years of service as president. This commission consisted of five members and had complete charge of the decoration of the Missouri State Capitol, said to be one of the most beautiful of its kind in America. Our distinguished brother was the author of numerous articles which have been published in philological, archaelogical and art periodicals of this and other countries; he also wrote and published two well-known


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

95

volumes, one of them "Standort del' Schauspieler und des Chors im Griechischen Theater des Fuenften J ahrhunderts" and" Pre-Greek Art. " In 1889, he was happily married to Miss Jeanie A. Gerrish, which union was blessed by a daughter, now Mrs. Caroline P. Culbert of Taos, New Mexico, both of whom survive him. Doctor Pickard's Masonic career began in the year 1909 and from that date until his demise he labored diligently in all the bodies connected with our Ancient Institution. He presided over the Grand Lodge, the Grand Chapter, the Grand Council, and the Grand Imperial Council of the Red Cross of Constantine. He was also active in the Scottish Rite and was coroneted Sovereign Grand Inspector General (Honorary) in October, 1917. In everyone of these bodies, as well as the subordinate units, he did his full share of work and was in constant demand for lectures and addresses relating to Freemasonry. We shall always remember him as a diligent and devoted exponent of the principles of our Mystic Art. "May we meet again when twilight has become day." Funeral services were held in the First Presbyterian Church at Columbia, on Sunday afternoon, November 28. The religious service was conducted by the pastor of the 路church, followed by the Grand Lodge Service conducted by the Grand Master, assisted by the Grand Secretary acting as Grand Chaplain. A large number of Masonic Brethren including several grand officers and past grand officers of the various bodies, were present. At the conclusion of the service the body was conveyed to the train, under a Knights Templar escort, and the final interment took place in the family lot in Harmony Grove Cemetery at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in the presence of a number of the officers and members of the Grand Lodge of New HampsJ:ii.re. It is ordered that this memorial be read in all the lodges in this jurisdiction, and that entry be made in the records thereof. Done in the City of Webster Groves, Missouri, this 7th day of December, 1937. HAROLD L. READER, Grand Master. Attest: ARTHUR MATHER, Grand Secretary.


96

PROCEEDINGS

1938

MASONIC

Raised-March 3, 1909, in Acacia Lodge No. 602, of Columbia, Missouri. Worshipful Master-1911, 1912. District Deputy Grand Master-1912 to 1917. GRAND LODGE

Elected Junior Grand Warden-1923. Elected Senior Grand Warden-1924. Elected Deputy Grand Master-1925. Elected Grand Master-1926. Presided as Grand Master-1927. Received Capitular Degrees, Columbia Royal Arch Chapter No. 17,1909. High Priest in 1911. Grand High Priest 1923. Received Cryptic Degrees in Centralia Council No. 34, March 20, 1911. Ill. Master in 1913 and 1915. M. Ill. Grand Master in 1918. Knighted in St. Graal Commandery No. 12, Columbia, Missoul'i, May 25, 1909. R. E. Commander, 1911, 1912. Imperial Sovereign: Imperial Council Order of Red Cross of Constantine of the United States of America, 1934. Received the Degrees in Western Consistory A. A. S. R., at Kansas City, Missouri, 1909. K. C. C. H., 1913. S. G. I. G. (Honorary) 33째,1917.


(~

\.

-

ORESTES MITCHELL DECEMBER 26, 1876

APRIL 19, 1938


98

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

IN MEMORIAM GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. OF MISSOURI ORESTES MITCHELL

To the Worshipful Masters, Wardens, and Bl路ethren of All Lodges A. F. <f A. M. in Missouri: Dear Bl'ethren: It is again my sad duty to inform you of the passing of another of our distinguished Past Grand Masters, Most Worshipful Brother Orestes Mitchell, who exchanged mortality for life on Tuesday morning April 19, 1938, thus depriving our Grand Lodge, and Freemasonry at large, of a highly esteemed, active and useful member. M. W. Brother Mitchell, our eighty-first Grand Master, was the oldest son of Levi and Sarah E. (Oliphant) Mitchell. He was born near Buena Vista, Indiana, December 26, 1876, and when he was foul' years old his parents moved to a farm near Orrsburg, Nodaway County, Missouri, then to a farm neal' Lakin, Kearney County, Kansas, and after a short residence there, moved to St. Joseph, Missouri. M. W. Brother Mitchell grew to manhood in St. Joseph, and on graduating from its high school, he entered the School of Law of the State University at Columbia, completing the course and graduating with honor in 1900. Beginning the practice of law in St. Joseph he successfully continued to follow his profession there to the end of his life. He was a member of the St. Joseph Bar Association, and served two terms as its President. He was also a member of the Missouri Bar Association, and the American Bar Association. He was for many years actively identified with the civic life of his beloved city, having been an active member of the Chamber of Commerce, and a Past President of the Rotary Club. He also took an active part in the educational work of his city and county, having served for eight years on the Board of Education of St. Joseph, two of which he occupied the President's chair. During the World War he was a Government appeal agent and a member of the Americanization Committee of the State Council of Defense. He has always been characterized by his patriotism and loyalty to our American Institutions. M. W. Brother Mitchell was a devoted member of the Huffman Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church, and an earnest worker therein. He was happily married April 15, 1902, to Miss Inez A. Samuel, of St. Joseph, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Samuel. Foul' children have blessed this union j two sons and two daughters j Samuel Orestes, Martha Elizabeth, Francis Marion, Maryle Florence, all of which, with their mother, survive him. M. W. Brother Mitchell first saw the light of Freemasonry when he was made an Entered Apprentice in Charity Lodge No. 331, on June 13, 1904. He was passed to the Degree of Fellow Oraft on June 27, 1904, and raised to the sublime Degree of Master Mason on July 16, 1904, serving as Worshipful Mastel' of Oharity Lodge in 1910. In 1913 and 1914 he was District Deputy Grand Master for the Ninth Masonic District. In 1914 he was appointed Grand Sword Bearer in the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and regularly advanced in line until 1924, when he was elected Most Worshipful Grand Master. During his year of office Brother Mitchell gave ample proof of his fitness for the exalted position to which he had been called by his brethren, giving freely of his time and talents. In a word, he was a most painstaking and level-headed leader of our Masonic forces in Missouri. At the close of his term of office as Grand Master he was elected a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home, which honored position he still held at the time of his death, and whose interests he served with conspicuous ability, more extended acknowledgment of which doubtless will be placed on record by that Board.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

99

Funeral services were held in the Meierhoffer Funeral Home at St. Joseph on Thursday, April 21, 1938, the religious exercises being under the direction of his beloved Pastor, Rev. E. L. Robison, one of the Grand Chaplains of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The scripture lesson was read by the Rev. Doctor Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, and prayer was offered by the Rev. Doctor Harold L. Reader, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, after which the ~1asonic funeral service was rendered by the officers of Charity Lodge No. 331 at the graveside in Memorial Cemetery, St. Joseph. It is ordered that this memorial be read in all the lodges in this jurisdiction, and that entry be made in the records thereof. Done in the City of Webster Groves, Missouri, this 28th day of April, 1938. HAROLD L. READER, Attest: Grand Master. ARTHUR MATHER,

Grand Secretary. MASONIC RECORD SYMBOLIC. Raised in Charity Lodge No. 331, St. Joseph, Missouri, July 16, 1904. Worshipful Master 1910. District Deputy Grand Master 1913-1914. GRAND LODGE Elected Junior Grand Warden-1921. Elected Senior Grand Warden-1922. Elected Deputy Grand Master-1923. Elected Grand Master-1924. Presided as Grand Master-1925. CAPITULAR. Exalted in Mitchell Royal Arch Chapter No. 14, March 21, 1909. CRYPTIC. Greeted in St. Joseph Council No.9, R. and S. M., November 30, 1910. CHIVALRIC. Knighted in Hugh De Payens Commandery No.4, May 3, 1920. A. A. S. R. St. Joseph Consistory, St. Joseph, Lodge of Perfection 1905, Chapter of Rose Croix 1906, Council of Kadosh 1907, Consistory 1908. K. C. C. H., October 19, 1911. S. G. I. G. (Honorary) 33째, October 24, 1913. Deputy: Valley of St. Joseph, November 1, 1913 to April 1916. A. A. O. N. M. S. Moila Temple, April 9, 1909. Ill. Potentate 1918. M. O. V. P. E. R. Zoroaster Grotto, Charter Member, April 9, 1921. Monarch 1922. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC PUBLIC:ATIONS

M. W. Brother James W. Skelly presented the report of the Committee which was adopted, and is as follows: The report submitted last year by this Committee stressed in detail the importance and need of Masonic education through the medium of the Lodges, and made several recommendations, which were adopted. These recommendations included, among other things, furnishing of Masonic literature to Lodges, and ultimately the publication of a Masonic bulletin or magazine under the direction of the Grand Lodge. This is being done in other Grand Jurisdictions, one of which has a smaller membership than Missouri. Our Grand Lodge has so far been unable to find means to carry these recommendations into effect. We understand that the Committee on Masonic Service will resume publication and distribution of the pamphlet prepared several years ago


102

PROCEEDINGS

1938

CALLED FROM LABOR

At 2 :15 o'clock P. M. the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 3 :00 o'clock P. M., to meet at the Masonic Home. DEDICATION OF THE WOMEN'S BUILDING AT THE MASONIC' HOME

Promptly at 3 :00 o'clock P.M. the Grand Lodge assembled in the hall of the new Women's Building at the Masonic Home, and after an invocation by 'Worshipful Brother Rabbi Samuel Thurman, the Grand Master, assisted by the Grand Officers, formally dedicated this building in due and ancient form, in the presence of a multitude of the brethren, and many members of the Eastern Star Chapter of St. Louis. CALLED FROM LABOR

The Grand Lodge was then CALLED FROM LABOR to refreshment, to meet again at 7 :30 o'clock P.M.} at the Scottish Rite Cathedral.

FIRST DAY, EVENING SESSION CALLED TO LABOR

At 7 :30 o'clock P. M., the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by the M. W. Grand Master. Prayer was offered by W. Thomas B. Mather, Grand Chaplain. THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, we are to have a rare treat tonight. It is now our privilege to listen for thirty minutes to an organ recital by Brother Wade Fallert. This is indeed a privilege which is accorded us as members of this Grand Lodge. Then followed a most delightful musical recital by Brother Wade Fallert, organist of The Scottish Rite, which was enjoyed by everyone present. THE GRAND MASTER: On behalf of this Grand Lodge, Brother Fallert, I thank you most heartily for your beautiful program. Brethren, it is a great personal pleasure to me to introduce to you the Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge. He and I have been friends for several years, and for a year or two were neighbors in my home city. May I present to you the Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge, W. Brother Rev. Dr. Cassius E. Street, Minister of the Linwood Boulevard M. E. Church in Kansas City, Missouri, who will speak to us at this time. ORATION

Most Worshipful Grand Master, Right Worshipful Grand Wardens and members of this Grand Lodge: It is a great joy to me to have


104

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

fellowship with you on this occasion, and I want first of all to congratulate you on having the good taste and the good judgment to elect our brother and my good friend, the Most Worshipful Grand Master of this Lodge. I think you exercised particularly fine judgment possibly because he appointed me as Grand Orator. I heard a story a few weeks ago which I thought you might like to hear. It concerns a man who was slowly but inevitably going blind. He had done everything that he knew to stop the terrible darkness that was gradually creeping in upon him, but nothing seemed to avail. He talked to his friends about it-he talked to everyone who would listen. Finally in sheer desperation one day a friend said to him, "Have you ever tried a chiropractor~" He said, "No, I haven't. " , 'Well, " the friend said, "it may seem a peculiar suggestion, but I have a lot of faith in this man and I think he is worth going to, I believe I would try him if I were you." So under the persuasion of his friend, and having everything to gain and nothing to lose, he said, "All right, I will be glad to try it." He went to the chiropraetor's office and the doctor examined him and then proceeded to give him a treatment. Finally he struck a certain place, and when he pushed in at that place, something clicked, and just as clearly as the noonday sun, for the first time in many long, dreary months, the man could see. You can imagine the sheer joy of his soul as he paid the doctor, and adding an extra bill to the fee, went on his way rejoicing. When he arrived at his office he called the chiropractor and he said, "I am a little bit troubled. I deeply appreciate what you have done, but I can't remember anything that happened since the time that I was able to see." The chiropractor was somewhat disturbed and said, "Well, you better hasten back to the office." So the man went back, and the doctor put him on the table again and began another treatment, and when he struck that place--click-he could remember everything but he couldn't see. So the doctor experimented with him a little bit, and when he would push in at that particular spot the man could see but he couldn't remember, or he could remember, but he couldn't see. At last the chiropractor said to him, "Well, sir, I have the painful duty to tell you that you will have to take your choice. If you see, you will not be able to remember.. If you remember, you will not be able to see." The man hesitated a bit and then said, "Well, I choose to see." "Very well," said the doctor, and proceeded to make an adjustment so the patient could see. As the man was leaving the doctor's office, the doctor said, "Just a moment, I want to ask you a question. It isn't professional, you need not answer it, but I would like to know by what standard of judgment, by what scale of value, you made up your mind that you would rather see than remember." The man replied, "Well, I decided immediately that I would rather be able to see where I am going, than to remember some of the places I have been." Well now, wouldn't we all prefer to see where we are going ~ Let us think togetlier about this subject-" Masonry As aWay of Life." To first discover where we路 are going, we have to know where we are. I am told that the Chinese have five points on their compass, north, east, south, west and where you are. It does make a difference. The colored boy asked his friend, "What is the meaning, Mose, of status quo ~" The friend replied: "Status quo, boy, that is Greek for the fix that you is now in. " The fix that you is now in, the place where we are, the starting point from where we are to go, as we look at this subject tonight, constitutes one of the important considerations as we think together again about that subject, "Masonry As a Way of Life." There is a great deal of confusion economically, as to just exactly


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

105

where we are. For example, I remember, when an honest day's work for an honest day's pay was the accepted philosophy of life, the man who worked was expected to thrive. The man who refused to work was generally expected not to get along so well. Back in the days when this country of ours was being wrought out of the wilderness, the law was that a man who didn't work didn't eat. The best thing about our democracy and the factor that made equals of us all was the urgent demand to work. There are quite a few people, some of them may possibly be very near where we live, who do not Beem to relate wealth and work together. I remember reading a story about Lady Asquith walking along the shores of her beloved England one morning when she came upon a hobo camp. Being interested in all life, she thought she would inquire how one member of the camp would spend his day. Approaching him she said, "My good man, do you know what you are going to do today'" He replied, "Well, Madam, every morning after we have had our coffee in camp, I get up on the railroad dump and do what we hoboes call' smell the wind,' by that I mean I find out which way the wind is blowing, then I turn my back to the wind." That constituted his program for the day. So he became the victim of every' hapless breeze that blew. And I think there are a good many people that smell the wind to find out which way it is blowing and then turn their backs to it. It is incredible and almost unbelievable to read in our newspapers what I presume is a fact, that one man out of every four in the population of the United States is getting pay from the National Government. There are a lot of things about economics that I do not know. I don't even pose as a partial expert or the son of one, but I do have a vague impression that that sort of thing cannot long endure. I have a profound conviction that that sort of thing is going to be changed. We are not only economically confused today, but we are also socially confused. There was a time when wealth that had been accumulated by thrift and hard work entitled a man to a place of respect and honor in his community. That has been gradually changed in thesc reccnt years. It is not only unpopular, but almost impossible for that thing to prevail today. Great sections of the world have turned from that philosophy of life, of thrift and hard work. And so those sections of the world go Communist or Fascist, or whatever they choose to go. The class distinctions that are arising as a result of that confusion are inevitable. Weare not only confused in economies and social customs and practices, but we are also confused morally. Millions and millions of people have come to doubt the very existence of God. Did you read in the newspapers last week the report on a questionnaire circulated by Professor Link, one of the great psychologists of our country, asking about the state of religion' The majority answered that religion was on the decline as far as they could see. Men are giving up faith in God, which means they are giving up the belief in moral law, in the fact that somewhere at the heart of the universe is goodness, that ultimately right will triumph, and justice, virtue, and integrity will be the things worthy of honor. They are giving up a belief in the whole category of judgment and reward. They are throwing over faith in life beyond the grave. In a word, greed and selfishness have become the law. And the fool's philosophy of eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow you die, becomes the noblest wisdom of the ages. So with faith in God gone, every standard that we have in the moral code today is brought into question. I can pronounce assuredly that tomorrow is going to bring changes. What they are' I am not at all sure that I know. Masonry takes its stand in the midst of a confused world, and in the


106

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

words of another says, "I am the Way." What is that way, brethren' Let me point out just two or three things that we mean by Masonry as a way of life. First of all it is a way of work. I do not know how old Masonry is, but this 1 do know, that it is venerated with the forgotten customs of accumulated centuries, and it was gray-headed when many of these things, Communism and Fascism for instance, were brought to the scene of life. Masonry had its birth, though aged it may be, at a place where men labored together. Such words as "tools" and "craft" permeate our ritual, and sound like a repeated refrain over and over again. Masonry knows no other vocabulary except the vocabulary of work and labor. It comes out of and derives its name from the trade out of which it grew. I am keenly aware that there is a great deal of trouble in the world today because of enforced unemployment. But 1 am also fully aware that there is a great deal of trouble as a result of acceptable unemployment. I talked this afternoon with Bishop Hughes, who is here to hold a conference in which I have a membership. Bishop Hughes lost his wife a few days ago, and it was a question whether or not he would accept our invitatum to preside at our annual conference meeting at Union Church in St. Louis. I greeted him on the street and expressed my sympathy for his loss and he said, "The most miserable time I ever spent in my life was the three days following the funeral of my wife, when I didn't do a thing. My only hope and my only salvation," he said, , 'is to have a job." He had come to St. Louis to carryon the regular routine of his work, because he knew without it life would be intolerable for him. This is Van Dykes' gospel of labor, "Ring out ye bells of Kirk-but the blessing of earth is toil." It is work that men need, it is work for which we ought to be willing to strive and make sacrifices. A good many of our problems could be solved if we had but the willingness to sacrifice, in order that we might have that compensation. No man liveth unto himself. Masonry long ago learned that supreme lesson. We must learn that we need to help each other-not only because the other brother needs it, but for ourselves, and to guarantee our own security. A frail little girl was once met by a man on the street. She was carrying a little brother who was smaller than she was. The man remarked about it. He said, "Why, sister, he must be a terrible load for you, why do you carry him'" .She replied, "Oh, no, you don't understand, Mister, he is my brother." Ah, yes, that does make a difference. The helping of a brother in need, not only because he needs it, but for our own welfare and for the sake of our own security, we need to do just exactly that. There is the story of two men who found themselves on a' mountain caught in a snowstorm. It became evident that one of them couldn't go on. One fellow fought a great battle in his soul as he saw his companion struggling against the elements, and he did not know whether to leave him for certain death in the snow, or whether to put him on his own shoulder and take a chance on finding shelter not far away. Finally' his better nature won, and he pulled his exhausted companion up on his shoulder and started on. Much to his amazement he discovered that the extra energy needed to carry that added burden brought new heat to his own body, which later revived his companion, and soon he found a sheltered place and so both were saved. That is the kind of brotherhood that ought to bind us more closely together than ever before through these trying days through which we are passing. That is the way to keep us from sel1ishness and self-centeredness,


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

107

and ultimately it is the way for us to save ourselves. Not only is Masonry a way of life, but it is also a way of liberty. Liberty first of all from fear. I heard a man a few days ago discussing fear as Public Enemy No.2, and I think perhaps he is right. Talk to a business man on the street today, and ask him what is the matter with business. He will tell you the reason is that nobody quite knows what is going to happen. Insecurity, fear of the unknown, fear to face that which might happen. The thing that sometimes makes death appear as such an enemy is the fact we know nothing about it. Masonry is a philosophy of truth, and the truth makes men free. Freedom from fear, liberty from injustice. I suppose when I say the word "inquisition" most of us here tonight believ.e it to be just a dull word on history's even duller page, and yet do you know, gentlemen, that the inquisition, following its origin about the year 1230, cost the lives of twenty-one thousand men' Any man could be seized and tried for heresy. He may never know the name of his accuser, but he could be put in prison and tried by a secret trial, robbed of his property, bereft of his loved ones, stretched upon the racks until he was literally torn limb from limb. It is a long way from that day to the liberty which you and I enjoy today. But the time is here when it behooves all men, and particularly Masons, to be keenly sensitive and to discourage those powers that would gradually stifle and deny the liberties that have been so nobly gained. I think it is time that we keep our ears to the ground in order that we might somehow guarantee that liberty from injustice. How easily we forget those days, prior to 1776. For one hundred and fifty years unwilling taxes had literally been wrung from our reluctant h3:Dds. Then there stood up in the South that fiery man who said" ... but as for me, give me liberty or give me death. " It was these immortal words that sent men out to purchase at the price of blood, the noblest instrument of government that God has ever given to the face of the earth, and into the hands of mankind--democracy. I pray God that in these trying, troubled hours, the democracies of the world might stand shoulder to shoulder, let the consequences be what they may. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are named as the inalienable rights of all, so liberty is one of the triune rights of every man. Liberty from tyranny and oppression. It was Abraham Lincoln who said, "I would rather be assassinated upon the spot upon which I now stand, than to surrender the principles contained in the Declaration of Independence." And so, my brethren, Masonry is a way of life, it is first of all, a way of work, a way of brotherhood, and a way of liberty, and may God grant that her sun may never set. (Applause.) THE GRAND MASTER: Worshipful Brother Street, I want to thank you on behalf of this Grand Lodge for your excellent address. I know that we are deeply appreciative of it and we thank you most sincerely.

PRESENTATION OF FIFTY-YEAR MASONIO VETERAN BUTTONS TO M. W. BROTHERS ROBERT R. KREEGER AND VAN FREMONT BOOR THE GRAND MASTER: Right Worshipful Brother Grand Senior Deacon, you will present at the altar Most Worshipful Brothers Robert R. Kreeger and Van Fremont Boor. (Presented as requested.)


108

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

My brethren, it is a very great personal pleasure and joy to me, on behalf of this Grand Lodge, to present to you this token of love Rnd esteem. This is indeed a memorable occasion as it is the first time in the history of Masonry in this state that any Grand Master of this Grand Lodge has been presented with a veteran button. I am much younger in years and in service than either of you brethren, but I have known you personally for a long time and your friendship means much to me. Now as Grand Master of this Grand Jurisdiction, it is my privilege to present to you these veteran buttons. Most Worshipful Brother Robert R. Kreeger was initiated January 7, 1888, passed April 21, 1888, raised June 19, 1888, in Temple Lodge No. 299. Most Worshipful Brother Van Fremont Boor was initiated February 22, 1886, passed March 22, 1886, raised April 24, 1886, in Acacia Lodge No.9 at Lawrence, Kansas, demitted July 21, 1887 and affiliated May 2, 1888 with Rural Lodge No. 316. My well beloved Most Worshipful brethren, I now present to you these veteran buttons. I hope you will wear them with pleasure. I know you will wear them with honor to this Fraternity. May I wish for you God's richest blessing, and express the hope that you may be with us for many more years. God bless ~ou. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 8 :35 o'clock P.M. the M. 'V. Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 8 :30 o'clock A.M. 'Veonesday morning, September 28, 1938.

SECOND DAY-MORNING SESSION CALLED TO LABOR

At 8 :30 o'clock A.M., the M. "'N. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by M. 'V. Grand Master, the Grand Officers being in their respective stations as on the preceding day. Prayer was offered by R. "'N. Brother Thomas B. Mather, Grand Chaplain. M. E. COMPANION ROBERT LEE BARGER

M. W. BROTHER SKELLY: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren. From the peace of Arcadia Valley there comes to us a visitor, the Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons. He is no stranger to us in this locality. I now take pleasure in. presenting Most Excellent Companion Robert Lee Barger. . :THE GRAND MASTER:. Most Excellent Companion Barger, 'we' greet you in this Grand Lodge. The relationship between your body and


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

109

ours is most cordial and it is a great pleasure to have you with us today. Y 011 will be escorted to a seat in the East. RESOLUTIONS

THE GRAND SECRETARY: Most 'Vorshipful Grand Master, I have here five resolutions which are to be read. I For several years the Committees on Masonic Publications and Masonic Service Associations, in their reports, have recommended the establishment of some plan of Masonic Education, and These reports having been adopted by the Grand Lodge without, however, any concrete action, therefore, Be It Resolved by this Grand Lodge that the sum of $200.00 be appropriated to be used by these committees jointly that such work may begin. Resp€ctfully submitted, RoBT. C. WINKELMAIER, JAMES W. SKELLY, ROBERT R. WRIGHT.

II

This Grand Lodge having adopted the custom of erecting suitable markers to mark places of Missouri Masonic history, and believing that such a marker should be placed in St. Louis to mark the place at which those intrepid explorers ap.d ,Freemasons started on their journey to the Northwest, we l'erommend that such a marker or plaque be erected in the City of St. Louis, preferably on the facade of the New Masonic Temple. Resp€ctfully submitted, RoBT. C. 'VINKELMAIER, JOHN R. DAVIS, ROBERT R. WRIGHT.

III In conformity with a custom adopted in recent years, looking towards the marking of Masonic historical places of interest, your committee recommends that a memorial plaque be erected in the City of Columbia, Missouri, commemorating the Session of the Grand Lodge held in Columbia. Resp€ctfully submitted, ROBT. C. WINKELMAIER, JOHN R. DAVIS, ROBERT R. WRIGHT.

The above resolutions were read and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

IV Be It Resolved, That Section 66 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws, be, and the same is hereby repealed, and a new section, to be known as Section 66, relating to the same subject, is hereby enacted in lieu thereof.


110

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

SECTION 66-EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

In cities where there are twenty-five or more Lodges, there shall be an employment bureau, composed of representatives from each Lodge who shall be appointed by the Worshipful Master. Such employment bureau shall aid unemployed members and their families in securing employment and shall adopt by-laws and rules for its government, which shall be approved by the Most Worshipful Grand Master. It shall maintain a permanent office for the conduct of its affairs. Each member Lodge shall contribute, for the maintenance thereof, a sum not to exceed five (5) cents per capita per month, to be calculated on the Annual Grand Lodge returns as hereinafter provided, but those members of a Lodge whose dues have been remitted shall not be included in such calculation. The per capita to be paid each month shall be determined and fixed as follows: . On or before September fifteenth (15th) of each year, said Employment Bureau shall prepare a budget for its operation beginning October first of each year; said budget shall be submitted to the Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge, and said committee shall, during the annual communication of the Grand Lodge approve or revise said budget and determine and fix the amount of contribution of each member Lodge, per capita each month, that may be necessary to meet the budget as approved or revised by said Ways and Means Committee. Such contributIons shall be payable monthly to the Employment Bureau, the first payment being due October first of each year. The Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge appointed for the year 1939-40, shall immediately determine and fix the contributions as provided herein, to be payable on October first 1939, following the closing of such Grand Lodge Session. Fraternally submitted, RUA O. WEHRHEIM, Past Master of Anchor Lodge No. 443, HERBERT F. HAHN, Past Master of Meridian Lodge No.2. The above Resolution was read, and ordered printed in the Proceedings and laid over for action next year. V

The Resolution amending the Grand Lodge By-Laws to create a Lodge of Research, which was read yesterday, was again read, thus complying with Grand Lodge Law.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WELFARE

M. 'V. Brother T. W. Cotton presented the report of the Welfare Committee, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: That" it is more blessed to give than to receive" is a fine sentiment to which this Grand Lodge lends itself liberally in providing funds to assist lodges finding themselves unable to care properly for their members, widows and orphans who have been impoverished by misfortune. The work of your committee has been interesting and on the whole rather pleasant; however, that there is a business side to the proper


1938

111

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

and judicious dispensing of such aid, is obvious. Every application presented has had careful consideration and we have endeavored to render relief in as full measure as possible, consistent with reasonable economy in the use of funds placed at our disposal. Assistance is handled through the lodge and in co-operation with the lodge, usually on a 50-50 basis, since the lodge can better understand the situation and gather all the facts than is possible for this committee; and again it is the duty of the lodge to care for its own, wholly, when it can do so, without seeking outside help. Lodges have generally been respoI}8ive and it is rare that a lodge takes out, and wants us to bear the whole burden. While it is in keeping with the spirit of Freemasonry to aid the distressed and we are convinced that this Grand Lodge has no desire to sidestep this responsibility, yet it is equally appropriate and fitting, that first the individual, and then the local lodge make reasonable provision against emergencies, that sooner or later come to all. Of course the first thought in this connection is the matter of lodge dues; some lodges have their annual dues placed at so low a figure, that after Grand Lodge dues of $2.10 per member are paid, along with current expenses, there is little left in the treasury for emergency demands. For instance, we selected ten of the smaller lodges from our list. The average membership in this ten was 53, the average dues paid $3.56 per member, from this deduct the $2.10 per capita to Grand Lodge and we have remaining $1.46 per member or $77.38 per lodge to meet current expenses, in the absence of initiation fees including possibly hall rent, lights, fuel, relief in illness, burial expenses in case of death. These :figures are submitted for your information and without recommendation so far as your committee is concerned. We are glad to note that this situation is improving as indicated by a reduction in amounts paid by your committee, which for the last four years are as follows: 1935-$11.826; 1936-$7.720; 1937-$5.598; 1938-$5.286. Appropriations were made for relief in 67 cases during the year. This relief extended to 95 persons. These 95 persons were made up as follows: 9 couples representing 18 persons; 31 men; 27 women and 19 children, a total of 95. The 67 cases where relief was granted came from 58 Lodges; 3 Lodges had 3 cases each, representing 9 persons; 3 Lodges had 2 cases each, representing 9 persons; 52 Lodges had 1 case each, representing 77 persons. SUMMARY OF FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED, OCTOBER SEPTEMBER

1, 1937,

TO

30, 1938

Balance on hand October 1, 1937 $ 510.88 Recei'9'ed from Grand Lodge........ 4,750.00 Received from Waynesville Lodge No. 375, account Mrs. Mrytle Bucher and children.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 Check issued to Barbee Lodge No. 217 returned unpaid during this year 5.00 Total Receipts

$5,315.88 DISBURSEMENTS

Paid for bank charges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 5.43 Paid for Relief..................... . . . . . . . . . . .. 5,286.00

5,291.43

Balance on hand September 30, 1938. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $

24.45


112

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

The following is a list of Lodges assisted, with the names of the person or persons for whom appropriations were made, and the amount of appropriation. Albert Pike Lodge No. 219, for Elmer Elsworth Hay , $ 120.00 35.00 Anderson Lodge No. 621, for Fred S. Moss . 115.00 Arlington Lodge No. 346, for Squire E. Bryant . 120.00 Aurora Lodge No. 267, for Mrs. Marie Anderson . 60.00 Barnesville Lodge No. 383, for Mrs. J. A. Griggs . 150.00 Beacon Lodge No.3, for Mrs. Corinne Cadwell . 90.00 Benevolence Lodge No. 170, for Mrs. Catherine Clyde Brown . 90.00 Bucklin Lodge No. 233, for Mrs. Elbert Lamkin . 20.00 Canopy Lodge No. 284, for Wesley Bennett Jones . 120.00 Cardwell Lodge No. 231, for Mrs. Edgar Harper . 48.00 Composite Lodge No. 369, for Mrs. George Smith . 62.50 Eldorado Lodge No. 318, for Mrs. Luella Buckley and children .. 90.00 Everton Lodge No. 405, for W. H. Grace . 120.00 Forsyth Lodge No. 453, for Mrs. George B. StiBler and children 120.00 Four Mile Lodge No. 212, for J. F. Laswell . 60.00 Friend Lodge No. 352, for William Robertson . 90.00 Gate City Lodge No. 522, for Mrs. Sidney M. Jones . 65.00 Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for George Ransdale . 2.50 Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for Walter Strong . 90.00 Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, for Edward B. Browne . 120.00 Gentryville Lodge No. 125, for Mrs. Cora Riggins and children .. 48.00 George Washington Lodge No.9, for Leonard Nagel. . 82.50 Grain Valley Lodge No. 644, for Calvin T. Womacks . 30.00 Henderson Lodge No.477, for George Wilkerson . 120.00 Heroine Lodge No. 104, for Otho E. Seager . 45.00 Higbee Lodge No. 527, for H. H. Goldsberry . 36.00 Hinton Lodge No. 455, for Walter W. Berry . 40.00 Ingomar Lodge No. 536, for Herman A. Uterman . 120.00 Ionic Lodge No. 154, for Albert Clay and wife . 180.00 Itaska Lodge No. 420, for William Ward and wife . 120.00 Itaska Lodge No. 420, for August Roettger and wife . 40.00 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, for James Malone . 85.00 Jackson Lodge No. 82, for Mrs. Orilla J. Luyster . Jefferson Lodge No. 43, for C. E. Hoffman and wife . 37.50 112.00 Jonesburg Lodge No. 457, for Mrs. Alfred Churchill . 90.00 King Hill Lodge No. 376, for Marion McVey . 120.00 Lambskin Lodge No. 460, for William J. Stevenson . 90.00 Lanes Prairie Lodge No. 531, for Mrs. Myrtle James . 97.50 Missouri Lodge No.1, for Henry L. Henderson and wife . 120.00 Nodaway Lodge No. 470, for Mrs. John Thorpe . 60.00 Nodaway Lodge No. 470, for J. H. Bunger . Osage Lodge No. 303, for L. E. Deaton and wife . 48.00 Perseverance Lodge No. 92, for Mrs. Cora Wise Sloan . 120.00 111.50 Pine Lodge No. 314, for Lee Simpson . Polar Star Lodge No. 79, for Hugo S. Sievers and wife . 120.00 60.00 Polar Star Lodge No. 79, for Mrs. Jessie Belle Roseborough . Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, for Mrs. Frank Greenup . 25.00 Puxico Lodge No. 596, for Mrs. Eva Clark . 96.00 Pythagoras Lodge No. 583, for Michael H. Tribble . 48.00 30.00 Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, for William C. Eyster . Rural Lodge No. 316, for William G. Ashdown and wife . 120.00 60.00 South Gate Lodge No. 547, for Earl D. May . 21.00 South Ga.te Lodge No. 547, for Fred N. Withey .


1938

113

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

15.00 60.00 90.00 60.00 60.00 120.00 87.50 30.00 292.50 30.00 5.00 55.00 30.00 30.00

South Gate Lodge No. 547, for Mrs. Guy King . St. JOhn's Lodge No. 28, for Mrs. Lucille Fitzgerald . St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, for Albert P. Uhlinger . Strafford Lodge No. 608, for Mrs. Emma Haines . Summersville Lodge No. 555, for Marion W. Pittmann . Temple Lodge No. 299, for Ralph D. Weeks . Tuscan Lodge No. 360, for Schuyler Arnold and wife . Unionville Lodge No. 210, for Mrs. Sarah Gou!. . Waynesville Lodge No. 375, for Mrs. Myrtle Bucher and children Wellston Lodge No. 613, for Mrs. Mabel Hand . Wheeling Lodge No. 434, for Alvin Powers . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs.. William B. Polk, Sr . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for Mrs. Robert Edwards . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, for S. J. Craighill .

$5,286.00 Respectfully submitted,

T. W. COTTON, R. R. KREEGER, THOS. H. REYNOLDS, ARCH A. JOHNSON, HERMAN MAUCK.

BEPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

R. W. Brother Robert C. Duffin, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Chartered Lodges; the same was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A.. F. 4" A.. M. of Missouri: Brethren: The Committee on Chartered Lodges desires to submit the following report: LODGES

On September 15, 1937, the number of chartered lodges was 632, and during the year we have been fortunate by the loss of only one lodge by consolidation, so that the number of Chartered Lodges as of September 15, 1938, is 631. MEMBERSHIP RETURNS

Our net membership as of September 15, 1938, is 89,329, which represents a net loss of 1,040 over last year. It is encouraging to note that this is a decrease of 278 in the net loss as compared to last year. The records show that 2,092 were raised, 642 affiliated, and 1,149 reinstated, a total of 3,883 additional members, which represents a loss of 152 over last year's figures. However, the loss of members by 761 dimissions, 1,490 deaths, 2,661 Suspended N. P. D., 4 Suspended U. M. C., and 7 expulsions, or a total of 4,923, is 430 less than last year, and 367 of this figure is a decrease in the number of suspensions N. P. D. The number of dues remissions showed a slight increase of 174 this year. As is well known, the Grand Lodge Law provides that the annual returns from subordinate lodges must be in the office of the Grand Secretary on or before August 1. We call attention to the fact that on that day, 73 lodges had failed to report, and at the close of business on Sept.


114

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

15, there were still eight lodges unreported, four of which have been received since that time. We cannot impress too strongly on the Secretaries of our lodges to make their returns as early as possible after the first of July, as the business of the Grand Lodge is seriously impaired by the unwarranted delay in consequence of failure of lodges to do their duty. We particularly would impress upon every Secretary that he read Section 75 of the Book of Constitution and By-Laws, and govern himself accordingly. We are glad to note that there has been an improvement in the collection of delinquent dues, thus showing that the lodges that suffered so seriously several years back are gradually getting into clear water, and we feel confident, from a survey of the reports, that this improvement will continue. Taken all together, the condition of the Craft, as reflected in the annual returns, indicates a more general improvement on all lines, and it is hoped that this situation will continue. Fraternally submitted, ROBERT C. DUFFIN, Chairman.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY

R. \V. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, read the report of the Committee on Library, in the absence of W. Bro. Wm. B. Massey, Chairman. The same was adopted and is as follows: 1'0 the M. W. Grand Lodge A. F. go A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee begs to report that the lending department of our Library is still being used by Brethren in various parts of our Grand Jurisdiction, and is, of course, proving of value to these readers. As hitherto stated, the Committee desires to emphasize the fact that any Brother in good standing can obtain a book from our lending department if he is willing to pay the return postage on the book at the expiration of the time of reading. The Grand Secretary reports that he is engaged in a re-classification of our Reference Library, looking to the further developments in conjunction with our Committee on Masonic Publications and the proposed Lodge of Research. Your Committee is also appreciative of the developments in the Scottish Rite Cathedral Library, and is glad to report cooperation with your Committee in advancing this important phase of our Masonic endeavor. Fraternally submitted, W. B. MASSEY, Chairman. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

M. \V. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most WorshipfUl Grand Lodge, A. F. go A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: I herewith submit my annual report as State Chairman of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. The 28th annual convention of the Association was held in Alexandria, Virginia, on February 22.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

115

Missouri was represented by our Grand Master, M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader; our Deputy Grand Master, R. W. Brother Henry C. Chiles; our Grand Secretary, R. W. Brother Arthur Mather; M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, and myself. The convention was attended by most of the Grand Masters of the Grand Lodges in the country with many distinguished Freemasons. Every one was enthusiastic for the completion of the Memorial at the very earliest possible date. Some work had been done during last year and at this meeting it was decided to complete the entrances, lobbies, and the vestibules at once and to complete the lodge room on the first floor at the very earliest posible date. I have a letter under date of September 1 from the Secretary-Treasurer, M. W. Brother J. Claude Keiper, in which he states that the work is progressing very satisfactorily and should be completed before the annual meeting next February. Dr. Elmer R. Arn, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, was elected President at the last meeting. He has taken hold of the work in splendid manner and I am sure will be a faithful successor to Colonel Watres. Our Grand Lodge has resumed our payments from the one dollar payment contributed by every initiate and I am sure our Grand Master will be able to take with him to Washington next February a check representative of our Grand Lodge and our continued interest in the completion of the Memorial. I do not want to close this report without paying a tribute to the other member of this committee. No one in Missouri has had a greater interest in the Memorial than had M. W. Brother Orestes Mitchell, nor has anyone done more work for the completion of the Memorial than he. Our Grand Master has called him for work in that Higher Lodge, but we will always remember and honor him for his splendid work while here with us. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, Chairman.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON BINGERGALENA MATTER

R. 'V. Brother ''''''alter A. Phipps, Chairman, reported that this Committee had come to an agreement with the M. 'V. Grand Lodge of Oklahoma on this matter, and recommended that the M. 'V. Grand Lodge of Missouri grant a donation to the M. W. Grand Lodge of Oklahoma of $75.00 in settlement. (Report was adopted.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FORMS AND CEREMONIES

The report of the special Committee on Forms and Ceremonies was read by M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, Chairman, and adopted. . To the Grand Lodge, A. F. cf A. M., of the State of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Forms and Ceremonies report that they have prepared a form for the opening of the Grand Lodge. Our report is accompanied by floor plans showing the location of officers and their various movements. Whatever minor defects the present form may have can be" very easily ad.iusted, and we recommend the adoption of this form of opening as the official authorized form for the State of Missouri.


116

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

We also present for your approval, a ceremony for the presentation of the 50-year button, and recommend that it be adopted as the official ceremony for this jurisdiction. The Committee has made a careful study of certain other forms of procedure in use in Grand Lodge and recommend the following two sections concerning the introduction of distinguished visitors, the giving of Grand Honors, and the nomenclature for use in opening Grand Lodge. (Here read these sections.) We recommend the approval of these forms. While considerable time has been devoted to the study of other forms, ceremonies and services, our material is not in such shape as to be presented at this communication. We would, therefore, recommend a continuation of the committee. Fraternally submitted, RAY V. DENSLOW, Chairman, HENRY C. CHILES, ARTHUR MATHER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF SAINT LOUIS

The report of Committee 011 Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis was read by 'V. Brother Edward McGuigan, and adopted. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. 4" A. M.: Brethren: Your members appointed by the Grand Master to represent the Grand Lodge in the Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis, Missouri, submit the following report: Last year in our report we called attention to the outstanding bonded indebtedness of the Association as being in the sum of $292,000.00. These bonds draw interest at the rate of 4%%. On December 1, 1937, the Association paid the interest due at that time and paid off bonds of the par value of $9,000.00. On February the 16th, 1938, the Association bought one of the outstanding bonds together with the accrued interest thereon amounting to $13.00 for the sum of $1,000.00. On June 1, 1938, the Association paid the accrued interest and retired bonds of the par value of $11,000.00. This makes a total payment on the principal of said bonded indebtedness of $21,000.00 and leaving outstanding bonded indebtedness in the sum of $271,000.00. However, we want to call attention to an item which we have never brought to your attention. From time to time, the various Member Bodies of the Association have deposited with the Temple Association various sums and on which the Temple Association pays 3%. This money is used to retire bonds, which draw 4% %, making a saving to the Temple Association of llh % in interest charges. This money on deposit can also be used by depositor in paying maintenance charges if needed, interest to be adjusted, when so applied. In the 1937 report a large amount of delayed payments from member units was shown; in many cases this has been paid in full, others being substantially reduced; leaving now very few units in arrears. The Temple Association is to be complimented for its persistence in collection of these past due accounts as reflected in the Auditor's Report, and bond reduction.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

117

The amount that has been advanced by these Member Bodies now amounts to the sum of $19,546.95, so that the total indebtedness of the Association is at this date as follow: Bonds secured by mortgages Deposited by Member Bodies Total Indebtedness

$271,000.00 19,546.95 $290,546.95

We desire to commend the Member Bodies for these advancements, as it reduces the interest charge on the Association and such cooperation toward the end of reducing the entire indebtedness should be and is appreciated. Fraternally submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGER, Chairman, EDWARD MCGUIGAN, JOHN WOHRADSKY, JR.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON REVISION OF BY-LAWS

R. W. BROTHER HENRY C. CHILES: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren: The Committee on Revision has been in existence for a number of years. A good deal of work has been done by the Committee. The submission, consideration, and action upon a report by the Committee would have to be at a Revision Communication of the Grand Lodge, which would necessarily require considerable time. Certainly a communication of only two days is not long enough to take up a revision of the law. At any time the Grand Lodge desires to hold a Communication of sufficient length your Committee can make a report. After consultation with the other members of the Committee, we have decided to ask for further time, and to move that the matter of the revision of the by-laws, and the report of the Committee on such revision, and the Committee itself, be continued until the next Communication of the Grand Lodge. (Motion earried. Committee continued.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RECOGNITION

The report of the Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges was read by R.. 'V. Brother Arthur Mather, Chairman, and was adopted section by section and as a whole. To the Grand Lodge, A. F. 4' A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee, having considered Masonic conditions in many countries, make the following recommendations: GUATEMALA

In 1923, the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Guatemala made application for recognition by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The correspondence was addressed to the late Dr. Wm. F. Kuhn, then Chairman of our Committee on Foreign Recognition. Other correspondence between


118

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Dr. Kuhn and Dr. Briggs proves that it was tHeir intention to recommend recognition. The questions submitted and the answers made show the Gran Logia de la IWpublica de Guatemala conforms fully to all our requirements. This Grand Lodge is also in fraternal relationship with the majority of American Grand Lodges. We therefore recommend recognition and the exchange of representatives. COSTA RICA

This Grand Lodge for several years has carried on correspondence relating to its recognition. Forty-two American jurisdictions now recognize Costa Rica. Missouri has been dilatory in her "good neighbor" policy. We recommend recognition and the exchange of representatives. SWISS ALPn, A

Readers of the metropolitan papers in recent years may have noted the attacks made upon the Masonry of Switzerland in an attempt to destroy the Fraternity. Thanks to the fairness of the Swiss people, these attacks failed and Freemasonry continues to exist. The Masonry of Switzerland is entirely regular in all respects and is recognized by nineteen American jurisdictions including Massachusetts and New York. American Masonry should assist in every way possible to support the smaller jurisdictions which bear the colors of the Fraternity under conditions none too favorable for its development. Missouri wishes to add its support by extending recognition and exchanging representatives. This brings the number of Grand Lodges recognized by Missouri to 88, which, while not the largest number recognized by any state, is fully ample to prove the universality of our Institution and to exemplify our attitude, which is to extend recognition to all jurisdictions throughout the world, endeavoring to practice the true principles of FreemasonrJ'. Fraternally submitted, ARTHUR MATHER, Chairman, JAMES R. McLACHLAN, F. C. BARNHILL, Du VAl. SMITH.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION

The Report of the Masonic Service Association was read by Brother R. C. \Vinkelmaier, was adopted, and is as follows:

,V.

To the Grand Lodge, A. F. 4" A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Another year has rolled around and your committee is more than ever convinced that a definite plan of Masonic education should be adopted. In the Proceedings of 1937, page 91, the Committee on Masonic Publications suggested the adoption of the Lodge System of Masonic Education as practiced in New York. Your Committee has prepared papers along the lines suggested and for two years has used them in St. Louis. We differ from the usual system in that we embrace the entire district instead of an individual Lodge. This, we feel, wiII add sociability to the otherwise dreary process whereby the candidate or candidates sit in a small room and listen to the drone of various members of the committee reading the prepared papers. However, the necessity for Masonic education is so great that we would not quibble over the method.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

119

Last year you passed resolutions calling for the erection of markers in St. Louis and Columbia and your Committee has been working on this. We are offering resolutions to keep these two projects alive and can assure you that the markers will be erected. We suggest that a standard form or pattern for these and future markers be adopted. During the year the St. Louis Masonic Service Association has done its usual good work and a copy of their report is appended herewith. Through the hard-working secretary of the Association, W. Brother Davis, speakers have been provided on every conceivable subject, and these, together with the presentation of the papers on the degrees by your committee, have made up the educational work. We again recommend the formation of a similar body in Kansas City. We again call your attention to the vast amount of Masonic material in each section of our state where it has never been gathered and urge you to gather this material before it is too late. This work can be done in each district, and your committee will be glad to assist in its compilation. Another thing that should be done, is the listing of important dates in Missouri Masonic history so that proper observance of these dates may be made by the Lodges. One date, which is not part of our history, will be the seventy-fifth anniversary of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, which will be November 19, 1938, and will afford the Lodges a chance to hold Lincoln nights with readings of the address by suitable brethren. Also, April 29, 1939, will be the sesquicentennial of the inauguration of George Washington as the first President. During the year the committee has called upon some Grand Lodge Officers and Past Grand Masters for advice and information, and wishes at this time to thank them for their kindness and patience. Respectfully submitted, ROBT. C. WINKELMAIER, JOHN R. DAVIS, RoBERT R. WRIGHT.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES U. D.

W. Brother Louis J. Graue, Chairman, read the report of this Committee, which was adopted, and is as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation desires to report as follows: There are at this time no lodges Under Dispensation in this Grand Jurisdiction. J.oIOUlS J. GRAUE, Chairman. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM

The report of the Mileage and Per Diem Committee was read by Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman, and adopted. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. 4' A. M., of Missouri: Brethren,: Your Committee on Mileage and Per Diem at this session of the Grand Lodge, begs to report allowances paid for Mileage and Per Diem as follows:


120

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Grand Officers Past Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Masters District Lecturers Chairmen of Committees路 Committee on Jurisprudence Committee on Appeals and Grievances Committee on Credentials _ Chartered Lodges _.. _

$ _ _

. . . . . . . .

529.50 368.30 1,532.60 483.80 84.20 102.80 141.60 129.40 16,594.00

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $19,966.20 Respectfully submitted, WALTER R. SHRODES, A. W. REITER.

Chairman,

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS' REPORTS

W. Brother Nat D. Jackson, Chairman, read the report of the Committee, the same was adopted, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. go A. M., of Missour路i: Brethren: Your Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters have carefully gone over the reports received and beg leave to submit the following report: Of the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters, in this Grand J urisdiction, a report of some character has been received from fifty-one. The nine from which the Committee has not received a report are 1, 8, 10, 31, 34, 35, 36, 42, and 51. It is noted that of these nine not reporting, six did not make a report last year. The fifty-one reports received are of all kinds and descriptions, from a short letter of a few lines to the complete "Form" report of each lodge with an additional report on general Masonic conditions in the district. There are regular "Form" reports of official visits to 323 of the 633 lodges of this Grand Jurisdiction. Many of the D. D. G. M. 's either did not make an official visit to many of the lodges in their districts or if they did, failed to make the regular report. Special attention should be called to the reports from the twenty-one Districts which show that every Lodge in the District has been visited and a complete report made on each one, using the required form as furnished by the Grand Secretary. They are the 3,4,5,9, 13, 14, 17, 18, 21, 22, 24, 27, 29, 30, 33-A, 33-B, 44, 47, 49, 57, and 59 Districts. Some of these reports are more complete than others but all show conscientious care and interest in the preparation. This is a very noticeable improvement over last year when there were only ten districts in this class. It is noted from the reports received that many of the D. D. G. M. 's had the need of the Masonic Home in mind. Seventeen reported that they had on their visits made a total of 114 talks on the Home and there were probably more made which were not reported. This is good work and will do a world of good in addition to helping the building program which is now on hand. The Masonic Home is the greatest single activity of this Grand Lodge, yet it is surprising how few of our membership know or realize its magnitude and importance, and the wonderful work it is doing. The subject cannot be brought to the attention of the membership too often.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

121

From the reports received, Masonic conditions throughout this entire jurisdiction are on the upgrade. Most of the lodges are working; old interest is renewing and new interest is being created. The dues situation is clearing up. Thirty-eight lodges are reported as having no dues outstanding January l. The District Deputy Grand Masters of this Grand Jurisdiction are all outstanding Masons in their respective communities and leaders in the Lodge activities of their Districts. They are to be complimented on the good work they are doing as representatives of the Grand Master in the District they represent. Fraternally submitted, N. D. JACKSON, Chairman, F. G. FULKERSON, G. A. SAMPLE. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES

Report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances was presented by the Chairman, R. 'V. Brother Ray Bond, was adopted, and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M., of Missouri: Brethrert: Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances SUbmits the following report: In the Matter of Zeredatha Lodge No. 189 versus Milo Ritzer. On November 8, 1937, the Junior Warden of Zeredatha Lodge No. 189 filed charges on behalf of said Lodge against Milo Ritzer, at that time a member in good standing of said Lodge, alleging that said Milo Ritzer had been guilty of un-Masonic conduct. The charges were in two paragraphs, each of which alleged that the accused had been guilty of immoral conduct with a Master Mason's wife. The charges were tried on December 4, 1937, before a Trial Commission appointed by the Grand Master, consisting of Right Worshipful Brothers Henry C. Chiles and William F. Woodruff, and Worshipful Brother J. P. Hurtt. The Trial Commission found the accused guilty of both specifications of the charges and assessed his penalty at expulsion from all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry. From this finding of the Trial Commission the accused has prosecuted his appeal to the Grand Lodge. In the hearing before your Committee the accused has been represented by counsel, and the Lodge by its present Worshipful Master. Your Committee also had before it, in addition to the certified copy of the charges, answer of the accused and finding of the Trial Commission, the complete stenographic transcript of the evidence at the trial. Although the testimony at the trial was conflicting, the defendant denying his guilt in every respect, your Committee feels that the evidence conclusively established the guilt of the accused, particularly when very glaring discrepancies between the testimony of the accused and the testimony of the woman involved in the case are taken into consideration. We have also taken into consideration the fact that the Trial Commission was composed of distinguished lawyers and Freemasons, and that the Trial Commission had the opportunity of seeing the witnesses and hearing them testify, and the adva.ntage of being thereby able to pass upon their credibility. The guilt of the accused having been clearly esta.blished it is the feeling of your Committee that there is only one penalty which can


122

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

fittingly be applied to the offense involved in this case, and that is the penalty which was assessed by the Trial Commission. Therefore, your Committee recommends the judgment and finding of the Trial Commission be in all respects affirmed. Fraternally submitted, RAY BOND, ChairmMl. H. SWEARINGEN, JOHN C. ROBERTSON, HARRY BAUM, E. P. WALSH.

O.

RESOLUTION

M. W. BROTHER THAD B. LANDON: Most \Vorshipful Grand Master, I wish to present the following Resolution which is self-explanatory. I move the adoption of the Resolution. Be It Resolved, That the Grand Master is authorized to register the Jewels, Emblems, Symbols and Insignia of The Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Missouri, as provided by the Statutes of Missouri, thereby protecting the same from infringement. THAD B. LANDON, RA Y V. DENSLOW, HENRY C. CHILES.

The Resolution was adopted. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BOARDS OF RELIEF AND ~ONICEMPLOYMENTBUREAU

The Report of the Committee on Boards of Relief and Employment Bureau was read by \V. Brother Edward H. Loffhagen, Chairman, and adopted. To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. 4" A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Boards of Relief and Employment Bureau, report that they have carefully examined the reports as follows: The Kansas City Masonic Board of Relief: The report indicates that there are $853.00 still due as a balance on initiations made prior to June 30, 1937. The financial statement shows cash on hand June 30, 1937, $687.82. Receipts consisting of donations, initiations and refunds, $2,175.26, making a total of $2,863.08. Disbursements were as follows: For fraternal assistance accounts, printing, postage, telegrams, telephone, general office expense, salaries, and payments on old accounts, $2,436.74, leaving a balance on June 30, 1938, of $426.34. This Board reports that there were fewer calls for assistance during the past year than they have had for a number of years from those entitled thereto, yet calls from those not entitled thereto were more numerous. Funeral services were arranged for thirteen deceased brethren. The St. Louis Masonic Board of Relief reports having received 691 new cases, an increase of 185 over the preceding year, including impostors and fradulent claims. For St. Louis Lodges investigations were made in 103 cases. Their hospital Committee visited 39 sick, making 108 calls. Three hundred fifty-seven eases were found worthy and received aid 744 times. Masonic services were arranged for 28 transients.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

123

There is $380.00 due on initiations from past years. The financial statement shows cash on hand July 1, 1937, $378.86, receipts, consisting of donations, initiations and refunds, $2,633.79, making a total of $3,040.65. Disbursements, consisting of bond, office expense, postage, salaries, stationery, telegrams, etc., $2,867.04, leaving a balance on June 30, 1938, of $123.61. This Board lost by death four of its active and valuable workers during the year. Julius Reese, Jr., of Pride of the West Lodge No. 179; David Donton of Itaska Lodge No. 420; F. Y. Held of Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520; and Moses Bass of Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. The Masonic Employment Bureau of St. Louis reports having secured positions during the year for 351, to permanent placements, for 283 to temporary placements of one week or more, and for 195 to indeterminate placements of less than one week, making a total of 829 placements. The financial statement shows cash on hand July 1, 1937, bonds, interest and per capita tax from Lodges $7,271.64. Disbursements, consisting of salaries, rent, telephone, printing, stationery, postage, auto expense, etc., $6,278.72, leaving a balance on June 30, 1938, of $992.92. The report also states that "the receipts from the various lodges of the 33d district for the maintenance of the Bureau . . . is insufficient to properly conduct such a Bureau." Fraternally submitted, EDWARD H. LOFFHAGEN, Chairman..

REPORT OF BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

The Report of the Building Supervisory Committee was read by W. Brother Guy C. Million, Chairman, and was adopted. To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: The Building Supervisory Board submits the following report for the year of 1937-1938: BAYOU LODGE No. 365, BAKERSFIELD, MISSOURI October 29, 1937. Granted Bayou Lodge No. 365 permission to purchase a building, known as the Christian Church Building, for $700.00, and to borrow $400.00, $200.00 of which is to be used in the purchase and $200.00 for necessary repairs, providing they would increase their yearly dues from $3.00 to $4.00 per year. This loan to be made without placing a lien upon the building. CLINTON LODGE No. 548, CLINTON, MISSOURI October 29, 1937. Granted the Clinton Masonic Temple Association permission to borrow $3,500.00 from the Henry County Building & Loan Association, for the purpose of repurchasing and taking title to the Clinton Masonic Temple Building. In October, 1936, a member of their fraternity had borrowed the money and purchased the building for $4,路 800.00 from the bondholders, with the understanding that the Clinton Masonic Temple Association would take same over within twelve months at the purchase price plus the interest. BARNES LODGE No. 116, CABOOL, MISSOURI November 30, 1937. Granted Barnes Lodge No. 116 permISSIOn to borrow $2,000.00 to cancel an old loan of $4,500.00 made in 1928, which had been reduced to $2,000.00.


124

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

EI,VINS LODGE No. 599, FLAT RIVER, MISSOURI December 12, 1937. Granted Elvins Lodge No. 599 permission to purchase the Elvins Masonic Temple Building from a bondholding committee for $8,000.00, and to finance same by selling notes on the building to the members of the lodge. SrrELBINA LODGE No. 228, SHELBINA, MISSOURI January 18, 1938. Granted Shelbina Lodge No. 228 permission to purchase the second floor of a building, the third floor of which the lodge has owned and occupied for several years. The lodge had the necessary funds to make the purchase. They had been renting same for several years but could own cheaper than they could rent. FELLOWSIIIP LODGE No. 345, JOPLIN, MISSOURI April 4, 1938. Granted Fellowship Lodge No. 345 permission to erect a two-story and basement building on their property at 5th and Main Street at a cost not to exceed $55,000.00 and without incurring any indebtedness. This property has been leased for a term of 15 years to the J. C. Penny Co. at an annual rental of $6,000.00 per year, the J. C. Penny Co. paying the taxes and insurance during the term of their lease. MIDDLE FABIUS LODGE No. 244, DOWNING, MISSOURI April 7, 1938. Granted Middle Fabius Lodge No. 244 permission to purchase the lower floor of a building, the upper floor of which they then owned and occupied as a lodge hall. The cost was not to exceed $1,100.00, and they were to borrow not to exceed $1,000.00, with the proviso that the principal would be reduced $100.00 each J'ear until paid. DEFUNCT, NO\'ELTY LODGE No. 181, NOVELTY, MISSOURI May 17, 1938. Under date of May 17, 1938, at the request of Most Worshipful Brother Reader, Grand Master, I wrote to Dr. Willis J. Bray, D. D. G. M. of the 2d Masonic District, requesting him to have a quitclaim deed executed of the top floor property, formerly owned by the defunct Novelty Lodge, and delivered to the Trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church South at Novelty, Mo. lt seems that this property was in such a dilapidated condition, when the charter of Novelty Lodge was revoked, that it was agreed by all concerned that it would be well to dispose of it by deeding same to the Methodist Episcopal Ch-y.rch South, who owned and occupied the lower floor of said building. IONIA LODGE No. 381, ELDON, MISSOURI June 26,1938. Under date of May 24, 1938, received a very intelligently worked-out plan from Ionia Lodge No. 381, requesting that they be permitted to sell ninety life memberships at $60.00 each in order to liquidate an indebtedness of $5,350.00 they had on their Masonic Temple. As Section No. 160 of our Grand Lodge by-law grants a subordinate lodge the privilege of providing for life memberships in their by-laws, the Building Supervisory Board is of the opinion they have no authority to grant a lodge permission to do something already provided for in our Grand Lodge by-laws. At a conference held on June 26 with a committee from Ionia Lodge, the Board took the position that they had no authority to grant such a permission, but, in their opinion, the lodge could, in accordance with


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

125

Section No. 160 of the Grand Lodge by-laws, amend their by-laws to sell a certain number of life memberships for a definite sum each. The Board recommended that they limit the sale of life memberships to less than ninety and increase the price of same. EMINENCE LODGE

No. 607,

EMINENCE, MISSOURI

July 2, 1938. Under date of June 28, 1938, received a letter from the Secretary of Eminence Lodge No. 607, stating that their lodge hall had been destroyed by fire, and requesting permission of the Board to borrow money for rebuilding. On July 2 I wrote the Secretary informing him that the Board could not grant them permission to borrow money for the purpose of rebuilding without first knowing something of the assets and liabilities of the lodge, also something of their plans for rebuilding and the amount necessary to borrow. Requested that he give the Board' a detailed statement of their plans, etc., in order that we might give their request intelligent consideration. Having heard nothing further from him this matter is still pending. SULLIVAN LODGE

No. 69,

SULLIVAN, MISSOURI

July 29, 1938. Granted Sullivan Lodge No. 69 permission to expend not to exceed $4,300.00, and to borrow not to exceed $2,300.00, for the purpose.of remodeling their Masonic Temple. BRIDGETON LODGE

No. 80,

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

August 5, 1938. Granted Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 permission to expend approximately $8,600.00 for alterations and enlargement of their Temple building, no debt to be incurred as they had the necessary funds. GUY C. MILLION, Chairman, CURT C. MACK, JULIUS C. GARRELL, JR.

M. W. BROTHER WALTER R. RAECKE

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, it is my pleasure to present to you the Most Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. Weare indeed glad to have him with us this morning and I am now going to ask Most Worshipful Grand Master Raecke of Nebraska to speak to us. M. W. BROTHER RAECKE: Most \Vorshipful Grand Master, and brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: It has not been very many years since I first attended the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. However, practically from the first time I ever sat in our own Grand Lodge, I have had the desire to visit your grand jurisdiction. I believe it has .been largely due to the fact that year after year you have sent men of sterling character and great ability, to visit our Annual Communications. There is just one thought which I would like to leave with you this morning, and that is that the beauty and harmony of the ritualistic ceremonies which have been devised for our use in the Masonic ceremony, and in the principles which have been exemplified in the work, were intended to improve the human mind so that there would be a


â&#x20AC;˘ 126

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

desire to reach upward toward greater heights. I believe that we as Masons have an opportunity, and a duty, to do all in our power to improve ourselves according to those principles which we have adopted, and then to transmit those principles to others. I assure you that it has been one of the great pleasures of my life to be permitted to attend the Grand Lodge of the State of Missouri, and I hope that the pleasant relations between our two jurisdictions may continue unabated. THE GRAND MASTER: Thank you very much, Brother Raecke. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JURISPRUDENOE

W. Brother Richard O. Rumer read the report of the Committee on Jurisprudence which is as follows. Sections numbered III and V were rejected and Sections numbered I, II, and IV, were adopted. To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Jurisprudence submits the following report: SECTION

I

We have carefully examined the decisions reported by the Grand Master in his Annual Address, and we approve Decisions numbers 3, 5,6, 7, and 8. As to Decision number 1, concerning Life Memberships we approve the decision of the Grand Master. However, we want to call attention to the fact that this decision is not to preclude the Grand Lodge from assuming jurisdiction of the question of life memberships in the event that it is necessary for the welfare of a Lodge. We approve Decision number 2, which concerns the eligibility of the Secretary of a Lodge who had not passed his proficiency examination; however, this decision cannot apply to a Brother who was made a Master Mason prior to the Grand Lodge Communication in 1908. We approve the decision of the Grand Master on Decision number 4, concerning objection to a petition. But, we want to call attention to the right of objection to initiation that is preserved in Section 152 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. (Adopted.) SECTION II Last year action on the pending amendment to Section 76 concerning Mileage and Per Diem was deferred until this Grand Lodge Communication. The proponents of the amendment have asked that the amendment be withdrawn, and, therefore, your Committee reeommends that said request be granted. and that said amendment be considered as withdrawn. (Adopted.) SECTION III The amendment to Section 160 now pending before the Committee has been rewritten by the Committee, and said Section as rewritten is in words and figures as follows, to-wit: "Section 160. Life Membership. A Lodge, by its By-Laws, may provide that any member, because of length of membership or other meritorious cause, shall thereafter be exempt from


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

127

payment of dues, except the amount the Lodge be required to pay to the Grand Lodge, either in the form of annual dues, special assessments or any other financial obligation of the Lodge to the Grand Lodge on account of his membership, which sum shall be collected by the local Lodge, and the member shall be subject to suspension for non-payment of such dues, as provided by Grand Lodge By-Laws." We recommend that the above amendment be adopted. (Rejected. ) SECTION IV The new amendment known as Section 28lh has been rewritten by the Committee, and said amendment as re-written is in words and figures as follows, to-wit: "Section 28-A. Committee on Public Calamity. There is hereby created a Committee on Public Calamity. The following officers of the Grand Lodge shall compose this Committee: Deputy Grand Master, as Chairman; Grand Treasurer, as Treasurer; Grand Secretary, as Secretary; and the Senior Grand Warden and Junior Grand Warden. Whenever, as a result of any public calamity, the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge shall issue a call for voluntaty donations, to relieve distress in any stricken area, this Committee is empowered to receive and receipt for all donations or collections; they may receive donations at any time to accumulate a fund for use in such emergencies, and such fund shall be invested in United States obligations. They shall, with the consent and approval of the Grand Master, make such disbursements from their funds as may be necessary, including all expenses incurred by the Committee. They shall keep accounts of all funds received and disbursed, and make written report to the Grand Master, whenever required by him, and to the Grand Lodge at its Annual Communications showing their actions and finances for the preceding Masonic fiscal year. The Treasurer and Secretary of this Committee shall furnish such bond as may be required from time to time by the Grand Master. The cost of such bonds shall be paid out of the funds of said Committee." We recommend the adoption of the above section. (Adopted.) SECTION V A new Section to be known as Section 77-A, providing for the establishment for a Lodge of Research, having been introduced and read on two several days, and being an entirely new provisional law, can be acted upon at this time. Said Section being as follows, to-wit: "Section 77-A. Lodge of Research. Twenty or more Missouri Master Masons in good standing may form a Lodge of Research for the purpose of promoting, encouraging, conducting and fostering Masonic research and study and for the purpose of spreading Masonic light and knowledge and a Charter may be granted to such Lodge of Research by the Grand Lodge without compliance with the usual requirements prescribed for the forming and chartering of regular subordinate Lodges. , 'Th~ Lodge of Research chartered under the provisions of this Section shall not have power or authority to receive petitions for or to confer the Craft Degrees; its representatives, as


128

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

such, shall not have a vote in Grand Lodge, nor be entitled to receive mileage or per diem, as such: nor shall the Lodge be liable for or required to pay per capita tax or assessments to the Grand Lodge, and, in lieu of annual returns, it shall make an annual report to the Grand Lodge. "The territorial jurisdiction of such Lodge shall be to-extensive with that of the Grand Lodge and it may hold its annual, stated or special communications at such times and iu such places as it or its duly authorized officer or officers may determine. "Active membership in such Lodge shall not continue unless regular membership in good standing is maintained by sueh member in a regular subordinate Lodge of this jurisdiction. Honorary, associate, corresponding and/or subscribing memberships in such Lodge may be had and maintained by individual Masons, Masonic Libraries, Masonic Bodies or organizations on such terms and conditions as the Lodge of Research may ,prescribe. Individual Masons may be elected' fellows' by the Lodge of Research as a recognition of outstanding accomplishment." This Section is in proper form, and at the request of the proponents of the Amendment, we recommend that the same be adopted. (Rejected. ) Fraternally submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGER, Chairman, C. LEW GALLANT, SA~I WILCOX, RICHARD O. RUMER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TRIAL BY OTHER STATE JURISDICTIONS

The Report of Committee 011 Trial by Other State J urisdictiol1s read by ,V. Brother Forrest C. Do 1111 rll , Chairman, was adopted, and is as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. 4' A. M., of Missouri: 1. Brethren: Two paragraphs appearing in the Address of Grand Master Ray V. Denslow, delivered September 27, 1932, to the Grand Lodge of Missouri (see Proceedings of 1932, page 48) create the problems which are considered by this Special Committee. In one of those paragraphs the Grand Master expressed the opinion that there is no legal obligation on the part of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to recognize the suspension, by an Oklahoma Lodge, of a Freemason whose membership is in a Missouri Lodge. The Grand Master stated that the Oklahoma Bodies have the right legally to deprive OUl' brother of the right to participate in their meetings, but this does not affect his status in Missouri (citing precedents). The Grand Master then said: "I have serious doubt as to whether the law of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is that of the common law of Masonry, but it is at least the regulation under which the Grand Master works." In the second of the paragraphs above mentioned, the Grand Master informed the Grand Lodge that a Missouri lodge received a petition from a candidate who had been rejected several years ago in the State of Maryland, and that after necessary investigation he was elected and


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

129

the degrees were conferred. The Grand Master then stated that the Grand Master of Maryland complains that our lodge has invaded his jurisdiction, inasmuch as they (evidently meaning the Maryland Masonic Grand Lodge) claim permanent jurisdiction .over rejected. material. Grand Master Denslow proceeded with the following language: "The old doctrine of permanent juristl.iction over rejee.ted material was settled by most jurisdictions many years ago, although one or two are still clinging tenaciously to it. I believe our Lodge acted fairly in the matter in writing to the Lodge in which the petitioner was rejected and notifying them of their intent. In our regulations there is nothing to prevent one. who has been rejected in another jurisdiction petitioning a Missouri Lodge." The Jurisprudence Committee (p. 177, Proceedings of 1932) said, of the foregoing views in said two paragraphs, the following: "The observations of the Grand Master, on page 48 of his address, with respect to the jurisdiction of an Oklahoma Lodge to tTy a Missouri Mason and with respect to the claim of the Grand Master of Maryland that permanent jurisdiction is retained by the Grand Lodge of Maryland, involve important matters which require full and careful consideration and our relation with some or all of the other Grand Jurisdictions. We accordingly recommend that the incoming Grand Master be diree.ted to appoint a special committee to consider the problems involved . and report to the 1933 Annual Communication its recommendations with respect thereto." Accordingly, this Committee was appointed. Its report has, pursuant to its request, been continued until the present time.

II. We have first considered the question whether the Missouri Grand Lodge should recognize the suspension of the member of a Missouri lodge whom the Oklahoma Lodge adjudged to be by said latter Lodge suspended. From information in the possession of this Committee it appears that the alleged offense was committed in the lodge hall of the Oklahoma lodge which rendered the judgment of suspension. In determining this question we are materially aided by the llistory of what is now Section 230 of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Said section reads: "SEC. 230. JURISDICTION. A Lodge shall have Jurisdiction to try any Freemason, affiliated or unaffiliated, for any offense committed within its jurisdiction; but such Lodge shall notify the Lodge of which the accused is a member, if known, of the pendency of the charge, and if requested so to do, within thirty days after such notice shall transfer the cuse to such Lodge for trial, and the case shall there proceed as though begun in that Lodge. If no such request be made within thirty days, then the Lodge first receiving the charge shall proceed with the trial." In said section (following the requirement that under the contingency therein specified the Lodge in the jurisdiction of which the offense was committed shall transfer the case to the Lodge of whick the accused is a member) the direction that "the case shall there proceed as though begun in that Lodge" seems to contemplate that the accused is a member of a Missouri lodge, for obviously it would not be proper that a Missouri By-


130

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Law should undertake to prescribe what shall, after transfer of a case to a Lodge outside of Missouri, be the procedure in such foreign lodge. It does not, however, follow that because said direction contemplates that the accused is a member of a Missouri Lodge the entire Section 230 contains a grant of jurisdiction to try only Missouri Freemasons. Obviously correct is the conclusion that said section vests in each Lodge, within the jurisdictiop. of which is committed an offense by a Freemason who is not a member of such lodge, power (limited as specified in said section) to try the Freemason regardless of whether his membership exists in a Missouri lodge or in a lodge outside Missouri. Not only is language in the opening sentence of the section sufficiently broad to justify said conclusion (said l:tnguage being" A Lodge shall have jurisdiction to try any Freemason, " etc.) but the history of the section conclusively demonstrates the correctness of the view that the power conferred by the section is a power to try a Freemason regardless of whether his membership exists in a Missouri lodge or in a lodge outside Missouri. Prior to 1908 Missouri lodges possessed jurisdiction to try any Mason, affiliated or unaffiliated. (Proc. 1912, p. 75.) In the By-Laws of 1908, however, S€ction 201 limited jurisdiction to the trial of Missouri Masons. (Ibid.) Said Section 201 reads: "A Lodge has jurisdiction to try any Missouri Mason, affiliated or unaffiliated, for any offense committed within its Jurisdiction.' , In the revision of 1921, however, the section was amended in certain respects, among which respects was the omission of the word" Missouri. " (See Section 230, Revision of 1921.) The opening portion of said Section 230 reads: "A lodge shall have jurisdiction to try any Freemason, affiliated or unaffiliated, for any offense committed within its jurisdiction." The language of the presently existing Section 230 is precisely that of said Section 230 of the Revision of 1921. It follows, from the above, that under the present law the Missouri Grand Lodge asserts the right (limited by the requirements of Section 230) of each subordinate lodge to try any Freemason, whether his me·ln· bership be or be not conferred by a Mi~souri lodge, for an offense com· mitted within the jur-isdiction of such subordinate lodge. Inasmuch as the Missouri Grand Lodge asserts this right as respects a member who derives his membership elsewhere than in Missouri, it is but reasonable that a similar right on the part of a lodge outside Missouri be recognized by the Missouri Grand Lodge with respect to the trial of a Missouri Freemason for an offense alleged to have been committed by him while in the jurisdiction of such lodge outside Missouri. In order that this Grand Lodge may be fully informed on the subjectmatter before voting thereon, it however should be and accordingly is here stated that the question as to the power of a Masonic lodge in one State to suspend or expel a member of a lodge in another State has given rise to a variety of opinion. In an article copyrighted in 1936 by The Masonic Service Association of the United States the writer of said article says:

"It is practically universal that a sojourning brother may be tried by the Lodge in the Jurisdiction of which he commits the offense but the sentence is left to his own Lodge, for obvious reasons. Any brother is obligated to abide by the laws, usages, customs, edicts of the Grand Lodge in whose Jurisdiction he resides, no matter where he holds membership. A sojourning brother who commits a Masonic offense must obviously be tried


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

131

by those whom he offended and who know the facts, rather than his home Lodge, which has no evidence. Having been tried and found guilty, it is obviously not possible for a Lodge in Jurisdiction A to suspend or expel him from his own Lodge in J urisdiction B. The power to suspend or expel is vested in the Lodge or Grand Lodge to which he owes allegiance." (The Missouri Freemason, October 24, 1936.) In the 10th Edition of Mackey's Masonic Jurisprudence, published in 1927, appears the following (p. 389): , 'A Lodge exercises penal jurisdiction over all affiliated Masons, although not its members, who live within its territorial limits. A, for instance, being a member of a Lodge in New York, but living in the vicinity of a Lodge in Florida, is amenable to the jurisdiction of both bodies; to the former by personal jurisdiction, to the latter by geographicaL" . . . "And if expulsion is the result of such trial, that expulsion, by the Lodge in Florida, carries with it expulsion from his own Lodge in New York; for, if the premises are not denied that the Lodge in Florida can rightfully exercise penal jurisdiction, then the conclusion follows, that that expulsion must be legal." It should be further observed, in connection with the excerpt above quoted from Mackey's Masonic Jurisprudence, that it appears likely that, among those who assert the existence of power in a Masonic lodge in one Jurisdiction to suspend or expel from Freemasonry one who derives his membership from a lodge in another Jurisdiction, there.is not a unanimity of opinion as to the basis of such power. Although said excerpt from Mackey's work does not occur in the chapter in which are discussed the Landmarks of Freemasonry, it is reasonable to assume that the view expressed in said excerpt that" a Lodge exercises penal jurisdiction over all affiliated Masons, although not its members, who live within its territorial limits" is based upon the alleged Seventeenth Landmark of Freemasonry set forth in Mackey'8 Masonic Jurisprudence (10th Edition, p. 14) as follows: , 'It is a Landmark that Every Freemason is Amenable to the Laws and Regulations of the Masonic Jurisdiction in which he resides, and this although he may not be a member of any Lodge. Non-affiliation, which is, in fact, in itself a Masonic offense, does not exempt a Freemason from Masonic Jurisdiction." It is to be observed, however, in connection with the above mentioned alleged Seventeenth Landmark that Brother Roscoe Pound rejects said Landmark (Pound's Masonic JurisprudC"J'We, p. 74) and quotes Brother George F. Moore as also rejecting it. It is of interest also to observe that Albert Pike quotes Dr. Mackey's Seventeenth Landmark and then says:

"This is not true, except to a limited extent. Suppose the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia should require every Mason residing here to become affiliated here. N or is it by any means settled that Masons affiliated in one state can be tried by a lodge in another state. If one of us visit Italy, do we become amenable to the laws of the Grand Orient of Italy, in every respect, by residing there unaffiliated' The language is too general and indefinite." (From The Landmarks of Freemasonry, copyright by The Masonic Service Association of the United States in 1924.) .


132

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Roscoe Pound, however, takes the view that notwithstanding a rejection of Dr. Mackey's alleged Landmark, there may yet be, as a matter of Masonic Common Law, a territorial jurisdiction (i. e., a jurisdiction over resident Freemasons, regardless of where they were made Freemasons). Says Dean Pound: , , In other words, we may agree with Brother Moore in rejecting Mackey's alleged landmark of a territorial jurisdiction and yet may claim that there is such a jurisdiction as a matter of Masonic common law, along with the personal jurisdiction for which Brother Moore contends." (Pound '.~ Masonic Jurisprudence, p. 76.) It is of interest, however, to ouserve that Dean Pound, though taking the view that Masonic common law admits of territorial jurisdiction over Masonic offenses (Ibid., p. 77) limits this jurisdiction as follows:

, 'But, mark ;you, tile territorial jurisdiction ought to be over general Masonic offenses, over offenses which injul'e Masonry generally and hence are either a danger to the local Masonic sovereign or are within a principle of cosmopolitan justice, and not offenses against mere local regulations. As the lawyer would say, they ought to be mala in se-not mala prohibita. ' , Not only, moreover, do there exist the views above indicated, but in addition there is held by M. W. Bro. Melvin M. Johnson, Past Grand Master of Massachusetts, the opinion that the Masonic theory of punishment follows what he terms" the theories of the forum of allegiance and forum of capture." Illustrating this view Bro. Johnson says that if a Mason belonging to a lodge "in the State of Washington commits a Masonic offense in Iowa and then goes to Florida for the winter, he may be tried by the Masonic tribunals appointed under the laws of the Grand Lodge of Washington because that is the Grand Lodge of his allegiance. He may be tried by the Masonic tribunals of Florida because he is there where service may be had upon him. He may not be tried by the Masonic tribunals of Iowa where he committed the offense, however, unless he belongs to a lodge in Iowa or the Grand Lodge of Iowa can get service upon him while he is within that state." (The Builder, Vol. 10, p. 177.) Notwithstanding the variety of opinion above noted, it is the view of this Commlttee that inasmuch as the Grand Lodge of Missouri claims (in Section 230 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws) the right for each Missouri subordinate lodge to try, for offenses committed within the jurisdiction of such subordinate lodge, Freemasons who derive their membership elsewhere than in Missouri, this Grand Lodge should recognize, in each lodge of another Jurisdiction, the same right to try Freemasons of Missouri for offenses committed within the jurisdiction of such lodge of another Jurisdiction. We accordingly recommend that the action of the above referred to Oklahoma Lodge in suspending the Missouri Freemason be recognized by this Grand Lodge to be valid.

III. The second of the questions considered by Grand Master Denslow, is, in substance: Does a Grand Jurisdiction, to a constituent lodge of which a petition for membership has been presented, have the right to impose on


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

133

another Grand Jurisdiction any restriction with respect to when or under what conditions the latter may entertain a subsequent petition from the petitioner. Dr. Mackey lays down the rule that a person "having been once rejected by a certain Lodge-is forever debarred the privilege of applying to any other for admission." (Ma.ckeY'8 Masonic Jurisprudenee, 10th Ed., p. 100.) Of course, the rule does not, according to the express terms of the Missouri By-Laws, prevail as against a subsequent application to a Missouri Lodge by one who had been previously rejected. (See Section 120 of By-Laws.) Moreover, Robert Ingham Clegg, the eminent reviser of Dr. Mackey's work, has this significant observation with respect to said last quoted statement of Dr. Mackey: "Dr. Mackey here asserts a doctrine that is not now universally accepted. See, for example, regulations 223 to 225, Book of Constitutions, Grand Lodge of Kentucky, 1919. 'A Kentucky Lodge having rejected a petitioner, loses jurisdiction over him upon his removal to another State, and in his efforts to become a Mason he must be governed by the laws of the latter jurisdiction. The doctrine of "Perpetual Jurisdiction" over a rejected profane is not held in Kentucky. Kentucky has always maintained the doctrine of territorial jurisdiction, and accorded to other Grand Lodges what it reserves to itself-the right to pass upon the fitness of all candidates who have been bona fide residents of the State for the requisite time. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky has never claimed power to act outside of its own jurisdiction, nor will it allow its own action to be controlled by any other body of Masons.'" (Note to p. 100, Ma.ckey ,s Masonic Jurisprudence, 10th Edition.) Brother Clegg also has the following to say (Ibid., p. 101) with respect to Dr. Mackey's views: "Another view to that of Dr. Mackey is expressed in the' Digest of Scottish Masonic Jurisprudence,' 1913, Brother R. E. Wallace-James of Edinburgh, Scotland, page 72, 'Perpetual .Jurisdiction over rejected or accepted applicants for the degrees, and over Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts, is a modern innovation, and has no basis of justification anywhere amongst Masonic principles. When a rejected applicant petitions another Lodge, it is the right and the duty of the Lodge petitioned to ask the rejecting Lodge if there is any Masonic objection still operating against the petitioner, and it is the duty of the rejecting Lodge to give the facts for the guidance of their Brethren, but to claim a right to the applicant (or the fees of the applicant) simply on the ground of having been first to receive his petition is wholly without foundation in Masonic principles. Some of the American States <'1aim perpetual jurisdiction, but it is certainly not held in Britain.' " We know of no Landmark of Freemasonry to the effect that permanent jurisdiction over a rejected candidate is retained by the rejecting lodge or is possessed by the Grand Lodge of the Jurisdiction wherein is located the rejecting lodge. We quote the following from M. W. Bro. Melvin M. Johnson: , 'When one becomes actually a resident within the sovereignty of a Grand Lodge, it is for that Grand Lodge alone to determine how long that residence must be maintained before he may be-


134

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

come a candidate. For any other Grand Lodge to attempt to impose conditions as to length of residence, would be to dispute the sovereignty of the Grand Lodge of his residence and to invade its jurisdiction. "Self-evident as this is, yet it is sometimes forgotten when the candidate has previously been rejected in another jurisdiction. . . . When the Grand Lod~ of PennsyLvania legislates that no other lodge shall ever elect an applicant without the consent of the rejecting lodge, that legislation is good and binding throughout the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania, but the Grand Lodge of that state has no right or power to impose its own laws upon Massachusetts. Massachusetts is just as sovereign as Pennsylvania. It may decide for itself the material which it will accept. The law of Massachusetts gives a rejecting lodge five years' control. If, then, one who has been rejected in Pennsylvania has really and genuinely moved to and acquired a residence in Massachusetts, and has maintained that residence for the required term, is, after five years from his rejection, given his degrees in Massachusetts under its laws, he is a Mason, neither irregular nor clandestine." (The Builder, Vol. 10, p. 165.) Nothing in the Constitution or By-Laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri recognizes any right of jurisdiction in Missouri to be possessed by another Grand Lodge over a candidate rejected in the Jurisdiction of such other Grand Lodge. We recommend that this Grand Lodge express itself to be of the opinion that an invasion of the jurisdiction of Maryland did not occur by reason of the election, by a Missouri Lodge, of a candidate who had been rejected several years previously in the State of Maryland. FORREST C. DONNELL, Chairman, HENRY C. CHILES.

REPORT OF OOMMITTEE ON OREDENTIALS

The Report of the Committee on Credentials was submitted by Chairman, W. Brother Walter Webb, was adopted, and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Andent Free &" Accepted Masons of the State of Missm~ri: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report: At the present session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge there are represented 554 subordinate lodges, and there are present: Grand Lodge Officers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Past Grand Masters.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Râ&#x201A;Źpresentatives District Deputy Grand Masters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . District Lecturers Past Masters Worshipful Masters Senior Wardens Junior Wardens Chairmen of Committees -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distinguished Visitors

21 15 7 51 17 524 529 112 74 21 3

Actual attendance is: Past Masters Worshipful Masters

524 529


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

135 112 74

Senior Wardens Junior Wardens Total

1,239 Fraternally submitted, WALTER A. WEBB, Chairman, FRED H. KNIGHT, GEO. A. McKEAN, HENRY F. WOERTHER, JACOB ABAECHERLI,

M. W. BROTHER LEWIS E. SMITH

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, I am now going to introduce to you a brother whom I have known for many years. May I present, Most Worshipful Brother Lewis E. Smith, P. G. M., and Grand Secretary of Nebraska. M. W. BROTHER SMITH: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren of the Grand Lodge. It is always a pleasure to me to attend the Annual Communi('ations of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and particularly this year ,vhile my good friend, your Grand Master, is presiding. I really have no special message for you at this time, and knowing that there is much work yet to be transacted, I merely wish to thank you for the many courtesies and kindnesses extended to me. THE GRAND MASTER: Thank you very much Most 'Vorshipful Brother Smith. . M. W. BROTHER C. C. HUNT

THE GRAND MASTER : We also have another visitor with us from the Grand Jurisdiction of Iowa. May I present to you M. W. Brother Charles C. Hunt, P. G. M. and Grand Secretary of Iowa. BROTHER CHARLES HUNT: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren. I simply want to extend to you the greetings of the Grand Lodge of Iowa, on behalf of our Grand Master who was obliged to leave last night, and to tell you how delighted I am to be present at your Annual Communication. Thank you. M. E. COMPANION ROBERT LEE BARGER

THE GRAND MASTER: We have with us today the Grand High Priest of the Royal Arch Chapter of Missouri, my good friend Most Excellent Companion Robert Lee Barger. Brother Barger will say a few words at this time. BROTHER BARGER: Most Excellent Grand Master and brethren: it is a great deal of pleasure to be here this morning and bring to you the greetings of nearly sixteen thousand Royal Arch Masons of this State. Capitular Masonry is very closely related and allied to Symbolic Masonry. I think that all branches and all divisions of Free-


136

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

masonry, particularly at this time, should try in every way to cooperate. We should cooperate to the extent that we might preserve the principles of Freemasonry, Brotherhood, Fraternity and Democracy. I am indeed glad to be here, Most Worshipful Grand Master, particularly to attend the session over which you are presiding, and I thank you for your kind reception this morning. R. E. COMMANDER LEO H. JOHNSON

THE GRAND MASTER: W. Brother Leo H. Johnson, Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of the State of Missouri, will you please address us. W. BROTHER JOHNSON: Most \Vorshipful Grand Master and Brethren: I am appreciative of the very fine courtesy extended to me as representative of the Grand Commandery of the Knights Templar of the State of Missouri, and I bring you the sincere fraternal greetings from all the Knights Templar of Missouri. I express their hope that this will be a very beneficial Communication, and I hope, brethren, that peace and harmony will continue to reign during the coming year under our newly elected Most \Vorshipful Grand Master, as it has during the year which is now drawing to a close. I thank you. W.BROTHERFORRESTC.DONNELL

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, in our Grand Lodge line we have the Deputy of the Scottish Rite of the State of Missouri. I present to you W. Brother Donnell. W. BROTHER DONNELL: Most Worshipful Grand Master and brethren, I simply desire to express appreciation of the courtesy extended to the Scottish Rite, and to myself as its representative, and to express also our appreciation of the honor which you grant us by meeting here in the Scottish Rite Cathedral. Thank you. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

\V. Brother C. A. Tolin, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Ways and Means which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge A.. F. ~ A.. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee is very much pleased after examining the financial reports of the affairs of the Grand Lodge by officers charged with expenditure of funds, to report that the Grand Lodge Officers have again been able to close the year with a substantial balance unexpended from the budget adopted a year ago. The total amount of the budget approved last year was $176,392.11, and out of this amount, there has been $1,741.92 returned to our General Fund on hand at this time. The Grand Lodge Officers deserve a great deal of credit in the excellent business method they adopt, which has enabled them for some years to remain well within the budget allowed them. We call your attention to an appropriation made last year in the amount of $110.00 for Lewis and Clark and Columbia Markers, which was not used and we are including it again in this year '8 budget.


