Page 1


OFFICERS ~F

THF..-

GRA D LODGE OF MO. 1888--9. J PERRY OOD, ew London THEODORE BRACE, Paris GEORGE E. ALKER, Potosi B. H. I GRAM:, edalia AMUEL M. KE ~ ~ARD, t. Loui REv. JOH D. OIL, D. D., t. Louis* REV. C. H. BRIGGS, Independence ELDER JACOB HUGLE ,Paris REV. J. L. L. W ,t. Joseph REV. J. J. WILKI ,Sedalia REV. B. G. TUTT, D. D., Liberty REV. A. E. ROGERS, Fulton ELDER THO . E. HEPHERD, Buffalo R. E. COLLI , t. Louis J. P. BLA TO ,Kirksville J Y L. TORREY, t. Louis R. E. WITI', Fayette E. . B , Potosi F. E. BRUTO , turgeon J. . L DALE, Independence JOH R. FERG 0 , pringfield ORA P CLARK, BOwling Green . R. EDG R, Ironton JOHN . OWE, t. Louis

GrandMaater. D. G. Ma8ter. G. Sen.. Warden. G. Jr. Wm·den. G. Treasurer. G. &eretary. G. C1w.plain. G. Chap14in. G. Chap14·n. G. Ch!Lp14in. G. Chapl4in. G. Chap14in. G. Chap14in.

G. &no Deacon. G. Jr. Deacon. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. G. Sword Bearer. G. Senim Steward. G.JuniorSteward. G. PurBfLivant. G. Ormor• G. Oralor. G. Tyler.

•Also committee on Foreign Correspondence.

OTE.-All Jette for the Grand Lecturer hould be addressed to care of the Grand secretary :il0 Pine treet, who will deli..er them.

ALLAN McDOWELL. St. Louis.

-

-

Gra~d Lecturer.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

SIXTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CmnWNICATION . OF TJ-fE

M. W. GRAND LODGE A. F.

AND

A. M.

OF THE

STArrE OF MISSOURI, COXVENED .\'1'

ST. LOUIS, OCTOBER 9, A. D., 1888; A. L., 5888.

s~r.

WOODWAHD & TIERNAN

LOUIS:

PRINTI~G CO)!PA:\Y,

1888.

301l to 313

~orth

Third Street.


OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE

SIXTY-EIGHTH

ANNUAL COJ\iJ\iUNICATION OF THE

M. W. GRAND LODGE, A. F. & A. M., STATE OF

~USSOURI.

• The Sixty-Eighth Annual COlnmunication of the l\10st Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted J\1asons of J\1issouri, assen1bled in Masonic Hall, City of St. Louis, October 9th, 1888, at 10 o'clock A. :3L There were present the follo'wing Grand Officers: WILLIAM M. WILLIAMS JAl\1ES P. WOOD THEODORE BRACE GEORGE E. WALKER SAM'L M. KENNARD JOIIN D. VfNCIL . ALLAN ",-fcDO\VELL .: ROBERT E. COLLINS B. n. INGRAHAM JAY L. TORREy CIIARLES J. WALKER R. E. WITT W. A. THOMS F. E. BHUTON 'J. r. BLANTON J.W. FARRIS JOHN W. OWEN

,

M. lV. Grand jlfW3ter. R. TV. Depu.ty Grand Master. R. W. Senior Grand Wardell. R. IF. Junior Grand Wardell. R. W. Grand Trca.su;rer. R. W. Grand Secrclal'.l!. R. W. G1"and Lecturei'. Grand Senior Dea.con. Grand.Juniol' Dea~oll. Grand llfarshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Pm·suivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Tyler.


4

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

OPENING.

o

The Grand Master opened the Most 'Vorshipful Grand Lodge in A~{PLE FORM. Sacred music was led by W orshipfuI Brother James JTorrocks, on the organ, and pa.rticipated in by the Brethren. John D. Vincil, as Grand Chaplain, led the devotions at a Throne of Grace. The Grand Lodge was then declared ready for business, a constitutional number of Lodges being represented. CREDENTIALS.

The Grand Master announced the names of the following Brethren as a Comnlittee on Credentials: A. Fisher, 'Vm. H. Carpenter, Sanl'l L. C. Rhodes, John R. Ferguson, and H any Keene. The Committee subsequently reported as present Representatives from 200 Lodges, besides penuanent nlembers and Grand Officers. [The Report is found in the Appendix.] The Grand :Master then proceeded to read his ANNUAL ADDRESS.

Following its reading, the Deputy Grand Master referred the Address to a COlnmittee of Past Grand Masters, whose names are herewith given: Oeo. R. Hunt, Sam'l H. Saunders, John D. Vincil, R. E. Anderson, N. 1\1. Givan,.r S. Browne, 'V. R. Stubblefield, Lee A. I-Iall, J. 'V. BO}Td.

o


1888.J

Cfrand Lod,qe of Missouri.

5

ANNU AI. ADDRESS.

To the Most Worshipf1J"l Grand Lodge of .Missouri, A. F. and A. M.: BRETHRE~: I meet you with cordial greetings at the opening of the Sixty-Eighth Annual Communication of our Grand Lodge. I bring good tidings from all parts of our Grand Jurisdiction. The past year bas been one of unusual prosperity among our people. The heart of the husbandman has been made glad by abundant harvests. Success has crowned the efforts of business enterprise.

Our State, while fifth in population, is, even now, second to none in the sisterhood of States in the wealth of her resources, in the intelligence and virtue of her citizens, and, during the past year, has steadily advanced in all that tends to add to her greatness. Masonry has shared in the general prosperity. It is true that, from here and there, C0111.e words of discouragement, and, occasionally, even discordant murmurs lllay be mingled with the general rejoicings. The Craft, hO\\'e\'er, throughout the State has never been in better condition. As we enter upon our labors, and before we begin to "layout upon our trestle board" desigils for future work, let us, ,,路ith grateful hearts, ackno\'dedge the protecting care, that the Great Architect of tIle uniyerse has exercised over us during the year, earnestJy and sincerely invoking His blessing" upon the work of our hands." OUR DEAD.

'While we exchange salutations to-day, we are reminded of the fact that familiar faces are missing from lllany of our lodge rooms. Since our last annual communication, 'some, who had worked long and faithfully, "have been called from labor," and, at the bidding of the Master, have laid aside "their working tools" and entered into rest. Others, who have just begun their life's work, have been summoned. "",Ve mourn, not as those without hope." 'Ve cherish the m81110ry of their good works. "Although dead, they yet speak." .


6

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

W. C. FORE:llAN,

Past Grand Orator, died at his home in Hannibal, Missouri, on the 7th day of June, 1888. He was an upright citizen, an able and distinguished lawyer, and an exemplary::.\lason. I recommend that. a memorial page be set apart in our proceedings in honor of our departed Brother. ROB. :lfORRIS, L. L. D.

The Poet Laureate of Masonry, died during the past year. His name is familiar to Masons throughout the world. He had devoted a lifetime to the service of the Fraternity, and his beautiful poetry, breathing the true ::\lasonic spirit, has made for him an enduring fame. Missouri Masons recall with pleasure his visit to our Lodges a short time ago, and join their Kentucky Brethren in lamenting his death, and vie with them in doing honor to his memory.

OFFICIAL ACTS. The Book of Constitutions requires the Grand Master to make report of his official acts since the last communication of the Grand Lodge. I have had frequent occasion to interpret our laws and explain their meaning, as well as to apply them to the facts in given cases. The principles in most instances were well settled, and the only question submitted was as to their proper application. I do not deem it necessary to incumber your proceedings 'with a detailed statement of such rulings. This would be a useless waste of time and space. I will say, however, that there seems to be a widespread misapprehension of the meaning of Seetion 25, p.48, Book of Constitutions. I have received numerous letters upon the subject. It is unnecessary to report any decision in regard thereto, as the language is too plain for misconstruction. To save future correspondence, however, it may be proper to call attention to the fact, that it is not a prerequisite to the right of dimit, that the application therefor should state, that it is made "for the purpose of joining another Lodge, forming a new Lodge, or with the view to removing out of the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge," and the Section referred to does not so declare. The absence of such statement from the application, only serves to make "the applicant a non-affiliate from the date of hiJ3 diniit, and subject to all the disabilities of such." I recall, as of practical importance, and not covered by reports of former Grand Masters, only one ruling made since the last session of the Grand Lodge. As an appeal is pending therefrom, it is proper that it should be reported. The Grand Lodge has heretofore decided that, upon a Masonic trial, the record in a crl:mi1wl proceeding against the defendant


1888.J

Grand Lodge of lJ!Iis80uri.

7

for the same offense with which he stands charged before the Lodge, may be read in evidence. Can the judgment or decree in a civil case be so used? I present, upon that point, for your consideration the following DECISION.

. 'Vhere the pleadings in a civil suit, to which a :J1ason is a party, and in which he has the right, as well as the opportunity, to appear, present the sole issue as to his guilt or innocence of a crime, the judgment or decree therein is competent evidence in a Masonic trial for the same offense. The question came up before me in a case where the charge was adultery, and, in support thereof, the decree against defendant in a divorce suit, predicated upon that ground, was offered in evidence. Our Lodges have no power to issue compulsory process for the attendance of witnesses who are not Masons, and unless such a record can be so used, one who is guilty of a heinous offense, and so declared after a fair trial by the courts of his country, may, to the discredit of the Fraternity, still remain in "good J[a.sonic standing," although his other standing in the community is anything but good. SALOON KEEPIXG.

This vexed question, which has given rise to much discussion in the Lodges, is finally settled in this Jurisdiction. I have to report that not a single Lodge within our borde'rs has a member engaged in this business, which you have declared constitutes a Masonic offense. The action of this Grand Body at its previous sessions left no doubt of the law upon the subject, nor of its purpose to require the strict enforcement thereof. "The Grand Lodge shall be the supreme Ma..,>onic authority within the State of Missouri," is the declaration of the "Book of Constitutions." . The right of appeal from its decisions to the Grand Officers, or to the Lodges, cannot be recognized. Its edicts, so far as Masonic tribunals are concerned, are final. "It is the court of last resorL" vVhile recognizing the fact that the Lodges should be permitted to exercise a "reasonable discretion" in the enforcement of discipline, the Grand Lodge has said with equal emphasis, that "they will be held responsible for the manner in which that duty is performed." This" reasonable discretion" cannot authorize an arbitrary refusal to enforce a law of the Grand Lodge because of a diJference of opin'ion as to the propriety of stiCh a lav;.

The discretion confided is a reasonable one, and extends to the time and manner of proceeding against offenders, in view of the circumstances surrounding the case, the character of the offense, etc. It cannot be so


PToceedings of the

8

[Oct.

extended as to make the Lodges practically independent of the Grand Lodge and of its superintending ~ontrol. 'Yith these principles in view, and realizing that the Law is binding upon the Grand 1\1aster, as well as upon every 1\1ason in the State, I have endeavored to deal with this question, wherever it has arisen, in a spirit of fairness to all concerned, and with due consideration for the feelings of those interested, at the same time endeavoring to uphold, with a :firm hand, the authority and. dignity of the Grand Lodge. I have been met with kindness and courtesy by the officers and members of the Lodges where the matter was of practical importance. I have advised and consulted with them. They, too, recognized their obligation to obey the Law as declared by the Supreme Masonic authority. Those engaged in "saloon keeping/' where they desired to do so, were permitted to dimit, when application therefor was made hefore charges were preferred. In some instances they quit the business. 'Where they have done neither, the Lodges to which they belonged have carried into effect the law upon the subject by instituting proceedings against them. The result is, that no member of any Lodge under the Jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is now engaged in the business of usaloon keeping." W. M., EXETER LODGE, No. 514.

Charges were'preferred against this Brother for gross un masonic conduct. The charges were investigated by R. W. Bro. 'Ym. Talbert, D. D. G. 1\1., Twenty-ninth District, and upon his report, that they were well founded, I suspended the 'V. M. ii'om his office and placed the Lodge in charge of the S. 'V. Inasmuch as the term of office of the ,Y. 1\1., expired prior to the present session of the Grand Lodge, I ,deemed it unnec-路 essary to cite him to appear here for trial. I submit herewith the papers in the case. W. M., PICKERING LODGE, Ko. 4i2.

Charges ofgross unmasonic conduct were preferred against this Brother. Upon my request, an investigation was made by R. 'V. Bro. Ira V. McMillan, D. D. G. 1\1., of the Thirteenth District, and upon his report, I suspended the Brother from office as 'V. 1\1. of said Lodge, placed the same in charge of the S. 'V. and cited the 'V. M. to appear before the Grand Lodge at its present session for trial upon said charges. The papers in the case are herewith submitted. ARREST OF CHARTERS.

During the year I have arrested the Charters of the following Lodges: '~Tarsaw,

No. 365.

Ionic, 1\0. 235.

Plumh, No. 375.


1888.J

GTand Lodge oj lJfissOUTi.

9

In each case the days of usefulness of the Lodge bad been numbered. Its members had lost interest. It was difficult to obtain the presence of a quorunl at the regular communications. :\1eetings had not been. held for months. Tbe Lodge was dying by degrees. It was thought best to end the agony and put a stop to its existence at once. This was done in each instance after a special investigation by the D. D. G. Jr., and upon his recommendation. SELIGl\JAN LODGE, Xo. 517.

The condition of this Lodge needs investigation.

The 'V. 1\1., the J.

'V., the Secretary; and a number of its members have severally, and at different times, written for information as to the laws of this Grand Lodge in regard to the sale of intoxicating liquors by Masons. Either a great deal of ignorance prevails upon this subject, or a large amount of whisky is being disposed of by the Brethren. Recently I have received letters from the officers and members, and even "the stranger within their gates," presenting charges and counter-charges. It was too late in the year for a proper investigation prior to the present session of the Grand Lodge. I deem it my duty, however, to call your special atten. tion to the matter. HU~TSVILLE LODGE,

No. 30 AND WESTVILLE LODGE, No. 202.

1 was directed by this Grand Body, at its last session, to investigate the condition of the above Lodges. This I did through R. 'V. Bro. J. 'V. Barnett, D. D. G. lVI., of the Seventh District, and I refer to his report for full information upon the subject. ORIEl'T FRANCAIS LODGE, Xo. 167,

Voted to surrender its Cbarter. It then attempted to grant all of its members dimits. This latter action was declared illegal, and the dimits issued after the charter was surrendered were held to be void, and the Brethren who had received them were required to surrender them, and apply to the Grar:td Secretary for dimits, as provided by law. APPOINTMENTS.

"T.

R Bro. Stephen Chapman resigned his position as D. D. G. M. of the Eighteenth District, and 1 directed a commission to issue to R. W. Bro. Geo. 'V. Carleton to fill the vacancy. R. 'V. Bro. Daniel Sayre, Hepresentative of this Grand Lodge near the Grand Lodge of Alabama, after a long and faithful service, died on May 22d,1888. Upon tbe recommendation of tbe M. '\T. Grand :\Iaster of that


10

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

State, I appointed 1\'1. 'V. Bro. H. Clay Tompkins his successor, and a commission was duly issued to him. DISPENSATIONS.

The usual number of dispensations have been issued during the year for removal to new halls, the election of officers after the regular time therefor had elapsed, the laying of corner-stones, etc. I refer to the Grand Secretary's Report for further information in reference thereto. Upon one or two occasions requests have heen made for permission to have Masonic celebrations jointly with political speaking, other organizations, etc. It is needless to say that the dispensations asked could not be granted under those circumstances.

CORNER-STONES.

I have received a number of invitations to lay the corner-stones of l?ublic buildings in different parts of the State. "There I have been nnable to attend in person, I have issued dispensations to suitable Brethren to perform the ceremonies. On June 13th, 1888, at the request of the parties in charge, I laid the corner-stone of the Christian Church in Sedalia. A large number of Brethren were present. An escort of Knights Templar was courteously furnished by St. Omer Commandery of that city. NEW LODGES.

Dispensations for new Lodges have been issued, a list of which will be presented in the report of the Grand Secretary. No such dispensations were granted until the law was fully complied with, and the D. D. G. M. had recommended the establishment of the Lodge. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND ?-IASTERS.

The Brethren holding these positions have, as a class, been faithful and efficient, and have done good work. Reports have been received from every District in the State, which is something unusual. Some have been late in reporting, and the reports of others are very meagre; yet it is encouraging to know that everyone has presented a report. I take pleasure in laying these reports before yOIl, and ask that they be printed with the proceedings. Some of them call special attention to the condition of the Lodges named therein. I commend this matter to your special consideration.


1888.J

GTand Lodge of JlfissoUTi.

11

Some method should be adopted by which the expenses of the D. D. G. Masters can be paid. It ought not to be left to the volition of the Lodges visited. It is too much to ask that they not only devote their time, but also expend their money in instructing the Lodges. As one of the most efllcient expresses it in his report, they ought not to be required !' to work for nothing and board themselves." To make the system as efficient as it should be, this must be remedied. When they are invited to visit a Lodge the expenses of the visit are usually paid, but, most frequently, it is the Lodge that fails to extend an invitation which is in greatest need of their services. Several of "the reports make complaint npon this subject, and it is a matter that deserves attention, if we expect the supervision of the Craft by the District Deputy Grand Masters to be as ,efficient as it should be. STATE LODGES OF INSTlWCTIO:N.

I have followed the precedent set by former Grand l\'lasters in holding State Lodges of Instruction. These Lodges were held in Boon ville, Springfield, Kansas City, St. Joseph and Kirksville. I ,vas unable to be present at St. Joseph and Kansas City. The instruction in the ritual was under the direction of R. \\T. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer. His fa,ithfulness and patience in communicating the work are well known throughout the State. The Grand Lodge is to be congratulated upon having a Grand Lecturer so "apt to teach," so thoroughly familiar with the ritual of Masonry, so efficient in the discharge of the duties of his position, and so earnest in his efforts to advance the interests of the Fraternity. A new feature was added, during the past year, to these Lodges. We arranged to have an address delivered upon a Masonic subject at each evening session. This added greatly to the interest as well as the profit of the occasion, and gave the Brethren an opportunity to listen to leetures by eloquent and distinguished Masons upon the History, Symbolism and Moral Teachings of Masonry. I am greatly indebted to those who so kindly consented to deliver addresses upon these occasions. All who attended the meetings will concur in the statement that they were productive of much good. YELLOW FEVEH.

An appeal for aid was received from our Brethren of Florida, who have been so sorely afflicted by this scourge. This Grand Lodge has always been ready to respond to such calls. In accordance with precedents sanctioned by this Body, I directed two hundred dollars to be sent at once out of the Grand Lodge treasury, and" issued an appeal to the Lodges for contributions to be forwarded to the Relief Committee at Jacksonville. The Grand Secretary will report the result of this call.


1~

PToceeding8 of the

[Oct.

TIlE MAXWELL CASE.

The trial of Hugh M. Brooks, alias Maxwell, has passed into history. The case attracted widespread attention, and everything connected with it was read with eager interest: It also has a Masonic history which it is my duty to present. 'Vhile the matter was pending before the Executive of the State upon an application for a commutation of the sentence pronounced by the courts, it was published far and wide, that tbe Masonic Lodges ,,,ere endeavoring, in their character as Masons, to influence Executive action. I did not believe that any of our Lodges had committed such an indiscretion, yet such wide currency had been given to the report, that it seemed necessary to take some official action in the matter, and to promptly repudiate, in the name of the Grand Lodge, such alleged interference. As soon as the matter was brought to my attention I sent the following telegram; Rev. John D. Vincil, Grand Secretary Masonic Grand Lodge, SI. Louis, jl[o. :

If any Lodge has in any manner attempt.ed to int.erfere in the Maxwell case, as is reported, its Charter will bc arrested at once. Rave D. D. G. M. Collins investigate and report. The Grand Lodge will not tolcrat.e any effort to use the influcnce of Freemasonry in any manner' whatever, either for or against the prisoner in this or any other case. Such matters are entirely foreign to our organization. If necessary, let the Lodges be notified of this action. w. :M. WILLIA~iS, Grand Master.

In accordance with the direction contained in said telegram, R. 'V. Bro. Collins made a thorough investigation of the matter, and, I am glad to state, fOUlIl] that the rumors were without foundation, and that none of our Lodges had attempted to interfere in the matter in any way. 'Vhile further proceedings were unnecessary, I feel that it was well that action was taken, so that any misapprehension upon the subject might be removed, and the position of the Grand Lodge in such matters be understood. MASONIC

Ho-r.m.

The Board of Directors of the Home made application for the money appropriated at our last session for the benefit of the same, and the amount so set apart was accordingly paid to the Treasurer of the Board. The Home has not yet been located, as I learn. 'Vhile those having it in charge would gladly have proceeded more rapidly, it was deemed more prudent not to act hastily in the matter. The affairs of the Home are in safe hands. ~o steps, I am sure, will be ta.ken that sound business methods will not justify. They will so act that, when it is established, the Home will do honor and credit to the Masons of Missouri. I am. not i 11-


GTand Lodge of

1888.)

lIfi.'J.'JOUTi.

13

formed as to the plans of the Board, but, doubtless, you will be fully advised in reference thereto. GRAKD SECRETARY.

I cannot conclude this report without acknowledging my obligations to 1\'1:. \V. Bro. Vincil, our efficient Grand Secretary, for his aid and assistance during the past year. I have had fi'equent occasion to call upon him, and have never "found him wanting," either in the ability or 1Jiilhngncs8 to respond to the call. I am indebted to him for many favors, both, personal and official. His services to the Grand Lodge have been invaluable. CONCLUSION.

You have now before you a plain recital of the more important events of the administration about to close. It has been my earnest desire, that all of my official acts should tend to promote the interest.'3 of Masonry, and to advance the welfare of my Brethren. I have received 'many courtesies from the officers and members of our Lodges during the year that has just ended. In my intercourse with the Masons of Missouri, I have met with uniform kindness at their hands. My official relations with all of my Brethren have been of the most pleasant character. I will always carry with me bright memories of my connection with this Grand Lodge, and will remember with pleasure the many courtesies shown to me. I will fondly cherish the friendships formed with the members of this body, and will look forward with pleasing anticipations to our annual meetings. In conclusion, I again most sincerely thank you, not only for the great honor which you conferred upon me, 'when you caused me to be hailed, Grand Master of Masons of Missouri, but also for the consideration which you have shown, the forbearance which you have exercised, and the assistance which you have rendered to me, in the discharge of the duties of the office. ,V. M. 'VILLIAMS, Grand .J!aster.

The Grand J\laster then said: l

"Upon coming into the Hall this morning, and since my Address was prepared, I have received a letter from Past Grand Master Ryland, paying a beautiful tribute to the memory of one of the oldest members of this Grand Lodge, wbo died in Lexington, 1\'10., on yesterday afternoon. 1 submit the letter in connection with my report, and ask for it a place in your proceedings. I will read it to the Grand Lodge: "


14

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

LEXINGTON, Mo., October 8th. 1888. WiUiam lot. WiUiams, Grand ],fastel' oj ],[asons, St. Louis. Mo.:

MOST WORSlIIPFUL Sm AND BROTHBR-Permit me to call your attention to the death of James Clowdsley, Past Master of Lexington Lodge, No. 149, A. F. & A. M., which took place at 2 o'clock A. 111., October 7th. 1888. Brother Clowdsley was made a :Master Mason at Lexington, Mo., on the 17th ofSeptember, 1840, while old Lafayette Lodge was Under Dispensation as Lexington Lodge. He was also a Royal Arch Mason and a Knight Templar. and filled the stations of Master and High Priest at Lexington for many years, and dies in full connection with his Lodge, as a Master Mason, at the ripe old age of seventy-six years. He came to Lexington in 1837, and helped to organize the Methodist Church of this place in that year, and was class-leader and steward of the same nearly his whole lifetime. Brother Clowdsley was elected Sheriffof Lafayette County, in 1848, which county was his principal residence for more than half a century. Asa man, in all the relations of life-brother, husband, father, friend, Mason and Christian, he endeared himself to his fellowmen, and goes to the grave full of hOllors, loved aI!d respected by aU who knew him. Of the little band of men who constituted the Masonic Lodge. Under Dispensation, our venerable Brother. Pa,~t Junior Grand Warden Cyrus Osborn, alone remains, and, in fulfillment of a mutual promise made to each other, as the survivor, will conduct the burial services of Masonry at the grave of Brother Clowdsley. If true worth and merit entit1e any man to notice in the Officia1 Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, no one is more deserving than our dear old friend and Brother. My first lessons and lectures in Masonry were received from him, and under the gentle guidance and loving wisdom of such Masons as Osboru, Boulware, Clowdsley and Zeiler I learned to love and revere the principles of our great Institution.

It was my intention to be with you at the opening of the Grand Lodge in the morning, but I must help put away the mortal remains of this good old man to-morrow, and will try and be with you 'Wednesday morning.

Fraternally, your friend and Brother, XENOPHON RYLAND.

AMENDMENT TO GRAND LODGE BY-LAWS.

The following amendn1ent to the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge was presented, being signed by the Masters of twentytwo Lodges in St. Louis: To the 11f. W. Grand 11fasler, Grand Wm'dens and Brelh)'en oj the F. & A • .Af, oj the Stale oj Missouri.'

],f.

W. Grand Lodge A.

The undersigned most respectfully ask your Most Worshipful Body to amend Section 6, Article XVI, of the Ry-Laws of thLo; 1\1. W. Grand Lodge by adding the following: "And the concurrent jurisdiction hereby created in the City of St. Louis shall include Kirkwood Lodge, No. 484."


1888.J

GTand Lodge of lIfisSO'LtTi.路

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REPORTS.

The Grand Secretary presented his Annual Report, which was received and referred to the Conllnittee on Accounts. The Report of Bro. Samuel 1\1. Kennard, Grand Treasurer, "vas presented, and referred to the SaIne Committee. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT. I herewith submit my Annual Report as your Grand Secretary. The Financial portion will appear at the close of this Report. BUSINESS. Immediately following the adjournment of the last session, Commissions were issued and sent to the several District Deputies appointed by the Grand Master. The Charters of the following Lodges were then forwarded to the Deputies, in whose districts they were located: Ava Lodge, No. 26, Ava, Douglas County. Humphreys Lodge, No. 32, IIumphreys, Sullivan County. Monticello Lodge, No. 58, :i\fonticello, Lewis Count)路. Cuba Lodge, No. 312, Cuba, Cra.wford County. Blue Springs Lodge, No. 337, Blue SpriJlgs, Jackson County. Reynolds Lodge, No. 385, Black, Reynolds County. Sedgewickville Lodge, No. 426, Sedgewickville, Bollinger County. Lafayette Lodge, No. 437, Corder, Lafayette County. Dexter Lodge, No. 532, Dexter, Stoddard County. Walker Lodge, No. 533, Walker, Vernon County. Columbia Lodge, No. 534, Pacific, Franklin County. Blackwell Lodge, No. 535, Blackwell, St. Francois County. Ingomar Lodge. No. 536, Willow Springs, Howell County. The above Lodges were severally organized and have made good progress, as shown by their Returns which were promptly made. LODGES UNDER DlSPEXSATION. Fifteen Lodges have been working under authority from the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge during the yellr. Russellville Lodge, at Russellville, was continued U. D. by the last session of this body. Labelle Lodge, at Labelle, Lewis County, was created by the Grand Lodge one year ago. The Grand l\faster has granted thirteen Dispensations for the formation of new Lodges. The list of all Lodges, working under Dispensation, fifteen in number, is herewith furnished. Russellville Lodge, Russellville, Cole County. Labelle Lodge, Labelle, Lewis County. Puxico Lodge, Puxico, Stoddard County. Sparta Lodge, Sparta, Christian County. Pine Lodge, Pine, Ripley County. Bethel Lodge, Bethel, Shelby County. Kennett Lodge, Kennett, Dunklin County. West Gate Lodge, St. Louis, St. Louis City.


16

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

Weatherby Lodge, Weatherby, DeKalb Connty. Bayou Lodge, Bakerstleld, Ozark County. Waynesville Lodge, Waynesville, Pulaski County. Braymer Lodge, Braymer, Caldwell County. Hermon Lodge, Liberal, Barton County. Claflin Lodge, Protem, Taney County. Canopy Lodge, Aurora, Lawrence Connty. ARRESTED CHARTERS. By order of the Grand :Master the following Lodges have been closed up, and their Charters are now on file among the archives of the Grand Lodge: Ionic Lodge, No. 235, Rennselaer, Ralls County. Warsaw Lodge, No. 365, Warsaw, Bellton County. Plumb Lodge, No. 37.), ?l1iddletown, :Montgomery County. The books and papers of said Lodges have been received, and are now on deposit in the office of the Grand Secretary. CONSOLIDATION. King Solomon Lodge, No. 90, formerly of St. Catherines, Linn County, consolidated with Brookfield Lodge, No. 86, same County. Cameron Lodge, No. 296, of Cameron, Clinton County, consolidated with Vinci! Lodge, No. 62, of the City of Cameron. Rome Lodge, No. 314, of Rome, Douglas County, comolidated 'with Ava Lodge, No. 26, of the same County. ' Orient Francais Lodge, No. 167, loc'ated in the City of St. LouiS, surrendered its Charter and turned over its books and papers to R. W. Bro. R. E. Collins, Deputy of the Fifteenth District. The same are now on deposit in the oflice of the Grand Lodge. DISTRICT DEPUTY APPOIl\TED. R. W. Bro. Stephen Chapman, Deputy of the Eighteenth District, having resigned his

office, the Grand 1\laster directed me to issue a commission to Bro. George W. Carleton, of Gayoso, Pemiscot County. He accepted the position and entered upon the work assigned him. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED. By authority of the Grand Master, I issued commissions to M. W. Bros. H. Clay Tompkins, of Alabama, and George B. France, of Nebraska, appointing them the Representatives of this Grand Lodge near their respective Grand Bodies. These appointments were made to fill vacancies. The venerable Daniel Sayre, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Alabama, was for many years our Representative at his Grand Lodge. During the past year he laid aside his pen and ceased to work and live, and entered upon the rest that follows long and faithful labors. Bro. J. N. Wise, of Nebraska, tendered his resignation and ceased to be our Representative longer in tha~ Jurisdiction. SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS Were ordered and issued in the following cases: To R. W. George W. Deatherage, for removal of Lodges Nos. 89 and 333, in the City of Chillicothe, into new hall. R. W. Robert E. Collins, removal of Occidental Lodge, No. 163, into a new hall in the City of St. Louis. To. R. W. Geo. E. Mayhall, for the removal of l'Ionroe Lodge, No. 64, into a new hall in Monroe City. To R. W. A. B. Martindale, for the removal of Wayne Lodge, No. 526, into a new hall in Piedmont. To Harry Keene for the removal of Osborn Lodge, No. 317, into a new hall in Osborn. To R. W. Allan :McDowell, Special Deputy, to organize Blackwell Lodge, No. 535, lInder Charter. 'roo Bro. J. J. Dillinger to direct the removal of Arcana Lodge, No. 389, from Wintersville to Harris, in Sullivan County.


1888.J

GTarLd Lodge of llfissOUTi.

17

To Bro. J. \V. Barnett, for removal of Cunningham Lodge, No..'125, to Sumner, Chariton County. '1'0 R. W. Bro. A. 'Fisher, for removal of Canton and Craft Lodges into a new hall in Canton. To Bro. John J. Dillinger, for removal of IIumphreys Lodge, ~o. 32, in Humphreys. To Bro. F. E. Bybee, for removal of Index Lodge, No. 54, from Index to Garden City. To Bro. Harry Keene, removal of Lodges in St. Joseph into a new hall. To Bro. Henry Marquand, for removal of Chamois Lodge, No. 185, into a new hall. To Bro. Ben~ Warner, for removal of Christian Lodge, No. 392, into a new hall at Oak Grove. To Bro. J. R. Ferguson, for removal of St. ~ieholas Lodge, ~o. 435, into a new hall at Cave Spring. To Bro. E. C. Steele, for removal of Ava Lodge, No. 26, at Ava, Douglas County. To lIro. Wm. B. Wilson, for removal of St. Mark's Lodge, No. 93, into a new hall in the City of Cape Girardeau. CORNER-STONES. By authority of the Grand Master special commissions were issued to divers parties to lay corner-stones of various public buildings, such as churches, schools, and other . structures. These commissions were severally and duly executed, and reports made of the facts. BOOKS .FOR LIBRARY. Some few valuable additions have been made to the library during the year. Our books are not read with that interest which should characterize members of the Fraternity. Very few of the works in the library are ever called for. The Grand Lodge of Iowa, our oldest :Masonic daughter, has a library that may well be the envy of the ){asonic fraternity of this country, for it iR, beyond question, the rarest and best collection of Masonic works on the continent. The library building is an ornament to the city, where the offIce of the Grand Secretary is located. That Grand Lodge has had a fine bronze medal of the building struck and sent to each Grand Lodge in this country. It is a memento of which this Grand Lodge may be proud, as all the Lodges which formed the Grand Lodge of Iowa were created by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Those Charters are now framed and hung in the oflice of the Grand Secretary of Iowa as mementos of the origin of that body. The medal mentioned presents a v.iew of the library building on one side, while the other presents a profile view of the faces of G. B. Van Saun, who was Grand Master when the corner-stone of the library was laid, and that of Bro. T. S. Parvin, the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge for so many years. On. the 20th day of OctOber, 1841, Charters were granted by our Grand Lodge to DesMoines Lodge, No. 41, located at Burlington, Iowa, and to Iowa Lodge, :No. 42, located at Bloomington. In 1813, October 10, Charters were granted by the same body to Dubuque Lodge, No. 62, located at DUbuque, and to Iowa City Lodge, No. 63, located at Iowa. City. All these Lodges were instituted during the administrations of the Hon. Priestly H. l\IcBride, Grand Master, who served five successive terms in the high office to which his Brethren called him. The above named Lodges united in the formation of the Grand Lodge of Iowa in 1844, being all the constitucnt Lodges of that Jurisdiction then; Iowa was, therefore, our eldest daughter, and a right lively daughter she has been. From the four Lodges, making up the Grand Lodge forty-four years ago, 'iihe has grown to be almost as large as her mother, and rivals us in many things. With more than four hundred Lodges, and over twenty thousand members, our neighbor and daughter has given Missouri Masons no cause to regret that she sent out into a new territory those pioneer Lodges. This honorable mention is madc here of our Iowa descendants ill view of the tribnte sent us by that Jurisdiction in the medal now on deposit among the a.rchives of this Grand Lodge. RETURNS. As has been my custom for a nnmher of years, I mailed to ~aell Lodge in the Jurisdiction two blanks for Returns, on the 1st day of July, with a circular of instructions enclosed, showing the law of the Grand Lodge, as to when the fiscal year terminated G. L. PRo.-L


18

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

and that Lodges were required to make up and forward their Returns to the Grand Secretary immediately after the FIRST 1IIEETING in August. To this requirement a great majority of the Lodges responded with commendable promptness. A number did not make their reports until in September. Some failed to report until October. While yet others have not paid any attention to the law of the Grand Lodge. A full and complete report of the financial affairs of the Grand Lodge cannot be made while there are delhlquent Lodges. The numerical stat~ of the Craft in Missouri can only be approximated unless the Returns are sent in on good time. Tlw Grand Lodge requires of its Grand Secretary to ma ke up and print a report for the usc of the session. It is the old requirement to make brick without straw. Such requirement caused trouble to those who were under the necessity of producing the brick for their masters. The delinquency of Lodges is a trouble as llseless as it is allJlOying. It is an utter disregard of the requirements of the Grand Lodge, and is unjust to the faithful and prompt Lodges which comply with the law. I have kept my report open to an unusual date, hoping the tardy Lodges would respond to notices sent out after the limit of the law had expired. A second and a third notice failed to bring any response. Those Lodges whose reports find no place in the tables will understand why they are omitted. The following Lodges were behind time, and have not been heard from at the closing ofthis report, October 4: Windsor Lodge, No. 29. Jonathan Lodge, No. 321. Defiance Lodge, Ko. 88. Pike I . . odge, No. 399. Vienna Lodge, No. 94. Cement Lodge, No. 431. Barnesville Lodge, No. 455. Gallatin Lodge, No. 106. Warrensburg Lodge, No. 135. Clifton I . . odge, No. 463. Kaseyville Lodge, No. 498. Bloomfield Lodge, No. 153. )Iirabile Lodge, No. 166. Exeter Lodge, No. 514. :mtchell Lodge, No. 229. Lockwood Lodge, No. 521. Lodge of Love, No. 259. IN ARREARS.

The Lodges in arrears for dues are the following, their returns having been made on time: :Numbers 14, 18, 31, 42, 52, m, 68, 77, 109, 110, 119, 12-5, 342, 376, 395, 146, 457, 46G, 500, 607. The amount.s due from these and non-reporting Lodges will foot up about eleven hundred dollars. The fees for Charters, and other sources, for the incoming year, will, iueluding the amount just mentioned, make the aggregate sum on hand for ensuing term fully thirteen thousand dollars. It will thus be seen that our financial condition is sound, and the Grand Lodge funds are ample, after donating and paying fifteen thousand dollars to the" Home" Fund. The Grand Lodge owes no man anything. It is living in literal obedience to the Scriptural injunction. YELLo\V FEVER FUND. Early in September I received a letter from Dr. C. W. Johnson, of JaeksoIlvilJe, Florida, who, as Chairman of the Masonic Relief Committee, wrote me an earnest and touching appeal for aid. He said: "The fraternity of this city IlTe in sore distress from the ravages ofYeJ]ow Fever. Manv of our brethren arc sick and very many are destitute. Our hom~ and state resources are ~xhausted, we having battled with the epidemic since August 16. We appeal to our Missouri brethren for help." On receipt of his appeal, I at once transmitted it to Most Worshipful Brother Williams, Grand }lastcr. He published an appeal t.o the :Masons of Missouri in behalf of the fever stricken people of Florida, in the papers of St. Louis, a.nd requested the press throughout the State to copy. The appeal brought some responses, but were slow in coming to hand. The emergency was such as to justify the Grand )1aster in sending help from the funds of the Grand Lodge. Accordingly, on the 15th of September, by direction


lH

GTand Lodge of Missouri.

1888.J

of the Grand Master, I drew a warrant for two hundred dollars, and transmitted the same' with other funds l"eceived, to the Masonic Relief Committee at Jacksonville, Florida: The several amounts sent have been dU~y acknowledged. I present herewith a statement of the amounts received, and from what sources. :\Ianning Treadway, SL Louis, :Mo... S 500 .J. H. Whceling, Cuba, Mo. 1000 'West Gate Lodgc, U. D., St. Louis, )10.. 10 00 Thos. Brown, West Gate Lodge, St. Louis, ::-'10 5 00 Turney Lodge, 519, Turney, ~Io.. 5 00 Henry Deitz and others, Chamois, IlIa 18 75 Palestinc Lodge, 241, St. Charles, )10. 1.) 00 Wallace Lodge, 456, Bnnceton, )[0 20 00 W. E. Black, Gallatin, ]\10. 2 50 Twilight Lodge, Columbia, Mo ]0 00 Donation by members of Montgomery City Lodge, 246. 12 50 Fulton Lodge, 48, Fulton, M o . ' 2ij 00 Cooper Lodge, 36, Boonville, ),'10.. 20 00 Cainsville Lodge, 328, Cainsville. ]\fo .... . .... ..... 0) 00 Donation by brethren of FUlton, lIlo .,. 31 50 II. W. Harris, Pilot Grove Lodge, 277. 10 00 ~fc])ol1ald Lodge, 324, Independence, Mo . 5 00 Brethren of Puxico Lodge. U. D., Puxico, Mo. 12 00 Gate of the Temple Lodge, 422, Springfield, ~ro.. 20 00 Clarksville Lodge, 17, Clarksville, :Mo........ ........ 50 00 Donation from Grand Lodge funds, by the Grand )Jaster... 200 00 Total amount forwarded to October 6th

$ 192 25

STATE OF THE CRAFT. From the returns received it is seen that the amount of work the past year exceeds that of the term preceding by a fair per cent. The initiations, not including the nonreporting Lodges, exceed those of 1887 by nearly three hundred. The passings were a~l足 most two hundred in a.dvance of tlIe former year, as were the rabings. The admissions and reinstatements were also in excess of last year by considerable numbers. Dimissions were about the same. Non-payment for dues were less by a fair number. Deaths wcrc larger than for several years. The footings will be but little different from last year. The general condition oHhe Fraternity is good. There is still a healthy and encouraging growth in the moral aspect of the Brot.herhood. The friends of morality have much cau;:e for encouragement and hope. Greater Vigilance is being exercised by the Lodges and subordinate Grand Officers than in former years, while the laws against vice arc being more rigidly and faithfully enforced. To the challenge, "Watchman, ,,,hat of the night?" 'the reply rings out from many a watch-tower, "The morning cometh." In the purity of the Institution is to be found t.he grand augury of its success and perpetuity. 'l'hc Masoll who detracts from the purity of this moral Institution, whether by act or word, is no friend to the 'Frat.ernity or to the race. }~INA:KCIAL.

The following is furnished as the Financial showing for the fiscal year. I have received and paid over to the Grand Treasurer the sums hereto appended for which I have his receipts from one to thirty: Heceipt ~o. 1 ......$ 64800 2 :3 4..

17650 37950 32950 724 50


20

Pmceedings of the

Receipt NO.6.

.. ........ $1,052 00 1,031 00 607 00 38900 296 00 43600 73650 624 00 102 flO 59900 49000 404 56 27950 35950 36250 100 00 19450 876 50 64100 254 00 12600 24100 12050 18950 15350

7.. 8. 9.

" " "

10. 11 12..

" 13.... " 14.. " 15. " 16.. " 17.. " 18 .. " 19... " 20..

" 21. .... "

22.

"

2:1 ..

"

24 .

" 2.5 .. " 26 ,. 27 " " "

[Oct.

28.

2U 30

............$13,22.3 50

Total

Of the foregoing amount, $1,533 50 came over from outstanding claims of last year. This sum was collected and paid over after the books were closed and balanced in 1887. Of the amount thus paid $260 was received for Charter fees. The books having been closed before any Charters were granted by the Grand Lodge, the fees for the same were not inCluded in the last balance but appear iri this rcport. DIsnURSKMEi\TS. The following are the disbursements: DATE.

WARRAJ.';T.

1887.

No.

October

13.

21. 21. 22. 22. 24.

25. 2'). 25. 2.5. 2.5. 25. 25. 26.

ZB. l\ovember 1. 3. 4.

379. 380. 381. 382.

383. 381. 385. 386. 387. 3&'1. 389. 390. 391. 392. 393. 394. 305. 396.

PAYEE.

AMOUl>T.

.. .. $ 10 00 W. H. Carpenter, Special Deputy.. 374 15 Pay Roll, Carnegy, Postage . 1.50 00 S. M:. Kennard, on Pay Roll. . Rent for Grand Looge Hall.. 7500 J. W. Owne, Grand Tyler.. 147 00 Cleaning Grand Lodge Carpets . 1010 W. 1\1. Williams, Grand :i\faster . 25000 ................ ... 100 00 Chamois Lodge, No. 1/l.5-Charity John Goff-Charity .. 10000 G. W. Trent-Charity. 10000 10000 J. F. Alberty-Charity. Versailles Lodge, Dues Refunded ... 4500 7400 John G. Miller, Reimbursement for Loss on Hall H. R. Hildreth, Printing and Stationery.. . ... 1,605 7;) Portraits Past Grand Masters.: . IRO 00 9400 Office Rent .. Salary of Grand Secretary, October.. 25000 Allan McDowell, Salary . 100 00


G?'and Lod,qe of Misso'w'i.

1888.J

2]

::\97. 398. 399. 400. 401. 402. 403.

Allan1lfcDowell, Expense Account. Office Rent.... Salary Grand Secretary, November.. Charter Fee Returned, Russellville ... J. W. Barnett, Special Deputy Bell Telephone... Allan McDowell, Salary.

.... $200 00 9400 25000 2:~ 00 11 00 2500 20000

17. 17. 23. 1.

404. 405. 406. 407. 408. 409. 410. 411. 412. 413. ·114. 415. 416. 417. 418. 419. 420. 421. 422. 423. 424. 425. 426. 427.

1.

428.

7. 10. 10. 21.

429. 430.

1. 1.

433.

Salary Qrand Secretary, December . Office Rent..... Allan McDowell, Salary J. W. Barnett, Special Deputy .. S. W. H. CarnegJ', Donation.. W. l\L Williams, State Lodge of Instruction..... Work on Grand Lodge Register . Salary Grand Secretary, January . OffIce Rent. . Allan McDowell, Salar)· . Allan l\1cDowell, Stationery, Books for Library .. Office Rent. Salary Grand Secretary, February . Allan McDowell, Salary Postage, etc . Dispensation Fee Returned-Braymer .. Bell Telephone... Salary Grand Secretary, :March.. Allan McDowell, Salary.... OffIce Rent.... C. H. Briggs, Expenses as Orator at Springfield. S. W. B. Carnegy, Third Donation . ' Office Rent.. """" Salary Grand Secretary, April Allan McDowell, Salary Appropriation for .Masonic Home Expenses of C. C. Woods.. H. R. Hildreth, Printing.. Office Rent . Salary Grand Secretary, May .. Allan )fcDowell, Salary.... Postage ... Bell Telephone D. Diamant, Painting... Office Rent... Salary Grand Secretary, June.. Allan McDowell, Salary S. W. B. Carnegy, Fourth Donation C. H. Briggs, Expenses to St. Joseph . Allan .McDowell, Expense Account Office Rent . Salary Grand Secretary, July . Books for Library.. Books for Library .. Expenses for Postage, Lodges of Instruction, etc. Allan McDowell, Salary Office Rent

250 00 9400 100 00 500 5000 :3 7;) 10500 25000 9400 100 00 670 1250 9400 250 00 200 00 3285 3000 25 00 25000 100 00 9400 11 00 5000 9400 25000 20000 ... 15,000 00 650 4100 9400 2.'iO 00 100 00 25 00 25 00 3000 9400 2.50 00 20000 5000 .....• 11 35 300 00 9400 ,.. 250 00 14 00 7 00 47 75 100 00 9400

November 10. December 12. 12. 12. 15. 15. 16. 1888.

January

9.

9. 14. 14. 17. 24. 30. February 3. 3. 4. 21. 23. ~farch 1. 1. 2. 9. 13. 22.

April

)fay

June

1. 1.

431. 432.

24, 27.

434. 435. 436. '137. 438. 439. 440. 0141. 142. 143. 444. 445. 446. 447. 448. 449. 450.

September 1.

4;')1.

July

9. 18. 19. 30. 1. 1.

1. 12. 14.

31. August

1. 1.

11. 23.


22

Proceedings of the

September L 1-

,. October

12. 15. 2124. 28. L L L

11.

452. 453. 4M. 455. 456. 157.

458. 1159.

460. 461462. 463.

LOd.

Salary Grand Secretary, August... Portrait Geo. R. Hunt, P. G. ~Iaster . Bell Telephone ... Allan 1\IcDowell, Salary. James Hogan Printing Co., Printing Yellow Fever Sufferers, Florida.. Geo. E. l\Iayhall, Special Deputy ... Johann路Palmer Printing Co., Printing ..... Office Rent. Salary Grand Secretary, September.. S. 1\1. Kennard, Salary Allan 1IlcDowell, Balance of Salary ..

... $250 00 5000 25 00 20000

12-5 :1,,) 200 00 350 25 75 94 00 250 00 15000 15000

RECAPITULA nOl'.

The entire income for the fiscal year, just closed amounts to ... Cash balance on hand last settlemcnt.. Bonds unsold Interest on Ronds, and premium. Total assets. Disbursements, including $15,000 00 for "Home"

$13,22850 19,890 33 4,00000 ]76 66 .$37,29049 25,897 00 :j:ll,3!J:~

Balance on hand, October, 1888..

19

Fraternally submitted, JOHN' D. VINCIL, Grand Secreta1'Y.


1888.J

23

G-rand Lodge of Jl1issoUTi.

GRAND TREASURER'S REPORT. ST. LoUIS, October 5th, 1888. To the Most Worshipful G1'and Lodge of J,fissouri, A. 1': and A. lIf. : BRETHREK-~ herewith

submit my report

u,.<;

Gra.nd Treasurer, to this date, showingS19,8S8 78 13,22505

Balance on hand October 5, 1887 .. Receipts from Grand Secretary.. Receipts from Cole County Bonds .. Coupons... Interest .. : from Cass County Bonds .. @ 101 premium.... Accrued interest

..... S3,OOO 00 6000 90 00

3,150 00

... 51,00000 1000 1666

1,026 66

..... $37,29049 2':),897 00

Total Warrants paid, Nos. 379 to 463, inclusive.

:311,39349

Balance due Grand Lodge Respectfully submitted, SAM.

:M.

KENNARD, G'rand Treasurer.

8 ..D1. M. KENNARD, GRAND TREASURER, In Account with GRAND LODGE OF :MrSSOURI, A. :B'. AJ.'<D A.

~1.:

DEBIT. $1\),888 78 5, 1887, To Balance as per last report ... October 64800 20, " To Cash, Jno. D. Vincil, Grand Secretary. do 17650 January 11,18SS, ................... do do do 3,000 00 February 2, " Cole County Bonds .................. 2, " 60 00 do do do Coupons.... 9000 2, " do do do Interest. 379 00 ~In.rch 2, " do Jno. D. VincH, Grand Secretary }fay 1,000 00 10, " do Cass County Bonds 100O do 10, " do Premium @ 101 do 16 66 10, " do do do accrued interest 3~9 50 do August 14, " Jna. D. V~nciJ, Grand Secretary. 724.50 do 15, " do do 1,0.:>2 00 16, " do do do 1,031 00 17, " do do do 607 00 20, ,. do do do 389 00 23, " do do do ,. 29600 23, do do do 436 00 do 24, " do do 73650 27, " do do do 62400 do do .- ............... 27, " do 402 ;-,0 ..... -_ ................... _28, " do do do


24 August

[Oct. 29, 1888, To Cash, Jno. D. Vincil, Grand Secretary do do do 30, " 30, " do do do 31,

"

September 1, " 3, 4, 12, 13, 14, 17,

24, 2-5,

October

26, 29, 1, 5, 5,

"

do do do

do do do

â&#x20AC;˘ do do do

~

~

~

do do do do do do " " do¡ do do do do do " do do do " do do do " do do do " do do do " do do do " " Difference between Grand Treasurcr's and Grand Secretary's reports last year . " Difference on March 2, 1888

Total amount of Receipts

..

~

599 00 404 50 490 00 279 .50 359 50 36250 10000 191 50 87650 61100 25400 126 00 241 00 12050 189 50 1.,);~ 50 1 55 50

$37,290 49

CREDIT. October

13,1887, By Cash, Warrant No. do 21, " do 22, " do do 22, " do do 26,' " do do I" 26, " do do 27, " do do 27, " do do , 28, " do do 29, " do do do do 31, " 31, " do do 31, " do do November 3, " do do 4, " do do 5, do do 5, " do do 5, do do

11, " December 13', " 14, " 17, " 17, " 20. " 30, " January 10,1888, 13, " 16, " 21, " 26, " 81, " February 3, " 4, "

do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do

do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do

381 380... 382 383 .. :184.. 392 .. :~85 .. 387 391 379 388 390. 393 386. 395.. 389.. 394. 396 .. 397. 398 .. 399.. 402 403 ... 401. 400. 40L .. 105.. 106.. 108.. 107.. 410.. 409 ....

111

$ 15000 374 15 7500 14700 1040 1,605 75 2.5000 10000 74 00 10 00 10000 4.500 15000 100 00 25000 10000 94 00 100 00 200 00 9400 25000 25 00 20000 11 00 2,300 25000 91 00 100 00 5000 500 10.5 00 375 2.50 00


1888.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

February

6,1R,<:;R, By Cash, Warrant Ko. 412 .,. ................ 6, " do do 41:1 6, " do . ....................... do 414 .. 21, " do do 41.5 ~rarch 2, do . . ... ... . ..... do 417. v, do do 418 .. 5, do do 416 . 12, " do do 419 .. 14, " do 420..... do 21, " do do 421. 29, " do 422...... do ............................ 29, " do do 42.'1 April 19, " do do 424 19, " do do 425 ..... 26, " do 426..... do :May 2, " do do 427 .. 2, do do 428 do 8, " do 429.... 10, " do do 430. .. 16, " 4~lL do do 21, " do do 432 June 2, " 434 .. do do 4, " do do 433 .... 11, " do do 435 .... 19, " do 43G .... do 21, " do do 437.. 4;38 July 2, ...................... do do 4:19 .. 3, " do do 3, " do do 440 .... 3, " . ...................... do do 441. 14, " 442 do do 17, " do do 443 August 1, " do do 444 ... . . . . - .......... 2, " do do 445... 2, " do do 446 17, " do do 447 25, " do do 448. 25, " do do 449. 28, " do 450 ... do September v, 4:)1... .................. do do v, do do 452 4, " do do 453. 4:),1 . 13, " . .................... do do 17, " do do 455 ..................... 4,iG ., 21, " do do 4:j7...... 25, " do do October 1, " 459. do do 2, " 45R ... ... - ........... do do 2, do 461 ......................... do ;j, do 462 ... do do do 460... do do '163 .... -

25 $ 94 00 10000 670 1250 25000 20000 94 00 328') 3000 2;) 00 25000 100 00 9400 11 00 5000 9-1 00 25000 200 00 15.000 00 65000 4100 2.5000 9400 10000 25 00 2.') 00 3000 94 00 25000 20000 5000 11 35 300 00 94 00 2.50 00 1400 700 47 45 10000 91 00 25000 50 00 00 20000 125 35 20000 25 75 3 50 25000 15000 94 00 1:)0 00

2.,

$19,68090 Total amount disbursements .......

$25,897 00


26

P1'oceedings of the'

[Oct.

SUMMARY. DEBIT.

October fl, 1887.

To balance as per la.st report ... Received of Jno. D. Vincil, Grand Secretary.....

$19,888 78 17,401 71

$37,290 19

CHEDIT.

October 5, 1888.

By warrants Grand Secreta.ry from No. 379 to 463 inclusive . Ralance due Grand Lodge A. F. and A. M ...

2路5,897 00 H1,39349

RespectfUlly submitted, SAM. l\f. KENNARD, Grand Treasurer.

GRAND LECTURER'S REPORT.

The Report of Bro. Allan McDowell was presented, and ordered printed in the Proceedings. It is as follows: ST. Lours, Octoher, 1888. To the )[ost Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. J: & A. N.:

Herewith I submit my Annual Report for year ending October, 1888. During the year, State Lodges of Instruction have been held at the following places, viz: Boonville, Kansas City, Ncvada, Sprillgtield, St. Joseph and Kirksville. 1'hese meetings were intended not merely as Lodges of Instruction in thc Ritual, but also, as stated in the call of the Grand )Iaster, as "Schools wherein the origin, history, philosophy, symbolism, and above all, the practical moml teachings of Freemasonry" were to be illustrated and exemplified. To this end addresses 011 Masonic subjects were delivered by well informed Brethren. That these meetings were the means of dispensing true Masonic light, and were productive of much good, is the uniteo. testimony of those 'who attended. At these meetings the Grand :Yfaster presided when present, and when absent deputized one or other of the Grand Officers to preside. They were well attended by representatives of the various Lodges in the different portions of the State in which they were held. I have held District Lodges of Instructions at the following places, viz: Iron Mountain, Harrisonville, Warrensburg, Stee'1ville, Monroe City, Went7,ville, Bethany, La Belle, Paris, Chillicothe and Poplar Bluff. These meetings have also generally had a large representation from the Lodges in the District where held. In fact some of them have been almost as large as the State meetings.


1888.J

G'rand Lodge of lIfi,s,s01uri.

27

I have also visited a large number of individual Lodges, in various portions of the State. The \\'~'k throughout the jurisdiction, though not all that could be desired, is in a heulthy condItion, the Lodges generally working fairly up to the standard laid down by the Grand Lodge. I prcsent the following gleanings from reports of District Lecturers and other sources: R. W. Bro. James T. Laughlin, of the First District, has held no Lodge ofInstruction, but has visited several of the Lodges. The Lodges in his District, with two exceptions, arc in good condition, and some of them very proficient. R. \;<Y-. Bro. A. Fisher, of t.he Second District, says that from personal visits and correspondence he is pleased to report a prosperous year for )fasonry. While the Lodges are not all proficicnt, yet in most of them, some of the Brethren have learned the work f1lirly well, and by this means the Lodges are becoming better informed. This is particularly noticeable in the lectures pertaining to the Degrees. lIe has visited quite a. nllln ber of the Lodges, and gave them such instruction as was considered most necessary. lIe has held two Lodges of Instruction in the District, both of which were well attended and resulted in great good to the District. As far as he has been able to ascertain, prosperity and good-fellowship extend throughollt the District. R. W. Bro..r. A. Thomason, of the Fourth District, held a Lodge of Instruction at Louisiana, to which all the Lodges in the District were invit.ed. The local attendance wa.<; good. He has answered all'calls, and given all the instruction he could in ever~足 way. He reports the Lodges in his District, in a prosperous cOl\llition, and the members willing to learn. R. W. Bro. Chas. J. Walker, of the Fifth District, has visited about half the Lodges in his District, and spent considerable time in exemplifying the work, and finds the Brethren willing to learn. A Lodge of Instruction wa.<; held, which was fairly attended, and doubtless resulted in much good to the Fra.ternity. R. W. Bro. W. H. Carpenter, of the Sixth Dist;rict, ha.<; visited a large number of his Lodges and gives a long list of those most proficient in the work. His f,tithfullabors for several years past have produced lL very marked imprO\'cment in the work of the Lodges in his District, as I can testify from personal observation. R. W. Bro. C. S. Glaspell, of the Tenth Di8trict, reports that most ofthc Lodges ill his Di8trict arc in good working condition. He i!:l a zealous and conscientious teachcr, and, if the Lodges have not profited by his instrllction, it is certainly not his f,wlt. W. Bro. S. H. Black, of the Eleventh District, has put in his leisure time instructing oflicers of Lodges. lIas had many calls to hold Schools of Instruction which, o\ring to press of business, he wa." unable to respond to. He has visited several Lodges and left them in possession of the work. The Lodges in hi.,; District arc generally in good condition. . R. W. Bro. Harry Keene, of the Twelfth District, has visited nearly all his Lodges, ,md found and left them in excellent condition. lIe has met Brethren from the Lodges he has not vbited, from whom he learns that they are doing well. This indef'ltigable laborer has done milch to bring about a uniformity of work in his District. R. W. Bro. 1. V. },Ic)fillau, of the Thirteenth District, has held no Lodge of Instruction during the past year, but has becn with thc Brethren of several Lodges on different occa.<;ions in an informal manner. Generally, the Lodges are in good condition, and, with few exceptions, the work is well (lonc. R. W. Bro. J. B. Thomas, of the Fourteenth District, has given a.<; much of his time to


28

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

the Lodges and the Brethren as he could control. From the best information he can get., the Lodges in his District are somewhat lacking in t.he work of the Grand Lodge. No District Lect.urer was appointed for the Fifteenth Dist.rict, W. Bro. Simon Suss, who had filled the posit.ion for several years with credit to himself and honor to the Fraternity, declining to serve. I, therefore, undertook, as far as my time and other engagements would permit, t.o discharge the duties appertaining to t.hat office. A Lodge of Instruction was held weekly during the winter months at Freemasons' Hall in the City of St. Louis, which was fairly attended by the oflicers of the various Lodges located in the city. The work is well done in all, or nearly all, the Lodges in St. Louis, so far as my information extends. R. W. Bro. F. R. Newberry, of the Sixteenth District, reports that the condition of the Lodges in his District, a.<;; to work, is good. Brotherly love prevails, and the condition of the Lodges is generally favorable.

R. W. Bro. W. B. Wilson, or" the Seventeenth District, has been unable, on account of sickness in his family, to hold a meeting of Instruction in his District, or visit the Lodges. but has given private lectures, and believes the Lodges are all well up in the work and lectures, with the exception of two. which he names. He is afraid neither of these is doing any good. R. 'V. Bro. A. B. Martindale, of the Nineteenth District, has not been so sitnated that he could do much visiting among the Lodges. He has visited three Lodges, and is satisfied, from what he can learn of the Lodges. that, with a few exceptions, the work in his District does not fully conform to that of the Grand Lodge. R. W. Bro. Ferd. W. 'Vebb, of the Twentieth District, has held one Lodge of In: struction for the District, and has visited several of t.he Lodges, and gave them such instruction as he thought best. The Lodges are fairly proficient in the work, with the exception of three or four whose condition is not good. R. W. Bro. Henry l\farquand, of the Twenty-first District, reports that owing to press of private and official business his time has been so taken up that he has not made many visits to perfect the work in the Lodges. Some of t.he Lodges are rusty and need brightening up, but do not seem to care much about it. Others are in better condition as to ability to do work, and also as to their ambition in this respect. R. W. Bro. L. F. Wood, of the Twenty-second District, ha.s visited and exemplified the work in the Lodges in Moniteau and Morgan counties, and t.hinks all the Lodges of his District have the work of the Grand 'Lodge, and but little more is to be asked for than to keep them at their present commendable unifon~ity. R. W. Bro. B. H. Ingram, of the Twenty-third District, reports that most of the Lodges in his District are fairly up in the work. lIe believes the Twenty-third will compare favorably in work with allY of the country District,S. R. W. Bro. F. E. Bybee, of the'.I;'wenty-sixth District, reports that the Lodges, generally speaking, have been so conditioned as not to require the presence of the District Lecturer' save in a few instances. Of the Lodges visited, about eleven in number, all but three have the work fairly well. These three were carefully instructed by him, and he has since learned, were doing very well. He has heard from most of the Lodges not visited, and from said reports and personal knowledge, he reports the Lodges of the District in fair working order. He ha.,; held two ])istric~ Lodges of Instruction. R. W. Bro. Seymour Hoyt, of the Twenty-seventh District, has held one Lodge of Instruction which was well represented. The delegates were very attentive, and many errors were eliminated from the work. He has also given much private instruction to


29

Q1'and Lod,qe of lJlissOILT'i.

1888.J

individual Brethren. He finds the work of t.he various Lodges approaches more nearly each year the work of the Grand Lodge. The radical diffl~rences are (lisappearing and will in time cea~e to jar the "most accomplished ear." R. W. Bro. E. P. Linzcc, of the Thirtieth District, has been in poor health during the past year, and consequently has visited but few of his Lodges. R. W. Bro. .Tno. R. Ferguson, of the Thirty-first District, assisted at a State Lodge of Instruction in his District, and has also visited a majority of the Lodges. He thinks that without exception the Lodges have the State work correct as to opening and closing ceremonies and the dispatch of regular business. Some are not as proficient in the ceremonies of conferring degrees as they should be. R. W. Bro. E. C. Steele, of the Thirty-second District, reports that his business oflicially has been so pressing during the past year that he has been unable to hold any rcgular Lodge ~f Instruction. He has mct with several of the Lodges at their regular communications and found them in fair working order. On the whole hc thinks his District in keeping with any country District in that portion of the State. R. W. Bro. or. Wo Farris, of the Thirty-third District, has been sorely afflicted during the past year, and deservcs and has the sympathy of the members of this Grand Lodge. His faithful labors in thc past have put his District in such good condition that no special attention to it has been n~eded the present year. Fraternally snbmitted, ALLAN McDOWELL, Grand Lecturer.

ST. LOUIS BOARD OF RELIEF.

The following Report from the St. Louis Board of Relief was presented, and ordered printed: To the }'fost Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. P. and A. flf.:

The St. J-,ouis "Masonic Board of Relief" beg leave to present their report for the year ending October 1, 1888. OFFICERS. 1888.

l\f ARTIN

.T OlIN H. B.

COLLINS

0 ................................... â&#x20AC;˘

President.

GLEN Ny .. :

Trea.surel¡.

HU'['CHrNSo~

8ecretary.

Total membership, forty-fonr delegates. Averagc attendance at weekly meetings, twenty-four.


30

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

RECEIPTS.

Balance October 1, 1887 $4,042 1'1'0111 City Lodges................................................................. 545 Refunded by sundry Lodges................................................... 454 Interest ,...... ........................ ...... ........... 90

34 00 85 00

$::>,132 19 DISBURSE;'fE~TS.

Total for Cbaritieti . S 899 10 General Masonic Relief Association of the United States and Canada . 65 00 Expense Account : . 105'S5 Bonds Account . 3,221 50 Balance October 1, 1888, cash on hand : . i'l40 74 $5,1:12 H) The sum of S545.00 reported above, as "Receipts from City Lodges," was received from the following: :'Iissouri l.odge,~o. J. !3 Beacon Lodge, ~o. 3........................ George Washington Lodge, No.9..... ~aphtali l.odge, No. 25.................... l\1t. Moriah Lodge, Xo.40............... Polar Star Lodge, No. 79........... ....... Erwin Lodge, No. l21....................... Occidental Lodge, 1\0. 163.. Pride of the West. Lodge, ~o. 179..... Good Hope Lodge, No. 218......... ...... Keystone Lodge, Xo. 243..................

25 00 8500 40 00 2;:) 00 1::> 00 85 00 5 00 20 00 40 00 5 00 30 00

Aurora Lodge, 1\0. 267 S 3500 Cosmos Lodge, 1\0. 282......... 15 00 Corner-Stone Lodge, ~o. 323...... ...... 20 00 13enton Lodge, No. 353..................... 25 00 Tuscan .Lodge, No. 360..................... 3:) 00 Cache Lodge, Xo. 416....................... 30 00 Itllska Lodge, No. 4:20......... 20 00 Anchor Lodge, No. 443..................... 35 00 Lambskin Lodge, No. 460................. ;) 00 S;J4500

The sum of $454 85re ported above, as "Refunded by sundry Lodges," was received from the following: Excelsiqr Lodge, No. 25!) Centralia Lodge. No. 201 Shibboleth Lodge, 1\0. 28 Corner-Stone Lodge Xo. - Antwerp Lodge, No.335 North Star Lodge, Xo. 241.. Rising Star Lodge, No. 4 Whitfield Lodge, Ko. 2S9 Illiopolis Lodge, No..521 Rockton Lodge, No. 316 " Terre Hautt~ Lodge, Ko. lU LebanOIl Lodge, No.7 Britannia Lodge, No. 170 Akron L')dgc, No. 83

"

.Iowa $10 00 1Ilinois SS :-l;'j 80uth Cnrolina 12 40 }lassadlUsetts 1:Z 05 0hio.......................................... 4 15 Pennsylvania 20 00 Geor!,'ia 23 00 Arkansas 1000 lllinois 80 00 Ohio ".................................... :3 90 lndiana 4G GO District Columbia.. 7 70 Cunada " 26 00 0hio , 15 00


1888.J

31

[hand Lodge of JlfisSOUT1:.

Bigham Lodge, So. :!;3G 1'0tOJ1lflC Lodge, .1\0. 100 :\'Ior.art Longe, ~o. GGG l'hmnix. Lodge, :\"0. 13G Cairo Lodge, So. ;\S;J Falls City Lodge, No. :~7G Keyst.one Lodge, .1\0.6:39 Star of the West Lodge, :No. 138 Alpha Lodge, No. ;);)

Kentucky $15 :Maryland 6 Illinois..................................... 6 :Missouri 15 Kcntucky 7 Kcntncky 10 Illinois 66 :.:Ih;souri 1;") .lllinois ,'i

00 80 50 00 00 ;,0

00 00 00

$1iYl 85

The sum of $899.10 reported above, as the "Total Disbursements for Charities," was distributed as follows: Eight

Onc Two Three One 1路'0111'

One Two Three Two.

ca~es

from' lllillOis Virginia Indiana :Missouri Texas Ohio Georgia Kentucky l'ennsylvania

~2G3.30

. ]:.);).50 . 67';)0 . -12.00 . 25.00 . 2~.SO .. n.oo . 17.;)0 . 13.8.5 Massachusctt'5 .: . 13.55

One casc from Arkallsll~ One Califomill.

. $10.00 .. 8.GO One Dist. of Columbia 7.70 One Maryland .. 6.80 One North Carolina . 3.00 Two Canada . 36.00 One Ireland . 2.00 Donation to Florida yellow fever sullerers .. 200.00 :;r899.10

The expense account, $105.85, includes salary of Secretary, stationery, postage and telegmms. Eleven applicants have been provided with employment during the year. Seventy umvortby cases were reported to an(} published in official warning circular of "The General Masonic Relief Association of tLe United States and Canada." A considerable saving has resulted from securing reduced transportation; in fact, t.he business of the Board haB been carefully managed, and a very large amount of "Good 'Vork" accomplished. Respectfully sublnitted, lVlARTIN COLLINS, P.re.~ident.

H. B. HUTCITI~SO~, Secretary.


32

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

MASONIC BURIAL LOT.

A paper, nun1e1'ously signed, was presented and read concerning the Masonic Lot owned by this Grand Lodge in Bellefontaine Cemetery, asking that consideration be given to our interests in said property. On motion of Bro. R. E. Anderson, the paper was referred to the COlnmittee路oll Jurisprudence. Another paper, signed by the same Brethren, touching the St. Louis Masonic Board of Relief, was read, and, on Illotion of the san1e Brother, was referred to a Special ComInittee, to be hereafter appointed. VISITORS.

It being announced that there were SOlne distinguished visitors in waiting, the Grand Master appointed Brothers Noah M. Givan and John D. Vincil to introduce them. They retired, and brought before, and introduced to, the Grand Lodge 1\1. 'V. Bro. Ed,vin C. Blaclonar, Grand 1\1aster of the Grand Lodge of Imva, and Bro. Theodore S. Parvin, Past Grand 'Master and present Grand Secretary of the saIne Jurisdiction. They were received with appropriate honors, and warn1ly welcomed by the Grand Master. Each responded to the welcon1e accorded in terms both fraternal and eloquent. MEMORIAL.

Bro. R. E. Anderson presented a men10rial from Ionic Lodge, No. 235, praying .for the restoration of its Charter, recently arrested by the order of 'Grand :Master 'Villiams. The memorial was referred to the Committee on Chartered


1888.J

G'rand L.odge of Jlfissowri.

33

Lodges. A paper fr0111 ,Vest Gate Lodge, U. D., concerning the property of the late 'Vest Gate Lodge, No. 445, in St. Louis, was referred to Salne COlnmittee. No further business appearing for the action of the Grand Lodge, it was called from labor until half-past two o'clock this afternoon.

TUESDAY-

AFTERNOON SESSION.

ST. LOUIS, October 9th, 1888.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 3 o'clock by the :Most Volorshipful Grand :Master. Other Grand Officers were present as at the forenoon seSSIOn. â&#x20AC;˘

ORATION.

The Grand Master introduced Worshipful Brother J. P. Blanton, Grand Orator, who proceeded to deliver the Annual Oration. At its conclusion, on motion of R. ,V. Bro. Janles P. ,Vood, the thanks of the Grand Lodge were unanimously voted to Brother Blanton for his able and instructive address. A copy was requested for publication, but the Orator declined to have his oration published. G. L. l'RO.-::l.


Proceedings oj the

34

[Oct.

. REPORT ON THE GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS.

The Committee on the Address of the Grand "Master presented the following Report, "which was adopted: 1'0 the ],[ost Worshipful Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F & A. M.

Your Committee to "which was referred the to report as follows:

~1.

W. Grand l\iaster's Address, beg leave

We approve of the action of the Grand Master in granting dispensations for removals to new halls, for the election of officers and laying of corner-stones, and in other formal matters. We endorse what the Grand Master says under the head of the Maxwell case. We are glad to know that the rumor he refers to, proved to be unfounded; still it is right and proper to caution the Brethren on this sUbjeet~ As Masons, we cannot be too circumspect in such matters. We heartily endorse the action by the Grand Master taken to aid and assist our distressed Brethren of Florida, who were suffering from that terrible scourge, the yellow fever. We approve the action of the Grand Master taken in the matter of Orient Francais Lodge, No. 1G7. We recommend that the decision of the Grand Master in reference to the admissibility in evidence of the record of the Civil Courts, in a civil case, on the trial of a ~iasonic Brother charged with unmasonic and immoral conduct, be referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence. f

We recommend that the action of the Grand Master, in granting dispcnsatiolls to form new Lodges, be referred to the Committee on Lodges Under Dispensations. We recommend that the action of the Grand Master in suspending Worshipful Masters and Arresting Charters be referred to a Special Committee of five. The appointments made by the Grand

~Iaster are

hereby endorsed.

We recommend that the action of the Grand Master in reference to Huntsville Lodge, Xo. 30, and Westville Lodge, No. 202, be referred to the Committee on District Deputy

Grand l\fasters. We recommend that the Grand Master, for the ensuing ~fasonic year, fully investigate the condition of Seligman Lodge, No. 517, in order that he may take such steps in reference thereto as the good of Masonry may demand. We recommend that a Co=ittee of five be appointed to consider and report upon the matters suggested by the Grand :1I1aster in reference to District Deputy Grand l\Iaster System, including some plan by which to pay their expenses and other matters connected with that office. We congratulate the Grand Master upon the number, efficiency and success of the State Lodges of Instruction held during his term of office.


1888.J

GTCtnd Lodge of Missouri.

35

It affords your Committee great plcamre to bear testimony to the wise, conservative, and able administration of our Grand Master. Under his prudent, efficient, and commendable course in the high oflice bestowed upon him one yenr ago, Masonry throughout this Grand .Jurisdiction ha.'i enjoyed a prosperous year, and is now in an excellent condition. There is not a cloud in all the sky. The future looks extremely bright and earnestly invites us to go forward in all those grand and noble enterprises, which true )Iasonry so delights to foster and maintain. GEO. R. HU~T, Chairman. S. H. SAUXDERS, JOSEPH S. BROWNE, JOliN D. VIKCIL, N. :'If. GIVAN, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, R. E. A~D.ERSO~, L. A. HALL, J. W. BOYD. XENOPHON RYLAND.

COMMITTEES.

The Grand Master made the following appointments of Committees, standing and special: ST ANDlNG COMMITTEES.

Jurisprudcnce.-J. W. Boyd, W. R. Stubblefield, George R. Hunt, B. H. Ingram, D. A.

Jamison. Grievance.-Noah :'If. Givan, S. H. Saunders, Joseph 8. Browne, Seymour Hoyt, F. E.

BrutOIl. Chartered Lndges.-R. E. Collins, J. T. Craig, George L. Faulhaber, George W. Death.erage, A: F. Braun, John R. Ferguson, :'If. P. Edwards, Z. T. MartIn, Isaac Clark. Lodges Under Di.spensation.-W. H. Mayo, George E. Walker, II. L. Rogers, John D. Flint, M. H. Garwood, Henry Marquand, J. S. Arnbros. Drury DaYis, P. C. Armentrout. Reports on Disi?'iei DC]Jutics.-C. C. Woods, Lee A. Hall, Theodore Brace, A. M. Hough,

C. S. Owsley. Charity.-R. E. Anderson, J. W. Petty, George E. :Mayball, Jack P. Richardson, Jesse .J. Shaw. Accounts.-F. W. "Mott, Walter M. Monroe, John H. Deems; J. P. Wood, J. H. Bab-

cock, ?-f. Cook. By-Laws.-W. R. Stubblefield, P. P. Ellis, 1. W. Batchelor, James A. Harris, Newton

Jones. Ways and j1fcans.-Charles F. Vogel, F. J. Tygard, J. A. Gordon, George L. Faulhaber,

J. W. Farris.


36

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

SPECIAL CO],DIITTEES.

On Board of Rcl~r.-Xenophon Ryland, J. P. Blanton, Charles J. Walker, R. Q. Roach, F. E. Bybee. On D. D. G. ,If. System.-Lee A. Hall, Allan :McDowell, John D. VincH, John Parson, F. J. Tygard.

n.

A1"1'est of ChaTters and Snspension of lVorshinflll Jfasters.-Joseph S. Browne, W. B. Wilson, W. H. Carpenter, R. E. Collins, R. E. Witt, W. F. Roberts.

MEMORIAL.

A I11â&#x201A;ŹlllOrial ,,,ras presented by the Representatives of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 430, asking aid fr0111 the Grand Lodge for the widow of a deceased 1l1elllber of said Lodge. '1"he paper was referred to the COnl11littee on Charity.

The Conl111i ttee on Chartered Lodges reported back a paper in their hands concerning the restoration of the Charter of Ionic Lodge, No. 235. The Sall1e was referred to the C0l1ll11ittee on Arrested Charters.

A 1110tion was adopted requesting the Board of Directors of the" :Masonic Honle " to furnish a report to this body not later, if possible, than two o'clock to-nl0rrow. It was 1110ved and carried to have an exenlplification of the work in the First and Second Degrees this evening at 7:30, and that the Grand Lecturer, Bro. l\1cDowell, be requested to perform that duty.

Nothing further appearing before the Grand Lodge, it was called from labor until 7:30 this evening.


1888.J

Qi'and Lodge of Mis80uri.

37

TUESDA Y - EVENING SESSION.

ST. LOUIS, October 9, 1888. The Grand Lodge ,vas called to labor at the appointed hour by the :Most 'N orshipful Grand :Master. Officers in their respective stations. Bro. Allan :McDo\vell, Grand Lecturer, then took charge of the work and p.roceeded with the exelnplification, following which the Grand Lodge was called frOln labor until 9 o'clock to-morrm\' morning.

, WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION. ST. LOUIS, October 10, 1888. The M. V.;r. Grand Lodge was called to labor at 10 o'clock A. M. by the Grand Master, Bro. W. M. "'\Villiams. Grand Officers in their respective stations. Prayer by the Grand Chaplain, Rev. Bro. C. H. Briggs. The minutes of the sessions of yesterday were read and approved.


38

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

SECOND READING.

The proposed amendment to the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge was read a second time.

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCE.

Most 'Vorshipful Bro. Noah 1\1. Givan, P. G. 1\1., presented and read the Report of the Comn1ittee on Appeals and Grievance. The same ,vas considered ai1d acted upon by subjects. vVhen a vote was taken upon that portion of the Report connected with the expulsion of a lnember of one of the Lodges who had denied the God of tl~e Bible and the Truth of the Book of the Law, the Report was adopted by a rising vote with 路entire unanimity and grcat enthusiasl11. One portion of the Report was postponed until the afternoon session when it was approved as read during the 1110rning. The Report was then adopted as a ,vhole. To the ]'fost WorshipJul Grand Lodge oj ]'fissonri, A. [.: & A. ]'f. :

Your Committee on Grievance beg leave to report that we have given careful con路 sideration to all cases presented, with the result in each case as hereinafter stated路 While the number of appeals taken during the past year are not large, yet some of the questions raised are of unusual importance, and have required more space than we have been in the habit of taking for ordinary cases. We have endeavored to do justice in all matters, disregarding mere quibbles and technicalities, at the same time upholding and conforming to our laws and the proper rulings of the Grand Lodge heretofore.made.


(}rand Lodge of MiSS01tri.

1888.J

39

We report as follows: No. 1. HOUSTON MONTGOMERY, Appellant, }

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

V8.

V AN BUREN LODGE, No. 509.

Appellant was charged with the murder of Jackson Bungard in Carter County, February 8,1888. At the trial he was found guilty, and expelled by almost a unanimous vote of the Lodge. He appeals for the reasons (1) that the trial should have been deferred until after his trial in the courts; (2) being in prison he could not give attention to his defense as well as if he had been present; and (3) be felt aggrieved at the judgment of the Lodge. In passing upon this case it is not necessary to determine whether or not the accused is guilty of murder in the first degree. We are not disposed to pre-jmlge or prejudice his case ill court. If his trial ill court had preceded that in the Lodge, its result would not have been conclusive. It would only have lJeen competent evidence tending to prove his guilt or innocence. Sometimes the innocent are convicted, and sometimes the guilty arc acquitted in the courts. It was competent for the :Master to determine whether or not the trial should have been postponed. The accused was represented by counsel of his own choosing. His being in prison should not necessarily of itself postpone the Lodge trial. If his offense is such as not to entitle him to bail, he could not attend the Lodge trial in person until after his trial in court. If that should terminate in his conviction and execution, he, being in good standing, would be entitled to Masonic burial. If the rule were to obtain that no person charged ,vith a felony, and in prison therefor, could be tried by his LOdge because he was in prison, then the trial would necessarily be postponed until he had served his sentence, and the Lodge compelled to retain on its list of members in good standing a convicted felon. That he should feel aggrieved at his conviction is quite natural, but does not afford a valid reason for a new trial. If that were so, most convictions would result in new trials, as the party found guilty usually feels aggrieved. The evidence adduced at the trial shows that the accused shot and killed the deceased; that he was drinking at the time, and the killing occurred at or near a saloon. Whether it was murder or not, it was done under such circumstances as justified the' Lodge in its judgment, and we therefore recommend that it be affirmed.

No. II. S. C.

MCGEORGE, Appellant, V8.

WHITESVILLE LODGE,

No. 16:2.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The record in this court is in bad shape, but from it we find that in the first specification the accused was charged with the heinous crime of incest, with one daughter and in the second, with soliciting intercourse with another. He was acquitted of the first specification but wa." convicted of the second, and expelled. He appeals and complains that after the evidence was all in, the ~faster ordered the second specification amended by erasing the name of the daughter mentioned therein, and inserting in lieu thereof, the name of another daughter.


40

P?'oceedings of the

[Oct.

This we think was such error as to entitle the accused to a new trial. The offense is of so repulsive a character that while certain punishment should follow guilt, when it is established in a valid trial, yet to be wrongfully convicted of it, imposes such a hardship as no one should be required to submit to. It seems that the daughter whose name first appeared in the specification did not testify, but there was present in the Lodge the sworn statement of another daughter which was in regard to improper proposals made to her. Because of this, and in the absence of any testimony to support the specification as it stood, the amendment was ordered to be made. The specification upon which he was placed on trial did not advise him that he would ,be expected to defend as to similar conduct with another daughter. The sworn statement of the other danghter was not competent evidence against him on the trial of the second specification, as it was before amendment. The accused made no statement in his own behalf at the trial. lIe was not required to make a statement, yet if he saw fit to testify in his own behalf he had the right to do so. We infer from his statement in the appeal, which asserts his innocence, that he was not aware of his right to make a statement. If he desires he should make his statement and the Lodge should give it such weight as it deserves. As the case goes back for a new trial, let the second specification be amended by inserting such names as are desired, but allow no changes to be made therein after the evidence is heard. Let the judgment of the Lodge be reversed and the trial.

cau~e

be remanded for a new

No. III. MARCELJ,US HERBERG,

APlwllant,

VS. WF,sT GATE LODGE,

U. D.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge, expelling him.

The accused was a non-affilliate residing in St. Louis. On June 5th, 1888, he was charged, in West Gate Lodge, with the crime of adultery, was served with a copy of the charges, and on June 28th, following, he deposited his Dimit with Napthalia Lodge, No. 25, for affilliation. At the trial which occurred July 3d he appeared in person and by counsel, and objected to the right of West Gatc Lodge to try him, which was overruled, and his trial procecded with. lIe was expelled and has appealed. lIe asked the interference of Grand Master Williams, who refused to set aside the action of the Lodge, and the case. therefore, comes to your Committee. The opinion of the Grand Master so completely covers all the questions raised in the appeal, that we beg leave to submit it as the law governing the case. It is as follows: "Marcellus Herberg, a non-affilliate residing in the city of St. Louis, was tried by West Gate Lodge, U. D., located in said city, was found guilty and expelled from all the rights and privileges of Masonry. He asks me to interfere and grant him a new trial, because of alleged irregularities ana violations of law in the proceedings of thfl, Lodge. I have given the matter the conRideration that its importance demands, and will state my conclusions upon the points made by him in the order that they have been presented to me: 1. "The jurisdiction of the Lodge is assailed, because, after the charges were presented and the time was set for trial, the appellant presented his petition for affilliation to Napthali Lodge. The charges were preferred in West Gate, June 5th, and the application for affilliation was made to Napthali Lodge, JWle 28th. There can be no doubt


1888.J

Grand Lodge oj Missouri.

41

that West Gate had jurisdiction when the proceedings were begun. Having rightfully acquired jurisdiction, its right to proceed could not be defeated by the action of the appellant in applying for membership in another Lodge. When jurisdiction has once attached. the Lodge must be held entitled to proceed to final determination in the case. 2. "The charge against the Brother was stated to be 'Adultery.' It is objected that the specific chargc of 'Gross Unmasonic Conduct' was not set out in the written statelnent of the offense. The charge stated that the appellant was to be tried for the crime of 'Adultery.' "It is true that it did not say that this was 'gross unmasonic conduct,' but I am inClined to think that it would be the 'refinement of technicality' to say that 11 trial, regular in all other respects, should be路 sct aside because the complaint stated the exact offense, and the specifications set out the time and place of its commission, instead of a general charge of 'gross llnmasonic conduct.' I do not find that the Rook of Constitutions requires such a written statement, i. e., the setting out in the charge the words 'gross unmasonic conduct.'

"I am personally of the opinion that it would be more in accordance with the spirit of fairness to the defendant to state what the offense is, and then set out in the specification the facts relied upon by the prosecution to prove it, than simply to make a general charge of 'gross un masonic conduct.' I appreciate the importance to an accused person of ha路ving the forms of la"w fully observed in his trial, but I think that the charge of 'adultery' was sufficient, and if necessary, which I do not decide. the charge could have been amended at the trial in the mere matter of form, by saying- that the offense constituted 'gross unmasonic conduct.' I do not think that the Grand Lodge intended any such unnecessary allegation when it prescribed the form of procedure. To charge 'adultery,' and in the specifications set out the time and place of its commission, would seem suffIcient, wi~hout adding, this constitutes 'gross unmasonic conduct.' 3. "The point that the 8]Jecijications were not voted on is not borne out by the record. 4. "It is objected that the record of the proceedings in the Circuit Court of St. Louis was incompetent. evidence. It has been held that the proceedings in the courts are ~ompetent. I can see no reason why the records of a criminal court should be admitted, and those of a ch'u court excluded. In each ca..,e, the party has had an opportunity to meet the charge, and its truth has been passed upon by a compctent tribunal, and if the record is admissible in one instance, I can see no valid reason why it should not in another" It is true that the quantum of proof required to convict is greater in a criminal trial than is required to predicate a finding upon in a civil snit, yet the reason for allowing the record to be read in one case is as strong as in the other. Its weight as c1.'idcnce may be affected, but not its competency. 5. "If the record was competent, then it was sufficient, unless there was some evidence offered to reb~t the presumption it raised. 6. "The petition in the divorce case alleged as the ground for the application, that the appellant was guilty of adultcry, setting out the person with whoIll. and the time at which it was committed. If, as is claimed in the appeal, t.he petition had been predi~ated upon desertion, as well as adUltery, the objection would be well taken, as it could not in that event be determined upon what grounds the court decided the case, and the finding of the court would not necessarily support the specification, but it is a mistake to say that the petition was based upon an alleged dcsertioll. The charge is simply adultery. and the court must have found this eharge to be trne. The defendant had his day in court to answer it.


Proceedin.9s of the

42

LOct.

7. "The letter of the wife is presented, saying, that she has concluded that. she was mistaken in the allegations of her petition. The testimony of the defendant himself upon the hearing before the Lodge, denying the charge, which was J)rima facie proved by the divorce record, would have been better evidence of his innocence, especially if accompanied by a proper explanation of his failure to show the facts to the court. Even the letter of I.he party, with whom he is charged to have committed the adultery, would have been more appropriate, than that of one who cannot be supposed to have had any personal knowledge of the matter. 8. "The statement 'that because of the position of the defendant, as a minister of the Gospel, his offense was greater', did him no harm, nor did the statement that the I,odge was directed to proceed by the D. D. G. l\f. r think the first was a proper matter for consideration, being a teacher of morality he should be held to a stricter accountability. Hypocrisy added to the cri~e would ce.rtainly add to the guilt.

"The record in the divorce case made a prima facie case for the prosecution. The defendant, although present, did not contradict by his own statement, the serions charge of which the court had found him guilty, and t.here is no showing before me, that he would do so if there was It new hearing granted. The rule in civil cases is that a new trilll should not be granted, even if error \Va.':> committed, unless it was such error a.., to materially injure the ?-ppellant. I think the same rule should apply in l\{asonry. "In view of the whole record, the failure of the defendant to testify or offer to do so, and the failure to show that he could present any evidence to rebut the presumptions arising from the judgment of a court of his country, if a new trial should be granted, that I am not justified in interfering. The papers will therefore be delivered to the Grievance Committee for consideration of the matter upon appeal. W.

)f.

WILLIAMS, Grand

Ias/er."

11

We recommend that the judgment. of the Lodge be affirmed."

No. IV. ED. G. SHELDON, A])]JeUcrnt, .

V8. STEWARTSViLLE LODGE,

No. 182.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

The charge in this case is that of wronging and defrauding a Brother out of money. He was found guilty by a vote of twenty-two to one, and expelled, by a vote of twemy to two. He appeals, for the rea.~ons, that (1) he had no notice of the trial; (2) he did not kJloW that the defrauded Brother was a Mason; (:1) he can show conclusively that he did not try to defraud the Brother: (1) that he has repaid the Brother; (5) that the decision of the Lodge was not made in the true spirit of M:a.~onry. On the question of notice, the record shows that he "lmd been duly served with a copy of the charge and specification." This must be conclusive upon that question, in the absence of anything to corroborate the mere statement of the accused. . That he did not know the defrauded Brother was a Mason does not help his case. He should }lave shown at the trial that he did not try to defraud the Brother. The repaymcnt of the money was made aftcr the Lodge had expelled him. If this is a sufficient atonement of the offense in the estimation of the Lodge they will so decide on his ap-


Chand Lodge of JlfissoUTi.

1888.J

43

plication for reinstament, when that is made. It does not justify a reversal of the judgment of the Lodge. There is no merit in the appeal, and we rcommelld that the judgment of the Lodge be aflirmed.

No. V. H. S. BUCK, Appellant, V8.

STEWARTSVILLE LODGE,

No. 182.

}

A ppeal from the judgment of the Lodge

expelling him.

The appellant in this case was a banker at Stewartsville, and his bank failed December 6th, 1887. Charges were prefered against him by order of the Master, in open Lodge, which he had a right to do: . He is charged with (1) perjury, by swearing to a false statement concerning the financial condition of the bank, September 12th, 1887; (2) wronging and defrauding Brother Masons by receiving money, knowing the bank to be in a failing condition; (3) not warning them of danger, etc. The only papers that have reached your Committee, except the charge and the .appeal, are what we suppose is the evidence, a statcment by the Secretary, copies of several â&#x201A;Ź-J;parte affidavits and a lead pencil tally on "guilty" and "not guilty." There is no record of the proceedillgs of the Lodge at or before the trial, and the papers that are prescnted are detached. We are unable to determinc whether or not they contain all the evidence. Ftom the papcrs presented we are unable to find any evidence of perjury, except such as may be inferred from the fact that the bank failed about three months after the affidavit as to its financial condition was made. The accused stated at the trial that the statement sworn to by him was true. Several depositors testified that they had confidence in the bank whell they deposited in it, but there is no evidence as to how long before the failure it was in a failing condition, or whether any money was received after it was known by the accused to be in a failing condition. The accused testified that he did not know that the bank would have to suspend until just before it did suspend, and therefore he could not warn anyone. H the paper before us is the tally of the vote on his guilt and punishment, he was found guilty, and the punishment fixed by a divided vote, just sufficiellt to carry them. On sllch a record as is here presented, with the evidence as unsatisfactory as it here appears to be, we can not concur in finding the accused guilty a.~ eharged. If he is guilty, he should bc punished, but it should be upon a full, complete and fair lH'aring, and if we are to again pass upon the case, the record should show all the facts as they transpire at the trial. A new trial should bc had. Let the judgment of the Lodge be reversed, and the cause remanded for a new trial.

No. VI. L. D. CAIN, A1)peUant,

vs. PUT:-<A!l1 LODGE,

No. 190.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspendin,g. him.

In t.his case the accused is charged with (1) abusing and villifying a Brother and (2) accusing a Brother with being a notorious liar and ,,'ith being drunk,

~iason


44

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

. Ac the trial he was found guilty of both specifications by a vote of twenty to two, and he was suspended for five yearg by a vote of fifteen to seV2n.

He appeals, and for grounds of appeal, in his own language are as follOWS: First, "Prejudice in church matterg - there being six members present belonging to the Christian church, and three to the Methodists, and three to the Baptists, myself making the fourth, and ten that did not belong to any religious denomination-was against me. Second, That the influence of temperance was against me, I being opposed to the use of liquors and had the influence of intemperance路to contend against among the members of the Lodge." The record does not disclose whether or not the members of the Lodge who tried the Brother were Methodists, Baptists, Christians or sinners, but it is evident that they were quite unanimously against him. Even his Baptist brethren did not stand solidly by him. Such denominational unity is quite rare. We would hardly be justified in eoncluding, withou~ evidence," that "prejudice in church matters" had any thillg to do with his convict.ion. If he could show that the Mcthodists, Christians and sinners had combined against him because he was a Baptist, then he would have agrievance, but the fact that at least one of his Baptist brethren must have voted against him, and possibly aU of them did, explodes the possibility of that theory. Nor can we assume that because he was opposed to the use of liquors, he had the influence of intemperance to contend with. The Brother is right in being a temperance man, but he cannot afford to make an Ishmaelite of himself, or to base his conviction in this case on the ground of prejudice against his temperancc or religious belief.

".

The cvidence warranted the finding of the Lodgc. Let the judgment of thc Lodge be affirmed.

No. VIT. SA~lUEJ, COI,E~[AN,

Appellant,

'Vs. CASS LODGE,

N'o. 147.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge reprimanding him.

The specifications upon which the appellant in this case was tricd were (1) defrauding the daughter of a Brother Master II路fason, (2) using course, profane and abusive language to her, and (3) ejecting her by physical force from his premises. At the trial he was found guilty on all of the specifications, and after several ballots on the question of punishment, it was decided by It vote of thirteen to six that he be reprimanded. He appenJs for the reasons, (1) the charges do not state a violation of Masonic law, incompetent and irrela,vent evidence was admitted, (3) the testimony of the lady alleged to be defrauded wali admitted without being sworn to.

(2)

Two remarkable facts are suggested by the record in this case. The first is that the Lodge should find the Brother guilty of all the matters charged and then only inflict the punishment of a reprimand. Defrauding a Master Mason's daughter, by a Mason, is II violation of his obligation and is an offense of no slllall magnitude, and should not be trea.ted lightly by a Lodge.


Grand Lodge of

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JlfiS80u,?路i.

45

It required a two-thirds vote of those present to find him guilty of this specification, and yet the vote on the question of sixty days' suspension (the lowest before reprimand) was "yes" nille, "no" eight. It required twelve votes to find him guilty. Three of these must have thought that the small punishment of sixty days' suspension was too severe for the offense of defrauding a :;\1ason's daughter. If this bt= so, the Lodge may reasonably look for other cases of a similar character. We are not dcciding that the accused is guilty of that offense, but are referring to it for the purpose of showing ~.he inconsistent action of the Lodge in findiug him guilty of so serious a charge and then inflicting so light a punishment.

The other remarkable fact, shown by this record, is that the accused, after being charged and found guilty of so serious an offense, and then escaping with the light punishment of a reprimand, should have appealed to the Grand Lodge. The publicity given the case by the appeal will be a worse punishment, even though the case should be reversed, than a reprimand by the good-natured :Master of that Lodge would be. But there is no merit in his appeal. The specifications certainly state facts which, if true, show "a violation of Masonic law." It may be that the facts should have been stated with more definiteness, and the speciji.colions could have been amended before the trial begun,' if that objection had been made, but to say that defrauding a Mason's daughter (or anyone else, for that matter), or, that using coarse, profane and abusive language to her, or to any lady, is not un masonic, would be throwing a cloud over Masonry. As to the character of the evidence, the record shows that the statement of the lady was taken and reported by the Lodge committee. Whether she was sworn or not does not a.ppear, but her statement seems to have been taken by consent, and the attorney for the accused cross-examined her. This statement was read at the trial over his objection. This was not error. On the other specifications there was other evidence than that of the young lady, sufficient to support the findings of the Lodge. In his own statement he admitted that he was excited and called her a liar. On his own evidence, he at least deserved a reprimand. Lodge be affirmed.

Let the judgment of the

No. VIII. THOS. D. RICE, A1J]Jellant,

t's. OSBOH~ LODGE,

No. 317.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge suspending him.

There were five specifications to the charge presented against the accused in this case. He was found gnilty of the third and fifth, and not guilty of the other three. Those upon which he was found guilty were, in substance, (3) that in open Lodge he used language derogatory of the character and standing of a Brother named, and made many insinuations reflecting upon the l\IflSonic standing of said Brother and other mellL bel'S of the Lodge; (5) that as a member of a purchl\""ing committee, appointed to purchase furniture for the Lodge, he disregarded the wishes of the Lodge in a spirit of malice. He was found guilty of these specifications by very decided v otes, the third being, ".guilty, twenty-four, not guilty, four;" the fifth being, "guilty, nineteen, not guilty, nine." .


Proceedin.fJs of the

46

[Oct.

He was suspended for five years, and in his appeal urges thirteen specific objections. Many of them are exceedingly frivolous, as for example, that the hall in which trial was had was unsafe; that the first notice was defective, and hence no notice; that the wording of the charge was changed by order of the Worshipful Master, by inserting the word "Gross" before the words "Un masonic Conduct," and the word" Brother" before the names of the Brethren mentioned in the specifications; that counsel for the Lodge were illegally appointed; that the evidence written down was not in the language of the witnesses; that visiting Brethren were present: that the Brother preferring the charges was present and permitted to vote; that the appellant had received no official notice of his trial, &c., &c. In reference to these objections it may be said, that the pllLce of trial was in the Loclge room, which had been dedicated only three months before by D. D. G. :M. Harry Keene. All objections as to notice are cured by his presence at the trial, he announced himself ready, cross-examined most of the witnesses and testified fully in his own behalf. The changes made in the charge by the Master were wholly immaterial and unnecessary, and did not prejudice his rights. They were made before the trial begun. Counsel for the Lodge were appointed.by the Master, which was right. The testimony of each witness was written down and signed by the Witness, llnd it must, therefore, be substantially correct. It. cannot be expected that the evidencc could be taken down word for word. The visitors were present by consent of all parties, including the accused. As the Brother who preferred the charge was interested, he should have been excused from voting, but his vote could not have changed the result, and, therefore, no harm resulted therefrom. The accused received verbal notice of the result of the trial, which was sufficient after being present during the entire trial. He al!'\o ela.ims that he apologi;'.ed to the Lodge on account of the matter contained in the third specification. The evidence is conflicting as to that, but it was for tQe Lodge to determine whether or not he did so in a satisfactory manner. He also claims that the evidence was not sufficient, and that the punishment is too 路severe. It is not the province of the Grand Lodge to weigh the evidence, and where no material error is committed at the trial, we will not reverse a case, unless manifest injustice has been done. The members of the Lodge who know the accused aud the witnesses, and who saw them testify, arc more competent to judge of the facts than we are, from an exa.mination of the record. The record in this case is very full and complete. The trial was regular, and we cannot reverse the case. We, however, think the punishment too severe, under all the circumstances presented in the record. We, therefore, recommend that his suspension terminate at the end of one year from the date of the trial.

No. IX. J. G.

LOBAUGH, Appel-lant, 'VS.

)fONTROSE LODGE,

No. 108.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

In this case the specifications were (1) threatening to stop an Entered Apprentice (naming him) from advancing; (2) denying the Divine authority of the Holy Bible: (3) non-belief in the existence of Deity. The appellant was acquitted of the first specification, but was found guilty of the other two and expelled. He appeals, and, as the only ground of appeal, states, "t~at I


1888.J

Grand Lodge oj Jllissouri.

47

do not consider that t.he Lodge ha.<; any right or authority to question my religious helief." The evidence, including his own statement to the Lodg-c at the trial, shows that he does not believe any part of the Holy Scriptures or Bible, as a revelation froro God, does not believe in the God of the Bible, his belief being, to use his own InJlguage, "I believe God is a Snpreme Being, and created all things, lLnd made unchangeable laws to govern the snme," and he gets his ideas of God "from thc works of Nature and what I can scc around me." When asked if he believed in the same Deity as when he was made a :Mason, he answered, "I do not." To one of the Brethren, who was a Witness, he stated that at the time he was made a Mason he believed in God and the Bible as firmly as anybody, but after getting older he found out better. At the trial he was represented by two Brethren as counsel, and one of them, Bro. C. C. Arnold, has furnished your Committee with 路an elaborate argument in his behalf. We have given the case and the argument that careful consideration which its importance demands. We approach the discussion of the questions involved with a realizing sense of the delicacy of the subject. The appellant is not charged with any offense which impiies turpitude or intentional wrong. He is not a violator of the laws of the land. He is not a criminal in this hi.nd of ours which tolerates the largest liberty of conscience. From all that we know he may be as good and upright a citizen as any in the Lodge. Belief is often a matter over which we have little or no control. When we reach a conclusion on any subject, after examining the evidence pro and con, if we are honest in our conclusions, we are entitled to respect as honest men. Any action of any soci~ty, in this country, which tends to impair liberty of conscience or freedom of thought, is watched with a critical eye. Societies founded on any belief may, however, require its members to conform to that belief, without encroaching upon these rights. The very essence of our freedom is, that those who are in harmony on any given subjcet may associate themselves together, and may exclude from their number those who lire not in harmony with them. When we, as Mll.',ons, are compelled to separate from a Brother on account of his honest convictions or belief, we can but experience feelings of regret. We do not put. him away as a monster, but rather as a friend, whose opinions honestly formed, have placed him out of harmony with' the symmetry of our edifice. If his belief is in conflict with the fundamental principles of Masonry, if he cannot promulgate its most import.ant teachings, and especially if he must, to be consistent with his belief, antagonize its plainest precepts, he cannot be a Mason in fact, however long he may have been one in name. Howcver sincere or good a man he may be, he cnnnot be a l\fnson unless he can subscribe to the principles of the Ordcr,-not necessarily to everything in detail,-but to its fnndamental teachings. One of the first acts of an initiate in :Masonry is to trust in God-not the God of Nature alone, not a force in Nature, butthe one true and living God. There could be no such thing as trusting in an unchangeable law of Nature. lIe has advanced but little further when he is taught that the religion of Masonry consist.s in an unfeigncd belief in the one living and true God. In the very act of being permitted to see the beauties of the Lodge, he is greeted with the words, "God said, let there be light," etc. The God of Nature does not talk, and never said, "Let there be light." A little farther on he is taught to so divide his time as to give eight hours of each day to the service of God and a distressed Brother. Again, one of the great duties which, as a Mason, he is charged to inculcate. is to never mention the name of God bnt with that reverential awe which is' due from a creature to his Creator; to implore His aid in alliaudahle undertakings. He is taught that before engaging in any important undertaking he should invoke the aid and blessing of Almighty God. At almost every step in his journey through the various


48

Proceeding8 oj the

[Oct.

Degrees of Masonry he has met with similar teachings. If these references in our beauti路 ful ceremonies only refer to the God of Nature, or to the God which our Brother now believes in, they would be meaningless and foolish. If the appellant himself had entertained his pre5ent views when he received the Degrees, he would have elected" to retire" when that opportunity was given him. Our ceremonies to such an one mllst be as "sounding brass and tinkling cymbal." Our teachings with reference to the Holy Bible are no less at variance with the belief of the appellant. He was early taught that the Holy Bible is dedicated to God, because it is His inestimable gift to man as a rule for his faith and practice. The l\fasonic definition of a Lodge shows the necessity of the Holy Bible. It is as follows: "A Lodge is a certain number of l\fasons, dUly assembled, with the Holy Bible, square and compasses, and a charter frol11 a Grand Lodge authorizing them to meet and work." It is as indispensable to the existence of a Lodge as the square or the compasses, or even the charter. Our ritual teaches that" the furniture of It Lodge consists of the Holy Bible, square and compasses." Mackey says, "It is a landmark that 'a Book of the Law' shall constitute an indispensable part of the furniture of ('very Lodge." He then defines what is meant by the "Book of the Law." It is "that Volume which, by the religion of the country, is believed to contain the revealed will of thc Grand Architect of the Universc." But it is urged that many Masons do not believe that all of the Bible is the revealed will of God; that, for example, our Hebrew Brethren do not believe the New Testament to be a part of God's Word. True, but those living in our jurisdiction are in a Christian country where the Old and New Testaments are recognized as the revealed will of God, the Christian Bible, and the Hebrews firmly believe in the Old 'festament, and devoutly worship the God of our fathers as therein revealed. The argument cannot avail the appellant, for he denies that any part of the Bible is the revealed will of God. He renounces the God of the Bible; and the Bible alSO. If he will place himself in harmony with our Hebrew Brethren, his Masonic standing will not be disturbed. Until he does so, he should not claim their privileges. He does noc believe that God has recorded His will anywhere except in nature. He does not believe that any book ~ontains, or can contain the inspired will of God. There is It vast difference between his belief and that of the Jew, the l\{ohammedan or the Christian. This matter is placed in its true light by that distinguished Masonic jurist, Albert G. Mackey, who says: "It is not absolutely required that everywhere the Old and :Kew Testaments shall be used. The 'Book of the Law' is that Volume which, by the religion of the country, is believed to contain the revealed will of the Grand Architect of the Universe. Hence, in all Lodges in Christian countries the 'Book of the Law' is composed of the Old and the New Testaments; in a country where Judaism was the prevailing faith, the Old Testament alone would be sufficient; and in Mohammedan countries, and among Mohammedan :Ma,<;ons, the Koran might be substituted. Masonry does not attempt to interfere with the peculiar religious faith of its disciples, except so far as relates to the belief in the existence of God, and what necessarily results from that belief. 'l'he landmark, therefore, requires that 'n, Book of the LfLw,' a religious code of some kind, purporting to be an exemplar of the revealed will of God, shall form an essential part of the furniture of every Lodge." The God which our Brother now believes in has no revealed will except lUi it may seem to be manifested in nature. He only studies or learns of God from the works of :Kature. As his God has made unchangeable laws only, to govern all thing'S, the frequent invocations in our ritual must be to him the merest mockery. Suppose for It moment we admit the correctness of his position, wherever the word God, or Grand Architect of the Universe, or any word meaning the same person, is used, let us give it the meaning attributed to it by him. Then let us call the ,. Great Light," which in open Lodge, is always open on ollr altar, a forgery, or, to be more mild, a fable, or legend, and then, with these ideas prominent, go through with ollr ceremonies; what impressions would they make!


1888.J

Grand Lod,ge

~f

Jllissou1'i.

