Page 1


Centennial History of

The Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Ancient Masons of

Missouri

For the Committee:

William F. Johnson, Grand Master By

William Frederick Kuhn Past Grand Master

182'1 路"1'921


Preface The Committee appointed to make arrangements for the Centennial Anniversary路 of the Grand Lodge, believed that no more appropriate and fitting Souvenir of this important event could be made, than the preparation of a brief History of the Grand Lodge, including a ShOft biography of each Grand Master, Grand Secretary, and a History of the Masonic Home. It is said, "That we live in deeds not words"; hence what could be more appropriate on the one hundredth birthday, than a recital of the deeds of the Grand Lodge and of the men who formed and directed its destinies. The Committee would present in a tangible form an answer to the question :Has the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missouri lived in vain? A careful perusal of these pages will reveal the high hopes,. the fond anticipations, and the realization of worthy and far seeing. men7 It will also unfold the disappointments, the sorrows, hopes frustrated, and ideals, seemingly crushed, only路路路to arise triumphant in the end. History is but the thought50f men crystallized into deeds, and these deeds shaping the course of a Fraternity, of a Community, of a State or oia Nation to an ultimate goal. 1\fay the reader find in this volume, what the Freemasons of Missouri in its first Century, have accomplished for God and humanity, how they have knit closer the ties of human thought and feeling and created a bond of sympathy among men, that will come to a fuller realization in the Centuries that are to follow.. Fraternally Submitted, \tVILLIAM

A.

KARL M.

'T~JtSBURG,P.D.D.G.M.

ARCH

P.D.D.G.M.

F.KuHN, P.G.M. M. WILSON, P.G.M. A. ]O:HNSON.. P.G.M.

WILLIAM DAVID

SOMMERS,

1


Introduction THS EARLY HISTORY OF

FR~~MASON:RY

IN MISSOURI.

Freemasonry walks in the vanguard of civilization. As the pioneer blazed the trail through the forest beyond the Inountains toward the Mississippi Valley, Freemasonry followed hard afterward. When France established a chain of military posts from the Great Lakes, and down the Mississippi River, it opened the way for the trader and the pioneer, to the west side of the Father of 'Vaters on toward the Gulf. The first of these settlements was called Ste. Genevieve in upper Louisiana. This hanlIet was ab:out seventy mites south of the confluence of the Missouri and· Mississippi. Its history dates from 1763, when there was concentrated there the fur trade for that region. and an egress for the lead and iron ore, mined forty miles inland. In 1764, the present city of St. Louis was established, and it SOOfl became the Capital of upper Lonisianaand its great commercial city. It is stated that in those early days, the merchants of the two settlements procured their goods from Philadelphia whither they. went annually. \iVhile in Philadelphia these merchants, beingchiefiy Frenchmen,. received their Masonic Degrees in the old French Lodge No.. 78 under· the Grand Lodgp of Pennsylvania. In course of time the ·settlers at Ste.Genevieve made· application to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania for a warrant to open a Lodge of Freemasons in that hamlet.. This request was granted and HLouisianaLodge No. 109 in the Territory of Louisiana,". ca,me into existence in 1807-8. I ts first officers were: .Otho· Strader, Master; Dr. Aaron Elliott and Joseph Hertickas Wardens. This was the first Lodge of Freemasons established west of tbe Mississippi River.

u


After many viciss,itudes, but chiefly owing to the rapid development of St. Louis, from a hamlet into a city, the Lodge at Ste.Genevieve declined and in 1816-17, it ceased to exist. In 1809-10, the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania granted a Warrant to form and open a Lodge in St. Louis under the name of St. Louis Lodge No. 111" No record or any information as to the Hames of the officers or the career of this Lodge are known. A \Varrant was granted by the Grand Lodge of Indiana to form and open a Lodge at Jackson, County of Cape Girardeau, in 1820. This Lodge came under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1821, and received its Charter therefrom under the name of Unity Lodge No.6" On October 8, 1816, a dispensation was granted to Joshua Pilcher, Thomas Brady, JeremiahConners and others, by the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, to form and open a Lodge under the name of "Missouri Lodge No" 12,," This is the onlyone·of the ·original·thTee Lodges 'which form.ed the G:rand·. Lodge of Missouri, that, except for a short interval during the antimasonic period, is still in existence. On October 6, 1819, the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a Charter to William F. Roberts, Seth Converse, ,William Bates and others to form and open a' Lodge at Herculaneum, Missouri, under the name of "Joachim Lodge No. 25." This Lodge lived fora few years after the forrn·ation of the Grand Lodge of Missouri.. On the same date and year, the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a Charter to Benjatnin Emmons" B. Palmer, John Payne and others to 'form and open a Lodge at St: Charles, ~issouri under the name of "St" Charles Lodge, No. 28." 'The Grand Lodgeo£' Missouri is in. debt to the Grand I.. . o dgeofPennsylvania, the Grand Lodge of Indiana and to the Grand Lodge of Tennessee for its Masonic heritage. Ho\v much. the first t\voGrand Lodges contributed, no one can measure, yet.altlTough they do not ent~r into the direct parentiii


age, yet the sturdy, uncompromising and steadfast spirit of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania is still present with us. It is to the Grand Lodge of Tennessee that we look and consider her as the mother of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. From her loins sprang the original three Lodges; Missouri Lodge No. 12, Joachim Lodge No. 25, and St. Charles Lodge No. 28 that formed the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1821. It v\'ill be of interest to the reader to here give an excerpt from a report by George Frank Gauley, Grand Secretary, made to the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1877. It bears directly on the history of the days that are no\v a century old. "In 1869 I had occasion to search into the early history of Missouri Lodge, No.1, and wrote to the Grand Secretary of Tennessee, Brother JOHN FRIZZELL, who, out of the wreck of archives left by the civil war,was enabled to compile the following, and for which vve are under many obligations :" Extracts from Proceedi"tgs of Grand Lodge of Tennessee Tuesday, October 3" 1815. If Ordered, That a Dispensation issue to Brothers Joshua Norvell, Joshua Pilcher and *Thomas Bradley, to open a Lodge in the town of St. Louis, in the Missouri Territory, under the name of "Missouri Lodge, No. 12."

At this date the Grand Officers wereROBERT SEARCY, G. M. JAMES 路TRIMBLE~ S. G. W.

G. 路W. T ANNEHILL G. S. J. C. McLEMORE, G. TR. DAVID IRWIN, }.

WILKINS

J

October 8, 1816. uThe By-Laws and a transcript ,of the proceedings of Missouri Lodge, No. 12, were presented and approved, and a charter ordered to be issued to said Lodge."

4, 1819. "The Secretary communicated to the Lodge: That the MostWorshipful Grand Master had issued a Dispensation to sundry brethren

January

*This is from the printed proceedings-in the original manuscript proceedings the name is ((Thomas Brady."

iv


residing at or near Elkton, on the 28th of November last, by name of

"Elkton.," No. 24. UAlso., to sundry brethren residing at Herc~tlaneu1n~ J,,1issouri Ter.. . ritory, by the name of 'Joachim' No. 25." July 5, 1819.

"Received a petition from sundry brethren, Master Masons, residing at St. Charles, Missouri Territory, praying for a Dispensation to form a new Lodge at that place, to be calIed 'St. Charles Lodge, No. 28,' which being read, it was "Ordered, The prayer of the petitioners be granted." October 4, 1819. LODGES REPRESENTED

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

"Missouri N'o. 12, by Isaac N. Henry."

October 5, 1819. tlReceived a petition from St. Charles, No. 28, surrendering its Dispensation .and praying for a charter." NOTE.-llmmediately after foregoing entry occur these words"which being readtl'Ordered, That a charter issue accordingly to Benjamin Emmons, as Master; Bennett Palnler, as Senior Warden, and Jno. Payne, as Junior Warden," which are erased by the pen, because, as I suppose, the committee had not reported upon the proceedings of the .Lodge. The next entry in the minutes is the report. October 5, 1819. HThe Committee who were appointed to examine the returns from the several subordinate lodges presented yesterday, reported that the returns from Nos. 8, 16, 12, 9, 10, 6, 13, 14, 19, 21, 22路 and 23路 were regularly made. "That the following lodges, working Under Dispensation, appear to he returned in a regular manner, viz: Nos. 25, 24, 30, 28, 26 and 27. HAnd find that they have been conducted according to the ancient custom of the Craft. They therefore recommend that Charters be granted them respectively. JOHN SPENCE,

1.. N. HENRY, Committee.

v


"Which being read was concurred with, and "Ordered, That charters issue to Elkton Lodge, No. 24; St. Charles Lodge, N'o. 28; Joachim Lodge, No. 25; Rising Virtue Lodge,. No. 30; St. John's Lodge, No. 27; and \Vinchester Lodge, No. 26, forthwith."

October 2, 1820. "'The Grand Secretary reported that on the 5th of October last,eharters were issued to Lodges, Nos. 24, 26, 27, 28, and 30; and on the 6th day of the same month, to "Lodges Nos. 25 and 29, agreeably to the directions of the Grand Lodge Clt thdr last l\J1t1tt3:1 Communication." rlj)pended to the printed proceedings of 1820. "RETURNS

From the Subordinate Lodges, up to the October meeting, 1820, sho,ving their present strength, together with the number initiated, passed, raised and admitted since the Grand Annual Communication of 1819."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

'~1vfissouri,

No. 12-Initiated, 8; passed, 'fatal number of members at present, 40."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

7·, raised, 5; admitted, 1-

? raised, 2·, adtnitted, 1"J oachim, No. 25-Initiated, 3; passed, ....,

Total number of members at present, 17."

*.

*

1'10. 28 not reporting.

*

*

O£tober 1, 1821. "The Grand Secretary reported:

*

*

*

*

"Also, that, from information received from some of our subordinate lodges, it appears that Grand Lodges have been established in the States of Missouri and Alabama, and that they have joined those Grand Lodges, and renounced. their allegiance to this Grand Lodge. There are other lodges nO\\7 'working under this Grand Lodge, within the limits of those States." ((Resolved, That so much of the foregoillgcolumunication as relates not to lodges beyond the litnits of this· Stater considering themselves under the jurisdiction of this G'rand Lodge, be referred to a comInitteeconsisting of Broth~rs Norvell, Dixon and Wood." October 2, 1821. "The committee to whom. was· referred that part of the· Grand Secretary's Report relative· to lodges beyond the limits of this State, re-

as

port-

vi


"That in a communication from Joacehim Lodge, No. 25, dated July last,. tltere was forwarded a resolution, adopted by. that lodge,; requesting the officers to surrender the charter from the Grand Lodge of Tennessee to the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and obtain a charter from said Grand Lodge of Missouri.. . "In a communication from Miissouri Lodge, No. 12, we are informed of tbe organization of the Grand Lodge of 'Missouri, and of said Lodge, No.. 12, having come under its jurisdiction. In which commulli.... catiOiQ tneFe is a comJ)laint ab<out the payment of one dotJJar for each degree and avdmissii>n,; and a request tha.t the debt due this Graad Lodge,.originatiJlg in that way, be ,ermit1!ed by this Grand ·Lodge to be paid to the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The same request is made by Lodge No.. 25-which request is~in the opinion of your committee, u11"reasonable, and ought 11l.0t to be granted."

.*

*

*

*

*

*

*

UNo communications from other of the lodges under the jurisdiction of this Grand· Lodge, wifhrfl the States of· Missouri (or Alabama) t have come into the possession· of your committee, nor save any advices been received directly from either the Grand Lodge oJ Alabama OF Missouri.. "Your committee would, .therefore, recommend that a·· correspondence be opened. .by ·tbe ·Grand ·Secretary with all tbe .. lodges.iormerly under the jurisdiction of thistodge, within 'said States, in order to ascertain. in·what .situation they stand, and report ·to this Grand Lodge, at the next Annual Communication, and in said correspondence, that the state of the accounts· of those lodges with this Grand Lodge be forwarded in order that those lodges may have an opportunity of paying the 1:>alances which may be due. "M. NORVELL,

M.. L.. DixON, , Committee.. UWhichreport was concnrredwith."

October 8, 1822. "The Grand Secretary reported: UThat he had writtell to. the. subordinate lodges within tla.~ S,tates of Alabama and 1vlissouri, Qn the subject of their haviag£ome under the jurisdiction··.of the Grand Lodges of .those· States; .and it appears ·that lodges Nos. 12, 25 and 28, have joined. the Grand Lodge of' Missouri; and lodges N'os. 21,·36 and 41, have j.a1:,nedtheGran<iL&dge of Alabama."

.A.ppended to printed proceedings" 1822.

vB


":alttURNS

From the subordinate lodges, up to the October meeting,路 1822, showing their present strength, together with the number initiated, passed, raised and admitted, since the Grand Annual Communication of 1821."

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

'CSt. Charles, No. 28-Initiated, 12; passed, 10; raised, 11; admitted, 3. Total number of members, 27. Returns from September, 1819, to March, 1821, when said lodge joined the Grand Lodge of Missouri."

"The annual returns of our then three lodges to the Grand Lodge of Tennessee being destroyed by the .war, it is impossible now to obtain a roll of their membership between 1816 and 1820. "As the members of those lodges comprise many who were then the most prominent citizens of the young State, and as a guide to the reader of the following proceedings, and to enable him to properly locate the active membership of the Grand Lodge, I herewith include a list of the same, in their respective order."

Sullivan Blood. William Renshaw. Jos. V. Garnier. Wm. Clarkson. Hart Fellows. Thornton Grimsley. D. B. Hoffman. P. Rochblave. Nathaniel B. Tucker. *The names of Hamilton R. Gamble, Archibald Gamble and Thompson Douglass appear in the Proceedings of Grand Lodge, 1821 ~22,but not upon the first returns of .either of the three lodges named, although these brethren appear as among the first Past M'asters of 11issouri Lodge, No.1, upon its records. The usage at that time, of allowing members to act as represeptatives of a lodge ot which they were not members, has done much to confuse the individuality of lodge membership until the usage was abrogated by law.

viif


ED\V'ARD BATES President of the Convention which organized the Grand Lodge. \vards Grand Master.

After-


Henry Rollins. Thomas H. Benton. Risdon H. Price. Daniele. Boss. C. B. Alexander. J. C. Lavei11e. William Stark. Thomas F. Riddick. Robert P'. Farris. Wm. Hughes. Joseph Walters. Paul M. Gratiot. Samuel Stebbins. John Shackford. Charles Bent. Wm. Orr. Asa Wheeler.

John Wallace. Phineas James. Thomas Berry. Moses B. Wall. Zenus Smith. Abraham Beck. James Conner. George Morton. Jas. P,; Spencer. Geo. H. C. Melody. }. J. Douherman. Wm. Robertson. Thea. L. McGill. Francis Mason. Edward Moore. Otis Tiffany. R. Milligen. Abraham L. Platt.

JOACHIM LODGE, NO. 2.-AT HERCULANEU'M. All records of this. lodge between 1821 and 1825 are lost, except the original charter and a few .letters. . The returns of 1819 and 1821 were lost in Nashville, Tennessee, by the war. Its charter was arrested by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, April 7, 1825, but what became of its record and papers, I am unable to ascertain. The following list is made up out of the few papers in existence. WIL~IAM: BATSS,

JAM~S

WILLIAM ROWLAND

S.

W. M. WILLIAM F.RoB~RTS, S. BEAUMONT, J. W. HENRY CELLINGER, Sec. SETH CONVItRSlt, P. M.

HIRAM LODGE, No. 3.-AT ST. CHARLES. G. PETTUS, W. M. JOSEPH W. GARRA'1'Y, S. W. WILLARD, J. W. HlNRYHAYEs, Sec.