1938

137

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

There have becn presented to this Committee four resolutions as follows: I

" Be It Resolved, That the directors of the Masonic Home be instructed, if deemed to be advisable, to use 3 per cent of the dues payable to the Masonic Home in accordance with Section 74 of the By-Laws, for relief of indigent Master Masons, their widows and orphans, either at the Masonic Home or elsewhere, and regardless of whether the beneficiary would be entitled to admission to the Masonic Home or not, and to transfer such amounts as the Board may deem advisable for relief for those not entitled to admission to the Home, to the Welfare Committee. " II

"Be It Resolved, That the Ways and Means Committee, by and with the consent of the Grand Master, be authorized, the funds of the Grand Lodge being available, to transfer to the Welfare Committee from time to time, moneys from the General Fund for the operation and maintenance of the Welfara Committee, not exceeding, however, the sum of $5,000.00." III "Be It Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Missouri donate to the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma the sum of $75.00 to compromise and settle dispute between Galena Lodge No. 515, of Missouri, and Binger Lodge No. 431, of Oklahoma."

IV , , Be It Resolved, That the Grand Lodge appropriate $200.00 for use of Committees on Masonic Publieations and Masonic Service Association to enable them to establish some plan of Masonic Education." We approve adoption of all the above resolutions. The Committee refused the request of Laclede Lodge No. 83, for a refund of $69.30, being overpayments during the last six years in their reports to the Grand Secretary. We recommend the following appropriations: Printing Proceedings Salary, Grand Master Expenses, Grand Master Maintenance, Grand Lodge Offices Expenses Grand Lodge Officers (Order Grand Master) Salary, Grand Secretary Office Help (Grand Secretary's Office) Printing, Postage and Stationery Salary, Grand Lecturer Expenses, Grand Lecturer District Lecturer and District Deputies Conferences Grand Lecturer Emeritus Salary, Grand Treasurer Grand Correspondent Masonic Relief Association, United States and Canada Past Grand Master 's Jewel

$ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,600.00 1,000.00 1,500.00 1,800.00 300.00 5,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 4,200.00 1,200.00 750.00 1,500.00 500.00 500.00 297.76 175.00


138

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Lewis and Clark and Columbia Markers . Masonic Publications and Masonic Service Association . Telephone, Jefferson 4877 . Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer . Reporter, Grand Lodge Session . Expenses Grand Lodge Session . Contingent, Grand Lodge Expense, Funerals, etc. . . Perkins Audit Company . Expenses George Washington Memorial and Grand Masters' Conference . Grand Lodge Officers Conferences ' . Pay Roll 1938 . Masonic Home Board Per Capita . Grand Lodge of Oklahoma, A. F. & A. M .

1938 110.00 200.00 225.00 300.00 75.00 650.00 750.00 150.00 300.00 300.00 19,966.20 127,559.53 75.00

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $176,983.49 Fraternally submitted, C. A. G. C.

TOLIN, Chairman, MARQUIS, SOLON CAMERON.

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, we now come to the report of a very important committee. This liquor question has been a most vexatious one. Last year M. W. Bro. Walker appointed a special committee with instructions to look into this matter. The Committee made a partial report last year and suggested the Committee be continued, which was done. They now are prepared to bring in a final report. May I remind you that this report contains a suggested amendment to th~ by-laws. Therefore, the report will be received this morning and then lie over for consideration until next year. We will now listen to the report of this committee.

REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON INTOXICATING LIQUORS, LOTTERIES, GAMBLING, ETC.

'V. Brother Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman, read the report of the Committee which was adopted, and is as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Lodge A. F. ~ A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: This Committee was appointed by Most Worshipful Brother George W. Walker when Grand Master. It was his desire that the committee make a survey of the conditions, to which his attention had been repeatedly called, in our lodges arising from the traffic in liquor, lotteries and gambling devices, and make to the 1937 Communication of the Grand Lodge a report and any recommendations the committee might see fit and proper. On the subject of gambling this committee (accepting language of a previous committee) made certain recommendations at the 1937 Communication. On the subject of questions relating to the liquor traffic, this committee pointed out at the 1937 Communication, the requirements and prohibitions of the Masonic law of this Jurisdiction, discussed certain then existing


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

139

conditions, reported that it had not determined to make any recommendation further than the enforcement of the law so long as it exists, and recommended that the committee be continued for further investigation, report and recommendation. The committee was accordingly continued. In order that the Grand Lodge may at this time have before it a synopsis of the existing Missouri Masonic law on matters pertaining to intoxicating liquor, we quote from our report of 1937, the following: , 'The Masonic law of this Jurisdiction: "Item One: Requires all Lodges to enforce the Masonic law against saloon keeping, selling intoxicating liquor as a beverage by druggists, and habitual drunkenness. "Item Two: Prohibits every Lodge in this Jurisdiction from receiving a petition for the degrees or for affiliation from any person who is engaged in the manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage, either as a distiller, brewer, brewery agent, wholesale or retail liquor dealer, or a salesman or agent for the sale of intoxicating liquors, superintendent or foreman for such manufacturer or dealer, a saloon keeper, bartender, or one who serves intoxicating liquors as a vocation, or of anyone who is engaged in any capacity in the handling, manufacturing, or selling of intoxicating liquors as a beverage, or of one who signs a petition for a dram shop license. "Although the Trial Code repeals the provision for arbitrary expulsion of a Freemason who may begin any such business as is described in Item Two above, and places in the hands of a jury the power to determine the punishment, it has been held by the Grand Lodge that it is still the law that any member of a Lodge who engages in traffic in intoxicating liquor for beverage purposes in any capacity whatever, whether legalized or illicit, is guilty of a Masonic offense, subject to trial and punishment, and that the proceeding against such a member is yet subject to review by the Grand Lodge." The primary difficulty which confronts this committee in its attempt to determine whether a change should be made in the above outlined Masonic law is produced by conditions which have arisen in the past few years. Under the present law of the State of Missouri (Sec. 13a. Sess. Acts 1933-34 Sp. Sess., p. 82) a person possessing the requisite qualifications may procure license to sell intoxicating liquor, by the drink at retail, on the premises described in the application. Under the Statute of Missouri (Sess. Acts 1935, p. 267, 1. c. 274) provision is also made for the sale of intoxicating liquor at retail in the original package by a person (upon a license granted to him) engaged in one or more of the following types of business--drug store, cigar and tobacco store, grocery store, general merchandise store, confectionery and/or delicatessen store, provided snch person has and keeps in his store a stock of goods having a value according to invoices of at least $1,000.00, exclusive of fixtures and intoxicating liquors. The liquor so sold shall not be consumed upon the premises where sold, nor shall the original package be opened on the premises of the seller, except as provided in the Act of the Legislature. In said Act, provision is made, upon the payment of additional license fee, for sale of certain malt liquor containing alcohol in excess of 3.2 per cent by weight and not in excess of 5 per cent by weight, by the drink at retail for consumption on the premises where sold.


140

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1988

It is the belief of this committee that in many instances brethren of our fraternity who are eJ?gaged in the drug, cigar and tobacco, grocery, general merchandise, confectionery or delicatessen business, have procured, and are operating under, licenses by which the liquors are not to be consumed on the premises where sold and the original packages are not to be opened on such premises. In addition, doubtless others of our members, are, as stock clerks, salesmen or delivery men, in the employ of individuals or companies operating under licenses by which neither consumption on the premises nor opening of the original packages on the premises is permitted to occur. Competition with other stores is thought by us to have caused members of our Order to engage in the liquor traffic under such licenses as last above mentioned. Our Lodges are faced with the alternative of either ignoring Masonic law or, in event proceedings be brought against a member who is engaged in any manner in the sale of intoxicating liquor, of convicting such member, regardless of the legality under State Law of his acts, or the freedom of those acts from disorder, and even though such member be a respected and honored citizen. If a young man who is employed by a highly respected grocer applies for membership in a Missouri Masonic Lodge, he is not eligible if he is engaged in the sale or delivery of intoxicating liquors to a customer of his employer, even though such customer consumes not a drop upon the premises and is himself a member of our fraternity. No discrimination is made in our present Missouri Masonic law between, on the one hand, the tavern keeper whose sales of liquor by the drink are 100 per cent of his business and who, though acting within the law of the State, may be operating an establishment which is regarded with disfavor by his community and, on the other hand, the grocer who maintains an orderly establishment with no consumption of liquor on his premises, and whose liquor sales may be less than 5 per cent of his gross transactions. These circumstances justify serious consideration of amendment of our Masonic law. If our present law be retained there is a constant temptation to our Lodges to overlook and condone violations of it, and, if such temptation be yielded to, the reputation of the fraternity is likely to be besmirched by the charge of hypocrisy based on tIle existence of strict Masonic law accompanied by little or no enforcement of it. If, on the otJier hand, prosecutions of our members under present Missouri Masonic law be instituted, the fraternity may in many localities suffer dissension of a serious and irreconcilable character. After careful deliberation we have concluded that our Masonic Law in respect to these matters should be so changed that (a) the only manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor included within the category of Masonic offenses is such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling as tends, or which course in a manner or under a surrounding which tends, to impair the good name of the Masonic institution, or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings and (b) the only manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor included within the conduct which disqualifies one from attaining Masonic membership is such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling as if performed by a Freemason would tend, or which occurs in a manner or under a surrounding which if such manufacture, sale or handling were performed by a Freemason would tend, to impair


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

141

the good name of the Masonic institution, or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings. We believe, however, that the personal sale by a Freemason of intoxicating liquor at retail for consumption as a beverage on the premises where sold does impair such good name or usefulness, or degrade the Masonic institution in public estimation. Our recommendations therefore are: Item A. That Sections 198 and 199 of the By-Laws be repealed. Item B. That there be enacted a section to read as follows: "SECTION 198. All Lodges shall enforce the Masonic law which is hereby declared to prohibit habitual drunkenness, gambling, blasphemy, profanity, and practices of a kindred character, and all other Masonic offenses." Item C. That there be enacted a section to read as follows: "SECTION 199. No Lodge in this Jurisdiction shall. receive a petition for the Degrees or for affiliation from any individual who is connected directly or indirectly with any such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor as if performed by a Freemason would tend, or which occurs in a manner or under a surrounding which if such manufacture, sale or handling respectively were performed by a Freemason would tend, to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings; and the sale by any individual personally of intoxicating liquor at retail for consumption as a beverage on the premises where sold is hereby declared to be such conduct as, if such sale were made by a Freemason, would impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness or degrade it in public estimation." Item D. That sub-section" b" of Section 229 of the By-Laws (which section is the one which defines Masonic offenses which subject the individual offender to trial and punishment) be repealed and that in lieu thereof there be enacted the following to be known respectively as subsection lib" and sub-section "b-l" of Section 229, namely " (b.) Any direct or indirect connection with any such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor as tends, or wlJich occurs in a manner or under a surrounding which tends, to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings; and the sale by any Freemason personally of intoxicating liquor at retail for consumption as a beverage on the premises where sold is hereby declared to be such conduct as impairs the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness or degrades it in public estimation. "(b-1.) Any other act, conduct or neglect of duty tending to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings. ' ,


142

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

We therefore submit and offer the foregoing Item A, Item B, Item C and Item D, for discussion and adoption at the 1939 Communication of this Grand Lodge. Respectfully submitted, FORREST C. DONNELL, Chairman, LEO. H. JOHNSON, R. R. KREEGER, J. A. KINDER, WALTER A. HIGBEE (Abscnt) .

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS

¥l. Brother Robert L. Dixon, Chairman, read the report of the Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Grand Lodge, A. F. 4- A. M., of Mis.'wuri: Greetings: Aftcr thorough investigation I find that there is no unROBERT L. DIXON, Chairman. finished business. ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS

M. W. Grand Master Reader announced the appointment of the following brethren to act as tellers: Dr. Solon Cameron, Chairman, Nat D. Jackson, Morris E. Ewing, Elmer Flack, Robert Winkclmaier, Louis J. Graue, Alfred B. Ludlow, Fred H. Knight, Rex Dewhirst, Ralph Wilson, Morrison W. Rinkel, Kipp C.•Johnson, Harry Hightower. M. W. BROTHER HENRY C. CHILES

R. W. BROTHER ELWYN S. WOODS R. W. BROTHER KARL M. VETSBURG R \V. BROTHER HARRY S. TRUMAN

R. W. BR.OTHER EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. BROTHER ARTHUR MATHER

'"

Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Senior Grand Warden J1tnior Grand Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary

ELECTION OF BOARD OF DmECTORS FOR MASONIC HOME

1'he following brethren were nominated and elected to serve as directors for the Masonic Home for the next three years: M. W. Brothers Arch Johnson, Robert R. Kreeger, William \V. Martin, and DuVal Smith. For the two-year term to fill the vacancy caused by the death of M. \V. Brother Orestes Mitchell Most \Vorshipful Brother George W. \Valker, was elected. PRESENTATION TO GRAND MASTER FROM W. BROTHER J. J. DEMUTH, PAST MASTER OF WELLSTON LODGE NO. 613

W. BROTHER J. J. DEMUTH: Most Worshipful Grand Master, may I please be allowed just three minutes' time to present to you a small gift from Wellston Lodge No. 613. Most Worshipful Sir, in just a matter of minutes you will again be just a Baptist preacher, but you have been tremendously rich this :year in having made friends, and


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

143

secured the devotion of the brethren in the State of Missouri. Our lodge is small and not very wealthy, but we are rich in having had a Past Master of our lodge, District Deputy of our district, as the Grand Master of our State. We are tremendously proud. This little gift, Doctor Reader, doesn't represent much in the way of value or money, but it contains the name of every member of your lodge, and every time that you open the leaves of this book, the love and the affection of each of our members will fly right out to you. Thank you. THE GRAND MASTER: W. Brother Demuth, and brethren of my lodge: I can't begin to tell you how much I appreciate this gift and your thoughtfulness. You have quite overwhelmed me, and I do indeed thank you from my heart. R. W. BROTHER HENRY C. CHILES: In a moment you will hear, brethren, my list of appointments read by the Grand Secretary. Much to my personal regret, and I am sure to the regret of the Grand Lodge, you will find the name of Dr. Eli S. Haynes of Columbia is missing. Dr. Haynes has served this Grand Lodge with distinction for a long time. After mature deliberation and a reconsideration of the matter made at my request, he says that his decision is final. He states, "I see no possibility of satisfactorily discharging the accumulating obligations incident to continuing in the official line of the Grand Lodge and at the same time giving adequate attention to my university duties." Consequently, he made the request that his name be withdrawn, and the request was granted. APPOINTMENTS

The Grand Secretary read the following list of appointments made by the M. W. Grand Master-Elect: ANTHONY F. ITTNER R. W. Grand Lecturer SAMUEL THURMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . W. Grand Chaplain THOMAS B. MATHER W. Grand Chaplain EMMET L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain Z. N. WILLIAMS • . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • . W. Grand Chaplain HARRIS C. JOHNSTON • . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . • • Grand Senior Deacon FORREST C. DONNELL . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand J u'Tllior Deacon GROVER C. SPARKS . • • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . • • . Grand Senior Steward LEO H. JOHNSON . . . • • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Grand Junior Steward WM. F. WOODRUFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • Grand Marshal JAMES A. KINDER : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . Grand Marshal WILLIS J. BRAY . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . Grand Sword Bearer SOLON CAMERON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . • • Grand Pursuivant FRANC L. MCCLUER . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . • • • . . . . . . . . . . • . . • • . • • Grand Orator WALTER R. SHRODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . Grand Tiler

INSTALLATION

The hour for installation having arrived, M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner was presented as the installing offic.er, and M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, as Grand Marshal.


144

1938

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

The following Grand Officers were then installed for the ensuing year: HENRY C. CHILES M. W. Grand Master ELWYN S. WOODS • . . . . . . . . . . R. W. Deputy Grand Master KARL M. VETSBURG . . . . . .R. W. Senior Grand Warden HARRY S. TRUMAN. oR. W. Junior Grand Warden E. E. MORRIS . . • . . . • . . . . . . . . R. W. Grand Treasurer ARTHUR MATHER ••....•.. .R. W. Grand Secretary ANTHONY F. ITTNER R. W. Grand Lecturer SAMUEL THURMAN W. Grand Chaplain THOMAS B. MATHER W. Grand Chaplain EMMET L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain Z. N. WILLIAMS ••••....... W. Grand Chaplain HARRIS C. JOHNSTON .. Grand Senior Deacon FORREST C. DONNELL Grand Junior Deacon GROVER C. SPARKS Grand Senior Steward LEO H. JOHNSON .•... Grand Junior Steward WM. F. WOODRUFF .. Grand lfarshal JAMES A. KINDER . . . . . Grand lfarshal WILLIS J. BRAY • . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . Grand Sword Bearer SOLON CAMERON . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Pursuivant DR. FRANC L. McCLUER , '" . • . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . • Grand Orator WALTER R. SHRODES . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . Grand Tiler 0.0

•••••

0

0

0

0

0

•••

••••

•••••••••

••••••••

0

0

0

••••••

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.;

••

0

0

0

0"

••••

•••

0

0

0

0

••

0

00

••••••

00

00

••••

0

"

0

•••••

0

00

••••••••••

••••••

••••

0

••••••

0

0

"

••

.,.

••••••••••

0

•••

0

0

•••

0

•••••

•••••••

,

0

0

••••

"

0

•••••

0

0

••

0

0

••

••••••

••••••••••

,

•••

••••••••••••••••

0

••••

••••••••••••••••••

•••

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

••••••

•••

•••••••••••

••••••••••••••••

0

0

0

•••••••••

0

0

0

••••••

•••••••••••

0

0

00

••••••••

0

0

••••••

••••••••

0

0

••••••

•••••••••••••

0

••

0

•••••••••••••

PRESENTATION TO GRAND MASTER AND PAST GRAND MASTER

M. W. BROTHER ITTNER: Most Worshipful Brother Chiles, my only remaining duty as installing officer is to turn over to you this gavel of authority. When I appointed you in the Grand Lodge line, I did so with the conviction that you were possessed of all the qualifications we expect of a Grand Master. You have a knowledge of Masonic law, a knowledge of Masonic procedure, of symbolism, and anything else necessary fully to equip the occupant of the office of Grand Master for the discharge of his duties. The ten years that have passed since you started in the line have fully borne me out in my belief. It is a great pleasure, and a great honor, for me to turn over to you the gavel of authority, which I know you will wield with love, justice, and wisdom. M. W. BROTHER READER: Most Worshipful Brother Chiles, it is now my pleasant duty to give you tl)is official badge of your office. It is a great joy to me to present you the jewel of the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the State of Missouri. I am sure you will wear it with great honor. M. W. BROTHER CHILES: Most Worshipful Brother Reader, I deeply appreciate receiving this jewel of office from your hands. It has been worn most worthily by you, and your long line of predecessors, and it is my hope that I may wear it with the same worthiness. I thank you. W. BROTHER SELLERS: Most \Vorshipful Grand Master, I would


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

145

like to have the privilege of reading a telegram which explains why I ask this privilege: "Colonel J. M. Sellers: Every Master Mason, Royal Arch Mason and Knights Templar in Lexington desires you to convey to M. W. Brother Henry C. Chiles his congratulations on his advancement to the most honorable office in Freemasonry. We are proud of him and extend to him through you our best wishes for a successful year. W. R. Eckle, Secretary and Recorder." M. W. Brother Chiles, nothing that I could say would carry anything like the weight of what has already been said. This is the first time I ever attended a -Grand Lodge. You have already received the honors from the State, but I am bringing you the honors from your own home friends. I am just a small-town boy telling you that we are exceedingly proud of the honor you have brought to Lexington Lodge No. 149 and to our community. I believe it would not be out of place, however, for me not only to congratulate you, but also to congratulate the Grand Lodge. I have known this distinguished brother all of my life. You have known him as a distinguished Mason. I have known him as a personal friend, and as a partner at the bridge tables, and I know that he is honorable, upright, and just. -Thank you. M. W. BROTHER CHILES:' Worshipful Brother Sellers, I deeply appreciate your kind words, and I thank you most sincerely. R. W. BROTHER ARTHUR MATHER: Most Worshipful Grand Master; you will kindly remove that apron, which by the way, does not signify what you now are, or what you were a while ago, and if you will allow me, put this one on. It is the custom of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to invest its newly installed Most Worshipful Grand Master with an appropriate apron, and to my mind this is the most significant of all our aprons. During the year you will be traveling here and there, spreading Masonic light among the Brethren, and you will have a crowded life, because in this day when civilization is so speeded up, you will have little surcease from labor. At times, however, you will have an opportunity for quiet introspection and reflection, and as there is a kinship among all Brethren-all good men and true-you will look at the emblems, symbolic and otherwise, which adorn this apron, and they will serve you as a sure-cure for discouragement, or any other of the peculiar moods to which human nature is subject. Unless I am greatly mistaken, this apron will be a means of inspiring you in all the good work which you will accomplish. Wear it, my Brother, with the continual assurance of the unanimous good will of every member of this Grand Lodge. M. W. BROTHER CHILES: Right Worshipful Brother Mather, I want to assure you that this apron will mean much to me. I will ever be thankful to the Grand Lodge for this gift, and it has for me an additional significance because it came through your hands.


146

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

M. W. BROTHER BIGGER: Most Worshipful Brother Reader, you have kept the faith of Freemasonry during your term of office. You have gone up and down the state, and have proclaimed to the brethren both by word and by conduct, the real genuine principles of Freemasonry. \Vhat a heritage that is! It is now my privilege to present you with a Past Grand Master's jewel, which is a symbol of the fact that that course is finished, the faith has been kept. (Pins same on Doctor Reader's lapel.) This is a symbol of the purity of life and ('onduct that a Grand Master should live after he leaves the life of being Grand Master. Let me congratulate you on the work you have done so splendidly, and I assure you we shall expect you to rarry on as one of our Past Grand Masters. M. W. BROTHER READER: Most Worshipful Brother Bigger, I certainly appreciate this gift. It is indeed a great honor which I shall cherish as long as I live, and which I shall hand down to my daughter, and I hope to her children, as a heritage from their forebear. May I thank you, Most Worshipful Brother Bigger, who have been a personal friend of mine for many years, for all your kindH('sses."

ANNOUNCEMENT

M. BROTHER SELLERS: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren, I would like to make an announcement. We plan to have a homecoming Convocation for our newly installed Grand Master in Lexington on October- 20. I should like for every Worshipful Brother from our neighboring lodges to put that date down. An invitation is extended to all of you who can come to Lexington on that day, Thursday, October 20. STANDING COMMITTEES 1938-1939

Jurisprudence-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Henri L. Warren, C. Lew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer, Sam Wilcox, Henry \V. Fox, .John R. Baker. Appeals and Gt路ievances-Ray Bond, Chairman; O. H. Swearingen, Edward P. Walsh, John C. Robertson, Henry Baum, Percy A. Budd, John Calhoun. Ways and Means-Cecil A. Tolin, 2 years, Chairman; George C. Marquis, 1 year; Edmund E. Morris, 1 year; Ransom A. Breuer, 3 years; Harold H. Brummall, 3 years. Credentials-Walter A. Webb, Chairman; Jacob Abaecherli, Fred H. Knight, Henry F. Woerther, George A. McKean, Jewel E. Windle. Mileage and Per Diem-Walter Shrodes, Chairman; H. A. Magoon, Arthur W. Reiter, George Black, Arthur V. Schopp, Robert L. Dixon. Chartered Lodges-Robert C. Duffin, Chairman; George W. Paddock, Caeser Wollman, Frederick Stueck, Harry B. Bolte, G. W. Stegen.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

147

Lodges U. D.-Louis J. Graue, Chairman; Gus O. Nations, C. B. Waddell, Fred W. Bendick, Albert Theis, Jr., H. W. Brown. Welfare-Tolman W. Cotton, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, Arch A. Johnson, Thomas H. Reynolds, Herman Mauch. Reports of D. D. G. M.'s-Nat. D. Jackson, Chairman; David A. Leslie, Fay G. Fulkerson, Charles L. Woods, George A. Sample, John W. Adams, Walter L. Eshelman. Masonic Boards of Relief-Edward H. Loffhagen, 1 year, Chairman; Andrew J. O'Reilly, 3 years; Albert Linxwiler, 3 years; Morris E: Ewing, 1 year; Cyril A. Carpenter, 2 years. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, 3 years, Chairman; Theodore C. Teel, 2 years; James A. Kinder, 1 year; Harry P. Hovey, 2 years; Wm. D. Rogers, 3 years. Masonic Home (Visiting Committee)-A. P. Fletcher, Chairman; Walter A. Phipps, Emsley C. James, Sterling H. McCarthy, Herbert Powell. Correspondence-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman. Necrology-Harold L. Reader, Chairman; Julius Edwards, Wm. C. Martin. Auditing-Perkins Audit Company. Grand Master's Address-Harold L. Reader, Chairman; and all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business-Fred H. Kurz, Chairman. Transportation and Hotels-Wm. F. Miller, Chairman. SPECIAL COMMITTEES 1938-1939

Masonic Service Association of Missouri-Robert C. Winkelmaier, Chairman; John R. Davis, Robert R. Wright, Chas. C. Freeney. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Arthur Mather, Chairman; James R. McLachlan, Frank C. Barnhill, DuVal Smith. Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Edward McGuigan, John Wohradsky, Jr. George Washington Masonic National Memorial Associationr-Berl S. Lee, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell, Jr., T. J. Wornall. Library-William B. Massey, Chairman; Wm. P. Mason, Wm. C. Rese, Renick Jones, Shelby Wilson. Printing of Proceedings-Arthur Mather, Chairman; Cecil A. Tolin. Masonic Publications-James W. Skelly, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Frederick M. Smith, Harold L. Reader, Ray V. Denslow, George C. Marquis. Building Supervisory Board-Guy Million, 2 years, Chairman; Curt C. Mack, 1 year; Julius C. Garrell, Jr., 3 years. Revisions of By-Laws-Henry C. Chiles, Chairman; Byrne E. Bigger, Ray V. Denslow. Intoxicating Liquors, Lotteries, Gambling, Etc.-Forrest C. Don-


148

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

nell, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, James A. Kinder, Leo H. J ohnson, Walter A. Higbee. Forms and Ceremonies--Ray V. Denslow, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles, Arthur Mather. LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION Name and Location Year of Service Robert R. Kreeger, 3404 Morrell Avenue, Kansas City 1908-09 Arch A. Johnson, Landers Building, Springfield 1911-12 Van Fremont Boor, 1201 Commerce Building, Kansas City 1913-14 Tolman W. Cotton, Van Buren 1914-15 Julius C. Garrell, 251 Twenty-fourth Street, Santa Monica, Calif 1919-20 Bert S. Lee, 1224 Washington, Springfield 1922-23 William W. Martin, 5351 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis 1925-26 Anthony F. Ittner, 1530 Telephone Building, St. Louis 1927-28 Byrne E. Bigger, Courthouse, Hannibal 1928-29 William R. Gentry, 717 Louderman Building, St. Louis 1930-31 Ray V. Denslow, Trenton 1931-32 Thad B. Landon, 1902 Power and Light Building, Kansas City .. 1932-33 F. C. Barnhill, Marshall 1933-34 DuVal Smith, 517 Corby Building, St. Joseph 1934-35 James W. Skelly, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis 1935-36 George W. Walker, 627 Good Hope Street, Cape Girardeau 1936-37 Harold L. Reader, 529 Lake Avenue, Webster Groves 1937-38 MINUTES APPROVED

On motion made by M. W. Brother James \V. Skelly, the minutes as reported, were ordered printed in the Proceedings and the Grand Secretary was directed to print and distribute the necessary number of Proceedings of this session of the Grand Lodge. BENEDICTION

Rev. Grand Chaplain Z. M. Williams, after invoking the Divine blessing, pronounced the benediction. CLOSING

The M. 'V. Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Missouri rested from its labors and was closed in AMPLE FORM at 1 :06 o'clock P.M., this day, the 28th of September, 1938, no further business appearing, to meet again at St. Louis, Missouri, the last Tuesday, viz., the 26th day of September 1939.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

DISTRIOT DEPUTY G. M.'S 1938-1939 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Harold M. Jayne, Memphis James M. DeWitt, Kirksville Walter E. Singley, Green City Clyde C. Evans, Trenton Carey A. Brock, Ridgeway Curtis F. Smith, Darlington George Houchens, Ravenwood Fred H. Binder, Bigelow Ernest E. Pischker, St. Joseph

Thos. D. Williams, Maysville Emsley C. James, Plattsburg John M. Gallatin, Chillicothe Herman D. Taggart, Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon David A. Leslie, Williamstown Guy A. Magruder, Bowling Green 17. Chas. S. Hicks, Monroe City 18. Turner D. Barnes, Moberly 19. Arthur G. Lynch, Brunswick 20. Earl F. Cheesman, Carrollton 21. Earl W. Foley, Weston 22. Claude A. Ferguson, Kansas City 23. C. B. Waddell, Lexington 24. John W. Adams, Marshall 25. Samuel L. Jewett, Boonville 26. Julius R. Edwards, Centralia 27. Louis J. Graue, Mexico 28. Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City 29. Wm. C. Martin, Troy 30. Edwin H. Barklage, St. Charles 31. Albert Linxwiler, Jefferson City 32. Ransom A. Breuer, Hermann 33-A. Wm. Zavadil, St. Louis 33-B. James M. Bradford, St. Louis 34. Ernest W. Miller, Belton 35. Dudley O. Bradley, Butler 36. JQlly P. Hurtt, Sedalia 37. Thornton Jennings, Clinton 38. Oren Simpson, Richland 39. Chas. L. Woods, Rolla 40. Harry H. Balsiger, Crystal City 41. Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville 42. Clyde Tinsley, Eldorado Springs 43. David V. Morris, Nevada 44. George Dillard, Joplin 45. Jewel E. Windle, Springfield

149

DISTRIOT LEOTURERS 1938-1939 Homer G. McDaniel, Wayland Walter H. Epperson, Hurdland Walter E. Singley, Green City Emmett M. Wilson, Laredo Carey A. Brock, Ridgeway Curtis F. Smith, Darlington George Houchens, Ravenwood Fred H. Binder, Bigelow Cyril A. Carpenter, 2908 Sylvania, St. Joseph Thomas D. Williams, Maysville Emsley C. James, Plattsburg John R. Blackman, Chillicothe Herman D. Taggart, Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon David A. Leslie, Williamstown Guy A. Magruder, Bowling Green Charles S. Hicks, Monroe City Turner D. Barnes, Moberly Arthur G. Lynch, Brunswick L. Herbert Thomas, Carrollton Henry C. Noland, Parkville F. Ernest Carter, 5711 Locust, Kansas City C. B. Waddell, Lexington John W. Adams, Marshall Samuel L. Jewett, Boonville Robert N. Hall, Columbia Louis J. Graue, Mexico Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City Wm. C. Martin, Troy Edwin H. Barklage, St. Charles Wm. D. Rogers, Jefferson City Ransom A. Breuer, Hermann Elmer Flack, St. Louis Ernest W. Miller, Belton Dudley O. Bradley, Butler Jolly P. Hurtt, Sedalia Thornton .J ennings, Clinton Oren Simpson, Richland George W. Reeves, Steelville Joseph S. Withington, DeSoto Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville Clyde H. Tinsley, Eldorado Springs John C. Senate, Milo Leland Roy Hoffman, Joplin Wm. J. Craig, 1527 S. Pickwick, Springfield


150

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

DISTRIOT DEPUTY G. M.'S 1938-1939 46. John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove 47. John N. Sparks, Grandin 48. J. Clyde Akers, Farmington 49. W. Glenn McCain, Cape Girardeau 50. Geo. A. Sample, Chaffee 51. Thomas R. Wilkins, Campbell 52. Kipp C. Johnson, Poplar Bluff 53. C. Earl Armstrong, West Plains 54. John S. Taylor, Ozark 55. Charles Werdein, Aurora 56. Walter A. Phipps, Neosho 57. Irwin F. Rosenfelder, St. Louis 58. George Catron, Eldon 59. Nat D. Jackson, Independence

1938

DISTRIOT LEOTURERS 1938-1939 John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove John N. Sparks, Ellsinore J. Clyde Akers, Farmington W. Glenn McCain, Cape Girardeau Alonzo A. Harrison, Sikeston Thomas R. Wilkins, Campbell Kipp C. Johnson, Poplar Bluff C. Earl Armstrong, West Plains John S. Taylor, Ozark Charles Werdein, Aurora Walter A. Phipps, Neosho Robert H. Groppe, 230 Harrison, Ferguson, Mo. George Catron, Eldon John S. Carmical, Independence

AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS ADOPTED , 'SECTION 28A. COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC CALAMITY. There is hereby created a Committee on Public Calamity. The following officers of the Grand Lodge shall compose this Committee: Deputy Grand Master, as Chairman; Grand Treasurer, as Treasurer; Grand Secretary, as Secretary; and the Senior Grand Warden and Junior Grand Warden. Whenever, as a result of any public calamity, the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge shall issue a call for voluntary donations, to relieve distress in any stricken area, this Committee is empowered to receive and receipt for all donations or collections; they may receive donations at any time to accumulate a fund for use in such emergencies, and such fund shall be invested in United States obligations. They shall, with the consent and approval of the Grand Master, make such disbursements from their funds as may be necessary, including all expenses incurred by the Committee. They shall keep accounts of all funds received and disbursed, and make written report to the Grand Master, when"ever required by him, and to the Grand Lodge at its Annual Communications showing their actions and finances for the preceding Masonic fiscal year. The Treasurer and Secretary of this Committee shall furnish such bond as may be required from time to time by the Grand Master. The cost of such bonds shall be paid out of the funds of said Committee. ' , AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS WHIOH LIE OVER FOR AOTION AT THE 1939 ANNUAL OOMMUNIOATION

Be It Resolved, That Section 66 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws, be, and the same is hereby repealed, and a new section, to be known as Section 66, relating to the same subject, is hereby enacted in lieu thereof. SECTION 66-EMPLOYMENT BUREAU In cities where there are twenty-five or more Lodges, there shall be an employment bureau, composed of representatives from each Lodge who shall be appointed by the Worshipful Master. Such employment bureau shall aid unemployed members and their families in securing employment and shall adopt by-laws and rules for its government, which shall be ap-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

151

proved by the Most Worshipful Grand Master. It shall maintain a permanent office for the conduct of its affairs. Each member Lodge shall contribute, for the maintenance thereof, a sum not to exceed five (5) cents per capita per month, to be calculated on the Annual Grand Lodge returns as hereinafter provided, but those members of a Lodge whose dues have been remitted shall not be included in such calculation. The per capita to be paid each month shall be determined and fixed as follows: On or before September fifteenth (15th) of each year, said Employment Bureau shall prepare a budget for its operation beginning October first of each year; said budget shall be submitted to the Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge, and said committee shall, during the annual communication of the Grand Lodge approve or revise said budget and determine and fix the amount of contribution of each member Lodge, per capita each month, that may be necessary to meet the budget as approved or revised by said Ways and Means Committee. Such contributions shall be payable monthly to the Employment Bureau, the first payment being due October first of each year. The Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge appointed for the year 1939-40, shall immediately determine and fix the contributions as provided herein, to be payable on October first 1939, following the closing of such Grand Lodge Scssion.

Add to Section 161 : The form of petition shall be substantially as follows: PETITION FOR RESTORATION

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Members of Lodge, No._ , .A. F. go .A. M.: The Subscriber represents that he was suspended by said Lodge, on the ..........day of , 19 , for non-payment of dues, that he has liquidated his indebtedness to the said Lodge, and now desires to be restored to membership and promises, if restored, to comply with the Laws and Regulations of the Fraternity. Yours respectfully, Signature ................................, 19.........

Address

Repeal Sections 198 and 199 and enact new Sections 198 and 199 to be as follows: , 'SECTION 198. All Lodges shall enforce the Masonic law which is hereby declared to prohibit habitual drunkenness, gambling, blasphemy, profanity, and practices of a kindred character, and all other Masonic offenses." "SECTION 199. No Lodge in this Jurisdiction shall receive a petition for the Degrees or for affiliation from any individual who is connected directly or indirectly with any such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor as if performed by a Freemason would tend, or which occurs in a manner or under a surrounding which if such manufacture, sale or handling respectively were performed by a Freemason would tend, to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teaehings; and the sale by any individual personally of intoxicating liquor at retail


152

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

for consumption as a beverage on the premises where sold is hereby declared to be such conduct as, if such sale were made by a Freemason, would impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness or degrade it in public estimation." Repeal sub-section "b" of Section 229 of the By-Laws (which section is the one which defines Masonic offenses which subject the individual offender to trial and punishment) and in lieu thereof enact the following to be known respectively as sub-section" b" and ~mb-section "b-I" of Section 229, namely "(b.) Any direct or indirect connection with any such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor as tends, or which occurs in a manner or under a surrounding which tends, to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings; and the sale by any Freemason personally of intoxicating liquor at retail for consumption as a beverage on the premises where sold is hereby declared to be such conduct as impairs th good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness or degrades it in public estimation. "(b-l.) Any other act, conduct or neglect of duty tending to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation, or which is in anywise contrary to its principles, obligations or teachings."

RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED I Be It Resolved, That the Grand Master is aQthorized to register the Jewels, Emblems, Symbols and Insignia of The Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Missouri, as provided by the Statutes of Missouri, thereby protecting the same from infringement. II Be It Resolved, That the dircetors of the Masonic Home be instructed, if deemed to be advisable, to use 3 per cent of the dues payable to the Masonic Home in accordance with Section 74 of the By-Laws, for relief of indigent Master Masons, their widows and orphans, either at the Masonic Home or elsewhere, and regardless of whether the beneficiary would be entitled to admission to the Masonic Home or not, and to transfer such amounts as the Board may deem advisable for relief for those not entited to admission to the Home, to the Welfare Committee. III Be It Resolved, That the Ways and Means Committee, by and with the consent of the Grand Master, be authorized, the funds of the Grand Lodge being available, to transfer to the Welfare Committee from time to time, moneys from the General Fund for the operation and maintenance of the Welfare Committee, not exceeding, howev.er, the sum of $5,000.00.

IV Be It Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Missouri donate to the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma the sum of $75.00 to compromise and settle dispute between Galena Lodge No. 515, of Missouri, and Binger Lodge No. 431, .of Oklahoma. V

Be It Resolved, That the Grand Lodge appropriate $200.00 for use of Committees on Masonic Publications and Masonic Service Association to enable them to establish some plan of Masonic Education.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

153

NUMERIOAL LIST OF LODGE8-1938 I-Missouri 2-Meridian 3-Beacon 4-Howard 5-United 6-Ark 7-0 'Sullivan 8-. 9-Geo. Washington 10-Agency 11-Pauldingville l2-Tyro l3-Rising Sun l4-Eolia 15-Western Star l6-Memphis l7-C1arksville l8-Palmyra 19-Paris Union 20-St. Louis 2I-Havana 22-Wellington 23-Florida 24-Wyaconda 25-Naphtali 26-Ava 27-Evergreen 28--St. John's 29-Windsor 30-Huntsville 3I-Liberty 32-Humphreys 33-Ralls 34-Troy 35-Mercer 36-Cooper 37-Hemple 38-Callao 39-DeWitt 40-Mt. Moriah 4l-Bismarck 42-Middle Grove 43-Jefferson 44-Fair Play 45-Bonhomme 46--Wentzville 47-Fayette 48-Fulton 49-Holt

50-Xenia 51-Livingston 52-Wakanda 53-Weston 54-Index 55-Arrow Rock 56-Tipton 57-Richmond 58-Monticello 59-Centralia 60-New Bloomfield 6I-Waverly 62-Vincil 63-Cambridge 64-Monroe 65-Pattonsburg 66-Grant City 67-Rocheport 68-Kennett 69-Sullivan 70-Armstrong 71-Savannah 72-Gorin 73-Eureka 74-Warren 75-Silex 76-Independence 77-Lebanon 78-St. Joseph 79-Polar Star 80-Bridgeton 8l-Central 82-Jackson 83-Laclede 84-Webster Groves 85-Miami 86-Brookfield 87-Washington 88-Defiance 89-Friendship 90-Russellville 9l-Madison 92-Perseverancc 93-St. Mark's 94-Vienna 95-Pomegranate 96-St. Andrews 97-Bethany 98-Webster

99-Mt. Vernon 100-Ash Grove lOl-Bogard 102-Bloomington 103-West View 104-Heroine 105-Kirksville 106-Gallatin 107-Greenville l08-Altamont l09-Stanberry 110-Marcus 1] I-Trenton 112-Maitland 1I3-Plattsburg lI4-Twilight 115-Laddonia ll6-Barnes 117-Helena 1I8-Kingston 1I9-DeSoto l20-Compass 121-Erwin 122-Triplett 123-Hermann 124-Union Star 125-Gentryville l26-Seaman 127-Athens 128--Lorraine 129-Monett 130-Hume l3l-Potosi 132-Farmington l33-Star of the West 134-Olean l35-Braymer l36-Phoenix 137-Delphian 138-Lincoln 139-0regon 140. l41-Amsterdam 142-Pleasant Grove 143-Irondale 144-Modern 145-Latimer 146. l47-C88S


154

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

148-Purdy 149-Lexington 150-Birming 151-Milton 152-Linn Creek 153-Bloomfield 154-Ionic 155-Spring Hill 156-Ashland 157-North Star 158-Mountain Grove 159-Green City 160-Pleasant 161-Clifton Hill 162-Whitesville 163-0ccidental 164--Joachim 165. ] 66-Portageville 167. 168-Colony 169-Camden Point 170-Benevolence 171-Hartford 172-Censer 173-Gray Summit 174-Sturgeon 175. ] 76-Point Pleasant I77-Texas 178-Griswold ] 79-Pride of the West 180-Pyramid 181. 182-Pilot Knob 183-California 184-Morley 185-Chamois ]86. 187-Hermon 188-Hannibal 189-Zeredatha 190-Putnam 191-Wilson 192-Frankford 193-Angerona 194-Wellsville 195-Bolivar 196-Quitman 197-Carthage 198-Allensville ]99-New Hope

200-Sonora 20 I-Ravenwood 202-Westville 203-Brumley 204-Rowley 205-Trilumina 206-Somerset 207-Clay 208-Salisbury 209-Poplar Bluff 210-Unionville 211-Hickory Hill 2]2-Four Mile 213-Rolla 214-Forest City 215-Hornersville 216-Hale City 217-Barbee 218-Good Hope 219-Albert Pike 220-Kansas City 221-Mystic Tie 222-La Belle 223-Ray 224-Hamilton 225-Salem 226-Saline 227-Cypress 228-Shelbina 229-Claflin 230-St. Jamps 231-Cardwell 232-Polo 233-Bucklin 234-St. Francois 235-Weatherby 236-Sedalia 237-La Plata 238-Rushville 239-Hopewell 240. 241-Palestine 242-Portland 243-Keystone 244-Middle Fabius 245-Knobnoster 246-Montgomery 247-Neosho 248. 249-Carroll 250-Glensted 251-Hope

1938 252-Alanthus 253-Laredo 254--Butler 255-Alton 256-Shekinah 257-Lodge of Light 258. 259-Lodge of Love 260-Mechanicsville 261-Florence 262-Holden 263-Summit 264--Kirbyville 265-Corinthian 266-Social 267-Aurora 268-Lodge of Truth 269-Brotherhood 270-New Salem 271-Solomon 272-Granite 273-St. Clair 274--Cold Spring 275. 276-Grand River 277-Wm. D. Muir 278-Essex 279-Hogle's Creek 280. 281-Fenton 282-Cosmos 283-Stockton 284--Canopy 285-Earl 286-Urich 287-Craft 288-Hermitage 289-Graham 290-Fairmount 291-Edina 292-Lamar 293-Sarcoxie 294-Mound City 295-Moniteau 296-Sparta 297-Qzark 298-Sampson 299-Temple 300-Doric 30l-White Hall 302-Lick Creek 803-0sage


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

304-Signal 305-Cecile Daylight 306-Asblar 307-New London 308-Parrott 309. 310-Sikeston 3ll-Kearney 312-Cuba 313-Meramec 314-Pine 315-Jerusalem 316-Rural 317-0sborn 318-Eldorado 319-Paulville 320-Versailles 321-Jonathan 322-Hardin 323-Cornerstone 324-McDonald 326-Linn 327-Mt. Zion 328-Cainsville 329-Kennedy 330-Paul Revere 331-Charity 332-Excello 333-Chillicothe 334-Breckenridge 335-Joplin 336-Hallsville 337-Blue Springs 338-Herculaneum 339-Fidelity 340-Westport 341-Rockville 342-Circle 343-Agricola 344-Moberly 345-Fellowship 346-Arlington 347-America 348-Wadesburg 349-Pollock 350-Tyrian 351-Mosaic 352-Friend 353-Barnesville 354--Hebron 355-Adelphi

356-Ancient Landmark 357. 358-Northwest 359-Garrett 360-Tuscan 361-Riddick 362-Hiram 363-Fraternal 364-Higginsville 365-Bayou 366-Adair 367-Barry 368-Crescent Hill 369-Composite 370-Williamstown 37l-Sheldon 372-Nonpareil 373-Belle 374. 375-Waynesville 376-King Hill 377-Ancient Craft 378-Berlin 379-Billings 380-Queen City 381-Ionia 382-Mt. Ararat 383-Pythagoras 384-East Prairie 385-Richland 386-Dayton 387-Woodside 388-Chula 389-Arcana 390-Marionville 391-Raytown 392-Christian 393-Beehive 394: .. 395. 396-Western Light 397-Gower 398-Jasper 399-Pike 400-Decatur 40I-Carterville 402-Malta 403-Lowry City 404-Rosendale 405-Everton 406-Malden

155

407-Charleston 408-Montrose 409-Louisville 410-Iberia 4ll~Joppa

412-Appleton City 413-Valley 414-Greensburg 415-Hunnewell 416-Cache 417-Whitewater 418. 419-Star 420-Itaska 421-Urbana 422-Gate of the Temple 423-Galt 424-Samaritan 425-Grecn Ridge 426-Rothville 427-GlenwoOd 428. 429-New Madrid 430-Winona 431. 432-Competition 433-Mack's Creek 434-Wheeling 435-Rockbridge 436-Gothic 437-Lafayette 438-Temperance 439-Mt. Olive 440-Trowel 441-Excelsior 442-Burlington 443-Anchor 444-Ada 445-West Gate 446-Ivanhoe 447-Jacoby 448-Schell City 449. 450-Belton 451. 452. 453-Forsyth 454-Continental 455-Hinton 456-Wallace 457- Jonesburg


156 45B-Melville 459-Hazelwood 46o-Lambskin 461-Caruthersville 462-8anta Fe 463-Clifton 464-Concordia 465-Gaynor City 466-Southwest 467-Pleasant Hope 468-Red Oak 4.69-Plato 470-Nodaway 471-Mineral 472-Pickering 473-Nineveh 474-Guilford 475-Golden 476-Mt. Hope 477-Henderson 478-Racine 479-Rich Hill 480-Jewel 481-Marceline 482-Clintonville 483-Fairfax 484-Kirkwood 485-Coldwater 486-Cairo 487-Chilhowee 48B-Lock Spring 489-Lakeville 490-Montevallo 491-Vandalia 492-Daggett 493-Vernon 494-Lewistown 495-Unity 496-Robert Burns 497-Equality 498-PeeDee 499-Harmony 500-Jameson 501-Buckner 502-Philadelphia 503-Prairie Home 504-Platte City 505-Euclid 506-Lathrop 507-Clearmont 508-Saxton 509-Van Buren

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 510-New Hampton 511-8kidmore 512-Webb City 513-Senath 514-Granby 515-Galena 516-Milford 517-Seligman 5I8-0riental 5I9-Crane 520-Clifton Heights 521-Lockwood 522-Gate City 523-Stinson 524-Spickardsville 525-Cunningham 526-Wayne 527-Higbee 528-Conway 529-Apollo 530. 53I-Lane '8 Prail'ie 532-Dexter 533-Comfort 534-Columbia 535-Blackwell 536-Ingomar 537-Bethel 538-Stella 539-Dawn 540-Winigan 54I-Jacksonville 542-Ferguson 543-Mansfield 544--Algabil 545-Zalma 546-0rient 547-South Gate 54B-Clinton 549-Carl Junction 550-Rose Hill 551-Pendleton 552-Calhoun 553-Clarksburg 554--Foster 555-Summersville 556-Prairie 557-Blairstown 558-Moscow 559-Clarksdale 560-Nelson 561-Cowgill

1938 562-Deepwater 563-York 564--Jamesport 565-Tebbetts 566-Maplewood 567-Miller 56B-Naylor 569-Marlborough 570-Republic 571-Hayti 572-Rutledge 573-Bernie 574--La Monte 575-Easter 576-0live Branch 577-Ewing 578-Forest Park 579-Grandin 580-Houston 581-Illmo 582-Koshkonong 583-Novinger 584-. 585-Shamrock 586-Criterion 587-Branson 588-St. Francisville 589-Grovespring 590-Advanee 59 I-Barnett 592-La Russell 593-Union 594-Blodgett 595-Cole Camp 596-Puxico 597-Bosworth 59B-Leadwood 599-Elvins 600-Cosby 60 I-Clayton 602-Aeacia 603-Morehouse 604. 605-Walker 606-Craig 607-Eminence 60S-Strafford 609-Warrenton 610-Clark 611-Centertown 612-Mokane 613-Wellston


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

614-Mt. Washington 615-Chaffee 616. 617-8wope Park 618-Grandview 619. 620-Willard 621-Anderson 622-Norwood 623. 624-0wensville 625-Sheffield 626--Magnolia 627. 628-Mendon 629-Valley Park 630-East Gate 631-Tower Grove

632-Belgrade 633-Archie 634-Steele 635-Greentop 636. 637-Mountain View 638-Triangle 639-Mizpah 640-Jennings 641-Trinity 642-Benj. Franklin 643-Northeast 644-Grain Valley 645. 646-Shaveh 647-Noel 648-Elmer

157

649-University 650-Parma 651-Cleveland 652-Pilgrim 653-Shawnee 654-Commonwealth 655-Gardenville 656-Country Club 657-Progress 658-Purity 659-Alpha 660-Holliday 661-Theodore Roosevelt 662-Clarence 663-Rockhill 664-Aldrich

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LODGES-LOCATIONS- DISTRICTS A No.

Name of Lodge

602 Acacia 444 Ada 366 Adair 355 Adelphi 590 Advance 10 Agency 343 Agricola 252 Alanthus 219 Albert Pike 664 Aldrich 544 Algabil. 198 Allensville 659 Alpha 108 Altamont 255 Alton 347 â&#x20AC;˘ America 141 Amsterdam 443 Anchor 377 AncientCraft 356 Ancient Landmark 621 Anderson 193 Angerona 529 Apollo 412 AppletonCity 389 Arcana 633 Archie 6 Ark 346 Arlington

Location of Lodge

Columbia Orrick Kirksville Edgerton Advance Agency .Petersburg Alanthus Grove Kansas City .Aldrich St. Louis Allendale N. Kansas City Altamont Alton St. Louis Amsterdam St. Louis KingCity Harrisburg Anderson Missouri City St. Louis AppletonCity Harris Archie Newark .Dixon

County

Boone Ray Adair Platte Stoddard .Buchanan Hell1'Y Gentry Jackson .Polk Worth Clay Daviess Oregon Bates Gentry Boone McDonald Clay St.Clair Sullivan Cass Knox Pulaski

District

26 23 2 21 50 9 37 6 22 41 33-B 6 22 10 53 33-B 35 33-B 6 26 56 11 33-B 37 3 34 2 39


158 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

70 Armstrong 55 Arrow Rock 100 Ash Grove 156 Ashland 306 Ashlar 127 Athens 267 Aurora 26 Ava

Location of Lodge

Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland Commerce Albany St. Louis Ava

County

1938 District

Howard 25 Saline 24 Greene 45 Boone 26 Scott 50 Gentry .. '. . . . . . . . . .. 6 33-A Douglas 46

B 217 591 116 353 367 365 3 . 393 632 373 450 170 642 378 573 97 537 379 150 41 535 551 594 153 102 337 101 195 45 597 587 135 334 80 86 269 203 233 501

Barbee Sweet Springs Saline 24 Barnett Barnett Morgan 58 Barnes Cabool. Texas 46 Barnesville Ellington Reynolds .47 Barry Washburn Barry 55 Bayou .Bakersfield Ozark 53 St. Louis 33-A Beacon Beehive .....â&#x20AC;˘...... Lawson Ray 23 Belgrade Belgrade Washington .40 Belle .Belle Maries 39 Belton Belton Cass 34 Benevolence Utica Livingston 12 Benjamin Franklin .. St. Louis 33-B Berlin .Berlin Gentry 6 Bernie Bernie Stoddard 51 Bethany Bethany Harrison .. ~........ 5 BetheL .Bethel. Shelby 14 Billings Billings Christian 54 Birming Faucett Buchanan 9 Bismarck Bismarck St. Francois .48 Blackwell Blackwell St. Francois 40 Blairstown .Blairstown Henry 37 Blodgett .Blodgett Scott 50 Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard 50 Bloomington Bevier Macon 14 Blue Springs Blue Springs .T ackson 59 Bogard Bogard Carroll 20 Bolivar Bolivar Polk 41 Bonhomme Ballwin St. Louis 57 Bosworth Bosworth Carroll 20 Branson Branson Taney 54 Braymer .Braymer Caldwell 12 Breckenridge Breckenridge Caldwell 12 Bridgeton .st. .T ohn 's Station. St. Louis 57 Brookfield Brookfield Linn 13 Brotherhood St. .T oseph Buchanan 9 Brumley Brumley Miller 38 Bucklin .Bucklin Linn 13 Buckner Buckner .Jackson 59


1938 No.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lod~e

County

159 District

442 254

Burlington Butler

.Burlington Jet .Butler

Nodaway .........â&#x20AC;˘ 7 .Bates 35

416 328 486 552 ]83 38 63 169 284 231 549 249 401 197 461 147 305 172 611 81 59 615 185 331 407 487 333 392 388 342 229 662 610 553 559 17 207

Cache Cainsville Cairo Calhoun California Callao Cambridge Camden Point Canopy Cardwell Carl Junction Carroll Carterville Carthage Caruthersville Cass Cecile-Daylight Censer Centertown CentraL Centralia Chaffee Chamois Charity Charleston Chilhowee Chillicothe Christian Chula Circle Claflin Clarence Clark Clarksburg Clarksdale Clarksville Clay Clayton Clearmont Cleveland Clifton Clifton Heights Clifton Hill Clinton Clintonville

St. Louis 33-B Cainsville Harrison 5 Cairo Randolph 18 Henry 37 Calhoun California Moniteau 31 Callao Macon 14 Slater Saline 24 Camden Point Platte 21 Aurora Lawrence 55 Cardwell Dunklin 51 Carl Junction Jasper .44 Norborne Carroll 20 Carterville .Jasper .44 Carthage Jasper .44 Caruthersville Pemiscot 51 Harrisonville Cass 34 Kansas City Jackson 22 Macon ,Macon 14 Centertown Cole 31 Molino Audrain 27 Centralia Boone 26 Chaffee Scott â&#x20AC;˘............. 50 31 Chamois Osage St. Joseph Buchanan 9 Mississippi 50 Charleston Chilhowee Johnson 36 Chillicothe Livingston 12 Oak Grove J ackson 59 Livingston 12 Chula St. Clair 37 Roscoe Protem Taney 54 Shelby 14 Clarence Clark Randolph 18 Clarksburg Moniteau 31 10 Clarksdale De Kalb Clarksville Pike 16 11 Excelsior Springs ..Clay Clayton St. Louis 57 Nodaway 7 Clearmont Cleveland Cass 34 Thayer Oregon 53' St. Louis " 33-A Clifton Hill Randolph 18 Clinton .Henry 37 El Dorado Springs .Cedar 42

C

~01

507 651 463 520 161 548 482


160 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

274 485 595 168 534 533 654 120 432 369 464 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519 368 586 312 525 227

Cold Spring Cold Water Cole Camp Colony Columbia Comfort Commonwealth Compass Competition Composite Concordia Continental Conway Cooper Corinthian Cornerstone Cosby Cosmos Country Club Cowgill Craft. Craig Crane Crescent Hill Criterion Cuba Cunningham Cypress

Leeton Drexel. Cole Camp Colony Pacific Wheaton St. Louis Parkville Competition Doniphan Concordia Stewartsville Conway Boonville Warrensburg St. Louis Cosby St. Louis Kansas City Cowgill Canton Craig Crane Adrian Alba Cuba Sumner Laclede

492 539 386 400 562 88 137 119 39 532 325 300

Daggett Dawn Dayton Decatur Deepwater Defiance Delphian De Soto DeWitt Dexter Dockery Doric

McKittrick Ludlow Dayton Pierce City Deepwater Sheridan Birch Tree De Soto DeWitt. Dexter Meadville Elkland

County

1938 District

Johnson Cass Benton Knox Franklin Barry

36 34 36 2 32 55 33-A Platte 21 Laclede 38 Ripley 52 Lafayette 23 De Kalb 10 Laclede 38 Cooper 25 ,Johnson 36 33-B Andrew .. . . . . . . . .. 9 33-B Jackson 22 Caldwell 12 Lewis 15 Holt 8 Stone 54 Bates 35 .Jasper 44 Crawford 39 Chariton 19 Linn 13

D

Montgomery Livingston Cass Lawrence Henry Worth 'shannon Jefferson '" Carroll Stoddard Linn Webster

28 12 34 55 37 6 47 40 20 50 13 45

E 285 630 384 575 291

Earl East Gate East Prairie Easter Edina

Coffey Kansas City .East Prairie .8t. Clair F.dina

Daviess Jackson Mississippi Franklin

Knox

10 22 50 32 2


1938 No.

318 648 599 607 14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Eldorado Elmer Elvins Eminence Eolia Equality Erwin Essex Euclid Eureka Evergreen Everton Ewing Excello Excelsior

Location of Lodge

Luray Elmer .Flat River Eminence .Eolia Newburg St. Louis Essex St. Louis Brunswick New Haven Everton .Ewing Excello Jackson

County

161 District

Clark .. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 .Macon 14 St. Francois .48 .shannon 47 Pike 16 Phelps 39 33-A Stoddard 50 33-A Chariton 19 Franklin .. : 32 Dade 42 Lewis 15 Macon 14 Cape Girardeau .49

F 483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542 339 261 23 214 578 453 554 212 192 363 352 89 48

Fairfax Fairmount Fair Play Farmington Fayette Fellowship Fenton Ferguson Fidelity Florence Florida Forest City Forest Park Forsyth Foster Four Mile Frankford Fraternal Friend Friendship Fulton

Fairfax Wyaconda Fair Play Farmington .Fayette J oplin Fenton Ferguson Farley New Florence Florida Forest City St. Louis Forsyth .F'oster Campbell Frankford Robertsville Ozark Chillicothe ,Fulton

Atchison Clark Polk St. Francois Howard Jasper St. Louis St. Louis Platte Montgomery .Monroe Holt Taney Bates Dunklin Pike .F'ranklin Christian Livingston Callaway

8 1 41 48 25 .44 57 57 21 28 17 8 33-B 54 35 51 16 32 54 12 27

Stone Daviess .' Grundy St. Louis Dade Jackson Greene Nodaway Gentry

54 10 4 57 .42 22 45 7 6

G

515 Galena 106 Gallatin 423 Galt 655 Gardenville 359 Garrett. 522 Gate City 422 Gate of the Temple 465 Gaynor City 125 Gentryville

Galena Gallatin ,Galt Gardenville Arcola Kansas City Springfield Parnell Gentryville


162 No.

9 250 427 475 218 72 436 397 289 644 514 579 276 618 272 66 173 159 425 414 635 107 178 589 474

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of LoWre

Location of Lodge

County

George Washington .. St. Louis Glensted Glensted Morgan Glenwood Glenwood Schuyler Golden Golden City Barton Good Hope .st. Louis Gorin Gorin â&#x20AC;˘........... Scotland Gothic Alexandria Clark Gower Gower Clinton Graham Graham Nodaway Grain Valley Grain Valley Jackson Granby Granby Newton Grandin Grandin Carter Grand River Freeman Cass Grandview Grandview J ackson Granite .sedalia Pettis Grant City Grant City Worth Gray Summit Gray Summit Franklin Green City Green City Sullivan Green Ridge Green Ridge Pettis Greensburg Greensburg Knox Greentop Greentop Schuyler Greenville .Greenville Wayne Griswold Bell1lower Montgomery Grovespring Grovespring Wright Guilford Guilford Nodaway

1938 District

33-B 58 1 43 33-B 1 1 11 7 59 56 .47 34 59 36 6 32 3 36 2 1 52 28 46 7

H 216 336 224 188 322 499 171 21 571 459 354 117 37 477 338 123 288 187 104 211 527 364 455

Hale City Hale Hallsville Hallsville Hamilton Hamilton HannibaL H anniba!. Hardin Hardin Harmony St. Louis Hartford Hartford Havana ............â&#x20AC;˘McFall Hayti. Hayti. Hazelwood Seymour Hebron Mexico Helena Rochester Hemple .Hemple Henderson Rogersville Herculaneum Herculaneum Hermann Hermann Hermitage Hermitage Hermon Liberal Heroine Kansas City Hickory Hill Eugene Higbee Higbee Higginsville .Higginsville Hinton Hinton

Carroll Boone Caldwell Marion Ray Putnam Gentry Pemiscot Webster Audrain Andrew Clinton Webster J efferson Gasconade Hickory Barton Jackson Cole Randolph Lafayette Boone

20 26 12 15 20 33-B 3 6 51 .45 27 9 11 .45 40 32 .41 .43 22 31 18 23 26


J938

163

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

No.

Name of Lodge

362 279 262 660 49 251 239 215 580 4 130 32 415 30

Hiram Hogle's Creek Holden Holliday Holt Hope Hopewell Hornersville Houston Howard Hume Humphreys Hunnewell Huntsville

Location of Lodge

Kahoka Wheatland Holden Holliday Holt Washington Lesterville Hornersville Gant New Franklin Hume Humphreys Hunnewell Huntsville

County

District

Clark Hickory J ohnson Monroe Clay Franklin Reynolds Dunklin Audrain Howard Bates Sullivan Shelby Randolph

1 41 36 17 11 32 47 51 27 25 35 3 14 18

Miller Seott Jackson Cass Howell Miller St. Francois Washington

38 50 59 34 53 58 48 40 33-A 22

I

410 581 76 54 536 381 154 143 420 446

Iberia Illmo Independence Index Ingomar Ionia Ionic Irondale Itaska Ivanhoe

Iberia Illmo lndependence Garden City Willow Springs .Eldon Desloge Irondale St. Louis Kansas City

~

Jackson

J

82 541 447 500 564 398 43 640 315 480 164 321 457 335 411

Jackson Jacksonville Jacoby Jameson Jamesport Jasper Jefferson Jennings Jerusalem Jewel Joachim Jonathan Jonesburg Joplin Joppa

Linneus Linn J acksonville '. Randolph Darlington Gentry J ameson Daviess Jamesport Daviess Jasper Jasper Jefferson City Cole .Jennings St. Louis .Jerico Springs .â&#x20AC;˘.. Cedar Pleasant Hill Cass Hillsboro â&#x20AC;˘........ Jefferson Denver Worth Jonesburg Montgomery J oplin . . . . . . . . . . . Jasper Hartville Wright

13 18 6 10 10 44 31 57 .42 34 .40 6 28 44 .46

K 220 311 329

Kansas City Kearney Kennedy

.Kansas City Kearney Elmo

.Jackson Clay Nodaway

22 11 1


164 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

68 Kennett 243 Keystone 376 King Hill 118 Kingston 264 Kirbyville 105 Kirksville 484 Kirkwood 245 Knobnoster 582 Koshkonong

Location of Lodge

Kennett St. Louis St. Joseph Kingston Hollister Kirksville Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

County

Dunklin Buchanan Caldwell Taney Adair St. Louis Johnson Oregon

1938 District

51 33-A 9 12 54 2 57 36 53

L

222 83 115 437 489 292 460 574 531 237 253 592 506 145 598 77 494 149 31 302 138 326 152 51 521 488 257 259 268 128 409 403

La Belle Laclede Laddonia Lafayette Lakeville Lamar Lambskin La Monte Lane's Prairie La Plata Laredo La Russell Lathrop Latimer Leadwood Lebanon Lewistown Lexington Liberty Lick Creek Lincoln Linn Linn Creek Livingston Lockwood Lock Spring Lodge of Light Lodge of Love Lodge of Truth Lorraine Louisville Lowry City

La Belle Lebanon Laddonia Corder Bell City Lamar St. Louis LaMonte Vichy La Plata Laredo La Russell Lathrop Licking Leadwood Steelville Lewistown Lexington Liberty Perry Fillmore Linn Camdenton Glasgow Lockwood Lock Spring Eagleville Lancaster Atlanta .Ridgeway Louisville Lowry City

Lewis Laclede Audrain Lafayette Stoddard Barton Pettis Maries Macon Grundy J asper Clinton ' Texas St. Francois Crawford Lewis Lafayette Clay Ralls ,Andrew Osage Camden Howard Dade Daviess Harrison Schuyler Macon Harrison Lincoln St. Clair

15 38 27 23 50 43 33-B 36 39 14 4 44 11 39 .48 39 15 23 11 15 9 31 38 25 42 10 5 1 14 5 29 37

M

433 91 626 112

Mack's Creek Madison Magnolia Maitland

Mack's Creek Madison St. Louis Maitland

Camden Monroe Holt

38 17 33-A 8


1938 No.

406 402 543 566 481 110 390 569 324 260 458 16 628 313 35 2 85 244 42 516 567 151 471 1 639 344 144 612 129 295 64 490 246 58 408 603 184 351 558 294 614 158 637 382 476 439 40 99 327 221

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

Malden Malden Dunklin Malta Malta Bend Saline Mansfield Mansfield Wright Maplewood Maplewood St. Louis Marceline .Marceline ........•Linn Marcus Fredericktown Madison Marionville Marionville Lawrence Marlborough (Jackson Co.) J ackson McDonald Independence Jackson Mechanicsville .Howell St. Charles Melville Dadeville Dade Memphis .Memphis Scotland Mendon Mendon Chariton Meramec Eureka St. Louis Mercer Princeton Mercer Meridian St. Louis ' Miami .Miami Saline Middle Fabius Downing Schuyler Middle Grove .Middle Grove Monroe Milford Milford Barton Miller Miller Lawrence Milton Milton Randolph MineraL Oronogo J asper Missouri St. Louis , Mizpah St. Louis Moberly Moberly Randolph Modern .Humansville Polk Mokane Mokane Callaway Monett Monett Barry Moniteau Jamestown Moniteau Monroe Monroe City Monroe Montevallo Montevallo Vernon Montgomery Montgomery City ..Montgomery Monticello Monticello Lewis Montrose Montrose Henry Morehouse Morehouse N ew Madrid Morley Morley Scott Iron Mosaic Belleview Moscow Moscow Mills Lincoln Mound City Mound City Holt Mount Washington .. .Mt. Washington Jackson Mountain Grove Mountain Grove Wright Mountain View Mountain View Howell Mt. Ararat. Topaz Douglas Mt. Hope Odessa ~afayette Mt. Olive Rogersville, R. 3 Webster Mt. Moriah St. Louis Mt. Vernon Mt. Vernon Lawrence Mt. Zion West Plains Howell Mystic Tie Oak Ridge Cape Girardeau

165 District

51 24 .46 57 13 48 55 59 59 30 42 1 19 57 4 33-B 24 1 17 .43 55 18 44 33-A 33-B 18 41 27 55 31 17 43 28 15 37 50 50 48 29 8 59 .46 53 46 23 45 33·A 55 53 49


166

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

N No.

Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 372 643 157 358 622 583

Naphtali. Naylor N elBon Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton New Hope New London New Madrid New Salem Nineveh Nodaway Noel NonpareiL Northeast North Star Northwest Norwood Novinger

.st. Louis Naylor Nelson Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton Elsberry New London .New Madrid Winfield Olney Maryville Noel East Lynne Kansas City Rockport Tarkio Norwood Novinger

163 134 576 139 546 518 303 317 7 624 297

Occidental Olean Olive Branch Oregon Orient OrientaL Osage Osborn 0 'Sullivan OwensvilleOzark

St. Louis Olean St. Louis Oregon Kansas City Blackburn Nevada Osborn Walnut Gro\-e Owensville Fair Grove

County

Ripley Saline Newton Callaway Harrison Lincoln Ralls New Madrid Lincoln Lincoln Nodaway McDonald Cass Jackson Atchison Atchison Wright Adair

District

33-B 52 24 56 27 5 29 15 51 29 29 7 56 34 22 8 8 46 2

o " Miller " Holt Jackson Saline Vernon De Kalb Greene Gasconade Greene

33-A 58 33-A 8 22 24 .43 10 .45 32 45

P 241 18 19 650 308 65 11 330 319 498 551 92 502

Palestine Palmyra Paris Union Parma Parrott Pattonsburg PauldingviIle Paul Revere PaulvilIe Pee Dee Pendleton Perseverance Philadelphia

St. Charles Palmyra Paris Parma .Maysville Pattonsburg Wright City St. Louis Hurdland Musselfork Doe Run Louisiana Philadelphia

St. Charles Marion Monroe New Madrid De Kalb Daviess Warren Adair Chariton St. Francois Pike Marion

30 15 17 51 10 10 30 33-A 2 19 .48 16 15


1938 No.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of ~

136 472 399 652 182 314 469 504 113 160 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 166 242 131 556 503 179 657 148 658 190 596 180 383

Phoenix Pickering Pike Pilgrim Pilot Knob Pine Plato Platte City Plattsburg Pleasant. Pleasant Grove Pleasant Hope Point Pleasant Polar Star Pollock Polo Pomegranate Poplar Bluff Portageville Portland Potosi. Prairie Prairie Home Pride of the West Progress Purdy Purity Putnam Puxico Pyramid Pythagoras

Bowling Green 'pickering Curryville St. Louis .Richville Bardley Plato .Platte City Plattsburg Morrisville Otterville .Pleasant Hope Conran St. Louis Pollock Polo St. Louis Poplar Bluff .Portageville Readsville .Potosi. Gilman City ,Prairie Home St. Louis .st. Louis Purdy .st. Louis Newtown Puxico .st. Louis Cassville

380 196

Queen City ..•..•....Queen City Quitman Quitman

County

167 District

Pike Nodaway Pike

16 7 16 33-B Douglas 46 Ripley ...........•. 52 Texas 46 Platte 21 Clinton 11 Polk .41 Cooper 25 Polk 41 New Madrid 51 33-B Sullivan 3 Caldwell 12 33·A Butler 52 New Madrid 51 Callaway 27 Washington ....•... 40 Harrison 5 Cooper 25 33-B 33-B Barry 55 33-A Sullivan 3 Stoddard 50 33-A Barry 55

Q .schuyler ........... 1 ,Nodaway 7

R 478 33 201 223 391 468 570 479 385 57 361

Racine .......•.•..•. Seneca Ralls Center Ravenwood Ravenwood Ray Camden Raytown .Raytown Red Oak Red Oak Republic .Republic Rich Hill Rich Hill Richland .Richland Richmond .Richmond Riddick Buffalo

Newton ...........• 56 Ralls 15 Nodaway 7 Ray 23 Jackson 59 Lawrence 55 Greene .45 Bates 35 Pulaski, 38 Ray 23 Dallas 41


168 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

13 Rising Sun 496 Robert Burns 67 Rocheport 435 Rockbridge 663 Rockhill 341 Rockville 213 Rolla 550 Rose Hill 404 Rosendale 426 Rothville 204 Rowley 316 Rural 238 Rushville 90 Russellville 572 Rutledge

Barry Gainesville Rocheport Rockbridge Kansas City Rockville .Rolla St. Louis .Rosendale Rothville Dearborn Kansas City Rushville .Russellville Rutledge

225 226 208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448 126 236 517 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 304 310 75 511 266 271 206 200 547 466 296 524

Salem St. Mary's Salisbury Bonne Terre Lutie Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Milan Sedalia Seligman Senath .shamrock St. Louis Warsaw Kansas City Festus Shelbina Sheldon .Mindenmines Sikeston Silex Skidmore Martinsburg Springfield Powersville Watson Kansas City Southwest City Sparta Spickard

County

Platte Ozark Boone. . Ozark Jackson Bates Phelps ; Andrew Chariton Platte Jackson Buchanan Cole Scotland

1938 District

21 53 26 53 22 35 39 33-A 9 19 21 22 9 31 1

S Salem Saline Salisbury Samaritan Sampson Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Seaman Sedalia Seligman Senath Shamrock Shaveh Shawnee Sheffield Shekinah Shelbina Sheldon Signal Sikeston Silex Skidmore SociaL Solomon Somerset. Sonora South Gate Southwest Sparta Spickardsville

Dent Ste. Genevieve Chariton St. Francois Ozark Monroe J asper Andrew Buchanan Vernon Sullivan Pettis Barry Dunklin Callaway Benton Jackson Jefferson Shelby Vernon Barton Scott Lincoln Nodaway Audrain Greene Putnam Atchison oJ ackson McDonald Christian Grundy

39 .48 19 48 , .. 53 17 44 9 9 .43 3 36 55 51 27 33-A 36 22 40 14 43 43 50 29 7 27 .45 3 8 22 56 54 4


1938 No.

155 96 273 588 234 230 28 78 20 93 109 419 133 634 538 523 283 608 174 69 555 263 617

GRAND LODGE OF MIS30URI Name of J,odge

Spring Hill St. Andrews St. Clair St. Francisville St. Francois St. James St. JOhn's St. Joseph St. Louis St. Mark's Stanberry Star Star of the West. Steele Stella Stinson Stockton Strafford Sturgeon Sullivan Summersville Summit Swope Park

Location of Lodge

Spring Hill Shelbyville Osceola Wayland Libertyville St. James HannibaL St. Joseph ,St. Louis Cape Girardeau ,Stanberry ,Taberville Ironton Steele Stella Stinson 'stockton Strafford Sturgeon Sullivan Summersville Lee's Summit Kansas City

County

Livingston Shelby St. Clair Clark St. Francois .Phelps Marion Buchanan ,Cape Girardeau Gentry St. Clair Iron Pemiscot Newton Lawrence Cedar Greene Boone Franklin Texas Jackson Jackson

169 District

12 14 37 1 .48 39 15 9 33-B 49 6 37 48 51 56 55 42 45 26 32 46 59 22

T 565 438 299 177 661 56 631 111 638 205 641 122 440 34 360 114 350 12

Tebbetts Temperance Temple Texas Theodore Roosevelt .. Tipton Tower Grove Trenton Triangle Trilumina Trinity Triplett TroweL Troy Tuscan Twilight. Tyrian Tyro

Tebbetts Smithville Kansas City Houston St. Louis Tipton St. Louis Trenton St. Louis Marshall St. Louis Triplett Marble Hill Troy St. Louis Columbia Johnstown Caledonia

Callaway Clay Jackson Texas Moniteau Grundy Saline Chariton Bollinger Lincoln Boone .Bates Washington

27 11 22 46 33-A 31 33-B 4 33-A 24 33-A 19 .49 29 33-A 26 35 40

u 593 Union 124 Union Star 210 Unionville 5 United

Union Union Star Unionville Springfield

Franklin De Kalb Putnam Greene

32 10 3 45


170 No.

495 649 421 286

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lod¥e

Unity ............•. Richards University University City Urbana Urbana Urich Urich

County

1938 District

Vernon St. Louis Dallas Henry

43 57 .41 37

413 629 509 491 493 320 94 62

Valley .Bolckow Andrew Valley Park Valley Park St. Louis Van Buren Van Buren Carter Vandalia Vandalia Audrain Vernon ...........••Bronaugh Vernon Versailles Versailles .......• Morgan Vicnna Vienna Maries Vincil Cameron Clinton

9 57 47 27 43 58 39 11

348 52 605 456 74 609 87 61 526 375 235 512 98 84 22 613 194 46 445 103 396 15 53 340 202 434 301 417 162 620 370 191 29

Wadesburg Wakanda Walker Wallace Warren Warrenton Washington Waverly Wayne Waynesville Weatherby Webb City Webster Webster Groves Wellington Wellston Wellsville Wentzville West Gate Wcst View Western Light Western Star Weston Westport Westville Wheeling White Hall Whitewater Whitesville Willard Williamstown Wilson Windsor

V

W Creighton Cass 34 Carrollton Carroll 20 Walker Vernon 43 Bunceton Cooper 25 .Keytesville Chariton 19 Warrenton Warren 30 Greenfield Dade .42 Waverly Lafayette 23 Piedmont Wayne 52 Waynesville .Pulaski 38 Weatherby De Kalb 10 Webb City Jasper .44 Marshfield Webster 45 Webster Grovcs St. Louis 57 .De Kalb .Buchanan 9 Wellston St. Louis 57 Wellsville Montgomery 28 Wentzville St. Charles 30 St. Louis 33-B Millersville Cape Girardeau 49 Louisburg Dallas 41 Winston Daviess 10 Weston Platte 21 Kansas City Jackson 22 Westville Chariton 19 Wheeling Livingston 12 .Barnard Nodaway 7 Whitewater Cape Girardeau 49 Whitesville Andrew 9 Willard ...•...... Greene 45 Williamstown Lewis 15 Pocahontas Cape Girardeau 49 Windsor Henry ............• 37


1938 No.

540 430 277 387 24

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodlte

Winigan Winona Wm. D. Muir Woodside Wyaconda

Location of Lodge

Winigan Winona Pilot Grove Thomasville La Grange

County

171 District

Sullivan 3 Shannon .47 Cooper 25 Oregon ........••.. 53 Lewis 15

x 50

Xenia

Hopkins

Nodaway

7

Jackson

22

Bollinger Buchanan

49 9

Y 563

York:

Kansas City Z

545 189

Zalma Zeredatba

Zalma .st. Joseph


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT FIRST DISTRIOT-RABOLD M. JAYNE, D. D. G. M., Memphis, Mo.

NAME, AND NUMBER OF LODGE

~ d

] E

.-::. 't3]

~ ~ ~rn ~

l]] .~ ~ '" := s:: ... Gl ... e'~

GI

<:!

50

.!S

~ ~

f

~ ~ ~ ~.8

]

P, <II

...

oS

P, 112

GI

GI

P, •..,

<:!

50

]ll.~<~O~~~~~~~

Fairmount. 290..... 41 41 41 1 1 3 4\... 1 .... 1.. .. .. Eldorado. 318. .. .. .. 6 41 4............ 9 .. Hiram. 362.. .. .. • .. 61 6 6 1... 4 4 3 21.. Gothic.436 1•.. 51 .. · 1.. St. Francisville. 688. ···1 1 3. . 1 3 ". . Memphis. 16....... . 21 1 1.. 2 9 1 4 6...... Gorin.72 ..•.•.•.... 31313 ..... , .... 2 -.:a flO Rutledge. 672 ..•..•. 1 1 1 1 .•....... 1... 1 2 Middle Fabius. 244.. . .. 1••• 1 1... . . 4 1 2 Lodge of Love. 269. . 11 1/ 1 '1' .. ·1· . . 1. • .. .. .. .. Queen City. 380. " . . 11 1 1 .. , 6 31 2 3 . . . . . . . . . . Glenwood, 427. .•. .• 11 1 1. . 1 •.•. ,... 1 7..... . Greentop. 636. . .. 41 41 4.. 2 1. . . 1 3..... . TOTAL 28126129121161 331 81171 601 .. 1.. 1..

1........

,...

1...

't3"c I:: Eo<

~~ ~ ...::l ~ 0 Ql

0 ell

"'~

.s.~

~5

1: g

ll.GI

't3

~

E

~] 5 l~

::

<

~

GI '" GI

'" ~ >t

GI "" ;:l ... ~

'" ] GI U

"

't3

'S!

GI

'""

~

~$

ll.

GI

0

0]

§

~~

8

112

...::l

<

;:l

~

-oS

~

~

~'~gj

:a ~ llG

~ ~j ... ~ .s 112 ;:l

e5

.~ ~

't3 0 ... s::

~ srz:

§ 't3 tlGS '" .S ~ ~~ 8 't3!> GI

~-

~

S::p,'t3

~ rJ)

.~ ~

S

.~ ;> ~

661$ 116.601$ 6.301$ 1$ 121.801$ 8.40 $ 113.401$ ...... '1$ 72.001$ 30.001$ 661 138.601 I 1 138.601' . . . . . . 138.601. . • . . . . . 180.001 60.001 1181 247.801.. .. 1 247.80 8.40 239.401.. .. .. .. 392.601 10.001 271 56.701 1 1 66.70 10.60 46.201 1 21.001 .. · 1 641 113.40\ 2. 10 .1 116.50 6.30 109.20\. . . .. .. . 575.001 1661 326.501 4.20..... 329.70 18.90 310.801........ 124.001 10.00 601 126.001 ...... 1 126.001 126.001· ....... 101.601 10.00 641 113.40 1 •..... 1 113.401 113.401........ 16.001· ··1· 1 701 147.001 . \ 147.00 8.40 138.601... . . . . . 140.001 / 1131 237.30 "1 6.30 231.00\. . . . . . . 231.001· '1 171.001 10.00 631 111.301 • .... 1 111.30 6.30 106.001. . . .. .. . Nonel 10.001 361 76.60. .. . .. ..:.. 75.60. . . . .. . 75.601. .. .. .. . None 10.00 481 100.801 4.20 •.... 1 106.001 2.10 57.601 46.40 16.001 40.001 9091$ 1.908.90/$ 16.801$ 6.301$ 1,919.401$ 69.30$ 1.804.701$ 46.401$ 1,808.001$ 180.001$

1' ."

1

1.00 6.00 6.00

'1" .. ..

1.00 1.00 · .. 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 21.00

SEOOND DISTRICT-WILLIS J. BRAY, D. D. G. M., Kirksville, Mo. Kirksville. 105 .•.... Paulville. 319 ....... Adair. 366 .......... Novinger. 583 ..•... Ark.6 ...•...• , .•.. Colony. 168 .•••..... Edina. 291. ........ Greensburg, 414 .... TOTAL .......

131 121 10111 31 21 1 1 26 261 26 3

7 2 2

.. ~I ..\ .~ll" .~ .. ~ 21

1/

61 6/ 61 31'" 51 61 6.. 2 681 661 621 91 141

181 6 1 •.. 22 8 1 3 1 3 6 1

3

.. 16~~I:..:1:: :: 1....

11

91 . . . . . .

6

"I" ..

....... .. ,.... 1 1 ...... .. ·1 .... 1......

641 161 111

371 .. 1· ·1··

48.001$ 160.001$ 14.00 308\$ 646.801$ 14.701$ . " .1$ 661.6°r 37.80 $ 623.70\$ .....•. \$ 1.00 2.10 144.90 671 140.701 93.001 10.001 142.801······· .\ 4. 20 1 .... ·1 46.20 294.001 160.00 16.00 782.90 686.701 ........ 3471 728.701 4.20 ..... 1 2.00 2.10 472.601 ....... 651 134.401· ....... / 136.601 ...... / ..... 1 136. 50 1 6.80 107.101 2.10 ..... 109.20 102.901· ....... 244.001 80.001 3.00 611 46.201 ...... , ..... None •....•. 1 . . . . . . 221 39.901··· .. ·· ., 46.201 6.30 126.001 20.00 2.00 169.60 12.60 147.001 ........ 163.301 6.30 ..... 1 731 2.00 184.80 ....... 263.001 20.001 861 180.601 4.201 ..... 1 184.801 .. ····· . 10191$ 2.139.901$ 36.701$ .... 1$ 2.176.601$ 113.40 $ 2.062.201$ ....... 1$ 1.639.601$ 380.001$ 39.00


THIRD DISTRIOT-WALTER E. SINGLEY, D. D. G. Mo, Green Oity, :Mo. Hartford, 171....... 61 61 7/11 2 Somerset, 206....... 81 8 7 1 1 Unionville. 210. . . . .. 6 6 6 1 1 Humphreys. 32..... 11 ... 1 1..... Seaman. 126........ 41 4\ 4 1... Green City. 159..... 11 1 1..... Putnam. 190. . . . . . . . 31 2 2 6 6 Pollock. 349.. .. .. .. 41 41 1.. 4 Arcana. 389........ 21 1... Winigan.540 41 3/ 3 .. 1 / TOTAL........ 391 351 321101 141

····1· ·1 .. ·· 2 1... 51 .. 1.... 2. . . 3 16\ .. \.. .. 3... 1 7...... 8 ... 6 6 .. 1.... 10... 1 4 .. 3 ... 1 12..... . 21 1 2 .... 4... 3 24...... 4 5 1.. 381 21 221 741 .. 1.. 1· .

1.... "I" .. 1..

