Page 1

OFFICIAL PROCEED

as

of the

LODG s of the STATE OF MISSOURI

U ICATIO

Held at

LOUIS, MISSOURI SEPTEMBltR 25 AND 26 A.D. 1934, A.L. 5934


)-f3f~=:( GRAND MAS TER

_


BIOG RAPHICAL

II

II FRANK CLINTON BARNHILL

Frank Clinton Barnhill, ninetieth Grand Master of Masons in Missouri, the son of Joseph William and Emma A. (Scobee) Barnhill, was born on a farm two miles east of Miami, Saline County, Missouri, December 3, 1879. He has resided in that county all his life, and at its county seat, Marshall, for the last forty-nine years. His parents, like so many of Missouri's early settlers, were natives of Kentucky, and their forbears were of Scotch-Irish descent who came to North Carolina in colonial days. "Clint," as he is known to his intimates, was educated in the excellent public schools of Marshall, graduating from the high school in the spring of 1897. It was his ambition to continue his education through college, but difficulties of a practical nature caused him to accept a position with an insurance and loan office in Marshall, with a view of entering college later on. It was while he was in this employment that an opportunity came to him which could only be open to a young man of sound character and proper background, natural talent and ability: The Wood and Huston Bank, of which the late J. P. Huston was then cashier (and later president), offered him a clerkship on condition that he would learn shorthand. This Clint did, in Kansas City, under the instructorship of the late Willis H. Leavitt, and on December 1, 1899, he began his life career with the Wood and Huston Bank, which then was, has since continued to be, and now is, one of the sound and strong banks in rural Missouri, and in which he has risen from clerk to the active vice-presidency, to which post he was elected in January, 1929, and which position he still holds. The assets of the bank at this time total more than a million and a half dollars. He has been active in banking circles in Missouri; in 1918 he helped organize the Saline County Bankers Association and was its first president. In 1925, he served as chairman of Group路 Four of the Missouri Bankers Association; and from time to time he has served as a member of various committees of the Association. Our Grand Master is identified with a number of the more important civic and community activities of his home town. and county; and


ii

BIOGRAPHICAL

his associates and fellow citizens, eager to utilize his sound business and financial judgment, have placed him in many positions of trust and honor, particularly in those posts having to do with his specialty, finance. Since 1915 he has been treasurer of the Sappington School Fund of Saline County, a fund originally $20,000 created by the will of the late Dr. John Sappington, of Arrow Rock, who died in 1854, the income of which is used to help worthy boys and. girls of Saline County through high school and college, as a gift and not as a loan. Up to August, 1934, this fund has been used to help 11,459 students, in a total amount of $179,148.21, and the principal of the fund at this time is over $80,000. Since 1919 he has been a member of the board of trustees of the George A. Murrell Memorial Library. For many years he has been treasurer of the Ridge Park Cemetery Association of Marshall, which has an endowment fund of over $60,000, the income from which is used to maintain Marshall's beautiful cemetery. During the World War our Grand Master was Saline County's chairman in the Liberty and Victory Bond drives, in which were sold to citizens of Saline County more than five million dollars of Government bonds. During the same period and since, he has been treasurer and member of the board of the American Red Cross Chapter of Saline County. He has been an active member of the Marshall Chamber of Commerce since its organization and served it as president in 1927. At the age of fourteen years Clint united with the Methodist Episcopal Church (South) at Marshall, under the pastorate of the Reverend A. R. Faris; he was elected to membership on the Board of Stewards in 1903, during the pastorate of Dr. C. H. Briggs, and later was made one of the trustees of the church, both of which positions he continues to hold. The marriage of our Grand Master occurred Oat Warrensburg, Mo., February 11, 1912, when he was united in marriage to Miss Mary R. Rayhill, daughter of Judge George W. and Laura B. RayhiU, of that city. This charming lady and three children, Laura Louise (now Mrs. Harry B. Bolte of Slater, Mo.), Emma Mary, and Frank, Jr., make up the family of our Grand Master. The Masonic career of our Grand Master began early in life. He was initiated in Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall, Mo., January 13, 1903, passed February 5, 1903, and raised March 5, 1903. He completed the York Rite the same year, having been exalted in Saline Chapter No. 74 on October 24. M. W. Brother Barnhill cherishes the memory that the late Dr. Corona H. Briggs, the grand old man of Freemasonry in Missouri, then pastor of the Methodist Church at Marshall, acted as E. C. on the occasion of his knighting. The newly made Mason was put to work at once, for he was installed in January, 1904, at the foot of the line in each of the three bodies, and in each ascended by regular graduations to the East. He served his Lodge


FRANK CLINTON BARNHILL

iii

as W. M. in 1909; his chapter as H. P. in 1910, and his Commandery as E. C. in 1911. M. W. Brother Barnhill is a member of Centralia Council No. 34, R. and S. M., having passed the circle in that Council January 19, 1914. He is a member of Ararat Shrine, A. A. O. N. M. S., Kansas City, where he crossed the hot sands February 22, 1915. He is a Mason of the 32d degree, having received the grades of the A. A. S. R. at Kansas City, in November, 1918. His O. E. S. membership is in Marshall Chapter No. 408, where he was initiated in January, 1919. He is an illustrious and perfect Knight Companion of the Order of the Red Cross Constantine, having been initiated February 12, 1924, and served his Conclave, St. Chrysostom, No. 36, Columbia, as Most Puissant Sovereign, in 1931. He served as D. D. G. M. of the 24th District from October, 1910, to October, 1913. In 1917 he helped organize the Saline County Masonic Association and served it as president in 1928. In May, 1923, he was appointed Grand Pursuivant in the Grand Lodge line by M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, Grand Master, and has since been regularly advanced each year until his election as Grand Master, at the Grand Lodge Communication of 1933. He represents the Grand Godges of Montana and Kentucky near the Grand Lodge of Missouri. In February, 1913, he was appointed Grand Treasurer of the Grand Commandery of Missouri, which post of honor and trust he has held continuously ever since. For the past eight years he has also been one of the trustees and the treasurer of the Knights Templar Educational Foundation of Missouri, which has loaned over $300,000 to 1,680 college students, and which has assets now on hand of almost $150,000. The Masonic Fraternity of Missouri counts itself most fortunate to have had as its leader during the trying days of 1933-34 a man of the caliber and capacity of our Junior Past Grand Master. Endowed with a genial and kindly disposition and an intense love for Freemasonry, in which he has been an active and effective worker all of his adult life, M. W. Brother Barnhill brought to his task an experience and viewpoint which have accustomed him to meeting and solving weighty problems in a firm and decisive manner. By nature and training a builder and conserver, he naturally devoted his energies to constructive measures calculated to upbuild and strengthen the Fraternity. His outstanding accomplishment was the organization of Lodges into District Associations. He found eight such associations at the outset of his administration (including the Association in his home county, which he helped to organize many years ago); and well knowing the positive value of such organizations, he organized twenty-one districts more during his year as Grand Master. The writer believes it safe to predict that the future will herald this constructive work as one of the outstanding accomplishments of recent years. H. O. O.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS of the

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION of the

GRAND LODGE ANCIENT FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS of the

STATE OF MISSOURI Held in

ST. LOUIS

SEPTEMBER 25 AND 26 A. D. 1934


ONE HUNDRED FOURTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION-FIRST DAY

The One Hundred Fourteenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened at Scottish Rite Temple, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri, at 10 o'clock .A.M., on Tuesday, September 25, 1934. PRELIMINARY

Prior to the opening of the Grand Lodge, delightful musical selections were rendered by the Orchestra of Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 in collaboration with a program rendered by the children from the Masonic Home, under the general superintendence of William W. Martin, President of the Home, Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron, and Mrs. H. J. Falkenhainer, greatly to the enjoyment of all present. PRESENT Fra.nk C. Barnhill, Marshall, M. W. Grand Master. Du Val Smith, St. Joseph, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. James W. SkeUy, St. Louis, R. W. Senior Grand Warden. George W. Walker, Cape Girardeau, R. W. Junior Grand Warden. Edmund E. Morris, Kansas City, R. W. Grand Treasurer. Arthur Mather, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Secretary. James R. McLachlan, Kahoka, R. W. Grand Lecturer. Emmet L. Robison, St. Joseph, R. W. Grand Chaplain. Samuel Thurman, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Chaplain. H. L. Reader, Webster Groves, R. W. Grand Senior Deacon. Henry C. Chiles, Lexington, R. W. Grand Junior Deacon. Elwyn S. Woods, Springfield, R. W. Grand Senior Steward. Karl M. Vetsburg, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Junior Steward. Harry S. Truman, Independence, R. W. Grand Marshal. Harris C. Johnston, Boonville, R. W. Grand Marshal. Forrest C. Donnell, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Sword ;Bearer. Grover C. Sparks, Savannah, R. W. Grand Pursuivant. Thomas B. Mather, Jefferson City, R. W. Grand Orator. Thomas Needham, St. Louis, R. W. Grand Tiler.

OPENING

Promptly at 10 :00 o'clock .A.M. the Most WorshipfuJ. Grand Master, Frank路 C. Barnhill, opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri in .AMPLE FORM in its One Hundred and Fourteenth Annual Communication assisted by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of Representatives. 3


4

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

W. Brother Shelby H. Wilson of Trilumina Lodge No. 205 rendered the solo "Fear Ye Not, Oh! Israel!" accompanied on the organ by Brother O. Wade Fallert. R. W. Grand Chaplain Samuel Thurman offered the following INVOOATION I lift mine eyes unto the mountains whence cometh my help. My help cometh from God, Maker of Heaven and earth. Oh, Heavenly Father, Lord, Supreme Architect of the Univel'se, we are looking up to the heights and yet we stand humbly at the foot of the mountain. In humility and contrition we return to Thee in this sacred and solemn annual Communication, a Communication of humble servants in Thy name, in Thy cause, in Thy service. We would render homage in humility and we would take pride only in the sense and in the knowledge of our kinship with Thee. Inspire this great assembly with strength, with courage, with beauty and with love, that they may better understand who come at the altar of honest and honorable craftsmanship in the Masonry of the Temple on high. We ask Thy wise and merciful and loving knowledge to guide us in deliberation. We ask Thine invisible yet ever touching hand to lead us away from error that we may not stumble in the folly and frailty of our own will and of our own passion and of our own self-satisfaction. More than ever, oh, Heavenly Father, do we, thy children, recognize the need of Thee, of Thine all-supreme law and order in the midst of the chaos and confusion that fill the hearts of men the world over. Oh, we would return in simplicity and obedience of Thy commandments and drink the living waters at the weH-springs of Thine eternal truth. Here in the Grand Lodge room of our sacred ancient and honorable Fraternity we would renew our vow of faithfulness to Thee as well as to one another, and we would assume anew the responsibilities of the badge of our Fraternity, the responsibilities to the oppressed and the downtrodden, to the widow and orphan, to the helpless and the unfortunate, to the blind who though seeing yet see not, and to those heedless though they hear, yet they hear not. We would ask Thy blessing upon our nation, this great and glorious country of ours which we believe to be the gift of Thy hand, and we would ask Thee that our nation may become the radiant torchbearer of light and liberty and truth and law and love among the nations of the world. Open Thou, Lord, the hearts of those who would seek to close the gates and put up the bars of narrow nationalism against our Brethren all over the world, and we ask Thy presence and Thy guiding spirit in this great sanctuary of Thine dedicated to Thee, consecrated by our service, built and established every day according to the laws of Thy creation, and we ask Thee especially to guide the lips and the hand of him who is our Grand Master in loca dei, in the place of Thee, sitting at the head, yet in his humility worthy to be crowned with the reward of faithfulness and honor. Guide him, Oh, Heavenly Father, that while he rules with firmness and strength, yet that he also listens to the humblest cry of the humblest brother. Draw us unto Thee and bless us with the fullness of Thy. blessings so that in Thy spirit and in Thy wisdom and in Thy love we may work and pray, yea, we may rejoice that Thou hast sent us this day. Amen.

CREDENTIALS

R. W. Arthur Mather for the Chairman of the Committee on Credentials reported a constitutional number of Lodges represented,


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

5

and the Grand Lodge thereupon proceeded to the discharge of its duties. MOTION

M. W. Brother Wm. R. Gentry moved that the hearing of the Special Committee on Grand Master's Relief Program be made the special order of business for Wednesday morning at 9 :00 o'clock. The motion prevailed. APPROVAL OF MINUTES

The Proceedings of the year 1933, having been printed and distributed, were approved. TELEGRAM

The Grand Secretary read the following telegram: Please convey my fraternal greetings to the Grand Lodge with my hope that our hearts may beat in unison and our hands be strengthened for those great duties which Freemasonry faces in the future. (Signed) JOSEPH S. McINTYRE, P. G. M.

The Grand Master instructed the Grand Secretary to make suitable acknowledgment of this telegram. MOTION

M. W. BROTHER BERT S. LEE: For the first time, I think, in about thirty-two years, one of our Grand Masters is absent from this session of the Grand Lodge-Most Worshipful Brother Julius C. Garrell. He is at his home in Santa Monica, California. I had the great pleasure of visiting him in July. I would like to move that the Grand Secretary be instructed to send the best wishes of this Grand Lodge to Brother Garrell, and our disappointment at his absence at this session. THE GRAND MASTER: I am sure this meets with our entire approval, and there being no objection it is so ordered. Brother Grand Secretary, you will attend to that. INTRODUCTION OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

The Committee on Credentials reported the presence of several distinguished visitors. The following were conducted to the altar, introduced to the Grand Lodge, rendered appropriate honors, and assigned to seats in the Grand East: M. W. Brother Honorable Judge James Garnett, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky and Present Grand Treasurer. M. W. Brother Virgil R. Johnson, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Nebraska. M. W. Brother Lewis E. Smith, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Nebraska and Present Grand Secretary.


6

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

M. W. Brother James C. Cassler, Grand Master of the Grand Jurisdiction of Kansas. M. W. Brother Alexander Hamilton Bell, Past Grand Master of the Grand Jurisdiction of Illinois. W. Brother Alex S. Rankin, R. E. Commander of the Grand Commandery K. T. of Missouri. R. W. Brother Willis J. Bray, D. D. G. M. of the 22nd Masonic District and M. E. Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri. W. Brother Charles Gurley, Most Illustrious Grand Master of the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters of Missouri. M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, P. G. M. and General Grand Principal Sojourner of the General Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of the United States. ADDRESS OF GRAND MASTER

Brethren: Weare assembled in the One Hundred and Fourteenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M., of Missouri, and it is my very great pleasure to bid you a most hearty welcome this morning. Since last we met 1,516 of our brethren have passed within the Portals of thatUndissolving Lodge to which we all are advancing, their labors in our midst having been completed and their records immutably stamped upon the surroundings in which they lived and labored. We who are here are still engaged in that noble purpose of building up our moral and masonic edifice and we hope that our labors will meet with the approval of Him who overseeth all things and whose "well done" is the highest commendation that can be received by mortal man. NECROLOGY

During the year our Grand Lodge has been exceptionally bereaved by the passing into the Higher Service of the Celestial Lodge, of our Beloved and Most Worshipful Brother Doctor \Villiam Alfred Clark, Past Grand Master, who presided over this Grand Lodge in 1918 and whose service to the Craft is known to aU of you. His genial personality and rare gifts have left an impress upon us which will abide in the years that are to come and the place which he occupied among us will be hard to fill. Doctor Clark passed away in the early hours of April 11, 1934, and I conducted his funeral which was said to have been one of the largest ever held in Jefferson City, testifying eloquently to the high esteem in which he was held by people in all walks of life. Assisting in the ceremonies were Most Worshipful Brothers R. R. Kreeger, W. W. Martin and Byrne E. Bigger, Past Grand Masters,


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

7

James W. Skelly, Senior Grand Warden, and Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, together with a great company of Craftsmen from Jefferson Lodge No. 43 and the Lodges in the surrounding district. On February 8, 1934, the Grand Secretary wired me that R. W. Brother James F. Blair of Belton, Missouri, District Deputy Grand Master of the 34th Masonic District, had passed away that morning. In company with R. W. Brothers Henry C. Chiles and Harry S. Truman, I attended the funeral on Friday, February 9, 1934, and was deeply touched to hear the universal expressions of appreciation of Brother Blair's high standing as a citizen and Mason among his own people. Brother Blair's loss will be keenly felt by a host of friends and those with whom he daily came into contact. In company with Brothers William C. Gordon, William Y. Lockridge, and John T. Wells of Marshall, Missouri, on November 28, 1933, I drove to Springfield, Missouri, and attended the funeral of Brother William Y. Bean who for over twenty-five years was Grand Instructor of the Grand Commandery Knights Templar of Missouri. He was also Past Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery and Past Most Illustrious Master of the Grand Council R. and S. Masters of the State of Missouri. In previous years he had also served as Master of his local Lodge. Brother Bean was an active and zealous Mason and one of the best known Masons in this jurisdiction. He had been in failing health for some months and was finally laid to rest at Springfield, Missouri, on November 28, 1933. On March 13, 1934, I conducted the funeral of Brother Edwin Reavis, a member.of Barbee Lodge No. 217, Sweet Springs, Missouri. On April 8, 1934, I conducted at Humansville the funeral of Brother William McCracken, aged 87, a member of Modern Lodge No. 144. Brother McCracken was an outstanding citizen of that community. This was testified to by the large concourse of people from that section of the state who attended the funeral in the auditorium of the new community hall at Humansville. The funeral address was delivered by W~ Brother Thomas H. Douglas. On June 27, 1934, I conducted the funeral of Brother Henry Strong Smith, aged 96, a member of Barbee Lodge No. 217, Sweet Springs, in accordance with his request made to me some ten years ago. These all died in the faith. The Committee on Necrology will doubtless present suitable memorials. SPECIAL VISITATIONS TRILUMINA LODGE NO. 205, MARSHALL My first official visitation was made to my home lodge, Trilumina No. 205, at its Stated Communication, Thursday, October 5, 1933. This was a particular pleasure for me for it was in this lodge that I


8

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

first saw Masonic light over thirty years ago, and it is among the members of this lodge that I have lived and labored all these years. TYRO LODGE NO.

12, CALEDONIA

On Saturday, October 7, 1933, I attended the one hundred and ninth anniversary of Tyro Lodge No. 12, in Washington County, attended by a large number of brethren from that section of the state. This is one of our oldest lodges. The Grand Lodge Proceedings show that on "October 5, 1824, a petition for dispensation was presented by sundry brethren residing at or near Caledonia in County of Washington, State of Missouri, praying to open a Lodge by name of Tyro Lodge." After the anniversary program in the Hall of Tyro Lodge the brethren proceeded to Bellvue Cemetery nearby and placed a wreath on the grave of Brother Martin Ruggles, its first Master and Senior Grand Warden for the years 1826 and 1827. R. W. Brother Charles E. Pyle made appropriate remarks at the grave. In this cemetery, also lies buried Comfort Ruggles, uncle of Martin Ruggles. Comfort Ruggles, so it was said by the brethren at Caledonia, was a Revolutionary soldier, and a participant in the Boston Tea Party. The original charter of Tyro Lodge No. 12 was exhibited, signed by N. B. Tucker, Grand Master, dated April 5, 1825, which goes back to within a few years of organization of our Grand Lodge, and the admission of Missouri to the Union of States. The membership of Tyro Lodge No. 12 is 61, just what it was one hundred years ago. They are, therefore, holding their own, something many of our Lodges are not doing. The brethren at Caledonia take their Masonry seriously and are going forward firmly into their second century as a Chartered Lodge. Success and prosperity to Tyro Lodge No. 12! A. J. MICHENER BANQUET, ST. LOUIS

On Tuesday, October 10, 1933, on invitation of the committee in charge, it was my privilege to attend a testimonial dinner given by the various civic organizations of St. Louis, honoring our District Deputy Grand Master, Athol J. Michener. This was a very interesting affair and was participated in by representatives of various organizations of St. Louis, political, civic, business and religious. On invitation of the Committee, I spoke briefly representing the Fraternal Societies and Freemasonry particularly, offering words of commendation so richly deserved for the many years of service of R. W. Brother Michener to the Fraternity. This dinner was in recognition of his retirement from 44 years of service in the U. S. Postal Department, the last six of which he was postmaster of St. LOUIS. It was a great honor, worthily bestowed upon Brother Michener.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

9

RABBI SAMUEL THURMAN BANQUET, ST. LOUIS

On invitation, I attended a testimonial dinner in honor of Rabbi Samuel Thurman, our Grand Chaplain, on his twentieth anniversary as Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregation, St. Louis. Various civic, educational and fraternal organizations were represented at the banquet and the Grand Master brought the greetings of the Grand Lodge on this occasion. GRAND CHAPTER ORDER EASTERN STAR, ST. LOUIS

On October 11, 1933, on invitation of the Most Worthy Grand Matron, I visited the Grand Chapter Order of Eastern Star, then in session at the Scottish Rite Temple, St. Louis, extending greetings of the Grand Lodge and commending them for their support of the Masonic Home. GRAND LODGE OF KENTUCKY

In company with our Grand Secretary, Dr. Arthur Mather, .it was my good fortune to make an official visit to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky at its one hundred and thirty-third Annual Communication held in Louisville on Tuesday, October 17, 1933. For a number of years it has been my pleasure to represent the Grand Lodge of Kentucky near the Grand Lodge of Missouri and it was therefore a pleasure to make a personal report in connection with that appointment, and also in my official capacity as Grand Master. An added interest in our visit to the Grand Lodge of Kentucky is the fact that both of my parents were natives of that state, and my ancestors for many generations back sleep among the hills of old Kentucky. It was my pleasure to meet many near kinsmen, a number of whom are zealous Freemasons in their respective communities. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky reported having had an active year under the leadership of M. W. Brother J. L. Phillips, and is carrying on in splendid manner in spite of the economic depression. The brethren have a forward look and are building well. Missouri owes much to Kentucky, for that State has made a large contribution to the West. Over a century ago her sons, many of them Freemasons, joined the stream of emigrants from Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee, who following in the wake of that great explorer and pioneer, Daniel Boone, pushed forward into the West, settling among the river counties of Missouri and built new homes in the wilderness and on its prairies. They had a large part in the establishment of a dependable citizenship here. MIZPAH LODGE NO.

639,

ST. LOUIS

It was my privilege to attend an unique meeting of Mizpah Lodge No. 639 at Mt. Moriah Temple on the evening of November 14,1933.


10

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

This meeting was called their 100 per cent night and several weeks prior to the meeting a special committee contacted personally every member residing within thirty miles of their lodge. This was a very unusual plan, but it was of great benefit, not only in getting out an attendance on this particular occasion, but also in the way of locating brethren who had not been in the Lodge for a number of years. The contacts alone were worth all the effort put forth. While they did not succeed in getting 100 per cent a very large number of the able-bodied brethren who were within reasonable distance of the Lodge was present. A very interesting program was rendered. I was accompanied on this trip by our Grand Secretary, Dr. Arthur Mather; the two D. D. G. M.'s of St. Louis, R. W. Brothers A. J. Michener and Frank Magoon; our Senior Grand Warden, R. W. Brother James W. Skelly, and Grand Junior Steward, R. W. Hrother Karl Vetsburg. MASTERS AND WARDENS CLUB, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

On November 14, 1933, after having visited Mizpah Lodge at 8 :00 o'clock P.M. on invitation I visited the Masters and Wardens Club of St. Louis and St. Louis County in a meeting at Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 and also made an official visit to the brethren of Webster Groves Lodge. Dr. Arthur Mather, our Grand Secretary; our three D. D. G. M.'s, R. W. Brothers A. J. Michener, F. L. Magoon and Fay Fulkerson; our Senior Grand Warden, James W. Skelly, and our Grand Junior Steward, Karl M. Vetsburg accompanied me. The Masters and Wardens Club is doing a very valuable work in St. Louis as it furnishes the medium of contact between the officers of the various lodges, and does similar work out in the state with our District Associations, furnishing opportunity for holding fellowship and making friends throughout the various sections of the city. On January 29, 1934, I attended the annual dinner and election of officers of the Masters and Wardens Club of the 33rd District and 57th ~istrict at the American Annex Hotel, St. Louis, at which 186 were present. Through their Lodge visitation program these clubs are doing splendid work for the Fraternity in St. Louis. MASTERS AND WARDENS CLUB, KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

On April 18, 1934, I accepted an invitation to visit the Masters and Wardens Club of the 22nd District at Kansas City, Missouri, which was a very enjoyable occasion, revealing the fact that this organization is performing a similar duty to that at St. Louis, and great good is being accomplished. On June 16, 1934, I attended a joint dinner of the Masters and Wardens Clubs of St. Louis and Kansas City at the Tiger Hotel, Columbia, Missouri. Dean Robbins (M. S. D.) addressed the meeting


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

11

and his address was well received. The brethren are enthusiastic and stand ready to help any worthwhile Masonic activity. GRAND COUNCIL ROYAL AND SELECT MAsTERS OF MISSOURI

On April 23, 1934, at 10 :00 o'clock A.M., I attended the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Missouri convened in its 69th Annual Assembly, in the Masonic Temple, St. Louis, and was greeted with great cordiality. This body is composed of high type men with splendid ability, who are warmly attached to the principles of Freemasonry. GRAND CHAPTER ROYAL ARCH MASONS OF MISSOURI

On April 24, 1934, it was my pleasure to attend the Annual Convocation of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, assembled in the Masonic Temple at St. Louis, to which body I extended the hearty greetings of the Grand Lodge, after having been received with the warmest of courtesies. This body, as is well known, is composed of men of outstanding ability who are deeply devoted to the cause of Freemasonry. SCOTTISH RITE REUNION, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

On April 24, 1934, at 11 :00 o'clock A.M., I found myself the guest of the Scottish Rite Bodies of the Valley of St. Louis at their semiannual reunion and had the privilege of being their guest at the luncheon. St. Louis Scottish Rite Masons are noted for their zeal and hospitality and I sincerely appreciate the courtesies which they have extended me throughout the year. BEACON LODGE

No.3,

ST. LOUIS

On May 10, 1934, I accepted an invitation to Beacon Lodge No.3, to attend their eighty-fifth anniversary celebration at which Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 and Mizpah Lodge No. 639, as Lodges, were guests. All together about 400 brethren were present and a most enjoyable celebration followed. R. W. Brother Dr. F. L. Magoon, one of the D. D. G. M.'s of the 33rd District, is the efficient Secretary of Beacon No.3. SCOTTISH RITE REUNION, KANSAS CITY

On May 12, 1934, I had the privilege of attending the reunion banquet of the Scottish Rite Bodies at Kansas City and enjoyed my fellowship with those brethren. GRAND COMMANDERY OF MISSOURI, KNIGHTS TEMPLAR

On May 23, 1934, I had the pleasure of attending the Annual Conclave of the Grand Commandery of Missouri, Knights Templar, at Rolla, Missouri, extending the greetings of the Grand Lodge to the Sir


12

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Knights present and enjoyed the splendid fellowship of that distinguished group. GRAND LODGE OF NEBRASKA

On June 5, 1934, in company with Dr. Mather, the Grand Secretary, I visited the Grand Lodge of Nebraska assembled in its seventyseventh Annual Communication in the Masonic Temple at Omaha, Nebraska, where every courtesy was extended to us. The Nebraska brethren have a warm fraternal feeling to the Grand Lodge of Missouri and we are to be favored by the presence of their Grand Master and Grand Secretary at our present Communication. Our Nebraska brethren are to be congratulated upon their splendid activities and the good work which they are doing for Freemasonry at large. KNIGHTS TEMPLAR TRIENNIAl., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

On July 6 to 10, 1934, I attended the Knights Templar Triennial at San Francisco, which occasion will long be remembered by me, and at which the Grand Commandery K. T. of Missouri was well represented. R. E. Brother Wm. C. Gordon of Marshall, Past Grand Commander of Missouri, was appointed as Grand Warder of the Grand Encampment, thus affording me great satisfaction by reason of the fact that this appointment honors a much beloved townsman of my own, and the Commandery of which I have the privilege of being a member. I am sure that Masons throughout our Grand Jurisdiction will be greatly pleased with the preferment of our distinguished Brother. I was accompanied on this trip by Mrs. Barnhill and my kinsman, Dr. J. W. Fitch and Mrs. Fitch of Louisville, Kentucky. The conclave over, we visited Yosemite Valley, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Pasadena, Catalina Island, San路 Diego, Tijuana, returning home via the Grand Canyon of Arizona and Santa Fe-a vacation trip much enjoyed. DISTRICT MASONIC ASSOCIATIONS

For many years I have been convinced of the good that can be accomplished by Masonic District Associations. My own district, the 24th, has had such an organization for seventeen years. It meets quarterly, taking each Lodge in rotation. At its gatherings work is done, discussions are held, and a banquet brings the gathering to a close, each Brother paying for his own plate. The effect is to bring brethren together, thus allowing a larger contact and the fostering of deeper zeal for our Fraternity. With the success of our own district in mind and caused by the fact that similar associations were already operating, namely, districts 14, 19, 20, 23, 24, 36, 37, 59, I felt that othel路 districts might find it profitable to


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

13

follow suit and in my visitations throughout the state I have encouraged this movement and it is my pleasure to report that during this year District Masonic Associations have been organized in the following districts: 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 25, 27, 40, 44, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 55, and 56, making a total of 29 active associations, not counting the Masters and Wardens Clubs of St. Louis and Kansas City. I have not endeavored to carry this movement to the cities as the Masters and Wardens Clubs furnish the necessary activity there. These districts are now at work and furnish the hope that eventually other districts will follow in the same direction. It is my opinion that these district associations and Masters and Wardens Clubs should function in close cooperation with the D. D. G. M. that their activities at all times may be properly guided. Here follows an account of my visits to some of these District Associations: 24TH DISTRICT

On Thursday, October 26, 1933, in the afternoon beginning at 4 :00 o'clock, it was my pleasure to make an official visit to the brethren of my home district, the meeting was arranged in my honor and held in the Hall of my home Lodge, Trilumina No. 205, Marshall. There were representatives from the eight lodges in the district as well as brethren from several of the adjoining districts, Higginsville, Lexington, Carrollton, Sedalia and J effersoI). City. Special guests on this occasion were Dr. Mather, Dr. Samuel Thurman, Rev. Thomas B. Mather. The ladies of the Eastern Star served a splendid banquet at 6 :30 o'clock P.M:. to the Masons and their wives, after which all repaired to the Lodge room where the addresses were given. It was indeed a pleasure to me to attend this gathering among my home brethren among whom I have lived and labored for so many years. I was raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason in this Hall 30 years ago, mine being the first degree work conferred in the Hall after its dedication in May, 1903. Here I have spent many of the happiest days of my life. 14TH DISTRICT

It was my good fortune to be able to make an official visitation to the brethren of the 14th District on Thursday evening, October 23, 1933, in the Hall of Bloomington Lodge No. 102, Bevier, Missouri. In spite of the very inclement weather over one hundred Freemasons were in attendance at the dinner which was addressed by our Grand Orator, Thomas B. Mather of Jefferson City, after which the brethren repaired to the Hall and after a short address by the Grand Master, the


14

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Third Degree was conferred on a candidate from Macon, and at the request of our D. D. G. M. Brother Luther E. Wilhoit, I raised the candidate. The brethren in the 14th District are loyal and enthusiastic and look forward to increased activity in Freemasonry in their district. 23RD DISTRICT

It was my privilege and pleasure to路 make an official visit to my neighbors the good brethren of the 23rd District on Tuesday, October 31, 1933, at Lexington. One hundred and four brethren, many of them my personal friends, were present representing six Lodges. A male quartette sang several negro spirituals at the banquet table, which with the generous and repeated servings of old Lafayeete County country-cured ham made the occasion one long to be remembered. This is the home Lodge of our beloved Grand Junior Deacon, R. W. Brother Henry C. Chiles. Freemasonry in this district is very much alive, and this is one of the first districts to form an association. 18TH DISTRICT It was my pleasure to visit the brethren of the 18th District at Higbee No. 527, Higbee, Missouri, on the evening of November 15, 1933. A goodly number were present from Moberly, Clark and Higbee Lodge. Higbee Lodge appears to have been more or less inactive the past few years and it is my idea that a district association of the Lodges in the 18th District would be very beneficial to the Lodge at Higbee and in fact, to all the Lodges of that district. Brothers Shelby Wilson, William Y. Lockridge, George B. Walton and Rev. Brother M. B. Williams, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church, accompanied me on this visit. 36TH DISTRICT On invitation of R. W. Brother Jolly P. Hurtt, D. D. G. M. of the 36th District, I visited the brethren of that district at their quarterly meeting held at Chilhowee, on Tuesday evening, November 27, 1933. The brethren reported that this was the first time a Grand Master had visited Chilhowee Lodge No. 487. Something like 130 Masons from the various Lodges of the district were in attendance and a very enjoyable time was had. A fine fraternal spirit prevails among the brethren of the 36th District. 26TH DISTRICT In company with R. \V. Brother J. \V. Adams, and Brothers Shelby H. Wilson and W. M. Westbrook, I visited the brethren of the 26th District on Monday, December 4, 1933, at a Lodge of Instruction held


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

15

in the HaH of Ancient Landmark Lodge No. 356, of Harrisburg, Missouri. This is one of our old and small Lodges, which while not active, is composed of men of路 very substantial standing and abiding interest in our Fraternity. The Third Degree was exemplified under the instruction of Grand Lecturer R. W. Brother James R. McLachlan at the conclusion of which the ladies served a bounteous lunch, including a generous supply of old Boone County ham, which was certainly enjoyed by the brethren. 49TH DISTRICT

In company with R. W. Brothers Harold L. Reader and Dr. Thomas B. Mather, I attended a district meeting in the 49th District held in the Hall of Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Jackson, Missouri, on Thursday, December 14, 1933. Six Lodges of the district were represented with about 125 brethren in attendance. The ladies of the Eastern Star served a splendid banquet after which a program was held in the Masonic Hall. Brothers Reader and Mather gave inspiring messages which were listened to with great interest by the brethren. 24TH DISTRICT

In the Hall of Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall, Missouri, a district meeting and Lodge of Instruction was held on December 12, 1933, with R. W. Brother J. R. McLachlan in charge. 48TH DISTRICT

Had a conference with R. W. Brother J. Clyde Akers of the 48th District and officers of Farmington Lodge No. 132 on December 14, 1933. Matter of district association was discussed. They looked with favor on the proposition and later called a meeting which resulted in the organization of an active district. 50TH DISTRICT

On December 14, 1933, had a conference with Dr. G. A. Sample, D. D. G. M., suggesting a district organization which he will put up to the brethren in his district. Such conference was held and district organized. 52ND DISTRICT

December 15, 1933, had a conference and lunch with R. W. Brother Kipp C. Johnson and officers of POp'lar Bluff路 Lodge No. 209. Discussed District Association which they will consider. 26TH DISTRICT

January 16, 1934, attended district meeting of the 26th District at Columbia accompanied by three Past Masters from my home Lodge,


16

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

. R. W. Brothers W. C. Gordon, Immanuel Wittrup and W. M. Westbrook. Splendid attendance. In addition to talks by the Grand Master and the Marshall visitors, Rev. Frank C. Tucker, pastor of the Missouri Methodist Church at Columbia, and Past Grand Master Dr. John Pickard addressed the brethren. 24TH DISTRICT Visited the regular quarterly meeting of this district on January 25, 1934, in the Hall of Malta Lodge No. 402, Malta Bend, Missouri, and assisted in conferring the Third Degree. The meeting was addressed by Dr. I. N. Evrard of Missouri Valley路 College and Past Master of Trilumina Lodge. 20TH DISTRICT In company with Dr. 1. N. Evrard and Shelby H. Wilson, I visited the quarterly meeting of this district in the Hall of Wakanda Lodge No. 52. I participated in the conferring of the Third Degree. The meeting was attended by about 200 Masons from the various Lodges of this district. Dr. Evrard delivered a splendid address. This is one of our most active and well organized district associations. 50TH DISTRICT Visited the 50th District meeting at Dexter, Missouri, on February 6, 1934. Dr. G. A. Sample and other brethren made splendid arrangements for the meeting and there were 208 brethren present. Rev. T. B. Mather and Rev. H. L. Reader accompanied me on this visit and both of these brethren made inspiring addresses which were highly appreciated by all present. This is one of our recently organized districts. 4TH DISTRICT With Brother W. C. Gordon I visited the first meeting of the newly formed 4th District in the Hall of Trenton Lodge No. IlIon February 13, 1934. Over one hundred brethren were present from the various Lodges in this district. This is the home Lodge of our honored Past Grand Master and my personal friend, Ray V. Denslow, who is held in high esteem in the Fourth Masonic District, as elsewhere. 28TH DISTRICT On February 15, 1934, I attended an enthusiastic meeting of the 28th District at Montgomery City Lodge No. 246. Six Lodges were represented, a total of 125 Master Masons present. They will give consideration to organizing their district. 45TH DISTRICT On February 28, 1934, I visited a meeting at Springfield, Missouri, in Hall of Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, with Solomon Lodge No.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

17

271, United Lodge No.5, and eight of the other Lodges of the district participating. The First Degree was conferred in the afternoon, and a banquet at 6 :30 o'clock P.M. was followed by a George Washington birthday anniversary program. Four hundred and eight Master Masons were present including M. W. Brothers Arch A. Johnson and Bert S. Lee, Past Grand Masters, and R. W. Brother Elwyn S. Woods. The program over, the brethren repaired to the Hall where the Third Degree was conferred by a select team of Past Masters. 3RD DISTRICT March 7, 1934, attended 3rd District meeting at Milan at which officers were elected for a permanent organization. Six Lodges were represented with a total attendance of 78. Brother R. N. Wilson, son of our late beloved David M. Wilson, P. G. M., was elected president of the association. 9TH DISTRICT Attended this meeting on March 8, 1934. About 200 were present including P. G. M. Orestes Mitchell, D. G. M. Du Val Smith, Grand Chaplain Emmet L. Robison, and Grand Pursuivant G. C. Sparks. A fine fraternal spirit appears to prevail among the brethren at St. Joseph. 5TH DISTRICT March 8,1934, I attended this district meeting at Bethany, Missouri, which was organized under the leadership of R. W. Brother Hendrix Newman, who is doing splendid work there. An active association is now under way and the brethren are well pleased with it. 6TH DISTRICT March 8, 1934, Albany and King City, Missouri. Conferences with officers of this district in regard to organizing the Lodges of the district into an association. Later organized. 59TH DISTRICT Attended the meeting of this district on March 21, 1934, at Mt. Washington Lodge Hall. Two hundred present including 40 visitors from Wyandotte Lodge No.3, of Kansas City, Kansas, who conferred the second section of the Third Degree according to Kansas Ritual. R. W. Brother N. D. Jackson is doing splendid work for the Fraternity in Jackson County. 35TH DISTRICT March 27, 1934, attended Lodge of Instruction with J. R. McLachlan in charge at Butler, Missouri.


18

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

56TH DISTRICT March 28, 1934, attended a district meeting at Neosho, at which all Lodges were represented. The brethren here are much pleased with their new district organization, under the splendid leadership of Judge W. A. Phipps, D. D. G. M. 44TH DISTRICT Attended this district meeting on March 29, 1934. Attendance 350. R. W. Brother Ray Bond is efficiently leading the Masonic activities at Joplin, Missouri. 40TH DISTRICT April 4, 1934, attended first meeting of this newly organized district at Festus, Missouri, under the leadership of R. W. Brother H. H. Balsiger. I was accompanied by our Grand Secretary, and R. W. Brothers James W. Skelly, A. J. Michener, and Eugene J. Altheimer. 41ST DISTRICT Attended this meeting on April 6, 1934, at Bolivar, Missouri. Reports show that R. W. Brother Morris E. Ewing is doing good work in this district. I was accompanied by Brothers Jesse C. Patterson and Stanley Mac Neese of Marshall, who also addressed the brethren. 17TH DISTRICT Organized this district association on April 10, 1934, at Holliday Lodge No. 660. PracticaHy 60 present. R. W. Brother Hicks is much interested in this work. 15TH DISTRICT April11, 1934, attended this meeting at Hannibal, Missouri, in Hall of St. John's Lodge. R. W. Brother Thomas B. Mather gave an inspiring address. Two hundred and fifty present. M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger acted as Tiler. 5TH DISTRICT Assisted in organization of district association at Bethany, Missouri. All lodges but one represented. Seventy-five present. 19TH DISTRICT Attended this meeting on April 19, 1934, at Hall of Eureka Lodge No. 73, at Brunswick, Missouri. One of our oldest organized districts. 20TH DISTRICT April 20, 1934, attended regular meeting of this district held at Bogard, Missouri, in company with R. W. Brother Thomas B. Mather, who delivered a splendid address.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

19

36TH DISTRICT April 27, 1934, attended this meeting in Hall of Windsor Lodge No. 29. A very active and successful organization. 25TH DISTRICT On April 30, 1934, visited Fayette Lodge No. 47 and assisted in organization of the Cooper-Howard District Association. Good prospects. 24TH DISTRICT Attended district meeting in Hall of Oriental Lodge No. 518 at Blackburn, Missouri, on May 2, 1934, at which Dr. J. H. Scarborough of Warrensburg made an address. He told of his visit to the Lodge at Havana, Cuba. Attended regular meeting May 9, 1934, in Hall of Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia, Missouri. Participated in conferring Third Degree. I attended a district meeting in the Hall of Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377, King City, and helped organize district association. Permanent officers were elected and the association started. Dr. J. A. Ringold is one of the moving spirits among the brethren there and I can testify that his good wife knows how to fry chicken and ham. 27TH DISTRICT June 15, 1934, attended regular meeting held in Hall of Fulton Lodge No. 48, to 路consider district organization. 13TH DISTRICT With Brother G. H. Fuller, I attended the first meeting of this district on June 21, at Marceline, Missouri. The brethren appear enthusiastic about their new 路organization and I bespeak good work in this district. 27TH DISTRICT Helped to organize this district association at Mexico, Missouri, on June 26, 1934. R. W. Brother Louis Graue had made splendid arrangements. Officers were elected and th~ association started on its career. 24TH DISTRICT Attended district meeting August 9, 1934, at Ruff Hotel at Marshall, Missouri. Brother William C. Gordon and the Grand Master reported their recent trip to California where they attended the Knights Templar Grand Conclave. 1ST DISTRICT On September 27, 1934, accompanied by R. W. Brother J. W. Adams, I attended the district meeting at Lancaster, Missouri, in Hall


20

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

of Lodge of Love No. 259. This meeting was in honor of the late Edward Higbee, Past Grand Master, and was well attended. R. W. Brother WiHis J. Bray, our D. D. G. M. for the 2nd District, and present G. H. P. of Royal Arch Masonry, made the address which was inspiring and well received. OTHER VISITATIONS FRATERNAL LODGE NO. 363 Saturday, October 7, I visited Fraternal Lodge No. 363, Robertsville, Missouri, at which meeting a large number of brethren from Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 were in attendance and also R. W. Brothers F. G. Fulkerson and L. W. Mottert. CAMBRIDGE LODGE NO.

63

Attended stated communication on December 19, 1933, and had the pleasure of conferring the Third Degree on my new son-in-law, Brother Harry B. Bolte. Most of the Lodges in the county were represented. 1.HSSOURI LODGE NO.

1

Official visit January 4, 1934, to Missouri Lodge No.1, meeting in the Masonic Tempie, St. Louis. Mizpah Lodge No. 639, and Polar Star Lodge No. 79 made a fraternal visit to Missouri Lodge No. 1 at this time. The early history of No. 1 is interesting and should be read by all our brethren. WAVERLY LODGE NO. 61 Accompanied by officers of Trilumina Lodge No. 205, I attended the stated communication of Waverly Lodge No. 61, on January 9, 1934. The officers of said Lodge announced that after searching through the records they were convinced that this was the first time a Grand Master ever visited their Lodge. SCOTTISH RITE CLUB

On February 7, 1934, I was the guest of Brother J. W. Skelly at the weekly dinner of the Scottish Rite Club at the American Annex Hotel. The guest speaker was Walter W. Head of St. Louis. LODGE OF INSTRUCTION

On March 13, 1934, I attended the Lodge of Instruction in charge of Brother McLachlan, 34th District in Cass Lodge No. 147, HarrisonviHe, Missouri. I was accompanied by Brother Harry B. Bolte of Slater, Missouri. MIAMI LODGE NO. 85 I visited Miami Lodge No. 85 March 24, 1934, and assisted in conferring the Third Degree. This visitation was accompanied by some


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

21

sentiment, for I was born in Miami. It was there my parents started when they came out from Kentucky, and raised a large family. I recall an incident my mother told me happened in Miami many years ago. She was taking her large tribe of children to Sunday School and passing a man on the street he said to her, "Mrs. Barnhill, are those your children, or is it a picnic ,,, My mother replied, "They are my children, and it's no picnic." LODGE OF INSTRUCTION, 33RD DISTRICT On April. 23, I attended the Lodge of Instruction together with R. W. Brother A. J. Michener of St. Louis at the Masonic Temple, St. Louis. R. W. Brother Charles Duggan was in charge of the instruction. Charley is very popular with the brethren of St. Louis. OLIVE BRANCH LODGE NO. 576 On April 24, 1934, I attended a meeting of Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, this being the only daylight Lodge in St. Louis. A splendid musical program was rendered on this occasion. In company with Dr. Arthur Mather, A. J. Michener, Anthony F. Ittner and Karl Vetsburg, I visited three St. Louis Lodges as follows: At 8 :00 o'clock P.M., George Washington No.9; at 9 :00 o'clock P.M., Rose Hill No. 550, Brothers R. R. Kreeger and E. E. Morris being present, and at 10 :00 o'clock P.M., Mizpah Lodge No. 639. ARROW ROCK LODGE NO. 55 I attended this meeting on April 26, 1934, their stated communication, and presented the Lodge with a picture of Brother Anthony O'Sullivan, who was made a Mason in this Lodge in 1846. OLIVET COMMANDERY NO. 53 On May 1, 1934, in company with Brother William C. Gordon, I attended the forty-fifth anniversary of Olivet Commandery Knights Templar at Boonville, Missouri. The meeting was in honor of oldtime members, and was presided over by Roy D. Williams, son of W. M. Williams, Past Grand Master. MONETT LODGE NO. 129 Visited Monett Lodge on June 1, 1934, in company with Brother W. N. Marbutt and had a good meeting. SAVANNAH LODGE NO. 71 June 4,1934, at 11 :00 o'clock A.M., I visited Savannah Lodge No. 71, the home Lodge of R. W. Brother Grover C. Sparks, and at 3 :00 o'clock P.M., I visited Northwest Lodge No. 358, at Tarkio, Missouri.


22

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

LODGE OF INSTRUCTION Attended Lodge of Instruction of the 33rd District on January 30, 1934. Large attendance and an inspiring musical program was rendered by the orchestra of Olive Branch Lodge. GRANITE LODGE NO. 272 On January 17, 1934, attended Lodge of Instruction under R. W. Brother J. R. McLachlan. INSTALLATIONS TRILUMINA LODGE NO. 205 On December 27, 1933, I had the honor to install the officers of the eight Lodges of my home district, the 24th, in the Hall of Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall, Missouri. After the installation an unusual address was given by Brother Milton B. Williams, on the subject of "Stewards of Mysteries." WESTPORT LODGE NO. 340 On January 6, 1934, on invitation of the Master-elect J. Earl Tobler, I installed the officers of Westport Lodge No. 340. There was a splendid attendance and at the conclusion of the installation splendid addresses were made by Judge Darius A. Brown and Charles T. Kornbrodt. CONCORDIA LODGE NO. 464 On Monday, January 8, 1934, I installed the officers of Concordia Lodge No. 464. One notable factor of the installation was that every officer-elect wa~ present and installed. While this is a small lodge and operating under adverse conditions, they have a splendid group in charge for the coming year and I predict better days for them. CALIFORNIA LODGE NO. 183 On January 12, 1934, on invitation I installed the officers of California Lodge No. 183. A rainy and inclement night did not visibly affect the attendance and a splendid group of young officers were installed. MOON LODGES During the year I have been in correspondence with those Lodges who still work "By the Moon," with a view to having them alter their By-Laws so as to provide for holding their meetings on some regular date in order that the brethren may not have to refer to an almanac to find out when their Lodge meets. I am pleased to report that the following Lodges have changed their By-Laws fixing their regular meetings to stated dates rather than by


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

23

the moon: Paulville, Havana, Eolia, Pike, Schell City, Rising Sun, Western Star, Mosaic, Barnett, Florida, Modern, Pleasant, Bolivar, Mystic Tie and Sampson. I am also pleased to report that the following Lodges have complied with the request to elect their officers by the calendar year: Somerset, Lorraine, Bethel, McGee, Westville, Hale, Bosworth, DeWitt, Ancient Craft, Havana, Frankford, Cypress, Kirksville, Adair, Gallatin, Signal, Montgomery, Glensted, Pleasant, Warrenton, Wentzville. The Grand Master appreciates the cooperation of these Lodges in complying with his suggestions. DEDICATIONS WEST PLAINS, MISSOURI At the request of the brethren of Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327, I dedicated the new Masonic Temple at that place on Friday, December 15, 1933, assisted by R. W. Brother Harold L. Reader and Thomas B. Mather. This was a delightful occasion. The new Temple was dedicated free from debt and the brethren at West Plains are to be congratulated on their splendid enterprise in providing such a beautiful Temple for the Masonic bodies of West Plains and especially upon the fact that it has been built and paid for. It was my pleasant lot to lay the cornerstone of this structure in August, 1933, and it was therefore a real pleasure to return and dedicate the Temple. LOCK SPRINGS LODGE NO. 488 On the evening of February 27, 1934, I dedicated the New Hall of Lock Springs Lodge No. 488. After the dedication there was held in the New Hall a meeting of the 10th District Masonic Association. There were 111 brethren present and we had a very enthusiastic meeting. This was the third regular meeting of the newly formed 10th District Association. R. W. Brother Thomas D. Williams has done splendid work in his district. OLD MASONIC COLLEGE MEMORIAL On May 18, 1934, I dedicated the replica quarter scale of the original building of the Masonic College of Missouri at Lexington, and the Memorial Columns erected at the four corners of the original site of that building, the replica occupying the middle of the site. This event took place on the eighty-seventh anniversary of the laying of the original cornerstone of the building in 1847. Earlier in the year I had been notified that this replica was being erected as part of the Civil Works Administration program in Lafayette County by R. W. Brother Henry C. Chiles, who was Chairman of the C. W. A. for that county, and I had authorized the marking of


24

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

the site by a suitable bronze memorial tablet in the name of the Grand Lodge, pursuant to the resolution adopted by the Grand Lodge in 1932 at the suggestion of M. W. Brother Denslow. The Memorial at the northeast corner, consisting of three steps of stone surrounded by a brick column, capped with stone, was erected by Lexington Lodge No. 149 and on its east side the Grand Lodge Memorial Tablet was placed; on the north side is another memorial tablet placed by Lexington Lodge. The two tablets fully commemorate the Masonic College of Missouri. The other Memorial Columns were erected by the City of Lexington, which had cooperated with the C. W. A. as the old College Campus is now a City Park. The one at the northwest corner commemorates the Battle of Lexington, September 12 to 20, 1861; the one at the southwest corner the Central College for Women, and the one at the southeast corner the Presidents and former students of the Masonic College of Missouri. Appropriate memorial tablets and pictures pro'vided by the city, ornament these columns. Following a luncheon in my honor, I opened a specific Grand Lodge in the Hall of Lexington Lodge No. 149 and the Masons in attendance marched in a body to the oid College Campus. The dedication program was so arranged that the various addresses unfolded the history of the Masonic College of Missouri, the Battle of Lexington, of the Central College for Women and of the plan for the erection of the replica, etc. The occasion was a most interesting one and the Grand Lodge is to be congratulated upon the fact that all of the important and historic activities and events so intimately connected with the 6.47 acres of ground which were the campus of its College have been suitably memorialized. It is worth the while of any Freemason ~o make the trip to Lexington and see these things for himself. Dr. Arthur Mather, and Dr. Z. M. Williams were in attendance and took their places on the dedication program. DISPENSATIONS

During the year I have had applications for a number of dispensations, most of which were granted, and a list of which will be found in the Grand Secretary's Statistical Report. DISPENSATIONS REFUSED

1. A Lodge reports that a regular meeting of said Lodge, a petition for the Degrees was reported on favorably by the Committee and that one blackball appeared in the first ballot taken, whereupon a second ballot was ordered ~nd a blackball again appeared. The W. M. of said Lodge makes statement that in view of the splendid character of the applicant, the brethren believe a mistake was made, undoubtedly on account of the poor light in the room, and asks for dispensation for the


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

25

TABLET PLACED BY THE GRAND LODGE-REPLICA OF OLD MASONIC COLLEGE, LEXINGTON, MO., MAY 18,1934

PICTURE qF THE REPLICA OF THE OLD MASONIC COLLEGE, LEXINGTON, MO.


26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

privilege of voting on said petition again at the next regular meeting. It is my decision that the matter should be allowed to rest for the required time when a new petition can be presented and go through the proper routine, for I do not feel that I am justified in granting a dispensation and waiving of our Law after a blackball appeared in the second ballot. 2. A Lodge asked for dispensation that they might confer the Masonic Degrees on a young man who has served in the United States Marine Corps and is now ready for a third enlistment. They sought to have the Degrees conferred in less time than permitted by the Law. They also wished a waiver of the time the petition should layover from its presentation to the election or rejection of the petition. I refused the dispensation and quoted to them Section 118 of our By-Laws which reads as follows: A candidate shall not receive more than one Degree at the same communication, nor shall he be advanced in less than four weeks from the time the preceding Degree was conferred. The Grand Master has no authority by dispensation under any circumstances to render nugatory the requirement that a candidate shall not be advanced in less than four weeks from the time the preceding Degree was conferred.

3. A Lodge asked for a dispensation to hold its stated communication in a Hall other than their Lodge room in order to have room to take care of visitors and members to hear an address, as their Lodge room was too small to accommodate the audience. The Lodge asked the question whether or not this could be done. Answer. No. Stated Communications must be held in the Masonic Hall, and the Grand Master has no power by dispensation to provide otherwise. 4. The Secretary of a Lodge asked for dispensation to confer the Third Degree on July 10, 1934, ona F. C. who received his Second Degree on June 22, 1934. Dispensation refused for reason that four weeks would not have elapsed between the conferring of the Degrees. 5. A Lodge asked for dispensation to lay a cornerstone of a Church • on a Sunday. Dispensation refused, but suggested that the date be changed to a day other than Sunday, and the dispensation would be granted. COMMISSIONS

Owing to the lamented death of R. W. Brother James F. Blair, D. D. G. M., of the 34th Masonic District, I instructed our Grand Secretary to issue a Commission to Brother William C. Deacon, of HarrisonviHe, Missouri, as his successor. Vacancies having occurred among the Grand Representatives, I have nominated the following for Commissions: Major Walter S. MacAaron, to Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan; Brother Thomas D. Wil-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

27

liams, to Grand Lodge of Alabama; Brother Leo H. Johnson, to Grand Lodge of Tenness~e. COMMITTEE ApPOINTMENTS

There being a vacancy on the Jurisprudence Committee of the Grand Lodge, I appointed Leo H. Johnson of Neosho on this Committee, relieving him of the chairmanship of the Committee on D. D. G. M.'s Report. I placed Brother Frederick M. Smith as Chairman of the latter Committee. I also appointed Dudley D. Thomas, Jr., as Chairman of the Committee on Unfinished Business which position was left vacant because of Brother Smith's being placed as Chairman of the Committee on D. D. G. M.'s Report. Owing to the passing of M. W. Brother Dr. William A. Clark, I appointed P. G. M. Byrne E. Bigger as a member of the Welfare Committee. I also appointed a Committee on the Revision of the By-Laws as follows: Henry C. Chiles, Chairman, Ray V. Denslow and Byrne E. Bigger. Being unable to accept an invitation to attend the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, February 21, 22, 1934, I appointed R. . .N . Brother T. H. Reynolds as my representative. Brother Reynolds accepted this appointment and attended to this duty to my entire satisfaction. DR.

L. W.

HUNT, GREAT-GRANDSON OF DANIEL BOONE

On the evening of the dedication of the Masonic Temple at West Plains, December 15, 1933, I had the pleasure of meeting Brother Oscar E. Ellis, P. M. of Salem Lodge No. 418, Arkansas, and Present Grand King of the Grand Chapter, R. A. M. of Arkansas, who with others had driven from his home at Salem, Arkansas, to attend the dedication ceremonies. Shortly after my return home, I received a letter from Brother Ellis advising me that Dr. L. W. Hunt, aged 97 years and blind, a great-grandson of Daniel Boone, was a resident of Salem, Arkansas, having lived in Fulton County, Arkansas, over 40 years. He advised that Dr. Hunt formerly lived in Missouri and many years ago secured a dimit from Daggett Lodge for the purpose of joining a Lodge in Fulton County, Arkansas, but before he had opportunity of doing so, his residence burned and the dimit was destroyed. Dr. Hunt became affiicted, and nothing was done. Brother Ellis advised that Dr. Hunt was now desirous and so were the members of Salem Lodge No. 418, that a duplicate "dimit be secured, so that Dr. Hunt might affiliate with Salem Lodge and later have a Masonic funeral when he passed away, which would probably be in the near future.


28

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

I wrote to Brother W. A. Bezold, Secretary of Daggett Lodge No. 492, at McKittrick, Missouri, who promptly sent me a duplicate dimit in favor of Dr. L. W. Hunt, dated September 17, 1910, and requested that when Dr. Hunt passed away that they be notified, as some of their old members knew him. I forwarded the dimit to Brother Ellis, who wrote a letter of thanks for our service in this connection and advised that he would send a telegram to Daggett Lodge when Dr. Hunt passed away. True to his promise, Brother Ellis of Arkansas notified me on April 16,1934, that Dr. Hunt passed away on the 15th of April, 1934, and that Daggett Lodge No. 492 had also been notified. DECISIONS

No.1. Statement: The Worshipful Master of one of our Lodges writes for a dispensation to hold a stated communication of the Lodge in the I. O. O. F. Hall in order that they might have more room for the convenience of the brethren to hear a prominent Mason speak. Answer: Stated communications must be held in the Masonic Hall. Would suggest that you change the date of your meeting to another evening than that of your stated communication, then a dispensation could be granted. No.2. Statement: A committee of three of one of our Lodges asked the question whether or not, as a Lodge, they might send a telegram to their Congressman and Senator urging support of a certain bill. Answer: The individuals of the Lodge may send such telegram but not as a Lodge. No.3. Statement: A Lodge asked whether it could sub-rent a dining room adjoining their Lodge room by double doors, for the purpose of conducting a dancing class. Answer: I assume that this dining room is not the Masonic Hall itself and is not an anteroom of the Masonic Hall, within the meaning of the By-Laws, Sections 50 and 51, and that it is similar to dining halls to be found in the Masonic Temples in larger cities. Such dining halls under previous decisions may be used for card parties and dances by the members and their families. Proceedings 1924, pp. 36-37. Decision 10, approved on page 158. I am inclined to the opinion that the safe thing for a Lodge to do is to avoid allowing outside interests the use of its dining room for any purpose which is not clearly beneficient, educational, religious, or charitable. I have doubts if a dancing class falls within that category. No.4. Statement: A Lodge advised that one of their members had been suspended for nonpayment of dues, and afterwards wrote the Lodge a letter requesting that his dues be remitted and that he be placed in good standing. The Lodge asked whether or not this could be done legally.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

29

Answer : Yes. See Section 159 on Remission of Dues. "A Lodge may remit the dues of a Mason suspended for the nonpayment thereof, and such remission shall have the same effect as payment thereof would have, as provided in Section 161." This remission must occur within one year. No.5. Statement: The W. M. of one of our Lodges advised that at one of their regular communications ballot was bad upon a certain petition. The applicant was declared rejected by reason of the fact that there were two adverse ballots, whereupon an objection was made that the ballot was not legal on the grounds that certain brethren came into the Hall and voted after the Master had announced the names of the petitioners on which ballot was to be taken. He asked for a ruling on this matter. Answer: Section 131 provides that all members present must vote on a petition (except members who have not passed the proficiency examination). Section 132 provides that the ballot must be free and secret. In line with these two sections it seems to me that the brethren coming into the Lodge after the announcement of the ballot, were clearly entitled to vote (unless otherwise disqualified by reason of not having passed the proficiency examination). It would have been in order for the W.M. to have reannounced the names of the petitioners for ~he benefit of those who came in after the first announcement. But the fact he did not do so, does not, in my opinion, invalidate the ballot. No.6. Statement: The Secretary of one of our Lodges asked the question, "How long shall a petition for reinstatement layover before being acted upon ," Answer: It is my opinion a petition for reinstatement should be presented at a stated meeting at which time it should be referred to a committee of investigation who should report by the next stated meeting at which time vote may be taken. No.7. Statement: The W. M. of a Lodge asks if they may receive the petitions of two young men who recently moved from Mt. Vernon to Greenfield without waiting the six months' period and wish to accomplish this by obtaining a waiver of jurisdiction from Mt. Vernon Lodge. Answer: This cannot be done. By a decision Proceedings 1905, page 21, rendered under Section 121, this may not be done. "The petitioner must live within the jurisdiction of the Lodge six months before his petition can be received." Section 187 in reference to waivers. Where the applicant has stayed within the jurisdiction of the first Lodge, is not here involved. No.8. Statement: A Past Master of the Lodge at Kearney, Missouri, submits this question: We received a petition for initiation from a person who has been working and living in Kansas City for the last one and one-half or perhaps two years (single). His father


30

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

lives here and his brother belongs to this Lodge. He comes home once about every two months for a visit. In his petition, in answer to the question, "Where have you resided the past six months," the answer was "Kearney." Should it be Kearney, or should it be Kan路 sas City~ Answer: If these statements are literally true, in my opinion Kearney Lodge No. 311 does not have jurisdiction. I suggest it be ascertained where the party voted, or registered for voting during the past year and a half, as I believe that might solve the question of legal residence. The question of residence is very largely one of intent. No.9. Statement: A Lodge advises that on the night of the regular election of officers, Brother A was elected W. M. and Brother B was elected S. W. The Secretary of the Lodge then reported that Brother A and Brother B had not yet paid their 1933 dues. They ask the question if these two -brethren are eligible for the offices to which they have been elected. Answer: Yes. I find nothing ln the By-Laws to the effect that failure to pay dues for current year makes a brother ineligible for the office of W. M. or S. W., and therefore, the election which was held at the time specified in the By-Laws of the Lodge which resulted in favor of Brother A for W. M. and Brother B for S. W. is legal and effective. No. 10. Statement: The question comes from the Secretary of one of our Lodges advising that they have brethren who have been suspended for nonpayment of dues who are continuing to pay to the Royal Arch and Scottish Rite and are in good standing in both of these bodies and asking the question what should be done in the matter. Answer: I do not find anything in the By-Laws requiring Secretaries of Blue Lodges to report suspensions to other bodies. However, it is my understanding that it is the rule in the other bodies that suspension in the Blue Lodge for nonpayment of dues, or for any other cause, will sever the connection in such bodies in the Chapter, and in fact all other bodies above the Blue Lodge. While the Secretary is not required to do so, it seems to me it would be perfectly proper if he would notify the Secretary of the Royal Arch and Scottish Rite that the brethren have been suspended in the Blue Lodge for they are certainly sailing under false colors otherwise. No. 11. Statement: A Lodge Secretary makes the statement that a member paid his dues for the year 1933 during April and died in May, a few weeks after paying his dues, and asks the question should the unearned dues be returned to the family of the deceased brother. Ans1ver: No. Annual dues are due and payable annually in advance. The reason we have dues on this annual basis is to make


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

31

ample provision for the Lodge expenses and to pay the Grand Lodge per capita, and meet other requirements of the Lodge. In 1909 Proceedings,p. 26, it was decided that when a brother dimitted that he was not entitled to any refund of unearned dues. It seems to me that the case in this letter is similar and unearned dues need not be refunded. No. 12. Statement: A member of one of our Missouri Lodges now resides in another state. He makes a statement that he was elected W. M. of his Lodge (in Missouri) and was installed December 26, 1932, and that on January 1, 1933, he moved out of the state and has lived there since. After two months' residence in another state he resigned as W. M. and a successor was duly elected and installed. His inquiry is whether or not he now ranks as a Past Master. Answer: Any officer of Lodge may resign. Section 100. Where an officer of a Lodge resigns, etc. "such office ipso facto becomes vacant." Section 93, "One who has been elected and installed as W. M. of his Lodge is, at the conclusion of the term for which he was elected, entitled to the rank of P. M." Section 98. The language of Section 92 of the revision of 1908 is identical with this quotation. Decision No. 13, Proceedings 1916, p.16, and approved at page 104, held that where a W. M. moved out of the state to reside and the S. W. was elected as W. M., that the former would rank as P. M. at the conclusion of the term for which he was elected. This decision does not seem ever to have been overruled, and if it is followed in this case, the brother will be a P. M. No. 13. Statement: The W. M. of one of our Lodges advises that on April 18, 1933, "A" petitioned Lodge "B" in this state for membership by initiation while he lived in the jurisdiction of another Lodge "C." Lodge "B" asked Lodge "c" for waiver of jurisdiction but Lodge "c" did not answer the letter, but proceeded to get "A" to petition Lodge "c" and did confer the First Degree on him in due course. The W. M. makes the further statement that the D. D. G. M. asked Lodge "c" not to confer any further degrees on the petitioner until this matter was settled. Answer: It is my opinion that the failure of Lodge "c" to answer the request of Lodge "B" was equivalent to refusal to waive jurisdjt>tion. Mr. "A," living in the jurisdiction of Lodge "C," that Lodgt. had a perfect right to receive his petition and confer the degrees on him. Lodge "B" should have returned the petition and check to the petitioner with the information that Lodge "B" had no jurisdiction over him. If the petition and the check have not been returned by this time, it should be done and the conferring of the degrees on the petitioner should proceed in Lodge "C." No. 14. Statement: After a petitioner is rejected and it is the


32

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

opinion of the officers of the Lodge that it was because of a purely personal reason, can dispensation be granted for another ballot on the petitioner 'I Answer: I do not consider rejection for personal reasons sufficient cause for dispensation. No. 15. Statement: What would be the standing of a member of a Missouri Lodge who now or hereafter manufactures, handles or sells, or serves as a vocation, intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes according to the law of the State of Missouri 'I Ans~ver: He is subject to our laws, Sections 198 and 199. No. 16. Statement: What would be the standing of a member who manufactures or sells beer, containing in excess of 3.2 per cent of alcohol by weight' Answer: The term "intoxicating liquor" as used in the present law of the State of Missouri, includes alcohol for beverage purposes, alcoholic, spirituous, vinous, fermented, malt, or other liquors, or combinations of liquors, a part of which is spirituous, vinous or fermented, and all preparations or mixtures for beverage purposes, containing in excess of 3.2 per cent of alcohol by weight. Beer containing in excess of 3.2 per cent of alcohol by weight is thus included in the liquors embraced in the term "intoxicating liquors" as that term is used in the Missouri law. A member engaged in the manufacture or sale of same would be subject to our M~onic Law. No. 17. Statement: A member in good standing of a Missouri Masonic Lodge now engages in the sale of intoxicating liquor and makes application in writing, or in person, at a stated meeting for a dimit. Can the dimit be granted' Ans'wer: If the dues of the member are fully paid and he is not under charges or indebted in an official capacity to the Lodge his application shall, unless objections are made, be immediately granted unless he shall have been made a Master Mason after the enactment of Section 129 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws and shall have failed or refused to stand the examination required by said Section. No such objection shall he entertained unless the objecting brother shall prefer charges against the applicant for the dimit, or give notice that he will do so at the next stated meeting, at which time if no charges are preferred, the dimit shall be granted. (See Section 165 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws.) No. 18. There has been referred to me by the Building Supervisory Board a question of doubt as to their authority to act. It is my opinion that Section 72th, adopted by the Grand Lodge in 1929, and Section 56, as amended in 1930, should be liberally construed to put power and authority in the Building Supervisory Board. Its decisions as to the methods of financing, holding title by a corporation or otherwise, joint efforts with other bodies and the nature of the


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

33

other bodies should be governed by the particular circumstances and limited only by the fact that adequate finances must be provided so that the reputation of the Fraternity will not be impaired by default and by the provisions of Section 50 of our By-Laws in reference to joint occupancy. GRANDVIEW-NORTHEAST CASE

A case involving infringement of jurisdiction arose early in my administration, between Grandview Lodge No. 618 and Northeast Lodge No. 643, of Kansas City, Missouri. An applicant petitioned Northeast Lodge March 2, 1933, for the Degrees, was elected April 6, initiated April 20, and passed May 18. He gave on his petition his address as 7029 Montgall, Kansas City, Missouri. Investigation developed the fact that the applicant registered in the Grandview precinct on October 15, 1932, and stated at that time that he had lived in that precinct two years. Registration books also show that he voted in that precinct in the November election in 1932. It seems to me that this should be conclusive as to his residence, and it is my opinion that Northeast Lodge infringed the jurisdiction of Grandview Lodge in receiving this petition. In order to settle the matter in a fair and amicable way, I recommended that Grandview Lodge accept $50.00, being the amount of the fee of $61.00 paid by the brother to Northeast Lodge less the $11.00 sent to the Grand Lodge. Northeast Lodge settled on that basis, sending to me their check for $50.00 which I endorsed in favor of Grandview Lodge. This should close the incident. I recommended that the Lodges investigate carefully the matter of residence of a petitioner so that these jurisdictional troubles may be avoided. TRIALS

Hogle's Creek Lodge No. 279 vs. W. Brother L. Frank Stevens. On April 7, 1934, charges were filed by three members of Hogle's Creek Lodge against the Master of said Lodge, W. B. L. Frank Stevens, charging un-Masonic conduct. I removed W. Brother L. F. Stevens from the office of W. M. at once and have passed the charges up to the Appeals and Grievances Committee of the Grand Lodge for action, our Masonic Laws providing that charges against a Master of a Lodge shall come before the Grand Lodge and not before the Lodge of which the brother is Master. Carroll Lodge No. 249 vs. W. Emmitt Nash. The J. W. of Carroll Lodge No. 249 preferred charges against Brother W. E. Nash, member of said Lodge, for un-Masonic conduct.

•


34

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Both the Lodge and accused requested a trial by commission. I appointed the following commission: Henry C. Chiles, chairman, B. M. Little and Lester W. Nyeo The trial was held Tuesday, December 12, 1933, and was concluded at 2 :00 o'clock on December 13, 1933. The commission found the accused guilty on charges 1, 3, and 4, and not guilty on charge 2, and affixed the punishment at expulsion. The chairman of the commission instructed the Secretary of the Lodge to read the report of the commission at the next stated communication of the Lodge and spread same upon the minutes as provided by Section 256. This case has been appealed by the accused to the Grand Lodge.

Shekinah Lodge No. 256 vs. Vincent Salvo and Joseph Houghton. On December 26, 1933, charges were filed separately in Shekinah Lodge at Festus, Missouri, by Brother Lloyd Bradshaw, J. W. of that Lodge, against Brothers Vincent Salvo and Joseph Houghton for unMasonic conduct, and the Lodge requested trials by commission. I appointed the following commission to try these two cases: James A. Kinder, chairman, J. Clyde Akers and Allen L. Oliver. The trials were held in the Hall of Shekinah Lodge No. 256 on January 18, 1934, which resulted as follows: In the case vs. Vincent Salvo, the accused was found guilty but in view of extenuating circumstances the penalty was fixed at six months' suspension from January 18, 1934. In the case vs. Joseph Houghton, the accused was found guilty and the penalty fixed at expulsion. _ Modern Lodge No. 144 vs. Homer B. Wann. On November 23, 1933, I received a copy of charges in the above case, which had been filed in the Lodge on November 11, with request that I appoint a trial commission to handle the case. The accused also requested trial by commission. I appointed the following committee: Leo H. Johnson, chairman, Ernest L. Harrison and Thornton Jennings. The trial date was first set for December 18, but at the request of Brother A. A. Johnson, attorney for the accused, the trial was postponed to January 10, 1934, at which time it was held in the Hall of Modern Lodge No. 144. The trial resulted in the verdict of "not guilty on charges 1 and 3, and guilty on charge 2, and punishment fixed at suspension for a period of one year from January 10, 1934." The verdict was unanimous. The Secretary of Modern Lodge reports that both the Lodge and friends of the accused are satisfied with the verdict, and that he believes peace and harmony will prevail. Hermon Lodge No. 187 vs. I. H. Todd. This case was tried in the Hall of the above Lodge on August 17, 1933, and resulted in favor of the accused. Judge Thad B. Landon,


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

35

the then Grand Master, appealed the case to the Appeals and Grievances Committee of the Grand Lodge but there was not sufficient time for the case to be heard at the last session of the Grand Lodge. r have had all papers in this case forwarded to the Appeals and Grievance Committee with instructions that it be given full consideration and reported on at this session of Grand Lodge. GRAND MASTERS' CONFERENCE AND GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION MEETINGS

On February 21, 22, and 23, 1934, in company with our Grand Secretary, r attended the Grand Masters' Conference and annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial As- . sociation at Washington, D. C., and Alexandria, Virginia. There were 41 jurisdictions represented at the Grand Masters' Conference and a number of matters of importance in which the various Grand Lodges are interested were discussed. Your Grand Master had a place on the program. The annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association was held in the Memorial Hall at Alexandria on February 22, 1934, and was largely attended. The reports read at this meeting showed that about $3,800,000.00 have been spent on the Memorial to date. It was estimated that some $600,000.00 more will be required to complete the building. It is especially desirable to complete as soon as may be practical all of the first floor, which includes the Blue Lodge room and the replica in which will be house the various George Washington relics now in the Hall of Alexandria, Washington Lodge No. 22, at Alexandria, Virginia, and it was estimated that about $200,000.00 would be required to complete the first floor. The plan calls for $500,000.00 endowment fund estimated to provide about $15,000.00 annually for operating the Memorial building including the salary of a secretary, custodian, elevator operators, etc. At this meeting some $14,000.00 in checks were turned in by various Grand Lodges making a total of cash and bonds now on hand of something over $65,000.00. It will be remembered that under the plan adopted at the beginning of the enterprise no contract for work on the Temple will be let until sufficient funds are on hand to meet the same; the wisdom of which has already been manifested by the events of the past few years. Conditions being as they are, r recommend that another year be allowed to our Lodges before resuming the collection of one dollar per capita on each initiate for this purpose. WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA

Arriving in Washington in advance of the Grand Masters' Conference, and having a day to spare, r took a bus to the histOl1.C town


36

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

of Williamsburg, Virginia, which is now being restored by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., to its appearance in the days of its colonial prosperity and supremacy. Over $11,000,000.00 have been expended on this enterprise during the past four years. It was my privilege to view in the churchyard at Williamsburg, the grave and tombstone of our former beloved Grand Master, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, who was four times elected Grand Master of Masons in Missouri, namely 1821, 1822, 1823, and 1824. I visited the house in which Brother Tucker lived, it being the home of his father, St. George Tucker, and now occupied by his grandson, George Preston Coleman. The name of Nathaniel Beverly Tucker stands high in Virginia as it does in Missouri. He had three separate and distinct careers all of which were distinguished. . Career Number 1. Born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, in 1784, graduated from William and Mary College of 'Villiamsburg in 1801, practiced law in Williamsburg, Charlottesville and Richmond, Virginia. Attained high standing in that profession. Career Number 2.. In 1815 at the age of thirty he moved to the Louisiana Territory and settled at St. Louis, where he was active in the movement for statehood and was elected Circuit Judge, which position he held during the years that he served as our Grand Master. In 1829 he moved to Saline County, Missouri, where he entered eight hundred eighty acres of land from the government about seven miles southwest of Arrow Rock where he resided for several years during which time he was admitted to the bar of Saline County (1829), and practiced law in that county. Career Number 3. About 1835 he moved back to his native city of Williamsburg, Virginia, and was elected Dean of the Law Department of William and Mary College which position had been held for many years by his distinguished father, St. George Tucker. He occupied this position until his death in 185l. OLD MASONIC LODGE AT 'VILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA

It was my privilege to visit the old Masonic Lodge at Williamsburg and read from the original minutes showing the organization of the Grand Lodge of Virginia in 1778, and the election of John Blair as the first Grand Master in Virginia. It has been said that at this meeting the Grand Mastership of Virginia was tendered to George Washington but was declined by him for the reason that he had not at that time served as Master of a Lodge. However, the minutes did not show this. RECOGNITION OF VETERAN MASONS

M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, in his address two years ago, referred to the desirablity of recognizing members of our Fraternity


BROTHER ALFRED B. RIDINGTON This picture was taken at the time of his being invested with a Masonic Yeteran 's Button-the day being the hundredth anniversary of his birth. Brother Ridington is a member of Aurora Lodge, No. 267, St. Louis, Mo., and has a Masonic record of 62 years.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

37

who have labored in season and out, and who have borne the heat and burden of the day, and recommended that the Grand Lodge should officially recognize them by presenting through Grand Lodge officers or D. D. G. M.'s a distinctive badge or button which would testify to the loyalty and long service of the recipient. He recommended the appointment of a committee to consider the design, make the necessary rules for award and carry out the distribution. Through a desire for economy this committee was not appointed last year but on March 23, 1934, I requested the Ritual Committee to carry out the reco~endations of P. G. M. Denslow and am pleased to inform路 you that this has been done and to this date 130 buttons have been distributed to brethren eligible to receive the same, a complete list of which will be found in the Grand Secretary's report. In connection with this most desirable recognition, some interesting facts have come to light. Notably that of Brother Alfred B. Ridington of Aurora Lodge No. 267 of St. Louis, Missouri. Brother Ridington has resided for a number of years past in the vicinity of London, England, and it was ascertained that August 4, 1934, would be the one hundredth anniversary of his birthday. Aurora Lodge took suitable action by creating Brother Ridington a Life Member and through the Grand Secretary transmitted a silver certificate of the same, together with the 50-year button to the Grand Secretary of the United Grand Lodge of England, Sir P. Colville Smith, with the request that our Grand Representative, Captain the Honorable Wykeham Stanley Cornwallis, M. C., if possible, present the same to Brother Ridington on the anniversary day. The mementos reached London on August 3, the day prior to the anniversary and Sir P. Colville Smith at once notified our Grand Representative who immediately delegated this duty to W. Brother E. P. Debenham, who duly carried out the wishes of Aurora Lodge. A letter路 received from Captain Cornwallis expressing regret at his inability to discharge this duty in person by reason of his absence from the city, states that he himself will take personal pleasure in visiting Brother Ridington from time to time as long as the Grand Architect of the Universe allows him to remain on this terrestrial globe. Incidentally, word has just been received that their Majesties, the King and Queen of England, sent Brother Ridington a telegram of congratulations on his hundredth birthday. May I call your attention to the fact that Captain Cornwallis is the Junior Grand Warden of the United Grand Lodge of England and is the son of Lord Cornwallis who visited the Bicentenary of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania two years ago, and who, as it is well known, is the lineal descendant of the Lord Cornwallis who had an interesting interview with the Father of our Country at a momentous hour in its history.


38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

I am persuaded that this movement is eminently worthwhile and the returns as a result of this activity will more than justify the small outlay incurred. GRAND OFFICERS' CONFERENCES

On January 30, 1934, at the Masonic Temple in St. Louis, I held a conference with those of our Grand Lodge officers and members of the Jurisprudence Committee residing in the eastern part of the state at the Grand Secretary's office. Among other matters considered was a form of circular letter to the Lodges setting forth the position of the Grand Lodge on the Intoxicating Liquor Question which is before our Lodges. On February 9, 1934, a similar conference was held at the Union National Bank at Kansas City with the Grand Lodge officers and members of the Jurisprudence Committee residing in the western part of the state which dealt with the same matters as were discussed at the one in St. Louis. On September 3, 1934, a conference of Grand Lodge officers, all line officers being present, was held at Arrow Rock, Missouri, in the Lodge Hall of Arrow Rock Lodge No. 55, at which matters of importance were discussed. It being Labor Day, a holiday, the Grand Lodge officers, a number of whom were accompanied by their wives, enjoyed a dinner at the historic Arrow Rock Tavern. During the conference I had the pleasure of calling attention to the fact that I had presented to Arrow Rock Lodge No. 55 a lifelike portrait of R. W. Brother Anthony O'Sullivan, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, from 1851 to 1867. Brother O'Sullivan was made a Mason in Arrow Rock Lodge No. 55 in 1846 and was a resident of Arrow Rock from 1841 until his removal to St. Louis in 1851, where he lived until his death in 1866, with the exception of a short period during the Civil War which he spent at Springfield, Missouri. He was undoubtedly the most outstanding Freemason of Missouri in his time. Bo.ARDS OF RELIEF

On November 1,1933, Brother Van F. Boor, President of the Kansas City Board of Relief, called me by telephone advising their board was completely out of funds and was in urgent need of money with which to meet current emergency relief, and asked me if there was any way the Grand Lodge c路ould advance funds to his Board to be repaid later when legal machinery might be set up for collection of funds from the various Lodges supporting the Relief work in Kansas City. Within the next day or so I received a letter from Brother A. J. O'Reilly, President of the St. Louis Board of Relief, advising that


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

39

the funds of their board were also completely exhausted and that they had a deficit of some $1,100.00 and asked that I give the matter consideration and make some recommendation as to how they might be provided with funds with which to carry on their work. On Tuesday, November 14, 1934, I went to St. Louis and held a conference with Brothers O'Reilly, Edward McGuigan, Chairman of our Grand Lodge Committee on Boards of Relief and Employment Bureaus, and the two D. D. G. M.'s, Brothers A. J. Michener and Frank A. Magoon. After discussion and consideration of this matter, I made the recommendation that the D. D. G. M.'s of St. Louis and Kansas City call a conference at an early date of the Masters, Wardens and Secretaries of the Lodges in their respective jurisdictions and ask them, on behalf of their Lodges, to pledge a donation on the basis of ten cents per membel to the relief boards of their respective cities, to be used to meet current relief and not to pay prior indebtedness. The two St. Louis deputies agreed that they would hold such a conference the latter part of the month and I asked Brother McGuigan, as chairman of his committee, to request Judge Darius A. Brown, D. D. G. M. at Kansas City, to likewise call such a co~ference in his jurisdiction and put the matter up to the officers of the Lodges there. It was hoped that the Lodges would cooperate on this program and enable this very important Masonic activity to continue functioning in our two largest cities and I am pleased to say that the suggestions were carried out and the requested amount was in large measure provided from this source and also from private donations. EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

I am informed that the Masonic Employment Bureau of St. Louis is actively engaged in the interests committed to its care and is gradually increasing its serviceability to the Lodges in St. Louis that provide the funds for its support. Of course, it is understood that the Bureaus activities are confined primarily to the area occupied by the contributing Lodges. I say this in order to correct some statistics recently appearing in the daily press which have created an erroneous impression, the recurrence of which should of necessity be obviated in the future. I commend Polar Star Lodge No. 79 for the manner in which they seek to cooperate with the Employment Bureau by acquainting themselves with conditions pertaining to the unemployment of members of their Lodge. Their example and methods may prove helpful to other Lodges. GRAND LECTURER

In midsummer R. W. Brother James R. McLachlan, who has served this Grand Lodge as Grand Lecturer for a period of 28 years, informed me that by his physician's advice he must tender his resigna-


40

PROCEEDINGS OF THE.

1934

tion as Grand Lecturer to take effect as and at the close of this present Communication of the Grand Lodge. This intimation he sent to all his deputies and I am sure that the cause of his resignation will be received with regret by all the members of this Grand Lodge. Many of us have been the recipients of his instruction through our entire Masonic careers and he has held a position among us which is to say the least, an unique one. The Grand Lodge of Missouri" has been extremely fortunate in its Grand Lecturers. R. W. Brothers George H. Melody, Anthony O'Sullivan and Allan McDowell, who preceded Brother McLachlan were distinguished Freemasons and each in his own day rendered services of inestimable value, which Brother McLachlan has most faithfully and diligently perpetuated. It can be confidently said that he retires with the love and esteem not only of his brethren but of all who know him throughout this great commonwealth. . I am sure that this Grand Lodge will desire to recognize Brother McLachlan's services in a practical manner and I, therefore, recommend that on his retirement he be given the title of Grand Lecturer Emeritus and that the Ways and Means Committee be requested to provide an honorarium of $175.00 per month for the coming year, future provision to be made from year to year by the Ways and Means Committee. MASONIC HOME

It goes without saying that every member of the fraternity in our Grand Jurisdiction is interested in the success and welfare of our Masonic Home, which institution is of such vital importance to the general interests of Freemasonry. In accordance with our custom I have attended meetings of the Masonic Home Board and held conferences with its president and officers during the year and I am happy to commend the good work that is being carried on under the supervision of M. W. Brother W. W. Martin and the Board. I am told that the Board has been able to live within its income during the year but this is largely due to the fact that the Welfare Committee has been able to care for an increased number of applicants for relief in their own home environment rather than at the Masonic Home and also to the fact that there has been a reduction in the number of children in the Home during the past year. I understand that the Home needs some alterations and repairs, but all these matters will doubtless be covered in the report of the Special Committe appointed by the Grand Lodge at its last Annual Communication which will be presented to you for consideration at this session. Owing to conditions which still prevail I recommend that the $10.00 fee hitherto collected for the home from each initiate, be further suspended for another year.


1934

41

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI WELFARE COMMITTEE

The report of the WeHare Committee shows that a splendid piece of wt9rk has been accomplished and indicates the wisdom of this particular phase of our work. It will be shown in its report to be presented at this session. This Committee has certainly had a tremendous task put upon it, and is entitled to our commendation for the splendid manner in which it has functioned. . I requested the Special Committee appointed by Judge Landon last September to make a thorough investigation of all matters pertaining to Masonic Relief and if necessary visit and obtain first-hand information from other jurisdictions faced with similar problems to our own. We shall all look with special interest to its report and recommendations. It is assuring to know that the income from the delinquent per capita tax which was directed for the use of the WeHare Committee under Judge Landon's Relief Program last year should be sufficient to meet the needs of the Committee for the past year and also for the ensuing year, and if all of the back per capita is collected there should be sufficient income for the use of this Committee for two years, provided of course the basis of expenditures would be at the rate of the past year. ANCHOR LoDGE

No. 443

AND UNIVERSITY LoDGE

No. 649

In the early summer I was informed that a proposition had路 been made to Anchor Lodge No. 443 at St. Louis, Missouri, offering for sale the Temple lately occupied at University City by University Lodge No. 649, which Temple had been foreclosed by the bondholders on account of University Temple's default in payment. This being a matter pertaining to the work of the Ways and Means Committee under the enlarged powers delegated to it at the last Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge,'I requested R. W. Brother James A. Kinder, Chairman, to call a meeting of his Committee at the Grand Secretary's office in the Masonic Temple on June 4, 1934, for the purpose of looking into this proposition. The meeting was held and the matter thoroughly discussed, but later other developments arose which retarded the progress of these negotiations and it was therefore impossible for me to take further action by reason of circumstances that would have to be arranged relative to jurisdiction etc., and I, therefore, recommend that this matter, which is still pending, be referred in its entirety to the incoming Grand Master, and the Ways and Means Committee who now have it in charge, there not having been sufficient time to allow negotiations to be completed before this Annual Communication. It is my hope that negotiations can be so advanced whereby the


42

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Grand Lodge can give authority to this Committee providing the details can be satisfactorily arranged, to allow of a speedy settlement. I therefore recommend that authority be given the Ways and reans Committee to consumate the deal as and when the consent 0 twothirds of the Lodges of the 33rd and 57th Masonic Districts has been obtained as to Jurisdiction. MEMBERSHIP

The year just closed shows that the downward trend in membership has slackened and there are encouraging indications of returning prosperity among our Lodges. From the Grand Secretary's report you will note that our loss is 4,358. You will also路 note that if those reported as initiated and passed could have been raised before the close of the Masonic year, our net loss would have been 1,243 rather than 4,358, as the figures show. I am glad to inform you that petitions are coming in all over the state and work is being done which will surely change the complexion of things as they have stood for the last few years. From these figures and from reports which have been coming to me from the Grand Secretary's office and from my own personal observation during my visitations up and down the state, I am confident that we are on the upward grade and that the future outlook is much brighter than it was a year ago. FINANCIAL

I am pleased to report that the Grand Lodge has lived within its budget during the year and that the 1934 per capita tax thus far has yielded $132,907.93, all of which goes to the support of the Masonic Home as the result of your action taken one year ago. This amount exceeds the per capita paid to the Home in 1933 by $1,851.06, with some outstanding balances still to collect. I would refer you to the reports of the Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary, and Auditor for full details on our finances. A sum of $17,925.45 on delinquent per capita tax has also been collected during the year for the use of the Welfare Committee, $10,500 of which has been turned over to that committee, the balance being in the Grand Treasury for the committee's use for the coming year. In addition thereto, the remaining delinquent per capita tax still to be collected, which we confidently expect to collect, should carry the Welfare Committee for two years. It must be remembered, however, that the Grand Lodge Treasury is practically exhausted and that the Ways and Means Committee in preparing their budget for the coming year will find themselves under the necessity of drawing out at least $25,000.00 from our reserve fund,


1934

GRAND J.JODGE OF :MISSOURI

43

which means that the Grand Lodge at this time cannot with propriety entertain proposals for any large or extraordinary expenditures. An amendment presented at our last Annual Communication looking toward the reduction of the per capita tax, having been withdrawn, places the per capita tax for the coming year at $2.10, of which $1.50 goes to the Masonic Home and 60 cents to the Grand Lodge Treasury. It is my judgment that it should be our policy to replace any amount which has to be taken temporarily from the reserve fund, at the earliest possible moment, as it is not desirable for us to impair our reserves, but as consistently as possible, increase them. BONDS, GRAND TREASURER AND GRAND SECRETARY

Pursuant to our By-Laws I caused a bond of $55,000.00 to be issued upon the Grand Treasurer with the Aetna Casualty Company, Number F. B. 146355, and one with the same Company, Number F. B. 146356, for $25,000.00 upon the Grand Secretary, the premium being $300.00, the same having been retained by me as required by Law. INTOXICATING LIQUOR QUESTION

This important matter which is nationwide in extent, and whose ramifications touch every strata of our civilization, demands our calmest, most deliberate and mature judgment. On February 22, 1934, I issued a circular letter to all our Lodges in which I ruled as follows: It is my ruling that no intoxicating liquor can be used in any Masonic Lodge room, anteroom or banqueting room in this Grand Jurisdiction. It is my further ruling that no portion of any premises within the control of any Masonic Lodge, or of any Masonic Temple Association which holds title to property used by or intended for a Masonic Lodge, shall be leased or rented to, or allowed to be used by, anyone for the dealing in or serving of intoxicating liquors. The Grand Lodge of Missouri has ever endeavored to hold Freemasonry in this jurisdiction on a high plane, and I believe our membership want to keep it there.

Since issuing the letter I have not changed my mind as to the ruling. From continuous observation and information that has come to my hand, I am of the opinion that this is not the time to come to hasty conclusions but that it will be our best policy to await further developments before any changes in our Laws are made. As I have repeatedly said to those seeking information: "Our Lodges are already fully provided with authority to deal with brethren committing Masonic offenses and I have always felt that the individual Lodge should be the first to take care of its own interests, ever remembering that it is also their duty to protect the interests of Freemasonry in general, and I confidently believe that this matter can be well left in its present status for the time being so that no mistakes may be made by any precipitate action which might prove unwise."


44

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

As I bring this report of the year's activity to a close I cannot refrain from thanking publicly our efficient Grand Secretary, Dr. Arthur Mather, for the valuable assistance he has rendered to me throughout the year. He has been zealous and active for the cause of Freemasonry in season and out of season. By the aid of his two efficient and industrious assistants the heavy work of the Grand Secretary's office has been kept up to date, and in addition the Grand Secretary has been ready at all times to make any trip, or render any helpful service to the Lodges and the brethren throughout the entire jurisdiction. My thanks are due and are whole-heartedly presented to our corps of District Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers who have so splendidly cooperated with me during my term of office. I wish our brethren in the Grand Lodge to know that these representatives of the Grand Master form a tremendous asset in the upbuilding of our institution and when it is remembered that many of them live in remote districts and have to exercise the duties of their office under considerable disadvantage, I am sure that all will unite with me in this expression of thanks for their splendid service. I also wish to thank sincerely the brethren who have served on the :various committees of the Grand Lodge for the conscientious and faithful service they have rendered. CONCLUSION

During the year I have traveled not less than 28,000 miles by automobile, more than 21,000 of which was in the State of Missouri and directly on business in discharge of the dtities of my office as Grand Master. In addition to this I have made a number of trips by train, and while the tax on time and strength has been considerable, yet I have enjoyed every minute of my association with our brethren, in their meetings, homes, places of business, and elsewhere, and I tender my thanks to all who have extended courtesies to me at various times. My visits to various District Associations have been of particular pleasure to me, and indeed the memory of all my contacts will abide for long years to come. Reviewing the year from the standpoint of the Grand Master, I feel sure that at last Freemasonry in Missouri is beginning to catch its normal stride and that we are headed for better days. I am making no prophecies nor holding out hopes that might be illusive, but when I take into account the fact that petitions are coming in, reinstatements taking place and affiliations being consummated, it will not be long before the conditions through which we have passed for several years will change, and the change will be for the better. I cannot but say, however, that we have far from reached the period when we can relax our foresight and treat lightly the possi-


1934

45

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

bilities of our future. In other words, this to my mind is not the time for incurring extensive responsibilities in material expansion. The conditions of the country, nay, of the world, forbid, for the present at least, anything but the most prudent caution in all our undertakings, and given the exercise of these factors, I am sure that our future will work out successfully. It is my belief that the institution with which we are connected can never be destroyed by the elements that are outside, but it is equally true that the most vulnerable points in our fabric will ever be found on the inside. Let us, therefore, guard well our portals, keep our feet on the ground, incline neither to the right nor the left, keep eternity in view, and thus shall we ever be in a position in which the Grand Architect of the Universe shall bless and prosper us. It has been said, "In the last analysis every institution is no stronger than the character and quality of the men who are responsible for it." If that be true, and I believe it is, then those who are officers in our Lodges, and Grand Lodge, as well as every member of the Craft, should ever strive to practice the principles of brotherhood and service promulgated by our Fraternity, to the end that Freemasonry in Missouri may continue to be a strong influence for the upbuilding of character and good citize;nship in the future as it has been in the past. Fraternally submitted,

J-8J~~ Grand Master. LETTERS AOOOMPANYING ADDRESS OF GRAND MASTER October 24, 1933. To the Secretaries of All Constituent Lodges, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Dear Brethren: RESUME OF LEGISLATION AFFECTING LODGES

At the 1933 Communication of the Grand Lodge several important measures were adopted to which I call your attention. RELIEF PROGRAM

1. The delinquent per capita tax is carried as a debt of the Lodge to the Grand Lodge for one year without interest, and when paid the Grand Secretary will transmit it to the Welfare Committee to be used for relief outside the Masonic Home whether the recipient thereof is eligible for admission to the Home or not. 2. The per capita tax due June 30, 1934, will be $1.50 per member instead of $2.10, and all of this goes to the Masonic Home. This means that the Grand Lodge must pay its expenses for two years out of funds on hand or from its emergency fund.


46

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

3. The ten-dollar initiation fee required from every candidate for use of the Masonic Home, and the one dollar per capita for the George Wash路 ington Memorial, are both discontinued for one year, as and from September 27, 1933. This will doubtless encourage the incoming of petitions. BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

The Grand Lodge adopted the ruling of the Grand Master that the Building Supervisory Board has authority over all building programs of our Lodges, and also over all refinancing programs of Lodges and Temple Associations. This does not apply, however, where a Temple is already erected and a bona fide lease has been made. All refinancing schemes from now on must be submitted to this Committee. The title to Lodge real estate is to be carried by three Trustees for the benefit of the Lodge. BUDGET COMMITTEE

A Budget Committee shall be established in every Lodge consisting of the Worshipful Master, Secretary-Treasurer and two other members to be appointed by the Master, immediately after installation. This Commit路 tee shall budget all expenses including Grand Lodge Per Capita, and Report the Budget at the second regular Communication of the year. Before the Budget is made the Master shall require the Temple Association to file with the Budget Committee an Annual Report of its affairs and a copy of its own Budget for the ensuing year before any money is voted out of the Lodge Treasury for Temple Association purposes. If the Budget Committee and the Temple Association fail to agree the matter is to be referred to the Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge for set路 tlement, and its decision is to be final. Your Budget should include a reasonable amount of charity. CONSOLIDATION OF LODGES

The Ways and Means Committee of the Grand Lodge shall have authority to consolidate Lodges upon such terms as may seem advisable fo'f the best interests of Freemasonry, and adjust financial problems of the Lodges affected. It is preferred, however, that consolidations be voluntary in order that harmony and goodwill may be preserved. CONCLUSION

It is felt that this legislation will prove of great benefit to the Lodges, and it is hoped that all Secretaries will give close attention to the collection of dues, and my advice to them is to begin early, be patient and sympathetic, but also persistent; and good results will doubtless reward the effort. You will please read this letter in open Lodge at the next meeting after its receipt. Sincerely and fraternally yours,

F. C.

BARNHILL,

Grand Master.

October 31, 1933. To the District Deputy Grand Masters: My dear Brethren: As we face the new Masonic year it is my earnest desire that the leaders of Freemasonry in this jurisdiction do what they can to help put forward a program of Lodge activity that will reduce the dimits, remissions and suspensions, so that the leakage in membership of the past four years may be stopped and our Fraternity in this state placed on the upgrade once more. To this end I am offering a few suggestions which I believe are constructive and which I trust will be helpful.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

47

1. COLLECTION OF DUES When you receive your copy of the Grand Lodge Proceedings, analyze the Reports of the Lodges in your district. Where an unusual amount of delinquent dues, dimits, remissions and suspensions are shown, hold an early conference with the Master and Secretary of such Lodges and assist them in outlining a more effective program for the collection of dues. 2. WEAK LODGES First, try earnestly to organize a program of activity that will enable them to function creditably. If hopeless, recommend consolidation, but let it be voluntary if possible. The recent session of the Grand Lodge authorized forcible consolidation of weak Lodges, but let us use that method only as a last resort. I trust it will not have to be used at all. 3. DISTRICT ASSOCIATIONS That you give encouragement to the organization of the Lodges in your district into an Association with quarterly meetings, to be rotated among the Lodges. Particularly, do I refer to the country districts which do not contain large cities. Several District Associations have been functioning successfully for a number of years. Write to the Deputies in any of the following districts for information and for a copy of By-Laws: Nos. 20, 23,24, 36, 37 and 59. An active District Association will go far towards accomplishing suggestions I and II, for what is needed is a program of Lodge activity that will interest and attract the brethren, which should make the collection of dues easier and should strengthen the weak Lodges. These suggestions, coupled with the Relief Program granted at the recent session of the Grand Lodge, should result, I believe, not only in holding our present membership, but also in the reception of new candidates for the mysteries of Freemasonry; for I believe there are those outside the Fraternity who are good men and true, and who would like to become associated with an organization engaged in such an active and constructive program. Assuring you that the Grand Lodge Officers and the Craft at large appreciate your labors in behalf of the Fraternity, and bespeaking your hearty cooperation in carrying on the work for the coming year, I am Sincerely and fraternally, F. C. BARNHILL, Grand Master. P. S. If your district organizes an Association, or if there are districts already organized other than the numbers mentioned above, please advise me. F. C.B. February 22, 1934.

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of All Lodges, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Now that the Eighteenth Amendment has been repealed, and a statute has been enacted in Missouri regulating the sale of intoxicating liquors, the Grand Master is receiving, from Lodges and individual brethren, a路 number of inquires on this question. With a view of clarifying the situation, I beg to advise that Sections 198 and 199 of the Grand Lodge ByLaws are in force and e1Iect. The penalties specified in the last clause of Section 199, however, have been repealed by the Trial Code. The repeal of the Prohibition Amendment to the Constitution of the United States does not repeal our Masonic law. Any change in the Masonic law of Missouri can only come through action by the Grand Lodge. Your attention is directed to these two sections and particularly to the decisions annotated thel'eunder at pages 110-113 of our 1925 By-Laws. A reading of these sections, together with the decisions already made, will


48

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

answer practically all of the questions being propounded to me by numerous Lodges and members. It is my ruling that no intoxicating liquor can be used in any Masonic Lodge room, anteroom, or banqueting room in this Grand Jurisdiction. It is my further ruling that no portion of any premises within the control of any Masonic Lodge, or of any Masonic Temple Association which holds title to property used by or intended for a Masonic Lodge, shall be leased or rented to, or allowed to be used by, anyone for the dealing in or serving of intoxicating liquors. The Grand Lodge of Missouri has ever endeavored to hold Freemasonry in this jurisdiction on a high plane, and I believe our membership want to keep it there. Please read this letter in open Lodge at its next communication. Sincerely and fraternally, F. C. BARNHILL, Grand Master. April 13, 1934. To the Secretaries of AU Missouri Lodges, A. F. and A. M.: Brethren: We are now at the time when our Secretaries are wrestling with the collection of dues, and the close of the fiscal year, June 30, is not far away. With the hope that I may offer a suggestion or two that may be helpful, this letter is written. DELINQUENT DUES: SPECIAL COMMITTEE

If the amount of your uncollected dues is worrying you and you feel

that help is needed, I suggest that you request the Master of your Lodge to appoint at once a Committee of three to assist you. I feel that the delinquents should be interviewed personaUy, if possible, and, of course, sympathetically, telling them: 1. That a goodly portion of their dues goes to the support of the Masonic Home, which is having heavy demands upon it at this time. 2. That your Lodge has to pay the Grand Lodge per capita tax on delinquent members, and that this is a burden to the Lodge. (This Committee might be furnished with a list of those suspended and dimitted during the past few years of the depression, and some of them may be in better financial condition now, and on invitation of the Committee may be glad to be restored to membership.) This Committee, with your cooperation, should be able to reduce mao terially your list of uncollected dues, and help save to the Fraternity and to your Lodge many good brethren. I ask that there be no wholesale suspensions or remissions of dues. Let each case be carefully considered, and action taken on the merits thereof. Please be sure to send in your annual report and remittance as soon after June 30 as it is possible. QUESTIONNAIRE

Some of our Secretaries in the interior of the State have received a Questionnaire purporting to be sponsored by the Government C. W. A., in which questions are asked pertaining to fraternal and educational societies. In view of the fact that information required to properly answer some of the questions is not available to the local Lodges, I request that each local Secretary who receives any of these questionnaires forward the same immediately to the Grand Secretary, whose address is 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri, for answering, giving him the name and address of the party to whom the Questionnaire is to be returned. I am pleased to report that Freemasonry appears to be on the upgrade in Missouri; petitions are coming in, and if we can keep down our suspen-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

49

sions and make reinstatements, we hope it will not be long before we once more show a gain in our membership. Fraternally yours, F. C. BARNHILL, Grand Master. May 7, 1934. Committee on RituaZ: A. F. Ittner, Chairman; John Pickard, Henry C. Chiles, C. T. Kombrodt, J. A. Kinder. To the WorshipfuZ Masters, Wardens and Brethren of All Lodges, A. F. and A. M. of the State of Missouri: Dear Brethren: Most Worshipful Brother Ray V. Denslow, in his address to the Grand Lodge at the Annual Communication of 1932, recommended some suitable recognition by the Grand Lodge of such Master Masons of this Grand Jurisdiction who had or might thereafter have attained, a total of fifty years or more of good Masonic standing. He further recommended the appointment of a Committee to consider designs and make necessary rules for carrying his recommendation into effect. Pursuant to the Report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address, the Grand Lodge unanimously approved the Grand Master's recommendation. In accordance with the action of the Grand Lodge, I have appointed the Ritual Committee to constitute the Committee contemplated by the above action of the Grand Lodge. Acting under authority of the Grand Lodge resolution, the Ritual Committee has adopted a design for a button, and rules regulating the awarding thereof, as follows: , 'Each Brother to be thus honored must be designated by a vote of his Lodge, and his eligibility and the facts constituting the same, must be certified to the Grand Secretary under the seal of the Lodge. The Grand Secretary shall thereupon verify the facts furnished him by the Lodge and on finding them to be correct shall certify the name of the Brother thus designated to the Grand Master. The Lodge in which the Brother in question holds membership must bear one-half of the expense of the button, which one-half under prevailing prices for the time being, is $1.50. The Grand Master may present this button in person, or may designate some suitable Master Mason to make the presentation. It shall preferably be made in a meeting of the Lodge but may be made elsewhere whenever circumstances require it." A supply of these buttons has been ordered, and the Lodges are earnestly requested to certify the names of eligible Brethren whom they desire to have thus honored, as early as possible. Failure to comply with this request may deprive a number of worthy Brethren of this well deserved honor. Kindly enclose remittance of $1.50 for each Brother to be honored with your certificate of eligi1?ility. Fraternally yours, F. C. BARNHILL, Grand Master. Attest: ARTHUR MATHER, Grand Secretary.

REPORT -OF THE GRAND SECRETARY

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, presented his report covering official action in the office of the Grand Secretary for the period September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934, which was received and ordered printed in the Proceedings.


50

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

DUPLICATE CHARTERS

Duplicate Charters were issued to the following Lodges: Ionic Lodge No. 154, charter destroyed by nre; duplicate issued March 2, 1934. Weatherby Lodge No. 235, charter destroyed by nre; duplicate issued May 9,1934. PROCEEDINGS DISTRIBUTED

The 1933 Proceedings were printed and distributed as soon as possible after the Grand Lodge session. COMMISSIONS TO D. D. G. M.'S

By order of M. W. Brother Frank C. Barnhill, Grand Master, commissions were issued to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters by him appointed in the fifty-nine Masonic Districts; the thirty-third district having two District Deputy Grand Masters. CHANGES IN D. D. G. M.'S

R. W. Brother James F. Blair, of the thirty-fourth District, having died, W. Brother Wm. C. Deacon was appointed to fill the vacancy on March 14, 1934. REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS

Blanks for these reports were sent to the sixty District Deputy Grand Masters, and their reports have been turned over to the Committee on Reports of District Deputy Grand Masters. COMMISSIONS TO GRAND REPRESENTATIVES

M. W. Grand Master Barnhill, appointed the following as Grand Representative of Missouri near their respective Grand Lodge: England, Captain Honorable W. S. Cornwallis, M. C. Plovers, Horsmonden, Kent, England. Ireland, Herbert Malcolm. Virginia, Vernon G. Harlin, Harrisonburg, Virginia. Manitoba, Maris H. Garton, Boissevain, Manitoba, Canada. BLANKS FOR ANNUAL RETURNS

Two copies were mailed June 15, 1934, with accompanying circular giving full directions to Secretaries. STATISTICAL

Number of Chartered Lodges in this Jurisdiction as of June 30,1934 .. 645 No consolidations, therefore 645 is actual number of Lodges. Number of Lodges reported as of September 15, 1934 625 Number of Nonreporting Lodges

20


1934

51

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI MEMBERSHIP RETURNS

1933 Membership 625 Reporting Lodges ..................•. To which is added: Initiations ...................•........ 1,694 Passings 1,421 Raisings Affiliations Reinstatements Total Gross total as of September 15, 1934

100,451

1,275 554 1,252

'

. .

From which is deducted: 831Dimissions Deaths 1,516 Suspended N. P. D•............................. 5,070 Suspended U. M. C. 6 Expelled •..................................... 17 Total ................................•............ Net membership 625 reporting lodges as of September 15, 1'934 1933 membership on 20 reports remaining outstanding Actual net membership September 15, 1934............

3,081 ---103,532

7,440 -----96,092 1_,1_7_4 97,266

Net membership as of June 30, 1933. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101,624 Net Membership year 1934 _ _9_7,;,..,2_6_6 Net loss in membership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,358 Per capita on 96,092 M. M.'s from 625 reporting Lodges as of September 15, 1934 $144,138.00 Arrears for preceding years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,939.28 Overpaid, 1933. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$147,077.28 89.30

Dues remitted..........................................

$146,987.98 8,421.50

Balance due on 1934 per capita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$138,566.48 5,800.20

Credits •...............................................

$132,766.28 141.65

Total per capita received to September 15, 1934 ... : ..... $132,907.93 LODGES CONSOLIDATED

There were no Lodges consolidated during the past Masonic year. COURTESIES RECEIVED AND GRANTED

By direction of M. W. Grand Master Barnhill, 23 requests have been made to sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer degrees for Missouri Lodges and 30 requests have been received to confer degrees for sister Grand Jurisdictions.


52

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS

Circular letters were mailed out as usual to all Lodges with the information concerning the list of leading hotels and locations and rates. Copies of this circular may be found at Grand Lodge. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS LAYING CORNERSTONES

Harry H. Balsiger, Methodist Church, Hematite, Mo., October 11, 1933. Bert S. Lee, Community Building, Ozark, Mo., March 21, 1934. DEDICATIONS

Fay G. Fulkerson, New Hall, University Lodge No. 649, University City, November 28, 1933. Willis J. Bray, New Hall, Paulville Lodge No. 319, Hurdland, Mo., December 5, 1933. J. Clyde Akers, New Hall, Ionic Lodge No. 154, Desloge, Mo., March 13, 1934. William E. Lange, New Hall, Warrenton Lodge No. 609, Warrenton, Mo., August 24, 1934. ELECTION OF OFFICERS

Pleasant Lodge (160), November 10, 1933. Strafford Lodge (609), December 2,1933. Cypress Lodge (227), January 3, 1934. Skidmore Lodge (511) , January 15, 1934. Greenridge Lodge (425), January 15, 1934. Brumley Lodge (203), January 16, 1934.

Vandalia Lodge (491), January 16, 1934. Ingomar Lodge (536), January 19, 1934. Western Star (15), January 20, 1934. Tyrian Lodge (350), July 31, 1934. Middle Grove (42), May 4, 1934. LaMonte Lodge (574), March 30, 1934. MarionLodge (616), September 11, 1934.

INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS

Trilumina Lodge No. 205, December 27, 1933, for joint installation of officers of all lodges in the 24th District. Beacon Lodge No.3, January 11, 1934, in Commandery Hall, New Masonic Temple; St. Louis, Mo. Fenton Lodge No. 281, February la, ]934, in Hall of Kirkwood Lodge No. 484, at Kirkwood, Mo. :MEET IN OTHER HALLS

United Lodge No.5, to meet in hall of Gate of the Temple Lodge, Wednesday February 28, 1934. Solomon Lodge No. 271, to meet in hall of Gate of the Temple Lodge, Wednesday, February 28, 1934. Ionic Lodge No. 154, to meet in old hall of Ionic Lodge until one destroyed by fire is rebuilt, March 2, 1934. Weatherby Lodge No. 255, to meet in hall of Parrott Lodge No. 308, until further notice, April 3, 1934. Earl Lodge No. 285, to meet in Jameson Lodge No. 500, until further notice, April 14, 1934.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

53

RECOGNITION OF VETERAN ::MASONS FIFTY-YEAR BUTTONS

The following Brethren, whose names have been certified by their respective Lodges and confirmed by the records of the Grand Lodge as eligible, have received buttons in recognition of their long years of Masonic standing, as follows: No. 420 332 243

and Lodge Itaska Excello Keystone

591 Barnett 104 Heroine 71 Savannah 79 Polar Star 445 West Gate

354 Hebron

34 Troy 358 Northwest 377 Ancient Craft

20 St. Louis 60 New Bloomfield 82 Jackson 267 Aurora 400 Decatur 480 JeweL 205 Trilumina

475 Mt. Hope

527 Higbee

Name of Brother Number of Years August F. Weeke..... . . . .. 53 Matthew T. Halley.. .. . . 53 William F. Thompson............ 57 Thomas J. Monroe. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 57 Dudley G. Berry.. .. . . . .. . . . . . .. . 58 Sam.uel Latz.................... 61 William S. Wells................ 64 A. J. Lam.bright. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Alex S. Mann................... 50 .Joseph J. Wharton............... 51 James H. Absolom............... 52 John N. Cross.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Sam Morris..................... 50 Lilburn T. Pasley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 William J. Rixey................ 62 John E. Richards.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Henry H. Russell........ . . . . . . . . 53 oM. H. Hall ; ~ 51 J. W. Holliday "... 51 James Vaughn.................. 61 J. W. Sullinger... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 59 George Ward. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 56 William Millan.................. 52 Louis Held. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 57 Jacob Guhman.................. 52 J ames S. Guthrie................ 53 William B. Craig. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 65 Alfred B. Ridington. . . . .. . . .. . 62 C. B. McCormack................ 53 .Jessee F. Stark.......... 53 Louis A. Rayborn................ 51 J. T. Railey. . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 58 A. H. W. Sullivan................ 53 R. E. Sydenstricker.............. 52 P. H. Franklin.................. 50 E. D. Hyatt..................... 56 Sam T. Roberts................. 51 C. L. Frost, Sr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Moses Emanuel 51 Thomas R. Taylor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 R. G. Duncan.... . .. .. 53


54

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

No. and Lodge 477 Henderson 360 Tuscan

33 Ralls

227 Cypress 237 512 492 443

LaPlata Webb City Daggett Anchor

362 Hiram

397 542 11 73 36

Gower Ferguson Pauldingville Eureka Cooper

121 Erwin 416 Cache 447 Jacoby 218 Good Hope 33 Ralls 487 Chilhowee 159 Green City 90 Russellville 174 Sturgeon 366 Adair 446 Ivanhoe a52 Friend

Name of Brother Number W. D. Delzell................... I. N. Rogers..................... Alex. Cudmore.................. Joseph F. Goodfellow............ Gustav Niemann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alfred H. White................ Joshua E. Briggs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ben O. Briggs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James T. Howard. . . .. .. . .. .. .... William C. Love................. George W. yount..... . . . . . . . . . .. E. P. Ausmus... . .. . . . . .. . . .. Elijah T. Webb.................. Benjamin Price.................. Michael R. Fay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R. H. Caffall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Bold...................... T. L. Montgomery............... Harry Martin................... Hiram Martin.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henry G. Ransdell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R. O. Kennard.................. William E. Bryan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ben L. Kendrick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David S. Koontz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William S. Stephens............. James E. Taliaferro. . . . . . . . . . . . .. John V. Wettle.................. ,William G. Arpe ,. Arthur P. Watkins............... Oliver H. Owings................ Oscar F. Doering................ Robert Heinle................... William E. Huppert. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Joshua E. Briggs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Benjamin C. Briggs.............. James T. Howard. . . . . . . ... . ..... R. F. Graham.................... John W. Muncy................. T. R. Davis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John W. Bond................... I. D. Bond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Enoch N. Gentry................ William H. Roseberry. . . . . . . . . . .. W. A. Henderson................ Samuel F. Blodgett .John C. Rogers.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. William L. Robertson............ W. M. Wade..................... James T. Wilson.. .. .. .. . . .. .. ...

1934 of Years 59 50 54 64 50 54 65 57 51 52 53 69 60 52 50 61 58 57 50 50 53 58 59 53 68 59 58 52 56 52 59 50 53 52 65 57 51 55 64 50 57 51 51 50 51 56 53 51 51 54


1934

55

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

No. and Lodge

Name of Brother Number of Years Alexander Eckles................ 57 .Edward A. Davis....... . . . . . . . . . 50 Nathan S. Goodrich...... . . . . . . .. 64 Fillmore Reed................... 53 Washington James L. WetzeL................ 57 Seymour Hoyt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Hamilton Davis Mann... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 J. Riley Cheshire................ 58 Albert Pike 0. P. Bloss...................... 64 Charles E. Clark................. 52 Meridian George Enzinger................ 51 Union Star .H. D. Moyes.................... 57 Chesley M. Wyatt................ 55 Lebanon ....•......... Samuel R. Darst. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 50 New Bloomfield Ewing O. Guthrie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Windsor J. H. Gordon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 68 Memphis William Cash Ladd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 John M. Jayne.................. 53 B. R. Grinstead. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 54 DeWitt Wagner................. 51 J. R. Hudson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 51 William R. Moore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 53 George A. Andres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 64 RuraL William G. Ashdown........... .. 57 Charles S. Owsley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Galena ,J ohn S. May.................... 52 Clay Thomas B. Saylors.............. 54 Housten Allen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Preston Fahnestock.............. 59 Mystic Tie W. J. Roberts................... 60 David A. Drum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 51 C. A. Wills..................... 58 Lowry City Samuel M. Gracy................ 57 Hardin Charles W. Dawson.............. 54 Fenton Harry S. Tonkins.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 C. P. Longworth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 James H. Winer.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Windsor H. C. Churchill.................. 63 ContinentaL Alex D. McCroskey.............. 58

501 Buckner 24 Wyaconda 62 Vincil 87 224 219 2 124 77 60 29 16

316 515 207

221

403 322 281

29 454

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

Check No. 10 of October 2, 1933, was issued to Masonic Home, representing balance due, May 7, 1933, per capita to September 15, 1933........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 16 of October 2, 1933, was issued to Masonic Home, representing amount appropriated by Grand Lodge to Welfare Committee to Refund Loan from the Masonic Home

$

2,978.87

1,675.00


56

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1934 PER CAPITA TAX

Total 1934 per capita collected to September 15, 1934...............................

$132,907.93

Total amount paid to Masonie Home to September 15, 1934. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

125,000.00

BALANCE DUE Masonie Home to September 15, 1934, on this account.. . . . . . . . . .. .

$

$125,000.00

7,907.93

WELFARE COMMITTEE Check No. 17, October 2, 1933, Masonie Home, aceount Welfare Committee....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 52, November 25, 1933, Masonie Home, aceount Welfare Committee. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. Cheek No. 71, January 3, 1934, Masonie Home, account Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 77, January 31, 1934, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 94, February 28, 1934, Masonie Home, account Welfare Committee.................................. Cheek No. 111, April 24, 1934, Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheek No. 129, June 1, 1934, Masonie Home, account Welfare Committee.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Check No. 139, June 30, 1934, Masonic Home, aceount Welfare Committee.................................. Total amount paid to Masonie Home, aecount Welfare Committee, to September 15, 1934................ TOTAL amount eollected from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934, on aecount delinquent per eapita tax to be used by Welfare Committee

$17,925.45

TOTAL amount paid to Masonie Home to September 15, 1934, on aceount Welfare Committee

10,500.00

BALANCE DUE Masonie Home, aecount Welfare Committee to September 15, 1934

$ 7,425.45

$

1,500.00 1,000.00 2,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 2,000.00

$ 10,500.00

SPECIAL INITIATION FUND Total amount reported from October 15, 1920, to September 15, 1934. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. *Total amount reeeived on this aceount from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934......................

$505,126.00 1,374.00

TOTAL AMOUNT received on this account from Oetober 15, 1920, to September 15, 1934. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $506,500.00 • This amount is in the First National Bank, St. Louis, Mo.


1934

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Cash balance in bank, September 16, 1933. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ·Total amount received on this account from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934 .

$

824.60 128.40

$

953.00

PAYMENTS

Check No. 26, February 21, 1934, paid to J. C. Keiper , . Bank service charges . Federal tax on 1 check .

$850.00 3.00 .02

September 15, 1934, Balance in bank to credit on this account '. . Total amount paid to J. Claude Keiper, Secretary-Treasurer of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Incorporated ~ .. ..

853.02 $

99.98

$157,017.01

THE DR. WILLIAM: F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Inaugurated by Donatio-n of $500 by Brother Marcus ..4.. Loevy, at Grand Lodge Sessio-n, October 17, 1922. This fund since exchange of bond was made July 18, 1928, consists of: One $500 United States Treasury 3% per cent bond, he}d in .Grand Lodge safe deposit box, Kansas City, $ 500.00 MIssourI Total Library Fund reported September 15, 1933. . . . . . Interest on bond. • . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Interest on savings account as follows: ,..... $2.13 December, 1933 June, 1934 ,............. 2.26 TOTAL

$

672.27

$16.88 4.39

FUND, September 15, 1934. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21.27 $

693.54

GRAND LODGE FINANCES

Cash in Grand Depository, September 16, 1933 .. , .. , . . . . .. $ 71,966.53 Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City (restricted)............... $ 4,778.82 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65,416.84 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 1,770.87 Total 1933 per capita tax received from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934, from Lodges delinquent in payments (for Welfare Committee) $ 17,925.45 Total 1934 per capita received to September 15, 1934. . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. • . . . . . 132,907.93 $150.833.38 ·For amounts paid by individual Lodges, See Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement, 1934 Proceedings.


58

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Sale of dues receipt cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Sale of Picket Edition Manuals..... $519.75 Sale of Library Edition Manuals. . . . 5.00 Sale of 1925 Constitution and ByLaws Sale of 1921 Constitution and ByLaws

893.06

$

524.75

$ 41.00 3.00

44.00

Sale of 1 (1933) Proceedings . Sale of 50-year buttons . Profit on transfer of $12,000.000 4* Liberty Loan Bonds . Sale of one 4* % Liberty Loan Bond, $1,000 bond sold at par and 14/32 .

1.50 198.00 138.50 1,004.37

Interest on U. S. Gov. bonds, due October 15, 1933 . Interest on U. S. Gov. bonds, due December 15, 1933 . Interest on U. S. Gov. bonds, due Apri115, 1934 Interest on U. S. Gov. bonds, due June 15, 1934 Interest on $1,000.00, 4* Liberty Loan bond from April 15, 1934, to September 14, 1934 ..

2,804.18

998.75 809.97 998.75 810.03 17.59

3,635.09

TOTAL RECEIPTS to September 15, 1934. . . . . . . . . . . . .

$229,239.18

ANALYSIS OF DISBURSEMENTS

Total of vouchers Nos. 1 to 173, inclusive. . . . Federal tax on 173 checks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pay roll, 1933 . Proceedings, 1933 . Salaries and allowances, Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Lecturer, Grand Lodge Office Account . Maintenance, Grand Lodge offices . Masonic Temple Association, St. Louis, Mo . Masonic Relief Association, United States and Canada . Past Grand Master's J ewe!. . Expenses, Grand Lodge Session, 1933 . Reporter, Grand Lodge Session, 1933 . Telephone, Jefferson 4877 . Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer Contingent fund, funerals, etc . Perkins Audit Company . Expense, George Washington Memorial and Grand Masters' Conferences . Grand Lodge Officers' Conferences . Expense Grand Lodge Officers, order Grand Master . Printing, postage, stationery and incidentals ~eprint old proceedings .

$192,794.36 3.46

$192,797.82 18,512.93

1,329.47 13,660.24 1,800.00 8,000.00 253.96 175.00 499.93 150.00 221.04 300.00 490.93 150.00 200.00 211.96 150.94 1,941.24 2,862.00


1934

59

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Assistant Tilers, 1933 Grand Lodge Session. . . Welfare Committee, by order G. L. to refund loan from Masonic Home................ Committee on Building Supervisory. . . . . . . . . .

$

30.00 1,675.00 44.73

$ 34,146.44 Total budget appropriation for 1933-34 (exclusive of pay roll) Actual disbursements . Unexpended Balance

.

$36,055.01 34,146.44 $ 1,908.57

Out of which Grand Master ordered following items paid: Buttons for 50-year Masons . $ Tablet at Lexington, Missouri .

580.00 58.80

$

638.80

Masonic Home, balance due 1933 per capita tax to September 15, 1933 ..•.........•....... Masonic Home, on account 1934 per capita tax Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee .. Dues Receipt Cards, 1934 . E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, account Sampson Lodge No. 298 1934 per capita cheek returned unpaid . Federal Tax on 173 "'Checks

.

$

638.80 2,978.87 125,000.00 10,500.00 975.93 41.39

----

September 15, 1934, ACTUAL DISBURSEMENTS........

$174,281.43 3.46 $192,797.82

RECAPITULATION . .

$229,239.18 192,797.82

CASH BALANCE, September 15, 1934, General Fund. . ..

$ 36,441.36

Total receipts to September 15, 1934 Total disbursements to September 15, 1934

Cash balance, September 15, 1934, Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo. (restricted) Cash balance, September 15, 1934, Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo........ . . . .. . Cash balance, September 15, 1934, Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo...............

$ 4,778.82 29,891.67 1,770.87 $ 36,441.36

TOTAL CASH BALANCE, Grand Secretary's Cash Book, September 15, 1934. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 36,441.36

Less: Balance due Masonic Home, account 1934 per capita $ 7,907.93 Balance due Masonic Home, account Welfare Committee 7,425.45 $15,333.38


60

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Less: $4,778.82 ' 'restricted' , Fidelity Savings Trust Company........................

$ 4,778.82

$ 20,112.20

Total Amount Available Cash in General Fund........

$ 16,329.16

Fraternally submitted,

... M~

~~

Grand Secretary.

REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER

R. W. Brother E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, presented his report covering the period from September 15, 1933, to September 15, 1934, which was received as follows, together with report of Auditor, and both ordered printed in the Proceedings: 1933 Sept. 15

"

15

"

15

" " ,,

Oct. Nov.

" " Dec. " " " " "

Receipt No. 26 654 Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y $ 1,974.20 443.50 2 655 " " " " 10.46 2 .656 " " " " 413.10 23 657 " " " 19.38 1 658 " " " " 1 1,112.20 659 " " " " 113.35 660 16 " " " ', 998.75* 28 661 " " " 479.60 662 1 " " 365.30 663 4 " " " " 67.20 664 9 " "I I " "I t 665 179.05 18 " " 500.00 21 666 " " " " 809.97* 21 667 " " "

1934 Jan. 3 " 116 17 " 29 1 Feb. 17 " 17

" " "

Balance cash on hand in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri (restricted) ........................ Balance cash on hand in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri.. I! •• • • • • • Balance cash on hand in Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri .............

"

" "

"

"

668 669 670 671 672 673 674 675

" " " "

" " " "

"

"

((

((

"

(,

"

"

((

" "

"

"

" "

"

"

"

"

((

"

((

"

((

48.70 425.30 215.80 31.15 1,054.20 334.25 520.25 38.85

$

4,778.82 65,916.84 1,770.87


1934

Mar.

" Apr.

" " " May " June "

"

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI 1 16 2 11 17 18 2 17 2 19 27

July

2

"

3 3 6 6 6 6 7 7 9 9 10 10 11 11 12 12 13 13 14 14 16 16 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 23 23 24 24 25 25 26 26 27 27 28 28

"

" "

" " "

" "

II

" " "

" " " "

II

"

"I I

" " " " " ,",

"

" " " "

II

" " " " " " " " "

"

676 677 678 679 680 681 682 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 692 693 694 695 696 697 698 699 700 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719 720 721 722 723 724 725 726 727 728 729 730 731

• Bond interest.

Arthur Mather, Grand See'y $

" " " " "

" " " " " " ,", " "

" " " " " " " " " " " " "

II

" "

" " " " " " ,", " " " " " " " " "

" " " " " " "

" " "

" ,", " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " ",, " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

"

" " "

" "

" " " " " " " " " " "

" "

" " " " " "

" " " " " " " "

" " " "

" "

" " " " " " " " " " "

" " " "

"

"

" " " "

" "

" " "

" ,", "

" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

,", " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

198.40 811.00 564.15 943.95 881.65 998.75* 545.20 404.90 784.52 969.68 514.90 1,723.77 36.77 3,470.40 11.71 1,889.10 26.63 4,723.30 6.32 973.75 18.74 3,258.30 35.26 5,954.00 8.23 2,292.60 23.73 4,780.60 32.91 5,377.70 66.08 2,095.60 24.77 1,645.63 40.63 6,887.70 18.74 3,260.45 20.62 3,408.00 7.55 2,158.70 35.89 6,481.50 2,444.80 16.53 30.31 5,138.80 5,188.20 33.79 26.07 4,638.00 38.08 6,360.90 15.45 2,225.10

61


62 July

30 30 31 31 1 1 1 2 " 2 " 3 " 3 " 3 4 " 4 " 8 " 8 " 9 " " 109 " 10 " 15 16 " 22 " Sept. 4 " 144 "

" " " Aug. " "

"

"

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 732 733 734 735 736 737 738 739 740 741 742 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 752 753 754 755 756 757

37.45 6,004.50 11,403.55 72.50 87.26 39.25 12,747.20 11,505.32 41.00 1,910.70 13.18 810.03* 717.30 5.80 830.10 3.35 677.29 5.60 2.58 310.20 1,269.25 25.03 851.70 1,382.70 89.79 1,021.96

Arthur Mather, Grand Sec'y $

" " " " " " "

"

" " "

"

"

" " " " " " " " " "

" "

" " " "

"

"

"

"

" " " " "

" " " "

" " " " " " "

" "

"

" " " " " "

"

" "

" " " "

"

" "

"

" "

" " " " " " "

" "

" "

" "

" " "

" "

" "

" "

"

"

" " " " "

$229,054.49 DISBURSEMENTS

1933 Cheek No. Sept. 14 153 Thad B. Landon, Grand Master Expense ale ............... $ 500.00 Lodge A. F. & A. M. of " 21 1 Grand Mo., mileage & per dien ale .. 18,000.00 A. Fries, Grand Lodge " 26 2 Amos Session Exp. . .............. 225.00 Mather, Gr. Sec'y, ptg., " 28 3 Arthur postage, and incidentals ..... 200.00 Temple Assn., mainte" 28 4 Masonic 150.00 nance ..................... 333.34 5 Arthur Mather, salary ......... " 28 28 300.00 6 J. R. McLachlan, salary ....... " 28 150.00 F. Berger, salary ............. " 28 87 R. L. Bohle, salary ............ 75.00 " Oct. 2 35.35 9 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service ..... 2 10 Masonic Home of Mo., per capita " tax ..... , ................. 2,978.87 2 11 Masonic Temple Assn., last in" stallment .................. 8,000.00 2 12 Masonic Relief Assn., U. S. and " 253.96 Canada ................... 2 13 Herman Mauch, Grand Master's " 175.00 jewel ..................... 2 14 Perkins & Co., audit ........... 150.00 " • Bond interest.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Oct.

2

15

"

2

16

"

2

17

" "

20

18

20

19

25

20

31

21

31 31 31 31 31

22 23 24 25 26

31

27

31

28

31

29

31

30

31

31

31

32

31

33

31

34

31

35

31

36

31

37

81

38

81

39

31

40

31

41

31

42

,,

" " " " "

"

Nov.

31 43 1 44 1

45

Mendle Ptg. Co., Bal. reprint proceedings ...•............ $ 2,862.00 Masonic Home of Mo., alc Welfare Committee . 1,675.00 Masonic Home of Mo., alc Wel1,500.00 fare Committee a/c . Gr. Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Mo., 500.00 mileage & per diem . B. E. Bigger, alc St. Louis 15.80 Temple Assn. . . Van Dyke & Co., Bonds Grand 300.00 Sec 'y & Treas . Masonic Temple Assn., mainte150.00 nance . 333.34 Arthur Mather; salary . 300.00 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . F. C. Barnhill, Exp. Grand 500.00 Master . J. Arthur Anderson Laundry24.57 alc Grand Lodge Session .... Ararat Temple, Exp. Gr. Lodge 50.00 Session . Spalding Sta. Co., Exp. Gr. 36.14 Lodge Session . E. A. Long Tramlfer Co., Exp. 8.00 Gr. Lodge Session . Lilly-Ames Co., Exp. Gr. Lodge 25.29 Session . Bastian Bro. Co., alc Gr. Lodge 54.58 Session Exp . Hotel Muehlebach, alc Gr. Lodge 71.50 Session Exp . W. F. Woodruff, alc Gr. Lodge 4.85 Session Exp . Chas. H. Wolf, Transcript ale 92.60 Alpha Lodge . Richard L. Blume, alc Exp. Appeals & Grievance Com . 5.00 Strauss-Peyton, Portraits Freet 65.00 & Denslow . William Ballinger, Gr. Lodge 150.00 Reporter . Seaman Russell, Ass't Grand 15.00 Tiler . Wm. Brockmeier, Ass't Grand 15.00 Tiler . Menke Ptg. Co., ptg., postage 61.75 and sta . Spalding Sta. Co., ptg., postage 135.37 and sta . 35.15 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . Union Safe Deposit Co., alc SID Box No. 6111 . 8.25 J. R. McLachlan, alc Exp. Grand Lecturer ..................• 27.00

63


64 7

46

"

14

47

" "

14

48

14

49

" " "

15

50

24

51

25

52

" "

29

53

Nov.

" " "

Dec.

29 54 29 55 29 56 29 57 8 58

"

8

59

"

12

60

" "

12

61

12

62 <i3

"

23 23 23 23 30

"

19

68

"

30

69

1934 Jan. 2

70

"

"

"

"

"

3

" "

13 13

"

13

"

16 31

" "

"

1934路

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

31 31

64 65 66 67

Guy G. Million, Exp. Bldg. Su44.73 pervisory Comm. . .. _........ $ Elsa A. Ripley, Exp. alc G. L. 66.68 Session . Arthur Mather, alc Marshall, 21.29 Mo., meeting . Thos. B. Mather, alc Macon, 12.72 Mo. meeting . Arthur Mather, alc G. M. Re41.50 lief Program . U. S. Guarantee Co., check alter14.00 ation insurance . Masonic Home of Mo., alc Wel1,000.00 fare Comm . Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . . 150.00 333.34 Arthur Mather, salary . 300.00 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Spalding Sta. Co., 1934 dues 975.93 receipt cards . J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand 86.83 Lecturer . Forrest C. Donnell, Pro Forma 26.30 decree . Menke Ptg. Co., Ptg. & Sta. sup104.25 plies . Arthur Mather, Ptg. & Sta. sup100.00 plies . 333.34 Arthur Mather, salary . 300.00 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 150.00 F. Berger, salary . 75.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . Masonic Temple Assn., St. Louis, 150.00 maintenance . Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of 12.93 Mo., mileage and per diem alc J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 61.35

The Ovid Bell Press, Printing Proceedings . 71 Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare Relief . 72 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . 73 W. N. Marbut, alc 55th Dist., Cassville . 74 Arthur Mather, alc Exp. Jackson & West Plains .. : . 75 The Ovid Bell Press, binding alc 76 F. C. Barnhill, Grand Master's expense . 77 Masonic Home of Mo., alc Welfare Relief . 78 Masonic Temple Assn., St.Louis, maintenance .

1,329.47 2,000.00 37.05 3.50 17.35 52.50 500.00 1,000.00 150.00


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

31 79 Arthur Mather, salary $ 333.33 31 80 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 300.00 150.00 31 81 F. Berger, salary . 31 82 R. L. Bohle, salary . 75.00 6 83 J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 96.90 84 Spalding Sta. Co., supplies . 65.84 " 12 E. Morris, alc G. L. Officers " 12 85' E.Conference 13.05 . C. Barnhill, Exp. Geo. " 12 86 F.Washington 100.00 Conf. . . Mather, Exp. Geo. Wash" 12 87 Arthur ington Conf . 100.00 Mather, Exp. alc Dexter, " 12 88 Arthur 15.25 Mo . Temple Assn., mainte." 28 89 Masonic "150.00 nance . 90 Arthur Mather, salary . 333.33 " 28 300.00 91 J. R. McLachlan, salary . ,", 28 28 92 F. Berger, salary . 150.00 93 R. L. Bohle, salary . 75.00 " 28 28 94 Masonic Home of Mo., Welfare 1,000.00 Relief . 300.00 28 95 F. C. Barnhill, salary . " 28 96 J. Claude Keiper, alc Grand " 50.00 Masters Conference . Mar. 1 97 Thos. H. Reynolds, Exp. Kansas 4.30 Grand Lodge . 6 98 J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand " Lecturer . 69.18 15.75 26 99 Menke Ptg. Co., supplies . 100 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . 30.98 " 26 101 Spalding Sta. Co., supplies . 60.68 " 26 Mather, alc Columbia " 26 102 Arthur 40.48 . Com. Ritual Temple Assn., mainte" 31 103 Masonic 150.00 nance . 104 Arthur Mather, salary . 333.33 " 31 300.00 31 105 J. R. McLachlan, salary . " 31 F. Berger, salary . 150.00 " 31 106 75.00 107 R. L. Bohle, salary . Apr. 2 108 J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand 81.60 Lecturer . 4 109 B. E. Bigger, Exp. St. Louis " 15.80 Masonic Temple Assn . Mather, Gr. Sec'y, ptg, " 24 110 Arthur 100.00 postage, etc. . . Home of Mo., alc Wel" 24 111 Masonic 1,000.00 fare Relief . R. Mather, Exp. to Hanni" 24 112 Thos. 23.00 bal and Bogard . Temple Assn., mainte" 30 113 Masonic 150.00 nance . 333.33 114 Arthur Mather, salary . " 30 115 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 300.00 " 30 150.00 116 F. Berger, salary . " 30 75.00 . " 30 117 R. L. Bohle, salary

Jan.

" " " Feb.

"

"

"

65


66 May

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 10 118

.,

10 119

"

10 120

"

10 121

" " "

24 122 31 123 31 124

" " " " June

31 31 31 31 1

125 126 127 128 129

" " "

1 130

"

1 133 14 134

" " "

1 131 1 132

14 135 14 136

"

30 137

"

30 138 30 139

" " " "

" " "

July

30 140 30 141 30 30 30 30 10

142 143 144 145 146

"

20 147

"

31 148

"

31 149

"

31 150

" "

31 151 31 152 31 153

"

Strauss-Peyton, Portrait Thad 32.50 B. Landon, G. Moo $ Hugo Busch, flowers, W. A. 25.00 Clark, funeral . Spalding Sta. Co., ptg., postage, 103.09 etc . J. R. McLachlan, Exp. Grand Lecturer . 37.38 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service . 45.31 F. C. Barnhill, salary . 300.00 Masonic Temple Assn., maintenance . 150.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 333.33 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 300.00 F. Berger, salary . 150.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . 75.00 Masonic Home of Mo., a/c Wel1,000.00 fare Relief . Whitehead & Hoag Co., Veteran Masonic Emblems . 580.00 Bodine Pattern Co., Grand Lodge Tablet . 50.00 B. M. Little, freight, G. L. Tablet . 5.80 J. E. Kist, setting G. L. Tablet 3.00 E. E. Morris, salary Grand Treasurer . 400.00 Journal Ptg. Co., Dr. W. A. Clark, memorial . 31.45 Arthur Mather, postage, alc annual returns . 100.00 Missourian Ptg. & Sta. Co., office supplies . 106.00 Spalding Sta. Co., office supplies 91.31 Masonic Home of Mo., a/c Welfare Relief Com..•.......... 2,000.00 F. C. Barnhill, a/c salary . 200.00 Masonic Temple Assoc., maintenance . 150.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 333.33 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 300.00 F. Berger, salary . 150.00 R. L. Bohle, salary . 75.00 Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax a/c . 5,000.00 Masonic Home of Mo., per capita tax a/c . 10,000.00 Masonic Home of Mo., per tax alc ...............•... 15,000.00 F. C. Barnhill, Grand Masters Exp. alc . 200.00 Masonic Temple Assoc., maintenance ..•.•••.............. 150.00 Arthur Mather, salary . 333.33 J. R. McLachlan, salary . 300.00 F. Berger, salary . 150.00

1934


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

67

31 154 R. L. Bohle, salary. . . . . . . . . . .. $ 75.00 31 155 S. W. Bell Tel. Co., service ..... 37.20 6 156 Arthur Mather, Gr. Sec'y, ptg., 100.00 postage, sta. . . 43.95 6 157 Spalding Sta. Co., ptg. supplies " 6 158 Masonic Home of Mo., alc per capita tax . 25,000.00 Home of Mo., alc per " 13 159 Masonic capita tax . 20,000.00 Home of Mo., alc per " 21 160 Masonic capita tax . 25,000.00 E. Morris, Grand Treas., alc " 22 161 E.Sampson Lodge, cheek unpaid 41.39 54.30 162 Spalding Sta. Co., office supplies " 31 415.00 and sta... " 31 163 Menke Ptg. Co., ptg. Portrait of Gr. " 31 164 Strauss-Peyton, 32.50 Master . C. Barnhill, alc Gr. Master's " 31 165 F.salary 200.00 . C. Barnhill, alc Gr. Master's " 31 166 F.expenses 300.00 . Temple Assn., mainte" 31 167 Masonic 150.00 nance . 31 168 Arthur Mather, salary . 333.33 169 Not in September 15, 1934 31 170 F. Berger, salary . 150.00 75.00 171 R. L. Bohle . " 31 Home of Mo., per " 31 172 Masonic capita tax . 25,000.00 Sept. 4 173 Arthur Mather, Gr. See'y, alc Conference at Arrow Rock ... 211.96 Federal check tax paid during the year . 3.46 $ 192,997.82 July

" Aug.

"

" "

Cash on hand in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo. (restricted) .. $ 4,778.82 $ 4,778.82 Cash on hand in Union Nat ion a I Bank, Kansas City, Mo. $29,506.98 Cash on hand in Wood Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 1,770.87

31,277.85 $

36,056.67

Total $ 229,054.49 Addenda: The $4,778.82 referred to above as being in the Fidelity Savings Trust Company in Kansas City is 47% per cent of the balance which was in said bank at the time of the bank moratorium which affected all banks in the United States on March 3, 1933. Because of a large amount of frozen assets, believed good, the said Fidelity Savings Trust Company did not reopen at the close of the holiday but went into voluntary liquidation, under direction of three liquidating trustees acting for the depositors, and serving without pay. The recovery of the amount referred to above will be slow, but those most direetly concerned with this liquidation be-


68

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

lieve at this time that there are ample assets with which to pay the entire restricted balance referred to above. In the meantime the amount in question will receive 3 per cent annual interest if depositors are paid in full. It is confidently believed at this time that there will be no ultimate loss.

Respectfully submitted, EDMUND E. MORRIS,

Treasurer. REPORT, GRAND LODGE, A. F. & A. M. OF MISSOURI

September 14, 1934.

To the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri. Gentlemen: Conforming with your instructions, we have examined and checked the book records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri for the period from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934; also the Masonic Home Initiation Fee Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund, and the W m. F. Kuhn Library Fund for the same period, and respectfully present the following report: GENERAL FUND---PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS

Balance, September 16, 1933

.

$ 71,966.53

Receipts, Forwarded to Grand Trea.'~urer: Per capita tax, 1934 $132,907.93 Back dues 17,925.45 $524.75 Sale of Manuals Sale of dues receipts 893.06 Sale of By-Laws 44.00 Sale of 1933 Proceedings 1.50 Sale of Masonic Veteran Emblems 198.00 1,661.31 Interest on temporary investments, General Fund . Interest on Government Bonds in Permanent Fund . Profit on exchange of Liberty Bonds for Treasury Bonds ..... Sale of Liberty Bond from Permanent Fund .

468.75 3,166.34 138.50 1,004.37

157,272.65 $229,239.18

Per cheques issued Federal tax on cheques

Disbursements . .

Balance in Banks, September 15, 1934 .

$192,794.36 3.46

192,797.82 $ 36,441.36


.1934

69

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI GRAND TREASURER'S BOOKS

$ 72,466.53

Balance in Banks, September 16, 1933 . Add: Receipts forwarded by Grand Secretary deposited in banks September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934 .

156,587.96 $229,054.49

Deduct: Cheques issued by Grand Secretary cleared by banks September 16, 1933 to September 15, 1934 Tax on cheques " ...

$192,994.36 3.46

Balance in Banks, September 15, 1934 Consisting of: Balance in Fidelity Savings Trust Company, Kansas City, Mo. (in liquidation, not subject to withdrawal) Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo. Balance in Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo.

192,997.82 $ 36,056.67

$

4,778.82 29,506.98 1,770.87

$ 36,056.67

RECONCILIATION

Balance per Grand Treasurer's Books, September 15, 1934 . Deduct: Cheque No. 169 outstanding .

$ 36,056.67 300.00 $ 35,756.67

Add: Receipt No. 758 forwarded 9-15-34, deposited 9-17-34 Receipt No. 759 forwarded 9路15-34, deosited 9-17-34

by Secretary $ by

Secretary .

35.39 649.30

Balance per Grand Secretary's Books, September 15, 1934 .

684.69 $ 36,441.36

BONDS

On September 19, 1934, in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, A. F. & A. M., of Missouri, and a representative, designated by the Grand Master, we counted and examined the following securities in the Grand Lodge safe deposit box of the Union National Bank of Kansas City, Missouri. All interest income accruing from these securities was accounted for. PERMANENT FUND

Par Interest Interest Value Bond No. Kind Date Rate G01534387 4th Liberty Loan 4-15 & 10-15 4JA, % $ 1,000.00 F00991756 4th Liberty Loan 4-15 & 10-15 4JA, % 1,000.00 C02026283 4th I.. . iberty Loan 4-15 & 10-15 4JA, % 1,000.00


70

Interest Interest Kind Date Rate Bond No. D01306564 4th Liberty Loan 4-15 & 10-15 414% FOO141826 4th Liberty Loan 4-15 & 10-15 4%% GOO026327 HOO026328 JOO026329 KOO038060

1934

PROOEEDINGS OF THE

U. U. U. U.

S. S. S. S.

Treasury Treasury Treasury Treasury

4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15 4-15 & 10-15

4% % 4% % 4% % 4% %

Par Value 1,000.00 5,000.00

$ 9,000.00

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

25,000.00 6,000.00

000002873 U. S. Treasury 000000803 U. S. Treasury

6-15 & 12-15 4% 6-15 & 12-15 4%

$ 1,000.00 5,000.00

4911A JOO048489 KOO048490 000013673 DOOO13674

6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15

3%% 3% % 3%% 3% % 3%%

$ 5,000.00

1,000,00 1,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00

27,000.00

4-15 & 10-15 3 1,4 % 4-15 & 10-15 3% % 4-15 & 10-15 3% %

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 10,000.00

12,000.00

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

150022B U. S. Treasury 1500230 U. S. Treasury 7569K U. S. Treasury

$79,000.00 GENERAL FUND

35236F 129377H 129378J 129379K 129380L 129381A

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15 6-15 & 12-15

3%% 3% % 3%% 3% % 3%% 3% %

Par $10,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00

Cost $10,012",50 996.25 996.25 996.25 996.25 996.25

$15,000.00

$14,993.75

WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

7451A U. S. Treasury 3%% $ 500.00 There had been no change in the bonds in the General Fund or the Wm. F. Kuhn Library Fund since our examination of September 20, 1933. In the Permanent Fund, $12,000.00,4% %, Fourth Liberty Loan Bonds were called and r(jplaced by $12,000.00, 3:14 %, United States Treasury Bonds. On September 15, 1934, one $1,000.00 Fourth Liberty Loan Bond was sold for $1,004.37 plus $17.59 accrued interest and the proceeds deposited in the General Fund bank account. MASONIC HOME INITIATION FUND

The Grand Secretary received from the Masonic Lodges of Missouri, September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934, the sum of $1,374.00 and deposited this amount in the Special Initiation Fund account in the First National Bank in St. Louis. No withdrawals were made from this account during the fiscal year ended September 15, 1934. GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Balance in Bank, September 16, 193~ ..... , .... Re~e.iv:ed from Masonic Lodges $1.00 per IDltlate , .. , , , , ,

$

824.60 128.40

$

953.00


1934

71

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Disbursements Remittance to J. Claude Keiper, Treasurer, George Washington Memorial Fund, February 21, 1934 ..... . Cheque tax Bank service charges .....................â&#x20AC;˘

$

850.00 .02 3.00

Balance, September 15, 1934, First National Bank. in St. Louis ...................â&#x20AC;˘

853.02

$

99.98

$

672.27

WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 16, 1933

.

Receipts Interest on bond .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. Interest on savings account . Consisting of: Cash in Savings Account, First National Bank in St. Louis, Missouri United States Treasury Bond No. 7451A .

$

$

16.88 4.39

193.54 500.00

21.27 $

693.54

$

693.54

MILEAGE AND PER DIEM COMMITTEE

Deposits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$18,512.93

Disbursements Payroll cheques issued Tax on cheques Balance, September 15, 1934

$18,499.75 13.18 $

18,512.93 00

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from tIre books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer, and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri from September 16, 1933, to September 15, 1934, and the securities on hand in the above stated funds as at September 15, 1934. Respectfully submitted, PERKINS & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountants. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

M. 'V. Brother John Pickard, in rising to present the report of the Committee spoke as follows: Knowing how many duties we have before us at this point I will make the report very brief, but I cannot sit down without referring to that great, that loyal and devoted friend, Dr. William A. Carpenter, Past District Deputy Grand Master. His splendid service as a doctor, as a citizen, and as a member of the Home Board, call for our careful consideration and our loving memory. In central Missouri he was known as "Uncle" Bill Carpenter. He was ninety-seven years old and had been a Freemason for seventy-six years. R. W. Brother Carpenter was born in Boone County, lived practically all his life there, was initiated in Sturgeon Lodge, became a member of the Centralia Lodge, served as its Master in


72

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

twelve different years, was its Secretary eighteen years, was District Deputy Grand Master and Lecturer for some twelve years and at all times through practically three generations of men was a power and force for good in Masonry. His record is a remarkable one, and as our old friend Dr. Briggs used to say, his long years are a proof of the longevity of living the life of a good Freemason. Wm. H. Carpenter was born on June 23, 1836, on a farm five miles east of Columbia, Missouri. It is interesting to know that his father obtained the land through a patent from John Quincy Adams, and that Uncle Will is the only person to hold title to it since the death of his father. On December 18,1863, he married Amanda Susan Bruton. He joined the Lodge in Sturgeon in 1858. Julius R. Edwards often heard him say, "He took his Third Degree at the first meeting night in June of that year." He was a member of Centralia Lodge No. 59 since 1868 and was easily the most distinguished Freemason our Lodge has ever had. He was Worshipful Master of Centralia Lodge No. 59 during the years 1870, 1871, 18.72, 1874, 1876, 1877, 1880; 1881, 1889, 1890-a total of ten years. He was Secretary of his Lodge as follows: 1878, 1889, 1887, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1912-a total of 15 years. He served as District Deputy Grand Master during the years 1871, 1872, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 1901, 1902 and 1903-a total of 17 years. It is my understanding that during a period of 52 years, he attended 48 Annual Sessions of the Grand Lodge. He was District Deputy Grand Lecturer for a few years. I have heard him say that he got his first accurate conception of the ritual from R. W. Bro. Anthony 0 'Sullivan. He was a close friend of Bro. Allen McDowell and he regarded M. W. Brother T. E. Garrett as the finest mind of his day. He conferred the First Degree in our Lodge after he was 90 years old and did it with great accuracy. He was a great old man. The Grand Lodge during the year just passed has been bereaved of one of its most distinguished Past Grand Masters. Dr. Wm. A. Clark, of Jefferson City, Missouri, who presided over the 'Grand Lodge in 1918, obeyed the summons of the Supreme Grand Master on April 11, 1934. A suitable memorial was prepared by our M. W. Grand Master and sent to all constituent Lodges, as well as to the Grand Lodges throughout the world with which the Grand Lodge of Missouri is in fraternal relation. Dr. Clark has written himself large on the pages of our history and his memory will abide forever. On February 8,1934, R. W. Brother James F. Blair, D. D. G. M., of the 34th District, passed to his eternal reward at Belton, Missouri. His funeral was attended by M. W. Brother F. C. Barnhill and R. W. Brothers, H. C. Chiles and Harry S. Truman, together with a large concourse of brethren and citizens of that section of the State. R. W. Brother Blair was a man among men, greatly beloved and highly esteemed by all who knew him. The following Grand Jurisdictions have been bereaved of the eminent brethren whose names are hereto appended. Missouri pays tribute to the high standing and worth of these distinguished brethren whose services to the Craft have been of inestimable value. Arkansas: Fay Hempstead, Grand Secretary, died April 24, 1934. Colorado: Marshall V. Van Fleet, Past Grand Master, died July 7, 1934. C<mnecticut: Rev. Wm. F. English, Past Grand Master, died October 11,1933.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

73

Delaware: Harry F. Guthrie, Past Grand Master, died September 6, 1934. Florida: F. Leroy Brandon, Past Grand Master, died September 18, 1934. Illinois: Henry Thompson Burnap, Past Grand Master, died. July 3, 1934. Indiana: Charles F. Orbison, Past Grand Master, died July 27, 1933. Louisiana: Prentiss B. Carter, Past Grand Master, died August 4, 1934. John Antonia Davilla, Grand Seereta.ry Emeritus, died February 10, 1934. Maine: Wallace N. Price, Past Grand Junior Warden, died June 16, 1934. Maryland: George Cook, Grand Secretary, died October 9, 1933. Michigan: John Jay Carton, Past Grand Master, died August 26, 1934. Nebraska: John J. Tooley, Past Grand Master, died July 31, 1934. New York: Thomas Penney, Past Grand Master, died November 11, 1933. Robert H. Robinson, Past Grand Master, died November 7, 1933. Nova Scotia: Arthur James Davis, Past Grand Master, died June路 12, 1934. Ohio: O. P. Sperra, Past Grand Master, died December 20, 1933. Oregon: Frank John Miller, Past Grand Master, died June 14, 1934. South Oa.rolina: George Thomas Harmon, Past Grand Master, died May 22, 1934. South Dakota: John Frederick Schrader, Past Grand Master, died June 14, 1934. Tennessee: William Alexander Walker, Past Deputy Grand Master, died September 10,1934. Texas: William Seat Fly, Past Grand Master, died June 1, 1934. Washington: Thomas Merle Askren, Past Grand Master, died Jan. 31, 1934. West Virginia: Frank Wells Clark, Past Grand Master, died June 17, 1934. Luther Hale Clark, Past Grand Master, died December 23, 1933. Wiscon.~in: Ernest Egbert Gatchell, Past Grand Master, died December 10, 1933. Aldro Jenks, Past Grand Master, died January 1, 1934. Frank Johnson, Past Grand Master, died January 20, 1934. Wyoming: Emile A. Abry, Past Grand Master, died July 5, 1934. Harold Banner, Past Grand Master, died March 30, 1934. We tender our fraternal sympathies to each of these Grand J urisdictions and offer our condolences in the losses which they have sustained through the home-going of these brethren. Fraternally submitted, JOHN PICKARD, Chatirman.

NOTE: After the adjournment of the Grand Lodge, notice was received of the passing of R. W. Brother Sterling P. Cunningham, for many years District Deputy Grand Master of the Twenty-seventh District, who died full of years and honors on September 24, 1934. R. W. Brother Cunningham was made a Master Mason on November 8, 1890, in Centralia Lodge No. 59. He dimitted therefrom on September 27, 1906, to become a charter member of Houston Lodge No. 580, and continued his membership therein until his death. R. W. Brother Cunningham was a prominent member of the Christian Church at Salt River, Missouri. After moving to Mexico, Missouri, however, he taught the Twentieth Century Bible Class at


74

PROOEEDINGS OF THE

1934

the First Christian Church at Mexico, one of the largest in central Missouri, although retaining his membership in the Church at Salt River. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

The Report of the Committee on Grand Master's Address was presented by M. W. Brother Thad B. Landon, Chairman, and on motion was adopted and is as follows. To the Grand Lodge, A. F. ~ A. M., of Missouri: Brethren: Your Oommittee on Grand Master's Address respeetfully recommends the following references: 1. All recommendations as to finances and expenditures of monies to the Ways and Means Committee. 2. All decisions to the Jurisprudence Committee. 3. All matters appertaining to Masonic discipline to the Committee on Appeals and Grievances. 4. We approve the action of the Grand Master in all other matters and commend him for his efforts to build up a Masonic spirit within the Fraternity. The Grand Master's Address, to which you have listened, shows that he has ably, faithfully and diligently performed the duties of the office of Grand Master, befitting the dignity and importance of that high office. His reward is the affection and gratitude of the Fraternity, and the sat路 isfaction in knowing that the brethren can and do say in the words of holy writ, "Well done, Thou good and faithful servant. ' , Respectively submitted, THAD B. LANDON, Chairman. R. R. KREEGER ARCH A. JOHNSON T. W. OOTTON V. F. BOOR RAY V. DENSLOW JOHN PICKARD

ORESTES MITCHELL WM:. R. GENTRY BYRNE E. BIGGER BERT S. LEE W. W. MARTIN ANTHONY F. ITTNER

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AMENDMENT TO THE CHARTER OF THE MASONIC HOME

M. W. Brother Thad B. Landon, Chairman, reported as follows: Your Committee begs leave to report that the Charter of the Grand Lodge has been amended in accordance with your directions, and that the suggestion as to amendment of the Charter of the Masonic Home has also been amended and that the duties and perogatives and labor of the Committee have been fully completed.

The report of the Committee was adopted and the Committee discharged. APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES

The Grand Secretary called attention to the list of Committees which had been appointed to serve during the 1934 Communication. They are as follows:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

75

STANDING COM:MI'M'EES

Jurisprudence-- Henri I. Warren, Chairman; C. IJew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer, Sam Wilcox and Leo H. Johnson. Appeals and Grievancca-William F. Woodruff, Chairman; John R. Baker, Ray Bond, Allen L. Oliver, James H. Scarborough. Ways and .Means-James A. Kinder, one year, Chairman; George C. Marquis, three years j Edmund E. Morris, three years j Solon Cameron, two years; Oscar W. Arcularius, two years. Credentials-Theodore C. Teel, Chairman; Henry W. Woerther, Charles M. Christie, Julius R. Edwards, Thomas A. Harbough. Pay Ron-Walter R. Shrodes, Chm-rman; Henry C. Elberg, Wilbert A. Wells, John H. Hoopes, E. L. Harrison. Chartered Lodge~-Eugene J. Altheimer, Chairman j J. Earl Tobler, Shelby H. Wilson. Lodges U. D.-John W. Adams, Chairman; W. H. May, Earl F. Cheesmen, J. P. Hurtt, Thomas W. Hoskins. Welfare-Tolman W. Cotton, Chairman; B. E. Bigger, Robert R. Kreeger, Arch A. Johnson, Wm. S. Campbell. Reports of D. D. G. M.'s-Dr. F. M. Smith, Chairman; J. Renick Jones, Thomas J. Wornall, W. L. Eshelman. Masonic Boards of Relief-Edward McGuigan, three years, Chairman; Fred H. Knight, one year; Morris E. Ewing, two years; Albert Linxwiler, Wm. A. Piner. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, five years, Chairman; John Pickard, four years; Henry C. Chiles, three years; Charles T. Kornbrodt, two years; James A. Kinder, one year. Masonio Home (Visiting Committee)-Albert Linxwiler, Chairman; Harry Hightower. Correspondence-Ray Y. Denslow, Chairman. N ecrology-John Pickard, Chairman. Auditing-Perkins Audit Company. Grand Master's Address-Thad B. Landon, Chairman; all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business-Dudley D. Thomas, Jr., Chairman. Transportation and Hotels-Wm. F. Miller, Chairman. . SPECIAL COMMITTEES

Masonic Service Ass'n of Mo.-Tha.d. R. Sm~th, Chairman. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Arthur Mather, Chairman; J. R. McLachlan, Henry C. Chiles, Byrne E. Bigger, Buel P. Parks. _ Masonic Temple Ass'n of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Edward McGuigan, John Wohradsky, Jr. Geo. Washington Masonic National Memorial Ass'n-Bert S. Lee, Chairman. Library-Wm. B. Massey, Chairman; Julius C. Garrell, Jr., Wm. P. Mason. Printing of Proceedings-Arthur Mather, James A. Kinder. Masonic Publications-Wm. R." Gentry, Chairman; Ray Y. Denslow, Byrne E. Bigger. Chartf'Jr of Masonic Home-Thad B. Landon, Chairman; Grover C. James, C. Lew Gallant, Walter A. Higbee, Thomas H. Reynolds. BUilding Sup~visory Board-Guy C. Million, Chairman; F. Wm. Kuehl, Cecil A. Tolin. Special Committee on Grand Master's Relief Program-Willis J. Bray, Chairman; Robert Y. Goggin, U. W. Lamkin, L. J. Graue, K. C. Johnson, C. B. Waddell, T. D. Williams. Special Committee on Revision of By-Laws-Hen.ry C. Chiles, Chairman; Ray Y. Denslow, Byrne E. Bigger.


76

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

CALLED FROM LABOR

The M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR to refreshment at 12 :30 o'clock P.M., to reconvene at 1 :30 o'clock P.M. of the same day.

FIRST DAY, AFTERNOON SESSION CALLED TO LABOR

At 1 :30 o'clock P.M. the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by M. W. Grand Master Frank C. Barnhill, the Grand Officers being in their respective stations as at the morning session. RESOLUTION

M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow offered the following resolution: Be it resolved: That the Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri erect a bronze memorial plaque on the exterior of the Old Masonic. Lodge Hall at Arrow Rock, Missouri, commemorating the life of Anthony 0 'Sullivan and the remarkable services rendered to the Masonic Fraternity of Missouri by him during a most eventful period of our history.

The foregoing resolution was adopted and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means for necessary appropriation. REPORT OF DmECTORS OF MASONIC HOME

M. W. Brother William W. Martin presented the report of the Masonic Home Board which was adopted and ordered printed in the Proceedings. (See Page 223.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES U. D.

The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of M i.~sO'Uri: The Committee on Lodges Under Dispensation reports that there are no Lodges under Dispensation. JOHN W. ADAMS, Chairman. REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER

R. W. James R. McLachlan presented his report as Grand Lecturer, which was read by M. W. Brother W. W. Martin. KAHOKA, Mo., September 20, 1934. To the M. W. Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Aocepted Masons of the State of Missouri: The report of my activities during the past year does not vary much from preceding reports, except that I was compelled to cancel some of my scheduled engagements on account of sickness. Prior to that time, however, I had made a very active campaign, and was considerably ahead of the schedule that I had mapped out for my guidance. It is unnecessary for me to mention the difficulties with which we had to contend, as everybody is familiar with existing conditions. At the


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

77

beginning of the year, when the initiation fee was reduced, there was some activity in many of our Lodges, but this was of short duration. The drought continued, the hot winds came and wrought ruin to the growing vegetation and blasted the hopes of our Lodges for a good harvest of candidates and had a tendency. to lessen their ardor. A number of my deputies reported that many of their Lodges celebrated certain events in the history of their own Lodge, which were of more than local interest and from the reported attendance on such occasions, we can reasonably infer that we have not lost all interest in our institution. There are many Masonic occasions that are worthy of commemorating every year, and the membership need not go further than their own Lodge or community for talent to enact a program that will be both interesting and edifying. The meetings of the District Associations are a source of attraction to the brethren and the attendance is very gratifying. The programs are varied to avoid monotony and according to the demands of the different groups. The general purposes of these meetings are to form acquaintances, establish friendships, educational and to maintain interest in Masonic work. From my own observation, I feel that they are fulfilling their mission and are of great benefit to the Craft in gene~al. I visited and held Lodges of Instruction at the following places: Downing, Rutledge, Memphis, Wyaconda, Elmer, Shelbyville, Macon, Chillicothe, Hamilton, Carrollton, Mendon, Montgomery City, Bellflower, New Florence, Mexico, Huntsville, Moberly, Winfield, Harrisburg, Columbia, Ashland, Sturgeon, Armstrong, Marshall, Lexington, Buckner, Cameron, Monroe, St. Charles, Wentzville, Washington, Steelville, Salem, Jefferson City, Sedalia, Parkville, Platte City, Rockport, Tarkio, Burlington Junction, Maryville, Bolckow, Whitesville, Eagleville, Cainsville, McFall, Maysville, Excelsior Springs, Kansas City, Brookfield, Moscow, Meramec, Princeton, Trenton, Milan, Kirksville, Harrisonville, Clinton, Hermitage, Bolivar, Greenfield, Lamar, Eldorado Springs, Butler, Versailles, Eldon, DeSoto, Carthage. Death invaded our ranks during the past year and took from our midst two of my most valued Deputies. Brother E. J. Koch, of the Thirtyninth District, was stricken while in the performance of his duties in the Masonic Hall at Rolla, on October 13, 1933, and lingered. until October 30. His death was a distinct loss to the community and to the Masonic district over which he presided. With the exception of one year, he had served continUOUSly since 1903, sometimes representing both the Grand Master and Grand Lecturer, but more recently the representative of the Grand Lecturer. His Lodges were considerably scattered but distance was no obstacle to him. The results of his labors will long be remembered by the brethren. Brother James F. Blair, of the Thirty-fourth District, was suddenly stricken while at his desk in the bank on February 7, 1934. He had long been active in Masonic work and was well known and respected by the brethren throughout the district. He had been engaged in the banking business at Belton for 45 years and was univeil'sally respected for his honesty and good judgment. Much more could be said concerning the lives of both these brethren and I've no doubt but what the committee on necrology will give a more extended account. This is my last report as Grand Lecturer to the Grand Lodge. Sometime in July I mailed letters to the officers of this Grand Lodge and to my deputies announcing my retirement at the conclusion of the session of this Grand Lodge. This action was taken on the advice of my physician and I think it wise to heed his counsel. I had looked forward to such action but I did not anticipate an enforced retirement on account of


78

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

health, nor did I want it to be at the request of my brethren as having outlived my usefulness. I have received many letters from the brethren from all parts of the state, laudatory of the service I have rendered and expressions of regrets at the necessity of my retirement. The consciousness of having performed my duties faithfully and well, according to my ability and the satisfaction of the Craft in general, does much to alleviate the sorrow for the sacrifice that I am compelled to make, and will ever be a pleasing reflection to me. If, in all the years of my labors, "I have put one touch of a rosy sunset into the life of any man, I shall feel that I have worked with God." I have witnessed many changes in this Grand Body, since my appointment as Grand Lecturer in July, 1906. I have seen almost, if not quite, three regular lines of officers succeed to the exalted station of Grand Master. It has been my privilege to serve during the administration of twenty-nine Grand Masters, all of whom I shall gratefully remember for their kindly assistance and for the many pleasant incidents of our association. Of the twenty-nine Grand Masters under whom I served, thirteen of them have been translated to the Grand Lodge above. The membership in this Grand Jurisdiction has grown from 42,954 in 1906 to 97,266 as given in the Grand Lodge proceedings for 1934. Some of the members of this Grand Lodge were comparatively young men then. Now, the marks of time are plainly visible upon their countenances. " Thus wastes man." I am most grateful to my Deputi68 for their loyalty to me and for the many favors I have received from their hands. I have enjoyed my association with them and always looked forward to my visits in their districts. These visitations will be denied me in the future and I must be content with the many pleasant memories which such visits offered. The past few years have tested the ardor of these faithful workers but they are bravely hoping for the dawn of better days. Appended hereto is an abstract of their reports to me. ABSTRACT

m'

REPORTS OF DISTRICT LEC'fURERS

Brother Homer G. McDaniel, of the First District, held no special Lodge of Instruction but visited and assisted in the work of the following named places: Wayland, Kahoka, Luray, Revere, Alexandria, Memphis, Downing and Wyaconda. But few of the Lodges had much work. The Lodges at Wayland and Alexandria eaeh acted favorably on five candidates. In company with R. W. Brother H. M. Jayne, D. D. G. M., he visited a number of the Lodges and succeeded in organizing a District Association which has been in successful operation ever since, which is indicative of the interest maintained by the Lodges of the District. Brother Walter E. Singley, of the Third District, reports that aside from the Lodge of Instruction at Milan, presided over by the Grand Lecturer, he held no other schools. With the exception of the Lodges at Harris and Lucerne, he visited all the Lodges in his charge, some of them several times. He says that as a whole the brethren are to be commended for their good work. On several occasions, he was ably assisted by Brethren John Santee and Joseph W. Moore, two former District Lecturers. The Lodges generally are in good condition and very well equipped for service. Brother E. M. Wilson, of the Fourth District, visited and assisted in degree work in five of the Lodges under his supervision and otherwise performed the duties ineident to his office. He responded to every eall made upon him but on account of general conditions, no great amount of activity was necessary.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

79

Brother George Houchens, of the Seventh District, visited the Lodges at Quitman, Burlington Junetion, Pickering, Maryville and Ravenwood. He was also present and assisted the Grand Lecturer at Maryville and Burlington Junetion. The prospects for unusual activity throughout the District were very bright until the drought came, and as a eonsequence of whieh but very little work was done. " Brother Frank R. Elton, of the Eighth District, visited the Lodges at Forest City, Fairfax, Maitland, Mound City, Rockport and Tarkio. Lodges of Instruction were held at Tarkio on each Monday night during the months of January and February. Every Lodge in the District had some work, and notwithstanding the heat and drought this year's reeord has been better than the last year. Brother Frank A. Miller held Lodges of Instruction in every Lodge in the District; in many of them on more than one occasion. All the Lodges have been more"or less active and their interest in their Lodge work is beyond expectations, under present eonditions. He feels that the Lodges are in as good condition, generally, as could be expected. A special team, composed of members pf the city Lodges, accompanied him on numerous occasions and the degrees were exemplified in sueh a manner as to inspire all those present to greater efficiency and much good was accomplished by these visitations. Brother Emsley C. James, of the Eleventh District, reports that more interest in Masonic work than usual is evident throughout the District. A number of Masonie occasions in various Lodges, at which there were many invited guests, were very interesting and did mueh to maintain interest among the brethren of the various Lodges. All but one of the Lodges were visited and instruetion given. A Distriet Assoeiation was organized and. is now functioning in a very sueeessful manner. Brother John M. Gallatin, of the Twelfth Distriet, visited twelve of the thirteen Lodges in his charge. He notes a fine spirit of revival in nearly all of them. Hamilton, Polo, Wheeling and Chillieothe had edueational meetings whieh were enjoyable as well as profitable. Neatly all of the Lodges had some work, which was done in a very ereditable manner. The Distriet Association held two meetings, one at Breekenridge in April, and the路 other, a Masonic picnie, with Chula Lodge, in July. An interesting and instructive address was delivered by Brother Walter A. Higbee of Lancaster at the latter place, which was very mueh enjoyed by the brethren present. Brother Luther E. Wilhoit, of the Fourteenth Distriet, had a very busy year in the performance of his duties. Visitations were made to all of the Lodges, and instruction was given in many of them. EleveJ,l of the thirteen Lodges had more or less work, which has revived their enthusiasm and the members are seemingly more interested in the work than they have been for some time. There were many speeial events, eelebrated by the different Lodges, which were most enjoyable, and they have contributed eonsiderable to the renewed interest manifested in all of the Lodges. Brother Warren H. May, of the Sixteenth District, notes a decided improvement in the Lodges of his jurisdiction. Nearly all of them had some work and the brethren are very well qualified to perform their duties in a creditable manner. Brother Charles S. Hicks, of the Seventeenth District, reports that he has visited every Lodge in his care and has given instruction therein. He says that all the Lodges are in good working condition, except the one at Madison, and after working with it, some improvement was evident. This Lodge has been very inaetive for some time and its regular meetings


80

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

were ofttimes dispensed with. The District Association is proving a factor in arousing interest and for general improvement. Brother Henry C. Noland, of the Twenty-first District, reports that no Lodges of Instruction were held, except the ones at Platte City and Parkville which were under the direction of the Grand Lecturer. More work has occupied the time of the Lodges and they are very capably performing all the duties necessary for such work. Brother C. B. Waddell, of the Twenty-third District, reports that early in the year he held weekly Lodges of Instruction at Lexington but they were not well attended. A number of visitations were made, at which times he rendered whatever assistance was necessary. Some Lodges show a lack of interest while others are normal. Brother John W. Adams, of the Twenty-fourth District, reports that "although there have been few candidates and very little work, the spirit or purpose of Freemasonry has not suffered." Wherever Lodges of Instruction were held, he found a better attendance than previously, which is an evidence of greater interest. In many instances the lower ranking officers were preparing themselves for the duties in the higher ranks to be in readiness should they be promoted. As a group, he feels, progress has been made. The office'rs of all the Lodges have given much time in preparing for their respective duties, which has an enlivening effect upon all the brethren. Brother Louis J. Graue, of the Twenty-seventh District, visited every Lodge in his jurisdiction and reports that all seem to be taking an active interest in the affairs of the Lodge. Some of the Lodges were favored with a few petitions, which gave them the advantage of doing actual work and an incentive for good work. Lodges of Instruction were held at several different places; the attendance was good and the enthusiasm manifested was beyond expectations. Brother William E. Lange, of the Thirtieth District, visited all the Lodges and reports good attendance. Two Lodges of Instruction were held. L District Organization was formed and hopes are entertained that some interest may be maintained. None of the Lodges was very active and consequently there was not much to do. Brother W. D. Rogers, of the Thirty-first District, reports a revival of interest throughout his District. A Lodge of Instruction was held at Chamois and a number of meetings were held in his own Lodge at Jefferson City. Jefferson Lodge was blessed with considerable work and the brethren are doing good work. He says that Freemasonry is progressing in the District and a spirit of hopefulness prevails among the brethren generally. Brother R. A. Breuer, of the Thirty-second District, reports that his Lodges are in fairly good condition, considering the state of affairs in general. There has been a healthy degree of activity among the Lodges. A number of new members have been added and the work is done very efficiently, according to the ritual, and with increased enthusiasm on the part of the brethren. I quote the following thought from his report which is worthy of remembrance: "Adversity is a test of man's strength and develops the best that is in him. This principle reaches not only material things but the fraternal as well. The good Freemason is on the alert to diffuse what is noble and upholding." Brother W. C. Deacon, of the Thirty-fourth District, was appointed to this office late in the spring to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Brother J. F. Blair. He, however, visited a few of the Lodges. The hot weather came on and it was neither convenient nor agreeable for all concerned. to have any meetings. The Lodges "at Harrisonville and Freeman were reasonably active but the others had little to do.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

81

Brother J. P. Hurtt, of the Thirty-sixth District, reports that with the exception of one Lodge (Corinthian at Warrensburg, which raised 9 candidates) there was not much activity in any of the Lodges, yet he finds a hopeful sign in the interest taken in the ritualistic work and a desire for proficiency. He visited and gave instruction in several of the Lodges. He says that with the exception of two of the smaller Lodges, all are in fair condition. Brother Thornton Jennings, of the Thirty-seventh District, held Lodges of Instruction at St. Clair, Appleton City and Clinton. He reports a large increase in degree work and a corresponding increase in Masonic interest generally. The sessions of the District Masonic Association are well attended and much interest is manifested. Brother Charles E. Pyle, of the Fortieth District, reports a very quiet year among his Lodges. He held Lodges of Instruction at Festus and Hillsboro with very good attendance. Visitations were made to other Lodges and notwithstanding the fact that there was very little work, he found no diminished interest among the brethren. Brother T. W. Snodgrass, of the Forty-second District, made no visitations on account of the distressing condition of the people in general. Three of his Lodges showed a gain in membership and four lost. The net loss in the District was six. Brother John C. Senate, of the Forty-third District, held only one Lodge of Instruction but visited a number of others and assisted them in various ways. He has kept in touch with all the Lodges and as there has been very little activity among them, it is reasonable to presume they are not up to normal. The Lodge at Lamar conferred the first degree recently, which was the first candidate in two years. Brother Carl A. Swenson, of the Forty-sixth District, says that on account of the depression and drought, Masonic activities have been retarded. He visited the Lodges whenever possible, and rendered assistance whenever necessary. The District Association has done much to maintain interest in bringing the membership closer together. Brother James A. Kinder, of the Forty-ninth District, reports very little work in the Lodges and that the ritualistic work is suffering thereby. There is a decided tendeney on the part of former good ritualists to thoughtlessness, even to a point where they realize they are not proficient. Brief instructions were given in two Lodges-St. Marks and Whitewater. A District Association has been organized and it is hoped that the brethren will become more interested and proficient in the ritual. Brother G. A. Sample, of the Fiftieth District, visited and gave instruction in the followng Lodges: Commerce, Chaffee, Morley, Illmo, Essex, Dexter, Sikeston, and gave instructions to representatives of Lodges who called upon him from time to time. All the Lodges but two are in good condition for degree work. There has been an increased number of candidates over last year and more interest is manifested as a consequence. Brothel' B. P. Parks, of the Fifty-first District, visited the Lodges at Senath, Malden, Kennett, Caruthersville, Hayti, Steele and Hornersville. No special Lodges of Instruction were held and the ritualistic qualifications are about as usual. It has been a very successful year in the number of candidates raised and the spirit shown in the various Lodges. Brother C. E. Armstrong, of the Fifty-third District, visited several of his Lodges and had some very interesting meetings. He notes that about half of the Lodges are meeting regularly with fair attendance. Mt. Zio:tl Lodge has a wonderful new temple and the brethren are doing good work. Three or four of the smaller Lodges are dormant. On the whole, the District is in very good shape.


82

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Brother G. J. Vaughan, of the Fifty-fourth District, visited all but one of his Lodges, and his failure to visit this one was due to the inactivity of the members. He assures me that the Craft in all of these Lodges are working steadily and making some advancement. The Lodges visited are as follows: Billings, Crane, Galena, Branson, Hollister, Forsyth, Sparta, Clever and Ozark. Brother W. N. Marbut, of the Fifty-fifth District, reports that the most of his Lodges were very inaetive and some of them met very irregularly. The Lodges at Pierce City, Cassville and Aurora had an abundance of work and are in excellent working condition. Brother W. A. Phipps, of the Fifty-sixth District, writes as follows: , 'This year has been one of trial and tribulation. The path has been rough and the way rugged, but we have survived it all, walking in faith strengthened and buoyed by the hope that the coming year will lift the clouds that hover so hea.vily over us and bring to us a better and brighter day. The business depression, the heat and drouth have borne heavily upon us and have tried us in many ways. During it all we have had some very pleasant and profitable meetings. We have studied our ritual and kept the form and method of procedure in lodge and degree work well in our minds, and will stand ready to go forward as soon as the way is open. Very little work has been done in the district this year. ' , Brother Louis W. Mottert, of the Fifty-seventh District, reports that the Lodge of Instruction held twenty-eight meetings and from the statistical table of attendance enclosed with this report, the officers and members of the various Lodges are to be commended for their faithfulness in attendance. As a result, it is not surprising when he says that almost every Lodge can confer the degrees in a very creditable manner, and that the District as a whole is in fine shape. Brother Mottert was not able to attend all the meetings, but in his absence B. W. Brother Fulkerson took charge of the meetings, and conducted them in a very satisfactory manner to all concerned. Brother E. F. Starling, of the Fifty-eighth District, visited all of his Lodges, some of them several times. Lodges of Instruction were held at Versailles, Eldon and Olean. All the Lodges, but two, had work. The condition of the Lodges is as good as could be expected under existing conditions. Brother John S. Carmical, of the Fifty-ninth District, held a District Lodge of Instruction at Independence early in the year, one night each week for five weeks, with an average attendance of more than fifty. He also visited each of the eleven Lodges at various times, participated in the work and rendered any assistance that might be required. The Lodges had more degree work than they had last year and they are all capable of doing very good work. Fraternally submitted, J. R. McLACHLAN, Grand Lecturer.

REPORT OF JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE .

To the Most Worshipful Grand Master and the Grand Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons: Your Committee met in St. Louis the 24th day of September, 1934, at the office of the Grand Secretary, 3681 Lindell Boulevard, at 9 :30 A.M., and proceeded to the duties prescribed for it. We respectfully report, in Sections covering business of different nature, as follows:


1934

83

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

I. CHANGES TO THE By-LAWS INTRODUCED LAST YEAR. The only ehanges in the By-Laws coming over from last year are shown on page 128 of the Proceedings of 1933. (1) Resolutions in reference to Welfare Committee. This matter will be reported on by a special committee. (2) Amend Section 74 in reference to Grand Lodge per capita. We are advised by the proponents of this change that they would like to withdraw the same. The Committee recommends that this permission be given to them and that the change in Section 74 be withdrawn. SECTION II. THE GRAND MASTER'S DECISIONS. The Committee recommends the approval of Decisions No. 1 to 18, inclusive. SECTION III. MATTERS REFERRED BY COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S SECTION

ADDRESS.

(1) We approve that section of the Grand Master's report under the title of Dispensations Refused, Items 1 to 5, inclusive. (2) We also recommend the approval of that section of the Grand Master's report under the title of Grandview Northeast case. SECTION IV. No AMENDMENTS TO THE By-LAWS WERE INTRODUCED AT THIS SESSION OF THE GRAND LODGE.

Respectfully submitted, HENRI I. WARREN, C. LEW GALLANT, RICHARD O. RUMER, SAM. WILCOX.

Chairman,

REPORT OF THE MASONIC HOME VISITING COMMITTEE

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary, read the Report for the Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, ..4.. F. and ..4.. M., of Missouri: Your Committee appointed by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, consisting of Brother Albert Linxwiler, Chairman, and myself to visit the Home. Brother Linxwiler not being able to attend this session of the Grand Lodge, I wish to make the following report. I made two visits to the Home and found that the crowded eonditions still exist, although they have fifty less in the Home than the report shows last year. The Home Family now consists of 137 men, 132 women, 66 boys and 66 girls-a total of 401; and in addition five men and five women had been admitted but had not arrived. The waiting list still eonsists of about 150. The new kitchen equipment that has been recommended before is now installed and will greatly add to the efficiency and economy, as well as the sanitary conditions of this department. The Home Board and the Superintendent are doing a wonderful work in the face of almost unsurmountable difficulties and are certainly entitled to the earnest eooperation and active support of every Freemason in Missouri. Fraternally submitted, HARRY S. HIGHTOWER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS

M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman, presented the Report of the Masonic Temple Association Committee, which was adopted and is as follow3:


84

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

To the Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your members appointed by the Grand Master to represent the Grand Lodge in the Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis, beg to submit the following report: La.st year, in our report, we called attention to the outstanding bonds of the Association as being the sum of $390,000.00. On December 1, 1933, the Association paid the interest due at that date and retired bonds of the par value of $20,000.00. Then on June 1, 1934, the Association paid the interest due on that date and in addition thereto retired bonds of the par value of $14,000.00. So that at this date the outstanding bonded indebtedness of the Association is $356,000.00. We believe the Association has made an excellent record for these days and that the officers are to be commended. Respectfully submitted, BYRNE

E.

BIGGER,

Chairman,

EDWARD MCGUIGAN,

JOHN WOHRADSKY, JR.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

The Grand Secretary presented the Report of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, which was adopted and ordered printed in the Proceedings. (See Page 237.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented his report, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri: I herewith submit my annual report as State Chairman of The George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. The Twenty-fourth Annual Convention of the Association was held in the Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia, on Thursday, February 22. Forty-two of the Grand Lodges were represented by their Grand Masters and other Grand Officers. Missouri was represented by our Grand Master and Grand Secretary. The work on the Memorial is progressing as fast as the contributions from the Grand Lodges will permit. Last year there was spent for build路 ing construction and maintenance $35,503.59. President Watres stated that in order to complete Memorial Hall, Blue Lodge Room, the Replica Room and adjoining spaces would require $193,029.00 additional funds and that no work would be done or contracts let unless the necessary funds were on hand to pay for the work as it progressed. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC SERVICE

R. 路W. Brother Thad. R. Smith, Chairman, presented his report, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Grand Lodge, A.F. and A. M. of Missouri: Shortly after the last Grand Lodge the Chairman of the committee on Masonic Service was called upon by the Grand Master of a sister juris-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

85

diction for a report on the condition of Freemasonry in Missouri. Being unwilling to give an opinion from our own limited observation we wrote to members of the Grand Lodge, lo~ated in the four corners of Missouri, representing both the densely populated sections and the remote centers. The replies to our inquiry enabled the committee to give an optimistic report on the condition of the lodges and the membership in Missouri. We found that many of our lodges were carrying on worthwhile programs and that the results were satisfactory. Recovering from a sluggish condition several lodges show a revival of interest and a stronger bond of brotherhood than experienced in several years. Early this year our Grand Master asked the committee to furnish him . with a list of speakers available for Masonic addresses, indicating that calls for speakers were being received from various sources. The Servii~e Committee has a list of speakers which was made up several years ago which is revised as change requires and it now contains the names, home addresses and in many instances list of Masonic topics, of well informed speakers in practically every section of the State. In its report for the year 1932, your committee recommended that the Grand Lodge make an appropriation for the purpose of providing a Veteran's Jewel and suggested that there were some two hundred Freemasons at the time eligible to receive a jewel for fifty years' membership. While no action was taken by the Grand I.Jodge it has come to our attention that during the past year some Lodges have distributed jewels to those of their membership of fifty years' standing, the presentation being made in a public ceremony designated as "Old Timers' Night." Recently the members of the committee conferred with the Grand Master on the matter of submitting to the Lodges a plan to secur!3 phonograph records containing music for the three degrees. This matter has been considered in other years and the Service Committee learned that the practise in some jurisdictions was found to be successful. There is no thought that the records will displace quartets or organists but there is occasional request for something to use in Lodges which have no means of using music in degree work. We are grateful to the Masonic Service Association of St. Louis for a splendid report of its activities. This Association is composed of one delegate from each of the sixty Lodges in the 33rd and 57th Masonic Districts and meetings are held once a month. A speakers' bureau is maintained which has provided 28 programs of merit this year. Bro. William V. Kopfstein is serving as president of the District Council and Bro. John R. D~is~~cl~ . Matters of historical interest appeal to us and your committee desires to refer to the erection of a replica of the old Masonic College building in Memorial Park at Lexington, Missouri. While we take no credit as a committee for this worthy undertaking, aside from the fact that the Grand Master in 1932, who is a member of the committee, referred to the fact that the building at Lexington had been destroyed by fire in August of that year and that plans were being formed to build a replica which when completed should contain a suitable memorial tablet to be erected by the Grand Lodge, we were privileged to have a part in the dedication ceremonies. The visit to Lexington and the inspection of the edifice which is a reproduction of the original building of the Masonic College, aroused our admiration for the men whose names we love to honor and who, as the Westward course of the Empire took its way, came to Missouri to establish higher institutions of learning. Coming at a time when the population was small, communication was slow and times were hard, they located in Marion County and started Marion College in 1829, which was afterwards known as "upper college" and which was located on an 800-acre tract of


86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

land at Philadelphia, twelve miles west of Palmyra. Dr. David Nelson, Dr. Clark and Col. William Muldrow brought many celebrated persons with them and the vicinity was known far and wide for its distinguished educators and lawyers. A hundred years ago the Grand Lodge of Missouri took over the college and a spark of Masonic light destined to shed its rays over the early history of this Grand Jurisdiction attracted many Masons to Northeast MissourL J. Worthington Smith was the first president of the Masonic College and was assisted by Priestly H. McBride, Judge of the Circuit Court of Marion County, as manager and associated with him were Thos. L. Allderson and Stephen W. B. Carnegy. Profane history tells us that from its earliest foundation the work of the College was painstaking and fault- . less and its founders were praised. The College was moved to Lexington from Marion County in 1847 where until 1859 the Grand Lodge provided higher education for young men and then conveyed the property for use as a college for young women. The dedication of the replica by Grand Master Barnhill assisted by others, including Grand Secretary Mather and Past Grand Master Denslow, commemorated the eighty-seventh anniversary of the laying of the cornerstone of the building at Lexington by the Grand Lodge in 1847. The program for the occasion was directed by Wor. Bro. Henry C. Chiles of Lexington, Grand Junior Deacon, and who is also Chairman of the Lafayette County Relief and Reemployment Committee, which includes the Civil Works Administration through which agency with the assistance of the City of Lexington and Lexington Lodge No. 149 the memorial park and replica were assured. The Service Committee functioned again this year without expense to the Grand Lodge. Fraternally submitted, THAD. R. SMITH, Chairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY

R. W. Brother William B. Massey presented the Report of the Library Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee begs leave to report that the Lending Department of our Library is still used extensively by various members of the Craft throughout the State. Our list of borrowers numbers around 125 and these brethren ftom time to time avail themselves of the privilege of the Library as evidenced by correspondence between them and the Grand Secretary. Owing to the continuation of unsettled conditions throughout the country and our State in particular, the Committee has continued to mark time but sincerely trusts that err long conditions will warrant further developments in this important branch of our work. Respectively submitted, W. B. MASSEY, Chairman. REPORT OF BUILDING SUPERVISORY OOMMITTEE

R. W. Brother Guy C. Million presented the Report of the Building Supervisory Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and ..4.. M. of Missouri: Breth1'en: The Building Supervisory Board submits the following report for 1933 and 1934.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

87

CLINTON MA.SONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION, CLINTON, MISSOURI

On November 7, 1933, received a communication from the Clinton Masonic Temple Association stating that they had an outstanding indebtedness of $8,000.00, secured by notes with deed of trust on the Temple property. In addition thereto, there was a debt for accrued interest and commission note, secured by deed of trust, and necessary building repairs, making a total indebtedness of approximately $10,000.00. They requested permission to issue bonds in the sum of $10,000.00, to bear 6 per cent annual interest. It seems the holders of the original $8,000.00 mortgage had signified their. willingness to accept the new bonds in lieu of the mortgage and the members of their Masonic bodies had signified a willingness to purchase the remaining $2,000.00 in bonds. . In order to provide for the payment of interest, the general running expenses of the Temple and create a sinking fund for the payment of the new bonds, the Masonic Temple Board had made leases to each of the Masonic bodies meeting in the Temple, the rentals aggregating $1,500.00 annually, and to be paid monthly. Their expense budget, as estimated, amounted to $1,150.00, including interest, leaving $350.00 for payment on the principal. After making a rather thorough investigation of this matter, we found these brethren to be in a very difficult situation, foreclosure proceedings being threatened. The Most Worshipful Grand Master, after conferring with a committee of these brethren, recommended that we grant their request. The Board was of the opinion that their estimated expense budget was too conservative and the amount set aside each year for the retirement of the bonds inadequate, but in view of their situation and believing that the best interests of Freemasonry would be served by allowing them to go ahead with their re-financing, on December 6, 1933, we granted them permission to increase their indebtedness from $8,000.00 to $10,000.00 and issue bonds to the amount of $10,000.00, with the understanding that they would retire at least $300.00 of the bonds each year and more if possible. FENTON LODGE No. 281, ST. LOUIS COUNTY January 3, 1934. Granted Fenton Lodge No. 281 permission to spend, out of the cash funds in the hands of the Lodge, not to exceed $2,500.00 for alterations and repairs to their present building. MOUNT VERNON LODGE No. 99, MOUNT VERNON, MISSOURI January 4, 1934. Granted Mount Vernon Lodge No. 99 permission to transfer a loan of $2,500.00 to the Mount Vernon Building and Loan Association. This indebtedness, incurred several years ago when they built their Temple, had been reduced from $4,000.00 to $2,500.00. LOCK SPRINGS LODGE No. 488, LOCK SPRINGS, MISSOURI January 4, 1934. Granted Lock Springs Lodge No. 488 permission to borrow $800.00 for the purpose of completing a Lodge Hall, which they were erecting, to replace one destroyed by fire. They apparently have assets amounting to something over $5,000.00 and an income from rentals and dues of $612.00 a year. ACACIA LODGE No. 602, CoLUMBIA, MISSOURI July 20, 1934. Granted Acacia Lodge No. 602 permission to purchase a building, for Masonic purposes, at a cost not to exceed $23,000.00. Acacia Lodge, together with Columbia Chapter No. 17, Royal Arch Masons, had assets aggregating $18,375.00 and no liabilities. The building they purchased has a rental income of $250.00 a month.


88

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ELMER LODGE No. 648, ELMER, MISSOURI

August 15, 1934. Granted Elmer Lodge No. 648 permission to purchase and remodel, for Masonic purposes, the second story of what was at one time a hotel building, at a cost not to exceed $1,100.00. It is not the policy of this Board, as a rule, to approve the purchase of a sky title, as there is always the danger of the first floor being used for some purpose that would be objectionable. But in this case, on the favorable recommendation of Brother Luther Wilhoit, D. D. G. M. of the 14th District, and considering the splendid value they were getting, we granted their request, but admonished them to protect their future interests at the time of the purchase. Several requests are still pending before the Board, on which no definite action has been taken, as follows: Earl Lodge No. 285, Coffey, Missouri; Weatherby Lodge No. 235, Weatherby, Missouri; Leadwood Lodge No. 598, Leadwood, Missouri; Senath Lodge No. 513, Senath, Missouri; Paul Revere Lodge No. 330, St. Louis, Missouri; and Brotherhood Masonic Temple Association, St. Joseph, Missouri. Respectfully submitted, GUY C. MILLION, Chairman, F. WILLIAM KUEHL, C. A. TOLIN.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WELFARE

M. W. Brother T. W. Cotton, Chairman, presented the Report of the Committee, which was adopted and is as follows: SUMMARY OF FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED, OCTOBER 1, 1933 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1934 $ 65.16 10,500.00

Balance on hand, 'October 1, 1933 . Received from Grand Lodge during the year . Received from Waynesville Lodge No. 375, account Mrs. Bucher and Children . Received from Koshkonong Lodge No. 582, account John S. Wherry . Received from Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, account Mrs. Richard Baird . Received from Rural Lodge No. 316, reimbursement for payments made to Victor H. Merryman through 1932, 1933 and 1934 .

55.00 30.00 15.00 405.00 $11,070.16

Disbursements Federal tax on checks Postage, printing and stationery Paid for relief Balance on hand, September 30, 1934

$

18.58 48.90 10,389.00

10,456.48 $

.

613.68

LIST OF PAYMENTS MADE TO LODGES TO ASSIST IN CARING FOR APPLICATIONS FOR CHARITY

Name of Lodge

Persons Assisted

Total for Year 30.00 37.50 100.00

Ancient Landmark No. 356 ..J ames N. Farris $ Alton No. 285 Jane P. Gaulding. . . . . . . . . . . . Apollo No. 529 H. W. Powers and Wife.. . . . .


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

89

Name of Lodge Persons Assisted Total for Year Arlington No. 346 Squire E. B~yant............ 90.00 Aurora No. 267 .Mrs. Marie H. Anderson. . . . . . 120.00 Aurora No. 267 Wm. Roulston and Wife...... 80.00 Barbee No. 217 J. E. Godlove............... 25.00 120.00 Barnesville No. 353 .Mrs. J. A. Griggs. . . . . . . . . . . . Benjamin Franklin No. 642.Joseph Wolf... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120.00 Benevolence No. 170 Mrs. Catherine Clyde Brown. . 120.00 Bolivar No. 195 lIenderson Boone and Wife... 117.50 Cache No. 416 Wm. Rebbing................ 67.50 Callao No. 38 Mrs. Finis Williams. . . . . . . . . . 90.00 90.00 Callao No. 38 Mrs. A. J. Mathis. . . . . . . . . . . . Canopy No. 284 Asa V. Massey.............. 30.00 Elisha McDaniel. . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.50 Cairo No. 486 Carl Junction No. 549 J. J. Robertson.............. 5.00 Centralia No. 59 John F. Betz and Wife....... 30.00 Charleston No. 407 Four JohllBon children. . . . . . . . 80.00 C. G. Howe and Wife......... 45.00 Censer No. 172 Composite No. 369 Mrs. M. A. Henderson........ 110.00 Continental No. 454 Alex D. McCrosky........... 8.00 Clayton No. 601 Keith and Glenn Specking ( children) . 85.00 Clifton Heights No. 520 Robert N. Johnston . 20.00 Crane No. 519 Mrs. Sarah Sherwin . 30.00 Crescent No. 368 Anna S. Hall. . 20.00 Cardwell No. 231 .Mrs. Edgar Harper . 120.00 East Prairie No. 384 James A. Smotherman . 120.00 Eldorado No. 318 Mrs. Luella Buckley and five children . 90.00 Erwin No. 121 C. H. Prior . 88.00 Everton No. 405 George Hankins and Wife . 90.00 Ewing No. 577 "James Willows and Wife . 40.00 Fairfax No. 483 George W. Brooks . 30.00 Farmington No. 132 Rebecea Fleming . 95.00 Fellowship No. 345 Jonas Myall . 20.00 Forsythe No. 453 Mrs. George Stiffler and five children . 120.00 Four Mile No. 212 J. F. Lasswell and Wife . 240.00 Four Mile No. 212 Claud Smith (child) . 25.00 Four Mile No. 212 Mrs. Melvina Walker. ; . 5.00 Friend No. 352 John D. Inman . 60.00 Fulton No. 48 Mrs. Eliza Helen Bartley . 60.00 Gate City No. 522 Albert Lowe Johnston and Wife 300.00 Gate City No. 522 Sidney M. Jones and Wife . 150.00 Gate of the Temple No. 422. George RallBdale . 82.50 Gate of the Temple No. 422. Mrs. John Phillips . 66.00 Gate of the Temple No. 422. Walter Strong . 27.50 Gate of the Temple No. 422. Edward B. Browne . 115.00 George Washington No.9 William J. Otto and Wife . 127.50 Granite No. 272 0. M. Browne . 50.00 Granite No. 272 Mrs. Theodore Schwartz . 25.00 Green City No. 159 John W. Muncy . 50.00 Hazelwood No. 459 Emil Manke . 37.50 Henderson No. 477 George Wilkerson . 155.00 Hinton No. 453 Walter W. Berry . 180.00 Illmo No. 501. Mrs. Barney August . 30.00 Independence No. 76 Mrs. Ethel Smith and two children . 25.00


90

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Name of Lodge Ingomar No. 536 Ivanhoe No. 446 Jackson No. 82 Jacksonville No. 541 J efferson No. 43 J onesburg No. 457 Joplin No. 335 Keystone No. 243 King Hill No. 376 Kirksville No. 105 Koshonong No. 582 Lambskin No. 460 Lewistown No. 494 Lock Springs No. 488 Lodge of Truth No. 268 Livingston No. 51 Maitland No. 112 Missouri No.1 Missouri No.1 Mizpah No. 639 Moberly No. 344 Moberly No. 344 N aphtali No. 25 N aphtali No. 25 New Hampton No. 510 Nodaway No. 470 Nodaway No. 470 Northwest No. 358 Norwood No. 622 Naphtali No. 25 Occidental No. 163 Olive Branch No. 576 Olive Branch No. 576 Pauldingville No. 11 Pee Dee No. 498 Perseverance No. 92 Pickering No. 472 Pine No. 314 Pleasant Hope No. 467 Polar Star No. 79 Polar Star No. 79 Polar Star No. 79 Puxico No. 596 Puxico No. 596 Pythagoras No. 383 Ralls No. 33 Ralls No. 33 Ralls No. 33 Rocheport No. 67 Rural No. 316 Samaritan No. 424 Sampson No. 298 Santa Fe No. 462 Sa.vannah No. 71. Salisbury No. 208 Solomon No. 271

1934

Per:sons Assisted Total for Year H. A. Uterman and Wife. . . . . . 120.00 W. G. Fraser................ 30.00 Mrs. Orilla J. Luyster. . . . . . . . 120.00 Charley Woods and Wife. . . . . . 82.50 John E. Gorman. . . . . . . . . . . . . 130.00 Alfred Churchill and Wife. . . . 80.00 Wm. VanBuren White........ 120.00 Mrs. Elizabeth Pomeroy. . . . . . 100.00 .Marion McVey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150.00 Mrs. Mary Aydelotte. . . . . . . . . 120.00 John S. Wherry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100.00 John Boullier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25.00 65.00 J ames L. McCann. . . . . . . . . . . . Samuel Wahner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60.00 Mrs. Laura Sears. . . . . . . . . . . . 61.00 Samuel Quinley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25.00 Francis M. Coyle............ 60.00 William Montrose. . . . . . . . . . . . 12.50 M. L. Henderson and Wife. . . . 120.00 Three Sotier Children........ 25.00 120.00 Mrs. Mary J. Howard. . . . . . . . 2.50 Mrs. Edith C. Cotty. . . . . . . . . . John F. May. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 Mrs. Drenning Stevenson. . . . . . 10.00 .Mrs. Martha Fouts. . . . . . . . . . . 7.50 Carlos J. Alderman and Wife.. 160.00 John H. Thorp and Wife. . . . . . 40.00 J. J. Wright................ 30.00 Charles T. Schoonover. . . . . . . . 90.00 Mrs. E. M. Hoyt...... 10.00 15.00 Mrs. J. R. Campbell. . . . . . . . . . William H. Athey. . . . . . . . . . . . 82.50 Mrs. Theodore and three children . 120.00 120.00 Wm. E. Bryan . 7.50 Wm. H. Owens and Wife . 60.00 Mrs. Cora Wise Sloan . 60.00 .R. J. Schrader . 30.00 Charles F. Franken . 22.50 ,Mrs. Hattie Goodnight . 113.00 Hugo Sievers and Wife . 55.00 John Williams and Wife . 125.00 Leon Behr . 240.00 Robert Smock . 120.00 Mrs. Eva Clark . 48.00 Michael H. Tribble . 89.00 George W. Wybrant . 45.00 A. H. Fike . 67.50 Mrs. Martha Watkins . 120.00 Henry Spillman . 135.00 Victor H. Merriman . 96.00 Mrs. Ivan Rouse . 45.00 Elliott Stockton . 112.50 J. S. Drake . 105.00 .Jacob Bachman . 150.00 Joshua T. Bunton . 10.00 Horace Hussey and Wife .


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

91

Name of Lodge Persons .AssMted Total for Year Solomon No. 271. Herschel Ingram. . . .. . .. .. 122.50 South Gate No. 547 Edwin Downs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 St. James No. 230 H. W. Alverson.............. 50.00 Stanberry No. 109 Mrs. Martha Bucklew.. . . . . .. 99.00 Strafford No. 608 ........â&#x20AC;˘.Mrs. Emma Haines.......... 15.00 .M. C. Talbot................ 25.00 Summersville No. 55 Trowell No. 440 .Mrs. Virginia Morgan. . . . . . . . 35.00 Trowell No. 440 .Mrs. F. A. Meyers............ 90.00 Twilight No. 114 W. C. Botts................. 60.00 Twilight No. 114 " Virgil Hawkins.. . . . . . . . . .... 120.00 Twilight No. 114 Wm. F. and Robert K. Corey (children) . 300.00 60.00 Valley No. 413 A. C. Hendry . 60.00 Valley No. 413 J. H. Goforth . 30.00 Van Buren No. 509 Mrs. Myrtle Bone and children Waynesville No. 375 Mrs. Myrtle Bucher and 300.00 five children . 52.50 Weatherby No. 235 Wm. G. Smith and Wife . 40.00 J. C. Carter . Wheeling No. 434 40.00 Wilderness No. 374 John C. Simpson and Wife . 35.00 Wilderness No. 374 .......â&#x20AC;˘ .Lee Simpson . 15.00 York No. 563 George Guilfoyle . 25.00 Zeredatha No. 189 Mrs. Richard Baird . Zeredatha No. 189 Mrs. Wm. M. Polk . 60.00 Carterville Chapter No. 11, O.E.S Miss Lucy Irvin . 36.00 Spring River Chapter No. 145, O.E.S Mrs. Julia Alford . 32.50 $10,456.48 T. W. COTTON, Chairman, BYRNE E. BIGGER, ARCH A. JOHNSON.

ALEXANDER H. BELL, P. G. M. OF ILLINOIS

THE' GRAND MASTER: The first visitor I am going to call on is the representative from Illinois, Most Worshipful Brother Alexander Hamilton Bell. He is Chairman of the Jurisprudence Committee of that Grand Lodge and one of the wheel horses in Freemasonry and we are honored in having him here as our guest. We would like to have him address us at this time. M. W. BROTHER BELL: Most WorshipfUl Grand Master and Brethren: I esteem it a very great privilege to be permitted to visit the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Our Grand Master was invited to be present but finding that he could not be here asked me to attend in his place and he desired me to express to you his sincere regret that he could not be with you. You know, it seems to me very strange indeed that, although I have lived within the vicinity of St. Louis all my life, I have never before been in the Grand Lodge in Missouri and have practically very little acquaintance in the city. You know, I was born and raised out here eighteen miles in Illinois and when I was a small boy I would come down to St. Louis in a farm wagon and we would always talk about what time we would get to


92

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Illinoistown when we would come across the dike into East St. Louis. I have been surprised in talking with many St. Louis people to find that they didn't know that there ever was an Illinoistown and didn't know what I meant by Bloody Island. I can't claim that I was here when the Lord made the world but I must say that I think I got here soon afterwards because I know that you must be surprised when a youngster of my appearance and fine military carriage talks about things before the Civil War, he must be stretching it a little. I know, for instance, that this town of St. Louis until this Louisiana territory was ceded to the United States under the administration of President Jefferson-I know that St. Louis was called "Pain Court" and it had no other name until after this territory became a part of the United States. I know your town of Carondelet down here was called Viva Poche, which meant an empty pocketbook, and Pain Court meant short breath, which meant, of course, that we had hard times here, but what a wonderful change, Brethren, there has been since those days, what great states have been erected in this wilderness and what stately cities have grown up. What is the influence of Masonry, what wonderful development in Masonry has there been in this territory' When I say this territory I mean this great territory along the Mississippi Valley. Do you know, my Brethren, that Freemasonry today is the greatest conservative influence on earth' Do you know that when our people become divided and when angry discussions and dissension threaten the public peace, that Freemasonry by its general conciliating influence induces conciliation, reconciliation and peace' I know they say to us that Masonry is not a religion. That depends on what you call a religion. We have no creed. We ask that every man shall unequivocably say that he believes in the existence of God, but beyond that he is left to believe as he pleases. We do insist that the Mason shall be a good man, that he shall be a good citizen, a good husband and a good father. We do insist that he shall strictly obey the moral law. You know, this world is full of people who go through life trying sedulously to be good as if that were some positive virtue. It isn't. If I were talking to a class of young people, I would say, , 'It isn't worth while to waste any of your time in an effort to be good but it is a matter of first importance that you do good," and that is the religion of Masonry. When you do good you are good, when you fail to do good you are not good. You can be good by doing good and not otherwise. That is Masonry. There is many a man who tries to be good by going into some remote !)lace in the mountains or in the forest, separating himself from all his associates, trying to preserve himself unsullied from the sinfulness of the world, meditating upon holy things, praying, fasting, trying to be good. Great Lord, if he wants to be good let him come out into this sinful world that he seeks to avoid and do his utmost to reclaim the sinner from his evil ways. Masonry teaches the doctrine of a really active life, of service to our fellow creatures, and that is the only happiness that you can have on this earth, that is the only service that you can render to God or to yourselves. If I were to ask you, "Are you willing to serve God," every many would say" Yes. " How can you serve God' He doesn't need your assistance to see that the sun sets tonight in its accustomed place and at the usual time. God doesn't need your assistance to see that the sun rises tomorrow morning at the proper time and place. The only way in which you can serve your God is by serving your fellow creatures. But, Brethren, I am not here to make a speech, others are to follow me. I want only to say to you that our Grand Master first sincerely regrets that he is not


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

93

here and he apologizes, or I do, for the substitute that he sent. You know, I am in no condition to make a speech. I will tell you why. I was asked to take lunch with the Grand Master. Anybody can tell from this attenuated frame that it needs nourishment. I was quite conscious of it and I proceeded to give it the most liberal nourishment that I could, and the Lord knows they furnished enough of it, so I come up here full. Now, the man that invented after-dinner speaking was no friend of mine. Fortunately I didn't know exactly when I would be called upon. I think when I look over this crowd that some of you, perhaps, were good enough in your boyhood days to attend the Sabbath school, and I feel from the looks of many of you that you have not attended lately. I think I can do no better missionary work today than to call your attention to a little subject of Bible history. Do you remember when you were a boy in Sunday school that you were taught that there was once a man named Daniel' Now, I don't know what Daniel's other name was. Doubtless he had another name, but it has been torn off or worn off through the abrasion of passing centuries. But Daniel was a great man in his day. He was a great prophet, and he verified in his life the truthfulness of that old saying that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country, that is to say, a prophet is a great man otherwise, but he is not a great man at home. That was Daniel's failure, his neighbors were jealous of him and they didn't like him. They watched for him and they laid for bim and one day when poor Daniel was coming down the street they jumped out, took hold of him, rushed him down the back streets and threw him in a den of hungry lions, well knowing that in two or three minutes there wouldn't be anything left of Daniel, those lions would banquet on his frame and leave nothing but a lot of polished bones on the floor. As soon as Daniel lit in the den, he realized at once the peril of his position. The first thing you know his face brightened with a smile and he was heard to say, "Well, well, this is not so bad after all, because if they have speaking after this banquet I shall not be called on." (Laughter.) Brethren, I can only say to you again the Grand Master of Illinois, the Grand Lodge of Illinois and all the Lodges of Illinois join hands with you across the little river that separates us and we hail you and acknowledge you as our Brethren, all our Brethren, Brethren in one great family, children in our Father's home, children of only one God, "Who cares not for state lines but recognizes that Masonry in Missouri, Masonry in Illinois and Masonry in these great states of this Central Mississippi Valley is a core of a vitalizing center of the culture, intellectual, moral and spiritual culture of this great land of ours. (Applause.)

THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, I knew when I invited Brother Bell over here he would do just exactly what he has done-give us a good speech. M. W. BROTHER VmGIL F. JOHNSON, GRAND MASTER OF NEBRASKA

THE GRAND MASTER: I think now we will hear from Nebraska. The Grand Master of Nebraska is not only the Grand Master and high in Masonic circles in Nebraska but he is also the largest farmer not only in the State of Nebraska but probably in the Middle West. This brother is the American agent for the famou 3 Scully estate of Eng-


94

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

land and as manager of that estate he operates something over thirty thousand acres of farm land in Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri. Most Worshipful Brother Virgil F. Johnson of Nebraska; we will ask him to tell us how many wagonloads of corn he raised this year. M. W. BROTHER VIRGIL F. JOHNSON: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Grand Lodge officers of the State of Missouri, Distinguished Guests and Brethren of this grand convocation: Most Worshipful Sir, I must correct you in one statement relative to the position that I occupy. I am not the United States representative of the Scully lands.

THE GRAND MASTER : You are manager of their farm lands. BROTHER. JOHNSON: Only in part. The Scully people have a man in the State of Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and Louisiana. I happen to be just a small spoke in that wheel. I am managing the lands in the County of Gage, State of Nebraska, and a small portion of the lands that they own in the State of Kansas known as Marshall County, Kansas, adjoining Gage County. There is nothing but an imaginary line between us, approximating about 33,000 acres of land, and you ask me to tell the brethren here about how many wagonloads of corn we will .get off of that 33,000 acres this year. I think I can safely say we will get approximately thirty-three ears off of that 33,000 acres. I know. I have been over in the County of Gage from which I come. There are roughly 25,000 acres, and I have traveled over section after section of that land and the corn was all-it has now been either grazed off or cut off with a mower or hand sickle or lawnmower, something that you would not even bother to pick. It didn't get up high enough to cut with a corn binder, but just little stuff like that. Appreciating the value of time relative to a gathering such as this, I am not here to make a speech. I am not an after-dinner speaker and I want to say Amen and Amen and Amen to the remarks of Brother Bell of Illinois. You know, right now I feel very much like a little boy in the Sunday school class. The teacher was trying to impress upon the children of this class the need and necessity of foreign missions and she had been reading to these children about the vast wilderness in Africa, the great area of land down there where there was not to be found a Sunday school or a church where the children could be taught any religion whatsoever and she had just finished saying, "Just think of it, children, there are over six hundred million square miles down there inAfrica where there isn't a single Sunday school for a child to go. What do you think we ought to do, children, what should we save our money for ~ ' , And the hands went up all over the class, "Go to Africa." That is where I feel I would like to be right now, especially when called upon to make an after-dinner speech. From a number of the remarks that I have heard since I have been down here from numerous of the brethren in this Grand Jurisdiction, I take it that they are largely Missouri people. I am not going to attempt to uphold the dignity and the reputation of the State of Nebraska more than to just stand back behind the remarks of a brother, whom I believe, Most Worshipful Sir, that you will give an opportunity to defend himself very soon, because I anticipate or I rather suspicion that in times past the reputation that he has left down here possibly might bear investigation and looking into, from some of the remarks that I have heard since I have been here. Lest I encroach upon the time of路 a man that I know you brethren "ould be delighted to hear, I shall simply conclude my remarks, Most Worshipful Grand Master, by saying that I sincerely appreciate


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

95

the honor and courtesies which you have and are now extending to me as Grand Master of the State of Nebraska as well as to Most Worshipful Brother Lewis E. Smith, Grand Secretary, and I want to assure you that we always have a warm weloome in our hearts in the Grand Lodge of Nebraska for you brethren. I think that you can testify to the accuracy of the warmth with which we greet you brethren in the State of Nebraska because we always meet in June. We have been doing that for sixty-three years, and it is usually about 110 0 up there, so you will always find a warm welcome if you attend the Grand Lodge of the State of Nebraska. Most Worshipful Sir, believe me when I tell you that I bring you fraternal greeting of good will from the State of Nebraska and thank you most cordially for this kind invitation.

THE GRAND MASTER: Most Worshipful Brother Johnson, we appreciate your talk very much and the greetings you bring from Nebraska. Brother Lew Smith, Grand Secretary of Nebraska, told me early today that he had a severe cold and would like for me not to call on him today but from the remarks of Grand Master Johnson it looks to me I am pretty near forced to call on him right at this time, but it is just up to you, Brother Lew, if you would defer until tomorrow. I am afraid that "tomorrow he would say his cold was still worse and we wouldn't get to hear from him at all so we better hear from him now. M. W. BROTHER LEWIS E. SMITH, GRAND SECRETARY OF NEBRASKA MOST WORSHIPFUL BROTHER LEWIS E. SMITH: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: I have an awful cold and I did ask the Grand Master and he promised me, so you see how far a promise of a banker and a gentleman from Missouri goes. I am not insinuating, of course. The first thing to be a success as an actor, of course, we have to have our-especially if we are ventriloquists-is to have our dummy present, and in looking around. I discover I am not in a position to really do business. Ed Morris fails to路 be sitting over at his desk and I hardly know how I can tell any stories with Ed absent. I came down to .Missouri this year after an absence of two years. I first came to your Grand Lodge in 1925 and I have been to every session of your Grand Lodge including the special session that was .held in the Washington Memorial a couple of years ago, excepting last year. Circumstances over which I had no control kept me away last year. Last week I was in bed most of the week with a cold and my doctor told me that I absolutely could not leave home and I told him I thought maybe I would come, anyway. Finally, my wife suggested that, anyway, a Republican ought not to be running out loose alone down in this ter.ritory. But I want to tell you the reason that she gave me, and the reason is this: Last week the Postmaster-General of the United States eame to Omaha to honor us with a visit and address in the City Auditorium, and in the early evening before the Postmaster-General arrived they had the other dignitaries making addresses, and a man who would be Congressman from our district was addressing the audience and


96

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

finally he asked this question: "Is everybody in the audience for the President'" And some man down in the audience climbed up on his chair and said" No." It nonplmlsed the speaker quite considerably, he hardly knew what to say and he kind of stood on one foot and the other, looked foolish for a moment and he said, "Do you mean you are against the PresidenU" The fellow said" Yes," and then somebody knocked him off the chair and there was a free-for-all fight for a few moments. They arrested him and took him down to the police station, and after the police judge had heard the testimony and what had happened at this meeting he sent him over to the Insanity Commission to have him tried for his reason, all of which is a good reason why a Republican shouldn't be wandering around alone these days. Not so long ago, I am told, a Baptist minister, who was said to have in his lifetime practiced over here in Missouri left this earth and was called to Heaven. A minister friend who later departed and went up there to visit along with his fellows, met his old friend and said to him, "Well, how do you like it here, Brother'" He replied, "Well, not so good. You know, these pearly gates, the glare of the sun on them is terrible on my eyes and these golden streets, they just blister my heels, and this ceaseless singing, I would like a little peace. But," he said, "the worst of it is, you know, my halo came last night, and," he said, "you know, the damn thing doesn't fit."Of course, being an Episcopal, I often like to tell this story and I think it is quite true of the man who went to ll. city and he, having been very much interested in church edifices, thought he would like to look over the different churches in the town. So he met a man and he said, " Could you tell me where I could find the various churches in town'" The fellow said, "Yes, yes, that is easy. You go up in the theatrical district and there you will find the Episcopal Church and you go up in the banking district and there you will find the Synagogue. You go up in the cold storage district up by the cold storage plant and there you will find the Presbyterian Church. Then you go over by the river and there you will find the Baptist and the Christian Churches, and finally you go over by the gas plant and there you will find the Methodist Church." Judge Landon said this morning that I didn't treat him square last year. I don't know exactly why that is, because down in Washington Judge Landon insisted that I read the stories out of the Crescent magazine and then come down to the Grand Lodge of Missouri and tell them. I haven't ever seen the magazine, but I must take it for granted that it must be quite an edition at that. But here is one that I didn't get out of the Crescent magazine, either. Judge Landon had his picture taken for a particular purpose and after he had it taken he went down to look at the proof and he looked at it and he said to the photographer, "You know, that just doesn't do me justice." The photographer said, "Justice isn't what you want, it is mercy." M. E. BROTHER WILLIS J. BRAY, GRAND HIGH PRIEST, R. A. M. OF MISSOURI

THE GRAND MASTER: I believe at this time we will call on Most Excellent Companion Willis J. Bray, Grand High Priest of Royal Arch Masonry of the State of Missouri. Brother Bray, we will be glad to hear from you.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

97

BROTHER BRAY: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: I am glad to have this opportunity to express my appreciation for the very cordial reception that has been given me, not to me personally but to the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri. I assure you that we appreciate this more than it is possible for me to tell. In my visitations over the State of Missouri the past year there is just one thing I am trying to bring to the companions and brethren of Missouri and I make no apology for its frequent repetitions. It seems to me that in these days of reconstruction when men are trying again to find their very souls, we must get down to what may properly be called Masonic fundamentals. It seems to me, as I have said on many an occasion in this state that there are two fundamental cornerstones upon which the superstructures of Freemasonry rest. The first of these il!l an unfeigned belief in the unity of God. Wherever and whenever Masons assemble, that is the only test of faith. We never ask whether one be a member of this or that or the other particular denomination. Our question is as to his belief in God. The second of these greatest fundamental principles, as I see it, is the belief in immortality. If there were only two things that Freemasons should keep in mind, because they are fundamental, I place these two before you. In these days when men have been swept off their feet by the swift rushing currents of history we need to find our footing and plant our feet fIlquarely upon a foundation that will certainly stand. The path of history of recent years is strewn with the wreckage of human life, wrecked because they had built on the wrong foundation, they had built upon material things. Many of them doubtless were nominally at least members of this Fraternity. The great difficulty has been, we have been measuring life with the wrong yardstick. There is only one thing that constitutes an adequate measure of human life and that is character. Nothing else counts. This fraternity has in all of its history been dedicated to building. In its earlier days it was the building of physical temples, but with the coming of speculative Masonry, it dedicated itself to the building of those spiritual temples which must endure through all eternity, and it seems to me that in these days we need to place ourselves squarely before the proposition, what are the fundamentals upon which this venerable institution has always stood, and place ourselves on those fundamentals. The great difficulty with many of us is that we are investing a life, the most valuable legacy ever left man, we are investing that life not by plan but by chance. Brethren, you wouldn't invest your money that way and yet there are thousands and millions of men and women in the country who are investing that which is infinitely more valuable, and we never go to the great Book of the law that lies upon our altar there to secure the rules and regulations and directions upon which a great Masonic structure may really be erected. It seems to me, Brethren, that we need to place ourselves squarely in the position, then, of finding what are the fundamental principles of Freemasonry, that we may embrace those principles, those great, beautiful tenets of Freemasonry that have for all these centuries been taught by means of symbolism and allegory. They brought to the souls of men the most exalted truth ever revealed by God to man, and it is our opportunity, my Brethren, to continue throughout all the years of life to search for that truth. We have set about to find the lost word. It distresses me to find so many of the brethren throughout the land who are looking not for the word as it is conceived symbolically, but they are looking for some word in the dictionary. That


98

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

word may be money, that word may be pleasure, that word may be honor or political preferment, but, my Brethren, that is not the teaching of Freemasonry. The teaching of Freemasonry is that you and I must dedicate our lives to this search for the Master's word, and, my Brethren, the Master's word is defined truth. It may be necessary for you and for me to go through life with the substitute for the Master's word. That substitute will never satisfy the seeker after truth. The soul which really seeks after the Master's word can never be satisfied until that word is communicated in all its beauty when we have passed through the veils of these earthly courts into the presence of the Supreme Grand Master. There the Master's word, defined truth, will be communicated to us in all its beauty and glory and there the rewards of well spent lives will be ours to enjoy. My Brethren, if there is just one thing that I commend to you that you as Masonic leaders in Missouri take back to your Lodges it is that now is the time for us to remind ourselves by everyday living that the world at large knows Freemasonry only as it is reflected in our lives and that it is incumbent on us therefore to reflect that order and duty that has always characterized this venerable institution, that order and that duty which should always characterize those seekers for defined truth which will be revealed to the faithful of the craft in the last day. I thank you, Most Worshipful Master, for this most generous reception and I assure you of the continued good will and fraternal fellowship that will always exist, I trust, between the Grand Lodge and the so-called higher degrees of Masonry in the Royal Arch.

