Page 1


OROSS'

MASONIC CHART: REVISED:

(!toutaiuing tIxe

~t.grttS

nf tht

~utitut

!ork

~itt

AS lfORKED IN rrHE UNITED STA.TES OF AMERICA;

ARRANGED

!.ttotlJiltjI to ti).e %1nti.cnt ;fl;ltllre .of ~ork ann 3Lttturts. TOGETmm. WI'l'I{

A HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF

AND A

COJJIJECTION OF MASONIC SONGS, FUNER.:\IJ SERVICE, ETC.

BY

'VII.lL:·~t:1mNl.q·-I::~G FI.AJ\I, M. A. K.o. T... , S. ·.G.·. 1.°. G.·. Sad. THIRD EDITION REV.SEO.

PIIIL1\.IlELPIIIA: ~ross

&;00.,418 l\IARI{ET STREET. 1866.


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865, by MOSS &, CO. in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern . District of Pennsyl'"ania.

_._._----------,

BL1~CTROTYPED

------------ _._----_

:BY IJ. JOHNSON & l'lIILADELPHIA.

co.

...

-


TO THE

GENERAL GRAND CHAPTER OF TH:E

UNITED S1'.4.4.TES OF Al\IERICA,

,By

TIlE .A..UTIIOR..


OFFICERS OlIO TlIE

GENERAL GRAND CHAPTER

ELECTED AT CHICAGO (ILL.), SEPTEMBER 13, 1859, AND YEAR OF R. A. M. 2389.

M. E. C. ALBERT G.1fACI{EY, OF CHARLESTON, S. C., G. GnAND HIGH PRIEST.

M. E. C. JOHN L. LE\VIS, JR., PENN YAN,

N. Y., D. G. G. H. P.

M. E. C. IRA A. W. BUCK, AURORA, ILl..., G. G. KING.

M. E. C. GILES M. HILLYER, NATCIIEZ, MISS.,

G. G. SCRIBE.

M. E. C. JOHN D. CALDWELL, CINCINNATI,

0., G.G. SECRETARY.

M. E. O. JAMES PENN, MEMPHIS, TENN.,

G. G. TREASURER.

M. E. C. JOHN McCLELLAN, BOSTON,

6

MASS., G.G. C.

OF HOST.


PREFACE TO REVISED EDITION. IN presenting to路

the~fasonic

Fraternity a revisecl

edition of the "True hlasonic Cllart, orllHieroglypllic 1fonitor," tile eclitor would again desire to disclairn allY intelltioll of adding to the alreacly too numerous list of" Monitors of the York Rite ;" his only o~ject being to render more "TortIly of favor a work tl1at llas already been so "veIl receivecl by the craft,-it having now reached its eighteenth edition.

The Masonic

editor has a more difficult task in pruning "Monitors" of interpolations, inaccurate statements, and the too

frequent use

oi'~th~-~~~teric'part of Free~MasonrYI

rather than in the presentation of new ideas..

loose ideas of the Frencll

~fa8onry of

The

the seventeentll

century lla,ring of late prevailed to an alarming e1\."ient

in our monitorial

worl~s,

may have caused the editor

to have been too pa,rticular in discrinlinat.ing bet\veen 7


o0.

Esoteric and Exoteric

~Iasonr.y ill

tIle revision of th.is

,vork; but should this prove to be the only case in vVllich he has erred, he feels well assurecl tllat tIle

craft ,viII not complain at Ilis respect for his Masonic vows. NEWARK,

0., 1865.

,v. ~I. c.


OONTENTS. PAGE

ON

OPENING AND CLOSING LODGES........ ••..•....•....•. ..•..........••

11

DEGREE..........................................

15

ENTERED ApPRENTICE'S

~"ELLOW-CR.A.FT'S

DEGREE

..

34

.

l'fIASTER l\iASON'S DEGREE.. ,....................................................

54

l\IAI~K l\L\STER'S DEGREE •.. '"

73

~............

83

P.'\ST l\'IAsTER'S DEGREE ~IASONIC FUNEItAL SERVICE

115

1\IosT EXCELl.JENT l\IAsTER'S DEGREE....................................

131

~ ...............•..•..........•

142

ROYAL ARCH DEGREE .

".

IG6

ROYAL MASTER'S DEGREE SELECT IVIASTER'S DEGREE

170

ORDER OF HIGR PRIESTHOOD

179

CONSTITUTION

ARCH

OF

l\{ASONS

THE

GENERA-loA

(i'RA.ND

CHAPTER OF

F()~~iDS'j5ATES OF

H.OYAL

ttMERICA •••••••••••

205 213

HISTORY OF FREE l\IAsONRY.................... LIST OF GRAND LODGES AND GRAND CH_,,"PTERS IN THE UNITED

ST.A.TES

'••

Oo

••

Oo • • •

272

Oo

l\IASONIC SONGS. ENTERED ApPRENTICE'S SONG •••..........••.............••......•.••....•

279

FELLOW-CRAFT'S SONG•••..••........•••...••••..•.••••••••.•••••••••••....••

281

9


10 PAnE

SONG•••••••• , ••., •••••••••••••••••• o . o • • • • ~ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

283

MASTER'S SONG ••••••••••••••••••.•••• "•.•••••..••••••••••••. , ••••..•..•••••••

285

THE l\fASON'S ADIEU •••••.•••....••..•.•.••.• ;

287

ODE FOR GRAND VISITATION •..••......•••.•.•••• '\"

289

l\I..\ .STER'S

II'i'"l\fN FOR CONSECRATION ••..........•••

4<

••

•••••

"

•••••••••••••

2n2

>0,

ODE FOR DEDIC.A.1.'ION ••..........••••...•..•...••••.••••.•••••••••.•••.••••••

GI.AEE

(IIAIL,

l\1YSTERIOUS, GLORIOUS SCIENCE)

CHAltITY •••••..•••••.....•.•.••...•.......•... "••

~IAsoNrc

IIYMN •••••••.••••.•••••••••••

Jj"UNERAL

I-IyMN

u

: .....•.....

l\:IOST EXCELLENT ~IASTER'S ODE ROYAL ARCH SONGS

"

u •••••

~

: ..

0.... ..

.. . ••••••••••••••• :. • • •••••

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

294 297

301 304 306

308

'.

i310, 311,314

:

SELECT ~IASTER'S SONG .•..•••••..••••.•••••.....••....•.•................•••

316

SELECT l\IAsTER'S ANTHEM

318

SONG : " .AlI, ·WHY SHOUl.AD' THE IIEART BE DEPRESSED

'?" .....•..•• 318

320

l\'I.o\.SONIC ODE E'PIIJOGUE •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••.

t •• ..... u •••••••••••••••

320


INTRODUOTION. ON OPENING .AND CLOSING LODGES.

ceremony of opening and closing a Lodge with solemnity and decorum is universally admitted among ~lasons j and although the mode in some Lodges may vary, and in every degree must, in SOUle particulars, still a uniformity prevails' in every Lodge, and the variations, if'any, are only occasioned by want.of method, which a little application might easily remove. To conduct· this ceremony with propriety ought to be the study of every Mason, but more especially those who are called to officiate as officers of the Lodge. To those of our Brethren who are thus honored, every eye is naturally directed fol" propriety of conduct. and beha,vior; and frolll them our Brethren who are less informed will expect an example ,vorthy of imitation. From a share in this ceremony no ~fason C~ln be exempted: it is a general concern, in which all IDUS.t assist,-the first notice of which is given by the W. lVI.,with a request of the attention and assistance of his Brethren. No sooner has it been signified, than every officer repairs to his station, and the Brethren rank according to their degrees. The next object is to detect impostors among ourselves; and for this purpose recourse is had to our peculiar rites as l\ia.sons. This object being accomplished, our next care is directed to the external avenues of the Lodge; and the proper officers, '\vhose province it is to discharge that dutJ, execute their trust with fidelity, and by certain n1ystic· forms, of no recent elate, illtim~tte that we lnay safely proceed. l\.t opening the Lodge, two purposes ~tre wisely effected: the ~I:l!ster is rexninded of t,he dignity of character which he is to Illtlintain fronl the elevation of his office, nnd the Brethrcll of the reverence ~tnd respect due fi·Olll them tn their respect.ive stations. These are not the only advantages l"csulting flrom ~t . clue observance of this.cereulony: the lnind is drawn with l"eve- • rential awe· to the Supreuie l\..rchite~t of the Universe, and the eye fixed on fII~I who is the oilly ~luthor of life n,nd immortillity. I-Ierewe a.re tn,ught to worship uncI adore the sllprelue J lt1HOV AIr, and to supplicate his protection and assist~tncc ill all our well-.meant THE

11


12

INTRODUCTION.

endeavors. After the custoluary salutations, the lVlaster pronounces the Lodge to be opened in due and ancient form, and assumes the government, and under him his 'Vardens; the Breth.. ren with one accord unite in duty and respect, and the business of the meeting is conducted with order and harmony. At the closing of a Lodge a similar ceremony takes place as at opening :-the avenues of the Lodge are guarded; a recapitulation of the duties of the officers is rehearsed.; a proper tribute of gratitude is offered up to the Great Author of our existence, and his blessing invoked and extended to the whole fraternity. If it should be deemed necessary that the Lodge be opened in the several degrees, for despatch of business, when that in the first degree shall have been finished, the W.l\'Iaster, after due inquiry of the "V\Ta1'dens and Brethren, will proclaim it to be his will and pleasure that the Entered Apprentices' degree be dis.. pensed with for the purpose of opening on the Fellow..Craft degree, and all who are not Fellow-Crafts are requested to retire. 'Vhen the necessary precautions are taken that 110ne remain but those who are entitled to this privilege, the sentinel is again relninded of his duty, and the Fello"\v-Craft's degree opened in due fornl. "Then the business in this degree shall have been finished, the Lodge is dispensed with, as in the first degree, and a ~raster's Lodge opened ill due form. After the business in the l\iaster's degree is finished, the Lodge is closed and the labors of the Fellow-Orafts resumed. If nothing should offer in thi~ degree, the Lodge is closed and the labors of the Entered Apprentices resumed. Should nothing further ofter in this degree, (the records 0,ÂŁ the evening having been read and approved,) the Lodge is closed in due and ancient fo1'11l. These are but faint out.lines of the cereul0nies which ,prevail 3.ll1011g lVlasons in every country, and distinguish all their meetings. FORl\'!S OF PRAYERS, CHARGES, ETC.

" Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy â&#x20AC;˘ kingdom conlee Thy will be dOlle, ns in heaven, so also upon the earth. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as'we also forgive our debtors. And lead us not Into temptation; but deliver us fronl evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, ~Lnd the glory, forever. Amen."


INTRODUCTION.

13

A PR...~YER SOl\IETIMES USED ON OPENING A LODGE.

Most holy and glorious L'ord God, the great Architect of the universe, the G-ivel" of all good gifts and graces: Thou hast promised that ",vher~ two or three are gathered together in thy name, thou. wilt be in the midst of thein, and bless them." In thy name we assemble, most humbly beseeching thee to bless us in all our undertakings, that we may know and. serve thee aright, and that all our actions may tend to thy glory, and to our advancement in knowledge and virtue. And 'we beseech thee, 0 Lord God, to bless our present asseu1bling, and to illuurinate our minds, that we may walk in the light of thy 'couutellance, and, 'when the trials of our probationary state are over, fie admitted into THE TElVIPLE "not made with hands, eternal \n the heavens." So mote it be. Amen. PRAYER AT CLOSING.

SupreUle l\.rchitect of t.he lTniverse, accept our humble praises for the many mercies and blessings which thy bounty has COI1ferredon us, and especially for this friendly and social intercourse. PtLrdon, we beseech thee, whatever thou hast seen amiss in us since we hase been. together; and continue to us thy presence, protection, and blessiug. !vlake us sensible of the renewed obligations we are uncler to loye thee supremely, and. to be friendly to each other. l\lay all our irregular passions be subdued, and may we daily increase in Fa'l~tll" Hope, andOhafrity ; but more especially in路 that C~ha'rity which is the bond of peace and the perfection of every virtue. ~Iay we so practise thy precepts that we may finally obtain thy promises, and find an entrance through the gates into the te111ple and, city of our God.. So 1110te it be. Amen. INVOC.A.TION AT CLOSING..

l\fay the bles5illg of fleaven rest upeu us and all regular l\Iasons 1 l\lay brothel~ly love prevail, and every Dloral and social virtue cement us ! So mote it be. Ameri. CHARGE AT CLOSING. BRETHR.EN : -

We are 'now about to quit this sacred retreat offri~ndshipand virtue, to ulix again wit,h the ,vorld. Anlidstits.edncernsand enlployll1ents, forget not the duties whicll you have heardsofre.. quently inculcated ancl so foreibly recoluluended in this Lodge .. 2


lle diligout. prudent, teillperate, discreet,. I:eulelu ber t.hat nr()und t,}lis altar you have IH'(Hllised to befriend and relieve every ]~r(ltherwho ;-;hall need ,your' assistance. 'You IHLve prolui::-;ed in the U10St. fi'iendly 11lanner to l"€nniud hhn of his cn'Ol~8 and aid a. 1'tdbrlnation. ~l'hesc generous prineiph.l~ nre to (~xtend thrthcr. ]i'iVlH·.Y Ilulnan b(~iug has a elainl llJ)On your kind (JJuces. Ilo good unto all. l·tec(nrllnend it 1Horo "espeeiaHy tt) the hou.sehuld of t.he J~lit.hfuL" l~'inally lJrethren, be ye all of' (HIe nriucl; live in peace; and Ina)" the (~od of love and peace delight. to d'well ,vith unrl bless you! 'I

:t"ORl\I 011' A !)l;J'rrl'ION r.rOHB SlflNED BY ,A

To the No. - ,

"T. 'JIHster.,

C~NDIDATE

}"OR

INI'rIA'PI()N ..

"rnrdeIl8~

aTld :Brethrcn of - - - Lodge,

}"ree i~nd ··.~\.ee{~})ted '2\Iasons.. '.. ' of the snbseriber resl)cctfull.'y represents that., :l. HlYt)1',d)le fff your --:\lH~ieIlt Institution~ IH.~ .. ,.'..'....'.. '.",. rt IllfllUiH:il' there(ri'~ ifJ~)llnd 'rorthy. l'(~siderl(~e is - - - - ; his age, -"--; his oeeUI)~l-

(tf

1~he ,..•. ~.. ,

(J.t). 1~~,l~'.

*

(Signed) .1\.. ]3.

A (~,;\NDII1.\~l'g~ :IN.AN ~'\I";:J(H.N r:.sn ,APAu/r:\l]l::",[,~PH,EVl()lJS 'I'() 1:'\ l.'I'L:\.'PION.

IJll;(UJAU.A'Plf)N '1'0

.... ])0

BNASSB~'l'gl)

*

;i:

*'

~rOBY

*

*

*

*

thnt" nuhiassed by tlH . reeUn1"y IlH)tives~ you f'reml;- und,,()-

upon Jour

.pni

hfHH)l",

fi'ienll~ and ullill nUt'flt'ed luntarily (lll;,.,ryolu';-:,ulf a candidatenn' the ulJsteriecl of l\lasonry ~" ..:tuH.-·~l tIr>." l)~} "Y'(Hl (le(~lare" npon Jour hf)nt)l\ t.hat you are prfHupted to snlieit ofjla~(nlry hy a favorable f)pirti~}n (HHH~(~i \'(~(l of the . a. d(~tli 1'0 (Jf and 4.l sin(,~ero \vish or seryieeahk~ to vour ft·~II()';\~.f·l'flntl1rf·~~ ·,An.. .;.-··l do." '" ~. IJo sohnunlv your llonal', that you "rill ~".h,,· I~, GrndtrrUl t;. all estahlislled usnges alHl eU8,.u ••• +·.·' T" H

.. 'u,.t, . . t

•••• iI·..

l!eY(~I'

jet·ted

'f.lns.-·· I

di].t.'

A,ftt.~r tlH:~ :1 tHlve

dtt,elarations :lre to t11e hint luade known to the IJod~e~ there arn t·hen no otl Ie l,' t Iln 11:;';. the (\uu:1idate h~ iutl"odlleed in duefbrul.

un,}


16

MASONIC CHART.

SECTION FIRST

-i-l

SEOTION SEOOND.


ENTERED APPRENTIOE.

SECTION THIRD

17


18

l\I.ASONIC CHAltl'..


ENTERED APPRENTICE.

19


20

:MASONIC CHART.


ENTERED APPRENTICE.

21


l\IASONIC CHART.

)lOY.A,BLJI

UIMOVABLJI.


ENTERED AIJPRENTIOE.

23


ENTERED APPRENTIOE'S DEGREE.

SECTION FIRST. ~

THE first section cpnsists of general heads; which, though short and simple, carry weight with them, and tlualif)'- us to try and examiue the rights of others to our privileges, v.rhile they prove ourselves. It also accurately' elucidates the 1110de of initiating a candidate into our ancient order.

~l.(ltbing+ Apron,-white lamb-skin, w'ith no ornaU1ent, device, or edging, fifteen inches ,vide hy' fourteen inches deep, squa.re at tIle bottoul, "with a triangular fall at the top five inehes deep. 'rhe l3rethr<Hl should all wear white gloves and black or dark-colored clothes.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

CHARGE AT OPENING.

"Behold, how good and how pleasallt it is for brethren to elwell together in unity! "It is like the precious ointluent upon the head, that ran down upon tIle beard, even j\.aroll's beard; that went do,vn to the skirts of his garments: "As the dew of II erln011, that descended upon the tnountains of Zion: for there the Lord commanded the blessing, e,\'I'en life for evermore.. "

* 24

*

*

*

*

*

*


25

F:Nfl'Er-tED APPHENTICE.

PRAYER USED AT THE INITIATION OF A CANDIDATE.

Vouchsafe thine aid, Almighty Father of the universe,. to this our present convention; and grant that this candidate for l\il~1sonry. may dedicate and d.evote his life to thy service, and become a true and faithful Brother anlong us! Endue hiul ,vith a call1petency of thy Divine '\\Tisdam, that by the secrets of our art he may be better enabled to display the Beauties of Holiness, to ,the honor of thy holy name! So mote it be. Amen.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The following passage of Scripture is either rehearsed or may be chanted during the ceremony:-

CIll\.NT.

HAYWARD,

!~~~- F:3~_[~~_~~:-= =-==a= li ~!'--?-2'8-" ~.._J_~_ -61--~=f?;;.J! ... ,'

----

I-;:r--"o-- ~._-:-:.~.- -(9-:-- -'-a-o---=~:-

0-

i.-""'1~ .j;Ji'--o._[-f2..'-P--~-~6t~1 :.,;>-;~'-.I."--.-'.'-'--"." -c.. · . "'E r -='_~--"- .~--~-'=£B-~l! f-'':'--- ~: . . '-

! ·

l--r;1- - -..

.1= -

r

-=F-:=

-*

-

1. Behold, how good and ho,v I plea·sant it I is For brethren to <hvell to!geth'er inl unilty! 2. It is like the precious ointnlent up I on the I head, That ran I down uplon the I beard, 3. Even f .A.aron's I beard, That went down to the I skirts I of his" I garments. 4. It is like the I dew of I IIerlllon, That descended nploll the I moun'tains of I Zion: 5.. For there the Lord conllm!1ud'ed the I blessing, Even I life for I ever Inlore. Ps. cx'l:xiii..

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Towards the close of the section is ex:plaiQe~ tllat peculia:r ensign of l\Iasonry, the larn."b..sk?·n, or (wh£~e ?(x~.thf!.t ~.JI'ron. 3


2f3

1\IASONIC CHAnT.

'rho hllnb-skin, or ,,~hite leather a.proIl, is an emblem of innocence, and the badge ~f a ~lason; rnore ancient than the G()lden Fleece or Roman Eagle; more honorable than the Star and Garter, or a,ny other order that could be conferred upon you at this or any future period, l)y king, prince, potentnte, or any other person, except hebe a l\lason; ttnd "\yhich everyone should ,year ,vith pleasure to hilllSelf, and honor to the frftternity. rfhis section closes with an explanation of the working tools, which are the twenfy-}owr 路拢nch gauge and the c.:ont?non gavel.

The tUJenty-foll'r 'incl/;

gaZf.,gl~

is an instrun1ent used by

nl~1sons

to Ineasure and layout their v;ork; hut ,,-e, as Free and Accepted ~Iasons, ttre taught to 11lake use of it for the nlore noble and glorious purpose of dividing our tiule. Its being divided into t,ventJ:r-four eq lutl parts, is ernblelnatic of the t'\venty-fourh()urs of the day, "whieh ,ve are ta.ught to divide into three (~(p.ull parts; '\rllereb)r ar(~ found eight hours for the service of (lod, 3.11<1 u distressed 'worthy brother; eight for our usutll :1voeations; and eight fc)r refreslllllent arl.d sleep. operative

The

C(Yln'lnOn ..9a'l'Bl

is an instrllTnent made use of by

op(~rative

Dlasons to hreak ofr the superfluous corners of rough stones, the bettHI" to fit theIn for the builder's use; but ,,'"e, as J~"'ree and ,Accepted :31a,sons, rtre taught to Inake nse ()f it for the Dlore noble and glorionspurpose of (livesting our llearts and conscienees ()f all the yiees UJHl Luperfluities of life; therel)y fitting <lUT" rninds as living ~tOllCS for th:1t spiritua.l building, tluLt house IH,t nuult~ '\vith hn~nds, et(~rnul in tho hen, Yens. SI~CTI()N

S}~(~ON'D.

The sc(~ond B(~etion ratifHHtIly :H.,eouui.s 1(lr tile (~Creln()ny of i.lit,hl.ting a.eandiflate into ()lU' :tlleientl iustitution.

*

*

~

*

*


ENTERED APPRENTIC.E.

27

TIlE BADGE O:B-' A l\IASON.

Every candidate, at his initiation, is presented witlh a la'1nbsll.:£n, or 'u,Jtite lettiller al)]'on. The lanzb has in all ages been deenled an elnblenl of innocence.: the lalub-skin is, therefore, to renlind hiul of that purity of life and conduct ,vhich is so essentially necessary to his ga.ining admission into the Celestial Lodge above, where the Supreme Architect of the universe presides.

SECTION THIRD. The third section explains the nature and principles of our Constit:ut,ion. IIere also vre receiv-e instructions relative to the je)J''tIt, sILJ~p()rts~ tOl'crin,q, jhrnillire, orna?nents, lights, and jewels of the Lodge, ho\v it sho uid be situated, and to \vhorn <1ed£ca.tecl. "

Frolll I~rLst to 'Vest, and bet'\veen North and South, Frec-?vla,;jonry extends; and in every clinle are l\Iasons to be found. ()ur institution is sttid to he supported hy JJTisdO'fil, Stren~'Jth, nndBeautZI ~.; because it is necessary that tllcre should he ,visdom to contrive, strength to support, and lJcauty to ~1dorn, aJI gront and iUlportant undertakings. Its e(n~er-infl is no less tha,n a clouded canopy, 01" ~t stttrry-decked .H caven, '\vllere all good 1\Iasolls bope at l~tst to arrive, by the aid of the theological Indder, ,vhich Jacob, in his vision, sa1V extending frcnneuJ.. th to heaven; the three p1<Jine'l}Jal 'rouncls of ,,,hich are dcnOluinated J?a£t1l., I£o.pe, and (}ltarity; a,nd "rhich adrDonish us to haye fa.ith in God, hope in inlD10rtalit:y, and charity to all Illankind. · The greatest of. these is (:lun·'ity,; for Faith nUl,y be lost in sight; IIope ends in. fruition; but ()harity extends beyond the grave, through the l)oun(.lle~s reahus()f

eternity.


28

l\IASO~IO

CIIAR'r.

Every ,vell-governed l..lotlge is furuished w"ith the Holy Bible,

the SquaJ'e, and the

ChJnpa~ses.

The l101y Bible is dedicated to God; the Square, to the ~f:tster; and the Compn.sses, to the Craft. 'l'he Bible is dedicated to G'od, because it is the inesti1l1a~hle gift of God to 1n:111; * * * the Sq uare to the jIa.ster, bec:tuse it is the pl'loper ftlasonic cUlbleul of his office; and the cOlnpasses to the craft, because, by a due attention to their use, they are taught to circumscribe their desires, a,nd keep th6~~ir passions '\vithin due bounds. The Ornarnents of a Id)dge :tre the JJIo8ale .lJ{l've1ne,'zt, the inclentetl te8f!el, and the bla;~'bl{/ star. ':rhe pal,~enzent is a representation of the grolrnd-floor of ICing Solornon's telnple; the £n<lentrnl that beautiful tf~8­ sellated horrler, Ot skirting, ,,"ith,vhieh it Vi~lS SlllTOUnd(~d ; a.ntI the blCl.z£n!l Star in tho (jentre, the'S.· . S. ".,or lIoly ()f IIolies. ~rhe

l)(('L'enu.:'n,t is enlldenlatie of hllDl:ln lifp, with good and evil; the bealltfful b07"(ler 'whieh sllrrollnll...; it, th()se rnanifold l,lesRings a.nd cOlnforts 'whieh ~ul'round U~, and ,vhieh ,,'"e hope to (~IljOY h~y :1, faitll'ful reliance on I)irine l)rovi<h nce'l ,,~hiehis llieroglyphieally represented by the bla~~infJ ,If:5tar ill the eentre. l

rrhe

nl/)/~(tl;l(~ :ulclinllnOl',ddf' se(~tion.

",Te'weI;;; also clairn our attt1U"

tion in this

rrht: i"Oll//h asllle1" is fl., stone as taken from the quarry in its rlHle and natural state. TIH~ ashIer isa stone rc·adj1' hj"r tIle lutnds f)f tIle \",01'k1ne11, to l)e "working tools of tIle ]?t*~11()'\y.. Craft" 'rIle is for the master \VI)rk,nlftn to dra,Y his 1l1'C)!1.. By rout;'" asltle'l ,\'\ve ar(~ reu'linded of our rude 1uHI irnperfeet state bJ naturt~; the a.sh,ler, that state


ENTEltl!~D

29

AI1PltENTlCEo

of perfection at ,vhich ,ve hope to arrive by a virtuous education, our own endeavors, and the blessing of God; and by the trestle-boa1·d, ,ve are also reminded, that as the operative 1vorkman erects his tenlporal building agreeably to the rules and designs laid do,vn by the nlaster on his trestle-board, so should we, both operative and speculative, endeavor to erect our spiritual building agreeably to the rules and designs laid dow'n by the Supreme Architect of the universe in the great Books of nature and revelation, ,vhich is our spiritual, moral, and l\fasonic trestle-board.. Lodges vrere anciently dedicated to I{ing So!onlon, as it is said he wa,s the first l\lost Excellent Grand ~laster. Yet l\Iasons professing Christianity dedicate theirs to St. J 01111 the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, ,yho ,,"ere t,vo eminent Christian patrons of l\lasonry; and since their tiule there is represented, in every regular and wellgoverned Lodge, a certain poirnt ~lJitltin tlte ei1·clc, * embordered by t,vo perpendicular parallel lines, representing St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist; and upon the top rests the 1101y ScriI,tures. In going round this circle, "\ve necessarily touch upon these two lines, as ,veIl as the IIoly Scriptures; ancl "Thile a l\Iason keeps hinlself circunlscribed ,vithin their precepts, it is impossible that he should materially err. t OF BROTHERLY LOVE.

By the exercise of brotherly loYc, we are taught to regard the ,,,,hole human 'Sp·ecies as one family, the high and 10"", the rich and poor, wllo, as created by one AI~r: The 1iOillt represe'hts nn individualhrother, th-e ci1 eh: the boun<1tLry... line beyond which he is nc\·er to ~mirer his prejudices or passions to betray him. t This sj~lnl)ol is one of the oldest known in ~I:tsonry, nnd idenHcal with the.Lingam of tlw Indian l\fysteries a.nd the Phallus lU1<l Cteis of th(~ l\<neient Eg;ypthtus. Originally it \Vtl,S usc,l to symbolize the Creative Power of the Ahnigllty,-U. Being without beginning of Jears or end of days. o

3.:i:·


BO

l\l..:\SONIC CHAR'!,.

mighty Parent, and inha.bitants of the saUle planet, are to aid, support, ttnd protect each other. On this principle, lVIasoIlry unites l11en of every country, seet, und opinion, and concilialtes true friendship among those "who, might other,vise lutve rctnain cd at a perpetual distance.

To relieve the distressed, is a duty incumbent on all men, but particularly on 1\1a80n8, ,vho are linked together by an indissoluble chain of sincere affection. To soothe the unhappy, to sympathize "with their misfortunes, to cOD1passionate their Dliseries, and to restore peace to their troul)led I11inds, is the great a.1m "re ha. YO in vie,,,",,, On

this basis ,ve form our friendships and establish our connecti?ns.. OF TItUTI1"

Truth is a diyine attrihute, and the foundation of every virtue.. To good and is the first lesson 'w'e are taught in nlasonry.. ()n this therne ,ye contelllplate, and by its dictates encle:.tvor to our conduct; hence, while influenced by this principle, h~lPocrisy "and deceit are u11kno,vn arnong us; sinceritj" and pla.in-deali11g distinguish us; and hea.rt and tongue join in prolnotillg et1ch other's 'welfare and rejoicing in each other's pros.. perity~

AN ]~XPLANA1'ION O'F TIlE POUR CARDIN AL 'VIRTUES; 'VIllCII AltE TBl\IPERANCE, ItOR'rrrUI>I~, PRUDENCE) .AND JUSTICE. OF T,E1\IPBRANCE.

TCJnperaJ1Ce is that due restraintu,pon our affections and passions, ,:r h'H~h renders tIle bfHly tatTle and governable a,ud frees the nlind frolIl the :,dlurcnnents of viee.. This yirtue should he tIle cOI1stan t pra.eticc of every ~Iasoll; as l'le is therehy taught to avoid excess, or contracting tLUy


31

ENTERED APPRENTICE.

licentious or vicious habit, the indulgence of '\yhich might lea,d him to disclose some of those valuable secrets, which he has promised to conceal and never reveal, and "which would consequently subject him to the contempt and detestation of all good lVlasons. * * * *

*

OF FORTITUDE.

Fortitude is that noble and steady purpose of the mind, ,vhereby we are enabled to undergo any pain, peril, or danger, when prudentially deemed expedient. This virtue is equally distant from rashness and cowardice; and, like the former, should be deeply impressed upon the mind of every l\Jason, as a safeguard or security against any illegal attack th~tt may be made by force or other,vise, to extort from him any of those ,valuable secreta with which he has been so solemnly intrusted, and '\vhich were emblematically represented upon his first admission into the Lodge. * * * * * OF PRUDENCE.

Prudence teaches us to regulate our lives and actions to the dictates of reaSOll, and is that路 habit by which lye ,visely judge, and prudentially determine, on all things relative to our present as well as to our future happiness. This virtue should be the peculiar characteristic of every ~IasoD;, not only for the government of his conduct while in the Lodge, but also when abroad in the ,vorld. I t should be particularly attended to, in all strange and mixed companies, never to let fall the least sign, token, or word, ,vhereby the secrets of l\lasonry might be unla'\vfully obtained. * * * * * agreeabl~y

O:P JUSTICE.

Justice is that standard, or boundary of right, which enables us to render to every man .his just due, w~thout


:MASONIC CHART.

distinction. This virtue is not only consistent 1",ith divine and hUnUll1 la"\""s, but is the very cement ::lnd support of civil society; and a.s justice in a great measure constitutes the real good Ulan, so should it be the invari~Lble praetice of every l\lason never to deviate from the minutest principles thereof. * * * * * The illustration of these yirtues is acccnnpanied ,vith SOllIe general observations peeuliaf to l\Iasolls. Due veneration is also paid to our ancient patrons. CHARGE AT

INITIA~l'ION

INTO THE FIRST DEGREE.

BROTIIER:-

As you are now introduced into the first principles of I congratuhLte you on being accepted into this ancient and honorable order :-ancient, as having subsisted frorn time inlnlcrnorial, and honorable, as tending, in every particular, so to render all men w'ho vlil1 be conformable to its precepts. N (.) institution '\\'"as ever raised on <1 better princ:iple, or 1110re solid foundation; nor 1vere ever more excellent rules ftnd useful lnaxitns laid do,\vl1, than are inculcated in the several 11asonic lectures. The greatest and best of men, in all ages, have been en,couragers and promoters of the art, and ha,ve neyer ~ deemed it derogatory to their dignity to lcyel themselves 'Yith the fraternity, extend their privileges, and patronize their assemblies. There are three great duties 'which, as a ThIason, you are charged to inculcate,-to G"od, your neighbor, and yourself. To God, in never nlentioning his name but ,vith tha,t reverential awe ,vhich is due frOll1 a creature to his Creator; to iUlplore his aid ill all your laud~tble undertakings, and to esteem hinl as the chief good :-to your neig11bor, in acting upon the square, and doing unto hirn as you "\viah he should do unto you :-and to yourself, in a\yoiding a.ll irregularity and internpcrancc, ~fasonry,


ENTER:ED

APPRENTICE.

33

,vhich may impair your faculties, or debase the dignity of your profession. A zealous attachUlent to these duties will insure public and private esteem. In the State, you are to be a quiet and peaceful subject, true to your government, and just to your country; you are not to countenance disloyalty or rebellion, but patiently submit to legal authority, and conform "rith cheerfulness to the goYernment of the country in 1vhich :you live. In your outward demeanor, be particularly careful to avoid censure and reproach. Although your frequent appearance at our regular meetings is earnestly solicited, yet it is not meant that 1\lasonry should interfere ,vith your necessary avocations; for these are on no' account to be neglected; neither are you to suffer your zeal for the institution to lead you into argulllent 1vith those W}lO, through ignorance, may ridicule it. At your leisure hours, that you may inlprove in lYIasonic kno,,~leclge, you are to converse ,v'jth 'Yell-informed Brethren, ,vho ,vill be alw'ays as ready to give, as you "Yill be ready to receive, instruction. Finally, keep sacred and inviola,ble the mysteries of the order; as these are to distinguish you from the rest of the cp 111111 unity, and nlark your consequence among l\Iasons. If, in the circle of your acquaintance, you find a person desirous of heing initiated into lVlasonry, be particularly attentive not to recommend him, unless you are convinced he ",rill conform to our rules; that the honor, glory, and reputation of the institution may be firmly established, and the ,,,"orld at large cOllvinced of its good effects.


SEC'I'ION 1'''1 RST.


35

SEC~ION

SECOND.


86

:MASONIC CRaT.


37


38

l\IASONIC CHART.


FELLOW..CR.A.FT.

39


40

IV£ASONIC CHART.


41

FELLO'V-CRAFT;.

FELLOW-ORAFT'S DEGREE.

SECTION FIRST. THE first section recapitulates important ceremonies, and instructs the diligent craftsman how to proceed~ in路 the proper arrangement of the several ceremonies used on the occasion. It should, therefore, be well understood by every officer and member of路 the Lodge.

Qttotttiu.g. ' Apron,-wllite lamb-skin, salne size and shape as that of the preceding degree, lined with white and edged with a binding of white watered silk one-fourth of an inch wide; upon the apron two light-blue rosettes, one in each 16wercol'ner. Gloves, white; clothes, dark or black.

*

*

*

*

*

CIIARGE AT OPENING.

*

*

*

" Search us, 0 God, and know our hearts; try us, and know our thoughts; and see if there be any wicked way in us, and lead us in the way everlasting."

~tttptinu.

*

*

*

*

* AMOS

vii.. 7, 8.

*

*

*

"Thus he shewed me; and behold the ,Lord stood upon a ,vall made by a plumb-line, 1vitha plumb-line in his hand. And the Lord said unto me, A.mos, what se'est路 4*


42

:MASONIC Cn.A.RT.

thou? And. I said, A plumb-line. Then said the Lord, Behold, I 'will set :;1 plumb-line in the midst of 111y people Israel: I will not agttin pt1SS by theul any ll1ore."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The working tools of a fello1v-craft are here introduced and explained; ,vhich are the plzldnb, squa're, and level.

The lJlu/Jnb is arn instrument made use of by operative masons to i."'1ise perpendiculars; the square, to square the work; and the level, to 131y horizontals; but ,ve, as free and accepted JYIasons, are taught to make use of them for more noble and glorious purposes. The plu/rnb admonishes us to ,rJ.lk uprightly in our several stations before God and man, 8q~a1·£ng our actions by the square of virtue, and remembering that "\ve are travelling upon the level of time to "that undiscovered countrJT , from. Yvhose bourn

no traveller returns." SECTION SECOND. The second section of this degree refers fro the origin of the institution, ttIld vie"ws l\lasonry under tw"o denOlninations, operative and speculative. 1 he period stipulated for re\vaTding luerit is here fixed, and the iniluitable 1110ral to \v hich that circurnstance alludes is explained. 'The celestinl and terrestrial globes are considered; tlud here the aecc)]uplished l\Jnson 11lay display his talents to advantage, in elucidating the (h·t/()/,8 oj~ ..I.1')'ch£tecture,the ;..genses of human nature, and the liberal . ..4.rts and Sc£ences, \yhich are severally classed in a regular arrangement. 1

1vIasonry is considered under t,vo clenonlinations; operative and speculative. OPERATIVE J\!ASONRY.

By operative rnasonrJ', ,ve allude to a proper appliCfttion of the useful rules of archit('eture, ,vhence ,1 structure vlill derive figure, strength, and b.eauty, and ,vhence ,vill result a due proportion and a just correspondence in all


FELLO,\V-CRAFT.

its parts. It furnishes us ,vith dwellings, and conV'enient~ shelters from the vicissitudes and inclenlencies of seasons: and'\vhile it displays the effects ofhull1un ,visdom, <1S ,veIl in the choice, as in the arr<:lngement, of the sundry Illaterials of which an edifice is coulposed, it demonstrates that a fund of science and industry is implanted in man, for the best, most salutary and beneficent purposes. SPECULATIVE l\IASONRY.

By speculative 11::180nrJ1", ,ve lea,rn to subdue the passions, act upon the square, keep a tongue of good report, maintain secrecy, and pl路actise charity. It is so far inter,Yove,n with religion as to lay us under obligation to pay that rational homage to the Deity 1vhich at once eOllstitutes our duty and our halppiness.. It leads the con... teulplative to vie,v\vith reverence and adnliration the glorious works of' creation, and inspires hilll \vith the most eX~11ted idet'1S of the pt~rfections of his 'divine Cre<1tor. In six days God created the heavens and the e::trth, and rested upon the seventh day: the seventh, therefore, our ancient brethren conseeratec1 as a clay of rest fr0111 their labors; thereby enjoying frequent opportunities to contemplate the glorious '\vorks of creation, and to adore their great Creator. * * * * * Peace, Unity, Plent,y, and the doctrine of the Spheres, are here intl路oduced and explained.

OF TfIEG-LOBES.

The Globes a.ro t1VO 3irtificial :111(1 spherical bodies, on the convex surfttce of ,vhich a.re represented the ,countries, seas, and variou.s pUlrts of the earth, the face of the heavens, the plalietarJ"r revolutions, ~lnd other particulalrs. TllliJ Ui,J21 OJ? TIIB GLOBES.

Their princip~11 U8e, serving as maps to distinguish the out1varcl parts of the earth n,ncl the 8itu~1tion of the fixed is to illustrate and expl:llin the phenonlen<1 a,rising fronl the annual rc'v'olutioll and the diurnal


44

MASONIC CH.A.lt'r.

rotation of the earth l"ound its own axis.. They are the noblest instruments for improving the mind, and giving it the most distinct idea of any problem or proposition, as ,veIl as enabling it to solve the sarriC. Contemplating these bodies, we are inspired ,vith a due reverence for the Deity and his works, and are indueed to encourage the studies of astronomy, geography, and navigation, and the arts dependent on them, by ,vhich society has been so much benefited.

As the five Orders of Architecture are considered in this section, a brief description of them may not be improper. OF ORDER IN ARCHITECTURE.

By order in architecture is meant a system of all the IDelllbers, proportions, and ornaments of columns and

pilasters; or it is a regular arrangement of the projecting parts of a building, ,vhich, united ,,'"ith those of a column, form a beautiful, perfect, and complete w'hole. OF ITS ANTIQUITY.

From the first fornlation of society, order In architecture ma.y be traced. vVhen the rigor of seasons ol)ligcd men to contrive shelter fi" 0 ll] the inc]eulency of the \'Veatl'lcr, ,ve learn that they first })lantecl trees on end, and then la.id others across, to support ~t covering. ~rhe bands ,vhich connected those trees at top and bottom are said to have given rise to the idea, of the base and capital of pillars; and from this sinlple hint originally proceeded the more improved art of architecture. The five orders are thus classed :-the 1"uscan, Doric, Ionic, ChrÂŁnthia'lL, and Gunposite. TIrE TUSCAN

Is tIle most sinlplc and solid invented in Tusc:1ny, vdlence sinlplicity of the construction eligihle v{ hr1ro ornanlent ,vould

of tho fiye orders. It ,vas it derives its nalne. 'The of this colrunn renders it l)c superfluou:;.


FELLOW-CRAFT..

45

THE DQRIC,

Which is plain and natural, is the most ancient, and vtas invented by the Greeks. Its column is eight diameters high, and has seldom any ornaUlcnts on base or capital, except mouldings; though the frieze is distinguished by triglyphs and metope.s, and triglyphs conlpose the orna.... Inerlts of the frieze. 'rhe Doric is the best proportioned of all the orders. f).'he several parts of ,vhich it is composed are founded on the natul'al position of solid bodies. In its first invention it was nlore siulple than in its present state. I~l aftertimes, when it began to be adorned, it ~ained the name of Doric; for when it was constructed in its primitiye and siUlple form the name of Tuscan ,,"as conferred on it. Hence the Tusoan precedes the Doric in rank, 011 account of its resemblance to that pillar in its original state. IJ.'IIE IONIC

Bears a kind of moun proportion l)etween the more solid and delicate orders. Its colurfln is nine diameters high; its capit~LI is adorned ,\"ith volutes, and its cornice has dentals. There is both delicacy and ingenuity displnyed in this pillar; the invention of ",vhich is attributed to the Ionians, as the f:t1l10US of .Diarla, at Ephesus ,yas of this order. It is stl,i<l to lutve been forl.necl after the lllodel of an tlgree::tble young \YOUHtll, of an elega~lt shape, dre,ssed in her hair,-a.s a contrast to the Doric order, which "was formed after that of a strong, robust man. TIlE CORINl'III.AN,

The richest of the fiye orders, is deemed a masterpi ece of art. Its coltnnn is ten diarneters high, and its C:tl1ital is adorned \vith t\VO ro\\~s of IC[\Jves, and eight volutes, '\vhieh sustain the 3,bacus. The frieze is ornaulented \yith curious devices, the cornice ,,,,ith c1entnls and nlodillions. This order is used in stately and superb structures.. OF THE i:NVI~NTION OF TIllS ORDER ..

It is said to have been invented at Corinth, by CaJlimachus, who is said to have taken the hint of the capital


46

:MASONIC CHART"

of this pillar from the following remarkable circunlstance. Accidentally passing by the tonlb of a :young lady, he perceived a basket of ,toys covered ,vith tile, placed over an 'acanthus-root, having been left there by her nurse. As the bra.nches grew up, they encolnpassed the basket, till, arri ving at the tile, they met with an obstruction, and bent do'\vn\vards. Callimachus, struck "rith the object, set about imitating the figure: the base of the capital he made to represent the basket; the abacus the tile; and the volutes the bending leaves. THE COMPOSITE

Is compounded of the other orders, and was contrived by the Romans. Its ca,pital has the t,YO ro,vs of leaves of the Corinthian, and the volutes of the Ionic. Its COlUI1111 has quarter-rounds, as the Tuscan and Doric order; is ten dialnetel'S high; and its cornice has dentaJs, or sirnple n1odil1ions. This pillar is generally found in buildings ,vhere strength, elegance, and beauty are displayed. OF THE IN\TENTION OF ORDER IN ARCIIITECTURE.

The ancient and original orders of architecture reyered by 1\la80ns are no more tha;l1 three,-the Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian, '\yhich ,vere invented hy the G~1.'eeks. Tothese the ROmt111S have added tvto,-the Tuscan, ,Yhich they rnade phliner than the Doric, ~tnd the Composite, which ,vas 1110re ornament:11, if not more beautiful, than the Corinthian. The first tllree orders alone, hovtever, show invention and particulaT character, and essentially differ froul each other; the t,v路o others have nothing but路,,"hat is borrow'ed, a,nd differ only accidentally; the ':ruscan is the Doric in its earliest state; and the Con1posite is the Corinthian enriched w'ith the Ionic. To the Greeks, therefore, and not to the Romans, are "l'e indebted for what is great, judicious, and distinct in architecture,


FELLOW-CRAFT.

47

SENS~S OF IIUl\1AN NATURE, 'VHICH AREIIEARING, SEEING, FEELING, S~lELLING, AND TASTING.

OF THE FIVE

HEARING

Is that sense by which lve distinguish sounds, and are capable of eIljoying rtll the agreeable charms of music. By it "l'e are enabled to enjoy the pleasures of society, and reciprocally to comulunicate to each otl~er our thoughts and intentions, our. purposes and desires; while thus our . reason is capable of exerting its utmost power and energy. The vlise and beneficent Author of Nature intended, by the fornlation of this sense, that "\ve should be social creatures, and receive the greatest and most important part of our knowledge by the information of others. For these purposes, ,ve are end()'\yod with hea,ring, that by ~1 proper exertion of our rationaJ powers our happiness UUty be complete. SEEING

Is that sense by 1vhich ",ve distinguish objects, and in an instant of tiulC, ,vithout change of place or situation, view' armies in battle-array, figures of the most stately structures, and all the agreeable variety displayed in the landscape of nature. B~y' this sense, lye :find our 1-vay on the p:tthless ocean, traverse the globe of the earth, determine its figure and diulensions, and delineate any region or quarter of it" By it 1ve measure the planetary orbs, a,nd make ne,v discoveries in the sphel"e of the fixed stars. Nay, more: by it lve perceive the tempers and dispositions, the pa,ssions and affections, of our fello'\v-creatures, when they"vish most to conceal them; so that, though the tongue lllay be taught to lie and dissemble, thecountenance \vQulddisplay the hypocrisy to the discerning eye. In fine, the rays of light, 'which administer to this sense, are the most astonishing part of the aniInated creation, and render the eye a peculiar object of admiration. Of all the faculties, sight is the noblest. The structure of the eye, and its 3lppurtenances, evince the admirable contrivance of nature for performing all its various external and internal motions; while the va,riety displai;lod in the eyes of different animals, suited to their several


48

:MASONIC CHART.

ways of life, clearly demonstrates this or~an to be the masterpiece of Nature's lvark. FEELING

Is that sense by which we distinguish the different qua.. Ii ties of bodies, such as heat and cold, h8Jrdness and softness, roughness and smoothness, figure, solidity, motion, and. extension. These three senses, I-Iearing, Seeing, and Feeling, are most revered among 1\fasons. S~IEIJLING

Is that sense by which we distinguish odors, the various kInds of which convey different i111pressions to the mind. Animal and vegetable bodies, and indeed most other bodies, while exposed to the air, continually send forth effluvia of vast subtilty, as \vell in the state of life and gro,vth as in the state of fernJentation and putrefaction. These effluvia, being dra'\vn into the nostrils along v?ith the air, are the means b~y' '\vhich all bodies are smelled. lIenee it is evident thtLt there is a, lnanifest appearance of design in the great Creator's having planted the organ of smell in the inside of tluLt canal, through 'which the air continually passes in respiration. TASrrING

Enables us to make a proper distincti!tJn in the choice of our food. The organ of this sense guards the entrance of the alimentary canal, as that of smelling guards the entrance of the canal for respiration. From the situation of both these organs, it is plain that they ,yere intended by nature to distinguish ,,"holesolne food from that ,vhich is n11useous. Every thing tha,t enters into the stomach must undergo the scrutiny of tasting; :lncl by it we are capable of discerning the changes ,vhich the ~alne body undergoes in the different compositions of art, cookery, chemistry, pharmacy, etc. Smelling and tasting are insepalrably connected; and it is by the unnatural kind of life men commonly lead in society, that these senses are rendered less fit to perform their natural offiees.


FELLOW-CRAFT.

49

OF THE SEVEN LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES, WHICH AREGRAl\Il\iAR, RHETORIC, LOGIC, ARITHlVIETIC,

GEO~fETRY,

MlJ.i3IC, AND ASTRONOl\'IY.. GRAl\fMAR

Teaches the proper arralngement of words, according to the idiom or dialect of any particular people, and that excellency of .pronunciation which enables us to speak or write a language with accuracy, agreeably to reason and correct usage. RHETORI路C

Teaches us to speak copiously and fluently on any subject, not merely with propriety alone, but with all the advantages of force and elegance, wisely contriving to captivate the hearer by strength of argument and beauty of expression, whether it be to entreat or exhort, to ad... monish or applaud. LOGIC

Teaches us .to guide our reason discretionally in the general knowledge of things, and directs our inquiries after truth. It consists of a regular train of argument, whence we infer, deduce, and conclude, according to certain premises laid down, admitted, or granted; and in it are employed the faculties of conceiving, judging, reasoning, and disposing; all of which are naturally led on from one gradation fo another, till the point in question is finally determined. ARITHMETIC

Teaches the powers and properties of numbers, which is variously effected, by letters, tables, figures, and instruments. By this art, reasons and demonstrations are given for finding out any certain number whose relation or affinity to another is already known or discovered. GEOMETRY.

Geometry treats of the powers路 and properties of rnttgnitudes in general, where length, breadth, and thickness are considered, from a point to a line, froID a line to a superficies, and from a superficies to a solid. 5

,


50

MASONIO CHART..

A point is a dimensionless figure, or an indivisible part of a space. A line is a point continued, and a figpre of one capacity, namely, length. A superficies is a figure of two dimensions, namely, length and breadth. A solid is a figure of three dimensions, namely, length, breadth, and thickness. to

OF THE .ADVANTAGES OF GEOMETRY.

By this science, the architect is enabled to construct his plans, and execute his designs; the general to arrange his soldiers; the geographer to give us the dimensions of the world,and all things therein contained, to delineate the extent of seas, and specify the divisions of empires, kingdoms, and provinces. By it, also, the astronomer is enabled to make his observations, and to :fix the duration of time and seasons, years and cycles. In fine, geometry is the foundation of architecture, and the root of the mathematics. }!USIC

Teaches the art of forming concords, so as to compose delightful harmony, by a mathematical and proportional arrangement of acute, grave, and mixed sounds. This art, by a series of experiments, is reduced to a demonstrative science, with respect to tones and the intervals of sound. It inquires into the nature of concords and discords, and enables us to find out the proportion between them by numbers. ASTRONOMY

Is that divine art by which we are taught to read the wiscloln, strength, and beauty of the Almighty Creator in those sacred pages, the celestial hemisphere. Assisted by astronomy, we can observe the magnitudes and calculate the periods and eclipses of the heavenly bodies. By it we learn the use of the globes, the system of the world, and. the preliminary law of na,ture. While we are eillployed in the study of this science, we must


51

FELLO'V-CRAFT.

perceive unparalleled instances of wisdom and goodness, and, through the whole creation, trace the glorious Author by his works.

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~. OF THE MORAL .ADVANTAGES OF GEOMETRY.

Geometry, the first and noblest of sciences, is the basis on which the superstructure of ~Iasonry is erected. By geometry we may curiously trace Nature through her various Yvindings to her most concealed recesses. By it ,ve may discover the po,ver, the 'Yisdom, and the goodness of the Grand Artificer of the universe, and view ,vit.h de~ light the proportions "\vhich connect this vas.t machine.. By it ,ve mtlY discover ho,\v the pl~1nets move in their different orbits, and demonstrate their various revolutions. By it we account for the return of seasons, and the variety. of scenes lvhich each season displays to the discerning eye. Numberless worlds are around us, all framed by the sanle Divine Artist, which roll through the vast, expanse, and are all conducted by the same unerring law of nature. A survey of Nature, and the observation of her beautiful proportions, first determined man to imitate the divine plan, and study symmetry and order. This gave rise to societies, and birth to every useful art. The architect began 路to design; and the plans which he laid down, being improved by experience and time, have produced works which are the admiration of every age. The lapse of time, the ruthless. hand of ignorance, and the deYast~'Ltions of wttr, have laid ,vaste and destroyed many valuable mOnU111ents of antiquity, on ,vhich the utmost exertions of human genius IHtve been enlployed. Even the temple of SoloDlon, so spacious a,ndmagnificent,


52

.MASONIC CHART.

and constructed by so many celebrated artists, escaped not the unsparing ravages of barbarous force. FreeMasonry, notwithstanding, has still survived. The attentive Ear receives the sound from the in8tr~tet-i-ve Tong'ue; and the mysteries of Free-lVIasonry are safely lodged in the repository of faithful Breasts. Tools and instruments of architecture, and symbolic emblems, most expressive, are selected by the fraternity, to imprint on the mind wise and serious truths; and thus, through 'a succession of ages, are transmitted, unimpaired, the most excellent tenets of our institution.

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ClI.A.RGE AT PASSING TO TILE DEGREE OF FELLO'V-CRAFT. BROTBER:-

Being passed to the second degree of IVlasonry, we congratulate you on your preferment. The internal and not the external qualifications of a man are ,vhat l\fasonr! regards. As you increase in kno,vledge, ~Y'0u will improve in social intercourse. It is unnecessa,ry to recapitulate the duties Vt"hich, as a '1\-fason, you ,-\re bound to discharge, or to enlarge on the necessity of a strict adherence to theIn, as your o'wn experience must llave established their value. Our lu;ws and regulations you are stl"enuously to support, and be al,vays ready to assist in seeing them duly executed. You are not to palliate or aggravate the offences of your Brethren; but in the decision of every trespass against our rules, ;you are to judge with candor, admonisll ,vith friendship, and reprehend ,vith justice. The study of the liberal arts, that valuable branch of eductttion, whicll tends so effectually to polish and adorn the mind, is earnestly recommended to your consideratioIl ; especially the science of geometry, ,,"hich is established


FELLOW-CRAFT.

53

as the basis of our art. Geomet.ry, or lVlasonry, originally synonynlous terms, being of a divine and moral nature, is enriched with the most useful knowledge: ""hile it proves the wonderful properties of nature, it demonstrates the more important truths of morality. Your past behavior and regular deportment have merited the honor which we have now conferred; and in your new character it is expected that you will conform to the principles of the order, by steadily persevering in the practice of eyery commendable virtue. Such is the nature of your engagement as a fellow-craft路, and to these duties you are bound by the most sacred ties.


SECTION FIRST

SECTION SECOND.

54


}VIAs'rER l\IASON.

----=..:::-=====::.=-

55.


56

MASONIC CHART.

8ECTION1;HI RD.

)i I


MASTER MASON.

1,453.

Oolumn8#

2,906.

Pila81;~/.~

3. 8,300. 80,000.

70,000.

s

Grand路 Masters.

Overseers. Fellow Crafts. Entered Apprentice8.

57


58

l\lASONIC CHART.


MASTER MASON.

59


60

MASONIC CHART.


MASTER MASON.

61


62

,I\;IASONIC CHART.


1\IASTER l\'IASON.

~fASTER

63

MASON'S DEGREE.

SECTION FIRST. THE ceremony of raising to the sublime degree of Master Mason is particularly specified, ancI other useful instructions are here given.

~tfittr~. W.·. IVI.·., S.·. W.'., J.'. W..., Treasurer, Secretary, S.·. D.o., J.'.. D.·., two Stewards, and a Tyler.

<!tlnttttug. AJlron,-white lanlb-skin, of' the same size and shape as that of tEe preceding (legrees, lined with white and edged with· a binding of sky-blue watered silk three-fourths of an inch in width, with two sky-blue rosettes on the bottom and one on the flap of the apron. Dark or black clothes and white gloves should be worn by Officers and Brethren. '

(9ffiti~ll Qtl{ttltitlg. ·W.·. 1\'1.'. Collar,-blue silk velvet or watered silk three and one-half inches in width, edged with silver lace one.. half of an inch wide;* upon .the collar there should be seyen. embroidered silv'cr stars one and a half inches in diameter, three upon each side and one in front immediately above the jewel. J ewel,-a sHyer square, worn suspended to the collar. Apron,-same as ~hat "rorn by the Brethren, but with a triple-tau cross ~ in each lower corner and upon the fiap,instead. of rosettes. t Custom has sanctioned the usc of fringes . to official collars in Amerioan and French Lodges. ,Vhen worn, they should only be added to the collars of the VV... M.·., S.... '\V.·., and J .... W.·., and should be of silver, from one to two inche:s in width. t As this is the emblem of'the Royal Al'eh Degree,the forty.. seventh prob-


64

MASONIC CIIART.

S,,·. W.o. Collar,-the same as .hat worn by the 'Vo·. ~I."., with this exception,-it should have upon it but five stars (instead of seven), two upon each side and one iInmediately above the jewel. J ewel,-a silver level, worn suspended to the collar. Apron,-same as that worn by the Brethren.* J ... 1V"". Collar,-the same as that worn by the S.·. \V.·., except that it should have but three stars upon it (instead of five), one upon each side and· one immediately above the jeweL tJewel,-a silver plumb, worn suspended to the collar. The collars of the other officers are the same as those above mentioned, but without stars or device. The official jewel of each officer is worn suspended to the collar, and are as follows:Treasurer, silver crossed keys; Secretary, silver crossed pens; Senior Deacon, silver compasses and square, with a sun in the centre; Junior Deacon, silver compasses and square, with a moon in the centre;t Stewards, silver cornucopia; Tyler, crossed swords.

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CHARGE AT OPENING.

(Ps. xxix. 1, 2, 4, 11.)

Give unto the Lord,O ye mighty, give unto. the Lord glory and strength. Give unto the Lord the glory due unto his name; worship the Lord in the beauty of Holiness. lam of Euclid, or the square, upon the centre and an All-Seeing Eye upon the flap of the apron, would be more in accordance with the H American York Rite." Should either of the above devices be adopted, the rosettes should be left upon the lower corners. ~:. Should the device of the square, or forty-seventh problem of Euclid, be adopted upon the apron of the 'V.·. 1\1.·.., then the level should be painted or embroidered upon the apron of the S.·. 1V."., and the plumb upon that of the ~J ••• 'V."." t This is an innovation that should never ha.ve been tolerated. The jewel of the Deacon is a silver dove. *"rhe duties attached to the office of a Deacon arc, 'to convey messages, to ohey commands, ~tnd to assist at initiations, and in the general praotice of the rites ttncl ceremonies of the Order/ The jewel of their office is a dove, u.s an '<nnbl'em of peace and chn,racteristic of their duties."-OLLIVER, Dictionary of SymboUcal Jlasotl.'ry, p.61.


65

:MASTER l\lASON.

The voice qf the Lord is powerful; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty. The Lord will give strength unto his people; the Lord will bless his people with peace.

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(ECCL. xii. 1-7.)

"Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, nor the years draw nigh . when thou shalt say, I have no pleasure in them; while the sun, or the light, or the moon, or the stars, be not darkened, nor the clouds retul'n after the rain; in the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkelled; and the doors shall be shut in the streets, when the sound of the grinding is low; and he shall rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall be brought low. Also, when .they shall be . afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond-tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail; because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets: or ever the silver cord ~e loosed, or the golden bowl be broken at the fountain, or the. wheel broken at the cistern.. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it ,va~; and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it."