James Alcorn. Daniel Monro,e. RichardH. Waters. Horace Barker. Francis F'arker. Stephen W .. Foreman. William Smith. Daniel Howland. Phineas Block,. F. C. Jacob D. Williams, E. A.

Samuel C.Owens. G. W. Ash. John Lilly. Samuel Keithley. BernardO'Neil. Thos. D. Stevenson.. Emanuel Block. Nathaniel Simonds. Otis Peck,F. C. William Rector, E. A.

w.


THE BEGINNING PRELIMINARY CONVENTION

On February 22, 1821, a preliminary convention looking to ,the formation of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was held in St. Louis. This convention was held, purs1:1ant to an invitation sent to the other Lodges of Missot:tii, by Missouri Lodge No. 12 and was held in the hall of Missouri Lodge No. 12 on Elm St. between Maine and Second Street. Duly accredited representatives .from Missouri Lodge No. 12,. Joachitn I~odge No. 25, and St. Charles Lodge No. 28 were present. The Convention was organized with Edward Bates as Chairman, and vVil1Eann; Renshaw as Secretary. The records do not give the names of any other Brethren who were present.

The following preamble, resolution, and constitution were adopted and copies thereof sent to the Lodges for ratification and approval.. WHEREAS, the silbordinate Lodges of this state are situated at a considerable distance from the Grand Lodges by which they have been severally chartered, and their attendance upon the Grand Lodges to which they are subordinate, is rendered inconv'enient .and ex}?ensive, and whereas Mas,oory is daily increasJng, and the number of Lodges multiplying in tllis State-

Therefore-1st. Be it resolved, That it is expedient and necessary to the interest of the Craft that a Grand Lodge sh€>uld be established in this State to be invested with all the powers and privileges usually enjoyed by Grand Lodges. heretofore established. 2d. Be it resolved,. Th~t a committee of three be appointed to draft a Constitution for the gQvenllnent of the Grand Lodge so to be established, and, that they seuda copy thereof to each of the Lodges in this State, ,vi thin two weeks from this date. 3d.· Be it ,.e.sol'11ed~ That each .of. the Lodges in this State be requested, as soon as conveniently ma.y be, after receiving a copy of the Constitution, as pr@~idedfE)r in the second resolution, to pass upon the same, and decide whether they will ratify or reject it, andwhetlier they will voluntarily place themselves under the jurisdiction· of the

x


Grand Lodge so to beesta~~iS'hed; and 'further, th~l't they be requested, with as litde delay as possible, to communicate t'heirproceedmgs thereon to all the Lodges in' this State.

4th. Be it resolved, That if a majority of the Lodges in this State do ratify such Constitution, and do agree to place themselves under the jurisdiction of such Grand Lodge, the officers of such Lodges, by themselves or. their proxies,prQperly appointed, and all Past Masters usually admitted to seats in Grand Lodges, shall meet in the town of St. Louis, on the' 23d day of April, A. L. 5821, and there organize the Grand Lodge, and elect' the necessary officers. 5th. Be it resolved, That Brothers WM. BAT:ES,of Joachim Lodge, Nto. 25, NATHANIa SIMONDS, of St. Charles Lodge, NQ. 28, and EDWARD BATES, of Missouri Lodge, No. 12, be appointed a committee to draft a Constitution of the Grand Lodge, in pursuance of the second resolution. 6th.. Be it 'YesoVved~ That a cOPYQf these reselutioRs be sent to eaca of the Lodges in this State..

EDW. BATES, Presiding.

Att.est: WM.R!N,SHAW,

Secretary.

CONSTITUTION OF THE GI{AND LODGE OF MISSOURI, Of Ancient) Free' and Accepted Masons..

:8£ IT ORDAIN£D" That the Grand Lodge shall consist· of a Grand Master, a D'eputyGra.Jld Master,Grand SeGiorand Graad. Junior Wardens, a Girand 'Chaplain, a Grand .Treasurer, a 'GraBEl Secretary and DeJ:}uty Grand Secretary, two Grand .Deacons, a Grand Marshal, a Grcw<i Ty"ler:"two Gramd Stewards, a Gramd Sword Bearer, a Grand Pursuivant, the Master aDd' Wardens for the ti'me being of the several LQe.ges under;tthe jarisGictioll of this Grand Lg'Qg,e, all Past Graadoiicers 0·£ this ~odige, anElaU Past Masters,·of Fegu1.uLodges under the jurisdiction. of this Grand Lodge, whocontisue· members Bf .any regularLodge. 'raisGrand Lodge so to be ·orgamzed, sballbe style4 ana. 'im.B~ by tltenameoi t '1fikeG"snJLo.dge ,of MusJ(),,~i) of.Annen:t, Free and Accepted Masons.."

xl


The Grand Lodge· shall hold Semi-Annual Communications; and the Grand Master, or his D:eputy in case of his absence, may, on very urgent occasions, call special meetings. When any officer of a subordinate Lodge cannot attend . the Grand Lodge, he may depute any brother, being of equal rank or superior to himself, to act for him in the Grand Lodge; and such deputation shall be under the hand and seal of the brother deputing. When the Master and . Wardens of any subordinate lodge depute the same brother to represent them, he must have attained at least the rank of Past Master. Past Grand Officers may hold offices in subordinate lodges, and this shall not deprive them· of any privilege they might claim in the 'Grand Lodge as P·ast Grand Officers. The Grand Master, Grand Senior and Junior W'ardens, Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary shall be annually elected by ballot. The Grand Master and Grand Secretary shall appoint the.ir. deputies respectively, and until the Grand Lodge shall, by its By-Laws otherwise provide, the Grand Master shall· appoint all other officers.. In all questions which shall come before the Grand Lodge for its decision, every subordinate lodge shall be entitled to three votes, which shall not be separated, but the brethren representing such ·lodge shall agree among themselves, on which side· the votes shall be given; and every Present and Past Grand Officer and all P'ast Masters being members of this Grand Lodge shall be entitled to one vote individually, and the Grand Master, or his Deputy, when presiding, shall, whenever it is necessary, give the casting vote. The Grand Lodge .shall have power to constitute new lodges, by letters-patent under their seal. To establish an uniform mode of working throughout· the State, strictly adhering .to the ancient landmarks, usages and customs of Masonry. And in furtherance of this desirable object it shall be the duty of the Grand Master, by himself Qr some wellinfQrmed brQther by him appointed, at least once in every year, to visit every subordinate lodge under the jurisdictiQn of this Grand Lodge, .to lecture and in... struct .the brethren, and to correct such errors ~s may have obtained among them. To require from the several lodges .under their jurisdictionsuch annual dues as they shall deem necessary, to be apprQpriated for the benefit of the Craft. TQ hear and determine aU.appeals from subordinate IQdges, and tQ decide all disputes between the different lodges under· thtir jurisdiction. To demand such fees as may be deemed just and reasonable, upon granting charters constituting new lodges. xii


To make such By-Laws as may be necessary for their good government and not inconsistent with this Constitution. And to do all things heretofore accustomed to be done by other Grand Lodges, which are within the ancient landmarks and usages of the Craft" No alterations shall take place in this Constitution, except in the manner following: Every amendment shall be proposed in writing at a regular. Communication of the Grand Lodge, a fair copy of which shall be sent by the Grand Secretary to each of the subordinate lodges, who shall pass or reject the same, and certify their proceeding to the next regular. Communication; when, if it appear that two-thirds of the subordinate lodges have agreed to路 pass the same, it shall become a part of. this Constitution.

This Constitution 'Nas signed by the Committee: William Bates, Nathaniel Simonds and Edward Bates. A few prominent facts and matters of interest are found in this first Constitution" The name, of the organization is:

THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI, OF ANCIENT, FREE AND ACCEPTED MASIONS. The honorary title of "Most Worshipful," so often used at .the present time, was not applied to路 the name of the Grand Lodge. It will be noted that among the list of elective officers the name of "Deputy Grand Master" does not appear. This office was by the by-laws made an appointive one, by the Grand Master, and in the event of incapacity of the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master succeeded to the office of Grand Master and was recognized, not as "Acting Grand Master," but as the Grand Master, and entitled to all of the honors. It will also be noted that this Constitution was so framed that it was almost impossible to amend it by making it obligatory that all amendments thereto must be sent to the subordinate Lodges for their approval and if approved by twothirds of the Lodges, the amendment became a part of the Constitution. A r~ferendum that blocked all efforts to amend this路 instrument for more than seventy-five years. This preliminary convention of February 22, 1821, was folxiii


xiv


THOM~A.S F. RIDDICK. The First Grand 11aster.


After the election, the Grand Lodge adjourned to Friday, May the 4th, 1821, without the installation of the Grand Officers. A rather novel procedure.

ADJOURNED PRELIMINARY CONVENTION. St. Louis, M ay4, A.D., 1821 ; A. L. 5821 The Grand I~odge met in what the records term :-"The first setni-annual Convocation.'" 1'his is the only instance in which the '-\lord Convocation occurs. The Constitution heretofore adopted provided for senli-annual S'essions of the Grand Lodge. The following officers and menlbers were present: I~"'. H.I-D'DICK JAS. KEN,NERLY

It/f. VV. G. M. C.S. W. WM. BATES G. J. W. WM. G. PETTUS G. T., pro tent. WM.REN'SHAW .. , .. G. S. ]NO. W. HONEy G. S. D. ]NO. JONES G. J. D.

HT.

D,,' C. BO, SS

","""" .. " {

\ Tylers.

HUGI-I RANKI1'J ED'vV. BATES

.

J. D. DAGGETT

.

VISITORS.

Bro's. W. H.

POCOCK, STARK,

P.

HALDlMAN,

G. H. C.

MEI.,ODY,

T.

GRIMSLEY, A. BECK, T. BOTHICK, ]. V. GARNIER, COTES, S. D'CAMP, L. AYRES,D. B.HO}l~Fl'IAN, ]. A. PAx'roN, FELLOWS, DOUBERMAN, D. C. Boss, J. WHITE, T. ANDRE'VS, DAVIS, H. ROLLINS, G. MORTON, PtTTUS,

J. C. POTTER." The' first order of business \vas the installation of Grand Officers. Brother T. Douglassvvas appointed installing officer, "a 'procession "vas then formed and proceeded to the Baptist Church, where the solemn ceremony of consecration and in~ stallation were performed in confortnity with the Ancient Landmarks and Customs of the Fraternity.. " The Grand I.,.odge started off well by taking "The river Route.. " A.RNor~D,

xv


On the second day of. the SessiQn, the Committee on Grand Lodge By-laws. reported and was adopted. As these By-laws contain nlatters of unusual interest· they are herein embodied: BY-LAWS. The semi-annual meetings of the Grand Lodge shall be held in the town of St. Louis, on the first Mondays of April and October, but the meeting in ,October shall be called the Grand Annual Comrnunication, at which time the Grand officers shall be elected and appointed in the nlanner prescribed by the Constitution. S~C. 2. No brother shall be admitted into the Grand Lodge but those "VI.10 are men1bers thereof, without special invitation of the Grand 11aster, or one. of the· Grand Wardens, and such brother when admitted is not to vote or even speak· on any question without leave of the Grand Master. SEC. 3. No 1:fason shall be eligible to any office in the Grand Lodge unless he shall have passed the Chair in so~ne regular lodge, unless it he in cases 0 f emergency. SEC. 4. In case the Chair of the Grand Lodge· shall become vacated hy death, resignation or other\vise, it shall be filled by seniority until the next Grand Annual COlnmunication, but the Deputy Grand Master ceases to exist as such, so soon as the Chair becomes vacated by the Grand?vfaster w'ho appointed him; and in case any other office beCOlnes vacated by death, resignation, removal or otherwise, the Grand 11:aster for the time being shall fill such vacancy by his nomination. SEC. 5. Every lodge under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge shall, at each Grand Annual Communication, deliver to the Grand Sec'retary, a list of the officers and members of their lodge, also a list of the initiations, admissions,. deaths, removals, suspensions and. expulsions of tnen1bers, and rejections of candidates, with the respective dates signed by the ~/faster, and attested to by the Secretary; and each lodge under this jurisdiction, .shall, at the first Grand Annual· Communication, to be he1din. October next, furnish the Grand Lodge with a copy of their By-Laws. S-ec. 6. N'o Letter, or Warrant of Dispensation shall be granted for the {ormation of a new lodge, but upon the petition of at least seven knoitvn and approved Master Masons, in which their first Master and Wardens, .shall be nominated, which petition shall be .accompanied by a recomn1endation· from the lodge nearest· to the place in which·· the ne\v· lodge is to . be holden. SECTION 1.

SEC. 7. For every Letter or vVarrant of Dispensation for the formation of a ne\v lodge, there shall be paid into the Grand Treasury

xvi


tbe sum o£ twel1ty doll~rsr and for every Charter of Constitution the sum of ten dollars, and the further sum of three dollars in addition to be paid to the Grand Secretary, which said sums respectively shan be paid before the delivery of the Warrant or Charter; and all other ca.s~~'. the s<c:;a.l the G:r~nd. Lodge is required to be affixed, there shall be paid by the applicant to the Grand Secretary, the sum of two dollars. Sse. 8. Every lodge under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge shall pay into the Grand Treasury the sum of twenty-five cents annually, for each nlemb~r thereof, as a grand charity fund, and a further sum of .fifty ceDtsa.nl1ual~y for each member belonging to their lodge at the titne of making their Grand Annual Communication. Provided, That no lodge shall pay a less sum than ten dollars, exclusive of the contribution for charity. And the Master and \Vardens, or representatives. of any lodg~ shall not take their seats in the Grand Lodge until all their dues be. paid, and the Treasurer's receipt therefor be prodijced, and in case of the neglect or refusal of any lodge to pay the same, at or before· the next Communication thereafter, unless reasonable eXCl)se be offered, such lodge shall he stricken off the books of the Grand LQdge, and their warrant or charter considered null and void. But on properapplica.tion to the Grand Lodge, .making due returns, and payment of dues, they may be restored to their former rank ang privileges, if the G1(and Lodge shall judge proper. SEC. 9. Every member of the Grand Lodge, and every visiting brother, shall pay into the Grand Treasury, each meeting, the sum of one dollar. SEC. 10. Any member of the, Grand Lodge. who shalt neglect or r~fuse to pay h,is setll"i-anqual dues,· for two succesive communications, s~all be su~uended. or ··expelled, as; the Grand Lodge may determine, and nomemner. of· the. Grand Lodge shall be perrnitted to vote at any election for Grand. offi~,e"s, until he shall have paid his dues. S~c. ·1 L It shall· be the. duty of the Grand Treasurer to lay before the Grand Lod~~at eaGh Grand. Annual Communication, all his accounts for inspection and .• adjustment, and. shall . imme.diately pay oyer to 'his s~ccessora'iX bp:l~!1se which may be found due. from hirr· to the Grand LOdge, together with all the books, papers anddocumen.ts· belonging to his,. 0!rc1. S£c. 12.·. AllaJ?peal~· from.. any subordinate locl,e, s~al.1 b~ in· writ~ in~, 'a,n~, left wi.tl) the G-rand, Secretary,. all(l the appeJlaJlt shall .give the ot~r paI",o/. ~t l~a~t ()fle lllO'Pth's -not~ce therepf, or otherwise the Grand. Lodge shall not proceeg to. meal." a.,nQ: Qe;t~rtnipe the $3.tlJ!]e.