THE GRAND MASTER: Brother Bray, we thank you for your very inspiring and instructive address. M. W. BROTHER J. A. CASSLER, GRAND MASTER OF KANSAS

THE GRAND MASTER: At this time we will give Kansas a chance to defend themselves. Most Worshipful Brother Cassler, we will be glad to hear from you. M. W. BRO'l'HER CASSLER: Most Worshipful Grand Master and Members of the Missouri G'rand Lodge: I believe that I can best convey to you my impressions from a little story taken from the life of the celebrated American lawyer, Rufus Choate. It is said that on one of the occasions in which he appeared before Chief Justice Shaw he prefaced his remarks or his argument with these words: "If Your Honor please, I appear before you with the same reverence and the same respect of a Hindu bowing before his idol. You may be homely, but, ah, you are great." From the time that I was made a Mason on down to my experiences in the Grand Lodge I was told repeatedly that Kansas Masonry was the child of Missouri, and your Grand Lodge officers in visiting us have constantly reminded us of that fact, which goes to show to me that at least you must not be-well, rather, you are rather proud, I should say, of us. So, Worshipful Sir and Brethren, I do desire to say this, I came not for the purpose of making a speech but I did come to listen and to see in the hope that I could carry back with me an inspiration that would help me in the performance of my duties as Grand Master of the Masons of Kansas. I assure you that I so far have had an exceptionally pleasant time. I know that I am receiving an inspiration and I desire, Brethren, to


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

99

thank you for the privilege that has been granted to me to be present, and I also wish to extend to you an invitation to visit the Grand Lodge of Kansas next February at Wichita, and, incidentally, Brethren, also an invitation to visit the subordinate Lodges of Kansas whenever you have the opportunity. Worshipful Sir, I thank you.

THE GRAND MASTER: Vve are glad, Most Worshipful Brother Cassler, to have these words from you. M. W. JAMES GARNETT, P. G. M. OF KENTUCKY

THE GRAND MASTER: Brother Garnett is going to be our chief speaker this evening, but I would like at this time to have a few words of greeting from Judge Garnett that you may begin to get acquainted with him, but his main address will be later this evening. Brother Garnett, will you say a few words to us 'f M. W. BROTHF..R. GARNETT: Most Worshipful Grand Master and my Brethren of the State of Missouri: I am going to ask you to bear with me only for a short time while I say a few words of appreciation for the wonderful reception I have received at the hands of this Grand Lodge on my behalf and on behalf of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky. You know, we had the pleasure of a visit last year at our Grand Lodge from two of the most distinguished Missouri Masons, your Grand Master and your Grand Secretary. We not only enjoyed them but we profited by their speeches and their statements, and your Grand Master at that time secured a promise out of me that I would visit you on this occasion. You know, a Kentuckian will promise anything a year in advance, and he reminded me of it not long ago, told me I was to appear before the Grand Lodge to make a speech. The people in Missouri and the people of Kentucky are very much alike in their habits and their custOms and they look and act alike, and that finds its origin in the fact that they both came from the pioneers who settled both states. Daniel Boone broke the wilderness trail, the Kentucky pioneers stopping in Kentucky where the blue grass was productive of race horses and the water was productive of good Bourbon liquor, while Missouri pioneers came onto the plains in order that they might raise grain and livestock. That is about the only difference between Kentuckians and Missourians. Then at a later day there was another period of immigration to Missouri, even in my time. These descendants of the pioneers whose relatives had come on to Missouri, they heard the call of the wild, and I recall when they used to live in the covered wagons with the family and the dog and the children and all come out to Missouri to my native County of Adair and they used to tell me there was one county in this state, Carroll, that had enough ex-Adair County people in it that they could control an election. Now, they used to go to Kansas, about that same time we had an immigration to Kansas, Arkansas and Texas, and all the people who went to Kansas and Texas came back to Kentucky. Those who went to Arkansas said they had highland fever and couldn't work, and those who went to Kansas said the wind blew them out and they came back where they could live comfortably and happy. But those who came to Missouri remained, and we have today in Missouri many leading citizens and many leading Masons who were born and reared in Kentucky.


100

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

I said I was not going to take but a moment or two. You know, it is said that nobody ever told-no public speaker ever told the truth .about just saying a few words, except the man who was at dinner with his wife and, of course, didn't have a chance to get in a few words. I am going to keep my promise with you and not delay the deliberations of this Grand body further, since I am going to speak tonight, ex,cept to say that I am delighted to be with you. I enjoy the association of Masons of different Jurisdictions, I get inspirations, and we hope to have your incoming Grand Officers visit us next month. The Grand ,Master of Kansas tells me he is going to Kentucky from here. We hope he will find out what a good state is and we would be glad to have any of the Masons of this great commonwealth of Missouri visit the Grand Lodge at any time, and when you do you will find exactly the same kind of people constituting the Grand Lodge of Kentucky as those of you who constitute the G'rand Lodge of Missouri. OALLED FROM LABOR

At 3 :35 o'clock P.M. the Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 8 :00 o'clock P.M. this evening.

FIRST DAY, EVENING SESSION OALLED TO LABOR

At 8 :00 o'clock P.M. the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by the M. W. Grand Master. Prayer was offered by R. W. Reverend Brother Emmett L. Robison, Grand Chaplain. THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, in making up our program for this evening we selected two speakers. They are different types of speakers, but I am sure both of them will have a message for us. Our first speaker is our own Grand Orator and son of our beloved Grand Secretary, Dr. Arth~r Mather. Our speaker is Dr. Thomas B. Mather, Pastor of the Methodist Church at Jefferson City, Missouri, who will now address us. ADDRESS OF R. W. BROTHER THOMAS B. MATHER, GRAND ORATOR

Most Worshipful Grand Master, Warde1ts and Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Missouri: What is more fitting upon this occasion than to turn the spotlight of our attention upon one of the Great Lights of Freemasonry I In the 路ancient archives of the Bible we find some very interesting pictures and some very pertinent advice. The Bible is an interesting book because it is a human book. It is a practical book revealing the foibles and virtues of a growing people. You can pick up volume after volume from thi8 remarkable library and find the ups and downs of races and peoples, past, present and even future. One wishes that more of us would treat it as a guide book for life rather than as a collection of some debatable theological maxims.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

101

And so I would like to think with you for a little while tonight upon two very searehing utteranees, taken from two divergent ages. One of them written in the days of the early kingdom of Israel, under the leadership of the earliest king, chosen for his popularity and personality; and the other taken from the records of the early ehureh under the mysterious in:tluence of a great prophet and missionary. Saul of the Old Testament said toward the elose of his life: "Behold, I have played the fool," and S:;tul of the New Testament toward the close of his life said, "I have fought a good fight." And men have been saying one or the other from those days until now. Only a few months ago, we read in one of the city papers of a promising young business man, who eracking under the terrifie strain of eeonomic disorder, decided to run away from life and kill himself, he left a note behind whieh read: "It is all a mistake and I have made a sorry mess of my life." And about the same time, a teacher in one of the old colleges of the East was suddenly stricken down in the prime of life, and was given but a few hours to live, during those hours in the presence of his wife, he said: "Life owes me nothing. I have had work that I loved and I have lived in a beautiful place among congenial friends. I have had love in its highest form, and I have got it forever. I can see now that death is just the smallest thing-just an incident." There you have a modern expression of the two moods. I suppose that you wonder, as I often do, what makes the difference. Something must because the two attitudes are so far apart, so very different. And I do not think it is a question of possessions or of a particular station in life or of a particular culture or even of a particular religion. There is something more in it than that. I believe that there is something radically wrong with the whole structure of life-namely that oftentimes we do not seriously grasp just what life is, what it means and what it is for. When that happens, you find men awakening to the fact that they have been fools, and when we do dig deep enough into the structure of our thought, activity and aspirations, and see life steadily and see it whole, then we find that we are happy in the fighting of a good fight. That means defeat or it means' victory. That means that we are fools or that we are heroes. Let us begin then by saying that human life is something more than animal life. When we read some of our modern literature, we find ourselves in the presence of this lower interpretation of life. Consider the procession of disillusioned faces stalking through the pages of the novels of Aldous Huxley, D. H. Lawrenee, and Sinclair Lewis. Even Professor Whitehead in his latest book says: "The nineteenth century was an epoch of civilized advance, but at length it wore itself out." Listen to Bertrand Russell as he says: "Brief and powerless is Man's life; on him and all his race the slow, sure doom falls pitiless and dark. Blind to good and evil, reckless of destruction, omnipotent matter rolls on its relentless way. " And we ean add to these the comments on various modern economists and sociologists upon world affairs. All of them are staggering under the burden of increasing doubt. They all have a lot to say about failure, defeat and d~om, but they have little or nothing to offer U8 to inspire us to victory. And there is a reason-that is they all consider a man to be an animal and consequently doomed to an animal existence. While it is true biologically that there is a close kil'lship between men and animals-you can see that quite plainly if you will visit the monkey house in Forest Park-it is not true that man is only an animal. I know that many times wesee him acting beneath himself and we wonder. Man often reveals jungle appetites and wild passions, sometimes he fails to control himself and recklessly spends himself in debauch and satisfies himself with the gutter. Aye, but that is not all there is to a man. A real man can never live happily upon the level of an animal. There are just


102

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

two satisfactions for an animal-two and only two. An animal is perfectly satisfied if he can find food and gratify his hunger for sex. That is all there is to an animal, food and sex. Give him food and allow him to satisfy his sexual instinct and you will have a contented animal. But by what stretch of the imagination can you limit a man to such an existence I There is much more to a man and that is what makes a man. When a man lives solely upon the animal level, he will cry out when he faces the tremendous issues of life: "I have played the fooL" That comes because he has been living on the lower scale, when the life of a man must be lived on a higher scale. That is tragedy, that is pathos, and there always follows a genuine disgust and disillusionment. A man finds himself face to face with other cravings that must be thoroughly satisfied before he can enjoy victory or appreciate contentment. And first among these higher cravings is the desire for truth, the hunger for knowledge. Who wrote the philosophies of the ages' Who discovered the startling secrets of modern science' Who framed the beliefs and aspirations of the world' Certainly not the animals, but men. Men longing for fellowship with something above them and something around them and something within them, seek to know the answers to the myriad questions that arise in their everyday life and they will risk their lives to find those answers. Aye, it is a man who dares to fly into the stratosphere to discover new light about cosmic rays. It is a man that enters a laboratory to find the cause and cure for some dreaded disease. It is a man that braves the storms of the sea to discover new land. It is a man who dares the unknown to establish trade and commerce. It is a man who takes the letters of the alphabet and writes a book. It is a man who takes the primary colors and paints a picture. It is a man who takes the notes of the scale and improvises a melody. Aye, talk about men living for food and sex all you please, but history portrays the vivid picture of men, real men, growing and moving on, restless until this craving for truth is satisfied. And there is the hope of any world. It is not what things are, it is what things can be. And among men there is the craving to build something beautiful, it is the inherent hunger for beauty. And so men go out and build cathedrals with their majestic grandeur, they establish worship to express the sense of something beautiful in themselves and beyond themselves, they arrange and rearrange the things of life until they glow with the presence of beauty. They transform the raw material into the finished product, and there is something that makes them take unusual pride in making" something worthwhile with their genius and out of their best experience. There is something of the master craftsman about men. And further consider how far men will go to find the beautiful, they cross the sea, they climb the mountains, they journey through the woods-all to find beauty, seeking to be strengthened and encouraged by a satisfaction of that inherent hunger. It is a man who feels as he looks into the heavens, "I am thinking God's thoughts after Him"; it is a man who can say, "I have felt a presence that disturbs me with the joy of elevated thoughts." Talk about the limitations of a man all you will, he does have foibles and he does have frailities, yet remember also that there is something within him that must be expressed in intimate fellowship before he can ever be happy, and it is that desire for the beautiful. And further, there is the desire to be better men than we are. That is a hunger for goodness. No man is satisfied with his own standard of conduct. If he is good, he wants to be better and if he is evil, he wants to be good. He strives ahead, he presses on, he looks ahead. This follows from his desire for beauty, that desire to make something, and so he is by nature a man of faith and confidence, one who will not give up easily, who will grit his teeth and work harder. Of course he may feel, as many of us


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

103

do, that he has little ability or opportunity to go out and startle the world with his genuis or make a name for himself in the indelible record of the ages, but he feels that he can do much more, he ca:Q. make something of his own life, and after all the most beautiful thing in all the world is a beautiful life--to take the raw material of life, instincts, yearnings, and aspirations and blend them into a perfect symmetry, to take the hopes and fears and arrange them in such a way as to develop an heroic and creative character. What is grander than that' I make bold to assert that every man has that hunger within him to be good. That is why kindness appeals to so many of us, that is why bravery shames us and justice thrills us, these are all basic values in our lives and are seeking to express themselves路 in our activity. If we do not achieve them ourselves, we do admire them in others and long to have them for our own. And so every man is eager. to try his hand with them. This is a hunger that must sooner or later be satisfied, and until it is no man realizes himself nor can he satisfactorily express himself. There you have a man. The man who does not grow that tall, but who contents himself by living on the animal plane, he sighs again and again, , 'I have played the fool." He looks at life in its vast proportion and sees it all in disjointed attainment, and comparing his own scale with it all, sees it as vain and empty. But the man who is striving to satisfy these deeper hungers, these higher values, striving for knowledge, beauty and goodness, he feels and knows that he has the power to fight a good fight. He may not succeed from many angles, he may not possess much in material things, he may not .even have many friends, and life may use him very hard and his way may seem exceedingly difficult, but if he feels that he can become better acquainted with himself and empower himself in some definite way of inner progress, that will bring him peace and joy, and what is more, the thrill of living. Another thing we must consider is that life, being so much more than the animal expression of it, men must live upon that higher plane and be given an opportunity to live on that higher plane. We must aspire to higher levels, rising above our indifference and indolence, intolerance and hatreds, into the rarer atmosphere of love, service and creativeness. Civilization must guarantee to all men the possibility of satisfying theil' hungers. Institutions must exist for the development of men. Society itself must arrange its activity to minister to these inner needs of men. The man who finds these satisfactions will never experience disgust or disillusionment, rather he will always find life worth living because he will continue to grow and expand, learning always what is on the other side, finding new lands to explore and conquer. That will give him faith in himself and faith in humanity. We lose that faith when we live to ourselves. We despise that faith when we seek life's meaning on low levels. That, then, is the standard for all life and it must be applied. That is the reason we have so much disorder in the world. We have developed externals and neglected the inner values. We have produced machines and despised the development of manhood. We have been thrilled with all of the wonder of modern achievement and then placed in control those who have prehistoric minds and ancient ideals. And so we still have war and rumor of war, we still have economic injustice and continued oppression, we still have social disorder and group confusions. Why, because we have not considered seriously enough the value of a man. I t is not deflated money, it is deflated men that have caused our trouble in the world. And you can talk about your new deal all you want to, we shall never have better days in our land until we bring back the forgotten man and minister to his deeper hungers. Much of this modern recovery is merely an attempt to patch up the old garment. You cannot change the country


104

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

without changing men's hearts. You cannot have a happy and contented people as long as the same old rivalries and greed and selfishness rule the minds of people. The crux of the whole matter is what is a man' An animal or a potential child of all that is true and good and beautiful. That answer will explain the kind of government, social order, religion or what not. No nation has ever endured and no nation will endure that denies to man the opportunity of a larger growth. We hear a lot about communism today. They tell us that we must fight it. That we must drive it out. You can't do that. There is only one way to get rid of it and that is to remedy conditions in. the nations and world so that it can no longer exist. That is what we need to do in America. Fight communism, and crown greed. Fight eommunism and defend political intrigue. Fight communism, and throw men out of work so we can pay dividends on stocks. Aye, it is ridiculous. Ch~nge conditions, elevate a man, and give him the possibility of endless growth-and I say that communism will never live, it cannot live. I was in Holland this past summer while there were riots in Rotterdam. I read an account of them in the papers. The press stated that the cause of them all was certain communist agitators. Maybe, you know there are times when people are on an edge l:!-Dd conditions are ripe for some sort of agitation. But I found out what was the cause of trouble in Holland. The dole for unemployment was reduced by the government about 33 per cent, malting it impossible to get a living. In Amsterdam and Rotterdam, more than ten per cent of the population was out of work. In Rotterdam, 75 ships regularly plying the seas from that port, were manned with Chinese labor, the regular seamen were dismissed because the company would not pay the price. The conditions were bad and so you have rebellion. In Germany you have people of twentieth century stock, with twentieth century likes and interests, and you have a man at the head with all of the modern machinery but with the ideals and values of the dark ages. He believes in force, that is his religion, his companion and his vision. And in my judgment, he is riding for a fall. In France, you have troubles due to the fact that certain territory was given France during the war, and those people are of German descent, and have German interests, and never will be any different, and as long as that condition lasts there will be growing hatred. How much better it would have been to make Alsace an independent state after the war.' Conditions are much better in England. Better than they have been for twelve years. And why' Because England is now trying to minister to the needs of people. She is building better quarters for her aged and poor, she has an old age insurance that protects those who have worked long and hard against the fear of unemployment, she has beautified her parks and eliminated unsanitary conditions in many of her factories. She has found her people work and the ranks of the unemployed have been radically reduced. There are happy faces and there are loyal hearts. She is making rapid strides toward a decent recovery and is in better shape today than any nation in the world. That is what you will get in any country and. among any people when you begin to consider the men, women and children in the world as the greatest things in the world. "I have played the fool' '-yes, many of us have, and many of the nations have. In God's name, let us retrace our steps and fight the good fight for the betterment of the world, by beginning with the premises of making our own lives better and the lives of those about us. There is the hope of the world. That is the value of this honored fraternity. If it can


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

105

do that, it deserves to live, if it cannot do that, it will be forgotten with the dust of the centuries. Are we to be fools or are we to be heroes'

THE GRAND MASTER: Brother Thomas, we thank you for your inspiring address and for the wonderful message it contains for us. THE GRAND MASTER: Brethren, we are honored in having as our next speaker a distinguished Freemason from a sister Jurisdiction of Kentucky. I was interested in reading a little story recently in which a high school boy had been appointed to preside at an evening's entertainment where a lecturer was to speak from a distant state and he asked his father how he should introduce this speaker. "Well," he said, "I will tell you what not to say. I would suggest that you not name his native state because," he said, "if he is from Kentucky he will tell you that in the first sentence and if he is not from Kentucky, why embarrass him '" Brethren, our speaker has been honored in many ways by the Fraternity of Kentucky. Many years ago he was its Grand Master and for some fifteen or twenty he has been treasurer of their Grand Lodge, treasurer of their Masonic Home and attorney for their Masonic Home. He was the moving spirit in the rebuilding of their wonderful Children's Home, Masonic Children's Home, there near Louisville, Kentucky, and just recently he was elected President of that wonderful Masonic Home in the State of Kentucky. He has also been honored by his state in various and sundry ways. He has served his state as AttorneyGeneral and now Judge of the Chancery Court at Louisville, Kentucky. It gives me great pleasure to present Judge James Garnett of Kentucky who will address us. ADDRESS OF M. W. BROTHER JAMES GARNETT Most Worshipful Grand Master, I want to express to you my appreciation for the invitation which gives me the privilege of speaking to my Brother Masons of Missouri on this occasion, and I want to also thank you for furnishing me the subject on which I was to address my remarks, and fixing a time limit on the time to be occupied by me. The subject which the Grand Master asked me to address myself to was "Freemasonry in Kentucky as I have known it." The time limit I will not路 tell you because when I have finished I am going to insist that I kept within the limit and that he has forgotten what limit he put on it. I have been connected with Masonry so long in Kentucky that if I should undertake to tell you what I do know about Masonry in Kentucky I would violate the time limit, wear your patience out and wear myself out in an effort to do so. I was raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason in Columbia Lodge No. 96 something more than forty years ago and I became a member of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky at the very first part of the twentieth century. Since that time I have missed only one meeting of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky has done more for the


106

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Masons of Kentucky, I might say done more within the last thirty years, to constructively establish the principles of friendship, charity and brotherly love in Kentucky than was done by the Masons of Kentucky in the hundred years preceding that time. The work has been of a character that will be beneficial to the fraternity for generations to come. Now, in order that you might understand how the Masons of the present century were induced to do what they have done, let me describe the type of Masons who dominated Masonry in Kentucky when I first became a Mason. As I told you, I was made a Mason in Columbia Lodge. That town is located twenty miles from a railroad and has never become contaminated with that type of citizenship that follows a railroad. It is surrounded by a fairly good agricultural country. We eould say it was the "blue grass," we could say it was the "Pennyrile" or most any other type we have. We are on the border line, but the town itself has four Protestant Churches and at that time had a splendid junior high school or junior oollege, rather, which was conducted by a denomination called sometimes Christian and at other times Campbellites, and that school was supported by all these denominations including we Baptists who always felt rather hard towards Alexander Campbell because he left the Baptist Church just because we required the members to be elected into the brotherhood when he thought they should be admitted without election, but we supported that school. As a result of that Christian and educational institution the town had a wonderful citizenship, educated, refined and cultured. I knew that membership of the Lodge was composed of the lawyers, the doctors, the merchants and the educated people of that community, and you can imagine my surprise when I was brought from darkness to light to find that the Master of the Lodge was an uneducated blacksmith whose grammer was poor and whose pronunciation was wretched and who invariably used the wrong word at the wrong time, but he had a heart of gold and he understood how to communicate to a candidate the principles of Masonry. He did it in that crude way of his, but the candidate who received the Degrees at his hand understood what they meant. For instance, he would refer to the Entered Apprentice Degree as the hancy prancy Degree, and other expressions similar to that. That was ludicrous to the well educated but the candidate didn't know any different. Now, that was the type we had. He was the type that you would find allover that country. Then another type that took an active interest in the Grand Lodge was a type of mountaineer that I will describe to you in order that you mikht understand how Masonry in Kentucky was inspired to do what was done. We had up in the mountains a man who was a great friend of mine, in fact, we both lived in the old Eleventh Congressional District which usually went Republican by from twenty-five to f.orty thousand votes. There was just a few of us Democrats there and we had a sort of fraternal feeling for each other. I got to know Dave Jackson in that way early in life. Dave was a rugged mountaineer that everybody knew. He was raised between two hills in Laurel County. His education consisted of three months' country school during the year and the rest of the time devoted to work on the little mountain farm, but he scured something of an education and then secured a positi()n as traveling salesman in his county and adjoining counties for some wholesale house. Then he became a member of the Grand Lodge and by reason of an honest statement he was elected Grand Master. He was appointed Grand Senior Deacon. We don't have a custom there like you all, I understand, have here. The appointment to Junior or Senior Deacon never makes you a Junior Warden.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

107

The fact is that the appointees seldom ever succeed to the elective offices but Dave was appointed Senior Deacon and we have a custom in the Grand Lodge that the Senior Deacon stands at the back of the hall and calls for those who are wanted at the door. Well, Dave had one of those beautiful strong voices that you could hear about four squares and he was all the time smiling, was known as "Smiling Dave Jackson" and could laugh at the least thing. Because of thQse beautiful bursts of laughter everybody got to know Dave Jackson, and when they came to nominate the Junior Warden somebody in the back end of the house nominated Dave Jackson and when the ballots were counted Dave had secured about two-thirds of all of the votes and became Junior Warden, and later became Grand Master because he made this statement when he was nominated. He burst into a laugh and said, "Brothers, don't do that, you know I haven't got sense enough to be Junior Warden," and they elected him Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, and he was one of the most influential Grand Masters we ever had. He did more to promulgate the principles of Masonry and impress them on the brethren throughout the state than any other single individual that I have known. He did it in this way. He had a speech, the same speech on all occasions, and there was more in that speech than any speech of the kind I have ever heard. He would get up before an audience and say, "God bless you, Brothers, it means much to be a Mason," and then he would say, "Now, at first you got into a Lodge by petitioning it and two brothers had to recommend you and then a committee was appointed to examine into your character and standing and qualifications, and a month intervened and that committee came back and recommended you unanimously as a suitable person t<> become associated with this great body of brothers in Kentucky, coming from every section of the state, constituting the best citizens of this state. They had to be careful about making you one of them, but finally they came back, the ballot was spread and you received the vote of every member present. Now," he said, , 'Brothers, that means much and you ought not to lose that right. Suppose your character or conduct is such that you should be expelled. You would lose that right. If you fail to pay your dues and are suspended, you lose the right to associate with this group of the best men in Kentucky. Therefore, I say to you, " and about that time he would let a big tear run down his cheek, and would say, "Now, you understand what I mean, Brothers, when I say it means much to be a Mason. It is no simple thing," and with that speech he would amplify it allover the State of Kentucky. When Dave died we got up money to build a monument and the Masons of Kentucky erected one on which they put that saying. But I want to tell you a little more. Dave was one of those mountaineers-they are pretty smart down in Kentucky...:......I don't know how they are down in the Ozarks, but they are about the smartest people we have. God created them with a good mind, a sharp intellect, a fine disposition and they can take care of themselves witHout education. Dave had been a drummer, as we call them down there, and during his term of office the old Grand Secretary, Captain H. B. Grant, who had been Grand Secretary for many years, died, and it became the Grand Master's duty to appoint a successor. Well, you know they have in the Grand Lodge of Kentucky what in common parlance you would call a "Brain Trust." It is composed of the Past Grand Masters and a few of the Masonic politicians, who manage to tell the Grand Master what he Qught to do, and get by with it and he doesn't know it until after he goes out of office. To illustrate, I was living down at Columbia, as I told you, twenty miles from the railroad, and in those


108

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

days we didn't have any automobiles. The only manner of transportation we had was a Concord stagecoach that ran over a toll road and you had to pay the stage owner for ~hat twenty miles over the road, and that money went to the owners of the turnpike. Some of my family happened to be part owners so I didn't kick about that, however that was the system. Some of the boys over on the railroad had me elected Grand Junior Warden over at Lebanon, that was the town where the Communication was held and where the Commandery was located. They had me elected Grand Junior Warden, I never knew how, because I was just a lad. A man there by the name of Patsy Johnson, who was the Masonic politician of Kentucky when I became Deputy Grand Master, would send me a letter about once a week to this effect, "You know, Brother so-and-so up here at a certain place would make a good man on your Committee on Credentials." In about a week I would get another one, "So-and-so would make a good man on some other committee." I didn't know very many brethren in the state so I just put them down on the list and when the Grand Lodge came on and I was elected Grand Master, I had to appoint all those committees. I didn't know who to appoint so I just pulled out this list that Patsy had furnished from time to time. I had forgotten how he had worked me, and when I got over the list and appointed them and go路t back home where I could think, I found that Patsy Johnson had appointed all my 00mmittees. Well, then, I began to get my eyes open a little so at the next session of the Grand Lodge just after I had finished my address, somebody offered a resolution requiring the Grand Master to appoint a committee of five. I saw about fifty fellows I wanted to give a place to and there was a chance to give it to five of them, no mileage or per diem, that is the main thing with a committee, they don't do much work, so I thought I would go down to the hotel and figure out how I could divide those five places among fifty men. Just as I walked out of the door Patsy got me by the arm and started walking down the street. He said, "The Grand Lodge authorized you to appoint a committee of five, didn't they'" I answered, "Yes, and I will be damned if I don't do it and you are not going to do it for me." That was the only committee I appointed, but it was too late before I found out about this thing. . That is the way these politicians" do" the Grand Master, and it isn't his fault. Well, as I started to say, the past Grand Masters didn't think much of Dave Jackson on account of his illiteracy as they called it, because he couldn't write a good letter, he couldn't spell well and he made mistakes. When this vacancy occurred they went to him with one of their crowd to be appointed Grand Secretary.. Well, Dave didn't tell them what he had in mind but he selected a young fellow there in Louisville who didn't know anybody out in the state and appointed him Grand Secretary. We always understood that Dave made him promise before he did it that he wouldn't run for election at the end of the term, so his term as Grand Master expired at the same time that the term of the Grand Secretary did. When it came time for nominations, this machine crowd had their man nominated and they thought he was going to be elected Grand Secretary because they had given out word that Howard French must be elected. He was Recorder of the Chapter, and the ideal man, but somebody got up in the back end of the houie that Dave had stationed there (he would never get up on the stand with his own motion, he always made them back among the boys as he said he was more at home among them), and nominated Brother Dave Jackson for Grand Secretary. When they nominated him the boys all laughed, but when they took up the ballots Dave just got two-thirds of all the votes that were cast. Well,


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

109

you never saw a political machine as greatly outraged as that was at that election. They just talked about it and said it wouldn't do, it was a reflection upon the Grand Lodge. Dave held that office until he died, and he did more good for Masonry by his preachments throughout the state than the other man would have done. The old blacksmith is the type o路f Mason who was controlling Masonry when I became a member of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky and you know what they did. They were what you would call in present-day parlance "rugged individuals." They believed in conferring Degrees just like each fellow wanted to. You just talk to them about having uniform work, or talk to them about printing a thing that you had promised you wouldn't write--it never had been done in Kentucky, and it won't be done there as long as the spirit of those fellows lives. Their theory of uniform work was that it became monotonous, if in every Lodge you visited everybody did the work the same way it would be monotonous, just like going to see the same picture show three times a week. They wanted some individuality, and they wanted to see how each individual could impress the candidate, and they did impress the candidate with that sort of Masonry which is founded upon Holy Writ, and is based on the cornerfjtone of truth. I listened to my brother a few minutes ago in that wonderful address which he gave, and was very much inspired with it, but I was trying to solve the question while he was drawing the picture. I looked out over there and I saw that Bible that we Masons are taught to believe, and we swear we believe it-that it is God's gift to man and it is God's plan for the government of man by man. When we read that Bible, if we are sincere as Masons, we find that man was made by God, in His own image, he didn't come from any monkey. The one trouble in this eountry is that about a quarter of a century ago the people of this country accepted Darwin's theory of evolution which was that man came from an animal, and that when he died he went back to the same place, and that was a popular doctrine and we all subscribed to it. That is our trouble. Today we don't believe all we profess to believe. If we do, we don't act it. We talk about charity. We say that charity as laid down by Holy Writ is to do for our fellowman only what his needs require and our ablity will permit. When we go beyond that it isn't charity, it is creating a dependent and depriving ourselves of something of which we should not be deprived. Now, as Brother Mather said a while ago, look into the Book, it is all there, and that is the thing that we call truth. That is what those old men did back in my younger days, and that is the sort of Masonry that prevailed in Kentucky when I became a member of the Grand Lodge about thirty-three years ago. We then had about eighteen thousand Masons in Kentucky, today we have about fifty thousand. At that time we had an institution which these old fellows eonceived in 1867 to carry out their Masonic obligations of helping, aiding and assisting the destitute widows and orphans of deceased Masons. At the close of the Civil War you will recall that Kentucky was pretty much like Missouri. We sent about as many men to the North as we sent to the South, and when the War was over we had widows and orphans throughout the State belonging both to the Union and Confederate families. A few Masons who had that principle of Masonry instilled in their hearts, realizing that the individual Lodge couldn't take care of their needs, decided that Kentucky Masons should collectively take care of all the Kentucky dependents that were worthy. They secured a charter from the Legislature which authorized fifteen men to direct an institution which was to care for the destitute widows and orphans of deceased Ma-


110

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

sons who were members of Lodges in Kentucky at the time of their death. They provided in that charter that those fifteen men who were directors should be elected by people holding life membership certificates, that is, anyone who gave a hundred dollars to that institution procured thereby a life's membership certificate which lasted only during his lifetime, and was cancelled by his death or else went to his Lodge. People holding those certificates could elect every year five men who should serve for a period of three years. They fixed that election, as far removed from the Grand Lodge as was possible, so the home wouldn't become the subject of Grand Lodge politics. We are still operating under that charter exactly as they organized it, but that institution, though being properly organized, was not properly run. It was an institution like all the old children's illiltitutions, and they never grasped the thought or the idea of their duties to these childr(>n until long afterwards, and when they did they built a new illiltitution. About 1900, a little after 1900, 1901 or 1902, they bought a farm up near Shelbyville with exactly the same type of organization as the Masonic widows and orphans had, and established a home for the old, destitute Masons and their wives. They got a wonderful plant up there where, I believe, we have about eighty of the old people now. The only mistake they made was when they built the Masonic Temple in Louisville, which was dedicated in 1903 and proved a financial loss, because the Grand Lodge was undertaking the conduct of a business which was not authorized by the principles of Masonry, and should never have been undertaken, and came very near bankrupting the Grand Lodge. They finally sold it. The next step they took was to improve the welfare of those children. In 1914 they decided that the children who were in that home and who left it when they were sixteen years of age were not properly prepared to meet the battles of life. They didn't have initiative, and lived according to rules, so we established what is called the Educational Trustees, giving to five men ten thousand dollars a year to give the children, and train them in some vocation, so that they would be capable of taking care of themselves, on the theory that if the children, after having a junior high school education and being trained in some vocation, wanted further education they could get it for themselves. This question of education is a wonderful thing. We are all in favor of educating everybody, but the trouble in this country is we are overeducating too many people, and sending people through college that can't assimilate the grade education. The Masons of Kentucky do not believe in that. They believe in giving the boys and girls a junior high school education, train them in some vocation and send them forth in the world to take their positions in society. We couldn't do that with the old institutions, so in 1920 we had a new inspiration. Everybody, you know, was making money, and that was a good time to take it away from them. That year was the fiftieth anniversary of the home and a few of us got together and decided that while the boys were making money so easy it wouldn't do any harm if we took away a couple million dollars and built a new home. They started a campaign to raise the money payable by subscription in ten years, ten illiltallments. They appointed a building committee, very promptly. They only appointed three members as a committee, three fellows who didn't know anything about any part of a building-myself as chairman, another lawyer, and the city buyer of the City of Louisville. We left off all the architects and the builders and material men, and everybody else, and we just acted as a jury who didn't know anything about the case, and had to be , 'shown" about everything. Well, they finally made up about a $1,200,000 on paper, and we adopted plans for a home after traveling allover the country. The Grana Lodge adopted that plan and finally ordered


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

111

us to go on with the building, saying they would furnish the money when and as needed. We contracted for the school building, the industrial building and the dining room which took all the money we had on hand. You know Masons never think about where the money is coming from, they just say, "build, go ahead," so at the next Grand Lodge we laid the cornerstone. Everybody came out and had a great time, they thought their Home was going to be built, and nearly all the representatives who came there expected to send some children to put in that home in a week or two. That is what they were interested in. We finished the dedicatory services and the next morning we went into the Grand Lodge with a report and said, "Now, here is the resolution you all told us to proceed under, and we pledged all the assets of the Grand Lodge to furnish the money when and as needed. N ow, we proceeded under that, and you have only furnished us three hundred some odd thousand dollars in money and we have only got three buildings up as contracted for and no children can stay in them. If you don't get the rest of the money, a million and a half more, bats and owls will take these buildings." Well, they appointed a Committee on Ways and Means which worked and worked and worked. At that time we had about seventy thousand Masons on the rolls. I never know how many Masons we have or the number who belong to the Lodges because I have come to the conclusion all fellows who belong to the Order aren't Masons, and a heap of fellows that don't belong are Masons at heart. At that time we had seventy thousand members, thirty thousand of which subscribed for something, but thirty or thirty-four thousand did not. That committee met along about twelve 0 'clock at night, and they decided there wasn't any way to complete that home and save the face of the Grand Lodge. I told them in my report, "If you don't furnish us the money the Catholics will make fun of us." The next day this committee came in with a plan to assess every Mason in the State of Kentucky twenty dollars, payable in four installments and give him credit for what he had paid voluntarily. When they read that report all the representatives began to think what the boys back home would say. Then they began to think about what they would say if they didn't do it, so finally they reluctantly adopted the report, and levied an assessment on every Mason in Kentucky of twenty dollars-and they paid it. The result was that when we had finished that plan it had eost over $2,000,000, with about everything in it that we thought was practicable. A central heating plant, built roads all around the plant, farming equipment, and a hundred and twenty-five acres right in Louisville. We had a hundred thousand dollars left which we turned back to the Grand Lodge, the whole thing being paid for. We had three hundred thousand dollars endowment funds at the beginning of this century. We now have for the support of that institution an endowment fund of $2,100,000 in book value which was made before the depression. It is now only seven per cent below the book value, which fund produces nearly a hundred thousand dollars a year income out of which we support it, together with the dollar assessment made against each member of the home. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky has a surplus in its treasury, and last year it refunded the assessment to the subordinate Lodges under a promise that they would pass it on to the members, which they did. That is the situation. The Grand Lodge of Kentucky nor either of the institutions of the Grand Lodge owe anybody a penny. They are operating at full capacity, and successfully. The widows' and orphans' home maintains there a school with seventeen teachers, a junior high school, plus a woodwork~ ing establishment, shoe shop, where the boys make practically all their every-day shoes, barber shop, shorthand and stenographic department,


112

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

music department, and an infirmary, with trained nurse where all the children have to do some work, and all the work they do in these different locations is reported to the principal of the school and reflected in their grades, so that the children don't really think they are working. Happy and contented, out of debt and running easy. But I don't know what the next generation will do. I am just wondering if we give credit (and I do give credit) to the old fellows for the manner in which they taught those of us who lived during their time, what the next generation is going to do -whether we are true to those principles, and whether we teach them with the Bame earnestness and the same force that they were taught to us. There hasn't been a time in the history of this country since Colonial days when the Masonic fraternity was in a better position to help relieve the economic and social conditions, and bring about peace and harmoJly in the country than today. Brother Mather reverted to this idea, and I don't want to trespass on his thought, but as he suggested, if the two and a half or three million members in the Masonic Lodges in the United States have the Masonic principles in their heart and soul, in the correct way, are living it and transmittin~ it to others, the question is solved. It is up to us as individuals to speak the truth as we have obligated ourselves, and testified that we believed the truth. We talk about the truth, we forget that truth is the foundation of charity, and brotherly-love, and unless that Bible is the truth, we haven't any foundation for our organization. Our whole organization is built there, and it has survived a long time. My Brethren, I would offer no admonition to you because the Grand Lodge of Missouri, although it is twenty years younger than the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, and although the Grand Lodge of Kentucky elltablished some of the Lodges in Missouri before there was a Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge of Missouri has outstripped it. You are like the average child of today, who when he gets to be fourteen or fifteen years of age he is running his father and mother instead of his father and mother directing him. You already have outstripped Kentucky, and I wouldn't make a comparison between the Grand Lodge of Missouri with its hundred thousand Masons and the little Grand Lodge off in Kentucky with fifty thousand members, but I will suggest this to you, when yoW" hundred thousand has done as much constructive work and paid for it as Kentucky has done, you can point to it with considerable pride. I wish you would all come to Kentucky and visit these institutions. In conclusion let me say that I pray God will be with you in your further deliberations and that all you may do and say shall redound to the glory of the Creator of all mankind and He in whom every Mason believes.

THE GRAND MASTER: Judge Garnett, we thank you for that wonderful address. You have drawn a great picture of Freemasonry in Kentucky. I think that the message that w路a should get from it is that we should all take our Ma5lonry more seriously and realize that it really means much to be a Freemason. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 9 :50 o'clock P.M. the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED FROM LABOR until 8 :30 o'clock A.M. Wednesday morning, September 26, 1934. Prayer was offered by R. W. Brother Reverend Samuel Thurman, Grand Chaplain.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

113

SECOND DAY, MORNING SESSION CALLED TO LABOR,

At 8 :30 o'clock A.M. the M. W. Grand Lodge was CALLED TO LABOR by M. W. Grand Master, Frank C. Barnhill, the Grand Officers being in their respective stations as on the preceding day. Prayer was offered by R. W. Brother Rev. Samuel Thurman, Grand Chaplain. REQUEST OF ROBERT H. MOON

The Grand Secretary presented the request of Brother Robert H. Moon, formerly a member of Springfield Lodge No.4, located at Springfield, in the Grand Jurisdiction of Illinois, a Past Master of that Lodge and now a member of Occidental Lodge No. 163 located at St. Louis, Missouri, desiring to be recognized as a Past Master in this Jurisdiction, under our law. The Grand Lodge granted this request. REQUEST OF WILLIAM JOHN VANNIX

The Grand Secretary presented the request of Brother William John Vannix, who was made a Mason in Keystone Lodge No. 412, located at Sault Sainte Marie, C~nada, and afterward became ,a charter member of Hiram No. 123, located at Fort Pierre, South Dakota, being Master of that Lodge while under dispensation and the first Master after receiving its charter. . He is now a member of Charity Lodge No. 331 located at St. Joseph, Missouri, and desires to be recognized as a Past Master in this J urisdiction under our law. The Grand Lodge granted this request. REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S RELIEF PROGRAM

R. W. Brother Willis J. Bray, Chairman, read the following report which was adopted as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A~nt Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri: Brethren: Your committee which was appointed to investigate the matter of Masonic relief has the honor to make the following report: This Grand Lodge, in its 1933 Communication, referred to this committee the inveE!tigation of certain matters touching the Welfare Committee and its relationship to our program of Masonic relief. In pursuing its study of the problems that presented themselves in this connection, your committee was instructed by the Grand Master to make as exhaustive a study as possible, not only of conditions and facilities in our own Masonic Home, but in all of the Masonic Homes of the United States, as well as of the administration of Masonic relief outside the Home. In the :first place an elaborate questionnaire was formulated for the purpose of securing complete information from Masonic Homes through-


114

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

out the United States. We secured a one hundred per cent response from this questionnaire. Then, finding ourselves in need of still more information, we formulated a second questionnaire to be mailed to the various Grand Secretaries in Grand Jurisdictions having Masonic Homes. Wereceived practically a one hundred per cent reply from this questionnaire. The data from these two questionnaires were then tabulated and studied carefully. In order that your committee might have still more complete information concerning conditions in Masonic Homes, the Grand Master instructed the chairman of your committee to attend the Fourth Annual Convention of Masonic Home Executives of the United States, which was held at the beautiful Masonic Homes near Elizabethtown, Pa., June 19 to 21, 1934. With this rather complete study of conditions made from questionnaires and as a result of personal interviews with the leading Masonic Home executives of the country, in addition to careful inspection of the Masonic Homes of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana, your committee feels itself in position to report to you conditions about as they are, and to make certain recommendations as to permanent policies. The most important question before this Grand Lodge at the present time is, to quote Brother H. P. Bosworth, of the New York state Masonic Home Board, "How well do we want to do our job T" The Fraternity in New York state is taking its job seriously. They raised the per capita tax for the support of the Home $0.50 last year, and are voting on a further raise of $0.75 for next year in order that they may be able to discharge their obligations to the needy ones. Missouri Freemasonry needs to face this question squarely. Several states are supporting their outside relief work better than we are in Missouri. We need now to face squarely the question of how well we, in this state, are doing our job. We occasionally hear the statement that" Missouri has the finest Masonic Home in the country." There is no excuse for our being misled in this regard. The facts are that there are a number of states that are doing their task of administration of Masonic benevolence better than we are. If we are only half-heartedly meeting our obligations in this regard, we should know it, and not be deceived by those who are uninformed. Our home for old people is well equipped and well furnished. They are well housed in comfortable quarters, where they can be as contented as their enfeebled bodies and minds enable them to be. While they are somewhat crowded they are not uncomfortably so. The worst feature of the plan for the old folks is the fact that, while waiting for meals, they have to congregate in the corridors of the hospital, and their dining hall is in the basement of the hospital. This is quite unsatisfactory because of the serious disturbance of patients in the hospital. This cannot be avoided under. present conditions. It is the opinion of your committee that insufficient recreational facilities for the old people are provided. There is an almost universal agreement among Masonic Home executives that children should not be housed too near the old people. It is our feeling that we are open to criticism in this regard. Many of the brethren throughout the state seem not to realize that the old people who are guests in the home are feeble in both mind and body, in most cases, and that allowance must be made for their physical condition when considering reports from them concerning the Home. By far the most unsatisfactory situation in our Home is that which pertains to the housing of the children. They are very seriously overcrowded, and there are practieally no playground faeilities, and no indoor play facilities. The contrast with what we saw in the Homes in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana in this regard was calculated to give us food for serious thought. There the children. have ample room to live and to play.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

115

Another condition which impressed your committee is the very great inadequacy of drinking fountains. There is now one, where perhaps fifteen are needed. Think of the severely hot weather of the past summer with only one drinking fountain. This is not the fault of the Masonic Home Board. The Fraternity itself is responsible for not making it possible to have adequate facilities. A study of the Masonic Homes in other states makes it possible to make several rather interesting observations. 1. It was found that 18 of the Homes have the congregate type of buildings, all but 5 of which found this type unsatisfactory. Five had the cottage type of buildings, and all reported this type highly satisfactory. Three follow a combination of the two plans, and three appear to follow neither of the two plans. There 'is no question but that the trends are definitely toward the cottage type of housing. No one who has ever seen the cottage type of housing as they have it in the Pennsylvania Homes would ever be willing to see other types installed, though the cottage type is somewhat more expensive to maintain. 2. In the feeding arrangements, 20 homes reported a congregate type of dining room in a more or less central dining hall. Seven others reported plans for more or less complete decentralization. The trend is for separate dining room in each cottage, housing about 20 children to a cottage. Only two are now completely decentralized. 3. Twenty-seven reported that they have a home for the aged; one a home for old ladies only; while seven reported that they have no old people's home. It seems, from our conference with Masonic leaders from other states, that there is a trend in some states to care for the aged indigent in the home environment by increasing the amount of allowance for outside aid. There are difficulties to be encountered in this plan, as will be pointed out later, but it is the opinion of your committee that we might relieve the pressure on the Old People's Department of the Home by adopting a policy of more outside aid for those who might be cared for in the home of a relative or friend, and where no illness or disability requires hospitalization. 4. Eleven of the homes reported that they do accept old people who are hospital or bed patients, While 17 reported that they do not do so. Missouri, as is well known, does provide adequate hospital care for both children and old people. 5. Fourteen homes reported that some provision is made for outside aid, while twelve reported that no such provision is made. This refers to financial aid for those who need help, but can be cared for outside the Masonic Home. It seems tha.t New York has an almost ideal arrangement in this regard. They had last year an almost 50-50 division between people cared for inside the home, and those cared for outside the home. This is a definite trend, and should probably be encouraged, not only as to the care of old people, but as to care of children as well. Where no provision is made for outside aid, it is generally contended that it is because it is too difficult to administer satisfactorily, and that the task can be much better done in the Home. The facts seem to be that the indigent can be cared for better in the Home, but at much greater expense. It is found that a special social-service worker is a valuable adjunct to any system of outside relief. 6. Nineteen homes reported that, in their opinion, it is desirable to have indigent persons cared for in the homes of relatives or friends if possible, while five reported that this plan has been found unsatisfactory. The consensus of opinion favors the plan of caring for the indigent outside the Masonic Home where possible. 7. In 25 of the Masonic Homes, it was reported that hospital facilities are provided, while 8 reported that they do not have such facilities. As a matter of fact, many of the old people in our Missouri Home are hospital cases, totally unable to care for themselves in any respect.


116

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

8. Only six homes reported a separate accounting for the hospital. These six reported an average annual per capita cost of maintaining the hospital of $419.57 per year. The other Homes maintaining hospitals do not keep separate cost accounting for the hospital, but it was the opinion of many whom your committee consulted on this subject, that this figure is not excessive. 9. There were 11 Homes reporting a per capita cost of maintaining the old people's department. The average was $386.74. Eleven Homes reported the average per capita cost of maintaining the Children's Home as $325.36 per year. Twelve homes reporting the cost of maintaining both Old People's and Children's Homes together reported an average per capita cost of $333.49 per year. It should be noted, in this connection, however, that comparison of costs is likely to be grossly misleading unless we take into account what they are getting for their money, or how well they are undertaking to do their job. Thus, one Home whose per capita annual cost is about $225.00, could not be compared with ours, for, as their Superintendent readily admits, they are not doing the job. We can not get away from the inevitable. question, "How well do we want to do our jobf" 10. There were 21 Homes reporting well equipped playgrounds for children; one reporting very little equipment; and one reported a partially equipped playground. On this point we in Missouri are sadly in the minority. It is almost heartbreaking to see those children forced to do without any playground or equipment. 11. There were nine homes reporting well equipped gymnasium facilities for the children, while eight others reported little such equipment. It is safe to assume that most Homes do not have gymnasiums. 12. There were 31 homes reporting reasonably well equipped and furnished libraries, while three reported little attempt to provide such faeilities. The 30 Homes reported an average of 3,947 books in the library. One other reported that they have a library' of ' , several thousand volumes. ' , In this connection, it is interesting, though not encouraging, to note that we in Missouri provide no library or reading room facilities for either children or old people. Your committee can not understand how high school and university students in our Home manage to study at all under the very unsatisfactory conditions under which we force them to live. We provide no library or reading room, and no study room except their meager living quarters. It would be easy to get a good library started in our Home, if it were possible to provide a suitable suite of rooms for such purposes. How one of our girls made Phi Beta Kappa in Washington University last year, is difficult to see. 13. Of the homes reporting, 28 expect, and receive little or no help from the old people, while five report that they get considerable help from them. The overwhelming judgment is that the old people do not render much service, and should not be expected to do so. 14. Twenty-one Homes reported that they receive much aid from the children, except for cooking, while two reported that they receive "little" or "eome" aid from the children. The general trend is for the children to do most of the cleaning up, and many other odd jobs about the Home. 15. Sixteen reported that they provide educational opportunity for capable students to complete high school, while two others provide high school opportunities, but less than high school graduation. Seven Homes provide some opportunity for capable and qualified students to complete college. Nineteen of the Homes reporting send their children to the local public schools, one having its own school system, while three others have some combination of the two plans. The Indiana Home furnishes the school building, and the city of Franklin furnishes the teachers. The building is on the Home grounds. It should be noted in this connection


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

117

that our Missouri Home is up with the best in that we do provide facilities for completion of high school and college, or trade scnool. The Masonic home in Mississippi has acted very wisely under the able leadership of Brother J. A. Redhead, the superintendent, in that they have accumulated a large educational endowment. The interest on this fund pays the expenses of worthy, capable students for the first two years in college. During their last two years their expenses are met by loans from the Knights Templar Loan Fund. Other states could well afford to follow the lead of Mississippi in building ample educational endowment funds. 16. Twenty-one Homes reported that their present educational facilities are adequate and satisfactory, while two others would add more of vocational work. Our Home is well provided with opportunities for vocational training through the local Rankin Trade School. 17. Twenty-four of the homes for old people reported an average of 146 guests to the home. (Note that they are guests or members and not inmates.) 18. Twenty-two homes reported an average of 88 boys; while twenty homes reported an average of 81 girls in the home. 19. The range in the number of guests among boys was from three to 481; while that for girls was from three to 239. 20. Three homes reported that they have provision whereby it is possible for children to be adopted from the Home under rigid board regulations, while 14 others reported that they do not permit children to be adopted from the Home as a regular practice. 21. Twenty-seven homes reported emphatically "No" on the advisability of housing children and old people near each other; one reported that such a plan is advisable; and one made a qualified reply placing the two some 300 yards apart. 22. Where aid outside the Home is given, only three states were reported in which the Grand Lodge bears all of the cost of such aid. In 11 eases the Lodge is required to share in the expense if possible. Ten others report that the Lodge "usually does" help; while one reports that the Lodge "does not always" help. Fourteen make no provision for outside aid. Of the 33 homes reporting on this item, nine require the Lodge to furnish at least half if possible. Nine others require the Lodge to supplement the main source of revenue by such donations as the Lodge can make; nine others have no such service; three others require the Lodge to defray no part of the expense; while three others require the Lodge to defray from one-fourth to one-half of the cost when possible. It seems, from the study your committee has made of this question, that probably the most satisfactory plan, taking it by and large, is to have an adequate, well administered fund at the control of the Grand Lodge, so that something approximately uniform can be accorded, the Lodges cooperating when it is possible for them to do so. 23. It appears that the per capita tax for the support of the Masonic Homes in the several states, averages about $0.75, though several states reported their tax as fractions of the total per capita tax. 24. The general practice seems to be that the Masonic Home Boards consist of about seven elective members together with the three highest officers of the Grand Lodge line. In only the case of Missouri is the executive head of the Masonic Home a member of the Home Board. 25. Twenty-three states reported an average of $9.98 per candidate initiated as going to the Masonic Home. This generally goes to the building fund or the endowment fund. In view of our rather extended study of this question it seems that we are forced to face several rather pertinent questions as pertaining to the problems of Masonie relief, the answer to which should form the basis for a permanent policy of this Grand Lodge. These questions may be stated as follows:


118

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

1. Wbat relationship should exist between the Masonic Home Board and the Welfare Committee on the one hand, and the Grand Lodge on the other' It is the understanding of your committee that the home Board and the WeHare Committee are creatures and agents of this Grand Lodge for the administration of its program of relief, and, as such, they must always act in harmony with the expressed policies of the Grand Lodge governing such matters. 2. What arrangement is best for administering the funds of the Home' I t is the opinion of your committee that, as long as the Home Board is amply qualified to administer such funds, that is the most satisfactory plan. When, and if, that becomes impossible, then a commercial firm should be employed for that purpose. 3. Should Masonic relief outside the Home be administered by a board or committee separate from the personnel of the Home Board' It is the opinion of your committee that the proper administration of the program of outside relief requires rather intimate knowledge of the administration of the Home. The two forms of Masonic relief are so intimately interrelated that, for them to be administered by two separate and distinct boards, would be needless waste of time and energy, as well as money. At the same time, the problems are so different and so intricate that it would be practically impossible for the Masonic Home Board itself to perform both functions effectively. There is no doubt that, in Missouri, we are getting the task done better and cheaper by having the outside aid administered by the Welfare Committee, the members of which are also members of the Home Board. We believe that the present plan of this Grand Lodge is quite satisfactory. 4. What age limits should be placed on admission into the Home' A physical limit is feasable for old people; an age limit is not. The average age of the old people in our Masonic Home is about 78. The average age of those who have died in recent years has been about 78. That means, to admit a man or woman at, say 50 to 65 years of age, would be to undertake the task of keeping him for 13 to 23 years. If the average cost of maintaining a person in the Home is $386.00 per year, the cost of a single individual to the Grand Lodge might be as high as $12,000.00. Unless the individual is physically incapacitated, it is the opinion of your committee that it should be the policy of the Home Board not to admit persons to the Home until they have become well advanced in years.. It is the opinion of your committee that there should be no lower age limit for admission of children to the home, except that only in case of absolute necessity should a baby under 3 years of age be admitted. This is because of the prohibitive cost of governess or nurse hire. The Board should be left free to exercise its judgment as to upper limit for children. 5. Should the Grand Lodge expand its outside-Masonic-Home relief program' In view of the fact that, to use a statement often heard in the meeting of Masonic Home executives in Pennsylvania, "any good mother is better than any institution can be," your committee is of the opinion that we should adopt a policy looking ultimately in the direction of the present definite trend. This involved a definite program of decreasing the child population of the home, and increasing the amount of care and aid for children outside the Home. This should entail, ultimately, as a definite part of our plan, the employment of at least one trained social service worker as an investigator for the Grand Lodge through its agencies for administration of relief. The practice of having a trained social service worker is not an experiment. Many states have had one Or more for years, and have found conditions much better after the social service worker had her work under way. New York, for example, has had such a special worker for 14 years, and would not think of dispensing with her services. In fact, Brother Harlan P. Bosworth of the New York Home


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

119

Board said, "We have 600 members in our Home, and have $3,000,000 invested in the plant. If this sum were invested in seeurities at 4 per cent we could have our cake, and eat it by supporting our needy by outside relief." He recognized, of course, that the beautiful $3,000,000 plant was what had attracted the funds from benevolently minded persons. Noone, we feel, would seriously argue for the discontinuance of the Home, but there is undoubtedly a definite trend toward more outside relief, and the deereasing of the Home population. Most of the Homes that have adopted this policy have increased the average age of the old people in the Home. New York increased the average age from 67 to 74 in 7 years. It is the opinion of your committee that this Grand Lodge, through the Welfare Committee and the Masonic Home Board, should adopt and follow the policy of gradually decreasing both the child and the adult membership in the Home by increasing the outside aid, and admitting only such old people as absolutely cannot be placed in suitable homes and supported by outside aid. It also is the opinion of your committee that the primary responsibility for the maintenance of an effective relief program rests upon the individual Freemason and upon the Lodge, primarily, and that the Lodge be required to bear its fair share of the cost of such relief unless excused by the Grand Master for inability to do so. The Masonic Home and the Welfare Committee, or the Grand Lodge, should take steps as soon as possible to employ a trained social service worker as an investigator for all forms of Masonic relief. It is also the opinion of your committee that no change in organization is needed for admimstration of the various forms of relief that we plan to undertake. 6. What policy should govern the future building program of the Home' It is the opinion of your committee that the Grand Lodge should definitely commit itself to the cottage type of building for children. It is our opinion, also, that the Masonic Homes should be located in or near St. Louis, and on one of the main streets or highways. 7. Should there be any limitations placed upon subordinate lodges as to membership in the Home' It is difficult to make any arbitrary rules on this point. The records show that there are lodges which have nearly always kept a disproportionate number of members in the Home. As someone has expressed it, they have the "Masonic Home habit." This , , habit" seems not to be confined to anyone seetion of the state, or to small lodges. One lodge having between 600 and 650 members had six members in the Home July 1, 1932, and their total payment to the Grand Lodge and the Masonic Home for that Masonic year was $1,251.60. During that year the Home spent $2,757.18 caring for their six members, while the Welfare Committee of the Grand Lodge spent $540.00 assisting certain of this same lodge's members outside the Home. Thus, this one Lodge cost the Fraternity $3,297.18 in one year, or $2,045.58 more than they paid into the Grand Lodge treasury. Should any lodge be permitted to draw as much as three times the amount of their per capita tax in Masonic Home benefits' Your committee thinks not. Another Lodge in a small town paid the Grand Lodge per capita tax in 1932 a total of $180.60. They had five members in the Home, costing the Fraternity $2,297.65, and this Lodge found itself unable to contribute even $1.00 per month to the support of a member on the outside.. One Lodge with a very small membership had about 10 per cent of its membership in the Masonic Home. For several years the Masons of Missouri have been spending more than $5,000 per year on the members of this Lodge. This Lodge finds itself unable to defray the funeral expenses of one of its members, or to pay even $1.00 per month to support a member outside the Home. There are about 440 members of the Home from 191 Lodges. Thirtynine Lodges in the state furnish. 167 members of the Home family. There


120

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

are 216 Lodges in Missouri that have never had anyone in the Home in its 47 years of history. There are 456 Lodges which had no one in the Home at the time these data were collected. It is a mistake, it seems, to relieve the Lodges of all responsibility in connection with support of the indigent members and their families. It causes carelessness, particularly in the matter of investigations. Once recently, an old brother died in the Home after his residence of 12 years there. The fraternity had spent $6,000 on him. After his death, it was discovered that his son had a beautiful home in Philadelphia, and another in Miami, }'lorida, and that the son had five different bank accounts. Thus was the Fraternity imposed upon because careful investigation was not made. We make it too easy for a Lodge to neglect its duty in this regard. Such instances could be multiplied from the records of the Home. They all have the same import. Your committee is definitely of the opinion that no Lodge should be permitted to have a disproportionate number of members in the Home. The question may be seriously raised as to whether some of our Lodges have not been somewhat lax in the matter of investigation before admitting candidates to membership. It is equally certain that, as a rule, investigations are not made with sufficient care before Lodges petition for admission of members into the Home. As a matter of fact, very few Lodges have anyone who is qualified to make such an investigation as it should be made. That, again, is the work of the trained social service worker, and we need not expect busy men, without any special training for such work to be able to do it right. For some reason, after a Lodge has petitioned for the admission of a member into the Home, the members of that Lodge have a feeling that they must take the attitude of defending their action, rather than promoting the further investiga,tion of the case. 8. What should be the policy of the Grand Lodge toward the problem of funeral expenses of deceased members of the Home' The Lodge agrees in the application to meet funeral expenses. During the two years and three months ending March 30, 1934, the Home paid $1,460.15 in funeral bills that had been assumed as an obligation by the respective Lodges concerned, but, in these cases, the Lodges apparently made no effort to meet the obligation. It is the opinion of your committee that the Grand Lodge through the Home Board should make such regulations as will make it impossible for a Lodge to willfully ignore this responsibility. If the Lodge is unable to meet its obligation, that fact eould be readily established and the Lodge absolved from responsibility by the Grand Master. 9. What should be the policy of the Grand Lodge toward financing the program of Masonic relief' One dollar and fifty cents per capita per year will support our present program in times of prosperity, but not in times of adversity. Neither will $1.50 per capita afford opportunity for expansion and growth. It is the opinion of your committee that, within one year, the per capita tax should be put back to $1.60, $0.10 of whieh is to go to Masonie relief outside the home. It should be understood that the adoption of this item in this report does not imply that it is the intention of the Grand Lodge to limit itself to $0.10 per capita per year for outside relief. As the outside relief program is expanded, more and more funds will be needed for such relief, and, hence, funds for such purposes will need to be found, either by inereased per capita tax for such purposes, or by transferring of funds from the treasury of the Masonic Home Board for sueh purposes. It is also our opinion that the initiation fee for the support of the Home should be restored just as soon as possible, and that should go to the building fund until an adequate plant has been provided, and then to an endowment fund. It is the opinion of the committee that the building fund of the Masonic Home should be kept intact to care for the immediate, -and ultimate needs for expansion of the physical plant.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

121

10. Should possible membership in the Home be looked upon as a form of insuranceT There is the tendency in the Fraternity for members to feel that they are investing in a form of old age insurance in paying Grand Lodge dues for the support of the Home. That takes all ideals of Masonic relief as a fundamental tenet out of the picture. With that as a prevalent idea, we then would become a sort of cheap insurance organization, having lost one of the most fundamental tenets of the venerable order. It is certain that no real Mason would be willing to take such a position if he realized what it means. We do not buy old age insurance with our dUe!. We invest in a splendid form of benevolence, with the realization of course, that the hand of adversity might some day cause us to become worthy recipients of such aid. 11. What does it mean to the Masonic Home to have occasional visitors in the Home' A visitor in the Home is sure to become better informed on the Home and its progress, as well as its needs. Those who make the most adverse criticism are frequently those whose visits to the Home are conspicuous by their infrequency. The Home has everything to gain by making reasonable provision for such visitors. 12. What provision should be made for in-service training of governesses, housemothers and other employees of the Home' The manage.ment of our Home is to be congratulated on its wisdom in making possible a period of such training by widely known experts in the Home last year. National leaders came to the Home, and conducted lectures for a week or longer at almost no expense to the Home. This resulted in a better trained personnel. In addition to this, some workers in the city outside our' Home benefited by the courses. This practice is to be commended. 13. Should Lodges show more personal interest in the Home and its members by making occasional gifts, especially at Christmas or on birthdays , No one who had ever studied this matter as has your committee could doubt for a minute the value of such gifts, not only to the members of the Home, but to the Lodges as well. If the Lodges outside St. Louis County could only know of the splendid work done by the Lodges in St Louis and follow their plan, there would be a radically changed attitude toward the llome in a short time. 14. Should the Grand Lodge require each Lodge to maintain a definite minimum balance in its charity fund, as is done in Indiana, for example, or should all relief work be administered out of funds provided by our per capita tax' It is felt that, as a general rule, the work will be better done if administered by the regular Grand Lodge agency, cooperating where possible with the local Lodge. Your committee recommends that Lodges be required to contribute part of the funds necessary to the outside relief of their members in cooperation with the Welfare Committee except that, with the consent of the Grand Master, any Lodge may be excused from such obligation for inability to pay. 15. Should Missouri, as many other states have already done, make defi. nite efforts to increase the Masonic Home endowment fund' Pennsylvania, Illinois, and New Jersey, for example, have been quite successful in doing this. We have had some success along this line, but our efforts have been more or less disorganized and sporadic. It seems that it should be a definite policy of the Grand Lodge to make systematic effort to enlarge the endowment fund of the Home as much as possible, by solicitation from persons who might be inclined to invest in such benevolences, and as rapidly as possible. Especially &hould we create an educational endowment fund. 16. Should the old people, as well as the children of the Home, have a regular monthly allowance' This plan has proven quite satisfactory in other states, and seems to be thoroughly sound in principle. The best


122

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

way to teach a child how to spend his money and make budgets is to give him some to spend and supervise his making and keeping a budget. The same principle would apply with the old folks. Massachusetts gives each old person in the Home a monthly allowance of $2.00. 17. What attitude should members of the Craft have toward rejections of applications for admission to the HorneT When a Lodge makes such an application the members should adopt the attitude of presenting a case before a competent committee or tribunal who are trained in the administration of such cases in the interest of the Craft at large. If, in the experienced judgment of this group, the interests of the Craft at large would be jeopardized by the granting of the petition, the Lodge or the members should readily acquiesce in the judgment. To do otherwise is an inexcusable form of selfishness. 18. What provision should be made for quarters for help employed in the Home 1 It seems that it is the duty of the Home to provide adequate qua.rters for those whose duties require them to be on almost constant duty in the Home. Your committee recommends the- adoption of the 18 principles just discussed as a policy for the guidance of the Masonic Home Board and the Welfare Committee in their work of administration of Masonic relief. In conclusion, your committee is glad to express its hearty appreciation for the constructive helpfulness of Most Worshipful Brother W. W. Martin, President of our Masonic Home, and other members of his staff. Everything possible was done to aid us in the prosecution of our work. The Home Board have done well with what we have given them. The question for us to face is "How well do we want to do our job." The Home cannot be an unemployment agency, but it must be maintained as an efficient organization for administering relief in the spirit of brotherly love to those who are bound to us by the most solemn ties. Respectfully submitted, WILLIS J. BRAY, Chairman. L.J.GRAUE THOMAS D. WILLIAMS C. B. WADDELL UEL W. LAMKIN KIPP C. JOHNSON ROBERT Y. GOGGIN

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

R. W. Brother Eugene J. Altheimer, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Chartered Lodges, the same was adopted and is as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge ...4.. F. and ...4.. M. of Missouri. Brethren: R. W. Brother Eugene Altheimer, Chairman, presented the Report of the Committee on Chartered Lodges, which was adopted and is as follows: Your Committee reports that the exhibit in the Grand Secretary's report shows a loss of 4,358 members during the past year, leaving our net membership as of June 30, 1934, to be 97,266. It is cheering, however, to note that the initiations are 1,694 and the passings 1,421a total of 3,115. Had these Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts been raised as Master Masons before June 30, 1934, our loss instead of being 4,358 would have been 1,243, thus it will be seen that at least we are on the upward grade. From the reports to the Grand Secretary we note that Lodges of every part of the state are at work and petitions are beginning to come in in greater numbers. As of August 1, 1934, the last day for reporting, the reports of 101


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

123

Lodges were still outstanding, as against 155 at the same time one year ago. Since that time we have twenty reports still outstanding but these Lodges are striving to complete their reports and we recommend that owing to the unusual Circumstances which still obtain in our Grand Jurisdiction all of these Lodges be granted further time, as was done last year. We also recommend that the $10.00 fine for delinquency be waived this year on these Lodges, feeling sure that the outlook being increasingly better, they will soon catch their stride and come into the clear. We notice that the dues remitted aggregate $8,420.50, as against $14,702.10 of last year, which shows a decided improvement. We call attention also to the number of suspensions for nonpayment of dues which at present is 5,070 as against 6,284 of last year, which is also significant of improvement. Taken all together we are of the opinion that at last the tide has turned and better days are ahead. We would especially urge our Lodges the coming year to report promptly according to law within the thirty days after the close as of the first of the fiscal year and if any should not have their finances complete they should not delay reporting because of this reason but should send in the report to the Grand Secretary's office without their per capita. Not to do so seriously retards the work of the Grand Secretary's office and this has been done for the past two years. We also urge those Lodges which are still outstanding to send in their money as quickly as possible in order that the work of the Welfare Committee may not be retarded. Fraternally submitted, EUGENE ALTHEIMER, Chairman, J. EARL TOBLER, SHELBY H. WILSON.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON REVISION OF BY-LAWS

R. W. Brother Henry C. Chiles, Chairman, read the report of the Special Committee on Revision of By-Laws, the same was adopted and is as follows: To the Grand Lodge, Lt. F. and Lt. M. of the State of Missouri. Brethren: Your Committee on Revison of the By-Laws reports that it has not completed its work, although progress has been made, notwithstanding the handicap due to the fact that no appropriation for the expenses of its work has ever been made by the Grand Lodge. Your Committee recommends that the Committee be 00ntinued and be granted further time in which to complete its work and be allowed to report to the next Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge. Respectfully and fraternally submitted, HENRY C. CHILES, Chairman, RAY V. DENSLOW, BYRNE E. BIGGER. REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON TRIAL BY OTHER STATE JURISDICTIONS

R. W. BROTHER FORREST DONNELL: A special committee was appointed some two years ago for the purpose of considering and re-


124

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

porting to the Grand Lodge upon two questions, one relating to the question of the right of Lodges in Foreign Jurisdictions to try Masons whose Masonic membership exists by virtue of their membership in Missouri lodges and the other the question of the right of other jurisdictions to maintain the right to determine whether if a man has applied in the other jurisdictions, there may exist a certain period of time during which he cannot apply in Missouri. These two questions were referred to a special committee which last year asked for further time. I ask at this time that this committee be continued and be given one year further time in which to consider and report upon these two questions. (Request granted.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MASONIC PUBLICATIONS

M. W. Brother "Vm. R. Gentry, Chairman, requested that this committee be continued for another year and the request was granted. THE GRAND MASTER: We have one of our guests who visited us yesterday who has also appeared today, Right Eminent Sir Alexander S. Rankin. It was our hope that M. W. Brother Joseph S. McIntyre might have been with us, too, because we had hoped to be honored by the heads of both the York Rite and the Scottish Rite bodies of Freemasonry in this Jurisdiction. It has been my pleasure during the past year to visit the various Scottish Rite bodies in the State, at St. Louis, Kansas City, and Joplin and I was interested and pleased to note in those visits that many of our Blue Lodge brethren who are workers in the Scottish Rite are also active in the councils of the York Rite. I think that is very gratifying and it should be because it indicates a close and fraternal regard existing between those two Rites in this Jurisdiction. We are pleased to introduce Right Eminent Sir Alex S. Rankin, who is the Grand Commander of Knights Templar in Missouri, and we want him to address us. ADDRESS OF R. E. ALEXANDER S. RANKIN W. BROTHER RANKIN: This is my first visit to the Grand Lodge and I felt in coming that I might find myself in a strange place, but I find many of my friends here of long years' standing. Will Gentry and I went to the same Sunday School half a century ago, but in Will's estimation I have fallen from grace since that time. He says it is rather a strange thing to find a Scotchman in a Methodist Church but whatever our affiliations of that kind may be, Brethren, we are all striving to reach the same end, and as we go we are endeavoring to do the same thing, you in your way and I in mine. Yesterday morning I was peculiarly affected by the song the young man sang to us from the gallery on my right, and it seemed to me that ne struck the note that is necessary at this particular time as perhaps never at any other time in the history of this great people and this great institution. Of whom shall I be afraid f But it seems to me that the greatest stumbling block in our way of progress today is fear.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

125

We are afraid of what the other fellow is going to think or say or do, and it keeps us from conducting ourselves as we should. Last night those two splendid addresses that we heard brought out that very same thought, how much we are afraid, and the greatest Teacher that ever walked on this earth continually emphasized that thought, "Don't be afraid." At one time He says, "Don't be afraid for I have overcome the world," and He has sent us out in a sense from that time until the present date to herald this note wherever we are, and He sent those immediate friends of His at that particular time out on a strange platform to them and it is strange to us today. He said that the meek shall inherit the earth. I read a very interesting story not long ago in which the officers of Napoleon's army were engaged and they were talking about the power of the world. In their estimation the greatest powers in the world were the armies of Caesar, Alexander, and the Emperor himself, and Napoleon said, "Yes, sirs, that is true, these armies were powerful. We compelled men to follow us at the mouth of the cannon and at the point of the sword and bayonet, but the greatest power in the world and the greatest influence in the world is the power of that Carpenter of Nazareth. We compelled men to follow us with arms, He has compelled men to follow Him because they love Him. Our power shall decrease while His shall ever increase." Today while we are sitting in this beautiful temple dedicated to God, this message that was sent out through that humble Galilean is reverberating to the ends of the earth, and I bring to you the greetings of the Grand Commandery, and pray that you may continue in this great work that you are in, of lightening the loads of those with whom you come in contact and in lightening the hearts and minds of the less fortunate. That beautiful group of children we saw yesterday reminds us of the statement of this Great Teacher, "What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul," for what can he get for th~ exchange of his soul' One of those chldren, my friends, is worth more than all we have invested or ever will invest in this great work reaching out and touching the unfortunate. I thank you. ELECTION OF GRAND OFFICERS

M. W. Grand Master Barnhill announced the appointment of the following Brethren to act as Tellers: N. D. Jackson, Chairman, A. J. Michener, Morris E. Ewini, Harry S. Hightower, Fred H. Knight, E. F. "Hanna, Louis Graue, Carl Swenson, Fay G. Fulkerson, Charles D. Duggan, R. Y. Goggin, A. D. Ludlow, Robert L. Dixon, Oliver Kortjohn, and Henry M. Guitar.

The following were elected: M. W. BROTHER Du VAL SMITH R. W. BROTHER JAMES W. SKELLY R. W. BROTHER GEORGE W. WALKER R. W. BROTHER H. L. READER R. W. BROTHER EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. BROTHER ARTHUR MATHER

Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Senior Grand Warden Junior Grand Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Se(N'etary

ELECTION OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR MASONIC HOME

The following Brethren were nominated and elected to serve as directors for the Masonic Home for the next three years: Brothers


126

PROCEEDINGS OF TIlE

1934

William S. Campbell, Orestes Mitchell, Frank H. Wielandy, Byrne E. Bigger, and Ray V. Denslow. Brother Thad B. Landon was also elected to serve the unexpired term of the late William A. Clark. INVITATION TO ST. JOSEPH, MISSOURI

M. W. BROTHER ORESTES MITCHELL: M. W. Grand Master, I want to say that you have elected a Grand Master of the Grand Lodge from St. Joseph, and on behalf of St. Joseph I want to say something to him before I present some particular business. Brother Smith, when a small boy, lost his father and was raised by an uncle who had a wonderful wife. Soon thereafter the uncle died, and this good woman continued to rear Du Val. She did a good job of it and she is tremendously proud today of his advancement to Most W orshipful Grand Master of this Grand Lodge. This woman has been interested in Masonic work for many years, perhaps many of you know her, Anna Lee Smith, Past Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star of Missouri, a woman who has done much for the education of the youth of our Eastern Star people, and right here today I want to present to this young man at her request, this envelope. Brother Smith, I deliver it to you. M. W. BROTHER SMITH: Naturally this comes as a complete surprise to me, and not knowing what the envelope contains I shall refrain from adding anything else at this time. M. W. BROTHER MITCHELL: It has been a long time since the Grand Lodge met in St. Joseph, the home of M. W. Brother Smith, and I have a letter from the Mayor of the city of St. Joseph addressed to the Grand Master on behalf of the citizens of St. Joseph inviting this Grand Lodge to hold its 1935 session in St. Joseph, and I have a letter to the Grand Master addressed to the Grand Lodge from the Chamber of Commerce in which they offer to provide a meeting place and everything else that is necessary to take care of this Grand Lodge if we will meet there. I have the petition which I will read to you: "We, the undersigned officers of the St. Joseph, Missouri, Lodges, to the members of the Grand Lodge. We extend a cordial invitation to hold the 115th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in the State of Missouri in the city of St. Joseph, Missouri, in the year 1935." This petition and invitation is signed by the Masters and Wardens of all the Lodges in St. Joseph. Most Worshipful Grand Master, I move that the next session of the Grand Lodge be held in the city of St. Joseph, Missouri. M. W. BROTHER LANDON: Most Worshipful Grand Master, notwithstanding the fact that Kansas City is always open, we are going to concede that they are entitled to it and we take pleasure-I haven't


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

127

talked to the fellows from Kansas City but I know they will agree with me, and I will second the motion. THE GRAND MASTER: It seems like everybody in St. Joseph wants us to go up there except Brother Du Val. I don't know whether he wants to go or not. Those in favor of going to St. Joseph will let it be known by the usual voting sign. (Carried.) MOTION TO PRINT

M. W. Brother William R. Gentry moved that the Grand Secretary be instructed to put in pamphlet form a number of additional copies of the Report of the Special Committee on Grand Master's Relief Program, using his judgment of the number to be printed and the manner of their distribution. M. W. Brother Thad B. Landon moved that this matter involving extra expenditure be referred to the Ways and Means Committee. (Carried.) REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PAY ROLL

W. Brother Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Pay Roll, which was adopted as follows: To the Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Pay Roll, at this session of the Grand Lodge, begs to report allowances paid for Mileage and Per Diem, which have been distributed as follows: Grand Officers $ 467.50 Past Grand Masters ................................... 362.90 District Deputy Grand Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,418.40 District Lecturers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486.00 Chairmen of Committees . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133.00 Committee on Jurisprudence 118.50 Committee on Appeals and Grievance. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 155.70 Committee on Credentials 164.40 Assistant Tilers 77.70 Members Board of Relief and Special Committees. . . . . . . . . . . . 67.80 Chartered Lodges ............•........................... 16,734.30 Total $20,186.20 Respectfully submitted, WALTER R. SHRODES, Chairman,

JOHN

H. HOOPER, WILBERT A. WELLS.

NOTE-The itemized report of the Committee in full is in the archives of the Grand Secretary's office. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND :MASTERS

R. W. Brother F. M. Smith, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on District Deputy Grand Master's report, the same was adopted and is as follows:


128

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

To the M. W. Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: A scrutiny of the reports of District Deputy Grand Masters of the state, by the Committee appointed by you to examine these reports, reveals the following facts: Of the 60 Masonic Districts there have been submitted to the Committee reports from 41. The Districts from which no reports have been received are the Second, Tenth, Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-sixth, Twenty-ninth, Thirty-first, Thirty-fifth, Thirty-eighth, Thirty-ninth, Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-fifth, Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth. Of the 41 Deputies reporting only 12 have visited all the Lodges of the District. These Districts are the Fifth, Ninth, Eleventh, Seventeenth, Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-eighth, Thirtieth, Thirty-third A and B, Thirty-fourth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth, and Fifty-ninth. Of the remainder, the reports show a part but not all the Lodges visited, and some four reports show no visitations made. The law governing the matter of District Deputy Grand Master's reporting is as follows: , 'He shall make annual report to the Grand Master thirty days prior to the meeting of the Grand Lodge, setting forth an account of his official acts during the year; the state of Freemasonry within his Jurisdiction; the condition of the Lodges, and suggesting such measures as may to him appear conducive to the general good, which report shall be by the Grand Master laid before the Grand Lodge, but shall not be published with the Proceedings." This law is quoted here as it is apparent that diversity of opinions exists on what is required in the way of a report from each Deputy to the Grand Master, for these reports vary in scope from a very brief letter statement concerning the work, sometimes not even accompanied by a short recapitulation, to some which include practically all, if not all, the statistical and other information which the Grand Master might desire or need to give him adequate knowledge of the work prosecuted. It is evident that a more general knowledge of what is required in the way of reports from D. D. G. M. 's should be engendered. As might be expected, among the reports of District Deputy Grand Masters who have covered the field with thoroughness are to be found the most comprehensive reports. Among these is one which might be cited as nearly if not quite model. It is that of the Fifty-seventh District. Here the statistical reports of the various visitations are complete, together with the checkbacks of the Grand Secretary, and the short recapitulation of data. Besides this, there is a letter-form report summarizing the work, with commentaries o,n the spiritual condition of Lodges, the character of their work, the elan (or otherwise) of the members, together with other special information which the Deputy felt that the Grand Master should have. Besides all this, are attached to the report printed evidences of the dates of official visits, Lodges of Instruction, etc., which indicate a systematic approach on the part of the Deputy both to his work and the task of reporting it. Others of the D. D. G. M. 's have approximated this one report in its completeness, and are also to be commended. Zeal on the part of the D. D. G. M. in his work is to be expected. We could scarcely expect other workers to display elan if the Deputies do not, and this zeal should carryover into proper reporting. They should by example in reporting to their superior o,fficers display the punctillio they ,desire in reports from their subordinates. Of course, it is well known that excellent workers are sometimes lacking in reportorial ability; at least,


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISiOURI

129

they have disinclination towards, or distaste for, the exacting task of furnishing statistics or evidences of the work done. But reports are necessary, and where this disinclination or inability on the part of the Deputies exists, assistance should be secured from those who would gladly extend it; such for example as some of the many good secretaries in all the districts. Or if and when the D. D. G. M. is in doubt as to what is expected in the way of report we respectfully suggest that the Grand Secretary's well known courtesy holds promise that helpful suggestions might be had for the mere asking. Only about nine of the reports mention the organization of Masonic Associations; but those which do, speak well of the effect upon the work of the Order by the activities of the Associations. The reading of these reports from the various districts indicates a gradual adjustment of the Lodges to the untoward conditions in the immediate past, and promise is held that the Order is on the upward trend. At least, a general feeling of wholesome optimism prevails that gives rise to the hope that even some if not all of the Lodges now moribund or inactive might be awakened into activity by infusion of new blood or through the processes of mergers and affiliations, and also by the work of the Associations encouraged by you in your year's work. On the whole, Most Worshipful Grand Master of Missouri, Masonry is to be congratulated in having such a fine body of men as the District Deputy Grand Masters who so willingly and uncomplainingly spend their time and energy in working for the good of the Order with no stimulus towards zeal other than the desire to contribute to the advancement of the cause and the joy of seeing Masonry move forward. Respectfully submitted, FREDERICK M. SMITH, Ohairman.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES

The report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances was presented by its Chairman, R. W. Brother William F. Woodruff, same as read, adopted section by section, and as a whole, and is as follows: Oarroll Lodge No. 249 V8. W. Emmitt Nash. Charges were filed by the Lodge, through its Junior Warden, alleging un-Masonic conduct under four (4) specifications. Specifications 1, 3 and 4 allege misconduct on the part of the accused toward three different young ladies employed as telephone operators by the wife of the accused, who had charge of the telephone exchange at Norborne, Missouri. Specification No. 2 alleges that the accused, by misrepresentation, decoyed one of the young ladies into his automobile with the intention of accomplishing improper relations with her. At the request of both the Lodge and the accused, the Grand Master appointed a Trial Commission, composed of Right Worshipful Brother Henry C. Chiles, Chairman, Brother B. M. Little, of Lexington, and Brother Lester W. Nye, of Malta Bend. Trial was had in the Lodge hall commencing December 12, 1933, and extending into December 13, 1933. The Lodge and accused were represented at the trial by competent counsel. The Trial Commission found the accused guilty of Specifications 1, 3 and 4; not guilty on Specification 2; and assessed the punishment at expulsion. Accused has appealed. The accused, his wife, and several friends, appeared before the Commit-


130

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

tee, and the Lodge was represented, before the Committee, by Worshipful Brother Dudley D. Thomas, Jr., who was counsel for the Lodge at the trial. The Committee has given the accused, and those who appeared with him, full opportunity to present his side of the case and has carefully studied the transcript of the trial below, constituting more than one hundred and fifty pages. We are forced to the conclusion that the evidence sustains the Trial Commission's finding of guilty on the three specifications, and there is nothing in the record, and nothing has been presented to the Committee, which justifies the Committee in setting aside this finding. Accordingly, the Committee recommends that the finding of judgment of the Trial Commission be affirmed.

Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 V8. Olarence G. Dicke. On the 4th day of November, 1933, charges containing three (3) specifications were filed against the above accused in the name of the above Lodge, through its Junior Warden, as follows: Specification 1, that the accused, on March 24, 1933, had pled guilty in the United States District Court to the charge of violation of the National Prohibition Act and was assessed a fine of one hundred dollars, which he paid; Specification No.2 charged generally the publication in a daily newspaper of the City of St. Louis of an account of the arrest of the accused on the charge mentioned in the first specification; Specification No.3 charged that on or about April 11, 1992, together with two profanes, accused was arrested in the City of St. Louis, suspected of the offense of attempted extortion, and that the accused, while so arrested, signed a written confession admitting his participation in an attempted extortion, and that as a result of said arrest, the photograph of the accused was taken and is permanently placed in what is known as the "Rogue's Gallery" of the Police Department of the City of St. Louis. Trial was had on November 25, 1933, before a jury of the Lodge. At this trial no evidence was received to sustain the second specification of the charges. The jury returned a blanket verdict of guilty on the remaining specifications and assessed the punishment at suspension from the rights and privileges of Freemasonry for a period of two years. From this verdict and finding of the jury the Lodge appealed on the ground that the punishment assessed was not adequate considering the nature of the charges and the evidence in the case. The evidence relative to the first specification was conclusive, consisting of certified records of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. The offense was committed, a plea of guilty entered and fine assessed and paid, prior to the effective date of the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. The accused defended this specification on the theory that he had been the victim of an entrapment. This Committee finds under the conclusive evidence introduced on this specification of the charges that the finding of guilty by the trial jury was proper and could not have been otherwise. The evidence relative to the third specification of the charges consisted of testimony of police officers of the City of St. Louis and admissions on the part of the accused made by him in a statement to the police officers and further admission in his testimony at the Lodge trial of the case, that he had entered into an arrangement with two other men, both profane, under which it was agreed that a sexual degenerate would be placed in a compromising position through the solicitation and efforts of one of the conspirators, and while in a compromising position the consummation of such act would be apparently discovered by the accused representing himself to be a police officer, as a result of which plan it was hoped to extort


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

131

money from the degenerate victim. This plAn was carried into operation and resulted in an agreement on the part of the victim to meet the accused on a subsequent date, at a place agreed upon, in St. Louis, at which time the victim was to pay the sum of six hundred dolla]'s to the accused. This latter part of the agreement was never carried into effect, the accused and his associates in the conspiracy having, after consultation, decided, through fear or otherwise, to abandon the collection of the extortion money. These facts were shown conclusively, not only by the evidence and records of the Police Department of St. Louis, but by the admissions of the accused under oath at the trial. The third specification of the charges does not expressly charge either an attempted extortion or the impersonation of a police officer, either of which offense would constitute a criminal act under the laws of the State of Missouri, of both of which offenses the accused admitted he was guilty on trial. Your Committee, however, feels that the charges as made in the third specification constitute allegations of a Masonic offense and certainly of such immoral conduct as would tend to cause scandal and to degrade the Masonic fraternity in public estimation. Your Committee therefore feels that the allegations in the third specification of the charges are sufficient to charge an offense under the Masonic Law. Counsel for the accused took the position, before your Committee, that inasmuch as the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States had been repealed prior to the Lodge trial, that the conviction on the first count should not be permitted to stand. Irrespective of the merits of this question your Committee feels that the serious nature of the offense charged in the third specification and admitted by the accused, requires us to recommend that the finding of guilty on the part of the Trial Jury should be affirmed. The only attempted defenses offered by the accused to the offense charged in the third specification were that he was under the influence of intoxicating liquor at the time he entered into and assisted in partially carrying out the attempted extortion, and that he abandoned the conspiracy before its complete consummation, being actuated in this, as he claims, by repentance. Your Committee feels that the defense of intoxication is not an appropriate or valid defense for a Master Mason. In addition to this, the testimony clearly shows that the accused was at all times in sufficient possession of his mental faculties to realize entirely the nature and gravity of the acts which he planned and in which he participated. The Masonic Law offers an opportunity for a Master Mason who has been expelled to reform his manner of living and be thereafter restored to Masonic membership. This opportunity is and will be open to this accused. It is the opinion of your Committee that the punishment assessed by the Trial Jury was entirely inadequate considering the nature and the gravity of the offense committed, and we therefore recommend that the accused be and hereby is expelled from all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry.

Hernwn Lodge No. 187 V8. I. H. Todd. Charges were filed July 20, 1933, against the accused in the name of the Junior Warden of the Lodge upon the order of Most Worshipful Brother Thad B. Landon, then Grand Master, and upon the order of the Grand Master trial was had before a Commission consisting of Right Worshipful Brother Darius A. Brown, Worshipful Brother J. M. Fisher, both of Kansas City, and Right Worshipful Brother N. D. Jackson, of Independence. The trial was at the Lodge hall at Liberal, Missouri, on the 17th day of August, 1933.


132

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Charges against the accused are under five specifications. Three of these, numbered 1, 2 and 5, are based on allegations that the aMused, while Treasurer of the Lodge, had deposited the funds of the Lodge in the Bank of Liberal, of which he was cashier, when he knew the bank was in a failing condition. Specification No. 3 is based on the charge that accused, as cashier of the Bank of Liberal, received a deposit in the bank of which he was cashier, from Mulberry Lodge No. 261, of Mulberry, Kansas (Mulberry being located close to the Missouri-Kansas line) upon the representation to and agreement with the officers of Mulberry Lodge that a United States government bond of one thousand dollars was segregated and held by the bank as security for the deposit, whereas no bond was so deposited as security, and the representations of accused were deliberate and known by him to be untrue. Specification No. 4 alleges that the accused wrongfully promised and agreed to segregate and deposit a United States government bond of one thousand dollars to secure the deposit of Mulberry Lodge when he knew that the bank of which he was cashier had no legal right to make such promise or agreement. At the trial no evidence was introduced to support the charges that accused, as rrreasurer of his Lodge, deposited the Lodge funds in his own bank when it was in a failing condition, and consequently these specifications are out of the case. To support the charges with respect to securing the deposit of Mulberry Lodge No. 261, of Mulberry, Kansas, a written instrument, signed by the accused was introduced, which is as follows: , 'December 10, 1931. , , As security bond for the funds of Mulberry Lodge, No. 261, deposited }'lith this bank on daily balance, it is understood and agreed that a United States Government Bond in the amount of $1,000.00, is deposited in the safe of the Bank of Liberal, said bond to remain the property of the said bank of Liberal, provided the funds of said Lodge are disbursed as directed by the proper officials of said Lodge. , 'Bank of Liberal, By (Signed) I. H. Todd, Cashier." Along with this written instrument there was the testimony of the representatives of Mulberry Lodge that the deposit was made only upon the representation of accused that the deposit would be and was secured, and that the deposit would have been withdrawn on the very day that the written instrument was executed had it not been executed and delivered to the representatives of the Mulberry Lodge. The only other evidence on this feature is that of the accused himself, whose attempted explanation is that he intended only to represent that a bond would be obtained and segregated to secure the deposit. This explanation cannot be accepted because it contradicts the written instrument which the accused admits that he wrote and signed. Neither side has appeared before your Committee though both were notified that hearing would be accorded. The undisputed evidence is that no bond was ever segregated to secure the deposit of Mulberry Lodge, and that approximately two months after the written instrument was executed the bank closed. In the liquidation of the bank the Mulberry Lodge claim has been allowed as a preferred claim, presumably on account of the fact that the bank had agreed to secure the deposit. The Lodge has received about thirty-five per cent of its deposit; the balance, or a large part of it, will be lost. The Trial Commission found the accused not guilty. The opinion of


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

133

the Chairman of the Trial Commission is in the record, from which it appears that the Commission based its finding of not guilty on the feeling that there had been no express proof of fradulent intent and that to establish fraud, there must have been proof that the accused personally benefited from the fraud practiced and proved. The Trial Commission also took the position that in a trial for un-Masonic conduct, the accused must be proved guilty "beyond a reasonable doubt," applying the same rule as to proof of fraud and as to the burden of proof that applies in prosecutions for violation of crimial statutes in the courts. Your Committee finds it is unable to agree with the Trial Commission on the question of the guilt of the accused. We think the definite preponderance of the evidence is that accused deliberately and knowingly made a misrepresentation to representatives of Mulberry Lodge for the purpose of securing the deposit of that Lodge; that if accused had not made the misrepresentation, his bank would not have received the deposit nor retained it after it was received. It seems to us that when he made so deliberate and definite a misrepresentation as this, he was clearly departing from that standard of honesty, integrity and regard for others which Freemasonry requires of its adherents, and accordingly we conclude that accused has been guilty of un-Masonic conduct. It may not be inappropriate to say that there is no provision of the Constitution or By-Laws of this Grand Lodge, nor is there any decision of this Grand Lodge, which establishes the, rule that when a Brother is on trial for un-Masonic conduct he must be acquitted unless proved guilty "beyond a reasonable doubt. " The evidence should be clear, definite and convincing, but that would seem to be sufficient. In this particular case, your Committee does not have any reasonable doubt of the guilt of the accused on the charge of misrepresentation to the representatives of Mulberry Lodge. We recommend that the finding of not guilty by the Trial Commission be set aside; that the accused be and is hereby found guilty of un-Masonic conduct; that his punishment be and hereby is assessed at suspension from all the privileges and rights of Freemasonry for a period of seven years from this date.

In the Matter of Charges of Un-Masonic Conduct Against Worshipful Brother L. Frank Stevens, Master of Hogles Greek Lodge No. 279, March 30, 1934. Three members of Hogles Creek Lodge No. 279 made written complaint to the Grand Master of un-Masonic conduct on the part of the Master of the Lodge, Worshipful Brother L. Frank Stevens, specifying that W orshipful Brother Stevens appeared at the funeral of a deceased brother at the Baptist Church at Weaubleau, Missouri, on March 28, 1934, under the influence of intoxicating liquor, to the scandal and disgrace of the Masonic fraternity. In accordance with the provisions of Section 278 of the By-Laws, the Grand Master made investigation, and from his investigation concluded the charge was well founded. He promptly suspended the accused as Master of his Lodge and ordered him to appear at this Communication of the Grand Lodge for trial. A full trial was had before your Committee on Monday, September 24, 1934. The complaining members were represented by Brother Dewey B. Thatch of Osceola; the accused was present in person and was represented by Right Worshipful Brother James A. Logan, of Shawnee Lodge No. 653, Warsaw. The evidence presented on behalf of complainants definitely establishes that on the occasion of the funeral services, accused appeared at the


134

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

church under the infleunce of intoxicating liquor; that several times he talked out loud during the funeral sermon, disturbing the minister (who is a Brother Mason of accused and a Past Master of his Lodge) and also the congregation so as to materially violate the proprieties of the occasion; that in one remark the accused used profanity; that at the conclusion of the church service a complaint was made to the sheriff of the county, following which, at the request of the sheriff, accused appeared before a Justice of the Peace and pleaded guilty to a charge of disturbing religious worship, and paid a small fine and costs. A few days later the Prosecuting Attorney of the county called accused to his home and, apparently by agreement between the accused and the Prosecuting Attorney, the small fine was increased ,with the result that the accused paid a fine of fifty dollars and costs of about ten dollars. Accused denies that he was intoxicated or in any way under the influence of liquor and denies that he created a disturbance at the church. Testimony of the accused was supported by the Senior Warden of the Lodge, who accompanied him to the Church and who also accompanied him to the office of the Justice of the Peace and advised accused to plead guilty to the charge of disturbing religious worship. The evidence in the case consisted partly of verbal testimony of witnesses who appeared before your Committee and partly of affidavits of witnesses which were submitted by both sides. Much of the eVIdence presented was sharply conflicting. There was also verbal testimony to the effect that the accused had, on prior occasions, attended Communications of his Lodge while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, which evidence, though not directly tending to prove the charges made, your Committee feels justified in considering in determining the punishment to be assessed. After giving both sides a full hearing and hearing the arguments of counsel representing both sides, your Committee has reached the conclusion that the evidence shows overwhelmingly that the accused is guilty of the charge made by the Brethren of his Lodge to the Grand Master. In recommending punishment in the case your Committee has taken into consideration the fact that the accused was, at the time of the commission of this offense, the Worshipful Master of his Lodge, and as such, charged with a very high responsibility and duty. We have also taken into consideration that the accused has been a Master Mason and active in the Craft over a long period of years. We recommend that the accused be found and declared guilty of unMasonic conduct as charged; that the action of the Grand Master in suspending him as Master of his Lodge be approved; and that he be punished by suspension from all of the rights and privileges of Freemasonry for a period of five years from this date, and be deprived of the rank of Past Master for the same period. Respectfully submitted, W. F. WOODRUFF, ALLEN L. OLIVER, JAMES H. SCARBOROUGH, RAY BOND,

Members of the Committee in Attendance. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

R. W. Brother James A. Kinder, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Ways and Means which was adopted and is as follows:


1934

135

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

To the Grand Lodge .d. F. and .d. M. of Missouri: Under the provisions of the law as enacted last year, the duties of this Committee have been enlarged. A number of matters have come to the attention of the Committee during the year which it has been impossible to complete. A number of Lodges are in financial distress with their Temples, and have applied to the Committee for assistance in working out a solution of their problems. The Committee has been unable in most cases to be of any assistance, because the debt had already been incurred and with greatly reduced income, cannot be met. In such cases, the Committee feels that the creditor and debtor must be left to work out their own problems; and while it is always extremely desirable to see that the obligations of Lodges and their Temple AssociatioIis be promptly met, yet, in cases so far submitted, there seemed no way open for this Committee to assist. Also, as a result of the enlarged duties of the Committee, a number of proposals to consolidate various Lodges have come before the Committee, and in due time most of these _proposed consolidations will be completed, although progress has been slow by reason of the fact that all the efforts of the Committee have been confined to correspondence in an effort to save travel expense to the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master having recommended the elimination of the $10.00 fee due from each initiate be continued for another year and that the $1.00 per member for the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association be eliminated for a further year, we therefore, recommend: ".d. That the $10.00 initiation fee to be collected from each initiate be eliminated until January 1, 1936 and "B. That the $1.00 per member collected for the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association be eliminated until July 1, 1936." It will be recalled that the Grand Lodge at its 1933 Communication adopted a resolution waiving the sixty cents per capita tax for the support of the Grand Lodge. This action compels the Committee to appropriate a sum far in excess of available money now in our general revenue fund and it will be necessary at this session to withdraw from our permanent investments the sum of $25,000.00. Your Committee believes that it is imperative that our permanent investments be carefully guarded and conserved, and we therefore recommend that this withdrawal be restored to the permanent fund at the very earliest moment and that this Grand Lodge endeavor at all times to live within its income. We recommend the following appropriations: BUDGET

1934-1935

Pay Roll, 1934 Communication Printing Proceedings Salary, Grand Master Expense, Grand Master Maintenance, Grand Lodge Offices Expense, Grand Lodge Officers, Order Grand Master Salary, Grand Secretary Office Help (Grand Secretary's Office) Printing, Postage and Statione~y Salary, Grand Lecturer Expense, Grand Lecturer Grand Lecturer, Emeritus

-

. . . . . . . . . . .

$ 20,186.20 1,600.00 1,000.00 1,500.00 1,800.00 300.00 4,000.00 2,700.00 3,000.00 3,600.00 1,200.00 1,500.00


136

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

400.00 Salary, Grand Treasurer . 250.00 . Masonic Relief Association, U. S. and Canada 195.00 P. G. M. 's Jewel , . 225.0.0 . Telephone, Jefferson 4877 300.00 Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer . 75.00 Reporter , . 500.00 . Expense, Grand Lodge Session 750.00 Contingent, Grand Lodge Expense, Funerals, etc . 150.00 Perkins Audit Company . 200.00 Expense, George Washington Mem. and G. M. Conference . 300.00 Grand Lodge Officers' Conferences " . Mileage and Per Diem one delegate 1931 Session from Arm30.70 strong Lodge No. 70 A. F. and A. M . . 132,907.93 Masonic Home Board (from Per Capita at $1.50) Total

$178,669.83 Fraternally submitted, J. A. KINDER, Chairman, GEORGE C. MARQUIS, E. E. MORRIS, SOLON CAMERON, O. W. ARCULARIUS.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS

The following report of the Committee on Credentials was presented by its Chairman, R. W. Brother Theodore C. Teel, and adopted. The Grand Lodge of Missouri, Ancient Free and Accepted Mason.<l: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report: At the present session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, there are represented 557 subordinate Lodges and there are present: 24 Grand Lodge Officers, 13 Past Grand Masters, 33 Grand Representatives, 47 District Deputy tirand Masters, 47 District Lecturers, 629 Past Masters, 525 Worshipful Masters, 134 Senior Wardens, 83 Junior Wardens, 27 Chairmen of Committees, 8 Distinguished Visitors. Attendance, 1,379. The itemized list of attendance is on file in the Grand Secretary's office. Fraternally submitted, HENRY F. WOERTHER THEO. C. TEEL, Chairman. WALTER A. WEBB JULIUS R. EDWARDS

CHARLES M. CHRISTIE THOMAS A. HARBAUGH

FINAL REPORT OF JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE

WORSHIPFUL BROTHER WARREN: The Jurisprudence Committee asks to add Section 4 to its report; no amendment to the By-Laws were introduced at this session of the Gand Lodge. The full report is signed by C. Lew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer, Sam Wilcox and Henri I. Warren, members of the Committee. Most Worshipful Master, I move you the adoption of the full report of the Committee on Jurisprudence. (Adopted.)


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

137

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RITUAL

M. W. Brother Anthony F. Ittner, Chairman, read the report of the Committee on Ritual, which was adopted, as follows: To the M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Brethren: Your Committee on Ritual begs leave to pay its tribute to our dearly beloved retiring Grand Lecturer, R. W. Brother J. R. McLachlan. Most of us were privileged to know him at the time when he assumed the duties of his important office and we have observed him with sympathetic and approving interest during the 28 years of his great service-years marked by the rapid spread of a correct knowledge of the Ritual of Freemasonry-but more important still, yean marked by the spread of a true appreciation of the tenets of Freemasonry as a result of the high example of his noble life. If it may be said of anyone man in our Fraternity that he is known to all and dearly beloved by all the Freemasons of Missouri, that man is assuredly R. W. Brother J. R. McLachlan. . He has erected a monument which will endure not only while we are yet privileged to have him with us in the flesh, and God grant that he may long be with us, but which will endure for all time. It may be truly said of him that the virtues of his amiable, distinguished and exemplary character are on perpetual record in the hearts of all his brethren. No change in the ritual has been proposed during the past year, and therefore in that phase of its duties your Committee has had nothing to路 do. We do not invite changes and most emphatically discourage them. Fortunately, under R. W. Brother McLachlan the work has become so firmly fixed in the minds and hearts of our ritualists that proposals to change it are seldom made. Under its new work of conserving and preserving the ritual and lectures your Committee has earnestly endeavored to qualify itself to discharge that duty. With the kind cooperation of our beloved Grand Lecturer Emeritus we trust that in the very near future we will be able to function in our new capacity in a manner that will meet the unqualified approval of the Craft in Missouri. Your Committee has held three meetings since the last Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge. These meetings have resulted in a better understanding of their duties and responsibilities by the members of the Committee, which we think will be productive of great good. It was our privilege to aid the Grand Master in selecting a design for the 50-year button and in formulating rules and regulations for the awarding of these important tokens, which are bestowed as a joint recognition by the Grand Lodge and the subordinate Lodges on those who have faithfully served Freemasonry for a period of 50 years or more. We can conceive of nothing that will result in greater credit to our beloved Fraternity than this well merited recognition of the faithful brethren who have so signally earned our love and thanks. Fraternally submitted, ANTHONY F. ITTNER, Chairman, JOHN PICKARD, HENRY C. CHILES, CHARLES T. KORNBRODT, JAMES A. KINDER.


138

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS

WORSHIPFUL BROTHER DUDLEY D. THOMAS, JR.: The Committee on Unfinished Business has made an investigation and is happy to report that there is at this time no remaining unfinished business except the installation of officers. APPOINTMENTS

The Grand Secretary read the following list of appointments made by the M., W. Grand Master-elect: ANTHONY F. ITTNER, St. Louis ............•....•...... Grand Lecturer EMMET L. RoBISON, St. Joseph Grand Chaplain SAMUEL THURMAN, St. Louis Grand Chaplain HENRY· C. CHILES, Lexington ' Grand Senior Deacon ELWYN S. WOODS, Springfield ..•................. Grand Junior Deacon KARL M. VETSBURG, St. Louis Grand Senior Steward HARRY S. TRUMAN, Independence Grand Junior Steward HAR.R.IS C. JOHNSTON, Boonville Grand Marshal FORREST C. DONNELL, St. Louis ...................•.. Grand Marshal GROVER C. SPARKS, Savannah Grand Sword Bearer LEO H. JOHNSON, Neosho Grand Pur.mivant REV. C. MADISON CHILTON, D.D., St. Joseph Grand Orator W. L. MULVANIA, St. Joseph ....••...................... Grand Tiler

INSTALLATI()N

The hour for installation having arrived, M. W. Brother Orestes Mitchell was presented as the Installing Officer, and M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow, as Grand Marshal. The following Grand Officers were then duly installed for the ensuing year: Du VAL SMITH, St. Joseph ...•.....................•... Grand Master JAMES W. SKELLY, St. Louis ....•.............. . Deputy Grand Master GEORGE W. WALKER, Cape Girardeau Senior Grand Warden HAROLD L. READER, Webster Groves Junior Grand Warden EDMUND E. MORRIS, Kansas City Grand Trea.mrer ARTHUR MATHER, St. Louis Grand Secretary ANTHONY F. ITTNER, St. Louis Grand Lecturer EMMET L. ROBISON, St. Joseph Grand Chaplain SAMUEL THURMAN, St. Louis ....•.................•. Grand Chaplain HENRY C. CHILES, Lexington Grand Senior Deacon ELWYN S. WOODS, Springfield Grand Junior Deacon KARL M. VETSBURG, St. Louis ..•......•.......... Grand Senior Steward HARRY S. TRUMAN, Independence Grand Junior Steward HARRIS C. JOHNSTON, Boonville Grand Marshal FORREST C. DONNELL, St. Louis Grand Marshal GROVER C. SPARKS, Savannah, ..•................. Grand Sword Bearer LEO H. JOHNSON, Neosho Grand Pursuivant REV. C. MADISON CHILTON, D.D., St. Joseph Grand Orator W. L. MULVANIA, St. Joseph .....•......•..... ~ Grand Tiler


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

139

PRESENTATION TO GRAND MASTER AND PAST GRAND MASTER

R. W. Brother Cyril Carpenter of St. Joseph, Missouri, then addressed Grand Master Du Val Smith as follows: Most Worshipful Grand Master, I don't think it has always been customary, whether it has or not I don't know, but the Brethren of Zeredetha Lodge No. 189, Most Worshipful Du Val Smith's home Lodge, have asked me to present him with a hat or something so he can get out of town. It seems as though he has lost his hat some place and they have asked me to present him with one to take back with him, so at this time I am going to give him the ballot box and everything that goes with it. M. W. BROTHER PICKARD: MostWorshipful Grand Master and Junior Past Grand Master, from time immemorial it has been the custom of this Grand Lodge to present to the retiring Grand Master a token in evidence of the esteem in which he is held by the members of this Grand Lodge. The pleasant duty today devolves upon me to present to you this beautiful token. It is beautiful. I selected the design myself. In the process of time it may easily become a perfunctory matter but when I present you with this jewel I want you to feel the truth that every member of this Grand Lodge through me speaks to you and says, "You have fought a good fight, you have kept the faith," and we unanimously together pronounce your work well done. More than t~at I want you to feel that the hundred thousand Masons in this Grand Jurisdiction unite with us who are here assembled in doing you this honor and in making this statement of our appreciation of the splendid work you have done during the past year. M. W. BROTHER BARNHILL (accepting Past G. M. Jewel): Most Worshipful Brother Pickard and Brethren, I need not tell you that I appreciate the gift of this Jewel, for I believe that you know it. It is appreciated for three reasons: First, because of its peculiar form and beauty, and for its intrinsic value. Next, because it will serve as a pleasant reminder of the service I have tried to render the fraternity during the past year. Lastly, it is appreciated, because, as the years may pass, and I am permitted to thumb the pages of my memory book, it will serve to ,remind me of the happy associations and friendships formed during my year as Grand Master. These, Brethren, are the things I shall never forget, and the memories of which I shall ever cherish most highly. Again, Brethren, I thank you. M. W. BROTHER Du VAL SMITH: Most Worshipful Grand Past Master, Brother Mitchell, I thank you for the excellent manner in


140

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

which you have placed me here, and to you, Most Worshipful Past Grand Master Barnhill, I want to say I thank you for the valuable instruction which you have given me while I have been Deputy Grand Master of this State. It would be most difficult for any of the coming Grand Masters of this State to approach your enviable record, and to you, Right Worshipful Brother Cyril Carpenter, first, let me thank you as I know Worshipful Brother Barnhill does for your splendid work which you have done in our district as District Deputy Grand Master, and if you will convey to the Brethren of our Lodge my thanks for this excellent hat I will also thank you. I should mention this envelope which seemed somewhat mysterious this morning. You know, there is an old German proverb which says that every mother's child is beautiful, the word "beautiful," of course, leaving the impression that a mother's child can do no wrong at any time and is not susceptible of committing any fault. That, of course, is the feeling that my own mother has who is still living and seventyfive years of age, and this beloved aunt of mine who presented me with this envelope, the contents of which I will not disclose to you because of my inherent modesty. (Applause.) R. W. BROTHER MATHER: Most Worshipful Grand Master, please take off that with which you have been invested and put this one on. I hope that you will wear it with pleasure to yourself and ever keep it as a memento of the year 1934-1935 when you served as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. THE GRAND MASTER: Right Woshipful Brother Mather, I accept this presentation of this apron and I shall endeavor to wear it according to the manner which you suggest. STANDING COMMITTEES-1934-1935

1934-1935

Jurisprudence-Henri 1. Warren, Chairman; C. Lew Gallant, Richard O. Rumer, Sam Wilcox, W. H. Utz: .A. ppeals and Grievances-William F. Woodruff, Chairman; Ray Bond, J. V. Gaddy, Thomas B. Mather, Robert C. Duffin. Ways and Means-J. A. Kinder, five years, Chairman; George C. Marquis, two years; E. E. Morris, two years; Solon Cameron, two years; Oscar W. Arcularius, one year. Credentials-Theodore C. Teel, Chairman; Joseph E. Bell, Henry W. W oerther, Julius R. Edwards, Thomas A. Harbaugh. . Payroll-Walter R. Shrodes, Chairman; Henry C. Elberg, Wilbert A. Wells, John G. Utz, George L. Markley. Chartered Lodges~Eugene J. Altheimer, Chairman; J. Earl Tobler, Harry K. Hopkins. Lodges U. D.-Frank A. Miller, Chairman; W. H. May, Earl F. Cheesman, Fred H. Kurz, Waldo Byers.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

141

Welfare-Tolman ,V. Cotton, Chairman; Robert R. Kreeger, Arch A. Johnson, William S. Campbell, Thomas Reynolds. Reports of D. D. G. .M.'s-Frederick M. Smith, Chairman; Thomas J. Wornall, Clyde C. Miles, Harry H. Balsiger, Cyril A. Carpenter. Masonic Boards of Relief-Edward McGuigan, two years, Chairman; F. L. Magoon, one year; William A. Piner, three years; Albert . Linxwilel', one year; M. E. Ewing, two years. Ritual-Anthony F. Ittner, Chairman, four years; John Pickard, three years; Henry C. Chiles, two years; Charles T. Kornbrodt, one year ; James A. Kinder, five years. Masonic Home (Visiting Committee)-Albert Linxwiler, Chairman; Harry Hightower. Correspondence-Ray V. Denslow, Chairman. N ecrology-John Pickard, Chairman. Auditing-Perkins Audit Company. Grand Master's Address-F. C. Barnhill, Chairman, and all Past Grand Masters. Unfinished Business-Harry Baum, Chairman. Transportation and Hotels-Edward L. Speer, Chairman. SPECIAL COMMITTEES-1934-1935

Masonic Service Association of llIissouri-Thad. R. Smith, Chairman. Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges-Arthur Mather, Chairman; J. R. McLachlan, Henry C. Chiles, Byrne E. Bigger and Buel P. Parks. Masonic Temple Association of St. Louis-Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman; Edward McGuigan and John Wohradsky, Jr. George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association-Bert S. Lee, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell. Library-William B. Massey, Chairman; William P. Mason and William C. Rese. Printing of Proceedings-Arthur Mather, and J. A. Kinder. . Masonic Publications-William R. Gentry, Chairman; Ray V. Denslow and Byrne E. Bigger. Building Supervisory Board--Guy C. Million, Chairman, three years; F. William Kuehl, two years; and Cecil A. Tolin, one year. Revision of By-Laws-Henry C. Chiles, Byrne E. Bigger and Ray V. Denslow. Anthony O'Sullivan Marker-F. C. Barnhill, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles and Ray V. Denslow. Trial by Other State Jurisdictions-Forrest C. Donnell, Chairman; Henry C. Chiles, ~exington, and J. M. Fisher.