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The l.oor]ci'l1.{J tools of a Master l\Iason are all the implements of l\Iasonry indiscriminately, but more especially the trowel..

The Tr01lJcl is 31n instrument made use of by operative nlasons to spread the cement which unites a bu~lding into one common mass; but we, as Free and Accepted Masons, 6*


66

l\IASONIC

CH~-\.RT.

are taught to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of spreading the cement of Brothe1"ly Love and affection; that cement which unites us into one sacred band, or society of friends and brothers, among whom no contention should ever exist but that noble contention, or rather emulation, of who can best work, or best agree.

SECTION SECOND. This section recites the historical traditions of the order, and presents to view a finished picture of the utmost consequence to the fr.t.ternity. It exemplifies an instance of' virtue, fortitude, and integrity seldom equalled in the history of man.

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PLEYEL'S I-IYl\iN.

4

l d li= _-~.-~~~-a~~_~± I1@:.. __ ~-fm_~ __w-=E=--_t I

so, - ~ern strikes the _~.- neral chime, Notes ?2

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-C2- -(2

of

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I,*=~_t~ _~_==:=t _~-_~~_~.I.~~=: ~ ,~~_E~ _ =~._._ I

.

our

I

de - part - ed

_..

titne,

As

I

we

jour - ney

J I J I ~. ~,"- 1?-= -~1ilir~~ e=- -A~fi"~.,_. -~. e=-~- "~--~~~b··'-·

.Z===t=._~f-~--+-_---.l.i-. --\

~

-F--- -

-

-r-=--~t -r---· -


67

l\IASTER l\'IASO N.

I~b=搂-I~~~~a~=[ l[!~ -~--;--~-~

!

.... -

- -

-?9-G-

--:--.-

-0- - -

GJ,.=~

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here be - low Through a pH-grim - age of

JI

r1

-r---

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-(.2-.

woe.

-fl.-, -e-JI -F-- -'-11-

I~'-.}!_~ ~-.-~~-~l--~,.~---!-,---~-/---_~_~a. -~.,-..,.. ~- --6t- r---~- !---;--~.-t---.-

: I

.:J;ji

f- PFF- Ff :

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I路----p

"iIj~--~-- ~----I--'-G-

~Iorta.Is, now indulge a tear; For mortality is here! See ho'w ,vide her trophies 'wave O'er the slumbers of the grave.

--r-

.' -(

~~ - ~

Jlere another guest we bring: Seraph of celestial wing, To our funeral altar come; "\Vaft this friend and brother home..

There, enlarged, his soul shall see 'Vhat. was veil'cl in mJ'-st.ery; IIeavenly glories of the place Show his l\laker face to face.

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PIt.A.YER .AT RAISING A BROTIIER TO TIlE

* SUBLI~IE

* DEGREE

OF 1:1.ASTER l\1:ASON.

Thou, 0 God t kno"rest our do,vn-sitting and our uprising, and understal1dest our thoughts afar off. Shield and defend us from the evil intentions of our enemies, and support us under the trials and affiictions we are destined to endure while travelling through this vale of tears: l\tfan that is born of a woman is of fe1v days, and full of trouble. lIe COllleth forth a,s a flower, a,nd is cut dO'wn; he :fieeth also as a shado,,,,, a,nd cOlltinueth not. Seeing his daJ1's are determined, the nUlllber of hismontlls are with thee, thou hast appointed his bounds that he cannot pa.ss; turn from him tha.t he may rest, till he sha'}l accomplish his day. For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that 路it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof will not cease.. But man dieth a,nd ,,"asteth


68

MASONIC CHART.

away; yea, man giveth up the ghost, and where is he ~ As the waters fail from the sea, and the flood decayeth and drieth up, so man lieth down, and riseth not up till the heavens shall be no more. Yet, 0 Lord! have compassion on the children of thy creation; administer them comfort in time of trouble, and save them with an everlasting salvation. So mote it be. Amen.

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SECTION THIRD. The third section illustrates certain hieroglyphical emblems, and inculcates rna,ny useful lessons, to extend kno'wleclge and promote virtue. In this branch of the lecture, many p~Lrticulars rclativ'e to I{ing Solonlon's Telllple are noticed. This famous fabric ,vas supported bJ fourteen hundred and fifty-three eo}ulnns, anel two tJlousancl nine hunch·ed and six pilasters, all hevtn £1'0111 the finest Parian Inarble. There were clnployed in its huilding three a-rand l\Iasters, three thousand three hundred overseers of the work, eight.y thousand Fellow(~rafts; and se';renty thousand I1Jntered .A.pprentices, or bearers of burdens.

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TIlE TIIB.EE STEPS

Usually delineated upon the 11aster's carpet,are emblematic of the three principal stages of human life, viz.. : yo'Uth" 1nctnl~ood, and age. In youi'h" as Entered Apprentices, we ougllt industriously to occupy our minds in the . attainment of useful knowledge; in 1nanltoo£l, as Fello'vCrafts, '\ve should apply our knowledge to tIle discharge of our respective duties to God, our neighlJors, and ourselves; tha,t so ill a/7e as 1\Iaster 1\1a80n8, we 11lUy euj oJ the llappy reflections eOllsequent on a well-spent life, and die in the hOl)e of ~1 glorious imnlortality.


MASTER J\IASON.

69

THE POT OF INCENSE

Is an emblem of a pure heart, 1vhich is always an acceptable sacrifice to the Deity; and, as this glows with fervent heat, so should OU1~ hearts continually glow with gratitude to the great beneficent Author of our existence, for the manifold blessings and comforts we enjoy. THE BEE-HIVE

Is an emblem of industry, and recommends the practice of that vir'tue to all created beings, from the highest seraph in heaven to the lowest reptile of the dust. It teaches us that, as we came into the '\vorlc1 rational and intelligent beings, so we should ever be industrious ones, never sitting clown contented while our fellow-creatures around us are in ,Yant, 1vhen it is in our power to relieve them 1vithout inconvenience to ourselves. THE BOOI{ OF CONSTITUTIONS, GUARDED BY THE TYLER'S S,\VORD,

Reminds us that ,ve should be ever watchful and guarded in our ,yords and actions, particularly when before the enemies of l\fasonry; ever bearing in r~en1brance those truly Masonic virtues, silen,ee and ci'lYl'u?nspeetion. TIlE S'VORD, POINTING TO A NAKED HEART,

Demonstrates that justice will sooner or. later overtake us; and although our thoughts, '~torcls, and actions may be hidden from the eyes of men, yet that ALL-SEEING

EYE,

路whom tIle SUN, ~IoON, a.nd. STARS obey, and under wllose ,,"'atchful ca,re even COl\IETS perform their stupendous re'v'olutions, pervades the inmost recesses of the human HEART, and will reward us according to our merits.


70

MASONIC CIIART.

THE ANCHOR AND ARK

Are emblems of a well-grounded hope and a well-spent life. They are emblematical of that divine A~rlc which safely wafts us over this tempestuous sea of troubles, and that .Aneltor which shall safely moor us ill a peaceful harbor, where the wicked cease from troubling and the weary shall find rest. THE FORTY-SEVENTH PROBLEM OF EUCLID.

This was an invention of 'our ancient friend and Brother the great Pythagoras, who, in his travels through Asia, Africa, and Europe, was initiated into several orders of priesthood, and raised to the sublime degree of a 1:Iaster Mason. This wise philosopher enriched Ilis mind abundantly in a general kno,vledge of things, and Ulore especially in geometry, or masonry. On tllis sul)ject he drew out many problems and theorems; and aUlong the most distinguished he erected this, which, in the joy of his he~Lrt, he called Eup1Jxa. (EuJrBka) in the Grecia,n language, signifying, I Itave fO~fJrid it; and upon the discovery of which he is said to have sttcrificed a hecatomb. It teaches ~Ias?ns to be gelJ:erallovers of the arts ana sciences. THE IIOUR-GLASS

Is an emblem of human life. Behold how swiftly the sa,nds run, and how .rapidly our lives are drawing to a close! We cannot without astonishment behold the little

particles which are contained in this machine,-how they pass away almost imperceptibly, and yet, to our surprise, in the short space of an hour they are all exhausted. Thus W~1stes man! To-day he puts forth the tender leaves of hope; to-morrow) blossoms, and bears his bluslling hOllors thick upon him; the next day comes a frost, which nips the shoot; and when he thinks his greatness


71

MASTER l\fASON.

is still aspiring, he falls, like autumn leaves, to enrich our mother earth. THE SCYTHE

Is an emblem of time, which cuts the brittle thread of life and launches us into eternity. Behold what havoc the scythe of time makes among the human race! If by cllance we should escape the numerous evils incident to childhood and youth, and with health and vigor arrive to the years of manhood, yet, withal, we must soon be cut down by the all-devouring scythe -of time, and be gathered into the land where our fathers have gone before us.

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CHARGE AT RAISING TO THE SUBLIME DEGREE OF :MASTER MASON.

BROTIIER:-

Your zeal for the institution of IV[asonry, the progress you have made in the mystery, and your conformity to our regulations. have pointed you out as a proper object of our favor and esteem. You are now bound by duty, honor, and gratitude to be faithful to your trust, to support the dignity of your character on every occasion, and to enforce, by precept and example, obedienceio the tenets of the order. III the character of a Master Mason, you are authorized to correct the errors and irregularities of your uninformed Brethren, and to guard them against a breach of fidelity. To preserve the .. reputatioll of the fraternity unsullied must be your constant care; and for this purpose it is your province to recommend to your inferiors obedience and submission, to your equals courtesy and affability, to your superiOi's kindness and condescension. Universal benevolence you are always to inculcate, and by the regularity of your own bellaviQr afford the best example for the conduct of others less informed. The ancient land-


72

MASONIC CHART.

marks of the order, intrusted to your care, you are carefully to preserve, and never suffer them to be infringed, or countenance a deviation from the established usages and customs of the fraternity. Your virtue, honor, and reputation are concerned in supporting with dignity the character you now bear. Let no motive, therefore, make you swerve from your duty, violate your vows, or betray your trust; but be true and faithful, and imitate the example of that celebrated artist whom you this evening represent. Thus yon will render yourself deserving of the honor which we have conferred, and merit the confidence that we have reFosed.


SECTION FIRST.

7

1S


iUASONIC CHART.

IECTION SECOND.


l'IARK. l\IASTER.

75


76

l\IASONIC CHART.

MA.RK MASTER'S DEGREE.

By the influence of this degree, each operative mason at the erection of King Solomon's temple was known and distinguished by the Senior Grand 'Varden. If defects were foun,d, the overseers were enabled without difficulty to ascertain who was the raulty workman, so that deficiencies might be remedied without injuring the credit or diminishing the reward of the industrious and faithful of the craft.

SECTION FIRST. The first section.. explains the luanner of opening a 1'fark l\1:aster's Lodge, and recapitulates the 111ystic ceremony of the preparatory circurnstance of introducing a candidate. The nUD1ber of artists elllployed in building the Teulple is specified; and the progress t,hey made in architectltre is ren1arked; and it ends with a beautiful display of the luanner in: which one of the principal events originated which cluLraeterizes this degree.

~ftietrti. R.·. w.·. ~I ..., S.·. W.·., J ... W..., T.·., S.--, S.·- D.·., J ... D.·_, M.... 0.*., S.·. 0.·., J... 0.·., M.·. of 0.·., and Tyler. ~pttlin,g.

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CHARGE TO BE READ AT OPENING. (IsA. xxviii. 16, 17, 25.)

Give ye ear, and hear my voice; hearken, and hear my speech. Thus saith the LORD GOD, Behold, I lay in Zion for a


77

1"IARl{ l\IASTER.

foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner-stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste. Judgment also will I lay to the line, and righteousness to the plummet.. And the hail shall sweep away the

refuge of lies, and the 'w'aters shall overflow tJie hidingplace. SECTION SECOND. In t.he second section is recited the 'mode of advancing a candidate to this degree, by which the nIa,rk ~Iaster is instructed in the origin and histJory of the degree, and in the indispensable obligations he is under to stretch forth an assisting hand for the relief' of an indigent and worthy Brother. Weare here taught to ascribe praise to the meritorious and to dispense rewards to the diligent Hnd industrious.

~tttptiou.

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"The stone which the builders refused is become the headstone of the corner."-PS. cxviii. 22. "Did ye never read in the Scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner1"-

lVIATT. xxi. 42. "Anti have ,you not read the Scripture, The stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner ?" -MARl\: xii. 10. ""\Vhat is this, then, that is written, The stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner?"~ LUKE xx. 17.

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" This is the stone "\",hieh ,vas set at naught of you 7':::'


78

l\IASONIC CHART.

builders, which is become the head of the corner."-ACTS

iv.11. "To him that overcometh ,vill I give to eat of the hidden manna; and I will give him a white stone, and in the stone a new name written, 1vhich no man knoweth, saving him that receiveth it."-REV. ii. 17.

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"He that hath an ear to bear, let him hear."-REv. iii. 13.

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"And ,ve will cut wood out of Lehanon, as much as thou shrtlt need; and we will bring it to thee in floats by sea to JJppa, and thou shalt carry it up to Jerusalem."2CfIRoN.ii.16., * * * ~ "Then he brought me back the ,Ya.y of the gate of the out1vard sanctuary, ,vhich looketh tOlvards the east, and it ,vas shut. And the Lord saicl unto me, Son of mall, mark well, and behold v;ith thine eyes, a,nd hear with

thine ears, all that I say unto thee, concerning all the ordinances of the house of the Lord, and all the la,,路s thereof; and ma,rk ,veIl the entering in of the house, ,vith every going forth of the sanctuary."-EZEI{. xliv. 1, 5. *

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The I,vorlcing tools of a l\fark l\Iaster are tIle chisel and mallet. THE CIIISEL

Morally demonstrates the advanta,ges of discipline ana education. The nlind, like the diamond in its original state, is rude 3lndunpolished; but as the effect of the chisel on the external coat soon presents to view the latent beauties of tIle diamond, so education discovers the la.tent virtues of the mind, and dra"\vs thelTI forth to range the large field of nlatter and. space, to di~phlY the sumulit of human kno,vledge,our duty to God and to man.


79

lVIARK l\IAS'rER.

THE MALLET

1\tIorally teaches to correct irregularities, and reduce man to a proper level; so that, by quiet deportn1ent, he may, in the school of discipline, learn to be content. "That the nlallet is to the "\vOl"kUlan, enlightened reason is to the passions: it curbs ambition, it depl~esses envy, it moderates anger, and it encoura,ges good dispositions; "\vhence arises among good ~lasons that con1ely order, "'Vhich nothing earthly gives, or can dest.roy,The soul's calm sunshine, and the heart-felt Joy.. '~

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l\f.A:RK l\IASTER'S SONG.

-=--'-=--=r'-II---"-t

)$'~21J-_'-_' -~!C~-"-r--r"-~- ~_I!_-·_~-fl.t' -:~r=--_~=. :.-i",~. --~l--l L _ i

l\lark l\Ias - ters,

all

:1p- pear;

Be - fore the

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l\Iark l\las .. tel'S,

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80

1\1ASONIC CHART.

:~~~:_i

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work inspect, For the OhiefAr.. chitect; If there be

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You who have passerl the square, For your rewards prepare, Joil1heart and hand; Each with his mark in view, 1\1arch with the just and true: 1Vages to you are due, At your command.

Now t.o the westward move, Where, full of strengthaxid loye, Hiram doth stand; But if impostors are !vlix'd with the worthy t.here, Oaution tlu!1n to beware 0/ tlte rig/it hand.

Hiram, the widow's son, Sent unto Solomon Our grCttt key-st-one ; On it al)peu,rs the natne Which raises high'the,fam,e Of aU towhOJll t.he S~tme Is truly kUOWIl.

Now t.o the praise of those 'Yho triulllph'd o'er the foes Of l\Iusons' art.,To the praiseworthy three founrle<! this degree: rtll1Y nIl their virtues be Deep in Ollt' lte~Lrt8.

' ' 'ho


l\IARI{ l\lASTER.

81

Previous to closing, the following Parable is recited. (l\IATT.

xx. 1-16. )7ÂŤ

"For tlle kingdom of heaven is like unto a man that is tt n householder, which went out early in the nlorning to hire laborers into his vineyard. l\nd when he had agreed with the laborers for a penny a day, he sent them into his vineyard. . And he went out about the third hour, and saw others standing idle in the nlarket-pla.ce, and said unto theul,Go ye also into the vineyard, and 'v hatsoever is right, I will giye you. A.nd they ,vent their way. And again he went out about the sixth and ninth hour, and did likewise. And about the eleventll hour he went out and found others standing idle, and saith unto theIn, 'Vhy stand ye here all the day idle? They say unto him, Because no nlan hath hired us. He saith unto them, Go ye also into the vineyard, and 'W'hatsoever is right, that shall ye receive. So, when even ,vas come, the lord of the vineyard saith unto his steward, Call the laborers, and give thelu their hire, beginning froIllthe last unto tIle first. And when they caIue th~1t "rere hired about, the eleventh hour, they received every luana penny. But ,vhen the first caIne, they suppr,~ed that, they should have received lllore; and tlley likewise received every luau a penny. And 'when they had received it, tlley ]U111'mured against the good man of the house, saying, These last have \vrollght but one hour, and thou hast luade them equal unto us, 'which have borne the burden and heat of the day. But he ans,vered one of theul and said, Friend, I do thee no wTong: didst not thou agree with nle for a penny? Take tha.t thine is, and go thy way: I will give unto this last, even 118 unto thee. Is it Dot la,vful for me to do ,vhat I will with tuine own? Is t.hine eye evil, because I ~un good? So the last shall be first, and the first last: for many be called, but few chosen." CHARGE TO BE READ WHEN A CANDIDATE IS .ADVANCED TO THE DEGREE OF l\I.A.RI{ 1\fASTER.

BROTIIER:-

I congratulate you on having been thougllt worthy of being advanced to this honorable degree of Thtlasonry. !)erulit me to impress it on your nlind that YOU1" assiduity â&#x20AC;˘ The int.roduction of this pn.rallle and the use nf quotations frt1m the New Testu/J:nent Scriptures in worldn~ t.he (h~gr(le of "~111,rk :Mnson/ ' tue ,., A..meri.. oanisms,"-too long sil,nctioned hy custom, however, to admit. of (~Ilallge nther than hy order of the Genen.Ll Graud Chu,pter of th.e Unit(Hl Stfl.t(~s.


82

IVIASONIC OHART.

should ever be commensurate ,vith your duties, which ,become more and more extensive as you advance in Masonry. In the honorable character of 11ark l\1aster lVlason, it is more particularly your duty to endeavor to let your conduct in the Lodge and aUlong your Brethren be such as may stand the test of the Grand Overseer's square, that you may not, like the unfinished and imperfect work of the negligent and unfaithful of former tim'es, be rejected and thrown aside, as unfit for that spiritual building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. While such is your conduct, should misfortunes assail you, should friends forsake you, should envy traduce your good name, and malice persecute you; yet may you have confidence that among J\1:ark Master I\([asons you ,viII find friends ,vIlo ,viII administer relief to your distresses, and cOlllfort to your afRictions; ever bearing in mind, as a consolation under all the frowns of fortune, and as an encouragement to hope for better prospects, that tlte stone , ?ohia!t the builders reieoted [possessing merits to them un.. known], became the chief stone of the corner. 'rhe following selection may be read at ~l\lSilxg.

Look upon Zion, the city of our solemnities: thine eyes "shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle that shall not be taken down; not one of the stakes thereof shall ever he removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be broken. But there the glorious Lord will he unto us a place of broad rivers and streams; wherein shall go no galley with oars, neither shall gallant ship PU$S thereby. For the Lord is our judge, the Lord is our la,ygiver, the Lord is our king; he will save llS.ISAIAH

xxxiii. 20, 21, 22.


I!

I ,

r

J !

I

I

!

I'

!

!

! ! I! !!

! "

;

I

83


34

l\'IASONIO CHART.

PRESENT OR PAST MASTER'S DEGREE.

THIS degree treats of the government of our society; the disposition of our rulers; and illustrates their requisite qualifications. It includes the ceremony of opening and closing Lodges in the several preceding degrees: it comprehends the ceremonies and forms of installations, consecrations, laying the foundation.. stones of public buildings, and also at dedications and at fune.. rals, by a variety of particulars explanatory of those ceremonies.

SECTION FIRST. This section explains the manner of opening and closing a Lodge of Past Masters, and illustrates the ceremonies of the Rieception of a Candidate.

R.·. W.·. M.·., S.-. W.--, J:. W.·., T.·., S.·., S.·. D.'., J.'. D.'., and Tiler.

(!tlotltitxg. The apron is of white lamb-skin, edged with purple, wit.h the jewel of the degree inscribed upon it. The collar is of purple, edged with gold. The jev,-rel is 3, pair of golden compasses extended to sixty deg~gees, resting on the fourth ofa circle, with rt fhulling sun between theextellded legs of the compasses.


85

PRESENT OR PAST MASTER.

~lJttlillg.

*

*

*

*

*

nn J

*

*

*

CHARGE ON OPENING A LODGE OF PAST MASTERS.

" Blessed is the man that ,valketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sit.. teth in the seat of the scornful.. But his "delight is in the law of the Lord; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringetll forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not w~ther; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper. The ungodly are not so; but nre like the chaff -which the wind driveth away. Therefore the ungodly shall not sta.nd in the judgment, nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous. For the Lord knoweth the way of the righteous: but the way of the ungodly shall perish."-Ps. i.

Itttptiou.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Previous to the investiture of the Candidate, he is required to signify his assent to the following charges:BROTHER:-

Previous to your investiture, it is necessary that you should signify your assent to those a,ncient charges and regulations which point out the duty of tl1(~ 1\1aster of n

Lodge.. I. You agree to be a good man and true, 8tlld strictly to obey the nlor~tl law. II. You agree to be a peaceable citizen, and cheerfully 8


86

, MASONIC CHART.

to conform to the la,vs of the country in which you reside. III. You promise not to be concerned in plots and conspiracies against. governnlent, but patiently to submit to the decisions of the supreme legislature. IV. You agree to pay a proper respect to the civil magistrates, to '\vork diligently, live creditably, and act honorably by all men. V. You agree to hold in veneration the original rulers and patrons of the order of Masonry, and their regular successors, supreme and subordinate, ac~ording to their stations; and to submit to the awards and resolutions of your Brethren, when convened, in every case consistent with the constitutions of the order. VI. You agree to avoid private piques and quarrels, and to guard against intemperance and excess. VII. You agree to be cautious in carriage and behavior, courteou~ to your Brethren, and faithful to your Lodge. VIII. You promise to respect genuine Brethren, and to discountenance inlpostors, and all dissenters from the original plan of Masonry. IX. You agree to promote the general good of society, to cultivate the social virtues, and to propagate the know.. ledge of the art. X. You promise to pay homage to the Grand -Master for the time-being, and to his officers ,vhen duly installed, and strictly to conform to every edict of the Grand Lodge, or general assembly of Masons, ~hat is not subversive of the principles and groundwork of 1Iasonry. XI. You admit that it is not in the power of any man, or body of men, to make innovations in the body of Ma.. sonry. XII. You promise a regular attendance on the com-


PRESENT OR PAST l\1.c\.STER.

B7

tnittees and communications of the Grand Lodge, on receiving proper notice, and to pay attention to all the duties of l\1asonry, on convenjent occasions. XIII. You admit tha.t no new Lodge shall be formed ,Yithout permission of the Grand Lodge; and that no countenance be given to an irregular Lodge, or to any person clandestinely initiated therein, being contrary to the ancient charges of the order. XIV. You adulit that no person can be regula.rly made a lVIason in, or admitted a n1enlber of, any regular Lodge, without previous notice, and due inquiry into his chal"acter. XV. Y Oll agree that nQ visitors shall be received into your Lodge ,vithout due examination, and producing proper vouchers of their llaving been initiated into a regular Lodge.. These 3,re the regulations of Free and Accepted lVlasons. Do Jrou subnlit to these charges, and promise to support these regulations, as J\fasters have done in all ages before

you? Aft,er his investiture, the impleUlellts 'Of a Past l\'Iasoor are pre.. sented to the Candidate, and their uses explained.

The Book of the Law-tha,t great light in ~Iasonry足 guide you to all truth; it ,viII direct' your path to the temple of happiness, and point. out to you the whole duty of man. The8quare teaches us to regulate our actions by rule and line,a,nd to 11armonize our conduct by the principles of morality and virtue. The OOllpa8ses teach us to limit our desires in eycry station, th~tt, rising to eminence by merit, we may live respected and die regretted. The R'ule directs that "to should punctually observe our . ~"il1

~


88

:J.\.IASONIC CHART.

duty, press forward in the path of virtue, and, neither inclining to the right nor to the left, in all our actions have eternity in view. The Line teaches the criterion of moral rectitude, to avoid dissimulation in conversation and action, alld to direct our steps to the path which leads to a glorious immortality. The Book of Oonstit-Mt'ions you are to sea-rcll at all times. Cause it to be read in your Lodge, that none may pretend ignorance of the -excellent precepts it eIljoi~s. You no,v receive in charge the Oharter, by the authority of which this Lodge is held. You are carefully to preserve and duly transmit it to your successor in office.. You will also l路eceive in charge the By-La1iJ8 of your Lodge, ,vhich you are to see carefully and punctua,lIy executed.. CHARGE TO BE READ TO THE

CANDIDATE UPON PASSING

THE CH..AIR.

BROTIIER : -

Having been temporarily appointed JYIaster of this Lodge to qualify you for passing the Chair, that you might thereby be entitled to advance to the Holy Royal Arch, you cannot be insensible .to the obligations de-, volving upon you. For a pattern of imitation, consider the great luminary of nature, \Yhich, rising in the East, l~egularly diff~ses light and lustre to all within its circle. In like manner, it is your provin ce to spread and COIl1municate light and instruction to your Brethren.. Forcibly impress upon them the dignity and high in1portance of l\fasonry; and seriously adnlonish them never to disgrace it. Cha,rge them to practise out of' the Lodge those duties which are tttught in it, and, by amiable, discreet, and virtuous COIl-


PRESENT OR PAST :MASTER.

89

duct, to convince mankind of the goodness of the Institution: so that, when anyone is said to be a member of it, the ,vorld may know that he is one to whom the burdened heart may pour out its sorrows, to whom distress may prefer its suit; whose ha.nd is guided by justice, and whose heart is expanded by benevolence. In short, bya diligent observance of the by-laws of your Lodge, the Constitutions of Masonry, and, above all, the Holy Scriptures, which are given as a rule and guide to your faith, you will be enabled to acquit yourself with honor and reputation, and lay up a ero路wn of 1'eJ路oicing which shall continue when time sha.ll be no more. PRAYER ON CLOSING A LODGE OF PAST t,fASTERS.

" Help us, 0 God of our salvation, for the glory of thy name; and deliver us, and purge away our sins, for thy

name's sake."-Ps. lxxix.. 9.. SECTION SECOND. This section pensation, or a them to work. are considered, FOR~r

contains the form <>f a petition for letters of diswarrant of constitution for a I.Jodge, enlpowering The eerenlonies of Constitution and Consecration with the form of"t a G-rand Procession.

OF PETITION FOR A CHARTER OR WARRANT TO路

ESTABLISH A

NE~V

LODGE..

To the 1Iost Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State of - - - , the petitioners humbly show, that they are ancient free and accepted :Jlaster lJrIason,8. II~lvillg the prosperity of the Fraternity at heart, they are willing to exert their best endeavors to promote and diffuse the genuine principles of Masonry.. . For the 'Convenience of their respective dwellings, and 8-


90

MASONIC CHART"

for other good reasons, they are desirous of forming a new Lodge in the town of , to be named In consequence of this desire, and for the good of the craft, they pray for a Oha1oter, or Warrant, to empo,ver them to assemble as a legal Lodge i to discharge the duties of Masonry, in the several degrees of Entered Apprentice, FeI19w-Craft, and Master l\fason, in a regular and constitutional manner, according to the ancient form of "the fraternity, and the laws and regulations of the Grand Lodge. That they have nominated and do recommend A. B . to be the first J\laster, C. D. to be -the first Senior Warden, and E. F. to be the first Junior Warden of said Lodge路; that, if the prayer of the petition should be granted, they promise a strict conformity to all the constitutional laws, rules, and regulations of. the Grand Lodge. This petition nlust be signed by at least . seven regular l\Iasons, and recommended by some I.Jodge contiguous to the place where the new IJodge is to be held. It III ust be delivered to the Grand Secret(1ry, '\",hose duty it is to lay it. before the <"1-rand ]~odge . .After ,a charter is granted by the G-rand Lodge, the G'rand ~Iaster appoints a day and hour for constituting and consecra.ting the ne,v Lodge, and for installing the l\laster, ardens, and ot,her officers. The Grand lVlaster has power to appoint sorne 'worthy Past J.lfaster, with full power to consecrate, constitute, and install the petitioners..

"r

CEREl"IONY OF CONSTITUTION AND CONSECRATION.

On the day and hour appointed, the Grand l\faster 3lnd his officers Uleet in tt convenient rOODl near to the Lodge to be constituted, and open in the third degree. ..A.fter the officers in t~ ne\v lodge are ex~unined, they send a Dlessenger to the Grand l\Iastcr, \vith the follo"wing message, viz. : :\iOST

"r

ORSHIPFUL:-

.

The officers and brethren of Lodge, who are now assembled at , have instructed me to inform you that the Most "\Vorshipful Grand Lodge ,,~as pleased


PRESEN'r OR PAST l\IASTER.

91

to grant thenl a Charter, authorizing 'them to form and open a Lodge of Free and Accepted JYIasons in the to\yn of . They are now desirous that their Lodge should be consecrat'ed, and their officers installed in due and ancient fort'ln; for ,,"'hich purpose they are now met, and await the pleasure of the Most Worshipful Grand Master. "1hen nbtice. is given, the Grand Lodge walk in procession to the hall of the new Lodge. "Then the Grand Master enters, the grand honors are given by the new Lodge, the officers of which resign their seats to the Grand Officers, and take their seyeral stations on the left.. The necessary cautions are given, and all, excepting PRESENT or PAST l\:I.ASTERS of L~dges, are requested to retire until the 1\:Iaster of the ne\v Lode.-e is inducted into the Or拢ental C1ha~~r of Solonton. I-Ie is then bOl~nd to the faithful performance of his trust, and inyested ,vith t,he characteristics of the chair. Upon due notiee, the (j rand l\larshal reconducts the Brethren into t.he hall; and all take their places, except the menlbers of' the ne\v Lodge, ,vho fornl路 a procession on one side of the halL As they adya,nce, the G'rand llIaster addresses them: "B'retltren, behold your 1Jlaster I" " lIfastcr, behold lIourLodge 1" The Brethren Inake the proper salutations as they pass the east.. A grand procession is then formed, in the following order,

viz.:-

~

'f.aJW<

~

io

Tiler with a drawn Sword; Two Ste"rards with ,vhite Rods; Entered .A.pprentices;* Fellow-Crafts; lVIaster I\iasons; Stewards; tJunior Deacons; Senioi.. Deacons; Secretaries ,; 'rreasurers ;

\$ The Entered ApIlrenticcs nnd Follow-Crafts take their places in the procession outside of the Lodge..


92

MASONIC CHART.

Past Wardene ; Junior Wardens; Senior Wardens; Past 1\'1asters .; l\tIark l\'lasters; Royal Arch lVlasone; Select ~Iasters; Knights Templar; Masters of Lodges.

The New Lodge. Tiler with a drawn Sword; Stewards with white Rods; Entered Apprentices; Fellow-Crafts; l\laster nlasons j Junior and Senior Deacons; Secretary and Tl'easurer ~ Two Brethren, carrying the I~odge; *' Junior and Senior '\Vardens ; The Holy 'Vritings, carried by the oldest or some suitable mOlD ber, not in office; The 'V. l\laster j l\tIusic;

The Grand Lodge. Grand Tiler with drawn Sword; Grand Stewards with white Rods; A Brother carrying a Golden essel of Corn;t Two Brethren, carrying the Silver Vessels, one of Wine, the other of Oil; Grand Secretaries; Grand Treasurers; A burning Taper,t borne by a Past l\faster;

,T

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpet.

t

This Taper should be of blue wa.x.

t

Wheat..


PRESENT OR PAST l\IASTER.

93

A Past l\laster bearing the IIo1y \\i ritings, Square and Compasses, supported by two Stewards with ,vhite Rods j Two burning Tapers, borne by two Past l\'Iasters;* The Tuscan and Composite Orders; The Doric, Ionic, and Oorinthian Orders; Past Grand "Tardens; Past Deputy Gl'and j)Iasters; Past Grand l\Iasters; The Globes; Clergy and Orator; R. Junior and Senior Grand Wardens; R. \V. Deputy Grand l\Iaster ; The l\iaster of the oldest Lodge, carrying the Book of Constitutions; The 1\1. W. Grand l\Inster; The Grand Deacons, Olla line seven feet apart, on the right and left of the Grand l\:Iaster, with black Rods; Grand Sword Bearer, with a drawn Sword; T,,<ro Stewards with white Rods..

w.

The l\Iarshals conduct the procession to the church or hall where the services are to be performed. '~Vhell the fi'ont. of the procession arrives at the door they halt, open to the right and left" and fhee in\vard, while the (i'rand ~Iaster and others, in succession, pass through and enter the house. l'\.. platform is erected in front of the pulpit, and provided with seats fbI" the ucconllnodation of" the Grand Officers. The Holy Bible, Square and Compasses, and Book of CODsti.. . tutions, are placed upon a table in front of the Grand l\Iaster: the flooring is then spread in the ~entre, upon the platfhrm, covered with white satin or linen, and encompassed by the three tapers, and t,he vessels of corn, u"ine, and o'il.

SERVICES. 1. A piece of Music. 2. Pru.yer.. .. The Taper upon the right should be of white, and the one upon the left of red, wax.


94

MASONIO CHART.

3. An Oration. 4. A piece of Music. 5. The Grand l\'larshal forms the officers and members of the new Lodge in front of the Grand l\Iaster. The Deputy Grand Master addresses the Grand lVlaster as follows: . ~IoST

VVORSHIPFUL:--

A.. number of Brethren, duly instructed in the mysteries of Masonry,having assembled together at stated periods, by virtue of a dispensation granted them for that purpose, do now desire to be constituted into a reg路ular Lodge, agreeably to the ancient usages and customs of the fraternity. The dispensation and records are presented to the Grand who examines the records, and, if found cor~ect, pro-

~Iaster.,

claims:The records appear to be correct, and are approved. Upon due deliberation, the Grand Lodge have granted the Brethren of this new Lodge a charter, establishing and confirming them in the rights and pri-\rileges of a re[J~llar con8tituted Lodge; which the Grand Secretary will now read. After the charter is read, the Grand l\'laster then says : We shall now proceed, according to ancient usage, to constitute these. Brethren into a regular Lodge. vVhereupon the several officers of the new Lodge deliver, up their jewels and badges to their~raster, who presents theIn, ~ith his own, to the Deputy Grand l\iaster, and he to the Grand l\Iaster.. . The Deputy Grand l\1:aster presents the l\Iaster Elect to the Grand l\Iaster, saying:-

l\;losT WORSHIPFUL : I present you Brother

, vlhom the members of the Lodge, now to be constituted, have chosen for their ~Iastel".

The Grand Master. asks them if they remain satisfied with their choice. [They bow in token of assent.]


PRESENT OR PAST MASTER..

95

The Master Elect then presents, severally, his Warden:s and other officers, naming them and their respective offices. The Grand lVlaster a.sks the Brethren if they remain satisfied with each and all of them. [They bo'w as bejore.] The officers and members of the new Lodge form in front of the Grand ~iaster,and the business of Oonsecrration commences with solemn music. 6. Oerernony of Oonsec'ration. The Grand l\-iaster, attended by the Grand Officers and the Grand Chaplain, form themselves in order round the Lodge,-all de'"I'outly kneeling. . 7. A piece of solemn music is performed while the Lodge is uncovered. After which, the first clause of the Consecration Prayer is rehearsed, which is as fbllo,vs : -

" Great Architect of the universe! Thiaker and Ruler of all ,vorlds! Deign, from thy celestial teulple, from realms of light and glory, to bless us in all the purposes of our present assembly! 'Ve llunlbly inyoke thee to give us, at this and at all times, 'l.l'isdorn in all our doings, 8tren[Jtlt of mind in all our difficulties, and the beauty of harmony in all our comulunications 1, Perulit us, 0 thou Author of light and life, great Source of love and happiness, to erect this Lodge, and now solemnly to CO'l'lt8ecrate it to the honor of thy holy name! "Glory be to God on high." [Response by tlte B'rethren.]

"As it ,,"as in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be; world ,vithout end. A.men." The Deputy Grand Master takes the Golden Vessel of Corn, and the Senior and Junior Grand ,~rardens take the Silv'er Ves... sels ot Wine and Oil, and sprinkle the elements of consecration upon the Lodge. The Grand Chapla.in then continues:

"(trant, 0 Lord our God, that those ''(tho are now about to be invested with the governmen.t of this Lodge


96

MASONIC CHART.

may ~~e endued with wisdonl to instruct their Brethren in all their duties. May brotherly love, relie..f, 'and truth always prevail among the members of tl1is Lodge; and may this bond of union continue to strengthen the Lodges throughout the world! "Bless all our' Brethren, wherever dispersed; and grant speedy relief to all who are either oppressed or distressed. "We affectionately commend路 to thee all the members of thy whole family. l\iay they increase in grace, in the kno'\vledge of thee, and in the love of each other. . "'Finally: may we finish all our work here below with thy approbation; and then have our transition from this earthly' abode to thy heavenly ten1ple above, there to enjoy light, glory, and bliss, in~ffable and eternal! " Glory be to God on high." [Response by the Bret}tre?t.]

"As it was in the beginning, is no\v, So mote it be. Amen."

an~

ever shall be.

8. A piece of solemn music is performed while the Lodge is covered. 9. The G'rand Chaplain then dedicates the路 Lodge in the ~ollo,ving tern1S : -

"To the nlemory of the HOLY ST. JOHNS, we dedicate this Lodge.. ~Iay every brother 'revere their charttcter, and imitate their virtues! "Glory be to God on high." [Response.] "As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, ' ,Yorld without end. "So mote it be. Amen.,t 10. A piece of music is perfol"lned, while the 13rethrenof th(~

new Lodge advance in procession to salute the G'rand ]~odg路e, \vith their hands. crossed upon their hrenst8~nnd howing as they pass. They tlH~n. ut.ke their plaecs us t}H~Y were.


PRESENT OR PAST !\1.A.STER.

97

11.. The Grand ~faster then rises, and constitutes the new Lodge in the form fbllo,ving:-

"In the name of the llfost vV orshipful Grand Lodge, I no,v constitute and forul you, my beloved Brethren, into . a regular Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. From henceforth enlpower you to meet as a regular Lodge, constituted in conformity to the rites of our order, and the charges of our ancient and honorable Fraternity; and may the Supreme Architect of the Universe prosper, direct, and counsel you in all your doings!

r

[Response.]

"So mote it be.

Amen." SECTION SECOND.

cERErvrONY OF INST..4..LLATION..

The Grand l\-Iaster, or presiding officer, addresses the l\Iaste~ Elect in the words following, viz.:BROTHER:-

Previous to your investiture, it is necessary that you should signify your assent to tllose ancient charges and regulations which point out the duty of a Master of a Lodge. I. You agree to be a good man and true, and strictly to obey the moral law. II. You agree to be a peaceable subject, and cheerfully toconforul to the laws of the country in which you reside. III. You proDlise not to be concerned in plots and conspiracies against government, but patiently to submit to the decisions of the Stl prenle legislature. IV. You agree to pay a proper respect to the civil ma1gistrates, to ,york diligently, live creditably, ancl act honorably hy a11 men. V. You agree to hold in veneration the original rules and patrons of the order of :NIasonry, and t.heir regular 9


98

:MASONIC CIIART.

successors, supreme and subordinate, according to their stations, and to submit to the a,vards fLIlcl resolutions of your Brethren, when convened, in every case consistent ,vith the constitutions of the order. VI. You agree to avoid private l)iques and q~arrels) and to guard against intemperance and excess. VII. You agree to be cautious in carriage and bellaviol", courteous to your Brethren, and faithful to your Loc1ge. VIII. You promise to respect genuine Brethren" and to discountenance impostors, and all dissenters from the original plan of Masonry. IX. You a.gree to promote tIle general good of society, to cultivate the social virtues, and to propagate the knovv'ledge of the art. X. You promise to pay homage to the Grand l\iaster for the tin1e-being, and to his officers 'when duly installed; and strictly to conform to every edict of the Grand Lodge, or general assembly of 1V1ason8, that is not subversive of the principles and ground\'Vork of ~Iasonry. XI. You a,clmit that it is not in the power of any nlal1, or body of men, to make innovations in the body of ~fa足 sonry., , XII. You promise a regular attendance on the committees and cOlnnlunications of the Grand Lodge, on recelvIng proper notice, and to P~lY attention to all tIle duties of ~fasonry, on convenient occasions. XIII. You adrnit that no new Lodge shall be formed without perulission of the Grand Lodge; and that no countenance be given to an irregulttr Lodge, or to fLllY person clandestinely initiated therein, being contrary to the ancient charges of the order. XIV. You adnlit that no person can be regularly made a 1\:Iason in, or adnlitteda nlember of, any regular Lodge, without previous notice, and clue inquiry into his character.


PRESENT OR PAST l\'IASTER.

99

xv. You a.gree that no visitors shall be received into your Lodge, without due examination, and producing proper vouchers of their having been initiated into a regular Lodge. These are the regulations of Free and Accepted ~fasons. Do you submit to these charges, and promise to support tl1ese regulations, as l\1asters have done in all ages before you? The lVlaster is to answer, I (10. The presiding officer then addresses him : BROTHER

A. B. : -

In consequence of your cheerful conformity to the charges and regulrttions of the order, you are now to be installed lVIaster of this* Lodge, in full confidence of your care, skill., and ca pa.ci ty to govern the same. The new lVlaster is tllen regularly invested with the insignia of his office, and the furniture and iUlplemcnts of his Lodge. The various implements of the profession are emblematic of our conduct in life, and upon this occasion are carefully enunlerated. ' The Holy Writings, that great light in J\fasonry, will guid,e you to all truth: it will direct your path to the teluple of happiness, al1d point out to you the whole duty of ma,n. The Square teaches us to regulate our actions by rule 31nd line, and harmonize our conduct by the principles of 1110rality and virtue. The CfonlJJa8SeS teach us to limit our desires in every station; that, rising to enlinence by merit, we may live respected and die regretted. The Rule directs that we should punctually observe our duty, press for'ward in the path of virtue, and, neither â&#x20AC;˘ If the Lodge is installed for the first time) it is called " this new Lodge."


100

1\IASONIC CHAR'r.

inclining to the rigllt nor to the left, ill all our actions have eternity in view. The Line teaches' the criterion of moral rectitude, to avoid dissiululation in conversation and action, and to direct our steps to the path which leads to a glorious iUlmortality. The Book of (Jonstitutions J"on are to seare}l at all times. Cause it to be read in your Lodge, that none may pretend ignorance of the excelleilt precepts it enjoins. You will also receive in charge the BJj-La~o8 of your Lodge, vvhich you are to see carefully and punctually executed. CHARGE UPON THE IN&TALLATION OF THE MASTER OF .A LODGE.

'VORSHIPFUL ~fASTER:--

Being a,ppointed Ivlaster of this Lodge, you cannot be insensible of the obligations ,vhich devolve on you, as their head; nor of your responsibility for the faithful discharge of the irnportant duties annexed to your appOil1tnlent. The honor, reputation, and usefulness of your Lodge will materially depend 011 the skill and assiduity '\vith which you manage its concerns; ,vhile the happiness of its lllembers ,viII be generally prOIDoted. in .proportion to the zeal ~lnd ability with 'w'hich ~you propagate the genuine principles of our institution. For a pttttern of imitation, consider the great luminary of nature, ,vhich, rising in the East, regulal'ly diffuses light and lustre to all '\vithin its circle. In like nlanner, it is your province to spread and COU1111unicate light and instruction to the Brethren of your Lodge. Forcibly iIrnpress upon them the dignity and high importalnce of ~iasonry, and seriously adlnonisll theln never to disgr::1ce it.. Charge thenl to practise out of the Lodge those duties '\"hich are taught in it; and by amiable, discreet, and vir-


PRESENT Oit PAST l\'Il"tSTElt.

101

tuous conduct, to cOIlvince mankind of the goodness of the institution: so that, when anyone is said to be a nlember of it, the world may kno\v that he is one to whom the' burdened heart may pour out its sorrows, to whom distress n131Y prefer its suit; vihose hand is guided by justice, and his heart expandod by benevolence. In short, by a diligent observance of the by-la,vs of your Lodge, tIle Constitutions of lYlasonry, and, above all, the Holy 8e'riptures, '\vhich are given as a rule and guide to your faith, you ,rill be enabled to acquit yourself with honor and reputation, and lay up a cro~on, of re~joicin[J, which shall continue ,yhen time shall be no n10re. The symbolic colors of your station are ,vhite, and are eml)lematic of Innocence, of Peace, and of 1Yisdonl. In its application to humanity the color white denotes purity, good reputation, and happiness.. In its Sacred I...lunguagc it signifies the regelleration of the soul, and in Divine Language it is the 8y111bo1 of the Divine vVisdom of the Supreme Grand Architect of the Universe.. ""\Visdom," says Solomon, "is the glorious emanation of the All-Powerful Divine, the purity of eternal light, the spotless nlirror of tIle operations of God, and the inla~e of his goodness; it is a one, yet is capable of becoming a plurality. The Prophets sa,v the Divinity clothed in a garment white as S110'V, and his ha,ir \vhite, like unto wooL" "God created the universe from his love, and he susiainsit by his ,visdom. In every system of Cosmogony the Divine wisdom, the Eternal light, dissipates the prin1itive darkness, and fashions the vlorld in

the "\","0111b of Chaos."* This symbol is also represented by it "\vhite ta1per, ,vhloh at the opening of the I.Jodge you are (presumed) to light at the altar, therehy reulinding =* Book of '짜isdom vii. 25; Rich's Portal, p. 11. {}:!:


102

!\IASONIC eIIART.

you that before entering upon the important duties of your station you should first seek to be enlightened by that Divine wisdom 路which can only be obtained by diligently searching the revealed ,yard of IIim ""rho is ,vithout beginning of days or end of years." The subordinate officers are then severally invested by the presiding officer, who delivers each of them a short charge, as follows, viz. : TI-IE SENIOR '\V ARDEN~

BROTHER

O. D. :-

You are appointed Senior Warden of this Lodge, and are now invested ,,"ith the ensign of Y01..1r office. The Level demonstrates that ,ve are descended from the same stock, pa-rtttke of the same nature, and share the sanle hope; and though distinctions among men are necessary to preserve subordination, yet no elninence of station should rnarke us forget that ,ve ~1re Brethren; for he ,vho is ph1ced on the lo,vest spoke of fortune's wheel nlay be entitled to our regard; because a time vdll come, and the '\visest kno,\ys not ho\v soon, ,vhen all distinction but that of goodness shall cease, and death, the grand leveller of huulfLn greatness, reduce us to the stl:me sta,te. Your regular attendance on our stated nleetings is essenti:'11ly necessary. In the absence of the ~Iaster, you are to govern this Lodge; in his presence, you are to assist hirn in the gOYCrnluent of it. I firmly r~ly on your kno'wledge ~f l\Jla.sonry ~tnd attachment to the Lodge for the faithful discharge of the duties of this importa,nt trust. Your station in the \vest denotes the affection o~., or the love of, truth. The symbolic colors of your station are red, ,vhich is enlblemt1tic of Strength, of Zeal, of Virtue, and of Love. This syulbol is represented by the red tap~~r, ,yhich at the opening of the Lodge you are (presulIlecl) tG' light at the altar, thereby rcrninding you that before enter..


PRESENT OR Pi\.ST l\lASTER.

103

iug upon the duti~s of your station you should first seek an endo,vment of that strength and Divine love which is . requisite for the faithful discharge of the duties of your office.-Look ~()ell to the lVest! TIlE JUNIOR W.ARDEN.

BROTHER

E. F. :-

You are appointed Junior Warden of this Lodge, and are now invested ,vith the badge of your office. The Plurnb admonishes us to walk uprightly in our several stations; to hold the scales of justice in equal poise; to observe the just medium between intemperance and pleasure; and to make our passions and prejudices coincide witll- the line of our duty. To you is committed the superintendence of the craft during the hours of refreshment. It is thel~efore indispensably necessary that you should not only be ten1perate and discreet in the indulgence of your ow'n inclinations, but carefully observe that none of the craft be suffered to convert the purposes of refreshment into intemperance and excess. Your 路regular and punctual attendance is particularly requested; and I have no doubt that you will faithfully' execute the duty which you owe to your present appointment. Your station in the south signifies tr~"t7L in light. The symbolic colors of your station are blue, and denote Beauty, Fidelity, Eternity, Friendship, and Divine Truth. This symbol is also represented by a blue taper, which at the opening of the Lodge you are (presumed) to light at the altar, thereby reminding you that as it is your province to first direct the minds of the u'll/infor7ned in their search afterr t?路uth, so should you seek to be endo'w"ed 1vith that Divine truth 'which is so esseJltial to the faithful discharge of the duties of your station.-Look well to the f}o,tttlt!


104

l\IASONIC CHART.

THE TREASURER.

G. H. :-

BROTHER

You are appointed Treasurer of this Lodge. It is your duty to receive all moneys from the hands of the Secretary, make due entries of the same, and pay them out by order of the vVorshipful JYIaster and the consent of the Lodge. I trust your regard for the Fraternity will prompt you to the faithful discharge of the duties of your office. THE SECRETARY. BROTHER

J. K.:-

You are appointed Secretary of this Lodge. It is your duty to observe all the proceedings of the Lo.dge; make a fair record of all things proper to be ,vritten; to receive all moneys due the Lodge, and pay them over to the Treasurer, and take his receipt for the same~ Your good inclin~1tion to l\Iasonry and this Lodge, I hope, will induce you to discharge your office "rith fidelity; and, by so doing, Jfou \yill rnerit the esteem and applause of your Brethren. SE:NIOR AND JUNIOR DEA.CONS.

11. AND N. 0.:You are appointed Deacons of this Lodge. To you, with such assistance as may be necessary, is intrusted the

BROTHERSL.

examination of visitors.

It is also your province to at-

tend on the Master and 'Vardens, and to act as their proxies in the active duties of the Lodge, such as in the reception of ca,ndidcttes in to the different degrees of 1\fasonry, and in the immecliatte practice of our rites. The Square and CouJpasses, as bad.ges of your office, I trust to your care, not doubting your vigilance and attention. TIlE STE'VARDS.

P. Q..

RI. S.:You are appoint,(Hl Ste\vards of this Lodge. The duties

BROTHERS

AND


PRESENT OR PAST

~{IASTER.

105

of your office are, to assist in the collection of dues and subscriptions; to keep an account of the Lodge expenses; to see that the tables are properly furnished at refre'shment, and that every Brother 'is suitably provided for ; and generally to assist the Deacons and other officers in performing their duties. Your regular and early attendance will afford the best proof of your zeal and attachment to the Lodge. THE TILER. :BROTHER : -

You are appointed Tiler of this Lodge, and I invest you with the implement of your" office. As the sword is placed in the bands ,of the Tiler to enable him effectually to guard against the approach of C01vans and eavesdroppers, and suffer none to pass or repass but such as are duly qualified, so it should morally serve as a constant admonition to us to set a guard at the entrance of our thoughts, to place a watch at the door of our lips, to post a sentinel at the avenue of our actions,-thereby excluding every unqualifiecl and un1vorthy thought, word, and deed, and preserving consciences void of offence towards God and towu,rds man. Your early and punctuaJ attendance ,viII afford the best proof" of your zeal for the institution. CHARGE TO THE BRETHREN OF THE LODGE.

Such is the nature of our constitution that, as some must of necessity rule and teach, so others must of course learn to submit and obey. Humility in both is an essential duty. The officers who are appointed to govern your Lodge are sufficiently conversant with the rules of pro~ priety and the la,vs of the institution to a'\Toid exceeKling the powers 'vtith which they are intrustecl; and you are of too generous dispositions to envy their preferment. I


106

l\IASONIC CHART.

therefore trust that you will have but one aim,-to please each other, and unite in the grand design of being happy and communicating happiness. 'Finally, my Brethren, as this association has been formed and perfected with so much unttnimity and concord, in which \ve greatly rejoice, so may it long continue! J\fay JOu long enjoy every satisfaction and delight which disinterested friendship can afford! 1\1ay kindness and brotherly love distinguish your conduct as men and as lVIasons! Within your peaceful walls, may your children's children celebrate ,vith joy and gratitude the transactions of this auspicious solemnity! And may the tenets of 071/r projession; be transmitted through your Lodge, pure and unimpaired, from generation to generation! The Grand 1\Iarshal then proclaims the New I..4odge in the following manner, viz. : -

In the name of the 1fost "\\T orshipful Grand Lodge of the State of , I proclaim this new Lodge, by the naUle of Lodge, No. - , to be legally constituted, consecrated, and the officers thereof duly installed. 13. A piece of music is then performed. 14. Benediction. The procession is then formed, and returns in due form to the hall whence it, set out. The \"\T. l\Iastcr, having been previously inducted into the OJ',tental C7~air oj" JSolo"tnon, all but l\Iaster l\IasoIls a.re caused

to retire. A 1n"oc088ion is then f()rllled~ anel passes three tilllCS round the hall, and, npon passin:,! tho .l\Iaster, pays hiIll due hOllHtge by tJ1C usual honolJ~, in the diil'orcnt degrees.. During the procession passing round, the following song is

sung.;IIn"il, l\I:1sonry divine! Ol()ry of ages shine; Long rnayst thou reign!


PRESENT OR PAST MASTER..

107

Where'er thy Lodges stand, l\tlay they have great command, And always grace the land,Tho~Art divine. Great fabrics still arise, And grace the azure skies: Great are thy scheme-s! Thy noble orders are ~Iatchless, beyond compare: No art with thee can share,.Thou ...~rt divine. Hiram, the architect, Did all the craft direct How they should build: SOl',m, o,n, Great Israel's king,} rn'" ~ Did mighty blessings bring, ' ; ~ And left us room to sing, 0 ~ Hail, roynl Al't! 搂~

The Grand 1vlaster then directs the Grand l\farshal to form the procession,-whell the (~Tand I.lodge walk to their own hall, and both Lodges are closed in due form.

SECTION THIRD. This section cont,ains the ceremony observed on laying the foundation-stones of Public Structures. This ceremony is conducted by the 1\1. W.Grand l\Iaster and his officers, assisted by such officers and members of subordinate I.Jodges as can conveniently attend. The chief magistrate and other civil officers of the place 'vhere the building is to be erected, a.lso generally attend on the occasion. . At the time appointed, tIle Grand Lodge is convened in SOllIe suitable place. A ba.nd of Inartial music is proyided., and the . Brethren appear in the insignitL of the order. . The Lodge is then opened by the Grand :1''laster, and the rules for regulating the procession are read by the路 G-rand Secre.. tary. The ]~odge is then adjourned, after which the procession sets out in etzte jorrn, ill the following order:PROCESSION .AT LAYING FOUND.ATION-STONES.

Two Tilers with drawn S"rords; Tiler of the older Lodge, with do.; Two Stewards of the older Lodge;

Entered Apprentices;


108

l\IASO.NIC CHART.

Fellow-Orafts; l\faster l\Iasons; ~ Secretaries; ~ Treasurers; 8 Junior 'Vardens, ~ Senior 1"\Tardens ; ]vIark ~Iasters; Past l\Iasters ; Royal Arch l\Iasons; Select lVlasters; Knights Templar; Mast.ers; l\Iusic; Grand Tiler with 3, drawn Sword; Grand Stewards with white Rods; A Past l\faster with a Golden essel con~aining Corn; Principal i\.. rchitect witll Square, I..Aevel, and Philnb; Two Past nlasters with Silver Vessels, one containing 'Vine, and the other Oil; G-rand Secretary and Treasurer; The Five Orders of Architecture; One large Light, borne by u. Past l\Iaster ;* ~rhc IIoly J3ible, Square and COlllpasses, borne hy a l\faster of a I.Jodge, supported by t路wo Stewards on the and left; T,Yo large Lights, borne by two Past l\Iasters;t Gr~lnd Chaplain; Clergy and Orator j Grund "Vardens; I)eput,y Grand l\laster; ~rhe l\Iaster of the oldest Lodge, carrying the Book of Constitutions on a velvet cushion; G-rund Deacons, with black Itods, on u, line seyen feet apart;

,T

Granel lVlaster,; T,vo Stewards with white Rods;

G-rand Sword.. Be~lrer vvith

'* 1 nte, p. 92.

dr~L'wn

Sword.

t Ibid. p.9a.


PRESENT OR PAST l\IASTER.

109

A Triumphal . .~rc~ is usually erected at the place where the ceremo.ny is to be performed. The pro.cession passes through the arch; and the Brethren repairing to their stands, the Grand l\Iaster and his officers take their places on a temporary platform covered with carpet. The G-rand lVIaster commands silence. An Ode to l\lasonry is sung, after which the necessary preparations are made for laying the stone, on which are engraved the year of l\iasonry, the name of the Grand l\laster, &c. &c. The stone is raised up 'by means of an engine erected for that purpose, and the Grand Chaplain or OrateI' xepeatsa short prayer. The Grand Treasurer then, by the Grand 1)1aster's command, places under the stone various sorts of coin and medals of the present age. Solemn music is introduced, and the stone is let down into its place. The principal Architect then presents the working tools to the Grand ~laster, who applies plu'Ji~b~ square, and level to the stone, in their proper positions, and prOl1ChUnCeS it to be 'VELL FORl\IED, TRUE, and TRUSTY. The {}olden and Silyer Vessels are next brought to the table and delivered, the forlnel~ to the Deputy Grand Thlaster~ and the latter to the (irand Wardens, who su~cessively present them to the Grand l\Iaster; and he, according to ancient cerenlony, pours the corll, the ,vine, and the oil, which they contain, on the stone,

saying:"~Iay the all-bounteous Author of Nature bless the inhabitants of this place ,vith all the necessaries, conveniences, and conlforts of life, assist in the erection and completion of this building, protect the workmen against every accident, and long! preserve this structure from decay! And grant to us all a supply of the CORN of nourish-Ill rnent, the WINE of refre81~ment, and the OIL of J路oy! "So mote it be. Amen."

lIe then strikes the stone thrice with the mallet, and the jyubUc grand h0110'rs of 1J1CJ.,sora71 Q,l"e gtiven. The Grand l\;Iaster, then delivers over to the Architect the various implements of architeetul'e, intrusting him with the superintendence and direc.. tion of the work.; after which he reascends the platform, and an Oration suitable to the occasion is delivered. A voluntary eollection DUty then be lllade for needy. workDlcn, and the sum collected placed upon the stone by the G-rand

Treasurer.

10


110

l\;IASONIC CHART.

A suitable Song in honor of ~lasonry concludes the cerelllony; after which the procession returns to the place whence it set out, and the Lodge is closed in due form.