49

Would Masonry continue to be a beautiful system of morals, vailed in allegory and illustrated by symbols? No. To the believer in our God and IIis Bible, it would be the vilest sacrilege, and those who have" found out better" would look upon it with contempt and disgust. With this interpretation, Masonry would not stand for a day. When we reach that point we will sound the death-knell of an Order that has withstood the ruthless hand of time and through ull the ages has lightened the woes oflife. The utterances of the Grand Lodge upon this sUbject have been uniform. In 1877, the sentiments of Grand Master Ryland, so beautifully expressed, concerning the Holy Bible路 were hertftily endorsed. In 1884, Grand Mastel' Hall spoke with emphasis and clearness upon the same subject. He discussed a character very much akin to the olle at bar, one who felt ., called upon to cast ridicule upon God's Word, the Holy Bible, and boldly avowed a disbelief in some or all of its essential provisions." In discussing the natnre and character of a Mason's belief, Grand Master Hall says: "IIis belief in God is to be taken as a declaration that it not only means more than the bare fact that there i5 a Supreme Being, the conception of whom is bounded by the physical senses, contracted to their narrowest limits, but that belief is in God as the Great Creator and Ruler. who watches over all. It implies a belief in God's law as laid down in the Great Li~ht of Masonry." These sentiments were endorsed by the Grand Lodge, together with the statement of the Grand Master, "that any Lodge allowing one who holds and avows such doctrines to remain among its members should be cut off with him, and all perish together." . This action of the Grand Lodge must satisfy the appellant that the Lodge not only has the right and authority, but it is made its duty to question his religious belief, or rather his want of religious belief, as taught by Ma.<;onry. He must see the impropriety of his remaining a member of a l\lasonie Lodge. Usually a :Mason who abandons his religious belief and becomes a materialist, or a disbeliever in the Bible and its God, voluntarily withdraws from Masonry. We confess to a partiality for this course. We cannot understand why a member who believes as appellant does should want to reinain a member of a Masonic J.Jodge. To do so is manifestly inconsistent. When one has "found out better" than the Bible and its God, he should unite with those who are in harmony with that idea. As a citizen of this free country he may exercise his preroga. tive of free speech alld free discussion as much as he may be inclined. He should not" however, teach his views as a 'Ma.c;on, for they are not :M:asonic-but the opposite. Neither should he be endorsed by the Order as an exponent of its teachings, for he is not. Throughout the ages, thousands and millions of Masons of different religious faiths, have been comforted and blessed by the Great Light of Masonry. Those of the Hebrew faith by the manifestation of God to Moses, in the burning bush and by the glory of the Lord as it filled the Lord's house at the dedication of the Temple, as revealed in the Old Testament:. Those of the Christian faith by the manifestation of God in the person of His Son, and in sweet communion with His Holy Spirit as revealed in the ~ew Testament. To a.c;sail the faith of our Brethren, is the privilege of those who may think we are wrong and who can offer us something better, but the effort should 'not be permitted in the name of Masonry. The assault on our citadel should not come from within. The workmen on our mystic temple should be so classified and arranged that neither envy, discord nor confusion should be suffered to interrupt or disturb the peace and good fellowship which prevails alllong us. In any view of the case the appellant is wrong in supposing that the Lodge has no right to deal with him for this offense. He has voluntarily disqualified himself from beinga living stone in our mystic'temple, and we must have the right and power to cast out faulty material. Let the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed. G. L. PRO.-4.


Proceedings of the

50

[Oct.

No. X.

w.

H.

STEEl', Appellant, VS.

EVERETT LODGE,

No. 219.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

This case is vcry similar to the last one, the specification being, "That Bro. W. H. Steen declares himself an infidel and proclaims his disbelief in the Bible as the Word of God in a public manner and in his known character as It 1\Iason, to the. great sCllndal of ' the Fraternity and contrar)' to the deliverance of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, as found on pages 18 and 19 of the Grand Lodge Proceedings oÂŁ1877, approved on page 30. Also in the Proceedings of 1884, on pages 23 and 24, approved on pages 31 and 32." The appellant was tried, found guilty and expelled. The evidence fully justifies the finding. He does not complain of the insufficiency of the evidence. His appeal rather confesses its sufficiency and raises the question as to whether his disbelief in the Bible is a Masonic offense. His appeal is in these words: First. I do not believe that I was tried under any Masonic law. Second. I think that I am justified in asserting a disbelief in the inspiration of the Bible.

It

Third. If this is Masonic law, no Jew in the State can be made a Mason or remain 1\'lason.

The discussion of the proceeding case, we think, fully covers the questions raised by this appeal and we deem it unnecessary to repeat or enlarge thereon. The writer of this report, the more keenly regrets the position appellant has placed himself in, because of personal knowledge of his being a good citizen and an upright man. He has, however, placed himself beyond the pale of consistent Masonic standing and while he thinks that he is "justified in asserting a disbelief in the inspiration of the Bible," he cannot work upon our mystic temple, in harmony with those Craftsmen who believe that "the Holy Bible is the inestimable gift of God to man as a rule for ]lis faith and practice." Let the judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. XI. M. JOACHI1IfI, AplJeliani, 'l:S.

VERSAILLES LODGE,

No. 11i.

}

Appeal from the jndgment of the Lodge suspending Bro. D. E. Wray..

The appellant preferred charges agamst Bro. Daniel E. Wray, in Yersailles Lodge, containing two specifications as follows: First, with having illicit carnal intercourse with a Master Mason's uaughter, to-wit, with - - - - , the daughter of-- - - , deceased, a Master MaBon, on or about the 15th day of July, 1884, and at divers times since that date. Sccond, with gross unmasonic conduct in this, that at diyers times during the year 1884 he did unlawfully and illicitly cohabit with the said - - --, and did secretly and


1888.J

Grand Lodge of lIfissouri.

51

clandest.inely convey and remove her from her home. relations and friends, in the City 0 f Versailles, :Mo., in the latter part of the year 1884, by a circuitons route, to the City of St. Lonis, Mo. That from December, 1884, to June, 1886, he lived with her as her husband, under the assumed name of Ed. W. Burt, and under the guise of a drummer or traveling man, and during said time kept up a continuous correspondence and intercourse with her under said fals~ and wicked pretenses; that, prior to the time aforesaid, he was employed by her as her attorney and counsellor, and, as such attorney, brought suit to obtain a divorce for her at the October term, 1884, of the Circuit Court of :Morgan County, )10., which ease was never tried, but finally dismissed by him as her said aUoflley. That during the time aforesaid he made divers declarations of his love and fidelity to her alld made repeated aud divers promises to live with her and to provide a permanent home for her and her boy in the future; and, during said time, to-wit, on the 31st day of October, 1885, and at other times, recognizer} and acknowledged her infant child as his "boy;" and afterwards wholly failed and neglected to prosecute her said suit for divorce to a termination, thereby cffeet.ually cutting off and preventing the fulfillment of his promise to.her and the consummation of his repeated declarations of love and affection in marriage, and left her among strangers, in want, misery find shame, to the reproach and the disgrace of the :Masonic Fraternity. At the trial the a.ccused was present, and admitted some of the facts charged against him. Some twenty or more letters, admitted to have been written by him, were read ill evidence, SUbstantiating most of the allegations in the specifications; He was found guilty of both specifications, and his punishment fixed at one year's suspension. Bro. Joachimi appeals for the reason that the punishment is inadequate, and in this we fully agree with him. It is a little remarkable that a Masonic Lodge should think one year's suspension adequate punishment for one guilty of all the things set out ill these specifications. Its estimate of the nature of the offense is, to some extent, at least, measured by the extent of the punishment it imposes on those found guilty. Judged by this rule the Lodge has placed itself in an unenviable position. If the accused was guilty as charged, he should havc been expelled; if he was not guilty, he should havc been acquitted. As he was found guilty by the Lodge, and the evidence fully justified its findings, we cannot endorse its estimate of the character of the offense, and we therefore recommend that its judgment of suspension be set aside, and tha.t Bro. Daniel E. Wray, of Versailles Lodge, No. 117, be expelled from all the rights and privileges of :Masoury.

No. XII.

In

TC

petition of W. C.

WADLOW,

for restoration.

On No,ember 18th, 1886, the petitioner was expelled by St. Nicholas lJOdge, No. 43;). He petitioned the Lodge for restoration in July, 1887, and his petition was rejectcd. At the regular meeting of the Lodge, held August 16th, 1888, he petitioned the Lodge askingit to recommend him to the Grand Lodge for restoration. His petition laid over to the next rel:,'Iilar meeting, when it was voted on, the vote being 12 in the affirmative and 3 in the negative. Presenting this action of the Lodge, he petitions the Grand Lodge for restoration. The Grand Lodge has no jurisdiction over this petition. He was expelled by his Lodge, and no appeal was taken. We never had acquired any right to act in the premises. The l'Ille to be followed in cases of this kind, as plainly laid down by the Grand Lodge in 1879 (see Book of Constitutions, page 72, note 8) is as follows: "He should peti-


52

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

(.ion the Lodge from which he was expelled (if in existence) for restoration. His petition should lie over one month, and the members be duly notified. At the communication which the members ha,ie been notified to attend a vote by ballot should be taken. If the vote in favor of restoring the petitioner be unanimous, he is thereby restored to good Masonic standing, and to membership in the Lodge ,,:ithout ani action on the part of the Grand Lodge. If it it be not unanimous, but two-thirds or more favor restoration, he is restored to good Masonic standing, and no petition to the Grand Lodge is necessary, as that body could not restore him to membership. But if the vote for restoration be less than two-thirds of those present, then he may petition the Grand Lodge, setting out in his petition the action of the Lodge, etc.

This the petitioner did not do. He only asked-the Lodge to recommend him to the Grand Lodge for restoration, a thing the Grand Lodge could not do until the Lodge had voted directly on the question of his restoration. The Lodge must first act. If its vote for restoration be less than two-thirds, then he may petition the Grand Lodge as provided above. Even then his petition should set forth satisfactory reasons for his restoration. No reasons at all arc given in this petition. This would prevent us from granting his petition if its prcscntation were regular. We recommend that the petition be dismissed.

No. XIII. JA~ms

VI'.

THO~lPSON,

Appellant,

V8.

SAMARITAN LODGE, No. 424.

}

Appeal from the action of the Lodge acquitting Bro. Jno. Wilkson.

The accused was charged with saloon keeping. at the trial wa.'> acquitted, and Bro. Thompson has appealed. The evidence establishes the fact that he Wl\~ engaged in the business. FollOWing the precedents heretofore established by the Grand Lodge. we recommend that Bro. John Wilkson, of Samaritall Lodge, No. 424, be suspended for five years.

No. XIV. A. J.

DEAN,

Appellant,

VB. SELIG~fAN

IAlJ)GE, No. 517.

}

Appeal from the judgment of the Lodge expelling him.

In this case the specifications are (1) selling whisky illegally, (2) drunkenness, (3) blasphemy. The accused wa.'> found guilty by a vote of thirteen to one, and expelled by a vote of eleven to three. He appeals and alleges several grounds for reversal, viz.: he sent a legal excuse for not being present. at the trial; that the whisky sold on election day \Va/; sold on prescription; that the witnesses who testified against him owed路 him money alld had been pushed on their acconnt;;; that the specifications did HOt give the time and place the offenses ,,,ere committed; that visiting Brethren were present at the trial; that the W. ~L and witnesses were his personal enemics, ilnd thc Brother appointed to defend him wail a prohibitionist, etc.


GTand Lodge of lIfiss071,T1:.

1888.J

53

The accused is a druggist and physician, and the evidcnce di~closes that he made a business of sclling whisky, by the glass, on his own prcscriptions, to be drank on the premises, on election and other days. Also that he was often under the influence of liquor himsclf. He was in town and on the streets the evening of the trial, and no excllse for his non-attendance is in the record or among the papers in the case. Neither does the record show that visitors were present at the trial, or that the witnesses were indebted to him, or that they or the 路W. M. ,vere prejudiced against him, or that his counsel was a prohibitionist, and if he were we do not see why he might not do his duty, The specifications do not. give the dates of the selling or of his drunkenuess, but we think no injustice was done him on that account. All the evidence was confined to recent. dates. There is no reversible error in the record. '拢he evidence justified the finding of the Lodge. The vote, on the qucstions of guilt and punishment, were o,erwhelmingly against him. 'Ve recommend that t.he judgment of the Lodge be affirmed.

No. XV. VEAZEY PHlCE, Appellant, VS. FENTON LoDGE,

No. 281.

}

Appeal from the action of the Lodge acquitting Gustave Baumbach.

The accused was charged with having seduced a young lady under promise of marriage. At the trial he admitted having had criminal intercourse with the girl, bllt claimed he had not promised to marry her. There was introduced in evidence a certified copy of the proceedings of the Circuit Court of .Jefferson County, Missouri, from which it appears that 011 an indictment in that court for "seduction under promise of marriage," the a:ccused plead guilty, and was fined and imprisoned therefor. The Lodge failed to find him guilty, t.he vote being, guilty, seven, not guilty four. From this action of the Lodge, Bro. Price, who is the Worshipful ~Iaster, appeals. The action of the Lodge is certainly unaccountable. The four members who voted him not guilty on this state of facts must have strange ideas of duty. He had plead guilty in court to the whole charge, was a self-convictcd fehm, and admitted partial guilt. at the trial in open Lodge, and yet they voted him not guilty. What kind of 1\IasOlls must they be! God save our Order from many such! The mcmbership of this Lodge is fifty-five, and only eleven were present at this important trial. The Lodge deserves severe rebukc, and if its character is to be judged .by this vote, it should not be permitted to exist very long. We hesitate, however, to rccommend the arrest or'its Charter because of the action of foul' of its members, especially as the Grand

Lodge is clothed with authority to correct the wrong done the Order by their action. Let us hope there is yet salt enough in the Lodgc to save it. On the uuqucstioned facts in the case, the accused should have been expelled. As the Lodge failed signally to do its duty, and as the Grand Lodge has jurisdiction of the case by viTtue of our law, we recommend that GustavcBaumbach, of l\'enton Lodge, Xo. 2~1, be, and he is herehy expelled from all the rights and privileges of

:Masonry.

Fraternally submitted, XOAH M. GIVAX, JOSEPH S. BROWXE. S. H. SA U:i'iDERS. SEYMOUR HOYT. F. E. BRUTOK. Commi.ttee.


54

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

MEMORIAL.

A memorial fron1 Brother G. H. Otte, late a 1nember of :Ma1ta Lodge, No. 337, was presented and read, asking the granting to him of a Grand Lodge Dimit, as the Lodge to whieh he fornler1y belonged had ceased to exist. The prayer of the petitioner. was granted, the action resulting in his full restoration to good Masonic standing.

AMENDMENT TO.THE CONSTITUTION.

Brother A. 1\1. Hough presented the follmving proposition to amend the Constitution of this Graild Lodge. The same was read by the Grand 1\1aster, as required by law, .and is herewith submitted to the Lodges of .the Jurisdiction for their action.

Amend Section 1, of Article II, of the Constitution, by striking ant inserting in lieu thereof the following:

sa~d

section and

ARTICLE II. o.tru:ers and 11fcmbcrs-Proxies- Voting.

SECTION 1. Enumeration of o.tficers and JlfemlJcrs.-The Grand Lodge shall consist of the following officers and members, with the following rank and title: A Most Worshipful Grand Master; A Right '\'orshipful Deputy Grand Master: A Right Worshipful Senior Grand Warden; A Right Worshipful Junior Grand Warden: A Right Worshipful Grand Treasurer; A Right Worshipful Grand Secretary: A Right Worshipful Grand Lecturer; Two Worshipful Grand Chaplains ; A Grand Senior Deacon ; A Grand ,Tunior Deacon; Two Grand Marshals; A Grand Sword Bearer; A Grand Pursui"ant ;


1888.J

Grand Lodge of MisSOUTi.

.5.5

Two Grand Stewards; A Grand Tyler; ~1:ost Worshipful Past Grand Masters; Right Worshipful Past Deputy Grand 'Masters ; Right Worshipful Past Grand Wardens; Right Worshipful Past Grand Treasurers; Right Worshipful Past Grand Secretaries; Right Worshipful District Deputy Grand Masters; The Worshipful :Master, for the time being, of the several chartered Lodges under the Jurisdiction of this Graud Lodge, or their legally appointed 'proxies; Past l1:asters who have been duly elected Masters and have actually presided as Worshipful Masters of Lodges within the Jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, aud who still remain me~lbers of Lodges. Amend Section 2, of Article II, of the Constitution, by striking out said section and inserting in licu thereof the following: SEC. 2. Proxies-How Appointed-Duties of.-Whenever the Worshipful ){aster of allY Lodge shall be unable to attend the communications' of the Grand Lodge, he may deputc any member of his own Lodge as a proxy to represent his Lodge in the Grand Lodge; and the proxy so deputed shall be entitled to the same privileges and perform the duties of him deput{ng him. Such deputation shall be in writing and signed by the offiqer so deputing him. Amend Section 3, of Article II, of the Constitution, by striking out said section and inserting in lieu thereof the following: . SEC. :~. On every question which may come before the Grand Lodge for decision, . each Subordinate Lodge, by its Representative present, shall be entitled to cast five votes; and each officer and member of the Grand Lodge present, shall be entitled to cast one vote, but no one in his own right shall give more than one vote.

CHARITY.

:Most \짜orshipful Brother R. E. Anderson, Chairman' of the Con1mittee on Charity, presented a Report which, on being :eead, was .adopted. It is as follows: ST. LOUIS, October 9, 1888. To the ,l{ost Worshipful Grand [,odge of Nissow'i:

Your Committee on Charity would beg leave to report: Petitions for the renewal of the dOllations heretofore made to 1f. W. Bro. Carnep;y, Bro. Jno. F. Alberti and Bro. Genrge W. Trent were forwarded to the Chairman of your


56

P1'oceedings of the

[Oct.

Committee ninety days before the sitting of the Grand Lodge, endorsed by their respective Lodges, as required by law. With increasing age, and the infirmities incident thereto, they are as needy as ever,and we recommend appropriations in their behalf as follows: 'To Past Grand Master Stephen W. B. Carnegy $200, to be paid in quarterly installments, by the Grand Treasurer, upon warrants drawn by the Graud Secretary. The first installment to be paid at the close of this Grand Communication. To Bro. Jno. F. Alberti $100, to be paid to Alexandria Lodge, No. 404, upon the warrant of t.he Grand Secretary, to be disbursed by said Lodge as his necessities require. Third, the sum of $15 to be paid to Aullville Lodge, No. 4G4, on account of expenses in behalf of Geo. ,\~. Trent, deceased. Since our last Grand Communication Bro. Juo. Goff, one of the .recipients of our charity has been "called from labor to refreshment" by the Grand Master of the Universe, and his spirit is in the land of plenty, where no sorrow, no suffering, 110 want is felt, but there is "joy forever more," as the unfading reward of the faithful Craftsman. "Peace to his ashes." The memorial of the officers of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 430, in behalf of the widow of Bro. Robert Newall, asking this Grand Lodge to appropriate $250 towards paying off a mortgage of$i42 on her farm of 200 acres, of the approximate value of$4,OOO, was handed your Committ.ee on yesterday. It is not endorsed by tlH~ Lodge; was not presented at' the time requited by law; shows the land to be worth $3,258 more than the incumbrance, and does not show that the widow has anyone dependent on her. To establish the precedent of paying off such incumbrances by this C;rand Body we think would be, to say the least of it, impolitic. While it might be a very gencI'm,s act, we fail to see any" charity" in it, and recommend that the prayer be not granted. Your Committee were no less pained than surprised to receive an application from an honorable and heretofore active member of this Grand Body, stating: "I have been ill and unable to make my living for about eighteen months. I am slowly recovering my strength, but not yet in condition to work. I am very poor, and under the路 necessity oflaying my case before the Gmnd Lodge. If anything can be done for my relief I would be very thankful for such aid." Of him it may be said truly, he has "borne the burden and heat of the day." Of his zeal. for our cause, his many and valuable works in this Grand Body do testify. He has filled the highest posit.ion we could bestow upon him, with credit to himself and honor to the Craft, while aR the Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence,until the hand of disease wrested it from him, he not only commended our legislative fiction as sound and conservative, but wreathed it with garlands of rhetoric and flowers of poesy, which proved him not only the wise legislator, but the brilliant scholar and polished writer as well. With all this he did not deem it derogatory to his character to travel with the seeker after Light and Truth, from the "ground floor" to the "sanctum sanctorum," and, a<; a "j\{'lsonic worker," he had few equals and no superiors. His aptness as such commended him for the office of Grand Lecturer, and he held that office so long as'his business engugem~nts, as literary editor of tlle then _~[issonl'i Republican, would allow. But, in the order of Providence, he has been stricken, sorely amictcd, and Thos. E. ::;arrett is to-day but the shadow of his former路self..


1888.J

Grand Lodge of lIIisSO?tTi.

57

As a member of this Grand Body, no endorsement of his Lodge is necessary to verify his needs, and his prayer, made, no doubt, reluctantly, is in such simplicity as to emphasize his wants. We recommend an appropriation of the sum of$2oo for the use of !II. W. Bro. Thos. E. Garrett, to be paid by the Grand Treasurer in such installments as Bro. Garrett ma.y indicate. Fraterually submitted, R. E. ANDERSON, J. \Y. PETTY, GEO. E. :MAYHALL, JACK P. RICHARDSON, JESSEJ.SHAW. -

Committee.

The Grand Lodge was then called off until 2 o'clock this afternoon.

WEDNESDAY-AFTERNOON SESSION.

ST.

LOUIS, OCTOBER

10, 1888.

The Grand Lodge ,vas called to labor according to order at 2 o'clock P. :M., by the lVlost 'Vorshipful Grand :Master, Bro. ,,,illianls. Grand Officers in their usual places.

RESOLUTION.

A resolution ,vas offered by Bro. John 'V. Farris, defining the rights of Lodges to remit dues of suspended 111embers and restore theln to good "Masonie standing. The same was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence.


58

Proceedings of the

[Oct.

BY-LAWS.

Bro. Stubblefield presented a Report f1'.0111 the Committee on By-Laws, which was adopted, and is as follows: To the ],{ost Worshipful Grand Lodge of

Jl{iss01~ri,

A.

~P.

& A.

],f.:

Your Committee on By-Laws beg leave to report that they have examined the ByLaws of the fo11owing Lodges, and find them to be in accordance with the By-Lawspre'scribed by the Grand Lodge: Pine Lodge, U. D., Ripley Co. Puxico Lodge, U. D., Puxico, Mo. La Belle Lodge, La Belle, Mo. West Gate Lodge. SL Louis, Mo. Russellville Lodge, Russellville, Mo. Waynesville Lodge, Waynesville, :Mo. Bayou Lodge, Bakersfield, Mo. Weatherby Lodge, Weatherby, Mo. Sparta Lodge, Sparta, Mo. Fraternally snbmitted, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, JAMES A. HARRIS, P. P. ELLIS, NEWTON JONES, J. W. BATCHELOR, CommiUee.

PLACE OF MEETING.

Bro. Lee A. Hall, for the Con1mittee on Place of :Meeting, presented a Report as fo11O\vs, and the same was adopted: To lhe ,l[ost Worshipful Grand f,odge of .msSOUl'i, A. F. & A. ]'f.:

Your Committee to whom was referred the question of securing a suitable place for the meeting of this Grand Lodge beg leave to report: That so far they have been unable to do so. '''e are, however, advised that the large new building, now being erected by the Odd Fellows' Hall Association, at the corner of Ninth and Olive streets, will contain a ha11, with suitable ante-rooms, committee-rooms. etc., and in every way suitable for a permanent place of meeting for the Grand Lodge; and that same will be ready for use before the time for our next regular communication. We would, therefore, respectfully recommend': That the Committee he conti~uerl. and that they be authorized to arrange for our next Annual Communication in said hall.


1888J

GTand Lodge of jlli880t~Ti.

We would further respectfully recommend that, inasmuch as the lease on t.he present office occupied by the Grand Secreta.ry will expire soon after the next Annual Communition (December l;;t, 18S9), that the Committee be authorized to take into consideration . the question of securing proper office room in said building for the use of the Grand Secretary, so that., if the Grand Lodge should determine to use said hall as a regular place of meeting, our business will all be together. All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted, LEE A. HALL, JOHN D. VINCIL, JOHN R. PARSON, Committee.

CHARTERED LODGES. Bro. R. E. Collins, for the COllllnittee, nlade the following R.eport on Chartered Lodges, which v,ras adopted: . 1'0 the ],fost WOl'sldpjal Grand Lodge. of lIfi,~80Ul'i, A .

.P. & A. M.:

Your Committee on Returns of Chartered Lodges, respectfully submit the following report: LODGE RETl'HNS.

Total number of Lodges on Register.............................................. 533 Of which follOWing have reported........... 509 Of which follOWing have not reported.. 24 fl33

We find the reports of the following Lodges substantially correct: Kos. 1, 2, 3, 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 1.'), 16, 17, 18, 1!l, 20, 22, 23, 24, 2.), 26, 27, 2S, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35, 3G, :~7, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 1fj, 47,' 18, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56. 5R, 60, 61, 63, 64, '66, 67, G9, 70, 71, 72, 78, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, SO, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 97, '98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 107, lOR, 109, 111, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, I'll, 122, 123, 124, 125, 127, 128, 12!l, 130, 131, 132, 18:), 134, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 111, 142, 143, 144, 115, 147, 148, 149, 1-50, 151, 1-52, 154, 156, 1;:>7, 1::>8, F>9, 160, 162, 163, 164, 165, 168, 170, 172, 173, 175, 176, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 186, 18S, 189, 190, 191, 192, l!lS, 194, 195, 196, 197, 19S, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 20-5, 206, 'lOS, 210, 211, 212, 215, 216, 218, 219, 220, 221, 223, 224, 22;:>, 226, 227, 228, 230, 231, 232, 2:33, 231, 235, 236, 237, 239, 241, 242, 243,路 244, 245, 247, 248, 249, 251, 2-53, 2.55, 256, 257, 2.58, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 278, 274, 275, 276, 277, 279, 280, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 2.'\8, 289, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 315, 316, 317, 31S, 319, 320, 322, 323, 321, 325, 326, 327, 328, 330, 331, 332, 333, 384, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 341, 312, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 352, 353, 354, 3;)5, a56, 358, 359, 360, 361, 363, 361, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 377, 378, 3S0, 381, 382, :~3, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, '395, 396, 397, 398, 400, 402, 403, 404, 405, 40S, 109, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 41-'), 416, 'H7, 418, 419, 420, 121, 122, 423, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 430, 482,


60

PToceedings oj the

434, 460, 484, 507, and

43.'\ 461, 48'3, 509, 5:16.

'1:16, 162, 487, 511,

4:17, 464, 488, 512,

438, 465, 489, 515,

439, 167, 490, 516,

440, 470, 491, 519,

441, 471, 492, 520,

442, 472, 493, 52.3,

443, 473, 494, 524,

446, 474, 49;3, 52:3,

117, '175, 496, ;")26,

448, 476, 49i, 528,

[Oct. 450, 477, 499, .')29,

453, 478, .500, 530,

454, 479, 501, 531,

456, 480, .')02, 532,

457, 481, 50.1, 533,

458, 1H2, 504, 534,

4ii9, 48:1, 506, 535¡

The returns of the following mentioned Lodges are ineorreet in the particulars mentioned: In the reeapitulation of membership: 'Nos. 12, 57, 59, 65, 91, 95, 444, 451, '169, 486 and 508.

no,

112, 146, 155, 169, 1il, 184, 246, 2.52, 2:"'.>4, 376, 379, 393, 401,

In the finuncial statements: Nos. 14, 21, 45, 62, 68, 79, 15.'), 187, 207, 246, 290, 329, 362, 384, 401, 407, 433, 466, 469, 486 und 522. :No Seal attached: Nos. 32, 42, 50, 68, 169, 177, 209, 213, 240, 278, 394, 406, 426, 449, 452, 505, 513, 517, 518 and 527. Not signed by the Master: :Nos. 21'1, 2:1S, 2.')0, 254, 281, 340, 351, 357, 449, 4-52, 510 and 527. Not signed

uy the Secretary:

:Nos. 89, 171 and 185. The following mentioned Lodges return each one saloon-keeper as a member, viz: Williamsburg, :No.8, Wilson, No. 191, and Granby, No. 216. But we are informed that since the dates of their reports the said saloon-keeping members have ceased to be members of said Lodges. Your Committee calls attention to the financial condition of Rich Hill Lodge, No. 479, which returns assets, $132.64, and liabilities, $295.50, ornet liabilities of $162.86. Also to Madison Lodge, No. 91, whose return states that it has no method of ascertaining the amount of its liabilities. Your Committee has experienced great difficulty in examining the Lodge returns; and, on account of the imperfect manner in which many of the returns are made out, it was only lLfter much labor expended by your Committee in revising and correcting many of the returns that we were able to classify as correct returns, which if not revised would have been reported incorrect. Secretaries of the Suhordinate Lodges should see that their returns are perfect before sending them out, and not impose the labor of having their returns revised by a Committee which ha,~ enough to do to examine more than â&#x20AC;˘ five hundred returns, e,'en if all were correct. ROB'T E. COLLINS, Chairman. Z. T. MARTIN, ,J. T. CRAIG, A. F. BRAUN, .T. R. FERGUSON, GEO. W. DEATHERAGE, W. 1':. 'M:cKINLEY, ISAAC CLARK, Commitlee.


1888.J

GTCcnd Lodge oj Misso'UTi.

61

"MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI." B~'o. Noah :M. Givan, President of the Board of Directors of the "11asonic HOlne," presented a Report fro III the Board. Each separate subject was considered and adopted unani1110usly, and the Report was then adopted as a whole. Following this action, the Inembers of the Grand Lodge indulged in the very pleasant and profitable exercise of a "Love Feast," gi\:ing the most earnest and unqualified endorsement to the action of the Board, and of the Grand Lodge in determining the question, and making final the matter of the "Horne" and its location. 1\1any of the Brethren delivered telling addresses in behalf of the great enterprise nmv fonnally inaugurated under such encouraging auspices. This is regarded as the "jubilee year" of the Grand Lodge of 1\1issouri 1\1asonr,)'. Here is the report, followed by that of the ,"!"'reasurer of the Board: To the

M().~t

Worshipful G10and Lodge oj lrfisso'nri, A. }: & A .•~f.:

B'HETIIItEK:-I herewith submit my Annual Report as President of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri, the same having been submitted to and approved by the noard. Immediately after the adjonrnment of the last session of the Grand Lodge, propositions were invited from localities desiring the locatioll of the Home. In respome thereto, we receivcd and considered, at our meeting held I\~ovelliber 29, 1887, offers of donations from several localities. The most liberal moneyed proposition came from the citizens of Liberty and Clay County, although several of the propositions were quite liberaL By direction of the Board, a Committee visited Liberty and examined the situation there, who reported themselves greatly plea.<;ed"with the interest manifested by the Masons and citizens of that place. The Board held a meeting at Boonville the day following this visit, but a full attendance was not had, and action on the question of location was postponed until the meeting in May. At the May meeting, the question of location was again postponed until the present time. The postponements ·have heen made solely because of the earnest desire on the part of the Board to make no mistakes in this most important question of location. It involves, not simply the present benefits to the Home, but its permanent prosperity and success. If located where it cannot receive the continued careful and gratuitous attention of our Brethren, though present liberal inducements are offered, it call1lot continue to grow and prosper as it should. Til view of the vcry many questions to be decidcd and considered, you will appreciate the great difficultie::; which are involved in its location.


62

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

It should be where it can be casily visited by the largest number of Masons; where the

Graud Bodies can visit it at. their Annual Sessions; where there are the best facilities for educating llnd caring for its inmates; where, in emergencies, money can be readily raised; where the grent.est advantages are offered for finding employment for the young, as we)] as where there are the gTeatest opportunities for their engaging in business, when they leave the Home. These are considerations of far greater moment than any offers of money for location, that do not confer these advantages. While the Board has been seemingly dilatory in locating t.he Home, the~' are free to say that the delay has bE-en the result of their sincere desire to select ~uch location as will insure, not only the present, hut the future maintenance of this noble monument to the genero;;ity and loyalty of 'Missouri Masons. And after mature deliberation, looking, at it not from one, but from all standpoint.~, and carefully studying the experience of similar enterprises in other States, they arc forced to the con.clusion that at or near the City of St. Louis-thc gTcat commercial center of the West, and the home of liO many cam est and large-hearted :Masons, as indicated by the fact that their suhscriptions, already made, are nearly one-third of the whole amount now subscribed-is thc placc where the Home should be situated. Accordinglv, the Board. at its meeting held during the present session of the Grand Lodge, adopted the following resolution: Resolved, That it is thc sense of the Board that the Home should be located at or near St. Louis. This resolution was adopted by the unanimous vote of all the members present, Brothers Stevenson and Dockery being absent.

Should the Grand Lodge endorse this action, the selection of one of the most eligible sites will be made and the Home opened in the near future. It is believed that if this location is approved by the Grand Lodge, it will secure a most liberal contribution from our Brethren in St. Louis, both for thc present and for all time to come, in addition to their present liberal 路donations. Besjdes, it ,"vill better accommodate ala.rger number of the :l\fusons of the State, outside of the city, than any other location could do.

The Board submits these considemtions in support of its action, trusting that the Brethren of the Grand Lodg(~ will carefully weigh the mattcrs presented, and act solely for the present and future good of the Home.

n is proper to state in explanation of the action of the Board, that while, as before stated, the most liberal proposition came from Liberty, yet we did not consider it sufficient to justify the location of the Horne at that place, and, of course, as was our dnty, we reserve.d the right to reject any or all bids. CHAHITY DAY FUND.

At the last Report the amount of the proceeds of Charity Day was given at $32,000; It wa." still in the hands of the TrieI;nial Committee, a portion of it drawiIlg interest

the business of the Committee not having been fully settled, the exact amount to he turned over could not then be given. Since then the Committee has paid to our Treasurer, Bro. F. J. Tygard, for the .Masonie Home of Missouri, the munificent sum of $35,000, as the proceeds of Charity Day of the Triennial Conclave of Knights Templars, held in St. Louis, in September, 1886. This is the grandest work ever accomplished by the Knights Templars, in one day, in all the history of that noble Order of Christian Knighthood. The Board of DJ.re~tors have, to perpetuate the remembrance of the glory of that day, created the sum thus reali",ed liS a permanent endowment fund, to be kIlown llS the "Knights Templars' Triennial Endowment Fund ofthe Masonic Home of l\-lissouri." The amount has been invested in County and Township Bonds, bearing interest, the.


1888.J

GTand Lodge路 of JlfissoUTi.

63

interest to be used in keeping up the Home, the principal to be permanently kept at interest as a part of the permanent endowment of the Home. III addition to this fund, Bro. Parson has, for the Triennial Committee, during the present session, paid to the Treasurer the further sum of $114.

The expenses incurred by the Board during the past year amount to the sum of S350.90.

The Annual Report of the Treasurer is herewith submitted, which gives a full exhibit of the finances of the Board up to July 31, 1888. On Board, Bro. S. Bro. S.

May 9, 1888, Bro. John R. Parson resigned his office of Vice-President of the and as a member of the Board. The office of Vice-President was' filled by electing l\f. Kennard to the vacancy; iLlld the vacancy in the Board was filled by electing C. Bmlll, of St. Louis.

The resignation of Bro. Parson was accepted with deepest regrets after repeated efforts to induce him to remain with us. His demands were imperative, and the Board could only submit. Bro. Parson has been lJa1' eueUence our most valued member. He' had inaugurated tile plan by which Charity Day, with its glorious .results, was made to contribute so much to the permanent prosperity of the Home. He, with the Triennial Committee, had labored both mentally and physically, day and night, in season and out of season, for the success of that day and that great cvent in St. Louis. Broken in health from over. exertion, he repaired to the mountains of ColoI'llQO for recuperation. On his return he continued to labor with us until the proceeds of that day had become a permanent endowment fund, a Grand Corner-Stone upon which to builll our Home, and then he usked to be relieved of the cares and anxieties that had for years weighed him down. Under such circumstances we could but accept his resignation, but we could not entirely relieve him of anxiety for the welfare of this noble work. His heart is too large, his soul too Henr akin to the Good Samaritan to fail to hear the cry of the widow and the orphan. 'We shall continue to have his counsel and his effort in our work. He deserves to, and will, live long in the gratitude of our Brethren. Bro. Trusten P. Dyer, the Secretary of our Board, has remO\'ed from this Grand Jurisdiction to 'Vashington Territory, where he has become a permanent resident. His resignation as Secretary was accepted June 5, 1888, and the vacancy was filled by the election of our Grand Secretary, Rev. .John D. Vincil, D. D., to that office. Brother Dyer .has also resigned as a member of the Board, and it will be necessary for the Grand Lodge to fill the vacancy at this Session, as also to elect a mem bel' to the place of Brother Bunn, as the Board could only elect till the meeting of this Grand Body. The term of office of the following Directors expires with the present Session, which you should fill by election, viz. : :Noah M. Givan, John D. Vincil, R. F. Stevenson and Joseph S. Browne. llECOIlD1ENDATlONS.

I recommend: Pi1'sl: That the usual appropriation of Five Thousand Dollars be made this year by the Grand Lodge;

_

Second: I would fraternally a.<;k that the Grand Lodge, in addition to that sum, appropriate the sum of Five Hundred Dollars toward paying the necessary expenses of the IIome, such as clerk hire, etc.

These are necessary expenses, not large, but must be paid, and if this body will pay them, the fund subscribed for the Home can be kept solely for the maintenance of the Home.


64

PToC<3caings of the

[O,ct.

CONCUISION.

Tn conclusion, I commend the Home, with all its interests, lLnd the importancc of its success, to the prayerful consideration of the Grand Lodge, and through it to the more than thirty thousand l\lasons of :Missouri. Fraternally submitted, NOAH M. GIVAN, President.

REPORT OF F ..1. TYGARD, TREASURER l\'1ASONIC HOME OF :MISSOURI, From October 7,1886, to July 31,1888. HECEIPTS.

1886. â&#x20AC;˘ Oct. 7, To cash from Bro. Wood for acct. Bro. Parson Oct. i, Oct.. 7, 1887. :May 2:;, Aug. 3, Nov. 29,

. Reeei:]Jt No. 1

Dr.

2 3

00 10000 100 00

4

3100

5 6

1845 32,43293

Bro. T. P. Dyer, Sec. (Nov. '87) 7 (Dec. '87) 8 (Jan. '88) 9 (Feb. '88) 10 (l\lch.'8S) 11 S. l\f. Kennard, Treas. Gr. L., A. F. &A.l\f..12

2,03.) 60 35840 247 00 500 2,768 57 15,000 00

Bro. Vinci! for acct. Bro. Pettit Bro. \Vann Mo. K. T. Triennial Committee

Cr.

~100

188B. Jan. 5, .Jan. .5, Jan. 31, Fcb.29, :l\lch.31,

May 11,

Total receipts

$53,196

!),")

DlSBUHSHIENTS.

1887. Dec. 19, By amt. paid Compton & Sons, Wt. No. 1.. Dec. 19, T. P. Dyer, Wt. No. '2

.

$1108') 10000

.

1888. T. P. Dyer, Wt. No.2 .. Jan. 4, Little & Co., for Henry Co., Mo. Bonds . Jan. 5, Compton & Sons, Wt. No.3 . Jan. 7, Little & Co., for Grand River Twp. Bonds . Feb.13, F. J. Tygard, Wt. No.4 . ~lay 9. Coqull.rd, for Pettis Co. & Brookfield Tp. Bonds l\fay 11, :Ma.)' 11, S. :\L Kennard, for Cass Co., Mo. Bonds...... .July 23, Jos. C. :Moore Co's, for Grand Riv.Tp. Bonds J. D. Vinci!, Secretary, Wt. No. 1.. . July 21, .. .July:n, By balance

5000 20,000 00 2.) 00 9,80000 4005 3,07490 1,028 66 1,000 00 2500 17,944 49 $:")3.196 95

July 31,1888, Dr. to balance

$17,944 49

$53,196 9,)


65

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

1888.J

$12,000 of above balance is deposited, subject to call after Oct. 1, 1888, with interest from June 1, 1888, at 5 per cent per annum. See statement attached, account o'f bonds purchased, and made a part of this report. Fraternall~ submitted, F. J. TYGARD, Treasurer.

BUTLER, Mo., July 31, 1888.

STATE,IENT OF BONDS BOUGHT BY AND HELD BY

F. J.

TYGARD, TREASURER MASOl\IG

HO)!E OF MISSOURI, ON ACCOUNT ilK. T. ENDOWMENT FUND,"

Date of PU1路ella.se. January 5, 1888, February 13, 1888, May 11, 1888, May 11, 1888, May 11, 1888, July 23, 1881),

Am't of Bond. Arn't Paia,

Name of Bond.

Henry Co., Mo Funding Bond, $20,000 $20,000 00' 9,800 00' Grand River Twp., Cass Co., Mo........ "'10,000 1,029 35' Brookfield Twp., Linn Co., Mo......... 1,000 2,04.5 55 Pettis Co., Mo.................................... 2,000 1,02666 Cass Co., Mo.. 1,000 1,000 00 Grand River Twp., Cass Co., Mo........ 1,000 Total amount of Bonds Total cost of Bonds

.. ..

$35,000 $34,901 56

The Henry County Bonds are dated July 5. 1887, and due July 5, 1907, except $9,000 may be called July 5, 1902. They have coupons attached for interest from MaTch 1, 1888, at rate of 5 per cent per annum payable annually. The Grand River Township Bonds are dated Nov. 1st, lR87, and due Nov. 1st, 1917, but subject to call Nov.. 1st, 1907. They have coupons attached, for interest, from Feb. 1st, 1888, at the rate of 5 per cent per annum, payable annually. The Brookfield Township Bond is dated April 1st, 1883, alld due April 1st, 1903, but may be called April 1st, 1893, and has coupons attached, for interest, from April 1st, 1888, at the rate of6 per cent per annum, payable annually. The Pettis County Bonds are dated May 1st, 1&~, and due May 1st, 1908, but may be called May 1st, 1898. They have coupons attached, for interest from May 1st, 1888, at the rate of 5 per cent per annum, payable annually. The Ca.'iS County Bonds arc dated Feb. 1st, 1883, and due Feb. 1st, 190:J, but may be called Feb. 1st, 1888. They have coupons attached, for interest, from Feb. ht, 1888, at. the rate of6 per cent per annum, payable annually. The purchase of the above named Bonds has been approved by the Finance Committee, except $1,000, bought, July 23d 1888, was not reported to the Committee. All of these Bonds are deposited with the St. Lonis Safe Deposit Company, St. LOllis, l\{o.

BUTLER, Mo., July 31st, 1888. G. L. PRo.-.5.

Fraternally submitted, F ..J. TYGARD,

Trea~路nl'er.


66

Proceedings路 of the

[Oct.

DIRECTORS.

The Grand Lodge then proceeded to elect the following Directors to fill vacancies of those whose tenns have expired: Vil. M. ",Villiams, V. O. Saunders, Noah 1\1. Givan, John D. Vincil, Joseph S. Browne and S. C. Bunn.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON D. D. G. M. REPORTS.

A Report was presented and adopted on D. D. G. 1\1. Reports as follows: To the Most WO'I'shipfnl Grand Lodge of Missouri, A. F& A. AI.:

Your committee to whom was referred the Reports of the District Deputy Grand Masters of the several Districts, beg leave to report that they have carefully examined the Reports and find that the District Deputy Grand Master in each of the several Districts has made report. The Reports seem to indicate that the Order is in a healthy and growing condition throughout the State, and are much more full than heretofore, and show that the Deputies have b~en faithful and diligent in the discharge of their duties in almost every case. Respectfully submitted, C. C. WOODS, LEEA. HALL. THEO. BRACE,

A. M. HOUGH, C. S. OWSLEY, Committee.

THE ST.. LOUIS BOARD OF RELIEF.

Bro. Xen. Ryland, P. G. 1\1., Chairman of the Special Committee of the St. Louis Board of Relief, presented the following Report, which was adopted:


1888.J To the

jl[.

Orand Lodge of lJlissoUTi.

67

IV. Gmnd Lodge oj .fl1issou1'i, A. F. & A. jl1.:

The路 Special Committee to. whom was referred the memorial of Brothers Philip Rodan, William H. Mayo, and others, concerning the Masonic Board of Relief of St. Louis, 路Mo., have carefully investigated the matter. We commend the Board of Relief for the noble work which it has been enabled to perform by virtue of the provisions of the resolution of this Grand Lodge, adopted in 1854.

Your Committee fire satisfied that it was the object of the Grand Lodge in adopting that resolution to provide a fund for the relief of distressed worthy Master Masons not connected with the membership of the Lodges of the City of St. I,ouis, and in order that this burden might fall equally on all the Lodges in cities, where Boards of Relief existed in this State, each Lodge was required to set apart the sum of five dollars towards this fund out of every initiation fee. Your Committee are further satisfied that it was never the intention of this Grand Lodge by that resolution to create an unnecessary burden upon the Lodges, by withdrawing any greater amount from their funds than was necessa.ry for prompt 'and efficient relief that the Boards of Relief would be expected to afford when called upon. And inasmuch as the Board of Relief of the City of St. Louis has now on hands a suflicient sum to meet any and all demands that may be made upon it for several years to come, and to enable the Lodges to better care for their own indigent members who can not be assisted out of this fund, your Committee .recommend that the resolution of 1854, so far as the same relates to the payment of five dollars from initiation fees, shall be, and the same is hereby suspended until the funds of the various Boards of Relief shall be .reduced to the sum of one thousand dollars. The Lodges in connection with the Masonic Boards of Relief have it in their power by their proper agents to correct, alter and amend the rules regulating the powers of the same, and we sec no necessity for furt.her action on the part of this Grand Lodge. Fraternally submitted. XENOPHON RYLAND, C. J . WALKER, F. E. BYBEE, .J. P. BLANTON, R. Q. ROACH, Committee.

REPORT ON ARRESTED CHARTERS. Bro. Joseph S. Browne, P. G.1VI:., presented a Report of the Committee on Suspension of :Mcmbers alld Arrested路 Charters, which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipjul Grand Lodge oj Missouri, A. F. & A. M.:

Your Committee on Suspension of Worshipful Masters and Arrests of Charters respect路 fully report:


68

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

That \ve have examined all of the papers presented and heard evidence of witnesses, and submit the following: We recommend that the action of the M. W. Grand Master in suspending the Worshipful Master of Exeter Lodge, No. 511, and the Worshipful Master of Pickering Lodge, No. 472, together with the arrests of the Charters of Warsaw Lodge, No. 365; Ionic Lodge, No. 235, and Plumb Lodge, No. 375, be approved. With regard to the suspension of the Worshipful Master of Pickering Lodge, No. 472, in consequence of the statements of the D. D. G. M. of the Thirteenth District, and the expressions of penitence made by the accused, we recommend that he be suspended from all the rights and privileges of Masonry until January 1st, 1890. We recommend that the property of Warsaw Lodge, No. 365. be taken in charge by the D. D. G. l\f. of the Twenty-third District, and that, upon the certificate of the late Worshipful Master and Secretary of said Lodge to the Grand Secretary, that the outstanding indebtedness of said Lodge has been paid, the Grand Secretary be authorized to issue Dimits to the members. We recommend that the property of Plumb Lodge, No. 375, be disposed of by the D. D. G. M. of the Fifth District to the best advantage, and the proceeds applied by him to the payment of the outstanding indebtedness of said Lodge, and the surplus, if any, forwarded to the Grand Secretary, and on account of the financial inability of several of the members to pay their individual indebtedness to the Lodge, that the Grand Secretary be then authorized to issue Dimits to those of the members whom the D. D. G. M. of said District may recommend without payment of back dues. Fraternally submitted, JOSEPH S. BROWNE, W. F. ROBERTS, ROBT. E. COLLINS, WM. H. CARPENTER, R. E. WITT, Committee.

LODGES UNDER DISPENSATION.

The GOlnmittec on Lodges Under Dispensation presented the following Report, which was adopted: To the -ft{ost Worshipful Grand Lodge of A. F. & A. -ftf., of the Stale of Missouri:

Your Committee 011 Lodges Under Dispensation respectfully report that we have carefully examined the records of the following Lodges under Dispensation, and recommend that Cha.rters be granted the same:


1888.J Name. Russellville LaBelle Puxico Sparta Pine West Gate 'Veatherby Bayou Waynesville Bethel

69

Grand Lodge of MisSOUTi. Location. Russellville La Belle Puxico Sparta Pine St. Louis Weatherby Bakersfield Waynesville Bethel

County. Cole. Lewis. Stoddard. Christian. Ripley. City of St. Louis. De Kalb. Ozark. Pulaski. Shelby.

We recommend in the case of West Gatc Lodge, whose records show that considerable work has been done, and their future prospects being bright, peace and harmony prevailing in their midst, that the Charter, Seal, Books, all property formerly belonging to the late West Gate Lodge, No. 445, begiven to this Lodge. We would fail to do our dutv, not only to the ~L W.Grand Lodge but to several of the above mentioned Lodges, if we did not call their attention to the several inaeuracies in their records. We can only point out a few in this report. The first is that of recording the reports of Committees on Investigation of the Petitions of Candidates for the Mysteries or Affilliation, whether favorable or otherwise. Your Committee arc of the opinion that it is sufficient to say, the Committee reported and were discharged. Second. We find that some of the records show that candidates having been initiated or passed were examined as to their proficienc)r, "then made application for advancement." This is unnecessary, as their petition for the Mysteries, and passing proper examination, cover this point. Third. Some of the Lodges use the word meeting for communication. We further recommend that Pine Lodge and Russellville Lodge be required to procure a suitable book each, and transcribe their records, as the ones referred to your Com. mittee are totally unsuited for the purpose. We recommend that thc records of all Lodges be signed by the Worshipful Master and Secretary, personally. and not, as we find in many ca.<;es, both names signed by either the Worshipful Master or Secretary. In the cases of the following Lodges: Kennett, at Kennett, Dunklin County, Braymer, at Braymer, Caldwell County, Hermon, at Liberal, Barton County, Claflin, at Protem, Taney County, Canopy, at Aurora, Lawrence County, Not having furnished the Grand Lodge with their records and returns, we recommend that their Dispensations be continued for another year. Fraternally submitted, Wb!. H. MAYO, GEO. E. WALKER, H. L. ROGERS, HENRY MARQUAND, P. C. ARMENTROUT, J. S. AMBROSE, . D. L. DAVIS, 1\'1. H. GAm~'-OOD, J. D. FLIKT,

Commillcc.


Proceeding8 of the

70

[Oct.

REPORT ON ACCOUNTS Bro. F. W. Mott, Chairman, presented a Report of the COlnmittee on Accounts, as follows, and the same was adopted: To the Most Worshipful Gmnd Lodge of M1J;smtri, A. F. & A. M.:

Your Committee on Accounts have made a careful examination of the financial records of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer, and find that the balances referred to by them in their Report.s to this session of the Grand Lodge correspond and that the books are kept correctly. . F. W. MOTT, J. II. BABCOCK, JOHN H. DEEMS, W. :M. MONROE, ~L COOK, Committee.

JURISPRUDENCE.

"T.

Bro. J. Boyd, P. G. M., Chairman of the ConlInittee, presented a Report, ,vhich was adopted, and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of lIfissouri, A. F. & A. M.:

Your Committee on Jurisprudence beg leave to submit the following Report: Only three matters have come before us for our consideration. 1.

Is the decision of Grand Master in reference to the admission in evidence of the judgment of a civil court, in the trial of a Master Mason, correct? That decision is as follows: "Where the pleadings in a civil suit, to which a Mason is a party, and in which he has the right as well as the opportunity to appear, present the sole issue as to. his guilt or innocence of a crime, the judgment or decree therein is competent evidence in a l\fasonic trial for the same offense." This decision is correct. Under the circumstances in the case, there can be no doubt but that the record of the proceedings,of a civil court is properly received as evidence in a Masonic trial. The weight to which it is entitled is to be determined by the members of


1888.J

G1"and Lodge of

MisSOUTi.

71

the Lodge trying the Brother. Under some circumstances the record of the civil court, even when admissible in evidence, may be very light testimony of defendant's guilt, under other circumstances such evidence may be convincing. We do not say that the record of a civil court in a case wherein a :Mason is a party to the suit is, under all circumstances, proper evidence to be received against him on a Masonic trial. But under the circumstances mentioned by the Grand :l\:laster, such record is proper evidence. II.

In reference to the resolution concerning the remission of the dues of a Mason suspended for the non-payment thereof, we need only say, that we deem it entirely competent for the Lodge to remit such dues, and to reinstate the suspended Brother. III. BELLEFONTAINE CEMETERY LOT.

We find that in 1866 this Grand Lodge purchased a Burial Lot in Bellefontaine Cemetery, in St. Louis, and set it apart for, find dedicated it to the interment of the remains of worthy Masons who die within, or belong to our jurisdiction, without the ability to procure a proper home in the city of the dead. [Proc. 1866, p. 151.] Without any reference in its proceedillgsto this lot, in 18i7, the Grand Lodge adopted the following resolution, offered by Bro. S. W. B. Carnegj' : Resolved, It is the duty and interest of the Grand Lodge of Missouri to provide and enclose a lot of land, to be improved and used as a cemetery, for the interment of deceased Masons and t.heir families. â&#x20AC;˘ Resolved, That a Committee be appointed, &c.

That in 1878 and 1879 reports were made by that Committee, but no final action was taken on the subject by the Grand Lodge until its Annual Communication held in 1880. At that time the Committee reported as follows: To the WorshipJul Grand Lodge oj Missonri, A. F. & A. M.:

"Your Committee on Burial Lot would report that, after several interviews with the officers of Bellefontaine Cemetery Association, a location in that cemetery was agreed upon, and for the sum of one thousand dollars we secured a lot of 4.020 square feet, for which a deed bas been made to the Grand Lodge. At the request of your Committee a warrant was issued by the Grand Secretary in payment of same." The action of the Grand Lodge on this report is as follows : "On motion of Right Worshipful Bro. Martin Collins, the afore-mentioned h.uriallot is placed in charge of the :l\fasonic Board of Relief to have control of the same and direct who shall be interred therein." From the foregoing proceedings it is readily seen that the said burial lot in Bellefontaine Cemetery has been purchased for the purpose of being used as a place for the interment of deceased Masons and families.


72

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

We think this law or resolution of the Grand Lodge ought to be changed. We think this burial lot ought to be used for the most part for purposes clcarly stated in the rcsolution passed in 1866, at the time this Grand Lodge purchased another lot in said cemetery, to wit: "For the interment of the remains of worthy l\'Iasons, who die in or belonging to our Jurisdiction without the ability to procure a sure home in the city of the dead." Your Committee consider that undcr certain circumstances, a worthy Brother whose estate is cntirely able to pay for a burial place for him, may with propriety lIe buried in same lot, upon路 certain conditions. In order that the law governing this matter may be made definite and cert.ain, your Committee present the following resolutions: Resolved, I. That any worthy Brother Mason, in good st.anding in his Lodge, holding his membership outside of our Grand Jurisdiction, who dies within our jurisdiction, leaving no means with which to purchase a burial place, may be buried in said lot.. Re.oolved, II. That all worthy Brother Masons, in good standing in their Lodges, holding their membership in Subordinate Lodges of this Grand Lodge, who die, leaving no means with Which to purchase a burial place, may be buried in said lot; pl'ovided, the Lodge to which he belongs shall pay the sum of ten dollars for said burial permit; 1)1'0vided, further, that if his Lodge be not able to pay said sum, the said deceased Brother may be buricd in said lot free of any charge against his Lodge therefor. Resolved, III. If any worthy :Master Mason, whcther he holds his membership in this or some othcr Grand Jurisdiction, dies within our borders, leaVing means with which to purchase a burial place, may be buried in said lot, UPOil the payment by his estate of the sum of twenty five dollars for said burial privilege. . Resolved, IV. That said burial lot be continued under the control of the Masonic Board of Relief of St. Louis, to be used by them in accordance with thc views of the (:;rand Lodge as herein expressed. Resolved, V. That whenever application is made to said Board of Relief for burial permits, and said application conforms to the law as herein set forth, it shall bc thc duty of the President and Secretary of said Board, or in case of the absence of said President from the City of St. Louis, then the Vice-President and Secretary of said :Board, to issue said permit for said purpose. Resolved, VI. That the money, if any, that shall be realized by the said Board of Relief, shall be collected by the President of said Board, and immediately turned over to the Treasurer of the Grand Lodge, taking his receipt therefor. That the amount thus realized shall be kept as a separate fund, to be expended by the Grand Lodge as it may see fit in enla.rging, improving, and caring for said burial lot. Resolved, VII. That the PreSident and Secretary of said Board of Relief be required, and it is hereby made their duty, to make Report to this Grand LOdge at each Annual Communication thercof. giving a full and correct statement of all burials in said Lot during the year, the names, places of membership and financial condition of the deceased Brothers buried there, the amount of money collected, and such other matters as may be necessary to show the Proceedings of the said Board in this regard during the year.

Under the law, as it now stands, the Board of Relief has done the best it could to see that this property is applied to the purposes intcnded by the Grand Lodge, and the Presinent of said Board has been zealous in the discharge of his dnty as such President. Hi~


1888.J

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Grand Lodge of Missouri.

only desire in regard to this property is, that he may still be instrumental in promoting the object of its pmchase to the end, that no worthy Mason need be buried in the potters' field. JAMES W. BOYD, B. II. INGRA~f, W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, GEORGE R. HUNT, DORSEY A. JAMISON, Comrnitice.

On motion, Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer, was requested to exeinplify the work in. the Third Degree this evening at 7: 30. On motion oLBro. L. A. Hall, P. G. 1\1., the Grand Lodge appropriated $50 with which to procure a portrait of P. G.路 M. P. H. McBride, deceased, the same to be presented to the Grand Lodge of Iowa, Bro. 1\1cBride having been Grand Master for five successive years, during which time the four Lodges which con1posed the Grand Lodge of Iowa at its organization were chartered. The Grand Lodge was then called fronl labor until 7: 30 this P. M. WEDNESDA Y-EVENING SESSION.

ST. LOUIS, October 10th, 1888. Grand Lodge called to labor. R. R. R. R. R. R. R. R. R. R. R. R.

W. W. W. W. W. W. W. W. W. W. W. W.

BRO. GEO. Eo 'WALKER as BRO. R. E, COLLINS as BRO. W. H. CARPENTER as BRO. F. E. BYBEE as BRO. J. R. FERGUSON as BRO. W. J. CLARK as BRO. B. II. INGRAM as BRO. ALLAN McDOWELL BRO. P. P. ELLIS as BRO. J. L. FINAGAN as BRO. J. E. GASKELL as BRO..J. W. OWEN

:

Grand ltfaster. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden. Grand Treasurer. Grand Secreta1'1J. Grand senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Tyler.

The work in the Third Degree was then exemplified by R. W. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lodge was called fron1 labor until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.


74

Proceedings oj the

[Oct.

THURSDAY-MORNING SESSION. ST. LOUIS, October 11th, 1888. The Grand Lodge was called to labor by -the Most shipful Grand Master, Bro. VV. 1\1. ,V illialns.

,V 01'-

Grand Officers in their usual places. Prayer was offered by Rev. Bro. C. II. Briggs, Grand Chaplain. The luinutes of yesterday's proceedings were read and approved. AMENDMENT.

The proposed alnendment to the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge was read a third time, and, under a ruling of the Grand 路Master, was ordered ~printed in the Proceedings and go over to the next session of the Grand Lodge. The amendment is as follows: To the 111. W. Grand Maste,路, Grand Wardens and Rreih"en oj the M. W. Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M., of the SfIJJ,e of Miss01Lri:: 1

The undersigned mORt respectfully ask your Most Worshipful Body to amend Article XVI of the By-Laws of this 1\1. W. Grand Lodge by adding the following section: "The concurrent jurisdiction hereby created in the City of St. Louis shall include Kirkwood Lodge, No. 484."

The above was signed by the Masters of all the Lodges in St. Louis except one. MASONIC COMITY路

In response to a request of the Grand 1\1aster of the Grand Lodge of Iowa, the question of Masonic COlnity was consid-


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75

Grand Lodge oJ Jlfissouri.

ered, involving the passage of a law looking to arrangements by which Lodges contiguous to State lines may receive the petitions of parties residing in a sister Jurisdiction nearer such Lodges than their own. On motion of Bro. James VV. Boyd, a Committee was appointed to consider and report upon the subject at the next session of this Grand Lodge. The Grand :Master appointed Brothers James W. Boyd, John D. Vincil and 'Xenophon Ryland.

WAYS AND MEANS.

The COllllnittee on \V,ays and Means presented the following Report, and the saIne was approved. To the Most Worshipful Grand [,odge of Missouri, A. F. & A.

il[. :

Your Committee on Ways and Means beg leave to sllbmit the following Report: Your Committee find that the available cash balance in the hands of the Grand Treasurcr is $11,393.49. We recommend the following appropriations: Printing Proceedings of 1888 Rent of Grand Secretary's Office Salary of Grand Secretary Chairman Committee on Foreign Correspondence Salary of Grand Treasurer Postage, Printing, Stationery and Incidentals Grand Tyler Grand Lecturer Expenses of Grand Lecturer Grand Master's Expenses for 1888-9 Expenses of Special Deputies Past Grand Master's Pay Roll hereto attached

,

'.'

$1,000 00 .. 1,200 00 . 2,50000 . 50000 . 15000 .. 80000 . 15000 .. 1,75000 .. 500 00 . 25000 . 200 00 . 197 85

Total appropriations ; $9,197 85 Expenses of C. H. Briggs, Grand Chaplain, added by resolution of Grand Lodge, 19 65 Total

$9,217 50


76

[Oct.

Prroceedings of the PAY ROLL OF PAST GRAND MASTERS.

. .. . .. .. . . . . .. .. ..

$ 17 75

TotaL.................................................................................................... ....

$217 50

Past Grand :M:aster S. H. Saunder8, 175 miles, 3 days R. E. Anderson, 135 miles, 3 days " " N. M. Givan, 253 miles, 3 dayR " J. S. Browne, 350 miles, 3 days " W. R. Stubblefield, 3 days " Lee A. Hall, 3 days " J. W. Boyd, 350 miles, 3 days " Geo. R. Hunt, 220 miles, 3 days Xenophon Ryland, 244 miles, 2 days " " C. C. Woods, 310 miles, 2 days " Thos. E. Garrett, 3 days Grand Chaplain, C. H. Briggs, 273 miles, 2 days

15 75 2165 2650 900 900

2650 2000 18 20 2150 900 1965

Fraternally submitted, CRAS. F. VOGEL, F. J. TYGARD, J. A. GORDON, GEO. L. FAULHABER, J. W. FARRIS. Committee.

Bro. Lee A. Hall, for the Comnlitteo on the D. D. Grand :Master System, announced that, owing to the press of work, and the shortness of tinle to consider the question, it was necessary for the Comnlittee to have further tilne. On motion the matter was postponed until nex.t session of the Grand Lodge. . Bro. Xenophon Ryland moved that the C0111111ittee on \Vays and Means be directed to audit the expenses of Rev. C. I-I. Briggs, Grand Chaplain, and pay the same out of the funds of the Grand Lodge. The motion was adopted.

THANKS.

A vote of thanks was tendered to Bro. John R. Parson for the very convenient ballots furnished by~ him for the election of Gralid Officers.


1888.J

Grand Lodge of Missouri.

77

ANNUAL ELECTION.

At. 10 o'clock', Grand Master 'Villiams announced that the hour for the election of Grand Officers had arrived. He appointed Bros. John R. Parson and John R. Ferguson as tellers. The Grand Lodge then proceeded to the election of Officers for the ensuing :Masonic year, with the following result: BRO. JAMES P. WOOD, New London, M. W. Grand Master. BRO. THEODORE BRACE, Jefferson City, D. Grand Master. Bn,o. GEO. E.W ALKER, Potosi, Grand Senior Warden. BRO. B. H. INGRAM, Sedalia, Grand Junior 'Varden. BRO. SAMUEL M. KENNARD, St. Louis, Grand Treasurer. BRO. JOHN D.

VINCIL,

St. Louis, Grand Secretary.

APPOINTMENTS.

The Grand Master elect announced the following appoint111ents: REV. C. H. BRIGGS, Independence ELDER JACOB HUGL:EY, Paris REV. J. L. LAWLESS, St. Joseph REV. J. J. WILKINS, Sedalia REV. B. G. TUTT, Liberty REV. A. E. ROGERS, Fulton ELDER THOS. E. SHEPHERD, Buffalo R. E. COLLINS, St. Louis J. P. BLANTON, Kirksvillc .lAY L. TORREY, Sr. Louis

GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND CHAPLAIN. GRAND SENIOR DEACON. GRAND JUNIOR DEACON. GRAND MARSHAL.


78

[Oct.

Proceedings of the

R. E. WITT, Fayette E. W. BLISS, Potosi... F. E. BRUTON, Sturgeon J. }\of. LANGSDALE, Independence JOlIN R. FERGUSON, Springfield CHAl\lP CLARK, Bowling Green W. R. EDGAR, Ironton JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

GRAND l\lARSHAL. GRAND SWORD BEARER. GRAND SENIOR STEWARD. GRAND JUNIOR STEWARD. GRAND PURSUlVANT. GRAND ORATOR. GRAND ORATOR. GRAND TYLER.

A paper was presented by Bros. E. P. Garrison and S. O. Goode, concerning the compensation of D. D. G. 1\1.'s. It was referred to the Committee on that subject. The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until bvo o'clock this afternoon.

'l'HURSDA Y~AF'fERKOON SESSION.

ST.

LOUIS,

October 11, 1888.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at two o'clock, according to announceInent, with Bro. "Tilliams, Grand Master, present and presiding. Other Grand Officers were in their respective places.

RESOLUTION.

The following resolution, presented by 1\10st \Vorshipful Bro. S. H. Saunders and seconded by M. \V. Bro. Xenophon Ryland, was adopted: "Information having been received of the death of Past Grand Master John W. Luke, too lute to be announced in the Address of the Grand Master, therefore be it

"Resolved, That this Grand Lodge extend to the family of our deceased Brother, J. W. Luke, our warmest sympathies in their bereavement, and that a memorial page be set apart in the printed proceedings of the Grand Lodge to the memory of P. G. M. John 路W. Luke."


1888.J

Grand Lodge of J1fissou?'i.

79

PRINTED PROCEEDINGS.

On motion of Bro. Jos. S. Browne, P. G. IV!., the Grand Secretary was directed to have printed for distribution and use, twenty-five hundred copies of the forthcoming Journal of our Proceedings. He further moved that the thanks of the Grand Lodge be tendered to the Railroads and Hotels for the usual courtesies accorded the 111embers of this Grand Body.

CORRESPONDENCE. \

The Committee on Correspondence presented a Report which was ordered printed in the Proceedings.

CHAIRMEN OF STANDIN'G COMMITTEES.

The Grand Master elect, previous to his installation, appointed Chairnlen of the Standing Committees for the year as follows: . . FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE JURISPRUDENCE APPEALS AND GRIEVANCE LODGES U. D CHARTERED LODGES TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS ON REPORTS OF D. D. GRAND l\IASTERS CHARITy ACCOUNTS WAYS AND MEANS BY-LAWS

:

:

JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis. W. M. WILLIAMS, Boonville. NOAH M. GIVAN, Harrisonville. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis. LEE A. HALL, St. Louis. W. H. MAYO, St. Louis. XENOPHON RYLAND, Lexington. R. E. ANDERSON, Hannibal. 1". W. MOTT, St. Louis. J. W. BOYD, St. Joseph. W. R. STUBBLEFIELD, St. Louis.


P1'oceedings of the

路 80

[Oct.

INSTALLATION.

The retiring Grand路 Master, Bro. Willialns, appointed R. 'V. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand l\1arshal, and proceeded to install the following Grand Officers: JAMES PERRY WOOD THEODORE BRACE GEORGE E. WALKER B. H. INGRAM SAMUEL M. KENNARD .. : JOHN D. VI-NCIL REV. C. H. BRIGGS R. E. COLLINS J. P. BLANTON R. E. WITT F. E. BRUTON J. M. LANGSDALE JOHN R. FERGUSON JOHN W. OWEN

GRAND MASTER. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER. GRAND SENIOR WARDEN. GRAND JUNIOR WARDEN. GRAND TREASURER. GRAND SECRETARY. qRAND CHAPLAIK. GRAND SENIOR DEACON. GRAND JUNIOR DEACON. GRAND MARSHAL. GRAND SENIOR STEWARD. GRAND JUNIOR STEWARD. GRAND PURSUIVANT. GRAND TYLER.

The Grand Master appointed the following DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 1st District-J. T. LAUGHLIN, Fairmount. 2d A. FISHER, La Belle. 3d GEO. E. MAYHALL, New London. 4th J. A. THOMASON, Louisiana. 5th CHARLES J. WALKER, Wentzville. 6th WM. H. CARPENTER, Centralia. 7th JOHN W. BARNETT, Moberly. 8th JOHN J. DILLINGER, Owasco. 9th GEO. W. DEATHERAGE, Carrollton. 10th C. S. GLASPELL, Trenton. 11th NORTON B. ANDERSON, Platte City. 12th HARRY KEENE, St. Joseph. 13th JOHN H. BUNGER, Maryville. 14th J. B. THOMAS, Alban)'. 15th SCOTT H. BLEWETT, St. Louis. 16th JAS. B. WILDE, Bonne Terre. 17th W1\1. B. WILSON, Cape Girardeau. 18th GEO. W. CARLETON, Gayoso. 19th A. B. MARTINDALE, Williamsville. 20th FRED. W. WEBB, Steelville. 21st H. MARQUAND, Chamois. 22d A.1-l, HOUGH, Jefferson City. 23d B. H. INGRAM, Sedalia.


1888.J

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81

JlfiSSOlUi'i.

24th Di!itrict-J. A. GORDON, Marshall. 2;jth J. T. CRAIG, Kansas Cit)'. 26th F. E. BYBEE, llarrisonvillc. 2ith SEYMOUR HOYT, Greenfield. 28th F. A. AFFLECK, Bolivar. 29th WM. TALBERT, Cassville. 30th E. P. LINZEE, Peirce City. 31st JOHN R. FERGUSON, Springfield. 32d E. C. STEELE, Hartville. 33d JAS. F. RHEA, Dixon.

The minutes of the day's session were read and approved. Bro. Theodore S. Parvin, Grand Secretary of Iowa, being present and about to take leave of his Inother Grand Lodge, made a touching and delightful" parting talk, which was responded to in appropriate terms by the new Grand Master, Bro. Vlood. ffhe Sixty-Eighth Annual Conllnunication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri was then closed in AMPLE FORM, amid great peace, and prevailing harmony, prayer being offered by Rev. Bro. Briggs, Grand Chaplain. JOlIN D. VINCIL,

Qrrand SecTetary.

G. L. PRo.-6.


ANNUAL OOMMUNIOATION IN 1889.

The Sixty-ninth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held in St. Louis, commencing at 10 o'clock on the n10rning of the First Tuesday after the Second :Monday (viz. the 15th day) in October, 1889.


8:3


85


87


89


91


93


APPENDIX.


1

REPOR1 ON CORRESPONDENCE. ST. LOUIS, Mo., October 1st, 1888.

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ni.ssouri, A. F. & A. lIf. I herewith submit my Annual Report on Correspondence:

ALABAMA,

1887.

The sixty-seventh Annual Communication was opened in the New Masonic Temple, in the City of Montgomery, Deceiilber 5, 1887, with }VI:. \V. Bro. John Gideon Harris, Grand Master, presiding. Brother Daniel Sayre, Grand Secretary, was at his post. The report shows 291 LodgeR on the roll, ,,,ith representatives present from 179. The membership foots up 7,:305. There is a slight decline in the number of Lodges, though four new ones had been chartered. The volume under review is of moderate size, being less than 200 pages, 105 of which are occupied with the report on correspondence. ADDRFn'3S.

The address of Brother Harris, the Grand Master, is Rhort, being practical and business-like. He announced that Peace among all the grcat nations of the world exists, and the principles of Freemasonry are having free course. As the twin sister of a higher civilization, and the promoter of every virtue, our system of morals is lighting up the pathway of man llnd pointing him to a high lind noble destiny. DECISIO:\S.

Seven rulings were reported, five of which met with immediate approval from the Committee on the Address, while two were sent to the Committee on Jurisprudence, and not heard from afterward. He reported affirmatively the oft-rendered ruling that a Brother must have served as a ,V arden b(~fore he is eligible to the office of Master of a Lodge. He said that the Gran<;l Lodge of Alabama knows nothing about side degrees. Next: That one indefinitely suspended must be restored G.~.

Ap.-l.


2

[Oct.

according to the law. Somehow this docs not seem very d~finite. The next seems equally strange. He said the Grand Lodge can not authorize a Subordinate Lodge to bury a dimitted Mason. If not disfranchised by his non-affiliation, why should he not be buried as a Brother? The ruling, which follows, may be determined by local regulations, but does not suit this latitude. He ruled that a Junior Deacon may dimit from his Lodge while in office. If he may, why not any other officer who had been installed ? If others, why not all? Then where is the Lodge? . The follo,ving were referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence: " An applicant who can not sign his name is eligible as a petitioner." Again: A Lodge in Tennessee requested a Lodge in Alabama to initiate a candidate elected by the Tennessee Lodge. The Grand Master ruled that it could not be done. '''hat his reason was, does not appear. l\fasonic comity 'seems to have been lost sight of in the case. These b,,路o rulings were referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, but no such committee appears in the list of committees, and, of course, no report could be rendered. This writer is curious to see what the Committee would say to such decisions as were sent over. Perhaps it was thought best to ignore them. At least no bill was found. The Grand Master reported that he had visited a large number of Lodges and delivered numerous addresses, and, while in office during two terms, traveled many hundred' miles, doing much work for the Craft without expense to the Grand Lodge. He urged upon the fraternity the cultivation and practict: of the social features of Masonry. MASONIC HO){E.

Touching this important work, he said: It seems to me that the time has arrived when we should take under advisement and formulate some plan looking ultimately to the establishing- a home in this State for indigent widows and orphans of deceased worthy Master Masons. Other jurisdictions have inaugurated such an enterprise, which has been crowned with success. Only yesterday the wires announced the fact that the noble-hearted, charitable Jere Baxter had donated to the Masons of Tennessee ten acres of land, just outside the city limits of Nashville, on which to erect the Widows' and Orphans' Home. Kentucky has already a magnificent home, fully equipped, which is the pride of the Craft of that State. Our jurisdiction has held siXty-SiX sessions, and it is fitting now that we determine to put 'forth our energies in carrying into effect such a project.

demla~~~ea~3~~e}~1~~I~~t~~r~igW:~J:tl~l;~\~~~~;~~i~l~\)1~}~~~\~~~rIj,.~r:sua~;~a~:~aio~l~~

indigent widows and orphans of deceased brethren should" claim our most zealous and liberal co-operation. To prepare a home for the helpless and penniless is God-like in its purpose. 1 earnestly recommend, therefore, that you take this matter seriously in question and pursue it t.o ultimate success. It will not be the work of a day", nor a year, but perhaps of many years, yet nonc need doubt that so nohle and glorious undertaking will eventually succeed.

He concluded in terms befitting one who had served the Craft so ably, and' in keeping with the sublime mission of our ancient and honorable Institution. He said: '


1888.J

Appendix.

For two years you have confided to my ~uidance a sacred trust, that of chief executive of this Grand .Jurisdiction. My relatIOn with thc Subordinate Lodges has becn pleasant and beneficial to myself. Whatever may have been my shortcomings, none can say that I have disregarded the trust reposed. During my official term, nothing has transpired to disturb the fraternal and cordial relations that has existed between this â&#x20AC;˘ and other Grand Bodies. Peace, harmony and good will abound, find the Craft in this State is in a flourishing condition. And here let me say that there is no creed higher or nobler than that of ours, save that creed, or principle, that draws us nearer to our Creator. We teach every command found in the Decalogue, and the violation of any of these commands is a violation of the :Masons' Creed. It detests and denounces slander, hatred, malice, backbiting, falsehood, drunkenness, Sabbath-breaking, and every act that tends to lower the standard of true manhood. We should purge our IJodges of every dead weight, and garner up thc just, the noble, the true. 'Vords are powerless to convey my appreciation of the high aim to which we should aspire. We should remember that among all created objects, man was awarded the highest compliment, that of being created a little lower than the angels, and in the image of his niaker. To lift man to a higher and s.till higher plane of moral development should be our constant study and effort-to be useful we must be virtuous and good-to guide others aright we must go right ourselves. A nation's glory, a nation's prosperity, a nation's freedom depend upon the chivalry, integrity and virtue of its people. The forcefulness and benefits of Masonic principles must depend upon the unflinching devotion of its members. To proclaim a truth and act a falsehood dethrones the very subjcct sought to be attained. Heroic, unyielding- devotion to moral sentiment ann moral truth beg-ets a priceless manhood. "REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CORI{ESPO~DE~CE, BY P. G. ~f.

PAUIIER .J. PILLA)<S, CIIAIR\1lIS."

Under the above heading there iR furnished a review of over one hundred pages. The Grand Lodges noticed received courteous attention. The "Chairman" used his scissors freely, as the report is made up largely of clippings. The .Journal of l\fissouri for 1887 wa.'3 given a notice of three pages. Extracts were made from the address of Grand Master Hunt and comm.ents offered. Brother Pillans agreed with our Jurisprudence Committee concerning the burial of a Mason whose habits had been irregular and bad. This Committee is in full accord with the view that a Lodge should not take ad vantage of its own neglect as to the enforcement of disci pline and refuse rights and privileges to a member who had acted unworthily. ¡While it is true a Lodge compromises the character of Masonry by giving public recognition to the standing of a bad member, yet the mockery of a funeral in such cases could be easily avoided by the application of correctives before the faulty member needed a funeral. Brother Pillans correctly said: "If he was in sufficiently good standing to continue a member, surely he should be so esteemed for buria1." The principle here enunciated is the correct one. However the humiliation suffered by the Lodge in having to appear before the public and perform the solemn services ofl\1asonry at the grave of such characters is very great, but not greater than is deserved by a Lodge so recreant to duty. The mortification suffered should teach the important lesson that discipline is a.'3 necessary as a funeral.


4

Appendix.

[Oct.

SALOO~S.

Brother Pillans had something to say about the position taken 'by Grand Master Hunt concerning the saloon-keeping Masons in Missouri. He is not alone in his views as to that delectable class of members of the j<";raternity. Hear him: The Grand Master also drew attention to the position of saloon keepers, and in a circular to the Lodges instructed them to enforce the edicts of the Gralld Lodge, which, he contended, classed all such as guilty ofullmasonic conduct, He also arrested the charters of some Lodges for being in contempt on this sUbject, The Committee to whom this matter was referred reported in favor of the Grand Master's construction of the law, but one member presented a minority report opposing such rigid construction. The Grand Lodge, however, by a tremendous majority, on a call of the Lodges, sustained the Grand :l\1aster. To thus single out anyone calling in life authorized by the laws of the land, and to puniSh, appea.rs to us far from the proper purposes of l\lasonry.

Yes, the Grand Master did draw attention to -the fact that there were "Saloon-Keepers" in a few Lodges who were disregarding the law. He assumed, correctly too, that the la\v applied to all, and could exempt none. The By-Law, under which he acted, reads: "All Lodges SHALL enforce the :l\'lasonic Law against ALL unrnasonic conduct." The Grand Lodge had defined the quality of the saloon-keeping business and declared it unmasonic. The right to define the quality of that which affects human interests and destroys human happiness is a Moral right. Such right belongs to Masonry, because it is a "system of Morals." In determining the qual'ity of the pursuits ,and actions of our brethren, we do not look to, or depend upon, the STATE to furnish our standard. '\Ve measure the actions of Masons by a Masonic standard, because they are Masffi1s. That standard is a .:\10RAL one, because Freemasonry is a "system of Morals." It therefore does not belong to the State to furnish a standard by which Masonry shaH measure and determine the actions of its members. The Institution alone has the right to supply such standard, and thereby define the l.{oral .qualitie.s of Masonic actions. Masonry alone has the right to say what is Masonic, and what is unmasonic. It concedes such right to no power on earth. Having the right to d~fine the quality of an act, as it apper.tains to Masons, the Grand Lodge, as "the SUPHEME MASONIC Authority," in any .Jurisdiction, can declare what may and what may not be allowed. The ST1\TE does the same thing concerning the acts of its citizens, and declares what must not be tolerated. No one will question the right of the State to define the quality of the actions of the citizens. FOllnding its deliverances upon the Divine statute, promulgated at Sinai, the State declares "Thou shalt not kill." The State is supreme in its own domain. So is Freemasonry. In its own realm, which is a Moral one, its authority is beyond question, and its powers are absolute as to the conduct of the members of the Institution. And this concession is made by every petitioner for the Mysteries of Freemasonry who aspires to become associated with the "Sons of Light." 'Vhen a eandidate "freely and voluntarily" prays for


1888.J

5

admission into our "Mysteries," he solemnly "promises a r:heel:ful compliance with the Rules and Regulations of the Fraternity." 'With his name signed to such a petition, the candidate concedes to the Institution the absolute rl:ght to regulate and rule his Masonic life. The "Fraternity" asserts that right and the petitioner concedes it, and signs the contract. Much more solemn and binding is the contract into which the candidate enters, when, before God, he promises to "stand to and abide by" the "Rules and Regulations of the Fraternity." He makes a necessary concession to the Institution when he vows to "support and maintain" its laws. His obligation to "support and maintain" the lawl'> of Masonry il'> a concession necessary to gain admi,ssion. OBEDIENCE to those laws is especially necessary in order to continued good standing, and is the only true recognition of the supremacy of the law and the sovereignty of the law-making power. By his petition and his obligation, the candidate acquires relationship with others, ,,,ho enter into solemn covenants wi,th him, to "help, aid and assist," to protect his character and his life, to care for his family and become his benefactors. These covenants are not more binding on the members of the Fraternity, than are the obligations of the candidate to render a "cheerful compliance" to the laws governing the Fraternity. He cannot be allowed to disregard the "Rules and Regulations of the Fraternity," which he promised to "support and maintain," and hold the Fraternity bound to "help, aid and assist him." I now return to the criticism of the Alabama committee upon the action of the Grand Lodge of Missouri and its Grand Master. in reply to said committee, I again announce that" Freemasonry is a system of JlIORALS." Its standard is, therefore, a MORAL one. Such standard can only apply to the JlfORAL or MASONIC acts of Masons, and determine the moml quaWy of their conduct. The law of the State does not apply in the Masonic domain. In Missouri, the statute defines the qualifications of a dram-shop or saloon-keeper, and inquires if the "applicant is a person of good character." This being the law, every saloon-keeper ill Missouri must be "a person of good character," or else the law is violated. The Masonic champions of the poor, persecuted saloon-keepers will hardly put themselves upon record as endorsers of the" good character" of this element of our population. Brother Pillans, of Alabama, thinks the Grand Lodge of Missouri has taken a wide departure" from the proper purposes of Masonry" in defining the quality of the business of saloon-keeping, and declaring it immoral. If we of IVTissouri are U"/'ong in saying the saloon business is irnnwral, then Bro. Pillans is right in declaring the business is moral and, therefore, MQ"90nic. He has chosen his position and may rejoice in his association. This committee possesses too much courtesy and good will to arraign or animadvert upon his choice. He said of the action of our Grand Lodge: " To thus single out anyone calling in life, authorized by the laws of the


6

Appendix.

[Oct.

land, and punish it, appears to us far from the proper ])'urp08es of Ma-. sonry." Of course our Missouri action is "far from the proper purposes of Masonry," as viewed by Bro. Pillans. If Bro. Pillans is right, saloonkeeping is right, and we of Missouri arc wrong for putting it out of Masonry, because we have banished a good thing kept by" a person of good character." But we of Missouri are glad we put the saloon out of our Masonry because of the good we have done. If ,ye erred in putting out the delectable thing, we are happy over our 0rror because of the results. At the same time, we of Missouri are sorry for Alabama Masonry, if Bro. Pillans represent", it, because he, being right, defends an indefensible evil. Pity it should be so. Sad, indeed, is the predicament of a Brother who, in defending "the proper purposes of Masonry," writes himself down as an apologist of the saloon business of the day. If " Ephraim is joined to his idols," let him remain. But the Missouri Committee has not so learned the" proper purposes of Masonry." The plea offered by Bro. Pillans, justifying saloon-keeping Masons tn their business, is a current one. He says it is "authorized by the laws of the land." "Yea, verily! " And so are other things" authorized by the laws of the land" which are not Masonic. Bro. Pillans would defend the lottery schemes of some of the States on the same grounds. He must apologize for such huge GAMBLING concerns run under State auspices, because "authorized by the laws of the land." If as many Masons carryon the lottery business as are engaged in saloon-keeping, Bro. Pillans would have to take both under his protecting care, because the business of both is" authorized by the laws" of the States where lottery gambling is legalized. Lottery gambling being" authorized by the la1JJs of the land," must be right, if engaged in by Masons, because Bro. Pillans ,Yould not "single out anyone calling in life authorized," and so "punish." He certainly did not consider, when writing his apology for saloon-keeping Masons, "authorized" by law, how far such views would carry him from the true" purposes of Masonry." It has been the belief of this \yriter for thirty years, and he has so taught with tongue and pen, that the mission of Masonry is to make better men out of its votaries, to elevate humanity and to lessen the vices of life. Gambling, whether by lottery, under" the laws of the land," or by other devices is a great moral wrong, and, therefore, unmasonic. Yet Bro. Pillans must become the apologist and defender of Masons who engage in lottery gambling, because it is "authorized by the laws of the land." Drunkenness is a great moral wrong, therefore, unmasonic. "The law of the land" docs not license men to get drunk, but it does license men to make men drunk, and takes a rc\vard for doing so. It will not be denied that drunkard-making is caused by liquor-selling. Though "authorized by the laws of the land," it is none the less a great ~('Tong, and no apology by those who defend the business can make it right. I presume Bro. Pillans would vote to en-


1888.J

Appendix.

7

force Masonic la:w against drunkenness on the part of members of his Lodge. " The law of the land" in Alabama does not p1'ohibit drunkenness, and it does not prohibit selling intoxicants, which cautie drunkenness. Yet drunken Masons must be punished by the Lodge, while saloon-keeping Masons must escape justice. It is right to punish an unfortunate, degraded and fallen brother, hut foreign to "the proper purposes of Masonry" to "single out the calling" of a saloon-keeper, whose business is licensed by "the laws of the land." It is wrong to punish the destroyer of human happiness and life, but right to punish those degraded and ruined by one" authorized" under the forms of law. I have not so learned Masonry. The Grand Lodge of l\ljssouri proclaimed several years ago that it would路" BE A STRANGE RuLE '1'0 PUNISH THE VICTIM AND NOT THE VICTI]I[IZER." Upon this principle, which is infallibly correct, we of Missouri have based our action, and declared saloon-kee'ping (drunkard-making) to be unmasonic. In the long ago our Grand Lodge legislat.ed against "drunkenness and kindred vices." Having t.hus defined the quality of the act-drunkenness-and having declared it to be unmasonic, we, of necessity, must pronounce our verdict against the CAuSE of drunkenness as one of the" kindred vices." Consistency, as well as justice, demanded this. It was not just to "punish the victim, and not the victimizer." As we had declared "drunkenness" to be a m~ce, and, therefore, unmasonic, it was natural and easy to define the CAUSE of that vice to be unmasonie. Our Grand I.Jodge, therefore, consistently and correctly determined the classification of drunkardmaking. It exercises its moral and constitutional right to define the quality of the saloon-keeping business. It held the business to be not only a "kindred vice" to "drunkenness," but the PARENT vice. Thus holding, the Grand Lodge proclaimed hs verdict to the world, and said: "The business of saloon-keeping is UNlI1ASONIC." This was simply a definition of the position always occupied by the Grand Lodge, and the body so declared in these words: "The adoption of the resolution defining saloon-keeping to be unmasonic was only a specific declaraiiim of what has ahcays been the la1JJ." Thus the Grand Lodge settled finally and forever the moral phase of the business of saloon-keeping, placing it and drunkenness in the same black list. Having declared both to be unmasonic, because immoral, Missouri has said both must go. The Grand Lodge having defined its position and the status of the saloon-keeping business, announced that any Mason engaged therein had the" OPTION to quit the Bl;SINESS or QUIT MASONRY." At the last session the doctrine, thus enunciated for years, was re-affirmed, and the whole subject set at rest by an overwhelming majority, It is a pleasure, deeply enjoyed by this writer, to announce to the Masonic world that the saloon bas gone o'U.t of Missouri Masonry - gone to stay, for no saloon-keeper "need apply." vVe of Missouri have made war upon the b11siness because it is 路immoral. Its presenee, as carried on by Masons, could not be tolerated


8

[Oct.

without reproach and disgrace to the Fraternity. "Good men and true" felt the humiliation of it.",> presence among our brotherhood. They said it must" go." And it went. The critics of MisRouri legislation are welcome to all the comfort they can derive from the action of our Grand Lodge. The champions and patrons of the Saloon in Masonry may console themselves with the aRsurance that the action of the Grand Lodge of Missouri is FINAL. This action voiced the sentiments of nine-tenths of our brethren in the State. It proclaimed to the Masonic '''orld that saloonkeeping Masons, and their patrons, can not dictate the policy of the Craft in this Jurisdiction on a Moral Question. And it announced anoth er truth that brethren may do well to keep in mind: The Grand Lodge of Missour i will never take a backward stcp on the great moral issuc involved in a contest where the very life and character of the Institution were in the balance. Correct moral principle has gained a victory over the worst elements of our population and theit adherents, at home, and in other juriRdictions. The year 1887 will stand marked as the grandest epoch in the calendar of Masonic history of Missouri. \Ve have said that the saloon business by Masons is grossly immoral, even though "authorized by the laws of the land." The Committees of the Grand Lodge ot Alabama and Louisiana have affirmed the contrary, and constitute themselves self-appointed champions of the business, because it is "authorized by the laws of the land." Missouri Masons will not envy their positi0n or contest their right to the championship of evil. If their patronage of the husiness championed is equal to their zeal in its behalf, the reason of their defense need not be sought for elsewhere. \Ve of Missouri have driven the Saloon from our :Masonry, because it is an immoral and, therefore, an "unmasonic" business. The champion of the saloon in this jurisdiction could not deny the immoral and unmasonic character of the business, and wanted a law enacted which would debar the admission of anyone into the Order hereafter engaged in the traffic. But they desired to retain those who gained admission in violation of the law, which said that the rule against saloon-keeping "had alwaY8been the law." Thus the advocates of the saloonkeeper sought to protect and d~fend bad men in the Order by class legislation, favoring those in, as against the Outs. They admitted that saloonkeeping was wrong, but they forgot that whatever is morally \\Tong once is ahcays wrong. If "anyone calling in life" is so nefarious as to debar the admission of any person, it is sufficiently nefarious to put out all snch as arc in the Order, who are engaged in it. If the business of saloon-keeping is '''rong in principle to-day, it was '''rong when saloon-keepers were admitted in violation of the known will of the Grand Lodge. Therefore the Grand Lodge could not allow such to remain and maintain any claim to deccncy and self-respect, to say nothing of the Opinions of Mankind. Hence the Grand Lodge of Missouri drove the saloon from Masonry in


1888.J

Appendix.

9

this Jurisdiction. It had the right to do so. Knowing our rights we dared to maintain them, though the business was Hauthorized by the laws of 1.he land." The said business was NOT authorized by }'lasonry, the opinions of the Committees on Foreign Correspondence of Alabama and Louisiana to the contrary notwithstanding. Said Committees have placed themselves in unenviable attitudes as the apologists of things "authorized by the laws of the land." Let them enjoy the reputation achieved in their championships of such "authorized" things. They will add to their reputation, already gained, by defending the villainous Lottery schemes of some of the States known to themselves. These exist by Statute. Additional reputation, if not fame, can be won by the championship of a "law of the land," authorizing another form of vice. A "Social Evil" law was upon the Statute Books of one State a few years ago, licensing and protecting brothels, while revenues derived from these houses of shame flowed into the public treasury. To have denounced this licensed vice, as some of us did, and thus Hsingle out anyone calling in life, authorized by the laws of the land," was, in the view of our brethren of the Grand Lodges named, "far from the purposes of Masonry." Saloons, Brothels and Gambling Hells have all been favored by the laws of the land. The championship of one of the vices commits their defenders to the defense of all, because all have been "authorized by the la,vs of the land." Our Missouri Masonry has declared all these vices 1.6 be "high crimes and misdemeanors" in the Fraternity. And in saying so, we have assigned them to their proper place. I need not tell how proud I am of Missouri Masonry. I prefer it to that kind which would not banish an evil from the Craft because it happened to be "authorized" and protected by Statute. To measure Masonry, and determine the limits of its powers or its character by the laws of the land, is Hfar from the proper purposes of Masonry," as I have learned it. Masonry is either Moral, or it is Immoral. ,Ve teach that it is a "System of Morals." Saloon-keeping, licensed houses of Sin and Lottery Gambling, are Immoral and vice-producing callings. They have been Hauthorized by the laws of the land." Can Masonry be a "System of Morals," and tolerate such vices among its members? Do the "laws of the land" make such vices moral? And will an apology for them lessen their hideous phases of immorality, even though the apology came from some occupying high places in our Masonic courts? "I speak as unto wise men. Judge ye what I say." â&#x20AC;˘ I close this subjeet by presenting the ground on which our Gralld Lodge action was based concerning Saloon-Keeping as an 1hmAsoNlc business. The outcry raised against our action, and the defense of liquor selling by Masons has amounted to this :-'ÂŁhe business is "authorized by law." These advocates of the saloon interest overlook the fact that HMasonry has a law." In the realm of Morals :Masonry is a law unto itself. The authority for exercising given powers is hereto appended:


10

[Oct.

The Grand Lodge sJlIlll be the supreme Masonic authority within the St.ate of Missouri, and by the Ancient Constitution and Usages of the Fraternity is, and shall be, invested with all the original essential powers and privileges belonging to the Ancient Craft, and shall have power especially: To enact and enforce all Laws and Regulations for the government of the Fraternity, and to alter, amend and repeal the same at pleasure.

The a.bove is takel? from Article V, of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The same power is vested in the Grand Lodge by its . Charter, approved by the Legislature. The Grand Lodge being" the supreme Masonic authority \vithin the State," its ri,ght "to enact and enforce" laws for the ,governm.ent of all1\1asons in the Jurisdiction is beyond question. Therefore, it has the inherent authority to define the quality of any Masonic act, and the po路wer to "enforce all Laws and Regulations" against whatever it defines to be unmasonic. 'With the above law, decla.red by "the Supreme Masonic Authority" in Missouri, coupled with the many, many instances wherehl saloon-keepers were punished for continually violating the mandates of the Grand Lodge, the Craft need not fear that we will ever go back on our record. To do so would necessitate the repeal of Constitution, By-Laws, Legislat.ion and precedents, and require us to strike out the" first cardinal virtue" - Temperancefrom our lecture. But no. Having said saloon-keeping is "unmasonic," the law will stand. ,Ve of Missouri endorse the declaration of "the Grand Lodge at York, 1725." Rule fifteen, adopted by that body, 163 years ago, said: " No more persons shall 路be admitted as Brothers of this Society that shall keep a Public House." Keeping" a Public House" was "authorized by the laws of the land," but was considered unmasonic by our English brethren nearly two centuries ago, because such places, like saloons now, were nests of drunkenness, and breeders of vice, and nurseries of crime.

f)

The foregoing has been written, not in defense of Missouri Masonry, but to define our position on a moral question. Here \ve stand. ",Vo are f()rt~fied. If our" friends, the enemy," want us, let them come and take us. ",Ve never surrenda. The saloon in Missouri Masonry is a thing ~f the past. Missouri heads the column in the grand movement to purify the Fraternity and drive therefrom the minions of vice marshaled under the black banner of death and whisky. A dozen Grand Jurisdictions are in line, and" still they come." Since this Review was commenced, official notice has been receiycd announcing that the Grand Jurisdiction of Mississippi has wheeled into line. "Vvelcome" and "Wen done," grand old Mississippi-home of Speed, and Power, and Kimbrough, and Barkley, and many others. Sweeter be the rest of her noble sons, who sleep in graves bathed with Southern sunshine and decorated with Southern flowers, because Mississippi Masonry \vill he henceforth free from the foul breath of those who despoil character, ruin homes, rob women and beggar children. Rest peacefu]))', ye Henrys and Johnsons!


1888.J

Appendix.

11

Your sons and brethren have vindicated your teachings and crowned your labors. With Ohio, and Kentucky, and Arkansas, and Mississippi, and Oregon, and ,Vashington, and Colorado, and Dakota, and many other Jurisdictions in line, the column is formidable. The army is large, considering the fact that only within the past few years has the movement crystalized and the moral forces been mobilized. Ten years ago our present law would have been defeated in the Grand Lodge. But our brethren have been educated. The leaven has been working. The moral sense of the Craft has been aroused. The Lodges are assured that the Grand Lodge will not only back them in the enforcement of the law, but exercise original jurisdiction, and enforce its mandates where its subordinates fail to do so. With the law of the Grand Lodge behind them, the Subordinate Lodges make short work with evil-doers. Thus stands the case in Missouri. The revolution has been effected. " Nobody hurt." The work was accomplished and a grand victory achieved without the loss of a single member of the Craft in Missouri, except such as ought to go out. And for all such put out by the law, hundreds of good men will come in, feeling that they can find associations in Masonry that will not be contaminating. So mote it be. In speaking of our movement to erect a "Home" in Missouri for the widows and orphans of deceased brethren, Bro. Pillans made an extract from my report, and said, by way of comment, that he hoped our "boast" was " well founded." Indeed, this committee fails to discover any boast in the statement that we had secured a good fund to begin with. With fifty thousand dollars in interest-bearing bonds, and a large and increasing subscription, ,ye Missouri Masons are proud; but we do not boast. Bro. Pillans made another discovery not warranted by the text of my review of his pet" Prerogative." He said: " ,Ve find again a slur on the position of our Grand Lodge as to the prerogatives of a Grand Master." Bro. Pillans is a good writer, but not a careful one. None but he could find anything in my criticism of his'" Prerogative" dogma justifying the application of the term" slur." It does seem to me that he was hunting for something to carp at. ,Vhen one seeks a grievance, one is apt to find it -:- or fancy it is found. GRAND SECRETARY.

Brother Daniel Sayre, Grand Secretary, presented a brief business report, showing the fiscal status of the Grand Lodge. It was his last report. He has since laid down the pen, and gone to meet his reward where the records of earthly life are infallibly kept. Since this review was commenced, official notice has been received announcing the departure from earth of the Venerable and Venerated


12

Appendix.

[Oct.

Daniel Sayre, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Alabama. He was above four-score years old, and had served his Grand Lodge as its Secretary for more than thirty-one years. Of him the Grand Master Raid in the circular announcing his death: No one lives to say aught a.gainst his good name. He so conducted himself us to receive and merit the good opinion of all men. In the Masonic fraternity he has been a tower of strength. Devoted to its principles, his conduct and example were such as to shed lustre upon the Fratemity. Kind, charitable and just, he practiced in his dail~路 walk and life the grandest of injunctions,-to do unto others as he would be done br. From the annual session of the Grand Lodge in December, 1857, until the 7th of April, 1888, when he passed away, he was the Grand Secrctary of the Grand Lodge of l\1asom; of Alabama. During that long period he was always at his post, and ever ready to perform his arduous duties. We shall miss his wise co1\nsels and good judgmcnt, for he was singularly correct in suggcstion and action.

DR. MYLES J. GREENE, Talladega, Grand Master. - - - - - - - - - Grand Secretary.

ARIZONA,

1887.

The Sixth Annual Session of this Grand Lodge was held at Tombstone, commencing on the 8th of November, and lasting three days. The meeting was presided over by the Most V/orshipful Grand Master, Brother Martin W. Kales. Brothe~ George J. Roskruge was Grand Secretary. All the Lodges working under charter were represented, six in number. One Lodge had been formed under dispensation. The total membership in the entire Jurisdiction amounted to 3f>5-two less than reported last term. The address of Grand Master Kales covered four pages, and embraced matter of local interest.- He stated that the Lodges had pursued the even tenor of their ways; that no dissensions e~isted among the brethren,8.nd that brotherly love prevailed throughout the Jurisdiction. He said that the business of the year had been limited, and that his labors had been pleasant-not arduous. No decisions were reported, as the general harmony prevalent had obviated all necessity for official interference. As the Territory is large, the Lodges few and scattered, he had not visited any except his own home Lodge. He had refused to grant diRpensations to eonfer degrees out of time, and for a Lodge to celebrate the Fourth of July with a political organization. His action in both cases was approved by the Committee on the Address. This was a wise conclusion on the part of both Grand Master and Grand Lodge. The precedent thus established will be good for future guidance. The following comments by the Grand Master furnish good and sound admonitions to the Craft in that Jurisdietion. They were reported on by the Committee, showing that there was reason for the treatment of the subject. Here is what he said:


1888.]

Appendix.

13

Complaints have been made to me of violations of the principles and rules of Freemasonry, which 1 consider my duty to mention. It is charged that we receive and retain members addicted to profanity; who pUblicly blaspheme the name of that Supreme Being' in whom we are taught to "put our trust;" whose name we are bound in the most solemn manner to revcrence, and whose name is more realistic in Masonry than in any other form of religion. Profanity in a Mason is criminal; it is less excllsable than any other vicious habit, and the brother addicted to such practice shollld be reproved and reminded of that august command, "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain! II Another evil complained of, and one which should be especially guarded against, is intemperance. Drunkenness, J am free to say, is not prevalent among the Masons of Arizona; but still, we have it in our midst. While Masonry does not prohibit the temperate use of stimulants, it does prohibit intemperance and excess. No matter what our individual views or opinions on this subject may be, drunkenness is in direct violation of our principles and tenets, and I hold that no drunkard should evcr be admitted into our Order, or retained when good counsel, fraternal infiuencc and friendly admonition fail to effect a r e f o r m . ¡ â&#x20AC;˘ The Magonic code of morals emanatcs from Divine source. It has been handed to us from ages unchanged and unimpaired, and it should be faithfully observed. True :M:asonry knows no difference between the rich and the poor. It interferes with no form of religlOn. The humblest citizen is on a level with the most influential of the nation, as long as he holds that respect and allegiance due to the laws and discipline of our Order. In view of these facts, my brethren, it becomes our duty as Masons, while viewing the shortcomings of our brothers with the spirit of charity, to endeavor to correct and suppress those evils that may tcnd to bring 0111' institution into disrepute.

If " complaints" had been made, there must have been grounds for "complaints." The Committee on "Address" thought" profanity and intemperance" not "wide-spread, but confined to a few," and that "special legislation" was not necessary. Surely, if "confined to a few," the vices complained of ,,,ould be more easily corrected or cured than to wait until they become" vdde-spread," when" special legislation " would be demanded. It is easier to quarantine against and control small-pox than to fight the malady when" wide-spread." Educate the membership of Lodges to.obey the moral law by healthy legislation against vices before they become" wide-spread," and" complaints" will cease. Here is the view the Committee took of the admirable utterances of Grand Master Kales: Your committee regret the necessity for the remarks of the Grand Mastcr relative to profanity and intemperance, but is pleascd to learn, upon strict examination, that these evils are not wide-spread, but confined to a few. Still, thcy I;hould not be found amongst us. It should be our pride, as individuals and as a body, to maintain in its fullest splendor the dignity and purity of our ancient institution. While special legislation is not deemed nccessary, the attent.ion of the Craft., particularly tbat of tbe officers of Lodges, is directed to the remarks of the Grand l\faster; and it is earnest.ly urged, that when admonition and good advice fail to work reform in the individual cases coming to their knowledge, that sterner measures be used, and the offender taught that, in tbis Jurisdiction, offenses against the moral code will meet swift condemnation and punishment. A laxity on the part of Lodges in disciplining offending members will entail a speedy revocation of tbeir charters.

The report of the Grand Secretary, Brother Roskruge, was very brief. There is a fund for widows and orphans in that Grand Lodge amounting to sonic $700, which has been invested in interest-bearing securities. An Oration was furnished during the session and read, the Orator, Brother Zabriskie,. being absent.


14

Appendi:/;.

[Oct.

CORRE~WONDENCE.

An interesting review of forty-five Grand Lodge journals was the product of Bro. Morris Goldwater, Committee, covering some seventy pages. He styled his ,''''ork "Chips From Our Neighbors' Quarries." He gave numerous" Chips," and presented the best review yet emanating from that quarter. The Report is full of good things, the writer showing a wise discretion and judgment in selections, and endowing the whole with pleasant humor and an amiable spirit. Missouri received cordial recognition. He said of Brotber Boyd's address that in "parts trenches on an oration." 'Why not? Grand Masters must be allowed to " orate." Brother Boyd had once been Grand Orator, and" knew how it ,vas himself." As we do not have orations very often, we depend upon our Grand Ma.<;ters to supply the article. .

In conclusion, this Committee desires to assure Brother Goldwater of the most profound personal and fraternal regard, and to compliment him upon his good work. FRANCIS A. SUA",V, Phcenix, Grand Master. GEORGE J. ROSKRUGE, Tucson, Grand Secretary.

ARKANSAS,

188'7.

The Jonrna1 under review contains the proceedings of three Emergent Communications, which were held for Corner Stone la.ying purposes. The 48th annual Communication commenced its labors in Little Rock on the 22d of November, and was presided over by the M. ",V. Grand Master, Brother ",V. H. Gee. Bro. Fay Hempstead was Grand Secretary. The representation was la.rge. Out of 397 Lodges in the jurisdiction, 299 were represented. Eight Past Grand Masters appear enrolled as present, and representatives from 36 Grand Lodges. Brother .John J. Sumpter, our honored representative of Missouri, was in attendance. SUMMARY.

There arc 397 Lodges on the roll with a reported membership ofll,].5:~, showing a gain of 657. Eighteen Lodges had been instituted under Dispensation. Sixteen were granted Charters. The income was reported at sometbing over seven thousand dollars. Nearly all dues to Grand Lodge had been paid.


1888.]

Appendi:c.

15

ADDHESS.

Grand Master Gee furnished a long report amounting to about twenty pages. A good portion of it was taken up with reports from the D. D. Grand Masters, and another large part was given up to the twenty rulings reported. The Address was local and business-like. He announced that this was the 49th session, and reminded the Grand Lodge that next year would be their semi-Centennial year as a body, and suggested preparation for its observance. The Grand Secretary records it as the 48th session. I presume his record contained an error of the type-man. A committee was created on the subject, and ::mbsequently reported as follows: The committee to which was referred that part of the Grand :;\faster's address, which referred to the celebration of the semi-centennial aniversary of this Grand Lodge in 1888, have considered and recommend that this Grand Lodge by appropriate ceremonies do celebrate said anniversary at the next Annual Communication, and that to this end there shall be a committee consisting of the Grand Master, Senior and Junior Grand Wardens, Grand Secretary and eleven others, who reside in the same town in some convenient part of the State, to be selected by the Grand Master to act as a committee of arrangements with full power to do all things necessary to the appropriate celebration of the occasion.