·r

431$ 90.301$ .. · .. 1$ 1$ 90.3 0 1$ 481 90.30\ 2.10..... 92.40 1291 270.90 2.10 ....• 1 273.00 481 90.301 1..... 90.30 1551 325.501 1 1 325.50 671 140.701 1 140.70 1171 245.701 8.40 1 254.10 541 118.40 8.40 / 121.80/ 551 115.501........... 115.50 711 149.101 1 149.101 7771$ 1.631.701$ 21.001$ 1$ 1.652.701$

$ 90.301$ \$ 4.20 88.201........ 4.20 268.801. . . . . . . . 6.30 84.001........ 11;.80 308.701........ 21.00 119.701........ 6.30 247.8QI. . . . . . . . 4.20 109.201 8.40 8.40 107.101........ 8.40 140.701 79.80 $ 1.564.501$ 8.401$

1

108.75 $ 20.00 $ 2.00 20.00 60.00 6.00 8.00 40.00 5.00 24.50 10.00 1.00 353.00 20.00 4.00 80.00 10.001 1.00 6.00 30.00 3.00 36.00 40.00/ 4.00 68.001 20.00 2.00 65.001 30.001 4.00 764.251$ 280.001$ 32.00

FOURTH DISTRIOT-CLYDE E. EVANS, D. D. G. :M., Trenton, :Mo.

I-' ....::l ~

11 .81 ll l·8 "~i"jl"j :~

Trenton. 111 ....... 11 21 Laredo. 253 ........ •• I ••• Galt. 423 ........... Spickardsville. 524 .. Mercer. 35 ......... TOTAL ........ 31 51

21 5

... 5 71 71 101

r

1 I

~ .. ~ ....9 / ••.. ,.... 1 ... .... .... .. .... 1··1 ....

2 16 2 8 591 141 111

61 . . . . . . 151 .. 1.. 1..

••8.601$... ·.. '1'

2941$ 617.401$ 21.001$ .... 1$ 638. 40 1$ 79.80 $ 126.00 6.30 119.701 6.30 ..... 1 571 119.701 .. · ..... 144.901 691 2.101 ..... 1 147.001.· ... ·· . 147.001 .. · .... 115.50 4.20 50 551 111.301 ........ 115. 1 . . . . . . , · . . . . 1 392.70 10.50 ..... 403.20 33.60 1871 369.601 ........ 1 6621$ 1.390.201$ 39.901$ .... 1$ 1.430.101$ 123.90 $ 1.306.201$ ....... 1$

111.001$ 10.001$ 1.00 13•••• 1 . . . . . . . 1 ••••• , 237.00 ....... 1 . . . . . . 250.00 •....•......• 167.00 10.00 ...... 895.001$ 20.001$ 1.00

FIFTH DISTRIOT-cAREY A. BROOK, D. D. G. :M., Ridgeway, :Mo. Bethany. 97 ........ 1 21 3 ... 51 1 Lorraine. 128 ..•..•. 2 •. ... 81 Lodge of Light. 257. · .. 1... 1.. · 3 ... Cainesville. 828 ..... 31 31 8 1 ... New Hampton. 510. 2 21 Prairie. 556 ........ 2 .. 2 ... .. 21 TOTAL ........ 161 101 111 41 21 241 41

~I ~I

~I

2 .... 1.. ' .... 1 11 . . . . . .

~ ~

1 .... .. .. I.. , .... ' .. 1 .... 1 3 .. 1 1 51 .. 1 11 1 41

'T'

..

1041$ 511 251 351 411 311 2871$

218. 40 1$ ..... 1$ ... '1$ 107.10 ........... 52.501 ...... 73.501 ...... 86. 10 1 . . . . . . 65.10 ...... 602.701$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$

..... .. .. ·1

'j$

450.00 $ 40.001$ •...• 218.401$ 16.80 $ 201.601$· •.••• 107.10 4.20 203.70 .. .. · .. 1 ...... 102.901 ... ·· ... 52.50 21.00 ......... 1 425.00 81.50 80.00 73.501 6.30 67.201 ........ 1 86.10 2.10 95.00 10.00 2.00 84.001·· ••••.. 65.101 ....... 104.00 .. .. • .. 1 .. • .. • 65.101· .... · .. 602.701$ 60.40 $ 520.801$ 31.501$ 1,357.701$ 50.001$ 2.00

............. .............


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued SIXTH DISTRIOT-C'URTIS F. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Darlington, Mo. NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

~ d

]

"d~ =~

....~ ~~

f~k fl'ifl ] I I I]I] ]] ~ ~ l'i I'i e~ I 41]~ ~&:~

] ! J~ I ~ 1i i in ~I ~

.c

to'

)l

6

~

d1

S ...

&:~ "d

g e

"d

'9. !l ~

~ ...

~

c .!

as ~ ~

.;~ fo'-

<~

Q

1:='

.<

0

~

J

<

411

3Q

='~S ;~

~; ...

8

~

tIC

:a~'i !ltIC

.s=~~ ~~ .'5 Q s

6

Cl

5i

C"d

'=9 "..~-g= ~~=~§ k

~~~ s.. :sl=~

2:ad

c;

ga ;

:sl~;:Fil

~

~

Havana, 21 ......•.. l 381$ 79.80 $ ..... \$ .... 1$ 79.80 $ ...... $ 79.801$ ....... $ 275.00 $ 10.001$ 1.00 tl'i"2 "i6"2"2 "'i " ' ' ' ' ' ' 851 178.50 4.20 •..•• ' 182.70 81.50 151.201........ Stanberry. 109 ...•.• None . 1 1 1 ..... 5 2 .... Gentryville. 125 ..... 891 81.90 ...... 81.90 10.50 71.401·····... 186.65 10.00 1.00 185123 22 Athens. 127 .....•.. 1101 231.00 4.20.. .• . 235.20 6.80 228.901.. . .. .. . None.. .. . . . 1.~0 Alanthus, 252 ......• 291 60.90. . . . .. . .... 1 60.90 10.50 50.401. . . . . .. . 75.00 10.00 1.00 111 1 ..... 6 1 7"1"1" 1 1 1 .. 6 4 2 8 .. Ancient Craft. 377 .. 881 184.80 12.60 ...•. \ 197.40 8.40 189.001. .. .. .. . 152.00 10.00 1.00 2 2 21 1 1 . Berlin. 378 . 311 65.10. . . . .. ..... 65.1Q. . .. . • . 65.101. .. . . .. • 16.00 .••.... 1 •••••• Jacoby, 447 . ... 1... 2 2 .. 481 90. 30 90.80 4.20 86.101·....... 191.00 ....... 1 . . . . . . Grant City. 66 ...•.. 681 182.80 8.40 ..... 1 140.70.. .. .. . 140.701 ........ \ 76.00 20.00 2.00 61 1 4.... 1 . ~ Defiance, 88 .•••.•.. 521 109.201 4.20 •... 118.40 4.20 109.201· . . . . . . . 116.00 10.00 1.00 11 1 1. . 2 2 2 1 ~ Allensville, 198 . 81 81 2 1 1 •••........•........ 481 100.801 2.10. .. .. 102.90 ..... " I 102.9Q1 None 10.00 ...... t Jonathan. 321. . ... 1.. ·1 .. ·1 ..... · .. ·1 .. · ......... 1.. 1.. ..... 1........ ·1 .. • ... · .... 1.. · .. ·· .. 1 .. · .. ·· 1.... · ... 1.. · ........ · .... 1···· .. TOTAL .. 181 191 201 51 171 361 91 91 201 .. 1 •• 1 1 6261$ 1,314.601$ 35.701$ .... 1$ 1,350.30)$ 75.601$ 1.171.801$ 102.901$ 1,036.651$ 80.001$ 8.00

1.....

51 5

1

'11

1...........

'1

SEVENTH DISTBIOT-GEORGE HOUOHENS, D. D. G. M., Ravenwood, Mo. Xenia. 50 1\ 1 1\ Quitman. 196 Ravenwood, 201..... 1 1... Graham. 289.... .. .. 1 1....... . White Hall. 301. ... . 11 1 1.... . Kennedy. 329. . • • • •• . •. 1. •• .,. •. .•. Burlington. 442..... .. Gaynor City. 465 \... .. Nodaway. 470 514163 8 Pickering. 472...... . .. I... 1 GuUford,474 1 \..... Clearmont, 507 1... .. •.. Skidmore, 611. 1... 1 1 21 TOTAL... 81 71 91 61 111

'1'"

tNo report received.

,.

612

2

4

.. .. ..

2 2 4.......... 2 ... 1.......... 2 1... 2 .. .... 8 •. . 1. . .. •. " .. 1............. 1.......... 14 4 3 23 . . . . . . 1 5 .. .. .. 1... .•. 3...... 1 2 1.......... 4................ 361 121 131 871 .. 1.. 1.·

109\$ 228.901$ 1$ $ 228.90\$ 12.60$ 216.301$ 1$ 77Q.30$ I$ .. 351 73.50........... 78.501........ 1 73.50 641.35 \ .. 851 178.501........... 178.50 4.20 174.301........ 290.66 .. 411 86.101 I 86.10 4.20 ......•. 1 81.90 266.50 10.00 1.00 311 66.101 65.1Q 4.20 60.901... .... . 69.50 ....... 1 . 231 48.30. . . . .. 48.301 6.30 1 42.00 None ••.... 241 50.401 1 50.40......... \ 50.40 83.10 . 241 50.401 1 50.401....... 50.401........ 67.60 . 2581 541.80 12.60 ' 564.40 29.40 525.00 1......•. , 492.601 50.00 4.00 401 84.001 2.10 ,. 86.10 2.10 25.901 58.10 64.00 , .. 891 81.90 ......•.... 1 81.9Q 2.10 79.801 \ 50.00 . 311 65.10.. .. 1 65.10 2.10 I 68.00 171.65. .. . . 501 105.00 1 1 105.001 8.40 96.601 ........ 1 75.001 1 . 7901$ 1.659.001$ 14.701$ 1$ 1,678.701$ 75.60 $ 1.229.2014 868.9Q1$ 3,032.061$ 60.001$ 5.00

'1'

.


EIGHTH DISTRICT-FRED H. BINDER, D. D. G. M., Bigelow, Mo. North Star, 167. • . . . 41 1 1... • • 1 •••••••••••••••• Sonora, 200. ... .. • • 21 2 2..... 2 1 6 .. Northwest, 858..... ... ... 1 1... 1 ... 1 .. Fairfax, 488........ .•. 1 2 8... 11...... 2 ....•. Maitland, 112...... 1 ••. ••• •• ••• 2 ••. 2 2 ....•. Oregon, 189. . . . . • . . 1 1 1... • • 1 ••. ••. 2 .. " .. tForest City, 214 .. Mound City, 294.... 6 6 4..... 7... 1 7 .. Craig, 606. .. .. .. .. . 1........ 1.. .. 1 1 8 .. .. .. TOTAL .....•../ 161 Itll 111 41 11 261 11 51 281. ·1 •• 1..

1041$ 28 66 861 511 601

218.40 $ •.••• , •.•• , 58.80 •••.•• .•.•. 186.60 .. , . " ..... 178.50........... 107.10... .•• •..•. 126.00...........

218.40 $ 68.80 186.60 178.50 107.10 126.00

2.10' 4.20 2.10 28.10 4.20 2.10

216.80/$ •.-.•... , 54.60 ••• • • • • . 184.401 •... , • • . 166.40/........ 102.90 •••.••• • 123.901 •·

460.00 $ .. , ... $ ••.•. 89.00 20.00 2.00 120.00 10.00 1.00

None ••.....••.•.. 120.00 10.00 406.001 .. ·•• ..

"'s41"' i7S:401 :::::: :::::I'''i7S:40!''i4:io "isi:701:::::::: ....i~:oo 881 79.80.. . ... .. ... / 79.80. .. .... 79.80 ..... . .. 70.00 6151$ 1,08l.601$ ..... I'

.... 1$

1,08l.601$

I

1.00

··

"30:00 "8:00

... , .. . 62.5tll $ 1.029.001$~ ...... 1' 1,485.001$ 70.001$

1.00 8.00

NINTH DISTRICT-eLYDE C. MILES, D. D. G. M., Halls, Mo.

Savannah, 71 ....••. ~ Helena, 117 ..•..... c:n Lincoln, 188 ...•...• Whitesville, 162 ..... Rosendale, 404 ....•.

I-'

Valley, 418 .........

2 1

8 1

2 2 4 6 1

2 2 4 6 1

... ... ...

C08by, 600 .......... Agency, 10 ..•...••• Wellington, 22 •..... '" St. Joseph, 78 .••.•• 6 7 Birming, 15tl ....... 2 2 Zeredatha, 189 ..•... 8 11 Ruahville, 288 ....•.. 1 1 Brotherhood, 269 .•.. 7 Itl Charity, 881. ....... 9 8 King Hill, 876 •.•••• 7 9 Saxton, 608 ......... 81 8 TOTAL ........ 611 701 tNo report received.

...

...... 2 .. .... ... .... ... ... .... .... ...... .... .. ... ... .... 1 .. . ... .... ... , ,. ... .... .... .... . 8 .. ....

6 7 ... 7 1 6 1 •. 1 ••. 5 2 1 2 •• 8 ... 2 1 2 ... 8 .• 4 •• 1 1 ... 1 2 2 6 .. 9 ... 1 1 1 4 4 1 6 1 1 '" 8 ... 6 5 12 6 6 1 ••• 1 5 1 12 8 9 26 2 12 1 •• 4 1 ... 10 .. 1 6 ... 2 14 5 18 28 6 16 12 1 9 8 ••. 7 8 ... 8 .. 1.. • 881261 681 1101 161 561

...

...

,

..

,. 8 •• 18 •.•. 1 2 •. 5 .. 1 .. 8 .. 11 .. ,. 19 .. 10 ..•. 1 8 .. 801 •• 1 11 2

....

.. .. .... .. ....

1781$ 281 471 471 481 511 681 961 581 6001 621 7441 80 266 894 1 2471 461 8,4291$

'1'

124.00 , 40.00 , 2.00 876.90 $ 14.70 $ 861.201$ .••••• 48.80 ...... 1.00 98.00 48.801 •..••••. 98.70 10.60 129.00 88.201 ..••.• · . 98.70 6.80 2.tlO 66.00 10.00 92.401 .. · ..... 96.60 4.20 2.00 26.00 92.401.· •.•• · . 111.30 2.10 4.00 200.00 109.201· .. · .. · . 182.80 190.00 182.801 ... · .... 199.60 18.90 8.00 134.85 80.00 180.601 •• ····· . 121.80 2.10 128.90 10.60 186.00 118.401 •• ····· . 1,05tl.00 26.20 1,075.20 6.80 400.00 80.00 5.tlO 1,068.901······· . 180.20 2.10 182.80 12.60 119.701 ........ 196.00 20.00 2.00 1,662.401 48.76 1,606.16 54.60 1,661.651 ........ 928.70 80.00 6.00 168.001 ...... 8.40 10.00 1.00 168.00 188.00 169.601 ........ 10.60 2.10 589.7tl 890.00 70.00 7.00 629.201 ....• · .• 687.60/ 1,877.40 87.90 1,915.80 48.80 698.60 50.00 6.00 1,867.tlOI .•..••.. 16.80 587.60 .90.00 40.00 7.00 520.801 ........ 618.70/ 18.90 96.60 ...... 96.60 6.80 164.00 10.00 1.00 90.801 .• ·.·.· . 7,200.901$165.16)$ ••.. 1$ 7,866.051$ 281.00 $ 7,126.061$ •...... 1$ 4,440.651$ 890.00'$ 48.00 868.80\$ 12.60 48.80 ...... $.::: :1$ 7 ••• 98.70 ...... 90.80 6.8tl 107.10 4.20 182.801 ......

°1 ......

,····°1·····.

.....

.....

..... .... ......

.

.......

....... ....... ...... ....... ........ ...... ......

....... ......


GRAND SECRETARY 'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TENTH DISTRICT-THOMAS D. WILLIAMS, D. D. G. M., Maysville, Mo. NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

] 'd

l

~

] j

~

.-l Q)

Union Star, 124 ...•. Weatherby, 235 ..•.. Parrott, 308 ...•.... Osborn, 817 .....•.. Continental, 464 .... Clarksdale, 559 ..... Western Star, 15 .... Pattonsburg, 66 .... Gallatin, 106 ....... , Altamont, 108 ...... Earl, 286 ........... Lock Spring. 488 ... Jameson, 500 ..•.... Jamesport. 664 ..... TOTAL ........

~

IE 'Qi 0«

~

~

'1:1

QI

'i 'i ~ ~ .;

:s i

ci 0

·s

~

~

!l::s

·s

~III

l:l

l:l

QI

l:l

QI

.. 1. . . ' . . . .2/' . . .1 1 ...3 .. 11 . 1...11·· 1....' ..... 11 11 1 1 1 2 1 1

"""I""r"I""

'I

.. ·1 .. · '''11... 21 ... '" .. ... ... 1..... ·1.. ... 21 21· .. 1 1 11 21 21 2\ 2 3

3 1 1 31 1 ...2 8'""" 291... 1 11... 1 41 2 4

. .. I.. ·1 .. · 1...

5/ 5 6\. 711

Z Po

r! rn

rI>

'1:I:E

=i

~]] Po ~ ~ rI> Co .... ::s x QI rnr.:l~

.... \."1" ...

.... I·· .... 10\ •. \....

""or:::: 1 ...... .... .. .. .. ..... , .... ..... ....

""ihhl"i ""; :1::::: ""r""" .. ··1...... ,

... 1... 1. . . . . . . , 11 1\ 1\.. 4 101 81 51 71 121

1 1 2 ... .. 2 91 161

10 .... " 14 ., ....

••••

,

'0

••

39 1.. 1. ·1··

~

QI

'S

Ql

::a

=~

IllQl

""~""~ t.'''O

~j~

l:l

""~ 0=

~i~ Ill~'"

QI "" QI

::~~

-<

d>~

C ::s

""Ill

~~

0

:5!~

~1

°

.;

=='.~

....

S

~~

~

ai~

l:lS

::s=0

<

III =

Co'~

'1:1 '1:1

ol:l

~

co Ql

~~

S

<

~

=

~

.~ ~'1:1

'EO]

::asr:

te.S .S ~

QI

::s

l:l QI

~

!l~..::l

~

~l5S

..!!i

III I:l::l

°

§Co=

='1:1

t~§

:l rn ::s

2'=~

:5!=C ell ....

.;~)1

~

~

t.'..c:

S

"O:3Q1

811$ 170.101$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 170.101$ ...... $ 140.001$ 30.101$ 218.251$ 10.001$ 1.0~ 4.20 77.701 30.001 43.501 194.25 1 . . . . . . . 1 ...... 371 77.701 · .. ···1 ·· .. 4.2Q 289.801 201.00 ....... 1 1.0~ 1371 287.701 2.101 ..... 285.601··· ..... 1 6.30 140.001 75.601 .•..... 1 .•.... 341 69.301 .. · ..... 1 71.401 4.20\ ..... 6.30 84.001 220.001 ....... 1 ...... 77.701· ....... 1 401 84.001· .... · ..... 1 6.80 86.001 ....... 1 ...... 421 81.901· ....... 1 88.201 ...... I .. ···1 88.20/ 1Q8.60 60.90 461 96.601 12.001 ..... 1 172.001 ....... 1 ...... 47.701· ....... J 2.10 2.00 102.801 ........ 1 20.001 481 1Q4.90/ 100.801 4.10\ ..... 1 200.00\ 8.40 203.70 1.00 197.401 6.30 ..... 1 454.75 941 196.301 ........ 1 10.001 102.901 ....•. . .... 1 76.001 .•..... 1 ...... 491 92.401 ........ 1 102.90 1 10.60 8.40 94.501 431 86.101 ........ 1 16.001 10.00 I 1.00 90.301 4.201 ..... \ 10.60 115.501 ...... 1 ..... 115.601 551 106.001· ...... ·1·· ...... · ...... 10.50 115.501 551 116.501 ...... 1 ..... \ 283.001. . . . . .. . ..... 105.001· ...... 10.50 73\ 153.3ill 8.40\ ..... 161.70\ 151.20\. . . . . . . . 408.60\ 10.00 1.00 8341$ 1.761.401$ 41.301$ .... 1$ 1.792.701$ 149.10 $ 1,570.001$ 73.601$ 2,617.751$ 60.001$ 7.00

·1

'1

·1· .. ·..

ELEVENTH DISTRICT-EMSLEY C. JAMES, D. D. G. M., Plattsburg, Mo. Liberty, 31. ....•. " ... 1... 1... 131 21 8··1 .... 81 11 2 Holt. 49 .....•..•••• 6 .. 1.... 21 21 21 ..... ' .... Angerona, 193 •..••. .... Clay, 207 ........... 13 . . . . . . Kearney, 311 .....•. 4 ...... 11 11 1 1 •.. \ 1 2 3 Temperance, 438 .... 21 21 21 2 6 9 1 2 12 ., .. " Hemple, 87. , ....•.. 5 ...... 21 21 21 ..... 1 21 1 ... Vincil, 62 .......... 61 41 4 1 11 21 11 3 Plattsburg, 113 ...•. .. • 1.. ·1 .. '14 21 4 ...... 71 ... \ 6 Gower, 397 ..•...•.. 51 41 4..... 101. .. 2 .. Lathrop, 506 .....•. 11 11 1.. 2 11 1 3 3 .... " TOTAL ........ 271 231 281121 131 511 81 341 591· .1. ·1··

I......

"";hhl"f: ""ifi "ii

.. .. ..

l""

........ ,

1591$ 333.901$ 4.201$ .... 1$ 338.101$ 16.80 $ 321.301$.·· .... 1$ 220.501$ .... "1$ ..... 64.601 ....... 261 24.001 30.00 2.00 54.601· .... 54.601· .. ·· .. 60.901 ........... 291 100.001 ....... 1 ...... 60.901 ... · .... 60. 90 1 . . . . . . . 312.90 27.30 1491 275.001 7.00 30.001 285.601 .. ····· .1 312.901 ...... ·····1 2.10 591 123.901 ........... 1 123.901 1.00 130.60\ 121.801···· •. · .\ 10.001 18.90 10.00 841 176.401 12. 60 1·····1 189.001 90.001 2.00 170.101 .. · ..... 1 4.20 291 60.901 ...... 1 ..... , 60.901 56.701 ........ 1 105.001 10.001 2.00 4.20 6.00 1131 237.301 2.101 ..... 239.401 110.001 20.001 235.201· ....... 1 14.70 871 182.701 4.201 ....• 186.901 172.201 ........ 1 68.00 1 ....... \ ...... 21.00 521 109.201 40.001 40.00 4.00 88.201 .. · ..... / 109.201 •.. ···1 .... 2.10 ........ 1 113.40 631 111.801 4.201 ..... 116.601 49.60 10.001 1.00 8401$ 1,764.001$ 27.301$ .... 1$ 1.791.301$ 111.30 $ 1,566.601$ 113.401$ 1.212.501$ 160.001$ 25.00

'1' .... / I '1

'1


TWELFTH DISTRIOT-JOBN M. GALLATIN, D. D. G. M., Chillicothe, Mo. t Kingston, 118

l" ::::1::1::::

. .. · .. 1$ ........ 1$ .. · .. 1$ 1$ ........ 1$ ...... $ · .. 1$· .. ·· .. 1$·· .. · .. ·1$ 1$·· . l Braymer. 135 . i 1061 222.601 .. · ···1 , 222.601 52.50 1 170.101 116.501 ·1 . Hamilton. 224 . 1071 224.701 /..... 224.70 16.80 207.901........ 181.45 40.00! 4.00 91 91 11 .. I.. · 8/ 1 2 41. '1" .. Polo, 232 . 701 147.001 147.001" . . .. . 147.001 ... " ., . 88.001 10.001 2.00 31 31 3 11'" .... 3. . . 71··.·· . Breckenridge. 834 ..• 851 178.501 .. · 1 178.50 14.70 163.801..... 170.001 10.001 . 11.··1 1..... 71 11 2 71·· .... Cowgill. 561. ....•.. .. • 1... 1... 1.. 541 113.401 .. · 1 \ 113.40 •.. , .. . 100.001 13.401 152.001 •...... 1 . 1 · .. ·1· .. 1 1 .... 1.. 1····· Friendship. 89 . 1591 833.901 2.101 ,. 336.00 12.60 323.401 1 Nonel 10.00 1.00 41 21 2 2 1 61 11 1 81 .. Spring Hill. 155 . .. . 1.. ·1 ..... 171 35.701 1.· 1 35.701 2.10 ....... ·1 88.601 2UlOI 1 .. 11·.. 1 ·· .. 1 .. Benevolence. 170 . 11 11 1121... 31...... 11 .. 491 102.901· ·1 ·1 102.90 6.80 96.601· .... · .. 1 125.001·· 1 . Chillicothe. 333 . 1181 247.801 2.101 1 249.90 12.60 237.301 .. , " 1 380.001 10.00 1.00 31 21 2121 2 61 21 3 31· '1" .. Chula. 388 .. 21 21 2..... 181· . . 1 . 851 73.501 1 \ 73.50 37.80 35.701 1 71.251·· \ .. Wheeling. 434 . ... ... 1 2 6 1 ... 5 .. 1 .. 541 118.401 4.20..... 117.60 12.60 105.001. . .. . 15.001 . . ~ Dawn. 539 .. .. ·1·· ·1 711 149.101 ...... 1..... 149.10........ ....... 1 149.10 Nonel 1 . 1.... 1 1,,1 .. 'I TOTAL . 241 211 251 71 61 .801 111 211 351 .. 1.. 1.. 9251$ 1.942.501$ 8.401$ .... 1$ 1.950.901$ 168.00 $ 1.416.701$ 866.201$ 1,820.201$ 80.001$ 8.00

"ii" 21.. s ::I::: " 25 1" l

2

1"'1

1 81. ...

THmTEENTH DISTRIOT-HERMAN D. TAGGART, D. D. G. M., Linneus, Mo. Jackson, 82 ......... Brookfield. 86 ....... Cypress. 227 ........ Bucklin, 288 .......• Dockery. 325 ...•.••• Marceline. 481 ...... TOTAL ........

t No report received,

.... .iol'iol'iol: : ·i_I'Z!""; 8 4 .. ... 5 .. ... 21 .. · 121l 6 21 2 11 21·· .. 261~l..\.~ . ~ 61 6 2 "41" iol ~ ~ "i21::

' '1 l'

191 191 191 31 201

271

91

81

271 .. 1.. 1..

781$ 163.801$ ..... \$ .... $ 168.801$ 6.80 $ 157.501$· . " ... $ 1841 886.401 21.00 2.10 21.00 384.801· ....... 405.80/ 118.40 4.20 541 118.401 ...... 1 : .... 109.201 .. · ..... 731 149.101·.·· .... 158.301 ...... \ ..... 158.80\ 4.20 119.701 ........... 119.70 ....... 571 119.701· ....... 1491 312.901 8.40 ..... 321.30 21.00 800.801 .. · ..... 5951$ 1.249.501$ 29.401$ 2.10\$ 1.276.801$ 56.70 $ 1.220.101$.· " ... 1$

124.001$ .... "1$ ..... 860.001 ...... . 1.00 "0.001 20.001 2.00 57.00 10.00 1.00 220.00! ............. None 80.00 4.00 911.001$ 60.001$ 8.00


GRAND SECRETARY 's TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-LUTHER E. WILHOIT, D. D. G. M., Macon, Mo. I

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

]

l

] j i~ ~ :!IS ... !l

'g 'g

~

I ~

]

l!l

-< ~

~

Callao, 88 ....•..••• 1 1 .. 8 Bloomington, 102 •.. 1 1 •. Censer, 172 ..•..•... 41 8 8 2 8 La Plata. 287 ..••... 51 5 5 1 2 Lodge of Truth, 268. 2 ••• 11·· . Excello, 882 •....•.. 11 2 8 .. Elmer, 648 ..•...... 81 8 1 .. St. Andrews, 96 ..... ... 1 2 ~ Shelbina, 228 ••..... ~ Hunnewell, 415 ..... co Bethel, 587 ..•..•... 1 Clarence, 662 •...... 2 2 2 1 TOTAL ........ 281 211 201121 111

~I

...

...

"f; . ~I·~ L.~

;:l

c:l

2 2 16 4

1ISI c:l

~

~1II

c:l

z

! m~~

rJ.l

4 2 11 1 2 1 .••• 2 1 1 5 3

1 2 1 •.. 8 2 1 6

.... ... ... .... ... ... ... 8 .•. ... 15 ... 6 1 7 ••.

d p.; ~ ~]] ~ Ii Ii § 'i Q, ....

21·· . 571 71 151

.... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...... .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. ••

2 5 ··1·· .. 851· .1 .. 1••

.!!I

f

i1II ~

]~

f~

... ~

...

~] ~ ~

c:l

~

.s.S

f'g f

~~~ :::~~ -<

...dl

f

~

~~

:g~ CIll:l Q,'"

~1

0

.., =

;:l

0

S

-<1II ~c:l

-;:l

E-4

'tl

~] ;:l.~

c:lS

j~

'Qj ~

..., l:l ;:l

0

s

-<

~

~.S ~

1II;:l c:l 1II

.S

~ ~

'tl O ]

~~ ~£3

tJ

c

~

0

lXl

.~ ~'tl

om =

:i lll &:

~S •

:g=~ CIl .... ~

='tl 1II,,= ~ ;:l ... =~ ~ .c'

...

'tllll~ 'Qj~~ ~

4.20 $ 159.601$······· $ 188.751$ ...... 1$ 1.00 761$ 159.601$ 4.20 $ .... $ 168.80 $ 4.20 105.QO 105.00 24.001.· ..... , ...... 100.801· .•••... 501 88.60 800.00 10.00 1.00 806.60 812.90 6.80 1461 279.801.······ . 8.40 247.50 80.00 8.00 247.80 252.00 4.20 248.601··· .•... 1181 96.60 100.80 4.20 461 100.801······· . 10.001' ..•.. 81.50 886.00 10.00 1.00 180.60 180.601· ..•..•• 180.60 861 6.30 117.60 117.60 85.00 10.00 1.00 561 111.801 .. • .. ·· . 31.50 142.80 ..... ..... 142.801 111.301.·· ..... , ..... 1 ....... [ ...... 681 12.60 205.801 4.20 ..... 210.001 981 65.001 80.00 3.00 197.401······ .. \ 14.70 100.00 10.00 1.00 81.90\ 891 67.201.····· .. 81.901·· .... 1 . . . . . None 10.00 1.00 65.101 2.10 •.... 311 67. 20 1 . . . . . . . 67.201 .• ··· .. 115.50 4.20 115.501 ............ 1 551 111.301.······ . 286.251·· .. ···1·· .. · . 8691$ 1,824.901$ 25.201$ .... 1$ 1,850.101$ 119.70 $ 1,780.401$ ....... 1$ 1,669.001$ 120.001$ 12.00

...... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... .

....... .......

'1

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-DAVID A. LESLIE, D. D. G. M., Williamstown, Mo.

'1"

821$ 172.201$ 4.20 $ ..• '1$ 176.40\$ $ 176.401$ \ Nonel$ 20.001$ 8.00 W:vaconda, 58 24...... Monticello, •..... , ...811. ..81 ••.8..1...2....8 1"'1 1 1 28\ •• .. \.•. .. 401 84.00........... 84.00 6.30 1 77.70 $ 229.25 \ . 109\ 228.901 6.80.. .. . 235.20 27.80 207.901..... .. . 87.50 80.00 8.00 LaBelle. 222....... 81 8 8 4 5 18 1 8 5 ...... 1101 281.001. .. . .. ..•.. 281.00/ 231.001. .. .. . .. 150.001 , / . Craft, 287. . • . . . . . .. ., ./ .. 1.... • •• ••. 6. • •. •• •• •• Williamstown, 870. . 4 4 2. . 1 1 •.. ... 8 491 102. 90 1 2.10. • . . . 105.00 2.10 102.901 ......•. [ 10.501 20.00 •..... 541 118.40 4.20..... 117.601 16.80 96.601 4.20 179.50 40.001 4.00 Lewistown, 494. .. .. 41 1..... 2 8 ... 1 2 371 77.701 1..... 77.701 21.00 56.701........ None . Ewinlr, 577......... 21 21 2..... 10 1 3 .... /. 1011 212.101 4.201' .... , 216.801 16.80 199.501 ,... 256.20 ....•.. 1 2.00 Palm:vra, 18........ 21 21 21" 2 8 1 8 7 . St. John's, 28....... 8/ 101 7 6 2 16 1 9 2 .. 4291 900.901 4.20.. . . . 905.101 38.60 871.501 1 72.001 50.00 5.00 Hannibal, 188. ..... 181 191 12 8 2 23... 9 ••.. , .. 3771 791.70 8.40..... 800.101 48.30 751.801 / 720.00 180.00 18.00 351 78.501 ...•.. 1 ·· .. ·1 78.501 ., . . . . . 78.501. ... 90.00 •... ···1 . Philadelphia, 502. . . . .. 1. "1 11'" .. .... ... ... .. .• 911 191.101 2.10 , .\ 198.201 21.00 150.001 22.201 224.00 ..... "1 . Ralls, 88 ..•....•... ···1 1 1.. 1 10 1 2 Lick, Creek, 802.... 61 51 8 2... 4 ... 2 . 1091 228.901 / 1 228.90/ 8.40 220.501 / 276.00 6Q.00 6.00 New London. 807 ...... 1... 1. . . . . 1... \ 8...... 18 .. 581 111.801. .. . 1 111.80 6.30 / 105.00 248.00 1 .•.... TOTAL ........I 551551411221 171 991 71391 871 .. 1. ·1 .. 1,6761$ 8,619.601$ 85.701$ .... 1$ 8,555.801$ 207.901$ 8,188.301$ 209.101$ 2,542.951$ 400.001$ 46.00

'1' ..

'1' ./..

'1"


SIXTEENTH DISTRICT-WARREN H. MAY, D. D. G. M., Louisiana, Mo.

"1"

Eolia, 14 •••••••.••• ... 1... \ 1111 •.• 1 13 .. 1 1.... 3 2 2 11 •. Clarksville, 17 •..•.• ••• 1........ 1 1 3 10 Perseverance. 92 •... 61 21 21 8 .,. 1 1 Phoenix, 136 ..•..•. 8 ... 8 .... \ Frankford, 192 ..•.. 1 .... Pike, 399 ....••..... .. ·1· .. 1···· ••.• 1 •.• TOTAL ........ 81 61 71 51 81 871 21 101 131 .. 1001 ..

.. ~I .. ~I"~I::'I .. '~

1'"

T'

"1''1'

.... ........

61 70 1$ 1761 1041 471 171 4641$

T.,. '1'

107.101' 147.001 .... 2.10

•. " • 367.501 6.30 ..... 218.401 8.40 •..•. \ 98.70\ ...... 1 . . . . . 35.70 .•....•.... 1 974.401$ 16.801$ •... 1$

107. 10 1$ 149.10 373. 80 1 226.80 98.70 36.701 991.201$

27.30 $ 6.30 18.90 16.80 6.30 2.10 77.70 $

79.801$ ••••••. \ 142.801 •.•••••• $ 354.901 ••••..•. 210.001 •• ·· •••. 1 92.401 •.•.•••. \ 33.601· ....... 918.601$ .....•• 1$

.. NOnr····r····

U::~g

40:00 .. :':00

96.00 80.00 . ..•.• 65.001······ ·1··· .. · None •••.••••••..• 416.76\$ 70.001$ 4.00

SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT-CHARLES S. HICKS, D. D. G. M., Monroe City, :Mo.

1:1"~

Paris Union, 19 ..... 2/ 11 11' '\' •• Florida, 23 .•••..•.. .. ·1 ... 1· ....... 2 ... Middle Grove. 42 ...• 4 ... ~ Monroe, 64 ..•...... ~ Madison, 91. .•. " .. ·1· .. co Santa Fe, 462 •....•. .. ·1 ... 1.. .. ·1 .. ·1· .... I· .. 10... Holliday. 660 .....•. • .. 1.. ·1 ... 1.. 1.. · 1 11 TOTAL ........ 41 31 3/ 21 ... 1 371 41

.'21" 21' '21'21:::

'I'

2

4

1

1 1 3

l" ...

2 1 61

...... ......

1 101 .. 1.. 1..

81/$ 281 241 661 231 421 261 2721$

170.10/$ .... ·1$ .... 1$ 48.801· .... • ..... 60.401 2.10 •.•.. \ 136.501 2.10 •...• 48.30\ •.•..• ..· .. 1 88.20 ...... .. • .. 1 62.601 ...... ..· .. 1 671.201$ 4.201 $ '" .1$

170.101$ 48.80 62.60 188.60 48.30 88.20 62.601 675.401$

29.40 $ 4.20 4.20 8.40 8.40 21.00 2.10 77.70 $

140.701$ •.••••• $ 21.001· ••••••. 48.301· ....... 180.201· .....•• 39.901 ...••. · • 67.201· ••••••. 60.401· ...•••• 497.701$ •..•. · .1$

""6"1' 20.001$ 2.0'

75.00 ....... 1 . . . . . . 66.00 ••..••..••..• 65.00 20.00 2.00 40.001" ..... / ...... 92.00 •••••••.•..•• Nonel .............. 470.601$ 40.001$ 4.00

EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT-TURNER D. BARNES, D. D. G. M., Moberly, Mo.

'I

Huntsville, 80 •.••.• ]... I. "1"1 21 2 ...1 6 MUton,151. ........ ... •• • / ... 1... " ... 1 Clifton HilI. 161. .•. 11 11 1\.. 2\ .... 1... Moberly. 344 ..••.•.. 21 51 7 1 10 16 1 7 Cairo, 486 .......... 11 11 1 1. , \ , " \ 2 3 2 Higbee, 627 ......... 11 ... 1 1j..... 14 3 J acksonvilIe, 541. .•. ... 1... 1... 1.. 51 .. •· Clark, 610 ..••••••.. ... 1... 1... 1.. 1... 1 8 TOTAL ....... 61 71 101 11 191 451 61 181

·.. ~l:: .... 1 ..

....

0

•••••

8 111 .. 1.. 1..

"II

1'

6.30 $ 277.20]$.. ..... 283.601$ 1851$ 28,.6"1' ..... 1$ .. 310.,'1"" ... ]' ..... 4.20 48.30 44.101 .. ·.·... 36.00 ....... 1 ...... 231 48.50 ...... 1 ..... ....... 79.80 4.20 •••.• 84.00 381 84.001. .. .. • .. 68.10 10.001' ..... 876.701... .••• • 1,600.76 10.00 1.00 909.30 33.60 4231 888.30 21.00 •••.• \ 4.20 115.60 661 111.301 ...... 62... 1 ....... 1 1.00 116.601 ...... 1 ..... 29.40 222.60 60 1061 193.201..... .. • 367.50 ....... / ...... 222. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . 79.80 10.50 •..•• 381 90.301· ••.••• None. . . • • •• • ••.•• 90.30\ ....... 65.00 •.....• • ••..• 96.601. . . . . . • • 113.40 16.80 113.40 ••....••.•• 1 641 94.60 $ 1.772.401$ ....... 1$ 2,600.301$ 20.001$ 2.00 8721$ 1.831.201$ 36.701$ • " .1$ 1,866.901$

"I '1


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued NINETEENTH DISTRICT-ARTHUR G. LYNCH, D. D. G. 14., Brunswick, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

]

.. :5 III

~S

] ] 11 11 :.::III !j~ ~gj .!!/ ! IS 'iii A::l Po. ~ < ~

.. ~I .. ~I .. ~

2 1 Eureka, 78 ..••....•. Warren. 74 ...•.•..• Triplett, 122 .••...•. .. 8 I-' Westville, 202 ..•..•. 00 9 11 o Salisbury, 208 ..•.... Rothville. 426 .••.... 11 1 2 1 ... Pee Dee, 498 •....•.. .. 2 1 Cunningham, 626 ... ... .. ·1 ... ... Mendon, 628 .•...... .. ·1· .. 1· .. TOTAL ........ 111 131 141121 171

"":I";W;i ' '1 ...

..... "I'"

0

~

~

·s.... ~ I»

A

~ ~]]

~

~

A

IlO

Z

Q. 'i ~

Q. ~

~

$:lo .... >< I»

mril~

rIJ

2 2 3 81 .. .... .... 8 ... 8 3 1 .... .. 4 '" 7 10 2 18\ . . . . . . 2 2 ...... , .......... 1 2 6 2 .. .... I.... 321 171 101 481· ·1· ·1· .

...

..::1::

....

....I......

~:E f

~

e

~

=E-4

III I»

""!llI'" 0'8 ~

~..:l~

A

",,!llI .s.S f 11 f

Ill&llll I» "" I»

l::Po.~

<

f .L ""Ill

Po.~

:g!lll III I: $:lo'"

""11 ~CJ

°

.

~ .;

I: ::l 0

e 315

Po.

]0'8

AS

....I::

A

::l

!jgj..:l

°e

I: III

IlOI»

3~

0

E-4

!llI !llI.S gj .S ~!llI

gj] ='~

<Ql

::l

4.20 $ 981$ 206.80\, 2.10 $ .... $ 207. 90 1$ 16.80 106.00 ..••.• 106.00 601 6.30 121.80 121.801 ...... .... 681 8.40 6.30 ..... 92.401 441 98.70\ 14.70 369.10 386.001 23.10 ... 160/ 4.20 73.601 ...... 1 .... 73.601 361 2.10 46.201 22/ 46.20/ ...... 1 .... 10.60 117.601 .......... 117.601 661 79.801 .......... 79.801 ....... 381 561/$ 1,178.101$ 31.501$ ... 1$ 1,209.601$ 67.20 $

.

<

CJ

'i CQ

203.701$ •.•...• $ 88.201··· ••• · . 116.60/ ....•••. 90.301.··· .... 126.601 218.90 69.301 .. · .. · .. 44.101 ........ 107.101· ....... 79.801 ........ 1 923.601$ 218.901$

~c5S

°166.10

'aom!~

I::

~Ql' ~ S • :g=i: III .... Po.

I::~

~~§ 2'S~ o.s::

e

~:I» ~

'ai Po.

/~:~~I· .. ~:~~

20.00 $. 124.00 \ 20.00 ••..... 1.00 28.71 20.00 6.00 None 1.00 10.001 Nonel ....... 1 ..•... 25.00/ ....... / ...... 90.001 .......•.•••• 472.71/$ 60.001$ 11.00

....... ......

TWENTIETH DISTRICT-EARL F. CHEESMAN, D. D. G. 14., Carrollton, Mo. DeWitt, 89 ....•.... VVakanda,52 .•••••• Bogard, 101. •..•••. Hale City, 216 ..•..• Carroll, 249 ....••.. , B08WOrth, 597 ..• , .• Hardin, 322 ..•.•... TOTAL .

III..

11 31 11 31..1 32 2711'" 2 411 31 11 ... 1... 1... 2 3... 51 41 4 1 3 21 11 1......... 3 4 ... 1.. 7 1 11 1 1.. 1 2 3 1 131 101 101 31 91 401 131 10/

'1'" "I'"

·1

211"\' 3/ .. 1 11 1..

'1" . ..

I.. ..

1..

1.. 1.. 71 .. 1.. 1..

601$ 126.001$ 12.60\$ .. "1$ 138.60\$ 2841 596.401 16.80 613.20 1011 212.101... ... 212.10 661 117.601 6.801. . . . . 128.901 771 161.701 ...... 1 ..... 1 161.701·· 681 121.801 •.... ·1 121.80 921 198.201 2.10 ..... 1 196.30 7281$ 1,628.801$ 37.801$ .... 1$ 1,666.601$

'1" ..

1

2.10 $ 136.601$······ '1$ 56.70 566.501 .. 4.20 207.901 .. 2.10 121.801 . ..... 161.701· .. ·· 1 14.70 107.101··· .. ···1 4.20 191.101 ......•• 1 84.001 $ 1,482.601$······ .1$

106.601$ 10.00/$ 1.00 None/ 20.001 2.00 200.00 10.001 1.00 25.841 40.00 4.00 128.00 20.00 2.00 165.001 ....... 1 . . . . . '. 195.001 10.00 1.00 819.44/$ 110.001$ 11.00


TWENTY-FmST DISTRIOT-EARL W. FOLEY, D. D. G. M., Weston, Mo. RisingSun, 18...... Weston, 63......... Compass, 120....... Camden Point, 169.. Rowley.204 Fidelity, 339........ Adelphi. 356 Platte City, 504..... Waverly, 61.. .. . .. . TOTAL.. . .. ...

61 61 6111-11 2 ....... , .. /.. .. •• 31 4j 6 3 1 4 1 3 2 .. 21 11 1 2... 1 3.......... 11 1........ .... 21...... 1 1 2 8\ 1 2 11 1.................. 6.... .. ·1·. ·1 .. · \ 2\... 2 2\. 11 ... I... 1 1 8 1 1.......... 6j 61 3.. 2 23.. . 2. ... .. .. .. 181 151 141"9181-861-4111'- 'j21 :-:-1-:-.1..

·1....

871$ 182.701$ 8.40 $ ... '1$ 191.10 $ 4.20 $ 186.901$ ....... 1$ 800.001$ 60.001$ 6.00 1101 281.001 2.10..... 288.10 8.40 224.70 1•••••••• 1 186.00 1 . 741 166.40........... 165.40 2.10 168.801........ 819.00 20.00 2.00 641 118.401...... 118.40....... 118.401........ 10.001 10.001 1.00 541 113.401 6.30 119.70 2.10 117.601 169.601 1 .. 471 98.701........... 98.70 ....... 98.701........ 114.001 10.001 1.00 801 63.001· 63.00 4.20 1 58.8Q 166.001 .. · .. ··1 .. 661 188.601 2.10..... 140.70 6.30 134.401........ 182.001 ....... , .. 691 144.901 8.40.. .. . 168.80 48.80 106.001.... .... None 50.00 1.00 5911$ 1,241.101$ 27.301$ .... /$ 1,268.401$ 76.60 $ 1.184.001$ 58.80/$ 1,324.601$ 140.001$ 10.00

·1 .. ·..

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRIOT-oHAS. T. KORNBRODT, D. D. G. M., Kansas Oity, Mo.

....

....

00

·1....

Heroine. 104 17/ 20/ 231 3/ 61111/ 8 7 81. 9711$ 2,039.101$ 12.60($ 1$ 2.051.701$ 233.10 $ 1,818.601$ $ 1.099.001$ 110.001$ 18.00 AlbertPike,219.... 31 81 21 .. /... 26 4 6 141".... 2971 623.701 1 623.70 54.60 669.10/........ 219.00 10.001 1.00 Kansas City, 220. . .. 21 21 411 3 46 2 21 37..... . 6611 1,888.101 6.30 4.20 1,890.20 96.60 1,293.601 .. , .. .. . 780.001 20.001 2.00 Temple, 299 ... , .. . . 121 121 14 11191 86 5 26 25.. 1 1 18491 2.832.901 89.101.... 2,872.001 180.60 2,691.401. .. .. .. . 1,110.90 60.001 12.00 Cecile-Daylight, 306. 31 31 312 11 7 1 1 21...... 981 205.801 2.101.... 207.901 14.70 198.201........ 86.00 10.001 1.00 RUral, 816. . .. .• . ... 61 41 11 2 7 72 6 9 14...... 4631 972.801 18.90 .... 991.20 162.70 888.501. . . .. .• . 874.90 60.00/ 6.00 Westport, 840. . . . .. 181 181 12 4 86 23 5 18 46..... . 8621 1,810.201 76.601.... 1,885.80/ 48.30 1,837.50/. . . .. .• . 1.088.00 110.00 11.00 Ivanhoe, 446........ 841 291 2716 8811761 88 42 48...... 29031 6,096.801 1.... 6,096.80 369.06 1.060.001 4,676.70 6,921.20 840.001 84.00 Gate City, 522...... 81 91 7 1 12 89 2 27 66...... 12151 2,561.601 25.35 2,676.84 186.90 2,389.951 1 658.001 50.001 8.00 Orient, 546....... .. 861 811 29 6 8 63 11 8 871·..... 8811 1,850.101 6.30.... 1,866.40 182.80 924.101 800.001 1,398.001 280.001 81.00 South Gate, 547..... 71 71 6 1 12 29 8 19 81...... 7051 1.408.501 26.20 .... 1.505.70 60.90 1,444.801 .. ······ 665.001 50.00 7.00 York, 563.......... 91 71 9 6 3 13 8 8 16 .. " . . 4891 921.90/ 6.80.... 928.20 27.80 900.901···.· 98.00 70.001 7.00 Swope Park, 617.... 81 2 2.. 7 29 3 2 13 .. 1 1" 3041 638.40 14.70.... 653.10 60.90 692.201........ 180.00 80.00 8.00 Sheffield. 626. .. . .•.. 71 10 9 2 4 58 2 15 28..... . 4201 882.001 8.40. . . . 890.40 121.80 768.601. . . . . .. . 600.00 60.00 6.00 East Gate, 680...... 881 821 38 4 16 84 6 9 40...... 10361 2,173.601 82.401 .201 2,206.70\ 71.40 2,184.801........ 1,712.20\ 170.00 28.00 Northeast, 648 161191 23 21 9 34 6 7 28.. 3981 825.8QI 18.901 1 844.201 71.40 772.801 ·· 1.112.00 80.00116.00 Country Club, 666. . . 2 81 3 1 6 9 5 1 41' . 2401 604.001 4.201 11.00/ 497.201 18.90 478.301.. . .. .. . 278.001 20.00 2.00 Rockhill, 668....... 121 9 7 1 4 2 10 .. 144/ 802.40/ 8.40 6.30 304.60 4.20 300.301........ 106.00 60.00 6.00 Alpha, 669......... 101 9 9 2 1 2 .... .. 1181 247.801 2.101..... 249.90....... 249.901........ 492.60 30.00 8.00 ---rrOTAL 2861229123816211861 9071102\2281 6021 .. 1 21 113.4981$28,346.801$806.861$21.701$28,630.951$1906.20 $21.248.061$5.476.701$19,828.701$1660.001$197.00

"'1


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TWENTY-THIRD DISTRIOT-CAMILLUS B. WADDELL, D. D. G. M., Lexington, Mo. NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

]...

] ]

]

·s <II

'i "2 ...III !a ~ ~ 5 is ... ::l8l ~ ll< ~ < ~ Cl

..~I .. ~I . ~ .'1'

Lexington, 149 .•••. Higginsville, 864 .... •• 2 Lafayette, 487 ..•••. .. 1 Concordia. 464 ...•.. .•• 1 1 .. 1 Mount Hope, 476 ••• , 7 7 ' 1 ClO Richmond, 57 ..•.... 6 7 6 1 to Ray, 228 ...•..•.••• 1 1 1 .. ••. Bee Hive, 898 ...•••. 1 1 1 .. Ada, 444 •••.••••... 8 2 2 .. TOTAL ..•.•••• 241 261 241 11 141

....

!=i d

l's

-1!III

Cl

Cl

<II

.!!I

p.; ~

Z =:i] ~'i

~

l§ ~

<II

m~

00

~

1e ~

i

..

2 .. '" 8 2 4 8 2 8 ..•• 6 ... 1 .... 4 2 .•. 6 2 4 2 •. 8 .. 2 2 ... 8 .... "' "' "' 6 .. 2 2 .. 8 491 111 221 151· .1. ·1··

....

II

••••

II

••••

II

••••

I

71" • ..: ... ~I:::

•••

II

••

II

••

II

••

<II

)1

",tlO

-g~

~.5

t.']~

1Il~1Il

ft",

~ Cl

~

~ 'i ~

<II "'<II

:::ll<~

<

",Ill

....C

ll<>:

0

dI~

:5!tlO lIle Q.'"

"'"2 ~u

0

::l

S <<II

-'::l

~Cl

E-4

gj]

:s.~

ClS

..,<11

~~

~ .;

<II

ll<

Cl

...e

::l 0

E! <

::l

tlO tlO.5 rJ .5 ~ tlO

.~ ~~

~81 ~15~

..c' ::a a . ~~~ :5!=tl

~O]

<II

u

eIII

c;

0

a:l

Om e ~41&

III

ll<

....

e~

t~§

...

"'e~

~

.;~~

ll<

1481$ 800.801$ 2.101$··· .1$ 802.40 $ 16.80 286.601$$ •••••.. $ 424.001$ 80.001$ 8.00 196.80 16.80 911 818.00 20.001 2.00 178.601 .. ·· ••.. 12.60 ··· .... ·1 105.00 92.40 840.97 •• .. • .. 1 .. •• .. 601 90.801 ........... 90.80 8.40 124.80 ·· .. · .. 1···· .. 481 81.901 .. ·· .••. 12.60 1291 270.901 ........... 270.90 288.76 268.801· ., ..... 411.60 29.40 1891 396.901 14.70 ..... 882.201·.···.· . 1,208.00 .. 4'0:001 ., 4:00 60.40 4.20 241 70.00\ ....... j ...... 46.201·· .• ·· •. / 60.40\ ...... 2.10 126.00 4.20 •.... 180.20 128.101 .....••• 9.00 •...•.......• 601 100.801 4.20 ...•. 106.00 106.001 ........ 60.001 20.00 ...... 481 7771$ 1,681.'101$ 29.401$ .... 1$ 1,661.101$ 102.90 $ 1,465.801$ 92.401$ 2,778.621$ 110.001$ 9.00

m:!ZI "':~~I :::::1

I.....'

.......

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRIOT-JOHN W. ADAMS, D. D. G. Mo, Marshall, Mo.

... ... ... ... ...

.... ...

.

.,. ... Arrow Rock, 55 .••.. ... / Cambridge, 68 ..•••. 2 ... 4 8 8 21 .• \ Miami, 85 •...•.•••. 6 •. .. 1 8 .•. Trilumina, 205 ...•• 5 6 4 2 1 7 4 4 11 .. 8 2 8 .... Barbee, 217 ......... 4 •• 1 Malta, 402 .......... •.. 1 1 .• 1 .... 2 8 .... 8 ... 2 .... Oriental, 518 ..••... 8 Nelson, 660 .•....... 81.· . 1 .... TOTAL ........ 101 121 121 41 41 281 111 161 881··1 .. 1..

r

.. ~ .. ~

.1

•••

II

...

••

10

II

••

••

II

.1

••

1110

••

...... ...... •

0

••••

'1

221$ None $ ..... ·1$ •...• 46.201$ •.. , .1$ ... ·1$ 46.20/$ ...... $ 46.201$ •..... 1621 340.20 8.40 840.001·· .. ·· ..... 1 881.801·.· .. · .. $ 150.00 ..... ··1·· .... 46.60 46\ 92.40\ ....... 98.701 6.80 96.60 1 2.10 ..... \ 422.10 2.10 • .... 1 2011 424.20 14.'10 800.00 .. 50:001" 5:00 409.601 .. ·· .••. 1221 268.80 6.&0 260.66 20.00 2.00 262.001 .. ·.··· ./ .119.70 . . . . .1 .·,• 2.10 •..... 121.801 ....... 571 145.501 .....•. \ ...... 121.801 .. ··.·· . 6.30 94.601 10.00 1.00 641 118.40) ...... / ..... 107.101.······ . 118. 40 1 79.80 ........... 79.80 80.001 ....... 1 •••••• 6.80 381 78.501· .. · .. · .1 7021$ 1,474.201$ 8.401$ •... 1$ 1,482.601$ 48.80 $ 1,434.301$,. ..... 1$ 1,076.151$ 80.001$ 8.00

····1

'1


TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRWT-SAMUEL L. JEWETT, D. D. G. M., Boonvllie, Mo•

'1" .. .. . .~~:II~ .. ~~~::~I$· :::::'.::::~ .. ~~~: :~\$.. ~~:~i '1" . 1...........

Cooper.-36 .. ~ ...... 516151 ... 8 8 2 1. . . . . . t Pleasant Grove. 142 , ... 1... 1. .. .. .•. .... ... ... Wm. D. Muir, 277 •... ·.1 11 1......... 1 1 6 .. Wallace. 466 1••• '" •• ••• 8 .,. 1 19 . Prairie Home. 603.. 31 31 3..... 2 ..... , ... Howard. 4. • • . . . . • .. 81 3 8 1 1 2 . .. 2........ .. Fayette, 47. . • • . . . .. '" 8 8 1... 10 1 2 6 .. ., .. Livingston, 61. .. .. . 31 11 1... • • 18. • . 8 •.••...••. Armstrong, 70. . • . .. ., .1 ... 1••• / •• /. • • 3 .. . 1 •. " .. .. .. TOTAL 1 141 161 16131 11 411 61 121 291 .. 1.. 1..

~~~:~~l~:::::::I~ .. ~.1~:??-$.. ~~:??l·

$ .. 671 140.70........... 140.701" .. " . 140.701. .... .•• 291 60.90 '" 60.90 6.80 64.601... .. .. . 431 90.301 90.80 4.20 86.101 .... , . .. 811 170.10 8.80..... 178.40 4.20 17,UOI........ 1171 245. 70 245.701 21.00 222.601 2.10 48 100.8Q 2.10. . .. . 102.90 27.30 76.601... ..•. . 651 115.50. .. ... ..... 115.50 6.30 18.591 90.61 6071$ 1,274.701$ 10.401$ .. , .1$ 1,286.101$ 86.101$ 1,106.291$ 92.711$

6:?? 7.00 1 . 25.00 , . 136.00... . . . . 1.00 60.00 60.00 8.00 406.40 •...... 6.00 20.00 2.00 180.00. . ... .. .. .... 978.401$ 130.001$ 11.00

1......

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-JULIOS R. EDWARnS, D. D. G. M., Oentralia, Mo.

.. ~I .. :I.. ~.~ .. ~

Centralia. 69 ....... Rocheport. 67 •....• Twilight, 114 ....... 7 61 6 1 4 t Ashland, 166 ...... Sturgeon, 174 ..•... Hallsville, 336 ..•..• ~ 00 Ancient Land~ mark, 866 ......•. Hinton, 466 ...•...• Acacia, 602 . ........ "71"6"5'2 ~I TOTAL ........ 201 161 161 81 18/

~6 ...•.~"i2 ...12~ .::1::\:: .....

"ihh:: "i "is ::: ", :::: ::I:f 21 2 2.. ... 3 1··t·· .....t .. ...... ·..1''''1 1~I·iil ,1 .. '1..'" 6 1il:: 2·t'l' :::: 1

I

48/ 13/ 111

331 .. 1.. 1..

r. :,.1 .,.,:••

941$ 261 178 J

197.401$ 6.80\$ .. .. \$ 62.601........... 878.80 8.40 ..... 1

31 /,

66.10 •• , ..• \ .....

..i.il· ..•i.:i. ..•:i.1 ::::

203.70\$ 62.60 382.20

8.40 $ 4.20 12.60

66.101

6.30

' i..

461 ........... 1 ..... ••.••\ ' •. 80 281 48.30 2.10. . •. .' 50.40 4.20 3001 630.00 18.90.. .. . 648.90 21.00 7971$ 1,673.70j$ 37--:8i)!$ ~~1$1;711-:50T$100.80 $

196.301$· •..•.. 1$ 48.30 1........ 1

...

.. ~l .. ~ ~I

·l·~ .. ~I .. ~l .. ~ "I'" .....

2 2 2 13 4 1 7 8 8 2 3 421

... ... ... 3 1 .. 1 0

1

...

... . ..... .... .... .... .... ..

4 .. .. 1 .. ... 1 2 .... . 1 .. 6 9 .. 3

'0'

4 1 1

S 1 91 191

.I.'!" . .......... 3 ....

1

7 ......

......I.. ·· 1 ...... 85/ .. 1.. 1 1

tNo report received.

60.90 $ 291$ 60.901$ ..... 1$ .... $ 86.10 411 94.60 2.10 .•... 96.60 451 676.40 6.30 . .... 681.70 2741 189.00 2.10 •.... 191.10 901 87.80 181 37. 80 1 . . . . . . 491.40 2.10 498.60 2841 172.20 2.10 '10:501 168.80 821 67.20 321 67. 20 1 . . . . . . 69.30 .•.... .. · .. 1 69.30 331 42.00 201 42.001·· .... 193.20 193.20 ...... 921 990/$ 2.079.001$ 14.701$10.50IS 2,088.201$

86·'·1·....· ..... .....

...

. ..3.6.9:~?1: : : :: : :: ....2.6.6:?? ., .~o:?? 4:?~ 186.901 ..•.. '" 220.00 •.... ,. • ..•.. 2.00 20.00 81.60 58.801· .......

I

77.701 ..... ·· . 46.801 • 627.901.· ... ·· . 1.61~.801$ ....... 1$

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRIOT-LOUIS J. GRAUE, D. D. G. M., Mexico Mo.

... ... ... ......

Central, 81. ...•. '" " / Laddonia, 115 •.•... Social, 266 ......... Hebron. 864 ..•...•. ···1 2 4 " 8 4 " Vandalia, 491 ..•.... 1 Houston, 580 • •••••• Fulton. 48 •....•.... 71 7 New Bloomfield. 60 .. 31 4 Portland, 242 ..•..•. 61 4 6 Tebbetts, 566 ..•..•. .. I.. · Shamrock, 686 ..•... Mokane, 612 ••••.•.. 31 81 s TOTAL ........ 211 261 281 31 51 •• Credit $1.00. • Credit '0.10.

12.46 $ 10.00 $ 2.00 76.00.. . .... .. ....

·····1 ....·..1......

16.00 •.....•...... 90.00 10.00 6.00 766.961$ 80.001$ 13.00

'4. 1' ...... I' .....

4.20 $ 80 66.701$ ...... '1$ 4.20 ........ I 116.00 .....•.•..... 81.90 4.20 21.00\ ....... ...... 92.401······· .\ 866.00 ....•.• . .••.. 27.30 664.401·· •..••. 142.00 ....•.......• 8.40 182.701.· ...... 46.00 2.10 36.701 ........ 626.00 40.00 6.00 14.70 478.801 ..... · .. 148.00 10.00 ...... 6.30 168.601 6.30 77.00 '20.00 2.00 60.90\ ........ 40.00 10.00 1.00 4.20 66.10 ..•..•.• 57.00\ ....... , ...... 42.001 ... · .. · .\ 112.00 •••.......•.. 6.30 186.901 ........ 88.20 $ 1,914.101$ 81.901$ 2.281.801' 80.001S 8.00

.......

....... ......

••


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-P. A. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

] CIS

....

:s .... 00 ~

~

'i

~ .... ~ ~

'i 'i :.::CIS ~ .; IS

'4j

< ~ 11 11·· .1 .. 1···1 ~

~

Griswold. 178 .•••... Wellsville, 194 ..•... . .. I.. ·1... 11 1 Montgomery, 246 ... 11 1\ 1 2... Florence, 261 ..•. '" Jonesburg, 457 ...•. ... 1. . . . . . . . \ ... \ Daggett, 492 •...•.• .. . 1.. ·1 .. · ..... TOTAL ........ 21 21 11 81 11

~

·s CII

~

gj ::I

·s~

.2

l:l

l:l

CII

l:l

c:l d p.; )i Z ~]] r:i.

iiiCII

~

rJ)

11

... /'"1''' ..I... ....

]~

""till 01:

1G

1l

~-ggJ

~i~ CIS~CIS

rJ)rzl~

~

l:l

<

r:i.

Qj

gj ~.~

21 .. 1.. .. 20 1 1 4 1 ...1· .. 5·1 .... 81 .... 2 1 5 ... 2 .... I 3 2 ••. 21···· 331 61 61 171 .. 1.. 1..

11 1

.is

"l"

·t·

~

ClSCII

""till""

S CII

~~>t

611$ 1371 1021 451 701 641 4691$

t~~

....I:

di~ ""CIS ~~

::I 0

:gtlll

S

<

ClSC

A'"

~~

107.101$ ..... /$ .... 1$ 287.701 6.30 ..••. 1 214.201 ······1 ., .. 94.601 ...... I ..... 147.001 .. · .. ·1 · .. ··1 184.401 ..... ·1 ... .,1 984.901$ 6.301$ .... 1$

'1

l:l

cCIS

l:lS

-=::I0

~

~

<

~~

2.10 $ 107.101$ 42.00 294.001 214.201 8.40 94.50 ....... 10.50 147.001 6.30 134.401 991.201$ 69.80 $

till

S

tIlI.S 8"J .S ~ till ]O-g

CII

::I

~

=8 "Ol:l

0

8"J~ ::I ...

~ .;

CII

Col

C

lJ.

~rJ)

c

::I

)jS~

l:l~

~~§

~.S~ ~..= S

!i8"J~

~=C11 :g=-= .;~)j

0

~

~l5S

=

~

.!:! ~~

CIS

....

~

106.001$· ••.... 1$ 167.001$ 10.001$ 1.00 296.201· .. · .. ·1·· .. · . 252.001··· .. · .. \ 174.001 ....... 1 ...... 206.801··· ..... 92.001 ....... 1 ...... 94.601 .. ··· ... 1 195.001 ....... 1 ...... 136.501··· .• ·· .\ 320.001 ....... 1 ...... 128.101· ....... 1 921.901$ ........ 1$ 1,233.201$ 10.001$ 1.00

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-WM. C. MARTIN, D. D. G. M., Troy, Mo.

l·ll"!""

Troy, 34 •.•.•••.... 11 11 1 1 ... Silex, 75 ..•.....••• ... 1.. ·1 ... .1 ••. 1 • 1 New Hope, 199 ..... 1.... 1 2 11 21 1 .. New Salem, 270 ..•.. 21 31 4 .. 2 5 ... Louisville, 409 .•.•.. ···1 ... 1· .. Nineveh, 478 ..•..•. 21 21 2 1 ... Moscow, 668, , .... , . 71 7/ 7 .. '" 21 1 1 TOTAL ........ 131 161 161 01 31 121 61 61

..I.......

..'...1....

3 .... 00 2., ....

·.'I::::I::I:r 3\ .. 1. . . .

21 .. , .. , 101 .. 1.. 1..

1191$ 291 741 811 461 481

711

4681$

249.901$ ..... 1$ 00 •• 1$ 60.901 ...... 1 . . . . . 1 165.401 2.10 ..... 1 170.141 4.201 ..... 1 96.601 2.101. , ... \ 100.801 ... , .. 1 • • • • . 149.101 .... 001 ..... 1 982.801$ 8.401$ .... 1$

249.901$ 10.50 $ 60.90 ....... 157.50 ....... 174.30 10.50 98.70 100.80 ....... 4.20 149.101 991.20\$ 25.20 $

.......

'I

239.401$···· ... 1$ 60.901··· .... 157.501 .. · ..... 163.801····.·· . 98.701· .... · .. \ 100.801······· . 144.901 ........ 1 966.001$ ....... 1$

158.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 70.001 ....... 1 ... · .. 87.501 10.00 1.00 2.00 106.001 10.001 45.001 ....... 127.001 20.00 2.00 170.001 80.00 6.00 768.601$ 120.001$ 11.00

I......


r

THIRTIETH DISTRICT-EDWIN H. BARKLAGE, D. D. G. M., St. Charles, Mo.

'f'l

'!'..

Wentzville, 46 .....• 11 11 1 .. I... \... Palestine, 241. ••..• , 81101 9 MechaniC.llville, 260 .. 1 11 ... 1... 2 ... 641 ..., Pauldingville, 11 ..•. • .. 1.. ·1 .. · 1... Warrenton, 609 ..... 31 31 3 1 2 .... 1 1 TOTAL ........ 131 161 131 81 21 111 21

3 1 41

· .. ·1 .. 61 ..

....

"'41:: .... I.. 10 1.. 1.. 1..

261$ 1391 81/ 641 641 3631$

62.601$ .... '1$ ... 291.90/ .... " ..•.. 170.10 ...... / ..... 113.401 .. · ... 1 .... ·1 134.401 00 .. 001 ..... 1 762.301$ •.... 1$ ... ·1$

62.601$ ...... $ 10.60 291.901 4.20 170.101 113.401 8.40 134.40 •...... 762.301$ 23.10 $

62.601$···· ... 1$ 281.401· .•..... 1 166.901· ....... j 106.001· .... •· 134.401 ........ 789.201$ •••.... 1$

'1

46.001$ ...... 1$ ..... 447.001 40.001 4.00 89.001 10.001 1.00 63.001 •••..•. \ •••••• 85.001 ....... 1· ..... 729.001$ 60.001$ 6.00

THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT-ALBERT LINXWILER, D. D. G. M., Jefferson City, Mo.

I-' 00 <:1l

Jefferson, 43 ...•.•. , Russellville, 90 ..•... Hickory Hill, 211 ... Centertown, 611. ... Tipton, 66 .....•.... California, 183 ...... Moniteau, 295 .....• Clarksburg, 563 ..•.. Chamois, 185 .•..... Linn, 326 .....•.••.. TOTAL ........

23/ 23/ 231 7 3

L

"'j

161

2

1..', i ::: ::::1--'

11 11 1 1... 21 21 2 .. ' 1 .. ·1 .. ·1· .. 21'" 11 ... 1.. '11 1 ... 1... 1..... I... 11 11 l.I... 61 4/ 1 .. I... 381 341 311131 21

4 1

.'1" ..

14 1 41·· .... 11·· .... .. .. 1.. 1....

3 .,. 21 1 1 .... I...... 6 .... I...... 21 .. · 71·· ..•. 41'" 2 1 1 71 . . . . . . 81 .. · 2 31·· .. / .. / ...... 21 1 1 341 61 161 361· ·1· ·1··

....

4621$ 949.201$ .... '1$ ... ·1$ 949.201$ 33.60 $ 916.601$ ....... 1$ 1,661.001$ 120.001$ 19.00 3.00 130.201 ........... 1 621 130. 20 1 . . . . . . . 130.201 ........ 1 68.00 I 30.00 50.40 ....... 1.00 221 50.401 ........ Nonel .•.•... 46.201 4.201·· .•. 1 6.30 1.00 130.201 123.901 ........ 1 167.501 10.00 621 180.201 '" . "1 ·····1 4.20 100.801 4.20 ..... 1 105.001 481 191.301 ....... 1 2.00 100.801· ., ..... 1 4.20 310.801 ...... , ..... 1 310.801 68.801 247.80 1481 807.501 .. ·• .. ·/ ...... 8.40 147.001 4.20 ..... 1 151.201 142.801· ......• None I ....... 1 .....• 701 4.20 77.701 371 76.001 •...... 1 . . . . . . 77.701· .... ·1 .. · .. 1 73.601 ....... 6.30 226.801 220.501 ........ 1081 226.801 .... 1 2~~~~1 ...1~:~~1 .•.1:~~ 4.20 • ••••••• 1 304.60 308.701 808.701 ........... 1 147/ 11561$ 2,427.601$ 12.601$ .... 1$ 2,440.201$ 71.40 $ 1,816.501$ 652.301$ 3,085.301$ 170.001$ 27.00

I

'1

"1 .....

THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT-R. A. BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo. Evergreen, 27. . • . . . 11 ... I... 1.. / ••• Sullivan, 69........ 41 41 511 6 Gray Summit. 173 ...... 1... 1••• 11 .. Hope, 251. . • • . • . . .. . .. 1••. 1 1 1 . Fraternal, 868. '" .. 61 41 4.. 1 Columbia, 534.. . . . . 81 81 31 8 ••. Easter, 575......... 11 11 11 2 ... Union, 598......... 31 81 311 Hermann, 128...... 21 31 3 ..... Owensville, 624. .•.. 111 91 7 21 .•. TOTAL ........I 301 271 271111 81

II'

11 1... 4 1.. 1"1" 11 3 3 8 1.. 1 . 4 1 2 11 . 2 1 2 31 .. 1 1 .. 1... 3 4 1. . \ . . 1 . . 41... 3 .... 1. . . . 31'" 2 .. "1"1"'" 5...... 2 .... 21 21'" 11···· 3... 3 .... I.... 261 81 181 231 .. 1 11 ..

661$ 1671 751 1481 781 1011 721 93[ 1241 1261 10501~

188.601$ ..... $ .. "1$ 138. 60 1$ 350.701 12.60 363.30 167.601 1 157.60 310.801 ' " '" 1 310.801 168.801 2.10. . .• . 165.90\ 212.101 1 1 212.10 151.201 \ ....• 1 161.201 196.801 2.10 1 197.40 260.401 ...... \ 1 260.40 264.601 .. · · .. 1 1 264.601 2,205.001$ 16.801$ .. , .1$ 2,221.801$

1$ 2.10 $ 136.501$ 2.10 361.20 1 , 8.40 149.101 ..•.•••. 4.20 306.601 ......•• 2.10 163.801 \ 8.40 203.701 .. 6.30 144.901 10.50 186.901 ......•• 4.20 256.201 , . 6.80 268.30 I 54.601 $ 2.167.201$ .••.... 1$

'1

68.001$ ..... ·1$ ••.•• None 30.001 2.00 Nonel •••..•. , ...... 98.001 ••.•••...•..• 24.001 60.00 5.00 20.001 10.001 2.00 285.00 10.00 1.00 117.50 30.00/ 3.00 190.001 ....... , 8.00 195.001 30.00 ..•.•• 992.601$ 160.001$ 16.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

THIBTY-THIBD DISTRICT (A)-RALPH V. WILSON, D. D. G. Mo, St. Louis, Mo. 'U'E NA ..... AND NUMBER

I

OF LODGE

]

1 'i! 'i 1e'"~ ~

..s

Missouri, 1. ... :-:. •. Beacon, 3.......... Mount Moriah, 40... Pomegranate, 95.... Erwin, 121. .• . .. .... Occidental. 168 ~ Pyramid, 180 ....•.. Keystone, 248. .. • Aurora.267 Paul Revere, 880.... Tuscan, 860... ..... ltaska, 420......... Magnolia, 626...... Euclid,505 •........ Clifton Heights, 520. RoseHill,550 Olive Braneh, 576 •.• Triangle, 688. ... .• . Trinity,641 •.....•. Shaveh, 646. .•. .•. . Commonwealth, 664. Purity, 668......... Theo. Roosevelt. 661. University,649 TOTAL • Credit $0.30.

";! .' :l Q 0• ;0;::.

.5

~ ~ < ~

S

~~ ~S ~as Q

l! l!

::~ ~

rn

~

~~ ~~....1 rn r&l ~

l!l

.8 ~ ~

.l!l!ll '1;l,c '" s::

s:: ~

oS·..

Q

.<

A, l!l

r; ~

~~ :g bI

~-r~ ~1~ ei ~.J~ "'ll4~ ~ u 0

~

§0

e

~~ -00 ~

III

15's ~~ ~

'1;l ...a s : : l~

':

~ S

<

bI bI.S s:: Il

Q

:a ~ bI

~

0

~ ~

Q

... s:: Sl'1;l is. s::

i~

='1;l ~B s:: li::l

.S ~

~~] ~~5 ~1~ ~Q S ~=.s ~~~ ll4

~

91 6\ 5- . . 4 62 9118 41'" -·1 1 5681$ 1,192.801$ 81.70 $ $ 1,224.50 $ 180.20 $ 1,094.801$ ·· .1Nonel$ 90.00\$ 9.00 21 221 22 6 5 54 6 22 16 3 15061 8,162.601 10.50 8,178.10 118.40 3,059.701 1$ 1,794.25 100.00 17.00 12 10\ 10 4 5 100 5 25 5 1.. .. 15101 8,171.001 10.60 8,181.50 210.00 2,971.501 · .. \ 701.00 2o.OOl 2.00 8/ 8 11.. 1 7 9 9 31.... 2 5171 1,085.70 2.10..... 1,087.80 14.70 1,078.401 • 260.00 70.00 7.00 11 8/ 12 1 8 20 3 15 71...... 5281 1,098.80 27.80 89.10 1.086.50 42.00 994.50/ \ 28.00\ 60.00 6.00 1••• 1 1 14 2 12 11 ·· 2181 457.801 2.10 459.90 29.40 480.501........ 252.00 1 . 71716,,'1 44 2 11 1 3261 684.601 10.50 695.10 92.40 602.701 1 228.50\ 80.00 7.00 131 17 16.. 4 35 6 11 151...... 5631 1,182.301 6.80. .. . . 1,188.60 78.50 1,115.101 1 1,880.00 120.001 18.00 121 91 9 .. 4 181 8 6 2 "1"1" 8131 667.301 21.00 678.80 87.80 640.5QI 1 644.001 70.00 8.00 91 10 10.. 3 41 4 4 6 1.. .. .. 2081 486.80 4.20..... 441.00 8.40 482.601........ 380.00 50.00 8.00 71 61 6 3 4 361 101 17 5\ .... 1 9811 1,955.10 8.40 1 1,968.50 75.60 1,887.90\........ Nonel 40.00 4.00 6/ 61 6..... 321 4 9 6...... 3931 825.30 1 825.80 67.20 758.101........ 519.00 20.00 6.00 111 161 14\ 3 51 231 3\ 151 51.... 1 8771 1,841.70\ 8.40 1 1,850.10 48.80 1,801.801 .....•.. 1 544.00 70.00 9.00 10115116 2 2 41 1 61 21 .. 1•• 1•• 3671 770.701 4.20 , 774.90 8.40 766.601 1 None 60.00 9.00 61 51 6/"1"'1121 1 61 I.. j •••• 5201 1,092.001 1,092.00 25.20 1,066.801........ 488.00 80.00 6.00 121 61 55 3 181 4 91 71 .. 1 4951 1,089.601 6.80 1,045.80 27.80 1,018.501 ...••••• 154.00 90.00 9.00 41 41 4/41 5 501 1 8 .... 1 2 4891 921.901 10.601 1 982.401 105.00 827.401........ 281.00 30.001 8.00 7/ 6 5 1 2 61 4 2 21..... . 2811 485.101 2.10 1 487.20 12.60 474.601. .. . . •• . 816.00 20.00 7.00 10\101 91"\ 91 17 1 3 4 17\ .. ( .. 1 270\ 667.00\ 18.901 •.... 1 686.901 86.70 660.201........ 60.00 80.001 6.00 81 81 4.. 2 11.. . 1 91..... . 26%1 529.201 4.20 1 688.40 23.l0 510.801. . . .. . . . 472.00 20.00/ 2.00 61 81 91..... 21 2 11 21··.... 1491 312.901··· · .. 1 812.901 44.10 268.801 \ 396.001 80.00 4.00 61 61 6 1... 8 3 2 8/...... 2011 422.101 6.80 / 428.40 16.80 411.601 1 282.00 40.00 4.00 21 21 2 1 1 10 5 8 2 •. .. •. 1881 279.80 2.101 .. " . 281.40 21.00 260.401 1 96.00 20.00 2.00 61 41 8 81 118! 21 41 1\ .. 1. 801\ 632.10\ 1 1 682.101 27.80 604.801 1 400.001 80.001 6.00 1981198/1961841 641 6141 9812001 1211 11 .. 112 11,8111$24,808.101$197.601$89.101$24,911.601$1289.40 $23,622.501$ 1$ 9,665.751$1140.001$153.00

.1..


r

THIBTY-THIRD DISTRICT (B)-REX E. DEWHIBST, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo.

1'

Meridian, 2 •••.•••.• 4\ 61 51· ·1 1 32 3 5 None $ 40.00\$ 4.00 31· . .... 6811$ ,,220. ,0 2.10' ••. 1,222.20' 67.20 $ 1,155.001$ •..•••• Geo. Washington, 9. 70.00 7.00 89.90 6 .. 8 19 1 11 6401 1,344.00 6.30. . . . . 1,350.80 41·· .. 2 1,310.4~1······· • $ 1,244.00 8 .. 1 .. 8 18 4 8 37.80 St. Louie, 20 ........ 11 101 7 •. 5051 1,060.50 6.80. . • . . 1,066.80 1,029.00 ........ 210.00 50.00 5.00 5 5 .. .. Naphtali, 25 ...•.••• 7 .. 64.60 8 26 .•. 3441 722.401 6.80..... 728.70 None 674.101 ... · .... 5 .. 8 15 Polar Star, 79 .....• 8 .. 4 26 54.60 1,606.501 ........ 612.00 50.00 6.00 61 81 7871 "'52.701 ......... 1 l,<'LiO Pride of the West,179 12 11110 1 ••• 7 1 6 2 .• .. 2 14.70 456.00 90.00 11.00 8921 828.20 ...... 1 ..... 828.20 808.501 ••.... · . 789 Good Hope, 218 ••••. 83.60 2,072.701 •••••.•. 16 2 8 11 .. " 2 1003/ 2.106.80 ...... / ..... 1 2,106.30 7.00 132.00 70.00 8 41 4 •. 52.50 Cosm08, 282 .....•.. 25 4 6 19 .. 3.00 1,0~.00 80.00 835.801 ........ 4181 877.80 10.50 ... 888.80 4 4 8 2 15 27 8 5 12 .• " 1 Cornerstone, 828 ..•. 85.70 8.00 5041 1,058.401 81.501..... 1,089.90 1,054.201 ........ 176.90 30.00 8 11 11 1 America, 347 ....... 12.60 6 2 2 4.00 548.901 ....••.. 704.00 40.00 2651 556.50/ •..... ..... 556.50 6 8 8 1 2 Cache, 416 ......•.. 6 .. 8 4 7 710 1,491.00 4.20 ..... 1 1,496.20 16.80 1,478.401 ......•• 3.00 263.50 80.00 Anchor, 448 ........ 201 24 21 2 25.20 12 2 12 5 .. 980.701 ........ 477.50 80.00 11.00 4791 1,005.901 ........... \ 1,005.90 West Gate, 445 .•••• 1,227.90 5 26 1 9 20 " 64.60 1,178.801 ........ 1,095.00 50.00 5.00 5801 1,218.001 9.90 •. ... 41 1 1 .. Harmony, 499 ...... 4 1 2 16 8 8 .. 1 2.00 616.80 38.60 248.00 2921 618.20 2.10 ..... 581.701 .. ·· .... , 20.001 241 541 7 •. Apollo, 529 ......... 424.20 6.30 8 1 2 7 .• 4.00 417.901 ........ 8 70.00 10.00 2021 424.201.· .. · .\ ..... Algabil, 544 .....•.. 61 11 7 2 4 9 1 5 1 .. 655.20 18.90 6.00 686.801 ....••.. 8081 646.801 8.40 ..... 225.00 60.00 Forest Park, 578 .... 2 448.10 8.40 30.00 3.00 81 21 8 .. 8 9 1 .• 484.701 ........ 352.50 2091 438.901 4. 20 1" ···1 Lambskin, 460 ...... 181 10\15 1 2 80 6 16 27 .•.. 1 68.00 1,482.201 ... " ... / 890.00 18o.00l 13.00 711/ 1,493.10 2.10 ..... / 1,495.20 Tower Grove, 631 ... 91 16 14 2 1 5 6 5 8 •• 798.80 10.50 793.801 ........... 208.00 80.00 9.00 8781 788.801 ...... ',' Mizpah, 639 ........ 151 161 16 1 2 .... None 15.00 1 2 .... 1,176.001 ........ 1 5581 <.201 .....1 1,176.00 ...... Benj. Franklin, 642. .. 6 7 .•• 6 12 .. 718.20 14.70 6.00 3861 705.60 12.601 ...•. 703.501 ........ 1 2,004.00 150.001 60.00 71 6 81 56 Pilgrim, 652 ........ 6 18 2 ... 3 .. 37.80 6.00 445.20 118.00 60.00 2081 486.80 8.401' .... 407.401 ... " .. Progress, 657 ....... 111 10 11 4 ... 2 8 •• 2211 464.101 •..... . .... 16.00 100.00 11.00 8.40 455.701 ........ 464.101 TOTAL ........ 166119311881181 661 3441 5311481 1711 .. 1 11 9 10,6811$22,325.101$127.501$ .... 1$22,452.601$ 701.40 $21,751.201$ .....•. 1$10,517.401$1880.001$144.00

.. ~I :

.. ....

"... ..."

.0

"'r

...

....

00 ~

"

..

"I

••

. ...

!

l' ....

.. .. ...... .. .. .. ..

"

.0

••

.............

.

,,171.80/

'1

THIBTY-FOUBTH DISTBICT-WM. C. DEACON, D. D. G. M., Ha.rrisonville, Mo. Index,54 •• ~ .••...-.. 11111 C8B8, 147. . . • . . . . • . . 2 3 3 GrandRiver,276 .... 4 5 4 Wadesburg, 848 ••••..•• / Nonpareil, 872 •.....•..•... " tDayton, 886 .•.•.•..•.•.. 1 Belton, 450....... .. 41 61 8

451$ 94.501$ ..... 1$ .... \$- 94.501$ ·· . 1211 254.101 6.801... •. 260.40 .. 671 140.701 2.101" .. . 142.80 181 37.80........ ... 37.80 .. , •• 251 52.50........... 52.50 , .. .. • .. 1 1 2 4 .. 1061 222.601 10.501 238.10 1841 281.40 •..... ,. . . . . 281.40 Jewel, 480.......... 71 .•.•............ 1 41·· .. Coldwater, 485...... "21111 4 4..2...1 581 121.80.. .. 1 121.801 Archie, 688.. . . . .... ... ... ... .. ... 4 4 .. 871 77. 70 1 / 77.701 Cleveland, 651. • . . . . 1 1 1 1... 1 .•.. . . 261 54.60 1 64.60 TOTAL ......../ 181 211 221 81 111-291 61 14/ 271 .. 1001 .. 6371$ 1,387.701$ 18.901$ .... 1$ 1,856.601$

tNo report received.

1"'11 8 1 1 " 1 1 , 1 5

2 ... 4 ••. 4 2 2 1

1 .... 1 4 3 2 2 1 8 1 4 / 1 6

"I' '1·'

.1 '1

.

4.20 $ 90.801$ $ 8,40 252.001.. .. . 8.40 184.401. .. .. .. . 88.60 4.20 .•...... 1 5.26 47.251. . • • . . . • ....

• •• 1

4.20 228.901........ 14.70 266.70 I.. .. .. .. 2.10 119.701. . . .. .• . 8.40 69.801. .. .. •• . 2.10 52.601.. .. . . .. 61.95i$ 1,261.051$ 88.601$

200.00 $ 1$ ..... 70.00 \ 2.00 7.60 20.00 3.00 None •...••. 1 •..... None .•.•••• / .. ..

None ~'001""" 485.00 10.00 1.00 116.00 20.00 4.00 12.00 • 00 1 ...... 66.00 1.00 955.601$ 70.001$ 11.00


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-DUDLEY O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo. "d

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

....

00

00

]

] ]

]

"d

."

ell

~

ell

.;

~

:s Hume, 130 .....•.•• Amsterdam, 141. .•. Butler, 254 ..•...... Rockville, 341 ....... Tyrian, 360 ......... Crescent Hill, 368 ... Rich Hill, 479 ....... Foster, 554 ......... TOTAL ........

A d

2l

~

.~

ell ~

.!!! ~ - '4jc: IE

<

~

~ ·Sell ~ l=l

~

~

.1!:

)i

Z ;:i]]

~

Po

00

>< ell oor.:l~

~

ell

l=l

&l

Po

gj

Qj

Q, ....

···I···'·'1·I·r" ..

11 21 11 2l·1 31 .. 1...3\···1·· 1.............. 1--\ .... 11 11

21 21

2 1\ 4..

.. ·1·· ·1.· .1 .. 21 11

6 8

81 6 8 1\......

1

11····· ·1··· ·1· ·1· ·1··

21 212 11 .... 1.. · 2 11 1\.. 1 21 131 11 11 21 21 11... 1 ... ... 91 121 141 41 201 241 61' 61

... 1

91· 1\ . . . . . .

41 .. 1.. 1.. 9\"1"\" 5/ .. 001 .. 281001 .. 1..

~

ell .0

S ell

)1

",till ol::l

]~

111 ell "'till'"

~:a

~~rl

t']~

111 ell 111 ell '" ell

l=l

<

~

~

t~~

~~

'" 111

I

~~~] I 11ll::l

Q,'"

0

~

."

l::l

:' 0

S

<

"iii~ "'5l=l Eo<

""

::s~~ ... l=lS <nell

~~ ..::l

till

::s l=l

::s

c: lIS "iii

~

...c: 0

E

<

tIII.S ~

ell

'iii

.5 ~ till ]0"8 !l gj..::l

ell

()

~~2

0

l:Q

631$ 132.301$ 10.501$ ... '1$ 142.801$ ...... $ 142.801$.· ..... 1$ 76.60 ....... 76.601 ........... 36: 76.601·.·· .... 1 16.80 1211 264.101 10.501 ...•• 1 264.601 247.801· ...... 2.10 47\ 98.70\ 16.80\ ..... \ 115.50\ 113.401 .. ·· .... 56.701 ....... 54.601 2.10 ..... 1 56.701· ....... 1 261 197.401 ....... 931 195.301 2·l()1 ..... 1 197.401· .... ·· .1 27.30 205.80\ 96\ 201.60\ 4.20\ ..... \ 125.00\ 53.601 2.10 721 151.201 ........... 1 151.201 149.101 .. · ..... 5641$ 1,163.401$ 46.201$ .... 1$ 1,209.601$ 48.30 $ 1,107.801$ 53.601$

'j

r..