SECTION FOURTH. The fourth section contains the ceremony observed at the Dedication of the Free-l\iasons' Halls. On the day appointed, the Grand nlnster and his officers, accompanied by the members of the Grand I..lodge, meet in a convenient room near the place 'where the ceremony is to be performed, and open, in due and an~l)le jo rnl;, in the third degree of l\lasonry. The l\laster of the Lodge to which the Hall tiD be dedicated belongs, being present, adcl'resses the Grand l\faster as follows : G

MOST 1VORSIIIPFUL : -

The Brethren of Lodge, being aniluated with a desire of promoting the honor and in~erest of the craft, have, at great pains and expense, erected a J\Jasonic IIall for their convenience and acconlmoclation. They are de- . c:;irous that the same should be exarrlined by the ~f. "'V. GltAND LODGE, and, if it should llleet their approbation, that it should be solemnly dedicated to IV[asonic purposes, agreeably to ancient forn~. The Grand ~faster then directs tlle 路Gralldl\Iarshal to fo1'111 . the procession, when they move for\vard to the hall to be dedicat,ecl. On entering, the music will continue while the procession luarches three times round the hall. The Lodge, or flooring, is then placed in the centre; and the Grand l\laster having taken the chair, under a canopy of state, the G-rt1ud Officers, and the l\Iasters and 'Vardens of the Lodges, repair to the places previously prepared for their reception~ 'rhe three Lights, tLnd the Gold and Silyer Pitchers, 'with the corn, ,vine, and oil J aTe placed round tIle l~odge, at the head of which st~tnds the .A.ltar, vlith the IIoly 13ible open, and the Square and COlupasses laid t,hcreon, \vith the oharter, Book of Constitutions, and By-.Laws. An .t\..nthem is sung and an ExordiulD on l\Iasonry given, after which the .A.rchitect addresses the Grand 禄:Iaster as follows : -


PRESENT OR PAST MASTER.

111

1:fOST VVORSHIPFUL:-

Having been intrusted with the superintendence and luanagement of the ,vorkmen employed in the construction of this edifice, and having, according to the best of my ability, accomplished the task assigned me, I now return my thanks for the honor of this appointment, and beg leave to surrender up the implements vvhich were committed to my care when the foundation of this fabric was laicl,-humbly hoping that the exertions '\vhich have been made on this occasion will be cro,vned with your approbation, and that of the }\Jlost 'Yorshipful Grand Lodge. To which the Grand 1\Iaster makes the following reply:BROTHER ARCHITECT : -

The sleill and fidelity displayed in the execution of the trust reposed in you at the commencement of this undertaking have secured the entire approbation of the Grand Lodge; and they sincerely pray that this edifice may continue OJ lasting 'monument of the taste, spirit, and liberality of its founders. An Ode in honor of l\Iasonry is sung, accompanied with instrumental music. The Deputy Grandl\Iaster then rises and says : JYIOST VVORSIIIPFUL : -

The hall in which we are now assembled, and the plan upon ,Yhich it has beell constructed, having met with your approbation, it is the desire of the Fraternity that it should now be dedicated, according to ancient form and usage~ "Thereupon the Grand Master requests all to retire but such as are l\Iaster ~Iasons. A procession is then formed in the f01lo\ving order, viz.:Grand Sword-Bearer; A Past l\faster, wit.h a Light;* A Past ~Iaster) with a Bible, Square, and Compasses, on a velvet cushion;

'* Ante, p. 92.


112

l\IA.SONIC CHART.

Two Past l\fasters, each with a I..Iight ;* Grand Secretary and Treasurer, with EUlblems; Grand Junior V\Tarden, with Pitcher of Corn; Grand Senior Warden, with Pitcher of Wine; Deputy Grand ~Iaster, with Pitcher of Oil; Grand l\lastcr; Two Stewards, with Rods. .All the otber Brethren keep their places, and assist Lll per.. forming an Ode, which cantinues during the procession, excepting only at the intervals of dedication. The Lodge being uncovered, the first time passing lound it, the Junior Grand vVardenpresents the Pitcher of Corn to the Gr:'1nd ~laster, who pours it upon the Lodge, at the same time pronouncing : -

"In the name of the Great JEIIO'l.AH, to whom be all honor and glory, I do solemnly dedicate this Hall to l\IASONRY." The grand 7tonors a're giroen. The second tiule passing round the I..Iodge, the G-rand Senior

l\r arden presents the pitcher of "Yine to the G-rand l\iaster, who sprinkles it upon t.he Lodge, at the same time

sa~yiug:-

"In the na,Ule of the IIoIJY SAINT JOHNS, I do solemnly this Hall to VIRTUE."

DEDICATE

The grand honors are twÂŁce g-iven. The third time passing round the Lodge, the Deput.y Grand presents the Grttnd l\laster with the pitcher of Oil, who sprinkles it upon the Lodge, Sftyillg:~Iaster

In the name of the whole Fraternity, I do solemnly de~icate this flaIl to UNIVERSAL BENEVOLENCE." The g'rand honors are thrice g"iven. A solelnll Invocation is nlflde to tIle Throne of Grace l)y the G-rand Chaplain, and an ..A.nthem sung; after which the Lodge is covered, and the Cj-rand l\Iaster retires to his Chair.. An Oration is then delivered, and the ceremonies conclude with 11111Sic. 'l'he (Jrand Lodge is tIlen closed in due and ample form. .. Ante, p. 93.


lO'itE'

113


NOTE. IN presenting to the Craft the following l\Iasonic funeral service, it was not with the expectation that it would at once come int.o general use; neither was it considered th.at. the ,vhole service should be used upon all occasions,-unpropitious weather, or other circumstances, often rendering brief ceremonies indispensable~ It was rather a desire to present a form of service which would not only be nppropriate when used as a whole, but which could equnJly well be used in part; together with a desire to perpetuate the labors of those eminent. Brethren to whose industry we owe many of the gems collect.ecl into the services of the severall\Io..sonic jurisdictions of the United States. TIH1t. this may be accomplished, and t.hat the solemnity of the 1\Iasonic funeral service may be further enhanced, is the desire of the EDITOR.

114


MASONIC FUNEB..A.L SERVICE.

115

MASONIO FUNERAL SERVIOE.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.* T. No Brotl1er can be interred with the formalities of the Order, unless he has received the 'lThird Degree in l\Iasonry. II.. The l\Iaster of a Lodge, being notified of the death of a Brother, and of his request路 to be buried with l\Iasonic cere.. monies, shall convene his Lodge and make all suitable arrange.. ments to that effect. III. If two or nlore Lodges attend, the cereluollies will be conducted by the Lodge of ,vhich the deceased was a mClllber.. In the case of a Stra,n.qer or JSoJourne1", the l\laster of the Senior Lodge present \vill preside. I\r. 1\.11 the Brethren who walk in procession should observe as much as possible ~1 UnifOl'll.lity of dress. J.\. proper badge of lllourning around the left arU1, 'with 'white gloves and aprons, are most suitable. It is recommended to avoid all ostentatious display of .l\Iasonic costume. V. l\Iusicians, if belonging to the Fraternity, "rill walk in procession imnlediately aftler the Tiler; if they are not l\Iasons, they will precede him. Solelull and appropriate pieces of m.usic only should be perfornled; all others are expressly interdicted. VI. 1'11e cushion on \vhich the Hol~y' Bihle is plaeed should be covered with black; a piece of black cralie should be. tied around all the furniture carried in procession, around each Stc\varcl's rod, and on the nlusicaJ instruluents. 'l'he procession will iUlmediately precede the corpse, and the J3rethren \vulk two and two, except such officers as, frolll their station, are to "ralk other\vise. \tIl. It would he proper for each I.Joc1ge, w'hen convenient, to have a pall of black cloth, velvet, or other suitable ulaterial, to be used on fhnerul occasions. On the coffin \vill be placed or tied a w"hite apron. ii~

Colla.ted by the Grand Lodge of Ohio for the use of its subordinates.


116

l\IASO.NIC CHART.

VIII. If the Grand l\faster, Deputy Grand l\:Iaster, or Grand Wardens attend any funeral procession, they will take precedence, aud preside over and conduct the ceremonies, unless they desire otherwise.. Their place in the procession will be af~er the ~Iaster of the Lodge. 'two Deacons, on the right and left, \vill attend a Grand vVarden. When the Q-rand l\laster or Deputy Grand lVIaster is present, the Book of Constitutions is borne be.. Pore him, a Grand S,vord Bearer follows him, and the Deacons, with black路 rods, are placed on his right and left, on a line, seven feet apart. If a Past Grand Officer appears in procession, he will be recognized with the customary respect.

ORDER OF PROCESSION. The following Order of Procession ,vill be proper to be observed when a single Lodge conducts the Oeremonies (see above,

No. VIII.): Tiler, with dra\Vll sword; Stc'\vards, 'with '\vhite rods; 1\1 usicians, (if they are l\Iasons; othervrise, in advance of the Tiler); l\laster l\lasons; Senior and "Junior I)eacon; Secretary tind Treasurer; Senior andJunior ardeHs; l")ast l\Iastcl's of the I.Jodge; The IIoly,,-rritings, on a Cushion, carried by the eldest Inellber of the Lodge present; The l\Iaster, SU11!)orted by tw'O I)eacolls,; Clergy;

"r

The Body, with the

insignia placed thereon;

Pall Bearers;

Pall Bearers;

1\1 aurn (~rs.


l"IASONIC FUNERA.L SERVICE.

117

THE LODGE SERVICE. The Brethren being asselubled ~tt the I.Joc1ge-room, or some other convenient l)}aoo, the presiding officer ,yill open the Lodge on the third degree. After having stated the object of the lueeting, the service will commence-all the Brethren standing:-

11'Iastel路.. -1!an that is born of a 1voman hath but a short time to live, and is full of ll1isery. FIe cometh up, and is cut down like a flo1ver; he fleeth as it were a shado,v, and never continueth inane stay. In the midst of life we are in death. Of w}lom, then, may we see}\: for succcr, but

of

THEE,

0

LORD,

,,'"ho for our

sin~

art justly displeased?

1\1y Brethren, 1vhere is the man that liveth, that shall not see death? Resp0l"J'l,sC by the B'ret1l,ren.-l\:Ian walketh in a v~1in shadow'; he heapetll up riches, and cannot tell who shall

gather them. jJ.Iaster.-Wllere is now our departed Brother? llesponse.-Ile dwelleth in night; he sojourneth in darkness.

lJ拢aste'r.-Can vve offer any precious thing to redeem our Brother?

Response.-We have nota ransom. The place that once kne,Y him shall know him no lllore forever. lJIaste1路 .-Shall his nallle then be lost upon the earth? Response.. - 1,Ve ,viII treasure it in our memories, we will record it in our hearts. .LlIastc1路.-IIo'\v, then, will it be kno'\vn? ' llc81Jonse.-It shall live in the exercise of his virtues. jJ:fCtster.-\Vhen our Brotl1er died, did he carry nothing a"way 1vith him? lle8pon.15e..- He fulfil1ecl his destiny: Naked he came into the world, and naked he has departed out of it. ..LlIa8ter.-Ilear, then, the conclusion of the whole


118

MASONIC CHART.

matter: It is THE LORD only路 that can g~~ve, and it is THE LORD tl~at hath taken away. Response.-Blessed forever be the 'narne of THE LORD. 11拢l8ter.~Let us endeavor to live the life of the righteous, that our last end may be like his. Response.-God is our God for ever and ever. He "rill be our guide and support even through the dark valley of the shado,,," of death. lYIaste'r.-I heard a voice from Heaven, saying unto me, "\tYrite from henceforth, Blessed are the dead "rho die in the Lorel! Even so, saith the Spirit: for they rest from their labors." ~

The l\faster here takes the ROLL, on which is inscribed the name and age of the deceased, and says : ALl\IIGI-ITY FATHER! In thy hands we leave:, vrith humble submission, the soul of our Brother.

The Brethren will respond tl~'i'ee tin~es, giving the p?tbltc [Jrancl ltOno1"s* each tiIne : Tlz,e 'UJ'ill of GOD is ae(Jo1nlJlished. So mote it be. The l\Iaster here deposits the R,OLL in the archives, and repeats the following or some other suitable prayer:"~10st glorious and merciful LORD GOD! our heavenly Father! l\..uthor of all good, and giver of allnlcrcy! Pour down thy blessings upon us, and strengthen our solemn engagements ,yith the ties of sincere affection! lYfay the present instance of mortality remind us of our approaching fate, and draw our attention toward thee, the only refuge in time of need: that, '\vhen the a,vful moment shall arrive that we are about to quit this transitory " -The public G'rnll.d :EIonors are given in the following manner :-Both arms are crossed on the hreast, tho left uppermost, nnd the open palms of the haotls ~harply striking the shoulders; they are thon raised above the hend, tho pahns .striking eaoh other, and then made to fall smartly upon the thighs.lYj.A,OKEY..


~lASONIC

119

FUNERAL SERVICE.

scene, the enlivening prospect of thy mercy may dispel the gloom of death; that after our departure hence in peace, we may be received into thine everlasting king... dom, and there enjoy, in union with our departed friends, the just reward of a pious and virtuous life. So mote it be. Amen." Then may be sung or rehearsed the following or some other suitable selection:-

CHANT.

PECULIAR. Sl'U.A.RT.

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-

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.

-'1-

SELECTION.

1. Blessed I are the I dead 'Vho I die· in the. I LORD from I hence Iforth. 2. Yea, saith the Spirit: that they nlay I rest · from their I labors, And their works do I follow I with I them.-REv. xiv. 13. 3. Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the 1 first . resurrection: Upon such the I second I death hath I no I-power.. 4. But they shall be priestls of I G'OD . and of I CHRIST, And shall I reign with I him a 1 thousand I years..- REv. xx. 6.

i

DOXOIJOGY..

A1Uel1: Blessing, and 1 glo-ry, and I wisdom,

And thankslgiy· ing, and Bel un" to our (GOD

For

1

ev· er and

I

I hOll .. or, and Ipower, and I miD"

ever.} AJmen.-REv. vii. 12.

Aprocessioll is then formed, whichmoves to tlle 110use of the deceased, and from thence to the church or place of inter+I\~n~


120

MASONIC CHART.

TIlE CHURCI-I SERVICE. To be used at the church or at the house of the deceased. Immediately after the benediction the :rtlaster will take his station at the head of the Coffin, which will be uncovered, the vVardens at the foot and the Brethren around it, all standing, when the service will commence:-

Master.-I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and vf.hosoever liveth and believeth' in me shall never die.-ST. JOHN xi. 25, 26. Take ye heed, watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is. For the Son of man is as a man taking a far journey, who left his house, and gave authority to his servants and to every man his work; and commanded the porter to watch. Watch ye, therefore: for ye know not when the nltlster of the house cometh, at even, or at midnight, or at the cock cro,ving, or in the morning: lest coming suddenly, he find you sleeping. And "\vhat I say unto you I say unto all, vVatch.-ST. lVIARK xiii. 33-37. ~1l"l8te1".-"'That man is he tha;t liveth, and shall not see death? Shan he deliver his soul fran). the hand of the grave ?-Ps. lxxxix. 48. ReslJonse.-I ,yill ransom them from the hand of the grave: I will l"edeeUl them fr()m death. 0 death, I "lill be thy plagues: 0 grl2Jve, I vlill be thy destruction!IIosEA xiii. 14. 1JIaster.-As for man, his days are as grass: as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth. For the v,1"ind passeth over it, and it is not; and the place thereof shall kno'\v it no re.-Ps. ciii. 15, 16. esponse.-Likeas a father pitieth his children, so tIle pitieth thelD that fear him. For he kno,vcth our fralne; he rtUneDlbereth thaJt 1ve are dust.. -Ps. cHi. 13, 14. Master.. --1:he days of our years ~1re threeSCol"e years


121

l\IASONIC FUNERAL SERVICE.

and ten; and if by reason of strength they ·be fourscore years, yet is their strength labor and sorrow; for it is soon' cut off, and ,ve fly a,vay.-Ps. xc. 10. Response.-So teach us to number our clays, that we may apply our hearts unto ,visdom.-Ps. xc. 12. Then may be sung the following or some othe'r suitable hymn:-

SCOTL.A.ND.

DR. CLAt{K.

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Thou art gone to the grave, but we 'will not de-plore thee,

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. Though sorrow and clark-ness en - com-pass the tornh; The

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Sa .. viour bas pass'd through its por.. tals be ..

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fon~

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t bee,

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~"i


:MASONIC CHART.

f\.

. -".Jl-~=~ .- ~-~-.-~- ~5f-, ~---,1-.-... ~ . ..L...---J.:L

i

~

t':'\

-.-

. .-.,,- -~--+- ~-,,-11-

:

And the lamp of his

I

love

is thy guide through the gloom.

~.

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Thou art gop.e to the grave: we no longer behold t.hee, Nor tread the rough path of the world by thy side; But the wide arms of rnercy were spread to enfold thee, For all men may hope, since the Sinless ha.s died. Thou art gone to the grave; but 't,vere wrong to deplore thee, 'Vhen God was thy ransom, thy guardian and guide; lIe gave thee, and took thee, and soon win restore thee, ,\Vhel'c death has no sting, sin.ce the Saviour has died.

The I\faster then says : ~1y

Brethren, let us pray! All kneel, ~Lnd join with the l\faster in saying the Lord's Prayer:Our Father, who art in heaven; hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come; thy will be done, in earth as it is in heaven. Give us .this day our daily bread; and forgive us our ,debts, as we forgive our debtors. And leitd. us notint6telnptation, but deliver us from evil. For thiue,


MASONIC FUNERAL SERVICE.

123

is the kingdom, and the power, and the ~lory, forever. AUlen.-lVIATT. vi. So nlote it A procession is ttgajn ti)rtned, which proceeds to the church.. yt1rd. )Vhen the procession a,rrives at the grave, the Lodge having the cereluonies in charge, the clergy, pall-bearers, and 1110Urners, halt, uutl1 the members of other Lodges have forll10d a circle around the grave, when an opening is lllade to receive thenl.. They then advanee within the circle, and the clergYlnan and officers of the acting Lodge take their station at the hea,d of the gr:tve, and the mourners at the foot. After the clergynlan has concluded the services of the church, the l\Iasonic service is again resulued.

ue.

SERVICE AT THE GRAVE. ~Ia8ter.-nfan dieth and wasteth a1vay; y,ea, man giveth up the ghost, and ,vhere is he ? Response.-The Lord gave, and the Lord hath t<lIken away: blessed be the name of the Lord! :Dlaster.-.1f.ay we die the death of tIle righteous, a,nd m:1Y our last end be like his I ResjJonse.-God is our God for ever and ever; he will be our guide even unto deatli! 1Jfa~lfter.-.L\.lmightyFather! into tlly hands we commit the soul of our departed Brother!

The Brethren respond three times, giving the public grand honors ea.ch tinle : -

The will of God is accomplished! So mote it be! Amen. The }\Iaster, or Chaplain, (or officiating clergyman-if he be a l\I nso 11) will then resunle the service, as follows : l\Iy BRETIIREN : ,짜e are again called upon by the most solemn admonition to rega:rd the uncertainty of huma,n life, the inui1utable certainty of. dea.th, ttrHl the vanity of all earthly pursuits. Decrepitutle a.utI decay are written on eV"E~ry 1ivii15 ~ The cradle and the coffin st~tnd side by side;


124

MASONIC CHA.RT.

a melancholy truth that, so soon as we begin to live, that monlent also "\ve begin to die. vVhat an eloquent comlllentary is here exhibited upon the instability of every hUlnan pursuit! and ho'v' touchingly does it echo the sad sentiment of the great preacher, ,vha 1vrote for our perpetual warning the imu10rtal text, JTa'nity of van'itie8! all is vanity! The last offices that ,ve pay to the dead are useless things, except as they constitute lessons to the living. Tl1e cold, lllarble form enclosed in the "narrow house" before you is alike insensible to our sorro,vs t1nd our ceremonie~. It lllatters not no,y to hilll ,,,,bethel" t\yO or three gather around the graye to perfbrnl his funeral ritual, or that hundreds have assenll~lcd, ,vith the banners and insignia of our order, to deposit him in his final restingplace. It is of little lIlonlent ho'\v or in ,vhat 111anner his obse(:luies are perforu1ed; vihethcr the '\)"ild ,vil1ds chant his requielu, or it be accoulpanied ,\yith rare and costly 111usic and the 111instrclsy of llHtny voices. fIe has gone to accolllplish the destiny of all our race, and his body to the profound slulnber of the grave, there to be resolved into its origina.l elements. "That, then; are all the extel~nals of human dignitythe power of 'w'calth, the drealns of all1bition, the;pride of intellect, or the chn.rnls of beautY-1vhen nature has paid her just debt? Fix Jour eyes on the last sad scene, and view hunlanity, stripped of its dazzling, nleretricious ornan1ents, and Jrou nlllstneeds be persuaded of the utter en1ptiness of these delusions. The 1110narch ofa hundred provinces, at "whose hidding naltiolls pay oheisance, and the poor beggar tha,t shi vers at Iris gate, are equals in the house of death. The one is obliged to {)art 1\?it.h his seeptre ind his crO,\VI1; the other lu~s no further use for his . wallet 8,nc1 his rags; and both are indebted to their


MASONIC FUNERAL SERVICE.

125

In the grave all fallacies are detected, all ranks are levelled, and all distinctions are done away. While we drop the sympathetic tear over the grave of our departed Brother, let us cast around his foibles, whatever they may have been, the broad mantle of a Mason's charity, nor withhold from his memory the just commendaiion that his virtues claim at our hands. It is of record ill the volume of Eternal Truth, that perfection on earth can never be attained. The best of cre~tted men did most grievously err, and the "'risest of QUI' race went sadly astray.. Suffer, then, the apologies of human nature to plead in behalf of him who cannot any longer extenuate for himself. Our present meeting and proceedings will have been v~tin and useless, if they fail to excite our serious reflections, and s,trengthell our resolutions for future amendment. Be then persuaded, my Brethren, by the Ullcertainty of life and the unsubstantial nature of all its p:ursuits, and postpone no longer that preparation which it is 'U)isdont to provide, and n~acZne88 to defer. Let us each embrace the present propitious moment; and now, while time and gracious opportunity offer, prepare for the exigencies of our latter end, when the pleasures of this world will be as poison-cups to our lips, and the reflections consequent upon a ,veIl-spent life alone afford us comfort and consolation.. The summer is rapidly passing away, and the harvest will soon be gttthered.. Let us here resolve to nlaintain with greater assiduity the dignified character of our profession. l\J!(lY our jalt}" be evinced in a correct moral vvul1{and deportulent! lVlay our lu~pe be bright as the glorious nlysteries that ,,路ill he revealed hereafter, and our char'ity boulldlessas the wttnts of hUUHlnity! Mother Earth for a common sepulture.

lJ*'


126

lVIASONIC CHART.

J\.nd, having faithfully discharged the great duties which ,ve o路we to God, to our neighbor, and ourselves, 'when at last it shall please the G-l=tr\.ND l\IASTER of the Universe to send his 1Vler, DEATH, to SUU1Ulon us into his eternal pl'eSellC~, may the t')'estle-boCt'rd 路of our 'vhole lives prtss such inspection that it nla,y be given unto each one of us to "ea,t of the hidden ll1anna,," and to receive the ",yhite stone "Vvith the ne路w nanle ,vrittcn," that ,viII insure perpetual and unsl)e~kablehappiness in the Paradise of God. The fol1l,)"wing invocations are then made:lYIaste'r.-lJlay "re be true and faithful to each other, and may,ve live and die in lo,~e ! ReslJonse.-So nlote it be. lJ-faster.-"l,Ia,y ,ye profess ",,"hat is good, and al'v\"ays act 3 greeably to our profession. ResjJonse.-So nlote it be. J.1ftl8ter.-1Iay the Lord bless us and keep us! May the Lord be g~'acious unto us, and may all our good intentions be cro"\vned ,\yith success ! 1

Res.l)onse.-So Dlote it be. Jllaster.-Glory be to God in the highest: on earth peace-good 'Yill to'wards men! ResjJonsc.-So n10te it be, now, henceforth, and forever. Anlen. Ifere t11e apron is taken from the coffin and handed to the l\Iuster, and the coffin is deposited in the grave, when the seryice is resulllcd : Forasmuch as it hath pleased . A.lmighty God, in his wise providenee, to take out of the ,varld the soul of our deceased Brother, we therefore comu1it his body to the

ground: earth to earth-ashes to ashes-dust to dust. The Secretary will then advance and deposit the ROLL in tIle gtaye 'with the usual f{)rUls.

11.faste1 .-Friend and Brother! '\ve bid thee 4

~1

last, a

lO1l{j


:M~ASONIC

127

FUNER.AL SERT'ICE.

Thou art at rest from thy labors: may it be

FAREWELL!

in peace!

Response.-So mote it be.

Amen.

Then llla.y be sung, or rehearsed by the l\faster, thQ following or some other appropriate hymn : -

PLEYEL'S

HY~IN.

!i~~~d ~==-j~61 §j-J:I -~ ==~f~-.-~~ ~-_I

i

I

, I

.

(9-

fIJ

'ft

So - lemn strikes the

J

I

+2-•

_~_-

-fIL +-

neral chime, Notes of

-r:2-

-rQ

-!2- -(2.

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,.

'i"~ ~J- .~.,~ 11f~. ~ ~===4' . --1--.-1- - --:---1~-'--l1.-. ===.:~~==~= -:-= _ ;_,~~~_: ~3 , _ . ~=:E~.=! our

t_ _

de-part . . ed

tilne,

...;\.s

jour - ney

",va

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I

---1-+-- H- 0 - =r-- - , - 'I

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here be - low Through a pil.grim - age of woe.

I

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-~


128

1"IASONIC

l\'fortals, now indulge a tear; For mortality is here! See ho'\v wide her trophies wave O'er the slumbers of the grave.

Clf.AR~.

Here another guest we bring: Seraph of celestial wing, To our funeral altttr come; 'Yaft this friend and brother home.

There, enlarged, his soul shall see '\Vhn,t was yeird in rnystery;

Jlea.venl,Y glories of the place Show his ~Il1ker 1':10e to face.

The service is then resumed by the ~laster, who, presenting the Apron, says : The Lamb-Skin, or vVhite Apron, is an emblem of In.. nocence and the badge of a IVlason. It is more ancient

than the Golden Fleece or Roman Eagle, more honorable than the Star and Garter. The l\laster then deposits it in the grave. This elnblem ~ no,\y deposit in the grave of our deceased Brother. 'Ve are thus rClllinded of the universal dominion of Death. The mattock, the eofEn, and the melancholy grave admonish us of our nlortality, and that, sooner or later, these fr::Lil, '\veak bodies IIlust nloulder in their parent

dust. The l\.Iaster, holding the Ener拢lreen in his hand, continues:This Jil,vergr'een is an eUlblem of our faith in the im-

mortality of the soul. By this '\ve are reminded of our high and glorious destiny beyond the "world of shadows," and that there dwells ,,~ithin our tabernacle of clay an imperishable, immortal spirit, over which the grave has no don1inion, and death 110 power. The Brethren v;ill nnw llHnre in !)rocession round the grave three times, a,nd severally drop in it the sprig of evergreen, * after which the lJubh~c !lra'nti honors are given in silenee. The ~Iaster then continues the ccrcnlony, in the following words:-

*

In depositing th(~ Ever!!recn, all ~h()uld strictly observe the proper fornl, which is hy extending the right. hand over the g-ra.Yc, dropping tIw Bvergreen; thtm raising trw ha Inl, pointing it t.o tlH~ Zenith~ In'ingin~ it dClwn upon the left breast, lLUd thenf~e to tho 8 itlc, thcrehs signif:ving that. ,,"e ('onsign the body of our (h~parterl Bl'fltlH'l' t.o tb(~ tomb, cnUlmend his spirit to IHlll who gave it,. and t.ha.t his路 U:CUHII'"Y i:~ fuitht'ully cherished within our hearts.


l\f.A.. SONIC FUNERAL. SERVICE.

129

From time immemorialit hath been the custom among the Fraternity of Free and Accepted ~fasons,at the request of a I~rother, to aCCODlpttny his body to the place of interment, there to depo~it it with the usual formalities. In confornlity to this ancient usage, and at tl:e request of our deceased Brother, we have asseulbled at this time, in the chart1cter of ]\{asons, to offer up before the world the last sael tl'ibute of our affection, and thereby to demonstrate In the strongest possible manner the sincerity of our past esteem for him, and our steady attachment to the principles of the Order. 'Ve have no,," ,yith the usual ~Iasonic ceremonies committed the body of a Brother to its kindred dust, there to renutin until the trumpet of judgulent shall sunlmon it froul its abiding-place. 1Ve leave hill1 in the hands of a Being ,vho doeth all things well, ,yIla is glorious in holiness, fea.rful in' praises, doing 1vonders. To those o"f his, inlmediate relatives and friends, who al"e most heart-stricken at the loss we h~1V'e all sustained, we have nothing of this ,,,"orld's consolrttion to oifel". \Ve can only deeply, sincerely, and most aifectionately sympathize ,vith them in their afflictive bereavenlent. But, in the, beautiful spirit of the Christian's theologJ, VfC dare to say ~ that lIE 'v 110 "telll pers the ''lind to the shorn lamb" looks down 'witll infinite compassion upon the ,vidow and fatherless in the hour of their desolation, and that the same benevolent Saviour who wept tears of synlpathyat tbe grave in Bethany will fold the arms of his love and protection around those who put their trust and confidence

in him. Then let us each in our respective spheres so improve this solemn 'W"arning of our God, that at last, ",.hen the "sheeted dead" are stirring, when the ÂŤ great white throne" is set, and the volume of the'record of our lives


130

l\I.ASONIC ellART.

is opened, we may receive frolu the Omniscient, Eternal Judge the thrilling invitation, "Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world." The service is concluded with the follo,vil1g or some other suitable prn,yer : -

Alnlighty and most nlerciful God, in ,vhom we live, and move, und have our being, and before ,vhom all men must appear to render fLU account for the deeds done in tIle body! we do most earnestly beseech thee, as we n01V surround the grave of our departed Brother, to iUlpress deeply upon our minds the soTenib).ities of this day. l\lay we ever remember that" in the midst of life ,vo are in death, Hand so live and act our several parts ,ve ,viII desire to have done ,vhen the hour of departure is at hand! And oIl! gracious Father, Voucl1safe us, we pray thee, thy divine assist~1nce, to redeenl our nlisspent tinlc;. and, in the discharge of the duties thou llust assigned US in the erection of our Inora,1 edifice, nlay '\ve have 1}){Sdom from 011 high to direct us, 8trentqtl~ conlmensurate ,vith our task to support us, and the b(a'Ut~lJ of holiness to render all our perfornlt1nCes acceptable in tl1Y sight. And at last, 'w'hen our ,york on etLrth is done, when the rnallet of death shall call us froul ou:r labors, may we obtain a blessed and everlasting rest, in that Spiritual House, not made with hands, eterna,l in the heavens. Amen.. So mote it be..

as

The procession will then return to the place whence it setout, and the Lodge is closed in the Third I)egree..


132

MASONIC CHART.


133

)10ST EXCELLENT l\'IASTER.

•MOST EXOELLENT MASTER'S DEGREE.

N ONE but those who haye been inducted into the 01~'iental Oha~-r of Solornon can be admitted to this degree of lVlasonry. When the t.eulple of J erusalern was finished, and the cap-stone celebrated, with great joy, King Solomon admitted to this degree only those who had proyed themselyes worthy by their virtue, skill, and inflexible fidelity to the craft. The duties incunlbent on a l\fost Excellent l\Iaster are such that he should have a perfect knowledge of all the preceding degrees.

~ftit:er~. 1\1.·. E.,. lVI.-_, "S.·. W.·" J ... VV.·., Treasurer, Secretary, ~I.·. of C.o., S.", D.-., Jo·. D.·., ~Lnd Tiler.

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*

n n .r~

*

*

*

LESSON. (PSALl\1

xxiv.)

1

"The earth is the Lord's, and the fulness the~eof; the world, and they that dwell therein. For he hath founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the floods. Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? .or who shall stand in his holy place? He that hath clean hands. and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully" He shall receive the blessing from the 12


134

l\IASONIC CHART.

Lord , and rio-hteousness from the God of his salvation. b This is the generation of them that seek him, that seek thy f~ce, 0 Jacob: Selah. Lift up your heads, 0 ye gates; and be ye lifted up, ye everlasting doors, and the I(ing of Glory shall come in. Who is this I(ing of Glor.y? The Lord, strong and m'ighty; the Lord, mighty in battle. Lift up your heads, 0 ye gates; even lift them up, ye e\i"erlasting doors, and the I{ing of Glory shall come in. Who is this King 路of Glory? The Lord of Hosts,he is the King of Glory. Selah."

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*

(PSALM

*

*

*

*

cx.xii.)

"I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the Lord. "Our feet shall stand vtithin thy gates, Jerusalem. " Jerusalem is builded as a city that is compact together: whither the tribes go up, the tribes of the Lord, unto the testimony of Israel, to give thanks unto the name of the Lord. "For there are set thrones of judgment, the thrones of the house of David. "Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: they shall prosper that love thee. Peace be within thy ,valls, and prosperity within thy palaces. "For nlY brethren and companions' sakes, I will now say, Peace be ,vithin thee. Because of the hou~e of the Lord our God I will seek thy good.'"

ff'

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*


135

lVIOST EXCELLENT MASTER.

lVIOST EXOELLENT IVIASTER'S SONG.

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136

MASONIC CIIART.

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1'0 the Power Almighty who

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137

l\1:0STEXCELLEN'r l\tASTER.

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vided, Let's send forth our voices to praise his great Name.

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vided, Let's send fo;th our voices to praise his gre~t Nl1me.

i~~~ KfW~$fftm Companions, assemble On this joyful day, (The occasion is glorious,) ~rhe keystone to lay: Fulfill'd is the pronlise, . By toIle l\..NCIENTOF D..A.YS, . To bring forth the cap-stone ""'ith shouting and praise.

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*

There is no more occasion for level or plumb-line For tro,vel 01" ga,\rel, for compass or square; Our works are conlpleted, the ark safely seated, ..<\.nd we shall be greeted as w'orkmen most rare Now those tlult are ,,"orthy, Our toils w110 have shnred, And proved thenlselves faithful, Shall meet tlheir reward. Their virtue and knowledge Industry and skill, Have our approbtttion, Have gain'd our good will.

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*

We accept and receive theIn, ~Iost Excellent Masters, Invest.ed wit.h 11onors, and po\ver to preside, Among woi-thy craftsulen, wherever assembled 7 The kIlowledge of l\Iasons to spread far and wide. 1::::;;

*


138

1\1A80i'110 OHART..

ALl\-IIGIITY JEI-Io,r.A.H! Descend no,v and fill This ]~odge 'wit,}} thy glory, Our hettrts 'with good will! Preside ~Lt our 111eetings, Assist us to find True pleasure in teaching Good will to mankind.

Thy 'lvisdo1n inspired the great institution, Thy strength shall support it till natlU'e expire; And ",.hen the creation shall fhII into ruin, Its beauty shall rise through the midst of the fire.. PRAYER.

And no"\v, 0 God of Israel, let thy word, I pray thee, be verified, ,yhich thou spakest unto thy servant David, nlY fÂŤtther. But "rill G-od indeed d"\vell Q.U the earth? Behold, the heaven and henven of heavens cannot conta,in thee: ho,,,, nluch less this house that I lutye built! Yet have thou respect unto the prayer of thy servant, and to his supplicfttion, 0 Lord In~yGod, to hearken unto the cry and to the pr~1yer ,vhich thy servant pr:'1J!'eth bebe open to,yard fore thee to-day: th~1t thine eyes this house night and day, ev'cn to"rard the place of ,vhich thou hast said, ~fy nUlne shall be there: that thou 111ayest hearken unto the prayer "which thy ~ervallt shall lIlake to\vard this ph1ce. And hearken thou to the supplication of thy servant, and of thy people Israel, ,vhen they shall pru;y to\vard this })lace; and hCH"r thou in heaven, thy cl\velling-place; and, wIlen thou hearest, forgive. So rl~ote

it be.

Arnen. (2

CIIRON.

vii. 1-4.)

Nbw when Solomon had nUlde an end of pral:ring, the fire came do,vn from heaven, and COl1slul1ed the hnrntoffering and s~terifices; and the glory of the IJord filled the house. -,\,nd the priest could not ehter into the house


1\10ST EXCELLENT l\IASTER.

139

of the Lord, because the glory of the Lord)lad filled the Lord's house. And ,Yhen all the children of Israel saw how the fire C~1me down, and the glory of the Lord upon th\) house, they bowed themselves ,vit'll their faces to the ground upon the pa,vement, and ,vorshipped, and praised the Lord,

saying,

FOR HE IS GOOD; FOIt HIS l\IERCY ENDURETH FOR...

EVER..

CHARGE TO A. BROTHER WHO IS RECEIVED AND ACKNO'VIJ"EDGED AS A l\IOST EXCELLENT MASTER.

BROTIIER : -

Your aclulittance to this degree of 1\iasonry is a proof of the good opinion the Brethren of this Lodge entertain of your 1Iasonic abilities. Let this consideration induce :J'rou to be careful of forfeiting, by misconduct and inattention to our rules, tlutt esteem ,vhich has raised you to the rank you n01v possess. It is one of Jour great duties as a l\Iost Excellent ~Iaster,to dispense light and trutll to the uninformed J\!:tson; and I need not reulin d you of the impossibility of cOlnplying ,vith this obligation ,Yithout possessing an aceur:tte ~tcquaintance 'with the lectures of each degree.. If you a,re not already completely conversant in all the degrees heretofore conferred on you, rememherthat an indulgence prompted by a helief that you 'will apply yourself ,vith double 'diligence to ll1ake yourself so has induced the Brethren to accept you. Let it therefore be your unrcrnitting study to acquire such a degree of kno'\vledge and inforulation as shall ena,hIe you to discharge '\vith propriety the vfl,rious duties incumbent on you, and to preserve unsullied the title no,v conferred upon yOLl of a l\IOST EXCELLENT

l\1.A.S'l'ER.


140

l\:1ASONIC CHAR1\

The following Psalm is read at closing : (PSAL!I

xxiii.)

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie d01vn in green pastures; he leadeth me beside the still ,vaters. lIe restoreth my soul; he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art ,,"ith me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou' l'reparest a table b~fore me in the presence of mine enemies; thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follo·w· me all the days of my life, and I ,vill dwell in the house of the Lord forever. A DESCRIPTION OF SOLO~10N'S TE1\1PLE.

This structure, for beauty, lungnifieence, and expense, exceeded any building which ,vas ever erected. It ,vas built of" large stones of ,vhite lllarble, curiously he\vl1, and so artfully joined together that they appeared like one entire stonc. Its inner H~llls, Beanz,s, Posts, .Doors, l/'loors, and C(el~lin!ls ,yore luade of cedar and olive ,vooel nIu:! planks of fir, which 'were enth'ely covered \vith plates of gold, ·with various beautiful engravi.ngs, and adorned. ,vith precious jewels of many splendid colors. 'l'he nails \vhich fastened those plates ,vere also of gc)Id, \vith heads of curious worklnanship. 'The roof ,vas of olive v¥ood covered witJl gold; ~tnd when the sun shone thereon the reflection fi'om it, ,vas of such a rrfulgent SJ)lendor that it dazzled the eyes of all \vho beheld it. The court in \vhich the tenlple st()od, and the courts. ,vithout, \vere adorned on all sides \vith stately buildings and cloisters; u,nd the gates EHltering therein ,ycre exquisitely beautiful and elegant. ~'\ho Yessel~ consecrated to the perpetual use of the ternple ,vere suited to the luagnificcnce of the edifice in \v·hich they ,yere deposited and ltsed. J'osephus st11tes t;hat, fhere 'were one hundred and DJrty thousand of those vessels Vtrhich w'ere Inade of gold, and ono luillifHl three hundred und forty tllousnnd of si1vel~-; ten thrHlSUJld vestU1Cll ts for the priests, Inade of silk, \vith purI,le girdles; and two luilliol1s of purple vestInents fbr the singers. 'Iherc 'were also two hUDch'ed thousand trlunpels and H)rty thousand other lllusical in8truluellt;~ nUl.de use of· in the tenlplc and in ,vor;dlipping (]oel.


~10ST

EXCELLENT MASTER.

141

According to the most accur,lte computation of the .number of talents of gold,silver, and brass, laid out upon the temple, the sum amounts to six thousand nine hundred and four millions eight hundred and twenty-t,vo thousand and five hundred pounds sterling; and the jewels are reckoned to exceed this sum. The gold vessels are estimated at five hundred and forty-five millions two hundred and ninety-six thousand two hundred and three pounds and four shillings sterling, and the silve~" ones at four hundred and thirty-nine millions three hundred and forty-four thousand pounds sterling; amounting in all to nine hundred and eighty-four millions six. hundred and thirty thousand two hundred and thirty pounds four shillings. In addition to this there were expenses for workmen, and for materials brought from lVlount Libanus and the quarries of Zeradatha. There were ten thousand men per month in Lebanon employed in felling and preparing the timbers for the craftsmen to hew them, seventy thousand to carry lJurdens, eighty thousand to hew the stones and timber, and three thousand three hundred overseers of the work, "rho ,yere all en1ployed for seven years, to whonl, besides their ,vages and diet, King SoloDlon gave, ~s a free gift, six. lllilliolls seven hundred and thirty-three thousand nine hundred and seventy-seven pounds. '~rhe treasure. left by Dav-id tOVir arc1s carrying on this noble and glorious ,york is reckoned to be nine hundred and eleven millions four hundred and sixteen thousand two hundred and seven pounds; to ,vhich if \YC add I(ing 路Sololllon's annual revenue, his trading to Ophir fbr gold, and the l)resents made him by all the earth, as nlelltioned 1 I(ings x. 2.:1, 25, we shall not wonder at his being able to carryon so expensive a work; nor can we, without impiety, question its surpassing all other structures, since we are assured that it was built by the immediate direction

of fIE.A. VEN.


SECTION FIRST

*

t------..

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-----I

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14.2

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ROYAL ARCH

DEGRE~

143


144

MASONIO

'*'*, *~ ** \

CHART~


I)~GltEE.

put off*,thy sho~$f'Gm off thy feet, for the pl&ot) wh.ereon thou·standest, is aoly ground. Moreover he S3~d., I am the God of thy father) the God of" Abraham, th,o ~hGod of Isaae, and the "God of Jacob. And Moses hitSl his face: for he was afraid to look upon God.

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CHJ:10N.

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*

xxxvi. 11-20.)_

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*

Zedekiah was one-and-twenty years old when he beg3D. to reign, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusal~.",:A1Q(j he did that which watf evil in the sight of the Lor)£lhi~ God, and humbled not himself before Jeremiah the prophet, speaking from the mouth of the Lord. And he also rebelled against king Nebuchadnezzar, and stiffened,.;!lis neck, and hardened his heart, from turning unto the Lord God of Israel. Moreover, all the chief ~f the priea ts anI the people transgressed ve~'3' much, after all the·abi()~.iI.. tiona of the heathen, and polluted the house of the he had hallowed in J~rnsale£. And the Lord fathers sent to them by his messengers, ~~eC~"~;tIi~i!O ']be,hadoompassion on his ''I>,eople,'and on his<!d But they the . messengersof'G, d~;spised his word, an.d mis,tGed his p,rop.'t$,. '_1 w~I..*h·'of tlae ,Lordar&s'e against ais p~opI1$)tilIIL; remedy.. rt),erefQire· he h,l"'.I\TJiB":t!Wv'It.. '.I1J1rJI',I!i'til:,r:iIIc"D"J;l!'·'l('iJ!!lJ'.I1

sl$w of their ,e>ung l)l!e. or maJ;(1E~.DS~, age; he' gave them. ,9£ the house of God, great and small, of the house of. the L'Urd., and the tr'e&sures of __,__... ,." . . . . .__ princes: all these he brought· to Babylon. taey burnt the house~.fGod,'. and Jel1lsaJem,and b1l!l.ftlt .;sJlthe palaoe~ 14:


luS

!\1.A.SONIC CIIAH,T.

fire, and destroyed ttll the goodly vessels thereof. And them that had escaped from the s"...ord, carried he away to Babylon,-,vhere they were servants to him and his sons until the reign of the kingdom of Persia.

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(EZRA i. 1-3.)

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Now, in the first year of Cyrus, King of Persia" the Lord stirred up the spirit of Cyrus, I{ing of Persia, that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom, and put it also in writing, saying, Thu; saith Cyrus, King of Persia" The Lord God of heaven 'hath given me all the kingdoms of the earth, and he hath charged me to build him a house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah. "\\110 is there among you of all his people? His God be ,vith him, and let hiln go up to J erusalern, ,vhieh is in Judah, and build the house of the Lord God of Israel, '\vhich is in J erusalenl. * * * * * (EXODUS

iii. 13, 14.)

And ~Ioses said unto God, Behold, '\vhen I come unto the children of Isr"ael, and shall say unto thein, The G'od of' yOlU'路 fathers h:lth sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, 'Vhat is his name? what shall I say unto them'r And God said unto ~foses, I AM THAT I A~1: And thus thou shalt say unto the children of Israel, I A1I hath sent me unto you.

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* (PSALM

*

cxli.)

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*

Lord, I cry unto thee: make haste unto me: give ear unto my voice. Let my prayer be set forth before tllE~e as incense, and the lifting up of hands as the evening sacrifice. Set a ~watch, Lorcl, before my Dlouth ; keep the door of my lips. Incline not my heart to any evil

o


159

ROYAL ARCII DEGREE.

tIling, to practise wicked ,,'"orks with men that work iniquity. Let the righteous smite file, ~t shall be a kindness; let hint reprove nle, it shall be an excellent oil. lVIine €yes arc unto thee, 0 God the Lord; in thee is my trust: leave not my soul destitute,. I{eep me from the snares "Thich they have laid for me, and the gins of the ,yorkers of iniq nity. Let the ,vicked fall into their o,vn nets, while that I withal escape.

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* (PSALM

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*

cxlii.)

I cried unto the Lord with my voice; with my voice unto the I.Jord did I make my supplication. I poured out nlY cOlupla.int before him: I sho\ved before him my trouble.. "then. D1J spirit was 'Overwhelmed within me, then thou kne"Test my path: in the ,vay 'w'herein I walked, have they privily laid a snare for me. I looked on my right haud and beheld, but there ,vas no man that "would kno'\v TIle: refuge f:liled UIe; 110 Ulan c<tred for lll)T soul.. I cried u:p.to thee, 0 Lord: I said, Thou a,rt n1.Y refug'e, and my p'ortion in the land of the living. .i"-ttend unto my cry, for I ttDl brougllt very·lo,v; deliver nle front my persecutors, for they are stronger than I.. Bring my soul out of darkness, that I may praise thy name.

*

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*

* (PSALM

*

*

*

*

cxliiL)

IIear my prayer, 0 Lord; give ear to nlY supplication. In thy faithfulness ans~w'er nle, and in thy righteousness.. And enter not into judgment ,,"ith thy servant; for in thy sight sha.!l no man liv-ing he justified. For the enemy hath persecuted IHy soul; he ha,th Dlade 111e to d,vell in darkness. Therefore is TI1Y sl)irit over,,~"hehned ,vithin rne; U1Y heart within Ine is desohtte.. , I-Iear lIle speedily, o I..Iord; 11ly spirit faileth: hide not thy faec frfHn nle, lest I be like th(~l)l that go do,vn into the pit. C<.tuse me


160

MASONIC CHART.

to hear thy loving kindness in the I trust: cause lJle to kno'w the walk; for I lift up my soul unto thy ,vilI; for' thou art my God. trouble, and of thy' mercy cutoff thy servant.

*

*

*

*

(EXODUS

morning; for in thee do way ,vherein I should thee. Teach me to do Bring nlY soul out of mine' enemies; for I am

*

*

*

iv. 1-10.)

*

And 1\10ses answered and said, But behold, they' will not believe me, nor hearken unto my voice; for they will say, The Lord hath not appeared unto thee. And the Lord said unto him, '\Vhat is that in thine hand? And he said,A rod. And he said, Cast it on tIle ground; and he cast it on the ground, and it became a serpent; and IVIoses fled frolll before it. .Lt\nd the Lord said. unto 1\108es, Put forth thine hand, and take it by the tail. And he put forth his hand and caugh t it, and it became a roel in his hand.. That they may believe that the Lord God of your fathers, the G路od of Abrahaul, the God of Isaac, ~tnd the God of Jacob, haUl a,ppettred unto thee.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

And the Lord said furtherlTIOre unto him, Put no,v thine hand into thy boson1; and he put his hand into his bosorn; ~tnd when he took it out, behold his hand was leprous as SJ10VY"., And he said, Put thine hand into thy bosom again; and he put his hand into his bosom again; ~nd he plucked it out of his bosom.,. and behold it ","as turned again as his other flesh. And it shall come to pass, if they w'ill not believe thee, nei ther hearken to the voice of the first sign, that they ,viII believe the voice of the latter sign.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

And it shall come to pass, if they will not believe also these two signs, neither hearken unto thy voice, that thou


161

ROYAL ARCH DEGREE.

shalt take of the ,vater of the river, and pour it upon the dry land; and the water which thou takest out of the l'iver shall become blood upon the dry land.

*

*

*

*

* (I-IAGGAI

ii. 2-4, 23.)

*

*

*

Speak now to Zorubbabel, the son of Shealtiei, governor of Judah, and to Joshua, the son of Josedec, the high priest, and to the residue of the people, saying, Who is left among you tha.t sa,v this house in her first glory ? and how do you see it now? is it not in your eyes in com~ parison of it as nothing? Yet now be strong, 0 Zerubbabel, and be strong, 0 Joshua, son of J osedec, the high priest; and be strong, all ye people of the land, saith'the Lord, and work; for I am with you, saith the Lord of fIosts. In that day ,viII I take thee, 0 Zerubbabel, my servant, the son of Shealttel, saith the Lord, and will make thee as a signet: for I have chosen thee.

*

* '"

*

(ZECHARIAH

*

f*

*

iv. 9, 10.)

The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the 路foundation of this house; his hands shall also finish it; artd thou shalt 7cno~o, that the L01路d of hosts hath sent 'lne uJnto you. For ,vha hath despised the day of sUlall things? for they 8ha11 rejoice, and shall see the plummet in the hand of Zerub babel wi~h路 those seven.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

(AMOS ix. 11.)

In that day will I raise up the tabernacle of David that is f~Ll1en, and close up the breaches thereof, and I will raise up his ruins, and I ,,"ill build it as in days of old"

*

*.

*

*

1,{~;*

*

*

*

*


162

l\fASONIC OII.A.RT..

The following passages of Scripture are read by the IIigh Priest:-

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

AnA

the earth 'was ,,,,ithout forD:l, and void; and dttrkness was upon the face of the deep; and the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light; and there was light.-GEN. i.. 1-3.* And it caIne to pass, \vhen ~loses had made an end of \yriting the '\yords of this la'\v in a book, until they 'vere finished, that 1\f08e8 commanded the Levites \vhich bare the ark of the covenant of. the Lord, saying, Take this book of the lu,'\v, and put it in the side of the ark of the covena,nt of the Lord your God, that it u1ay be there for a witness against thee.. -DEuT. xxxi. 24-26. And thou sllalt put the DlercY-SCt1t above, upon the ark; ~tncl in the ark thou shalt put the testiulony that I shall give thce.-ExoDUS xx. 21. And n:Ioses said, This is. the thing vlhich t.he Lord commandeth, Fill an orner of the manna, to he kept for your generations; tlJlJtthey Inay see the bread 'where1yith I have fed you in the "'ivilderness, ""vhen I brought you forth frol11 tIle land of Egypt. And l\losessaid unto Aaron, Take a pot, and put an orner full of Inann~1 therein, and. htJ it up befol"e the Lord, to he kept for your generations. As the Lord C0l11lnnJHled l\Ioses, so . A.aroD laid it up befol:e the testinl0ny, to be kept.-ExoDUS xvi. 32-34. And the Lord said unto l\Ioses, Bring .A.aron's rod again before the testimony, to be kept for a token.-Nul\!BERS xvii.. 10.

*

*

*

* (EXODUS

*

*

*

vi. 2, 3.)

And God spalre unto l\loses, l,Lnd said unto him, I am the .;;:. 'W"hml titne \vill ndmit, this lesson should consist of the$lrst cha.pter of' Genesis u.nd t.he first throe verses of the second ch:Lpter.


163

ROYAL ARCH DEGREE.

Lorcl; and I appe~red unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name. of God Almighty; but by nlY name JEHOVAll was I not known to them.

*

*

*

*

*

CHARGE.

*

*

*

CO:MPANIONS : -

By the consent and assistance of the members of this Chapter you are now exalted to the sublime and honorable degree of Royal Arch Mason.

The rites and mysteries

developed in this degree have been handed down through a chosen fe"\v, unchanged by time and uncontrolled by prejudice; and ,ve expect and trust they will be regarded by you w路ith the san1e veneration, and tranSDlitted with the saUle scrupulous purity to your successors. No one' can reflect on the ceremonies of g<1ining aclmissian into this ph'Lce ",vithout being forcibly struck ,vith the inlportant lessons which they teach. I{ere ,ve are necessarily led to contemplate with gratitude ancI ac1n1iration the sacrecl" Source from whence aJl earthly comforts flo,v. Ilere ,ye find adcI'itional inducements1"to continue steadfast and inlIDovable in the discha.rge of our respective duties; and here we are bound by the most solemn ties to promote each other's '\velfare and correct each other's failings by adyice, admonition, and reproof. It is a duty we o,ve to our companions of this order, that the aclnlission of every candidnte into this Chapter ,should be attended by the eXtuuina,tioll of the most scrutinizing eye, so thatw"e nlay alw:1)'rs possess the satisfaction of finding none among us but such as ,vilI promote to the utnlost of their pov~'er the great end of our institution. By p~lying due attention to this deteru1ination, you ,viII never recolnmend any candidate to this Ch~1pter ~~hose ~lbilities and kno,yledge you cannot freely vouch for, and whom you do not firlllly and confidently believe will fully. conform to the pi"inciples of


164

l\IASONIC CHAR'I'.

our order and fulfil the obligations of a Royal Arch Mason. 'Vhile such are our members, ,ve ulay expect to be united in one object, without lllke,\varlnness, inattention, or neglect; but zeal, fidelity, and affection will be the distinguishing characteristics of our society, and tIl at su,tisfl1ction, harmony, and peace ll1ay 1)e enjoyed at our meetings which no other society can afford. INVOCArrION AT CLOSING.

By the

Wi8do'/1~

of the Supreme Higll Priest n1ay we be directed, by his 8tre1~9tllJ may we be enabled, and by the beau.ty of virtue may we be incited, to perform the obligations here enjoined on us, to keep inviolably the mysteries here unfolded to us, and invariably to practise all those duties out of the Chapter which are inculcated in it.. Arnerl. The following rClllarks relatiye to I(ing Solonlon's temple cannot be uninteresting to tL l{oyal . A.reh l\fason : rfhis famous f1thrie "1'as situated on l\lount l\Joriuh~ near the place ,vhere .l\.brahalll was about to offer up his son Isaac, and w"here ])avid luet and u11peased the destroying angel who "'''as visible over the threshhl!l:floor (~l Ornan t!l.f3 J(~bUsl;te. It was begun in the fourth :year of tIle reign of Solomon, the third after the death of David, four hundred and eighty years after t,he passage of the Red Sea, and oIl'"the second da.y of the month Zif, being the second month of the sacred year, which answ"ers to the 21st of l\pril, in the year of the 'world t'wo thousand nine hundred and ninety-tv{O, and \vas carried on ,vith such prodigious speed thttt it ,,~as finished in all its parts in little Illore thall ~"en years. By the masonic art, and the wise regulations of SoloDlon, this famous edifice \\raS ereeted '\vithout the sound of the axe~ hUU1lller, or any tool of iron; for the stones 'were all hewed, squared, and numbered in the quarries of Zerildathnh, where they were raised; the tinlbers were fitted and lu'eparcd in the forest of Leba,uon,and con vc,:yed by Seft in floats to ~Joppa, and fronl thence hy land io tJerllsaleln, ,vherc the fhbric \\~as erected by the assi8t.. ance of' wooden instrulnents prepnr(~d fbI" tlul.t, purpose. And when the building wus finished, its several parts fitted vtitll that exact nicet,y that it 11:u1 luore th.e :l11!)earanee of being the llandi-


ROYAL AROH DEGREE.

165

lv-ork of the Supreme Architect of the Universe, than of human hands. In the year of the world 3029, King Solomon died, and was succeeded by his son Rehoboam. Soon after this, instigated and led 011 by Jeroboam the son of N ebat, tell of the tribes revolted fi路om Rehoboam, and set up a separate kingdom, with J ero boaln at their head. In this manuel' were the tribes of Israel divided and under two distinct governments for two hundred and fifty-four years. The ten revolted tribes becalue weak and degenerated; .their country was laid waste, and their goyernment overthrown and extirpated, by Salmanezer, King of .A..ssyria. After a series of changes and events, Nebuchadnezzalo, King of Babylon, having besieged Jerusalem, and raised towers all round the city, so that, after defending it for the space of a year and a half, it was, in the eleventh year of the reign of Zedekiah, I(ing of Judah, surrendered and delivered at midnight to the officers of Nebuchadnezzar, "rho sacked and destroyed the tenlple, and took away all the holy vessels, together with those t,yO ftUllOUS brazen pillars; and the renluant of the people tllat escaped the s\vord carried he away capti\'le to Babylon, ,,,,here they relna,ined servants to him and his successors until the reign of Cyrus, King of Persia. Cyrus, in the first year of his reign, being directed by that divine power lvhiell invisibly led him to the throne of Persia, issued his famous edict for the liberation of the Iiehrew captives, ,vith permission that they should return to their nat~:ve cou:nt.ry and rebuild the city and house of the L01"Cl. Accordingly, the principal people of the tribes of ~Judah and Benjamin, '\vith the priests and Levites, immediately departed for trerusalem and commenced the gre~tt and glorious 'York of re-edification.


I

'---t

!:W

l---

0

"'------I


ROYAL l\1.A.STER.

167


168

l\-IASONIC CHART.

ROYAL MASTER'S DEGREE.

THIS dagree cannot be legally conferred on any but Royal l\.rch l\Iasons, who have taken all the preceding degrees;. and it is preparatory to that of the Select blaster. Although it iSi~ short., yet it contains luuch valua.ble information, and it is intilllfLtely connected with the degree of Select nIaster. It also enables us 路with ease and facility to examine the privileges of others to this degree, while at the same time it proves ourselves.

*

*

*

* (1

KINGS

*

*

*

*

vii. 48-50, and 40.)

And Solomon n1ade all the vessels that pertained unto the house of the Lord: the altar of gold, and the table of gold, whereupon the shew-bread ,vas; and the canc11e-' sticks of pure gold, five on the right side, and fi'v'e on the left, before the oracle, with the f!o,\vers, and the lamps, and the tongs of gold, and the bo路w"ls, and the snuffers, ~Lnd the basins, and the spoons, and the censers of pure

gold, and the hinges of gold, both for the doors of the inner house, the Ul0st holy place, and for the doors of the house, to ,vit, of the Temple. So IIiram made an end of doing all the ,york that he nlade King Solomon, for the house of the Lord..

*

*

*

*

*

(REV. xxii. 12-14.)