The committee created by the above was duly appointed. The Grand Master reported the suspension of the Masters of two of the Lodges. The ca.'3es were referred to the Grand Lodge and nothing more can be found concerning them. DECISIO;';S.

Twenty decisions were reported by the Grand ~1aster and considered by the usual committee. The bulk of them received approval, 路while some were doctored. The Grand Secretary, Brother Hempstead, presented quite a lengthy report, which was full of the usual details of such an office. His work is eminently creditable and commends its author as a careful officer. OUATIO)l.

An Oration covering seven pages was made by the Grand Orator, Brother ,V. M. Mellette. He recei ved a vote of thanks for the same, which was worthily bestowed. ST. ,JOlIN'S COLLEGE.

This Institution has been for a number of yean; a good-sized Elephant on the hands of our Arkansas brethren. The purpose to sell the property has become a fixed one, and as soon as opportunity offers it will be disposed of. It seems to be the design of the Grand Lodge to inyest the


16

Appendi;l.路.

[Oct.

money, received for the College property, 'when sold, in a Masonic Temple in Little Rock. For the carrying out of that purpose, a desirable lot has already been secured at the capital of the State. The Committee on "Law and Usage" made an able report, while the Committee on "Appeals and Grievances" furnished lengthy and stron~ presentations of matters reviewed by them. Some of the cases determined are in keeping with the findings of our O\\'n Missouri Committee. They went to the bottom of those cases, and when the bottom 'was seen, the Grand Lodge sent the "lewd fellows of the baser sort" to their own place. One of these ttlewd fellows" had been suspended, and afterwards expelled. He appealed. The Committee said: "Your Committee feel that the only error committed by the Lodge \-vas in not expelling him at the first trial, and recommend that the judgment of expulsion be affirmed." As Punch said when he hit the devil: "That's the way to do it." THE ENGLISH MONU)fENT.

The Masons of Arkansas have honored themsel yes by honoring their deceased Past Grand Master, Hon. Elbert H. EngliRh, late Chief .Justice of the Supreme Court of Arkansas.. Brother English died in 1884, at the age of sixty-eight years. For more than forty years he was an honored and faithful member of the Masonic family. Dying, he left a record of which that family may well be proud throughout its vast extent. He was the ttNestor" of Masonry of his own jurisdiction and prized in all jurisdictions. During the session of the Grand Lodge the Monument erected to his memory by loving brethren was formally unveiled. The ceremonies were most interesting. An address 'was delivered by Hon. George Thornburg, Past Grand Master. It was characteristic of the head and heart of its author, and alike creditable to both. I have read nothing in the many tributes to men more appropriate. An extract from the address of our loved brother Thornburg will close this review of the journal of Arkansas. An Albitype portrait of the monument graces the proceedings of the unveiling ceremonies. 'While the shaft will stand as monumental of the life of a great and good man and Ma.'3on, and will proclaim to ages how he was loved and honored by the Fratern~ty in Arkansas, yet the words of the Orator of the hour will linger and live, as more expressive of his worth and work, longer than the granite column that marks the spot, hallowed by the dust of the peerless English. A few paragraphs from the address of Brother Thornburg must suffice as showing its merits: No men ever deserved the CONFlDE"CE OF THE MASONS of Arkansas to.the degree that Bro. English did, and no man ever had it. And how careful he was never to abuse that confidence. He was indeetl a great light of :Masonry, which shone in calm alld real splendol'; fixed and certain in its position, it constituted a safe guide. Masons loved and hOIlored him, and why not'! He wa.s truly one of the brightest adornments of our moral tern.


17

Appendix.

1888.J

pIe, a stately column combining wisdom, strength and beauty. His mind had fully conceived the true character of a Mason and his life lind conduct were practical illustrations of the sublime excellence of the theory of Masonry. How gentle his temper! How kind his manners! How steadfast his virtue! How quiet his walk! now free from malevolence! There WfiS much about him for :i\'Iasons to love. Never wasjuster homage laid upon a holier altar or nobler award to merit exacted by the powcr of worth. Oh the gathered wisdom, tbe apt judgment, the ripe experience, tbe exalted example, which are buried beneath that monument! Bro. Englisb was a tender husband and an indulgent father, and with bleeding hearts we sympathize with the disconsolate widow and afflicted son and grand-dau:rhters. Their griefs are ours, for ours the loss they feel. But let us look forward, enli gl1teued by the religion our brother professed, to the brig-hter scene when he shall be raised to immortal life llnd admitted to his celestial homc.'\Vith these prospect~ we would console those who mourn. In his last communication to the Grand Council, Bro. English touchingly portrayed his own life and end when he said, "How pleasant it must be at the sunset of life to one who hus toiled over its journey and is about to gird up his loins to cross the dark river, to look away, back over the traveled path and to feel that he has permitted no day to pass without doing some good." He toiled indeed over the journey, but his sunset was clear and a precious rest was in sight. Elbert H. English is no more among us. His matured wisdom and silver tons-ue will no more adorn our councils or instruct our minds. He fought the battle of life bravely and fell in the heat of the conflict covered with honors and a fame as imperishable as it is pure and lofty. After a life of nearly three score years and ten he was gathered to his fathers yet comparatively young; young in energy; young in persistent love of benevolent labor; young in fragrunt associations with virtue and the holier spheres of human kindncss. It is appropriate that the cross, and no crown, adorn his monument. He bore tbe cross here, the crown llwaitshim in the kingdom of eternal bliss. Illustrious English, we lament thee as mortal by nature, but we celebrate thee as immortal by virtue. Having been faithful in thy course, thou art now raised to the sublime degree of light ineffahle. Taught by thy pure example, we hope to follow thee to the Grand Lodge of kindred spirits. Farewell till the grand summons!

路w.

H. GEE, Dardanelle, Grand lVIaster. FAY IIE:MPSTEAD, Little Rock, Grand Secretary.

CALIFORNIA,

1887.

The Thirty-eighth Annual Communication c0ll1111eneed its labors on the 11th day of October, 1887, in the city of San Francisco, with lVI. 路W. Brother E. C. Atkinson, Grand Master, present and presiding. Brother A. G. Abell was Grand Secretary. Representatives from 185 chartered Lodges, and delegat.es from eight Lodges U. D. were present. Seven l>ast Grand Masters and eight Past Grand 路Wardens were enrolled as present. The membership amounts to 14,622, being a gain of 181. ADDRESS.

The Address of Grand Master Atkinson opened like a psalm of joy, and swells with poetic life and beauty. The exordium eovered a fe\\' pages, and then came the business part, in \vhich he gave an account of his official stewardship. He announced that the condition of the Craft was never more prosperous. An awakened and renewed interest marked the Brotherhood, and peace and barmony prevailed throughout the JurisG. L. Ap.-2.

o


18

Appendix.

[Oct.

diction. During the year the Grand Master had paid a visit to a Lodge under the jurisdiction of their Grand Lodge in the Ha"waiian Islands, located at the city of Honolulu. While there he met the King of that country, Brother David Kalakaua, whom he characterized as a warmhearted and generous Craftsman. Much kind and fraternal attention was shown our California brother as he mixed among the citizens of that foreign land. Brotherhood exists wherever Craftsmen meet beneath the starry decked covering of the Lodge Universal. DECISIONS.

Fourteen decisions were found among the reported doings of Grand Master Atkinson. These were approved" without exception." From said rulings the following clippings are made: A brother applied for affiliation, but died in a few days after his application had been received by the Lodge. Should he receive :Masonic burial? " Yes.

The above is a Tighf,em"8 decision, because it is right. A contrary vie\v has been maintained, which I have opposed, and must ever do so. A mere technicality should never be'used to deprive a Mason of all rights and privileges. Spirit, letter and precedent should furnish all possible encouragement to induce affiliation. Here is another good ruling: If a suspended Mason, on his death-bed, pay his dues, and thereby re-instate himself, would the preferring of charges against him excuse the Lodge from burying him with Masonic honors should he die before the case could be brought to trial? No!

He would remain in good standing until deprived thereof by comriction upon trial, and the enforcement of penalty. Being in good standing at death, his rights would remain and should be respected. In case of the death of a Mason suspended for )lon-payment of dues, and nothing else appearing against him, should the Ma.<;ter, at the request of any number of the brethren, call the Lodge together for the purpose of determining whether or not he should be buried with Masonic honors? ' Yes; and without such request, if he belie',es that there would be a general disposition to pay the last tribute of respect to the deceased,

There can be no mistake as to the meaning of the Grand Master in the above answer. The plain English of the ruling is: "A s'uspl.-'nded Mason may be bUTied Masonically." I ask from what is a brother suspended '! It is usually said to be from" ALL rights and privileges of Masonry." Masonic burial belongs to those" rights and privileges." It may be assumed that" Masonic burial" is a right to which every Mason, in good standing, is entitled. If suspended from said right while living, for good cause, how can that right inure to him when dead? D~es death revive the right, and thereby restore the brother to good standing? If so, we will have a large


1888.]

Appendix.

19

mass of resurrected dead-heads on our hands to look after. If death does not revive the rights of the suspended party, why bury him, granting a right from which he had been cut off by suspension? 路What sense, or use, in suspending a party as punishment for derelictions, and holding him under legal disabilities while alive, when Masonry might do him some good, and then invest him with a forfeited right after death, when it could not benefit him or his family? The procedure seems to be endowed with a good degree of inconsistency, to say the least. Here is another ruling which, I think, should follow the one above noticed: Is it lawful to use the funds of a Lodge to pay the funeral expenses of a Mason who has been suspended for non-payment of dues? No.

Here is a party in the same category as the one above referred to. Re is under s'uspension. So was the other. He dies. So did the other. Both had lost the right of burial, being under suspension. The rights of both were forfeited by suspension, unless suspension in California means less than anywhere else. As the right of burial was forfeited by suspension, both were buried contrary to law, unless, as before stated, death removed the disability and revived forfeited rights. If it did, why refuse "to pay the funeral expenses" of one whose rights were revived? If the right to burial did not inure by death, the disability existed after death. Then why bury a suspended :Mason? If a suspended Mason is counted worthy of Masonic sepulture, he ought to have the full benefit of the funeral. Therefore, the expenses should be paid. But the Grand Master said (and the Grand Lodge approved) that it is not lawful to use Lodge funds for such purposes. How about the lawfulness of the funeral? The tender sensibilities of the heart in according a burial is one thing; the sensitive condition of the money nerve is another. In the foregoing I have not discussed the justice, or the injustice, of suspension for nonpayment of Lodge dues. That is a very different question. The attention of the Grand Lodge was called by the Grand Master to. the inroads made upon their numbers by the destroyer, Death. Two Past Grand Masters had been summoned hence ::)ince the close of the last session. Of them this was said: Brethren, in the year that has gone there have been shadows across the dial of time. Two of our most loved and honored brethren have been caned from the Lodge on earth to the Supreme Lodge above. Past Graud Master Leonidas E. Pratt, whose serious illness was made known to you at our last Annual Communication, survived but It few days thereafter. I convened the Grand Lodge in this Temple on the twenty-eighth day of October last, and 111id to rest the remains of our beloved brother with the honors whieh his life and sen' ices had so richly earned. How keenlY'do we feel his loss at this time! The place he was W01lt to occupy is vacant. We miss his courtly presence-his kindly grceting. His manly form we shall


20

Appendix.

[Oct.

never more behold, and our souls will never again be thrilled with his matchless eloquence. "The tongue On which enraptured thollsands hung Is hushed in long repose." Our honored brother has left an endearing record, and his memory will be fondly cherished by his brethren of the Mystic Tie. On the thirtieth day of December last, Past Grand Master Jonathan Doan Rines departed this life, under circumstances which appeal to our deepest sorrow. He had attended his Lodge in San Buena-ventura, and was returning late at night to his home in the Ojlli Valley. His team, from some cause, became unmanageable, the vehicle was overturned, and Bro. Rines, in falling, sustained injuries which soon caused his death. On the follo'wing day his lifeless remains were found near the place where the accident occurred. He was buried with :Masonic honors by San Buena1J(:nluTo Lodge, No. 214, of which he was a member and Past Master. The valuable services rendered to this Grand Lodge by our distinguished brother, and the kind and fraternal spirit ever manifested by him towards his Masonic brethren, have caused his untimely loss to be most deeply felt. Let us remember the widow and fatherless in their bereavement, and tender to them our heart-felt sympathies. CO"IPLIMENTAHY.

The Committee on the Address paid Grand Master Atkinson the following just compliment. He deserved it: YOllr committee congratulate the Grand Lodge upon its good fortune in entrusting the interests of :Masonry in CalifornilL to the keeping of such zealous, skillful and faithful hands. The Address is an able and interesting epitome of a vast amount of work, and of the progress that has characterized the l<'raternity during the year. As we love our Order, we all like to chronicle, or to see chronicled, evidences of so much harmony, usefulness and progress. The proficiency and success of any institution depends largely upon the wisdom of its govermng head. As the executive chief of this Grand Lodge, Grand Master Atkinson has reason to be proud of the record which he has made; and this Grllrnd Lodge, as in most of the years of its existence, has abundant reason to rejoice in the good fortune that has so often permitted it to be presided over by such brethren. GRAND SECRETAR\'.

The annual report of Bro. Abell, the Grand Secretary, was complete and full. His exhaustive reports are suggestive of the work done by the head of some State department in civil affairs. The brethren appreciate him, as shown by the following tribute presented by an able committee: And now, brethren, your committee cannot close this report without again bearing testimony to the zeal, capacity, and fidelity of one who, for more than thirty-two years, has been, by the suffrages of his brethren, entrusted with the most important interests of this .Jurisdiction. He needs no cncomium at our hands. There he Sits, where, for ea(~h and every of those many years, without exception, his familiar and genial presence has been wont to greet the members of this Rody. The records of that long term of faithfnl, earnest, honest service speak his praises with no uncertain note. He has grown grav in your service. You have honored him by re-election throngh all these years; and he, in turn, has returned the honor, measure for measure. It is largely due to him that this Grand Lodge is now one of the prondest and most respected among the Grand Lodges of the world; and it is believed that your committee voice your sentiment when they say that we not only honor him; we love him. Maya kind Providence long continue him among us; and, when called to join the loved companions who have gone before him, may he find that he has not. only reared for himself a monument to perpetuate his memory among his brethren, but an enduring record in the great book of life eternal! BOAHDS OF RELIEF.

Thcse agencies continue their generous work, and their reports sho'w a large outlay, especially the one located in San Francisco. This Board


21

1888.J

expended during the year the sum of eleven thousand dollars. Of this amount more than seven tlw'U..'!and dollars went to " the relief of the sick and distressed" "Masons of other Jurisdictions," and their "wives, widows and orphans." These California Masons expend large money on applicants for relief, who hail from all lands. It is noticeable that Missouri applicants received $102.50. This one Board in San Francisco has expended for charity during its existence - not a long one -largely over two hundred thousand dollars. ",Vhat an agency for good! The reports from the Boards of Sacramento, Oakland, Stockton and Los Angeles made a good showing. The Grand Lodge appropriated to all its Boards the sum of $5,800. As heretofore, the San Francisco Board received $4,000. I need only repeat a former statement to do justice to California Masons. They still maintain their" well-earned reputation for charity." ORATION.

The Annual Oration was made by Brother John N. Young, Grand Orator. It covered six pages, and was a learned presentation of what smacks of Antiquity. CORRESPON DENCE.

Last year I had the pleasure of reviewing the Report of Brother Anderson. This year he is missing, and a Hill looms up before me with such proportions that to compass the work seems impossible. Just as this committee had become familiar with the old, on comes the new. I do not drink wine, but old wine is said to be better than new. Brother "William Henry Hill" is the author of a Report covering 100 pages. It was mostly written, though there are enough excerpts in it to season the paper. He said he would waive the discussion of law points, usually noticed by committees, and confine himself to culling from the journals of different Grand Lodges. Upon these he made sufficient comments to enable his readers to understand the position he occupied. He made a review of all North American Grand Lodge journals, except Nevada. His work may be characterized as a very thorough review. Missouri received very kind attention, our journal for 1886 having been given nearly four pages of his space. In noticing the Address of Grand Master Boyd, he pronounced portions of it an" excellent word picture.'" Copious extracts were made therefrom. Brother Hill made a slight mistake in his allusion to the action of Grand Master Boyd. He said; "Two or three Lodges refused to discipline brethren who were engaged in the saloon business." And that their charters were arrested for such recusancy. This was correct. He then said; "It appears that this (the saloon business) is forbidden by the State laws, and hence has been declared by the Grand Lodge to be a


22

Appendix.

[Oct.

Masonic crime." The error of Bro. Hill is in assuming that the saloon business is contrary to State laws. Unfortunately, this is not the case路 But the Grand Lodge of "Masons in Missouri declared that the saloon business is a MASONIC CRIME, without any reference to State laws. Treating the business as a crime against morality, we declared it a cri11'w agamst Masonry, and have punished the agents of the crime as guilty of UNMASONIC conduct. This little correction of Bro. Hill's mistake is deemed necessary, that he may understand the true position of Missouri Masons. We judged the business by its fruits, and settled, the moral phase of the question independent of the laws of the land. The review of Brother Hill is in keeping with his former labors as a committee, and places him among the careful and thinking reviewers of the day. I hope the frequent changes of committees may not throw another stranger to the front. Perhaps the opulency of the Grand Lodge in able and competent writers may be the reason for these changes. If it is necessary to bring new men into prominence, why not have several of them on the committee at once, and thus increase the strength of the reportorial corps and their work, instead of shelving good men? HIRAM N. RUCKER, Merced, Grand Master. ALEXANDER G. ABELL, San Francisco, Grand Secretary.

CANADA,

1887.

The 32d Annual Communication was held in Brockville, commencing on the 13th day of July, 1887. Most "Worshipful Brother Henry Robertson, Grand l\Iaster, presided, and Brother J. J. Mason was Grand Secretary. The record shows the presence of Representatives from 304 Lodges, besides many Past Grand officers and Representatives from other Grand Lodges. The roll shows a membership of 19,450, with 357 Lodges in the Jurisdiction. Their reported income was about $16,000, for the year, with a. fund of nearly $70,000. WELCOl\1E

was accOl'ded the Grand Lodge by the Mayor, the Odd Fellows and the Masonic Lodges of Brockville. From the numerousness of it, the welcome must have been very good. ADDRESS.

A most excellent address was read to the Grand Body by the Grand Master, Brother Robertson. It covered nine pages. He said the. condition of the Craft was one of the greatest harmony and prosperity. Mem-


1888.J

Appendi:r.

23

bel's were added, new Lod~es had been organized, work improved and more than usual relief had been extended to the suffering. He opened t be address by a most just and appropriate tribute to Queen Victoria. The loyalty of Masons to the ruling power never found better expression than in the following: QUEEN VICTOHIA.

Our gratitude is also due to the Father of All for the great blessings of peace and comfort bestowed upon our country. The yearl8S7 posses~es It peculiar interest for us as Freemasons. Loyalty and devotion to our Sovereign and fidelity to our country are leading principles in our Order. Our Queen is endeared to us not only for her-many personal virtues, not only because of her fidelity to the Constitution under which she has so wisely reigned, but also because of her many acts of kindness and sympathy towards the poor and suffering, and for the support and help she has always afforded in times and occasions when human charity was essentially needed. She has further claims upon the Craft from her Masonic a,<;sociations. Her Royal an路 cestors have been Patrons of the Fraternity. Seventeen of the Princes of blood royal of England have been Freemasons. Our gracious Sovereign is the daughter of a Freemason, her uncles were Freemasons, her sons arc Freemasons, and she has a grandson who is also a member of our Order.

Relations "'ith other Grand Lodges continue to be of the most kind and fraternal character. The Grand Master reported his presence at the Chicago Convention of.Masons, held last June for the purpose of consultation. He was greatly pleased with what was done and with those he met. His views concerning Processions are so like our own American teachings that they must be commended. He stoutly refused to permit Lodges to turn out in public with Non-Masonic associations. Gr~tIld Master Robinson announced that in a response to a call from the sufferers of Charleston, S. C., he bad remitted $400 to the committee of relief in tbat city. His action wa~s cordially approved by the Grand Lodge. The committee on his address complimented him very highly, and at the proper thne he was further honored by a re-election. There is a tone in the address of Grand Master Robertson which shows the stamp of elevated and dignified manhood. He is worthy of the honors Canadian Masons have conferred upon him.

The Grand Lodge adopted wha.t is termed a "New Book of Constitution.". After doing much and very important business the Grand Lodge closed its 32d session, to meet in the City of Toronto in July of the present year. A proposition is before the Grand Lodge to make Toronto the permanent place of meeting. No Report on Correspondence appears in the J oumal. Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.


24

Appendix.

COLORADO,

[Oct.

1887.

The 27th Annual Communication was held in the city of Denver, comme:Qcing September 20tb, lR8i. The M. '\T. Grand Master, Brother Albert H. Branch, presided. Bro. Ed. C. Parmelee was Grand Seeretary. In addition to the Representatives from forty-three Lodges, there were present eleven Past Grand Masters, and several other Past Grand officers and Representatives from t"!enty-seven Grand Lodges. The roll shows a list of sixty Lodges, eontaiping a membership of 4077. The Craft in that jurisdiction is in a healthy condition. No very marked increase took place during the term under notice, it appears that many Lodges had been weeding out their delinquent members, thus reducing their numerical strength. The cordial and fi'aterna.l feeling heretofore' existing between Colorado and other Grand Jurisdictions is still maintained. At home, peace and harmony continue. Five new Lodges had been created under Dispensation. The Groand Master having been called to fill some public station, which took him out of the jurisdiction, the Deputy Gr~nd Master, Bro. George K. Kimball, filled the office very acceptably, and discharged the duties so as to elicit the commendation of his chief. The Reports of both officers were presented and considered with favor by the committee. The Grand Nlaster made the following suggestion: I am of the opinion that a law should be enacted for the protection of Lodges expelling any Brother who has been or may be indicted and convicted of any crime under the laws of the State. Under our present laws, it is necessary to prefer charges and have a trial before any Brother can be expelled. Any Brother who has committed It crime of sufficient importance, to be taken notice of and considered by our civil officers, and upon receiving a fair and impartial trial, is COIlvicted and sentenced either to a county jail or the state penitentiary, is unworthy of being called a Mason and of receiving any 1\fasonic recog-nition, and the Lodge to which he belonged should not be burdened with giving said Brother a Masonic trial. Section No. 125 of our by-laws, I am satisfied, has worked much good during the past year. I am of the opinion that this should be considered at this session, and if possible, make the same more stringent, so that those who persist in handling and selling intoxicating liquors will fully realize that they cannot be good Masons and traffic with that which has ruined and made desolate the homes of thousands.

Respecting the above reeommendations a committee reported thus: Concerning the recommendations of the l\L W. Grand Muster that further steps be taken to emphasiz:e the position of the Grand Lodge upon the subject of tempemnee, the Committee are of opimon, if they understand the sentiment of this Grand Lodge correctly, 1st, That the Masters and Wardens ofTJodgcs will do a service to their members who may be engaged in the liquor traffic, by explaining to them what the tendency is, and advising them to retire from the business before further action be taken by the Grand Lodge. And 2d, That fiS our law prohibits the affiliation or initiating of one engaged in the liquor tru.ffic, Lodges are hereby instructed to add to blank petitions, the following-


1888.J

25

Appendix.

questiou, and require an auswer thereto; and that the question be added to those printed in t.he fonn on page 261 of the proceedings of 1886: "Are you engaged in any manner in .the liquor traflic, and do you ag-ree not to become so engaged in the future?"

An Oration of some merit was delivered during the session by the Grand Orator, Bro. John M. Maxwell, and is found in the journal. CORRESPO~DENCE.

The Report was rendered "for the committee" by Bro. George \Vyman, and covers some 75 pages. He noticed forty-six Grand Lodge proceedings, Missouri for 1886 included. Of course his notices were necessarily brief, but little more than a page being awarded to each journal on an average. In commenting upon the Address of our Grand Master Boyd, the committee characterized it as "particularly fine." And so it was. Bro. \Vyman made an extract from the comments of Bro. Ziegler of\Vashing,ton, who bad criticised the action of Colorado on physical qualifications, and thus he dealt with the brother whose works he handled so tersely: We recognize no argument in this tiradc, a.nd fail to understand the Brother's real position. He proclaims himself in favor of a very libeml construction of the law, and at the same time as Grand Master he decides that It man who has lost the first joint of his right thumb caunot be initiated. Bro. Carr took the ground that the Lodge should pass upon the physical as well as the moral qualifications of applicants. Now, we respectfully ask Bro. Ziegler if Lodges that lLre "badly officered, poorly mana&,ed and deeply in debt" are not as liable to suffer from the introduct.ion of moral as phYSICal deformity? Which is the worst on general principles? In England, which is the birthplace of such Masonry as we know and practice, the Fraternity have realized that they are pursuing a speculative science rather than an operative art, and interpose no bar in the shape of physical perfection. The floodgates of destruction ought to have be~n opened upon English Lodges ere this, but we sec no signs of it or of the ruin sure to ensue; on the contrary, we challenge the Freemasons of the world to produce a better record for charitable expenditures and the practice of the Masonic virtues generally, than that of the Grand Lodge of England.

Bro. \Vyman said some vcry terse things in his short review, and holds good views as to most Masonic laws and usages. I have no wish to pass upon his positions wherein we differ. He had his say. I have had mine. GEORGE K. KIMBALL, Golden, Grand Master. ED. C. PARMELEE, Pueblo, Grand Secretary.

CONNECTICUT,

1888.

The Journal of this Grand Lodge, as heretofore, is commendahle, and maintains the well-earned reputation of its author, Brother \Vheeler, Grand Secretary. For neatness, interest and dispatch, his ,,,"ork is always The journal for 1888 contains a record of eight Emergent first-class. Communications, held at different times and places for various purposes.


26

Appendix.

LOct.

The 100th Annual Communication convened in the city of Hartford, January 18, 1888, and was presided over by the Grand Master, M. "'". Brother Henry H. Green. Brother Joseph K. "'''heeler was Grand Secretary. In addition to the regular Grand Officers, there '''ere present nine Past Grand Masters, Representatives of thirty Grand Lodges, and Representatives of all the Subordinate Lodges in the Jurisdiction, 110 in number. The membership amounts to 14,510. The income was reported to be $:),700. This was derived from a per capita tax of thirty cents. THE ADDRESS

of Grand Master Green was simply and wholly a business paper, devoted to the consideration of local aftairs. .He said that a review of the past year showed that peace and unusual prosperity had been with the Lodges and among the brethren throughout the Jurisdiction. One decision had been made, which was in reference to the celebrated Hiram Lodge matter. His ruling was approved. THE PAST MASTER'S DEGREE

was treated as a small affair, in the following manner: I have received several communications during the year from Past Masters of Lodges asking, find in some instances demanding, as a matter of right, that the Past 1\faster's degree be conferred upon them, which I have declined to do. I am aware that in some Jurisdictions this custom prevails; but whence comes the authority for such a procedure? It has been said that the Past Master':; degree is Wholly and entirely a Lodge degree; why, then, is it not recognized, defined and regulated by the Grand Lodge? If, on the other hand it is claimed that the degree appertains to the Chapter, what have Master Masons to do ,vith it, even those who preside in the East and sit 111 Grand Lodge? In any view of the case, there is an incon:;istency in the matter. It is a custom not ill harmony with the general system of Freemasonry, and is of no practical use. '''''hat there is of importance in the Past Master's degree, certainly, so far ali known to the ~~l~~~~};~%~짜ie~b~h~~iW~!.ropriety b e incorporated with the installation service; the

In attesting my approval of the above, I reproduce my comments on the same subject offered last year: THE PAST lI1ASTEJ~'S DEGREE

Met the following fate as shown by the record: "The practice of conferring the Past Master's Degree upon a Master-elect is abolished within the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Utah." And why not everywhere? Is a "Master-elect" made a PAST Master by that so-called degree? If so, he is a PAST Master before he pa.~se8 the chair. He must he a PAST Master when the degree is conferred, or else there is no sense in bestowing it upon a recipient. If made a PAST l\faster by a degree, what does he become by actual service? "But," says one, "the degree is necessary to fit the Master-elect to become Master in facL" That is to say, a degree that does not belong to


1888路1

Appendix.

27

the Lodge, is very essential in order to do Lodge business and work. This is quite pretentious, surely. 路Why not say tbat the Master-elect must receive some degree conferred in the Commandery or Consistory in order to preside over Brethren, many of whom never beard of either body? If the Past Master's Degree belongs to the CHAPTER, as it certainly does, being conferred therein, why is it so necessary to the Lodge? If it is so indispensable, as some claim, it ought to be a part of, and belong to the Lodge system. A Brother cannot be made a Royal Arch Mason unless he has first received the degrees of Mark Master, Past Master and Most Excellent Master. It must be, then, that these very essential prerequisites to receive the Royal Arch Degree are necessary parts of, and belong to the Royal Arch system. Capitular Masons claim all the above degrees as l>elonging to the Capitular system. The claim is fully conceded and cheerfully admitted. Then, what business has anyone of said degrees with another and entirely different system? If Capitular Masonry were consistent, it would contest the right of Symbolic Masonry to appropriate and use one of its degrees. The Lodge is not consistent in claiming and using that which does not, can not, and never did belong to it. We ought to be ashamed of ourselves for doing so. Eschew and banish stolen property from the domain of Symbolism. The address of Bro. Green was warmly approved, and his administration for two terms, justly commended. He said in conclusion: Brethren, one thought ;more. Let it be my word of valediction. As individuals, let us resolve to practice more fully those great moral and Masonic duties, of b,otherly love, relief and charity, than we have in the past. More especially, the noble one of charity, the very foundation and capstone ot our venerable institution; not only in giving aid to destitute brethren, but in whispering good counsel to erring ones, sympathizing with each in his misfortune, visiting each other in sickness and sorrow. Is there one among the family circle who, seeing any of their number violating the laws of God or society, would not take him by the hand, and, by kind and loving counsels, endeavor to win hIm back into the paths of rectitude and virtue? So let it be with us, as J,fasons. Although we are not linked together by ties of blood or kindred, yet we are bound by those mystic ties, for we have each and everyone of us knelt at the consecrated altar of Freemasonry, and bound ourselves under most solemn obligations of brotherly love and friendship.

It has often occurred to this Committee, in reading the Addresses of Grand Masters of American Grand Lodges, that there is a vast amount of excellent teaching done by them along moral lines. These addresses contain moralizing and admonitions sufficient to lift the membership to an elevated plane of life and true character. The above extract bears such a stamp. The Grand Secretary, Brother 'Vheeler, presented, as usual, a clear and concise statement of the fiscal affairs of the Grand Lodge. He is a good officer and a faithful guardian of the interests committed to him.


28

Appendix.

[Oct.

"~:IASONIC CHARITY FUND."

This Grand Lodge has such a fund, which amounts to some ten thonsand dollars. It is the purpose of the Grand Lodge to have an ineorporated management, under which to enlarge the fund and make it the benediction of many in the future. A committee on the subject reported at length, calling attention to the doings of other Jurisdictions in the great field of charity. The work done by our Jurisdiction was mentioned with favor, and the commendation used, "Well done, Missouri." It is true that Missouri has" done" something, but not what should have been done when it is remembered that our Grand Lodge is more than SIXTY years old. 'Ye ought to have had hundreds of thousands of dollars, where we have only thousands. Our present cash funds, amounting to fifty thousand dollars, with subscriptions reaching thirty thousand dollars, tell what can be done in a short time, and give promise as to what the future may bring forth. But had such a work commenced twenty years ago,what a princely sum might now be at command of the Board for creating and maintaining a " HOME" for the widows and orphans of our fallen brethren, and for aged and infirm members, who, in the winter of their years, find it necessary to look to the l<'raternity for aid. Some of us may be preparing a place for ourselves. 'Ve can not tell what a day may bring forth, nor where the wheel of fortune may land us, or, rather, where misfortune may place us. "A good foundation against the time to eome" is most desirable. CENTENNIAl..

T~

Grand Lodge of Connecticut is preparing for its Centennial Year. The Proceedings say that "the Grand Lodge was not organized permanently until July 8, 1789, though a General Assembly of Masons was held as early as 1783." It was resolved to celebrate the event of organization of the Grand Lodge, at New Haven, on the 8th day of July, 1889, and a large committee was created to prepare for the coming Centennial. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother J. K. '\Tbeeler, Committee, furnished the Annual Review, as he has been doing for years past. The Report is in keeping with former efforts in matter and extent, containing, as it does, 160 pages. The work is very complete and quite interesting. Brother 'Yheeler is one of our safe, conservative and clear-headed writers on correspondence. The Review is mostly written, but has judicious selections from many journals. It is not my purpose to cull from the Review the many good things which have arrested thought in its perusal. Brevity is my purpose in making a Report this year. JOHN W. MIX, Yalesville, Grand Master. JOSEPH K. 路WHEELER, Hartford, Grand Secretary.


1888.]

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29

DELAWARE, 1887. "Little Delaware" sent out a neat Journal of Proceedings which contains an account of the doings of the 81st Annual Communication, which assembled in the city of \Vilmington, October 6th, 1887. Bro. George W. Marshall, Grand Master, present and presiding. Bro. "Vm. S. Hayes was Grand Secretary. 'rhe record says, "A constitutional number of Subordinate Lodges were represented, so that the "Grand Lodge opened in Ample Form." How many Lodges were represented does not appear. A brief a,ddress was made by the Grand Master, touching interests purely local. A few rulings were reported having no general application. The Grand Master stated he had visited most of the Lodges and found them generally in a healthy and prosperous condition. He cominunicated to the Grand J~odge some information received concerning the election of a one-armed member of a Lodge to the office of Senior 'Varden. The party had lost his arm after becoming路a Mason. The Grand Master ruled that the brother must not be installed, "although a very worthy brother and a very bright Mason" and formerly Junior "Varden. His reason for so deciding was, that "anyone that has been so maimed that it will prevent him from transmitting the work cannot be installed as a 路Warden." This seems strange doctrine. It is the first time in my Masonic life that I ever heard of such disbarment. That a Mason physically able to perform the duties of Junior Warden should be deprived of the honor and position of Seni01" \Varden, while in the same physical condition, is queer beyond cavil. The committee on Address said, "we dissent from the decision." Finding this "dissent" in the report of the committee, I felt it would disembarrass the strange rule laid down by Grand Master Marshall, and furnish evidence in proof of the claim that our Masonry is "Speculative" or moral, not "Operative" or physical. But to my surprise a new, and to me unheard of, reason was assigned by the Committee. Here it is: "\Vardens are prohibited from conferring any degrees in this Jurisdiction." Therefore a onearmed brother may not be installed Senior \Varden. From various causes Masters of Lodges are often prevented from filling the station. 路Who is to preside in the absence of the l\faster? As a general rule the Senior 路Warden succeeds to the chair in such cases. Dela,vare may be. an exception to the rule. If so, when the Master is absent who can fill his place? In Missouri the Senior Warden ,..: ould act as Master and do the work, if work was to be done. The Delaware rule, prohibiting the 'Vardens "from conferring degrees," is as strange as the decision of Bro. Marshall in declaring that a Junior 'Varden, minus the left arm, could not be installed Senior \Varden. And both rulings are as novel as they are contrary to good law and sound policy. From the doctrine taught by the committee, under


30

Appendix.

[Oct.

their law, it follows that a party could not be installed Master, though he had been S. 'V., who had lost his left arm. The Committee 'said, "the loss of the left arm does not in any way disqualify the brother from doing all the work that may be necessary for him to do in his station" as Senior 'Varden. "But he is not qualified for the station of'Vorshipful Master," notwithstanding he is "a very worthy and a ve1'ybright Mason." So after all it is an Arm and not brains, character or heart that qual{fies a brother for the office of Master. Certa.inly there is very little for the Master to do in conferring degrees that he cannot do with the left arm missing. This could be easily performed, as a physical act, by some one. Lodges often have presiding officers who do not know the Ritual. Some "very bright Mason" is called to the chair to do the work. He becomes the mouth-piece of the Master and speaks for him. The work is done by proxy, and is accepted as legal everywhere, except in Delaware. If the degrees, as to language, may be conferred by a mouth-piece of the Master, why may not the physical representations be made by a proxy of the Master? The Master may be "a very bright Mason," eminently representative, and thoroughly competent to discharge the duties of his station in every particular, except the physical act of instruction. Yet in Delaware such "very bright Mason" can never become Master of a Lodge, "where duties devolve upon him which he cannot perform." I close my notice of the matter with the expression: "As you like it." The Grand Master made a decision which I would characterize as "local," for it applies to no other .Jurisdiction known to me. He ruled against the "right of o~jection," and held that "a simple objection by a

brother is void" as to a candidate duly elected. He said there was no law in Delaware by which o~jection "ca.n prevent the advancement of a candidate." If there is no such law there, one should be enacted. The right of oMection is one that I never saw questioned before. It is as sacred as the secret ballot, and is as "necessary to the preservation of harmony and purity in a Lodge. I note, vdth pleasure, that the Committee on Address reversed the above ruling of the Grand Master, and the bottom. fell out of this decision. The Grand Secretary, Bro. 'Vm. S. Hayes, furnished a brief report connected with his office. The financial condition as shown by him and the Grand Treasurer, seems to be sound and satisfactory. His Statistical Tables show 21 Lodges in the Jurisdiction, v,'ith a membership of 1,553. A review of 4R Grand Lodge .Journals embraced in seventeen pages was submitted by Bro. T. 'V. 'Villiams. It was a mere synopsis. Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-lected.


31

1888.J

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

1887.

The Journal of this Grand Lodge contains t.he proceedings of two Emergent, one Semi-annual and one Annual Communication. The Annual Communication was held in "Washington, November 9, 1887. The Journal says it is the 77th annual report. Brother Jose l\f. Yznaga, Grand Master, presided, and Brother '''m. R. Singleton was Grand Secretary. Twenty-one Lodges were represented. There are twenty-seven Lodges, with a membership of 3,191 under that Grand Jurisdiction. ADDRESS.

The Address of the Grand Master consisted of nineteen pages, embracil,lg quite a large number of subjects connected with Grand Lodge business. He reported a vigorous condition of things in the Grand Lodge, and stated that its prospects for future usefulness were very encouraging. Considerable business was transacted during the session which was purely local. The Grand Officers were elected at this session, but not installed until December 27, following. At the December session the installation of officers took place, and other matters of business were transacted. CORRESPO:\'DE:\'CE.

The Report, which was submitted by Brother Singleton, amounted to seventy pages, in which the proceedings of forty-eight Grand Lodges were fraternally reviewed. The work was synoptical. Brevity and terseness mark the review, and the comments were very pertinent. The Missouri Journal for 1886 received a brief notice. Short extracts were made from the Address of Grand Master Boyd. Bro. Singleton is happy because he caught this Committee in a mistake, and is willing to square off and call it even. He shall be let off as to the other mistake, but in bis review of Arizona in 1886, he perpetrated one more, just for fun. Goldwater, of Arizona, was converted into "Godwater." Bro. Singleton owes this Committee another explain. This Committee expresses . surprise at the views of Bro. Singleton touching the fixing" Sunday as the day for holding Lodge Communications." A proposition had been submitted to the Grand Lodge of South Carolina, forbidding" Sunday Commnnications." The proposed rule was declared" unmasonic and ont of order" by the Grand Master. Bro. Singleton favors" Sunday Communications." He said:


32

[Oct.

There is not a degree in Masonry that may not be conferred on that day especially devoted to the worship of the Mason's GOD. Do not aU the teachings of those degrees refer most essentially to the worship of God? Does not the second degree teach ns that dav is devoted to the contemplation of the Great Creator? How can anyone contemplate Him and His works in a more profitable manner than in listening to those beantifullessons taught in our ritual? In 1794, the old Chapter, which met in this city, and in which three clergymen were officers, always held their meetings on Sunday.

To which it may he replied that the 1.uork of the three degrees conferred on " Sunday" is violative of the letter and spirit of the Sabbath law. "The Sabbath day" is not remembered, or kept in memory, as a " holy" day when 1J)ork is done. Six days were provided for human labor, and one for rest-sacred. rest. In the six days provided, Bro. Singleton, thou mayest " do all thy 'work." You will find a wide disparity between religious or sacred contemplation and the active labors necessary to confer the three degrees of Masonry. Such" contemplation of the Great Creator" as Masonry enjoins, requires a res~ful mood, and not a 1JJorking mood. The law of God is very plain in its definition of the sacredness of one day in seven. "The seventh day is .the SABBATH of the Lord." It is His day - " a .sacred day unto the Lord thy God. " In it thou shalt not do any work." But you may reply that it is not work to confer degrees. 'Vhat is it, pray? "Contemplation," you answer. Yes. How much contemplating is done when brethren are doing the work of a Lodge? With the secular ideas of many in our Fraternity as to what Masonry is, and the effort to secularize the institution, we will have work enough to maintain the respect of the religious world without throwing open our Lodges on the Sabbath. 'Ve can not afford to offend the moral sense of millions by doing ,...hat is not necessary. A healthy admonition comes to us from the" Great Light" of Masonry, "Let not your good he evil .spoken of." 'Ve should do nothing to cause good men and true to think less of our " good works" than they would otherwise. Let none have occa,gion against us. In holding" Sunday Communications," Bro. Singleton would simply engage in "the contemplation of the Great Creator." But he forgot, in approving" Sunday Communications," that such "Communications" were to be Stated ones, as much as meetings held on Saturday. If Lodges are allowed to hold stated communications on Sunday, the regular business will be transacted as on other days. They will be business meetings more than for" t.he contemplation of the Great Creator." The" order of business" will be called, and all business common to Lodges wi1l be attended to on Sunday. I am surprised at Bro. Singleton, and enter my Masonic protest, notwithstanding " three clergymen were officers" in an "old Chapter," which "alway:,; held their meetings on Sunday." In view of the sacred calling of "clergymen," their teachings and their example, I can not concede anything in favor of "Sunday Communications,". because some of the cloth were " officers" in a Masonic body that" al'ways" met on Sunday. I will not say what my estimate is of such" clergymen." Nor will I venture an


Appendix.

1888路1

33

opinion as to tbe character of an institution that. necessitates the presence of "clergymen" at its meetings on Sunday in order to give it moral tone and respectability.

"T.

JESSE LEE, JR., 'Washington, Grand Master. 路WM. R. SINGLETON, 'Washington, Grand Secretary.

FLORIDA,

1888.

The Journal of this Grand Lodge came to hand in g\lod time, and is, as usual, full of the presence of its maker, the Grand Secretary, Brother Dawkins. It records the "Transactions" of a "Special" and the Annual Communication. The special session was beld for the purpose of laying tbe Corner Stone of "Summerlin Institute." Brother Dawkins was suddenly called upon to supply the place ofthe Orator of the day, who failed to materalize. The address was brief and juicy. The 59th Annual Communkation was beld in JacksonYille, commencing January 17,1888. Brother George路 S. Hallmark, Grand Master presided. Brother Dewitt Clinton Dawkins, Past Grand Mai?ter, was at his post as Grand Secretary. "Wbat the Grand Lodge of FlOlida would do without Brother Dawkins is a question not to he answered. May it be a long time before a necessity for such an answer arises. l!lve Past Grand Masters were present, with the Representatives of 78 out of the 96 chartered Lodges On t.he roll. Twenty-six Grand Lodge Representatives were accredited as present. Tn the gG Lodges of that Jurisdiction there is a membership of 2,949, indica~ ting a gain of 192. 93 Lodges had made Returns in due time. This is doing well. The Address of Grand Master Hallmark, like his former paper, was largely devoted to local affairs, and furnished an account of transactions connected with his office. He had granted numerous dispensations for special purposes, such as the election of officers, conferring degrees out of time, and for balloting for candidates "ahead of time," as he phrased it. Five Dispensations had been granted for the formation of new Lodges. The remainder of the address was devoted, as last year, to moralizings on the principles of Masonry. He presented many good thoughts. From his conclusion one extract is made' Thus, brethren, we present you to-day a brief outline of the principles of our ancient order. It is no creed, no dogma of faith, no ritual of empty forms. It simplY accepts God as the Infinite Father, and his Divine Word as the revelation of truth and the rule of life. Freemasonry is not religious. Like the hospice of St. Bernard on the Alps, it stands a sort 'of half-way house between earth and beaven, and offers protection and shelter to the weary travelers struggling up from beneath and perishing in the storm. G. L. Al'.-3.


34

Appendix.

[Oct.

Ancicnt, mysterious and impenetrable in its antiquity, it stands in the silent grandeur of its origin, wit.h its base upon the plains of earth, like the Pyrimids of Egypt, and its SUfimits pointing to the skies. No page of history has ever recorded its progress; no voice of earthly wisdo~ has ever broken the seal of solemn silence that has overshadowed the beginning of its years. And thus it shall ever stand, a monument of moral grandeur amid the ages. It has fought no battles, subverted no kingdoms, overthrown no dynasties, taken part in no revolutions, staiued no pages of history with the records of crime and blood. But calmly, silently, nobly it has held on, on its way, leaving the impress of its footsteps upon evcry scene, in every land whither it has gone.

During the session a Past Grand Master's .T e\vel was presented to Brother Henry .T. Stewart, who had won the right to wear it in other yea.rs. The presentation and reception addresses were printed in the Jonrnal of Proceedings. They are quite readable. The Report of the Grand Secretary, Brother Dawkins, was in keeping with his former papers, and showed a fine condition of affairs in his department, and in the Fraternity generally. He made some ,valuable recommendations to the body, but they were sent over to the next annual meeting. The Grand .Ma..<;ter made fraternal mention in his address of their dead, who had been called from labor during the past year. Kind tributes were paid to the memory of these fallen ones by a committee, and memorial pages were furnished to commemorate their worth. CORRESPONDENCE.

A review covering about one hundred pages was furnished by Brother Dawkins, Chairman of the Committee. It isa good piece of work, presenting such views;;' he deemed best for the general enlightenment and information of his home readers. Bro. Dawkins, opened his review after the following fashion, and showed therein a purpose to pursue a line of work peculiar to himself: Your pen of Foreign Correspondence has so long been still tlmt many may have supposed it vanquished by non-usage. But not so; for your unrecorded but unanimously expressed desire, a year ago for a report, had only the effect of arousing involuntary inaction into the vigorous position of renewing and pursuing our long-cherished "labor of love." In beginning this report we are not unaware of the magnitude of t.he undertaking; yct we dare not amass it and inspect it beforehand, lest we falter. One by one, therefore, shall we seek the tidings from abroad uutil we shall have gathered, in our feeble way, the sparkling jewels of mystic lore and wisdom from the intellectual offerings from all our sister Grand Lodges which, in due time, favor us with their latest doings. In pursuing our work we shall gather all the mystic flowers that we can safely plant into a crowded space, and be as conciso a.'l possible in our own expressions, and thus save the expense of elaborate printing. And thIS of itself is taxing labor, upon the principle depicted by the mall who said, "I write a long letter because I have not time to write a short one." We tip our hat to our con"(~.~pondentialfmtcl's, feeling that a fraternal bow is due upon stepping again into the circle of the quill. At the head of our review of every Grand Lodge we will note the State, Territory or country wherein it is situated, the year for which the proceedings are under inspection, and the dates, showing in what month and the number of days occupied in the session, thus avoiding the monotony of writing and reading a full record of those facts literally indicted, and then fifty or sixty times repeated in our report; and we hope all our read-


1888.J

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35

ers will thank us for it in spirit, whether they say so or not. It is only our old plan, and , just under such heading we note the present acting Grand Master, Grand Secretary, and writer of the report on Foreign Correspondence, when such a report is found; and when the latter is not so noted it may be taken for granted that no such report was made. Every writer of such reRort we will term "Reporter." Silence upon the subject of 1'011calls of Grand Lodge wIll indicate that the representation was amplc and encourll~ing. As we think that the Grand Lodge of Florida ha.., a pretty nice code of regulatiOns of her own, which may with benefit be enlarged from time to time, we will make "Jurisprudence': a special heading for a part of this report, hopin~ in that way to pick up a few useful grams of law, to add to our prescnt stock. As the dIrectory of Grand Lodges usually pUblished with our Grand Lodge proceedings show 'who we can correspond with in the various Grand Jurisdictions, we think it unnecessary to name the newly cleeted Grand officers in this report.

This being the first Report from a Florida Committee, since this \'.Titer has been Grand Secretary of :Missouri Masons, he welcomes Bro. Dawkins, as a "Reporter," to the ranks of his "Correspondential fraters," and accords him a most fraternal greeting. Of his work I can say "well done." Bro. Dawkins is a discreet and careful glea1ier, and sees all that is to 1)e seen in Grand Lodge Transactions and in the reviews of his" Correspondtmtial fraters." In Olle instance he saw or thought he saw what was not in the text. In his review of our Missouri Proceedings for 1887, he thought this Committee had criticised him as to the tardiness of his work in printing the Grand' Lodge Journal of Florida. So far from such purpose on my part, I had paid him the following compliment: "The report of the Grand Secretary, Brother Dawkins, is an excellent one, and makes a fine showmg of all the lines of work in his department. He is a valuable officer, and has proved hiillself an indispensable factor in Florida :Masonry for thirty years. He is to be congratulated upon the success achieved in the Grand Lodge of Florida. His Journal of Proceedillgs, eighty pages, WIIS printed and delivered in thirty days after the close of the Grand Lodge."

Of course I could not have said, as above, that Bro. Dawkins had "printed and delivered" his Journal of eighty pages in "thirty days after the close of the Grand Lodge," if I had not 1'ecel:ved said Journal. How he

overlooked that fact I cannot imagine, especially in view of the very sincere tribute paid him as an officer, in the same paragraph. In contrast with his efficiency in delivering the Proceedings I said: "There lies before this Committee now a journal of seventy pages, which came to hand just cleven months after the body closed its very laborious labors."

This had no reference to Brother Dawkins, and could have none. Because the difference in the two cases is apparent. Of Bro. Dawkins' work of eighty pages, I said it was done in thirty days. Of the other fellow's work of seventy pages, I said it required him eleven months. Besides the "eleven mon'tluJ" joh was not the Journal of a Grand Lodge, but of another Masonic body much nearer home thail Florida. I have no complaint to make in the case, and only seek to correct the error into which Brother Dawkins permitted himself to faU by an oversight. He is too magnanimous and full of the true Masonic spirit to do anyone an injustice. We are all liable to reach immature conclusions.


36

Appendix.

[Oct.

Bro. Dawkins holds and expresses views which have the true ring concerning perpetual Jurisdiction. In his comments upon the Arkansas Proceedings he said: By a decision of the Grand l\raster, approved by the Grand Lodge, the Lodges in Arkansas retain perpetual jurisdiction over their rejected material. We see no rea~on at all given for making this law, and we think that it is erroneous. The presumption is that every rejection is right, hence the requisite of unanimity of ballot. But what a violent presumption! We know that some of them are not. A wolf wearing the lamb skin can, and sometimes does, arbitrarily keep one of the best men Ollt of an Arkansas Lodge. The rejected gen.tleman removes to Florida, resides twelve months. in the State and six months continuously under the jurisdiction of one of her Lodges. Under the Floridalaw, just intimated, he petitions the Lodge, saying therein that he was rejected, as stated. The Florida Lodge, under Florida law, simply asks the Arkansas Lodge if it knows any good reason why the applicant should not now be made a Mason, and, if yea, what that reason is. The Florida Lodge, having absolute' jurisdiction under the Florida law, is the judge of the reason, if any be given, and acts accordingly: and we apprehend that the former rejection in Arkansas, given as a reason, would be regarded as no reason. Now, if the Florida Lodge make a Mason of the applicant, whom we depicted as perchance a misused ~entleman, what is the chance for a little disturbance between the two Grand .JurisdictIOns, and how is it to be settled?

I have been pressing similar vie,vs upon the attention of the Craft for ten years. To my mind perpetual Jurisdiction is the most indefensible and unjustifiable dogma maintained by Masons in Modern times. Bro. N. R. Carter was el~cted Grand Master and Bro. Dewitt Clinton Dawkins, Grand Secretary. His address is Jacksonville.

GEORGIA, 1887. The lOIst Annual Communication began its labors in the Masonic Temple at Macon, October 25, 1887. Most 'Worshipful John S. Davidson, Grand Master, presided; Brother A. M. 'Volihin was Grand Secretary. Representatives from 46 Grand Lodges were reported as present. There are 280 Lodges in that Jurisdiction, with a membership of 11,461. A gain of 203 members was reported, 259 Lodges were represented at this session. A NNUAL ADDRESS.

The Grand Master presented an address covering thirteen pages. From it the following extracts are made: There appears to be, on the part of some of the Grand Lodges of the United States, a disposition to organize a representative body of Masons to represent the Craft at large within certain restricted lines of action. 'fherc are some reasons why a properly selected body might further the interests of the Craft, by making rules and regulations for t.he ascertainment of fraud and its ex-posure, for the dispensing of Masonic charity to the "\\'"orthy and for the settlement of dIsputes between the different Grand Bodies and matters germain thereto.


1888.]

Appendix.

37

The above is supposed to allude to the ".Masonic Congress" called to meet in Chicago last year. Bm. Davidson wisely and in conservative terms disposed of the "Congress" thus: Rut such orga.nization should be entered into with very rigid requirements for the preservation of all the rights, powers and privileges of the Grand Lodges composing it, so as to guard against the centralizing influence such associations are likely to produce. Masonry is one of the few institutions of human origin which has preserved unimpa.ired through the ages, the fundamental principles of perfect liberty of action within well defined limits of authority, and it behooves us to maintain this form of government if we would preserve the admitted advantages which have followed on its administration. The tendency of the profane world is to paternal forms of control in matters of government, and this tendency, unless carefullv guarded against, may enter into the affairs of our institution" and when once admitted, its voice, like unto the daughter of the horse leech, will be ror more and more. DECISIONS.

Eleven decisions were reported, referred to the Committee and unanimouslyapproved by the Grand Lodge. The Committee said that the decisions were "based on good and sound Masonic laws and usuages." The Committee further said that the Grand Master's ruling indicated a clear conception of the great principles which underlie the Order, and showed the deep research which had been displayed in the discharge of his high official duties. A large number of dispensations bad been granted by the Grand Master. Many of them were simply permission to confer the oegrees out of the usual time. He had granted five dispensations to institute new Lodges. The Grand Master reported that the past year had been one of great prosperity and growth throughout the jurisdiction. Numerous reports had been made of the zeal and advancement of the路Fraterllity. :Many accessions were reported and of such material as to encourage the belief that the best interests of the Order would be advanced. He called attention to the fact that one hundred years ago, the Grand Lodge severed its connection with the Grand Lodge of England. The Grand Master seemed to think that the Grand Lodge should, in some way, recognize their centennial year. Concerning their indebtedness the Grand Master said that, at the pressent rate of reduction, ,vithin a few years, the amount owed would be liquidated. The bonded debt amounts now to less than $5,000. He paid tribute to the faithfulness with which the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer had performed their duties. EXPULSION FOR NON-PAYMENT OF DUES.

In the report of the "Committee on Appeals and Grievances" I :find this:


38

Appendix.

[Oct.

We recommend that the action of various Lodges he sustained, and the following persons be expelled from the privileges of Freemasonry for non-payment of dues.

It is enough, perhaps, for me to express great joy that I do not live in Georgia. "EXPELLED from the p1'ivileges of Freemasonry for Nonpayment of dues." The money standm'd in Georgia Masonry is indicated in the above, and must be a. very exacting one.' "Your money or your life," is the demand contained in the la.w. No dues, Masonic death. EXPUL_ SION "from the privileges of Freemasonry" on account of non-payment of a few dollars. It mustbe so, for the Grand Lodge adopted the above. Yes, it is in the Bond, and Shylock is inexorable. He must have the pound of flesh, if the money (dues) is not forthcoming. Oh, Shylock, you lived too soon. Your nature was amiable, and your character lovely, compared to a system of Masonic Jurisprudence which would EXPEL a brother from "the privileges of Freemasonry" because he does not pay money when required. A ruffian made a demand of an illustrious Masonic personage for an important secret. He threatened, if the demand was not complied with, to take the life of his powerless victim, and canied the threat into execution. In the case of EXPULSION for non-payment of dues, ~!J[oney is demapded, or yout life. "Payor you die a Masonic death." I could paint my conception of the scene, when the beleaguered and helpless one fell beneath ruffian blows which killed him outright. But I defy pen or brush to exhibit the cruelty displayed, in taking away the Masonic life of a Brother, wpose only fault consists in not paying a paltry sum called "Lodge dues." "EXPELLED from the privileges," cut off from the benefits "of Freemasonry" for "non-p:~yment of dues." The measuring of Freemasony by the dollar standard is unmasonic as it is cruel. In the case under consideration, 1 find the EXPUV:iION of one hundred and twenty-tMee brethren for non-payment of dues. That number of Masons were EXPELLED-eonsigned to Masonic graves, from whi('.h the trump of the resurrection that will raise them will be a SILVER one, the Almighty dollar. In the same report where 123 names appear, showing 'who were e1:pelled for non-payment of dues, there is a list of th'irteen persons who had been expelled for "forgery," "immoral conduct," "swindling," "larceny," "defrauding Lodge," "blackmailing," "drunkenness," etc. This class of "lewd fellows of 1.he baser sort" were tum bled into the same gr(wp- with the 123 unfortunates who were "expelled"-killed outright"-for an insignificant offe~lse. I cannot do the subject justice, and refer it to Bro. Parvin of Iowa.

CORRESPONDEl\CE. The Journal contains a Report amounting to 112 pages. The record shows that "Brother Blackshear, Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, laid the report before the Grand Lodge, which, after


1888..1

Appendix.

39

some discussion, was on motion of Brother Bigham, referred to the Committee on General 'Yelfare." Said Committee reported adversely to some things contained in the report rendered by Brother Blackshear and the same was adopted. The resolution offered by the Committee was as follows: o Rcsnlval, That this Grand Lodge disapproves of what is said in the Report of James

E. Blackshear, as one of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence, concerning "the resurrection of the body," on pages 19 and 53.

A certain writer on Correspondence had said, "",Ye don't believe in the resurrection of this body at all. ",Ve deny that the doctrine is found in the teachings of Masonry or the revelations of God." Brother Blackshear said for himself. ""'''e give the foregoing our unqualified endorsement." The Grand Lodge pronounced its disapproval of what he said on the subject. In attempting to review the Georgia Report on Correspondence it was found that the way was "beset with difficulties and dangers." Brother Blackshear presented the Report and on the last page I found the name of Bro. Bigham. The question arose "who wrote the Report?" "Thile examining the work I discovered that another workman had been engaged in the labor of construction. Bro. James A. Gray was a eontributor; and furnished thirty pages of matter. Bro. Blackshear wrote 64 pages, and Bro. Bigham 18, making a total of 112 pages. Judging from the diverse views of the writers, they did not "retire and consult" before presenting tb eir Report. Taking the resolution offered by Bro. Bigham, which condemned the views of Bro. Blackshear "concerning the resurrection of the body," one feels inclined to say, "Behold ho,"" good and how pleasant it. is for brethren to dwell together in un'ity." Brother Blackshear said he had "no communication with the other members of the Committee." He said he did not favor the segregation of the work-"farming out the report." Tbe best evidence that can be furnished against the "Segregate system" or "farming out" business is found in the Georgia Report. I notice that the Committee for next year consists of five members. More "farming out." Bro. Davidson was rc-elected Grand Master. tary Bro. 'Volihin, 'whose address is Macon.

So wa." the Grand Secre-


40

Appendix.

[Oct.

IDAHO, 1887. o

The 20th Annual Communication was held at Boise City, commencing September 13th. Geo. H. Davis, Grand Master, presided and Jas. H. 'Wickersham was Grand Secretary. Out of seventeen Lodges on the roll, fourteen were represented. The tables show a membership of six hundred and thirty-four. ADDRESS.

The address of Grand Master Davis covered eight pages. He reported two new Lodges instituted under dispensation. A few decisions of local bearing were reported. His recommendation of the Grand Lodge of South Australia for recognition, was approved. The remainder of his address was devoted to practical suggestions and moralizings. This Grand Lodge has an Orphan Fund amounting to some $1,700 which is growing. Six orphans have been aided by donations from said funds during the past year. The Grand Secretary, Brother Wickersham, presented an able and extendec... report. He said: CONDITION OF LODGES.

The Grand Lodge and the Craft have a right to feel proud of the satisfactory condition of }\:[asonic affairs as they generally exist throughout this jurisdiction. With one exception the lodges con,stituent to this Grand Lodge have enjoyed peace and prosperity during the year. Only one case of appea.l appears a.s of record for your adjudication, and this is a fact upon which we may proudly congratulate ourselves. The amount of work done by our lodges has been much larger than in the past for the same space of time, and I am informed by visiting brethren that it has been well performed. All the lodges havc reported and paid their annual dues. TEMPERA~CE.

The following resolution was presented, amended and adopted. Resolved, That all spirituous, vinous, lLnd malt liquors shall be excluded from the lodge-rooms ante-rooms, or halls connected with and under the control of any of the constituent lodges in this jurisdiction, and from all refreshments given by any MasoniC Lodge under the j urisdictlOn of this Grand Lodge.

No report on Foreign Correspondence appears in the Journal. Ed. A. Stevenson was elected Grand Master and Jl:!-mes~. 'Wickersham was re-elected Grand Secretary. Both resid8 at Boise City.


41

1888.]

ILLINOIS,

1887.