SEC. 13. When any brother is excluded frotn any particular lodge for malpractices, information thereof shall be sent to the Grand Lodge, and all the lodges under this jurisdiction, as soon as convenient, but no lodge within the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, nor any member thereof, shall publish, or in any manner make public, the suspension or expulsion of any member, except it be to the. fraternity, or within the walls of a lodge; but nothing herein contained shall prevent the Grand Lodge giving publicity to such expulsion, should they deem it proper to do so. SEC. 14. In all cases of the suspension, expulsion or restoration of a member, two-thirds of the votes of the members present shall be required, and in all cases of the restoration of a Mason suspended or expelled by any lodge under the jurisdiction路 of this Grand Lodge, the same maj ority shall be required.. SEC. 15. The GrandMaster, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Wardens, Grand Treasurer, and Grand Secretary for the time being, or a maj ority of them, shall be a standing committee of charity, under whose direction the Grand Charity Funds shall be distributed. SEC. 16. Each. member ,of the Grand Lodge shall be entitled to a certificate thereof, which shall entitle him to admission into any lodge under this jurisdiction, and to all the rights and privileges which the members of such lodges respectively possess. SEC, 17. For. every certificate granted by the Grand Lodge, to any member of. any subordinate lodge under this jurisdiction, there shall be paid into the Grand 'freasury the sum of one dollar, and no certificate shall be granted to any brother, without a previous certificate from the lodge of路 which he is a member, setting forth his regular behavior, and that he has discharged all his dues to the lodge. SEC. 18. Upon the demise of any lodge within the jurisdiction of this Grand. Lodge, the last Secretary路 and Treasurer of the said lodge, shall, within six months thereafter, surrender to the Grand Secretary all the books, papers, jewels, funds and furniture of the lodge so demised. SEC. 19. Every lodge within this jurisdiction, may exercise all the rights of discipline over Masons, (not members thereof, or of any other lodge) who reside in the immediate vicinity of such lodge, so far as may relate to the conduct and behavior of such Masons; whilst resident in the vicinity of suc~ lodge. SEC. 20. vVhenever any alteration or amendment shall be proposed to these By-Laws. it must be reduced to writing and read from the Chair, when it may be debated, and if concurred in, shall be submitted to the subordinate lodges; if approved of. by a maj ority of them, it shall then becoIne a part of the~e By..Laws.

xviii


These By-Laws fixed the date of the semi-annual Comnlunications to be held on the first Monday in April, and the Annual Communications to be held in October; both to be held in St. Louis. Section 4, provides for the succession of the Grand l\1aster in the event of resignation, death or otherwise. Section 8, requires the payment, annually, to the Grand Lodge, a fee of twenty-five cents for charity, fifty cents per member, to pay the expenses of the Grand Lodge, and no Lodge being per1nitted to pay less than ten dollars. Section 9 puts a prelnium on being an officer or member of the Grand Lodge, by making him pay at each Conlmunication the sum of one dollar and should he fail to pay, for two consecutive meetings, he could be suspended or expelled. Even visiting Brothers did not escape. It cost something in those days to even look in on the Grand Lodge, but fortunately it' appears that no additional tax vvas levied on a visitor for giving him the "Grand Honors." A resolution looking toward路 the exchange of Charters by the Grand Lodge to all Lodges, that desired to con1e under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was adopted. I t reads as follows: Resolved, That the 1v1ost Worshipful Grand 1faster be authorized to open a Communication with the different Grand Lodges in the United States, and the different subordinate lodges in this State; and that during the recess of the Grand Lodge, the Most Worshipful Grand Master and Grand Wardens be authorized, on the receipt of any Charter or Warrant of Dispensation from any lodge under this jurisdiction, to grant them a new charter or dispensation, under their private Seals, attested by the Grand Secretary, ,vhich shall be full authority for such lodge to continue their labors, until the next regular Communication of the Grand Lodge, but no longer unless the Grand Lodge shall then confirm the same-and that the M. W.Grand Master be requested to communicate this resolution to each of the subordinate lodges under this jurisdiction.

The hat was then passed' around to provide for the immediate financial necessities of the Grand Lodge, after. which the first "semi-annual Convocation" was closed. xix


THOMAS,F. RID'DICK, Grand Master 1821 M. W. Brother Thomas F. Riddick, the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was路 born at Suffolk, Virginia, June3rd, 1781. He caIne to S'1:. Louis in 1803. His first Masonic. appearance is as Senior \'larden of St. Louis Lodge No. 111 under the registry of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. At the organization of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, he appeared as the representative of Joachim Lodge No. 25 at Herculaneum. He vvas elected Grand Master 'at the age . of forty years. In civil affairs, he served as clerk of the. Court of COlnmon Pleas, as i\ssessor of vVeights and 11easures, St. Louis; in 1808 he served as Recorder of Land Titles, was a representative of the Territorial Legislature in 1818, and President of the Board of Directors of the Old Territorial Bank in 1820. He later moved . to Sulphur Springs, ]effersonCounty, Missouri, ",rhere he died, January 15, 1830 at the age of 49 years.


THE FIRST ANNUAL COMIvlUNICATION (First Conlnlunication) St. Lo'uis, October 1, .I1.D.1821; A.L. 5821. The "First Annual Communication" of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masollswas held in the hall of Missouri Lodge No. 12 October 1, 1821. It is called the first annual Communication, the one previously held is styled a uSemi-annual Communication." The first lV1asonic year being one ·0£ only six months. This should be kept in mind in computing the JYlasonic Conln1unications, as \vell as the Masonic year in the history of the Grand Lodge. j\t this annualColnmunication there \verepresent:M. W. TH01fAS F. RIDDICK~ W.EDWARD BATES _ W. JOHN D. DAGGETT Brother .A.RCHIBALD GA1YIBLE 'VVILLLt\M RENSHAW T'H. DOUGLASS G.H. C.1iELODY Di\NIELC. BOSS J. C. POTTER

_

G. J.~1. G. S. ~V. pro tC1n. G. J. ~tV. pro t('1t~. G. T1"eaSurer. G. Secretary. D. G.Secretar)!. C.S.D. pro te'Jn.

G.. J. D. pro G. T'J'ler pro t'etn.

and the representatives from Lodges No.1, No.2, No.3, and No.. 4 with six visitors. A total of eleven menlbers of the Gr<l:nd· I...odge. In only one instance was the Lodge represented, not a Grand, or a pro tern Grand .Officer. The GrandMaster, as Grand Masters for many years thereafter,didnot submit a report, or address,. or give anyinformatioD of the transactions of his office for the year. 1~hereis no Grand S'ecretary's report, but a brief financial state~.,ent is found at the end of the minuteso£ the Session. It appears that during the year a dispensation had been issued to forIn and open a Lodge at Louisiana, Missouri, under the name, of Harmony Lodge. The Brethren of this Lodge, Hof their own free will and accord" considered the dispen~ation, a Charter, and proceeded to· do business .accordingly'. Hence Brother Gamble· moved .that : -1-


Resolved) That the charter granted to Harmony Lodge, No.4, by the .11. W. G. 111., in vacation, be recognized and confirmed.

All is well that end~ well. A petition was received from "Sundry Brethren" residing in the tov-rn of Alton, Illinois, praying for a letter of dispensation. This prayer was laid on the table, but later by resolution, the Grand Master was empo\vered to grant on proper application, during the recess of the Grand"Lodge, warrants of dispensations to form Lodges. The three Lodges that participated in the formation of the Grand Lodge surrendered their old Charter, and were granted new Charters under the natues of Missouri Lodge No.1, . St. Louis ; Joachim Lodge No.2 at Herculanetlln, and the name St. Charles was changed, to Hiram No. 3 ,at St.. Charles. On the second day of the Session the election of Grand Officers was held, resulting in the election of. 11. \\'. FREDERICK BATES \lY. BENJAMIN E11MONS \V. 'vVILLIAJvI BATES

G. M. G. S. 'ltV. G. J. W.

Brother ARCI-IIBALD GA1\1BLE

G. T. G. Secreta1'Y

WILLIAM REN,SHAW

A COlnmittee was appointed to inform Brother Frederick Bates of his election and to request his acceptance. The Grand Lodge then adjourned to Saturday, October 6. When the Grand Lodge reconvened, the Committee reported, that Brother Frederick Bates路 declined to. accept the office of Grand Master and Brother Benjamin' Emmons declined the office of Grand Senior Warden. The' reader of this .history should here pause. Sit do\vn, and 'carefully ponder .this ahnost . inscrutable probleln,-a Past Master in Missouri, refusing the office of Grand 1faster, or the office of Grand Stenior Warden! Past Masters of that kind are all dead. None of that temperament are in evidence to-day. This Frederick Bates, two years later, was elected Governor of 11issouri, the second in its history. Perhaps political fences needed attention more than the Grand Mastership. The Ben-2-


jamin Emmons mentioned here, had been and continued pronlinent in civil and political affairs in St. Louis. In the election to fill these vacanCIes, the lot fell upon: "M. W. N. B. TUCKER W. EDW ARDBATES

G. M. G..S. W.'"'

. A. .. somewhat unique procedure took place in the installation of officers. The records state that:((When a Past lWaster's Lodge was opened) Most TV orshipfulNathaniel B. Tucker was duly installed Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the State of Missouri in Ample Form, -Past ftyf aster's Lodge closed and the following Brethren duly installed." The total receipts for the year were, General Fund, $96.50, Charity Fund, $19.75.

NATHANIEL B. TUCKER, Grand k!aster, 1821. M. W. Nathaniel B. Tucker, the second Grand Master, was born at Mattox, 路路Chesterfield County, .Virginia, September 6, 1784, and came to St. Louis in 1815 to practice his profession, that of la\v. He was one of the organizers of the Grand Lodge, elected and installed Grand 11aster at the first annual Comn1unication held路 October 1, 1821, and was re-elected for four consecutive terms,-1822, 1823, and 1824. He was one of the framers of the first Constitution of the Grand Lodge. In civil life he served as Judge of the "Northern Circuit" for several years, beginning in 1818. His biographer speaks of him as eccentric in many ways, and路 that he held his office and library in the stump of a hollow tree in Florissant Valley, St. Louis County. He was regarded as one of the best writers of his day and figured as a political p,rophet by outlining the civil war and secession twenty-four years in advance. Brother Tucker returned to his native State in 1833, settling in Winchester. He was chosen Professor of Law in William and Mary-College and served as such up to the time of his death" which occurred, August 26, 1851, at the age of 67 years. -3-


THE FIRST SElVII-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (Second Communication.) St. Lou,is, Aprii 1, A.D. 1822; A.L. 5822. This semi-annual Communication was held in the hall of Lodge No.1, St.Louis, at the above date with all of the elective Grand Officers present and the representatives of the following Lodges, No.1, No.2, No.3, No.4. and Np. 5 V.D. . ~1issouri

Brother Thomp,son Douglasspresent~d .his credentials of having heen appointed Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge by .Grand Master Tucker. A dispensation had been granted by the Grand Master to form and open a Lodge at Franklin, Missouri, and a Charter had been issued to Unity Lodge· No. 6 at Jackson, Mo., jurisdiction over the latter Lodge .had been relinquished by the Grand Lodge of Indiana. A dispensation was granted to several Brethren at Vandalia, Illinois, .tQ form and .open a Lodg~ and Charters \vere granted to Olive Branch Lodge No.5 at Alton, Illinois, and to Franklin Union Lodge No.7at Franklin, MissQuri. The following~mendments to the Constitution 'Yere offeted and· ordered sent to the Lodges for their· approval or rejection. That, in addition to the officers enumerated in the first clause of the Constitution, there·· shall an'f111allybe elected a Orand Lecturer, whose duty it shall be, at least once in every year, to visit all the s~bordinate lodges .under· this. i,\1risdiction,. for the purpose. ()-£ establishing anuniform mode of wqI-fkit'lgandcorrectingany errorswhi~h may. have obtained amo~g,~hem, and that so .much oJ the 9th clause of the Constitution requiring this s~rvice to be· performed .by the Grand Master, be, and the same is hereby. repealed. The Grand Lecturer shaH receive from the Grand Treasury lor his services, a sum not ·e:X:ceedirtg three dollars per ·.day,while actually engaged in the performances. of the dutieso~his~ffice; to be fixed from time to time, by Grand Lodge, for .which purpose the. several. subordinate lodges shall from time to time pay into the Grand· Treastiry such further sum as may be requisite for compensating the said officer.

-4-


That so much of the ninth section of the By-laws of this Grand Lodge, as requires a contrihution from 'Visiting Brethren, at the SemiAnnual Communication be repealed.

This is the first mention of a Grand Lecturer. Just what rituaIisticwork was being used, no reference was made, and this resolution was evidently looking toward a distinctive Missouri Ritual. The moving spirits of the Grand Lodge had been rnade Masons in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee and Indiana. Evidently a uniform Ritual was essential. Th,e other amendment looked askant at a law that 'assessed a Master Mason one dollar for looking in on the Grand LOdge. A Committee \vas appointed to secure the cooperation of Missouri Lodge No.. 1, Missouri Chapter Royal Arch Masons and the Grand Lodge to purchase a lot and erect a building. The building "bug" began \\I~orking early.. A very significant resolution was offered that'\vould indicate that the boom spirit· prevailed iIi Freemasonry one hUlldredyears ago as it does to-day. It is as follows, . .• ~lo~r committe~~re lead .. to .thisretn:ark byrefl"ecti()u that young are too apt to suppose they confer. a benefit on the' order by' swelling the number of its nlembers ',vitbout paying a due att~ntion to the qualifications ·of the individuals. ~rasonsand new lodges

and as "corn juice" was plentiful in those days, the Lodges were cautioned to look after the moral habits of its menlbers.. Total receipts for the half year amounted to $94.00..

-5-


THE SECOND ANNUAL C011MU~ICATION (Third Communication.) St. Louis, October 7, A路.D. 1822; A.L. 5822. The Grand Lodge was opened in "due and solemn form." On motion by Brother Melody due respect was accorded to the late vVilliam Bates \vho had died during the year, and as a nlark of sorrow and respect to his memory, the members of the Grand Lodge were to wear crepe on their left arm .for ninety days. During the intervals of the 'session of the Grand Lodge, the. Grand Master had issued a dispensation to the Brethren at Jonesboro, Illinois, and to the Brethern at Covington, Illinois, to form and open Lodges under the distinctive title of Union No. 10 and Eden No. 11. The following significant communications .were received, read and referred: A communication from the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, received in vacation, containing an account of their Proceedings at their last Annual Communication, in which is found a resolution relative to the formation of a General Grand Lodge of the United States, and a resolution requiring the Grand Secretary of that Grand Lodge to transmit to each Grand:~Lodge in the United States, the signatures of the Grand Officers, in their 'own proper hand writing, and requesting each of the Grand Lodges to furnish a similar list of the signatures of their Grand Officers, was read; also, a communication, received in vacation, from sundry brethren appointed by a .Convention of Masons, held at the City of Washington, on the 9th of March, 1822, a committee to correspond with the different Grand Lodges in the United States, relative to the formation of a General Grand Lodge; and a communication from the Grand Lodge of路 Pennsylvania, on the same subj ect, declaring that the formation' of. such a General Grand Lodge would be inexpedient and impracticable; but recommending a ~eneral Convention of 1{asonsfor the purpose of taking into consideration the general interest of the Craft; which were severally read.

The specter of a General Grand Lodge ,vas. stalking through the land one hundred years ago. The Committee on raising a fund to build a 1\1asonic Hall at St. Louis, reported that it "had not been able to obtain anything for the contemplated. purpose." -6-


were issued to Lodge No.8, Vandalia, Sanganlon No. Springfield, Illinois, Eden Lodge No. Covington, Illinois. Union Lodge No. 10 U. D., at Jonesboro was censured for failing to make a report and notified to get busy, or suffer the loss of its dispensation. A good portion of the time of the Grand Lodge was taken over the Records of each Lodge for the year, whether in such Lodge was under Charter or Dispensation. How long would the Grand . Lodge be in session to-day if this plan were still followed? Some glaring errors were found in these records, such as transacting business and electing candidates in the E. A. Degree, respreading ballot on candidates rejected, etc.. ' k .............. 拢10 ........