*

*

*

And behold I come quickly; and my re",Tard is ,,"ith Inc, to give every man according as his work shall be. I 路atIl


169

ROYAL l\IASTER..

Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last. Blessed are they that do his commandments,路 that they nlay have a rigllt to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city. (1

KINGS

vi. 27~)

And he set the cherubim within the inner house; and they stretched forth the wings of the cherubim, so that the wing of the one touched the one wall, and the wing of the other cherub touched the other wall; and their wings .touched one another in the midst of the house.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

The Ark, called the glory of Israel, which was seated in the middle of the holy place, under the wings of the cherubim, was a small chest, or cofter, three feet nine inches long, two feet three inches 'W"icle, and three feet three inches high. It was nla.de of 'wood, excepting only the luercy-seat, but oyellaid with gold, hoth inside and out. It hud ~1 ledge of gold surrounding it at the top, into which the coyer, calleel the mercy-seat, was let in. The 11lercy-seat was of solid gold, tIle thickness of a hnnd's-breadth; at the two ends of it \vere two cherubim, looking inwards t0~ards ~ach other, \vith their wings expanded, which enlbracing路路 the \vl'lole circumference of the ~}ercy-seat, they luet on each side, in the middle; all of which, the llabbins say, was made out of the same mass, without allY solderillg of parts. Here the Shekinah, or Divine Presence, rested, and was visible in the tlppearance of a cloud over it. Fronl hence the Bathkoll issued, and gave ans'wers '\vhel1 (lod \vas consulted.. And hence it is that G"od is said, in the Scriptures, to dwell between the cherubim,-that is, between the cherubim on the mercy..seat; be.. cause there was the seat or throne of the visible appearance of his glory among them. 15


170


SELECT MASTER.

A£A

AAA~ A~AA

AAA&

A&AA AA~~ AAA£

171


172

l\IASONIC CIIART.

l

..

I

III l'\\i\\ 1

I


SELECT ThIASl'ER.

15*

..

178


174

l\l.ASONIO CHART.

SELEOT MASTER'S DEGREE.

THIS degree is the summit and perfection of Ancient l\Iasonry, and without which the history of the Royal Arch Degree cannot be complete. It rationally accounts for the concealment and preservation of those· essentials of the Craft which were brought to light at the erection of the second Telllple, and which lay concealed from the l\iasonic eye four hundred an~l seventy years. Thiany particulars relative to those fe,v who, for their superior skill, ,yere selected to complete au important part of !(ing Solomon's Temple, are explained.

Qt {otltillg + Apron,-white hll11h-skin, of a triangular fbrm, edged with purple and gold.

Collar,-purple silk or \TeIYct~ ceJged with gold from the bottonl of which th.e je,vel of the degree is worn. J ewel,-a gold equilateral triangle, in the centre of which is a gold tro,vel. The officers of a Council of Select 1\Iasters are~ as follows:1. Thrice Illustrious (t. .. 1\1.·., as l{.·. S.·., seated in the IDast. 2. Deputy Illustrious G·.·. 1\1.'., as II.·. Ie.'. To·., on the right, in the East!. 3. :P.·. 0.·. '~V.·., as II.,..A..·., on the left. -4.. ~rrea . . surer, in the North. 5. llceorder, in the South. 6. Captain of the (}uards, as l\.cloniralu, in the 'V·est. 7. <':1'rand Steward, as . A.chizar, at the door.

®lJ.cning. :+:

*

*

*

* ,..., I

*

n -•n i I

tJ tI tJ

I

i

*

*


17{i.

SELECT l\lASTER. (PSAL~I

lxxxvii.)

IIis foundation is in the holy mountains. The Lord Ioveth the gtttes of Zion more than all· the dwellings of Jacob. Glorious things are spoken of thee, 0 city of God. Selah. I ,viII make mention of Rahab and Babylon to thenl that kno,v nle. Behold Philistia and Tyro, lvith Ethiopia; this man ,vas born there. And of Zion it shall be s~1id, This and that man was born in her; and the highest himself shall establish her. The Lord shall count, when he1vriteth up the people, that this man was born there. Selah. As well the singers, as the players on instruments, shall be there: all my springs are in thee. 3X

m JJl m ~:ettl)ti.O·tl.

*

*

* (1 I{I~GS * iv. 1, 5*and 6.) *

So I{ing S't>lomon ·was king over all Israel.

*

* Azariab,

the son of Nathan, ,,~as oyer the officers; and Zabud, the son of Nathan, ,vas principal officer, ancl the king's friend; and .f~hishar was over the household; and Adoniram, the son of .A:bcla, was over the tribute. (1

ICINGS

v. 17, 18.)

And the king cODlmanded, and they brought great stones, costly stones, and hev{ed stones, to lay the founda.tion of the house. ,And Sololnon's builders and Hiranl's builders did h€f\V them, fi,ncl the stone-squarers-; so they prepared timber and stories to build the house. (1

KIXGS

viii. 13, 14.)

And ICing Solomon sent and fetched I-liram out of Tyre.

lIe ,vas a ,,"'iclo,v's son, of the tribe of Naphtali; and ·his father ,yrtS t1 man of Tyre, a ,vorker of brass; and he ,vas


176

l\fASONIC CHART.

filled with wisdom, and understanding, and cunning, to work all works in brass. (EZEKIEL

xxvii. 9.)

The ancients of Gebal, and the wise men thereof, were

In thee thy calkers; all the ships of the sea, ,vi tIl their mariners, were in thee, to occupy thy merchandise.

*

*

*

*

*

(DEUT. xxxi. 24-26.)

*

*

*

And it came to pass, 1yhen l\1oses had made an end of writing the words of this law in a book, until they ,vere finished, that lVloses commanded the Levites, whicll bore the ark of the covenant of the Lord, saying, Take this book of the la1v, and put it in the side of the ark of the covena.ntof the Lord your God, that it may be there for a witness against thee. * * *

* *

(EXODUS

xvi. 33, 34.)

.i\..nd Moses said unto Aaron, Take a pot, and put an orner full of nlanna therein, and lay it up before the Lord, to be kept for your gener~1tions. .t\.8 the Lord comInanded lVloses, so Aaron laid it l;1P before the testiulolly to be kept.

* * * * * xvii. 10.)

(NUl\IBERS

And the Lord said unto lVloses, Bring Aaron's rod again before the testimony, to be kept for a token.

*

*

*

*

(NUMBERS

*

vii. 89.)

*

*

*

And when ~foses was gone into the tabernacle of the congregation, to speak vrith him, then he hetlrd the voice of one speaking unto him from off the mercJT-sea,t that ,vas upon the ark of the testimony, fronl bet'\veen the t,yO cherubim; and he spa.ke unto hiul. * * * * * (EXODUS

xxv. 40.)

And look that thou make them after their pattern, which ,vas show"ed thee in the nlount..

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SELECT :MASTER..

177

CHARGE TO A SELECT MASTER.

CO:i.\IPANION : -

Having attained to this degree, you have passed the circle of perfection in ancient ~lasonry. In the capacity of Select l\Iaster you n1ust be sensible that your obliga. tions are increased in prol)ortion to your privileges. Let it 'be your constant care to prove yourself worthy of the confidence reposed in you, and of tIle high honor conferred on you, in adu1itting you to this select degree. Let uprightness and integrity attend your steps; let justice and mercy n1ark your conduct; let fervency and zeal stimulate you in the discharge of the yarious duties incumbent on you; but suffer not an idle or impertinent curiosity to lead you astray, or betray you into danger. Be deaf to every insinurttion ,,~hich would have a tendency to '\yeaken ~your resolution, or teulpt you to an act of disobedience. Be voluntarily dUlllb t111d blind, "when the exercise of those faculties ,\yould endanger the peace of your mind. or the probity of )Tour conduct; and let silence and secrec.y, those cardinal virtues of a Select 1Iaster, on all necessary occasions be scrupulously observed. By a steady adherence to the in1portant instructions contained in this degree you will merit the approbation of the select number ,vith '\VhOU1 you are associated, and 'Yill enj oJ the high satisfaction of having acted ,,"ell your part in the important enterprise in. "\vhicllYOU are engaged; and, after having wrought your, regular hours, may ~you be admitted to participate in all the privileges of a Select I\laster. CHARGE AT CLOSING A COUNCIL OF SELECT MASTERS.

(PsALl\rXxxiii. 18-22.)

Behold, the eye of the Lord is upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in his ll1ercy; To deliver their soul fronl death, and to keep them alive in famine .


178

.M:ASONIC CHART..

Our soul waiteth for the Lord: he is our help and our shield. For our heart shall rejoice in him, because we have . trusted in his holy name. Let thy mercy, 0 Lord, be upon us, according as we hope.in thee.


ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD,

179 .

ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

THIS order appertains to the office or High Priest of a Royal Arch Chapter, and no one can be legally entitled to receive" it until he has been duly elected to preside as High Priest in a regular Chapter of .Royal ...t\.rch l\lasons. This order should be conferred by the Grand High Priest of the Grand Royal l\.rch Ohapter: or such Present or Past High Priest as he may designate for that purpose. A convention, * consisting of at least . nine duly qualified IIigh Priests, notified to nleet at the tinle of any convocation of the Grand Chapter, will aflord the best opportunity of conferring this inlportant and exalted degree of l\iasonry with appropri~1te solenlnity. '~Vhenever it is conferred, the follo,ving directions are t.o be obseryed. A candidate desirous of receiving the order of I-ligll Priesthood makes a written request to his predecessor in office, and through hilu to the Grand IIigh Priest, resllectfnlly requesting that a conve'lttion of Iligll l)riests may be called, for the purpose of con.ferring the order upon him.. '\V"hen the con... vention Ineots and is duly organized, a certificate of the due election of the candidate to the office of lIigh I)riestmust ·be . produced. This certificate is signed b,J his predeeessor in office, 3,ttested by the Secretary of the Chapter. On exanlinntion of~ this certificate, the qualifications of the candidate are ascertained.. The solclun cei'C~10!~ies of conferring the order upon hilll then ensue. ",Vhen eIlded,the presiding officer directs the Se(~retary of the convention to lllake~l. r~corcl of tIle proceedings and· return it to the Secretary of th~ Grand_ Chapter., to be l)y hinl laid before the Grand Ifigh Priest,·· for tIle infornlRtion of all W'1101U it lllay concern. The conyention of High Priests is then . dissolved in· due forIn. It is the duty of every Companion, as soon after his election to the office of IIigh l:>riest as is consistent· ,\yith his personal

.. Councils· of Ifigh Priests a.re now regularly orga:nized and held in nearly every State during the session of Sta.teGrand Chapters..


180

IHASONIC CHART.

convenience, to apply for adnlission to the order of High Priesthood, that he may be fully qualified properly to govern his Chapter.

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*

LESSON.

(ISAIAH

*

*

lxi. 1, 2, 3.)

The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the broken-hearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound; To proclaim the acceptable :rear of the Lord, and the day of vengeance of our God ; to comfort all that mourn; To appoint unto them that lllourn' in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called Trees of righteousness, The planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified. PRAYER â&#x20AC;˘.

Father, ,vho art in heaven, hallow"ed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy ,viII be done, as in heaven, so also upon the earth. Give us this d:ty our daily bread. And forgive us 0'111'" debts, as we also forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliYe~'" us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the po\ver, and tIle glory, forever. Amen. OUf

*

*

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*

*

(GENEsIS xiv. 12-24.)

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*

*

And tIley took Lot, Abraha.m's brother's son (who dwelt in Sodam), and his goods, and departed. And there came one that had escaped, and told Abram, the Jlebrew; for


181

ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

lie dwelt in the plain of l\1amre the Amorite, brother of Esheol, and brother of Aner; and these were confederate ,vith Abram. And "\vhen Abram heard that his brother was taken captive, he armed his trained servants, born in his own house, three hundred and eighteen, and pursued them unto Dan. And he divided himself against them, he and his servants, by night, and smote them,and pursued them unto Hobah, which is on the left hand of Damascus. And he brought back all the goods, and also brought again Iris brother Lot, and his goods, and the women also, and the people. And the king of Sodam went out to meet him (after his return from the slaughter of Chedorlaonler, and of the kings that were ,vith him), at the valley of Shevah, which is the king's dale. And lVlelchizedek, l\:ing of Salem, brought forth bread and '\yine; and he was the priest of the 110st Higll God. And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be J.\.bram of the ~fost I-ligh God, who hath delivered thine enemies into thy hand. And he gave him tithes of all. And the king of Sodom said to 路Abram, Give me the persons,~nd ta~e the goods to thyself. And Ab~anl said to the king路 of Sodom, I have lifted up rrline hand to the Lord, the 1\fost Jligh God, the possessor路 of heaven and earth, that I ,viII not take fronl a thread even .to a shoe-latchet, and that I will not take any thing that , is thine, lest thou shvuldest say, I have made l\.br<tln rich: save only that whic:r~ the young men have eaten, and the portion of the men which ,,路ent with me, Aner, Eshcol, and ~1[Lmre, let them take their portion.

*

*

*

*

* (NUMBERS

*

*

*

vi. 22-26.)

And tIle Lord spake unto 110se8, saying, Speak unto Aaron, and unto his sons, sttying, On this vrise, )1"e shall bless the children of Israel, sarying unto then1, The Lord

bless thee, and keep thee; the Lord u1al(o his face to shine IH


182

l\IASONIC CHART.

upon thee, and be gracious unto thee;' the Lord lift up llis countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.

*

*

*

*

* (HEBREWS

vii. 1-6.)

*

*

*

For this Melchizedek, king of Salem, priest of the Most High God (who nlet Abraham returning fronl the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him; to 'Y hom also Abraha.m gave a tenth part of all; first being, by interpretation, King of Righteousness, and after that also, King of Balenl, which is, I{ing of Peace: 1vithout father, without mother, without descent; having neither beginning of days, nor end of. life; but made like unto the Son of God), abideth a priest continually. Now consider how great this man ,vas, unto ,vhom even the patriarch Abraham gave the tenth of the spoils. .L\.nd verily they thult are of the sons of Levi, ,vho receive the office of the priesthood, have a commandment to take' tithes of the people, according to the lal'v, that is, of their brethren, though they come out of the loins of Abraham. For he testifieth, Thou art a priest forever, after the order of Thfelchizedek. And inasmuch as not without an oath 11e was made priest. For those priests (uncleI' the Levitical la"\\'r) 'vere made without an oath; but this ,vith an oath by him that said unto him, The Lord s,vare, and Virill~lot repent, Thou art a priest forever, after the order of 11elchisedek..

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

PRAYER ON CLOSING A COUNCIL OF IIIGII PRIESTS., (PSAIll\1

cvi. 47, 48.)

Save us, 0 Lord our God, and gather us from amongs1 the nations, to give thanks unto thy holy name, to triumph in thy praise.


ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD..

183

\Blessed be the Lord God of Israel from eternity to eternity; and let all the people say, Amen. Praise ye the Lord.. CEREI\iONIES AND CIIARGES UPON THE INSTALLATION OF TIlE OFFICERS OF .A. ROYAL ARClI CIIAPTER..

1.. The Grand Officers will meet at a convenient place, and open. 2. The subordinate Chapter ,vill meet in its Hall, and open on t.he l{,oyal .l\rch Degree pre!)aratory to the reception of the (jrand Officers. 3. )Vhen ready for their reception, they will dispatch a committee to t.he place where the Grand Officers are assembled, to inform the (}rand 1Iarshal that the Chapter is prepared to receive t.hem.The Grand l\larshal ,vill announce the committee, and in,troduce thenl to the G-rand (lIE.cers. 4. The Grand Officers will move in procession, conducted by t.he committee, to the hall of the Chapter, ill the following order : Grt1nd Sentin~; Two Grand Ste\vards; l\lelubers of subordinate Chapters, according to seniorit,y, triRngularl~~ ; Three ,G-reat Lights; ~ Orn.tor, Chaplain, and other clergy; Grand Secretary, Grnnd Trea.surer, and Grand Royal Arch . Captain; Grand P. Sojourner,G-rand Captain of the IIost, and Deputy IGrand IIigh Priest; Gl'and Scribe, Grand l(ing, t~nd Grand Iligh PrIest; (Grandl\Iarshalon the left of the procession.) vVhen the Q-rand IIigh Priest enters, (he grand honors are given, and the officers of the ne\v Chapter resign their stationR to the errand Officers. . 5. The (Jrand Secretary will then call over the names of tho officers elect, and the G路rand I-ligh Priest 'will ask ,vhether they accept their respective offices. If they ans,ver in the affirUl!1tive, lle then asks the luemhers "wl1ether they rell1ain satisfied with thoir choice. If they answer ill the affil'IDtttive, he directs.their


184

MASONIC CHART.

officers to approach the sacred volume, and bCCOlllC qualified for Installation, t1greeably to th'e 4th section of the 4th article of the General Grand Royal Arch Constitution. '" 6. The Grand 1vlarshal will then fornl the ne,v Ohapter in procession, and luarch around the Chapter and through the yeils into the inner apartlnent, where they will surround the altar, ,vhich is previously prepared in ample form for the occasion. 7. All present路 will kneel, and the following prayer will he recited. PRAYER.

Almighty and Supreme High Priest of Heaven and Earth! 'VIlo is there in heaven but thee? and who upon earth beside thee? Thy Ol\iNISCIENT ~iind brings all things in review, past, present, and to come; thine OlV1NIPOTENT Arm directs the movements of the vast creation; thine OftlNIPRESENT Eye pervades the secret recesses of every heart; thy boundless beneficence supplies us '\vith every cotrlfort and enjoyment; and thine unspeakable perfections and glory surpass tl1e understanding of the children of men! Our Father, 1vilo art in heaven, ,ve invoke thy benediction upon the purposes of our present assembly. Let this Chapter be established to thine honor; let its officers be endo,ved ,~ith "Tisclonl to discern and fidelity to pursue its true interests; let its lnembers be ever mindful of the duty they o~"e to their G路od, the obedience they o''''e to their superiors, the love they o,ye to" their equals, and the good ,viII they Ovye to all nlankind. Let this Chapter be consecrated to thy glory, and its members ever exemplify their love to God by their beneficence to nlen. Glory be to God on high. [Ilcsponse.] Alllen. So mote it be r They are then qunlifiecl in due form. 8~ The whole then repair to their a,ppropriate stations, when


185

ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

\ the Grand l\Iarshal will form a general procession on the outside of the. Hall in the following order : Three Rloyal Arch Stewards, with Rods; Tiler of a Lodge of l\Iaster Masons j Entered .t\.pprentices; Fellow-Crafts; l\Iaster l\Iasons; ... Stewards of Lodges, having Jewels; 00. o Deacons, having Jewels; ~ Secretaries, having Jewels j Treasurers, having Jewels; 'Vardens, having J e,vels .; lYlark ~Iaster l\Iasons; 1\1. E. Th1asters; Royal A.rch l\Iasolls, by three; Royal l\lasters, by three; Select l\fasters, by three; Orders of I{nighthood; Sentinel of the New Chapter; l\Iembers of the ne\v Chapter, by three; Three l\Iasters of Veils; Secretary, Treasurer, R. A. Cu):;tain, alld P. Sojourner, carrying the Ark; .. A CODlpanion, carrying the Pot of Incense; Three COlllpanions, carrying Li.ghts;* Scribe, IIigh Priest, and I{ing; Grand Chapter, as befbre prescribed.t ~

On arriving at the church, or house where the services are to l)c perforuled, they halt" open to the right and left, and face inward, while the .(}rand Officers and ot.hers in succession pass through 路and euter the house. 9. The o!ficers and uleulbers of the new Chrtpter., and also of the Q'rand Ohapter, being seated, t11e Grand l\larshal proclaims silence, and the cerelDonies cornUlence.. 10. l\.Iusic. (.A.n l~.nthenl.) 11. Pr~lyer hy the (}rand Chaplain. 12. .A,n Oration or Address.

---,,--------

t Ihid. 16+

rl. 1 s;~.


186

l\IASONIC CHART .

.13'. nI usic. * [14. The Deputy Grand IIigh Priest t.hen rises and informs the G"rand Jligh l)riest that" a number of Companions, duly instructed in the sublime mysteries, being desirous of pronloting the honor Hnd propagating the principles of the J\.rt, have applied to the Grand Chapter for n. \yarrant to constitute a ne\v Ohapter of Royal l\.1'ch nlusons, ,vhich having been obtt1ined, they are no\v asselnbled for the purpose of being constituted and having their officers installed in due and ancient form."] [15. The G-rand ~Iarshal will then forul the officers and members of the new Chapter in front of the G-rand Officers; after which the C*-rand High Priest directs the Grand Secretary to read the warran t.]

[16 The Grand High Priest then rises, and sa:ys, -

By virtue of the high pO'w"ers in me vested, I do form

you, my respected Companions, into a regular Chapter of Royal Arch lVlasons. From henceforth you are authorized and etnpo,vered to open and hold a Lodge of 1\la,rk J\fasters, Past 1\lasters, and l\Iost Excellent l\Iasters, and a Chapter of Royal Arch nlasons; and to do and perforln all such things t"LS thereunto Inay appertain; conforn1ing in all your doings to the General Grand Royal .l\.rch Constitution, and the general regulations of the State Grand Chapter. And may the God of your fathers be '\Tith you, guide and direct you in all your doings.] 17. The furniture, clothing, je,Yels, hUI)lenlents, utensils, (\:c. belonging to the Chapter (having been previously l)laced in the centre, in front of the G-rancl Offieers~ eo-verecl), are no\v un路 covered, and the ne\v Chapter is dedicated in due and aneient fOrlll

18. The Dedication then follows: tIle G-rancl Chaplain sa:ring, ~l"o our l\1ost Excellent Patron, ZER UBBABEL, ,,"e soleulnly dedicate this Chapter. J\ltty the blessing of our m NOTE.-Those pnrngrltphs which. nrc enclosed within hrackets apply esclusively to mlSes when new Chaptel's arc cOllstituted and thclr ofIiccl's installed fr'f the first time. ~.rhe rest npply eqnnlly to such cases us well as to nnnuu,l installations.


ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

181

Heavenly High Priest descend and rest upon its members, and may their felicity be immortal. ,Glory be . to. God on high. Response by the Gompan~ons.

As it was in ,the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, . world without end! Amen. So mote it be. 19. The Grand

~rarshal

then says,

I do hereby proclaim this Chapter, by the name of-Chapter, duly consecrated, constituted, and dedicated.

This, &c. &c. 20. nlusic. 21. The Deputy Grand High Priest wil~ tl1en present the first officer of the new Chapter to the Grand IIigh I)riest, saying,

lVIoST

EXCELLENT GRAND HIGH PRIEST:-

I present you Illy ,yorthy COlllpanion , nplllinated in the "iarrant, to be installed IIigh Pl"iest of this [netv] Chapter. I find him to be skilful in the royal art, and attentive to the moral precepts of our forefathers, and have therefore no doftbt tha:t he will discharge the duties of his office with fidelity. T!le Gra,nd High Priest then addresses him as follows : ~losrr EXCELLENT :.-

I feel much satisfaction in performing my 'duty 011 the present occasion by instaJling you into the office of I-ligh Priest of this [ne"w] C~hapter. It is an office highly honorable to all those 1vho diligently perform the important duties annexed to it. Your reputed l\Iasonic knowledge, ho,\ye路ver, precludes the necessity of a particular enumeration of those duties. I shall therefore only observe that by:;1 frequent recurrence to the constitution, and general regulations, and constant practice of the seveTul sllbliule lectures and charges, you ,viII be best able to fulfil them;


188

l\:IASONIC CHART.

and I am confident that the Oompanions who are chosen to preside with you will give strengtll to your endeavors, and support your exertions. I shall 'now propose certain questions to you, relative to the duties of your office, and to which I must request your unequivocal answer. 1. Do you solemnly promise that you ,viII redouble your endeavors to correct the vices, purify the n10rals, and promote the happiness of those of your Companions ,vha have attained this sublime degree? 2. That you 'vill never suffer your Chapter to be opened, unless there be present nine regular Royal Arch 1ti::lsons? "3. That you will never suffer either more or less than three Brethren to be exalted in your Ohapter at one and the saIne time? 4. Tlutt you ,yiII not exalt anyone to this degree ,vho has not sho\vn a charitable and hunulne disposition, or ,vho has not nlude a considerable proficiency in the foregoing degree? 5. Tlutt you ,vilI pronlote the general good of our order, and on all proper occasions be read)" to gi ve and receive instructions, and particularly from the General and State G-ra;11 cl 0 fficers ? 6. That to the UtUl0st of your p01ver you lyill preserve the solenluities of our ceren10nies, and belHLve in open Chapter 1vith the most profound respect and reverence, as an example to your COlupanions? 7. That you ,vill not ackno'\vledge, or have intercourse ,~tith, any Chapter that does not ,york under a constitutional ,varr::1ut or dispellsation ? 8. That you ,,~ill not admit any visitor into your Chapter who has not been exttlted in a. Chapter legaJly constituted, ,vithout his being first fornu111y healed? 9. That you ,,~ill ohserV'c and support such by-laws as


ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

189

may be made by your Chapter, in conformity to the General Grand Royal Arch Constitution and the general 路 }~(~gulations of the Grand Chapter? 10. That you will pay respect and due obedience to the instructions of the General and State Grand Officers, particularly relating to the several Lectures and Charges, and will resign the chair to them, severally, when they may visit yo-q.r Chapter '.? 11. That you will support and observe the General Grand Royal Arch Constitution and the general regulations of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter, under whose authority you act? Do you submit to all these things, and do you promise to observe and practise them faithfully? These questions heing answered in the affirmative, the Companions all kneel in due forln,nnd tlle Gralld I-ligh Priest, or ftrand Chaplain, repeats the follo'\ving, or some other suitable prayer:, lVIost holy and glorious Lord God, the Great High Priest of IIeaven and Earth ! We approach thee with reverence, aI.ld implore tIl]路 blessing on the Companion appointed to preside over this neVY assenlbly, and now prostrate before thee. Fill his lleart ",vith thy fear, that his路 tongue and actions may pronounce thy glory. l\fake him steadfast in thy service; grant him firmness of mind; . animate his heart, and strengthen his endeavors. l\fay he teach thy judgments and thy laVfTs, and may the incense he shall put before thee upon thine altar prove an acceptable sacrifice unto thee! Bless him, 0 Lord, and bless the ,vork of his hands! Accept us in mercy; hear thou from" heaven thy dwelling-place, and forgive our trans-

gressions! Glory be to God the Father: as it was in, the beginning, &,0. Response.-So mote it be !


190

l\fASONIC CHART.

22. The Grand IIigh Priest will then cause the Iligh Priest Elect to be invested ,vith his robes, jewels, t%c., after which he will address him as ÂŁ0110'''8, viz. : -

lVIoST

EXCELLENT:-

consequence of your cheerful acquiescence with the cllarges which you have heard recited, you are qualified for installation as the IIigh Priest of this Royal Arch Chapter; and it is incumbent upon llle, on this occasion, to point out some of the particulars appertaining to your office, duty, and dignity. III

[All legally constituted bodies of Royal Arch 1fasons a,re called Ohapters; as regular bodies of ~lasons of the preceding degrees are called Lodges. Every Chapter ought to asseulble for Yvork at least once in three months, and must consist of a IIigh Priest, I{.ing, Scribe, Captain of the IIost, Principal. Sojourner, Royal Arch Captain, three Grand J\lasters of the Veils, Treasurer, Secretary, and as many members as ma,y be found convenient for 1vorking to advantage. The officers of the eha,pter officiate in the Lodges, holden for conferring the preparatory degrees, according

to rank, as follo'w's, viz.:The High Priest, as ~Jaster. The !(ing, as Senior 'Varden. The Scribe, as Junior 'Varden. The Captain of the Host, as ~rarshal or DrIaster of Ce.. renl0nies. The Principal Sojourner, as Senior Deacon. The Royal .LL\..rch Oaptain, as Junior Deacon. ~rhe l\Iaster of the First Veil, us Junior Overseer. The l\Iaster of the Second Veil, as Senior Overseer. The l\Iaster of the Third Veil, as :rviaster Overseer. The Treasurer, Secretary, Chapla.in, Stewards, and Sentinel, as officers of corresponding rank.] The IIigh Priest of every Chapter has it in special charge to see that the by-h1ws of his Chapter, as "\vell ~s the General Granel Royal. Arch Constitution, and all the regul~ttions


ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

. 191

of the Grand Chapter, are duly observed; that all the officers of his Chapter perform the duties of their respective offices faithfully, and are examples of diligence and industry to their companions; that true and accurate records of all the proceedings of the Chapter are kept by the Secretary; that the Treasurer keeps and renders exact and just accounts of all the moneys and other property belonging to the. Chapter; that the regular returns be made annually to the Grand Chapter; and that the annual dues to the Grand Chapter be l·egularly and punctuallypaid. He has the right and authority of calling his Chapter together at pleasure upon any emergency or occurr'ence which in his judgn1cnt may require their meeting. It is his privilege and duty, together with the King and Scribe, to attend tIle uleetings of tIle Grand Chapter, either in person· or by proxy; and the well-being of the institution requires that his duty should on no occasion be omitted. The office of IIigh Priest is a station highly honorable to all those who c1iligently.perfor:m the important duties annexed to it. By a frequent recurrence to the constitution. and general regulations, and a constant practice of the several sublime lectures and cllarges, you will be best enabled to fulfil those duties; and I am confident that the companions ·who are chosen to preside with you· will give strength to your endeavors and support to your exertions. Let the JJfitre with ,yhich· you are invested remind ypu of the dignity of the office you sustain, and its inscription impress upon your mind a sense of your dependence upon God; . that, perfection is not given unto man upon earth, ttncl that perfect holiness belongeth alone unto the Lord. The Breast-Plate ,vith 1Yhich you are decorated, in imitation of that upon ,,"hich ,vere engraven the names of the twelve tribes, and worn by the I-ligh Priest of Israel,


192

MASONIC CHART.

is to teach yC>,u that you are a.lways to bear in mind your responsibility to the laws and ordin~1nces of the institution, and that the honor and interests of your Chapter and its nlembers should be al,vays near your heart. The vario~/';8 colors of the Robes you wear are emblematical of every grace and virtue which can adorn and beautify the human mind; each of 1vhich will l)e briefly illustrated in the course of the charges to be delivered to your subordinate officers. You will now take charge of your officers, standing upon their right, and present them severally in succession to the Deputy Grand High Priest, by whom they will. be presented to me for installation. 22. The High Priest of tl1e Chapter 'Yill then present each of his officers to the Deputy Grand IIigh Priest, who will present thenl to the Gr~lnd IIigh Priest, by 'whonl they will be invested with their official clothing and je\vels, and addressed as fo!lo,vs:CHARG路E TO THE SECOND OFFICER, OR I{ING.

EXCELLENT COMPANION:--

The iUlportant station to which you are elected in this Chapter requires from you exemplary conduct; its duties demand your most assiduous attention: you are to second and support your chief in all the requirements of his office; and should casualties at any tinle preyent his attendance, you are to succeed him in the performance of his duties. Your badge (the Level, surnlountecl by a crown) should remind you that, although you are the representative of a King, and exaltecl by office above your Companions, yet that you remain upon a leyel with them, as respects your clut:y to God, to your neighbor, and to yourself; that you are equally bound with them to be obedient to the laws nnd ordinances of the institution, to be charitable, hUlllane, and just, and to seek every occ~1sion of doing good.


ORDEl:1. OF !IIGI-I PRIESTHOOD.

193

Your office teaches a striking lesson of humility. The . institutions of political society teach us to consider the king.as the chief of created beings, and that the first duty of his subjects is to obey his mandates; but the institutions of our sublime degrees, by placing the I{ing in a situation subordinate to the High Priest, teach us that our duty to God is paramount to all other duties, and should ever cl~tim the priority of our obedience to man, and that, ho,vever strongly ,ve n1ay be bound to obey the la,vs of civil society, yet that those la,vs, to be just, should n~ver intern1eddle 1,vith matters of conscience, nor dictate articles of faith. The J5lcarlet Ilobe, a,n emblem of imperial dignity, should re:p.1ind you of the paternal concern you should ever feel for the welfare of your Ohu,pter, and the fervency and zeal ~ith ,vhich you should endeavor to prOulote its prosperity. In presenting to you the Crown, '\vhich is an eUlblem of toyalt:y, I would remind you that to reign sovereign in the healrts and affections of men must l)e far more grateful to a generous and benevolent minoa than to rule over' tl1eir lives and fortunes; and that, to~nable you to enjoy this pre-eminence ,vith honor and satisfaction, you must subject ~rour ovrn passions and prejudices to the dominion of reaso~ alld charity. You are entitled to the second seat in the council of your Companions. Let the bright example of your illustrious predecessor in the Grand Oouncil at Jerusalem stimulate you to the faithful discharge of your duties; and when the ICing of kings shall summon you into his imn1ediate .presence, fronl his hand may you receive a cro'UJn of glory, which shall never fade a'\vay. CIIARGE TO THE TIIIRD OFFICER, OR SCRIBE. EXCELLENT COl\fPANION : -

The office of Scribe, to ,yhich you are elected, is very 17


194

l\lA.SONIC CIL.1..RT.

important and respectable. In the absence of your superior officers, you are bound to succeed thenl~ and to perfoI'n1 their duties. The purposes of the institution ought never to suffer for ,,,ant of intelligence in its proper officers: you will, therefore, perceive the necessity there is of your possessing such qualifications as ,viII enable you to accomplish those duties "which are incumbent upon you in your appropri::1te station, as well as those ","'hich may o~casionally devolve on you by the absence of your superiors. The P'u1]Jle Robe, with which you are invested, i~ an emblem of unio'n, and is calculated to remind you that the ha,rmony and unaniu1ity of the Chapter should be your constant aim; and to this end you are studiously to avoid all occasions of giving offence, or countenancing any thing that may create divisions or dissensions. You are, by all nleans in your po,\ver, to endeavor to establish a permanent union and good understanding a,n1ong all orders and degrees of l\Iasonry; and, as the glorious SUll at its nleridian height dispels the mist and clouds ,,"hich obscure the horizon, so may your exertions tend to dissipate the gloom of jealousy and discord, whenever they 111ay appear. Your badge (a PZ.un'lb-R~{;le, surn10unted by the Turban) is an emblem of rectitude and vigilance; and ,,~hile you stand as a ,vatchn1un upon the to,ver, to guard your Companions against the approach of those enemies of human felicity, intenzpe:ran.ce and e~l:ee88, let this faithful I11onitor ever remind you to ,valk uprightly in :your station, admonishing and aninlating your Companions to fidelity ~Lnd industry ,\,rhile at labor, and to temperance and moderation vihile at refreshment. And when the Great '\Vatchman of Israel, ,vhose eye never slulnbers nor sleeps, shall relieve you from your poston e~trth, may he perlnit you


ORDER OF HIG-r-r PRIES1'HOOD.

195

in heaven to participate in that food and refreshment ,yhich . . is '~Such

as.. the saints in glory love, And such as angeIs eat."

CHARGE TO THE FOURTH OFFICER, OR CAPTAIN OF THE

HOST. CO.MPANION : -

The oflice with which you are intrusted is of high importance, and deD1a.nds your most zealous consideration. The preservation of the most essential traits of our ancient c'ustoms, usages, and landmarks is within your province; and it is indispensably necessary that the part assigned to you, in the imlnediate practice of our rites and ceremonies, should be perfectly understood and correctly administered. Your office corresponds \vith th'at of lVIarshal, or :Thlaster of Ceremonies. You are to superintend all processions of Jqur Chapter ,vhen moving as tt distinct body, either in public or private; and as the warlcl can only judge of our private discipline by our public deportment, you will ~)e careful that the utUlost oreIer and decorum be observed on all such occasions. You will ever be attentive to the cOlllmands of your chief, a,nd al,vays near at band to see them duly executed. I invest you with the'badge of your office, and presume that you will give to your duties all that study and attention which their ilnportance demands. CHARGE TO TIlE FIFTH OFFICER, OR PRINCIPA.L SOJOURNER. COlVIPANION : -

The office confided to you, though subordinate in degree, is equal in importance to any in the Chapter, that of your Chief alone excepted. Your office corresponds 1yith that of Senior Deacon, in the preparatory degrees. Among the duties required of you, the preparation and introduction of candidates are not the least. As, in our in t~r-


196

MASONIC CH..:\.RT.

course ,vith the world, experience teaches that first im" pressiolls are often the most durable and the most difficult to eradicate, so it is of great importance, in all cases, that those impression~ should be correct and just: hence it is essential that the officer, ,vho brings the blind by tt ,yay that they kneyV" not, and leads thenl in paths that they have not kno1vn, should al"\vays be ,veIl qualified to make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. Your Robe of Offioe is an emhlem of humility, and teaches that, in the prosecution of a l<ludable undertaking, ,ve should never decline taking any part tha.t may be assigned us, although it may be the most difficult or dan..

gerous. The rose-col01"ed tesselated B01'"cle'r, adorning tl1e robe, is an emblenl of ardor und persever~tnce, and signifies that when ,ve halve engaged in a virtuous course, not,vithstanding all the iJnpedill1Cnts, hardships, and trials we 111H.J7 be destined to encounter, V1e should endure them all,vith forti tude, and ardently persevere unto the end, resting assured of receiving, at the ternlination of our labors, a noble and glorious rc"\yard. Your past exertions ,vill be considered as a pledge of ~lour future assiduity in tIle faithful discharge of your cl uti os. CHARGE TO TIlE SIXTII OFFICER, OR ROYAL .ARCH CAPTAIN. CO:\IPANION : -

The ,yell-known duties of :your station require but little elucidu,tion. Your office in the prep~tratory degrees corresponds ,,'"ith that of Junior Deacon. It is your provjn<~e, conjointly ,vitl1 the Captain of the IIost, to attend the exu,Iuination of all 'tisitors, a,ncl to take care that none are perlnitted to enter the Chapter but such as have travellecl the 'rugged }?atllt of trial and evinced their title to our


ORDER OF HIGl-I PRIESTHOOD.

favor and friendship.

197

Yon will be attentive to obey the

'colllll1ands of the Captain of the Host during the 'intro~

(luetion of strange1""S among the workmen; and, should they he permitted to pass your post, nla,y they by him be introduced into the presence of the Grand Council. ~rhe Tf;Tlt'ite Bannerr, intrusted to your care, is emblematical of that purity of heart and rectitude of conduct '\vhich ought to actuate all those who pass the ,,"'"hite veil of the sanctuary. I give it to you strongly in char~ never to suffer anyone to pass )TOUr post without the signet of t1"1.ttll. I preScl1t you the badge of your office, in expectation of YOU!" perforuling your -duties with intelligence, assiduity, and propriety. CIIARG-E TO THE

~rA.sTER

OJj' TIrE THIRD VEIL.

Cq:MP.ANION : -

路 I present you ,,"ith the Scarlet Banner, '\vhich is the

ensign of your office,' and with a sword to protect and defend the same. The rich and beautiful color of your banner is embleulatical of je路rven:ey and zeal; it is the approprit1te Coolor of the Royal Arch Degree; it admonishes us that ,,"e should be fervent in the exel"cise of oUt" 'devotions to Goel, ~and zealous in .our endeavors to promote the happiness. of nlun路. CHARGE TO TIlE l\:IASTER OF TIlE SECOND ,tElL. COl\IPANION : -

I invest you ,vith the PU11Jle Bannetr, ,vhich is tIle ensign of your office, and arnl you ,yith a s'\vorcl, to enable .you to Dlaintain its honor. The color of your banner is produced by a due mixture of blu.e and scarlet, the fornler of ,vhich is the characteristic color of th(~ 8l:11nboltc or jh..'St tlrrl'c (legree."5 {~r .11fa]7'::~


198

MASONIC CHART.

8onry, and the latter, that of the Royal A1"eh Deg'ree. It is an emblem of u1~io'n, and is the characteristic color of the intermediate. degrees. It acll110nishes us to cultivate and in1prove that spirit of union and harlnony betlveen the Brethren of the symbolic degrees and the Companions of the sublime degrees, ,vhich should ever distinguish the menlbers of a society founded upon the principles of everlasting truth and universal philanthropy. CHARGE TO THE J\IASTER OF TIlE FIRST YElL. COl\1PANION : -

I invest you ,vith the Blrzte Ban1ze'r, which is the ensign of your office, and a s,Yord for its defence and protection. The color of your banner is one of the most durable and beautiful in nature. It is the appropriate color adopted and ,yarn bJ our ancient Brethren of the three synlholic degrees, and is the ]Jec'l(;liar characte1"-lst'ie of an institution ,vhich has stood the test of ages, and ,vhich is as much distinguished by the durability of its materials or principles as by the be~tuty of' its superstructure. It is an embleul of universal j""rriencl8hÂŁjJ and benevolence, and instructs us that in the lllincl of a 1\1ason those virtues should be as expansive as the blue a~ch of heaven itself. CII.ARGE TO TIlE TITREE l\fASTERS OF TIlE YEILS, AS OVERSEERS.

COl\:IPANIONS : -

Those ,vha are placed as overseers of any ,york should be ""011 qualified to judge of its beauties and defol"lnities, its excellencies and defects; they should be catp~tble of estimating the former and anlcnding the latter. This consideration should induce you to cultivate ~1nd ilnl)rove all those qualifications 'w"ith 'which you are already en.. do,ved, as

,,~el1

as

to persevere in your endeavors to acquir(~

those in '\vhiehyou are defieient.

Let the various colors

ill


ORDER OF HIGH PRIESTHOOD.

199

of the banners committed to your charg<p adnl0nish :;"ou to' the exercise of the several virtues of which they are . enlblematic; and you are to enjoin the practice of those virtues upon all who shall present thenlselves, or the ~oo1路k of their hands, for your inslJectio'}2,. Let no work receive your approbation but such as is calculated to adorn and strengthen the l\fasonic edifice. Be industrious and faithful in practising and disseminating a knowledge of the tr~lle and pe'ijeet 1.Dorlc, 路w'hich alone can stand the test of the Gi"and O'verseer' 8 Sq'uare in the great day of tria! and retribution. CHARGE TO THE TREASURER. CO:MPANION : -

. You al-e elected Treasurer of this Chapter, and I have the pleasure of investing you ,vith the badge of your office. The qualities 'vhich should recommend a treasur~r are aecu'raey and fitlel拢ty: accuracy in keeping a fair and minute account of all receipts and disbursements; fidelity in carefully preserving all tl~e property and funds ., of the Chapter that may be placacl in his hands, and rendering a just account of the same 1vhenever he is caJlerl upon for that purpose.. I preSUU1e that your respect for the institution, your att:tChUlent to the interests of J"our Chapter, and your regard for a good name, \vhich is better than precious ointment, ,,,,ill prOll1pt you to the faithful discharge of the duties of your office. CHARGE TO THE SECRET.AnY.

CO~IPANION : -

I \yith })leasure invest you \vith your badge as Secretary of this Chapter. The qualities ,vhich should recoIIllllend a secretary are }n"onl,ptit~(,cle in issuing the notificn,tions and orders of his superior officers; J)'U;nctuality in nttending the convocations of the Clutpter; eorreetne~')s in re-


200

l\lASONIC CIIART.

cording their proceedings; }uclglnent in discriminating bet,Yeen what is proper and w"hat is improper to he conl.. nli tted to ,v-riting ; f)'egularity in nlaking his annual returns to the Granel Chrtpter; i'ntegrlty in accounting for all nl0neys that may P<lSS through his hands; and fidelity in paying the same over into the h~1nds of the treasurer. The possession of these good qualities, I presume, has designated you a suitable candidate for this important office; and I cannot entertain a doubt tl1at you vtill discharge its duties beneficially to the Cha,pter and honorably to yourself. .t\..nd ,,,,hen you shall have co路mpleted the record of your transactions here belo,,,",' and finished the term of your probation, nlay you be admitted into the celestial Grand Chapter of saints and angels, and :find your name Tceordecl in the book (~f ll~fe eternal. CIIA,RGE TO TILE CHAPLAIN.

E,

AND REV. COl\IPANION:-

You are appointed Cht1plain of this Chapter; and I now invest you ,,,,ith this circular jEnvel, tho badge of your office. It is en1blematical of eternity, and reminds us that here is not our abiding-place. Your inclination ,viII undoubtedly conspire ,,~ith your duty, ,,~hen you perfOrll1 in the Chapter those solemn services \yhich created beings should constantly render to their innnite CREATOR, and 1vhich, 'w'heu' offered by one ,vhose holy profession is "to point to heaven Hind lead the '\vn.y," Inay, by refining our morals, strengthening our virtues, and purifying our nlinds, prepa.re us for t1cbnission into the society of those above, '\vhose happiness ,rill be as endless as it is perfect, CIIARGE 1'0 TIlE1 SENTINElh CO~IPANION : -

You are appointed Sentinel of this Ohapter, and I invest ,vith the biL<lge and this irl1plelnent of your ofilce. As

)TOU


ORDER OF

HIG~

PR.IESTHOOD.

201

the sword is placed in the hands of the Sentinel, to enable him effectually to guard against the approach of all eOWCl'n,B 'aIle!' eavesclrolJ}JerS, and suffer none to pass or repass but such as are d'uly qualified, so it should' morally serve as a constant admonition to us to set a gl1a.rd at the entrance of our thoughts, to place a watch at the door of our lips, to post a sentinel at the avenue of our actions, thereby exclud.ing every unqualified and un,vorthy thought, word, and deed, and preserving consciences void of offence to'\vards God an(l to'wards man. As the first application from visitors for admission into the Chapter is generally made to the Tiler at the door, your station will often present you to the observation of strangers. It is, therefore, essentia.lly necessary that he who sustains the office with which you are intrusted should be a man of good morals, steady habits, strict discipline, :temperate, affable, and discreet. I trust that a just regard for the honor and reputation of tIle institution ,,~ill ever induce you to.l)erform with fidelity the trust reposed " in you; and when the door of this earthly tabernacle shall be closed, nlay you find an abundant entrance through the gates into the temple and city of our God. ADDRESS TO TIlE HIGH PRIEST.

M. E.

COl\IPANION:-

IIaving been honored with the free snffrages of the members of this Ohapter, you are elected to the most important office ,yhich it is within their pO'wer to bestow. This expression of their esteem and respect should dra,v froln you corresponding sensations; and your demeanor should be such as to repay the llonor they have so conspicuously conferred upon you by an honorable and faithful discharge of the duties of your office. The路station you are called to fill is important, not only as it respects the correct


202

~IASONIC

CIIAB/拢.

practice of our rites and ceremonies and the internal econoulY of the Ohapter over ,vhich you preside, but the public reputation of the institution ,,~ill be generally found to rise or fall according to the skill, fidelity, and discretion with which its concerns are managed, and in proportion a.s the chi1racters and conduct of its principal officers are estimable or censurable. You h~1ve accepted a trust to which- is attached a weight of responsibility that will require all your efforts to discharge honorably to yourself and satisfactorily to the Chapter. You are to see that your officers are capable and faithful in the exorcise of their offices. Should they lack ability, you are ~xpected to supply their defects; you are to watch ca.refully the progress of their performances, and to see that the long-established custonlS of the institution suffer no derangelIlent in their hands. You are to have a careful eJe over the general conduct of the Chttpter; see thUlt due order and subordination are observed on all occasions, that the nlembers are properly instructed, that due soleUlnity be observed in the practice of our rites, that 110 improper levity be perulitted at any time, but more especially at the int1"'ocluetlon ojst1'*angc1路8 Q.lnong the ~()or lcrne:n.

In fine, you are to be an example to your officers and Inemhers, ,vhich they need not hesitate to follo,y,-thus securing to yourself the favor of IIeavel1 and the applause of your Brethren and COlllpanions. ADDRESS TO TIrE OFFICERS GENERALLY.. COl\1PANIO:NS : -

Precept al1d example should ever advance witll equal pa,ce. Those Inoral duties ,yhich you arc required to teach unto others you should never neglect to practise yourselYes.


ORDER OF HIGH PRIES1'HOOD.

203

. Do you desire that the demeanor of your equals and inferiors to",vards you should be marked 'with deference and respect? Be sure that you omit no opportunity of furnishing them with examples in your own conduct to'wards your superiors. Do you desire to obtain instruction from those '\vho are more wise or better informed than yourselves? Be sure that you are alw:tys ready to im})art of your knowledge to those within your sphere ,,~ho stand in need of and a,re entitled to receive it. Do you desire distinction among your companions? Be sure that your claims to preferment are founded upon superior attainments; let no ambitious passion be suffered to induce you to envy or supplant a Companion '\vho may be considered as better. qualified for prOll1otiol1 than yourselves; but rather let a laudable eU1ulation induce you to strive to excel e3/o11 other in improvement and discipline; ever remembering that he who faithfully performs his cluty, even in 3, subordinate or private station, is as justly entitled to esteem and respect as he who is invested ,vith supreme authority. ADDRESS TO THE CIIAPTER AT LARGE. CO~IPANIONS : -

The exercise and management of the sublime degrees of l\Iasonry in your Chapter hitherto are so highly appreciated, and the good reputation of the Chapter so well established, that I must presume these considerations alone, were there no others of great.er nlagnitude) ,,,"ould be sufficient to induce you to preserve and to perpetuate this valuahle and honorable character. But 'when to this is added the pleasure which every philanthropic heacrt nlust feel ill doing good, in promoting good order, in dif.. fusing light and knowledge, in cultivating ~fasol1ic and Christian charity, which are the great objects of this sublime institution, I cannot doubt that your future con..


204

~IASONIC

CHART.

duct, and that of your successors, will be calculated still lllore to increase the lustre of your justly esteemed reputation. 1\lay your Chapter b~come beautiful as the te1njJle, lJeaeeful as the ark, and saclj路ed as its rnost holy place! l\Jay your oblations of p'iety and praise be grateful as the ~'n,een8e, your love warn~ as its flan~e, and your charity diffusive as its fragrance! ~Iay your hearts be pure as the altar, and your conduct aeeeptable as the offering! l\fay the exercises of your char拢tJj be as constant as the returning wants of the distressed 'lIJidOUJ and helpless orphan! May the approbation of Heaven be your encouragement, and the testimony of a good conscience your support! l\fay you be endo"\ved '\vith every good and perfect gift ,vhile travellirfl,g the rugged path of life, and finally be ad?nz'tted within the veil of heaven to the full enjoyment of life eternal! So mote it be. AUlen. 24. T'he officers nnd members of the Cha.pter ".,.ill then pass in revie\v fi'Ollt, of the Grand Officers, giving the public gra.nd honors. 25. The (irand ~Iarshal will then proclainl the Chapter, by the lUtnle of - - - , to be regularly constituted, and its officers duly installed.

in

26. The cel'enlonies conclude with appropriate music. 27. The procession is tl1en formed as before, 路when they return to t.he place from 'whence they set out, and close their l'espectiye Ch~lptcrs.


205

CONSTITUTION.

CONSTITUTION OF THE

FOR THE

UNITED STATES OF .Al\fERIOA, As路 Revised and Amended at the

SEVE:iTEENTH TRIEXNIAL SESSION,

September, 18G9.

held at

CHICAGO,

TIl.,

ARTICLE I. OF THE GENERAL

SECTION 1.

G~AND

CHApTER.

There shall bea General Grand Chapt.er of Royal Arch

1\I:Lson8, for the United States of AUlericl1, which shaJl be holden triennh1l1y, on the second Tues<hty in Septcltlher, at snell place as shall frOtll

tinle to time be designated for that purpose, and at which tinlc the Gener:tl Grand Officers shall be elected by ballot, and installed, exe(:~pt t.he Gencl'al Grand Chaplain, who shoJI be appointed by the General Grand High Priest at the COlllmencement of each Convocation of the General Grand Chapt.er. The Generu.l Grn.nd Chapter, n,t any regulnr nleeting, may change the t.itne fer the next succeeding nleeti:ng; n.nd if, in the opinion of the General Grt1ud lIigfl Priest., 01"", in c~:tse of his death or absence, of the senior Generu.l Grn.nd Officer, there shall be danger to life or health, from sickness or other local causo, by any nlcet.ing being held at the time appointed, he nHty cluLuge the time of the particular n1eeting to SOUle subsequent thne; and, in the event of such change being rna-de, he shalll irnrnedio.tely notify tbe General Grand Se0retn,ry thereof, who sIla:!1 forthwith notify the ot.her officers and nleulbers in such Inantler as he l]1ay deenl best cnlculated to effect the desired object.. Sgc. 2. The General Gr~tnd Chapter receives all its powers, faculties, ond preroga.tives by gr:tnt and delegn.tion front t.he seyera.l Strtte Grand Clw.. pters; and it. C1Ul llayc and possess no of her powers thnn sueh ns nrc expressl~y granted and delegated to it. 1:>y tlH..~ln, or as are indi~pen颅 sably necessary to the exercise of its geU(n路flJ pov't'crs, anti COIlsistCllt 18


206

MASONIC CHART.

with the nature of the confederation bet.ween the State Grand Chapters. It CH,n exercise no doubtful powers, nor any powers by implication merely; and all J\1asonic powers not hereby gr:.tnted to it are reserved to the Grand and Subordinate Chapters of the several States. It. shall have and Il1u.intu.in jurisdiction over all Chapters established by itself in those Stntes, Districts, Republics, and 'Territories which recognize this jurisdiction, and where there is no Grand Chapter established. It. shall have po,\yer to decide all questions of l\Iasonic law, usage, and custom which may arise between any two or more Grand Chapters, or in any of the Subordinate",phapters under its own immediate jurisdiction, and aU that. rnay be referred to it for its decisioll by nn~y Grand Chapter, by fOl'lllal vote; and its decisions so made 8h:111 be deenlcd and regnrded as t.hose of the supreme judicial tribunal of Royal Arch ~1~1soriry in the last resort.. . It shall have no p01ver of discipline, admonition, censure, or instruction over the Grand Chapters, nor any legislative powers ,vhatever, not hereby specially granted, 110r any authorit.y to suspend the proceedings of' any State Grand Chapter, nor shall entertain Any complaint agajnst a Granel Chnpter, preferred by any Subordinate Chapter 01' individual IHason in that jurisdiction or elsewhere; but it. m..ay, upon prO}3Cr reference to it of ~1ny matter of controversy between any two 01' 1110re Gru,nd Chttpters, and eycn ,vhere the question is not one of 1\lasonic law, eustonl, or usage (both or all such Grund Chapters consenting to such reference), act as final arbiter between thenl, and settle such con路 troversy. It shall judge of t.he qualifications of its own Dlenl hers. It shall see that the ancient. ,vork of the Order is preser"cd in its severnJ degrees, uncI estfLblish unifol'lll fornlulas for instnllation of its o,yn officers and those of Gr~tnd. and Subordinate Chapters, for the consecration and constitut,ion of Chapters, and the opening of Grand Chnpters; :lIHl it may suspend the proceedings of any Chapter under its own irnmediate jurisdiction, in any State, District, 01" Territory where路 there is no Grand Chapter, for any ,vilful violation of any of the provisions of this Constitution, or for gross, unull1sonic proceedings or conduct. SEC. 3. The officers of the General Grand Chapter sha.H consist of a General Granel High Priest, Deputy General Grand I-Iigh Priest, General Grand I{illg, General Grand Scribe, General (i'rand 1'reasurer, General Granel Secretary, General Gr~1nd Chaplain, General Grand Captain of the IIost, and Gener~1l Grand Royal Arch CRphtin. These, tt>gether ,,,ith the first four officers of every State Grand Chn.pter under this jurisdiction, or the prox.ies of the first foul' General Grand Oilicers, and of the first. four officers of each State Grund Chapter aforesaid, shall compose the General Grand Chapter: Provided, 'l'hat any Chapter under this jurisdiction, in any State, District, or Territory where there isno Grand Chn,pter duly established, slUtH h~tve a right to appea.r by its 11rst three officers, or anyone or two of them, \vhich officers shall collectively l~ave one vote. S}~o. 4. On all questions t.o be decided l)y the General Grand Chap... tel', each State Grand Chapter shitJl be ent.itled to foul" votes by its representative or representa,tives. If there be but two representatives, the inferior officer or his proxy shnll give but his o\vl1single vote, nnd

the higher or his proxy shall give the other three.

If

thel~e

be three


CONSTITUTION.

;207

representatives, the highest officer or his proxy shn11 give two votes, and the others or their proxies one each. , ,]~he General Grand Officers, when present., shall each have one vote; and no General Grand Officer shall be allovtecl to ta.ke a seat in the General Grand Chapter as the representative of any State Grand Ch:1Ptel', nor shall any luernber of the General Grand Chapter be permitted to vote as proxy while the person giving the prox.y is present; 11tH路 shall any person be admitted into the General Gl'~nd Chn,pter, as tIle representative of Ulore than one State Grand Chapter, at one aIld the saIne tinle. SBC. 5. The General Grn.nd High Priest and Deputy General Grand lIigh Priest shall have authority to call a special meeting of the Gene.. ral Grand Chapter, ,vhenever they may consider it expedient or necessary; and it shall be their duty so to do \vhen properly requested by a nU1jority of the St.ate Grand Cba,pb-;rs, of which four months'notice shi~ll be given of the tinl(~ flnd pln.ce of nleeting. SEC. 6. The General Grand High Priest, Deputy GenernJ Grand High Priest., Gener[t,l Grand K.ing~ and Gener-n} Grand Scribe shull severally have power and authol-ity to grant Dispensations, for a lilnitcd length of time, for new Royal Arch Chapt.ers and Lodges of the appendant Orders, in nuy State, Country, Hepublic, or l'erritory in \\"hich there is not a Grand Chapter regnlarly establishccl, when, in their opinion, the good of the Craft. llU1Y require the 8;l1nc, which tC1'lll of tinJc shall in 110 Cl~se extend bc)"ond tIle close of the next triennial rneeting of' the General Grn,nd Chapter; but no now' Chn"pter shall be established in any State, Country, R,epul)Hc, or 1'ol'rHory where there is a, Chapter '\vithin ft reasona,ble dist.auec, under the jurisdiction of this General Grand Ch~1pter, 'without the aPFll'ol1{1tion of the Chapter nearest the .. pl.tee "\vhere said nc\y Ch:1pter is in'oposed fo he 1<)(~fLtcd; fLnd in nU en,ses of sneh Dispensntion, the oflieer \'\"ho ihn:? grant. the saIne shall irnmedintely notify the General Grttnd Secretary thereof, and nlake repol't of the S~1Ine at the next triennial rneeting of this General Grand Chnptel"1 when the General Grand Chapter rutty grant the said Chu!Jter a Chn,rtcr. Sl~C. 7. The fees for instituting 3r new Royal Arch Chapter, "rith SUbol'dinatc degrees, shnll be ninety dollars, and no nlore; and no credit shall be given for Dispensations or Charfe1-s, or for conferring the degrees, in any Chapter or Lodge under this jurisdh~tion. ..l nd every Chapt.erholden by Dispensation or Charter under this jurisdiction shnll pay into the treasury of the General Gru,l1d Chapter the sunl of t\yO donal's -for eaeh Con1pauioll t.herein exalteci, until such tinlC ~LS a Grand Chapter shall be regularly eRtnl)lishcd 'in the State, Countr)", l~,epublic, or Territory in ,vllicli such Subordinate Chapter is located.. The Secretury 8h:111 be paid 'bJ the petitioners ten donal'S for his services in fUl"uishing the Charter. 'rho fees in the severn} States for conferring the scycral degrees of l\In,rk 1\Iaster, Past l\lnster, l\lost Excellent i\Iastcr, and Itoynl ,Al'ell 1\Iftson shall not be less than twenty dollars. SJ.~c: 8. It shall be tlH~ duty o"f the General Grand lIigh Prie~t, Deputy General Grand H.igh Priest, Gener:ll Grand King, nnd General Grand Scribe to irnprovc Rud perfeet thenlSely<.~s in the subliule Art s and ~York of' :\Ilu'k l\Iast,(~l'S, P:lst ':'\lasters, :;\r()stR~~cellent~ra~ter~, and

Itoyal.A.rch l\lu,sons ; to lna,ke thm:nsclvcs rnnsters of the ~cYeral I\lasonio


208

l\IASONIC CHART.