The Journal for Illinois opens with a record ofmemorial proceedings containingthe funeral obsequies oLMost 'Vorshipful Brother Theo. T. Gurney. The communication at which the memorial services were rendered, in honor of the distinguished brother, was held in Chicago, Nov. 11, 1886. The Grand :\faster on opening the session announced the purpose of the meeting a:s follows: This is an Emergent Communication, called for the purpose of paying the last sad tribute of respect to the memory of our dear departed Bro. ]\f. W. Theodore T. Gurney.

~~~~ s~W~rt~~r~lid~~~}\1fea~.~~:~ ~~od~~~~~,gOl flf~b~li~e f~;~e;;~:~s :!i?~~ U~~l~~~~n~t~~ Grand Lodge, yet within this short time two Past Grand )lasters of this Grand Lod~e have been called from time to eternity; from labor on earth to eternal refreshment ill the Paradise of God. He further said of Bro. Gurney: During his afflictioll I called upon him, and found him resigned, but full of courage and determination. He had no fears for the future, and expressed his faith as follows: "I am not afraid to die. He that doeth all things well will take care of me." His faith in the merits of the Lion of the tribe of Judah was firmly fixed, and by the benefit of the pass, of a pure and blameless life, he has doubtless gained ready admission into the eclestiallodgc} where the Sup,reme Architect of the universe presides. The loss we have sustained is Irreparable. 'Ihere was but one Brother Gurney. No one stood higher in the estimation of the Craft than he. No one enjoyed the confidence, respect and esteem of his brethren to a greater degree. He was honest, conscientious, upnght, a t1'lle and faithful brother. The proud position the Grand Lodge of Illinois sustains to-day among the Grand Lodges of the world, is as much due to the faithful and intelligent serVICe and labors of Brother Gurney as to that of any other brother. No one has labored more earnestly and zealously in the interests of the Craft. No one is entitled to a greater reward. His loss is not ours alone. The loss is to the Craft generallv. Wherever Masons are found, there a loss has bc(~n sustained. The church has lost a. zealous supporter, an indefatigable worker; the St.ate a quiet. peaceable, order loving citizen; society one of its brightest ornaments; the grief-stricken widow a kind and loving husband; the children an indulgent and warm hearted father: the sister a dearly belovcd brother, and a proud city one of its most efficient and faithful officers. Brethren, let us humbly bow in submission to the will of Him who noteth the sparrow's fall, and who will fold His arms of love and compassion around those who put their trust in Him.

Truly, "There was but one Brother Gurney." His loss is to the Masonic world. "Missouri mourns him as her own son. '\.

Addresses on the occasion were delivered by Brothers D. C. Cregier, Carter H. Harrison, Loyal Munn and others. A memorial tribute of superior merit ",vas furnished by the committee, consisting of Brothers Cregier, Robbins and Browning. The 48th Annual Commnnication began its labors in Chicago on the 4th of October, 1887, with Brother Alexander T. Darrah Grand Master, presiding and Brother Loyal Munn, Grand Secretary.


42

[Oct.

Tllere are between seven and eight hundred Lodges in the Illinois jurisdiction, with a membership of over forty thousand. The income is large, and the funds are carefully handled and ably managed. The address of Grand Master Darrah was nearly fifty pages in length, and embraced every conceivable subj~ct likely to claim attention in the second largest Masonic jurisdiction in this country. Concerning the address, an able committee made the following statement: Your committee are heartily in accord with the Grand Master in the views expressed as to the duties of representat.ives, and as to elect.ioneering for office. The neglect by representatives of the plain and imperative duty of attending the sessions of the Grnnd Lodge, for which they are paid, and the endeavor to oQtain official st.ation in Masonic bodies by the use of the electioneering methods of t.he politician, fire evils that cannot be to strongly reprehended, f\.lld while your committee do not desire to lllld to t.he remarks of the Grand :Master in this connection, they earnestly recommend that the members of this Grand Lodge reflect upon these subject,~ with that care and consideration which their importance demands, lind apply a remedy for these evils if possible. In conclusion, your committee would say that this able and exhaustive report affords an indicntioll of t.he varied and onerous duties which fall to the lot of the presiding officer of a frateI'llity so great, in numbers as the Masons ofthis great St.llt.e, and they congratulate the Grand Master and the Craft ofIllinois, that in dealing with interests so important, and with such a vast number of cases. the work has been so well and faithfully done. . '

The Grand Master referred in appropriate terms to the fraternal dead. Just and touching tributes ,,,ere paid to the Most Worshipful Brot.hers Ira W. Buck and Theodore T. Gurney, Past Grand l\1.asters. Concerning the condition of the l~'raternity, he announced the favorable condition of Masonry, and said the records would show a satisfactory increase in the membership, while more care is being exercised as to quality of the material admitted into the Order. FRATERXAL RELATIOXS.

The Grand Master announced that their relations with the Grand I"odges of the world were most satisfactory, with a single exception, alluding to the Grand Lodge of England, which still exercises control over three lodges in the Grand Lodge of Quebec. MIXED FUNERAL'S.

The Grand Mastâ&#x201A;Źr treated this subject it1 the following clear and correct terms: Having referred to the subject of Mixed Jo'u1lCral.~, I only mention it now for the purpose of emphasizing what has already heen ~33id on that topic, and to insist that lodges be more careful in the future. A Mllsonic procession should be tyled and guarded as mueh as a lodge at labor-no one being permitted to eitber enter or retire from it without permission from the W. 1\f. No Mason would think of admitting a profane to visit a lodge while at labor, much less permit one to take part in the ceremonies of conferring a degree. Yet a lodge would have as much right, legally, to admit a profane to visit as it would to admit him within u Masonic procession. J reg-ret to say the latter has been done in this jurisdiction, and not only so, but the same individual has been permitted to take part in the active ceremonies of the occasion.

â&#x20AC;˘


1888.J

Appendix.

43

Grand Master Darrah treated the subject of official visitations in a very practical way. He said the value to lodges of such visitations could not be over estimated. He had visited lodges in different parts of the State, so far as his time would permit. As a result, good had been accomplished, errors corrected and valuable information imparted. DISPENSATIONS.

A number of ne"\\' lodges had been instituted under dispensation duri ng the year. He reported an instance in which a Lodge had been instituted in the southern part of Chicago to work in the German language. He found considerable difficulty' in having the ritual translated that the work could be done in German. He then entered a protest against creating lodges to work in other than the English language. The following is his statement of the case. In this connection I wish to stat.e that I think it exceedingly unfort.unate that the Grand Lodge should eyer have chartered a lodge to use any other than the English language, and that it is a cOllsumruation greatly t.o be desired should the German lodges in our jurisdiction abandon the use of the German alid me only the En~lish language. At it is, it is almost impo~sible for a Grand Master to exercise any superYiSlOn over them. The only feasible alternative that I can see would be to appoint some brother who understands both the English and German languages to look after their welfare.

One of my official sins, when Grand Master in this Jurisdiction, calling for deep repentance, was the granting a Dispensation to parties to form a Lodge to work in an "unknown tongue." The Lodge is dead now and I am forgiven. :Missouri will never do so again. A very large number of subjects were ably treated by the Grand Master, and received due consideration in the Grand Lodge. MASONIC

CO~VENTION.

Brother Darrah mentioned, approvingly, the Masonic Congress which assembled in Chicago last June, and furnished a synopsis of its transactions. EL]~CTIOXEERING

FOR OFFICE.

The following admonition is taken from his address upon the above subject: It should he considered a very high honor to be able to serve the Craft in any capacity, but more especially as an officer of so important an assemblage of illtelligent persons as compose this Grand Lodge. In order to enjoy this honor to its fullest extent, the office should seek the brother, and not the brother the office.

This leads me to say, and I regret very much the necessity for saying it, that a system of electioneering for place and position has crept into this Grand Lodge that should ])e speedily checked. This has gone on and on, until the methods now in vogue will compfiTe favorably with the most approved scramble for political place and Jlower. Early in my Masonic Ufe J was firmly impressed wHh the belief that electioneering for office in lodge or Grand Lodge would not be tolerated; and that the most that could be legitim a-


44

Appendix.

[Oct.

tely done was to present the names of brethren for various offices at the time of election I believe this to be the true Masonic principle of action to-day. Contrast this with what is transpiring among members of this Grand Lodge, and see how far we have departed from the rule of practice as adopted by our fathers. When the contest between brethren for office becomes so warm that one charges the other with unfair means in the contest; when crimination and recrimination is indulged in and undue advantages charged, as has recently transpired, is it not time that a halt should be called? If these things are tolerated this Grand Lod$'e will soon degenerate into a mere political machine, as has occurred in a very conspICUOUS Grand Lodge on the American Continent, where two eminent Past Grand Masters were denied the privilcge of visiting, for fear some undue influence might be exerted that would disturb the harmony of the political machine that was running, not smoothly, in that distinguished body of Ma"ons. Brethren, the remedy is in your hands; apply it at once, and before it is too late. Administer such rebuke as will settle the matter for years to come. Do this and save the reputation of Masonry, and the honor and dignity of this Grand Lodge.

In our Missouri 'Grand Lodge we have this kind of a law: "That electioneering for office in this Grand Body is contrary to Masonic usage, and is hereby prohibited." This enactment was necessitated by a condition of things brought before the Grand Lodge by the Grand Master in his address. Since the foregoing rule was made, we have not been troubled with "electioneering for office" brethren. Such did not succeed very much. COURT RECORDS

were declared admissible as evidence in Lodge trials.

Here is the case路

It is doubtless known to every member of this Grand Lodge, that a number of persons--commonly called "boodlers"-were convicted recently by the courts in the city of Chicago for very serious offenses. I regret very much to say that among the number so convicted there were several members of our Fraternity. This has been a source of great allnoyanee to members of the Craft, and especially to the lodges of which they were members.

Although cOIlvicted and sentenced--one doing service for the State at JOliet, another a fugitive from justice-it looked as though they would escape discipline ill their respective lodges, for want of evidence to convict. It will be remembered that the only evidence a~ainst these persons was furnished by witnesses who were promised immunity 011 condItion that they would "turn State's evidence." It seems that these witnesses, as soon as their evidence was given, lost all interest in the matter, and there was no way of compelling them to testify in a :Masonic trial. Under the circumstances, it looked much as though these criminals were likely to escape a punishment they richly deserved. These two lodges were instructed to admit, as evidence in the trilll ofthese criminals, the record of the court in which the conviction was had, the lodge to judge of the weight this should have in determining the question of the guilt or innocence of the accused.

Missouri adopted a similar rule in 1877, and thereby justly punished some of the plunderers of the public Treasury, who otherwise had escaped justice, while Masonry would have suffered in her good name. Rascally Masons should be punished even when other rascals escape. A BAD CASE

was reported thus': The best members of this lodge made an effort to rid the lodge of a disreputable, profane and drunken member, whose hands were stained with the blood of a fellow being. l<'ailing to do this, the powers of the Grand Lodge were evoked to assist in doing that which the lodge alone was powerless to do; but unfortunately the wrong was sustained, and the death knell of the lodge was sounded. Reputable and order loving members


1888.J

AppendiJ:.

45

who could no longer stand the stigma and scorn heaped upon the lodge by the outside world, failed to attend lodge, so that for veal'S it was difficult to secure a quorum. The - secretary could scarcely collect dues enough to pay the ordinary expenses of the lodge.

It is not to be wondered at that such a Lodge ceased to exist. ORATION.

Bro. VV. S. Hooper, Grand Orator, delivered an oration covering thirteen pages. It is as good as lengthy, being thoroughly readable and instructive. OF TIlE BIBLE

he said: ()

Whoever accepts a part of the teachings of this sacred volume has acccpted all; and ifby obligation or oath, we have promised to take it for our guide, we have thereby promised to accept it us our standard of morals, and to be guided by its precepts. It mcans much to the true and honorable Mason. It means a basis of the highest and purest morals. It meansupright conduct with all men, and bon~sty to self and God, and having premised before God and in the presence of men to thus observe the precepts of this sacred volume, we arc personally responsible before God. l\fORALITY.

:Masonry is not a religion, but somehow men have learned to consider it almost a twin sister to the church, and an erring Mason is regarded almost in the light ofan erring Christian, and the effect is almost cqually disastrous to the morals of a community. Let us, brothers, look at this fact and be noble, upright men. It is a painful and almost unaccountable thing to hear a Mason profane the name of his God, attcr the solemn positions he has occupied, obligations he has taken, emblems he has heard explained, and Bible teachings that have been unfolded to him.

It seems to me that after such things that a man using profane words against his Maker would feel almost as if the very clouds of bitter condemnation would envelop him, the heavens fall upon him, or the earth open to receive him.

Profanity is wrong in any man, but doubly so falling from the lips of one who has knelt at the altar and sat beneath the bright and beautiful canopy of the lodgc. :Masonic morals, however, are not merely the abstinence fronl"these things. Whatever are morals in the highest sense of Christianity, are morals in Masonic teaching. It does not mean that you are to be kind and good with your brother on ly; not merely that you are to be honest and true in the commercial line of thought, but Whereever the idea of morals may appear in the highest type of human purity it must apply to a Mason.

Masonry does not mean that there is to be purity with regard to the wife, daughter, sister ana mother of the brother of the lodge, and a broad and unbridled licentiousness with regard to others; but Masonic purity in this regard is the purity of the highest class of morals, human and divine, and when ODce the bounds of purity have becn overstepped and the line of licentiousness has been touched by the toot of a Mason, he has violated one of the highest teachings of his order. He obligated himself as to his brother's family, because of the nearness of the frnternity tie; but when he pledged himselt against the libertine, and stood with uncovered head and reverentially listened to the emblematic teaching of purity, he accepts the implied obligation of a pure life. 1fthere are men ',:ho have giVED themselves up to unbridled appetites, let them reflect as to the meanmg of Masonry, when they tremble beneath the power of lustful temptation.


46

Appendi;r. ATHEISJT VERSUS

[Oct.

~I:\SONRY.

The Grand Master reported the following case: June 5th I received a communication from a member of a lodge inquiring whether "Charges could be sustained against a Mason who disbelieves the Bible, and who does not believe in the God of the same?" I assured the brother that charges should be sus. taiJled again such brother and he promptly expelled. I sUbsequently learned that a number ofthemembers of Vienna Lodge belonged to a society which disbelieved the Bible and denied the existence of the God of the same. The president of the society, Bro. John S. Crum, sometime previous published an address, which had been delivered, on the subject of the Bible and the God of the Bible, but which bore for a title the startling words: "Believe or Be Damned." In this he takes great delight in making light ofthe Book of Books, as well as ofthe Goel of our fathers. I need only quote one sentence from his address: "1 therefore pronounce the first sentence in this old Jewish book a falsehood." The sentence to which reference is had, as will berememiJered, is !L part of our ritual, from the "Great Light in :Masonry," and has reference to our Supreme Grand "Jaster. This is a sample of the address. The doctrine of this atheistic society has crept into the lodge, and unless speedily checked must affect the welfare and reputation of the Fraternity very seriously in the community where it is located. Bro. Crum was placed on trial, at which R. W. Bro. James A. Rose presided, and although found guilty on one specification, the lodge refused tofix a penalty. This being reported to me, I immediately suspended the functions of the lodge.

The above was referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence, with lVr. 路W. Bro. Joseph Robbins, chairman. The subject was fully considered and reviewed, and conclusions reached which have caused surprise among thousands of the Fraternity. Henceforth Illinois Masons may hang their heads in shame and hide their faces in sorrow, while those who "disbelieve the Bible and deny the existence of God" flaunt their Atheistic teachings unrebuked, in the presence of :Mankind. The Committee on Jurisprudence, having charge of the foregoing case, prepared the way for their findings, as the following will show: Holding in common to the great fact. of the existence of God, all Masons must stand upon the level of a perfect equality whenever and wherever assembled as such. As a man, Masonry leaves each one free to his own theological interpretation; but this freedom confers no license to enforce or engraft his interpretation upon the Institution.

The members of the Committee are doubtless, well versed in ~lasonic the law." But they need to acquaint themselves with matters concerning whieh they evinced a strange blindness, if not fatuity. They constantly confound THEOLOGY with Sectarianism. The Committee characterized "Sectarianism-" as a "twin edl" with "political partizanship," classed both evils with Revealed Trnths, and then condemn all alike. The issue before the Committee was the truth of the charge against the accused. Had he declaimed and inveighed against the "Great Light in Masonry?" The scurrilous and blatant publication of the accused was in evidence. He had published his views, in pamphlet form, to the world, aga:inst God and the Bible. He attacked the first verse in "the Book of Books." "In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth." law-~'learned in


1888.]

47

The Atheistic member of Vienna Lodge in Illinois said in his pamphlet, "I pronounce the first sentence in this old .r ewish, book a falsehood." The Illinois Lodge that tried hiln said "Amen," by acquitting him, and the Committee of Jurisprndence of Illinois said, "so mote it be," while the Grand Lodge approved the verdict. The Committee rebuked the Master of the Lodge who permitted charges to be brought against the member that pronounced the existence of God "a falsehood." It causes no surprise to this writer that the same Committee criticised the Grand Master for his action in the case. The same Committee of Jurisprudence in 'indicating the libellant of God's \vord, pronounced his trial in fact, and in law, void from the beginning, and declared the whole proceeding "Mischievous." They said: There is nothing to be gained in inflicting punishment npon those who have broken the law, at all comparable to the mischief of continued agitation of a question so dangerous to the peace of the Fraternity, one which, as the Grand Lodge long ago foresaw, can bear only the bitter fruits of strife, alienation and discord.

"Nothing to be gained" by punishing a Mason \\Tho declared in print that the existence of God is "a falsehood." Pray how much is to be lost by vindicating such a creature? "I pronounce the first sentence" in the Bible "a falsehood." What does that first sentence" reveal? One Grand Original fact is proclaimed. THERE IS A GOD. In the beginning GOD was. I pronounce this "sentence" a '~falsehood" cries the Illinois Atheist. "The sentence which reveals GOD is false." Therefore there is no God. "Amen" responded the Illinois Committee. This Committee said of the pamphlet in question: In the case before us a strongly sectarian address, published in pamphlet form by the accused, was made the basis ofa charge against him of committing a 'Masonic offence, and also constituted the sole evidence put in upon bis trial to substantiate the charge. One of the specifications involved the charge of Atheism, a disbelief in God, and the others. three or four in number, were various ways of stating in substance that be was guilty of denying the divine authenticity of the Bible, of ridiculing that hook, of declaring that some portions of it were false, or of speakin{;$' contemptuously of it. Upon the trial the accused was found not guilty of the speCIfication of Atheism, and not guilty of all the rest of,the specifications save one, and thftt one form of specifying that he had cast ridicule and contempt upon the Bible.

From the above it appears that the accused was vindicated by the Illinois Committee, because bis "pamphlet" was too "strongly Sectarian" to be allowed in a Lodge or constitute the basis of Lodge action. It further appears that the pamphlet "Constituted the sole evidence" in the case. 'Vith such evidence as the pamphlet contained, which declared that the THEISM of the opening "sentence" of the Bible was "a falsehood," the Lodge acquitted the accused. The Committee justified the finding, restored the Charter and reflected upon Grand Master Darrah for his course in the matter. I ,vould like to ask the Illinois Committee how they make


48

[Oct.

an address "strongly Sectarian" \vhich pronounces as "a, fal.sehood" that great Theistic Truth found in "the first sentence" of the Bible. "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth." "I pronounce this a falsehood" said the Illinois Atheist. By declaring this "first sentence" in the Bible "a falsehood," the Illinois Atheist repudiated the whole sentence. In doing so he repudiated the GOD fact, as well as the GOD act.

Thefact of the Divine EXISTE~CE is as much a part of "the first sen,tence" in the Bible as the act ascribed to him as Creator. Both 1J1'esence and action are in that "first sentence" pronounced "a falsehood" by an Illinois Atheist. Pronouneing that' 'sentence" a ''falsehood'' as to the acts of Creation, the Atheistic Mason.declared against the existence of God and won for himself the description written by an "old Jewish" Poet three thousand years ago: "The fool hath said in his heart, TrrERE IS NO GOD." Who but ajool would say such a thing. The difference between the fool of David's time and the Illinois fool is that one said in his heart "TIIERE IS ~o GOD." Entertaining a decent respect for the opinions of mankind he kept his mouth closed. 'While the Illinois creature proclaimed his folly through the press, and openly gloried in his own shame. David's fool was the better fellow. 'When a Mason pronounces the existence of God and the facts of Creation "a jal.sehood," and is shielded by his Lodge, and vindicated by the Court of last resort, it need not cause surprise if Blanchard opens his villainous tirades upon Illinois Masonry and the Fraternity generally. Grand Master Darrah said the accused in this case was president of a "Society which di.sbelie.ved the Bible and denied the exi.stence of the God of the same." The president of this Atheistic Society, not content with his position, and his unbelief, must make open war against "the Bible and the God of the same," by delivering a public address, and then published the same, declaring as false "the .first sentence" of the Book on which he had taken the obligations of Masonry. 'What is an obligation to such a Man? What is Masonry to him? And yet the plea of "Sectariani.m'/''' is interposed to protect such a character from the just indignation of Masons who "Believe in God" and respect the sanctity of an obligation. The cry is raised "Masonry is in danger of being Sectarianized. It will never do to permit a Sectar-ian pamphlet to be made the ground of charges in a Masonic Lodge." Did this Illinois Atheist attack the sects alone? Had he gone no farther, his assaults had not been noticed by this writer. But when he, with leprous touch, laid his desecrating hand upon the Holy Bible, and with poisoned words proclaimed as false a "SeJltence" that reveals to us the God of Masonry, I can not be silent. And I enter my protest against such specious reasoning as blindly confounds mere "Sectarianism" with Theism.


1888.)

Appendix.

49

I have to ask wbat must be the opinion of thousands of our brethren, after reading the assault upon God and Revelation by the Illinois Atheist, and his vindication, when they stand in the presence of the Great Light of Masonry? 'Vhat ,vill be the thoughts of pure, conscientious Masons when they see men obligated on that Holy Book? How will they feel in listening to the beautiful expression "God said, light be-and light was" when they remember that a IVlason pronounced the "sentence a falsehood ?" The moral obliquity and deep turpitude of a nature uttering such a slander can be fancied but not painted. The colors with which to portray such a character must be imported from regions of deepest diabolism. CONCLUSION.

From the concluding part of Dr. Darrah's address tbe following extraet is made: In my report to you I have not reported every case brought before me. This would not he feasible or desirable. I have submitted the more important ones, and t.rust that t.heir disposal may meet the approbation of the Grand Lodge. It is almost wonderful that in a. .iurisdiction so large as ours.: embracing so much territory, and containing so lar~e a ll1embership,-pcrhaps over litty thousand Masons, affiliated and unaffiliated-as we haTe, Hnd have so little friction or trouble. It is true that we must be subjected to more or less of disturhances, yet in the aggregate they are very small for so large a membership. ] h:we made no elfort to conceal or hide the true state of affairs mnollg the Craft, but have fairly and candidly stated the facts as they exist. I think this is due each member. I have no sympathy with that. modesty that would conceal from the Fraternity, and the world, for that matter, the true state of affairs as they exist.. I believe that our Institution works as smoothly and harmoniously as any other organization of equal numbers, the church not. excepted. This should be a source of very great satisfaction and pride to each member of the Craft in our jurisdiction. Finally, for the uniform kindness and consideration accorded me by my brethren, of which I am proud, I again desire to thank you. GRAND SECRETARY.

Brother Munn, as Grand 'Secretary, presented as usual a very full exhibit of the fiscal affairs, proving, as he has ever done, his fidelity and . ability. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report was rendered by lVI. ,V. Bro. DaniellVL Browning, and covered 140 pages. It abounds in cullings from the Journals reviewed, with occaBional comments. Bro. Browning made his bow, as a new writer on Correspono.ence, acknowledged his inexperience, and retired from the reportorial ranks. He was succeeded by Bro. Joseph Robbins, an able writer and experienced Committee. Hon. John C. Smith, of Chicago, was elected Grand Mast.er. L. Munu, of Freeport, was re-elected Grand Secretary.

G. L. Ap.--4.

Bro. Loyal


50

Appendix.

[Oct.

INDIANA. This Grand Lodge has resumed Annual Sessions. The Journal under consideration contains the Proceedings ofthe first Annual Communication held for some years. The Brethren are to be congratulated upon their return to first principles under such favorable circumstances. They bave paid off their Temple debt and are no longer encumbered by financial embarrassments. The 67th Annual Communication was held in the Masonic Hall in tbe City of Indianapolis, beginning the 22d day of May, 1888. Brother Mortimer Nye, Grand Master, presided, with Brother W"m. H. Smythe, Grand Secretary. There are 467 chartered lodges in this Jurisdiction with a membersbip of 23,015, showing 'a gain of 424 members the past year. There were present, representatives from 462 lodges. Ten Past GrandMasters were in attendance. THE ADDRESS.

The address of Brother Nye covered sixteen pages, besides Appendix matter embracing six pages. It is sufficient to say that the address is a good business document. He announced the condition of the Craft as highly satisfactory and said that an era of prosperity bad been enjoyed. 'While this was true, he said tbat in some of the lodges the working tools had become covered with dust, and the workmen had failed to perform. tbeir duty. THE DEAD.

He reported the death of Brother 'Wm. M. Black, Grand Tyler, and Brother Cyrus Vigus, Past Grand Tyler. In a general statement of official labors, he announced that some lodges had been constituted, the charters of others arrested, two had ceased to exist by surrender of charter, tbree new lodges had been constituted under dispensation, while he had refused twelve applications for permission to institute lodges. He gave it a,<; bis experience that they have lodges enough for all practical purposes in tbat jurisdiction. He stated that on the 1st of April, 1888, fifty-nine lodges were delinquent as to Grand Lodge dues. He found it necessary to issue an order to the


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delinquent lodges, suspending their charters until they should make their reports and pay their dues, and required them to appear before the Grand Lodge to show cause why their charters should not be annulled. POWERS OF THE GHAND JlfASTER.

The following sensible views of the powers of the Grand l\1aster were uttered by Grand Master Nye, and have the unqualified endorsement of this Committee: The idea seems to prevail in the minds of Dlm~y members of the Fraternity that the Grand Master has the power at will to set aside any provision of the Constitution or standilJg rule or re~ulation of the Grand Lodge-in fact that the Grand :'IIaster is the Grand Lodge to all mtents and purposes, and often the most persistent efforts are employed to indnce the Grand :;\faster to do so. To all applications oftbis character, I have earnestly endeavored to impress upon the minds of Masons tbe fact that the Grand Master possesses no power of such a character; tbat be is not the Grand Lodge; that it is as much his duty to obey the law as the most obscure member of a Subordinate Lodge;. and, in fact, more so, because it is his duty to enforce obedience to the laws of the ~j-rand Lodge, and it would be in exceeding bad taste for him to be guilty of the violation of law or the usurpation of power not specially conferred upon him. I have therefore been compelled very many times to refuse Lodges dispensations to remove from olJe town to another, to march on Decoration Day, make Masons without leg-s and arms, meet ilJ hal Is occupied by other societies, and, in fact, to violate nearly every rule for the government of Subordinate Lodges. :Most applications for special di<>pensations have been refused, find very few indeed have been granted. I shall always be ready to advocate the proposition that the Grand .Master is not tbe Grand Lodge.

Brother Nye certainly ignored "the high powers in me vested" when he 'wrote the foregoing. Commend me to such a man. He respects his obligation to support the written Constitution and Laws of Masonry. He is an example worthy of the imitation and tells his brethren "it is my duty to obey the law." The best e140rcement of law in such case is obedience to law. It is only,by a due regard to the Jaw in official life that officers can expect obedience to them from others. If all Grand Masters would act as our Brother Nye has done, by enforcing written laws instead of breaking them, "by virtue of the high power in me vested," soon the Fraternity would learn that Grand Masters were not larger than Grand Lodges and Constitutions. 'Write it every where in letters of light "the Grand Master is not the Grand Lodge." He is only its creatni'e. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master stated that he had given many opinions and made many decisions on questions submitted, nearly all of which could have been easily decided by reference to the rules and regulations of the Grand Lodge. He did not deem it necessary to report his rulings in detail to the Grand Lodge. During his term of office, he had received some t,vo thousand letters, making the correspondence of the office quite heavy.


52

Appendix.

[Oct.

CIRCULARS.

The following extract is very pertinent, and deserves attention: A very peculiar practice has been gaining a foothold in the State, to which I now invite your attention. Some of the Lodges and a few of the brethren have been sending out printed circulars asking charity, in some cases to rebuild a home destroyed by tire, buy a spo..n of horses, pay oif a mortgage, and in one case to pay a security debt of three hundred dollars, and asking the Lodges to contribute a dollar or two toward the enterprise. I have in some cases given the Lodges to understand, :ill a very positive manner, that tl;J.is method of raising money did not meet with my approval. I suggest that the Grand Lodge adopt some rule relative thereto.

The Grand Master closed his very excellent address in appropriate terms, acknowledging the high honor wbich had been conferred upon him as the presiding offlCer of the Grand Lodge. He said: "I shall not go into elegant retirement, but shall always be an active and industrious 1I1ason." He received, as he deserved, tbe thanks of t.he Grand Lodge for his many and satisfactory services for two years, and the compliment of a Past Grand Master's jewel. Indiana Masonry has produced many able men and officers. Brother Nye may take rightful position with illustrious predecessors. . The reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer show a healthy state of finances, the total amount on hand being represented as $31,755, less the disbursement'5 to be made for the session. The Grand Lodge property is represented to be in good condition by the following extract: The property of the Grand Lodge is now in good repair] and'there will be no occasion for the expenditure of so la.rge a sum of money upon It for several years to come. We have contracted with the Broad Ripple Natural Gas Company lor gas to heat the buildiJlgs lor one year for $320, which will greatly lessen the expense for fuel, and we believe that when our contract expires, that better terms may be made for fuel than the above named contract calls for. On the night of October 8 188i, the daughter of George W. Bolen fell down a stairway in the rear of Masonic Temple, and was killed. The father brought suit for damages, tixing his claim at $10,000. We employed Harrison, Miller & Elam, of Indianapolis, and Past Grand Mast.er Albert P. Charles, of Seymour, as our attorneys to defend the Grand Lodge, which t.hey have successfully accomplished, the case having been decided in favor of the Grand Lodge upon a demurrer to the complaint tiled by our attorneys.

The Grievance Committee reported in extenso. The report is very interesting, and shows that careful attention had been given to the matters and things claiming attention. The pay-roll was necessarily large, as tbere were present five hundred claimants, perhaps, who received $3 per day, and ten cents per mile for travel one way. This cuts a big slice out


Appendix.

1888.J of their fund,

a,.c;;

53

the amount paid on pay-roll account footed up over

$7,000. INDIANA lIIASONRY.

Under this head, Past Grand Master Robert Van Valzah furnished a paper covering fourteen pages of very interesting reading matter. The Grand Lodge, by resolution, sternly forbids the issuance of circular letters for begging purposes. The Grand Lodge of Colon-Cuba was formally recognized. This seems rather late, as that Grand Lodge has been recognized among the sister jurisdictions of the world for a number of years. vVhile the business of the session was extended and varied, it received very careful consideration. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report covering 110 pages was submitted by Brother Simeon S. Johnson, chairman. Two years have elapsed since any report emanated from that Grand Lodge, the last one having been furnished by Brother Johnson in 1886. The Committee glanced at the proceedings of sixtyone Grand Lodges, domestic and foreign, and noted the transactions therein contained for two years each, consequently but little space could be employed in the work of the review of each Journal. The proceedings of our Grand I..Jodge for the past two years ,,,ere noticed on one page. The report is a very plain summary of the proceedings examined. Brother Johnson was continued as Committee on Correspondence; Brother Isaac P. Leyden, of New Albany, Grand Master, and Brother :Wm. H. Smythe, of Indianapolis, Grand Secretary.

INDIAN TERRITORY-1887. The 13th Annual Communication was held at Eufaula, commencing November 1, 1887. Brother F. H. Nash was Grand Master and Brother Jos. S. Murrow was Grand Secretary.


54

Appendix.

[Oct.

There are twenty-five lodges in the Territory with a membership of seven hundred and ninety-four. Twenty-one of the lodges were repre~ sented. The address of Grand Master Nash was brief and business-like, covering five pages. He rendered an account of his work which embraced a few decisions and some recommendations. The business transacted by the body was of a local character. The Grand Secretary presented a full report of matters pertaining to his office. An oration was delivered by the Grand Orator, Rev. A. F. Ross. He made strong points against gambling, intemperance, profanity and slander. TEMPERAKCE.

The following paper was presented, discussed and unanimously adopted by a rising vote: . WHEREAS, The laws of the United States prohibit the introduction of intoxicating liquors into the Indian Territory, and the several tribal nations have endorsed these laws by enacting similar ones; and whereas, the evil of intemperance is one of the greatest curses to our country and olle of the most prolific causes of dissensions among the Craft; and, . WHEREAS, Temperance is one of the cardinal virtues of Masonry; and we, as Masons, are pledged to uphold and support the laws of our country; therefore be it

Resolved, Whenever any Mason shall appcar in public in an intoxicated condition, the W. M:. of hig Lodge at thc next regular meeting, shall order the J. W. to prefer charges aga.inst the brother; and should any :Mason appear in lL Masonic hall, during labor, in an intoxicated condition, the W. 1\1. shall tcmporarily suspend such brother until the .T. "V,. sha.!l have prcferred charges, and the mattcr be passed upon by the Lodge; and be It further Resolved, That when any subordinate Lodge refuses to properly discipline its members for intemperance or other Ullmasonic conduct, it shall bc the duty of the M. W. G. M. to arrcst the charter of such Lodge, and report the facts to the Grand Lodge at its next meeting.

As the United States l)rohibit the presence of intoxicants in the Territory, and similar laws have been enacted by the Indian tribes, that country is supposed to be free from -the curse of the liquor tra.tfic. It would not seem necessary, therefore, to legislate against the sale of intoxicating liquors. But from the above it is apparent that intoxication exists in a land where liquor selling is not allowed. As the stuff will be smuggled into the country, and Masons will drink it to intoxication, punishment for drunkenness on the part of members of the Fraternity is just. The Grand Lodge strikes at the "crime of Intemperance" where it is


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found among the members of the Craft. The Territory may therefore, be classed with Missouri and other Jurisdictions, as arrayed against the curse of our Civilization. Still they come. The ranks are being increased yearly by accessions of Grand Lodges. The "Grand Army" is swelling its members and gathering forces, moral and numerical, for the great hattIe of the future. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of some fifty pages was rendered by the Grand Secretary, Brother l\f urrow. It is a mere synopsis, containing brief references to the Grand Lodge transactions under review. Missouri was conspicuous by its absence from the review. The Grand Master was re-elected. Rev. Bro. Joseph S. Murrow is still the Grand Secretary. His address is Oklahoma.

IOWA-1888. FORTY-FIFTH A:i\NUAL COMMUNICATION.

"Tith his usual promptness, Brother Parvin, Grand Secretary, sent out the Journal of the Forty-fi~h f3ession of the Grand Lodge. The Session opened in Cedar Rapids, June 5th, and continued three days. The business was quite extensive, running through one hundred and ninety-five pages of the .Journal. The printers did a handsome job for Brother Parvin; the .TournaI being in the highest styIe of art. His recapitulation shows four hundred and thirty lodges on the roster with a total membership of 21,572. There were four hundred and fiftyseven representatives present from three hundred and sixty-six lodges. The income was shown to be 818,711.85. The disbursements, including mileage, were :516,816.60. The Communication commenced its labors with Brother Edwin C路 Blackmar, Grand Master; Thea. S. Parvin, Grand Secretary; and N. R' Parvin, Deputy Grand Secretary. Twenty-three Grand Lodges ,yere represented, Missouri among the number.


56

Appenclix.

[Oct.

ADDRESS.

The Grand 'Master presented quite a lengthy address, covering twentytwo pages. It bristles with business items, and is a superior production. He said the year had been one of great activity so far as his office was concerned and involved a large amount of time and labor. GRA:~m' ;\JAI-iTER'S PREROGATIVES.

Under this head, Grand IVlaster Blackmar treated the subject of prerogatives at length. From his statement of the subject the follo'wing extracts are made: I had scarcely laid down t.he gavel at t.he close of the last Grand Lodge when I was approached and urgently requested to grant a special dispensation to confer degrees ont of tim,c. and on my ret.urn home similar requests poured in upon me by nearly every mail. Being unfamiliar with the law upon the subject, but knowing that many of my predecessors had exercised such supposed power, I took it for granted that the power existed, and I therefore exercised it myself in two or three cases; but the applications became so frequent that I tin ally felt it my duty to investigate the sUbject, and I therefore made an exhaustive research-embracing thc ancient cha.rges and general regulations of the Grand Lodge of England, the laws and decisions of nearly all our American Grand Lodges, and the laws, decisions, and annual proceedings of our own Grand Lodge -which resulted in the conviction that my powers were only such as were expressed by the provision c of our own laws, and that no emergency could possibly arise which would justify me in authorizing a deviation therefrom. Having thus satisfied myself that I had no power to set aside the operation of Section 25, Grand 1,odge By-Laws, which provides that a full lunar month must. clapse between degrees, I communicated my decision to all the lodges in the jurisdiction by a circular-letter under date of August 27th. After the issue of said circular I continued my investigation, and ga.ined snch further information as to greatly strengthen and fortify me in the conclusions arrived at. In a few of our American jurisdictions the law is similar to ours in limiting the time between degrees, but the most of these have re!,TUlations forbidding the Grand Master to set aside the operation of the law by dispensation. In many other Grand Jurisdictions ildhe United States the dispensing power is given to the Grand Master by positive provisions oflaw. In some of our American Grand Jurisdictions it is held that those ancient general regulations are still in force; not so, however, in Iowa l for in 1860 our Grand Lodge declared by a vote of two hundred and nine to seventy-sIx, on a call of lodges, "that the "thirtY-lIine articles of general regulations, never having been adopted by this Grand "Lodge, are not, and at no time have been, in force in this jurisdiction."

The Committee on Address approved the above, saying: "We arc ,'Tlad to note that in treating the matter of special degree Conferment, the Grand :;\faster'has erected a legal bulwark which we sincerely hope by adoption may prove to be impregnable in the future." PHYSICAL

QUALIFICATIO~S.

The Grand Master stated that a large number of inquiries had been made respecting physical qualifications and conditions, asking for dispensations to receive petitions or confer degrees on men with but one arm or one leg. Of course the Grand Master could grant no such privileges, because it would have been a violation of the well settled principles of law. The Committee on the Grand Master's address said that he eould neither


1888.J

Appendh.. ~.

57

perform miracles upon maimed persons nor control any sort of an artificiallimb factory. They, therefore, approved his ruling. "LOTTEHY SCHE~lES."

Grand Master Blackmar was advised, during his term, that a Lodge in Maryland has sent to Lodges in Iowa, a circular concerning a lottery scheme, with tickets, asking that the same be sold and proceeds remitted. The Grand Master said: Deeming this to be an act wholly unwarranted, and contrary to every principle of true Masonic ethics, and not believing that it had the sanction or approval of the Grand Master of Maryland, I immediately addressed it courteous letter to that most worshipful brother. stating the case and asking if it had his approval. In due time I received his reply, which is worth reading by every Iowa Mason.

To his letter the Grand Master of l\faryland replied: "I need hardly a,c;sure you that I was entirely ignorant of the application to other "jnrisdictions and of the questionable methorl resorted to for raising money, even within "our own borders. When applied to for permission to hold a fair, my consent was given "to that onl!!, and any application to outside jurisdictions was expressly inhibited. The "scheme of a lottery I first learned of through your letter. "Be assured th'lIt tlJe lottery fentnre receives quite as severe reprobnt.ioll from all good "Masons in Maryland as in Iowa, and that any and all sums contributed ill response to "the circular shall be returned as soon as an account thereof can be ascertained."

The Committee on the address of Brother Blackmar said on the subject: The admirable treatment of this question by our chief executive, tog-ether with the positive sta.nd taken by the Grand Master of .Maryland, calls forth special mention at this time, and should be imitated by all socia.l, moml, and religions institutions in an effort, uniformly exerted, to put down 1.h is growing and blighting evi I.

It is eause fOl; surprise, and almost condemnation, that the ::VIaryland Lodge should have becn "sat upon" so summarily, for wanting to do a little lottery business by way of increasing its funds. "Then it is remembered that one of the Grand Lodges in this country has a large interest in a "Lottery Scheme" authorized by the laws of the 8tate, why should one weak lodge in the State of Ma.ryland be squelched for running a Lottery attachment in connection with a "Fair." It is fair to presume that the "Laws of the land" a.llowed such scl{eme.

Now is the time for the apologists of certain things forbidden by some of the Grand Lodges to get in their work. One of these tender, loving friends of evils he prefers to the honor of Masonry says that "No act can be made a Masonic crime unless such act is made a crime or misdemeanor by the laws of the State." As said writer was defending the saloon in the above quotation, it is fair to assume he will rush to the defense of the :i\1aryland Lodge, as running such a "Lottery Scheme" was not contrary


58

Appendix.

[Oct.

to the laws of Maryland. The Grand Master put his objection on Moral grounds, and condemned the act of the Lodge in sending out such circular. If the State of Maryland does not condemn, by its laws, the said "Lottery Scheme" of the Lodge, wherein is the harm? According to two of our illustrous writers on Correspondence nothing is wrong or "a Masonic crime" unless the State prohibits it. Therefore 'we must look to the State for our standard of morals and not to the teachings of Masonry. It is time that the t,vo distiuguished defenders of what is protected by the State, rise up and rebuke Iowa and Maryland for their puritanic interference with human rights. The laws of the State of Maryland did not make "a crime or Misdemeanor" of the little "scheme" or "raffie" proposed. But the Grand Master of Maryland said it received a severe reprobation from all good Masons in that Jurisdiction. And the Grand Lodge of Iowa characterized it as "a growing and blighting eviL" Now let the friends of "personal liberty" rise up and smite Iowa and Maryland "Hip and thigh." They have interferred with the rights of the citizen under the "laws of the State" and pronounced their little "Scheme" a "blighting evi1." The "Ajax" of the saloon interest must characterize the transactions of Iowa and Maryland as he did the comments of this writer concerning the temperance issue of Missouri Masonry. Quoting from my reports of the position taken by Missouri, the apologist of the saloon fraternity said: "These extracts show ahout as mueh intemperanee in language as is exhibited in drinking, by a confirmed inebriate." I profess some familiarity with "language," and am sOlne\vhat particlilar in my seledion of the most expressive terms. Being wholly unfamiliar with the character described by the critic of my "language," I must defer to his superior knowledge of those whose habits have made them "confirmed inebriates." I prefer my "language" to his familiar illutitration and comparison. But he must not forget to defend the "Lottery Scheme" because some of the States do not make it "a crime or mi8demeanor." T think that the author of "a Fundamental proposition" declaring nothing IVTa.'ionically wrong, "unless such act is made a crime or misdemeanor by the laws of the State," will make poor headway in convincing the Masons of Iowa that his doctrine is worthy of their acceptance. He will find it equally difficult to convince Masons generally, outside his own jurisdiction, that the State must erect and furnish the standard for Masonic government. Masonry in this country has not yet become so lost to bel' higb mission as to be led by "blind leaders." She abhors the inevitable "ditch" into 路which sueh leader8 would plunge her. Iowa, like Missouri, will condemn gambling by her Lodges, even though such acts be not made "a, erime or misdemeanor by the laws of the State."


lS88.]

Appendi;c.

59

SPECIAL DISPENSATIONS.

The Grand ::\'1aster said he had granted two or three special dispensations to confer degrees out of time, having supposed that he had that power; but becoming convinced that he had no such right, he begged the pardon of the Grand Lodge for his mistake. It is thus seen, from his statement of the case, and from the action of the Grand Lodge already noticed, t11at the 11igh and swelling pretensions of "King Prerogative" in Iowa have gone glimmering in the distance. So may it be everywhere. LODGE HETURNS.

The law in Iowa requires that the returns and dues from Lodges shall be forwarded to the Grand Secretary within the month of January, and that no Lodge shall be entitled to a representative in the Grand Lodge unless this la\~T is complied. with. The Grand Master said this law had become, in a measure, a dead letter. Last year's report shows more than fifty Lodges in disobedience. Bro. Blackmar determiped to correct the evil. He adopted vigorous measures to this end, and the result seems to have been a surprise generally. For the first time in a quarter of a century reports had been made and dues paid by every Lodge in that Grand Jurisdiction. This is a \~onderful success to be achieved in one year, and is further testimony of the ability and efficiency of the Grand Master. THE CO:\DITION OF THE LODGK'i.

Early in tbeterm the Grand Master resolved to undertake an investigation of the financial, moral and social condition of all the Lodges. This required time'and labor, but he pushed his investigation in such a way as to conclude that such efforts would place Iowa Masonry on a higher plane and secure many needed reforms. NEW LODGES.

During his term the Grand Master authorized the formation of seven new Lodges under dispensation. From his statement of the subject the following extract is made: It is a matter of record that for the past eight or ten years the rapid increase of our Lodges has been so largely in excess Of, the increase of population as to giv~ us a large number of very weak and non-progressIve Lodges. Year by year our commIttees have admonished us to call a halt and to adopt measures to aid and strengthen those already established, rather than diminish their territory and deplete their membership by the creation of others. Having these facts in view when I assumed the duties of this office, and being familiar with the action of the Grand Lodge upon the subject, 1 c1etermined that I would not authorize the formation of any new Lodges until nofter a thorough investigation and inquiry as to the necessities existing therefor, and the probable effects that would result in each case.


60

Appendix.

[Oct.

His purpose was effectually accomplished, and the best results followed. Treating of Lodges under dispensation, the Grand Master called attention to the fact that the custom had existed, for how long he did not know, of requiring Lodges under dispensation to pay Grand Lodge dues, and to allow mileage and per diem to one delegate, or representative, each U. D. Lodge. In .Missouri, Lodges under dispensation are not allowed a representative in the Grand Lodge, nor do we charge Grand Lodge dues until charters are granted. WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' HO~fE.

The Grand Master called attention to the above subject in the following terms: For the purpose of keeping the matter before the Grand Lodge. and in the hope that the eonst.ant agitation of the subject will at an early date culminate in the inauguration of a plan for the establishment of a home for the widows and orphans of our deceased brethren, 1 take this occasion to refer to and endorse the sentiments in regard thereto expressed by M. W. William P. Allen, in his address last year, as also the report. of the committee thereon, and I now recommend the appointment of a special committee, with instructions to report a plan to provide the ways and means necessary to build. equip and maintain such a home us would meet our requirements and be ereditaable to our Grand Lodge.

The Com.mittee on the above said: Having had occasion to review this topic as presented ill the Grand Master's address, we have only to say in this connection that if the Grand Lodge sees fit to adopt our suggestions, the idol of Iowa Masonry will shortly be found in her care for the widows and orphans of our deceased brethren, thus practically living and exemplifying the life she professes. CONCLUSION.

From the eonclusion of the address the following

is taken:

It is now for you to pronounce judgment upon my official acts, and I can only hope that you will judge with candor, and at least gIve me credit for having acted conscientiously in all things, and with a fixed. purpose of promoting the highest measure of prosperity to the craft., and a desire to protect and maintain the integrity and best interests of the Grand Lodge. Such a desire, at least, has been nearest my heart, and the in:,piration of every act, and while I ma.y have committed many errors, let me assure you it has resulted from an error of jndgment, and not from a willful intention to deviate from the right. \

'rhe trallsaetions of my office for the year have involved an extra amoullt of labor, for, in addition to the large correspoi1dence, embracing over 2,000 letters written and received, I have taken an active part in the preparation of the new code, which, however, has becn a ,rery pleasant labor, and if it has contributed in the least to t.he results which we hope to attain by the cnaetment of more adequate laws, my reward will be ample in the knowledge of that fact..

The Committee on address said of it: As a whole we endorse the document, in its parts we commend it, and in its detail we tind a forceful presentation of ideas intensified throngh the administrative experiences pertaining to the Grand East so Masonically pertillellt and engrossing that our review rather the more gives prominence than criticises.


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The Grand Lodge of Iowa has been singularly fortunate in the selection of wise and able Grand Masters. To the names of Gilbert, Van Saun, Granger and Allen may be added that of the vigorous, efficient and clear-headed Blackmar. It is a pleasure to knO\'" and a joy to honor such brethren. The address of Grand Master Blackmar was followed by an. appendix, which contained an analysis of the reports made to him by the Masters and Secretaries of the Lodges in response to the circular sent to them. This was done with a view to elevate and strengthen the Lodges in their financial, moral and social conditions. The paper shows with what interest the Grand Master had watched over the Craft in his Jurisdiction and labored for the general welfare of the Order. WORK.

Most 路Worshipful Brother George B. Van Saun, Secretary of the Board of Custodians, presented a report pf the operations of said Board for the year. From it a few extracts may be made and read with profit: For myself, I can report l1 busy year, and, in many respects, a very satisfactory work done. I have received sixty-three invitations, of which I have supplied forty-eight, leaving fifteen unfilled - for t.he reason that they were countermanded on account of the time not being acceptable, or for other satisfactory reasons; and a few were abandoned because of snow blockades and the missing of railroad connections. Over eight months of my time has been given to this labor: holding schools, visiting Lodges, issuing nearly or quite one thousand circulars and postals, and writing over our hundred letters. The schools held have occupied from two to tll1'ce days each, with a total of two hundred and forty-one sessions, and with an attendance of nearly twenty-five hundred of the Craft.

He further said: This work should not be done at the option of the Lodges, but by the will and pleasure of the Grand Lodge itself, and the work paid for from the general funds, for the good reason that many of the Lodges needing instruction the most would be the last to ask it, and for reasons well known by them. Light is needed and wanted by the Lodges, so we say, "l,et there be light;" and we firmly believe the Grand Lodge will say, "You shall receive it," and further, "There is light."

And the Missouri Committee '''ould add, that as the Lodges pay their dues to keep up.the Grand Lodge, the parent body should feel bound to furnish the needed" light." If it does not meet this obligation, it is not true to its own children. When Grand Master of this Jurisdiction, more than twenty years ago, I pressed upon the Grand Lodge of Missouri /similar views, holding that those who paid for music should share the pleasures of the dance. The Grand Lodge cannot neglect its subordinates in this matter \vithout detriment to its own interests.


62

Appendi;r.

[Oct.

BIOGRAPHY.

Brother Parvin presented a report of seven pages, giving biographical sketches of many whom the gleaner, Death, had gathered from the ranks of the Fraternhy during the year. It is a most interesting paper. ImpoRT OF GRAND SECRETARY.

Brother Parvin furnished a complete transcript of business. His report covered everything. This tells the story. Brother Parvin would make a first-class Secretary of State under the National Administration. His report on their library is, like all other documents, full and complete. That institution is the pride of r owa Masons. "'VeIl may they feel proud of it. The business of the session was quite extended and varied. Everything bears the marks of deliberation, and shows the presence of exacting care and critical examination. ",Vith the presence of such men as Granger and others, IO'wa Masonry is safe. A new code was duly considered and adopted. The constitution bears the legal impress of the best minds in Iowa. A NICE

PRESE~'l'.

The following speaks for itself: Immediately upon the amlOuncement of the result of the ballot for Grand Secretary, Brother Clark Varninn, of Newton Lodge, No. 59, came to the side of the Grand Secretary, on the dais in the East" bearing in his hand lL certificate of deposit for $1,530, and said: There are occasions when the thoughts which swell in one's heart make him wish that the mantle of Cicero had fallen upon his shoulders, and that he was .!!'iftcd with the silvery tongue of an Ingersoll. Such an occasion has how arisen, ann, although wholly inadequate to discharge the dnty imposed upon me at your hands, I will endeaYor, in snch weak words as I may be able to command, to perform a service which makes me proud indeed. A trifle over fifty years ago, a young man possessed of a liberal education was initiated into the mysteries of Masonry. He entered heart and soul into the spirit. of its moral teachings. So interested grew he in his labors in the advancement of :3Ia.~onry; and so imbued did he become in the study of its jurisprudence and in the developnientof its almost unwritten literature, that he eventually resigned all other (some of them worthy and lucrative) position~Jor the purpose of devoting his entire life to the advancement and improvement of the Craft.. For forty-four years he has served the Grand Lodge of Iowa ill its most difficult and laborious ollice. He has been the assistant, advisor, and help of every Grand Master whom this Gmnd Lodge has ever known. Under his skillfulmanagement of details anll careful watchfulness, this Grand Loc1~e has attained its present gigantic proportions, until it now i'ltands the peer of any Grann Lodge of }lasons. Almost exclusively through his ef'1'orts lLnd the enthusiasm which he thereby aroused, engendered and fostered, the largest. Masonic library in the "'orld has been collected by this Grand Lodge, paid for by it, and is now safely deposited in a beautiful and commodious edifice erected exclusively for that purpose, and located on yonder hill in this beaut.iful eity. The collection, building up and preservation of that library is a work, which of itself alone, is sufficient to send the name of its principal originator down through all Masonic history. But this Mason of whom I speak has done more than this. As a :3Iasonic lilteratcw', as a Masonic jurist, and as II writer of reports on correspondence, in short, in ~he whole literary and Masonic world, his llllme is recognized as being one amollg the foremost..


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The fifty years of labor of :Masonie work, which this brother has passed through has no,v fully expired, and to him the Masonic" year of jubilee" has come. We cannot to him, as in olden times, remit t.he debt he owes us, because we are not his creditors. We are his debtors, each and all of us, for his energ-y. ability, constancy and fidelity. This good brother, while devoting his life to these lahars, has done so at an expense of his own physical comfort and financial condition, and he now, in his old age, remains pecuniarily poor - rich only in the honor lLnd esteem which the Masonic world owes to him. Knowing- these facts, and also being moved with a desire to, in a feeble way, express their appreciation of his efforts, and at the same time assist this brother to a little ready money, all the living Grand ~iasters of this Grand Lodge united in an effort to raise for him a sum to be denominated the "Parvin Jubilee Fund," to which each ~fason in the state who felt so inclined might contrihute his mite. This was done without the knowledge or consent of the intended beneficiary, but it was a success, and this certificate of money deposited in bank which I hold in my hand presents the free, voluntary contribution of each and all of you, together with many of the members of your lodges. While the amount is not great, and was not intended so to be, being designed as a testimonial of regard rather than it financial tribute, it is the voluntary gift of those contributing, without solicitation or request.. Your Grand Masters who sit here on this dais having requested me to act as their prolocutor in tendering this public acknowlcdgment of a grateful Masonic people to a. beloved brother, 1 now present this fund to him, and ask him, in your name and in the name of the 22,000 Masons of IOl,va, to receive it at their hands as a certificate of their esteem. But, you say, who is this Mason of whom you speak? Brethren, there is but one. His name you all know. I now present him and prononnce his name. It is a name which will go down through 'Masonic history. It is the Ilame of Theodore Sutton Parvin.

Brother Parvin deflerves well of the Fraternity hi Iowa. He has done a great work for the Craft in that Jurisdiction. ,\Thile he is Parvin, and can not be anybody else, he is as tru(~ to Masonry as any man in the wide world, and labors with tireless zeal to promote its interests, guard its honor and advance its principles. Faultless he is not, and nOlle know it better than himself, but none can charge him with infidelity to his trusts. His record will be his best and just mOllument. A::\' EPISODE.

During the session of the Grand Lodge the follO\ving occurred: On 'Vednesday evening, during the session. the Grand and Deputy Grand Secretary opened the library J.milding, lighted from basement to attic, for the reception of the members of the Grand Lodge and their wives accompanying them, the l\la.'3ons and citizens, ladies and gentlemen, to a wekome and entertainment provided by the ladies of the Cedar Rapids Literary Club and their lady friends of the city. During the evening the" Em See Club," of the city, were introduced by the Grand Secretary, when they favored the audience with several SOllg:> very happily rendered. l\fiss Bessie Barter being introduced, recited the piece entitled, "The Naughty Girl of the Hotel," greatly to the amusement of the audience. The" High School Cadets," in full uniform, went throngh the manual and drill of the corps, in which they displayed great proficiency. The ladies served strawberries and ice-cream, and all went home happy, refreshed in their physical as well as in their intellectual manhood. FRATER1\' AL COHRESPONDENCE.

A review of fifty Grand Lodge proceedings by Brother Parvin, covering 185 pages, opens thus:


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It will be seen from the dates given that three full months have elarsed ~ince the last, even of the five held its annual communication -time enough, in al conscience,to get out a volume of from one-half to OIle-seventh t.he size of ours, issued every year within the mont.h. In the West the days of the old stage-Gorrch have long since glven place to the steam-car. It is high time the "slow coaches" of Grand Secretaries learned to keep puce with the progress of the age, or make room for those who will.

We will not do as many of our trother reporters do, put" dilatory proceedings" at the" foot of the dockct." We propose, rather, to give Ollr space to t.hose '''ho deserve it by the timely publication of their proceedings. We have thi8 ?lear, in deference to the good opinions of some of the {luild, borrowed a pair of scissors, and, wit.h the majority, done some clipping, both in compliment to the writers and for the edification of our home readers. While the preparation of this report haB involYed a great deal of labor, and consumed much valuable timc, it. has nevertheless been largely a work of love, as well as of dut)', and we trust our readers may imbibe herefrom some of the interest it has afforded us.

But for a wholesome fear of being found among the" slow coaches of Grand Secretaries," and liable to the lash in the hands of the go-ahead Parvin, I '"ould say, " Lay on, Macduff!" Some Grand Secretaries seem to enjoy their tardiness: How these belated ones retain their positions is a mystery. If this office was run on the same" slow coach" plan as some hereabouts, I would be bounced by the Craft forthwith, or sooner, if possible. It is impossible to review the very strong and pertinent report of Bro. Parvin without writing a book. He is vigorous, inci~ive and fearless. More need not be said.

The Missouri Journal of 1887 received an extended notice, kind and fraternal. He said there was much of interest in the address of Grand Master Hunt, but centered all his interest in the report on "Fraternal Correspondence," and noticed nothing else in our proceedings. Therein was his mistake. And just here this Committee wants to say two things:

be

First: Thanks are due from me to Bro. Parvin for the name has given our reports, "Fraternal," instead of "Foreign Correspondence." For years I protested in feeling against the term" Foreign," as applied to tIle review of American Grand Lodges. Finally I abandoned the use of "Foreign" wherever possible, and simply wrote" Correspondence."

"FRATERNAL CORRESPONDENCE" will be the term hereafter employed, unless, Bro. Parvin shall, by " injunction," interdict the use of the title. Second: I ha.ve been Committee on Correspondence for ten years, and have prepared ten reports. Following the example of the" Fathers," "from the rising of the sun to the going down of the same," I uniformly employed the plU1'al form, and wrote" We" as conspicuously as if the Committee had been composed of a dozen Solons. I never liked it, and


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felt all the time a. sense of stultification. \Vriting for myself, and largely on my own respom;ibility, I am no longer" 'VE." There is only one of us, and that is me, myself. I would rather he impersona.l than be a big "'Ve" of the singular number. Personality is not dependent upon plurality. From Bro. Parvin's very c;ourteous notice of the Missouri Report this extract is taken concerning our Lodge in Mexico: He devotes two pages to the consideratioll of the creation of Toltec Lodge, in' the City of J\Iexico, hy the Grand Lodge oOiissouri. Wc and others have complained that that was an invasion of that jurisdiction. He excuses the act of this Grand Lodâ&#x201A;Ź;'e by stating that it was not known at that time that there was a Grand Lodge of any kind 111 existence at thc Capital. There was, and has been for many years past, a Grand Orient in Mexico, as in all the South Americall states, and it is well-known that these Grand Orients have ahl'ays claimed and exercised in all the Latin states jurisdiction over the three symbolic degrees. It is only within a few years past, with the consent and approbation. if not by the direction of, these Grand Orients, that Grand Lodges after the American plan have been established in Cuba, Peru, and later in l\'Jexico. There being such a Grand Lod~e in Mexico at this date, it is the duty of the Grand Lod~e of Missouri to transfer the jUrJsdiction of its suhordinate to the Grand Lodge of Mexlco. Moreover, it is a very unsafe pr!lctice, and a n~r~' unwise thing for an American Grand Lodge to invade the jurisdiction of even a Grand Orient in a neighboring republic or a European monarch~" The inevitable result of the continuence of this practice would be to compel such Grand Orients. under the lex f.alinni8, to establish lodges of the three degrees among their own people in many of the jurisdictions of this country. It is well known that they once did this, both in ~e\l' York and New Orleans; wherefore we say, hands off!

Missouri was aware, when she created Toltec Lodge in the City of Mexico, that some kind of a Grand Body existed there. Buta.'S such Body ,vas not working what is called the "York Rite," our Toltec Lodge was recommended by the exislin,q Rite, and welcomed among them with heartiness. Our Grand Lodge believed that the field was open and that we were welcome. The creation of ToHec Lodge being recommended by the "Rite then and there existing, Missouri planted the "York Rite" Lodge in the Capitol of ::\Iexico, to work in English, for the benefit of American and other English speaking Masons. The formation of the Grand Lodge in the Federal District clearly places a.ll Lodges in that jurisdiction under its control. l\'[issouri will not hesitate to transfer Toltec Lodge to Mexico Grand Lodge when arrangements are perfected. . In commenting upon the position of Missouri on the "Crime of Intemperance" and drunkard making, Bro. Parvin said "Missouri and Bro. Vi neil have our sympathy and co-operation in their crusade against the Criminals guilty of the Commission of this crime." There is no mincing of words in the above sentence. "A spade is a spade" with Bro. Parvin. He, like Bro. Brown of Kansas, is always found where we look for himon the right side of an important question. But his charactE'yizations above of "criminals guilt?! of the commission of this crime" will cause the Grand Master of Louisiana and his co-worker, the Committee on Correspondence, to train their guns on him at long range. Bro. Parvin may G. L. Ap.-5.


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turn his ear Southward and listen for the fire-cracker fusilade from the two heroic champions of the "crime of intemperance" and defenders of the saloon in Masonry. They must repel the charge of Bro. Parvin, made against "the criminals guilty of the com'In'ission of this crime," because the conduct of such is not "made a crime or misdemeanor by the la~~',~ of the State."

Bro. Parvin asked for an explanation why Iowa was placed at the foot of the docket, or under "Addenda." Simply because your Proceeriings were not re~eived in time to be reviewed in alphabpticr.d order. M.y repo~t was nearly finished, forms were made up and all printed before the Iowa Journal came to hand. To put my notice down among the "V's would have been worse than at the foot of the docket. This year Iowa is on time and in the proper place. . I can notice only one more part of Bro. Parvin's able and critical review. In reply to Bro. Cunningham of Ohio, Bro. Parvin says: The difference between Brother Cunningham and ourself, which is both great alJd broad, consists in this: He does not read up and keep abreast with the times' he has read and swears by Anderson, Hutchinson, l'rest.Qn, Oliver, Webb, :Maekey, and others of the old-time writers. He even believes all the mvths and old woman's tales that have been twice and more told touching the history of Freemasonry. If he would cast these antiquated works, authors, and ideas aside, and read the "new lights," as he calls them, of :Masonry, such as Findel, Hughan, Lane, Gould, Pike, and other modern investigators and historians, he and I might walk together in the same path. There has never been a volume published on Masonry, or any other subject, so full of nonsense and untruth touching the history of Freemasonry as is to be found in the history of:Masonry published by introductory to Anderson's Ancient Constitutions, and until within the last quarter of acentnry these lies have been repeated oftimes, even down to the period of Mackey. Nor can a greater bundle of nonsense be found in print than that published bv Mackey under the title of "Ancient LlLndmarks"-almost wholly the fabrications of l-iis fertile brain, and without the shadow of any authority on which to support t.hem other than his own ip.se di.'Cit. It is quite true that in our earlier days and ignorance we believed, as we were then taught, that, as Brother Cunningham asserts, "Romulus and Remus, his brother, the founders of Rome, were nursed by a she wolf," and knew no better till the Gerlllltn historian, Niebuhr, proved it to be a myth. We also, in our childhood, believed that "Willillln Tell shot an apple off his son's head," as Brother Cunningham still believes; and furthermore, we swallowed the whole of "'''eem's Washington," and, of course, believed the story concerning "the apple tree and the hatChet," and that George Washington was the only boy, unless we except Brother Cunningham, who never told a lie,

'Tis true, BrotherCullllingham, that when you want us to believe that King Solomon was a Freemason, or even the Queen of Sheba, or anyone of his one hundred wi ves, or that Freemasonry originated at the building oft.he first temple, we do require such statements to be substantiated by documentary evidence beyond allYthing we have found in Anderson, Webb, Mackey, oreven the Reports on Correspondence of the Grand Lodge of Ohio. Nay, more; when you want us to believe in the twenty-five articles, or more properly, bundle of errors, fi1"8t 1mblV31wd and promulgated to the world by Dr. :'Ifaekey (1874) in his Encyclopedia of Freemasonry as ancient Landmarks you must substantiate your beliefs by better documentary than any you have ever yet produced in your own reports from the fertile imagination of your own brain or extracted from the reports of Bro. Vaux and others."

The foregoing smacks of an Iconoclasm much feared by "the Fathers." I have been swearing by "the Fathers" for thirty years. The ,,yonder with me now is, which to wonder at the most, the puerilities taught as Masonry, or the blind avidity with which they have been swallowed.


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Bro. Cunningham charged Bro. Parvin with being a a Progres.~ionist," and enumerated ten points or counts in the indictment. None of them hold except the ninth which reads: "The long-continued effort to eliminate the official grade of a Past Master, as taught by Thomas Smith Webb and predecessors, from the Masonic system."

It occurs to me that if Bro. Cunningham wanted to dOLGn an adversary he selected a very poor cudgel witb which to smite him. Sampson used the Jawbone of an Ass and caused the Philistines to scamper. Our Ohio Brother will never "put to flight the aliens" with his little wisp of straw.

Indeed Bro. Parvin makes fun of the Ohio champion of a degree that does not and cannot belong to the symbolical department of 31asonry. How such an able and accomplished writer as Bro. Cunningham can attach any reality to the degree of Past Master in a Blue Lodge, and endow it with an aOF~'ICIAL grade" is beyond my comprehension. Can anything aOFFICIAL" belong to, or inhere in, a mere title? The Chapter does not invest it witb any such aOFFICIAL" dignity. As it belongs to the Chapter and not to tbe Lodge, wby should ~,t be endowed with aOFFICIAL griJ,de" where it bas no business? Again, quoting from the peerless Gurney of Illinois, I would say "Kick the abnormity out." Bro. Parvin, whether a aProgressionist" or not, on this subject, is a good "Kicker" and Bro. Cunningham will think so before he is done with him. Bro. Parvin pleads to the ninth count thus: We plead guilty to having- made persistent efforts in this dircction, and are greatlv rejoiced to know that such efiarts are being crowned with success in most qrand Jurisdictions, excepting, of course, thc benighted region of Ohio. And yet with all this, neither we nor our associates are deserving the rank of pr0lp'essionists. We are only striving to get back to the "good old way~," and "kick out,' as Brother Gurney once said, the innorations of Brother Webb, and his successors, in their un-.J\Iasonic efforts to engraft on the Masonic system a fourth degree, a bundle of errors aud nonsense.

The "fourth degree" nonsense in a symbolical Lodge is sufficient in itsselfto make glaring the fallacy of the Past 'Master's degree as an aOFFICIAL grade."

The Progressionist" Bro. Parvin, is charged by Bro. Cunningham with, "The persistent effort to legislate away rights and landmarks." To which charge Bro. Parvin replies in words as follows: 'We are quite as persistent in our effort to uphold all j\l~t rights and legitimate la.ndmarks as is Brother Cunningham. But we cannot and will not permit him to dict.ate to us what are the landmarks of Freemasonry, and then forbid us to remove them. When Brother Cunningham shall have furnished us with a catalogue of the landmarks in any authoriJ.ative work we will be ready to conform thereto. But since no two writers of the presellt day have or can agree as to what they are, wc have just as good a right to declare one of Brother Cunning-ham's supposed landmarks to bc illegitimate as he has to proclaim its legitimacy and validity.

But I cannot follow the review of Bro. Parvin further. To do his Heport justice requires more space than is allowed to anyone Jurisdiction.


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May he long be spared to stand for the right and deal solid blows upon error and sin. The Grand Master 'was re-elected and resides at Burlington. Bro. Parvin is still at his post in Cedar Rapids, as Grand Secretary.

KANSAS,

1887.

The Grand Lodge of Kansas began the labors of its thirty-second Annual Communication in Junction City, February 15, 1888, and closed the following day. The Journal of proceedings came to hand in good time, containing about five hundred pages. It is as clean and fresh in appearance as the dew-bathed flowers of Ka.nsas prairies, and bears the impress of the Grand Secretary as to taste and arrangement. The number of working Lodges in the Jurisdiction of Kansas is 305, with a membership of 15,798. There is evident prosperity in that Grand Lodge, from the increase of membcrship-1,160 - and from the number of new Lodges created. The report shows an income of $7,656.50. There were sixty-five Lodges delinquent when the report was closed' l The Grand Lodge opened with Most "Worshipful Brother Henry C. Cook, Grand Master, present and presiding, and Brother John H. Brown, Grand Secretary. The attendance was large. ADDRESS.

An address of fifteen pages was presented by the Grand Master. There was no floral display, but a plain prese~ltation of business matters. He reported that their fraternal relations with the Grand Lodges of the country ,vere of a satisfactory character. Mention was made of the trouble in the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. He approved the action of said Grand Lodge in respect to Hiranl Lodge, No.1, and recommended a reference of the subject to the Committee on Correspondence. The M.asonic Congress held in Chicago last summer received his approval. Dispensations had been granted for the formation of eighteen new Lodges. Permission had been given to confer degrees out of the regular time in more than twenty instances, and "still he was not happy," for he said, "These are but a tithe of the applications made."


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He presented six decisions, which are of local application, and are in keeping with the general jurisprudence of Masonry. Numerous other matters were mentioned, but, being of local import, need not be noticed. The report.'3 of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary show a solid financial condition, as they have $11,000 in the Treasury. The General and Fiscal Report made by the Grand Secretary, Brother John H. Brown, was in keeping with his previous productions, a first-class business paper. The usual run of Grand Lodge business was handled with facility and good judgment. VISITORS.

Brother Edwin D. Hillyer, a former Grand Master of Kansas, and for some time past a resident of Sweden, was welcomed home right royally by his brethren of the Grand Lodge. CONNECTICUT.

Most 'Worshipful Brother O,,,-en A. Bassett, Grand Representative of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut at the Grand Lodge of Kansas, presented a lengthy paper concerning Hiram Lodge, No. 1. He furnished a full and complete statement of the origin of the difterences which led to the defection of Hiram Lodge, No. 1. Said paper was referred to the Committee on Correspondence, Brother John H. Brown. This Committee subsequently reported on the case, justifying the action of the Grand Lodge of Connecticut; also forbidding Kansas Lodges or Masons recognizing the members of Hiram Lodge, No.1, until such time as they shall return 路to their allegiance to the mother Grand Lodge. ORA'fION.

Rev. Bro. Barry, Grand Orator, delivered an oration covering five pages of the Journal. He treated Masonry as to its antiquity, extent, comprehensiveness and utility. He certainly believes in the antiquity of l\1asonry, as the following will show: Masons are well informed from their own private and interior records that the

~~\~~i~r~~eT;~r~on's Temple is an important era, from whenee they derive many mys-

Yon will remember that this great event took place more than a thousand years before the Christian era, and consequently more than a century before I-Io.mH, the first of the Grecian poets, wrote; more than five centuries before PYTHAGORAS brought from the East his sublime system of truly jlfasonic instructions to illuminate the Western world. But we date thtl commencement of our art from a remoter period. We acknowledge our debt of gratitude to the ,vise and glorious King of Israel for many of our mystic forms and hieroglyphic ceremonies.


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Having endowed the institution with such antiquity, he concluded that the institution must be very extensive; consequently he said, "An institution of such remote antiquity may reasonably be supposed to be of boundless extent." The term "boundless" indicates to this writer something beyond measurement or of unknown limitations. In the study of Geography in my boyhood days, I learned, from the books, the estimated size of our globe, and was taught to believe that it was 25,000 miles in circumference. That would not be considered a boundless globe, but would create the impression that it had been measured or might be. If measured and limits given to it, the globe is not "boundless." That it is not so, is evidenced by the fact that it has been circumnavigated. I have known several persons who have traveled around it. All the Masonry that I know anything about belongs to this world and cannot be of of "boundless extent" as claimed by the Reverend Orator. IfFreemasonry is "boundless in extent," it must belong to some world not yet bounded. Perhaps its extent, like its antiquity, is of some pre-adamite planet and origin. It is the opinion of this Committee, that the Orator was too liberal in the use of large words. All this ado about antiquity and boundlessness, is little better than bosh. The J om'nal under consideration, contains a list of the membership of Kansas Masons by lodges. This necessarily largely increases the size of the Journal. CORRESPONDElS'CE.

A Review amounting to one hundred and eighty-five pages, was prepared and submitted by Brother John H. Brown, Qommittee on Foreign Correspondence. The work of the Committee was well done. Brother Brown says that it was intended for those who desire Masonic information, and who wish to have it placed within their reach. Surely such a compend of information as Brother Brown furnishes, may well meet the wants of those who desire to learn, and wish more information through this important channel. His views of the Grand Lodge proceedings were ample and complete, some ofthe111 being quite extensive. Brother Bro\\!n is a manly man. He is firm, courteous, candid and independent. I like his style, especially when he tackles some one or something that gets in his way. His trumpet never gives an uncertain sound. "T e always know where to find him. The Janus-faced man is as despicable as he is unreliable. I know such men and esteem them as they deserve; and Bro. John Brown can size up that class of "every body's" man as readily as any person in the world. Treating of the unnecessary increase of Lodges, Brothel' Brown uttered,

""T ords of truth and soberness." He said:


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It is not the sole and special work of Grand Lodges to aid in founding local lodges. On t.he contrary, it h; their imperative duty to forbid the planting of a lodge, where there is a sparse population, extreme hostility to the Im;titution with but few defenders, and those feeble or lacking the manly courage to defend the truth, nor for the mere convenience of a knot of brethren whether affiliated or not members of lodges. Lodges should only be created where there is a working- force respectable in numbers and ?tfasonic charact.er, alld to this condition should be closely annexed, where there is great probability of steady growth and where the petitioners will prove their fait.h in the promises of the路 future by building and equipping a hall suitable for :Masonie work.

The plea of personal convellienee as inducement for the opening of a new lodge is the poorest reason that call be given for permission soto do. When will men, andl\fasons in particular, learn that no great attainment can be made in the mental or moral world without great labor, and often not without extreme fatigue of mind and body. When will they learn that social pleasures to be keenly enjoye3 and f8r-reaching in their influence, can only be secured by some sacrifice of personal quiet? .Just when they learn to banish from consideration all mere personal gains, all that selfishness which abases man, degrades a l\fason and disgraces the Institution; and in the Mason's particular case, whEm he masters the tenets and doctrines ofthe Order and so far ingrains them into his very soul, that they will color and give marked tone to every thougllt, impulse and act of his life, and enable him not only to resist temptation of every hlle and kind, but give him (,he moral power to lead others from the broad into the narrow path, which leads to everlasting rest. Such a l\'1ason will violate no obligation, evade no duty; he will ask no favor, seek no enjoyment, which will not contribute to the general welfare of the Fratemity and his fellow men.

The fruits of a system of multiplying Lodges, as ahove criticised, are soon seen. Great harm has followed. A desire for members, evinced on the part of many new Lodges, bas been a curse, and a general one, to the Institution. Our Grand Masters, as a rule, are too amiable to say "No" when petitions are presented for Dispensations. An early death, or what is worse, a l1:ngeri'ng one, often follows the creation of so many lodges. In Missouri we have a perfected and easy working system of Consolidation of Lodges. The system works well and is growing in favor, as is shown by the union of weak Lodges with stronger ones. Thus territory is enlarged, an increase of material is secured and more vigorous Lodges are the results. Missouri to-day can spare one hundred Lodges from her roster and be in better condition by such decimation of numbers. Railroads make towns, and kill nearly as many, by not passing such places. Lodges spring up or die in the sam:e proportion. Instead of new Lodges being created for every new town in our rapidly improving 'Vestern country, old and decaying ones should move to the growing locations and take the current as it rises. Bro. Brown gave our Proceedings for 1887 the benefit of seven pages in his review. Extracts from, and comments upon the Address of Grand :Master Hunt occupied a good portion of the notice. All other matters of interest in our Journal received courteous attention. Extended quotations were made from the Report of this Committee on Correspondence. His estimate of the Report was expressed in terms at once gratifying and flattering. I will be pardoned for copying the following as representing my position and views: Regarding 1\lasol1ry as a high-next toChristiunit.y-the highest Institution on earth, he resisls eyery attempt to degrade, or eyen lower, lhe pristine standard set up by the


72

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[Oct.

fathers and honored by their worthy successors. Whi!(=' he is ever ready to forgive acts proceeding from honest ignorance, those who sin in spite of light and knowledge, find him a sturdy opponent. one who dares to enforce law until his opponent does works meet for repentance. Like Bro. PARVIN, he despises half-way reformers ann stoutly repudiates all measures which profess to bc reformatory, but, in fact, telld ollly to extemiate doubtful acts and thereby invite a repetition. Thorough might well be his motto, for in Masonry as in all else he hegills on the solid rock and in building up ha..<; the moral courage to reject imperfect ashlars.

The chief satisfaction derived from the above is found in the fact that I am underst.ooc1 by Bro. Brown and not sUb.ieete~ to unjust criticism. The conelusion of the Report is both suggestive and characteristic. Here it is: The foregoing report is respectfully submitted for the consideration of those brethren who are lIot averse to Masol1le information, nor reluctant to acquire it when placed within their reach.

But few of the Craft read these reports, furnished for their "information." And who of the number reading such productions appreciate the annual labor performed by Committees in their preparation? The work done in producing such a review as that furnished by Bro. Brown is out of all proportion to the valuc placed upon it by the general Craft. Kindly reciprocating the brotherly spirit of our esteemed friend and fellowlaborer, in his closing notice of this Committee I part with him, as ever, in the bonds of truest fellowship. Watson M. Lamb, Sterling, Grand Master. John H. Brown, Kansas City, Kansas, Grand Secretary.

KENTUCKY-1887. The 88th Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge was held in Louisville, embracing the 18th, 19th, and 20th days of October. James "V. Hopper was Grand Master. Hiram Bassett was Grand Secretary. In addition to the large number of representatives of lodges, there were present fourteen Past Grand Masters and representatives of thirty-four Grand Lodges. The Journal of Proceedings was large, containing over five hundred pages. The size of the work wa.s largely increased by printing the memhershipof the jurisdiction by lodges. The membership in Kentucky is less than 15,000, a small loss having occurred in the past term. The insti-


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tntion ought to be popular among its own members in view of the size of its pay-roll. ADDRESS.

The address of Bro. Hopper, Grand Master, was a very superior document. He announced the death of one of their prominent and leading Masons, Dr. Garrett Davis Buckner, Past Grand Master. Concerning him he said: Among the dead of the past year was Dr. Garrett Davis Buckner, Past Grand )faste l' of Masons in Kentucky, who died suddenly at Lexington, where he resided, on the morning of the 1st of May last. He wa" It man who, in an eminent degree. emboaied and illustrated the virtues which our order inculcates. In the formation of his character, wisdom, strength and beauty combined to raise, fashion and adorn a spiritual edifice well worthy of the admiration of his brethren and of mankind. A wise head, a. strong will, and a heart that beat responsive to all that is beautiful, true and noble in nature and art, conspired to mark him itS a man alllollg a thousand. He was learned in :Masollic lore, and zealously attached to the p,rinciples of our noble institution. It will be long, J fear, before we shall look upon his hke again.

DEC,ISIONS.

Concerning- his rulings, the Grand Master said: I have g-iven many decisions during the year upon questions long since settled by decisions or by the plain letter of the Constitution. A failure on the part of members of subordinate lodges to study the digest, or even to consult it when a question arises, entails upon the Grand J\faster It great deal of quite unnecessary labor. And it is by no means safe to answer questions by a reference to the digest, for not infrequently the rejoinder comes that the digest has been lost or mislaid, and so the Grand :Master has to write two letters instead of one. Experiences of this kind have caused me to answer at lcn~h maJl~' inquiries upon points already settled, adding the page of the digest upon WhICh the decislOn may be fOlllld. I Cllnnot too strongly urge upon the brethren. and especially the Masters of lodges, carefully to study the Constitution and digest of decisions. .

He reported quite a list of decisions which were, for the most part, admirable interpretations of Masonic law. In speaking of the consolidation oflodges, he ruled that a new charter must be granted. 111 Missouri, when consolidation takes place, one lodge surrenders its charter and merges into the other, which retains its chartered name and number. This is preferred to the Kentucky rule. He decided that a lodge under dispensation cannot elect officers. This is the correct view, as the corporation or new lodge is created by the Grand Lodge. That body alone has the right to create or appoint its three principal officers. The Grand Master decided that a member of a lodge under suspension for non-payment of dues, may be tried and expelled for another Masonic offence. He further ruled that "after the expulsion of the member, he must come back, if at all, by petition and unanimous ballot." It seems that some lodges have been in the habit of refusing to members, who have been in arrears for dues, the privilege of voting or holding office. This custom was declared illegal. This is the correct view, because if the lodge does not enforce the


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law against delinquent members, it cannot deprive them of their rights and privileges by some arbitrary and unauthorized act. SALOON KEEPEHS.

A petition had been presented to the lodge by a party who gave his avocation as that of a saloon keeper. The presiding officer decided that, under the ruling of the Grand Lodge, the petition could not be received. Grand Master Hopper ruled that the decision was correct. Thus the saloon keeper was prevented from obtaining place and position among those who did not want him. ' The Grand Master decided that it was improper to use postal cards for the purpose of notifying members to appear and show cause why they should not be suspended for non-payment of dues. By this method of notification it seems evident that any kind of Masonic notice sent in that way is giving undue publicity to the business of the lodge. NEW LODGES.

Four lodges had been instituted under dispensation by order of the Grand Master. COKSOLIDATIO?\.

In the city of Louisville four lodges consolidated. This affords another evidence of the fact that in many localities too many lodges have been created. The reduction of the number of lodges, by consolidation or otherwise, would be ofgreat benefit to the Fraternity in many jurisdictions. SUGGESTIONS.

The Grand Master offered a number of suggestions, submitting them to the Grand Lodge for consideration. The following are culled from the list presented: I desire also to call the attention of the Grand Lodge to the pending amendment to abolish the Past Master's degree as a r.re-requisite to the installation of al\iaster. ln view of the loose, irregular and often Illegal manner in which the degree is frequently conferred, there seems to be a demand for some legislation upon the subject. In the present state of the law an officer of the lodge cannot resign, and consequently cannot demit. This is often productive of great inconvenience to lodges and to the officers. especially in case of the removal of the latter to distant States. An amendment to the Constitution is respectfully suggested as a remedy. In the same connection I invite the attention ofihe Grand Lodge to the propriety of vesting in the Grand Master the powe.r to grant dispensations to lodges to hold elections at times other than that fixed bylaw. It has been decided by this Grand Lodge that a lodge cannot be opened in the absence ofthe Master and both Wardens. This leads to serious inconvenience in the case of the


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death or removal of 1. he three principal officers of the lodge. Whether, under such circumstances the Grand Master or his proxy has power to open the lodge, or not, is a question concerning which experts in Masonic jurisprudence entertain different opinions. It would be well, I think, to resolve this doubt, or to provide for the case by constitutional amendment.

Concerning the first suggestion above touching the Past Master's degree, the following was adopted: Rcsolvr.d, That all laws heretofore enacted by the Grand Lodge requiring a Masterelect to take the Past Master's degree before bcing entitled to preside over his lodge, be, and they are hereby revoked.

Thus the Past Master's degree, like some other things we read of, is "Going." The great Good sense of American Masons will yet consign a good many superfluities to their own place. The age in which we live is growing more pra.c6cal with the march of intelligence and expansion of thought. Thc Committee found in favor of the Grand Master declaring vacant any elective office in a I,odge, \vhose incumbent had removed from the Jurisdiction or had been called away by death. I find no mention made by the Committee, of the third recommendation. In Missouri any Past Master may open a Lodge and preside on funeral occasions in the absence of the Master and Wardens. In case the three principal officers are dead, removed from the Jurisdiction or disqualified, the Grand Master provides for the life of the Lodge by ordering an election. Our system has worked well and proved satisfad,ory at every point. "OUR IIOj\rE."

1<'rom. the address the following extract is made concerning the grand enterprise of Kentucky Masons, than which none greater can be found on this Continent. The Masonic Widows and Orphans Home is justly the pride and boast of Kentucky Ma-'SoDs. It is a monument to their intelligence and liberality besides which all the costly monUDlents of pride and power look dwarfed and insi/Pliflcant. It has attracted the attention and eliCIted the admiration of the whole Masomc world. No single cause, no combination of causes has contributed so much to shed luster on Masonry in Kentucky as this grand and noble institutioll. More than anything else it "marks our consequence" among the Masons of the world. As imitation is the lilghest, because the most sincere, compliment, we have the pleasure of knowing that in several other jurisdictions steps have been takcn to emulate us in this respect. "That noble emulation" so forcibly enjoined upon us by :Masonic teaching should prompt us to strive to maintain the present eminenee which "Our Home" has given us. Let no other jurisdiction go beyond us in our zeal and liberality. At the close of my term as your Grand l\faster, I feel that there is no word of weightier import that I can say, no more valuable legacy that I can leave to this Grand Lodge, than the injunction, guard well the interests of the :Masonic Widows and Orphans Home. The report of thc Board of Directors is bcforc you and shows that the "Home" has had a quiet ycar. It has lived within its income, but had its resources been greater, its usefulness might have been proportionatel~路extended. 'l'he wisdom of the Grand Lodge might well be brought to bear on the questIOn how these resources may be increased.


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Thus briefly I have scanned what the Grand Lodge said was a "very excellent address," which was a just tribute to 'Most ,,,orsbipful Brother Hopper, and one well deserved and faithfully earned. As an officer of the Grand Lodge, he showed a dear comprehension of the princi pIes of Masonic jurisprudence, and made a most intelligent application of them. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

The Report of Grand Secretary Bassett was very brief and business-like. He noted the hi:lprovement in the returns of lodges both as to the neatness of their preparation and correctness, as well as promptness in making them. Finances were shown to be $18,431. The resources besides the above sum amounted to over $20,000, showing: a grand total of about $35,000. SALOON KEEPING AGAIN.

A proposition was submitted by four members asking that the resolution adopted in 1886, declaring saloon keeping a Masonic offense, "be and the same is hereby repealed and rescinded." The motion was sent to the Committee on Jurisprudence, and that Committee subsequently returned it without recommendation. The Grand Lodge seems to know how to act on such questions, even when Committees decline to do so. The proposition to "repeal and rescind" was laid on the table, and "personal liberty" met another backset. '\That a pity. More diatribes will be in order from those who defend saloons because "authorized by the laws of the land." Some Ajax, with the jaw-bone of an ass, will soon be after the Kentucky Masons, and "a fundamental proposition" will be laid down for their guidance. MORE "PREROGATIVE."

Bro. Hopper, Grand Master, recommended a change in the Constitution to suit the convenience of a little troublesome imp called Prerogative. Here is what he said: I have received during the year several applications for dispensations to confer degrees out of time. Under our Constitution the Grand Master has no authority to gTll.nt such dispensations. In this respect there appears to be a conflict between our Constitution and one of the landmarks of Masonry, and it is worthy of the consideration of the Grand Lodge, whether it would not be weil to remove this incompatibility by a constitutional amendment. Cases arise which seem to call for the vesting of such power in the Grand Master, and to prevent applications where no real necessity exists the payment of a suitable fee for such dispensation might be required.

It did not take the Committee on .Jurisprudence very long to dispose of the above recommendation.


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Bro. Larue Thomas, P. G. M., ,vas Chairman of the Committee, and presented the following, which was approved: rVe note the Grand :Master's "suggestions" in regard to the prerogatives of Grand 1\'Iasters to permit the conference of degrees out of time. Also, the amendment to our Constitution permitting them to grant such dispensation where a lodge shows good reasons 1:.herefor, and upon the paym.ent of a fee to the路 Grand Secretary of five dollars for such dispensation. The question of "prerogative of Grand :Masters" is like the question of "ancient landmarks" -a subject on which there is such a diversity of opinion, and which is so susceptible of construction as to be made applicable to any case that might arise. We are continually hearing of some important discovery of another "prerogative" or the finding of a "new" "ancient landmark." Our fathers, no doubt, were troubled in the same way and in their wisdom framed our Constitution so that there could be no difl'erences of opinion on these sUbjects. They had worked under the "ancient landmark" giving Grand Masters an immense amount of "prerogatives." In fact their authority was supreme. A "Grand Master" could go ahead and exercise his own judgment or inclination, and if objection was made, or criticism offered, he at once took refuge behind the "ancient landmarks" and shouted "prerogatives." Not having lived ill the olden time when Grand Masters were autocrats, and when they were not restrained by such things as Grand Lodge Constitutions, we can only imagine the immense power they possessed and the great influence they could wield-possibly at times for good, but more frequently, we fear, for evil. The amendment suggested proposes to revive one of those landmarks, which we all know never rcsulted in any good to the order and many times great hann has followed. We cannot see how the charging of II fee of five dollars for the Secretary is an improvemcnt on the old plan. Tf there was any good reason for the Grand :Master giving any such dispensation it. certainly should be given wit.hollt any fee being chargcd. But your Comnllttee are of the opinion that we had better go by our Const.itution and not amend it giving the "Gralld Master" any such authority. We therefore disapprove the amendment suggested by the Grand lIfaster.

The "Land Markers" had better eall a "Masonic Congress" and agree -forthwith among themselves-as to what they will "stand to and abide by." Tbe house div'ided against itself is in imminent danger of a tumble, because of the unsettled condition of its foundation. Here is an old, respectable and conservative Grand Lodge, declaring "we had better go by our CO~STITL'TION" instead of hiding behind Land Marks and shouting "Prerogatives" at every body and every enactment. Poor old "Prerogative 1" It must be in a bad way when its advocates sought to conciliate the opposition by a jive dollar bid. Surely these are strange times when "Prerogative," the companion of Kings, (yea their off.'3pring) is willing to leave the high places of power and sit down in dust and ashes. Yea more, that same mysterious power, so long enthroned above all gods, like Jupiter upon "High Olympus," whose thunders bavecaused theweak(only) to tremble, begs to be allowed only a Rervant's place at nominal wages. 0, cruel Kentuckians! Afiersuchastoop on the part of"Prcrogative"-"the child of a King-" as to offer service "at a fee of five dollars" per opportunity to "do some great thing," then to be told we will "Go BY OUR Co:\,STITuTION." Poor Joe! "Move on 1" No rest for the sole of your feet in Kentucky. AN AGED

~IASON.

The venerable Brother Clinton Fitch, ninety-six years of age, being present, was honored with a seat in the Grand East and appropriately received by the Grand Master. Bro. Hiram Bassett, for many years


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Grand Secretary of Kentucky Masons, having declined a re-election, the Grand Lodge by resolution, offered him its thanks for the faithful and efficient discharge of his duties during his long term of service. He will not be lost to Kentucky Masonry, but will be heard from in coming years. As Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence he may playa most important part in the future of his Jurisdiction. COHRESPONDE:;\CE.

Brother J. 'V. Staton, for the Committee on Correspondence, presented a report covering 130 pages, which is a well written and carefully compiled review. Brother Staton writes his reports, and gleans the fields thoroughly, over which he passes. He never uses the scissors. He says: "路We have too much regard for the printed proeeedings to put the scissors into them." It seems to this Committee that the Kentucky brother is super-sensitive. Grand Lodge proceedings are furnished in such numbers as to justify the Committee on Correspondence in making extracts therefrom. to the fullest extent. I prefer copying entire the sayings and doings of others, thus putting them on record in their own language. Bro. Staton is an able committee, and has done his work well in the past. The only regret entertained by his Missouri co-worker and admirer is that he has retired from the position of Chairman of the Kentucky Committee. But he has been appointed Chairman ofthe committee on Grievances and will not be lost sight of in the coming time. His notice of Missouri Proceedings for 1886 was ample and gra.teful. He complimented Grand Master Boyd, our Grievance Committee and Grand Lodge work generally. His terms of appreciation for tile Missouri Committee are high and exceedingly gratifying. I will not make any extracts therefi'om lest I seem to compliment myself.

.T oshua Soule Smith, Lexington, Grand Master. ville, Grand Secretary.

H. B. Grant, Louis-

LOUISIANA-1888. The Journal contains records of two special communications held for the purpose of laying corner stones. 'fhe 76th Annual Communication was held in Ne,.... Orleans, commencing February ]3, 1888, and was presided over by C. F. Buck, Grand Master. James C. Batchelor was Grand Secretary.


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There 'were presen.t five Past Grand Masters and Representatives of fifty-three lodges. Thirty-five Grand Lodges were represented. A resolution was adopted "that all lodges that had made returns and paid dues to date, be allowed representation." The membership in the jurisdiction is given by lodges, and amounts to less than four thousand. This seems a very small membership for an old and well established Grand Lodge of the proportions of Louisiana. ADDRESS.

The address of Grand Master Buck was of unusual length, covering thirty-four pages. After words of welcome to the Brethren, he said they had reason to be thankful for the good which had been vouchsafed to them, as ,veIl as for the evil which had been kept from them. In referring to the deatbs of some of their brethren the Grand Master said that "the nearest to our hearts and duties are the deceased of this jurisdiction. Especially those who had been honored with high office in the Grand Lodge." He mentioned the members who had been called away and advised that the Grand Lodge express, in some proper manner, its sympathy and respect for their worthy brethren, as well as the recognition of their manhood, virtues and valuable services in the cause of Masonry. To other jurisdictions sympathy was extended for losses sustained by them in a like manner. }'n"ANCES.

The Grand Master stated that at their last Communication their bonded debt was $32,500. A reduction had been made during the year, but the amount now owed reached the sum of $29,000. GRAND LODGE HALL.

Under this head, Grand Master Buck shows very plainly that there is an incubus resting on the Grand Lodge of Louisiana. He said that substantial and material improvements must be made on the property to meet the demands of the Brethren. This was regarded as impossible, as an additional debt of some $10,000 ",~ould have to be contracted, which he declared, was out of the question, unless they could accomplish tbe sale of their Temple property. The sale of this ground is complicated with practical difficulties. The foundation of the Temple cost $30,000 and is of no value, but rather a drawback, as the foundation would have to be removed before the property would become valuable as residence sites. No wonder Masonry in Louisiana is under deep depression, and, judging from the statements of the Grand Master, the future possesses but very litt.Je promise.


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The following extract will show the helpless out-look entertained by the Grand Mast.er: I think I have sufficiently indicated that in my humble judgment the interests of the Grand Lodge would be best served by leavillg the matter again. under the resolution of your last Communication, in the hands of your proper aut.horities. I am most anxious that the sale should be effected. I do not think that Masonrv, in Louisiana will matcrially revive until that ever-present witness of the disappointments of our Past. be removed,-the finances of the Body relieved of discouraging drains for interest on an Ullproductive invest.ment, and our loves and efforts, unburthened of the inculms of our failures concent.rated upon the ncw hopes of a new era.

One year ago, Grand Master Homer expressed the hope that the time would come when there would be a revival of their "long lost prosperity." The above extract from the address of Brother Buck would indicate that the "long lost prosperity" had not been realized. I repeat the opinion put forth in my last review of Louisiana that that Grand Lodge has suffered from "TOO MUCH TEMPLE." Grand Master Horner said last year, that one cause of their declension was the system of life membership. The question may be asked again, what are the other causes? An answer to that question may be found in the further review of the Grand Master's address. ])ECISIONS.

The Grand Master furnished a few rulings on local questions. The right of visitation of non-affiliated Masons, who had remained such for the space of one year, was treated at considerable length. He held that their rules would not allow such person8 to visit their lodges. In Missouri, we not only deny them the right of visitation, but refuse them the benefits and privileges of Masonry, such as Masonic relief and burial. The following extract expresses the sentiment of Grand Master Buck: As a Mason I stand upon the broad and generous ground, and should be loath to shut the door of the Temple on a worthy brother. But the worst enemies to thc prosperity of our Order arc those who, having received the benefits of Masonry, hold them in light esteem, and by their open and public neglect call forth and encourage derogatory and depreciating comment. Against such J would check the "genial current" of misplaced charity and invoke the incxorable rigor of the law. CONSOLIDATIO:N OF LODGES.

This subject is treated by the Grand Master in the following terms: On the merits of "consolidation" itself, my feelings, if not my judgment, are divided. Undoubtedlv it is better that a Lodg-e dragging on fl, mere breathing existence, impotent for any good to its members or the Craft, should, by seekinli" co-operation through menlls of consolidation, save what there is of l-fasonic life and actIvity rather than let it go out altogether in the slow process of gradual decay. But in the midst of its enthusiasm it "consolidation" occasionally involves It depressing element. Call it by what name we please, it is i,he extinction of at least one of the contmcting parties, only in appearance, rcmoyed from a surrender. Yet I would not oppose consolidation of Lodges, except


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under some special conditions, because besides the danger of extinction of the old bodies, there is, by reunion in the new, always the hope of revived individual interest and energy on the part of the brethren. ASSESS:\fENTS.

A former edict had imposed an assessment of $3.00 for each degree conferred. Concerning the subject the Grand Master made some interesting remarks. From all the statements made by him I conclude that the Fraternity is heing taxed to death. Too much Temple and too much debt. Here is what he says: Referring, us necessary to be considered in this connection, to what has been said in regard to the property of the Grand Lodge, I can only add. and I do it most reluctantly, that unless some other source of revenue is devised, we have barely an option in the matter. It is a simple question offignres. If it can be made to appear from the reports of your financial officers and committees that the assessment can be withdrawn, it should be promptly done; but if you find the fact to be that this Grand Lodge cannot meet its obligations without it, your duty to the Order wi11 prompt you to snbmit a little longer to the inevitable burden.

In his treatment of the subject of the Grand Lod.ges of England and Quebec, he concludes as follows: I am conscious that in much that I have said, in a general way, on this sUbject, I run counter to preconceived ideas, and perhaps a preponderance of Masonic authority. I only submit my individual opinion to the extent that J deem the welfare of this Jurisdiction demands it; and I repeat, that whatever we lilay think of the merits of the controversy, the occasion has 110t arisen for the interference of this Gra.nd Lodge. Neither our own welfare, nor the interest of Masonry, nor any principle of Masonic law and order, under the peculiar cOllditions of this controversy, warrant or demand that we shall pass judgment between the contestants. WOHK.

The Grand Master urged upo'n the Grand Lodge the necessity of more systematic work in the Jurisdiction. He said: "There is a bewildering amount of diversity, or better, perhaps, \vant of precise knowled.ge, in reference to some of these things, which should be corrected, and greater uniformity established." From his statement of the subject one would conclude that" more light" is needed in that Jurisdiction. HElIfAHKS.

From his general remarks extract'S will now be made and comments offered. As to the state of the Order in his own Jurisdiction, the future may not present a cheering aspect, but still he would" hope on and. hope ever" for "its purity, and usefulness, and beauty." Hear him: Behind all our lethargy, our failures and disappointments, behind even the deserted Lodge room, the surrendered charter, the mass of indifferent Masons (?) who abandoned the" fold," there remains Masonry itself, inviolable, indestructible, as potent for good among "three" or "five" or "seven" only as among so many hundreds. And as long as any respectable number of men, indifferent to outward show or material success, will devote themselves to the study and transmission of Masonry, it will remain in its purity and usefulness and beauty. G. L. Ap.-6.


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Yes, Masonry is, in itself, "indestructible." It has nothing to fear from without. External pressure only solidifies, provided there is soundness" purity "-within. Thus viewing the Institution, Bro. Buck grmv eloquent, and almost transcendental. He said: Masonry to-day, in the world at large, stands on more elevated ground than ever before, since its known history. In the great contentions of modern development, the whirl of this progressive but essentially matC7"iali~~t'ic progressive age, Mllsomy might appear a beneficial and peace hearing factor. It is foreign to the very essence of its bemg to min~le in the specia.l contentions of men; it places itself, from a purely human standpoint, of course, abo'vc 1'eligion, creed, nationality or faction. Its philosophy consecrates the logic of nature, its morality the commands of universal conscience. But, indirectly, through its sublime teachings, it disseminates those safegnards of justice. moderation and equality through which an equitable basis of adjustment is easily founa ,to harmonize the conflicting interests in which the desires and the ambitions of men engage our race. Equality absolute, justice unassailable, peace universal, Ilre the superstnlcture-a temple not made with hands, but liYing in our hearts-which shOUld ascend to heaven on the columns of Wisdom, Strength lLnd Beauty. This consummation is attained when the truths taught on our tasselated floors and under our emblematic vaults are made vital factors in the work of the Great Architect's Lodge room,universal nature.

There is enough in the foregoing extract to excite a thrill in the dullest nature and stir the fires that burn in a poetic soul, while some of the sentences are so involved as to call for an 'interp1 eter. As its mission is not to "mingle in the special contentions of men," the author quoted surely never intended that Masonry should mingle in the general" contentions of men." I presume he means that Ma..<;onry, though in the world, is not of the world. This makes the Institution superlatively celestial; placing it, as the Grand Master says, "above religion, creed, nationality or faction." It must be, as" a TElI1PLE not made with hands," quite ethereal, because he would have it "ascend to heaven on the columns of "Tisdom, Strength and Beauty.'" If" not made with hands, it either made itself or God made it. o

It could not make itself, because self-creation involves action, when there was nothing to act. "Not made 1JJith hands." Then who made tbis "Temple" that is to "ascend to heaven"? If not of hU1I'/,an origin, its origin must be divine-from God. I presume this was the reason prompting the eloqnent expression, "a..'3cend to heaven" whence it came. If from God, and of divine origin, why place it" above Religion," and thus outrage the faith and piety of millions by placing Masonry H above Religion," which binds man to God. If Masonry is so divinely celestial as to be" above Religion," why not place it, at least, by the side of Religion, and let it help bring about a state of "purity, usefulness and beauty." Better assign it this kind of wOTk in this" materialistic, progressive age" than have it climbing" to heaven" on invisible" columns."

This" materialistic, progressive age" is essentially a practical one, and needs, yea, demands, great agencies as a vital factors" in the workshop of moral life, rather than in that mythical thing styled the" Lodge room universal nature." An interpreter may unfold to future generations the esoteric meaning of that expression, "The Great Architect's Lodge room


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uniYersal nature." The author of the sentence has lived too soon. From what follows in the address, it is obvious that Grand Master Buck had heen iwepari ng for a grand movement along certain lines. His conscience had been giving him trouble. He said: " There is something struggling in my Masonic conscience." Fi'om what follows, it seems that his" conscience was much larger than his judgment or his prudence, and, consequently, got the better of him. I respect his conscience as little 3,.<; I do his judgment. He said, "that any dictum, rule or regulation on the part of a Masonic body to exclude from the benefits of Masonry any individual, or class of individuals, involves a destruction of the essential identity of :l\'lasonry itself." How is this? I thought that" a Temple, not made with hands," which Brother Buck sent climbing to "Heaven on columns of 'Visdom, Strength and Beauty," ,vas sufficiently divine to be indestructible. If certain legislation designated b}T him" involves a destruction of the essential identity of Masonry," the institution must fall to pieces, because its identity is very necessary to its perpetuity and stability. How ahout the stability with which he had just dowered M.asonry in his grandiloquent flight, calling it "a Temple not made with hands?" Does not the Great Light of Masonry style the" Temple not made with hands" an "eternal" one? That which is not made with hands, or by human invention and contrivance, must be above their works, and, therefore, "eternal." In this class our brother places Masonry, as "a Temple not made ",,'ith hands." This iH the endowment given Masonry by the aforesaid writer. And yet his" conscience" is so troubled about the action of a Grand Lodge, which has not asked his advice, that in the next breath he says such legislation will destroy the existence of the Institution. The display of the brother evidences the fact that he was bent upon serYing a purpose without the judgment for its accomplishment. He has, therefore, made himself the object of ridicule by his lofty attempts at dictating to another body, what alone concerns it, without reference to his" opposition to this action." Allow me to inquire, preliminary to noticing his deliverances about the acts and doings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, whence his authority to sit in judgment upon the legislation of our Grand Jurisdiction? "'Vho 'made thee a judge?" " 'Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? " From ,the manner in which this self-constituted Mentor of Grand Lodges strides into obtrusive prominence, one might conclude that he had been endowed with authority to dictate the policy of Masonry universal. 'Hear him, " and be silent that ye may hear: " Any dictum, rule or regulation, on the part of a Masonic Body, to e.xclude from the benefits of Masonry any hl.dividv.al, or class of 1:ndividuals, involves a destruction of the essential idcntit)' of 1.\Iasonry itself.

How about gambling, drunkenness, blasphemy, atheism? Can not a Grand Lodge enact rules or regulations to exclude from Masonry such


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characters? I ask the question direct. 'Will Brother Buck, of Louisiana, affirm that the foregoing things are un masonic ? Affirm that they are not Masonic offenses, and you admit that they are not wrong. Take your position. It is true that OIle high in the Grand Lodge of Louisiana affirmed in 1883 that "many rich railroad magnates, bankers, merchants, and millionaires, not a few of whom swear, and lie, and steal, and swindle, and get as drunk as beggars," would be welcomed into the Order "as brothers of the Mystic Tic." It may not be fair to ask Brother Buck if he opposes these things, after his Grand Lodge sent out its publication of them through a committee appointed by the Grand Lodge. But if he is opposed to such things, which one of his brethren endorsed, he must admit that the Grand Lodge can make rule!':i and regulations to exclude such from the benefits of Masonry, without endangering or destroying the identity or stability of the In!':ititution. To accept the result of his deliverance would be to say that the Grand IJodge cannot legislate against anything' unmasonic, because it would deprive an "individual or ind'iv路idual.~" of the" benefits of Masonry." His assumption went so far that it defeated its own aim and purpose. He overdid himself, and destroyed the object of the declaration.

B ear him some more: Our great sister Grand Lodge of the State of Missouri, in the langnage of its )fost Worshipful Grand ~{aster, "has put itself upon record against saloon-keeping or selling liquor for drinking purposes, declaring the business to be nnmasonic.

"Well, what if the State of Missouri has "put itself on record against Saloon-keeping?" Has she not the right to legislate upon matters that affect the character and welfare of the Fraternity in her own Jurisdiction? Brother Buck may be assured of two things: First: The Grand Lodge of :Missouri will never call upon a Masonic community for advice on this, or other Moral questions, which sent out to the Masonic world, an endorsement of "men who swear, and lie, and steal and swindle and get drunk as beggars." 'Ve have to say to such, "Physician, heal thyself." The best thing for Brother Buck, and his noble coadjutors, is to look at home, and see that there is no skeleton in the closet before they go out hunting for one in the domain of others. Second: Be assured tbat what. ever legislation the Grand Lodge of Louisiana may indulge in, especially ifit looks to the purification, improvement and moral elevation of the Craft, no Grand Master of Missouri will ever so far forget the dignity of his office or the amenities of life, as to thrust himself fonvard as critic of their labors, or meddl~ with their business. Our :Missouri Grand Masters arc not that kind, and they have as much "conscience" as anyone who feel!':i called upon, as Mentor of other Grand Lodges, to arraign their legislation. It will not be with them a matter of "conscience," but hased upon the correct principle, "mind your own affairs, and ,ve will attend to ours."


.Appendix.

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85

Brotber Buck defined his position thus: WUh all due fraternal sincerity, I place myself in opposition t路o this action, as wholly, radically and es~entil1lly foreign to the nature and mIssion of :Masonry.

Because he placed himself in opposition to our Grand Lodge action, it is necessarily wrong. "Tith as much "fraternal sincerity" as Brother Back dare claim I place myself in opposition to his ipsi dixit, and call for the proof that our action is subversive of the "nature and mission of Masonry." And a fraternal reminder is volunteered that neither his "opposition" nor the endorsement of his Grand Lodge; as against the Grand Lodge of Missouri, will diminish our maintenance of the principle involved, nor lessen our convictions that we are in the right. Indeed if thf~re ,vas testimony 1ranting that we are Tight, the "opposition" fulminated from the Grand East of Louisiana wo_uld be sufficient. As Grand Master Buck assailed the action of Missouri under the caption, "The state 'of the Order," and as a committee of his Grand Lodge in treating "Upon the state of the Order" approved his assault, and said, "the logic of tbe Grand Ma.."iter is good," it follows his Grand Lodge has taken its position with him. I have nothing to do with said Grand Lodge, although it endorsed an attack upon my own. Brother Buck said, "1 do not ask any brethren of th is Grand Lodge to commit themselves upon tbis question: it is not before you." If he meant that he did not want them to commit themselves in favor of saloon-keeping, condemned by Missouri, his admonition was superfluous, as its position had been defined by an apologist of those who "swear, and lie, and steal and svdlldle and get drunk as beggars." If his meaning was that they must not "commit themselves upon this question," by declaring against the action of the Grand Lodge of :M:issouri, then his admonition was either a bid for endorsement or he had no influence with his o,Yn Grand Lodge, for it immediately proclaimed that his " logic was good" in his arraignment of Missouri. He said further, tbat "with tlle merits of the question, as against the business of saloon-keeping, we, as :Masons, have notbing to do." I presume, so far as that Jurisdiction is concerned, he represented the facts. But, as a "business," we :l\fasons in J\1issouri do have sometbing to do with it, and we have had much to do with it, and we 'have done just what we started out to do; and the" identity and integrity of Freemasonry" in this Jurisdiction, by reason of what ,"ve have done, will not suffer, but live as long as the type or quality represented by our volunteer critic of Louisiana. Yea, more, Freemasonry in Missouri is of a kind that has won the respect and approval of thousands, and has not lost the appreciation of anyone who believes" Masonry is a beautiful system of l\'lorals." And as to the business of saloon-keeping, as a l\Iasonie crime, we of Missouri do not stand alone. Knovdng we are right we bave gone ahead, and propose to "continue in well doing" as far as the class of persons is concerned who I ~


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violate our la,vs, whether they be in the saloon business, or whether they ~, swear, and lie, and steal, and swindle, and get drunk as beggars." am; record is made. We have placed it before the Masonic world. 'Ve have acted in harmony with our own laws. Those laws were made by ~lis足 souri Masons for Missouri Masons. If our laws made for the purification of Masonry are regarded by the opposition a,'3 "foreign to the nature and mission of Masonry," those who do not like said laws may find comfort in the fact that we, of Mis..<;ouri, do not propose to meddle with matters which belong to other Jurisdictions, but will attend to affairs strictly at home. By doing so, we expect to prosper and be as snecessful as the man who became rich by minding his own business. 'Ve have treated the question as a moral one, affecting the welfare of our own Jurisdiction. \\Te are authorized by our Constitution, and by our Charter from the State, to le~islate upon all questions appertaining to the improvement of the Craft. Having done so, the Grand Lodge of .Missouri never takes a step backward on a moral issue. She has freed the Fratemity from the presence of a blight which was a disgrace to her good name and a curse to bel' members. Her growth and prosperity will not be retarded by her action in the premises, but be marked by an elevation of character and tone, as well as a forward movement in all healthy enterprises. Our Lodges all over the State arc doing more work (ont of the best material) than ever before. Our Grand Lodge is unencumbered, we have a large fund on hand, our "Home" moves forward, gaining on the confidence of our brethren, and we do not nave to deplore our "long lost prosperity." 'Ve have lost a few members by defining their business as unmasonic, but have gained hundreds of the best men of the Commonwealth. Our progress is steadily forward. Our Grand Masters do not assume to sit in judgment upon the aetions of sister Jurisdictions, and our committees do not feel called upon to rush into the public prints in the defense of the most indefensible vocation of our civilization. Upon the whole we are very well satisfied with our condition, a.nd not likely to become dissatisfied by the carping of disgruntled critics. Missouri Masons can take care of Missouri Masonry. CORRESPONDEXCE.

The report \vas rendered by Brother .T. Q. A. Fellows for the committee. It covered about 110 pages. He follo,'.. .e d the plan a.dopted in a former review. As said last year of his production, I may repeat, that "the review is conducted in a manner somewhat different from the custom now common with committees in the various Grand Lodges of this country." The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.


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MAINE-1887. The Grand Lodge Proceedings of 1887 were not received in time for review in my last report. The Journals of the Grand Lodges "whose session~ are not held until summer, generally come to hand when the labors of this commit.tee have been completed. If received in time for notice, alphabetically, due consideration is given them. If not they are placed in the Addenda. The Maine Journal for 1887 did not come to hand in time even to he placed at "the foot of the docket," but had to go over to the next term. The Proceedings of that Grand Lodge constitute a contribution to Masonic literature too valuable to be overlooked, hence this notice. Still it must be a bdef OIle as I hope to receive the Journal for 1888 in time for consideration. The 68th Annual Communication commenced its labors in Portland, May 3, 188? Most Worshipful Brother Fessenden 1. Day, Grand Master, presided; Brother Ira Berry was Grand Secretary. Seven Past Grand "Masters, and representatives of thirty-six Grand Lodges were present. There are one hundred and eighty-seven lodges on the roll of this Grand Lodge, and one hundred and sixty of that number were represented. The membership was shown to be 20,218. The Address was twenty pages in length and covered every point incident to the work of the Grand Master in a large jurisdiction. The Grand Master said "Our relations with other Grand Jurisdictions have continued pleasant." He announced that the initiations in the lodges show a decided increase over the previous year. The applications for membership were larger and dismissions less than formerly. Still, by reason of suspension for non-payment of dues and deaths, the total gain was not very large. It is stated that the average membership of each lodge is 110. . The business matters treated by the Grand Master, were extended and varied, but of a local character. From his report it is learned that no new lodges had been created. To the credit -of the lodges, as well as to the efficiency of the Grand Secretary, every lodge of the jurisdiction had made returns. From statistics furnished by the GraJ:].d Master, it appears that one hundred and fifty-four Lodges have their property insured; one


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hundred and sixty-four meet in halls not occupied jointly; and fourninths of the lodges own their own halls. Grand Master Day, by his administration proved himself to he a man of affairs, having given very particular attention to the varied matters appertaining to his official position. The Reports of the Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer show a very healthy financial condition. From these reports it is learned that the Grand Lodge has in cash, and in investments, over $30,000. The Grand Secretary said, "The exhibit of the year's work is encouraging;" notwithstanding the large losses by death, and on account of non-payment of dues, there ,,'as a net gain ofabout 200. FRATERNAL CORHESPONDENCE.

This department of the Maine Journal is always a treasure, and I turn to it with more than ordinary interest. The review under consideration is signed by Brothers Drummond, Burnham and Berry. It is simple justice to Brother Drummond to say that he always performs the labors for the Committee. His report embraces one hundred and eighty pages, containing a review of fifty-five Grand IJodge Proceedings, Domestic and Foreign. Brother Drummond is a careful reviewer. He is one who 1'eads what he reviews, and then thinks of what it contains, giving us the benefit of bis thoughts. But in view of the fact that this report is one year behind, I can only briefly notice his work. Missouri for 1886 received the compliment of a five paged notice, in which he quoted approvingly from the address of Grand .Master Boyd, and commended earnestly his a.ble and eloquent views to the Brethren of Maine. In referring to BrotLer Givan, Chairman of Committee on Appeals, Brother Drummond has this to say: We read with much interest thc reports of the Committee on Appeals. The Grand Master bad arrested tbe charters of four lodges for failure to convict or failure to impose punishment, upon conviction. There were seven appeals from acquittals: four of them were cases in which the charge was "saloon-keeping;" the truth of the charge was admitted in every case, but the lodge acquitted the accused. The Grand Lodge, affirming the reports of the committee, sustained the arrest of the charter, set aside the judgment of acquittal in every case, expelled th1'ce of the accused and suspended each of the othcr Jow' for five years. This is a step in the right direction: we notice, however, that the committee gwe as a reason for thcir recoDlmendations, that the charter, having been arrcsted, the case could not be sent back. However, the power of the Grand Lodge to set aside an acquittal and render such jndgment as it deems proper, is fully recognized: and it is only a question of time when the Grand Lodge will send no case back, except for the purpose


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of receiving evidence that was not admitted, or when evidence had bcen admitted which

ought to have been excluded, so that at the second {rial, the case will be heard on different evidencejl'om that adduced on thejirst trial.

Concerning the work of this Committee, Brother Drummond said: "It is a summary involvi ng great lahor and patience. Vle are in accord with him on almost every question, EXCEPT PREROGATIVES OF GRAND ~fASTERS."

Speaking of my criticism of the action of the Grand IJodge ofPennsy1vania, "declaring initiations void for some trifling irregularity by the Lodge," Brother Drummond said: The trouble is that in Pennsylvania, they donot recognize the injustice of the matter. The regulations are all correct and proper, and we did not criticise them but we criticised the course of procedure afterwards: it is a proper regulation to require that inquiry shall be made of the Grand Secretary if he has any record of the rejection of a candIdate; but we hold it unjust and not in accordance with :Masonic law, for the Grand Master, wit/lOut dny eX]J1'ess 1'egulation oj the Gmnd Lodge to declare an initiation utterly void, because the lodge failed to make such inquiry.

Tbat is precisely what I protested against. It is both unjust and unmasonic for any Grand Master to declare an initiation utterly void because he wants to, on account of some informality on the part of the l~odge. TlJe regulations may be right and proper, but a failure to tithe a little "mint; anise and cumin" should not fall, as a malediction, upon an innocent party. If there was 'wrong-doing enough on the part of a Lodge to .iust'ify such extreme measures as were employed in the above case, the punishment should have fallen upon the Lodge and not upon a candidate, who could not know the law. 'Why should the innocerl.t be made to suffer for the guilty? It has often occurred in the history of the race that the innocent have suffered with the guilty. But that innocent ones should bear the penalty for violations of some, regulations in Masonry, is as cruel as it is unjust. An old Patriareh appealed ~o the Almighty thus: "Wilt thou alBO destroy the Righteous ~lJith the wicked?" No, indeed. God would even spare the bad for the sake of the good. But in Pennsylvania the Grand l\iaster spared the derelict Lodge and annihilated the poor Candidate, who was ignorant of the law and innocent of wrong. "By their fruits ye shall know them." This is a Divine Rule. It applies to systems as well as human character. Tried by this rule, and accepting the injustice done the Candidate aforementioned, as legitimate fruit of the "Prerogative" system, the verdict should be "down with this deified monster." Brother Drummond t.hinks this Committee may yet be brought to see the error of his ways and be saved from an evil heart of unbelief in the


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Appendix.

"Prerogatives of Grand Masters." 'We may yet be brought to "sec eye to eye," if Bro. Drummond and other "Prerogative" advocates will carefully consider a fe",' more such cases as was furnished by the Grand Master of Pennsylvania. Yes, the work of conversion is in progress, and I have hope of the salvation of even Bro. Drummond, for he holds it "U1~ju8t ann not in accordance with Masonic law" for a Grand Master to do as was done hl the case under consideration. Verily"the world do move." Bro. Drummond is a very learned. Mason, and an able writer. For him I entertain the highest appreciation. But he has never yet written and published an argument sufficiently convincing to even incline me to the view that solemnly enacted CONSTITUTIO"S can be suspended by the ipsi dixit of a Grand Master. You may reply that it has been done. I beg pardon. The Constitution has not been suspended. It has been BROKEN. If I assume an obligation to "support and maintain" a law, and then do what that law forbids, have I not broken the law? Yea, more. I have violated my vow of fealty to the law. Here is the ground on which I am bound to reject the claims of the "Prerogati ve" school. In Missouri our Grand Master:;; govern the Craft according to the 'Written Constitution and act within the limits of the law. If matters come before them for consideration concerning which the law is silent, then they pass upon such questions and settle them according to the principles of right and justice. Such cases are reported to the Grand' Lodge, which body approves, or correct,>, by proper legislation, the rulings of the Grand Master, and thus precedents are established. The decisions of the Grand Master have the force and elred of law until the meeting of the Grand Lodge, and no longer. If his rulings are approved, they become the law of the Grand Lodge by its own act, and not by any mighty "power in me vested" a.<; some Grand Masters phrase it. Are such act<; by Grand Masters, ad interim, to be styled "Prerogatives?" To meet a necessity, not provided for by the Ia-,", and settle a principle for future guidance, would seem more like the exercise of ad'lilinistTativc functions in the discharge of official duty than the use of what is called "Prerogative." If "Prerogative" means the right on the part of a Grand Master, to do some proper thing not provided for by law, then it is not such a big thing after all, because the Grand Lodge approve or disapprove his act. In doing so, the Grand Lodge shm.. . s itself to be a greater power than its Grand Master and may annul his acts or rebuke his temerity. But this is not the kind of "Prerogative" claimed and exercised by the "Higher Law" advocates. Their "Prerogative" is a god, above all gods, even above Constitutions which must bow l'l nd cry loud a.nd long,

,,,ill

"Great is Diana of the Ephesians.;'

Excuse me, Diana. I bow only to GOD and Law. It would be amusing were it not so ludicrous, to observe the inflation of some brethren


1888.J

Appendix.

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upon whom this dowery of power may chance to descend. 'Vith the placing upon them of the official jewel, they become dowered, and empowered to do things "Solomon in all his glory" never knew or heard of. "A greater than Solomon is here." "By the h'igh power in me vested," Constitutions are broken. Masons are made at sight. Questions of time and residence are ignored. The rights of Innocent candidates a.re trampled upon, 'with many other things "too tedious to mention. All these have been done in the name of "Prerogative," and "by virtue of the high power in me vested." Yes, and done in the face of Constitution and Laws, promised obedience to which was required before the Grand Master could enter upon an office that was to endow him 'with such rare and extraordinary"power." vVhence this investiture of "power?" It is not derived from the law. If not, what is its warrant? I was twice inducted into the office of Grand 1\1a.路.;ter, and twice invested with an official .T ewel. But I received no such "enduement" of power as some of my brethren claim who usc the term, "by virtue of the high power in me vested." It must have come upon them. They did not have it before, and tne Constitution cried out "Not in 1\1e." Now you don't have it. Now you do. "'Vhence came" it. You say you are "vested" with it. You ought not to say you have it unless you know it. If you are so confident of its possession, you ought to be equally clear as to whence it came. But it is the old truth, "ye cannot tell whence it cometh, nor whither it goeth." And like the wind, thus described, its claims and pretcnsio'ns are varied, empty and blustering. Anything else in Masonry as useless, harmful and boastful would be abolished by the Craft witbout delay. "By virtue of the hi,qh power in me vested," an immature and inexperienced mind will perpetrate things by suspending laws whicb were enacted by the best brains and ripened experience of the Grand Lodge. In defense of your little god, whom even the Ephesians would not \vorship, you plead abuse of power must not be charged to the power itself. It is sufficient to say in reply that any power liable to such abuses as "Prerogative," has no business in Freemasonry. It should be abolished for the wrongs perpetrated "by virtue" of its existence. I waited long, am waiting still, for my share of the "high power" with which the OFFICE of Grand l\faster is endowed. But it never came to me, and my dowery was the law. "Only this, and Nothing IVIore." Perhaps "Prerogative" is chary and '\'(~ry seleet. Tlds may explain why I was slighted. But it does not explain why "Prerogative," like Noah's dove, found no place to rest in:Missouri Ma.sonry. In this Jurisdiction, the Constitution and Laws of the Grand Lodge have always been accorded a higher position than an "unknown quantity" in the problem of 'Masonic government. In closing this notice of Maine for 1887, I wish to give to Bro. Drummond "renewed assurances of my most distinguished consider-


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ation." In the language of my venerated Bro. Richard Vaux, of Pennsylvania; "I do so love my dear Bro. Drummond" that I can t~ke great liberties with him and enjoy the full freedom of fraternal discussion.

MAN ITOBA-1888. The 13th Annual Communication was held in the City of 路Winnipeg on the 8th and 9th days of February, 1888. Brother Thomas Clark, Grand Mast.er, presided, William Ci-. Scot.t was Grand Secretary. That Jurisdiction has thirty-seven lodges, with 1,628 members. There was a good representation present made up of representatives of Grand Lodges, subordinate lodges, Grand and Past Grand Officers. The address, consisting of eleven pages, opened and ended poetically. The question will arise sometimes, how some writers can get along without poetry. In tbis case, the Grand Master buhbled over with poetic quotations, closing witb one from Bryant's Thanatopsis. . The Grand Master mentioned a number ofdispensations granted. Two new lodges had been created. A dispensation to confer the third degree out of time was granted, but he refused to permit a lodge to initiate a candidate out of the regular time. In the exercise of "the high po路wer" conferred by that unknown quantity called "Prerogative" in this case there seems to have been a sligbt degree of inconsistency. However, the foregoing was redeemed by repeated refusals to allow the brethren to wear Masonic regalia at public balls. '1'he Grand Master mentioned a long list of visits made to the lodges. The good effects of these official visits were apparent. CONDITION OF MASONRY.

On this subject the Grand Master spoke as follows: The condition of Masonry in this jurisdiction is, as far as I am able to judge, steadily improving, its tone is becoming- more elevated. The growing sentiment of the age in favor oftempernnce has so thoroughly leavened the members of the Craft that "coffee"


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holds almost universal sway at the refreshment tables, and I hope the time is very near when intoxicating liquors will not appear on the refreshment table of any lodge room in any jurisdiction. The proceedings in the refreshment rooms are elevating- and improving, such as would be approved of by our wives and daughters. The brethren go home at seasonable hour~, all feeling that the evening's enjoyment will bear the morning's reflection. Brethren, I con<rratulate you upon this state of things, and I am glad to know that it is not confine8 to our own jurisdiction, but that the leaven is workin?" throughout the Masonic world. It is the dawning of a brighter day, and if we are ail true to our obligations it will soon break out in a glorious effulgence that will shed a halo ofglory over our beautiful world, and hasten the happy day when man shall see in every Illan a brother, when nations shall learn war no more, but the arts of peace will employ all the powers of redeemed humanity, and which will soon make it clear to all unprejudiced minds that. "Masonry" is the comeliest handmaiden of religion, and that her votaries are men whose lives and characters are in beautiful harmony with the sublime principles and teachings of our Order.

Concerning one point in the above the "Board of General Purposes" said: Your Board notes with pleasure the fact that the condition of :M:asonry is steadily improving, and its tone becoming more elevated; and is an accord with the Grand Master, in the bl1llishment of intoxicants from the refreshment rooms. It is much to be desired tlJat the Grand Lodge should recommend all subordinate lodges to make provision towards that end, in their by-laws.

The Board echoed the sentiment of Grand Master Clark in proposing to banish "intox.icants from the refreshment rooms" of Lodges. But it is noticeable that no recommendations came from the Board to put in force the views of the Grand Master. The "much desired" recommendation mentioned was not made and "Subordinate Lodges" will not "make provision" in "their By-Laws" to exclude intoxicants froul their banquets as long as the Grand Lodge fails to speak out against the presence of an evil so derogatory to Masonic character and profession. Appropriate tributes to deceased Brethren in that jurisdiction were paid by the Grand Master, including some more poetry. The reports of the several District Deputy Grand Masters were printed in the Journal. The Grand Secretary, Brother Scott, furnished an excellent and complete report. ROB MOHRIS.

This distinguished. Brother visited the Grand Lodge during its session. That far North country seems to possess an inspiring influence on brethren of a poetic turn of mind. Even in the cold month of February, so far north as Manitoba, the Muses have wrought nponBrotherMorrisand the Grand Master most effectually. Brother l\forris, "Poet Laureate," composed and dedicated to the Grand Master, a Masonic poem called "IN 路WHITE ARRAY." Brother "'\'Iorris received a vote of thanks. There is no report on Fraternal Correspondence. The Grand ::\'Ia.'3ter and Grand Secretary were both re-elected and reside in the city of 'Vinnipcg.


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MARYLAND. The Journal of this Grand Lodge contains a record of t,vo special communications. At one of them, the burial of Past Grand Treasurer, Brother James D. :lVfason took place. The other was for the purpm;e of extending a fraternal welcome to the Grand Master, Thos. .I. Shryock, who had just returned from a European tour. ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. The 101st Annual Session was held in Baltimore, commencing November 15, 1887. Brother Thos. J. Shryock, GraJid Master, presided, ",ith Jacob H. Medairy, Grand Secretary. The list of Grand Officers, Past Grand Officers and representatives of subordinate and Grand Lodges was quite large. ADDRESS.

The Address of the Grand Master was contained in nine pages, and wa.'5 purely a business document. He referred to the death of Pa.'5t Grand Treasurer Brother Mason, to whom a memorial page was dedicated. He said that from the report of the Grand Secretary, he had found that the receipts of dues of lodges were the largest that had ever been paid. For the past two years, the income of the Grand Lodge had been greatly increasing while itB indebtedness had been gradually diminishing.路 He announced to the Grand Lodge that during his visit to England, he had been shown many Masonic courtesies. The General Masonic Relief Association was mentioned with much favor and received the hearty endorsement of the Grand Master. Tbe reports of the various officers were full and complete. The .Journal under review contains the membership ofthat jurisdiction by lodges. The footings show 5,1:37. There is no report on Fraternal Correspondence. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary ,,,ere re-elected, both residing in Baltimore. SEMI-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. The re"ie,,' of the Annual Communication was in type last year before the journal of the Semi-Annual Communication came to band. This meeting was held in Baltimore, May 8, 1888, the Grand Master,


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Brother Thomas .J. Shryock, present and presiding; Brother Jacob H. Medairy, Grand Secretary. The membership in Maryland is reported as 5,299. A short address by the Grand Master was furnished. He reported all the Lodges working according to the ancient landmarks, except one. He said the financial condition of the Lodges is improving. Their debt, which has for so long hurdened the Fraternity, had been somewhat reduced. It still amounts to more than $100,000. Brother Shryock, like Brother Lawrence, of New York, is the man for the place he fills, and has done a grand work in reducing the debt upon his .Grand Lodge. The address was followed by reports of the Grand Inspectors, \\rhich reports are printed in the proceedings. The Committee on the Grand Master's Address rendered a very flattering report concerning that document, and even complimented the Grand Master in a very poetic way. There is nothing interesting beyond a local character in the proceedings. CORRESPO~DENCE.

The review wa.s prepared by Brother E. T. Schultz for the Committee. It is as nearly all extracts as possible, he having culled extensively from the forty-nine Grand Lodge proceedings examined. nal of 1887 received a three-page notice.

The Missouri Jour-

Brother Schultz referred to the address of Dr. George R. Hunt, our Grand MaHter, and said that he gave "an account of his doings for the year in a clear and business-like manner." Reference was made to the action of Grand Master Hunt in arresting the charters of severalI-,odges for not enforcing the law of the Grand Lodge in regard to saloon keepers. Brother Schultz then Haid : The committee to whom the snbject was referred, were divided, and a majority and minority report were made; the former sustained the interpretation of the law as explained by the Grand Master, while the minority expressed the opinion that the Grand :Master was mistaken in his interpretation of the law.

It is but fair to presume that a reviewing committee 1'eads what he reviews. I will do Brother Schultz; no injustice in assuming that the portion of our Grand Lodge Journal was read by him which called forth the above paragraph and his subsequent criticism. "The truth of history" compels me to say that the distinguished committee of Maryland can not, or did not, read, or else he has a defective memory. Perhaps a preference had something to do with the perversion of fact. There is an anil1W.s here, which may be yet discovered. In the mildest terms by which the above may be characterized, I must say that the statement is full of errors. He sayH the committee" were divi,ded," Nothing could be more remote from the fact. The committee \vere NOT divided. If the Maryland


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committee will turn to page 29 of our Proceedings and read, he will find at the bottom of that page a " Committee on Arrested Chartel's," consisting of five members. If the memory of Brother Schult;r, will carry said five names until be can turn to page 62, he will see the same .five immortal names signed to a "Report on Arrested Charters." Did Brother Schultz intend to create an impression that there was di'vision among us, which found expression even in the committee? It would seem that he had a leaning towards the supposed minority, when he quoted the concluding paragraph of a paper which he calls a "minority report," which paragraph was adverse to Grand Master Hunt. Why did he not quote a line or two from the report of the committee which defined the law and vindicated the Grand Master? No, Brother Schultz, the committee was not diV):ded. Therefore, your statement that there were t1VO reports is errorno two. There was no "m'inority report," beeause there was no division in the committee-it was all majori,ty. Being no division in the committee, as you 'would have your readers believe, there could be no minority. But a substitute was offered in the interest of the saloon keepers.¡ That was voted down by.an overwhelming majority. Perhaps Brother Schultz has concluded that the Grand Lodge was "divided" as badly as the committee. He said, "Upon a vote by Lodges, the majority report was adopted." Brother Schultz will stick to the majority idea. Well, there was hut one majority idea in the whole contest, but that was not in the 'work of the committee. That was unanimity. No minority there. The majority idea found its expres::;ion in the" vote by Lodges." The vote was a majority of hundreds. That is what hurts in certain quarters. If Brother Schultz had seen the unanimity of the members of the Grand Lodge, excepting, ahâ&#x20AC;˘..-ays, the elements of St. Louis, wherein ninety per cent. of the saloon keepers in Masonry was found, he might have eonduded that there was not much division after all. 'Vhen he knows the Masonic Fraternity of Missouri as well as this writer, he will not be likely to volunteer an opinion as to our legislation upon local questions. Here is one that he launched forth, as a legal mind, at long range. It is presumed by this writer that his" opinion" was without charge, as he seemed to offer it ,,,ithout occasion. But here it is for what it is worth: Whatever differences of opinion may exist a.s to the right of it Gra.nd Lodge to prohibit its subordinates from receiving an application for initIation or for membership from a dea.ler in liquor, in the opinion of your committee, there can he no question that an Co,\; post facto regulation that compels a Lodge to expel from the rights of ~1asonry a member who, when he received the degrees, was engaged in the business of selling liquor, is illegal, and would be so held by the civil courts.

As the foregoing" opinion" was evoked by the action of the Grand Lodge of Missouri against saloon keeping Masons, it may not be out of place to say to the Maryland committee that we of Missouri knew precisely what we were doing, and acted in harmony with the law of the Grand Lodge and the law of the State from which we received our


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charter forty-five years ago. It is true, we acted withont consulting Brother Schultz, of Maryland, and did not have the benefit of his "opinion" as to the effect of "an ex post facto regulation." Perhaps ,ve should have delayed action until that" opinion" had reached us. But we did not wait. Our hasty action in not having waited for the aforesaid "opinion," may cause us trouble, and lead to litigation in the" civil courts." 'l'he " opinion" maker for our jurisdictions should have been consulted in advance of our precipitate action. Perhaps he would have been, had the fact reached Missouri Masons that such a legal mind was in existence anywhere in the universe. It is a sad thing to" be little and unknown," but grand to gain the heights of fame by a single" opinion." "A Daniel has come to judgment." It is to be deplored that our adviser did not settle the other point raised by him" as to the right of a Grand Lodge to prohibit its subordinates from receiving an application for initiation or for membership from a dealer in liquor." Perhaps the offering of one " opinion" voluntarily was all he could afford, lest his legal resonrces should become exhausted. Brotber Schultz, suffer a word of admonition; "Be sure you are right, and tben go ahead." And accept a little information from a Missouri writer. It may be of advantage to you in the rendition of your next "opinion." As you took the liberty to COll1.ment upon the action of tbe Grand Lodge of Missouri, touching the question under consideration, let me take the liberty of informing you that your want of knowledge of the matter condones your blunders. Tbe information I would impart is, that the Grand Lodge of Missouri never has, and never will," prohibit its subordinates from receiving an application for initiation or for membership" from anyone because engaged in any particular line of business. So your question as to "differences of opinion" about this point, as applied to Missouri, falls, like your" opinion" as to " an ex post facto regulation," and becomes" nothing worth." Our subordinates are left free to receive applications for admission, but the Grand Lodge reserves and exercises a chartered and constitutional right to regulate the cond'UCt of the members of its subordinates. All applicants for" initiation or for membership" sign a petition promising" a cheerful compliance .vith the rules and regulations of the Fraternity." Such applicant surrenders himself to the control of the laws governing the Fraternity, not merely a Lodge. 'Vho makes the" Rules and Regulations of the Frate"rnity?" The Grand Lodge. Has the Grand Lodge the right to make "Regulations?" Read the Charter of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, granted by the St.ate. "Said Grand Lodge shall have pOLcer to add to, alter, amend or repeal the Constitution, By-Laws, Rules and Regulations for the government of the same." 'With this Cbarter from the State, we are not much alarmed by the" opinion" of Brother G. L. Ap.-7.


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Schultz concerning the "civil courts." His" opinion," with us Missourians, falls into "innocuous desuetude." Be it known unto thee, oh thou maker of opinions for another jurisdiction, that we of this Grand Jurisdiction maintain the right furnished us by the State, and set forth in our excellent Book of Constitutions, to make laws for those who are in the Fraternity, as well as concerning those who seek to come in. 'What is your" opinion" of this claim? Our Charter says we may make laws for the" government of the Fraternity." This applies to the mem1>ers of the Fraternity. It is of them that the law takes account particularly. 'Ve have not disturbed the conditions on which admission is based; but we do re,qulate the members of the Fraternity, which the Grand Lod'ge is authorized to govern. 'Ve have proposed no new test of admission; but we do say to those who promised a cheerful compliance witb the" Rules and Regulations of the Fraternity," that your conduct is proper, or it is not. That right we have exercised, and intend to exercise. It is a vested right. Being a vested right, we exercise it without fear of the" civil courts," the "opinion" of Brother Schultz to the contrary, notwithstanding. Let me inform this "New Daniel" that the Grand Lodge of Missouri is a chartered body. Its subordinates are not. Any act of the subordinate which contravenes the law of the parent body, is null and void. Our courts have so held. The subordinate Lodge holds its existence at the will and pleasure of the Grand Lodge. The petitioners for a charter promise that, should their prayer be granted, they will render" strict conformity to the CONSTITUTION and By-Laws of the Grand Lodge." The life of the subordinate Lodge depends upon this promised "conformity." It has no vested rights. The Grand Lodge is vested with "SUPREME Masonic authority within the State of Missouri." Its Constitution, approved by the State, says: "The Grand Lodge shall be invested with all original essential powers and privileges belonging to the Ancient Craft, and shall have power, especially, to enact and enforce all Laws and Regulations for the government of the Fraternity, and alter, amend and repeal the same at pleasure." 'Vho but Brother Schultz 'will question the original powers of the Grand Lodge of Missouri? The Grand Lodge is endowed with" Supreme Masonic Authority." 'l'he Subordinate llas no vested rights, but holds existence by a mere tenure. It can not do anything which is forbidden by the Grand Lodge. To allow it to do so would be to make the creature greater than the creator. The Grand Lodge has, therefore, the right to prescribe for its subordinates such regulations as may be deemed best for the Fraternity. It bas also the right to de.fine the conduct of the members of the Fraternity, and to declare what is wrong, and what is right, or proper. It has the right to do so without asking the permission of the State, or even consulting the" civil conrts." It has done so, regardless of an "opinion" of anyone outside of'Missouri. It has the same right to declare saloon keeping to be "unmasonic" that it had to prononnce against" habitual drunkenness, gam-


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bling, blaspbemy, and practiceR of a kindred character." In 1882, the Grand Lodge, in answer to a memorial, d~fined the quality of the saloon b?J.8ine.ss, as carried on by Masons. In defining the conduct of those engaged in that business, the Grand Lodge of Missouri has not only said it is unmasonic, but that the definition given "Had always been the la w." How about your" ex post facto regulation," Brother Schultz? The plain truth is, some of our over-zealous brethren of other jurisdictionsbave meddled in things that do not concern them. 'Ve, of Missouri, have not acted hastily in the matter. The question is of long standing among us, and our legislation, dating back to 1858, shows the mind of the Masons of this JuriHdiction. The Lodges received saloon keepers into their ranks in violation of the laws of the Grand Lodge. The parent body said the Lodges must purge themselves of an element that no one can defend who loves morality and virtue. The Lodges bad received these men and become parties to their wrongs by accepting money from them. The Grand Lodge said to the Lodges: " You are responsible for the presence of some of the worst elements of every community in ::\Iasonry. You must get rid of them, as you received them." The Gra.nd Lodge did not look to the saloon keeper, but to tbe Lodge that received and retained him. If the Lodge failed to get rid of the offensive elements, then the Grand Lodge exercised original jurisdiction in the case, and put out what the Lodge had no right to receive. The saloon keepers all cried out "ex post facto," like our "opinion" maker in Maryland. But when the old laws of the Grand Lodge were drawn out, and the Charter and Constitution, under which our legislation had been going on for nearly fifty years, were put in evidence, then the cry was "retroactive," followed by "personal liberty." Then they raised the plea of " vested rights," like our Maryland adviser. The" civil courts" will sustain us. Some of us offered to furnish the money for anyone who would try his vested rights in the" civil courts." But they did not try; and they will not, unless the" opinion" of the Maryland committee should induce them to test the matter in the" civil courts." If Brother Schultz is a lawyer, he may get a case hereabouts. Ko :i\iissouri attorney '''auld undertake to try in our "civil courts" the rights of our departed saloon keeping brethren. The Supreme Court of Missouri decided long since that "sa~oon keepers have no vested ri.ght.s under our laws." And the Grand Lodge followed that decision by saying that "saloon keepers have no vested rights in morals, more especially, in Freemasonry." Brother Schultz can take the case now. It will go for the saying that if he can make no better case for his clients as to "vested rI~ghts" than he has in bis criticism of the action of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, his services will not be long in demand, even among the onsted saloon keepers of Missouri.


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I may close by expressing the wish that the next time he reviews our Proceedings, .that he will not divide our committee, nor have two reports where there was but one. If he will do so, and acquaint himself \"ith the history of Missouri legislation for thirty-five or forty years, he may be ready to volunteer an " opinion" for a sister Grand Jurisdiction. So mote it be.

MASSACH USETTS. The Journal announces the bolding of the Quarterly Communication December 14, 1887, in Boston, witb Brother Henry Endicott Grand :lVIaster, Sereno D. Nickerson, Grand Secretary. The attendance was large. ADDRESS.

The address of the Grand Master opened gracefully and embraces avery large amount of business matter. It is a custom with the Grand :i\1asters of that Jurisdiction to incorporate in their address all lines of business, and furnish an exhibit of financial affairs. The Grand Master Raid that the past year had been one of continued Sllccess. He reported their Fraternal relations with similar bodies unchanged. Their financial condition was most satisfactory and a matter for congratulation. He mentioned the name ofa veteran Mason, a brother who was ninety-two years old, and had been a Mason for seventy-one years, the venerable B. Nyc. The following reference to Past Grand Master Gardner is graceful and proper. Brethren, among the many friends whom I am glad to greet here to-day I look in vain for the face of one, dear to us all, who never failed us when it was possible for him to be here. My thoughts turn in affectionate remembrance to our dear friend William Sewall Gardner. Thirty-three years ago, on the thirteenth of this month, he became It member of this Grand Lodge; and of his loyalty to its principles, his devotion to its welfare, his affection for its members, let his noble recora of services testify. One year ago this month he came here and witnessed the installation of officers, although he wasunable to remain and celebrate with us the Fea.st of St. .John, but he has not entered the Grand Lodge since. His place cannot be filled, but let us remember to-day the high standard of' M:ll.Sonry which he ever set before us. With such examples of Masonic virtue as we have had in our very midst, it cannot be that we shall ever prove faithless to our trust.