PHYSICAL QUALIFICATION.

The question of physical qualification, Hthe perfect youth idea," arose early in the history of the Grand Lodge. At this Communication the questio1! of conferring the Degrees on Jabez Warner who had lost his right arm, and . on Winstead Davis ((who was very much deformed in his legs and lower extremities," but possessing every qualification of mind and character. This important question was referred to a Committee. Brother G. H. C. Melody presented a bill for services as Lecturer amounting to $171.38. The Lodges had paid him in "State Paper" to the amount of $64.. 68, accordingly the ten Lodges were assessed to make up the deficit. M. W. Brother Nathaniel B. Tucker, Grand Master elect, was duly installed ina Lodge of Past Masters from which all the Brethren who were not Past Masters were excluded. After the Past Master's ceremony, the Brethren returned and the other Grand Officers were installed. The Grand Master appointed Thompson Douglass, Deputy Grand Master. At.an emergency meeting of the Grand Lodge, held October 24, 1822, Union Lodge No. 10, Jonesboro, Illinois, was forgiven and received a路Charter. -7-


THB SECOND SEMI-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION (Fourth Communication.) St. LO'/rtis, April 7, A.D. 1823; A,.L. 5823. This .semi-ann~al ses~ion was brief. The Grand Lodge met and ,vas ope~ed in ample form, and immediately adjourned until the afternoon of tile next day. The Lodges represented w~re No.3, No.7, No.9,' and No.IO. ' The first matter that claimed the attention of. the Grand Lodge \vas . a report of a Committee on physical qualification. Th~committee .consisting, of Archibald; Gamble and GeQrge H. C. Melpdy presented the report. It isa lahoredand heavily straille~ argvrnent, based~ntirely upqn the uAhiman .Rezon"'; a. treatise on the Constitution and landmarks of Freemasonry by Dermott, which he had prepared for the schismatic Grand Lodge of England, known as the "Ancients," iIi contra'distinction to Anderson's Constitution adopted by the Grand Lodge of England in 1723. The uAhiman Rezon" defined physical qualifications along .the line O! the Hper£ect youth" theory:-tbat no one could be admitted into Freemasonry, who was not Hupright inbody, ·not deformed or dismembered, but· of hale and entire limbs,as a man ought to be; must be .without blemish andhavefun· and proper use of .his limbs." The Anderson' Constitution is less stringent and.is older than the Ahiman Rezon by more than thirty years. It defines physical qualifications as follows :-"That he must }l"ave no maim or defect . of body that olay render . him incapable of learning the art,and of serving his Master's Lord and of being a Brother." The Committee ignored the Anderson Constitution entirely in its reasoning. It is possible that the Pennsylvania influence had. much ·to do with· it, as the Ahiman. ~ezon was and is now the Masonic gospel in th.at State, whereas, aIL or nearly all, other Grand Lodges are.based on the Anderson Constitution. The Committee reported as follows: Re$91'qed, Thq,t thi~ Grand Lodge cannot gra.nt a Letter of Dispensa.. tion to a subordinate lodge working under it$ ju:ri$<ii~tjQP, to ini~iate

-8-


wanting the qualifications established any person maimed, disabled by ancient usage. Resolved, that the Grand Secretary send a copy of the foregoing report and resolution to Union Lodge, No. 10, and that be furnish }ifr.. Jabez Warner with a copy of the tatter. ~

I f it were possible to publish this report in full, it would be interesting reading to the Freemasons of Missouri of today, .and would mark a mile post in the progress of constructive and practicable application of this old and obsolete landmark. In reference to the proposed forrn.ation of a General Grand Lodge the Committee reported wisely as follows: 1. Resolved, That in the opinion of this Grand Lodge- it is impolitic and unnecessary to establish a General Grand Lodge. 2. Resolved, That a general Convention of delegates from the several Grand Lodges in the United States might be of great utility to the Craft. 3. Resolved, That this. Grand Lodgewina~pointa delegate to meet the delegates路 路of the sev~ratGra~d Lodges in th~.lJnit~d.Stat~~Jdue notice of the time and place of meeting .being first received. ' 4. Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania be requested to give to this Grand Lod~e the earliest information of such Grand todges as may concur in the above proposition and of the time and place of such meeting of delegates. 5. Resolved., That the Grand Secretary forward to the different Grand Lodges of the United States, and to Wm. W. Seaton, Esq., of Washington'City, a copy of the foregoing report arid resolutions.

Sjgned,

EPWARD BATES, A~Ca.. GA~B,LE,

W楼.. ~~. G.'

:a.C.

~'!?:T1.JS, Me~ody,

Committee.

-9-


THE THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (Fifth Communication.)

St.Louis, October 6, A.D. 1823 A.L. 5823. At this Grand Annual Communication all of the Grand Officers with M. W. Brother Tucker presiding and six Lodges were present. The Session extended for three days. A large portion of the time was devoted to the records of the Lodges and the hearing of Appeals and Grievances. A three page, closely printed report, was presented on the question of what constitutes a Past Master. It was claimed by some that a Master Mason who had received the ceremonies of a Past Master in a I."odge of Past Masters, or as at present, in a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, was entitled to sit and vote in the Grand Lodge.. The Committee reported that only those who had been elected, installed and presided over a Lodge of Master Masons, \tvere entitled to the privileges of the Grand Lodge. This report 路was a clear .distinction between what is known as actual and virtual Past Masters. , The Grand Lodge decided that a Lodge could not assess and collect annual dues from an Entered Apprentice or a Fellow Craft. The amendment to the Constitution offered at the semiannual Session in 1822, in reference to the Grand Lecturer, had received the attention of only two Lodges out of ten. Evidently in its early Masonic career, the Grand Lodge was haunted by the referendum vote, and this referendum, in spite of its delays, inconveniences and impracticability, remained unmodified for more than seventy-five years. The election of officers resulted as heretofore, except, Brother Thompson Douglass was elected Grand Secretary in place of William Renshaw. Grand Master Tucker appointed George H.C.. Melody Deputy Grand Master: The Grand Master after his installation delivered a set address. The first one recorded路 in the Proceedings. -10-


"'-" ..... ""J ............·JLJI.

of note that the refreshments served during to only No H. C. L. around in receipts of the year $142.25.

"'lI"I'YIlA11nt't:;)rI

..... . , ... . , RENSHAW, Gra1z,d Secretary, 1821-1"824. R. W. Brother William the first Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was born in Baltimore, in 1792, and came to St. Louis in 1818, engaging in Inerchandizing and He held the position of Grand Secretary £ronl 1821 to 1823 inclusive. No record exists showing where he was nladea Master Mason, but he was a member of Missouri Lodge No. 1 and was its treasurer froul 1843 to 1848. He was also a menlber of Missouri Royal" Arch Chapter No.1. He served on Governor Gamble's Staff as Colonel, later comnlissioned a Brigadier at the close of the war. He died at the residence of his son at Fulton, Mo., March 14, 1864 at the age of 72 years. THO'MPSON DOUGL"t\SS, Grand Secretary 1824-1825. R. W. Brother 'thompson Douglass, the second Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was born in Maryland, date unknown. He came to St. Louis as Pay Master in the United States Army, with a rank of Major, and held that position during the war of 1812-1815. He served as Grand S'ecretary for two years, 1823-1825 and served as the .first Deputy Grand Master in 1821 and 1822. He acted as the installing officer of the first corps of Grand Officers. He was a member of St.. Charles Lodge· No. 28 and assisted in forming Missouri Lodge No. 12. I-Ie owned a two· story· building ·on Elm St., between Maine and Second Street, to this he added an attic which was used as a Masonic Hall by •Missouri Lodge No. 12, afterwards No. 1 and by Missouri Royal Arch Chapter No. 1 for sixteen years. It was, doubtless, in this room that Grand Lodge of Missouri was born. He died·in 1844. -11-


THE THIRD SEMI-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION (The Sixth Communication) St. Lou-is,April 5, A.D. 1824, A.L. 5824. The Grand Master was absent路 during the entire Session, R. W.George H. C.Melody presiding.. At this路 Comn1unication, Joachim路 Lodge No.2 and Unity Lodge No.6 had their Charters suspended, until the .annual Communication for. failure to Inake returns. TH~ GRAND LODGE OF ILLINOIS

All the Lodges heretofore chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri in Illinois, were: Olive Branch No.5, Alton; Vandalia No.8) Vandalia ;$angamon No.9, Springfield; Union No. 10, ]onesboro, and Eden No. 11, Covington, withdrew to form the first Grand Lodge of Illinois in 1824. This reduced the ntunber of Lodges, under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missouri by more than one-half. The following significant resolution and .bill were presented: Resolved, That the sum of 75 dollars be taken from the charity fund and paid to the Trea~urer of Missouri Lodge, No.1, to 'be applied exclusively to aid in enclosi'ng and improving a lot lately purchased. by that lodge fora burying ground. An account of BEElJE& ANDREWS against the estate of MOSES SCO'tT~ for a coffin, atnounting to $18.00 was presented and ordered to lie over for consideration.

The resolution was adopted, but the undertaker"s bill was rejected.

-12-


COMMUNICATION Seventh Cotnmunication.)

October 4, A.D. 1824; A.L. 5824. The fourth annual Communication of "The Grand I-todge of Ancient, and Accepted Masons" met with R. lv\T. George H. C. Melody, Deputy Grand Master, in the Grand Master was absent for a greater portion of the Session. Jtwasa long drawn out ,annual Communication. The Grand was in sess,ion on O'ctober 4-5-6-78-16:25 and 26. But as only three Lodges were represented and these by proxy, some Grand Officer, it was a comparatively easy matter to continue the Session through so many days. A petition was presented to form and open a Lodge £r0111 ,the Brethren at Caladonia, Washington County. The dispensation was granted under the .name of Tyro Lodge. An amendment to the By-laws was introduced by Brother Ed\l)vard Bates' reducing the fee of visitors, those who might desire to Hlook 011 .the Grand Lodge, frOlllone dollar to twenty-five cents. It surely was worth that "small sun1" to see the GrandMaster and the "expectants" perform. It was customary for Grand Lodges to report to each other the names of all persons suspended or expelled from the Fraternity in special letters, ·but. as the Fraternity was not very large it was an easy matter. The annual election .was held on the third day resulting as follows: UN'A THANIEL B. TUCKER

G. M. "G. S.W. ". G. J. W. G. Sc!cretary GAM:B,LE .. " .............. • G. T,".eas."

"~

THORNTON GRIMSLEY WlvLG. P'ETTUS THOMPSON'DiOUGLASS

The Grand Treasury seemed. to be ata low ebb, and only $31.25 \vas in the charity fund and $1.19 in the General Fund. The exp,enseof re£reshJ4).1etlts at the close of the eighth day, amounted to only '$2.25. The kind of refreshments was not stated. -13-


The Grand Master elect, was not able to be present for installation, hence an adjournlnent \vas made to October 25, when a Past Master's Lodge was duly opened and Brother N. B. Tucker was installed. After which the Lodge of Past Masters was closed and the other Officers were installed. They are as follows: "Brother WM. G. PETTUS, by his proxy .. G. S. W. ,( THORNTON GRIMSLEY G. J. W. ARCf-IIBALD GAMBLE G. T1l'easurer. TH. DOUGLASS G. Secretary. GEO. H. C. MELOD:Y D. G. M. DANIEL BLAIR G. S. D. ISAAC A. LETCHER G. J. D. ABRAM S. PLATT G. Tyler. JA1vIES P. SP'E.NeER, ~G S d )} GEORGE MORTON, ~ . teu ar s. 1

Brother Grand Secretary appointed BrotherF. L. D. G. Secretary.

BILLON

THE FOURTH SEMI-ANNUALCOMMUNICArION. (The Eighth COlumunication) St. Louis) April 4, A.D. 1825; A. L. 5825 At the Fourth semi-annual Communication, "~We Thornton Grinlsley G. J. W." presided in the East. It appears that all of the other officers, except the Grand Secretary, were pro tenl Grand Officers. The records and by-laws of Tyro Lodge, which had received a dispensation at the last annual C0111munication, reveals some interesting irregularities. The Lodge clain1ed the right to confer some higher degrees and had conferred the Past Master's Degree on two of its members. It also had a by-law, that in the event a black ball appeared in the balloting for the degrees, the men1ber casting such ebony hued ball, could be called upon to divulge his vote and the reason therefore. And to cap the climax, the by-lavys required all applicants for degrees to believe in the Christian religion. 1

---14-

â&#x20AC;˘


committee before granting a Charter to Tyro Lodge, gave it a good verbal spanking and ordered the by-laws to be changed according to the usages and principles of the Ancient Craft. It ,vas a Tyro Lodge in more than mere name. The Grand Lodge received notice of the formation of the Grand Lodge of Illinois. ] oachinl Lodge No. 2 one of the original three, forming the Grand Lodge of 1\1issonri, had its Charter arrested and its nalne ordered stricken fronl the roll. CENERAL r.. AFAY~TTE

'fhe ll1inutes of the special emergency Comtnttnication are of great importance. The presence of General Lafayette, the co-\V'orker vvith George \\T ashington, the great patriotic French111an and distinguished Freemason makes this enlergency Convocation of such historical interest, that it is herewith given in full: ST.

LOUIS,

l\pril 29, A. L. 5825.

'路.A.t a special Ineeting of the Grand Lodge of J\;fissouri, held in the

city of St. Louis, on Friday, the 29th day of April, A. L. 5825, Were present: R. W. GEO. H. C. 11:ELODY D. G. M. &.G. M. pro te1n. W. THORNTONiGRIMSLEY G. S. W., pro tent. W. JOHN D. DAGGETT G. J. W., pro tem. Brother A. GA'1fBLE G. Treas.

"

"

TH. DOUGLASS D'ANIEL BLAIR ISAAC A. LETCHER JAMES 路P. SPENCER, GEORGE, MORTON, ABRA11 S. PLATT

SlTI~~IVAN BLOOD, WILLIAM RANKIN, ELIHU

H.

H.

i

G. Secretar,:>'. G ). D. G.. J. D.

") G. Stf'lvards.. Grand Tyler. POCOCK~, THOMASANDRlWS, HUGH

SHltPARD, EDWARD

S. GAN't'!',

WILLIAM RSNSBAW.

VISItORS JOHN ]. DoUBltRMAN, SAMUEl, S~EBBINS, JAMES Di.EARL, ROBINSON

KSLLY, WILLIAM GRIMSLSY, ROBERT WASH, D;AVIDEr..r.ER, THOMAS SPICER, N. B. ATWOOD, HUGH JOHNSON, RICHARD MILLIGltN, JAMES PENROSE) PETER FE~GUSON.

Grand Lodge opened路 in 3d degree in -15---

SOLltMN FORM.

Y. H.


It being stated from the chair, that Gen. Lafayette, a Brother 1Iason and an officer of the Revolution, had arrived in this city, On motion, Ordered, That the' ballot be now taken on the election of Brother LAF'AYETTE as an honorary member of this Grand Lodge. When he was .duly elected. Ordered, That a committee be appointed to w~it upon Brother LAF'AYETTE, inform him of his election as an honorary member of this Grand Lodge,. and to solicit his attendance at路 the present meeting. Brothers MELODY, DOUGLASS and ATWOOD were appointed that committee. After a short absence the said committee returned, accompanied by Brother LAFAYETTE and his son, Brother GEO.WASHINGTON LA:FAYETTE, who were received by the lodge standing~ and an address delivered by Brother A. GAMBLE, to which Brother LAFAYEtTE replied, and was then conducted to a chair in the East. On motion, Ordered, That. the路 ballot be taken on the election of Brother CEO. WASHINGTON LA]fAyltTTE as an honorary member of this Grand Lodge. When he was duly elected. Brother LAFAyeTTE again addressed the lodge, and, ,vithhisson, GEO. WASHING'ION.路 LAF'AYE1'1t, withdrew. Grand Lodge closed in .peace and ha.rmony. Attest, TH. DOlTGLASS, Grand Secretary."