()d

'a000~'"c: :(jell&:

)1

S •

::!='i: 111 ....

136.601$

~

1:."

ell~l::l::s

till

...

"'I:r...

~

t'..c: Ei ell 'iii~~

.,,:l ~

10.001$

1.00

1~~~~1

...1.0:~~1 ...1:~~ Nonel 10.001 1.00 45.001 ....... 1 ...... 184.301 .. · .... 1 ...... 1.00 10.00[ 150.001 1.00 42.061 10.001 697.851$ 50.001$ 6.00

THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOLLY P. HURTT, D. D. G. M., SedaUa, Mo. Cole Camp, 596 ..•.. 11 11 '1".1···1 2°1 11·· ·1· ·1· ·1·· Shawnee, 663 ....... 21 21 2 11··· 1··.1··· 11 .. I.r Knobnoster, 246 .... 11 11 1 .. 1· ...... 1 31 .. 1.... Holden, 262 ....••.. 21 2 ... 1\1 7 1 31 26 1.. 1.... Corinthian, 265 ..... 6/ 6 1 6 1 2... 5\ 4 5 81 .. 1.... Cold Spring, 274 .... 21 21 21..... 4 1 1 61 .. 1.... Chilhowee, 487 .....• .. :1 ... 1... 11 ... 36 1... 11 21 .. 1. Sedalia, 236 ........ 101 10/ 71 .. \... 29 2 9 21. Granite, 272 .....•.. 71 81 7 2 2 81 2 21 181 . . . . . . Green Ridge, 426 .... 11 11 1\ 1... 11· ..... 1.... 1.. 1.. 1.. La Monte, 674 ...... ... 1... 1... 1.. 1 1· .. ·1 1 11 .... 1.. 1.. 1.. TOTAL ........ 31/ 331 271 81 41 1111 12/ 231 651· .1. ·1··

I...

'I' .1.. 'I' .

Nonel$ ...... 1$ ·1.00 88.201$ 42.00 $ 421$ 46.201$ ....... [ 88.2°1$ .... ·1$ 170.10[ 2.10 170.10 ........... 1 811 10.00\ 1.00 168.001 .... · ... $ 471.33[ 65.101 ....... 55.001 ....... 1.00 311 66.101 .... ·· ..... 1 66.101· .. ··•· .1 14.70 1171 245.701 2.10 ..... 1 247.801 44.001 .. • .... I ...... 233.101· .. · .... 1 10.60 315.001 80.001 3.00 1821 382.201 371.701· ....... 1 382.201 .... "1 ·····1 8.40 132.301 ......•.... 1 132.301 123.901 .. · ..... 1 631 15.001· .. · .. ·1 ...... 75.60 130.201 ........ 1 1,230.001 ....... 1 •••••• 205.801 981 206.801 ...... \ ..... 1 50.001 6.00 60.90 4111 863.101 ........... 1 863.101 802.201· ....... 1 1,412.001 460.001 40.001 4.00 16.80 3231 678.301 665.701· .. · .... I 4.201 ..... 1 682. 50 1 2.10 245.821 ...... ·1 ...... 86.10 84.001· ....... 1 41/ 86.101 ...... I .. · .. 1 147.001 ...... ·1 ...... 401 84.001 ...... 1· .... I 84.001· .. · .... I 84.001 .. ·· ... 1,4291$ 3,000.901$ 6.301$ .... 1$ 3,007.201$ 233.10 $ 2,774.101$ ....... 1$ 4,386.151$ 130.001$ 16.00


THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-THORNTON JENNINGS, D. D. G. M., Olinton, Mo.

. .+: ........

Windsor, 29 .•••.••. 41 ... \ 1 2 11 81· • 61 41 4 •••• , 10 2 1 Urich, 286 .•••.•••• Agricola, 343 ....... :: ::: "2i "21"i Montrose, 408 ...... 6 8 11 4 2 Clinton, 648 ..••.... ..•• , 2 ...... Calhoun, 562 ....... 9 .. Blairstown, 557 ..... .. ·/· .. 1··· 1 ....... '" 1 Deepwater, 562 ..... · .. 1· .. 1.. · .. ... .... 1 1 1 .... I·· .... St. Clair, 273 .....•. 31 21 2 4 1 1 .. ··1 . . . . . . Circle, 842 ..•....... 11 1 1 .. 2 Lowry City, 403 ..... 71 91 7 2 4 .... 2 1 ····1 ...... Appleton City, 412 .. 1 .. \ 1 1 •• , .. ~ Star, 419 ........•.. ·• .. 1. . . . . . 00 (0 TOTAL ........ 281 171 15/161 171 581 211 141 231 .. 1.. 1..

::il·· ~I·· ~

... y

.~~I .. ~I .. ~

·.. l·~

.. l.~\ .. ~

... ~\

:

.... 1··1 ....

212.1.1$.· ....

T

106\$ 222.60\$ 2.10\$ .. , . $ 224.701$ 12.60 $ 80.001$ 40.001$ 4.00 21.00 94.501 451 94.501 ...... / ..... , ••.••1 ....... 73.501······· . 46.201 •.•........ 46.201 ....... • ••••••• 1 22.50 ••.•••. 1 •••••• 46.20 22/ 94.601 44.10 94.501 ...... I ..... 451 60.401··· ..... None .••.... \ 1.00 23.10 600.00 100.00 •.••.. 1691 333.901 16.801 ..... 360.701 327.601· .. •• ... 1 4.20 92.401 441 207.001 ....... , ...... 88.201····· ••• 1 92.401·· .. · .1 ..... 1 52.501 •.....•...• 1 52.501 ....... 261 Nonel·· ...•...•... 52.501··· ... 296.001 ............. 641 134.40\ .•..... ........ 1 134.40 134.401·· .... 1'·· .. ·1 270.90 14.70 2.00 1281 455.801 2.10 1 • • • • • 268.801 256.201· ., .... 10.001 79.701 ....... 10.00 1.00 351 128.001 79.701····· .•. 7.00 176.401 10.50 •.... 841 183.001 70.001 186.901····· ... I 186. 90 191.101 2.10 •.... 193.20 2.10 911 81.901 10.001' ..... 191.101····· •• 69.301 ....... 30.001 ••..•.....••. 331 69.801 .... •· ..... 69.301····· ... 8811$ 1,860.101$ 39.801$ . " .1$ 1,889.901$ 121.80 $ 1,587.601$ 180.601$ 2,184.201$ 240.001$ 15.00

1......

"I

7•.6.1 6.2.1 .....

r

'1

1'" ....

'j

THmTY·EIGHTH DISTRICT-OREN SIMPSON, D. D. G. M., Richland, Mo.

lOll"i ... ~ 00;1 ~

Linn Creek, 162 ..... Mack's Creek, 438 ... 41 141 Laclede, 88 ...•..••. '2il'i91'i9'i Competition, 482 .... ... 1· .. 1... •• . " Conway, 528 .•...... Waynesville, 875 ..•. 11 1 1.. 2 Richland, 385 •••.... 61 6 8 •.•.. Brumley, 203 .••.••. \ , Iberia, 410 ••••••... 7 81 8 1 1 TOTAL ........ 421 681 501 41 71

41 61 6.. 1

... ..........

19 ., ~ .. ~

"f;

2...

3

,g1 1 1 61... 2 401 51 141

8 8 12 2 8 2

....

1

6 311 .. 1.. 1 1

180.6"1'

0$

174.801$· •..... 1$ 861$ 180. 6°1$ ..... \$ ... 6•• 75 167.50 •...... 157.601· .... · .. , 1 ..... 182 277.20 ........... 277.20 10.50 266.701 .. ·.·•· . 62 1 130.20 21.00 130.201 ......•.... 1 109.201·····.· • 4.20 117.601 2.10 ..... 1 119.701 661 115.601····· ... 1 6.30 170.101 791 165.901 4.201 ..... 1 1261 248.601··· ..... 264. 60 ·1 · .. ··1 264. 60 1 21.00 2.10 77.70 371 77.70 ...... \ ..... 1 75.601· .. ·• ... 153.30 12.60 163.80 ...... . .... 1 731 140.701····· ... 7261$ 1,524.601$ 6.801$ •.•. 1$ 1,53Q.901$ 84.00 $ 1,446.901$.·· •... 1$

167.6•......

1' ....

..····1·····.· '1

~i:~~I$ .. 40:..16•••:"

278.16 130.00 14.00 81.00 •......•..•.. 4.00 102.00 20.00 2.00 149.10 20.00 2.00 171.00 ....... 120.00 . 70.00 7.00 990.171$ 290.001$ 82.00

Nonel'····


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THmTY-NINTH DISTRICT-eHARLES L. WOODS, D. D. G. M., Rolla, Mo. NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

] 111

] ]

'i 'i ::::111 .srJ .;

:9 Po.! ~

IE

'Qj

~

o

c:l d

·s

·s~

~ ~

::s

QI

.!l

)i ~]] Qi ~ Ii Ii !§ Po ....

~

~111 QI

z gj rn

><

QI

f

~ El QI

'8~ I1IQl

""liIl"" t''gf

~..::l~

eLf "" 111

""liIl .s.S

f'i

Po.:::

f

111 all1l QI "" QI

tPo.~

~liIl 111= Po·..

~]

.... ::s0= El <QI

-::s

~t:l

'tl

'tl .;

~~

Po.

t:l

t:lEl

::s=

c 'i

:s:~

~~

.... 0

El

liIl liIl.E rl .S ~ liIl

QI

::s

0

] ;~ ~::sS ::st:l

'0

QI

Col

111

.~ ~'tl = Po = ~rn ::s

~Sr; ~~~ 111 ....

='tl

t~§

~.Sr...

t'..c::

S

'tl:lQl

.;~~ Po.

t:l t:l P:: < P:: rnlZlP:: I:Q ~ 0 Po. t:l ~ ..::l 0 < < 4.20$ 128.901 $ ....... $ 141.001$ ..... '1$ ..... 2 Vienna, 94 .....•... 611$ 128. 10 1$ •... '1$ ... '1$ 128. 10 1$ 21·· . 41 41 4/ .. .. ·1 31 3 403.20 6.30 ..... 409.60 16.80 Lebanon. 77 ....•... 101 111 12 1 1921 892.701· ...... 31·· .... 26.701 40.00 4.00 126.00 20.00 7.00 1 Cuba, 812 .•..•..... 1471 71 71 6 •. 61 .. . ... 300.301····· .. 308.701 2. 10 1 810.801 10.'0 626.90 80.001 6.00 407.40 10.60 Salem, 226 ......... 1 .... I.. . ... 1941 407.401 ........... 1 396.901· " .... 71 71 6 .. 6 '" .... 601 106.00j ...... 1 ..... / 106.00 ....... 1 Lane's Prairie, 631. . ... / 11 3 .. ... .... 106.001· ...... 10.00 ....... 460.001 70.00 7.00 2 6 61 ....7 ' .. 866.80 4.20 862.601· ...... Rolla, 213 .....•...• 4041 848.401 8.401 ..... 81 91 10 2 4 60.001 20.00 2.00 4.20 1 1091 St. James, 280 ...... 2 ... 11 . . . . . . 228.901 224.701.· ..... 21 21 8 2 228.901 ...... I ..... \ 1 Equality. 497 ....... 691 144.901 26.201 •.... 170.101· ...... 41 41 4 100.001 30.001· ..... 170.,0\ ....... 42.00 •...... 1 ...... 1 4 Arlington. 846 ...... .. ·1 .. ·1 .. · 142.80 2.10 4 .. 1.... 140.701· ...... 681 142.801 ...... I ..... I Latimer, 146 ..•.... 1 222.60 ....... 266.761 1041 218.401 11 11 ... 222.601· ...... 4.201 .. ·· .1 80.001'" '" 1 60.00 ...... Nonel Belle. 878 ........... 186.90 2.10 2 861 180.601 6.301 ..... 1 184.801· ...... 61 61 6 81·· " .. TOTAL ........ 481 611 621 71 181 261 171 141 831 .. 1.. 1.. 1,4841$ 3.116.401$ 62.601$ .... 1$ 3.168.901$ 64.60 $ 8.114.301$ ....... 1$ 1.747.361$ 290.001$ 26.00 t:l

..~I

....

~

~I" 2

...

::1 .. ~

il i "'il

.'1" ..

1' ....

·"l·l.... "I" ..

l......

I

FORTIETH DISTRICT-HARRY H. BALSIGER, D. D. G. M., Crystal City, Mo. DeSoto. 119.... ..... Joachim. 164 .••. '" Shekinah.266 Herculaneum. 838 Tyro.12 ..••.•...... Potosi. 181. .. .. Irondale, 148 .,. Belgrade. 632....... Blackwell. 686 TOTAL

41 31 81"\ 21 61 2 6 71 1 \.... 81 3\ 8.. 1 2 1 .. 9111 11 4 2 1 6 1 41 41 4 8... 1... .. .. 1.. \.... 11 1 1 ..... 4... 21 . . . . . . 21 81 3 2... 1 1 21 21........ 1 ... 1 71...... 71 61 2............ 1 ...... 1 11 1..... 11... 1 1 .. .. .. 321 33128191 3! 171 61 161 17121 .. 1..

"I" .. I....

2311$ 486.101$···· ·1$ ·1$ 485.101$ 12.60 $ 472.601$· ·1$ 346.001$ 30.001$ 8.00 911 191.101 2.101 1 193.201 4.20 189.001 1 72.00 10.001 8.00 2271 476.70 1 1 476.701 4.20 472.601 1 419.601 60.001 6.00 1 681 142.801 1 142.801 2.1Q 140.701........ 100.00 30.001 .. · .. · 671 119.701 1 1 119.701 8.40 111.801 1 178.07 10.001 1.00 1021 214.201 .•.... 1 • • • • • j 214.201· . . . . . . 214.201 1 320.001 10.001· . 661 138.601 .. · .. ·1 1 138.601 2.10 186.601 · 1 276.001 20.001 2.00 271 66.701 · .. 1 1 66.70/ .... ... 66.701 1 40.001 10.00 2.00 431 90.301 I 1 90.30 2.10 88.201 1 24.001 ...... ·1 ...... 9121$ 1,916.201$ 2.101$ 1$ 1,917.301$ 36.70 $ 1.881.601$ 1$ 1.773.671$ 180.001$ 17.00


FORTY-FIRST DISTRICT-MORRIS E. EWING, D. D. G. 114., Morrisville, Mo.

II""

'"\"l'

Riddick, 361 .••..... 1 ··.[.··1 21 Western Light, 396 .. ... 1... 1 11'"\""1 1... . . 21 1 2 1061·· .... Urbana, 421. ••..... 31111 ···.1·· Hogle's Creek, 279 .. •••311.. 31 "\" . . . . . . . \ 41 .. · 4 2[ ...•.. 11 1. .. .. 1 4 ., . 1 2 .. 1.... Hermitage, 288 ..... Fair Play, 44 ....... . ··1·· .1 . 1 1 .... Modern, 144 ........ 21 11 2 1 3 11 7 ...•.. Pleasant, 160 .....•. 1···1····1··· 1 Bolivar, 193 ........ ···1···1··· 41 41 4 11··· \ 11 1 21 9. ·1·· .. Pleasant Hope. 467 .. 41 31 31 .. 1. . . 1 ... 2 ..... ·1·· .. Aldrich, 664 ........ 11 11 11 .. 1... ....... 1 .... \ .. 1.· .. TOTAL ........ 151 131 141 31 41 151 61 171 40j .. 1. ·1··

·ll··I·t· . l'\.1. .... /.1 ... ·t·I..

'···r

98.701$ 471$ 4.20 $ ........ 1$ 94.Mj NOne\$ 10.001$ 1.00 98.701$ ..... \$ .. "1$ 75.601 ........... 75.60 4.20 361 71.401· ....... $ 100.00 •...... 1 '" ... 119.70 ....... 113.401 6.30 •.... 541 119.701· ....... 1 151.20 8.40 •• 142.801 ••..•... 1 711 149.101 2.101· ..•. 1 128.10 126.00 2.10 I ••••• , 8.40 601 15.00\ •...... 1 ...... 119.701· ....... \ 88.20 ....... 124.00 •...... 1 ...... 421 88·21>1 ...... 1 ..... 88.201· ..... · . 2.10 721 151.201 155.401 153.301· .... ·· .\ 4.201 .. ·· .1 46.201 ....... 221 46.201· .... ·· .1 •. 46.201 ...... 1 ·····1 2.10 1341 281.401 765.001 ............. 279.301· ...... 281.40 ······1 .· .. ·1 111.301 ...... , ..... 1 531 55.25 1 ....... \ ...... 109.201· .... ·· . 111.30\ 2.10 58.80 ....... 58.801 ....... · ... 1 58.801 ........ 1 48.00 10.00! 1.00 281 6191$ 1,299.901$ 14.701$ .... 1$ 1,314.601$ 31.50 $ 1,188.601$ 94.501$ 1,397.101$ 70.001$ 7.00

1~~~~1 ~~:~~l " ~:~~

'1

.

1~~~:1 ~~:~~I' ~:~~

FORTY-SEOOND DISTRIOT-MARK D. GWINN, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo.

'1···ll·t"l""··

Stockton, 283 ....... 2 Jerusalem, 315 ...... ...'I1...'I\ . . . . . . . .11 5 ... 2 5 ...... Clintonville, 482 .... 11 2 4 2 2 61··· 1 .. 001" .... Washington, 87 ..... 11· .. I.. · 2 1 .... 1 21 6 3 . ·1·· .. (0 ""'" Garrett, 369 ........ 31 11 1..... 3 .... " 4 .. I.... 406 •.•..... ... 1... 1 4 .. 1... 1 7 11 1 41 .. 1.... ""'" Everton. Melville, 468 ........ 31 31 2 .. , ....... /... 1 91. Lockwood, 621 ...... .. ·1.· ·1··· 2·.·1 1 .. ·1··· 21······ TOTAL ........ 12\ 10\ 16\ 8\ 4\ 26\ 31 13\ 27\ .. \ .. \ ..

'1

'1" ..

Osage, 303 ......... Sheldon. 371. ••..... Schell City, 448 ..... Montevallo, 490 ..... Vernon, 493 •••.. , , . Unity, 496 ......•..• Walker. 606 .•••..•• Hermon. 187 .••.••• Lamar, 292 ..•••.... Signal. 304 •..•....• Golden, 476. , ••. , ••. Milford, 616 ..•...•• TOTAL ........

61 11 11

·1 ·1 .. ·..

195.301$ ....... 1$ 268.001$ 40.001$ •.... 27.001 •...... 1 ...... 63.001· ..... · .1 46.00 10.001 1.00 172.201· .... ·· .1 266.001 10.001 ...... 214.201· ....... 1 3.00 76.001 79.801 ........ 1 30.001 84.001· ...•• · .1 180.001 ....... 116.001 40.00 4.{)0 116.601· ....... 1 60.001 ....... 1 ...... 71.401· ....... 1 996.401$ ....... 1$ 1.016.001$ 130.001$ 8.00

I.... 00

FORTY-THIRD DISTRIOT-DAVID V. MORRIS, D. D. <I. M., Nevada, Mo. 6 2 2581$ 641.801$ ..... 1$ .... 1$ 641.801$ 27.30 $ 514.601$ ....... 1$ ~I 2 61"\" 1 ••.. 6.30 741 ~\.. ~l 149. 10 1. . . . . . . . 1 165.40 1 166.401 ,., •.. " , ... \ 1 86.10 4.20 81.901. .• . . . . . 401 21··1 .... 1 84.{)01 2.10 .... 1[ 2 .. 11 1 ..·1 ....... 68.801 ........... 58.801 ....... 21 .. 1.... 281 68.801 ........ 1

I:\.. tl.1 1 1 ... ....I."\" ... ···1··· ... .. ••. '"''''1''' 2 ...... ·· .. 1. . . . . . 61 61 6 1... 61 11 11

8.40 $ 961$ 201.601$ 2.101$ .... 1$ 203.7{)1$ 10.60 73.501 351 73.50\ ......•.... 1 861 178.50 4.20\ •.... 1 182.7°1 10.50 214.20 ....... 1011 212.101 2.10 ..... 1 86.H) 6.30 41/ 86.101 .... ··1 .... 98.70 14.70 98.701 .•.... 1 ••.•. 471 116.501 ....... 661 116.601 · .... 1 2.10 73.501 ........... 1 73.601 361 496\$ 1,039.601$ 8.40\$ .... 1$ 1,047.901$ 62.60 $

.. ·/ .. ·1 ...

.. 31 31 3 .. ... / ... / ... 1

' '1::' il.. :l..~

..

1 ,

1 9

... 1.. ·

2 181 171 191 61 201

1 ...... 1 .,. 1 2 ... 1 4 1

301

61 111

10 .. 1....

9·r··

6 ...... 13 . . . . . . 1 ...... 21 .. 1. . . . 611 .. 1.. 1 2

427.431$ 60.001$ 5.00 260.00 ....... 1 . . . . . . 66.00. • .• • . . 1.00 56.00 ............. 2.10 • .....•. \ 48.30 ••...••..•...... \ ...••• 50.401 ...... \ ..... 241 50.40\ 320.00 4.20 132.301 631 132.301 ...... 1 128.101·· ... ·· 46.00 2.10 63.001 2.10 ...•. 66.101 301 63.{)01· .•.. · .. 40.00 30.00 3.00 2.10 391 79.801· ..•..•. 81.901 81.90 1 . . . . . . . . . " 4.20 100.00 961 197.401· ..•• · •. 199.60 2.10 •.... 1 201. 60 1 None 68.801 18.90 •••.. 77.70 8.40 281 69.301· ....... \ 138.60 2.10 None •.••.. , 1.00 661 136.501· .... • .. 138.601.··· ....... 36.00 ...•... 1.00 60.401 4.20 •.•.• 64.601 ....... 64.601 ........ 241 7691$ 1,614.901$ 29.401$ ..•• 1$ 1,644.301$ 63.00 $ 1,633.001$ 48.301$ 1.329.431$ 100.001$ 16.00

'1

I·....

.1

. ~~:~~I ...6:~~

·······1······

.............


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FORTY-FOURTH DISTBICT-GEO. Dn.LABD, D. D. G. M., Joplin, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER

I

OF LODGE

] '9.

~

~

~ ~

e]

Z

~

.~

..c:

'i 'i

.! ~~ 'i! 'i.5 lis'sj ~::s ~~ -!~ Po~ PoI~I~ ~ ~ .~ oS Il<~-<~ tIlril~ ~ Cl

Carthage. 197.'-:~.. Sarcoxie. 293 ...•. " Joplin. 835......... Fellowship. 345..... Jasper.898 Carterville.401 Mineral. 471........ Webb City. 512..... .... Carl Junction. 549 co Criterion. 586 , La Russell. 592. . . .. TOTAL ........

ci 0

~

ClCl

til

is

'"

oS .S

I'.:l ~

is

Cl

-<

f ~ '" ~ ~.::l>t

~

"I" ..

. 'I '1 l· ,

1is~ '"

l::1l<>t

2651$ 556.501$ 41 71 71 31 1 7\ 81 S 10\ .. , .• , .. 751 157.501· ... 1•.. 1.. 8 .. 4831 1,014.301 61 61 5 3 10 23 2 10 19 •. 5441 l,142.4QI 91 81 81 2\ 7 6 1 14 21··· '1" 616161 .. 1 .... 1 1 51 .. 551 115.501 1111 288.101 3111 11 .. 15 16 2 2 14 3 561 117.601 31 21 2111 2 2 ... 2 .. 151 151 15 11 5 22 2 5 1 .. " 2171 455.701 721 151.201 1... 1... "1 4 31 21 2 21 .... 31 21 1. . 1 15 1 1 •.•..... 461 96.601 .·.1.· .1 ... 1.. 1. .. •... 2. .. • •.. 1.. 1.. 161 33.601 491471451101361 941 161401 611 .. \ .. 13 1.9401$ 4.074.001$

'1' '1'" .... ... ...

till

~~

~. is

l:4 ~

~ I:

1l<::S og >t 0 'iii

.~

~]

E''i

-

~ ::s

6i

0

~

..:l

~ Cl

QI

QI

~Cl

~~

:g

QI

Il<

Cl

till till I:

GII::S

"=

e::s

I::

~

:a1::'"~ till~ ; ~~ ... ::s.::l

~

0

~

-<

~Cl.s

Cl • 1r._ i3.... 0 til §

S=og

QlB

... I:

I::

liiI::s

~ I:: r.z.

~ El0'"r; ~ ~GIl S QI

~=oS

~~~

Il<

Il<

I·..·..

2. 10 1$ .... 1$ 558.601$ 14.10 $ 544.501$ •....• '1$ 100.QOI$ 10.001$ 1.00 .... '1 .. · .. 1 157.50....... 157.501... ..... 432.00\ ....... 21.00 •.... 1.085.80 48.30 987.001 ....•... 1 400.00 50.00 6.00 14.701 .. "'1 1.157.10 12.60 1.144.501 .•.. , .• ·1 600.001 90.00 9.00 2.101 ..... 117.601 ........ 117.601 1 133.351 30.00 6.00 1 ••••• 1 238.10 33.60 199.501 .. , ,. 204.001 30.001 2.00 6.301" ) 123.90 4.20 1 119.701 210.001 30.001 8.00 10.50 .····1 466.201 46.20 420.001 ..•...•. 1 Nonel 80.001 15.QO 8.40 1 159.60 6.30 153.801. . • . . . . . 60.00 , . · •. 1 •.... J 96.60 31.50 65.101. .. .. .. . 110.00 80.00 3.00 I " 1 88.60"..... 33.601 ........ \ 40.001 ....... 1 . . . . . . 65.101$ 1$ 4.189.1QI$ 196.80 $ 3.822.601$ 119.701$ 2.289.351$ 850.001$ 45.00

FORTY-FIFTH DISTBICT-J. E. WINDLE, D. D. G. :M., Springfield, Mo.

'~ ~·I:lr

United. 6 .••.•..•... 131 121 15 9/18 1 291 8 "'11 ' ••2....11 27."11 .... I O·Sullivan. 7 .....•. 641 134.401 •..... •... 21 2[ 2 2 ... 1 61 ... 1201 252.00 6.30. . . . Ash Grove. 100 •.•.. 2 81 . . . . . . 21 Solomon, 271. •...•. 4721 991.201 25.20 •... 71 '1 91 •8 7 12 281 21) 21 7 15j ...... ... 9 ...... 271 56.70.......... Ozark, 297 ..•.....• Gate of the ': 'I 1 2 I 1 Temple. 422 ..•... 7291 1.530.901 63.00 .... 91 71 10 21 30 491 4 9 10j. "1" 1 Republic. 670 ....... 184.801 6.301 .... 11 11 1 4 3. .. . 2 1·· .. 1. . . . . . 881 Strafford, 608 ...•... ... 1 11 1 471 98.701 ...... 6\ ... .. ..... 1.. 1. . . . 126.001 4.20 .... Willard. 620 ........ 601 31 31 31.. 2 51 1 .. , .. ··1 .. ·· .. Webster. 98 ........ 3 21 .. 1.... 721 61 31 21 .. 1 1 21 ... 151.201 2.10/ .... Doric, 300 .......... 102.901 2.10 .... 491 1 .... 1.. / .... 'I··· Mount Olive. 439 .•.. ...'I/ ...'I/ . . . . . . . .111 2/ 1 .... 1. . . . . . 331 ... 69.301····· ., .... Hazelwood. 469 ..•.. 100.801 2.10 .... 481 11 11 1.. 1\ 8\ ... ... 1. . . . 1.. 1.... Henderson. 477 ..••. 142.801 2.10 .... 11 11 1 2 1 ....... 2 .... 1.. 1.... 681 TOTAL ........ 551 631 571271 741 1611 201 461 781 .. 1 . . 1 1 2.5071$ 6.264.701$140.701$ ... 1$

"I'"

'n

I....

, ......

'1'

134.40 258.30 1.016.40 56.761

60.90 $ 1.289.401$ •••.. ·. None $ 70.00 $ 12.00 12.60 1.00 121.801 ....• · .. $ • 78.50 ....... 58.80 None 8.00 199.501 ..••...• 60.00 44.10 None 7.00 50.00 972.301 ....•... 2.10 24.60 6.00 60.00 64.601 ... " ...

I

I

1.698.90\ 102.90 1.491.001 .• , .••.. 1.575.001 20.001 2.00 191.101 ...... · . 191.10 1 ....... Nonel·······,······ . 98.70 10.50 84.00 •...•.....••. 88.201 ........ 130.20 10.50 Nonel 30.00 8.00 119.701 ........ 153.30 4.20 149.101 ........ 1 115.001 60.00/ 6.00 10.50 Nonel 20.00 6.00 106.001 94.501 ....... 4.20 69.30 65.101 ..... ·· . 1~~~: .• '10:001 •• 16.80 . ....... 1 102.90 86.10 144.901 ....... 144.901 .......• 1 116.001 10.001 1.00 5.406.401$ 338.10 $ 4.981.201$ 86.101$ 2.159.481$ 380.001$ 46.00

'1

i:oo


FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOHN H. mcKS, D. D. G. 14., Mountain Grove, Mo.

I-"

~ ~

278.001$ 2.101$ .... $ 275.101$ 5.70 $ 269.401$.... ... None $ 10.001$ .. · .. 87.801. . . •• • . . None ............. .. ~i .. ~I .. ~ :: I.. ~I ~I ~I .. ~ ...... .. .. 1801$ 2'1 ........... ,..... 42.0'1 .... ........ 1· ................ ............. .. ...l··· iii:••..• :i. :::::.... ii<:"'··· .:i. 112.351 ........ $ 41.50 10.00 1.00 7 ., ··~hh :f~l· ··tij""i 54 .... 10.00 1.00 1281 268.80 8.40 6.80 270.90 14.70 74.65 256.201. .. .. .. • None 80.00 8.00 178.501. . . . . .. • 841 176.40 4.201' .... \ 180.60 2.10 541 118.40 .•.. " .•... 118.401 2.10 111.801. ..•. .. . 162.00 10.00 1.00 II ll··r ·.'1 4t ··i2 :::2 .'39/:: 1191 249.90 8.40 ..•.. 258.801 8.40 249.901... .•••• 57.85 ....... \ 4.00 3 ...... 86.101 ...... , . 124.00 10.00 1.00 441 '''''1 92.4'1 •.•• 80.00 3.00 90.801. " ..•. . 150.00 481 90.801'..... .. ...·1.····1 ..... 90.801 ....... .:1..'1 ..\: :::1::::1:::1::: 12.601 21.00 None 161 88.60.. . ... ..... 88.601 ....... 21 21 1 401 84.00 8.40.. .. . 92.40 4.20 88.201 .•...... 92.10 •. 20:001" 2:00 81 ..

Ava. 26 ••...•...... Pilot Knob, 182 ..... tMt. Ararat, 382 ... Barnes, 116 •...•... Texas, 177 ......... Plato. 469 .......... Summersville, 555 ... Mountain Grove, 158 41 31 4 8 4 Joppa, 411 .... _.... 11 11 1..... Mansfield. 543 ...... Grovespring, 589 .... Norwood, 622 ....... 41 41 41.. 2 TOTAL ........ 271 241 231 41 131

. .+:

1

1

241

81 131

621 .. 1.. 1..

7311$ 1,585.101$ 84.651$ 6.301$ 1,568.451$

49.80 $ 1,492.651$

21.001$

701.601$ 180.001$ 16.00

212.101$. .. 140.701 :. 119.701 $ 130.201. . . • . . • . 105.001.. • .. . .. 12.661 65.04 142.801. _. .. .. . 868.16\$ 65.041$

None $ $ . None .. 66.00 .. None 10.00 7.00 18.00 • .. 20.00. .. • .. .. 227.50 80.00 8.00 831.50\$ 30.001$ 10.00

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-JOHN N. SPARKS, D. D. G. M., Grandin, Mo. VanBuren. 509 \ 11 2 11 8 31 9 1... 1 1 Grandin, 579....... 81 81 3 .. 1 .. 2... 1 Hopewell, 239. ..... 31 31 3 1\ . Barnesville, 858. .. .. 111 111 12 ..•.. Delphian, 137. . . . . .. . .. \ ... 1.. • .. I .. Wi~ona, 480........ ... 1\ 1 .. \ \ 1 1... 2 Emmence, 607...... 81 21 21 .. 1•• '. TOTAL f 201 211 281 21 31 281 31 6\ tNo report received.

~I .. ~ .. ~

21'"

24 ..1,. 4

'1".. ..

L:j:::: ..

.. 171 1\ .. \..

101\S 701 591 671 561 391 691 4611$

212.101$ 6. 30 1$ 147.001 12.60

'l$ .

~~~:;gl ::::::1' :::::1

117.60 . .•.. 81.90 . 144.90 . 968.101$ 18.901$ .... 1$

40 218. 159.60 1$ 123.90 140.70 117.601 81.90 1 144.90 987.001$

6.31 $ 18.90 4.20 10.50 12.60 4.20 2.10 68.8 $


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRIOT-J. OLYDE AKERS, D. D. G. M., Farmington, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

IJ J) ~ ~ -5 z ~I~IJ

StaroftheWest,133 Mosaic, 351 Marcus, 110........ Bismarck, 41. ." .. . Farmington, 132 .... Ionic, 154.. St. Francois, 234 ~ Samaritan, 424 Pendleton, 5IH ...... Leadwood. 598...... Elvina, 599 Saline, 226.. .. .. .. . TOTAL ....... .I

~

. u

~ ~ .•

aa 'i ~ .!!! ~ :E ~.21iS·" ..5£&!<~

:rJ

=

~

O . ~ ::s

••

~

~

000

Q.

~

Co

~ ~

gj><'Qj'

mm~~

J.<

'1:lEo<

rl

~

E QI

::s

1

till

0.1::

ft ~ 'f'i f

e,,'1:l

III allll

<lI~"'" "'p..>o =,....... 0 < o

QI

QI'" QI

di f

....

p..~

§0

J.<

~

~Co'"~ J.<

;. 0 QI]

~_

aa

....

0

!R'i

=

QI

0

Eo<

~~ 0 E ~~QI <tl

~ p.. 'C

::s 0 E

<

~

0

QI

~ III

-III I:l:l

£:~

u •

till

.StIII.S~

.~om~~£:

:rJ

till

]O~ ~ !~

QI " '

~

~ ~ §..;

2:=· e" i ~ ...'1:laa ~::s

QI'

'1:l

...

:loS =

...aa

0

§

£:r.:.

=..5

p..

p..

771$ 161.701$ ..... 1$ 1$ 161.701$ 4.20 $ 157.50/$ ......'.1$ 126.001$ ...... 1$ .. · .. 2\ ... 1 41'" .\ .. \. '1" 1•.. 1••• 1.. 1. . . 2 ..• 1. •. 6 . 431 90.301 ·.·.·.1 1 90.301 4.20 86.101 ......•. 1 Nonel •....•• , ...... 1691 333.901 8.40\ 1 342.301 6.30 336.001 \ Nonel 50.00 5.00 81 71 7121 4 31"'1 21 61 .. 1.. 1 . . 951 199.501 6.30 1 205.801 14.70 191.101 1 140.00 10.001 1.00 11 11 11 1 3 71. .. 2 11·· .. I.. 2.101" 1 310.801 10.60 300.301 1 212.321 ·1 . 147/ 308.70/ , .1 .. ·1··· 2 1 51··· 11 31··· '1" 1201 252.001 6.30 ..•.. 1 258.301 10.50 247.801 ...•.... 1 272.001 20.001 7.00 71 71 711 3 5 1.. 1 .. 1... 1... 1.. 1... 21... 1 21 .. 1 · 341 71.401 ..... ·1 1 71.401 4.20 67.201··· 1 30.001 ....... \ ...... 1301 273.001 4.201 1 277.201 29.40 247.801 1 678.001 10.00 1.00 11 11 41 11 2 141. . . 1 51. ·1· . . , 411 86.101 1 1 86.101 ., . . . . . 60.00\ 36.101 115.001 .....• • , .1 ... ).. ·1··· ....... I.. ,. 1261 264.601 1 1 264.601 8.40 256.201. " ., / 250.001 20.00 2.00 81 71 9 .. · .. 1 41 1 1 41···· 2 1621 340.201 12.601 1 352.801 8.40 344.401 1 106.001 50.00 10.00 101 11 10 2 3 4 3 1.. \ .. 11 11' 1 .. ... 11.. • 2 1 .. I.. .. 1151 241.501 1 1 241.501 23.10 218.401. " 1 90.001 10.001 1.00 361 351 391111 16j 591 4/ 141 271 .. 1.. 1 2 1,2491$ 2.622.901$ 39.901$ .... 1$ 2,662.801$ 123.901 $ 2,502.801$ 36.101$ 2,018.321$ 170.001$ 27.00

1... 1.. ·1 2 1..• \

'1' '1'" .. ,

'1' ..

'1"

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT-W. GLENN McCAIN, D. D. G. Mo, Cape Girardeau, Mo. Trowel, 440 ........ 11 31 31 3/ 21 Zalma, 545 ......... 11 11 11·.1 31 St. Marks, 93 ....... 61 71 81 41 11 West View, 103 ..... 21 11 11"'''' Wilson, 191. ....... Mystic Tie. 221. .... "il"il"il::/"i\ Whitewater, 417 .... 11 11 31·· 21 Excelsior. 441. ..... 101 111 131 11 1 TOTAL ........ 221 251 301 81 101

31 ... 1 11· · .. 1.. 1· ·1 .. 51 ... 1... 1 2\ .. \ .. \.. 211 31 41 3\ .. 1.... 1 1... 1 2 31· l.·1 41 .. 1.... 1 1 1 .. ... 41 1...1 \ . . .1 \ ....2 I.'\' 61 2 ....... I...... 421 61 81 141· ·1 .. j ••

"'1

""1"

"1"

1131$ 237.30/$ 4. 20 1$ •.. ·1$ 241.501$ 6.30 ..... 1 117.601 531 111.301 3701 779.101 777.001 2. 10 1 ..... 1 105.001 ........... 1 105.001 501 109.201 ........... 1 109.20\ 621 159.601 2.10 ..... 1 161.701 761 151.201 147.001 4.201 ..... 1 701 294.001 1391 291.901 2.101 ..... 1 9231$ 1,938.301$ 21.001$ .... 1$ 1,959.301$

6.30 $ 236.201$· ...... 1$ 10.60 107.101 ........ 1 44.10 735.001··· ..... 1 2.10 102.901· .. ·· ... 1 2.10 107.101· .... " .1 2.10 159.601· ....... I 8.40 142.801· .. ·· ... \ 12.60 281.401· .. ·· ... 1 88.20 $ 1,871.101$ ....... 1$

300.001$

2~;'~~1

"

10.001$

1.00

50:001 .. '5'.00

100.001 20.001 2.00 Nonel •...... 1 ...... 185.001 10.001 ...... 1.00 171.001 10.001 Nonel 40.001 11.00 961.001$ 140.001$ 20.00


FIFTIETH DISTRIOT-GEORGE A. SAMPLE, D. D. G. M., Ohaffee, Mo.

T··'''1 l" '1""'"' 'l' .

.

621$ 130.201$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$ 130.201$ 14.70 $ 116.601$ ... ··· .1$ 160.001$ 10.001$ 1.00 I " East Prairie. 884.... 11 11 1 ..... / 8.40 Charleston. 407. ... . 41 31 1. . 7 4 31 9 .•...... 1611 317.101 14.701 ..... , 331.801 328.401······· .1 14.70 2.101 ..... 105.001 491 102.901 90.301 .. · .. · .. I Morley. 184 ........... ·1· .. 1..... 1\ 7 1 51 .... 2.00 •...... \ ...... 27.80 85.58\ 58.28\ ........ 1 89\ 81.90\ 3.68\ ..... \ Ashlar. 306 ........... ·1 11 2 2 2 13\... 1\ .. 361.201 ....... 126.001 ....... 1 1.00 369.101 361.201 ........ 1 1711 2.101 ..... 1 Sikeston. 310....... 11 51 6 4 1.... 21 41 ........ 4.00 12.60 1841 281.401 12.001 40.001 286.601 273.001 ........ 1 Illmo. 681. .. .. .. .. . 101 101 101 2 2 61 ...... 1 1 .... 4.201 ..... 1 88.001 . 00 .... 63.001 26.001 ..... 1 301 16.001 .... · .. 1 2.00 88.001 .... ··· .1 Blodgett. 694 .... 00' ... 1 21 2\.. 2l .... I...... 1 41 .... 4.20 247.801 266.201 Nonel ....... 1 .... ·• Chaffee.616 ........... 1 21 1 8 4 21 3 3 11 .... 1 1181 262.001· .. 00 ... 1 8. 40 1 . . . . ·1 29.40 200.001 60.001 6.00 220.601 4.20 ..... 1 224.701 196.801· .. 00 00.1 1 3 31 .... 1061 BI_field, 163.... . 61 61 'I 1 2.10 60 441 92.401 4.201 •.. ·.1 10.001 60.001 4.00 94.601··· ..... 1 Essex. 278 .. 00 ...... 101 81 2 1 1... 3 .... 96. 1 109.20 6.30 102.901 ........ I 106.001 17.00 •...... 1 . . . . . . Lakeville. 489....... 81 61 8.. 2 8 1 1 9 .... 601 4.201 .. · .. 1 2.10 241.60 238.101 198.00\ 40.00 ...... 239.401· ....... 1 Dexter. 632 .. 00..... 61 61 31 1 4 1 1... 21 .... 1111 8.401 .. · .. 1 6.30 40.00 10.001 1.00 121.801 ........ 1 106.001 23.101 ..... 1 128.101 601 Advance. 690 ....... 21 21 21001111 31 2 3 61 .. 1.. 79.801 ....... · ...... ·1 381 Puxico. 696. . . . . . . .. . .. 1•. ·1. .. . ·1. .. . ... /.. ·1. .. . ... I.. \.. 79.801 .. ·· .. 1 • .... 1 79. 80 1 6i~:ggl 107.101 ....... 106.001 2.101 ..... 107.101 .... , ... Morehouse, 603..... 121 121 91 41 11 .... 1 11 11 61 .... 501 TOTAL ........ 641 621 661171 411 611 161 271 391 .. 1.. 1 1 1,2021$ 2.624.201$106.381$ .... 1$ 2,630.681$ 128.10 $ 2.422.681$ 79.801$ 1.376.001$ 360.001$ 84.00

~~~:l· ~~:~~I ., ~:~~

l' 2j"1

. "t"to:ool .'l"t:OO

l-l

cc

I:1l

FIFTY-FIRST DISTRIOT-THOMAS R. WILKINS, D. D. G. M., Hornersville, Mo.

121

1

1 Kennett. 68 ......... 221 131 16( ... 'I 111"1 .. 1..1 6 .... 8 2 Four Mile. 212 ..•••. 41 41 7 8\ 1 1 2 1 31 ...... Hornersville. 216 ... 41 31 3.. 2 1 1 Cardwell. 231 ....... 61 61 4 ..... ..··1 .. .... .... 5 2 1 3 Malden. 406 •....... 21 11 2 .. 6 2 2 6 Senath. 618 ...... , .. 51 61 7 .. 1 1 1 1 ... Portageville. 166 .... 11 11 .... 1 Point Pleasant. 176. 91 61 6.. 8 1 •• 1 2 New Madrid. 429 .... 41 61 4 •• \ 1 Parma. 650 ......... 31 .. .... 11 11 1 ..... 4 1 .... Caruthersville. 461 •. 31 31 6'I·· .. Hayti. 671. ......... 11 11 fl. 8 8 1 Steele. 684 .......... 1 1 .... 1.. 11 11 1/ ....... Bernie, 673 ..••••... 2 31 .. 11 ..... 1.... 11 TOTAL ....... 641 61/ 51/111 211 471 161 161 591 .. 1•• 1 1

~h

~I

~/..~

ll'

~I "21 l' 11

1371$ 287.701$ 2. 10 1$ .,. '1$ 289.801$ 31.60 $ 268.301$.·.··· .1$ 662.601$ 90.001$ 9.00 16.80 2.10 ..... 203.701 206.801 971 189.001······· .1 170.001 ...... '.00 2.10 160.00 40.00 4.00 147.001 ........ 1 4.20 ..... 144.901 149.101 691 None....... 1.00 2.10 94.601 92.401 ...... · .1 461 94.501· ..... .... ·1 6.30 ..... 10.60 196.301 201.601 931 300.00 20.00\ 2.00 191.101 .... , ... \ 12.60 201.601 10.50 ..... 212.101 961 199.501···.·· •• 168.751 20.00 •.•... 2.10 2.10 79.801 81.901 881 None •...•.. 1 1.00 79.801 ....... '1 2.10 90.00 80.00 3.00 88.201 ........ 6.80 .. • .. 1 90.801 84.001 401 2.10 96.601 ........ \ 98.701 461 4.00 25.001 40.00\ 96.601 2.10 ..•. 310.00 10.00 1.00 119.701 ....... 119.701· ....... 1 571 119.70/ ....•.•.... 233.10 6.30 ..... 8.40 146.001 86.001 1111 266.60 20.001 2.00 239. 40 1 119.70 6.30 113.401 ........ 1 571 160.001' . • . . • . 1.00 197.50 10.001 1.00 119.701 ........... .... "' ..... 1 117.601 661 17.601 100.001 117. 60 1 . . . . . . . 79.801 ........ 45.00 10.001 1.00 79.80 ....... 79.801 ........... 1 381 9801$ 2.068.001$ 42.001$ .... 1$ 2.100.001$ 96.60 $ 1,817.401$ 186.001$ 2,529.251$ 290.001$ 84.00

·1

,

'1


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT-KIPP C. JOHNSON, D. D. G. :M., Poplar BIu1f, :Mo. NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

] ] ~

~

:s

] ] 11 11 :::~ ~~ I &!.!5 <E ~'S ~

ooll~

~

q) ~

Poplar Bluff, 209 .•• 8 4 Pine, 814 •••.•••••. Composite, 869 ..... ... 8 8 1 2 Naylor, 568 ......... 21 1 1 Greenville. 107 ••..•. . 4 4\ 4 •• 6 Wayne, 526 .•..•.... 1 41 2 2 .. TOTAL ........ 141 141 141 41 181

41

.1

~

i

ill

~

~

~

d

ltl

~:E

~

)1j

l:i, ~

l:i,'i ~

~EI -5

Z ::i] ]

~

00

ill

~

l!

! ~

oor.:'l

....

...... ...... .... ...... ...... '0

S

~ ::a

21 8 8 18 .. 4 2 2 .... 8 2 5 .... 1 1 8 .... 1 1 •.. 2 .,. 1 .... 821 91 141 181··1 .. 1.. ••

rl

II

••

ill

1:E-4

~ilI

"'~'" to''g ~ ~ ••::ll>"

0

"'~ o.S

~~ ~ ~~~ t~~

<

frl

~~ :g~ ~I: l:lo'~

~]

0

...I:

5 l3 <ill -::I

~l3

E-4

~

~~

8191$ 669.901$ 8. 40 1$ ..• '1$ 678.30 $ 107.10 ......•..•. 107.10 511 186.90 871 182.701 4.20\ .•••• 78.50 351 78.50 1 . . . . . . . . . . . I 203.70 911 191.10 12.60 •.•. '1 1221 256.201 2.101 ..... 258.80 7051$ 1.480.501$ 27.30/$ •... 1$ 1.507.801$

~l ::I.~

;~

~ .;

~

ill

=

~

~

::I

I:

...I: 0

S

<

ill ~

~

iii

l:Q

'a ~~

~.E ~ ~ ~

.S

000 I:

~l3

:g:=i: c6 ....

2'S~ to'"cEi ~l:lill

.;~~

~

~

~ilI'•

~O]

~gj ~~S

0

44.10 $ 634.201$ •....•. $ 840.00 $ 8.40 98.701 ........ . 76.50 6.80 65.00 180.601 ... · .... 2.10 71.401 ........ 50.20 2.10 None 201.601 ••....•• 4.20 254.101 ........ 1 178.28 67.20 $ 1.440.601$ ••• ··· .1$ 1.204.981$

I:~

~,§

10.001$ 2.00 . ..... ........ ...... ...... 1.00 10.00 10.00 ...... 10.00 40.001$ 3.00

......

FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT-e. EARL ARMSTRONG, D. D. G. :M., West Plains, :Mo.

4

...

ilL 2mb, .27000000. 2 2 Ingomar, 586. .. . . • . 1 1 1 1 ... Mountain View, 687. .•. ••. •.. 1 1 Alton. 255.......... 4 4\ 3 1 1 Woodside, 887...... 11 1 1 ..... Clifton, 468....... .. 71 7\ 8 2 4 Koshkonong, 582. . . . 31 8 6. . 2

8 4 1 8 7

1

Sam...,., 2......... "0 Bayou, 865......... 11 9 8 .. , 1 Rockbridge, 485. .. .. 21 2 2... •. Robert Burns. 496 ... 81 4 51 ..... TOTAL ........ 861 341 881 71 111

8 2 1

1

"l" .....

291

5 1 1 1 2 1

......

7 8 2 8 2 .. 4 1 1

1 ••

......

1

"''1''

21 121

281 .. 1 11 ••

mo·T

16.80 $ 462.001$ •••.•. '1$ 2261$ 474.601$ 4.201$ .... 1$ 94.00\$ 80.001$ 8.00 159.601 ...... , ..... 1 8.40 1.00 159.60 151.201 ........ 12.00 10.00 761 2.10 58.80 56.701 ........ 45.00 281 58.801 2.101 2.101 '4:00 172.20 6.30 None 170.10 2.10\ ..... 1 811 165.901 ••• ·· .•• 1 87.80 ....... · ...... ·1 181 37.801 42.50 ....... ...... 87.80 1 ...... 1 . . . . . 1 264.60 14.70 None 30.00 7.00 249.901 ..•••.•• 1 1221 256.201 8.40 ••... 1 10.00 92.40 4.20 ..... I 96.60 ....... 441 96.60 1......•. 1 59.50 107.10 6.80 100.801. . . .. •. . 116.00 511 107.101 ... ·1 84.00 4.20 77.701 2.101 ......... 391 81.901 2.10 ...•. \ 98.701 ...... 1 ..... 98.70 2.10 20.00 2.00 471 68.00 96.601 .. ·· .... / 1.00 158.30/ ...... 1 ..... 158.80 ....... 158.801 ........ 8.00 10.001 781 60.90 89.901$ 8051$ 1.690.501$ 23.101$ 2.101$ 1.711.501$ $ 1.610.701$ 440.001 $ 120.001 $ 18.00

"'1 ....

., i'o:oo\ ..

......


FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-JOHN TAYLOR, D. D. G. M., Ozark, Mo. Sparta, 296 ... ,..... 21 21 2 •.••.. ,.. 1 •.. /..•. /. '/' ./ •• Friend, 352. .. . . . . .. 11 1 1.. 1 4 1 4. • •. •• •. •• Billings, 879. , . • • • • • .. I. .. ... 28 1 5 .•• ••. ..'. .. ,. .. Claflin, 229. . . . . . . .. . .. 1••• 1. •• •• '" •••• 1 1 Kirbyville, 264. . . . . . 11 .. 1 .•• • •. Forsyth. 458. . . . . • .. 11. .. ... 1 1 8 ••. 8 BTanson.587 31 11 2 2 1 5 2 I ...... tGalena, 515 ·1 1.. • Crane. 519 .. ,...... 71 71 61 3 8 71... 1 4 ...... TOTAL ...... 001 151 111 111341 121 251 61 61 71 .. 1.. 1..

'1'" .. ...

"'1

"I'"

\. ·1· .\..

1.

511$ 981 581 311 851 41/

107. 10 1$ .... '1$ 1$ 205.80 2.10 1 121.801 2.10 •. , .. I 65.101 1 \ 78.60 1 86.101 2.101' ,

107. 10 1$ ...... $ 207.90 8.40 128.901 10.50 65.10j....... 78.50 2.10 88.20 6.30

107.101$., .. · .. 1$ 199.501 ... , .•. 118.401.. . .. • .. 20.001 45.101 71.401 I 81.901 :I

., 1361 .~~\ ... ~:~:~~\ .. ~::~ :::::/... ~~?:~~I .. ~~:~~ " .1.6.9:~?11: : : : : : : : 288.50 16.80. . . . . 800.80 14.70 285.601. . . . . . . . 6321$ 1,117.201$ 28.801$ .... 1$ 1.146.001$

62.601$ l.O48.401$

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-CHARLES WEBDEIN, D. D. G. M., Aurora, Mo.

~

(0

-::a Monett, 129 ......... Purdy, 148 ......... BarrY. 867 ......... PTt;halroras, 383 .... Seligman, 517 ....... Comfort, 538 .....•. Mount Vernon, 99 ... Canopy. 284 ........ Marionville, 890 ..... Decatur, 400 ..•..... Red Oak, 468 .. , , ... Stinson, 523 ........ Miller. 667 .•...... " TOTAL ........

tNo report received.

8821 7/ 181 2 2... 61 ... 1.. ·/ .. • .. 1 4 .... 41 41 4 3... 61 41 21

31 21

.. ·1.· ·1.·· ..

51 81 1 .. 1 1 2 7

·' •• 1•• '1'" 161· ·1 .. 1.... l'l""

71

81

1611 '.1 11 ... 1 11 31 31

7 1...

'1" 1..

r..

40 ......

I. ......[..... ·1 ...... I.... 1 5 2 2 l.I....

... 1... 1. . . . . \

61 1

8

8

'I

'I

1 ..•.• ·1· ...

'I'

661 2 4 2 ...... 811 11 21 .. · · ...... I...... 31.. 1 .... I... 1 .... 1...... 61 .1 61 .. 1.. 1.. ·8y ·2j ......... .. y .. ·· 11 11 11.. 2 I.... 381 891 351431 231 561 20\ 211 77\··1 .. 1..

'I' ..

'1

II

108.00 $ 20.00\' 2.00 250.00.. . . .• • 1.00 100.00.. .. .., .•. 87.50 .. 82.00.... 1.00 None 10.00 1.00

1~~:~~

~~:~~l .. ~:~~

.. 280.00 80.00 3.00 902.501$ 90.001$ 11.00

....

45.101$

••.•"1' .....

2621$ 650.201$ 10.501$ .... 1$ 560.70 $ 37.80 $ 522.901$ •..•..• 1$ 1$ 3••' 88.20 ....••..... 1 88.20 12.60 612.00 ....... 1 ...... 421 75.601·.· ..... 1 50.40 201 42.00 8.40 •... 50.401 ••. ·• ... \ l~i:~~ '80'.00\ " '4'.00 294.001 ....••. , ... 294.00 12.60 281.401 .••..... 1401 69.80 252.90 ••.••.. 1 •• , ••• 331 •••• , ••• 1 69.80\ 69.801 ........ 9.50 86.10 81.901 4.20 .••.. 891 76.601.·.··., . 266.70 6.80 .' 1271 260.401.·.· .. · .1 266. 70 1 . . . . . ' . . . . . , 12.60 881.80 480.00 100.00 10.00 1521 819.201 ... ··· .. 1 12.60 88.201 75.601 ........ 421 80.00 •. " '" , .•... 4.20 199.601 285.67 941 195.801 ..•• · •.• 197.401 2.10 •.... 44.10 •••••...... 44.10\ ....... 44.101 ....... , None 10.00 1.00 211 100.801 ........ 50.00 10.00 1.00 481 100.80/ ....... 100. 80 1 . . . . . . ·· .. 10.00 1.00 105.00 8.40 ..... 118.40 6.80 225.00 501 107.101· .. ·· ... 1.0701$ 2.247.001$ 46.201$ .... 1$ 2.293.201$ 114.60 $ 2.109.401$ 69.801$ 2.688.771$ 240.001$ 25.00

'1

' '1

81m ..12:"1 :::::1 ·1

..

5~~:gg

50:001" 5:00

....... ......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-WALTER A. PHIPPS, D. D. G. M., Neosho, Mo. NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

]

] ]

]

'i 'i :.::as ! .;~ <e ~

as :3

:9

..... f.O

00

Southwest, 466 ..... Anderson, 621. ..... Noel, 647 ........... Neosho, 247 ........ Racine, 478 ........ , Granby, 514 ........ Stella, 538 ..•....... TOTAL .......

11 11 31

31 11 31

~

~

'Gj ~

iQI ~

gj ;:l

Cl

!'S ~

~

d

z

=:i]] .8~ l:i. ~ ~

~

.!

l:i.

~ Q/

~ m

~

2

.!!l

~

l:lo ....

l< Q/ mr.:l~

-r

..

3\ .. 1 1\ 3\ 1 11 1.... 3.. 1 9 1 211 .... 21 1 .. ·1 .... 1... 61 .... 101 1 4 3 .... 1.. 1.. .. 11· .. 61 1 ., . 81 .. 1· ·1 .. 21 ... ' ... 1 1 11 .. · 11 .. 11 41 11 2 .. .. 1.. 1.. 1.. 111 101 131 31 141 331 51 111 281· ·1· ·1··

.. ~I .. ~I

~V

.~~I

S Q/ ::E!

]r::

~tlIl

f~~

t.''g

~

gj..::l >t

~

.s.S

I ~ Q/as

~QI

~>t

~ 'i ~

:s!tlIl

l::~>t

~]

as&las Q/ ~ Q/

<

ass::

l:lo'~

0

...s:: ;:l 0

S

<QI

]c5 0

Eo<

~

~] ='.-::;:

~S

~~

..::l

'iii

Q/

;:l

~

...s::

~

;:l 0

S

s:: as

iii

<

Q/

CI

l:l:l

621$ 130.201$ 2. 10 1$ ... ·1$ 132.30\$ 6.30 $ 126.001$· . " ... 1$ 18.90 2.10 ..... 1 163.80 144.901 ......•. 1 771 161.701 311 65.101 ....... 65.101 ........ 1 65.101 .... 001 · .... 1 21.00 90 2221 466.201 35.701 ..... 1 480.901·.· ..... 1 501. 2.10 ........ I 136.501 138.60 1 661 138.601 ...... I . . • . . 1 182.70 12.60 871 170.101 ........ 1 182.701 ·····.1 .. ···1 8.40 371 77.761 70.301 ........ 1 1.001 ..... 1 78.701 5821$ 1,222.201$ 40.901$ .... 1$ 1,263.101$ 69.30 $ 1,057.301$ 136.501$

tlIl tlIl.S fj .S ~ tlIl ]O'g

:i

Ql

Q/"S:: tlIl ;:l

2'S~ t.'..c::

&:

~gj..::l

::E! S . :s!:iJc: as ....

0

~

~c5S

s::~

'2om~~s::

e

~gjQ/

';~::E! ~

\$

1.00 104.00\$ •..... 242.00 10.00 1.00 2.00 100.001· .... 20.00 30.00 4.00 123.401 ....... 1 . . . . . . 2.00 204.001 20.001 10.00 1.00 67.251 860.651$ 70.001$ 11.00

"I

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-M. W. RINKEL, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. Bonhomme, 45 ..•... Bridgeton, 80 . Webster Groves, 84 .. Fenton, 281. .•...•. Meramec, 313 . Kirkwood, 484 ...•.. Ferguson, 542 . Maplewood, 566 . Clayton, 601. " .. Wellston, 613 . Valley Park, 629 . Jennings, 640 .. Gardenville, 655 . TOTAL .

961$ 201.601$ 4.201$ 1$ 206.801$ 6.30 $ 199.601$ 1 31 31 3\ .. \ 2\ 31... 1... \ 3 1 .. \ . None\$ .... "1$ 2.00 60.00 7.00 2741 575.401 2.101 •.... 1 677.60 10.60 667.001· 1$ 160.00 71 71 5 4 1 5/ 11 6 .... \ .. 840.001 70.00 7.00 6801 1,218.001 31.601 ...•. j 1,249.601 66.70 1,192.801 1 61 61 61 61 151 27 11 91 31· ·1·· .. 1 308.70 6.30 302.401 .. 235.001 10.00 3.00 147/ 308.701 ...... 1 31 31 8171"'\ 31 2 11 31 21 11 3 1 41..... . .. ··\.·, 1 1· 621 109.201 2.101 I 111.301 8.40 102.901 . 48.00\ 30.001 3.00 520.00 20.001 2.00 21 21 11 71 2 2 1 4 3 . 2781 683.801 4.201' 1 688.00 4.20 683.801· . 286.601 12.60 273.001· . 136/ 283.501 2.10 •.... 1 133.001 40.001 4.00 51 41 31 .. 1 1 6\ 3 .. ·1· .. · .. 1.. 1.. 432.001 60.001 5.00 3581 761.801 ...... 1 1 761.801 6.30 746.601· .. 111 101 111 71 31 31 3 4\ ... '1' ' 1 " 800.001 40.001 6.00 101 91 9 31 31 21 4 2 6 . 3061 640.601 6.301 1 646.801 4.20 642.601· . 412.001 40.001 4.00 5461 1,146.601 18.901 1 1,165.601 54.60 1,110.901· . 10/17116161 81 261 61 81101 .. 100' .. 26124121 51 1 1. . . . I ... 3 .. 1. . . . 941 197.401 2.101 1 199.601 •... . . . 199.601· . 76.001 110.00/ 11.00 140.001 30.00 8.00 1931 406.301 2.101 1 407.40 27.30 380.101 .. 41 61 6 1 2/ 11 131... 1 ...... 1.. 1 1 18.001 60.001 6.00 1381 289.801 4.201 1 294.001 8.40 286.601 . 61 9/ 61 1 21 41 21 2 1 .. 1.. 1 2 9611021901611401 981321371 301·.1··14 3.1961$ 6,711.601$ 79.801$ .. , .1$ 6,791.401$ 205.801$ 6,586.601$· ..... 1$ 3,813.001$ 560.001$ 62.00

'j'

j...


FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-ANDREW B. STANLEY, D. D. G. M., Eldon, Mo.

T. :::1

Glensted, 260 .••.... Versailles, 320 ..•... ...211...211... 2 Barnett, 691. .. , .... 21 .. ·1 ..... ... Olean. 134 .......... 21 21 2 .. Ionia, 881. .......•. 71 71 71 3 14 TOTAL ........ 131 111 111 61 141

11 11'" 41 1 ... 1 41... 3 3 1 7 81

11· .

.... I..

....

"'1'" ."21::

201

31 101

6 .. 81 .. 1.. 1··

381$ 821 291 621 2241 4261$

79.801$ ..... 1$ .... IS 172.201 ...... 1 · .... 1 60.901 ...... 1 .... ·1 109.201 ...... , ..... 1 470.401 29.40 ..... 892.601$ 29.401$ .... 1$

.

79.801S 172. 20 1 60.90 109. 20 1 499.80 921.901$

2.10 , 8.40 6.80 9.10 16.80 42.70 $

77.70IS ••...• 'IS 163.801.·· .•... 64.601 ........ 1 100.101.·· ..... 1 486.001 I 881.201$ ....... 1$

62.001S ...... 1$ ..... 816.001 ·• .... ·1 ...... 48.00 20.001· .•..•

l~::g~1

.. 50:00/ .. 6:00

644.671$

70.001$

6.00

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT-NAT. D. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo. ~

c:c> Independence, 76 ... 11 3\10 1 34\ c:c> Summit. 268 ...•••.. ...81I...91J... 2 21 33

21 4 1 4 McDonald. 324 ...... 61 91 11 1 Blue Springs. 837 ... 14 ••• 1 •1 1 .... Raytown. 391. .•..•. "51"51"5 8 2... 1 1 7 1 8 Christian, 392 ...•.. 31 21 1 Buckner. 601 ....... IJ .. ·I ..... 2 12 . "11 Marlborough, 569 ... 1 1. .. 61 61 6 .. Mt. Washington, 614 141 161 16/1 8 10 1 5 Grandview. 618 ..•.. 21 51 4 2 4 1 21 1 Grain Valley. 644 ... 111 21 31 3 2 TOTAL ........ 461 631 561131 891 1061 91 261

T'" .

·~I 'I I... ....I......

• Credit $2.00.

4 .... 1 101 . . . . . . 61 . . . . . .

"I" ..

361 . . . . . . 161 .. 1.... 11.. 21001 .... 631 .. 1•• 1 1

\.'1"

3661$ 747.601S 21.001$ ... 'IS 768.601$ 71.40 $ 697.201$ ....... 1$ 348.601$ 40.001$ 6.00 69.30 901 189.001 8.601 ..•.. 192.601 123.301· ..... , .1 240.001 ....... / ...... 2031 426.301 14.701 ..... 1 411.601· ....•.. 1 441.001 29.40 147.00 ....... •• ..• 691 147.001 ........ 1 144. 90 1 2.10 ..... 1241 260.40 6.80 .... ·1 266.70 4.20 88.00 50.00 5.00 262.601· ....... 1 14.70 2.10 · .... 1 661 136.601 138.601 20.00 128.901· ....... 1 60.001 2.00 2.10 4.20 138.601 80 10.00 10.001 1.00 140.701··· ..... 1 • .... 1 661 142. 1 99 4.20 2.10 .... ·1 210.00 207.901 60.00 4.00 205.801··· ..... , Nonel 21.00 2861 617.401 696.401· ....... 69.00 40.00 4.00 600.601 16.80 •..•. 2.10 1811 276.101 8.401 ••... 283.601 281.401 •• · ..... 70.00\ 10.001 1.00 2.10 661 138.601 ...•.. J •.... 188.601 136.601 ••...... 1 60.00 •....•. 1 ..•••• 1.6661$ 8,266.601$ 81.301$ .... 1$ 3,346.801$ 220.60 $ 8,126.301$··.·.· .1$ 1.826.461$ 260.001$ 27.00

4~~~:1

!

~~~~~

4~~~


REOAPITULATION ~

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER AND DISTRICT NUMBER

~

o o

H. M. Jayne, 1....... W. J. Bray, 2......... W. E. Singley, 8..... . C. E. Evans, 4........ C. A. Brock, 6........ D. F. Smith, 6.... .... Geo. Houchens, 7. . . . . F. H. Binder, 8....... C. C. Miles, 9......... T. D. Williams, 10.... E. C. James, 11....... 1. M. Gallatin. 12. . . . . H. D. Taggart, 18.... L.E.Wilhoit.14..... D. A. Leslie, 16....... W. H. May, 16........ C. S. Hicks, ~7..... .. T. D. Barnes, 18...... A. G. Lynch, 19....... E. F. Cheesman, 20. . . E. W. Foley, 21. ..... , C. T. Kornbrodt, 22... C. B. Waddell, 28..... 1. W. Adams, 24. . • . . . S. L. Jewett, 25...... 1. R. Edwards, 26.... L.J.Graue,27....... P. A. Thomas, 28..... Wm. C. Martin, 29. . . . E. H. Barklage, 80. . . .

.

~

;

]

~

]

lij§

1 .~

ot'

~

~

<

'i'S

~ ~ .S !l ~

281 261 291 21 16 58/ 661 62 9 14 891 861 821101 14 81 61 7 7 10 161 101 11 4 2 181 191 201 6\ 17 81 71 9/ 6 11 161 101 4 1 611 701 88 26 68 101 81 61 7 12 271 23\ 28 12 18 241 211 26 7 6 191 191 19 8 20 281 211 20 12 661 651 41 22 17 81 61 7 6 8 4j 8 81 2 .... 61 7/ 10 1 19 111 18 14112 17 131 101 10 8\ 9 181 16 14 9 8 2361 229\ 283 62\ 186 241 261 24/ 1 14 101 121 12 4\ <I 141 16 16 8 1 201 161 161 8 18 211 261 281 81 6 21 21 1 8' 1 181 161 161. . . 8 131 161 181 8 2

111

11

~

l '~s

~

~ ~

.

~ =a

~ ~ ~] j ~ ~ ~.~ s

m

rZ~~

1......

~

:E f t:o ~]~

'gE-4

~

~. fl

'" tlO J:ot'~~ ~ 15 ·~.5 ~~~ t ]

.s.S ~

0(1

~

§ 0

~ 3~ QI

~

gj]

tSi

~~

J

~ ~

g

S

<

u •

tlO

~

~.§

~ ]

~~] !l~3

~:a II'

~

6

gj tlO

'=om; ~ ot'

~ Elr:

:st=!: ~

....

C::ot'

Ql" S ~ C::~

~:a a :st~~ ~

60 88 81 17 9091$ 1,908.901$ 16.801$ 6.301$ 1,919.401$ 69.80 $ 1,804.701$ 46.401$ 1,808.00 $ 180.001$ 21.00 64 16 11 87.. 1,0191 2,189.901 36.701 1 2,176.601 118.40 2,062.20 1 ) 1,689.60 880.001 89.00 88 2 22 74.. 7771 1,681.701 21.00 1 1,662.70 79.80 1,664.601 8.40 764.26 280.001 32.00 69 14 11 161...... 6621 1,390.201 89.901 1 1,480.10 128.90 1,806.201 896.00 20.001 1.00 24 4[ 4 61.. 1 1 2871 602.701............ 602.701 60.40 620.801 81.601 1,367.70 60.00\ 2.00 361 91 91 201 .. 1.. 1 6261 1,314.601 36.70 1 1,360.301 75.60 1,171.801 102.901 1,086.66 80.001 8.00 86 121 18 871' .1.. 1 7901 1,659.001 14.701" 1 1,678.701 75.60 1,229.201 368.901 8,082.06 60.001 6.00 26 11 6 28 .. \.. 616\ 1,081.60\ ·1 1,08l.50\ 62.50 1,029.001 '11'485.001 70.001 8.00 1101151 66 801.. 1 2 8,4291 7,200.901 156.161 1 7,356.061 281.00 7,126.061....... 4,440.66 890.001 48.00 71 91 16 891······ 884/ 1,761.401 41.801 1 1,792.701 149.10 1,670.001 78.60 2,617.75 60.001 7.00 61 8 84 59j...... 8401 1,764.00 27.801..... 1,791.301 111.80 1,666.601 118.40 1,212.50 160.001 25.00 80 111 21 36. . 9261 1,942.60 8.40 ..... 1 1,960.901 168.00 1,416.701 366.201 1,320.201 80.001 8.00 27 9 8 271...... 6961 1,249.601 29.401 2.101 1,276.801 66.70 1,220.101 1 911.001 60.001 8.00 57 7 16 86/.. 8691 1,824.9PI 26.201 / 1,860.101 119.70 1,780.401 1 1,669.001 120.001 12.00 99 7 89 87. . 1,6761 8,619.60 85.701 1 8,666.801 207.90 8,138.801 209.101 2,642.961 400.001 46.00 87 2 10 181...... 4641 974.401 16.801 ·t 991.201 77.70 918.60\ 1 416.761 70.001 4.00 87 4 6 101 .. , ... , 2721 671.201 4.201.· 1 676.401 77. 70 497.701 , 470.601 40.001 4.00 46 6 18 111...... 8721 1,881.201 86.701 1 1,866.901 94.60 1,772.401....... 2,600.80 20.001 2.00 82 17 10 481' .,.... 6611 1,178.101 81.601 1 1,209.601 67.20 928.501 218.90 472.71\ 60.001 11.00 40 18 10 7 .. .. .. 7281 1,628.801 87.801 1 1,666.601 34.00 1,482.601 / 819.44 110.0el 11.00 86 4 11 12 .. I.... 6911 1,241.101 27.801 1 1,268.401 76.60 1,184.001 68.80 1,324.601 140.001 10.00 907102 228 602 .. 2 1 13,498\ 28,846.80\ 806.85\ 21.701 28,680.951 1,906.20 21,248.06\6,476.701 19,328.701 1,660.001 197.00 49 11 22 161...... 7771 1,681.701 29.401 ..... j 1,661.101 102.90 1,466.801 92.40\ 2,773.62/ 110.001 9.00 28 11 16 881··.·.. 7021 4474.201 8.40 •. 1,482.601 48.80 1,484.801. . . . .. . 1.076.16 80.001 8.00 41 6 12 291...... 6071 1,274.70\ 10.40..... 1,286.101 86.10 1,106.291 92.71 978.401 180.001 11.00 48 18 11 881...... 7971 1,678.701 87.80\..... 1,711.601 100.80 1,610.801 1 766.961 80.001 18.00 42 9\ 19 36 "j" 1 9901 2,079.001 14.70110.601 2,088.201 88.20 1,914.101 81.901 2,281.801 80.001 8.00 88 6 6 17...... 4691 984.901 6.801 ..... , 991.201 69.80 921.901....... 1,288.201 10.001 1.00 12 6/ 6 101..... . 4681 982.80\ 8.401.. . . . 991.201 26.20 966.001. . .. . . . 768.601 120.001 11.00 11 2 4 10 ....• , 8631 762.80 1 .. . . . 762.801 28.10 739.201. . . . . . . 729.001 60.001 6.00

"'1


A. LinxwUer. 81...... 381 341 811 131· 21 841 61 161 36 1.. , . . . . 1.1561 2.427.601 12.601.····1 2,440.201 71.40 1.816.501 552.801 8,085.301 170.001 27.00 R. A. Breuer, 32.... . . 301 271 271 111 8 261 81 181 231.. 1 1,0501 2,205.001 16.801 ..... 1 2,221.801 54.60 2,167.201.. .• •• . 992.50 160.001 16.00 R. V. Wilson, 88A.... 1981 1931 1961 341 64 614 981200 1211 1 .. 12 11,8111 24,803.101 197.601 89.10/ 24,911.601 1,289.40 28,622.501....... 9,565.751 1.140.001 158.00 R. E. Dewhirst, 38B.. 1661 1981 188 181 66 844 58 148 171/ .. 1 9 10,6311 22,325.101 127.501 ·· 22,452.601 701.40 21,751.20J 10,517.4011,880.001 144.00 Wm. C. Deacon, 84... 181 211 22 8 11 29 6 14 27...... 6371 1,887.701 18.90\ 1 1,856.601 61.95 1,261.051 33.60 955.50 70.001 11.00 D. O. Bradley, 85..... 91 121 14 4 20 24 6 6 28..... . 5641 1,168.401 46.20 1 1,209.60\ 48.80 1,107.801 58.50 697. 85 1 50.001 5.00 J. P. Hurtt. 86....... 81 831 27 8 4 III 121 28 651...... 1,4291 8,000.90 6.80 ·1 3,007.201 288.10 2,774.101....... 4,385.15 180.001 15.00 T.Jennings,87....... 281 171 15 15117 58 211 14 231...... 8811 1,850.101 89.801 1 1,889.901 121.80 1,587.501 180.60\ 2,184.20 240.001 15.00 O. Simpson, 88....... 4.\!1 581 501 4 7 40 51 14 31 .... 1 7261 1,524.60 6.80.····1 1,580.901 84.00 1,446.901....... 990.17/ 290.001 82.00 481 511 521 7 18 26 17 14 83\...... 1,4841 8,116.401 52.50.····1 3,168.901 54.60 8,114.301.· .... ·1 1,747.85 290.001 26.00 C. L. Woods, 89....... H. H. Balsiger, 40.... 321 881 281 9 3 17 51 15\ 17 2.. .. 9121 1,915.201 2.10.····1 1,917.801 35.70 1.881.601 •...... , 1,773. 57 1 180.001 17.00 M. E. Ewing, 41...... 161 131 141 81 41 15 61 17 40...... 6191 1,299.901 14.701 1 1,314.601 81.50 1,188.601 94.50 1,397.10 70.001 7.00 M.D.Gwinn,42...... 121 101 161 81 41 25 8\ 13 271 .. 1··.. 4951 1,039.501 8.401 ·1 1,047.901 52.50 995.401.· ..... 1,016.00 130.001 8.00 181 171 191 6 20 30 61 11 51 .... 2 7691 1,614.901 29.40..... 1,644.801 63.00 1,588.001 48.301 1,329.43 100.001 16.00 D. V. Morris, 48...... 491 471 46110 86 94 161 40 611 .. 1.. 3 1,9401 4,074.001 66.10\ 1 4,139.101 196.80 8,822.601 119.701 2,289.85 850.001 45.00 Ceo. Dillard, 44. . .. ... to J. E. Windle, 45...... 551 531 57 27 74 161 20 46 78 1 1 2,5071 5,264.701 140.701 ·1 5,405.401 338.10 4,981.201 86.101 2,159.48 880.001 46.00 Q J. H. Hicks, 46....... 271 241 28/ 4 13 24 8 13 621...... 7311 1,585.101 34.651 6.301 1,563.451 49.80 1,492.651 21.001 701.60 130.001 16.00 J. N. Sparks, 47...... 201 211 23 2 8 28 81 6 171 1 .. .. 4611 968.101 18.901 ..... \ 987.001 58.80 863.161 65.041 38l.50 40.001 10.00 10 J. Clyde Akers, 48.... 361 351 39111 16 59 4 14 271...... 1,2491 2,622.90l 89.90!..... 2,662.801 123.90 2,502.801 86. 1 2,018.82 170.001 27.00 W. G. McCain, 49..... 221 251 30 8 10 42 6 8 14...... 9281 1,938.80 21.00 1 1,959.801 88.20 1,871.101....... 961.00 140.001 20.00 541 621 561 17 41 61 151 27 39 .... 1 1,2021 2,524.20 106.88 ·1 2,630.581 128.10 2,422.681 79.80 1,876.00 860.001 34.00 G. A. Sample, 50. ..... T. R. Wilkins, 51. .. , . 641 511 511 11 21 47 16\ 16 591.... 1 9801 2,058.001 42.001 1 2,100.001 96.60 1,817.401 186.001 2,529.25 290.001 .84.00 K. C.Johnson. 52 1411411414 13 829 14 131 .. 1 70511,480.50127.801 •.... 11,507.801 67.201,440. 60 1 1 1 '204.98 40.001 3.00 861 841 38 7 11 29 2 12 28.. 1.. 8051 1,690.501 28.10 2.10 1,711.501 60.90 1,610.701 89.90 440.00 120.001 18.00 C. E. ,/\rmstrong, 58.. J. Taylor, 54......... 151 11 11 84 12 25 5 6 71.... .. 5821 1,117.201 28.80..... 1,146.001 52~50 1,048.401 45.10 902.50 90.001 11.00 C. Werdein, 65....... 881 891 86 48 28 55 20 21 771...... 1,0701 2,247.001 46.20 ..... 1 2,298.201 114.50 2,109.401 2'688'771 240.001 25.00 W. A. Phipps. 56. .. . . 111 101 18 3 14 38 5 11 28...... 5821 1,222.201 40.901 .. · .. 1 1,268.10 69.80 1,057.801 186.501 860.65 70.001 11.00 961 1021 90 51 40 98 82 87 30 4 8,1961 6,711.601 79.801 1 205.80 6,585.601 1 8,818.00 560.001 62.00 M. W. Rinkel, 67...... A. B. Stanley, 68...... 181 11 11 5 14 20 8 10 81.. 4251 892.50 29.40 1 921.901 42.70 881.201.·· .. ·· 644.67 70.001 6.00 N.D.Jackson,59 .••.. 461 58 56118 89 105 9 26 531 1 1,5551 8,265.501 81.80 1 8,846.80 220.50 3,126.801 ....... 1,826.45 250.001 27.00 TOTAL 2,08412,08012,092164211,14914,488176111,49012,6611 41 7142 88,9291186,750.9012,466.881138.101189,079. 18 1 9,427.95 170,466.4819,188.151128,888.22112,700.0011.462.00 1

....

"1"

6,791.40~

~9.301


~

o

~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIRST DISTRIOT-HAROLD 1'4. JAYNE, D. D. G. 1'4., Memphis, Mo. Lodge INo.1 Location County 290IWyaconda Clark ...••.... Fairmont Eldorado , 318ILuray Hiram 362IKahoka Gothic ........•.. 486IAlexandria St. Franeisville 588IWayland Scotland . Memphis......... 16IMemphis Gorin. . . 72IGorin........... Rutledge " .. , 572IRutledge Sch~,Yler . Middle Fabius •... 244IDowning Lodge of Love 259ILancaster Queen City 880lQueen City Glenwood 4271G1enwood Greentop 635IGreentop

..

I

Master C. D. Roberts . Harry Kearns . O. C. Buck .. W. C. Rebe . J. O. Gray . Wm. C. Fender . R. E. Dorsey . F. A. Trummell . Dee R. Rife . F. W. Graves . F. Wm. Lauer .....•. W. L. Freeman . T. S. Waddell .

Secretary W. H. Pulliam Edgar F. Mosier E. C. Dingler J. P. Foley E. W. Henshaw Ralph J. Ladd R. E. Shacklett James A. Bailey John O. Morgan H. C. Burkland G. Lee Lauer H. W. Roberts W. L. Young

. .. , . . , . . . . . .. .

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Fridays . 1st and 8rd Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 2nd Tuesday . 1st Thursday ...........•........ 1st Friday . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Fridays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Mondays .

Charter Date Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 17, 1870 Oct. 19, 1898 Sept. 26, 1907 May 6,1852 Oct. 18, 1892 Sept. 28, 1905 May 26,1865 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 10, 1871 1872 Oct. 22,1924

I-Ij ~

o

ot%j t%j

t:::1

H

Z

Q 00

o

~

SECOND DISTRICT-JAMES M. DeMITT, D. D. G. 1'4., Kirksville, Mo. Adair

. Kirksville " .. , PaulviUe Adair Novinger ..•..... Knox ..•...... Ark............. Colony Edina , Greensburg

105IKirksville . 819IBrashear . 366IKirksville . 683INovinger . 6INewark . 168IColony ..•........ 291IEdina . 414IGreensburg .

Carl L. Eggert Arch Clemison Ben F. Timson W. R. Mosley Frank Baldwin C. E. McReynolds C. E. Stockman Rouster Pearce

. . . . . . . .

G. C. Chambers M. J. Crawford. . .. Chas. F. Link C. R. Truitt C. R. Kendall B. S. McReynolds. .. Ira D. Williams C. R. Slocum

1-3

p:: t;rj

1st and 3rd Tuesdays . June 30, 1864 1st Tuesday . Oct. 12, 1869 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . Oct. 13, 1881 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . Sept.27,1906 3rd Wednesday . May 8,1852 'l'hursday on or before full moon . May 24,1864 2nd Friday . Oct. 15, 1866 2nd and 4th Mondays . Oct. 13, 1871 ~

c.o

CIj

00


~

\:.0

~

00

THIRD DISTRICT-WALTER E. SINGLEY, D. D. G. M., Green City, Mo. Putnam

1Hartford . Somerset , Unionville . Sullivan ....•. '\ Humphreys .....• " Seaman . . . . . . . ' Green City . Putnam . Pollock . Arcana . Winigan .

1711Hartford 206lPowersville 210 IUnionville 32IHumphreys 136IMilan 1691Green City 190jNewtown 349IPollock 389IHarris 640 IWinigan .

. . . . . . . . ,

A. S. Montgomery , L. W. McDonald . H. McCalment . E. W. Lewis . A. L. Berry .....•... , W. W. McKanna ..... Wm. Thogmartin ..•. WayneElam ......•. R. E .. Cox . C. K. Moddrell .

~.

J. D. Smith . M. L. Brown . J. U. Brown . D. H. Humphreys .. Chas. E. Smith . J. M. Border . J. W. Moore . Otis Reinhard . Joe Blagg ......•.. R. R. Crist ..

1st Saturday .....•............... 1st and 3rd Mondays . 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays ' 1st and 3rd Thursdays . Saturday on or before full moon . 1st and 2nd Tuesdays . 1st Wednesday ..•...•.....••..... 1st Wednesday .

May May May Oct. May Oct. May Oct. Oct. Oct.

30,1867 29,1861 30,1861 13, 1887 9,1867 16, 1884 28,1869 16, 1884 13, 1871 14,1889

<:;:) ~

> Z

tj

t'l

otj o

FOURTH DISTBICT-C'LYDE E. EVANS, D. D. G. Mo, Trenton, Mo. Grundy·······1 " " " Mercer '

Trenton '1 Laredo.......... Galt Spickardsville Mercer...........

111ITrenton .. ·······1 263/Laredo.......... 423IGalt 624ISpickard 361 Princeton. . . . .

John A. Baugher .•.. 1F. M. McKinney 'lIst Thursday····················1 Wm. Chrisman L. V. Woods 2nd and 4th Mondays ...........•• R. E. McCracken.... A. R. McKay 2nd and 4th Fridays ...........•.. Gerald Pittman R. B. Kennedy 1st and 3rd Wednesdays A. M. Coon " E. E. Stacy. . . . . . .. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays. .. . . . . . . . . ..

t':l

May 9,1860 Oct. 16,1868 Oct. 16,1890 Oct. 16,1886 June 9, 1863

o

1"9 ~

H

l/l l/l

o

~

FIFTH DISTBICT-eABEY A. BROCK, D. D. G. M., Ridgeway, Mo. . Harrison ....•. Bethany Lorraine ....•.... Lodge of Light . Cainsville . Nell! !lampton . Prairie .....•....

971 Bethany . 128/Ridgeway....•..• 267lEagleville . 328lCainsville. '" . 610lNew Hampton . 6661Gilman City .

L. R. Chambers ....•. Ernest F. FJucke . P. R. Vanyant . Rolla Pryor . O. P. Lippincott . Albert Mote .

Lester Davison. . . .. S. M. Gutridge. . . .. E. O. Martin , R. O. Chambers. . .. R. L. Grun ...•.• " W. E. Richter .....

2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays .......••.... , 1st and 8rd Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .....•.....•• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ..•....•.•

May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

25,1854 7,1878 16, 1868 18, 1870 28, 1925 19, 1892 ~

o~


~

o

~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SIXTH DISTRICT-oURTIS F. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Darlington, Mo. County I Lodge INo.1 Location Gentry Havana.......... 21IMcFall . •...•.•• Stanberry........ 109\Stanberry . " ......•. Gentryville 125IGentryville . . • • . . . . •• Athena........... 1271 Albany •.....•. Alanthus .......•. 2521Alanthus Grove .. ••....•. Ancient Craft 3771King City . Berlin 378IBerlin . ........1 Jacoby ...•....... 447IDarlington . Worth. . . . . . .. Grant City. . . . . . .. 661 Grant City ..•..•. Defiance.......... 88jSheridan . . Allensville , .. 198IAllendale Jonathan 321IDenver .

Master H. L. Childers . . Glen Thomas Alexander Patton . . C. L. Scott E. C. Grantham . J. L. Wheatley .. Walter Miller . . Glade Pruden Jack Barker . . M. C. Runyan Zene Hammer ..•....