Lectures and Ancient Charges, to consult with each other, and"with the Grand an~ Deputy Grand High Priests, Kings, and Scribes of the several State Grand Chapters. aforesaid, for the purpose of adopting measures suitable and proper for diffusing a kno,vledge of the said Lectures and Charges. And the better to acconlplish this laudable object, the aforesaid officers are hereby severally authorized and empowered to visit and preside in any Cllapter of Royal Arch 1\lason8, and Lodge of l\'Iost Excellent ~Iaster, l\I~lrk, and Past J.\.'laster l\lasons throughout the ~aid States, and to give such instructions and directions as the good of t.he Fraternity may require; always adhering to the ancient landmarks of the Order. SEC. 9. The only degrees recognized by this General Grand Chapter, to be conferred in Chapters under its jurisdiction, are l\Iark l\Iaster, Past l\:Iaster, 1lost Excellent lVlaster, and Royal Arch ~Iason. And nQ Royal . .I\.roh lVlason who shall have regularly received said degrees shall be excluded from the rights of such by reason of his not being in possession of any other, so-called, degrees. SEC. 10. In all cases of the absence of an officer from any body of ~Iasons instituted or holden by virtue of this Constitution, the officer next in rank shall occupy his place; unless through courtesy, or for other. reasons, he should decline in favor of a Past High Priest. SEC. 11. In every Chapter and Lodge under the imnl.ediate jurisdiction of t.his General Grand Chapter, all questions (except the admission of members or candidates, which shall require a unanimous ballot) shall be considered and determined in such ,vay and manner as such Cha,pters and Lodges ma,y, all circunlstances considered, find most conducive to their harmony and pernlanent prosperity: Prom'ded, They do not in nny case interfere ,vith or infringe on the regulations of the General Grand Chapter. SEC. 12. The General Grnnd Secretary of the General Grand Chn.ptel" shall have and keep a seal, ,vhich shall be affixed to all his communications. SEC. 18. Should any casualty, atany time hereafter, prevent the triennial election of offi.cers, the several officers shall ret.ain their respective offices until successors are duly elected and qualified. SEC. 14. An appeal shall in all cases lie to the General Grand Chapter from t.he decision of the 1\1. E. General Grand High Priest; but his opinion a.nel decisions shall stand as the judgment of the General Grand Chapter, unless it is otherwise deterlnined by the concurrent vote of two-thirds of all the members presellt.

ARTICLE II. OF THE STATE GRAND CHAPTERS.

1. The State Gr:lud Chnpters shall severally consist. of a Grand High Priest,Deputy Grand High })riest, Grund I{ing, Grand Scribe, Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary, Grand Chaphdn, Grand Captain of the IIost; and like,vise of the High Priests, Kings, Rnd Scribes, for the Hnle-being, of t.he several Chapters oyer which they shall respectively preside, n.nd of the Pn.st Grand and Deputy Grnnd :High Priests, !{ings, and Scribes of the said Grand Ch~lpters; .and the said Grand Chapters shall have full power and authority to elect such SECTION


209

CONS1'I'!'U'1'ION.

Dth{~r officers, and establish such rules and regulaHons, as they shan, frorn lilne to time, cOllsider necessary ftnd proper: 1}?'ovided, Such regulations do not in any 'way interfere ,vith the proV'isiollS of this Constitution. 814:0. 2, The State Grand Chapters shall sevcrn.lly be holden once in every year, and oftener if they may consider it expedient or necessary, at such tiule and place a,s they shall respectively direct; and, at their ~lnnul11 Dleetings, the constitutiollnl officers shall be elect.ed or appointed in such nU1Ullel' as shall be provided for b,Y their l~ules and l~egullttions, and installed into their respective offices ~ and the Grand or Deputy Grnud FIigh Priests, respectively, for the thue-being, Inay call special meetings, to be holden n-t such times and places as they nlay think proper. SEC.S, The路 several St.ate Grand Chapters shan hn:ve the sole governnlent and superintendence of the several Hoyal.A.. reh Chapters, and Lodges of 1\1081. Ex.cellent, Past, a.nd l\lark I\laster l\lasons, ,,,,ithin their 'respective jurisdi13tions, to assign their lilnits, and to settle the controversies th~Lt Inay lULppen bet\veen thenl; and 811:111 bn.ve power, under their respective seals :l.ud the signs nlaulw.l of their respective Grand or Deputy Grand High Priests, Kings, ~lnd Scribes, attested by their respective Grnnd Secretaries, to constitute new Ch.apters of Hoyal . .\ .reh l\Iasolls, within their respective Jurisdictions; but their jurisdictions shall in no CfLse be construed to extend bej'ond the Ihnits of the State, except by consent of the General Grn,Ild Chnptcr. , 8110. 4. The Grand and Deputy GTRUd lIigh l')riests, severally, shuJI ht1YC the power nnd :tuthoriJy, wllt~neYer tlH~Y shall dceln it expedient., during the recess of the Grand Chapter of:- \vhich they nrc officers., to grant let.ters of Dispenstlltion under their-respective hunds n-nd priyate seals, to it COlnpetent l1urnbel' or petitioners I)OSsessing tlH~ qualifications required by the 7th Seetioll of the second .A.rticl(~ of tIt is Constitution, eUlpo\yering them to open t1 ChaI)ter of Royal .Al'cll l\lu.sons, for a certa.in specified ternl of tillle: .Providt'd, ~rh~lt the said te1'111 of thue shn.llnot extend beyond the next uleeting of the Grn:nd Clull)tm~ of the 8tu.tein which such Dispensation shall he granted: . l lndprol'idcrl, furtlu1t, Thnt the 8:11110 fees us are req uil'(~d b:y thisCoIlstitution for Charters shall be first deposited in the h:uHIs of the Grand SeCl'ctary* A.ud ill all cases of such Dispensation, the officer ,\",110 llU1Y grnnt the sanHJ shall lnake report thel'eof at the next stated meeting of th<.~ Grund Chnptcr of his jurisdiction,whcn the said Grund Chnptel" tuuy either continue or reco.11 t.he sa/tel Dispensation, or Inay grant the petitioners a Charter of constitution. And in case suell Chnrter shall 1)0 granted, the fees first deposited shull be credited in paylnent of the SflnlC ~ but if ft Charter should not. be gr:tnted, nor the DiRpcnsntion eontinued, the said fees shall be refunded to the said petitioners, ex.cepting only such Ilftl't, t.hereof" Its shall have been. actually (~xpendetl by In0:111S of their UItpE.. cation. Se'C. 5. No Dispensfl,tion or Chn,rter shull he granted for instHuting

Lodges of 1\1051. Excellent, Pnst, or l\Iark l\lastcl'l::I

intlcI)('~llll(~Ilt

or

u.

Clu1pter of J:tnyo,l . Arch l\lnsons, Sgc. 6. The Grand Chapters shn,H hayc 11ower, scYeral1y~ ifl requin~ frola the several Chapters lutder their l'esl)(~ctive jnrisd ietinn;-; Fudl r(~asonahlc proportion of sunu'l, received hy theln fCIl' th(~ eX:llt atioll 01' ndvl,lnoculont. of c::tndidrLtes, und suell Cel'lu.ill allllual ~;UIU;:$ frotH their 1


210

:MASONIC CHART.

respectiYe members, as by their ordinances or regulations slHl,l1 be appointed; all which said sunlS or dues shall be Dlade good and paid annually, by the said Chapters respectively, over to t.he Grand Secretary of the Grand ChtLptei- uncleI' which they hold their authority, on or before the first day of the respectiYe a,nnual Ineetjngs of the several Grand Chapters. SEC. 7. No Dispensation or Chnrter for the institution of a. no\v Ch~tpter of Royal . A.reb l\Iasons shall be granted, except upon the petition of nil10 regular Royal Arch l\.Iasons; which petition shall be aCCODlpuuied '\vith a certificate froln the Chapter nearest. to the place 'where the ne,v eha pter is intended to be opened, vouching for the Dloral character Hind Masonic abilities of the petitioners, and l'econlmending that a Dispensation or Charter be grnnted thelll. SECo 8. The Grand Secloctaries of the State Grand Chapters shaH severally ma.ke an annual comrnunication to each other, and also to the Scc"'retn.ry of the General Grand Cha.pter, containing a list of Grand Officers, and nIl such other matters as nlay be deem~d necessary for the l:'utual benefit and infornlution of the snjd Grand Chapters. And tlle ::H1id Granel Secretaries shall also regularly tr3nsmit to the Secretary of the General Grand Chapter n, copy of all their By-Laws and regulations; and also a COI)Y of their proceedings, annually, to each of the officers of the Gcnernl Grand Chapter; and the State Grnnd Chapters shaH see that their Secretaries faithfully aud punctually perform this duty. SEC. 9. ','hencver there shall have been three Chapters l'cgularly instituted and consecrated in any State, Country, R(~public, or Territory, by virtue of authority derived fronl this Constitution, a Grand Chapter shall be estnblished, so soon as convenience and propriety rnay dictate: l>ro'vided, rrhat the apIJl'o bation of one of the first fonr offic<:.~rs of the General Grt1nd Chapter be first obtained. And said Grand Chapters, by their regular offIcers, shall asscnlble in some suitnble place, elect their ofIlcers, and Inakc such rules and regultttions for their government as nlay be l1eCeSsfLr~Y'-not inconsistent ,vith the regulatiolls of the General Grand Chapter. SEC. 10. No persoll shall be permitted to take a seat, in any Stato Grand Chapter as the representntivc of luore than one Chnpter; nor unless he is a member ofa Subordinate Chapter under that. jurisdiction.

ARTICLE III. OF THE SliBOlunXATE CHAPTERS.

1. E'v'ery Chapter of Royal Arch l\Iasons throughout. this .jurisdiction shnJl have itt Dispensation, as is pro"id(~d in Section 6 of Article L, or Section 4 of .A.rticle II., of this Constitution, or a Charter fronl the General Grand Chnpter, or frOln sonle Gra11d Chapter under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter; and no Chapter ,shall be decrncd legal "dthout such Dispensation or Charter; and l\l~lsonic (~Oln足 rnunic~ation, both public and private, is herebjT interdicted and forbidden bet\vecn any Chapter, or any DlcDlber of it, and any Chapter or assenll)ly that. nuty be so illegally f'ornled, opened, or holden without such Charter, or any or <:'ither of their 111CDl hers, or nny person ~xnHcd or aclvttnced in such ilh~gal Cbapter. But nothing in this sectiGn shall SECTION


CONSTITUTION.

211

be const.rued to affect any Chapter ,vhich was established l)efore the adoption of the Grand Ho:y'al .Arch Constitution, at IIartford, 011 the 27th day of .J anuary, A.D. 17HS. " SEC. 2. 'Vhenever a Chnrter is issued for instituting a Chapter of Royal Arch l\Iasons, wit 11 it po,ver in said Charter to open and hold Lodges of l\Iost Excellent, Pa.st, and l\Iark l\Iaster l\Ia.sons, the High I)riest, King, und Scribe, for the tinle- bei ng, of such Chapter, shn11 be the J)Iaster and 'V~1rdens in suid Lodges, according to seniority. SEC. 3. It is incUlubent on the High Priest of every Chapter, as appertaining to his office, duty, nnd dignity, to see that t.he By-La'vs of his Chapter, itS well as the Constitution of the General Grand Chapter, and t.he Begulations of the Grlll1d Chapter, be duly observed; that all his subordinnte officers perforul the duties of their respective stations faithfully, and are exaulples of diligence and industry to their COInpaniolls; that true and exact records be kept of an the proceedings of the Chapter by路 the Secretary; that the Treasurer keep and render eXftct and just accounts of all moneys belonging to the Chapter; that regular returns be ma.de by the Secretary annually to the Grand Chapter of the admIssion of all ca.ndidates or Inelnbers; and that the annunl dues to tho Granu ChRpter he regularly and IHlnctually paid. The Cht1rter of this Chapter is comnlitted to his special care and charge. lIe has the right :lInd authority of calling his Chapter at pleasure upon any ernergency or occurrence v;hich in his judgrnent nIfty require their lneeting, and he is t.o fill the clutil' ,vhen present. It is like'\vise his duty, together ,vith his King n,nd Scribe, to attend the regular and special nleetil1gs of the Grand Clutptcr, eit.her in person or by proxy. SEC. 4. No person, haJving been a lUell1ber of 11 Chapter, shall be adnlittecl t1 member of nny other Chapter under this jurisdiction, until he shall have produced a certificate 1"1'0111 the Chapter to ,vhich he last, belonged tlu!.t he w<tS in regular standing, and, as such, at his o\vn request, is disrnissed and rcconlluended. SEC. 5. 'l'll:lt any worthy GOlupanion, from '\vithout the Jurisdiction of the United 8tH,toS, w'ho nlfiY present himself n,s a Ro:ra1 Arch 1\la8011, and produce srLti~factory evidence of' his haying received that degree, tha.t. each ftnd every Chapter under the jurisdiction of this General Grand Cha,ptet' have lilH:;rty, and they are hereby authorized, to confet" the degrees of ~lt:trk l\Iu,ster, Past i\Inster, ttnd l\lost. Excellent. l\lnster on such CompfLnions (,:vho have not, heretofore received them), to the end t.hat they nuty be healed, and thereby becoute regular Royu.l11rch l\Iasons, free of charge. SI~C. 6. That the Subordinttte Chapter so conferring said degrees shall be exelnpt fronl paying any dues therefor. SEC. 7. It shall not. be deemed regular for any Chapt.er to confer the degrees of' the CIU1IJter upon an)'" person ,vllose fixed place of abode is \vithin any other Stat.e in w'hich there is a Chapter regularly esfa,blishec1, except by the consent of the Chapter nearest the place of residence of suid applicant. MISCIU..LANEOUS. SECTION 1. 'Vhcneyel' it shull be inconvenient for the General Grand Otlicers, or the Grand or Deputy Grand High Priests, respectively, to att.end in person to constitute a, nc\v Chapter n.nd instaU the officers,


212

~lASONIC

CHART.

they shall scyernllJ have power and nuthority to app;illt some 'worthy High Priest, or Pnst High Priest, or the lIigh Priest of the salne Chapter 'while it. was UncleI' Disl)ensation, \,"hen he himself shall have been installed, to perfornl the n'ecessary cereIllonies. SEo.2. The officers of every Chapter under this jurisdiction, whether Chartered or Under Dispensation, before they enter upon the exercise of their respective offices, and also the nlenlbers of all such Chapters, and every candidate upon his adrnission into the sanlC, shull take the following obligation, viz.: "I, A. E., do prornise and swear that I win support 1Lnd rru1intain the Constitution of the General Grand Chapter of Hoyal .1\.rch l\l~lsons for the United States of Arnericft." SEC. 3. 1'his Constitution shall not be altered or amended, unless such alteration or a,mendnlent be proposed in \yriting at one regular 111ceting of the General Grand Chapter, published unlong the ITlinutes of the proceedings, and at the next regular Dleet.ing receive the approval of two-thirds of the lllenlbers then present. I hereby certify that the foregoing is 'a true copy of the Constitution of the General Grand Chapter of Hoyul .A.roh l\Iasolls for the United States of .A.merioa.

. ... ] In testimony 'whereof, I ha,''tte c:ulsed the Soal of the General [ SEAL. Grand. Chapter to be hereunto affixed. DaJed at.. the city of Ne\v Orleans, this first. day of November, 1859, and the :y'efH~ of the 01'<1e1' 2an8. S.A.~lUEL G. RISI\:, General Grand Secretary.


HISTORY OF lntEE l\IASONRY.

213

HISTORY OF FREE MASONRY.

THAT we may be enabled to discover Free ~Iasonry under those 'various forms which it has assunled in different countries" and at different times before it receiYed the name it now bears: it will be necessary to give a short description of the nature of this institution, without developing those mysteries or revealing those ceremonial observances 'Y hich are known only to the Brethren of the Order. Free nlasonry is an ancient uncI honorable institution, elnbracing indivic1ualsof every nat,iol1, of every religion, and of' eyery condit.ion in lif(~. ealth, po,ver, and talents are not necess:1ry to the person of ~t I~'ree l'Jason. An unblemished chu,racter and ,\rirtuous conduct are the only qualifications which are recluisite f(u'l adrnission hltO the Order. In order to conform to the requircl1)cnts of this institution and attain the ends fDr which it ,vas originally forlueel, eyery candidate must come under u solemn engagell1ent !leVCr to divulge the 111Jrsteries and cerelnonies of the Order, nor COllUlllluicate to the uninitiated those iDlportant precepts with "which he lllay be intrusted, and those proceedings and plans in which the l?raternitlY m<."ty be engaged. . A.fter the candidate has undergone the necessary ceremonies and received the usual instructions, appro11riate words nnd significant signs are iluparted to hirll, t.}lut he may be enabled to distinguish his Brethren of'. the Order froln the uninitiated public, and convince others that he is entitled to the privileges of a

"r

Brother. If the ne,vly-adnlitted nlember be found qualified for a higher degree, he is promoted, after clue intervals of probation, until he has received that. ~iasonic kno,vledg'e ,vhich enables hhll to hold the highest office of trust to ,vhich" the .Fraternity can raise its members. OBJECT OF l!'R,EE l\lASONRY.

In all a[!'cs it has heen the object of Free l\Iasonry, not only to inform the minds of its members by instructing them in the


214

l\IASONIC CIIART.

sciences and useful arts, but to better their hearts by enforcing the precepts of religion and 1110rulity. In tho course of the cerelllonios of initiation, brotherly love, loynlt;l, anc1 other virtues are inculcated in hieroglyphic sYlubols; and the candidate is often rCluinded that there is an eye ahoye 'which observoth the ,vorkings of his heart and is ever fixed upon the thoughts and the actions of Iuon. llegular and appointed Il1eetings of the Fraternity a.re held in Lodges constructed for this purpose. Telnperance, harrnony, and joy characterize these mixed asseulblies. All fictitious distinctions of rank are laid aside, all differences in religious and political sentilllents are forgotten; and those petty quarrels which disturb the harmony of' private life cease to agitate the ~lind, and Brother strives to contribute happiness to Brother. Such are the general features of an institution vvhich has produced many sllcculations among the profane, respecting its objects, origin, and tendency. ORIGIN OF FR.EE l\IASONRY.

\Vhilst. SOlue, over-anxious for the dignity of tl1C Oreler, have represonted it as coc''"al 1vith the \vorld,* or arising frolll the constitution of I)ythagora.s,t others, fi'Olll opposite Illotives, have Inuint,uined it to be tJ10 iuvention of IDl1g1ish ~Jesuits,:t or that it nrose during the Crusades,搂 or, as 1\1. I~arrueI, that it is a continuation of the TClllplnrs.11 \Vithout adopting any of these lUltenable opinions, or attclllpting to cliscoyor the precise period "'hen I;\'ee l\Iasolll'Y arose, it is sufllcient to sho,v tlUlt it can j ustJy lay claiul to a very early origin, and tlult it has existed f'nnn that })orioc1 to the In'esent day, under different forms and difierent appellations. \\T e shall have occasion to consider l?ree 1\Iasonry v.rhen connected ,vith the idolatry of the heathens, v..,.hen devoted to the Church of Ilollle, and 'when flourishing under the milder influenee of the Reforulcd religion; for, as every hUllUUl instit;ution is subjeet to great and nUlllcrous variations, so ]3'reo l\Iasonry is affected by the progress of civilization, by the nature of the gOYCrrilnent under'\vhich it exists, and by the l)cculiar opinions and habits of its 1116111 bel'S. .~ Anderson's History and Constitution of Free 1\ofnsonry, p. 1. Desagulier's Constitutions, p.l. Smith's Use and Abuse of Prce n.Ias(lnry, p. 27~ Preston's IBust.rations of l\fasonry, I). (>, 10th edition. 路t .Anthologia. IIibernicl1 for .January, l\!utch, April, and .Tune, 17S路t~ .Ma.nuscript of Bode of Gerxnany, in the pnssesSitlll of 1\1. J.\Iounier. I . eyden'sPreliminary ])issertation to the Crllnp!aynt ofScoth:Lnd, pp. 67, 71. . U nlemoirs of ,Jacobinisrn, vol. 2, pp. 377, i~7S, &0.

t

*


IIISTORY O:b' FREE l\I.A.SONRY.

215

In the early ages of society the pursuit of science was pro-

bably a secondary consideration,·· and ,vhatever \vas found necessary to a safe and comfortable existence must have been nutde a primary concern. As architecture, ho\vever, could only be preceded by agriculture itself~ it was in th is science that the fii'st efl'orts of huulun skill were tried, and in ,vh~~.h Ulan must have first experienced success in extending his dominion over the ''lorks of nature. The first architects, therefore, were philosophers; and the information which ,vas acquired individually was imparted by symbolic instruction to others of the same profession; and an association would naturally be formed for the Inlltual communication of knowledge and the mutual improveluent and protection of its members. In order to preserve among thelTISelves that infornlation which they alone collected, to excite in others a higher degree of respect for their profession, and to prevent the intrusion of those ,vho were ignorant" of their pl'ofession, appropriate ,vorcls and signs ,,,"ould be cornnlunicated to the lucmbers of the institution, and significant cereul011ies, synlbolizing the search after truth and light, and the \vorship of one G-od, ,vould be l)crforlned at their initiation, that their engagement to secrecy lnight he irnpressed 11 pon their luincls, and greater regard excited fen' the inf<.)l'lnation they were to receive. N or is this Inere speculation: there exist at this day, in the deserts of Egypt, 11lOlluments of architecture, covered ,vith hieroglyphic inscriptions, \vhich l11ust IltlYP been reared in tnose early ages 'w'hich precede the records of a.. uthentic history; and the erection of those stupendous fabrics 111Ust have required an acqllailltttllCe with the mechanicill arts 'wh ich is not in the possession of modern architects. It is an undoubted £Lct also, that there existed in those da,ys tl particular associat.ion of nlel1 to whonl scient.ific knowledge was con~ fined, and ,vha reselubled the society of ]'1'ee ~lasolls ill every thing but the lla111e. In Egypt, and those countries of Ashl which lie contiguous to t1utt f11vored kingcloln~ the nrts and sciences were first cultivatod with suecess; und it is hel'e,vhex·e Free l'lasollry '\vould :flourish, and here we can discover marks of its existence in the remotest ages. It is cxtre111cly probable thtlt the first and only object of the Rociety of Egyptian l\Iasons ,YUS ll1utJual proteetion and the interCOllllllunication of knowledge cOllnected ,vith their profession, and that those only could gain adulittance into their Order ·whose labors ,,'"ere subsitliary to those of the arehitect. But ,vhen the 1mbitiol1 or vanity of the Egyptian priests prOlllpted the!n to t,


216

l\I.t\.SONIC CHAH.T..

erect huge and expensive fabries for celebrating the worship of their gods or perpetuating the luenlory of' their kings, they would naturally desire to participate in that scientific kno~w'ledge which ,vas possessed by the architects they enlployed,; and as the sacerdotal order seldorn fhil, among a stlperstitious people, to gain the objects of their aIllbition, they ~Nould in this case succeeel, and be initiated into the lllysteries and instructed in the science of l;'1'ee l\'Iasons. "Vhen the Egypti<l11 priests had procured adnlission into the society of Free 1\1(1sons, they connected the Dlythology of their country, and their luetaphysical speculations concerning the nature of God and the condition of Ulan. with an association formed for the exclusive purpose of scientific iUlpl'OVenlent, and produced that cOll1bination of science and theology 'which in after-ages formed such a conspicuous ,part of the pl'inciples'of Free ~lasonry. The kno'w ledge of the Egyptians ,vas carefully concealed fron1 the vulgar; and 'when the priests did condescend to cOllilnunicate it to the learned of other nations, it v.ras con.. ferred in synlbols und hieroglyphies, ncccHllpaniecl with particular rites and cereulonies, luarking the val ue of the gift they bcstcrwed. '~'rhat many of those Cel'eIllOl1ies \vere 'which ,vere perfOl'llled at initiations into the Egyptian lllysterics, ,ve are unable at this

distance of tiIue to deternline. I3ut, ns the l~leusinian and other lllysteries had their origin in l~gypt, 'we IllUY perhaps discover the qualities of the fountain by exurnining the; nature of the streaUl. It is ,vell know'n that C*reece 'YHS peopled by a colony frorn Egypt., conducted thither by Inueus, about nineteen hun.. dred and seventy years before the Christian era, and that about three centuries after'wards he 'was follow'ed by Cecrops, Cadillus, and Danaus.* ~rhe Egyptians introdueed the arts and sciences into that country, and so\~"ec1 those seeds of improvement \vhich in future ages exulted Grecce to such pre-eminence among the nations. l~. fter tlle Eg:yptian colonies lute1 obtained a secure settlelnent ill t.heir new territories, they constituted, after the nlanner of their ~Lncestors, particular festivals, or Inysteries, in honor of those ,,,,ho had benefited their country by arts or by arms. TIlE EI..EUSINIAN :MYSTERIES.

In the reign of ~Jrictllonius, about fifteen hundred years before the cOllllnenCClnel).t our Cl'H,-t- the Eleusiniun rnysteries

of

~l~ 'Toyage du tleunc Anueharsis en Greco" ,Uo, tom. 1, p. 2. Cccropss,rrivcd in Attica in 16.17 B. c. Cadmus came fl'Olll Phccnicin. to lJo.wtiu.. in 1[:~94" and

J)anaus to ,c\r.;olis in 1586, B.O.

t

Robertson's Greece, pp. 58, 59.


IIISTORY OF FREE lVIASONRY.

217

were instituted, in honor of Ceres, who calue into Greece and instructed 1'riptoleulus in the knowledge of a future state.* About the saUle time the Panathenea were instituted. in honor of l\Iinerva, anel the Dionysian mysteries in honor of Bacchus, who invented thcu,tres,t and instructed the Greeks in many useful arts, but partieularly in the culture of the vine.! That the Eleusil1iall and Dionysian nlysteries were intiuuttely connected with the progress of the arts and sciences, is 111anifest from the very end for ,vhich they were forlnecl; and that they were nlodelled upon the 111ysteries of Isis and Osiris, celebrated in Egypt, is probable from the similarity of their origin, as well as the consent of their ancient authors.§ And if t.here is any plausibility in our former reasoning concerning the origin of knowledge in ]~gypt, it will follo,v that the DiollJsia and the mysteries of Eleusis were societies of Free ~Iasons, tinctured with the doctrines of Egyptian ulythology. But it is not frolu conjecture only that this conclusion may be drawn; the striking shnilarity alllong the external un"Ills of these secret associations, and the still more striking similarity of the objects they had. in view, are st.rong proofs that they \vere only different stre:1rns issuing fi'orll t1 001111110n fountain. Those ,vha were initiu.ted into the Eleusinian ulysteries were bound by the Illost a:wful engage.. Inents to cOhceal th-e instructions they received .and the ceremonies that \vere perf(n·.nled.lI None 'were adluitted as candidates till they arrived at a cert.ain age; and particular persons Vlere a.ppointed to exalnine ahd prepare thcln for the rites of initiation.' Those whose conduct was founel irregular, or ,vho had been guilty of atrocious criInes, were rejected as ul1,vorthy of initiation; while the successful candidates \vere instructed, by significant synlbols, in the principles of religion,** ,,~ere exhorted to quell every turbulentappetite and passion,tt ttnd to merit by the improvelllent of their minds ~l11d the purity of their hearts those ineffable henefits which they w'ere still to receive.tt Significant words were COlnmunicated to the Inclubers; superior officers presided oyer as.. semblies.§§ Their e111b101U8 were shnilar to those of Free l\Ia..

"* t

t II

~r *'l~

tt it ~e

Socrates Paneg. t. 1, p. 132. Polodor. Virgo de Rerum Invent. lib. 3, cnp.13. Rohel·tson's Greece, p. 5~l.. L. Ap111eii1\Ietamorph~lib. xi. Andoc. de l\lyst. p. 7. J.\;Icurslus in EIJ3tls. 11 J"st. cap. 20. Hcsy chius in H.l/dran. Clemens. Alexn,l1d. Strom. lib. 1, p.B25, lib. 7, p. 845.. Porphyr. up. Stob. Ecdog. }>hss. p. 1.12. Arrian inEIJ1ctet. lib. B, cap. 21, p. 440. Robertson's Greece, p. 127.

e

19


218

:MASONIC CIIART.

80nry,* and the candidate advanced from ol~e degree to another, until he had received all the lessons of 'w'isdolU and virtue ,vhich the priests could inlpart. t But, besides these circUulstances, there are many other f~tcts transmitted to us by ullcientauthors, ,V'hieh show its similarity to the cerelIlonies of Free l\Iasonry. So striking is the reselllbhtnce that every Brother of the Order who is acquainted with them cannot question for a mOluent . the opinion ,vhich we haV'e been attempting to support.! I-Iaving thus mentioned SOUle features of reselublance between the mysteries of ]jJleusis and those of ]'ree l\lasonry, let us now attend to the sentiments of cotenlporaries respecting these secret associations, and we shall find that they have been treated 'with the same illiberality and insolence. There were SODle men who, from self:'suffioiency or unsocial dispositions, refused to be admitted into these orders; and there ,vere others '\vhose irregular conduct excluded theln from initiation. 1\1en of this description -repl"esented the celebration of Elensinian mysteries as scenes of riot and debauchery, and reproached the Illellbers of the associa,,:, tiOll that they '\vere not l110re virtuous and nlore holy than theulselves;§ but it is the opinion of coten1porary writers that these rumors '\\"ore ,vholly conjectural, and originated in the silence of the initiated and the ignorance of the vulgar. They even Iuaintain that the 111Jsteries of Eleusis produced sanctity of nU111ners, attention to trle social duties, and tt desire to be as distinguished by virtue as by silence.1I The illustrious Socrates could never be pre\1'ailed upon to partak.e of these mysteries,crr and Diogenes, having reeeived a silnilar solicitation, replied that Pat::ecion, ~1 notorious robber, obtained initiation, anel tlult, Eparninondas ~,nd AgesihLus never desired it.** But did not these kno"w that in all hUll1an societies the virtuous and the' noble lllust sometimes associate \vith the ,vort.hless and the nlean? Did they not know that there often kneel in the salue telllple the righteous and the profane, and that the saint a.nd the sinner frequently officiate at the salne altar? ~!~

Euseb. Prepar. Eva,nge1. lib. 3, cn,p. 12, p. 117. Pelav'. ad rrhemist. I). 414, Anach:1!sis, t. 8, p. 582. t The Brethren of the Order may consult, fOl~ this purpose, the article Elcllsinia" in the 6th vol. of the last edition of the Encyclopt:edia. Britunnica., and ~lob~::tsol1~S lIistorJ of Ancient Greece, p. 127. ,See ~Il.tckcy's Lexicon, pp. It)O-l.J~3.-1~D.. â&#x20AC;˘ ? Robertson's Greec9, p. 127. Porphyr. de A bstinentia, lib. 4, p.353. Ju lian Orat. 5, p. 173. II Encyclop::cdia Britul1nica, article Elcusinia. ,'" Lucian in Demonact. t. 2, p. 380. *.;~ Pluto de and.. Poet. t. 2, p. 21. Diog. Lnert.. lib. 6, ~~9 ..

t

*


HISTORY OF :PREE l\IASONRY.

219

Thus did tl1e philosophers of antiquity calumniate and despise the mysteries of Eleusis; and in the sanle luanner have SOUle pretended philosophers of our own day defamed the character and questioned the lllotives of Free ~fasons. . The similarity of treatnlent which the Dlysteries of Ceres and Free l\fasonry have received, is no snlall proof of the s~milarity of their origin and their obj ect. To this conclusion, however, it may be objected that, although the points of reselublnnce bet,veen t.hese secret societies are numerous, yet there were circUlllstances . ill the celebration of the Eleusinian mysteries Wl1ich have no counterpart in the cereIllonies of Free Masonry. ~rhe sacrifices, hyu1ns, and d,111ces 'which were necessary in the festival of Ceres, have, indeed, no place in the society of Free l\lasons. But these points of dissimilarity, instead of weakening, rather strengthen our opinion. It cannot be expected that in the reign of polytheism· just sentiments of the Deity should be entertained; ~Lnd much less that (.he adherents of Christianity should bend their knees to the go1s of the heathens. The prilnitive vlorship of the ancients 'was gr~Ldually perverted into the ,vorship of those sYlnbols by which true worship was i·epresented. But ,yhen revelation httd again disclosed to lllall correct idoas concerning the Divine Being, the society of Jj"'ree l\Iasons banished from their nrvsteries those useless rites '\vhich the ancient Brethren of the Oi.~'tler incorporated in their mysteries, and rernodelled their ceremonies upon" this foundation, tlUlt there is but. Olle God, \vho must be 'worshipped in spirit and in truth. The n1y"steries of Ceres were not confined to the city of Eleusis ; they ,vere introduced int·o Athens about thirteen hundred and fifty-six years before Christ, * and, with a few slight variations, were obseryed in Phrygia, Cyprus, Crete, and Sicily.t They had reached even to the capital of J)"'r,tnce;t and it is highly prob[Lble that in a short thne after they were introduced into Britain and other northern kingdollls.. In the reign of the IDmperor .A,.d.rian§ they ,vere carried into ROIne, and were celebrated in that metropolis \vith the stune rites and ceremonies which ,vere performed. i.n the Illnuble ,Tillage of Eleusis.. They had contracted iUlpurities, however, froul the length of their duration and the corruption of their abettors; and although the £orlns of initiation were still sy-nlbolical of the original and

* Pln,yfair's ~;hrollologJr.

t

t

LllCii Apuleii l\fetamorph. lih. 11, .pp. 197, 198. Praise of Paris, or n. ~3ketch of the French Capitol, IS08, by S. 'Vest,

F .. R.S. A. D. 117. p.389.

*

EncJ..clop. Brit. vol. 6, p. 555.

Pottcr~s Antiquities"

yo1. 1,


220

l\IASONIC CHART.

noble objects of the institution, yet the licentious Romans mistook the shadow for the substance; and \vhile they underwent the rites of the Eleusiniun mysteries, they'\vere strangers to the object for which they were fi-aUled. About the beginning of the fifth century, Theodosius tIle Great prohibited, and almost totnlly extinguished, the pagan theology in the ROlllall empire, * and路 the lllysteries of }1~leusis suffered in the general devastation. t .It is probable, however, that these mysteries were secretly celebr~ted, in spite of the severe edicts of Theodosius, and that they \vere partly continued during the dark ages, though stripped of their original purity and splendor: we are certain, at least, that many rites of the pagan religion were pertm'>med, under the disseulbled name of ' convivial meetings, long after the publication of the enlperor's edict;! and Psellus搂 informs us that the ll1Jlsteries of Ceres subsisted in Athens till the eighth century of the Christian era, and were never totally suppressed. Having thus considered the origin and c1ecline of the lnysteries of Eleusis, and discovered in them nunlerous und pronlinent features of resemblance to those of l?ree l\Iasonry, it is reasonable to infer that the Egyptian 111ysteries w'hich gave rise to the forlller lUld a still nearer affinity to the latter ;11 and frolll this conclusion the opinions \vhich were fOl'll1crly stated concerning the antiquity of the Oreler, and the origin of J1Jgyptian knowledge, 'vill receive vel'Y considerable confirmation. THE

DIONYSIA:

THEIR ORIGIN AND CONNECTION 'VITH THE l\fYSTERIES OF CERES.

The Dionysia, or mysteries of Bacchus, were intinlately connected with those of Ceres. lIeroclotus informs us that the solemnities in honor of Diol1ysius, or Bacchus, \vere originally instituted in }Jgypt., and were transported fi'OIll that country into GTeece by one l\lelalupus., But not only did the ruysteries of Ceres and Bacchus flo'w from the saIne source: the one 'was in SOllle Ineasure interwoven with the other, and it is ahllost certain, from 'what w'e are now to mention, that those \vho 'were initiated into the former ';i:-

Gibbon's lIistory of the Decline ancl Fall of the Romall Empire, 8yo,

vol. 5, p. 120.

t

Zosim. llist. lib. 4.

II

See article on Egyptian l\1ystcries, ~Iackey's Lexicon" pp. 122-12S.-En..

t

5~

vol. p. 110. . . * InGibbon, his Treatise on the gods wh ich the Hreeks worshipped, fluotcd 11y ]\ilr. Clinch in the Antholngia, IHbernica, for .Janua.ry 17H路l, p. ~

;)t),

Lib. 2.


HISTORY OF FltEE IVfASONRY.

221

were entitled to be present at the celebration of the latter." The sixth daly of the Eleusinian festival was the most brilliant of the whole. It received the appellation of Bacchus, because it was chiefly, if not exclusively, devoted to the worship of that god. IIis statue, attended by the initiated, and the ministers of the tClllple, was conducted franl Athens to I~leusis with much POlllP and SOlelllnity,* alHl after it had been introduced into the teulple of Ceres, it ,vas bro~Lght back to . A.thens with similar ceremonies. 'l'he connection between the Eleusinian and Dionysian mysteries is manifest, also, from the COlllnlon opinion that Ceres was the mother. of Bacchus;t and Plutarch assures us that the Egyptian Isis was the same 'with Ceres, that Osiris was the same 'with Bacchus, and tha,t the Dionysia' of Greece was only another name for the Paluylia of J1Jgypt.t As Bacchus was the inventor of theatres as well as of dramatical representations, that particular class of l\Iasons \vho were employed. in the erection of these ex.tensive buildings were called the Dionysian artificers,搂 and were initiated into the lll)'"steries of their founder and consequently, into those of Eleusis.1I But, from the tendency of the hUlllan mind to embrace the cerellJonial while it neglects the substantial part of an institution, the Dionysian fest,ivaI, ill the degenerate ~Lges of Greece, was more reulurkable for inebriation and licentiousness than for the cultivation of virtue and science; al1d~e ,vIla at first was celehrated as the inventor of arts was afterwards worshipped us the god of \\J~ine.Those who were desirous of indulging secretly in licentious mirth and unhallowed festivity cloaked their proceedings under the pretence of worshipping Bacchus, and brought disgrace upon those lIlysteries ,,:hich ,vere instituted for the promotion of virtue and the improyeul.ent of art. ..A.bout t,vo hundred yea.rs befoi'e Christ, an illiterate and licentious priest came frolll G'reece to Tuscn,ny, a.nd insdtuted the l~acchanalinJ, or Feast of the Bacchanals.,-r Frolll Tuscany they w'ere iInported to BOlue; but, the prOllloters of these midnight orgies having proceeded to the furthest extrelnity of dissipation and disloyalty, they were abolished throughout all Italy, by a decree of theSenate.** It has been foolishly supposed that dIe J3acchanalia were siInilar to the Dionysian mysteries, lllcrely .::!. Anacharsis, tom. :::~, p. 5:31. Pluto in Phoc. tom. i. p. 754. l\1curs. in BIens. l\lyst. cap. 27 ~ t Potter, vol. i. 1\. :393. t De Iside ct Osiride. Idee Ch1 GOtlyerneUlent ancien et IUtH.lerne de l'Egypte, p. 26~ l\tris, 1743. ? .Aulus Genius, lib. xx. c. 路1. Vide Putter, YO!. i. p. 41. ~ 'fit.. IJiv. lib. ;JH, cap. 8.. Lb-. lib. :~9., cap_ 18.

19*


222

MASONIC CHART.

because they were both dedicated to Bacchus. The Liberalia of Rome was the festival corresponding to the Diollvsia of Greece;* and it is probable that this feast 'was obs'erved throughout the Roman Empire till the abrogation of the Pagan theoloo'y in the reign of Theodosius. . C) , Hitherto ,ve have considered the Dionysian nlysteries under III unpropitious aspect; let us no,v traee them in their progress from ~urope to Asitt, where they retained Jtheir priJllitive lustre and effectually contributed to th.e rapid advancelne.nt of the fine arts. About a thousand years before Christ, the inhabitants of Attica, complaining of t,he narrowness of their territory and the unfi"uitfulness of its soil, went in quest' of lllore extensive and, fertile settlements. They sailed to Asia l\linor, drove out the inhabitants, seized upon the most eligible situations, and united thenI under the name of Ionia, because the greatest nUlllber of the refugees were natives of that t}recian province.! .t\..8 the Greeks, prior to the Ionic l11igration, had HULde considerable progress in the arts and sciences,§ they carried these along :\vith thenl into their ne\v territories, a.nd introduced into Ionia the Inysteries of l\linerya and Dionysius~1I before they ,yore corrupted by the licentiousness of the . A. thenians. In a short time the . t\.. siatic colonies surpassed the mother-country in prosperity and science. Sculpt,ure in ll.lal'blo, and the Doric and Ionian orders, were the result of their ingelluitY.,r 'l'hey returned even into (lreece, and cOlunlunicated to their ancestors the il.lventions of tlleir O'Nll couptry, and instructed them in that style of architecture 'which has been the nduliration of succeeding ages. Iror these iluproveUlents the ,vorld is indebted to the J)l()n~ljs'ian Art'fficers, an association of scientific lllen, who possessed the exclusive privilege of erecting teulples, theatres, and other public buildings in ..A.sia l\linor.** The:y" supplied Ionia, a,nd the· surrounding countries as far as IIellespont, "\vith theatrical apparatus, by contract, and erected the InaglliY

t

Vide Uniyersal lIistory, vol. 13, p. 262. })layfair says in 104:1:, Gilliesil1 111;)[)~ nnd Barthelemy in 1076, n.(~. Herodotus, lib. i. cap. 1~12. Gillies' lIist of Greece, Svo, vol. 1, p. 102. According to tho ttuthor of Anacharsis' Tra.vels, the arts took their rise in Greece about 15~17 B. c. 11 Cbancller's Travels in Asia ~nnor, p. 100, 4to. 1775. The Panathenen. and the Dionysian mysteries \yore institut.ed t1bout three hundred years before the Ionic migratiou. ~ Gillies' llist. Ant. Greece! vo1. 2, p. IG2• .;::~::: Strabo, ih. 4. Chishull, Antiquitates Asiaticm, p. 107. Hobison's Proofs of Conspiracy, 1;. 20.. ii:

-r t

*


HISTORY OF FREE lVI.A.SONIty.

223

ficent tenlple at Teas, to Bacchus, the founder of their order.* These in"tists were very numerous in Asia, and existed under the sanle appellation in Syria, Persia, and India:r .1\.bout three hun}lred years before the birth of Christ, a considerable nurn her of thelu were incorporated by command of the kings of I)ergamus, who ~1ssigned to them Teas as a settlement, it being the city of their tutelary god.! The luenlbers of this association, which ,vas intimately connected with the Dionysian mysteries, ,vere distinguished from the uninitiated inhabitants of Teas by the science \vhich they possessed, and by approlJriute ,vards and signs by which they could recognize their Brethren of the Order.§ Like Free l\Iasons, they were divided into Lodges, They which were distinguished by differenp appellations.11 Qccasionally held convivial llleetings in houses erected and consecrated for this purpose; and each separate association vvas under the direction of a master and president, or ,,~ardens.~ They held a general meeting once a year, ,vhich 'wns solelllnizeu with great pomp and festivity, and u,t which the Brethren partook of ~1 splendid elltertainrnent, provided by the Inaster, after they had finished the sacrifices to their goels, and espeeially to their patron, Bacchus.** They used particular utensils in their cerelnonial observances, sorne of vthich ,yore exactly siInilur to t~lose ,vhich are eUlployed by the Fraternity of :Pree I\la.sons ;t~r and the ID.ore opulent artists ,vere bound to provide for the exigencies of their poorer Brethren.tt The very 111onUlucnts which ,vere reared by these l\lasons to the ll1eulory of their masters and 'wardens remain to the present clay in the Turkish burying-grounds at Siverhissar and ]~raki.§§ The inscripti,~ns upon them express, in strong ternlS, the gratitude of the Fraternity for their disinterested exert.ions in hehalf of the ()rder, for their generosity and benevolence t.o its individual lllculbers, for their private virtues as well as for their puhlic conduct.

'*

Ionian .Antiquitics, published by the Society of Dilettanti, p. ~L St.rubo, lib. 4. Chishull, Antiq. Asia-t. p. 18H. t Straho l p. 471. Ionian Antiquities, p. 4. t Chu,nlUer's 'l'rn.vels, p. 100. Chishull, Antiq. Asiat. p. 1:;8. Icmian Antiq. p. Lt. ~ l~obisonJs Proofs of a Conspiracy, p. 20. n ChishulJ, p. l:HI. ~r See the two decrees of these artists, preserved in Chishull, PI). l:~8-1 ~H) . .;::.::: Chandler's Travels, p. 103. tt See the decree of the Attalists, in Chishull,-particularly the pu.ssuges at the bottonl of pp. 1·11., 142. it Chishull, p. 1·.10. ~~ Chl1ndler's Trayels, p. 100. These nl.onUlnents \"ere erected H hDUt: one hundred and Jifty years before Christ. The inscriptions upon them ,vere published by 'Bdmu nil Chishull, ill 1728, from copies t:'Lken by Consu.l Shcl·a.rd in 1100, and exa.mined in 1716. Ionian Antiq. p. 3.


224

l\JASONIC CHART.

FrOIn SOllle Cil'Clllllstances which nrc stated in these inscriptions, but particularly fi'onl the IHlllJC of one of the }()d,ges, it is proba,bl~ that .A.ttalus, I(ing of I)ergarlJus, 'was a lneluber of the Dionysian Fraternity. Such is tho natnre of that association of architects ,vho erected those splendid edifices in Ionin. ,vhose ruins, oven, afl'()l'd us illstructioil, 'while they excite our surprise. If it be possible to prove the identity of any. tw'O societies f1'0111 the coincidence of their external ±()rrns, 'vo are authorized to conclude that the 11'raternity of the Ionian architects and the li\-aternity of Pree l\Iasons are the saU1C; and as the farIHer l)ractised the n1ysteries of 13acchus and Ceres, several of '\vhich ,ve have ShO\Vll to be SiUlihlr to the Inysteries of I\Iasonry, ,ve nluy safely affirrn that in their internal as ""011 as external procedure the Society of Freel\Iasons resembles the Dionysians of .A.sia }rlinor. ::~ FltEE l\IASONRY AT THE 13UILJ)I~G OF SO~LO)ION'S TE:\lPLE.

The opinion of Free 1\Iasons, that their Order existed and flourished at the building of 8010111011'8 tenlple, is by no lueans so pregnant ,,"ith absurdity as SOllIe nlon ,\yould ,,,ish us to believe.

,\1'c have already fl'CHll authclltie sourees of irrf()fluation, that, the 11lystol'ies of and lSaeel1l1s 'were insti tnted about fbur hundr(;'d years ber<l1'c the ()f Sult.Hnoilj-j- and there arc strong reason:::. Itn' belie'\'ing everl the ass()('iation of the ~)ion)~sian .1\.rchiteets existe~l befbre the l)uiIding' of the. teluple. It \ytlS not, inde(~d, till about threo hundredvears bef()re the birth of Christ that they \\Tere incoq)(ITuted at '" 'I\~os~ urlder the ](iug of J?crg<uuus; but it, is Ulliyersally alltH\Tcd that they arose long befbre t,lloir scttleulcnt in Ionia, aIlel, '\vhat is THoro to our present PUl'I)()SC, that they existed in the very land of ,Judea.:I: It is observed by J)r. R()bison§ tllUt this association ealne fronl l?ersia into Syria; ntHl, since ,vo are inHn·nled, l)y ~Tosephus,lI that that species of :ll'ehitecture ,vas llsed at the erection of t.he tClllple, ,vc arc unthori:led to infer not only that the ])ionysians existed lJefc)1·c the reiQ'n of 80101110n. hut that they assisted this 11lon:'ITch in building t,hat. lllagnificeut f~thrie, \yhie·h he rcurcd to .:;;. Dr. RolJison, who will not he stlppcett'd of p~:rtiality to Free l\l'asom:.:, ascribes their origin to the Dionysian ::lI'ti~tS. It i~ impossible" indeed, for any candill inquirer to call in question their id<.mtity. t":'\O(Hlrding to Playf:Lir's chronology, the temple CIt' Solomon was hegun in 10H;~ nud finished in lOOR, H. c. The Elel1sininn mysteries '\vere introduced into Athens in 185(;, a considerable time nner their institutiotl. ~ Robiscm 1 s Proofs of n. Ccm~piracj'"" p. 20. ? l)roofs of a Conspirae,Y, pp. ~W,' 21. II Jewish Antiqllities~ bC.H>k S, ehap. 5.


IIIBTORY OF FREE :\IASONRY.

225

the God of Israel. N othillg, indeed, can be 11101'0 sirn ple and consistent than the creed of the:Frateruity concerning; the stato of their Order at this period. The vicinity of I'JeruRaleul to Egypt, the connection of SoloIllon '\vith the royal f~unily of tl1~lt kingdolll,* the progress of the ~Jgyptittns in architeetul'ul scicneo, their attachlnent to lllysteries and hieroglyphic symbols, and the probability of their being eUlployed by the I\:ing of Israel, arc additional considerations ,,,,hich Q,orrol)orate the sentirnents of I~'ree l\Iasons, nnd absolve thenl fronl those charges of credulity and pride \yith ,vhich they have been loaded.t THE ESSENEAN FRATERNITY.

After the completion of the temple and the disl)crsion of the Craft in other lunds\ the Order still existed in ~Juclea~ but known by a different aPI)cllation. The association here alluded to is .that of the Essenes, ,vhose origin and scntirncnts llayc occasioned llluch discussion [HUong ecclesiastical historians: they arc ull of one ruinc1, ho,,~eYer, respecting the constitution and observances of this religious Order. '\r'hen ucandidute ,\ras proposed for adluission, the strictest serutiuy 'was Illude into his charaeter.t If his life had hitherto been exernp1ars, und if he appea.~路ed cap~thle of curbing his passions and regulnting Ids conduct ace()rding to the virtuous though austere lnaxirns of their Order, he \vas presented, at the expiration of his lH)vitinto, ,vith t1 'w'hite gal'IUent, as an ell1blelU of tho l'egrllnrity of his conduet and. the purity of his heal't.搂 A solelnn oath 'VtlS then adUlinistered to hiln~ that he ,yonld never divulg'c the 111ysteries of the ()rder, that he would llluke no illllovati<Hls on fhe doctrines of the society, and that he ,vould continue in that ~::

Josephus. Jewish Antiquities, book 8, chn,p. 2. 'rhe exist(~nce of this Order in Tyro at the time of the buildin,g of tho teulple is universally admitted; and Iliram, the widow's son. to ,,-hom 8010. man intl'tlste<i tho superintendellce of the workmen, as un inlulhitftnt of Tyre, and as a.. skilful architect and cunning and curious worlcman, was dmlllt,le::;s one of its members. lIenee we are scarcely clainling too nlueh for our Onlcr when Wf~ suppose that the Dionysians were sent by lIirnm, l{ing of T'yl'e, t.o assist ICing Solomon in the construction of the house he wns about to dodieate to JEHOVAH, and that they cOfilIDllnieaJed to their .Jewish fel1ow-la,borcrs a knowledge of the advantages of their Fraternity, and invited thelll to a partieipation in its 111ysteries and privileges. In this union, htywcyel", the apocryphal Ie,gend of the Dionysinns gave way to the true l(~gen(l (~f the l\Iast1ns, which wa.s unhappily furn.isbcd by a melancholy incident tha t ol~currcd at the time. l\Incl\cy's Lexicon, p. 30. t Pictct1 'rheolo~ic ebreti,cnne, tom. 3, pt. 3, p. 109. Basna,gp's History of tho ,Jews, book 2, chap. 12, 9. 24. Pictet, 'Theolog. ehret. tOU1. 3, pt. 3, pp. lOt-lOU. Basnage's I1.istOl'Y of the Jews, book 2, chap. 12, 2路1.

t

*

e


226

~IASONIC

CHART.

honorable course of piety and virtue which he hud begun to pursue. Like Jj"ree lVlasons, they instructed the young members in the kno\yledge which they derived frolll t.Heir ancestors. They admitted no WOTnen into their Ol'der.:~ They had par.. ticular signs for recognizing each other~ \vhich have a strong reselllblance to those of :Free l\~asons.§ They lutd colleges or places of retirement,U ,vhere they resorted ·'to practise their rites and settle the affairs of tlw society; and, after the perforulance of these duties, they assellJ.bled in it large hall, '\vhere an entertainment was provided for thelll hy the president, or nlaster of the college, vlho allotted a certain quantity of provisions to every individual.1 They abolished all distinctions of rank; and if preference was ever given, it ,vas given to piety, liberality, and virtue.** Treasurers were appointed in every tow'n to supply the wants of indigent strangers. The Essenes pretended to higher degrees of piety und kno,,~ledge than the uninitiated vulgar; and, though their pretensions \,"ere high, they 'W"ere never' questioned by their 8nemies.tt Austerity of nltlnnerS was one of the chief characteristics of the EE:senean Fl;.aternitieso They fj..equently asselubled, howey-or, in convivial parties, a.nd relaxed for ft 'while the severity of those duties ,vhich they were accustouted to perform. ~rhis I'Clnarkable eoincidence bet\veen the chief features of the l\Iasonic and Essene'an l"fraternities cun be accounted for only by l eferring thoru to the stune origin. vVere the cirCuID§tances 'of l'eseulblance either f:Env or fanciful, the similarity luight have been lllerely casual. 13ut 'when the nnture, the object., and the external forlus of t\yO institutions are precisely the same, the arguDlents for their identity are SOIllething Ulorc than l)loesul.llptive. Concerning the origin of tl1~ Essenes there is a great diversity of opinions '\vith both sacred and profane historians. r:rhey all agl."ee, ho"rever, in representing thenl as ~1n ancient nssociation originating from particular fraternities which fOl"IUerly existed in the land of Judea. And although they \yore patronized by IIerod, and respected by all

*

t

o

* Pictet.,

Theolog. chret. tom. 3, pt. 3, p. 107. Basuagc's :History of the 2L t Philo de Vita Contemplutivn, apud Opera, p. 691. Basnage, b. 2, ch. 13, ? 8. :t: B:1s11age, b. 2, c. 12, 26. ld. 22. ~ Philo's Trer.Ltise de Vita Contculp. p. 691. II Basnage, b. '8, c. 12", P. LL Vide Opera Philonis, p. 679. ~,:~13:ltsn~ge'l)~. 3, c..12, 1. 21. .... '.' ~d ....0, ""..... PlnloIlls Opera, p. 6, tie ttPor a nunc particula,l' account of' the Esscnes, the reader ma,y consult Dr. Prideaux's Conncxions. vol. 3, pp. 453, 1175, and Lodge's Josephus, pp.. 329, 61:>-617.-ED.

.Jews, book 2,. o11:tp. 12,

*

*

e

r\


HISTORY OF l!....R EE ::\LA.SONRY.

227

nlen for t.he cO\1"ectness of their conduct and t,11e innocence of their Order,* yet they suffered severe persecutions fi"om the Iloluans until their Order was abolished, about the luiddle of the fifth centurJ,t a period extremely fhtal to the venerable institutions of I~gypt, of Greece, and of Rome. THE ·INSTITUTION OF PYTIIAGORAS.

rrhe intiInate connection existing between the Pythngorean, Esseneall, and l\Iasonic Fraternities has caused the inference to be generally made among l\Iasons, that Pythagoras had the honor of first introducing I1'l'ee l\Iasonry into ~Europe. Be this as it nULy, it is. evident that the institution of Pythagoras was derived from that of the l~ssenes. .A.fter this philosopher, in the course' of his travels through J~gypt, Syria, and Ionia, had been initiated into the lllysteries of thu~e enlightened Idngdonls, he iUlported into l£urope the scienees of .Asia, and otTCl'od to the inhabitants of his native soil the iu!pol'tant benefits \vhich he hilllself had -received.! 1'ho offer~ of the sage having been rejected by his countryulen of Snn10s~§ he settled at CrQtona, in Italy, \vhere luorc respeet ,vns paid to his person and tHore attention to his precepts. II }~y11)agorns~ inspired by the aniIllating prospect!s of success ttluong his people, selected a nl'llllber of his disciples who seelued best adapted :for fOr'VHl'ding the p~u"­ poses he had in yiew.~ lIe fornlcd these into a fi·aternity, or separate order of nlen, \VhOlll he instructed in the seiences of~ f,he East, and to whom he irnpartecl the lll'ystcl'ies a,nd rites of the ~jgyptian, Syrian, I~ssenean, and Ionian a~soeiutions.** Bcfbre any oue ,vas receivecl into the nUlnher of his diseiples, a nlinute and diligent inquiry ,vas l1ulde into his teu'1per find eharaetel"·tiIf the issue of this inquiry ,vns fhvoral)le to the candidate, he bound himself by 3. 801e1nn engagelnent to conceal from the Ullinitiated the mysteries vlhich he Inight receive und the sciences in which he lnight be instructed.tt ~I."he doctrines of charity, of universal henevolence, and especially of afrection to the Brethren of the Order, 'were ,varlllly recouullended to the ~:~

t t ? II

PhHo's Treatise nplld Opera, p. 678. B~tSnt1ge, 1).2" chap. 12,

**

25, 2ft Pythagoras retnrned from Egypt about 560 B. C. Iamblichus de "V'itu, Pythagorm, part 1., cup. 5, 1'. 37. rd. cap. 6, pp. 42, 4:3. ~ Gillies' IIistory of Ancient Greece, "\'01. 2, p. 27. ~;* Aulus Gellius, book 1, cap. 9. Gillics. '''01. 2. p. 27. IarnbIichus de Vita Pytha.gorm, cap. 17, !'. 76. Gillies1 vol. 2, p. 27. ~t Ialublichus, ca,p. 23, p" 104.

tt


228

l\IASONIC CHART.

young disciples;* and such was the influence ,~hich they had upon their minds, that discord seemed to have been banished frOlll Italy,t and the golden age to have again returned. St,rangers of e\'e1'y country, of every religion, and of every rank in life 'were recei \red, if properly qualified,· into the Pythagorean association.:~ J-Jike Free lYIasons, they had particular ,vords and signs, by which they might distinguish each other and correspond at a distance.§ They wore white garnlents, as an embleul of their innocence. II They had a particular regal-a for the l~ast., They advanced from one degree of kno,vledge to auo'ther.** They"were forbidden to COllilUit to writing their mysteries, 'which 'were preserved solely b:r tradition. tt The Pythagorean SYUl boIs and secrets were borro\ved from the I~gyptians, the Orphic anel Eleusinian rites, the lVlagi, the Iberians, and the Celts.:t.t They consisted chiefly of the arts and sciences united with tl1eology and ethics, and were communicated to the initiated in cil)hers and 8ym bols.§§ To those \vho 1\:ero destitute of acute discernUlent, these hieroglyphic representations seeulcd pregnant "with alJsul'dity; \vhile others of Ulore penetration discovered in them hidden treasures, calculated to inforn1 the understanding and purify the 11eart.\111 .1\.11 associat,ion of this nature, {()lInded upon such principles and fitted for suell ends, diel not continue long in obscurity. In u short tinlo it extended over the kingdollls of Italy and Sicily, and was cliffusedeyen thr?ugh ancient (}reece and the islands of the..t"Egean. Sea.~' Ilut, like other secret societies, it ,vas vilified by ,veak and 'wieked Inen, and the innocent I)ythngoreans w"ere often necessitated to sustain the vengeance of the disappointed and enraged; for even the lodges wherein they "Tere asselubled were set on fire.*** . 13ut no suft"erings or hardships-not even death in its agonizing {orIll-caused them to violate their engagements; nor .::~ ;I:amblichus, cap. 8, p. 53; cap. 33, p. 193; cap. 6, p. 48; cap. 2:3, I). 102. Basnage's History of the Jews, b. 2. cap. 13, 21. Anthologia lliberl1ica for

l\Iarch., IHU., p. 181. t IaUlbIichus.• cap. 7, p. 46.