-16-


THE

ANNUAL COMlVIUNICATION. (Ninth Communication.. ) St. I-Io~~,isJ October 3, A.D. 1825; A.D. 5825.

The Grand Lodge was opened with R. v\l". George H. C. Melody, Deputy Grand }Vtaster in the Grand East. Grand l\1aster Tucker \vas absent during the entire annual Communication. The number ·(j.f appear to be decreasing while a very few were being formed. Harmony Lodge No.4, Louisiana, and Unity Lodge No.6, Jackson disappeared during the last year. Although eight Lodges ha.dbeen chartered, since the organization of the Grand Lodge, these with the three original Lodges nlade a total of eleven Lodges under its jurisdiction. B~! ''lith the arrest of Charters and the loss of Lodges by the fornlation of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, only four Lodges remained. At this annual Communication ·appeal:"ed for the first time vvhat n1aybe termed a report on Correspondence. It ·discussed the actions of the Grand Lodge of N orthCarolina in reference to the non-publication of those rejected. It takes exception to tbe Grand Lodge of Indiana· in reference to a proposed. legislation to collect annual dues from aU Master Masons residing within its jurisdiction. whether affiliated or non-affiliated. It concurs V"/ith the action 9£ the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in reference to physical. qualifications, but is decidedly opposed to the action of the Grand Lodge ot Maine in changing the mode of conferring the Degrees fron1 that "handed down to us by our predecessor." Just ,\That this "mode" was, is not stated. The Grand Lodge of Ne,v Hampshire endorsed the proposition to raise funds to erect a Masonic· Monument over the remains of George Washington at Mt. Vernon. This propositlQn received the Committee's endorsement. It will be seen that this report is not inkeepi.ng with SO'file of the latter days "thin-skins" whohDld that a Reviewer should give merely statistics and transactions., of -17-


Grand Lodges, without criticism. Some people are afraid of honest criticism. Well they may. The annual ,election resulted as follows: "M. w. EDiWARD路 BATES W. W'M. G.PETTUS

G. Master. ~

W. THORNTON' GRIMSLEY Brother ARCHIBALD GAMBLE JOHN D. D'AGGETT

.. G. S. W. G. J. W. G. Treasurer. G. Secretar'j'."

A Past Master's Lodge was then opened and Brother Edward Bates was duly installed. He appointed Brother George H. C. Melody, Deputy Grand Master. A new Grand Secretary appears in the person of John D. Daggett. Total amount of money received $77.50.

EDWARD BATES', Grand Master} 1825, 1826, 1827 and 1831. M. \"1. Brother Edward Bates, the third Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was born on a farm in Goochland Co., Virginia, September 4, 1793. He was the youngest of a family of twelve children. Through early orphanage, and lack of n1eans, his early education was limited. As a youth he served as private in the war of 1812. In 1814 he came toSt. Louis without a profession and with limited means. Through the assistance of his elder brother, Frederick, who was an .historic figure in the formation of the ,Grand Lodge and the second Governor of Missouri, he studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1816. M. \V.Brother Bates stands preeminently as the dominant character in the early history of the Grand Lodge. He signed the call for the Conyention and wrote the first Constitution. His influence and name figure prominently in .all the Sessions of the Grand Lodge, and at the. annual Communications held in路 October, 1825, he \vas elected Grand Master. He served as .such for three consecutive terms, 1825, 1826, and 1827. In 1831路 he vvas again called to the Grand East for one year. In civil life, he served as an attorney of the territory of upper Louisiana, 路and in 1820 he served as Attorney General. 1

-18---


v/as elected to the Constitutionafter ]\1issouri ,vas to the Union, he served in the State Legislature. In 1824, he "vas elected to In ,vas elected 0 f the Land Court. President F"illtnore tendered hinl the Secretaryship of \\1ar he declined. He presided over the National Whig Convention at Baltimore in President Lincoln appointed hinl i\ttorney General in 1860, \vhich, owing to ill health he after years. It is believed, that he was nlade a Master lVIason in Missouri I.,odge No. as he represented this Lodge at the organ路路 ization at the Grand Lodge and served as l\IIaster of his Lodge for eight years. In later years he returned to his farm and died March 25, 1869, at the age of 76 years. A bronze statue of hinl stands in Forest Park, S1. Louis, to conl111enlorate his great \vork in the early history of Missouri. 't"'.t:!>C"1N,'f'''\o,r't

D. Grand S'lecretary, 1825, 路1826, 1827, 1828, and 1829. Grand Treasu~rer, 1855 to 1864. R. W. John D. Daggett, the third Grand Secretary, \vas born in Attleboro, Vern1ont, October 4, 1793. At the age of 16 he\vas apprenticed to learn the machinist trade, \vhich he followed until 1815. He lived a short time in Pennsylvania and then came to St. Louis in October, 1817. He served as Grand Secretary for five路 consecutive years; Deputy Grand J\1aster in 1836, 1837 and 1838. In 1855 he was elected Grand Treasurer and reelected until 1864. His service in the Grand Lodge was a long and honorable one. He was made a Master Mason in Missouri Lodge No. 12, in 1818, represented his Lodge in the Convention of 1821 which organized the Grand Lodge. He served his Lodge as Master, Senior \Varden and Treasurer. In Capitular JVlasonry he attained distinguisqed prominence. He was .made a Royal Arch Mason in Missouri Chapter No.1, St. Louis; and served as High Priest in 1829 to .1839. He was elected Deputy Grand -19-


Hight Priest in 1848, and Grand High Priest in 1849, and reelected in 1850. He 'also served as Grand Treasurer from 1855 to 1872. In the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar, he served as Grand Treasurer from 1860 to 1865. He was elected Mayor of St. Louis in 1841,. Secretary of the School Bo~rd in 1846-1847. He was engaged in stealnboating for many years, and organized the St. Louis Gas Light Co.. Re died in St. Louis,May 12, 1874, at the age of 81 years. THE FIFTHSEMI-ANNUJ\L COMMUNICATION. (Tenth Communication.) St. Louis, April 3, A.D. 1826.;A.L. 5826. This semi-annual .Conlmunication found only three of the elective Grand· Officers present. It extended over seven days, including the adjourned periods. The intervals of adjournment ,vere longer than. the actual business session. The chief lnattersof interest \vere :-a petition to forin and open a Lodge at Ste. Genevieve, under the name of Tucker No. 13 \ivas issued; Hyram Loc}.ge No.3' at St.. Charles, owing to re1110vals and other causes surrendered .its···.Charter, thus ending the history of another Lodge, that assisted in the formation of the Grand Lodge. 1,t appeared .that Tyro Lodge No. 12 had, vvithout permission tTIoved· from Caledonia· to Potosi.. This was held· as irregular and Tyro Lodge was directed to present . documents that ·such renl0val was sanctioned by a majority of the members, to the GrandMaster, and ifapproved by him, the Lodgenlay move and the Charter endorsed accordingly. In reference to the expulsion of a member by his Lodge, which came up ·on an appeal, the Committee used plain and· elnphatic language as follows: I f the. report of the· committee of Tyro Lodge be true, it is impossible that any . luau can be found, within or without the lodge, who would hesitate to expel from the Order, from society, and from the world, a man so· utterly abandoned as the •. accused· must be. The crime with :which he is charged, is sufficiently base to excite the indignation of· every 'Mason, but. the· circumstances under which that· report' shows -20":'-'


to have been committed, to it an asp,ect at which every man must shudder, \vho is wholly destitute of all moraLsense.. y'"our committee was most desirous, that in the defense written for the purpose of submitted to this Grand Lodge, ana which was written after the report of the comnlittee in the inferior lodge was made, some denial of the charge,. and of路 the truth of that report should be found, that we might have some doubt that man was capable of such enormity.. But that defence is a senseless jargon, containing neither denial or confesion, in the greater part applying as wen to one case as another; and showing nothing from which the correctness of the sentence can be doubted.

The Grand Master appointed Reverend Brother Justinian \\Tilliams as Chaplain. This is the first mention of such an officer.

-21-


THE SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (Eleventh COll1munication) St. Louis, October 2, A.D. 1826; A.L. 5826. At this annual Comtllunication only one regular Officer vvas present. All the others were pro tern, with Thornton Grin1sley, G. J. W. in the East. On the third day the Grand Master presided. Routine business vvas transacted in¡ brief daily session. The report of the Committee on Correspondence occupies the largest space in the records. The Committee is still displeased with the Grand Lodge of Maine, as to its "mode" of conferring the Degrees. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania sent a copy of Ahiman Rezon, as a guide to physical qualifications. Brother Daggett submitted an an1endment to expunge frOlTI the Code, requiring.a fee from visitors. This is the third effort to reduce or expunge this fee, but the referendun1 was \vorking very slowly and the Lodges seemed too indifferent to pay any attention in the matter. J\lasonically, the referendU1TI ,vas an impracticable and unworkable thing. The Grand Secretary was instructed to print one hundred copies of the Constitution and By-Laws for the benefit of the subordinate Lodges. Judging from the constant violation of lav\t, the Lodges surely needed it. The follo"Vving resolu~ tion was adopted: Ordered, That the expulsion of MARTIN RANN:E~Y by Franklin Union Lodge, No.7, in April, 1825, together \vith a description of him, be published in one of the nevvspapers printed in St. Louis.

This is surely givingp-ublicity of Masonic transactions. How \:vould such a procedure look in 1921? The annual election and installation resulted as foHows: "1f. W. ED'WARD BATES

W. MARTIN RUGGLES W. JOHN F. RYLAND ......â&#x20AC;˘....... Brother RICH'D T. M'KINNEY JOHNIn,. DiAGGETT FREDIERICK L. BILLON THOMAS AND'REWS -22-

G. Master. G. S. w.

G.l. TIV. G. G. G. G.

Treas. Sec'},.

S. D. J.D.


Bro:.her ~A~ES P. SPENCER··········t G. ELIHU SHEPHARD . · . · . · . f u S.:\.1fIJEL T. 1I'KINNEY G. The Rev. Bro. JUSTINIAN WI LLI.i\1JfS G. Brother GEORGE H. C. 1tfELODY G. THORNTON: GRI1JfSLEY ." G. GEORGE 110RTON G. SlTLLIV,A.N BLOOD G.

Stewards. Tyler. Chaplain. Lect'U,rer. Marshal. S. Bearer. [J'l,trSU,i1)ant/'

ne\v faces appear in this corps of officer5. One of \VhOl11, John. becarne a figure in Freen1asonry in l\!Iissouri as the years 011. office of Grand Lecturer for the first appears in the list of Grand Officers.

SEI\·iI-J\NNUi\L COMMUNICATION. (Twelfth Comn1unication.)

St. Lou'is, April 2, .l1.D. 1827; A.L. 5827. 'rhe sixth semi-annual Con1n1unication was held in' the City of St. Louis with Grand Master Bates presiding, three pro tern officers, and the representatives of Missouri No. 1 and Tyro No. 12 present During the year a dispensation had been issued to the Brethren of Boonville to forln and open a Lodge under the nanle of Boonville No. 14. It received its Charter at this Session. Franklin Union Lodge No.7 was censured for hurrying candidates through the Degrees, and the Lodge at Boonville was required to strike out a by-law that pern1itted a ballot in which one. black ball appeared, to lie over until the next Communication. The referendum finally labored and brought forth the result, that the fee for "looking in" on the Grand Lodge was repealed. -

-23-


THESEVENTI-I A:NNUALCOMMUNICATION. (Thirteenth Communication.)

St. Louis, October 1, A.D. . 1827; A.L.5827. The Grand Lodge opened with the Grand Officers present as follows: "11. vV. EDWARD BATES G. M. R. W. HARDAGE LANE ~ D. G. M. W. MARTIN RUGGLES S.G. W. W. FRED'ERICK L. BILLON J. G. W.) p1"ote1n. Brother GEORGE M'GUIRE ,G. Treastl,rer. JOHN D.. D'AGGETT G. Secretary. JAMES S. LANE Dep.G. Secretary.. JOHN' SIMONDS .. " ." S. G. D., pro te111,. FRAN:CIS ·S. SAMUEL ........ •J. G. D.) pro ten~. GEO. H. C. MELODY G. TylcrJpro te11t. TH'ORNTON GRIMSLEY G. Marshal. R. 'A'. THOMPSON DOUGLASS." I

together· with the representatives of Missouri. No.1, Franklin Union No.7, Tyro No. 12 and Boonville No. 14. The Grand. Lodge of New York received the thanks of the Grand Lodge for courtesies extended to R. \V. Brother George H. C.Melody, D. G. '1\1. on his visit to that Grand Jurisdiction. A controvet'Sy. arose bet"veen the Grand Lodge of Missouri and the Grand Lodge 0.£ Illinois. It appears that one Berry. was expelled by his· Lodge several years ago when this Lodge \\ras under the" jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Missanri. The ,Grand Lodge affirmed the expulsion on an app.eal. Efforts to reopen the case were made for· several years, .without anyehallge in the results. When the Lodge came under the jurisdiction of the Grand I"odgeof Illinois, the,GranCl Lodge appealed to the Grand Lodge of .Missouri to fieopen the case fora new trial. This request was refused. The :Grand Lodge of. Illinois took up the case and restored Berry . to all the rights and benefits of Freemasonry~ The follo,ving resolution grew out of this controversy: -24~


Resolved, That the Grand LQdge do protest against the exercise of power assumed the Grand LQdge of Illinois, in restoring the said E. C. to of without the consent of this Grand Lodge first had heen obtained. ,I.路",s;;..;:;v.-c."'" That a committee be for the purpose of reviewing the various communications from relative to his case, and also the Proceedings of Vandalia Lodge, No.8, and of this Grand Lodge; to embody the same, and submit them to the other Gralld Lodges' in the United States, with a request that they express an thereon. Resolved, That this Grand will not, and that the lodges under its jurisdiction, he directed not to recognize the said E. C. B~R:RY as a member of the 'Masonic Fraternity, until the \vhole subject shall have been finally disposed of. IoAI.