Secretary R. T. Kidney S. A. Goodding Bert Miller L. F. Smith L. W. Morris J. F. Heath J. B. Owens, Jr Fred Minkner Geo. Hunt Wm. C. Walker Homer Brewit

Time of Meetins . 1st Saturday ....••••••••••••••••• . 1st and 3rd Saturdays .•.......... , . . 2nd and 4th Saturdays . . 2nd and 4th Fridays . . 2nd and 4th Saturdays . . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . . 2nd and 4th Fridays , . 1st and 3rd Fridays , . 1st and 3rd MondayS . . 2nd and 4th Mondays . 2nd and 4th Saturdays .....•..•.•.

Charter Date Oct. 6,1879 Oct. 17, 1879 Mar. 10, 1850 May 8,1851 Oct. 16, 1868 Oct. 18, 1871 Sept.24, 1906 Oct. 17, 1901 Oct. 10,1894 Oct. 17, 1878 May 30,1860 Oct. 12, 1869

"'d

l;l

o C

t.%J t.%J tj

I-j

~

00

SEVENTH Nodaway ..... Xenia............ Quitman Ravenwood Graham White Hall. ..•... Kennedy Burlington Gaynor City Nodaway.. . . . Pickering Guilford Clearmont Skidmore

DISTRICT~EORGE HOUCHENS,

50IHopkins 196IQuitman 201 IRavenwood 289\Grallam 801IBarnard 329IElmo.....•....•. 442 IBurlington Jet... 465\Parnell 470IMaryville 472 IPickering 474IGuilford 507IClearmont 611ISkidmore ..•....•

G. T. Bennett J. S. Billey. . . . . . . . .. E. A. Hammond M. H. Weston....... J. P. Gorsuch •....... E. L. Aldrich Clarence Miller W. C. Timmermann .. Roy Schrader , Floyd Billingsley C. C. Bledsoe •....... M. M. Simpson...... V. V. Goslee , .. ,

o

D. D. G. M., Ravenwood, Mo.

R. P. Chaney J. J. McDonald J. J. Smith F. E. McNeaL P. D. Stalling L. R. Pruitt H. S. Staples...... J. S. Matteson F. R. Marcell.. . .•. C. G. McMillen. . . .. Alex H. Wilson O. O. Gregory E. D. French ,.

1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 8rd SaturdayS 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 8rd MondayS 1st and 3rd Fridays 1st and 8rd Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th ThursdayS 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Mondays

. . . . . . .. . . . . . .

June 2,1866 May 30,1861 Oct. 13, 1892 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 15, 1886 Oct. 30, 1870 Oct. 18, 1881 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 17, 1877 Oct. 11, 1878 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 17, 1874 Oct. 12, 1888

~

1-3 ~

t.%J

~ ~

CI.:l 00


~

~ ~

00

EIGHTH DISTRICT-FRED H. BINDER, D. D. G. M., Bigelow, Mo. Atchison •..... 1 North Star .. Sonora N.orthwest. . • . . •. Fairfax Holt ..•.•..•.• Maitland ............ Oregon .......••. .. • ••.•..•.. Forest City •.•.•..... Mound City. '" .. .......... Craig

157IRockport •....... 200IWatson 858ITarkio........... 48SIFairfax 112IMaitland........ lS910regon .....•.... 2141Forest City .. , . .. 2941Mound City ," 606ICraig

C. M. Hunter J. D. Hays Fred G. Andrews. . Everett A. Deardorff. M. V. Snyder Thos. I. Kreek ..•.....•......•.... Dean Wightman. J. B. Offenbacker

J. E. Welch Oscar Lenden A. E. Anderson. . .. W. A. Groesheck H. L. Leeper .•..... S. W. Skelton .•................ W. R. Swope W. A. Sharp, Jr

1st and 8rd Thursdays . 1st and Srd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•...•.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•........ 1st and 3rd Mondays .. . ........•.......•.....•..•••.•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and Srd Tuesdays .

May 29,1856 Oct. 19, 1876 Oct. 17, 1884 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 19, 1867 May 81,1855 May 80,1861 Oct. 14, 1868 Sept.29, 1909

NINTH DISTRICT-ERNEST E. PISCHXER, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph, Mo. Andrew

1 Savannah........ Helena Lincoln Whitesville Rosendale ..•..... Valley .......[ Cosby. . . . . . . . . .. Buchanan Agency.......... .. . ..•. Wellington....... St. Joseph....... Birming .•....... Zeredatha Rushville. . . . . . .. Brotherhood Charity King Hill ......•. Saxton

7lISavannah 117 IRochester •.•..... 138IFillmore 162IWhitesville 404IRosendale 41SIBolckow......... 6001 Cosby. . . . . . . . . .. 10IAgency 22IDeKalb 781St. Joseph 150IFaucett 1891St. Joseph 238 IRushville . . . . . . .. 269/St. Joseph .....•. 3311St. Joseph S761St. Joseph 608\Saxton

F. O. Schmitt Carl Munger........ J. G. Thorburn...... Earl Abell. C. J. Watts •......... Ambrose L. Riley. . .. Elmer Schinder. . . . .. M. H. Krumme C. U. Jenkins John W. Keplinger C. F. Brown ..•...... Geo. M. Overlander.. Roy 1. Gillis. . . . . . . .. Geo. T. Hopkins Orestes Mitchell J. C. Hyde W. N. Guymann

W. W. Hall H. E. Shanks Fred N. Foster Fisher Potts W. B. Wood McF. Price , Willis Durant. . . . .. John T. Marteny H. V. Redmon W. L. Mulvania C. S. Mays .....•... G. L. Markley S. G. Hiner , Harry K. Hopkins .. Lewis O. Weigel. Jesse Moore J. S. DeVall.......

1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd Monday and 4th Saturday . 1st and 8rd Tuesdays .•.......••.. 1st Saturday and Srd Wednesday .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 1st and Srd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Saturdays .....•...... 1st and Srd Saturdays . 1st Saturday . 1st and Srd Tuesdays ..•.•.••..... 4th Saturday .....•...•.......... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 2nd and 4th Mondays , . 2nd and 4th Fridays . 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 1st 'and Srd Thursdays •.•......... . .................•.•.•.........

Oct. 24, 1844 Oct. 20, 1929 Jan. 2,1866 May 28,1858 Oct. 22, 1896 Oct. 17, 1878 Sept. 80, 1908 June 1,1866 May 6,1862 Oct. 14, 1846 May 22,1858 May 28,1859 May 26,1866 Oct. 19, 1922 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 12, 1882

o >-

!;d

Z

Ct t"'

o Ct ot'=j o

~

i:i:: ~

m m oq

~

~

o

C1


t-:l

o

en

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued

TENTH DISTRICT-THOMAS D. WILLIAMS, D. D. G. M., Maysville, Mo. County DeKalb

..

Daviess

Lodge , Union Star Weatherby Parrott Osborn Continental Clarksdale . Western Star Pattonsburg Gallatin Altamont EarL Lock Spring Jameson Jamesport

. . . ' . . . . . . . , . .

No. I Location 1241Union Star ...•.. 2351 Weatherby . 308lMaysville . 31710sborn . 4541 Stewartsville . 559lClarksdale . 15IWinston . 65JPattonsburg . 106lGallatin . 1081 Altamont . 2851 Coffey . 4881 Lock Spring . 500IJameson . 564lJamesport .

Master Robert Oliver . B. W. Frazier . Reuben Dunlap . Raymond Brand . L. S. Cook . H. Weiner . Elmer West . Harvey N aIle ..•..... L. O. Gillihan . Lawrence Gregory . Otto H. White . H. E. Moore . Ralph A. McNeel. . Ross Thompson .

Secretary B. U. Clark R. F. Cope O. E. Heins Wm. E. Baker R. W. Kibbey Donald Barrow E. C. Creekmore Roy Gromer Wm. O. Tague Elmer Kirkendall W. Guy Welden John Bills J. E. Robison Byron Maharg

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Saturdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 2nd and 4th Saturdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Mondays

. . . . . . ' . . .. .. . . ,

Charter Date Oct. 15. 1885 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 12. 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 21, 1903 Oct. 12. 1898 June 1,1886 May 29.1854 Oct. 16. 1879 Sept. 18, 1919 Oct. 15. 1868 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 9.1898

. Liberty Holt Angerona Clay Kearney Temperance Clinton .....•. Hemple Vincil. Plattsburg Gower Lathrop

..

..........

. . . . . . . . . . .

31 1Liberty . 49IHolt . 193JMissouri City ...• 207 1Excelsior Springs. 311IKearney . , 438 ISmithville 37IHemple . 62ICameron . 113/Plattsburg . 397IGower . 506ILathrop .

A.H.Nims Alton Bailey D. Galle D. J. Hurt. Jr R. W. Klepper. Jr Lloyd Taul. J. R. Vaughn T. W. Chapman R. W. Morrow Reed Mumford J. C. Balton

. . . . . . . . . , .

Edgar Archer. . . . .. R. E. Powell. . . . . .. R. E. Hicklin. . . . .. W. A. Craven C. W. Hessel. . . . . .. Alfred O. Lowman. Ray Slaybaugh. . . .. J. F06ter Poland R. W. Hayward L. H. Connell J. L. Taylor. . . . .

2nd and 4th Mondays . 8rd Friday . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays ........•. "" 1st Thursday . 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .. 1st and 3rd Mondays '

pj

otz:j tz:j

I::;f ~

Z

o00 o ~

ELEVENTH DISTRICT-EMSLEY C. JAMES, D. D. G. M., Plattsburg, Mo. C~~y

"'d

o

~

Oct. May May May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. May Oct. Oct.

9.1840 25, 1853 28.1859 30,1861 12. 1869 16. 1872 18. 1900 19. 1868 9,1850 16. 1872 12. 1882

~

tz:j

c.o" """' ~

00


~

~

TWELFTH DISTRICT-JOHN M. GALLATIN, D. D. G. M., Chillicothe, Mo. . Kingston Braymer Hamilton •....... Polo Breckenridge Cowgill Livi~~ton .... Friendship. . . . . . . Spring Hill Benevolence Chillicothe. Chula Wheeling. . . . . . .. Dawn Caldwell

118IKingston . 135IBraymer . 224IHamilton . 232IPolo ..•.......... 334 IBreckenridge .. 561ICowgill . 891 Chillicothe . 155 1Spring Hill ..•... 170IUtica . 333jChillicothe . 388IChula . 434 IWheeling . 539ILudlow .

....................

F. B. Murray . D.!. Farrar....... Rudolph Houghton . J. E. Deems. . . . . .. S. M. James . Ronald Green Leo M. Connor . J. L. Walker Daniel Webster . J. C. Hawse W. B. Rasberry . Martin L. Nerly W. M. Black . T. J. Nash . A. J. Stamper. . . .. M. A. Pollard . F. W. C<>rnue C. S. Greenwood R. D. Adkins . A. J. Owen. . . . . . .. . H. J. Barnes. . . . . .. M. O. Utt J ames Baxter . Roy Smith. . . . . . . ..

2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 2nd and 4th ThursdaYB 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Fridays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 1st Saturday 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Fridays

. . . . . . .. . . . .. .

Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 10, 1869 Oct. 16, 1878 Oct. 30, 1870 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 12, 1847 June 2,1855 May 30,1857 Oct. 12, 1867 Oct. 3,1871 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 17, 1889

Jackson.......... Brookfield. Cypress Bucklin Dockery......... Marceline

82ILinneus 86[Brookfield 227ILaclede 233IBucklin 3251 Meadville. . . . . . .. 481 IMarceline

J. R. Hall F. H. McCue F.G.Disney S. H. Townsend Jess A. Bailey Edward W. Tayler

A. J. Knapp E. J. Faut LyleSavage F. E. Hockett ' H. A. Collis. . . . . . .. Wm. E. Parks

2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1stand3rdWednesdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Tuesday of each week 2nd and 4th Tuesdays

~

> Z

t:I ~

o

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT-HERMAN D. TAGGART, D. D. G. :M., Linneus, Mo. Linn .. . .•....... .......... ..•....... . . . . . . . . .. ..........

e.." 00

t:I

. . .. . ' .

Oct. 5,1846 June 29, 1869 May 29,1862 May 26,1864 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 17, 1889

Q t.%j

o

~

~

H

00 00

oq

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-LUTHER E. WILHOIT, D. D. G. M., Macon, Mo.

..

. Macon ....•... Callao Bloomington ..•.. Censer . La Plata . Lodge of Truth . Excello ...•...... Elmer ...•......• . Sh~!by . St. Andrews Shelbina .•....... Hunnewell . BetheL ..•••..•.. Clarence .

381 Callao. . . . . . . . . .. 102IBevier 172IMacon " 2371La Plata 268IAtlanta 332lExcello. .. . . . . . .. 648IElmer 96IShelbyvilIe 228IShelbina .....•... 415IHunnewell 537IBethel. 662lClarence ,

L. 1. Leffler H. H. Hilderbrandt R. L. Vickray D. E. McDade Albert Norton R. K. Stokes G. N. Meeks E. P. Thompson L. B. Haden Hugh Carr E. W. Hawkins W. H. Burnett

. .. . . . . . .. . . . .

Ransom D. Wood ... C. F. Larsen .•..... B. B. Stock . L. A. Carter . Paul Conduitte . Ross King . . C. I. Murry S. P. Engle . Ellis Hack ......•.. R. F. Lyell .. Sam Zeigler . . C. W. Layne

1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd FridaYB . 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays .. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Mondays ......•...... 2nd and 4th Fridays . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 1st and 3rd Mondays .. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

June 2,1866 May 10,1849 June 14, 1875 June 22, 1866 Oct. 15, 1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 20, 1920 May 10,1848 May 29,1882 Oct. 13, 1871 Feb. 22, 1888 Oct. 22, 1924

~

~

o

-::a


t-:)

o

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued

00

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-DAVID A. LESLIE, D. D. G. M., WUliamBtown, Mo. No.1 Location County I Lodge . Lewis .•....... 1 Wyaconda . 241La Grange 58lMonticello . .. Monticello ...•... . LaBelle ..•....... 2221 LaBelle Craft . 287ICanton .••....... . Williamstown . 3701 Williamstown . Lewistown . 494ILewistown Ewing . 577IEwing .. . Marion I Palmyra . 18IPalmyra . St. John's . 281Hannibal. . Hannibal. ....•.. 188lHannibal . ...... '" Philadelphia . 5021 Philadelphia . RaIls. . . . . . . .. Ralls . 33ICenter .. •..•..... Lick Creek '. 302IPerry . •.••••••. , New London . 3071New London ..•..

Master R. S. Rice .........•. Arnold Barker . David W. Wilson . W. E. Zenge . E. L. Dorsey . J. F. Wilson . Carl F. West . E. Greening . S. L. Monroe, Jr . Russell R. Ridge . W. E. Dunn . J. L. Horn . S. G. Rouse . Frank Hall .

Secretary Leslie Edwards Otto P. Shanks David S. Bagby A. Clyde Stock John S. Smith Egbert F. Arnold Frank Bugh R. L. Haydon W. H. Blackshaw Harry C. Smith T. J. Bleigh G. C. Layne S. J. Hart G. D. Harris

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Time of Meeting 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 2nd and 4th Fridays . 1st and 3rd Mondays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays , 1st and 3rd Mondays ......•...... , 2nd and 4th Mondays . 1st Thursday . 2nd and 4th Saturdays . 2nd Tuesday . 1st and 3rd Fridays .

Charter Date Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 12, 1887 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 12, 1876 Sept. 7, 1906 Apr. 25, 1881 May 80,1861 May 80,1860 Oct. 11, 1877 May 27,1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 12, 1869

""d

~

~ trj tj H

Z

C)

U1

SIXTEENTH DISTRICT-GUY A. MAGRUDER, D. D. G. M., Bowling Green, Mo. Pike. . . • • • • • .• ........•• .......... .......... •......... •.........

Eolia.,.......... 141 Eolia. . . . . . . . . . .. Clarksville....... 17IClarksville .....•. Perseverance..... 92ILouisiana , Phoenix......... 1361Bowling Green. .. Frankford 192IFrankford Pike 399ICurryville

E. C. Smith ' T. B. Jamison James L. Garner J. W. Gillum. . . . . . .. R. B. Ruffin......... R. K. Rose ,......

Wharton Schooler.. K. C. Patton Wm. H. yager..... H. M. Strother, . . .. R. J. Parham J. H. Sisson

Saturday on or before full moon 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 8rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd Thursday

. . . . . .

Oct. Oct. Oct. May May Jan.

16, 1884 8,1880 12, 1847 9,1857 26,1859 24, 1871

o

I'2j

8

l:Il trj

SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT-CHARLES S. mCltS, D. D. G. M., Monroe City, Mo. Monroe .....•. Paris Union . . 19IParis Florida , .. 28lFlorida . Middle Grove . 421Middle Grove . . Monroe ...•...... 64/Monroe City Madison .. 91 IMadison ...•..... . Santa Fe . 4621Santa Fe Holliday . 660 IHolliday .

N. J. Heatnman . Chas. Miller . J esse Fisher . G. S. Tompkins . Frank Humphrey ..•. Frank Snyder . R. S. Ellington ,

J. L. Gwyn Arch Bausman B. E. Neale C. A. Gentry C. O. Farris J. N. Bailey T. E. Sparks

. . . . . . .

2nd and 4th Mondays . 4th Saturday .....••.•............ 1st Saturday . 2nd and 4th Mondays . 2nd Tuesday ...•................. 4th Saturday ...................• 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

March, 1835 May 6,1852 June 2,1866 June 2,1866 Oct. 12, 1847 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 17, 1928

~

(,0 ~

00


~

'"

c:.:l

00

EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT-T. D. BARNES, D. D. G. M., Moberly, Mo. Ran~olph .....

Huntsville . Milton ..•....•... Clifton Hill .....• Moberly .......•. Cairo .........••• Higbee ........•.. Jacksonville. '" .. Clark .

30lHuntsville. .. . 151IMilton 1611Clifton Hill S44IMoberly 486ICairo 5271Higbee. . . . . .. 541IJacksonville 610IClark

A. D. Lonell .....•... E. L. Fleming . E. A. Eubank .....•.. M. W. Bierman .....• Fred Haynes ..•..•.. A. M. Robb . R. M. Carter ......•.. G. T. Carr ..

M. P. EvaIlB . Arthur Haak •..... H. C. Eubank ....•. J. W. Tate .. N el L. Dameron . E. B. HawkiIlB . W.N.Miles . F. L. Amburn .

1st and 3rd Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Saturdays ..•.......... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ..•..•...... 2nd and 4th Mondays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 8rd WednesdaY8 ........•.. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ........•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays .

Oct. 8,1840 Nov. 1865 May 28,1869 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 14, 1874 Oct. 15, 1886 Sept. 24, 1902 Sept. 28, 1910

o >

=:0

Z

t:t

NINETEENTH DISTRICT-ARTHUR G. LYNCH, D. D. G. M., Brunswick, Mo. Chariton ...•.. Eureka.......... Warren.......... " Triplett Westville Salisbury. . . . . . .. Rothville. . . . . . . .• Pee Dee Cunningham Mendon

78IBruIlBwick .•..... 74IKeytesville 122ITriplett 202IWestville 208 ISalisbury . . . . . .•. 4261 Rothville. . . . . . . .. 498IMusselfork 525 ISumner ........•. 628IMendon

John A. Michael. •... H. D. Garrett .••..... D. N. Gann Homer Green C. A. Glassen. . . . . . .. James S. Grubbs. • . .. R. E. Lain Sylvan McDonald Roy McCollum

Arthur G. Lynoh O. L. Davis C. C. Stobaugh ...•. Walter Hainds H. H. Brummall Lee Clair. . . . . . . . .. J. T. Prather...... A. Stobaugh S. L. Leipard

1st and 8rd Tuesdays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•••••.•..•. 8rd Saturday .•.........•......•.. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays .....•....... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . Last Saturday . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Mondays .

t"I

Oct. 16, 1845 Oct. 20, 1845 Oct. 12, 1896 June 2,1866 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 19, 1888 Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 28, 1925

o t:t otzj o

~

~ H

00 00

o

c::

TWENTIETH DISTRICT-EARL F. CHEESMAN, D. D. G. M., Carrollton, Mo. Carroll •...... , De Witt ..•..••... Wakanda . " Bogard . Hale City . Carroll .. Bosworth . Ray .. Hardin ..•.......

.......

891De Witt.......•• 621 Carrollton ...•... 101IBogard.....••..• 216IHale .. 249INorbome ...•.... 597IB08worth ..•..... 8221 Hardin .

Vernie F. Harrold . Ward Carson. . . . .. G. M. Shields . H. E. Shany. . . . . .. E. C. Minnis . D. W. Minnis. . . . .. Oft'a C. Swinney . Dennis E. Parish. .. R. L. Pugh ,. R. E. Parrish. . . . .. C. A. Taylor . Wm. B. Finley. . . .. Marvin Holsinger . O. C. Grimes. . . . . ..

1st and 8rd Thursdays ..••.•...... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•....... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ....•........ 1st Monday ..............•....... 2nd and 4th Mondays . 1st and 2nd Thursdays ..........•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .

~

Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 17, 1842 Oct. 14, 1866 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 19, 1867 Sept. 80, 1908 Oct. 12, 1869 l\:l

o

(,0


l-":) ~

o

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT-EARL W. FOLEY, D. D. G. M., Weston, Mo.

I

County Lodge Platte · RisingSun .. • ....••.. Weston. . . . . . . . . . Compass Camden Point Rowley Fidelity Adelphi. , Platte City ,

No.1 Location Master 13IBarry NormieElam 531 Weston. . . . . . . . .. James L. Bull. . . . . . .. 120IParkville .....•.. Park Noland 1691Camden Point W. F. Bailey 204IDearborn 1 Oren Foster 339 iF arley 1 L. H. Francis 355IEdgerton Ward Miller 504 IPlatte City i W. C. Porter

Secretary F. R. Williams Earl W. Foley C. H. Hook W. K. Bywaters D. B. Ford Sam Ray W. H. Mizener Arthur Ham

Time of Meeting 1st Saturday , , 1st and 3rd Thursdays. . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd Monday 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd Wednesday 2nd Wednesday 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Mondays. . . . . . . . .. . ..

Charter Date May 8,1852 Oct. II, 1842 May 10,1850 Oct. 18,1867 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 13,1870 Oct. 18.1888 Oct. 13, 1881

1

1041Kansas City M. I. Blashalg 219jKansas City Wm. F. Cooke 220lKansas City H. F. Rapp 2991Kansas City Perry W. Seaton 3051Kansas City W. E. Cederholm 3161Kansas City "1 Harvard G. Milton. .. 340lKansas City Wm. E. Tracy 4461Kansas City Chet A. Keyes 5221 Kansas City. . . . .. J. Willard Smith. . . .. 5461Kansas City Donald C. Hawley 5471Kansas City C. H. Leonhard 5631Kansas City Edward C. Nielsen 6171Kansas City 1 L. F. Weaver 6251Kansas City Arthur H. McCary 630lKansas City , E. R. Shockey ' 6431Kansas City C. C. Freeney 656iKansas City Herert B. patt , 6631Kansas City A. L. Snyder 6591N. Kansas City E. E. Dodd

J. S. Epstein L. V. Knapp J. W. SchlaegeI. Alfred D. Ludlow ,A.. D. Nordberg Geo. W. Paddock. .. John Pfahler J. O. Christensen F. H. Knight. . . . Vernie G. Fisher T. M. Pratt Irvin F. Strycker L. V. H06ic Leonard F. Owens .. Ernest W. Berry. .. Geo. R. Hadge Robt. E. Robertson. Joseph Weinsoft C. L. Shippee

2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd and 4th Mondays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays..... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays. . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays. . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays........... 2nd and 4th Mondays

~

o

trJ trJ t:t

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT-CLAUDE A. FERGUSON, D. D. G. M., Kansas City, Mo. Jackson Heroine .. . Albert Pike •...... Kansas City ....... Temple •...... Cecile-Daylight. · , .. Rural ....... Westport ....... Ivanhoe · ..... , Gate City. . . . . . .. ••..... Orient ....... South Gate ' •...... york •...... Swope Parle ....... Sheffield East Gate · ...... Northeast ....... Country Club ....... Rockhill ......., Alpha

"d

o H

1

May 10,1849 Oct. 17,1895 May 30,1861 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 17,1923 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. H,1894 Oct. 17,1901 Oct. H, 1888 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15,1890 Oct. 17,1896 Sept.H,1911 Sept.25, 1912 Oct. 21, 1918 Sept. 2,1916 Sept. 21, 1921 Oct. 28,1926 Sept. 21, 1921

Z

Q

(f)

o

~

8

~

trJ

I--'

1:.0 ~

00


Io-.l

~ ~

TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT-CAMILLUS B. WADDELL, D. D. G. M., Lexington, Mo. Waverly Lexington Higginsville Lafayette Concordia Mount Hope . Richmond Ray BeeHive Ada

Laf~rette .....

Ray

. .. . . . . . .. . .

611 Waverly 149ILexington 3641 Higginsville 437ICorder 464lConcordia 4761 Odessa 571 Richmond 223ICamden 393ILaWBon 44410rrick

. . . . . . .. . .. .

Theo. H. Utlaut . J. McBrayer Sellers .. G. L. Brown . L. F. Slusher . M. Cretzmeyer . Roy T. Scott .. F. A. Blackwell . . K. U. Jackson L. D. Estill . . V. K. Remley

J. A. Allisch W. R. Eckle A. W. Fuhr S. M. Reynolds Everett Pape C. D. Newhard R. B. Hughes W. L. Huffman T. E. Manso A. W. Burnham

. . . . . . . , . .

00

2nd Thursday •.....•..•..•....... 3rd Tuesday . 2nd and 4th Mondays . 3rd Tuesday ..............•...... 2nd and 4th Mondays . 2nd and 4th Fridays .......•...... 4th Monday . 1st Thursday . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 2nd Thursday .

June 2,1866 June 4,1855 Oct. 14, 1884 Apr. 6,1887 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 11, 1842 Sept. 1, 1921 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 16, 1872

o ~ > Z

tj

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-JOHN W. ADAMS, D. D. G. M., Marshall, Mo. Saline ....... , Arrow Rock C~mb!"idge

Miami TrUumina Barbee Malta OrientaL Nelson

. . . ' .. . . .

551 Arrow Rock 63ISlater 851Miami. 205IMarshall 2171Sweet Springs 402 1Malta Bend 518IBlackburn 560INelson

' Ernest Harney H. B. Bolte .. A. M. Ayres. K. P. McCrary Paul A. Wylie Wm. H. Wilson Geo. H. Borchers R. S. Edwards ......•

B. C. Bradshaw . T. R. Haynie, Jr . Geo. P. Wilson . G. Howard Fuller .. Will C. Pelot ..•.... E. H. Wilson . W. C. Borchers . R. B. Finley .

2nd Thursday 1st Tuesday 4th Tuesday 1st Thursday Last Friday 1st Tuesday 3rd Tuesday 2nd Tuesday

t'4

. Oct. 11, 1842 . June 2,1866 . June 2,1866 . Dec. 9,1867 . Oct. 19, 1867 . Oct. 17, 1901 . Oct. 11, 1883 . Oct. 12, 1893

' . . . , . . . .

36IBoonville 14210tterville 277 1Pilot Grove 4561 Bunceton 503iPrairie Home 41New Franklin 471 Fayette 51 1Glasgow 70 I Armstrong

. . . . . . . . ..

Ben N. Smith

C. L. Hurt .•....... 2nd and 4th Fridays .........•.... Oct. May O~r·l~:·.:·.:·.:·.: i~t ~~'d 8~d·rfu~d~Y~:::·.:::·.:·.::: Feb. H. L. Shirley. . . . 1st and 3rd Fridays .. Oct. F. L. SchUb 1st and 3rd Thursdays . Oct. C. L. Painter , 1st and 3rd Thursdays . May Raymond Sunds. . .. 1st and 3rd Tuesday . Oct. R. W. Raines .....• 1st and 3rd Thursdays . Oct. Aubra M. Green 1st and 3rd Thursdays . May

S: 'F: H~s·e;::::::::. R'o';

c. E. Mullett. . . . . . ..

L. C. Simmers ......• Roy McClanahan , A. B. Barber. . . . . . . .. J. E. Borders Nick Pyle

Q

tI:J

o

~

~

H

00 00

o

c::l

TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-SAMUEL L. JEWETT, D. D. G. M., Boonville, Mo.

CXx:per , Cooper Pleasant Grove Wm.D.Muir Wallace Prairie Home Ho~ard ..•... , Howard Fayette Livingston Armstrong

ot;j

~

9,1841 31,1856 6,1878 16, 1872 13, 1882 6,1852 11, 1842 12, 1876 25,1854

H

~

I-' I-'


~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY

I-'

DISTRICTS-Continuc~

~

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-JULIUS R. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Centralia, Mo. County I Lodge Boone .•...... ·1 Centralia . Rocheport . .. Twilight . .........\ Ashland . ..•...... Sturgeon .....•.. Hallsville . Ancient Landm'k. Hinton .......•.. Acacia ........••.

Location No. I 59lCentralia .. , . 67lRocheport . 1141 Columbia . 156lAshland , . 174 ISturgeon . 336lHallsville .. , . 3561 Harrisburg . 455IHinton .........• 602lColumbia .

Master I Wm. S. Drace / G. C. Harper .•...... M. C. Creasy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A. E. Boothe L. S. Neese. . .. . . . . .. Oscar Tisdell Raymond Wood E. S. Gray. . . . . . . . . ..

Secretary Jas. C. Hunt '1 J. P. Huntington ..• J. P. Oliver. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. W. M. Spelman F. L. Faucett. . . E. S. Watson Tilford Goslin E. Roy Boothe. . . ..

Time of Meeting 1st and Srd Thursdays . Thursday on or before full moon . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . '" , 1st Friday 1st Friday. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st and Srd Saturdays 1st and Srd Saturdays , 1st Tuesday ,

Charter Date Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 20, 1848 Oct. 19, 1867 May 28, 1859 May 30,1856 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 27.1878 Sept. 6.1904 Sept. 29, 1909

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRIC'l'-LOUIS J, GRAUE, D. D. G. M" Mexico, Mo, Audrain

I Central. . . . . . . . . . Laddonia Social ..•.......•, Hebron .......•.. ....... Vandalia ....... Houston Callaway Fulton........... ...... New Bloomfield... ...... Portland ..•... Tebbetts Shamrock Mokane

81lMolino. . . . .. . 115ILaddonia.•...... 266 IMartinsburg . . •.• 354IMexico 491IVandalia 580IGant 48 IFulton 60lNew Bloomfield 242IReadsville 565ITebbetts 585IShamrock 612IMokane

Harry Rowland.. • . .. W. K. McCall R. W. Moser. . . . . . . .. Jim H. Weaver Otis S. Williams Theophilus Dunn C. E. Mirts. . . . . . .. .. C. H. Wehmeyer Richard Holzhauser .. David J. Rootes J. N. McKibben C. D. Winter

C. W. Ellis ..•...... A. R. Hancock Carl Johnson. . . . .. B. C. Denton Arch L. Motley H. W. Groves W. L. Meng , Wade F. Enloe A. D. Bridges W. W. Griffin W. S. Armstrong T. F. Hafner .•.....

2nd Saturday ..•......•.......... 2nd Thursday . 2nd Friday . 1st and Srd Tuesdays . 2nd Friday . 3rd Friday ..•..•................. 1st and 8rd Friday , 2nd and 4th MondayS . 1st and Srd FridayS . 2nd and 4th Saturdays . Thursday on or before full moon . 1st and Srd Thursday .......•.....

'"d ~

o ~ t%j t:l

Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 28, 1882 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. IS, 1870 Oct. 12, 1876 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 17,1841 May 25,1854 May 26,1865 Oct. 22. 1902 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 11, 1911

H

Z

o00 o ~

t-3 ~

t%j

TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-PAUL A. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo. Monta.:~mery ..

Griswold Wellsville Montgomery ....• Florence Jonesburg Daggett.

178jBellfiower 194IWellsville .....•.. 2461Montgomery City 2611New Florence ..•• 457IJonesburg 492IMcKittrick

T. W. Earnest .....•. Wilmer Hedges E. L. Brigham .•••... S. M. Dixon......... J. M. Shelton J. Louis Timmerberg.

W. H. Aydelotte Goo. R. Barton H. N. Cason E. H. Deubbert J. E. Reeds W. F. Huenefeld...

2nd Monday .•••.•..•..........•. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...•.......•. 2nd and 4th MondayS 1st and Srd Mondays ..•........... 3rd Monday 1st and 3rd Saturdays............

May 28,1858 May SO. 1860 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 12,1893 Oct. 12,1876

I-' ~

Ci:)

00


~

CoD

C\j

00

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-WM. C. MARTIN, D. D. G. 14., Troy, Mo.

..

Lincoln •....•• Troy. . . . . . . . .. . • Silex............ New Hope New Salem Louisville Nineveh ..•.••••. Moscow

0

841 TrOY. .. • • • • • • • •• 75ISilex ...•........ 199IElsberry 270\Winfield " 409ILouisville ..•..... 478jOlney 5581M08cow Mills. . .•

Arlie R. Koster ..•• " Isaac Josephson. .•.. C. W. Miller•......•. Sam Riffle HaroldM088 Wayne L. Porter C. O. Anderson "

Andy J. Blair. . . . .. E. C. Teague H. K. Cunningham. H. H. Arnhold ..•.. H.H.Higginbotham Harold K. Hudson .. Fred Karrenbrock ..

2nd a.nd 4th Mondays. . . . . . . . . . . .. Friday on or before full moon ....• 2nd Thursday 1st and 8rd Saturdays.... ...•..•. 3rdThursday ...•....•........... 1st Saturday ...................•. 2nd and 4th Saturdays ..•..•......

Oct. Oct. May Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

7, 1841 21,1899 31,1860 15,1868 17,1901 15,1874 18, 1892

o ~ >

Z

l:j

THIRTIETH DISTRIOT-EDWIN H. BARKLAGE, D. D. G. M., St. Charles, Mo. St. charles····1 .. . .. . Warren .. •

Wentzville '1 Palestine Mechanicsville Pauldingville..... Warrenton

461 Wentzville. ······1 2411St. Charles 260IHowell.......... 11IWright City 609IWarrenton

C. R. Karrenbrock"'1 Martin L. Coma.nn A. F. Fricke ..••..•.. W. E. Daniels ••...•• H. L. Southern o

W. R. Dalton ....• '1 E. R. Engholm R. L. Fulkerson Clarence H. Feix L. M. Hutcherson ..

1s t and 8rd Fridays ......•..•... "1 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Saturdays .....•..•... 1st a.nd 3rd Saturdays ......••..... 2nd and 4th Fridays

t-+

June 2,1866 May 25,1865 Oct. 80,1868 May 8,1852 Oct. 1,1917

F. H. Carson, Jr.... : H. W. Leslie ....••... J. A. Farmer H. R. Hutchinson L. W. Shipley J. W. Wilson........ G. G. Pennington G. E. Dexheimer H. O. Barberick Rhey Mantle

R. L. Gwinn .....•. W. B. Thompson J. E. Dooley Hermon Miller Jay A. Conn R. L. Fulks .....•.. J. A. Roesch .....•. D. M. Maness ' A. H. Siebern Clyde Morton

1st and 8rd Mondays ..•........... 2nd Friday ..•..••.........••.... 1st Thursday 1st Monday 2nd a.nd 4th Thursdays ....•••.... o 2nd and 4th Fridays .......••...•. 1st Saturday 1st and 8rd Mondays 4th Friday Sat. on or b. f. m. and 2 wks. after.

o

~

~

THIRTY-FmST DISTRICT-ALBERT LINXWILER, D. D. G. M., Jefferson Oity, Mo. Cole .•••..•.•• Jefferson........ 481Jefferson City ..•.•...•• Russellville....... 90IRussellville .......... Hickory HilL 211 IEugene Centertown 611ICentertown Moniteau ...•• o Tipton........... 56ITipton .. California ......•. 183ICalifornia....... Moniteau 295IJamestown .....• . . . . . 1 Clarksburg .....•. 553\Clarksburg Osage Chamois 185IChamois .. . .•..•... Linn............ 826ILinn

o otrj l:j

H

W

Nov. 15, 1841 Oct. 11,1888 Oct. 19,1867 June 18,1910 June 2,1866 Oct. 19,1898 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 15,1891 May 28,1857 Oct. 19,1892

00

o q

~

~ ~

C\j


County Franklin

I

l:\:) .....

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THIRTY-SEOOND DISTRICT-RANSOM A. BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo.

Lodge No.1 Location Evergreen....... 271New Haven Sullivan.......... 69ISullivan Gray Summit , 1731Gray Summit Hope 251IWashington Fraternal 363 IRobertsville Columbia 534IPacific , Easter 5751St. Clair Union 593IUnion Gasconade .... Hermann 123IHermann Owensville. . . . . .. 6241 Owensville. . . . . ..

Master C. L. Smallfelt Theo. R. Baker...... August Schueddig Floyd Koirtyohann John Enins G. W. Leher Ken Rogers A. H. Steinbeck ,. Geo. Sohns, Jr C. T. Berger. . . . . . . ..

Secretary D. W. Kappelmann. Chas. S. Betz...... Aug. J. Holthaus Walter A. Pfautsch. Louis H. Bruns. . .. E. A. Roemer R. C. Murphy Gordian O. Busch.. W. D. Stoenner J. H. Hansen. . . . ..

~

Time of Meeting Charter Date 2nd and 4th Thursdays -::.---:::::. May 26,1864 1st and 3rd Saturdays . June 25, 1866 1st and 3rd Thursdays . Sept. 23, 1908 1st and 3rd Fridays . Oct. 16, 1867 1st Saturday . Oct. 12, 1870 2nd and 4th Thursdays . Oct. 13, 1887 2nd Tuesday . Sept. 28, 1905 2nd and 4th Fridays . Sept. 7, 1907 1st and 3rd Mondays . May 10,1850 1st and 3rd Thursdays . Sept.25, 1912

~

THIRTY-THIRD (A) DISTRICT-WILLIAM ZARADIL, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis City. '1 Missouri. . . . . . . . . ", Beacon.......... " ..\ Mt. Moriah....... " .. Pomegranate..... Erwin Occidental Pyramid Keystone Aurora Paul Revere Tuscan ltaska .. Euclid .. Clifton Heights .. Rose Hill , .. Olive Branch •. Magnolia .. Triangle......... •. Trinity St. Louis Co University St. Louis City .. Commonwealth Purity " Theo. Roosevelt .. ,

liSt. Louis , 31St. Louis , 401St. Louis ' 951St. Louis . 1211St. Louis , 1631St. Louis ..•..... 1801St. Louis .. 243\St. Louis , 2671St. Louis . 3301St. Louis . 3601St. Louis . 4201St. Louis . 5051St. Louis .. 5201St. Louis . 5501St. Louis . 5761St. Louis . 626tSt. Louis ' 638 t St. Louis .. 6411St. Louis .. 649 IUniversity City .. , 6541St. Louis . 6581St. Louis .. 6611St. Louis .

John H. Yahn . John W. Lehmann . E. O. Shoulders . Albert J. Engel . Raymond W. Huning. F. W. Peterson . H. M. Baruch . . G. H. Suelthaus . J os. H. Beare Thomas F. Thiel. . Fred Stueck . F. O. Barnes . Clifford Hervey . Lloyd E. Yates . Thomas J. Rucker , :Francis M. Murphy .. Otto F. Birk . Paul L. Reinholz . R. W. Harney . E. C. Haid . Herman Willer . H. C. Herchenreder .. G. A. Gutmann .

John Wohradsky,Jr. Harvey E. Waldt. .. H. A. Borgmann . Emile E. Vetter . A.A. BlankenmeisteJ C. L. Alexander . R. S. Lorimer . Ch86. W. Speirs . Chas. V. Ehrmann. Wade H. Funk ..•.. Wm. C. Hilmer , . G. E. Black Merle E. Campbell. J. E. Winterton, Jr. Chas. C. Jackson . Fred L. Oatman . James H. Leathers. Henry G. Diller . W. P. Morgan . A. A. Nall . Duval O'Neal . John Heines . R. W. MacDonald .

1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Fridays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays

I-C l:O

o

tr:l

,

. . . . . . . .. . . .

................................

1st and 3rd Mondays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..........•.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .. , . 1st and 3rd Saturdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. 1st and 3rd Mondays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays . 2nd and 4th Mondays .

Sept. 4, 182"1 May 10,1849 Oct. 14,1841 Sept. 21, 1916 May 9,1851 May 29,1856 Oct. 13, 1916 May 26,1865 Oct. 19, 1868 Oct. 26, 1928 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept.21,1917 Oct. 10, 1894 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 26, 1906 Oct. 15. 1918 Sept. 29. 1915 Sept. 21. 1916 Sept. 22. 1921 Sept.21.1921 Sept. 12, 192, Oct. 17. 1928

~

H

Z

o00 o ~

1-3

~

tr:l

.....

~

C.:J

00


I--t

<:.0

~

THIRTY-THIRD (B) DISTRICT-JAMES M. BRADFORD, D. D. G. Mo, St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis City .. .. .. " .. " .. " .. .. .. " .. .. ., " .. " ., .. " " .. " ., " ., " ., ., " ., " .. " .. " " " " . " .. .. ..

Meridian......... Geo. Washington. St. Louis......... Naphtali......... Polar Star....... Pride of the West. Good Hope COSmOB Cornerstone America Cache Anchor West Gate Lambskin Harmony Apollo Algabil Forest Park Tower Grove Mizpah Ben Franklin Pilgrim Progress......... Shaveh..........

21St. Louis 91St. Louis 201St. Louis 251St. Louis 791St. Louis , 1791St. Louis 2181St. Louis 2821St. Louis 323/St. Louis 3471St. Louis 416jSt. Louis , 4431St. Louis 4451St. Louis 4601St. Louis 499ISt.Louis .......•. 5291St. Louis........ 5441St. Louis 5781St. Louis 631/St. Louis 6391St. Louis 6421St. Louis 6521St. Louis 6571 St. Louis. . . . . . 6461St. Louis ......•. '

Emil G. B. Rake Ernest P. Brinkman .. S. M. Weiss August W. Geise Edwin P. Ambler Edw. J. Guetebier Elmer M. Ruffin C. A. Bremer Chas. H. ClOBe, Jr John M. Gallagher Elmer H. J. Schulz J. F. Dueringer Bernard Quinn Ray W. Accola LawrenceJ.Kunkler. AlbertPretz Archibald E. Murphy. E. C. Mittler Lyman T. Walton Winston L. Kirby Wm. Katz C. W. Walden....... H. O. Grob. . . . . . . . .. Stanley J. Miller. . . ..

Arthur V. Schopp .. Robert C. Duffin H. A. Steiner Paul F. Eckardt JOB. L. Kohner Wm. M. Schisler Robt. L. Dixon Sam Broadbent W. R. Schmitt F. Wm. Kuehl. Joseph W. Schuette. A. W. Reiter Edward McGuigan. Ben C. Burroughs .. CecilStreet ....•. ,. George Ruths Arthur C. Scharf Wm. C. Rese John V. Horn Walter H. V068 Morris Popper Theo. C. Teel. Fred J. Mahner , H. W. Williams ,

2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th TuesdaYS , 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 1st and 3rd Mondays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th SaturdaYS 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1stand3rdMondays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Fridays 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd and 4th Thursdays ' 2nd and 4th Tuesdays , 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ...•...... 1st and 3rd ThursdayS. . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays. . . . . . . . . . ..

00

May 6,1862 May 10,1849 Oct. 24,1886 Oct. 14,1839 Oct. 14,1846 May 28,1868 May 30,1861 Oct. 16,1868 Oct. 12,1869 Sept. 17, 1919 Oct. 14,1871 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 11,1888 Oct. 16,1872 Sept. 19, 1917 Sept. 18, 1918 Sept. 19, 1917 Sept. 26, 1906 Oct. 2. 1918 Sept. 29, 1915 Sept. 26, 1916 Sept.21.1921 Oct. 6, 1921 Sept. 22, 1920

G. C. Kimberlin.···.·1 M. G. Holloway C. R. Anderson. . . . .. C. Eggers........... H. H. Miller. . . . . . . ..

P. J. Shepp '1 Wm. A. McCool. L. R. Mitchell. . . . .. F. C. Blossom I. A. Stone. . . . . • . ..

T~~~ili 1i: Y~~~":::. R~; L.·j~h~i~~·.·.

Claude R. White. . . .. J. M. McPherson. . . .. L. P. Hodges. . . . . . . .. J. A. Main "

'.'

J. R068 Thomas. . .. L. H. Garner. . . . . .. E. M. Goodrich J. A. Sears ,

1st and 3rd Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 3rd Saturday . 1st Friday on or before full moon .. Saturday on or before full moon ...

i~t ~~d 3~d·T~~d~Y~::::·.::::::::

2nd Friday . 1st and Srd Mondays . Last Tuesday . 2nd Tuesday .............•.......

Z

~ ~

o

~

o

tJ:j

o

~

~ H

Ul

00

o

THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-ERNEST W. MILLER, D. D. G. M., Belton, Mo. Cass ........• , Index , 54jGarden City . Cass 147IHarrisonville . Grand River .! 2761 Freeman . Wadesburg 348ICreighton . Nonpareil. 3721East Lynne . Dayton 386IDayton . Belton 450IBelton .•......... Jewel. 480lPleasant Hill . Coldwater .....•.. 485IDrexel. . Archie 633jArchie .........•. Cleveland " 6511 Cleveland .

o >

::0

~

Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 17, 1867 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 14, 1880 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 6,1872 Dec. 20, 1887 Oct. 3,1881 Oct. 1,1914 Sept. 20, 1920

~

H

t>:l

1-4 l:J1


t-:l ~

0')

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-DUDLEY O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo. Lodge County Location No.1 Bates ....•.... Hume ............ 130IHume .•......... Amsterdam ...... 1411 Amsterdam ...... Butler ........... 264/Butler ........... ......... RockviIle ........ , 341lRockville ........ ......... Tyrian ........... 360lJohnstown ....... ......... Crescent Hill ..... 3681 Adrian .......... ......... RichHiII ......... 4791Rich Hill ..•..... ......... Foster ........... 6541 Foster ...........

...... .....

......... .........

Maater C. F. Porter ......... J. Kipper ........... H. C. Nicolay ........ E. L. Midkiff ........ J. P. Herman ..•..... P. R. Ewing ......... F. W. Long .......... John W. Hough ......

Secretary Time of Meeting I Virgil McConnell ... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ Ed. Smiser ........ 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. H. M. Cannon ...... 1st and Srd Saturdays ..••..••.... Geo. B. Swezy ...... 1st Thursday ..........•........ B. E. Gilliland ..... Sat. on or before full moon ....•.. A. J. Combest ...... 2nd and 4th Mondays ...... ~ ...... L. F. Anthony ..... 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. O. D. Jennings ..... Every Friday ..............•..•..

Charter Date Oct. 14, 1886 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 15, 1868 Nov. 18, 1900 Oct. 12, 1870 Oct. 13, 1878 Oct. 18, 1881 Oct. 15, 1891

"'d

;d

o

at%j t%j

t1 H

Z

Q

w

THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOLLY P. HURTT, D. D. G. M., Sedalia, Mo. Benton ......• 1 Cole Camp .. . Shawnee .•....... Johnson ....•. Knobn06ter Holden Corinthian Cold Spring Chilhowee pettis 1 Sedalia .. . Granite ......... Green Ridge ......... La Monte

6961Cole Camp 653IWarsaw .......•. 246IKnobnOllter 262IHolden 266IWarrensburg.... 274ILeeton 487IChilhowee....... 236ISedalia 272/Sedalia 4251Green Ridge 6741La Monte

J. F. McGhee L. H. Martin C. L. Saults ...•..•.. E. A. Andruss ......• A. L. Stevenson J. D. Bradshaw R. L. Tarr ..•........ Eldridge Bybee Chaa. T. Plumlee F. W. Smithpeter R. L. Tucker

N. B. Stockton James A. Logan H. A. Wimer J.A. Zion ..•...... H. M. Caah R. A. Brauninger .. R. E. Peyton .•..... W. J. Kennedy Sid B. Kennon ..•.. L. E. Nicholson G. M. Wellman

1st and 3rd Mondays............. 2nd Tuesday .................•... 1st and 3rd FridaYS 1st and 8rd ThursdaYS 1st and 3rd Mondays ...•...••..... 3rd Thursday 1st and 3rd Fridays ........••..•.. 1st Friday 3rd Friday ..•...........•..•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd Friday

o Oct. 28,1926 Sept. 21, 1921 May 26,1865 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 15,1868 Oct. 16,1877 Sept. 27, 1906 May 29,1864 Oct. 15,1868 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 28, 1905

~

~

l:Q t%j

~

CC o:l 00


I-' '-0

THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-THORNTON JENNINGS. D. D. G. 14., Clinton, Mo. Henry ......•. Windsor •••...... Urich . Alrl'ieola . Montrose .•...... Clinton . Calhoun . Blairstown . Deepwater . St. Clair . St. Clair . Circle . Lowry City . Appleton City . Star .

29IWindsor . 286IUrich . 348 1Petersburg , 4081 Montrose . 548lClinton , ....•. 552 ICalhoun . 557/Blairstown . 662 IDeepwater . 27810seeola . 3421 Roscoe . 4031Lowry City . 412/Appleton City . 419/TaberviIle '

G. A. Titsworth . J. E. Crump . H. Cleveneger . E. W. Krenkel. .•.... Rolla H. Bradley ..... C. P. Short .•...•.... A.M. WalL .•....... Raymond Lasswoll. .. R. W. Ginsburg ..•... C. H. Nitchie . J. A. Colley ..•....... V. E. Shoemaker ..•.. F. G. Bausman ..

O. F. Weiss .....•.. R. E. McDonald. . .. R. E. Waugh ....•• , C. P. Gardner. . . . .. C. C. Canan. . . . . .. W. C. Maupin. . . . .. L. H. Fisher. • • . . .. C. E. Leach. .. . . . .. G. W. Davies ......• C. A. Weinlig. . . . .. C. R. Johnson , D. D. Scroggs , Perry Atchison. . ..

1st and 3rd Tuesdays . 1st Friday . Wed. on or b.f.m. and 2 wks. after 1st and 8rd Mondays .. 2nd and 4th Fridays ......•.•..... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ........•... 1st and 3rd Thursdays .•.......... 1st and 3rd Fridays . 4th Thursday ..............••.... Thursday on or before fuII moon ... 1st Friday ................•...... 3rd Monday .....•..•..•.•........ 4th Saturday ..

~

June 2,1866 Oct. 19, 1889 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 15, 1891 July 4,1882 Oct. 17, 1895 Oct. 16, 1869 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1873 Oct. 18, 1871 Oct. 16, 1872

152/Camdenton . 4881Mack's Creek . 83ILebanon . 4321 Competition . 528 IConway ..•...... 375jWaynesviIJe. '" ., 385 IRichland . 2031 Brumley . 41QIIberia .

J. F. Bargenbruch . Joe V. Bonner . Chas. W. Day . Finis E. Dougan . T. Ray Gourley . H. O. Eldredge ..•... G. W. Warren . C. R. Hawkins . M. Earl Kinder .

Daniel B. Claiborn. Eldon Clemmons ... D. D. Joslyn ....•.. Virgil F. Loney .... E. H. Morris ..•.... Roy C. Wilson . H. B. Warren . J. B. WaIL . Chas. L. Brown .

2nd Thursday .......•.•••••...•.. 1st Saturday ............•...••... 1st Wednesday ......•.......•.... 2nd Monday .•.............•...•. Saturday on or before full moon . 2nd Tuesday . 2nd Wednesday .....•..•..•...... Sat. on or before full moon . 1st Friday .........••............

Oct. Oct. May Feb. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

12, 1869 17,1876 25,1854 21, 1908 15, 1886 11, 1888 17,1901 17, 1878 13, 1871

Lebanon......... Cuba Salem Belle Lane's Prairie Vienna.......... Rolla St. James Equality Arlington Latimer

77ISteeviIle 312ICuba 225ISalem 373)Belle 531IVichy 94IVienna 213IRolla 2301St. James 497lNewburg 346IDixon 145ILicking

H. H. Lark ..•..•.... James A. Bland .. James L. Bangert . L. C. Ritterbush . E. J. Snodgrass ....•. Cecil Hutchison . C. D. Hazelwood . Thos. T. Bohon . Lee Johnson . Gayle T. Parker . Bryan Austin .

T. H. Roberta Chas. F. Wilmesher C. Rex Miner. . . . .. H. R. Terrill R. M. Copeland. • .. L. O. Nichols. . . . .• E. E. Decker. . . . . .. 'Urn. J. Moreland <Y. C. Fordyce. '" .. C. W. Schillinger. .. LeRoy Smith. . . • ..

lst Saturday .. 2nd Saturday ......•.•..........• 1st and 3rd Fridays ..•.......•.•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ..•..•...•.. 2nd Saturday . 1st Saturday .............•...•... 1st and 3rd Saturdays . 1st Thursday .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . 3rd Thursday ........••.••••••... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ....•••..•..

Z

tj

otj Q t;rj

oI'%j ~

l-4

r:n

00

oq

THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT-CHARLES L. WOODS, D. D. G. 14., Rolla, Mo. Crawford " Dent " •••••••••. " ••.••••••. Maries ....•... Phelps " " Pulaski. ....•• Texas •......•.

~ >t"4

THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-OREN SIMPSON, D. D. G. M., Richland, Mo. Camden .....•. Linn Creek . Mack's Creek . Laclede ..•.... Laclede .. Competition . " Conway , Pulaski. . Waynesville . Richland ..•...... Miller .. Brumley . Iberia '" ,

00

Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. IS, 1887 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 17,1878 Mar. 6,1906 Oct. 15, 1885 May 30,1861 May 27,1863 Sept.27,1906 Oct. 18, 1870 Oct. 19, 1899

~

t-:l

~

-:J


l\:)

.....

00

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FORTIETH DISTRICT-HARRY H. BALSIGER, D. D. G. M., Crystal City, Mo. County Jefferson .. . ...... ...... Washington .. St. Francois

Lodge De Soto Joachim Shekinah Herculaneum Tyro............. Potosi. Irondale ........• Belgrade 1 Blackwell

No.1 Location 119jDe Soto 164 I HiIlsboro 256/Festus 3381 Herculaneum 12ICaledonia 131 IPotOSi. 143Ilrondale 632IBelgrade 535IBlackwell

I Master .1 c. W. Green j Louis Kohler........ Wm. D. Wheatley , F. ·W. Rachel. " John Kitchell : G. B. Maxwell L. S. Shuler Edward Webb James O. Brod 1

Secretary D. L. Rouggly E. M. Williams Joe Bennett J. V. Cassiedy " Iva Queen Goo. Carr J. B. Robinson E. R. Breckenridge. H. E. Brown

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st Saturday 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Fridays. . . . . . . . . . . . . Saturday on or before full moon Friday on or before full moon 1st and 3rd Saturdays Friday on or before full moon 1st Saturd~y._:-=-.:~~_~..

Charter Date Nov. 16, 1867 May 31,1856 Oct. 17,1868 Oct. 19, 1922 Aug. 7,1825 May 10.1851 May 6,1864 Oct. 1,1914 OcL_.t3.1887

'i:I

;d

o l.} t.%.l t.%.l tj H

Z

Q

rn

o

FORTY-FIRST DISTRICT-MORRIS E. EWING, D. D. G. M., Morrisville, Mo.

....

Dallas ........ Riddick .......... ........ Western Light ... ........ Urbana .......... Hickory ...... , Hogle's Creek .... ....... Hermitage ....... Polk ....•... ,. Fair Play ........ .......... Modern .......... .......... Pleasant ......... .......... Bolivar .......... .......... Pleasant Hope .... .......... Aldrich ..........

.

361IBuffalo .......... 3961 Louisburg ....... 421lUrbana ....... , .. 279/Wheatland ....... 288lHermitage ....... 44IFair Play ........ 144 IHumansville ..... 160lMorrisville ....... 195 IBolivar .......... 4671 Pleasant Hope ... 664jAldrich ..........

R. E. Harrell ........ L. B. Montgomery ... A. L. Carter ......... J. Fisher Murphy .... J. S. Ingram ......... W. M. Price ......... Paul K. Pritchard .... Wm. Marsh ......... R. L. Trogdon ....... R. J. Cochran ........ M. W. Stewart .......

W. C. Hawkins, Jr.. R. S. Lindsay ...... W. E. Seaton ...... J. M. Murphy ...... Isaac W. Clark ..... H. O. Cure ......... Monroe A. Fields ... C. L. Hamilton ..... C. E. Schooley ..... F. P. Slagle ........ J. S. Toalson. . . . . ..

4th Friday ....................... Saturday on or before full moon ... 4th Saturday ..................... 1st Saturday ..................... 3rd Monday ..................... 2nd Thursday .................... 2nd Friday ...................... 2nd Tuesday ..................... 2nd Wednesday .. ~ ............... Thursday on or before full moon ... 1st Tuesday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Dec. Oct.

13, 1871 13, 1891 14, 1886 15, 1868 15, 1868 18, 1900 19, 1867 27, 1867 19, 1867 17,1893 26, 1927

~ ~

~

t.%.l

......

<:C ~

00


~

\.0

FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT-oLYDE H. TINSLEY, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo. C~ar ....•....

Dade

Stockton Jerusalem Clintonville . Washington Garrett ....•..... Everton Melville _, Lockwood

283IStockton 3151Jerico Springs 4821Eldorado Springs. 87IGreenfield 359IArcola 405IEverton 458jDadeville........ 521ILockwood

W. E. Williams J. C. Skaggs E. F. Pentec08t...... Phillip Griffith T. W. Higgins C. E. Bain T. J. McConnell T. S. Carter.........

C. C. Gill GUY Farmer C. B. Herndon F. E. young T. R. Owens Willard T. Burton .. A. C. Blakemore... W. H. Davis

~

1st and 3rd Thu-rsdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays. 4th Tuesday 2nd Thursday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Thurs. on or b.f. m. and 2 wks. aft. 2nd and 4th Thursdays...........

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

16,1869 23,1896 15,1874 12,1847 13,1870 15,1885 17,1873 11,1883

00

Q

::d

FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT-DAVID V. MORRIS, D. D. G. M., Nevada, Mo. Vernon ..•.... Osage....... Sheldon Schell City. . . . . .. Montevallo Vernon Unity , Walker Barton . Hermon. Lamar Signal Golden Milford

.

303INevada 371ISheldon .....•... 448/Schell City , 490IMontevallo 493jBronaugh 495IRichards 6051 Walker 187ILiberaI. 292ILamar 304IMindenmines , 4751Golden City. . . . .. 516IMilford

K. C. Corbett . T. F. Dowell . Russel Blakely . Robt. Cook . T. S. Funk . W. R. Holder . M. R. Piotrowski. . E. R. Bingham . Otis Smith . V. W. Nygren . Phillip Phillips ..•... J. Louis Davisson .. ,.

D. V. Morris 1 2nd Friday W. G. Jones '11st and 3rd Thursdays C. P. Funks " 2nd Wednesday W. S. Kokendoffer.. 1st and 3rd Saturdays S. P. Linn ' 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays C. H. Newland John A. Jones 1st and 3rd Wednesdays E. H. R08elle 1st and 3rd Thursdays W. A. Heydenback. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Ray Goff , 2nd Tuesday A. Farr. . . . . . . . . .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays J. C. Thomas. . . . .. 3rd Saturday

>

. . . . . .. . . . . . .

Oct. 15, 1868 May 23,1895 Oct. 17,1873 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 12, 1876 Oct. 17, 1895 Sept. 29, 1909 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 81, 1905 Oct. 16, 1874 Oct. 12, 1882

........ Carthage Sarcoxie Joplin Fellowship Jasper Carterville Mineral Webb City Carl Junction Criterion La Russell

' 197ICarthage........ 293ISarcoxie 3351Joplin ..•........ 345IJoplin , 398IJasper 401ICarterville 47110ronogo 6121Webb City 6491Carl Junction 686IAlba 5921La Russell

A. B. Wheeler , R. K. Holder Sims A. Wilson L. Roy Hoffman A. V. Ayers......... Cecil H. yates ..•.... Leslie Cahill , D. C. Morris W. C. Cooley V. E. Byers E. F. Cochran

Ernest Davis , Paul V. Martin.... S. A. Smith D. Ray Grayston C. L. Hayzlett Clement E. Ault H. L. Keys T. A. Harbaugh J. W. Fowler. J. W. Hart Otis Vickroy

2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Fridays 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 1st and 3rd Saturdays

tj ~

otj

Q trj

o

~

~

H

W 00

oq

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-GEO. DILLARD, D. D. G. M., Joplin, Mo. J~per

Z

.. . . . . . . .. , . .

Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 21, 1921

t:O H

l\:) ~

\.0


~ ~

o LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FORTY-FIFTH DISTRIOT- JEWELL E. WINDLE, D. D. G. M., Springfield, Mo. County I Lodge INo.1 Location Greene •..•.••. United........... 6lSpringfield . " •••..••. O'Sullivan....... 71Walnut Grove . •••.••.. Ash Grove....... 100lAsh Grove . ........ Solomon •..•..... 271ISpringfield ..•.•.• ........ Ozark 2971Fair Grove . ....... Gate of Temple 422ISpringfield . ........ Republic 570IRepublic . · Strafford........ 608IStrafford . · Willard 620IWilIard . Webster .....• Webster......... 98IMarshfield . " • • . • •• Doric............ 800 IElkland . ..••..• Mount Olive 489IRogersville,R.R.8 ..•.... Hazelwood 409ISeymour ........• ....... Henderson 477IRogersville .

Master H. Z. Morris .......•. J. F. Sherman . M. L. Hansen . H. E. Spencer . Ed Leach . Garvin H. Dyer . Ronald Cowden . H. D. Key . W. Clay Cloud . B. McDaniel . Roy Price . W. L. McDowell . E. P. Carter . John Johnson .

FORTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-JOHN H. Douglas " " ,. Texas " ......... ...•..... Wright .....•. " · ...•... •...•.•. ........

Ava............. Pilot Knob Mt. Ararat .....•. Barnes Texas Plato ..•.......•• Summersville Mountain Grove .. Joppa Mansfield........ Grovespring Norwood

26jAva ...•.....•... 182\Richville 882ITopaz........... 116ICabool. 177IHouston 469IPlato 005ISummersville 1581Mountain Grove .. 411IHartville 04S IMansfield . • . . . . •. 589jGrovespring 622INorwood

L. H. Pettit C. M. Cearley

Secretary I Time of Meeting M. F. Smith 8rd Monday .•.......••........... J. G. Page. . . . . . . .. 2nd Tuesday .........•..•.•••.... J. H. Turk 4th Thursday ..........•......... V. F. Anderson 2nd Monday . J. M. Gardner. . . . .. 2nd Thursday ' . Edw. H. Clark. . . .. Srd Thursday . E. L. Britain. . . . . .. 2nd and 4th Thursdays . Walter Ricard 1st and 8rd Thursdays . Phonso Fortner .. " 1st Thursday ..................•.. P. V. Rathbun 2nd Friday . G. F. Price , Saturday on or before full moon . Otto Brooks. . . . . .. Friday before full moon ....•...... E. B. Mayfield Thur.on or b.f.m.and 2 wks.after. A. P. Martin. . . . . .. 3rd Thursday .....•..............

moKS, D. D.

Charter Date May SO, 1807 Oct. 19, 1867 Dec. 19, 1899 Oct. 10, 1868 Oct. 10, 1868 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 28, 1900 Sept. 28, 1910 Sept.26, 1912 May 28,1858 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 16. 1872 May 8.1874

1st and 8rd Wednesdays Saturday on or before full moon ..• •.......................•....... W. H. Petefish A. J. McKinney 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Oscar Coats L. B. Curtis 2nd Wednesdays Wm. B. Tilley R. E. Daniels 1st Monday ..•...••...........•.. J. E. Summers .....•. Lee Bell 2nd Monday ..•............••••.. J. B. Denton John H. Hicks 4th Friday J. R. Mott R. F. Adams 1st and 8rd Fridays Floyd A. Steffe. . . . . .. Chas. A. Stephens.. 2nd Tuesday. . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . • .. A. J. Webb Glen Smith ' 8rd Saturday .•.........•...•••.. R. L. Ferguson...... Oscar Freeman. , 1st and 3rd Thursdays

E:3 tr.1 t:t H Z

o w o

~

G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo.

L. E. Reynolds L. O. Dickison

"tI

::t1

o

Oct. 1,1887 Oct. 17,1895 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 19,1867 Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 15,1891 Oct. 15,1885 Oct. 16,1872 Oct. 10, 1891 Oct. 26.1907 Sept. 10, 1912

1-:3

P:l

t9

~ ~ ~

ex>


~

~

C\j

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-JOHN N. SPARKS, D. D. G. M., Grandin, Mo. Carter Rey?,olds Shannon

"

. Van Buren Grandin . Hopewell Barnesville . Delphian Winona Eminence

. 509jVan Buren . 579lGrandin . 2391 Lesterville . 353 IEllington ' 1371Birch Tree . 430lWinona . 6071 Eminence

.. . . . . .. .

Isaac Bucy W. E. Harris Burlin Sizemore C. M. Buford A. S. J. Carnahan J. Talmadge Loyd Henry RobiIlBon

. . . . . . .

R. L. Coleman W. E. McKinney C. R. Burroughs P. B. Smith C. O. LemoIlB J. T. Loyd A. Claud Smith

00

. Saturday on or after full moon . . 2nd Saturday . . 4th Thursday .........•.......... . 4th Tuesday . . 3rd Saturday . . Thursday on or before full moon . . 1st Saturday .

Aug. 12, Sept. 27, Oct. 13, Sept. 27, Oct. 17, Oct. 10, Sept. 29,

1882 1906 1881 1906 1895 1894 1909 Q l;I:1

>

FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-J. CLYDE AKERS, D. D. G. M., Farmington, Mo. Iron

. Star of the West .. Mosaic ' Madison . Marcus . St. Francois .. , Bismarck . Farmington . Ionic . St. Francois , Samaritan . Pendleton . Leadwood . Elvins . Ste. Genevieve. Saline .

133lIronton 3511 Belleview 1101Fredericktown 41lBismarck 132 IFarmington 1541 Desloge 2341 Libertyville 4241Bonne Terre 5511Doe Run 598lLeadwood 5091 Flat River 226/St. Mary's

, . . . ' . . . . . . .

Adrian W. Buckey L. F. Hatridge Dick Ford Fremont Shaner J. W. young Paul Blunt Leslie Ellis C. L. Adams J. A. Meidert. Fred T. Westlund G. V. Graf Hy Schroeder '"

. . . . .. . . . . . . .

Frank H. Comfort. '1 R. B. Moore. . . . . . .. Earl B. Graham 1 M. W. Baker. . . . . .. J. C. Akers J. L. Blunt ' P. A. Cashion. . . . .. H. C. Thompson. . .. B. R. Hunt. . . . . . .. J. M. Link J. E. La Breyere. .. J. F. Bartels "

2nd and 4th Fridays 1st Saturday 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Mondays 1st Thursday 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Saturdays 2nd and 4th Saturdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st Saturday

Z

. . . . . , . . . . . .

May 1,1851 Oct. 13, 1870 May 24,1862 Dec. 15,1891 May 10,1851 Oct. 17,1901 May 26,1864 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 13, 1908 Sept. 30, 1908 May 29,1862

t;

t-t

o

t;

Q t;j

o"%j ~ H

00 00

o

~

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT-W. GLENN McCAIN, D. D. G. M., Cape Girardeau, Mo. Boll!~ger..... CapeGi~,ardeau

Trowel. Zalma St. Mark's West View Wilson MyStic Tie Whitewater Excelsior

' . . . , . . .

440lMarble Hill . 545\Zalma . 931Cape Girardeau .. 103lMillersville . 1911 Pocahontas .. , . 22110ak Ridge . 417IWhitewater ..•... 441IJackson .

T. E. Graham Virgil Payne Wm. M. Barks Dale S. Miller A. E. Ackman F. H. Bruihl. R. B. Nothdurft H. A. Steinhoff

. E. J. Taylor . . E. A. Schrader . . W. Glenn McCain .. . Geo. W. Howard , . H. R. SteveIlBon . . J. R. J enkiIlB . . Daniel F. Jones . . A. G. Penzel. .

2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd Saturday 2nd Friday 1st and 3rd Saturdays 2nd and 4th Fridays 2nd and 4th Thursdays

~

. . .. . . . . .

Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 14, 1847 June 8,1866 Oct. 16, 1879 May 30,1861 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 16, 1872

~

~


t>J t>J t>J

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTIETH DISTRICT-GEORGE A. SAMPLE, D. D. G. M., Chatfee, Mo. County Lodge Mississippi .... East Prairie ..... .... Charleston ....... Scott ......... Morley ......... , ......... Ashlar .......... , ......... Sikeston ......... Illmo ............ ......... Blodgett ......... Chaffee .......... Stoddard ...... Bloomfield ...... , Esaex ........... ' Lakeville ......... Dexter ........... Advance ......... Puxico ........... New Madrid ... Morehouse .......

.. .....

..

.... ..

......

...... ......

Location No.1 3841 East Prairie ....• 4071 Charleston .....•. 184lMorley .........• 306lCommerce ....... 310 1Sikeston .....•..• 681IIllmo ............ 694 IBlodgett ...... , .. 616lChaffee ......•... 168lBloomfield .... , •. 278IEsaex ........... 4891Bell City ......... 6321 Dexter .......... 690IAdvance .....•... 696JPuxico .......... 608jMorehouse .......

I Master S. E. Drennan ....... R. C. Marshall ....... C. L. Halford ........ G. W. Marshall ...... J. B. Martin ......... W. W. Napper ....... E. R. Tisdell ......... J. Ray Abernathy .... Scott Reed ........... C. E. Smith ....... '" G. N. Oakley ........ LeeRoy Warren ...... W. F. Morgan ....... Harry White ........ W. T. Wafford .......

Secretary I R. M. Walden ...... J as. A. Boone ...... G. C. Blocker ....... W. B. Sander ...... A. A. Harrison ..... BenHill ........... Geo. W. Pearman .. , M. H. Stubblefield .. Goo. L. Fopay ...... E. Y. Launius ...... Gus Keller ......... Vane Brannock .... C. C. O'Nea!. ...... G. H. Fuson ....... E. W. Leming ......,

Time of Meeting Thursday of each week ........... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 2nd and 4th Fridays .............. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............ 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 1st and 8rd Wednesdays .......... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 3rd Saturday ..................•. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 1st and 8rd Thursdays ............ 1st and 8rd Mondays ............. 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...........

Charter Date Dec. 29, 1904 Oct. 18, 1893 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 14, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 17, 1907 Sept. 28, 1911 May 28,1869 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 12, 1874 Oct. 18, 1887 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 30, 1908 Sept. 29, 1909

FIFTY-FIRST DISTRICT-THOMAS R. WILKINS, D. D. G. 14., Campbell, Mo.

..

Dunklin .....• , Kennett. . . . .. . . . Four Mile .....•.. Hornersville ..... ' Cardwell ......•.. Malden Senath ..•....... New Madrid::. Portageville " Point Pleasant New Madrid Parma " .' Pemiscot . Caruthersville .. ,. Hayti. ' Steele. . • . . . .. . .. Stoddard . Bernie ,.

..

..

68jKennett ..•...... 212ICampbell . 2161 Hornersville . 231ICardwell , 406IMalden ........•. 613ISenath ........•• 166IPortageville . 176jConran . 4291New Madrid . 660IParma . 4611Caruthersville 671IHayti. . 634ISteele . 673IBernie .

J. M. Hicklin . Robert A. Whiteaker . Archie A. Young .... , H. D. Meadows ....•. R. C. Patterson . W. P. Montgomery . . G. R. Heaney J. L. Litelberger . Jake Shainberg . Wm. B. Sharp . P. A. Wright . . C. J. Morgan Sims Michie . Herschel Kinkade .

M. F. Simer . . R. D. Whiteaker B. P. Parks . W. K. Lockard . L. O. Wicecarver . Raymond Toombs .. A. L. Carnahan . L. F. Lafont . C. M. Barnes . J. P. Salyer .....•.. F. H. Blomeyer . H. B. Bryant , . M. L. Kelley William Jones .

2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Mondays , 1st and 3rd Wednesdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays ' 2nd and 4th Mondays . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays . 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............• 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Fridays '

Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30,1861 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 18, 1881 Oct. 27, 1902 Oct. 11, 1890 May 80,1867 Oct. 17,1878 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 28, 1906 Oct. 1,1914 Sept. 8, 1906

'"0

l;d

o

o

tri tri

ti

H

Z

o00 oI:;j 8

~

tz.j

~

c.o

~

00


~

~

Cl,j

00

FIFTY-SEOOND DISTRIOT-KIPP O. JOHNSON, D. D. G. M., Poplar Blu1f, Mo. Butler RiJ?!ey

Wa;rne

. Poplar Bluff. . . . .. " . Pine Composite Naylor '" . Greenville Wayne. . . . . . .

2091 Poplar Bluff . 314IBardley .. 369IDoniphan . 568INaylor ...••..... 107IGreenville . 526jPiedmont .

Omar F. Coats ... ; •.. I. E. Newberry. . . • .. C. E. Williamson.. . .. W. C. Koehler. . . . . .. M. M. Shiffman. . . . .. R. W. McGhee

Art H. Harwell .... Clyde Turner ....•. A. L. Showman . J. W. Abernathy . C. L. Ellinghouse . W. E. Hamacher .

2nd and 4th Tuesdays 3rd Saturday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Saturdays

. . · . . .

May Oct. Oct. Nov. Oct. Oct.

31,1861 11, 1888 18, 1871 29, 1904 14, 1886 15, 1885 Q ~

>-

FIFTY-TUmD DISTRIOT-C. EARL ARMSTRONG, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo. . Mt. Zion Ingomar Mountain View Or~~on ....... Alton Woodside Clifton Koshkonong Ozark . Sampson........ Bayou Rockbridge Robert Burns Howell

327jWest Plains 5361WiIlow Springs .. 6871Mountain View .. 255IAlton 387IThomasville 468IThayer ..•....... 582IKoshkonong 298ILutie 365IBakersfield 435IRockbridge 496-IGainesville

Wayland Ford M. E. Squires M. E. Smith F. O. young ..•...... D. D. Frey ........•.. A. McKenzie C. W. Pease Earl Friend ........• Virgil Wiles D. P. Wade L. F. Ebrite

Eugene N. Laird .•. J. S. Whitten Ralph Penninger Geo. C. Martin C. A. Elliott Albert A. Taber E. Middlestedter A. J. Logan....... Allen Ferguson.... C. E. Hicks E. W. Ebrite

1st and 3rd Fridays .. 2nd Tuesday . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . Saturday on or before full moon . Saturday on or before full moon . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ........•... 2nd Wednesday .........•........ Saturday before third Sunday . Saturday on or before full moon . 2nd Saturday .. 2nd Friday ..•...................

Z

Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 18, 1887 Sept. 29, 1915 May 24,1868 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 18, 1881 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 11, 1877

t1

t'"

o

t1 t::J

Q

o

~

~ H

00 00

o q

FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRIOT-JOBN TAYLOR, D. D. G. M., Ozark, Mo. Sparta Friend ..•........ Billings . Claflin Kirbyville ......•. Forsyth Branson '" . Galena Crane

Christian ..•..

..

Taney

..

Stone

296ISparta 35210zark 379IBillings 229IProtem 264jHollister•........ 453jForsyth 587jBranson ..•...... 515lGalena. .. 519ICrane

James Rathbun W. A. Rainey ..•..•.. E. R. Head Chas. Parks ........• C. M. Parkey H. L. Shields H. R. Melton........ .....•..•...•....... Clarence Bennage

A. M. Alexander... G. T. Breazeale E. A. Stellwagon W. T. Holt R. J. Bushnell Henry M. Blunk S. P. Winch....... . .•............... , D. A. Holderman

Saturday on or before full moon . Saturday on or before full moon . 2nd Thursday ...•••.......•.•.... Saturday on or before full moon . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st Saturday . 1st and 8rd Fridays .. ...•.......................•.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ..

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

21, 1888 18, 1870 13, 1881 17,1889 18, 1900 16, 1872 26, 1907 12, 1882 22, 1896

~

H

t.:> t.:>

Cl,j


t\:) t\:) ~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-CHARLES WERDEIN, D. D. G. M., Aurora, Mo. Lodge ' Monett Purdy Barry Pythagoras Seligman Comfort. Lawrence ..... Mount Vernon Canopy Marionville Decatur Red Oak Stinson Miller County Barry

..

I

. . . . . . . . . . . , .

'No.1 Location Master 129IMonett . A. R--:-Biggerstiff::-:-:·. 148IPurdy . T. C. Crawford...... 367IWashburn . N. E. Edens 383ICllBSville ' James D. Dopp " W. B. Hammers 617 ,Seligman .. , 533IWheaton . Loyd F. Ghan. . . . . . .. 991Mount Vernon . F. R. Howell 284lAurora . Delbert Hilton. . . . . .. 390lMarionville . V. W. Anderson 400lPierce City . K. I. Cowan....... .. . J. H. Koontz. . . . . . . .. 4681Red Oak 523/Stinson . Arch Richensin " 567IMiller . O. E. Bowman

Secretary R. C. Farrow . W. F. Carter . John Black . W. T. Priest . L. E. Fawner . Joe A. Frazier . Leon Pugh . W. H. Lloyd . J. D. McCullah . E. T. Ecroyd , . W. A. Clyman . Lee J. yingst . Charles Henry .

Time of Meetin~ 1st and 3rd Fridays " 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Saturdays . 2nd and 4th Saturdays . 2nd and 4th Thursdays , . 2nd Thursday . 1st and 3rd Fridays . 2nd and 4th Tuesdays .. 1st and 3rd Fridays .............• 1st and 3rd Thursdays . 1st and 3rd Thursdays . Saturday on or after full moon . 1st and 3rd Wednesdays .

Charter Date Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 7, 1884 Oct. 13, 1858 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 19, 1868 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 17,1871 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 22, 1902 Sept. 29, 1904

~

pj

oo

tzj tzj

tJ H

Z

Q

'(j)

o

~

1-3

P::

FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-WALTER A. PHIPPS, D. D. G. M., Neosho, Mo. McDonald ..... Southwest Anderson NoeL Newton . Racine Neosho Granby Stella

. . . ' . . .

4661 Southwest City . M. W. Woods . C. A. Allman 621 I Anderson 647jNoel. . J. W. Howerton 478lSeneca . L. D. Laughlin 247/Neosho . L. R. England 514/Granby , . F. A. Scholes 538IStella . Ed Jones

. . . . . . .

W. F. Stevenson .. '11st and 3rd Tuesdays Henry Eppard. . . .. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays B. F. St. Clair "lIst and 3rd Wednesdays J. S. Rhea '12nd and 4th Mondays F. H. Gulick. . . . . .. 1st and 3rd Thursdays Will W. Scholes. . .. 1st and 3rd Mondays Noble C. Jessee .. ,. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays

t<:l

. . . . . . .

Jan. 22, 1892 Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15, 1874 May 28,1856 Oct. 22, 1902 Oct. 17, 1889

~ ~

CA:l

00


~

CO

CIj

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-mWIN F. ROSENFELDER, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo.

.. .....

St. Louis. . . . .. Bonhomme ...... , . Bridgeton ........ ...... Webster Groves .. ..... , Fenton .......... ...... Meramec ........ ...... Kirkwood ........ ...... Ferguson ........ ..... , Maplewood ....... ...... Clayton .......... ...... Wellston ......... ...... Valley Park ... , . , ...... Jennings ........ ...... Gardenville. , ....

.....

.

..... .. ......

45IBallwin .......... 80 ISt. John's Station, 841Webster Groves .. 281IFenton ......•... 313lEureka .......... 484IKirkwood ........ 5471 Ferguson ........ 5661 Maplewood ...... 6011 Clayton ......... 613lWellston ........ ' 629 IValley Park ...... 640lJennings ........ 655 !Gardenville ......

Henry E. Falluo ..... Chas. W. Harig ...... H. J. Hassfurther ... , David F. Bawles ..... Mathias Miller ....... F. M. Cockran ....... Stephen D. LaBerge., Wm. A. Seigel. ...... Geo. T. Williams ..... Lee. O. Chestnut ..... R. S. Hazen ......... Oliver R. Koeneman .. George P. Utter ......

H. F. Woerther .... Walter Reinemer ... Geo. A. Shepardson Geo. Fuchs ........, George E. Mottert .. Herman Schroeder. Harry A. Magoon .. J. W. Menaugh .... Gordon Anderson .. ' Cecil A. Tolin ...... B. F'. Feldman ..... Harry F. Sylvester. Florian Wolz ......

1st and 3rd Saturdays ............ 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Saturdays ........... , 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 1st and 3rd Fridays .............. , 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 2nd and 4th Thursdays ........... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Saturdays ............

00

Oct. 9. Oct. 14. Oct. 21, Oct. 15. Oct. 19. Oct• 5. Oct. 16. Sept. 29. Sept. 30. Sept. 28. Oct. 2. Sept.21, Sept. 21,

1841 1846 1897 1868 1923 1874 1889 1904 1908 1911 1913 1916 1921

o t:d >Z t:1

t"l

FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-ANDREW B. STANLEY, D. D. G. Morgan·······1 Glensted .. . .•.... Versailles .. . Barnett Miller Ole~n Ioma

j25 0 IGlensted·········1 320IVersailles , , 591IBarnett 13410Iean 381IEldon

G. T. Scott P. F. Eckhoff Robt. Frost G. R. Haynes J. L. Morrow

1

,'

M. A. Lammert W. B. Todd C. R. Tompkins H. A. Weneke Ford Vaughan

~.,

o t:1 o

Eldon, Mo.

Saturday on or before full moon 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd Saturday 3rd Saturday 2nd and 4th Mondays

Oct. 18.1900 Oct. 18.1923 Sept. 6.1907 June30.1860 Oct. 13.1871

t.':l

o

~

~

H

r.J2 r.J2

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT-NAT D. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo.

.... .... .. .. ....

Jackson ...... , Independence ... , ....... Summit ......... , ...... McDonald ........ Blue Springs ..... ...... Raytown ......... Christian ........ " ....... Buckner ......... ....... Marlborough ..... ....... Mt. Washington .. " . . . . . . , Grandview ...... , . ..... , Grain Valley ... , .

.

761 Independence .... 2631Lee's Summit. '" 3241 Independence .... 3371Blue Springs ..... 391IRaytown ........ 39210ak Grove ....... 501 IBuckner .....•... 56918534 Woodl'd.K.C. 6141Mt. Washington .. 6181 Grandview. . . . . .. 6441Grain Valley .....

F. F. Livesay ........ Wesley Burton ..•.... Archie H. Smith ..... Alva Rutherford ..... W. E. Pettegrew ..... G. E. Church ........ V. M. Reppert ....... Fred J. Kerr ......... F. C. Herbster ....... Paul Dillon .......... Roy Moore .......... ,

R. B. Strader ...... Jesse Boyd ........ , W. Lee Whitmire .. , F. W. Tuttle ....... Morris Stout ....... R. E. Livesay ...... John Ahrens ....... E. B. Chapmann ... G. B. Christy ....... Gilbert Strode ...... Clyde A. Fristoe ....

2nd and 4th Mondays ............. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Mondays ............. ' 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 1st and 3rd Thursdays ............ 1st and 3rd Fridays ............... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ............. 1st and 3rd Mondays .............. 2nd and 4th FridayS .............. 1st and 3rd Thursdays ......•..... 2nd and 4th TuesdayS ............ ,

Oct. 14. 1846 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 12. 1869 Oct. 13. 1887 Oct. 13. 1871 Oct. 13. 1871 Oct. 11. 1877 Oct. 26. 1927 Oct. 17,1911 Sept. 28, 1911 Sept. 21, 1916

oq

l:d H

~ ~

Cl


LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI

~ ~

O':l

FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election April,1821 . Oct., 1821. . Oct., 1822 . Oct., 1823 . Oct., 1824 . Oct., 1825 . Oct., 1826 . Oct., 1827 . Oct., 1828 . Oct., 1829 . Oct., 1830 .•.. Dec., 1831 . Oct., 1832 : Dec., 1833 . Nov., 1834 § Oct., 1836 .. tt Oct., 1836 . Oct., 1837 . Oct., 1838 . Oct., 1839 . Oct., 1840 .••• Oct., 1841 ..•• Oct., 1842 . Oct., 1843 . Oct., 1844 . Oct., 1846 . Oct., 1846 . Oct., 1847 . May, 1848 . May, 1849 . May, 1850 . May, 1861. . May, 1862 . June, 1863 . May, 1864 .

Grand Muter Thos. F. Riddick .. Nath'l B. Tucker ..• Nath'l B. Tucker .. N ath'l B. Tucker ..• Nath'l B. Tucker .. Edward Bates ....• Edward Bates ....• Edward Bates ....• Hardage Lane ....• Hardage Lane ....• Hardage Lane .... Edward Bates ....• H. R. Gamble • Sinclair Kirtley • A. B. Chambers • A. B. Chambers S. W. B. Carnegy.· S. W. B. Carnegy.· S. W. B. Carnegy.· P. H. McBride P. H. McBride P. H. McBride • P. H. McBride P. H. McBride J. W. S. Mitchell .. J. W. S. Mitchell .. John Ralls Joseph Foster Joseph Foster ....• John F. Ryland • John F. Ryland • B. W. Grover ....• • • B. W. Grover Wilson Brown L. S. Cornwell

D. Grand Muter

....................

Thompson Dougla88 • Thompson Dougla88 Goo. H. C. Melody ... • Goo. H. C. Melody ...• Geo. H. C. Melody ... • Hardage Lane .....• Hardage Lane .....• Geo. H. C. Melody ...• Fred L. Billon ......• Goo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • A. B. Chambers ....• Sinclair Kirtley ....• Sinclair Kirtley ....• John D. Daggett ....• John D. Daggett ....• John D. Daggett ....• A. B. Chambers ....• J 08eph Foster ...•.• J oab Bernard ......• J oab Bernard ......• Joseph Foster .....• Fred L. Billon ......• John D. Taylor .....• John D. Taylor .....• E. S. Ruggles ......• E. S. Ruggles ......• E. S. Ruggles • B. W. Grover .......• E. S. Ruggles ......• S. F. Currie • L. S. Cornwell • D. P. Wallingford ..•

Senior G. Warden J ames Kennerly ..• Edward Bates ....• Edward Bates Edward Bates Wm. G. Pettus Wm. G. Pettus Martin Ruggles ..• Martin Ruggles ..• H. R. Gamble • H. R. Gamble • Sinclair Kirtley ..• Oliver Parker ....• M. J. Noyes • John Wilson .....• Oliver Parker ....• Oliver Parker ....• Edward Searcey ..• A. B. Chambers ...• A. B. Chambers ... • Alex. T. Douglass.· Alex. T. Douglass.· Joseph Foster .... Joseph Foster ....• J. W. S. Mitchell .. • E. S. Ruggles .....• E. S. Ruggles .....• E. S. Ruggles .....• J. L. F. Jacoby ...• CyrUS Osborn ..... • Joseph Megguire .. • P. Draper ........• S. F. Currie .......• J. H. Turner ..... • J. W. Chenoweth .. • James H. Britton .. •

Junior G. Warden William Bates • William Bates '" • Wm. G. Pettus • Wm. G. Pettus • Thornt. Grimsley • Thornt. Grimsley • John F. Ryland. '" .• H. R. Gamble • Adam L. Mills ......• Adam L. Mills ......• Adam L. Mills • Augustus Jones • Augustus Jones .....• G. A. Tuttle ........• S. W. B. Carnegy ...• S. W. B. Carnegy ...• Granville Snell ......• Thomu Andrews ...• Alex. T. Douglass ...• Wm. C. Vance • John Orrick ........• C. H. Bowers . . C. H. Bowers E. S. Ruggles • J. L. F. Jacoby • J. L. F. Jacoby .....• J. L. F. Jacoby Cyrus Osborn J 08eph Megguire P. Draper S. F. Currie J. H. Turner • S. H. Saunders R.C.Hill •

..,

-.