*

.

t

Gillies, yol. 2" p. 28. Iamblichu8, cap. 3B, p. 202. Gillies., Yol. 2, p. 27. Allthologia lIibernica. for l\Iarch, 17U4, p. 18I. II 13asnagc, 1,. 2, chap. 13, ? 21. Anthol. Hibern. l\1arch, 179~1, p. lSi3. ~r Basnage, b. 2., chap. In, 9. 21. ~:,,::. Iarllbliehus, cap. 17, p. 72. tt leI. cap. 17., p. 72. ~::I: \Varburton's Divine Legation of lVloses, book 3, :3, yol. 2, pp. 132, Lunblichus, cap. S, p. 189. Gillies, vol. 2, p. 27. I ttlllh lieh u:;;., cap. 8, p. 139. Gillie$, 'ut HupJ'a. 111\ It1Illblichus, cap. 2::3, p. 104; cap. 3~ pp. HH, 192. ~l~i Gillies" yolo 2,1:1. 28. IambIichlls, en/p. 35, p. 207. ~!:..:::~;:. Io.mblichus, p. 208 et 8Cq.

?

e

**

lsa.


HISTORY OF FREE l\:IASONRY.

229

did banishment to distant countries diminish their s)",lupathy or cool their love f01" each other. li'rom these observations it is nlanifest that the Pythagorean and l\lasonic institutions were similar in their external f()rU1S, as "Tell as in the objects which they had in view·; and it \vill not be denied that both have experienced fr0111 cotelllporaries unmerited reproach. Is it not f~lil', then, to conclude that l\Iasonry is tt continuation of the Pythagorean association, and that the principles which constituted the basis of the IJythagorean school 'tvere gathered by Pythagoras hirnself from the reruains of the Eleusinian, Dionysian, and Ionian Fraternities in Egypt, and from that of the Esseneans in. Syria and in t.he land of J"udea ? There is one ohjection to the vie,v ,vhich we have taken of this subject, which, although it has been slightly noticed, it ma)"" be necessary more completely to remove. Although it will be ackuO"wledged by every unhiassed reader that Free n-Iasonry has a wonderful resclublance to the ]~leusiniun and Dionysian mysteries, the fraternity of Ionian architects, and the Esscnean and Pyt.hagorean associations, yet some nitty be disposed to question the identity of these institutions, because tlley had different lUUlles, and because SOUle usages \yere observed by O~,40 \vhich were neglected by another. 13ut these CirCUll1stanees of dissimilarity arise- frolll those necessary chunges vthich are sUI)erinduced u})on every institution by :1 spIrit of innovation, hy the caprice of individuals, and by the various rcyolutions in civilized society. Eycry alteration or illlpro''"6111ellt in philosophical systems or ceremonial inst!tlltions generally produces a, eorrespondiug \r··~riation in their ll<UUO, deduced ii'onl the nature of the iUlproveUlent 01: frolll the Tuune of the innovator. 'Vhen the mysteries of the I~ssel1es ,vere iDlported by Pythagoras into Italy, ,vithout undergoing many variations, they '\vere then denonlinat€\{;l the luysteries of Pythagoras; and in our OVlU day they are called. t.he secrets of l?ree l\lasonry, because lllany of their sYll1hols are derived frOIH the art of building, and. boca,llse they are believed to have been invented by an association of ar(~hitects, ''\Tho ,yere anxious to preserve arnong thell1selves the knowledge 1\rhtch they had acquired.* The difference in the eereulonial observances of these institutions DUty be .accounted for upon Ilcarly the SUU10 principles. From the igl~.OM ranee or superior sagacity of those\vho presided over the ancient ._-"-,._._._...•.__ _--_ __ ..

•..

._-~-----------------

.*. SYlnboIs derived fl"om the art.,of building were !lIS0 enlployed hy tho l)ythngorenns for conveying instruetion to those who were initiated into their Fraternity. Vide Proclus in Enel. lib. 11, def: 2" &e. 20


230

l\lASONIC CHART.

fraternities, SOUle cerelll0nies 'would be insisted upon luore than othel's, SOlne of less 11lOlllent would be exalted into consequenec, whilst others of greater iInportance 'would sink into obseurity. In process of tilue, therefore, SOHle trifling changes would be effected upon these cerelllonies,-some rites abolished and others introduced. The chief difference, ho,vever, bet\veen the aneient and Inodern mysteries is in,those points \vhich concern religion. But this ai'ises from the great changes \vhich have been l,ra.. duced in religious knovrledge. It cannot be supposed that the rites of the Egyptian, Jewish, and Grecian religions should be observed by those ,yho profess only the religion of Christ, or that \ye should pour out 1ibation~ to Ceres and Bacchus 'who ackno'wledge no heavenly superior but the t:ruc and living God. It Inay be proper here to take notice of an objection urged by 1\1. Barruel against the opinion that the mysteries of Free l\lasonry are silllilar to the DIS"steries of Egypt and G-reece.* From the unfairness \vith ,rhich this 'wTiter has stated the sen tinlents of his opponents on this subject, f1'0111 his confidence in his OlVll, and frolu the clisillgenuity ~with 'whieh he has supported them, many inattentive readers IHUy have' been led to adopt his notions, and to farul as despicable an idea of the und.erstanding of l\Iasons as he would 'wish thell1 to forIn of their characters. fIe takes it for granted that all ,vho elllbrace the opinion, \vhieh we have endeavored to support lllUst necessarily believe that a unity of religious sentilnents and luoral precepts VrTas luaintailled. in all the ancient lIlysteries, and tlutt the initiated entertained just notions of the uuit.y of (}od, \vhile the vulgar \vere addicted to the grossest l)olytheisl1l. Upon this gratuitous Sllppositiol1whieh ,vo disrtYo\v, because it has no connection ,vith our hy!)othesis-does 1\1. Barruel found all his declaulutions against the connection of our Order with the Pythagorean and jjjleusiniall institutions; and upon this sophism rest all those ~reproaehful epithets 1vhieh he so la;vishly bestows upon us" '\\~hile representing us the children of sophistry ~ deisn1, and pantheisul.t But this writer should have recollected that the son is not accountable for the degeneracy of his parents; and if the ancient nlysteries were the nurseries of such dangerous opinions as this

writ1or, in opposition to authentic history, lays to their charge, it is to the glory of their posterity that they have shaken off the

*' :Memoirs of ,Tacol)inism, vol. 2, pp. 355-:',60.

t \Tide Barruel, :rol. 2, p. 357. I ,do ~ot find in any systenl of chronology thn.t Christiu,nity existed in the time oIPythngoras Qf at the esta,blishmcut of the Eleusinian mysteries.


231

HISTORY Oli' FltEE :MASONRY.

yoke and enlbraced that heavenly light which he says their ance~tors affected to despise. THE PROGRESS OF FREE :MASONRY SINCE TIrE REIGN OF THEODOSIUS.

IIaving finished this brief outline of what may properly be denOluinated the Ancient IIistory of ]'ree l\Iasonry, ive ,yin endeavor to trace its progress fi'OIU the abolition of he~tthen rites, in the reign of Theodosius, to the present day; and although the fi'iends and enemies of the ()rder sceUl to coincide in opinion upon this part of the history, yet the materials are alrnost as scanty as before, and the incidents equally unconnected. In those ages of ignorance and disorder which succeeded the destruction of the ItOIUtll1 enlpire, the nliuds of men 'were ~oo much debased by superstition and 'warped by bigotry to enter into associations for prolnoting luental illlprovcnlcnt and Inutua.l benevolence. The spirit 'which then raged 'VH.S not a spirit of inquiry. The Dlotives which then influenced the conduct of 1110n were not those benevolent and correct princi pIes of action which once distinguished their ~lncester~, and whieh still distiuguisll their posterity. Sequestered habits and unsocial dispositions characterized. the inhttbitants of ]~urope in this season of lllcntal degeneracy. Science was sy110nyulous \vith heresy in the vie\v of the Ohurch of ROIne, and every scientific and SE~cret association ",ras overa\ved and persecuted by the rulers of Europe. But, although the politieal ilnd intellectual condition of society \yas unfavorable to the progress of 11'ret) l\l41sonry, and although the se~ret associations of the ancients 'v ere dissolved in the fifth ceutury by the comuHtnd of the Itoluan elUperOl', :ret there are many reasons for believing that the ancient Inysteries vvere observed in priYat~e, long after their prohibition, by those encIllies of Christianity who ,vere still attaehed to the religion of tlleir fhthers. SOlue authors* even infornl us that this 'was actually the case, a.nd that the (}recian rites existed in the eighth eel~. t'llry, aIlll ,vere neyer cOlnpletely ubolishe(l.t These ~onsidera足 tions enable us to connect the heathen 11lysteries vrith that trading association of architects \vhich appeared c1 uring the Dark .A.ges under the special authority of the See of Itol11c. The insatiable desire for external finery and sh()\vy eereUlon ie~, ,vhich ,vas displayed by the Catholic priests in the exercise (If

'* Gihbon, 8vo. vol. 5. p. 110. t

Vide Anthologia lIibernica for Jan. 1794, 1). 36. and

})p.

21t), 220, supra.


232

l\tIASONIO CH~\.RT.

their religion, introclucecl a corresponding desire for splendid monasteries and magnificent cath<;3dl'als. But, as the clem,and {()t" these buildings \VUS urgent and continually increasing, it, '\vas with great difficulty that artificers could be procured, e"Ven fo1," the erection of such pious \yorks'. In order to encourage the pl'ofession of architecture, the bishops of ROlne and the other potentates of Europe conferred on the Fraternit.y of Free l\Iasons the nlost important Inivileges, and allowed them to be governed by hl,\vs, customs, and ceremonies peculiar to themselves. The association ,vas composed of men of all nations, of Italian, Greek, French, GernHtn, Hnd Flemish artists, ,vho ,vere denolninated Free ~iasons, and 'who, ranging fi'om one country to another, erected those elegant churches and cathedrals \vhich, though they once gratified the pride and sheltered the rites of a corrupted priesthood, 110W excite the notice of antiquaries and adll1inister to the grandeur of kingdoms. The gO"\1"ernl11ent of this association ,vas rClnarkably regular. Its lllelllhers lived in a canl)> of huts, reared beside the building in ·which they were €Illployecl. A surveyor, ()1' nwster, presided over anel directed the \vhole. I~Yery tenth Ulan was ca.lled ft ,varden. and overlookeel those v,rho were 1111(101" his charge; and such artificers as were not meIllbel'S of this Fraternity were prohibited f1'Ol11 engaging in those buildings ·which :Free l\lasons alone had a title to rear.* "\"{herever the Catholic religion ,vas taught, the meetings of ~"ree l\Iasons vtere sanctioned und pat.ronized. It lllay scent strange, and perhaps inconsistent with vdlat 'we

have already stticl, that the :Fraternity of Free l\lasol1s should have been sanctioned, and even protected, by tlle bishops· of llolue. But the Church of l:lome i instead of uJ)proying of the principles of Free l\lasonry, only entployed theltl as instrulucllts for gratifying their vunity and satiating their ambition; for after,vards, when :Nlasons ,vere m,ore l1U1l1erOUS and 'when the c1elnund for religious structures ,,"as less urgent than before, the bishops of I-tome deprived the Fraternity of those very privileges ,yhicl1 had been conferred upon thenl ,vithout solicitation, and persecuted w'ith unrelenting rage the very Ulen 'VhOlll they had voluntarily taken into fhvor, and \vho had contributed to the grandeur of their ecclesiastical establisllluents.

~:~ 'Yren's Parentalia,: or, A lIistory of the Family of Wren, pp. 306, :307. lIenry"s History of Great Brita.in, 8vo, vol. S, p. 273, b. 4, cha!>. 5, ~ 1.. Robison"s Proofs of a Conspiracy, p. 21.


IIISTORY OF FREE l\lASONRY.

233

FREE l\IASONRY INTRODUCED INTO SOOTLAND.

The principles of the Order were probably introduced into Scotland by the travelling I(ree 1"Iasons who built the abbey of I(ihvinning, in the bailiwick. of Cunningham. ,This abbey was founded in the year 1140 by If ugh l'Iorville, Constable of Scotland, and dedict1ted to St. "\Vinning,* where they continued for lliany years in their prillitiye simplicity, long after they had been extinguished in the continental king.. dams. In this llli.1l1ner Scotland becuule the centre from ,yhich those principles again issued, to illunlinate not only the nations on the continent, but every civilized portion of the habitable world. "Vhat those causes 'were 'which continued the societies of J?ree l\Iasons longer in Great Britain than in other countries, it may not, perh~Lps, be easy to determine; but, as the fact is unquestionably true, it must have arisen either from favorable cirCUlnstances in the l)olitical state of tIle country, ,vhich did not exist in other governlnents of Europe, or frotH the superior policy by ,vhich th'e British l\iasons eluded the suspicion of their enemies, and the superior prudence '\yith 'which they !lluintttincd . the primitive simplicity and respectalJility of their Orcler:t 'rIlE .A.. GE OF CHI,rALRY.

About the thne of the I\:.nights Teulplar, chivalry had arri'v'ed at its highest perfection. It had its existence, indeed, })rior to this pe~"iod; bat, us it continued to influence the luinds of luen long after the qestruction of that unhappy ()rder, it, ,vas thought proper to defer its consideration till the present stage of our history. vVhcn chivalry lnade its appeal',tnCO, the luoral and political condition of J;Jur~pe ,vas in every respeet deplorable. T'he religion of t.Jesus existed only ill n~ulle; a de~radin拢r superstition li:ld. usurped its place auci threatened l'Uil~ to th~ reason and the dignity of mn,ll ,; the political rights of the lo\ver orders were sacrificed to the interests of the great; '~tar 'was carried on with a degree of savage cruelty equalled only by the sanguinary contentions of beasts of prey; no cleluency was sho\vn to the vanquished., no huruanity to the captiye; the fernale sex 'were sunk below the natural level; they 'were doonlod to the Inost

*'

Vide Stat.istic:l.l Account of Scotland, yolo 11, Parish of I\:i1winlling. EtHnImrgh Magt1ZhH~ for April, IS02, p. 2路1:3. ~:r:tekey's Lnxieon. pp. 2;::-r -:!,{ O. ~r The mysteries of Free l\Iasonry were IH'(~8e~ved nnd tr:lllslnitted l)y t.hl\ Orders of Knighthood, v路iz.: the Teutrlllic Order~ the I\:nights l'('lllpl:u', ete., for it xnore full account, of whieh the reader is referred to the l\:f:nllud of the A.'. A.'. 8c{)tt.i~hRite,~ pp, 118, 185-1HO. TCUlplu.r's Chart. llcvis(\(l, pp.29-bH.

20:'


234

l\IASONIC CHART.

laborious occupations, and were deserted and despised by that very sex on whose protection and sympathy they have so natural a claim.. To remedy these disorders, a fe,v intelligent and pious men formed an association, whose members vowed to defend the Christian religion, to practise its morals; to protect innocent maidens, orphans, and widows, and to decide judicially the disputes which might arise about their goods or effects. It was from this and similar associations that chivalry probably arose. * But, whatever was its origin, chivalry produced a considerable change in the manners and sentiments of the great. It could not, indeed, eradicate that ignorance and depravity which engendered those awful evils which we have already enumerated. It has, however, softened the ferocity of war.. It has restored the fair sex. to that honorable rank which they now possess, and which at all tilnes they are entitled to hold. It has inspired those路 sentiments of generosity, sympathy, and friendship which have already contributed so much to the civilization of the 'world. Such was the origin of chivn,lry, and such the blessings it imparted. ~rhat it \vas a branch of Free l\lasonry lnay be inferred fi'om a variety of considerations, ii'om the consent of those who have nlade the deepest researches into the one, and \vIlo were intimately acquainted 'with the spirit, rites, and cere1110nies of the other. They were both ceremonial institutions. Important precepts \vere comnlunicated to the members of each for the regulation of their conduct as men and as Brethren of the Order.t The ceremonies of chivalry, like those of li'ree nIasonry, though unintelligible to the vulgar, were aI'ways symbolic of important truths.:~ The object of both institutions was the sallle, and the IncIllbers bound themselves by solCInu vows to promote it \vith ardor and zeal.搂 In chivalry there were also difIerent degrees of honor, through which the youths were obliged to pass before they were invested ,,~ith the dignity of I{nighthood ;11 and the I{nights, like Free l\lasons, were fbrn10d into fraternities or orders distinguished by different appellations., }j'rom these circumstances of reselnblance we do not mean to infer that chivalry was Free l\Iasonry under another nunle: ,ye Plean only to show that the two institutions were so intimately cOllnected, that the former took its origin from the latter, and

*

Bontainvilliers on the Ancient Parliaments of Fra,nce, Letter 5, quoted in 13rydson's Summary View of IIeraldry, pp. 2.1:-26. t Brydson's Sununary View of IIel'uldry, p. 31. rd. p. 9~. ~ 1d. p. i~2. ~ Id. Pl" 36, :31'. ~ Id. pp. 38, 40.

+


HISTORY OF FREE l\IASONltY.

235

borrowed from. it some of its ceremonial observances, the leading features, and the general outline of its constitution. And within the portals of at least t",,"o ()rders were preseryed intact and COl1felTed upon the worthy the mysteries of Jj"ree l\Iasonry. The one institution ,vas ad~tpted to the habits of intelligent artists, and could flourish only in tillles of civilization and peace; the other was accomulodated to the dispositions of a martial age, and could ex.ist only in seasons of ignorance and ,var. "Vith these observations, indeed, the history of both Fraternities entil'ely corresponds. In the enlightened ages of Greece and Rome, when chivaJry was unkno,vn, l~'ree ~Iasonry flourished under the sanction of government· and the patronage of intelligent men. But during the reign of Gothic ignorance and barbarity which follo\ved the destruction of imperial Rome, Free 1\la80nry languished in obscurity, ·while chivalry succeeded in its !)}ace, and proposed to .ttccolnplish the same object by different means, \vhich, though luore rough and yiolentl~ were better suited to the manners of the age. ,"Vhen science and literature revived in J~urope and scattered those elouds of ignorance andharrJaris1l1 ,vith ·which she had been OYCrShi,l.clo\vecl, chivalry decayed along with the m~1nners ,vhieh gave it birth, '\vhile l~'ree .l\Iasonry arose \vith increasing splendor, and advanced ,vith the saIne l)ace as civilizlltion and refinetnent. r.rhe connection br:t:\veen chivalry and Ifr~e l\Iasonry is excellently exeruplified in the }'raternity of· I{nights Tell1ph"Lr. It is ,veIl kno\Yll that, this association was an order of chiva.lry, that the J~e~l1plarsperfbrllled its cercIIlonies and were influenced hy its precepts., and that the I(nights ",rere initiated' irito t.he 11lysteries, were governed by the lnaxiuls, arid practised the rites of Free l\Iusonry.* ]3ut.~ although they then existed in a double capaeity,it lllHSt, be evident to all ,vho study the history of the Ternplars, that their l\Iasonic eharactcr ehieily predominated, and that the.y deduced the lULIne of their institution, and their external ohservances, frolll the nsages of ehivnlry, in order to conceal fi'onl the 11,oruan Pontiff the priluury of their Order, and to hold their secret ll1eetings free frolll suspicion and alarlll. 13efbre lea.ving this subject, it luay be interesting to SOlllC re~1ders,··and necessary for the satisfhetion of others~ to S}lf)\V in ,vhat luanner the l\:nights ~relnplnr heealne deposit:ll"ies of the l\Iasonic lllysteries. 1Ve 11411'0 alr(~ad.y seen that ahnost all the secret associu,itions of the aneients either flourished or oriQ'hJuted in Syria and the adjacent countries. It W'tlS here that the I>iQ-


236

l\IASONIC CHART.

nysian artists and the Essenes arose. Froln this country also came sevel'al members of that travelling association of l\iasons

which appeared in Europe during the Dark . .I-\.ges;* and we are assured that, notwithstanding the unfavorable condition of that province, there exists ~tt this day on :rtlount Libanus one of these Syriac fraternities.i- As the Order of the Terrlplars, therefore, was originally formed in Syria, and existed there for a considerable time, it "Tould be nQ illlprobable SUPl)osition that they received their l\lasonic knowledge from the Lodges in that quarter. But we are, fortunately; in this case not left to conjecture; for we are expressly infornled by a foreign author,! who was well acquainted with the history and CllstOlllS of Syria., that tl1G I(nights Telllplar \vere actually Dlernbers of the Syriac fra.. ternities. FREE :MASONRY IN OR/EAT BRITAIN.

I-Iaving thus compared Free l\iasonry with those 'secret associations 'which arose during the Dark l\.ges, let us no\v direct our attention to its progress in (treat Britain after it 'was extinguished in the other kingdolils of l~urope. ,\re haye already seen路路 that a travelling fraternity of Free l\.Insons existed in Europe during the l\Iic1dle .A.ges, that luauy speein.! favors \yere eoni-erred upon

them by the Ilonlan See, 路that they had the exelusive privilege of erecting those Inagnificent buildings which the pride of the Ohurch of Ilollte and the l11isguided zeal of its THeIn bel's had lU'ompted theul to rear, and that several l\lnsons travelled into Scotland about the beginning of the t,velfth century, and iIn.. ported into that country the principles and cerClllonies of their Order. .And vre ill llstrated severtll causes ,\~hich preserved this

association in Britain after its apparent dissolution on the

COll-

tinent.. 'I'hat Free l\Insonry was introc1u*'eed into Seotland hy those architects who built the abbey of ICilwinl1{ng, is llutnifest not only frolll those authentic dOCUll1Cnts by \vhich the existence of

the Kihvinning Lodge has been traced haek to the fifteenth cen.. tury, but by other collateral argulnents ,,~hic:h aluount ahnost to a demonstration. In every country 1vllcrc the teruporal and spiritual jurisdict,ion of the l?ope \vas ackno'wledged there was a continual demand, pttrticularly during the t\VelftJl century, for religious structures, and eonsequently for operative uJasons, proportioned to the piety of the inhabitants and the opulence of Anthologia lIibernica for April, 179-1., p. 280. tId. p. 279. ~: Alder de Drusis l\fontis Liba.ni, Rom. 1786.

.:!;


HISTORY OF FREE :MASONRY.

237

their ecclesiastical establishulcnts; and t.here ,vas no kingdom in Europe where the zeal of the inluLbit:lnts for popery \vas 11101'e ardent, w·here the kings and nobles were ·l1101'e liboral to the clergy, and where~ in consequence, the Ohureh ,vas more richly endowed, than in 8cotland.* The dOluand, therefore, for elegant cathedrals and ingenious artists lUust have been proportionally greater than in other eountries; and that deuHLnd could be sup1)lio<1 only frollt the. H8soeiations on the tontincut. \Vhen ,ve consider, in addition to these fttcts, that this assoeiution monopolized the build;ng of religious structures in Christendolll, we are authorized to conelllde that those nUlTIerOUS and elegant ruins \\Thich still adorn t.he villages of Scotland "\vere erected by foreign l\Iasons who introduced into this island the customs of their Order.t The fraternity in :Englanc1 Inaintain that St. . .A.lban, the Protoluartyr, \vas the first ,'lho brought ~Iasonry to Great Britain,t that the Brethren rc!:eived a charter frolll I(ing l\thelstane, and that h;8 brother j~:dwin snnnnoned all the Brethren to Ineet at 'Y ork, ·which formed the first GTand Lodge of l~rlgland.§ l\fter the estlablislunent of the IZihvinning and York J.Joc1ges, the principles of 11'ree ,vere rapidly diffused throngh(Hltl both kingdolus, and seycral w'ere ereeted indifferent, parts of the islu.nd. ..A.. s all theso derived their and existenee frOTH the t\yO lllother \\Tore like\risc lllHler their jurisdict;ion and control arl,V dilferenees arose which were connected ·with art. of bui1ding~ they "were 1'0fo1'1"(,"-<1 to the general of t.he l~'raternitv~ 'whieh ,rCl'e always held at ){jlwiIll1ing ) .. ork. In this llu~'nner did 11\'ee . 1\la80n1'Y flourish fen- a 'while in (~reat 13ritain, ,vhen it ,vas eOIllpletely aboLshed in every other of the ,,~orl(l. l3ut even here it \vas to sufl(~r a Ion!.!' n.nd serious decline, ttnd to experiellce those alternate suce~~~8ions of advanCClllellt and decay ·which llULl'k the history of eyery Innnan institution; and though during centuries after the .::~

The Ohurch possessed above one-·ha1f of the property in the kingdoln. :)),.;7, (i;), 21i9. or It is a curious fact that in' one of tOWll:-:l 'where there is an elc('l'ant abbey, which ,yltS huilt in the twelfth eentury, lUI'. A. Lawrie, of 0 has often heard thu,t it. was erected lL of industrious Inen. spl)ke in a foreign lang:ua,ge 3!Hl frOln the stories are still tJlld ahout their petty illla,lTcls wIth the il1.llat.lit:.LlltS. Abont the end of the third e('ntn~·Y. A. n. H2u. Preston't-; IlluslratjOlj~"of l\f:18onry, }). 1.1S. 8mHh"s r:'t'. niH! of Free l\Iasoury, p. f)l. Erco i'Ia.::ion'.'3 Calendar, 177S. l\laL~l\(~.y's Lexicon" pp. luS-171. Rubertson's History of Scotland] yol.


238

lVIASONIC CIIART..

of Free l\fasonry Into Great Britain the Brethren of the Order held their public assemblies, and were s.ometimes prohibited from nleeting by the interference of the legislature, it can scarcely be said to have attracted general attention till the beginning of the seventeenth century. 1'he causes of this remarkable retardation \vhich the progress of l\Iasonry experienced, it is by no means difficult to discover. In consequence of the important privileges which the Order received franl the Oh urch of I~ome, many chose the profession of an architect, which, though at all thues an honorable enlployment, was partieularly in the highest request during the l\liddle l~ges. On this account the body of operative masons increased to such a degree, and the rage as. well as the necessity for religious edifices was so much diluinished, that a more than sufficient number of hands could at any time be procured for supplying the denlands of the Church and of pious individuals. l\.nd, as there was now no scarcity of architects, the very reason ,,-rhich prol1Jpted the Church to protect the Fraternity no lpnger existed: they therefore withdre"w frOlll t.hen1 that patronage and those favors which they had spontaneously proffered, and denied thern even the liberty of holding their secret asselnblies, the unalienable privilege of every free-born cODIIDunity. 13ut these ,yere not the only causes which produced such a striking change in the tonduet of the Church to the ~iasonic Order. '"\Ve have already 111el1tioned that the spirit of Free l\Iasol1ry was hostile to the I,rinciples of the Ohurch of ROlne. The intention of the one was to enlighten the luind; the object and policy of the other, to retain it in ignorance. "\Then ~Free l\Iasollry flourished, the po\ver of the eh urch must have decayed. The jealousy' of the latter, therefore, was aroused; and, as the civil pO'wer in JiJngland and Scotland ,vas alUlost ahvays in the hands of ecclesiastics, the Church and the State ,vere both COlI} bined against the principles and practice of :Free l\Iasollry. Along with these causes, the dOlnestic and bloody wars \vhich convulsed the two kingdoills fi'orn the thirteenth to the seventeenth century eonspired,'""in a great degree, to produce that decline of the Fraternity for "\vhich we have been attempting to account. But, not\vithstailding these llnfhvorable cirCUlllstances, Free l\Iasonry seems to have flourished and attracted the attention of the public in the reign of lIeury ,rI., 'who, when a llliuor, aseended the thronG of ]~ngland in 1422. In the third year of his reign the parlialllellt passed :1 severe aet ngninst the 11"1 raternity,at the instigation of Henry Beaufort,Bishop of ":"iIl-


IIISTORY OF FREE l\:I:ASONRY.

239

chester, who was then intrusted with the education of the young king. They enacted that the l\Iasons should no longer hold their chapters and annual assemblies; that those who sUllilllonecl suell chapters and assemblies should be considered as felons; and that those ,vho resorted to them should be fined and ilnprisonecl.* But it would appea.r that this act was never put in cxeeutiol1; for in the year 1429, about fiye years after it \vas frarucd, :1 respectable I...Iodge was held at Canterbury, under the patronage of the archbishop hirllself.t '·Vhen ICing lIen1'Y was tlble to take int,o his o,vn hands the government of his kingdom, and to ft11'l11 an opinion of his own respecting the use and tendency of the l\Iasollic :Fraternity, ill order to allo\v for the rigorous eonduct of his parliament, he not only perlllitted the Order to hold their meetings \vithout 11101estation, but honored the Lodges \vith his presence as tt Brother. Before he ","'as initiated, ho\vcver, into the lllysteries of the Order, he seClllS to have exalnined ,,"'ith scrupulous care the nature of the institution, and to" have perused the charges itnd regulations of the E'raternity as collected fronl their ancient records. ']]1e8e fhcts are contained in fL record written in the reign of his successor, Edw'arcl I,r., and conflrlued by a luanllscript in 1(illg IIcnry's o\vn lutl1c1\vriting, \vhieh is fallliliar to every . persoll "who has studied the history of our Order .:~ 'Vhile ~B'ree l\Iasonry 'was flourishing in ]~ngland uIHlor the ~uspices of Flenry ·VI., it "ras at the same thue patronized ill the sister kingdom by I(ing . Jarues I. ]3)'" the authority of this 11101Utrch, every tirand l\Iastcr ,vho Vr"tlS chosen by the I3rethrcl1, either from nobility or clergy, ttnd approved of' by the crOWll, ,vas entitled to an annual revenue of four p()unds Scots frolll each nlaster nIason, and like,vise to a fee at the initiation of every

*

Henry VI. c::tp. 1, A. D.. 1,1:25. See RutThead's Sta.tutes. Dr. I)}ut's N:l.tura,l History of Staffordshire. chap, 8, I). 318. • t l\Ial1uscript l=tegister or'VillhtUl l\lo1art, Prior of CantcThury, p. 28.. III this register are nHmtioned the nalnes of the lVlasters" 'V~,1rdcns, n.ud other mOlnbers of tbeLodge. :I: ""Vo have hitherto been careful to llring forWflf(l no facts upon the solo evjdence of the records or the opirlions of Free l\Iasol1s: such c\·idence. indeed, can never satisfy the minds of the uninitiated I>ublic. But when the~o records conta.ill facts the fabrication of which could be of no service to tho ~"raternity, they may, in this case, he entitled to credit; Of. whell facts whieb do reflect honor upon the Order are confirmed by evidenee frOIll anot!lf.lf quarter, the authority of the record clltitles therll to n. still greater {h~t~rec ()f oredit. 'Nith resI)cct to the faets ,mentioned in the text. we" haTe not~nf.'rHlV the authority of the record and U1luluseript alluded to, bllt "we ha.veproof UUtt thero \Vas no collusion in the CfLse; for the record is nlCntioned in th<, I~o(tk of Constitutions by Dr. Anderson, who hud ncithel" ~ce:u nor hea,rd of tho

manuscript.


240

:MASONIC CHA.RT.

new member. lIe was Olnpo\vered to adjust any differences which might arise among the Brethren, and to regulate those affairs connected 'with the L-'raternity which it "\\ras iUlproper to bring under the cognizance of the courts of law. The G-rand l\Iaster, also, appointed Deputies, or \\r:.trdeus, "rho resided in the chief towns of Scotland, and IQ,anaged the concerns of the Order when it was incouvenient to appeal to the Grand l'Iaster himself. In the reign of James II. Free lVlasonry was by no means neglected. 'l'he office of Grand l\Iaster was granted by the crown to 'Villi am St. Clair, Earl of Orkney and Caithness, Baron of Roslin, and founder of the 11luch-admired chapel of Roslin. On account of the attention which this llobleman paid to the interests of the Order, and the rapid propagation of the royal art under his administration, I(ing James II. made the office of G'-rancl l\Iaster hereditary to his heirs anc1 successors ill the Barony of Roslin, in '\vhich flllllily it eontinued till the institution of the Grand Lodge of Scotland_ The Barons of Roslin, as hereditary Grand l'Iastcrs of Scotll'nc1, held their prineipal annual uleetings at, I(ilwiuning, the bii-thplace of Scottish l\i~?足 sOllry; "rhile the I.lodge of that village granted constitutions and charters of erect.ion to those J3retbren of the Order v;ho 'were anxious tluLt regular Lodges should he fornlcd in c1itTerent parts of the kingdom. These Lo~ges all held their charters under the jurisdietion of the Lodge at l(ihvillning, and, in token of their respect and SUbUlission, joined to t.heir o,vn name that of their 1110ther Lodge, fi"om \)"Thorn they derived their ,existence ~s a cOl'l)oration. * . During the succeeding rejgns of the Scottish u16narchs, Fre~ ~lasonry still flourished, though very little il1fornlation can be procured respecting the peculiar state of the :Fraternity. In the Privy Seal Book of Scotland, ho,vcver, there is a letter dated ait IIolYI'ood IIouse, 25th ~eptelnber, 1590, and granted by I{ing J alnes ,rio "to Patrick Copland, of lJ daught, for using and exercising tIle office of ~Tal'dal1rie over the art and craft, of IDasonrie, over all the boundis of .l:\.herdeen, Banff, and I(incardine, to hold wardan and justiee courts ,,"ithil1 the said boundis, fVld there to luinister justice." This letter proves beyond dispute that the kings of Scotland IlOlninated the office-bearers of the Order; that these provineial masters, or warden!, as they 'were then called, administered justice in every dispute which concerned the "art and craft of masonrie;" that IJodges \vera esta-

t

~~

Such as Canongate Kilwinning, etc.

t Priv;y SC~11 Bool{ of Scotland, p. 61, f. 47.


HISTORY Oll FB.EE lVIASONRY.

241

blished in all parts of Scotland, even in those remote and, at that time, uncivilized counties of .A.berdeen, Banff, and Kincardine; and it completely overturns the unfounded assertion of Dr. Jtobison, who lllaintains* that the celebrated antiquary, Elias ...I\.8hmole, who 'was initiated in 1646, is the· only distinct and unequivocal instance of a person being admitted into the Fraternity who was not an architect by profession. The nlinutes of St. l\lary's chapel, which is the oldest Lodge in Edinburgh, extend as far back as the year 1598. It appears from these minutes that Thomas Boswell, Esq., of Auchinleck, was lllade a 'Varden of the Lodge in 1600, and that the honorable Robert ]\foray, Quartermaster-General to the aI·my in Scotland, was created a lVlaster l\Iason in 1641. These facts are deserving of notice, as they show, in opposition to Dr. Robison, that, persons were early admitted into the Order who were not architects by profession. '\Then J anlBS ,rIo ascended the throne of England, he seCU1S to have neglected his right of n0111ina,ting the offiee-bearers of the cr~tft. In lIay's l\Itlnuseript, in the _f\.dvocates' ]~ibrary') there ar~ two charters, granted by the. Seottish l\Iasons, apl)ointing the Sinclairs of Iioslin their heredita,ry G'r~tnd l\Iasters. ~rhe first of theul is without a clate, but is signed 11y several l\Iasons, ,vho appointed 'Villiam St. Clair, of }{oslin, his heirs and successors, to be their" patrons and judges." The other is in SOllIe measure a ratification of the first, and is dated 16BO, iu\vhicll they appoint Sir Williaul St. Clair, of I{;oslin, his heirs and successors, to be their "patrons, protectors, and oyerseers ill all tilne corning." In the first of these deeds, "\.vhich seenJS to llavo been ,vritten a little after the union of the cro\vns, it is stated that the want of a protector fbI' SOllIe yenrs hu,d engendered mauJ corruptions among the.l\lasons, and had considerably retarded· the progress of the craft, and that the appointluent of Williarn Sinclair, Esq., was 'with the advice and consent of "\Villhun Shaw, l\Iaster of '\Vork to I-lis l\lajesty. l\.fter presiding over the Order for many years, 'Villiall1 St. Clair ,vent to Ireland, where he continued a considerable tilne, and, in consequence of his departure, tJle second charter ,vas granted to his SOH, Sir vVillialll St. Clair, investing hiIn with the saU1C pcnvers ,vhiell his father enj oyed. It deserves also to be rcnna rked that in both these deeds the appointlnent of 'ViIlialll Sinclair~ }Ja,rl of Orkney and Ct1ithness, to the office of C~Tand l\Iaster~ bv James II.' of Scotland, is spoken of as a fact 'well l\]lO\\~n' an~l • Proofs of a Conspiracy, p. 2121


242

l\IASONIC CHART.

universally adnlitted. These observations will set in a clear point of view what, lllust have hitherto appeared a great inconsistency in' the history of Scottish l\lasonry. In the deed by which 'Villium Sinclair, Esq., of Roslin, resigned the office of hereditary G-rand l\Iaster in 1736, it is stated that his ancestors, "lVillialll and Sir VVillialn St. Olair, of 11081in, "\yere constituted patrons, of the Fraternity by the Scottish l\lasons then1selves; "\vhile it is well known that the grant of hereditary G-rand l\Iaster 'was originally made by Jarnes II. of Scotland to their ancestor, '-Villiam Sinclair, Earl of Orkney and Caithness. But, when 'we consid~r that J~Ulles VI., by not exercising his po'w"er, virtually transferred to the craft the right of electing their office-bearers, the inconsistency vanishes; for 1\:11'. Sinclair and his predecessors, as far back as the clate of their charters, held their office by the appointment of the Fraternity itself. Lest any of 1'i1". Sinolair's posterity, ho'wever, Inight after llis resignation lay claim to tl1e office of Grand l\Iaster, upon the pretence that th is office was bequeathed to t,hem by the grant of J-anles II. to the Earl of Caithness and l1is heirs, he renounces not only the right to the office 'which he derived £'1'0111 the Brethren, but a.ny right, also, '\vhich, as a descendant of the l~arl of Cnithness, he might claim frotH the grants of the Scottish nlontu·chs. N ob;vithstanding those civiI cOlumotiol1s ,~v hich disturbed G'reat Britain in the seventeenth century, Free ~Iasonry flourished in Scotland under the auspices of the Sillclairs of lloslin.. No particular event, however, ·which is worthy of notice, oceurred during that thne, or even during the remainder of the century. The annual asscrnblies of the lfraternit.y w'ere still held at I( il'\vinning, and many charters ancl constitutions were· granted by the I..loclge of~ that village for the erection of Lodges in different parts of the kingdorn. In the year 17:36, William,st. Clair, Esq., of Roslin, who 'W"as then G-rand J.\faster of Seotlalid, was under the necessity of disposing of his estate, and, as he had no children of his o'wn, he was anxious that the office of Grand l\Iaster should not be vacant at his cleath. llaving, therefore, asserubled the Edinburgh and neighboring Lodges, he represented to thern the utility that would accrue to the Order by having a geutleulfUl or nobleman of their O\Y11 choice as Grand l\Iastcl of l\Iasonry in Scotland, and at the saine tiule intirnated his intention to resign into the hands of the Bret.hren every title to that offiee ,~rhich he nt, present possessed, _, or 'Wl1ich his snccessors Inigl\t elaiul fr 0 III the grants of the Scottish kings a.nd the kindness of the I~'ra­ ternity~ In consequence of this representation, circular letters a


HISTORY Oli' FREE l\IASONRY.

243

were despatched to all the Lodges of Scotland, inviting them to appear, either by themselves or proxies, on next St..A.ndrew's day, to COnCl,lr and assist in the election of a Granel 1\1 aster. 'Vlhen thttt day arrived, a.bout thirty-t路wo Lodges appeared, by thenlselves or proxies, and, after receiving the deed of resignation frolll 'Vnl. Sinclair, ]1Jsq., proceeded to the election of another Grand ~laster,-,vhel1, on account of the zeal ,vhich he had always sho\vn for the honor and prosperity of the Order, he was ununilllously elected to that high office, and proclaitned Grand l\Inster l\lason of all Scotland. Thus ,vas the Grand Lodge of Scotland instituted, the future history of which will be resullled in its proper place. vVe have already brought down the history of :n'Iasonry in England nearl'y to the end of the fifteenth century. During the whole of the sixteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth century no events occurred vv-hich it is necessary to insert in a genertl1 history of the Order. The I...lodges continuecl t.o lllcet, but seem neither to have attractecl the notice nor excitecl the displeasure of the legislature. During the ciyil wars, however, between the king and the Parliament, the Fraternity app(~ars to have been better known; and Dlany were initiated into its mysteries \vho ,verc cflually distinguished by their literary talents and their rank in Iifb. Elias l\.shnlole inforills us that he and Col. l\I:lin'\varing 'were ~ldlllitted into the Order at 'Varrington, in ()ctober, 1646.* ,]~his gentlelnan was the celebrated antiquary who founded the i\.8hnlolean l\Iuseuul at Ox.ford. IIis attachluellt to the Fraternity is evident from his diligent, inquiries into its origin and histol'..y, and his long and frequent attendance upon its nleetings.t Charles II., too, was a lllernher of the Fraternit)", and frecluently honored the ]~odges ,vit.h his presence.t l?roDl this fact, chiefly, Dr. Ilobisou assert.s that Free l\Iasonry was elnployed by the Itoyalists fbr promoting the cause of their sovereign, and that tIle ritual of the l\Inster's Degree SO(:1118 to httve been fbrlned, or t\visted from its original institution, in order to sound the palitieal principles of the candidate.搂 'The st,rained and fttncifnl ana10gy by ,vhich this notion is supported is perhaps one of the nlost striking inst.ances that could be ad.. d need to sho\v to \vhat puerile argulnents the most learned ,vill resort when engaged in the defenee of a bad cause. l1n opinion of an opposite nature, though equalls extravagant,

* Ashmolc's Diary, 1). 15. t Proofs of a Conspiracy, p. 22.

t

Ashmoh:~'R

*Ibiu. p. 21.lJiar.Y, p.66.


244

l\iASONIC CHART,

has been maintained by Pivati,* and the autllor of "Free l\fasonry Excunined." These \Yl'iters assert that ]'ree l\:Iasonry originated in the tinles of the EnglishOolnnl0n1V"ealth, that Oliver Cromwell was its inventor, that the level was the SYill bol of republican equality, and that the other signs and cerenlonies were ulerely arbitrary and formed for concealing their political designs. That Jj-'ree l\lasonry existed before the time of Oliver Crolllwell is as CUlpable of demonstration as that Cronrwell hinlself e\~er existed. It is really entertaining to observe what inconsistent al1d opposite opinions are forlned upon the same subject. According to one writer, Free l\lasonry was invented and employed by the adherents of the king; according to another, it was devised by the friends of the Parliament: in the opinion of some, it originated among the Jesuits, who used it for the promotion of their spiritual tyranny and'sul)erstition; while others maintain that it arose among a nUlllbel" of unprincipled skeptics, who employed it for destroying the spiritual tyranny and superstition of the J路esuits ! INTRODUCTION OF FREE l\fASONR,Y INTO THE CONTINENT.A.L ICINGDOl\IS.

It was about this tilne, according to Dr. Robison, that Free ~lasonry \vaS introduced HJ1l0ng the continental kingdoIl1s. After ~J~unes II. of England had abdicated the throne, and taken refuge in l?rance \vith se\楼eral of his adherents, it is probable that they would cOlllnlunicate additional spirit to the French Lodges; hut that the English refugees. "were the first v,rho exported l\Iasonry from Great Britain, or that they eIllployed it fbI' re~establishing the Stuart falllily on the I~ngli8h throne~ it is iUlpossible to prove. N o~'withstanding the clifficulty, howevol', of deterulining the l)recise period ,vhen the principles of Free l\Iasonry ,,"ere illlported into :France, it is Dlanifest fi'om the universal路 consent of the continental Lodges that it was of' British origin; and it is lllore than probable that the French received it fl'Onl Scotland about, the Iniddle of the sixteenth century,. c1ul:ing the Iuinority of Queen l\Ia.ry. It is \yell knO\Vll that there 'was at this time a fi'eer intercourse bet"ween Scotland and Franc~ than at any other period. l\Iary, Queen of Scots, was t.hen married to the heir apparent of Jj'rance; and l\Iary of Guise, sister to t.he ]'rench king, was at t.he sanle tinle llegent of Scotland. In consequence of this intinlute conneetion be-

*

Pivati, arta Liberi :l\Iuratori auvero Francs Mr. Clinch.

~Iacons

'Venezia, quoted by


HISTORY OF FREE :.\lASONRY.

24~

tween the two kingdoms, French troops were sent to the assistance of the Scots, who, having resided many years in the kingdOlU, and being habituated to the manners and CUSt-OlllS of their allies, ,vould naturally carry along with them into their native country those customs which afford them pleasure j and none, we kn()w, could be THoro congenial to the taste and dispositions of lfrenchmen than the ceren~o1u~al obseryal1ces of ~'ree l'lasonry. I~ut it is not upon these considerations merely that our opinion depends: it receivJs tlll1ple confirmation from a fact of which Dr. Robison seems to have been totally ignorant. In the year 1645 a pftrticular jurisdiction for l\lasons, called l1fo9onner£e, or l\Iasonry, was established in France. All differences which related to the art of building were decided by particular judges, w·ho were called Overseers of the art of l\Iasonry; und several counsellors wel*e tl,ppointed for pleading the cU"uses ",hich ,,~ere referred to their decision. This institution has such a striking reselublance to the 'Varden courts \vhich existed in Scotland in the sixteenth century, that it lllust lU1ve derived its origin from these. In both of them those causes only were dccid~tl which related to l\L~sonr'y, and overseers were chosen in both fbr bringing these causes to n decision. But as silnilar tribunals \vere held in no other part of the world, and as the ",'Tarden courts 'were fIrst est'<Lblished in Scotland, it is ahnost certain that, the :French borrow'ed ftOlll the Seats 'the idea of their l\Insollic tribunal, as well as ]'ree .l\Iasonry itseH~ at that particular period 'when there was such 3, froe COllntlunication bet\vecl1 the t\VO kingdoms. 'l"hat the French received }:I'ree l\lasonry ii·oll} Scotluud 111H.Y' he prcsHlued also froul the singular I)re-erninenec ,vhich ,vas ahvilYs g'iveu by f()reigners to Scottish l\Iasollry, and f\:Olll the degree of ()!t!'';l)a!ir.;r Jlar;o}t Ecossols, ,vhich~ as a llHlrk of respect to' Seotland, the French had. added to the three 8)"111bolical degrees of l\Iasonry, about the bGginning of the eig·hteerlt.h century. IIad Free Alnsonry not beon int·roduced into l?rance till after the Itevolntion in IG88, as l)r. 11obison aflirl~ls, it is ,vonderful hcnv such a fhet should have been f()l"goottcn; f()l· it ,vas unknown, about thirty or forty years after\\"ard, at what, period the 11'rench received it frOD} (Jreat I3ritain; and if the exiled filluily had employed Jj"ree l\Iasonry for O\~ertllrnillg the llano'verian .succession, it ,vas still more strange that 'Such a eir.. CUulstance should be unkno,vl1 in a country where coneeahnent ,vas certainly unnecessary. '\i"rhen any ne,v custOlll is introd need into ~t nation, the tinlc of its introduction Ina)" be rernenl1Jered for seventy or eight,y years by Olle individual, \vitlHHlt being

C01Uulitted to ,vrit.ing; and, though it be not of sufficient illl.. 21-*


246

~IASONIC

9IIART.

portance, tradition will preserve it from oblivion for a Dluch greater length of titne. If Free l\Iasonry, tl1erefore, never existed in :b'rance till after the Ilevolution in It5S8, is it not absurd to suppose that the' period \vhen such a singular institution was established should be utterly forgotten at the distan ee of, thirty or fbrty years from its establishment, though during that time it ,vas never l)ersecntecl by the ]'rench governlnent ? But at "whatever period, and Âąi'OUI ,vhatever source, Free J\Iasoury was' introdu.ced into France, it assumed there a very 1'enlarkable foru1. The attachUlcnt of tl1:1t people to innovation and external finery produced the IDost unwarr~tntable alterations upon the principles and cerenlonies of the Order. A number of new degrees "were created; the office-bearers of the craft were arrayed in the lllost splendid and costly attire, and the Lodges were tranSfOl'Illed into lecturing-l'oo1l1S, where the wiser Brethren supported the nlost extravagant opinions, discussed the nlost abstruse questions in theology and political econonlY, and broached opinion's 'whieh \vere eerta,inly hostile to true religion and sound governlnent. In other countries of tl1e continent siulilar innovations prevailed in ~1 greater or less degree; "\vhile the British, ]~odges preserved the princi})les of the craft in their I)rimitive siInplicity and excellence. Such dangerous innovations have 110t~ the sm:tllest connection "with the principles of ]'1 ree l\Iasonry. ~rhey ~1re uUllaturnl excl'cscenees, fbrlned by a 'Vtl,!'lJl inutgination, and f(}stered by the interference of designing Incu. 'Those \V 110 reprehend }free l\Iasonry, thel'efore, for the changes \vhich it under\vent in the hands of for0igners, llH1Y thro1V equal blanle upon religion, because. it has l)cen,a cloak 101" licentiousness and hypocl'i8y.; or 111)on science, because it has been converted into an instrlunent of iniquity. The ehanges of \vhich 'we have been treating arose nltogether fronl the politieal condition of the conlltries in ,vhieh they ,,"ere Illnde. In I f n.ll1c'e and the other kingdolus of Europe wh'~~re popery "wn.s the eccle.. siastical establislnuent, or ,vhere absolute I>o\ver was in the hands of their 1110!HU ehs 1 the lllost slavish restraints )vere imposed UP01~ the conduct and conversation of the people. None durst utter his o\vn sentiuJents, or converse upon such llletaphysieal subjeet~ as lllilitated against the t.heology and politics of the tiules. lJnc1er such restraints speculating nlen, in p~trticular, v{(~re highly dissatis'fied; those p(fWerS whieh I-Ieaven had besto'wed, and on the exereise of which their happiness depended:r V1lcre fettered by h lunall hl\vs, and that liberty of speech restru,ined \\"hieh tyranny had no right to (o,ontrol. J~'or these rensons the Lodges 1jvere frequented by men of philosophical O


HISTORY OF FREE l\IASONRY.

247

habits, who eagerly embraced an opportunity of declaring their sentiments, and discussing the, favorite objects of their stud.y路, without dreading the threats of government or the tortures of the Inquisition. In this view, th~ Lodges nlay be com pared to little republics, enjoying the rational liberties of human nature in the midst of extensive empires el1s!,lved hy despotislU and superstition. In the course of time, however, that liberty was abused, and doctrines were propagated in the ]"rel1ch Hnd German I.odges which it is the duty and policy of' every government to discover and suppress. But those corruptions had no necessary connection with Free Masonry; they arose wholly from the political condition of the continental kingdouls. In Great Britain, where the路 Ordet has had an existence much longer than in any other country, its history is stained by no glaring corruption or offensive innovations: more attention was paid to the intrinsic value of' the Order than to its ext.ernal observances; and the British Lodges had.a greater resemblance to charit~tble 111(~et:UH2~'S than to pOlnpous and spl<;)ndid assemblies. Blessed. with a free constitution, I3ritons are under no teulptatioll to introduce int.o the ,Lodges religious and politlical discussions. rrhe. liberty of the press enables thelu to b~ve the \videst circulation to their opinions, ho'wever ne'\v or extravagant; tLud they are lial:>le to no punishluent by publicly attacking theesta,blished religion of their country. rfhe British J..Iodges, therefore, haxe retained their priruitive purity; they have been eUlployed in no sinister Ctluse; they have harbored in their bOSOIUS neither traitors nor tLtheists. EXTENSION OF FREE l\IASONHY IN ENGIu\ND FRO)I THE BE.. GINNING OF THE EIGlrrEEN'I'I! CEN~I:UItY.

'Vhile the Ifrench were busily engaged in the decoration of their Lodges, and iu the invention of new deg-rces and trifling ~erenloni~s, the 'l\lasons i~ .England were luor~ ,v"isely elnploye~l In extending the hOl.llldarlCs of the royal art. :\b()ut the hegin!ling of the eighteenth eentury, during the reign of Clneen .A.line, :Free l\lasonry SeetHS to have rapidly declined in the sonth of ]~nglaTHl. lj"our .Lodges only existed in t,he south~ and f'e,v could be cnterttLined of a revival ,vhile the seat of the <]r:ilHl ]~oclge ,vas at such a, distance as the eity of 1~ ork. lJnder sneh cirCllnlstances, the fhur I..Iodges nH~t, in 1717; and, in (H'del' to give vigor to their declining cause and adyanee the illterost of' the ]"raternity in the south, they elected theluselves inti) a ~Jra.nd Lodge, ~tud chose l~llthony Sayer, Esq_, for their first Grand l\faster.


248

1\IASONIC CHART.

Thus was instituted the Grand Lodge of England. The mo.. tive which suggested this institution was certainly laudable and useful; but every person 11lust be aware that the four Lodges were guilty of a considerable ilnpropriety in omitting to request the countenance of tho Grand Lodge of York. Notwithstanding this negligence, the greatest harmony subsisted between the t",.o Grand Lodges till 17:3':1:; and, under the auspices of both, the Order flourished in every part of the kingdom, but particularly in the south of England, '\vhere it had formerly' been in such a languishing condition. In the year 1734, ho,,"ever, the Grand LQdge of England, having granted constitutions to Lodges 'within the district of York without the consent of their Granel Lodge, incurred to such a degree the displeasure of the York 1\1'u80ns that the friendly iutercourse which had forlllerly subsisted hetween theln was conlpletely broken off,ul1d the prosperity of the one was always vie'wed by tl1e other vvith a suspicious eye. In 1739, also, some trifling innovations upon'the ancient custOlllS of the Order having been illlprudently sanctioned by the Grund Lodge of England, several of the olel London l\lasons ,,~ere路 highly offended, and, after seceding ii'Olll the Grand Lodge, and pretending to act under the Y orkeonstitution, they gave thelllselves the appellation of .AnC'i~ent illclso1ls, 'while they attached to those connected "rith the (}rand I . odge the odious appellation of lJfoderns, 'who, in tlleir opinion, never existed till the year 1717. The Ancient 1\Iasol1s" after their ~ecession~ continued to 1101d thoir nleetings without' tl(:kno'\vledging a sUI)erior till the Jear 1772, ,vhen they chose f()r their Grand l\Iaster the Duke of Athol~ ,vho was then Grand l\IHster elec,t for Seotlalld. Since that period both the Ch,tlnd Lodges of Englund have attained to a high degree of prosperity; but such has been their nlutual antipathy that the luelubers of the one have had no correspondence or communion 'with those of the other until a very recent date. The Irish and Scottish l\Iasons, h01,yever, "rho seenled rather to have favored the .A.. llcients, held conllllunion ,yith both the Grand Lodges, and "Tore a11cHved to be present at all their lueetings. It is much to be regretted that such res'pectable bodies as the t\VO Grand I--Ioclges of l~nglu.nd should have retarded the progress of l\lasonry by their lllutual jealousies and dissensions. SchislllS in societies generally arise fi路om miscond uet on both sides,-which was certainly the case in the schism under consideration. The l\Ioderns undoubtedly departed from their usual caution and propriety of conduct by authorizing the slightest innovat.ions upon thl~ cerel110nies of uu ancient institution. I311t the .A.n-


HISTORY OF FREE l'rI.A.SONRY.

cients were guilty of a greater hupropriety by being the active promoters of the schism, and still nlore by holding up the lVloderns to the ridicule of the public. These errors, however, have been mutually acknowledged and buried in oblivion, and the breach repaired which so long separat,ed the tV{O G-rand Lodges, and which the Scottish and Irish l\lasons have always regarded with pity and indigna.tion. After the institution of the Grand Lodge of England in 1717, Free 1\Iasonry assumed a bolder and a more independent aspect.. It was no longer confined to the British Isles, or to the capital of France, but ,vas destined to irradiate eyery portion of the globe; and while the Grand Lodges of Scotland and England contemplated with pleasure the propagation of the royal art, their diligence was fully rewarded by the gratitude ulld liberality of the foreign Ilodges for the gift they received. In the year 1729, Free nIasonry was introduced into the East Indies, and in a short time after ,a provincial Ch'und l\Iaster "\VHS appointed to superintend the _Lodges in that quarter. In 1730, the Grand Lodge of Ireland ""U8 instituted, I--lodges ,vere cl"ectecl in different parts of All1erica, and a provincialdeputa.t.ioll 'was granted to'lVlonsieur Thuanus for the circle of I..iow"er Saxony.. ...J\ patent was sent fi'Olll England in 1731, to erect a lodge rd. the FIague, in 'W'hich Francis Stephen, Duke of ]~orraine, and subsequently }~nlperor of (}ernluny, was initiated into the ()rder. Provincial Grand l\fasters ,yere appointed for Itussia and .A.ndulusia. in Spain. In 173B, IJodges \vere erected at, Cu})e Coast in . AJi路ica, a.nd at Geneva; and provincial deputations '\vere granted for lJpper Saxony and the .!\ruericiln Islands. III 17B8~ a.Lodge ,vas instituted at I~rtulsw'ick under the patronage of the (Jrand J--lodge of Scot1u,llCl, in 'which the late ICing of :Prussia initia.ted '\vhen l?rince l~oyaL IIis lllajesty \YtlS so l)leased\yith. the nlaxill1S and cererl10nies of tho Order thnt he eyer after\vurds ,vas its lllost zealous partisan, and rocluested c'ven that a r.. odge should be established in the capital of his o,vn dOll,Jinions. In. this Lodge many of the (i-erman llrinces were initiated, '\vho nfterwards filled the office of G-rand l\Iaster with much honor to themselves and advantage to the Ii'raternitJ,...

,,,,us

PERSECU1'ION OF FREE I\IASONS.