The elective and appointive officers for the coming year were: "M. W. EDvVARD BATES G. M. 'fl. MAR.TIN RUGGLES S.G. W. W. H. R. GAMBLE 1.G. W. Brother THORNTON GRIMSLEY . G. Treas. JOHN D. D路AGGETT G. Sec''},. FREDERICK L. BILLON .. S. G.. D. " FRANCIS S. SAMUEL..... J.G. D..

~~~~A~' ~~~~~~~.:::

:fe.

Stewards. BENJAMIN WALKER .... . G.T3-'ler. The Rev. Bro. JUSTINIAN WILLIAMS . . G. Chaplain. Brother JOHN ]. DOUBERMAN G. Marshal. " JOHN SIMON'D路S G. S. Bearer. SULLIVAN BLOOD G. P1<trsz",ivanf.n

Grand Master, as usual路 was installed in a Lodge of Past Masters. A new Grand Treasurer in the person of Thornton Grimsley, makes his appearance. Total amount of money received $73.50.

THE SEVENTH SEMI-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (F ourteenth .COlumunication. )

St. LOlltis,Apri.l7,A.D. 1828; A.L. 5828. At this sen1i-annual S'ession of the Grand Lodge, only two of the regular Grand Officers . were present,all the other Sta-25-


tions were filled pro tempore, \vith R. W. Hardage Lane, Deputy Grand Master, presiding. Four Lodges were represented, but only by its Master, the. others by proxy of SOUle Grand Officer. T~he Conl'n1:ittee on Work reported that Franklin Union Lodge No.7, had elected and initiated Candidates on the same evening on vvhich the petitions were received. This action vvas condemned, "except \vhere the emergency of the case strictly demanded it." Then, as novv, the en1ergency was easily found. In Tucker Lodge No. 13, a dispute arose as to \vho should路 represent the Lodge at the Grand Lodge. The meu1bers maintained that the Lodge elected its representatives. The Committee: held that under the Constitution, the Master and Wardens were empowered to appoint their proxies when they were not -able to attend the Grand Lodge in their own official capacity. A resolution of respect to the men10ry of DeWit Clinton, a distinguished Freem:ason, was passed. Perseverance Lodge No. 15, Louisiana, received its Charter, and its Master was invested with the Degree of Past Master, in a Lodge of Past Masters opened by the Grand Lodge Officers.

-26-


COlYfMUNICATION

At this annual session, there were present five Grand Officers, three proxy路 Grand Officers and the representatives of Lodges No.1, 7, and 10. The business transacted was .rather unique and out of the usual beaten Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania which chartered Lodge No. 109 atSte. Genevieve, in 1807, and whose charter was vacated for non payment of dues, before the Grand Lodge of Missouri was formed, now came before the Lodge of Missouri with a request to be permitted to resuscitate Louisiana Lodge No. 109, for the purpose of collecting these dues and closing up its business. The Grand Lodge of Missouri adopted the following resolution: Resolved., That this Grand Lodge will freely acquiesce in the revival of Louisiana Lodge, No. 109, at Ste. Genevieve, by the Grand Lodge, of P'ennsylvania, for the purpose of collecting its debts and closing its business.

The Grand Lodge must have sn1iled when the resolution was adopted. I t was a great resurrection game to bring back the life of the Lodge whose members had 路either died or dispersed for years. What a sight it must have been as the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania grasped this corpse by the throat and said, "Pay me what thou owest." Great scheme,-but suppose the corpse refused to listen to this Gabriel's Trumpet of Pennsylvania? "Aye, there's the rub." The Grand Lodge of Tennessee brought similar charges against Missouri Lodge No.1, which, while Missouri Lodge No. 12 under the Grand Lodge of Tennessee had failed to pay all its dues before coming under the wing of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. ...~s lVlissouri No.1 was alive and lusty, it was an easy matter to handle. The Grand Lodge, therefore, ordered Missouri No. 1 to pay its old debts to the Grand Lodge -27-


of Tennessee. The moral ,vhich adorns this tale is to collect debts before the debtor i~, dead. The ne,v corps· 6fOfficers were: HR. W. HARDiAGE LANE .~ ~ G. M. W. HAMILTONR.. GAMBLE .. S.. G. W. W. ADAM L. 11ILLS J. G. W. W. THORNTON' GRIMSLEY G. Treas. W.JOHN D. DAGCETT G. See'y. Brother JAMES P . SPENCER G.. S. D. II TH01tfAS ANDREWS J.G.. D. BEN].. WALKER G.. Tyler.. R. W. GEORGE H . C. lVIELODY .. D. G. M . The Rev. Bro. JUSTINIAN WILLIA·MS G. Chaplain . Brother SULLIV AN BLOOD G. ,Marshal. ]. J.DOUBERMAN' G. Sword Bearer. FRED. L. BILLON G. Pursuivant.

" ~~r. ~~~~~~NS':::: :.\

G. Stezoaj·ds."

HARDAGE LA.NE. Grand Master,-1828, 1829 and 1830. ~M. \\T.Brother HarClageLane, the fourth Grand .Master of the Gral1d Lodge of Missouri, served as Grand Master for three yeats, 1828, ·1829, 1830. There isnb record of his nativity or date of· birth. He. appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1826, when he ·acteclasSenior Deacon pro tem.H;e appeared at several GrandCommunications, as .. pr~oxies, . for several different Lodges. He was appointed. Deputy. Grand Master two years prior to his election as Gi-and Master. In· the subordinate Lodge, the only record found is, tha't he affiliatedwithl\'1issottri LbdgeNo... l, July 8, 1826. In the Tecords .0£ Missouri Chapter No. 1 he ··isrecorded,. August 13:J827, ~s a visitor froin Vince'l1nes'Chapter No. 1 Royal Arch Masons of Indiana. There is no record of his· death.

-28__


COM MUNIC-,.t\. TION. (The Sixteenth Communication.) St. LOt"is) April A.D. 1829; A.L. 5829" semi-annual Session vvas very brief. All its business \vas transacted at one sitting without adjournment. M. \\7. Brother Lane, G. M., presiding.

-29-


THE NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Seventeenth Communication.) St. Louis, October 5, .I1.D. 1829 ;A.L. 5829. The Grand Officers, four Grand Officer's Proxies, and the representative of路 Lodges Nos. 1, 7,. 14, and 12 'iVere present. Grand Master Lane in" the路 Grand East. Beside the usual routine business transacted, a Comn1unication from the Grand Lodge of the District of Cohllnbia, "vas received on "the subject of establishing a new Masonic test." After the Comtnittee had labored long over this problem and after having interrogated the ancient landtnarks "handed do\vn fromoistant ages," solen1nly resolved Resolved) That in the opinion of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, no authority on earth, except the universal body of Masons, or their representatives especially empowered for that purpose, has the right or the power to alter, in any manner whatever, the ancient landmarks of the Order. Resolved) That the establishment of any other new or different test or rule" for the examination or admission of visiting or .other Masons, besides that handed to us from distant ages, cannot rightfully be effected by any other than the high authority alluded to in the preceding resolution. Resolved~ That the attempt to establish such a test by some o~ the Grand Lodges of the United States, meets the settled disapprobation of this Grand Lodge.

These ancient landlnarks "from. distant ages" worked "vonders when puzzling questions arose. The annual election and appointlnents were.as follows: "M. W. HARD'AGE LANE R. W. HAMILTON R.GAMBLE R. W'. AARON L. MILLS R. W. BERN,ARD PRATTE, JR. R.W. JOHN' D. DAGGETT Brother JOHN SIMON;DS, JR " THOS. ANDREWS BEN].路WALKER R. W. FREDERICK L. BILL,ON Rev. Bro. JOHN R. BROWN -30-

G. P'llt1's'ltivant.

S. G. W. J. C.W.

G. G. G. G. G.

See'y. :AtI. S.D. J. D. T:yler.

Dep~tty

G. M. G. Chaplain.


Brother SULLIV.t\N BLOOD THOS..A.. ND'RE\lVS " R. T. !\f'KINNEY lAS. P'. SPENCER J 1'\$. I<ENNERLY"

G. J1arshal. G. Sword Bearer. G. Treas. 路t~ S ' ' d f G. tewar s.

Grand Treasurer reported $93.25 in the charity fund and $14.98 in the general fund. i\ ne\v Grand Treasurer appears in Bernard Pratt, Jr.

rfHE NIN'I'H SEMI-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighteenth Con1munication.) St. I-(ou'is April 5, 1830, A.L. 5830. J

'fhis sen1i-annual session of the Grand Lodge found the Grand Master absent, and all the stations filled by proxies, except that of Grand Junior Warden, Grand Secretary and Grand Tyler. Brother Han1ilton R. Gamble, Grand Junior V\T arden" presiding. The Com111ittee on Vlork sublnitted a report on Franklin Union Lodge No, 7 that was' very condemnatory of this Lodge. It received, balloted and conferred Degrees on the same candidate on the same evening. It refused to admit the Grand Lecturer ,vhen he came on an official visit, transacted business in the E. A. Degree. and did many things in an irregular manner, and ,immorality existed among the members in a ,gross degree. The Charter' of the Lodge was ,suspended pending investigations.

l\ dispensation was granted to the Brethren to form and open a Lodge at Clarksville. Tyro Lodge No. 1~ having tnoved to Potosi, a few years ago, repented in sackcloth and ashes, and asked the privilege of retracing its steps and returning to Caledonia. It was granted. A dispensation was granted to ,the Brethren at Columbia to fornl and open a Lodge under the name of ,Columbia Lodge No. 16. -31-


THE TENtH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (l'he Nineteenth Communication.) St. Louis, 0 ctober 4, A.D. 1830; A.L. 5830. 1'his Annual Con1ffiunication \vas opened by Grand Master I.(ane,with three regular Grand Officers in their Stations and five proxy· Grand Officers present. This Session continued for six days. For the first time Standing COlnmittees are mentioned: "On \Vork and credentials of subordinate Lodges," "On Communicatiollsfrom other Grand Lodges." These SeelU to be the onlyCOlTIlnittees. The following significant iten1 appears· in the Report of the COll1111ittee on Work, in reference to Boonville Lodge No. 14. That this Lodge had been in the habit of receiving petitions, balloting, and transacting business in the E. A. and F. C.. degrees. This complaint among the Lodges seemed to be general, but the reason for it is not easy to .understand. Surely the Grand· Lodge had called attention to this violation of .Jaw often enough. A Charter was granted to Columbia Lodge No.. 16. .The annual election and appointive officers resulted as follovvs: "M. W. HARDAGE LANE W. SINCLAIR KIRTLEY

. W. ADAM L.MILLS -Brother THOMAS AN,DREWS

FRED'CL.BILLON R. W.GEO. H. C. MELODY Rev. Bro. JOHN R.BROWN Brother J.

"

J. DOUBERMAN'

J. SIM'OND:S, JR.

.

R. T. McKINNEY

-"

~A~~~T~~J~ERLY'

:

G~

M.

G. G. G. G.

S. W . J. W. Treas'r. Sec':,'.

Dep~ttyG.M.

G. Chaplain. G.Marshal. G. Sword. Bearer. G~ Pursuivant.

J

G. Stewards."

The GrandMaster ~susual was installed by a Lodge of Past Masters. The following resolution with reference to the retiring Grand S'ecretary was adopted: Resolved, That the. thanks . of thisGJ;andLodge be .• tendered .to Brother J. D. DAGGETT, for his correct and faithfuldiscl1arge of the


duties of Grand Secretary for the term of four years, during which he has served in that laborious office.

resolution the salary of the Grand Secretary was fixed at $25.00 per annum, and the Tyler "vas to receive One Dollar per day while the Grand Lodge was in session.. A new face app«:;ars in the list of Grand Secretaries in Frederic L. Billon.

FREDERICK L. BILLON, Gra,zd Secretalry, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1845, af1~d 1846.. Gra1'td Treasurer, 1843" Frederic L. Billon, the fourth Grand Secretary, vvas born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 23, 1801. In 1822, at the age of 21 years he came to St. Louis. He entered the'Grand Lodge in 1825. In 1827, he appears as Senior ,Grand Warden pro tern. In 1829, he was appointed Deputy Grand Master and in 1830 he was elected Grand Secretary, reelected in 1831 and 1832. Reappears again as Grand Secretary in 1845' and 1846, but in 1843 he served as .Grand Treasurer. He was ll1ade a Master Mason· in Missouri, Lo·dge No.. 1, D,ecember 23, 1823. In this Lodge . he served as Master in 18.28 and 1844. He also served as S'ecretary for many years. He was made a Royal Arch Mason in Missouri Chapter No. 1 in 1824. In this Chapter he .served as Secretary and Treasurer. He assisted in organizing the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, October 16, 1846, and served .it as its Grand Secretar.y for three years,-1846 to 1849. He received· the Orders of Knighthood, while on a. visit ··toNew York in Morton Encampment March 28, 1824, and assisted in forming St. Louis Comlnandery No. 1 Knights Templar, in St. Louis in 1846. In civil life he served as Alderman, Comptroller, and· Auditor of the City of St.. Louis. He. wrote the annals ·ofSt. Louis in its Territorial days, in 1888. Later he was Secretary· and Treasurer of the .Missouri •Pacific Railroad.

-3a-


Before his death, \vhich occurred October 20, 1895, at the age- 0''ÂŁ 9S y~'~rs, he was considered the oldest Freemason in Missouri.

THE TENTH SEMI-ANNUAL CO'MMUNICATION. (The Twentieth Communication.) St. Lou-is, April 5, A.D. 1831; A.L. 5831. At this semi-annual COlnmunication, Grand Master Lane was in the Grand East with five Grand Officers and pro. tern Grand Officers, and the representatives of four Lodges present. The surrender of the Charter of Tucker Lodge No. 13 was accepted upon paylnent of all dues. During the interval between the Grand Comn1unications, a dispensation had been issued to the Brethren at Palmyra to open a Lodge under the name of Palmyra Lodge No. 18. It also appears that a Brother was granted indulgence for one year to pay back $80.00 loaned him by the Grand Lodge. Total receipts for the half year, $52.75.

-34--


ELEVEN1'H .... ,.....,..." .... ~r,..

St.

."....... ,~ ....

C01v11\r1UNICATION. Comnlunication.)

October 17, /1.D. 1831; .I1.L. 5831.

The eleventh annual Session vvas opened in due fOfIn vvith Grand Master Lane presiding. Four Grand Ofncers, three pro ten1 Gra!ld Officers, the representatives of four Lodges \vere present On the first day's analllendn1ent to the Constitution \vas offered, eliminating the sClni-anl1ual Communication, but e111powering the ,Gr~lnd l\1aster to call special sessions if necessary. The 1\1aster, \Vardens, and t\'/o other Brethren of Franklin Union Lodge No.7 ,vhose Charter had been arrested, were sumtTIoned to appear before the Grand Lodge for trial on account of irregularities and unmasonic conduct. The annual election resulted in returning M. "\tV. Brother Ed\vard Bates to the Grand Mastership. The corps of elective and .appointive officers for the year 1832 were: G. M.

"M. \V. EDWARD BATES

W. OLIVER PARKER G. S. W. W. AUGUST'US JONES G. J. W. Brother THOS. ANDREWS G. Treas. FRED'C L.· BILLON G. Sec,y. R. W. GEO. H. C. MELODY D. G.M. Rev. Bro. JOHN R. BROWN G.Chaplain. Brother JA1.iES P. SP'EiNeER G. S.D. J. B. D. VALOIS G. J. D. A. L. MILLS G. Marshal. JOHN SIJ\1:0NDS, JR. . ......•.. G.. SZe.'ord Bearer. T. ~fcIZENNEY G.Pursuivant. JA'1JIES .K. ENNE...RLY ·.. ~.G.e'lvar St" ' d s. BERNARD PRATTE, JR . JAMES R. PULLEN G. Tyler.''' H

After the installation the Grand Master'! delivered· an appropriate address. Receipts for the half year an10untedto $94.05.

--"35-