Grand Treuurer Archibald Gamble Archibald Gamble Archibald Gamble Archibald Gamble Archibald Gamble • Archibald Gamble • Rich. T. McKinney ..• Thornton Grimsley .. Thornton Grimsley .. • Bernard Pratte .....• Thomas Andrews • Thomas Andrews • Thomas Andrews • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody • Geo. H. C. Melody John Simonds • Fred L. Billon • John S. Watson • John S. Watson • John S. Watson • John S. Watson • John S. Watson John M. Reed • J. T. Johnson • J. T. Johnson J. T. Johnson • Joseph Foster Joseph Foster •

Grand Secretary William RenshawWilliam RenshawWilliam Renshaw· T. Douglas· T. Douglas· John D. Daggett· John D. DaggettJohn D. Daggett· John D. DaggettJohn D. Daggett· Fred L. BillonFred L. Billon· Fred L. BillonJohn GarnettTh08. W. Conyers· Thos. W. Conyers· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. DalIamRichard B. Dallam· Richard B. DalIam· Richard B. DallamRichard B. Dallam· Fred L. BillonFred L. BillonJ. W. S. Mitchell· J. W. S. Mitchell· C. D. W. Johnson· C. D. W. Johnson· C. D. W. Johnson· A. O'SullivanA. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan·

!-oj ~

o

ot'j. ttj

tj H

Z

o00 o ~

1-3

= t tj

~

c:.o ~

00


~

May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, May, Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct.,

1855 ...• 1856 .•.. 1857 •.•. 1858 .•.. 1859 ••.. 1860 ..•. 1861. . 1862 . 1863 . 1864 . 1865 . 1866 •.•. 1867 ..•• 1868 . 1869 . 1870 . 1871. . 1872 . 1873 ...• 1874 ...• 1875 ...• 1876 ...• 1877 .... 1878 ...• 1879 .... 1880 ...• 1881. .. , 1882 .... 1888 ...• 1884 .... 1885 ..•• 1886 ..•• 1887 .... 1888 ...• 1889 ...• 1890 .... 1891. .•• 1892 .•.. 1898 ..•• 1894 .••• 1895 ..••

L. S. Cornwell .... • Benjamin Sharp •.• S. H. Saunders • • S. H. Saunders Marcus Boyd ..•..• M. H. McFarland.· Wm. R. Penick ..•• Geo. Whitcomb • John H. rfurner • John F. Houston .. • John F. Houston .. • John D. Vincil ....• W. E. Dunscomb .. • John D. Vinci) ....• William D. Muir .. • Thos. E. Garrett .. • Th08. E. Garrett .. • Samuel H. Owens.· R. E. Anderson ... • John W. Luke .....• James E. Cadle ... • Xen. Ryland ......• T. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • J 08. S. Browne • W. R. Stubblefield.· Alex. M. Dockery .. • Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall • Robt. F. Stevenson· James W. Boyd ... • Geo. R. Hunt ......• Wm. M. Williams ..• James P. Wood ~ Theodore Brace • Goo. E. Walker • B. H. Ingram • John R. Parson • Harry Keene ......• J. B. Thomas • A. M. Hough •

.................. •• W. A. Cunningham .. P. Draper .........• Marcus Boyd ......• M. H. McFarland. . .• • W. R. Penick John Decker .......• John H. Turner • Wm. N. Loker • John D. VinciI. • John D. Vinci) • W. E. Dunscomb. . . .• C. A. Rowley • R. E. Anderson...... T. E. Garrett • R. E. Anderson • • R. E. Anderson J. E. Ryland .•..... • John W. Luke • Xenophon Ryland • Xenophon Ryland • Th08. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan J 08eph S. Browne . .• W. R. Stubblefield .. • Alex. M. Dockery • Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall • Robt. F. Stevenson .. • James W. Boyd ......• George R. Hunt • W. M. Williams • James P. Wood • Theodore Brace • Geo. E. Walker * B. H. Ingram :.* John R. Parson. . . . .• Harry Keene . . . . . . .• J. B. Thomas. . . . . . .• • A. M. Hough D. A. Jamison •

J. W. Chenoweth .. • S. H. Saunders ..•• Marcus Boyd • John F. Houston .. • W. R. Penick • John Decker • Geo. Whitcomb • Wm. N. Loker • John D. VinciI. • A. L. McGregor • Martin Collins ....• R. E. Anderson ....• T. E. Garrett ......• Wm. D. Muir ..... • A. M. Dockery .....• Sam H. Owens .... • Sam H. Owens ....• John W. Luke ....• J as. E. Cadle • J as. E. Cadle • Th08. C. Ready ....• Noah M. Givan ....• J08. S. Browne .... W. R. Stubblefield • Jas. E. Carter .... ~. Chas. C. Woods ...• Lee A. Hall .......• Robt. F. Stevenson. James W. Boyd ...• George R. Hunt ... • Wm. M. Williams .. • James P. Wood • Theodore Brace • Geo. E. Walker • B. H. Ingram • John R. Parson • Harry Keene ......• J. B. Thomas • A. M. Hough • D. A. Jamison • F. J. Tygard •

H. E. Van Orsdell .. • Marcus Boyd • John F. Houston • John Decker • John Decker • Samuel M. Hayes • A. L. McGregor • Samuel RusselI • A. L. McGregor ....•• Martin Collins ......• R. E. Anderson • A. L. McGregor Wm. D. Muir • Alex. M. Dockery • Sam H. Owens ......• John E. Ryland .....• John E. Ryland • J as. E. Cadle • Xenophon Ryland ...• Th08. C. Ready .....• Noah M. Givan • M. G. Hubble ,. W. R. Stubblefield .. • J as. E. Carter • Alex. M. Dockery • Lee A. Hall • Robt. F. Stevenson .. • James W. Boyd • Goo. R. Hunt • Wm. M. Williams • James P. Wood ..•.. •

..................••

Geo. E. Walker • B. H. Ingram • John R. Parson • Harry Keene ........• J. B. Thomas .......• A. M. Hough .•..... • D. A. Jamison ......• F. J. Tygard ......• • E. F. Allen •

John D. Daggett ....• John D. Daggett . John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett ...• • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker ......• Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker ......• Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker Wm. N. Loker John W. Luke • John W. Luke • John W. Luke -11 John W. Luke • Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.·

A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan. A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan. A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan·t G. Frank Gouley·t G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank GouleY·-lI John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci!· John D. VincU· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vincii· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci)· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci)John D. Vinci)·

(,0

Cl:l

00

Q

l;O

>Z

t::J t'l

o t::J ot:.:rj o ~

a::

H

00 00

o

q

~

~ ~

-:I


LIST OF ELEOTED OFFIOERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI

l\:) l\:)

00

FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election Oct., 1896 . Oct., 1897 . Oct., 1898 . Oct., 1899 . Oct., 1900 . Oct., 1901 . Oct., 1902 . Oct., 1903 . Sept., 1904 . Sept., 1905 . Sept., 1906 .•.• Sept., 1907 .. , . Sept., 1908 . Sept., 1909 . Sept., 1910 . Sept., 1911 . Sept., 1912 . Oct., 1913 . Sept., 1914 . Sept., 1915 . Sept., 1916 . Sept., 1917 .. ,. Sept., 1918 . Sept., 1919 . Sept., 1920 . Sept., 1921. . Oct., 1922 . Oct., 1923 . Oct., 1924 . Oct., 1925 . Oct., 1926 . Oct., 1927 . Sept., 1928 . Sept., 1929 . Oct., 1930 .

Grand Master D. A. Jamison .....• F. J. Tygard ......• E. F. Allen • • C. H. Briggs Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin.· John C. yocum .... • Wm. F. Kuhn .....• Leroy B. Valliant .. • A. S. Houston 4o D. M. Wilson • John T. Short • . R. R. Kreeger Wm. A. Hall • Clay C. Bigger • Arch A. Johnson . Jacob Lampert • Van Fremont Boor. Tolman W. Cotton .. Frank R. Jesse 4o Edward Higbee 4o Wm. A. Clark .....• John W. Bingham • Julius C. Garrell ... Wm. F. Johnson .. • O. A. Lucas .......• Bert S. Lee . Joseph S. McIntyre· Orestes Mitchell • W. W. Martin . John Pickard • Anthony F. Ittner .. Byrne E. Bigger . S. R. Freet • Wm. R. Gentry .

D. Grand Master I Senior G. Warden I Junior G. Warden F. J. Tygard 4o E. F. Allen: • C. H. Briggs • E. F. Allen • C. H. Briggs • Campbell Wells • C. H. Briggs • Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin .. • Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin • John C. yocum • Joseph C. Finagin .. • John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn • John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy B. Valliant • Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy B. Valliant.· A. S. Houston • Leroy B. Valliant • A. S. Houston .....• D. M. Wilson • A. S. Houston • D. M. Wilson • Howard Watson • D. M. Wilson • John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger . John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger William A. Hall • R. R. Kreeger . . . . . .. William A. Hall . . .• Clay C. Bigger • William A. Hall • Clay C. Bigger • Arch A. Johnson . Clay C. Bigger • Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert • Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert. • Van Fremont Boor . Jacob Lampert . . . . .. Van Fremont Boor. Chesley A. Mosman.· Van Fremont Boor ... Chesley A. Mosman· Tolman W. Cotton . • Chesley A. Mosman.· Tolman W. Cotton .. Frank R. Jesse Frank R. Jesse. . . . .• Edward Higbee . . .• Wm. A. Clark • Edward Higbee ..... • Wm. A. Clark ..... • John W. Bingham • Wm. A. Clark ......• John W. Bingham • Julius C. Garrell . John W. Bingham .. • Julius C. Garrell Wm. F. Johnson • Julius C. Garrell Wm. F. Johnson • O. A. Lucas • Wm. F. Johnson O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee .. O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre.· Bert S. Lee. . . . . . . . .. Joseph S. McIntyre· Orestes Mitchell 4o Joseph S. McIntyre.· Orestes Mitchell • W. W. Martin . Orestes Mitchell 4o W. W. Martin. . . . .. John Pickard .......• W. W. Martin John Pickard • A. F. Ittner . John Pickard • A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger . B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet • A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet. * Wm. R. Gentry, Sr . . S. R. Freet .........• Wm. R. Gentry, Sr.. Ray V. Denslow Wm. R. Gentry . . . . .. Ray V. Denslow. . .. Thad B. Landon . Ray V. Denslow . . . .. Thad B. Landon. . .. Frank C. Barnhill .

Grand Treasurer Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· John R. Parson .....• John R. Parson ..... • Alphonso C. Stewart • Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alphonso C. Stewart.· Alph. C. Stewart . .... Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall • Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall ........• Wm. A. Hall ·ttt E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris . E. E. Morris .

Grand Secretary John D. Vinci). John D. Vinci). John D. Vinci). John D. Vinci). John D. Vincil40 John D. Vinci!. John D. Vincil· John D. Vincil· John D. Vinci)·U John R. ParsonU4o John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson· John R. Parson tt· Frank R. Jesse· Frank R. Jesse· Frank R. Jesse. Frank R. Jesse. Frank R. Jesse. Frank R. Jesse··tt Arthur Matherttt Arthur Mather Arthur Mather Arthur Mather

""d

:;0

o

ot!j t!j

t::l

~

Z

4:l

00

oIo::rj 1-3

P:l

trj

~

c.o ~

00


f-' <.0

c:.:>

00

Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept.,

1931. 1932 1933 1934 1936 1936 1937 1988

Ray V. Denslow. . .. Thad B. Landon F. C. BarnJ:1ill Du Val SmIth James W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader: Henry C. ChIles

Thad B. Landon..... Frank C. Barnhill Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reade: Henry C. ChIles Elwyn S. Woods

Frank C. Barnhill.. Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader: Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods Karl M. Vetsburg ..

Du Val Smith. . . . . . .. Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reade: Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods Karl M. Vetsburg Harry S. Truman

E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E.

E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E.

Morris. . . . . . . .. Arthur Mather Morris Arthur Mather MOlT!s Arthur Mather Morr~ ArthurMather Morr~ ,. ArthurMather Morr~ ArthurMather Morr~ Arthur Mather Morns ArthurMather

Q

i;:d

I>

Z

t:l t"l

·Deceased. §Was not installed. ·tDied August 11, 1866, while in office. ·tAppointed August 13, 1866, by John D. Vincil. Grand Master. •• IIDied April 11, 1877, while in office. ·~~Died October 12, 1904, while in omce. ·"Died April 22, 1916, while in office.

·IIJohn W. Luke served, by appointment, as Grand Secretary, from April 11, 1877 to October 11, 1877, and died October, 1888. ~Died within week after his installation. ttThere was no Communication in 1836, owing to the anti-Masonic excitement. ·"Withdrawn from Masonry.

tt·Resigned May 20, 1921, account ill health. ·tttDied November 7, 1924, while in office. .··Appointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. Valliant, Grand Master. ··ttDied August 29, 1927, while in omce. ttt Appointed September 1, 1927, by John Pickard, Grand Master.

o

t:l

~

oI:l;j

Is: H

17l 17l

o

@

OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATON, FEBRUARY 22, 1821 EDWARD BATES, WOI'Shipful Master JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer

JAMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden

WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden ABRAM BECK, Secretary

};g <.0


AIRPLANE VIEW OF GEO. WASHINGTON MEMORIAL, SHOWING ALEXANDRIA AND THE POTOMAC RIVER IN THE BACKGROUND


THE MASONIC WORLD By RAY V.

DENSLOW,

P. G. M.

Weare at the beginning of an era of momentous happenings, happenings which will affect you and me personally, and collectively, the great fraternity of which we are all members. The world moves in cycles; first comes turmoil, then war, then peace; again, turmoil, war, peace. Whether we emerge at the end of each cycle improved in character and condition depends largely on what we think and what we are willing to fight for. Peace is not to be attained through crying "Peace, Peace" and we have no patience with those who would permit our America to be stripped of all protection and left to the onslaughts of nations whose only desire is for power and more power. A good shepherd will conduct his sheep to the protecting walls of his sheepfold; the traveler through the forest will protect himself with proper weapons when traveling the regions of the wild beast. There are in the world today, wild beasts, not necessarily the kind with four feet, but nations-nations wild with their thirst for power and domination, equally as dangerous as any beast of the field. Many of us have read the book "It Can't Happen Here," yet if you are a student of government and foreign relations, and have been keeping in touch with the daily press, you will find that it IS happening here, and happening NOW. At the present time it is a subtle thing, too subtle indeed for many of our people to perceive. On the outside it appears a sheep, but in reality the skin covers the body of the wolf. We rate about communism, socialism, fascism and their ilk without knowing even what they are. All of the laws in Christendom are of no avail unless backed by the forces of decency, and law and order. Today is the day of the demagogue; graft runs riot. Punchboards, gambling machines, crime, murder, political protection, scandal are too common. Men in high places, many of them entitled to wear the square and compass, emblem of moral honesty, are failing to measure up to the principles taught them at the Masonic altar. Why all this discussion about things apparently political' Because it is the business of Masonry to maintain good government. The watchwords of the liberty-loving have ever been "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" and they are more essential today than ever before. With Liberty gone, there can be no equality, and no fraternity (or brotherhood). Look at the liberty in the dictator-controlled countries today' Do you think you would admire the Russian equality' Then get a taste of it.


232

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

America does not require stream-lining. We shall not tear down in a few months what it has taken years to accomplish. If the four million Masons of North America will unite with the church elements and other patriotic Americans and strike everytime the serpent of radical change sticks its head into the air, then, and only then, may we expect to get out of this maelstrom in which all of the so-called civilized countries of the world have found themselves. It is not political to defend one's country from danger either without or within. And Freemasonry has its dangers both without and within. As to which is the greater, our readers may decide. From without: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Various religious elements. Governments, usually dictator-controlled. Natural jealousies of groups and individuals. Changing conditions of modern life.

In the past, our principal opposition has come from one or more of the religious groups, an opposition generally sensed by the average Mason. This danger is not so apparent in the United States as in Latin-American countries where these groups are strongly entrenched in the national life. If many of our grand lodge foreign recognition committees could appreciate these situations they would be more sympathetic with certain foreign countries where to be a Mason means sacrifice, oftentimes of life itself. 'Vhere this opposition force needs tolerance, they preach tolerance. 'Vhere they are in authority, they practice intolerance. First to cry persecution when attacked, they are first to persecute when in power. Masonry is an institution which practices those principles which it teaches. It preaches tolerance; it practices tolerance, for no man of any religious belief which recognizes the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man is prohibited from entering our portals. Freemasonry never persecutes; the history of the organization from beginning is one that will bear the light of day. Second of these groups, is the monarchial government headed by king or dictator and which fears the spread of the great principles taught by the fraternity, believing that such doctrine will cause them to lose their hold over the common people. Oftimes these governments are yoked with forms of religion. No religion is worth the name which requires armed force or autocratic authority to keep it in power. CONCERNING CORNERSTONES In our recent reviews we have often mentioned the trend of the times. For many years the fraternity has been asked, and even sought, to lay foundations of public buildings, not because we are a fraternity, but because we have a history as a building fraternity and link the


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

233

present and the past. Our ceremony is short, dignified, and impressive, calculated to impress an audience with the dignity of labor and our responsibility to the Great Architect of the Universe. In the early history of the republic we heard little objection to Masonic ceremonies, but in recent years, we find many instances where every objection has been filed against such ceremony. As Grand Master of Masons in Missouri, I had some very choice instances where religion and politics have interfered. A few years ago, these cornerstones frequently contained the reference to the Masonic year, or to the fact that the stone was laid by the Grand Lodge. But not so today; the probabilities are that the Secretary of the Treasury or some other political entity is thus honored. And recently, we note evidences of doing away with such ceremonies altogether. \Vhjch way is the wind blowing' Next, we find the jealousy of similar societies, or of individuals; this jealousy is not as strong as it was many years ago, for the reason that there has been a growth in the number of societies, most of them having sufficient to keep them busy in maintaining their own organization without detracting from others. \Ve may consider ourselves as fortunate in the advent of many similar societies, although in some instances membership may detract from our organization. The feeling of individuals is sporadic, caused in most instances by a rejection or personal grudge, the fraternity suffering for the sins of its membership. MODERN CONDITIONS Last of the four dangers is modern conditions. Freemasonry of today lacks the mysticism of former times. Far too much publicity is given Masonic affairs. Many Masonic publications leave little to be imagined by the outsider. Our history, our customs, our traditions, our business affairs, and statistical matters are open for inspection of member and non-member alike. Lodges compete with the picture show, the bridge party, the boxing match, the radio, the automobile and many other personal "pleasures." The auto-funeral removed the glamor of the once dignified and splendid Masonic funeral service; pension systems, public relief, bonuses and the like, relieve lodges from expending their funds for the brothers' relief. The funeral "home" and public nurse and hospital do away with the "sitting up" with the sick brother or remaining for the care of his body after death. The discussion of charity is not for the lodge any more. Master and Secretary rush to get the disabled brother entrance into the nearest Masonic Home. \Ve prate of Faith, Hope and Charity. Sweet Charity, greatest of the virtues! And yet only a few years ago a certain Past Grand Master appeared on the floor of our Grand Lodge asking that Sweet Charity smacked of the institution, whereupon grand lodge viva voce changed our Charity Committee to "Welfare Committee." And now Missouri has "Faith, Hope and \Velfare."


234

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

But we are bordering upon a discussion of the dangers from within, which after all is by far the most dangerous. Eradication of these dangers means the prosperity of the fraternity. Greatest of these is the loss of leadership. Before the period A. I. (Anno Influx), the average Master of a lodge was the village doctor, the lawyer, merchant, minister-conservative, dignified men of reputation and standing in the community. After the influx, a younger group of men, many of whom were seeking only the glamour of office, began the gradual displacement of these conservative elements until there came into the forefront the parrot ritualist, the brother with the big Past Master jewel and a love for Masonic nomenclature to the nth degree. I would not have you believe this true in every community, but our readers will recognize such instances. With leadership gone, a program of charitable, educational and social activity ceases to exist. Finances exist only for feeds, for show, for jewels. With lack of a definite program, individual interest wanes and Masonic influence is gone. EXTRANEOUS SOCIETIES And lastly, the problem of extraneous societies; where a few years ago we had only lodge, chapter, council and commandery, today we have an auxiliary built upon the foundation of each-and not content with these, our brethren rush about in an ambitious desire to learn more about co-masonry, adoptive masonry and the like. Our juniors are urged to join the rainbow, Job's daughters, Builders, or the DeMolay; mothers and fathers are pushed into auxiliaries until we begin to feel that the only field left is that of Infant Masonry, limited to sons and daughters of milk-and-bottle age. Then we shall all be organized and await only for the millenium. Most of these organizations are purely commercial, working under the guise of humanitarian effort. The danger of these is that of divided interest. Hundreds of men are frivoling their time away with useless organizations when their efforts applied to the promotion of Masonic ideals and Masonry would advance our interests materially. Our needs' Anything which will supply the antidote to the above named evils. First, however, is leadership. The leadership of conservative, dignified and influential men-men who will attract other men and who have influence in their community. If you want to do your part in such a constructive work, go out into your community and draft such a one. The fraternity need not worry as to whether he can repeat the ritual forward or backward or whether he knows his title to be "Worshipful," as long as he has something in his heart and in his head. Next, a sustained program of charitable, educational, and social activity. Freemasonry will never be a dead institution as long as it does things. As an individual you may help by withdrawing your support from extraneous societies which have nothing to offer in a


1938

235

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Masonic way and which only sap the strength and finances of legitimate Masonic organizations. Not how many degrees have you, but how well you practice those you have. Finally, there should be more brotherhood. If we are to delay or ward off the dangers of class warfare, we must begin to reduce the feeling of class consciousness. A friend of mine who has attained national prominence recently said to me : , 'What this country needs right now is for men such as you and myself who have attained a certain amount of prominence, to visit their Masonic lodges and sit besides their brethren, to speak to them in their own language, and to make them feel, that after all we are brethren, made of the same clay, :filled with the same spirit of God, and anxious and trying to do God's will justly and fairly. Men cannot feel ill will towards their brethren while sitting within the tiled recesses of a Masonic lodge."

And here, in brief, is a possible solution to many of our troublesa simple remedy-involving only the getting' acquainted with our neighbor, or our brethren-friendliness and companionship. And when we get acquainted at home, let our friendship extend outward and outward until it may encompass the whole state, the nation, and finally the world, for our brethren in foreign countries need our aid and support in their front line fight against the enemies of human freedom. . FOREIGN RECOGNITION

It has always been our belief that too many Masonic jurisdictions are prone to follow the custom of the Grand Lodge of Delaware when it reported "that while we have received several requests from Grand Jurisdictions of foreign language for recognition, we do not at present recommend recognition as it would be necessary for the committee to employ an interpreter to decipher the several journals of proceedings."

If Freemasonry, in general, was to follow such procedure we could

never attempt to do what our monitor specifies in "uniting men of every country, sect and opinion, and conciliating true friendship among those who might otherwise have remained at a distance." We much prefer the attitude of our brethren in New Hampshire, the . committee reporting: "Several requests have been made by South American Grand Lodges to establish fraternal relations and we are pleased to believe that the recent overtures of the national government, made with the object of more :firmly cementing international relations, are re:fiected in the number of such requests received. We feel, therefore, that there is a duty incumbent upon us to help foster a closer union with those supposedly represented the best and most conservative element in their respective republics. We :find, however, no universality of recognition among the Grand Bodies of our New England States. Massachusetts heads the list in admitting them to fraternal relations. In principle, we believe in the example of

.


236

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Massachusetts. The information upon which she acted is undoubtedly upon to us and your committee will be glad to review it. If, upon such information, no valid reason appears why New Hampshire should not do likewise, we shall recommend several applications now before us."

This brings us to the question of the custom of extending foreign recognition, and from the proceedings of West Virginia, we learn : , 'The custom of entering into fraternal relations appears to have originated between the Grand Lodges of England and Sweden in the yeaI 1799. During that year, the Grand Lodges of England and Sweden exchanged letters in which they expressed their most cordial and fraternal sentiments. During this same year, the Grand Lodge of Sweden sent a representation to the Grand Lodge of England. This representation was received by the Grand Lodge of England and awarded the highest honors. This delightful and honorable custom we feel should be continued by our Grand Lodge. We know that all Grand Lodges do not have the Bame standards and with meager information at our disposal, it is not always easy for YQur committee to decide with which Grand Lodge we should enter into fraternal relation."

ThiFi, 'we feel, is the attitude of most Grand Lodges. Most of our standards are man-made in the first place and many Grand Lodges are finding it necessary to "modify some of the requirements of this Grand Lodge regarding recognition." (Colo.) We approve the attitude of an Illinois committee which, after referring to the misuse of Freemasonry by European groups masquerading as Freemasonry, said: "Although Freemasonry in certain sections of Continental Europe has fallen under the ban, it must be remembered that there is in existence legitimate Freemasonry in many countries of Europe and that its work is being carried forward by bands of stalwart men of high charactermen who believe that the solution of many of our present political and economic troubles of the present day, depends upon are-establishment in the minds and hearts of men, of that great Masonic fundamental-the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of men."

Reviewer West, of the District of Columbia, quotes an instance which is representative of the condition which exists throughout the United States today. A brother who held a certificate from a lodge in Germany, but was unable to get in communication with his lodge, was permitted to petition in one jurisdiction, but a similar case in another jurisdiction was turned down. Both these jurisdictions were in amity with the Masonic bodies in Germany prior to the present regime in that country, but the two Grand Masters involved took different views of the situation. The first Grand Master held that since the applicant's Grand Lodge in Germany had been in amity with the Grand Lodge of his OWtl State, the brother's petition might be accepted. The second Grand Master held since the Grand Lodges of Germany had been interdited by the government, no German lodge was recognizable in the United States. In one instance the Grand Master placed himself in the position of the applicant, committed no


FOREIGN REOOGNITION BY AMERIOAN GRAN]) LODGES (19S8) PREPARED BY RAY V. DENSLOW

i

~

III

:sa

j

41

I:

.~

:s..I:l

~0

.~

Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Dist. of CoL Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland M888achusetts Michi~an

Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana' Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wiseonsin Wyomin~

~

Po4

Po4

x

X

X X X X X

X

X

X X

X

x

X

x x x

X

X

X

x

X

X X

X

x x

X X X

X X X

X

x

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X

X

X X X X X X

X X

X

X

X X

X

X X X

X

X

x

X

X

X X X

X

X X

~

X X X

X

X

x

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

"g ~ "g

~

~

.!

'0 o ..c ~

....~~

I:

~

II

c>J

<

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X

x x x X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

" X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

'Q .!

""

'C ~

I:

.!

S ,!l

;;

$ "i ~

.s ..

.!!

~

b

"i

lIQ

~

'1:4

..

. J e" •

t

-!

J

1II

..c •

II

..

f

...

..:l

J d

~

1II

...

1II

till

~

III

~

..I:l

I:

'1:l

b

::l

!!l Z

e"

Z

. .!

1II

;:l!!l

x

x x x x

X

x

X X

x

x

X

X

X X X X X X

X

X X

X X

x

x X X x X X x X X x X X x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

X X X X X X X X X X X

x

X X X

X X X

X

X X

X

X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X X X X X X

X X X X X X

X .X

X

X

X

X

X X X X

X X X X

x x X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X

X X

X X

X X X X X X X X X

x x

x x x

X

X X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X X

X X X

X

X X

X X X

X X

X X X

X

X

X

X X X X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X X X X X X

X X X

.X

X

X

X

X

x

x x

x

x x

X X

X

X

x

X

X

X

X

x

X

X

X

X X X X X X

x

X

x

X

X

x x

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

x

X

X

X X X X

x x x x

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X

X

x

X

X

X

X

x

X

x

X

X

X

X

X

x

x x

X

X

x x

X X

X

X

x x

x

X X

X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

x

X

X

X

X

X X X X X

X

X

X

x x x x x

x X X X X

X

X

X X

x x

X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X

X

X

X X X X X X X X X

x X X

X X X

X

X

X

x

x

x

x x

x x x x

x

X X

X X

X X

x x x x

x

x

X

X

X

X

X X X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

x

x

x

x x

x x x x

x

X

x x

x x x x

x

x

x x

x

x

x x x

x

x

x

x

x x x x x x

x

x

x x x

X

X

X

x x

x

X

x x

X

X

X

x

x

X

X X X

X

X X

x

x

X

x x

x x x x x

X X

X

x x X x

X

x x x

X X

X

X X

x

x

x

x x

x x x

x

x x x x

x x

X

x

x

X

x

x x

x x x x

X

x x

x

x

o

. e".

I: III

III -

e"

...

till

III

III

f

I:

.~

-<

.

11;5

0

o ~

Col

! ..... to i::

e"

§!.6.6.:o:~

~ ~ ::~-<

-<

""

'j3

:II:

S III

x

x

x x

x

x x x

x

x

x x x

{

III ....

E .; fgl fIII ~ o Po4

1 III

Po4

~ 1II

~

rn ~ 0

'3 as

Po4

~ I:

e

e"

01:0

~

~

~

o

B 31 ! ::s 0 "" 0 ~

a .s Po4

):l

):l

x

x

ao

~

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x x

~

I

0

Po4

~

d

• III

t

Po4

~ ~

x

x x x

X

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

X

X

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x x

x x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

X

x x

x x x x

x

x

x

x x x x x x x x x x x

x

x

x x x x x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x x

x

x x

x x x x

x

x x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

X

x

x x

x x x

x

x x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

X

x

x

x

x

x x x

x x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

e"

= :=

x

x

x

x

x x

~

~

.;

'1:l

§

x x

x

x

x

x x

x x

x x

x

x

x

x x

x

x x

x

x x x x

x

X

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x x

x x

x

x

x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

X

x x

x x x x x x

x x

x

x x

x

x

x x

x x x x x x x

X

x

x x

x

X X

x

x x x x

x x x

X X

x

x

x x x x

x

x

x x x

x x x x X X X

X

x

x

x X

X

X

X

f;I:1

~

x x x

x

x

x

x

X

X

x x

x

x x

X

x

x

X

x

X

x

x

x x x x x

x

x

x

x x X X X

x

x x

x

X

x

x

X X X X X

x x

x x

x x x

x

X X

x

x

x

x

x

x

X X

x

X X X

x x

x

x

x

x x

x

x X

X X X

x

x x

x x

x x

E-4

x

x

X X X

x

1S ~

X

x

x

x x x x x x x x

~.8

X

X

x

x

x x x x

x x

x x x x

x

x

x

x x

.6;

Q,

X

x

x

o

I

X

X

x

x

x x x x x x

X X

l

f;I:1

... j ~-= Po4~ .s. . . .i!! ~ ~ :5 t3 ~

X

x

X

~ ~

~

E

X

x

X X X X

ra

~ .:l

H

X X X X

X X X X X

X

~

..:l

x

X

x

x

oj

41

:=

!

X

X

X

41

j

0

X

x

x x x

x

x x

x

x

x x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x x

~

x X X X X

!

X X

x

,.lll

X

x x x x x x x x

.~ Po4

~

x

x x

1

~ ~

x

x x

0

c8

Q

I~~ j ~ J ~ ~ !

~ rn ~

x x

x

x

c:: _8 ~ Z

~

::I!l

f .:l

e"

x

x

x

1"" .sc:: ..~

x x

x

x

~

e f ~

iii

'1:l

x

x

x

EO

!!

soc::

x

x

x

x

III

.S

x

X

x

x

x

x X X

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x x x

x

x x

x

x x

x

x x x

x x

x x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

i

~

!!

i ] .i

X X X

x

x x x

x x

!~

~

x x x

x x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

X

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x x

x

x

x x x

x x x ~ x x x x

x

x

x

x

x x

x x

~S

o ~

x

x x

Col

x

x

x

III

I

X

x

2

~ ]~ P1~ P ~ ~

x

x x x x

x

x

x

x

x x

c.:

:I := q) S := ,g ~ ~ .S ..c 0

III

X

x

x

0

x

x

x

·C

x

x

]

~

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x x .x x

x

x

X

x

x x

x

x x

x x

x

x

x

X

x

x

x

x

x

X

.s.~

f

'C

~

'3

x

x

x

x

1

~ ~ !

x

x

x

x

X

x x x x x x

X

x

x

'1:l

x x x x

x

x

x x x

X

X

x

x

x

x

x

x

X

x

x

x

x x

x

x x

X

x x

.x

x

x

x x

~

41

x x x

x

x

x

x x

X

x x

x

x

x

x x x

x

X

X

x x

x x x x

x

x x

x x x

x x

x x

x x x

x

x x

x

x

"gIII

..

..

x

x x x x x

x

x x

]

x

x x

X X X

X

x x

x

x

x

x

x x x

x

x x

x x

X

x

x x

X

x x x

x

X

X X

X

x

x

x

X

x

x

x

x

X

X

j(

x

x x x

X X

x x x x

X

x

x x

41

.!! .!~

.~ ~ ~ ~

IS

~

~ ~

11

• ...., e". . .,,0. 11~ J ~ g 8ri f;I:1~ ! ~ -! .i !!l III -<I: -< .:0:.:0: .s &:i rn 'S :l j ~ J3 ~ ! -< .~ .! ""ri~ ~'g~411: --<~~~§'cIII !..c ..c!~.... s.!~~i .~ I: ; ; :§ = 'aIII ..t III~ ; .~ 41 .:0: ~ ~ II ~ s:I .~.s ~~s 8l.!!~~'Ooo~ '3 ~ ~j Z Z o Po4 & ! Z Z & ! E-4 > ~ > ~ ~ := Z Z rn rnr:c r:.e r:."" r:."" ~ ~ !

III

III

.~

I:

I:

~

X


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

237

Masonic sin and rendered a great courtesy to a brother who was in no wise at fault when his jurisdiction was banned by a Nazi government. We commend the Grand Master of Iowa for his sympathetic and Masonic attitude. A recent conference of Grand Secretaries in Washington, D. C., at which the question of foreign recognition seemed to be uppermost, has brought most forcibly to our attention the lack of recognition of certain Grand Lodges universally regarded as regular and legitimate. .To find out just how far this recognition had extended, your reviewer has prepared a table. In most instances the information has been supplied by the Grand Secretary of each jurisdiction, and for their promptness and courtesy in this matter they have our sincere thanks. In one or two instances it has been necessary to resort to printed proceedings for the information. Several Grand Secretaries did not understand there were two Grand Lodges in Denmark, and an irregular Grand Lodge in Norway. Some cannot understand how two Grand Lodges can operate in one jurisdiction. To us in America this is almost a landmark, but our troubles are largely caused by an attempt to gauge other jurisdictions by our own yardstick. We cannot reconcile ourselves to a wholesale recognition. We cannot believe that some committees have had sufficient information before them in order to recommend recognition. As for Missouri, we want to see, eventually, every legitimate and regular Grand Lodge duly recognized, but in the meantime we must be reasonably positive that we are not extending recognition to a jurisdiction which is not justly entitled to it. BRITISH ISLES England: Grand Master Klinck of New York, addressing his Grand Lodge, called attention to the fact that while we in the United States had been losing members, England had increased not only the number of her lodges, but also the number of members. He said:

"England is reported as over 100,000 members ahead of New York. Many believe that the magnificent temple on Great Queen Street has had something to do with the rise, but that is only a minor item and a far more convincing reason seems to be that English Freemasonry is regarded as one of the strong props of the Empire. One need only look at the line of officers to see the close connection between the Royal House and the Craft. Among the Chaplains have always been great churchmen, even that does not fully explain the hold which the English Craft has taken on public esteem. There is the unsurpassed extensiveness of the benevolent work carried on, represented by the three Royal Institutions. Yet another point well worth taking into account is the real care taken in the examination of applicants for admission, to make sure not only of their moral qualities and general standing in their communities, but also of their financial ability to meet the many calls for help. "Contributions to the institutions alone totaled over one and one-half million dollars in 1936, or about forty per cent more than Grand Lodge of New York received in dues and from other sources. . . .


238

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

, 'Perhaps we have been too much influenced by numbers and not enough by quality. Efficient work can be done only by efficient workers. From now on let us consider more carefully what a candidate for Masonry is able to contribute to its cause, and pass by those who join us for what they can get out of our fraternity and not for what they can put into it through sacrifice and service."

The Duke of Connaught has been Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of England since 1901. His jurisdiction covers 4,943 lodges, 1,221 of which are in London, 2,990 in the Provinces of England, 730 overseas in various parts of the world, and 2 traveling or military lodges. The annual Grand Festival was held in London April 27, 1938, presided over by Gen. Sir Francis Davies, Deputy Grand Master. It was reported that the Grand Lodge had recently issued catalogs of the museum, its portraits and pri~ts. The third volume is to be issued later, containing a complete catalog of the library. The volumes are bound in Royal Blue buckram, stamped in gold with the coat of arms of the Grand Lodge, and are of particular interest to Masonic students. A Board of General Purposes reported that an agreement had been approved covering the operations of the Advisory Council in China and that the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands had ratified the approval; fraternal intercourse has, therefore, been resumed. A deputation to the Island of Cypress, headed by the Pro Grand Master, the Earl of Harewood, reported that it had visited Cypress and Greece and was convinced of the beneficial effects to Freemasonry as a result of the visit. A new lodge was instituted on the Island of Cypress, Othello No. 5670. Grand Secretary Photiades, of Greece, came from Athens to attend the installation ceremonies. The deputation later proceeded to Athens, Greece, to visit brethren of Star of the East Lodge No. 880. King George VI gave instructions for the parly to be conveyed on board H. M. S. Sussex. The Earl of Harewood was entertained at the palace by King George of Greece, while other members of the party were guests of the English legation. During their stay in Athens, the party were guests of Eleusis Lodge No. 67, a Greek lodge working in English. A deputation, headed by General Sir Francis Davies, was appointed to represent the Grand Lodge at the Bicentenary in Nova Scotia. The question of Masonic regalia was discussed by the Board and we learn: , 'It is the custom, very widely adopted, that the regalia of a candidate is obtained by the Tyler and that considerable discounts are obtained by the Tyler from the manufacturers without, generally speaking, the knowledge of the candidate. It is quite a custom for a receipted notice, at the full catalog price, to be presented to the candidate, whereas the Tyler has paid considerably less. . . . , 'We do not dispute the fact that the Tyler is entitled to proper remuneration for his services, but we do say that remuneration should not be at the expense of the candidate. The Board in its report confines itself to the recommendation that all necessary regalia should be procured


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

239

in future by "the lodges and that the candidate should receive the benefit of the total discounts granted by the manufacturers."

The question of the wearing of Masonic clothing and the discussion of Masonic questions in places of public resort came in for attention: "The principal complaint is leaving the lodge room, when the Masonic regalia is to be worn at dinner, passing from the lodge room into a place where the future proceedings are to be held through places of public resort. We ean only ask brethren to be as careful as possible in this matter and also be careful as to the discussion of Masonic matters in mixed companj'."

The property which adjoins the great Masonic Temple in London, and which is occupied by the Mark Masons, is the property of the Grand Lodge, leased to the Mark Masons at an annual rental of $1,800.00. The lease has expired, the building is past its useful life and is now a liability. Recently negotiations have taken place between the Mark Mason bodies and the Board of General Purposes and it is anticipated that the site on which the hall now stands is to be let on lease to the Mark Grand Lodge for a period of ninety-nine years, at a grand rental of $4,000.00 a year. The Grand Mark Lodge is to erect a steel-framed building for Masonic purposes only; its front elevation is to be similar in every way to Freemasons Hall. Should the Grand Lodge require the premises for its own use later, it has the right to cancel the lease by giving five-year notice at the fortieth, sixtieth and eightieth year of the term. It is significantly added: , 'The Board appreciates that a slightly higher rent might be obtained for the site in the open market, but this is negligible in view of the fact that the transaction is between two Masonic bodies which work in such close cooperation."

It was announced that the Masonic Peace Memorial has been thoroughly completed and paid for. The entire cost was $6,910,225.00. The committee is rejoicing in the successful termination of the great undertaking entrusted to it by the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge. Scotland: Among the honorary members of the Grand Lodge of Scotland are to be noted the Duke of Connaught, the Earl of Donoughmore, the Duke of Windsor, and King Gustav V of Sweden. At a quarterly communication, held in February, 1938, six lodges were reported dormant: one in Glasgow, two in Constantinople, one in Paramariba; one in Aberdeenshire, and another in Cape of Good Hope. Brother Wilford R. Butters was appointed District Grand Master of the Western Province of the Cape of Good Hope. Representatives were appointed to the Grand Lodge of Jugoslavia and the Grand Lodge of Venezuela. Sir Cecil Blackwell was named Grand Master of all Scottish Freemasonry in India, replacing Brother Dr. Sir Temulji B. Nariman. David M'Farlane was appointed District Deputy Grand Master of Newfoundland.


240

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Their method of voting is interesting. Election of members of Grand Committee took place under the following regulations: "By ballot on the voting card prepared by Grand Secretary. A card was handed to each member on entering Grand Lodge. The cards were collected by Grand Stewards and deposited in the ballot box, which was locked and sealed by Grand Secretary in presence of Grand Lodge. The Grand Master intimated that the result of the election would be published in the Scotsman, and other publications, at a later date."

Grand Secretary \Vinning reported receipt of a cablegram from the Grand Secretary of the Philippine Islands, whereupon relations with the Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction were restored. An application was received for a lodge at Kirkwood of the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope. A charter was granted to Lodge Caribbean Light, Port of Spain, Trinidad. The Earl of Elgin and Kincardine has retired from the Provincial Grand Mastership of Fife and Kinross and has been succeeded by Lt. Col. Philip G. M. Skene. Ireland: \Ve have not received the 1937 proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Ireland, but we do have a copy of their Yearbook containing much valuable Masonic information. The Right Honorable The Earl of Donoughmore continues as Grand Master, a sufficient evidence of the integrity of this Grand Lodge, for his Lordship is a delightful personage, popular with all with whom he comes in contact and his frequent attendance at Masonic gatherings in the British Isles testifies to his interest in things Masonic. Recent press dispatches convey the information that he was present at a meeting held by one of the English military lodges in the Tower of London. This Grand Lodge has several Provincial Grand Lodges and District Inspectors under it. In addition to those in Ireland, there are Provincial Grand Masters in New Zealand, South Africa Northern, Southern Cape, Rhodesia, and Nata!. There is a District Grand Inspector for India, with assistants in Bombay, Bengal, and Punjab. There is another District Grand Inspector in Shanghai. The Grand Lodge is ruled largely, as is the Grand Lodge of England, with its Board of General Purposes consisting of certain Grand Officers, fifteen representatives from Dublin lodges, and one or more representatives from each Provincial Grand Lodge. During six months of the year stated communications of the Grand Lodge of Instruction are held, open to all Master Masons properly vouched for. Ireland has its Lodge of Research No. 200, which is founded for the Association of Installed Masters who are subscribing members of lodges under the Irish constitution. It has its outer or correspondence circle open to those not working under Irish constitution. Its transactions are published and distributed to the membership from time to time. The Grand Lodge operates a Masonic female orphan's school, which


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

241

was established in 1792; it is supported solely by voluntary contributions. There is also a Masonic orphan's boy school, founded in 1867 and similarly supported. Additional relief is provided from the Victoria Jubilee Annuity Fund and the Masonic Orphans Welfare Committee. The first named has 228 annuities, all of whom must be at least sixty years of age and pennanently disabled from earning a livelihood. SCANDINAVIAN MASONRY

Since the visit of Swedish representatives to the Grand Lodges of England, Ireland and Scotland, and the visitation of a number of American representatives to the Grand Lodge of Sweden in 1936, there has been an increased interest in the Freemasonry of Scandinavian countries. The Masonry of Denmark, Norway and Sweden is quite distinct; it is represented by three very generally recognized Grand Lodgesthe National Grand Lodge of Denmark, the Grand Lodge of Norway, and the Grand Lodge of Sweden. In Denmark and Norway some recently organized Grand Lodges have appeared and are seeking recognition at the hands of many American jurisdictions. Of these we shall have more to say later. Twenty-eight American jurisdictions have already recognized the National Grand Lodge of Denmark, and others have asked for recognition; twenty-three have exchanged grand representatives with Nor-way; twenty-eight have exchanged "grand representatives with Sweden. All three of these Grand Lodges have existed for more years than has the average American Grand Lodge; they have very high standards of membership. Their Grand Lodges have been visited by active Masons representing many of America's largest Grand Lodges and, in every instance, reports of these representatives have been most favorable. We would not devote the space to a discussion of Scandinavian Masonry were it not for the fact that some Grand Lodges have recognized other Grand Lodges existent in those territories. Interest in these countries has also increased as a result of the visit of that veteran Danish Mason, \Villiam Malling, who, in 1937, was the guest of the Supreme Councils of both Northern and Southern Jurisdictions. He brought with him the greetings of King Christian X, they were on a vellum enclosed scroll, embellished in gold and personally signed by the King. Grand Commander Johnson, of the Northern Jurisdiction, ruled: , , The first three degrees of the Swedish system are on a. parity with the first three degrees of our system; the fourth degree of the Swedish system corresponds to the fourteenth of our Rite; the sixth degree corresponds to the sixteenth of our Rite; the eighth degree of the Swedish system corresponds to the eighteenth degree; the ninth degree corresponds to the thirty-second degree; the tenth degree corresponds to the thirty-third


242

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

degree of our Rite, it is purely an honorary degree; the eleventh and last degree of the Swedish system corresponds to the thirty-third degree active. The bodies of the Scottish Rite should receive, acknowledge and llOnor accordingly our brethren of the jurisdiction of the National Grand Lodges of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Our brethren should bear in mind that in the Scandinavian countries visitors who do not belong to the Swedish system are not admitted beyond the work of the three symbolic or blue degrees, and not even then in Sweden unless they profess the Christian religion. The Grand Lodges in those countries are supreme and have the right to impose any conditions with regard to visitation which they see fit. Brethren traveling in Scandinavia should not apply to visit bodies working in the degrees from the fourth to the eleventh inclusive. Brethren hailing from those Grand Lodges may be admitted to our bodies in accordance with the above ruling. It was by special dispensation of His Majesty King Gustav V that the official delegation, visiting Sweden in 1935 and 1936, were welcome to witness the degrees up to and including the eighth. It was also by special dispensation of the Grand Master of Masons in Norway that your Grand Commander, attended by his secretary, witnessed their tenth and eleventh degrees."

Much of our 1937 report was taken up in a discussion of the three regular Grand Lodges and that Ollr readers may know something of the irregular Grand Lodges in those jurisdictions, we append the latest information concerning them. NORWAY (Polar Star)

For several years following the year 1882, Germany established private lodges in the territory of Norway under the jurisdiction of the German Grand Lodge "Zur Sonne," then located at Bayreuth. By 1893 they decided to establish a Provincial Grand Lodge under Zur Sonne. Neither the private lodges nor the newly organized Provincial Grand Lodge were recognized by the Grand Lodge of Norway which had occupied the territory since 1749. In 1920, after the conclusion of the World War, this Provincial Grand Lodge decided to convert itself into a Grand Lodge and assumed the name ((Den Norske Storloge Polarstjernen" or "Grand Lodge Polar Star." Norway has never recognized Polar Star, although statements have been made from time to time that such was the case. A committee from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts reported: "Confusion has arisen because, in 1896, His Majesty, King Oscar II, then Grand Master, owing to special local circumstances, granted the Brethren of the 'Polar Star' lodges a very limited permission to visit the legitimate grand lodge. This permission was terminated when the independent Polar Star Grand Lodge was established in 1920; but owing to the same particular reasons, the permission was renewed in 1926. The fundamental attitude was preserved, however, and the Independent Grand Lodge Polar Star has never been recognized by the Grand Lodge of Norway."


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

243

Polar Star is said to have four lodges under its obedience: St. Olav of Olav Kyrre Kolbein of Haakon of

the Restored Temple, Trondheim of the Golden Chain, Oslo the Rising Sun, Oslo the Three Lights, Oslo.

North Carolina is the only American grand lodge to recognize Polar Star, but also recognizes the Grand Lodge of Norway. DENMARK Grand Lodge

A few months ago we received a circular which apparently had been mailed out to all American jurisdictions, reading as follows: T.T.G.O. T.G.A.O.T.U. Lux Fuit (Seal) Wisdom, Strength, Beauty. GRAND LODGE OF DENMARK, A. F. & A. M.

To all Grand Lodges and Grand Orients of A.. F. 4' A.. M., Greetings: By these presents we have the honour to communicate the list of Grand Officers and Members of the Boards of, our Grand Lodge for the year HI37路38.

We take the opportunity of stating that our Grand Lodge, which maintains and supports all the Ancient Landmarks of Freemasonry, including the Three Great Lights and the Working to the Glory of the Grand Architect of the Universe, is the only responsible, independent, selfgoverning Grand Lodge of our country, with sole and undisputed authority over the Craft or Symbolic Degrees within its Jurisdiction. We should be happy to extend fraternal relations to every Regular Grand Lodge or Grand Orient of Pure and Ancient Craft Masonry in the world, with which an exchange of Representatives has not yet been arranged. With the best wishes for the prosperity of Ancient Craft Masonry in your Jurisdiction we send our fraternal compliments to all your Brethren. Yours fraternally, A. HINRICHSEN, Grand Secretary. Address The Grand Secretary Freemason's Hall, 33 Smallegade Copenhagen F., Denmark.

Among the officers listed are Carl Gunnerman, Orand Master; Chr. H. Clausen, D. G. M.; C. C. Jacobsen, S. G. W.; Th. Jorgensen, J. G. 'V.; Otto Larsen, Grand Chancellor; A. Hinrichsen, Grand Secretary, and others. Of our American jurisdictions, only Louisiana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Washington and Wisconsin have extended recognition to this Grand Lodge. We cannot say as to whether any of these believed they were extending recognition to the generally recognized Grand Lodge of that territory, for some very amusing circumstances have taken place as a result of the attempts of several Grand Lodges to extend recognition. For example, Virginia recognized the Grand


244

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Lodge of Denmark; later the Grand Secretary discovered he had recognized the wrong group and in listing the names of the Grand Lodges recognized by his jurisdiction, he inserted the name of the Grand Secretary of the generally recognized Grand Lodge. On the other hand, North Carolina recognized the National Grand Lodge several years ago, but recently the Grand Secretary erroneously inserted the name and address of the Grand Secretary of the wrong Grand Lodge. Our correspondence with Grand Secretaries brought out a number of these disputed points. \Ve found several Grand Secretaries had made the mistake of copying the name of the Grand Secretary from proceedings of other Grand Lodges and in this way inserted the name of the individual who represented the Grand Lodge of Denmark. One Grand Secretary ('Visc.) is firmly of the opinion that the Grand Lodge of Denmark is the only Grand Lodge which it can legitimately recognize under its rules for recognition. These rules specify that a new Grand Lodge be composed of at least three lodges, all of which must traee descent from regular sources recognized by the Grand Lodge of \Visconsin; that recognition will not be extended to a new Grand Lodge that shall have been formed in occupied territory against the wishes of a recognized Grand Lodge in that territory. Past Grand Master Jasperson of \Visconsin, who is a native of Denmark and who recently visited that country, writes: "Of the two forms of Masonry practiced in Denmark, that of the Grand Lodge, which we recognize, comes nearer to our conception of socalled York Rite or Ancient Craft Masonry. . . . I think possibly neither of the Grand Lodges could trace a legitimate ancestry to the Grand Lodge of England. . . . Our Grand Lodge no longer stresses the point of ancestry as it once did, stressing rather present performance and adherence to the ancient usages of the Craft. The younger Grand Lodge is a democratic body, both in its form of government and in the character of its personnel. It does not limit its membership to Christians; it practices the system of three degrees and no more; it yields allegiance to no higher body. I know several of the Grand Officers and they would measure up very favorably with the average in our American Grand Lodges. . . . There is no question about the high caliber of the officers and members of the National Grand Lodge; it is an exceedingly autocratic body, one which you or I, and most of our American Masons, would find difficult to join; it is based upon the principle of autocracy, the lower degrees governed by the higher degrees; certain degrees entitle the holders to civil rank; it limits its members to those professing the Christian religion; its masters are not elected but named by some higher officer who was not elected by the Craft. A form of Masonry with which we are not familiar is practiced. We do not hold to the Templar origin of Masonry, all this is nullified by the system practiced by the National Grand Lodge of Denmark and other Scandinavian countries. The King, the head of the government, is Grand Master for life. Officials high in the State are the officers of the Grand Lodge. Some of the so-called Masonic degrees have a civil status.' ,

Brother Jasperson brings up some very pertinent questions. He errs in his statement that forms of Masonry with which we are not


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

245

familiar are practiced. American Masons witnessed the conferring of the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and eighth degrees. The Craft degrees would have been readily recognizable by a lodge Mason of an American jurisdiction, even though he might not have understood the language of the country. As to the legitimacy of the National Grand Lodge, there is no question. It is much older than any Grand Lodge which exists in American territory. Lord Byron, the Grand Master of England, issued a warrant on October 8, 1749, resulting in the establishment of a Grand Lodge in Denmark. Later, in order to harmonize certain elements, the ritual was remodeled and we have today what is generally known as the Swedish or Scandinavian Rite. The writer is not familiar with the ancestry of the newly established Grand Lodge of Denmark, but is under the impression that it traces its ancestry to the Grand Lodge of France. We cannot say that the Danish membership is restricted to members of the Christian faith, although we do know that such is required in their higher degrees, much the same as sueh a belief is required in obtaining the York Rite degrees in this country. After all, we can see little difference in restricting membership to Christians, as they may do in that country, or restricting it to the white race as we do in this country. As to the aristocracy of the National Grand Lodge, there is no question. It comprises a group of very high class gentlemen, but as far as being exclusive is concerned, certainly no objection could be had to an organization which had a membership of 7,500; there could be little exclusiveness in a group of that size. There are those of us in the United States who believe that 'a little more exclusiveness on the part of some of our Grand Lodges would result in great good to the fraternity and enlarge its usefulness. A Past Grand Master of olle of our largest jurisdictions expressed this sentiment: "In our State, the substance has been lost in worship of the form of the ritual, and administration of affairs are, and seem to be destined for too many years in the future to be in the hands of office seekers and ritualists lacking in ability, training and standing in their respective communities to properly represent the fraternity and manage its affairs. I am not generally a pessimist, but I am losing hope and interest. ' ,

Brother Jasperson's objections to members of the Royal family holding official Masonic office is not sufficient to prevent his jurisdiction from recognizing the United Grand Lodge of England, in which Grand Lodge the Duke of Connaught has been Grand Master for 10 these many years. We confess to know little about the newly organized Grand Lodge of Denmark, but in the telephone directory of the City of Copenhagen we discovered that the address of the Grand Lodge, which is Smallez 33, is also the address of the following organizations: Frimureri, Det Universelle Faelles (Le Droit Rumain) of Denmark; Frimurerligaen (Universal Frimurer-Liga); Frimurerordenen, Det Regeste Raad of 33 0

â&#x20AC;˘


246

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

If the Grand Lodge of Denmark is regular, it has surrounded itself with some peculiar Masonic auxiliaries. Almost two-thirds of the American jurisdictions have recognized the National Grand Lodge of Denmark. Irrespective of any argument which might be presented against this old and well established Grand Lodge, it is our opinion that the interests of Freemasonry may best be subserved by general recognition on the part of all Ameri('an lodges. 'N e can easily understand how our own jurisdictions might feel at the organization of some new Grand Lodge within our territory in opposition to an old established Grand Lodge which was headed by the leading men of our own country, and lest other Grand Lodges become confused in the matter of their recognition, let us again refer to the National Grand Lodge of Denmark, headed by His Majesty King Christian X, and whose Grand Secretary is Alex. Troedsson, 23 Blagdamsveg, Copenhagen. CZECHOSLOVAKIA

This jurisdiction has the strange anomaly of having two Grand Lodges functioning in the same territory, yet working together in perfect harmony and both perfectly regular and legitimate as far as Masonic jurisdictions may go. Dr. Ernest Klatscher, Grand Secretary of Lessing zu den drei Ringen, in a letter to the writer, expresses his satisfaction over the fact that "brethren prominent in U. S. A. Freemasonry have come to the conclusion that European conditions demand European solutions and must not in every respect be solved according to what has been developed in the U. S. A. for the U. S. A. and conditions obtaining there." In the above statement he refers, of course, to the existence of more than one Grand Lodge in a territory. He further adds this significant statement: "You are, no doubt, aware of the fact that the educational effects of a ritual can be best, if not exclusively obtained, when a ritual is presented in the mother tongue, as it is supposed to work on the sentiment; particularly the work which we Masons, as individuals, are suppoS€d to do amongst our fellow-citizens cannot be done effectively if those fellowcitizens cannot have the feeling that they have to work with co-nationals, with men of their own people. I wish to emphasize that we Masons, amongst ourselves, know that Masonic brotherly feeling is independent of questions of nationality, of language, and we know that it is one of the foremost purposes of Freemasonry to overcome all such divergencies which might inject themselves into human relations. We Masons here are few. In fact a fraction of the percentage in population to what they are in the U. S. About 2,500 in both Grand Lodges, together out of a population of 14,000,000, and for this reason it takes different Grand Lodges to work amongst the different nationalities, but knowing that we are all working for mankind, irrespective of such dividing lines. The relations between our Masonic bodies can be, must be, and are such of friendship and cooperation. It may, in this connection, interest you that I last night attended the memorial service for the late Grand Secretary for Foreign Affairs of the National Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia."


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

247

For the information of our readers, may we add that Czechoslovakia is a Republic, formed at the close of the World War, made up of territory in Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia, Slovakia, Karpathian Russia. Both Grand Lodges are located in Prague. Grand Lodge Lessing works in German, while the National Grand Lodge works in the Czech language. We have before us the proceedings of the annual communication of Grand Lodge Lessing, held on April 3, 1938. To show the intimate relationship between the two Grand Lodges we have only to mention the fact that the death of Professor Karel Weigner, late Grand Master of the National Grand Lodge, was mentioned in the report of the committee on necrology, the necrologist saying of him: "His memory will live with the brethren of both jurisdictions alike as that of a man in the fullest meaning of the work, one who has lived Masonry in every step of his life and understood, like few, to translate beauty and strength by benevolence and energy."

The Grand Lodge, according to a statement, is now in fraternal relation with 87 Grand Lodges, 28 of which are in the U. S. A. Both Grand Lodges appear to cooperate in the handling of charitable undertakings and exchange of lodge activities, and in all other matters where duplication of effort is apparent. The jurisdiction shows a gain of 10 for the year. They now have 1,428 members in thirty lodges, in addition to 4 Masonic Circles, which operate in town where lodges cannot be established. They have a junior association, "Amicitia," which endeavors to attract the interest of sons and daughters of members. Dr. Klatscher has supplied us with a condensed history of his Grand Lodge (Lessing) and only lack of space prevents us from printing it. From it we learn that the first lodge was erected in Czechoslovakia in 1740. Freemasonry was forbidden from 1794 to 1800; attempts were made to revive, 1800-1868; from 1868 to 1919, membership was in border lodges located in Hungary. MORE FOREIGN RELATIONS

Alaska: Lodges in this territory are under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodges of 'Vashington and British Columbia, depending upon their geographical location. The Grand Master of Washington usually makes an annual pilgrimage to the Alaskan lodges. He reported that he had visited all lodges in that territory, with the exception of the lodges at Nome and Fairbanks. There appear to be lodges at Ketchikan, Juneau, Cordova, Seward, Valdez, and Wrangel. He states he found "Masonry in Alaska friendly and healthy and there, in the pioneer territory, on our last geographic frontier, the spirit of our fraternity flames freely." While at Ketchikan he installed a District Deputy Grand Master; the day was Sunday and the Grand Master asked the indulgence of the Grand Lodge for this action. However,


248

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

he was not so indulgent of others, for he reported that in his absence the Deputy Grand Master had given permission to a lodge to install its officers on Sunday, an act for which the lodge was, by the Grand Master, reprimanded. A deputy of the Grand Master of British Columbia visited the lodges at Yukon and 'Vhite Horse, necessitating a round trip of approximately one thousand miles by plane. Owing to unfavorable conditions, he did not arrive until the day following the scheduled meeting. Argentine: We have no proceedings from this Grand Lodge, but, according to our infonnation, an irregular Grand Lodge has arisen in that territory-Grand Logia Federal Argentina. Belgium: Alabama, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, North Dakota and Utah recognize the Grand Orient of Belgium. It is not generally recognized by other Grand Lodges because the display of the Holy Bible is not considered indispensable in lodges obedient to its jurisdiction. In lieu of the Bible is placed the Book of Masonic Constitutions of 1723. According to the Louisiana committee, its absence "is to the Belgium Masons rather a symbol of the absence of liberty of conscience, since, in line with the dogma of the infallible papacy, they have not the right to interpret it according to their own convictions. The Belgian Masons consider Catholicism in their country a political party rather than a religion."

Bolivia: Kentucky, Massachusetts and New Jersey recognize this jurisdiction. A Commission on Foreign Relations has recently been appointed by the Grand Master of this Grand Lodge and the probabilities are they will be receiving further recognition in due time. A dispute between Bolivia and Chile resulted in a war, and the usual number of war orphans; the Grand Lodge has established a manual training school for their benefit. It urges upon the part of its various lodges the establishment of night schools, medical dispensaries and other beneficences. Brazil: The breaking up of the old Grand Orient of Brazil resulted in the formation of a number of State Grand Lodges. Those States which do not boast of a Grand Lodge have attached themselves to nearby States. For a time it appeared as if the government was to close Masonic lodges and all Masonic activity, but the ban was later removed and our latest information is that Grand Lodges are now functioning. Many of these Grand Lodges are being recognized by American jurisdictions, most generally recognized being the Grand Lodge Rio de Janeiro, followed closely by Parahyba, Bahia, Amazonas and Acre. Rio de Janeiro was recognized during the year by Idaho, Montana, South Carolina and South Dakota, but recognition was declined or postponed by West Virginia, Canada, and Quebec. Sao Paulo was declined or postponed by Maryland, Oklahoma and Texas. Rio Grande do SuI was postponed by Michigan. Parahyba was recog-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

249

nized by South Dakota and Alberta, but declined or postponed by Quebec and New South 'Vales. The Grand Master of Illinois reports that he has an appeal on behalf of American Masons in Brazil asking that they might hold dual membership in a new American Lodge at Sao Paulo. n is our opinion that these Grand Lodges will ultimately receive quite general recognition on the part of American lodges. Canal Zone: Canal Zone Masonry is under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. Lewis B. Bates functions as the representative of his Grand Lodge in that territory. General conditions there appear to be good, traffic being about the same as in former years. Although there has been a reduction in tonnage and tolls, caused by strikes, the force of American employees has been increased which works to the ultimate good of Freemasonry. The seven lodges in the district had 88 initiates, as against 81 the previous year; the total membership 1,716, as against 1,695 the year previous. Grand Master Allen visited the Zone during the year and assisted in the dedication of new temples at Ancon, and Gatun. The Ancon Temple cost $50,000.00 and is entirely paid for. Grand Master Endara of the Grand Lodge of Panama and his associate officers were present at the dedication. Chile: In addition to the regular Grand Lodge of Chile, Massachusetts has three lodges in this territory; all are small and have been suffering for some time from unfavorable business conditions. Montana reports recognizing "the Grand Lodge of Chile (Englishspeaking) ." China: If it were not for war conditions existing in China we might truthfully say the Masonic situation is satisfactory. The dispute between the Philippine Islands and other Grand Lodges occupying the territory has been amicably settled. The trouble arose over the granting, on October 28, 1930, by the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands, of a dispensation for Amity Lodge at Shanghai. Later four other dispensations were issued. Massachusetts had eight lodges in that territory, while other lodges existed under charter from Grand Lodges of England, Ireland, Scotland, Vienna and the Philippines. Under the agreement just ratified, each Grand Lodge is to appoint a representative to an Advisory Council for China which shall consider all Masonic questions pertaining to that territory; each representative will then make recommendation to his Grand Lodge as to what may be to the best interests for all in relation to Masonic matters in the Far East. Colombia: The situation in Colombia has been well stated by Leo Fischer of the Philippine Islands: , 'There are now two rival Grand Lodges in Bogota: (a) One of which Dr. Tulio Rubiano is Grand Master and Carlos Saul Hernandez is Grand Secretary. This Grand Lodge is sponsor for the new Grand Lodge del Departamento de Antioquia, at Medellin, which was formed on December


250

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

16, 1934, by three lodges. (b) One headed by Dr. Miguel Lopez Pumarejo. This claims to be the legitimate body and has the backing of the Grand Lodge of Colombia at Cartagena and of the newly organized Grand Lodge of Cali. "The split started when Rubiano's Grand Lodge, upon the withdrawal of the Grand Lodge of Cartagena, in August, 1934, from the treaty establishing the jurisdictions of the three Grand Lodges in Colombia then existing (Bogota, Cartagena, and Barranquilla) authorized the creation of the Grand Lodge of the Department of Antioquia by three lodges chartered by Bogota. The Rubiano-Hernandez side is set forth in a semiofficial statement signed by Grand Secretary Hernandez. The Pumarejo body is supported by the Grand Lodge at Cartagena. We are not prepared to decide which is the legitimate and which the illegitimate. "Petitions for recognition have been received from the two new Colombian Grand Lodges referred to: (a) The Gran Logia del Departamento de Antioquia, located at Apartado postal 260, Medellin, Colombia; (b) The Gran Logia Occidental de Colombia, located at Apartado postal 286, Cali, Colombia."

Brother Melvin M. Johnson, of Massachusetts, who is familiar with conditions there, tells us that the territory now has five Grand Lodges with separate jurisdictions : National Grand Lodge of Colombia, at Cartagena ; National Grand Lodge of Colombia, at Barranquilla; Grand Lodge of the Department of Antioquia, at Medellin; Grand Lodge Occidental of Colombia, at Cali; Grand Lodge of the Republic of Colombia, at Bogota. In August, 1936, all the Grand Lodges agreed to consolidate under the name Grand Lodge of Colombia, A. F. & A. Masons. On August 11, 1937, this Grand Lodge was officially recognized by the President of the Republic, in accordance with the provisions of Colombian law, as an entity privileged to enjoy all the rights and benefits conceded by the State to corporate entities. The Grand Master is Dr. Enrique Garces and the Grand Secretary is Americo Carnacelli. Arkansas withheld recognition of the new Grand Lodge until assured all parties have ratified the concordat. Most Grand Lodges have postponed any further recognition until assured of the actual conditions; among these are Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, and Quebec. Costa Rica: Grand Secretary Bowden of this Grand Lodge has very kindly furnished us with a copy of the annual proceedings and history of his jurisdiction. This Grand Lodge was founded December 7, 1899. The present Grand Master is Stanley Lindo; his Grand Secretary is Edward Sasso. Former Grand Secretary Bowden has been made Grand Secretary Emeritus. There are six lodges in the jurisdiction, with a total membership of 271. During the year they report having established fraternal relations with the Grand Lodge of Maine, Rio Grande do SuI and Queensland. The new temple for the Grand Lodge was dedicated November 6, 1937; it appears to be a large and commodious building and calculated to add to the dignity of the Grand Lodge. There appear to have been present representatives from the Supreme Council of Central America, Hondura, Panama, and Salva-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

251

dor. This Grand Lodge is recognized by all American jurisdictions, with the exception of Missouri, Maryland, Illinois and Colorado. Cuba: The last proceedings from this Grand Lodge are for the year 1933; apparently their printer is behind time. Weare forcibly impressed with the size and character of these proceedings, although they are printed in the Spanish language. From a general directory which accompanied the proceedings, we note the election of Gonzalo Garcia Pedroso as Grand Master, and Luis Martinez Reyes as Grand Secretary. There are 189 lodges in Havana and Provinces, Havana having 48 lodges. During the year several American lodges had representatives in Cuba and we note on all occasions they were hospitably entertained and afforded every courtesy by our Cuban brethren. Ecuado路r: The Grand Lodge held its Seventeenth Annual Comnunication in Guayaquil, January 14, 1937. They have 7 lodges under their jurisdiction, with 225 members. Melvin M. Johnson, speaking before the Grand Lodge of Texas, says of them: , 'Think of a Grand Lodge and a Supreme Council able to exist in such a country as Ecuador, for in the whole country there is not one single Protestant Church. And yet, in that country Masonry has among its members, althougll their membership is small, some of the leading men of that country, members of the Cabinet. Indecd, I think the President, or the head of the government at this time, is a member of the Masonic fraternity. At least the Minister from Ecuador to this country is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and that illustrates to you something about conditions there."

Egypt: Missouri receives no proceedings from Egypt, although we have never withdrawn recognition. For several years trouble was brewing in that territory between the National Grand Lodge of Egypt and the Grand Orient. Apparently the breach has been healed for Grand Secretary Abdel Meguid Younis presents a report at the Fiftieth Annual Communication, stating that his fondest hope had been realized by the amalgamation of the Grand Lodge and the Grand Council. This was apparently fonned on October 15, 1932, having 59 lodges, most of which work in Arabic and Greek, but others working in English, French, Hebrew, Italian and Armenian. Finland: Missouri last year recognized Finland, but its 1937 proceedings have not been received. It has 5 lodges, with 250 members. The Grand Lodge of Sweden has a lodge working in the same territory. All are accomplishing great good, although there is some strong anti-Masonic agitation. France: Past Grand Master Johnson (Mass.), in speaking of the three Grand Lodges in France, tells us: "The Grand Orient is the oldest body. It became a Masonic outlaw many years ago and it is not recognized by any Grand Lodge in the English-speaking world. (Brother Johnson does not know that the Grand Orient is recognized by Nevada.) It, however, is legal in its descent, but it banished the Bible from its altars and saw fit to propagate Freemasonry


252

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

in this country within the jurisdictions of our Grand Lodges here, and therefore it is an utter outlaw so far as Freemasonry is concerned. It is a political organization today, pure and simple-nothing more, but it has under its membership more men than are in both of the other Grand Lodges put together, and therefore people in France take their idea of Freemasonry from the Grand Orient of France and get a very wrong idea. "Your Grand Lodge (Texas) recognizes, and properly, the Grand Lodge of France, a Grand Lodge founded originally by the Scottish Rite. There is also a third body, known as the National Grand Lodge of France, which is practically an adjunct of the Grand Lodge of England, like the Provincial Grand Lodges of the Grand Lodge of England. "In those countries, legitimate Freemasonry has a hard row to hoe. Where the Temple of the Grand Lodge of France is located, there are two gendarmes posted to march up and down in front of their headquarters day and night, because the Temple has already been bombed once, and the government is endeavoring to protect them from outrages of that kind in the future. The legitimate Freemasonry of France, overshadowed by the large membership of the Grand Orient, is not understood by the people. I have seen great placards upon the billboards of Paris, such as you find advertising movie shows and that sort of thing in this country, condemning Freemasonry. I have bought newspapers there that had whole pages devoted to attacks on Freemasonry and listing those in the government who were supposed to be members of or favorable to Freemasonry.' ,

Illinois and \Vest Virginia have postponed action as far as recognition of the Grand Lodge is concerned; Kansas has denied recognition. Germany: As we all know, Freemasonry has been banished in Germany. There is an organization attempting to carry on in the German language under the name of Germany in Exile. It claims to follow the Rite of the Symbolic Grand Lodge of Germany. The only Grand Lodge to recognize this group is the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. Michigan postponed recognition, while Oklahoma, Manitoba and Nova Scotia declined recognition. Greece: Brother Darrah, of Illinois, states that the Grand Orient of Greece first appeared at Corfu in 1814. It made very little progress, and by 1821 had almost disappeared. Attempts were made to revive it in 1836, but it was not until 1866 that it made its appearance as an independent Masonic power. An anti-Masonic agitation in 1869 resulted in the closing of all Provincial lodges and a great many people, supposedly 'Masons, would in all probability have lost their lives had it not been for the personal intervention of Prince John of Denmark. A deputation from England recently visited Greece and were officially entertained by the King and higher authorities. Freemasonry appears to be in the hands of an intelligent class of citizens and is generally recognized wherever the facts have been properly made known. Of its 56 lodges, two are located in Egypt. Unforlunately only nine American lodges recognize this outstanding jurisdiction. Holland: Through some personal correspondence we have learned much concerning the Grand Lodge of the Netherlands. Through the


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

253

courtesy of Brother Van del' Laan, we have received a copy of "Templebouw," a beautifully illustrated volume showing many Masonic temples and their paraphernalia in detail. The Grand Master is H. van Tongeren. The jurisdiction has 147 lodges, with 7,950 members. Many of its lodges are in far-flung Holland Colonies. Recently the Grand Master visited the Dutch Indies, and a few years ago South Africa, in an attempt to secure the close cooperation and coordination of the lodges in his jurisdiction. There is a strong anti-Masonic current from the clerical party, but gains in membership are noted annually. Jugoslavia: Louisiana proceedings tell us that the Grand Lodge of Jugoslavia has a legal standing in that country, for copies of its constitution and by-laws are on file with the Ministry of the Interior. It is regarded as a closed, and not a secret, society. The Grand Lodge has agreed that no Freemason will beco~e a member of any secret society, that it will not become involved in politics, will make no distinction between religions, and will support no revolutionary movement. We learn further that there were lodges in that territory during the Napoleonic era and that they were instrumental in opening the first school teaching in the Serbian language. The present Grand Lodge was organized in 1919, and has 23 lodges with a membership of 1,200. It supports a maternity home, a school for deaf mutes and an institute for the blind. Panama: Brother Melvin Johnson (Mass.), addressing the Grand Lodge of Texas, gives a vivid picture of conditions in Panama. He said: I I In Panama, a little country like that, there is strong Masonry, and there is one incident about the Freemasonry in Panama that might interest you. The first Grand Master of that Grand Lodge, organized. not so many years ago, was Guillermo Andreve. He was a member of the Cabinet of the first President of the Republic of Panama. He was made Secretary of Education. There was no educational system in Panama at the time of the formation of that government, and the only schools there were, were operated by the Catholic church and only the children of the wealthy were able to attend those schools. Ninety-five per cent of the citizens of Panama were utterly illiterate. "Somehow or other, Andreve had become imbued with the ideals of Freemasonry, so far as education was concerned. He had something of that spirit of your old pioneers of Masonry in Texas, WllO built the schools of this great state, of whi.ch, when I was last down here I saw a sample in the remaining building at Onion Creed. You had a vital part in the building of the school system here, and he did there, for as the first Secretary of Education in the Panamanian Cabinet, he built an entire system of free public education, from the kindergarten to the normal school, inclusive. He had quite a struggle with the legislative body about it, in putting it over, and finally he had to make a compromise. In order to get the last few votes to give him a majority in favor of the bill for free public schools, he had to concede that on Thursday afternoon of each week the priests and the teachers of the Roman Catholic church should be permitted to attend the schools and give religious instruction. He did


254

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

concede that and so the bill was enacted into the law, and the school system was established; but Guillermo Andreve, as Secretary of Education, then issued an executive order that attendance on school on Thursday afternoon should not be compulsory. That ended the religious instruction in tIle schools of Panama. ' ,

Grand Master Allen, of Massachusetts, visited the Grand Lodge of Panama while in the Canal Zone and was entertained at a banquet by the Grand Master of Panama and his associate officers. Washington withdrew the appointment of its representative near Panama "the appointment having been made in 1934 and no letters patent or commission having issued from the Grand Lodge of Panama, and inquiries thereupon remaining unanswered." At any rate, the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Panama for 1938 do not list Washington among the forty-one Grand Lodges of the United States as recognized by them. The present Grand Master is David C. Robles. One of the features of the April 9, 1938, annual communication was the reception of the District Grand Lodge of the Canal Zone. Peru: We did not receive proceedings from this jurisdiction. The Grand Lodge has 28 lodges, with 816 members, and it recently showed a remarkable gain in membership. Texas continued its request for recognition; Alberta recently recognized it. Most Grand Lodges of the United States are in fraternal relation with this jurisdiction. Philippine Islands: The Grand Lodge of California has a peculiar interest in the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands, according to a story prepared by a California brother. It appears the first attempt to introduce Masonry in the Philippines was in 1756. Since that time, the fraternity has suffered from bitter intolerance, persecutions and even executions. American Masonry was taken there by our soldiers at the time of the Spanish-American war, but the first lodge under the juriSdiction of California was not chartered until October 10, 1901. Later two other California lodges were chartered, and, in 1912, these three lodges formed the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands. They took as their constitution, the constitution of the Mother Grand Lodge of California; then they amalgamated twentyseven other lodges with charters from other jurisdictions. This was accomplished in 1917. 'Ve read: "Those other lodges had pas~d through bitter trials because of the antagonisms of the officials of the dominating church, and the subservient public officials. The same house was seldom used more than once for a meeting place. While a Masonic meeting was being held it was customary to invite the young sons and daughters of the members to make merry with Bong and dance as an excuse for the gathering. Meanwhile the faithful brethren met in the most secluded parts of the building. "When the fusion of the Grand Lodge was completed, the American brethren were outnumbered nine to one and it was presumed that the Philippine brethren would elect Manuel Quezon as Grand Master, but in appreciation of what the Americans had done, they unanimously elected William H. Taylor as their first Grand Master. They have an unwritten


]938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

255

law that there should be rotation thereafter, and since that time the office of Grand Master has been regularly alternated between an American and a native of the Philippines."

Past Grand Master Conrado Benitez was recently a guest of the Grand Lodge of Maryland. Weare interested in what he had to say: , 'Since political order was established over a year ago, Masonry in that jurisdiction has had to face a new challenge. Masons who are members of the Constitutional Convention of the Philippines, the Convention that drafted our present constitution, were interested in seeing to it that Masonic principles were incorporated in that document, and so those of us who were in that convention held special meetings-we had about 40 Masons out of 200. There was some conflict; there was an attempt to modify the fundamental principles of separation between church and State, but those efforts failed, and today we may proudly say that the Philippine Constitution is truly a Masonic document."

Rumania: Conditions are very much disturbed in Rumania. The last information is that the Grand Lodge, after consulting with heads of the government, have suspended labors for the time being. The fact that there were two Grand Lodges contributed to the confusion of the constitution. Salvador: Although we have been in fraternal relations with the Grand Lodge of Cuscatlan, Salvador, for many years, we have never seen a copy of its proceedings. From other sources we learn they have approximately 150 members within six lodges. South Africa: Most of the lodges of South Africa hold charters from the Grand Lodges of England, Ireland, Scotland and the Netherlands. There is a District Grand Lodge of South Africa, Central Division, whose proceedings we have just received. The forty-second meeting was held April 9, 1938, at the Masonic Temple in' Kimberley. Lodges not represented are fined $5.00; Grand Officers not in attendance are fined $2.50. The District Grand Master is Joseph van Praagh. They have recently organized a correspondence study circle. One member of each lodge is supposed to secure Masonic information from various journals, and a monthly Masonic leaflet is sent out to lodge secretaries and to far distant brethren in the hopes of giving them some Masonic education. They have established an education fund for the purpose of educating children of living or deceased Freemasons, "no deserving applicant has ever been refused and since the institution of the fund assistance has been given toward the education of 169 beneficiaries. Switzerland: The Grand Lodge Swiss Alpina is rapidly becoming recognized by all American jurisdictions, whether because of their approval of the fight which this little Grand Lodge has to undergo in order to maintain its sovereignty, or because of the high character of its membership, we are unable to say. It has 41 lodges under its obedience and is entirely regular in every respect. It was founded in 1844 and was formerly a District Grand Lodge of the Grand Lodge of


256

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

England. The lodges work in German, French and Italian, and are in perfect harmony. The seat of the Grand Lodge, according to long established practice, alternates every five years between the German and French speaking parts of Switzerland, and Grand Officers ar(' elected every five years. From a friend in Switzerland, we learn: "That since the overthrow of the Weimar Constitution in Germany, through the Hitler party, a constant growing campaign in favor of fascists principles is spreading over Switzerland. Pretending to represent the only true patriotic spirit, a new party, sailing under the flag National Front, not wry numerous but very noisy, started a campaign against Jews, Freemasons and Communists, although no connection between tllC three elements can ever be proven. These groups have the silent support of the Roman Catholic Church. United with the la\v, the succeeded in forming the so-called Helvetic Action, and collected a sufficient number of signatures (minimum 50,000) to launch a popular vote."

The result of the vote was that Freemasonry will continue in Switzerland. The Federal Council, previous to the voting, unanimously decided to recommend the rejection of the anti-Masonic bill, since the attacks were in no respect justified. Syria : New York recently granted a dispensation to EI Merj Lodge in South Lebanon, Syria. They have several lodges in this same territory. Masonry, brought there by the Grand Lodge of Sotland, has existed about eighty years. New York is now attempting to form a Masonic District and to establish a Provincial Grand Lodge for that territory, with the ultimate hope of the establishment of a Grand Lodge of Syria. There are, at the present time, eight Scottish lodges and eight New York lodges; there is another group of lodges chartered by tl:.e Grand Orient or the Grand Lodge of France, 12 in number. The difficulty is in establishing the background necessary for them to properly understand what Freemasonry represents. This condition has necessitated an entirely new set-up on the part of the Grand Lodge of New York and they have recently adopted regulations providing for the establishment of Provincial Grand Lodges. Uruguay: Ohio recognized Uruguay during the year, while \Vashington denied recognition. \Ve have no other information available. Vienna: Just when the newly organized Grand Lodge of Vienna had. an opportunity to embark in the world as a full-fledged Grand Lodge and was securing the support of its Masonic neighbors, Herr Hitler stepped in, and by force and power has caused the work entirely to cease. Our understanding is that the government has taken over the offices of the Grand Lodge and has arrested its various Grand Officers. Those who are not of Jewish extraction have been liberated, but are under surveillance, while those who have Jewish blood are languishing in Austrian prisons. Previous to their being banned, they were recognized by Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, North Dakota, Virginia, Alberta and Quebec.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

257

CONFERENC'E OF GRAND MASTERS

The annual conference of Grand Masters of Masons in the United States was held in Washington, D. C., Monday, February 21, 1938, preceding the annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. The conference was called to order by Past Grand Master A. T. Higgins of Louisiana. Missouri was represented by Brothers Reader, Chiles, Lee, Ittner and Mather. Robert R. Lewis, Grand Master of Pennsylvania, was elected to preside over the conference. The agenda included such subjects as printed rituals, physical perfection, relief and lodge charity, community activities, Masonic conditions in Europe, incorporation of Masonic bodies, and the Social Security Act. Missouri was represented in the discussion by Grand Master Reader, who discussed the Social Security Act. It is with regret that we find space prevents us from quoting sections of the matters discussed at this conference. One of the most enlightening things was the report of Past Grand Master Johnson, of Massachusetts, on Masonic conditions in Europe. An invitation was extended to all Canadian Grand Lodges to participate in the annual conference held in Washington, D. C. MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION, U. S. A.

The nineteenth annual meeting of the Masonic Service Association, U. S. A., was held February 23, 1938, during the same period as the conference of Grand Masters and G. 'V. M. N. M. Association. Grand Master Merwyn Brown, of Nevadn, presided over the meeting; he represented the smallest Grand Lodge in the Union in Masonic population. The outstanding feature of the meeting was the address of Rev. Dr. Joseph Fort Newton. The Executive Commission is now composed of Past Grand Masters Fly (Texas), Murfin (North Dakota), Foulds (New Jersey), Goodwin (Utah), Poteat (North Carolina), Wilson (New Hampshire). We have been supplied with a copy of the report of the Executive Commission for the fiseal period and note that during the year the Grand Lodges of Vermont and Kentucky rejoined the Association. The Association has no liabilities except current bills, and has provided a reserve fund to carryon relief machinery when the call comes. Relief activities for the year centered in the collection and distribution of funds in flood stricken Kentucky. In addition to the usual Digests, lodge room plays and entertainments, educational plans, etc., there were sent out during the year various other matters of current Masonic interest. The Digests included pamphlets on liquor and gambling, historic Masonic relics, Masonic libraries, and physical perfection. The new play written by Carl Claudy is "A Rose Upon the Altar." The usual twelve short-


258

PROCEEDINGS

1938

talk buUetins were issued and considerable educational material issued upon the Constitution, the Social Security Act, and relief work. The Association should be commended for its activities in the Kentucky flood relief case. Appealed to by the Grand Master of Kentucky, on February 9, 1937, for $20,000.00 for relief, which neither Red Cross nor National and State Government could give, the Association succeeded in raising $33,771.01. Almost half of this was contributed to the M. S. A. Flood Relief Fund and there was no charge of handling or bookkeeping involved. Forty-five states are listed as contributors to the flood relief; nothing is reported from Missouri. The largest donation was made by the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, $3,400.00; Texas ranked second with $2,305.00; Massachusetts and Utah contributed $1,360.00 and $1,312.00, respectively. It is interesting to note that the Philippine Islands, through its Grand Lodge and associated bodies, sent $1,835.00. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

The twenty-eighth annual convention of the Association was held in the auditorium of the memorial at Alexandria, Va., on Tuesday, February 22, 1938. The meeting was presided over by Past Grand Master James R. Johnson of South Carolina, acting President by reason of the decease of the veteran Louis A. vVatres. Missouri was represented by Brothers Reader, Chiles, Lee, Ittner and Mather. The acting President, in his address, recited some of the early history of the Association, from which we learn that in 1910 the Grand Lodge of Virginia issued an invitation to the Grand Masters of the United States to "IIleet in Alexandria to hear a proposition from one of their subordinate lodges, Alexandria 'Vashington Lodge No. 22. Thirteen Grand Masters responded to the invitation and all were enthusiastic about the building of a suitable fireproof structure to house the relics of Washington. It took two years before the Grand Lodges endorsed the recommendations of these Grand Masters and in 1912 only eighteen Grand Lodges had joined in the movement. Then came the W orId War. The building still stands incomplete. It is estimated that a half a million dollars will be required to complete the building, one hundred thousand dollars to complete the grounds, and something in excess of a million dollars for endowment. From the report of SecretaryTreasurer Keiper, we learn that there was received during the fiscal year $78,368.91; and that $54,493.00 was expended in construction and maintenance. Grand Master Reader presented Missouri's contribution of $250.00 during the session. The financial report shows that Missouri has contributed $157,267.01. The largest percentage of quota is New Hampshire with 349.9, on the basis of $1.00 per capita, and the smallest is Kansas, 2.4.