He recorded the death of Past Grand r.1:a.<;ter A. H. Howland. Bro. Howland was the yonngest Past Grand :Master in the State, having closed his labors at the session when Brother Endicott was elected.


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Two new lodges had been instituted under dispensation. The Grand Lodge Yoted the sum of $500 for charity and placed it in the hands of a committee for disposal. The Grand Master concluded his address in the following terms: In conclusion, Brethren of the Grand Lodge, I have placed before you, in accordance with t.he provisions of our Grand Constitutions, an exhibit of the affairs of this Grand Lodge. I congratulate you, and the Fraternity throughout our Commonwealth, upon the evidence it gives of financial prosperity and increased membership. The signs are hopeful. The Lodges generally are united and interested. Peace reigns throughout our borders, and truly blessings from on high attend us. Let us prove ourselves even more worthy of them, by increased diligence, and a more earnest living in accordance with the sublime tenets of our Institution.

The Committee appointed to consider the question of recognizing the Grand Lodge of the Federal District of Mexico, presented the following: In the Federal District of Mexico there are two Grand Lodges, each claiming to be the legitimate Grand Lodge. Until these diflerenees are settled, and we are informed in the constitutionalmanner1 by proper authority, as to the status of all organizations claiming to be Masonic Lodges Jl1 the States and Territories of Mexico respectively: and until we learn which and how many of these united in forming the respective Grand Lodges, and that these Grand Lodge:> hold exclusive jurisdiction over tbe symbolic Lodges in their respective States and Territories,-until these facts are fully and clearly established, it would not be in harmony with the usage of the Grand Lodge of ~fassacbusettsto ~ant the petition for recognition llS presented by the Grand Lodge of the Federal Distnct of :Mexico. STATED COMMl.;"N"ICATION.

The Stated Communication was held December 27th, in the Masonic Temple, Boston. At this meeting the Officers, previously elected, were in stalled and some general business matters disposed of. THE GREAT FEAST.

The stated communication of this Grand Lodge is always held on the 27th of December, and is noted as an occasion of great social festivity and fraternal communion. After the installation of the Grand Officers, one hundred and forty brethren repaired to the banquet hall where the Feast of St. John, the Evangelist, was celebrated in due and ancient form. Numerous sentiments were offered, to which appropriate responses were made by leading Brethren present 011 the occasion. At a late hour all joined hands and ended with singing "Auld Lang Syne." The Grand Lodge was then declared closed in proper form. The number of lodges in this jurisdiction was not reported; the membership foots up 28,558. The Grand :Master and Grallo Secretary were re-elected. of both is Masonic Temple, Boston, Mass.

The address


102

[Oct.

MICHIGAN. A large and handsome volume of more than five hundred pages contains the Proceedings of the 44th Annual Communication, held at East Saginaw, January 24th and 25th, 1888. The .J ournal is a neat and well arranged production of the Grand Secretary. The Session was presided over by Brother Rufus C. Hatheway, Grand Master, and Brother '''m. P. Innes was Grand Secretary. The business and tables covered morc than two hundred pages, while the Report on Correspondence embraced three hundred and forty-four pages. From the recapitulation found in the .Journal, the number of lodges amounts to 361 with a total membership of 28,823. The lodges in that Jurisdiction have a large average membership. Missouri has 175 more lodges than Michigan but a smaller membership by three tbousand. Our average membership per lodge is forty-eight, that of Michigan is nearly double, being eighty members to the lodge. ADDRESS.

The address of the Grand Master is the most lengthy document of the kind I have ever seen, covering, as it.does, fifty pages. It is a thoughtful paper, however, and contains much of general interest, as well as of local concern to the Fraternity in Michigan. He said, that one hundred and twenty-four years ago, a number of Masons in Detroit obtained a warrant to organize the ,first lodge in that Territory. It was called Zion Lodge, Number One. That was the beginning of l\iasonry in Michigan. The troubles produced by the Revolutionary '''aI', caused Masonry in l\fichigan to lie dormant for some time. In 1794, another lodge was fonn.ed called Zion, but it did not live long. In 1806, De'Vitt Clinton, Grand Master of Masons in New York, issued a Charter for the formation of another lodge which was named Zion. As this lodge did not meet for some four years during the war ofl812, the Charter lapsed. In 1816, the Charter of Zion Number One, was renewed by the Grand Lodge of New York. In July, 18~6, the first Grand Lodge of Michigan was formed, General Lewis Cass being its Grand Master. This body ceased to meet in 1829. In 1841, another Grand Lodge was formed, but owing to the fact that the first Grand Lodge was considered as having previous rights, the second body was not recognized and subsequently dissolved. In 1844, the present Grand Lodge was organized in the City of Detroit. That Jurisdiction


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has grown wonderfully in forty-four years, as they have now about four hundred lodges, and nearly thirty thousand members. During its history, the Grand Lodge has had thirty-five Grand Masters, t,velve of whom have passed away, the remainder still being alive. Following the foregoing historical resume, the Grand Master glided into a detail of official business very gracefully and naturally. He had visited many portions of the jurisdiction during his term of Office, and announced an enthusiasm which inspires great hope for the future. He devoted several pages to moralizing and practical enlargement upon the principles and teachings of Masonry, its Philosophy, morals and dogmas. He stated that the correspondence of the Grand Master had been of immense proportions. Answers had been given to over one thousand questions, while he had written five thousand letters. CHARITY.

The Grand Master dwelt at considerable length upon Charity, presenting sound and proper views upon the subject and the duties of the Fraternity concerning it. A CASE.

In lSi5, a member became disgusted with his lodge, and rcnounced l\iasonry, and demanded that his name be stricken from its membership: and finally, after making considerable disturbance in the Lodge, they, at his continual urgent demand, yoted to discharge him from his membership. After a time he went south, and finally settled in Texas; and now, twelve years after withdrawing, he demands that the Lodge he so troubled should assist him financially, and that the Grand Master should force the Lodge to do so, [nvesti&,ation showed the ancient trouble to be, that he was not elected at the time to an office 111 the Lodge. Another, living out west, was one who had been suspended many vcars ago, in fact had not paid all his fees, and the Lodge snspending him afterwards became defunet; and when he fonnd, by corresponding, that the Lodge "had /i:0ne to rest," then he makes a demand upon the Grand l\Iaster to send him immediately fifty dollars to help him in his necessities. Comment on these, and others like them, are unnecessary. A DISTURBER.

The Grand Master presented the following statement concerning an irrepressible customer they have had to deal with in that Jurisdiction. He said: About tbe close of the last session of this Grand Body, a mandamus was issued from the Supreme Court of Michigan, to compel this Grand Lodgc to remove the sentence of expulsion she had unanimously passed against the individual, and which is yet in full force and effect; and thought it might have been economy to have allowed the case to go by default, still the principle involved was of too much consequence to not attempt to sustain and protect the position this Grand Lodge had so decidedly taken on the subject; and feeling well satisfied you would support the Grand Master in his efforts in this matter, he procured counsel to take charge of the case; and when the hearing finally occurred, we were crowlled with success-the mandamus denied-and the individual relegated to tbe same Masonic stflI1ding as before--expelled.

Let the name of this disturber, like his works be consigned to eternal oblivion. He deserves it.


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DISPENSATIONS.

Dispensations had been granted for the formation of six new lodges. COi\fPIJ1\.INTS.

Quite a large number of complaints had claimed the consideration of the Graild Master, prese~ting some very troublesome cases which he seems to have disposed of in a very judicious manner. He announced that the condition .of the Fraternity was gratirying. The records show an increase in numbers and everything was considered flattering. CONSOLIDATION.

He said that this needed improvement had been attempted but failed in several instances. FRATERNAL RELATIONS.

The Grand Master announced that the Grand Lodge of Michigan was enjoying the most amicable and satisfactory relations with other Grand Lodges. CLANDESTINE WORK.

On this subject, we have the follmving: I havc found very much of such work, published in an Eastern city, which has been sown broadcast over our jurisdiction by members claiming to be MfLSOl1S, and have succeeded in calling in and destroying large numbers oftbem. In two installces, the Worshipful :ilfasters were highly indignant because I presumed they had any such illegal work, but thcy subsequently dclivered it to me. They had even loaned it to an Entercd Apprent.ice to "post" from. Other Ma;,;ters denied there being any such 路work in their limits, but I convinced them to the contrary, and some of them werc obtained and sent me. In 1868, Grand Lodge adopted the report "that the possession and use of kcys were positively llnd without qualification interdictcd; and theIr indiscriminatepossessioll and usc forbidden. ;,: * ;,: * Also, again reiterated that the indiscriminate use of printed keys, or having of them, or selling of them, is 3. violation of the edicts of this Grand Lodge, and it is the duty of the Lodge to prefer charges and try the offenderl and if found guilty to inflict Ma,sonic punishment for lLny and all such unma;,;onic conauct. Worshipful l\fa>;ters and members CUll no longer plead ignorance of our positiYe requirements in connection with this matter. The standard of work, as settled by this Grand Lod~, is the only true and lawful guide, and must be follo,ved. DISCIPLINE.

The foliowing healthy expressions arc worthy of a place in this report, and are commended to the Lodges in M:jssouri: J have found in some Lodges a want of discipline which is very injurious to the best interests of the Craft. If 路Worshipful Mastcrs would retain the respect which is due them in their hip;h position, they should cnforce their authority; and if they do not, thei.r Lodge sessions will soon be like a ward C3.ucus-or on a par with a smoking car-its air fined with stifling odor. No wonder good, worthy members losc all interest in the meetings. The best interests of the Lodge are subservcd when church rules are sustained, and Lodge rooms kept tastily and as inviting as is 3. Brother's.llOme, or a parlor.


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If the WOrRhipfulMasters would enforce and keep up strict discipline, complaints of smalfattendance would seldom be heard, and our temperate citizens and non-smokers be found at our meetings. FUKERALS.

On the subject of Masonic and mixed funerals, the Grand Master uttered very sound and proper views as follows: As heretofore, this question has this year been a. vexing one, and a bone of contention. It is claimed by our older members, that the Sir Knights perfonning the burial service of members who are Knights, that the burial of a Master Mason, when conducted by the Lodge, has, but a small attendance and is largely neglected.

No :Master Mason in good standing, though not a Knight. should be excluded from attending a Brother :Mason's funeral, though, he be a Knight, and yet they practically are. I finnly believe the only satisfactory way to handle this "grave" question, is for Grand Lodge t<> declare that our :M:asters Lodges shall conduct the ceremonies; but if they desire, a suitotle number of "Sir Knights" may act as an escort, providing the Brother was one of their members. As members of Commanderies are Master Masons, Grand Lodge has an undoubted right to so declare. JllIXED FUNERAl,S.

When a Lodge is at labor, it is duly guarded, and a Masonic procession at a funeral is also tiled, and no one should be permitted to either enter or retire from its ranks without permission. A lodge would have as much right, legally, to admit a profane, as it would to admit him in the Masonic procession. I mention this here, to insist that Lodges be more careful in future, and only allow members of our order to join in the services or processions. . Where non-Masons declare their determination to participate in our ceremonies, such as lun'ing a portion of the pall-bearers, or the placing of emblems on the collin, or the performance of their, or any part of their burial service, the W. Master of the Lodge should peaceably retire with his members to his hall and close the Lodge, thus avoiding all strife and discord and unpleasant discussion.

The above is clearly and strongly presented. As to the first part, wben a Mason is to he buried by tbe Templars, they rendering tbeirown service, let Master Masons, as such, stay away. If a Mason prefers a request while living, to have a Templar funeral when dead, his wish should be respected. Let the Templars bury him. Master Masons should have nothing to do with the affair in their .Lodge character. The Lodge with me must have the first place all the while. A templar escort is eminently proper where a Lodge has exclusive control, provided always it is desired by the living or was the kno\vn wishof the deceased. There is just a little too much parade and demonstration connected with some 1\1 asonic funerals. I want none of it when loved 'Ones shall bear my mortal part to the silent city. And above all things I do not want the feelings of my family,-already ~leeding-barrowed and tortured by the blare of trumpets, the rattle of drums and screeching of other instruments when I am borne to my final resting place. No brass band accompaniment for a funeral in my case. I do not possess greatness enough to merit a. big funeral. I \vant. a quiet one.


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As to mixed funerals the Grand Master of Michigan treats the subject as we of Missouri have done for years. Our Grand Lodge says that during the conducting of funeral ceremonies the Lodge is at Labor and not "called o.ff." This being the case non-Masonic associations cannot be allowed to participate. Our law says, "The Lodge must take fnll charge of the funeral, or have Nothing to do with it." A custom obtains among us to this effect, that when the Lodge bas completed its work, and retired, other associations, with which tne deceased may have been connected, appear and perform rites peculiar to themselves. To this we have no objection as our Order bas rendered their last service to the dead. The Grand Lodge of Michigan adopted the following: Resolved, That this Grand Lodge recommcnds to all subordinatc Lodges and their members in this Grand jurisdiction, that in all cases, where not in conflict with the expressed wishe~ of the Brother, or his family or immediate friends, all Masonic funerals, be conducted by the Lodge; and in case the Brothcr was a Sir Knight, that the Commandery be requested to act as escort; and this Grand body most urgently requests all ~Jasons in this Grand jurisdiction to aid in carrying out this recommendation in their respective Lodges, to the end that the Lodge, which is the real and only foundation Oil whieh the higher degrees and orders must build, may have that complete recognition which of right and by ancient usuge belongs to it. But nothing in this recommendation shall be construed as prohibiting Lodges from attending funerals when conducted by Knights Templar, in compliance with the wishes of the deceased Brother or his friends.

:MASONIC "HOl\IE."

The Grand Master said their Masonic "Home" is havinQ' considerable success in obtaining membership, and that they are sanguine of success. DECISIONS.

Twenty-two pages were occupied by questions and answers. The Grand Master said that a large number of questions had been received for consideration, and most of them involved no new principles. He gave only such as seemed not to be generally understood. In view of the fact that twenty-two pages were occupied by questions n,nd answers, one can easily believe that the one thousand questions propounded to the Grand :Master was it moderate demand made upon his time and patience. Many brethren must ask questions of Grand Masters just to he sure that they are in the right, even when the law is plainer than the inquiry propounded. Concerning the many rulings made by Grand j\laster Hatheway, the Committee on Jurisprudence said: Your Committee on Jurisprudence, to whom was referred the decisions of the IVI. W. Grand Master, would respectfully report that they have given the same careful consictemtion, and find them all to be in a.ccord with the well established principles of Masonic law, and we recommend that they be approved by the Grand Lodge, and declared to be the law.

An examination of the decisions will justify the above finding. I have thus gleaned the field (a large one) occupied by Grand l\faster Hatheway, and must say that he proved himself to be a clear-headed, firm,


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painstaking and laborous official. He merited the "'VeIl done" of his brethren, accorded in a vote of thanks, unanimously adopted, as well as the further tribute described as "a Past Grand Master's Jewel, of the usual pattern, with the best wishes of the Grand Lodge." The Grand Secretary's Report was brief and of a business character. 'l'E?lIPERAKCE.

The resolution below was presented last year and laid on the table: Resolved, That it shall be considered a l\fasonic offense for any member of I. he Fraternity of this Grand jurisdiction to deal in malt, fermented or spirituous liquors a,~ a beverage, and that the penalty for so doing shall be slJspension or expulsion from the Lodge, at the discretion of the Lodge of which the Brother is a member,

This resolution was l~ft on the tahle. The Anti-Saloon sentiment was in the minority. 'Wait a few years. Revolutions do not go'backwards. The business of the session was transacted in two days. local nature notice of it need not be taken here.

Being of a

COHRE'SPO~DENCE.

The review was made by the Grand Secretary, Brother 'Villiam P. Innes. As heretofore, the Report was, largely made up of extracts from the Journals reviewed. The Committee accorded the Missouri Proceedings of 1887 the benefit of sixteen pages. After noticing the address of Grand Master Hunt, and some other matters of the session, be gave particular attention to the work of this Committee, by copying much that had been said. Excepting one subject, be copied without comment. He gave me tbe benefit of a full hearing before his readers of wbat I published last yearon the subject of colored Masons. After culling all that I had written, he gave expression to his views briefly and tersely. He shall be accorded the same courtesy, and I will copy all that he said. If I feel inclined to comment on his views, the right will not be denied me. Here is what Brother Innes had to say: Pardon us, Brother

VINCIL;

but don't yon think the "dark ages" about past '!

Regularly chartered Lodges of colored Masons may not be an "American institution" at the present date, but that "there are thousands of colored :Masons in foreign countries, possessed of black skins, but white hearts, no one doubts. Certainly England and her dependencies, as also other foreign countries, do possess reg'ulllr colored 'Masons, made in Lodges holding charters from Grand Lodges whose po\\'er and lega.lit)' we cannot question, The question WitS not asked of Past Grand :Master SHOlmAKER as to whether a colored ~fason of -:\1ichig,m should be admitted, but. the broad -:\iasonic question of whether a Brother, worthy and well qualified, and properly vouched for, irrespective of color, should not be admitted,


108

A]'pendi:r.

[Oct.

With due respect to our beloved Brother, we despise a Masonic platform that is not broad enongh to hold upon it loyal and true Masons of every color, clIme and nation. There-is no question, in our mind, that, previous to the American ReYolution, the fact of a man's skin being black, or he being of mixed blood, did not debar him from Masonic light, and the writer is sometimes led to question whether the Prince Hall Lodge, of Boston, was not largely composed of colored men of no more intelligence than we have in the present age. The writer could name many colored gentlemen whom he would gladly see members of the Masonic fraternity. That Michigan and Missouri do not make proper provision for the admission of men of color is to bc regretted, and, in our opinion, is no mark of "great intelligence." A few years ago much was said on this subject, throu~h the reports on correspondence. Our stand was taken then that Masonry 1s "color b1md," and we stick to it ?Jet.

He then added the following. "Postscript.-This is from the Masonic-not political-standpoint; for politically we are not built that way; MasonicaUy we are."

That is to say, in political matters be is indifferent to color. But in Ma.sonic relations he is "Color blind" and will "stick to it." I may not understand Brot.her Innes. Perbaps it is the other way. He may mean that politically he is particular about color. But Masonically he is for taking the "colored man and brother" where he would not have him politically. 1fthis be the correct interpretation of his terms, why I have no objection. But why be exclusive as to color in your politics, and broadguaged in your Masonry? Candor compels me to say that I do not understand Brother Innes wben be asks me if I do not think the "dark ages" about past. The Brother may learn from my position in the subject reviewed by him that there is nothing "Dark" in this writer. The treatment of the matter by me last year was intended to make "darkness light" before such minds as Brother Innes, and otbers of his kind. That article was formulated and promulgated as my "Platform of principles." Like Martin Luther, I say "Here I stand." I have not changed my ground. This 'writer is as color blind as Brother Innes so far a.s the recognition of persons "worthy and well qualified, and properly vouched for" who claim :i\fasonic consideration, "irrespective of color." But I am not so blind to social and political conditions as to discriminatâ&#x201A;Ź against the "colored man and brother" in political life, aud recognize him in Masonic relations. My theory is if he is fit for citizenship and all its belongings, he then becomes a subject for consideration in the fraternal sphere? And not until then. I close my review of the Journal of Michigan by using an extract from the opening page of Bro. Innes' Report. He said: We find, from the reports before us, that large numbers have been added to our membership during the year. Ma~' we hove that the introduction of too many strangers among the workmen will not cause contilslOn in the Craft.


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The pressing duty of the hour, "all along the line," is to guard well-the portals ofthe outer door; use the ballot with strict diligence, ever bearing in mind that to each Brother is given the power to prevent the entry into our Lodges of any but the good and true: and while bearing that fact in mind, let all 'who are within the portals so conduct'themselves that they may reflect to the olltside world the true dignity of the ~faster l\lason.

W'm. B. 'Vilson, Muskegon, Grand 'Master, 'Vm. P. Innes, Grand Rapids, Grand Secretary.

MISSISSIPPI. This Grand Lodge began the labors of the seventieth Annual Communication in the city of Columbns, February 9, 1888, with 1\'r. 'V. Brother E. G. De Lap, Grand Master, and Brother John L. Power, Grand Secre_ tary. The occa--sion was honored by the presence of eight Past Grand Masters, and representatives of twenty-one Grand Lodges. Over two hundred Lodges of the Jurisdiction were represented, as shown by the Committee on Credentials. Said committee reported 264 Lodges entitled to representation. In this number of Lodges the membership aggregates (reported and estimated) 7,253. A small decrease is observable. ADDRESS.

Brother De Lap presented to his brethren a lengthy and detailed statement of official doings. The report covered twenty-five pages. The document suggests a new method in address making. Some eighteen pages were oecupied by copies of his correspondence" with an the world, and the rest of mankind." A letter book is a great convenience in making up an address in such cases. How many letters in his book were not transferred to the address by the Grand Master of Mississippi can not be determined by this writer. His portfolio must have been large, if many were omitted, judging from the official report rendered. Brother De Lap expressed regret at his" inability to report a general revival of interest all along the line." He gave it as his opinion t.hat in many localities there had been an awakening, and that, upon the whole, no ground had been lost. He presented strong views against joint occupancy of halls. His views were approved, and Lodges are not permitted to rent their halls to non-Masonic bodies, except in cases of necessity to the Lodge. He held that Lodges U. D. cannot elect members. His deci-


110

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[Oct.

sion was that such Lodges "are constituted simply for the purpose of _~{a8on.s." The Committee on Law said: "Lodges U. D. can not aft1liate members." This is a local regulation, and may not be controverted, as it is the right of each jurisdietion to regulate all such matters. In "Missouri, we endow Lodges U. D. with numerous powers. It seems anomalous that Lodges may make Jl1asons, and not reCei1Je those already rnade. 1naking

PHEROG ATlV E.

I have met with nothing in my reading more amusing than Brother DeLap's endorsement of the" Divine Right of Kings." He certainly does not take his prerogative hOlJ1reopathically, but gulps the monstrous thing down all at once. Hear him as he prepares to swallow the animal without even smoothing down its repulsive ean;: "I have always believed in the doctrine that the Grand Master is amenable to NO LA"'. That he is not only the executor of the law, but is a law unto himse?f." Only one assumption more waf; necessary, though that is implied, namely: he who is "amenable to NO LAW" may override ALL LAW." 'Vhat is a COXSTlTUTION to the man who" is a law unto himself?" The king ca"n do wrong. Brother DeLap may now go up to the head of the class, and even make Alabama and Maine and Pennsylvania advocates of the pO'wer of the king, hang their heads. I am sorry for them, that this new light has so f;uddenly eclipsed their glory, so long unclouded. The wa.y Brother DeLap ,~ralks up head, having "spelled do,,,n" so many grand heroes of the past, ",;QuId do credit to an old fashioned " spelling bee." Hear him, as he leaps to the front, " a prince among his equals:" "In my opinion, there is but one thing that a Grand Master can not do in the exercise of his authority over the Craft." If "the Grand Master is amenable to NO LAW," he must, of necessity be above all law. Therefore he is infallible. Infallibility is a Divine attri~ buteo At last I have found the stronghold of Prerogative. It is fortressed in the Divinity, and comes from God. It is, therefore, a kingly power. "The king can do no wrong." Prerogative being Divine (above law), and therefore infallible, its possessor can do no wrong and make no mistakes. But Brotber DeLap contradicted himself in bis statement and assumption of regal powers. Then what becomes of bis infallibility? He said: "The Grand Master is amcnable to NO LA'V." He is, thercfore, ABOVE ALL LA'V. He wbo is above aUla,>,' can set aside or suspend all that is below and infcrior to him. But Brotber DeLap said there is "one thing" a Prerogative fcllow "cannot do." That is, a law about making" Innovations." If he cannot set aside that one law, he must be " amenable" to it. But he has just said that he is " amenable to


1888.J

111

NO LA,V." How he contradicts himself! I have, therefore, as little faith in his infallibility as I have respect for his dogma that the" king can do no wrong," which means that the pr~rogative of a Grand Master is infa1lihle. I am glad that tbe secret of tbe prerogative dogmatists is out at last. Brother DeLap let it out unconsciously, perhaps; but it is out. His friends of the prerogative school will say to him, in the language of Brother Kimbrough, of the committee, "You made too much law," and told too much. They must endorse or disown their pupil. 'We will see. From the agility displayed by Brother DeLap in leaping all barriers-Ie amenable" to none-he will have no difficulty in clearing at a bound the" one thing" yet remaining, which is "Innovation." If in one term he distanced all rivals for high pretences, 'what might he not do had he more time and other worlds to conquer. Hear him again: The difference between Brother Kimbrough and myself is, that he thinks the Grand :Mastcr has no right to set aside the action of the Grand Lodge, as in the Thomastown case, and I think he has the right, but should be extremely careful about exercising it. The fact that the chances arc about ten to one that you will sustain the position of Brother Kimbrough in this maUer, makes no sort of difference. As an individual, I had the right to my own opinion, and my being Grand ~IasterdoeslIot curtail that right in the least.

Brother Kimbrough, late Grand Master, and present Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence, stoutly maintained that Grand Master DeLap had" no right to set aside the action of the Grand Lodge," because be, Kimbrough, had respect for the law. As an able, conscientious Mason and jurist, he did not believe that the Grand Master ,vas" a law unto himself," and therefore a bigger man than the law, and the Grand Lodge ,vhich made him Grand Master. Brother Kimbrough's position was sustained, and the Grand Master was left" alone in his glory." Poor old Prerogative! It knows no law, and" is amenable" to nonc; but may break all laws, and thcn hide behind "the high powers in me vested." It" is a la'" unto itself," and therefore may make laws at its own sweet will and pleasure-such as making Masons out of minors, and declaring them of "lawful age" because made Masons" by virtue of the high powers in me vested." Mighty 'Prerogative [ companion of kings! thy behest, thundered from thrones and burled by bierarchs, have caused nations to tremble and frightened devotees to quake. But in this fair land, "home of the free," wrested from the grasp of tyranny by our fathers, in the field and in the cabinet, the power that" is amenable to NO LA. w" will yet find a burial place as deep and deserved as was furnished British tea in Boston babor. "Down "\'ith law! dmvn with constitutions!" is the cry of Prerogative advocates when law is in the way of a "Grand Master who is amenable to :NO LAW." ",Vhy should damage grow to the hurt of the king"? "Disperse, ye rebels!" shouted Major Pitcairn to tbe colonists at Lexington, and fired a volley, whose battle shock precipitated a struggle, amid the throes of which was born the greatest


112

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Republic of all the centuries. The" rebels" retired, but were heard from, and felt, at Bunker Hill, and Trenton, and Yorktown. "Disperse,". ye opposers of the king's power, which "is amenable to NO LAW," while Prerogative strides forth, "a law unto himself," trampling upon constitutions and defying obligations taken to support and maintain constitutions. 'Ve ,,,ill not" disperse," oh, King Prerogative. 'Ve warn you, oh, king, that the American mind of to-day is cast in a different mould from the allegiant worshippers in other lands and times of thy power which "is amenable to no law." In this land law governs, not power, as unreal as a chimera, and as unlimited as the will of Grand Masters, who are a law unto themselves. Your day is coming, oh, Prerogative, and the bands of despisers of your pompous pretensions are preparing a grave, deeper than six feet, where no acacia shall mark your resting place or tell the passersby " Hie ,jacet."

Brother De Lap saved his reputation, though he buried his discretion. A Lodge had not made returns for some fourteen years, and its charter was arrested eight or nine years before "for contumacy, and for contempt of the authority of the Grand Lodge." Yet by "virtue of the high power in me vested," he "re1Jived" said Lo,dge and put it to work. One would naturally conclude that said Lodge was qt~ite dead. Yet he "revived" it by the "high power" he possessed as a Grand Master who was "amenable to NO LAW." His action in the case marks him as the" reviver" of all time. Brother Kimbrough, for the committee, said the Grand Master can create Lodges U. D., but the "reviver" was not recognized as "a la'" unto himself" in the reviving business. The committee said, " The Grand Master has no power to 'revive.' " Pray, where is the" high power in me vested? " I have said that Brother De Lap saved his reputation.

He did it by

not exercising "the high po,,,er" -the divinity, perhaps - he felt stirring

within, exeept in the "reviving" instance.

Here is what he said:

I beg to assure the Grand Lodge that while my ideas of the prerogatives of the Grand Master are a" above stated, that, in no case, have 1. during my administration, beml in the least inclined to encroach upon the laws, cllstoms, and trn,ditions of the Grand Lodge, and, as this session will close my career in that capacity, lily perhaps extreme views on the subject will not result in any harm.

For all contained in the above paragraph, let us be devoutly thankful. The Grand Lodge unanimously tenclered to Brother De Lap, as the retired Grand Master, a vote of thanks "for the able and excellent manner in which he had presided over the Craft during the past year." The report of Brother Power, Grand Secretary, presenting a general and fiscal exhibit of affairs, was a paper of merit and value, showing that a master is in charge of that department. He is worthy, aB a gentleman a.nd a Mason, of the warm approbation of his brethren.


1888.1

AppencU;-r.

113

The report of the Jurisprudence Committee by Brother B. T. Kimbrough, P. G. )iL, was an able and strong presentation of principles applied to a large number of issues considered. Brother Kimbrough is a Solon in his Jurisdiction. Much business of interest to the Fraternity in Mississippi was transacted. CHARITY.

Our brethren, motived by charity as a "great tenet of our profession," made a number of donations to "helpless widows" and dependent brethren. The usual donation of five hundred dollars was made to the Protestant Orphan Asylum at Natchez. BROTHER GURiIlEY.

M. W. Brother Frederic Speed, P. G. M., paid a most graceful, eloquent and just tribute to the distinguished Brother Theodore T. Gurney, P. G. M., late of Illinois. " SALOON-KEEPING." REPORT OF TUE LAW CO)Ii\1ITTEE."

Brother B. T. Kimbrough, Chairman of the Law Committee, presented a report on the above subject. The question had been presented to the committee as follows: "Is saloon-keeping, or the selling of intoxicating liquors, as a beverage, a Masonic offense?" The report of the committee is in answer to that question. The committee said that a former decision by the Grand Lodge was to the effect that retailing" is sanctioned by the laws of the land," and is, therefore, Masonic. This former decision was controverted by the committee, which said that the logic of that decision would coinpel ::\fasonry to permit whatever the la-\vs of the State permit. If this be so, it is not unmasonic to speak evil of the good name of a brother Mason. Nor would it be unmasonic even to deny the existence of God Himself, because it is permitted by the law's of the land. The committee wisely said that the former decision \vas vicious, because it failed to distinguish between what the State commands and \vhat it permits. Another vice of the former decision was its failure to discriminate between the domain of the State and that of ~fasonry. The domain of the State is one of public policy merely. That of Masonry is morality. In this realm Masonry enters to protect man against himself, and charges him with duties to his neighLor and to his God. G. L. Ap.-S.


114

[Oct.

The committee further said: "Not what the laws of the State permit, but what the moral law permits," and this only is not ullll1asonic. After a very thorough and logical argument, and a long list of quotations from various writers, together with the statement of the action of a number of Grand Lodges against saloon-keeping in Masonry, the committee reached the conclusion that saloon-keeping is unmasonic, and an offense against Masonry. Having made this declaration against the curse of the liquor traffic by Masons, the report of the committee was adopted almost unanimously. The motion to ado pt was made by Past Grand Master Frederic Speed, and seconded by Past Grand Master Patty. Subsequently Past Grand Master Kimbrough offered as an additional statute the following, which was adopted: "Subordinate Lodges may not hereafter initiate or admit to membership saloon-keepers." The Grand Master decided that the words "may not" means "shall not." The statute adopted allows any member of a Subordinate Lodge who had license to keep a saloon to continue the business till the expiration of his license. The Grand Lodge also decided, upon the report by, the .Law Committee, against gambling, as permitted by the civil law declaring that the permission of the State is no moral license to a Mason to engage in gambling.

la,,,

The adoption of the foregoing, by the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, places the question raised upon the proper plane, and defines it to be a moral issue. As such, it isa question that may and should be treated by the Grand Lodges of the country. That Grand Lodge enunciated an unanswerable truth, which I heartily endorse: that the legislation of a State is not necessarily right morally, and its action can form no just standard for the guidance and government of an Institution that is declared to be "a beautiful system of morals." The foregoing deliverances stand in marked constrast with the utterances of the Grand Master and reportorial committee of another Jurisdiction in the same latitude. In IVnssissippi the standard of Masonic measurement is a ~lORAL one. In the other Jurisdiction it is laid down as a "fundamental proposition, that no act can he made a Masonic crime unless such act is made a crime or misdemeanor by the statute laws of the State or country."


1[-;88.J

Appendix.

115

CORRESPOKDEKCE.

A well digested and forcible review of more than 100 pages was furnished by 1\1. "'V. Bro. A. H. Barkley, P. G.l\'T., "Reporter on Correspondence." He said his Grand Lodge created the name" Reporter" for the writer on correspondence instead of "Committee," hence he had to be obedient to his "mother." That is right. You must not" be a law unto yourself." 1 rather like the title, and would be a "Reporter" myself, but for a healthy fear of m.y " motJwl'." Brother Barkley is a member of the" Reporter" family after my own heart. He says "I" when there is no "we's." Then he is plain, easily understood, candid and fraternal. He does not go oft at a tangent when others differ with him. Above all, he is sound on the great questions that involve the character, permanency and perpetuity of Freemasonry. Commend me to such Masons, as leaders and niolders of thought. Commenting on the action of a sister Grand Lodge in dealing with a drunken member, Brother Barkley said: A W. M. wa~ reported to the Grand Lodge as having been drunk the evening before. An investigation wa" had by a committee, and the report mnde showed that they had found the brother as Having been beastly drunk the preceding evening, and the recommendation made was that he be expelled. On his arraignment, the brother confessed hi~ gllilt, and by a unanimous vote he was expelled from the Grand Lodge. The offense "'as committed at night-the expulsion took plaee carly next morning. The Grand Lodge did right. Ko man claiming to be a :Mason ought to be allowed to make a beast of himself lind bring reproach upon the Inst.itution, and then go unpunished for his deeds. 'Yhen we were quite young in the cause of :Masonry, a brother who had been honored with the second place within the gift of the Grand Lodge, was guilty of a like offense during its scssions. He aspired to a seat in the Grand East, and up to the time the offense was committed his prospects were exceedingly flattering, but this one act "'as so repugnant to the feelings of those who before bad lent him their aid, that they with!:lrew t.heir support. and a signal d~fe3t was the result. We will yield to no one in readliless to extend the mantle of chanty over a brother's faults; but when he so far forgets himself and the duty which he owes to the Fraternity, as to ftct in it beastly manner llnd bring reproach upon the good name of an Institution which he is bound by the ~tron~est obligations to honor, our charity fails, and we stand ready to mete out to such 3n oftender punishment due to the offense committed.

To the above the Missouri eommittee desires.to utter a characteristic :'Amen." In his review of Pennsylvania, Brotl}(~r Barkley pays his respects to our much-loved brother and esteemed co-worker, Richard Vaux, P. G. M., and Committee on Correspondence. Brother Vaux belongs to the advanced school of the" High-Power-in-Me-Vested" prerogative teachers. Concerning the making of a Mason of a youth, or one in his non-age, Brother Vaux said: "A youth, under age, has never yet been defined to he a person a certain number of years old. A youth is of Masonic age ?cllen he has been initiated." To which Bl'{;>ther Barkley replies:


116

Appendix.

[Oct.

A boy between the ages of ten and sixteen is a )IImth, and, according to Bro. Vaux's statement, such a one, if he has been initiated, "is of :;\lasonic age," and, therefore, it is the initiation that gives to anyone the proper Masonic age. There is such a thing as being of a proper age according to law. Bro. Vaux will understand what we mean if he will but refer to 11 question which is asked the candidate at the door of the preparation room, and correctly answered for him before he can be admitted to the Lodge-room. Now, if Brother Vaux's statement is correct that" A yanth Is - of jl{asonic aye when he has been initiated," then why make such an inquiry? The Lodge must have some definite idea as to what is leg-al as to age. The Junior and Senior Deacons must have a definite idea as to what constitutes it. Without this the question would be meaningless. The eig-hth Landmark, as given by Dr. Mackey, says the Grand )faster has the prerogative to ma.ke Masons at sight but nowhere do we tind an~'thing relative to making "a yontJ~ wuter ayc" a :Mason: and if the youth is not of lawful age, his having been initiated by the Grand Master neither does, nor can it. make him of lawful age, or, as Bro. Vaux says, ":Masonic age." It is not his having been initiated that make-s him of )lasonic age, but his being of lawJnl age, so far as this can do it, that gives him that qualification to be made a I1Iason. If the candidate is possessed of every other qnalification, and yet is lacking- in this, he cannot be made a Ma.~on. This is one of the prerequisites, and although the candi路 date should have been initiated by the Grand ~faster, that act does not give him this qualification.

The qualification is not one that can be infused into, or conferred upon the candidate by any Grand Master who claims the prerogative "By the hig-h power in me vested."

Prerogative can do anything, because its possessor" is amenable to NO It can make a Mason of a young man in his non-age in defiance of both law and obligation. Brother Barkley continued his inquiries after the following pertinent style: LA \Y."

Some very able and learned Masonic jurists do not accept the doctrine as taught by Pennsylvania, of which Bro. Vaux is an lwknowledged exponent, and their viewl; are worth just about as much, and are entitled to as much weight. as any we have read from Pennsylvania. Each one puts in his own claim, lays down his own premises, and, from this as a start.ing point, proceeds to argue the question, and, having different. premises, they arrive at difIerent conclusions. We are honest about this matter, and we want to know the truth, \\'e are not for wa.<;ting time for the sake of mere argument. Such disCllssions are not worth the paper they are written on. "'hat we want to know now is this, Bro. Vaux, where is the proof that what you claim for your Grand Master (or any Grand ~1aster) is taught in the Landmarks, or is a Landmark. '

Yes, \\There is "the proof?" It seems to me that all the challenges made for "proof" upon the subject have been met by only one reply, "the high power in me veste~.l" being the pompous and taunting answer. But nO reply beyond the "high power" pretense will ever be vouchsafed. Having lingered long and pleasantly with the lioble brethren of "Jfississippi, I must close the interview. In doing so, I beg to assure them of continued fraternal consideration and feelings, warm as their south land in the springtime, where recently I was charmed by their sunshine and flowers during a hurried visit. Brother Barkley remains in charge of the department of Correspondence as Reporter; 1\1. ,V. Bro. lVr. l\1. Evans, Grand Master; Bro. John L. Power, Grand Secretary.


1888.]

Appendix.

117

MONTANA. The twenty-third Annual Communication commenced its labors in the city of Helena, October 5,1887, Brother Samuel ,YoI'd, Grand Master, prescnt and presiding; Brother Cornelius Hedges, Grand Secretary. It is always a pleasure to review the work of this Grand Lodge. The proceedings, as furnished by the Grand Secretary, Brother Hedges, present an attraction that must be derived from the surroundings of that wonderful country, showing both freshness and beauty.

From the very complete recapitulation furnished by the Grand Secretary, the following items are gleaned: Thirty Lodges, t\venty-five of which were represented. The membership given by TJodges amounts to 1,875, showing a gain of seventy-seven members for the year. The income was $2,690; expenses, Sl,318. An address of seven pages was furnished by the Grand Master, Brother 'Vord. It is not burdened 'with business, but mostly occupied with excellent teachings and moral sentimcnts. The following extract is taken from the address, and shows the profound respect of its author for God, and his reverence for the Holy ,Yritings: The )fa~onry of our allcestors shuts out the atheist and irreligious Jibertine from its member>:hip. It calls for the recognition of God at every stcf' The all-seing eye is one of its hallowed symbols. The Holy Writings Il.re an essentia of evcry Lodge, and without it no l\Iasonic work can be done. More thun this, whilst there is a single promise, cmblem or sign of Masonry in conflict with reverence for and faith in God, every precept alld lesson the true :Mason encounters in his progress, arlmonishes him that hc must square his life according to the sacred law if he wouid fit himself for that" temple not madc with hallds, eternal in the heavens." Masonry puts men in a devout attitude before God, and enjoins them in the strongest manner to obey His law. It does not assume to fill the place of the church, but it does give recognition to the onc eternal God and His immutable la\\'s. It stands for more than all average amount of intellectual and moral liberty.

The Grand .Master announced the death of one of their Past Grand Masters in t.he following terms: Death has cJaimed its tribnte from among- us. Places once filled are empty; voices once heard nrc forever hnshed in the deep silence of the grave; noble forms that once moved amOllg' us, the emborlill1ent of what was manly and worthy of being loved, have crumbled to dust. Tried hearts and true spirits have burst: the bands that bound them on carth, and have entered an untried futnre. Loving souls have cast aside the sorrows or earth to realize the fruition of their drenms of eternity. Eyes whose exprel'sive gleam of thonght were welcomed in fraternal circles havc closed on time and opened on eternity. While the mortality has been comparatively light in our jurisdiction in the past year. the loss of even a few noble hearts and tried souls is great cause for lamentation. Wc are at this time especially called to mourn the loss of our worthy Brother,


118

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[Oet.

Hugh Duncan, who but It few weeks since (leparted this life at a ripe old age. He was but a few short years ago the Grand ;\iaster of :Masons in this jurisdiction. He attended and helped to organize the first Grand Lodge of ;\fontann. at Virginia City in 1866, and has attended every Anllual Communication since. A long life had bcen devoted to the happiness and good of his fello\v-men, and he died as he had lived-an honored member of an order which he loved. He had worn the armor from earliest manhood, and strove, ill his own way, to exemplify the true and trusty :Mason.

The business engagements of the Grand l\1:aster during the year prevented him from visiting many of the Subordinate Lodges. He announced a very great' degree of prosperity existing in the Jurisdiction. He said that glad tidings of peace and harmony came to them from every portion of the Grand Lodge. DECISIONS.

The Grand Master stated that a few questions of Masonic law had been referred to him for consideration. One case claimed his attention, in which a brother had been sllspended for non-payment of dues. The suspension having lasted over one year, the Lodge seemed to think that the brother should be required to pay dues for the time that he stood suspended. The Grand Master ruled that the brother was entitled to restoration upon the payment of such dues as he owed at the time of his suspension. A question had been presented to the Grand ::\laster as to whether a person who had lost the sight of one eye was eligible for initiation. He decided that there was nothing that rendered the candidate incapable of performing the art and becoming perfect in the degrees. His rulings were approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence, which report was adopted by the Grand Lodge. These rulings are in harmony with the custom in Missouri. The following distinguished visitors were welcomed and entertained by the Grand Lodge during its session: Robert Morris, Past Grand Master of Kentucky; J. H. McLeary, Past Grand Master of Texas, antI N. ",V. McConnell, Past Grand Master of Tennessee, and present Chief Justice of Montana. During the session, Brother Robert 1:Iorris, being inspired by the grandeur of that country, wrote a poem, dedicated to the Masons of Montana. At one of the evening sessions of the body he delivered a lecture and recite'! two of his poems, which appea.r in the proceedings. The Grand Lodge voted him ~200 in consideration of his services rendered to :Masonry in Montana, and that he should a.'5sist them in perfecting their ritual. The reports of -th~ Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were excellent businel'ls papers, and show a satisfactory financial condition.


119

]888路1 RECOGNITION.

The Special Report on Correspondence, by Brother Hedges, recommending the recognition of the Gi'and Lodges of Peru and Porto Rico, was adopted. The same Committee reported on the trouble between the Grand Lodge of Connecticut and Hiram Lodge, No.1, whose charter has been arrested. Connecticut was assured of the sympathy and support of Montana in her position. The ',Masons and the Lodges in ::\10ntana were ordered to hold no :Masonic intercourse with Hiram Lodge, No.1, formerly of the Connecticut Jurisdiction. PAST GRAND lIIASTER HUGII, DUNCAN.

A very interesting report was furnished concerning this distinguished brother Mason. In the year 1864 he settled in Montana, having been made a Mason in Scotland, his birthplace. He was among the first to organize the Fraternity in Montana. He filled various offices in the bodies of that .Jurisdiction, and was elected Grand Master in 1883. The last mention made of him by the Grand Lodge is found in the minutes of the la.'3t session, October, 1886: "路Burns' 'Adieu,' by Brother Duncan, followed as usual." The Committee said: "We miss him; and as we shall adjourn, who will take his place, or who shall, or can, raise his voice in harmony and lead in that favorite farewell?" A resolution was adopted in this connection, " That at all future Communications of the Grand Lodge we close with singing Burns' , Adieu,' as a token of respect to the memory of our deceased Brother Duncan, so that the pleasant association of the past may be transmitted to the future." The Grand Secretary says, in closing: "Repeated attempts were made tosing Burns' 'Adieu,' but it was painfully evident that the voice of the Master Minstrel was hushed forever, and as yet none other had appeared who could take his place." A beautiful memorial page appears in the Proceedings. 'Vithin dark lines appears the favorite song of the de~ ceased Past Grand Master, and to which is appended the following touching tribute: TO THE "lEMORY OF OUR BROTHER,

REV. HUGH DUNCAN, A NATIVE SCOTClurAN, ONE OF THB FATHERS AND FOUNDERS OF MASONRY IN ;llONTANA, AND NEVER MISSED ATTENDANCE AT EVERY ANNUAL COMMUNICATION; WHO WAS GllAND CIIAPI,AIN FOR MANY YBARS, AND GRAJS'D "rASTER IN 1883-4, AND ALWAYS SUJS'G BURNS' "ADIEU" AT THE CI,OSE OF EVERY SESSION; WHO DIED SEPTEMBER

16, 188i,

THIS MEMORIAL PAGE IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED BY 'HIS SURVIVING BRETHREN.


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[Oct.

JURISPRUDENCE.

The Committee on Jurisprudence rendered a report ratifying the various acts of the Grand Master, and submitted the following amendment to their Grand Lodge by-laws, which was adopted: The act of payment shall reinstate to membership if made within one year from date of suspension, but after a lapsE' of one year, in addition to payment of arrears, or so much of them llS the Lodge shall exact, a two-thirds vote of the members of the Lodge present shall be necessary.

This amendment was designed to define t.he status of members, whose suspension for non-payment of dues had extended beyond one year. In our Missouri code the rule is to require a two-thirds vote to reinstate a party whose suspension has continued three years. The Grand Master incorporated the following in his address. very interesting paragraph:

It is a

The march of Masonry in its mission of love llnd charity in this Territory is keeping pace with the steady tread of civilization, the increase of population and wealth and the advance of science, learning and commerce within its limits. From a comparativeiy wild wa<;te but a few short years ago, our young Territory hM grown to be great-great in all the elements of wealth and prosperity. It is rapidly filling up with people of sterling qualities, who are determined to place it in front of all Western communities. Railroads are adding to its wealth and greatness. Its mines of silver, gold and copper were never in so prosperous a condition. Its soil continues to yield marvelous products. Labor in all departments of industry is productive and amply compensated. Our people are happy. It affords me unbounded plea<;ure to congratulate you upon these blessings so bountifully vouchsafed by the Great Giver of all good.

On retiring from. office, the Grand Master, Brother Virord, presented his successor with a signet ring of solid gold, deeply engraved with the significant emblem of a lion's paw, to be used as the Grand Master's private seal during his official term, and to be transmitted to his successor, and so on in endless succession, while time and Mas6nry endure. A very cordial vote of thanks to Brother 'Word, the retiring Grand Master, was adopted, and a committee appointed to prepare and present to him, as a parting token of est.eem, a Past Grand Master's jewel. COHRESPONDEl\CE.

Brother Cornelius Hedges prepared an excellent review of 103 pages. As heretofore, his report was written. There is not an excerpt found in the entire work. His preference for writing over clipping must be respected, and is commendable. If he had the saIne amount of labor to perform, all alone, that falls to the lot of this" scribe," he would feel like using the scissors occasionally. I am unlik.e my Brother Staton, of Kentucky, who shrinks from l1lutilating the G~'and Lodge proceedings reviewed by him. I prefer to furnish the readers of my reports the language of those reviewed; then if I criticize said language, or comment thereon, the reader will have both text and comment 路before him. I have be~n


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charged with misrepresenting brethren and Grand Lodges. own mouths let them be judged.

121 Out of their

Brother Hedges gave our Missouri Proceedings of ] 886 a fair hearing and kind treatment. He always does. Concerning Grand Master Boyd's Address he said: It does not appear that the Grand Master was .called upon for any final decisions. In his glo,,,ing words upon "the condition of the Craft," the Grand :Master pictures a pretty bad world with powerful tendencies to divert, disturb, distfllct and destroy, an of which is true to some extent, and yet our disposition is to look on the bright side, and we honestly believe the world is steadily growing better, with many oscillations of the pendulum. There are more folks than there used to be, and our telegraph is more industrious we fancy, in gathering details of crime, than other items. We fancy Bro. Boyd wanted a dark back-ground upon which to project his bright picture of Masonry. _

He made a slight mistake in this statement: "The Lodges number 531, but the total membership does not appear." Had Brother Hedges looked at the recapitulation on page 222, Proceedings of 1886, he would have found this: "Total number of members on the roll, 26,571." He commended the Grand Lodge Register prepared by this writer, and said it would 'become invaluable. ~o it has already. It pays for itself every year. Brother Hedges paid a just compliment to our Committee on Appeals, saying, "Their judgment challenged admiration." He thought the "saloon keeping ordinance" was "not much respected" in some sections of our Jurisdiction. Brother Hedges will have occasion to change his views when informed by the Grand Master at the coming session that the" saloon keeping ordinance" has been so "much respected" all over the State that none remain in Masonry to violate the" ordinance." 'Vhen the Grand Lodge of Missouri speaks, it intends to be heard and obeyed. It said years ago that the saloon business was immoral, and, therefore, unmasonic. It sai9., moreover, that this was a simple" declaration of what had alu;ays been the lew)." Hence the "optiOll to quit the business or quit Masonry" was presented the saloon keeping Masons. They are all out of the Lodges. The" ordinance" is effectual. Brother Hedges said: ." 'Ve have got a Temple before Missouri, and, possibly, may have a ' Home' first." In their new country, a " Home" for destitute ones is not so much needed as in the older Jurisdictions. Missouri eongratulates Montana over the acquirement of a Temple as warmly as 1\J ontana will rejoiee with Missouri in the success of our cherished and llmch-needed "Home" enterprise. The" Charity Day" work during Templar week here was the grandest achievement ever effected by the Templars on this continent. As a member of the "Triennial Committee," I am proud to announce, as a result of our "Charity Day" experiment, that we turned over to the "Home" trustees thirty-five


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[Oct.

This sum, as an Endowment J!lw~d, has been invested in good, interest-bearing bonds. Our entire "Home" assets foot up some severity-five thousand dollars. It has been the cherished and prayerful desire of this writer to see a "Home" in our Jurisdiction worthy of the Masonic name and of Missouri Masons, where" destitute widows, helpless orphans" and dependent brethren may find an asylum. The work is, to me, all-absorbing. God knows I would rather be an instrument in carrying forward and completing such a "Holy Charity," than to' be numbered among the great ones of earth. But I must not tarry longer with Brother Hedges. He closed thus:

thousand dollars, cash.

Wha.t Masonry wants is a field of operation a.c:; broad as its principles, a career of aggressive charity, harmonizing the waning elements of society, Substitut.ing the arbitrltlion of reason for that of the sword, and when wars come, itS come they will, soHening the asperit.ies and animosities, and staunching the wounds and relieving the sufferings they entail. There is a mission and a work for our noble institution at all times and all over the world. There is work enough, too, for all we can enlist and for all the allies we can gain. Our creed and professions are good; what is needed is that our career should correspond with our creed, our practice with our professions.

James vV. Hathaway, of Helena, was chosen Grand Master, and Bro. Cornelius Hedges, of the same city, was re-elected Grand Secretary.

NEBRASKA. The thirtieth Annual Communication opened in the city of Omaha, June 15, 1887. The proceedings of that session were not received by this Committee in time for review last year. In fact, the examination of the Nebraska Proceedings is always one year behind. The session opened with Grand Master Charles K. Coutant in the the chair, with representatives from 124 Lodges out of 146 on the roll. There is 110 index furnished by the Grand Secretary, and but for the report of the Committee on Returns, the membership could not be ascertained. The 146 Lodges contain 7,377 members. There was a gain of 716 over the preceding year. The Grand Master presented quite an extensive business paper, covering fifteen pages. He reported having granted dispensation for nine new Lodges. Twenty-three decisions had been rendered. They are of a local character, and received the approval of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master encumbered three pages of his address in reference to a very undeserving character. He had been requested to define the standing of one Calvin Burt, and give an opinion


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to the merits of the society called" The 'Aneient Egyptian :Masonic Rite of Memphis." Perhaps the Grand Master thought best to 'present the subject for information. It certainly could not claim consideration on any other grounds. The Committee on Jurisprudence made short work of the subject, saying that Burt had been expelled, and with the aforesaid rite they had nothing to do. This was short and sweet. 3S

The Grand Master refused permission to Lodges to meet over saloons. He announced, in closing, that peace and harmony prevailed among the Fraternity. The Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer presented their usual reports. The Trustees of the Orphans' Educational Fund rendered a report, showing that the Fund amounts to nearly $15,000. c

The Grand Orator, 'V. H. Munger, was not present, but sent an oration of four pages, which was printed in the Proceedings. In examining the laws of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, I find the following: "It is a Masonic offense for a Mason to engage in the retailing or wholesaling of intoxicating liquors as a beverage." " A ::\fason accepting the position of bar-tender in a saloon is subject to Masonic discipline." )IASONIC JIO)!E.

The Grand Lodge of Nebraska has taken the preliminary steps looking to the establishment and maintenance of an institution to be called "A Masonic Orphans' Home and School, and Home for Aged, Infirm and Indigent Masons." CI

It was ordered that a commISSiOn of seven members be appointed with full power to act iri asking for donations and proposals for location of the Home; to accept such proposition as \vill best serve the Home; to make ~:;uch location, and establish such institution as in their judgment may be deemed best. A proposal was made that the Grand Lodge appropriate the sum of twenty cents per capita, annually, out of its funds to be used to support and maintain such institution. It was further proposed that the SUIll of $10,000 he appropriated out of the general fund to the commission for the location and establishment of the institution. It was further ordered that the Orphans' Educational Fund be invested, and that $5,000 of the Grand Lodge fund be loaned for the purpose of assisting in establishing the Orphans' Home.


124

[Oct.

There is nothing further in the Journal under consideration claiming attention.' It is hoped that the proeeedings of June, 1888, may reach this Committee in time for review. As usual, there is no report on correspondence. Milton J. Hull was elected Grand Master, and '''m. R. Bowen was reelected Grand Secretary.

NEVADA. This Grand Lodge, like Nebraska, never sends its Proceedings in time for notice in the same season when issued, necessarily being one year behind time. <.I

The Grand Lodge meets in June, and the Journal embraces but little more than one hundred pages. Months intervene after the session closes before the Proceedings come to hand. Such a work ought to be delivered in a few days. The twenty-third Annual Communication opened in the city of Reno June 14, 1887. Henry Rolfe, Grand Master, and Jno. D. Hammond, Grand Secretary. There are 20 Lodges and 1,036 members in the Jurisdiction. The income is $1,000. The address of Grand Master Rolfe was quite short, and contained but little of general interest. He announced the death of Past Grand Master 'V. C. Currie, also that of N. C. Haslund, Grand Tyler. The Grand :Master reported having granted permission to a Lodge to confer the Third Degree out of time. He did so by " power in me vested." The Grand Secretary rendered a report in detail. Brother Christopher Diehl, Grand Secretary of Utah, was present as a visitor, looking after a matter of interest to his Grand Lodge, growing out of an invw3ion of the Jurisdiction of Nevada. This case has caused a good deal of disturbance between the two Grand Lodges. It seems that one 1\1. D. Foley, who resided in the State of Nevada, was made a l\fason in a Lodge in Utah in 1884. Nevada considered this an invasion of its Jurisdiction, not only on the ground of citizenship in Nevada, but from the fact that Foley had been rejected three times by a Nevada Lodge. The Grand Lodge of Nevada declared him suspended. Brother Diehl, the Grand Secretary of Utah, visited the Grand Lodge of Nevada for the pur-


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pose of effecting a fraternal adjustment of the differences. The matter was referred to a committee, and that committee declared that the Utah brethren had not intentionally done wrong, but had been deceived and imposed upon. A gross offense having heen committed against 2.\fasonry, and specially against th.e Grand Lodge of Nevada, that body could not overlook the invasion of their rights. As a conclusion of the whr:>le matter, the following was adopted: Resolved, That whereas the 11'1. W. Grand Lodge of Utah Ihas sent to us its personal representative, aut.horized to make such amends as are contained in an apology for an unintentional invasion of our Jurisdiction, we cordially and fraternally accept such amends in the spirit in which they are offered, and that this Grand Lodge appoint three special representatives to attend the next Annual Grand Communication of thc Grand Lodge of Utah, with powers to confer with said Grand Lodge of Utah, or with a like commission appointed by it, and to seek ont, if possible, the real offendcrs in this llnfortuIlate affair, and recommend such punishment as the honor of Masonry shall demand, it being the desire of this committee and of the Grand Lodge that every fraternal endeavor should be made to amicably settle our di1liculties, firmly believing that when the real facts in this casc is understood by all parties there will be no difference of opinion as to the remedy; and that, ulltil t.his ma\ter is finally scttled, said l\f. D. Foley continue suspended from all the rights and privileges of Masonry in this Jurisdiction.

There was no business of any moment transacted during the session of the Grand Lodge. CORRESPONDENCE.

A review of sixty-seven pages was furnished by Brother Jno. D. Hammond, Grand Secretary. It is wholly made up of extracts from Grand Lodge Proceedings. Two pages are devoted in this way to )1issouri for 1886. Brother Hammond closes his labors as a committee by the following announcement: . Changes, both as to business relations and as to domicile, make it necessary for the undersigned scribe to give up the further writing of Correspondence Reports. Like many anot.her thing in this life, the work has been, at once, llll irksome task and a constant pleasure. Tiresome as to details, yet full of kindliest sympathy and sugg-estion. To all our bret.hren, wheresoever dispersed, but especially to those who dwell amid these mountains, whom, knowing best, we most esteem, and from whom we have received so much kindness, we offer our hearty greeting and our best wishes for their welfare. Jfay we all be good men and true.

80 mote it be.

A. L. Fitzgerald, Grand Master; C. N. Noteware, Grand Secretary. His address is Carson City.

NEW HAMPSHIRE. This Grand Lodge holds semi-annual and annual communications. The semi-annual meeting is held for the purpose of exemplifying the work. The nath Annual Communication was opened May 16, 1888, in the City of Concord. Brother \Vm. R. Burleigh was Grand Master. Brother (;eo.


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[Oct.

P. CleaYes was Grand Secretary.. From his summary it is learned that there are seventy-six lodges on the roll, all of 路which had made their returns in due time. Representatives were present from fifty-one lodges, with a large list of Past Grand Officers and Representatives of Grand Lodges. The membership in the jurisdiction amounts to 8,194, there being a small gain of 20 members. ADDRESS.

The address of the Grand Master was brief and contained but little of interest to anyone outside ofthe Grand Lodge. He reported the death of five members of the Grand Lodge during the term. A few dispensations had been granted. No decisions of any moment reported. The address was approved by the proper committee. The decision was rendered in the Grand Lodge, that a Master Mason should not appear in public, at a funeral or any other time, in Masonic clMhing, unless it was such an occasion when the lodge, opened on the 3rd degree, might take part. But little business, and that of a local character, was transacted during the Session. CORRESPONDENCE.

An extended review covering over two hundred pages, was furnit;hed by Brother A. S. 'Wait, "for the Committee." The Proceedings of fiftyfour Grand Lodges were reviewed; some of them for two years. Brother 'Vait is a charming \",riter, everything, being clear, bright and strong. He gleans well and writes freely. In noticing the Connecticut difficulties, he commented upon the subject at some length, more for information than otherwise. He said their Grand Lodge was not called on to act, as the controversy was purely local. He concluding his notice on that question by saying that should any ofthe expelled members of Hiram Lodge in Connecticut ask to visit their lodges, the question would then have to be determined as to their standing. Brother 'Vait was of the opinion that no loss would be felt if the Proceedings of the Masonic Congress held at Chicago should never be published. This Committee is in full sympathy with Brother'Vait. From his comments upon the subject, the following extract is made: At this writing the convention has been held, but no report of its action has reached this committee, nor are they informed how the convention was constituted, whcther by a reprcscntation of many or few of the Grand Lodges. Its action, whatever it may prove to have been, cannot, we think, be a matter of indifference to American Masons. We think it more far-reaching, in its probable consequences than is now gCllcrally believed. We do 1101. assert that those consequences will bedisa.'3trous to Masonry, or that they ,\'ill be injurious to its best interests. We have heretofore exprcssed the belief and we see no ground now to change the opinion, that the meeting of such a body looks in its consequences towards the destruction oft-hat purity of Grand Longe sovereignty which up to


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the present time has distinguished the institution in its organized character. We do not, indeed look for the present assumption by this body, or those which may succeed it in the lIear future, of any authority to prescribe rules for the government of the Craft; its professed functions are only advisory. We do look, however, to see the claim set up for this body that. the conclusions by it promulgat.ed and the advice it assumes to publish, ou.qht because of the chametC1' of the body, to be accorded a special weight above that of individual opinion. Should this claim be accorded such a degree of favor as to sanction a repetition of the assembly it will have become a recognized elementin the organization, and we shall look in the not very far distant future to see its advice assuming the tone if not the express form of dictation. We expect in the outset great modesty in the promulgations of this convention. Such has been the case with some heretofore, to whom in after ages the rack and the stake have been the instruments of their established power.

Speaking of the Report of this Committee Brother 'Vait said: Brother Vinci! is in full sYTIl{)athy with his Grand Lodge on the liquor selling question : indeed, as we understand It, he has been one of the chief and most persistent of those by whose labors and influence that business has heen made a Masonic crime within his own jurisdiction. In his comments upon Colorado he speaks with some very just exultation of the fact that that Grand Lodge with several others have followed the noble example of Missouri in this vindication of Masonry as a conservator of correct ill.orals.

Yes, I am in '~f1J,ll sympathy" with my Grand Lodge, as it is arrayed by legislation and acts against dmn7cal'd rnak7:ng. I occupy ground in common with many thousands of "Missouri Masons. My Grand Lodge has been applying and carrying out its legislation of long standing. The present movement is no new thing as some imagine. It is simply the enforcement of laws made many years ago. Brother'Vait will please withdraw the "soft impeachment" above, that I have been "the chief and most persistent" :vorker "whose labors and influence" have brought about the results noted. He gives undue credit to one who has nevel; lead but follo路wed. In no just sense can I be regarded as a leader. But I love to follm.u, when "good men and true" sound the battle-cry and charge the hosts of evil doers. It is as unfair to give me the credit of the work accomplished in Missouri, as it is unjust to execrate me for the results produced. 'Vhen there are so many better men than myse If who are glad to bear the responsibility, they must not be denied the honor of the end gained. 'Vith such leaders as our Most 'Vorshipful brethren, Ryland, Givan, Cadle, Browne, V,Toods, Stubblefield, Stevenson, Hall, Boyd, Hunt and "Tilliams, who have filled the highest positions in Missouri Masonry, the present writer is glad to co-operate. Yea, more, 1 am proud to follow such men, knowing them to be as honest as they are able. We think and feel alike on the question at issue and work together. They have been educating the Fraternity along moral lines for many years and the fruits of their labors are seen all over this Commonwealth. No one man could have brought about the results achieved, and no Mason in Missouri will give the credit to anyone of the grand corps of workers. There is an army of such in ::\iissouri. The ovenvhelming majority against the saloon in Missouri Masonry, given by the Grand Lodge, voiced the sentiments ,of more than twent)r thousand of the brotherhood in this Jurisdiction.


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[Oct.

The deep and wide-spread feeling of satisfaction among our brethren of 'Missouri, the ready compliance with the law on the part of the few affected by it, together with the influx of the best material of various communities, demonstrate that we made no mistake in puri(ying the Fraternity. The intelligence and morality of the State approbated the verdict of the Grand Lodge. Good men, outside of the order say that they regard t.he action as a declaration in favor of decency and morality. Such men express a desire to become assodated with us, saying that they have no fear now of being associated with elements they would not recognize anywhere. ",Ve have lost afew saloon-keeper;:; and have received hundreds of gentlemen. Other Grand Jurisdictions can act according to their pleasure and preferences. As for 1\1issomi, Be it K:\ow:\ that "TH E GRA:\D I,ODGE IS THE SUPHEUE :MASONIC AlJTIIORITY .wITHI~ TIlE STATE OF lVhsSOURI."

Brother ",Vait made the following comments on the question of liquor. selling by Ma.'3ons. While habitual intemperance is doubtless by all reo-arded as l\fasonie delinquency worthy of cxpulsion, in scveral of the juri!;dietions rcgnlations have been adoptcd making the traltie in spiritous liquors a Masonic crime and subjecting the offender to that punishment, and also rendenng such traffic a disqualiiication for the degrecs. It is easy to see the possibility that t.his Illay lead to complications, the solution of which may require as weU forbea.rance as cool and candid deliberation. It. is largely, perhaps, more generally held that "Magonic offenses are punishable bv the ].Jodges where they are committed irrespective of the membership of the oft(mder. The query has already been snggestcd as to what would be thc result in case a memher in It jurisdiction wherc this rule against thc liquor traffic does not prcvail, should, in a jurisdict.ion where it does, violatc that law; must his expulsion thcre be recognized by the jurisdiction of his membership?

He admits that "habitual drunkenness" is a "Masonic delinquency worthy of expulsion." But how about the "delinqueney" of drunkard making? That is what selliIlg liquor means and amounts to. As to the query above concerning a Ma.son, who might violate our law, though he belongs to a Lodge in anot.her Jurisdiction, Missouri answers in one of her By-Laws as follows: All chartered Lodgcs in this Jurisdiction have fuU power and authority to exercise Penal jurisdiction over all Masons, Non-affiliated as well as Affiliated, within t.heir several jurisdictions, for violations of Moral and :\Iasonic law.

Brother 'Va-it gave the Missouri Proceedings for 1887, the benefit of four pages, making extracts from the address of the Grand Master, the Conullittec on Jurisprudence and tJlis Committee. Tn commenting upon the report of Brother Drinkard of Virginia., Brother'Vait had the following to sa.y: Brot.hcr DHINKARD asks, "Will Brother WAIT tell us how a Fcllow Craftsman who has lost his lcft arm conld be made a Master ,Mason? Who conld do tl,le work?" Wc presume this query has refcrence to the vicw which we have advocated, that a )fason having- by misfortune become physically imperfect after initiation, is not thereby debarred from advancemcnt.


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As we have said heretofore, the rule of physical perfection, hy the ancient charg-es onlY applies to the 1Iwkin.Q of :Masons, that is, to initiation, and has nothing to do with the'!;\Ihseqilent dcg-rees. If the candidate in the later .degrees is, from physical imperfection unahle to conform literally to all the ceremonial, he is still able to receive the information belonging to those degrees, and once having entered the portals of Masonry, there is no law or sllbstantial reason why he should not ha ve all the Masonic knowledge comm1lnicated to him, in whatever manneris found practicable in the particular case.

Brother 路Wait is referred to the review of Delaware for the views oftbis writer. "Nhile there are many subjects ably and fully treated by Brother 'Wait whieh would be of interest, further space cannot be allotted beyond copying the following from his conclusion: A survey ofthe Masonic field presents to the brethren infinite cause for present gratulation that they behold their beloved Fraternity in a state of harmony and the enjoyment of a prosperity, if ever equaled, surely never exceeded, and that the year closes with prospects bright for its future growth lLnd usefulness. As we lay down the pen we see for it victories higher and better than those of the tented field, victories whose Te Deums are sung by misfortunes relieved, by sorrows assuaged, by humanity improved.

Brother Geo. 'V. Currier, M. D., Grand Master, Brother Geo. P. Cleaves, Concord, Grand Secretary.

NEW JERSEY. The 101st Annual Communication was held in the city of Trenton, commencing January 25, ]888. Present-Robert 1\1:. Moore, Grand Master; Joseph M. Hough, Grand Secretary. This Grand Lodge sends out, annually, a good sized volume of Proceedings. The one under notice contains 355 pages, 225 of which arc devoted to business, tables and members by lodges, the remainder being occupied by the Report on Correspondence. The Journal is ,,,itbont index. The number of lodges and representation at the Grand Lodge were not given. The present membership is reported at 12,932. ADDRE~S.

This document embraces 18 pages. It contains much of local interest, and is a valuable paper to the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master mentioned various brethren who had died during the past year. He announced that their relations with other Grand Lodges continued harmonious and fraternal. Three new lodges had been organized during the term. G. L. Ap.-9.


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[Oct.

Under the head of Masonic Discipline he treated of various subjects that had claimed his attention. The following extract is made from his comments: Brethren, the safe way is the best way. There is 110 room in :\fasonry for either utilitarianism or latitudinarianism. Lower the standard of requircmcnt by evcr so little; remove cven one bar to accommodat.e a special case, be it ever so meritoriou!;, and you will find (as I have found t.his year) special cases multiplying so rapidly that, accommodate them all, and our requirements will become meaningless, alln aU'the bars will have been praeticall?, removed. By so much as we I.rench upon or remove an ancient landmark, by so much we cease t.o be Masons. My bret.hren, let us abide in the old Masonic ways-walk in the old Masonic paths-maintain inviola,blc the old landmarks, in both lett.er and spirit, and thus transmit ullimpaired to those who comc after us the sacred tenets of our timehonored institution. DECISIONS.

The Grand Ma,,<;ter reported five decisions rendered during his term of office, which were approved by the Committee on Address, and recommended the adoption of each and all 'Of them. Numerous dispensations had been granted, and appeared in the report of the Grand l\faster. RECO)[MENDATION.

Under this head the Grand Master declared that they ought to have, under the control of the Fraternity, a Masonic Home or Asylum, where the ",,"orthy poor might find shelter and support.路 He recommended that an appropriation be made to the family of a deceased distinguished brother. An appropriation of $300 for the same objeet was made last year. The Gi-and Secretary, Brother Hough, is approaching the completion of his fiftieth year of continuous service in connection with the office of Grand Secretary. The Grand Master said that some appropriate recognition of the fact should be made. He recommended the appointment of a special committee to provide a suitable testimonial to be presented to the able and venerable Grand Secretary on the completion of his fiftieth year of service. The Grand Lodge gave expression of their satisfaction at the work accomplished and the labor performed by the Grand Ma~ter during his term of offIce. The report of the Grand Secretary has a detailed statement of the fiscal affairs of his office. Concerning the Connecticut difficulties, the Grand Lodge said that it had nothing to do with the merits of the controversy. It was declared, however, by the Grand Lodge, that the Masons of Hiram Lodge must be


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considered clandestine until said I,odge has been restored to its Masonic standing by the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. The committee reported that a suitable jewel had been prepared and presented to Past Grand Master Brother J os. vV. Congdon. Much business was transacted during the session in detail, but being of local interest can claim no special attention here. There were some rulings made by the Committee on Jurisprudence, and approved, 'which would not suit Missouri Masons. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of 127 pages was furnished by Rev. Henry Vehslage, D. D. It is a compendium of matter gleaned from the forty-four Grand Lodge Proceedings which he had reviewed. Missouri, for 1887, received the compliment of six pages, embracing extracts from the address of Grand Master Hunt and other matters presented to our Grand Lodge. He extracted liberally from the report of this cornmittee. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.

NEW

MEXICO.

The tenth Annual Communication was held in Raton, beginning November 14, 1887, with Brother C. :N. Blackwell Grand Master, and Alpheus A. Keen, Grand Secretary. There are 11 Lodges, wilh a membership of 581 reported. An address of some ten pages contained an account of the doings of the Grand Master. Two Lodges had been created under dispensation. He reported that a Lodge had received the petition for initiation of a candidate who was minus one eye. The Grand Master declared him ineligible. The Committee on the Address approved the ruling somewhat after a dubious form. They said: " Your committee believes the decision to be correct. Your committee holds that the loss of an eye is not of so vital importance as the loss of a limb, in the material used in the construction of a temple, yet the timber used in the erection of this moral temple should be complete in all its parts." Let me ask that learned committee, what had the loss of an eye to do with the timber used in the erection of this "~fO}{AL temple?" Is not the structure a moral, not a material one? The comrnittee caUed the edifice a " moral temple." Then how was a man disqualified by the loss of an eye? As the eye was not a part of the moral nature of the candidate, its presence or


132

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[Oct.

its absence had nothing to do with its fitness, if he was otherwise qualified for the mysteries. Reports of the officers show a healthy growth in the jurisdiction. The finances were said to be in a flourishing condition. The Grand Lodge refused to allow lodges to hold stated meetings weekly, assuming that two regular meetings per month were ample for all purposes. This Grand Lodge does not permit joint occupancy of its halls, not even with the Odd Fello,Ys. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report amounting to sixty-four pages was rendered by M. ",V. Bro. Max Frost. He is a good gleaner. Of course, owing to sucb limited space, he did not grapple the problems claiming general consideration, but only presented a brief summary. Missouri was amiably treated in a three-paged notice, in which he styled the address of Grand Master Hunt "a strong docum.ent." Bro. Frost said: "The liquor question seems to bother them considerably in Missouri." No, Brother Frost, not the " liquor qnestion," but the conduct of liquor Masons. 'Ve were annoyed by the bad conduct of J.l[ason.s who preferred their business to character and Masonry. But we are not" bothered" any more. The docket has been cleared. Bro. Frost noted, with approving comments, the report of our Committee on Jurisprudence, rendered last session, respecting the burial of Masons as in good standing who were guilty of the" crime of Intemperance." Bro. Frost jumped at conclusions respecting the mind of this committee. He gave it as his opinion that I did not look with much favor upon their recognition of two Grand Lodges mentioned. I said nothing that can justify such an opinion. One of the Grand Lodges named had never been heard of by this writer, and I so stated. "Only this and nothing more."

" Harroun, Santa Fe, Grand Master; A. A. Keen, Las Vegas, Dr. 'V. S. Grand Secretary.

NEW YORK. The one hundred and seventh Annual Communication opened in the Grand Lodge Room, Masonic Hall, in New York City, June 5, 1888, Brother Frank R. Lawrence, Grand Master, present and in the chair; Edward L. M. Ehlers, Grand Secretary. There are 717 Lodges reported on the roll. The representation was necessarily very large. Fourteen Past Grand Masters were present, with fifty-six representatives of Grand Lodges. The membership of this


1888.J

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133

Jurisdiction amounts to 72,G25, it being by far the largest Grand Lodge among the American Jurisdictions. The Address of Grand Master Lawrence was nece~sarily very lengthy, and amounted to forty pages. He first paid due and proper attention to the Fraternal dead. Among the departed in that Jurisdiction, he mentioned particularly Rev. John G. \Vebster, Senior Grand Chaplain. The Grand Master said his long and valued services, his pure and stainless life, his exalted character and his honored example deserved the largest appreciation. The following will be of interest to American Masons, as it mentions the illustrious Brother 'William, the German Emperor: William, King of Prussia and German Emperor, died at Berlin on the 9th day of 1-farch, 188R, at t.he advanced age of ninety years. It would be superfluous now to make mention of his wonderful career. Despite the cares of state, he had upon frequent occasions manifested his attachment to our Fraternity, of which for many years he had been a member. He held the office, unknown among us, of Protector of the eight German Grand Lodges, composing the Grand Lodge Lea.gue within his dominions. Under the auspices of t.hose bodies, a Grand Lodge of Sorrow, in memory of the illustrious dead, wa" held at Berlin on the 22d day of :Marchl. 1888, our participation in which, though prevented by distance, was fraternally invitea. DISPENSATIONS.

A large number of dispensations had been granted for various purposes, and were reported in the address. Only one new Lodge had been created during the term. The Grand Master said that the Lodges in the City of New York, as a rule, were particularly strong and prosperous. wonK. Congratulations were offered to the Grand Lodge upon the efficiency of the system of work observed in that J urisdietion. The system of District visitation had been adopted and carried on extensively for the past few years with results that justified the effort. During the past year he had visited sixteen Districts. This system is like our method in Missouri of District Lodges of Instruction. FOREIGN RELATIONS

were reported as eminently peaceful and harmonious. There seems to be some misunderstanding between the Grand Lodges of New York and New Jersey. It is to be hoped that the question of difference will be settled without any alienation or severance of fraternal ties. 'fHE HOME AND ASYLUM.

At the close of the last Annual Communication, there was a reported indebtedness due on account of the Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund, amounting to $185,000. During the year, this has been reduced very largely, over $100,000 having been paid on that account.


134

A ppendi~I;.

[Oct.

ViThen Grand Master Lawrence took charge of the affairs of the Grand Master, he found an immense debt hanging over the Craft, with seeming discouragement, 路wide-spread and general. The work he has accomplished in two years in paying off the large bulk of their debt, is almost marvelous. From the statement made by the Grand .Master, it seems that the actual debt of the Fraternity, above all resources, would be, perhaps, less than $40,000. During the year, the wives and relatives of Masons in New York and Brooklyn went into an organization known as the" Ladies' Masonic Fair Association." The work accomplished by these valuable friends of the Grand Lodge is wonderful. The Grand Master said that the Fair was a most complete and glorious success. Financially, it was without example. The amount realized, after paying all expenses, was over $75,000. It may be said of these excellent workers, in the language of the Divine Master, "She hath done what she could." The amount raised by the ladies has been deposited and will be paid to the Trustees of the Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund to be used in building the Asylum. If the Grand Lodge of New York. will ke8p Brother Lawrence at its head fvr a few more terms, aided by the work of Brother Ehlers, Grand Secretary, and will secure the continued co-operation of our sister women, they will accomplish the greatest work of Masonic history. In concluding his statements upon the general subject of their indebtedness, the Grand Master said: "There is no reasonable doubt but that the payment of the debt ,,,,ill be completed before the next meeting of the Grand Lodge." He said that one more effort was needed, and by that effort, the debt, with its bitterness and with all its troubles, would be banished from sight. He closed his address with congratulations upon the state of affairs within the body of the Fraternity. He proclaimed that harmony has abounded and activity prevailed in all the Lodges. A prospect of unlimited prosperity opens up before them for the future. . This closes the address of one of the most active and efficient Grand Masters this country has ever seen. The Masons of New York acted wisely and 路well in the election of Brother Lawrence as Grand Master for a third time. The report of the Grand Secretary, Brother Ehlers, is an extensive document; also the report from the ladies who conducted the Fair. I should judge that the wife of Grand Master Lawrence is his equal in the depal'tment of work she has undertaken. As President of the Fair Association, she rendered a full and complete account of their operations and success. To the Masonic '"omen engaged in that enterprise the thanks of New York Masonl'Y are due.


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Appendix.

Various matters of business claimed the attention of the Grand Lodge during its sitting, all of which were carefully considered and duly adjusted. CO){RESPON DEN CEo

A report of something more than one hundred pages was presentcd by Brother Jesse B. Anthony to the Grand Lodge. As there are three names signed to the paper, there is no determining clearly who wrote it. This Committee is inclined to give the credit of it to the venerable chairman, Brother John . w. Simons. Over fifty Grand Lodge proceedings had been reviewed. There is considerable mattcr contained in the report taken from Grand Lodge journals. The eommittee did not deal in extensive comments. :Missouri Proceedings for 1887 received a short notice. An extract is made from the address of GrandMaster Hunt, with hearty approval. He said that tbe reports of our Grand Officers of Missouri were the best that could be路 expected, and thought the Craft of Missouri to be in good condition. The committee said that our law in Missouri against saloon keeping in Masonry could not be enforced in New York. It is the opinion of the Missouri Committee that such a law could be enforced anywhere, if the Grand Lodge bas the mind to do so. Grand Master Lawrence was unanimously re-elected, as was also Brotber Eblers, Grand Secretary. The address of each is Masonic Hall, New YorkCiW~

NORTH

CAROLINA.

Tbe lOJst Annual Communication was held at the Masonic Hall, in the city of Raleigh, commencing January 10,1888. Brotber Chas. H. Robinson was Grand Master. Grand Secretary.

Donald ",\T. Bain,

Out of 214 Lodges on tbe roll, 99 were represented. membership amounts to something over 8,000.

The estimated

An address of seven pages was submitted by the Grand Master. He said that the progress of the Order during the year was a subject for congratulation. He reported visits made to several Lodges. From all he bad seen it was his opinion that there was a growing interest in the Order, and many of the best young men in the country were seeking admission. This he attributed to tbe fact that the management of the Orphan Asylum bad been in the hands of Masons of such high charac-


136

[Oct.

tel' as to take a strong hold of the hearts of the people. He truly said that the principles of )'lasonry are best illustrated by the lives of Masons¡ From 'his excellent address I make the following extract; We occupy the peculiar position of being the great conservative Society of the world, and I say this without any wish or intention to derogate from the many other noble

~~a~r~0~~~~a~f~nf~~ln~~~c~1~\,~0~~it~i:~c\~~11~fL~~ 8g~l.lg,~~;tA~~~1stt~a~ab~k~11~~so~;~~

Belief in God carries with it the belief ill His COlltrol of the Universe and the direction of aU affairs, and this involves a belief ill our individual responsibility to Him, and the duty of conforming to His moral law. There is no pla.ce in our Order for Anarchists or conspirators against government and law; the teachings of Masonry accord with the la"". of God. It seems to me if every 1\[ason could realize the grand mission of our Order and its responsibility to the world, and the opportullity it affords to all good mcn to stand up under its mighty sheltering fold against all the discordant elements that seem to be threatening our land, that there would be no want of interest felt in attending the communications of the Lodges, and no lack of illteresting questions to be discussed. I confess I fail to see why :M:asonry should be denoullced by allY church or religious believer, as 1 regard it as the coadjutor to true religion. When Cardinal Gibbons was urging the claims of the Kl1i~nts of Labor in his address to the Pope, hc used these words: '''l'here exists an organizatIon which presents a thousand attractions, Ii thousa.nd advantages, but which our Catholic toilers, \\'ith filial submission, refuse to accept. It i~ the ~fa>;onic organization, which spreads all over our country, which, as :Mr. Powderly explicitly said, IlIlites the employer and employe in a fraternit.y which is very advantageous to the latter," etc. This testimony from high authority is true. Shall there be a want of interest in such a fraternity?

The Grand Master reported a few decisions, wlJich are of local application. THE ORPHAN ASYLUM.

â&#x20AC;˘

Of this institution the Grand Master spoke in the following terms; The statement of the excellent Superintendent of the Asylum and the report of the Board of Directors will be presented to you, and will detail the operations of the institution for the past yea.r. It is the pride and glory of the Grand Lodge, and I am happy to be able to say it has enjoyed a prosperous year. A larger number of children have been cared for, and the contributions of the good people have been liberal, and the financial condition comfortable. I had the pleasure of meeting a number of the brethren at the Asylum on the 2-1th ot June, 188i, St. .John's Day, when a large number of good people of Oxford and Granville county assembled in the chapel, under the auspices of Oxford Lodge. The exercises were delightful, the children happy, and by their songs and recitations found their way into the- hearts of the audience. Several short addresse>; were delivered, and the Superintendent and his estimable wife, and the efficient assistants, were congratulated on the perfect condition of every department of the Asylum. I am satisfied it should he made the order of the Grand Lodge that it should meet at the Asylum on St. John's Day in .June, annually. It will bring us together socially, and it will bring to the personal knowledge of the Fraternity the magnitude and importance of the work we are doing, and no one can visit the place and see the children and realize the blessedness of the charity without determining to do more for it.

Our first Grand Master, in his Proverbs, tells us: "He that has pity upon the poor lendeth unto the Lord, and that which he hath given will He pay him again." Have we been repaid'? A thousand times yes! It has done more for the Grand Lodge and our Order than can be expressed. Shakespeare says of mercy: "It blesset.h him that gives and him that takes." It has done morc tha.n to return the blessing to us. It. bas set an example that has heen followed by several religious denominations who now have Orphan Asylums in our State. There is room for all, need for all, and God's blessing will be upon all. It is thc brightest jewel in our crown. Keep it pure and sparkling, that its rays may send light and warmth into every Lodge in our Jurisdiction.


1888.]

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GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

Brother Bain presented as usual a good business exhibit of the affairs of his office. The Superintendent of the Orphan Asylum furnished an extended report. This grand institution is making its impress on North Carolina Masonry. The health of the children, two hundred and twenty-one in number, has been excellent. The Superintendent said that during the past ten months he had not been called on to administer to the children a single dose of medicine. One orphan had died, but was diseased at the time of admission. Our North Carolina brethren are doing a grand work for the needy, dependent ones. Like Kentucky Masons, they are rearing a monument superior to any material structure possessed by them-one that \villlive in the hearts and be seen in the lives of the thousands of happy people that will go out from that Bethesda. There is nothing of general interest contained in the Proceedings claiming our special attention or comment. CORRESPONDE~CE.

The committee, consisting of Brothers Bain and Martin, furnished a review of the Proceedings of forty-one Grand Lodges, covering some eighty pages. The committee said, in speaking of the Masonic Congress at Chicago, that such things may cause much mischief, an'd it is safer not to have them. The report of the committee consists largely of extracts, with approp,riate comments. There seemed to be some diffidence on the part of the brethren as to expressing their opinions. But it is very clear from the report that the committee had opinions and expressed them both clearly and positively. The committee apologized in concluding the report by saying that they had done the best they could. Professional and official duties prevented the committee from making such a review as they had desired. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected. of the latter is Raleigh, N. C.

The address

.

NOVA SCOTIA . The twenty-second Annual Communication \vas held in Truro, June 1, 1887. Brother Lewis Johnstone, M. D., Grand Master; Brother Benj. Curren, Grand Secretary.


138

Appendi:e.

LOct.

At the roll call, forty Lodges were found represented. There are sixtysix chartered Lodges in that Jurisdiction, with a reported membership of some three thousand. DIVINE SERVICE.

After the formal opening of the Grand Lodge, the brethren proceeded to church where Divine service was conducted and a sermon preached by Rev. Brother D. C. Moore, Grand Chaplain. The Grand Master, in his address, referred to this method of entering upon the business of the session. He suggested that such procedure might be properly adopted for their future observance at each Annual Communication. There is shown, in this proceeding, a spirit on the part of our English brethren that proves what Masonry claims to be, a "beautiful system of morals," founded upon the Bible and faith in the true and living God. Masonry can never suffer, in its moral character, while conducted by such firm believers in God and Truth. The Grand Master announced that their fraternal relations with other Grand Lodges have not been disturbed by any untoward event. He announced a long list of visitations made to the Lodges. He also furnished a list of his official acts, embracing many items of local interest. A few decisions were -:r:eported which appertained alone to their home affairs. The address, as a whole, is a good business exhibit of Grand Lodge matters. The report of the Grand Secretary, Brother Curren, is a very full and complete presentation of business matters belonging to his department. The reports of District Deputies were furnished and printed in full. I find nothing in the Proceedings that would be of interest to anyone outside of the local Jurisdiction. Special Communications were held, the reports of which are to be found in the Journal. One such Communication was held in the City of Halifax, June 22,1887. It was" held to celebrate the Juhilee of Her Majesty, Queen Victoria." Divine service was conducted in one of the churches of the city, when a sermon was preached by the Grand- Chaplain, Brother Moore. A loyal address was adopted and forwarded to Queen Victoria from the Grand Lodge. CORRESPONDENCE.

Rev. Brother David C. Moore, Grand Chaplain, furnished a report embracing about one hundred pages, in which he reviewed the trans-


139

1888.1 ations of fifty Grand Lodges. ternally complimented.

Missouri was handsomely treated and fra-

The Grand Master' was honored by a re-election; Brother Benjamin Curren was continued as Grand Secretary. His address is Halifax.

OHIO. This is one of the large, prosperous and representative Grand Lodges of this country. It ranks fourth in numerical strength, having a memhership of 33,856, with 488 Lodges, being an average of about 70 members to the Lodge. The Journal shows' that over 1,800 had been made Master Masons during the term. The income from all sources amounts to about $13,000. This Grand Lodge has heretofore charged twenty-five cents a member for Grand Lodge dues, and :S2.00for each initiation. The ByLaw was amended increasing the per capita to thirty-five cents. This was deemed necessary, as the balance of their fund on hand at the close of the session amounted to less than ~1,000. The 78th Annual Communication began its labors in the city of Dayton, October 25,1887, and was presided over by Brother S. S. \Villiams, Grand Master; Brother John D. Caldwell was Grand Secretary. The address of Grand Master 路Williams, including an appendix, was quite lengthy, amounting to nearly thirty pages. He made fraternal mention of the brethren who had passed away during the year, and noted that Iowa, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Massachusetts and Tennessee had severally lost Past Grand Masters, who had been prominent in their respective Grand Lodges. The Grand Master, in giving a detailed account of his official work, announced the laying of a number of corner-stones, and among them was that of a penitentiary building in the city of Mansfield. One of the Lodges in the State proposed, without authority, to lay the corner-stones of five manufacturing establishments. The Grand Master; learning the purpose of the Lodge, notified it that such work was not proper, as business houses did not come within the scope of Masonic enterprises. The Grand Lodge approved the action of the Grand Master. One new Lodge had been created under dispensation.


.. 140

Appendh:.

[Oct.

He reported that the charters of several Lodges had been surrendered. In the administration of discipline, he found it necessary to suspend and arrest the charters of several Lodges. One case is reported in extenso. The Lodge was complained of as guilty of irregularity and non-performance of duty. The Grand Master sent a Deputy to investigate the condition of the Lodge. Said Deputy reported to the Grand Master that he found a deplorable state of things ill the Lodge. At the meeting which he attended, several brethren, two of whom were saloon-keepers, were "considerably intoxicated." . From the report of the Deputy I make the following extract: When the attention of the two saloon-keepers was called to their violation of ~fa­ sonic law, they both in turn got up and franl.!y stated that they were in the business to make a living for themselves and families without any regard whatever to the requirements of flfasl)nJ'Y 01' any other Praternity, and virtually said that they did not consider it the business of anyone as to what they did in that direction. Qne of the intoxicated brethren E. K. Booth, then made a very disagreeable and unmasonic exhibition of himself by denouncing my action in a tirade of profanity terrible to listen to. When I attempted to reason with him, he said that J had treated them badly, and that he did not want to talk to me, and broke off down the stairs swearing like a pirate. . . From personal observation and information gathered from a number of good, sober, well-meaning brethren, members of Clarington and sister Lodges, I lUll forced to the conclusion that dnmkennes.s and ?:mmoral1:ty has for years been the bane of Clarington Lodge, and is more responsible for the non-payment of dues than the !lood of 1884. The Worshipful Master seems to have been either unable or unwilling to check the direful element until it has ffill.de his Lodge a dug/'ace to the Fraternity.

The charter of the aforesaid Lodge was duly arrested, and properly so. The act was made final by the Grand Lodge. The saloon-keepers were left out in the cold. Of course there will be a howl started by some sympathetic Grand Master or Committee on Correspondence over the lost rights of those two members who" were in the business to make a living for themselves and families." That is what they are there for. They are in the business for blood money, "without any regard whatever to the requirements of l\'[asonry." They were quite frank in their avowal, and deserve credit for their candor. 'rheyare in the business for gain for themselves and families, without any regard whatever to the interests of those families whose ruin they have hastened, and whose husbands and fathers they have destroyed. Masonry is nothing to such men, only as it serves to give them respectability and an opportunity to reap profit from those Masons ,,,ho patronize them. The conduct of the members mentioned above is in keeping with the actions of some in this Jurisdic- â&#x20AC;˘ tion last year, who swore that they would break down the Grand Lodge, and that they had millions of money at their command with which to down the accursed Grand Lodge. This was their boast, and I had the proof on the floor of the Grand Lodge during the discussion of the question then at issue. Yet some Grand Master, who had something the matter with his conscience, would lay down the rule that any" rule, or


1888.J

141

regulation, which would exclude from the benefits of Masonry" such characters as <:lbove mentioned, would violate the rights of members and destroy the integrity of the Institution. Those Ohio saloon-keepers, who are in the business for money alone, "without any regard whatever to the requirements of Masonry," will thank the Grand Master who delivered himself of said opinion. In the Ohio case it was shown that drunkenness and immorality had for years dominated the Lodge, while the conduct of the members made the "Lodge a disgrace to the Fraternity." And yet the" Masonic body which excludes from the benefits of Masonry" any such "individual or individuals" is subverting the very foundations of the Order. Ohio Masons will not accept the dictum of the Grand Master who preached that kind of doctrine from the Grand East of Louisiana. It is hardly necessary to inform the reader that the Grand Lodge of Ohio has a rule excluding saloon-keepers" from the benefits of Masonry." By the time the Grand Master, with a" Masonic conscience," gets through with all the Grand Lodges that are in line with Missouri in excluding those who have no "regard whatever for the requirements of Masonry," he will be tired.

Grand Master Williams referred approvingly to the General Masonic Convention held at Chicago. Four decisions were reported which were approved by the Grand Lodge. One of them was in answer to a question as to the legal character of certain bodies in that Jurisdiction claiming to be Masonic, and" known as the "Cernau Bodies of the Scotch Rite." The Grand l\1:aster decided that they were" irregular, illegal and un masonic, and not to be countenanced or recognized in any manner by the brethren of the Grand Lodge of Ohio." This decision called forth a report, endorsing the action of the Grand Master, to "\vhich an amendment was offered to the effect that" the Grand Lodge should take no action in regard to the contending Scottish Rites." A discussion followed, participated in by a number of brethren, and the amendment was lost upon a vote by ayes and noes. The Grand Lodge of Ohio thereby makes itself the judge of an institution claiming to be M-asonic, concerning ,,,hich it is not supposed to have any direct knowledge. To the contending factions of "Riteism" the Grand Lodge of Ohio, as well as others, might well have presented the question: "'Vho made me a judge or divider over you?" Grand Mastei W"illiams reported the condition of the Craft, so far as the same had come to his knowledge.


142

Appendi;r.

[Oct.

He had visited over one hundred Lodges. He said that a fair proportion of the Lodges were found in good working order, with plenty of material at hand. He further said, and there is dry humor in the remark, that quite a number were without work, and possibly this was well, as they could not do the work with credit if they had it to do. The Grand Master urged upon the Grand Lodge a preparation and preservation of the early history of their organization. The Grand Lodge was organi7;ed in January, 1808, Brother Rufus Putnam being the first Grand Master. Since then there have been thirty-four Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge, all of whom are dead but eight. He made the following injunction as to preserving sketches of Lodge members of the past: Let us have biographical sketches of the zealous brethren who brought our Grand Lodge into cxistence, as well as of those who have fostered it during those long veal's. Reminiscences of the early days of l\1:asonry in Ohio, a.nd thrilling events of anti-l\:lasonie times can !lOW be furnished; a few years hence and they cannot. Let us eOUlmence now; let us follow the example set us by older Grand Lodges, and send down to posterity something more than the bare record of our transactions. Brethren of the Grand Lodge, in behlllf of the thirty odd thousand Ohio j\:lasons of to-day, and the untold thousands yet to eome, I ask you to aet upon these suggestions.

He communicated the fact to tbe Grand Lodge, that while death had not made any inroads upon their present or past grand officers during the year, an affliction had overtaken one of their brethren, which was worse than death. Brother J. M. Goodspeed, Past Grand Master, had been for several months insane, and is now confined in a lunatic asylum. He said that while words of condolence could not reach the afflicted brother, the sympathies of the Grand Lodge were due his family. CORRESPONDENCE.

The annual review of Grand Lodge transactions was made by M. "'V. Brother '''m. M. Cunningham, "for the committp,e." The report covered lIS pages, and consisted of numerous excerpts and ocea..o;ional comments, pertinent and forcible. The Missouri Journal of 1886 received cordial consideration. Brother Boyd's address ,vas pronounced "a thoroughly Masonic report." Several extracts were made therefrom. Of our Grand Lodge action on certain matters, he said: The Grand Lodge of Missouri not onlv reviews the aetion of Subordinates in Masonic trials, reversing judgment and remandillg for new trial, but also exercises its rightful prerogative of reversing action and making final judgment in certain cases. In this connection, in the case of seven brethren who had been acquitted or declared not guilty of charges preferred against them by the Lod~es of which they wcre members, although the evidence was conclusive as t.o their I,"llllt-the Charters of the Lodges have been arrested-the Grand Lodge reversed the action of the Lodges mentioned. and expelled three of the accused brethren and suspended the other four. The charges were licentious conduct, drunkenness, profanity, and violation of the Grand Lodge enactment a.gainst liquor-selling. .


1888.]

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Missouri bas at length taken the position so long maintained by this writer, and exercises" Original Jurisdiction" in given cases, and makes a final disposition of'them. There is much in the review of Brother Cunningham worthy of a place in this report, but my space is exhausted, and time is being called on me. r close this notice of Ohio with an expression of profound respect for that Grand Lodge, and sincere regard for its able committee, Brother Cunningham. The Grand l\iaster and Grand Secretary were re-elected.

PENNSYLVANIA. The volume of proceedings under review, like its predecessors, is very attractive as to style, and interestin~ as to matter. It contains the transactions of four Quarterly Communications, and the Annual Communication. Brother Joseph Eichbaum, Grand Master, presided, with the usual representation. Brother Michael Nisbet was Grand Secretary. At an Emergency Session the Grand Master said he had called the meeting for the purpose of making C. Kirsch a Mason. He made him an Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and Master Mason at the same meeting. It is to be supposed that the candidate became thoroughly posted and proficient in the several degrees, having received them all at one session. At the June Quarterly Communication, a tribute was paid Brother Edward Coppee Mitchell, LL. D., Past Grand Master, who died in Philadelphia, January 25,1887, in the fifty-first year of his age. The Committee furnished a sketch of his life, showing his many valuable services to Masonry. He was elected Grand Master in 1884, and re-elected in 1885. From the tribute the following extract is made: When he sat in the chair of the Right Worshipful Grand Master, we thought that he would, in due course, take his place among the fathers and teachers of Freemasonry, keepers of the Landmarks, until in years he would become a patriarch among' us. But his duties and labors were so many and so exacting, and made such demands upon his strength. that they told upon his health. His vital organs became weakened; he fell ~ick, languished, and died. Death set his mark upon our Brother, and made him a stone in that spiritual temple, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. Oh, my Brethren, what a loss you have suffered, and how much do you feel it! The grief is universal; all share it. Our hopes have been disappointed. We mourn and submit..


144

Appendix.

[Oct.

Our Pennsylvania brethren are masters of finance, and handle great interests with distinguished ability. The report concerning the Grand Lodge Charity Fund shows a total investment of $72,000. The interest of this fund is disposed of in charities. The trustees of the Girard bequest reported respecting the interests of that fund. From the report it is gathered that the fund amounts to over $60,000. The commissioners of the sinking fund report total investments and cash on hand amounting to nearly $400,000. The accounts of the Grand Secretary footed up as per receipts over $100,000. The outlay and expense account, embracing interest and other items, amounted to about $130,000. The Grand Master called the attention of the Grand Lodge to the fact that one of the District Deputies had participated in an organization known as the "Cerneau Masons." The Deputy being aamonished, did not withdraw from the body, but persisted in his course, regardless of the warning of the Grand Master. As a result, his commission was revoked. The Grand Master said that an important point to be considered in the case was that no body, claiming to be Masonic, and which claims to have the right to confer the three degrees of Freemasonry, can obtain a foothold in the Jurisdiction of Pennsylvania. If this claim is set up and maintained by any body of "Scotch Riteism," it should be sternly reprobated and rejected. THE ANNUAL COMlI:IUNICATION

was opened in Philadelphia, December 27, 1887; the usual Grand Officers present. Sixty Lodges were represented.

ADDRF.sS.

The Grand Master presented an address of some sixteen pages, embracing a statement of his official actions during the term. He said nothing had occurred to disturb the friendly relations existing between their Grand Lodge and neighborin~ Masonic Jurisdictions. The address contained a detailed statement of all matters claiming attention and consideration at the hands of the Grand Master. He concluded his address in appropriate and feeling terms touching the death of their brother, Past Grand Master Mitchell. Speaking of their Masonic Temple, the Grand Master said it " surpasses any building in the world devoted to 'Masonic purposes."


145

1888路1

The Proceedings are graced by two striking engravings - first, that of Grand Master Eichbaum, and the other of Past Grano. Master Conrad B. Day: CORRESPOi\DENCE.

The report was presented by Brother Richard Vaux, Past Grand l\faster. He had reviewed the Proceedings of fifty-four Grand Lodges, some of them for two years. He opened the report in the following manner: Again, dear Brethren of Committees of Correspondence ofthose Grand Lodges holding with us fraternal Masonic relations, with the salutations of our earnest brotherly love we greet you. God in his adorahle mercy has permitted us once more to address you. We desire to express our .gratitude. It is a reasonable service. We recognize the responsibility of our work. In self-communion it manifests itself. im~ulsive conclusions; carping criticism; arrogant assumptions; combative controversy 1II dealing with the views and opinions of tllOse with whom we are associat.ed, we seek to avoid, as for路 bidden by the teachings of Freemasonry, and unworthy of the position assigned us.

It. is a serious duty wc undertake; idle words; immature thoughts;

Devoted to the preservation and perpetuation of the great principles of our Fraternity, we are earnest in our efforts to secure theirunaltered, unchanged form, and the fulness of their eternal spirit.

The Review amounts to two hundred and forty pages. ,

.

The Missouri Proceedings for the years 1886 and 1887 received a notice of nineteen pages. He pronounced the address of Grand Master Boyd as "possessing high merit." Speaking of the case reported by Brother Boyd of the Mason in Missouri who appropriated to his own use some $15,000 or 820,000, held by him in trust for others, Brother Vaux said that the man should have been "punished by the profane la'" he violated, hut what Masonic offense did he commit?" This Committee would reply, the Masonic offense he committed was embezzlement. Having abused a public trust and tied the country, Missouri Masons considered he had committed a crime against Masonry. We have a law in Missouri which' punishes such crimes without waiting for the criminal to be "punished by the profane law which he violated." Others may view the subject in a different light. We are satisfied with our own laws. Perhaps our ignorance of the ethics of Masonry has led us into error. While we are open to conviction, we are convinced the purity of Masonry and the vindication of the institution demand the punishment ofsuch recusant members. Several pages of extracts were made from the addresses of Grand Master Boyd and our venerable Brother Rob Morris, who was present on that occasion. He approved the action of our Grand Lodge in reference to one who died. a member' of a lodge in good standing but whose character had been G. L. Ap.-IO.


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under a cloud on account of his had character. His approbation of the work of our Committee of Appeals and Grievances was cordial. He said it had one merit, that of sustaining lodges "where the weight of t-estimony is for the judgment of the lodge." From the report of this Committee on Correspondence he made various extracts. He agrees with this writer that Toltec Lodge, Number 520, located in. the City of Mexico, should surrender its Missouri Charter and take one from the Grand Lodge of the Jurisdiction where it is planted. Brother Vaux, after making a number of extracts from the report of this Committee,. seemed to melt into a mello\\7 mood, touched with a little grim humor. Speaking of my review of Iowa, he says that I had given a very enlarged review of Brother Parvin and then cried out, "'Vhere, o Where is Maine. Maine and Brother Drummond do not appear in this review of Missouri. Brother Vinci! must be distressed that he cannot review this Grand Jurisdiction. 路We are." In reply to the above dry humor, I have to say to Brother Vaux that the Proceedings of Maine for 1887 were not received until after my report \vas printed. It is a pleasure to review the productions ofBrother Vaux and Brother Drummond. Holding them both in the highest personal esteem, and ve路nerating them as Masonic authors and teachers, I make no discrimination. It is when Brother Drummond uses his Masonic flail upon Brother Vaux, that this Committee enjoys heartily the war of giants and laughs at the noise of the combat. In closing his review of my report, having copied the entire conclusion, he employed terms intended to convey a little tart criticism. Here is his comment: This is very beautiful. We cordially rejoice in the anticipation. We look on his banner with gratification. We hope it is made of something not combustible. The "burning letters Morality and Charity" else might set it in It blaze of light to 1,50 out in darkness. We always thought that Faith and Hope were among the tradItions of l\fasonry, and on its shield and buckler.

I desire to assure my venerated and highly esteemed Brother Vaux, that there is no occasion for alarm concerning my banner. The burning letters "Morality and Charity," upon a white background, "Purity," will never be set on fire by anything but a faithful Masonie heart. I join him in the statement that Faith and Hope are not merely Masonic traditions, but the grand facts in the true experience of every Godly Soul. "Faitll, Hope and Charity" are words endeared to the heart of this writer, not merely as 1\fasonic traditions, but as "lights shining in dark places," binding the saddened heart to God, inspiring it \vith desire and warming it into living activity in the service of God and humanity. In taking leave of my much loved and dear Brother Vaux, I desire to assure him, as in the years gone by, of never failing friendship and unabated affection. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.


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PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. The 13th Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge wa." held in the City of Charlottetown, June 26, 1888. The Journal of Proceedings contains thirty-six pages. There are twelve lodges and four hundred and ninety-five members in that jurisdiction. The Grand "Master who presided at this Session has been continued in office since the organization of the Grand Lodge in 18i5. His name is J ohn Yeo. Brother B. 'Vilson Higgs was Grand Secretary. The address of the Grand Master covers three pages. There is nothing claiming attention. The Grand Secretary presented a brief business report. He is allowed $150.00 annually for his services. There is nothing claiming consideration in the Proceedings. Of course there is no report on Correspondence. The Grand l\:1aster and Grand Secretary were re-elected.

QUEBEC. The 18th Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge began its labors in the city of Montreal, January 25, 1888. Brother J. Ed. 'Valker was Grand Master. Brother J. H. Isaacson, the 0-rand Secretary, wa." present. Of the 59 Lodges on the roll, 50 "were represented. The membership in that jurisdiction amounts to 2,680. ADDRESS.

The Grand Master presented a very brief paper, which had but little of interest to anyone. He said that his business engagements had prevented that attention to Masonic duty which he had desired to perform. He mentioned the controversy between their Grand Lodge and that of England. The same condition exists as heretofore. England refuses to remove her Lodges from the Jurisdiction of Quebec, and the latter continues to hold the English Lodges as in revolt against her rights and


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supremacy. It is strange that England will not perform one simple act of Masonic comity and disembarrass the whole matter. There may be an animus in the case that governs England of which we, at this distance; cannot judge accurately. But from the surface view presented, England cannot be justified on any grounds known to our American Jurisdictions. "The Grand Master of Louisiana offered to mediate between England and Quebec." So we are informed by Grand i\faster W'alker. To said offer, the reply came: "I am to explain that as the situation remains the sanle, the Grand Lodge of England cannot possibly change its attitude or alter its decision in the matter." The English Mason is still a John Bull of a fellow. After quoting from the correspondence touching the controversy, Brother ,Valker had this to say, and the facts justify his remarks: Thus England resents any interference; she declines friendly mediation; she says that she, and she alone, is the Masonic authority that cannot err. Serene in her adherence to a position manifestly injurious to l\'Iasonry in this Province, and totally opposed to Grand Lodge jurisdiction as understood on this continent, and so understood bl~cause harmonious intercourse between sister jurisdictions require it, the Grand Lodge of England spurns all offers ofl\fasonic settlement by way of mediation. She says in substance we must submit like cravens to her Will, and consent to share our habitation with her. There Clln be no question as to the propriety of the course to be pursued by this Gralld Lodge. Whatever differences of opinion there may have been as to the advisibility of is:me oftbe edict of non-intercourse previous to its issue, and it must be admitted there were differences, not as to the principles involved, but rather as to time of enforcement, there can be none now. The step has been taken, and to recede now would be to admit that we were wrong when we were right, that our rights and title were not those which appertain to a Sovereign Grand Lodge, and that having dared to take a stand for the right we have not the manhood to defend that right. The Grand Lodge of Quehec would justlv ex-pose itself to the scorn and contempt of Masons throughout the world if it weakenea, now that the Grand Lodge of England refuses mediation or anything short of absolute unconditional surrender on our part. Believing ourselves to be in the right, we can afford to wait'. Struggles for truth and right are never finished in a day. If right, we must gain in the end; if wrong, time will show it, and I am confident that the opinions of sister jurisdictions, if offered, will not be treated by the Grand Lodge of Quebec with contumely.

The report of Brother Iseacsoll, Grand Secretary, eonsisting of a financial and -statistical exhibit, was full and extended. ORATION.

An interesting addresR was delivered by Brother 'V..J. Smyth. ,Ve would call him Grand Orator. His subject .vas "The two books of the Deity." "Nature" and "Inspired Truth," were the points made, and the theme was handled with discretion and ability. Our Brethren, unlike an Illinois Atheist, hold to the "Book of the Law" as the great light of Masonry. I make an extract from the address as showing the sentiment of tLe brethren across the line. How different from the inane utterances of the Fool, who hath said, "There is no God," and published his shame to the world, declaring "the first sentence in the old Jewish book is a falsehood." And such a Fool claims to be a Mason. But here are the remarks of Brother Smyth: Oft where the voice of nature is silent the voice of revelation speaks. To the question: "If a lUan die shall he live again ?" there comes no answer frlJm nature, other than the death of grain before growth. But this volume of the sacred law


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gives a clear and emphatic reply, Brethren, in this book are refleetions which shall cheer the lonely house of virtuollS poverty. and carry mys of holy li~ht where clouds of adversity have darkened the windows of the soul. This volume IS the key to God's pavillion in the day of deep distress, and can impart a softening balm to the wounded spirit. At.this blessed fountain the rich and poor may meet together, for its Author, the Lord, IS the maker of them all. In the day of temptation we may learn here of safety. and in time of need we may obtain support. And in the gathering shadows of dissolution, which we shall all experience, the truths of this blessed book shall light up the valley and clear the way for an abundant entrance into life and peace. ~ Ages have swept over this sacred volume, but unlike earthly fabrics it has never crumbled. The combined artillery of infidelity has for centuries confronted the truths of this book, yet they still remain unharmed by the affmy. It still stands in its own colossal strength, defying every assailant, and ill its own tenderness invites a faithful perusal. Brethren, you do well to preserve this foundation stone in the fabriC of Masonry. Without it the highest band of brotherhood would be broken, and your purest motive force destroyed. Take away the sacred volume from its holy place, and on your portals might bc written "lchabod," the glory has departed, Your system of morality, illustrated by symbols, and veiled in allegory, would be robbed ofa11 its beauty; and your assembly rooms would be moral sepulchres, whose unwholesome vapors would not remain within, but spread their poison through society. to the blasting of many a hopeful life. CORRESPONDEXCE.

A delightfully entertaining review amounting to 72 pages was prepared by Brother E. T. D. Chambers. The Committee writes and comn'lents with facility and grace. He is an improving Correspondent. Our Missouri journal for 1887 received very courteous consideration, for which fraternal thanks are hereby accorded. It is with pleasure that I note the election of our Brother H. L. Robinson, of W'aterloo, as Grand Master. Having enjoyed the satisfaetion of a personal interview with him, and as he is our Representative near the Grand Lodge of Quebec, this Committee, for himself, and for the Grand Lodge of Missouri, extends cordial and hearty congratulations to Grand Master Robinson. Brother J. H. Isaacson was re-elected Grand Secretary, and resides at Montreal.

RHODE ISLAND. The Journal contains the record of severa.l communications, Emergent, Special and Annual. An Emergency Session was held in Providence, June 14,1886, called for the purpose of burying their Past Grand Master, Thos. A. Doyle. The Semi-Annual Session was held in Providence, November 15,1886, and was presided over by Bro. Newton D. Arnold, Grand


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Master. Bro. Edwin Baker was Grand Secretary. Various matters of business claiming attention were disposed of. During this session, lengthy memorial notices were furnished by Brothers Henry Rugg and William Gilpin as tributes to the memory of Brothers Thos. A. Doyle, Past Grand Master, and John Eldred, Past Junior Grand 'Varden.

"T.

The 97th Annual Communication was held in Providence, May 16, 1887. Brother Arnold, Grand Master, presided. Brother Baker was Grand Secretary. This Grand Lodge has thirty-five working lodges with a membership of 3,689. The address of the Grand Master is five pag:es long and devoted exclusively to business. He reported in detail the matters connected with his official labors; among these was a long list of dispensations granted. Permission bad been granted in a number of cases for doing things not allowed by the la,>,T. I notice that he permitted ballots to be taken without examination of the candidate on the previous degree. In another case he allowed a lodg:e to take the ballot on a rejected candidate, each member of the lodge being notified that such ballot was to be taken. A very natural inquiry occurs to this writer, if Grand Masters, by virtue of the high power they possess, may set aside ballots taken by a lodge, when will the lodge ever reach a final conclusion and know whether a candidate is elected or not? On the subjeet of exercising his high power as a "prerogative" Grand Master, he had the following to say: It will be noticed that several of Uiese dispensations were given to waive requirements of the Grand Constitution or General Hegulations. and I desire to say in this connection t.hat while it is acknowledged in this jmisdietion that the Grand Master has the power to t.hus waive the provisions of the Grand Constitution and General Regulations in cases that do not affect the ancient landmarks of Freemasonry, and while I believe that the Grand Master bas this power by right, yet I do not believe that such power should be e.1;c1路ciscd except in extraordinary and pressing cases. It is better that a Lodge or person should suffer considemble inconvenience rather thlLll that any provisiun of the Constitution or General Hegulations should be waived.

There is nothing of special interest in the address. The business attended to during the session, was local and of no general importance. The Grand Secretary, Brother Baker, presented a very full and thorough exhibit of the matters connected with the financial and statistical interests of the Grand Lodge. The address was approved by the Committee appointed to consider that document. "A Festival Communication" was held June 24, 1887, for the purpose of laying a corner stone. An oration was delivered on the occasion by Brother Geo. H. Kenyon; also an interesting address was made at the sallle time and place by the Grand Chaplain, Brother Henry 'V. Rugg. No report on Correspondence. , The Grand Master, elect was Rev. ,Villiam N. Ackley. tary, Edwin Baker, Providence.

Grand Secre-


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SOUTH CAROLINA. This Grand Lodge assembled in its 11Uh Session in the City of Charleston, December 13,1887. Brother J. Adger Smyth, Grand Master presided, with Brother Charles Inglesby as Grand Secretary. Of the 168 Chartered lodges, 143 were represented. The Recapitulation shows the membership to be less than 5,000. THE ADDRESS.

An address, consisting of fourteen pages, presented by Brother Smyth, opened elegantly and even poetically. He informed the Grand Lodge that their Masonic Temple, wliich had been injured by the earthquake, was now in good repair. He announced that their relations to the Craft throughout the world continued undisturbed. The condition of the Craft in that Jurisdiction is shown in the following extract: It has given me pleasure to visit a number of Lodges during the past year, in different parts of the State and to confer degrees in several of them. I am glad to note the interest manifested by the Brethren, the large attendance, and the signs of improvement on all sides. r trust the Craft throughout the Jurisdiction will share in the general prosperity with which our country has been blessed during the past year.

Two new lodges had been created under dispensation. Special dispensations had been granted for various purposes. The decisions reported were few and of local application. FINANCIAL.

The Grand Master gave an exhibit of their financial condition, stating that their Temple debt had. been reduced to $18,000, and the interest had been duly paid. He further stated that the interest on the entire bonded debt had been reduced to six per cent per annum. There is thus shown a considerable saving on interest account. During his service, as Grand Master for three years, their bonded debt had been reduced $5,000. He said that as he was about to retire from the office of Grand Master, and resign the gavel into the hands of his successor, he would congratulate them upon their present financial condition. And I join them in their common joy. GRAND SECRETARY.

Brother lnglesby presented in his usual business style, an interesting report. The Grand Master said concerning him the following:


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It was with great regret that I heard at our la.~t Communication an amendment proposed to reduce the salary of the Grand Secretary. Agai.n and again si.nce my connection with this Grand Body has a similar amendment been proposed, and a.gain and again at the succeeding communication it has been voted down.

I need not allude to the fidelity and ability with which our R. W. Brother has discharged, for so many years. the arduous duties of his oflice. You know this well. Nor need I call your attention to the well-known fact that if we desire first-classofficers, we musLcontinue the salaries that will secure for us the services of such brethren. Everyman at all familiar with business methods understands this rule. But I 'will say, as your Grand ]\faster, having for three years been charged.with the management of your financial matters; that I do not believe any reduction III the salary of the Grand Sccretary is either necessary or essential. Did I think so, I would unhesitatingly recommend you to adopt the proposed amendmcnt. But I think it un wise, as well as unnecessary, and trust it will not prevail.

It did not prevail !

In closing his address, the Grand Master employed most expressive terms and eloquent language from which the following clipping is made: Who of us can measure the life-time of a soul fitted for its place in the Heavens? It is a mighty stream that grows broader and deeper as it flows on ward. An angel's eye cannot penetrate its utmost limit. An angel's wing cannot reach its furthest boundary. When even thc Pyramids shall have crumbled to the dust and thc desert winds have swept away that dust, until not the faintest semblance of their former glory remains, the immortal soul will be but pluming its wings for higher flights. And if Builders-then day by day are we adding to the Temples we are erecting within us, that are to last throughOllt eternity. These Ancient :MasOllS, with watchful care suffered no stone to be placed within the walls of these buildings, until each one by thorough tests was proven "well tried, true and tmst!!." Let us be careful how each day we build! l&t no stone be added to the moral building, OUR. CHARACTER, that we are erecting within us, that has not been plumbed by Virtue, levelled by Faith and squared by Charity. ' So, as these walls arise, not only shall they have a sure foundation but they shall grow up increasing in beauty and s)'mmetr)T, proving us to be perfect, upright men and ulltil that day when the Cap-Stone shall be laid with shoutings and rejoicings; when we shall pass through the veil and enter the Holy of Holies above; ,yhen no longer we shall see through a glass darkly, but face to face with the Grand Architect Himself, we shall bask in the full perfection of that light we have been searching for so long! Maso~s,

During the Session, a Pa.."t Grand Master's Jewel was presented to Brother .T. Adger Smyth by Brother Z. Davis,' Grand Treasurer, in behalf of the Grand Lodge. The Committee presented a beautiful and interesting memorial tribute in honor of Brother Henry Buist, Past Grand Master. I :find nothing further clai.ming attention in the general business of the Grand Lodge, except two decisions made by the Committee 011 Jurisprudence. The first one was that a Lodge cannot release its jurisdiction over rejected material. I am surprised that the Grand Lodge of South Carolina still adheres to that indefensible doctrine of "Perpetual .T urisdiction." Anotherruling was that neither the Senior or Junior 'Varden could convene a lodge, during the absence of the Master, to bury a Brother Mason. From this decision 1 dissent. If the ::\faster is absent, the Senior 'Var-


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den is the ranking officer, who succeeds to higher duties. I would ask the question "what the Senior 'Vaiden is for, if not to assist the Master when present, and in his absence rule and govern the lodge." The practical result of the above ruling is that if a Brother Mason should be so unfortunate as to die during the absence of the Master of the lodge, he cannot be buried Masonically. An amendment to their Constitution was proposed, and I hope will be adopted, to the effect that in the absence of the Worshipful Master, the 'Wardens, according to rank, should be empowerecl to convene a lodge for the purpose of burying a Brother. CORRESPONDENCE.

The Report is signed by Bro. "Chas. Inglesby, Grand Secretary." He reviewed the transactions of sixty-one Grand Bodies, domestic and foreign. The Report covered one hundred pages. It evidences the same care and attention shown by Bro. Inglesby in all his former efforts. The attention bestowed upon each Grand Lodge Journal was necessarily brief, owing to limited space. His gleanings were, like his comments, short and pertinent. The l\fissouri Proceedings of 1886 received full notice, three pages being accorded us. A. H. 'Vhite, Rock Hill, Grand Master; Charles Inglesby, Charleston, Grand Secretary.

TENNESSEE. The 74th a~nual session of this Grand Lodge was opened in the city of Nashville, on the 25th day of January, 1888. M. 路W. Brother Caswell A. Goodloe, Grand Master, present and presiding. Brother John Frizzell was Grand Secretary. The attendance was large, consisting of representatiyes from 324 lodges, 12 Past Grand Masters, and other Past Grand Officers, and representatives of 32 Grand Lodges. Our Grand Lodge was represented by Dr. Deering J. Roberts, who holds a commission from this jurisdiction. The very complete recapitulation furnished by Brother Frizzell shows a membership of some 14,000 in the 386 Lodges of the State. The increase by Raisings, Restorations and admissions amounted to more than 1,200. Yet with all these accessions, t.here is a reported loss of 253.


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THE ADDRESS

Of the Grand Master was unusually bI'ief, amounting to some five pages. "OUR DEAD."

were mentioned as follows: Looking out upon this large assembly, two things, among mHny others, force themselves upon my notice: The many new faces and the absence of some familiar ones. Among the latter and perhaps the most prominent on the list of the departed is our distinguished and much-belayed brother, Past Grand Master John S. Dashiell. When slllall timbers of the forest are blown away by the pa.%ing cyclone others sprOllt readily, and quickly sprin~ up, but when the rifting tornado fells the giant oak the vacuum is sogreat that natural forces are unequal to the task of a speedy renewal. Anticipating that proper memorial services would be held at this Annual Communication, I have requested our veteran brot.her, Past Grand :Mllster A. M. Hughes, to deliver the eulogy at such time during the meeting as t.he Grand Lod~e may select to hold a Lodge of Sorrow. I therefore forbear further comment as to the 11fe and character ofour illustrous deceased brother, and recommend that mention be made of the departed as his well-known merits deserve.

It was t.he pleasure of this writer to know the departed and highly venerated Brother Dashiell. The last Maso.nic association enjoyed among the fraters of Nashville, a few years since, I realized the great satisfaction of spending an evening in company with our Most \Vorshipful Brother. The tribute paid him by his brethren was due and well deserved.

Grand Master Goodloe reported quite a number of Dispensations granted by him during his term of offIce. Among them I have sought in vain for an instance where he exercised "the high power in me vested" by overriding written law. I am inclined to say "'VeIl done, Tennessee." He reported several very sensihle rulings, which met approval at the hands of a committee. He referred briefly to Physical qualifications, t.he Masonic Home, Non-affiliates and Temperance. Respecting the "HOME" I find the fonowing in the Proceedings as coming from Brother Bumpas, Secretary of the Home Association: The most gratifying result of the Year's efforts is that throughout our beloyed Tennessee, wherever men meet. in Masonic love and Charity, wherever they rest beneath the square and compass, this cause of the poor widow and friendless orphan has been rooted in the hearts of the Craft. All over Tennessee the :i\Iasonic mind ha;; largely acknOWledged that the Home is a necessity to illustrate to the world the practical benefits of Masonry, as well as to keep pace with the great progress ofthe Stat.e in every ot.her particular, and to save them the humility of being lett hehind in the laudable race with other States, in building these monuments of Masonic love. But there is a pleasing recollection that causes our hearts to swell liS we stand here before you to-day looking into so many faces we have met, and that is, that wherever we have gone on our mission we have been kindly, fraternally, and cordially received and treated. The very best evidence of the determination of the Masons to carry the scheme through has, however, been shown by Nashville. In the midst of our arduous duties b~' which we have to provide for those dependent upon us, where here and there we could steal an hour from our business or our hom('s, we have gotten together a mbscription from the best men of the city, aggregating nearly $10,000, and, brethren, we are willing here to pledge you that Nashville will double this before June 24t.h, and perhaps do more.


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Hence, you see, that with moderate aid from the other cities and towns our home is an assured fact. We have ten acres of ground, donated us by a wealthy citizen, three miles from the city, on the L. & N. Railroad, affording a beautiful and commanding site in full view of the city, and we hope to go to work on the house before the summer. Many of the citizens of Kashville are helping us, and we do not mean to cease work until the last nail is driven. These are facts and firm resolves, aJ1d if you will only take them home with you and add your own energies, Tennessee Masons will not longer bear the shame of having proved false tothe promises made their dead brethren, but our beautiful home will rear it:; loftv head like a grand and enduring monument of our faith, our lovc and practice, stretclling out her hands to the ends of the State, calling under her friendly roof widowhood in its tears and age, and orphanage in its cries and destitution. GRAND LODGE OF SORROW.

A session of this ki nd was held during tbe sitting of the Grand Lodge in honor of tbe late John S. Dashiell, Past Grand Master. M. 'V. Brotber 'Wilbur F. Foster, P. G. M., presided. The address was delivered by Brother A. lVI. Hugbes, the senior Past Grand lVIaster of tbe Jurisdiction. It was a most appropriate tribute. From it I clip his closing remarks: May I, whose sands of life have nearly run out, be permitted to say a few words in rcgard to thc institution of Masonry and your duty thereto? Masonry is 1I0t the Christian religion. The Bible and Masonic history and tradition inform us that the first Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons that was ever organized and held was presided over by the wise King of Israel at the building of Solomon's Temple. In point of time it was nearly one thousand years prior to the birth of the Saviour. The systcm of symbolical ?I'Iasonry teaches us the finest and purcst systcm of morals cver instituted by the wit or wisdom of man. And there is nothing taught or required of Masons which is in conflict with the teachings of the Christian religion. We insist that the great moral truths inculcated by :Masonry have survivcd all the rcvolutions in all civil governments that havc taken place in thc civilized world since its institution at the building of Kin~ Solol11on's Temple until the present time. And that it is still maintaining and teachmg the same symbolical morality instituted at its beginning. It has sprea.d all over the world teaching the sa.me moral duty of man to his God, his neighbor, and himself. A belief in God constitutes the creed of a Mason. Upon entering any well-furnished Lodge, you will see above the :i\1:aster's station a symbol which should ever remind you that in your journey through life the all-seeing' eye of the Great I am is ever upon you. And when your earthly career is ended you will appear before the Grand Master above to give an account of how you have performed your Masonic duties to God, your neighbor, and yourself.

The Grand Secretary, Brother Frizzell, furnished as many tables as I have ever seen in a Journal of Proceedings, some thirty-two pages being assigned to Tabular work. His Journal is always a good one. COHRESPONDENCE.

A review was furnished by some one amounting to one hundred pages. Mention of the report was made by the Grand Secretary, bnt the name of the Committee did not appear. Guess

It is not signed by tbe autbor.


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the Committee was Brother F. 1\1. Smith. His modesty bespeaks his merit. And the review was not without merit, though it was unsigned and unfathered. Brother Smith, do not fear to father your own children. The Report is almost wholly made up of clippings from j oumals reviewed. Brother Smith has opinions;but he studiously refrained from an expression of them. Henry Ingersoll, Knoxville, Grand Master. John Frizzell, Nashville, Grand Secretary. 1

TEXAS. A volume of more than seven hundred pages claims attention as the last product of the Grand Lodge of Texas. This is by far the largest Journal emanating from any of the Grand Lodges in this country. The space occupied by the transactions ofthe session covers one hundred and fifty pages. The remaining six hundred pages were taken up by Statistical Tables, Membersh)p by Lodges and Report on Correspondence. The latter alone consumes two hundred and thirty-two pages of the J oumaI. Texas is a large State-an empire in itself-and it does nothing in a small way. The number of Lodges is large. The exact figures cannot be arrived at, with certainty, except by counting. The highest number on the roll is 658. The membership as reported foots up 20,417. The 52d Annual Session was opened in the city of Houston on the 13th day of December, 1887. M. 路W. Brother A. J. Rose was Grand :Mastel' and Brother T. ",V. Hudson was Grand Secretary. There were representatives present from more than two hundred Lodges, together with eight Past Grand Masters and other Past Grand Officers. The address of the Grand Master was lengthy, covering more than twenty pages. Brother Rose congratulated the Grand Lodge upon the general prosperity of the Craft in Texas. He said the moral growth of Freemasonry wa." very encouraging, its principles and purposes being better understood and acted upon, while peace and" harmony prevailed. He said further that the best evidences of prosperity were found in the fact that the officers of the Lodges attended the meetings, filled their places promptly, prepared to perform their duties witn credit rather than by an increase in membership. He reported the institution of four Lodges under dispensation. S.pecial dispensations had been granted for numerous purposes. He had declined to allow Lodges to call lIpon sister


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Lodges for aid in building halls. Some dispensations had been granted to confer degrees out of time. The Grand Master declared in favor of retaining the Past Master's Degree, and decided said degree to be a portion of the ceremony of installation of the Master-elect in the Subordinate Lodge. He further said that the :Master-elect is not installed until he has received the Past Master's Degree. It would seem to follow naturally that if the Past Master's Degree is a portion of the installation of the Master of a Subordinate Lodge, said degree must belong of necessity to a Subordinate Lodge. A contradiction appears at this point, and is seen in the fact that the Royal Arch Chapter confers the Past Master's Degree as a part of its system. How can it belong to two systems? I leave the Texas Grand Master and the Grand Lodge of that Jurisdiction to settle this question and reconcile the conflict. The Grand Master reported a number of decisions, all of which were approved by the Grand Lodge. They have a rule that any member more than six months in arrears . for dues shall not be entitled to hold office hl the Lodge. It seems, also, that members who are behind with their dues are not allowed to vote. Putting the two cases together, the Texas law amounts to this: members who are in arrears for dues are in good standing in the Lodge, and yet are not allowed either to vote or hold office. Such a law bears upon its face its own condemnation, and needs no comment. I cannot do the subject justice. The Grand Master presented abstracts from the reports of the several District Deputy Grand Masters in the Jurisdiction. There are fifty-two deputies of this kind. The address of the Grand Master is a thorough business paper. The various interests of the Craft in that Jurisdiction, coming under the notice of the Grand Lodge, were carefully considered. The reports of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary furnished extended details of the matters belonging to their departments. The Grand Lodge made a donation of $500 to a venerable Past Grand Master who had spent the prime of his life for the good of Masonry in Texas. This was a noble act upon the part of the big-hearted Masons of Texas. The report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances is an extended one, in which there is shown fairness, firmness and ability. The Grand Lodge adopted a resolution favoring the claim of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, declaring that said Grand Lodge should have the exclusive control over all Masonic Lodges in its territorial limits. Our Texas brethren are moving in the direction of a Home for the Widows and Orphans of deceased Masons. They created a Board of


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Directors for their enterprise, and directed said Board to formulate a plan for the establishment of a Home. In order to accumulate a fund for the purpose of establishing the institution, the' sum borrowed by the Grand Lodge from the "Grand Charity Fund," used in the erection of their Masonic Temple, is to be returned to the Charity Fund, and after said sum bas been repaid, one-half of the gross revenues of the Grand Lodge, and all of the Charity Fund, shall be set apart for the establishment and maintenance of said Home for 'Widows and Orphans. The fund created is to be invested in good securities until such time as the Board of Directors shall have accumulated a fund sufficient to establish the Home. CORRESPONDENCE.

As already stated, the Report on Correspondence covers two hundred and thirty-two pages. Fifty Grand Lodge Proceedings had passed under review. Part of the work was performed by Brother Geo. 'V. Tyler, Chairman, and the remaining portion of the report was produced by Brother Tbos. M. Matthews. It would seem from. the statement of these brethren that both of them intended to retire from this important position, both declaring in their conclnsion that they would not likely re-appear in the character of "corps reportorial." Yet I notice that in the list of standing committees, made at the close of the session, Brothers Matthews and Tyler, with others, constitute the committee for the coming year. Brother :Matthews reviewed the Missouri Proceedings for 1887. He is a pleasant writer and a good gleaner, and, withal, very complimentary. His review of Missouri, covering eight pages, was very fraternal. Numerous extracts were made from our Proceedings and from my work on Correspondence. He denominates tbis writer" a veteran." In this he is mistaken. In years I am among tle young members of the "corps reportorial" In the work of Correspondence 1. am a novice. Therefore, in no view can Brother Matthews make me a "veteran." If he wants to find" veterans," he must go to 1\1:aine, Iowa, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Brothers Drummond, Parvin, Vaux and Drinkard are " veterans" of tbe " old guard." Brother Matthews thinks tlat this committee has "no pronounced opinion" on the" Nevada-Utah and the Quebec-England troubles." He is not acquainted with the writings of this comnlittee. I" pronounced an opinion" on the "Quebec-England" matter long ago, even before Brother Matthews was appointed a Committee on Correspondence. As to the "Utah-Nevada" trouble, I deemed the affair of such moment as to be let alone, that it might be the sooner adjusted by. the Grand Lodges interested, believing that the conflict as to jurisdiction in the Foley case had grown out of a misunderstanding. Such proved to be true, and an amicable settlement was effected by the parties interested without the intervention of a "peace commission" from abroad. I


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Replying to my comments upon a Texas law which deprives an actual Past Master, who takes a dimit, of his standing as such, Brother Matthews said: We answer No. The committee was right, and not the Grand }\{aster. Such is the Texas law, and the Grand Master's decision should have been in accordance therewith. That, too, is vour own argument, as the extract shows. Your law, you say, does not aHow the "Actual Past l\'!astcr," Brother Jones, of another Jurisdiction. who has moved into Missouri, to be a Past Master still, and for that reason he is no longer such. The Texas law does not allow him, after dimission, to be a Past :Master again because of affiliation. "Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander," Brother Vincil, but this writer believes the law is wron9' 111 both Texas and Missouri. 'Ve believe thRt as "once a Mason, always a Mason,' so once an actual Past Master, always a Past Master everywhere should be the rule.

The Grand Master may have been wrong as to the rule, but right as to the principle. The Texas rule is found in a simple resolution, and therefore easi) y 1路epealed. The principle is an immutable one, which a mere resolution could not render nugatory. Therefore the Grand Master was 1'ight in maintaining the principle as against an unsound rule, which was wrong in itself. I still stand opposed to the Texas rule and in favor of Grand Master Coombes. The Past Mastership is a dowery gained by actual service, and no resolution can rob its possessor of the honor, title or privilege. Such an act of disfranchisement is unjust, and ought to be repealed. Brother Matthews says tI the law is wrong in both Texas and Missouri." So do 1. Hence the effort by us in Missouri to have the unjust law repealed. "Go thou and do likewise." But please note the difference between the rule in Texas and the law in Missouri. Ours is a c01'/.stitutional provision, and cannot be repealed without a proposition being submitted and read for jour' successive days during the session. We never remai"n in session but three days. If the proposed change could be legally sent out to the Lodges, they would not act upon it, as the proposition. must be read" at three stated meetings" of each Lodge. If it should come back approved by a majority of all the Lodges in the State, then it must be voted on during" one of the first jour days" of the session. Repeal of a constitutional provision in Missouri is very nearly impossible. The" Fathers" who enacted our Constitution in Missouri made it air and water-proof, locked it up tight and fast, and then threw the key into the Mississippi river. Your Texas proscription of dimitting Past Masters is a simple resolution, and one that Grand Master Coombes believed to be wrong, and brought up the matter that the rule might be repealed. Your Texas resolution proscribes and disfranchises Past Masters in your own .Jurisdiction who dimit from 'one Lodge to join another at home. If a Past Master in Texas dimits from a Lodge over which he presided, and subsequently returns to his old home Lodge, he is no longer a Past Master. 'What a travesty on Masonic rights! Brother Matthews, repeal that unjust resolution. Our Missouri law protects" Past Masters who have been duly elected Masters, and have actually presided as Worshipful Masters of Lodges within the .Jnrisdiction of this Grand Lodge."


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They thereby become members of our Grand Lodge, and remai.n so as long as they conti.nue in affiliation. Our law in Missouri, against which I protest, disallows the claims only of such Past Masters as have served as Masters in other .r urisdictions. Our law is an unj ust discrim ination against the Pa.st Mastership in not recognizing the status of brethren honored by other Jurisdictions when they affiliate with us. But the key being lost, I have no hope of changing the iron rule. We tried to remove the barrier, but failed. "THE AMENDE HONOHADLE."

In my review of the Texas Journal last year, I did the Grand Lodge great injustice. A member of the Grand Lodge, during its session became "grossly intoxicated." Charges were preferred, and admitted by the party. A motion was adopted that the accused be reprimanded. He departed without taking his medicine. I thought that was the end of the matter and said: "Let us all blush for Texas Masonry." Brother Matthews says, "Take that IJack, Bro. VinciI." I do, and will make the "amende honorable" as public as was my blunder. The injustice, though purely unintentional, was very great, for which I offer my sincere apology. I overlooked the action of the Grand Lodge in the case, which gave a quietus to the unfortunate member. I introduce the final action of the Grand Lodge, and thereby make partial amends for the wrong done my Texas brethren, and vindicate the Grand Lodge of that .r urisdiction. Here is the resolution offered by Bro. Moses, P. G. M. "Whereas, Bro. J. II. SIMMS, of Hardwood Lodge, No. 468, pleaded guilty to the offenses preferred against him in this Grand Lodge, of drunkenness while in attendance upon this Grand Lodge at its present communication as a del(~gate ; and whereas, this Grand Lodge affixed as a punishment for said offense a r~primand, to be administered by the Grand l\'Iaster in open Grand Lodge; and whereas, with full notice of the charge pending against him, said Bro. J. H. SUliIIS absented himself, and refused and fa.iled to appear and submit to the sentence of this Grand Lodge; and whereas, it appears that said Bro. J. H. Sums, since the said charges were preferred, and since he pleaded guilty to the same, has repeated the offense. 'l'herefore be it Resolved, That J. H. Simms be, and he is hereby expelled from all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry."

The above was unanimously adopted. It was a disposition of the case worthy of the Grand Lodge of Texas. Brother Matthews said: "That's the Texas Masons' way. Now, let us all Huzza for Texas Masonry, Bro. VinciI." May I join the cry? Allow the remark that the "blush" is on me. Brother Matthews quoted the' following from Brother Diehl of Utah: "Bro. Vincil's style of writing never leaves the reader to know exactly what he means." Bro. Matthews said in reply to Bro. Diehl: We had come to just the opposite conclusion. We thought Bro. VINCIL could not well be misunderstood-that he was unusually emphatic and clear. However, it is not t.he intention of this writer to enter the list in defense of Bro. V. He is amply able to take care of himself, as must be the inevitable verdict of any who will read what he says.


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Bro. Diehl may have obtained a patent for his discovery tlJat this writer never makes himself 'understood. If he has not secured "letters-patent" on the discovery, an early application should be filed for fear some one may jump his claim. I have one consolation, however. It is better to be misunderstood than to be misrepresented. Thanking Bro. :Matthews for his very warm and fraternal courtesy, I bid him "good-by," hoping that we may meet again. Anson Rainey, 'Vaxahachie, Grand Master; T. 'V. Hudson, Houston, Grand Secretary.

UTAH. SEVENTEENTH AKNlJAL CO)1iI:WNICATlON

This Grand Lodge assembled on the 17th day of January, 1888, in the city of Salt Lake, and was opened by :Most 'Yorshipflll Brother Parley Lycurgus 'Villiams, Grand Master. Brother Christopher Diehl was Grand Secretary. There were present seven Past Grand Masters, and other Past Grand Officers. Thirty-three Grand Lodges were represented. There are eight Lodges in this Jurisdiction, 'with a membership of 462. All the Lodges '\'ere represented. Early in the session, the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Nevada, Brother A. L. Fitzgerald, was introduced. The welcome and the response seem to have been warm and cordial. AN ADDRESS

of eight pages was furnished by the Grand路 Master. He treated btiefly and tersely all matters incident to his official position. He called attention to the controversy between the Grand Lodges of Utah and Nevada, and mentioned the fact that Brother Diehl, Grand Secretary, had been appointed to attend the Granel. Lodge of Nevada, and labor for the adjustment of the matters of difference between the two Grand Lodges. Brother Diehl had not succeeded in his mission, though kindly received by the Grand Lod!re of Nevada. That Grand Lodge commissioned its Grand Master, Brother Fitzgerald, and other brethren to visit the Grand Lodge of Utah, and labor for the settlement of the questions involved. The Grand :Master said tlJat, with the exception of the Nevada difficulty, foreign relations with aU other Grand Lodges throughout the world were pleasant and harmonious. No decisions were reported by Grand l\faster G. L. Ap.-ll.


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Williams, though he had been importuned, in some instances, to give opinions upon matters which he characterized as frivolous in their nature. From his address the following extract is made: The Grand Lodge of Utah is diminutive as to Lodges and members, but ithas secured and so far maintained an enviable position in the family of Grand Lodges, a fact of which we may feel justly proud. I do not say that it has attained this position solely because it has always had ample means to meet its necessary expenses, but this no doubt is one of the aids through which its success ha.<; been achieved. With ample funds in our treasury, we can assist the unfortunate when called upon, ,ve can issue every year a volume of our procei,dings that will be a credit to Utah, and many other things too numerous to mention may he done that wi)) benefit Masonry at home and abroad. Without the necessary means, much of this good and desirable work must nece~sflrily be omitted, and our Grand Lodge will, as an inevitable consequence, suffer in power and prestige. But, my brethren, it is a question for you to determine whet.her you will remain at a stand still, or whether yOIl will keep pace with the times and steadily advance the interest, prosperity and power to do good of this Grand Lodge. WOHK.

The Grand Master said that his visits, dnring- the past three years, to the Lodges had convinced him of the fact that uniformity of work exists in name only, and not in reality. Each Lodge deems its o,vn work the best. It follows, as a consequence, that there is "confusion among the Craft." ELECTIONEERING Fon OFFICE.

The Grand Master treated this subject at some length in the following terms: It is a cardinal tenet of our Fratemity that there is to be no personal striving for advancement-that merit alone should be the passport to official po~itions. To have the respect, esteem and confidence of our bl'dhren, to be properly qualified for and occupy an official position in a Lodge, or in a Grand Lodge, i~ an object that any member may feel a just pride in obtaining. But in order t.o enjoy this hOllor to its fullest extent, the office should, in every illstance, seek the Brother, and not the Brother the office. If members of our Fraternity would be COli tent to qualify themselves for discharging the duties of whatever office may be within the ~Ift of the emft, and leave the question of selectioll to be determined solely by appreciation of the fitness for it, there would thell be heard no just complaint of the means adopted in secUl'in!? the electioll, and none but friendly and fraternal criticism a.<; to the manner of dischal'gll1g the duties of the ofl1ce: but once let intrigue, partisanship and the desire to lift some one up, irrespective of his merit or fitness, or to pull another down by reason of some dislike, or wrong, real or imaginan', previollsly infEcted by that. person, and we have at once in the Lodge all t.he conditIons that go to characterize the worst phases of political contention, and that unworthy striving for power and place which has made the pursuit of politics a reproach.

Grand :Master 路YVilliams closed his third term, having rendered valuable and satisfactory services to the Craft of that ,Jurisdiction. His labors were heartily approved and commended by an appropriate committee. He retires from a well filled and highly honored station with the approbation of his brethren. Brother Diehl, Grand Secretary, rendered Lis usual full and complete report of all matters appertaining to his position, embracing numerous miscellaneous Inatters. His work met the hearty approval of the Grand Lodge.


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Reports were presented upon all matters appertaining to the local interests of their Grand Lodge. Concerning the dispute between the Grand Lodges of Utah and Nevada, over the famous Foley case, a report was presented from the joint commission created by the two Grand Lodges. Said commission stated that the gi'cat obstacle in the way of the fraternal settlement of the matter had been a misunderstanding of the true facts in the case. A statement of the facts was agreed upon, and, in view of the same, the commission recommended that the Grand Lodge of Utah recognize and respect the action of the Grand Lodge of Nevada against the said Foley. This places the control of Foley, and his status, in the hands of the Grand Lodge of Nevada. The commission said there was no reason why the most cordial and fraternal relations should not exist between the two Grand Lodges. The report of the commission was unanimously adopted, and peace and harmony reigns between the two neighboring Grand Lodges of Nevada and Utah. Thus has happily ended an unfortunate conflict which came near resulting in the breaking up of fraternal relations between the brethren of those two Jurisdictions. They are to be congratulated upon the satisfactory and honorable adjustment of their misunderstandings. Missouri offers her warmest and most cordial congratulations to tbe brethren, and would say, ÂŤ Peace be unto thee." FRATERNAL ADDRESSES