142

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF TmS JURISDIOTION Name and Location Year of Service Robert R. Kreeger, 3404 Morrell Avenue, Kansas City 1908-09 Arch A. Johnson, Landers Building, Springfield 1911-12 Van Fremont Boor, 1201 Commerce Building, Kansas City 1913-14 Tolman W. Cotton, Van Buren 1914-15 Julius C. Garrell, 251 Twenty-Fourth Street, Santa Monica, Calif.. 1919-20 Bert S. Lee, -1224 Washington, Springfield 1922-23 Joseph S. McIntyre, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis 1923-24 Orestes Mitchell, Corby Building, St. Joseph 1924-25 William W. Martin, 5351 Delmar Boulevard, St. Louis 1925-26 John Pickard, Columbia 1926-27 Anthony F. Ittner, 1530 Telephone Building, St. Louis 1927-28 Byrne E. Bigger, Courthouse, Hannibal 1928-29 William R. Gentry, 717 Louderman Building, St. Louis 1930-31 Ray V. Denslow, Trenton 1931-32 Thad B. Landon, 1902 Power and Light Building, Kansas City 1932-33 F. C. Barnhill, Marshall 1933-34

MINUTES APPROVED

Motion made by R. W. Brother James W. Skelly that the minutes, as reported, be published in the proceedings was carried. PRINTING PROOEEDINGS

On motion, the Grand Secretary was directed to print and distribute the necessary number of proceedings of this session of the Grand Lodge. (Carried.) BENEDIOTION

Rev. Grand Chaplain, Samuel Thurman, after invoking the Divine Blessing, pronounced the Benediction. OLOSING

The M. W. Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri, rested from its labors and was closed in AMPLE FORM at 1 :35 o'clock P.M., this day, the 26th day of September, 1934, no further business appearing, to meet again at St. Joseph, Missouri, the last Tuesday, viz., the 24th day of September, 1935.

Grand Secretary.


DR. WILLIAM ALFRED CLARK, P. G. M. DIED APRIL 11, 1934


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

143

IN MEMORIAM:

Grand Lodge A. F. and A. :M. of Missouri William Alfred Clark

To the W lYrshipful Masters, Wardens, and Brethren of All Lodge A. F. and.A. M. in Missouri: Dear Brethren,: In the early hours of April 11 our Beloved and Most Worshipful Brother William Alfred Clark, Past Grand Master, obeyed the summons of the Unseen Messenger, and entered into the Everlasting rest and refreshment of the Grand Lodge on High. "Night slipped to dawn, and pain merged Into beauty, Bright grew the road his eager feet had trod: He gave his salutation to the morning, And found himself before the Face of God !"

Doctor Clark presided over the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1918, and in his I I Home-going" the Craft has been bereaved of one of its choicest spirits. His unlooked-for removal will long be felt, particularly by those who knew him best and loved him most. Doctor Clark was born at Clarksburg, Missouri, September 11, 1865, the eldest of ten children. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish who first came to North Carolina, afterward settling in Kentucky, and from them he inherited the best characteristics of that race. His grandfather, Hiram Clark, left Logan County, Kentucky in 1833, drove across the country to Missouri in an ox wagon, and settled on the broad prairie where the village of Clarksburg now stands, the town being named for him. Graduating from Washington University, Medical School in St. Louis, in March, 1897, he at once located in Jefferson City, Missouri, where he ever after resided, and engaged in the active practice of medicine, building up a large practice. At the time of his passing he was a member of the State Board of Health, Chairman of the Cole County Medical Advisory Board and Chairman of the Cole County Chapter, American Red Cross. Doctor Clark's love for Masonry was intense and as time permitted he gave of his best to our Ancient Institution. For many years he was an outstanding member of the Masonic Home Board and in that capacity rendered conspicuous service. His funeral, one of the largest ever held in Jefferson City, testified eloquently to the high esteem in which he was held by people in all walks of life. After short religious exercises at his late residence we conducted the Masonic Funeral Service in Riverview Cemetery in the presence of a large representation of the members of Jefferson Lodge No. 43 and the following members of the Grand Lodge: Most Worshipful Brothers, R. R. Kreeger, W. W. Martin and Byrne E. Bigger, Past Grand Masters; James W. Skelly, Senior Grand Warden, and Arthur Mather, Grand Secretary.


144

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE "How many a strong, right hand that grappled ours In Mason's Faith, How many a generous heart with mercy filled, Lies low in death! How many a beaming eye that caught its fire From the better路shore-How many a tongue that moved our immost chords Will speak no more! How many a seat where sat the good and true Is vacant now! How many a foot on mercy's quest that flew No more will go ! How many a knee that knelt with ours in prayer, Or knelt alone, Has vanished from our mystic brotherhood And gone-and gone-To the Celestial Lodge, the land of peace, And light, and song, Where war and bloodshed have no entering, Nor vice nor wrong: Where the Supreme Grand Master wise presidesNo blight nor curse, And keeps in gracious welcome crowned and blest A seat for us !"

F, C.

Attest: ARTHUR MATHER,

BARNHILL,

Grand Master.

Grand Secretary,

MASONIC

Initiated, Tipton Lodge No. 56, February 15, 1890. Passed-March 1, 1890. Raised-April 15, 1890. Affiliated, Jefferson Lodge No. 43, February 7, 1898.

Secretary-June 14, 1898. Junior Warden-1899. Senior Wa.rden-1900. Worshipful Master-1901 and 1902.

GRAND LODGE

Elected Junior Grand Warden, 1914. Elected Senior Grand Warden, 1915. Elected Deputy Grand Master, 1916.

Elected Grand Master, 1917. Presided Grand Master, 1918.

Received Capitular Degrees, California Royal Arch Chapter No. 59, 1892. Exalted May 7, 1892. Affiliated with Jefferson Royal Arch Chapter No. 27, in 1898. High Priest in 1903 and 1904. Knighted in Olivet Commandery No. 53, Boonville, Missouri-October, 1893.. Affiliated with Prince of Peace Commandery No. 29, Jefferson City, in 1898. Commander in 1910 and 1911. Member of Ezra Council Royal and Select Masters; Red Cross of Constantine; St. Louis Lodge of Perfection, Ancient and Aceepted Scottish Rite; and Moolah Temple.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

DISTRICT DEPUTY G. M.'S 1934-1935

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

H. M. Jayne, Memphis Willis J. Bray, Kirksville Walter E. Singley, Green City Clyde E. Evans, Trenton Hendrix Newman, Bethany Curtis F. Smith, Darlington George Houchins, Ravenwood Frank R. Elton, Tarkio Charles P. Jameson, St. Joseph Thomas D. Williams, Maysville Emsley C. James, Hemple John M. Gallatin, Chillicothe H. D. Taggart, Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon Donald H. Sosey, Palmyra Warren H. May, Louisiana Charles S. Hicks, Monroe City Harry M. Voth, Moberly T. H. Edwards, Salisbury Otto Hale, Carrollton Earl W. Foley, Weston Darius A. Brown, Kansas City Care Court House 23. C. B. Waddell, Lexington 24. John W. Adams, Marshall 25. S. L. Jewett, Boonville 26. Earl S. Dysart, Columbia 27. Louis J. Graue, Mexico 28. P. A. Thomas, Montgomery City 29. W. P. Smith, Troy 30. Wm. E. Lange, Wright City 31. Col. A. Linxwiler, Jefferson City 32. R. A. Breuer, Hermann 33-A. Ben H. Lahrman, St. Louis 6221 Southwood 33-B, Charles G. Duggan, St. Louis 4873 Kossuth Ave. 34. Wm. C. Deacon, Harrisonville 35. D. O. Bradley, Butler 36. Jolly P. Hurtt, Sedalia 37. Thornton Jennings, Clinton 38. Winan 1. Mayfield, Lebanon 39. Charles L. Woods, Rolla 40. H. H. Balsiger, Crystal City

145

DISTRICT LECTURERS 1934-1935

Homer G. McDaniels, Wayland Chas. S. Crawford, Kirksville Walter E. Singley, Green City E. M. Wilson, Laredo Hendrix Newman, Bethany Curtis F. Smith, Darlington Geo. Houchins, Ravenwood Frank R. Elton, Tarkio Frank A. Miller, St. Joseph Thomas D. Williams, Maysville Emsley C. James, Hemple John M. Gallatin, Chillicothe H. D. Taggart,.Linneus Luther E. Wilhoit, Macon Donald H. Sosey, Palmyra Warren H. May, Louisiana Chas. S. Hicks, Monroe City Harry M. Voth, Moberly T. H. Edwards, Salisbury Otto Hale, Carrollton Earl W. Foley, Weston Harry P. Hovey, Kansas City, 845 W. Gregory Boulevard C. B. Waddell, Lexington John W. Adams, Marshall S. L. Jewett, Boonville Maurice Walden, Columbia Louis J. Graue, Mexico P. A. Thomas, Montgomery City W. P. Smith, Troy Wm. E. Lange, Wright City W. D. Rogers, Jefferson City H. A. Breuer, Hermann

Robert C. Winkelmaier, 4627 Rosa, St. Louis Wm. C. Deacon, Harrisonville D. O. Bradley, Butler Jolly P. Hurtt, Sedalia Thorton Jennings, Clinton Winan 1. Mayfield, Lebanon Geo. W. Reeves, Steelville Chas. E. Pyle, DeSoto


146

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

DISTRIOT DEPUTY G. !tL'S

DISTRIOT LEOTURERS

1934-1935

1934~1935

41. M. E. Ewing, Morrisville 42. M. D. Gwinn, Eldorado Springs 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57.

D. V. Morris, Nevada Scott Walker, Joplin Jewell E. Windle, Springfield C. A. Swenson, Mountain Grove J. N. Sparks, Grandin J. Clyde Akers, Farmington J. A. Kinder, Cape Girardeau G. A. Sample, Chaffee B. P. Parks, Hornersville Kipp C. Johnson, Poplar Bluff C. E. Armstrong, West Plains G. J. Vaughan, Ozark W. N. Marbut, Mt. Vernon W. A. Phipps, Neosho Fay G. Fulkerson, Webster Groves 58. E. F. Starling, Olean 59. N. D. Jackson, Independence

M. E. Ewing, Morrisville Mark D. Gwinn, Eldorado Springs John G. Senate, Lamar Harry S. Hightower, Reeds E. F. Hannah, Springfield C. A. Swenson, Mountain Grove J. N. Sparks, Grandin J. Clyde Akers, Farmington J. A. Kinder, Cape Girardeau G. A. Sample, Chaffee B. P. Parks, Hornersville Kipp C. Johnson, Poplar Bluff C. E. Armstrong, West Plains G. J. Vaughan, Ozark W. N. Marbut, Mt. Vernon W. A. Phipps, Neosho Stanley Horn, 2632 Lyndhurst, St. Louis E. F. Starling, Olean John S. Carmical, Independence


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

147

NUMERICAL LIST OF LODGES-ID34

I-Missouri 2-Meridian 3-Beacon 4--Howard 5-United 6-Ark 7-0 'Sullivan 8-•...••..•..• 9-Geo. VVashington lo-Agency lI-Pauldingville l2-Tyro 13-Rising Sun l4-Eolia l5-VVestern Star l6-Memphis l7-Clarksville l8-Palmyra 19-Paris Union 20-St. Louis 2l-Havana 22-VVellington 23-Florida 24-VVyaconda 25-Naphtali 26-Ava 27-Evergreen 28-St. John's 29-VVindsor 30-Huntsville 3l-Liberty 32-Humphreys 33-Ralls 34-Troy 35-Mercer 36-Cooper 37-Hemple 38-Callao 39-DeVVitt 40-Mt. Moriah 4l-Bismarck 42-Middle Grove 43-Jefferson 44-Fair Play 45-Bonhomme 46-VVentzville 47-Fayette 48-Fulton 49-HQlt

50-Xenia 51-Livingston 52-VVakanda 53-VVeston 54-Index 55-Arrow Rock 56-Tipton 57-Richmond 58-Monticello 59-Centralia 60-New Bloomfield 6l-VVaverly 62-Vincil 63-Cambridge 64-Monroe 65-Pattonsburg 66-Grant City 67-Rocheport 68-Kennett 69-Sullivan 70-Armstrong 71-8avannah 72-Gorin 73-Eureka 74-VVarren 75-Silex 76-Independence 77-Lebanon 78-St. Joseph 79-Polar Star 80-Bridgeton 8I-Central 82-Jackson 83-Laclede 84-VVebster Groves 85-Miami 86-Brookfield 87-VVashington 88-Defiance 89-Friendship 90-Russellville 9I-Madison 92-Perseverance 93-St. Mark's 94--Vienna 95-Pomegranate 96-8t. Andrews 97-Bethany 08-Webster

99-Mt. Vernon 100-Ash Grove 101-Bogard 102-Bloomington 103-VVest View 104--Heroine 105-Kirksville 106-Gallatin 107-Greenville lOB-Altamont 109-Stanberry lIo-Marcus lIl-Trenton lI2-Maitland lI3-Plattsburg lI4-Twilight 115-Laddonia lI6-Barnes lI7-Helena lI8-Kingston lI9-DeSoto l20-Compass l2l-Erwin l22-Triplett 123-Hermann 124--Union Star l25-Gentryville l26-8eaman l27-Athens l28-Lorraine l29-Monett l30-Hume l3l-Potosi 132-Farmington l33-Star of the VVest l34--Olean l35-Braymer l36-Phoenix I 37-Delphian 13B-Lincoln 139-0regon 140-...•..•••••• l4l-Amsterdam l42-Pleasant Grove l43-Irondale 144--Modern U5-Latimer l46-McGee 147-Cass


148 148-Purdy 149-Lexington 150-Birming 151-Milton 152-Linn Creek 153-Bloomfield 154-Ionic 155-Spring Hill 156-Ashland

PROCEEDI~GS

OF THE

200-Sonora 20l-Ravenwood 202-Westville 203-Brumley 204-Rowley 205-Trilumina 206-Somerset 207-Clay 208-Salisbury 209-Poplar Bluff 157-~orthStar 210-'-Unionville 158-MountainGrove 159-G'reen City 211-Hickory Hill 160-Pleasant 212-Four Mile 161-Clifton Hill 213-Rolla 162-Whitesville 214-Forest City 163-Occidental 215-Hornersville 164-Joachim 216-Hale City 217-Barbee 165. 166-Portageville 218-Good Hope 167-Revere 219-Albert Pike 168-Colony 220-Kansas City 169-Camden Point 221-Mystie Tie 170-Benevolence 222-La Belle 171-Hartford 223-Ray 172-Censer 224-Hamilton 225-Salem 173-Gray Summit 174-Sturgeon 226-Saline 175-...........â&#x20AC;˘ 227-Cypress 176-Point Pleasant 228-Shelbina 177-Texas 229-Cla:flin 178-Griswold 230-St. James 179-Pride of the West 231-Cardwell 180-Pyramid 232-Polo 181-~ovelty 233-Bucklin 182-Pilot Knob 234-St. Francois 183-California 235-Weatherby 184-Morley 236-Sedalia 185-Chamois 237-La Plata 186. 238-Rushville 187-Hermon 239-Hopewell 188-Hannibal 240. 189-Zeredatha 241-Palestine 190-Putnam 242-Portland 191-Wilson 243-Keystone 192-Frankford 244-Middle Fabius 193-Angerona 245-Knobnoster 194-Wellsville 246-Montgomery 195-Bolivar 247-~eosho 196-Quitman 248. 197-Carthage 249-Carroll 198-Allensville 250-Glensted 199-~ew Hope 251-Hope

1934 252-Alanthus 253-Laredo 254-Butler 255-Alton 256-Shekinah 257-Lodge of Light 258-Ravanna 259-Lodge of Love 260-Mechanicsville 261-Florence 262-Holden 263-Summit 264-Kirbyville 265-Corinthian 266-Social 267-Aurora 268-Lodge of Truth 269-Brotherhood 270-New Salem 271-Solomon 272-Granite 273-St. Clair 274-Cold Spring 275-Bunker 276-Grand River 277-Wm. D. Muir 278-Essex 279-Hogle's Creek 280. 281-Fenton 282-Cosmos 283-Stockton 284-Canopy 285-Earl 286-Urich 287-Craft 288-Hermitage 289-Graham 290-Fairmount 291-Edina 292-Lamar 293-Sarcoxie 294-Mound City 295-Moniteau 296-Sparta 297-0zark 29B-Sampson 299-Temple 300-Doric 30l-White Hall 302-Lick Creek 303-0sage


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

804-Signal 805-Cecile Daylight 806-Ashlar 807-New London 80B-Parrott 309- .........•.. 310-Sikeston 311-Kearney 312-Cuba 313-Meramec 814-Pine 315-Jerusalem 316-Rural 317-0sborn 81B-Eldorado 319-Paulville 320-Versailles 321-Jonathan 822-Hardin 323-Cornerstone 324-McDonald 325-Dockery 326-Linn 327-Mt. Zion 328-Cainsville 329-Kennedy 330-Paul Revere 331-Charity 332-Excello 333-Chillicothe 334-Breckenridge 335-Joplin 336-Hallsville 337-Blue Springs 33B-lIerculaneum 339-Fidelity 340-Westport 341-Rockville 342-Circle 343-Agricola 344-Moberly 345-Fellowship 346-Arlington 347-America 34B-Wadesburg 349-Pollock 350-Tyrian 351-Mosaic 352-Friend 353-Barnesville 354-Hebron 355-Adelphi

356-Ancient Landmark 351-.........•.. 35B-Northwest 359-Garrett 360-Tuscan 361-Riddick 362-lIiram 363-Fraternal 364-lIigginsville 365-Bayou 366-Adair 367-Barry 368-Crescent lIill 369-Composite 370-Williamstown 371-Sheldon 372-Nonpareil 373-Belle 374-Wilderness 375-Waynesville 376-King lIill 377-Ancient Craft 378-Berlin 379-Billings 3So-Queen City 381-lonia 382-Mt. Ararat 383-Pythagoras 384-East Prairie 385-Richland 386-Dayton 387-Woodside 388-Chula 389-Arcana 390-Marionville 391-Raytown 392-Christian 393-Beehive 394-Lucerne 395-..••.....•.. 396-Western Light 397-G'ower 39B-Jasper 399-Pike 400-Decatur 401-Carterville 402-Malta . 403-Lowry City 404-Rosendale 405-Everton 406-Malden

149

407-Charleston 408-Montrose 409-Louisville 410-Iberia 411-Joppa 412-Appleton City 413-Valley 414-Greensburg 415-lIunnewell 416-Cache 417-Whitewater 418. 419-Star 420-ltaska 421-Urbana 422-Gate. of the Temple 423-Galt 424-Samaritan 425-Green Ridge 426-Rothville 427-Glenwood 428. 429-New Madrid 430-Winona 431. 432-Competition 433-Mack's Creek 434-Wheeling 435-Rockbridge 436-Gothic 437-Lafayette 438-Temperance 439-Mt. Olive 440-Trowel 441-Excelsior 442-Burlington 443-Anchor 444-Ada 445-West Gate 446-1vanhoe 447-Jacoby 448-Schell City 449. 450-Belton 451-Raymore 452-Verona 453-Forsyth 454-Continental 455-lIinton 456-Wallace 457-Jonesburg


150 458-Melville 459-Hazelwood 460-Lambskin 461-Caruthersville 462-Santa Fe 463-Clifton 464--Concordia 465-G'aynor City 466-Southwest 461-Pleasant Hope 468-RedOak 469-Plato 470-Nodaway 471-Mineral 472-Pickering 473-Nineveb 474-Guilford 475-Golden 476-Mt. Hope 477-Henderson 478-Racine 479-Rich Hill 480-Jewel 481-Marceline 482-Clintonville 483-Fairfax 484-Kirkwood 485-Coldwater 486-Cairo 487-Chilhowee 488-Lock Spring 489-Lakeville 490-Montevallo 491-Vandalia 492-Daggett 493-Vernon 494-Lewistown 495-Unity 496-Robert Burns 497-Equality 498-PeeDee 499-Harmony 500-Jameson 50I-Buckner 502-Philadelphia 503-Prairie Home 504--Platte City 505-Euclid 506-Lathrop 507-Clearmont 508-Saxton 509-Van Buren

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 510-New Hampton 511-Skidmore 512-Webb City 513-Senath 514-Granby 515-Galena 516-Milford 517-Seligman 518-0riental 519-Crane 520-Clifton Heights 521-Lockwood 522-Gate City 523-Stinson 524-Spickardsville 525-Cunningham 526-Wayne 527-Higbee 528-Conway 529-Apollo 530-....•..•.••. 531-Lane 's Prairie 532-Dexter 533-Comfort 534--Columbia 535-Blackwell 536-Ingomar 537-Bethel 538-Stella 539-Dawn 540-Winigan 541-Jacksonville 542-Ferguson 543-Mans1ield 544-Algabil 545-Zalma 546-0rient 547-South Gate 548-Clinton 549-Carl Junction 550-Rose Hill 55I-Pendleton 552-Calhoun 553-Clarksburg 554-Foster 555-Summersville 556-Prairie 557-Blairstown 558-Moscow p59-Clarksdale 560-Nelson 56I-Cowgill

1934

562-Deepwater 563-York 564-Jamesport 565-Tebbetts 566-Maplewood 567-Miller 568-Naylor 569-Marlborough 57o-Republic 571-Hayti 512-Rutledge 513-Bernie 514-La Monte 515-Easter 576-0live Branch 517-Ewing 518-Forest Park 579-Grandin 580-Houston 581-Dlmo 582-Koshkonong 583-Novinger 584-Red Bird 585-Shamrock 586-Criterion 587-Branson 588-St. Francisville 589-Grovespring 590-Advance 59I-Barnett 592-La Russell 593-Union 594-Blodgett 595-Cole Camp 596-Puxico 597-Bosworth 598-Leadwood 599-Elvins 600-Cosby 601-Clayton 602-Acacia 603-Morehouse 604-Strasburg 605-Walker 606-Craig 607-Eminence 608-Strafford 609-Warrenton . 610-Clark 611-Centertown 612-Mokane 613-Wellston


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

614-Mt. Washington 615-Chaffee 616-Marion 617-Swope Park 618-Grandview 619-•.•••..••..• 620-Willard 621-Anderson 622-Norwood 623- ••••.••..... 624-0wensville 625-Sheffield 626-Magnolia 627-Wallace Park 628-Mendon 629-Valley Park 630-East Gate 631-Tower Grove

632-Belgrade 633-Archie 634-Steele 635-Greentop 636- .•..•••••..• 637-Mountain View 63B-Triangle 639-Mizpah 64o--.Jennings 641-Trinity 642-Benj. Franklin 643-Northeast 644-Grain Valley 645-Clever 646-Shaveh 647-Noel 648-Elmer

151

649-University 650-Parma 651-Cleveland 652-Pilgrim 653-Shawnee 654-Commonwealth 655-Gardenville 656-Country Club 657-Progress 658-Purity 659-Alpha 660-Holliday 661-Theodore Roosevelt 662-Clarence 663-Rockhill 664-Aldrich

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LODGES-LOCATIONS-DISTRICTS A No.

602 444 366 355 590 10 343 252 219 664 544 198 659 108 255 341 141 443 311 356 621 193 529 412 389 633 6 346

Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

District

Acacia ..........••• Columbia .••....••Boone ..•.......... 26 Ada ...............•Orrick Ray 23 Adair .......•...... Kirksville Adair 2 Edgerton " Platte 21 Adelphi. Advance Advance Stoddard 50 Agency Agency .Buchanan ....•....• 9 Agricola Petersburg Henry 31 Alanthus .. : Alanthus Grove Gentry ............• 6 Albert Pike Kansas City .•.... ..Jackson ........•... 22 Aldrich Aldrich .Polk .•............. 41 Algabil ........•....St. Louis 33-B Allensville Allendale Worth ....•........ 6 Alpha N. Kansas City Clay 22 Altamont Altamont Daviess : 10 Alton Alton Oregon 53 America •...........St. Louis 33-B Amsterdam Amsterdam .....•. Bates •............• 35 Anchor St. Louis .............•............... 33-B Ancient Craft King City Gentry ............• 6 Ancient Landmark Harrisburg Boone .....•.•..... 26 Anderson .•......... Anderson ....•....McDonald ....•..... 56 Angerona Missouri City Clay .....•......... 11 Apollo St. Louis ...••.......•................ 33-B Appleton City ...••.. Appleton City ...•.St. Clair ..•...•.... 31 Arcana Harris .•....•..•. Sullivan 3 Archie Archie ......•..•. Cass 34 Ark ...•........•...Newark Knox 2 Arlington Dixon .•.......•..Pulaski .•....•..••. 39


152 No.

70 55 100 156 306 127 267 26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland Ashlar Athens Aurora Ava

Location of Lodge

Armstrong Arrow Rock Ash Grove Ashland Commerce Albany St. Louis Ava

County

.Howard Saline Greene Boone Scott Gentry .Douglas

1934 District

25 24 45 26 50 6 33-A 46

B 217 591 116 353 367 365 3 393 632 373 450 170 642 378 573 97 537 379 150 41 535 557 594 153 102 337 101 195 45 597 587 135 334 80 86 269 203 233 501 275

Barbee Sweet Springs Saline 24 Barnett Barnett Morgan 58 Barnes Cabool Texas 46 Barnesville .Ellington Reynolds 47 Barry Washburn Barry 55 Bayou .Bakersfield Ozark 53 Beacon St. Louis 33-A .Ray 23 Beehive ..........•..Lawson Belgrade .........•. Belgrade Washington .40 Belle Belle Maries '39 Belton Belton Cass 34 Benevolence Utica Livingston 12 Benjamin Franklin St. Louis 33-B Berlin Berlin Gentry .. . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Bernie : Bernie Stoddard 51 Bethany Bethany Harrison 5 Bethel .Bethel Shelby 14 Billings Billings Christian 54 Birming Faucett Buchanan ..•....... 9 Bismarck Bismarck .......•. St. Francois .48 Blackwell Blackwell St. Francois 40 Blairstown .Blairstown Henry 37 Blodgett .Blodgett Scott 50 Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard 50 Bloomington Bevier Macon 14 Blue Springs Blue Springs Jackson 59 Bogard Bogard Carroll ...........•. 20 Bolivar Bolivar .Polk 41 Bonhomme .Ballwin St. Louis 57 Bosworth Bosworth Carroll 20 Branson Branson Taney 54 Braymer Braymer .........•Caldwell 12 Breckenridge .Breckenridge Caldwell 12 Bridgeton St. John '8 Station. St. Louis 57 Brookfield Brookfield Linn 13 Brotherhood St. Joseph Buchanan 9 Brumley Brumley Miller 38 Bucklin Bucklin Linn 13 Buckner Buckner Jackson 59 Bunker Bunker Reynolds 47


1934 No.

442 254

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Burlington Butler

Location of Lodge

.Burlington .Tct .Butler

County

153 Distrid

Nodaway .......••. 7 .Bates .......••.••.. 35

C

416 328 486 552 183 38 63 169 284 231 549 249 401 197 461 147 305 172 611 81 59 615 185 331 407 487 333 392 388 342 229 662 610 553 559 17 207 601 507 651 645 463 520 161 548 482

Cache St. Louis .........•.•..• ~ 33-D .Harrison .........•. 5 Cainsville .........•.Cainsville Cairo Cairo Randolph 18 Calhoun Calhoun Henry 37 California California Moniteau .......•.. 31 Callao Callao .Macon .........•••. 14 Cambridge Slater Saline 24 Camden Point .•..... Camden Point Platte .........•... 21 Canopy Aurora Lawrence .......•.. 55 Cardwell .•..........Cardwell ......•.. Dunklin ........••.. 51 Carl.Tunction ,Carl.Tunction .Tasper .....•....... 44 Carroll Norborne Carroll ............• 20 Carterville Carterville .Tasper ..........•. .44 Carthage Carthage .Tasper 44 Caruthersville Caruthersville Pemiscot .......•... 51 Cass Harrisonville Cass· 34 Cecile-Daylight Kansas City .Tackson 22 Censer ,Macon Macon ...........•. 14 Centertown Centertown Cole 31 CentraL Molino Audrain .....•..... 27 Centralia Centralia Boone .........•... 26 Chaffee .........•...Chaffee Scott .........•.... 50 Chamois Chamois Osage .......•.•.•.• 31 Charity St. .Toseph Buchanan 9 Charleston Charleston Mississippi 50 Chilhowee Chilhowee .Tohnson ...........• 36 Chillicothe Chillicothe Livingston ........• 12 Christian Oak Grove .rackson 59 Chula ...•.......... Chula Livingston 12 Circle Roscoe St. Clair ..........• 37 Claflin .. : ,Protem Taney ........•.... 54 Clarence Clarence Shelby ...........•• 14 Clark Clark ....•....... Randolph ...•....•• 18 Clarksburg Clarksburg Moniteau .....•.... 31 Clarksdale Clarksdale De Kalb ....•...... 10 Pike 16 Clarksville .•........ Clarksville Clay ...•........... Excelsior Springs ..Clay : 11 Clayton ............•Clayton St. Louis 57 Nodaway •....•..•. 7 Clearmont ....•..... Clearmont Cleveland Cleveland Cass ...••....•..... 34 Clever .•............Clever .•..........Christian .......•... 54 Clifton Thayer ...•....... Oregon 53 Clifton Heights St. Louis ...........................•. 33-A Clifton Hill Clifton Hill ; .Randolph 18 Clinton Clinton Henry 37 Clintonville El Dorado Springs. Cedar ..........•.•. 42


154 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

1934 District

274 485 595 168 534 533 654 120 432 369 464 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519 368 586 312 525 227

Cold Spring Leeton Johnson ..........•. 36 Cold Water Drexel Cass 34 Benton 36 Cole Camp Cole Camp Colony ............• Colony Knox .............• 2 Columbia Pacific Franklin 32 Comfort Wheaton Barry ..........••. 55 Commonwealth St. Louis ..........................•.. 33-A Compass .•....•.....Parkville Platte 21 Competition Competition Laclede •.........•. 38 Composite Doniphan .Ripley ...........•. 52 Concordia Concordia Lafayette .....•.... 23 Continental Stewartsville De Kalb 10 Conway .........•.. Conway Laclede .......•..•. 38 Cooper •............ Boonville .•....... Cooper 25 Corinthian Warrensburg J"ohnson 36 Cornerstone St. Louis ..............•.•............ 33-B Cosby ......•....... Cosby Andrew 9 Cosmos ............•St. Louis 33·B Country Club Kansas City J"ackson 22 Cowgill Cowgill Caldwell ..........• 12 Craft ..............•Canton Lewis ............•• 15 Craig Craig Holt ..............• 8 Crane Crane Stone 54 Crescent Hill Adrian Bates .•............ 35 Criterion ....•.....• Alba J asper 44 Cuba Cuba Crawford .........• 39 Cunningham Sumner Chariton 19 Cypress Laclede Linn •...•..••...•. 13

492 539 386 400 562 88 137 119 39 532 325 300

Daggett Dawn Dayton Decatur Deepwater Defiance Delphian De Soto DeWitt Dexter Dockery Doric

McKittrick Montgomery .•...... 28 Ludlow .•.........Livingston 12 Dayton Cass •..........•... 34 Pierce City Lawrence ..•....... 55 Deepwater Henry ' 37 Sheridan Worth 6 Birch Tree Shannon 47 De Soto Jefferson .40 .DeWitt Carroll 20 Dexter Stoddard 50 Meadville Linn 13 Elkland ....•..... Webster ..........•• 45

285 630 384 575 291

Earl East Gate East Prairie Easter Edina

Coffey ...•...•....Daviess ••..••••.•.•10 Kansas City .Jackson •........... 22 .East Prairie Mississippi .•...•••• 50 St. Clair Franklin 32 Edina ......•.....Knox .......•..•.•• 2

D

E


1934 No.

318 648 599 607 14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

155 District

Eldorado ...••.•.... Luray ...•.....•..Clark ••.•.•..••.••• 1 Elmer .•.•..........Elmer ••.•..•.....Macon ....••.••••... 14 Elvins ............• .Flat River St. Francois .•...•. .48 Eminence Eminence Shannon ••..•••..•• 47 Eolia .•............ .Eolia •••......... .Pike ••••.•..•.•••.• 16 Equality ....•.•.... .Newburg ......••. Phelps .••....•••••. 39 Erwin ...••.........St. Louis .........••............•.•... 33-A Essex Essex ..••........ Stoddard .......••.. 50 Euclid .st. Louis ..........•.................. 33-.~ Eureka .....•.......Brunswick Chariton .•.•..••... 19 Franklin ........•.• 32 Evergreen New Haven Everton Everton Dade .......•.....• 42 Ewing Ewing Lewis .............• 15 Macon •.....•.•.•.. 14 Excello •............Excello Jackson Cape Girardeau •.•.. 49 Excelsior F

483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542 339 261 23 214 578 453 554 212 192 363 352 89 48

Fairfax ••.......••. Fairfax .........• Atchison .........•• 8 Fairmount ~yaconda..••.••. Clark .•..•.......•• 1 Fair Play "••...Fair Play .Polk 41 Farmington Farmington St. Francois •....•.. 48 Fayette .•....•..... Fayette ..•....... Howard .........••. 25 Fellowship J oplin .••........ .Jasper .......••.... 44 Fenton •......•..... Fenton St. Louis .........•. 57 Ferguson Fergnson St. Lonis ...•...•.•. 57 Fidelity Farley Platte .......•..•.. 21 Florence .........•..New Florenec ..•.. Montgomery .....•.. 28 Florida .Florida .........• .Monroe .......•.... 17 Forest City Forest City ....•.. Holt •.............• 8 Forest Park .•.......St. Louis .........•..•••..•........... 33-B Forsyth ..•...•....• Forsyth .......•.. Taney •............ 54 Foster ...•......•.. .Foster .......•... .Bates .....•.....••• 35 Four Mile Campbell. Dunklin .....•...•.. 51 Frankford ...••.....Frankford Pike ••............ 16 Fraternal ....•....• .Robertsville Franklin .........•. 32 Friend •............ Ozark Christian ......•.••• 54 Friendship ...•......Chillicothe Livingston •...•...• 12 Fulton •••.•.....•.. Fulton •..•....... Callaway •••..•....• 27 G

515 106 423 655 359 522 422 465 125

Galena ..•.....•••.• Galena .......••.. Stone ....••••••.••• 54 10 Gallatin ...••.•..•. Gallatin .•....•••.Daviess Galt .•............. Galt ..•.......... Grundy •........••. 4 ': .. Gardenville St. Louis 57 Gardenville Garrett ....••.......Arcola ..•........ Dade •............. 42 Kansas City .Jackson 22 Gate City Gate of the Temple ..•Springfield Greene ............• 45 Gaynor City .••..... .Parnell. ..••......Nodaway .........• 7 Gentryville Gentryville .•.••.. Gentry ...•.•...•••. 6


156 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

1934 District

9 250 427 475 218 72 436 397 289 644 514 579 276 618 272 66 173 159 425 414 635 107 178 589 474

George Washington .. St. Louis 33-B Glensted Glensted .Morgan 58 Glenwood Glenwood Schuyler 1 Barton 43 Golden Golden City Good Hope St. Louis 33-B Gorin Gorin Scotland 1 Alexandria Clark 1 Gothic Gower Gower Clinton 11 7 Graham Graham .......•.. Nodaway Grain Valley Grain Valley Jackson 59 Granby Granby .Newton 56 Grandin Grandin Carter .47 Grand River .Freeman Cass 34 Grandview Grandview J ackson 59 Granite Sedalia Pettis 36 Grant City Grant City Worth 6 Gray Summit Gray Summit ,Franklin 32 Green City Green City ••......Sullivan 3 Pettis 36 Green Ridge Green Ridge Greensburg ........• Greensburg Knox .............• 2 Greentop Greentop Schuyler 1 52 Greenville Greenville •....... Wayne Griswold .Bellflower Montgomery ......•. 28 Wright 46 Grovespring Grovespring Guilford Guilford ' .Nodaway 7

216 336 224 188 322 499 171 21 571 459 354 117 37 477 338 123 288 187 104 211 527 364 455

Hale City Hale Hallsville Hallsville Hamilton Hamilton HannibaL Hannibal. Hardin Hardin Harmony ...•.......St. Louis Hartford Hartford Havana McFall Hayti Hayti Hazelwood Seymour Hebron .Mexico Helena Rochester Hemple Hemple Henderson Rogersville Herculaneum Herculaneum Hermann Hermann Hermitage Hermitage Hermon Liberal. Kansas City Heroine Hickory Hill Eugene Higbee Higbee Higginsville Higginsville Hinton Hinton

H

Carroll .....•.....•• 20 26 Boone Caldwell 12 Marion 15 Ray •.............. 20 33-B Putnam 3 Gentry . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Pemiscot .•......... 51 45 Wcbster Audrain 27 .Andrew ..........•• 9 \Clinton 11 Webster .•.......... 45 .Je1Ierson 40 Gasconade 32 Hickory 41 .Barton 43 .Jackson 22 Cole 31 Randolph 18 Lafayette 23 Boone •••.....•.... 26


1934 No.

362 279 262 660 49 251 239 215 580 4 130 32 415 30

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

157 District

Hiram Kahoka Clark .........•.... 1 Hogle's Creek Wheatland Rickory ..........•. 41 36 Holden ...•.........Holden .........•.Johnson Holliday Holliday Monroe ..........•. 17 Holt Holt Clay ..........••... 11 Hope Washington .Franklin .........•. 32 Hopewell Lesterville Reynolds .....•.... .47 Hornersville Hornersville Dunklin 51 Houston Gant Audrain 27 Howard New Franklin Howard 25 Hume Hume Bates ...........•.. 35 Humphreys Humphreys Sullivan . . . . . . .. 3 Hunnewell Hunnewell Shelby 14 Huntsville Huntsville Randolph ...•..•.•• 18 I

410 581 76 54 536 381 154 143 420 446

Iberia ••.....•......Iberia Miller ..••...•....• 38 Scott ........•..... 50 Illmo .•............ lllmo Independence •...... Ildependence ....• Jackson .......•..•. 59 Index Garden City Cass .....•.•....... 34 Ingomar ......•.....Willow Springs Howell ........•.... 53 Ionia .Eldon ••.......... Miller ••..•........ 58 Ionic .Desloge St. Francois •......• 48 Irondale Irondale Washington •....•• .40 Itaska St. Louis ................•...........• 33-A Kansas City J ackson ....••...... 22 Ivanhoe

82 541 447 500 564 398 43 640 315 480 164 321 457 335 411

Jackson ...••....... Linneus Linn ..•.•..•...••.. 13 Jacksonville .Jacksonville .Randolph .....•.•.. 18 Jacoby Darlington Gentry 6 .Daviess .....•..••.. 10 Jameson ...•....... .Jameson Jamesport •......... Jamesport Daviess ........••.. 10 Jasper ..•.......... Jasper .•......... Jasper ..........•.. 44 Jefferson Jefferson City Cole •.............. 31 Jennings .........•. Jennings St. Louis 57 Jerusalem Jerico Springs Cedar .••.........• .42 Jewel ...•.......... Pleasant Hill Cass 34 Joachim Hillsboro Jefferson •.....••••. 40 Jonathan .•....•.... Denver Worth •............ 6 Jonesburg Jonesburg Montgomery. ...•.•.. 28 Joplin .Joplin .Jasper ...........•. 44 Joppa Hartville Wright .•.......•• .46

J

K 220 Kansas City .Kansas City Jackson ......••.... 22 .Kearney Clay •.....•......•. 11 311 Kearney 7 329 Kennedy ...••....•. Elmo ...•........ oNodaway


158 No.

68 243 376 118 264 105 484 245 582

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Kennett Keystone King Hill. Kingston Kirbyville Kirksville Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

Location of Lodge

: .. Kennett St. Louis St. Joseph Kingston Hollister ,Kirksville Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

County

1934 District

Dunklin

51 33-A Buchanan 9 Caldwell 12 Taney 54 Adair . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 St. Louis 57 Johnson 36 Oregon i • • • • • • 53

L

222 83 115 437 489 292 460 574 531 237 253 592 506 145 598 77 494 149 31 302 138 326 152 51 521 488 257 259 268 128 409 403 394

La Belle La Belle Laclede Lebanon Laddonia Laddonia Lafayette Corder Lakeville Bell City Lamar Lamar Lambskin St. Louis La Monte La Monte Lane's Prairie Vichy La Plata La Plata Laredo Laredo La Russell La Russell Lathrop Lathrop Latimer Licking Leadwood Leadwood Lebanon Steelville Lewistown Lewistown Lexington Lexington Liberty Liberty Lick Creek Perry Lincoln Fillmore Linn Linn Linn Creek Camdenton Livingston Glasgow Lockwood Lockwood Lock Spring ......•..Lock Spring Lodge of Light Eagleville Lodge of Love Lancaster Lodge of Truth Atlanta Lorraine Ridgeway Louisville· Louisville Lowry City Lowry City Lucerne Lucerne ;

433 91 626

Mack's Creek Mack's Creek Madison Madison Magnolia .........•. St. Louis

Lewis Laclede Audrain .. , Lafayette Stoddard Barton ~ ..Pettis

Maries Macon Grundy Jasper Clinton Texas St. Francois Crawford Lewis Lafayette Clay Ralls .Andrew Osage Camden Howard Dade Daviess Harrison Schuyler Macon Harrison Lincoln St. Clair Putnam

15 38 27 23 50 43 33-B 36 39 14 4 44 11 39 .48 39 15 23 11 15 9 31 38 25 42 10 5 1 14 5 29 37 3

M

Camden ..........•. 38 Monroe 17 33-A


1934 No.

112 406 402 543 566 481 110 616 390 569 324 146 260 458 16 628 313 35 2 85 244 42 516 567 151 471 1 639 344 144 612 129 295 64 490 246 58 408 603 184 351 558 294 614 158 637 382 476 439 40 99

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

159 District

Maitland Maitland ..' Holt 8 Malden Malden .Dunklin 51 Malta ·. Malta Bend Saline : 24 Mansfield Mansfield Wright ..........•• 46 Maplewood Maplewood St. Louis 57 Marceline Marceline Linn 13 Marcus Fredericktown Madison ...•...... .48 Marion Mercer Mercer 4 Marionville Marionville Lawrence ........•. 55 Marlborough (Jaekson Co.) .Jackson 59 McDonald Independence Jackson 59 McGee College Mound Macon 14 Mechanicsville Howell St. Charles 30 Melville Dadeville Dade 42 Memphis Memphis Scotland 1 Mendon Mendon Chariton 19 Meramec Eureka St. Louis 57 Mercer Princeton Mercer .. '. . . . . . . . .. 4 Meridian St. Louis 33-B Miami Miami Saline 24 Middle Fabius Downing Schuyler 1 Middle Grove Middle Grove Monroe 17 Milford Milford Barton .43 Miller Miller Lawrence 55 Milton Milton Randolph 18 MineraL Oronogo J asper .44 Missouri St. Louis 33-~A\. Mizpah St. Louis 33-B Moberly Moberly Randolph 18 Modern ............•Humansville Polk 41 Mokane Mokane Callaway 27 Monett Monett Barry 55 Moniteau ...........•Tamestown ,Moniteau 31 Monroe Monroe City Monroe 17 Montevallo Montevallo ,Vernon .43 Montgomery Montgomery City .. Montgomery 28 Monticello Monticello Lewis 15 Montrose Montrose Henry 37 Morehouse Morehouse New Madrid 50 Morley Morley Scott ..........•... 50 Mosaic Belleview Iron .48 Moscow Moscow Mills Lincoln .....•...... 29 Mound City Mound City Holt ~. 8 Mount Washington Mt. Washington Jackson .........••. 59 Mountain Grove Mountain Grove Wright 46 Mountain View Mountain View Howell 53 Mt. Ararat Topaz .........•..Douglas .46 Mt. Hope Odessa Lafayette ........•. 23 Mt. Olive Rogersville, R. 3 Webster 45 Mt. Moriah St. Louis ........................•.... 33-A Mt. Vernon Mt. Vernon Lawrence 55


160 No.

327 221

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Mt. Zion Mystic Tie

Location of Lodge

West Plains Oak Ridge

County

Howell Cape Girardeau

1934 District

53 .49

N

25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 372 643 157 358 622 181 583

Naphtali. Naylor Nelson Neosho New Bloomfield New Hampton New Hope New London New Madrid New Salem Nineveh Nodaway Noel NonpareiL Northeast North Star Northwest Norwood Novelty Novinger

St. Louis ...........•................. 33-B Naylor Ripley 52 Nelson Saline 24 Neosho Newton 56 .New Bloomfield Callaway 27 New Hampton Harrison 5. Elsberry Lincoln 29 New London Ralls 15 New Madrid New Madrid 51 Winfield Lincoln 29 Olney Lincoln 29 Maryville Nodaway 7 Noel McDonald 56 East Lynne Cass 34 Kansas City .Jackson 22 Rockport Atchison 8 Tarkio Atchison 8 Norwood Wright .46 Novelty Knox 2 Novinger Adair . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2

o 163 134 576 139 546 518 303 317 7 624 297

Occidental St. Louis 33-A Olean .•............ Olean Miller 58 Olive Branch St. Louis ....................•....... . 33-A Oregon Oregon Holt 8 Orient Kansas City Jackson 22 OrientaL Blackburn Saline 24 Osage Nevada Vernon .43 Osborn Osborn De Kalb 10 O'Sullivan Walnut Grove Greene .45 Owensville Owensville Gasconade 32 Ozark Fair Grove Greene .45

P 241 18 19 650 308 65 11 330

Palestine Palmyra Paris Union Parma Parrott Pattonsburg Pauldingville Paul Revere

St. Charles Palmyra Paris Parma Maysville Pattonsburg Wright City St. Louis

St. Charles Marion Monroe New Madrid De Kalb Daviess Warren

30 15 17 51 10 10 30 33-A


1934 No.

319 498 551 92 502 136 472 399 652 182 314 469 504 113 160 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 166 242 131 556 503 179 657 148 658 190 596 180 383

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

County

161 District

Paulville Brashear Adair ............•• 2 Pee Dee Musselfork Chariton 19 Pendleton Doe Run St. Francois .48 Perseverance Louisiana Pike 16 Philadelphia Philadelphia Marion 15 Phoenix Bowling Green Pike 16 Pickering Pickering Nodaway 7 Pike Curryville Pike 16 Pilgrim St. Louis ..............•.............. 33-B Pilot Knob .Richville Douglas .46 Pine Bardley Ripley 52 Plato Plato Texas 46 Platte City Platte City Platte 21 Plattsburg Plattsburg Clinton 11 Pleasant Morrisville Polk 41 Pleasant Grove Otterville Cooper 25 Pleasant Hope Pleasant Hope Polk 41 Point Pleasant Conran New Madrid 51 Polar Star St. Louis 33-B Pollock Pollock Sullivan 3 Polo ..•............ Polo Caldwell .........•. 12 Pomegranate St. Louis 33-A Poplar Bluff Poplar Bluff Butler 52 Portageville Portageville New Madrid 51 Portland Readsville Callaway 27 Potosi. Potosi. Washington .40 Prairie Gilman City Harrison 5 Prairie Home Prairie Home Cooper 25 Pride of the West St. Louis 33-B Progress St. Louis 33-B Purdy Purdy Barry 55 Purity St. Louis 33-A Putnam Newtown Sullivan .. .- ........• 3 Puxico Puxico Stoddard 50 Pyramid St. Louis 33·A Pythagoras Cassville Barry 55 Q

380 196

Queen City Quitman

Queen City Quitman

Schuyler N odaway

1 7

Newton Ralls Mercer Nodaway Ray Cass

56 15 4 7 23 34

R 478 Racine 33 Ralls : 258 Ravanna 201 Ravenwood 223 Ray 451 Raymore

Seneca Center .Ravanna Ravenwoo·d Camden Raymore


162 No.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

391 Raytown 584 Red Bird 468 Red Oak 570 Republic 167 Revere 479 Rich Hill 385 Richland 57 Richmond 361 Riddick 13 Rising Sun 496 Robert Burns 67 Rocheport 435 Rockbridge 663 Rockhill 341 Rockville 213 Rolla 550 Rose Hill 404 R.osendale 426 Rothville 204 Rowley 316 Rural 238 Rushville 90 Russellville 572 Rutledge

Raytown Red Bird Red Oak Republic Revere Rich Hill Richland Richmond Buffalo Barry Gainesville Rocheport Rockbridge Kansas City Rockville Rolla St. Louis Rosendale Rothville Dearborn Kansas City Rushville Russellville R.utledge

225 226 208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448 126 236 517 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 304 310

Salem St. Mary's Salisbury Bonne Terre Lutie Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Milan Sedalia Seligman Senath Shamrock St. I.Jouis Warsaw Kansas City Festus Shelbina Sheldon Mindenmines Sikest.on

County

Jackson Gasconade Lawrence Greene Clark Bates Pulaski Ray Dallas Platte .ozark Boone Ozark .Jackson Bates Phelps Andrew Chariton Platte Jackson Buchanan Cole Scotland

1934 District

59 32 55 .45 1 35 38 23 41 21 53 26 53 22 35 39 33-A 9 19 21 22 9 31 J

s Salem' Saline Salisbury Samaritan Sampson Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Seaman Sedalia Seligman Senath Shamrock Shaveh Shawnee Sheffield Shekinah Shelbina Sheldon SignaL Sikeston

Dent Ste. Genevieve Chariton St. Francois Ozark Monroe J asper Andrew Buchanan Vernon Sullivan Pettis Barry Dunklin Callaway

39 .48 19 48 53 17 44 9 9 43 3 36 55 51 27

Benton J ackson J effersori Shelby Vernon .Barton Scott

36 22 40 14 .43 .43 50

33-J\


1934 No.

GRAND LODGE' OF MISSOURI Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

75 Silex ...•........•.. Silex 511 Skidmore Skidmore 266 SociaL Martinsburg 271 Solomon Springfield 206 Somerset Powersville 200 SonOra Watson 547 South Gate Kansas City 466 Southwest Southwest City 296 Sparta Sparta 524 Spickardsville Spickard 155 Spring Hill Spring Hill 96 St. Andrews Shelbyville 273 St. Clair Osceola 588 St. Francisville Wayland 234 St. Francois Libertyville 230 St. James St. James 28 St. John's Hannibal 78 St. Joseph St. Joseph 20 St. Louis ......•.... St. Louis 93 St. Mark's ........••Cape Girardeau 109 Stanberry Stanberry 419 Star Taberville 133 Star of the West Ironton 634 Steele Steele 538 Stella Stella 523 Stinson Stinson 283 Stockton Stockton 608 Strafford Strafford 604 Strasburg Strasburg 174 Sturgeon Sturgeon 69 Sullivan Sullivan 555 Summersville Summersville 263 Summit Lee's Summit 617 SwopePark KansasCity

County

163 District

Lincoln 29 Nodaway 7 Audrain 27 Greene .45 Putnam 3 Atchison 8 Jackson 22 McDonald 56 Christian 54 ,Grundy 4 Livingston 12 Shelby 14 St. Clair 37 Clark .............• 1 St. Francois 48 Phelps 39 Marion 15 Buchanan .........• 9 , 33-B Cape Girardeau .49 Gentry ...•........ 6 St. Clair 37 Iron 48 Pemiscot 51 Newton 56 Lawrence 55 Cedar 42 Greene 45 Cass 34 Boone 26 Franklin 32 ,Texas 46 Jackson 59 Jackson 22

T

565 438 299 177 661 56 631 111 638 205 641 122 440

Tebbetts Tebbetts Callaway 27 Temperance Smithville Clay 11 Temple Kansas City Jackson 22 Texas Houston Texas 46 Theodore Roosevelt .. St. Louis 33-A Tipton Tipton ....•...... Moniteau 31 Tower Grove St. Louis 33-B Trenton Trenton Grundy 4 Triangle St. Louis .........•................... 33-A Trilumina Marshall. . . . . . . . . Saline 24 Trinity St. Louis 33-A Triplett ..........•. Triplett Chariton 19 TroweL Marble Hill Bollinger 49


164 No.

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

34 Troy •.............. Troy 360 Tuscan St. Louis Columbia 114 Twilight 350 Tyrian Johnstown Caledonia 12 Tyro

County

District

Lincoln ~

Boone Bates Washington

29 33-A 26 35 .40

u 593 124 210 5 495 649 421 286 413 629 509 491 493 452 320 94 62

Union •.............Union Union Star Union Star Unionville Unionville United Springfield Unity Richards University University City Urbana Urbana Urich Urich Valley Bolckow ValleyPark ValleyPark Van Buren Van Buren Vandalia Vandalia Bronaugh Vernon Verona Verona Versailles Versailles Vienna Vienna Vincil Cameron

Franklin 32 De Kalb 10 Putnam 3 Greene 45 Vernon .43 St. Louis 57 Dallas 41 Henry ....•........ 37 Andrew 9 St.Louis 57 Carter .47 Audrain 27 ,Vernon 43 Lawrence 55 Morgan 58 Maries 39 Clinton 11

W 348 52 605 / 456 627 74 609 87 61 526 375 235 512 98 84 22 613 194 46 445 103 396

Wadesburg Creighton Wakanda Carrollton Walker WaIker Wallace Bunceton Wallace Wallace Park Warren Keytesville Warrenton Warrenton Washington Greenfield Waverly Waverly Wayne Piedmont Waynesville Waynesville Weatherby Weatherby Webb City .......•.• Webb City Webster Marshfield Webster Groves Webster Groves Wellington De Kalb Wellston Wellston Wellsville Wellsville Wentzville Wentzville West Gate St. Louis West View Millersville Western Light Louisburg

Cass 34 Carroll 20 Vernon .43 Cooper 25 Buchanan 9 Chariton 19 Warren •........... 30 Dade •............ .42 Lafayette 23 Wayne 52 Pulaski 38 De Kalb 10 Jasper .44 Webster 45 St. Louis 57 Buchanan 9 St. Louis 57 Montgomery 28 St. Charles 30 33-B Cape Girardeau 49 Dallas .41


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

165

v No.

15 53 340 202 434 301 417 162 374 620 370 191 29

Name of Lodge

Location of Lodge

Western Star •.......Winston Weston Weston Westport Kansas City Westville ......•.... Westville Wheeling Wheeling White Hall Barnard Whitewater Whitewater Whitesville Whitesville Wilderness Wilderness Willard .•...........Willard Williamstown Williamstown Wilson Pocahontas Windsor Windsor

540 Winigan Winigan Winona 430 Winona Pilot Grove 277 Wm. D. Muir 387 Woodside •........•.Thomasville La Grange 24 Wyaconda

County

District

Daviess .......•..•. 10 Platte •.......•..•. 21 Jackson ......••.... 22 Chariton .•.....••.• 19 Livingston ••....... 12 Nodaway ••........ 7 Cape Girardeau •.••. 49 Andrew 9 Oregon 53 Greene ...........• .45 Lewis 15 49 Cape Girardeau Henry •..•.•....•.. 37 Sullivan ......••••• 3 Shannon .......•••. 47 Cooper ............• 25 Oregon •.........•. 53 Lewis .........•... 15

x 50

Xenia

Hopkins

Nodaway ....••.•.• 7

Y 563

york

Kansas City

.Jackson .•........•• 22

Z

545 189

Zalma Zeredatha

Zalma St. Joseph

.Bollinger Buchanan

49 9


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT FmST DISTRIOT-H. M. JAYNE, D. D. G. M., Memphis, Mo. "d

~

Ql

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

"d QI

]

:s

'T:l QI

1len gj

Po.

"d QI .~

III

~

l

~ ~

EE

....:

'Qj

~

~

~

gj ~

Cl

'T:l

~

's .s QI ~

III Ql

~

d

.~

~

:i

Z

=:i ~~

~

~

'T:l'T:l

~.S;

~ ~ l< rn rn l:ol .... " 6 .. 7 .. " 8 .,

QI ~

2 2 2 Revere, 167 ••..•••• ... .. ·1 .. · .. ,... .. 1 1.. 4 1 5 Fairmount, 290 ••... ... 3 2 2 3 2 ... 1 Eldorado, 318 ...... .. .. ... 2 2 6 2 2 Hiram, 362 ••••.••• .. Gothic, 436 •••.••••• 5 5 5 ... 8 ... 1 .. .. ., St. Francisville, 588. 5 5 4 .. 3 .... .. " Memphis, 16 •.••••• 4 1 2 1 1 14 1 5 15 .. Gorin, 72 .......... ... ... . , . .. ... . ... . 2 .. Rutledge, 572 •••••• ... ... .. ... 1 6 .. " Middle Fabius, 244 .• 1 1 1 .. 3 2 1 Lodge of Love, 259 .• 2 9 .. 21 2 1 Queen City, 380 .... 7 1 3 13 .. .. 11 1 1 1 1 Glenwood, 427 •••••• .. ·1 .. · ... .. 4 . ... 1 .,. 7 . .. t Geentop, 635 •••••. ... .. '" .... ... .... ., . \ TOTAL ........ 231 201 171 51 12 1 421 111 251 711 .. 1.. 1..

...

... ...

~

QI

'S QI

~

52 $ 51 64 98 39 64 177 60 58 86 118 48 36

'g~ IIlQl

"'1lIi'" t.:l'T:l1ll

~j~

~

dI~

'" ~

",1lIi

Po.~ .s.S :gllli ~1l ~ III I: 1Il~1Il

Ql '"

QI

l::Po.~

e'" Qlll :> CJ

-< 0 78.00 76.50 $·::::r·:::: $ 96.00 ..... 147.00 ..... 58.50 ...... ..... 96.00 ...... ..... 265.50 2.10 90.00 87.00 .... 129.00 177.00 ..... 72.00 2.10 54.00 8.40 .

. . .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. . . .. ... .... .. .. .. .. .. . .. .,. . .. ..... ........

...... ......

..... . ..... ..... . .... .... ...... ..... ...... ...... ...... .

.....

+'

I:

~

"d

0

"d

.;

QI

~ QI

~

S

gj~

Po.

-<QI

~s

~

I:

S

-;

~~

~

Ql 8J~

315

0

lIl

0 ~

..:l

78.00 $ 76.50 96.00 147.00 58.50 96.00 267.60 90.00 87.00\ 129.00

-<

3.00 $ 7.50

.......

3.00 12.00

....... 21.00 . ......

...

::

951 1$ 1,426.501$ 12.601$ .... 1$ 1,439.101$

III

!=Q

50.00 $ 25.00 $ 69.00 . 96.00 144.00 46.50 .. 96.00 246.60 ....... 90.00 . 85.50 . 124.50 177.00 63.60 62.40 ......

...... ....... ...... ....... ......

.......

...... ....... ....... .......

1.50 4.50

177.001······. ~~.:;~ :1~:~~

CJ

.. .. • .... 1

63.00 $ 1,351.101$

IlIi IlIi.S gj .S ~ IlIi 'gO-g

... QI"d §l:lol:

~.s §

~l5.s

~Sr::

:g=1: III H

t.:l,!:l 'T:lt;!QI

CJ

gjrn

~gj..:l

0

I:"d

U

'g... " ~~

~

a

.;~~

Po. Po. 60.00 $ ...... $ ..... 160.00 80.00 404.00 ...... ...... 89.00 721.20 244.50 ....... 141.50 114.50 ....... 150.00 ....... 252.75 195.00

....... ....... . ....... ....... .......

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

......

. ...... ...... ....... ...... None ....... ...... . ...... ....... ........ 25.001$ 2,612.451$ ...... 1$ .....

SEOOND DISTRIOT-WILLIS J. BRAY, D. D. G. Mo, Kirksvllle, Mo. 5 5 6 2 17 14 5 6 26..... . Kirksville, 105 ••..•• 1 ... 3 5 ...... Paulville, 319 ••••••. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adair, 366 ......... 14 14 14 2... 22 6 2 27 ••..•. Novinger, 583 ••.... ... '" 1 .. Ark,6 .•..••••••.•. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 .. :I: Colony, 168 ....•.. Novelty, 181 •.•.... Edina, 291. . Greensburg, 414 •... 1 1 1 .. 3 1 ... 1 1 ...... TOTAL ........ 231 221 221 41 211 411 111 141 631. ·1· ·1· . t No report received. :t See end of tabular statement.

:~I :~I :i: : il::~ : : : i :::: :: :: ::

298 $ 62 326 77 84

447.00 $ 35.70 $ .... $ 93.00 489.00 115.50 126.00

482.70 $ 93.00 489.00 115.50 126.00

21.00 $ 1.50 33.00 1.50

461.70 $ ...... $ 91.50 456.00 114.00 126.00

....... .........

461 69.00 69.00 50 75.00 2.10 77.10 51 76.50 6.30 82.80 9941$ 1,491.001$ 44.101$ ., .• 1$ 1,535.101$

None $ None 647.50 345.50 200.00

66.00 None 77.10 128.00 1.50 81.30 227.00 61.50 $ 1,347.601$ 126.001$ 1,548.001$

10.00 $

1.00

20.00

2.00

30.001$

3.00

3.00


THIBD DISTBIOT-WALTER E. SINGLEY, D. D. G. M., Green City, Mo. Hartford, 171 •••••• Somerset, 206 •••••• Unionville, 210 ••••• Lucerne, 394 ••••••. Humphreys, 32 ••••. Seaman, 126 .•••••• Green City, 159 ••••• Putnam, 190 ••••••• Pollock, 349 ........ Arcana, 389 ........ Winigan, 540 ..... TOTAL ........

.. ..

... ... ... .. 4 7

4 3

3 .,. 1 3 .• 1 5 .... 4 •• 2 '" 11 ••• 1 10 .. 1 .• 1 1 •.. 1 .... . .. .. 2 .... .. 1 1 ••. 1 '" 4 1 1 4 3 2 .... 1 10 1 5 2 .• 1 .. 1 1 3 7 .• .. 2 1 1 1 1 1 .... 4 .. 4 2 ... 1 1 6 .. 1 .. 3 ••. 1 4 .. 191 51 181 391 101 151 311 .. 1 11· .

... ... ... .. ... .... 1 1 6 4 4 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 5 5 341 271

...

~I

. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

67.50 $ 45r 42 63.00 133 199.50 42 63.00 51 76.50 189 283.50 84 126.00 112 168.00 67 100.50 78 117.00 73.50 491 8921$ 1,338.001$

..... $ •••• $ 10.50 16.80 2.10

67.50 $ 73.50 214.20 63.00 76.50 291.90 130.20 174.30 100.50 127.50 77.70 60.901$ 2.101$ 1,396.801$

..... ...... ..... ...... ..... 8.40 ..... 4.20 ..... 6.30 ..... ...... ..... 10.50 ..... 4.20 .....

4.50 $

63.00 $ ...••. $

130.00 $ 40.00 12.00 566.50 60.00 1,000.00 96.00 6.00 90.00 812.00 24.00 64.501$ 2,336.501$

....... 73.50 . ...... 16.50 197.70 ....... ....... ......... 63.00 1.50 75.00 ....... 6.10 285.80 . ...... 15.00 115.20 ....... 171.30 ....... 3.00 99.00 ....... 1.50 120.00 6.00 1.50 73.20 . ...... 4.50 58.60 $ 1,273.701$

14.00 $ 10.00

....... ....... ....... 10.00 .......

....... 10.00 ....... .......

1.40

..... ........ ..... ....... 1.00 ...... ...... 1.00 ...... ......

44.001$

8.40

FOURTH DISTRIOT-LYNN J. LIMES, D. D. G. M., Trenton, Mo. Trenton. Ill •••.••• Laredo, 263 ........ Galt, 423 ••••••••••. Spickardsville. 524 •• Mercer, 85 •••.••••• Ravanna. 258 •••••• Marion, 616 .••••.•• TOTAL ........

... 2 1 9

2 1 1 .,. 1 1 7 1 5

···r 1 2 8

.. ·'···1···1·· 121 111

91 41

... 61

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . ... . .. ... .... .. .. .. 21 6 7 11 .. 4 1 1 2 .. 23 1 2 .... 2 ... 1 .... 15 1 5 11 .. 2 1 •.. 8 •.

671 101 161

321 .. 1· .1··

84T 67 101 70

.. ~~?I

510.00 $ 2.10 $ .•.• $ 100.50 ..... 151.60 ..... 105.00 ..... 264.00 10.60 .... 45.00

...... ...... ...... . ...... ..... ........ .... " . .....

512.10 $ 100.50 151.50 105.00 274.50 45.00

........

31.50 $ 6.00 34.50 8.00 22.50 8.00

512.10 $ 94.50 117.00 102.00 252.00 18.50

*

31.50 $ 1,056.50 $ ...... $ .....

....... 82.00 ....... 548.00 ....... 200.00 ....... 195.00 28.50 None ....... ......... ....... ........

7841$ 1,176.001$ 12.601$ •••. 1$ 1,188.601$ 100.60 $ 1,091.101$

....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... 10.00 1.00 ....... .. ..... ....... ......

28.501$ 2,026.501$

10.001$

1.00

FIFTH DISTRIOT-HENDRIX NEWMAN, D. D. G. M., Bethany, Mo. Bethany, 97 ••••••• • ,. ... ... 2... 7 1 9 .. .... 107 $ 160.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 160.50 $ 10.50 $ 150.00 $ ..•.•. $ 597.76 $ ...... $ ..... Lorraine, 128 •••••• 4 4 4 1 .... ... .... .. .• •• 60 90.00 2.10 92.10 92.10 196.00 Lodge of Light, 257. 1 ..• ••• .•.• •• .. •. 40 60.00 2.10 62.10 1.50 60.60 825.00 •.•••• 1 1 1. • 1 CainesviIIe, 828 ••••. 4 2. •. •• ••• •••• ••. ••• .••. •. •• •. 87 65.50. . • • •• ••••• 55.50. • • • • • • 55.50. . . • • • . 125.00. • • . • •• • ••••• New Hampton, 510. 1 ••• ••. .. ••• 1 1.. • 4 •• •• •. 88 57.00. .. . •. ••••• 57.00 1.50 55.50.. .. .•• 80.00 •••.. ,. • ••••• Prairie, 556 •••••••. 1 1 1. . 1 2. .. ••• 8 .. .. •• 43 64.50 2.10. • . • • 66.&0 3.00 68.60. . . . • • . 120.00. • • . • •• • ••••• .•-.~1$~4~97L~M~17$~U~~~0·~$~~fi=7~~~0~1$~ •.-..•-.~I$~1~~~4~L~"~17$-...-...~I$~.-.-.•• TOTAL ........ III 81 6181 31 111 11 11 211 •. I.-.+I.-.I~~~~5~1$~4~8~~~5~017$~~~8~OI7$-.* Credit $81.50.


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued SIXTH DISTRIOT-QURTIS E. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Darlington, Mo. ~

cl 0

III

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

~

~

~

~

Havana, 21 ..••..•. Stanberry, 109 ..... Gentryville, 125 .... Athens, 127 ••.•.... Alanthus, 252 •••... Ancient Craft, 377 .. Berlin, 378 ..••...•. Jacoby, 447 ........ Grant City, 66 .•.... Defiance, 88 ..•••... Allensville, 198 ...•. Jonathan, 821. .. .. TOTAL ........

III

~

~

~

.:!l

III

III

.:i ~ ~

is ] ~ -< ... ... .. , 2 ... ... ... .. 2 4

ell ~

2 3

1

t:

's

1's £

III

~

~

::s

'S

III

l::l

~

~

~

:i ::5

ell

III

l::l l::l

s:i. !§

s:i.

00

00

~

•.. 4 .. 3 6 1 3 8 .. 2 .. 2 .... 1 2 3 .. 3 .. 1 4 1 ... 18 .. o. 8 5 ... 2 9 .. 4 2 1 4 1 2 5 .. 4 .. 2 ... 1 1 .. 2 1 1 .... 2 " ... " 1 1 .... , 8 2 2 2 ..

... ... ... 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 1 ...

.. "

11 3 3 1 21 1 191 161 41 311

'1:l

]

.!!

Ql

U

l:l,

l<

r:il

III

.. "

. . .." .. .. .. ..

ell III

1l

""tllI"" ell

e;:,~

~j>:

a

~ ::a ..

.. .. .. "

~

III

A

3T

95 40 105 25 99 31 45 49 57

""tllI

.s~

5~5

1lI",,1lI

l::~>C

-<

f5

~>: :gtlll ell I::

l:l,'" ",,~ III III

>u

0

55.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 142.50 6.30 60.00 3.85 157.59 4.20 37.50 16.80 148.50 2.10 46.50 ...... ..... 67.50 4.20 ..... ..... 73.50 85.50 6.30

..... ..... ..... ..... .....

...

~

I::

::s0

~

~~ =~

a

<Ill

l::la mill

3~ 0

~~ ..::l

~

55.50 $ ...... $ 148.80 9.00 63.85 161.70 6.00 54.30 7.50 150.60 6.00 46.50 3.00 71.70 73.50 91.80 3.00

.......

.. .. .. ....... .. .. ...... ....... ... .. .. ..... ... .... .. .. .. ..... ........ ...... ..... ........ ....... 1 1 61.50 23.10 ..... 84.60 1.50 .. .. .. 41

....

..

.:!l

-g~

241

61 151

501· .1.

·1··

624 1$

936.001$ 66.851$ .•.. 1$ 1,002.851$

86.00 $

.;

III

~

l::l

tllI tllI.S II .S ~ tllI

::s

...

'1:l0~ I:: 0

III

u

I::

::s0

I:: ell

a

-<

56.6T ......

139.80 63.85 155.70 57.30 144.60 43.50 71.70 73.50 88.80

60.00 954.251$

•...... ...... ....... 10.50

$

0

.•...... . ...... . ...... ....... ...... ........

23.10 28.101$

§~§

11l1~

a • ~O'" ';lJ:l,s

.s ~~

)l

0

~

~l::lS

ia CQ

ucS

'''IlI~

I::~

illS

I::

tllItllI::S ""I::~

2'" e;:,.c:l ~ 1 QI

s

.;~):l ~

190.00 $ ...... $ ..... None ...... 32.25 ....... ...... None 279.00 47.00 156.00 100.00 114.67

....... ....... ...... ....... ...... 10.00 20.00

1.00 2.00

. ...... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ... .... . .....

....... ...... ,

None 918.921$

30.001$

3.00

SEVENTH DISTRIOT-UEL W. LAMBKIN, D. D. G. M., Maryville, Mo.

ie::;;ilf~'i65:'.:''''',,,,,,: .. ~I.~ Quitman, 196...... Ravenwood. 201 Graham, 289....... White Hall, 301. .. .. Kennedy, 329 .. ",. Burlington, 442,... Gaynor City, 465.... Nodaway, 470 ..•.. Pickering, 472..... Guilford, 474....... Clearmont, 607..... Skidmore, 511...... TOTAL........ 0

• Credit $10.50.

~

~

~~~1$ 1:.8:~~1$ :::~$.::::

1~~::~$ ,~:~~~ 1~~:~~$ :.4::~$ 6.3.0:~~$.::::::

..: ... :::::::::: .. ••. •• $ ••. .. ... •. ... $.::::: 2... .. ..•. •.. . .. , ., .. .. 37 55.50. • . . .. ..... 55.50 ••..... 55.50. . . . . . . 488.00. . . . . •. , ....• 1... 5 1............. 94 141.00 141.00 7.50 133.50 174.00 .. ••. 8 '.. 2. . .. .. .. .. 57 85.50 85,50 4.50 81.00 288.30 .. , .. 4 1 1 8 .. .. .. 36 54.00 54.00 6.00 48.00 29.60 . '" 8 •.. •.. ..•. .. .. .. 35 52.50 52.50 4.50 .. ,...... 48.00 305.00 . ,........ 1 1 .. " .. .. .. 40 60.00 60.00 12.00 48.00 297.30 .. ... .... ... ... .... .. .. .. 33 49.50 49.50 49.50 865.00 1...... 1 1 8 4 9 28...... 277 415.50 2.10 417.60 12.00 100.00 305.60 None 20.00 2.00 . ,.. 1 3 1 •. , •.. 16...... 461 69.00 69.00 1.50 67.50 20.00 ... .. ... .... ... 1.......... 47 70.50 70.50 70.50 194.00 . •..•.•. , .. ••• 1 1. .. .••• .. .• .• 54/ 81.00 81.00 1.50 79.50 432.56 _.-;'';T-''-;'+'_'-;;'7-'-;'7-'-';:;1':-:;;-:;2+-:-=1-l---=-~1 1-',;,,' .:+.:....:.+-.'+-'·_1_--;:-:;6:-=07::--=--:-::-:90;;.;..0~0::+=-~~+::=-:":"':'~~"7"9:-:0;.:,.0:-:0+=---:-3::.:: ..;:..00~ 1-::-_::-::8,",,7.:..:.0,",,0+-::--=~~~~.;30~0;.:,'0~0~~~±~~ 51 51 81 41 71 311 101 161 471 .. 1.. 1.. 9351$ 1,402.501$ 6.301$ .... 1$ 1,408.801$ 46.50 $ 655.501$ 706.801$ 3,528.761$ 20.001$ 2.00 3

3

7 :'


EIGHTH DISTRIOT-FRANK. R. ELTON, D. D. G. M., Tarkio, Mo. 1 1 1 28..... . 108 $ 162.00 $ •••.. $ •.•. $ 162.00 $ l.50 $ 160.60 $ ..•••• $ 600.00 $ •••••• $ ••••• North Star, 157 ••••• 2 2 2 1... Sonora, 200 •..•••.• 1 1 1..... 2 ... 1 1 .. .. .. 38 .67.00... ••. ...•• 67.00 8.00 54.00.. .•.•. 162.35 ... , '" .....• Northwest, 858 .•••. 7 5 6. • 2 1 2. . . . .. 88 182.00. • . . .. .•••• 182.00 8.00 129.00. . . . . . . 194.50. . . . . .. • •..•• Fairfax, 483 ....•.. 1 1 1. . 5 6 1 1 3 .. 94 141.00 10.60. . . .. 151.60 9.00 157.65· 15.15 None 10.00 1.00 Maitland, 112 ...••. 2 8 2. . 1 3 2 1. . . . .. 67 100.50 2.10. . . . . 102.60 4.60 98.10. . . . . . . 235.00. • . . . •• • •..•• 1 '" 1 8. . 65 97.50......... .. 97.60 ••.•.•. 97.50 .... " . 287.00. • .. ... • •..•• Oregon, 139 .•.•.••• 1 ... Forest City, 214 •.••• 8 8\ 8.. 1 8 1 1 21...... 68 102.00 2.10..... 104.10 12.00 92.10....... 177.50 ....•...•..•• 4\ 3 1 1 1 8 •• . 3 3 .• .. .. 96 144.00 2.10. • . . . 146.10 4.60 141.60. . . . . . • 418.60. . . . . .. . .••.. Mound City, 294 .••• Craig, 606 .. 1 '" •.. .. 2. • . . 1. . . 8 .. .. .. 48 72.00. • • . . • 8.40 63.60. • • . . . . 63.60. . . . . . . 77.00. . • . . .. . •...• 27123121181101 251 71 III 621.·I .. I.. I~~67=2~1$~I~~~0~8~~~01~$~I~L~8~017$~8~.4~0~1$~I~~~I~L~40~1~$~37~~~0·~$~~99~4~~~5~1$~·~1~5~~~5~~~2~~~4~L~95~17$~10~~~0~1$~I~~~0 TOTAL ....•••.

NINTH DISTRIOT-OYRIL A. OARPENTER, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph, Mo. Savannah, 71 ••.••• Helena, 117 •••••••• Lincoln, 188 •••.••• Whitesville, 162 .•••• Rosendale, 404 .•.•• ' Valley, 418 .••..••• Cosby, 600 ••••••••• Agency, 10 .•••••••. Wellington, 22 St. Joseph, 78 ••••.• Birming, 150 •••.••• Zeredatha, 189 .... Rushville, 238 •...•• Brotherhood, 269 ... Charity, 331 •.•.... King Hill, 876 ••••.. Saxton, 508 ..•.•••• Wallace Park, 627. TOTAL ........ • Credit $1.50.

.. .. 164 $ .. .. 24 4 1 .... .. .. .. 56 .. .. .. 57 2 ... 2 ... 48 3 ... ... .... .. .. .. .. .. .. 55 3 ... '" 1 ... 1 4 .. .. 60 1 1 1 .. 1 1 1 1 '" 91 5 ." 2 12 .. .. .. 65 2 2 2 1 '" 2 2 .... .. .. .. 6 7 7 .. 12 .... 5 9 22 .. .. 525 61 8 1 1 .. 4 5 ... 9 .. .. .. 779 15 16 11 3 6 24 1 5 27 .. .. .. 9 5 6 1 '" 2 ••. 71 7 .. .. .. 16 16 14 7 •.. 10 1 1 16 .. .. 253 10 7 7 8 8 18 3 15 16 •• .. 1 4 4 2 .. 13 214 6 2 1 24 .. .. 1 1 1 ... .. '" 1 ••• 89 5 .. . . .. 1 •.. , 28 . ... .. .... 8 .. .. ···1· .. '" '63' 5 5 1 1 1 1 1 ..• 5 5

5 1 2 1 .. 1 1 '" .. 1 5 .. '"

801 711 681231 411

• Credit $15.16.

15 .. 4 ..

246.00 $ 4.20 $ ..•. $ 250.20 $ 15.00 $ 235.20\$ ..•... $ 180.00 $ ...... $ ..••• 36.00 86.00 36.00 ....... 134.60 84.00 6.00 84.00 78.00 ....... 248.00 87.60 3.00 86.10 85.50 2.10 L50 72.00 . 72.00 4.50 67.50 ....... 340.00 82.50 82.50 4.50 78.00 . 115.00 90.00 ..... 90.00 L50 195.00 88.50 ....... ..... 136.50 ...... ..... 136.60 7.50 129.00 ....... 148.00 97.50 ..... 97.50 .. ...... w ... 97.50 ....... 259.00 787.50 25.20 812.70 812.70 870.00 20.00 2.00 99.90 91.50 8.40 7.50 92.40 219.00 1,168.50 12.76 1,181.25 36.00 1,146.25 1,206.10 106.50 106.50 106.50 108.00 364.60 879.50 879.50 15.00 460.00 1,423.80 1,444.50 1,460.80 27.00 554.10 6.30 346.10 9.00 337.10 666.50 321.00 25.10 58.60 58.50 1.50 57.00 198.40 42.00 42.00 40.60 92.50 1.60 931 171 441 1611· .1 .. 1 2 3,6531$ 5,829.501$ 84.061$ .•.. 1$ 6,413.551$ 139.50 $ 5,276.551$ 1.501$ 5,998.101$ 20.001$ 2.00

10 .•.

8

...

....... ..... ..... .....

..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... ...... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ..... ..... ..... ......I ...... .....

.......

......

....... .......

....... ....... ......... ...... ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... •

....... ....... ........ ....... ........ ...... ....... ........ ...... ........ ........ ...... ...... ........ ...... ....... .......

..... ........ .....

...... . ..... . ...... ...... . ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TENTH DISTRICT-THOMAS D. WILLIAMS, D. D. G. M., Maysville, Mo. "tl QI

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Union Star, 124 ..••. Weatherby, 235 ..... Parrott, 808 ••..•.. Osborn, 817 •••.•••• Continental, 454 ... ' Clarksdale, 559 .••.. Western Star, 15 ..•. Pattonsburg, 65 ..•.. Gallatin, 106 ..•.••. Altamont, 108 .•.•.. Earl, 285 ••........ Lock Spring, 488 ... ' Jameson, 500 .....• Jamesport, 564 ..... TOTAL ........

"tl "i ] QI 1ii "tlQI 'il .i .Pi~ .!l ~ :5 p..~ ~'" is< 'Qi~

::I. .~

21·· . 1 1 1 5 4 5 1 2 1 1 1 2 ... 6 6 5 1 ... 1 .,. " '" 2 1 1 ... 1 1 1 " 4 4 4 " 1 5 5 5 1 ... 2 2 1 .. 4 2 3 .. 4 5 2/ 2 .. 3 2 .. ·1 .. 2 421 321 29 1 51 151

I::i

::::

·s QI ~

::s~

(:l

d

1's oS

rIl

QI

(:l

z ~

~

]

"tl

i....

~ "i ~ !!l >< QI rJ2 fil ~

'" rJ2!!l Cl . .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. QI

• 1::

rIl

p.; )i

2 ... ,. " 2 ... 2 ... 1 4 1 ... 1 .... 2 1 1 .... .. 2 ... 1 3 .. .. .. .. .. 16 '" 1 1 ... 18 .. 5 3 2 9 .. .. 2 ... 4 .. 3 1 1 .,. .... 1 .. 2 ... 2 .... .. 1 1 ... 10 .. .. 2 7 .. .. 1 51·· . 441 71 131 551 .. 1 11 1

"tl:.a I:: Eo!

rl

"'QI

""be""

~

t.:l"tl '"

""be 01::

~irl

'" ~ '"

QI '"

"" QI p..>t

:Sbe

...

"'I:: ~ ",,"tl

.., I::

::s

"tl

°a

!l2

<QI

(:lEI

=~

"tl .;

QI

p..

(:l

~

QI

be be.S ~

::s

.= ~ be "tlO"tl I::!l

.Pi::s..:l°

u

::s

I::

I::"tl QlE I::

ucS

... QI"tl

§~S

bebe='

""I::~ 0 ...

~QI~

~

QI,.d

a.

"tl 0 '"

~~m

.

......

3~ .;~~ .;=~ ~(:lE >u ~~ 13 'a p.. p.. ~ Cl < 0 Eo! < l:Q 0 ..:l 66 $ 99.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 99.00 $ 40.00 $ ...... $ ..... 96.00 $ ...... $ 3.00 $ 55 82.50 ...... 82.50 79.5() 150.00 ....... ...... 3.00 ...... 144 216.00 4.20 ..... 220.20 155.00 40.00 217.20 4.00' ...... 3.00 33 49.50 49.50 25.00 ...... 1.50 48.00 47 70.50 .... 70.50 ...... 171.85 ....... ...... 3.00 67.50 50 75.00 . ..... 75.00 101.50 ....... ...... 3.00 72.00 48 72.00 1.50 . 73.50 24.00 64.00 ....... ...... 49.50 54 81.00 81.00 175.00 ....... ...... 1.50 ........ 79.50 123 184.50 . ..... ..... 2.00 184.50 686.00 20.00 7.50 177.00 ....... 59 1 88.50 ..... 88.50 None ....... ...... 3.00 85.50 ....... 75.00 ...... 75.00 110.00 ....... 1.50 73.50 81 121.50 9.90 131.40 285.59 ....... ...... 3.00 128.40 ....... 55 82.50 . .... 82.50 121.00 ....... ...... 81.00 1.50 86 129.00 4.20 .... 133.20 125.70 ....... 7.50 307.50 ....... ...... 9511$ 1,426.501$ 19.801$ .... 1$ 1,446.301$ 66.00 $ 1,228.801$ 151.501$ 2,392.441$ 60.001$ 6.00 ~j~

13 QI

6°1

QI""QI

:::p.. >t

°

QIQI

°

'"

.

..... ...... ..... ...... . ..... .... ...... ..... ...... ...... ..... ..... ...... .

. ....... . ......... ....... . ....... .......

ELEVENTH DISTRIOT-EMSLEY O. JAMES, D. D. G. M., Hemple, Mo.

*~~~t~9.~~·::.·::::: .. ~II .. ~I .. ~ .~"6

~ .. ~ .. ~I

3L:::::

Angerona, 193..... .... .. 1. .. .. '" ... ... .... .. Clay, 207.......... 1/ 2 2 1 1 18 2 l' 2 . Kearney, 811....... 2 2 2......... 3 1 .•........ Temperance, 438... 2 1 1.... . 6 4 1 . Hemple, 87........ 6 6 6... . . 2 2. . . 1 .. .. .. Vincil, 62.......... ... ... ... .. 3 1 4 4 7 ... Plattsburg, 113..... 2 11 1 21··· 7 1 1 1 .....• Gower, 397 •.•................. \... 1 1 .. Lathrop, 506....... 2 2 2 1... 1 .. . 1. . .. .. .. .. TOTAL 181 171 17191 101 381 141 15/ 561 .. 1.. 1..

'1 ..

189 $ 283.50 $ $ $ 283.50 $ 22 33.00 12.60 45.60 36 54.00 54.00 170 255.00 2.10 257.10 73 109.50 109.50 111 166.50 166.50 32 48.00 48.00 123 184.50 6.30 190.80 97 145.50 145.50 57 85.50 85.50 69 103.50 103.50 9791$ 1,468.501$ 21.001$ .... 1$ 1,489.501$

4.50 $ 27.00 9.00 3.00 1.50 10.50 1.50 57.00

279.001$ 45.60 54.00 230.10 109.50 157.50 45.00 189.30 135.00 85.50

$

476.55 $ 28.00 510.00 1,460.00 135.00 400.00 101.50 230.00 147.00 160.00 102.00 111.00 $1,330.501$ 102.001$ 3,759.051$

$

.

10.00

1.00

10.001$

1.00


TWELFTH DISTRICT-JOHN M. GALLATIN, D. D. G. M., Chillicothe, Mo. Kingston, 118...... Braymer, 135 •••.••• Hamilton, 224 .••••• Polo, 232 •••.•••.••• Breckenridge, 334 .. Cowgill, 561. .•••••• Frien~hip, 89 ••••• Spring Hill, 155 .•••. Benevolence, 170 ... Chillicothe, 333 ••••. Chula, 388 ••••••••. Wheeling, 434 ...... Dawn, 539 ••••••••.

TOTAL ........

"oro

.. .. .. . . . . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

2 5 " 1 30 2 2 .... 3 2 ... .. 17 4 1 4 5 5 3 ... 7 " 1 2 5 3 2 2 ... 2 .• 2 12 3 ••. '" 5 1 3 .... 1 '" , 2 3 10 2 3 11 .. 3 •.. '" 3 .. 2 ... 2 '" 13 .,. 2 1 1 3 ... 1 10 " " 1 1 1 10 2 ••• 3 3 3 1 1 3 4 1 3 .. ., ,. 1 •.• " 201 151 141121 101 1001 251 161 361 .. 1.. 1..

... .. ... ... .. ... ... .., .. ...

...

...

.. ...

...

... .

.... . ... ....

.. ..

156.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 156.00 $ ...... $ $ 156.00 $ None $ ...... $ ..... 147.60 145.50 45.00 102.60 2.10 110.00 184.50 184.50 25.50 109.00 50.00 197.50 142.50 142.50 142.50 324.00 168.00 4.20 6.30 165.90 18.00 147.90 194.00 100.50 6.30 106.80 106.80 220.00 246.00 6.30 252.30 237.30 15.00 162.50 31.50 31.50 4.50 15.00 12.00 None 76.50 76.50 3.00 73.50 85.00 213.00 213.00 19.50 193.50 42 303.75 57.00 38 57.00 42.00 15.00 45.00 2.10 101.10 99.00 4.50 96.60 30.00 ' 66 1 124.50 124.50 83 124.50 1.575.50 1,1631$ 1,744.501$ 21.001$ 6.301$ 1,759.201$ 150.00 $ 1.391.201$ 218.001$ 3,247.251$ ...... 1$ ..... 104 $ 97 123 95 112 67 164 21 51 1

..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ...... .... ...... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ..... ...... .....

....... .......

.......

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

....... ....... . ......

........ ...... ......... ....... ......

....... ........ ...... . ...... ....... ........ ......

. ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

THIRTEENTH DISTRICT-FORREST L. MADDEN, D. D. G. M., Meadville, Mo. Jackson, 82 •••.•.•• Brookfield, 86 ...... Cypress, 227 .•••••• Bucklin, 233 .•••••. Dockery, 325 •••.••• Marceline, 481. .....

TOTAL ........ • Credit $1.50.

... ...

4 4 2 2 1 '"

1 81

'"

61

1 1 '" 5 3 4 1 •. 1

... .,. ...

2 ... 1 19 71 71 241

• Credit $3.00.

.. .. .. .. ..

.. .. .. ..

1 2 1 .... " 8 2 3 .... " 1 1 ••. 3 .,. 4 8 .. 1 .,. 6 5 3 4 " 201. 10 1 111 121· .1 .. 1••

.. .. ..

1041$ 176 66 73 70 150 6391$

156.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 156.00 $ 264.00 272.40 8.40 101.10 99.00 2.10 109.50 109.50 105.00 105.00 225.00 39.90 264.90 958.501$ 50.401$ ., .. 1$ 1.008.901$

. .... ..... ...... ..... ..... .....

1.50 $ 12.00 1.50 4.50 1.50 9.00 30.00 $

154.50 $ ...... $ 352.00 $ ...... $ ..... 263.40 • 3.00 99.60 90.00 10.00 106.50 1.50 60.00 103.50 191.00 255.90 1,105.36 983.40)$ • 4.50)$ 1,798.361$ 10.001$ ., .••

. ...... • ........ ......

........ ....... ...... . ..... ........ ...... ...... ...... ....... ......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-LUTHER E. WILHOIT, D. D. G. M., Macon, Mo. 'tl

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Callao, 38 .......... Bloomington, 102 .•. McGee, 146 ••••••••. Censer, 172 •••••••• La Plata, 237 .••••• Lodge of Truth, 268. Excello, 332 •••••••. Elmer, 648 •••••.••. St. Andrews, 96 ••••• Shelbina, 228 ••..•• Hunnewell, 415 ••..• Bethel, 537 ••.••••• Clarence, 662 •••••• TOTAL ........

'tl 41

'tl 41

'tl

'tl 41

~ 41 ;§ ~~ 2

.!!l CIS ~

2

'tl 41

~

~ ~ is '4j <: ~

...

~

~

·s

~

'tl

~ oS ZPo S CIS

41 ~

~

::s

...

...

... ...

"~I"~

.!!l

]

~ Po "ip, gj ~

gj 41 41 l::l l::l Ul Ul r"l ... 15 .. ., , 1 1 .... 2 1 .... , 3 2 .... 3 2 1 " 1 3 •. , 1 1 •• ,

l::l

2 .. 2 1 1 2 1 1 .. 2 .... 5 5 1 ... 9 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 .. 1 .... 1 •. , 4 4 •. 4 1 1 .. 20 •.. 1 1 .. 1 9 1 •.. 2 1 ••. 1 •.. 2 3 ... 4 •.. 2 21 201 1 201 71 61 541 111 91 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 1

d ~

...

.. ...

.. . .. .. . .. . . ... ... .... .. ., .. .. ., 2 . .. .. . ,

'tl 2

~

41

Col

,Q

~

~

.~ 41

.. .. "

.. ..

.. .. .. .. ..

.. . , .. 8 .... .. . , .. 251 .. 1.. 1..

]~

,Zl

",tlIl '0 s::

CIS 41 "'tlII'" ~'tlClS

~~ ~ CIS&lClS

l::l

<

41 CIS "'41 ~~ :s!tlIl ClSS::

p,'"

i:J::s

'tl

°S

'tl il2

<41

l::lS

.; ~

l::l

s:: ::s

CII

..,

::s~

41

::s Col

s::CIS

tlIl tlII.S il .S ~ tlIl

]O-g ,5il..:l

S::'tl

.~ ~'tl §p,s:: gj Ul ::s

::E!Sr; 0

CII.s

s::

CII..c:

tlIItlIl::S "'S::~ 0 ...

~ gj m

]~ gj~ ~~.s .;~.E ';~::E! S -a ~ ~ 0 0 l:J::l Eo! ..:l < 126.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 126.00 $ 3.00 $ 123.00 $ ...... $ 249.00 $ ...... $ ••••• ~8.50 4.50 59 2.10 2.10 85.50 ....... 88.50 3.00 41 144.00 4.20 65.70 61.50 65.70 1.00 10.00 183 274.50 . 906.00 261.00 274.50 13.50 123 184.50 422.50 ....... 181.50 ....... 184.50 8.00 43 64.50 72.00 12.50 ....... ...... 2.10 66.60 • 5.40 36 54.00 38.50 ....... 64.00 54.00 56 84.00 None ....... 84.00 6.00 78.00 86 129.00 410.00 129.00 99.00 ....... 30.00 ...... 107 149.10 195.00 160.50 2.10 . 162.60 13.50 46 69.00 69.00 67.50 150.00 1.50 . 37 55.50 16.00 54.00 55.50 1.50 66 99.00 93.00 ........ 99.00 230.00 6.00 9671$ 1,450.501$ 10.501$ 2.101$ 1,458.901$ 81.00 $1,383.301$ • 5.401$ 2,778.001$ 10.001$ 1.00

S 41

' I'

~j~

CII"'CII

~~~

..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

"'~' 5Coll

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... .... ..... ..... .....

rn

Cli

°

°

.......

....... .......

.......

....... ....... ....... ....... .......

'tl

'"

....... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... ....... ....... ...... ....... ..... ....... ......

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-DONALD H. SOSEY, D. D. G. M., Palmyra, Mo.

Wyaconda, 24 •.•.•. Monticello, 58 ...•.. LaBelle, 222 •.•...•. Craft, 287 . Williamstown, 370 .• Lewistown, 494 ••••. Ewing, 577 . Palmyra, 18 •••••••. St. John's, 28 ••••••. Hannibal, 188 ...... Philadelphia, 502 .•. Ralls, 33 . Lick Creek, 302 ••••• New London, 807 ••• TOTAL •••••••• • Credit $5.40.

... 10 .. . . .. ... ... .... .. . . .. ... .... .. . . .. .... .. ., .. .. .. .... .. ., . . ... ... ... . .... ... ... - .. ... ... ... ..... 8 3 2 1 1 3 .. ... 18 2 5 .... ... .. 6 2 2 ... 3 3 8 .. '" 1 1 1 .. 7 5 4 1 .,. 1 .,. , 3

4 5

4 2

4 3 2 1 3 ...

... ... .. , . , 3 3 3 .. ... . , . ... ..

... ...

,.,

1 ...

2 4 •.. 1 ... 2

114.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 76.50 175.50 183.00 78.00 6.30

114.00 $ 76.50 175.50 183.00 84.30

1.50 $ ....... 3.00 6.00 8.00

112.50 $ ...... $ 76.50 172.50 177.00 81.30

None $ ...... $ ..... 145.35 540.00 870.00 None

41 61.50 49.50 61.50 12.00 40.00 , 130 195.00 195.00 168.00 960.00 27.00 2 1 58 .. ., 448 672.00 4.20 676.20 644.70 420.00 81.50 4 11 18 .. 1 368 552.00 2.10 549.90 507.90 798.00 42.00 1 •.. 37 8 •• , 55.50 127.00 55.50 55.50 11 '" 110 165.00 1 .... 148.50 336.00 165.00 16.50 S 2 104 3 15 .. 156.00 151.50 156.00 4.50 200.00 , 79 118.50 2 .... 90.00 28.50 815.00 118.50 981 15 1 2 31 1061 .. 1.. 1 1 1,7351$ 2,602.501$ 10.501$ 2.101$ 2,610.901$ 147.00 $ 2,190.901$ 273.001$ 4,751.351$

..

21 28

.. . . ....

, 1 1 .,. 281 221 191 71 111

76 $ 51 117 122 52

...

.. . .. .... .. .. .. ... ..

.........

10.00

1.00

10.001$

1.00


SIXTEENTH DISTRIOT-WARREN H. :MAY, D. D. G. M., Louisiana, Mo. Eolia, 14 .••.••••••. Clarksville, 17 •.•••• Perseverance, 92 .•• Phoenix, 186 .•••••• Frankford, 192 ..... Pike, 899 ••.••.••.• TOTAL .•••••••

... .. , ... .. .,. .,. ... ... .. .,.

2 2 2 .. 3 1 1 1 ... 1 1 .. , 1 ••.

... .,. .. , .. ... 41

31

21 21

41

.... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

7 2 1 14 4 7 20 .. 18 1 2 6 .. .. 2 1 1 4 .. 4 ... .. 1 .... " 401 81 121 301 .. 1.. 1..

60 $ 88 196 119 49 20 621 1$

76.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 132.00 292.60 6.30 178.60 4.20 78.60 80.00 781.601$ 10.601$ •.•. 1$

...... ....... .....

..... ..... ..... ..... .....

76.00 $ ...... $ 132.00 10.60 298.80 21.00 182.70 19.60 73.60 3.00 80.00 6.00 792.001$ 60.00 $

34.60 $ 40.60 $ 121.60 200.00 77.80 163.20 70.60 24.00 ...... 613.701$ 118.301$

....... ....... ....... .

None $ ...... $ ..... 326.00 260.00 193.00 26.00 None 794.001$ ...... 1$ .....

....... ........ ...... ........ ...... ...... ....... ..... ....... ......

SEVENTEENTH DISTRIOT-oHARLES S. mOltS, D. D. G. M., Monroe Oity, Mo. 13 3 4 2...... Paris Union, 19 •••.. ... ... .. , ... ,. Florida, 28 ...••••.. Middle Grove, 42 .••. 2 2 .. 1 4 1 2 6 . Monroe, 64 •••••.•• Madison, 91........ ... .•. .•. .. .... ••. .•. .... .. .. .. Santa Fe, 462. • . . • . . 2 2 .. , ., 9 ••• 1. . •. " .. .. HollidaY', 660....... ... ... . •. 1.. .... ... .•. .... .. •. .. TOTAL........ 31 41 21 .. 1 11 261 41 71 81 .. 1··1 ..

...

I-l

~

..

.. ..

96 $

144.00 $ ••.•. $ .... $

144.00 $

78

117.00

117.00

61.60 46.00 367.601$ ..... 1$ ... ·1$

61.60 46.00 367.601$

41/ 30 2461$

19.60 $ 6.00 13.60 39.00 $

124.60 $ ....•. 1$

126.60 $ ....•. $ .....

111.00

402.00

48.00 46.00 328.601$

144.60 None 673.001$ ...... 1$ ....•

1$

EIGHTEENTH DISTRIOT-WILLIAM F. WIGGINTON, D. D. G. M., Moberly, Mo. Huntsville, 30 .•.••.. , .....•. 1. . 6 7. . . 3 17..... . Milton, 161........ .•..•..•.............•............ Clifton Hill, 161 ....•. , .•.••.... ,. .... ... •.. .... .• .. .. MoberlY', 844....... 8 4 4 2 3 18 3 6 69...... Cairo, 486.......... 1 1 1... . . 1 2 1 " .. .. Higbee, 627........ .• 9 .•. .•. " 1.. Jacksonville, 641... 2 2 .. . 1 8 " Clark, 610......... 1 3 1.......... TOTAL. .. ••••. 41 61 61 21 111 361 61 121 941 .. 1 11..

'1' ., .. ...

169 $ 26

238.60 $ 10.60 $ •••• $ 39.00

249.00 $ 10.60 $ 238.60 $ .••... $ 826.00 $ ..•... $ ••.•• 39.00 89.00 64.00 • . . . . •. . .•...... 492 738.00 6.30 744.30 19.60 724.80 1,600.00 71 106.60 106.60 1.60 106.00 187.06 626.00 124 186.00 186.00 13.60 172.60 62 78.00 4.20 82.20 8.00 79.20 108.00 64 96.00 2.10 98.10 4.60 66.00 :101.60 88.60 9881$ 1,482.001$ 23.101$ .... 1$ 1,606.101$ 62.60 $ 1,414.001$ 38.601$ 3,000.661 ....... 1 . . . . . .


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued NINETEENTH DISTRICT-T. H. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Salisbury, Mo. ~

ci d p..;' ~

~

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

~

·s

'tl 'tl

'tl

$

~

:s

'tl ~

Ul

gj

~

'tl

$

i

is

~ <

ij

::s

'Qi l:l::

Q

IJl

.~

~

Q

Q

'" ~

z

~

cio ~

cio ~

'tl 'tl

~ ~ Qi tJ l:l. ~ >< QI

....

00

~

9 ..

.,

00

I:l::

.. ... .... ... .., .... .. . , ..

1 Eureka. 73 . 10 9 8 .. .. Warren. 74 .....•.• . ,. ' " Triplett. 122 .....•. ." 1... 1 1 1. .... Westville. 202 . 2 2. .• 2... .... Salisbury. 208 . 1 ~ Rothville. 426 ..•.•• Pee Dee, 498 ••••.... ... ... Cunningham, 525 ... 1 Mendon. 628 .•.•... 3 3 3 TOTAL ........ 171 161 141 3 1 11

...

1

~

I:l::

.!!! IJlr:: .rB ~

2

4 5 9

1

'"

1 2. . .

.. 3 . 16..... . ..

1... 7 ... 2 1 1 271 41 51

1 5

.. .. ..

341 .. 1.. 1 . .

. , ~~~I$ .•.1~~~~~ $. : : : : : 1$. : : :: $ ...1~~~~~ $... ~:~~ ~ . , .1~~:~~ $ . : : : ::: $ .. ~~.5~~~ $. : :: ::: $. : : : : : 65 97.50 97.50 6.00 91.50 141.00 47 70.50 70.50 7.50 63.00 33.00 183 274.50 274.50 13.50 261.00 818.00 42 63.00 63.001....... 63.00 None 19 28.50. . ... . 28.50 1.50 27.00 None 55 82.501 ...•.. 82.60 10.50 72.00 10.00 45 67.50...... 67.50 ....... 67.50 None 5641$ 846.001$· 1$ 1$ 846.001$ 42.00 $ 804.001$· 1$ 1.237.001$ 1$ ., .

TWENTIETH DISTRICT-OTTO HALE, D. D. G. M., Carrollton, Mo. De Witt, 39 .•••••.. Wakanda. 52 ••..... Bogard. 101. ....... Hale City. 216 ..••.. Carroll, 249 .•••.••. Bosworth, 697 ....•. Hardin, 322 .•...... TOTAL ........

9 61 5 .. 3 6 7 7 3 1 1 1 1 .. 1 1 1 1 '" 4 4 4 .. '" 1 1 1 1 ... 2 ... • .. 1.. 24 1 20/ 191 51 41

.,.

1 2 ... 11 1 2 3 1 2 6 1 ... 1 4 1 . ,. 2 , 4 '" 271 41 111

..

.,

2 .. 4 .. .. 1 8 .. . , 3 .. 1 .. 1 .. 2 .. 11 .. ., 311· .1 11 1

..

.. .. ..

88.80 $ 82.50 $ 6.30 $ .... $ 551$ 298 455.40 447.00 8.40 108 162.00 162.00 58 ..... 87.00 87.00 77 115.50 115.50 '66 101.10 99.00 2.10 92 138.00 138.00 ..... 7541$ 1.131.001$ 16.801$ .... 1$ 1.147.801$

.....

...... ..... ...... ...... ..... ..... ......

85.80 $ ...... $ 438.90 ....... 157.50 ....... 78.00 ....... 116.60 ....... 99.60 1.50 138.00 34.50 $ 1.113.301$ '" ···1$

3.00 $ 16.50 4.50 9.00

....... .......

....... .......

52.80 $ ...... $ ..... None ....... 2.00 ........ 42.50 ...... 86.00 ...... 25.00 96.00 ...... ...... 303.301$ ...... 1$ .....

. ..... ...... ...... . . ...... ........ . ..... .


TWENTY-FmST DISTRICT-J. P. TtTCKER, D. D. G. M., Parkville, Mo. 3 1 .• Rising Sun, 13 •••••• 6 .. Weston. 63 ••••••••. 8 Compass, 120 .•••••. 4 2 •. Camden Point, 169 •• 8 8 1 Rowley, 204 ........ 2···1· .. 1 Fidelity, 889 •• , ••••. 1· .. 1··· .. Adelphi, 855 ........ Platte City. 604 ••••• 2 :1" TOTAL ........ 281 26 1 181 21

fl

.'21" 21:

1 4 1

2 81

.... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

1 1 6 ....• , 6 2 2 4 .• 2 1 •.. 17 .. .. 8 ... 1 .. .. .. 8 1 2 1 •.. 2 14 •• 1 ••. 1 .... 4 •.. ... 12 .. .. 201 51 131 481 .. 1.. 1··

....

96 $ 114 78 52 74 50 47 83 1 5941$

144.001$ ••••• $ .... $ 171.00 2.10 117.00 ...... 78.00 8.40 111.00 2.10 75.00 . 70.60 124.50 4.20 891.001$ 16.801$ •••• 1$

..... .....

..... ..... ...... ..... .....

144.00 $ 173.10 117.00 86.40 118.10 75.00 70.60 128.70 907.801$

1.60 $ 7.60 3.00 4.60 4.50 1.50 1.60 6.00 80.00 $

142.60 $ •••••• $ 260.00 $ •••••• $ ..... 165.60 160.00 10.00 1.00 114.00 323.50 None 81.90 108.60 306.00 73.50 228.00 10.00 69.00 270.00 . 122.70 112.33 877.801$ . ...•. 1$ 1.688.831$ 20.001$ 1.00

....... ....... ....... ........ ...... ....... .......

....... ...... ....... ....... .....

....... ...... ....... ...... ....... .....

TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT-DARItTS A. BROWN, D. D. G. M., Kansas City, Mo. Heroine, 104 •.••••. Albert Pike. 219 ••••. Kansas City, 220 •••• Temple, 299 .••••••• Cecile-Daylight, 306. Rural. 816 .•••••••• Westport, 840 ...... Ivanhoe, 446 ••••••• Gate City, 622 •••••• Orient, 546 ......... South Gate, 647 ••••• York, 563 .......... Swope Park, 617 .••. Sheffield, 626 ....... East Gate, 630 •••••• Northeast, 648 •••••. Country Club, 656 .•• Rockhill, 663 ••••••• Alpha, 669 .... TOTAL ........

....

1~1

6 23 3 16 37 ••.. 2 '6 2 ... 1' 36 3 5 64 .. 6 1 9 .. 2 146 7 12 29 .. 9 7 8 6 16 148 13 81 82 .. 2 3 2 8 1 23 2 4 2 .. 7 6 7 .• 1 .. 4 48 6 15 4 4 4 3 14 34 12 14 144 .• 1 .• 29 21 1427 32 172 88 38 227 .. 1 .. 10 9 6 3 22 198 6 23 40 .. .. 11 15 812 ·2 273 10 2 8 .• 8 3 3 2 11 82 1 21 27 .. 5 5 6 4 18 24 6 13 26 .. 8 4 3 8 13 31 4 3 47 ••.• 1 13 5 8 2 89 66 4 6 16 .. 51 43 39 7 57 63 10 7 80 .. .. 5 6 6 .• 8 66 4 3 58 •. .. 1 1 ... 4 2 21 6 2 20 .. 16 11 8 2 7 4 1 3 12 •• 1 1 1 2 ... 9 6 3 28 .. 20311691140182125611415114112201 9821 .. 1 21 3 9 8 ..

.. .. .... .... .... .. ..

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

...... ....... ........ ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ........ ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

978 $ 1,459.60 $ 12.60 $ .... $ 1,472.10 $ 34.50 $ 1,437.60 $ $ 8.359.00 $ ...... $ ..... 380 670.00 12.60 682.60 64.00 528.60 498.00 921 1,381.60 1,260.00 1,168.20 4.20 80.00 3.00 1.386.70 217.60 1,520 2,280.00 28.10 2.10 2,301.00 260.40 2,040.60 2.333.90 1.00 120 180.00 2.10 182.10 147.60 301.00 84.60 598 889.50 8.40 897.90 819.60 2,366.60 50.00 5.00 78.30 969 1,463.50 118.40 1,666.90 1,516.90 1,200.00 20.00 2.00 61.00 3,188 4,782.00 67.20 4,849.20 258.00 3,391.20 1,200.00 7,307.20 80.00 3.00 1,390 2,086.00 46.20 2,131.20 307.20 1,824.00 791.00 944 1,416.00 None 4.20 1,420.20 i 09•6O 1,010.70 10.00 ..... 820 1,230.00 23.10 1,263.10 1,205.10 1,298.00 48.00 780.00 27.80 520 807.30 771.80 260.00 36.00 316 472.60 27.30 499.80 629.50 10.00 46.50 463.30 490 736.00 52.60 787.60 688.60 400.00 99.00 1,077 1,616.60 119.70 1,736.20 1,000.00 94.60 640.70 1,669.00 407 16.80 627.80 629.80 240.00 97.50 249 378.50 4.20 877.70 346.20 892.00 31.60 · , · ·. .1 178.60 14.70 198.20 187.20 188.00 6.00 119\ 115 172.60 ...... 996.60 181.10 172.60 41.40 16,110)$22,665.001$679.601$ 2.101$28,242.501$2205.30 $19,196.601$1,840.70)$25,408.701$ 160.001$ 14.00

.....