THE ELEVENTH SEMI-ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Twenty-Second Con1ffiupica,tion.) St. Louis~ April 2, A.D. 1832; A.L. 5832. Exit Sen1i-Annuals. The Eleventh selni-annual marked the end of the double barrelled Session. The atnendment proposed at the last Session was ratified by the Lodges. At this Communication M. W. Brother Edward Bates, .with nearly all of the Grand Officers, were present, and the representatives of Missouri No. 1,Tyro No. 12, P'erseverance" No. 15, Columbia No. 16 and Palmyra No. 18 V\Tere present. The difficulty with the officers and the two members of Franklin Union Lodge No. 7 ,vas finally settled by the expulsion of the Master, one \\'arden suspended for five years and the others at the pleasure of the Grand Lodge. An amendment to the Constitution .,vas presented requiring that the rep'resentatives of路a Lodge, shall be the Master. and Wardens, or proxies "vho are members of said Lodges. Heretoforeproxies were appointed irrespective of . where .their luembership was held ; frequently the Grand Lodge appointed these proxies. from the Grand Lodge Officers. The dispensation issued to the路 Brethren to form a Lodge at Galena was withdrawn.


T\VELFtrH ANNUAL COlVl IVIUN ICA1'lON. (The T\\Tenty- Third Con1tnunication.) ).)t. Lou-is, October 1, A.D. 1832; A.L. 5832.

The Twelfth annual Com111unication was not ~l'ell attended and the amount of husiness transacted was meager. The Grand Lodge was opened with only Grand l\1aster Bates, [)eputy Grand 1vIaster Melody, Grand Secretary and Grand Senior Deacon present. Four Lodges \Vere represented.. The election resulted as follows: "Brother H. R. GAMBLE M. J. NOYES AUGUSTUS JONES rrHOS. ANDREWS FRED'C L. BILLON

1O

.

G. M. G. S. W. G. J. W. G. Treas. G.. Sec."


THE THIRTEENTH AI'JNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Tvventy-Fourth COll1munication.) St. Louis) October 9, 1833; A.L. 5833. The Grana Lodge was opened by the Deputy Grand Master, owing to the absence of the Grand Master and all of the other Grand Officers. Every station belovv the Deputy was filled pro tempore. There, is no record of representation by the Lodges. This condition of the Grand Lodge and of Freemasonry in Missouri was due to The Anti-1v1asonic Propaganda. An intense anti-Masonic feeling p:revailed throughout the country, especially in the eastern States. This feeling did not affect the country districts and sn1aller cities and towns, but in St. Louis it was intense. The old reliable Missouri No. 1 succumbed, as told in the follovving note in the reprint of the minutes of 1833, by George F. Gauley in 1877: At a called meeting of Missouri Lodge, No.1,. October 5, 1833, the records show. that the lodge had not held a stated meeting for six months, in consequence of the prevailing epidemic of cholera, and the strong anti-Masonic feeling then raging throughout the country, and fiercely waged by some of the leading ministers in St. Louis. At that Ineeting we find the following officers present:

W. M. P. SPENCER, S. W. L. MCGIL~) J. W.

EDWARD BAtES,

JA:MES THttO.

THORNTON GRI:M:SLEY-, Treas.

J,

WOOLFOLK,

S. D. J.D.

JOHN HAVERTY,

J. B. D. VALOIS, Sec. JEss~Lrr1'LE) Tyler. After settling the accounts of the Secretary and Treasurer, the following appropriations. were made of the funds; Sisters of Charity Hospital, $200; St. Louis Library Association, $250; Rent, $123; and $35.18 to cancel due bills held by Treasurer... Brother'. BATES offered a preamble setting forth the necessity of abandoning work, on account' of the anti-Masonic feeling, and a resolution to' surrender the. charter to the Grand Lodge was adopted. In addition to the officers named, the following were members of the lodge at that date: Thos. Andrews, Geo. Wilson, R:obert W.Coan, }. R. Pullen, Bernard p1ratte, Augustine Kennerly, Frederick' L. Billon, Wm. K. Rule, Rue! Bryant, Hamilton R. Gamble, Archibald Gamble, .-38-


Ceo. }v{ortou, Adam L. 1vfills, John D.. Daggett, Phineas Block, Cornelius Tas. C. Lavielle, Thos. H. vVest, Thos.. H . Benton. David E. Cuyler, G;'o. H. C. l\'felody, ' James Kennerly~ }YIaster 1YIasons, and Charles Cabanne and Edward T. Christy, Entered Apprentices. The charter \vas restored to the lodge by the Grand Lodge, October 18th, 1842, with all its forn1er rights and powers as such lodge. """,CUUlJ 1•1 '1.,.A.A,

This note by Gauley fully explains the small attendance of Grand Officers. \Vhen Missouri Lodge No.. 1 succumbed, the nloving spirits of the Grand Lodge, like Grand ·Master H. R. Gamble, t\rchibald Ganlble, Edward Bates, JohnD. Daggett, and Grand Secretary Frederic L. Billon and 'others vvere withOtlt a Masonic hOl1le. Fronl the roster given in this note the small n1elnbership of the Lodges is clearly seen. The Grand I-todge, after transacting a little business, elected the tollovving Officers, and adjourned to 111eet in Columbia in December. "'Brother SINCLAIR KIRTLEY

JOHN WILSON GILPIN' A.TUTTLE JOHN GARNETT GEO. H.C. lYfEL·ODY

G. M. G. S.W.. G. J. W. G. Sec.. G. Treas/'

No appointive officers appear in the ll1inutes·. The financial statell1ent shows funds to be as follo\vs, current fund $131.82, charity fund $41.50. A new Grand ~/laster makes his appearance in I-Ianlilton R.· Galuble.

Hi\.1v1ILTON R. GAMBLE G'ra1zdlJ1aster} 1832. l\f. \V. Brother Hamilton R. Galnble, the fifth .Grand Master, was born in vVinchester, Virginia, November 29, 1798. He ·obtained his education in Hall1pden-Sidney College, and admitted to practice law at the age· of eighteen years. He caIne to St. Louis in 1818 and·\vas Deputy Circuit Clerk· under his brother, Archibald Ganlble.. At that· time there were but two Counties north of the Missouri River. He moved to Old Franklin and became Circuit Prosecuting Attorney. Ip. 1824, -39-


Governor Frederic Bates appointed him Secretary of State, the seat of gov~tnmentbeingat St. Charles. He served in the State Legislature in 1846 and was elected Supr~n1e Judge in 1831. In politics he v;as a Whig. He moved to. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1858, but returned to St. Louis in 1861. While war "vas impending and dissension appeared everywhere he 4eclared his ulls\verving loyalty to the Union and became a power in its cause. After the flight of Governor Claiborne F. Jackson, in July, 1861, lVI.W. Brother Gamble was unanimously elected by the State Convention, asprqvisional. Governor of Missouri and by his actions Missouri was saved.for the Union. Little is known of his Masonic history,prior to his affiliation with Missouri Lodge No. 1, November 2, 1824, In this Lodge he served as Master in 1826 and 1827. He first appeared in Grand Lodge in 1823. In 1827, he was elected Grand Senior Warden, elected and served two years as Grand Senior Warden and at the annual Communication in .October, 1832, he was elected GrandMaster. He died }anuary31, 1864, worn out by arduous duties and anxiety. His funeral \iVaS a Inost.imposing one. The cortege being over a mile in length. So passed one of Freemasonry's great ruen.

THE ADJ01JRNEDTHIRTEENTHANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The T\venty-Fifth· Communication.) Columbia Decetnber 11, A.D. 1833, A.L.S833. At this adjourned session of the Grand Lodge from October 9, there was present only one· regular Grand Officer,--the Deputy GrandMaster, George H.C. Melody. All the other stations were filled pro tempore. Grand Master. elect Kirtley -had. not been .installed, but acted ·as 'Grand Secretary pro tern. The representatives of .Boonville Lodge No.. 14, Tyro Lodge No. 12 and Coltunbia Lodge No. ··16, vverepresent. J

-40-


A p,etitiort to form and open a Lodge at Fayette was received and,a dispensation "vas granted..

Owing to the anti-masonic feeling at St. Louis, an amendment to the by-laws was agreed to" fixing Columbia as the permanent meeting place of the, Grand Lodge, and a committee was .appointed to s,ecure suitable quarters for the use of the Grana Lodge. Grand Mastet ,Kirtley was duly installed Grand Master in a Lodge of Past Masters by George'H. 'C. Melody, Deputy Gtand Master, after which the Grand Master made the following appoi11tolent and installed them. "A. B. CHAlvfBERS, of BO'wling Green

HAMPTON L. BOONE CHARLES D. W. JOHNSTON AIRS HUDSPETH JACOB EVERSALL JESSE HART ~" OLIVER PARKER

" "

Deputy Grand Master. Grand Chaplain. Grattd Senior Deacon. Gra1,td Ju,tior Deaco'1t, Gran,d Ma:rshal. Grt1ftd Tyle'r. tCrand SfeW,a1"ds

>I)

GEORGE KNOX A.UGUSTUS JONES"

C. Sword 13earer.

WILLIAM H. RUSSELL."

G.Pursuiva11t.

Anew Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer were elected.

SINCLAIR KIRTLEY, Grand Master~ 1833. M. W. Brother Sinclair Kirtley, the sixth Grand Master of the, Grand Lodge of Missouri, first appeared in' the Grand Lodge in 1829" He was elected Grand Senior Warden in 1830 and Grand Master in 1833. He afterwards serv€d as Dep~ty Grand Master in 1834. He represented Columbia Lodge No. 16 in the Grand Lodge in 1830. He died in 1853. No other information in civil or masonic history is obtained.

':'-41-


THE FOURTEENTI-I .LL\NNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Twenty-S'ixthCommunication.) Columbia, N ove'inber 13, A.D. 1834, A.L. 5834.

At this annualCon1municatioll four Lodges were represented, vvith Grand Master Kirtley in the Grand East. He, . \vith the Grand Treasurer were the only Grand Officers present. The amount of business transacted was small, but it was spread over a two days' session. The Lodge U. D. at Fayefte was continued under dispensation. A dispensation had been g1;anted to open a Lodge at Pax:-is under the name of Paris Union Lodge No. 19. It was granted a Charter. By resolution the perlnanent meeting of the Grand Lodge was fixed on the first Thursday after the second Monday in November, at COlulubia. The following Grand Officers were elected, but not installed. The minutes of this session are signed by Sinclair Kirtley, Grand Master. Evidently the Grand S'ecretary was not present. "Brother A. B. CHA11BERS was elected.. Grand Master. OLIVER P'ARKER Grand Senior Wa1'"den. S. W.B. CARNEGY Grand Junior Warden. G. H. C. 11ELODY Grand . Treas~trer. THOS. W. CONyERS G. Sec. of the G. L. of Mo. 1J

A. B. CHAIvIBERS. Grand Master elect)-1834. Brother路A. B.. Chambers vvas elected路to this office路 Noven1ber 13, 1834, but. vvas never installed.The~e was no annual Comn1unication in 1835, hence Sinclair Kirtley ren1ained in office as Grand Master until succeeded by S. W. B.Carnegy. Brother Chan1bers was born in IVlercer County, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1808. He settled in Bo\vlingGreen, Missouri, in 1829. Having studiedlavr,he took up his profession and attained preeminence. in both the Civil and Criluinal Courts. He served -42-


in the Black Hawk War as a private. In 1832 and 1836 he served in the State Legislature, in the meantime assisted in publishing a newspaper in Bowling Green. In 1837 he moved to St. Louis and became a partner in the Missouri Republican. He was a man of spotless reputation, high standing and indomitable courage.. His masonic history is brief, because unknown.. He was a member of St. Louis Lodge No. 20, filled several stations in the Grand Lodge, elected Grand Master in 1834 and his last appearance was on October 21, 1839; he acted as Grand Master in laying the corner stone of the St. Louis' Court House. H-e died May 22, 1854, at the age of forty-six years.

THOMAS CONYERS, Grand Secretary, 1834-1836. There is no history of the life of R.W. Brother Thomas Conyers, the sixth Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge. The only record extant is that of his election to the office of Grand Secretary but not installed. His name appears after his election as a representative of Columbia Lodge No. 16 of which he was a member by affiliation.

-4a-:-


NoCommunic4tion of thpGrand Lodge o!MisstnW; during the year owing t.o the anti-fI'tO,$onic fp-eling. The GrQndOffleers of 183$ held .over ito 18.36.


SIXTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Twenty-Eighth Communication.)

Columbia, October 3, 1836; A.L. 5836.

No annual Communicati9n having been held in 1835~u~to anti-masonic condition prevailing and as the Officers elected at the annual Session of 1834 had not been iIlstalled, Grand Master Kirtley preside<i with pro tern officers fi.1~i.ng all of the other stations. The following Lodges were represented, Tyro No. 12, Columbia No. 16, Palmyra No. 18, Paris Union No. 19, these with Perseverance No. 15 helped weather the anti-masonic storm. "" During the interval of 1834 and 1836, Grand Master Kirtley had granted a dispensation to form and open a L09-ge "at and near the city of St. Louis." A Charter was granted to it under the name of St.Louis No. 20. Permission was granted to Perseverance Lodge No. 15 at Louisiana to ,move to Bowling Green. The reason for it' is not stated.

The election of officers reveals a method, that would shock some Masons of the present day. Nominations w;ere made for t~e office before the ball~t was taken. Three were nomil1ate<i for Gr:fl~nd ¥~ster,al;lda'£t,erb~llotwastaken, ,Brother .'Step~.~I). W. B.Carnegy of Palmyra was elected. Four Brethren were nominated for Senior Grand Warden, and after ballot, Brother Edward S'ercey QfP.a1myra was elected. It would appear that the name of Palmyra was a good one to conjure by. Three B.r:et~:t:'eower,e nominated for ,Grand Junior Ward~~, .no1T.li~a­ tions cIQ$ed, and the ballot . revealed the election()fBrot4~r Granville Snell of P~ris. Brother Richard DaI\am (JfS~. L9u~s was elec~ed Gr~nd Secretary and Brother George H. "~. M:~lody'GranQ. Treasurer_ After the instanatio~ of Officers in tQ.~ ,~sl1aI manner, ~heGral1dLodge was clos~d inElu~'~o;~.

-4:5-


STEPHEN W. B. CARNEGY, Grand Master, 1836, 1837, 1838. M. W. Brother S. W. B. Carnegy, the eighth Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, was born in Harrison County, Kentucky, January 29, 1797. In his youth he was elected a membero拢 the County Court and commissioned a Colonel in the 86th Kentucky Regiment of Militia. In March, 1829, he moved to Palmyra, Missouri, and in 1835, he was elected to the State Legislature. He was made a 'Master Mason in St. Andrew's Lodge No. 18, Cynthiana, Kentucky, over which he served as Master for two years. He assisted in organizing Palmyra Lodge No. 18 in which he served as Master for several years, beginning in 1831. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1832. He was, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1835 and Grand Master in 1836, 1837 and 1838. H,e was made a Royal Arch Mason in Palmyra Chapter in 1837, and received the Cryptic Degrees the same year. He attended the famous Baltimore Convention in 1843 and while there received the Orders of Knighthood. In October, 1846, he assisted in the formation of St. Louis Commanderyin which he served as its first Generalissimo. In 1849 he removed to Canton, Missouri. He was the author of the resolution to organize a Masonic College. He died' January 5, 1892, at the age of ninety-five years.

RICHARD B. DALLAM, Grand SecretarYJ 1836 to 1845. R. 路W. "Brother Richard B.Dallam, the seventh Grand S'ecretary of the Grand Lodge of Missouri was elected to that station in 1836. Very little is known of his Masonic or civil life. He was a member of St. Louis Lodge No. 20 and served as its Secretary in 1841. He was also a member of St. Louis Chapter No.1 and its ~ecretary from 1837 'to 1845. He died April 14, 1858. --46-


SEVENTEENTI-I ANNUAL C01:1J\1UNICATION. (The Twenty-Ninth Comlnunication.) St. Louis, October 2, A.D. 1837; A.L. 5837. At the last annual Communication, it vvas voted to return from Columbia to St. Louis, to hold the annual Sessions of the Grand Lodge. This change of place was doubtless due to the difficulty of transportation and traveling overland, as well as the fact that three of the Lodges in and near Columbia were in a ttdrooping" condition, viz., Columbia No. 16, Boonville No. 14 and Perseverance No. 15. The Grand Lodge was opened by R. W. John D. Daggett,Deputy Grand Master. The minutes showing those present as follows: Dep~yG.