followed the peaceful $ettlement of the matters in controversy. Grand "jiaster Fitzgerald, of Nevada, and Grand Master 'Villiams, of Utah, and otbers, grew eloquent in their remarks over the happy and satisfactory settlement of tbe difficulties which had existed between the two Jurisdictions for years. The addresses were followed by a general hand-shaking, and the Secretary says that the members of the Grand Lodge of Utah gathered around the distinguished members from Nevada, and "smoked the pipe of peace." Just before the session closed, Brother Varian made a very complimentary address in honor of the retiring Grand :Master, Brother Williams, from which I make the following extract: When, therefore, we are called upon to part with one who, for three consecutive, happy years, has administered the great trust confided to him with di~ity and honor to himselt and the Craft, it is meet that we should place upon our reeoras appropriate expression of our appreciation and love for our past leader. For three years, the retiring Grand Master, Parley Lycurgus Williams, has guided and directed the Craft in this Jurisdiction. Under his administration, the harmonious unity and Brotherhood of :Masonry have been strikingly signali7.ed. With a firm, but considerate kindness, he has performed the duties of his great office, and as he relinquishes the gavel to-night, he takes with him to his retirement the respect and admiratlOn of all Masons in this Jurisdiction. But he takes something more. As a man and It :M:ason, we have watched his daily walk: we have seen his true and faithful life ; we have felt his anxious, brotherlv care, and have learned to know and love him as an honest man, a good citizen, a true and upright Mason. Brother Williams takes with him, in addition, therefore, our love. "Well done, thou good and faithful servant, retire with the consciousness of well doing, and carry with you this tribute of our respect and love."


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I move that the sentiments I have expressed be, by resolution, adopted and spread upon the records of the Grand Lodge.

The motion was unanimously agreed to by a rising vote. Thus closed in peace and.hannony the seventeenth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Utah. CORRESPONDENCE.

The report for the year was rendered by Brother Christopher Diehl, Grand Secretary. The review embraced notices of fifty-four Grand Lodge proceedings, and covered ninety pages. Brother Diehl is a dose observer, compiles well, comments briefly, and furnishes a good summary. lIe devoted less than two pages to a review of Missouri transactions for 1887. He said that the Grand 'Secretary of Missouri had performed a feat which should not pass unnoticed. Sixteen days after the close of our session, he received the Grand Lodge proceedings sent out from this office. It is singular that it took so long for the proceedings to reach him. They were mailed in six days after the close of the session. He thinks this Committee has superior advantages as to the labor performed. I must inform him that there is morelabor in the preparation of a large Grand Lodge journal than is generally supposed. He thinks I have nothing to do but to "dictate to a few type-writers, telephone the printer," and the work is done. I wish to say that" type-\vriters" in my office, as a rule, are unknown, and "telephoning the printer" does not prepare "copy." But Brother Diehl is not envious, and says that "the only thing that troubles him is that life is so awfully short." Brother Diehl, being a philosopher, should make the most of this shmt li;fe, and prepare for the next. He said the address of our Dr. Hunt, Gr~nd :Master, was" a short, but able paper." Samuel Paul, Salt Lake City, Grand Master; Christopher Diehl, Salt Lake City, Grand Secretary.

VIRGINIA. A volume of nearly five hundred pages, received in good time, proclaims the efficiency and ability of Brother Isaacs, the Grand Secretary. The Journal of Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Virginia is always examined by me with a sense of personal gratification and fraternal pleasure. No other .Jurisdiction has the same hold upon the affections of this writer as my own "mother-land." As a native of that old Common-


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wealth, identified with her people by the ties of blood, my devotion is filial. "\Vithin her bosom rests the dust of a mother, whose loving care I never knew. Sisters and other loved ones lie in dreamless quiet amid the silent grandeur of her blue mountains. There, in her beautiful valleys and along her limpid streams, dwell friends and brethren, very dear to the heart of this writer. I would be untrue to the holy memories and associations of the past, not to cherish the land of my birth and the home of my youth. I love Virginia. The 110th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Virginia commenced its duties in the City of Richmond, December 12, 1887. Most "\Vorshipful Brother William F. Drinkard, Grand Master, presided. Brother \Vm. B. Isaacs, was Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from 136 lodges. Several Past ~rand Masters were in attendance and numerous Past Masters Representatives of twenty-five Grand Lodges were enrolled. Brother Isaacs represented Missouri. There are 237 lodges on the roll, with a membership of 8,799. The records show a loss of 111 members during the past year. ADDRESS.

The address of Brother Drinkard was brief and to the point, covering six pages. It was just such a paper as I looked for from him. There is no flourish, but solid business in the document throughout. From Brother Drinkard, I expected nothing sophomoric. After a brief exordium, he announced the death of their Grand Lecturer, Brother Peyton S. Coles, Past Grand Master. From the heartfelt tribute paid路 the deceased by Brother Drinkard, I make the following extract: PEYTON S. COLES, Grand Lecturer of the Grand Lodge of Virl1inia, who had many other Masonic titles, but who prided himself most upon this, WhICh some might have considered one of the least of the honors he wore, died at his residence at Estonteville, in Albemarle county, on the 2.5th of June last. As soon as the Grand Secretary had received the necessary information, he, by telegraph, notified the officers of the Grand Lodge of the time and place of the funeral, and on the 2ith of June, accompanied by Past Grand Master 'VeIl ford, Grand Secretary Isaacs, and District Deputy, Grand Master Fisher, I repaired to the late residence of the deceased, where after taking part in appropriate religions services, the brethren of the Lodges of Scottsville and Charlottesville, the Grand Master presiding, assumed charge of the remains. A large procession of the brethren and friends followed the body to the grave, in the old family burying--ground, where the beautiful funeral ritual of our Order was read by Past Grand Master Wellford, and all the ceremonies appropriate to the occasion were duly observed. If the death of Brother Coles had occurred on any other day, or at allY other hour, than at night on a Saturday, the number of brethren who would have attended his funeral from this city alone, would have constituted an imposing procession. They weTe absent only because they had no notice of the death of Brother Coles, nor of the time of the funeral. I have seen largpr processions, of course, in this city, but I never saw so large a proportion of the members of any Lodge, turn out on a funeral occasion as were present at Brother Coles' funeral from the Lodges in Charlottesville and Scottsville, the one place seven miles distant from Estouteville, and the other thirteen. I have seen more brethren around a grave, but I have never heard so many make responses appropriate to tl.e occasion.


166,

[Oct. DISPE:KSATIONS.

Five new lodges had been created by the Grand :Master under dispensation during his term. He reported several cases where the law had been suspended "by virtue of the high power in me vested." T notice that in three instances permission had been granted to receive and act upon petitions for initiation without waiting the prescribed time. In other cases, candidates were permitted to advance without regard to Masonic proficiency. Brother Drinkard knows my views in regard to suspending laws of the Grand Lodge. V'l e differ so widely upon this point that discussion is useless here, as it will never bring us to entertain the same views. I refer him to my treatment (of the prerogative question) found in the discussions of the past, as well as to the arguments presented in other parts of this review. Brother Drinkard mentioned the Centennial Communication of the Grand Lodge of :Maryland, which he had been invited to attend. There had been Centennial Meetings held in his own Jurisdiction during his term of office at which he was present. Concerning said gatberings, he had the following to say: On the 31st of January last I attended the centennial of the chartering of Fredericksburg Lodge, No.4. As this was the mother Lodge of George Washington, who was therein initiated in 1752, it may be well for me to explain that the celebration of th is year was a celebration of tbe centennial of the issuing of a charter to that Lodge by the Grand Lodge of Virginia. There were present at the celebration Past Grand Master T'aliaferro and Past Grand Master Wellford, and distinguished brethren frvm other States, among them Brother Charles H. Allen, of Massachusetts. Brother S. J. Quinn read a. highly interesting paper, historical in its nature, and worthy of preservation in the archives of the Grand Lodge. Speeches were made at the public celebration by l~ight Wor~hipful Wm. B. Isaacs, Worshipful C. H. Allen, Most Worshipful Beverly R. Wellford. Jr., and Right '''orshipful George II. Ray; and at the banquet by a large number of brethren. Music, vocal and instrumental, lent its aid to the occasion. It affords me much satisfaction to add that a revival of interest in the Craft followed the celebration. a. number of petitions for initiation having been sent to the Lodge soon afterwards. ' On the 31st of October last I attended the celebration of the centennial of the chartering of Richmond-Randolph Lodge, No. 19. As the membership of George Washington bas rendered immortal the fame of Fredericksburg Lodge, so the membership of Edmund Randolph has entered the name of Richmond-Randolph Lodge, No. 19, upon the roll of names that "were not born to die." By the way, let me add that when General Lafayette 'was in this count.ry in 1824 he visited both FredericksburJ:;' Lodge and RichmondRandolph Lodge, as their records show, and was received with all the honors due him. At the centennial celebration of Richmond-Randolph Lodge the record book for 1824 was opened upon the altar, and there were to be seen, lJl their own handwriting, the signatures of General Lafa)'ette and his wn and their traveling compmlion, as well as the signatures of brethren of the Lodge who were proud to avail themselves of the oPPOltunity to sign their names in such distinguished company. CORNER STONFAS.

He reported the laying of "the corner stone of the new City Hall to be erected in Richmond at a cost of many hundred thousands of dollars." During his term of office, be laid the corner stone of a monument to be erected in the City of Richmond in memory of Gen. Hobert E. Lee. The ceremony wa.q performed at the request of the Lee Monument Associa-


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tion, whose Board of Managers is presided over by the Governor of Virginia, General Fitzhugh Lee. Brother Drinkard reported no decisions. cellent address in the following language:

He concluded his very ex-

In conclusion, my brethren, let me express t,he hope that your deliberations may be marked by a manifest desire .to promote the welfare of the Craft. I kJlow that harmony will prevail, and I trust that the moral and social virtues which unite and cement us will be known and read of all men, Masons or profanes, who take an interest in our proceedings.

The death of Brother Coles, Grand Lecturer, caused a vacancy in that position which 'was filled by the appointment, by the Grand Master, of Bro. .T. C. Little. This Brother made an extended report of his labors. The Committee appointed to prepare a testimonial to the memory of Brother Peyton S. Coles, late Grand Lecturer, and Past Grand Master, presented a lengthy tribute, evidently prepared by that elegant gentlemen and cultured Brother, B. R. \Vellford, Past Grand Master. From the report I make the following extract. In the zealous discharge of the duties of his office while 'visiting the brethren of one of our Southside Lodges he received the premoJlition of his approaching end. netuming to his home weak and ellfcebled, he WfiS compelled to recognize his present iIlllbility to comply with ellgagements which the brethren of other Lodges were especially hoping for hi~ presellce to fulfill. But the hand of death was upon him, and after Il brief illness in the bosom of his family, surrounded by wife and children, the final summons came. The silver cord was loosed, the golden bowl was broken; the pitcher was proken at the fountain: the "'heel was broken at the cistern, the dust was to return to the earth, as it was, and the spirit returned to the God who gave it. Into the sacred circle of his desolated home we hesitate to intrude, even with words of tender sympathy. But we would fail to give even half expression tothe feelings of all his :Masonic brethren in Virginia if we did not claim with the widowed wife and orphaned children part and parcel of their sorrow. The name and memory they cherish is scarcely less dear to the Fraternity of Virginia than it is to them. It is stamped upon their hearts; it is written upon their records not only at this centre, but radiating aU around the circumference, in its Subordinate Lodges from the Sea-board to the Holston, from the Potomac to the Dan, and it is perpetuated in our history in the baptismal name of one ofour youngest Lodges.

The Grand Chaplain, Rev. Geo. 路W. Dame, having met with an accident, was denied the pleasure of attending the Session of the Grand Lodge. A communi<:ation was received froll him to which the Grand Lodge responded, expressing its deep regret at the cause of his absence, and extending the sincere sympathy of the body to the absent Brother. Reports fi'om the District Deputy Grand Mast.ers were received and printed. The Board of Trustees of the Grand Lodge made a report thruugh Brother Isaacs, Grand Secretary. The Grand Lodge has undertaken to build a Masonic Temple. From the business capacity and financial ability of the President of the Board, Brother 'Wellford, it is to be presumed that the Grand Lodge of Virginia will not swamp itself, and become burdened to death with "too much temple." The enterprise, exclusive of the ground and furniture, is not to cost more than $100,000.


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[Oct.

A resolution was adopted requesting the lodges in the State to subscrihe to the Masonic Temple Association, and thereby assist in building and furnishing a permanent home for the Masons of Virginia. I have thus gleaned all jt,ems of interest from the Journal of Proceedings. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother Drinkard, the Grand Master, has been the Committee on Correspondence in Virginia for a liumber of years. He presented a brief review covering seventy-two pages. His notices of the various Grand Lodge transactions examined by him were necessarily short. He gave our Missouri J omnal for 1887, the benefit of six pages. This was clearly' more than our share, and he has the thanks of this Committee for his fraternal consideration. A briefnotice was given to the address of Grand :l\1:aster Hunt. He then paid his respects to this Committee, giving it the compliment of numerous extracts and fraternal comments. Bro. Drinkard said: The law of Missouri makes saloon-keeping unmasonic conduct. So the Grand Master merely carried out the law. The wholc subject was thus brought to the attention ofthc Grand Lodge. and fully discussed in this body, and thc action of the Grand Master was approvcd by a vote of 800 to 3,')0. The report on Foreign Correspondence was furnished by Rev..John D. VincH, D. D., Past Grand ~:[aster a.nd Grand S()cretary. He is always on guard. He never sleeps on his post. We do not always concur in his opinions, but we always appreciate the sincerit~路, a.bilit.y. and 7.CILI with which they are presented. It is not t.oo much to say that it is t.o his influence that the ~fasons of Missouri are indebted for the high repntation of their Grand Lodge and of themselves as Masons. We give below a specimen of Brother VincH's "lurid rhetoric."

He copied entire my treatment of the question of colored Masonry and said he enjoyed the subject. His review em.braces many extracts from the Proceedings examined. I close my notice of his admirable work with expressions of warm personal regard for Brother Drinkard, and offer my congratulations upon his re-election to the honorable position of Grand Ma.<;ter of the Grand Lodge of Virginia. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected. of each is Richmond.

The address


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169

WEST VIRGINIA. The Journal contains the record of five special Communications. The 28d Annual Communication was held in the city of Charleston, commencing November 15, 1887. Brother Hiram P. Howard, Grand Master, and Brother Geo.W. Atkinson, Grand Secretary. Eighty-two Lodges were represented. There are 84 Lodges in the .Jurisdiction, with a membership of ~~,721, showing a gain of 280. Returns from all the Lodges but two had been received. The committee reported upon returns in a very complimentary terms. The committee said there \Va." a better representation than for many years, and that the Order is in a prosperous condition, and that Masonry is in a growing and healthy state in 'Vest Virginia. ADDRESS.

An address of fourteen pages was rendered by the Grand :l\laster. It is full of business. After presenting a very good exordium, he announced that their relations ",,'itb other Grand Jurisdictions were of the most fraternal character. He said that Masonry was in a healthy and prosperous condition in the Jurisdiction. He had created one Lodge under dispensation. Several special dispensations had been granted, but none to work out of time. He reported a case in the following terms: January 10th, 1887, to Bates Lodge, 1\0. 33, to complete the work of conferring the Degree of E. A. 011 a candidate who had some two years before received the Degree as far as the obligation, when he was led out of the Lodge by order of the W. 1\1., because of being ~nder the influence of liquor. I quote from my reply in refUSing to grant the dispensatlOn: "A degree cannot be completed at any snbsequent communication, but once commenced must be finished before the Lodge is closed. In a case like the one you present, however, the Grand Master must exercise his prerogative of granting a dispensation before you can lega.lly proceed with the work. You charge the young mall with being intoxicated while taking the E. A. Degree, and for that reason did not complete t.he work. Intoxication is a Masonic offense, and until your Lodge disposes favorably by II. trial of so grave It charge I shall refuse to grant a dispensation in the case, believing it would be an injury to the Craft and of no benefit to the young man. If he is found not guilty I shall cheerfUlly grant it." â&#x20AC;˘

The Grand Chaplain, Rev. John W. Grantham, was reported sicktoo ill to attend the Session-and died during the sitting of the Grand Lodge. -The following beautiful tribute was paid to his memory by the body:


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Intelligence having been received during- the present (J-rand Annual Coinmunicapon that our well beloved and Right Worshipful Bro. John W. Grantham has been this day called from labor upon our Symbolic Temple and has been admitted to rest and reward in the Grand Lodge on high; it is therefore fitting that we, his brethren, who knew him well, and to whose heart.s he was dear, should place upon record some expression, however imperfect, of our sense of the mental and moral and Masonic worth of our departed friend. . Brother John W. Grantham has been dllfing nearly fifteen years past a member of this Grand Lodge, always in attendance at the Annual Grand Communication, and prompt, faithful and capable in the performance of every duty, and bis courteous demeanor and wise counsels greatly endeared him to all with whom he came in contact. As a citi7.en Brother Grantham worthily and satisfactorilv filled various positions of great honor and trust, and in every walk in life he exemplified the character of a zealous and consistent Christian, an upright and honest man, and faithful Free and Accepted Mason. koill Re.~olved, That this statement be spread upon the records of this Grand Lodge, and an attested copy thereof be furnished to the family of the deceased.

Reports of the G rand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Lecturer and District Lecturers were furnished and printed. The business of the session was local. The membership of the Order in that Jurisdiction is furnished by Lodges. DECISIONS.

Twenty-five decisions were reported by the Grand Master. No doubt they were in harmony with the law of procedure of the Grand Lodge, as they were an approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence. I copy a few of bis rulings as follows: It is a violation of 1\fasonic law for a. brother Mason, who is a hotel proprietor, to keep and sell spiritllous liquors in a local option town or county, notwithstanding he has paid the United States ~tamp tax.

In the above case the violation grows out of the fact that liquor selling was contra.ry to "the law of the land." Rut the decision does not touch the moral wrong in the case. Is it Masonic to commit a moral ~vrong? If so, I will abandon Freemasonry. Case 2When a petition has been inadvertently received from P. person not eligible to be initiated into the mysteries of Freemasonry, by reason of sex, residence, non-age, etc., upon the fact becoming known, the fee should be returned without a ballot upon the petition.

Sex, indeed. There are but two sexes: male and female. Ho'" can a petition be "inadvertently received" from a woman.? As petitions are receivable only from one sex, what use Was the term "sex" in the decision? Perha.ps the Grand Master was guarding the Fraternity from the presence of a nondescript, mentioned in the obligations thirty years ago, which belonged to neither sex, yet was supposed to represent both;


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171

CORRF-SPONDENCE.

Brother Geo. 路W. Atkinson, Grand Secretary, served up a good review of fifty-seven Grand Lodge Proceedings in the short space of ninety-three pages. Missouri, for 1887, received a brief notice of less than two pages. He extracted largely from the address of Grand Master Hunt. Concerning this committee be said: Brother Jobn D. VincH, Grand Secretary, presented his tenth report on Correspondence, covering lSi printed pages. I rcad it with interest and profit. Brother Vincil is a )Iason of wide erudition and large experience, obtained by over thirty years connection with the :i\iissouri Grand Lodge. He takes me to task for allowing bis name to be printed " Vail" in our Proceedings. If our good brother had spen t the greater portion of his life in a printing office, as I have done, he could readily understand how a printer could make" Vail" out of "VineH," and how easily a proof-reader, not familiar with the names he i~ passing upon, could slip over the mistake without discovering it.

The work of Brother Atkinson, 'whether as Grand Secretary or Committee on Correspondence, is very creditable. Chas. H. Collier, 'Wheeling, Grand Master; Geo. 路W. Atkinson, Wheeling, Grand Secretary.


172

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[Oct.

ADD:ENDA.

Notices of the following Grand Lodge .J ournals must be brief, because they came to hand after my review 路was printed and the forms made up. They are assigned a place under the above caption.

DAKOTA. A very handsome Journal, as clean looking as Dakota snows, contains the transactions of the 14th Annual Communication, which was held in the city of Deadwood, commencing June 12, 1888. The Session was presided over by Most vVorshipful Brother Henry M. vVheeler, Grand Master. Brother Chas. T. McCoy was Grand Secretary. Representatives were present from seventy-nine chartered lodges. There were about one hundred lodges on the roll, with a membership of some four thousand. This is one of the most growing and vigorous young Grand Lodges on the Continent. ADDHESS.

A clear presentation of business matters was furnished by Grand Master vVheeler. He said that their fraternal relations with other Grand Lodges were most pleasant. 'fhe state of the Craft was mentioned as being very satisfactory. All the lodges had made their Annual returns, showing an increase of membership of five hundred and twelve. The average membership of the lodges is greatly increased. He announced the financial condition as most gratifying-a large cash balance being reported on hand. Eight new lodges had been created under dispensation. Two decisions were reported, o~e was that a lodge under dispensation had a right to discipline its members for un-Masonic conduct. This is the Missouri rule and is a good law.


1888.J

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173

Concerning the action of the Grand Lodge adopted at a former Session against saloon-keeping in :Masonry, the Grand Master had the following to say: Believing the resolution, dpbarring saloon-keepers as applicants for the degrees of :Masonry, adopted at Huron last year, to have been wise and just, find, in view of the now existing law, in nearly every county in this Grand JurisdicUon, I earnestly recommend that a resolution be formulated and adopted declaring that on and after January 1st, 1889, the dispellSing, for profit or hire, of intoxicating liquors to be usedlas a beverage, shall be deemed a :'Iasonic offense, punishable upon conviction by expulsion.

The Report of the Grand Secretary was brief and of a business character. The Committee on Jurisprudence rendered a very able report. The question had been presented to the Committee, "What is legitimate Masonry?" The Committee presented a very thoughtful report in reply, and their conclusion is herewith furnished: In conclusion, your Committee assert without hesitation, that as Ancient Free and Accepted MasoIls, we know of no masonry that this Grand Lodge, comistently can or should sanction as legitimate, except the degrees of E. A., F. C. and M. M.

Of which findi11g thi,s Committee desires to record an unqualified endorsement. The Committee had been called on to define the status of non-affiliated )1asons. After giving the subject careful study, they submitted the following which was approved: 1st. An unaffiliated l\fason has no right to visit anyone lodge in this jurisdictioIl more than three times, nor can he be permitted to join in any Masonic procession or participate in any festivity of the lodge except by the courtesy thereof. 2d. lIe or his family can make no claim for charity upon the funds of the lodge, but the same may be granted when thought just and proper. He is, however bound to respond, so far as his ability permits, to the call of distress by an indiViduall\luson, and they are in like mal1llCr bound to him. 3d. lIe has no right to Masonic burial, but the saDIe may be given him by the lodge, at its discretion, if he has shown commendable zeal for the interests and adhered to the principles of the institution. 4th. He is subject to alr:Masonic obligations as a member of the fraternity at large, and for any violation of the moral or Masonic law, subject to trial and discipline by the lodge near which he sojourns or resides.

The business of the Session was transacted with ability and facility. CORRESPONDEXCE.

A report was rendered by Brother Frank J. Thompson, Chairman, which covered 186 pages. The review embraced notices of a very extensive list of Grand Lodges. .Missouri Proceedings for 1887 received a three page notice. It is too late in the season to answer Brother Thompson's


174

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[Oct.

criticism upon Grand Master Hunt's doctrine. The Committee briefly scanned the Proceedings of our Grand Lodge, and treated Missouri very fraternally. In his notice of this Committee he said, "Dakota, unfortu~ nately, not included in the list." If Brother Thompson had taken the pains to read the report of this Committee on Correspondence, he would have found, commencing on page 169 of my report, a full and complete notice of the Grand Lodge Journal of hi~ J urisdictiol1 for 1887. Hereafter I hope he will not hold me responsible, and publish to the Masonic world the result of his failure to read what I have printed. The above proves very clearly that he did not examine my report on Correspondence. John Quincy Adams Braden, Grand Master. Secretary. Both reside at Aberdeen.

Chas. T. McCoy, Grand

MINNESOTA. This Grand Lodge met in St. Paul, January 11, 1888, and held its 35th Annual Communication. Brother John H. Brown, waR Grand Master and Brother A. T. C. Pierson, Grand Secretary. The Proceedings under notice came to hand eight months after the Session closed. The volume contains 226 page~. In consequence of its late arrival, this notice must be placed in the ADDENDA. Much against my will, I am compelled to give it that assignment on account of my review being in print before the Proceedings came to hand. Losing its place alphabetically, a brief notice of the :Minnesota Proceedings must go to the "foot of the docket." The Proceedings of the Session show that there are 155 chartered lodges and eight under dispensation. The membership reported amounts to 10,186, being a gain of three hundred and forty-five. It is stated by the Committee on Returns that all of the lodges except one had made their annual returns, and all but one bad paid Grand Lodge dues. ADDHESS. The Grand Master presented a lengthy address, covering twenty-five pages. He reported all of his official acts, in extenso, embracing dispensations granted, corner-stones laid, and various other matters. He referred appropriately to the death of some of their brethren who had been called from labor. Varions matters of local interest '"ere treated elabo-


1888.]

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Appendix.

rately and ably. He deli vered some very clear and practical views against hasty legislation. Quite a number of decisions were reported which ,,,ere approved by the proper Committee, except one. The business ofthe Session was of local character and cont.ains nothing of general interest. CORRESPONDENCE.

Brother Pierson, the Grand Secretary, performed the duty of the Committee on Correspondence, having noticed the transactions of fifty Grand Lodges. His report covered one hundred and thirteen pages. As heretofore, his work consists almost wholly of extracts from the Proceedings reviewed. The Grand :Master and Grand Secretary were re-elected.

OREGON. This Journal came too late for a fair and full review. is all that can be given it.

A short notice

The 38th Annual Session began its labors in the city of Portland, June 13, 1888. Brother Andrew Nashurg, Grand Master, presided, and Brother F. J. Babcock ,vas Grand Secretary. There are 76 lodges in this jurisdietion with a membership of 3,499. Seventy-five of these lodges were reported as represented. Twelve Past Grand Masters were present. ADDRESS.

This document covered fourteen pages and was devoted exclusively to local affairs. The Grand Master offered congratulations on the prosperous condition of Masonry in that Jurisdiction. He had created three new lodges under dispensation. Several corner-stones had been laid and halls dedicated during his administration. A number of decisions were reported which were of local application. They were approved by the Committee on Jurisprudence, all being of a practical sort. His official visits to the lodges had been limited. The Report of the Grand Secretary, Brother Babcock, was very complete and full of details of official business. The Grand Lodge was treated to the annual oration by the Grand Orator, Brother Thos. H: Tongue. It covers nine pages of the


1'76

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[Oct.

J ourna,l, and is a. production of merit. The Orator, belonging to the Tongue family, was necessarily and naturally a talker. "Thetller he is such by profession, as well as name, he presented a 'l'onguy affair, and made an excellent talk. CORRESPONDENCE.

Some' forty Grand Lodge Journals were reviewed in the brief space of one hundred and five pages, by that chaste 'writer and able correspondent, Brother S. F. Chadwick. Missouri received very ample and fraternal consideration, five pages being devoted to our Journal for 1887. His kindly consideration of Missouri and her works win om heartiest thanks and fraternal appreciation. From his comments upon our actions, the following is taken. .. It is strange that drunkenness is found under the shadow of the lodge-room. Wldle :Masonry does not proclaim itself to be a total ahstinence society, it is It temperance organization so far as that principle is concerned. That is, brethren must be temperate for their own good, and that makes it good for Masonry. It would seem that there was less drunkenness really when brethren had no concern on the subject except to be social. In old times, we infer that it was not respectable to hold a loage without some refreshments, supplemented with cider, cider-brandy, old rye, New England rum, hardt.ack, codfish, etc. The time came when membership increased so fast that these things had to be laid aside. Then the virtue of temperance taught in the lodge-room and the lesson therefrom, were .taken home to the heart of every brother. Many adhered to them; others feeling a restraint used intoxicants, and while they assented to the edict on temperance, they did not practice it. This is the edict that is no\\' being enforced. In the olden time no legislation was needed to carry out the spirit of the temperance injunction. Now it must be taken by the throat by special and decided action of Grand 路Lodges. The reason is, that it is made a business to sell intoxicants, and on general principles, it is claimed that no one has a right to interfere with the business of others. But Masonry comes in and says to the brot路her keeping a saloon that he must give lip one or the other-either saloon or 路Masonry. When we look at it in a proper light, no lllan can maintain his credit, Mason or no ~fason, who, engaged in busmess, frequents saloons dur.ing business hours. When we see men carrying on trades of various kinds, dodging in llnd out, of saloons during business hours, it is only a question of time when that habit will end disastrously. Creditors now-a-days will not stand it, nor will any business justify it. These facts can not be wiped out. A business man may be well thou17'ht of, but when he is seen running after his cups at a time when his business shaul d recelve the best attention, with the clearest judgment, a child can teach him his error, or correctly predict his absolute ruin. All Masonry asks of her votaries are temperance, sobriety, and integrity. And where can these great principles be so effectually carried out as they can in the Masonic relation? The good :vt"asonry has done already in this behalf is wonderful. And her glorious mission is onward. When a brother is about to fall from this tottering pinnacle of inebriety to be dashed to pieces against the coldness. of the world, Masonry reminds him of his promises, and tells him to desist for his own sake and happiness, and if he Will, she will not desert him in his unfortunate condition. And she implores him not to forsake her, but to adhere to the convictions received in his apprenticeship. If a brother cannot be the best :Mason in the world, he can be as good as he can be, for it takes no costly or impossible exertioll to be honest, temperate, true and charitable. While the saloon-keeper is but one man, his customers are many. It is with the many that Masonn-labors, and in doing so will not allow a :Mason to impair her mission by interposing a saloon business nor becoming a steady customer.

Brother Cha.dwick, as representative of the Grand Lodge of Missouri a.t the Graud Lodge of Oregon, presented hh; credentials and was duly recognized. The new Gi'and Master, Brother Jacob Mayer, after his election, tendered the members of the Grand Lodge a banquet at the public hall in the Temple.

.

Brother F. J. Babcock was re-elected. Grand Secretary.


177

1888.J

WISCONSIN. The Journal of this Grand Lodge, like its predecessors, was received in good time, looking as fresh as a June rose. It contains the trans~ctions of the 44th Annual Communic;:ttion, which was presided over by Most Worshipful Brother Eugene S. Elliott, Grand Master. Brother Jno. '\T. Laflin, Grand Secretary. He reported 209 chartered lodges on the roll with a membership of 13,151. 187 lodges were represented. Eight Past Grand Masters were present; also eight Past Deputy Grand Masters and representatives of twenty-six Grand Lodges. ADDRESS.

The address of Brother Elliott, consisting of ten pages, was confined exclusively to matters appertaining to his administration. At the very opening, he dashed into business with energy and force. He said the year had been quiet but prosperous. Mention was made of the death of their Senior Grand \Varden, Brother J. S. Reynolds. The Grand Master said the fraternity of Wisconsin had lost one of its brightest and most promising workers. A memorial page was set apart in honor of the deceased Brother. The Grand Master said his official correspondence had been very extensive, embracing many questions which had been easily settled by the Constitution and laws of the Grand Lodge. He reported quite a number of rulings which were approved, with slight corrections, by the Committee on Jurisprudence. That Grand Lodge holds and maintains the doctrine of perpetual jurisdiction. ]\fASONIC HOllIE.

The Grand Master expressed himself at length upon this subject. He said the advisability of such an enterprise depended upon the necessity for it. Brother 'Vilson offered the following upon the subject : WHEllEAS, The )fasonic Fraternity of the world has been justly classed as a benevolent institution: and \VHEREAS, as such an institution, it has, in various jurisdictions successfully maintained such character, by the establishment lLnd maintenance of homes for the aged and infirm brethren and destitute widows and orphans; therefore

Resolved, That in furtherance of its duties of Masonic charity, it hereby appropriates the sum of five thousand dollars for the purchase of the necessary amount of land, to be located outside of the county of Milwaukee, to serve as the nuclcus of a Masonic Home for the maintenance of indigent aud infirm Masons, or their widows and orphans. G. L. AI'.-12.


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[Oct.

Rcsol1Jcd, That a tax of forty cents per capita be levied on the fraternity ofthe St.ate for the ensuing year. Re.8olvcd, That.a Committ.ee of three be appointed to carry out the provisions and pur, poses ofthe foregomg resolutIOns, and locate and purchase the grounds.

The propositions embraced in the foregoing were not approved. The address of the Grand Master was a clear and business-like presentation of all matters of local interest coming under his direction. He closed his address as follo,...s : The mission of Masonrv is to promulgate and enforce the doctrine of the brotherhood of man. It has done wond.ers. Never opposin~ force \vit.h force. under its subtle inftuence the walls wit.h which bigotry would have 8ividcd man from man have been shaken or thrown down. so that now around one common altar people of every race and every creed unite in adoration of the Universal God. This it has accomplished-it is its glory. It has vet to subdue the prejudice of class; this is its work. This work will be accomplished when, and only when, each member of our fraternity individually and for and of himself, applies the principles contained in the five points of fellowship, the Golden Rule ofl\1asonry, to the va.ried transactions of every-da.y life. GRAND SECRETARY'S REPORT.

Brother Laflin, in his usual clear business style, furnished an exhibit of routine matters connected with his office. He announced the gratifying fact that the returns for eyery lodge in the state had been received. The law of that Grand Lodge requires the returns to be made and forwarded in the month of .hnuary. Brother Laflin complained that many reports had been receiyed at such a late date as to prevent the correction of errors by correspondence in advance of the Session. His report was extended, embracing a large amonnt of detail and statistical matter. The bnsiness of the Session was local. CORRESPONDENCE.

A report of seventy-three pages was rendered by Brother Duncan McGregor, Committee. The review contained notices of the transactions of forty-five Grand Lodges. The work is a synopsis, being a brief summary of the Proceedings examined. It is a 'written report, containing very few extracts, and is a creditable documen~, showing that the author had given close attention to that line of work. Brother Myron '\T. Reed, Grand Master. Jno. 'V. Laflin was re-elected Grand Secretary, with headquarters at Milwaukee. Brother McGregor was reappointed Committee on Correspondence.


Appencl?:x.

1888.]

179

CONCLUSION. The end of another year of communion and fellowship ""ith the brethren of the Corps Reportorial has been reached. I close the labors of the term by 'giving a list of the 49 Grand Lodge .J ournals reviewed. They are as follo,vs: ALABAMA,1887. ARiZONA, 1887.

1'1INN":SOTA, 1888. 1'IISSISSIPPI, 1888.

ARKANSAS. 1887. <lALIFORNIA,1887.

l'IONTANA, 1887.

<lANADA, 1887. <lOLORADO, 1887. <lONNE<l'I'I<lUT, 1888. DAKO'I'A, 1888.

NEBRASKA. 1887. NEVADA. 1887. NEW HAltIPSDIRE, 1888. NEW .TERSEY, 1888.

DELAWARE, 1887.

NEW MEXICO. 1887. NEW YORK, 1888.

DISTRI<l'I' OF COLUl'IBIA, 1887.

NORTH <lAROLlNA, 1888.

FLORIDA. 1888. GEORGIA, 1887.

NOVA SCOTIA, 1887. OHIO, 18!ii7.

II.LINOIS, 1887.

OREGON, 1888.

IDAHO, 1888. L~DIANA, 1888.

PENNSYLVANIA, 1887.

INDIAN TERRITORY, J887.

PRIN<lEEDWARDISLAND,1887. qUEBE<l, 1888.

IOWA, 1888.

RHODE ISLAND, 1887.

KANSAS, 1888.

SOUTH CA.ROLINA, 1887. TENNESSEE, 1888.

KENTU<lKY,1887.

LOUISIANA, 1888. 1'IAINE, 1887. MANITOBA, 1888. MARYLAND, 1888. ltIASSA<lHUSETTS, Hi88.

TEXAS, 1887. UTAH, 1888. VIRGINIA, 1887. WES'!' VIRGINIA, 1887. WIS<lONSIN, 1888.

MI<lHIGAN, 1888.

Six Grand Lodges have failed to send in their Proceedings, viz: British Columbia, New Brunswick, Maine, for 1888, Vermont, Washington, 'and'Vyoming. Under ordinary eircumstances their convenience would be my pleasure. In the present case, it is neither convenient nor pleasant to delay the work which must give place to other and not less important claims. I am. not responsible for the tardiness of Grand Secretaries.


180

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[Oct.

The foregoing work has been performed with as much zest as any enjoyed by this writer in all the past years of his service. It is not what I would have it, but is not less the child of my sober thought and earnest convictions. It would always be a pleasure to present better work, each successive year, and thus make good progress along the line of useful and practical life. 'With my own labor I am never well satisfied. Perhaps it is best not to be. He who feels such complacency will not strive for the mastery. 'Vho ceases to stri ve, ceases to grow. THE PRESENT STATUS.

On the outlook I shall have nothing to say in this conclusion. As to the status of the Craft in other jurisdictions, I have made such comments as I deemed proper in pa,c5sing over the works of the several Grand Lodges. Others have spoken for their respective Jurisdictions, and I have gleaned therefrom. Of my own Jurisdiction, it is not out of place to say that the Grand Lodge of Missouri has never been in a better condition as a whole. The fraternity is united on all great questions affecting the welfare and perpetuity of the Institution. There are no divisions in our ranks. Peace reigns throughout our borders.

,

Those dissatisfied with our legislation and position on Moral questions, have either left, or have been sent to their own place. The sentiment created by a deeply fixed and determined purpose to make Masonry decent and respectable, has crystalized and become the rule. It will not be changed or be receded from. The inflow of the best material of the country bas never heen surpassed in the history of Missouri Masonry. The Returns, now in hand, from the lodges, prove this. The lodges are in a more healthy condition morally and financially tban heretofore. Never have the dues been so promptly paid a.nd in such uniform regularity. Footings have not yet been made by which to determine the exact status of our membership, but will appear in the recapitulation at the close of my fiscal report. One fact is observable, from the Returns in hand: the Lodges have done a good amount of necessary pruning. This is a hopeful augury. CONFLICTS.

It has struck tbis Committee, in the review of some Grand Lodge Journals, that there is an unnecessary disturbance about questions foreign to the work and character of Symbolical :Masonry. There may be con0.itions connected with certain legislation of which J am ignorant. Animadversion in such cases, on my part, would be gratuitous. I refer to the conflict now being waged by some of the jurisdictions of the country for and against "High Riteism." Certain Grand Lodges have undertaken to de-


1888.1

Appendix.

181

cide between the contending bodies of which I know nothing, and cannot know aught in my character as a Master l\-t:ason. There are in this country certain bodies styled "Scotch Rite" Masons. They are divided into two jurisdictions, Tam informed, one being known as the "Southern" and the other the "Northern" Jurisdiction. 'Vhy this division of a good thing, this deponent sayeth not. Then there is still another claimant for recognition as the legitimate body of the "High Rite." This, I learn, is called the "Cerneau" body. Against this body the other jurisdictions, Northern and Southern, are arrayed. The battle waxes hot along the lines. The "Cerneau" body, like the "Memphian Rite" of Burt and Wilson, has been excommunicated and not allowed a place in the synagogue. 路While the Kilkenny fight goes on, and it is confined among the "Riters," I have no objection, but rather enjoy the fun. I know nothing personally of any of these "Rites"-so-called. I belong to none of them. I was simple enough to start in one and received what was said to be some degrees. Fourteen ,,,ere Communicated at one time. I soon found that I knew as little as the party who communicated what he knew nothing about. I quit. Some years since the agent of the Burt-Wilson "combination," representing the ninety-six incomprehensible, ineffable and toploftical degrees of the "Memphian" order came to St. Louis. He offered to give me the lot for nothing, and throw in a Diploma, if I would join the superlative concern. I did not join. Correspondence with the parties interested revealed the fact that the "combination" was using the names of such hrethren as Gurney of Illinois, Lawrence of Massachusetts, Nisbet of Pennsylvania, and others, in the published literature of the said free show, without their permission or consent. Having obtained this information from the brethren l}amed, I exposed the free sho,,, in the St. Louis papers. The thing ultimately died the death of all such frauds, and found its graye among the rubbish of the past.. An agent of the aforesaid combination visited another large city in this jurisdiction, and proposed to open up a show for the moderate price of ten dollars per head, for the whole ninety-six degrees. I was written to by a leading Mason of said city and my opillion asked as to the character of the thing. I replied by furnishing him the evidence in my possession as to the fraud perpetrated upon the names of the distinguished Masons mentioned. I supposed, naturally enough, that the exposure would forestall the working of the show. Some time after the party who had written me, called at this office. I asked him if he received my expose of the 路Wilson fraud. "Yes, I did." 'Vell, has the thing failed in your City. "Oh, no," said my friend. "'Ve in vested ten dollars just to beat the members of the "Scotch Rite" order. A number of the boys of our city have taken the Thirty-second degree in Scotch Riteism, and they crow over us fellows, and sport their badges in a very lordly way. We concluded to get ahead of them so we have taken ninety odd degrees, and are in the lead


182

Appendix.

[Oct.

as to the number of degrees taken." Yes that explains much of the stir of to-day about "Riteism." It is a rage for many and so-called high degrees. I want none of it. And the reason is I need none of it. The \Vilson-Burt "combination" has met a long felt want, and offers cheap inducements to the lovers of the toploftical in what is supposed to be Masonry. This rage for high and numerous degrees has produced more degree tinkerers than the world ever saw or ever had any use for. And in my judgment the "High Riters" are more responsible for this demand than anyone else. I have but one thing to say about the contest between the Scotch. Rite claimants for supremacy and for recognition. It is that they can run their institution at will and get all into it who may desire high degrees, so-called. But if they open shop in our jurisdiction and attempt to work our material in conferring the three degrees of symbolical lV[a.<;onry, it will be made warm work for them. It is on this ground alone that any Grand Lodge, working the York Rite, can be justified in passing 6entence upon the "Riters" and declaring what is and what is not legitimate Scotch Rite Masonry. I learn that the "Cerneau" body claims the right to make Masons out of all profanes, wheresoever found, without any respect to the prior rights of the Grand Lodge occupying the territory. If this be true, they will do well to keep out of 1\1isSOUl路i. I have been told that the other Scotch Rite bodies claim the same right, but in deference to the Grand Lodges occupying the various jurisdictions, they graciously 1JJaive said right in our favor. For such profound consideration of our claims to pre-occupy the ground, let us be devoutly thankful, hut none the less firm in our views as to the impertinence of the claimants pretensions. I have been a Mason more than thirty-four years. I was a member of the Grand Lodge s~veral years before I became a memher of the Capitular or Tcmplar orders. During my service as a representative of symbolical Masonry in the Grand Lodge, I sought to acquaint myself with all matters appertaining thereto, so as to represent my Lodge and serve the Craft intelligently. Suppose during such period, the claims of Capitular Masonry, or thos~ of the Templar order had been presented to ollr Grand Lodge for a deliverance, like Massachusetts made, ,,;ith Ohio and Pennsylvania following in the wake. Or to go further, suppose the "High Riters" had come up for recognition as they have been before the Grand Lodges named. 'Vhat could I have said or done intelligently in passing upon claims of bodies of which I knew nothing and never heard of until they came before the Grand Lodge? A. Grand Lodge of York Masons has no business with these "Rites" about which, in its character as such, it can know nothing. My view is to let all such severely alone, unless they invade thc jurisdietions of Grand Lodges. Then will be the time to make a deli vcrance, assigning them to their own place, and defining their status. To me it looks very much like somebody wants to get our Grand Lodges to pull chestnuts out of the


1888.]

Appendi:r.

183

fire for their particular benefit. It makes no difference how badly we may burn our fingers, so they get the chestnuts. I have as little use for the parties interested as I have for their chestnuts. The Grand Lodge of Missouri will never beeome a party to such a scramble as is going on in certain Jurisdictions of this country. Let the "Riters" fight it out and eat each other up, tail and all. In my view the world will not suffer greatly from the loss of the chestnuts, or those who are creating all this rumpus. JOHN D. VINCIL, Committee.


184

Appendix.

[Oct.

ADDRESSES OF Gl{AND SECRETARIES.

State.

Alabama Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Cuba Delaware District ofColumbia Dakota Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Illdiana Iowa Indian Territory Kansas Kentuck~r

Louisiana 1\1:aine : Massachusetts Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi... Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New York

Jlla1ne.

Address.

Adam R. Baker, app'nted.:M:ontgomery. Fay Hempstead Little Rock. Geo. J. Roskruge Tucson. Alexander G. Abell San Francisco. Edward C. Parmelee Pueblo. Joseph K. 'Wheeler Hartford. ,Jose F. Pellon Havana. William S. Hayes 'VilmingtoIl. Wm. R. Singleton 'Vashington. Charles T. McCoy Aberdcen. De ViTitt C. Dawkins Jacksonville. A. M. 'Volibin Macon. J. H. 'Vi ckersb an"l.. Boise City. Loyal L. Munn Freeport. 'Villiam H. Smythe Indianapolis. Theodore S. Parvill Cedar Rapids. Rev. J. S. Murrow A-to-ka, C. N. John H. Brown KansasCity, Kan. H. B. Grant : Louisville. James C. Bachelor, M. DooNew Orleans. Ira Berry Portland. Sereno D. Nickerson Boston. Jacob H ..i\1:edairy Baltimore. 'Villiam P. Inlles Grand Rapids. A. T. C. Piersoll St. Paul. John L. Po路wer Jackson. Cornelius Hedges Helella. William B,. Bowen Omaha. C. N. Noteware Carson City. George P. Cleaves Concord. Joseph H. Hough Trenton. Edward. 1\1'. L. Ehlers New York.


1888路1 New Mexico North Carolina Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia ,Vashington ,Vest Virginia 路Wisconsin 'Vyoming British Columbia Canada England Egypt Irela.nd Manitoba );ew Brunswick .Kova Scotia Prince Edward Island Quebec '" Scotland

185

Appendix. Alpheus A. Keen Donald ,V. Bain John D. CaldwelJ.. F. J. Babcock Michael Nisbet.. Edwin Baker : Charles Inglesby J ohn Frizzell T. '\T. Hndson Christopher Diehl L. M. Read ,Villiam B. Isaacs Thomas M. Reed Geo. VV. Atkinson Jno. ,V. Laflin ,TohnH. Simons Edward C. Neufelder J. J. Mason Shadwcll Clerke F. F. Oddi Samuel B. Oldham ,Vm. G. Scott Edwin J. ,'Tetmore Benjamin Curren Geo. W. 'Vakeford ,Tohn H. Isaacson D. Murray Lyon

Las Vegas. Raleigh. Cincinnati. Salem. Philadelphia. Providence. Charleston. Nashville. Houston. Salt Lake City. Bellows Falls. Richmond. Olympia. 'Vheeling. Milwaukee. Laramie. Victoria. Hamilton, Ont. London. Cairo. Dublin. Winnepeg. St. John . Halifax. Charlottetown. Montreal. Edinburg.


186

Appendix.

[Oct.

REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED NEAR OTHER GRAND LODGES BY THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURl.

State.

Alabama Arkansas Arizona British Columbia Canada Connecticnt Chili. Colorado California Colon-Cuba Delaware District of Columbia Dakota Egypt England Florida Georgia '" Iowa Illinois Idaho Indiana Indian Territory Ireland Kentucky Kansas IJouisiana l\1aine Minnesota Michigan Mississippi

Name.

Henry Clay Tompkins John J. Sumpter Thos. H. lVIcMullin Hob't Burns McMicking Jamei-j K. Kerr Geo. Lee Jose Mondalodo .Ed. C. Parmelee Alexander G. Abell Edwardo Loredo Tacob Moore Wm. R. Singleton Thomas H. Brown F. F. Oddi Braxton Baker De 'Vitt C. Dawkins J. Emmett Blackshear N. R. Parvin Jerome R. Gorin Jonas 'V. Brown 'Villia III Hacker Jobn H. Dannenberg Edward Linaban H. B. Grant Albert D. McConaughy John A. Stephenson Ira Berry Henry L. Carver J. C. Coffinbury 'V. P. Bouton :

Address.

Montgomery. Hot Springs. Phcenix. Victoria. Toronto. New Haven. Valparaiso. Georgetown. San Francisco. Ravana. Gcorgetown. Washington. Sioux Falls. Cairo. London. Jacksonville. Macon. Cedar Rapids. Decatur. Idaho City. Shelbyville. Flint. Dublin. Louisville. AtchisOll. New Orleans. Portland. St. Paul. Kalamazoo. Canaan.


1888路1 1\1assachusetts

Maryland 2\fontana ' Manitoba Xew Brunswick ~ew York Kew Hampshire Nova Scotia ~evada

)Iebraska ~ew Mexico Ohio Oregon Pcnnsylvania Quebec Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Wyoming Territory V\Tashington Territory \-Vest Virginia 'iVisconsin

Appendi;r.

:,rohn K. Hall.. John S. Berry 'iVm. Davenport J ames Munroe 'iVm. F. Bunting .John Stewart Chas. G. Connor J. 'iVilberforce Longley John D. Hammond George B. Francc 'iV. 'iV. Griffin Chas. Stroud S. F. Chad wick J. Simpson Afi路ica H. L. Robinson Cyrus 1\1. Vanslyck Charles Inglesby Deering J. Roberts, M. D Geo. H. Bringhurst.. P. L. 'iVilliams Henry H. Smith 'iVilliam R. Isaacs Edgar P. Snow Thomas M. Reed 'iVilliam J. Bates, Sr. Henry L. Palmer

187 Boston. Baltimore. Helena. 路Winnipeg. Saint John. NewYorkCity. Exeter. Halifax. Carson. York. Santa Fe. Sandusky. Portland. Philadelphia. 'iVaterloo. Providence. Charlcston. Nashville. Houston. Salt Lake City. Rutland. Richmond. Cheyenne. Olympia. Whecling. l\1ilwaukce.


188

[Oct.

REPRESENTATIVES 'APPOINTED BY OTHER GRAND LODGES NEAR THE GRAND LODGE OF 路MISSOURI.

State.

Alabama .A.rkansas Arizona British Columbia California Connecticut.. Canada Colorado Colon-Cuba Dakota Delaware District of Columbia Egypt Florida Georgia Idaho Iowa Illinois Indian Territory Ireland Indiana Kentucky Kansas Louisiana l\faine Montana :Michigan }Iinnesota l\fanitoba Ne"7 Hampshire

Name.

,James E. Cadle James H. Betbune Robert E. Collins Tbeodore Brace J ohn E. Ryland Reuben Barney Xenophon Ryland "'Vm. N. Loker Wm. H. Mayo Joseph S. Browne , James P. "'Vood Isaac IVL Abraham John D. Vincil Edward Spencer A. M. Crow J ohn R. Parson Fred V\T. 1\1:ot1. Martin Collins P. G. V-loods Samuel 1\1:. Kennard Asa Maddox "'Villiam E. Robinson Jack P. Richal路dson Wm. H. Mayo Xenopbon Ryland S. M. Davidson Trusten P. Dyer 8amuel H. Saunders ",Vll1. R. Stubblefield Alexander M. Dockery

Addre88.

King City. Cbarleston. St. Louis. J efferson Cit~,. Lexington. Chillicothe. Lexington. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Joseph. Ne'lv London. Harrisonville. St. Louis. St. Louis. Kansas City. St. Louis. 8t. Louis. St. Louis. Versailles. St. Louis. Kansas City. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Lexington. \Vasbingtoll. St. Louis. Otterville. St. Louis. Gallatin.


1888.] New York Xew Jersey ~orth Carolina Nebraska ~evada ~ew l\Iexjco Xova Scotia Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Quebec Rhode Island Scotland South Carolina Tennessee Utah Vermont Virginia Texas '\Vyoming Territory 路Wisconsin West Vi路rginia Washington Territory

Appendix. Noah M. Givan Charles F. Leavitt Geo. E. 'Valker Chas. F. Vogel.. Seymour Hoyt Jay L. Torrey Gco. R. Hunt Henry L. Rogers Lee A. Hall Robert F. Stephenson Rev. C. C. Woods, D. D Stephen B. Potter Thomas E. Garrett V. O. Saunders Chas. B. Stark B. H. Ingram 'Vm. M. Williams J ohn D. Vincil Allan McDowell JamesW. Boyd Rufus R Anderson Wm. E. 路Whiting Stephcn Chapman

189 St. Louis. Springfield. Bonne Terre. St. Louis. Greenfield. St. Louis. 'Varrensburg. St. Louis. St. Louis. Kansas City. Nevada. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Louis. Scdalia. Booneville. St. Louis. St. Louis. St. Joseph. HannibaI. Kansas City. Bloomfield.


190

Appendix.

[Oct.

REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS.

THIRD DISTRICT. NEW LONDON,

Jr.

Mo., September 1st, lSSS.

W. Williams, Esq., Grana ilfwster: DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:-

As District Deputy Grand Master of the Third District, I have the honor to submit herewith a report of my oflicial acts for the Masonic year ending this date. On the 15th day of November, 1887, I visited 'Monroe Lodge, No. 64. Examined the new hall just then completed, and l:ecommcnded the petition of said Lodge to remove into the same. On the 22d'day of December, 1887, by your direction I visited Bethel, Shelby county, llnd examined thc proposed officers for Bethcl Lodge, U. D., as to their proficiency in conferring the Degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry, and also examined the hall in which it was proposed for said Lodge to hold its meetings, and duly certified to you the resul t of my invei';tigations. On the 22d day of February, lS&~ (having previously received from you a Letter of Dispensation therefor), I dUly organized Bethel Lodgc, U. D., and set it at work; the Lodge is doing well, and, I think, has a bright future before it, On the 9th lLnd 10th days of August I held a District Lodge of Instruction at Monroe City, and on that occasion was honored by the presencc of, and was assisted and counseled by R. W. Brother Allan :McDowell, Grand Lecturer. We had representatiYes present from but few of thc Lodges of the District-a majority of the Lodges sending none at all-although every Lodge in the District was given due notice. However, the representatives present were very enthusia8tic and eager to learn the work, and much good was done. I have made but few oflicial visits during the year; conJining my visits to those Lodges which most needed instructions, and where my services were requested. The idea seems to be prevalent in the District that the District Deputy should not only give his time but also pay his own expenses, and visit every Lodge in the District once a year; this is expecting rather too much of anyone. -While 1 am ready and willing to give my time to the Lodges and Brethren whenever required, they ought not to expect the Deputy to pay his own expenses for the mere privilege of giving them instruction and assistance. We have to live-like other mortals-and we cannot afford to work for nothing and board ourselves. The Lodges throu~hout the District are all in reasonably prosperous condition, with the single exception of Ionic Lodge, No. 235. This Lodge has been in a state of decay for some yeaTS past. There are now but a single dozen of members, and those so scattered that thc Lodge has not held a stated communication since November, 1887. At


191

188S.]

the stated communication of said Lodge held in November last, officers were elected for the then ensuing year, but were not installed. Since then, although strenuous efforts have been made, it has been impossible to secure a quorum, so that the officers elected in November la.~t have not yet been installed. I would, therefore, in view of the foregoing state of facts, recommend that the Charter of said Lodge be arrested, and that the members thereof now in good standing be granted dimits by the M. W. Grand Lodge. Most of the Lodges of the District have their halls fairly equipped with reasonably good furniture to render the ceremonies of the Degrees imprcssive, and there is, among the officers of the various Lodgcs (so far as I have been able to ascertain), a, fair degree of proficien,cy in thc work of conferring the Degrees; though it is due to candor to say, that some of the Lodges seem very reluctant to conform to the work of the Grand Lodge as it is now taught. They did not learn it that way, and it is very difficult to get them to nnlearn what they have learned wrong. Congratulating you upon the success of your administration, and thanking you, 1\lost Worshipful Sir, for the honor conferred ill my appointment, and the Brethren of the District for the many courtesies I have received at their hands, I am, Very Truly and Fraternally, GEO. E. MAYHALL, D. D. G. ,Af., Third District.

FOURTH DlSTlUCT.

LOUISIANA, Mo., Sept. 1, 1888. IV. M. Willimns, Esq., G1'and Master:

DEAR SIR AND BIWTHER :The Fourth District is at present in a peaceable and fairly prosperous condition. have visited and instructed the following Lodges: .Perseverance No. 92, Louisiana, on February 23d, 24th and 2.5th. Instruction in First, Second and Third Degrees. All the Lodges in the District were invited and a fair attendance was the result. On March 1st, 3d and 5th, I visited the Brethren at Clarksville Lodge, No. ii. A good interest was manifested by the Brethren. On December 8th I met with Globe Lodge, No. 495, and installed their officers. I visited Pike Lodge, No. 399, on May 23d, 24th and 2::>th. Conferred the Third Degree on one candidate and gave instruction in all three Degrees. The Brethren are zealous Masons here. On August23d, 24th and 2.5th, I met with Phcenix Lodge, No. 136, and exemplified the work in all three of the Degrees. The attendance here was not as fiattering as I had hoped for. This Lodge is doing considerable work. On two occasions I invited the Lodges in this District to attend meetings of Perseverance Lodge, when the Third De,!,'Tee was to be conferred, and on both occa."ions there were about seventy present. April 5th I attellded a funeral at Frankford Lodge. Soon after entering upon my duties, I recei ved a special dispensation for Cyrene Lodge, granting them privilege to meet in Phcenix Hall, No. 136, Bowling Green, which I delivered to the W. 1\1. It appears to me this Lodge is a little lukewarm, as there were none of them present when I held my Lodge of Instructions in their hall. The Lodges in the District that I have visited are secure and law-abiding, and owners of their halls, except in one or two cases, where Lodges do not own their halls.


192

LOct.

There has been nothing of a serious nature transpired in this District this year and no questions worthy of noting. I have answered all calls that was possible for me to do. Would have been glad to have visited all the Lodges in the District, but for good reasons could not do so. 路With much esteem for you for the honor conferred on me, and thanking the Brethren of the Fourth District, I am, Fraternally yours, J. A. THOMASON, D. D. G.

],f.,

Pow路th

DI~~tTict.

FIFTH. DISTRICT. 'VENTZVILLE,

:;\fo., Sept. 6, 1888.

TV. Af. WiUiams, Esq., Grand Master: DEAR SIR AND BROTHER : -

I herewith beg leave to submit the following report of my official acts as D. D. G. M. of the Fifth District during the year just ending. There are fourteen (14) Lodges in the District, seven (7) of which I have visited during the year. So far as I have been able to observe, peace and prosperity prevail within our borders, and the Craft is in a healthy condition, with one or two exceptions, where Lodges are numerically weak. The halls that 1 have visited are safe and secure, and the officers discharge their duties faithfully and well. Some of the weaker ones are not so 路well provided with furniture and equipments to render our ceremonies impressive, as they should be, but they do as well, probably, as their finances will permit. l\fost of the Lodges show a healthy growth. Palestine Lodge, No. 241, has had a remarkably prosperous year, its numbers being largely increased by good, live, active material, "worthy and wcll qualified." In obedience to your order, I visited Plumb Lodge, No. 375, located at l\'Iiddleto,"l'll, Montgomery county, on August 31st, and found the condition of said Lodge substantially as set forth in the letter of the Secretary. There are only fourteen members, three of whom have removed from its jurisdiction. One is an invalid and can't attend. Others are quite old and must soon die. Some, otherwise worthy, have fallen a prey to the evils of strong drink, but their presence is necessary to constitute a quorum, and the W. M. informs rue that they have been drunk in open Lodge. The Lodge has not suftlciellt vitality to reform or remove them. Without the infusion of new blood the Lodge must soon die, but good material is not apt to connect itself with such a Lodge. There has been but one initiation and one affiliate since 1883. The Lodge is in debt. It formerly rented and controllcd the hall, but latterly it has been forced to become a sub-tenant, and other societies and political clubs havc bccome its co-tenants, and relief seems impossible. All are behind in the payment of dues, but suspension can't be had as this would break up the Lodge. After a careful survey of the field, as loth as I am to curtail Masonry, ram satisfied that the best interests of the Craft will be subserved by discontinuing Plumb Lodge, No. 375, and I have arrested the Charter of said Lodge and ordered the W. M., Bro. Wm. Parker, to forward the Charter, books, jewels, etc., to the Grand Secretary and to hold the other property of said Lodge subject to order. All of which is Fraternally submitted, CHARLES J. WALKER, D. D. G. M., I-Vtlt District.


193

Appendi:c.

1888.J

I:;IXTI-I DISTRICT. /

CE:-iTRALIA, 1\10., September 20th, 1888. lV.

"~[.

Wi.lliams, Esq., Grand

DEAR Sm

.Jfa.~ter:

AND

BIWTHER:-

I herewith submit to you my annual report District.

fiS

your Deputy for the Sixth Masonic

I have visited the following Lodges during the year 1,)1 at has.iust closed, vb'.: Sturgeon. Centralia, Hallsville, Hickory Grove, Concord, Laddonia, Social, Vandalia, Portland and Williamsburg. The Lodges in my District have ~ecure halls, except Hallsville and Hickory Grove, and, with a fcw cxceptions, are well furnished and do their work well. I faDed to get to Yanda~ia on tllP occasion of laying the corner-stone of the ",1. E. Church, South, but requested Past Grand ~1n.ster J. W. Boyd, who was there, to take my place. In concluding this brief report permit me to return to you Illy thanks for past favors, and through you, to the Brethren of the Sixth Masonic District for favors received at their hands. 1\{y visits to the Lodges ho,Ye becn pleasant and, I trust, have been of benefit to them. Fraternally submitted,

,.y.

H.

CARPE~TER,

D. D. G.

"~f.,

Si.T1h District.

SEVEXTH DISTRICT. MOBERLY,

w. g.

1\10., August 30, 1888.

Willi.ams, Esq., Grand Master: DEAR

SIR

AKD BnOTHER : -

In compliance with the requirements of the law, I herewith transmit my report: Noyember 29th I visited Huntsville Lodge, No. 80, this being one of the Lodges the Committee on Appeals aud Grievances referred to the Grand Master for investigation; the trouble at this time being settled. The Lodge is now in a prosperous condition. . December 3d I visited Westville Lodge. No. 202, this being another Lodge refcrred to the Grand Master for investigation. Therc was a good attendance and an intercsting meeting. I found, upon investigation, all that wa" necessary was a little warning, advice and encouragement. I had the pleasurc of conferring the First Degree on one candidate. In December I examined a hall in the town of Sumner, aIld recommended the removal of Cunningham Lodge, No. 52::), frOIl1 Cunningham to Sumner; and on the 4th of January, armed with authority from the Grand l\faster, I dedicated the hall and installcd thc officers elect. The Brcthren of this Lodge arc very zcalous in thc work, but need instruction. I am a regular attendant of 1\'Toberly Lodge, No. 814, of which I路 am a member, and frequently visit Gothic Lodge, No. 108, both of which are situated in Moberly, and are in a flourishing condition. As far as I have been able to lcarn, the various halls and furniturc of thc Lod.ges in this District are in good condition, and I feel safe in saying that their moral and financial standing is also good, and what we most nced in this District is a live and energetic District Lectnrcr. G. L. Ap.-13.


194

[Oct.

I regret very much t.hat I have not been able to devote more of my time to the interest of the Craft.. Thanking you, Most Worshipful Sir, for the honor conferred in my appointment, and hoping that un able successor may be found to perform the duties of District Deputy Grand l\Iaster and District Lecturer of the Seventh Masonic District, I am Respectfully and Fraternally yours, J. W. BARNETT, D. D. G. .~r., seventh Distn:ct.

EIGHTH DISTRICT.

BUCKLIN, Mo., September 24th, 1888. W. ill. Williams,

E.~q.,

Granclltfaster:

DEAR.

Sm.

AND BROTHER:-

I herewith submit a report of my stewardship as D. D. G. l\f. and D. L. for the Eighth Masonic District, embracing the counties of Putnam, Sullivan, Linn and Macon: October 28th, 1887, organizcd Humphreys Lodge, No. 32, under Charter. January 7th, 1888, visited Biswell Lodge, No. 510. February 15th, superintended the removal of Humphreys Lodge to another hall. :March 31st, superintended removal of Arcana Lodge, No. 389, from \\'intersville to Harris. At that meeting initiated three. April2Sth, visited Pollock Loage, No. 349, and conferred the First and Third Degrees. July 17th and 18th, visited Cypress Lodge, No. 227. Attendance moderate; Lodge works fair. July 19th, 20th and 21st, visited Bucklin Lodge, No. 2,13. Attendance fair. Lodge works reasonably well. August 2,<:;th and 29th, visited Putnam Lodge, No. 190. Attendance good. During meeting,! initiated one and passed five. August 31st and September 1st, visited Arcana Lodge, No. 389. Attendance light. September 3d and 4th, visited Humphreys Lodge, No. 32. Attendance fair. Lodge works well. September lOth and 11th, visited Biswell Lodge, No. 510. Circumstances somewhat unfavorable. Attendance light. September 12th and 13th, visited FairvieW Lodge, No. 447. Attendance only moderate. September Hth and 15th, visited Jackson Lodge, No. 82. Attendance fair. Conferred Second Degree on olle candidate. September 17th and 18t.h, visited Dockery Lodge, No. 325. Attendance fair. During visit conferred Second Degree. September 19th and 20th, visited Brookfield Lodge, No. 86. Attendance fair. Lodge well furnished. I am, at this writing, visiting Bucklin Lodge, No. 233. I regret that 1 have been unable to visit more extensively in time to report to your Honor. I am proud to report that our Order is progressing Hnely in this District. The Lodges seem, without exception, to realize their duties in vindicating the law against offenders. Some of the Lodges are having a rapid growth, viz: Humphreys, No. 32, Arcana, No. ::l89, and Putnam, No. 190. On vh;iting Arcana Lodge I found no less than ten petitions


Appendi~e.

1888.J

195

to be balloted on (for initiation), \vith two new ones filed. are getting the very best men of the country.

But the Brethren report they

At every Lodge visited I have admonished the Brethren to guard well the outer door, always giving the benefit of a reasonable doubt to the Fraternity. In conclusion, allow me to return my sincere thanks for a manifestation of your confidence in my appointment. Hoping that our noble Order may continue to prosper, by a strict adherence to its cardinal virtues, temperance, fortitude, prudence and jm;tice, I subscribe myself, Yours Fraternally, J. J. DILLINGER, D. D. G. ftf., El:ghth District.

NINTH DISTRICT.

CARROLI.TON, :MO., August 20th, 1888. W: M. lVilliams, Esq., Grand ftfastel':

DEAR SIR AND BROTHER :In compliance with the M. W: Grand Lodge Constitution, I herewith hand you my report. On the 6th of December, 188i, I officiated at the removal of Friendship Lodge, No. 89; Chillicothe Lodge, No. 333, and conducted the ceremony of the dedication of the new Masonic HaH at the city of Chillicothe, and wish to here freely acknowledge the very able and ample assistance rendered me by R. W. Bro. Ruben Barney, W. Bro. Norvell, and others. I was requested, on the 2ith of December, 18Si, to install the officers of Wakanda Lodge, No. 52. I availed myself of this invitation, and had the pleasure of seating R. W. Bro. Jas. E. Drake in the chair. This being his eighteenth installation as Master of this Lodge. On March 3d, I received a petition of Brethren in and around Braymer, requesting dispensation. From the knowledge I then possessed relative to the geographical situation, etc., etc., I refused to recommend the granting of same. After pressing solicitation I visited Braymer, traveled around the country, called the Brethren together, examined their proposed hall, and, upon their second application for dispensation, I recommended same. On the 9th of August, my business calling me away from home, I authorized R. W. Bro. James E. Drake to set Braymer Lodge, U. D., at work, at Braymer, Caldwell Co., Missouri. However with the full understanding that, owing to the short11ess of time between meeting of the Grand Lodge, they would not apply for a charter. The Brethren at Braymer have an excellent hall, fully and well furnished. Officers familiar with the work and fully competent. My business has been such I co~ld not give the Lodges in this District the attention I desired, but in my travels through the District I have made inquiries and I find no saloon clement. While in some points 'Lodges are not as enthusiastic as they might be, I think all are in a very healthy condition. l<"'raternally, etc., GEO. W. DEATHERAGE, D. D. G. ft[., Ninth District.


[Oct.

196 ELEVENTH JHSTIUCT.

PLATTE CITY, Mo., Sept.

~2d,

1888.

W. 11[. j'Villiams, Esq., Grand jfas/.er: DEAR SIR AKI>

BROTHER:-

As D. D. G. ]\f. of the Eleventh District I have the honor to report: I have visited, during the past year, a number of the Lodges in this District "and lind them generally in an excellent condition. I lind the Lodges, so far as I have visited them, provided with the necessary furniture and equipmellts to render our ceremonies impressive; and am glad to report that a large number of the Lodges, under the skillful and efficient instruction of Brother Black, our District Lecturer, have reached a high degree of proficiency in the "work." By your direction, under date February 9th, 1888,1 visited Haynesville Lodge, Ko. 19, and thereafter made to you a report and recommendation as to its condition. On St. John's Day, in June, 1 had "again the plea.sure to visit that Lodge and participate with the Brethren in a public celebration of that day. I have the pleasure to report the happy union and consolidation of Cameron Lodge, No. 296, at Cameron, with Vincil Lodge, No. 62, of that city. Yours Fraternally, NORTOi-; B. AKDERSON, D. D. G. flf., Eleventh Dis/Tiel.

TWELFTH DJSTmCT.

ST..JOSEPH, :Mo.â&#x20AC;˘ 8eptf'mber 10.

]~S8.

W.1I1. Will?:ams, Esq., G?'Cmd NaMer: DEAR

Sm

AN]) BROTHEH : -

Herein 1 tender you statement of my official acts as D. D. G. :M., Twelfth ~Iasonic District. October 22, 188i.-l'ublicly insta.lled the officers of Valley Lodge, No. 413, Bolckow, Mo. Thirty-five members present. Over 100 visiting ladies and gentlemen present. After the ceremonies a banquet was spread, of which n,bout 400 persons partook. Musk enlivened the occasion. A splendid time wn,s had by all. In the evening we exemplified the Third Degree, assisted by the new olli.cers, who are well posted "in the work. This Lodge owns its ball, and is beautifully furnished; out of debt; propert.y insured; some money in treasury; forty-eight members. November 12, 188i.-Visited Weat.herby, Mo. Examined lmll, also members of proposed Lodgc; sixteen being present. of the eighteen applicants. Eight visitors. The officers did .the work of the three Degrees very creditably, and I recommended the Dispensation. March 7th.-Set this Lodge to work, U. D., us per your order, and reported to Grand Secretary. I have met quite a number of the Brothers of this Lodge, also received letter from the . . .V. :M., Bro. Dildene, st.ating they were working in the Degrees right along. J anticipate a bright future f')r this Lodge if Charter be granted them. November 26, 188i.-By special invitation visited Agency J~odge, No. 10, and conferred 'Dcgrees on four candidates (Fellow Craft), also M. }.:L on two clindiolltes. This was some work, but oysters were never better; enjoyed by all. February 26, 27. 28, 29, 1888.-Held Lodge of Instruction, same Lodge. On 2ith, regular mceting night. conferred First Degree. The ofllcers of this Lodge are exceedingly


1888.J

Appendix.

197

wellnp ill the work. Books in good shape; out of debt; hall lIicely furnished; about twenty present. This Lodge has reeoyered from a Rip Van Winkle stupor, allel the members are to be congratulated for the thorough purging given. The process has made it one of the hest Lodges in the District. November 29, 1887.-At St. Joseph attended joint gathering of :Masons and families. About 150 present. Speeches, coftec and sandwiches graced the occasion. A very pleasant time. December 23, 1ilS7.-Examined hall for Osborn Lodge, No. 317. Recommended its use. December 81, lRS7.-Dcdicated said hall. This Lodge is neatly furnished and money enough on hand to start on its mission of Charity-having, Phren ix-like, arisen from its ashes. I have since met some of the Brethren of this Lodge. Report doing well. December 23, eyening.-Visited Charity, No. 331, at St. Josepl.l. Election of officers. December 2S.-0fficers were installed. One 11l1l1dred present. This Lodge is in a splendid condition, peace and harmony prevailing. The new olficers are very efficient In the work. Deecmber 27, 1R87.-Attended the joint installation of the omeen; of S1,. Joseph, Xo. 78, and Zeredatha, No. 189, P. G. 1\-1. BrowninstalJing; P. G. 1\1. Boyd, Grand ~Iarshal. Seventy present. Refreshments, etc. January 3, l8SS.-The W. M. of St. Joseph, No. 78, was decorated with "Kllox Hat." It appears regularly with dignity. January 25, 188il--Visited Zeredatha, No. 189. Found Lodge in good shape. Three petitions received that night. )Iay S.-Directed removal Zeredatha, No. 189, to new hall. June 19, 20, 21, n.-Attended State Lodge of Instruction at St. Joseph. :Met many of the members of Lodges from this District who report their Lodges in good order. :March 2(), 27, 28, 29th, 18S8-Held Lodge oOnstruction at King Hill, No. 376. W. Brother C. B. Powers having" arranged for special meetings on the 26th and 27th, when we conferred the Third Degree on three 0andidat.es, which added much to the interest and instruction of the officers and members. This Lodge is a perfect oasis, as it were-situated three miles from the busy city, in a low va.le, surrounded by hills and dales, sparkling running water, and lots of fish. Here the Brethren, who comprise some of t.he most substantial farmers of the county, gather around t.he refreshment board and discuss crops, mules, Charity, Brotherly Love, and practiee true :\[asonry. The ofIicers are very efficient in the work; much interest manifested; ~;jOO.OO in the treasury; owns the hall; owes nothing; books in good shape; work nhead. July 17th, IBH8.-Dedicated hall for St. Joseph, No. 78. Fifty present. The splendid condition of this Lodge needs no comment. July 24th. 1888.-Directed the removal of Zeredatha Lodge, No. 1S9, and dedicated same. Twenty present. ~Iay Sth, 1888.-Conducted funeral services for Zeredatha Lodge, No. 189, for P. )I. H. :N. l\'Iontague. Twenty-four present. Have arranged for Lodge of Instruetion at Fillmore, Missouri, for 'the 18th, 19th and 20th of September. Lincoln Lodge, :No. 188. September 4th.-St. Joseph Lodge, No. 7S, First Degree. St. Joseph-Commeneing December 3]st, 1887, unm March 24th, Hi8S, inelnsiH~.足 Held weekly Lodge of Instructioll with a good attendance, resulting in much benefit to all. Have visited many of the Lodges in the District several times but kept no date, and given private instruction where and whenever possible, to all who have sought light. Have had occasion to answer many letters from Lodges and Bret,hren which has been done cheerfully and promptly, simply referring them to the Constitution and By-Laws, which has been satisfactory to all.


198

Appendix.

[Oct.

In the past two years 1 have visited all the Lodges in the District from one to five times, except the Lodges at Saxton's and Whitesville. 1 havc written to each one once or twice, but received no reply. In my visits amongst thc Lodges and membcrs I have bcen treated with much courtesy, and my work and instructions cheerfUlly complicd with, and the best of feeling exists between the Fraternity and the Grand Lodge. Fraternally, HARRY KEENE, D. D. G. /If., Twelfth DistTicl,

'I'HIRTEEN'l'H DIS'l'RICl'.

MARYVILLE, Mo., Septembcr 1st, 1888. W. N. lViUiams. Esq., Grand )fastel': DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:-'

As D. D. Grand Master of this, the Thirteenth District, 1 have the pleasure to herewith submit a report of my official acts for the Masonic year ending this date. On September 11th, 1887,1 dedicated a new hall at Quitman, which had just been com路 pleted by the Brethren of Quitman Lodge, No. 196. This is one of the oldest Lodges in this part of the State, and now has a fine hall owned by them and out of debt. They are prosperous and happy in their new home. On August 31st, 1888, in obedience to your orders, 1 went to Pickering and investigated charges preferred against the W. M. of Pickering Lodge, No. 472. Suspended him and placed the Lodge in charge of the S. Warden, a special report of which 1 made to you. 1 have visited several of the Lodges in my District, but not all, during the past year. They are all in good working condition, well furnished and properly equippcd to render our ceremonies impressive, with one or two exceptions, where not much is being done; the Brethren do not seem to take much interest in the affairs of the Lodge, but this, in the case mentioned, 1 attribute chiefly to a want of some one to take the lead and properl)' confer the Degrees. In one Lodge there has existed, almost from its beginning, personal differences and difficulties. I refer to Burlington Lodge, No. 442; but I am happy to say they are now all reconciled, and the Lodge is doing plenty of work, and good work, and I predict for it a success fnr in advance of its former record. Fraternally, 1. V. McMILLAN, D. D. G. M., Thi?'teentlt District.

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT.

ALBANY, Mo" September 25th, 1888. fIT. /If. Williams, Esq., Grand /lIaslel': DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:1 have the honor herewith to submit to you my annual report as D. D. Grand Master of the Fourteenth Masonic District. On the 16th, 17th and 18th of August, 1888, R. W. Brothers Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer, and George F. Rogers held a Lodgc of Instruction at Bethany, Harrison


199

Appendi1:.

1888.J

county, at which I presided. We had a fair attendance, there being five or six Lodges represented. Brothers McDowell alld Rogers labored faithfully during the three days and nights. Owing to pressing business engagements I have been unable, during the )'car, to visit very many of the Lodges ill my District. The Lodges in my District are in fair condition. However, they need considerable instruction in the work. As the District is rather poorly situated as to central point of holding Lodges of Instruction, I would suggest the appointment of some suitable person as District Lecturer who cau and will give some time and atention to the different Lodges and the work, as the Grand Lecturer cannot visit all the Lodges. Fraternally sUbmitted, J. B. THOMAS, D. D. G. !Jr., Fourteenth Di$ll'ict.

S{XTEENTH DISTRICT.

FREDERICKTOWN', Mo., Sept. 11th, 1888. W. M. Williams, Esq., Grand Master:

DEAR SIR A"l\D BROTHER ;I have the pleasure to say that all the Lodges in the Sixteenth Masonic District are in a healthy condition. Peace and brotherly love prevail. Fraternally yours, FRANK R. NEWBERRY, D. D. G.•~f., Suteenth Di$trict·

SIXTEENTH DIRTRTCT.

FREDERICKTOWN, Mo., September 26th, 1888.

W.

Jr. Williarns, Esq.,

Grand Master:

DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:I have the pleasure to report that the state of Masonry existing in the Sixteenth Masonic District is good. The Lodges, so far as my knowledge extends, are in good condition. The work done is not great, but the material is first-class, and brotherly love prevails. I am Fraternally yours, FRANK R. NEWBERRY, D. D. G. !Jf., Sbuenth District.

SEVENTEENTH DIS'l'RIG'T.

CAPE GIRAIWEAU, MO., September 26th, 1888. W.

Jr. Williams, Esq.,

Grand !J[aster:

DEAR SIR AND BROTHER;About the middle of August I wrote to all the Lodges in my District (Seventeenth) for information such as I thought should be embodied in my report to you, but have only


Appendi;r.

200

[Oct.

heard from a part of them. I did this because I had been unable to vi~it any of t.hem, on account of sickness in family. I can safely say that the L-odges are, with two exceptions, in a health~' condition and doing good work on good material. Hope to be able t-o meet you at Grand Lodge. Respectfully and Fraternally, W. B. WILSON, D. D. G. llf., Seventeenth Di817'ict.

EIGHTEENTH DISTHICT. JEFFERSON CITY.,

:Mo., Septemher 2;)th, 1888.

W. Jlt. lVilliams, Esq., Grand .Master: DEAR SIR A"l'D BROTHF.l~:-

The only official business transacted by me during the present Masonic' year prior to my resignation was the inst.itution of Dexter Lodge, which was chartered at last session of the Grand Lodge; this I attended to in person, I think some time in October of last year-the exact date I am not able to give for the reason that r cannot have access to my notes of the work, which are at my home in Bloomfield. I also appointed R. W. Brother T. B. Turnbangh, of Bloomfield Lodge, No. 153, to set Puxico Lodge, U. D., to work, which was done by him shortly afterwards. I regret that I cannot be more explicit as to dates, but the above is a substantial account of my proceedings. Fraternally submitted, STEPHEN CHAPMAN, Late D. D. G. H, Ri,r;/iler:nth Distriel.

EJGHTEE~TH

DISTHICT.

GA YOSO, Mo., September :25th, 1888. TV. N. TriUiarns, Esq., Grand llfaster: DEAR Sm A~D BROTHEl:

;-

As I expected when I accepted the commission as D. D. Grand ~Iaster of this Masonic District, 1 have been so prel3sed with business that I could not get time to visit the different Lodges in t.his District, thcrefore I have nothing to report that has come under my own personal observation regarding t.hc workings of the Craft, or the condition of halls. I was in New Madrid last week. Our Brethren thcre have sust.ain~d a great loss. Their hall, with all their records, chaTter and paraphernalia were destroyed by firc some two weeh since. They had an insmance policy on the building for ~SOO. They illtend to rebuild immediately. A number of Brethren belonging to Point Pleasant. Lodge, No. 176, at Point Pleasant, Mo., living at and near Portageville, some twelvc miles from Point Pleasant, are taking ~teps to organize a Lodge at Portageville. I would recommend a dispellSation be /,'Tanted the Brethren at Portageville, as it is very inconvenient for them to attend the regular communications at Point Pleasant, besides there is good Masonic material that can be utilized at and ncar Portageville.


201

1888.J

A question has come up in the Point Pleasant Lodg-e which is ('xerci~illg the minds of the Brethren there. The case h; this: :l\lr. Fred. R. Yount wn~ a man tlwt slood high in the community in which he lived. He was a saloon-keeper. He petitioned the Point Pleasant Lodge for the rights, etc., of Masonry. He received them. Thi~ ,,路as before the edict was passed prohibiting a brother from dealing in the accursed stuff. When Brother Yount found he could not. remain in the Lodge and carry OIl his saloon, the Lodge permitted him t.o dimit therefrom. His intention was to tmnsfer his membership t.o some Lodge in Illinois. He still carries on his saloon. The Lodge has preferred charges against. him for llnmasonic conduct, in this-selling int.oxicating liquors in violatiOll of the edict of the Grand Lodge. If there is anythiJIg irregular ahout. it, it is thb: The charge was preferred by the Junior Warden-elect, before he was installed. 1 suppose the Lodge under whose territorial jurisdiction a brother may be in, has the right to prefer charges, and hring to trial any brother Violating Masonic obligations, or ~Iasonie laws, whether he be it member of that Lodge or not. Am I not. correct '? I think you would do well to relieve me of the duties of D. D. Grand Master that I have so poorly attended to. With great respect I am, Fraternally yours, GEO. W. CARLETOX, D. D. G. M., Eighteen/II, Dis/Ticl.

"J~ETEE:K'fH

DISTRICT.

WILLL\~rSVILI,E,WAY~E

Co., :l\10., September 2;)th, 1888.

W. l1f. IFilNams, Esq., G'rand ;1[(/Rter: DEAH

SIR

A::"D

BHOTHER:-

I have been waiting for blanks on which to make out my annual report as D. D. G. ?If. of Nineteenth District. Xone to hand as yet. In December last J received Chart.er for Reynolds Lodge, at Black P.O., Reynolds Co. But being sick at the time and for several weeks afterwards, I requested Bro. W. E .. Sizemore, W. M. of Hopewell Lodge, No. 239, to do the work for me. Bro. Sizemore rcported to me that he set them to work under Charter, in due form, About the same time I re(~eiYed dispensation for Lodge at Pine, Ripley Co., bill. sickness prevented me from putting them to work in proper manner, so I requested Bro. H. C. Barrett, of DOlli_ phan Lodge, No. :)~9, to attend to t.]lat work, which he did. Being engaged in a public enterprise, as you see from the heading of this sheet, I have not found time to visit the Lodges in the District, as I would have liked to have done, bnt will say that the Cmft in the Nineteenth District is at peace, and that harmony prevails, with but few exceptions. Yours very Fraternally, A. B. :MARTIXDALE, D. D. G. Jr., .Yinr:ICflltli J)iglricl.

TWENTIETH mSTRlCT.

STEELVILLE, ?lIo., Sept., Ist, 1&"8. W. .Jf. IViUiams, Esq., (frand ].[aJi/er: DEAR

Sm

AND

BROTHEH :-

As my District, the Twentieth, covers a large territory, T have not been able to visit all the Lodges. Some of the Lodges I can 1l0t reach without. traveling some finy O!' sixty


202

Appendi:r.

[Oct.

miles. No R. R. in that portion of the District. I learn from the W. M., of Latimer Lodge. No. 395, that his Lodge is in a healthy condition; financial condition good; average attendance 2.'). Texas Lodge reports financial condition good; average attendance twenty, Spring Creek Lodge, No. 347, is in fair working condition. Bro. J. W. MIres, W. 1\1, of Barnes Lodge, No. 116, reports his Lodge in fair condition, in the work much above the average. But I learn that Plato Lodge, No 469, is in bad condition. The W. M. said a portion of the members desired to surrender the Charter; I suggest that the D. D. G. M., appointed for next year, be urged to visit said Lodge. Salem Lodge, No. 225, is in good working order; they are well posted in the work, and they are out of debt, with money on hands. I have visited them several times. Lebanon, No. 77, is not doing much, but is in fair working condition, ont of debt, and Lodge Ran insured. Cuba Lodge, No. 312, is working nicely, membership small but increasing fust. I set them at work under their Charter, November 25th, 1887. I have visited them several times and assisted in conferring degrees. I called a Lodge ofInstruction at Steelville, August 23d, 24th and 25th, 1888. R. W. Bro. Allan McDowell was present and took charge of the work; the attendance was fair and results favorable. St. James Lodge is not in very good condition; I have not visitcd it personally, but I am informcd that they are doing nothing. Thanking yon, most worshipful Sir, for the honor confcrred in my appointment, and hoping that in my endeavor to discharge the duties imposed, I have received your approbation. I am, Vcry Fraternally, yours, FERO!N AND W. WEBB,

D. D. G.

ill.,

Twentieth Distrirt.

TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. CHA~IOIS,

lV.

,~f.

Will-iam8,

E.~q.,

Mo., September 27th. 1888.

Gtand Master:

DEAR SIR AND BROTHEl( : -

I desire to submit the following as my annual report of my official acts during the :Masonie year about to close:

In pursuance of your dispensation, dated on the 16th day of May, 1888, I opened the Grand Lodge, and, having duly filled the oJlices, proceeded to examine and dedicate the proposed Hall of Chamois Lodge, No. 18-5., A. F. and A. M., to universal Freemasonry, virtue and benevolence, on the 2.5.th day of May, 1888. During April, 1888, a correspondence was opened through your oflice between the Secretary and Master of Vienna Lodge, No. 94, A. F. and A. ~L, on the one side and myself on the other. A trouble had arisen between the officers and members of the L~dge in reference to the trial of a charge against a member of that Lodge. I appointed a time to visit the Lodge, at the instance of the Secretary, and notified the W. M. of my intention. He gave me his version of the matter and asked me to defer my visit to some other time, giving some reason therefor. The visit was deferred and correspondence continued until thc difficulty seemed to fadc largely out of existence, and the visit was not made at all. You have the full correspondence with Evergreen Lodge, No. 27, A. F. and A. M., in reference to saloon-keeping Masons. conducted through me in April, 1888. The Lodge at Chamois is well equipped with furniture and an necessary app1iances except columns. These will be supplied at thc earliest possible time consistent with other obligations. The Lodge at Linn is owned by the members, but is neither well furnished nor well kept..


203

Appendi:r.

1888.1

The Lodge at Herman is in good conditioil as to furniture, and the Brethren there seem to have a laudable pride in the manner of keeping their Lodge. So far as I have been able to form an opinion, I am led to belie"e that 1\:[asonry does not sta.nd on as high a plane of morality as is its design in the Twenty-First District. Owing to the pressure of personal and official duties, I have not been able to devote as much time to Masonry as I had hoped to do. Yours Fraternally, HENRY :i\'IARQUAND, D. D. G. ,1[., Twenty-Pirst District.

TW}~NTY -SECO~D

DISTRICT.

CALIFOR~IA,

Mo., September 24th, 1888.

W. M. Williams, Esq., Grand NaBler: DEAR Sm AXD BROTHElt:Since receiving your Commission as District Deputy Grand Master for the Twentysecond Dist.rict, I have officially visited the Lodges in Moniteau and :Morgan counties and Russellville, U. D., in Cole county. All the chartered IAldges in this District have convenient and safe halls, and are cheerfully obe)'ing the laws of the Grand Lodge and doing good work. On the 23d of .June, at the invit.ation of Ionia Lodge I publicly installed the officers of that Lodge and delivered a :Masonic address. As suggested by the Committee on Lodges U. D. of the last Grand Lodge, I visited and conferred with the officers of Russelville Lodge, U. D., and permitted the Lodge to Correct the Lodge minutes to conform to the facts. The failure of this Lodge to obtain a Charter has created a feeling that the Lodge may not be permanent, and thus prevented them from doing much work. I find the officers and members zealous and well qualified to do good work, and if a Charter is granted them I have no doubt they will build up a good Lodge. Allow me to thank yOll personally for the honor conferred upon me, and to congratulate you upon the success of your administration of the affairs of the Grand Lodge. Fraternally, L. F. WOOD, D. D. G. M., Twenty-Second Di8trict.

TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT. SEDAUA,

August 27, 1888.

lV. M. Williams, Esq., G-I'and flfastCl': DEAR

Sm

A~D BROTHER;-

Pursuant to custom, and in obedience to law, I have the honor to herewith submit my annual report. During the Masonic yea.r just closing I have visited most of the Lodges in my District. All have good, safe halls, and are reasonably well supplied with furniture, charts, etc., with the exception of Potter Lodge, No. 84, at Longwood. Its hall is old, too smull, and poorly furnished. The IAldge is in good financial condition. Its membership is not large, but is made up of good and true men and faithful !lfasolls. They are doing but


Ap]Jend'iJ..~.

204路

litt.1e work. Peflce ann harmony prevail.' more commodious hall.

[Oct.

I think they will

SOOIl

t.ake steps to secure

:1

The town of Clinton, unfort.unat.ely, ha.<; two Lodges; one would be amply sufficient. I have been t.rying for more than a year to persuade them t.o consolidflte. I see but liWe prospect of success; between some of t.he Brethren of these two Lodges a Fraternal or Masonic feeling does not seem to exist, and as a result both Lodges are almost dead and )Iasonry in Clinton is at a low ebb. I have not visited Warsaw Lodge, No. 3G5, but have written two letters within the last three months to the Secretary, a.sking for information concerning the condition of the Lodge, .but no reply has been received. From the b(~st information obtainable, I very much douht t.heir having held a meeting within the last six months; no intercst whatever seems to be manifested by the members; 110 work, I believe, has becn done for several years; the Lodge is dead and the funeral ceremonies should have been performed long ago. I recommend that the Charter be called in. I have held no Lodge of Instruction in the District t.his year for the reason that a State Lodge was held at Boonville, in the latter part of Decembcr, which affordcd an opportunity to all the Lodges in the District, that so desired, to obtain the work from the Grand L(~cturer. Hoping to have the ])leasure of meeting you at the Grand Lodge, in October, I am sincerely and Fraternally yours, B. II. INGRA.:M, D. D. G. X, Twent.y-thinl District.

'nYEN'l')'-THlRJ) DISTHlCT.

w.

!-3EDALL\, ],f.

:\fo., September 14th, 1888.

lVillia?Jv" Esq., Gtand Mastel': DEAl{

Sm

AND BHOTHl,H ;--

In obedience to your request of August 28th, I visited Warsaw ye~terdayfor the purpose of examining the condition of War;<aw Lodge, No. 365, and consulting with the Brethren as to the best course to pursue in regard to it. On an examinatIon of the Records, I found that the Longe has held but two meetings since Jnly.l88:"); one, February 3d, 1887, nnd the other January 26th, 18&~. 1 took possession of the Charter and Rooks and ha,ve them in my ofli.ce, snbject to yonI' order. 1 left all the balance of the furniture and property of the Lo(lge in charge of Brothers James R. .Jones and Arthur S. :\IcGowan, both Past :'If asters of the Lodge, subject to such orders as you or the Gr!111d Lodge may give concerning it. I found the treasury empty, with a debt of about twenty dollars against the Lodge, due principally to Brother "McGowan. There is a considerable amount of delinquent dues which might be collected. I left a list of the same with Brother :MeGowan, who, for several years, was Secretary of 路the Lodge, and told him to collect liS m路uch of it as he could, pay the indebtedness, and reudel' un accouut to me to be filed in the offiee of the Grand Secretary. The hall in which the Lodge met is a good one and W:lS occupied jointly by this Lodge, the A. O. U. W. and 1. O. O. F. The three bodies owned the carpet, chairs, stoves, etc., jointl)'. The Charts, Collars, Jewels, etc., are all put away under lock in agood desk in the hall, and I would recommend that they be left there until the Brethren determine whether they will attempt to reorganize or until the Grand Lodge may have some usc for them. All of the resident members whom I met [ully approved and endorsed my action in taking their Charter. Fraternally Yours, B. H. INGRAM, D. lJ. G. M., Twenty路third District.


Appendix.

1888.J

205

TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. :M:ARSHAJ~L, }\fO.,

Sept. 5th, 1888.

IV. ltf. Will,tams, Esq., Grand ltfaster: DEAR SIR AND BROTHER:-

I herewith submit the following report: Having received Charter of Lafayette Lodge, No. 4:37, at Corder, i\Jo., on 29th October. 1887, I, with It number of Brethren from Marshall. Higginsville and Blackburn, went to Corder and dedicated the hall, and set the Lodge to work under their Charter. This Lodge has twenty members, and will never be a strong, Lodge, unless the town gro\vs much larger, owing to the proximity of other lodges. I received dispensation for Chapel Hill Lodge, No. 320, to move into theiL: new hall. I requested P. :1\1. S. Finis King-, of Odessa, to inspect the hall. On his first inspection lie did not consider it snJe, find ordered ehnnges to be made, when he reinspected and found it entirely safe, and permitted the Lodge to move in and occupy the same. I have visited but few of the Lodges in my District, but from the best information] have, peace and harmony prevail alllong the Craft, and Masonry in my District has not a rapid but a steady growth. In some port.ions of the District too many new Lodges are being formed to the detriment of the old olles. I think the Grand Lodge ought to use great precaution in granting Charters for Ilew Lodges, so that the old and established Lodges will.not be weakened thereby. Fraternally submitted,

!A.S. A. GORDON, D. D. G. 31., Twenty-Jourth Dis/rict.

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. HARlUSO.l\VILLE,

September, 1888.

W. ltr. lVi.lliams, Esq., G1'and NaI3ter: DEAR

Sm

AND BROTHER:-

As District Deputy Grand J\faster of the Twenty-sixth District, truth compels me to acknowledge that I have not" officially" been as industrious as I should have been. However, when everything is considered, especially in this District, where peace and harmony prevail, or where" they" are supposed to prevail, and where a visit from the D. D. G. M. is not often expected, and seldom reqUired, we feel like saying we have done enough. I have convened two District Lodges of Instruction: One at Harrisonville, )\fo., 011 :1\Iarch 15,16 and 17, 1888, at \vhich twelve Lodges were represented and eight lessons given, with an average attendance at each of eighteen; the other at Warrensburg on April 17, 18 and 19, where twelve Lodges were represented, and eight lessons given, with an average attendance of sixteen. R. W. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lect.urer, had charge of the work and lectures at both Harrisonville and Warrensburg, and the regular attendants were greatly benefited. I examined a hall at Garden City, Cass county, and recommended the removal thereto of Index Lodge, No. 54, A. F. and A.]\f. The removal was permitted, and in compliance with dispensation from the M. W. Grand :i\fll~ter, with the assistance of R. W. 131'0.1. 1\1. Abraham, I dedicated the ball, since \yhich time the Lodge bas been working nicely. I have visited and instructed in law and work, to some extent, each of the following Lodges, to-wit: Index, 51; Cass, 147; Grand River, 276 ; Dayton, 38G; EYerett, 219; Belton,


Appendi:v.

.206

[Oct

4:30; Jewell, ,180; Wadesburg, 348; Rich Hill, 479; Corinthian, 265; and Warrellsburg, 135. l\Iost of the above Lodges arc in good condHion, and working fairly well. In some they have been wrongly instructed, or have forgotten the work, as their WORK ill some particulars is foreign to this Grand Jurisdiction. The Lodges heard from and not visited by me, are, from the reports, in very good condition. By authority of dispensation from you, I convened the M. W. G. Lodge and laid the corner-stone to the school building at Belton, Mo., on July 6th, 1888. R. V-,T. Bro. C. H. Briggs, Grand Chaplain, was present and assisted. After rendering ample justice to the good and bounteous dinner, prepared by the good ladies of BeHon and vicinity, the Grand Chaplain delivered a beautiful and instructive oration to a large and attentive audience. I am authorized by dispensation from you, to lay corner-stone for a church house at Pleasant lIill, on September 11th, which will be attended to at that time. 1 will hold a Lodge ofInstruction at Tyrian Lodge, No. 350, A. F. & A. M., beginning September 12th, 1888. I would respectfully recommend that the Twenty-sixth Masonic District be divided and two Districts made thereof. It is too much to ask one D. D. G. M. or D. L., either with or without pay, to perform the necessary duties therein. Sixteen or more of the twenty-eight Lodges meet on the same night. I would also respectfully recommend that the Grand Lodge Law be so amended as to prevent subordinate Lodge "A" changing the jurisdictional boundary of subordinate Lodge "B" by removing its ("A") Hall from one point to another in its ("A") own jurisdiction without the conseJ1t of "B". See Decision 11, page 27 and Decision 5, page 38, Book Constitution. Fraternally submitted, F. E. BYBEE, D. D. G. M., 1'wenty-sixlh Disl1路ict.

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT.

GREENFlEi,D, Mo., September 19th, 1888. W. ltf. William.., Esq., Grand lIfaster:

DEAR Sm

AND

BROTHER:-

Herewith I submit my annual report as D. D. Grand Master of the Twenty-seventh District. For want of time I have visited but few of the Lodges during the year. Among those visited, I found Everton, No. 405, in fair working order. The financial affairs are in a healthy condition, and work, in prospect at the time of my visit, has since been completed, and other material, all of "good quality," is now oeingused. Greenfield Lodge, No. 446, is always in working order; so also is Washington, No. 87. The former has done no work during the year, and the latter but little. Both of these Lodges can be safely trusted to secure the best interests of Masonry in their jurisdiction. On the 15th inst. I set Hermon Lodge, at Uberal, Barton county, to work U. D. The membership of this new Lodge is made up of Masons who are alive to the true purposes of our Fraternity, and will, no doubt, prove their "faith" by "their work~." They have a very neatl)l furnished and comfortable hall; a growing town and thriving community 路about them. The officers named in the Dispensation were in their appointed stations, and 1 left them full of zeal and energy to begin the work before them. The foregoing includes all my official visitations. I intended to set Walker, No. 533, at work under charter, but sickness in my family prcvente~, and that duty was performed


1888J

Appendix.

207

by proxy, as heretofore reported. I am informed by members that the Lodge is progressing as well as could be asked. From the members of Vernon, N:o. 4\l3, whom I met at Liberal, I learned that a majority of that Lodge is desirous of removing their place of meeting to a town some six miles south of their present home (Mounds, Vernon county), for the. reasons that it would be more convenicnt for their "working" membership, and that their present hall is inconvenient and the town "dead." If. thcre is life enough left in the Lodge to "get therc," the proposed move should be made. I gave the brethren the necessary instructions as to the manner of procedure in such case and suppose they will be heard from in due time. 1''rom other Lodges I hear good reports, and, from what I know of the mcmbers, I find cause to think that :Masonry is ever advancing in this District. The character of the applicants received is better each year, the members become more and more careful in their own conduct, and will receive none but the best material offered "for the building." If a few "stumbling blocks" were removed, our status might be improved. As it is, I see no cause for complaining, but, on the contrary, feel encouraged by the year's work. Fraternally SUbmitted, SEY:MOUR HOYT, D. D. G. ftf., Twenly-seventh Disb路ict.

TWE]\TY-EIGHTR DISTRICT. BOLIVAR, :i\1.0.,

September 25th, 1888.

W.ltf. William,s, Esq., Gmnd Mastel': DEAR SIR AND BnoTHER;-

I have thc honor of submitting my annual report for 1888 of the condition of the Craft in my District, following, to wit: Hogle'S Creek, No. 279.-Recordsfairly kept;haU safe; improvement in furniture and apparatus needed; average number of members attending each regular meeting small. Hermitage, No. 288.-0n stand still, not doing much of anything. Records very well kept; good hall, well furnished. Black Oak, No. 432.-Not doing anything; large anti-Ma.~onic element around it: have not had a regular meeting for three or four months; work is hardly known, and candidates arc never taught all of the lectures in the several Degrees. :Modern, No. 144.-Doing but little work; excellent hall owned by Lod~e, out of debt, well furnished; records properly kept and Degrees properly conferred. Pleasant, No. 160.-This Lodge hu." been booming; work correctly given; records fairly kept; good hall, nicely furnished and safe. Bolivar, No. 195.-Hall safe, best furnished in this District; at least half a dozen members who can confer the work in thc Several Degrees correctly; records properly kept; lost one of her brightest rnemhers by death this year, R. W. Brother \V. G. Weaver. Cement, No. 431.-Wcak Lodge; only one or two who can confer degrees; records poorly kept; hall moderately safe, b8ing over a school house; no apparatus but a set of charts. Pleasant Hope, No. 467.-Good growing Lodge; fair hall, after one gets into it; nicely furnished; work only fairly. conferred; records properly kept; good Secretary, knows what he is about. . Doric, No. 300.-Have not been able to visit this Lodge, but learn from a Brother who is a member of said Lodge that they have done but little work the past year.


208

Appendix.

[Oct.

Rictdick, )\0. 36l.--Ha.<; a good hall, well furnished,safe; records in bad shape; have promised to do better; only one or two who take interest enough in the work to keep posted. Western Light, No. 396.-Good hall, well furnished, safe; work fairly ,understood and given; records very well kept; has not. done a'great deal of work this year. Urbana, No. Hl.-Not a strong Loclge, only about two years old; had trouble with members who arc druggists, on account of selling whisky; trouble about died out now: hall safe, poorly furnished. Stockton, ~o. 283.-Good hall, safe, nicely furnished; have done but little work; have no use for a District Deputy; could do good work if they had a chance. Hesperian, xo. 2S6.-This Lojge is on the extreme I have not visited them.

Wci~8l'll

edge of my District and

Jericho, Xo. 340.-Is in the southwest corner of my District. They sent me word not to come, but send some other Brother. I did so, and, therefore, have never visited them. Clintonville, ~o. 482.-This Lodge is not doing anything at all, and I believe it would be better for the Order if it were tak~1l from there, for a while at ;,[(~lLst; have had complaints from there, but no one cares to take the bull by the horns; dissipation with somc of the members the cause.' The following Lodges arc almo,t in a straight line north and south, and only from eight to ten miles apart, to wit: Doric, Ko. 300; Riddick, Xo. 361; Western Light, No. 396; Urbana, No. 421; Black Oak, No. 432; ITel'lnita.ge, Xo. 288, and Rogle's Creek, ~o. 2i9. Their membership is small and it is only possible that they will ever do much. None of my Lodges can be reached by railroad and I have not done the visHing that ought to be done. IIav~ not had a Lodge ofInstructioll in the District this year, as we have no District Lecturer. R. W. Brother MC])Jwell held one at Springflehl and it was attended by several representatives of Lodges in this Dist.rict. Thus I close my report of the Twenty-Eighth District and think, on an average, we are ::\lasonica.lly in fair sha.pe;hut there could be a,wollderfnl change made in the working of the Lodges if the D. D. G. M. and D. Lecturer could visit the Lodges in their Districts oftener. Fraternally submi tted, FLA vms A. AFFLECK, D. D. G. ,1[. Twenty-Eighth District.

TWEXTY-NINTH DISTHlCT. CASSVILLI<;. 1\'10.,

Sept. 10th, 18SK

W.lIf. Wiltiwn,<, Esq., G-rand MaBle/': DEAR SIR AND BROTHER : -

/At the close of another Masonic year, I would respectfully submit the following report: for the Twenty-ninth District of nIissouri : The year has been a pleasant one in Masonic Circles. I held a District Lodge of Instruction in Purdy Lodge, No. 148, on the 23d, 24th and 25th of February, assisted by Bro. C. W. Carter, Assistant D. D. G. L., with fair attendance and good interest. ITeld Lodge of Instruction at Washburn, Barry Lodge, No, 36i, on :March 12th, 13th and 14th, with fair attendance and fair interest.


Appendix.

1888.J

209

Had application to hold Lodge of Instruction at Pineville, McDonald Co., preparatory to organizing Lodge. There was a fair attendance and good interest, and found material sufficient to form good Lodge. Since then lcarned they would defer their application for dispensation. Held Lodge of Instruction at Granby, Granby Lodge, No. 2lfl, with fair attendance and gooe! interest, with neighbodng Lodges well represented. Held Lodge of Instructions at Monett, Barry Co., preparatory to org.mizing Lodge at that place, with fair attendance and good interest. They have plenty of good material for a Lodge, and they have since had a good large brick hall erected and will soon make application for dispemation. The different Lodges of the District arc in good working condition. Some of them are deficient in furniture and equipments but promise to provide better furniture as soon as their finances will permit. In Seligman Lodge, No. 51i, brotherly love does not prevail to that extent that it should: therc seems to be two factions of the Brethren, with considerable whiskey as a disturbing third faction. They have charges preferred against two of the Brethren, to be tried on the 22d of September, which will probably determine the future usefulness of the Lodge. Fraternally submitted. WILLIAM TALBERT, D. D. G. M., Twenty-ninth

Di~lI"ict.

THIR"rIETH DISTRICT. PIERCE CITY, ::110.,

W. 11f. Williams.,

E.~q,

Septcmber 26th, 1888.

Grand ,lfaster:

DEAR SIR A~D BROTHER:-

My health has been so poor that I have not been able to visit any of the Lodges in the District, and, therefore, am not able to rep01:t their condition. On September 10th, 1888, I set "Canopy" Lodge, U. D., at work under very favorable auspices, and feel confident that the Lodge will do well and prove beneficial to the Order. Fraternally, E. P. LINZEE, D. D. G. M., Thirtieth District.

TJURl'Y-FlRST DISl'HICT.

SPHlNGFIELD, Mo., September 18th, lSSS. W'. ,If. Williarns, Esq., Grand )fasler.路 DEAR SIR ANn BROTHER:-

Herewith is submitted allnual report of my official acts during the last year, and of the condition of the Lodges in the Thirty-first District: My official acts during the year have been as follows: Puhlic installation of officerselect of Galena Lodge, No. 515, Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 422, United Lodge, No.5, Solomon Lodge, No. 2i1, and St. Nicholas Lodge, No. 135. J remained two days with the Galena. Brethren, devoting the time to instruction and exemplification of the work. Early in the year I instituted a new Lodge, under dispensation, at Sparta, Christian county, spending two days with the Brethren, endeavoring to give them "proper instruction to pursue their labors." G. L. AP.-14.


210

Appendix.

[Oct.

In the month of August I dedicated anew hall for St. Nicholas Lodgc, No. 4:l5, with public ceremonies, in the prescnce of a very respectable gathering of the Brethren and their friends and neighbors. I have investigated the condition of the various halls in this District, and I am glad to report a marked improvement in safety and convenience. One new hall has becn built and two others have been remodcled and made as good as new. With few exceptions the Lodges in this District have safe and comfortable halls to meet in, but few of them are supplied with the necessary equipments to make the cercmonies impressive. The records of proceedings in the Lodges are generally well kept, and, with olle or two exceptions, the accounts and finances of the Lodges are in good shape. The moral Condition of the Craft is gencrally good, and pcace and harmony prevail in the various Lodges without exception. I will here submit the memorandums of the condition of the several Lodges, made upon personal visitations and inspections, with two exceptions, where my information was acquired by proxy. United, No.5, Solomon, No. 2i1, and Gate of tbe Temple, No. 422, Springfield, Greene county, all have Hew commodious halls, well furnished, and are supplied with all equipments necessary to render the ceremonies impressive. They are making moderate progress and harmony reigns. O'Sullivan, No.7, Walnut Grove, Greene county, bas a good hun, plainly furnished; lacks winding stairs. Otherwise well equipped for work and in good condition. Rising Star, No, 145, Ebenezer, Greene county, has a very good hall for a country Lodge, and is equipped with necessary implements for conferring Degrees. General condition ofthis Lodge is hamwniou,s inactivity. Ozark, No. 297, Fair Grove; Greene county, meets in a good and safe hall, comfortably furnished. Lack pillars and winding stairs; otherwise equipped for work. Relief, No. 341, Brookline, Greene county. bas a very poor hall as to safety and comfort, wbich should be abandoned as soon as the Brethren can do better. This Lodge also lacks the pillars and winding stairs, but is otherwise fairly equipped for .vork. Friend, No. 352, Ozark, Christian county, has now a splendid hall to meet in, which has been entirely remodeled and neatly furnished. The Lodge is poorly equipped for work, being deficient in nearly everything necessary to render the ceremonies impressive. But the l\1su;ter, with the consent of the Brethren, has ordered the funds appropriated and direct.ed the Secretary to provide all things lacking without delay. With improved facilities for advancing the interests of the Craft there should, and doubtless will be, a revival in this direction in Friend Lodge. Billings, No. 379, Billings, Christian county, has a comfortnble and safe hall; Lodge is supplied with n.ll necessary equipments for good work. This Lodge might be denominated tbe model Lodge in this District for zeal in good works and method in business affairs. Their hall wsu; badly damaged by fire in lI1arch, but, being wisely and well insured, the loss to Lodge was promptly paid and damage soon repaired. St. Nicholas, No. 435, Cavc Spring, Greene county, now meets in a new and convenient hall-property of the Lodge. This Lodge, until recently, has been without a home since its organization; meeting, when permitted, in a church used for public services, and its past life has been, to some extent, a struggle for existence. It is now in a position to advance the interests of Masonry, and signs of a revival arc already apparent. The Lodge is not well equipped for work, having neither charts nor winding stairs. Ash Grove, No. 436, Ash Grove, Greene county, has a commodious and safe hall, but Lodge is poorly equipped for impressive work, lacking charts and winding stairs; and the implements with which the Lodge is supplied are of an order crude and primitive. A revival of the old-time spirit of :Masonry is the one thing needful to place this Lodge on the plane of advancement. Bois D'Arc, No. 449 Rois D'Arc. Greene count.y, meets in a fairl)' good hall for acoun-


1888.J

Appendix.

211

try Lodge. The equipmellts for work are not complete, but sufficient to make the ceremonies, to some extent, impressive. In other respects the Lodge seems to be in a healthy condition. Forsyth Lodge, No. 453, Forsyth, Taney county, meets in a commodious new hall comfortably furnished. The Lodge is not supplied with pillars or windingstairs, but has the other necessary equipments for work. The general condition of this Lodge is somewhat improved and the morale is better since the Brethren have purged it of some of the violators of :Masonic law, and harmony seems to prevail now. Stratford. No. 497, Strafford, Greene county, meets in a middling fair hall, plainly furnished. The Lodge is poorly equipped for work. Has no working tools for illustrating the Second or Third Degrees, no pillars or winding stairs to make the ceremonies of the Second Dcgree impressive, excepting representations on chart hanging on wall. Record of proceedings lind account book of Lodge in bad condition. The business of Lodge is absolutely loose at both ends. TIle Brethren promise to straighten out. matters at once, and, knowing the zeal for the principles of Masonry of some of the Strafford Brethren, I confidently expect a rcvival and reformation. Without this Strafford Lodge will soon succumb to the inevitable, and be assigned to a place in the list of "dead Lodges." Galena Lodge, No. 515, Galena, Stone county, meets in a neat and convenient hall, comfortably furnished. Fairly equipped for work. Need pillars, winding stairs and a set of the Missouri charts to make the ceremonies more impressive. The Brethren are efficient in the work, and, if thorough 1)' furnished with all nect'ssary equipments, would never fail to make the ceremonies interesting and impressive. The general status and condition of Lodge is good, barring a little delinquency in collection of annual dues. Sparta, U. D., Sparta, Christian county, was set at work in January last, under favorable auspices, and I shall be greatly disappointed if these Brethren do not furnish the Most \Vorshipful Grand Lodge, at its next annual meeting, ample evidence that Sparta Lodge can safely be placed on the roll of chartered Lodge'S. Suggestions.-Permit me to suggest that, in my opinion, the Grand Lodge should provide for the traveling- and contingent expenses at least, of the District Deputies and Lecturers, or speak out in language emphatic to the subordinate I,odges of the State, impressing them that it is their duty to reimburse these officers their legitimate expenses when visiting them, whether at their invitation or in compliance with Masonic law, in the interests of Masonry. In support of this suggestion I will state that, during the past year, my actual expenses, for travel, postage, stationery,. etc., aggregate about forty dollars. Time lost, twenty days, worth tome in my office five dollars per day, or one hundred dollars. I have been reimbursed by Lodges a little less than ten dollars. It will thus be seen that a brother who is not well fixed, or does not hold a lucrative office, cannot afford to hold the office of D. D. G. 1\:1. or D. L. in this District. To visit aU the Lodges ill this District once during the year involves 567 miles travel, 157 of which is off of railroads, and at least twenty days time, devoting one evening only to each Lodge. Respectfully and Fraternally, JOHN R. FERGUSON, D. D. G. M., Thirty-first District.


212

[Oct. THIRTY-SECOXD

DI~THICT.

HARTYlLLE, Mo., Septemher 24th, 1888. TV. ],f. lViUiam.s, Esq., Grand Master:

DEAR SIR Al\D BROTHER:In compliance with your order of December 2ith, 188i, I did, by Special Deputy Bro. Wm. Howard, on the 14th day of Feb., 1888, examine new hall at Bakersfield, Ozark Co., Mo., approved the same and filed report. I appointed Bro. H. T. Smith Special Deputy to set Ingomar Lodge to labor, llnd dedicate hall of same, which was very satisfactorily done and report filed. I ordered Rome Lodge to take vote on uniting with Ava Lodge, Douglas (;0.,1\'1:0.; also ordered Ava Lodge to vote as to whethcr they would accept them. Both reports being received and satisfactory, I ordered them to unite, and reported same to Grand Secretary. On May 28th, 1888, and by Special Deputy Right Worshipful Bro. O. H. P. Catson, I set Bayou Lodge, U. D., at Bakersville, 1\'10., to work, and report filed. On Aug. 18th, 1888, by Special Deputy R. W. Bro. L. O. Haily, directed the removal of Ava Lodge, No. 26, A. F. and A. 1\1., into new hall; I herewith return dispensation. Business has been so pressing for the past year that I have been unable to visit but few of the Lodges of my District; those that I have visited are in fair working order, and their furniture and halls in good condition and safe. I have corresponded with the officers of other Lodges, and from information gathered in this way would report that the District is in a healthy and prosperous condition. Of course, owing to pressure in financial matters, the Lodges are doing but little work; but my advice is to do work only with the best material and reject the inferior. The Lodges in my District are scattered and off the railroad, so that it is quite difficult to reach them. They are needing instruction, and about the only way to reach them is to visit each Lodge llnd instruct separate]y, as they are so far apart that they will not, or do not, attend it Dis路 trict Lodge ofInstruct.ion, and they are too poor to pay a competent lecturer for the time necessary to instruct them; or, in other words, do not do it. I am only referring to those Lodges off the railroad, and ill-convenienccd for t.ravel; but. in commendation of them will say they are whole-souled :Masons and men, and the very hest citizens. If there cou](l be any enthusiasm brought about, there might be some va]uable accession~ to the Fraternity. All of which is fraternally submitted. Yours Fraternally, E. C. STEELE, D. D. G. ,11., Thi,路tll-second Dist?路ict.

THIRTY-THm))

J)T~TRICT.

[On account of deep personal affliction, R. W. Brother John W. Farris was unable to prepare his report. The follOWing uote, addressed to the Grand Master, is inserted here in justice to Brother Farris, who has always been faithful and prompt in the discharge of Masonic duty.-GRAl\D SECRETARY.] . I have been serious]y ill for more t.han a month and am too feeblc no,\' to get up a report. I am sorry, but have been dangerously sick, and now don't even know that J am safe. Your Brother, SEPTEMBER 25th, 1888.

J. W. FARRIS, D. D. G. JI., Thirty-Third District.


Appendi:e.

1888.]

213

[The following reports were received too late for location in proper numerical order.] SECO:-iD DISTJUCT. LA BELLE, )10., September 26th, 1888.

W. )f. IVilliarns, Esq., Grand

ilfa.~ter:

DEAR SIR AND BROTHEH:Time will soon have ushered a.nother ){fi.'iollic year into the past, and, in compliance with the law, I herewith submit my annual report. On the 20th of October I received a Charter for :Monticello Lod~e, :Ko. 58, and after due notice, on November 23d I opened a specific (;rand Lodge at Monticello and organized :Monticello Lodge, No. 58, in accordance with established usage and ancient form. On February 6th, I called a specific Grand Lodge at Canton and dedicated the new "Masonic hall, and authorized the removal of Canton Lodge, No. 100, and Craft Lodge, No. 2-."7, by the authority of your dispensation, dated January 14th. 1888. 'fhe Brethren at Canton deserve the highest praise for their "tu:;te, skill and liberality." In their hands the interests of ?1asonry are secure. The past year has been a prosperous one for )1asonry in the Second District. Harmony prevails. Fraternally snhmitted, A. FISHER, D. D. G. Af., Second District.

TENTH DISTRICT.

TRE?\TON, :Mo., September 29th, 1888. IV. ftf.lVillimn.s, Esq., Gmnd

llf~lcr:

DEAR SIR AND BHOTHER:Herewith I submit my annual report as D. D. Graud )Iaster ofthe Tenth District. I am happy to report all the Lodges, except one, in the Tenth District in a prosperous condition, holding regular meetings and doing work. Lindley Lodge, No. 2-.53, is in bad condition; their huH having been torn down, they have no place to meet. They desire to move to Laredo, it new town on the C., :M. & St. P. R. R., in the same county. I would recommend the remova,l as soon as practicable. ?1ercer Lodge, No. 35, had their hall and building damaged by fire, but were fully insured. During the year I have not been called upon to perform any official duties which I deem of sufficient importance to report. Regretting that I have been unable to visit all the Lodges in the District, and with thanks to yourself for confidences of the past, I am Very Fraternally yours, C. S. GLASPELL, D. D. G. Af., Tenth District.


214

[Oct.

Appendh:. TWENTY-FIFTH DISTinCT. KANSAS CITY,

W.

M~

Williams, Esq., Grand .J[a~tcr: DEAlt Sm AND BROTHER

Mo., September 29th, 1888.

:-

I herewith submit report of D. D. G. M., Twenty-fifth District.

1st. On the evening of Nov. 10th, 1887, assisted by R. W. Bro. J. A. Ward, D. L., and W. Bro. J. E. Jackson, of Hural Lodge. No. 316, I consecrated the Lodge and dedicated thc haH of Blue Springs Lodge, No. 337, at Bluc Springs, Mo., and set the Lodge to work under charter. 2d. ~Iarch 11th, I received a communication from Blue Springs Lodge, No. 337, stating that her jurisdiction hud been invaded by Jewel Lodge, No. 480, Pleasant Hill, and that said Lodge refused to make proper amends therefor. I referred the communication to R. W. Bro. Bybee, D. D. G. 1\1., 26th District, and, with his kind assistance, peace and hannony were soon restored. 3d. In obedience to your orders I dedicated the hall of Christian Lodge, No. 392, Oak Grove, :Mo., May 24th, 1888. I have visited all the Lodges ill the Distlict excepting RaytowlI, No. 391. I tind them working harmoniously, halls in good condition, and the Brethren interested ill work of our a.ncient and honorable Institution, both in its ritual and work of charit)'. There is one thing I wish to call your attention to in this report. It is the matter of halls used by Lodges Nos. 104-, 220 and 316. There has been no change in the condition of things since I wrote you about it in :March last. This I believe is the onl~' case where the Lodges are not complying strictly with Grand Lodge requirements. Fraternally submitted, BEN. WARNER, D. D. G. 31., Twenty-Pijth District.

[Reports from First and Fifteenth Districts came to hand after forms had gone to press.]


Appendi~c.

1888.J

DI~ATI-IS.

REPORTED TO THE GHAND LODGE OF MISSOUHI, OCTOBER 1, 1888.

No. of Name of Party. Lodge. 1. Jno. B. Hiserman. Jno. Whitesides. 2. F. Welcker. C. L. Walther. 3. Jno. W. Bame. Henry Overstolz. T. W. Bushbaum. A. Weigle. w. P. Paulding. H. Eicks. 4. J. F. Moore. 5. G. ''I'. Sitler. J. B. Biedlinden. 8. W. Crews. 9. J. N. Groves. J. E. Loomis. 11. J. B. Oliver. 12. H. W. Poston. 13. Robert Reddish. 16. Henry Keller. P. A. Neil. W. Brown. J. Clapper. Isaac Miller. 17. John F. Baxter. V3. R. H. Tucker. W. L. Rice. W. C. Doyle. 19. H. C. MeGee. J. L. Chowning. 22. Joseph Mark. 25. Jno. '1'. Dozier. J. H. Eckelmall. James A. Felps. T. T. Fields. E. \V. Manning.

No. of Name of Pa.rty. Lodge. 28. David Dean. L. W. Bunch. 31. 1. Sisson. 33. Jno. Phillips. ~4. A. H. Chenowoth. W. T. Harris. R. H. Jackson. 36. R. C. Gibson. A. :Marrs. ~S. Thos. Struth. ~9. G. W. Beachem. 41. Ben. Hayden. 42. Jno. H. Mitchell. 44. J. W. Lamb. R. J. Owens. 46. Jno. McCoy. W. C. Williams. 47. W. M. Boyd. 48. David Nalley. 49. Jacob Harmon. 51. G. W. Morehead. 52. J. P. Goodson. 5:3. E. D. Kenney. 56. 1. Snorgrass. S. H. Fisher. 57. John E. Bates. 62. John Stokes. 63. D. W. McLoney. 64. W. W. Moore. J. T. Jones. G5. S. C. Rhinehart. G6. Wm. Davis. 70. Cornelius Vaughan. 71. Alex. Mann. 75. John A. Smith. 79. l~ob't. :Martin.

215


216

Appendi:r.

No. oj Lodge. 79. 81.

&l. 8,').

87. 92. 93. 95. 100.

104 ]05.

107. 108.

no. 111. 113. 114. 117. 119.

121. 1:!2. 123. 124. 129. 132. 1:~3.

1:34. 136. 137. 140. 111.

H2. 143. 1'16. 147. 1'18. 149.

Fame oj Party.

W. C. Orr. P. Judy. n. W. Burford. O. Hurt. A uglISt Royal'. S. B. Bowles. J. G. Carter. .1 aeoh Block. .lno. H. Clark. W. A. Bennet·t. W. H: Graves. W. H. Hopson. •J. ~I. Sutton. R. Harberg. T. C. Harris. J. D. Stephens. A. Wolf. D.A. Ely. John Gilliam. J. W. Shaw. C. T. McCarty. Robert Bailey. J. H. Peirce. W. A. Clark. B. F: Kemper. Thos. Montgomery. .Ina. J. Wright. Jno. :M. Samuel. W. E. Howard. W. A. Parkes. Henry Eul~r. D. D. Goff. James Welch. T. 1,. Williams. Jacob 13oshold. Jno. P. Hickam. C. F. Gross. J. F. Cull. Alexander Smiley. A. J. Gentry. J. W. Stafford. .T. l\L Russell. G. T. l\fol;eJey. .1. W. Johnson. .J. D. H. Butler. C. W. l\fartin. S. W. Potter. A. R. Eaton, S. Cunningham. .lno. Lent.hers. •T. H. Callaway. A. P. Hoss. J. '1'. Akins. T. G. Young.

No. oj Name oj Pm·ty. Lodge. 154. Alfred Ba.rnes. 156. G. :M. Thompl;oll. Allen Vawters. 157. A. J. Warmschaffe. P. A. Thompson. 160. Chus. Hardwick. 163. G. L. Babington. T. A. Buckland . Thos. Fcatherston . J. McArthur. R. MllCkwitz. E. L. Mctcalfe. A. E. Peters. Chas. Saeding. 164. Wm. Clark. 165. Thos. P. Graves. Oscar S. Briggs. 168. W. Buford. W. P. Douglass. French Carder, 170. S. l\fitchell. liS. W. H. Cheatham. Comud Dill. 174. .T. H. Doling. S. \\'. T11rner. W. G. McAllister. 176. Rob't Kimes. 177. J. H. Steely. J. C. White. H. :'If. Williams. .1no. Farris. 179. Rob't Court. M. SpoerL 182. Thos. Owens. 184. John W. Staton. 186. J. A. Helldrix. 188. W. C. Forcman. 189. G. C. Beun. S. Broiles. H. N. Moutague. J. H. Rogers. 190. J. Williams. 192. N. 1'. Brown. S. J. DnnKum . 1!J3. V. lifo Tuley . 1\17. J. Hodscm. S. F. 13eebe. Jacob Ulmer. 202. W. H. Kintner. 206. David Howry. 207. W. W. Crosset. ChaoS. Singleton. 208. J. H. :Masol1. Geo. Syms.

[Oct.


1888.1 No. of Nwne of Party. Lodge. 209. R. M. Green. 210. .las. Gowl. 212. G. W. McElzea. Jonathan Pollack. 213. P. II. O'Brien. S. 'V. Luseuer. 216. .Jesse Beavers. 220. J. R. :Marrs. W. S. Gregory. 224. C. II. Taylor. T. W. Higgim. P. N. Norton. 228. M. O. Rohinson. Milo Butler. 230. F. N. Wersheim. 233. T.B. Burk. 234. Jno. Coffman. 2.'36. David Smith. 237. Jno. Gilbreath. Walker Paul. 243. H. W. Blanke. .J. T. Buel. C. B. Waddell. 247. H. C. Armstrong. James Shannon. 251. R. W. Zierlein. D. 13. Childs. 253. J. D. Boyers. R. M. 'robson. 255. H. P. Lock. '2])7. J. S. Downing. '2])8. Jno. McRae. 260. J. D. l\flll'dock. 262. J. S. Dever. 263. T ..J. 'Vhitehurst. 265. J. B. Naylor. 267. N. Christensen. ,'\'. D. Marshall. A. J. Seaman. l\L Levy. 271. J. R. Rayr;ond. 272. A. S. Fernald. A. H. Thompson. 273. T. H. Wright. 281. L. Wilson. I. Sneezberger. Wm. Stethum. 283. Lewis Brown. 286. J. M. Sitton. 287. J. W. Dillon. 28R. T. L. Hargiss. 290. Henry Black. 291. F.P. Hall. 292. .las. Zook.

Appendi:r. No. of Name of Party. Lodge. 293. C. O. Orcherd. R. H. D. Long. 295. Jno. W. :Moore. 297. J. C. Heard. 299. 'Vm. S. Bird. 300. Jno. Rice. 302. Peter Springsted. 303. R. A. Short. 305. H. N. Turner. S. S. Patton. 308. W. H. Addington. J. F. Clark. G. W. Crenshaw. 310. S.D. Hill. T. B. Lennox. A. J. Pigg. 'V. L. Lennox. 313. W. T. Hesler. 315. John Scroggins. 316. J. H. Dayton. 319. W. R. Hopkins. 323. W. F.Geyer. 327. J. A. Burroughs. 330. A. Heggie. 331. D. B. ?>Ioore. Jno. Kenmuir. R. S. :Musser. 335. L. B. Howell. 338. F. l\L Fcrvee. :139. Israel Heath. 342. J. W. Roberson. 343. J. T. Victor. 344. Jos. Browning. 34路5. M. \V. Stafford. S. D. Peeler. 346. Jeff. Smith. 351. E:. J. Boothby. 352. Jos. Wade. 354. Thos. Smith. J. G. Dingle. 355. .I. :i\L Mitchell. J. D. Jones. 356. H. J. Patton. 359. .I. G. Brooks. 360. A. W. Spalding. .los. Campbell. Ed. White. H. H. Symmes. 368. :M. ){, Norris. 369. Ed. Shaxtoll. 374. S. A. Pratte. 382. A. W. Davis. J. B. West. 383. W. G. Hobbs.

217


:218 No. oj Nmne oj Pa1째ty. Lodge. 383. A. J. Lee. John Ray. A. B. Talbert. 38G. P. V. McCool. 387. W. C. Boyd. J. A. Jenkins. 388. S. L. Livingood. 392. W.H. Zink. 393. J. C. Weakly. 398. ,~r. 'V. Welch. 404. J. W. Lingle. Mose Weaver. 406. John Renick. 407. A. B. French. Wm. H. Green. Adam Lydick. 412. W. F. McCoy. 416. J. G. Tawbold. 417. Geo. W. Clippard. 420. l<:rnst L. Seidel. 42l. J. H. Slavens. 422. C. F. Leavett. H. F. McDaniels. 423. P. Kincheloe. J. C. Sbamuel. 427. E. F. Roberts. 430. Aug. Dreanernicht. 432. T. C. Piper. 434. J. A. Pace. J. H. Harlall. M. N. Spooller. 435. Oscar Farmer. 436. A. C. Bradley. J. D. Boone. Geo. Vandiver. 437. G. W. Corder. 440. R. G. Berry. 44l. John V. Priest. 443. Wm. Wilcox. Geo. Clark. 447. J. W. Shipman.

Appendix. No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 449. J. H. Firstoone. 450. Thos. Trekell. J. M. Alderson.' 45l. C. O'Brien. A. H. Logan. 453. E. Claflin. 458. J. n. Blakemore. 459. John C. Trimble. 460. W. W. Moore. 4Gl. J. F. Myers. F. Bell. 464. J. ,"V. Brown. 466. J. W. Cleaveland. 467. E. H. Blevins. 471. Thos. Waldron. 476. J. M. Dorman. M. M. Roberts. 477. W. A. Gault. 478. W. C. Roark. M. L. Campbell. 480. David Kivett. J. W. Boswell. 484. Henry C. Hough. 486. J. S. Roberts. 487. J. M. Riggins. 49l. 'V. H. Walton. 494. D. N. Glaves. 497. C. B. Kiebel. G. W. Morelock. 499. G. W. Davis. 50l. L. G. Hollingsworth. 503. J. B. Johnston. 504. Th. E. Wilkinson. 506. R. L. Blakey. 516. n. S. Isenhower. 520. W. Sullivan. 525. L. A. Baker. 526. W. J. Jordan. 533. B. F. Fieding. 534. A. H. Wilson. 536. J. S. Tilly.

[Oct.


Appen,dix.

'1888.]

SUSPENSIONS FOR NON-PAYMENT O:F DUES.

REPORTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF ~IJSSOUHJ, OCTOBER 1, 1888.

No. of Name of Party. Lodge. 1. James Bergin. Henry Rowell. 2. H. Steinwender. 7. Alex. Davis. W. G. Butcher. 9. D. Y. Wheeler. Chas. Etzel. 10. H. F. Bunten. 12. S. H. Lewis. 20. A. Jacobs. J. K. McFarland. B. Spyer. !If. L. Cohen. J. Scherck. 28. E. Robinson. W. E. Disbrow. 31. T. J. Chandler. 33. Isaac Ely. James Fleming. J. J. Morris. 40. J. B. Gore. W. M.oody. J. W. Archer. A. Barker. C. Carleton. W. G. Morgan. J. H. :M:urphy. 42. E. C. Brooks. 路G. W. Chilton E. V. Farrar. M. A. Maupin. 43. E. C. Johnson. D. L. Lane. W. S. Pope. C. H. Raithel. T. Robeson.

No. of Name of Pa1'ty. Lodge. 43. H. B. IIamelton. 44. J. M. Ferguson. 48. M. S. Clemens. C. W. Wright. B. F. IIemage. T. F. Gilbert. D. C. V,rhaley. 50. W. N. Bond. Ed. Dowlin. H. Demott. John Dawson. A. W. Florea. N. Goslee. Geo. Green lee. A. C. Kennedy. H. McCoy. W. R. Owens. 51. W. T. Maupin. C. fl. Lewis. L. F. flume. L. W. Clark. 53. N. M. Manl)'. J. W. Murdock. 59. W. J. Bruton. James Griffith. O. H. Glore. O. Nichols. T. J. Roberts. J. H. Robcrts. \\'. J. Sexton. T. K. Wallace. J. H. Williams. 60. J. T. Bagby. J. W.Chancy. J. M. Davis. M. Stallord.

219


220 No. oj

{Oct'

Appendix. Name oj Pw路ty.

Lodge. 60. B. F. Shelley. 62. N. Follet. 63. L. P. Bates. F. :\1. Brlwn. Louis Levy. W. O. McLain. D. A. Ridgeway. 64. '1'. J. Mendenhall. Isaac )'1elsol1. A, II. 11cGlothlin. R. n. Woods. J. '1'. Lighter. 65. David Groomer. A. F. Pastorius. W. G. Welden. J. H. Welden. N. C. Walters. 69. S. T. Baker. S. J. Gardener. James Shaw. J. Shanks. J. K. Tice. J. A. Woodruff'. J. '1'. Yeats. 76. Asa Farrar. Jordan Lowe. 77. G. W. Paul. 78. O. H. P. Craig. 1. R. French. '1'. J. Pully. 79. 11. C. Grogan. Chas. Thaw. 80. R. A. Lewis. J. L. Davis, E. '1'. Thomas. J. F. G<ndon. S. J. Perry. A. F. Edmonston. Geo. Howard. J. A. Henderson. Ed. '1'. Lewis. 88. J. F. De'.vitt. Jno, Lindsay. E. \V. 1Ioffitt. C. :NI. Wilson. Mark Burke. 84. Samuel Scott. 92. Chas. G. Hunter. R. L. :Moir. L. Nihoul. 97. A..J. Needels. J. E. Zimmcrlee. W. C. Heaston. !l8. '1'. M. Alsup.

No. oj

Lodge. ~.

Name oj Party.

F. Bodenheimer. R. D. Blankenship. R. S. Calloway. N. :M. Calloway. A. W. Clark. W. '1'. Fisher. J. L. Ficklin. S. A. Julian. '1'. T. Jameson. A, P. Johnson. C. H. Powers. Fenton Young. 109. J. C. Adams. }f. F. Brown. A. Due)'. . J. Wheeler. A. H. Quigley. C. F. Bradley. IJ. W. Smith. A. R. Tye. F. D. James. C. B. Wilcox. ,J. L. Canady. .r. R. Farris. J. R. 路Webler. James House. Joseph Darnall. 110. '1'hos. A lIen. J. G. Donnell. 112. C. W. Charles. C. Conklin. j. H. Linville. A. L. Williams. 113. A. D. Mitchell. F. K. Doniphan. 115. T. B. Brown. W. H, Beal. A. P. Lott. 118. E. N. Blue, D. A. }1urray. .Tno. CannaTla. E. H. Johnson. J, D. Cravens. R. W. Dodge. 119. W. G. Herold. 121. H. K. Nauert. Jos. Wlllterspiel. 123. Henry Vogt. C. Kuhn. A.Rick. 127. C. S. Canaday. G. W. Newman. 路W. C. Porter. J. R. Sanders. 98.


1888.J JYo. qf Lodge. 127. 128. 129.

131.

HL 1:-\4. 1:36.

1:l\J. 140. 156.

163. 165.

171.

174. 175. 177. 181.

221 Xwnc of Party.

John A. Stewart. Chas. Davis. Rich. Rice. Chas. :1\:1oore. J. H. Guthrie. W.A. Bush. L. T. Aspley. 'V. II. Bass. J. F. Cook. B. Long. .T. D. Lowry. .J. B. l\Iesplay. V. B. :Mesplay. J. F. Richardson. Sam'l Richardson. J. F. Robertson. J. H. Walton. SIU11uel Warsing. J. S. Blankenship. .T.1\1. Anderson. J. T. Bagby. A. B. Richards. B. T. Smith. J. R. Wise. j\:I:. H. ~oper. C. S. Henderson. H. l\:I:. Chevens. D. Hamilton. S. T. Mustain. W. 1'. Tuttle. .J. R. Wiggins. R. R. Foster. C. L. Kraft.. A. W. Penny. George D. Davis. )1. L. Lomax. M. Hefline. J. Ashville. C. Harkins. G. Lawson. W. Millirons. R. Musgrove. Jno. Ryles. J. D. Summers. Wm. Woodard. A. J. Woods. John Weems. C. H. Johnson. W. H. Henderson. H. Everman. G. W. Hendricks. D. F. Hunsacker. S. A. Magruder. T. H. Townsend.

No. of Lodge. 182. 186. 190. 193. 195. 201.

204 .

205.

208. 209. 213.

215.

218.

219.

220.

Name of l>a?'ty.

J. C. Ritchey. Jacob Beaty. Dudley Jackson. Eli Stanley. David Peburn. J. S. Heydorn. A. J. Drummond. W. .T. Gilliland. J. C. Griffith. T. E. Carter. Brice Yount. S. Hamilton. .Tames Drais. .Tno. j\f. Elgin. R..J. McKim. Thos. Shaunessy. N. E. Burrus. G. T. Bartlett. C. S. Goggins. C. V. Sandford. C. G. Woody. R. \'\'. Douthat. Henry Dean. H. B. Brown. J. N. Love. W. F. Yost. \V. R. Hale. Newton Dean. ViTo C. Faulkner. R. F. Hawkins. J. B. Storey. David Rice. R. H. Douglass. Henry Hiekerson. W. C. Johnson. 1. A. l\'Iize. W. R. Pierce. J. B. Ward. A. B. Wilkins. E. T. Anderson. Jno. Cockrun. H. C. Guiteau. E. Truube. V. B. Cropsey. G. L. Frazier. .Tames Dooley. Wm. Van Note. .T. A. Whalen. T. C. Lyons. Jno. Deand. J. B. Browning. James Bewsher. H. B. Conwell. D. L. Hall.


222 No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 220. T. C. McCrimmon. H. A. Russell. M. J. Rolfe. J. H. Reading. lVI. E. Smith. :N. Spatcier. 225. S. W. Stringer. H. T. Stringer. L. H. Dent. B. H. Frank. E. R. Moore. W. D. Hawkins. 230. N. H. Elliot. 238. L. E. Smith. J. A. Jenkins. Pat. Sharky. 243. J. C. Bloomfield. E. C. Darley. J. H. Farrar. . Oscar O. Girard. J. D. IIenriguez. Jno. Howard. P. M. Ogan. H. N. Samstag. J. C. Swain. Sol. Scott, Jr. Wm. Taylor. 247. E. E. Carnes. S. W. Shcddlebarr. R. B. Steward. R. L. Wills. 254. A. M. Ellington. J. L. McConnell. F. M. Manlove. Jas. Meredith. J. T. Rich. A. F. Wyard. L. :M. Wright. 2:)5. J. C. Johnson. W. C. Livingstone. J. P. McClellan. S. A. McKec. 2GO. Henry Bates. Chas. Boone. Jas. Bigelow. J. W. Howell. Victor Stoltz. B. Silvey. Tesson Howell. 262. J. M. Fort. S. H. Moseley. S. Marshall. J. N. Stroud. J. A. Shaw.

Appendix. No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 262. S. Openheimer. T. B. Murray. 2G7. R. F. McCormack. J. C. :1\1cCormack. A. J. Stratton. 269. J. W. Baugh. 270. Jno. Gentry. 271. C. H. Evans. O. H. Travers. T. H.. Johns. 275. Jos. Gorrell. S. P. Allen. ~76. J. W. Blevens. G. E. Hale. W. J. Ratliff. J. R. Shaw. 277. J. J. Dickinson. W. W. Roe. 280. C. C. Morrow. \V. R. Culley. 2112. Wm. B. Millick. J. W. Browu. 283. T. B. Graham. T. J. Hartley. J. 1\1. Blake. Wm. Stockhour. 28.5. W. H. 路Brown. 291. Josiah Andcrson. J. R. Bowen. Hcnry Birch. T. R. Fuuk. D. N. Kennedy. W. R. McQuoid. A. P. Nodlett. Chas. Payne. Stephen Sharp. 293. W. R. Lynch. O. P. Johnson. 2!H. J. B. Denny. Lcvi Dodge. A. S. Snell. ~Hii. T. G. Hickcox. 299. I. S. Alexander. C. A. Carpenter. E. S. Duchann. C. H. Knickerbocker. 1. B. Marlatt. J. A. Robinson. 301. Jno. Robertson. 308. T. B. Harrison. 307. B. F. Brown. Felix Brigh t. C. C. Carter. J. L. Kimball.

[Oct.


1888.J No. of Name of Party.' Lodge. 307. E. H. Ralls. 308. W. Bevel. J. Mahan. 309. '1'hos. Baker. J. '1'. Craven. D. '1'. :Mayes. '1'. B. Cook. J. W. Long. Jno. :Milstead. S. B. Smiley. 310. B. F. Hunt.er. Henry FaTle~'. 313. W. Ferguson. W. M. Outon. H. C. Seaman. 315. J. M. Pearson. S. n. West. 319. Wm. Craig. 322. '1'. W. Storms. '1'. H. Keyes. 331. B. H. Winton. E ..r. Crowthcr. T. C. Smales. 333. J. T. Brown. H. :M. Button. C. A. Goldman. "V. H. "'filler. Juo. '\T. Smith. 342. Taylor Weeden. 343. D. F. Leek. 345. L. C. Clark. Sam'l Vensen. H. A. Wellhardte. 349. J. T. Loyd. 350. W. J. Crabbe. R. S. Snow. 352. A. .T. Clark. D. M. Cowen. 354. J. W. Luckie. J. D. Murphy. T. 1\f. Gill. Jno. McLeod. J. P. Vance. '1'. J. Basket. H. Shafer. A. Carter. 356. H. A. Grigsby. Smith Willhite. 358. J. E. Hill. 359. J. T. Gallispie. 361. J. R. Welch. M. F. Atterberry. A. S. Stanley. W. E. Spear.

Appendix. No. of Lodge.

223 Name of Party.

361. '1'. C. Opdyche. 363. S. Murphy.

368.

371. 379. 380.

387. 388. 393. 396.

402.

406. 408. 412. 415. 416.

420. 428.

J as. Canriff. P. Harmon. R. R. Johnson. Eli Bey. '1'hos. Rucker. J. M. Johnson. J. K. Inman. Jno. Lee. Chas. Lee. L. Adams. G. W. Peebles. .T. Thornburgh. '1'bo;'. Givens. J. H. Duncan. R. A. Belt. A. '1'. Mudd. G. M. Lampkin. Dan. Little. F. E. Jacoby. D. Smith. P. F. Schwart7.. L. Daugberty. D. J. Pugh. L. Urton. A. W. Boon. Geo. McCullough. J.1\1:. Bollinger. A. Gould. W. Balmer. H. L. Paine. 1\f. O. Jones. W. D. Singleton. E. Braley. J . .T. Somers. J. L. Jackson. S. W. Meyers. A. B. Ward. C. W. Cox. Vol. H. Glover. A. L. Smith. Z. E. Gunn. James Hill. J. H. Brereton. R. 'V. Waters. J. C. Meyers. S. H. Jackson. W. H. Bush. John G. Knerzct. F. M. Dixon. J as. Merrill. J. O. Meyers. E. D. McGinnis.


224 No. of Nmne of Party. Lodge. 128. W. O. Robinson. G. N. Tinsley. J. S. Wilsoll. 130. R. M. Wann. 442. S. C. :Morrison. 448. W. A. DeLung. J. G. B. Marquis. A. J. Staley. 457. Uriah Abernathy. Frank Rhyne. 160. S. W. Thorpe. .John Cruikshank. 464. G. W. Kenny. 469. J. P. Anderson. J. W. Mansfield. 470. Arthur Andrews. 472. J. C. Lowry. Sam'l Meeks. 475. S. Holman. 476. W. H. Rea. 481. L. Currier. 482. Wm. Noyes. W. J. Ryan. Chas. Whaley. 483. Wm. Van Gundy. 484. J. '\'. Johnson. 185. G. W. Sharp. 186. E. Butler. 188. Thos. B. Brookshire. A. J. Brooks.

Appendh:. No. of Lodge.

[Oct. Name of Party.

488. 'B. F. Grimes.

G. W. Ra~dall. F . .M:. Burris. 489. L.13. Day. T. M. Swindle. 490. J. W. Keithley. N. Keithley. B. G. Logan. G. Owens. 491. ' 'W. J. Duncan. J. G. Bridges. 493. , J. 'V. ]\lyers. 195. J. H. Ledhetter. 501. A. J. Beckett. S. Douglas. 502.' J. A..Minter. Sam'l Sandusky. R. M. Sharp. 504. G. L. Brightwell. 路W. H. Hunt. J. H. Sloan. 510. D. N. Epperson. 520.' W; C. Mitton. 522. W. S. Carson. E. Edwards. C. S. Monroe. 523. L. J. Doll. 525. S. Stewart. 526. J. T. Malloy.

"T.


225

Appendix.

1888.J

SUSPENSIONS }-'ORUNMASONIC CONDUCT. HEPOHTED TO THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSO\jHI, OCTOBER 1, 1888.

No. oj Lodge. '27.

28. 44. 95. 109.

127. 13'2.

137. 140.

162. â&#x20AC;˘ 204. '218.

Ben. Scammel. :M. J. Burt. E. J. Stevens. W. C. Wilson. T. L. Wilson. D. E. Frank Hartin. A. Nieder\\'ieser. S. F. :Moore. J. F. Bush. R. lI. Wright. Levi Moler. E. Sha~'er. W. A. Crockett. V. Wilson. L. D. Cain. J. W. Mattucks. R. J. Hinsmann.

' 'ray.

117. I'lL

190.

Name oj Parly.

No. oj Lodge. 2;~R. '246.

282. 310. 317. 3'24.

341. 345. 401. 419. 136.

439. 4;"i8.

479. 51'2.

5:n.

Nmne oj Party.

R. B. Wells. Henry Payne. Jno. Willmann. Silas White. T. D. Rice. A. W. Randall. W. F. Steele. A. J. Yeager. W. L. Murphy. :M. Heath. H. T. James, E. A. '1'. F. Henslee. S. W. Roswell. J. C. Parish. W. T. Hudelson . .I. L. Keedy. Elias Shafer. .J. A. Harrison, Fellow Craft.

EXPULSIONS. REPORTED TO THE GI~AND LODGE OF "nfiSOURI, OCTOBEl~ 1, 1888.

.No. oj Name oj Parly. Lodge. 4. Arthur Ludwig. 109. D. 1\1. l\iathews. T. J. Trotter. 114. :Marshall J. Roultz. 116. A. J. Pain. R. J. Rolin. 162. S. C. :McGeorge. 177. Maxida Phegley. 182. E. G. Sheldon. H. S. Buck. 184. S.:M. Huddleson. 219. J. P. Akers. W. II. Steen. G. L. Ap.-15.

No. of Lodge.

Name oj Party.

2.'31. Wm. Shaden. 2.'38. F. H. Jones. 300. S. B. Robertson. 373. Jus. Hull. .'3!J6. T. L. Sloan. 400. Jno. Elswick. 408. J. G. Lobaugh. 471. C. Jackman. S. 'Vagner. 483. A. G. Argo. 509. Houston Montgomery, Non-Affil. 5Hi. ?If. J. Faubion. 534. J. E. Rodley.


22G

Appe7~dÂŁx.

[Oct.

REINST.L~TE~IENTS.

HEl'OHTEJ) TO TIlE GRAND LODGE 0.1<' MISSOURI, OCTOBElt

-_._._}

No. oJ Lodge. 2.

6. 9.

2.5. 27. 33. 35.

40.. 43. 46.

17. 48. 49. 50. 52.

56. 57.

60. 62. &1. 67. 7:1.

7G. 77.

J\'ame oj Parly.

H. Stein wender. J. C. Slaughter. M. J. GifIbrd. Chas. L. Pierce. E. B. Hammock. Geo. W. Briggs. II. S. :McCurn. F. 1\'1. ~lcKee. D. Cochran. C. A. Beamer. J. R. Spleter. C. Schwertfeger. J. W. Wray. Fred Becker. S. M. Bartley. W. C. Barrett. G. W. Mitchell. S. W. Girard. Geo. Swiggett. J. Sample. T. S. Moore. VV. D. Fortune. C. T. Gariwr. H. C. Garner. J. \V. F. Carner. .J. T. House. .J. E. }IcLain. A. C. Floyd. M. l\L Barge. Wm. Bierbower. G. W. Harper. R. II. Higgin. J. n. Toler. A. Hoover. J. M. Bntler.

/1'0. oj

J.odyc. 78.

Name oj Pal'!.t/.

N. H. Wilmot. A. \Vill';;.

82.

J. A. Prat.t.

8~1.

O. S. Darlington. B. F. Parsons. F. C. \\'cnkle. Louis Houck. W. J . .Phillips. N. Wilson. Jacob Helwig. C. R. Dudley. T. M. Hall. J. P. Lcwi,s. J. O. K. Gaut. B. F. Willis. E. C. Thomas. R. E. Dornan. I. O. Todd. John G. Wear. Rich. Hoffman. T. B. Winn. Jno. B. Bell. J. M. Young. G. M. Wright. Z. T. Ha.yden. Robert j\fcDolV. 8. Deshazer. E. L. Liggett.. T. T. Holman. .lno. Vanlltan. H. H. Simps()!!. J. C. Jordan. ?Ii. A. Wyatt. E. A. Smith. James Givan;;.

U:2.

93. 104. 10:'). 111.

113.

117. 119. 120. 122. 131. 132. 1'17. 156. 162. 163. 172. ]81. 18:\.

]8;;. 188.

1, 1888.


1888.J No. oj Name oj Party. Lodge. 189. C. F. Knight. 195. C. O. Milliken. J. T. Odor. 197. Israel Brewer. B. F. Blackmore. David Hopkins.. 201. L. C. Ricc. A. VV. Cropper. 205. Chas. Marshall. J. W. Dysart. 208. 210. Isaac Frost. 214. D. C. Stallard. 218. G. C. Curtis: R. R. Southard. 220. E. Builscornh. 230. W. IJ. Willeford. 231. C. E. Peers. 236. Carl Schilling. 237. Russell Bossim. 243. Jno. B. Flemi.ng. O. D. Tucker. S. lVr. Pearman. Geo. C. Betts. 246. S. S. Nowlin. 247. Edwin Elbert. J. P. Foster. 250. Jno. P.Jones. 252. Chas. Filbert. 255. W. E. Campbell. L. F. Rawdon. Frank Rawdon. 256. D. B. Veazey. L. A. Warne. 257. J. W. Moore. 260. Geo. "IV. Miller. 264. W. E. Borthick. 267. Fred Julian. 268. T. F. L. Branham. 279. H. B. Combs. 284. J. O. Calhoon. 292. E. C. Grant. C.B. Lake. S. W. Evans. 293. Geo. Boyer. 29.5. ,Tno. Kenney. 300. R. T. Phillips. :)01. B. H. Still will. :305. J. S. Wansy. J. G. Whiles. Clay Lee. 30G. M. Arnold.

Appendix. No. oj Lad,qe. 327. 333. 339. 341. 342. 344. 354. 355. 360.

362. 368. 373. 374.

381. 387. 388. 398. 409. 412. 416.

427. ,129. 438. 140. 451. 453.

461. ,171. 173. 483. 484. 487. 507. 524. 528.

227 Name oj Party.

G. W. Loch. S. R. Moore. W. H. Gaunt. Pit Cloudas. Thos. Waldron. J. W. Firestone. J. W. Roberson. C. Adams. J. V. Williams. J. D. Jones. Wm. Clemmings. J. R. Johnson. A. O. Terry. C. H. Cottman. H. J. Taylor. Henry Rodgers. J. H. Shields. A. Bigelow. T. D. Owens. "T. II. Allen. J. A. McLain. Benton Honsel'. P. A. Arbergoss. R. F. Robinson. T1Ios. E. Lewis. Jm;. Stewart. Edwin Mason. ,Tames Hill. W. O. Schwab. R. W. Waters. John Storm. W..J. Inzer. C. Dowlling. O. P. Gentry. D. H. Rickart. G. S. Hoss. S. W. Roswell. J. R. Ellison. .J. C. Parish. H. H. Barnett. Henry Eshelman. W. R. McNutt. W. C. Wombles. K. Drummond. }f. Koons. Chas. B. Gallegher. D. T. Belvel. J. T. Hanna. J. W. Cartmell. J. F. Wilsoll.


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATE:NIENT.

~ ~

(y)

COMPILED FROM RETURNS SEPTEMBER, 1888.

~I

-LoDGE.

1

IIl\'IiS~OI~ri

P.'if.'',('D~:~SS. !~UNH.

St. Lou!s St. LOUIS St. Louis

2.Mendmn 3lBeacon '!Ho~vard

Fra.nkl~n

:)IUmted 6 Ark 7 O'Sullivan 8 Williamsburg 9 G~o. \V.ashington 10 Abenc)' 11 Pauldingville 12 Tyro 13 Rising Sun I~CFene 1"1\\ estern Star lQI.l\:remPh~S : 1, Clarksville 18 palmyra 19 Paris Union 20 St. Louis 21. Havanna 22 Wellington 2.::\ i:"!orida 24 Wyaconda 2;) Naphtali 1 2(i.Ava 271 Evergreen 28IS.'t.. John 29 Wmdsor 30 Huntsvllie 31 Liberty 32 Hum P hreys :)3 Ralls 34 Troy 3,:, 1)[ercer 3r.,Coopcr

"·ISt. Lou!s IS..t. LOUIS St. Louis J~oward

Sprmgheld ·.. ICTreene Newark Knox Walnut Grove IGreene Williamsburg Callaway· St. Lou.is St. Louis Agenc) Buchanan Wright City Warren Caleelonia Iwashington Barry Clay C.y:rene IPike Wlllston Daviess ~[emph~s S.~o. tland Clarksville Pik~ jPalmyra I:\IarlOn Paris Monroe St. Louis Louis IMcFall Gentry DeKl1lb ,IBUChl1nan Florida MOnrOe LaGrange LeWiS S.t. Louis S. t. Louis Ava IDOUglaS ,New Haven Franklin II-Il!-unibal.. l\Iltrion Wmdsor Henry Huntsville 'Randolph I.Libert y I.Cla): Humphreys Sulhvan ,Centre Ralls ITrOy ILincoln Princeton l\Iercer ISoonville Cooper

""""""1

\81.

_I .

MmER.

Anthony H. WltlliS Jacob Frank Eugene J. Gross W. E. l\Ic~inley E. Nearmg Wm. Kindrick .T. 0. Edmonson G. R. Paden IGeo. R. l\Io!Jre W. C. HamIlton J. W. Tice J. A. Eaton .T. M. Barnes W .. E. V.¥i~tt · Rob't Wllltchurch .Tames P. ~esbit I. C. DaVidson .Tno. W. Drescher Jno. T, Vaughn Henry Coan A. AxtelL Thof:'. F, Morris .Tno. D. ~ower ID. H. ChIlders ,' H. J. :McKellops Henry C. Brown S. C. Griswold IJno. G. Foss

IH.

\0.

I

SeCReTARY.

i

·I'Jno. H. Deems Cha.s. :;Vlatt .Tos. Brunner R. T. Kingsberry G. W. Custer Hugh Templeton W. E. Edmonson 'rhos. R. Hobson P . .T. Heuer; ..: L. l\L McCr,uy Wm. T. Carter 8. l\.fcSpaden l\L '1'. SamueL IJ. L. Far.mer C. P. Lehr I~eo. E.~. Leslie 1-. :NI. Reynolds Jno. W. Boulware T. '1'. Rodes IDaniel J. Funk D. S. McFall ·.. IA. Derge h.o.!TIas Ch.o,wning Loms SchneIder J. '1'. IV[cCoy ILewis 0. Hailey H. R.Bendel : Iwm. O. FlaVell.

/lst & 3d Thursdays of each month ,.lst & 3d.wedneSday so.feach mono 12d & 4th 'fhursdays of each mono Saturday on. or before full moon. 3d Mondav 1I1 each month. Saturday on or after full moon. Tuesday night bet'. iull moon. e. m. Saturday on or before full moon. 2d & :lth Tuesday i.n eacl: month. Satmday on or bet. f. m. l\l e. m. Sat. on or bel'. 1'. m. e. m. at 2 p. m. Sat. on or bet'. f. m. e. m.at2 p. m. Saturday on or before full moon. Wed. on or. bel'. f. m.2d \Yeel. aft. Saturday mght on or bel'. e. t'. m. Fl'ioay on \If before full Tl.lOon. Saturday mght on or bel'. f. lll. e. m. 2d 'fhursday. 1st & 3d Saturdays of each month. 1st & 3d Tuesdaysof each month. ISaturday before full moo..n. Saturday bef. the full. moon. e. m. Sat. nL on or bet'. the f. Ill. in e. m. 1st & 3d Thursdays of each month. 2d & 4th Thursdays of each month. 3d Saturday each month. ·. 1st Saturday in each month. l~t & 3d :Mondays of each month.

J. C. Shaefer S. H. Brown IL N. :Nloberly B. C. Briggs !'I'.hO..f:'. H. Harris Wm. Hirons H. B, Chilton

Tues on or bel'. f. m, & 2d Tues. aft. 11.!;t "'.lond.a y & 3d. Saturday of e. m. Saturday on or before full moon. 2d Saturchly in each month. 'Sl.. tt.urda. y on or befor.e full moon. I'Tuesday on 01' before full moon. 2<1 & 4th 1<l'iclay each month.

'1'.

1

In.G.J. H.F.A. Miller Cor):>in Snllth

/N. A. Foster i.J. J . Shaw J. H. Moss IF. l\l. l\'icKinley

nxe OF MRET"".

~

:g S3l

~

~.

No Rct1t1'ns.

r-J

o (";)

~


87lcecliU' ·· .. ···1 Drake 'Gasconadc 88 Callao Callao ::\-lacon 39 DeWitt DeWitt Carroll 'lO l l\It.r,loriah St. Louis St. Louis 411.lEtna .iF-tna Scotland '12 l\liddle Grove I1\Iiddle Grove :\1ol11'oe 43 Jefferson ,JefrerSon City Cole 44 Jacksonville Jacksonville Randolph 45 Bonhomme Manchester St. Louis ,1(i'vVentzville Iwentzville St. Charles 47 Fayette Fayette Howard 48 l?ulton ..: IFulton ICallawuy 40 l!aY!1CSVIllc HoIL; Clay 50 Xellla " " ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 HOPkIl1S.. · · INOdaway 51 Livingston Gl~gow Howard 52 Wakanda Carrollton Carroll 53 Weston Weston Platte ; Index ICas.s uD Arrow Rock Arrow ROCk lsaIIlle ~~IT~pton T~~ton Monit.eau ':1 RIClll:uond RIehl.nond Ray.,' ;)SI~lontICello ,MontIcello LewIs 00 C.entmlia ,' Centralia I~oone 60 New Bloomfield New Bloomfield.. Callaway 6.1' Waverly /Waverl y Latllyette 62 Vincil Cameron Clinton 6.'3 Cambridge ISlater Saline (;'1 ~lollroe Monroe City iMonroe fi5 Pattonsburg IPattonsbur 6 Daviess 66 Linn Linn Iosage (i7 Rocheport.. Rocheport.. Boone 68 Tebo Clinton Henry ~~J Sullivan ISullivan IFranklin 10 Roanoke Roanoke IHoward 21 Sava.I~nah SavaI~nah Andrew 12 DanvIlle DanvIlle Montgomery 73 Eureka Brunswick Chariton 74 Warren Keytesville Chariton ._ 75 Ashley Ashley Ipike 2~IIlldependence IInd~p~ndence Jackson {I Lcbanon SteelvIlle Crawford 7SISt. Joseph St. Joseph Buchanan 79 Po~ar Star St.. Louis St. Lou!s SO BrIdgeton IBndgeton S.t. LOUIS SI Hickory Grove IHallsville Boonc 82 JJackson Linncus Linn

""'' ' ' ' ' ' '1

~!IIndeX

·Ic.A. P.D.Triplett.. Goodale P. B. Dart'.. ,Geo. Ude J.. w. p.. Ull.ianl J. P. <3arrett... A. i\1. Hough J. G. Brock John H. Brewer IChllS~ .1. Walker (;eo. B<?ughner IP. Jno. A. Edy .1. N. Strawn IJ.M. Norris '.1. E. Drake Jesse Brasher S. 0., Goolfe Abram Neff C: C.f; Ely .; W. M. All,Ison W. T. McCutchan J. w. Bryson Jno. C. Cave Chas.. Kraus J. S. Nelson S. 'r. I,yne w. R. 1'. Jacksoll 0. F. Shumway: I.{.. S. Ryors Jno. W. BelL E. P. Lamkin S. H. S~llivan J. D. HICks IG. W. Hayvey J. C. WhItesIde S. E. Everly 1\1. H. Holcomb 1.1. W. Mahaffey John A. Sea J. :iV1. Sanders J. W. Batcheller Robert Burnie .los. H. Garrett R. M. Flynt PC. Flournoy

Godfr~y

·

·ISqllire Cahill ,E. E.'" RichardsOu IW. W. Dumm E. V. Kyte 11. ::\-1. Busey 0. H. SneI1. Jno. 'rellman M. W. Jones IGeo. Straszer IFred. Chauncey Jos. Rosenbaum T. W. Hunter W. C. McFarland S. K. Wray I'1'hos. W. Morehead K. Krout J. 0. White J. S. F.lalcomb Wm. Putsch ~~ ".V. Hurst Ihos. ~. Laveloek J. P. RIchards /A. Rodmyre .,' Jas. S. Guthne '\" Corder W. D. Corn .IJ. E. Brid.ges J. D. Evans Cleo. H. Frost.. J. W. Voshall.. ChItS. ':\lyer M. Biermann ,B. S. Hutton.: IYewel Lockndge IS.amuel Hu.fl:man Jno. B. Harns R. G. Beazley 1\1. W. Anderson Jno. C. Wells,jr Lor,enm.j\.. J!~aven .1.' C. WhI~mlle U. Schneldcr Philip Ro.dan F. A. Heldor l\<r. C. Flynt S. D. Sandusky

[Saturday on 01' before full moon. ISat. on or bef. f. m. & 2 weeks after. 2d and 11th Saturdays. 2d and 4th Saturdays of each mo. satu.rela y on or before.' full moon. 1st and ;~d Saturdays, 2 P.::\-1. 1 3d :'1onday. Saturclay on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday night on or bel'. full mn. Monday night on or bel'. f:ull mn. 1st Sat. 10 Fn.nt. e.m. SaturdllY after fullllloon. 1st Saturday. llst and 3d Wednesdays in e. m. ISat. bel'. 1'1. ron. and 2 weeks after. bt and 3d Saturdays. Sat. nt. o.n or bet'. .. each mo. Saturda\ on or befole full moon. llst !l~d i'fhir.cl Sl.tturday.s. S£1.tu.1dll.y.on or before full moon.

I-'

00

g:;

.

~

A.~1.& 1~t&3d

f~ m~l.

I·L\.O l-i'rne [lwen.

Saturc.lay be~. full ~n. in each mo. 1st Fnday III ht&,~d Sat. each mo. Saturday nigtt on or bef. f. In. e.m. ..I1st & 3d Saturdays. ISaturday on or before f. m. ill e. m. 1st & 3d Satnrdays. 1st and 3d Sat. ni~ht in each mo. 'Saturday on or after full moo. n. 2d Thursday of each month. 11st & 3d Thursdays of each month. Sat. night bef. full.mn. each 1110. Sat. mght on or bet. full mn.ea.mo.

~

C' ~ ~ ~

:S..

e· ..

I~at;onorb,'f.m7Pl\<1.&2Wks.af.10.\M

vd fhurs. 111 each roo. at 10 A. 'M. Tuesday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. Sat. nt. on or bef. f1. mn. each mo. 2d and 4th Mo~days. sl.tturda y on 01 before full moon. 1st & 3d 'rucsdays. 12d and 'Uh Fridays. Saturday on or before full moon. ISaturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon.

~

<:0


~

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued.

o ~. I

- L o~ I P: TOWN AND' O. ADDRESS.

83 Laclede · 84 Potter 85 riami 86 Brookfield 87 Wa~hington 8SlDefiance S9'Friendship n..

·.. ·.. ··ILebanon ..· Longwood l\.riami Brookfield

I

CnUNTY.

··.. ·ILacl.ede .. ···· PettIs

10~\ Kirks~ille

·IT.8. G.A. Barley Barr

Lmn

Gre~nfield

D~de

\'\:orth Livinf:,"Ston

~~ i[~diso~..::::::::::::::: iin:diso~~·.·.. ::.·.·.::::::·i[;;n~oe·.::·.:·.·

92 Perseverance 9:'\ St. l\[arks 94 vicnna 93' ),[eramec !)(j St. Andrews 9il.B~than.y 98 \·'vebster !1!) .Mt. Vernon 100 Canton 10l\BOgard 102 Bloomington 10~~ West View .. ·· 104 Heroine

·..

S~line

Defiance Chillicothe

·.·.·

Louisiana IPike Cape Girardeall Cape Girardell.u 1vienna Maries Eureka St. Louis Shelbyville Shelby Bethany ·.. ·IH.aiTison /Marshficld Webster Mt. Vernon Lawrence (jan ton tr,CWiS BOgard IC.anoll IBloomington l\-racon IMillersville "'Icape Girardeau.. Kansas City Jackson Kirksv:ille Ad~!L:

' ' ' ' '1

M ' lASTER.

1

l1~ITWiligh~

110 Laddonlll 116B.arnes 117\VerSailles 11S Kingston 119 Dc Soto 120,Compllss

l~. andolph lrent.ry 1'redenckstown .. :\Iadlson ITrenton Grundy Maitland Holt Plattsburg Clinton Colllmb~a ..· ·1 Boone : Ladelolllu AUelWlll \Cab. OOl.. ITexas Versllilles "·I"Iorgan KI.·ll gston C.alelwei1. IDe Soto Jefferson Parkville Platte

IJ\.IIo.berlY

s.tanbe~Ty

8 ECRETARY.

ID. N. ~~IlTUS 8. L. ·Wllson W. R. Bowles

18. C. Demuth D. M. Gray L. A. Myers T. L. Kennerly IJ. L. Wetzel

\V. ~. Norville

IJ. E. Pardonner

I

T HIE OF ."LEETING. J\1f.

.

IWed: last.precedmg fl. mn. ea.mo. No tlrne gwen. IFriday all or before full moon. 2d and 4th Tuesdays of each mo. Friday eve. on or bef. f. mn. mono No Returns. 1st and 3d Fridays each month.

!.'j. ·i~: ..iio~:rest·.::::::·.:::::::::::: F:·B>i;;d~::::::::::::::::::::::18at. .fa.mes A. Thomason W. B Nilson

IH.

Geo. Hamaker Wm. Carson D . . J. H~ast.on.: .T. W. Klrkwnght Jo. P. Porter John C,. An(]cri'(l[I. M. C. Lltteer C. G. Taylor Carmi Steele : E. F. Allen J. P. Blanton

J. W. Gudemllth L. A. Hayward T. B. Ellis W. W. Bmnnock Jno. S. StanselL (acting) ,co. W. l' reeman .T. Belcher D. R. Cowan W. W. Wood Jos. Baum

ig~l~v1llr~~~S·~;i·iie.·. :::·.:::I~v1m,~~s~·ilie·::::: ~~~;~~s ::::::::::::::: A...iCi·[~{·ti·ll(ia·le·::::::::::::

lOS Gothic : l09!Jsland CIty 1l0jMarCUS 111 Trenton 112 Grabam 113!Plattsburg

I

F. J. '1\.~ttle IS. B. l~ll1klcy F. R. ~ewberry A. Fry D. Kennedy Charles E. Jones /""'. S. Wilson .J. O. Baskett A. J. SlIel.son 1El wyn Price Wm. A. Wooel A. F. Sln.wson W. T. Nolllnd

IB.

F. Summers Wm. Bonney

~r. L~ Ku~t~,

c.

on or bef. full. moon at 7 P. M. Mon.onorbef.f.m. &every 2 wks.af. 2& 4 Tlles.in e. m.&St.John'sDays. No Retnl'ns. . . Satur<'lIlY before full moon. Saturday night on or bet'. full mn. Sa~urday nig.ht on .01' bef. full mn. Fnday on or after full moon. No tirne qiven. . and 4th each month. .AIL'. nt. on or after full mn. ea. mo. Friday on or before full moon. Saturday on 01' after full moon. 1st and 3d Mondays of each mo. Tuesday on or before each full mn.

~cl

Monday:~

jOh·ll·i{·...j~a~v·renc·e·:::::::::ISa~urday on or before full moon. .Ina. Simps~)TI 11st & 3d M.onda,ys of each month. W. B. Mastm 1st a.nd 3~ Saturdays. R. Brooks No t1.rne gwen. ,,\'. H. McGrath 1st & 3d Thursdays of each month. ID. C. Everhart.. ISaturday on or before full moon. Geo. E. Riley Saturday on or before full moon. F. pann. C 11... 11st and 3d Monday of e.ach month.. J. A. GIllIland Saturday eve. on or before full mil. J. W. l\lires Satmelay eve. anal' he lore full 11111. James l\IcNair Saturday on or before full moon. .Tames 'McMillan sat.nt.onor bef.f.l.n.& ev.2 wks.aft. J. F. Carlcy ISaturday on or before full moon. .T. N. Brink :SaturdaJT on or before fl. mn. C. m.

~ ...

.~ C1:>

;::3

~.

~

~.

0

~ ~


1211Erwin 122/Dove1'.. 123 Hermann 12'11 Union S~ar 12·~IGentryVllle

126 Seaman

127.Ather~s 128 Lorrame

18t. Lonis Dover Hermann ,Union ~tar

:c:~ntrYVllle

iUllan IA!banyi RIdgeway '" Charleston

l".'o.IHum~····················IHuin~

12V Charleston

'8t. LOUiS Lafayette Gasconade De Kalb IGen~ry ·..· SullIvall IGent:y Harnson Mississippi. B!1tes: 'v\'ashmgton ISt. Francois

131. potOS1.. POtOSi 132 Fannington Farmington 1;)3 s.tar of the west 1lronto.n ; I.I.r~m 1341Pleasant MOUIlt... .. Pleasant Mount.. MIller 135·Warrensbllrg Warrensburg .rohnson . 1.:''G p.hc.enix Bowling Green Pike 1:l7 prairieville · lprairieville Pike t::l8 Lincoln Fillmore Andrew 1:3V Oregon Ore/?on Holt 140. I~ELp~nvi~le PaplI1ville J.~!L.tes 141lcham 01 Rocks Owen Lmcoln 14~ l'leasitllt Grove Otterville Cooper 143 IrondalE' Irondale Washington H~ 1\[?_5Ic~n.;: HUIT.IlL:li;ville [:~lk 1'1;) RI~lI1g Star Ebenezer (decne 14(j ~IcGee iCollege :Mound Macon 1'17 Cass Harrisonville Cass 148 Pur.(.IY pUrdy B.any 1~\) L~xir..gton Lexington ILafayettc IOO RUJJllDg Halleck Buchanan 151 :Milton Moberly Randolph 152 Linn Creek Linn Creek Camden 1f,o BlooDlfield Bloomfield Stoddard 1M Concord Concord Callaway 155 Springhill Springhill Livingston 15(j Ashland Ashland Boone 157 North Star Rockport IAtchison 158 Mountain Grove Mountain Grove.. Wri/?ht 159 Green City Green City Sulhvan l~O Pl~asant : M<;n'risville Polk 161 I' Clifton HIll r·ChftOn Rundolph 16~ Whitesville Whitesville Andrew 163 Occidental.. St. Louis St. Louis 164IJOlLChi?'1.. IHillsb<?r.o J.efi"erSOn 165 ·Maryvllle Maryvllle Nodaway 166 l\iirabile }l\Iirabile Cald well

j"". H. Henselmeier Travis Buford

jwm. Hirt ROb.ert '1': Koontz I~ W. WIld H. l\L 9.ochran: :.. \.r. :\1. Kll'kpatrlck

Geo. Kraettly ,Geo. H. Prince ··I Hugh stevenson

\2d and 4th Friday. Saturday on 91' before full lll.oon. 1st Saturday 111 every montl •. "'12d Monday and 4th Saturday c. 111. Saturday before full mOOll. 1

I.!: .Eo Si.ll.1S \tr. B. Jelfnes

r~ar.···

T. L. Patterson J; C. Fa. ·· K W. Bhss IChas. Eo Barroll ,\y. R. Edg~r IChas. Atkm C. L .. il1d. cnber~er W. H. Pollard A. S. Dodge R. B. Kenney "'1 H c .. Shiyely J. J. )IcElwee T. ,r. Starke IReuben W. Wilson F~ Renf.·row W. H. Payne Aaron Tete1'.. F. H. Clark B.. B Gladden ".1 A. l<'. l~lexander A. J. Ii urre1!... C. W. Grimes W. N. Todd

I'A..

J. W. Pledge J. B. Francis Joseph Bauman l\Ialeolm McKillop J. P. Raney H. O. Way A. E. MitchelL

10. B. Saunders

D. A. Jamison jw. S, Hopson Jno. H. Bunger

.r. F.. C.UI.P C. F. FrllllSham S. G. Rosenstein w. Underwood "'m. T. Hunter ·llVlilton P. Cayce IC.'. R. peck James Etter

.

,W.

J. w. pOPpleWCll.. W. R. Stubblefield R: W. McMullen Warren L. Johnson

(X)

VJ L.....J

Satl~rdays

~ull

·.. I..r. T. :Mccune W. B. Shaw J. Barnes J. '1'. Thatcher J.ac f.Iir~i... J. E. pnnf?le A. 1,. ZOlllI1$er Elisha ArnOld [.). A.. l\.Iur.P~y B. H. Robll1~oll. D. B. Gibson ·IGeo. D. Little B F. Anderson., P. H. Chambers Jno. Dallam p. D. l\'Ieyers Owen A. Nelson J. l\L Rudd G. W. Wingo W. P. Boqua J. A. Newel!... A. l\1itehell, Jr T. R. Davis W. Lane

VJ

12d.and4th each month. IFrlday before full moon. Saturday night on or before IT. mn. Saturday on or bel.ore moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or bef. f1. mn. mthly . /s.atu.rday.on or bef.. fl. mn. mthly.

·······I.J.. ·

f-'

'"

No tune gwen.

ITues. on or bef. f1.mn.& 2wks. aft.. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday before full moon. 1st Monday &3d Saturday evc. e.m. ··I~aturday night 011.0.1' belore fl. mn. :,aturday on or bef.full moon e. Ill. Saturday on or bet". full moon e.l1l. Saturday nearest full moon. IS. aturdi~Y eve. 01.1 or~c[ ~1.. mil. c.m. Wednesday nt. on 01 beUull moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. IThurs.nt.on or bef. f.m.&2 wks.aft. 13d Monday ot each month. .4th Saturday. 1st Saturday. Saturday OIl or before full moon. . 'lth Saturday in eaeh month. Saturday on or before full moon. 2d Friday and 3d Saturday. 2d Saturday. Thursday on or bcfore full moon. Saturday nt. on or bef. f. m. mly. 1 Friday night bef. f. m. in each rn. . jSaturday on or before full moon. 2d & 4th :Mondays in each month. Saturday on or before full moon. 1st & 3d Saturday eves. of each m. I

~ '-"

~

~

~

~.

~

.~

f-'


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, E'rc.-Cont'inued.

~

w

~

.I

~ -

LODGE.

I

AND P. TOWN O. ADDRESS.

COUNTY.

M i SECRETARY. lASTER.

I

T Il\£E OF o u. lhEEfING.

mCoi;;ny:::::::::::::::::::Icoi;;ny"::::::::::::::: Kn;;x:::::::::::::::::: i: S:""MeR,yn"oid;:::::: Iii.' 'B:' B·eci~ e~:.': .': : .: : : .1 S~tu~day ·O;{ ·o·~ 'bcfo'~e ·t·uif moon.'···

169 Camden Point Camden Point 170 Benevolence \Utica 171 Hartford Hartford 172 Censer Mucon 173 Union Union 174 Sturgeon Sturgeon 175 Newton Newtonia 176 Point Pleasant Point Pleasant 177 Texas Houston 178 Griswold Price's Branch 179 Pride of the West... St. Louis 180 Des Moines Athens 181 Novelty ..; Novelty ..: 182 StewlLrtsvllle \Stewartsvllle 1.83 california ,California 1~ Hale 0ty FInleC~ty 1&'1 Chamols ChamOIS 186 :Morality !Randolph 187lCarte~ IJeffe~on City 188 Hanmbal.. Hanmbal.. 189 Zeredatha ISt. Joseph 190 Putnam Kewtown 191 Wilson Ipocahontas 192 Frankford IFrank ford .. : 193 Ancyerona Missouri City 19~ We1lsville We~l~ville 19.) Bohvar Boln ar 196 Quitman Qnitman 1971carthage Carthage 198 Allensville A.llendale 199 New Hope Ncw Hope 200 Sonora Watson 201 Jamesp.ort.. J~mcsport.. 202..westvllle \VestVIllc 203) Brumley jBrumley 204 Rowley Dcarborn

Platte ILivingston Put.nam IMucon Franklin Boone Newton INew Madrid Texas IMontgomery St. Louis Clar\{ Knox DeKll.lb }[oniteau Carroll Osage Randolph , Cole Manon Buchanan Putnam Cape Girard Pike Clay

I~[ontgomery I olk Nodaway Jasper Worth Lincoln Atchison Davi.~ss Cl~anton

I1\:I:111er Buchanan

R. M. Parish Gco. A. Culling B. F. Speak .Tno. W. Riley Geo. W. Linck. J. H. Canada B. A. Duvall F. D. Kimes Jno. N. Green S. R. Tippett Geo. H. Reifenstahl 1. .T. Wilson S. A. [CClintic r. C. Hynum W. .T. Fulks jE. E. Westcott W. F. Cochran .T. W. Hendrix Jno. Tweedie M. P. Edwards A. G. Braun J. W. Harrvmnn R. 1'. Henderson J. E. Henry A. R. Allcorn ~I. H. Garwood 1. A. Affleck W. H. Frankum D. A. Innes C. 1\1. Hunt.. James L. Dawson J. K. Dyche P. Shour L. E. Pancost.. James 1'h.ompson J. J. Burgess C\.'

IA.

D. F. Craven A. A. Stone J. W. Roberts Adam A. .Gilstrap M. W. Martin H. L. Gray .T. :i\L :Marat.. James S. Law 1. N. Vance ; Jno. D. Anderson .TrIO. A. Sloan W. Clinesmith I.J. G. Herriott.. : jC. L. Fowler J. S. Roth Eli Wa.lk.er J. }1. l~lhott A. N. 'Maupin C. H. Palmer : W. F. Chamberlalll Geo. Rees J. T. Jones J. C. Thompson IG. B. Brown J. A. Posey Jacob.l\oIill~r : Tames G. Slmpson ITheo. Pifer W. Woodvv'ard Calvin Tilton Wm. H. Ba.<;kett.. J. E. Hancher W. F. ShUler · L: F. Ray J. L. Conner R. P. C. Johnson

Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. No.time gi·ven. i::laturday on or after full moon. Satmday before full moon in e. m. 1st & 3d Wednesdays. Sl~turday on or bef. f. m. each m. Saturday nt. on or bef f. m. e. mo. 1st &, 3d Saturday nts. each month. 4th Saturday in each month. 2c1.and 4th Saturdays each month. Fmlay 011 or after full moon. ISaturday on or before full moon. 1st Monday each ~onth.. 2d & 4th :Monday mghts 1Il e. mono \2d &1th TueSdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. 1st & 3d Saturdays. Satll~d~y bef. full moon at 7 p. m. SatUld,Ly on or before each f. m. Saturday on or aft. each f~l1 moon. 2c1 & 4th WednesdlLy evemngs e. m. Saturday nt. on or bet'. f. m. lTII. y. ISaturday nt. bef. f. m. each mono 1st & 3d Saturday nts. in each m. ISaturday night on or before f. m. Saturday on or after fl.lll moon. ISat~rday on o~ bef<?re full moon. lIst Saturday I1Ight 1Il caeh month.

~

'"8 ~

R..

~.

,---,

o

~


205 Trilumina 202 somerse.t 20, Clay 208 Salisbury 209 Poplar mulL 210 UJ.lionville : 211 HiCkorv Hill. . 212 Four Mile 213 Rolla 21'1 Forest . C!~y.; 215 HornmsVllle 216 Granby , 217 Barbee 218 Good Hope 219 Everett 220 Kansas City 221 Mystic Tie 222 La Belle 223'Woodlawn 224 HamiltOll 225 1Salem 22G Saline 227 Cypress 228 Shelbina 229 yfitchell... .. ·.. ·.. · 230 St. James 231 WlLrrentoll

i\farshall Saline .'T. C. Armentrout Ilil1,: :: Put':ltnl D. L.. Wild.er : Cla~· tOl/VIlle CJll.~ ; Harrlson Chambels Salisbury f;hal'1ton Levi '1'. Fawks Poplar Bluff Butler B. C. Jones Ut;ionviIle ; Putnam A. J. Williams HiCkory HilL Cole 1. D. Bond : Campbell Dunklin H. A. Gardner Rolla Phelps L. l<'. Parker Forest f;ity Holt :..; Geo..webe~ · ·· Cotton Plant Dunkhn w. G. rett~ Granby Newton T. J. Denham ,BrownS\ ille Isaline J. B. White South St. Louis St. Louis............. Wtight M. Powell... Everett Cll::'S 'IDaVid Gilbert Kansas City Jackson J. B. Dunkeson Oak Ridge ,Cape Girard E. R. Harris La Belle Lewis Woodlawn Monroe S. H. FarrelL Hamilton Caldwell Henry·E. Bater Salem Dent .f. M. Orchard St. ::\farys Ste. Genevicve .. , Henry Ro~emlLn Laclede Linn Ed . .T. iHaybee Shelbina Shelby ;C. H. Lasley ·I·c01umbus .. ·.. ·.. ·.. IJOhnson .. · ·.. ·:.. St. .fames P~elps Wm. StiJ!lson Warrenton ,Warren H. H. l\hddlekanrp 1

· ·.. ·..·

······1'r Eo T. Orear 1\:[, B,oland

1 hos. 1\[, Gash .fohn Clark IA. A. )fl1hll.ffey W. A. Shelton W. H. Plummer IJ. F. Lll.sswell .los. 1. Garvey ~elson Claiborne J. B.. Pool :W. A. Varner 'jJno. l\f. Bellamy T. J. Koetzle J. L L. Stephens. . Rufns:M Eades... W. J. Roberts

···1'1'.

Jno. C. Rodes H. W. 1\[arkham J. W. Wing-o Fred. Voelker Z. T. Stanc11y Wm. T. l\<IeDrmiel.. Chas. qartall D. Levisey

'IFrida y on or before full moon. Saturday on or b~fore full moon. Saturday before full mooll. Saturday on or before full moon. 2d & 4th Saturdays. ~aturclay before each full mOOll. SaturdaY before full moon . Thursday on or before full moon. 1st & 3d Saturnays each month. \~t. Sat~ll'~lay & 3d Monday each m. 1 wI a), mght on or bef. full moon. Monday night on or bef. each f. m. Friday on or before full moon. 1st & 3d Saturdays. Saturday eve. on or aft. f. m. e. m. 2d & 4th :Mondays of each month. Saturday on or bef. each full moon. .. Satnrday on or beforc full moon. 1st and 3d Fridays Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday OIl or before eaeh full m. 1st & 3d Wednesctays of each mono 1st & 3d Friday evening of each m.

. Saturday on or after full mooll. ISatnrda y on or after full moon.

~

(J)

OJ

(J)

...:...-.J

~ ~ ~

~

~.