But while Free l\Iasonry flourished in these parts of the '\Yorld, and in many other places which it ,vould be tedious to onulllerrtto, it 'was doolued to undergo a yariet.y of persecutio,ns fi'o!u the unfounded jealousies of ~t few despotic rulers ~tnd the


250路

:MASONIC CHAItl'.

deep-rooted superstition of a few Oatholic priests... These persecutions took their rise in Holland, in the year 1735. The StatesGeneral were alarmed at the rapid increase of Free l\iasons, 'who held their meetings in every town under their goverrllllent; and they resolved to discountenance their proceedings. III consequence of this deterulinRtion, an edict ,vas issued by the government, stating that although they had discovered nothing in the practices of the Fraternity either injurious to the interests of the republic or contrary to the character of good citizens, yet, in order to prevent any bad consequences ,~rhich might ensue from such路 associations, they deelued it prudent to abolish the assenlblies of Free l\Iasons. Notwithstanding this prohibition, a respectable IJodge having continued to 111Cet privately at Amsterdam, intelligence VltlS cOllul1unicated to the magistrates, ,,,,ho arrest,ed all the IueU1 bel's and brou8:ht then1 before a court of j l1stice. Before this t,ribunal, in pr~~eIlce of all the magistrates of the city, the l\lasters and tu路dens boldly defended theulselves, and declared upon oath that they were loyal subjects, f~Lithful to their religion and zealous fen' the interests of their country; tJutt:Free l\lasonry vtuS an institution venerable in itself and useful to society; and that, nIt,hough they could not rcyoal the secrets and cerenlonies of theIr ()l'dcr, the)'" \vould nssure theIll that. they were contrary to the hl\YS n(~ithcr of Ch)(l liar of luau, and t.hat, they ,vould ,villingly adnlit iIlto their Order any iucli'Vidual in whom the lnagistrates could eonfide, and fi'OIU whom they might rcceiye such 'inforrnatiolt as ,,",ould cstabl ish the truth of their stateluents. In COnSCf]UenCe of these declarations, the 13ret,hren ,vere disnlissed, and the to'W11 secretary 'l"as requested to becolne a 11101111>c1' of the Fraternity, . A.fter initiation, lIe returned to the court of justice, and gave such a fhvorable account of the l)rineiples and practice of the ~ociet,y that all the Inu2'istrates beelllue Brethren of the Order and zealous l,atrons of l~ree l\Iasonry. l\.fter Free l\Iasonry had thus honorably triruuphed over her })ersecutors in IIolland, she had to contend in }'rance w'ith prejudices equally inYeterate, though less irnprcgnahle. }dthough 11lt1Uy persons of distinction defendod the l~'raternity, and ex])ostulated .\vith the court on the iluproprietyof severe llleasures, their assemhlies were aholished in 1737, uncleI' the conunon l1retence tlu1t heneath their inviolalJle secrets they rnigllt ec)"er SOUle dreadful design hostile to religion and dangerous to the kingdom. l~ut 'when thclse clerelieticHls of party spirit and })l'ivttte nlalice had subsided, the prohibition of gOYCrnnlcnt \Yas gradually forgottel1, and the l?ratcrnity in !i'rance recovered their

"T


HISTORY OF

}~REE

l\IASONRY.

251

f()rlIler prosperity and sple~dor. In Germany the tranquillity of the Order was interrupted by the malice of ignorant 'VOluen. 1\.. few German ladies who were anxious to discover the secrets of Free lVlasonry, having been baffled in all their attempts upon the fickleness of their husbands and the fondness of their adlUil'ers, converted their curiosity into revenge, and attempted to influence the luind of the Elupress lVlaria Theresa against the Lodges in ,rienna. Their attempt ,vas in some llleasure successful, as they persuaded her to issue an order for surprising all the l\Iasons in the city when asseulbled in their Lodges. This plan, however, was frustrated by the intervention of the Emperor, Joseph I., who, being himself a nlason, declared his readiness to ans\\-rer for thei~ conduct, and showed the ladies and their friends that the charges "which they had brought against the Order \vere false and defamatory. When the flanle of persecution is once kindled, its devastations are seldom confined to the country \vhere it originated. The exaIllple of one nation is urged as an excuse for the conduct of another; and, like the stornl on the sanely desert, its effects are ruinous in proportion to its progress. In lIolland and France the hostility of the legislature against Free 1\Iasonry 'vus in a short time disarlned~ But 'vhen the flrune reached the ecclesiastical states of Italy it, broke out ill ungoYcrnal.le rage; its effects were nlore cruel and its direction Inore len~tlH::ned. In the year 1'138, a ft)Tlnidahle bull \\~as issuecl fi'onl the \' atican, not only against :b-'ree l\Iasons thell1Selves, but against all tlu)se who proluoted or flrvored their cause, "\vho gave theln the sllHtllest countenance or advice, or who ,\VCl'C in any respect cOlnle(~ted "\vith a set of 111e11 \vho, in the opinion of his fIoliness, 'were enenries to the tranquillitJ of the state and hostile to the spiritual interests of souls. Not\vithstanding the severity of this bull, which threatened excommunication to every oflende~", no particular charge, either of ~t Inol"al or political nature, was hrc)ught against a single individual of the Order. It was lllerely strtted that the Fraternity had spread fll1" and ,vide and ,rere dnil.v increasing, that they adruitted Incn of ev'ory religion into their society, tind that they hound their luclnbers by oath to preserye with inviolable secrecy the Dlysteries of their Order. TheH3 circumstances, indeed, were sufficient grounds fbr tIle Church of l.:tolne to oppose fL s.ysteul so cc>ntrary t() their COlltracted views of religion and g()yernulent.. .. This bull "\YUS fc)llo\vcd by an edict, dated 1路1th ~r:ln na ry, 1 containing sentiInents equally bigoted and enaetnlents" ef{ually severe. ~rhe servitude of the galleys, the tortures of the rack,


252

l\IASONIC CHART.

and a fine of a thousand crowns in gold, were threatened to persons of every description who were daring enough to breathe the infectious air of a l\Iasonic asselllbly. About a month ("ifter this edict was issued, a decree was emitted by his IIoliness, condemning a French book., entitled" .A..n Apology.for the Society of :Free l\fasons," and ordering it to be burnt, by the ministers of justice, in one of the most frequented streets of Rome. In consequence of these enactments at Rome, the Catholic clergymen of I-Iolland atteu1pted, in the year 1740, to enforce obedience to the COlllmal1ds of their superiors. It was custonlary a,mong the divines' of that country to exanline the religious qualifications of those who requested a certificate to receive the holy sacranlent. Taking advantage of their spiritual pO"l'er, they concluded their examination of the candidates by asking if tIley were Free ~Iasons. If they were, the certificates ,vere refused, and they Yiere expelled forever fronl the conlIDunion-table. After the priests had exerted their authority ill the expulsion several respectable characters, the subject excited general attention; and when 111<:1ny panlphlets had been published in defcHlce of both parties, the States-C}eneral interfered, and prohibited the clergy fronl asking questions that \yere unconnected \vith the religious character of the indiyidual.

or

ASSOCIATION OF TIlE l\IOPSES.

Seyeral Free l\Iasons of distinction in Germany, though steady highly of its proceedings :lS',linst the }1'raternity, and ,,~ere anxious to preserve the ()rder fi'onl that ruin 路which it was fhst approaching. In order to effect this, they instituted a ne路w association, forrned upon the Stl1l1C principles and proposing to itself the sarne object as l?ree nIasonry. The lllelubers were denorninated nlopses, frolll the Clernu1n \"'lord 1nO})S, denoting tl young lllastiff, which VlUS deenlcd a 11roper elublelll of the mutual fidelity and attaehnlcnt of the Brethren. But, that they might preserve the nlysteries of Free IHasonry fr0111 those mCll1bers of the new assoeiation \vho ,vere not 1\laso118, they rejected from their ritual all the 1\lasol1ic ccrelIlllioes, words, and signs; and, tlutt they lllight escape the vengt:ance of the llOllUtll Ohurch, they softened all those parts of the institution \vhich had a tendency to give offence to n~llTOVl and superstitious lllinds. Instead, therefore, of binding the members by ttn oath, they

f),'jonds to the Church of Itoll"lB, disapproved


HISTORY OF FREE l\IASONRY.

took their word of honor that they would never reveal the mysteries and cereulonies of the Order. It is well known to every person acquainted with the history of lVIasonry, tllat the exclusion of ladies has been a. fertile source of calumny against the Brethren. It was supposed that actions were perforlued in the I.Jodges inconsistent with the delicacy of the female sex, and, as in the case of the 'Tetnplars, that the lllost unnatural crimes were perpetrated and authorized. In ordor to avoid this ground of defttmation, the l\lopses admitted women into their Lodges, 路who were allowed to hold any office except that of Grand .ITIopse. The association of the l\Iopscs was patronized by some of the most ill ush路ions characters in Gernlany; the Lodges consisted of the 1110st respectable members of the community, and several of the princes of the empire were Grand ~1asters of their Order. The adnlission of Protestants or heretics into the l\'Iasonic I..Iodges in Catholic c~untries gave great offence to the eh urch of l~oln~, and ,vas one of the ca{L~cs ;hieh prompted the severity of their proeeedings. .t\w'are of this circUlllstance, the ~Iopses resolved to initiate llone into their nlys.. teries but the steady friends of the Oat.holic COIUDIUllion. This, ho\vevel', \vas llle.relyat pretence to deceive his IIoliness; lor they adulittecl into their Order, \vithout the smallest scruple, Ulen of every religion and every country. As the bulls of the Pope had no authority in Sw'itzerland, Free l\lasonry flourished in that republic until the year 17 4f), when a Illost unaccountable e~iCit "Yas issued by the Ccnlueil of Berne, prohibiting, under the severest penalti~s~ t.he, tlssolnl)}ies of :B"'I ree .filasons. No reasons ,vere assigned by the Counci~ f()r their conduct; and no charges \vere advanced against any of the Brethren. The Council of' Berne were terrified by f5ecret association; and on this account., forsooth, they lllllst persecute and destroy. l\lore intoler~1nt in their bigotry anc111l0re ernel in their condnet than the Church of' Rome, they were not satisfied with abolishing all the Lodges in the republic. Every Free l\Tasollill S\vitzerland was compelled to accuse hiIllself before the magistrates of the district, to renounce his obligations of secrecy, and s\vear, in the presence of the great God of heaYcn~ to traulple upon those engagements which before the saUie J3eing he had voV\red to revere. Such fLU instance of tyl'a.nny over the minds and C011sciences of men is ft reluarkable fact in the history of a republic where the Reforll1ecl religion had been prot.ected froIll its infhney, and 'where Free 1'Iasons had ahvays conducted thelllSelyes \vith exemplaTy propriety. * Tho severe t.reatlllcnt, therefore, 'which

_----_.

-------~----..

._------_.,,-------_ _._.

.. Free Masonry seems to haNe been directly imported into Switzerland 22


254

1\!ASONIC CHART.

they experienced must have originated in some private quarrel bet\veen the ulenlbers of the Council and the ]"raternity. It could be prolnpted by no patriotic motive, by no regard for the welfare of the state or the safety of individuals. N otwithstanding these persecutions, Jj"ree l\;Iasonry ,vas afterwards revived in S",yit'zerland and practised without molestation, though with less eagerness and success than in the other stutes of Europe.. During these various persecutions, of which we have only given a general C),ccount, n1any individuals of the Fraternity under"rent the sevelest treatment; and in their relief that practical l)enevolence was strongly exemplified which Free l\Iasons are taught to exhibit to the distressed Brethren of their Order. In 1739, after Pope Eugenius had issued his bull against Free l\lason1'y, one Crudeli, a Free llIason, was imprisoned at Florence by the Inquisition, and suffered the most unmerited cruelties for lllaintaining the innocence of the association. "Then the Grund Lodge of England was informed of his miserable situation, they, recollecting that ~t Bro.ther, whatever his rank and however distant his abode, had a claiul upon their syn1pathy, transluitted to hilll twenty pounds, for procuring the necessaries of life, and exerted every nerve for effecting his liberation. A Brother confined at St. Sebasti~tns in Spain experienced froul the ]jJnglish I\Iasol1s the salUC attention and generosity. .A.t Lisbon, in the year 1742, Jalucs ~Iollton, a Frenc11 artist, and ~J Oh11 Coustos, Hi native of Berne in Sw"itzerlalld, were imprisoned hy the Inquisition. ~rhey ,vera accused of belonging to H, society by ,,,hich sacrilege and sodr)1ny ,vere .allovted, and were requested to discover to their persecutors the true design of :Hree l'Iasonry. After defending the institution as useful and inllocent" they ,,-rere extended on the rack, in expectation that aJ confessioll ,vould be extorted by its tOI'IUents. Force, however, had 110 control over a mind conscious of integrity. Coustos, ht1Ving maintained his innocence after having been thrice stretched on路 this instrument of agony, was at last sentenced to "walk in the procession of the .A'ldo-da-Fe, and to serve in the galleys for four years. .A.t the inst~1nce of the English l\Iasons, however, George II. authorized the British Ininister at Lisbon to dernand, ill his l\lajestJ's name, from the I'Cing of Portugal, the liberation of Coustos; ,vhich \\ras granted in 1744, after a dreadful confinelllent of two years and a half. frODl Great Britain; as a deputation wus granted by the Grand Lodge of England for erecting a Lodge at Ln.usiLnne, ill the canton of Berne, in tho ;year 1739. It could not, therefore, in so short a time be corrupted by tho~e offensive innovations which were superinduced upon it ill France..


HISTORY OF FREE MASONRY..

255

From. such scenes of inhuman barbarity it is pleasing to turn to examples of real benevolence and generosity. As the consideration of these is always gratifying to a humane mind, they cert.ainly deserve to be recorded in a History of Free lVlasonry. In the year 1748, l\lonsieur Pre,Terot, a gentleman in the navy, and brother of thecelebrated 1\'1. Preverot, doctor of medicine in the faculty at Paris, was unfortunately ship"\vrecked on an _island whose viceroy was a Free 1\lason. Along with his ship IV1. Preverot had lost all his money and effects. In this destitute condition he presented himself to the viceroy, and related his misfortune in a manner which completely proved that he was no impostor. The viceroy made the l\Iasonic signs, which being instantly returned by the Frenchman, they recognized and elnbraced each other as Brethren of the saUle Order. lVI. Preverot was conducted to the house of the viceroy, who furnished 11iln with all the comforts of life, till tt ship bound for France touched at the island. Before his departure in this vessel, the viceroy loaded him with presents, alld gave him as much money as was necessary for carrying hilll iilto his native country. In the battle of Dettingen, in 1743, one of the king's guards, having his horse killed under hiul, was so entangled uluong its limbs that he 'was unable to extricate himself. "Thilst in this situation, an English dragoon gaJloped up to hill1, and, with his uplifted sabre, was about to depriyc him of lite. The French soldier having with much difficul~y made the signs of l\fasonry, the dragoon recognized hiIn as a Brother, and not only saved his life, but released him from his dangerous situation. He was lllade a prisoner by the English dragoon, who was well aware that the ties of l\lasonry cannot dissolve those of JXl.triotism. A Scottish gentleman in the Prussian service was taken prisoner at the battle of Lutzen, and was conveyed to Prague along with four hundred of his conlpaniolls-in-arllls. As soon as it was路 known that he was a l\Iason, he was released fi'OIll confinement, invited to the tables of the lllost distinguished citizens, and requested to consider hiruself as a Free lVIason, and not asa prisoner of war. About three months after the engagement,an exchange of prisoners took place, and the Scottish officer was presented by the Fraternity with a purse of sixty ducats, to defray the expenses of his journey.* The persecutions which Free l\Iasonl'Y encountered were hitherto confined to the continent. The tide of religious frenzy,

* Several striking and

~r:e/)l\Iasons may

27 j', (J78, &c.

curious instances of the extensive benevolence of be seen in Smith's Use ancl Abuse of Free l\1u.sonry, p:p'. 374,


256

l\lASONIC CHART.

however, no'w rolled to the shores of Britain. In the year 1745. the A.ssociate Synod, consisting of a few bigoted dissenters, attempted to disturb the peace of the Fraternity. In the beginning of this year an overture was laid before the Synod of Sterling, stating that m,luy hnproper things were performed at the initiation of lYlasons, and requesting that the Synod would consider whether or not the members of that Order were entitled to partake in the ordinances of religion. The Synod transmitted this overture to all the kir~-sessions under their inspection, allowing them to act as they thought proper. In 1755, . however, they directed all their kirk-sessions to examine every person who was suspected to he a Free J\Iason, and to demand an explicit answer to any question which they might ask can.. cerning the administration of the ~Iasonic oath. In the course of these examinations, the kirk-sessions discovered (for they seem hitherto to have been ignorant of it) that men who Vlere not architects were admitted into the Order. On this account the Synod, ill the yet"Lr 1757, thQught it necessary to. adopt stricter lueasures. They drew up a list of foolish questions, ,yhich they appointed every kirk-session to put to those under their charge. These questions related to what they though( were the ceremonies of Free l\Iasonry; and those "W' ho refused to answer thelli ,vere debarred fronl religious ordinances. The unrighteous oppressions created by these acts Qutstrip, in many l'esl)ects, the tyranny and cruelty inflicted 011 the ]"raternity by' the Church of llollle and the severe edicts of the Council of Berne, and should be held up to the ridicule and e~ecratiol1 of tIle public.* . N at-withstanding these persecutions, Free l\lasonry fiourislled and ,vas ill the highest estinlation in Great Britain, France, l1'er~ many, and several other kingdoms of Europe. In 1743, it "ras exported frolll Scotland to Denulark; and the Lodge ,vhich was then instituted is no,y the Grand Lodge of that kingdom. The StunG prosperity attended the first; Lodge in Sweden, 'which ,vas erected at Stockholul in 1754, under a patent fi'OIl.l Scotland. In 1765, a splendid apal'tll1ent ,vas erected at ~larseilles for the acCOll1Ulodation of the 13rethrell. It was a.dorned ,vith the finest paintings, representing the Illost interesti,ng scenes "'\vhich occur in the history of the ()ld and Ne,v Test~llnents, and calculated to rClnind the spectator of his various duties as a llUtll, n, subject, and a Christian. The repres.entatiol1 of ~J()seph and his brethren,

'*

It .is renul.rkal)le thftt the Grand IJodge of Scotland did not deign to tttl{6 the smallest notice of these proceedings.


HISTORY OF FREE MASONRY.

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of the Samaritan and the Jew, of Lot and the angels, reminded every Brother of the beauty of charity and forgiveness which are the' first principles of l\Iasonry, as they are the first duties of man. The picture of Peter and the apostles paying tribute to Cresar recalled to every individual Brother his obligations as a citizen to revere and support the constituted authorities ; and the representation of Job in his misfortunes lifting up his hands to Heaven, enforced upon the minds of the most inconsiderate the important reflection t.hat fortitude and resignation to the will of God are the duties of all in distress, and that the Divine blessing will ultimately attend those who bear without murmuring the chastisements of their Father, and preserve, amidst the severest trials, their patience and virtue unimpaired.* These opservations, apparently trifling, are important in one respect, as they show that the French Lodges had not at that time fostered in their bosom the votaries of skepticistn and disloyalty. The other Lodges in France were at this tilne numerous and magnificent. The Grand Lodge contained about twenty offices, which were all filled by noblemen of .the highest rank. They had provincial Grand lVlasters simihtr to those of Scotland, and the insignialand jewels of all the office-bearers were as rich., and splendid as the Lodge-rooms in which they held their assemblies. FREE l\IASONRY IN PRUSSIA.

In the year 1749, Free l\Iasonry WItS introduced into Bohemia, and eagerly embraced by many distinguished persons ill the city of Prague. They call thelnselves Scottish l\Iasol1s, and are remarkably inquisitive into the character of those whom they admit into the Order. 路 In the year 1767, a J..Iodge under an English constitution was' established in Berlin, under the appellation of Le Iloyale Jrorl17 , in honor of the Duke of York, who 'VYas initiated into t.heFra... ternity by that I...Iodge ,vhile he was trayelling on the eontinent. In 1758, the }j'ree l\lasolls of Gern1any ,vere -authoriz(~d to llold their asselublies by a charter granted by the KinQ' of Prussia ';'\ 1 f~ CI '-<.:.~, t I10 ].~ ector 0 onxollY, and the Queen of I-Iungary and Bohemia and subsequently ratified b)rthe ]~lnpcror of Gerlnnny. By a.n~ other charter frOUli England in 1789, a I~od!!e ,vas erect,ed at Bruns,vick, ,vhich, in 1770, becullle the (Jrali'd Lodge of that

*

]\lr a further account of this building, see Smith's Use and Abuse of Free Masonry, p. 165. 22~


258

l\IASONIC CHART.

part of Germany. Its Grand ~Iaster was Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick, ,,"rho, a short time after, received a provincial deputation from England for superintending the Lodges in Lower Saxony. In the yea,!" 1773, a C0111pact was entered into between the Grand Lodge of England, under ]~ord Petre, and the Grand Lodge of Berlin, under the Prince of IIesse-Darmstadt, which had a few years before been duly erected into a G-rand Lodge, at a uleeting of the lYlasters and Wardells of twelve regular Lodges.. In this compact it 路was stipulated that the Grand Lodge of Berlin should be acknowledged as the Grand Lodge of the whole Empire of Gerluany, including the dominions of his Prussiall Majest.y; that it should exercise no l\Iasonic pO'wer out of the Erllpire of G-ermany, or within the district under the ftuthority of the Grand Lodge of BI"uns\viek; that the Electorate of !{ano':er should be free to both Grand Lodges in Germany; and thn~1 the contracting l)urties should unite in their efforts to counteract all innovations in l\Iasonry, and particularly the proceedings of a set of l\Iasons in Berlin, ,vho, under the denomination of Str拢cte Observantz, had a.nnihilated their f01'11101' constitutions, erected thernselves into a G-rand Lodge, and sanctioned very improper innovations upon the principles and cerenlonies of the :Fraternity. This cOlllpact \vas highly approved of by the I{ing of Prussia, who inllllediately erected the G路rand Lodge of Berlin into a corporate body. In 1777, the Iring of Prussia was Protector of all the 1\la8011s in Gerlllany. I?erdinand, Duke of llrUllS\vick and I.~unenbtlrg, was Grand l\Iaster of all tl10 United :Lodges in G路ermuuJ; a~l'd the other offices were filled by able and illustrious princes of the eUlpire. 1Tuder the auspices of those distinguished l)orsonages~ "\vithin the jurisdiction of the . Grand IJodge of Berlin and Bruns"\vick, :Free l\1.asonry has flourished to the present da.y. In GerIuany, Dernnnrk, a,nd Sweden, charity schools were erected by t.he Lodges fbr ed licating the children of I~"'Iree l\Iasons 'whose poverty debarred theul f1'o111 thjs ndvnntage. In the one 1\"'hich 'was {()I"lued t.tt Brul1s,vick they 'were instructed even in classical learning and various branches of nUtthcluatics, and ,verc regularly exa.luined by the Duke of Bruns,vick, ,vho re\varded the lllost deserving ,vith valuable gifts. l\t Eisenach, several endo\ved seluinaries of this kind v{ere estahlished; and in tL short time after their institution they had sent into the \vol'ld seycn hundred children instrueted in the prineiplGci of science and the doct,rincs of Christianity. In 1771, an establisillucnt of" ~1 similar kind ,vas fbrnled at OasseL in '\vhich the children were maintained and edllcated until they could provide for them-


HISTORY OF FREE IVfASONRY..

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selves. In 1773, the united Lodges of Dresden, Leipsic, and Gorlitz erected at Frederickstadt a seminary of learning for children of every denOlnination -in the Electorate of Saxony. The Masonic subscriptions were so numerous that the funds of the institution were sufficient for its maintenance; and in the space of five years above eleven hundred children received a liberal education.. In the same year, an extensive workhouse was erected at Prague, in ,vhich the children were not only initiated into the first principles of learning, but into those branches of the useful and fine arts ,vhich might qualify thelU for commercial and agricultural situations. It deserves to be remarked tha.t the founders of these institutions, amid their anxiety for the public prosperity, never neglected the spiritual interests of their children. They sa,v that early piety is the foundation of all that is useful and honorable in life, and that "without this speculat.ive kno\vledge and practical skill are of little u,vail. IIow inconsistent are such facts \vith those fabulous accounts of the German ]~odges which have been published in England by a few party men! 'Vhilst l\Iasonry thus flourished in G'errnany, the Brethren in Portugal were exposed to the persecution of its bigoted rulers. l\Iajor Frau<}ois d'.A.lincourt, a I?renchmn,n, ~"tnd DOll Oyres (~e Ornellas Pracao, a Portuguese noblenutn, were in 1766 iUlprisoned by the governor of l\fadeira, for their attachment to the Order. Being afterwards carried to Lb!bon, the.)'" were there confined for fourteen months, until they 'were released;. by the p:cneral intercession of the 13rethren in that eit.J. In the following year several Free l\lasons \vere confined a.t Naples, hut were soon liberated by the intercession of foreign princes and the eloquence of an Italian ad\~ocate. Not\vithstanding the persecutions ,,~hich the Fraternity ex- .' pcrienced in IIolhtnd, 11'1'ee 1\Iasonry \yas flourishing in that republic in 1779. ...~t that tirne a cornpact was entered into between the Gr,tnd Lodge of IIolland~ held at the I-Iague. and that of ~Jngland. In this cornpaet it ,vas stipulated that the C*Tand Lodge of IIolland should be permitted to erect Lodges within her territories, hoth at hOlne and abroad, and to appoint provincial Grand l\Iasters over eae,h district. In consequence of this accessi.on of po,ver to the (Jrancl Lodge of IIolland, Free i\Iasollry flourished under its auspiecs in the Dutch settleulellt.s ill India, .A.frica, and South .A.. luerica. RISE OF THE ILI.JU:I\IINATI IN GERl\IANY.

Let us now direct our atitention to a new secret association,


260

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CHART.

'\vhich about this time arose in Germany, and which was imagined to have taken its rise from Free lVIasonry, and to have planned a diabolical conspiracy against every religious and political establishment in Europe. In 1775, the order of the Illuminati was founded by Doctor Adam Weishaupt, Professor of Canon Law in the U niverity of Ingolstadt. In this association speculative opinions were inculcated which were certainly inconsistent with the principles of religion and social order. But that Illuminism originated fi"om ]'ree l\lasonry, that it brought about the French Revolution, or ever })lanned any dangerous conspiracy, are circumstances for which the shadow of a proof has not as yet been adduced. Dr" Robison, indeed, expressly affirms th~t Illuminism "took its rise among the Free JYIasons, but was totally different from Free ~Ia颅 soury;" and, by a deceitful anachronism, he presents V\T eishaupt as an active member in the German Lodges before he acquaints his readers that he was the founder of the Illuminati, for no other reason than to make them believe that \IV"'" eishaupt was a Free l\Iason before he planned his new association.* Now, the case 'was very different indeed.. Barruel himself asserts H that it is ft fact demonstrated beyond a doubt that \Veishaupt beC~tDle a ~Iason in 1777 only, and that two years before this, when he established Illuminism, he was totally unacquainted 'with the Dlysteries of Free l\iasonry."t IIere, then, is an importt1nt fac't, which strikes at the root of all Dr. Robison's reasoning against Jj"'ree l\Iasonry.. Barruel nlaintains that "\Veishaupt was not a l\lason til!. two years after the organiza.tion of his new institution; and Dr. l:tobison allows that Illuminislu was totally different from Free l\lasonry. The t,yO institutions were totally unconnected; for the meulbers of the one were never adrnitted into the Lodges of the other without being regularly initiated into the mysteries of both. Upon these simple facts we would arrest the attention of every reader, and those in particular who have been s'\vindled out of their senses by the exertions of corrupt nlen. l\..fter 'Veishaupt had organized his institution, he exerted every nerve to disseminate its principles. For this purpose he became a Free l\lason in 路1777; and, by means of emissaries~J:\he atterllpted to circulate his opinions among the French and G"o1'man Lodges. III these attempts, indeed, he was sometimes sue~!:

Proofs of a Conspiracy, Introduction, pp. 15, 10l. 1rIomoirs of Jacobinism, part 3, Preliminary Obsorvations, p. p.12.

t

XY.

anu


HISTORY OF FREE l\fASONRY.

261

cessfliL But it should be recollected by those who on this account calullluiate Free l\fasonry, that the S,tIDe objection may be urged against Christianity because impostors ha.ve sometimes gained proselytes and perverted the wavering minds of the liul.. titude. These doctrines, ho'wever, were not merely circulate.d by ,\reishaupt in a fe'\v of the Lodges and taught at the assemblies of the Illuminati: they Vlcre published to the world in the most fhscinating form by the French Ellcyclopredists, and inculcated . with all the eloquence with which some of the most celebrated philosophers on the continent could adorn them. It can only be said of 'Veishaupt, therefore, that he was not such a determined infidel as oltaire and his associates. Such is a short and, it is hoped, an impartial vie,v of the origin and progress of the Illuminati. #: ..l.i\..fter the French Revolution, which, as l\lounier has wen shown, arose from other cau.ses than those to which Barruel and I~obison ascribe it, the plans of these parties were not carried on in Germany so systeluatically as before; and, not,vithstanding the fabrications with which the Jesuitical Barruel has calumniated the Lodges in that country, I?ree :1'Iasonry prevails to this day, respected by the most virtuous and scientific luembers of the community, and patronized by the most distinguished princes ~f the empire. In Germany, the路 ql1a1ificat.ions for a Free l\iason are great and numerous. No person is initiated into the Order without the consent of every member of the J..Jodge j and it frequently happens that a G-ermaIl is excluded hy a single dissenting voice. On this account, the Lodges of that country are filled 'with persons of the first rank and respectability, and every thing is conducted \vith the greatest decorum and solemnity. .1\..8 l\lasonry is there held in the highest esthnation, a foreigner call ' obtain an easier introduction to the nobilitJ and literati of Germany in a l\lasonic J..Jodge tl1t"Ll1 in any other place, and will never repent of having been initiated into the Order of his

,r

n~tivecountry.*

.A.ft.el" the publication of the ,vorks of Barruel and Robison, the progress of Free I\Iasonry in G-reat Britain was retarded l)y alt act of Parlhnuent in l'7B9, for the suppression of seditious societies, in which the Fraternity w'ere virtually prohibited frOln erecting new I . odges in the kingdom. 13ut this act was not ~* ~r. Render's Tour through Germa,n~", Introduction to vol. 1. pp. :10, ;1;1. Dr. Render !l1fLintu.ins that Free l\1asonry has grea,tly improved the manners and dispositions of the Germalls. See vol. 2, p.. 200, note.


262

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CHART.

prompted by the calumnies of these writers. It became necessary from the political condition of the kingdom; and the exceptions which it contained in favor of Free l\lasons are a COlliplete proof that government never credited the reports of these alarnlists, but placed the Illost implicit confidence in the loyalty and prudence of British ~lasons. HISTORY OF THE GRAND LODGE OF SCOTLAND.

We have already brought down the history of Scottish l\fasonry to the institution of the Grand Lodge in 1736, and given a short account of the different circumstances which occasioned and accompanied tha.t inlportant event. 'Ve shall now, in as concise a manner as is consiitent with the present design, continue the history of the doings of this body down to the nineteenth century.. No more will be attempted than to notice so n1any of their act.s as will show to the Oraft the pure principles, the excellent order, and the truly nIasonic practices \vhich haveuni-' formly characterized the Grand Lodge of Scotland,-the body to '~'tholn the Fraternity in J\merica o\ve mueh of their origin, order, and success, and for whose future prosperity all true l\Iasons will devoutly pray. In 1736, the G-rand I..Jodge of Scotland was instituted, in consequences of 路which alrnost all the Scottish Lodges applied for and received new chHrter sand, by a ready and voluntary renunciation of their forlller rights, evinced the steadiness of their attachllleut to the Grand Lodge and their unfeigned acknowledgments of its jurisdictioll and power. This yet"Lr the Grand Lodge ordered that a fee should be exacted of eyery person ,vIlo had been initiated into the Order since its organization, or who might afterwards be initiated, and that this fee should make a part of the charity-fund for the relief of the indigent and distressed Brethren, and other benevolent purposes. The StlnlC year, the opulent inhabitants of Edinburgh and its environs having resolved to erect an infirmary or hospital for the reception of poor patients, the Grand J..Jodge proposed to pay, out of their own funds, a certain number of operative masons to assist in building the infirnlary, provicred thnt the nlanagers of that institution ,vould allot a particular apt1rtrluent in the hospital for the reception of a few infirm IVfasons who should be recommended by the Grand l\Iaster. The G路rand Lodge decreed, also, that the annual election should 110 longer be celebrated on the 24th of June, thebirthda:y of St. John the Baptist, ~1S had been the usage from time immemorial,


IIISTORY OF FREE l\fASONRY.

263

and that in future, for many important reasons, it should be held on the 30th of November, the birthday of St. Andrew. On the 2d of August, 1738, the foundation-stone of the New Royal Infirrnary of Edinburgh, patronized by the Grand Lodge, was laid in due and ample form. . On the 30th of November, 1738, it was reported to the Grand I.Jodge, by George Drululliond, Esq., that the directors of the ltoyal Infirmary, out of gratitude to the Society of Free J\rlasolls DJf their countenance and aid in building that edifice, had unanimously agreed that preference should always be given to distressed and infirm Free lVlasons in one of the galleries of the hospital. :Frolll the institution of the Grt"tud Lodge, the principles of the Craft had been so rapidly propag~ted through every part of the kingdom that it was found necessary this year to appoint Provincial Grand l\Iasters over .particular districts, who ,vere elnployed to hold general rueetings, and to take cognizance of every thing relating to l\I'asonry within the bounds of their district. In the year 1739, the son of an operative mason in Edinburgh, having been left at his father's death in the most friendless and indigent condition, was recolulnencled to the patronage of the Grand I.Aodge. 'Vith a l'eadiness which enhanced the value of the action, they agreed to take him under their own charge, to bind him to an 0Rert1tive mason for eight years, for the freedoln of St. ~lary's eha/pel, and during that time to furnish hiIn "rith clothes and other necessaries. It was agreed, also, if any siluilar applications were made, the same action should be perforuled every three yea,rs. During the yea.r 1740, it was proposed and unanilnously agreed that a correspondence should be opened bet,veen the Grand Lodges of Scotland and England, and that the assist3,nce of the latter in building the Royal Infirmary should he particularly requested. In the year 1747, the Grand Lodge enlpowered Alexander Drlullulond, I~sq., Provincial Grand l\laster of the west of Seot... land, ,vho ha.d taken up his residence at A.1exandrett~Lin Turkey) and erected several l\iUSOllic Lodges in that country, to constitute JJodges in t;l.llY part of .l?urope or l\..sia bordering on the l\lediterral1ean Sea, to supernltend the saUIe, or any others already erected in those parts of the ,vorld, a.nd to trttnSlllit an account of his proceedings to the Grand l.lodge. During the year 1749, the funds of the Grand I~oc1ge ,,""ere much d~nlinished by numerous donations to indigent Brethr<Hl.


264

l\"IASONIC ClfART.

In the year 1752, a message was sent to the Grand J...lodge, informing them that the foundation-stone of the Royal Exchange was to be laid on the 13th of Septenlber, and that a splendid procession of the Grand Lodge, attended by the other Lodges in and about Edinburgh, \vould take place on that occasion. Accordingly, a plan of the procession was seasonably transnlitted to the Brethren by the Grand l\Iaster, which was' approved and unanimously adopted; and on the day appointed, this ceremony was celebrated in due and ample form. In the"sear 1753, the Grand Lodge of Scotland was petitioned by the Scottish J...lodge in Copenhagen, requesting a charter of confirmation, and also the liberty of electing a Grand l\laster, with full power to erect new Lodges ill any part of the kingdoln. 'This petition was not answered in the fullest extent,; but it was resolved to grant a patent of constitution and erection in the usual form, and a provincial cOlllmission to a qualified person, elllpowering him to erect new Lodges in the kingdouls of Denma.rk and Norway, and to superintend those which 'were already ereeted, provided th~1t this Provine-ittl Grand lVlaster should be always subject to the Grand :Lodge of Scotland, and that the Lodges which he constituted should recognize and acknowledge her as their sUIJerior. After the election of the office-bearers, in the year 1751, the Brethren, to the l1Ulllber of f()tIl' hunch"cd, "l'nlked in procession fi"onl l\fary's Chapel to the I-ligh School, accolllpaniecl \vith ba.nds of ruusic, and directed by the light of torches. ~rhis is the first instance of a procession h~y torch-light that occurs ill the records of this Grand Lodge. In the year 1755, it was represented to the Grand I.lodge that the interests of l\lasonry 'would be great1y promoted by tho division of Scotli1nd int,o districts and the appointrnent of Provineinl Grand l\lasters over each district. This suggestion being taken into consideration, it 'w'as resolved to norninate a nUluber of respectable gent1elnel1 who "1'e1'e qualified for the discharge of that iInportant office. In compliance with the request of tl1e Lodge of Canongate and J..Jeith, the Grand I ..odge this year appointed 1\11". John l\I'Clure, Grand Chaplain, to eonsecrate a new room "Thich \vas fitted up for l\Iasonic llleetings. This ceremon:y was perforn1ed in the presence of the a-rand l\Iaster and other officers of the G"ra.nd, Lodge. In the year 1756, a provincial cOlunlission was granted to Colonel John Young, ,vho had been f(~n" lnany yeurs Deputy G-rand l\Iaster for Scotland, over all the I.lodges in 1;\luerica and


HISTORY OF FREE IVLA.SONRY.

265

the West Indies. A路 patent of erection was also granted for ~ Lodge at Boston, in New England. In the year 1757, a charter of constitution was granted to ~. Lodge at Fredericksburg, Virginia. In the year 1758, the committee of charity resolved to expend ten guineas in the purchase of clothes and other necessaries for the French prisoners confined in the Castle of Edinburgh, giving preference to those who were Brethren of the Order, without neglecting the necessities of such as were unini': tiated. This year l\'Ir. J Ohll l\rI'Clure was installed Chaplain to the Grand Lodge, and was advanced to the proper rank 'and precedency in the Grand Lodge. 1759.-This year several Brethren who were Scottish 1\Iasons, having instituted a Lodge at Charleston, South Carolina, transmitted five guineas to the Grand Lodge of Scotland, for the use of their poor. Grateful for this unexpected instance of benevolence, the Granel J...ioc1ge ordered a charter to be instantly made out and transmitted to theln by the first opportunity. In the Jear 1761, two }j'rench prisoners in EdiJlburgh Castle who were Free ~iasons were allowed four guineas from the Grand Lodo路e. o On the 21st of' October, 1763, the Grand Lodge, agreeably to request from the Lord Provost, ~Iagistrates, and Town Council of Edinburgh, met an1 proceeded to lay the corner-stone of the North Bridge. Thesame year a lVlilitary Lodge was erected in Rolland, under the name of the {Jnioll Lodge. The Grttnd Lodge of Scotland granted the constitution, at the request of the chief officers in General l\larj oribanks's regiment, in the service of the States-General of the United Proyinces. 1764.-In the course of this year two guineas were transnlitted to the charity fund by St. J ohn'8 Lodge in Virginia. Thus we see, in more instances than one, that the wide Atlantic, even, cannot separate the hearts of the Brethren. During the year 1767, the practice of granting diplomas was introduced into the Grand Lodge. In the course of the year 1771, the foundation-stone of the Cowgate Episcopal Chapel was laid with the usual cerelllonies by Ifis Excellency, I.Jieutenant-General ughton, Grand l\Iasterl\:Iason of Scotland, attended by several gelltlclnen of distinction. Nov. 30, 1772, the Grand Lodge of Scot.lalldreceived a comtnunication froln t,he G"rand I~odge of l~ngland, requesting that a mutual correspondence might be n1~Lin tained bet\yeen theIn, '-which request was cordially coulplied with on the part of thQ Grand Lodge of Scotland.

o

23


266

MASONIC OHART.

1775.-Some difference having arisen in the course of this year between the two Grand Lodges of England, those who de.., nominated themselves the Ancients submitted the case to the Grand Lodge of Scotland, who, from motives of delicacy, declined to interuleddle in the affair. On the 24th of June, 1776, the foundation-stone of the I-lighSchool was laid, with great solemnity, by Sir 'Yillialu Forbes, Bart., Grand l\rlaster of Scotland, in. presence of the Lord ProYost and l\:fagistrates, the Principal and Professors of the U niYersity, the Rector, l\fasters, and Scholars of the High-School, and the Th1asters, Officers, and Brethren of all the Lodges of Free l\tlasons in the city and neighborhood, besides a large concourse of spectators. No ceremony in .the city for lllany yeal's had yielded such heartfelt satisfaction to the inhabitants. The importance of the objects, the dignity of the procession, the number of Brethren, and, above aU, the charuling exhibition of aboye three hundred and fifty fine boys, afforded a most an.imating spectacle. On the 24th of January, 1778, William Sinclair, Esq., of Roslin, died, at the age of' seventy-eight. In consequence of the loss of this amiable man and zealous l\Tason, the Grand nlaster ordered a Funeral Lodge to be held on the 14th of :H'ebruary. Above four hundred of the Brethren, dressed in deep Dlourning, having assell1bled on that occ3,sion, Sir "'\\iillium Forbes, Burt., as G-r~tnd l\laster, delivered the :funeral oration. 1778.-It is remarkable that at-this tiule the Duke of . A.thol was Grand l\Iaster both in Scotland and England. 1'181.-l\Iany new Lodges were instituted this year, and much n10ney was distributed among the poor. In the yetlr 1783, a cbarterfbr a I..dodge at St. Petersburg, under the name of the Imperial Scottish Lodge of St. I>etersburg, was grant,cd upon petit.ion of se"\."eral Scottish l\lasons who had been cornmissioned by the Enlpress of the Russias to settlIe in her capital. During the year 1784, tIle Grand Lodge granted a confirluation of the I>ythagorean Lodge at Antigua. On the 1st of' August, 1785, the foundation-stone of the South Bridge was laid, with great solemnity, by the l~ight lIon.. orable Lord IIaddo, Grand l\laster of Scotla,ud. During this same year, a charter of confirulation was granted to the Union I.Jodge in 'tIle island of St. Christopher; and a correspondence was opened between .the Grand I.Jodges of Scot-:land and Berlin; also, inlD1ediate relief was granted to a dis~


HISTORY OF FREE l\IASONRY.

267

tressed Turk, who, upon examination, was found to be a Brother of the Order.· In the course of the year 1786, a charter was granted to ~ French Lodge at Aix in Provence, under the title of La Douce Har1nonie. 1787.-This year a charter was granted to a number of Brethren to hold a Lodo'e at Rouen, in ~"rance, under the title of Ardente An~itie, and ~llother for the city of J\1arseilles, under the name of the FaitbJ1tl Friend. Lewis Clavel, l\Iaster of the Scottish Lodo'e at Rouen in Normandy, was appointed Provincial Grando~laster over all the Lodges in France which held under the authority of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. In the 'year 1788, it was agreed that gentlemen of ~he clergy should pay no fees for being initiated into the FraternIty. In 1799, a new Lodge, under the title of the l\Iount Olive Lodge, was instituted at St. Christopher, under a patent f1 0m Scotland. . During the year 1791, a provincial deputation was gra,nted for the Leeward Caribbee Islands. • 1795.-This year the Grand Lodge of Scotland addressed his Royal l\'Iajesty on the subject of his escaping from the hands of an assassin, congratulating him, and expressing their sense of the Divine goodness in delivering him from the murderous designs of the most wicked of men. In the course of the year 1796, a cOTrespondence was opened with the Grand Lodge of Ireland.. In the year 1799, the Parlianlent of England passed several acts 101· the 'inore ~flectual 81l}J}Jress'io ttt of societies establislLcd for 'secZ,itio'MS and t1·etJ,sonable PU1'1)OSeS j and although provisions were made in these acts favorable to all those societies which could prove themselves truly l\fasonic, yet they operated to tlleelnba.rrassmellt of many Lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Scotland ; and although the Grand Lodge "ras C011scious that those acts were the result of unfounded jealousies and in a degree oppressive, yet they immediately a.cquiesced in aU the proscriptions of Parliament,,' and exerted themselves to carry those acts into full effect with the greatest possible expedition: thus at once evincing their loyalty and their readiness to subnlit to the most rigid scrutiny which government deemed it necessary to institute. 1800.-.. .1\. charter was tllis year grant,ecl to the officers of t.he 51st regiment, stationed in the island of Ceylon, to hold a Lodge, under the denomination of the Orange Lodge. On the 14th of lVlay, 1801, the foundation-stone of the 'Vet 9


268

l\IASONIC CIIART.

Docks at Leith was laid by the Grand l\Iaster, in due and ample form, in the presence of' about twelve hundred Brethren and a splendid concourse of citizens.. UNION BETWEEN THE GRAND LODGES OF SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND.

In the general history of Free lVlasonry we have already given an account of the schism which took place in the Grand Lodge of England by the secession of a number of men who, calling themselves Ancient J.\:Iasons, invidiously bestowed upon路 the Grand Lodge the appellation of I\loderns.. These Ancient ~Iasons, who certainly merit blame as the active promoters of the schism,路 remained without acknowledging a' superior, or being acknowledged an independent body, from the year 1739 to the year 1772, when they chose for their Grand lYlaster, in connection with the Grand Lodge of York, his grace the Duke of Athol, who was then Grand l\Iaster elect for Scotland, and from that time they were acknowledged as a component pal;t of the,Grand Lodge of York. From this circumstance, more than from any predilection on the part of the Grand Lodge of Scotland for the Ancient l\fasons, a friendly intercourse has always subsisted between the two Grand Lodges; but as the Scottish l\Iasons, from their union with the Aricients,-that is, the York l\Iasons and those of London who seceded fron1 the Grand Lodge of Englalld,-inlbibed the same prejudices against the Grand Lodge of England, under the Prince of 'Vales and Lord l\loira,-arising merely from some trifling innovations in cerenlonial observanCt~S which the Grand Lodge of ]1Jngland had iri'consideratelyauthorized,they never cherished that mutual friendship ,\\rhich, by the principles of Free l\:Iasonry, they were bound to preserve. Such was the relative condition of the Grand J.Jodge of Scotland, and that of England under the Prince of ales, when the Earl of路 l\foira .appeared before the Gran d Lodge of Scotland, at the celebration of the festival of St. Andrew, A.D. 1803. At this meeting an opportunity was offered for the discussion of this subject, and the Earl of l\foira, in an impressive and eloquent speech, related at considerable length the conduct of the Grand Lodge of England to the Ancient l\fasons. He stated that the 11earts and arms of the Grand Lodge had ever been open for the reception of their seceding Brethren, ,vho had obstinately refused to acknowledge their faults and return to the bosom of their mother-Lodge; and that, although the Grand

"r


HISTORY OF FREE MASONRY.

269

Lodge of England differed in a few trifling observances from that of Scotland, they had ever entertained for Scottish lVlasons that affection and regard which it is the object of Free lVlasonry to cherish, and the duty of Free ~Iasons to feel. , His Lordship's speech was received by the Brethren with reiterated applause,the most unequivocal mal'k of their approbation of its sentiments. From this period we may date the origin of the union between the Grand I.Jodge of Scotland and that of England, and which was finally consummated in the .year 1813, under the Grand-Mastership of the Duke of Sussex.. FREE MASONRY IN THE UNITED STATES OF .Al\IERICA.

In the year 1729, the Duke of Norfolk, Grand 'l\Iaster, constituted and appointed R. W. Daniel Cox Provincial Grand l\Iaster for New Jersey.. In 1733, Lord Viscount IV[oDtacute, Grand ~laster of England, granted a charter to the St. John's Grand Lodge at Boston, l\Iass~chusetts, in which R. W. IIenry Price was designated Grand }\;Iaster for North .LJ\.merica, !Vith full power for forming a Grand Lodge and constituting subordinate Lodges. In the same year, this Grand Lodge granted a charter to St. John's Lodge at Boston, ~nd in the following year granted a charter for a Lodge in Philadelphia~PellDsylYania. Of the latter, Benj amin Franklin was the first l\Iaster. ..I.L\.bout the same time, Lord l\.berdour, Grand l\Iaster of Scotland, gran~ed a charter to St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 82, at Boston.

In 1769, the l\lassachusetts Grand J.Jodge-tlle descendant of the Grand Lodge ofSco-Mand-was regularly constituted and established. 1\iuch feeling having arisen among the Fraternity in consequence of having two Grand Lodges in the same jurisdiction, on the 19th of fJ une, A.D. 1792, the I\iassachusetts G'rand Lodge and the St. "John's Grand Lodge were happily united. In 17B5, Free l\Iasonry was introduced into South Carolina, and itl 1754, the l\larquis of Carnarvon, Grand i\iaster of the Grand Lodge of J1]ngland, issued his warrant for constituting a Proyincial Grand Lodge in that province, in which Chief-Justice Leigh was designated Provincial G"rttnd l\Iaster.. In 1787, a Grand Lodge of ...i\.ncient York l\Iasolls was also established at Charleston; and in 1817, these two grand bodies l\rere united under the title of the "G-ralld J.Jodge of ..t\llcient

Free l\fasons."


270

MASONIC CHART.

In 1764, the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania was constituted under a warrant issued by the Grand Lodge of England. In 1771, the Grand Lodge'of North Carolina was constituted. 1778.-Grand Lodge of Virginia established, and in 1781, the Grand Lodge of New York was regularly constituted. . Shortly after the close of the Revolutionary War the several Grand Lodges of the United States threw off their allegiance to the Grand J..Iodges of Scotland and England, and beoame iude.. pendent State· organizations, and were soon after recognized by the parent bodies, and fraternal relations established with them and the Masonic bodies of continental Europe. Until the year 1797, no Gra~d Chapter of Royal Arch IVfasons was organized in America. Previously to this period a· com.. petent number of Companions of that degree, possessed of sufficient abilities, under the sanction of a l\iaster's "\Varrant, proceeded to exercise the rights and privileges of Royal Arch Chapters whenever they deemed it expedient. This unre.. strained mode of proceeding was subject to many incollveniences and productive of many irregularities. Sensible of the existence of these things, a convention of delegates from several Chapters in the Northern States assenlbled at l\lasons' . Ilall, in Boston, on the 24th ()f Oct,ober, 1797, to deliberate upon the propriety and expe(liency of forming and establishing a Qrand Chnpter of Royal Arch l\Iasons, for the government and regulation of the several Chapters···within tIle said States. On t,he fourth vVednesday in January, 1798, the delegates met at Hartford, in Connecticut, and, after several du/ys' deliberation upon the subject, t,hey formed and adopted a constitution for the governUlent o( Itoyal Arch Chapters; and havingelected and instnJled their Grand Officers, tae Grand Chapter became conlpletely organized. The long-desired and necessary authol~ity for correcting abuses and regulating t.he concerns of Itoyal .A..rell l\Iasonry. being thus happily established, the Order soon became flourishing and l'espectable. The second meeting.of the General Grand Chapter took place on the 9th" of January, 1806, at ~Iiddletown, Conn.. (septennial).. The casualties of war having prevented the septennial meeting which was to have been holden in 1812, after the return of peace the General Grand Chapter was convened in New York City, on the 6th of June, 1816. i'he Grand Royal Arch Cha})ter of ~lassachusettswas fornled in 1798; that of Rhode Island, in 1798; of Connecticut, in 1798; of· New York,in 1798; of VerUlont, in 180f>; of South

Carolina, in 1812; of Ohio, in 1816; of Kentucky, in 1816;


271

HISTORY OF FREE MASONRY.

of New Hampshire, in 1819. The remaining Grand Chapters came in after this time. .After the Grand Lodges of the several States had declared themselves free and independent, and the General Grand Chap.. ter was formed and organized in 1798, it was deemed ad.. visable to a40pt a regular and uniform mode of Lecturing and ark for the whole; and in order to accomplish this great desideratum, the expert ,workmen from v~rious parts of the country met together. The work was completed and adopted fully by the year 1810. Taking the" Ancient York Rite" for a standard, they selected from the "Scottish Rite" those things which approximated to the former, and.out of the two systems formed a complete set of Lectures, which are beautiful in themselves, and have been preserved entire to the present time. The General Grand ]~ncampment of the United States of _;\merica was formed and established on the 21st of June, 1816, at New York City, and was COlllposed of the following Grand EncaUlpments : ~lassachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania. The Grand Encampnlent of Pennsylvania was first路 formed on the 12th day of ~lay, 1797, and was composed of four EIlcampUlents. . The Grand Encampment o~ l\Iassachusetts and Rhode Island was formed on the 6th day of l\Iay, 1805, and was composed of five Encampruents, viz.:Encampment of K. T. - Boston.

"r

". " Council of K. R. C. St. John's Encampment,

-

Newburyport. Portland. Providence.

Encampment of K. T. - Newport. Th~ Grand Encaulpn;lent of the State of New York was forlued J nne 18, 1814, and was composed of the following

Encampments : Old Encampment,

...

Jerusalem Encampment, Colulubian

City.

"

"

Temple"

New York

...

" Albany.

l\Iont,gomery " Stillwater. The Lectures and Work of the Encampment were under the saIne efficient supervision and arrangement as in the I...odges and Chapters. There are now Grand Encampments in almost every State of the Union.


.A LIST OF

GRAND LODGES AND GRAND CHAPTERS, THEIR ANNUAL PLACE OF MEETING, WITH THE NU1"IBER OF SUBORDINATE LODGES AND CHAPTERS.

MAINE. Grana Lodge-Annual Oommllnication held at Portland. Grand Oltapter-" Oonvocation" "

Number of Subordinate Lodges, 00.. N umber of Subordinate Chapters, 00.

NE'V

HA~!PSHIRE.

Grand Lodge-Annu'a! Communication held at Portsmouth. Grand Oltaptc'r- " Con vocation ,. Conoord. Number of Subordinate Lodges, 66. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 00. ~IASS.A.CRUSETTS.

Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Masonio Temple, Boston. Grand Oltal'fer- " Oon vocation "'" (( "

Number of Subordinate Lodges, 00.

Number of Subordinate Chapters, 23.

RHODE ISLAND. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Providence. Grand Ohapter- to Convocation" "

Number of Subordinate Lodges, 21.

Number of Subordinate Chapters,

CONNECTICUT. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held aJternately at New Haven and Hartford. Grand Ohapter-Annual Convocation held alternately at New Haven and Hartford.

Number of Subordinate Lodges, 64.

Number of Subordinate Chapters, 27.

VERMONT. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Montpelier. Grand Ohapter- H Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 52. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 13.

NE'\V YORK.. Grand Lodge-Annual Communica.tion held in the city of Ncw York. Gloarul Ohaptmo-" Convocation u U u Number of Subordinate Lodges, 453. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 174.

272


LIST OF GRAND LODGES AND CHAPTERS.

273

NEW JERSEY. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Trenton. Grand Ol~apter-" Convocation u; " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 52. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 12"

PENNSYLVANIA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Philadelphia. Grcllnd OILupter-" Convoca,tion" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 328. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 00.

DELAWARE. Grand Lodge-:Annual Communication held at'Vilmington. Grand Okal)te1'- "Convocation" It

Number of Subordinate Lodges, 00.

Number of Subordinate Chapters, 00.

MARYLAND. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Baltimore. G1'and Ohapter- U Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 106. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 20. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communica.tion held at Washington. Grand Ohapter- U Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges,l1. Number of Subordinate Cha.pters, 00.

(Under the Grand Ohapter of l\1aryland.) " VIRGINIA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communioation held at Richmond. Grand O/i,(tpter-" Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 180. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 50. NORTH CAROLINA. Grand Lodge-Annual Comm.unication held at Raleigh. Grand OlLapter- "Convocation " U Number of Subordinate Lodges, 000. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 00.

SOUTH CAROLINA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Charleston. Grand Ohapter- "Convocation U it Number of Subordinate Lodges, 91. Number of Subordina.te Chapters, 2.3.

GEORGIA. Lodge-Annual Communication held at l'tlacon. arand (J}tapter- "Convocation U H Nuxuber of Subordinate Lodges, 230. Number of Subordinate Chapters, -1:5. G~'and

FLORIDA. Gi"and Lodge-Annual Communication held at Tallaha.ssee.. Gl"ana .OILapfer- '" Convocation" U

Number of Subordinate Lodges" 45. Number 'Of Subordinate Cha.pters, 15.


274

MASONIC CHART.

ALABAMA. Grand Lodge-Annual Conlmunication held at Tuscaloosa. Grand Gl"apter- " Convocation ",,, . Number of Subordinate Lodges, 230. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 72.

LOUISIANA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at New Orleans. Grand Ohapter-" Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 156. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 25.

MISSISSIPPI. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Natchez. Grand Okapter- " Convocation " . " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 229. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 63.

ARKANSAS. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Little Rock. Grand Ohapter- "Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 128. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 25.

MISSOURI. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at St~ Louis. Grand路路Ohapter- " Convocation " " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 00. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 31.

TENNESSEE. Grana Lodge-Annual Communication held at Nashville. Grand Oltapter- U Conyocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 270. Number of SubordinatE;l Chapters, 43. KENTUCKY. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Lexington. Grand Oltapter-" Convocation" tt Number of Subordinate Lodges, 350. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 82.

INDIANA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Indianapolis. Grand Ohapter-" Convocation U U Number of Subordinate Lodges, 252. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 41.

ILLINOIS. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Jacksonville. Grand Ohapter-" Convocation U " Number of Subordinate Lodges,422. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 61.

Gra'lld

OHIO. Lodge-Annual Communication held at Columbus.

Grand Chapter-" Convocation" Number 路0拢 Subordinate Lodges, 339. Number

~f

" Subordina.te Chapters, S1.


LIST OF GRAND LODGES AND CHAPTERS.

275

MICHIGAN. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Detroit. Grand Oh.apter-" Convocation " " Number of Subordin3lte Lodges, 107. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 27. WISCONSIN~

Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at ~Iadison. Gra/1td Oltapte1路- u Convocation U " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 117. Number of Subordinate Chapters, .22.

IOWA. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication '.held at Iowa City. Grand Ghapter-" Convocation " " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 102. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 28. TEXAS. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Washington. Grand G1Lapter-" Convocation" " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 00. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 65.

C.A.LIFORNI.A... Gretnd Lodge-Annual Communication held a.t Sncramento. Grand O]l,apter-- U Convocation" U

Number of Subordinate Lodges, 144.

Number of Subordinate Chapters, 34..

OREGON.. Grand Lodge-Annual Communication held at Salem. O'rand Clwpte,路- U Convocation " U Number of Subordinate Lodges, 24. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 00.

MINNESOTA. Gra,nd Lodge-Annual Communication held at St. Paul. Grand Chapte'r- H Convocation H " Number of, Subordinate Lodges, 28.. Number of Subordinate Chapters, 6..

CANADA. G>"and Lodge-Annual Communication held at

Grand Ohapter-" Convocation " Number of Subordinate Lodges, 00. Number 'of Subordinate Chapters, 25.


MASONIO SONGS, ANTHE~rS,

AND ODES.

277


MASONIC SONGS.

ENTERED APPRENTICE'S SONG.

liM~~

I

Just straight from his home, See yon candidate come, Pre-

I~ ~-J~ .~-rn搂i~~~~~~~

I

.'Just straight from his home, See yon candidate come, Pre-

~-=-0L~.~=C-~. -~ -II

i-f,)-

--

-

\$$C 0CllcRlt~ I~are~ fo~~~on;

Ofan that can harm, ,,:e

i;;~-{D.-~~{-gj -~-~ i

I

-H-

-

pared for the time and

00 ..

c:l,sion;

-

0 f all that ca:p.. harn)., 'Va

!~~~-~:ff J==. ~ Iz=.. - :~ ,

;;1i~.-H l-~-=~--"-路

-#I

-\7

-

路-

~-ll.

~-~.-~~- . 279


280

MASONIO SONGS.

I'~.~-~-~~~P~IE-" -rr- ,

~-~

-~~- ,.--~

~

I

r--t--;-

~-V---~ will him disarm, That he no way may hurt a Free Mason.

I I~~~ ~ ~~--~[-E i~~ _, --: fI.-!-~-:L ~-- ~ _ -~ -~ ~-Jf' . -~I will him disarm, That he no way may hurt a Free Mason. ~-.-~~ ~ i~~-~-=-~:~~ -.-..~ .