PRESIDENT AND MRS. HOOYER LEAYING THE MEMORIAL AFTER THE DEDIOATION CEREMONIES, MAY 12, 1932


260

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Elmer R. Am, of Ohio, was elected President to succeed President Watres. Bert S. Lee, of Missouri, was continued as third VicePresident. The next annual meeting will be in Washington, D. C., in February, 1939. Here is what other Grand Masters and jurisdictions have to say concerning the Memorial and their participation in the raising of the funds: Alabama: "Your Grand Master was embarrassed as Alabama has made no contribution to the erection of this Memorial for several years. Several jurisdictions have contributed annually and I regret that Alabama has been derelict in this great undertaking which should be the pride of every Mason in America." Illinois: "Illinois made no further contribution this year and for several years has made none. I recommend and urge that this be given consideration which the great enterprise to which we stand committed as Freemasons deserves. Our cooperation at this time would practically assure completion of the edifice within a few years, and critics of the fraternity would be silenced and, more satisfying, we would accomplish what we set out to do twenty years ago." Minnesota,: "Minnesota contributed nothing, as has been the case for several years, although each year a delegate is sent to the convention. It must be embarrassing to these delegates, as it was to me, to see other States contributing liberally and to realize that Minnesota has not paid its share." Nebraska: "It ,,-as very embarrassing to your Grand Master to discover the great delinquency of Nebraska in the payment of her quota and outstanding almost at the foot of the list. It is not very flattering to Masonry to have attempted this work without better and more prompt results. It advertises to the world that Masonry lacks either skill and ability or unity." Ohio: "Ohio is fourth from the bottom of the list in percentage of quota contributed. The lodge room represents the foundation of the entire structure and today it is an empty shell. It is not a symbol of Masonry; it is a symbol of defeat. Let us lay aside every prejudice that has heretofore militated against our active and enthusiastic interest in raising our quota. Our reward will be the removing of the imputation that the Masons of Ohio are less patriotic than those of other jurisdictions." South Dakota: "I want to say that South Dakota is next to the foot of the list in quota subscriptions. It was embarrassing indeed to say the least to see other jurisdictions, through their Grand Masters, walk up and deposit checks totaling $70,000.00, while your Grand Master could do nothing. It may be true that mistakes have been made in planning a too elaborate memorial, that it might have been built smaller and cheaper, or the cost could have been reduced, the fact remains that the Masons of America have started the undertaking, which at present is far from completed, and for which we, as Masons, are receiving much adverse criticism. ' , Washington: "The original plan of the Association was to the sum of two and a half million dollars, one-half of which was to be expended on the erection of the Memorial itself, and one-half placed in an endo"'ment fund. . . . Our Grand Lodge took upon itself the burden of making the contributions from this territory and in so doing believed it was assuming a responsibility for $30,000.00 to be paid in ten annual installments. Misunderstandings, however, at once arose. The Association assumed that increase in membership meant increase in the amount of contributions.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

261

Some members of this Grand Lodge believe that the original sum was all that had been pledged. Changes made by the Board lifted the cost from $1,250,000.00 to $4,000,000.00, and this in turn forced a raise in the per capita levy from $1.00 to $1.70. Thus, the jurisdiction of Washington, in the eyes of the Association, is indebted to it $83,289.00, of which $37,519.00 has been paid. . . . The Masons of the United States are going to be called upon to contribute to this Association for many yea!s to come, if not forever. . . . It is not mine to determine your course in this matter, that responsibility is yours, but I should be false to the confidence you have reposed in me did I not say that, if this Grand Lodge has $45,000.00 to expend for the erection of a memorial to George Washington, I should rather see it used for the purpose of endowing scholarships at our state-supported institutions of higher learning." In considering the matter, the jurisprudence eommittee reported that the Grand Lodge of Washington" has discharged in full its obligation to the Memorial Assoe.iation."

BUILDING PROJECTS

At least two Grand Lodges are wrestling with building projects, both of them involving investments of more than one million dollars. In one instance the Grand Lodge has a site and a site only; in the other, the Grand Lodge is the owner of a large commercial building. The theme for this heading is to be found in the statement of an officer of the Grand Lodge of Ohio: "There are, unfortunately, a large number of Masonic Temples in Ohio which are in financial distress or jeopardy. They are more in need of financial advice than money. It occurs to me that either an existing or new committee should make a survey of the temples in the state, with a view of suggesting new financing on better terms, or abandonment of some temples. Someone schooled in financial matters sllOuld be pressed into service in this connection."

Temple Heights is the name of the white elephant belonging to the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia; they have a million dollars invested in this site, which overlooks the City of Washington. A motion to abandon the project was adopted by a vote of 103 to 73. At the annual communication the Grand Master found four reports dealing with this subject; the full reports are not published. A first trust loan on the property is held by the Acacia Mutual Life Insurance Company, in which several members of the Grand Lodge are interested. Since owning this property the Grand Lodge has paid on principal $554,000.00; interest, $377,035.00; taxes, $181,385.00. A special committee recommended the continuation of efforts to secure a purchaser at a price of $1,100,000.00. In the meantime, the Grand Lodge voted to continue an additional assessment of $1.00 per capita, payable in two equal installments during the year 1938. Out in Idaho, a few years ago, a lodge erected a temple, leaving a vacant spot in each front corner of the building for the purpose of later inserting a plaque or emblem of the lodge. The jurisprudence committee of the Grand Lodge received a letter from the secretary, stating:


262

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

, 'These plaques have recently been procured and it is the idea of some members that one of them be an emblem of the O. E. S. Before they are placed in the recesses provided, we wish to know if there is any objection to having the O. E. S. emblem used as one of them."

The words of the jurisprudence committee were short but satisfying: "\Ve can find no justification for such procedure and we disapprove it."

The situation in Illinois is expressed in the report of a committee on lodge finances, from which it appears that the losses incurred in the operation of buildings continues to be a problem. Of 261 lodges reporting ownership, depending in part at least on outside revenue, 103 report losses in building operations. Lodges in Cook County (Chicago) are finding it difficult to operate comfortably. The committee had to deal with four building projects. One was a most interesting case; a lodge bought a building for $90.00; no financial problem here. Another lodge had a pretentious building project, but when analyzed' by the committee, dropped their ideas. The Grand Lodge of Louisiana has a two million dollars project in its Masonic Temple. In twelve years it has collected $2,129,314.00, and $528,875.00 from a $2.00 assessment. It has expended for operating expenses $784,933.00, and $270,934.00 in taxes, applying $1,602,321.00 to the payment of bonds, debts and interest. The eighteen-story temple and office building was erected at a cost of two and a quarter million dollars; furnishings approximate $85,000.00. The debt is now $1,101,800.00. In the meantime the membership of the Grand Lodge has decreased from 35,191 to 21,000, which, with the dedine in rents, has made a crisis. The Grand Master reconimended that no attempt be made to sell the temple until a price comparable to its value be obtained. He believes the Grand Lodge is able to cope with the bonded indebtedness. Several years ago the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, prompted by a desire to render aid and assistance to those of the fraternity suffering from tuberculosis, provided funds for the erection of a building on the grounds of the State Hospital and entered into a eontract with the State Board of Health whereby the building was to be known as the Masonic Unit and to be used solely and exclusively for Master Masons. The Grand Master re('ently learned that the contract was not being ('arried out and that many non-Masons were being treated and cared for. The Grand Lodge has postponed action temporarily. This same Grand Lodge has been disturbed by failure to have proper office facilities, and spasmodic attempts have been made from time to time to purchase existing properties or to erect a new building. It has finally been decided to erect a building on the grounds of the Masonic Home. A Grand Lodge library, museum and office building has been turned over completed to the Grand Lodge of Montana by a committee charged with its erection. It was dedicated on the day of the annual eommunica-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

263

tion; it is a two-story building, well adapted to their needs and erected at an expense of $74,535.00. Speaking before the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, Past Grand Master Dean, of Massachusetts, said: , 'I think our foreign jurisdictions can show us something in the way of handling a temple program. The temple in the Canal Zone was all paid for before it was dedicated. The one in Shanghai, China, is paying a 6 per cent dividend to the stockholders, so I think we can all learn something from the way they do it in those foreign countries. . . . "During the past few years we have let our financial troubles obscure one of the real purposes of Masonry, which is to promote friendliness and offer men an opportunity to meet together on a common ground."

The Grand Lodge of New York owns the Grand Lodge building, which is partly commercial. Of the $183,986.00 received for rentals, etc., at least half comes from rentals to Masonic bodies. Only 74 per cent of the space is occupied. Lodge space is 100 per cent rented; 153 regular bodies held their meetings in this building, not including certain Masonic clubs; 275 regular meetings per month, exclusive of committees,路 district associations, etc., are held. Because of the nature of its occupancy, the building operates eighteen hours a day as compared with the usual eight to ten hours for office building. There are more than ten acres of floor area. Operating expenses are $167,358.00, leaving a net profit of $16,328.00 for the year 1937. The Grand Lodge of North Dakota went to the rescue of one of its subordinate lodges. Upon the deposit of $21,000.00 worth of temple bonds to be purchased, $5,000.00 was advanced by Grand Lodge from relief and home funds, and the temple was saved, being "both a good investment and an act of Masonic charity in the broadest sense." Because of the floods in Pennsylvania, damaging lodge rooms in J olmstown, a $10,000.00 loan was made from the emergency relief fund of the Grand Lodge. Lodges agreed to increase their dues $1.00 per annum, keeping the increase in a separate fund and paying the Grand Lodge annually, the interest to be 2 per cent. That the Grand Lodge of Tennessee would ultimately be provided with a Grand Lodge building has been foreseen for a number of years. In fact, ever since they were persuaded to purchase several thousand dollars worth of Scottish Rite bonds. The matter came to a head during the last year, Grand Lodge officers being authorized to bid in the temple property when sold, if it could be purchased at a fair, reasonable market price. The court approved its purchase at $150,000.00. The money was borrowed from the endowment fund and now the building is being occupied by the Grand Lodge. In Queensland, a District Grand Lodge has approved a law establishing an emergency building fund to assist in the restoration of any Masonic building damaged or destroyed by storm or other disaster. Wherever a lodge building is so damaged or destroyed it applies to the


264

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

District Board for a grant from this fund, whereupon the Board investigates and submits its recommendation as to amount of payment. A building corporation in Tasmania, known as the Tasmanian Freemasons Hall Company, Ltd., has recently erected a new Masonic Temple in the City of Hobart. At the laying of the cornerstone, following an oration by the Lord Bishop of Tasmania "a collection was taken up on behalf of the Hall Company for furnishing and decoration fund." CORNERSTONES Cornestone ceremonies appear to be obsolete in Eastern and New England States, judging from those reported in the various proceedings. Unfortunately there are not as many public cornerstones aR might be expected from a society actively identified with this cornestone business for so many years; there is only one outstanding event in the lot, and this in view of the large building program now being carried out by our government. We fully agree with the Grand Master of Kansas in his statement: "To much attention cannot be given the working out in advance every detail of public ceremonies. They should move off promptly and smoothly and the dignity of a Grand Lodge meeting be maintained from first to last.' ,

I t may be that this lack of dignity and smooth detail has had something to do with the limiting of the number of cornerstones laid under Masonic auspices. Alabama's cornerstones were restricted to an armory and a Baptist Church. Arkansas laid the cornerstone of a courthouse and a Methodist Church. California laid the cornerstone of Pasadena Junior College, a National Guard Armory in Hawaii, Scottish Rite Temple in Fresno, Masonic Temple in Arcadia, post office at Hayward, two high schools at Sacramento, Community Church at Courtland, a city hall at San Bernardino, a school at Wilmar, and two Masonic Temples in Honolulu. Colorado laid seven cornerstones: two schools, a junior college, city buildings, a post office, and a building on the Municipal Golf course. The worst experience in laying a cornerstone is that of the Grand Master of Kansas who, enroute to the scene, "ran into a dust storm and had to just feel our way along. The storm got so severe that the ceremony was postponed. It was difficult driving and many times we could not tell just where we were." The meeting was postponed three weeks and the Grand Master returned. It got dusty again and, although the dust was so thick that they could see only a few rods, the cornerstone was laid according to the ancient ceremonies, followed by an address by Governor Huxman. Later the Grand Master laid the cornerstone of the Hamilton courthouse, a post office at Horton, and a grade school at Greensburg.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

265

No cornerstones are reported in Louisiana, but the Grand Master reported attending the dedication of a post office at Gretna, where he "had the pleasure and privilege of addressing a gathering and introducing Postmaster General James J. (') Farley." Cornerstone ceremonies were conducted by the Grand Lodge of Ohio as follows: Post office buildings at Georgetown, Mt. Gilead and Minerva, schools at New Miami, Blue Ash and Ironton. Oklahoma had its share of cornerstone, including courthouses at Woodward and Claremore, schools at Okmulgee, Altus, Duke, Sapulpa, Pryor, Shawnee and Blair, a municipal building at Tecumseh. The Grand Master reports an additional ceremony, which is new to us: "On three occasions of our cornerstone laying we were followed by the W.P.A. with their service." Oregon tops the list by laying the cornerstone of the State Capitol building at Salem. There were between two and three thousand Masons in the parade and nearly every lodge in the State was represented. Thirty minutes of the program were broadcast by the National Broadcasting Company. The complete ceremonies and addresses made on this occasion are made a part of the Grand Lodge proceedings. In addition to this cornerstone, others were as follows: Post offices at Newburg and Marshfield, Congregational Church at The Dalles, courthouse at Oregon City, city hall at Dallas, and a high school at Sherwood. The blue ribbon for number of cornerstones laid doubtless goes to Virginia, ten such dispensations being noted, including high school buildings, lodge halls, fire department buildings, one post office, and a new clinic and laboratory building at the medical college of Virginia. A dispensation was refused to a lodge to lay the cornerstone of a hospital building because it was a commercial enterprise. A public land and social security building cornerstone was laid by the Grand Lodge of 'Yashington. Other cornerstones included Federal building at Bremerton, Sunnyside, and a city hall in Grandview. Few cornerstones are reported in foreign proceedings, but in Manitoba the Grand Lodge was opened in special session to lay the cornerstone of the pedestal for the statue of Brother Robert Burns, the Scottish poet, the statue being erected on the grounds of the Manitoba Legislative Building. CEREMONIES

Ceremonial forms of Masonry are what distinguish Grand Lodges from regular conventions and associations. How necessary, therefore, that these ceremonies be carried out with the greatest possible solemnity and worthy of the object and standing of our fraternity. Such a feeling prompted the Grand Master of Arizona, after visiting the Grand Lodge of California, to recommend: "That we give serious consideration to working out something along these lines for ourselves. I feel we have relaxed too far in our ceremonies


266

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

because of our strong leanings toward democracy in all things. Uniform aprons of appropriate design and color, together with some form of formal dress for all Grand Lodge officers might be considered. I believe the members of the Grand Lodge would enjoy an improvement along these lines, thereby enhancing the dignity to which a Grand Lodge session is entitled. "

This jurisdiction has just completed and adopted a form of ritual for the presentation of buttons to veteran Masons; it follows closely the form used in California. The Grand Lecturer of California finds: "For many Jears it 1ms been customary to wear the apron outside the coat while attending the communications of the Grand Lodge and when on processions at other times. Many of the brethren choose to wear it under the coat. I have learned that in some jurisdictions the apron is worn outside the coat on all occasions, but so far this ruling has never been made in California. To clarify the situation, let me say that the Grand Lodge communications and processions of lodges are looked upon as formal in nature and at such times the apron should be worn outside the coat. No harm is done in wearing it beneath the coat at lodge meetings if the brethren care to do so."

Thus California provides two ways of wearing the Masonic apron. We had hoped the Grand Lecturer would stop before he reached the situation in subordinate lodges. In our opinion the apron should be worn one way, and one way only. 1ÂŁ the apron is to be worn under the coat, then the brother had just as well enter the lodge room without any apron whatsoever. There should be uniformity of use on all occasions. Grand Secretary Smith of Nebraska has prepared a ceremony for use in presenting the Jordan medal, as well as the fifty-year badges, a ceremony which appears to be dignified and in keeping with the character of the event. Ohio is one of those jurisdictions which is going on record as opposing public installations. Speaking on this subject, the Grand Master said: "There may possibly be a few localities in the state where open installations are proper and serve some useful purpose, but my opinion is that the objections to them far outweigh their value and I believe they should be absolutely prohibited. As you all know, a lodge of Master Masons is opened, the public is then invited to enter, many come simply out of curiosity and are quite interested to see what a lodge looks like when open. Some Mason tries to read the installation ceremony, in rare instances is it ever committed to memory; he mispronounces many of the words and the general effect is no particular credit to the fraternity. Often members thoughtlessly give Masonic signs in full view of the public. The ancient charges are then read, the last one being, 'You agree that no visitors shall be received into your lodge without due examination and producing proper vouchers of their having been initiated into a regular lodge. These are the regulations of Free and Accepted Masons.' The room is full of women and children and men who are not Masons. The Master then and there is made to violate one of the ancient charges at the very time he is being installed. The audience is thereupon informed


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

267

of the duties of the various officers, which, after all, are none of the public's concern. But more serious than all these objections is the situation that sometimes arises and did arise last fall in one of our districts. "The officers-elect were standing before the Altar of Masonry. It was an open installation and a large crowd was present. The presiding officer said: 'If any brother is apprised of any just or Masonic reason why any of these officers should not be installed, let him speak now, or forever after be silent.' A Mason thereupon made an objection to one of the officers. What followed can well be imagined. The brother who objected was within 째his rights. He had previously notified the officers that he objected to the installation of this brother, but they, thinking he would not dare to do so at a public installation, proceeded with the ceremony anyway. "The chief purpose of an open installation is publicity. We ought not to seek that. This kind of publicity docs not do Masonry any good."

The Grand Master of 'fennessee has recommended that the Board of Custodians be directed to prepare a suitable ritual for opening ann dosing of Grand Lodge. The question of giving Grand Honors has been discussed in several Grand Lodges. The Grand Master of Washington finds that there has developed in his jurisdiction a tendency, rising out of an eagerness to show respect for visiting brethren, which is carrying us away from proper Masonic practice-the indiscriminate tender of Grand Honors. These honors, he believes, to be properly those of the Grand Lodge and to be extended to none except who by election or appointment hold office in that body. His Grand Lodge does not recognize any past holder of an appointive office, although practice and tradition do, except Past Grand Masters because of the character of their service. He recommended that the Grand Honors be extended only to appointive and elective Grand Lodge officers and to Past Grand Commanders, reserving private Grand Honors for the presiding Grand Master, or those whom he may at any given time designate as worthy of them. Laxity in carrying on activities is not confined to American jurisdictions, for a committee in the Grand Lodge of Prince Edward Island reported that "visitors have commented upon such laxity in the past and we consequently recommend that the suggestions be carried out, not only in Grand Lodge but in every constituent lodge." The neighboring jurisdiction of New Zealand wrestled with the question of the wearing of the apron. A lodge representative had moved that all brethren be allowed to wear their apron inside the coat. It was then announced that the resolution did not meet with the approval of the Board of General Purposes. Since the present practice was adopted by the Australian Masonic Conference, after a very full discussion by representatives of the various Grand Lodges, the motion was lost by a large majority. The Grand Master of Western Australia calls attention to a question which would be of no concern in this country, but which brethren visiting in foreign jurisdictions should be well aware of, that


268

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

"whilst a Master Mason is privileged to attend as a visitor the meeting of any lodge, that privilege docs not extend to the festive board. Invitations here are within the power of the Master of the lodge and unless such invitation is given generally in the lodge or specially by a member with the Master's approval, the visiting brother as a matter of etiquette should refrain from being present. There is not one of us who would dream of asking ourselves to dinner in another person's home, and the Festive Board of a lodge is to all intents and purposes that lodge's dinner table. I do not think there are many members of our lodges who are guilty of the practice I am referring to, but there is no doubt whatever that amongst the large body of unaffiliated Masons in this jurisdiction there are many who wish to secure all the privileges without expense to themselves, forgetting that it very often means considerable expense to a lodge." COMMERCIALISM AND MASONIC PUBLICATIONS

Several so-called Masonic publications are issued and distributed in California. During the year many complaints were made to the Grand Master concerning some of them. Most complaints were directed at the methods used to obtain advertising. A complaint against a San Francisco magazine was made on the ground that the solicitor stated funds received for advertising went to help defray expenses of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master stated: "some reputable merchants regard so-called magazine advertising as a racket." The committee which passed on the Grand Master's address said that such complaints were nothing new and that the warning note sounded by the Grand Master should be ample notice to all persons using the word "Masonic" in their commercial enterprises that a continuation of such abuse would result in affirmative action being taken by the Grand Lodge. Most advertisers do not know that such publications are purely private enterprises, independent of Grand or Subordinate Lodge. The following significant statement was added: I I The Masonic institution owes it to itself to maintain its dignity and its reputation and if the necessity arises it will not be remiss in checking abuses and practices that are to its detriment."

In Minnesota an attempt was made to make a certain Masonic publication the official publication of the Grand Lodge, being, of course, without any expense to the Grand Lodge. The committee in passing on the matter decided that the subject was of such vital importance and far-reaching consequences to Masonry in that state that it should not be passed on until after full consideration. Accordingly, a special committee will make report at the next annual meeting. The Grand Lodge of New York has an outstanding Masonic publication; it seems to meet the general approval of the Craft. It is directly under the eontrol of the Grand Lodge and is of very high character. The columns carry reputable advertising. This Grand Lodge has a committee on law enforcement which keeps its eye open for violations of Masonic customs and traditions. For example, it found objectionable the card of a jeweler, sent out at Christmas time, bearing a cut of


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

269

a Masonic watch charm and referring to his lodge membership. It found objection to a newspaper advertisement showing a man gorgeously attired in an admiral's hat and evening clothes, was girded with a long sword trailing upon the ground, and wore a sash extending from his right shoulder to his left hip, upon which were the words "Ancient Order Grand Lodge." It objected to posters appearing in subway stations, placed there by trustees who were handling property no longer owned by a Masonic group, announcing that the Masonic Temple was available for social entertainments and carrying pictures of parts of the building, including a cocktail lounge. It is un-Masonic conduct in Ohio, as in most other states, for candidates for public office to advertise their Masonic affiliations, and the Grand Master says: "Masonic publications around election time are full of objectionable advertisements. Last fall one candidate advertised: 're-elect him to another term. He has been a Mason for over thirty years, belonging to both the Shrine and the Grotto. He knows the meaning of the obligation. He takes his oath of office seriously.' "

Others use a more subtle method of having their photograph taken while conspicuously wearing a Masonic emblem or their shrine or grotto fex, and having this inserted in their political advertising. "I call upon all editors of papers and magazines, and each one of you, to cooperate with me in doing whatever is possible to discourage this un-Masonic practice. Candidates must no longer be permitted to use Masonry to further their political ambitions. Help us to keep Masonry out of polities and to keep politics out of Masonry."

Under the subject of Masonry and Politics, the Grand Master of Oregon said: "Masonry takes no part in politics. It is right that it should not. Neither sllOuld it permit discussions of political matters concerning which there can be an honest difference of opinion among Masons. Such discussions lead only to dissension. As to those forms of government concerning which there is no room for difference of opinions among Masons, a different situation exists. I refer to forms of governments or systems which do not permit or tolerate Masonry. We ought to fight those things which are trJing to destroy Masonry. If we do not, we may awake too late." DEOISIONS, DISPENSATIONS, JURISPRUDENOE

Alabama lodges may not rent their halls to a labor union if there are members of the lodge affiliated with rival labor unions, for to do so may lead to unpleasant relations between members of the lodge. The same Grand Lodge has decided that if a lodge member is a resident in the home of another fraternal organization, then the Grand Lodge is not under obligation to contribute to his support. Another lodge wanted the Grand Master to give dispensation to reduce its initiation fee. The Grand Lodge said that lodges should discourage putting on drives for membership and offering as inducement a reduction of initiation fees during the term of the drive.


270

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Before Arkansas lodges elect officers, the Master is required to ask if all present are qualified voters-that is, have all present paid their current year's dues. Georgia refused to adopt a resolution to give the rank of a Past Master to one who had moved from Florida into Georgia, for the reason "no evidence is submitted that this brother has done anything to earn this honor." The Grand Master ruled that he did not have authority to make a Mason at sight and referred to the confusion existing as to what constitutes such a ceremony. The committee chairman finds so many conflicting authorities that he was reminded of the query made of an old darky on the coast several years ago when he was asked as to whether he believed in signs; he answered: "Boss, I sho' does, and a sign will never fool you, but whenever you sees a sign, if you look close, you'll gen'ly see another sign what nullifies that first sign." A Maryland lodge had its charter arrested for holding a picnic on Sunday in violation of a Grand Lodge law which states that no lodge may hold any picnic, exrursion, or other public entertainment under the auspices and name of a lodge. Small balloons were distributed at the picnic bearing the name of the lodge and the advertisement of a well-known brand of whiskey. The jurisprudence committee in Mississippi decided that a lodge might not move its meeting place from its regular hall to an outdoor meeting in a private club house and camp where there was to be a barbecue. The committee had no hesitancy in stating the Grand Master had no authority to permit the conferring of a Masonic degree at any other place than the regular lodge room, for "it is never permissible to ronfcr degrees on tllegrouud floor of a building, and to do so in the open, outside any building, could hardly be justified on any grounds."

New Hampshire, however, permitted one of its lodges to hold an outdoor communication on an island on a Sunday. The Grand Master of Alberta refused dispensation for a lodge communication on a mountain top, holding that "conditions have so materially changed since the early days in the mountains that former seclusion and privacy is not now so positive." Another request was refused where a lodge desired to aet on a petition for affiliation where the applicant did not present credentials. Advanced age, failing health and a desire for Masonic burial were the arguments for the dispensation. In correspondence with England, where the applicant had formerly resided, revealed he had been suspended in 1913 and had never been reinstated. The Grand Secretary of South Dakota reports they have arranged for concurrent jurisdiction with adjacent Grand Lodges of Iowa, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota and Wyoming. The Grand Lodge of California has directed the Grand Secretary to cause to be registered with the Secretary of State the full and proper


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

271

title and designation of the Grand Lodge and its constituent lodges, together with its seal and the jewel of the Grand Master as the insignia of the Grand Lodge, and also to register the square, compass and letter "G" as provided for in the State law for the registration of names, designations and insignia of fraternal societies. The act provides that no fraternal society shall be permitted to register any name or insignia similar to or so nearly resembling another name or insignia as may be apt to deceive, and anyone who wilfully wears, exhibits or uses for any purpose a name or insignia registered hereunder shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. A resolution was presented in the Grand Lodge of Georgia which have made positions of Deacon and Steward elective. It was defeated, the committee reporting thereon: "It has been before this body once before and rejected. No system of selection or election is a guarantee against mistakes. There is no obligation on the part of the Grand Lodge to promote an appointive officer. Under the present method the elective officers select from this body the appointive officers. The elected officers are entrusted by the franchise of this body with this power. That they have sometimes made mistakes is possibly true, but to throw the selection of these officers into a political scramble will not guarantee that no mistakes shall be made. Qualifications which make for popularity, the ability to get in the limelight, the opportunity to trade political influence, does not necessarily mean that the person selected is best fitted to fill these offices. It is quite likely that District Conventions would soon be converted into more or less political conventions, wherein representatives would be trading their influences in anticipation of election in this body."

Our readers will know that a controversy has been going on for several years between Binger Lodge of Oklahoma and -Galena Lodge of Missouri over funeral expenses for a deceased member of Galena lodge. A special committee recommended that in view of the opportunity for the misunderstanding of hastily exchanged telegrams at the time of the brother's death, the proposal of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to pay $75.00 of the $145.00 be accepted, and further recommended a suitable expression of appreciation , 'for the spirit of fraternity and fairness of our sister jurisdiction of Missouri which enables us to affect a happy solution of this complicated problem. " DISTINGUISHED MASONS

Freemasonry has many who have distinguished themselves in their fields, their ritualism and executive position. Some of our best Freemasons are those who rarely attend regular meetings of their lodge, but who exemplify their Freemasonry in a more practical way by their actions and their outward conduct. Several of these names are prominently mentioned in the various proceedings which we have reviewed. One of these was the late Robert W. Bingham, American Ambassador to the Court of St. James. During the meeting of the United


272

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Grand Lodge of England, attended by from eight to ten thousand Masons, the Grand Lodge was opened by the Pro Grand Master, Lord Harewood, and subsequently attended by the King, the Duke of Kent, and Prince Arthur of Connaught. First the King was invested with the office of Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge; he assumed the chair during the remainder of the meeting and the first person invested with further honors was Robert 'V. Bingham, who was created a Past Senior Grand Warden of the Grand Lodge of England and took his place upon the dais next to Prince Arthur of Connaught. Lord Fairfax, in writing to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, stated it was a very impressive ceremony and Bingham "is the only Ambassador to the Court of St. James who was eligible for such distinction." Ex-Gov. Ben S. Paulen, of Independence, Kansas, accepted appointment as Grand Treasurer of the Grand Lodge. Later he was elected to the position. During the sesquicentennial of the Grand Lodge of Maryland a part of the social program included a reception at the Governor's mansion at Annapolis, by Governor and Mrs. Harry Nice. The Governor was on the program for an address and in concluding, he said: "It is an honor to be a member of this fraternity. It is an honor to be a Marylander; and may the Almighty God from on high descend upon us His richest blessing, so that you will go forth with a renewed vigor and determination to carry out His Divine command."

Samuel H: lVragg, a Past Master of a Massachusetts Lodge and President of the Massachusetts Senate, in speaking to his Grand Lodge, told them of a change that had come over the State in recent years: "In the years 1925 to 1930, I was fortunate enough to be a member of the legislature when our new Grand Master was a member of the House of Representatives, and we had some very delightful times together, because, in those days, we had a Beacon Hill Square Club. That is, we had a majority of the members of the lower branch, and of the members of the upper branch, who were members of this fraternity. "I must say that today we have in the Senate, out of forty members, approximately eighteen members of the fraternity; no majority there. Of the two hundred forty members in the House, we have only approximately sixty-five who are eligible to come to Masonic meetings. There is some change in these few years since our Grand Master left the legislature. "At that time, practically every elective official of the Commonwealth was a Mason, and practically every one of the heads of the twenty-odd commissions in the State of Massachusetts was also a Mason. "Just think it over, Brethren. How many have we on Beacon Hill today who are Masons' Very few."

Dr. Daniel L. Marsh, President of Boston University, spoke at the same meeting. He is a graduate of three American and two foreign universities, and holds doctor's degrees from six universities. His book, "The Art of Fine Living," has been read in both hemispheres. Past Grand Master Teodoro M. Kalaw, present Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands, was recently a patient in the Mayo Clinic, according to the Grand Lodge of Minnesota.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

273

In Montana, the address of welcome was given by Brother Hugh R. Adair, Lt.-Gov. of that State. Major General Stanley H. Ford was the recipient of a rare honor in Nebraska when the Grand Master "for good and sufficient reason" issued a dispensation to George W. Lininger Lodge to confer the degrees of Fellowcraft and Master Mason without reference to time. Five Past Grand Masters were present on this occasion. The Nebraska proceedings record the laying of the cornerstone of the Wayne Normal School, at which Brother Roy L. Cochran, Governor of Nebraska, was the orator. On December 17, 1937, the Kiwanis Club of Lincoln, Nebr., gave their 1937 award to Past Grand Master Henry H. Wilson as being Lincoln's most distinguished citizen. Brother Wilson has attended forty-three annual communications. Past Grand Master John J. Wemple of Nebraska, who served as Grand Master in 1884, is by ten years the senior of any living Past Grand Master of any jurisdiction in the United States. New York reports the death of the late Rev. S. Parkes Cadman, at the age of seventy-two. He was noted for his broad and liberal attitude with regard to the religious opinions of others. It is said that in this generation no man exerted more influence for the brotherhood of man. He had served for twenty-eight years as Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge. There was also reported the death of Brother Clarence A. Barbour who, had he lived two weeks longer, would have been retired as President of Brown University. He was Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of New York four years and of the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island one year. At the 1937 New York communieation, Grand Master Klinck of New York presented the medal for distinguished achievement in the field of art to Brother Irving Bacheller, novelist, essayist, journalist and artist. He is the author of "Eben Holden," "D'ri and I" and many other v01umes. In his response, he said: "My brothers, it seems very long ago-exactly, I think it was in 1898when I was a member of the editorial staff of the New York World--that my frienq Jules Chambers proposed me for membership in Kane Lodge, with a membership of distinguished and illustrious names. , 'That relationship has been one of the dearest of my life, one which I have been denied the pleasure of enjoying very much, for some twenty years ago I became a citizen of Florida. . .. "Sometimes I feel like congratulating the United States of America for a great conservative force like that which you and I represent this morning, and in the midst of the times of startling philosophies and tests that sometimes I fear are threatening the integrity of our Country."

Other holders of the medal in New York are John Ward Dunsmore, eminent painter; Edwin Markham, one of America's foremost poets; and John lV. Evans, engraver, philosopher and idealist.


274

â&#x20AC;˘

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

North Dakota records the death of Past Grand Master McDonald, leaving Brother Louis B. Hanna, the first Grand Tiler, former Governor and member of Congress, the sole survivor of the charter members of the Grand Lodge. During the Grand Lodge communication, Brother David Lloyd, eighty-eight years of age and a Mason for sixty-six years, was introduced. It was announced that while Brother Lloyd had never married, there were many nephews, nieces and others who had gained their college work through his generosity. During good years he had prospered. He was president of a bank which was compelled to close during the years of depression but Brother Lloyd, out of his own funds, saw to it that every depositor received one hundred cents on the dollar. Surely, Brother Lloyd has a right to appear under the heading of distinguished Masons. The Grand Lodge of Ohio was welcomed to the City of Cleveland by Honorable Harold H. Burton, a Mason and Mayor of Cleveland. In the absence of the Grand Orator, Dr. I. N. McCash, Grand Chaplain and President Emeritus of Phillips University of Oklahoma, addressed the Grand Lodge on his recent visit to Russia. He stated that the trend now is toward sixteenth century intolerance. Here is what he says about our own system of education: "I say it as a citizen, without prejudice, that our system of higher education must be more fully stabilized and held to a standard. It is a qu~stion in my mind whether taxation of this State will adequately support our present institutions of higher learning. That is to say, we had better have fewer of accredited classification to moot needs of the State without overtaxing her taxpayers. The better those schools are, the higher and better will 00 the life of Oklahoma."

Pennsylvania, in its observance of the sesquicentennial of the American Constitution, notes the names of thirty-one Deputies to the Constitutional Convention known to have been Freemasons. Other names, states and lodge memberships are given in the proceedings. The Grand Master of South Carolina visited Fidelity Lodge No. 304, located on John's Island, and witnessed the raising of two brothers. The lodge is unique in that it meets in the middle of the day, each member bringing his picnic basket. Present on this occasion was Brother Olin D. Johnston, Governor of South Carolina. Not all jurisdictions are taken into consideration by their Governors. However, the Grand Lodge of Washington received a telegram from Brother Clarence D. Martin, Governor of that State, regretting circumstances which prevented him from attending the annual communication. He added: " It has boon a satisfaction throughout my administration to know that behind me, supporting me in all good things attempted and done, there stood the Masonic Fraternity."

His Majesty King George VI has renamed His Excellency Sir Leslie Orme Wilson as Governor of the State of Queensland. The appoint-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

275

ment was without precedent, for no former Governor has held the office for two consecutive terms. The Governor is the present Grand Master of Queenslm1d. In Western Australia we learn of the investiture as Senior Grand Warden of the Most Rev. H. LeFanll, Archbishop of Perth and Primate of Australia. EXTRANEOUS ORDERS

There appears to be a wide divergence in various sections of the country as to the treatment of extraneous organizations. In one case the Grand Lodge receives the Grand Matron and renders her such honors as might be due a distinguished member of the Craft, whereas in another jurisdiction expels a member for having become a member of this same organization. Those who have been reading these reviews in recent years may have thought that the reviewer was highly antagonistic to membership in the Eastern Star. We have no objection to the Eastern Star as an organization; it has some very high standards and does much in its way. Our objertion is to their permitting members of the male sex, for the reaf;on the Masonic fraternity today is not accomplishing what it might because it has been divided up into groups, circles, societies, associations, guilds and the like, which detract from the work of the parent organization. Masonry needs all men of ability in its active ranks, more so now than ever before. In a few instances, the ladies are accused of being Masonic politicians; this is the reason attributed to their being compelled to vacate all Masonic lodge rooms in the State of Pennsylvania. Here in Missouri, they have done excellent work in contributing to the furnishing of our own Masonic Home, but an examination of the reeords will convince one that their members are also enjoJ ing the hospitality of that Home. In Alabama the Grand Master said: 7

"It has been my honor and pleasure to be associated with the O. E. S. During my administration I had the honor of serving as chairman of the jurisprudÂŁ'nce committee at frequent intervals; during the year I visited several chapters on many occasions; the Worthy Matron discussed problems with me. I attended the annual session of the Grand Chapter and extended the Worthy Grand Matron and other Grand Officers an invitation to visit us prior to the opening of our Grand Lodge."

They accepted the invitation and attended, the program being made up largely of addresses by the Worthy Grand Matron and the 'Vorthy Grand Patron, with an introduction of Grand Chapter O. E. S. officers. At a special sesquicentennial program in Arizona, officers of the Grand Chapter and the General Grand Chapter O. E. S. were listed as distinguished guests. Arizona has a piece of property consisting of sixty acres of land, with a number of buildings on it, which it had hoped to develop into a tuberculosis sanitarium, but it was found to be too large an undertaking for a small jurisdiction. It was offered to the


276

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

General Grand Chapter O. E. S.; the result was a visit of O. E. S. representatives to investigate the property. In Arkansas we learn that the Grand Patron of the General Grand Chapter O. E. S. was introduced and addressed the Grand Lodge and "brought to us much information relating to the O. E. S., its origin, work and ideals." The Grand Secretary of the O. E. S. in Georgia sent a telegram to Grand Lodge "wishing for you harmony and accomplishment of much good." In Idaho, flowers came bearing the O. E. S. inscription. Iowa's Grand Matron, finding it impossible to be present, sent her Grand Secretary as her personal representative. The Grand Matron of Louisiana sent the Grand Lodge a letter; the letter was accompanied by her personal check for $152.00 for Masonic Home purposes. R.ight in the midst of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Michigan, the Grand Master recognized the Grand Matron of the O. E. S. After the Grand Matron and her associate officers had retired from the North Dakota Grand Lodge hall, after presenting the usual basket of flowers, "Grand Lodge resumed regular order." Their neighbors on the south (S. Dak.) declared the Grand Lodge at ease, whereupon there entered the Grand Matron, Past Grand Matron, and three points of the star. The Grand Matron addressed the Grand Lodge. We read in the Tennessee proceedings that just before Grand Lodge was called to labor, the Grand Matron and her associate officers were officially introduced and that the Grand Matron "in a most charming manner expressed her pleasure at being able to visit the Grand Lodge." Down in New South Wales the O. E. S. does not fare so handsomely, for we read: "It llaving been reported to the Board that a Past Master of a Buburban lodge was contravening the edict of the Grand Master by attending meetings of the O. E. S., such brother was cited to appear before the Board, and in reply wrote admitting his membership of the Order referred to, and expressing the opinion that no good purpose would be served by his attendance. In view of his admission, it was resolved to sus~nd him from the rights and privileges of Masonry during the pleasure of the Board."

'Vestern Australia is contending with co-l\fasonry. In 1931 the Grand Master called attention to three irregular organizations claiming connection with Freemasonry: (a) Co-Masonry; (b) Order of the Star of the East; (c) Order of the Eastern Star. It was pointed out: , , No Freemason who had any regard for his obligation would take part in any of them. Neither at that time nor since have the latter two orders made any headway in Western Austi'alia, but in regard to CoMasonry the position is entirely different. The matter came up for the consideration of Grand Lod~ in 1933 and it was decided to ask the Grand


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

277

Lodge of England for an expression of its attitude towards irregular bodies. In reply the Grand Secretary forwarded a recommendation of the Board of General Purposes which had been adopted in 1921."

The Grand Master of \Vestern Australia said: "There is another association to which I desire to draw attention. A little while ago I was asked officially whether a member of one of our lodges could also be a member of the O. E. S., which I was assured had no connection whatever with Masonry. On reading the constitution of that Order, however, I find no meeting of it can be held unless a Master Mason be present, which rather destroys the contention that the Order has no connection with Masonry."

He then called attention to the Grand Lodge proceedings of 1929, describing the conference of the Grand Lodges of Australia which unanimously decided that no Freemason: "Be permitted to attend any meeting of, or be a member of the O. E. S., and that no meeting of the Order of the Eastern Star be permitted in any lodge room. It is sufficient answer to the question put to me, and it is a definite intimation to brethren who may be in that position that they must choose between membership of their lodge and membership of the O.E.S."

There has always been a closer bond between the Masons and the Odd Fellows than between any other group, doubtless because both organizations are about the same size and have been actively identified with community life for many years. Again, both bodies have a similar biblical and historical background. In Missouri, Governor A. M. Doekery had the reputation of being the only individual to serve in the capacity of Grand Master of both the Masonic and 1. O. O. F. Orders. In Idaho, the Grand Master of the Odd Fellows was officially introduced. I t seems that the Grand Master of the Masonic Grand Lodge was the guest of the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows at a recent meeting. The Grand Master of Oregon attended a reception given by the Grand Lodge 1. O. O. F. to its Grand Master, who was also a member of the Masonic Fraternity. \Vhen the Grand Lodge convened, among the distinguished visitors was Grand Master Zimmerman of the I. O. O. F.; he was extended every courtesy on this occasion. The Grand Master of Kentucky proposed a restriction of membership in extraneous orders to those organizations which had the approval of Grand Lodge, believing that "such a rule would be a protection to the members, as well as to the Grand Lodge." He was careful to provide in his proposed resolution that the prohibition should not apply to bodies subordinate to those bodies already existing or recognized as Masonic, or organizations composed wholly of non-Masonic membership predicated upon blood or family relationship. Michigan had a special committee on Americanization. This year's report was in the nature of an investigation of the youth movement. Letters were sent to all lodges in the form of a questionnaire. Many lodges failed to reply and "not a few frankly let it be known that they


278

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

have not, are not and will not be interested in anything beyond keeping themselves alive." This led the committee to believe that no rigid program for youth adivity could be recommended, for what might be doomed to failure ill olle eommunity, might be the very thing to interest Masons in another. Since Michigan was one of the first states in which the DeMolay was introduced, ,,,'e read with curiosity what the committee has to say about this movement: , 'When the Order of DeMolay was first introduced, Masons wdeomeo it as the answer to the question, 'lIow shall we reach the young men who some day will become Master Masons ~, The Order had a great opportunity and there seems room for doubt that the opportunity has been well met. It is doing very well in some communities, particularly in the larger cities, but it has proved a complete flop in others. . . . "It seems natural to conclude that the Order is suitable only to larger cities and that it is doomed to failure, from the start, in small communities. It certainly cannot be recommended by Grand Lodge as a program for every constituent lodge in !\-fiehigan to back or even sanction."

As to the Boy Scout movement, it was found to he a "Boy movement, instead of a youth movenwnt." Father and Son Nights were rerommended. 'Vyoming proceedings record the appeal of a member from the a('tion of a lodge remitting rentals due from a chapter of the Order of DeMolay. rfhe Grand Master of Nebraska proposed a law "prohibiting any organization, having Masonic prerequisites for membership and recognized by the Grand Lodge, from sponsoring any outside organization without first obtaining the eonsent of the Grand Lodge." The recommendation will lie over until next ycar. Tennessee is having a grievous experienee with Amra Grotto. It appears that this Grotto, located in Knoxville, sponsored a carnival with its attendant unfavorable publicity. l\fember of the Grotto were informed: "Masonry would not stand passive and permit its members to indulge in activities that would bring the name of Masonry into ill repute. That similar occurrences must be avoided in the future and members must deport themselves as Masons should."

The Grand Master later learned that the Grotto planned to sponsor another carnival. Certain games of chance and immoral and indecent performances were given in violation of a Grand Lodge edict, and so the Grand Master followed with an order requiring the Masters of Tennessee lodges to ascertain what members held membership in Amra Grotto, instructing such members to be notified to terminate their membership immediately and not later than July 1, 1937; that continued membership in the Grotto after that date 'would constitute a Masonic offense. In justice to the Supreme Council of that Order, it may be added that the Grand Monarch, learning of the Grand Master's action,


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

279

cancelled the charter of Amra Grotto. And here endeth their first lesson. EDUCATIONAL

The attempt on the part of Grand Lodges to educate the Craft has been crowned with little success. A number of committees are reporting to their Grand Lodges their activities, but we are inclined to believe that a large part of the educational program has been confined to the committee themselves. The California committee decided that their educational program should be confined to Masonic subjects, should be directed to the candidate and it should not he compulsory. They have adopted the socalled Lodge System, a simple, direct and inexpensive policy. The Master of a lodge appoints a committee, candidates meet with this committee four times; once before taking the first degree and once after each degree. The candidate has nothing to read, nothing to study and no examination to pass. He listens while a member of the committee explains the history of Masonry, the organization of a lodge, the Grand Lodge, a Mason's financial obligations, proper attitude of Masons in politics and religion, and some of the symbols, ritual, ideals and purposes. The plan was tried out in half a dozen lodges, and then enlarged to thirty lodges. The committee comments that during the twenty-one years the Grand Lodge has been experimenting with Masonic education, lodges have raised 121,561 candidates and that if each had been told something about Masonry, what a well-informed body of Masons we would have today. The p.rogram, which is based on the New York system, lists forty subjeets; the committee are authorized to select five. Those listed to be given before the first degree are (1) Short History of Freemasonry; (2) The Landmarks; (3) The Tenets; (4) Qualifications; (5) Machinery of Lodge Organization; (6) Powers of a Master; (7) A Mason's Financial Obligation; (8) Freemasonry's Attitude Toward Politics and Religion; (9) Duties and Privileges of Lodge Membership; (10) The Ballot. After the first degree: (1) The Meaning of the Term Entered Apprentice; (2) An Interpretation of the Ritual of the First Degree; (3) Symbols of the First Degree; (4) Duties, Privileges, and Limitations of an Entered Apprentice; (5) Place of the Obligations in Masonic Law; (6) What Freemasonry Owes to Architecture; (7) The Masonic Homes; (8) A Brief History of Masonry in This Jurisdiction; (9) Famous Men Who Have Been Masons; (10) Office and Duties of a Deputy Grand Master. After the second degree: (1) The Meaning of the Term 'Fellowcraft'; (2) Interpretation of the Ritual of the Second Degree; (3) Symbols and Allegories of the Degree; (4) Duties and Privileges of a Fellowcraft; (5) Operative Masonry; (6) Solomon's Temple and Masonry; (7) The Office of Grand Master; (8) The Teachings of Masonry; (9) The Mason as a Citizen; (10) Masonic Education. The final series, given after the third degree, are: (1) Interpretation of Ritual of Third Degree; (2) Symbols, Emblems, and Allegories of Third Degree; (3) The Legend of Hiram Abiff; (4) The Duties, Priv-


280

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

ileges and Rights of a Master Mason; (5) The Structure and Functions of Grand Lodge;. (6) The Lodge and Grand Lodge; (7) The Annual Communication of Grand Lodge; (8) The Financial System of Grand Lodge; (9) Freemasonry and tIle Holy Bible; (10) The Literature of Masonry.

A committee on education in Delaware submits its sixteenth annual report. It awarded eight scholarships for the school year. One of the scholarship holders maintained a 100 per cent average during the four years of his college career. The District of Columbia lodges are reported unanimous in desiring some form of Masonic education for their candidates. Most of them wish to include material on matters of everyday importance, such as modes of recognition, vouching, relief, procedure for visiting other lodges, etc. There will be no more compulsory reading of lecture or pamphlets in lodges of that jurisdiction. Iowa has a Speakers Bureau giving an extensive series of special lectures. These lectures are given in ten selected centers and consist of five addresses, delivered by members of the Bureau at intervals of one month. The course contemplated a total of fifty meetings in a five month period. The five subjects recently assigned were: "Masonic Frontiers"; "A Sane View of Masonic Symbolism"; "The Anti-Masonic Period in the U. S."; "Masonry in Other Lands"; "Masonry and Democracy." In spite of vile weather and road conditions, attendance was 3,800. The committee are also issuing a four-page leaflet entitled " A Word to the Candidate." The Maine brethren have discovered that an educational program cannot be successfully established by correspondence, that personal eontact with the lodges is necessary to impress upon them the needs and advantages of such work. It was also found difficult to obtain the serious attention of older members to a course of Maso1!ic study. Approach to them must be the attraction of meetings and the accomplishment with them must depend on the merit of the meetings, for it is with the candidates that we should have our greatest concern. The greater the inspiration we may impart to them, the greater will be their interest in the fraternity and the greater service they will render. A special communication of the Grand Lodge of Maryland was called during the year for the purpose of receiving the members of the Fellowcraft Club of Washington, D. C., who presented Carl Claudy's Masonic play, "Greater Love Hath No Man." A special committee on Grand Lodge library reported to the Grand Lodge of Minnesota that in their opinion the establishment of a general library at that time would be unwise, because such a library would cost from fifty to a hundred thousand dollars, that if such a library were to be established it should be a library limited strictly to Masonic works. The committee recommended a pocket library system, or traveling library. Our brethren in Montana have gone in for art, the Grand Master


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

281

recommending that a suitable painting be prepared for the library building showing the first meeting place of Masons in Montana, or any other portrait that would be appropriate in such building. Nebraska has a student fund for the use of any child who has been a resident of the Masonic Home, has graduated from the high school, and has been recommended by the Home Board. Each child is required to earn his or her room and board, all their expenses are paid from the fund. In addition, each student receives a cash allowance of $5.00 a month for incidental expenses. New York sees a danger in an nttempt to increase lodge attendance by inviting addresses on subjerts outside the pale of Freemasonry. New York has always assisted in educational work and when the establishment of the public school system of that state was an experiment, the Grand Lodge appropriated funds for the support of the schools and by its influence contributed to the establishment of the public school system. The fraternity was warned that dignified dispassionate discussion of social customs were not contrary to Masonic principles, that it was not so much the nature of the subject presented, but the manner of presentation, which carried vice and danger, for the propagandist with a mission is a man to avoid: "A partisan intem~rate crusader, for or against some given cause or movement, well may disturb the peace and harmony of a lodge and work great evil. Men of this sort always are a danger, the lodge room is not their forum and into it as teachers they cannot come."

This jurisdiction has by far the outstanding Lodge of Masonic Research. Their transactions are published and make a valuable addition to any Masonic library. Oregon has a Research Lodge, although we have never seen its proceedings. It appears to be furnishing speakers for lodges in that jurisdiction. Pennsylvania has a group of lecturers and suggests a variation in the type of material to be presented. Each District Deputy Grand Master is responsible for all names submitted by the lodges to the committee on lectures (what a responsibility). More than two hundred forty brethren have offered their services and the list covers over three hundred Masonic subjects. Tennessee Masons are not enthusiastically participating in their system of education, according to the report of the committee. The committee further believes it would not be a wise move to resort to compulsory education and that constant appeals for speakers will have a better effect than a mandatory edict. Part of the Texas centennial program was a pageant depicting the growth of the Grand Lodge of Texas. The pageant was arranged in nine scenes, most of them historical in character. Washington has its Research Lodge, the Master being an eminent Freemason, Walter F. Meier. It was instituted a year ago with twenty-


282

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

three members and now has a membership of thirty-two. They have established a correspondence circle, the dues being $5.00 for lodges and $2.50 for non-resident Masons. British Columbia has adopted a system of its own. The Grand Lodge has a committee on Masonic education and they in turn have established a separate committee in each lodge, the committee appointed by the Master. The Master designates meetings for committee programs, usually on nights when no ritual work is undertaken. A question box is a part of every program. Saskatchewan, through its educational committee, has prepared a program for each month in the year. The past three years have been devoted to studies of the first, second and third degrees; this year the program is varied. It may be of interest to our American brethren to know that the month of April was devoted to the study of Benjamin Franklin. New South Wales has its official lecturers and their subjects are listed in the proceedings. One brother, for example, is listed as lecturing on twenty-five different subjects. New Zealand appropriated $250.60 as a grant to lodges of research for the gathering and spreading of Masonic knowledge. r~ANCES,rEES,BONDS,DUES

For the first time in twenty years, the Grand Lodge of Alabama has operated without having to borrow money. Reports and remittances are now made to the Grand Secretary from each lodge quarterly. The Grand Lodge of Arkansas has a real estate mortgage of $10,541.00 on the Immanuel Baptist Chur<'h. California is not only balancing its budget, but is reducing its per capita tax 10c, due entirely to the better financial condition of the Masonic Homes. Colorado has $278,416.00 in its permanent fund. A few years ago the income was about 6 per cent; today it has dropped to 4.6 per cent, but in the meantime the fund has increased so that the return is approximately the same. On assuming the duties of his office, the Grand Master of Georgia found it necessary to become a collecting agency, there being a deficit of some $5,000.00 in monies due from lodges. Sabetha Lodge, in Kansas, issued a warrant to Grand Lodge for $383.00; it was cleared in the usual way, but came back from the bank which had failed in the meantime. The lodge took the position that the account had been paid. The Grand Lodge, receiving no money, concluded that it had not been paid. The Grand Master notified them that if not paid, he would immediately arrest the charter, whereupon the account was paid. Uniform reports for deputies, treasurers of lodges, secretaries, and finance committees were recommended in the Grand Lodge of Maine.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

283

The receipt of a gift of $100,000.00 from the estate of a deceased brother and its probable investment caused the Grand Master of Maryland to select a Trust Company as financial advisor to the Grand Lodge, believing that funds should be invested through experienced sources, constantly supervised by experienced heads free of all alliances with any underwriting group, or any specialized buying or selling organization. We huye yet to diseover a Trust Company which may be considered wholly free from all alliances. Montana refused to consider an amendment to the constitution giving secretaries the right of ballot in the Grand Lodge, as well as paying them mileage and per diem for attendance. A secretary in Nevada failed to turn over to the treasurer the funds which he had collected and the lodge now sustains a loss through the failure of the trustees to audit the books. The Grand Master said: "It is no reflection upon the secretary or treasurer to have an audit, but it represents a sound business practice."

Grand Master Dean of Massachusetts says: "Constant dunning drives men away from the lodge. Better results can be obtained by indirect method. A lodge which planned and carried out a big get-together meeting reported the largest amount received for dues in any month in years."

Thirty per cent of the Ne"" York lodges carry public liability insurance, prompting the committee to recommend that in all cases where buildings are rented to other organizations or used by non-members, the question of public liability insurance should receive thoughtful consideration, in view of the present tendency to present elaims for personal injuries upon the slightest pretext. North Carolina divides its delinquent lodges into three groups: (a) Where annual dues are insufficient to defray the expenses; (b) lodges allowing members to become so far in arrears that they cannot pay before suspending them, incurring further per capita tax in the meantime; (c) total absence of any business methods in handling lodge affairs. Surplus funds and trust funds of the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin may be invested only in certain national, state or local securities and these are very clearly set forth. Ontario says its constituent lodges must stand or fall as a result of their own effort and not to look to Grand Lodge for assistance, for Grand Lodge has its own financial problems and should not be involved in the financial problems of its lodges, and that while Grand Lodge uses a great portion of its income in benevolences, Freemasonry in reality is a principle or philosophy of living, a moral institution rather than a financial concern or a society primarily formed for the extending of material assistance to the unfortunate, needy or distressed. Manitoba has a large investment in Province of Alberta bonds, on


284

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

which interest has not been paid for some time. It has also become the owner of six piec~s of Winnipeg dwelling properties, but the revenue derived is equal to that obtained in the investment of government bonds. It is feared that the reduction in interest rates will have a serious effect on the benevolences of Grand Lodge. The regular dues-of the Grand Lodge of Quebec met only 80 per cent of the necessary disbursements of Grand Lodge. The benevolent fund has decreased from $77,000.00 to $56,000.00 in six years. While the membership of the Grand Lodge of Victoria decreased 2,000 in seven years, the treasurer's balance increased $77,000.00. Lodge fees in Iowa range from $30.00 to $75.00; more than half the lodges charge the minimum fee. Dues range from $4.00 to $10.00; more than half the lodges charge $5.00 per annum. Iowa has two Des Moines lodges, each with more than 1,000 members. It has one lodge with 9 members. In Alabama, the audit of a lodge secretary's books revealed that he had collected $66.10 and admitted that he had used the funds; the lodge suspended the brother indefinitely. The shortage was reported to the bonding company; six months passed without hearing a word from the bonding company. This is the first shortage reported since secretaries and treasurers were placed under bond. South Carolina handles its own indemnities. It discovered a case where the shortage of a treasurer was $550.00, but there was only a $250.00 bond. New rules for settlement have been proposed, which would require the examining committee to report promptly at the conclusion of the year, otherwise the lodge is barred from making claims against the sinking fund, except by consent of the Grand Master. Dpon discovery of a shortage, the lodge must immediately notify the Grand Secretary; the lodge will be required to try the erring officer and no claim will accrue against the Grand Lodge until after the report of the trial is made to the Grand Secretary. The Grand Lodge, having no machinery to attempt collection from the defaulter, feels the responsibility for making collections should rest upon the lodge and that any colle~tions made should be divided between the Grand Lodge and the subordinate lodge as their interest might appear. The Grand Master of Massachusetts called attention to the necessity of reviewing the situation in lodges in reference to preference for automatic exemption from payment of dues by reason of membership for a specified number of years, or the attainment of a certain age, and to the importance of amending by-laws where necessary for the preservation of the lodge income. It was found in some lodges that the number of members becoming automatically exempt from payment of dues is considerably in excess of the number of applicants for the degrees, and it is not difficult to foresee what the answer must eventually be, and the Grand Master quotes a paper delivered at the Grand Masters' conference:


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

285

"Logically, there is no sound reason why a life member should get something for nothing, except perhaps in unusual cases of special services rendered or extreme length of membership. Any other plan is actuarially and actually unsound."

New Jersey has recently adopted the automatic suspension act. It requires the secretary to send each member a statement in July. Each member is notified in writing, and this is accompanied by a copy of the law; he is given until the last stated communication in November, at which time the secretary reads the names of all to whom notices have been sent and action is taken accordingly. Where the default continues for three years, it is mandatory that the member be suspended, unless dues are remitted. In 'l'exas, the automatic suspension law provides that any brother owing any dues whatever that are past due at midnight on June 23 stands automatically suspended. This signifies that the member is suspended by law, rather than by act of the lodge and no further action on the part of the lodge is necessary, other than to enter the fact of suspension. "\Visconsin is concerned about the low amount of dues being charged by many lodges and most of these lodges are asking for relief: "Certainly no lodge should charge less than $5.00 when it is necessary to receive charity from the Grand Lodge. Let us not make our Masonry too cheap."

FUNERALS

Changed conditions of living, of transportation, and of spiritual philosophy have created a demand for the revision of many funeral services. At least three Grand Lodges arc now engaged in the work of revising the funeral ceremony. Many curious questions arise in the various jurisdictions over funeral customs and practices. In Alabama the Grand Master recommended that when requested by the famil~r, in the case of the death of an Entered Apprentice or Fellowcraft, the apron be permitted to be placed upon the coffin, but that no funeral service could be performed. The committee on ritual in California are considering a resolution which proposed the improvement (~) of the funeral service: , 'By adding thereto a supplemental and complete committal service for use at a crematorium or cemetery, in addition to the present funeral service now used in undertaking parlors."

A Delaware lodge received a request from a Philadelphia Lodge to perform the service at the funeral of a departed brother. The Delaware lodge attempted to comply "but could not, due to other organization taking charge at service." The wife of a suspended brother in the District of Columbia sent a sum of money to the lodge to be applied on the payment of arrearages because of her desire to have a status in the O. E. S. His death was


286

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

momentarily expected and there was nothing in the case indicating he had been unable to pay his dues if he had so desired. The Grand Master was asked to decide whether or not, if the brother filed an application for reinstatement and died before ballot was taken, the lodge could give him Masonic burial. The Grand Master decided that there were no circumstances indicating improper action by the lodge in suspending him, that several years had elapsed since he had been dropped and no steps had been taken for reinstatement, and that he was not entitled to Masonic burial. "The right of the wife to retain her membership in the O. E. S. is, of course, dependent upon the rules and regulations of that organization. "

From other Grand Lodges we quote the following in relation to funerals and funeral services: (Kansas) "There have been a number of requests for the modification of the funeral service. Many of our brethren feel that so long as the monitor is unchanged, tho service must be given in its entirety. A funeral service is particularly important and should be appropriate, comforting and helpful to the family and friends, and given with such dignity and decorum as will best serve its purpose and do credit to our institution." (Maryland) The Grand Master recommended a study of the funeral ritual and appointed a committee for that purpose. (New Hampshire) "For several years I have wondered if we might not properly consider the revision of the form of burial service. Several other jurisdictions have felt it advisable and have revised their services. It has been claimed that the aim of a funeral service should be to pay our tribute to the deceased and show our sympathy for the bereaved. I believe our service should be short, simple, dignified and such as to reflect credit to Masonry." (Texas) "It is improper for a lodge to use the ritualistic work of another jurisdiction in conducting the funeral service at the grave of a deceased brother."

mSTORICAL

Centennials, sesquicentennials and bicentennials are becoming so common among the Masonic bodies a.c;; to go almost unmentioned. They are historical events and should be properly celebrated by each Grand Lodge; they are mileposts in Masonic history and afford opportunity for the membership to analyze their accomplishments for that period. A part of nearly every centennial program is the gathering together of the scattered threads of history and placing them in such form that they are available to the membership. In the meantime, other historical incidents and events appear from time to time in the proceedings and we have grouped them under this heading in the hopes that the membership of our own jurisdiction will see the necessity of putting into visible form an account of the happenings of today without the necessity of waiting for the centennial program, when some of them may doubtless be overlooked. Morris Goldwater, who is the senior and first Past Grand Master of


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

287

Arizona, is chairman of the committee on history in that jurisdiction. His report shows that he has expended nothing during the year and believes that "if spared he can complete the work and submit it for inspection before the close of the next session." He asks the continuance of his committee another year and that in the meantime he be relieved from duty on any other committee. To Andrew J. Russell, Past Grand Master of Arkansas, has been assigned the honor of writing the history of that jurisdiction, probably in anticipation of their centennial program. He reports that in 1888, he was present as a representative of his lodge at the celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the organization of the Grand Lodge. The task of writing the history, he finds to be greater than he can complete and recommends that it be assigned to a commission made up of different sections of the state, and that the material which they compile should be edited by the chairman of the commission. Their centennial committee is headed by C. Eugene Smith. Formal invitations are to be sent out and special letters written to the Grand Masters of other Grand Lodges. Their religious services will open Sunday evening, November 20, a luncheon will be tendered distinguished visitors on Monday, and the centennial program will begin that afternoon. After the presentation of visitors, the Grand Orator will deliver an address on "One Hundred Years of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas." This will he followed by a banquet., with the mmal address. The committee urged that each lodge hold a special Grand Lodge Centennial Observance on the birthday of the lodge. 'Ve learn that Freemasonry was first established in Arkansas in 1819 with the institution of Arkansas Lodge, at Arkansas Post, by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. The removal of the site of government to Little Rock in 1821 led to the surrender of the charter and it was not until 1835, that another lodge was established, by Tennessee, at Fayetteville. In the fall of 1837, Louisiana instituted Western Star Lodge in Little Rock and Morning Star Lodge at Arkansas Post, and Alabama established Mt. Horeb Lodge at Washington. From these lodges came the Grand Lodge of Arkansas. The committee on Masonic History made an interesting report to the Grand Lodge of California, from which it would appear that a large amount of research is being done. They recently located a set of proceedings as originally printed for the Constitutional Convention in 1850. Only 250 copies had originally been printed for each lodge session until 1856, when 1000 copies were re-printed. Most of these have disappeared. An index, with cross reference, to the proceedings since organization was prepared, the work occupying several months; it is a storehouse of valuable masonic information. Lodges are reported as taking greater interest in preparing histories of their fifty year Mason's and are making a splendid job of this feature. Some lodges are even securing the history of each member. In their research work, it was found that:


288

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

"One lodge appears to have carried the name of a woman on its rolls for many years. We wish to stress the fact that they carried the name only. It appears that she belonged to the Eastern Star and simply signed the wrong roll book upon initiation, due to the fact that the brother served as Secretary for both organizations and picked up the wrong book. The mistake was not discovered until recently."

And to think that all these years, the sister has been supporting the by-la\vs, rules and regulations of the lodge. It would appear that finances will prevent the printing of the manuscript of the history of Freemasonry in Colorado. 'Vhile the committee reported it had completed the manuscript of approximately three hundred pages, it was well illustrated, that a thousand copies could be printed for $2,000.00 and it could be offered at $3.00 per copy, nevertheless the finance committe were of the opinion "that no urgent necessity exists with reference to the publication of this history, while, on the other hand, there is absolute necessity to confine our expenditures to probable receipts, and that further appropriations be dispensed with until action is taken by the Grand Lodge."

Delaware has its committee on history and research. This year the attention of the committee is largely devoted to Delaware delegates in the Constitution Convention. Their distinguished Brother Gunning Bedford, Jr., is said to be responsible for the adoption of equal representation of each state in the United States Senate thereby establishing the great basic principle of that document-protection of the minority. As a part of their sesquicentennial program, Brother E. 'V. Cooch delivered an address at the grave of Brother Bedford on the lawn of the Masonic Home. When 'Vilmington grew from a village to a city, it became necessary to remove the cemetery. Masons took charge of the remains of Bedford and his daughter and moved them to their present location, and the ceremony of re-interment was identical with the month, day, hour and meeting place of his first interment one hundred nine years before. The largest Masonic gathering of the year was undoubtedly the Masonic observance of the sesquicentennial held under the sponsorship of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, September 16, 1937. All Grand Officers of that Grand Lodge, fourteen Past Grand Masters, and the Grand Masters of eleven of the thirteen original states attended; the other two states were represented by their Grand Senior 'Varden and Grand Secretary. The meeting was held in Constitution Hall, following the parade from the Masonic Temple to that place. It was estimated that there were between five and six thousand members in the line of march, each carrying a flag. The program opened with a selection by the United States Navy Band, followed by an invocation by Bishop James E. Freeman. The Honorable Sol Bloom, director general of the United States Constitution Sesquicentennial Commission, spoke, but the principal address was by the Honorable 'Villiam E. Borah, United States Senator from Idaho and one of the foremost


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

289

authorities on the United States Constitution. His address was broadcast by NBC through fifty-five stations and it is estimated that it was listened to by at least twenty-five million persons. At the conclusion, the audience joined in a recital of the American's Creed, led by the author, William Tyler Page. Many historical things occur in the District of Columbia. Not so many government corenrstones are being laid as a few years ago, but there is included in the proceedings a report of a certain cornerstone of a Masonic Temple laid by Stansbury Lodge No. 24, on November 21, 1919. The Grand Master said of this: "It had been called to my attention that the Honorable and our Brother Franklin Delano Roosevelt, now the President of the United States, at that time the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, was the guest speaker at this cornerstone laying. I was interested in securing a copy of the address delivered by our President on that occasion, but was disappointed to find that the minutes of this special communication of the Grand Lodge contained merely the statement: 'A brief and interesting address was then made by Brother Franklin D. Roosevelt.' Investigation disclosed that the Washington Star carried a detailed account of the exercises, including reference to and excerpts from the address. This excerpt reads: " 'Cornerstone Laid for Brightwood Masonic Temple. Stansbury Lodge Exercises Attended by Gen. Pershing and Franklin D. Roosevelt. "With Gen. John J. Pershing, attended by his aide, Col. Quirkmire, U. S. A., and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt as guests of honor, fully 2,000 persons-members of Stansbury Lodge No. 24, F. A. A. M., and their friends, gathered at Colorado and Georgia Avenues, Brightwood, yesterday afternoon to witness the laying of the cornerstone of the New Masonic Temple that it so be erected at that spot. . . . "With bared heads the crowd listened to Grand Master Milans as he performed the ancient ritual of Masonry after the stone had been lowered to its base, the distribution of corn, wine and oil by the master of ceremonies .being most impressive. "The band then played 'The Star Spangled Banner,' and, after benediction llad been pronounced by Rev. Charles S. Cole, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, was introduced by Master Harry C. Stein. "Mr. Roosevelt congratulated the members of the lodge for the progressiveness they llad shown and assured those present that he was looking forward with pleasure to the completion of the building, when he would avail himself of the first opportunity of making a call. " 'It has gotten so now that no Masonic temple can be erected unless there is some member of the Roosevelt clan present at the laying of the cornerstone,' said the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 'and I am proud to say that no family in the country as a whole is more closely identified with Masonry than the Roosevelt family. This occasion brings to my mind a speech that was delivered in 1907 of this city at the laying of a cornerstone by Theodore Roosevelt, then President of the United States. That speech was declared by many as the most radical ever delivered by a President, but I think if one would read it today and then look around it would appear to be most tame.' "Mr. Roosevelt predicted a great future for the country and said this "..as no time to be harping on the 'good old days.' 'Those good old days are dead and gone. There is a golden age ahead for this country; a progressive age; an age when just such men as you will leave no stone un-


290

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

turned that might make for a cleaner, bright future and a closer brotherhood for the betterment of mankind.' "An amusing incident occurred just after Secretary Roosevelt had thrown a trowel of mortar on the base of the stone. Gen. Pershing, who previously performed the same duty, whispered to Mr. Roosevelt in a jocular vein, as he returned to his seat: " 'Mr. Secretary, from the way you handled that trowel I think J'ou could do better brick laying than helping run the Navy.' "To which Mr. Roosevelt replied: 'There is no doubt about that, General. I am sure I could make much more money, at least.' "

The District of Columbia proceedings further record the sale of the old Perry Belmont home in \Vashington to the General Grand Chapter O. E. S. to be used by them as national headquarters. Belmont was a member of Holland Lodge No.8 of New York City. In October, 1939, the Grand Lodge of Illinois will hold its one hundredth annual session and will be one hundred years of age on April 6, 1940. The Grand Master recommended the appointment of a committee to prepare a program and submit plans for the proper observance of this anniversary. He further called attention to the coming centennials of two Illinois lodges-Equality at Equality and Harmony at Jacksonville. The latter lodge has particular interest for Missouri Masons because it was instituted under dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Missouri on October 6, 1837. Grand Secretary Mather of Missouri was a visitor at their centennial meeting. Sometime between 1910 and 1915, three volumes of Iowa history were officially published by the Grand Lodge of that state. The last volume brought the history down to July, 1913, and a quarter of a century has elapsed since that timE'. The Grand Master has recommended that steps be taken to bring the history up to date for we are "prone to put off matters of that kind until the sources of information are lost through destruction of records or death of individuals. There are living today men who have facts of great importance to the Craft and unless this historical data is obtained while there is yet time, we, as well as future generations of Iowa, will be the losers." The Grand Lodge thought well of the recommendation and the trustees will carry out the plan. During one session of the Grand Lodge attention wa." called to the altar in usc. It bore the inscription "First Masonic Altar Used in Iowa." The altar was originally used in Des Moines Lodge No. 41 at Burlington, Iowa, which, upon the formation of the Grand Lodge, became Des Moines Lodge No. l. The history of Kansas Masonry has finally been completed by Grand Secretary Emeritus Albert K. \Vilson. The manuscript is in possession of the Grand Master and "will be held until such a time as the Grand Lodge may deem it expedient to proceed with the printing"whenever that is. An historical event which particularly concerned two Grand Lodges was the dedication of the monument of Benjamin T. Kavanaugh, first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin. A special communica-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

291

tion of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky was called at Mt. Sterling, October 30, 1936, and attended by most of the Grand Officers, for the purpose of dedicating the monument. Representing the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin was Past Grand Master Weiler, the present Grand Secretary, and other representatives from that Grand Lodge. Brother Kavanaugh was made a Mason in Winchester (Ky.) Lodge No. 20 in 1840. He left Kentucky and for many years resided in Wisconsin, where he assisted in the formation and became the first Grand Master of their Grand Lodge. He later removed to Boonesboro, Ky., where he died July 30, 1888, and was buried at Mt. Sterling with Masonic honors. The Kentucky proceedings contain a \rery complete historical sketch of Brother Kavanaugh's life. Because of Missouri interest, we quote the following from a letter of Brother Kavanaugh: "In the thirty-fifth year of my age, at the request of my mother, I was made a Mason in Winchester, Ky., my native state, December, 1840, by Most Worshipful Jesse Cunningham, then Grand Master of the State of Kentucky. While I remained in the city during the same spring, making arrangements to establish at the head of the Mississippi River, among the Sioux and Chippewas Indian missions under the M. E. Church, I was also initiated into the Order of Royal Arch Masons by R. W. Joseph Foster, the presiding high priest, who possessed the most philosophic, clean and comprehensive knowledge of the Order I have ever met with. In the fall of 1842 I was appointed by the Rock River conference, which formed a part of the original Illinois conference to the Platteville district, and removed my family to Platteville, where I resided for three years. "During my first year in that place I formed the acquaintance of a few Masons, but not enough to organize a lodge. My zeal for the Order was great, but not feeling competent to take the lead in the organization of a lodge, I sought diligently to find a competent and skillful Craftsman, and was referred to one whom I found to be true and trustworthy, and so procured the services of Brother Charles Gear and brought him to Platteville. We found seven competent Masons, including myself, and we formed ourselves into a Masonic convention and petitioned the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to grant us dispensation for a Masonic lodge at Platteville to be called Melody Lodge, in honor of George Melody, a distinguished member of the Order in Missouri."

Grand Master Eddy of Virginia, speaking before the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, told of the establishment of Freemasonry in his jurisdiction previous to 1776. On May 6, 1876, a convention of delegates met in Williamsburg, Va., to choose a Grand Master. This convention reassembled in 1778, when John Blair of Williamsburg was installed Grand Master of an Independent Grand Lodge of Virginia, and from which Kentucky Masonry, ten years later, was chartered. The first charter was to Masons at Lexington, Ky., November 17, 1788; later lodges were established at Paris, Georgetown, Frankfort, and Shelbyville. Because of distance involved, it was found necessary to establish a separate Grand Lodge of Kentucky and so, on September 8, 1800, at Lexington, Ky., there came into being the Grand Lodge of Kentucky.


292

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

The sesquicentennial of the Grand Lodge of Maryland was suitably observed beginning Sunday, September 16, 1937, with services at the grave of former Grand Master Thomas J. Shyrock. An invitation to these ceremonies was sent to the President, who, in reply said: , 'I shall be with you in spirit when the fraternity gathers in Baltilllol't, next Monday night. . " 'rht'se historic anniversaries are of deep significance in our Masonie annals. They t'mphasize the strength and vitality of Masonic principles. The fact that our order in Maryland has gro\Yll and prospert'd througll all the vieissitudes of a century and a half is abundant t'vidence of the wOl'th of its spiritual message to thp (,Olllmunity which has heen for so long the field of its activitit's."

The outstanding feature was the sesquicentennial banquet at the Lord Baltimore Hotel, at which Governor Nice of Maryland, and Mayor .Jackson of Baltimore were the principal speakers. On the program was a solo by Miss Enya Gonzales, a niece of Past Grand Master Conrado Benitez of the Philippine Islands. Massachusetts has re('('ntly unearthed considerable material concerning the late Jeremy L. Cross. The most valuable of the discoveries is the original manuscript diary kept by Cross during the years 18171820 with invaluable Masonic data. Cross is generally given credit for the grouping of the degrees into a system now known as the Cryptic Rite. The work of compiling the history of Nevada Grand Lodge has been assigned to a committee on history. Already the reeords of nineteen lodges have been compiled, but the committee finds that there are still living a s{>attered number of brethren familiar with the period of the existence of some lodges which flourished in the late 80's who should be able to throw some light on what happened in the early days. An effort is to be made to interview all these older brethren, and secretaries of lodges are asked to cooperate fully. The Grand Lodge participated in the 200th anniversary of St. John's Lodge No.1, Portsmouth, N. H. An unusual feature was the introduction of the Masters of lodges in Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island, New Jersey and Massachusetts, all of which were named St. John's Lodge. The late Grand Secretary, Harry M. Cheney, delivered an historical address on St. John's Lodge. The 150th anniversary of the formation of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey was held in the City of Trenton. There was issued during the meeting a history of Freemasonry in New Jersey by Grand Lodge Historian David McGregor. The 218 pages of history are also incorporated in the annual proceedings. A representative was present from Nova Caesarea Harmony Lodge No.2 of Ohio, originally chartered by the Grand Lodge of New Jersey in 1791, upon a petition signed by Governor Arthur St. Clair, of the Northwest Territory, and General Josiah Harmar, Commandant of Fort Washington. Dr. 'Villiam Burnet, a surgeon in the Continental Army, named as its first Master, jour-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

293

neyed to New Jersey to obtain the charter and remained there. The charter was conveyed to Cincinnati, Ohio, by Judge Symmes, who purchased a tract of land that is now known as Hamilton 'County, Ohio. For many years this lodge was the frontier lodge and was honored by visits of such individuals as General Andrew Jackson, Marquis de LaFayette, and De"Vitt Clinton. During the anniversary celebration, Grand Historian McGregor made claim that New Jersey had the first known Freemason in America, the first Provincial Grand Master, and the first native-born American to be made a Freemason. Grand Master Klinek of New York, escorted by a splendid delegation, took part in the exercises on Bedloe Island incident to the closing of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the dedication of the Statue of Liberty, the gift of the Republic of France to the United States as an emblem of liberty and a token of friendship and sympathy. The visitor's book, presented when the commemorative exercises began, was signed by visitors to the Statue from that time to the final exercises; last to sign the book was Grand Master Klinck. The cornerstone of the pedestal of the Statue of Liherty was laid by the Grand Lodge of New York Iifty years ago. New York observed its bicentennial, attended by representatives from many jurisdictions. The outstanding address was made by Rev. Joseph Fort Newton and we are sorry not to be able to reproduce it in full. Because of the sesquicentennial of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina, seventy-two pages of the proceedings are devoted to sketches prepared from the annals of the Grand Lodge; it is an historical review of Freemasonry in North Carolina and the story of the Masonic revolutionary patriots. Incorporated with the 1937 proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Ohio is the report of the committee on history, which this year deals with the history of Freemasonry in the Northwest Territory. Anticipating the coming 150th anniversary of the Grand Lodge, Rhode Island has already appointed a Grand Lodge Historian and each , lodge has appointed its own historian. It is expected to lay aside a small sum of money each year so a..c; to have a fitting observance. South Carolina held its 200th annual communication on April 5-8, 1937. It was a great event, attended by a host of distinguished visitors from home and abroad. Forty thousand words are estimated to have been written and published in the newspapers during the anniversary period. The cost of the observance was $6,608.00, one-third of which was chargeable to hotel for rooms and meals. The Grand Lodge of New South 'Vales has appointed two official historians for the purpose of compiling a history of Masonry in Australia, to be ready for distribution at the Jubilee Celebrations of Grand Lodge in 1938. Even as we write, the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia is observing its


294

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

bicentennial and have arranged a very attractive program for that occasion. It is our understanding that our own Grand Master was an interested visitor and doubtless a full report of the celebration will be contained in his address. HUMOR

There is a proverbial saying that all work and no play makes Jack 3 dull boy. Reading proceedings is not exartly all work, for interspersed here and there we find traces of real humor. For example, in the District of Columbia, we read in the service bureau report to the Grand Lodge of the work of that committee. They appear to have been called on for most every sort of service, but "probably the most unique was a call to furnish a Masonic escort for a visiting sister desirous of attending the President's birthday ball." Rather humorous to us was the work of a well known reviewer, amply qualified to write reviews for his own jurisdiction, but who used twelve pages of the Missouri review, giving it, of eourse, due credit, which ronstituted all but one page of his review, and for which the finance committee generously appropriated the sum of $200.00. We appreciate the compliment in using a portion of our review, but we feel we are entitled to a commission. Past Grand Master Ellis of Mississippi told his Grand Lodge what constituted his idea of practical religion, 'If a fellow could get his religion as easily as a Methodist, keep it as eternally as a Baptist, practice it with the same dignity as a Presbyterian, the ritualistic perfection of an Episcopalian, the devoutness of a Catholic and of a Jew, and then enjoy it like a Negro, he really would have the ideal religion."

New Hampshire proceedings give the address of Dr. George \V. \Valker, our Grand Master at the time, as ((Cafe Girardeau." At a Grand Lodge dinner in South Carolina, Dr. McKissick, President of the University of South Carolina, told of a letter received by the President of his college in 1809 from Governor Drayton stating: ,( Some citizens of the low country have serious objections to sending their sons to Columbia, on account of the general practice among the students of smoking and chewing tobacco, a custom now exploded with us in genteel company, except when there may be one or two old confirmed smokers. They fear, also, that this smoking and ehe"'ing will lead to other vices."

Brother Selecman of the Southern Methodist University of Texas was encouraged in addressing the Grand Lodge of Texas by the story of the colored preacher who said he was going to "unscrew the inscrutable," or another colored preacher who went to a new charge and who said on his first appearance there: ( 'Brothers and Sisters, I have come here now to pastor this congregation, and I am going to do my best to heal the dead, cast out the sick and raise the devil."


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

295

Past Grand Master Johnson of Massachusetts is the most tolerant man of the fraternity religiously, if we can accept his statement: , 'I was born in a Methodist parsonage, and I was brought up in a hard-shell Baptist Sunday School; I later joined the Congregationalist Church. Then I married a Presbyterian girl in a Unitarian home, the service being performed by a Universalist minister. I went to a Universalist college and a Methodist law school. Now I attend the Episcopal Church and for fourt('en years have lived in a hotel inhabited mostly by Christian Scientists."

When Grand Master Jenks, of Wisconsin, was introduced to the Grand Lodge of Texas, the following ensued: G. M. Jenks: "I want to bring you the greetings of that great State of Wisconsin, which is famous for its cows, its chee~, its cream, its chairs, its churches and its childl'en--" G. M. of Texas: "This is a Chamber of Commerce talk, I believe." G. M. Jenks: For any further information, write to the Governor of the State and he will be glad to send you circulars."

LOTTERIES, GAMBLING, LIQUOR

So far as we know, the lodges of Missouri have never engaged in eonductin'g lotteries, nor have they permitted any forms of gambling in their lodge rooms. This, in general, is the attitude of all Grand Lodges, but not so true of several organizations which fly under Masonic colors. During the last decade, shrines have been conspicuous by the character of their money-raising enterprises and in several instances have come in direct conflict with Grand Lodges; in most cases to the detriment of the shrine, which has recently discovered that Grand Lodges will not tolerate lotteries or gambling in any form, even though the money raised is for benefi(~ent purposes. The District of Columbia rerently changed their constitution so as to forbid all lodges, or members thereof, aiding or countenancing any raffies, lotteries or games of chance, and specifying such act as a Masonic offense. A Lexington, Ky., lodge wanted to raffie an automobile during their St. J ohn'8 Day observance. The Grand Master could understand the desire of the lodge to make money for a good cause, but could not approve the method which was a violation of state law and further expressed the hope that the time would never come when Masons should violate both State and Masonic law to secure funds. A gambling edict was New York's method of meeting the situation; it apparently had a sympathetic response and was scrupulously observed. The Grand Master said it was not in his heart to take any legitimate joy out of the lives of the members. Nor was it his intention to meddle in any respect with legitimate pleasures, but to remind the Craft that Freemasonry is a law-abiding institution, and that whatever is forbidden by law must not be indulged in by Freemasons:


296

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

"It would have been a sorry thing if a Masonic lodge had been raided on the pretext that at the time it was engaged in an unlawful gambling or lottery enterprise. The tragedy of such an occurrence has victimized other organizations. It was the determination of the Grand Master that no such experience should be shared by the Masonic Fraternity if it were in his power to prevent it. We ma.y rejoice that we have escaped the shame of contact with the law enforcing authorities. . . . "Much as our lodges have needed money, it is a cheering fact that all have managed to keep going, and that no charters were surrendered. Having weathered the most trying time, brighter days arc at hand and we must not yield to the temptation of practices not in keeping with our art.' ,

Notwithstanding the discussion of lotteries and gambling. devices in Grand Lodge for several years, a North Carolina lodge arranged a program which included some of these features. Their attention was called to the matter and they at once complied with the request to desist. Another organization which desired to operate a bingo game were told that while the prizes might he small, it was gamqIing. Another lodge sponsored a carnival, but were informed that gambling devices must be eliminated if they were operated under Masonic sponsorship. Associated organizations in Ohio gave the Grand Master their assistance, the only difficulty experienced being in the interpretation of the by-laws with reference to various games. vVhile bingo, keno, and card games played for prizes or money appeared to many to be a harmless pastime, yet the Grand Master <,ould make but one decision when called upon for a ruling. His ruling was: "We cannot permit raffles, punch boards, selling of chances, or any form of lottery under Masonic auspices, nor can we permit these things to be done by organizations which base their membership upon Masonry. The worthiness of the cause for which the unlawful act is done does not make it legal, nor does the fact that it is a game of skill, rather than a game of chance, make any difference. The statutes state that whoever plays a game for money or other thing of value is subject to a fine and imprisonment. The only way this can be changed is by action of the legislature. I realize that the spirit of gambling pervades many of our institutions today, including some of our chUl'ches, but until the laws against gambling are repealed, Masons will clH>erfully obey those laws."

A letter from the Grand Master of Tennessee was read in the Grand Lodge of Oregon, directing all members of Amra Grotto to terminate their membership in the Grotto immediately and explaining the reason therefor. The Grand Secretary was instructed to write the Grand Master of Tennessee acknowledging receipt and expressing the commendation of the Grand Lodge of Oregon. Said,the Grand Master of Texas: "I am happy to report that I received prompt response from the various Shrine Temples in this state assuring me that temples would engage in no practice contrary to the spirit of this resolution and pledging their cooperation as requested. Lotteries and games of chance are contrary to the laws of Masonry, as well as to the laws of our State, and should never


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

297

be sponsored by any organization whose membership is composed entirely of those who wear the lambskin."

The resolution referred to was one passed at the last Grand Lodge directing the Grand Master to circularize the Shrine and other appendant organizations, informing them that the raising of money by lottery or gambling would not be tolerated. That lotteries are not confined to American jurisdictions is apparent from the address of the Grand Master of Alberta. In this instance it appears that the flood of lottery tickets emanating from Windsor, Ontario, and issued by the Shrine Club, were being circulated. The Grand Lodge of Canada issued a letter of apology regarding the lapse of propriety of members of the Craft in that jurisdiction, indicating that they were proceeding to deal with these brethren. In the meantime many complaints flowed in as to the embarrassment caused to Freemasonry. The most interesting incident we have read is where a Masonic organization in Nova Scotia raised, through questionable methods, the sum of $7,400.00. A special committee of Past Grand Masters in reporting would not give its approval to the acceptance of the money for the reason that the process was illegal and a violation of the laws of Canada, and the committee were-"Unanimous in finding that Grand Lodge and the Masonic Body that constitutes it, cannot stultify itself in accepting money so raised in contravention of the public statutes and hereby recommend that the finance committee sec that this sum of money be returned to the source or organization that placed it to the credit of Grand Lodge."