.....

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... ....

..... ..... ...... .... .....

..... .....

....... ...... ........ ...... ......

....... ...... ...... ........ ...... . . ..... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ...... ......... ...... ...... ...... . .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT-e. B. WADDELL, D. D. G. M., Lexington, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Lexington, 149 ••••• 11 11 8 .. '8 6 8 2 .. 9.00 $ 235.80 $ ...... $ 992.00 $ ....•• $ ...•• 1591$ 238.50 $ 6.30 $ .... $ 244.80 $ 510.00 Higginsville, 864 ... 161.10 1 1 1 .. 1 3 2 6 15 165.60 4.50 . . 163.50 2.10 Lafayette, 437 .••••. 365.00 87.00 4.50 3... . .. 91.50 91.50 Concordia, 464 ••••. 815.00 184.50 10.50 195.00 3 8 1.. 7 3 3 .. 195.00 Mount Hope, 476 .••. 180 887.00 10.50 321.90 332.40 4 7 3 5 8 .. 324.00 8.40 .... Richmond, 57 •••.•• ........... 216 125.00 4.50 42.00 46.50 46.50 3... ... 6 .. 31 c;:: Ray, 228 . King Hiram, 309 ..•. Bee Hive, 893 ••.••.. ... 4 2 1 1.......... 71 106.50 8.40 114.90 8.00 111.90 None Ada, 444 •••••..••. ... •• ••• .••• 1 1 14..... . 71 106.50 106.50 106.50 285.00 Waverly, 61. •..•... 1 2 1 1.......... 1 8 .. .... 601 90.00 90.00 90.00 60.00 ..~.bl$~1~~~8~~~20~1~$~46~~~0:~$~~~17=9~~=0~1$~16~1~.1~ohl$~8~~=8=9~~~01~$-.••-.• •~1$~ ••-.~·· TOTAL ........ 161 171 III 11 121 311 181 191 461 .. I.. I.. I-~90~8~1$~1~~~6~2~~~01~$~2~L~2~01~$~.~

. ~::I

Arrow Rock, 55 ••••. Cambridge, 63 •..••. Miami, 85 •••••••••• Trilumina, 205 ..... Barbee, 217 .••••••• Malta, 402 ••••.••• Oriental, 518 ....... Nelson, 560 ••••.••• TOTAL ........

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-JOHN W. ADAMS, D. D. G. M., Marshall, Mo. 9.00 $ 28.50 $ ...... 37.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 37.50 $ ... 64 ...1 5 7 •• .,., .... 20725 $ 310.50 ...... ..... 310.50 6.00 304.50 ....... 2 •• ...

. , . ... ... .. 1 1 1 1 2 1

2 1 1 1 2 1

71

81

1 •• 1 1 .•. 1 1 .••

... .. .. , ... .,. ... ... 1 '"... 51 31 ..

·1

6 •. , 10 2 4 ... 4 4 381

. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ..

, 2 .... 4 17 .. 4 1 •• 1 .... 2 2 •• 1 1 1 .... . . , 41 191 271· .1 .. 1 1

...

...... ...... ........ ..... ..... ......

...... ....

103.50 103.50 69 282 348.00 348.00 213.00 213.00 142 74 111.00 111.00 81.00 54 81.00 45 67.50 67.50 8481$ 1,272.001$ ..... 1$ .... 1$ 1.272.001$

..... ..... ..... .....

9.00 15.00 6.00

.......

6.00 6.00 57.00

311.50 $ ...... $ ..... 412.50 94.50 ...... 227.50 ...... ...... 333.00 540.00 207.00 ....... 800.00 ...... 1.00 111.00 ...... 235.10 10.00 1.00 75.00 ...... 121.50 61.50 ....... 95.00 $ 1,215.001$ ·· .... 1$ 2,248.101$ 10.001$ 2.00

. ....... .

.

$

....... ...... . ...... ....... . ....... . ..... ....... ......


.. ~ll .. ~II:::

TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-S. L. JEWETT, D. D. G. :Mo, Boonville, Mo.

~

~ ~

~

~~~I$ ~.7.1:~~

~.7.1:~~

1~:~~ ~ 2.5.9:~~1$.:

1.8.0:~~

Cooper, 36 •••••..•. I. ::: ... .. .. : ... : :: :: . .. .. $.::::: $.:::: $ .. $... ... :: :: : $ ... $.: ::::: $. ::::: Pleasant Grove, 142. Wm. D. Muir, 277 ... 3 3 3 2 2 5 ... ... 4 " .. " 73 109.50 4.20 113.70 7.50 106.201 None Wallace, 456 .••.••. · " .,. ... .. •.. 6 1 1 11..... . 56 84.00 84.00 9.00 75.00 410.00 Prairie Home, 503 ... 2 ••• 1 2 .. " .. 43 64.50 4.20 68.70 3.00 61.50 4.20 146.75 3 311.. 2 5 .. . 1 9.. 1.. 91 136.50 2.10 6.30 132.30 7.50 129.00 • 4.20 90.00 Howard,4 •.•••••••. ... ... ..... 1 1 1 1 8... 4 1. •• .... .. " .. 135 202.50 202.50 6.00 196.50 882.90 10.00 1.00 FaYette, 47 •..•••••. Livingston, 51 ...... 1 1 2..... 9 1... 3 " 58 87.00 87.00 13.50 78.50 48.001 ....... Armstrong, 70 •..••. · " ., .1... .. 1 2 •• , " .. 50 75.00 2.10 77.10 3.00 72.00 2.10 None ••..••• TOTAL ....•••. 10/ 10/ 7/10j 6/ 41/ 8/ 10/ 361 .. / 11 1 687/$ 1,030.501$ 12.601$ 6.301$ 1,036.801$ 61.50 $ 973.201$ 6.301$ 1,757.651$ 10.001$ 1.00

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-ELI. J. HAYNES, D. D. G. M., Columbia, Mo.

·.'1

Centralia, 59.... •. 11 11" 61 7.. • 5 6 .. .• .. Rocheport, 67 •.••.. · ... ,. 1... . . 4 •.. .•. . ..... " .. Twilight, 114 ••••••• 10 8 12 3 8 4 1 5. '" .. " .. Ashland, 156 •••••.• Sturgeon, 174 .. "i "il"2:: ::: '''9''i "i7:: :::: Hallsville, 886 .. ... ... ... .. .. , 8 1 1.......... Ancient Landmark, 856 ........ 1 .. " .. " .. 1 1 1 .,. ••. .... .. " .. 3 3 3. . Hinton, 455 .••••••• 7 7 7 6 18 7 6. . . 31..... • Acacia, 602 •••.•..• TOTAL ........ 221 211 271 91 28/ 45/ 101 151 541 .. 1.. 1..

"8

I-l

=:::

Ill..... loll

89 $ 37 191

133.50\$ 12.60 $ .••. $ 55.50. • • • •• •.... 286.50 16.80.. ...

146.10 $ 55.50 303.30

121 35

181.50 52.50

181.50 52.50

47 70.50 21 31.50 347 520.50 8881$ 1,332.001$

10.50 $ 6.00 6.00

135. 60 1$ .•.•.. $ 49.50. . . . . . . 297.80

"ia:50 ....168:00 4.50

6.80 76.80 2.25 38.75 27.30 547.80 65.251$ .... 1$ 1,397.251$

14.00 $ ..•••. $ •..•• 75.00 202.20 259.00 16.50

48.00

15.00 61.80 1.50 32.25 10.50 537.30 67.50 $ 1,329.751$ ...... 1$

10.50 10.00 None 587.201$

10.00

1.00

10.001$

1.00

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-LOUIS J. GRAUE, D. D. G. M., Mexico, Mo. Central, 81 ......... Laddonia, 115 •••••• Social, 266 ......... Hebron, 354 .••.•••• Vandalia, 491 ...... Houston, 580 ••••••. Fulton, 48 •.•••.•••. New Bloomfield, 60 .. Portland, 242 •••••• Tebbetts, 565 ••••••. Shamrock, 585 ••••• Mokane, 612 ..•••.. TOTAL ........ • Credit $4.20.

...

"r' 2 9

.....

2 9 6 •.. 1 '"

3 8 12 5 8 8 2 8

.. ..

..

49.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 49.50 $ ...... $ 49.50 $ ...... $ 107.40 $ ...... $ ..... 33 $ 55.00 4.50 61.50 44 66.00 66.00 475.00 4.50 52 78.00 73.50 78.00 915.00 3.00 .. 30.00 298 447.00 18.00 447.00 429.00 244.00 7.50 .. 101 151.50 144.00 151.50 30.00 4.50 25 •. " 87.50 38.00 87.501 ...... 250.00 12.00 239 .. 366.30 354.80 358.50 7.80 244.00 8.00 135.00 138.00 .. 92 138.00 " 87.50 4.50 43.80 39.30 32 48.00 4.20 42.00 44 66.00 66.00 66.00 29.00 39.00 26 39.00 39.00 1.00 142.00 4.50 10.00 89 133.50 133.50 129.00 2 .. " 3 341 .. 1.. 1 3 1, 075 1$ 1,612.501$ 7.801$ 4.201$ 1,616.10/$ 63.00 $1,553.101$ ..••• ·1$ 2,620.901$ 40.001$ 4.00

1 .... 1 2 1 ... 4 7 16 ... 1 1 1 ••. 1 4 2 13 ... 1 .... ... 2 ....

"

" " "

....

.. . ... .. .. ... ... ... .. ... .. 8 7 782 1 .. .. 8 1 1 .• ... .. .. .. .. 3 2 ... , .. 1 .... ... . ... .. .. .. ... ... 2 .. 5 4 4 .• ... 8 ... 11

'"

.,

301 251 231391

21

421 10/ 181

...... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ....... .... .... ....... . .... ..... ...... ...... ...... .... ...... .....

.......

....... ....... ....... ....... ........ ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

....... ......

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... ...... ........ ...... ......

....... ....... ....... ........ ......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-P. A. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo. 'tS

~

CIl

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Griswold, 178 ...... Wellsville, 194 ...... Montgomery, 246 ••. Florence, 261 Jonesburg, 457 ••••. Daggett, 492 ••...•. TOTAL ........

.~

'tS 'tS

'tS

~

'0

:5

gj

~

lIJ

61

-<

I:l::

~

~I

~

CIl al .~ .s~ ~ .is = is 'iii ~

CIl

2 2 4

. ~I . ~

1 2 4 3 2

.. 1 1 1 1

~

I:l::

...

.•• ... •.. •.•

... .. ...

151 131 121 41 .. ·1

1 .~

~

4 •.. 8 ... 3 ••• 6 '" 11 3 21 1 331 41

~

z

lIJ

~ CIl

~

$i

{,,)

.!!I

~

::i] 'tS.2l $iQ) ~ ~

~

ooril ~ 3 .. .. 14 .. 4 6 .. 1 .. .. .. 1 2 .. 1 .... 61 251 .. 1.. 1.. ~

... ...

...

00

.... .. . ... .. ..

~

i

CIl

~

60 $ 164 104 63 67 73 52 1 1$

'g~ ClSGI

;..~'"'

~"g~

~~>-

~

J.<~ o~

di r; J.< 111 ~~

1::::l

11l~

-<

ig~

:g~

~tt~

J.<'O

11l~11l

l:l, .... CIl CIl

>C)

0 -< 90.00 $ ..... $ .... $ .... 231.00 166.00 . ...... 94.50 100.50 109.60 . ..... 781.501$ ..... 1$ .... 1$

...... . ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... .....

'tS

0

8

!l~

-~

~8

~

~

:s~

!~

~~

90.00 $ 231.00 166.00 94.60 100.60 109.50 781.501$

6.00 $ 12.00 4.60 7.50 16.60 3.00 49.50 $

~

'tS .;

• Credit $21.00.

.. ... 1 .. ... ... ... .. 1 1 2 2

1 1 11 81

1 2 2

1 1 11 81

1 2 2

"

1 1 2 ... 1 1 81 21 31

..

9 •. .. .. .... .. ... 1 .. 1 .. 8 1 .... . . .. .. 1 ... .... " . . .. . . .. 3 2 1 9 .. . . .. 5 ..•

7 .•. 2 ...

261 .. ·1

...

5j

181 .. 1 11 ..

1151$ 38 67 85 44 61 75 4761$

172.60 $ ..... $ .... $ 57.00 ..... 100.50 ..... 127.50 .. ..... 66.00 ..... 76.50 .50 112.50 ....... 712.501$ ....• 1$ . 60 1$

. ..... ...... ..... ...... ....... .....

172.50 $ 57.00 100.50 127.50 66.00 76.00 112.50 712.001$

10.60 $ 3.00

.......

12.00 1.60 4.60 7.50 39.00 $

.S

~!l..s

C) ~

::l 0

~~S

CIS

8

Lij

-<

0

l:l:l

§:§

~S § J.< ~~

~

:g:ij1:: CIS M

'0

~

~

iGl~

160.00 $ 478.80 . 252.00 87.00 ...... 200.00 84.00 130.00 106.50 ...... 275.00 753.001$· 21.001$ 1,495.80j$

84.001$ ...... $ 240.00 • 21.00

'·'··°1

...... . ....... .

162.00 $ 54.00 100.50 115.60 63.00 71.50 .. 106.00 671.501$

. . ·r

.......

5 ....': ......°1 1.501$

~'tS

.~ ~'tS

'tSo'O

GI

1:1

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-W. P. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Troy, Mo. Troy, 34 ........... Silex, 75 .•••••..... New Hope, 199 .•... New Salem, 270 ..•.. Louisville, 409 •..••. Nineveh. 473 ....... Moscow. 558 ••...•. TOTAL ........

~.S !l ~ ~

CIl

::l ~

~

~

....

S

~..c: gj GI .;~~

8 •

10.00 $ 20.00 10.00

1.00 2.00 1.00

40.001$

4.00

....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ......

103.00 $ 10.00 $ 1.00 118.00 63.00 . . 320.00 26.00 ....... . ..... 48.00 152.34 ....... ..... 829.341$ 10.001$ 1.00

....... ...... ....... .......

...... ...... ..... . ..... .


Wentzville, 46 •••••. Palestine, 241 •.•••• Mechanicsville, 260 •. Pauldingville, 11. ... Warrenton, 609 .... TOTAL ........

... ... ... 1

1

THIRTIETH

... ... ... ... I .. 11

21

DISTRI~T-WILLIAME.

.. .. . .. . .. ..

1 •. , 2 1 " ., 2 ... 5 1 3 1 .. .. , 1 1 1 •••. 1 1 .. 2 •. , 1 2 .. , 1 1 .... 1 ••• .. ., 21 81 1/ 91 31 71 41 .. 1.. 1..

... ...

....

27 $ 171 78 58 67 4011$

LANGE, D. D. G. M., Wright City, Mo.

40.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 256.50 117.00 . 87.00 100.50 601.501$ .•••• 1$ .... 1$

...... ..... ...... ......

..... ..... ..... .....

40.50 $ 256.50 117.00 87.00 100.50 601.501$

1.50 $ 7.50 1.50 3.00

.......

13.50 $

63.00 $ ...... $ ..... 39.00 $ ...... $ 1,150.00 249.00 90.00 115.50 52.50 84.00 150.00 100.50 . 588.001$ ..••. ·1$ 1,505.501$ ••..• ·1$ ...•

....... ........ ...... ......

....... ....... ....... .......

...... ...... ......

......

THIRTY-FmST DISTRICT-ALBERT LINXWILER, D. D. G. M., Jefferson City, Mo. Jefferson, 43 ....... Russellville, 90 ..... Hickory Hill, 211 ••.. Centertown, 611. ••• Tipton, 56 ......... California, 183 .•••• Moniteau, 295 ...... Clarksburg, 558 •••• Chamois, 185 ••••••. Linn, 826 ••..••.••• TOTAL ........

1~:~~1$·::::

686.10 $ 3 8 2 20 1 6 15 •. 1.. 8 447 $ 670.50 $ 103.50 108.50 $•• 1 1 2 1 ... 2 69 1 .... 52.50 54.60 ... 2 .. ., 35 2.10 ••••• 3 •. 81.00 1 1 1 9 .. . , 81.00 54 , ... ,. .. 56 84.00 84.00 3 ••. . , .. 177 265.50 . 3 •. , 2 265.50 4 3 3 1 112.50 ...... , 2 .... 112.50 ... 8 ... 75 64.50 ...... 1 64.50 2 48 9 •• ., ., 187.50 1 ... ... 187.50 1 2 .... 125 154 281.00 ...... .... 281.00 ... ... ... 2 1 1 .... .. , 121 101 131 51 31 841 41 161 361· .1 .. 1 8 1,2351$ 1,852.501$ 17.701$ .... 1$ 1,870.201$ 3 1 3

8 1 3

... ... ... .. ... . . . .. ... ... .. ... .. ... ... ... ... .. .... .. ... . . ...

.. .. .. .. . ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . ..

... ...

...... ..... . ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... .

30.00 $ 3.00

656.10 $ ...... $ 1,680.00 $ ...... $ ..... 100.50 ....... 144.00 .. 54.60 . ...... None 221.60 1.50 79.50 4.50 79.50 220.50 ...... 8.00 100.00 162.50 1,270:90 10.00 1.00 4.50 108.00 284.00 64.50 ...... 181.25 187.50 106.10 102.50 125.50 .. 3.00 468.00 49.50 $1,532.70 I$ 288.001$ 4,526.351$ 10.001$ 1.00

.......

....... .......

....... . ...... ....... ........ .......

....... ........ ...... .

....... ..... ...... ..... ....... ...... ...... ......... ...... ...... .....

THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT-R. A. BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo.

..

1 .• , Evergreen, 27 •••••. 1 2 .. 1 1 •••• 74 $ 111.00 $ .53 $ .... $ 111.53 $ 1 .... 2 .. 264.00 3 ..• 1 .. .... 264.00 Sullivan, 69 .•••••• 8 176 I, 1 2 Gray Summit, 173 .•. .. 74 111.00 111.00 5 5 2 2 .. ., 218.00 Hope, 251 ••.••••••• 4 .. 4 1 4 7 142 .... 213.00 5 •• ., 114.00 Fraternal, 868 •••••• 4 3 2 •. 1 1 1 ••• 116.10 76 2.10 ., Columbia, 584 •.•••. 2 2 2 2 3 1 102 153.00 158.00 ., 114.00 1 2 116.10 Easter, 575 •••••••. , 1 76 2.10 8 •• 1 .'•• 2 ••• 1 ••. 1 •.. .... . 88 182.00 .... Union, 593 .•••••••• 132.00 , 171.00 2 1 ••. 4 .••• Hermann, 128 •••••• 114 179.40 8.40 ,. 60.00 Red Bird, 584 ...... I 8 •• , 40 60.00 Owensville, 624 .•.•. 6 4 4 1 ... 2 115 172.50 ...... 2 4 •• . , 172.50 TOTAL ........ 33 23 21 1 4 I 7 15 4 16 18 I•• I 1 I.. 1,077 $ 1,615.50 $ 13.13 $ .... 1$ 1628.68 $ ,

... ...

;1

...

..

.. ... ... ... .. . ....

..

...

...

.. .. .. .. .. ... . .. . .. ..

..

...

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

. . .... ....... .... ...... ..... ..... .....

....... ...... .......

110.03 $ ...... $ 20.00 $ ...... $ ..... 55.00 259.50 ...... None 109.50 10.00 1.00 207.00 54.00 10.00 1.00 114.60 96.00 150.00 .. None 114.60 65.00 132.00 805.00 179.40 190.00 60.00 92.00 8.00 169.50 . 440.00 22.50 $1,606.18 $ ...... $ 1,317.00 $ 20.00 $ 2.00 1.50 $ 4.50 1.50 6.00 1.50 8.00 1.50

........ ...... .......

....... . ........ ....... ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ......

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

...... ....... ..... ....... .....

......


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THmTY-THIRD DISTRIOT (A)-A. J. MIOHENER, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. "C

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

"C GI

.i~

"C

"C

"C

m

.!l

QI

QI

~ ~ ...:

]

.s

~ 'S

t! 'S QI

~

!l

l::i d

J

.~

m

~

al

.:5

~

~

Z

::J~ ~ ci."i ~

ci.

'''C "C

~ ~

~ ~ ~ rIJ rlJrz'l ~ ~ ~ 5 .• Missouri, 1 •••.•••• ' 3 3 4 1 13 118 8 18 6 5 4 8 9 67 6 25 31 .. Beacon, 8 .......... 5 5 2 8 ••• 100 9 24 22 1 .... Mount Moriah, 40 ••• Pomegranate, 95 ••• 15 12 11 4 4 18 6 5 10 1 .• 2 2 .• , 1 63 6 21 6 6 6 .. Erwin, 121. •••••••. l-' Occidental, 163 •...• 1 1 1 .• 14 ••• ,12 21 .. 00 o Pyramid, 180 •••••.. 8 6 6 1 12 11 2 3 10 .. 4 5 5 1 .•. 85 2 9 34 .. 1 .• KeyStone, 243 •••.•• 8 4 2 .. 1 15 5 6 32 .. 1.1. Aurora, 267 •••••••• 4 .. , ,. 8 8 9 .. 4 5 ••• 5 Paul Revere, 330 .•.. 8 6 6 5 13 74 14 28 40 .. 1 1 Tuscan, 860 •••••••• 7 .. 6 6 6 .. 39 1 9 Itaska, 420 ......... 5 .... 2 1 2 2 Euclid, 505 •••••••.. 7 5 3 .. Clifton Heights, 520. 7 4 7 25 .. 8 8 7 .. 7 23 7 12 58 .. 8 8 8 .. Rose Hill, 550 •••.••. 4 .. 2 1 1 •• 1 3 1 5 Olive Branch, 576 ••. 4 .... 1 4 4 1 1 2 3 .. Triangle, 638 ...... 6 Trinity, 641 .•••••.• 8 29 2 1 15 .. 13 3 3 Shaveh, 646 .•. "••.•. 19 1 Commonwealth, 654. 4 4 34 1 ... 7 .. 7 ••• 5 4 4 Theo. Roosevelt, 661. 6 4 1 33 6 10 18 .... 2 Magnolia, 626 •••••• 15 2 2 .... Purity, 658 •••••••• " 4 2 2 4 ... TOTAL ....•.•. 116103 9326 I I 84 700 83200 8621 21 2 8

.e

gj Il<

al

::s

QI

1.1.

.

...

.. ..

...

.... .. ..

...

... ... ... ..

"1'"

~I' '5

alGI

""tlO"" Cl"Cal OQl

....

...

.. .. ......

...

.. .. -

......

QI

~~~

1,692 2,538.00 537 805.50 591 886.50 255 382.50 334 501.00 656 984.00 862 543.00 200 800.00 1,016 1,524.00 678.00 452 538.50 859 548 822.00 571 856.50 501 751.50 261 391.50 460.50 807 281 421.50 136 204.00 140 210.00 981/ 1,396.50 193 289.50 12,5691$18,853.50

~~

Il<~

~~rl ~~ ... algal

tit::: ...:

;E ~ ~ .... , 681 $ 1,021.50 $ .. .. 1,565 2,347.50

... ....

...

rl

~

]~

• rl

""tlO 0=

~

",,"C QIQI

>

Col

....

= ::s ° S

...:

';~

C)~

"C .;

GI

!l2

Il<

~

~S

::s

"C

=~

m

Ql

fi~

....I::

°S

::s

GI Col

=

~

tlO tlO.S !l .S ~ tlO

]0'8 .s!l~

~,53 0

S:l ~"C

§~§

gjGl~

~

S •

"Co ....

.;~.E

S="C

t~!

""~ ... ~

Cl-=

a

~gjQl

.;~~

0 ~ ~ ...: ~ Il< Poi 69.30 $ .... $ 1,090.80 $ 177.00 $ 918.80 $ ...... $ None $ 20.00 $ 2.00 18.90 2,366.40 100.50 2,265.90 8,073.00 2,538.00 150.00 2,888.00 None 8.40 813.90 27.00 786.90 276.00 30.00 3.00 24.00 910.50 94.50 816.00 50.00 30.00 3.00 882.50 21.00 361.50 228.00 25.20 526.20 16.50 509.70 401.00 20.00 2.00 984.00 52.50 931.50 3,343.50 10.00 1.00 2.10 545.10 22.50 522.60 1,530.00 6.30 306.30 7.50 298.80 140.00 10.00 1.00 1,527.00 111.00 1,416.00 3.00 82.00 2.10 675.90 58.50 617.40 780.35 2.10 1.50 584.90 536.40 123.00 10.00 1.00 14.70 10.50 826.20 836.70 504.75 856.50 84.50 822.00 630.00 4.00 2.10 749.10 753.60 4.50 1,533.00 12.60 8.40 889.70 395.70 6.00 911.00 433.80 16.80 477.80 43.50 214.00 421.50 421.50 496.00 10.00 1.00 254.40 44.40 210.00 50.40 88.00 4.20 214.20 10.50 203.70 217.00 1,396.50 49.50 1,347.00 936.00 289.50 22.50 267.00 .......... 816.00 .. $258.00 $12.60 $19,098.90 $1065.90 $18,033.001$ .. , ... 1$15,872.60 $ 140.00 $ 18.00

.... ...... ...... ..... ..... ...... ..... .....

...... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... ...... . .... ...... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... .... ...... ..... ...... .....

........ ...... .......

.......

....... ....... ....... ....... . ...... ....... . ...... . ...... . ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... . ......

....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ......

....... ........ ...... ........ ...... . ......

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ......

...... . ..... ...... ...... ........ ..... ..... ...... ..... ....... . .....


THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT (B)-FRANK L. MAGOON, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. Meridian, 2 ••••.... Geo. Washington,9 •. St. Louis, 20 •••.... Naphtali, 25 •••••.. Polar Star, 79 •.•.•. Pride of theWest,179. Good Hope, 218 •...• Cosmos, 282 .••.••• Cornerstone, 823 ••.. America, 347 •..•••. Cache, 416 .. : ••.••• Anchor, 443 •••••••. West Gate, 445 •••.. Harmony, 499 •••••. Apollo, 529 ••••••••• AIgabil, 544 ••••...• Forest Park, 578 •.•. Lambskin, 460 ...•. · Tower Grove, 631 ••• Mizpah, 639 •••••.• Benj. Franklin, 642 .. Pilgrim, 652 .•••••• Progress, 657 ...... TOTAL ........

4 .. 1 1 7 6 4 1 1 41 ••• 18 611\$ 916.50 $ 2.10 $ •••• $ 918.60 $ 742 1,118.00 12.60 1,125.60 8 8 8 1 6 14 9 15 48 .. 569 858.50 8.40 861.90 6 4 4 1 4 28 8 9 26 .• 388 582.00 14.70 596.70 8 5 5 1 7 15 4 8 30 .. 1,384.40 870 1,306.00 29.40 1 1 8 2 14 98 6 17 19 .. 415 622.50 8.40 630.90 17 16 15 •. 6 6 9 19 .... 2 4 5 .. 1,030 1,545.00 2.10 1,547.10 13 15 11 7 1 68 4 9 761.10 506 759.00 2.10 1 7 4 4 1 1 31 ••• 10 ••.. 858.30 852.00 568 6.30 11 9 7 1 3 40 8 7 27 .. 1 •. 412.50 2 .••. .. 275 412.50 3 4 4 •. 4 2 1,116.60 7 •. 743 1,114.50 2.10 8 3 2 6 1 38 ·2 17 756.00 504 756.00 22 5 16 13 •• 3 3 .• 1,039.20 690 1,035.00 4.20 1 2 •. 2 29 1 18 61 .. 491.40 822 483.00 8.40 5 .. 1 2 .. 44 3 1 817.10 210 315.00 4 .. 2.10 7 7 •• 1 2 1 2 324 487.50 486.00 1.50 1 1 .• 1 16 4 8 17 .. 247 372.60 370.50 2.10 6 •• 2 1 4 1 4 1,203.60 801 1,201.50 2.10 .. 8 34 10 7 6 2 4 81 8 642.90 409 618.50 29.40 7 .•. 4 3 2 •. 16 5 15 .. 572 868.50 858.00 10.50 9 .. 2 4 4 4 2 5 38 •.. 597.60 397 2.10 595.50 4 1 6 29 3 5 6 •• 1 341.10 226 339.00 2.10 6 .• 2 2 2 ... :. 1 14 ••. 292.20 8 .. 192 288.00 4.20 1 12 2 3 5 5 31· . 120/109/ 981261 751 5911 6811861 3871 •• 1 21 4 11,6111$17,416.601$156.901 $ .••• 1$17,573.401$

... ...

fl

...

.'s\ ...

..... .....

.... .... .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .... .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .... .. .. .. .. .... .. .... ....

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ..... ...... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

None $ ..•.•• $ ••••• 61.50 $ 857.10 $ ...... $ 1,400.00 21.00 1,104.60 . 789.00 42.00 819.90 800.00 574.20 22.50 612.00 147.00 1,187.40 . 342.00 10.00 1.00 9.00 621.90 60.00 20.00 79.50 1,467.60 2,808.00 90.60 670.50 784.00 60.00 798.80 1,340.50 10.00 6.00 406.50 10.00 277.00 1.00 73.20 1,043.40 390.00 723.00 33.00 2,828.00 986.10 53.10 None 66.00 425.40 . 270.00 314.10 8.00 270.00 24.00 463.50 1,125.00 366.60 6.00 4,212.00 1,157.10 46.50 726.00 632.40 ....... 10.50 20.00 342.00 2.00 811.50 57.00 2,767.00 591.60 6.00 138.00 21.00 320.10 None 274.20 18.00 956.40 $16,617.001$ ..... ·1$21,180.501$ 70.001$ 4.00

....... ....... ....... ...... ....... ....... ........ ...... . ...... ....... ....... ....... ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

....... ...... ....... ..... ....... ......

......

...... ........ ...... ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... • •. - .

It

THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-WM. C. DEACON, D. D. G. M., Harrisonville, Mo. Index, 64 ••••••.••. Cass, 147 •.••••••.. Grand River, 276 •... Wadesburg, 848 •••• Nonpareil, 872 ••••. Dayton, 386 •..••••• Belton, 450 ••••••••. Raymore, 451 ••••.• Jewel, 480 ••• •••••• Coldwater, 486 .•••• Peculiar, 530 ..••... Strasburg, 604 ••••. Archie, 638 •••.••.. Cleveland, 651 .•... TOTAL ..

1...

75.00 207.00 96.00 52.50 89.00 31.50 106.50 57.00 207.00 91.50

$····r .... $ ...........

75.00 $ •....• $ 10.50 209.10 117.00 7.50 52.50 3.00 53.70 31.50 3.00 125.40 71.70 3.00 207.00 6.00 91.50 . 1.50

75.00 $ ...... $ 198.60 109.50 22.50 80.00 50.70 16.50 15.00 122.40 68.70 201.00 90.00

210.00 $ •••••. $ ..... 120.00 None 118.70 None 228.35 . 5.00 66.00 490.00 32.00

4

. 6 .. .. ..

50 $ 138 64

2 .•.

6 ......

1 1 1 1 9 2 1 1 1 1 •.•••. ........... 7 2 2 2 . 4 6 . 1 2 11 .•. ......... 1 ... 1 2 1 7 ..

26 21 71 88 188 61

.•• ••. .•••. ••• •••• ••. 3 ..• .•. .. ••. ••.• .•• 1 .•• ... .. ... 8 •.. 1 111 111 61 51 341 261 16 1 171

22 33.00 88.00 •.....•. 38.00 150.00 66.00 354.00 44 66.00 66.00 ••••.•. 27 40.50 40.50 4.60 36.00 None 7851$ 1,102.501$ 71.401$ •... 1$ 1,173.90/$ 89.00 $ 1,029.90/$ 105.001$ 1,759.051$ ••.•• ·1$

11

1

21 2

1..

1

2 7 ...

:

.. ~ .. ~ .. ~ .~ .~~ ... .. ~ ... ~ ... ~ :: :: :: .........

1

7

..• ••. ••• .. ••.

2

1 ..•.•.....

.. . 6 ..•... 451· ·1 •• 1••

~5

2.10 •..•• 21.00 ••••• 14.70 ....• 18.90 14.70

.......

•••••


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THmTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-D. O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

""] ""QI ""QI ~ .59 :§

....

00 ~

Hume, 130 .•••••••• Amsterdam, 141 •••• Butler, 254 ..••••••. Rockville, 341 •••••. Tyrian, 350 ........ Crescent Hill, 368 •.• Rich Hill, 479 .••••.. Foster, 554 ......... TOTAL ........

~

~

0..

8

]

CIl

;';:l

a

gj

'Ql

<

.. ~ . ~

3 4 3 131

i

is

2

4 4 3 17 1

""

~

1 ..•

L.~

.~

~ ~

~

.. ·1··

31

""~

CIl

::l

CII

~

~

~

2

12

""'j" i

1 1 .. 3 .. 9 8\ 21 241

15 2 1 19

..

381

CIl

~

0

Z

~.!

~

gj

00

.~

~

."" ""$ .Qi

~

gj

~

~

oo~

~

'"

.. .. ... . .. .

f

.!

5 ~ ~

..

6 •• ., 5 •• . , " 2 4 34 •. .. 2 4 •• 1 •.. 6 " 1 1 4 .. , , 2 2 .... " , , 1 .... " 8\ 8\ 691 .. 1.. 1..

1 •• ,

l' ...

III

:5Gil

~ ~

.. .. .. ..

63 $ 43 145 42 27 100 1251 52/ 6971$

~~ CllCII

IotIlO",

~""GiI

~j~

~

<!If "'~

",1lO os::