,

His eyes cannot search Out the way of his march,

Nor yet where his steps he must place on: When him we receive, He cannot perceive How he came to be made a ~ree l\:Iason. Then he'll danger defy, And on Heaven rely For strength to support the occasion; 'Vith the blessing of prayer He banishes fear, And undaunted is made a Free Mason. 'When he makes his demand, By the mast.er's cODlmand, To know if he's fit for the station, Around he is brought., Ere he get what he sought From a free and an accepted Mason. When girded with care, By the help of the square, The emblem of truth and of reason, In form he is placed, While to him are rehearsed The mysteries of a Free l\:Iason; Then full in Ilis sight Doth shine the grand light, To illumine the ,vorks which we trnce on; And now, as his due, He's clothed in full view With the badge of an accepted Mason.

""'-"""


281 Now hark! we enlarge On the duties a.nd charge, Where his conduct a.nd walk he must place on: Then o:p.r rites we'll fulfil, And show our good will To a free and an accepted Mason.

FELLOW CRA.FT'S SONG. Anda.nte.

~.

-

J~=t~ When earth's foun ... da .

-

tian first was .

~

laid

By

r-~ 11 fir

-J;=Erl the Al ... migh

...

ty Artist's hand, 'Twas then our perfect, our

Or-

~M ¡

tr

r~ perfect laws were made, Esta.blish' d by

â&#x20AC;˘

his strict command.

~14~~1! 24*


282·

lIrIASONIC SONGS.

~

CHORUS.

111_"

,-IIJI--=------

II~ ~-~-!L-iI=~~-@k~---t:=-~~.g} 1 -~----~ --~-- - I t - I

_, ..!.-!----.l __

_

Hail! mys - te-rious,

I-Iail, glo - rious }\iIa - son - ry,

~ , --ffi..!.~-'~,U ~ · i

~I -=- -.: I~ ~ S-,--~ S~= -D-fll.------"=-.,,--t-',, tJ ~ ¥-~ -tl--

Ifail, glo - rious !vIa - son - ry,

.Hail! mys - te-rious,

-

I

:-+-7-~"'--,r~

~~e r-- r-'~-, --~-:t= tI-tl-!

--fJl--tJ----

Hail! my& - te-rious,

I

-~-

Hail, glo - rious Ma - son - ry,

!A~~~~~~~~ 1L:=G:;-~\7--~~ "-=b~.~

l,~.~-tlI.gt-~~,"-~!!=§=.r rLJ_. I--t--t:. ; ! ! - _

:' I

I

~

That makes us

ev

!

--1-

-

r----

That makes us

I

. I@ j; ;

I

,

ev

EC . :I!. _r---T-;' •

- e r great and

I ,,, ' ~-"-.~:rm-.m=t. I~ i7

i

fJr

i

--

-

er

free._

§I!.-

.-fI-r -- "· r-

great and

tr

free.

-,,~fL---. .~i -11--:. ~--t==t-~ ~~. I j -~. -II. ~ -~ -. -l--

That makes us

_ev_.

- -•.. -

er great and free.

:~~-~~ In vain mankincl for shelter sought, In vain from place to place did roam, Until from II e n,v en., from IIeavcn he was taught To plant to build, to fix. his home.


~IASONIC

283

SONGS..

Illustrious hence we date our art, llnd now in beauteous piles appear, We shall to endless, to endless time impart How worthy and how great we are.

Nor we less famed for every tie By which the human thought is bound; Love, tru,th, and friendship, and friendship socially, Join all our hearts and hands around.

Our actions still by Virtue blest, And to our precepts ever true, The world admiring, admiring shall request To learn, and 0\1.1" bright paths pursue.

M.l.t\.STER'S SONG.

. -I ~And~A~ ~2t =tz=tI~ ,,-- II- J {J=~ J-.---f1: ~

--r-..

hal" - mo - ny

1. In

~

the

'"

so .. cin..l

band

~l-

Are

~-'--.---£±f ~- rB=.~1-I--~g-.-"-II-II-f1l-tl-.,,-11-.--+---~\ -.-+--'F-r-~.L.---1--1- --~ "--l.~__' -~-~-II-tl·- - -(//1-11-.,,-. met a-round

the foun.t of light,

To spend beneath the

Tr. - - ---~-~ - - :I..-J_ ~§. --I. "-..!IlL.. ~ ~~ -..I--<--.J= -rc-tl-~~" 3=.+.1 {...i,..l._ _ ~_

-r~---

l\Ias-ter's hand, In

~ -

~.

j-.-.--

-[-_.\--!,--- I-(11-".--•.

--~

de-cent

joy,

the

fes .. Live night:

-IJ-.-·11-II -1-=1±t~---~". ~~--t

n----

~--r-

1 - -..

il--U

~ _~:~7:T

Let each in truth tl,nd 110 .. nor bright Be present at the

~l~~~-I'---~~'-~~~. '. .-

~-~.

- -_. -

----II·-...J-·__~.tL_ II

11- -

se .. cret

hall,

1

1

~

. -

:-

, .

11-11-----,,-

And

on

his

heart

in


l\fASONIC SONGS.

~ +-E I"=-.;= ,-,-(fL"" ~~~ ---~f l - " - , 路 - -,, ---------"

---l",.....- - .

si-ience write The

fI--. r--I-tr-~

sa-cred

- -~-ill

JVord that binds us

Beneath the blue and st.arry zone 'Vhose arch high swelling girds the pole, The l\JIaster on his orient throne Unfolds to view tpe mystic roll; At once the pure fraternal soul Bends to the 8ign with sacred a'we, And reads upon the lette1"'d scroll, In words of light, the unutter'd law. Let us our hearts and hands entwine And form one perfect. wreu,th of love, Then, kneeling at t.he voice divine That spake to mortals from above, Put on the meekness of the dove, And the '\vhite robes of charity, And in unerring 'wisdonl prove Our brethren with the single eye.

Be there no dn,rkling sco"\vl of hate Upon the calIn unruffled brow, But each ill innocence elate To Virtue's brightness only how: Blest guardi~1n of all pleasures! Thou Be ever at our l\Iaster's side, And Inarkw'ith radiant finger how Thy ~J..Jo)'d$ ca.n be our oIlly guide.

By thee conducted, we ascend The steps that lead alone to IIen-ven, And where the mounting arches end To each tIl e sign' of 'wo7,th is given; Then Inantled by the shades of e,"en lVe meet beneath the unclouded sky, And binel t.he links no power hath riven, In which lye sW'ear to live and die. Let us these ffl.vored hours employ, These monH~nts of the social night, To sing the silver song of joy, .And DUtko the chain of 'ltn'ion bright. So Inn.y "frye even here unite 'I'o spend th e hours in Inel'cy given t Led by the tokens 'which invite .Alone to happiness and .Heaven.

all.

-


285

l\-IASONIC SONGS.

MASTER'S SONG. BY BROTHER T. S. WEBB.

SOLO. Modera.to.

ER:!i~ §~ ';;---1 ~ rq -, -b--rGI' ~ ~' ~"=Lj.=-~

~

I

sing the

~Iason's glo

- ry, Whose pry-ing mind doth

p~ burn,

Un - to

com-plete per ... fee - tion,

Our

E@#--~~~R;§. mys - te - ries

to

learn;

,Not those who vi - sit

. .--_" _~" ~ -r -f2--iL -f2: __ ~~ ~,-'-''="J-II~---l~ ~1_

-11--

. Lod - ges To

eat

and

dri)lk their

lill,

Not

~ ~~~ ~'~ ilS~F;

~=.=-~~r ~~= 2~~ those who at

our meetings Hear lectures 'gainst their will, ,

i;.,~ -=- ~ .~~~~ II

~=.f-:

f!:;,'.

"--:J-"JI-

But

.

on-Iy those whose pleasure At ev'-ry lodge can

4-~~_-J--fl,' ~ ~ t---~~~-~~~~*~~ .--"---J =--i-~

l

,-

"

r-

'"

,,-

: .-~--i-,,-


286

lvrASONIC SONGS.

TRIO, CHOR.US..

~

i

f

..

.

~

: .fIb- ~~.~~ -r-,,-. . . ~-楼 :-"f -h-~+=-.JL ~ -~ ~_

~-=

f

_~= II---i:j-IJ ~_

~

.

_I

,

Hail! glorious Mason-ry! Hail! glorious Mason - ry!

~

~

~

~

~~m-路 -~~~~-~----~c ~-~t H~lil!

glorious l\fasou-ry! lInlil! glorious l\Iason - ry !

1":'\

~---",..-~-~-=-O~

I I I

~~J!=~

"-~~~~ T'improve themselves by lectures In glorious Mason-ry.

I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~Ei3hE :~~~~.~ I T'improve themselves by lectures In glorious Mason - ry.

i~_~~~~S ~~~ -~ E The faithful worthy brother, \Vhose heart can feel for grief, 'Vhose bosom with compassion Steps forth to its relief;

Whose soul is ever ready, Around him to diffuse The principles of l\Iasons, And guard them from a.buse ;


287

MASONIC SONGS.

T'impro'Ve ourselves by lectures CHORUS. In glorious l\iIasonry. These are thy sons, whose pleasure, Hail! glorious Masonry! At every lodge, will be T'inlprove themselves by lectures The duty and the station In glorious ~lasonry. Of master in the chair Hail! glorious l\-Iasonry ! Obliges him to summon Each brQther to prepare, King Solomon, our patron, That all may be enabled, Transmitted this command:By slow though sure degrees, "The faithful and praiseworthy To answer in rotation, True light mu~t understand; With honor and with ease. And my descendants, also, 1-Vho're seated in the East, CHORUS. Have not fulfill'd their duty Till light has reach'd the West." Such are thy sons, whose pleasure, At every lodge, ,vill be . CHORUS. T'improve themselves by lectures In glorious l\lasonry. Therefore our highest pleasure, Hail! glorious ~Iasonry ! At every lodge, should be

THE lVIASON'S ADIEU. WORDS BY BURNS.

1

1;.l=8=(i--~g§~ J-;,~+S~"-_,,-----l ---1-.-' b!:i-'-f-::J-------.J..

I

I

I

II'

--tl----

A - dieu,

a

.

:

-+-F----~

.;.-f

heart-warm, fond

a. - dieu, Ye

!;~~ -===b=~= ~~

I··

=s;t±E-1L.f±tL~~~ -,j- --,j• '


288

l\iASONIC SONGS.

Oft have I met your social ba.nd, And by that hieroglyphic bright, T() spend a cheerful, festive 'V'hich none but craftsmen ever night, saw, Oft, honor'd with supreme com... Strong mem'ry on my heart shall mand, write Presiding o'er the sons of light; Those happy scenes when far awa'.


289

l\'IASONIC SONGS. ~Iay

freedom, harmony, and love Cement you in the grand design, Beneath th' Omniscient Eye above, The glorious Architect divine: That you may keep th'unerring line, Still guided bythepl~mmet'slaw, Till order bright cOlupletely shine, Shall be my prayer when far

IVIy last request permit me, then: When yearly you're assembled a', One round-I ask it with a tearTo him, your friend that's far

awa'.

And you, kind-hearted sist·era fair, I sing farewell to all your charms: Th'impression of your pleasing air 1Vith rapture oft my bosom awa'. 'warms. Alas! the social winter's night No more returns 'while breath I And you, farewell, whose merits claim dl'aw, Justly that highest badge tow-ear: Till sisters, brothers, all unite In that Grand Lodge that's far 1vlay Heaven bless your noble name, awa'. To l\iasonry and friendship dear:

ODE FOR GRAND VISITA.TION. WORDS BY It. T.

Sweet Min - strel, who to

PAL~E,

ESQ.

mor-tal ears Canst tell

the

[Pi-+--_I-!.. ~ . . r=--+r--~-:~· .. -~

I.. :. Sweet

i-.

r

I

~Iin

- strel" who to

mor-tal ears Canst tell

the

__- ~$7·r~.lb'.=§~m....- -..- ~,. .~: :. -.-,,-11-·~-e=-'I lrf~

~r-f-

._ .

Sweet

~:Iin

I

~ --.--

f-- -

- strel, who to

'j

.

#I

nlor... tal ears Canst teU

-f'.

~

the

'A-"-~~~' ~-= t±!-;§L,t==(·~.!....'.-.7-!.~.l-l'~-,-.'~' :=-~ - + ~ -.- , --~1===~4-" ---~ 4l. :~ -_-_f-

- --

r-

25

'_.-"'-_

Gl-


. '=

290

.MASONIC SONGS.

~

i1

P

-no~'--\-i"-,,.11-T7"1--1-IJ-~.,---11---[--~~~-~.

I

- '-- - . -"-r-III'" 11- "'-' . - ., -fMl.- -_._-"I--'-l7 1~ -f'-17-r;- ,:.tr-.:. rtL:,- -a.!~~T~-' -- - - #L3 iJ-~ ~,,~

. \

Art which guides the spheres, :Blest 1\lasonry, all hail! With nature's -11-"-11-II-II.

I

,U

-. -=

77--=

1+~jI~·-~tt-I-l--l-II-~~~~ !~.-~~-t=r::l7w- - - -~Ii-·~-r-. -....-;.-·-H- flL-jll--

•• 1

I

:1-~~_

_1.1'

~-

_ I .- - - " :

. -

,.Art which guides th:Pheres, Bl;t Masonry, all hail ! With natur:'s

I

-fL C;l;tf=r-j!~~.-f!~~t~~E~--m= -"'-.-""·"1' ,

I

;.;

I

~

I-J-~-W-

",.

""'1!

~

~-f ~L -r-~$

-t-~

,-

.Art which guides the spheres, Blest Masonry, all hail! ":ith nature's

=----

-fl-

I

,-11.- . - i - I - - · -~ - --t:-5=-~*-~·~-H1(g~

l~-. ~---

t~_·-J~.-r--II-' I--~-t-~

-l7- - - -r*,.j-~ -'_._~

fIL-~ -+ - H= c2.-

-"-"'--fF?-' - ~-a-=-~-i~-l~'--kfI'"'Jrr-~+'--~.-=-f'-,,-#'.,,~-; 1J1-~..J- - ~!..J-.:.-r--.fl-,,#- . _ . . ~ 'f-r~- ~r---....-.

:. ''. I_~

I I

·~-II-~ ._-Ii1rti-~

~-I-_..

-,-1-

~

birth thy laws be - gau

-~ +f~ - 'I _

'

!P.:"b:T--~ ,

~_~__

I

To rule on earth fra - ter - nal

-II....'

-

_

_

man,

:~#~-===~~·----==-m

I

birth thy laws be - gan

To rule

~n earth fra -ter - nal

b

man,

. ,,--- -_._. II-··-.,,"-lItJ~II--"-"-t~~-t I .f---~i~tm~1=1 1't-~E ~ --fII-- E-fl.. f--lT-

II . !

;J.r-l-l-t-~~_-

---=-~ ~L.-

_·IJ--- -11-.1. 1-

·IJ-

h-

-I-L

.

-

-:-"-

-r

--

I birth thy laws be - gan To rule on earth fra- ter - nal man, :.'i7-"'~ 4-:-- '.....-.- - -~I~II.. ~ - -. ~- -. \----.. - - r-- fE"" ~--~-.-~~-·-l '~ [--rr ... _ / - -- --p1;J-=p--- = h--II-"'. - , - - - _.t.__.-.. --j-----


291

MASONIC SONGS.

f

~-~~~:IF--_·==-·~~=fSI And still in heD.v'n prevail, Vi.' ith nature's bh.,th thy laws began To

~.~r-=V~ .M~~~~--~ H+U=~ - ~. -~. y"

I

-U J-r_.

l~~4=-' -rtF---- -

I

c:

-

1-..;

---

--

And still in heav'n prevail, With nature's birth thy laws began To

.

!~ :m~~m,· ~"-~~ -~tI---~~' ~~~r~'l-!-I - . -- I-t;rrJ ..

. -. ,,--+--+:-.fl

-l--=+-IH-.:J+ -r--,.++_.I--t-J--'-&

~_I

-

And still in heav'n prevail, 'Vith nature's birth thy laws beftan To ~ -!'--

i~~~~-: ,-,. ,~~-.--~. "-..tfJ ~- -"'--II-!' ~.~' -,!J-- ·11 -+t-~"-m-~ "mr-~+-

1-'-11-

~.;2

-

. ~~ _

--r.

.

.~.-.'~~';+~~.--~~~~~~.l.· W~ -I'l/-~- ""1 . . '7 = .' -'t=-t- r---t-7 -~-~-""'-b--'--f-1! --~- ~--~

I

I

I

rule on earth frater-nal man, And still -fl- - -

.-

,-H-, --~ I

-1 . .- ··.E#---t- - . --1--

-tJ~ -11- --+-t----II--i:-t.. . --

--. -

r-~~-. ~~~ ~M~-. ."... --E"-.

11-._'r'~+;F --_ -. ~~-

-

I I

i

rule on earth frater-nal

i.~~~.... L__

-

in heav'n prevail.

man

And still in heav'n prev~lil.

' ~~'."I--~


292

MASONIC SONGS.

0' er matter's modes thy mystic sway Can fashion Chaos' devious '\vay

To Order's lucid maze; Can rear the cloud-assaulting tower,

And bid the worm, that breathes its hour, Its humble palace raise. From nascent life to being's pride, The surest boon thy -laws provide, ,Vhen wayward fate beguiles; The tears thou shedd'st for human woe, In falling shine like Iris' bow, And beam. an arch of smiles. Come, Priest of Science, truth-array'd, And \vith thee bring each tuneful maid, Thou lov'st on Shinar's plains; Revive Creation's primal plan, Subdue this wilderness of man, Bid social virtue reign.

HYl\lN FOR CONSECRJ.'\.TION.

~ .~~~ ~~~e=~~ ,: ~ -¥~~ Hail! u - ni - ver - sal Lord, By. Heav'n and

-+,=:=, 1_1F-"~.-~ ~--~ ~I ---4i: b==-=..-, , - ,~- ,~~1L---r=~~~_ I

I,

-".' ' - -

! j

I

,',

-t=~-

--~

,

.

I,·~,'" _~~ 11•. :::E.-~"lL,E~ !JI-~

i

Hail! u

-

ni -

-:--=E~~E~--.

ver - sal Lord, By

-= -.=~,.3=-

i.~~~t;II¥~ =a§~=~ -tt-::;E-.- 11-11-= .--,-- _. - --

1-·

Heav'n and

--~


293

MASONIC SONGS.

earth a - dored, All

hail, great God!

Be - fore

thy

fI- f'fi~-§ - ii ~-t~t= ~ b ==

i li

l-_

lP

_"-_11__

! I ?--tl= - -~- ..;J J I

I

_

_

earth a - dored, All

pL

--

hail, great God!

-~

Be - fore

thy

.

_.,~U-• .---aJI~;-J-.-J~~. ~'.r=~.~ -- _. . -l7 --t7 I_._-V_--===---4IL I

:i~~~~mt~=~ - ~ -JT - -. -17'· ~-=t

: i

i

throne vte bend, To

us

thy

gra.ce

extend, Anti

l,,·~~ •._!..-.-§~.---f:-.~~§.~-I. ?-l--liC= --'

t:;il-i.-~-l--- -~_._-I--I...---l-

1

~-!1----

I

~

- - h - \--- 1 -

--~-

~~-

i

It.l I

!I

+- .-:t5 _... .'~ • li~ '. . ~--tl-. .~.,-"-~-S---('-!,~ 1---\ __

i

',----,.-

I I

-

--

.!:.H-

throne we bend, To

us

thy

-,-I-.

---

r----~-

.

grace

r-----

-

extend, And

r- -~~.·m---'-·1-J-~~I 1-.. ---fI.'-~§e~-~-.l--.+---, If-!7-lI-- r--1+---f--!;-r-I.,· •.---. -,,----~ .~-t... ~-~-+-- ~~_:._f!" ~-,.-

i I

,

11r'Z •.,,-t)-r-+.i-- -_.- - - - .

~_~

.,

,

25*

.-

~~ _ _

. ._-r---r--"

.......-

~- -I-

'11_


294

MASONIC SONGS.

,

1':\ '

;#=T~1E~~~r ~ to

~

our pray'r at-tend! All

hail, great God!

.-~-.-~~ ~.~ ,'V-'!==t== L ="===-. ~ - ~ t Jl

"

r,-

r-

I

r--:-

--

.

Ij~-~ ~~_ to

our

pray'r at.-tend! All

?IT r

,A , •.. -,.-. II-=----~ .--1 .~

-+~

7~

~

Oh, hear our prayer to-day, Turn not thy face away, o Lord our God! Heaven, thy dl'e~1d dwelling-place, Cannot. contain thy grace; Remeluber no'w our race, o Lord our God! God of

OUi

i- -t-_~

----1- - - .

~--

fat.hers, hear,

And to our cry be near, J'ehovah, God!

hail, great God!

--P

-

-

tJI-II--

~

t9- ·

.

The heavens eternal bow; Forgive in mercy now Thy suppliants here, 0 Thou Jehovah, God! To thee our heart.s do draw, On them oh write thy law. Our Saviour, God! When in this Lodge we're met, And at thine altar set, Oh, do not us forget, Our Saviour, God!

ODE FOR DEDICATION. Anda.nte.

, I

-1,._ . lJr

BY J. H.

'fL-"

,

~~ . .6.~ 4--.- fl~",~~~U= -t=, ~~. -.-.-E'· ........ Al-rnight - y

..

Fn.-ther, God of

I B-'~~. r-~

~;=

Love! Sa-cred, e-

----_

-1!-=-

~-.~


m

. 295

MASONIC SONGS,

!~

Et:=w-t=E~~~~--~~--~ -,,-....

II

"

i~~$lf~~=~路~

Iter - ~~Kin~t ce-

53

;~H les .. tial courts

f1 ..

~

I

~~

rL~

bove, Send bet1ll1S of -,,-

grace

011.

-fIJ-

~.-~~ $ P h S ' wings;

路 i~~

Oh, may

~

_~~~~_

they,

~

~

I~-~,~~,.路~~,~",.,路~

i'

, light. I- - . -

l~

,-

- ~ -'~-~

--J

di.. vine,

~ F-~

Shed on

a,

..i24

, ,O"llr ,heart, S II

;ll-


296

MASONIC SONGS.

~ fir ~

PP Expressivo,

tr

-§7t, -_.---,,-.-!. ---=--=-=:t=---s=

'~=1~'-!J-=+~: ~ ..

~

--1--i-:-t~ -;:;----I ....: ht9L,•••-h.J.. ~

I

-fl--=---=---fdJf_-cf~_ - - t i lra~rs ;

spir - ing

---

-~fJ.fIl- '

-,,-,,-

'Vhile, bend - ing

~

-11.""-

-------Ii

at

this

-"-!

'A~~ ~ -1---,;-..._- H-~:~--,-~~£.-" 1::1'-~ ~-_,"S' &I , r- - . - , '--r-'~!'-'., d:4t= ,------;,' - - -----1- '- - - -

-

. .~

m" .

I

,

I

- - - - - - . . .

=r--- ,--

'~fB--1~~c~~~~ ~ h--~_., ,1)~fI..~.=j\,-1__ ,,---~,,- ~tI

i' i"

i

!

I

)

~

,

sa - cred

-

'I-r~-- ~~-h-"',

~~---itt'-......_-- ,_!~.J""_~_

--

"

...

.A. tempo.

~' @

tlJ-

-----,-

~

-'

tr

~~-g~-ri-l~·---f![ -- --, -- ~t===

9t=,~, i -l'i-.-d-fl-F--' :,' -,+--,k11--

!-.:- " ,,I

=-~==---

shrine, While bending at t.his sa - crcd shine,

','~, --"l-·Io-~--~-t:l-r-i-~-J-!-,l-~"r~""i .... '7~~F"r-

I,

We

h-r----!.. - - , , '.

--~-~- -'"~-=~1=

of - fer mys-t.ic

suugs

of

prais~. _

WE'

:~, ~t!9-~~t§:E -r--t;;;t- -;--==,~.==== --

I

.

~--'r--4-"-

~-~~ -sf'--n -fl· -"m"....,::=--------=--§~ ,' I7-fir-f: - - - - - ,"1"-..

I:A~=~,:: I

- .-IJ

i

Faith! with diYinc and heav'nward eye, Pointing to radiant realms of bliss, Shed here thy sweet benignity" And crown our works with happiness; Hope! too, with bosom void of fear, Still on. thy sten,dfnst anchor lean, Oh, shed thy ba.lmy influence here, And fill our breasts ,vith joy serene. And thou, fair Charity! whose smile Can bid the heart forget its ,voe, Whose hand can. nliserJrfs care beguile, And kindness' s'weetest boon bestow,

-~E!:


297

rvIASONIC SONGS.

Here shed thy sweet soul-soothing ray; Soften our hearts, thou Power divine I Bid the warm gem of. pity play, With sparkling lustre, on our shrine. Thou, who art throned midst dazzling light, And wrapp'd in dazzling robes of gold, Whose flo,ving locks of silv'ry white Thy age and honor both unfold, Genius of ~Iasonry! descend, And guide our steps by thy strict law; Oh, swiftly to our temple bend, And fill our breasts with solemn awe.

GLEE. ..

J.rAllegro ma. non presto.p

JL-rr--

~

---1.

~

11;~~~15F~J:t b=~J II~ J.f . ""i"7~

i

Hail! mys-terious, glorious science, •

:_ ±t=-:---.~!.-,

!

I

Cres,

I-~Iail!mysteriO~S,

~-~-~" ------

,

--

gt

I ----

I!ail! 111)"'s-terious,

I

:AiF.b:__ ~ t~ ----~ --~~-. :!~~~---_. 11' • ~-"_.---:;~-. . I~~ V-:±=:t -~ ~~ =t=t=--,CC:= ~*c~" II:-vP' I~ .. !~~ -~~ ~ §g-=-~=-1 I--t==r-+. tt~p-+-~~. I

i"

.-,,-fl.- ' . -I--flL-fl=.".'---.'t '-

glorious science, Hail! mys-terious, glo-rious science,

1;-

I

I=-4

-if-=--I · .-

~

-r--

-~r ~-}-.-+_..-

glorious science, Hail! mys-terious, glo-rious science,

~-" EE~-~~ I~~t---~~-bE

GE


298

l\IASONIC SONGS.

' -#

~

1

''-''-~~

'

~~"-"-I

~~,-II-"-"-'~"-f-- ~._-~-I/)-,- 'rr---!--~-r-l--,

f!'---+- "I i ~ I ~'r--"- '--~-l-­ ---t--t=t-~ ~--t-r---·~_L--L._-

I. \ I

\Vhich to dis - cord

-t-- - - - - - bids de - fi - U,llce! lIar-ma-uy a,-

1Vhich to dis - cord

bids de - fi - ance! IIa.rmo-ny

-

!

=

.MrJ.r ~ 1-:",~._~-'~~&t==i--=-==~ ~-._E~-=t=E -==t= ~, -II _. -=-F~~-':~------~Et=---·- '.'- Er= ""tct=t--± I

a-

I

.~~ ~ .~"--~ 1;)~1f~L~-~. ~~-~=t:=~~.~,

l~~-r--~-l=-+--- -

--~=t=

1-·

,=

1,~~#--~~~--a-'-fI-~~ ,'·i--.-

ift'-H--,,","~ =12-----i- -t----l--t== fIl-.!. -r---,1 - - , :'.,',-.,--rr-f--i \ :--+- 'I _

====t-- -:if;~T# ,~~--"-§ -f'--~-f*. L

I

-=--~

II

i

I I

I

F

lone reigns here,

-'- - - -

a - lone reigns here.

g

~r. -----f*.-.-~-_i _ ~=~_w_-. ,

--,.,._-.'--"

I~gt__~_p

Iitt-:

Hal' - roo - ny

lone reigns here,

+-~

IInI" - mo - ny

-----;--,.,.',.-

lone reigns here.

t9-I-"....!-fl--lI---; !I fit

-

-'ij-~ ~ !~!-o!'!'L_f*.-;L=,-- ~~--'-'-, -fI. ~----~-, :--'-rr-=r-I==L- ---~ ~ t== -- ._-." .!.-t"--'"~---

i·----~--

-1----,·-

-

-_.~.-

Corne, let's sing

:

Come, let's sing to

Hirn that raised us

iA~~~,:~-:--'--E~E~=~=E- §tt-~, . , ."==e=I :~:

-

E=:: -~- -~--I-.=-_~_-:=±=_' _-,1


299

l\IASONIC SONGS.

~ #-

1-'

'-#---l:•._~~.:--:-~--r--.-'--.rr--.--

~-~--~1 "~-r-.-~-\--!---•.-

!---.-~-I-r= .-.- - - -~_L_r---::~

I

I

.11

-}--II-- - - - - - - - - - .

Hail,

mYS-teriOUS~

Hail, mys-terious_

---i--P'----W-----. ;_

',,,;!fr.1-!'. . . ~-t=~-_--~---- tE-"'-~'--~---1' ,.\ =tr-~~=; -!=-~~=~= 7

:

'--r--L_-~

_ L _.. ~

Hail t U1YS -te.-rious, glorious science, Iluil! ItlJs-te - dous

1~":":rJi.'-:-.,.11'-:- - ,--.. -. _~l-_ ~. -. -----~-~----.----~----i· (.17-~~ . _ -'1t-~ -= .'11- }.-L-_L.-~==I.....

.

l._ _

- - - - -


~IASONIC

300

f

~

SONGS.

.

~~~~tยง

.

I~~_""" __ -~I==I== - _~ I Hail, my~ - te-rious, glorious science,

'if1-~ ~ --~ :-~-~-. -------~W= --r=t4=t

:- ~111t I

-"~ 11

glo-rious science,

'-I-~ :.,A.; ,1t-~ .7~-~-.rr-fI

.

"'_.-

Hail, mys - te-rious, glorious science,

t

II-"-ยงf!--"-~. I . =flt=t-1".. - - ~ r---L_ r--t-r--t-

t

---

,=t== ' ..


MASONIC SONGS.

SOl

ODE TO CHARITY. (Mus'ie, see page 281.)

of Heav'n, mankind's best friend, Bright Charity, inspire the lay; On these celestial shores descend, And quit the realms of cloudless day: CHORUS.-To Thee our constant vows are paid, Thy praise we hymn, Angelic ~laid. OFFSPRING

When Vulcan rages unconfined; And Neptune mourns his baiRed power; When flames, aspiring with the wind, To Heaven's high arch resistless tower, CHORUS.-'Tis thou our hearts with pity's glow Inspir'st to feel "for human woe. The house a dismal ruin lies \Vhere mirth late tuned her lyre of joy; And tears of anguish fill your eyes, Poor orphan girl and houseless boy : CHORUS.-But thou, s'weet maicl, ,vith pit.y's glow Inspir'st each heart LO soothe their woe. Come, then, all-hounteous as thou art, And hide thee fronl our sight no more; Touch ev'ry soul, expn.nd eaoh heart, That breathes on freedolu's chosen shore: CHo:aus.-Colulnbia:>s sons with pity's glow Inspire to feel for human woe.

CHARITY.

I,;. ~fi:-_,ezzlt fO~'

A HYMN.

~. _

l~~~ 11__

I

0 Cha - ri - ty! thou heavenly grace, All ten - der,

I

0 Cha. - ri - ty! â&#x20AC;˘thou heavenly grace, All ten - der,.

!~~

9 ~~ I**-~ I ~~-p:~8= .26


302

rtIASONIC SONGS.

~

I ' I I I

-~ -tJ--.II" -~- '-~---~--

~

'

soft, and

.

~-

--F ~-~~--t

~r-"-", ~- · -1-+-

_..__

~d,

I

b

11r--- ,J----l-...J-.'-§II-tlJII_ _~_

I

A friend to

all

the

_ _

hu - man

I"j~f,~"-!f-~--l-~rli=~" r--'+=~-tT-1t==r- ,!f i

-;-

I

-,IfL=tf-t~E~=~ _~¥tt===tLf soft, and kind,

.A friend to

all

the

hu - man

~-'~' ~. 'j~7~.~~E _!-~~_.-~-t

~-F·~t=~:'~-lfri~r-::t-~.=i II~ , P

1":\

i: ..'.

I

1-

~

-tiIP- - .

race, To all

-

~

--

~-l-I--l--

-~--.r

that's good and kind.

The man

of

i:,~,=F" ~-=~~~!f~E~'" ~~-=Ea==~ --E----.t !ILL-

I

race, To all

i

---

that's good and kind.

The man

of

g

i. "-tl-~(II.-"'~-~~~~]gg i~·~ r-- I=£:."--!f- .t::. -~-==~~__

__'_

--

--~-

-t:=

'~~~~-~ ~~I -----~- =fI- -~ ~e=+,,~=-.-. ~~,J'=

I

- -

fI)-

-

, - 1 - --j--+--t-~-

-.--

t

I

cha • ri . ty . ex· tends, To all

his

lib' - ral

~~=r=g~] I

:-.,-

cha· ri - ty

ex - tends, To all

r,"

' , - ,-].-

"'-*'-"" tEL-~-, .,,---:----

~,-i,A';-h-~~, !- , l - r -~t .-1;;;1"Ii7--~¥......-'"-, _L- r----'-

! - - ,

I

_h~i~ _~~' - ral

, -

.

r -.... 'r-


303

lVLA.SONIC SONGS.

f

-

i

;

i

I i..

I

I

friends

:Jr-'" i

.

--

~h_~_~ ~I _II--+===~ -路--~cP-=-~

. f}-4J-.

1

Ilis

,

pi

~

--fl---~--

~-

-

ty

may

com - mand. _

~-;cEf--~r - === r----=- ~

IJ.--',,,"--r-~- -11-- -, -

=--l=--t====~== friends His

pi

-

ty

may

com - man'!.

;~g-.g li~t-J~ He aids the poor in their dist.resslIe hears when the:)" complain; "\Yith tender heart delights to bless And lessen all their pain: The sick, the prisoner, poor, and blind, And all the sons of grief, In hinl a bencfn.ctor find; He loves to give relief. 'Tis love th:1t makes religion sweet, 'Tis loyc thn.t nlakes us rise, With willing mind and &rdent. feet, To :y'onc1er happy skies: Thon let us all in love a,bound, And charity pursue: Thus shall we be with glory crowned,

And love as angels do.

f!


304

l\1ASONIC SONGS.

lVI.A.SONIC HYl\IN.

Flr·~iO~:~:"teo

~

~

~~,-~~~ ~.,Grea.t Ar-chi - teet,

I

.-.-.

su-p~eme, di - vine, Whose wisdom

l~see:~:_:::~'~~E=.~

! I~~-' --1' i~'!l,-~ ~-, ~-tl•1===_"""-I-'-..-_......,,4=::-LL __• _ ~== tI11- #I 11Great .A.r-chi - teet, su-preme, di .. "!tine, Whose wisdom -

I

-

~

Bass.

I~~~-R,~=fi ~il Et.: =1L=b. I ~~ l=± 1

__

-, - __._.,__. __ __..... ~n=~: ~ tJ-~.~~~' ,. " .1'LY,7~tr:-, =-= riP" : -I·~,-' \- --_- - ---!--1 _,_~I

~

==-~r-

I

plann'd the grand de-sign, And gave

I

-i-W

i~c-~J

i- :=ff~---{--1-

'

#.

- - _..-

l)lann'd the grand de-sign, .A.nel gave to

na .. ture

....

............

na. - ture

-+' I; g ~~~ 11-...-.-~-~=!=. --·

--

I -{- ·,.pr--if--.- -- - , -t . fIl 11-£

I

to

i=Ji=.~

~ i~.!.~~~~! -'£!-fL~-+~-"-~~~§ j--+r--;i-til 1==. ..-t-fII-

..!-+_

I

~

~

--,

- " ~--t--

4===

11-.--

1J

,.'" •__ ',r==+=(g.~!-~,~-' .R_ ~~, , l-~

; i"

.

I

__

lL..-_

_.

-1--~--6ffJ-r-- - I - - r - ' il_ ( 1 _ - . - - - I - - -,L~ --I-- - - -

••

I

JJ.S=I-l-.., - . 11' ~~S ,~~--l. ~§ , '

I

I

.

birth! 1Vhose ,vord ,vith light

-t-·f"· - - - 4 --II---'~: - - - I I --(1- "

aclorn'd the skies, Gaye

tI----j--

-_._,-. -- l-

--~-

----

' birth! 'Vhose vlord with light

I

l-i-i--

adorn'd the skies, Ga,rc

~~~---~1§.~

--p--J.;-_. :-",-~-.,-;0,-,- -_.'-,, -- -r--~~ -..r;-, fL. -1-~1·l~~- --r~t;1-

~+f-t=--'r--

:-.

j

r-'

-t=-\.-L


305

MASONIO SONGS.

~~

~

-h~-~.

J

f

---I

I

mat - ter

form,

bade

or - der

rise,

And

I

mnt - ter

fo.:,

bade

or - der

rise,

And

,~~~

~

i~~~~~_L_§

t~ e o~~ ~§+%mC~O~ ~~ -+---/7

. .H-11'_1-~ I! '--fr--f!L,---r---:--

I

"---

I ,

r- '

..L

. ')

-

,

--:J

-c;-

I

...

I'

,~.-+-.._Q.:._II-!flT_

".~,,+--r.--

~~t~ ~neW::horn ea~rth; . Til~l_ love Shal~~' ti~l

~

*l'~1'L -M-

--

~-

,--II

.,_-rt_"__I)Ji- ,j---=t""-. 'fi=~

l

b~d the new-born earth;

I

-

-1- - I l -

Till love shall cease, till

-~-_._-~----___ - . -~ -h~-~~ ~ V, - - -' .-::iJ-t-+

~;-j ~:r,-- -~17--F--,i- - '-

I

l

. --;- -.--~".-+--1-Pf -.-:-:.,.,'.

"

~# E-~~~~Tk ,~ f1'-Ci~--p=. .-~= ~ f!. iFE! I

.#

or - der dies, To Thee Ma-son - ic

praise. shall rise.

~~tt:=:J=j'I~lI~+r=---=~=-= ~ ~--r~~or - der dies, To Thee

~,Ia-son

- ic

praise shall rise.

~#~f!. ~~--"l:­ I~~#_C ~~~"t~~=- -==s ~ ~ Repeat the last Olw'rus.


300

l\lASONIC SONGS.

Oh, bless this love-cemented band, Form'd and suppol·ted by thy hand, For Charity's employ; To shield the wretched from despair, To spread through scenes of grief and care Heviving rays of joy. CaoRus.-Tilllove shall cease, till order dies, To Thee ~Iasonic praise shall rise. The lib'ral Arts, by Thee design'd To polish, comfort, aid nUl.ukind, \Ve labor to improve; 'Vhile we adore Jehovah's name, pour on our hearts the melting flame, And mould our souls to love. CBoRus.-Till love shall cease, till order dies, To Thee ~rasonic praise shall rise.

FTJN]~R.A.L

IIynlN.

MUSIC BY RANDEL.

~

- -~- ===1= -==1 .-1- .- ,~. !=t:. ~-tt-t!.1d =z2-[~~~-~~ .. - 6 ' - I~-= - -~~_-=

--==;g

Adagio.

I

:;Jl-t-.._ ~~-~-i --+~~ _-,.-i-.-.-- II :

Un - veil

. t)-

~-

I

bo - 80m,

- - - " 1 - --j -----i.....

--2?-_.. Q

i.' I

thy

Un - veil

thy

JL..__

bo - 80m,

tomb,

fltith - ful

-+.

-I'; 4I-il-• .-

f;;Tth - ful

-r-~.._-..... ~ 0tomb,

:,~.-§,.e.., ~=;?1. - - t : - r " '. --. - Ir9-:"ffi-e-~--m~~. - - +_.-

I

I

".

r--C=- I

-~-

r.---

jJ¥=r -

I

Take this n~w trca - sure

-~-----

~-

=m~ to

thy.

trust,

And

i~~-----=F1-t

ltyC&=--'='---f??=--~~!

I .

I~

Take

t.his new trea - sure

to

thy _ trust,

And

=~-~


307

MASONIC SONGS.

give these sa - cred

re -' lies

room

To

slum - bel"

---+-I ---l--+,,---+--jfI IL-+~ --GJ---"~ I~~ -

.

-

--

-

- - .. _ - . -

-.--.-.

,--- -

give these sa - cl'ed

_.!.._~

-r-

re - lies

--+--:::a---f~-o-~--SI--

I

-_.~--

room

I

To

slum - bel" -&-

-6)-

i~~-~EtE=~¥F1§f~=I

I,~-~ '. - ~~t~t:=t= j

!

I

-

.' -.,

. .!.--.

~-1E-('E- - .

f-- --11-41....-

~. re - lies room To slumber in the

si

--• -". - lent dUst.:,r";'

1~ ----.,--t:~~-· ~- -1-~ -l--i==1- . ~ ~E=I~~~~, 1-· :-~~:Ji i" ~ ~-,: --~l! _?2:::;1= .·cr I

I

~liCS room To slumber

in

the

sy-::' lent-

d~.;;~.

r-:- _. ==1-~~~'~-E IIA.~.'·;--=E:!-"~WV.~-r-~m~~"-7~-t=

... ~~

,

--

-1--f--/'

~

-!--i- ,-

,- -

~~-- t - - .

-~--_.


308

l\I.A.SONIC SONGS.

Nor pain, nor grief, nor a.nxious fears, Invade thy bounds; no mortal woes Can reach the silent sleepers here, And angels watch their soft repose. So Jesus slept; God's dying Son Pass'd through the grave, and bless'd: the bed; Rest here, dear Saint, till from His throne The morning break and pierce the shade. Break from his throne, illustrious 1\forn 1 Attend, 0 Earth, his sovereign \V ord ! Restore thy trust, a glorious form, He must ascend to meet his Lord.

~IOST

EXCELLENT lVIASTER'S ODE. :MUSIC BY .A.. BROWN.

-~

All things in darkness lay, The Word ,vent forth, Up sprung ce-

I

Iv

โ€ข -~-~-'

~

~

---'--~-

----- - -- -----

fl~-~ยง

---


809

MASONIC SONGS.

;~i~~

~

i~-LfI.~-.-,""'-~ ~"_II_~~IJ,I_--I--h-+-, - -11,1:= flLlJ--'-~~ . -r«-II..f.+), • . I " -t--~-+--~H- . ~ _ -+-r--t--i~ --i I

--

a - bove,

---

-~

And on the key-stone blazed E - :rER-NAL

LOVE.

I;~~~-~ !A:~·~ ~I~~+~

~ i - ~ - L ~ ~ -Heaven's fayorHe, man, was made In beauty fair, Crime changed blest Eden's shade To black despa.ir; i.:.love from the sacred Arch came gently down. Raised man from death .to an immortal crown..


310

MASONIC SONGS.

Love, then, in chorus sing! Hail, Love divine! Masons, your Oassia bring To deck his shrine; Christians, unite, while Angels join in song, All Earth and Heaven, the glorious strain prolong.

ROYAL ARCH SONG. BY .A. COMPANION.

:MUSIC BY J. WHITAKER.

~

Joy! the sacred Law is found! Now the Temple stands com-

plete, Gladly let us gather round, Where the Pontiff holds his

L~-h~. II--.r~~'~~~ _=tLv ~ ~ โ€ข

-

-

seat. No,v he spreads the volume wide, Opening forth its leaves to day,

&j~---@ยงI And the l\;Ionarch by his side Gazes on the bright dis-play.

Joy! the secret vault is found! Full the sunbea.m falls within, Point.ing darkly under ground, To the treasure we would win. They have brought it forth to light, And again it cheers the earth; All its leaves are purely bright, Shining in their newest worth.

This shall be the sacred mark 'Vhich shall guide us to the skies, Bearing, like a hol.?! ark, All the hearts who love to rise; This shall be the corner-stone Which the builders threw away, But was found the only one Fitted for the arch' 8 stay.


311

MASONIC SONGS.

Then the solemn strain shall swell This shall be the gaveZ true, From the bosom and the tongue, At whose sound the crowd shall An.d the ~laster's glory tell bend, In the harmony of song. Giving to the law its due; This shall be the faithful friend; This the token, which shall bring Kindness to the sick and poor, Here the exile, 0' e1' the waste Tr\ldging homeward, shall re. Hastening on, on angel's wing, pose; To the lone and da1"ksome door. All his toils and dangers past, Here his long sojourning close. This shall crown the mighty arch, Entering fhrough the sacred 'Veils, To the holy cell he bends; When the temple springs on high, And the Brethren bend their march, Then, as sinking Nature fails, Hope in. glad fruition ends. 'Vafting incense to the sky.

ROYAL ARCH SONG. Andante Pompolo.

When or'-ent Wisdom beam'd serene, And pillar'd Strength a-

'Vhen Beau-t.y tinged the

rose;,

~

'A-:-..

glow - ing scene, .A.nd

~--f' -11- - ~l~~-!L=ยง_I==t=-II-II---r-f'-

_7_ _~~-

I-------

--

--~


312

1t:IASONIO SONGS.

p Sf

fJr

~~

fa - brio view'd, Myster'.. ous powers

&-

m

dored;

And

-,,-

II-:-:=---A1t":=::'=-fl=fl.---=---t=--~" .-fl-"~. 7路 I==~F ~-~=:. ----=-...-,,~J~t=_, _ . -

..1--------W'VIt...-

sf

.

~~~~~,~~~.

I...--f-I---i:t=.

i~-SI3-~1=~

I

high the Tri - pIe U - won stood, .And high the Tri - pIe

pl ~

...............

3+=:++

.l~_--'---_Ioo-f---I--t-------'_-~~.-tLtr~ Union stood, That gave the mystic word, -

I~

-

-

-

-

That

---搂


313

MASONIC SONGS.

gave the mys.. tic

I;':==bF U ... nion -11-

word,

... ...

... ..

...

And high the Triple

'-E-3i "I-~~ ~=i-k~-~~E stood, That

gave

the 1nys - tic

word. .

~~~

Pale Envy wither'd at the sight, And, frowning o'er the l)ile, Call'd ..~fllrderup from realms of night, To blast the glorious toil. With ruffian outrage join'd, in woe They form'd the league ab... horr'd路 And wounded Science felt the blow That crush'd the Mystic lVord.

At length, through Time's expanded sphelm, Fair Science speeds her way; And, 'warm'd by Truth' oS refulgence, clear Reflects the kindred ray. A second fabric's to'wcring height Proclaims the s拢gn restored; From whose foundation, prought to light, Is drawn the lIfystic Word.

To depths obscure, the fa'Vor'd Concealment, from .sequester'd Trine cave, A dreary course engage, t On sable pinions flew, Till, through the A'rch, the raydiAnd o'er the sacrilegious grave vine Her veil impervious threw. Illumes the sacred page~ The associate band, in solemn state, From the wide wonders of this The awful loss deplo.red ; blaze, And W'isdom, mourn'd the ruthless Our ancient sign's restol'ed;fate The Royal .A.raft alone displays That whelm'd the Mystic Wora. The long-lost l#lystic Word.

2'1


314

MASONIO SONGS.

ROY.A.L ARCH SONG. Anda.nte Moderato.

~~-~~ ~~~t;t-.-E Al-might-y Sire, our heavenly King! Before whose sa.-cred

ti==

"-~-"---¥~~J - ~fI _r--f'--!f---P=F~ ~r=-~-

~-!f~ -,~==¥---_C:=-,~ name we bend,

Ac - cept the praises which we sing, And

t

~.~---~E-~.. tte ~~-~~ .~~ ~ S~~: to

our hum-hie prayer attend; Thou, who clidst Per-sift's

~~-~--,--,~=1=3~---T~,-, "-"-·--"--.;-I~~ ._ '_,--.-~.~~ jg-~ -~-~~-+-C-~~ W~'~~-,,--·1 -+-~-+

-I

-II-/"'~~--lr-l--~,,l--- -

- , -.~- t l l - - t 7 .---}--

king command

A pro-cla-nla - tion to

~_+==

., ' , .

_--"L-'r-r--.

-tJ

ex-tend,

_11.- _

h-f--4P- 1-- "

_

That ....

--"-1-"-

-~ I---l-Israel's sons might quit the land, Their holy Temple to attend.

-

CHORUS. f \"".. _s=--;--:-Y"~, ..!l-~_ -~--~--~ ~!I--f-l----~-~-l--~ 1'---1- ~l--ft-!tf,--I, -;;-11-.=tT--r== · ~==+--- - - I I I •

I

All

hail! great Ar .. chi - teet

<Ii ... vine!

This

~--!-@l§--.r--~==-J=.~=~~ I I.

All

hail! great AI" - chi - teet . -II-

di - vine!

This

-L-~

I:l::~ C r=t§¥t=:·~


MASONIC SONGS.

315

;~-.-~~~~ยง jt. ;r'~=+=ยฅ!1t~~~~ "-11- ~ -II-~_ ~ r=t u - ni - ver .. sal frame is thine, This u.. ni - ver ... sal

u - ni .. ver .. sal frame is thine, This u.. ni - ver .. sal ". -11- -II- -11- -,,-11- -,,-

~~~ , ====t-V-+--~-

~

~---3-

That sacred pla.ce, where Three in On thy omnipotence we rest, One Secure of thy protection here, Comprised thy comprehensive. And hope hereafter to be blest, name; ' v V h e n ,ve have left this ,vorld of And when the bright meridian Sun care. 'Vas seen thy glory to proclaim, Grant us, great God, thy powerful .Thy watchful eye, a lengt.h of Hme, aid The ,vondrous circle did attend; To guide us through this vale, of The glory and the po,V'er be thine, tears ~ 'Vhich shall from age to age For where thy goodness is disdescend. play'd, CHORUS. Peace soothes the mind, and plea.All hail! great Architect divine! sure cheers. This universal fram.e is thine. All hail! &c.


316

l\IASONIC SONGS.

Inspire us wit.h thy grace divine; 'I'hy sacred law our guide shall be, To every good our hearts incline, Fronl ever)'" evil keep us free. Our glad hosannas, Sovereign King! Thy welcome here shall e' er proclaim, And heaven's eternal arches ring ,\VHh thy revealed, holy N arne: CHoltus.-All hail! great Architect divine! This univel~sal frame is thine.

SELECT r¥IA.STER'S SONG. HUNGARIAN.

~

- ~~=' t ~~~~. ----1-.- , . t-.-:==" -t1'_2Ji'j_~.~

-

-----The

--.-

~._--!-=--f-'

~~- ~-L-r-

---

vault arch-es

o'er,

~

6-

.....

-I

-

and night broods a ..

. ~~~=~~~§ round r

Not a whis-per is heard through the depth of the

~.~H-E~d-~~~a=e=rOO ~ f ~ ·-,Ebr~ Ca'lM,.

All hearts, in the si-lenee

of

se -

ere .. cy

. ~#-~~+~I.· .~==t~_ .. +=r~. ++-~~--l-l-L,-~t~-~~ ~ ~ ~; - - - -L-

.

bound r Are

._.

read - ing the words the Great AI' - chi - teet

.

~

I --..--1==

~# I ~=~ifJ ~ \ rc~~ c:E-~- tJI-.= ".=:I:=± gave.

U -' ni - ted they lis - ten the voice of

the


817

MASONIO SONGS.

~~~~~~=a E~-=-~- .~ - =±=± Law, TJJ.e guide to our rea .. son, the spur of

J.Jt

~

~-

"

the

~

,~#-+~.-J;,~~=~ ----0-~ '----l-

~- - - - -

-

if

-~11-

draw Theirhearts to the Spi"'}'it who ut... ter'd the whole.

Now the work is completed, and all are combined, To close in t.he secret and deep-hidden cell The words Which are treasured as light to the mind, Like the ,vu,ters of truth in their close-cover'd well. Here safely secured they sha.ll live on the rock, 'Vhen the storm rages o'er it and levels the wall, And still in the rage of the conque1'or' 8 shock The arches shall neither be shaken nor fall. We have laid in its secret. and silent retreat The treasures that kings shall exult to behold; And the pilgrinl shall hasten w·ith ardor to meet This gift, valued higher than jc'wels or gold: .Ages roll on their way, 3,nd no foot shall be heard In search of this roll to enlighten the world, But a hand shnll be found to recover the JVord, And then shall the standard of truth be unfurled. We are seated in silence, and nothing can find Its way to our dista.nt and lllystica.l cave: .A.n<l the wa'IJikm,an 'who guards not, our mandate shall bind In the deeper conceahnent of death and the grave; Be faithful and true, ever firm to your trust, In t.he lesson ,eve give ill the council of light, And t.he herald shall sumlnon you fortb from the dust, Above in the meeting of souls 10 unite.

27*

,


318

:MASONIC SONGS.

SELECT

~IASTER'S

l\.NTIIEIYL

(.Music, see page 304.)

"LET there be light,)) .th' Almight.y spoke; Refulgent streams from cha.os broke, 'r' illume the rising earth! Well ple:1sed the greuJt. J'EHOVAH stood; The Power Supreme pronounced it good, And gave the pl~1nets birth. . ClIoltus.-In choral numbers, l\'Iasons, join, To bless and pra.ise this· light divine. Parent of light, accept our praise, 1Vho shedd'st on us thy brightest rays, The light that fills the mind: By choice selected, 10! we sta,l1d, By friendship join'd, a social band, That, lODe, tha,t aid ma.nkind. CHoltus.-In choral nUll1 bel's, &c.

The widow's tear, the otphan' $ cry, All wants our reull1y hands supply, As 1':11" as po,yer is given; The na.ked clothe, the j)1'isonm' free, These are thy 'works, s\veet Oharity, Reveal'd to us from heaven. C1:Ioltus.-In choral numbers, &0.

SONG-. WRITTEN BY N. H. WRIGHT.

Allegretto. Mezza

Voce.~

U. "I';- - ---~-~1I.f'-r--F--·IfJ_~ -~-'-6I-1I-11 '-

~ ~-=

- _'"J:= ~"

--~-N--.-,J..L-tl-

~--t==,J.

t7-~

Ah! why should the heart be de - press'd, 'Vhen its

~~D Et=t~ J ~ C' -~~t4 fond -ness

is

treat - ed

'with

scorn?

The

~_ .•. ~~, ~~~-w--~-~ ~-J'"L~-~~--~--,j4~"L'\LJC-_~_ couoh that with ro - sea

is dress'd

In its


819

l\IASONIC SONGS.

~;~- ~~.--~- ".=--1 -~~,. -- ~--I-I----~--r_-I

~

~--1iiiiiiJ

soft .. ness con .. oeala

-

a

4

.----~-

41-

rude thorn,

In

its

.f'i---' ---+-~-.f!::-"--" --...j -r---"--...j~L ~ ~-I . ' -. --r-~" '-~---l..2-."r---.._-.~-.----~-

I

-,1-

soft .. ness con - ceals

-11------

rude thorn,

a

In

-_

its

.~-~"--~---'-----r-.~~ .m~ __-~

~----1----1'-----pr'---+-~

===~~

.

;_l.-It-

soft .. ness

,. . .

~-~

"==~.~_~==_tl-_~--

-11con.. ceals a

.. rude thorn,

The

---_-----§~-~-~~~~.-~-

~U_I--~-l--~. =---±-::::::_~=~:-.-=~=~'==:t=-, _-~-

.

:-- _ti:-_-~_--:-_-_-~IIf;:::-·~~_-...:L.-.--r-------,---· --couch

~

that. 'with

1'0

..

is

ses

dress'd

In

iq!=------~~-~-

its

l!

~-' . -.I- r" it_-===F=-. -~:::-:J~ .' '....- l~ E' ~~-h--III ~_ _-=:'!L-"",-• • , _ ._ ~_~_____

soft.. ness con .. ceals

a

rude

thorn.

The bright eye of Beaut.y may beam 'Vith a light like the meteor glare; But her victim may w'ake from his dream, And hope ron.y be changed to despair. Like the rainbo,v \vhich shines from the cloud, Her allurements a '\\"hile mny deceive, Till joy is en,vra,pp'd in a shroud, And t.he mourner is left but to grieve.. But, Friendship has charms which endure; Its birth 'was ill regions above; 'Tis a passion, like heaven, most. pure; For it sprang from the fountain of love. Then let. not tIle heart, be depress'd, If one treat. its fondl'tess with scorn; It m~ty find in a Brother's warm breast The rose that conceals not a thorn.


320

MASONIO SONGS.

MASONIO ODE. and kings have pass'd away Into oblivion's mine, And tow'ring domes have felt decay, Since auld lang syne.

EMPIRES

But ~L<\.SONRY, the glorious art, 'Vith wisdom's ray divine; 'Twas ever so, the Hebrew cries, In auld lang syne. Behold the occidental chair Proclaims the day's decline: Hiram of Tyre was seated there In auld lang syne. The Sottth procla.ims refreshment nigh, High tu'elve' 8 the time to dine; And bea'uty deck'd the southern sky, In auld lang syne. Yes, J\iasonry, whose temple here 'Vas built by hunds divine, Shall ever shine as bright and clear As auld lang s:yne. Then~

Brethren, for the worthy three

Let us a wreath entwine,

The three great heads of J.\iIasonry In auld lang syne,

Remembering oft that worthy one, 'Vith gratitude divine, The- Tyrian youth,-the widow's SOD Of auld lang syne.

EPILOGUE. As lately,. Bret,hren, from the Lodge I came, Warm'd with our J'oyal order's purest flame, .A.bsorb'd in thought, before my ravish'd eyes I saw the Genius l\IAsONRY arise: .A. curious hieroglyphic robe be wore, And in his hand路 the sacred volume bore; On one side was divine Astrrea placed, And soft-eyed Charity the other graced; Humanity, the gen'rn,l friend, was there, And PitlY, dropping the pat.hetic tear;


MASONIO SONGS.

There too wa.s Order; there, with rosy mien, Blithe Temperance shone, and white-robed Truth was seen; There, with a key suspended to his breast, Silence appear'd; his lips his finger press~d; . With these, soft '\varbling an instructive song, Sweet ~Iusic, gayly smiling, tripped along. Wild Laughter, clam'rous Noise, and ].\Iirth ill bred, The brood of Folly, at his presence fled. The Genius spoke :-" ]\ly son, observe my train, 1Vhich of my order different parts explain. Look up: behold the bright ASTRJEA there: She will direct thee, how to use the Squal路e. PITY will bid thee grieve with those who grieve, Whilst CHARITY will prompt. thee to relieve,Will prompt thee everyoomfort to bestow, And draw the arrow from the breast of woe; HU~IANITY will lead to honor's goal, Give the large thought, and form the gen'rous soul,..... Will bid thee thy fraternal love expand ~ To virtue of all faiths and every land. ORDER will kindly teach her laws of peace, 'Vhich discord stop, and social joys increase; TEMPERANCE, instruct thee all excess t' avoid, By ,vhich fair fame is lost, and health destroy'd; TRUTII ,varn thee ne' er to use perfidious art, And bid thy tongue be root.ed in thy heart; SILENCE direct thee never to disclose Whate' er thy Brethren in thy breast repose; For thee shalll\IusIc strike th' harmonious lyre, And, whilst she charms the ear, nW'l'ality inspire. These all observe; and let thy conduct show "\Vhat real blessings I on rrUln bestow." lIe said, and disappear'd;-and, oh, may we Who ,veal' this honor'd l)adge, accepted, free,. To every grace and virtue temples raise, ....~nd by our useful ,yorks our Order praise!

THE END.

821

CROSS MASONIC CHART  
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