~~~~ ~~l~ki·i·n·:::::·:::::::::::t~l~ki·i·n·::::::::::::::rt~i\w.~.~~.::::::::::::I~.~.j~l~/:. ·.:·.:·.·.::·:::·.::::::: t!:~~yR~)I~~~~·::::::::::::::::::.~~tt:~l~L~i·~~fore

234 St. Francois 235,Ionic 236 sedalia 237 La Pla~lt.. 231'; Il{ushvllle 239 Hope\~ell 240 GranVille 241 Palestine 242 Portland 243 Keystone 244 ::\!iddl~_Fabius Z,15 lI..nob l'wster Z,IG 1\fontgomery City 247 Neosho 211'; Rochester 249 Carroll : 250,I-I1gh Hill

Libertyville Rensselaer Sedalia .:' La Pla~lt.. Rushv111e Lesteryi11e Granvllle St. Charles Readsville St. Louis

St. Francois Ralls Pettis Maco.n Buchanan 1 Reynolds Monroe 1St. Charles CILllaway St. Louis ~owning ISchuyler Knob Noster Johnson 1\Tontgomery CitY.l\{ontgomery Neosho Newton Helena Andrew ,N?rbon.le Carroll 1fhgh Hill :Montgomery

A. i\L Wallace D. B. West B. H. lng-ram .B. C. l\ofcDavitt Wm. Steward Wm. Z. Carter.. D. H. Moore -Ino. P. MiHer S. A. Davis Geo. 1\1ilford R. T. Gamble , IJ. F. Tippctt... A. B. Powers Tsaile Clark A.l\TcCuistill.II Henry S. Leavell

IW.

full moon. I'Saturday on or before full moon. ,.f. W. Rudisill Saturday on or before full moon. F. Henry................ 1st Friday cach month. E. 1\1. Duiham Wednesday eve. au or befi.ore f. m. S. B. WeIrs Saturday hefore each full moon. S. H. Irvin Sa~urday before 3d Sunday e. m. .B. P. Sparks Fnclay on or before fnll moon. Oliver P. Reinhn.rt 1st & 3d Tuesdays of each luonth. B. II. Boone Saturday on 01' before full moon. Moses Ely 1st and 3d Wednesdays. A. M. Todd Saturday on or before full moon. .. H. W. Covington Monday on or before full moon. .T. C. Williams Tuesday on or before full moon. .T. M. Vanmeter, (acting;Satnrday OIl or before full moon. E. p.l\feeI~ltn lsat. on orbef. f. m. &t\~·owks.aft. Chas P. l\I111er Saturday eve. on or bet. f. m. mly. B. Cowley

',w.