~~

f

~~~ l::~>t <

94.50 $ 64.50 217.50 63.00 40.50 150.00 187. 50 1 78.00 896.501$

~~ :s!1lO Clls:: Po'·

"""" >CI 0 CIICII

..... $ .... $ 4.20

...... 25.20 ...... ......

.....

..... ..... .....

.....

1'" ..

2. 10 ••... 18.90 60.401$ •... 1$

....,s:: 0

8 -<QI

3~ 0

E-l

""

gj-S =~

~a

]~

94.50 $ 1.50 $ 68.70 217.50 21.50 88.20 3.00 40.50 1.50 150.00 ....... 189.60 28.50 96.90 945.901$ 66.00 $

.......

.......

~ ~

...s:: ::s °8

-<

CII ::l ~ ~

CI

§

-a~

IlO IlO.S gj .S ~ IlO

""0"" ;gj0 +'.,...:l

~~.s

.~ ~"" §~§

gj\l)f:<.

~

a.

:s!~1: III ....

s::""

CII~s::., IlO ",s::f:<.

2'·

~.s::

a

""gjQl

'Qj~~

~ 0 ~ 93.00 $ ...... $ 126.00 $ ...... $ ..... 175.00 ....... 68.70 163.50 82.50 277.50 ...... 86.70 1.50 10.00 39.00 . 28.00 ....... ....... 172.00 150.001 ...... 111.90 49.20 140.00 96.90 200.00 747.001$ 144.401$ 1,118.501$ 10.001$ ••...

........ • ......

.......

...... ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... ....... ....... ......

.

THmTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-JOLLY P. HURTT, D. D. G. M., Sedalia, Mo. Cole Camp, 595 ..... Shawnee,' 653 ••...•. Knobnoster, 245 .... Holden, 262 •••••••. Corinthian, 265 ••... Cold Spring, 274 ••• Chilhowee, 487 ..... Sedalia, 236 ........ Granit~, 272 ..••.••. Green Ridge, 425 ••.. Lamonte, 574 ...... TOTAL ....•••. • Credit $1.50.

... ,.. ···1 ... .. ... 1 ... ... .. ,

l" ,

~ .. 4\' 8 ... '" ... .. I.. · ... .. , ... .. '" 2 9 5 2

5 1

1

5 1· 1

1 6

22 2 4 6 11 36 23 6

... ... .. ... .... ... 1 '" .. • .. 1.... '"

19 1 131 10\10\

.. .. .. ., .. .. ..

..

1 4 3 1

..

... .... .. 7 6 2

.. .. .. ..

..

... ... .... .. ... ....

8\ 110\ 221 241

73.'"1' 10.55

84.00 $ 33.00 $ 51.00 $ ...... $ 236.50 $ ...... $ : .... 49 $ $ .... $ 141.00 138.00 ....... 3.00 94 141.00 ...... 480.00 ...... 66.00 ...... 66.00 44 66.00 ....... 175.00 ....... ., " 270.60 179 268.50 2.10 6.00 264.60 ....... 565.00 ....... ., 1 199 ..... 298.50 298.50 9.00 289.50 ....... 300.00 ....... ., 97.50 65 ..... 97.50 16.50 81.00 161.00 154.50 103 154.50 54.00 100.50 550.00 ...... 629.10 627.00 84.50 594.60 .. 418 2.10 18 .. 970.00 . ., 626.50 12.60 530.10 32 351 539.10 9.00 800.00 ....... . 61.50 61.50 61.50 15 .. 50.00 41/ 67.50 . 45 67.50 67.50 ...... 210.00 $ 165.00 2,244.301$ · .. • .. 1$ 4,487.501$ ...... 1$ ..... 80\:·1 .. \ 1 1,588\$ 2,382.001$ 27.301$ ...• 1$ 2,409.301$

1 ••. 7 1 .... 2 .... , 1 •• 3 5 3 14 ..

...

...... ...... ...... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... .....

.

.......

....... .......

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .

....... . ...... ....... .......

...... ...... ...... ....... ..... ...... ...... ..... ...... ......


THmTY-SEVENTH DISTRIOT-T. JENNINGS, D. D. G. M., Olinton, Mo.

§Clear Creek, 418 •• Windsor, 29 ........ Urich, 286 ......... Agricola, 343 ....... Montrose, 408 ... Clinton, 548 •••••••. Calhoun, 662 ••••••• Blairstown, 567 ..... Deepwater, 562 ••••• St. Clair, 273 ....... Circle, 342 ••••••••• Lowry City, 403 .... Appleton City, 412 •. Star, 419 ••.•••••••. TOTAL ........

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. ... 1 ... .. .. .. 4 13 .. .. .. ... .. .... ... 6 .. .. .. ., . . , . ... .. ... . ... ... 1 .... .. .. .. 1 1 ••. 3 1 1 .. 10 .. .. 15 8 9 •• ... 5 1 6 15 .. .. .. 2 2 2 .. ... .... 2 .... .. .. ... ... ... .. . .. .... 2 1 20 .. .. .. 4 4 4 1 ... 1 9 .. . . .. 1 1 1 .. ... 3 1 2 1 .. .. ..

"6\"5 ... ...

11 1 8 1 1 .... 2 " 4 18 1 ... ... 9 ... 12 6 6 1 7 ... . 1 ••. 6 1 1 ••.

4 ...

451 281 281 71 221

3 2 •• 2 ....

501 101 221

661 .. 1.. 1..

.......

..... $ $ 119 178.50 51 76.50 88 67.00 54 81.00 189 283.50 72.00 481 65 97.50 65 97.50 134 201.00 39 68.60 74 111.00 103 154.50 25 37.50 1,0041$ 1,506.001$

..... $ .... $

...... .....

....... $ ...... $

178.50 84.90 ..... 69.10 ...... 81.00 14.70 298.20 72.00 97.50 97.50 201.00 68.50 111.00 154.50 ..... 37.50 25.201$ ...• 1$ 1,531.201$ 8.40 2.10

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

.....

.....

..... ..... ..... ...... ..... .....

.....

16.50 12.00

....... 19.50

13.50 ........ ......

....... 7.50 ....... ....... .......

4.50 73.50

.......

....... $ .. .... $ $ ...... $ ..... 162.00 150.00 10.00 1.00 72.90 81.30 25.00 34.10 237.00 61.50 None 284.70 . 240.00 72.00 106.00 102.50 556.00 5.00 100.50 3.00 631.76 ..... 193.50 472.00 60.00 6.00 68.60 163.00 . 111.00 None . 154.50 289.70 . 33.00 None . $1,431.601$ 34.101$ 2,966.751$ 70.001$ 7.00

.......

.......

....... ....... ...... • • .......

....... ....... ....... .......

....... ........ ...... ....... ....... .......

....... ...... ...... ....... .......

...... ...... ....... ..... ...... II

•••••

.

...... ...... .....

.....

THmTY-EIGHTH DISTRIOT-WINAN I. MAYFIELD, D. D. G. M., Lebanon, Mo. Linn Creek, 152. Mack's Creek, 433 ••. Laclede, 88 ••.•••••• Competition, 432 ... Conway, 528 ••••••• Waynesville, 876 •••. Richland, 385 •••••• Brumley, 203 ••••.•• Iberia, 410 ••••••••• TOTAL ........ • Credit $5.00.

3 ... 2 1 2 ... 4 1 1 ••• 6 1 1 1 1 201

2 61

2 .•• 1 •. 1 .,. 1 •• 5 1 •• 2 ••

.,. ... ...... 3 ... 81 81

• Credit $3.00.

61

3 1 ... 6 1 11 ••. 3 ... 6 ••• 7 ... 4 1 2 1 401 61

2 .... 1 12 .... 1 44 .. 4 .. 2 16 ..

....

.. ..

.. ..

.. .. .. .. .. ..

1 18 1 •. 1 13 .. 1 .... .. 91 1071 11 .. 1..

.. ..

75 $ 112.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 112.50 $ ...... $ ....... $ 112.50 $ 314.60 $ ...... $ ..... 79 118.50 118.50 1.50 117.00 44.50 20.00 136 204.00 9.00 204.00 195.00 668.50 67 100.50 100.50 16.50 84.00 61.50 . 58 87.00 10.50 None 4.50 93.00 97.50 95 142.60 138.50 600.00 9.00 142.60 128 192.00 192.00 181.50 298.00 10.50 10.00 1.00 49 73.50 None 73.50 6.00 67.50 62 93.00 ...... 125.00 93.00 3.00 90.00 7491$ 1,123.501$ 10.501$ .••. 1$ 1,134.001$ 60.00 $ 961.501$ 112.501$ 2,112.101$ 30.001$ 1.00

...... ..... ...... ..... ...... .....

..... ...... ..... ...... .....

...... ..... .....

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ........ ...... .......

....... ...... ....... ....... ....... .......

..... ........ ..... . ..... ...... ....... .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT-eHARLES L. WOODS, D. D. G. M., Rolla, Mo. 'g NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

.... 00

"'"

Belle, 373 .•.••••••. Lebanon, 77 •••••.• Cuba, 312 .......... Salem, 225 ••.••••.• Lane's Prairie, 631 •. Rolla, 213 ••••••.••. St. James, 230 •.••. Equality, 497 •••••.. Arlington, 346 ••... Latimer, 145 •••..•. Vienna, 94 •.••.•.•. TOTAL ........

ll! ]

't:l

"t:l

j

CII

l:i 0 ~ ::;l

~

Z

."t:l

l:l

dI~

.rs

~

l

~

'g~

IIlCll

,..tllI,..

",tllI 0=

",Ill

p..:::

~1~ ~~ lIlallll Po'"

~ClI ~..s~ l::p..~ >u .rsIII ~ '41 ~ ~ gl !C. ! >< Q 00 l'zl ~ 00 ::a Q 0 ~ -< ~ Q Q :9 -< ... ... .. , .. ... 1 .,. 1 .••• .... 108 $ 162.00 $ 4.20 $ .••• $ 6 1 1 5 •. 5 3 4 1 6 .. 168 252.00 12.60 ..... ... 1 1 2 ••• 5 ••• 4 •... .. .. 128 192.00 ...... ..... 6 .,. 2 23 .. 2 2 2 1 ••• 172 258.00 ...... ..... ... ... .. , .. 2 .••• ., . 75.00 4.20 ..... 3 .... .. 50 16 13 12 3 ••. 3 .... 467 700.50 ...... ..... "t:l

1ii

"t:l

CII

CII

ro

~ p..

oS

'''i Clo Clo

CII

.. .. .. .. ....

4 4 6 .• 1 1 3 .... 3 1 1 1 .. 10 ., 7 .... 2 ... 1 .,. 2 1 1 1 2 1 5 •. 2 ., .. .. 4 4 3 1 1 5 1 2 1 1 1 1 ... 2 13 ., 341 301 311111 221 251 51 201 611· .1· ·1··

.... ...

t'''t:lgl

CII,..C11

,.."t:l CIIC11

....I::

~

"t:l

&1$ :::s;<:::

-<ClI

QS

iil:::s

ro

Il~

--oQ

..:l

~

166.20 $ 264.60 192.00 258.00 79.20 700.50 166.80 160.50 6.30 107 85.50 14.70 67 100.20 113.10 111.00 74 2.10 132 200.10 198.001 2.10 96.00 96.00 •••... ..... 64 1 1.5271$ 2,290.501$ 46.201$ ., •• 1$ 2,336.701$

..... ..... ..... .....

CII

:s!

tllI

ClI

p..

=' Q

='

I::

III

....I::

°a

-<

CII

u

III

iil ~

I::'t:l

.~ ~'t:l

bll.S &I .8 ~ tllI 'g0-g .s &I..:l

ClI~1:::::s tllI

§~;

"'1::1i't

::a~ClI~ S •

2'" t',l:l

't:l 0 ....

~15S

"t:l

.;~.e p..

0

~

a

41

.;~::a p..

1.50 $ ....... $ 164.70 $ 361.35 $ ...... $ ..... 9.00 255.60 160.00 . 7.50 184.50 None ...... ...... 9.00 249.00 942.80 79.20 None ...... 700.50 1,101.00 40.00 4.00 1.50 165.30 56.00 100.20 ...... 396.00 111.60 1.50 75.00 192.60 7.50 368.50 . 331.50 10.00 1.00 96.001 37.50 $ 2,134.501$ 164.701$ 3,792.151$ 50.001$ 5.00

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ........ ........ .........

....... ....... .......

....... ........ . ....... ....... ....... ......

.....

...... . .....

...... ...... ...... ......

FORTIETH DISTRICT-H. H. BALSIGER, D. D. G. M., Crystal City, Mo. De Soto, 119 •. , .... Joachim, 164 ••••... Shekinah, 256 ••..•. Herculaneum, 338 .. Tyro, 12 •..••••••.. Potosi, 131 .•••••... Irondale, 143 .••.... Belgrade, 632 .•••.• Blackwell, 535 ••.... TOTAL ........

3 1 1 1 2 3

... 2 1

3 1 2 5 2 2 1

···1··· · .. 1··1 .. • 131 111 91 51 31

3 191

31 31 2 1 1 2 1

31 2 2 1 3

.. ·1· ..

..

1 2 ,

..

... ••• 1 ••• ... 1

4 1 ., 1 •• 2 .... . , 1 1 2 1

.. 2

1 .. '" 2 .. 5 •• ... .... ."., . .. 1, ....3 .... .... / ...

..

399.00 $ ..... $ •••• $

.. .. 2661$ 133.50 89 .. 208 1 312.00 . . 66 99.00 .." .. 59 1 88.50 .. .. 97/ 145.50 .. .. 121.50 .. .. .,. :~/ . ....... . . .. 72.00

1 2 •..• 31 131 121 21 21· .

..... ...... 4.40 . .... 4.20 .....

...... ...... ...... ...... ......

9141$ 1,371.001$

399.00 $ 133.50 316.40 103.20 88.50 145.50 121.50

4.50 $ 1.50 3.00 7.50 3.00 3.00 1.50

394.50 $ ...... $ ...... 132.00 313.40 95.70 ...... 85.50 142.50 120.00

440.00 $ ...... $ •••••

. 100.00 ....... 310.00 . 120.00 ..... ....... 364.20 ..... ....... 280.00 ....... 500.00 ..... ...... .... ........ ....... ......... ....... . ....... 72.00 4.50 67.50 . ...... 30.00

8.60/$ •.•. 1$ 1.379.601$

....... . ..... . ...... ...... ....... . ..... 10.00 . ..... ....... ...... 10.00 1.00 ........ ...... . ..... . .....

28.50 $1.351.101$ .. ·· .. 1$ 2.144.201$

20.001$

1.00


FORTY-FmST DISTRIOT-M. E. EWING, D. D. G. :M., :Morrisville, :Mo. tRiddick, 861 Western Light. 896. . Urbana, 421....... Hogle's Creek, 279. • Hermitage, 288..... Fair Play, 44....... Modern, 144........ Pleasant. 160....... Bolivar, 198........ Pleasant Hope. 467.. Aldrich, 664 ....... TOTAL........

, 8 2 2... • • 1 ••. 1 1 .. .• •• ......• .. .. ••. 8 .•. 1. . .. .• •• .. 1 1 ••••• '" 6 •.. 2. . .. •• .• •• 8 8 8 1... 4 ... 2 17...... 1 2 1 2 2 .. 2 1 1..... 1 1 2 7 1.. .• ... •.. ••• 1... 1 •.. ••• 9 •• .. .. 6 6 6 4... 6 2 6 16...... •.• ••. 2... 1 ••• 2. . •• •• .. .• '" ' " .... 8... 18...... 141 121 111 81 11 251 71 171 691 11 .. 1..

$ 86 68 80 66 86 90 28 148 60 24 6041$

$ 64.00 79.60 120.00 97.60 62.60 186.00 84.60 222.00 76.00 36.00 906.001$

$

$

2.10

2.101$ .... 1$

$ ••.••. $ ••...•• $ ••...• $ $ •..•.• $ .. 64.00 1.60 62.60 76.00 79.60 4.60 76.00 81.00 120.00 9.00 111.00 None 97.60 6.00 91.60 66.76 64.60 8.00 61.60 42.00 186.00 1.60 188.60 876.00 84.60 1.60 88.00 None 222.00 17.40 204.60 1,000.00 75.00 1.60 73.60 175.50 36.00 36.00 None 908.101$ 45.90 $ 862.201$ .. ·· .. 1$ 1,805.251$ ...... 1$ .....

FORTY-SEOOND DISTRIOT-T. W. SNODGRASS, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo. Stockton, 283 •.••.. Jerusalem, 315 •...• Clintonville, 482 •.•• Washington, 87 ...• Garrett, 859 .•.•••• Everton, 405 ••••... Melville, 458 ••••••• Lockwood, 521. .... TOTAL ........

1 ... 1 1 1

12 12

... ... .., .. 8 ... 1 1

... ... .. .. ... .... 191 151

.. .. .. .. .. .. ... .... .. .. .. .... .. .. ... .... .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

1 .. 1 .... 1 .... 1 •. 11 .. 2 1 •.. 1 ••. 2 ... 1 2 .. 5 1 1 2 ... 1 .•• .. '" '" 2 ... 1 1 '" 2 ... , 2 2 2 .. 81 81 41 10 1 21 41 151· .1 .. 1••

1 .. ,

108 $ 89 77 142 48 58 54 811 5421$

154.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 58.50 4.20 115.50 218.00 2.10 64.50 79.50 .80 81.00 46.50 8.40 813.001$ 6.801$ 9.201$

.....

...... ..... ..... ...... .....

...... ..... ...... ......

154.60 $ ...... $ 62.70 1.50 116.50 8.00 215.10 8.00 64.50 1.50 78.70 8.00 81.00 8.00 88.10 810.101$ 15.00 $

.......

154.50 $ ...... $ 872.00 $ 61.20 89.04 112.50 124.00 212.10 755.00 63.00 100.00 75.70 290.00 78.00 280.00 88.10 15.00 505.001$ 290.101$ 1,975.041$

.........

.......

.......

.......

10.00 $ 1.00 ........ ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... 80.00 ...... ....... . ..... ....... ...... 40.001$

1.00

FORTY-THmD DISTRIOT-D. V. MORRIS, D. D. G. :M., Nevada, :Mo•

.."./I..

Osage, 803 •••..••.. 9. 10 28 2 88 •. 1. 3 8 ..•. •.•. 268 $ 402.00 $ 4.20 $ •••• $ 406.20 $ 12.00 $ 394.20 $ $ 829· 55 $. '. .' •' •' •.•• $••••..' '. '. 1 Sheldon, 871. •••.... 77 115.50 2.10..... 117.60 4.50 113.10 •..•.•. 1 5 N on e Schell City, 448 ••..• 2 2 2 1... 1 ••. 1 1 .. .. .• 48 64.50. . . • •• •..•• 64.50 1.50 63.00. . . . . . . 88.00 •.••••. • •••.• Montevalo, 490 •.... . .. ... 1 1. . • . 1. • • 3 .• .. .. 36 54.00 2.10. • • . . 56.10. . . • • . . 56.10 40.00 ••••••. • .••.. Vernon, 498 ••••.... 51 3... 2 2 1... .. .. .. 27 40.50 4.20..... 44.70 8.00 40.50 1.20 92.00 . Unity, 495 .••••.... 2 2 2. . 2 2 •. . 1. . . . ... . 61 91.50. . • . .• ••••• 91.50 8.00 88.50. . . . . . . 80.00 .•.•••• • ••••• Walker, 605 •••.•... 1 .., 1 8 1. • • 3 .. .. •• 42 63.00 2.10. • . • . 65.10 4.50 60.60. . . . . . . 80.00 •..••.. .. , 1.. • 1 ... 14..... • 51 76.50. . • . .. ••... 76.50 ••..... 76.50. • . . • . . 25.00 10.00 1.00 Hermon, 187 •..•... . .. 1 9 4 .,. 8 2 .. .. .. 105 157.50 18.90. . . . . 176.40 6.00 170.40. . • • • . . None .....•• . ..•.• Lamar, 292 .••..... Signal, 804 . 1 1 1 1 8 4 2 1 9 .. .. .. 37 55.50 16.80..... 72.80 7.50 64.80....... None .. Golden, 475 ••••.... 19 11 11 3 2 2 3... 2 .. .. .. 71 106.50 4.20..... 110.70 3.00 107.70....... 10.00 . Milford, 516 . 8 3 2..... 5 1 2 .. .. .. 36 54.00........... 54.00 7.50 46.50....... 48.00 .. .•-.hl$-1~~=3~L~60~1~$~52~~=0"'$~L~28=1~~~Ohl$~~1~~~Ohl$~1~~=3=~~5~51~$~10~~=0~1$~1~~~0 TOTAL . 401811281181281 341101 111 491 .. I.. I.. I-=85~4~1$~I~~=8~1.~0~01~$~~~L~60~1~$-.-


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FORTY-FOURTH DISTRIOT-RAY BOND, D. D. G. M., Joplin, Mo.

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

I-' ~

Carthage, 197 •••••• Sarcoxie, 293 •.•..•. Joplin, 335 .. Fellowship, 345 .•.. Jasper, 398 .•••.••• Carterville, 401. .... Mineral, 471 .•••..•. Webb City, 512. Carl Junction, 549 •• Criterion, 586 ••••.. La Russell, 592 . TOTAL .

5 3 5 4

3 1 4 7

3 1

3 1

4 1110 111 1... •• .••. 4. . 1 12 6 411.1.6 2.5.

3.. 2 1... • • . '126 2 2 2. . 2 1 1 .. , 11. . . . .• ,. 25121121171571

7 5 12..... . 276 $ 414.00 $ 21.00 $ ..•• $ 435.00 $ 16.50 $ 418.50 $ ••.... $ 150.00 $ •.••.. $ •...• 1 96 144.00 •••.• , •.... 144.00. • . • • . . 144.00. . . . . • . 512.00. . . . . .. • •..•• 1 9 91.... 1 477 715.50 2.10. • • . . 717.60 18.00 699.60 .... " • 240.00 10.00 1.00 2 11 43 591 886.50 33.60..... 920.10 37.50 882.60....... 690.00 .. 67 100.50. . . . .• ...•. 100.50. • • . . . . 100.50. . . . . . . 185.00. . . . • .. • . 1 2 3 3 16 105 157.50 4.20..... 161.70 4.50 157.20....... 253.00 . 2 .,. 1 52 78.00 •.... , •.... 78.00 3.00 75.00. . . . . • . 296.00. . . . . .. • ...•. 37 1 3 33...... 219 328.50 67.20..... 395.70 55.50 340.20....... None .. 4 3 1 68 102.00. . • . .• •..•• 102.00 6.00 .96.00. . . . . • . 65.36. . . • • .. • •.••• 4 2 48 72.00........... 72.00 6.00 67.50· 1.50 . 1 2 20 30.00 ..••. , ....• 30.00. . . . . .. 30.00 5.00 .••••.. . .•.•• 981141391 1981 .. 1.. 1 11~~~01~9~1$~&~02=8~~~0~1$~1=28~.1~0~1$~ ••-.~.1~$~3~,1~5~~~60~1~$~1~47~~~0=1·$~2~~~81~.~10+1$~~3~~~00~17$~2~~~9~~~35~1~$~10~.~00+1$~~1.~00

FORTY-FIFTH DISTRIOT-J. E. WINDLE, D. D. G. M., Springfield, Mo. United, 5 O'Sullivan, 7....... Ash Grove. 100..... Solomon, 271....... Ozark, 297......... Gate of the Temple, 422...... Republic, 570....... Strafford. 608...... Willard, 620........ Webster. 98........ Doric, 300.......... Mount Olive, 439. • • . Hazelwood, 459..... Henderson. 477.... TOTAL........ • Credit $1.50.

:1:2:1:1:0: 111 7

55

5 4 3 5 13 •.. ... .•. .. •..

57 8 201 5 ... 1 45 .•" 3 23 4 9 3 .•• •.•

93 2 6 .• •• .. 31...... 90..... • 2..... •

733 1$ 1,099.501$ 10.50j$ 71 106.60. . • • •. 145/ 217.50 10.50 486 729.00 6.30 37l 55.50 4.20

$ 1,110.00 $ 106.50 228.00 735.30 59.70

85.50 $ 1,024.50 $ 7.50 99.00 67.50 160.50 34.50 700.80 4.50 55.20

$

None $ None None None 44.00

20.00 $

2.00

10.00

1.00

7 6 4 1 6 55 3 16 22.... 2 801 1,201.50 12.60 1,214.10 82.50 1,131.60 2,980.00 2 2 2 1 12.... 2 2 9...... 81 121.50 25.20 146.70 146.70 36.00 1 1 1... . . 4 ••• 2 3 .. •. .• 37 55.50 55.50 6.00 49.50 12.00 ... ... ... .. 3 2 1 9...... 51 76.50 6.30 82.80 3.00 79.80 None 211.50 21 1... 2... 2 5 18...... 80 120.00 120.00 3.00 117.00 None ... •. 4 ••. 1. . •. •• .. .. 40 60.00 •. '2'.1' 0'1" .' .' '. '. 60.00 6.00 54.00 1 1. •. .. 2 ••• •.. 2 .. .. .. 33 49.50 51.6Q 3.00 48.60 None • •. ,. • . 1. . 7 •.. 3. • .. .. .. .. 76 114.00. • • • .• .•••• 114.00 10.50 103.50 469.00 7 7 5.. 2 1 2 4 ...•. '1-::--=770~~1~0-:-5..:.::0:::-0~.':::;'.;..'=-'.~.~.~• •:....:.-'=-~1~05~.~00~--::-:~3~.0,.::.01-:-~1~03::..-=:50:..!..,-,--:• ....:1:::.5:.::0~:....:....:...:..:...:..:...:.!c;...::..:..:..:....:..:.L:.:....:..:..:..: 371 341 271161 451 2111 181 651 2891 .. 1.. 1 4 2,7411$ 4,111.501$ 77.701$ .... 1$ 4,189.201$ 316.50 $ 3.874.201$ • 1.501$ 3.752.501$ 30.001$ 3.00

'1' ..

• Credit $1.50.


FORTY-SIXTH DISTRIO'T-Cl. A. SWENSON, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo. None $ •••••• $ ••.•• 2/1... 2 2 4. .•• •. •• .• 124 $ 186.001$· .. "1$ •••• $ 186.00 $ 3.00 $ 183.001$ $ 3 10................ 26 39.00 6.30..... 45.30 15.00 30.30 .. 39.00 2 1................ 39 58.50 4.20. • • .. 62.70· 1.50 61.20 .. None 1 2 2 3 14.... .. .. .. 63 94.50j 4.20 98.70 98.70 110.50 Texas. 177 ••••.••••.•••••••••.•••••••• ,. ••. ••.• •• .• •• • ..••••••••••••. Plato. 469.......... 7 6 3 2 .. 69 103.50 103.50 108.50 None Summersville. 555. •• .•• ••. ••• .. ••• 8 .,. 1 5 •. .• .. 621 93.00 93.00 4.50 88.50 158.40 Mountain Grove. 158 4 6 4 1 3 4 8 2 7 •. •• •• 161 241.50 6.30 4.20 243.60 6.00 237.60 300.00 Joppa. 411 ........ ... ... ... .. ... 16................ 50 75.00 75.00 24.00 51.00 243.00 Mansfield, 543...... 3 3 3.. 4....... 1 8 .. .. .. 561 84.00 8.40 92.40 92.40 53.83 Grovespring. 589. • . Norwood, 622 ...... "3 '''56 84.00 8.40 92.40 "'i:50 ·.. 172.00 _ _T_O_T_A_L_._._ ••_._ • •_.:-l-,91:-1_7...!..1_1-,21_3~1_1_7.!-1 _8_9~1_9~1_2_4~1 _2_0...!..1._•.!-1.-,.1~._.1=--=.~7_0~6.:.."1'-.:..$-=.1'=-.0~5~9...,,.._0~0~1":-$:....-:_3=7_.-:'8~0-,-1""'$,--'_4-:._2~0~1..:....$-=,1~,O=:'9""'2_.=6_0~1""'$:....-_=5_5==..5~0·~$==-"""1...:..,"""0_3~7""'._1~0';""1'-.:..$-=,-,_,-="-._.~.';""I'-.:..$-=,1,=-,O~7~6.==-7~3-,-1""'$,--_.-._.-=,.-._.~I$~;";._.:". -• • Ava. 26 ... '" ...... Pilot Knob, 182..... Mt. Ararat, 382..... Barnes. 116........

I-'

~

3/

2

I "il::: :::'i

'''i''i ::: ::::::::::

I

·gei.go

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTBIOT-J. N. SPARKS, D. D. G. M., Grandin, Mo. Van Buren, 509 •••• 5 4 4\.. 7.......... 8 .. .... Grandin. 579 ••••••• 1 ••. •.. 1... 85. . . 1 1 .. .• •• Hopewell, 239 •••••• • .• •.. ••• •• ••• 4 .,. 1 14..... • §Bunker, 275 ....... . ., ..... . . . , . . ,. ..... . . Barnesville. 358 •••• 9 8 6 .. 7 2 1 7 .. Delphian, 137 •••••• 1 2 ... Winona. 430 ••••.•• 3 8 .• .. 1 ., • 1 .... Eminence, 607 •••••. ... "il"i :: . .

... ... ... .. ... ... . ... ... .... ... ..

TOTAL ........

151 131 111 11

81

49 1 21

71

.. ..

104 $ 82 57

156.00 $ 21.00 $ .... $ 128.00 48.00 85.50

177.00 $ ...... $ 171.00 52.50 85.50 6.00

177.00 $ ...... $ 118.50 79.50

None $ •••••• $ ••••• 109.50 $ •••••• $ ••••• 120.00

64.50 120.00 642.001$ 69.001$ ••.• 1$

98.00 64.50 120.00 711.001$

61.5 0 1 118.50 637.501$ · .. • .. 1$

86.00 52.00 430.00 747.501$ ...... 1$ .....

.... ..... ......... ....... 93.00 621

.. .. .. .. . ..

381 .. 1.. 1..

43\ 80 4281$

......... ........ ...... 82.50 10.50 3.00 1.50 73.50 $


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-J. C. AKERS, D. D. G. M., Farmington, Mo. 't:l

ci 0

III

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

:;::

1-1

00 00

't:l QI

't:l

~

'C

~

't:l QI

III

~

:9 Star of the West, 183. Mosaic, 851. ••••••• Marcus, 110 •••••••• Bismarck, 41. ..••.. Farmington, 132 .. Ionic, 154 ••••.•..•. St. Francois, 234 •••. Samaritan, 424 .... Pendleton, 551 ••••• Leadwood, 598 •••••. Elvina, 599 ......... Saline, 226 •••••••. TOTAL ........

·s

't:l

.l!I

2 1 3 2 1 2 1 2

~

QI

~

E .~~

rl ~ l=l

l

Z

.s

~

III QI

QI

.'t:l p~

.Ql

l:l. l:l.

1 ~

.. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

...

... ... ... .. 4 3 4 3 2 2 251 221

.l!I

~

~ ~ ~ l=l l=l rn rnril -< 4 ... 1 .... .. ., 1 .. 1· .. 6 .•• 1 3 •. ., 1 .. 8 2 3 4 •• 3 3 18 5 1 .•• 2 2 ... 1 2 2 10 1 4 10 .. 5 ••. 2 •• 8 22 .. 1 ., .. 1 2 1 1 .. 2 1 1 11 1 2 17 .. .. 3 1 1 .... .. 8 1 2 .... 2 2 1 8 1 2 23 .. .. 3 1 4 19 1 4 4 .. 2 1 .•• 201121 2 1 1 881 111 241 841 .. 1.. 1··

III ~

~

2 1 3 3 1 2 1 2

]

~

..

~

III ,Q

S QI

~

-gE5 IIlQl

"'tIO'"

t'''8~ ~..:l~

",tIO 0=

dJ~ '" III ~>:

~~ ~ ~~ l:l. ... 1Il~1Il III ",Ill

l::~~

",'t:l IlIQI

;:.U

....l::

~

't:l

0

rl~

S

=~

l=lS

-<QI

-;~

.,,1lI

lC~

ol=l

't:l .; ~ ....I:l

QI ~

l=l u

't:lo'C I:l rl

-;

:;l=l.s

QI

;

~

0

S

tIO tIO.S rl .5 ~ tIO

°

~~..:l

uc.i

'''IlI't:l

sts § ~QI~

~

I:l't:l

~.s §

'"0 ...~r:.

~-'=

a

S • :g~~ III l-i

't:l~QI~ .;

...... ...... ....... ....... ...... ......... ...... ........ ......

. .

0 Eo! l=l ..:l lXl 0 ~ ~ -< -< 76 $ 114.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 114.00 $ 6.00 $ 108.00 $ ...... $ 94.00 $ ...... $ ..... ..... 42 63.00 9.00 54.00 68.00 ..... None . 154 258.80 12.00 246.30 231.00 27.30 ..... ..... None . ..... 108 162.00 154.50 10.00 162.00 7.50 1.00 860.00 288.20 223.20 15.00 156 284.00 4.20 520.68 . ..... 166.50 159.00 7.50 111 166.50 367.00 .... 38 57.00 55.50 57.00 1.50 68.50 154 233.10 216.60 231.00 2.10 16.50 996.00 ..... 57 85.50 85.50 4.50 81.00 124.00 ..... 201.00 196.50 . 4.50 134 201.00 160.00 207.90 141 211.50 219.90 12.00 8.40 189.65 ..... 147.00 ....... 117 175.50 175.50 28.50 20.00 100.00 2.00 1,2881$ 1,932.001$ 42.001$ •.•• 1$ 1,974.001$ 124.50 $ 1,768.501$ 81.001$ 2,929.831$ 80.001$ 8.00

......

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

....... ........ ...... ....... ........ ...... ....... ...... .......

..... . ..... ..... .....

..... ...... . ..... ...... . ...... . .....

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT-J. A. KINDER, D. D. G. M., Cape Girardeau, Mo. Trowel, 440 ••••..•. Zalma, 545 ......... St. Marks, 98 .••••• West View, 103 ••••. Wilson, 191 ••••.••• MyStic Tie, 221. ••.• Whitewater, 417 .... Excelsior, 441 •••••• TOTAL ........

~I

~I4

.. ;1 ..; ~I

7 2 17 1 181

11· . 2 .. 4 5 1 .. 1 .. 1 .. 7 .. 1 •• 181 51

1 1 3 3 1

.,.

91

2 ... 3 ••. 21 6

3 3

7 •• 11 .. 4 ••

.. .. .. .. .. ..

.. . ... .. 1 .... 1 ..•. .. 1

...

3 1 2 1 4 ••• 9 2 2 441 101 101

3 ....

..

2 •••• 281 .. 1.. 1..

118 $ 169.50 $ 2.10 $ .••• $ 171.60 $ 69.60 45 67.50 2.10 ..... 568.80 375 562.50 6.30 84.00 56 84.00 102.80 64 96.00 6.30 78 109.50 ...... 109.50 60 92.10 90.00 2.10 116 174.00 .... 174.00 9021$ 1,353.001$ 18.901$ •.•• 1$ 1,371.901$

..... ...... ..... ..... ..... ...... ......

3.00 $ 4.50 81.50

....... 4.50

168. 60 1$ ...... $ 65.10 ....... 537.30 .......

·····1

....... . ...... . ...... . ...... .......

97.80 106.50 3.00 86.10 6.00 13.50 160.501 66.00 $ 1,305.901$ ·· .. ··1$

228.00 $ ...... $ ..... 6.00 ....... 10.00 1.00 140.00 160.00 None 200.00 96.50 \ None 830.501$ 10.001$ 1.00

. ..... ....... ...... ........ ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... .............


FIFTIETH DISTRIC"l'-G. A. SAMPLE, D. D. G. :Mo, Cha1fee, Mo.

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .... . ..

East Prairie, 384 .••. .. ·1··· 4 2 ••. 73 $ 109.60 $ Charleston, 407 ••••• 237.00 2 2 2 1 9 8 2 4 18 158 Morley, 184 •••••••• 1 1 1 2 2 1 8 .• 65 97.50 8 .• .. Ashlar, 806 •••••••. 1 1 1 .. 12 ... 2 18 .. .. 41 61.50 Sikeston, 810 ••••.•. 20 12 12 2 2 2 2 2 •. 157 285.50 180.00 IUmo, 581 •••..••••• 1 1 1 •• 8 5 1 5 120 5 •• Blodgett, 594 ••••••. 8 .... 41 61.50 " Chaffee, 615 ....... 1 7 8 8 2 2 8 .• .. 113 169.50 Bloomfield, 158 ..... 1 1 ••• 1 •.• 87 '" 1 148.50 6 .. 99 1 2 2 .... 39 58.50 Essex, 278 ...•••••• 1 '" 8 2 1 .. 6 8 .. .. 82 48.00 Lakeville, 489 •••••• 1 '" 4 2 1 5 1 .... 2 1 25 .. , 96 144.00 Dexter, 582 ••••.••• Advance, 590 .•..•.. 2 1 1 1 6 4 2 ... 2 .• .. 58 79.60 Puxico, 596 ........ 2 •.• 1 1 .... 86 52.60 \ .. Morehouse, 60S •.••. 2 1 1 .. ... 1 48 64.50 2 .. . TOTAL ........ 481 241 281121 451 791 151 281 951· .1. ·1 .. 1,1651$ 1,747.501$

....

... ...

...

... .... .... ...

109.50 $ 6.00 $ 108.50 $ ...... $ 125.00 $ 243.90 255.90 12.00 98.00 None 100.50 1.50 101.00 • 2.00 68.60 18.00 45.60 20.00 289.70 ...... 239.70 85.00 ...... None 186.80 178.80 7.50 None 39.80 78.80 39.00 184.20 179.70 12.75 4.50 98.00 ....... 469.90 148.50 56.50 20.00 57.00 58.50 1.50 68.80 40.00 64.80 1.50 16.80 . 146.10 66.00 2.10 146.10 86.10 None 92.10 12.60 6.00 68.00 52.50 52.50 420.00 . 64.50 64.50 ....... 97.501$ .... 1$ 1,845.001$ 114.00 $ 1,698.701$ 89.301$ 1,419.651$ ...•. $ .... $ 18.90 8.00 2.10 4.20 6.80 16.80 14.70 .

..... ..... ....... .... .... ..... .... ...... ..... ...... .....

.... ..... ...... ..... ...... ...... ....

. .......

....... ....... .......

....... ...... ......... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

...... $ ..... ....... ...... ....... ...... 80.00 8.00 ....... ...... ....... . ..... ....... ....... ....... ..... ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ...... ....... 80.00 8.00 ....... ...... 60.001$

6.00

FIFTY-FmST DISTRICT-G. C. BISHOP, D. D. G. M., Caruthersville, Mo. Kennett, 68 .•.••••• 8 7 6\.. 8 12 1 8 2 5 Four Mile, 212 .••••• 7 •.• 1 11 . 4 88 8 '1' 4 Hornersville, 215 ••• 8 4 1 1 1.... .. Cardwell, 281 •••••• "4'\'2·1 1 1 1 6 .. Malden, 406 •••••••• 8 5 1 5 1. .. 6 2 4 8 81 2 5 2 . Senath, 518 . 2 1..... 2 Portageville, 166 ••• 2 .•. 10 •• Point Pleasant, 176. ........ 1 5 .. New Madrid, 429 •••. 1 11....... 1.... .. Parma, 650 •••••••• 2 ... 24 ... 1 ... 1 ...... Caruthersville, 461.. 4 2 2 4 8 4 2 5 10 .. Hayti, 571 ••••••••• 2 ... 5 2 1 1 1 .. 5 •••••• Steele, 684 . 11 10 8 2... 1 1 1 .. 6 6 .. Bernie, 578 •••.••. TOTAL ........ 501 401 881151 861 891 101 141 621 .. 1 11 7 • Credit $3.00. • Credit $2.00.

1.....

118 $ 169.50 $ 16.80 $ .••. $ 186.80 $ 18.00 $ 168.801$ ..•... $ 870.00 $ .••••• $ •.••• 89 188.50 8.40.. .. • 141.90 10.50 181.40.. .. .. . 195.00.. .. . . 66 99.00 8.40..... 107.40 1.50 105.90....... 55.00 . 46 69.00 2.10. . • • • 71.10 1.50 69.60. . . . • . . None. . . • • .. . .•••• 111 166.50 4.20..... 170.70 7.50 168.20....... 800.00 .. 96 144.00 4.20..... 148.20 7.50 140.70....... 160.00 .. 49 78.60 4.20..... 77.70 8.00 74.70....... None .. 40 60.00. . . . .. ...•. 60.00 •..•••• 60.00 160.00 •...• " •••••• 401 60.001 1 1 60.001....... 20.00 40.00 70.00 .. 56 84.00. • . . •. 84.00 •....•. 84.00. . • . • • • 70.00. • . • • •• • ••••• 126 189.00 6.80. . . . • 195.80 6.00 188.00 6.80 576.00 •..•• " •••••• 76 114.00 10.50. . . . • 124.50 8.00 124.50 • 8.00 • . . • • .• • ••••• 44 66.00 •...• , ••••. 66.00. • • . . . • 66.00. • . • • • • 176.00. • • • • •• • ••••• 41 61.50 12.60... .. 74.10 ....... 74.10.. .. .. . 80.00... .... .. .... 9981$ 1,489.501$ 77.701$ .... 1$ 1,667.201$ 58.60 $ 1,406.401$ 106.801$ 2,162.001$ ...... 1$ .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT-KIPP C. JOHNSON, D. D. G. M., Poplar BId, Mo.

a!

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

Poplar Bluft', 209 •••. Pine, 314 ••••.•••.. Composite, 369 ••••. Naylor, 568 •••••••• Greenville, 107 •••.. Wayne, 526 ...•.... TOTAL ........

~

:::

·s

a! ].fi ~ ! ~ .!!l ] ~~ ~ -< ~ !=I~

]

~

~

'2

QI

0

.!!l

p.; ::a

~e

Z

~ ~ !=I

QI

~]

.Ql

~

l:l.

til

til

l:l.

] al

i 3 3 3 3 1 31 5 3 15 .. .... 2 2 2 .. ... .... . .. ... 8 .• . ... ... ... ... .. ... 12 1 2 .... .. . ., 1 1 1 •. ... 1 1 ••• .... . ..... 2 1 1 " 11 •••• ... 4 4 •• ., .. 3 3 2 2 2 5 1 5 .... .. .... !=I

><

IZl

,

111 101

91 51 141

501

81 141

27 1.. 1.. 1..

]~

~

t'fi~QI ~..::l~

"'~

,s.=

fa! f

~allll ",QI l:::~~

• r-l QlIll '" QI

~~

::!~

III =

e'" ~8

...= ::s0

~

~~

e

<QI -;::s

!=Ie

C;!=I ~ !=I 0 Eo! -< 341 511.50 $ 2.10 $ .... $ 513.60 $ 41 1$ 61.50 61.50 106.50 106.50 41 61.50 61.50 70 105.00 23.10 128.10 135 202.50 4.20 206.70 6991$ 1,048.501$ 29.401$ •... 1$ 1,077.901$

"I

...... ..... ...... ..... ..... ..... .....

~~

46.50 $

....... 18.00

~

QI

::s

~

!=I

=

u

QI

+>

6

~

~

= 467.10 $ ...... $

~

~.!3

!

~~] ~! ~~3

0

e.

~iQl

::!lil~ III ~

.;~~ ~

~

966.00 $ 86.50 100.00 116.00

61.50 88.50 60.00 1.50 151.20 • 28.10 199.20 284.70 7.50 73.50 $ 1,027.501$· 23.101$ 1,558.201$

.......

QI,,= ~ ::s "'=r:t 2'" t'..c=s

iQlr:t

~

20.00 $

2.00

20.001$

2.00

........ ....... ...... . ....... ....... ....... .......

....... .......

=~

.~ ~~ §~§

...... ...... ...... ...... . .....

FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT-o. E. ARMSTRONG, D. D. G.:M., West Plains, Mo. lit. Zion, 327 ••••.. Ingomar, 586 ••.•.•. Mountain View, 637. Alton, 255 ......... Wilderness, 374 .... Woodside, 887 ••••.. Clifton, 463 ........ Koshkonong, 582 ••• Sampson, 298 ••••.. Bayou, 365 ••••••••• Rockbridge, 435 .... Robert Burns, 496 ... TOTAL ........ • Credit $28.10.

6

3

2 5

18 5 1 2 1 2 8

••• 1 ••• ... •.• ...

8 7 •• 1 8 •• 1 1 2 .. 1 ....

..

2

.. .... . .. 1 3 ... ... . .. .. .. ..,. .. ... ... ..... 8 .. ... ... 1 ... ... 2 6 •. ., .. ... ... .. 15 .. .. .. .....'1 .. 1 1 1 2 .... .. . . .. .... .. .. .. 9 9 2 1 1 .. .. 22 21 "91::I"i 17 1 ... .. ., ..

·.oll

• .. 2 3 3 •. /

., ,

,

,

411 361 421 81 131

401

21 121

831 .. 1.. 1 2

2451$ 867.50 $ 16.80 $ .•.. $ 884.30 $ 27.00 $ 857.30 $ ...... $ 138.50 . 87 130.50 10.50 141.00 7.50 87.50 ...... 26 89.00 89.00 1.50 111.60 75 112.50 2.10 114.60 3.00 23 ...... 34.50 84.50 1.50 38.00 87.80 23 84.50 6.30 ..... 40.80 8.00 121 169.50 181.50 ..... 181.50 12.00 42 63.00 .... 68.00 68.00 18 27.60 27.00 2.10 ..... 29.10 1.50 22 83.00 33.00 88.00 46 68.10 69.00 71.10 3.00 2.10 .... 62 93.00 ....... 93.00 ..... 98.00 ...... 7901$ 1,185.001$ 39.901$ •.•• 1$ 1,224.901$ 60.00 $ 1,164.901$ .•.•. ·1$

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

..... ..... ..... ..... . ..... .

....... ....... .

...... . ....... . ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

41.65 $ ...... $ ..... 82.00 . 30.00 None . 59.50 . 12.50 48.00 None None 24.00 21.00 320.50 589.151$ ...... 1$ .....

...... ........ ...... ..... ....... .....

....... ....... ....... . ...... ....... ....... ....... .......

...... ..... ...... ...... ....... ...... .....

......


FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRIOT-G. J. VAUGHAN, D. D. G. M., Ozark, Mo. Sparta, 296 •••••••• Friend, 862 •••.• '" Billings, 379 •••••••. Clever. 645 ••••••••. Claflin. 229 .••••••• Kirbyville, 264 ..... Forsyth, 468 ....... Branson. 687 .•••••. Galena, 615 •••••••• Crane, 519 •••••••.• TOTAL ........

4 8 1 2 1 4 2

":I"~ :i 2 2 •• 1 ••. 1 1 •• 2 1 •• 2 "2!'i

2 191 161 181 21

...

1

1 1

4 4 8

1

1 6 ... 4 1

... ...

2 61

1

2

... ...

14 361

1 61

... 1 8 51

1 •• 12 .. 6 ••

..

.. .... .. 3 •• .. .. " "

" "

.... 7 •• .. .. .. .. 15 .. .. 6 ••

"

"

491 .. 1.. 1..

44 $ 106 29 80 22 84 48 87

66.00 $ ..... $ .... $ 167.60 43.60 2.10 45.00 2.10 88.00 61.00 64.60 2.10 1.00 130.50

66.00 $ ...... $ 167.60 6.00 46.60 6.00 47.10 4.50 88.00 61.00 1.60 66.60 9.00 130.50 6.00

66.00 $ ...... $ 161.60 . 89.60 42.60 88.00 49.60 56.60 100.00 24.50

780.001$ 10.501$ 1.001$

198.20 789.501$

711.001$

..... ..... .....

...... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ..... ........ ..... 126 189.00 4.20 . .... 5201$

.......

...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ........

......... ....... ....... 172.20 ....... 21.00 64.00 $

None$ 224.00 70.00 48.00 20.00 114.80 None 196.00 8~6.00

10.00 $

10.00 ....... ...... ........ ...... ........ ....... ........ ......

24.501$ 1,068.801$

1.00

2.00 ....... ..... ....... ..... ...... ....... .....

......

20.001$

8.00

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRIOT-W. N. MARBUT, D. D. G. M., Mt. Vemon, Mo. Monett, 129 ........ Purdy, 148 •••.••••. Barry. 867 ••••••••. Pythagoras, 383 •••• Seligman. 517 •••••• Comfort, 583 •.••••• Mount Vernon, 99 ••. Canopy. 284 •••••••. Marionville, 890 .... Decatur, 400 ....... Verona, 452 •.•••••. Red Oak. 468 •••••• Stinson, 628 ........ Miller, 567 •.••••••• TOTAL ........ • Credit .90.

1\ .•. 1 1 5

3

2 1 6

1 1 7

...

:

.... ..

4 21 6 6 71 .. 1 256 $ 384.00 $ 8.40 $ .... $ 392.40 $ 31.60 $ 360.90 $ .. .... $ None $ ...... $ ..... 7 10 2 2 10 .. 62 78.00 14.70 92.70 16.00 77.70 480.00 4 ••. 16 6 2 8 •. " ., 24.00 12.60 2.10 84.50 6.00 29.40 • .90 1 174 261.00 2.10 8 1 4 .... 263.10 4.60 731.00 1.00 258.60 10.00 " 4 .... 41 61.60 8.40 69.90 69.90 286.00 " 1 •• '" 16 ••• 64 81.00 81.00 24.00 63.00 • 6.00 1 .. 2 2 2 131 196.50 196.50 8.00 198.50 928.00 149 9 3 6 4 8 2 13 .. " 223.50 6.00 228.50 450.00 217.50 6 1 ••• 7 •• 86 129.00 129.00 9.00 90.00 260.00 30.00 1 .... 5 .. 2 1 1 •• 98 139.50 2.10 141.60 141.60 166.00 2 1 1 ••. 33 49.60 4.20 63.70 2 •• " 1.50 62.20 46.00 1 .... 17 26.60 1 2 .• " 26.60 None 25.50 1 ••• 2 ••• 46 7 .. 69.00 8.00 66.00 75.00 69.00 1 .... , 2 13 .. . 59 88.60 280.00 88.60 88.60 " 221 81 821 691 17 1 221 1291 .. 1.. 1 1 1.2071$ 1,810.601$ 62.601$ 2.101$ 1.860.901$ 103.50 $ 1.674.801$ 90.001$ 8,641.001' 10.001S 1.00

0'"1' .. :~

... ... ... .. ... 6 5 ... ... ... .. ... ... ... .. "i\"i ...

231 19 1 • Credit $6.00.

... ... .... ....

..

.. .... .. .... ...... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . ..

.....

...... ...... ....... .....

..... .....

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ...... .....

.......

....... ....... .......

........ ...... ....... ........ ....... ....... . ........ ........ ...... ....... ....... ...... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... ........ ....... ..........

.......

......

...... ....... ..... ....... ..... ...... ........ ..... ...... .....


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-W. A. PHIPPS, D. D. G. M., Neosho, Mo.

'i NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

IIIII

'tl

]

tl.

'tl

CIl

:;:;

Southwest, 466 ••••• Anderson, 621. •••.. Noel, 647 .......... Neosho, 247 ••••••.• Racine, 478 ••••.•.. Granby, 514 .••.•••. Stella, 538 ......... TOTAL ........

~ ~~

'tl

CIl

~

.l!l

is -<

III ~

1 1 10 6 1 •.. 1 1 2 1 2 2

1 1 1 '" 1 3 2 .. 2 ..

~I

~ CIl

'tl

rl:;:I

·s

~

.~

~

CIl

l1J

0:5III CIl

.l!l

p..;

)j

Z

~ ..9! II

Co f§

'tl 'tl

Co~ t f§

><

~

I=l ~ rn rn~ 1 3 ... 4 •• 6 10 ••. 1 12 .. , 2 .... 1 5 .• 14 12 1 3 7 .. , 6 •• , 1 5 .. , 9 •.. 1 .... 6 ... 24 .. 231 461 11 71 571 .. 1.. / ..

~

A

... ... ... ... ... .. ... 17 1 111 131 61

ci d

. ... . .. .. .. . .. . ..

.. ....

...

~

CIl

'S CIl

~

47 $ 78 30 216 70 113 26 5801$

'tl~

III ~ ",till

;GI '"'till'"' O'tllll

~~ ~

~

-<

~j~

lIlallll

CIl,",CIl

I::~>t

l-t81

~>t

:5!tilI 1Il~

Co·..

'"''i ~Col

....~

:;:I

0

'tl

S

llll

ai8

~S

-<

~I=l

=~

~~

8 0 ..:I 70.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 70.50 $ 4.50 $ 117.00 12.60 129.60 15.00 45.00 4.20 49.20 324.00 27.30 23.10 328.20 18.00 105.00 105.00 9.00 169.50 169.50 13.50 39.00 . 39.00 9.00 870.00J$ 44.101$23.10/$ 891.001$ 69.00 $

..... ..... ...... ..... ...... .... ·1 ..... .....

.......

~ ~ .... ~

:;:I

0

S

-<

till

GI

.:;:1

~ CIl Col ~

~

l:I:l

66.00 $ ...... $ 114.60 49.20 310.20 96.00 156.00 30.00 822.001$ ..••• ·1$

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

tilI.S rl .S ~ till

.~ ~'tl §~§

.5~rl° :;:1..:1

~

S • 1l :5!:il III .....

0

tl.

'tlO'tl

~~,g

gjGl~

~'tl

GIS ~ bIltill:;:l

... a

'"'~~ ~ 0'=

'tl~GI:i

'iii tl.

92.00 $ ...... $ ..... 143.95 10.00 . . 90.00 30.00 45.00 225.00 .. 29.00 654.951$ 10.00/$ .....

....... ....... ....... ....... .......

..... ..... ...... ...... ...... ......

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRIOT-FAY G. FULKERSON, D. D. G. M., Webster Groves, Mo. Bonhomme, 45 .••• Bridgeton, 80 •••••• Webster Groves, 84 •• Fenton, 281. .•••••• Meramec, 813 •••••• Kirkwood, 484 ...... Ferguson, 542 ...... Maplewood, 566 ..••. Clayton, 601. •.•.•. Wellston, 613 ••.•••. Valley Park, 629 •••. Jennings, 640 ••••.• University, 649 ••.•• Gardenville, 655 .•.. TOTAL ........ • CredIt $1.50.

1 2 3

1 2 2

3 6

3 4

3 2

3 4 7 1 6

1 .. 2 9 2 3

1 3

. , . ... ... .. ...

1 .. 1 4 6 •.. 1 1 2 9 4 6 1 6 3 ... 1 .. 5 2 ... 4 ... 2 1 2 291361 18/

... ... ... .. 11

1 8

3 2 431 351

....

1 2 •.. 108 $ 162.00 $ ..... $ 1.00 $ 161.00 $ 2 .• 3.00 $ 158.00 $ ...... $ 120.00 $ 262 7 1 4 9 •• . , .. 393.00 27.20 420.20 409.70 10.50 168.00 64 12 8 55 .. . , .. 700 1,050.00 161.70 1,211.70 1,115.70 ....... 96.00 643.00 8 .. ; 137 205.50 . ., 193.50 205.50 12.00 145.00 ., 48 72.00 4.20 2 1 ... 76.20 3.00 73.20 66.00 293 439.50 3 6 5 14 .. , ..... 439.50 430.30 9.20 563.00 132 13 2 5 12 .. , 1 198.00 2.10 ..... 200.10 19.50 180.60 115.00 1 4 6 34 .. , 3 367 550.50 4.20 ..... 554.70 1.50 553.20 789.00 459.00 2 4 5 23 .. , 307 460.50 . 460.50 3.00 1.50 880.85 744.70 553 829.50 4.20 2.00 831.70 58 8 6 18 .. 87.00 622.00 60 90.00 1 .... . 90.00 90.00 815.00 182 273.00 3 5 .... .. 273.00 273.00 . 410.00 , 338 507.00 38 7 5 .... 507.00 450.00 57.00 1,390.00 120 180.00 169.50 7 2 1 4 .. , 1 180.00 10.50 108.00 205/ 501 521 1711· ./ •• 1 5 3,6071$ 5,410.50/$203.60/$ 3.001$ 5,611.101$ 312.20 $ 6,300.401$ ...... /$ 6,334.86/$

.... .

....

.. ..

. . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .

..... ..... ...... ..... ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

.... .... ..... ..... .....

....... ....... ....... ....... ....... .......

....... .......

• ....... ....... ...... ....... .......

10.00 $

1.00

20.00 10.00

2.00 1.00

....... ........ ...... ........ ...... ........ ...... .......

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

....... ....... ...... ...... 20.00 60.00/$

2.00 6.00


FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-E. 1':. STARLING, D. D. G. M., Olean, Mo.

...2 ...21

........ .. .. .. ..

Glensted, 250 •••••. Versailles, 320 ••••• Barnett, 591 ••••••• Olean, 134 ......... Ionia, 381 •••••••••• TOTAL ........

.. ~I .. ~I .. ~ '21" i "~I"~l": '41"2

Independence, 76 ••• Summit, 263 ....... McDonald, 324 ••••• Blue Springs, 887 ••• Raytown, 891. ••••• Christian, 392 •••••• Buckner, 501 .•••••• Marlborough, 569 ••. Mt. Washington, 614. Grandview, 618 ••••• Grain Valley, 644 ••. TOTAL ........

1 .. 8 26 1 3 11) .. 2 ... 4 ... 18 .. 3 3 3 •. 1 8 1 4 22 .. , 2 2 2 •• 1 2 •• 4 .... 2 2 2 2 ... 4 1 2 6 •• 5 1 ••• 3 5 5 6 1 ••. 5 2 8 12 .. 5 4 4 2 4 3 1 1 3 .. 4 4 2 3 8 3 1 1 23 .. 15 11 10 4 3 8 ... 2 5 •• ... ... ... .. 1 1 1 12 .. 871 821 301141 261 581 181 181 1181 .. 1.. 1..

61

51

8f 61

31

1 ••• 5 2 3 1 4 ... 13 5 261 81

51

4 •• 3 •• 4 " 1 •• 27 •••• 2 391 .. 1.. 1 2

41 $ 86 36 54 220 4371$

61.50 $ ..... $ .... $ 129.00 2.10 54.00 81.00 330.00 4.20 ..... 655.501$ 6.301$ •••• 1$

..... ...... ..... .....

61.50 $ 131.10 54.00 81.00 334.20 661.801$

1.50 $ 7.50 4.50 6.00 19.50 39.00 $

60.00 $ ...... $ 123.60 49.50 75.00 314.70 622.801$ .. ····1$

....... ........ ...... .......

10.00 $

1.00

10.00 20.001'

1.00 2.00

....... ...... ....... ......

88.00 $ 243.15 3.00 105.30 320.45 759.901$

FIFTY-NINTH DISTRICT-N. D. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo. 1

1

....

..

... ...

...

. ... .. .. .. .. ....

.. .. .... ...... .... .... .... .. .. .. ..

372 $ 558.00 $ 6.30 $ .... $ 564.80 $ 156.00 104 156.00 350.10 348.00 2.10 232 135.90 127.50 8.40 85 163.50 163.50 109 118.80 112.50 75 6.30 108.00 108.00 72 162.90 154.50 103 8.40 483.30 466.50 16.80 311 193.80 187.50 125 6.30 109.50 73 109.50 1,6611$ 2,491.501$ 54.601$ •••• 1$ 2,546.101$

...... ..... ...... .... ...... ..... ..... ...... .....

..... ...... .... ...... .....

39.00 $ ....... 12.00 ....... 6.00 7.50 7.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 1.50 87.00

525.30 $ 156.00 338.10 135.90 157.50 109.50 100.50 56.00 178.80 189.30 108.00 $2,054.901$

527.50 $ ...... $ ..... 220.00 664.35 175.00 81.00 1.80 128.00 30.00 8.00 5.00 80.00 8.00 102.40 199.90 10.00 1.00 300.00 324.00 85.00 148.90 404.201$ 2,552.751$ 70.001$ 7.00

...... $

...... ...... ......

....... ....... .......

....... ....... ....... .......

.......

....... .......

....... .......

........ ...... ...... . .....

.....•


REOAPITULATION

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER AND DISTRICT NUMBER

'i;:

"tl

~

'i

~

~

] H. M. Jayne, 1. •••••. Willis J. Bray, 2 ..... W. E. Singley, 3 ••••. Lynn J. Limes, 4 •••• Hendrix Newman, 5 •• Curtis F. Smith, 6 .... Uel W. Lamkin, 7 •••• Frank R. Elton, 8 ••.. C. A. Carpenter, 9 •• T. D. WilliamB, 10 .••. Emsley C. James, 11 •. J. M. Gallatin, 12 ••• Forrest L. Madden, 13 .. L. E. Wilhoit, 14 .... Donald H. Sosey, 15 ••• Warren H. May, 16 ••• C. S. Hicks, 17...... Wm. F. Wigginton, 18 • T. H. Edwards, 19 ••• Otto Hale, 20 •••••••• J. P. Tucker, 21. ••••. Darius A. Brown, 22 •• C. B. Waddell, 23 •••• John W. AdamB, 24 ... S. L. Jewett, 25 ••••• Eli J. Haynes, 26 •••• Louis J. Graue, 27 ••• Paul A. Thomas, 28 ••. W. P. Smith, 29 ..... Wm. E. Lange, 80 .•• Credits $95.25.

"tl 111

.!l III ~

~

23 23 34 12 11

21 5 27 80 42 18 20 8 20 28 4 3 4 17 24 28 203 16 7 10 22 30 15 8 1

20 22 27

17 22 19 11 9 8 6 19 16 5 3 23 21 63 71 32 29 17 1 17 15 14 6 7 21 20 22 19 3 2 4 2 5 14 1:1 20 19 25 18 169 140 17 11 8 5 10 7 21 27 25 23 12 8 2

1~1

'i ].a ~

's ~

~

~

~ 'S

<

~

5 4 5 4 3 4 4 3 23 5 9 12 7 7 7 2 ... 2 8 5 2 82 1 3 10 9 89 4 2 3

42 11 12 21 41 11 18 39 10 6 67 10 11 1 3 31 24 6 31 10 7 10 25 7 41 93 17 44 7 15 10 38 14 10 100 25 24 20 10 54 11 6 11 98 15 4 40 8 1 26 4 11 35 5 1 27 4 4 27 4 20 5 8 255 1,415 141 31 13 12 38 4 6 41 8 45 10 28 2 42 10 33 4 3 26 ••• 1 9 3

.... ....

~

~

111

Cl

~ d ~.)i

.!l

Z ;::i ] ]

~

s:i,

rg

111 ~

25 14 15 16 1 15 16 11

44 13 '16 16 11

9 23 12

'7

12 5 11 13 220 19 19 10 15 18 6 5 7

s:i,'i ~

rg ~

i 71 .. .... 63 .. ....

l'I.l

l'I.l

31 32 21 50 47 62 161 55 56 36 12 25 106 30 8 94 34 31 48 932 46 27 36 54 34 25 18 4

.. .. .. .. •• ..

ri<l

1 .•

.... .... .... ..... ... .... 2 .. 1 1 •• . ... .. . ... .. .. .. .. .... . ..... .. .. .. .. . ... .. 1 •• .. .. .. .. 1 1 .. .. .. •• 2 3 .. .. ..

•.•• 1 .. 1 1 .. .. , .. 1 3

. .. .. .. .. 1 •. .. .. "

f

~

111

=a

951 994 892 784 325 624 935 672 3,553 951 979 1,163 639 967 1,735 521 245 988 564 764 594 15,110 908 848 687 888 1,075 521 475 401

-gt:

. . .g . . III 111

~ ~ 8..:l~

If

... blI or::

111 III "'111 ~~

~~ f ~~ ... ~f~ "''i t::~i>l ~~ ~

....r:: 8 S <111 'iil~

o~

"tl

Il~ ~.~

~S

~~

~ ~

111

~

~ 111

i:l~

~

~

S

blI blI.S II .S ~ -gO

~"tl

.g

.~ ~'tS ~,§ §~§ "'r::~

~~..:l ~~.s

=a s . ~1a :5!~i:l ell .... ~~~

~111~

&j'"

l:Q 0 ~ ..:I 0 ~ ~ < $ 1,426.50 $ 12.60 $ ... $ 1,439.10 $ 63.00 $ 1,351.10 $ 25.00 $ 2,612.45 $ $ .... 1,535.10 61.50 1,347.60 126.00 1,548.00 30.00 3.00 44.10 1.491.00 58.60 1,273.70 64.50 2,336.50 44.00 3.40 1,338.00 60.90 2.10 1,396.80 1,091.10 28.50 2,026.50 10.00 1.00 12.60 1,188.60 100.50 1,176.00 1,443.75 493.80 16.50 477.30 6.30 487.50 23.10 918.92 1,002.85 36.00 954.25 30.00 3.00 66.85 936.00 20.00 ; 2.00 1,408.80 46.50 655.50 706.80 3,523.76 6.30 1,402.50 2,041.95 10.00 1.00 994.05 1,008.00 16.80 8.40 1,016.40 37.50 5,993.10 20.00 2.00 5,275.55 5,413.55 139.50 5,329.50 84.05 .... 1,228.80 151.50 2,392.44 60.00 6.00 1,446.30 66.00 19.80 1,426.50 10.00 1.00 1,489.50 57.00 1,330.60 102.00 8,759.06 1,468.50 21.00 1,391.20 218.00 3,247.25 1,744.50 21.00 6.80 1,759.20 150.00 1,798.36 10.00 983.40 50.40 1,008.90 30.00 958.50 1,383.30 2,778.00 10.00 1.00 10.50 2.10 1,458.90 81.00 1.450.50 2,190.90 273.00 4,751.35 10.00 1.00 10.50 2.10 2,610.90 147.00 2,602.60 613.70 118.30 794.00 792.00 60.00 781.50 10.50 ..... 673.00 328.60 367.50 89.00 367.50 1,414.00 1,505.10 52.50 38.60 8,000.55 1,482.00 23.10 804.00 . 1,237.00 846.00 42.00 846.00 1,113.30 . 303.30 1,147.80 34.60 1,131.00 16.80 . 1,638.83 20.00 1.00 877.80 30.00 907.80 891.00 16.80 22,665.00 579.60 2.10 23,242.50 2,205.30 19,196.50 1,840.70 25,408.70 150.00 14.00 1,179.60 161.10 3,539.00 1,387.20 46.50 1,362.00 25.20 1,215.00 2,243.10 10.00 2.00 1,272.00 57.00 1,272.00 ...... . 10.00 1.00 973.20 6.30 1,757.65 61.50 1,080.50 12.60 6.30 1,036.80 587.20 10.00 1.00 1,329.75 1,897.25 67.50 65.25 .... 1,332.00 1,553.10 2,620.90 40.00 4.00 63.00 1,612.50 7.80 4.20 1,616.10 1,496.80 40.00 4.00 763.00 49.50 781.50 781.50 10.00 1.00 829.34 671.50 1.50 712.00 39.00 .60 712.50 588.00 ...... 1,506.50 601.50 13.50 601.50 .... ~

<

.....

....

..... ... .... ....

.... .... ....

.... ...... .... .... ...... .... .... .... .... ...

...... .... ...... ......

. .....

......

...... . ..... ....... ..... .

..... ..... .....

...... ...... ...... ......

...... .....

...... ...... ...... . ..... ......

..... ...... .... ..... .....

...... .....

......

.....


Albert LinxwUer, 81.. 12 18 5 84 4 16 86 .. " 8 1,285 1,852.50 17.70 .... 1,870.20 49.50 1,532.70 288.00 4,526.85 10.00 1.00 R. A. Breuer, 82 .•••• 88 21 4 23 15 4 16 18 .. 1 .• 1,077 1,615.50 18.18 1,628.68 22.50 1,606.18 ...... 1,817.00 20.00 2.00 A. J. Michener, 88A •• 116 108 98 26 8!1 700 88 200 862 2 2 8 12,569 18,858.50 258.00 12.60 19,098.90 1,065.90 18,088.00 ...... 16,872.60 140.00 18.00 F. Magoon, 88B ..•..• 120 109 98 26 75 691 68 186 887 .. 2 4 11,611 17,416.50 156.90 .... 17,678.40 956.40 16,617.00 21,180.50 70.00 4.00 William C. Deacon, 84 11 11 6 6 84 26 16 17 45 •• .... 786 1,102.60 71.40 .... 1,178.90 89.00 1,029.90 106.00 1,759.06 ..... D. O. Bradley, 85 •••• 17 18 8 2 24 88 8 8 59 .. .... 597 896.50 50.40 .... 946.90 56.00 747.00 144.40 1,118.50 10.00 J. P. Hurtt, 86 •.••.. 19, 18 10 10 24 8 110 22 80 ..•• 1 1,688 2,882.00 27.80 .... 2,409.80 166.00 2,244.80 ...... 4,487.60 ..... Thornton Jennings, 87 • 45 28 28 7 22 50 10 22 66 .. .... 1,004 1,606.00 26.20 . ... 1,681.20 78.60 1,481.60 84.10 2,966.75 70.00 7.00 Winan I. Mayfield, 88 .• 20 6 8 8 6 40 6 9 107 1 ... , 749 1,128.60 10.60 .... 1,184.00 60.00 961.60 112.60 2,112.10 80.00 1.00 Chaa. L. Woods, 89 .•• 84 80 81 11 22 25 5 20 61 .. .... 1,527 2,290.60 46.20 . ... 2,886.70 87.60 2,184.60 164.70 8,792.15 50.00 6.00 H. H. Balsiger, 40 .•• 18 11 9 5 19 8 8 18 12 2 2 .. 998 1,489.50 77.70 .... 1,667.20 58.50 1,851.10 . ..... 2,144.20 20.00 1,.00 M. E. Ewing, 41 ••.•• 14 12 11 8 1 25 7 17 69 1 " •• 604 906.00 2.10 .... 908.10 46.90 862.20 ...... 1,805.25 . .... T. W. Snodgrass, 42. 19 15 8 8 4 10 2 4 15 .. .... 642 818.00 6.80 9.20 810.10 16.00 605.00 290.10 1,976.04 40.00 1.00 D. V. Morris, 48 ••••• 40 31 28 18 28 84 10 11 49 .. .. .. 864 1,281.00 54.60 .... 1,886.60 62.50 1,281.90 1.20 1,287.65 10.00 1.00 Ray Bond, 44 ••••••••. 25 21 21 7 57 98 14 39 198 .... 1 2,019 3,028.50 128.10 . ... 8,166.60 147.00 2,981.10 80.00 2,896.86 10.00 1.00 Jewell E. Windle, 45 .•. 87 34 27 16 45 211 18 66 289 .. .. 4 2,741 4,111.50 77.70 .... 4,189.20 316.60 3,874.20 ...... 8,762.60 80.00 8.00 Carl A. Swenson, 46 ••. 19 17 12 3 17 39 9 24 20 .. .. .. 706 1,059.00 87.80 4.20 1,092.60 56.50 1,087.10 ...... 1,076.78 ...... 16 18 11 1 49 2 8 J. N. Sparks, 47 ••••. 7 88 .. .. .. 428 642.00 69.00 .... 711.00 78.50 687.50 ...... 747.60 25, 22 20 12 J. C. Akers, 48 ••..•. 21 83 11 24 84 •• .. .. 1,288 1,982.00 42.00 . ... 1,974.00 124.50 1,768.50 81.00 2,929.88 80.00 8.00 17 18 18 5 James A. Kinder, 49 •. 9 44 10 10 902 1,358.00 28 •. .. .. 18.90 .... 1,871.90 66.00 1,805.90 . ..... 880.50 10.00 1.00 43 24 28 12 45 79 15 28 G. A. Sample, 60 ••••• 95 .. .. .. 1,165 1,747.50 97.50 . ... 1,846.00 114.00 1,698.70 39.80 1,419.66 60.00 6.00 50 40 38 15 86 89 10 993 1,489.50 Grover C. Bishop, 51.. 14 62 .. 1 7 47.70 .... 1,667.20 1,405.40 106.30 2,162.00 58.60 . 11 10 9 5 Kipp C. Johnson, 52 •. 14 50 8 14 27 •. .. .. 699 1,048.50 29.40 .... 1,077.90 78.50 1,027.50 . ..... 1,568.20 20.00 2.00 41 42 8 36 18 C. E. Armstrong, 58 •. 40 2 12 83 .. " 2 790 1,185.00 89.90 .... 1,224.90 60.00 1,164.90 ...... 689.15 .... 19 16 18 2 G.J. Vaughan, 64 •••. 86 6 5 6 49 .• . ... 520 780.00 10.50 1.00 789.50 54.00 711.00 24.50 1,068.80 20.00 8.00 28 19 22 8 W. N. Marbut, 55 .••• 82 69 17 22 129 .... 1 1,207 1,810.50 52.50 2.10 1,860.90 108.50 1,674.80 90.00 8,641.00 10.00 1.00 W. A. Phipps, 56 •.•• 17 11 18 6 28 46 1 7 57 .. .. .. 580 870.00 44.10 28.10 891.00 69.00 822.00 ...... 654.95 10.00 F. G. Fulkerson, 57 .. , 48 85 29 86 18 205 50 52 171 .. .. 5 8,607 5,410.00 208.60 8.00 5,611.10 812.20 5,800.40 ...... 6,884.85 60.00 6.00 6 E. F. Starling, 58 •••• 5 8 6 8 26 8 5 89 .. " 2 487 655.50 6.80 .... 661.80 89.00 622.80 . ..... 759.90 20.00 2.00 N. D. Jackson, 59 •••. 87 82 80 14 26 58 18 18 118 .... .. 1,661 2,491.50 54.60 .... 2,546.10 87.00 2,054.90 404.20 2,552.75 70.00 7.00 Total •••••••••••..• 1,69411,42111,275155411,25215,475188111,51615,0701 6117150 96,092 1144,188.0012,989.28189.801146,987.9818,421.50 182,907.9815,800.201188,826.9111,874.001 128.40 Credits $46.40. 2,516.41-Total back per caPIta receIved. Total credits $141.65. $185,424.84-Total cash received as of Sept. 15, 1984.

'°1

. ....

..... .....

....

.


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FmST DISTRIOT-H. M. JAnE, D. D. G. M., Memphis, Mo. County Lodge No.j Location Master Clark ...•••..•.. Revere ...••....•. 167IRevere ..••.....•.. George Inins .. • .••••..••. Fairmont ......••. 290 Wyaconda H. E. Sherwood ....• .. .. Eldorado. • . • . . 318 Luray .....•....••. F. C. Sample •• • Hiram ..•..•...•• 362 Kahoka •........•• , F. M. Story .......•• .. • Gothic ' 486IAlexandria . • . .. H. R. Carner .. • .••••.•••. St. Francisville 588 Wayland .........• L. Wayland ........• Scotland .......• Memphis. • • . . . • • • 16 Memphis. . • . . . . . •• A. L. Luther .. .. • . . . . Gorin. . . .. .. . . . . . 72 Gorin. . • . . . • . . . • .• Rollie E. Dorsey ••..•••. Rutledge ...•..••• 572 Rutledge .•.••.•... G. C. McDonald ....• Schuyler ......•. Middle Fabius ...•. 244 Downing•..•...... E. F. Harris ...•.... .. Lodge of Love ••••. 259 Lancaster.••..••.. H. E. Shepherd .•..• Queen City •..•••• 380lQueen City ••••.... P. A. Sloap .....•••• Glenwood •••••.... 427 Glenwood •..•...•.. C. V. Chattin .....•• Greentop 635IGreentop J. S. Clapper

Secretary Time of Meeting Geo. Hardy ••..•..•• 3rd Thursday M. L. Kurtz 2nd and 4th Fridays H. W. Calvert 1st and 3rd Tuesdays H. B. Montgomery 1st and 3rd Fridays J. P. Foley ......•••. 2nd Tuesday N. N. Frazee ......• 1st Thursday Ralph 1. Ladd , 1st Friday R. E. Shacklett 1st and 8rd Thursdays J. A. Bailey 1st and 8rd Fridays J. B. Bridges ...•..•. 2nd Thursday H. C. Burkland 2nd and 4th Fridays G. L. Lauer •..•..••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays H. W. Roberts Sat. on or after full moon J. E. Pearce 2nd and 4th Mondays

SEOOND DISTRIOT-WILLIS J. BRAY, D. D. G. M., Kirksville, Mo. Adair , Kirksville........ 105IKirksviIle :: ••••••••••••••••••••., PAadulal.vri.ll.e....•..••.....••••.. 319 Brashear ......•••. 366IKirksviIle......•.•. .. • Novinger ••••••••• 588 Novinger Knox ••.••...••. Ark.............. 6INewark ..•..•..••. ••••.•••.•. Colony ...•.....•• 168 Colony .•.......••. ........... Novelty 181 Novelty •••••.••.•. Edina •••••.•..••. 291/Edina•..••..••...• .•••..•..• , Greensburg .•..... 414 Greensburg...•....

C. O. Martin .•.•..•• M. J. Crawford ..••• R. B. McKinney ..••• F. Fiedler Tony Ahern ..••.••• R. E. Moffeth .....•• C. R. Welsh A. T. McCulloch ..••• C. E. Rice •...•..•••

G. C. Chambers F. R. Moore .•..•..•. Chas. F. Link ....•.. C. R. Truitt •••••.••• R. G. Hayden •..•..•. H. N. Killen •..•..•• H. B. Clements W. T. Sharp .....•.. L. A. Corbin

1st and 8rd Tuesdays 1st Tuesday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Sat. on or after full moon Saturday on or before full moon Monday on or before full moon 2nd Friday 2nd and 4th Saturdays


THIBD DISTRICT-WALTER E. SINGLEY, D. D. G.M., Green Oity, Mo. Putnam ••••.••• Hartford ..•..•.•• .. • ..••.••. Somerset ...•..... ••••••••. Unionville ••.••... ......... Lucerne ••••...••. Sullivan Humphreys....... .. • .. .. Seaman.......... Green City Putnam ••••...... Pollock. . . • . . • • • •. Arcana Winigan ...•.....

171IHartford ........•. M. E. Smith •••....• 206 Powersville .....••. F. B. Wison ...•.... 210 Unionville ••••..••. F. E. Wilson ...•••.• 394 Lucerne ........••• Tom Jones .....••.•• 32 Humphreys J. V. Forson 136 Milan C. L. Robinson...... 169 Green City .•••..••. W. R. Lintner .•..•• 190 Newtown ........•. A. N. Tipton .......• 849 Pollock •••••••..•.. R. E. Banner....... 389 Harris C. M. Clem 640 Winigan T. B. Adams ....••..

Zora Smith •..•....•. 1st Saturday M. L. Brown .••.•••. 1st and 8rd MondayS J. U. Brown •..••••• 2nd and 4th MondayS A. F. Lowry .....••.. Thursday on or before full moon W. E. Cook 2nd and 4th TuesdayS H. M. Strother...... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays J. M. Border ......•. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS Joe. W. Moore •••••• Saturday on or before full moon Otis Reinhard ..••..•. 1st and 3rd TuesdayS R. C. Fanning 1st Wednesday T. M. Crawder .....• 1st Saturday

FOURTH DISTRICT-oLYDE O. EVANS, D. D. G. M., Trenton, Mo. Grundy Trenton .. • •••...•. Laredo••••..•.••. ......... Galt ' ......... Spickardsville Mercer •..•..••• Mercer........... .. Ravanna ••...••.. Marion

111 253 423 524 35 258 616

Trenton Laredo ...•..•..... Galt Spickard Princeton •..•..... Ravanna ..•....... Mercer

C. C. R. R. A. O. J.

C. Evans C. Warren ...•..• R. Proctor A. Bushnell G. DubIe .......•• Callaway ......•.• H. Alley

A. O. Ginn Emmett M. Wilson .. A. R. McKay R. B. Kennedy W. E. Mullins .•••••• Charles Saylors ...••. Abijah A. Alley ...•.

FIFTH DISTRIOT-HENDRIX NEWMAN, D. D. G. Harrison •...... Bethany.......... .. • ....... Lorraine ......... •••••.•• Lodge of Light •••. ••.••••. Cainsville ..•••••• ........ New Hampton ........ Prairie

97 128 257 328 510 566

Bethany .........•. J. Ridgeway ......... J. Eagleville .•....... E. Cainsville......•... E. New Hampton E. Gilman City E.

E. A. O. F. R. D.

Webber ..••••. Linthacum .... Martin .....••• Harrold ...•••. Funk Woltz

l\I[.,

1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th MondayS 2nd and 4th FridayS 1st and 8rd WednesdayS 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Wednesday before full moon 2nd and 4th TuesdayS

Bethany, Mo.

Chas. T. Bridges ...•. 2nd and 4th TuesdayS J. L. Mirgon ........ 1st and 3rd Mondays F. Y. Cramer ••.....• 1st and 3rd TuesdayS C. E. Glaze •..•••••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays R. L. Grun 1st and 8rd TuesdayS Ira L. Noble 2nd and 4th WednesdayS


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SIXTH DISTRIOT-oURTIS F. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Darlington, Mo. County Ge?,try

Lodge No.1 Location Master Havana..... 21 McFall J. A. Childers Stanberry ...•.... 109 Stanberry ...••.•.. H. E. Wilson •.••..•... Gentryville •..•.•. 125 Gentryville ••.••.•. Burt Miller .......•. Athens •.•••••.... 127 Albany •••......... E. O. Woody .•....•. Alanthus ...•..... 252 Alanthus Grove ...• J. F. Bockright. ••.. Ancient Craft 377 King City C. C. Clark " Berlin 378IBerlin O. S. Morrow " •.••..•.. Jacoby ...•..•.... 447IDarlington •.....•. Aaron Morris ....••. Worth Grant City........ 66 Grant City C. Golding " ••.••.•••. Defiance.......... 88 Sheridan •..•..•••• J. C. Evans " Allensville 198 Allendale D. L. McQuary " ••........ Jonathan 321IDenver ..........•. A. Z. Combs .......•

Secretary Time of Meeting R. T. Kidney 1st Saturday S. A. Goodding .••... 1st and 3rd Saturdays F. M. Gist •........•. 2nd and 4th Saturdays J. Gavin Whiteley ... 2nd and 4th Fridays L. W. Morris .•....... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays J. A. Ringold 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. B. Owens, Jr 2nd and 4th Fridays Fred Minkner ..•..•. 1st and 3rd Fridays Geo. Hunt 1st and 3rd Mondays Wm. C. Walker ....• Monday on or before full moon H. Brewit 2nd and 4th Saturday C. M. Craven 2nd and 4th Wednesdays

SEVENTH DISTRIOT-GEOBGE HOUOHINS, D. D. G. M., Ravenwood, Mo. Nod~way

Xe!1ia............ 50IHoPkins •..••...... J. E. Mutte ..... " QuItman......... 196 Quitman. . . .. . .. .. H. G. Palmer •..••••. Ravenwood •..••.. 201\Ravenwood•••••••. Ed Spoonemore .•..• Graham ....•..••. 289 Graham ••••.••..•• Clyde Lang .....•..• White Hall ..•.... 301 Barnard ...•••••••. Willard Hartman Kennedy. . • . • • . . •. 329 Elmo ...•..••.••••. Joseph G. Morris Burlington. • • . . .. 442 Burlington J ct.. ... H. L. Rutherford Gaynor City. . • . .. 465 Parnell •••••••.•••• J. S. Matteson ...•.. Nodaway ••.•••••. 470 Maryville .••••.•••• R. H. Hotchkin ...•. Pickering ••.••••. 472\Pickering F. H. Billingsley Guilford 474 Guilford J. E. Todd Clearmont .•••..•• 507IClearmont A. B. Stokes ...•.... Skidmore ..•..•••• 511 Skidmore .••••••••• V. V. Goslee

Fred J. yeomans •... 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. J. McDonald 1st and 3rd Saturdays J. J. Smith •..••••••• 1st and 3rd Saturdays F. E. McNeal ...•..•• 1st and 3rd Thursdays Paul D. Stalling .••.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays T. W. McClaren..... 1st and Srd Mondays H. L. Staples....... 1st and 3rd Fridays W. C. Timmerman.. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays F. R. Marcell .•..•... 2nd Thursday J. L. Clayton 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Alex. H. Wilson 2nd and 4th Thursdays Ira B. Newlon ....••. 1st and 8rd Thursdays Enos D. French •..•. 2nd and 4th Mondays


EIGHTH DISTBIOT-FRAN'X B.. ELTON, D. D. G. 1\1., Tarkio, Mo. Atchison ••.•.••. NO.rth Star •• • Sonora •• .. Northwest .. • Fairfax Holt•..•..•..•.. Maitland ••...••.. •• • •••..••••• Oregon •.••••••.•. •• •.•........ Forest City. • • . . .. •••..•.•..••. Mound City ....••. .••...••.•. Craig............

l57IROCkport J. A. La Farte 200 Watson W. Morgan 858 Tarkio G. R. Wilkerson 483IFairfax ..•..••..•. Earl S. Davis 112 Maitland ••..••.... E. W. Poland ......• l39/0reg on ...••••..... Paul W. Bragg ...••• 214 Forest City ••.•.... G. H. Ramsey ...••.. 294/Mount City ........ Wm. G. McQuire .... 606 Craig .........••.• E. L. Redman ....•.•

J. E. Welch 2nd and 4th Thursdays A. W. Landen lat and 3rd Thursdays J. R. McNulty 2nd and 4th Thursdays W. A. Groesbeck •••.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Lafe Dawson ...•.•... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Silas W. Skelton .•••. 1st and 3rd Mondays O. E. Emery •....... lat Saturday and 3rd Monday T. J. Bridgman 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Wayne A. Sharp, Jr lBt and 3rd Tuesdays

NINTH DISTB.IOT-CHAS. P. JAMESON, D. D. G. M., St. Joseph, Mo. Andrew ...•..•. Savannah........ 71 Savannah E. L. Ritter .. Helena 117 Rochester Geo. Wyatt Lincoln.......... 138 Fillmore ........••. R. G. James Whitesville ••••••. 162 Whitesville .•...•.. W. J. Agee •........ . Rosendale 404 Rosendale F. G. Thompson Valley 413 Bolckow F. Baker Cosby •..•....•. ~. 600 ICosby. • • • . . . . . . . .• E. Schindley Buchanan Agency........... 10IAgency J. T. Marteny ••••... Wellington....... 22IDeKalb •..••••.••.. B. A. Stroud •....... St. Joseph........ 781St. Joseph .•••..... Wm. Morgan ......•. Birming 150IFaucett••.•.••.••• S. S. Connett, .Jr ZereQtha 189 St. Joseph E. L. Moore Rushville .•....... 238IRushville •••••••.•. G. S. Duncan ....•.• Brotherhood ...... 269 St. Joseph ........ R. J. Blakely ........ Charity •.•••••.•• 331ISt. Joseph •••••••• L. O. WeigeL ••••.•• King Hill 376!St. Joseph R. W. Kramer Saxton .•....••... 50BISaxton •••••••••.•. C. Holden ........•.• Wallace Park 627 Wallace J. T. Lamar

W. W. Hall •..•..... lat and 3rd Thursdays C. M. Jones ~. 2nd Fridar and 4th SaturdaY F. N. Foster .•...... 1st and 8rd Tuesdays Fisher Potts ...•.... Saturday on or before full moon C. J. Watts 2nd and 4th Thursdays McF. Price lat and 3rd Thursdays Willis Durant ......•. 1st and 3rd Saturdays R. H. Adams lat and 8rd Saturdays N. A. West ••..••.... lat Saturday W. L. Mulvania .•.•. lat and 8rd Tuesdays Chas. S. Mays ...•.•. 4th Saturday Geo. L. Markley 2nd and 4th Tuesdays J. H. DeBerry .•••.•. 2nd and 4th Mondays B. T. Andrews ....... 2nd and 4th Fridays Wm. A. Piner•••••.• 2nd and 4th Mondays Jesse Moore 1st and 8rd Thursdays Milton Edwards •.••.. 1st and 8rd Saturdays F. M. Pemberton 2nd Saturday


I:'..:l

o

o LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TENTH DISTRIOT-THOMAS D. WD..LIAMS, D. D. G. M., Maysville, Mo. Lodge Master County Location NO.1 DeKalb ...•..... Union Star •...... l241union Star ....... R. A. Johnson ...... Weatherby ....... 235 Weatherby •..•..•. J. M. Isaacs ........ Parrott •.....•.•. 308 Maysville ••••.. , ... .F. McClure ...•..••• Osborn .......•... 3l7IOsborn ............ L. E • Doak ........• " Continental ...... 454 Stewartsville ....... C. G• Waller ........ Clarksdale ......•. 5591 Clarksdale...•..... Harley Groom ....... Daviess ......... Western Star ..... 151 Winston ......•..•. A. Dunlap .......... Pattonsburg ...... 65 Pattonsburg ..•.... Ray Gromer ......•.. Gallatin .......... 106/Gallatin •..•......• W. C. Evans ......•. Altamont •.....•.. 108IAltamont •..•....•. W. T. Vanover •..... 285 Coffey ............. J. C. O'Hare ......•• ' EarL ..•......... Lock Spring ..... 488 Lock Spring .....•. V. McCallum ........ Jameson ....•.... 500IJameson ....••••.• M. H. George ........ Jamesport ....... 5641Jamesport •..•..... R. Thompson .......

.... .... ...... ... ...

......... ......... ......... ........ ........ ........ ........ ......... ........ ........

Secretary Time of Meeting W. E. Robison ...••• 2nd and 4th Saturdays R. F. Cope ...•..•.•• 2nd and 4th Saturdays Richard F. Brant ..... 1st and 3rd Mondays C. H. Hawn ......•. 2nd and 4th Saturdays Roy W. Kibbey ...... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays J. H. Mann .....••••. 1st and 3rd Thursdays E. C. Creekmore ...• 1st and 2nd Wednesdays Paul W. Eastman .... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Wm. 0. Tague ...... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Ben H. Kuhns .....•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays W. GUY Welden ...... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays R. V. Wickizer •..• '•• 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. E. Robison ....... 1st and 3rd Thursdays W. K. Dinwiddie .... 1st and 3rd Mondays

ELEVENTH DISTRIOT-EMSLEY O. JAMES, D. D. G. Mo, Hemple, Mo. Cl,l:,y •..•••...•.. Liberty , ............ Holt............. ............ Angerona........ ••.••••.•... Clay ...•.••...... ',', •.•••••..... Kearney •..•...•.. ............ Temperance ...... Clinton Hemple.......... .. .. Vincil. ......... Plattsburg........ ......... Gower ••.•.•.•. Lathrop. . . . . • . . ..

3lILiberty ...•.••..•. Geo. R. Crockett•.••• 49IHolt D. Thompson 1931Missouri City J. F. Wheeler 2011Excelsior Springs .. R. 0. Smith ...•..•.. 311 K earney •..•..•.• "C. H • H esse. 1 . . • • • •• 438 Smithville G. L. Walker 37 Hemple J. N. Boyer 62 Cameron R. W. Russell 113 Plattsburg R. J. Morrow....... 397 Gower Roy Moore 506 Lathrop ...•....... J. E. Shouse........

Edgar Archer .•...... 2nd and 4th Mondays M. Osley 3rd Friday R. E. Hicklin 1st and 3rd Tuesdays W. A. Craven ..•.... 1st and 3rd Mondays J 0 h n N • Shouss. • • • • • 1st an d 3r d Thurs d ays A. O. Lowman 1st and 3rd Wednesdays James R. Vaughn 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. F. Poland 1st and 3rd Mondays R. W. Hayward..... 1st Thursday H. T. Bowlin 1st and 3rd Saturdays 0. M. Robison 1st and 3rd Mondays


TWELFTH DISTRIOT-JOHN M. GALLATIN, D. D. G. Mo, Ohillicothe, Mo. Caldwell •....••. Kingston ••....... .. • •.••••• Braymer. . . • • • • .. •...••.. Hamilton ......•.. •..•.••. Polo•............. ••.•.••. Breckenridge •....•.•. Cowgill ...•..•..•. Livingston .•.••• Friendship....... .. • ••••. Spring HilL •••... Benevolence Chillieothe ...•.... Chula •..•..•..... Wheeling ...•••... Dawn.. .. . . ..

118IKingston •...•.•... H. Bridgewater .••.• 135 Braymer. . . . . . . . .. C. B. Woolsey....... 224 Hamilton .....•... ,Cecil Neal 232 Polo••............ D. F. Ellenberger••. 334 Breckenridge L. W. Hunt .......•. 561 Cowgill .•........•. S. F. Thomson •..... 89 Chillicothe •..•••••. W. L. Thompson .... 155 Spring Hill •.••..• Wm. Blake ...•...... 170 Utica A. young 333 Chillicothe•..••••.. J. R. Peters ...•.•••• 388 Chula .•....••••... M. F. Pollard ......• 434IWheeling •..•...••. H. Wells 539 Ludlow M. F. Pallard.......

H. L. .virtue .••••••• lst and 3rd ThursdayS D. Irving Farrar •..... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays J. E. Deems ...•.•.•. lst and 3rd Tuesdays B. Zimmerman .•.••• 2nd and 4th WednesdayS Jesse L. Walker ..••.. 2nd and 4th ThursdayS Robert R. Rone ....•• 2nd and 4th FridayS Ralph B. Winans .... 1st and 3rd Fridays T. J. Nash .....•.... 1st and 3rd SaturdayS A. J. Stamper 1st Saturday F. W. Cornue•...... 2nd and 4th MondayS Omar J. Owen •...... lst and 3rd Thursdays H. J. Barnes ...•.... 2nd and 4th ThursdayS R. C. Stewart 2nd and 4th Fridays

THmTEENTH DISTRIOT-H. D. TAGGART, D. D. G. M., Linneus, Mo. Linn .. . ••........ ............. ............. ............. .. .

Jackson.......... Brookfield........ Cypress Bucklin ..•......• ' Dockery Marceline

82ILinneus ...•....... 86 Brookfield 227 Laclede 233IBucklin 325 Meadville 481 IMarceline

H. D. Taggart L. F. Thiehoff L. O. Dowell W. H. Martin T. L. Holman F. H. Schutte

B. Burch .....•.•..•• J. T. Clevenger, Jr F. W. Burke C. A. Larson Chris. A. Martens Wm. E. Parks

2nd and 4th MondayS 2nd and 4th 'TuesdayS 1st and 3rd WednesdayS 1st and 3rd TuesdayS Every Tuesday 2nd and 4th TuesdayS

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-LUTHER E. WlLHOIT, D. D. G. M., Macon, Mo. Macon Callao.. .. . .. .. • .. .. • ••••••••• Bloomington •..•.. •.••...... McGee ......•...•. .......... Censer •••••.•••• La Plata .......••. •••••••••• Lodge of Truth .......... Excello •••••••••• Elmer. . . . . . • • . • •. Shelby•••••••••• St. Andrews...... .. • Shelbina ••••..•••• Hunnewell ••••.... •••••••••. BetheL •••.••••••. ••••..••.. Clarence ......•...

38 Callao H. L. Baker......... 102 Bevier.....•••.•... G. Moreland .•......• 146 College Mound ...•• W. B. Webster 172 Macon Louis K. Fower 237 La Plata ••••••.... C. A. Womack 268 Atlanta ....•••••.. W. S. Meisner ......• 332 Excello G. G. Miller 648 Elmer.•..•....•... W. M. Agee......... 96 Shelbyville M. E. Osburn 228 Shelbina O. C. Law 415 Hunnewell •••••••.. S. R. Crow 537IBethel. C. E. Swisher••••••• 662 Clarence•....••.... E. J. Conrad

E. M. Mayhew...... 1st and 3rd Fridaya D. M. Williams •..•.. 2nd and 4th TuesdayS Lewis M. Brockman. 2nd and 4th SaturdayS F. J. Pimpell 1st and 3rd FridayS L. A. Carter .•.•.•.• 2nd and 4th ThursdayS P. COnduitte .....•.• 1st and 3rd MondayS Charley S. King 1st and 3rd WednesdayS C. I. Murry......... 2nd and 4th Mondays J. M. Miller 2nd and 4th Fridaya E. E. Key lst and 3rd FridayS R. F. Lyell •••••••... lst and 3rd FridayS Sam Ziegler lst and 8rd MondayS W. H. Burnett lst and 8rd TuesdayS


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTEENTH DISTRIOT-DONALD H. SOSEY, D. D. G. 14., Palmyra., Mo. County Lodge Location No.1 Master Lewis •.....•... Wyaconda .. , ..•.. 24/La Grange ......•.. N. O. Owens ........ Patee .•....... A. H. Monticello ••..•.•. 58 Monticello •••••.•.. " Labelle ..•••••.... 222 LaBelle ••.••••.••. W. A. Simpson ...... "JJ Craft ...••..••••. 287 Canton •..•..•.•••. M. E . Stark •......•. Williamstown •.... 370 Williamstown •.••.. C. S. Deck .......... " " • • • • • • • • •• Lewistown........ 494 Lewistown. . . . . . •. L. W. McAfee ...... " • . . • • • • . .• Ewing........... 577 Ewing. . . • . •• . . • .. H. S. Phillips ....... Marion •..•..••. Palmyra.......... 18IPa)myra .•.•••••.•. W. D. Cooper ...•... .. • .•••.••. St. John's.. .•. .•. 28IHannibal. ••.•••... W. F. Hubb ......... J' ......... Hannibal.. ....... 1118 IHannibaI. ......... D. K. Griffith ....... .. • .••..... Philadelphia ••.•.. 502IPhilade)phia •..•••. D. M. Bleigh .•..•.•. Ralls .••••.•.••. Ralls............. 33ICenter .•.••....••. B. Watts ...•......• " •••..••..•. Lick Creek •.••.... 302Iperry •••.••••.•.•• C. S. Menefee •.....• " •.•........ New London ...... 307 New London •...... D. N. Fautes •.......

.......... .......... .......... ..........

Time of Meeting Secretary Leslie Edwards ...... 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. W. Hawkins .•..•• 2nd and 4th Thursdays A. L. Boone •....•.•. 2nd and 4th Fridays A. Clyde Stork ...... 1st and 3rd Mondays J. S. Smith ........ ; 1st and 3rd Thursdays E. F. Arnold ...•.... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays John Terpening..... 1st and 3rd Thursdays D. H. Sosey ••..•.•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays Wm. H. Blackshaw.. 1st and 3rd Mondays Julius Brown •..•.... 2nd and 4th Mondays Thos. J. Bleigh...... 1st Thursday G. C. Layne ...•..... 2nd and 4th Saturdays W. D. Morris •....... Saturday on or before full moon G. D. Harris........ 1st and 3rd Fridays

SIXTEENTH DISTRI<rr-WABREN H.·MAY, D. D. G. 14., Louisiana, Mo. Pike ...•••••.••. Eolia •......•..... 14IEolia....•••..•.... T. J. Brown " • • • • • • • • • •• Clarksville •...••.. 17IClarksville•..••.... A. B. McCardie • . . • • • • • . •• Perseverance •.... 92\Louisiana•.•••.•.. R. B. Hunter ••••••••••• Phoenix •..••....• 136IBOWlingGreen •.••. C. L. Robinson • • . • • • • • . •• Frankford . 192 Frankford ••.•..•.. J. D. McIntyre Robt. K. Rose ...•....... Pike . 399ICurryville

Wharton Schoaler K. C. Patton ...•..•. W. H. yager ..••..•. H. M. Strother •...... R. G. Teague J. H. Sisson

Saturday on or before full moon 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2nd and 4th Mondays 1st Thursday after full moon

SEVENTEE:-fTH DISTRIOT-oHARLES S. mOltS, D. D. G. 14., Monroe Oity, Mo. Monroe •.•••.••. Paris Union...... " •••••.••. Florida........... " ••••.•••. Middle Grove. • . • • . " •••••.•.. Monroe •..••.••••. " Madison " Santa Fe ••••.••.. Holliday ...•••....

19Iparis ...•..•.•.... P. Gerster .•........ J. L. Gwynn ....•••. 23 Florida ••.•••.••••. Chas. A. Miller Dan P. Violette ...••. 42 Middle Grove. . • • •• E. H. EnKle ••.•...••. F. H. Newman...... 64 Monroe City C. A. Gentry .•....•. Geo. E. Chipman •••• J. A. Powell C. O. Farris 91IMadison 462\Santa Fe •••••••••• H. T. Morley •....... I. N. Bailey •....•••. 660 Holliday •.......... J. Logan Ensor ..... T. E. Sparks •.......

2nd and 4th Mondays Saturday on or before full moon 1st Friday 2nd and 4th Mondays 2nd Wednesday Saturday on or before full moon 1st and 3rd Tuesdays


EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT-HARRY M. VOTH, D. D. G. M., Moberly, Mo. Randolph •.••••• .. • ..•.•• •..•• " ••.•..• ••••••• •..•••• ••.•... •..••..

Huntsville •••••••. Milton .•.••.•..•• Clifton Hill ••••... Moberly •.••••..•• Cairo •••••••••••. Higbee .•••••••.•. Jacksonville ..•.•• Clark .•....•..•...

30IHuntsville ••••..••. W. E. Malone •.....• 151 Milton •..•••••••... W. B. Burton ...•..• 1611Clifton Hill W. C. Bybee 344 Moberly ••••...•.•. E. E. Pennock 486ICairo H. J. Englee 527IHigbee•••••••••••. W. Edwards 541 Jacksonville Goo. E. Bye 610IClark D. A. Carr

D. S. Eubank •...•••. Arthur Haak ..••..•. J. E. Crutchfield John W. Tate Uel L. Dameron Erwin Hawkins ••.•.. E. H. Dennis F. L. Ornburn

1st and 3rd TuesdayS 1st and 3rd SaturdayS 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th MondayS 2nd and 4th ThursdayS 1st and 3rd WednesdayS 2nd and 4th SaturdayS 1st and 3rd ThursdayS

NINETEENTH DISTRICT-T. H. EDWARDS, D. D. G. M., Salisbury, Mo. Cha~iton.•••..•.

••••••• ....... ....... ....... .......

Eureka........... Warren.......... TriPlett••••......, Westville ••••••.•. Salisbury Rothville Pee Dee Cunningham Mendon •.....•...

78\Brunswick .•.•.•••. C. 74 Keytesville .•••• ; •.. D. 122!TriPlett ••••••••••. L. 202 Westville •••••••••. O. 208 Salisbury H. 426IRothville L. 498 Musselfork •...•••. A. 525 Sumner J. 628IMendon •.......... C.

I

S. Bittiker...•... H. Robertson •... D. Gross .•..••..• Robinson ......•• H. Brummall J. Cameron E. Lain •••.....•. R. Stoner G. Shull

A. G. Lynch •....••.. 1st and 3rd TuesdayS W. F. Arrington ..•• 2nd and 4th Fridays R. P. Price .•..•.•.•. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS W. O. Hainds •••••••• 3rd Saturday John Mode 1st and 8rd TuesdayS Lee Clair 2nd and 4th WednesdayS J. L. Prather ...•..•. 1st Thursday A. Stobaugh 2nd and 4th WednesdayS S. L. Leipard 2nd and 4th Mondays

TWENTIETH DISTBICT-oTTO HALE, D. D. G. M., Oarrollton, Mo. Carroll.. . .. .. .. ••.•••..• ......... ......... •.••.••.. Ray Lafayette.....

De Witt.. • .. . .. .. Wakanda......... Bogard .••••••.... Hale City Carroll Bosworth ••••••.•• Hardin.. .. • . .. Waverly.........

89 De Witt R. E. Jones 52 Carrollton D. D. Thomas, Jr 101 Bogard ••.••.•••... W. R. Walker •..•••• 216 Hale C. E. Hawkins 249 Norborne.••••.••.• A. R. Warren 597 Bosworth •••••••••. M. Wilhelm .••••.•.• 822 Hardin J. Kemmerer 611Waverly E. E. Brown

J. A. Williams...... L. H. Thomas D. W. Minnis •••••••• R. L. Bartlett R. E. Parrish Clinton SiJnpson •..•• C. C. Grimes........ J. A. Allison

1st and 8rd ThursdayS 2nd and 4th Thursdaya 2nd and 4th TuesdayS 1st and 8rd Mondays 2nd and 4th MondayS 2nd and 4th ThursdayS 1st and 3rd TuesdayS 2nd Thursday


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-FIRST DISTRIOT-EARL W. FOLEY, D. D. G. M., Weston, Mo. County Platte ...••..... " •......... • " •..•..•... •......... · ..•.... " •..••..•.. · .....•. "

Lodge No.1 Location Rising Sun....... 13IBarry ...•......... Weston........... 53 Weston ..•...••••.. Compass......... 120 Parkville. . . . . . . . .. Camden Point .... 169 Camden Point ..... Rowley ...•.•..... 204 Dearborn ••••....•. Fidelity.......... 339 Farley. . . • . • • . . . .• Adelphi. ........• 355 Edgerton ....•.•... Platte City ' 504 Platte City. . . . . . ..

Jackson .••..... .. .. ........ •••..... ••...... •..•.... ........ .. .. • . . • . . .. ••.•.... · . " ..•• .. .. . .. .. .. .. ........ • .•..... ••...... ••..•... • .. .. · • • • . . ..

Heroine ...•.•.... Albert Pike Kansas City Temple ••.••...... Cecile-Daylight Rural ...•••...... Westport......... Ivanhoe.......... Gate City. . . • . . . .. Orient ..•.....•... South Gate. . •. . .. york............. Swope Park ' Sheffield East Gate •.••..... Northeast .•.•••.. Country Club ..... Rockhill.......... Alpha............

J. S. H. A. G. W. E. E.

Master H. Reinecke ..••.. B. Ross W. Holms ...•.... J. Hillix ...•.•... A. Green ........• J. Porter ...•.... R. Shewey S. Miller

Secretary Time of Meeting L. D. Williams ...•..• Saturday on or before full moon Earl W. Foley ..•.... 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. W. Fleming ...•... 2nd Monday W. K. ByWaters ...•• 3rd Tuesday Wm. H. Sims ...•.... 2nd Wednesday Sam Ray .•...•...•... 2nd Wednesday W. H. Mizner •.....•. 1st and 3rd Saturdays Arthur Ham 2nd and 4th Mondays

TWENTY-SEOOND DISTRIOT-DARIUS A. BROWN, D. D. G. M., Kansas Oity, Mo.

o

104 Kansas City 219 Kansas City 220 Kansas City 299 Kansas City •••.... 305 Kansas City 3161Kansas City 340 Kansas City 446 Kansas City. . .. • •. 522 Kansas City. . . . . .. 546 Kansas City .....•. 547 Kansas City •...... 563 Kansas City 617 Kansas City 625 Kansas City 630 Kansas City •..•... 643jKansas City ••••..• 656 Kansas City•..•..• 663 Kansas City. . . .. .• 659 N. Kansas City

0

Max Rubin G. L. Hax H. E. Duncan H. W. Fox A. D. Nordberg J. H. Greer •..•..... J. E. Tobler ........ R. H. Mann......... H. R. Wyeth........ F. M. Smith ......•. F. CockrelL ..•...... J. R. Greenlee....... J. H. Mason........ T. J. Weddle O. E. Helton •••...•• A. H. Loos .••••.•••. J. S. Allred..••..•.• S. S. Goodman J. F. Cook ........•.

H. P. Sagand ....•... 2nd and 4th 'l'uesdayS L. V. Knapp 2nd and 4th Mondays J. W. Schlaegel. 2nd and 4th Mondays A. D. Ludlow •.••.... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays S. C. Hoyt ••.••.••... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays Geo. W. Paddock •.•. 1st and 3rd Mondays H. C. Elberg 2nd and 4th Tuesdays A.. H. Mann 2nd and 4th Thursdays Fred H. Knight •..... 1st and 3rd Saturdays F. M. Huffman ..••.. 2nd and 4th Fridays Thos. M. Pratt •...... 1st and 3rd Thursdays r. F. Strycker 2nd and 4th Saturdays L. Verne Hosic...... 2nd and 4th Thursdays Len. F. Owens 2nd and 4th Thursdays E. W. Berry ...•••... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays Geo. R. Hodge .•••... 1st and 3rd Thursdays M. H: DeVault •..••.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays J. Weinsaft 2nd and 4th Thursdays Peter Grasmick 2nd and 4th Mondays


TWENTY-THIBD DISTlUOT-C. B. WADDELL, D. D. G. M., Lexington, Mo. Lafayette

Lexington .•..... '1149 Lexington J. T. Larkin II Higginsville .••... 364 Higginsville ••.•..• J. E. Lyons .....••.. II Lafayette .•...... , 437 Corder ...••.•..•.• Goo. W. Armentrout. II Concordia ..•.•... 464 Concordia•...••.•. Cecil Fitch .•.••..... II Mount Hope •..•. '1476 Odessa •••••.•....• T. Surber ..••.••.••. Ray •..•......•. Richmond........ 57IRichmond••.••.•.. Wm. Nelson ••..•.•• II • • • • • • • • • • • • Ray 223 Camden J. J. Dunwoody •.•.. 00 • • • • • • • • • • • • B~e Hive •.••..... 393/Lawson ••••••••••• W. R. Morrow ..•••• II • • • • • • • • • • • • Ada .... 4441 Orrick ...•..•..•... J. A. Stockton •..•.• 0

••

W. R. Eckle 3rd Tuesday J. A. Simpson •..••.. 2nd and 4th Mondays E. L. Roberts ....•..•.••••.••.••••••••• Ezra C. Johnston ..•. 2nd and 4th Mondays C. D. Newhard •..•.. 2nd and 4th Fridays R. B. Hughes •..••••. 3rd Wednesday V. L. Hoffman ..•••. 1st and 2nd Thursdays T. E. Manso ••.••.•.. 1st and 3rd Fridays S. D. Brady ..•••..... Every. Thursday

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRIOT-JOHN W. ADAMS, Xl. D. G. M., Ma.rshall, Mo. Saline II

.......... ••.•.••••. •......••. .......... •..••...•. ..........

Arrow Rock...... Cambridge Miami Trllumina•...••.. Barbee ••..•...... Malta Oriental •..•..•... Nelson 0

55 Arrow Rock 63 Slater 85 Miami. .. 205 MarshalL ..••• 217 Sweet Springs 402 Malta Bend 518IBlackburn ••••.•••• 560 Nelson 00

00

••

0 ••••

'

A. B. Hogge T. R. Haynie R. L. Bradley W. A. Wells •...••.• C. W. Scott •••••...• F. E. Little W. C. Borchers A. Wilson

B. C. Bradshaw B. F. Pledge F. M. Burruss Goo. H. Fuller Will C. Pelot •.••.... J. G. Nye A. L. Finkaldin .••.. R. B. Finley

00'

Thursday on or before full moon 1st Tuesday FridaY on or before full moon 1st Thursday Last Friday 1st Tuesday Tuesday on or before full moon 2nd and 4th Tuesdays

TWENTY-FD'TH DISTRIOT-8. L. JEWETT, D. D. G. M., Boonville, Mo. Co?per ...••.... Cooper........... Pleasant Grove ......... ' Wm. D. Muir ......... Wallace ..••... " Prairie Home •••. Howard •••••... Howard.......... II Fayette.......... ......... Livingston •....... , Armstrong , 0

36/Boonville ..•....•.. John Haefer .•.•••.. 142 Otterville ...•.••••. W. S. Poage ...•••.. 277 Pilot Grove Ed. Oerly 456 Bunceton J. A. Laws 503 Prairie Home ..•••. M. Tuttle .......•••• 4 New Franklin •..•• J. T. Amick ...•...• 47 Fayette Chas. Eaton 51 Glasgow J. O. Wells 70 Armstrong ..•.•... R. Y. Hume .......•.

Clarence L. Hurt •... , 2nd and 4th Fridays A. N. Howlett ••••..• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays P. E. Hays 2nd and 4th Tuesdays A. Blomquist 1st and 3rd Fridays F. L. Schilb •••••••.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays C. L. Painter..•.••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays Roy Roberts 1st and 3rd Tuesdays R. W. Raines Every Thursday A. M. Green .••...•• 1st Thursday


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICT8-Continued TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-EARL S. DYSART, D. D. G. M., Columbia, Mo. County. Boone. . . . • • • . .. " .......... •••••••••. ••••...••• •••••••••. • • . • . . • • •. ••••••••.. •....•.•.• •......•..

No.1 Lodge Location Centralia . 59 Centralia ...•..•..• Rocheport . 67 Rocheport •........ Twilight •..•...... 114 Columbia Ashland .••..•.•.. 156 Ashland.. .. .. .. Sturgeon •.•..•... 174 Sturgeon Hallsville . 336 Hallsville .....•.••. AncientLandmark 356 Harrisburg Hinton ..•........ 455 Hinton •....••..... Acacia . 602IColumbia ...•......

Audrain .•.•••.. " •••...•. ........ ••••...• ••••..•. ••.•..•• Callaway "

CentraL.......... Laddonia ...•..... Social Hebron ..•••..•.•. Vandalia Houston ••••..•... Fulton........... New Bloomfield... Portland •........ Tebbetts .•••..•... Shamrock ••••••.. Mokane •.........

Mont~omery •..•

Griswold .......... Wellsville •..•••••. Montgomery •••.•. Florence .••...•.•. Jonesburg ......•. Daggett ....••....

Master L. M. Overton •..... G. E. Minor ...•.... G. R. Jackson ..... .. .. .. .. • .. .. . .. C. W. Wade F. F. Hall •.••.•..•• T. P. Watson E. M. Woodworth P. A. Williams ....•.

S~retary Time of Meeting J. C. Hunt ••.•••...•. 1st and 8rd Thursdays R. M. Campbell, Sr 1st Thurs. on or b. f. m. and 8 wks.later J. F. Oliver 2nd and 4th TuesdayS A. F. Martens 1st and 3rd FridayS A. E. Boothe 1st Friday F. L. Faucett .•...... 1st Friday E. S. Watson Sat. on or b. f. moon and 2 weeks later Tilford Goslin ••••••• 2nd Saturday R. R. Wright ......•. 1st and 2nd TuesdayS

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-LOUIS J. GRAUE, D. D. G. M., Mexico, Mo. 81IMolino ......•..... J. C. Cawthorn .•... 115 ILaddonia ...•...... W. H. McCoy ....•.• 266 Martinsburg W. P. Moser 854 Mexico ..•.•..•.•.. J. E. ·McPheeters .•.. 491 Vandalia •.••..•••• L. C. Schulze 580 Gant ••••.••....... W. M. Paterson 48 Fulton R. N. Bloom ••••..... 60 New Bloomfield ..•• A. R. Dunn .......•• 242IReadsville .•....•.. M. Gibson ••••..•••• 565jTebbetts •.••••..••. W. W. Griffin ......• 585 Shamrock ...••.••• H. H. Sevall. .....•• 612IMokane .....•.•••. J. O. Erwin

Clyde Willis ....•.••• 2nd Saturday A. R. Hancock •..•... Friday on or before full moon R. W. Moser 2nd Friday B. C. Denton •..•..... 1st, 2nd and 8rd TuesdayS A. L. Motley .......•. 2nd and 4th FridayS H. W. Groves .•••..•. 8rd Friday Wm. L. Meng 1st and 8rd Fridays Wade F. Enloe ••..... 2nd and 4th MondayS J. C. Garrett •...•..•. Saturday on or before full moon 3. T. Huffmaster 2nd and 4th SaturdayS W. S. Armstrong ..•• Thursday on or before full moon T. F. Hafner 1st and 3rd ThursdayS

TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-P. A. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo. " " "

"

.... .... ....

178IBellftoWer.•.•.••.. H. R. Varnon .....•. 194 Wellsville •••••••••• J. W. Hardesty ..... 246 IMontgomery City ... G. E. Rohrer ........ 2611New Florence •••... J. F. McRoberts ..... 457 Jonesburg ••.••••.. T. J. Bryant ........ 492 McKittrick .••.•... W. Huenefeld ......•

R. W. River ......•• 2nd Monday F. R. Barton •••.•••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Hugh N. Cason •••••. 1st and 8rd Mondays Chas. Cardwell ...••.. 1st and 3rd MondayS J. N. Lavender •..•.. 3rd Monday A. Schornhorst ..•..• Sat. on or b. f. moon and 2 weeks after


TWENTY-NINTH DISTRIC'l'-W. P. SMITH, D. D. G. M., Troy, Mo. Lincoln •......•. Troy. . . • . . • • • • • • • " Silex............. •••••••• New Hope ••.••••. •.••.•••. New Salem ••••••. ••••..••. Louisville. • • • • • • •. ......... Nineveh Moscow

84 Troy 75 Silex 199 Elsberry •••...•.•• 270 Winfield...•.•••••. 409 Louisville. . • • . • • •• 478 Olney 5581Moscow Mills

C. R. La Rue R. E. Williams W. A.Ulery, Jr••••.• E. M. Shields .•.••.•• H. J. Boston ..••••.• W. T. Porter F. L. Robinson

Andy J. Blair 2nd and 4th Mondays E. C. Teague Friday on or before full moon W. W. Watts ••.•••• 2nd Thursday H. H. Arnhold , 1st and 2nd SaturdayS H. Higginbotham.... 3rd Saturday D. G. Hazzard 1st Saturday F. Karrenbrock Sat. on or b. f. m. and 2nd Wed. after

THIRTIETH DISTRIOT-WILLIAM E. LANGE, D. D. G. Mo, Wright Oity, Mo.

....

St. Charles •.•.. Wentzville ••••..•. Palestine •.•••.••. Mechanicsville •.•• Warren ••.•.••. Pauldingville ...•. ' Warrenton •..•••.

..

........

461 Wentzville ••••••••• A. R. Cleveland••••• 241 St. Charles .......• W. F. Karrenbrock .• 260jHowell. ..•••••••.. C. J. Picroux ....... 11 Wright City •..••.• Ezra Caler•..•••••• 6091 Warrenton •....... L. W. Gunther ......

W. R. Dalton ........ 1st and 8rd Saturdays E. R. Engholm ....... 1st and 8rd Tuesdays R. L. Fulkerson ...... 2nd and 4th Wednesdays C. H. Feix ........... 1st and Srd Tuesdays L. Hutcherson •...••. 2nd and 4th Fridays

THmTY-FmST DISTRIOT-A. LINXWILER, D. D. G. Mo, Jeft'erson Oity, Mo.

... .

Cole ••..•••••••. Jefferson ......•.. Russellville •••••.• Hickory Hill ••.•.. Centertown ..••.•• Moniteau ••••••• Tipton ...•..•..•. California .••.••.. Moniteau .••••..•. Clarksburg •••.•.• Chamois •.•••••••• O~e:::::::::: Linn ..•.•••.•..•.

........... ........... ........... .... ....... .......

..

48r

efferson City ••.••. A. L. Yewham ...... 90 Russellville ..••..•• L. A. B. Leslie.•...• 211 Eugene ........... W. L. Scrivener ..•• 611lcentertown •..•.••. iI. H. Son ........... 56 Tipton ..•••••..•.. F. C. Swarner.•.... 188 California ••••••••. H. E. Wilson •....•.• 2951Jamestown ........ J. I. Deakins ...••.•. 563 Clarksburg •..••••• Wm. G. Martin ...... 185 Chamois ........... M. W. Townley•...•. 326 Linn ......•....... P. B. Dessieux .••...

I

.R. L. Gwinn ....•••. 1st and 8rd Mondays W. B. Thompson ..... 2nd Friday J. E. Dooley ••.••.••• 1st Friday K. I. Mahan •.•••••.. 1st Monday J. A. Conn ••••.•.•.. 2nd and 4th ThursdayS R. L. Fulks .......... 2nd and 4th Fridays S. R. Johnson ........ Sat. on or b. f. m. ~nd 2nd Tues. after F. B. Clark •••••.•••. 1st and 8rd Mondays A. H. Siebern .••••.• 4th Friday E. Campbell ...•..... Sat. on or b. f. moon and 2 weeks after


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THmTY-SECOND DISTRICT-R. A. BREUER, D. D. G. M., Hermann, Mo. County Lodge NO.1 Location Master Franklin , Evergreen........ 271New Haven , E. E. Murphy . " Sullivan.......... 69ISullivan K. W. Cline .. •...... Gray Summit 1781Gray Summit L. P. Jensen .......• ....... Hope 251 Washington E. E. Rush .. • . . • . .. FraternaL ....••. , 868 Robertsville L. H. Bruns . .. .. Columbia......... 584 Pacific E. A. Roemer . •...... Easter ...••...... 5751St. Clair .....•..... C. E. Johnson . •.....• Union 598IUnion •..•..••...•. J. W. Steinbeck . Gasconade •...•. Hermann ......•.. 128IHermann .•......•. W. D. Stoenner ...•.. .. .. Red Bird 5841Red Bird L. E. Licklider . ...... Owensville 62410wensville E. E. Smith .

Secretary E. E. Murphy .•...•. C. S. Betz.......... Aug. J. Holthaus. . . •. W. A. pfautsch H. P. Radeacker L. M. Roemer R. C. Murphy .•...... Paul W. Vitt Geo. Sohns, Jr C. G. Sewell......... J. H. Hanson.......

Time of Meeting 2nd and 4th Thursdays 1st and 8rd Saturdays 1st and 8rd ThursdayS 1st and 8rd FridayS Sat. on or b. f. m. and on St. John's Day 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd Wednesday 2nd and 4th FridayS 1st and 8rd MondayS Saturday on or before full moon 1st and 8rd Thursdays

THmTY-THmD (A) DISTRICT-BEN H. LAImMAN, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. St.

L~~is

City ... Missouri.......... •.. Beacon........... •.. Mount Moriah. . . . ••. Pomegranate..... ••. Erwin .........••. •.. OccidentaL .....•. •.• Pyramid ••. Keystone .....••.. ••. Aurora ••. Paul Revere ... Tuscan ... !taska.......•.•.. ..• Euclid .•.•..•...• , ••• Clifton Heights ••. ... Rose Hill ... Olive Branch , ... Magnolia •.. Triangle ..•..•..•. ... Trinity .... Shaveh .•......... •.. Commonwealth ... Purity ... Theo. Roosevelt

1 St. Louis ...•...... J. C. Siemer ......•• 8 St. Louis •....•.... M. C. Balensiefer ..•. 40 St. Louis E. W. Schaefer .....• 95 St. Louis G. E. Lansing ......• 121 St. Louis .•.•...... R. H. Aufderheide ..• 168 St. Louis .....•.... J. C. Garrell, Jr 180 St. Louis W. S. Trigg 248 St. Louis J. F. Steffens ......• 2671St. Louis W. GoebeL ........• 8801St. Louis C. C. Harig ........• 8601St. Louis B. H. Lahrman 4201St. Louis ....•.•... D. W. Eschenbrenner 5051St. Louis .•........ A. E. Hunt 520'St. Louis W. G. GoebeL .••..•• 550/St. Louis J. K. Monteith 576 St. Louis ....•..... H. A. Wahlbrink ...• 6261St. Louis A. J. Ploesser ......• 688 St. Louis E. L. Reid .........• 641 St. Louis M. C. Lefman 6461St. Louis ....•..•.. J. A. Turner 654 St. Louis •.......•. Geo. Grossius .......• 658 St. Louis G. O. Nations 661 St. Louis W. P. Tietjens

J. Wohradsky, Jr..... 1st and 8rd Thursdays F. L. Magoon •..•••• 2nd and 4th Thursdays H. A. Borgmann ..••. 1st and 8rd SaturdayS E. E. Vetter 1st and 8rd SaturdayS A.A. Blankenmeister .. 2nd and 4th FridayS C. L. Alexander ..•... 1st and 8rd MondayS R. S. Lorimier ...••.. 2nd and 4th FridayS Chas. W. Speirs 1st and 8rd WednesdayS R. A. Tubbesing ...•. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays C. R. Niccum ..••.... 2nd and 4th Fridays Wm. C. Hilmer•..... 1st and 8rd TuesdayS G. E. Black •..•...•• 1st and 8rd MondayS Merle E. Campbell •... 1st and 8rd MondayS Wm. H. Haley ...•... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays C. C. Jackson ...•..•. 2nd and 4th TuesdayS Emilio V. Corte ...•. 2nd and 4th TuesdayS J. H. Leathers 2nd and 4th WednesdayS H. G. Diller , 1st and 8rd SaturdayS Wm. P. Morgan 2nd and 4th ThursdayS H. W. Williams 2nd and 4th TuesdayS Duval O'Neal •..•..•. 1st and 8rd Thursdays J. Heines 1st and 8rd MondayS R. W. MacDonald •... 2nd and 4th MondayS

~

o

00


THmTY-THmD (B) DISTRICT-eHARLES DUGGAN, D. D. G. M., St. Louis, Mo. St. Louis City .•. Meridian......... 21St. Louis City •..... H. C. Plaetze .....•• A. V. Schopp •.•••... 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. • •• Geo. Washington.. 9 St. Louis City •••.•. J. N. Crandall ......• Wm. L. Reynolds .••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays " St. Louis.......... 20 St. Louis City H. V. Steiner H. A. Steiner 2nd and 4th Wednesdays " Naphtali................. 26 St. Louis City F. H. Pepmiller ...•• P. E. Eckardt 2nd and 4th Thursdays .. • •• Polar Star.. ... ... 791St. Louis City ....•. H. Gershenson ..•..• J. L. Kohner .••••.•. 1st and 3rd Fridays " Pride of the West .. 179 St. Louis City L. H. Burmester Louis Tisch 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .. Good Hope ••••.... 2181St. Louis City...•.. Geo. W. Snyder .•..• R. L. Dixon •..•••••• 1st and 8rd Saturdays ,. Cosmos 282 St. Louis City J. Stone Sam Broadbent 2nd and 4th Mondays " Cornerstone 828 St. Louis City J. W. MilfeU. Jr Wm. R. Schmitt 1st and 8rd Mondays " America 347 St. Louis City A. R. Romer ...••.•• F. Wm. Kuehl .•.••.• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ,. •.. Cache•..•...•.••• 416 St. Louis City •.•••. G. F. Meenen ..••.•• Joe. W. Schuette•••• 2nd and 4th Saturdays ,. ••• Anchor ..•••...... 443 St. Louis City ..•••. R. O. Wehrheim •..•• R. H. Cattail ...•..••. 2nd and 4th WednesdayS .. • .. West Gate •..•...• 445 St. Louis City .•..•. L. W. Kniekmeyer .. Ed. McGuigan .••••.. 1st and 3rd Tuesdays .. • •. Lambskin •.••.... 460 St. Louis City•••.•• H. T. Robinson ..•..• B. C. Burroughs •..•. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays ,. ••• Harmony•......•. 499 St. Louis City ....•. E. Wagner...••••..• N. B. Topping ••.•••• 1st and 8rd MondayS ,. Apollo ..•••.•.•... 529 St. Louis City .••.•. L. W. Painter •.••.•• George Rutbs .•.•..•. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays .. • •. Algabil .••••••.•.. 544 St. Louis City ..•••. E. W. Mueller •••.••• W. J. H. Perkins •••• 2nd and 4th FridayS " ••. Forest Park ..•... 678 St. Louis City .••.•. J. W. Havens Wm. C. Rese ...••.•. 2nd and 4th Mondays " ••• TowerGrove •..•.. 631 St. Louis City•.•••. J. G. Wilbas .•.•...• A. M. Jacobs •.•••.•. 2nd and 4th Thursdays " •.. Mizpah ••.•...•... 639 St. Louis City ....•. H. C. Gillespie .•.... W. H. Voss ..••.•••• 2nd and 4th Tuesdays " ••• Benj. Franklin •.. 642 St. Louis City ....•. E. Rosenthal •.•••.•• Morris Popper ••••••• 1st and 3l'd ThursdayS .. • •. Pilgrim ...•.••••• 6521St. Louis City•••••. J. A. Causley ••••••• Theo. C. Teel ..••.••. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays " Progress ...•..•.. , 657 St. Louis City W. H. Bray F. J. Mahner .••.•... 1st and 3rd Thursdays THmTY~FOURTHDISTRICT-WM.

Cass •.....•.••.. lndex .•...•.•.... .............. Cass •..•..••••... " ••••••••.••. Grand River •..••• :: •••••••..••. Wadesb~g.••••.. •••••....•.. Nonpared .. • ••••••..•.. Dayton. • . . • . . • . •. .............. Belton •..•••.•.••. ............ Raymore ..•..•.•• ••••......•. JeweL •.•..•..••. ••.••••.••.. Coldwater. . . . . . .. .............. Strasburg ..•••••. .............. Archie .•.••••..•. .............. Cleveland........

C. DEACON, D. D. G. M., Harrisonville, Mo.

54 IGarden City C. E. Rearick .•...•. 147IHarrisonville..•••• R. Robertson .......• 276IFreeman ..•....... A. C. Hammond ..... 348ICreighton C. Eggers ........••• 372lEast Lynne .•..... W. H. Schader ...••• 386 Dayton •..•...•.••. H. R. Wagner ...•••• 450IBelton ..••..••.•••. N. H. Mullen ......• 451 Raymore ...•..•..• I. M. Davis ..••••..• 480 Pleasant HilL ..•.. F. L. Seevers .••...• 485 Drexel. • • • • • • • . . .. J. E. Turner ...•...• 604IStrasburg Wm. Beckman •..•.. 633/Archie E. M. Goodrich .. ; ..• 651 Cleveland W. A. Moore .....•••

G. C. Kimberlin ...•.. 1st and 3rd 'l'uesdays Wm. P. McGooI ••••.. 1st and 3rd Fridays D. S. Wilson •...••.•. Saturday on or before full moon F. C. Blossom ••'•.•.•. Friday on or before full moon Hial H. Miller •.••.•• Saturday on or before full moon S. W. Wagner....••. Saturday on or before full moon R. L. Johnston ...... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays W. D. Chaffin •.•..••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Ross Thomas ......•. 2nd Friday Chas. A. Mitchell. . • •. 1st and Srd Mondays P. J. Yennie .•••••.• 1st Monday T. M. York, Jr••..••. 2nd Tuesday G. W. Coble ...•..•... 2nd Tuesday


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRIOT-D. O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo. County Lodge No.' Location Master Bates Hume 130 Hume L. B. Singleton ,. • •.•.•••.•. Amsterdam. • • • . .. 141 Amsterdam ••••.... J. W. Armentrout . . .. • .. . . • . Butler. .. .. • • • .. •. 254 Butler. • .. • • • . • • •. S. L. Rook ........... Rockville 841 Rockville C. W. Langley ........... Tyrian 850 Johnstown J. P. Heman ••.•.•••... Crescent Hill •...• 868 Adrian ....•....... M. W. Hogan •.•••.• ........... Rich Hill 479 Rich Hill M. F. Hall. •........ , Foster............ 554 Foster. . . . . . • . . . .. Ira Cayne ...•...•••

Secretary Time of Meeting J. R. Quinn 1st and 3rd ThursdaYs E. A. Smiser...•.•... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays . H. M. Cannon...... 1st and 8rd Saturdays S. H. Bothwell 2nd and 4th Wednesdays R. E. Gilliland Saturday on or before full moon J. B. Piper......•..• 2nd and 4th Mondays H. D. Philbrick 2nd and 4th Mondays O. D. Jennings Every Friday

THIRTY-SIXTH DISTBIOT-JOLLY P. HURTT, D. D. G. :M., Sedalia, Mo. Benton ••.•..... Cole Camp .••.... Shawnee •..••.••• Johnson •..•.... Knobn08ter ••.•... .. • ••••••. Holden ...•••••••• Corinthian ........ Cold Spring ......... Chilhowee Pettis Sedalia .. .. • .. .. Granite........... •••••.•..• Green Ridge .••.•. ...•...... Lamonte ..

0

• • • • • • • •

0

595 Cole Camp 658 Warsaw ....•...••. 245 Knobn08ter ••...•.. 262 Holden ••••..••••.. 265 Warrensburg ...•.. 274 Leeton 487 Chilhowee 236 Sedalia 272 Sedalia 425 Green Ridge ...•... 574 Lamonte

N. A. A. H. E. R. N. R. L. L. F.

B. Stockton Groomer .•••..... S. Adcock ......•• L. Mahnken B. Shanks E. Hobson Russell L. Weinrich R. Butcher H. Wadleigh L. Schenk

E. H. Preuitt ...•••.. 1st and 3rd Mondays J. A. Logan •..•..•.. 2nd and 4th Fridays O. F. Elliott ...•..•.. 1st and 8rd Fridays J. T. Glass. Jr 1st and 8rd Thursdays H. E. Allee ••••.....• 1st and 8rd Mondays E. S. Courtney Thursday on or before full moon W. H. Tempel 1st and 8rd Fridays W. J. Kennely 1st Friday Sid B. Kennon 8rd Friday Geo. T. Murphy •..... 1st and 8rd Thursdays Oliver G. Agee 2nd Friday


TBIBTY-SEVENTH DISTBIO'r-TBOBNTON JENNINGS, D. D. G. M., Olinton, Mo. Henry •..•..•.•. Windsor ....•••••. " Urich .. • •.•••••.. Aln'icola...••••••. ••.••••••. Montrose. • . . • • . •. .......... Clinton .....••... Calhoun ..•..••••. •..•...... Blairstown .•.•... , •....••... Deepwater .••.•... St. Clair••.•.... St. Clair••••••••. " ••.••... Circle ...•.••..... ....... Lowry City ....... Appleton City •...... Star ......•..•....

29IWindsor......•.... L. T. Hoback ...•••• 286 Urich E. Erwin 843 Petersburg •..•••.• W. H. Ross .•....••• 408 Montrose ...•..•.•. A. E. Irvin .....•••• 648 Clinton J. C. Ham 662 Calhoun •.....••..• W. C. Maupin ••...•• 667 Blairstown •....••. A. M. Wall •..••.••• 562 Deepwater•.•••.•.. R. A. Lasswell ••.••• 273 Osceola•.••••••..•. E. Leverich ....•..•• 842 Roscoe .•...•••...• J. W. Porter ..•••••• 403 Lowry City....... R. F. Dugan ........ 412\AP P leton City •..•.. W. J. Ingles •.••.••• 419 Taberville•.•...... T. M. Sandage

O. F. Weisa ..••••... R. E. McDonald R. E. Waugh ....••. Chas. P. Gardner.... C. C. Canan M. R. Munday R. W. Carrington •.. M. G. Dunning ..•••• 000. W. Davies .••... C. A. Weinlig .....•. D. A. Dawson ...... R. F. Powell •......• J. E. Harper

lst and 3rd 'ruesdaya lst and 3rd FridayS Wed. on or b. f. moon and 2 weeks after lst and 3rd MondayS 2nd and 4th FridayS lst and 3rd ThursdayS lst and 3rd Thursdaya 1st and 3rd Fridaya 4th Friday Thursday on or before full moon lst and 3rd FridayS Saturday on or before full moon Friday on or before full moon

TBIBTY-EIGHTH DISTBIOT-WINAN I. MAYFIELD, D. D. G. 1\1., Lebanon, Mo. Camden. . . . . • .. .. . Laclede " ••...••. ........ Pulaski •..•..•.. " Miller ...••.•••. .. .

Linn Creek " Mack's Creek Laclede Competition ...•.. Conway Waynesville .•..•.. Richland Brumley •••.....•. Iberia

162 Camdenton •..••.•. H. 433 Mack's Creek M. 83 Lebanon J. 482 Competition .••.•.. F. 628 Conway T. 876 Waynesville ....•.•. J. 386 Richland R. 208IBrumley C. 410 Iberia H.

C. Kingsbury.... V. Skinner H. Easley Dougan ..•....... R. Gaurley O'Day ...•........ Dodd R. Hawkins H. Pemberton

TBmTY-h~H DISTBIOT-oHABLES

Crawford••....• Lebanon......... .. • •..••. Cuba .••••..••.•.. Dent Salem Maries .••••••••. Vienna........... " Belle ," ......... Lane's Prairie Phelps •••••••... Rolla ...•••••.••.• h St. James " Equality Pulaski, ••••.••. Arlington •.....•.. Texas Latimer..........

77 312 226 94 878 681 213 230 497 846 146

Theo. Anderson •..•. O. P. Hack W. I. Mayfield O. Van Staven •....•. E. H. Harris J. L. Mitchell ...•.... H. B. Warren A. M. Phillips Chas. L. Brown

2nd Thursday lst Saturday 1st Wednesday Saturday on or before full moon 2nd Thursday 2nd Saturday 2nd Wednesday Saturday on or before full moon lst Friday

L. WOODS, D. D. G. M., Bolla, Mo.

Steelville ...•...•.. C. H. Mcintosh •.•••. Cuba •.•....•••..•. J. L. Trainer .....•. Salem C. O. Nelson Vienna ••••.••..•.. M. M. Tackett Belle A. J. Wofford Vichy C. P. Woodruff Rolla ..••.....••.•. J. E. Butler••••..•• St. James E. H. Shelton Newburg O. F. Fordyce Dixon ...•..•••.••. C. W. Schillinlrer Licking B. W. Dunlap

T. H. Roberts ......•. Chas. F. Wilmesher .. Rex Miner L. O. Nichols •••••.•. T. J. Tynes R. M. Copeland J. M. Ellis •..•..•••• Wm. J. Moreland A. B. Cottle D. R. Stevens •..•.•• L. Smith

lst Saturday 2nd Sfaturday lst and 3rd FridayS 1st Saturday 2nd and 4th Saturdaya Saturday before full moon lst and 3rd SaturdayS lst and Srd ThursdayS 2nd and 4th TuesdayS 3rd Thursday 2nd and 4th ThursdayS


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICT8-Continued FOBTIETH DISTBICT-H. H. BALSIGEB, D. D. G. M., Crystal City, Mo. County Lodge No.1 Location Master J eff~.rson. . . . . .. De So~o •..•.....•. 119 De Soto ••••••••.•. H. J. McKay ....•.•. •••••••. Joachlm .••••....• 164 Hillsboro ••••.•.••. A. W. Vreeland ...•. •....•• ' Shekinah ......•.. 256 Festus. • • • . . • . . . .. H. L. Sheakley ..•..• • . • • . .. Herculaneum ...•. 338 Herculaneum .•.••. Tamen Leny Wash!f-gton .•.•. Tyro ....••••.....• 12 Caledonia •......... C. E. Drew ..••....• .... ' PotOSI ••••••.•.... 131 Potosi ••••••••..... E. D. Bay ..••.•....• ••.•. Irondale . 148 Irondale J. A. Robinson ••.. Belgrade ..••..... 632 Belgrade. . . • • . • • •. M. E. Wiley .....•.. St. Francois ...• ' Blackwell . 535 Blackwell L. S. Lester ....•••.•

Secretary Time of Meeting D. L. Rouggly ••..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays E. M. Williams ••.... 1st Saturday J. E. Jennings •...... 2nd and 4th Tuesdan Joe. W. Cassiedy 2nd and 4th Thursdaya Iva Queen ......••.•. Saturday on or before full moon Geo. Carr ..•••..••.. Friday on or before full moon J. B. Robinson 1st and 3rd Saturdays E. R. Breckenridge 3rd Saturday Howard E. Brown 1st Saturday

FOBTY-FIBST DISTBICT-M. E. EWING, D. D. G. M., Morrisville, Mo. Dallas ; Riddick .. .. Western Light .......... Urbana Hickory Hogle's Creek .. • .•••••. Hermitage •••••••. Polk •.•••....... Fair Play........ " Modern " •..••.•••••. Pleasant •••••.••.. " Bolivar " ••.••.••.••. Pleasant Hope •... " Aldrich

361 Buffalo 396 Louisburg 421 Urbana 279 Wheatland 288 Hermitage •••.•.•. 44 Fair PlaY •.•...••. 144 Humansville 160 Morrisville .••••.•. 195 Bolivar : 467 Pleasant Hope ••••. 664 Aldrich

L. B. Jones A. F. Pitts R. E. HarrelL L. F. Stevens Goo. E. Wilson .....• W. A. Price ..••...•. J. B. Potter R. L. Elwyn .......• C. E. Hill ...•......• R. C. Calvert ...•.... D. E. Rice

Ike Price Friday on or before full moon R. S. Lindsey Saturday on or before full moon W. A. Owensly 4th Saturday J. M. Murphy Saturday on or before full moon E. I. Miller •••....••. Saturday on or before full moon W. L. Trullinger .•.•. Thursday on or before full moon Chas. D. Tharp 2nd Friday and 2 weeks after M. E. Ewing......•. Friday on or before full moon J. W. Gravely Wednesday on or before full moon F. P. Slagle.•••.•••. Thursday on or before full moon J. S. Toalson 1st Tuesday


FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT-MARK D. GWINN, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo. Cedar. . . • . . • • •• Stockton ••••••••• .. • •..••••••. Jerusalem ........ •..•••••••. Clintonville••..••. Dade ••••••••••. Washington •••••• ............. Garrett...••••••• " Everton . ........... Melville . ........... Lockwood .......•

288 Stockton ••••.•••.• 815 Jerico Springs 482 EldoradoSprings 87 Greenfield ••••..••. 859 Arcola ••..••••••.• 405 Everton •••••••..•• 458 Dadeville. • • • . . • • •. 521 Lockwood ........•

F. J. M. G. W. W. E. W.

E. Wrenn .....••• A. Cunningham .. D. Gwinn L. Painter ..•..•• D. yates ..•••.•• T. Burton .•••••• H. McAllister•••• E. Evans •......•

M. T. Carender•••.• 1st and 8rd Thursdays Guy Farmer •.•••••.. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays F. W. Elliott 2nd and 4th Thursdays R. H. Merril1 4th Tuesday T. R. Owens ....•.•.. Thursday on or before full moon L. A. Newkirk •.•.••. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays A. C. Blakemore ••••. Thurs. on or b. f. m. and 2' weeks after W. Henry Davis ..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays

FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT-JOHN G. SENATE, D. D. G. M., Lamar, Mo. Vernon ..••••••. Osage •••••.•..••• .. . Sheldon .. • ..••.••. Schell City. . . • • • •. .. • Montevalo .. • Vernon .. • ..•••••. Unity...••••••••• ••••••••. Walker Barton •••.•.••• Hermon .•.....••• .. .. .•..••• Lamar........... ......... Signal •..•..••. Golden ......•..•• ......... Milford

803\NeVada ..••..•..•• 371 Sheldon 448 Schell City •..•.•... 490jMontevalo 498 Bronaugh 495 Richards •......• .-. 605 Walker 187 LiberaL .••.•....•. 292 Lamar .'. .. .. • . .. •• 304IMindenmines ••••.. 475 Golden City ..•••... 516 Milford

C. T. G. E. D. A. G.

B. Frederick ...•• D. V. Morris 2nd Friday F. Dowell W. G. Jones 1st and 3rd Thursdays Steincross .•.•..•• C. P. Fink •.....•..• Thursday on or before full moon KennedY' W. S. Kokendoffer .. 1st and 8rd Saturdays T. Combs S. P. Linn 2nd and 4th Tuesdays M. Benedict ....•• C. H. Newland .•••... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays C. Phillips S. R. Harvey 3rd Saturday and 2 weeks after R. Wolfington •....•. E. H. Roselle ...••..• 1st and 8rd Thursdays E. L. Niehaus J. W. Hagny 2nd and 4th Fridays D. L. Rodgers ...•.•• Ray Goff ...•••.••... 2nd and 4th Tuesdays W. R. Marchbanks ••• Arthur Farr ......•.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays J. A. Medlin J. C. Thomas 3rd Saturday

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-HARRY S. HIGHTOWER, Reeds, Mo. J~per .•.••••..

••••..••• ......... •.••..••• ......... •..•..•..

' ......... • • . • • • • •. ......... ...•...••

Carthage •..•...•• Sarcoxie ..•..•..•• Joplin Fellowship ••.••••. Jasper Carterville•••••••• Mineral Webb City Carl Junction. . . •. Criterion Larussell

197 Carthage ......•... 293 Sarcoxie ••.••.•••.. 885 Joplin 345 Joplin .•••.•••••... 898 Jasper 401 Carterville •..••••.. 471 Oronogo 512 Webb City 549 Carl Junction. . . . .. 586 Alba 592 Larussell

R. A. Hendrickson .. W. B. Pingree ...•.. 2nd and 4th Thursdays N. C. Barkley •..••. C. F. Le Furjah ..••. M. Zumwalt Sherman A. Smith G. A. Kluseman ....• Frank G. Ade •••••••• G. W. Weatherby C. E. Brown D. O. Stines •.•.....• C. W. Keith •...•••.. W. A. Weaver Leslie Whitfield E. M. Johnson J. C. Bailey J. N. Hammontree •• J. B. Coons......... L. G. Petefish D. A. Carlyle L. L. Simmons .••.•. C. M. Gillock

1st and 8rd Tuesdays 1st and 8rd Fridays 2nd and 4th Fridays 1st and 8rd Tuesdays 1st and 8rd Fridays 1st and 8rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Thursdays 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 1st and 8rd Mondays 1st and 3rd Fridays


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FORTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-E. F. HANNAH, D. D. G. M., Springfield, Mo. County Lodge No.1 Location Muter Greene .•••..•.. United........... 5 Springfield •..•..•. L. H. Scott " O'Sullivan........ 7 Walnut Grove •••... P. R. Stockton Ash Grove ...•..• 100 Ash Grove ••••.... R. E. Hulett•......• Solomon 271 Springfield J. H. Sappington Ozark. . . . . . • . . • .. 297 Fair Grove •.••.•.. R. R. Willard •..•... Gate of the Temple 422 Springfield •••.•.•. C. J. Clark ....••••• .......... Republic ........• 570 Republic R. C. Grim Strafford .•••..... 608 Strafford •.....•... H. Winter •..•••.•. Willard ••.•••.•.•. 620 Willard .•.••••..... P. D. Squibb .•....•. Webster ...•..•. Webster.......... 98 Marshfield ...•.•... J. G. McKinney •••.. " Doric 300 Elkland P. Price ••...••. Mount Olive ....•. 439IRogersville.R.R.3 .. W. L. McDowell ••..• •..••••. Hazelwood •..•..•. 459 Seymour .......•.. C. Heckendom •..•.. ....•••. Henderson 477IRogersville ......•. A. H. Farmer

Secretary Time of Meeting Merritt F. Smith •..• 3rd Monday J. S. McLemore •..... 2nd Tuesday Joe H. Turk •..•..... 2nd and 4th Thursdays V. F. Anderson 2nd Monday C. E. Klingner ••.•.•. 2nd Thursday E. W. Clark ...•..•.. 3rd Thursday R. A. Johnson •..•••. 2nd Thursday H. E. Greier .•..•••• 1st and 3rd Saturdays Phonso Fortner .•••• 1st and 3rd Thursdays P. V. Rathbun •..•... 2nd Friday G. F. Price Saturday before full moon W. F. Atkinson •..•.. Friday before full moon R. E. Chaffin ...•..•. Thurs. on or b. f. m. and 2 weeks after E. R. McCarmack 3rd Thursday

FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-e. A. SWENSON, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo. Douglu " •....... ••.••••• Texu " •••••••••• •••••.•••• •••••••••• Wright •..•..••. " •..•••••. ......... •.....•..

Ava.............. Pilot Knob ...•.... Mt. Ararat •.••... Barnes ••••••••... Texu ...••.•..... Plato••...••••.... Summersville ...•. Mountain Grove Joppa Mansfield .•••..•.. Grovespring •..... Norwood ...•.....

26 Ava .•....••..•••.. Ovle Hause •........ 182 Richville ••.••••..• C. Cearley 382 Topaz •••••....••.. W. H. MurrelL ..•.. 116 CabooL .••.••..... J. T. Stubbs 177 Houston •••.•••.•.. John A. Rhea .....•. 469 Plato ....•.•••••••. H. U. Cook 555 Summersville••.••. R. S. Graham .•..... 158 Mountain Grove •..• T. D. George ....••.. 411 Hartville J. C. Pope 543IMansfield W. Terbutton ..•.... 589 Grovespring J. L. Hudson 622 Norwood •..•...... M. J. Huffman .••..•

F. E. Reynolds .•••... 1st and 3rd Wednesdays L. O. Dickison •••..• Saturday on or before full moon E. Barnes •.......... Saturday on or before full moon A. J. McKinney ..••• 1st and 3rd Saturdays W. H. Farris .....•.. 2nd Saturday R. E. Daniels SaturdaY before full moon Lee Bell ..•.......... 3rd Saturday C. A. Swenson .....• 2nd and 4th Fridays C. G. Newton .....•.. Fri. on or b. f. moon and 2 weeks after Chu. A. Stephens 2nd Wednesday J. M. Vestal 3rd Saturday Oscar Freeman 1st and 2nd Thursdays


FOBTY-8EVENTH DISTBIOT-J. N. SPARXS, D. D. G. M., Grandin, Mo. Carter ...••.•... Van Buren. . . • . .• Grandin " Reynolds ••.••••. Hopewell. • • • • . . .. " ...•..•. Bunker. . • • . . • • • •. •..•..•. Barnesville •••••.• Shannon ......•. Delphian. . . • . . . .. .. • ....••• Winona .•••.•.••• ........ Eminence

509 Van Buren. • • • . . •. E. Townsend R. L. Coleman Satul'day on or before full moon 579 Grandin W. E. Harris .....•. J. M. McGhee 2nd Saturday 239 Lesterville .•.•.••.. C. M. Fitzpatrick ... J. C. McHenry ....•.. Saturday on or before full moon 275 Bunker J. A. Hulsey•..••••.. C. C. Wilkins 1st and 3rd SaturdayS 353 Ellington •.....•••. A. F. Bugg .....••.•• J. B. Wadsow.•..••• 4th Saturday 137 Birch Tree........ E. T. Buffington ..•.. C. O. Lemons ......•. 3rd Saturday 430 Winona••••.•..... J. Talmage Loyd J. T. Lloyd .•••..•... Thursday on or before full moon 607 Eminence •........ J. W. McCormac A. C. Smith ...•....• 1st Saturday

:rOBTY-EIGHTH DISTBIOT-J. CLYDE AKERS, D. D. G. 1'4., Farmington, Mo. I~:)D

Star ~f the West.. ............ MosaIc. • .. • .. . Madison ....•... Marcus........ . .. St. Francois Bismarck......... .. Farmington. . . • .. Ionic St. Francois ..•••. . Samaritan Pendleton .•.....• Leadwood ...•..•. ..... Elvins Saint Genevieve. Saline .......•..•.

133 Ironton W. H. Wallett 351 Belleview J. C. Stewart 110 Fredericktown ...•• L. E. Abernathy ..•. 41 Bismarck •..••.•.•• T. Tinsley 132 Farmington. . . • . .• J. W. Bray .•...••.• 154 Desloge J. H. Gasney 234 Libertyville•.•..•.. A. Lore 424 Bonne Terre •...•.. L. H. Kurtz 551 Doe Run .•••.••..• E. Kassabaum ..••..• 598 Leadwood ••••...•. E. F. Karsch .•..... 599 Flat River •••••••• W. F. Graham 226 St. Mary's P. Eydemann ...•..•

F. H. Comfort 2nd and 4th FridayS J. C. McCall Saturday on or before full moon E. B. Graham ..•...•. 1st and 3rd ThursdayS W. F. Bone .....•••• 1st and 3rd SaturdayS J. Clyde Akers...... 1st and 3rd FridayS J. L. Blunt 1st and 3rd Mondays P. A. Cashion 1st Thursday H. C. Thompson 1st and 3rd SaturdayS Blondy R. Hunt .•••• 2nd and 4th SaturdayS W. G. Mason ..••.... 2nd and 4th SaturdayS E. A. Counts Every Tuesday John F. Bartels 1st Saturday on or before full moon

FOBTY-NINTH DISTBICT-JAMES A. KINDEB, D. D. G. 1'4., Oape Girardeau, Mo. Boll~~ger. .. .... ••.••.• Cape Girardeau. .. • •

Trowel........... Zalma •.....••.•.. St. Mark's........ West View ••..... Wilson •.••..••••. MyStic Tie Whitewater ..•.••. Excelsior. . . • • • • .. Perry ..............••..•••.•... ,

440 Marble Hill ........ D. A. Johnson ...... E. J. Taylor ......... 2nd and 4th FridayS 545 Zalma...•...•..... O. H. Carr.••••.•.•. Wm. Allison •.••..•.. 1st and 3rd SaturdaYB 93 Cape Girardeau ••.• D. Minnen ...••...•. W. Glenn McCain •..• 2nd and 4th Tuesdaya 103 Millersville ...•..•• A. B. Cobble ..•••.•• Geo, W. Miller ...•... Saturday on or before full moon 191 Pocahontas ••••...• Z. H. Drum ......•• H. R. Stevenson •..•• 1st and 3rd SaturdayS 221 Oak Ridge F. N. Bruihe J. R. Jenkina Sat. on or b. f. m. and 2 weeks after 417 Whitewater•..••••. T. O. Morgan ...•..• J. M. Slagle .•.•••••• 2nd and 4th SaturdayS 441 Jackson ...•••. : . .. E. Roberts ...•...•• H. M. James •.•••••. 2nd and 4th ThursdayS .•...••..•..•..........................•••...........•.•.•..•....•...•••..•..•..••••.•


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FD'TIETH DISTRIOT-G. A. SAMPLE, D. D. G. M., Ohaffee, Mo. County Lodge No.1 Location Mississippi ...... East Prairie ...... 3841East Prairie ....... .. • ..•• Charleston •..•.... 407ICharleston •.....•.. Scott Morley 184 Morley ............. Ashlar ...•..•.•.. 306 Commerce ..•...... .. • •.•..•.... Sikeston..... . • . .. 310 Sikeston •..•...•... ............. Illmo •...•.••..... 581 Illmo ...•.....•.... .. • •.•..•.••. Blodgett 594 Blodgett .•......... .. . Chaffee.... .. . .. .. 615 Chaffee Stoddard Bloomfield 153 Bloomfield .. Essex 278 Essex Lakeville •.•...•.. 489 Bell City Dexter 532 Dexter Advance •..•...... 590 Advance .•••..••••. ....... Puxico ...•....... 596 Puxico New Madrid .•.. Morehouse 603 Morehouse ...•..••.

Master E. C. Davis ....•••. T. W. Givlatney ..... R. F. Boyce •........ G. W. Marshal. J. B. Scillian •...... F. M. Craig .••...... E. R. Tisdell .•...... A. A. Klages Goo. L. Fopay W. Langley H. M. Poe W. J. Vaughan ...•. E. H. Zimmer C. E. Rogers C. H. Pease

Secretary Time of Meeting Wm. W. Bledso ...•.. Every Thursday J. A. Boone ........•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays J. H. Perdue 2nd and 4th Fridays H. M. Zaricor ....•.. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays A. A. Harrison...... 1st and 3rd Thursdays F. M. Craig •••...... 2nd and 4th Thursdays Geo. W. Pearman 1st and 3rd Thursdays M. H. Stubblefield 1st and 3rd Thursdays F. A. Brannock 1st and 3rd Fridays L. E. Estes 2nd and 4th Tuesdays W. G. Pyle 3rd Saturday Wm. C. Harris 1st and 3rd Tuesdays E. H. Zimmer 1st and 8rd Thursdays C. A. Wilkerson 4th Friday F. W. Leming 2nd and 4th Tuesdays

FD'TY-FmST DISTRI0T-BUEL P. PARKS, D. D. G. M., Hornersville, Mo. Dunklin .. • •.•..•. ........ ••....•. ........ ........ New Madrid .... •• • ••• .... •••• Pemiscot •.•••.• •• .. ....... Stoddard

Kennett.......... Four Mile •..••..• Hornersville •..•.. Cardwell ••.•..•... Malden Senath Portageville •..•.. Point Pleasant .•.. New Madrid Parma •..•••...•. Caruthersville Hayti Steele Bernie

68IKennett ....•...••. 212 Campbell ..••..••.• 215 Hornersville 231 Cardwell •..••••••• 406 Malden 513 Senath 166 Portageville 176 Conran •••...•..••. 429 New Madrid 650 Parma•.••.••..••• 461 Caruthersville ....•. 571 Hayti 684 Steele 573 Bernie

E. E. Lloyd .•••••..• B. Davenport......• W. F. Grantham W. H. Lockard W. L. Roehm L. B. Matsinger B. C. Wrathers P. J. Stearns ••..... W. A. Barnes P. J. Salyer ••••.•.. I. D. Bracy •...•...• J. F. Buckley L. Onerstuff .•..••.. W. C. Thurston

M. F. Simer .....•••. 2nd and 4th Thursdays R. D. Whiteaker 1st and 8rd Thursdays L. L. Bone 1st and 8rd Mondays P. A. Fitzgerald 1st and 3rd Fridays L. O. Wicecarver 2nd and 4th Thursdays L. B. DeHart 1st and 8rd Thursdays A. L. Carnahan ...•. 1st and 3rd Thursdays Goo. Newman •..•..•. Sat. on or b. f. m. and 2nd Thurs. c1fier Chas. M. Barnes 2nd and 4th Mondays Wm. B. Morgan .•.•. 1st and 8rd Tuesdays J. W. McCloskey •.... 1st and 3rd Tuesdays H. B. Bryant 1st 8Jld 3rd Thursdays H. Ballentine 2nd and 4th Thursdays M. M. Winer 1st and 3rd Fridays


FIFTY-SEOOND DISTBIOT-KIPP O. JOHNSON, D. D. G. M., Poplar Blu1f, Mo. Butler .......•.• Poplar Bluff•••••• Ri~!ey Pine : .. • .. • •••••••••• ComposIte•••••••• " •..•..•.•. Naylor ••••••••••• W~rne Greenville Wayne

209 PopJar Bluff•..•••• 814 Bardley.. • • .. • • 869 Doniphan••••••••• 568 Naylor •••••••••••• 107 Greenville 526IPiedmont

E. F. E. S. J. A.

B. Wilson ......•• Ollar C. White ....••..• P. Miller ..••••••• E. Lewis A. Wallis

Art H. Harwell ••.•. Clyde Turner........ R. C. Hoefer ••••..•. W. E. Koehler ••....• A. G. Templeton O. R. Sutton

2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st Saturday after full moon 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 1st and 3rd Thursdays 2nd and 4th Saturdays

FIFTY-THIRD DISTBICT-o. E. ARMSTRONG, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo. Howell •.•••.••• " •..••.••• ..•••. :.. Oregon ••••.•••. .. • ••.••••• .•••..••• .......... ••••..••• O~~rk .. ; •....•••.. •..••••••. •......• "

Mt. Zion ••••••••. 8271West Plains •••••.• Ingomar•••••.••. , 536,Willow Springs .... Mountain View ••• 6871Mountain View •••• Alton ••••••.•••.. _ 255IAlton Wilderness •.••••• 374 Wilderness Woodside ••••...•. 387 Thomasville Clifton •..••..•.•• 468 Thayer Koshkonong •••••• 582lKOShkOnOng Sampson . 298 Lutie••••••••.•.•• Bayou ••••••••..•. 365 Bakersfield Rockbridge .•••... 435 Rockbridge Robert Burns •.... 496IGainesville

Christian .•..•.• " •..•... •.•••.• ....... Taney .. • .•••••••• •..••••..• " Stone , "

Sparta •......••.• Friend ••••••••••• Billings..... . • • •• Clever............ Claflin... . .. .. Kirbyville.. • • • • •. Fors~h•••••.•••• Branson Galena Crane

A. H. West ..••••••• Ed. Abbott ......... M. E. Smith ...•.••• J. R. Trimble R. T. Simpson E. F. Pierce R. W. Mitchell Geo R. Hitt J. W. Jones .•.•••••• F. Swain C. Hicks J. C. Harlin

Eugene N. Laird ..•. J. S. Whitten ....... Frank Todd •........ Geo. C. Martin J. P. SimpSon John Grimth A. A. Taber Chas. Thoman P. U. Duggins •.••... A. W. Morris F. B. Morris E. W. Ebrite

1st and 3rd Fridays 1st Friday 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Saturday on or before full moon SaturdaY on or before full moon Saturday on or before full moon 2nd and 4th Tuesdays 2nd Wednesday 2nd Saturday Saturday on or before full moon 2nd Saturday 1st Friday

FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-G. J. VAUGHAN, D. D. G. M., Ozark, :Mo. 296 Sparta ..••..•..•.. 852 Ozark ••••..•..•••• 379 Billings. . • • . . . • . •• 645 Clever.. • .. .. • .. 229 Protem 264 Hollister. . . • . . • • • •. 458IForsyth 587 Branson 515 Galena 519 Crane

A. M. Alexander ..•. C. W. Haguewood ..• E. A. Stellwagen ..•. C. M. Kerr A. R. Jones S. B. Pimberton Lige Hicks A. B. Payne B. F. Hembree H. D. Wilson

Z. St. John .••••.••• Last Friday on or before full moon Geo. T. Breazeale•••• SaturdaY on or before full moon Colmore Gray •••••••• 2nd Thursday G. W. Estes Friday on or before full moon V. R. Rozell Saturday on or before full moon C. E. Jennings .••••. 1st Thursday H. M. Blunk 1st Saturday S. P. Winch 1st and 3rd Fridays Troy Stone 1st and 3rd Saturdays D. A. Holderman 2nd and 4th Tuesdays


LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-W. N. :MARBUT, D. D. G. M., Mt. Vernon, Mo. County Lodge No.1 Location Master Secretary Time of Meeting Barry .....•...• Monett ...•..•.... 129 Monett •••••••••••• F. Bullington F. M. Shriver 1st and 8rd Fridays If • • • • • • • • •• Purdy............ 148 Purdy ••........... J. B. Burg .......••• C. E. Williams .•••... 1st and 3rd Thursda)'B ••••••••.• Barry ••••••••.••. 367 Washburn •..•..••. E. E. Edens ••••..... J. L. Sage •••••.••... 1st and 3rd Saturda)'B ...•..•... Pythagoras •..•••. 388 Cassville •...•.••.. E. N. Meador W. T. Priest ..••.••. 2nd and 4th Saturda)'B •.••..•... Seligman .•••••... 517 Seligman .•••..•... W. B. Hammers ••••. J. L. Wilhelm ..••... 2nd and 4th Thursdays ...••.••.. Comfort ••.•..•... 533 Wheaton •..•••...• J. S. McOwein O. L. Burger •.....•. 2nd and 4th Thu1'8days Lawrence Mount Vernon.... 991Mt. Vernon M. B. Phillips Leon Pugh 1st and 3rd Fridays " ' Canopy ...•..•... , 284IAurora Rex Holterman W. H. Lloyd 2nd and 4th Tuesdays ...... , Marionville , 390 Marionville .•.•••.. C. J. Snyder •....••• I. O. McCullah ••.•.•• 1st and 3rd FridayS ...... ' Decatur 400lPierce City W. O. R. Smerdon ••. E. T. Ecroyd 1st and 3rd ThursdayS •..... ' Verona .••........ 452Iverona , Coy Wadley E. young 1st and 3rd Tuesdays ••••... Red Oak ...•..... 468 Red Oak •..••••••• F. Hagler ...•••..••.•.•......••••.........••••..•••••.•••••• ...... Stinson 523 Stinson •.•.•••..•. A. Reichensin .....•. L. E. yingst ••••..•• Sat. on or b. f. m. and 2 weeks Biter ,Miller•........... 567IMiller •.....•...... E. G. Webb ........• Chas. Henry 1st and 3rd Wednesdays

FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRIOT-W. A. PHIPPS, D. D. G. M., Neosho, Mo. McDonald Southwest •...... , 466' Southwest City " •.••••. Anderson ...•..... 621 Anderson ••.••••••. ....... Noel. 647 Noel. Ne~ton N~ho 247 Neosho •••••.••• Racme 478 Sentlca•••••.•...•. ........ Granby •.......... 514 Granby ........ Stella 538 Stella

J. C. R. A. H. C. F.

M. Stevenson ...• W. Green ...•.... Hogg C. Wright C. Helm .......•• Neal. •..•...•••.. A. Lynn

W. F. Stevenson •..•. 1st and 3rd TuesdayS H. Eppard .....••••• 2nd and 4th Wednesdays B. F. St. Clair 1st and 3rd Wednesdays J. D. Stout ....•••.•• 1st and 3rd ThursdayS C. J. Lawson 2nd and 4th Mondays W. H. Williams 1st and 3rd Fridays N. Jessee 1st and 3rd Tuesdays


FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-FAY G. FULKERSON, D. D. G. M., Webster Groves, Mo. St. Louis ......•. Bonhomme....... " ••••..• Bridgeton........ " ••••.••. Webster Groves.. . " ••••.•. Fenton ••••..•.•.. " ••••••• Meramec " Kirkwood ..•..•... • . . . . .. li'erguson......... ........ Maplewood ........ Clayton ....... Wellston •..•... Valley Park • • . . . .• Jennings......... •••••.•. University ..•..... •.....• Gardenville

45IBallWin ...•....•.. 80 St. John's Station •. 84 Webster Groves .... 281IFenton •..••.•..•.. 313 Eureka 484 Kirkwood ....•..•. 542 Ferguson ....•.•.•. 566 Maplewood 601 Clayton 618 Wellston 629 Valley Park ...•..• 640 Jennings 6491university City 655 Gardenville .••••...

T. F. Schmidt J. P. Rickerd......• W. A. Walker .•....• F. W. Hennen ......• G. E. Mottert W. F. McRaven A. Fendler •........• W. H. Albrecht W. C. Sanders W. J. Newman G. W. Booth ......•. O. A. See .........•. C. L. Israel, Jr F. R. Wolz

H. F. Woerther 1st and 3rd Saturdays Walter Reinemer ••... 1st and 3rd Thursdays Geo. A. Shepardson .. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays Goo. F. Fuchs .••.•.•. 2nd and 4th Saturdays J. F. Howell 2nd and 4th Saturdays H. Schroeder•.....•• 2nd and 4th Mondays Harry A. Magoon .•.. 1st and 8rd Fridays J. W. Menaugh 1st and 8rd Fridays E. P. Clark, Jr 1st and 8rd Thursdays C. A. Tolin 2nd and 4th 'l'hursdays Chas. C. Scholl 1st and 8rd Tuesdays Geo. E. Kohlmeyer 1st and 8rd Tuesdays A. A. NaIl 1st and 8rd Mondays Florian Wolz 1st and 8rd Saturdays

FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-E. F. STABLING, D. D. G. M., Olean, Mo. Morgan ....•••.. Glensted ...•..••.. ••.•..•• Versailles ...•...•. " •....••• Barnett......•..• Miller Olean " Ionia.............

250 Glensted ...•...••.. M. Lammert 820 Versailles ....••••• J. A. McKelvey...•• 591 Barnett •..•..•..•. Alex Sanders J. E. Hite 184 Olean 881 Eldon R. F. Clotworthy

G. E. Moore.•....... Saturday on or before full moon W. B. Todd ......•.•. 2nd and 4th Mondays J. D. Bradshaw •..••. Saturday on or before full moon Wm. H. Crum 8rd Saturday J. H. Rea 2nd and 4th Mondays

FIFTY-NINTH· DISTRIOT-N. D. JAOKSON, D. D. G. M., Independence, Mo. Jackson " •..•..•. ........ •..•..•. ••.•..•• •••••••• ........ •••••••• ........ ••••.••. ........

Independence..... Summit ..•.....•. McDonald .•..•.•• Blue Springs Raytown ..••.••.• Christian .••••••.. Buckner Marlborough •..... Mt. Washington ... Grandview .•••••.. Grain Valley ......

76 Independence H. N. Beatty 263 Lee's Summit ..•••. W. B. Stautzenberger 324 Independence ...•.. P. R. Hall 887 Blue Springs ...••. W. T. McWilliams •.• 391 Raytown •••••••••• H. B. Wright•...•.. 392 Oak Grove ••••.••. W. E. Church ...•.•• 501 IBuckner B. E. Auld 569'18584WoodIand,K.c. D. S. Harvey ......•. 614 Mt. Washington .... J. C. Fleeman 618 Grandview ••••..••. J. A. Billingslea 644 Grahl Valley....... W. R. Mabry

F. F. Livesay••••••• 2nd and 4th Mondays J. G. Boyd ...•.....• 1st and 8rd Tuesdays W. Lee Whitmire 1st and 8rd Mondays Walter Kirby .•...... 1st and 8rd Fridays G. W. Cassell .•••.•.. 1st and 3rd Thursdays Robt. E. Livesay 1st and 8rd Fridays J. Ahrens 1st and 8rd Tuesdays J. C. Hagood....•... 1st and 8rd Mondays Gregg B. Christy..... 2nd and 4th Fridays M. V. Long•••••..•. 1st and 8rd Thursdays C. N. Houston ....... 2nd and 4th Saturdays


LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election Grand Master D. Grand Master Grand S. Warden Grand J. Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary April, 1821. ••. Thos. F. Riddick .. * James Kennerly * William Bates * Archibald Gamble .. * William Renshaw* Oct., 1821 •••• Nath'l B. Tucker .. * Thompson Douglass * Edward Bates .•.. - William Bates - Archibald Gamble .• - William Renshaw * Oct., 1822 •••• Nath'l B. Tucker .. - Thompson Douglass * Edward Bates .•.. - Wm. G. Pettus .•••• * Archibald Gamble .. - William RenshawOct., 1823 .••• Nath'l B. Tucker .. - Geo. H. C. Melody ..• - Edward Bates * Wm. G. Pettus .••.•• Archibald Gamble .• - T. Douglas. Oct., 1824 .••• Nath'l B. Tucker .. - Geo. H. C. Melody ..• - Wm. G. Pettus - Thornt. Grimsley .•• - Archibald Gamble .. * T. Douglas* Oct., 1825 .••• Edward Bates ....• Goo. H. C. Melody ..• - Wm. G. Pettus ....• Thornt. Grimsley ...• Archibald Gamble .. • John D. Daggett. Oct., 1826 .••• Edward Bates ....• Hardage Lane Martin Ruggles John F. Ryland ....• Rich. T. McKinney •• John D. Daggett. Oct., 1827 .••• Edward Bates ....• Hardage Lane ......• Martin Ruggles ...• H. R. Gamble ......• Thornton Grimsley •• John D. Daggett. Oct., 1828 •••• Hardage Lane • Goo. H. C. Melody ..• H. R. Gamble .....• Adam L. Mills.•....• Thornton Grimsley •• John D. Daggett. Oct., 1829 •••• Hardage Lane • Fred L. Billon ....••• H. R. Gamble ..... • Adam L. Mills ......• Bernard Pratte ....•• John D. Daggett. Oct., 1830 .••• Hardage Lane • Goo. H. C. Melody ..• Sinclair Kirtley ..• • Adam L. Mills ......• Thomas Andrews ..•• Fred L. Billon. Dec., 1831 •••• Edward Bates * Geo. H. C. Melody ..• Oliver Parker •...• - Augustus Jones * Thomas Andrews ..• * Fred L. Billon. Oct., 1832 •••• H. R. Gamble .....• Geo. H. C. Melody ..• M. J. Noyes ......• Augustus Jones * Thomas Andrews ..•• Fred L. Billon* Dec., 1833 .••• Sinclair Kirtley •..• A. B. Chambers ....• John Wilson * G. A. Tuttle ....•.• • Goo. H. C. Melody .. * John Garnett· Nov., 1834 ••• 1 A. B. Chambers ...• Sinclair Kirtley ..... * Oliver Parker .....• S. W. B. Carnegy ... • Geo. H. C. Melody .. • Thos. W. Conyers* Oct., 1835tt •• A. B. Chambers ..• * Sinclair Kirtley..•.. * Oliver Parker ..... * S. W. B. Carnegy ...• Goo. H. C. Melody .. • Thos. W. Conyers * Oct., 1836 •••• S. W. B. Carnegy.· John D. Daggett ....• Edward Searcey .. * Granville Snell ..... * Goo. H. C. Melody .. • Richard B. Dallam * Oct., 1837 •••• S. W. B. Carnegy. * John D. Daggett ..•.• A. B. Chambers ...• Thomas Andrews ..• * Geo. H. C. Melody .. • Richard B. Dallam. Oct., 1838 •••• S. W. B. Carnegy.* John D. Daggett ..••• A. B. Chambers ...• Alex. T. Douglass ...• Goo. H. C. Melody ..- Richard. B. Dallam. Oct., 1839 •••• P. H. McBride ...•• A. B. Chambers ...•• Alex. T. Douglass .• Wm. C. Vance ..•..• Geo. H. C. Melody ... Richard B. Dallam. Oct., 1840 •••• P. H. McBride ...• • Joseph Foster .•.... * Alex. T. Douglass .• John Orrick * Geo. H. C. Melody ..• Richard B. Dallam. Oct., 1841 •••• P. H. McBride ...•• Joab Bernard ...•..• Joseph Foster •... * C. H. Bowers Goo. H. C. Melody ..• Richard B. Dallam. Oct., 1842 •••• P. H. McBride ...•• J oab Bernard ......• Joseph Foster .... * C. H. Bowers ..••.... John Simonds .....•• Richard B. Dallam. Oct., 1843 •••• P. H. McBride ...• * Joseph Foster ......• J. W. S. Mitchell ..• E. S. Ruggles * Fred L. Billon .•....• Richard B. Dallam* Oct., 1844 .••• J. W. S. Mitchell .. * Fred L. Billon ..••.•• E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jacoby John S. Watson • Richard B. Dallam. Oct., 1845 •••• J. W. S. Mitchell .. * John D. Taylor E. S. Ruggles J. L. F. Jacoby * John S. Watson * Fred L. Billon· Oct., 1846 •••• John Ralls * John D. Taylor * E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jacoby ....• - John S. Watson * Fred L. Billon. Oct., 1847 •••• Joseph Foster * E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jacoby ...• Cyrus Osborn .....• * John S. Watson * J. W. S. Mitchell* May, 1848 •••• Joseph Foster ....• E. S. Ruggles * Cyrus Osborn ....• * Joseph Megguire ..• • John S. Watson * J. W. S. Mitchell* May, 1849 •••• Jol)n F. Ryland E. S. Ruggles * Joseph Megguire P. Draper * John M. Reed * C. D. W. Johnson* May, 1850 •••• John F. Ryland * B. W. Grover .•••...• P. Draper * S. F. Currie • J. T. Johnson * C. D. W. Johnson· May, 1851. ... B. W. Grover * E. S. Ruggles ....... S. F. Currie J. H. Turner • J. T. Johnson * C. D. W. Johnson· May, 1852 •••. B. W. Grover ....• * S. F. Currie ........• J. H. Turner .....• S. H. Saunders .....• J. T. Johnson * A. O'Sullivan· June, 1853 •••• Wilson Brown .... * L. S. Cornwell ......• J. W. Chenoweth.* R. C. Hill .•........ • Joseph Foster .•.... * A. O'Sullivan* May, 1854 •••• L. S. Cornwell ....• D. P. Wallingford .. • James H. Britton .•................... *. Joseph Foster * A. O'Sullivan· May, 1855 L. S. Cornwell. *. J. W. Chenoweth .• H. E. Van Orsdell .. * John D. Daggett * A. O'Sullivan* May, 1856 .••• Benjamin Sharp .• * W. A. Cunningham .. S. H. Saunders * Marcus Boyd ......• * John D. Daggett ..• * A. O'Sullivan· May, 1867 •••• S. H. Saunders * P. Draper ••.••..•. * Marcus Boyd * John F. Houston ...• John D. Daggett..• * A. O'Sullivan· May, 1858 •••• S. H. Saunders * Marcus Boyd * John F. Houston .. * John Decker * John D. Daggett • A. O'Sullivan* May, 1859 Marcus Boyd M. H. McFarland W. R. Penick John Decker • John D. Daggett • A. O'Sullivan· May, 1860 M. H. McFarland .• W. R. Penick * John Decker * Samuel M. Hayes * John D. Daggett * A. O'Sullivan* May, 1861 .•.. Wm. R. Penick * John Decker • Goo. Whitcomb * A. L. McGregor * John D. Daggett..• • A. O'Sullivan·


May, May, May, May, May, Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct.,

1862 •••. 1863 .••• 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 .••. 1872 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881. 1882 1883 1884 1885 •••. 1886 .•.. 1887 1888 1889 1890 ..•• 1891 .••• 1892 ••.. 1893 .••• 1894 1895 1896 •••. 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901. 1902 1903

Geo. Whitcomb •••• John H. Turner••.• John F. Houston •.• John F. Houston ..• John D. Vineil ..... W. E. Dunscomb .. • John D. Vineil ..... William D. Muir .. • Thos. E. Garrett ... Thos. E. Garrett ..• Samuel H. Owens.· R. E. Anderson • John W. Luke • James E. Cadle • Xen. Ryland • T. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • Jos. S. Browne • W. R. Stubblefield.· Alex. M. Dockery.· Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson· James W. Boyd ... • Geo. R. Hunt ..•••• Wm. M. Williams.· James P. Wood l1 Theodore Brace Geo. E. Walker ••.• B. H. Ingram ••.••• John R. Parson .•. • Harry Keene ...•• • J. B. Thomas • A. M. Hough • D. A. Jamison ..•. • F. J. Tygard • E. F. Allen • C. H. Briggs Campbell WeDs ••• • Joseph C. Finagin· John C. yocum Wm. F. Kuhn

John H. Turner..••• Wm. N. Loker •••• • Samuel Russell ..•.•• Wm. N. Loker••.... • John D. Vincil .... • A. L. McGregor ..•.• John D. Vincil A. L. McGregor ..• Martin Collins John D. Vincil.....• Martin Collins • R. E. Anderson ..••.• W. E. Dunscomb • R. E. Anderson • A. L. McGregor C. A. Rowley • T. E. Garrett • Wm. D. Muir • R. E. Anderson Wm. D. Muir :. Alex. M. Dockery T. E. Garrett • A. M. Dockery Sam H. Owens R. E. Anderson • Sam H. Owens • John E. Ryland R. E. Anderson ..•..• Sam H. Owens • John E. Ryland.• J. E. Ryland • John W. Luke Jas. E. Cadle John W. Luke Jas. E. Cadle • Xenophon Ryland Xenophon Ryland ..• Jas. E. Cadle • ThOB. C. Ready Xenophon Ryland ..• Thos. C. Ready Noah M. Givan ThOB. C. Ready Noah M. Givan M. G. Hubble Noah M. Givan JOB. S. Browne W. R. Stubblefield .. • Joseph S. Browne W. R. Stubblefield. Jas. E. Carter W. R. Stubblefield ..• Jas. E. Carter 11. Alex. M. Dockery • Alex. M. Dockery • Chas. C. Woods Lee A. Hall • Chas. C. Woods Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson.· Lee A. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson. James W. Boyd Robt. F. Stevenson.· James W. Boyd Geo. R. Hunt James W. Boyd .....• George R. Hunt Wm. M. Williams •.•• George R. Hunt .•..• Wm. M. Williams •• James P • Wood .•...• W. M. Williams • James P. Wood ••.•..••.•.••.•••.•••..•• James P. Wood Theodore Brace ...• Geo. E. Walker Theodore Brace Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram John R. Parson B. H. Ingram • John R. Parson .••• Harry Keene ......•• John R. Parson ....• Harry Keene ....•• J. B. Thomas .••..•• • Harry Keene .....••• J. B. Thomas ...••• A. M. Hough ....••. • J. B. Thomas •......• A. M. Hough .•.••• D. A. Jamison ......• A. M. Hough D. A. Jamison F. J. Tygard D. A. Jamison F. J. Tygard ..•••• E. F. Allen F. J. Tygard ....••. - E. F. Allen •••••.• - C. H. Briggs .••.•.•• E~ F. Allen C. H. Briggs Campbell WeDs C. H. Briggs Campbell Wells Joseph C. Finagin ..• Campbell WeDs Joseph C. Finagin. John C. yocum Joseph C. Finagin John C. yocum Wm. F. Kuhn John C. yocum Wm. F. Kuhn Leroy B. Valliant Wm. F. Kuhn Leroy B. Valliant .• A. S. Houston Leroy B. Valliant A. S. Houston ..... D. M. Wilson

John D. Daggett••• • A. O'Sullivan. John D. Daggett•••• A. O'Sullivan. Wm. N. Loker A. O'Sullivan. Wm. N. Loker ....••• A. O'Sullivan. Wm. N. Loker A. O'Sullivan.t Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley.* Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley. Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley. Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley. Wm. N. Loker......• G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley. Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley· Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley"l1 Wm. N. Loker John D. Vincil. John W. Luke John D. Vincil. John W. Luke John D. Vincil· John W. Luke U John D. Vincil. John W. Luke John D. Vincil. Samuel Me Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. VincU. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel Me Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard - John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil. Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. VincilSamuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard. JohnD. VineU· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· Samuel M. Kennard. John D. Vincil· John R. Parson ..... John D. Vincil·


LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election Grand Master D. Grand Master Grand S. Warden Grand J. Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary Sept., 1904 Leroy B. Valliant .• A. oS. Houston .•...•• D. M. Wilson .•...• Howard Watson ••..• John R. Parson ....• John D. VincU·llll Sept., 1905 A. S. Houston ..••• D. M. Wilson ...•... • John T. Short ....• R. R. Kreeger Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. ParsonU· Sept., 1906 D. M. Wilson ••..•• John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger William A. Hall.•..• Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1907 John T. Short..•. • R. R. Kreeger..•..•. William A. Hall....• Clay C. Bigger ....•• Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1908 R. R. Kreeger .••... William A. Hall ....• Clay C. Bigger ...• Arch A. Johnson .... Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1909 Wm. A. Hall ....•• Clay C. Bigger .....• Arch A. Johnson ... Jacob Lampert.....• Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1910 ..•• Clay C. Bigger.•. * Arch A. Johnson .... Jacob Lampert ...• Van Fremont Boor .. Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1911. Arch A. Johnson .•. Jacob Lampert.•... * Van Fremont Boor. Chesley A. Mosman .• Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1912 Jacob Lampert ...• Van Fremont Boor.. Chesley A. Mosman. Tolman W. Cotton... Alphonso C. Stewart· John R. Parson· Oct., 1913 ...• Van Fremont Boor. Chesley A. Mosman .• Tolman W. Cotton. Frank R. Jesse .....• Alphonso C. Stewart. John R. Parson· Sept., 1914 Tolman W. Cotton. Frank R. Jesse ..••• Edward Higbee ... * Wm. A. Clark ......• Alphonso C. Stewart· John R. Parson· Sept., 1915 Frank R. Jesse ... • Edward Higbee ...•.• Wm. A. Clark ...•• John W. Bingham ..• Alph. C. Stewart.·· John R. Parson· Sept., 1916 Edward Higbee ...• Wm. A. Clark....•.. John W. Bingham. Julius C. GarrelL ... Wm. A. Hall .......• John R. Parson· Sept., 1917 Wm. A. Clark John W. Bingham ..• Julius C. Garrell Wm. F. Johnson ....• Wm. A. HalL ......• John R. Parson· Sept., 1918 John W. Bingham. Julius C. Garrell ..... Wm. F. Johnson .. * O. A. Lucas .......• Wm. A. Hall .......• John R. Parson· Sept•• 1919 Julius C. Garrell ... Wm. F. Johnson ..••• O. A. Lucas .....•• Bert S. Lee ••.••.••• Wm. A. HalL ......• John R. Parson· Sept., 1920 Wm. F. Johnson ..• O. A. Lucas ......••• Bert S. Lee Joe. S. McIntyre Wm. A. Hall .......• John R. Parson tt· Sept., 1921. O. A. Lucas Bert S. Lee Joe. S. McIntyre Orestes MitchelL Wm. A. Hall .......• Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1922 Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre .. Orestes Mitchell W. W. Martin Wm. A. Hall • Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1923 Joseph S. McIntyre Orestes Mitchell W. W. Martin John Pickard Wm. A. Hall Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1924 Orestes Mitchell W. W. Martin John Pickard A. F. Ittner Wm. A. Hall ttt Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1925 W. W. Martin John Pickard ...•.... A. F. Ittner ......• B. E. Bigger E. E. Morris Frank R. Jesse· Oct., 1926 John Pickard A. F. Ittner .......•. B. E. Bigger .•..... S. R. Freet .........• E. E. Morris Frank R. Jesse··tt Oct., 1927 Anthony F. Ittner. B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet .......• Wm. R. Gentry, Sr E. E. Morris Arthur Matherttt Sept., 1928 Byrne E. Bigger S. R. Freet .........• Wm. R. Gentry, Sr. Ray V. Denslow E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1929 S. R. Freet .......• Wm. R. Gentry Ray V. Denslow .•. Thad B. Landon E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Oct., 1930 ...• Wm. R. Gentry Ray V. Denslow Thad B. Landon Frank C. Barnhill E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1931 Ray V. Denslow Thad B. Landon Frank C. Barnhill .. Du Val Smith E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1932 Thad B. Landon Frank C. Barnhill ..• Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1933 F. C. Barnhill ...•• Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly ....• Goo. W. Walker E. E. Morris Arthur Mather Sept., 1934 Du Val Smith !as. W. Skelly Goo. W. Walker H. L. Reader E. E. Morris Arthur Mather -IIJohn W. Luke served, by appointment, as tt*Resigned May 20. 1921, account ill health. -Deceased. Grand Secretary, from April 11, 1877, to *tttDied November 7, 1924, while in office. §Was not installed. ·_·Appointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. October 11, 1877, and died October, 1888. -tDied August 11, 1866, while in office. lIDied within week after his installation. Valliant, Grand Master. • tAppointed August 13, 1866, by John D. ttThere was no Communication in 1835, ··ttDied August 29, 1927, while in office. Vincil, Grand Master. owing to the anti-Masonic excitement. tttAppointed September 1, 1927, by John ·*IIDied April 11, 1877, while in office. --Withdrawn from Masonry. Pickard, Grand Master. -'illDied October 12, 1904, while in office. U.Appointed October 22, 1904, by Leroy B. ---Died April 22, 1916, while in office. Valliant, Grand Master. OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATION, FEBRUARY 22, 1821 WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden J AMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden EDWARD BATES, Worshipful Master ABRAM BECK, Secretary JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer


Report

Masonic Home of Missouri FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1933, to SEPTEMBER 1, 1934 MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI, LOCATED AT ST. LOUIS OFFICERS W. W. Martin, President St. Louis, Robert R. Kreeger, Vice-President Kansas City, W. S. Campbell, Treasurer St. Louis, Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary .•................ St. Louis, Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician St. Louis, Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children St. Louis, Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old People St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Arch A. Johnson R. R. Kreeger W. W. Martin James R. McLachlan

Springfield, Kansas City, St. Louis, Kahoka,

MO.} Mo. Mo. Mo.

Term expires 1935

T. W. Cotton Thad· B. Landon Jos. S. McIntyre Thos. H. Reynolds

Van Buren, Kansas City, St. Louis, Kansas City,

MO.} Mo. Mo. Mo.

Term expires 1936

St. Louis, St. Joseph, St. Louis, Hannibal, Trenton,

MO.] Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

Term expires 1937

W. S. Campbell Orestes Mitchell F. H. Wielandy Byrne E. Bigger Ray V.. Denslow

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Du Val Smith, Grand Master James W. Skelly, Deputy Grand Master George W. Walker, Grand Senior vYarden H. L. Reader, Grand Junior Warden

St. Joseph, St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, Webster Groves,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

ADVISORY BOARD Mrs. Ella Jean Flanders Mrs. Alta L. Tate Mrs. Edith Ambruster

Excelsior Springs, Mo. Richmond Heights, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. 223


Masonic Home of Missouri 1934.

President's Letter To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Misso~tri: Brethren: Pursuant to the Constitution and By-Laws of the Masonic Home of Missouri, I路 herewith submit as President of its Board of Directors, the Forty-Ninth Annual Report and request your careful consideration. At the Annual Session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, held on September 26 and 27, 1933, in Kansas City,Missouri, the following brethren were elected directors for a term of three years: T. W. Cotton W. A. Clark Jos. S. McIntyre Thomas H. Reynolds

Van Buren, Jefferson City, St. Louis, Kansas City,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

At the Board Meeting held in Kansas City, September 27, 1933, the following officers were elected: W. W. Martin, President " R. R. Kreeger, Vice-President W. S. Campbell, Treasurer C. L. Alexander, Secretary Dr. Solon Cameron, Home Physician Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron of Children Mrs. Luella McCue, Matron of Old Folks

St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis, St. Louis,

Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo. Mo.

The standing committees for the past year have been as follows: Trustees of the Endowment Fund-W. W. Martin, R. R. Kreeger, W. S. Campbell. Executive Committee--R. R. Kreeger, Chairman; A. A. Johnson, Vice-Chairman; T. W. Cotton, J. S. McIntyre, W. S. Campbell, T. H. Reynolds, F. H. Wielandy. Finance Committee-To W. Cotton, Chairman; Orestes Mitchell, Ray V. Denslow. House Committee--W. S. Campbell, Chairman; J. S. McIntyre, F. H. Wielandy. Legal Committee--A. A. Johnson, Chairman; J. S. McIntyre, Orestes Mitchell, T. H. Reynolds, W. S. Campbell, Byrne E. Bigger. 224