The liquor question has not been found to be so easy of settlement as other problems; there are too many conditions involved. In the meantime the government has meddled in with a series of laws necessitating many Grand Lodges changing their constitution. Of course, the saloons have gone out of business (~) but they have been succeeded by night clubs, cocktail lounges, and other similar names. Their character, however, is no different than the old saloon. In fact, we feel that the old-fashioned saloon was much better; at any rate, the habitues were all one sex. Our readers will doubtless be interested in some of the problems which confront various jurisdictions and as to how they are being handled in general. The dignity of our fraternity is being upheld. In Alabama, the Grand Master said that the edicts of Grand Lodge were subject to only one interpretation in regard to members engaged in the manufacture of liquor-that it is un-Masonic and a Masonic offense. Reviewer 'Vest, of the District of Columbia, thought a year or two ago that the gamut had been run so far as Masonry and liquor was concerned, but he has changed his mind, for complications are multi-


298

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

plying, distindions growing finer and interpretations more technical. He finds: "A man in one jurisdiction who manufactures and sells liquor for medicinal purposes only is eligible. But if some chap should buy a case for medicinal purposes and sell it for beverage purposes, the manufacturer would not be eligible. Where does a Mason who owns a building in which there is a saloon get off~ Can a man who sells intoxicating liquors in his restaurant be reinstated ~ \Vhere does a brother stand who owns an interest in a distillery~ Can a man be reinstated who sells beer~ What should happen to a Masonic Club which had a booth at a Masonic Fair with an electric sign advertising the sale of liquor' "Personally, this writer is unable to arrive at any satisfactory conclusions. But he is still unable to distinguish the difference between the man behind the bar and the man in front of the bar."

The Grand Master of Illinois learned that liquor was being sold in certain Masonic premises by persons leasing from the Temple Association. Since it jeopardized the good name of the fraternity, he ordered the sale discontinued immediately. A Kentucky lodge received the petition for reinstatement of one who had been suspended for non-payment of dues. He had recently obtained work at a distillery. Grand Master ruled that when the constitutional amendment was repealed, it was no longer unconstitutional to traffic in intoxicating liquor for beverage purposes. Therefore, Kentucky law is construed to mean that one who legally sells whiskey for medicinal purposes is not ineligible to petition, but that one who sells it as a beverage is ineligible. If the applicant is an employee, selling liquor as a beverage, he is ineligible, but if his employment in the sale of such liquor as a beverage is that of a bookkeeper, or man of that type, he would be eligible. Some Montana members contended with the Grulld Master that an aet which does not conflict with the State law should not be construed as a Masonic offense. The Grand :Master said: , 'In our state, intoxicating liquors are sold in the State Liquor Stores under personal permits to individuals. We are advised that many of the restaurants and beer parlors permit other intoxicating liquors to be sold or surreptitiously served. Many permit not only men and women, but even minors to frequent the same; boys and girls congregate in them and beer is served them, and probably stronger drinks. "Just what to do is a problem; to determine the real nature of the business conducted is hard to determine. It is easily claimed that the greater part of the enterprise so conducted is not the liquor selling, and yet we believe that many would not be operated except for the beer licenses. , 'I recommend some definite legislation defining who would come under our present laws on the subject and to recommend additional legislation which would protect the high moral worth of our membership."

The jurisprudence committee found that while subordinate lodges were necessarily the judges of their membership, yet the fraternity was entitled to a clear-cut definition which would set at rest all doubts.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

299

Whereupon the Grand Lodge adopted amendments to its laws providing that no member who should engage in the saloon business, act as a bartender, or sell malt or liquor at retail, except in State Liquor Stores, is guilty of un-Masonic conduct and that the issuance of a beer license or a retail liquor license by State or Federal Government is prima facie evidence of guilt of Masonic offense. North Dakota reviewer finds that no two Grand Lodges treat the problem exactly alike, but notes an indication that Masonry and the liquor traffic do not mix and that few states are showing any inclination to compromise or sidestep. An unaffiliated Mason, who dimitted several years ago, was tried by a commission from the Grand Lodge for having engaged in the ret-ail sale of hard liquor. The evidence showed that he was a man of good character. His plea was that it was necessary for him to engage in such business to support himself and family, and that the liquor traffic was legalized under State statutes. Nevertheless, he was suspended. Learning that beer was being used in some Masonic Temples in the state by members of organizations basing their membership upon Symbolic Masonry, and that noisy, hilarious and boistrous revelry was at _ times indulged in to such an extent that the disturbance could be heard on the street, and that occasionally Freemasons went home in an intoxicated condition, and that there were, at one time, 3600 bottles of beer stored in the basement of a Masonic Temple ready to be used at a ceremonial, caused路 the Grand Master of Ohio to issue a decision sent to each lodge, forbidding the use of any form of liquor or beverage in any more than one-half of one per cent in any Masonic Temple, or at any gathering in Masonic Temple. He said: "The important fact is that 3.2 beer is intoxicating to some persons and it is immaterial that some courts hold that it is not. Furthermore, if 3.2 per cent beer is permitted to be used in our temples at all, then it is an easy matter to substitute beer of higher alcoholic content. We do not serve beer in our churches, and I do not think that beer of any alcoholic content whatsoever has any place in a Masonic Temple. Our actions as individuals, should be-and as Masons, must be, above reproach. Therein lies the real strength of the Masonic Fraternity and accounts for the fact that it has continued to survi,路e and to prosper throughout the vicissitudes of time."

Oregon has difficulty in interpreting their law which contains the expression "main business." There is no difficulty with respect to new material, and the Grand Master doubts whether Masonry can afford to play along the border line, that in every case of doubt it should be resolved in favor of the fraternity. It is difficult for trial commissions to determine what is meant by "main business." Lodges are reluctant to file charges and , 'the result is there are Masons operating or working in places within the state which, if not saloons within the strict interpretation of the law, at least their business is no credit to Masonry and causes Masonry to be criticized and held up to ridicule."


300

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

The Grand Master of Rhode Island believes that one of the important duties of Grand Lodge is to uphold and preserve the fair name of Freemasonry; that the greatest enemies of the institution are intemperance and gambling. He recommended that the Grand Lodge take their position as strongly opposed to those evils. The Grand Master of South Dakota believes he has neglected a duty in not having charges preferred against those engaged in the sale of 3.2 beer and intoxicating liquor. A ruling of the Grand Master of 'Vashington was to the effect that the brother who is employed behind a cigar counter, located in a pool hall where beer and wine were sold, was not eligible to petition for affiliation. 'Vashington has a peculiar law caused by repeal of State and National laws. It permits to members of the fraternity a right denied to petitioners. The Grand Master believes that the time for action has come and that the present anomalous situation be changed. Whereupon the Grand Lodge adopted, by a three-fourths majority vote, a change in its law whereby hereafter it shall be an offense for any Mason to engage in the business of manufacturing or selling intoxicating liquor as a l:feverage as his principal business. Wisconsin finds a certain amount of hypocrisy in its laws. The Grand Master expresses the hope that he shall live to see the day when their fundamental laws will coincide with the fundamental laws of the brotherhood of man. . The reviewer for Western Australia, after looking over the American jurisdictions, refers to it as a "topsy-turvy situation." MASONIC HOME, CHARITY AND RELIEF

The Grand Master of Arkansas regrets the system of education enforced in the Masonic Home, for when children attain the age of eighteen years they are compelled to shift for themselves with no way of getting any special training. He regards it as a very unjust method, believing that the children should have such training as would place them in the world of business upon an equal basis with other children, that they should be taught to work with their hands as well as with their brain. The number of children in the Home shows a decrease over last year which is attributed to the social security program: "State aid has made it possible for many families to be kept together, when without the aid the family was broken up."

California utilizes the service of social service investigation for all applicants to the Home. They keep in constant contact with all cases of outside relief, investigate the securing of old age security in lieu of lodge relief. The saving to Grand Lodge last year, as a result of these investigations and transferring eleven cases on outside relief to old age security, amounted to $3,300.00. The superintendent of the Home reports an unmistakable trend away from the institution:


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

301

"It seems not unlikely we are entering an era that will witness sweeping changes in social and charitable practices. We should not be the last to perceive these coming changes."

One applicant was rejected because of his eligibility to a veterans home. He refused to enter the veterans home for if he did, his government pension would be reduced to $6.00 a month, and if admitted to the Masonic Home the pension of $30.00 a month could not be assigned. California's goal of $1,000,000.00 endowment has been reached, but the reviewer said: "Grand Lodges by advertising the activities of Masonic Homes in efforts to raise endowment funds have tended to make the general public believe that one of our chief objectives is benevolence."

Kansas is continuing its special assessment of 50c a member for the Masonic Home for a period of five years. The endowment fund of the Masonic Home of Kentucky amounts to $2,022,000.00 in bonds; $233,824.00 in stocks, and $59,424.00 in notes, requiring seventeen pages of the proceedings to list. Massachusetts has recently established a post office in the Masonic Home. Mississippi has two homes. One costs $298.79 per capita to operate, the other $408.29. It is thought that $10,000.00 a year may be saved by disposing of one of the homes and purchasing a small place near the other home, all under one management. Life is everywhere undergoing a metamorphosis, according to Masonry's best posted authority on this subject, Charles H. Johnson of New York. He finds路 a decline in Masonic Homes of approximately ten per cent, and a membership decline in the number of children received, due to the growing conviction that home life is the finest product of civilization, that every child is entitled to a home and any child without a home is entitled to the best possible substitute. Since 1911, the number of children in foster homes has increased 59 per cent. In the twenty years, 1915-35, the number has decreased in institutions from 34,000 to 23,000, while in foster homes it has increased from 16,000 to 23,000, and in their own homes from 6,000 to 56,000. The reference to "own homes," of course, refers to children being kept through allowance to the mother. The New York report shows that at the Utica Home, the number of boys and girls has decreased in the last few years from 172 to 118. In the meantime, outside relief ca;es have decreased from 350 to 202. The conclusion is: "With social security, pensions, public and private, old age, mothers' aid, social welfare relief, unemploJment, general welfare compensation, and laws to similar effect, where money relief is awarded from the cradle to the grave to the millions who can and will qualify thereunder, is necessarily going to radically affect our pyesent comprehension of institutional care. Our fraternity would be wise to foresee what time is bringing, and if occasion demands, revamp, revise and remold its conceptions


302

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

]938

of our organized charities to meet the situation in accordance with the changes that are surely but iilently coming."

North Dakota has no Masonic Home, but contributed to the relief of all its aged and indigent brethren. One case is a tuberculosis case upon which they have expended $5,000.00. The brother is living on a desert and trying to pan gold. He refuses to make application for social security. Never having been on public relief, he is not eligible for W.P.A. work. A committee asked to have it thoroughly undcrstood and impresscd upon all members: "Freemasonry carries no cash benefits, is not an insurance society, guarantees no support to anyone and when a member tells his wife and family that the Masons will care for them when he is gone, is stating something which is not true and which always results in misunderstandings. Freemasonry does teach the great lesson of charity; it does relieve distress, but it has never assumed, and can never assume, the entire support of destitute and indigent Masons and their families until sufficient funds are created and these funds ample."

Each child in the Oklahoma Home docs a certain amount of educational work, receiving a small remnneration. Two boys regularly send the superintendent $20.00 to $30.00 a month. In 1935 Pennsylvania had 598 guests in its Home; today it has 578. The Grand Master of Tennessee finds it best to maintain a family in its own locality and not to break up families. He adds: "I find it most pleasing when that little family ean have its own homE', where they can sit at the family table and fireside, share in the company of each other and the cares of the moth('r who bore them into this world. I find that the children we are helping in their own homes are faring as well as the best and are fast taking over the responsibilities of making themselves useful to their respective communities. They have in their own communities everything that an institution can give them, and more, because they are growing daily with the children of other private homes and there is no distinction made between any of them. There will always be need for institutions, but our objective should be not to take in as many children as we can, but to take in only those children for whom no better plan can be made. In any event, they should not be kept in an instltution too long. The institution should be used more as a clearing house. Where ehildren arc being maintained in their own homes, the mem bel'S of subordinate lodgE'S are finding work they can do also; not onee a year as at Christmas, but every day in the year."

Virginia is trying out thc question of endowment insurance, asking lodges to take out policies which will eventually mature for a certain amount. They now have an endowment fund of little more than $100,000.00. In 1926, the Grand Lodge of 'Vashington borrowed $300,000.00 to finish paying for its home at Zenith. The last note was paid on September 1, 1936, two years before its due date, due to unexpected donations and bequests and several favorable sales of property belonging to the Grand Lodge, as well as the self-denial of the brethren of that


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

303

state who have, for some years, waived their per diem for attendance at the annual communication. The Grand Master of West Virginia believes that the institution is no place for a child to stay permanently and that each officer and charity committee of a subordinate lodge, 'Owes it to every child they desire to sponsor at the home, to make every possible effort to secure a proper home for the child in its own community where the Home Board may assist in its maintenan~. I am unable to state definitely whether the State Welfare Law has caused any appreciable difference in the number of applications for assistance, but am inclined to believe it has reduced the number. In 1936 we had 23 applicants, and in 1937 we had only 18."

Wyoming has discovered that an appraisal of its Masonic Home foundation funds indicates that the Grand Lodge will lose approximately 30 per cent on money advanred for loans. New Brunswick is asking its Board of General Purposes to continue its investigation of the proposal to establish a home for aged Masons. A special committee on Masonic Hospitals in California have discovered but one hospital maintained by a Masonic jurisdiction for the brethren generally and that is at Melbourne, Australia. The cost of a sixty-bed hospital, exclusive of land, was $344,000.00. It has not been in operation a sufficient length of time to judge as to its expense and possibilities. The committee were of the opinion that the building of hospitals by the Grand Lodge in Los Angeles and San Francisco would mean an outlay of at least $2,000,000.00, that the establishment of Masonic hospital wards in existing hospitals would give those living with. in the vicinity of the two cities an advantage over the rural districts, that illness is personal, and the membership at large should not be taxed to meet the expense of either method. The committee refers to the growing interest in group insurance and believes that this will be available in most communities within the near future. In fact, one lodge presented a resolution asking the Grand Lodge to investigate the group hospital insurance plan and to frame the necessary legislation enabling Masonic Lodges to set up such organization. The committee on general policy in Arizona, after expressing pride in the many fine Masonic Homes scattered throughout many jurisdictions, believe: "With the fast changing attitude of government during the past few years, we doubt the advisability of any building plan at this time and recommend that no change be made for the present in our manner of distributing Masonic relief."

The Grand Master of Arkansas wants the name pension changed to Masonic Charity, believing that our contributions are charity and not peI!sions; pensions being given as a result of premiums paid or services rendered. He asks for authority to make contributions for the


304

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

maintenance of orphan children in their own or other homes, to re路 establish home life for children now in the Rome. He believes the lodges should share in a portion of the expenses and finds a widespread idea that the Masonic Fraternity is some kind of an insurance organization that pays sick and death benefits. He believes that a petition should contain the information that Masonry is not an insurance or benefit society. Idaho has apparently done a good thing in the establishment of an orphan fund; the money is raised by collection of 50c per member per year. The Grand Master stated: "Regardless of what the individual member may think, we have with us now National and State legislation, both looking toward the idea of old age pension and various relief machines. You and I as Masons have been taught the great virtues of charity and relief. We take a certain pride in seeing that Masons take care of the needs of their members. During the past year we have been distributing funds for approximately sixty of our members of their dependents. Now look at the question from another angle. You and I as citizens of the U. S. A. and the State of Idaho are being taxed in various ways to provide funds for the relief of claimants under these relief programs. In the years to come, those of our memoors who may later require relief, will have had a financial equity in these various National and State relief and pension funds, through having paid their share during their earning years. This being the case, it would seem reasonable and common sense that you and I should be entitled to our proportion of these funds which we have helped create and no sense of false pride should prevent us from asking for what is ours. I am not advocating the abolishment of Masonic relief, but I do think we should take advantage of what is rightfully ours."

Oregon has discovered that "too many of its members are getting relief-minded and make no effort to help themselves." Their employment bureau has been a valuable asset in keeping hundreds of Masons路 off the relief roll and thereby protecting the honor and morale of the men themselves. Alberta has a Board of Benevolences. Many lodges are making demands of it which it cannot meet. It finds that lump sum grants are seldom advisable, except for temporary aid. \Vhen a lodge purchased a pair of glasses for one of its beneficiaries and paid a high price for them, expeeting the Grand Lodge to pay half the cost, they were advised that had they communicated with the Grand Secretary a considerable saving might have been effected. The committee on benevolences of Ontario expended for benevolent purposes $235,397.00. At the last annual communication, the committee considered 769 applications. There has been a slight falling off in the number of applications. The committee believe that Masonic benevolence must be kept out of the sphere of institutionalism. Arkansas gave $1,000.00 to the American Red Cross and $200.00 to the brethren of Kentucky during the recent flood situation. Illinois, which was hard hit by the flood, prepared a questionnaire for each applicant to fill out. They gave aid to 323 Masons or widows


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

305

in thirty-two towns, representing forty-seven lodges. In addition, assistance was given to four lodges that sustained losses to their hall and equipment. There was contributed $55,514.00, practically all of which was distributed for actual charity. Practically every Illinois lodge contributed, but $17,000.00 of the fund was the contribution of the Grand Lodge alone. Minnesota is accomplishing its great work through its relief activities at the Mayo Hospital in Rochester. There seems to be no end to the eharacter of the activities rendered by this committee. When the flood came to Ohio, the Grand Master called a meeting of all presiding officers of the York and Scottish Rites to discuss their activities; $5,000.00 was at once contributed to the Grand Masters Fund for the American Red Cross, a donation to all sufferers. Realizing that more money would be needed, an edict was sent out to the various lodges; there was contributed to this request $32,373.00, all of which was used for the relief of Ohio Masonic flood sufferers, not one cent was for administration purposes; members of the committee donated their time and paid their o,vn expenses. It is intercRting to know how the Red Cross handled their relief in the Ohio disaster. A representative visits the horne where application has been made for help, appraises its needs and inquires whether relief has been received from any other source. The amount given from the other sources was deducted from their appraised needs and the balance usually paid in cash. The Red Cross suggested to the committee that if it would defer giving relief until the member's needs were appraised and an amount awarded by the Red Cross, what the committee would then give would supplement what the Red Cross had given, rather than be a part of it. This policy, being for the best interest of the brethren, ,vas followed, but not without some criticism for the delay necessitated. Pennsylvania has one of the finest of the Masonic Homes and in order to relieve its crowded conditions, established what was termed home assistance for adults. Of this plan it is said: "This new idea has worked out very satisfactorily and many members, their wives or widows are now efficiently taken care of in this manner and the breaking of home ties is avoided."

South Dakota has endeavored to be as liberal with its benevolent funds as possible, but suggests that the local lodge also take care of as many cases as it can, furnishing the Grand Lodge committee a history of each case, financial condition of the dependent and of the local lodge, what expenditures the lodge has made and what is to be Gone in the particular case. As an evidence of home relief, we quote the experience of the Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan: "A widow had been receiving a small grant from Grand Lodge Benevolent Fund; by carefully conserving her own meager resources and the


306

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

assistance of a small monthly grant she succeeded in keeping her son, who was a brilliant student, in university with the result that he graduated with his M.D. degree, standing fifth in the graduating class for the year, and second amongst Saskatchewan students attending that University."

In far away New Zealand they heard of the Ohio river floods. The hand of friendship was extended in the way of a contribution, a demonstration of sympathy to others in distress. The Grand Lodge to whom it was sent, returned the check with thanks. For eighteen years the Freemasons of the south portion of Tasmania have donated funds for the endowment of a cot in the children's hospital. The fund, which now amounts to over $3,000.00, is being administered by the Grand Lodge Board of Benevolence. Recently $1,250.00 was taken from the Grand Lodge general fund and given to the Tasmanian Society for the Care of Crippled Children. Lord Gowrie, the King's representative in the Commonwealth of Australia, went to Victoria for the purpose of laying the foundation stone of the Masonic hospital which has now been completed. Lord Gowrie is the present Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New South Wales. In Arkansas it is reported that there are several cases in the Home where there are three or more children from the same family and the mother is still living. If she had the children with her at home they would be entitled to state aid for dependent children, but as long as they are in an institution neither the mother nor the children can get any aid from State or Federal government. In order to make them eligible, the homes must be re-established, but Grand Lodge, under existing laws, has no authority to make such expenditures. The Board believes the best place for a child is in the home with its mother and â&#x20AC;˘ that Grand Lodge is attempting to work under certain laws passed many years ago when conditions were entirely different. The Board of Charities will continue to ask .that effort be made to secure State and Federal aid before any application for Masonic relief is filed: "Because if the applicant is receiving any aid from the Grand Lodge they are automatically barred from participation in State and Federal relief. We do not think it right or proper to deprive a needy brother of state or federal aid to which he, as a citizen, is justly entitled, when the state aid usually amounts to more than we can hope to pay."

Much confusion has existed in California over the liability of lodges in the social security program. The state old age security has also created a problem for the Grand Lodge. Legislature passed a bill giving persons residing in homes for the aged, pensions up to $35.00 monthly; 200 of the 352 members of the Home can qualify for these pensions. The acceptance of such payment constitutes a new practice in the conduct of the Home. 'Ve quote from a report : "Such payments will reduce the annual operating expense of some $60,000.00. We are taxpayers and our Home comes under the law. Our


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

307

people are entitled to the same treatment from the state as those in other institutions. If we do not accept this aid, we have but two alternatives; to turn these people out of our Home and bid them seek aid from the state; or continue to operate as at present, letting the members of the craft absorb the expense which the state stands ready to pay."

The trustees were instructed to permit recipients of old age pensions to remain in the home. Ke'ntucky has learned that the next legislature would increase the old age pension from $10.00 to $15.00, making it possible for the aged to receive as much as $30.00 a month, a fund sufficient to support most of them in their own homes and in their own environment. The Grand Lodge has dee1ined to erect a widow's home, awaiting termination of the question of old age relief. Some dependents of lodges in Massachusetts are now receiving old age assistance and several residents of the home have resigned with the intention of securing that assistance. The general expenditures for charity, which were $221,000.00 in 1932, have gradually reduced to $122,000.00 for 1937. In Michigan we find that on April 30, ]937, there were 71 residents of the home receiving old age assistance in the amount of $15.00 per month. Each resident of the home is given $2.00 per month for his or her own individual use. A very full and complete report touching upon the liability of lodges for the payment of social security is contained in the Grand Lodge of Minnesota proceedings for 1938. North Carolina investigated social security payments and found that the 288 lodges in that jurisdiction paid a total of $18,155.00 in the way of gifts and salaries; the average for a lodge was $63.04, from which compilation it was easily seen that the amount of revenue derived by the government through this source was so small that it did not justify the time and trouble for the filing of returns of subordinate lodges. MEMBERSHIP, LIFE AND DUAL MEMBERSHIP

A few years ago Massachusetts required all applicants to appear before the Master and 'Vardens, or a pre-application <.'ommittee. The general effect has been good and the Grand Master recommends that it be carried a step further and that the applicant be required to read, sign and file a statement, upon blanks provided by the Grand Lodge. Reinstatement, after a specified time, is a matter to be passed upon by the Grand Lodge of Nebraska. One hundred twenty-one petitions were passed on. Care in the selection of petitioners is urged in New York: , 'From now on we should consider more carefully what a candidate for Masonry can contribute to its cause, passing by those who would join us for what they can get out of the fraternity."


308

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Lodges are required to preserve all petitions and committee reports and have them open for inspection at all times. North Carolina reported the largest number of reinstatements ever recorded in the history of that Grand Lodge. The Grand Master holds that non-affiliated Masons are liabilities, rather than assets, that suspended Masons do not feel kindly toward the fraternity, and that they have been unjustly treated. In Ohio, the dimit of a brother who has been adjudged insane, may be granted upon application of his legal guardian. The Grand Master of Alberta feels that a Masonic lodge which is successfully functioning is the most attractive recommendation it can have for an applicant. From Manitoba we learn: "A heavy responsibility路 rests on the brethren who sponsor petitions, and also to an even greater extent on character committees. It is the caliber of its member, rather than the member, that determines the usefulness of any lodge."

It is the opinion of an Arizona committee that while life membership may be good in isolated cascs, the investment of the funds in Masonic temples might be disastrous and in the majority of cases ill advised. The Grand Master of California provided a number of resolutions providing for life membership. The amount ranges from $150.00 to $250.00. No part of the principal of the life membership fund may be withdrawn, but must be kept in perpetuity for the benefit of the lodge. Reviewer West, of the District of Columbia, believes that life memberships should be sold at a cost high enough so that the money invested would be sufficient to pay both lodge and Grand Lodge dues, otherwise the lodge is playing a losing game and the dues-paying members are paying the dues of the life members. Louisiana has abolished its resolution permitting special life membership, stating that it was not working satisfactorily. Massachusetts points out the inadequacy of the sum usually charg9d for life membership. The great difficulty is found in placing sufficient safeguards around the investment of permanent funds. Investigation showed that one lodge had no record of its life memberships, nor as to what became of the money. Another lodge sold twenty-nine life memberships at $150.00 each and used the money for running expenses. Statistics show that 30,279 members of New York lodges enjoy life membership privileges. Many of the purchase plans are termed ridiculous, giving no weight to the age factor. The conclusion is: "There is neither rhyme nor reason to the life membership plans now in force. The financial tribulations of many lodges whose operations flhow a deficit are due to ill-advised life membership plans."

Oregon solves the question by handling the life membership plan in Grand Lodge. During the four years it has been in operation, 102 certificates have been issued, 94 being issued last year. The interest


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

309

earned and paid to lodges is at the rate of 4~ per cent, and the committee is greatly pleased with the result of the four years' operation. British Columbia is on record as opposed to the setting up of a new class of membership since the regulations provide for the remission of dues or honorary membership and furnish full means of dealing with the situation. Queensland would raise the time from twenty full years' dues to thirty full years' dues. Saskatchewan appointed a committee to investigate the practice of granting life membership "and the benefit or danger to the Craft of continuing this practice. Massachusetts experiences some confusion over cases of affiliation with brethren coming from lodges in other jurisdictions. Care is urged on the part of the various lodges, since the majority of Grand Lodges do not permit plural membership and many are greatly annoyed if their members are permitted to.affiliate without dimits. The procedure is to ascertain first whether the jurisdiction permits plural membership. If so, then all that is necessary is evidence of good standing. If there is no dual membership, applicants are urged to obtain a dimit, otherwise he may find himself stranded without membership. MISCELLANEOUS

The District of Columbia reports that for the first time since 1929 a net gain in membership was shown. The number of brethren raised was 17 per cent greater than the former year. From our observation, however, we note there has never heen any depression or recession in the District of Columbia. The best report on clandestine Masonry is always contained in the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of California; it has a special committee on this subject. It finds that some irregular: bodies have shown real activity, due to racial stimuli. The negro Grand Lodge, Hiram of Tyre, revived sufficiently to hold its twenty-seventh general communication. It appears that the members of the negro Eastern Star Grand Chapter met together with the masculine Masons; the group is antagonistic to the Prince Hall bodies. The other negro Grand Lodge, once known by the euphonious name Most 'Vorshipful Sovereign Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons has now become the "Most 'Vorshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of California Jurisdietion." Some irregular Mexican bodies are reported: Benemerito Rito Nacional and the original Rito Nadonal. Efforts of the Mexican Grand Lodge of Texas to wean away the local lodges of the older Rite were unsuccessful. Organizers of Filipino Masonry have been very active in several cities. Invitations to public installations, dances and social functions have been widely distributed. Some of the names as supplied by the committee, were Caballeros de Dimas-Alang, Gran Oriente Filipino. There appear to be several lodges in San Fran-


310

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

cisco, Seattle, Sacramento and EI Centro. Many members of the 'Mexican Rite have sought to affiliate with regular Masonic lodges. The Deputy Grand Master of a Filipino Grand Lodge operative in California and not recognized by the regular Grand Lodge of Filipino, endeavored to obtain recognition for his bodies and his lodges. He was told that his organization had neither fraternal nor legal 'Masonic standing in California and that it could probably he enjoined from using the Masonic name. He explained that his Grand Lodge was chartered in 1916 by the Grand Orient of Spain an.d was released in 1925 by that body. An irregular lodge at Santa Barbara, affiliated with the National Rite of Mexico, wanted to be taken into the Grand Lodge of California. They had previously applied to Grand Lodge Valle de 'Mexico, but were told by that Grand Lodge that they did not wish to invade the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of California. In Idaho so many restrictions have been placed around the Grand Master, technically and legally, that he is without power to remedy conditions concerning the immediate welfare of the Grand Lodge and its subordinates. The result is that many lodges have been for years asking and receiving dispensations for things which were in violation of the law. The Grand Master urges that powers be widened so that he may at least feel he is not usurping power which has been denied him. The best table of statistics appears in the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina; it is compiled by our friend J. Edward Allen and gives statistics not only of symbolic 'Masonry, but also of Capitular, Cryptic, Templar, Scottish Rite and the other auxiliary orders of the Shrine, Grotto and Eastern Star. Missouri has 62,305 Eastern Star members in 6,528 chapters; its net loss for the year was 1,593. The Grotto has six subordinates with 3,712 members; the Shrine has four temples with 10,714 members. The average net loss for the year in Grand Lodges of the United States is .7 per cent; Missouri reports 1.449 per cent. The average suspensions is 3.145; Missouri has 3.388. The average percentage of raisings is 1.889; Missouri shows 2.263. The mortality table average is 1.786; the average age 61. Missouri is healthier than the average, showing 1.782, with an average age of 61. In the past ten years, it is shown that while the membership has been decreasing, the number of deaths have been increasing, evidence of the higher average age of the Masonic brethren. The average number of members in Masonic lodges in the United States is 165, as compared with 190 in 1926; Missouri shows 141.7, as against 169 in 1926. The average number of 'Masons that took the Royal Arch is 21.11; in Missouri it is 19.01. The percentage in the United States of those who took the S<'ottish Rite is 15.03; in Missouri 12.21. The average number of Knights Templar to Royal Arch Masons in the United States is 50.41; Mi<;souri is slightly above the average with 50.46. The percentage of Royal Arch 'Masons that are members of councils jn the United States is '34.45; in Missouri 24.88. The average percentage of Eastenl


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

311

Star members to Master Masons in the United States is 62.04; in Missouri it is 69.53. Grand Lecturer Wood of California reports that many Masters of lodges are entirely unfitted, mentally and temperamentally, to guide the destinies of their lodges, and discord, confusion and inharmony have been the inevitable result. He does not believe in the established rule that any any member of a lodge in good standing is eligible to any office, nor is he of the opinion that where a member is appointed Junior Steward, that he should in seven years occupy the East. He sees no reasonable excuse for elevating one to the next higher station and subsequently electing him just to avoid hurting his feelings, when the usefulness of the lodge is at stake. He suggests the use of the appointive officers from Junior Steward to .Junior Deacon as proving grounds, making it clear to the appointees that they fill the office at his pleasure for one year only, that he has no right to speak for his successor as to their advancement. As an instance of the intolerance which is sweeping over the world, we quote the instance referred to in the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania where a brother was charged with wilfully and maliciously voting for the rejection of a petitioner because of racial and religious intolerance, without reason to believe that he was in any respect unfitted to become a Freemason. It seems he openly threatened to vote for the rejection of another brother who was a member of the same race and religion. A Trial Committee was appointed which found the accused guilty and recommended that he be expelled. The Grand Lodge committee had no means of proving that he cast a blackball and there was no evidence to show that he did not have ample Masonic reason for so doing. The rommittee believed it to be an inquisitorial proreedings and an attack upon free ballot. It, therefore sustained his appeal and restored him to lodge membership. Several Grand Lodges are copying our English brethren in the establishment of planning boards or boards of activities, corresponding to the English board of general purposes. The Grand Master of Minnesota recommends it in order to establish n C'ontinuing program of Masonic activities, a duty which in the past has rested largely upon the Grand Master. It takes too much time for the Grand Master to become familiar with eonditions to formulate a program; before he can accomplish very much his term is ended. The question involves a change in law and is being considered by a special committee. New York has a Board of General Activities v,Thich is functioning successfully. This year it recommends an increase in the number composing the board. It would increase the number from nine to fifteen, to be appointed by the Grand Master, with a term of office of three years. While not advocating a board, the Grand Master of Wisconsin suggests substantially the same thing in having regular meetings of Grand


312

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Lodge officers from time to time, at which meetings matters of importance could be discussed informally, keeping those in lower offices informed as to general policies. The Grand Master confesses he came to the job"Uninformed and had to kâ&#x201A;Źep still and look wise. I could not answer simple questions relative to current policies, nor enlighten brethren concerning Grand Lodge activities. My chief, and almost only duty was to take part in the opening and closing of the Grand Lodge. "

In Louisiana they have had a District Deputy system for several years. There were eighteen District Deputies; they did not perform with efficiency, but through some strange phenomenon, when they were given a vastly larger territory "they became surprisingly and exceedingly active, and apparently viewed their position as a greater honor." The Grand Lodge of Quebec has recommenued that District Deputies be more fully instructed respecting their duties by the issuance of a code of suggestions. These suggestions arc included under the subjects "duties," "qualifications," "rank," "visitations," "program of visitations," "finances," "ritual," "official reports," "district meetings," "addresses," "weak lodges," "Grand Lodge," and the "keeping of records." The Grand Master of 'Wisconsin believes that character and not physique should recommend a man to be made a Mason. He asked to have the so-called eighteenth landmark abolished or revised. A committee which passed on it, thought it had so long been accept<.'d as a landmark in the jurisdiction as to demand its retention. It has become the general policy in most Grand Lodges to present veteran Masons with some button or certifi<>ate showing their years of service. A committee in Arkansas did not believe it practical to adopt the fifty-year button idea for the reason that the Grand Lodge has lost most of its records by fire and is not in a position to substantiate these memberships, but the Grand Lodge, on a substitute motion, rejected their recommendation and appointed a committee to carry it into effect. The Grand Master of Colorado was asked in two instances to give his consent to the giving of a button to a brother who had not been a Mason for the full time, but who beeause of age or ill health was not likely to eomplete the fifty year period. It was his opinion that the full time must elapse. The District of Columbia has arlopted a Fidelity Medal, on<> to be presented by each lodge to its member who has been longest a Master Mason; it is modeled after the Nebraska Jordan medal. A speeial committee has formulated regulations for its presentation and use. At the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of 'Viscom;in, three brethren were honored by official introduction. One was ninetyfour years of age, another ninety-one, and the other eighty-nine. The first named had been a Master Mason for seventy-two years. During the meeting a message was received from a lodge at Wonewoc stating


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

313

that it had the distinction of having as a member a Civil War veteran, William H. George, who would be one hundred years old on November 11, 1937. It believed that he was the oldest Master Mason in Wisconsin, and probably in the United States. MISSOURIANS

Among the distinguished visitors at the Grand Lodge of Illinois we note Brother Harold L. Reader, Grand Master, and Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The Grand Master, in his address, referred to the attendance of Brother Arthur Mather at the centennial celebration of Harmony Lodge at J acksonville, Ill. We next hear of Grand Secretary Mather at the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, where we learn "that Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary of Missouri, a former Kentuckian, was present and addressed the Grand Lodge in his usual happy manner." Brother Mather was later presented with a copy of the history of Freemasonry in Kentucky as a souvenir of the occasion. Grand Master Reader and Grand Secretary Mather were guests of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska at its annual communication in June, 1938, but arrived too late to be received with other distinguished guests. They "addressed the Grand Lodge briefly, bringing greetings and good wishes from our neighbors, thereby adding to the interest and enjoyment of the session." Grand Master John R. Abernathy, of Oklahoma, graduated at Scarritt College in Neosho, Mo., in 1897. After graduating from that school, he eontinued his studies, taking his theologieal training in Vanderbilt University, Tennessee. He served pastorates in Missouri until 1908, when he transferred to Oklahoma. He married a Centralia, Mo., girl, Miss Helen Elizabeth Hinman. He received his Masonic degrees in Gate City Lodge No. 522, Kansas City, l\fo. For thirty years he has served as a minister of the M. E. Church South in various pastorates in Oklahoma. He is now Presiding Elder of Tulsa and Oklahoma City Districts. Grand Ma.c;;ter Abernathy told the Grand Lodge how he came to be a Fr~emason : "When I was a boy five and a half years old my father passed awa;v. I remember that men, when he was ill, came and sat up with him at night and when he passed away men clad in white robes and aprons came and bore him to his last resting place. I did not know what sort of men these were but they were so very kind to my mother and a little family of four. My mother was left very poor. I remember these Masons came and took us to the train when we moved to Missouri. I remember some things they said to my mother. When I was twenty-one years old I became a Mason, following the footsteps of my sainted father."

Missouri is fortunate in having as its representative in Oklahoma, Past Grand Master Perry Freeman. In answering the roll call of Grand Representatives, he said:


314

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

" I bring to )'OU and to the brethren of our Grand Lodge the fellowship, love and friendly greetings of the Grand Jurisdiction which I represent. For more than a quarter of a century I have answered the roll call as the Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. That I appreciate this great honor goes without saying. I first saw the light as a Mason in a small, obscure country lodge in that great jurisdiction more than }lalf a century ago and I shall always have a warm spot in my heart for Missouri and Missouri Masonry."

The late Thomas C. Humphry, fraternal correspondent of the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory, Oklahoma, for thirty-six years, died December 3, 1937, at the age of ninety-one. He was well known to many Missouri Masons, but few knew that he attended Missouri Medical College in St. Louis, graduating therefrom in 1869. An alarm at the outer door of the Grand Lodge of Texas proved to be Grand Master Reader and Grand Secretary Mather of Missouri. Both came in for a special introduction, the Grand Master explaining to the brethren: "M. W. Brother Reader found it necessary to leave before the time scheduled for the presentation of the other distinguished visitors."

They were received at the altar, where they were presented by R. 'V. Brother Lightfoot. Brother Mather was introduced as a "Past Grand Master of that great jurisdiction." REVIEW

'Ve are sorry we cannot devote more attention to our friends, the reviewers, 'Ve feel, however, that our Missouri readers are entitled to know what other jurisdictions think of us and we cannot forego mentioning some of the reviews. Arizona devotes considerable attention to our special committee report on liquor, gambling and lotteries. Jesse Whited, of California, gives us a topical review and while he has little to offer in the way of comment, he is very careful in his selection. He expresses his wish that space might be sufficient to present "the excellent review of the chairman of the correspondence committee of the Grand Lodge of Missouri which sets forth existing conditions in different localities other than English-speaking jurisdictionS',"

Colorado quotes extensively from Grand Master Skelly and his l'eeommendations. Delaware devotes a half page to Missouri. Reviewer 'Vest of the District of Columbia reported the actions of Grand Master 'Valker and refers to our review as "the acme of topical" and that the "benefits to be derived from reading the report need not necessarily be confined to the brethren in Missouri." Past Grand Master Daniel, reviewer for Georgia, pays us high compliment by using several pages of our review. Idaho has a brief review in which Missouri is not mentioned.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

315

After referring to the acts of Grand Master Skelly, in which he apparently finds little to criticise, the reviewer of Illinois turns to our review, which he says , 'furnishes a complete resume of the actions of various Grand Lodges which is interesting and informative. . . . And we commend the reading of this report to all Masonic students desiring to keep abreast of Masonic affairs.' ,

The Iowa reviewer regards as outstanding the prayer offered by Grand Chaplain Mather. The address of Grand Master Skelly is termed exceptional "not only for its excellent arrangement, but for its high literary quality. It carries a full report on all important activities and is replete with sensible suggestions." The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer come in for special commendation. Of our review, he said: "In the foreword, he covers a wide field-the world in fact-presents a vast array of facts not available to the average Mason and for that reason the more interesting and informative. All will read this foreword, even if they lack patience to read his general report, arranged topically and boresome in its reiterations."

The Kansas reviewer notes that there appears to be no list of Grand Representatives present at our annual communication. Grand Master \Valker's address he terms brief. He said: , 'The Grand Master lists in about four pages the visitations made by him during the year. Some are Masonic, while others are not; some are outside his own jurisdiction. . . . The address is very brief and we must therefore pass to other subjects."

Then he quotes a large section of the address of Grand Orator Morton. He is kind to the Missouri reviewer by tenning the foreword of our review as "a historical gem." The late Allison Holland reviewed Missouri (1936) for Kentucky. He intimated that he liked to quote as little as possible, but he did quote from Grand Master Skelly's a4dress. Of it he said: "The Grand Master believes in leaving out the Order of DeMolay for boys, but they accept the Eastern Star just the same."

As for the reviewer, he said: "We have been wondering what had become of our old friend, R. D. S., but we find he has the committee on foreign correspondence. It is a perfectly wonderful report and required a great deal of hard work."

Maine apparently did not receive the Missouri proceedings; we are not mentioned. The reviewer devotes his foreword to a defense of their policy in permitting initiates to affinn rather than to swear. Minnesota quotes from Grand Master Walker's address and particularly on his action in the matter of lotteries, liquor and gambling. The late reviewer, Sol Hepner of Montana, reports on Missouri proceedings for 1936. He gives a half page to Grand Master Skelly's address and a similar amount to Grand Secretary Mather. Then he ab-


316

PROCEEDINGS

1938

stracts a large portion of the Missouri review. He looked in vain for the address of General Pershing made at the Laclede cornerstone laying. Past Grand Master Crites writes a topical review for Nebraska. It should be very satisfying to Nebraska Masons as he is careful in the selection of material. He quotes from the New Jersey proceedings on the subject which we would like to devote more time to-the only regular lodge of colored Masons in the United States; it is Alpha Lodge No. 116 in the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, and has 90 members. As a finish to his report, Brother Crites, in referring to our review, pays us this splendid comment: "The review of Missouri is probably the most readable of them all." Nevada reviews Missouri proceedings for 1935 and 1936. Grand Master Smith is commended for his industry and quiet, efficient handling of the affairs of his office during his year. Of Grand Master Skelly he said his address was in topical form, with many suggestions that should be adopted "and we not the brethren treated his suggestions very kindly." The Missouri correspondence report "is of such interest that we are going to place it where we can go bark to it from time to time and study the excellent precepts it enjoins.' ,

We are sorry to record the death of Brother Harry M. Cheney, late reviewer for New Hampshire. Previous to his death he had reviewed Missouri for 1936. He approved many suggestions of Grand Master Skelly and noted the appointment of thirty committees, and added "if you don't think that is much of a job to make up such a list. get a chance to try it." And finally: , , There is no change in the variety of correspondence. It is still topical. The document this year is a wonderful assembly of facts, wonderfully presented, wonderfully discussed. It was a tremendous job to write itone that we would never undertake."

Missouri for 1936 is reviewed by David McGregor, the New Jersey Historian. While he devotes considerable space to telling of Missouri doings, he makes little comment about what we have done. New York devotes two and a half pages of its review to the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Apparently few items transacted by our Grand Lodge escaped the reviewer's eye. \Vhile he does not quote, nevertheless he gives the substance of Grand Master Skelly's address. Sometimes we wish we were a resident of the State of New York and in charge of its committee on foreign correspondence, for the finance committee report shows that the secretary of the committee is given $5,600.00, with $3,000.00 office salary and expenses, and $1,000.00 for work on the review. One of the most interesting reviews is written by J. Edward Allen of North Carolina. \Ve should like to quote much of his foreword, but when restricted to a certain number of pages, find it impossible to do so. Of Missouri, he said:


ST. LOUIS, Sd OCTOBER• .d. L.•It>• ••. D. 13i,;.

The committee to whom W$ reierrcd communicatioIJ3 from f1.'reign Grnnd Lodge~:

I..fd!!C

Reporl~d, That tbe Grand of ~ew Hampshire. has suhmitted to the Grolnd Lodg"<: "f thp several St:ltc~, a proposition to crect a ~[~nic 'Ionurncnt, at -'fuulil \ t:rnon,(J\'u the rernJi't~ of our late distinguished Bro. G£onm: \\' "SH1>;(JTO~, and request the c<Hlpcl.ltion of the !('\-clal Grand Lodges in the United States.-Your committee rc~ret that the want of flJnd~, a"d the Ilrnit.~d meJ.n5 o(this Grand Lodge, will ncccssaril)' prevent (heir making any appropriation in aid of bO laudable an object--and recommend the adoption of the following resolution~, yiz.: ResoltJed, That the ~lastcrs of the several Lodgei', under this jurbrliclion, be requested to open -subscriptions in their respectise Lodge and lIcighborhoods. \\ ith a ,ie'w of obtaiuing :lmong the membera of the order. a sum ~ufficient for the erection of a suitable monument o....er tbe gr-.1\"C of our decea~ed Brother GEORGE \V ASHIXGTO"'. at MouII1 Vernon. Rcsolurl, That this Grand Lodge earnestly recommend to eyerr Mason in1he StatE' of Mi~::ouri, to subscribe a smaH 8um, pI'"O{?ortionate to I,iil aLilit). for all ohject ~o laudable and important. Resulred, That the persons reechoing 5uhscriptiol's, be requested to forward to the Grand SccrebITt 3 statement oftbe amouof: subscribed, at or before our Grand Semi·Annual Cl,)mOlUnic~1tion, in

April ned.

Resolt:ed, That the Grand Serretary forward a copy of the forcgoingTcport and resolutions, to each of the subordinate Lodges under tllis Juri:ldiction, and to some re~pol1:ibJe person in (lach county of this State, where no Lodge is eslablishcd. A true abstract from proceedings.

~bTJ'----:~ J7.~ - -<-

SUBSCRIBERS.

~~r

:2 • -::-=g~-

I

I

SCBSCIUBERS.

G. Sa:.,.,lar!!.

I

MISSOURI FREEMASONS MADE THEIR FIRST CONTRIBUTION TO A GEO. WASHINGTON MEMORIAL IN 1825. THE PHOTOGRAPH ABOVE SHOWS ONE OF THE BLANK SUBSCRIPTION LISTS CIRCULATED IN MISSOURI DURING THAT YEAR. THE FIRST NAME APPEARING IS THA T OF A FORMER GOVERNOR


318

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

, 'Grand Secretary Mather sees to it that there is always a good looking picture of the presiding Grand Master in the book-an engraving of the finest type; the kind that makes the subject look handsome, e,en though he be ugly enough to flag a freight train with his face."

Our readers will note that the year he was reviewing, 1937, was the year in which Dr. Walker's picture appeared, but we cannot believe that J. Edward was at all personal. He refers to Dr. Vvalker's successor, Dr. Harold L. Reader, who was once invited to preach before the Grand Commandery of North Carolina, and whom he terms "a very versatile man." Eight pages are devoted to Missouri, for which he has our thanks. As for us, J. Edward believes that we are "more interested in the historical side of Mexican Masonry's regularity than in present conditions and what caused them." Reviewer Murfin (N. Dak.) gives Missouri two pages, devoting his quotations between Grand Master Skelly and the Missouri review. Unfortunately, we mentioned in our review that the National Masonic Service Association was in a position to investigate the status of foreign Grand Lodges. Whereupon he said: "We quite agree with him, but it must be remembered that with only eighteen or twenty member jurisdiction it is possible to maintain only a skeleton office personnel and there is a limit even to Carl Claudy's ability to perform miracles of research and compilation with the office force the Association can afford to pay. It takes money to make the mare go and even the railroads have found it impossible to operate their passenger service entirely on passes."

Past Grand Master Stewart of Ohio, in beginning his review, quotes largely from the introduction of Grand Master Skelly. After touching upon many details of the acts of the Grand Lodge, he gets to our review and with the following comment: "The 108 pages do not inake this one of his largest reviews, but the choice selection of matel'ial makes it one of his best productions. The 11 pages on the condition of world-wide Masonry is a most valuable, informative resume of this important subject."

Thomas C. Humphry, of Oklahoma, probably the oldest of the reviewers, died recently; he was born December 20, 1846. Being a graduate of Missouri Medical College, he necessarily noted the biographical sketch of Dr. Walker, who is also a physician by profession. He quotes two paragraphs from Grand Master Walker's address. Past Grand Master Hagmeier of Oregon reviews Missouri for 1936. He said of Grand Master Skelly: "It occurs to us that we had heard the Missouri brethren were of the opinion that they had a very fine Grand Master. . . . We read his message, noted what he had accomplished, and at the end were in hearty accord with them. He met the problems that came his way in a fearless, upstanding manner."

He notes the presence of their own Past Grand Master, Milton Meyers.


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

319

Past Grand Master Peeler, of Tennessee, in reviewing Missouri for 1937, pays particular attention to our action in the matter of intoxicating liquor. He was disappointed in finding that our committee made no further recommendation, except to point out the existing laws of the Grand Lodge and the conditions that existed in the state: "The report of the special committee, in that they reviewed the conditions and quoted some of the great men of the world. Edmund Burk and Benjamin Franklin, would indicate that they would finally wind up with some recommendation. However, the only thing recommended was that further investigation be made as to these matters."

Past Grand Master Fly, of Texas, reviews Missouri for 1936 and 1937. Due attention is paid to the Grand Masters' addresses and to the various committee reports. Our good Brother Fly believes we should apply some of the rules which we quote to our own conclusions. He refers particularly to the Texas recognition of the Grand Lodge Cosmos of Chihuahua, and believes it more courteous, if not safer, to hear the rebuttal of a friend before passing judgment.. And we may add that we are perfectly willing to hear the rebuttal of our friend Fly and have in no way pronounced a final judgment, for we believe no one is in position to路 pass final judgment on the question of Mexican Masonry. It is much like the Royal Secret or the Lost Word; it may never be found. Past Grand Master Clift, of Virginia, reviews Missouri for 1936. He quotes from several decisions of Grand Master Skelly and from his address. Our apology is due to the distinguished reviewer for a statement which appeared in our review concerning a certain Grand Representative who has been carried for ten years as Missouri's representative, but who has been dead for at least that same time. Our review should have read West Virginia, and not Virginia. He further takes exception to our statement that Captain Meriwether Lewis was a member of St. Louis Lodge No. 111 and that all honor should go to Virginia, where he originally received his Masonic degrees. It is true, Captain Lewis was not a member of the St. Louis lodge by initiation, but he was Master of the lodge under dispensation and charter, and at the time of his death was a member in good standing of that lodge. No one apparently was interested in either Lewis or Clark until a few years ago when the reviewer searched the records and found a complete Masonic record of both Lewis and Clark-but we are willing to share him with Virginia. Reviewer Davis, of Washington, devotes two pages to Missouri for 1936. He says he can give no better summary of the status of Freemasonry in Missouri than to quote from the Grand Master's address, which he does. Past Grand Master Tavenner, of West Virginia, finds much to quote in Grand Master Skelly's address. He mentions the reports of Grand Secretary Mather and Grand Treasurer Morris.


320

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

Past Grand Master Jenks, of Wisconsin, reviews Missouri's 1936 proceedings, quoting Grand Master Skelly in his reference to bringing Masonry up to date. The reviewer admits having read our review from "kiver to kiver," but"Fails to get out of it the same comprehensive picture of the various jurisdictions that we do from the other type of report. We suspect that the writing of such a report takes a great deal more time and ability than the writing of the usual type of report. This is in no sense as a criticism, but is given here for the benefit of our own Grand Lodge as an explanation of why the topical review is not used here."

After quoting Grand Master Skelly's remarks about bringing Freemasonry up to date, Reviewer Lowndes, of Wyoming, goes into detail as to the acts of our Grand Lodge. Reviewer Smith of British Columbia refers to Grand Master Skelly's addre!!is "as of only moderate length, in which he recounts the visits he had made, which were impartially distributed between Masonic and non-Masonic bodies. . . â&#x20AC;˘ Public installations arc permitted, which is a weak point in an otherwise excellent address."

Reviewer Ponton, of Ontario, confines his review largely to extracts from our proceedings, devoting six pages to Missouri for 1936. He notes Grand Master Skelly is an engineer by profession. He quotes from Grand Secretary Mather, Grand Master of Nebraska, the Grand Lecturer, Grand Chaplain Thurman, and devotes three pages to our review. Reviewer Jones of Nova Scotia notes that most jurisdictions to his south have been greatly disturbed over the question of the admissibility of those who touch intoxicating liquor, saying: "Largely the cause of temperance suffers as much from the fanatic as it does from the unfortunate person who abuses the usc of it."

After reading Grand Master Skelly's report,'he expresses the belief that the Grand Master must have been a busy man, and then quotes the Grand Master's concluding paragraphs. Past Grand Master Evans, in reviewing for Quebec, notes the instructive address of Grand Master Walker. He recommends that our review be especially referenced and kept in every Masonic library. Due attention is paid to Missouri for 1936 by Reviewer Martin, of Saskatchewan. New South Wales has a committee that writes its review. It is entirely topical and consists largely of extracts from foreign jurisdictions. Grand Secretary Stewart is the reviewer for Victoria. In his review. of Missouri, he referred to the fine opening speech of Grand Master Walker. J. W. Archdeacon is the reviewer for 'Vestern Australia. He finds a bit to amuse him in reading the addresses of Grand Masters, espe-


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

321

cially those of the United States, in a discussion of various ways to encourage lodge attendance. He can see no stimuli in radio meetings, lectures, debates, elocutionary contests, question boxes, and so forth. In speaking of Missouri for 1936, he referred to Grand Master Skelly's decision that a suspended member cannot be reinstated after he is dead. The reviewer said: "It would certainly be of no benefit to the corpse, though it be to the relatives. ' ,

As to public installations, he remarked: "Thank'"goodness, we do not have these freak performances here and while the countenancing of them in Missouri is Missouri's affair, a paragraph in the Grand Master's address impels one to ask, in its Chinese form, 'Whaffor~' "

Of our Missouri review, he says the production is sufficient , 'to supply enough informative matter to keep any lodge busy for a twelve month in using it for the purpose of lectures. This topical form seems to be slowly making its way in the jurisdictions, but it lacks the individuality and personal touch of the older form."

RITUAL

Arkansas believes that every Mason in Arkansas would like to own a monitor and that nothing would increase interest more than a study of the work. The monitor is sold at $1.25, when it should be sold at 75 cents. It has been printed by a private concern and changes in it appear to have been made without authority of the Grand Lodge; now the Grand Master wants to secure control of the printing. An Arkansas committee does not favor the writing of even one master copy of the work and recommends a continuance of the present system. The Grand Lecturer of Colorado found that 81 of the 147 Masters could confer all degrees in full; 36 could confer but part of the degrees; 2 were unable to confer any part of any degree; none were unable to open or close the lodge. Custodians of the ritual in Colorado did not favor the issuing of additional keys, believing it to be for the best interest of the Craft not to have copies of the esoteric work increased. The finance committee did not feel that the benefit would be commensurate with the deficit. The Grand Lodge went against the report of both committees and voted half of the appropriation asked for. Idaho is to copyright its monitor, but this state disapproves ritual innovations which seem to be a growing custom in the third degree work. Innovations refer "particularly to the use of a XXX or XX in the third degree." Weare not familiar with either the three X or the two X and are not in a position to judge as.to whether it is an innovation or not. Mic)ligan has a so-called long form for the lecture in each of the three degrees, from which it appears that the same words are used as


322

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

set forth in the ritual, but articles are placed on exhibit in the lodge room to illustrate each of the portions of the lecture. It does not contravene the ritual because it adds no words and the Master usually calls upon several different members each to take a portion of the lecture and deliver that portion which pertains to sYmbols near the chair at which he is working. The Grand Master accentuates the great value of enhancing the attractiveness of the rendition of these lectures. A Mississippi brother addressed a communication to the Grand Lodge stating that for seventy years a Blue Lodge text book for that state had been published by his family. He proposed that the Grand Lodge take over the publication, offering the use of all copy and cuts, but he felt , 'it would not be out of order to ask the Grand Lodge in taking oyer the book to pay me whatever in its best judgment it might regard as a fair and reasonable price."

New Hampshire is endeavoring to protect its ritual from the onslaughts of the rituals of other jurisdictions. It was claimed that "proper safeguard should be maintained against the too promiscuous use in our lodge of ritual phrases foreign to the unadulterated work which has been preserved in New Hampshire for over two centuries." No objection is made to other jurisdictions exemplifying their degrees upon their own candidates. Ohio is on record as opposed to Square Clubs as now organized. These clubs are usually composed of Master Masons employed by certain large companies and unquestionably perform considerable service to Masonry. It was stated that where clubs were kept in proper control there was no harm in permitting them to initiate candidates, for new interest could occasionally be fostered by permitting them to confer degrees, but in some instances these clubs have virtually taken over the lodge itself, for the club officers insist upon the right to exemplify the degrees on every candidate who is employed by the company, and in many lodges this comprises all its candidates. Ohio has a printed ritual. The plates and printing cost $1,257.00. A Masonic instruction committee of Oregon calls attention to the apparent lack of interest in ritualistic study. The Grand Master of South Dakota made three recommendations which would have required the Master-elect and possibly Wardenselect and others to demonstrate before installation their ability to perform the duties of the office which they were to assume. The dearth of candidates in recent years has resulted in a decreased proficiency in ritual. The Grand Lodge was inclined to favor the proposition of requiring the Master-elect to show proficiency, hut not so anxious to adopt the other sections. The Grand Master of 'Vashington is not enthusiastic over the exemplification by a foreign lodge on a dummy candidate:


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

323

"Since it is of questionable value and always inspires in some an irresistible desire to introduce foreign phrases and practices into our work, and causes Masters to make requests such as that herein denied."

Washington has a printed cipher, and, in the opinion of the Grand Master, when used to check up the memory or settle controversy great good accrues, but if used for original study and as a substitute for mouth to ear instruction, the brethren so attempting to learn their Masonry will lose the benefit of those lasting friendships which are formed between teacher and student, and they will fail, from the printed page, to catch the spirit of the institution, which a Mason apprehends only little by little as he receives explanation of the work and lectures from his teacher: , , The young Mason who does not get these traditions and oral teachings is unknowingly cheating himself out of the best that Masonry has to offer; and I apprehend that a long continued use of books for original study may result in the ultimate loss of many of these traditions and teachings. Precision in. repeating the work and lectures is a very worthy goal for which to strive. It is better still to add a correct pronunciation, a distinct enunciation, finished address, and even eloquence, in delivery. The brother who desires to get the utmost of pleasure and satisfaction from the work should add to this ritualistic perfection an understanding of the meaning of the emblems and allegories, the symbols and traditions of the Craft, and a fine appreciation of the moral and philosophical teachings. ' ,

West Virginia permitted Morgantown Union Lodge to confer a degree upon its own candidate in the George Washington Memorial at Alexandria. It also gave a dispensation to a lodge a:t Belpre, Ohio, to meet in Parkersburg, bring their own candidate, open a lodge with the Ohio ritual or any other ritual which they chose, and confer the Master Mason degree. The meeting honored Brother Ritchie, an Ohio Mason who resides in Parkersburg and who conferred the degrees at the age of eighty-eight years. The committee on the Grand Master's address in Prince Edward Island recommended that all lodges should have uniformity and avoid all innovations. Many Grand Lodges continue to confer the degree of Past Master. In some instances it is done by the Grand Lodge itself, and in other instances by groups of Past Masters. In Delaware, the degree was conferred by the Grand Master on sixteen Masters-elect, at the same meeting place on the same evening. The committee on work and lectures in the District of Columbia cooperates with the Grand Lecturer in conferring the degree on Masterselect in emergent lodges of actnal Past Masters, convened under authority given by the Grand Master. The form of the degree was approved by the Grand Master of Nevada when submitted to him by a committee of Past Masters. The jurisprudence committee reported that while such a ceremony is ad-


324

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

visable and that the degree is conferred in a symbolic lodge as an honorarium upon a newly eleC'ted Master, as a part of the installation ceremony, they did not believe that the Grand Lodge had authority, nor was its membership so constituted as to be able to act or pass UpOll any form of the ritual of this degree. Announcement was made by the Grand Lecturer of \Vashington : " A lodge of Past Mast('rs will be convened tonight at eight 0 'clock and the secrets of the chair conferred upon those eligible therefor by tIle Past Masters Association of Pierce County." UNUSUAL

April 6, 1937, the Masonic Home of Alabama was struck by a terrific storm doing considerable damage. The Grand Master of Arizona, whose ancestors were the People of the Book, had a dinner served to him in the tabernacle, according- to biblical injunction, only in this case it was located on the lawn of the home of a Past Master of the jurisdietion. The visit fell during the Feast of Tabernacles. Past Grand Master Goldwater, eighty-six years of age, returned to a lodge fifty years after he had instituted it, and installed its officers, probably the first time in Masonic history that such a condition ever happened. During the annual eommunication of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, a portrait of Past Grand Master Fay Hempstead, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge .for more than fifty years, was unveiled. The Grand Lodge has in prospect the erection of a monument to the memory of this distinguished Arkansas Mason. Masonic Homes of California have received a large number of bequests recently. Brother Charles M. Flint, who had already given them $90,000.00 and his home in Beverly Hills, added an additional $72,651.00. 1'hey received $25,000.00 from Brother George \Vadleigh, and approximately $75,000.00 in additional funds were received. The present Grand Master of Colorado is Harry L. Baum, who is the author of "John Brent," a Masonic play of the Hevolution, once given during the Grand Lodge communication in Missouri. The third annual gathering of the little lodge at Kokoma, Colo., is reported in the proceedings. This is the lodge with hrelve members, three of them resident, which is making its last stand in an attempt to sustain the lodge; the usual inspiring meeting was held in the little log lodge hall 10,000 feet above the sea; attendance reported was 95. A national Masonic Thanksgiving service was held in the Washington Cathedral, Washington, D. C., November 25, 1937. Music was by the United States Marine Band Orchestra; the sermon was by the Ht. Rev. James E. Freeman, Bishop of Washington. More than 5,000 scats were occupied in the Cathedral, while thousands were unable to secure admission.


1938

325

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

At a luncheon, the Grand Master of the District of Columbia had the unusual experience of being jointly presented to the assembly with Mr. Daniel J. Callahan, representing the Knights of Columbus. The annual ball game for the benefit of District of Columbia charities was held in 1937, netting $8,335.00. The Grand Lodge of Georgia has been presented with a ninety-nine year lease on sixty acres of land, fronting on the waters of Sapelo Sound, by Albert Earnest of the Union Bag Company of Savannah and New York; Sears, Roebuck & Company donated sufficient wire fencing to enclose the ground. Georgia has a committee on proverb circles. Boys and girls are rated according to the number of proverbs they are able to commit. Several years ago a brother in Springfield, Ill., died leaving a bequest of $500.00 to the Masonic Home. The executor thought the obligation had been met, but some months ago the son of the testator voluntarily assumed the obligation on a monthly payment basis, discharging his liability in January, 1937. A former Grand Lecturer of Illinois had accumulated such an amount of dues he was unable to pay, he requested his lodge to suspend him, and they did. Shortly thereafter it was learned that he was mortally ill and would live but a few hours. The Grand Master ordered him reinstated upon the representation made, and the brethren of the lodge would unquestionably reinstate him if they had time to accomplish it. The Grand Lodge termed it a sympathetic act. The Grand Master of Kansas attended a meeting of Delaware Lodge, witnessing the conferring of the first degree by Joseph J. Stotler on two of his grandsons. Brother Stotler is eighty-six years of age and was assisted by his son, Philip Eugene Stotler; 238 brethren were present. Kansas has a Council of Administration, which appears be a Board of General Purposes. Washington Meredith Lodge of Brownsville, Ky., was given dispensation to open lodge and confer the Master Mason degree in Mammoth Cave, which is near its lodge hall, and to carry its charter from its lodge room to Audubon Avenue, a chamber in Mammoth Cave. Representatives were present from seventeen states and one hundred twentyone lodges, numbering 1,000 members, who, seated upon rocks and ledges, witnessed the conferring of the degree. The presentations at the Grand Lodge of Kentucky remind us very strongly of the annual sessions of the O. E. S. The Grand Master received many gifts, among them an engraved watch, red wearing apparel (purpose not explained), gavel, roses, traveling bag, another gavel, a tie, and a basket of flowers. In order to keep Masonry alive in an extreme part of Maine, where the English-speaking population is comparatively small, reprCi;entatives from various sections of the country, including a delegation of

to


326

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1938

twenty members from the lodge at Edmonston, N. B., visited the lodge at Ft. Kent. The Grand Lodge of Maryland has received from the estate of Brother Arthur D. Rivers in excess of $100,000.00, and this is being added to the endowment fund. Grand Master McFadyen of Quebec told Maryland about his Golden Rule Lodge which extends down into the United States. Since the lodge is made up of members of both nations, they never have a meeting but what they sing both National Anthems. The lodge is .chartered to meet in a natural lodge room on top of a mountain, which it does on every June 24. Often fiS many as 250 assemble on the mountain. Eighty-five per cent of the people of this jurisdiction are of a different faith and from the fifteen per cent remaining it is necessary to select their members, and this from men between the ages of twentyone and sixty-nine. Proceedings of the Grand Lodges of Massachusetts and Michigan are copyrighted. Nominating speeches for Grand Lodge officers in Mississippi are limited to ten minutes for each candidate and only two speeches seconding each candidate's nomination are permitted and these are limited to three minutes each. Nevada has a committee on "legitimacy of Grand Lodges." Rather a large order, we think. The Grand Master of New York suggests the showing of favors to sons of members by reduction of initiation fees and annual dues, finding that "between the ages of twenty-one and thirty money is not apt to be very plentiful with young men and the fraternity can ill afford to forego the co-operation of desirable material." Brother \Vm. J. Wiley, superintendent of the Masonic Home in New York, recently turned over to the Home $100,000.00 as an endowment fund. The money was raised by individual solicitation on the part of Brother Wiley. North Dakota has something new. Miss Clara Elida Richards, librarian of the Grand Lodge Library, has recently been made an honorary life member of the Masonic Veterans Association of North Dakota. If we were Miss Richards we would hesitate about accepting so questionable an honor, particularly one involving the use of the word veteran. Probably the largest meeting of the year was that on May 15, 1937, in Cleveland, Ohio, attended by 3,000 Masons, when the degree of Master Mason was conferred by a Toronto, Canada, lodge. Mayor Burton of Cleveland was in attendance. The largest bequest to a Grand Lodge during the year was the $200,000.00 bequest of Bertha Braun to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. Tellers who served at the annual election of the Grand Lodge of


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

327

Rhode .Island were the Grand Masters of New York, Maine and Connecticut. No irregularities were reported. South Carolina reports two more sight Masons; they are Dr. Henry N. Snyder and James R. McKissick. One the President of Wofford College; the other the President of the University of South Carolina. Members of the faculty of the University of South Carolina participated as officers. Unprecedented in the history of the Grand Lodge of New South Wales was a letter from a member charging the Pro Grand MastPT "with un-Masonic conduct in that he has broken one of the three great principles in Masonry, i.e., truth." The brother was directed to make his charges more specific. In Dynamic Lodge, Queensland, Brother J. A. Boden conducted the ceremony of the initiation of his eighth son, when all the officers' chairs were filled by Brother Boden's sons. The Pro Grand Master of Queensland recently visited New Guinea. The trip was made by boat and included Port Moresby, Samarai, Rabaul, Madang, Salamoa and 'Vau. Lord Huntingfield recently visited Java and the Netherland Indies where the rich, fatty Dutch food and irregular meals seriously impaired his digestive organs. The Grand Lodge of Western Australia held a Masonic Coronation Service in the ball room of the Government House at Perth. It was held on Sunday and was in the nature of a divine service and was broadcast to all parts of the State.


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

I


FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE

Abernathy, John R.: former Missourian, 313 Adair, Lt. Gov. H. R.: mention, 273 Alaska: Masonry in, 247 Apron: wearing of, 266, 267 Argentine: Masonry in, 248 Arkansas: centennial anniversary, 287

Education: in Masonry, 279; danger in addresses, 281 Ecuador: Masonry in, 251 Egypt: Masonry in, 251 Emblems: registration of, 270 England: Masonry in, 237 Extraneous Societies: comment, 234, 275

Bacheller, Irving: received medal, 273 Barbour, Clarence A.: death, 273 Belgium: Masonry in, 248 Bingham, Robert W.: mention, 271 Bolivia: Masonry in, 248 Bonds, 282 Borah, Hon. Wm. E.: constitution address, 288 Brazil: Masonry in, 248 British Isles: Masonry in, 237 Building Projects: comment, 261 Burton, Mayor Harold H.: mention, 274

Fees, 282 Finances, 282 Finland: Masonry in, 251 Flood Relief: report, 258; see "Relief' , Ford, Gen. Stanley: mention, 273 Foreign Recognition: comment, 235; origin custom, 236 France: Masonry in, 251 Freeman, Perry: former Missourian, 313 Funeral, 285

Cadman, Rev. S. Parkes: death, 273 Canal Zone: Masonry in, 249 Ceremonies: in Masonry, 265 Charity, 300 Chile: Masonry in, 249 China: Masonry in, 249 Clandestine Masonry: committee report, 309 Cochran, Gov. Roy L.: mention, 273 Colombia: Masonry in, 249 Co-Masonry: in Australia, 276 Commercialism: in Masonry, 268 Cornerstones: comment, 232, 264 Costa Rica: Masonry in, 250 Cross, Jeremy L.: discovery of diary,' 292 Cuba: Masonry in, 251 Czeehoslova~ia: Masonry in, 246 Decisions, 269 Denmark: Masonry in, 241, 243; irregular Masonry in, 243 Dispensations, 269 Distinguished Masons: mention, 271 Dues, 282

Galena Lodge: settlement of controversy, 271 Gambling, 295 Geo. Washington National Memorial Association: annual meeting, 258; Missouri contribution, 258; Missouri's first subscription, 317 Germany: status of members, 236; Masonry in, 252 Grand Honors: indiscriminate use, 267 Grand Masters: conference of, 257 Greece: Masonry in, 252 Grotto: unfavorable publicity, 278 Hanna, Gov. Louis B.: mention, 274 History, Masonic, 286 Holland: Masonry in, 252 Humor, 294 1. O. O. F.: recognition of officers, 277

Ireland: Masonry in, 240 .Jolmston, Gov. Olin D.: mention, 274 Jugoslavia: Masonry in, 253 Jurisprudence, 269


330

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Kalaw, Teodoro M.: mention, 272 Kavanaugh, Benj. T.: history, 290 LeFanu, Archbishop: mention, 275 Liquor, 295 Lloyd, David: aged Mason, 274 Lotteries, 295 McCash, Dr. 1. N.: mention, 274 Mark Masons: in London, 239 Marsh, Dr. Daniel L.: mention, 272 Martin, Gov. Clarence D.: mention, 274 Maryland: observes anniversary, 292 Masonic Home, 300 Masonic Publications: comment, 268 Masonic Service Association, U. S. A.: annual meeting, 257 :M:ather, Arthur: visits Illinois, 290; visitations, 313 Membership: life and dual, 307 Missourians, 313 New Jersey: sesquicentennial, 292 Nice, Gov. Harry: mention, 272; speaks at Masonic banquet, 292 Norway: Masonry in, 241, 242; irregular Masonry, 242 Oklahoma: settlement versy, 271

of

contro-

Panama: Masonry in, 253 Past Master: degree of, 323 Paulen, Gov. Ben S.: mention, 272 Pershing, John J.: remarks at cornerstone, 289 Peru: Masonry in, 254 Philippine Islands: Masonry in, 254 Politics: in Masonry, 269 Public Installations: objections to, 266 Ragg, Samuel H.: mention, 272

1938

Reader, Harold L.: paper by, 257; visitations, 313 Recognition: foreign grand lodges, 235 Red Cross: handling of flood relief, 305 Regalia: in England, 238 Relief, 300; see" Flood Relief" Research Lodges; in other jurisdictions, 281; in Ireland, 240 Review: other jurisdictions, 314 Ritual, 321 Roosevelt, Pres. Franklin D.: remarks at cornerstone, 289; regrets to Maryland, 292 Rumania: :Masonry in, 255 Salvador: Masonry in, 255 Scandinavian Masonry, 241 Scotland: Masonry in, 239 Skelly, James W.: reviewer's comment' 314-321 Social Security Act: paper by Dr. Reader, 257; practical experience, 307 South Africa: Masonry in, 255 South Carolina: bicentennial, 293 Statistics: compilation, 310 Statue of Liberty: dedication anniversary, 293 Sweden: Masonry in, 241 Switzerland: Masonry in, 255 Syria: Masonry in, 256 Unusual: in Masonry, 324 Uruguay: Masonry in, 256 Veteran Masons: ritual ceremony, 266 Vienna: Masonry in, 256 Virginia: beginnings of Masonry, 291 Vistation: in Australia, 267 Walker, Geo. W.: reviewer's comment, 314-321 Wemple, John L.: oldest living P. G. M., 273 Wilson, Henry H.: mention, 273


1938

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

331

RECOGNITION OF GRAND LODGES

The following Foreign Grand Lodges are recognized as regular by the Grand Lodge of Missouri: Alberta; British Columbia; Austria; Grossloge Von Wien; Canada; Chili (at Santiago); Costa Rica; Cuba (Island of); National Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia; Grand Lodge Lessing zu den drei Ringen; Denmark; Finland; Grand Lodge of Finland; England; France; Guatemala (Nat. and Ind. G. L. of); Ireland; Jugoslavia: Grand Lodge of Jugoslavia; Manitoba; Mexico (York G. L. of); Netherlands; New Brunswick; New South Wales; New Zealand; Norway; Nova Scotia; Panama; Philippine Islands; Porto Rico; Prince Edward Island; Quebec; Queensland; Rumania; San Salvador; Saskatchewan; Scotland; South Australia; Sweden; Swiss Alpina; Tasmania; Victoria; Western Australia.

LIST OF GRAND SECRETARIES AND THEm ADDRESSES Alabama, Guy T. Smith, Montgomery. Arizona, Harry A. Drachman, Tucson. Arkansas, Woodlief A. Thomas, Little Rock. California, John Whicher, San Francisco. Colorado, Chas. A. Patton, 319 Masonic Temple, Denver. Connecticut, Winthrop Buck, Hartford. Delaware, John F. Robinson, Wilmington. District of Columbia, J. Claude Keiper, Washington. Florida, George W. Huff, Jacksonville. Georgia, Frank F. Baker, Maeon. Idaho, Curtis F. Pike, Boisc. Illinois, R. C. Davenport, Harrisburg. Indiana, William H. Swintz, Indianapolis. Iowa, C.. C. Hunt, Cedar Rapids. Kansas, Elmer ]<'. Strain, Topeka. Kentucky, A. O. Orton, Louisvillc. Louisiana, D. Peter LaGuens, Jr., New Orleans. Maine, Convers E. Leach, Portland. Maryland, Harry C. Mueller, Baltimore. Massachusetts, F. W. Hamilton, Boston. Miclligan, F. Homer Kewton, Grand Rapids. Minnesota, John H. Anderson, St. Paul. Mississippi, Sid F. Curtis, Meridian.

Missouri, Arthur Mather, St. Louis. Montana, Luther T. Hauberg, Helena. Nebraska, Lewis E. Smith, Omaha. Nevada, Robert H. Parker (acting), Masonic Temple, Reno. New Hampshire, J. Melvin Dresser, Concord. New Jersey, Isaac Cherry, Trenton. New Mexico, Alpheus A. Keen, Albuquerque. New York, Charles H. Johnson, New York City. North Carolina, J. H. Anderson, Raleigh. North Dakota, W. L. Stockwell, Fargo. Ohio, Harry S. Johnson, Cincinnati. Oklahoma, C. A. Sturgeon, Guthrie. Oregon, D. R. Cheney, Portland. Pennsylvania, Mathew Galt, Jr., Philadelphia Rhode Island, H. L. McAuslan, Providence. South Carolina, O. Frank Hart, Columbia. South Dakota, W. D. Swain, Sioux Falls. Tennessee, T. E. Doss, Nashville. Texas, Geo. H. Belew, Waco. Utah, Sam H. Goodwin, Sal~ Lake City. Vermont, Archie S. Harriman, Burlington. Virginia, James M. Clift, Richmond. Washington, Horace W. Tyler, 'l'acoma.


332

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

West Virginia, Ira W. Coffman, P. O. Box 346, Charleston. Wisconsin, William F. Weiler, Milwaukee. Wyoming, J. M. Lowndes, Casper. Alberta, J. H. W. S. Kcmmis, Calgary. Austria, Grossloge Von Wien, Dr. Wladimir Misar, StarhemberggasS<l 47, Wien IV 12, Vienna. British Columbia, Frank S. McKee, Masonic Temple, 692 Seymour St., Vancouver, B. C. Canada, Ewart G. Dixon, Hamilton,Ont. Chile, Francisco Fuentes Gormaz, Santiago. Cuba, Luis Martinez Reyes, Apartado 2, Havana. Czechoslovakia, National Grand Lodge of, L. Schwary, Vinohradska 24, Prague-Smichon. Czechoslovakia, Prof. Dr. V. Lesny, G. M. (NaIl. G. L.) 2 Dienzenhofferovy Sady, Prague XVI. Czechoslovakia, Felix Lenhart, G. M. (Lessing), Trojanova 7, Prague XI. Czechoslovakia, Grand Lodge Lessing zu den drei Ringen, E. Klatscher-Lessingham, Trojanova 7, Prague XI. Denmark, Alex Troeddson, Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 23. England, Sidney A. White, London. Finland, Masonic Hall No. 13, Unioninkatu, Helsinki. France (Nat. and Ind. G. L. of), G. F. Beaumont, Paris. Ireland, Henry C. Shellard, Dublin. Jugoslavia, Dr. V. Novak, Cika Ljubina 20, 3, Belgrade. Manitoba, J. H. G. Russell, Winnipeg.

1938

Mexico (York G. L. of), Fred T Berger, Apartado 1986, Mexico D.F. Netherlands, A. F. L. Faubel, The Hague. New Brunswick, R. D. Magee, St. John. New South Wales, David Cunningham, Masonic Hall, Sydney. New Zealand, H. A. Lamb, P. O. Box 562, Dunedin. Norway, Eivind Lowig-Hansen, Nedro Volgate 19, Oslo. N ova. Scotia, James C. Jones, Freemason's Hall, Halifax. Panama, Tomas Paredes, P. O. Box 350, Panama, Rde. P. Philippine Islands, Teodoro M. Kalaw, Manila. Porto Rico, Rodolfo R. Pabon, P. O. Box 747, San Juan. Prince Edward Island, Chas. M. Williams, Charlottetown. Quebec, W. W. Williamson, Montreal. Queensland, Leslie P. Marks, Box 675, Brisbane. Rumania, Corneliu Mihalesco, Bukarest. San Salvador, Tomas Soley, San Salvador, C. A. Saskatchewan, W. B. Tate, Regina. Scotland, Thomas G. Winning, Freemason's Hall, Edinburgh. South Australia, R. Owen Fox (Acting), Freemason's Hall, Adelaide. Sweden, Yngve G. Wisen, Narvunagen 32, Stockholm. Tasmania, W. H. Strutt, 11 '7 Mac路 quarie, Hobart. Victoria, William Stewart, Freemason's Hall, Melbourne. Western Australia, A. E. Jenson, Freemason's Hall, Perth.


~

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

(0 ~

ex> TO MISSOURI Post Office Grand ~epresentative ThomB8 D. Williams . Maysville , Wm. C. Rese '" St. Louis Byrne E. Bigger . Hannibal. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. James A. Boone . Charleston. . . . . . . . . . . .. " Frank G. Ade . Joplin Rolwrt C. Duffin . St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. St. Joseph E. L. Robison . Willis J. Bray . Kirksville James H. Scarborough . Warrensburg Elwyn S. Woods . Springfield. . . . . . . . . . . .. Albert Linxwiler . Jefferson City Ray V. Denslow . Trenton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Eli S. Haynes W. W. Martin Walter J. Simon DuVal Smith Nat D. Jackson Forrest C. Donnell ChB8. L. Woods F. C. Barnhill John Pickard James A. Kinder Harris C. Johnston James W. Skelly Arthur Mather

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Arch A. Johnson Harold L. Reader Curtis J. Neal. E. E. Morris Morris E. Ewing Guy C. Million Henry C. Chiles Grover C. Sparks Cecil A. Tolin

. . . . . . . . .

GRAND LODGE Alabama Alberta . .........•• Arizona . ArkansB8 British Columbia . Canada Colorado Connecticut Cuba " . Delaware District of Columbia . England

. ,. . . . . . . . . . .

Columbia Florida . St. Louis " ......•..... Georgia . St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Idaho . St. Joseph Illinois . Independence. . . . . . . . . .. . Indiana . St. Louis , Ireland . Rolla Kansas . Marshall , Kentucky . Columbia. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Louisiana . Cape Girardeau " Maine . Boonville. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. • ~ Manitoba . St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Maryland . St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Massachusetts .......•. .................................... Michigan . Springfield. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Minnesota . Webster Groves Mississippi, .. Cape Girardeau Montana .. KansB8 City , Nebraska . Morrisville Nevada . Boonville New Brunswick . Lexington. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . New Hampshire . Savannah New Jersey . St. Louis New Mexico .

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative I Post Office H. G. Earnest Anniston Archibald West Edmonton T. E. Sidebotham Clifton M. W. Greeson. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Prescott William Astley. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Vancouver Donald Sutherland , Princeton Carl J. Bradfield Pueblo Leonard J. Nickerson West Cornwall Calixto Fajardo Havana Weldon C. Waples Newark Leonard P. Steuart... Washington Hon. Wykeham Stanley Cornwallis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Kent Richard B. Lovett. . . . . . . . . .. Tampa William Bordley Clarke. . . . .. Savannah Clarence D. Purkhiser. . . . . .. Caldwell George A. Stadler. . . . . . . . . .. Decatur Herbert A. Graham , Indianapolis Herbert Malcolm Ireland D. A. Meredith '" Kansas City Sam K. Veach , Carlisle J. H. Rowland Shreveport Irving L. Case Luber Maris H. Garton. . . . . . . . . . .. Boissevain G. A. Rasch '. . . . . . .. Baltimore Robt. D. Webster Jamaica Plain Neil W. Murray. . . . . . . . . . .. Detroit Albert T. Pray Minneapolis John Foggo Dixon Natchez Knute L. Brujord . Edward E. Carr North Platte Nealy H. Chapin Lincoln John Twining Hartt E'y Oscar Earle Jewell. . . . . . . . .. St. John H. E. Hutchison Warner Herbert S. Murdock. . . . . . . .. Springer

Q

l;:d

:> 2: t;l

~

o

t;l

Q trj

o

~

a::H

00 00

o

~ l;:d H

~ ~ ~


GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI-(Continued) TO MISSOURI Grand Representative Post Office B. C. Hunt. . Columbia Athol J. Mitchener . St. Louis Louis J. Graue . Mexico George W. Walker . Cape Girardeau F. L. Magoon . St. Louis William R. Gentry . St. Louis " Fred O. Wood . Kansas City Walter A. Phipps . Neosho Thad B. Landon . Kansas City " Bert S. Lee . Springfield Anthony F. Ittner . St. Louis " . Bonne Terre W. B. Massey George C. Marquis . Independence. . . . . . . . . .. . William F. Woodruff . Kansas City T. W. Cotton . Van Buren , ............................ ........................' Eugene J. Altheimer . St. Louis Maj. W. S. MacAaron . Boonville. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Andrew J. O'Reilly . St. Louis , Theodore C. Teel. . St. Louis '" Harry S. Truman .. Independence Robert C. Winkelmaier . St. Louis , . St. Louis Solon Cameron , Leo H. Johnson . Neosho " Thomas H. Reynolds . Kansas City. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Karl M. Vetsburg . St. Louis J. R. McLachlan . Kahoka R. R. Kreeger . Kansas City . Kansas City O. H. Swearingen Van F. Boor . Kansas City. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Chas. T. Kornhrodt . ... . St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . C. Lew Gallant John M. Gallatin . Chillicothe Edward P. WaIsh

. St. Louis

" ..

~.I.

GRAND LODGE

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative Post Office James T. Smiles Sydney Bainbridge Colby. .. .. New York William Waring De Castro Wellington Walter E. Moore Webster Harry Lord , Cando Israel Edward Sanford. . . . .. Halifax James W. Morgan Jackson William P. Freeman McAlester H. Beckwith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Portland Julio Icaza Panama City Amos G. Bellis Manila C. C. Carlton. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Souris A. J. B. Milborne. . . . . . . . . .. Montreal Samuel James C08sart Brisbane Henry S. See...... Providence Charles O. Lord. . . . . . . . . . . .. San Juan Dr. Leo Salzman. . . . . . . .. .. Bucharest J. Orville Clark. . . . . . . . . . . .. Govan John B. Peden. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Edinburgh William James Host .. , Adelaide George T. Bryan , Greenville John K. Kutnewsky . . . . . . . .. Redfield Herbert Hays. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Hobart Robert V. Hope Memphis G. R. Montgomery. . . . . . . . .. Fort Worth Sidney Watson Badcon Ogden Seymour C. Hard. . . . . . . . . .. Arlington Baron Marks. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Melbourne Vernon G. Harlin Harrisonburg John I. Preissner Yakima A. C. Munro Perth P. P. Lester. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Fort Gay Charles E. George. " Weyauwega

New South Wales . New york . New Zealand . North Carolina . North Dakota . Nova Scotia . Ohio ' Oklahoma . Oregon . Panama . Philippine Islands . Prince Edward Island . Quebec . Queensland ' Rhode Island . Porto Rico . Rumania . Saskatchewan . Scotland . South Australia , South Carolina . South Dakota . Tasmania . Tennessee . Texas . Utah . Vermont . Victoria . Virginia . Washington . Western Australia . West Virginia . Wisconsin . York Grand Lodge of Mex:co. F. &. A. M '_:_:..L~arcus A. Loevy

. Mexico City

CJ.:) CJ.:) ~

"0

~

oa

t;rj t;rj l:j H

~ 00

~ ~

CJ.:)

00


INDEX 1938 PROCEEDINGS A PAGE

Address of Grand Master 5 Bicentenary Câ&#x201A;Źlebration in Nova Scotia 13 Birthday Visitations 15 19 Concerning a Masonie Journal Conclusion 22 Cornerstones 17 Decisions 16 Dispensations 17 European Relief 18 Geo. Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. . . . . .. 20 Grand Masters' Conference 20 Grand Representatives 18 Installations 17 6 Masonic Leadership Meetings of Distriet Lecturers 16 Necrology 7 Our Grand Secretary 21 Proposed Lodge of Research 19 Relative to Grand Master's Visitations 18 St. Louis Masonic Employment Bureau . 21 State of the Craft .................... 6 The Masonic Home 20 Trial Commissions 18 Visitations 8 Visits to the Other Grand Jurisdictions 13 Alphabetical List of Lodges 157 Amendments Adopted 150 Amendment Offered re Petition for Restoration 100 Amendment re Proposed Lodge of Researeh (read first time and referred to Committee on Jurisprudence) 80 Amendments Which Lie Over Until 1939 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 151 Announcement of Lexington Celebration 146 Announcement-New Women's Building at the Masonic Home. .. .. 85 Appointments 143 Appointment of Committees 81 Approval of Minutes 5 B Barger, Robert Lee, Address of Introduction of Benediction Biographical Boor, Van Fremont, 50-Year Button Presented to

135 108 148 i 107

C Closing Committees, Special-I938 Committees, Special-I939 Committees, Standing-I938

148 81 147 81


336

INDEX PAGE

Committees, Standing-1939 o' Correspondent's Report . Credentials-Interim Report .. 0

0

••

0

0

0

••

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

00'

•••••••••••••••

0

••

••

0

••••••••••

0

0

••

0

0

••••

0

•••••

0

•••••

0

146 231 4

D

Dedication, New Women's Building at the Masonic Home ..... Denslow, Ray V., Tribute to John Pickard ..... Distinguished Guests, Introduction of .. Directory of Lodges by Districts ..