~

C;.:) C;.:)


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, E'fc.-Contin'ued.

t-? <:A:l ~

---'-----'-----'--~~'=-

'l'0\V:-l AND P.O. ADDRESS.

COUNTY.

:MASTER.

Washington Franklin Alanthus Grove .. Gentry Lindley Grundy Butler ; Bates Alton Oregon Crystal City Jefferson 'I Eaglesville Harrison Rllvanna :Mereer Lanca.ster Schuvler )[echanicsville St. Cl1arles New .l!'lorence Montgomery HOlden 1iJOhnson 1;ce's SuJ!lmit .Tackson · l'llyettevllle Johnson Warrensburg IJohnson N1artinsburg Audrain St. LOUiS jst. Louis Atlanta Mucon Lawrenceburg :Lawrence Al'gentville Lincoln Sprin~ielcl. Greene SedalIa Pettis Osceola St. Clair ,llenrietta Johnson [Orearville Saline Freeman Cass Pilot Grove 'Cooper !Avilla I.Jasper Quincy Hickory Chillhowee :.Johnson IFeIlton St. Louis I'St. Louis St. Louis S.tockton. .. ceodar Xew Boston Linn Coffeysburg Daviess Virgil City Ced~r. \canton ,LC\Vls Hermitage IHickory

.T. W. Purvis .T. C. Poft" Hiram Doolin G. M. iV1cKissick Wm. T. Shaver James Houghton .Tno. Barber.. J. L. Shipley

LODGE.

ci

~

251lHOPC 252 Alanthus 253 Lindley 25'!:Butler 255\Alton 256 Skekinah '257 1Lodge of Light 258 Ravanna 2;)!J Lod~e of Love 2GOI.\[ecnanicsville 2611"lorence 26'2 .Holdcn 2~3 I Symmit..: 2b4 .l! ayettevllle 2.651Corinthian '266 SociaL 2(~7IAurora.;

268 Lodge of Truth 269 R.ock Prairie 2iOlNew Salem '271 Solomon 272,\,Grllnite 273 St. Clair 274 Cold Spring 2751TranQUilitY 27() Grand R.iver 2'i7 Wm. D. Muir 27SAvilla 279 Hogle's Creek :280 Lodge of Peace 2811 Fenton . 28'2 Cosmos 283.S.tOck .. ton 2&1 Kew Boston 285j'Earl 28~ Hesperion 28, Craft 288 Hermitage 1

1

' "'IJ. L. Martin .T. W. Stewart Geo. E. !{Op.p I~· C. Scoville I Ilea. Hyatt.. ,.. L. .:\1. B.erry T. J. Elder.. 'Chas. H. Pellet oM. Atleberry J. A. Troxell. IC, L: Alloway Ely Paxson ,Arch. CampbelL W. C. Holsapple J. R. Grimstead D. J. Orear F. E. Bybec J. n. Cox A. C. Stemmons L. W. Stiltz C. C. Little V. Price \Vm. Boyd J. "'.v, corbin J. )1. Jones C. D. Knight J., W. :May \-\-. S. Page Jas. R Pack

+\.,

SECRETAHY.

TDIE OF

:i\IEETING.

R. W. Zierlcin Tuesday on or before full moon. 0. T. Anderson. (acting).. . James "Vinters Saturday on or before full moon. Vun B. Van Dyke 1st & 3d Saturday in each month. Henry Thompson Sllturday eve. on Ot· bel'. each f. m. D. B. Froit Saturday on or before full moon. Jas. L. Downing '\.J1Tida y nt. on or bet'. f. 111. each m. J. .Jenkins \Vednesd~y before full moon. . Henry Johnson Saturday on or before full moon. B. E. Wilson 1st and;>d ·Mondays. J. H. Hewes : Thursday on or beforc fnll moon. T!I0;nll~ R. Thornton lls~ a~ld 3d.Sat. nights of each mth. W. I. (Treen lee ,YO hme given. Tno, Le Mar 11st Mon. e . In. and St. John's Day. ·A. J. Douglas Sllt. on or aftcr full moon e. Ill. Is. n. PO.tter lst and 3d Fridi1YJ> of each month. V. D. Borden jMonday on or before full moon. B. W. Stinson Saturday on or lifter full moon. !'.Jno. D.. cOx , lsllt.l.lrday on or after full moon. Thos. H. Cox 2d :i\londay in each month. :\or. L. Jacobs (Acting) \;)d Friday in each month. A. W. Duff Saturday before fulll1loon. '0. Hall. Thursday on or before full moon E. Ureal' Wednesday on or before full moon. F. W. Combs Sat. night on or before full moon. Wro. C. Ross '2eland 'lth Sat. in each month. !J. R. Freed Saturday on or before fullwoon. !.T. B. Brent. Friday on or before full moon. W. Sweeney Sat. night on or before full moon . G. W. Anderson Sat. night on or after full moon. .:\-lichael Sweeney 2d and ,!th ::\londay each month. I'!.'. T. I.,Oy Thurs. bel'. f. lll. e. m. & 2 wks aft. W. L. Cass Sat. eve. on or before full moon. IF. H. Dorsey jSaturday on or before full moon. j,:~lf. Bartel:--Saturday before full moon. Ihm;. W. l' urlong 1st and 3d l\londays. Moses :N. :Neihardt Sat. on or before each full moon. I

~

~

~

~.

",1'1'.

r--r

o

Q ~


289 :290 291 292 293 294

ACaCilt Fairmount. Edina Lamar Sarcoxie Aronnd City

I'paradisc Fairmount Edina Lamar Sarcoxie .Mound City

Clay Clark Knox Barton Jasper Holt

I'J. S. Hall Geo. Gonlty 1. H. Willis Jno. Bates W. W. FerrelL !C. S. Annstrong

Jackson ' Dallas J'o."oflaway Ralls Vernon Ripley Shelby Scott. Ralls De Kalb Ray Scott Clay Crawford JfJhnson

'Sam'l L. C. Rhodes D. G. Gorley J. W. Heath AI. Richards D. W. Graves James F. Tubb .T. W. Evans G. C. Rose Geo. E. Lear W. B. Kline T. B. Kincaid O. E. KendalL A. J. Porter.. Henry ForL Horatio Cox

M. F. Duncan T. AI. Wood Jas. J. Soule J. B. .Emer y D. A. Smith J. S. Hurt..

2d and 4th Satmday in each m'th. Sat. on or before full moon Sat. night on or before f. m. e. m. Thursdays on or before full moon. Tues. on or bel". f. Ill. & 2 wks aft. Sat. on or bef. f. m. & ~ weeks aft.

~

CJ:)

CXJ

CJ:)

~

~~~,~:.~~~~.~~:~:.:.:.:.:.:.: : : : :::~;~:.·~~i~::::::::::::I~:.I~::~:~~~:·::::::::::::I~::-~~~ ..S:~·~;i:.::::::::::::::::J~.·\~~··~:~i:s:~;~ :.:.:':':':':':':':':'::':': .~~:t:::~.~~::'i::~I~r before fuilmooll. HilL BoHinger F. :'-1. Wells L. Bowman Satmday on or before full moon.

.. 2!J8!Marble HilL 2!J!J Temple 300 Doric 301 Whitehall 302 Liek Creek 303 Osa.ge 304 Faithful ;~05 Clarence 306 Ashlar :30i New Londo11 808 Parrott 309 King Hiram 310 Sikeston 311 Kearney 312 Cuba 313 Kingsville

~[arble

Kallsas City Forkner's Hill. 'Barnard Pen·v Nevada Fair Dealing Clarence Commerce ~ew London ;\'[aysville Knoxsville Sikeston Kearney Cuba Kingsville

~tt ~\·ito~a. :::::.:::::::::::::IA"ito~a . :..:::::::

3lG RuraL 317 Osborn 318 Eldorado ~19 Paulville ; y20 Chapel HIll •)21 Jonathan ::>22Hardin 8~3 Corner·Stone 324lHeDonald 325 Dockery 326 New Home 327 l'vIt. Zion 328 Cainsville 329 Kennedy 330 Bertrand 331 Charity 33.2 RYlanc.:l 333 Chillicothe 3~;'! Breckenridge

Kansas City Osborn Luray Brashear..; Chapel fbI!... Denver Hardin St. Louis Independence )Ieadville New Home West Plains Cainsville Ebony Bertrand St. Joseph Berlin Chillicothe Breckenridge

::: Jackson i3~t~s·:::::::::::::::::: DeKalb ,Clark Adl,tir Lafayette \Vorth Ray St. Louis Jackson Linn : Bates Howell Harrison N\ldl)-w!ty.; MISSISSIppI Buchll.Tl!Ln IG. entry Livingston CuldweJ 1

T:·B·...ii·i·ghi(;y·

·.·.·· ·

C. S. Owsley L. D. Noland Eo P. Jones J. N. ·McCreery W. G. Shaffer Geo. P. Long Louis L. Lippman Jno. 1\;1. Longsdale E. D. Harvey Henry F. Smith Jos. H. Burrows S. Colli~lgs H. L. FIIlley .T. D. Flint S. G.. Weller W. R. Simpson Eel. G. OI·ear

J~.

Jas. N. Griffiths Jno. A. Day C. :M. A'lyers A. P. Settle J. J. Tucker, Jr 1. N. Presson J. H. Pollard L. A. :Mason Geo. '1'. Finegan W. S. Gourlay A. T. 1Iotlitt.. A. A. Harrison P. D. Anderson A. W. Farrow 'R. C. Davidson

·.·.·.·.:::::J.'·G:·Ca~t·I:eC:

l!:'t amI :>'(1 Tuesdaysoteach month. Saturday before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Satmday on or before full moon. Friday before full moon. Saturday on or before each fl. mn. Saturday on or before each fl. mn. Saturday on or aftcr each 1'1. mIl. Satnrdayon orbef. f1. mn. each m. 1st ILnd Rel Mondays. 2 o'clock Satnrdayonorbef. fl. mn. Saturday nt. on or bef. fl. mn. e.m. 1st and3cl Saturday night in e. m. 1st Saturday nt. on or aft. f. m. e.m. Saturday, night on or before f1. mn.

::::::.. :.. ::: Saturday on or before f.Ull n.lOon. J. W. Norman 1st and3cl Wednesdays. S. P. Moorman 2d and 4th Saturdays. Eo E. Hayman Saturday night on or before fl. mn. N. J,' ASl),b¥ ISaturday eve. on or before fl. mn. B. E. Plnlhps Saturday eve. on or before f1. mn . . W. J. Roach : Saturday before fl. mn. at 7:30p.m. ,Lewis A. J. Lippelt 1st and ;3d Alondavs each month. "Vm. H. Gregg : 1st and 3d :Monda)'s each month. G. A. Dougherty 1st and 3d Saturdays. . Timothy B. Carmical... Friday nt. bef. full moon in e. m. Henry Nally Thursday on or before full moon. S. P. Lamar : Saturday nt. befo~efull moone. m. C. W. Burton 2d Saturday evcnmg each month. 1\1. A. LytIc 2danc1 4th 'Mondays each :month. Sfunnel Lev.y Satmelay on or be.forc f.·Ull moon. .1no. W. 'foppas 2d&4th FrLe.m.exc.June,.1uly&Aug.2dFri. S. J. Dcwey ,2d & 4th Saturdays in each month.

~

~ ~

~

~.

~

Ci.:>

c.n


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued.

~ ~

OJ

~I

TOWl\ AND P.O. ADDRESS.

LODGE.

COl.:l\TY.

IHASTEH.

SECRETARY.

----- -------1------;

335'~IedOc

!JOPlin Hallsville Blue Springs ,1\'lillville

JilSpe.r 33(i Hallsville Boone 337;Blue Springs Jackson 338:~lyrtle Ray S39 .Fidelity :~'arley Plat.te 340 Jericho IJericho Cedar " 341 Relief Brookline Greene 342 Circle Roscoe St. Clair 34;3 Agricola Petersburg Henry ;34A :Moberly Moberly Randolph ;34;) Fellowship ,.Joplin .Tasper.. 346 ArlingtOll :Dixon PUlllSki. 347'Sprillg Creck Edgar Springs Phelps 348 Wadesburg Wadesburg Cass 349 Pollock Pollock Sullivan 850 Tyrian Johnstown Bates 851 Mosaic Bellevue fron 3:;:2 Frieucl. Ozark Christian ?~.8.Benton St. L~uis :. ::i.'to ~~is 3,)<[ Hebron MeXICO AudlalTl 355 Adelphi Edgerton Platte 35G Ancient Landmark Harrisbnrg Boone 357 Young's Creek Rowena Audrain 358 North West.. 'Tarkio Atchison 359 Garrett Arcola ,Dade 360 Tuscan St. Louis 'St. Louis 361 RiddiC.k Buffalo Dall.as 362 Hiram Cahoka clark 363 Fro.temal.. Robertsville Fmllklin

·i

:

3(!7 BI.tr:~· : 3(,8 CICscent HILL 30!) Composite 370 Williamstown 371 Sheldoll 37:2 Nonpareil

1 Kirksville

Was.?burn ; Adn,ll1 Doniphan rWilliamstown Shcldon .,East Lynne

Aclair Harry Dates 1Ripley Lewis Vernon Cuss

I~L

p.' DoWnin g R. F. Hulett... I'1'hoS. I. Roffe S. S. Young .T. H. Carsoll .T. P. Brasher S. F. Gibson \V. F. Shackleford J. H. McCann H(·nry Levy Clco. W. Gore £". S. Huckins G. 1. Bradford A. Wade r. C. Watson Jno. H. Beatty W.J. Russell '1'. h Robertson

0. R. Hmlllin ' 'vV. F. Roberts A. 1\'1. Cockrell R. C. Craven · J. L. S.impson J. W. Armstrong J. R. Gammin Cha.<;. BedelL S. H. Elliott H. A. Hatfield ;H. W. Harncs w. Howard J. M. Freeman R TomPkins \Y. L. WatsOll S. W. :\faxey R. J. Hill.. I.T. A. Hammond C.'. c.: walton A. c.. BIt! nes c. Kemper E. C. Haller.. \Y. H. White L. W. Gray R. A. Church Scott H. Blcwett.. W. Smithpcters C. Bradford G. Cable

!w.

I·w.

10.

w.~-I.. c.nt~c.r

r. C. Bassf,'rd Ir. 1'. Hopkins ·W. H. n. FentoIl Jas. A. Craig .T. F. Schoenccke Samuel Achord E. E. Hickok H. J. B.eh. rens S. Neeper Rich. ::irnith

IC.

;G.

~~g ~~~~~~~~.~~~.~e .. ::::::::::1 ~~~~~~~~~~.l.~~ ..::::::: ~.'~~:~::~.~~::::::~::~::: ~:.~::....~~~.~~.I:::

3G6 Adair..

Tnm OF :\fEETIl\G.

----------1

,::::::::::: :::

r.'. r..rL. sn.lith

I.J;

T.

B~ooks

C. 1.. 1\1111s D. K. Ponder \.Val.-ren Hile ·C. T. Seaver u. W. Farrow

: ,

~~: ..~~....~~~~..~~ .. :

:::::: wm.. J. ASh10.Ck A. ~). Et.<:h.erson J. N. Bncker A. J. i\fcCollum :M. BoweIl J. V. McGrew B. P. White

--.-----

11st and 3clFricl!tys of each mouth. Saturday on or before full moon. 2d and 4th Thl1l'sday nights. Saturdr.y on or before full moon. I\Vedllesclay on or before full moon. Saturday on or before fu1ll1l00n. Saturday before full moon. Thursday on or before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. 2d &. 4th Mondays in each mono 2d and '1th Frillays in each mOll. Saturday on or before full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday (In or before fullllloon. Satnrday on or after hIll moon Saturday nighton or before n. mn. Saturday night Oil or b.efOrefl. mn. 1SaturdaY nt. on or before f. m. e. Ill. :2d ~l;:.'.' 4tl~ '~'t~c.sd~~·~ ill each mOllth. 1st Tuesd,t)' Jll each wonth. Saturday on or before full moon. ~aturd!ly on or bef. each full moon. 2d Saturday in each month. 2d Thursday evening. Thursday on or before full moon. 1st and 3d Tuesdays. Saturday on or before full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Satmday on or after full mOOI,.

~

~ ~

~

~.

~:::::: 2d & 4th Mondays in each

month. ~. Fl'i.da y nt. O.ll or bef,. each fl. nl.ll. ~aturday ni~ht Oil or bcf.. full 1I1n. Saturday mght on 01 belole f1. lllil ·Saturclay bet'. 'lth Suuday in e. m. ,.-iaturdav Oil or after full m.o.oll. ISaturdayon or bel'. 1'1. mn. e. Ill. ;Saturday OIl or before fulllllOOll.

;--,

o

o .,...-


373 ·Mandeville

'Mande\·ille

~~~.I~.~~~.~~.~~~~~:::::'.:::: :~~.1~.~~~.~1.1:~.:

376King- HilL 377 Ancient Craft 378 Kilwinning 37!) Billings 380 Queen City 381 Ionia :-\82 Richland ~\S;3 Pythagoras 3&1 Harmony :)85 Reynolds 3SG Dayton 887 Woodside 888 Farmersville 389 Arcana

390,~Iarionville

:l91'Ravtown 392 chi·istian 398 B.ee Hh.. e 891 Dagan 395 lAttimer :.~96iWestel'll Light :397'Gower :)(.18 .ra.~per ;)99 Pike '100 Decatur <101 cel.lter 402 Gavel. ·103 Lowry City 404 Alexandria 405 Everton 40li Malden '10i Royal. 408 Montrose 409 Civil Benet 410. [beria 411 J.OPPlt 412 Appleton City 41::-. valle j .' : 414 Greensburg 415 HunnewelL 416 Cache 4171 White Water 418,Clear Creek

;

St. Joseph King City KilwiJ11ling Billings Queen City Barnetts Richland Cassville Vibbard Black Dayton Thomasville Farmersville Wintersville 'Marionville Raytown Oak Grove I·Lawson

Carroll. I'Vm. C. Baird !"NI. Block :::: ~~~~~~.~~~~~?:: ::::: .~'..~:~'..~~~~: :::::::::::::::::::: .r: ~::.n..~~~

Bucllanan Gentry, Scotland Christian Schuyler ;iV[organ Pulaski. Barry Ray Reynolds Cass Oregoll Livingston ·Sullivan Lawrence Jackson Jackson Ray ~[endon Chariton Licking Texa..<; :L.ouisbnrg IDallas Gower Clinton .Jasper ;.Tasper Cnrl'yville Pike !Peiree City Lawrence ,I.,eball.oll. Laelede New Cmnbria I:\Iacon Lowry City St. Clair.. Alexanclria Clark Everton Dade Malden Dunklin Mooresville Livingston Montrose Henry Civil Bend Daviess Iberia ,Miller Har.tville ·.. ·.. · IVI..righ. t Appleton City St. Clair 'BOlCkOW Andrew IGreensburf Knox Hunnewel 8helby South St. LOUiS ISt. Louis j'Stroderville Cape Girard Lincoln Benton

,,(;has. B. Powers J. II. Hal1del. Eli Barrickman .Tno. Garbee .T. O. Miller A. P. Franse .r. A. BrlId>'haw Chas. W. Carter '1'. Cra.ven Wm. Goggin C. T. GrOSshart S. Ledgerwood H. C. Crawford O. Harris Edwarfl Sinclair.. T. W. Green D. P. Dyer .ras.. A. cnmm.ings W. '1'. Asbury T. N. nradford J. D. Shaw Jno. W. Bowlin '1'. W. Shockley

R.

R.

A. ~L Chandler L. D. Gleason '1'. H. Hughes J. R Barnett. J. A. .Tenkins E. R. Hughes .r. I-I. llledsoe A. S. Fish H. B.Davb : IWm. L. Clark :M. J. Davidson B. ~ F ..HlId.son.: W. F. :\feColley '.\.. S. D.. O.dds Luke P. ~Iayfield I,W. S. :\lcClintic David i\[cPhel'son ·A. BOl'llemann IGeo. W. Weaver

Saturday before full moon.

:::

:::::::.iSaturday before full moon. Canada Little Saturday on or before full moon. Jno. lIutton Saturday on or before full moon. A. II.. Farnsworth Sn.turday on or before full moon. J. A.Knighten Fridav nt. on or n.fter 1'1. mn. e. m. IJames Carter Saturday on or bel'. fl. m. in e. m. J. H. Stillier Saturday on or bef. fl. llIll. ill e.lII. ,C. H. Davis Thursday eve. on or before 1'1. mn. Chas. Hay Sat. eve. on or bel'. f. m.& 2 wks. ail. Adam Hauser Saturday after full moon. ·1I. C. Stevens Saturda.y eve. on or bef. f. m. e. m. F. Smith Saturday eve. on or aft. f. m. e. m. .T. H. Old 4th Saturday in each month. E. C. ~fulford Saturday before full moon. J. L. Richardson iSaturday nt. on or aft. fl. mn. e.ln. ,A. H. Grover IFriday 011 or bel'. f. m. & 2 wks. all. M. T. Smith ISaturday nt. on or bel'. full moon. 1'. 1\L Vermillion Saturda).· nt. bel'. 2d& 4th Sundays. J. . W..A>'b.ury Saturday night before full moon. E. M. Shupe Saturday on or before full moon. L. Chambers Saturday before full moon. J. L. Watson Saturday on or before full moon. W. B. Sanders Saturdav before full moon. H. C. Hefley 1st & 3d'Saturdays in each month. . ;[J. A. Chapman Wednesday on or before full moon. Isan.l'l R . . Fn.rrar :\Io.lldaY night before full n.lOon. .Ina. O. .Tones Saturday after full moon. S. M. Gracy Saturday on or before full moon. W. B. Huston Satmday nt. on orbef. fl. mn. e.m. G. .M. Wilson Saturday nt. OIl orhe1'. 1'1. mIl. e. m. l{, G. Sandidge ·IFriday nt. on or bel'. 1'1. lYlIl. e. m. B. H. Kite 2d and 4th Saturdays each month. W. A. Walker ISaturday on or before full moon. OK L.Fro!>t :.lst & 3d Sat. nights in each month. Jno. Ferguson ; :Sat. on or after full moon. Wm. Nickle Friday 011 or before full moon. Albert Falcon La..<;t Sat. on or bel'. full moon e. m. C.has. Davis 2d Saturday in e.ach month. . Francis ~I. Johnson Sat. night on or bef. each full nm. .11£. B. Thiehoff.. Sat. on or before full moon. A. P. Watkins :2d and 4th Saturdays. B. F. Winters iSat. on or after fUll moon. E. H. Moxley 14th Saturday at. 2 o'clock P. M.

~.

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IR.

I"v.

:

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GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Contimted.

t,,:)

CI:!

(f)

o

:~0Star

LODGE.

I P

~\~~~~"..

~Ta~)e;vlille :~.~·

COUNTY.

ISt. Clair ,120 Itllska St. Louis St. Louis 421 Ul'bana Urbana Dallas 4:22 Gate of lhe Temple North SJ?ringfield Greene 423 Newburg Competition Laclede 424 Samaritan Bonne Terre St. Francois '125 Cedar City Cedar City Callaway ,126 Sedgwickville Scdgwickville Bollinger 427 Glenwood Glenwood Schuyler 428 Louisville Louisville Lincoln 429 New Madrid New Madrid New l\-Iadrid 430 Iron i\·Ionntain Iron l\-Iountain St. Francois 431 Cemcnt Halfway Polk .432 Black Oak Preston Hickory 433 Mack's Creek Mack's Creek Camden .; 434 Wheeling Wheeling Livingston ·135 St. Nicholas Cave Sprillg Greene 436 A::;h Grove Ash Grove C;reene ,137 Lafayette Corder Lafavette ,1:3.'; 'i'empc~·ance ism.ithv.ille Clay 4:W:VIt. 01lve !i\{arshfleld Webster 440 Trowel. Lutes';ille Bollinger HI l~xeelsior Jackson Cape Girard 442 Burlington Burlington Jllne.. Nodaway 44:3 Anchor St. Louis St. Louis 444 Ada Orrick Ray 445 West Gate St. Louis St. Louis 446 Greenfield Greenfield Dade 0147 Fairview Scottsville Sullivan 448 Schell City Schell city Vernon 44a Bois D' Arc Bois D' Arc Greene 450 Belton Belton Cass

I

lVIASTER.

Forsyth Cottonwood Pt Logan's Creek Buneeton

'fancy Mississippi Heynolds ,Cooper

TIME aI' MEENING.

---: IA. Roestler

T. :VI. Hays G. A. Ramsey F. 1\1. :Mott ,.Ina. H. Jones 1\'1. R. Tarlton D. B. Hil!... Wrn. Logan .l. L. Butler Sol. Levy .l. B. Green A. Morgan J. W. Foster Eo D. Carpenter R. H. Skeem A. 'r. "Veil' (Acting) .lno. Price ~. (.). By~.d ·;..;. T. Smith A. RJacques !Wm. H. Miller L. D. 1\'loore H. C. Christopher Yr. G. Taylor Thomas Brown J. W. Schrock B. Robinson W. D. Johnson Eo P. Garrison

~~~ O~~~~~·::::::::::::::::::t~~g~::::::::::::::::r~~~nr~~ce·.::::::::::T~: 6: ~~1~~t~:

,15:: Forsyth 454 Ceci1. 4G5 I Barnesville '156 1 Wallace

SECRBTARY.

A. Kleintoof... G. W. Crudginton Wm. A. Reed R. B. V. Nipper F. 1. Tetley James Lee F. E. Seabaugh H. D. B. Cutler D. C. Reeds Joel Cook :J. A. Parker : i.l. B. Crass is. D. Osborne 1wm. Scruby ,Geo. J. Biggs C;eo E. Comegys W. ::\f. Corder.. IW. H. patterson Wm. R. Brooks Geo. E. Statler ,Tacob H. Schaefer :J. 1\'1. White R. N. Caffall... ~. B. Pigg Andrew Rawson

1st and 3d Mondays. Wednesday on or before full moon. 2d & 4th Thurs. eves. each month. Saturday on or after f. m. e. m. Sat. on or before each full moon. Sat. on or before each full moo~l. No t'ime given.

:. Sat. cvcning on or after full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. Mon. on or before each full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. .. Saturday on or after full moon. Saturday on or after full moon. 2d and 4th Saturdays. Thursday before fllllmoon. l.'riday before full moon. SIlt. on or bel'. full moon in e. m. ;1. st. &3d Sa~. nights in cac.h. month. 'Fnday before each full moon. Fri. on or bef. f. m. & 2d Fri. after. Sat. on or bef. full or new moon. 1st and 3d Sat. in each month. 2d and 4th Weds. in each month. 1st and 3d Saturdays. 1st & 3d Tuesdays. . H. C. Warren, .lr 3d Saturday night of each month. T. L. Strong Every Saturday evening G. H. Redfearn, (acting).. Saturday on or before full moon. Samuel Clark Saturday on or before fllllmoon.

: ::::::::: }:.~: ]<~f~~~~~~:l.~~ ..::::::::::::: ~l~\~:t~~~rrl~C~(\~v~,tore 1'1111 moon. J. l\-L Haworth (acting) R. S. Branson Saturday on or aft. e. f. m. at 7 p. 111. 'J. ::\'1. Brashear H. C. Garrctt Saturday 011 or after c. full moon.

I

C. P. Tutt..

I· .. ·

S. Fnlton

.

,Saturclay nt. on or ber. f. m. c. m.

~

~ ,~

~

~.

r--1

o Q

r+


457,''l'ri Ple Tie 4!i8 Melville 4:)9 Har.elwood 400 1Lambskin.: 4hI C:t.ruther.sVllle 462 Santa Fe 46:'; Clifton 46~ An.nVille 46;l\Ga y nOr City 4fi6 Centre View 4fi7 Pleasant Hope 4(ii;,1 11eo Oak 469 Plato 470 Nodaway 4Z1 :V~ineril:l 4/2 PICkeTing 47:3 Ninevah ,174 Guilford 4Z:~ ..GOldel.l ,t/h Mt. Hope 4771HenctnfSOn 47S Racine 479 Rich HilL 480 .reweL .11<1 Clinton 482 Clintollville 4S.;~ I!'~sh Grove .11,,1 lurkwood 4~r) Co'.d Water 'ISf; Cairo 487 .f,ferr.IC.lon 4SI< 1 Lock Spring 489ILakcville 490 ;\Iontevallo 491 Vandalia 492jDagg ett.. 49il Vernon 4V4 Lewistown .19G.GlObe 49Q Robe~t Burns 49/IStraftord •198IKaseyVme ~99 .paynes.ville ;,,00 Jameson 501 Buckner 502)Philac1elphia

[Brar.eau Dadeville Isevmour St: Lonis jCaruthel..svllle Santa Fe Thayer AUllVi.ne. : Gaynor City Icentre View Pleasant Hope Red Oak Plato ,Maryvme O~ono&'o Plckenng Olney Guilford IGO.lden City Odessa Henderson Seneca 1 Rich Hill. IP.leasant Hill Clinton Clintonville i\nlton Ih.lrkwood 'Brosley Cairo IHerndon Lock Spring Ln.keville I1\Iontevallo Vandalia LOl1tre Island ;\lounds Lewistown

LO~isill;na

Gall1svll1e Strafford Kn.seyville Paynesville .Tameson Buckner Philadelphia

'Perry

1D.ade

Webster St. L.ouis Pemlscot ~fonro(} Oregon r.,afa.yette Nodaway Johnson Polk Lawrence ITexas I~odaWay rasper Nodaway Lincoln I£'odaway Barton Lafayette Webster Newton Bates Cass Henry Cedar

l~tchiso.n

St. LOUIs Cass Randolph sa.line Daviess Stoddard Vernon Audrain )lontgomery Vernon Lewis I.Pike , Ozark Greene Macon f.'ike Daviess Jackson )Iarioll

IE.G. N.N. Allder Barber

Wm. T. Huff Clovis Depn William Alcorn Michael Foerstel.. S. H. Steele Chas. C. Davis

['Jno. .v..A.:M.\Vard Davis

IJ. B. Jones ,S. C. Leach R. DeLancy Elisha E. Emerson

B. Bt:trnes S. W. Nigh "no. J. Wharton Jno. C. Cochrane

Iw.

W. T. Moon

11'Isaac .1\1. Fountain S. Kenney

J. W. Harmon A. Donaldson IW. H. Bigg-s J. E. Garrett.. E. F. Blake I,T. B. Horn M. Craigg .T. D. )loore .Tno..F.'. :McAffee ,J. H. Scherff T..J. )IcFarland .T. .T. Denny Fred. W. HOyt... G. L. Sayles r. B. Gooding Eo S. Herndon .T. page .Tno. Newcomer S. G. Popplewell S. D. Ely S. W. Gower H. J. Collier 'Jno. K. Stroup IAdam Wald I. l\-:l'ranth~m W. 1. Hawkll1s

R.

j,

.T. C. Brodly; Geo. P. Allen r. W. Kinsev Wm. Smith:

Wm ..J. Trimble .. : A. C. T. Schroeder

R.

jSaturda y nt. on or bef. f. m. e. m. Thursday n.ight on or bef.. e. f. m. /Thursdav Oil or bef. f. moon e. m. 2d & 4th\Vednesdays of e. montn. ,Saturda on o.r before full moon. Saturday on or before full moon. I Saturday nt.-oll or bef. f~ m. e. m. Saturday nt. on or bef. full moon. Friday on or before full moon. Thursday on or bef. e. full moon.

y

. Saturday before full moon. Henry Graves 2d & 4th Saturdays A. E. Cross!nan Thursday on or before full ~noon. F. ::\:[. Wll1hs Saturday o~ or before f. m. me. m. Theron Ives.. Saturday on or after full moon. Henry Cook Saturday on or before full moon. IJ. W. 1\Iardick Tu.esday on or before fun mooll. .T. A. Swetnam Fnday on or before full moon. G. F. Lilliston Thursdays on or bef. f. moon e. m. Wm. l\{eDavitt Saturday on or bef. f. moon e. m. S. H. Smalley 2d & 4th Wednesdays in e. month. W. D. :Myers Saturday eve. preceding f. moon . Albert Judge 12d & 4th Friday evenings. A. J. Ac1eock Sat. ev. on or bef. f. m. & 2 wksaft. W. M. Beck~t · /Tuesdays on or before fUI~ moon . s. Jacobi 2d & 4th 1\f011. e. m. at 8 0 cl. P. Nt J. W. Coleman "'ISat. night on or before full moon. J. S. Bennett Fourth Saturday in each month. C. J. wheeler ITues. on or bef. full m.oon in. e'.111' IL. L. Brookshier Sat. night on or af. f. m. & 2 w. aft. W. L. ::\fcCray Sat. night nearest. the full moon. H. C. Wallace Sat. on or bef. full moon in e. m. S. Pearson Sat. nigh.t before f\111 moon e. m. H. Rezoid Saturday on or before full moon . W. H. Parker Tues. bef. f. m. and 2 weeks after. W. Bagby Saturday before full moon. !wm. A. Gun.n.; 11st & 3d SaturdlLYs. Robert Q. <!llhlancl.. ,Saturday on or before full moon. H. A. McGmty Saturday on or after full moon .

~

(y) (y) (y)

~

1\1. T. McCoy

~

~ ~

~

~.

IH.

IR. R. i

Ii'. W. p.atton jR. H. Robertson E. R. Henthorn J. B. Cort..

,

Sat. onor before eac:h full moon. Saturday after full moon. 11st and 3d Saturday ni hts. :Saturday on or before1ull moon.

~

eN <:D


GRAND SECRETAHY'S TABULAR STATEMENT, ETc.-Continued.

~ ~

o ~•

I

LODGE.

r

AND P. 'fOWN O. ADDRESS.

-I 5031pmirie Home 504 Platte City ~O~ Avalon '?O~l.,athrop :.>0, Clearmont 508 Saxton 50!) Van Buren fl10 Biswell 511 Skidmore 512 Webb City 513 Chariton 514 Exeter ~ ~1~ GI~I~na

:.>16 ~llllord 51i Seligman 518 Ol'iental.. 51!J Tnrne y 5:10 1Toltee 521ILOCkWOOd

• COUNTY.

Prairie Home Cooper Platte City Platte IAvHlon ·ILi:.illgston Lath 1'0. p C.) mton Clearmont.. Nodaway Saxton BuchlUHtn Ivall Buren Carter Browning Linn Skidmore Nodaway Webb City Jasper Guthridge Mills.. Chariton Exeter Barrv GI~lenlt Stone ~hltord Harto!l Selif,"Illan IBarry IBlaekburn ISaline Turney ,clillt.on ~ I:MeXiCO Rep. of Mexico Lockwood Dade .. ·.. ·

~~~ ~~d~l~i~~~:::::::::~;:::~idci~~ ~.~~~ . :::::::li~Ia~~~li::::::: ?~~ S,Pick~LrdS;i1le

iJ2i.lICunmnghdm 526 "Vayne 52i Higbec 528 Conway 52\) Niangua ~~O Ritchey :..: :.>31 Lane's PrlLlne 5:~2 Dexter 533 ""alker 5:~lcolumbia

[)8:.> Blackwcll 536 Ingoluar

I

sPiek?-.r~s:.i1le

ICunrllngh,Lm Piedmont ·IWgbee Conway Niangua ~~tchey

IVlehy Dexter Iwalker Pacitie Blackwell. Willow Springs

,~ru~.dy

IChaIlton Wayne IRandolph Lacledc lwcbster New.ton Ma.nes Stoddard \Vernon

FraI~klin .: St. I' ranCOls IHowell

.

.

:MASTER.

.

. . 'fUIE OF MbErING.

SECRETARY.

---~--

-.-----

D. L. Davis !J. L. Carmack I'l'h?~. H. ~'Reily· Z. 1. ~Iartlll A. Gray Leroy Jeffries J. :\f. :\lcGhce John Carter IA. H. Garnett W. W. Greenlee E. D. Hirshey 1'

G. F. Jones W. L. Jenkins ·IJ· ·W. ~~aberry D. H. ~\.enc~all F. D. Sturtlvant.. P. X Smith .T. F. Short.. H. W. Crowley B. W. Campbell E. J. Webb O. n. Anderson

:

.

J. Frank Seaman 'f. W. Bundy Geo. W. Roller 11. P. Taylor ID. P. \-'latts A. W. Parsons 1.. · .. ·

·

·

J. 'rhos. Kennedy J. N. Herlocker '1'. J. Taylor J. E. Hayes J.. A. Scruggs G. D. Barron ·

:::::: 1-;r~~~r~~~~~:~~;:::::::::::::::: lb. ~.1j;!~~ktJr·.:; J.\-V. Wright J. H. Bedell. David J. Allen J. V. Adams 1'hos. Anderson James:Nr. Robertson James 11. Ritchey L. 1Iul'ts \James A. Sisler G. G. Wyss Iwm. B. sm.ith It H. Dea.rmg J. ~L Mott..

No l'ime give'll.

Saturday on or before full moon. ·Ilst ,~?d ~at. eves. i!1 each month. 1st &.'. 3d Saturdays HI el,tch month. Saturday on or after a full moon. Sat. eve. on or bet'. full moon e. m. Saturday on or after full moon. 1st Saturday night each month. Saturday on or before full moon. 1st Wednesday in each month. Sat. before full moon each month.

..

:::::~::::::::: ¥I~~l~~ ~~ osra~·e~~l'~~t~l %~l~~~.

IJ. R. Au~tin A. AndCIson Jos. '1'. Lanham J. S. Dysart O.Hardy Jno. J. Redmond Jno. H .. ~liller R, A. Kmg ,IJames C. Jennings E. D. Seamans E. Fisc!1e! N. Hawkll1so Geo. Pattersn

IR.

~at. nt. nearest f. m. llnd 2 wks aft. vel Saturday. ISnt. night on or after f. m. e. m. Wednes. on or before full moon. lst allC13.d Fridays ill each month. Eyery Thursday eve. at 8 P. M.

~

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l.~t and. 8~d.~Vcd .. in,c~e..h month. bt and 3,1 Wcd. III each month. 2d and 4th Sat. in each month. lwed. cve. on or before full moon. Saturday on or aftcr full moon. Sat. bet'. 1'1111 moon in each month. Sat. bcf. fUll. moon in .each month. Sat. eve. bcfore each full moon. 'rues: bet'. f. m. anel 2 wks. after. ISat. night on or before fnll moon. j2d and 4th Thurs. in eac.h month. 2d Saturdays. Last Tnesday each month.

,-,

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1"-

o

GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATE:NLENT.

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!---,------'-------'---'.

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Wclhngtoll.................... Florida.. ..

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III m~*:J.· • •••••• • • •.• • • •. ··.·f·i···J· i···r· .·.~.l • •~••••~.I • •'.!•• • •:.·.,.I·.·,.I•••,.I·••,.i· · ~·i ··1t·i··· 5HJ

I <,::o;a. 2 M~

~~>< ~ ~(' I --:~ ~ I ~ ~~ 'O~

CJ C1'ill

·1

·1

I::::::::::::I::::::::::::I

::::::1' .... ..:.:.. :I :::::::::::: 50

10 50

I'::::::::::::':::::::::::: ::::::::::> 1

I

,

I· ·

· .. 1.. ·

,

I

I

.

·~...1 159.0 I~ gg II:::::::::::: · · ·1

\

~ ..·

~

~ ~

~

~.

~g ~g [:::::~::~~:

900 / 14 00 , .1'1

~O

. ..

I

..

I

.

l'.. ·~. I.. ··~..;;.1 ~g~7 I 141~ ggflO I:::::::::::: :::::::::::: ~~.. I 11 o~ :::::::::::: , · ·1 1 , I~ flO : .

1 1 ••••••

1 1

I

1

v

00

I

1;) 00

1

10 00

~

o

(j ~


1888路1

255

Appendix.

FINANCIAL SUPPLEMENTAL REPOHT. Since my financial report was closed and the books hala-need, I have following amounts on Lodge dues: Cyrene Lodge, No. 14 $ Clifton Hill Lodge, No. 161.. . Red Oak Lodge, No. 468........... . . Spring Hill Lodge, 1\0. 155 '" . Wyaconda Lodge, No. 24 . Knob Noster Lodge, No. 245 . Fayetteville Lodge, No. 264.. .. New Home Lodge, No. 326 . Seaman Lodge, No. 126 :.. Bethany Lodge, No. 97........................ . .. Wakandn. Lodge, No. 52 .. Warrensburg Lodge, No. 135 .. King Hill Lodge. No. 376 .. G'lllatin Lodge, No. 106 . Bloomfield Lodge, No. 153 " . Bllrnsville Lodge, No. 455 .. Middle Grove Lodge, No. 4路2... .

received the 10 00 14 50 19 50 12 50 1250 2:; 50 15 50 2400 41 50 3000 72 50 2000 2100 2000 15 00 2600 1000

S388 00


~

c.n o

ROL.L OF "DEAD LODGES" UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE GRAND LODGE ,OF MISSOURI, OE!.G-.A.NJ:Z:E:D .J.S:Z:L .

COMPILED FRm.-r ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS BY GEO. FRANK GOULEY, GRAND SECRETARY, 1876. REVISED AND BIWUGHT DOWN TO OCT. 1838,

----------

-.~J

NA;\!l-: OF LODGE.

2IJoaChim 3 HirlwL 4 Hnrmony 5ITaylor 5 Olive Branch GIUl1lty 7 Fmnklin Union 7 Grover 8 Vam.hliR 9 StlI)gamon 10 Cnioll

I

-I

I

Tow:-<.

IHercuIH.neum St. ql~itrles LOlllSHl.nfi ,springtield j1.\lton .TlIllkson l<'fllnklin Calhoun

!v'ndnlin

Springfield IJOnesboro

I'

COUN·ry.

Jetferson S~. Charles !l'lke ~,Greenc Cape Girardca1.l , HOw;Lru· Henry 1

I

BY JOifN

-I

STATE. 1_

I:MO :MO :MO :\[0

1111... I:\fo ~rO

Mo 1.11...

1 ...Inl... 1111...

D. VLNCrL, GRAND S'·:Crn:TARY.

I

1 -

DATE OF CHAIUER.

RE;\IARKS.

Oct., 1820, by G. L. of Tenn Arrested April 7, 1825. 1820, by G. L. of Tenn Surrendered Apr!14, 1~26. 1 Oct. 11, 1821.. Surrendered Apnl, 182-:1. Mfiy 6,1852 .. · ·· ·.. ·· ·.. IUnited with "LTnited, NO.5." A. pril 3,1822 United with 1st G. L.. of Illinois, 1824. Nov. 25, 1821, clisp. G. L. Ind'jsurrendered Jannary 7, 1823. IApril 3,1822 Arrested December 20, IS.31. l\lay. 1852 Died18(jO. ctober 8, 182Z unitecl.With 1st G. L. of minois, lR24. October 25, 1822 'Arrested April 11, 1826. October 2:3, 182:L ·· lunited with 1st G. L. of Illinois, 1824.

I

°.

s--

'-3 ~

;:s

P.o->. ~

l~ ~;\~~~~~\c:.::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~~ir~Nn~/~~.·.· ·: L~1·~~~~te:::::::::::: ~}~:::::::: ~~~~'G~sr~2·::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ~~~~~g~~~~~ i~~:

nlEclen 13 Tucker 14 I BOOnYille..·.. ·· 14 IA. Ub.uru cntnLl 15 l'er:;evcrance 16 Colnmbia

l;Jlc..

~l N~w L?~don

21 GlCcnc,tStle 22lFmnkli.n 23 Hiram 24 Harmony 24 Wyaconclfi 25/Na Phtali 2(};Spril\gticlcl

!covmgto.n Ste. Genevieve ·.. ··· .. ·.. · .. · Boonville IAuburn !Smith. ville Louisiana Columbia ~e~v Lon.don (Treencastle ,Alton .., ISt. Charles : Jacksonville La Grange St. LOlliS Springtielf1

Ste. Genevieve Icooper Lincoln Clay Pike IBoone r:-all.s SullIvan 1

St. charles

j

Lewis

·IIlI... l\Io Mo 111-.[0

IMO MO l\[o )o[o.: 1~10

1.11...

IMO

Ill. Mo :\10 T11..

1

October 9. 1822 October 10, 1826 April 3, 1827 May 8, 1S52 May 6,1852 IA Pril8, 1828 October fl, 1i130 !October 5i.~837 June 2,186( 0. ctober 5,18;'\7 \OctOber 5,1837 October 2,1838 June 10, 1853

1

October 8,

1f:t~!l

United with 1st G. L. of Tllinois, 182·L \Surrenderecl April 6, 18:'\1. IArrestecl October 3, 18:~S. Arrei>ted Oct., 1884, b.Y.Lee A. Hn,lJ. G. :\L : Wcnt down on ac.count of wal', 1i1lil. Arrested April 3,18:38. Arrested October 0, 1838. ISu~r~n~lered~862. ~on accollnt of war. Arrested Apfll, 18/9. United with G.. L. o.r Illinois, oct.,. 1M::1. Arrested October 16. I&-Hi. United with G. L. of Illinois, IS-II) Sllrrendere<l1876. Arrested 1887, by G. R. Hnnt, G. l\L IUnited with G. L. of Illinois, 18-10.

r-1

o ~

;:+


Q

.

2(il?l[.exico 27 IRlllggoid 271'l'emperance

I~[.c.Xi.CO

Rlllggoid Vandalia

IAU(lrain \ Platte

;\[o Mo IlL

I~Iay~, 18;,)~

May 6, 1852 October 9,1839

\COnSOI.i.clatet! l~S!.,.with Hebron, Ko. 354. Arrested May, 18::J;). United with G. L. of Illinois, 1842.

~'1 ~ g~~~l~~:~:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.::::::::::,f:nli~~ll~i~:.::::::: ~·::~;:O:I:~:::::::::::::::,t{~::::::::I?~~,~~~{ti~·~:~~~:::::::::::::::::::::!!~~~;~;l~(~~1~6\~t I 32 Lafayette Lexington Le-:ing:ton .,2 1Iymgle : : pt;Jr),vllle 33 I-llllsboro alws ?>oIt. Monah.. HIllsborO

~ :3~ !~l~.fayette

.

j

Ln.fayette Lafayette Perry

MO Mo

I Nro

IlL

Ioetober 8, 1840 ,October 19, ISG7 10ctober 12, 1882 October 8.1&10

,..... (J:) (f) 'J)

t..:.......J

war. IArrested December 1, 18(\6.

c;on~ol. 188~ w~th ~c.xin~~~)Tl, ~o. ~'!p

C011S01.1881 Wlt.h 1.nple.l1e, NO.4;)". Arrested October lb, 1&16.

.

1!~£i~t::,~~t~T,7,~, t:~::F: fIEir1E~;~~,i'~lEgf~t~7N:!~6 Ist. '1OlColeman Louis 411D.es MOines \BUrlington 411Bolivar Bolivar Polk 42 Houston Breckenridge CaldwelL 42 [owa Bloomington 42 Middle Grove /Micldle Grove II~Ionroe 44 Rochester Hoehester Andrew 46 Sparta,formerly"Kabzeett"ISparta ,Buchanan 1 46,Mnrtha Washington ,WlL,;hinh>ton /Franklin '19.)linC.'t'H1 Point... M!neral Point 50 ~hddletown )IIddletown ~Iontgomery ~O Ozark : ,S.)rin~rfiel.d ,G;e.el~e ,,0 Anderson 1dlapel IIlll !L,tfayette t)lll D.oug-Ias Marthasville "'.arren 561Pllltte Platte City Platte 58 Monticello :Ylonticello ILewis 59 1 Lan~aster l.'ancaster Schuyler · · lsalelTI : 1 ~OI.St. ClalI' IBelleVII.le :· :::::::::·.· ::::::.::::: ::::::·.::: .. 62 ' Dubuque Dubuque 1 .. · 68 1~t. l\Iarys Perryville Perry (iilj[owaCity llowaCity I 64 Landmark Warsaw Benton .: 65 )-.[elod Y IPla.tteville I ~6 l\Iarshall. : I~IarShall. : jSaline 69 j Alexandna Alexandna Clark 70 College Il\Iarion College l\'Iarion 70IDickinson IMonroe Marion 7:')!Bowling Green Bowling Green Pike

591.l\Iar.lOl~

~~I~I~~~~;i\iE;·

~[~;~~v~t·ie

IMO Iowa 'IMO Mo 1[own. 1)10

IMO

1\-10

Mo ,WiS IMO Mo iVIo d\10

rlo \MO ;\Io 11.1... I.I,IL

loctober 8,1841 IOetober20,.1841. June 9,1853 June 2, 18G6 October 20, 1&11 June U, 1&')? June 10, 18<'3 · October 8,1841.. June 10, 1853 IOctob~r llz 1842 May 2v, 1S.'l4 'October}i, 1842 IMay, 1858 [October 11, 1842 October 14,1&12 October 12, 1842 Il\Iay 2:j, 1854 IOctober 11, 1842 'OctObe.1'11,1842

~tei~~b~ ::::::~::::::'~'t~:::::::: ~Ic;~~~~ iW~~ IIowa IMo Iowa Mo \Vis Mo 1\10

l\Io Mo ?lIo

October 10, 1843 II?I'lay 25, 1854 October 10, 1848 ,October 12,1848 IOctober 12,1843 10etober 1~, 1843 October 1h, 1844 October 16, 184L

I

October 14, 1846

Changed to "Mt. ::\Ioriah, No. 40," 1844. United withG. L. of Iowa, 1&1'1. Surrendered 1863. · Arrested April 22, 1869. United with G. L. of Iowa, 1844. IArrested. FebrUfl.._r y 29,18&-1. · ·.. ·ISurrenderedI86:.J. Arrested October l!l, 1846. I Arrested :Ylay, lR68. U. nited with G. 1" o.f Wisconsin, 1844. ·.. IArrested May lR, 18::J8. l-\~~ested Octc,>ber 18, ~847. " Destroyed 18hl, by w,tr. I'surrend.ered.:NOV. 15, 1888. Surrendered 1864. IArrested by Jas. W. Boyd, G. l\I., Oct., 1880. ~r~ested ~S{i6.. ., (<, L. I1l:no.ls, 184:L Umted W.'lth G.. L. of IllInOIS, 1&13.

·I~n~ted w~th

"',::::;-

"2i ~

;3 ~

~.

o~

:.:::::::::::::::: g~~i~g~~~ i~~~: ~~ ~~~~: United with G. L. of Iowa, 1&14. 1

'Surrendered January, 1864. United with G. L. of Iowlt,I&14. Destroyed 1861, by war. United with G. L. of Wisconsin, 1&14. Arrestedl~l.

Arrestecl1864. Changed to" Dickinson," 1&17. 1IFormed from "College, No. 70." Chang-eel to "Ashley, No.7:")."

~

VI

-1


ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES," ETC.-Contimted.

~: ~DGE..!

.

TOWN.

7f>. 'INeOShO jKeosho 81 Dana Calhonn 88.Multanomah Oregon City 84 ,TOhTlSon · ,1warrensburg 86' i\-litchell Columbus 86\Mo. Mil. 3d Reg't i-fo. Vol.. · 88 Bates Butler · 88!Olive Bmnch ,Union S8 re~c~en .. · · · · ·IDresc~en ; 90 Prame Harnsonville 90, King Solomoll St. Catharinc D.

:-

TSTATF~

COO'TY.

!Newton ·IHenry IJohnson IJohnson , · IBates Franklin jPettis ..· Cass Linn

j,,-ro ·11'10 Oregon. Mo , y[o · ·

1

:\10 11\'[0 IMO: ,~Mo

j1\'10

~

e.H

C/:)

nATE OF CHARTER. - - - , - . - - ' -

184~

Octob.er H, October 17,1&1(, October 19,1&16 March 19, 1847 Unknown October Hz 1&17 :May 28, 18;)8 October 1<1, 1847 ·1'October 19, 186Z October 12,1&1, ,June 2, 1866

:

RE3fARKS.

rest~red

,Surrenc1ered 1.863; as 247, in 186-.'. Arrested October 28,1852. 1st Lodge on Pac. Coast.. United G. L. Ore. Destroyed 1861, by war. Destroyec11861, by war. Closed with MeXIcan war. DestrOyed. 18fJl, by war. /'Arrestcd about 18:35. Arrested ,TUl~:., 1878, by T. C. Ready, G. i\L Destroyed 18(,1, by war. Consol. with Brookfield, No. 86, Jan., lSi'S.

g11~~~~~?~g·Stal:::::::::.::::::::::::I§~~:~~~~:::::::::::: ~~~~;.O~(l·::::::::::::I~Ig:::::::: ~t~r ~9,ltjg5.·.·::::::::::::::::::::::::IS\ll'rendered JUIIC 12, 1875.

95 Acacia· ·· ·IJackson 95 IPlcasant Hill. ,Plcasant Hill 95 Cha p man······ .. ···· .. ·· .. ····· .. L as Vegas · 901 M t. Vernoll :\[t. Vernon 101,Greelle Springtield 1011Easton Easton

··I

'Cape Girardeau Cass I,[.'er. Mex Polk Greene ·IBuchanan

of~ew

1'[0 Mo

1\'[0 'r.{o Il\[o

May:\ 1848 May 8,1&18 :.J..u ne 2, 18i\G May 11,1848 ,:\[ay 12, 1848

·

r

.;.

Ivv·ent down durillg the war. ,Arrcsted 18:i;t Unitcd. with G. L.. of New :\[eXic.'O' 1877. 1Surrendered December 27, 18()~. 'United with" United No. 5," 18.~)7. IArrcsted October, 18Bn, by J. W. Boyd, G. }f.

t~~lf;m~::~~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::IR~d~~~~~~·:I~::::::::it?~!*~::.:.:.:.:.:.::::::::::IHg::::::::i~~~~ ~~: i~ : ·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·: : : :~~~~1:~7~~~\11~~t. ·I:'Ifacon.~

lOfilL.apone 10ri Miami

n-ra.con 'Mo ,:1ITiami ·· · ·ISil.lille ··········· .. ··lwestPort : JaCkSon,'."':"""'" ,:\10 lOSll"CW Maclncl New :\o1ll.dnd New Madnd 1i'-ro 108 Aztee ILas Cruces Tel'. ofKew Mex 10!),r.[onteZllma ·· .. · · ·· .. ·.. ISanta [·'e ."l'er. of New Mex.. I 109jLOUisillna Ste. (.;e~eVieve ·.. ISte. Ge,nc.'vicve .. ·Ir-,ro

/MO

107,(~0Iden Sq~Ul.re

,1'[ay 28, 18fl8 1Mil.y 10,.1849

,:\fay 10,1&19 IOctober 19,1867 May 8, 18-51 ·i1807, by G. L. of Pa

~

~ ~

~

~.

Cha.nged to "Macon, NO.. lOG.'·' Surrendered Fcbruary 10. ],'I.fi7. Ar.rested Oct()l~er., 1886, by J.. W. Boyd, O.:'If. Destroyed c1111'1ng the war. United with G. 1,. of Kcw i\{exico, 1877. Unitcd with G. L. of Kew ]\{exico, 1877. I IArrestcd b.~T (T. L. of Pcnllsylvania, 18~4.

N~ ~;f{{~lliS ::::::::::::::::: ::::::: :::I'~t l~~~~~~'i'~~iiie:::'~;tL~~~.~~.·",·.·.·"""":::::'~:~b::::::::,ki~;i ~Yl~oT: ~~ ~~::::::::: :::::: 's\~'~;~~~~~red li;GO. y

114 .waverl y lLf>I'SibICY IF) HOI'. (~e.r lIt) DiLVlCSS 118 Hiram

Waverly Sibley S'onth-.West CitY" /Gallatlll St. chllrles..···

Mc~onald 1

".. 10 ,1\10 1."'110

124/Dllrdenne 128,KirhviLle

O'Fallon ,Kirksvillc

St. Chllrles.. ·.. · !Adair

I 1\'lo

ILlLfu ette ',Taekson DavIess

Mo

\1\1l1 Y 9, 18.'fiO r-fay 10, 18;;0 OctOb.er lfi, 1874 !\-[ay 10,18,)0 IMay 10, .l8f,O

Ii-:i.·llrrc.'Il.dcrec.1 Jll11uary 2\ ]SGO. Sllrrenc1erecl 1,'1.(;:1. 'Isurre. llclere. ~.l.octolJe.I'., 1.'182. Arrested 18,(•. 'Sllrrcllderccl JHay, 18(,2.

October 19, 18G7 !r-ray S, lW>l

IArrestecI .Jan. Fl, 18%, by R. F. Stevenson ,Arrested 18(;:>'. New Charter 18G4 to i\o.lO<

I'st. Charlcs MO n~I~'~d;;I~: . ::··::::::::::::::::::::::::::::I~~~~l~~n·t· :::::::::: 8~~1~r::::::::::::::::::'t~6::::::::!K~:~~:i~: i~?,~ : :::::::::::::::::::!~::~~~::~~::~;1 }~~~: I:v[o

.

[G.

;\1.

r--1

ol.l

r-t"


1281Live Oak 129 Constantine 1:{0 Barrv laO West P!airie

Pleasant. HiIL.··1'Cass Charleston Mississippi Cassville ,Barry ~larkt<.?n (l1nklin

1~11·~l~~~;.,~i{u

IMO

Mo Mo Mo

IArrestec1 by G. L. of ~Ussollri, um. Surrendered .Jnly 2R, 1874. Arrested 1852. IArrested Oetoberl l886, by J. W. Boyd, <.f.:\L

Octoher 19, 18G7 ~Iay 8, 1851 :May, 18.")2 l'Iay 28,}858

.• .• • ,~\~.;~:b:ll.?I~~'. • •:. • • • II~EJ~;~~<.I~'j~tt~li~~~fr8W"'

HI Mldclleburj 141 orient.al 14;)/Flint HilL 14'! J9~1l1 ?ade; .. ; B;) "" ll1dsor City 1.46IMCGee 147 Buffalo

MlddlebUly Mercer, TrCllton Grundy Flint HilL St. Charles C~.sSvi1l: ;.. : IBarry .. · ··· '" ll1dSOl City Carroll. :,{ound· .. Buffalo Dallas P!nevil~C :..; ~IcDonal:I LUlll Cleek Camc1clI

Coll~ge

1~8 y~ncy

1;>21 Lmn Creek

I~Iacon

Mo

MO IMo I"'[o Il'[o :\[o 1)'\0 MO IMo

:May ::\1,1&:)<) jOctober.1i, 1873 May 31, 1K)5 IJnne 1, l~~? .. ····..·..··· .June 1, 180<) \:\IUY, May, 18:)<) 1June I,. 185..~ ~[ay 2ti,}S;-'u

·

18~~

l<rankhn 'l:aney lh.nox Andrew Clark

I : CI~rl~

lVIo I~lo ·IMo Mo !Mo /MO ·..·.. · .. · 1l'10

l'I1ller 'MississipPi. /Bollinger Cla.rk

:\10

)10 Mo MO

~Tay 2S, 1856 October 111 1879 May 29,1&:.6 :\1ay 28, 1856 May 18,18.")7 October 191 }867 :\lay 18, 18:?~ )Iay 18, 18:.11 l\'.I.ay 30,1857 ,May, 1857 1lIIay , 1857

·

··

C/) C/)

....:.....J

·Arrested 18/2. lconsolidated with Trenton Lodge, 111. Surrendercd 181>3. ·Ir,>estrOyed 1861'.1?Y war. Surrendered 1850. . [G. yL Arreste.d April, 1885, by R. F. Stevenson, IArrested 1861. IA~~este.c1.Jan .. 19, ~884, by L. A. Hall, G. ~I. -qestro~·ed 1861, by war.

~~~ g~~~~~:::::::::::::::.::::::.:::::::Gre~I.lville ~~~~~1:l~~~~;:::::;~:~:1~:~~;;:.:::::::::::::1~~?~~1:~: t~~f-2~~~~~~:.:::::::::::::::::::::::::I~~~~:~~1\~~I~bywar. 158IJOh~?On ..· I':Yayne: · I~'1O October 19! ~867..· ··.. ·.. ··· lsurrendered ApE.i12:J, 1885.

159 Pacific PacIfIc 1591)Ie~ldota ~r~tem 160 E.'chna IEdma 161,Robert )[Orris '.savannah 167: Eldorado Luray 1(i71~r~ent Frangais S,t.. .I:ollis City 168 p'alrmou~t l<aIrmou~t.. TuscumbIa 169 1 fllscumbla 172 Wolf Island Wolf Island 173 Union, form'ly "Bollinger" Wolford's store 177!Winchester Winchester

~

en

b:...

_

Arrested Jan. 18/8, by T. C. Ready, U. M. !Arrested June 12,_ ~8S4, by L. A. Hall, G. tiL Arrested May, 18(.6. ,surrendered 1857. Surrendered 1861. ISurrendered January, 18&'l. ·Isurrendered June 12,1863. Surrendered 1863. /surrendered August 22,1874. No records. Destroyed 1861, by "rar.

:g ;§

~

~

}~I~~~d~;~:::~::::::::::::::::::::::::::~~~nel~~lS·vi·iie·::::::~~~k~.:· ·.::::::::::: ~~g:::::::: ~~~~; i~~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::'E~~t~~~~~ n~i; ~~ ~~~~:

184 ICalhoull 1861Dayton 187 "Henry Clay" 191 Zerubbabel 1951 Wet Au Glaizc 19~.1 camde.n : 200 Washburn 203 Pleasant Ridge 203 Green Ridge 20~IBent

20<:JIRocky Mount

·

··

c.alhoun IH.enry IDaytoll lcass :\Tillersburg Callaway Platte City IPln.tte ·I\Vet Au Glaize !Camden ,.ca.mdCI.l RlLY Washburn Barry PI~H,slmt Ridge Harrison lwllldsor Henry Taos Camp Floyd )

MO jMO Mo IMO MO

May, 1859 May, 1859 IMay 28,1859 IMay , 1860 ".MO May, 1859 I:MO ,l\'lay , 1860 :\(0 l'h~y, 1860 Mo October 19,1867 I~. l'fex.,JUne 1, 18~0 ,Utah June 1, 1860

!Arrested by J. W. Boyd, Grand Master. Destroyec11861, by war. AI'. June, 1881, by W. R. Stubblefield, G. M. I.AlTested June, 1879, by N. :i\-L Givan, G.M. Surrendered 1862. \v.ent down 1861, by war. Destroy'ed 1861, by war. Arrested 1863. Surrenderec11873. Surrendered 1865. Surrenclerec118G1.

l~

::.n

c:.o


~

ROLL OF "DEAD LODGES," ETC.-Continued. • I ~I

NA~[E

OF LODGE.

f1

Tow~.

-

I'

COU:'TY.

r STATE.

Mo Mo 110 Mo lYlo

I

_~ATB OF CHA~~

20S!AltO Vista 211 Orion 212 Austin 21f> West Plains 217 Q,uincy 219 Emerson 219 New Boston 222 Farmers 22::\ Jasper

Alto Vista St. Joseph j Austin West Plains Q,uincy Emerson New Boston Labelle Sarcoxie

232jDe'Vitt 232 Lone Jack 239 Spencersburg 2741:\'ew Market.. 277\Inctex 2134 Lilly 29:) Grove 29G 1Cameroll 3121~[t. Pleasant 314 St. Aubert.. 314 Rome 32(i/Kit carson s80.ILathrop 3:~2 Clark City 38(; Oak Grove B37 lY.f alta ::HO Amity 347 1Landmark 348 Ash Grove 348 Cimarron 3.49 Lone star 353 Ben Franklin SE,7 Phelps <l58 Comlort 364 King David :~65 Warsaw 3G6 Unanimity 371 Craig 375 Plumb

I.De.".Vitt Carro.ll. 7v.'IO !1863···:· .. · · ·· .. ·.. · Lone Jack Jackson MO ·IOctober 19, 1867 Spencersburg Pike i\'Io lY[ay, 1865 New i\'[arket.. Platte Mo October 15, 1868 IIndex: ICass · I~fo October 15, 1868 Gran.t City 'Worth \MO October, 1868 Webster Groves St. Louis Mo May 15,1868 .J cameron Clinton lY[o October 10, 1875 Ellingt.on Gentry ·.. ·..1Mo :: St. Aubert.. Callaway Mo October 12, 18b9 1 Rome Douglll.s IlYlo October 11, 1888 /Elir.abethtowll I i\'lex.iOctober 12,1869 Lathrop !Clinton ~[o IOctober 13, 1870 IClark City Clark Mo October 12, IS70 IPink Hill Jackson IMO October 12, 1870 · Malta.13end lsali.ne i\IO I Smithton Pettis ~[o IOctober 13,1870 IKennett.. IDUl1klin lYIo October 13, 1870 Ash Grove Greene li"lo October 1:3,1870 : Cimarron i\Iex. October H, 187,"> ILone Star Gentry : Mo October 13,1870 Savannah IAndrew ""[0 October 13,1870 Phelps Citv Atchison I;Ho October, 1870 IRocky cOl:lIfort...IMcDonald Ii\[o October 13,1870 Kansas City Jackson ~ro October 13, 1870 Warsaw /nentol1 jMO Octobcr l8. IS70 Weston Platte )[0 October 13, 1870 Craig Holt.. i\.:-o October 13, 1870 i\lolltgomery IMo IOctober 13, 1871 1i\Iiddletown

~~ri ~~~a~rii

:: :::::· ::::::::::::::: ~~~~~rii·::::::::::::::

Daviess Buchanan \C.ass Howell Hickory I·l\IariOn i\-racon Lewis IJasper

-

1~'fO

1MO Mo

1\10

May, 1861. :May, 1861.. 11ay, 1861. May, 1861.. lYlay, 18f>1.. May, l&il October 12, 18f>9 May 30, 1861 i\Iay, 18~1.

~~~~dr::::·.:::::::::: ~~g::::::::i~~~~'2~~(i8i,.i·

IN.

IN.

.

0:>

o RE)[AR_K_S_.~

_

IArrested 1865. Surrendered 1863. \Destro y ed18fil, by war. Surrendered 1861. Destroyed by war. Destroyed 1861, by war. !Snrrendered 1871. Surrendered 1887. Destroyed 1863, by war.

::::::::::· :::::::::1~~s~~~~;.~/861,

by war. · lsurre. ndered 1865. No returns. ,Surrenderecl1877. Isurrenderecl September, 1881. Surrendered October, 1878. '''IArrested 1877. AI'. Dec., 1880, by W. R. Stubblefield, G. 1L Surrendered 1874. jConsOI. with Vinci! Lodge No. 62. 1888. ~on. solidated With. Stanber~." No. 10!). Surrendered December 1-1, lS82. Collsol. with Ava. Ko. 2G, March, 18~8. I Arrested 1878, by T. C. Reafly, G. i\L /Arres.ted ~fay, 18.79, bv N..M. Givan. G. M. Surrellderecl1875.· . iSnrrendered October 3,1873. ,Arre.ste.'d Jan., 1S87, by G. R. Hnnt. G. i\1. Surrendered January, 1884. . i.\rres.ted Mar., 1879, by~. M. Givan, G. iH. Arrested 1872. ISllrrcnc]ereo 1879. Arres.ted Jan. 2:j, 1884, by L. A. Hall, G. M. Conso1. with Savannah Lodge, No. 71. \Surre.ndcredl&'l1. Arrested Jan. 19,188'1, by L. A. Hall, G. ;\L Surrendered 1879. jAr. Sept., 1888, by '.'1/. i\L Williams, G. M. Surrendered 1879. Arrested Jan. 10, 'S:{, by C. C. Woods, G. M. jAr. Sept., 1H88, by W. :\1. Williams, G. 1'1.

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37~lcoatesVille

S8.'i Alexander 401 Centre 405 .i\lericlian SUIl .lOG Hurrea .1OilI-Iollston 409 Uuity ,1l7ICoVenant 421 Euclid ·121; Leesville 4:~:21 Dauphine '13:) Silent Temple 43IiILamonte 437 Tuscumbia 442 )It. Leballon ,145 West Gate 449 Piedmont 454 Benton 463 Lake 465 Silver City 4791TrilLIIgle 4Sg ellion 1

Coat~sville ···.·····IS~h~lyler

Bedford Lebanon Austin HannibaL Wellington Richmond 'lcarrOllton Versailles Leesville Dauphine Macon !Lamonte Tuscumbia Mt. iHoriah ISt. Louis j'Piedrnont Lincoln Cunningham Silver City Blltler , f:a .Tlmtl~

· ;L1VlTlgston ILaclede C.'uss ;\-larion Lafayette Ray Carroll -:'I-[organ Hellry Osage Macon IPettis Miller Harrison St. Louis City Wayne Benton Chariton Gr.ant IBates New. Mexico

Consol. 18,~1 with Glenwood, No. 427. Consolo wIth Hale Lodge, 184, Oct., 1887. Arrested 1887, by Geo. R. Hunt, G. ~I. October 18,1871 Arr. Ang., 18&'>, by R. .F~ Stevenson, G. M. October 13, um ConsoL with Hannibal Lodge, No. 18S.. ,October 18,1871.. Destroyed by fire December 19, 18i3. October 13, 1871.. Surrenderecl1876. : jOctober 12,1872 Conso!. with Wakanda Lodge, No. f)2, '80. October 12,1872 Conso!. with Versailles Lodge, ","0. 117. I"'"'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' IArrested Oct., 1881;, by the Grand Lodge. October 17, 1873 Surrendered 1879. ,October Hi, 1~i72 Surrendered October, 1877. ~lo IOctober 1G, 1872 Arrested Oct., 1878, by T. C. Ready, G. M. -:'1.10 Arrested October, 1886, by.T. \V. Boyd, G. M. Mo October 16,1812 Surrendered 187\1. Mo October 1(i, 1872 Arrestec11887, by Geo. R. Hunt, G. ~r. ~-Io IOctober IG, 1872 Arrested Jan. 19,18&1, by L. A. Hall, G. iII. Mo October IG, 1872 Arrested ~{ltY 21, 1884, by L. A. Hall, G. -:'II. Mo October 17, lS7::l Arrested November 7, 1876. ~1ex.IOctobe. r 17, 18.7-3 lsurren'd Chal'.t.er & lll.lited with of:N. iHO I·october 15,1874 Surrendered Oct., 1877. [;\lex., 1882. October 15, 1874.. ,united with G~_L. of New 1'1exico, 1877.

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~lo :Mo Mo Mo Mo ;v[o 110 Nlo N1o !Mo

October, 1871, October 13, 1~:\70

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LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE l\L W. GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, FI{O~[

DATJ~ I

GRAND MASTER.

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D. GRAND

)1 ASTER.

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ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23D, 1821.

GRA~D S. WAr.DEN. I GRAND J. WARDEN. I

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I G~AND SF,CRETARY~

GRAND TREASURER.

April, ~821.. '1:nos., F. Ridd~ck : ; :.: .. ;,: J,ames Kennerly W~ll~am Bate~ ~ Arch~b~ld Gamble :.I\~~ll~am Ren~ha\~< Oct., 1821. Jl\ath 1 B. Tucker · Thompson Douglass Edward Bates WIllIam Bate::; · Archlb,tld Gltmble I·WIllmffi Rensha\\. Oct., 18~2""INath;1 B. Tucker : Thompson Douglass.~ l:dward Bates ~ W~ll~am G. Pettus .. Arch!bald Gamble :Yilliam R?n,;~haw.* Oct., lS~3 :Nath 1 B. Tucker · Geo. H. C. :Melody Edward Bates WillIam G. Pettus ... Arehlbald Gamblc...... 1. Douglass. Oct., 1824 Kath'l B. Tucker * Geo. H. C. Melody * William G. Pettus * Thornton Grimsley..'¥ Archibald Gamble *tT. Douglass.* Oct., 1825 Edward Bates ';'.Geo. H. C. Mclody * William G. pettus"'*IThornton Grimsley..* Archibald Gamble *John D. Daggett.* Oct., 1826 Edward Bates *IHardage Lane * Martin Ruggles * John F. Ryland '!' Rich. T. iVfcKinney * John D. Daggett.* Oct., 18;7 Edward Bates :IHardage Lane ; :IMartill,R.uggles : H. R. GambJe <'IThornton <{r~~le~.. John D .. D . agge.'tt.,~ Oct., 1828 Hardage Lanc Geo. H. C. Melod:; H. R. (Tamble.......... Adam L. Mills ·· Thornton Gnmsle~ John D. Daggett.· Oct., 1829 Hardage Lane * Fred L. Billon /H. R. Gamble * Adam L. Mills * Bernard Pratte * John D. Daggett.';' ~Iar~ll~e Lan~ : q~o. H. C. i\Ielody :: Si~slair ~~rt~ey ~ Adam. L. Mills.: ~: Thomas Andre·w~ ~~ed. L. B~llon. Oct., 183~ Dec., 1~~1... Ed\\ aId Bate,s ,;, ('co. H. C. 2\[~lody *Oll\ er TParker.. ~, Augustus Jone~ ,;,\homas Andrews ,;, ~red. 1,. B~lloll. Oct., 18.32 H. R. Gamble · Geo. II. C. 'Melody...... M. J. Noyes Augustus Jones · '1homas Andrews....... Fred. L. Billon. Dec:, 1~~~ lsillclai.r ,Kirtley A: B. 9ha!TJ-?ers ::: Jo~n W. ilSO!l.. -<:: G. A. Tllttle : ~' Oeo. .H... C. l\.[elod~ :T?hn ?arr:et~.* ,,'" Noy., ~;.~L. A. B. Ch,tmbers ~~ncla~r 15~ltl~~ ~ Ol~ver Par~er ~, S. W. B. Carnegy Geo. H. C. :M:elody ,~I,I,honMsW: Con),~r~.* Oct., l,-d~ tt A. B. Chambers SlIlclmr I'-Irtley OlIver Parker.......... S. W. ~. Carnegy Geo. H. C. Melody 1 homas W. COlI) er~.. Oct., 1836 jS. W. B. Carnegy John n.nllgg~tt '~ Ed\.va.rd Searcey ·;· GranVIlle Snell .'r. Geo. F.r. C. 1' ..felody *\R .. ichard B. Dallam.··' Oct., 1887 ,8. W. B. Carnegy John D. Daggett.. * A. B. Chambers '" Thomas Andrews * (;eo. H. C. .\lelody ·l' Richard B. Dalhl.lu.I' O~t., 1~:;'3 S. W. B. Ca!·negy ,: John D. Da?~e~t... A. B. C~ambers.:: .. i~}.e~. T. I?ouglass .. Geo. H. C. l\,felody R!chard B. Dallam.:, Oct., 18.)9 P. H. McRr~de ; A."B. Ch,!1'I~1Ders ,~ Al~:-:. '1. DOllgla~s ) \\ Ilham 9· :Vance ;, <{e,o. H. c. l\relody *IR~~hard B. Dallam. '" Oct., 1840 P. H. ~IcBnde IJo~ePh r o,,;ter. ·IAlex. T. DoUgla~s IJOhn Orncl, · (,eo. H. C. Melody RIchard B. Dallarn. Oct., 1841. P. H. :vrcBridc '~ Joab Bernard * Joseph Foster * C. H. Bowen' Geo. H. C. l\lelody * Richard B. Dallam.'" Oct., 1842 P. H. McBr!de ,.JOab Bernard *IJoseph F'o~ter * C. H. BO\.V.ers J.?llll Sim.O!lCls * R~chard B. Dallam.,.:, Oct., 1&13 P. H. l.ICB ..mle -<~ .~OS:Ph. Fos.ter *IJ: ~. S. 1IoIltc~ell E. .S. ~uggles ..: -:~ T'red.>;:L. ~hllon ,'.:. R. ~cha~d B. Dallam.~ Oct., 1844 J. W. S. 2\f1tchell · Free\. 1.. BIllon E. ~. Rugglcs J. L. F. Jacob:; John ~. "atson............ Rlchal d B. Dallalll. Oct., 1845 !J. W. S. Mitchell * John D. Taylor.. * E. S. Ruggles *[J. L. F. Jacoby *IJOhn S. Watson '" Freel. L. nillon. Oct., 1846 John Ralls John D. Taylor .'~:iE. S. ~uggles .I. 1" F. Jacoby John~. Watson Frc9. ~,. B.illon. . Oct., 1847 Joseph Foster. ·, E. S. Rnggles :' J. 1.. 1'. Jacoby ·•· Cyrus Osborn ·~ John ~. Watsoll ·,· J. w. S. i\I1tchell.·· iVlay, 1848 Joseph Fostcr '~ E. S. RUggles "'ICyrllS Osborn , * Joseph Megguire *IJOhn S. Watson *.r. W. S. Mitehcll.* May, 1849 John F. Ryland E. S. Ruggles * Joseph l\'Iegguire :" P. Draper * John M. Reecl.. ·;'IC. D. W. Johnson.* ~:lay, 1850 John F. Rylancl * B. vV'. Grover .';' P. Draper· * S. F. Currie * J. T. Johnson '" C. D. W. Johnson.*

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June, 1&53 May, 18.?'! J.\lay, 18uCl

Wilson Brown L. S. Cornwell L. S. CornweIL

* L. S. Cornwell D. P. WallingfOrcl I

J. W. Chenowcth

:':\Jam~s H. Britton

·",·

J. W. Chenoweth

1: :f: }~~~~g~~:::::::::::::::I~·. ~'~~iir~~~~i?n.*· * A. O'Sullivan.*

*tR. C. Hill *·Joseph Foster :.: ·;· ·.. · *:~IJOSePh Foster :'IH. E. Van Orsdell ·I· John D. Daggett..

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1856"'IRenjamin Sharp ~.I:~~, u:~n"'~' H. ~l1ullders )Ll~~, .1~~\ 1••• H., S~L. u.nel..c rs ~Ill~" 1.%.> }Iarcus Boyel

* W. A.

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Cnnniugham 1S. H. Saunders !:Marcus BOyd *I.fol1n D. Daggett *jA. O'Sullivan.* 1'. DI.. lLP.er ; :::I;..rarcll~.. Boyd <::.J..F. 1.[On~t~n .fohn 1.)..D~~ggett.. A. O:~IlIl~V;lIl<.!: ,; ;\.[ar.Cl.'.. B~.) ~l.. IJ9h~ .F.. H?~l~ton JOh.n De~k:.e~ ;.IJOlll.1 .1>..1.),Lg~~tt · · !.IA. o.,~nll~v,Ul .•.;' ·}I. H. Mc1,Llhtnd ,\·\. R. Pelllck John Dec],el .101m 1). ])ag"'ett A. O •. lllllvl111. ~{~y, 1~(!O"'Ii\r.. T~. iV[Cf!L;I,(ll~d \V. R. pe~\ick iIJ'Ohn De~ker :: Samuel ~~. I·[~L)·.es John D. D~g~ett... :::IA. O:~lll1!~an.:: . :v[,~y, 11'b1... WIlham h. I elllck John Decker (Teo. Wllltcomb · A. L. McC,regol.. .fohn D. Dllggett.. IA. 0 Snlh"an. May, 18(i~ IGeorge Whitcomb * John H. Turtler 'Vm. N. Loker Samuel Rusi'iell * John D. naggett.. * A. O'Sullivan.'" J.VI~y, 18~:L..I.rohn I-~. TlIrr~cr ;, Wm. N. ~?k:!'"'''''''''''' John D. \~i.r~~il A., ~ .. 1\[c,(;r€!g~r JC!hnI? Da¥g~tt..."""*IA. O:SlIll~~all< M,Ly, 18b·! .fohn 1,; HOll.ton :.JohnD. \~nc!I.. IA. L.. Mc.(,H;gOl M,u,tlllCollnls WI1l.~. Lokel. A. OSu\l!\an ..: May, 18.~~ John I.•.. r~ou~ton ". .r.l?h.n D .. 'THlCll ::Ml1r~JI.l. cOI.hns R. I A. ncleri'iOn WJl1. N..Loker ·: O'Snll!v,ul< ~Iay, 1866 .fohn D. Vlncll. W. E. Dullscomb :'jR. },. Anderson A. L. }[cGregor Wnl. N. Loker :\. O'Sullivan.'" t Oct., 1867 \''Y'. E. Dunscomb ·;· C. A. Rowley * T. E. Garrett Wm. D. 1\[uir 'I' Wm. N. Loker G. Frank Gouley.*~ Oct., 1868 John D. VincH R. E. Anderson Wm. D. lvluir *IA. 1\1. Dockery Wm. ~. Loker (;. Frank Goulcy.* Oct., 18(\() William D. ~Iuir * '1'. E. Garrett IAlex. ,M. Dockery Samuel H. Owens * Wm. :N. Loker ·O. Frank Gouley.* Oct., ISZ0 (:arrett R A. nder. H. .. .fOh.n :R. ·.. ·.. Oct., 1811.. .. 1homas.L. (Turrett R E. AndersoIl SnJnuel H. 0\\ ens '" John L Ryland Wm. ~. Lo],er (T. I rank (,ouley.· Oct., lS72 Samuel H. Owens * J. E. Ryland Jolln W. Luke .'!' Jas. E. Caelle Wm. N. Loker lo. Frank Gouley.* Oct., lS73 R. E. Anelerson \John W. Lukc .* Jas. E. Cnclle Xenophon Ryland , Wm. N. Loker 0. Fmnk Gouley.* Oct., lS74 John "'Y'. Luke * XenophoIl Ryland Jas. E. Cadle Thos. C. Ready Wm. N. Loker G. Frank (jouley.* Oct., IS75 James E. Cltdle lxenoPhon Ryland Thos. C. Ready * Noah M. Givan Wm. N. Loker 0. Frank GOllley.* Oct., 1876 Xen. R.. yland ThO.S. C. Rencly * Noah. iVI. Givan iV.1. CT., Hnbhle '. VITI.:N. Loker G . . Fra.nk Gouley> 2:1 Oct., ISZ7 C. Readx.:, * No.ah .l\f. wvan J~s. s. B\owne :: W.. St.l}bb]etield ,~ Wm. ~'T L.ok?r ;,; John D. \~nc~l. Oct., IRiS Noah ~1. (,nan Jos. S. Hrowlle I\\m. H.. Stubblefield.. Jas. E. C,lrter · John \\. Luke John D. \ mCI!. Jos. S. Browne "'Y'. RStubbletield IJas. E. Carter V* Alex. ~L Dockery John W. Lnke "/ohn D. Vincil. Oct., lS79 Oct., 18S0 W. R. Stubblefield Alex. M. Dockery Chas. C. Woods Lee A. Hall John W. Lllke * John D. Vinci!. Oct., 1881.... Alex. 1\1. Dockcry Rev. ChILS. C. Woods Lee A. Hall. Robt. 1<'. Stevenson John W. Luke * John D. Vinci!. Oct., 1882 Chas. C. Woods Lee A. lIaIL Robt. F. Stevenson James W. Boycl ISamuel M. Kennl1rd John D. Vinci!. b~t.. , 188,3 Lee A: l~al.! : R.. }." Steve.ns?IJ... 1IJp,m. e", '.V' J.30yd IG~0 l,{ •. Hl!Il~ : IS!Lm. ll~.l1\ .•L I.(ennarcl... .. John D. \~ne!!. Oct., 13&1.... Robelt}. StevensOIl.. James W. Boyd (,eorgc R. Hunt... Wm. M. Wllhams Samuel iVI. Kennard John D. \ mCI!. Oct., 1.885 James.w. Boyd G.eorge R. Hunt Wm. M. Williams James P,. WOOd jsamueJ:M. Kcnnard John D. ViIlC.i!. Oct., 188~ G~o. R. H~'.nt: W. M. \yill~ams !!Lmes P. WOOd [I!enr y L, Rogers Sallluel M. Kennard IJOhn D. "':jnc!!. Oct., 188/ Wm. M. Wllhams IJames I. ""ood 1 thcodore Bracc (,eo. E. Walker Samuel M. Kennard John D. \. HIed. Oct., 1888 IJames P. Wood.::.:: Th~o~ore Bruce Geo. Eo Wa~ker.. B. H. Ingram Samucl iVI. Kennard John D. VineiL

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* Deceased. Died August 11th, 1866, while in office. ~ Appointcd August 13th, 1866} by John D. Vincil, G. ~ Died April 11th, 1877, while HI otIice.

t

II John W. Luke served, by appointment, as Grand Secretary, from ~I.

11th, 1877, to October 11th, 1877. ,r DiedApril within one week after his installation. tt There was no Communication in 1&-15, owing to ** Withdrawn from Masonry.

the anti-masonic [excitement.

OFFICERS FOR THE ORGANIZATION, FEBRUARY 220, 1821.

EDW ARD BATES, Worsh'ipjul Mastcr. . JA1'lES KENNERLY, Senior WCLrdcn. WIL1,IA1\'1 BATES, Junior IVarclcn. JOSEPH V. GARNIER, 1'I'ea~'1.L1·er. ABR.A~I BECK, S'ccretaJ"!!. ~

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264

[Oct.

DISTRICTS AND D. D. GHAND MASTEHS. GRA~D

SECRETARY'S STATEMENT SHO"'I1'G LOCATIOI' OF

I~ODGES ACCORDING TO DIS1'RICTS FIRST DISTRICT. J. T. LAUGHLIK, D. D. G. M., FAIRi\10UNT.

County.

Clark do do do do

Nv.

Name of Ladge.

Location.

180 Des Moines 290 Fairmount 31~ Eldorado 362 Hiram 404 Alexandria

Athens. Fairmol111t. :Luray. Kahoka. Alexandria.

Scotland........................ 16 Memphis do 41 Etna do 378 Kilwinning

lVlcmphis. Etna. Kilwinning.

Schuyler do do do

Downing. Lancaster. Queen City. Glenwood.

244 Middle Fabius 259 Lodge of Love 380 Queen City 427 Glenwood SECOND DISTRICT. A. FISHER, D. D. G.

.Lewis do do do do

24 58 100 222 287

~f.,

LA BELLE.

"IVyaconda Montieello Cantoll La Belle Craft

LaGrange. Monticello. Canton. La Belle. Canton.


265

Appendi;r.

1888·1 Second Disl?'ict Contimted. J

County.

No.

Name of LodrJe.

·Williamstowl1 Lewistown

Location.

Lewis do

379 494

vVilliamstown. Lewisto\vn.

J{nox do do do do

6 Ark 168 Colony 181 Novelty 291 Edina 414 Greensburg

Ne\vark. Colony. Novelty. Ed·ina. Greensburg.

Adair do do

105 Kirksville 319 Paulville 366 Adair

Kirksville. Brashear. Kirksville.

THIRD DISTRICT. GEO. :MAYHALL, D. D. G. M., NEW LONDON.

l\farion........................... 18 Palmyra do 28 St. John's do 188 HannibaL , do 502 Ph iladclphia

Palmyra. Hannibal. Hannibal. Philadelphill..

Shelby........................... do do do do

Shelbyville. Hunnewell. Shelbina. Clarence. Bethel.

96 St. Andrew's 415 HunnewelL 228 Shelbina 305 Clarence 537 Bethel

l\fonroe.......................... 19 do 23 do 42 do 64 do 91 do 223 do 240 do 462

Paris Union Florida Middle Grove Monroe M'adison Woodlawn Granville Santa Fe ;

Ralls.............................. 33 Ralls do 302 Lick Creek do 307 :New London

Paris. }<"'lorida. Middle Grove. Monroe. Madison. 'Voodlawn. Granville. Santa Fe. Center. Perry. New London.

FOURTH DISTRICT. •J. A.

Pike............... do

THo:r.rASO~,

14 17

D. D. G. M., LOUISIANA.

Cyrene Clarksville

Cyrene. Clarksville.


Appendi:r.

266 Fourth District Contirmed.] County.

Pike.............................. do do do do do do do Lincoln do do do do do

.t.....

No.

75 g2

136 137 192 399 495 499

[Oct.

Narne oj Lodge.

Ashley Perseverance Phcenix Prairi eville Fran kford Pike Globe Paynesville

34 Troy 199 New Hope 2'70 New Salem 428 Louisville 473 Nineveh 141 Chain of Rocks

Location.

Ashley. Louisiana. Bowling Green. Prairieville. Frankford. Curryville. Louisiana. Paynesville. Troy. Ncw Hope. Argentville. Louisville. Olney . Owen.

FIFtH DISTRICT. CHARLES J. "" ALKER, D. D. G. M., WENTZVILLE.

St. Charles..................... 46 'Ventzvillc do 241 Palest.ine do 260 Mechanicsville

:Wentzville. St. Charles. Mechanicsville.

':Varren............... do

11 Pauldingville 231 \Varrenton

\Vright City~ \Varrenton.

l\fontgomery do do do do do do do

72 Danville 178 Griswold 246 Montgomery City 250 High Hill.. 261 Florence 374 Golden Rule 194 \Vellsville 492 Daggett..

Danville. Price's Branch. l\fontgomery City. High Hill. New Florence. ,Jonesburg. Wellsville. Loutre Island.

SIXTH DISTRICT. WM:. H. CAHPENTER, D. D. G. M., CENTRALIA.

Audmin do do do do

266 354 491 357 115

SociaL Hebron Vandalia Young's Creek Laddonia

Martinsburg. Mexico. Vandalia. Rowena. Laddonia.


II

267

Appendix.

1888.J Si.uh District Contin11,ed.] No.

CO'n1~ty.

.Name Qf Lodge.

Callaway........................ 8 \Villiamsburg 48 Fulton do do 60 New Bloomfield do 81 Hickory Grove do 154 Concord do 242 Portland do 425 Cedar City 59

Centralia Rocheport Twilight.. Ashland Sturgeon 336 Hallsville 356 Ancient Landmark

Boone do do do do do do

67 114 156 174

Location.

\Villiamsburg. Fulton. New Bloomfield. Hallsville. Concord. Readsville. Cedar City. Centralia. Rocheport. Columbia. Ashland. Sturgeon. Hallsville. Harrisburg.

SEVENTH DISTRICT. JOHN W. BARNETT, D. D. G. :l\L, :MOBERLY.

Ho,vard do do do

.. 48 . 51 . 70 . 4

Fayette Livingston Roanoke Howard

Fayette. Glasgow. Roanoke. Franklin.

Randolph.............. do do do do do do do do

30 44 151 161 186 344 486 108 527

Huntsville .Jacksonville :i\filton Clifton Hill 2\10rality :J10berly Cairo Gothic Higbee

Huntsville. .Jacksonville. Mobcrly. Clifton Hill. Renick. l\10berly. Cairo. Moberly. Higbce.

Chariton........................ do do do do do do

73 74 202 208 394 513 525

Eureka Warren \" estville Salisbury Dagan Chariton Cunningham

Brunswick. Keytesville. Westville. Salisbury. Mendon. Guthridge Mills. Cunningham.


268

tOct. EIGHTH DISTRICT. JOHN J. DILLINGER, D. D. G. M., OWASCO. No.

County.

Name oj Lodge.

Location.

Putnam do do

171 Hartford 190 Pntnam 210 UniOllYille

Hartford. Newtown. Uniollville.

Sullivan do do do do do

126 349 389 447 159 32

Seaman Pol1ock Arcana Fairview Grecn City Humphreys

Milan. Pollock. Wintersville. Scottsville. Green City. Humphreys.

Linn.............................. do do do : do do do

82 86 227 284 233 325 510

Jackson..; Brookfield Cypress New Boston Bucklin Dockery Biswell

Linnens. Brookfield. Laclede. New Boston. Bucklin. Meadville. Browning.

路Macon........................... do do do do do do do

38 102 146 237 268 402 172 498

Callao Bloomington McGee La Plata Lodge of Truth Gavel.. Censer Kaseyville

Callao. Bloomington. College Mound. La Plata. Atlanta. New Cambria. l\1a.con. Kasey ville.

NINTH DISTRICT. GEO. W. DEATHERAGE, D. D. G. M., CARROLLTON.

CarrolL.......................... do do do do do

39 52 373 101 249 184

Dewitt.. 路Wakanda Mandeville Bogard Carrol1 Hale City

~...................

57 309 322 338

Richmond King Hiram Hardin Myrtle

Ray do do do

:

Dewitt. Carro1ltQn. l\1andeville. Bogard. Norborne. Hale City. Richmond. Knoxville. I-Iardin. Millville.


Appendh:-

1888.J Ninth Dist-riet Continv.ed.] Cmmty.

No.

R.ay do do

384 Harmony 393 Bee Hive 444 Ada

Name of Lodge.

505

Friendship Benevqlence Chillicothe ]<'armersville "'''heeling Royal Spring JIill Avalon

Caldwell........................ 16() (10 224 do 334 ]18 do 'do 232 do 523

Mirabile Hamilton Breckenridge Kingston Polo Kidder

Li.vingston do do do do do do do

89 170

333 388 434 407 ]05

269 TJOcation.

Vibbard. Lawson. Orrick. Chillicothc. Utica. ,'" Chillicothe. Farmersville. vVheeling. M:ooresville. Spring Hill. Ava10n. Mirabile. Hamilton. Breckenridge. Kingston. Polo. Kidder.

TENTH DISTRICT. C. S. GLASPELL, D. D. G. :M., TRENTON.

15

"T

Daviess do do do do do do do

500 409 106

Grundy do do

1] 1 Trenton 253 Lind1ey 524 Spickardsville

65 201

285 488

estern Star Pattonshurg Jarnesport.. Earl I.Jock Spring Jameson Civil Bend Gallatin

)Iercer .. :........................ 35 Mercer do 206 Somerset 258 Ravanna do

",Vinstoll. Pattonsburg. Jamesport.. Coffeysburg. Lock Spring. Jameson. Civi1 Bend. Gallatin. Trenton. Lind1ey. Spickardsville. Princeton. I1ia. Ravanna.

ELEVENTH DISTRICT. NORTON B. ANDERSOK, D. D. G. M., PLATTE CITY.

Clay do

31 193

Liberty Angerona

Liberty. Missouri City.


270

[Oct.

Appendix.

Eleventh lMtrict Continued. ] County.

/ No.

Clay路 do do do do do Platte.. do do do do do do Clinton do do do do

Nal1U:: of Lodge.

207 Clay : 289 Acacia 311 Kearney 438 Temperaliee 13 Rising Sun 49 Haynesville 53 W'e8ton 120 Compal's 169 Camden Point.. 204 Rowley 339 Fidelitv 355 504

62 113 397 506 519

Adelpl~i

~

Platte City Vincil.. Plattsburg Go\ycr Lathrop Turney

Location.

Greenville. Paradise. Kearney. Smithville. Barry . Holt. eston. Parkville. Camden Point. Dearborn. Farlev. Edge;ton. Plattc City. Cameron. Plattsburg. (lOv.'er. Lathrop. Turney.

"r

TvVELFTH DISTRICT. HARRY KEENE, D. D. G. M., ST. JOSEPH.

Buchanan :................ do do do do do do do do Andrew........................ do do do do De Kalb do do do do

10 22 78 150 189 238

331 376 508

71 138 162 248

4]3

124 ]82

317 308 235

Agency '\Villington St. Joseph Birming Zeredatha Rushville Charity King Hill. Saxton Savannah Lincoln '\Vbitesville Rochester Valley Union Star Stewartsville Osborn Parrott.. 'Veatherby

Agency. De Kalb. St. Joseph. Halleck. St. Joseph. Rushville. St. Joseph. St. Joseph. Saxton. Savannah. Fill more. '\Vhitesville. Helena. Bolckow. Uniol1 Star. Stewartsville. Osborn. Maysville. '~Teatherhy.


271

1888路1 THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. . JOlIN H. BUNGER, D. D. G. M.,:MARYVILLE. County.

No.

Atchison do do ., do

:

Holt.. do do do Nodaway do do do do do do do do do do do

Narne of Lodge.

Roekport. \"atson. Tarkio. Fairfax.

139 214 294 112

Oregon. Forest City. l\'Iound City. Maitland.

Oregon Forest City Mound Cit.y Graham

165 Maryville 196 Quitman 301 'Vhitehall.. ~

Location.

157 North Star 200 Sonora 358 North-'Vest 483 Irish Grove

329 Kennedy Kodaway Pickering Guilford Xenia 442 Burlington 465 Gaynor 507 Clearmont.. 511 Skidmore 470 472 474 50

Maryville. Quitman. Barnard. Ebony. Maryville. Pickering. Guilford. Hopkins. Burlington .Junct. Gaynor City. Clearmont. Skidmore.

FOURTEEKTH DISTRICT. J. B. THOMAS, D. D. G. M., ALBANY.

Gentry do do do do do do

125 127

"Torth

198

do do

321 88

352 377

332 21 109

Gentryville Athens Alanthus Ancient Craft Ryland Havana Island City

Gentryville. Albany. Alanthus Grove. King City. Berlin. McFall. Stanberry.

Allensville .Jonatban Defiance

Allendale. Denver. Defiance.

.Harrison........................ 97 Bethany do 257 Lodge of Light.. do 328 Cainsville do 128 Lorraine

Bethany. Eaglevilie. Cainsville. Ridgeway.


272

Appendix.

[Oct,

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. SCOTT H. BLEWET'f, D. D. G. M., ST. LOUIS.

County.

No.

St. I.Jouis........................ do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do' do do do' do

J e ff'erson

Nmne of Lodge.

Missouri." St. Louis. Meridian St. Louis. Beacon St. Louis. George 'Yashington St. Louis. 20 St. Louis St. Louis. 25 ~aptbali St. Louis. 40 Mount ::\10riah.. 路 St. Louis. 45 Bonhomme Mancbester. 79 Polar 8tar St. Louis. 80 Bri dgeton Bridgeton. 121 Erwill St. Louis. IG3 Occidental St. Louis. 179 Pride of the '''est 8t. Louis. 218 Good Hope South St. Louis. 243 Keystone St. Louis. 2G7 AuroYa St. Louis. 281 Fenton Fenton. 282 Cosmos St. Louis. 32:1 Corner-Stone St. Louis. 353 Benton St. Louis. 360 Tuscan St. I.ouis. 416 Cache South St. Louis. 420 ltaska St. Louis. 443 Anchor St. Louis. 445 West Gate St. Louis. 460 Lambskin St. Louis. 484 Kirkwood路 Kirkwood. 95 Meramec Eureka. 119 De Sejto 164 Joachim 256 Shekinah

do do

Location.

1 2 3 9

De Soto. Hillsboro. Crystal City.

SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. JAS. B. WILDE, D. D.

Washington................... do do Iron do

l~

131 143 133 351

(~.

j\f., BONNE TERRE.

Tyro Potosi 1ron<1a1e Star of the 'Yest.. J\losnic

Ca1edonia. Potosi. Irondale. Ironton. Belleview.


273

1888.J Si.'tieenth District Continued.]

County.

No.

St. Francois.................... do do do do

Name oj Lodge.

132 Farmington 424 Samaritan 430 Iron Mountain 234 St. Francis 535 Blackwell

Location.

Farmington. Bonne Terre. Iron Mountain. Libertyville. Blackwell.

Madison

110 Marcus

Fredericktown.

Bollinger do do do Ste. Genevieve

298 Marble Hill 440 Trowel.. 417 'White ViTater 426 Sedgewickville 226 Saline

Marble Hill. Lutesville. Lafiin. Sedgewickville. St. Ma.ry's.

SEV'EKTEEXTH DISTRICT. WM. B. WILSON, D. D. G. M., CAPE GIRARDEAU.

Cape Girardeau.. do do do do Perry Scott do

93 St. :\1arks 103 West View 221 Mystic Tic 441 Excelsior 191 路Wilsoll 457 Triple Tie : 306 Ashlar 310 Sikeston

Cape Girardeau. Millersville. Oak Ridge. Jackson. Pocahontas. Brar,eau. COllnnerce. Sikeston.

EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. GEO. W. CARLETON, D. D. G. M., GAYOSO.

Stoddard do do do Pemiscot do New Madrid : do Mississippi..................... do Dunklin do do G. L. Ap.-18.

153 Bloomfield 489 Lakeville 532 Dexter 167 Puxico 461 Caruthersville 454 Cecil 176 Point Pleasant.. 429 New M'adrid.: 129 Charleston 330 Bertrand 212 Four Mile 215 Hornersville 406 Malden

Bloomfield. Lakeville. Dexter. Puxico. Caruthersville. Cottonwood Point. Point Pleasant. New Madrid. Charleston. Bertrand. Campbell. Cotton Plant. MaIden.


274

[Oct.

Appendi:r. NINETEENTH DISTRICT. A. B. MARTINDALE, D. D. G. M., WILLIAMSVILLE.

No.

Onmly.

Butler Carter Ripley do do W路ayne do Reynolds do do

209 509 304 369 314 526 107 455 239 385

Name oj Lodge.

Poplar Bluff Van Buren Faithful Composite Pine '\Vayne '\Villiamsville Barne~:;ville

Hopewell Reynolds

Location.

Poplar Bluff. Van Buren. Fair Dealing. Doniphan. Pine. Piedmont. .'Williamsville. Logan's Creek. Lestervi1le. Black.

TWENTIETH DISTRICT. FRED. W. WJmB, D. D. G. :M., STEELVILLE.

Crawford........................ do Phelps do do Dent Texas do do do Shannon .

77 312 230 213 347 225 177 395 469 116

Lebanon Cuba St. James

Steelvi1le. Cuba. St. James.

Rolla.

Rolla..

Spring Creek Sale]n Texas ~ Latimer Plato Barnes

Edgar Springs. Salen~.

Houston.. Licking. Plato. Cahool.

T,\VENTY-FIRST DISTRICT.

H.

MARQ,UAND, D. D. G. M., CHA~fOTS.

Franklin........................ do do do do do

27 Evergreen 173 Union 251 ITope 363 Fraternal.. 69 Su11ivan 534 Columbia

Gasconadedo

123 Hermann 37 Cedar

New Haven. Union. 'Vashington. Rohertsville. SuUivan.

Pacific. Hermann. Owensville.


275

Appendix..

1888.] Twenty-fi1'st Distrnt Continued.]

County.

No.

Osage.. 00

Name of Lodge.

66 I..Jinn 185 Cbamois

Maries........................... 94 Vienna do ~ 531 Lane's Prairie

Location.

Linn. Cbamois. Vienna. Vicby.

T'VENTY-SECO:ND DISTRICT. A. .i\L HOUGH, D. D. G. M., JEFFERSON CITY.

Cole............. do do do

43 211. 187 90

Jefferson Hickory Hill Carter Russellville

Jefferson City. Hickory Hill. .Tefferson City. Russellville.

:Miller do do

134 Pleasant Mount 410 Iberia 203 Brumley

Pleasant Mount. Iberia. Brumley.

:M:oniteau do do

56 Tipton 183 California 295 Moniteau

Tipton. California. Jamestown.

l\iorgan....... do

381 Ionia 117 Versailles

Barnett". Versailles.

TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT. B. H. INGRAM, D. D. G. M., SEDALIA.

Cooper........................... do do do do 00

36 142 456 277 503

Cooper Pleasant Grove 'Vallace . 'Vm. D. Muir Prairie Home

Boonville. Otterville. Bunceton. Pilot Grove. Prairie Home.

Pettis............................. 236 Sedalia 272 Granite do do 84 Potter

Sedalia. Sedalia. Longwood.

Henry......... do do do do

29 68 343 408 481

Windsor. Clinton. Norris ForIe Montrose. Clinton.

Benton

418 Clear Creek

;

'''indsor Tebo ~ Agricola Montrose Clinton

Polo Pinto.


276

[Oct. TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. J. A. GORDON, D. D. G. 1\1., MARSHALL.

County.

No.

Name of Lodge.

Lafayette........................ do do do do do do do

61 122 149 320 464 476 364 437

路Waverly Dover Lexington Chapel Hill.. A ullville Mount Hope Higgi llsville Lafayette

Saline............................ do do do do do do do

55 63 85 205 217 275 487 518

Arrow Hoek Cambridge Miami Trilumi na Barbee Tranquility Herndon Oriental

Location.

'Waverly. Dover. Lexington. Chapel Hill. Aullville. Odessa. '" Higginsville. Corder. Arrow Rock. Slater. Miami. Marshall. Brownsville. Orearville. Herndon. Blackburn.

T'VENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. J. T. CRAIG, D. D. G. 1\L, KANSAS CITY.

.Jackson........................ do do do do do do do do do do do

76 . 104 220 316 299 263 324 391 392 501 522 337

Independence Heroine Kansas City Rural.. Temple Suml1lit.. McDonald Raytown Christian Buckner Gate City Blue Springs

lndependence. Kansas City. Kansas City. Kausas City. Kansas City. Lee's Summit. Independenee. Raytown. Oak Grove. Buckner. Kansas City. Blue Springs.

TvVENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. F. E. BYBEE, D. D. G. M., HARRISONVILLE..

Cass do do

54 Index 147 Cass 276 Grand Hiver

Index. Harrisonville. Freeman.


277

Appenclh:.

1888.J TwenlY-Si.1;th Disl1'ict Contimwd.] Co~mty.

Cass do do do do do do Bates do do do do do do do Johnson do do do do do do do do do

No.

Name of Lodge.

372 Nonpareil.. 386 Dayton 219 Everett 450 Belton 480 Jewell 348 路Wadesburg 485 Coldwater

130 11unle Papinville Butler 315 AJtona 350 Tyrian 368 Crescent Hill.. 326 New Home 479 . Rich Hill 229 Mitchell.. 245 Knob Noster 262 Holden 264 Fayetteville 265 Corinthian 280 Lodge of Peace 313 Kingsville 466 Center View 135 'Varrensburg 274 Cold Spring 140 254

~

Location.

East Lynne. Dayton. Everett. Belton. Pleasant Hill. 'Yadesbnrg. Brosley. Hume. Papinville. Butler. Altona. J ohnstown. Adrian. New Home. Rich Hill. Columbus. Knob Noster. Holden. Fayetteville. ' Warrensburg. Chilhowee. Kingsville. Center View. 'Varrensburg. Henrietta.

T'YENTY路SEVENTH DISTRICT. SEYMOUR HOYT, D. D. G. nL, GREENFIELD.

Vernon do do do do do do Dade.............................. do do do do do

Osage 488 Schell City 490 Montevallo 451 Argyle 493 Vcrnon .. : 371 Sheldon 533 'Yalker 87 'Vashington 359 Garrett 405 Everton 446 Greenfield 458 Melville 421 Lockwood 303

Nevada. Schell City. Montevallo. Neva.da. Mounds. Sheldon. "Talker. Greenfield. Arcola. Everton. Greenfield. Dadeville. Lockwood.


278

[Oct.

Twenty-seventh D