1934

225

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Administration Committee-Orestes Mitchell, Chairman; F. H. Wielandy, Byrne E. Bigger, J. R. McLachlan. Hospital Committee-To W. Cotton, Chairman; W. A. Clark. Medical Staff: Dr. Franci~ Reader Dr. E. Lee Myers Dr. J. B. Wright Dr. A. H. Conrad

St. Louis St. Louis, Trenton, St. Louis,

MO.} Mo. Mo. Mo.

Dr. Louis H. Behrens St. Louis, Dr. M. A. Bliss (deceased) .. St. Louis, Dr. Solon Cameron St. Louis, Dr. W. A. Clark (deceased) ............. .. . Jefferson City,

MO.) Mo. MO.. . Mo.-

Term expires 1935

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

MO.} Mo. Mo. Mo.

Term expires 1936

Rudolph Buhman Frank Moore . Thomas A . H opkms D. L. Harris

St. St. St. St.

Louis, Louis, Louis, Louis,

T

. 1934 erm expIres

OFFICIAL BONDS W. W. Martin, President, $75,000.00; W. S. Campbell, Treasurer, $75,000.00; Clarence L. Alexander, Secretary, $75,000.00; Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, Matron, $2,000.00. Trustees of the Endowment Fund: W. W. Martin, $75,000.00; W. S. Campbell, $75,000.00; R. R. Kreeger, $10,000.00. APPLIOATIONS

During the past year 105 applications for admission to the Home were considered, and the following dispositions were made of them: Admitted to the Home Withdrawn by the Lodge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Died while the application was being investigated '. . . . . .. Referred to Grand Lodge Welfare Committee Referred to O. E. S. Welfare Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Rejected because of ineligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Continued for further investigation

17 1 5 46 5 2 29

MEMBER STATISTICS Men

Women

Boys

Girls

Members in the Home September 1, 1933 ..158 Admitted during the past year ............ 9

145 . 12

73

75

167 Discharged during the year... . . . . . . . . . .. 3 Deaths during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 27

157 1 24

73 7

75 9

137

132

66

66


226

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Total membership September 1, 1934 Net loss during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Admitted during the past year, but who have not yet arrived. . . .. The average number in the Home during the year

401 50 10 431

CONDITIONS IN THE HOME

Ev.ery room in the Home is filled and has been for several years. Five men and five women have been admitted who have not yet arrived. On September 1st we had fifty less members of the Home Family than a year ago. There were sixteen less children, but we are still so crowded in the children's department that twenty-one children are sleeping in basement rooms. We are also compelled to reduce the number of old people to a place where they will not have to wait so long for a room. A hospital is not a place for well people and to hold them there for any length of time leads to many complications. In spite of the reduction in number we are still being criticised for the crowded conditions. For the first time in years, and possibly in the history of the Home, we have been compelled to refuse the admission of children. There are now twenty destitute children who cannot be properly cared for on the outside by the Welfare Committee and should be admitted, but the crowded condition will not permit it. The average age of the old folks of our Home is 78 years. Many of them hospital cases that require constant care and attention. The waiting list continues to grow from year to year. Counting the applicants being cared for by the Grand Lodge Welfare Committee and those carried over by our Board for lack of room, gives a waiting list of well over one hundred and fifty. COSTS

Our per capita cost for caring for the members of the Home Family the past year shows a considerable increase. Everything we have had to buy has gone up in price, and everything points to increasing prices for the coming year also. A comparison of per capita costs for several years will prove interesting: 1928-1929 1929-1930 1930-1931 1931-1932 1932-1933 1933-1934

Per capita cost of Home Per capita cost of Home Per capita cost of Home Per capita cost of Home Per capita cost of Home Per capita cost of Home

Family $558.89 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 543.00 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 467.06 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 459.53 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 439.41 Family 451.45


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

227

GIFTS

In spite of the depression, many friends and organizations remember the Masonic Home in a substantial way from time to time. During the past year we have received money for our Education Fund, for magazines, books for the library and many other useful things. There are Lodges and Masons in the State of Missouri who never fail to remember the Masonic Home. Weare profoundly grateful for their help and their continued interest in this work. MASONIC HOME PLEASURES

The St. Louis Christmas Committee has again rendered great service to the Home. Their Christmas dinner, toys and gifts for the children and cash for the old people; Friday night parties and picture shows, trip to Forest Park Highlands and many other things during the year have added to the entertainment and the happiness and contentment of our Home Family. Each Lodge in the City and St. Louis County contributes to the work of this Committee. EDUCATION

For a number of years it has been the policy of the Home to provide the best education possible for each boy and girl in the Home. We try to ascertain what they are fitted to do and help them to do it, and after they have completed their school work we continue to help them until they are permanently located in a good position and are self-supporting. Our goal is to give every boy and girl a high school education and then fit them for some trade or profession. At the present time we have four girls in Washington University, three girls and one boy in business college, one girl in school of nursing and three boys in Rankin Trade School. The attendance at Washington University is made possible by the Advisory Board and the Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star who furnish the tuitions. During the past summer our girls in Washington University have been successful in holding jobs,. and they will be able to provide their own money for books and incidental expenses. During the past year we have had three girls complete their education. We have been able to secure good jobs for them and they are now self-supporting and making good in their positions. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR

The Advisory Board of the Order of the Eastern Star have gladly met every demand that we have made upon them during the year. They h&ve been called upon to furnish more than the usual amount and have completely refurnished several departments of the Home, as well as furnishing the new linens and the regular supplies of the Home, that they buy each year. Following their regular custom,


228

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

they furnished a turkey dinner for the family on New Year's Day, and in addition many gifts for both the old people and the children. Our relations with them have been most cordial and we have found them always ready to do everything that will add to the comfort and betterment of the Home. Weare deeply grateful to them for the service they have rendered. ENDOWMENT FUND

While we cannot report the large gifts that we reported last year, our Endowment Fund was increased in cash $20,509.60. There are several estates also that are being administered and this amount will be increased from time to time. The net income from our EndowmentFund, including the receipts from the Gussie L. Grenner Estate which was left to the St. Louis Union Trust Company for the benefit of the Masonic Home, was $52,526.09. Weare again repeating our statement that many of the gifts that come to the Endowment Fund are already invested in stocks and bonds; many of the stocks do not pay dividends and many of the bonds are in default. During the year we have been able to improve the condition of this fund and we are hoping before long that many of the bonds that are now in default will be finally adjusted and we will be able to get some income from them. Only the income from the Endowment Fund is available. The principal cannot be used and the trustees are placing every safeguard around this fund to protect the principal amount and see to its proper investment. About twentyfive per cent of our income comes from the Endowment Fund, and were it not for this income our work would be very greatly curtailed. ESTIMATE VALOE OF ASSETS

Endowment Fund cash and securities Home Grounds Improvements Furnishings

$1,106,261.79 240,000.00 775,000.00 165,000.00 $2,286,261.79

INSURANCE

Fire Tornado On all buildings and contents $896,660.00 $895,700.00 Steam Boiler Insurance. . . . . . . . . . .. 20,000.00 Contingent Liability-Compensation 20,000.00-$40,000.00 Public Liability.................. 25,000.00- 50,000.00 5,000.00 Electrical Machinery.............. MRS. MARY HUTHMAKER MEMORIAL

This consists of an eighty-acre tract of land located in Kirkwood, Missouri, and St. Louis County, to be used for a Children's Home. As soon as business conditions improve, we hope to improve this property.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

229

MASONIO INFmMARY

The following gives an account of the work done during the year: Total patients in hospital at beginning of year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Total patients admitted during the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Total patients discharged during the year. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Total patients treated during the year. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 532 Total number of deaths. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 69 Total patients in hospital at the end of the year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total patients' days in hospital. 31,797 90 Average patients per day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total number of out-patients' treatments given during the year 23,068 MRS. ETHEL O. STANSBERRY

Died December 30, 1933. Sister Stansberry was Treasurer of the Advisory Board of the Grand Chapter Order of Eastern Star. She was interested in the work of the Masonic Home for many years and at a former time had served as member of the Advisory Board. In the records of the Masonic Home there is a tribute of respect to her memory. We greatly miss her counsel, her friendship and the fine service that she rendered this Home. DR. WILLIAM ALFRED CLARK

Died April 11, 1934. We are deeply grieved to report the death of Brother Clark, who has been a member of the Masonic Home Board since 1924. Brother Clark was an active Mason for many years, an active worker of the Masonic Home Board and his services are greatly missed. Appropriate resolutions appear on the records of the Masonic Home and will also appear in the proceedings of this Grand Lodge. Weare deeply grateful to Almighty God for His continued kindness through another year. Fraternally submitted,

W. W. REPORT OF SEORETARY SEPTEMBER 1, 1933 TO AUGUST 31, 1934 GENERAL FUND September 1, 1933, Balance on Hand

MARTIN.

$186,996.44

Receipts Grand Lodge Per Capita Tax ..... $127,978.87 Grand Chapter, O. E. S. Per Capita Tax 17,197.75 $145,176.62 Interest on General Fund Securities Profit on sale of General Fund Securities . . . . . . .

4,558.27 1,571.26

151,306.15 $338,302.59


230

1934

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Disbursements Provisions $ Dry Goods and Clothing . Laundry . ~ . Ice, Light and Water Fuel . Salaries . Wages . Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory Board, attending Board Meetings . Hospital Supplies ........â&#x20AC;˘.................. Carfare for Members of the Home Family . Telephone . Legal and Auditing . Annuities paid . Insurance . Repairs and Maintenance . Supplies . Taxes and Other Expenses on Farms Foreclosed . Taxes and Other Expenses on Estate of Members of Home Family . Printing, Stationery and Postage . Miscellaneous Expense--Allowance for Steward's Car, Hauling Ashes, Newspapers, etc . Premium on Bonds Purchased . Tax on Checks and Bank Collection Charges . Transfer to Income Fund .

66,722.59 7,648.35 8,443.99 8,941.54 8,272.81 15,993.00 47,008.87 2,013.10 3,069.02 1,387.80 463.23 807.80 2,060.00 3,490.60 1,618.61 9,119.24 1,175.75 174.68 1,531.62 3,668.23 276.80 105.02 1,756.86

Total Disbursements

.

$195,755.51

August 31, 1934, Balance on Hand

.

$142,547.08

INCOME FUND Receipts Interest on Endowment Bonds $ 41,590.03 Interest on Real Estate Loans... .. 10,936.06 2,193.57 Received from Members of the Home Family Pensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 864.00 Rent of ]'arms, etc. 865.39 Transfer from General Fund. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 1,756.86 180.00 Sale of Cemetery Lots .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.68 Sale of Merchandise $ 58,397.59

Total Receipts . Disbursements, Tax on Checks and Bank Collection Charges . August 31, 1934, Balance on Hand . INITIATION FUND September 1, 1933, Balance on Hand . Receipts Receipts from Grand Secretary $ Interest on Securities . Profit on Sale of Bonds .

.59 $ 58,397.00 $123,101.76 220.00 5,542.37 1,325.63

7,088.00 $130,189.76


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

231

Disbursements Refund to Kidwell Children $ 1,267.56 1,402.78 Expenses on Huthmaker Property............ 2,670.95 Tax on Checks and Collection Charges .6_1 $127,518.81 August 31, 1934, Balance on Hand . IMPROVEMENT FUND September 1, 1933, Balance on Hand .........•

$ 93,402.41

Receipts Interest on Securities .•..................... $ 4,264.92 Pront on Sale of Securities... . . . . ... ... . . . . . 1,195.37 Disbursements New Kitchen Equipment Tax on Checks and Collection Charges. . .. . August 31, 1934, Balance on Hand

$

4,292.72 .16

.

5,460.29 $ 98,862.70 4,292.88 $ 94,569.82

TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT

Balance, Received Received Received

GENERAL FUND August 31, 1933 from Secretary Interest on Treasurer's Funds Pront on Securities Sold

Disbursements Balance, August 31, 1934

$186,350.10 $148,930.75 4,653.69 1,571.26 . .

155,155.70 $341,505.80 198,849.33 $142,656.47

. . .

$ 55,979.47 .59 $ 55,978.88

INCOME FUND Received from Secretary Disbursements Balance, August 31, 1934

INITIATION FUND Balance, August 31, 1933 . $ Received from Secretary Received Interest on Treasurer's Funds . . Received Profit on Securities Sold Disbursements Balance, August 31, 1934

. .

IMPROVEMENT FUND Balance, August 31, 1933 . $ Received Interest on Treasurer's Funds Received Profit on Securities Sold Disbursements Balance, August 31, 1934

$123,101.76 220.00 5,536.75 1,331.25

:

. .

7,088.00. $130,189.76 2,670.95 $127,518.81

$ 93,402.41 4,214.92 1,245.37 .

5,460.29 $ 98,862.70 4,292.88 $ 94,569.82


232

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

REPORT OF AUDITOR

PERKINS & COMPANY Certified Public Accountants SUITE 851-854 408 PINE ST. SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI

September 22, 1934. To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri. Gentlemen: In accordance with instructions received, we have examined the accounts and records of the Secretary, Mr. Clarence L. Alexander, for the fiscal year ended August 31, 1934, covering the General, Income, Initiation, Improvement, and Endowment Funds. We have also checked the statement of the Treasurer, Mr. W. S. Campbell, for the General, Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds, and have verified the Fund Balances as at August 31, 1934, by obtaining certificates direct from the depositaries as to cash balances and by examining the securities constituting a part of those funds. We have shown the securities listed in the General, Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds at cost. With the exception of one $9,000.00 real estate loan in the Improvement Fund on which there is due $270.00, delinquent interest, none of these securities are in default of interest payments. We submit the following summary of assets comprising the Gen:eral, Income, Initiation, and Improvement Funds at the close of the fiscal year ended August 31, 1934: GENERAL FUND Cash in Telegraphers National Bank , $ 88,276.22 Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company 23,665.73 Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank Savings Account 16,150.45 Cash in Savings Trust Company, Pay Roll Account 941.95 (Bank Closed, January 14, 1933, in Liquidation.) Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank, Pay Roll Account 2,918.87 Cash in President's Cash Drawer 60.41 Cash in Matron's Cash Drawer 200.00 Securities (at cost) 10,363.82 $142,577.45 Deduct Amount Due Endowment Fund 30.37 Total in the General Fund $142,547.08 INCOME FUND Cash in First National Bank, President's Account $ 2,311.81 Cash in Mississippi Valley Trust Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 29,897.04 Securities (at cost) 25,934.75 Accrued Interest on Securities at Time of Purchase. . . . . . . . . 147.09 Accrued Interest on Endowment Fund Securities at Time of Purchase 106.31 Total in the Income Fund $ 58,397.00


1934

233

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

INITIATION FUND Cash in Telegraphers National Bank $ 30,678.27 96,837.87 Securities (at cost) 2.67 Accrued Interest on Securities at Time of Purchase. . . .. . .. . Total in the Initiation Fund

$127,518.81

IMPROVEMENT FUND Cash in Telegraphers National Bank Securities (at cost)

$ 11,214.13 83,355.69

Total in Improvement Fund

:

$ 94,569.82

We have also examined the securities in the Endowment Fund and have obtained a certificate from the depositary as to the cash balance in this fund. The securities of the Endowment Fund, which are not in default, are stated at the values placed thereon by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund at the date of acquisition of the securities by the Home. In the case of bonds in default, they are carried at market or at an appraisal value believed to be market by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund. The following is a summary of the Endowment Fund assets as at August 31, 1934: ENDOWMENT FUND Real Estate Loans $ Real Estate Owned (Farms at Appraised Value) . Federal Land Bank Bonds . United States Liberty Bonds . . J oint Stock Land Bank Bonds J oint Stock Land Bank Bonds in Default (Market Value) .. Municipal and Other Bonds ....................â&#x20AC;˘....... Municipal Bonds in Temporary Default . . Rice Estate Notes Receivable, Secured by Deeds of Trust Rife Estate Securities in Default (Market Value) . . Comstock Estate Securities . Comstock Estate Bonds in Default (Market Value) Erdhaus Estate Securities . . George B. Mills Estate Securities . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate Securities . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate Bonds in Default Henry C. Grenner Estate Securities . Henry C. Grenner Estate Bonds in Default . . Cash in First National Bank . Due from General Fund

391,242.00 30,000.00 124,865.00 16,500.00 5,280.00 15,820.00 136,079.25 9,999.62 2,600.00 950.00 51,492.51 5,302.00 500.00 10,500.00 530.00 850.00 212,470.00 11,665.00 79,586.04 30.37

$1,106,261.79

Respectfully submitted, PERKINS

& COMPANY,¡

Oertified Public Accountants. GIFTS TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND AS FOLLOWS Knights Templar Fund James L. Kirkendall W. S. Smith ]j'und

$ 35,114.00 13,150.00 11,730.00


234

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

T. W. Higgins Fund ; .. $ 5,000.00 1,665.74 James W. Harris Fund . 1,117.60 Masonic Home Certificate Fund . 500.00 Ferdinand Herrold Fund . 1,000.00 John B. Creshaw Fund . 1,000.00 Jacob F. Gamlich Fund . 3,000.00 Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund . 2,500.00 Grand Chapter Royal and Selected Masters Fund . 1,000.00 T. W. Cotton Fund . 1,000.00 Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund . 5,000.00 A. M. Hough Fund . J acob Lampert Fund . 30,000.00 500.00 Mrs. E. Wurz Fund . 500.00 Adolph Gluck Fund . Parralle Massengale Fund . 80&.60 Mrs. Lillie L. Fletcher Fund . 1,000.00 500.00 Frederick A. Logan Fund . 1,000.00 Robert Elliott Black Fund . 932.83 Nathan Schloss Fund . 2,067.91 A. P. Christianson Fund . Rice Estate . 51,096.35 2,327.75 Hugh Hartshorn Fund . 1,000.00 Wm. Pamprin Fund . 500.00 Morgena Peterson Fund . 1,000.00 Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund . General Fund . 128,740.03 1,000.00 Julius C. Garrell Fund . 7,107.50 War Relief Loyal Service Fund .......................â&#x20AC;˘.. 500.00 James W. Boyd Fund . 500.00 Ararat Temple, Kansas City, Fund . 3,000.00 Mrs. Willie A. Woods Fund . Grotto and Shrine Fund . 17,056.95 1,800.00 Morris and Ella Leftwich Fund . 1,000.00 Mrs. May Lynch Fund . 1,000.00 A. P. ]'letcher Fund . Frank Beecher Fund . 1,442.48 1,000.00 A. M. Dockery Fund .................................â&#x20AC;˘.. Edward H. Meier Fund : .. 500.00 Wm. H. Potter Estate Fund . 13,305.50 J. C. Jacquith Estate Fund . 19,122.61 Initiation Fund . 246,700.00 Nicholas R. Wall Fund . 500.00 Abraham Palan Fund . 584.70 Bonds from a Friend of the Home Sold for . 52,218.75 Maggie Nicholson Fund . 550.36 500.00 Louisa Yott Fund . Gustav Bischoff Fund . 500.00 W. L. Tamme Fund . 550.00 Erdhaus Estate, secured and unsecured . 7,665.32 Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund . 2,000.00 Wm. A. Hall Fund . 500.00 Henry Siegfried . 1,000.00 Edward Meyer . 500.00 Charles V. B. Slade . 9,548.75 Robert F. Stevenson . 14,992.13 Glen Marquis . 1,105.14 Frank L. Schofield . 1,000.00 D. M. Wilson . 528.00


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

235

Mary E. Clapp ........................................• $ 3,405.09 S8Jlluel Rife . 7,500.00 E. C. Robinson •........................................_ 2,500.00 . B. S. Schwartz 692.83 Brocket A. Diekson . 1,000.00 . George F. Bergfield 500.00 Sarah B. Coffman . 465.89 S8Jlluel A. Gluck .........................•.............. 200.00 Charles Reilly . 100.00 . Wellston Lodge .No. 613 100.00 Richard Sinclair . 200.00 Karl Backrow . 100.00 Robert Lungstrass ....................................•. 286.00 June Lee Cotton . 250.00 St. Joseph Chapter No. 198, O. E. S . 450.00 Marcus A. Loevy . 70.00 Sam Plan . 100.00 . W. J. Scherck 46.00 Myrtle Lodge No. 338 . 310.95 Ludwig Katany . 200.00 . Charles E. Koken 300.00 Phillip Stremmel, Jr. . . 137.40 Boor Fletcher . 400.00 . Alphonso Whipple 100.00 . A. Bolin Fund 400.00 . M. A. Covey Fund 25.00 Willi8Jll F. Kier Fund . 10,000.00 John T. Short Fund . 200.00 2,000.00 Paul Keiser Fund . 371.36 John Oliver Fund . 5,000.00 J. M. Darrow Fund . 1,000.00 T. W. Pritchett Fund . 259.98 . Annie Martin Fund , 115,569.31 Comstock Estate . 2,500.00 Comstock Estate (Doubtful Value) 1,000.00 Julia C. Norton Fund . 5,000.00 J. M. Darrow Estate . 1,000.00 . Wm. Lath8Jll, Jr., Estate 5,467.91 John M. Woodson Estate . . Sol E. Wa.ggoner Estate 1,000.00 500.00 Jacob C. C. Waldeck Estate . 211.08 Adam Herold Estate . 933.24 J 8JllElS Vinyard Estate . . 11,600.00 Geo. B. Mills Estate, Stocks and Bonds 250.00 John Rehrs Estate ..•................................... 1,901,39 Wm. Russell Estate, Cash . 4,392.00 , . Wm. Russell Estate, Bonds and Other Securities 431.05 Joseph Kronacher Estate . 1,000.00 Willi8Jll A. RaJDing Estate " . Fred Herket Estate . 2,000.00 285.00 . Oscar H. Elbreeht Estate, Cash 2,780.00 . Oscar H. Elbreeht Estate, Stocks and Bonds Edward F. W. Kaiser Estate . 25,000.00 100.00 Henry W. Huning Estate . Dr. Louis F. Bode Estate . 300.00 214.47 Fred Segelke Estate . 1,000.00 . Charles Gietner Estate 5,000.00 Willi8Jll B. Archer Estate .


236

1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

James Ward-Nixon Memorial $ 1,000.00 Henry C. Grenner Estate, Market Value, Stocks, Bonds and Cash 253,675.00 Berthold Linder Estate 200.00 Charles H. Schureman Estate 365.67 Charles A. Brown Estate 1,000.00 Ernest Breunemann .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100.00 A. S. Hudson Estate.................................... 314.28 Myrtle Kipp Estate .. 707.16 ADDITIONS TO ENDOWMENT FUND THE PAST YEAR John Cunningham Estate Mrs. Pearl Kaiser Annuity Henry C. Grenner Estate, Final Settlement Estate of Wm. Modra George W. Leeak, Gift

$

'"

. . . .

9,720.98 1,500.00 7,477.94 1,310.68 500.00


THE MASONIC W"ORLD By RAY V.

DENSLOW,

P. G. M.

The next decade is the challenge to Freemasonry. That period will prove whether Freemasonry has its place in the world as an influence in stabilizing unrest or whether we are merely a large organization of men content with the mere paying of dues, the wearing of a lapel button and an occasional attendance at a Masonic banquet. Have we become so large as an organizaton that we believe it possible to accomplish things through mere numerical strength or do we think that our ancient traditions and a glorious past is a sufficient genealogy to insure future success Y

Masonry is dynamic and not static. When all of the evil in the world shall have been overcome and good reigns supreme, when brotherly love exists between men of every race, country, sect and :religion, when relief is ever present among the peoples of the earth, and. when truth only shall prevail-then will Freemasonry become static-for then shall it be no longer needed.

No institution 'will die which has a mission or a purpose in the world to perform. No reader of the daily press today believes that the ;'world is yet safe for democracy." On the continent of Europe, in South America, in the Far East there are wars and rumors of wars, while in our own country the organized forces of government combat the kidnaper, the gangster and the growing forces of the underworld. Surely Freemasonry has a mission to perform in such a world. But how can we as an institution perform such a missionf By being good citizens in our respective communities, serving on juries, on councils, in positions of public trust and by throwing our strength and influence on the side of law and order. It may be necessary for you to discard family political traditions and some few friendships but right, and truth, and justice only should be the thought in the mind of the Freemason. When class would array itself against class, let us insist upon the exercise of brotherly love; when false stories are being circulated about men in public office or candidates for such office, let us insist upon truth; should our brother be in need 237


238

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

let us do what we can to provide relief-not the dole, the bonus, the gift-but a chance to work, to preserve the self-respect and convince the world of the fact that only the laborer is worthy of his hire. We are continuing the so-called "topical review." To some of our reviewer friends and those of the old school it is almost a revolutionary idea,. but, as we have said above, Freemasonry is dynamic, and this we believe holds true and is equally applicable to reviewers. Our notion of the review of the future is that of an annual, or year-book, containing all of the news of importance which has happened during the year, so that our brethren may become acquainted with what is being done in the Masonic world, and become better qualified to advan<lc Masonic interests. Not many years ago our geographical knowledge scarcely extended outside our own county; we were little interested in what happened beyond our borders, but today state lines offer no boundaries to our desires or knowledge, and the news from London, or Paris, or Timbuctoo, is read with equal interest. We confess to a shortage of material concerning Masonry in Europe; our brethren there are facing problems. which our American brethren know not. In Russia, in Austria, in Hungary, Germany or Italy, our brethren are fighting not for the life of the institution, so much as they are their own lives. In Spain a revolution is today rendering life uncertain. Our sympathy goes out to our brethren in those countries who are waging an apparently unsuccessful warfare for liberty, equality and fraternity. Hitler, Dollfus, and Mussolini are not materials from which Freemasonry is formed. We might also add some American names to the list. If you think that the same forces at work in Europe do not have similar plans for America, then it is time for you to awake. The growing objection on the part of citizens (') to the laying of federal building cornerstones by Freemasons, a ceremony which has existed in the United States for one hundred and fifty years, is only a wisp showing the general trend of the wind. And this is why we have asserted that Freemasonry must continue its路 dynamic policy, and that we have a mission in the world to perform. The "City Four-Square" and the "Milennium" are too far distant for any of us, especially Masons, to sit down contentedly awaiting the arrival of the halo, or the golden crown, or whatever it is we are to receiver (it may be a pitchfork), when we reach the static condition of heavenly bliss. MASONIC PERSONALITIES

From the proceedings of the York Grand Lodge of Mexico we learn that Grand Master Malone was for a time a resident of Kansas City, Mo., having been employed in 1914 by the Pickering Lumber Company of that city. The proceedings of Florida record the death of Rt. Rev. W. Y. B. Wilkie, Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge and a native of Scotland. He held pastorates at Troy and Columbia in Missouri, receiv-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

239

ing the degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry in Troy Lodge No. 34 in 1875; he served as High Priest of Columbia R.oyal Arch Chapter in 1885. . John W. Robinson, Grand Master of North Dakota, was born in St. Louis, Mo., March 26, 1879. He left Missouri at the age of five. Grand Master John J. Allen, of Oklahoma, while a native of Kentucky, was educated in a business college at Chillicothe, Mo., and began life for himself by accepting a traveling salesmanship position in Kansas City, Mo. The Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands, by official resolution, congratulated Brother Quintin Paredes, Past Grand Master of that jurisdiction, who had been elected as Speaker pro tern of the House of Representatives. The honorary rank of Past Deputy Grand Master was conferred by the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia on Archbishop Worrell, of that jurisdiction, for his services in behalf of Ancient Craft Masonry. Among the distinguished visitors at the Grand Lodge of Michigan was Brother Wm. A. Comstock, Governor of Michigan, member of the lodge at Alpena in that jurisdiction. During the same communication, Grand Secretary Lou Winsor, who has attended fifty-one communications of his Grand Lodge, introduced Brother Ernest L. Nichols, who was a hundred years old on January 3, 1933, and who was made a Mason in 1863. Grand Master Clarke, speaking to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, told of Governor John J. Jackson, Past Grand Master and the first United States Senator from Georgia, while Senator he found that a great fraud was about to be perpetrated upon the people of Georgia. He resigned as United States Senator, returned to Georgia and ran for the State Legislature in order to fight for principlel which he knew to be true. They elected him Governor twice and, because of his advocacy of the right, three attempts were made to assassinate him. He fought seven duels in defense of his principles. Expert marksmen were hired to kill him upon the field of honor and the eighth time he received a challenge to a duel he declined it. The man who challenged him, advertised him throughout the State as a coward and not a gentleman: , 'Historians have never found why Jackson refused. to fight, but Masonic bodies give the answer. I found upon the minutes of my lodge the fact that the man who challenged him did petition that lodge for membership and he had been accepted, and was to receive the degrees, and that petition was signed by James Jackson as one of his vouchers. I found fourtee~ instances of challenges issued in Georgia, and fourteen instances of refusal路 to fight, and in everyone of those instances I found the participants to be Masons. They invariably remembered. their Masonic obligations and stuck fast to their Masonic principles, regardless of public criticism."

Brother Gaspar G. Bacon, Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, was one of the speakers at the 200th anniversary celebration of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. Another speaker on this occasion


240

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

was the H on. Eliot Wadsworth, who was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury under Coolidge, represented President Hoover in Santo Domingo, a member of a foreign relief commission to Russia, and former President of the Overseers of Harvard University. Hon. Marq1.tess of Zetland, Provincial Grand Master of Yorkshire, England, was given an official reception by the Grand Lodge of Alberta on the occasion of his visit to that jurisdiction. To the great disappointment of the Grand Lodge of North Dakota, two charter members of the Grand Lodge found it impossible to be present because of illness. One was Brother Louis B. Hanna, former Governor and the first Grand Tyler. Several fifty year Masons were introduced, including one brother sixty-seven years a Mason. The others ranged from sixty-two to fifty-two years of membership in the fraternity. Dr. Ramon D. Garcin was presented to the Grand Lodge of Virginia, it appearing that he assisted the first physician the Home ever had, and later took up the work. His practice for the children had been given freely, without any compensation, for over forty years. Commendatory resolutions were passed in his behalf and a suitable gift was ordered presented him. Brother John Hammill, twice Lieutenant Governor and three times Governor of the State of Iowa was an interested visitor at a recent annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Washington. Grand Master Harold R. Amens, of Nevada, was private in Troop L, 2nd U. S. Volunteer Cavalry (Torrey's Rough Riders) during the Spanish-American War. Brother Lew Wentz, of Oklahoma, is President of the Masonic Charity Foundation of Oklahoma. Brother Wentz is one of the wealthiest and best known citizens of the State of Oklahoma and his services on the committee are highly appreciated by his Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge of Utah, at its annual communication in 1934, received a telegram of regret for non-attendance from Past Grand Master George H. Dern, Secretary of War in the President's Cabinet. Past Grand Master 1. O. Blackwood, Governor of South Carolina, addressed the" Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction at its recent annual communication. Among other things, he said: "I have been honored possibly more greatly than I have merited, but as great as has been that distinction I have always thought and always felt that the greatest distinction that ever came to me was when I had the honor and privilege of being known as Grand Master of Masons of South Carolina. I believe that my father would have preferred that I be Grand Master of South Carolina Masons, or that I even become the Master of my home lodge, than that I be awarded the distinction that comes to but few sons of this grand old State."

Past Grand Master James H. Price, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Virginia, was officially presented to the Grand Lodge at the 1934 communication.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

241

In a written address of welcome and congratulation to the United Grand Lodge of England by King George, his opening remarks were: "The contribution of Freemasonry to the world lies in the life of its members."

General Amos A. Fries, of the United States Army, was an official guest of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana and addressed the gathering on much the same subject material as he did the Grand Lodge of Missouri two years ago. Gov. Henry Horner, of Illinois, by letter expressed his regret at being unable to attend the annual meeting of the Grand Lodge, the first annual meeting he has missed in many years. He said: "My inability to attend is most keenly felt at this time for I need, as never before, the tonic of the fine spirit and unselfish efforts of the assembled brethren. Masonry has always splendidly met the test in the trying periods of our country and it will meet our present problems courageously and manfully and to the everlasting credit of the fraternity.' ,

The Grand Lodge of T~smania altered its book of constitutions, a resolution being introduced: "Because at present they had a Governor of the State who was taking a very lively interest in the welfare of Freemasonry and it was almost the unanimous wish of the membership that by passing the resolution he would be made eligible to the office of Grand Master."

Grand Master Clarke, of Georgia, comes from a Masonic family. Four brothers have been Masters of Georgia lodges ; all have been officers in the Chapter and in the Council; all are Past Commanders of their commanderies. One is a Past Grand Commander; another is Grand Treasurer of the Grand Commandery; one is Past Grand Patron of the Eastern Star; one was elected Past Grand High Priest; one is Grand Treasurer of the Grand Chapter and Grand Council; one is the present Grand Master. The Grand Lodge of New York presented a Grand Master's medal to Brother John Ward Dunsmore, one of America's foremost historical painters. The lodges of the. metropolitan district of New York presented a check for $2,254.00 to the Warrrl. Springs Foundation Fund, as an appreciation of the Masonic services of Franklin D. Roosevelt. In a letter to Grand Secretary Johnson, President Roose. velt said: , 'It was mighty good of you to send me your more than kind letter of February 17. I do hope you will find some way of eonveying to all the lodges my grateful appreciation of their helpful interest in the Warm Springs Foundation."

Governor Ehringhaus, of North Carolina, made an interesting talk at the special communication of the Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction, called for the purpose of observing the ceremonies of St. John's Day. Grand Master Mixter, of California, commenting on his visit to the Hawaiian Islands tells us:


242

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

"His Excellency, Brother Judd, Governor of the Territory, is an honored member of Honolulu Lodge No. 409."

The Grand Master of Minnesota installed the officers of Rochester Lodge No. 21, the feature of the evening being the presentation to the lodge of framed pictures of three of the lodge's most distinguished members: Brother Wm. W. Mayo, noted man of medicine in his day and father of the Mayo Brothers; the second, Brother Oharles H. Mayo, world renowned surgeon and a Past Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge; the third, Brother Frank B. Kellogg, former United States Senator from Minnesota, Ambassador to England under Harding, Secretary of State under Coolidge, and at present a member of the World Court. The correspondence report of Tennessee contains an interesting story of the Masonic life of President Andrew Jackson. The Grand Master of South Australia is His Excellency, BrigadierGeneral the Hon. Sir. Alexander Gore Arkwright Hore-Ruthven, Governor of the State, whose term of office has recently been extended by His Majesty, permitting him to remain as Grand Master another twelve months. Many of the jurisdictions have distinguished Masons, distinguished because of their long connection with the fraternity. Brother N. N. Oyer, ninety-two year old member of the "Masonic Veteran Association of Ohio, was introduced to the members of that Association during the Grand Lodge communication, "gave an interesting account of his history in the Civil War, recited a very interesting poem on the Flag of our Country, and repeated Lincoln's Gettysburg address." Fifty year certificates of appreciation were presented by the Grand Lodge of Tennessee to many of the brethren who had served continuously for a period of fifty years. Brother Alex Fraser, of Nevada, recently missed the first official visit of a Grand Master to his lodge in over forty years. Thirty-two fifty year badges were presented by the Grand Lodge of Nebraska to those brethren entitled to receive them. When the Grand Master of Louisiana called for all Masons present who had been Masons for more than fifty years, Brother Will Moss, fifty-nine years a Mason, and Brother Joseph A. Ohargois, sixty-years a Mason, presented themselves and received appropriate badges. Later on in the communication two additional brethren came forward. A veteran's badge was proposed in the Grand Lodge of Queensland, the proposer stating: , 'It is not possible for every brother to be a Master of a lodge, and many a brother who has been a member of a lodge for many years has done more for the Craft than many Past Masters. It is he, and the like of him, that has made Masonry possible. ' ,

The jewel wil~ be for veterans of not less than forty years and will give preference of seats to the. wearer at the annual communication.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

243

Virginia has provided that a brother who has been a member of a Virginia lodge for fifty consecutive years may be made an honorary member. Brother Moses Morris, Sr., Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Montana, speaking to the Grand Lodge, stated that he first entered the lodge in 1866; he became Grand Master in 1892. When veteran Masons were asked to come forward, two brothers came forward who had been Masons for more than sixty years. Reviewer Hepner, of Montana, says: I I We do not intend to voice any note of discord, nor lack of appreciation, but merely to express our own personal views, when we state that mere long life or long membership in the order are not the greatest eontributions man can give to the order. Many members of but few years' standing have contributed more to advance Masonic ideals and usefulness than have hundreds of those who happen to live longer than the average man. We do not venerate old age unless it is accompanied by service which is worth while; our idea is that we overlook bestowing honors and exalt men who I do' things for the order, whether it be over a period of five or fifty years. ' ,

The Grand Master of Kentucky presented to the Grand Lodge Brother Henry Woods, ninety-three years of age, "who addressed the Grand Lodge." During visitations of lodges of his jurisdiction, the Grand Master of the District of Columbia discovered Brother O. S. Firmin, ninetythree years old and Master in 1883. Brother George King, ninetyfour years old, and Brother John Thomas, ninety-eight years old and Master in 1884. Reviewer West, of that jurisdiction, is pleased to note that the idea of giving recognition to veteran members is gaining in favor, that it embodies a spirit entirely compatible with the tenets of the Craft: I I Faithful service to the fraternity does not always mean that one should have served his lodge as an officer. There have been plenty of cases where a brother achieved the Master's chair, and was never again soon in the lodge after he received his Past Master's jewel. But these good old brethren have been faithful to their trust-paying dues regularly, at least, and answering whatever demands may have been made of them."

The Grand Lodge of South Dakota for several years has presented medals for long time membership, and it has been found that where these medals have been placed it has done nearly as much good to the members of the lodge as to the recipient. Idaho has found thirty honorary.fifty-year Masons. The oldest Mason in the State is Brother W. N. Oakes. While a resident of Idaho, he is a member of the lodge at Indianola, Iowa, and has been a Mason sixty-seven years. Texas presents fifty-year Masons with gold buttons bearing the seal of the Grand Lodge and the lettering "Fifty Years." From the Grand Lodge of Georgia proceedings, we give the following:


244

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

, 'A scene long to be remembered was enacted when Most Worshipful Past Grand Master Thomas T. Jeffries and Worshipful Joseph Kyle Orr were introduced by Most Worshipful Past Grand Master Robert J. Travis, with the statement that these beloved brethren were on this date attending for the fiftieth time the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Georgia. It was a singular coincidence that this the fiftieth session of the Grand Lodge they have attended, falls on the same day of the month that marked their first visit, October 31, 1883-0ctober 31, 1933."

Past Grand Master Aldro Jenks was unable to attend his Grand Lodge in Wisconsin, in 1933, not having missed a meeting in fortythree years. He has recently died. A lodge in Wisconsin carried the name of a brother for twentyseven years as a life member. In looking over the records it was found that he was born in 1826, which would have made him 107 years of age. The Grand Lodge, thinking they had a historical character, began an investigation and found that he had been dead twentyseven years. The lodge asked a refund of dues for that period. The Grand Lodge of New York has decided to award medals to members of the fraternity who have been members for fifty consecutive years or more, and to such other members who have made outstanding contributions to mankind in the field of art, sculpture, drama or literature. The demand for fifty year buttons continues in California; 110 buttons were issued last year, making a total of 891 since the inauguration of the custom. CONFERENOE OF GRAND MASTERS

Since 1822, when Henry Clay and his associates attempted to hold a national convention in the legislative halls of Congress at Washington' D. C., there have been spasmodic attempts to unite the various states and jurisdictions into an organization which would tend to promote harmony between the jurisdictions and secure a certain standard of Masonic fundamentals. For many years certain jurisdictions looked askance on the movement, believing that it was an attempt to establish a national grand lodge for the United States. Just what sort of a bugaboo a national grand lodge might be was never satisfactorily explained and there are still today jurisdictions which remain skeptical of any sort of attempt to secure Masonic unity, even through so loose a federation as a conference of Grand Masters. In recent years these conferences have been held at the same time and place as the annual meeting of the representatives of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. Practically all Masonic jurisdictions have been represented and most of the representatives return reporting to their Grand Lodge that the conference has been of mutual advantage and recommending a continuance in representation. In 1934 the conference was held in Washington, D. C., February 23-24. The meeting was called to order in the Willard Hotel at 9 :30, February 23, with Wallace Hughston, Past Grand


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

245

Master of Texas, presiding. Grand Master Richard P. Dietzman, of Kentucky, was permanent chairman of the conference, and J. Claude Keiper of the District of Columbia, was Secretary. Missouri was represented by Grand Master F. C. Barnhill and Grand Secretary Arthur Mather. Thirty-six Grand Masters were present and five other jurisdictions were represented by their Deputy Grand Masters. The agenda included a discussion of employment and service bureaus, Grand Lodge dues and assessments, recognition of Grand Lodge.s, rights of dimitted Masons, non-resident members; interjurisdictional relief, educational program, and open forum. . Grand Master Barnhill discussed the best method of financing employment and service bureaus. One of the most interesting topics of discussion was the recognition of foreign Grand Lodges. Grand Master Wilson, of North Carolina, in discussing the matter, expressed his belief that the subject was one of fundamental importance, that if Masonry means anything it is brotherhood, and that it was a narrow definition of Freemasonry which would confine that brotherhood to isolated units. The Masonic ideal is the union of all whose Freemasonry is not repugnant to true Masonry, that it is not a question of recognizing some foreign lodges so that members of lodges may visit in foreign countries, although that is important in its way. Almost every Grand Lodge has now incorporated in its fundamental law certain standards of recognition in continental Europe. Certain Grand Lodges have discarded requirements necessitating the presence of the volume of the Sacred Law and not requiring petitioners to profess faith in the Supreme Architect. At one time there was a danger that this sort of Freemasonry might spread, but immediate and concerted action on the part of most jurisdictions has prevented the spread of this tendency. Standards of recognition are in essence a declaration of what are considered indispensable characteristics in a Masonic body. If a Grand Lodge can and does show that such standards are a definite part of its fundamental organization, then recognition may well be extended. Not every Grand Lodge which meets the standards of recognition can dmiland recognition. There is a certain amount of diplomacy and etiquette to be used in effecting recognition. The rule is "that where it is proposed that fraternal relations between two Masonic powers shall be established, the older of the two grants recognition to the younger." Through standards of recognition the pure principles of Freemasonry are preserved and spread throughout the world and clandestine Masonry is stamped out. Only sixteen of the states have not adopted these standards; they are Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Virginia and West Virginia. Two Grand Lodges declare that they will recognize no Grand Lodge who cannot trace its descent from one of the Grand Lodges of the British Isles.


246

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

The speaker's conclusions were that a uniform standard of recognition was feasible since practical uniformity usually existed where standards were adopted. As to whether a uniform standard of recognition was desirable, he said: t t Of the four and one-quarter million Masons in the whole world, the United States and Canada represent three and one-quarter million. There is, therefore, not the slightest reason why the English-speaking Grand Lodges of the world should not define what Masonry is; what it must remain; and the only safe way in which this consummation may be assured, is by presenting a practically united front in the matter of adopted standards of recoknition, or minimum essentials of what an organization must show in order to be considered a Masonic Lodge or Grand Lodge."

Grand Master Wilson did not believe there was anything to be feared in such uniformity, as in no case does a Grand Lodge relinquish its inherent and complete right to use these standards when and if adopted, in as extensive or in as limited a way as it may desire, and while the ideal course would perhaps be that every Grand Lodge should adopt exactly the same standards and use them in exactly the same way, this will never come to pass and is not to be expected. He sums up his argument in the following words: "Vast improvement in world-wide Masonic relations has already come to pass as a result of the degree of universality of adoption of uniform standards that has been achieved to date. .Masonry in foreign languages has discovered what is required of it, and is anxious to conform thereto. We were too late in telling our weaker brethren of the several continents what was to be expected, in a language that they might not misunderstand. When we did do so, the effect was happy indeed; and it is to be hoped that the chorus of voices will become more unanimous and even more insistent, in Masonic unison. ' ,

Many have asked as to the object in appointing Grand Representatives, and the speaker gives us a splendid explanation: t t While it is true that the duties of a Grand Representative of one Grand Lodge near another Grand Lodge many not be onerous, nor his responsibilities burdensome, yet it is a very important fact that t~is office is much coveted amoBg the members of the Grand Lodges outside the United States. Moreover, these Masonic Ambassadors of Good Will are a symbol of the Unity of Freemasonry; an evidence that there is one Freemasonry, and not eighty or a hundred different Freemasonries. When the proceedings of your Grand Lodge go to their readers, the list of Grand Representatives, or, as it is put in Spanish, t Garantes de Amistad,' is an evidence to every Mason into whose hands the book falls, of the world-wide dignity of our ancient and universal institution. To the smaller Grand Lodges, like the most of those in Latin America, this list of Grand Representatives, if their names are included, is a stabilizing inlluence--an inlluence that means much to prevent long-haired, wild-eyed enthusiasts from being able to shake the ancient landmarks and the superstructure thereon. The deeper is our belief in Symbolic Freemasonry of the purest kind that ever came from England, the more is the reason why we should adopt workable standards of recognition, and thus stabilize the Ancient Craft throughout the whole world on those standards which we ourselves set up."


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

247

Grand Master Stephens, of Illinois, sees nothing to fear in the annual conference. He said: , 'There are some who doubt the value of such meetings and fear the formation of a Grand Body, but this is far from the real purpose. Those in attendance receive inspiration and help with the problems which they have and meet each other face to face, forming a common bond which makes their perplexities lighter and easier to solve. I believe our Grand Lodge should be represented in all meetings of this character."

Grand Master Nash, of Ohio, adds: , 'It may not be possible to precisely define the gain resulting from attendance, but there is pro:fit to be found, :first, in a better comprehension by those attending of the problems which confront the Grand Lodge from time to time; second, in forcing the Grand Master to understand and consider those problems; and third, in the standing of our Grand Lodge in the public opinion of the other Grand Jurisdictions, a not unimportant item. I fool that we should partieipate regularly in this conference. I found that in spite of a careful study of records, I entered this conference without full comprehension of its routine, scope, and purposes.' ,

Grand Master Manville, of Oklahoma, believes that the conference could be made a valuable adjunct to Masonry in the United States by not holding it in Washington: "Where it is convenient for those on the eastern side of the United States and but few of the states west of the Mississippi think it worth while to have their Grand Masters attend. If these conferences were held in different cities over the United States from year to year it might produce favorable results."

The next conference will be held in Washington, D. C., at a date as near the annual meeting of the George Washington Masonic National . Memorial Association as the officers of the conference may designate. MASONIO SERVIOE ASSOOIATION OF THE UNITED STATES

A number of years ago Missouri was a member of the Association known as the Masonic Service Association of the United States. Later, friction arose over the policies of the Association, and Missouri, with a number of other organizations, withdrew. Many of those which withdrew have now reunited with the Association and during all that time the Association has continued to hold its annual meetings. The fifteenth annual meeting was held Febmary 22, 1934, at the Raleigh Hotel in Washington, D. C. Earl K. Bitzing, Grand Master of North Dakota, was chairman of the meeting. In addition. to the regular business of the Association, the representatives listened to an address by the Rev. Dr. Joseph Fort Newton, widely known author and speaker. Arizona, North Carolina, South Dakota and Utah reported as having rejoined the Association in 1933. The Association has undertaken a number of matters of research,


248

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

including a discussion of the N. P. D. problem, trial methods of fortyfive jurisdictions, Masonic spelling contests, Grand Lodge finances and charity, programs of Masonic inspiration, standards of recognition, and Masonic law relating to liquor and beer. Carl H. Claudy has been re-elected as Secretary of the Association. GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL

The twenty-fourth annual convention of the George Washington Masonic National.Memorial Association was held in the auditorium of the memorial building at Alexandria, Va., Thursday, February 22, 1934, at two o'clock p. m., called to order by Past Grand Master Louis Watres of Pennsylvania, President of the Association. Missouri was represented by Grand Master F. C. Barnhill and Grand Secretary Arthur Mather. From the report of the President we find that no obligation has been contracted until the money was on hand to pay and that from the !lay on which ground was broken, June 5, 1922, until 1933, work had been steadily in progress. There has been received $3,963,352.24; there has been expended $3,831,799.56. The Association had on hand at the time of the report $44,079.21, not including other funds which have been tied up by the bank moratorium. Upkeep for the temple and grounds for the year was $10,218.42, and the Association has begun to encourage the building up of an endowment fund of an amount sufficient to carry this overhead. During the year $23,400.00 was expended for continuing the marble work in memorial hall. It is estimated that it will require $200,000.00 to complete memorial hall and the room in which the relics are to be kept. The Washington relics have not yet been removed from the old Alexandria-Washington Lodge at Alexandria, Va., and will not be removed until the room is completed. The newly elected officers are Louis Watres, of Pennsylvania, President; J. R. Johnson, of South Carolina, First Vice-President; Harry G. Noyes, of New Hampshire, Second Vice-President; Bert S. Lee, of Missouri, Third Vice-President; George L. Lusk, of Michigan, Fourth Vice-President; J. Claude Keiper, of Washington, D. C., SecretaryTreasurer. The Directors are: Harvey F. Ake of Ohio; Alexander H. Bell of Illinois; Joe P. Bowdoin of Georgia; Albert E. Boynton of California ; James C. Burger of Colorado; Charles H. Callahan of Virginia; William H. Carter of Mississippi; D. Rufus Cheney of Oregon; Charles C. Clark of Iowa; Edward C. Day of Montana; Raymond C. Dunn of North Carolina ; John A. Dutton of New York; Frank E. Gavin of Indiana; Fred W. Hardwick of Kentucky; Anthony F. Ittner of Missouri; Melvin M. Johnson of Massachusetts; Arthur K. Lee of Wyoming; Hiram F. Lively of Texas; Ralph E. Lum of New Jersey; Walter L. Stockwell of North Dakota; Louis A. Watres (chairman) of Pennsylvania; J. Claude Keiper, Secretary, of Washington, D. C.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

249

In addition to the directorate there is an Advisory Board, composed of the following: Frank O. Lowden of Illinois, chairman; John A. Lejeune, U. S. Marine Corps, Ret'd; Townsend Scudder of New York; Carter Glass of Virginia; Phillips Lee Goldsborough of Maryland; Simeon D. Fess of Ohio; Andrew W. Mellon of Pennsylvania. One or two jurisdictions do not seem to be in accord with the present plans of the Association. Grand Master Manville, of Oklahoma, said: , 'I regret to state that my attendance at some of the meetings and a few of the operations of the George Washington Masonic National M.emoria! Association has given me an unfavorable opinion. The original design which contemplated the expenditure of a reasonable sum of money for the preservation of objects of interest connected with our first President has grown out of proportion. ADDRESSES AND ORATIONS

The reviewer of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Western Australia (Archdeacon) is of the opinion that for some unexplained reason the office of Grand Orator in American Grand Lodges has witnessed a decrease in the number of addresses; that there was a time when an oration by that officer was an essential feature of the annual communication. He is of the opinion that the need of curtailing expenses has led to the omission of these orations. Some reviewers question the educative value of orations, which may be a justifiable aspersion. A large number of them delivered by brethren who have studied their subject and who possess the gift of making their addresses attractive, are highly meritorious contributions. Grand Orator Gates, in Nebraska, addressed his Grand Lodge on . "Traveling Toward the East." In Kansas, the annual oration was presented by Brother R. A. Schwegler. Past Grand Master Schmidt very appropriately addressed the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands on the subject of "The Inquisition." Archbishop Worrell, Grand Chaplain, spoke to the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia on "King Solomon's Temple." Past Grand Master Melvin M. Johnson, of Massachusetts, gave another of those masterly addresses at the Bi-Centennial of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. Brother Eliot Wadsworth, former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, President of the Boston Chamber .of Commerce, and connected with Harvard University, spoke to the same Grand Lodge on the subject of Russia. 'Ve regret that space prohibits our publication of both these splendid orations. Rev. Dr. Robert Paton spoke to the Grand Lodge of Alberta on "Forerunners of Freemasonry." Grand Historian Custer delivered an address before the Grand Lodge of Washington on "Grand Orators and their Philosophy." The


250

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

annual oration was delivered by Brother U. E. Harmon on the "Stabilizing Influence of Freemasonry." Almost an oration, was the foreword to Brother E. H. Van Patten's review of correspondence; it concerned the "Symbolism of the Three Great Lights." Bishop Fox, Grand Chaplain of Montana, addressed that Grand Lodge on the subject of "Fruits, not Roots." The Grand Lodge of British Columbia heard Grand Chaplain Henderson speak on the "Strength and Beauty of Life." Grand Orator Peters, of Oregon, spoke on "How shall Masonry meet the Challenge of the Future?" ((Masonry and the Crisis of Today" was the subject of the annual oration of Grand Orator Harold, of Idaho. Grand Orator Allen addressed the Grand Lodge of Texas on "The Masonry of Today" j while in Minnesota, Grand Orator Stone dwelt upon "The Trestleboard 0.' our Citizenship." One of the most interesting addresses of a Grand Master was that of George O. Foster, of Kansas. His introduction was not the usual stereotyped one: , , You come here for no idle purpose. We meet around this sacred altar to learn how best to serve the Brotherhood of Man. We are charged to perform three great duties, duties which we owe to God, our neighbor and ourselves. Few words, but they comprehend our whole duty. Every Mason in Kansas is a part of a great Fraternity that can and should be most helpful to ourselves, our brethren and our communities, by active and united fidelity to our vows, and performance of our duties as Masons during these chaotic conditions that affect so many of our members and their families. ' ,

Grand Lecturer Irwin, addressing the Grand Lodge of South Australia, spoke on "Time," which he thought was an extremely fascinating subject. It was the most mysterious thing in human experience. It had neither beginning nor ending. It had no divisions. It was like a stream that passed on its way at a regular pace without regard for human hope or human fear. The lover waiting for his mistress found time moving slowly. The criminal awaiting trial found that it passed with rapidity. Yet, when they thought it over, they knew that time, regardless of human purpose, kept on its way. Grand Orator Abernathy, of Oklahoma, urged the renewal of the study of the symbolism and doctrine of Freemasonry. He dwelt at length on the Altars of Freemasonry. The altar, he characterized as old as human life. It has always represented the presence of the Invisible, the answer to the deepest longings of the soul. While ofttimes stained with the blood of sacrifice, yet always has it represented that which was sacred and divine. Grand Master Philips, of Kentucky, in his annual address, said: "If there is any mystery about the Masonic Order, it is its independence. It solicits no one to join its ranks. It asks no favors. Yet, it has grown and prospered throughout the ages. During the year just closed, it plowed its way through a world of economic business distress


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

251

with remarkable fortitude, and successfully. Like the independence of nature, it swerves not from its pathway of rectitude, nor is its righteous influence foiled by any man or men. ' ,

Grand Master Stephens, of Illinois, believes that we should have the Masonry of our fathers: "Early Masonry was a personal Masonry. Founded by our forefathers with a desire to be of service to each other, it commanded personal action on the part of the individual. , , As I study it, I can find no cause for any change in our fundamentals in today's problems. We cannot be real brethren unless we understand each other. Unless we can enjoy the happiness and share the sorrows of each other. Unless we can meet upon the common level of a universal brotherhood. Our weakness today is in the fact that we do not know our brethren and as a result cannot know how we can serve. , 'We must return to the faith of our Masonic fathers or our institution will drift into a worldly organization with no other objective than that of social intercourse and entertaining features. If such does develop and I fear it is already encroaching on our order, then Masonry will have lost 'the faith of our Fathers,' and there will be no excuse for its existeJ\.ce."

Maryland's Grand Master offered the following: "I feel that in the great crises of the United States, the Masonic Fraternity is destined to play an important part, made up as it is in our nation, of more than three million men, scattered the length and breadth of our land, it has the opportunity to exercise its in:fluenee路 in an aggressive manner, to hasten the day when the Golden Rule shall be accepted not only as the basis for the settlement of all 'domestic questions, but the deciding factor in the attitude of our Government toward the other nations of the world. "There is nothing the matter with Masonry, but a great many Masons who talk MasODry do not live Masonry. We may fear little danger from without; Masonry has the confidence and good will of every community; but we are not free from dangers that may arise from within. , 'There was a time when the fraternal organization had an important place ~ our busy lives. It afforded an opportunity for social recreation. That was when we had no movie theatres, no good roads, no autom<?biles, no radios, no :flying machines, no golf courses and very few country clubs. Men joined the Fraternity because they wanted the companionship of their fellows and because the lodge mooting offered an opportunity for social recreation. But all this has been changed. A man no longer joins the Masonic Fraternity for the prestige which this great Fraternity of ours offers."

Grand Master Clarke, of Georgia, finds that the dream of riches has been the spiritual poison which has entered the ranks of Masonry : , 'There was a time, not so long ago, when the word of a Mason was thought to be as good as his bond. There was a day when the man who became a Mason seldom had a stain upon his name, a blot upon his character. There were those, wives and widows, who implicitly placed the honor of their daughters in the hands of Masons and the trust was not betrayed. What of the situation today'"

The Grand Master of Manitoba believes that: , 'Periods of adversity are but high lights of moral and spiritual reconstruction, testing the character of individuals and the pretensions of


252

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

institutions. Speculative Masonry, emphasizing as it does spiritual rather than material values, requires neither palatial dwellings nor other earpensive provisions to insure its permanency as an organized force for the uplift of mankind. ' ,

The Grand Master of South Australia expresses his opinion that: , 'Freemasonry still has its attractions for men of good report, who are prompted to solicit our privileges by a favorable opinion prooonceived of the institution. ' ,

Past Grand Master Lord Belhaven and Stenton, in receiving a jewel presented him by the Grand Lodge of Scotland, said: , 'I thank you, brethren, from the bottom of my heart as the donors of this most beautful jewel, which I shall treasure as much as any decoration given me by the King. Let me say this, that I have done nothing more than any other of my brethren would have done in a similar situation. For thirty-six years I have joined in the grand march of Freemasons of the world, and hope I will still' go marching on.' "

Grand Master Williams, of Mississippi, became historical: "You are assembled for your one hundred sixteenth annual communication in the historic City of Vicksburg. While this is a modern city, every foot of ground in and around it is hallowed by the heroic deeds, the suffering and the achievements of our fathers. Not only has Vicksburg helped to make state and national history, but the Masons of Vicksburg have always been a eredit to this Grand Lodge. Here have lived and labored some of the brightest minds Masonry has produced. This was the home of that truly great Mason, our lamented Brother Frederic Speed, Past Grand Master and Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge. Many brethren here, still active in their respective lodges, labored with him as he wrought so well for Masonry in Mississippi. "

Grand Master Manville, of Oklahoma, had anticipated spending his year in the promotion of the charity foundation, the cause of the Home, and other activities, but he says: , 'Your Grand Master during the past year was compelled to appear in several different roles; as a collection agency for delinquent dues, as a bond salesman to help dispose of our new bond issue, as a publicity agent for our Homes, as well as to attempt to lift Masonry from the level of ritualism to the plane of a living spiritual ol'ganization. The legislation and acts of this Grand Lodge will reveal as to whether my extreme efforts were justified. I gave every ounce of power that I possessed to the suc路 cess of this work. "

Grand Master Adams, of Vermont, finds that: , 'Masonry is measured by what it is. That depends upon each member of the Order. We each have a great responsibility. Masonry is an individual matter. The value of Masonry is the sum total of the lives of its members and a poor Mason detracts from the whole. Each of us, therefore, have a part and a very vital part in making Masonry in our own State, in our own country, yes, in the world, for Masonry is universal, the power for sta,bility and good-will which all of us so much desire."

Grand Master Padgett, of Virginia, concludes his address with the following:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

253

"Fertile in resources and dauntless in courage we face the battle of the future with an abiding faith that an impartial tradition will reseue from forgetfulness the full measure of service by Masonry to mankind. Let no one for a moment entertain the thought that Masonry will ever perish from the earth. The great principles around which it is built can never, never, never die. The loss of membership can only tend to reduce its units for administering to human needs. Socrates drank his bowl of hemlock but Philosophy lived on; the spirit of Savonarola went up in smoke from the market place of Florence, but Religion remained the supreme hope of the human heart. Forbid that we should ever wilt under the cruel blasts of adverse public opinion. Masonry has lost many of its members, but few of its Masons, and it will emerge from these apparent disasters, purified by tribulation, a greater and more powerful agency for the uplifting and betterment of Mankind. Its great truths have been hammered out in the forge of human experience and tested in the furnace of Time." Grand Master Haas, of Louisiana, urges his brethren to : "Put petty jealousies and jealous ambitions and desires aside and work for the common good of our great fraternity. Beware of the man who calls himself a Savior. The world never had but one Savior, born in a lowly manger, humbly rendering services to the world. These self-styled, so-called Saviors, whether they be in the Masonic fraternity or not are dangerous. Look well behind the scenes to see what their motive is, whether they are grasping for some honor that is not justly their due, or after some personal gain for themselves or a few immediate friends. ' , CORNERSTONES, CEREMONIES AND CELEBRATIONS The Grand Lodge of Delaware convened on July 3, 1933, for the purpose of laying the cornerstone of the State Legislative Hall at Dover. Past Grand Master Woodford delivered an address, as did Hon. C. Douglass Buck. The Grand Master of that jurisdiction has found a practice which has arisen in connection with cornerstone laying which he thinks should be discouraged-civic and religious organizations have requested the Grand Lodge to lay cornerstones of buildings which had reached a state of virtual completion. Grand Masters have complied in a desire to accommodate friends in the civic and religious world. He believes that Grand Lodge should break this precedent and decline to officiate when the structure has passed a certain stage. He says: , 'According to old custom, and also our ritual, the stone when laid should be the highest point in the structure then in the course of erection. To lay a stone after that point has been passed interferes with parts of the ceremonies and necessitates changes in the form laid down in our code. "

A cornerstone of a new government building was laid in Miami, Fla., May 14, 1932, by the Grand Master of that jurisdiction. The ceremony had been planned for many months previous, but , 'Outside influences tended to prevent the laying of the stone by the Masonic Fraternity. A few days before the ceremony the Postmaster re-


254

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

ceived a telegram from WaBhington stating it 'was preferable to the Department for the ceremonies to be in charge of some civic organization.' We got around this by inviting the presidents of each civic club to be present, 28 in all. Also invited 53 city, county, and local state officials; a Catholic Judge, a Jewish Rabbi, counsuls of various foreign countries; and about 25 officials from TallahaBsee and Washington. Another hitch occurred when the building contractor, who had not been very warm, demanded at 5 0 'clock the day before May 14, that we place insurance in case of accident to those on the platform. There WaB no time to arrange this nor money to pay the premium, but I fixed it up by giving relelUle8 personally in writing. The Stone MaBon's Union furnished their men to handle the stone; and in order to comply with their rules they made me a member of the Union, so I could legitimately and correctly (I hope) spread the cement, and work in the same crew with the Union men."

The Grand Lodge also laid the cornerstone of a new post office and government building at Ft. Myers on March 1, 1933. On May 14, 1932, the Grand Master received a communication from Mrs. Ruth Bryan Owen, a member of Congress, requesting the Grand Lodge to lay the cornerstone of a new post office building at Daytona Beach. He disapproved the request because: , 'Masonry feels that it is beneath its dignity to enter into any matter controversial, whether it be religious, civic or political, and the happenings in connection with the cornerstone laying of the Government Building in Miami would indicate the possibilities of something of the same kind occurring in connection with a further request from the present Post Office authorities."

The Grand Lodge went on record as follows: , 'We have no regulation covering the inscriptions which may properly be placed on a cornerstone, the laying of which has been under Masonic auspices and direction. Much unfavorable discussion haB arisen in reference to the names of certain individuals, with Masonic titles, on cornerstones which have been laid, and I recommend that a regulation be presented setting forth prescribed bounds for such future inscriptions."

The matter was referred to a committee. The cornerstone of the new Washington County, Kansas, court house was laid by the Grand Lodge, under the direction of the Grand Master, on March 11, 1933. More than three thousand visitors were in attendance. The new court house replaces one destroyed by a cyclone July 4, 1932, the cornerstone of which was laid by the Grand Lodge forty-seven years ago. Grand Master Anderson, of Michigan, laid the cornerstone of a post office building at Sturgis, Mich., on July 26, 1932. Two months previous he laid the cornerstone of the Tuscola County court house at Caro, Mich. The Grand Lodge of Nevada laid the cornerstone of a new post office and Federal building at Reno, the request coming from the Federal Business Association of that city. Senator Oddie addressed the gathering, as did Justice Edward A. Ducker of the Supreme Court of Nevada and a Past Grand Master. During the course of his remarks, he said:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

255

, 'This stone has bE'en laid by the Masonic Grand Lodge of Nevada. The laying of cornerstones by the fraternity, of its own and public buildings, is a time-honored custom which ha.s prevailed since and before the introduction of Masonry on American soil. Our Institution reserves the exclusive right to lay cornerstones of its own edifices, and, when requested, as it has been in this instance and countless times before, will lay the cornerstones of buildings having a distinctly public character. Washington, when President of the United States, as Acting Grand Master of Maryland, laid the cornerstone of the National Capitol with Masonic ceremonies such as have been observed here today. In fact, every stone laid, every step taken to build and sustain the great structure of Anglo-Saxon liberty the government of the United States has received the active cooperation of the Masons of the country. Ma.sonic i.n1iuences and endeavor have been all for America. What public function then could be more pleasing to Masons or more in keeping with the spirit of their institution than the laying of a cornerstone of a building dedicated by our government to the sel'Vice of the American people' ' ,

A note in the proceedings states: , 'This Grand Lodge was convened and the cornerstone laid on schedule, in spite of the fact that the head of a religious organization in this State

informed us, by serving notice on the Postmaster, that he was going to take the necessary steps to prevent any such ceremony by the Masonic Grand Lodge."

The Grand Master of New Hampshire attended the One Hundred Seventy-seventh annual Masonic service of the Masonic bodies of Portsmouth, at St. John's Church in that city. On June 24, 1807, the cornerstone of this church was laid by this Grand Lodge in the presence of Governor Langdon, and to commemorate that event a bronze tablet was last year erected and placed in the vestibule of the church. At the request of the present rector, the Grand Master was invited to unveil this tablet. Nearly one thousand members of the Masonic bodies of Portsmouth marched from the Masonic temple to the church and participated in the service. The Grand Lodge of Wyoming convened at Cheyenne on April 10, 1933, for the purpose of laying the cornerstone of the new Federal building. The Grand Lodge of Virginia did not agree with its Grand Master that it was in keeping with the dignity of our institution that a lodge be 'permitted to lay the cornerstone of a commercial building, such as the cornerstone of a chapel of a cemetery corporation. The cornerstone of a new Federal building at Port Angeles was laid on July 30, 1932, by the Grand Lodge of Washington. The Grand Orator gave an excellent address, followed by an extremely interesting historical address by Past Grand Master Walter F. Meier, who has just retired as Grand Exalted Ruler of the Elks. An emergent communication of the Grand Lodge of Ohio at Columbus, September 23, 1933, for the purpose of laying the cornerstone of the new Post Office and Federal building in that city. The cornerstone of a Post Office building was laid at Springfield on August 7,


256

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

1933, and on October 8, 1933, the cornerstone of a new City Hall in Lebanon. During the year 1933, the Grand Lodge of Tennessee laid the foundation stone of a new Post Office building at Jackson, and a new High School building at Sparta. The cornerstone of the Federal Forestry building at Ogden, Utah, was laid by the Grand Lodge on July 15" 1933. The ceremony was broadcast through the courtesy of radio station KSL of Salt Lake City. Past Grand Master Carver delivered the oration. The Grand Master of Nevada recommends the discontinuance of a Flag service, stating: "Let us return to that regulation as it was. I think that any man who has served under our Flag will agree with me that this parade only serves to cheapen it." .

From the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of England we learn that the Earl of Warwick, Deputy Grand Master of England, presided over a small gathering in Freemason's Hall when the American Ambassador unveiled a portrait of George Washington, which had been presented to the Grand Lodge of England. It represented Washington in the dress of the period, with full Masonic regalia. In conclusion, the speaker said: , 'I congratulate the Grand Lodge of England on thus accepting George Washington as one of their patron saints and trust his memory may be cherished in England as in America to the end of time."

Said to be the most notable lodge in Ohio, and probably in the United States, is Humboldt Lodge No. 476 of Columbus, in its exemplification of the third degree. Since 1913 the degree has been exemplified annually, the last exemplification being viewed by an audience of seventeen hundred, which was the capacity路 of the Masonic temple. In describing the recent dedication of the Masonic Peace Memorial in London, the representative from Minnesota tells us: "In the procession in which the Grand Master entered the lodge, immediately in front of him was the Grand Sword Bearer carrying the Sword of State which was deposited by him on a golden upright about eighteen inches in height resting upon and over the Altar which is situated in front of the Grand Master's pedestal, and not in the center of the lodge as in our lodges. This sword has a distinguished and interesting history. It contains the blade of the sword worn by King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden at the battle of Lutzen in 1632, in which he was killed. It was remounted and presented to the Grand Lodge of England in 1731 by the Duke of Suffolk, Grand Master, and for over two hundred years has been borne before the Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge of England and recognized by successive generations in Grand Lodge as the emblem of the authority that the Craft vests in its Grand Master as well as a symbol of freedom and justice. I noticed that the three Great Lights-large tall candles-were placed one in the East, West and South, and that the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer sat in the north. ' ,


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

257

The Grand Master of Manitoba encourages the use of ceremony and dignity in lodge gatherings : , 'There is always the danger that modern tendencies may lead to laxity in lodge etiquette and in the traditional Masonic procedures with whieh the teachings of Freemasonry are clothed. The Craft undertakes to train its membership in a well-rounded system of moral thought. Each procedure, like each symbol, represents a perfect part in the total system, Traditional Masonic procedures provide an orderly setting which gives tone, quality and dignified approach to the ideas we would inculcate. Something of value is lost when a golden thought is clothed in unseemly attire. The use of Masonic titles during discussion, the reception of visitors, the finer finish which enobles the details of degree work, beat upon the imagination of each individual and become a part of his Masonic experience. District Deputy Grand Masters and Masonic study groups may well assume responsibility for guidance in the matter of lodge etiquette and of lodge procedure."

One of the greatest Masonic gatherings of the year 1933 was the Bicentennial of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, which was opened at old North Church in Boston on June 25. The Grand Lodge of South Carolina adopted a resolution several years ago providing for the proper Masonic attitude during the time of prayer-folded arms and head slightly bowed. The Grand Lodge of Tasmania, through its Board of General Purposes, has appointed a committee to consider the question of suitably commemorating the Centenary of Freemasonry in Tasmania which takes place in 1935, and coincides with the Centenary of Tasmania Operative Lodge No.1. It is planned to have, during the same year, the Fourth Masonic Conference of the Grand Lodges of Australia, which had been fixed for 'February, 1931, but deferred from year to year owing to adverse conditions in several of the States. Past Grand Master Alva Bryan replaced Past Grand Master Cochran as chairman of the committee on Texas Masonic Centennial. The One Hundredth Communication of that Grand Lodge is to be held in December, 1935. Wisconsin, on December 3, 1933, observed the Ninetieth anniversary of the formation of its Grand Lodge. The Grand Master was directed to address a suitable communication to all subordinate lodges in reference to this event. The Grand Lodge of North Carolina convened in special communication at Raleigh on July 4, 1933, for the purpose of celebrating the Centennial of the laying of the cornerstone of the State Capitol and the laying of a second stone suitably inscribed. Brother J. C. B. Ehringhaus, Governor of North Carolina accepted the stone on behalf of the State. A committee on Sesquicentennial Celebration recommended to the Grand Lodge of Connecticut that the celebration be held on the 150th anniversary of the formation of the Grand Lodge, July 8, 1939, that it be held in New Haven where the Grand Lodge was formed, and that


258

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

for this purpose a special communication of the Grand Lodge be held. The Grand Lodge of South Australia held a Jubilee Celebration on April 17, 1934, commemorating the inauguration of the Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction in 1884. It was said to have been the most distinguished gathering of Freemasons ever seen in Adelaide. The Grand Master of each of the jurisdictions was present in addition to officials from New Zealand and South Africa. Four hundred South Australian brethren, mostly Masters and Past Masters, were in attendance. The question of the Bi-Centenary Celebration of the Grand Lodge of Scotland was referred to a special committee of the Grand Lodge, who recommended that preparations should be made to celebrate this event on November 30, 1936. Preliminary invitations are to be sent to all Sister Grand Lodges and to Scottish District Grand Lodges inviting the attendance of one representative. The committee expects to raise a special fund of $30,000.00 to meet the expenses in connection therewith, particularly the entertainment of over-sea guests. A speaker referring to the recent Masonic dedication in London, said: , 'It seems to me that when the aristocracy of England and the democracy of these United States can find a common meeting ground, such as that had in this fraternity, there is, indeed, hope of international peace and a freedom from international cataclysms. The universality of Freemasonry is never better exemplified than through these international visitations, nor is the equality, which is the basis, of course, of this Fraternity of ours, better understood."

South Carolina appears to be the next American jurisdiction to celebrate its 200th anniversary. The Grand Master recommended the appointment of a committee and hopes to make the celebration a world-wide event. To this end he would extend fraternal relations to all worthy Grand Jurisdictions in the world. A committee agreed with the Grand Master as to the observance in 1937, but suggested that a serious investigation take place before general recognition. EDUCATIONAL AND HISTORICAL

The ownership of Masonic publications by Grand Lodge was not approved by a committee from the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire. Questionnaires were sent to all Grand Lodges, from which it appeared that only a very few issued Masonic publications; two or three publish some form of a bulletin; some have experimented with it and abandoned it. The committee thought the disadvantages outweighed any possible advantages. It was not believed that the financial return would justify the undertaking. The matter is being discussed by the Grand Lodge of Ohio. The Grand Master is particularly concerned with the use of Masonic insignia at the masthead of so-called Masonic publications. He found


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

259

it impossible to enter upon any program for dealing with individual instances of complaint, because there were no regulations upon which to base his actions. The whole question is to come up for investigation by a special committee. One of the great advantages of educational publications is the recording of historical matter which might otherwise not be preserved. The Grand Historian of North Dakota records a number of historical matters in the annual proceedings. Many of the lodges of that jurisdiction have begun to write their history and the historian makes a number of suggestions as to what should be contained in the lodge history: (1) A list of charter members, with photographs. (2) Reproduction of old pictures, showing where the lodge had its earliest meetings. (3) Photographs of Masters of the lodge. (4) A yearly summary of the minutes down to the present time. (5) The record of members of long standing. (6) Masonic experiences and contacts. The Grand Lodge of Nevada reproduces a double page of the first Tiler's register of Carson City Lodge U. D., carrying with it the signature of Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain). The date is March 4, 1862, and the name appears on three other dates in February and March of the same register. Rising Star Lodge No. 47, of New Hampshire, appeared as a lodge on June 19, 1932, for the purpose of decorating the grave of Gen. John Sullivan, the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge. - In an address of welcome to the Grand Lodge of 'Vyoming, the Master of Wyoming Lodge No.2, said: , , Sixty-four years ago, when South Pass was one of the frontiers of our advancing civilization, nineteen of the Craft, with Masonry in their hearts, met and applied for a dispensation. It established its first home in a log building. It was furnished and adorned with an altar, working tools and equipment which was whipsawed and fashioned by the Craftsmen from timbers of our native hills. These are cherished relics, and are preserved like heirlooms bequeathed to us by our fathers, in Masonry. Through danger, adversity and untold hardship of its members it dispensed light and knowledge at South Pass for about ten years. It then removed to Lander, and what a fine heritage it has been to us. We welcome you to the scenes of }"ort Washakie, where lies the dust of Chief Washakie and the Bird Woman, who was call.ed Sacajawea, now renowned in song and story. "

The proceedings of Virginia show the service of J. W orlhington Smith as Grand Master; his election occurred December 13, 1842. He served for two years. He was Grand Senior VV'arden in 1839; Deputy Grand Master in 1840 and 1841. The chief interest to Missourians is the fact that he later served as President of the old Masonic College at Lexington, Mo. Past Grand Master Hepner, of Montana, is engaged in writing the history of the Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction. The Grand Historian of British Columbia has secured the history of a number of subordinate lodges and these have been incorporated in the annual proceedings, occupying about sixty-six pages.


260

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Saskatchewan has a committee on Masonic History, whose first duty appears to have been the compilation of biographical sketches of Past Grand Masters. An attempt is now being made to secure the history of subordinate lodges. The Grand Master of Western Australia calls attention to the introduction of Freemasonry into that State by the formation of St. John Lodge on April 4, 1843. He has recommended that the Board of General Purposes be requested to consider the publication of a history of the first one hundred years of Freemasonry in Western Australia. The late William H. Zarley, Deputy Grand Master of Illinois, attended the Grand Lodge of Nebraska a few years ago and upon returning from the meeting came by airplane, covering the distance between Omaha and St. Louis in four hours, a trip which his father had taken four months to complete by covered wagon in the 50's, when he had gone to Montana to dig for gold. Reviewer West, of the District of Columbia, finds: , 'The value of authentic history is rapidly becoming apparent to the Craft, and Grand Lodges as well as lodges and collateral bodies have lately been taking considerable interest in old records. Let us hope that interest will continue in this work, if for no other reason than that in case a lodge should sometime begin to wonder what it was in existence for, it could look back over the history and find something to be proud of, and possibly something that would stimulate it to an effort by way of emulation of the deeds of its forbears."

The Grand Master of that jurisdiction directed each Master to appoint a historian or committee to write for the lodge a comprehensive history and to file a copy with the Grand Secretary. The charter of the first Masonic lodge in Texas was carried through the battle of San Jacinto in the saddlebags of the immortal Anson Jones. The Grand Master of Texas assures us : "That since that time, Masons of Texas have stood openly, unqualifiedly and consistently for the principle of law and order."

The committee on Masonic History of the Grand Lodge of California has performed a service of valuable character in collecting historical data pertaining to the lodges of California. The committee reported that since a year would be required for the preparation of the manuscript, only a preliminary investigation of the question of printing had been made. They say: , 'A most comprehensive history of Masonry in California can be presented in three volumes. These books will be substantially bound, printed on good paper, generously illustrated, and could be sold at a sum approximating $12.00 per set."

Grand Historian Charles S. Plumb, of Ohio, has written a history of American Union Lodge No.1. It deals with a lodge that began its career as a war lodge February 22, 1776, and served through the Revolution, and later established itself at Marietta, Ohio, in 1790.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

261

The Grand Lodge of Manitoba has discovered an old Military lodge, organized in 1863, from among Hatch's Independent Battalion of Cavalry, Minnesota Volunteers, engaged in suppressing a revolt among the Sioux Indians. All the troops were residents of Minnesota, and while temporarily stationed at Fort Abercrombie a lodge was organized after securing a dispensation from Grand Master A. T. C. Pierson, of Minnesota. The Grand Master of Nevada visited Tuscarora Lodge No. 21 and says of it: "While their meeting place is located at the old mining camp, now practically a ghost city, their members live from five to sixty miles away, but regardless of this serious handicap and their small membership, the lodge is active and their Masonry progressive. They show an increase of two members over last year. "

Grand Master Smith, of Nebraska, presided over the Grand Lodge with a gavel containing the following inscription: , 'This mallet or setting maul was used about three thousand years ago by an operative Mason. It was found in one of the ancient tombs of Egypt and was preeented to the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, A. F. & A. M., June 5, 1901, by M. W. George W. Lininger, Past Grand Master."

We learn from the proceedings of South Australia that the introduction of Freemasonry into the vast continent of Australia is almost coeval with the foundation of the mother State of New South Wales. The originators of the movement to establish a lodge were: "Several officers of His Majesty's ships, together with some respectable inhabitants of Sydney. The Governor, to whom the petition had been addressed, refused his sanction, but in spite of the prohibition a lodge was held, probably of a formal character. It resulted in the prime mover being sent into exile."

In the diary of a private colonist, dated May 22, 1803, we read: , 'A number of Masons, meeting at the house of Sergeant Whittell, in Sydney, N. S. W., were arrested, and after serious report, were discharged as having no willful intention to disturb the peace."

Grand Secretary Goodwin, of Utah, is carrying on his historical work by writing the history of Tintic Lodge No.9, at Eureka, Utah. His "Mormonism and Masonry" has been reprinted. The monument erected on the site of the first Masonic building in Colorado has been completed, and was dedicated and unveiled on June 17, 1933. A photograph of the monument appears in the proceedings. George B. Clark, one of Colorado's outstanding Masonic students, is preparing a Masonic history of Colorado. A tablet was recently unveiled by the Grand Lodge of Queensland to the memory of the late Grand Secretary, Past Grand Master Charles H. Harley. A memorial tablet was erected by the Masons of the Philippine


262

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Islands on the site of the home of Brother Jose Rizal, the Masonic martyr. On the monument appears the following: , 'Masons must not rest so long the earth harbors a tyrant, so long as the night echoes the plaints of the oppressed, so long as there are slaves, so long as there are oppressors."

The words were those of Rizal himself. The Grand Lodge found it necessary to publish a resolution in both English and Spanish denying reports which had been spread concerning Rizal, that previous to his execution he had written and signed a statement abjuring Masonry and retracting everything he had said and written against the Roman Catholic religion. It was reported to the Grand Lodge that Masonic activities were current in the Islands previous to 1856, when the first lodge was officially chartered, brought there by a naval officer named Monge. It is generally understood that the lodge was established within the territorial jurisdiction of the Province of Cavite. The first lodge on Canadian soil was at Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, in 1738. Halifax had the first overseas Provincial Grand Lodge, the earliest minutes of the Mark degree on the continent, the earliest record in Canada of the Royal Arch, and the oldest chapter in the Empire. The Grand Lodge will observe its Bicentenary in 1938. Grand Master Clarke, of Georgia, speaking before the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, said: "Upon the altar of my lodge at home there lies the gift of a great Englishman, James Oglethorpe, who founded the Colony of Georgia, and on the 12th of February, 1734, organized Solomon's Lodge, of which I have the honor to be a Past Master, and upon its altar placed his first gift.' ,

Past Grand Master Melvin Johnson, of Massachusetts, during the Massachusetts Bicentenary, made another of those historical addresses for which he is rightfully famed. A descendant of Paul Revere presented the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts with Paul Revere's seal, the latter having been a Grand Master of that jurisdiction. Fellowship Lodge No. 122, of North Dakota, extended an invitation to the Grand Lodge representatives to visit the old camp site of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Sometime ago a tract of land, covering the camp site, was deeded to the Grand Lodge by the citizens of Washburn, for the purpose of erecting a marker to the memory of these two pioneer explorers and members of our fraternity. The grandson of the distinguished Philip C. Tucker, at one time Grand Master of Vermont, has recently presented the Grand Lodge with his grandfather's apron. The apron was made in London and was first presented by John Jacob Astor to the Grand Master of New York, whose daughter presented it to Grand Master Tucker of Ver-


1934

GRAND LODGE

qF

MISSOURI

263

mont. At his death it passed to Philip C. Tucker, the son, who became Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas. In 1866, the Grand Lodge of Maine adopted a resolution requiring all lodges to complete the history of th~ir lodge to that date, and requiring that each ten years, commencing in 1870, they should furnish their history for the preceding decade. Naturally, many lodges have not complied. A Grand Lodge library museum is in the process of making by the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. One of the most interesting historical documents we have read is the story of Freemasonry at Fort Monroe, Virginia, written by Brother Paul Anderson of Army and Navy Lodge No. 306. Louisiana is engaged in ascertaining the burial places of deceased Past Grand Masters and collecting data on their lives. Many of the graves are unmarked, but we notice from the list that one is buried in a Catholic cemetery. Reviewer Allen, of North Carolina, very properly states: "We have to start Masonic education normally. When a man is notified that he has been elected to the degrees of Freemasonry, he is in a distinctly receptive mood. Then is the time for some of our Masonic education to come in. Shortly he is initiated. Nine chances out of ten, his initiation was not what he expected it to be. He sorely needS Masonic education just at this point. We must be ready."

The Grand Lodge of California has recently been observing a Public School Week. A certain religious organization" does not look with favor upon such a celebration and one of its magazines says: , 'A secret society, the philosophy of which is naturalism, sponsors a week of propaganda for schools, the religion of which is naturalism, for nowhere in such schools may the supernatural be recognized. Operating with this secret society is a group of professional educational politicians, who, through the manipulation of parent-teacher associations, are able to supply publicity to papers and efficient lobbies and claques to legislatures.' ,

The Grand Lodge answers such attacks with a statement that the general admission of California's superiority among the public school systems of the country is a sufficient refutation. " The Grand Lodge of Montana does not approve of presenting to newly made Master Masons any work on symbolism: , 'For the reason that each author has his own particular conception of symbolism and we do not care to place the stamp of approval of this Grand Lodge upon anyone author's interpretation."

Oregon is the latest jurisdiction to organize a research lodge. The Grand Master is very much impressed with its work. The lodge was recently chartered as Research Lodge No. 198. This Grand Lodge is known for its educational work, more than $137,000.00 having been disbursed to aid orphan children in obtaining a public school education.


264 .

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

The Grand Lodge of New Mexico is holding Masonic Institutes. To supplement these meetings, corps of speakers are being sent to lodges which cannot participate in institute meetings. Georgia has organized a Mother Lodge of Research to assist its educational commission in the preparation of material and to govern local research lodges and courses of study. The Grand Lodge of Texas has acquired the records of five Civil War Military lodges which worked under dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Texas. They are to make an interesting chapter in a contemplated Texas Centennial history. The Grand Lodge of Ontario has decided that having passed the introductory stage of Masonic education, the question was not to be placed in the hands of individual lodges. District Deputy Grand Masters are to be the driving power; each lodge is urged to have an active educational committee. A course of study has been provided. American Lodge of Research, chartered by the Grand Lodge of New York, makes an annual report to the Grand Lodge and is continuing its splendid publications. A resolution proposed in the Grand Lodge of North Carolina asks the Grand Lodge to inaugurate a lodge system of education. Several years ago this Grand Lodge raised a Masonic Educational Fund and parceled it out to "A" and "B" colleges, permitting the colleges to handle the funds. The question has now arisen as to whether the Grand Lodge intended to give the money and relinquish all control to the colleges, or did it mean the funds were to be loaned under the direction of the Masonic Educational Loan Fund Committee. The Grand Lodge finally decided these were trust funds and not considered as gifts to the various colleges. FINANCES

In these recent days the subject of financing becomes more and more of interest. Heretofore the question of finances largely concerned subordinate lodges, but in recent years the difficulty experienced in collecting from subordinate lodges has made even Grand Lodge financing a serious problem. The Grand Master of Delaware has the following to say about finances: , 'Our lodges are all old enough and have been meeting in their present quarters long enough for them to be able to determine definitely just what their fixed expenses are. I fraternally recommend to them the need of putting their financial affairs on a sound basis. There is no reason why each lodge cannot adopt a budget system, similar to the system of Grand Lodge, and live up to it. It may be said that Grand Lodge has no right to interfere in financial affairs of the constituent lodges, but when lodges are unable to pay Grand Lodge dues and assessments, thereby crippling to some extent Grand Lodge affairs, it does become a Grand Lodge matter."


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

265

The Grand Master of Florida secured from the Grand Secretary a list of delinquent lodges; the total delinquency was a little over $30,000.00. One lodge, instead of sending their money in promptly after the first of the year as required, held onto it until the last minute, and because of carelessness in not remitting money due the Grand Lodge just because they didn't have to, they were caught with their money in a bank which failed in April. The Grand Master found that in one lodge it was the custom of the Secretary to offer a blank resolution at the beginning of the year, moving that no one be suspended, the reason for which was that he was paid a dollar per name for each name borne on the rolls. The Master found on investigation that many members were in arrears as much as six years, and one of these had gone on a trip to attend the Olympic games, but could not find money to pay delinquent lodge dues." A Kansas Lodge wrote the Grand Master setting forth "the unprecedent economic conditions, financial distress • • • ," asking the Grand Lodge to relieve subordinate lodges from payment of Grand Lodge per capita tax. The Grand Master wrote in reply: , , The duty to share in the maintenance cost of operating a lodge is very clear, and the obligation to relieve is a lodge obligation. If the latter is not able to carry its worthy indigent brethren, it would seem that the original plan of the tax or expense burden being borne by able and willing brethren within the lodge should again obtain. To call upon the Grand Lodge to eliminate so clearly an established feature would in all probability fail. "The financial responsibilities of parent and subordinate lodges are closely related but seem to require independent handling. The Grand Lodge should watch its expenditu.res that the tax may not become a burden. The lodges shoUld so conduct their affairs that the revenues may include the tax. .Masonry is a pure Democracy, and the fullest independence, as well a.."! responsibility, is in keeping with our system. If the Grand Lodge assumes obligations of a subordinate lodge, paternalism will enter, home rule will leave, and the ideal be broken down."

The Grand Master felt convinced that fully 25 per cent of the lodges of Kansas were not receiving sufficient income to be prosperous and healthy, and not inclined, of themselves, to improve their conditions. Under the heading "Pyramids of Masonry" the Grand Master of Michigan says: , 'Five thousand years ago, there was built in Egypt, along the west banks of the Nile stretching for a distance of sixty miles, a group of pyramids. They were built, doubtless, as tombs for the Pharaohs and Kings of those days. These mounments of stone and mortar are evidences of the engineering skill and industry of the people of that age. During the prosperous years of the recent past, our lodges saw visions of even greater prosperity and likewise built into the future by the construction of magnificient temples, involving the expenditure of millions of dollars and assuming financial obligations that have necessarily been passed on to other generations. This epidemic of physical expansion has not been centralized in one particular locality, but has spread into every part of


266

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

the jurisdiction. These monuments of Masonry-Pyramids of Masonry, shall I say-are now the bane of many of our lodges who are endeavoring honorably to get out from under their tremendous financial load. To meet this situation honorably, it has been necessary in many cases to relinquish the charitable obligations, which alone give any order its right to exist. A very serious problem confronts the craft today. Shall we, as a great fraternity, today, continue to pour into these pyramids of Masonry countless thousands of dollars to continue evidences of our physical prosperity, or shall we give more serious consideration to our obligation to aid and assist distressed Master Masons, their widows and orphans 짜 Many of our delinquencies in Grand Lodge dues are caused by the apparent necessity of paying fixed local expenditures far in excess of the ability of the brethren to pay. ' ,

The Grand Lodge of Michigan has experienced trouble in securing information as to its various funds from anyone source, which prevents unified financial control of expenditures. The finance committee said: , , The Grand. Secretary receives no report of the operations of the Home, other than a statement of the total receipts and disbursements for each month. The same is true with regard to the operations of the outside relief fund. We would recommend that a signed e.opy of the official proceedings of the Masonic Home Board be furnished to the Grand Secretary after each meeting. We would also recommend that a statement be furnished the Grand Secretary monthly showing the operating income and expenses for the current month. ' ,

Twenty-five per cent of Massachusetts lodges registered an objection to the submitting of a monthly report by the Secretary and Treasurer to the Master of the lodge, giving as reasons that these books were always open to inspection. The Grand Master said: , 'I fear if the Masters and Wardens who objected were questioned on the subject, it would be discovered that no systematic comparison had ever been made and that they were not at all informed regarding the financial condition of their respective lodges. , 'Many lodges state that they have a regular audit by a committee consisting generally of the Master and Wardens. This form of audit is usually of no real value, and in many instances consists of nothing more than signing the various reports. It is generally too superficial to be of value."

Before the close of their financial year, the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts received $117,039.00. The Grand Lodge has a Masonic Education and Charity Fund, whose value on August 31, 1933, was $1,998,670.00. Additional bequests of almost $51,000.00 to this fund were received during the year. The Grand Lodge of Washington is obligated to pay $12,000.00 principal each year on the new note issue, and this amount, plus interest, must come out of the general fund now that the Home Building Fund has been abolished. The only chance for relief is in an increase in Grand Lodge dues. Thirty-two lodges in that State, because of bank failures, were compelled to borrow monies to pay their Grand Lodge dues; these monies were loaned from the Grand Lodge charity


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

267

fund. A committee on constituent lodge financing, after calling attention to the unprecedented condition, stated that a score of lodges were in danger of losing their temple buildings. It is believed that some lodges will repudiate their bonded indebtedness, resulting in a loss of morale in the ranks of Masonry and loss of prestige for the Institution for years to come. The committee pointed out the following: "(1) This type of civilization is so founded upon material valuations that the payment of debts. is inseparable from honorable standing and repute. (2) Every lodge is vitally concerned in the honorable payment or settlement of a debt incurred by anyone of our lodges for a purpose strictly Masonic. (3) Every lodge is likewise discredited by the default of a sister lodge. (4) Refinancing by ordinary methods is impossible. (5) Masonry as a whole is solvent. (6) There are five lodges in the jurisdiction which have money loaned out at interest for every lodge which is in financial distress. ' ,

The committee therefore recommended: ~ ~ That the Grand Lodge seriously consider the practicability of a refinancing of the indebtedness of some or all of the constituent lodges which are in financial difficulties, to the end that these lodges and the Grand Lodge may be saved from reproach and dishonor. "

The Grand Master of Kentucky called a special meeting of his Grand Officers to find a way of providing financial relief for constituent lodges. It was proposed that the Grand Lodge communication be called off for the year, which would save $1.00 per capita. . The law apparently did not permit. In Illinois we find that the loss of investment through closing of banks has been appalling; in two districts this loss amounted to $336,000.00. The Grand Master is of the opinion: , ~ That it will take many years of concentrated effort to rebuild our Masonic financial structure on a solid basis. At the close of Grand Lodge a year ago there was more than $50,000.00 yet unpaid in per capita tax."

A committee recommended that the Grand Lodge create a law that would require all lodges to prepare a budget, the ultimate goal being to have all lodges keep their operating expenses within their income from dues only. The matter will be voted on at the next annual communication. All of the funds of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico were contained in the First National Bank of Albuquerque, which, fortunately, was enabled to reopen on a one-hundred per cent basis. While the Grand Lodge held collateral securities to protect their funds, it later appeared that such securities could not be lawfully given. The Grand Master of Georgia was, by resolution, empowered to borrow funds as might be necessary for the maintenance of the Grand Lodge and the Masonic Home.


268

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

In Texas a proposed ~esolution would have had the Grand Lodge estimate the actual needs, deduct this amount from the sum produced by the requirements of the constitution, and prorate the difference back to the subordinate lodges. A committee found the suggestion "novel and unprecedented," and in violation of the provision of the Constitution. The Grand Lodge of Wisconsin has in its general, charity, and endowment funds a total of $1,169,405.00. The Grand Lodge of Iowa has in permanent fund and endowment securities $697,025.00. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania recently charged off 6,080 shares of the capital stock of the Franklin Trust Company standing on the books of the lodge, to the value of $440,495.00. It appears from statistics that this Grand Lodge has $17,355,482.00 of trust funds. According to the Grand Master of Alabama, subordinate lodges are becoming accustomed to being from one to three years in arrears: , 'The practice has grown up in many of the subordinate lodges of remaining in arrears for at least one year, and of suspending Masons for non-payment of dues at their meeting previous to June 24 each year and letting them reinstate after September 15, thereby depriving the Grand Lodge of per capita tax and of letting Masons in the lodges pay a portion of their dues, frequently not sufficient to pay the per capita tax, and then remain as a Mason in good standing."

On February 1, 1933, subordinate lodges owed the Grand Lodge of Mississippi $37,000.00. The amount was reduced on February 1, 1934, to $"24,000.00. Some of the payments, however, were made by notes of lodges. By strict methods of economy and by reducing expenses to an absolute minimum, the Grand Lodge has a cash balance of $5,000.00 more than it did a year ago. "Because of the moratorium act, and the wide latitude given the junior lien holders by the courts, the Board of Trustees of the Nebraska Masonic Home decided not to loan any money on land, regardless of the value of the security, until the moratorium act is either repealed or modified." A foreclosure, which was in prospect last year, was stopped by virtue of the moratorium act. Grand Secretary Lewis E. Smith, of Nebraska, has supplied all subordinate lodges a suggested and simple form of budget for the use of lodges. Within four months following the bank moratorium, a Grand Lodge committee in Oklahoma refinanced the Masonic Home bonds for $132,000.00. Most of these bonds are held by the local lodges and the Grand Master informed his brethren that if lodges had invested in such bonds in the days of their prosperity "they would not have sustained a loss occasioned by closing of banks and the suspension of operation of building and loan associations." It appears that several claims have been presented against the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma for monies spent by sister jurisdictions on members of Oklahoma lodges. The Grand Master tells his brethren:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

269

, 'They should never guarantee expenditures unless they are financially able to meet that obligation. There are several cases where monies were spent by organizations in foreign jurisdictions without consulting the local lodge and were then referred to me with the idea they would be paid out of Grand Lodge funds. I have refused to recognize the validity of any such obligation and in virtually every instance the service rendered was, in my opinion, out of line with the financial condition of the brother involved. I was surprised to receive a bill for $664.11 dues charged against this jurisdiction by the Masonic Relief Association of the United States, which covers three years and is based on one-third of one cent per capita. I immediately withdrew from the organization and denied any indebtedness on the part of this jurisdiction. I think that this is another one of those organizations which largely exist to provide a job for somebody."

Some of the delinquent lodges in Virginia, we are informed, , 'Own valuable real estate. In fact, this is one of the reasons these lodges cannot pay the Grand Lodge per capita as the funds of the lodges must be used to pay interest on loans to avoid loss of the property."

As a means of reducing expenses, several Grand Lodges have reduced the mileage and per diem paid. In Michigan, according to a proposed amendment, representatives will receive $3.00 per day for actual attendance, and 3c per mile for each mile traveled. In Iowa, it was proposed to reduce the pay of delegates to $4.00 per diem, and mileage from 8c to 6c per mile. The Grand Master of Tennessee recommended that mileage and per diem be fixed at an amount sufficient to cover only bare expenses of mileage and per diem. MASONIC BURIALS

The Masonic funeral service.is being remodeled and rewritten. The Masonic Service Association, believing that a digest of the service as used in all jurisdictions might be of service to the Craft, went so far as to issue a complete digest. We still find evidence of disputes between Grand Lodges over the payment of burial expenses, and here and there so-called Masonic Cemetery Associations continue to ask for the support of members of the fraternity. In other instances Grand Lodges have definitely set their foot upon such societies. The Grand Master of Texas ruled that the words "Cemetery Association" in their law did not include a corporation organized for profit, but should be construed to mean "a non-profit mutual cemetery association, as those words are commonly understood." The Grand Master of Ohio ruled that the Masonic dedication of a plot in a cemetery, reserved by the proprietors for sale to Masons only, was improper, although members might appear in their individual capacity if they so desired. Brethren of Wisconsin and Michigan lodges engaged in a disput.e over the payment of funeral expenses. A Michigan brother had died


270

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

in Wisconsin. The Michigan lodge wired the Wisconsin lodge they were out of funds and could not assist in the burial expense. The Grand Secretary of Wisconsin authorized the Wisconsin lodge to take charge of the burial and limit the expense to $100.00. The Grand Master, referring to the fact, said: , 'It is the understanding of the Finance Committee that no foreign jurisdiction can properly incur such expense without authority either from the subordinate lodge or from the Grand Lodge of the State of Michigan. Our Grand Secretary gave no authority. The question is one of fraternal comity. It is our opinion that the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin should not look to this Grand Lodge for money spent without authority; we do not have money enough to take care of all cases like this, and we do not like to start a precedent. To bring it before you as a matter of fraternal comity and courtesy, without a recommendation from the finance committee, I move that the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Wisconsin be reimbursed for the actual burial expenses of this brother on proper recepit therefor, in an amount not to exceed $100.00. " The motion carried.

The question of the proper conduct of Masonic funerals is a vital one and Grand Lecturer Baker, of California, says: , 'It is one of the Masonic ceremonies that is done before the public and should always be well done. There are more favorable comments on this ceremony when well conducted, not only from the brethren but from the public. Masters should ask some Past Master or a member of his lodge who has a good voice and a good appearance to act for him in case he does not feel competent or capable of doing the c.eremony nicely. This not only reflects on the lodge, but on the fraternity as well. The public is not always as charitable as they might be in their comment. I trust that each Master will give due consideration and act accordingly."

The ritual committee in Ohio, after giving the matter long thought, were of the opinion that the service should be continued as written, but with the exception that the present service was not obligatory but only a guide. A committee tells the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma that the right of burial does not mean that Masonry is a burial society. The conditions which the committee present are similar to those prevailing in Missouri : "The average Mason in our large towns and in our cities seems to think it is entirely unnecessary for him to help bury the dead, and the neglect has reached such limits in certain localities that it is almost impossible to get a quorum present to attend a Masonic burial. Cases are known where the Master had to summons in order to get the brethren to do their duty. A Masonic funeral is one of the few occasions where the profane have an opportunity to view the lodge. The dignity and decorum with which the members should seek to impress the public on these occasions are all too often lacking. ' ,

A committee which has been rewriting the burial service in South Carolina was given another year to complete its work. The late Grand Chaplain Gallagher, of Michigan, read a proposed


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

271

funeral service, which was used for the first time on the occasion of his own funeral. By it he hoped to attain two objects: , 'While not wholly and irreverently neglecting our beloved dead, I shall save time, which is always a desirable desideration, and, at the same time, I shall associate with this newer service those who, during the past year, have gone from our lodge on earth to the Celestial Lodge above. I have tried to avoid maudlin sentimentality. It has been my endeavor to so frame the message of Masonry for those who have lost near ones and dear ones that they will leave the graveside under the mastery of the alluring hope of a happier reunion."

Reviewer West, of the District of Columbia, finds less discussion over the Masonic burial service than formerly, because "those Grand LodgE'S which wanted to do revising have done it, and those who were satisfied with the ritual have been content to let well enough alone." Grand Master Zimmerman, addressing the Grand Lodge of Maryland, said: , 'My observation is that our fraternity often makes a very poor impression upon the public upon practically the only occasion when it appears in public, namely, at funerals, because of thoughtlessness on the part of the brethren and lack of familiarity on the part of the officers and brethren with the funeral ritual. I am of the opinion that the Grand Lodge should recommend to the constituent lodges that their officers and members at convenient times rehearse the funeral ceremonies contained in the ritual both for use at the public funeral ceremonies and at the grave, until both officers and members are thoroughly familiar with the service and the various signs and movements which are part of it. I would not suggest that each lodge designate some Past Master regularly to officiate on all such occasions, but such a suggestion might not be amiss."

Grand Master Brown, of Minnesota, found many of the brethren dissatisfied with the Masonic burial service and no uniformity among the lodges with respect to the service used. He suggested that a committee of three be appointed to draft a new service to be standard throughout the jurisdiction. A committee on ceremonial forms of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut prepared a Masonic Interment Service, which was adopted, but not made compulsory. In far-off Victoria, AUo:icralia, the Board of General Purposes considered it "very desirable that the funeral service should be conducted by those who have made it a special study." They even went so far as to recommend that a list of all such brethren be prepared and supplied to the various lodges. FEES AND DUES

Change in the economic situation brings to the attention of the fraternity the question of fees and dues. In some states the fees were increased during prosperous years, and now that depressing times are upon us some jurisdictions feel that these fees should be reduced. The same argument holds true in the discussion of annual dues.


272

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

In Michigan the minimum fee for degrees was reduced from $30.00 Each lodge may provide how this amount may be apportioned between the degrees. In Montana the Grand Lodge provided that the fees for degrees and the annual dues in lodges having concurrent jurisdiction should be uniform. In case such lodges are unable to agree upon the amount, the Grand Master has authority to fix the amount thereof. The Grand Master of Canada deplores the reduction of fees and dues, believing that it is-

to $21.00, as it formerly was.

"An unjustifiable assumption that there will be no early improvement in the present ooonomic condition. We should not be panic-stricken because we are having a few lean years. Our fathers did not despair when they were overtaken by a similar disaster in the last decade of the last century. They' put on the dauntless spirit of resolution' and triumphantly emerged from the crisis that threatened to overwhelm them and so shall we if we but show a like 'boldness and aspiring confidence.' If such a measure be adopted for the purpose of temporary relief I fear it will react to the prejudice of the lodges concerned when at some future date an attempt is made to restore the fees and dues to the original amounts. It would savor too much of seeking candidates by means of the lowest tender, a course to be discouraged in any well regulated lodge. If a few dollars' difference in the initiation fee would deter a prospective candidate from applying for membership then it would be better for him to defer making his application until such a time, if ever, as his financial condition will warrant his taking such a step. ' ,

Iowa provided路 that the minimum fee be reduced from $40.00 to $30.00, $10.00 of which is to be put into the Grand Charity permanent fund. Grand Lodge dues were reduced from $2.00 to $1.75. The jurisprudence committee in North Carolina disapproved a recommendation reducing the minimum amount allowed to be charged by lodges as initiation fee. The Grand Master of California received a number of requests for approval of by-laws in which fees for degrees had been reduced. He addressed a circular letter to the several lodges, calling attention to the evil effect of this policy. In his letter he said: "The old rule by which petitioners were measured is good today, that no man should seek the privileges of Masonry unless he has not only a sufficiency for himself and family, but likewise has something to spare for works of charity and mercy. We have had in the past many periods of severe business depression, and we have invariably had full recovery. Our lodges are not increasing in membership, but a mere increase of names on the rosters is no cause of congratulation at any time. Better far that our lodges should secure a few men who may become workers in the Masonic vineyard, who will be given intelligent attention by the officers and and the older brethren, who are able to support themselves and their families and yet have something for works of charity and mercy, than that fees should be reduced merely for the accommodation of petitioners and the doubtful propriety of an immediate accumulation of money which later will almost of a surety be required for the relief of those who may be induced to join because of reduced fees."


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

273

By constitutional amendment the Grand Lodge of Alabama recently provided that petitioners who were ministers must pay the $10.00 for Masonic Home. Reviewer J. Edward Allen, of North Carolina, has positive views as to fees: , , We do not believe high fees keep out rotten material. . Some of the rottenest we ever know were ready to pay any sort of high fee. Some of the best material we have ever known were men who eould not pay high fees. Only in boom times do high fees add to the charity funds. The sooner we quit measuring candidates in dollar marks, the better off Masonry will be. Lodges should by some rigid law be required to set aside their funds in specific designations. Fees should not be counted upon to pay routine expenses. ' ,

The committee on financial readjustments reported to the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands that in its opinion the present economic depression was no cause for the reduction of the minimum fees, that "if a man has a real determination to become a Mason he would find no difficulty in raising the amount fixed as fees, and his ability to do so is an additional assurance of his sincerity." The question of delinquent dues in Virginia became so serious as to invite the serious consideration of the Grand Master. While he found many who were unable to pay and should be retained, he expressed the fear, 'There are many who are using the depression as an excuse and such members should be required to comply with the law. In many cases I have found that a large number of members have been allowed to run for several years, and consequently their dues have multiplied until they owe their lodge a considerable sum. This condition should never exist. The books of the lodge should be balanced each year and members in arrears either cited or their dues paid by the lodge. If we do not allow our brethren to become delinquent with their dues, we will not have so many suspensions. I hold no brief for the brother who will not pay his dues and yet enjoys his automobile, cigars, moving pictures and other nonessential attractions. ' ,

"The Masonic Chronicler" speaking of the extreme liberality and forbearance of lodges in remission of dues, adds: "Commendable as this procedure is, its unfavorable psychological effect is recognized. Members who at some inconvenience have paid dues are inclined to feel that others who are equally able to pay have secured exemption, and it is to be feared that next y ~ar they will be slower to respond, in the anticipation that dues will again be remitted later in the season. However, if lists are ruthlessly shorn of all who have failed to meet financial requirements, a terrific loss will be sustained and but a small fraction of it will ever be recovered through reinstatement."

The Grand Master of South Dakota, speaking of the problems before the Grand Lodge, said: "Our dangers are from within, rather than from without. There has been some criticism of the law which requires suspension o~ members who


274

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

have not paid their dues by a certain time. This law may seem drastic, but upon careful study and the recollection of the difficulty of collecting dues in many cases where there is no question as to the financial ability of members to pay, it is perfectly evident, I am sure, that the law is as lenient as could safely be enacted. There is a business side to Masonry which must not be overlooked. Every lodge as well as this Grand Lodge has its financial obligations which must be met. If Our lodges and our Grand Lodge is to be protected in meeting their obligations, I am sure that less effective legislation would involve and imperil our whole financial structure. ' ,

The Grand Master of Texas finds this to be true, for he states in his address: , 'If the Grand Lodge dues were reduced in accordance with suggestions, its activities, charitable, educational, the Home, the care of elderly and helpless widows, and relief work would be so handicapped and their usefulness so severaly impaired that thousands of Masons would dimit because our Grand Lodge had no program."

Grand Master Millard, of Wisconsin, believes that the Grand Lodge should not exempt from annual dues, any time, greater than ten per cent of the total membership of any lodge. An examination of the auditor's reports proved to the Grand Master of Pennsylvania: , 'That some of the lodges were guilty of wholesale suspension of members delinquent in the payment of their dues. There had been a failure on the part of the lodges to take into consideration the human side of the problem and they had failed to interview the delinquent member. It was my most earnest desire to drive home and to insist upon that in each case there must be a personal interview with the delinquent member and a careful inquiry into his financial ability to pay and of his interest in Freemasonry. ' ,

Grand Master Nash, of Ohio, sent a circular letter of instruction to all Masters, following an edict in which he set forth the time fixed by the Grand Lodge for indefinitely suspending members who had not paid- dues. He authorized lodges to receive from indigent brethren applications or requests for extension of time in accordance with a prescribed form. The Grand Lodge of Victoria, Australia, shows a list of brethren "who have been excluded by the United Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons of Victoria for non-payment of dues, and are automatically excluded from their respective Craft lodges under the provisions of the book of Constitutions." Grand Master Adams, of Vermont, believes: , 'There should be no wholesale suspensions at the present time, rather the kind hand of charity should be extended to our needy. More harm can come to our institution by suspension of one member who has been a true and faithful Mason, but who, unfortunately, cannot pay at the present time,_ than by the failure to suspend some who might legitimately be proper subjects for suspension. It is better to err on the side of charity and brotherly love, and remit dues than to err on the other. No


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

275

man should be allowed to continue to be a Mason who has no regard for his Masonic obligations. These obligations contain the fulfilling of his financial responsibilities to his lodge." MASONIC BUILDINGS

The question of ground floor lodge rooms has been brought to the attention of many Grand Lodges. In Montana the Grand Master plainly stated he did not favor ground floor lodge rooms at any time, but finally gave his consent to a removal under the following circumstances: "That they follow the regulations laid down in 1914; that they have all windows sealed and boarded up and the walls and ceiling deadened with sound-proofing material so sound will not penetrate to the outside or the rooms above. There must be only one entrance and this through the Tyler's door."

The Grand Lodge of West Virginia, a few years ago, rejected a proposal requiring that the financial and building plans for proposed structures for Masonic use be subject to the approval of the Grand Lodge, but Grand Master Coffman says: , 'The present experiences of some of our lodges tend to prove the wisdom of some such proposal; and it may be well for the brethren to give further consideration to it before the next cycle of business and Masonic inflation. The Grand Lodge is without authority or means to come to the assistance of those building projects which have proven too great for the needs of the lodges and their ability to support. In a sense, however, the reputation of the whole fraternity is involved; and the most serious efforts should, therefore, be made by the lodges to refinance these undertakings in such manner as will preserve the good name of the Order, at whatever sacrifice demanded."

The District of Columbia has a white elephant know as "Temple Heights." This beautiful piece of property was purchased during the high tide of a few years ago. Substantial payments have been made from time to time, but its continued maintenance is one of the serious problems confronting the Grand Lodge. The Grand Lodge owes approximately $100,000.00 in interest and taxes, in addition to the $346,000.00 balance due on the property. The Grand Master said: , 'The Grand Lodge cannot continue indefinitely to advance funds to pay interest and taxes on this property, otherwise our treasury will soon be depleted. Something must be done, and that soon, to provide for thig and to take this property out of the debit column. We have a property on Temple Heights for which at one time one and a quarter million dollars in cash was offered and refused. While its market value is less today, yet our brethren in general have made large investments therein and it must be safeguarded until we can payoff the encumbrances and then build or sell or build on part and sell part. ' ,

Grand Master Mollenhauer, of New York, referring to temple projects, said:


276

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

, 'With the return of prosperity, plans for new temples will be inaugurated, and the danger will be over-eonfidenee on the part of the brethren of the lodges in question, and the erection of plants that require beyond the capacity of the lodges to pay for. It is of the utmost importance that Grand Lodge exercise some form of supervision over temple plans if it is to keep the projects within the resources of lodges. I recommend that we adopt such action as shall make it necessary for any lodge to secure authorization of the financing plans under which such temple is to be constructed, whether the plan embrace merely the real estate, or the building, or both. ' ,

The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, which owns a beautiful site on one of the leading boulevards of the city, is maintaining the site as vacant and keeping it in good condition. The committee in charge is of the opinion that economic conditions in general and finances of the Grand Lodge do not warrant consideration of plans looking to the erection of a new temple at the present time. Grand Master Nash, of Ohio, ruled that extraneous organizations might be permitted to occupy portions of the temple other than the lodge rooms. Under his decision, Masonic temples are divided into three parts-(l) That portion dedicated to Masonry; (2) that portion used for social and other activities; (3) that portion deemed strictly commercial. The Grand Lodge refused to open up its lodge rooms to the Order of DeMolay, because "similar requests would be made by numerous other organizations with Masonic affiliations equally entitled to the same privileges." The Grand Master of Tennessee visited some lodge halls in his jurisdiction: "Which were not fit for human oecupancy. Each such lodge was admonished that cleanliness is next to Godliness. It might be well to say that the worst conditions found by me existed in halls owned by the lodge. Since repairs are made at the expense of the lodge, with no available funds to meet the expenses, the halls were neglected and fast going to decay. I believe debt to be the greatest handicap to progress and realize that some lodges have been forced to surrender their charters and pass out of existence because, in their zeal and enthusiasm, they incurred debts which they could not pay. Faith in Masonry has induced people to part with their property or lend money to a lodge with which to buy property, only to discover later that their confidence had been misplaced, the property returned to them badly damaged and in need of repair, or their money gone, at least in part. An effort was made at the last session of the Legislature to impose a tax on all property owned by religious, educational and fraternal organizations which might be rented either in whole or part, and such a measure will, in my opinion, be eventually enacted into law. This would affect every subordinate lodge in the State that owns its building in whole. When such a measure is enacted into law, it will add another burden to sueh lodges as own the building in which the hall is located, and this they can ill afford. An asset of today may become a liability of tomorrow, and no lodge should incur a debt without certain revenue in sight to meet it. Those of us who, unfortunately, are real estate owners, have come to the sad realization that the more we own the poorer we are, and that it Ut cheaper to rent than to own."


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

277

Grand Master Manville, of Oklahoma, echoes these sentiments in his address: "Unless one has had experience in trying to sell Masonic Home bonds, he does not realize how greatly the reputation of Masonry has been impaired by the defaulting of Constituent Lodges, as well as the other organizations with Masonic connection. The good name of Masonry has suffered to such an extent that the present generation will have to pass away and a new record be established before Masonry will again stand before the world as an institution that pays its honest debts."

One of the largest building projects is that of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, which a few years ago erected a skyscraper. Receipts have dwindled from $241,000.00 to $177,000.00 per annum and the vacating of offices leased to the government have made the question of continuation of payments a serious one. MASONIO RELIEF

Lack of employment and the great army of unemployed have produced a situation in the United States such as has never been experienced before. Naturally a certain percentage of this group consists of members of the Masonic路 Fraternity and the proceedings of all Grand Lodges for the past two or three years have been filled with discussions as to how best to handle the situation. A committee on jurisprudence in Rhode Island expressed itself: , 'There is, we believe, a rather general misunderstanding as to the responsibility for Masonic relief. There appears to be an impression prevailing that there is a rather definite obligation on the part of Grand Lodge and on the part of subordinate lodges to assume full responsibility in all cases where members of the fraternity, or their families, are in need, and the funds which have been accumulated with considerable effort by subordinate lodges and the Grand Lodge are looked upon as insurance and pension funds upon which claimants have a right to make requisition because of their present or past membership, or because of the membership of a relative. In order to reach a proper understanding of the matter it must first of all be borne in mind that the only responsibility. resting upon the fraternity is a personal on~the personal responsibility of every member of the fraternity to contribute to the relief of a distressed brother, so far as he could do so without affecting his own welfare or that of those who are depending upon him. That obligation, of course, is a positive one in so far as it concerns those who are associated with him in this particular lodge. Many lodges have anticipated this demand and have with foresight accumulated over a period of years substantial relief funds. In many cases, however, lodges have made no provision and in some cases have felt that even annual dues were unnecessary. It is not strange, therefore, that in a period such as we are now experieneing these lodges find it most difficult to meet the demands that are made upon them for relief."

The Grand Lodge of Colorado has a benevolent fund and Grand Master Luxford tells us: , 'During the life of this fund, the entire cost of operation has been so low that I feel justified in saying it amounts to nothing. Thus every dol-


278

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

lar earned by the benevolent fund has been available for the use of the needy. The services rendered have been gratuitous and the work has been a labor of love for all connected with the fund. From the humble beginning in 1901, the fund has grown to $251,296.76 at the present time. It is now caring for eighty-seven of our needy and is expending $13,922.50 for this purpose during the present year. No one who is entitled to the bounty of this Grand Lodge; no needy brother, or his wife, or his widow, or his orphan has been denied. All have been taken care of according to their needs."

The Nebraska committee on relief expresses the same opinion as Rhode Island: , 'The practice of expecting and requiring local lodges to assume a substantial portion of the relief of their cases seems, where possible, so obviously just that it has come to be regarded as fundamental. During the past year, however, it has become manifest that by reason of some misfortune to their funds, or through a depleted state of their treasuries, or for other reasons beyond their control, some of our lodges have been seriously hampered in their functioning, and have found themselves unable to discharge their duties in matters of relief. This committee recognizes its individual, solemn, responsibilities first to help, aid, and assist all poor, distressed Brother Masons when worthy; and second, as the very existence and prosperity of this Grand Lodge depends upon the sound condition of its subordinate bodies, we deem it imperative to preserve the integrity and stability of the local lodges; and while not willing to establish any undesirable precedents, or inviting or countenancing any evasion of duty, deem it justifiable, and even commendable, where circumstances demand, to assume the relief of their cases single-handed and alone."

Grand Master Moyer, of Florida, told his Grand Lodge: , 'No fraternal organization grows strong except by practicing its principles. Relief, as a Brother might render it, is one of the tenets of our organization-possibly its strongest, and when you transfer it to its Grand Body, relieving yourself of the responsibility as a Brother, it becomes charity. Convinced that much of our ills in this Grand Jurisdiction can be laid to this shirking of responsibility, this weakening of principle, yet realizing also that some lodges cannot fully carry the relief needed; realizing, too, that we cannot continue to function on our assessments with a decreased membership, I recommend that a new regulation be presented, requiring that lodges participate to the extent of twenty-five per cent, not only in Emergency Relief but also in the cost of those admitted to the Home, the regulation not to be retroactive, and excepting such relief to full orphans."

A committee from the Grand Lodge of Alberta reports an interesting case of an elderly widow who had been assisted by the Board for many years. Two years ago the chairman of the committee discovered that shortly before she had suffered from a broken wrist, which permanently prevented her from augmenting her grant by the occasional sewing she had been doing. Uncomplaining and without looking for more aid, she took in another elderly lady as a boarder and a few months ago wrote the Board, stating: "As the cost of food has gone down and as there is so much hardship in the land, I am sure that there are others who need help" and she requested that her al-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

279

lowance of $15.00 per month be reduced to $10.00, as her contribution in the present prevailing conditions. Grand Secretary Stockwell, of North Dakota, discusses the relief problem and finds that, It We frequentl~' :find no little misunderstanding about whose is the obligation to extend relief. The responsibility is personal in the :first place, then because of modern conditions it is now commonly passed on to the lodge with the Grand Lodge coming to their support when necessary. In spite of repeated suggestions from the trustees and warnings and resolutions in Grand Lodge, most of our lodges have made no adequate provision for relief in time of prosperity and now :find themselves practically helpless. Immediately the appeal goes to the Grand Lodge Relief Fund and many times with the assumption on the part of those who make it, that the Grand Lodge is responsible and must of course meet tpe demand. Well, in spite of some provisions wisely made in the past, it simply can't be done. Now this brings us to the point which is all-important. (1) There is much need for Masonic relief but it must not be assumed that the entire burden falls upon Masons or Masonic lodges or the Grand Lodge. (2) All relief must be given after careful investigation and in such a way as not to pauperize individuals. The best kind of relief is self-help. (3) The number of aged and in:firm Masons and their dependents is rapidly increasing. While we must understand the need we must also understand that the need cannot be met without adequate preparation. In the end it is a hard matter of fact problem of money and just now the problem is all but impossible because we are all pretty effectually deflated. ' ,

In Virginia, the Grand Master tells us that while demands on the Grand Charity Fund have been enormous, no worthy case has been neglected. He adds: , 'The splendid work of these agencies in taking care of aged Masons and widows in their home surroundings is sufficient evidence that we are not in need of any Old Folks Home at present. A careful study of this work in other jurisdictions has proved conclusively that the care of needy members and dependents in their home environment is not only more economical but more practical than to support and maintain an Old Folks Home. There are very few, if any, aged Masons in Virginia who would prefer going to a home路 rather than be eared for among their old friends and associates. Some statistics regarding Old Folks' Insurance given out by the Federal Government claim that four persons can be taken care of in their homes for the same amount necessary to care for one in an institution. ' ,

He offered the -following as a recommendation: , 'A lodge without sufficient funds for benevolence is missing the greatest enjoyment Masonry has to offer, and has no excuse for its existence. Besides it is these lodges charging insufficient dues that are absorbing most of the Charity Fund of the Grand Lodge without any attempt to help themselves. ' ,

The Masonic Relief Foundation, following up the. recommendation of the Grand Master, secured authority for the selling of parcels of land and farms belonging to the Foundation, and the funds were turned over to an endowment fund, the interest from which is to be


280

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

used as provided in the charter. One of the District Deputies in that jurisdiction offered a valuable suggestion: "In my humble opinion no lodge can keep its members active or continue to thrive for any length of time as long as its main activities are just meeting once a month, listening to appeals for subscriptions to this and contributions to that, and sending the Grand Lodge per capita. We must do local charitable work, every member should feel free to bring before the lodge any case of want in its jurisdiction, and the lodge should certainly be in position to assist the members themselves to survive such a crisis as we now face."

Unemployment conditions were investigated by the lodges of Cook County, in which Chicago is located, and of 44,739 Masons interviewed personally, 20,219 were employed; 10,776 were unemployed; 988 part time employed; 1,080 employers and 614 willing to employ. The Grand Lodge of Oregon expended during the year $69,820.85 in charity, of which $46,886.82 was for operation of the Home and outside maintenance. New Mexico has an unusual relief situation to meet because of the large number of tuberculosis cases which gravitate to that section. We find that, 'Masonic relief is now handled by the Grand Master, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer, the policy of past years-matching amounts allowed by constituent lodges, has been followed. This phase of the work has been a source of discomfort and concern. Not all lodges are able to care for half of the relief necessary-other lodges are more liberal than the Grand Lodge can afford to be. Just what amount should be fixed as a standard is hard to determine, but your attention is called to cases that appear to be identical and relief amounts vary from $7.50 to $45.00 per month, you will agree, I think, that a more equitable distribution must be made. There is apparently a growing feeling that Masonic relief is wholly an obligation of the Grand Lodge. I am convinced that this phase of work should be given careful study and if possible a basic figure agreed upon."

The committee on Masonic relief approved the suggestion of the Grand Master, and added: , 'A Masonic practice of long standing universally agreed upon that Masonic relief starts within the membership of the lodge, then to the lodge funds, and finally to the Grand Lodge. Too many of the lodges are overlooking this established procedure and applying directly to the Grand Lodge Masonic Relief Committee for funds for indigent members."

In South Dakota we find: , 'Calls from our brethren for relief and assistance are becoming more and more persistent and urgent. Many lodges have been caught in bank failures and are faced with embarrassing financial situations. Along with their changing and decreased incomes have come increased calls for assistance from their membership and their lodge funds. The lodges not being able to cope with the situation have made constant and repeated pleas to the Grand Lodge for relief from our Grand Charity Fund. For many years the relief work of our Grand Lodge has been carried on from


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

281

our temporary Grand Charity Fund. Being now faced with increased demands and dee-reased earnings from our investments we are now faeed with the task of providing adequate funds to satisfactorily answer the demands. Masonry in its inception had for its fundamental principle a personal responsibility. But as time went on our membership has drifted from this pl'inciple and has taken the modern way of 'letting George do it. ' We must return to this fundamental principle and again recognize our own individual responsibility."

Idaho has orphan funds to the amount of $172,920.00. All of its securities are thought to be in good condition with the exception of some South American bonds, which are in default as to interest. Past Grand Master Fly, of Texas, finds a growing disposition among the fraternity to view Masonry as an insurance concern and and that in the minds of some petitioners their policies are bought and paid for by way of initiation fees, and all premiums are flilly met in the payment of annual dues. Such become claimants, demanding as of right the relieving of his every need, both real and imaginary. He sums it up as follows: , 'When charity becomes a demand, selfishness becomes enthroned. When individual responsibility becomes transferable, the spirit of helpfulness and relief dies. Without either or both, Masonry is no longer itself. When other than itself, Masonry becomes as but another order without chart or compass. Charity is of the individual heart, and as has been aptly said: 'Freemasonry symbolizes the qUef!t of the soul after truth. ' No greater truth can be aequired by a Mason than to know that, 'We are our brother's keeper. ' No such virtue can long exist without personal contact and individual exercise and experience."

Grand Master Millard, of Wisconsin, agrees with other jurisdictions in that: , 'Masonic charity rests primarily with the individual, secondarily with the subordinate lodge, and lastly with the Grand Lodge. That the subordinate lodges may be brought to a full realization of their ref!ponsibility in this respect it is mandatory that they be given every possible aid consistent with sound business practices in their efforts to rehabilitate themselves. If ways and means for consummating these plans are approved it will mean that the charity work of the Grand Lodge will eventually become largely curtailed, and the burden of relief will then necessarily revert to the individUal Mason and the subordinate lodge. ' '.

Wisconsin handles outside relief through a special committee, and finds: " That many applications for admission to the Home fall more properly within the head of outside relief. The fact that the same committee handles both applications has enabled it to substitute outdoor relief for admission to the Home in many instances. Had it not been for this fact our Home would now be filled to capacity with a considerable waiting list. "

The Grand Charity securities of the Grand Lodge of Iowa were held in trust by a Trust Company which went into the hands of a receiver. The receiver claimed that the securities belonged to the Grand


282

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Lodge, the Grand Lodge had only a preferred claim for the amount of securities on deposit and entitled only to a pro rata share. Past Grand Master Block, well-known Iowa lawyer, took the matter in charge, with the result that all securities and funds were turned over to the trustees of the Grand Charity Fund without loss. Grand Master Nash, of Ohio, proposed to his Grand Lodge the establishment of a Grand Charity Fund. The Minnesota relief funds were exhausted and lodges were instructed to bear in mind: , 'The primary duty is within the individual lodge to render help, aid and assistance to its members when necessary, and that applications should not be made to the Grand Lodge therefor, except where the lodge and its members have rendered the same to the full extent of their ability so to do."

Connecticut as an emergency measure is collecting from their initiates and affiliates the sum of $20.00, to be paid to the Masonic Charity Foundation. A Nebraska committee said: "The practice of expecting and requiring local lodges to assume a substantial portion of the relief of their cases seems, where possible, so obviously just that it has come to be regarded as fundamental and your committee feels that only in exceptional cases should any change be made from this practice. This committee is here only to assist and supplement the work of the local lodge. ' ,

Following this report, the Master of one of the Nebraska lodges arose and said: "Every lodge in the State of Nebraska, if they have not done it, should take a small part of their dues that are collected and put this aside for the relief fund, where it cannot be used for any other thing. In going over these returns we find that the lodges that are in trouble are the ones whose dues are below $5.00. Every lodge should create a relief fund and put it away where it will not be taken for general expenses, setting aside an amount, if only 50 cents per member per year. If your lodge is asked for a little relief to help a brother, or his family, do not put it up to the relief committee and expect the Grand Lodge to put up 50 cents and match dollars with you until your relief is given."

Virginia has a relief foundation of $267,454.00, collected from 12,500 Virginia Masons. During the past two years it has contributed $10,000.00 for relief purposes. The Grand Lodge of Quebec refused to entertain a resolution appropriating funds for reading room and recreational facilities for unemployed brethren, believing that such money should be used solely for the purpose of relief. MASONIC' HOME

The unusual demands made for Masonic relief have resulted in an unusual number of applications for entrance to Masonic Homes.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF路 MISSOURI

283

Many jurisdictions do not operate homes and these problems are handled through outside relief. The Home problem is one which comes in for both censure and praise. Let us pass hurriedly through the various proceedings and discover the problems which confront the Homes in each of the jurisdictions. Colorado has been discussing the erection of a Home and a proposed resolution would have set aside a certain amount of the annual dues for the building of a home. Grand Master Luxford, in discussing the problem, stated that it was a question of the future policy to be followed by the Grand Lodge and was worthy of the most serious thought and consideration; the step once taken was irrevocable.路 He said: , , This is a wide departure from the mode that was long ago adopted and has since prevailed in this Grand Lodge in the handling of its funds for charitable purposes. The proposed change is such a radical one that I have been compelled to give it not only my personal, serious consideration, but also to obtain the views of the membership of the various lodges. I have found general satisfaction with the present mode of handling our benevolent funds; it has been in operation now for thirty-two years and, so far, it has been handled at an overhead that is simply infinitesimal, so that practically every dollar available has been given to the beneficiaries themselves. A Masonic Home--a building-is of course visible, physical and outstanding. You can see it, but granted that the erection of a Masonic Home is desirable, I do not believe it is possible to erect one for the amount that could be diverted from our general fund. I feel it my duty to recommend that both the resolution to appropriate and the amendment to divert be not adopted."

The trustees of the benevolent fund endorsed the Grand Master's opinion and called attention to the fact that, 'Persual of reports of charitable organizations demonstrated that a large per cent of every dollar goes to paying operating expenses, coal, light, water, wages and salaries, and that only a very small per cent is used for providing a home and board for the aged and indigent. Imagine an elderly Mason, or his wife, or his widow, who have been honored and respected in the community in which they lived, who have probably been a power in that community and whose activities have brought them name, honor and respect, and then when misfortune comes upon them and they are transported into an institution, whose rules and regulations in the interest of discipline deprives them of their individuality and happiness; where they must rise at a certain hour, attend chapel at a certain hour, and eat at a certain hour and remain in idleness between times, where there are no familiar faces and no friends with whom they can talk #of olden days and old happiness-they will waste and wane, become broken in spirit and deprived of happiness; the contributors and donors of the fund will also be deprived of their own happiness in feeling that they have perhaps not done as good work as had the purposes of the fund for which it was created been carried out as intended. ' ,

The committee found that thirty-six jurisdictions maintain Homes or Institutions; that the average per capita cost of maintenance was $403.00, and the annual assessment per member ranging from 50c to $4.00.


284

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

The Masonic Home of Delaware congratulated itself upon being able to reduce the per capita assessment from $2.00 to $1.00. In Florida the average membership of the Home was 150, and the cost of maintenance $270.03 per person. The Masonic Home of Michigan is confronted with a serious condition. They have an unpaid indebtedness of $130,000.00; the interest on the debt amounts to $21.37 per day. The finance committee authorized the Board of Directors to mortgage the Alma Masonic Home for an amount not exceeding $130,000.00. Qualifications for admission to the Home and for outside relief have been made more rigid; preference is given to residents of Michigan. Lack of funds caused suspension of all admissions in August, 1932; outside relief has been limited to $30.00 per person per month; 150 guests are maintained at an expense of $436.80 per guest. By resolution of the Grand Lodge, the number of residents of the Home were limited to 125 for the current fiscal year. The Grand Master of Massachusetts removed from office the Master and Senior Warden of a lodge because they had, 'Presumed to conduct what they were pleased to call an 'investigation' of the Masonic Home. Clearly, no particular lodge has any right to investigate upon its own motion and authority any department of the Grand Lodge activities. They had no more right to investigate the Home than they would have to investigate the Grand Master. If any such investigation should ever be conducted, it would necessarily be done by order of the Grand Lodge and by a properly authorized commission. In the course of this so-called investigation, they interviewed discharged employees, disappointed applicants for employment, and a few of the residents who were more or less dissatisfied, as old and infirm people are liable to be, with conditions, happenings, or requirements at the Home. In this way they collected a considerable amount of gossip. There was nothing in it which had not been known to and investigated by more than one Grand Master."

In 1930 the Grand Lodge of North Dakota decided to create a Masonic Home Fund by the collection of 50 cents per capita. A resolution proposed the waiving of future collections and the distribution of the income from the investments into Grand Lodge relief funds. The Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, finding the Grand Lodge and Masonic Home drifting apart, adopted a resolution reading: "Your committee, appointed to suggest a means whereby a closer relationship between the Grand Lodge and the Masonic Home might be attained, beg leave to submit the following report: " 'Having made a study of the method in government of the Masonic Home in five of the Grand Jurisdictions most nearly approaching the size of our own, we suggest, that: At the next meeting of the Masonic Corporation a petition from this Grand Lodge be presented, asking that they shall seek a revision of their charter or constitution and by-laws, whereby the Most Worshipful Grand Master shall be an ex-officio member of the board of trustees of our Masonic Home.' "

In Virginia, the Masonic Home Board received $1,000.00, turned over to it by the Grand Master for vocational training. A committee


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

285

of Past Grand Masters, called the attention of the Grand Lodge to their action in 1932 in which they declined to establish a manual training department because of expense, and significantly added: , 'We considered the action of the Grand Lodge was :final and that this fund should not have been so appropriated."

The trustees of the Masonic Home in Washington reported assisting , 'Ten married couples, seventy-six brothers and forty-five sisters outside the Home, at the expense of $2,058.50 per month. 'J;he number assisted outside the Home will probably be increased as our Home is now full and vacancies for admission can only be had by withdrawals or deaths."

Their committee on finance satisfied itself that no further economies could be made in the operation of the Home. The Board had asked for $90,000.00 for next year's budget; the committee recommended $80,000.00, which included outside relief, taxes, insurance, and other expense. A further recommendation was: "That from and after July 1, 1933, each lodge with a membership of 150 or more pay into the Masonic Home Fund, the sum of $5.00 per month for each new guest recommend by it and accepted by the Board, and each lodge with a membership of less than 150 pay into the Fund at the rate of 25 cents per capita per annum."

Grand Master Millard, of Wisconsin, took exception to the attitude of the Wisconsin Home because the property had been carried in the assets of the Grand Lodge at its original cost and no provision路 made for depreciation. He recommended: , 'That a smaller Home Board and one directly connected in some manner with the Grand Lodge will assist materially toward solving our troubles regarding the Home."

A special committee on proposed corporation to hold title to the Home property is to investigate and report next year. It summarized its data and found that of the thirty-two jurisdictions title to the Home property was held by the Grand Lodge in fifteen, and by separate corporations in seventeen; in all but two, in which title was held by separate corporation, control was held and exercised by the Grand Lodge. It said: "The only sure way to secure the desired. result is by the formation of a corporation, organized for charitable purposes only, to hold title to all property used for the Home and with authority to operate and manage the Home and accept gifts and bequests for its benefit."

This insures the use of the entire amount of the bequest for the Home without a reduction because of tax payment. Wisconsin has its interior Home troubles, as witness the following: "Previous to the new administration there was among the guests a small minority of the opinion that they could manage the Home better than it was being directed. However, regardless of how efficient the man-


286

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

agement might be, there will always be a few who, because of unrest, discontent and ingratitude, will fall into line with this trend of thought. To deal successfully with these human frailties requires a great measure of understanding and patience. The newly appointed matron, Mrs. Walker, has helped to bring about a much improved condition, as is apparent by the manifestation of closer and more congenial harmony among the guests. "

A committee was appointed to fully investigate the criticisms directed against the former Superintendent, he claiming that the Board had refused to accord him the right of appearance before it. The proceedings record that much material concerning the Home has been deleted. New York, which operates one of the most magnificent Masonic Homes, is faced with another deficit which is expected to exceed incoming contributions by approximately $130,000.00. It is almost impossible to borrow money against their assets, which are represented only by Home properties, valueless in the mortgage appraisal. The property is exempt from taxation, but the Grand Lodge anticipates tax exemption may some day be rescinded. The question of taxation is mentioned by the jurisprudence committee: , 'Another danger threatens us, it looms so big that we whisper and wear our rubbers when we talk about it. It increases the importance of having available funds. The policy of this State, presently, is to remove tax exemptions from property. In the past our argument in favor of our exemption was considered valid. The total net revenues of this building going to support our indigent brothers, their widows and orphans, to that extent we relieved the State of the expense of their support and, in return, our Hall and Home were exempted from taxation. Sentiment seems to be growing in favor of taxing charitable institutions such as we are. There is grave danger that this is coming, and if it comes this present year, we will be without funds to pay the tax. If we are taxed on our New York property the probabilities are that our Utica property will be taxed also. We must be prepared to meet this situation. We must not figure too closely. There must be come leeway. We must have the authority to borrow, if to borrow becomes necessary."

One of the finest Masonic Homes we have ever visited is the one at Elizabethtown, Pa. The Home Committee, in reporting, says: "During the more than twenty-three years of the existence of the Home, there has not been the death of a minor."

We also learn from their report: "Specialists in welfare work today are unanimous in their opinion that the best place for the child to grow up is the child's home if it is possible to conserve it, and if it is surrounded with such measures of physical and moral safeguards as not to endanger the child's future. When there is a mother therefore suitable to care for her child the principle of mothers' aid is more and more becoming the practice of your committee. In this way during the past year 211 children have been given assistance in their homes."


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

287

The capacity of the Pennsylvania Homes has been reached and until additional income is received the number of applicants to be admitted will be dependent upon the number of deaths and withdrawals. Reviewer Allen, of North Carolina, commenting on the decision of Colorado not to sponsor a Masonic Home, said: "As we see it, they were partly right. Three-fourths of the Masonic Home cases would better be supported in private homes. The trouble is the other-and impossible--one-fourth. These are of old people who can get no private home treatment and support; of children from vicious circumstances whose home life is the thing to get away from (and there are some even among Masons like this). The ideal is the combination of mother's aid, home support of the aged, and institutional care."

Trustees of the Masonic Home of California believe that"Lodges shirk responsibilities to their aged members and attempt to throw the care of such members onto the entire fraternity-that is onto the Homes. In 1925 we stated that we were embarrassed at times by being compelled to deny applications, then citing an instance of a brother and his wife who had been denied admission to the Home on the ground that the applicant had received his Masonic degrees only two years prior to application, at the age of seventy-two, and had been suffering from a severe heart ailment for seven years before he became a Mason. We took the view that the responsibility for the care of this distressed member and his wife belonged not to the entire fraternity, but solely to the lodge, and denied his application. Cases continue to be brought before us. Three months ago four applicants were denied admission, all being doubtless worthy men. One was made a Mason at the age of sixty-eight, owned no property at the time of his admission and carried no life insurance; the second carried $5,500.00 life insurance and was in receipt of State aid in the sum of $30.00 per month; he lived with a daughter and "had a tendency to complain regardless of what is done for him"; the third was a man of fifty-five, married to a capable woman, nothing the matter with him physically, but who had been out of employment for a considerable time. It is obvious that the Homes cannot admit those whose only distress is that of temporary lack of gainful employment. The care of this member is properly the problem of the lodge and the community in which he lives; the fourth case was a member received by dimit from another jurisdiction in July, 1929, at the age of sixty-nine. At the time of his election to membership he was holding a political job at a salary of $100.00, without any other resources."

The Superintendent of the Covina Home told the Grand Lodge: , 'The relationship of the children in the Home to the fraternity which is maintaining them is both interesting and important. We do not refer to the children as either' guests' or as 'inmates,' but rather as 'members' of the Home. They know that they are here as the wards of California's 140,000 Masons. They are entitled to a feeling of security and of being the objects of solicitude. Yet they must not be spoiled. They must not get the idea, 'The Masons are going to take care of us till we're 18,' or as has happened in some instances, 'The Masons have got to take care of us. ' As they reach the later years of their membership in the Home it is important that their thinking on their relationship to the Masons shall be reasonable and just. The help given them is a charity, and not the result of an insurance contract. They must know this and yet their self-respect must not be destroyed.


288

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

, 'Our instruction to them is that the Masons have voluntarily undertaken their care, have assumed a parental relationship to them with its attendant expense, for the satisfaction of seelng them become worthy men and women and good citizens. The relationship between themselves and the Masons, we tell them, is not one-sided but reciprocal. They as well as the Masons have a part to do; their part is to make the best possible use of their opportunities and not to make unnecessary demands upon those who are maintaining them. If they do this, when their time comes to depart they can leave us with no sense of diminished self-respect by reason of the fact that their rearing was in a Masonic rather than in a natural home."

California has a $25.00 Home fee which is charged against brethren who affiliate in that jurisdiction. The committee feels that this fee deters many Masons from affiliating in California, and "whether or not this is an unmixed evil is largely a matter of opinion. It may be that the Home fee is a protection against affiliates who might become burdens to our lodges." Ohio has a requirement that a Master Mason must have been a member of an Ohio body for two years prior to the date of application for admission to the Home. Applications are only considered at quarterly sessions of the Board. The Superintendent is required to personally visit each applicant before presenting his application to the Board. A few years ago Kentucky placed a $20.00 assessment against every member for the benefit of the Home. The result was 32,467 suspensions for non-payment of dues and assessments, 44 per cent of the total membership of the fraternity in the State. The Grand Master said: "From the information I have been able. to gather, I believe that where one brother was suspended for non-payment of the assessment, who was able to pay it; there were nineteen brethren suspended who were unable to pay it. Shall we continue to penalize nineteen worthy brethren, for nonpayment of this assessment, in order to administer justiee to one unworthy brother for the same cause' I believe the time has arrived for the assessment to cease. I recommend that the assessment be annulled."

Kentucky is very proud of the record of one of its wards. Charles Moore, son of a Past Master of one of its lodges, who, following his Masonic Home training, was graduated from the Louisville high school, matriculated at Yale University, received his Bachelor's, Master's and Doctor of Philosophy aegrees, and is now a full-fledged Professor at Yale University. The committee on Home reported that the per capita cost of upkeep had been decreased to $243.00, a saving of $42.94 over last year. A Past Grand Master in West Virginia expressed himself before the Grand Lodge in respect to the laws of the State of West Virginia which concern the operation of a Masonic Home. HebeJ.ieved that a careful examination should be made of the laws, rules and regulations of the Home, especially with respect to the status of property and property rights. Under a statute of West Virginia the Grand


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

289

Lodge may own and conduct a Masonic Home and the management may be placed in a Board of Directors, subject to being sued and the right to sue. One of the members of the Board resigned because he was the only resident of the county in which the Home was located, "and under the possible chaotic condition if an)1body got sued, he would have to be sued and have to stand the blame for it." The Masonic Home at La Grange, Ill., was struck by a tornado in July, 1933. The seventy-foot brick chimney was completely destroyed and the electric light and power put out of commission; the tile roof of the main building was almost a complete loss; beds of many children were showered with broken glass, but not a child or employee was injured. The property was fully insured against loss by windstorm. Almost $1,000.00 worth of farm produce was raised by members of the Oregon Masonic Home family. "In addition to providing absolutely fresh provender, it afforded interesting occupation for members of the Home family who were physically able to participate. It also added much to the orderly appearance of the grounds."

Reviewer Wright tells his Grand Lodge: , 'It is still firmly believed that a Masonic dollar is not receiving its full value in relief work. The "table of twenty-three states gives statistics wherein the figures indicate a terrible loss for maintenance alone. Some day emotion will be unhorsed by the liberal art logic. Horse sense will seize its place and put Masonic Relief on a stable and efficient foundation -sadly lacking today."

He quoted Reuben Perry, of New Mexico, who said: "The one possible object of a Home would be to centralize control of Grand Lodge charity to a certain extent, also to dramatize the idea and would afford Masons something to point to with pride. "

Maryland has just entered the field of those jurisdictions establishing Masonic Homes. The Grand Master announced to the Grand Lodge the donation of Brother Arthur Wallenhorst, who made a donation of $50,000.00 to the Home for the express purpose of having it open and operating at the very earliest possible date. The Grand Matron of South Dakota Eastern Star, before the Grand Lodge of that State, announced that the City of Redfield had offered the college buildings and an eight acre tract of land for an Eastern Star Home and that the organization was ready to accept it when the city turned it over. The Grand Master of Georgia was asked to become the legal guardian of two children in another State, by order of a court. The Grand Master declined to become such a guardian or to permit any officer or agent of the Grand Lodge to be appointed. He stated that the Home would receive the children only with the assurance that no legal contract was made and the Grand Lodge would merely assume the care


290

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

of the children until such time as the guardian named by the court took them back. He declined to have any officer act as guardian or bondsman, adding: , 'The Grand Lodge is not endorsing the bonds of any individual or either directly or indirectly assuming any financial obligations in the cases of guardianships. The sole function of the Home is to care for the children by having them voluntarily surrendered by the lodge or family into its keeping, and the children can be returned to the lodge or family for the asking. Beyond that, the responsibility. of the Grand Lodge ceases."

We cannot too highly .commend this statement from the report of Grand Master Hugston, of Texas: "It is respectfully recommended that a committee of not less than nine, distributed over the State for the sake of efficiency, be appointed for the purpose of assisting the management of the Masonic Home and School to secure positions for those who have graduated so that at the conclusion of their school career, they may not be set adrift without some position, otherwise the benefit from high school education might be either partially or totally lost. ' ,

The Masonic Home Board of Connecticut notes: , 'Of the 93 adult members admitted, 38 were Masons or dependents of Masons who received their degrees prior to 1900, and 55 were Masons or dependents of Masons who joined the fraternity since 1900, being the first time that a larger proportion of new members did not come from the so-called veteran class. The trend is significant and of great importanee to the fraternity in Connecticut and elsewhere. During the four years of depression, 403 new members have been admitted and our net gain in membership has been 79."

Grand Master Manville, of Oklahoma, found some agitation against the rules of the Board, especially when it required a petitioner to pay dues for three years before his children were eligible to admission. He told the Grand Lodge: , 'The facts are that there is no law anywhere requiring the local lodge or the Grand Lodge to care for the needy. This duty rests squarely on each individual by reason of his obligation. As a matter of economy and efficiency Masonic charity was disbursed by the local lodges for many years until it became apparent that by working through the Grand Lodge better service could be rendered for less money. For example, the rules require that an adult must be sixty-five years old before being admitted, yet it is evident that a man may become helpless at forty-five and need assistance. Since the Grand Lodge could not care for all the unfortunates, as the revenues are wholly inadequate for such a program, it restricted admissions to those of advanced years who would most need hospitalization and extra care. The duty to care for those not admissible to the homes is right where it originated, that is, on the individual Mason. Many Masons of means recognize this and make their personal contributions. Most of us, however, look to our local lodge to handle the work because it makes for economy and efficiency. The same principle holds with reference to children. There are no facilities to care for the baby and the boy or girl of fourteen years is more than likely to prove a disorganizing element, disastrous to the Home. For these reasons, the rules forbid their admission.


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

291

Brethren, if you will furnish the money, you will find that the Board will accept the responsibility, if the Grand Lodge changes the rules."

He grew highly indignant at the attitude of another Masonic body in that jurisdiction who refused to sell $15,000.00 in government bonds and invest them in bonds of the Masonic Home. The Grand Master of Alabama, apparently without authority, 'Invited the Advisory Board of the O. E. S. to assume the position of members of the Board of Control, with power to vote, to deliber:;l.te over all questions of the Board, to become part of sub-committees, to become familiar with the finance of the Home, to make mo,tions, offer resolutions and function as members, but maintaining at all times that the Grand Master's opinions and conclusions were supreme in all matters that related to the Craft. ' ,

The status of the Eastern Star was discussed in Oklahoma. Grand Master Manville stating: "Under the rule prevailing, the representative of the O. E. S. was voting upon the expenditure of funds of the Grand Lodge appropriated for the Board of Control, although the members of this Grand Lodge on the Board of Control had no voice whatever in the expenditure of the money contributed by the Eastern Star. I have found that the law did not con~mplate that the representative of the O. E. S. should be a voting member of the Board and I therefore issued an edict."

The Masonic Home Board expressed its belief that the O. E. S. would render a distinct service in the program of economy if they would make an appropriation of a fixed amount instead of for certain items that might appeal to them as an organization. The committee appeared before the O. E. S. finance committee and urged a change in policy. Their petition was rejected unanimously and did not even come before the Grand Chapter. LIQUOR PROBLEM

Missouri is not the only jurisdiction which is dealing with the liquor problem. It was felt to be of such moment that the Masonic Service Association of the United States prepared a digest of the various laws in all the jurisdictions in the United States. In the meantime the proceedings are filled with edicts of Grand Masters, report of jurisprudence committees and official Grand Lodge action. A proposed amendment in Colorado set forth that Masonic interdiction respecting the liquor traffic should not apply to transactions subsequent to April 6, 1933, involving only liquor whose alcoholic content exceeded 3.2 by weight, was withdrawn by the proposer and the law remained unchanged. . Grand Master Allmond, of Delaware, after discussing Communism and Hitlerism, said: , 'It should be unnecessary to reni.ind the brethren of two other Masonic teachings, but a situation is fast approaching to which I feel reference


292

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

should be made. It is quite probable that within a short time the Eighteenth Amendment will be repealed. It is not my intention to go into the merits of this highly controversial question. I simply wish to fraternally admonish the brethren that our teachings of Prudence and Temperance have not, and never shall be repealed. Likewise I wish to call to their attention the fact that our code, which sets forth the ruling of the Grand Lodge on this matter, is still standing as part of our law."

Grand Master Anderson, of Michigan, , 'Refused to allow the sale of 3.2 beer in a restaurant operated by a tenant of a Masonic building. The repeal by Congress of the Volstead Act and the probable ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment to the Constitution of the United States will naturally present a new problem to succeeding Grand Masters, unless definitely settled at this communication of Grand Lodge. I, therefore, recommend the adoption of the following decision: " 'The sale of 3.2 beer, or any beverage with alcoholic content exceed: ing one-half of one per cent, shall not be permitted in a Masonic temple nor in any building occupied wholly, or in part, by a Masonic lodge.' "

Grand Master Robinson, of North Dakota, referred to the question as a difficult problem: , , As a result of the act of the recent Congress we are face to face with a problem which during the entire life time of this Grand Lodge has not existed; namely, the legalized sale of intoxicating liquor as a beverage. The fact that Congress says that a certain amount of alcohol is not intoxicating does not make it so. We do not recognize that any issue is before us for decision, yet the activities of some members of the Masonic fraternity' in endeavoring to bring about the legal sale of 3.2 beer makes certain that the Grand Lodge must take notice of the situation which is very apt soon to confront us. We feel that Freemasonry cannot change its position of unalterable opposition to its membership engaging in the sale of liquor. We cannot compromise with evil. Masonry must stay out of the liquor business."

Grand Master Parker, of Nevada, finds a certain laxness creeping into the organization with its tendency toward disregard to law and "high standards. At the beginning of his administration, he warned against acts of intemperance which would bring discredit to the reputation and teachings of the fraternity. We find: , 'I had hoped that this warning would be sufficient to correct what lit路 tle trouble we were having. However, it became necessary upon receiving information as to the conduct of a brother to take action in this matter. I instructed the Worshipful Master of the lodge in which this brother held membership to have him brought before a committee, an investigation made, and charges filed for un-Masonic conduct. After consultation with the Master and committee, it was deemed best to take the following action, for which your Grand Master assumes all responsibility. These charges were to be held in abeyance, pending the future conduct of this brother."

Grand Master Forbes, of Wyoming, had the following situation presented for decision: A member of a lodge, manager of a store doing a general merchandising business, contemplated taking out a license for the sale of beer. Sev-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

293

eral clerks in the store were members of the fraternity. The Grand Master was assured that the Congress of the United States had defined this beer as being non-intoxicating, but the members of the fraternity wanted to know what the interpretation of the Grand Master might be. The Grand Master referred to the law, and added: , 'I have no authority to decide whether beer as legalized by Congress is intoxicating or not."

He refused to permit beer to be taken into lodge rooms to be served with lunches. His acts were approved. In Washington, Grand Master Roberts said: "In view of the fact that the Congress of the United States had by legislation declared that 3.2 per cent beer is non-intoxicating, and having no evidence to the contrary, I ruled that beer which complies with that legislation is non-intoxicating and therefore it is not a Masonic offense under the provisions of Section 2905, Washington Masonic Code, to engage in the handling, or to enter into the business of manufacturing or selling of such non-intoxicating liquor as a beverage."

Montana handled the question under the head of "A perplexing question." A committee summarized its ~onsideration of the question in the following recommendations: " That no action be taken at this session of the Grand Lodge relative to Masons who are engaged in the so-called 'legal beer or wine' business for the following reasons: "(1) The present uncertain condition of the law on the subject. (2) The lack of judicial interpretation. (3) The probability of an early and final determination of the question of repeal of the 18th amendment. ( 4:) The honest belief of some Master Masons. engaged in that business that they are not violating any Masonic obligation or duty. We believe that our further recommendations hereinafter contained will give such brethren opportunity for serious thought, and will provoke serious thought, not only by them but by all members of the Craft. (5) The sincere and honest difference of opinion among the brethren at the present time, as to the intoxicating qualities of this new beverage, the constitutionality of the 'beer laws,' and its effeCt upon the morals of the people. (6) The right of the brethren engaged in that business to be given fair consideration and an opportunity to withdraw from such business if its conduct and operation should be deemed unmasonic. (7) The necessity for new legislation by the Grand Lodge should the same be deemed necessary and the care required in its enactment to cover the many and peculiar problems which necessarily arise." . .

The subject appeared in the report of the jurisprudence committee at the Grand Lodge of Illinois, and the committee points out that in any transaction for the sale of intoxicating liquor it would be a necessary part of the evidence in support of the transaction to prove that the liquors sold were in fact intoxicating. The路 committee was of the opinion that there was nothing unlawful in Illinois Masonic law to prevent :Masons from engaging in the manufacture or sale of liquor under the act of Congress establishing the 3.2 maximum. Grand :Master Winslow, of Oregon, sent out a circular letter stating his decision, citing the Masonic code of that jurisdiction which


294

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

prohibits Masons from engaging in the saloon business. He attempted to obtain all the information available on the subject of whether 3.2 beer was intoxicating. He added: , 'From this information, I am convinced that the use of it makes at lea.st some people intoxicated. The fact that some people may be able to drink it and not become intoxicated, in my opinion, doos not remove it from the prohibition contained in our Code. I hold, therefore, that 3.2 beer is intoxicating. With reference to the selling of beer by tenants occupying Masonic buildings, I hold that the terms of the lea.se must govern, that if any Masonic lodge has entered into a lease with a tenant, without any provision with reference to this subject, it must be respected as any other contract. If the subject is covered by the terms of the lea.se, then of course those terms govern. Noone realizes more keenly than your Grand Ma.ster the hardships which such ruling will cause, but these consequences do not compare with the damage that would be done to the Craft and to the Fraternity which would follow any other ruling. It is my opinion that Ma.sonry can well afford to stay out of the liquor business, as it ha.s in the past. Masonry should not be influenced by an sudden popular demand for a change of attitude on this subject. Our history and traditions mark us out a.s an institution anchored to certain fundamental principles which remain the same at all times, regardless of public opinion."

Then followed a discussion on the floor of the Grand Lodge, in which one speaker made the following statement: , 'I am informed reliably that recently the Grand Oommandery of Knights Templar of Oregon conferred on a Pa.st Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of California, who attended the la.st conclave of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of Oregon, a.s the personal representative of the Grand Master of the Grand Encampment of the United States of America, an honorary membership. This gentleman from the South, a good Ma.son, who I am privileged to be personally and intimately acquainted with, is a man of sterling worth. He is active in Masonry and known for his good work throughout the entire United States. He is engaged in the brewery business in San Francisco, owned and operated by him, and known as the Pearl Brewery."

At any rate, the Grand Lodge approved the decision of the Grand Master. Here is what happens when such matters come on the floor of a Grand Lodge, as shown in the Oregon proceedings: (W. K. Belt) "A brother gave us an address at our 20th anniversary, and he empha.sized the fact that Ma.sons were patriotic, and that the Congress of the United States had ruled that 3.2 beer is not intoxicating(Gr. Ma.ster Winslow) "Congress never ruled aything of the kind. Congress said the old definition was not applicable. Congress dodged the issue as prettily a.s anything you ever saw." (W. K. Belt) " Well, how did they authorize the beer'" (Gr. Master Winslow) "They said a definition formerly existing did not have any application. They didn't say that it wa.s not intoxicating." (W. K. Belt) "But didn't they define what was intoxicating'" (Gr. Master Winslow) "Yes, there is a legal definition of what is intoxicating, but Congress has said that that definition shall not apply to 3.2 beer." Brother Neuner, will you tell us what that law is1"


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

295

(Geo. Neuner) "Most Worshipful Grand Master, I don't know whether I can throw any light upon this perplexing question or not. But, as our Brother Grand Master has stated, Congress did not intend to define intoxicating liquors, but it did intend to define what shall not be intoxicating. That is, liquor, spiritous liquors containing more than one-half of one per cent alcohol by volume, is intoxicating, but it took from that definition all malt, vinous liquors, containing not more than 3.2 per cent. In other words, they tried to get around the fact and not make applicable the definition applying to spiritous liquors, to all malt and vinous liquors containing less than 3.2 per cent alcoholic content by volume. I don't know whether that is clear or not. ' , (Geo. Cattley) "It isn't clear whether this 3.2 beer is intoxicating or not. That is a technicality to be threshed out by the lawyers. Some say it is and some say it isn't. Most Worshipful Grand Master, a few weeks ago I had the pleasure of being at a district meeting where you were in attendance, and you gave us to believe that you had the pleasure of sitting in with President Roosevelt, that President Roosevelt was at this diliner, and was a Mason, and I believe that President Roosevelt is the sponsor of this bill." (Gr. Master Winslow) " Not of our legislation. " (Goo. Cattley) "No, but our legislation is governed by the bill that went through Congress."

Grand Master Milne, of New Mexico, in his address, believed there was a demand on the part of many Masons for new legislation to deal with the liquor question, that the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment made their laws in that jurisdiction obsolete. He decided that a saloon on the lower floor and a Masonic lodge above was. not a proper combination. Reviewer James A. West, District of Columbia, finds that the advent of 3.2 beer has caused complication in many jurisdictions. His conclusion is: "If Masonry puts the ban on the seller of 3.2 per cent beer, why not put it on the buyer f ' ,

Grand Master Kimball, in reply to many inquires as to whether the beverage might be served or used in temples, said: , 'I am of the opinion that a proper regard for the best interests of our fraternity requires that these inquiries shall be answered in the negative and that the use or serving of the beverage in any of our temples will not be permitted."

In Idaho, the jurisprudence committee was asked as to the status of one who had received the degree of Fellow Craft and has since started selling 3.2 beer. The committee decided that since Congress decided 3.2 Beer non-intoxicating, there was nothing to prevent his being raised a Master Mason. Grand Master Millard, of Wisconsin, was asked as to the eligibility of a petitioner who was a brewer. His answer was that the edict of the Grand Lodge was as old as the Grand Lodge itself, and inflexible as the ancient landmarks, and the , 'Wisdom of our forefathers in promulgating this edict with the resulting benefit to the institution of Masonry is too well established to re-


296

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

quire comment at this time. With the enactment of recent legislation which authorizes the manufacture and sale of boor, Masonry is confronted with a new and, unfortunately, an alluring sidelight on an ancient evil. I have read statements by numerous large manufacturers to the effect that their product contained no larger a percentage of alcohol than that legalized by the new statute. That the liquor of the days to which they make reference was intoxicating, in my opinion, is not subject to question. I am unwilling to concede the existence of a fundamental difference between the saloon keeper of old and the tavern keeper of today. That the stigma of disrepute might not pass from the old regime into the new, likewise to lend respectability to the latter, it was deemed proper and expedient that the term 'tavern' be substituted for the term 'saloon.' The high calling of Masonry must be vigorously maintained and admits of no compromise at any time. If, in our decision.s, we may err technically, let it be on the side of safety and prudence, and always with due reg'ard to the incalculable influence which our official acts are certain to wield over the morals and ethics of society. , 'I recognize no necessity of temporizing with this question, and I therefore declare it as my opinion that the prohibitory edict of this Grand Lodge shall extend to and include person.s engaged in the brewery business, either as owners or operators or both; and that this same edict shall apply with路 equal force and effect to person.s whose occupation.s are legally designated as tavern keepers. ' ,

The jurisprudence committee felt: , 'That in ruling on this decision at this time would work an injustice and be inadvisable, and we recommend that no decision be made at this commwpcation. We reaffirm the principle that has universally obtained in this Grand Jurisdiction that anyone engaged in the manufacture or sale of intoxicating beverages shall not be eligible to petition a Masonic Lodge."

The Grand Master of Iowa held that the laws of that jurisdiction did not prohibit Masons from engaging in the sale of 3.2 beer, since both Congress and the General Assembly of Iowa had declared it nonintoxicating. The problem confronted Grand Master Mixter, of California. To all inquiriei he informed them that the legislation had not yet been made the subject of court decree, but, 'Such legislative declaration cannot relieve us as to our duty as Masons in the observance of the proprieties as evidenced by our own conduct. . Nor can it convey any authorization, real or implied, that we may forget the admonitions we have repeatedly received with respect to circumscribing our desires. I therefore direct that the serving, dispensing or use of the said 3.2 per cent beer in any Masonic hall, or the dining, banquet, refreshment or other rooms connected therewith, or at any Masonic gatherings, is hereby forbidden. It is our manifest duty as Masons properly to conduct ourselves. Any Mason engaged in any business, who suffers disorderly or any other conduct in connection therewith, which would tend to cast disrepute upon the fraternity, will always be subject to a charge of un-Masonic conduct."

A committee reporting on the matter said: , 'We see no reason to justify the abandonment of a policy and practice applied by our lodges for twenty-five years. We believe that our


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

297

lodges should continue to operate upon the highest plane of manifest propriety, thus observing the admonition so solemnly imparted to every Master Mason-to preserve unsullied the reputation of the fraternity ought to be our constant care. Regardless of the fact that 3.2 beer is now legalized and that high-content liquors will soon become legal, it should be remembered that the introduction of alcoholic bevergaes into our assemblies would offend the feelings of many thousands of our brethren and thus unnecessarily establish causes of discord and division, and militate against that harmony which is the strength and support of our society."

Grand Master Nash, of Ohio, issued an edict on April 1, 1933, which provided that as long as the present legislation was effective, beer which complied .with the legislation would have to be held to be non-intoxicating, and therefore not a Masonic offense to sell it. At the same time he prohibited the sale or use of it in any Masonic temple or rooms adjacent thereto and advised his brethren that the Masonic Code "still requires Masons to properly conduct themselves. Any Mason engaged. in any business who suffers disorderly or any other conduct in connection therewith were always guilty of un-Ma. sonic conduct." Grand Master Brown, of Minnesota, mled that 3.2 beer was not intoxicating within the meaning of reCent legislation, and that until court decisions made, the presumption was that one who is engaged in the manufacture and selling of it could not be construed to sell intoxicating liquor. He directed that such beer be not used in any place, or on any occasions referred to in his decision. He continues: , 'Since the ;elease of this communication, the situation has very materially changed. It is now legal in this state to manufacture and sell intoxiCating liquors for beverage purposes upon a compliance, of course, with the regulatory provisions of the law relative thereto. The law provides for sales of intoxicating liquors by the package not to be consumed on the premises by drug, general food and exclusive liquor stores in cities of the first class, Minneapolis, St. Paul and Duluth, but only by drug and ~xclusive liquor stores in all other cities and villages. I t provides for sales to be consumed on the premises by hotels, clubs and restaurants in cities and villages with more than 10,000 population, and by hotels, clubs and exclusive liquor stores in cities and villages under 10,000 population."

He believed that no change should be made in the law so far as it applied to persons selling liquor to be consumed in the place where sold, but doubtless should be modified so as to except drug and general food stores selling liquor by the package to be consumed off the premises. A committee has been appointed to investigate and study the situation and make proper recommendations. The Grand Master of Tennessee was besieged with applications for ruling as to the sale of beer. He told inquirers that he had no authority to make decisions on matters involving the construction of civil law, but that he was not precluded from giving advice. He did not believe, in view of Congressional and State legislative action, that the sale of 3.2 beer was in violation of Masonic law, but "in every instance I advised against a Mason engaging in the sale of this slop." The


298

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

jurisprudence committee agreed that the laws of Congress were convincing when it came to defining intoxicating liquor, but if 3.2 beer was in fact intoxicating it came within the prohibition of their edicts." Under decision of the Grand Lodge of Alabama, no Mason can engage in the sale of any beverage that is intoxicating. Grand Master Manville, of Oklahoma, issued an edict and urged the Grand Lodge to restate its decision in view of the change in nationalliquor laws. His edict set forth that since 3.2 beer was held to be non-intoxicating it was not a Masonic offense to sell it. It could not be served in Masonic lodge rooms, nor could Masonic publications carry ads concerning it. His recommendations were approved by the Grand Lodge and became the law of the jurisdiction. Reviewer Sam H. Goodwin, of Utah, says: , 'One matter that has especially interested the present writer in his reading of proceedings during the past year, has been the manner in which Grand Masters have handled the problem of 3.2 beer. Some have met the issue squarely and have placed upon this much discussed beverage the stigma of official disapproval; others have accepted the dictum of Congress, with or without an attempt to justify the position taken and have so advised their members; others apparently soft-pedaled the subject, while others, having due regard for the rights and prerogatives of those who should come after them, graciously left its status to be determined by their successors in office."

In Louisiana, the Grand Master announced that as long as the present legislation held 3.2 beer non-intoxicating, it w.as not a Masonic offense to sell it, that beer should not be served in Masonic lodge halls, but might be served in club rooms. He granted a dispensation to a lodge to change its place of meeting for the reason that the owner of one building had rented a store for a beer place, which was next to the lodge room. An amendment was adopted eliminating the prohibition in the law against persons engaged in the manufacture of alcoholic beverages. In the same proceedings are five appeals against brethren charged with being drunk and disorderly, buying, selling and transporting liquors, selling whiskey to high school boys, and being drunk and disorderly in the presence of ladies. Reviewer Gayie, referring to the action of his Grand Lodge, said: "It so happened that by the time of the annual meeting of many Grand Lodges, repeal had taken place and it had become legal for the ordinary citizen to manufacture and sell intoxicating liquor and a few Grand Lodges, including Louisiana, went all the way and repealed all resolutions and edicts prohibiting the membership from manufacturing and selling intoxicating liquor."

DUAL AND LIFE MEMBERSHIP

The granting of dual and life membership is another of the problems being threshed out on the floors of Grand Lodges. Missouri is one of the jurisdictions which does not permit dual membership; as


,1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

299

yet there are few restrictions surrounding the granting of life membership. Both dual and life membership have their attendant evils. A special committee in Florida present a rather complete report. It finds that of the forty-nine jurisdictions in the United States, twenty-nine do not permit either dual or plural membership; fourteen permit dual membership within their respective jurisdictions; three within and without; one without only; two permit dual and plural membership within and without. The committee finds Grand Secretaries divided. Some being enthusiastic and others strongly opposed; still others are neutral or indifferent. Virginia is the strongest proponent, with Pennsylvania the strongest opponent. Grand Secretary Perry, of Pennsylvania, says: "Dual and plural membership is not the spirit of Freemasonry-it is commercialism. My private opinion is that it has been put over in many jurisdictions by Grand Masters and Past Grand Masters who have wonderful vision and no particular experience."

In New York only one hundred sixteen dual memberships were reported after three years' operation of the law. The disadvantages were summed up by the committee in the following: " (1) Confusion in making up a statistical report of individual Masons in the Grand Jurisdiction affected. (2) The possibility of a Mason's being suspended or expelled in one lodge or Grand Jurisdiction, and in good standing in another. (3) The liability to violate jurisdictional law on the part of Masons and of lodges, innocently or ignorantly. (4) Duplication of relief. (5) Confusion in authority to discipline. (6) The possibility that an act committed might be a Masonic offense in one Grand Jurisdiction and not in another, where the same man held membership. (7) The possibility of the trial and expulsion of a Worshipful Master. Under o~足 jection '1,' Brother John A. Perry's statement may be cited that, 'Colville Smith, Grand Secretary of England, admitted to me that they cannot count their membership. They are lost in confusion.' "Under objection' 2,' may be cited a ease reported by the Grand Master of Vermont to the 1932 Grand Lodge: A man holding membership in a Vermont Lodge also held membership in another Grand Jurisdiction, and was suspended in the latter. The question came up to the Vermont Grand Master, 'can this man be tried in his Vermont Lodge for violating Vermont's dual membership regulation" The Grand Master ruled that he could not, and his ruling was sustained. Here we have the anomaly of a Mason suspended in one Grand Jurisdiction, while in good standing in another. "Under '3,' may be cited a case in our own Grand Jurisdiction: A man from another Grand Jurisdiction presented his dimit to a Florida Lodge, and was accepted. Later he took a dimit from his Florida Lodge, and with it, affiliated with a Michigan Lodge. Still later he took a dimit from his Michigan Lodge and presented it to another Florida Lodge, but before it was received by the lodge it was discovered that he still held membership in his original Grand Jurisdiction. The question was referred to M. W. J. S. B. Moyer, and he ruled that the brother would have to present a dimit from all and sundry lodges to which he belonged, before his petition for affiliation could be received by a Florida Lodge. "In this ease both the brother and the :first-named Florida Lodge violated Florida Masonic law-the one through ignorance, the other through the operations of Dual membership, and lack of information.


300

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

"As strait-laced as is the reputation of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, Brother Perry reports discoveriug the case of a Pennsylvania affiliate still holding membership in a Massachusetts lodge. This is probably not the only such case in Pennsylvania, as well as in many other Grand Jurisdictions forbidding dual membership, for wherever there is an affiliate hailing from a Scottish Lodge, such a condition technically exists as, under Scottish law, nothing but death or expulsion separates a Mason from his 'mother' lodge. "Scotland not only permits unrestricted Dual-Plural Membership, but imposes no residential requirement for home poople or visitors. The latter has given r~e to some complex situations between Scotland and other Grand Jurisdictions, but it remained for the combination of the two to create a unique situation at home: , 'In the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of South Australia for 1932, page 106, is noted the case of a man in Scotland who petitioned two Scotch lodges at the same time, and was rejected in one and accepted in the other. It is not stated how this enigma was unraveled. , 'Under '4,' it is easy to visualize how two lodges might honestly disagree on what constitutes un-Masonic conduct, in a given case, and one prosecute and the other refuse to prosecute. A Florida lodge has been known to disagree with the verdict of a criminal court jury. "Under' 5,' may be cited a case mentioned by the Grand Secretary of Maine. He says: " 'A brother of our lodge affiliated away, and when in need of help, we helped him. Later we learned that he was being helped by the other jurisdiction. ' . " 'Duplicate help, when others need it,' he says, 'I do not like.' "

Nevada "reached the conclusion that there is no benefit to be derived from either dual or plural membership. Sentiment may make a man reluctant to transfer his membership from a lodge in which he was raised, after he has taken up his residence in another jurisdiction. However, his usefulness in that lodge is practically ended, and except for. the payment of dues could have no part in its activities, and he soon becomes merely a name on the roster." The matter was reconsidered, following the adoption of the report, and final action was postponed for one year. In 1934 the matter was again continuetl Washingtoll has accepted dual membership. Montana, after considering the matter at two annual communications, finally adopted dual membership with restrictions. Reviewer West, District of Columbia, says: "Possibly the benefits of the practice would about equal its disadvantages, as witness several cases where lodges got into squabbles with each other over the question whether a brother could retain membership in one lodge when he was dropped from the other, or whether he could dimit from his mother lodge and retain membership in his step-mother lodge. It would seem that the original purpose of dual membership was to benefit the brother who sought it, but in many cases it has developed into a question of a lodge holding onto an old member or gaining a new one, which, we think was not the purpose of the plan. This writer was somewhat enthusiastic about it when it was first broached, but is somewhat skeptical now as to its real value."

Grand Master Kimball supplies a list of those Grand Lodges which permit dual or plural membership:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

301

, 'Alabama, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin, All Grand Lodges in Australia, British Columbia, Canada, Chili, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, England, France, Germany-Three Globes, Berlin, Ireland, Manitoba, York Grand Lodge of Mexico, Netherlands, Nova Scotia, Philippine Islands, Porto Rico, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Scotland, Venezuela."

The 1934 proceedings of the Grand Lodge of New York show thirty-four dual members in 1933, and a loss of twenty-three during the same year, so that only eleven of the 312,229 members of New York lodges hold dual membership. The reviewer of that jurisdiction, in commenting on membership statistics, reveals one of the difficulties encountered as a result of such membership: "There is no possibility this year of determining correctly the membership statistics of Grand Lodges outside the United States, Canada and Australasia. As regards England, Scotland and Ireland, there are difficulties caused by multiple membership, uncontrolled life memberships and other factors which reduce statistics to more or less guesswork. While there have been considerable seeming numerical losses, these represent chiefly withdrawals from multiple affiliations. In other words, the actual number of individuals does not appear to have changed appreciably. ' ,

The Grand Master of Vermont felt the urge to adopt dual membership, referring to the sentimental reason of retaining membership in the lodge in which they join. He was willing to permit a committee to investigate the matter and to report at the 1934 communication. Under present laws of the jurisdiction it is prohibited. Virginia, which is one of the strong proponents of dual membership, has been compelled to adopt a section providing that, , A member belonging to two or more lodges must make known to each lodge the other lodges to which be belongs. If suspended, or when charges are preferred against him in one lodge, or when the result of such charges has been. announced, such other lodges shall be notified of the fact. Secretaries shall report to all other lodges to which such brother belongs. ' ,

In our estimation, the question of granting life membership is of more serious moment than the question of dual membership. A Colorado jurisprudence committee disapproved the appeal of a subordinate lodge which provided for life membership in violation of the book of constitutions. The Grand Master of Florida said: "Another note of warning as to prospective Emeritus, or relief, subjects. I find no fault in affiliating an elderly brother of our own Grand Jurisdiction whose Masonic life is continuous, but be careful of the brother who, in the evening of life, after having been out of Masonic affiliation for many years, attempts to place his dimit with you. Nothing having been given in his active manhood, nothing should be expected in his later years."

In Kansas we find: , 'The evils incident to the spreading of the life membership idea require attention.. There are a growing number of instances where some


302

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

brother, without realizing the injustice resulting therefrom, offers a motion to make all Past Masters life members. Others move to confer this privilege upon those who have been members for, perhaps, twenty or twenty-five years, and so on. , , A recent survey of the Kansas Lodges shows a number of our lodges with a deplorable number of life members. "A special illustration is that of Mystic Tie Lodge No. 74 at the annual meeting in 1932. A motion was made and carried making Past Masters whose dues were paid to date life members, and twenty-five life membership certificates were executed by the Grand Lodge on July 1, 1933. No doubt most of these Past Masters were able and actually desired to continue to bear their share of the cost of maintaining their lodge. It may be said to the credit of our Past Masters that almost unanimously they feel that the honor conferred upon them in the opportunity to serve the Uraft is adequate compensation for the service and sacrifice made. The survey shows lodges having more than twenty life members. , 'Masonic writers are agreed that all members should share in the cost of operating a lodge. Mackey, the universally accepted authority, says, 'The payment of dues is a duty incumbent on all the members of a lodge.' Chase, another authority on jurisprudence, says, 'One brother should not be required or allowed to pay an increased tax for the support of our organization, for the purpose of relieving another, and one equally, or perhaps better able to pay, from any tax of the kind. ' "A number of our lodges have engaged in building ventures and as a part of their financial program have sold life memberships without consideration of mortality tables or scientific bases. These contracts cannot be invalidated but may be modified as are comparable civil contracts; for instance, the changing of fraternal insurance contracts to old line basis. "Union Lodge No.7 has a typical illustration of this situation with life memberships sold at $100.00 regardless of age, the amount returnable at death. These unscientific contracts have resulted in pyramiding the maintenance cost on other members of the lodge to a prohibitive degree. , 'If there is no happier way to readjust the financial structure, use could be made of the approved life membership ruling of last year; dues reduced to a reasonable basis, and levying an assessment as authorized in By-Law 142. , 'It is quite desirable that there be no controversy over the years that are past, and as imperative that we face the future united on this vital question. The logic of the tradition, history and law seems to require this ruling: A lodge may not make its past officers life members, exempt from the payment of dues, nor place on the free membership list those who have paid dues for a given number of years. Life memberships may be issued to the aged with impaired finances and earning power; and for rare cases of exceptional service."

In the Philippine Islands a resolution which proposed the giving of life membership after a membership of twenty-five years, or to one who had served a lodge as Master, was rejected, because: , , We think that it is not proper to adopt this resolution at the present time when some of the lodges and the Grand Lodge are having financial difficulties by reason of business conditions. It would result in many lodges losing the dues of several members who have belonged to the lodge for many years and have served as Masters; it would result in a reduction of the income from dues and in a reduction in the income of the Grand Lodge. The resolution has a good purpose, but at this time we are of the opinion that it is not advisable."


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

303

A lodge in West Virginia submitted some prospective by-laws, including one covering life membership. The jurisprudence committee found that such a by-law was not in conflict with the Grand Lodge laws, but suggested as a matter of policy that some safeguard should be included as to the expenditure of the monies received for such memberships: , 'To the end that they may not be used for current expenses, but applied to the discharge of interest-bearing indebtedness or invested in interest-bearing securities, and only the interest thereon be used for current expenses."

Oregon adopted a new section of law which provided that all monies received from life memberships should be invested by trustees of the Grand Lodge and that the interest derived from such investments should, at the end of each calendar year, be distributed to the lodges of the jurisdiction according to the amount of money each lodge should have to its credit in this fund. The amount fixed for life membership from twenty-five to thirty-five is $150.00; from thirty-six to fifty, $125.00; fifty-one and over, $100.00. The Grand Master of Texas recommended: , , The abolition of life membership in so far as payment of Grand Lodge dues is concerned and that all members in good standing be required to pay in good faith to his lodge the amount of the Grand Lodge dues, and that no evasion thereto be allowed by an forms of bonus, gifts Or otherwise."

Minnesota gave the following reasons for and against life membership: , 'Summary of reasons given in favor of life membership: Life membership privilege keeps members from dimitting, relieves lodges of remitting dues each year, avoids embarrassment; to honor old and faithful members; a reward for long membership or long service; relief to the poor brother who cannot afford to pay dues; it is something to look forward to and strive for; old members can afford to pay $1.50 but not $5.00, $10.00, $15.00; token of appreciation and esteem. , 'Summary of reasons against life membership: Life members hard to keep track of; if we did not have life memberships we could reduce all dues $1.00 per year, and other lodges advise they could reduce their dues $2.50 per year; small lodges need all income possible to pay expenses and would have to raise dues if life memberships were granted; loss of interest by life membership; most life members are well fixed while young men have to struggle and skimp to get enough to join and belong; if a man supports something he is bound to be interested in it; financial suicide of the small lodge; one lodge of 72 members would nearly all be eligible for life membership under the present regulation; those desiring life membership usually not much interested in lodge; per capita tax becomes a' burden; creates ill feeling; difficult to know where to draw the line; equality for all; special privileges for none; special honors for work well done comes from the heart and cannot be bought; paying dues is the only interest many have in their lodge and should not be eliminated; most lodge dues are kept at minimum and so should not be a burden to anyone; privilege of granting would be abused unless careful restriction be put on; life memberships should not be based on a dues paying consideration."


304

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

The Grand Master of New York, in 1933, decided that a lodge was . without authority to exempt its members from the payment of dues in the amount equivalent to per capita tax. In North Carolina a lodge may make any member who has rendered distinguished and meritorious service to Masonry an honorary life member, providing he has been a member in good standing for thirty years or more and shall have attained the age of seventy years. The Grand Master may even waive these requirements. Subordinate lodges shall be exempt from all Grand Lodge dues upon such members. In Quebec, an investigation shows that in the lodges situated in the City of Montreal twenty-three per cent of the total membership are life members. In one lodge the percentage is 53.7. A committee said: "It will readily be seen that this is a serious problem, as it cannot be expected that the active members can continue to carry the load and it would seem advisable that in some cases a canvass be made of life members, asking that they waive some of their privileges, to the extent of reimbursing the lodge, in part, of the expense involved in carrying them. Your committee recommends that no member initiated after March, 1934, shall be entitled to life membership, unless the by-laws of the lodge provide for the payment of a capital sum, the interest of which would be sufficient to reimburse the lodge. ' , POLITICAL

The Grand Lodge of California was called upon to decide as to whether a circular letter sent out by brethren of a San Francisco lodge was political in character. A committee said: , , There may well be a diversity of opinion as to whether the letter sent by accused to the members of his lodge involved a matter of controversial politics. To define what is and what is not political in character involves many and varied difficulties. The line of demarcation between things political in character and matters merely of civic interest, is not at all well defined. The accused has consistently maintained that his letter did not involve a matter of controversial polities, but tllat it related only to a matter of civic interest. In support of his position he pointed out in his letter to the Grand Master that Grand Lodge had heretofore approved the policy of a prior Grand Master wherein he proclaimed the belief that there is no higher duty devolving upon us as Masons than the duty we owe the State as citizens: 'and taking a part in politics-not political in that sense of artful and dishonest efforts to secure the success of party schemes, but politics in that broader and larger sense.' "

The Grand Master of Ohio found it necessary to admonish a brother who had sent out a large number of post cards in which qualifications of Brother was called to "the attention of the brethren of the Craft." Charges were filed and adequate punishment was administered. The Grand Master states: , 'The practice of merely stating on a candidate's card that he is a member of a certain lodge, while not in good taste, has been used in practice and may be regarded as a description of the person, rather than a Masonic appeal. Anything beyond this description is a violation of the Code. "


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

305

The associated press in Florida carried an announcement that Masonic Orders would participate in the home-coming of a candidate for Governor. The Grand Master "Wired the brethren that while believing it newspaper publicity, if correct it could not be permitted, being against all Masonic principles and traditions. I was later advised that the news item was not correct and that it was overenthusiasm on the part of a publicity agent."

This same Grand Master found it necessary to "Censure a particular lodge in the jurisdiction for petitioning, as officers and members of the lodge, a Federal Judge to extend leniency to one whom he had sentenced for a violation of the Eighteenth Amendment."

In Montana the Grand Master found a bill introduced in the legislative assembly which would permit the use of public funds for the furnishing of free text books to private and parochial schools, and "As your Grand Master, I deemed the effort to be contrary to the teachings of Masonry in our loyalty to our government and its institutions, and I invoked the aid of good and true Masons to help us in preventing such action. I myself took active part, being one of the members of the State Senate. This attempted assault on the public school treasury happily failed in its purpose."

The committee passing on his address approved his stand in laying aside personal and selfish consideration, even at the sacrifice of his political vote. Past Grand Master Hepner followed with a resolution in which we read: , 'Masonry disclaims most emphatically being a political organization; there is no hypocrisy about this; but it does not mean that Masonry does not take an interest in the welfare of the national institutions of our land, nor of failing to be interested in their preservation. On the contrary, Masonry in this republic of ours is and has been for the past two centuries an intensely patriotic order seeking to serve humanity and to see that human rights are not withheld or trampled upon."

Grand Master Rowland, of Montana, in accepting a gift from the Grand Lodge, said in part: , 'Brethren, may the NRA fill to overflowing the cornucopia of God's good gifts for each and everyone of you. ' ,

The Grand Master of Western Australia found: "There is a tendency at times. for some Past Masters to assume an authority they do not possess and to dictate to newly elected Masters as to whom they shall appoint to office in the lodge. In some instances they go so far as to tell a candidate for the office of Master that he will not be elected unless he agrees to appoint the brethren nominated by them. When a Master has been elected and installed, the brother who has vacated the chair has the right to the rank of Past Master, he has the experience gained while occupying the chairs of Warden and Master, but he has no mOre authority in the lodge than any other Master Mason. To tell a candidate for the chair that he will not be elected unless he promises to make certain appointmentS, is an action totally opposed to Masonic


306

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

custom. In any case, the Master is elected by the votes of his brethren, of whom the Past Masters are almost invariably a minority. "

The Grand Lodge of Texas sent a telegram to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, pledging to him the loyalty and support of the Grand Lodge of Texas and expressing the best wishes of the Grand Lodge for his continued health and success in every laudable undertaking, with the distinct understanding that such message was not to contain any endorsement of policies or other specific matters which might involve the Grand Lodge in politics. Grand Master Haas, of Louisiana, addressing the Grand Lodge of Texas, told his hearers: "We have to stop putting into office men who are grafters-I don't care whether they are Masons or not. Lots of good men practice Masonry who never saw the inside walls of a Masonic lodge, and there are a lot of members of the fraternity that do not know anything about Masonry. Let's put men in office that are willing to do for the benefit of the mass, and not for the benefit of the class at the expense of the mass."

Past Grand Master Rogers, addressing the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin, said that we were living in an age of dictators and that the great game of power is the dream of nations, that rivalry and amibition continue to rule the passions of men: , 'The intolerable, hostile power of dictators, by preventing its constituencies exercising their God-given right of suffrage in the choice of their rulers, is a positive peril and menace to the vigor and life of any people and the nation seeking to exercise its usurpation of power. While it is universally known that the Catholic Church has always been a persistent critic路 of what they term the ungodly institution of Freemasonry, nevertheless, we do share the dogmatic belief of others that the action of Mussolini and Hitler in closing Masonic lodges was due to the fact that they were Catholic. , 'All history warrants the statement that, as a general, fundamental proposition, any country having a dictator with absolute power, ultimately means tyranny to its people, subjecting them to the level of serfdom and slavery. Within the last decade, the Dictator of Italy issued a decree that closed one thousand and fifty-two Masonic lodges then existing in that country. He put the Grand Master in prison, where, in less than two years, he became blind. "The most startling news has come from Germany. Hitler, its Dictator, decreed during the earlier days of last April that all Masonic lodges in Germany be closed, and that the name 'Freemasonry' must never be used in the future by any organization of Masons. Thus the last vestige of the vital forces of Freemasonry in cultured Germany was swept away. Its traditions of two hundred years, with its historic charm and interest, will not again be heard in any Masonic lodge so long as Hitler rules the destiny of Germany. It is not too much to say that the despotic acts of Mussolini and Hitler in closing the Masonic Lodges in Italy and Germany may be likened to the tyranny of power exercised by the Caesars during the oppressive days of the Great Roman Empire. ' ,

The Grand Master of New York, under the head of "Politics," has observed with foreboding the development of the political situation


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

307

in European countries in which Masonic rights had been jeopardized. He tells the Grand Lodge: "Masons have ever been jealous of those civil rights which in modern times have been taken for granted among eonstitutional governments. This is true in all cases where differences of creed and race are involved. The temptation is strong to inject the great body of the Craft into the situation, but the Ancient Landmarks indicate very clearly the course which must be pursued. , 'Into the situation in European countries there have been thrown so many divergent factors of religion, race and polities, and with such force, that far-reaching effects are being registered in our own Country, with a situation developing that is charged with explosive materials. Into this situation Masonry must not throw additional confusion by injecting itself. Previous occasions have established for us a precedent, the wisdom of which has been revealed to us in full measure. , 'My Brethren well know that I am opposed to injustice, no matter in what form it may appear; at the same time, we are confronted with a situation of extraordinary danger, which requires that we proceed with the utmost caution if we are to play the part of a solvent agent rather than another stick of dynamite thrown into the arena of the world '8 affairs. "

CLANDESTINE MASONRY AND EXTRANEOUS SOCIETIES

Clandestine or spurious Freemasonry continues to disturb the Masonic Orders in several jurisdictions. In Ohio it is known as the National Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Freemasons for the United States of America, Inc. We are told that the organization has made no attempt to gain a foothold in Ohio except to take out a charter, but that its activities are to be found in other jurisdictions. The committee on jurisprudence is in charge of the litigation pending in the Court of Appeals at Columbus, Ohio, against this organization. Counsel for the committee took action in quo warranto proceedings brought by the State of Ohio, on relation of the Attorney General. The defendant filed a demurrer, but at the time the proceedings were printed the court had not passed upon the demurrer. It is believed that this will result in a cancellation of the charter, which would oust the defendant from corporate powers. Clandestinism is not officially confined to the American Continent. The committee on grievances of the Grand Lodge of the Philippine . Islands had before it a case in which a member was accused of being a member of a lodge under the Gran Logia Nacional de Filipinas. The committee, in finding him guilty, decided that it was impossible for any man to be a member of one of its lodges and at the same time be a member of an illegal lodge, that the organization referred to was a spurious and clandestine organization." The Grand Master of Alberta had his attention called to the fact, 'That a clandestine Mason had been a constant visitor in one of our lodges and had even addressed the lodge on Masonic subjects. Apparently


308

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

he was a member of an organization in Vancouver which he alleged was recognized by the Grand Lodge of England. Such a claim was, of course, sheer nonsense and steps were taken to put an end to this man's activities. This is an appropriate occasion to point out again the care which must be exercised in admitting visitors to our lodges, not only in seeing that credentials are in order but that the lodge from which the visitor hails is in a jurisdiction recognized by this Grand Lodge."

The Grand Master of New Hampshire issued a warning to his brethren: , 'That there is in the State a group of men belonging to a clandestine lodge in Lawrence, Mass., known as 'Composite Lodge No. 23,' who have sought to gain admisison into several of our lodges."

California has a committee on Clandestine Masonry. It finds little activity among the Filipino lodges. The negro lodge, "Hiram of Tyre," is practically dead; the other negro lodge, "Sovereign Grand Lodge F. & A. M., and also known as "Prince Hall Masons," has maintained its existence, though many of its lodges are in precarious condition. The largest body in California is the "Rito Nacional~eji足 cano." A meeting of the latter organization was called last year for the purpose of reorganization. Another clandestine lodge in Los Angeles is known as "University Lodge F. & A. M. No. 106." A negro lodge, "Sunset Lodge No. 26," operates in Los Angeles. In Oakland, they have a "King Solomon Grand Lodge of Ancient and Accepted York Masons." Considerable activity is being shown in the Co-Masonic Lodges; this was organized in 1926, with Mrs. Mary Goldy as the present Master. The Masonic Service Association has attempted to supply the Craft with complete information as to the activities of clandestine Masonry in the United States by the issuance of a complete digest, which is by far the most interesting article upon this subject which we have had the pleasure to read. Grand Masters of jurisdictions would do well to disseminate this information among the brethren of the fraternity to the end that we may eventually be rid of those who would attempt to make money through the establishment of a spurious society. On the subject of Extraneous Societies we find more references to the Order of the Eastern Star than to any other society. The reviewer for the Philippine Islands thinks it very unusual that in the various Grand Lodges of the United States, 'A recess is declared during the annual communication, the worthy Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter O.E.S., often accompanied by members of her staff, is introduced and conducted to a seat in the East, and there is an exchange of bouquets that is just too lovely for anything. We do not believe in this. There is a place for everything in this world. We hold that a Grand Lodge communication is for Masonic business and not for that kind of performances. We have an unbounded admiration for the fair sex and recognize the splendid work done by the Order, but in the interest of that organization, which is now under fire in a number of jurisdictions and has already been barred from more than one, we sincerely hope that such demonstrations will be eliminated. They serve no other purpose than giving ammunition to the enemies of the Eastern Star who


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

309

argue that that Order is not a whit better than. the Co-Masonry condemned by all regular Masons."

In Western Australia, the Board recommended: , 'That no Freemason be permitted to attend any meeting or be a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, and that no meeting of the Order be permitted in any lodge room."

The Grand Master of New Brunswick quoted from the above in his annual address and expressed himself as feeling strongly, 'That this Grand Lodge lilhould place itself on record as disapproving of members of this jurisdiction devoting to the Order of the Eastern Star any of that time and energy which might more properly be given to further the work of their own lodges, to which they certainly owe their undivided allegiance. ' , .

In the Grand Lodge of Florida telegrams were read from the Grand Matron and a Past Grand Patron of the a.E.S., and a committee of Past Grand Masters was appointed to make suitable reply. In the Grand Lodge of North Dakota it was moved "that the Grand Master take with him such associates as he deemed necessary and pay a visit of fraternal courtesy to the Grand Chapter a.E.S." A special committee of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick foundHIt must be universally recognized that the Order referred to is not and cannot be Masonic; that such Order is not and cannot be affiliated to or connected with Masonry in any respect; that it is undesirable that Masons, especially Secretaries of Lodges, should give to anyone for use in connection with such Order, any information as to the standing of members of our lodges; that Masons should devote their energies to the upbuilding of their own lodges; that association by Masons with the Order cannot in any case be productive of results sufficiently beneficial to warrant Grand Lodge in any way approving of it and in some instances it may prove to be absolutely harmful."

In Montana, the biographer of the Grand Master tells us thatHDuring the past year, while he was Grand Master, his wife held the office of Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter O.E.S. of Montana."

This probably accounted for the official presentation of flowers to the Grand Master in the Grand Lodge, the Grand Master remarking: , 'This bouquet (and I think my wife, the Grand Matron, had something to do with it) was presented by the Order of the Eastern Star. You know, brethren, peace and harmony has prevailed for the last year between the Order of the Eastern Star and the Masonic bodies. ' , (Laughter and applause.)

The Grand Master of Maine was asked whether Secretaries of Lodges were required to give information to Secretaries of the Eastern Star as to whether members of lodges were in good standing. His reply was: , 'My answer was that they were not. ' ,

The committee on jurisprudence, approving his decision, added: "We would further suggest that such information need not and should not be given to any except Masons and then only for Masonic reasons."


310

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Our brethren of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, a chivalrous jurisdiction, called their Grand Lodge at East while the Grand Matron of the Eastern Star of that jurisdiction was officially presented, and "delighted the representatives with a timely address which was much enjoyed by all present." The jurisprudence committee in Rhode Island considered a resolution reading: , 'That organization and existence of clubs and of groups of members within the body of or carrying the name of the Lodge and whose officers and :financial transactions are not authorized by and are not administered under its by-laws are prejudicial to Masonry and are unlawfuL"

A committee found that most of the difficulties could be fully covered within the regulations and were under the control of the Master of the lodge and that if their operations were in any way detrimental to Masonry it was within the power of the Grand Master to take appropriate action. Weare interested in this view of the Order of DeMolay as taken from the foreign correspondence of the Grand Lodge of Western Australia: " American Grand Lodges differ on the subject of the DeMolay Order for boys. Certainly, they do not differ as to it not being a Masonic Order. They agree on that point, notwithstanding the association of the name with Masonic Knight Templary. Still, they differ. On the one side are those who consider it a modern excrescence which must be knocked off with the emblem of authority. On the other side are those who hug the excrescence both as a duty and a pleasure. Between these two extremes exist opinions as varied as the hues of a chameleon. The fact is, of course, that there is no lawful connection between Freem.asonry and DeMolay, although its choice of a name, coupled with unbridled enthusiasm over the boys, often affords grounds for a belief to the contrary. In a number of jurisdictions DeMolay meets in Masonic temples, causing it to be viewed as a junior Masonic organization. To this view DeMolay apparently contributes, for it is stated that the law or rule of its Grand Council requires that a Chapter must be sponsored either by a Masonic Lodge or by a group of individual Masons. In a number of instances, lodges or groups respond favorably; consequently, any laches on the part of DeMolay becomes fastened on the Masonic fraternity. Owing to defective leadership in DeMolay, Sunday observance is not invariable. Sponsors permit chapters to meet on Sundays and confer degrees on candidates; basketball and other competitive games are permitted on the same hallowed day. Yet Masonry teaches Sunday observance; the Decalogue is regarded as that moral law which forms part of the general body of Masonry. Masonry prohibits lodge meetings on Sundays, save for the burial of the dead, when necessary on that day. While there are jurisdictions to whom the association of the Craft with DeMolay is anathema, there is, apparently, a fairly large Church of Laodicea in the Masonry of the United States."

The Grand Master of Delaware notes with alarm the steady growth of organizations which have Masonic affiliation as requirement for admission into their membership. He continues: , 'These organizations have been increasing at a fast rate during the past few years, until at the present time, there are more than forty organ-


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

311

izations in this country which requires that their members be Masons or members of Masons' families. In most eases, these organizations are under no control or supervision by the Grand Lodge, and while most of them have high motives and purposes, and conduct themselves in a manner beyond reproach, there are others whose activities do not reflect credit upon the Masonic fraternity. I am not referring to organizations already in existence in our jurisdiction. So far as I know those already in Delaware are conducting themselves in a proper manner. However, I do feel that we should look to the future and prevent the institution of any new societies, requiring for membership, Masonic affiliation. In order to limit the growth of such organizations or to gain a measure of control over them, many jurisdictions are adopting regulatory legislation. , 'Feeling that our Grand Lodge should take some steps to prevent the formation of organizations of such a character, I offer as a standing resolution the following: " 'Resolved: That no Mason in the Jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Delaware shall promote, organize, or become a member of any club, order or fraternal society hereafter established in the State of Delaware whose qualifications for membership include that of being a Mason, unless such club, order, or fraternal society shall have received the sanction and approval of this Grand Lodge. Violation of this resolution shall subject the offender to Masonic trial and puniShment.' "

Grand Master Moyer, of Florida, in a decision disapproved sponsoring of a troop of boy scouts for the reason: , 'It is not proper for a garticular lodge to sponsor any movement or organization over which the Grand Lodge of Florida, through its constitution and regulations, does not have absolute controL"

The Grand Master of Kansas has this to say about extraneous societies: "When the time comes that oui members, either voluntarily or through proper legislation by our Grand Lodge, divorce themselves from these various organizations predicating. their membership on Ancient Craft Masonry, and the Grand Lodge makes it unlawful for a Mason to become a member thereof-when the time, money and interest of our membership is not divided among half a dozen or more organizations---interest in our lodges will again be evidenced and the officers will not be placed in the embarrassing and humiliating situation of opening lodge with scarcely a sufficient number present to fill the offices, and Ancient Craft Masonry will come into its own."

The Grand Master of Wyoming decided, and the Grand Lodge approved the decisio~, , 'That a lodge has no more right to contribute or use its lodge funds for the maintenance of this organization (DeMolay) than it would have to contribute or use its funds for the maintenance of the Order of the Eastern Star or any other fraternal organization."

Most of the Grand Masters or Reviewers have paid their respects to the recent Shrine Lottery in California, and the Oregon reviewer's comment is typical of all : "The Shrine has done fine work in its hospitals-which exist because Imperial Potentate Freeland Kendrick realized Shrine was 'top-heavy,' and drove them to this enterprise. So far as aware, no hospital has a cor-


312

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

nerstone bearing the inscription' erected by a lottery put over by - - - Temple.' Just why the Shrine anywhere should finance its convention by that proceeding, is wholly beyond comprehension. Apparently Grand Master Gaylord, with his legal training, has prosecuted the responsible individuals successfully-and his Grand Lodge unanimously supported him. The word 'Noble' is defined in Shrine ritual as a decent man, a good citizen, one who stands for law and right things. In fact the word actually does mean--exalted in character, excellent, worthy, high-minded. How then can the Shrine-under its own laws and ritual--enter a plea of 'not guilty' for a lottery' Unless perchance it utters the plea-' guilty but insane.' Grand Master Gaylord adopted the well-known legal principle--he who acts by an agent must respond for the agent's acts as his own. His position is invulnerable."

In a few jurisdictions difficulty has been experienced with the Grotto. The Grand Master of the District of Columbia found it necessary to advise as to the nature of entertainment suitable for lodges, and his advice was followed. The Grotto even introduced a resolution. Forwarding it to him under seal stating that it was, 'Composed of Master Masons and as such were endeavoring to practice all the principles and observe all laws and regulations pertaining to Masonry. It is our aim to do or say nothing within our meetings that could not be said or done within the walls of a Masonic lodge. It is our purpose at all times to give our support to and uphold the dignity of the Masonic fraternity."

A fine sentiment and feeling from an extraneous society. A new organization creeps up in the District of Columbia, known as "Sigma Mu Sigma," which has been established in George Washington University and which limits its membership to Masons, their sons or brothers. . Reviewer West, District of Columbia, informs us that there will never be an end to the schemes proposed for linking Masonry with outside activities and that the last which has come to his notice was the request for the Grand Lodge to dedicate a cemetery. The jurisprudence committee of the Grand Lodge of Idaho seriously considered the decision of the Grand Master covering the erection of an O.E.S. emblem on a Masonic temple. It concurred in the Grand Master's decision, which was: "While there is no written law against putting an O.E.S. emblem on a Masonic temple, it is my belief that we should keep our Masonic temples free from entanglements with any other organizations."

The Grand Master of Ontario, Canada, was asked to approve the formation and incorporation of a cooperative society composed of members of the Craft: "The object of which was to supply groceries and other household needs to its shareholders. While commending the spirit that prompted the brethren to seek a means of reducing the cost of living, I express myself as decidedly opposed to the plan. It is improper and contrary to all


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

313

precedents to make membership in the Craft and essential qualification to participating in the anticipated benefits of such business."

In Alabama, the Grand Lodge, before opening its annual communication"Assembled in the Grand Lodge hall for the purpose of receiving a visit from the Grand Matron of the O.E.S. and her staff of officers. The officers of the Grand Chapter of the O.E.S., together with the officers of the Grand Lodg~, being assembled in the Masonic temple, the following program was carried out."

Just why a Council of Allied Masonic Degrees should request permission of a Grand Lodge to form Councils of the organization within a jurisdiction is unknown, but a committee in the District of Columbia considered such a request, unless because of the action of the Grand Lodge in 1930 which prohibited any Mason engaging in the formation of an organization basing its eligibility upon Blue Lodge membership. The committee found that it was the intent of the Grand Lodge to restrict the formation of new bodies and in this particular instance thought it to the best interests that action upon is petition be deferred. This is an echo of the situation which confronted the General Grand Chapter at its Triennial Convocation in Washington in October, 1933. RITUAL

That which most distinguishes Masonry from other secret societies is its ritual. Handed down to us from time to time, little changed by time and the elements, and comparatively uniform throughout the Masonic world, it supplies us with the framework for our society. The intelligent Freemasons long ago gave up the idea of attempting to secure an absolutely uniform ritual; the proceedings of today therefore contain little reference to the ritualistic work, but more of how it should be taught and by whom. In Wisconsin, because degree work had been at an extreme minimum, Grand Master Millard did not feel justified in appointing a successor to a Grand Lecturer who had resigned. He tells us: , 'I believe better results would be had if the esoteric work were conducted exclusively- through the medium of schools of instruction instead of by direct contact with each individual lodge. I think the entire State could be covered each year in this manner and at less cost than that proposed by the new budget, and surely with more general satisfaction. Perhaps if instruction were discontinued entirely for a year or two, or until economic conditions should warrant a resumption of this work, it is questionable if any material or permanent injury would result."

Our neighbor on the north (Iowa) has a Board of Custodians which control ritualistic matters. Grand Master Hansen, speaking of their work, said: , 'Of the work of the Board of Custodians, much can be said, and I must not fail to commend the work that is being so efficiently performed under


314

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

its supervision. For many years much time and energy has been devoted to instruction in the ritual and as a result material improvement is noted in the degree work. Perfection in ritual is not easily acquired, nor retained, and it is only by continual and industrious application and study that this can be accomplished. That we have more than seven hundred brethren in Iowa proficient in the ritual of our degrees is gratifying indeed. The ritual is but the means to an end and in itself is not sufficient to perpetuate the institution of Freemasonry. It is the vehicle by which we introduce the novitiate to the great principles of Masonry."

This jurisdiction grants certificates of proficiency to those found proficient in the ritual. Such a certificate establishes the individual as an authority in his own lodge on matters of ritual. New York has a Grand Lecturer, but his work appears to be the holding of conventions throughout the state, the individual lodges being instructed through assistant lecturers. The Grand Lecturer goes into a district once a year. North Carolina divides the State into four districts and has an authorized lecturer in each. Each lecturer is supposed to visit all of the lodges in his district within a two year period, this at the expense of the Grand Lodge. This does not prevent the lodge from engaging the services of an authorized lecturer, providing the necessary approval be secured. Masters of lodges certify to the Grand Secretary the satisfactory performance of this work, the Grand Secretary issuing, semimonthly, a voucher to these lecturers at the rate of $25.00 per week. Ohio apparently uses a master ritual, the Grand Master noting in his address that he had "received the written copy of the Grand Lodge ritual from my predecessor." This jurisdiction will not permit the ritual of other jurisdictions to be used within its borders, the committee on jurisprudence deciding that even a demonstration of the ritual of a foreign jurisdiction was not permissible since "there is no distinction between a demonstration and an actual conferring of the degrees." Grand Master Templeton, of Tennessee, had urged the establishment of a Board of Custodians, looking toward an extension of the lecturer's system. In his address, he said: , 'The Grand Lodge concurred in this movement and we have but to look at the progress made in this connection to ascertain whether or not your conclusion has been justified. Permit me to call your attention to the fact that only one hundred seventy-five certificates of proficiency were issued during 1932, while three hundred fourteen have been issued during the year 1933."

A lodge in Tennessee made arrangements for a degree team from another jurisdiction to confer one of the degrees, using the Scottish Rite ritual. The matter got into the hands of the Grand Masters of both Grand Lodges and since it involved the use in a Tennessee lodge of an unusual ritual, it was brought to the attention of the jurisprudence committee. Their statement was:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

315

, 'We could not consistently give our approval to the conferring of a degree in a Tennessee lodge by the use of any ritual other than one which at least purports to be founded on the York Rite ritual of Ancient Craft Masonry. We assured the Grand Master of the other jurisdiction that in taking that position we meant no offense, and he replied that, so far as his Grand Lodge was concerned, the matter was closed."

In Nevada it was decided to approve an appropriation for the printing of a new set of rituals. Following the adoption of the resolution one member arose and "wished to be put on record as being strictly opposed to the printing of the ritual for the ritualistic work." Grand Master Baker, of South Carolina, tells us : , 'A Masonic lodge cannot put on a show in the nature of a vaudeville nearly so well as a trained troupe of vaudeville players, and whenever a lodge undertakes to give that class of entertainment, it may expect its members to prefer attending a playhouse constructed and employed solely for that class of entertainment. But the lodge has no competition in the matter of its degree work; I am convinced that if anyone of the three degrees of symbolic Masonry was to be exemplified by a trained degree team in any lodge in South Carolina, every member of the lodge and Mason within reach of the meeting would make any reasonable sacrifice to be present. I am driven to the conclusion that we should emphasize ritualism in our jurisdiction."

In Quebec, the committee on Rites and Ceremonies debates the question of the substitution of electric lights for candles, and does not place much stress on the SUbstitution, believing that both serve the purpose equally well. Grand Master Padgett, of Virginia, informs his Grand Lodge that "ritual is only one phase of the great work of educating our members to the meaning and significance of Freemasonry." The Grand Master of Canada (Onto ) decided that if a member found it impossible to memorize the necessary ritual entitling him to advancement, the Master would be justified in conferring the next degree, provided the member had an intelligent understanding of the work. Texas is pretty well satisfied with itself, judging from Grand Master McKinney's address: . , 'It is my opinion that Texas has the best system of preserving and teaching the esoteric part of Masonry of anyone. Not only is the system the best that can be devised, but also the several members thereof are capable and efficient to a very high degree. The best prevention of formalism is the right kind of ritualism. Multiplied thousands of Masons find more joy and thrill in the secret work than in the study of Masonic history, symbolism, and the abstract principles involved in Masonic research."

Past Grand Master Chase, in Idaho, submitted a resolution to the Grand Lodge, later adopted, providing that the Board of Custodians should have final authority on all matters having to do with the interpretation of the ritualistic and esoteric work, but that any change should require the sanction of the Grand Lodge itself before becoming effective.


316

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Maryland attempts U; have a certificate man in every lodge, and the Grand Master reports that he is having enthusiastic response in this effort. In the District of Columbia we find that sixty certificates have been issued by the committee on Work and Lectures. These appear to be unlimited as to the time for which they run and that the one to whom issued, while letter perfect at the time of examination, might lose his accuracy and in time be unable to transmit the work in its purity. The Grand Master recommended that these certificates should be limited in time to three years from date of issuance, subject to further renewal. The committee which passed on the recommendation believe~ that those who desired to maintain a degree of unusual proficiency should not have any valid objection to demonstrating their continued knowledge and accuracy at intervals of three years and might even welcome the opportunity to receive evidence of their continued excellence in ritualistic work. The committee further recommended that the certificates be issued over the signature of the Grand Master and under the seal of the Grand Lodge. Reviewer Archdeacon, of Western Australia, devotes a page or more to the subject of modernizing the ritual. He believes that if a vote should be taken throughout the English-speaking and Masonic world on the question of retaining Masonic ceremonies in their present form, an overwhelming majority would answer in the affirmative. He says: , 'Those whose minds have been enriched with the lore of the past are well content with its philosophy, its symbolism, its history, its form of government and its ceremonies, all of which, in common with its established usages and customs, has come down to them through the ages as a priceless heritage. Why introduce any change, they may well ask. Yet, it must be admitted that there is a minority which exhibits signs of unrest when they regard the ritual as practices in Blue Masonry. Its archaismsand they are not few--do not appeal to them. Assertions which do not square with facts, as facts are beheld by them, are not considered consistent. Infected with the modem craze for bringing things up to date, they appear to think that Masonry would benefit greatly if (1) for the archaisms of the ritual there were substituted language suited to the educational standards of the present, and (2) discretionary power was entrusted to the rulers in the Craft to depart from the prescribed ritual whenever it appeared to them desirable. To effect such a change does not, however, warrant or support any attack upon our other ceremonies. We need to remember that our ritual is couched in language no less easily understood than the noble diction of the volume of the Sacred Law. Modernizing the ritual would no more increase its interest than modernizing the language of the Bible. ' ,

A special committee on ritual in Kentucky, discussing methods by which the jurisdiction could arrive at uniformity of work, sent out questionnaires to all other jurisdictions. Forty-three replies were received, twenty-nine reporting as having no ritual of any kind, and fourteen sending in copies of rituals as adopted, all of which were in code. The committee says:


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

317

, 'In the jurisdictioJl8 where rituals are approved it is found that the system. of district lecturers are the rille with all its attendant use and abuse. Although the district lecturer system has some meritorious aspects, the disadvantages would seem to outweigh the benefits to a considerable extent. We need only briefly call attention to the tremendously powerful machine which can be built on such a system with its power for harm to the best interests of the Fraternity."

Only four per cent of those jurisdictions approached for an opinion were favorable to a ritual or a district lecturer system. The State of Washington has a Board of Custodians, but Grand Master Roberts suggested: , 'That the Board of Custodians of the work is entirely too large, costing unnecessary expense to the Grand Lodge and I therefore wish to make the only recommendation that this Board be reduced to three memberstwo in the State of Washington and one in the territory of Alaska."

Grand Master Anderson, of Michigan, called off all scheduled lodges of instruction, due to economic conditions, and recommended the Illinois plan of having many lecturers proficient in the work available in every part of the State and to serve without pay. He thought if Masonry was to have a traveling exponent in the jurisdiction he might better be one designated as a Grand Orator, who could resell Masonry to its own membership by large group meetings, checking financial accounts, and laying out particular plans for administration. He adds: , 'If Masons could be shown that there is something more constructive in this fraternity than whether the ears of corn hang near a 'water ford' or a 'water fall,' then, my brethren, I am sure there would be more brethren paying their dues and, consequently, far less suspensions. I do not mean any personal criticism of the present Grand Lecturer, who deserves the commendation of every member of Grand Lodge for the efficient manner in which he has administered the duties required of him. I do, however, criticize the system and believe the same money spent to reconsecrate or resell Masonry to Masons will prove to be a better plan."

If Masonry in the United States has trouble in securing unifonnity in the teaching of its ritual, what do our readers think is the situation in the Philippine Islands, where there is apparently as many dialects as there are Grand Lodge officers' Many attempts have been made to secure translation into the native tongues of the various localities. Other brethren in lodges object to the translation of the ritual into the vernacular on the ground that it would give rise to great confusion and, owing to the many tongues spoken there, no one would be able to guarantee the correctness of the work as translated. The custodians of the work suggested that only rituals used in public ceremonies, where non-masons were to be invited, should be translated and that in such instances the translation should be revised and edited by at least three competent brethren qualified to pass judgment on the merits of the translation. The translation of degree rituals will not be authorized, at least at the present time.


318

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

Queensland brethren engaged in a wordy discussion over the adoption of a uniform ritual. It appears that when the Grand Lodge of Queensland was formed in 1920, some of the brethren were assured that the ritual would not be interferred with; later the Board of General Purposes attempted to enforce a uniform working, provoking a discussion on the floor of the Grand Lodge. One brother informed them: "You will not get united by forcing, or trying to force us to depart from what we have been used to all our lives. Why cannot you let men like myself die under the ritual we have lived our Masonic lives'"

The Grand Lodge decided against the resolution submitted by its Board of General Purposes. One of the earliest teachers of Masonic ritual in the United States was Thomas Smith Webb. His edition of Masonic monitors was almost unlimited and he probably had a greater influence on the ritual than any single individual. His remains lie buried in Rhode Island and by way of conclusion of this section of the review, the report of the committee on the Webb monument, as made to the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island, is apropos: "Your committee on the Thomas Smith 'Webb Monument begs leave to report that during a severe storm in the month of January of this year, a large tree which stood on the northerly portion of the Thomas Smith Webb burial lot at the North Burial Ground, was blown down. In falling, the tree struck the Webb monument and caused it to topple over. The blocks were not badly damaged, however, and arrangements were made to have the monument re-erected. , , An examination of the stump of the tree which caused the damage to the monument was made and it was found that the tree must have been in a weakened condition for quite a length of time. The stump showed that approximately two-thirds of the tree's diameter was rotted and due to this fact there was not enough strength to the trunk to withstand a storm. The condition was brought to the attention of the chairman of the North Burial Ground Commission and it was their decision that the North Burial . Ground was in no way responsible for the damage to the Thomas Smith Webb monument. As this monument is not under perpetual care, it was stated that no responsibility was assumed in the matter. , 'The cost of re-erecting the monument was not sufficiently large to warrant pressing the claim with the commissioner, even though your committee deems this an unfair attitude to assume, inasmuch as the Grand Lodge is paying and has been paying an annual amount for the upkeep of the burial lot for a great many years. , 'The monument is again in an upright position and will stand for a number of years, but it has stood there since the year 1862 and it is now desirable that the replacement be made, in order that a perfect stone may honor the memory of that illustrious and distinguished Mason."

REVIEWS

Reviewer Cheney, of New Hampshire, says: "Freemasonry is in this world to stay. Its ideals touch the infinite. All of the rest of it is dependent upon individual and cooperative effort. Let's not WOFry about the fate of our institution. But some good souls


1934

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

319

must have something to worry about. If they will turn their attention to themselves, as individuals, they may :find something to do; something to reclaim; something to win." Concerning the passing of the late Corona H. Briggs, he said: , , The last words he will ever write as to our personal relations were just to say that we were good friends. That will ever be a happy memory to us." Reviewer Clift, of Virginia, states that he has never once seen an evil of dual membership specified and it is surprising that we should admit it had any advantages whatever. He says: "If he will check up the names of the 5,571 that were suspended and dimitted from Missouri lodges during 1931, we feel sure he will :find over half of them accounted for in some degree at least by his Grand Lodge's , close communion' law."

If our friend Clift will read our section of the review under "Dual Membership" he will find several of these evils specified, nor do we believe that very many of the suspensions reported in 1931 are due to our close communion law. Reviewer Wright, of Oregon, tells us : "A worthy Secretary handed his W. M. the Grand Lodge proceedings to read. Upon return, book showed it had not been opened-no interest in what Grand Lodge did or in foreign review. Ignorance dismal still prevails as to these books. Some never heard of them-yet they are accessible in lodge libraries-a textbook for D.D.G.M.'s and lodge officers. Grand Lodge-Iecturers-writers-all combined--eannot make a W. M. or any lodge officers." Reviewer Mitchell, of New Mexico, believes that memorable occurrences of the year were: "The dedication of the London Peace Memorial; the Bicentennial Anniversary of the establishment of Masonry in Massachusetts; the suppression of Masonry in Germany; the withdrawal of recognition of the Grand Lodge of the Philippines by certain Grand Lodges." Reviewer Sanford, of Maryland, does not agree with Missouri's Grand Master in the action of the Missouri lodge at Eldon in initiating a candidate who had been rejected by a Maryland lodge several years ago. He believes our action, 'Shows a sad lack of that fraternal regard which one jurisdiction should have for another. May we ask what was there fair in the act of the lodge at Eldon writing to the lodge in Maryland of their intent to do the very thUlg about which complaint was made' It was in the nature of adding insult to injury." For the information of our friends in Maryland may I keep history straight by quoting the following communications: The chairman of the investigating committee of the lodge at Eldon, Mo., wrote the Secretary of the Maryland lodge:


320

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1934

"Mr. , of & Co., has applied for admission to Ionia Lodge No. 381, Eldon, Mo. He states he petitioned your lodge in 1926. Can you give me any information as to character'"

The Missouri lodge received the following reply: , 'In reply to a letter received from the chairman of the investigating committee in reference to the petition of Mr. , I am sorry to inform you that on ::March 23, 1926, he was rejected in lodge, therefore we hold jurisdiction over the applicant and it will be necessary for Ionia Lodge to request waiver of jurisdiction from lodge before action can be taken."

Under Missouri regulations there was nothing to prohibit the reception of the petition. The lodge at Eldon, therefore, knowing of the previous rejection of the petitioner, legally elected him to receive the degrees. The candidate later returned to Maryland and visited the lodge in which he was rejected; complaint was made as to his attendance and a communication was addressed to the Grand Master of Maryland, whereupon the Grand Master addressed the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri asking him to, , Notify me by what authority Ionia Lodge No. 381, of Missouri, conferred the degrees of Masonry upon Mr. ',

The communication was answered by the Grand Master of Missouri, who said in part: , 'I am very sorry that any Missouri lodge should have given offense to your Grand Lodge, for which we have the highest appreciation. I cannot find from our constitution and by-laws where they have violated any of the laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. * * * I feel very sorry if it has occasioned any misunderstanding between our jurisdictions and will present the matter to the jurisprudence committee of our Grand Lodge at the next annual communication in the hope that a solution may be found. ' ,

The jurisprudence committee of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, made up of representative Masons of the jurisdiction, fully approved the action of their Grand Master. Reviewer Ponton, of Canada, indexes topically the various subjects treated in his review. Missouri is listed under "Citizenship" and "Extraneous Societies." The late Aldro Jenks, Past Grand Master of Wisconsin, offered his thirty-sixth and last annual review. He criticizes Missouri's attitude in not recognizing the suspension of Missouri Master Masons by lodges in the jurisdictions in which the member resides. His conclusion is: , 'Of course, the Grand Lodge cannot be compelled to recognize such action of a lodge in another jurisdiction, but there can be no doubt that its ruling is contrary to the general rules of Masonic jurisprudence. ' ,

We thoroughly agree with our late friend and believe Missouri should take some action placing its laws in harmony with those of other jUTisdi