M. G. S. W.~ pro tem. G. J. W.} pro feme G. Treas.

W. JOHN D. DAGGETT R. W. JOSEPH JOHNSON

",hi!,

R. W. JESSE LITTLE

R. W. GE,ORGE H. C. MELODY, R. W. RICHARD B. DIALLAM G.Sec'y. R. W.GEORGE WILSON G. S. D.} protem. 'R. W.TH'OMAS AN:D'REWS G. J. W., pro te1n. R. W. ESRO'M OWENS G. Tyler. Brother JOSEPH L. CRAFl\ Webb l,odge, No. 24, la. WILLIAM S. VANCE, late of ~1urray Lodge, No. 35, Ky. THOMPSON DoUGLASS, St. Louis Lodge, No. 路20. Mo. ALEX'R T. DoUGLASS, St. Charles" " " q

t(

JOHN ORRICK)

WII.LIAM JOHN

D.

H.

"

PEAKE,

New London

TUCKER

"

JOSEPH FOSTER, P'artsmouth EBENEEZER C. BOSWORTH, U SAMUEL

C.

Naval Lodge, No. 100,. Va. 4(

Franklin

PntRcE,

HENRY P RUNDLE, BRUNER,

]. C.

H

4'

A. V. REED" Hiram Lodge, No. 21, Va. A. B. CHAMBERS; Perseverance Louisiana, Lodge, Mo." GEORGE

On the following day, Grand Master Carnegy occupied his station. He had during the year issued dispensations to, form . and open Lodges as follows: Franklin Lodge No. 22, Alton, Illinois; New London No. 21, Ne\v London, Missouri, and St. --47-


Charles (Hiram) No. 23, St. Charles, Missouri. A p,etition of sundry Brethren from Jacksotlville, Illinois, to form and open a Lodge at that place was received, the dispensation was granted under the name of Harmony No. 24. S't. Louis Lodge No. 20 was requested to condense its report to the Grand Lodge. Evidently too "windy," but characteristic. Judging from the report of the Committee on HWotk/' the Lodges still persisted in the violation of law by transacting business in the E. A. Degree, electing Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft to fellowship, and balloting out of time. The Grand Lodge holding: That by the general usages and customs of Lodges, Masons below the grade of Master appear to have had their. proper level assigned them; they are universally considered as only candidates for 'Mastership, and that as Entered Apprentices or Fellow Crafts they are m~rely probationary.

This is a well recognized principle and clearly stated here. It further held: On the 3rd April, 1882, the f ollo\ving resolution was adopted bY this Grand Lodge. "Resolved, that no subordinate lodge,·· working under the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, shall confer the degrees of Fellow Craft or Master Mason upon any brother who· has be,en initiated in any other lodge within the United States, unless the brother so applying shall. produce a recommendation or certificate of good standing from the lodge in which he was admitted or initiated."

Charters were granted to St. Charles Lodge No. 23, Franklin L6dgeNo. 22, Alton, Illinois, and New London Lodge No.21. The· officers elect and appointive were duly installed after the. GrandMaster had been installed in a· Lodge of Past Masters.. They were. as foHows :

us.

W. B. CARNEGY A. B. CHAMBERS THOMAS ANDREWS G. H. C. MELODY RI,CH'D B. DALLAM ESRO'M OWENS

~

G. G. G. G. G. G.

M. S. W. J. W.

Treasurer.. Secretary. Tyler.


R. W. JOH"N D. DAGGETT fC 41

U I'

D.G. M.

ALEX. T. DOUGLASS Rm. JOH,N H. FIELDINrG JdflN RULAND ~ JOHN 1J~ TUCKER

" :e.:B. BROWN II H

G. A. V. REED GEORGE WILSON

-

G. G. G. G. G. G. G.

S. D. Ch. Marshal. S.

S. S. Bea"r. Pursu£vant."


THE EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Thirtieth Communication.) St. Louis, October 1, A.D. 1838; A.L. 5838. This annual Communication found every Grand Officer in his station. It is, possibly, the only time since the organization of the Grand Lodge. A varied use of honorary titles had prevailed. At this session the Grand Secretary shifted the honorary title and attached it to the official title. There existed at that time and to some extent at present, no definite rule as to the use of honorary and official titles. Four Lodges were represented, and only five Lodges had made ~eturns. A charter was granted to Harmony Lodge No. 4, Jacksonville, Illinois, and Temperance Lodge No. 27, Vandalia, Illinois, had its dispensation continued for another- year. A charter was granted to N apthali LodgeNo. 25 at St. Louis, and Clarksville Lodge No. 17 which had surrendered its Charter, petitioned for restoration, which was grant~d. A petition for a dispensation to form and. open a Lodge at Hannibal, under the name of St. John No. 28, was granted. The charters of Columbia Lodge No. 16, Boonville No.. 14 and Perseverance No. IS, Bowling Green, were arrested for failing to make returns and paying dues. The Grand Lodge, upon the statement of the Grand Lodge of New York, declared non-recognition of St. John's Lodge and York Lodge of the city of N ewYork,: for rebellion, against the authorities of路the Grand Lodge of New York. By resolution the Grand Treasurer was directed 路to procure new trimmings for the jewels of the Grand Officers and to purchase a jewel of office for the Grand Chaplain. The following resolution was adopted. It is so pertinent that the Lodges of 1921 might pin it in路 the hat of their Masters and. request its enforcement. Resolved, That the Grand .Lodge recommend to a11the subordinate lodges, a strict observance of the requirements of the Masonic Monitor, in attending funeral processions, and especially that part of the instructions which require uniformity of dress, as far as practicable. -5(}-


The most variegated display, and often 'not creditable to the Fraternity, is a funeral procession of Masons in the Twentieth Century.. The following wholesome resolution was also adopted. It is even more applicable to-day than it was in 1838. Resolved, That the Worshipful GrandMaster and Grand -Wardens be a. committee, whose duty it shall be to address a circular letter to the subordinate lodges under this j urisdiction,on the subj eet of Masonry in general, and particularly urging on them: 1st. A more rigid scrutiny in the character of applicants for the privileges of Masonry. ~d. A more strict conformity to the Constitution and By:"Laws of the Grand Lodge and subordinate lodges. 3d. More particular and supervisory control路 over the moral character and conduct of their members.

The officers .elect and appointive were installed in the usual manner.. They were: , . G~(Jnd Moster. A.. B.CHAMBERS G.. S.. w. ALEX. T. DOUGLASS G. J. W. G.. H. C.. MELODy G.. Treas. RICHARD B. DALLAM G. Sec'y. JOliN D. DAGGETT D. G .M. GEORGE WILSON , G. S.. D. REv. HIRAM CHAMBERLAIN', . . C. Chaplain. JOHN RULAND G. Marshal.. EDWARD KLEIN G. Steward. BERN'ARD. PRATTE G. S'teward. JOHN SIMONDS, JR G. S. Bearer. JESSE LITTLE G. PursuivtJnl. ESROM OWENS G.Tyler/'

"Brother S. W. B. CARNEGY

U

R. R. R. R. R. R.

W. W. W.

w.

W.. W. R10 W. R.W. R. W.

In the minutes 路of 1838, is found a notice of the expulsion of one Busby from Missouri Chapter, No. 1 Royal Arch Masons. ' It gives a' full description of him even to the color of his hair, eyes, his walk and ,manner of talking. The statem;ent is also made that all these facts are to be published in the City papers. This is indeed 路giving Masonic aftairsa veil (?) of secrecy. Just why this notice appeared . in the Journal of the Grand Lodge is路 one of those p,eculiar . things that was peculiar to that day. -51__


THE NINETEENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATIO'N. (The Th'irty-First Communication.) St. Louis, October 7, A.D. 1839; A.L. 5839. ThIs anfiual C'omrnuriication was a busy one and extended over a five days' sessIon. All of the Grand' Officers, except two were present, and representatives from Tyro No. 12, Clarksville No. 17, Palmyra No~ 18" Paris Union No. 19, Harmony No. 24, and Sl. Louis No. 20, together with a long list of visitors, some ha.iling from Pennsylvania and -Kentucky. The Grand Master announced the granting of dispensations to form LoClges at Columbus, Illinois; Galena., Illinois; and Hillsboro, Illineis. Ten Lodges had made returns., The stanaing Committees had been increased to five as follows: (COn Work," "On, Foreign Communications,'" "On Unfinished Business," liOn Petitions and Memorials," arnd "On Accounts." Charters were granted to Napthali 'No. 25, St. Louis; Springfield No. 26, Springfield, Illinois; Fat West No. 29, Galena, Illinois; St. John No. 28, Hannibal,. Mis,souri, and Temperance No. 27, Vandalia, IHinois. The' dispensation granted to Columbia, Illinois, ·was coritiriued for one year owing to irregUlarities.. There appears no further record of the dispensation issued to ·Hillsboro, Illinois, under the name of Mt. Morice. 'The dispensation to Mt.Moriah Lod,ge at"Hillsboro, Missouri, was continued for on'e year. A resolution was adopted looking toward the publication of ciNationalMasonic'paper and mentorialized the Gtand Lodges to .this· end. On the evening of· the third ·day, the ·Grand Lodge consecrated Napth<ili Lodge and installed its Officers. The fbllowing resolutions, all of which are 'importa~t ·to the Masons of the 20th .Century as they show the trend of Masonic work and prirt<:iples: . Resolved~That the Most Worshipful' Grand Master address acircular letter to ·.the subordinate lodges under this jurisdiction, on the


subject of Masonry in gertetal, and particularly urging on the~lst, A more rigid scrutiny into' the character of applicants iM the privileges. of 'Masonry; 2l1:d, A more strict conformity to the Constitution and By-Laws of the Grand Lodge and subordinate. lOQges; 3rd, ,More particular and supervisory control over. the moral character and conduet of their mESmbers. Rts()l?Jtd, That the whole of the lectures appertaining to any degr~ in Masonry, ought to be given at the time of conferring thedegtee, and the omission of any ef them is 'highly censurable.

The following corps of elected and a.ppointive officers were installed: ' UBrother PRIESTLY H. McBRIDE Grana Masler. ALEXANDER T. DOUGLASS Senior Grand Warden. W. S. VANCE Junior Grand Warden. GEO. " It

"

C. MELODy

Grana T'eas-urer.

R1CH,ARD B. DALLAM A. B. CHAMBERS REv. HIRAM 路CHAMBERLAIN JOSEPH FOSTER GEORGE WILSON JAIMES McCLURE JAMES H. RELP'H EDWARD KLURE WM. S. HOUGH DAVID WILLOCK COLMORE BEAN of Palmyra

GrImd,Secref,wy. D. G. M.

H.

G. Chaplain.

G. Visitor. S. G. D. J.G. D. G.M. G. G. G. G.

S.

S. S. B. P."

M.W. Brother Stephen W. D. Carnegy, the retiring Grand Master, was presented with a jewel. He deserved it, as his three years in the Grand Master's Chair, had been the most prosperous in the history of the Grand Lodge. It is also the first record of a jewel presentation.

PRIESTLY H. McBRIDE. Grand M aster -1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1843. J

M. W. Brother Priestly H. McBride, the ninth Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, first appears in the Grand Lodge October, 1838, representing Paris Union Lodge No. 19, Paris, Missouri.

-53-


There is no record of his early life, birth nor nativity, or of his early ,masonic activities or .affiliation.. He. was very active in the Grand'Lodge, so that he soon advanced to the front, and was elected GrandMaster at the annual Communication in October, 1839. He was reelected annually, serving five t~rms. He was a lawyer by profession and attained preeminence, as he was elected to the Supreme Court of. Missouri and presided therein with distingu~hed ability. In the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri he displayed the same ability, as he was elected from the floor to the position of Grand High Priest. He died at Boonville, Missouri, May 21, 1869. At the time of his death he was a member of Twilight Lodge No. 114, and Columbia Chapter No. 17, Columbia, Missouri. He was buried by his Lodge with solemn and imposing ceremony.


THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Thirty-Second Communication.) St. Louis, October 5, A.D. 1840; A.L. 5840. This annual Communication found nearly all of the Grand Officers· .present with Grand Master McBride in the Grand East. The attenaance of representatives were· from eight Lodges, the largest in its history. There were now a total of sixteen Lodges, chartered and under dispensation under the Grand Lodge. The Grand JYIasterreported, that he had issued dispensations to form and open Lodges: Huntsville Lodge, Huntsville, Missouri; Liberty Union, Liberty, Missouri; and Lexington, Missouri. Charters were granted to these Lodges under the following name and number, Huntsville Lodge No. 30, Liberty Lodge No. 31, Lafayette Lodge No. 32, Lexington. A resolution. was adopted, on the first day of the Session, to enquire into· a certain lottery "being carried on in the City of St. Louis styled the M.asonic Lottery," and to ascertain "by what authority conducted and how the profits were appropriated?" The Committee appointed to investigate this little lottery and how the profits were appropriated, was to report next year. This resolution is rather amusing to the Masons of to-day, ~special1y to investigate the question of profit. Of course a Masonic lottery in St. Louis in 1840 must, be considered in the light of the age in .which it occurred. A dispensation was granted to sundry Brethren at Mineral Point, Wisconsin Territory, to· form and open a Lodge. A dispensation was also granted to the Brethren 'at Jefferson City, Missouri, to form a Lodge. The following important resolution· was adopted: t

uR.esolved, That all Grand Lodges in correspondence with the Grand Lodge of Alabama, be requested to elect on~ delegate to meet in general convention on the first Monday in March, 1842, in the city.of Washington, for the purpose of determining upon a uniform mode of work throughout all lodges of the United States, and to make other lawful regulations for the interest and ·security of the craft."

-55-


A r,~pr~set;ltati:ve~o tQis p1eeti~g i~ Washi~on .wa~ .~p­ pointed. Thi~, 'PQssil;>ly, is tl}e ~rst~ffQ;rtJ}il~de to secure uniformity in Ritua~istic work in the Ul).it~d S~ates. Of course, it resulted in a failure, as each Grand Lodge, and each Grand Lecturer, ·was l~boring under tl1eobsession t~at thejrs 'Y~s the best work, and ,ex,actly the Ritual used by King Solqmono Uniformity" of Ritualistic work is' merely a dream, ~nd always will be,' as lQJ;lg as there are "many 1lleIl of many minds." A memorial from SpriIl.gfiel~ .Lodge No. 26, Sprin~eld, Illinois, requesting permission to withdraw from the Gr~nd Lodge of Missouri and to come under the j~risdictioll of the Grand Lodge of IJlinoi 9. Base.d on this memoria~, the .fo}lowiog resolution was' adopted: Resolved, That theC~mmunication from Springfield Lodge be referred to the Grand Secretary, that'he open a correspondence 'with said Lodge, for the pur.pose of .ascertaining w.hat lodg.esworking Under Qb~t:,te.r~fr·o,mthi~G:1:'Ctitlf,i;~oclge, haye united and formedthemsel:ves into a Gra~d Lod~~, ~d des~gnated the Grand .Lo~~e of Illinqis. T~ESSCO:Nl)GRAN,DLODG~of .ILLINOI$ . rper~ader lllay w9nd~r. ~~d ~nqu:ire, why4~:d the .Gr~nd :L,tQ4g~ of Misso\lri~ha~'t.er~odgesi.n.Illinois a~~e:r the for1l).a-

tipn 'Qf the Gr:anp. 4>4g~ 9:£ I]Ji,~9is in 18?3?Lo4ges h~d hee.J1 qb.arter~d

,in Illipoi$, .byP~n~sylv9-n.i~, Kentucky, T,enAe$S~~ a~9 :M:.isso~ri, thegr~<lter n-um~~r l)y MissoU:t:i,a total oJ6ye Lodges. A !~onv:~p.ti9P ·9!£Ael~gates.. of ;thes-e Y->d~ep .~o:tl:\)eg~d D~ce~ber9, 1.82~flt V~:q9~~ia to Jor:W a Gran9~:Qg~.This Gran411;o4gew~s !o~gapiz~ ~ee~ber .1, lS~~,·hu;t in :l8~y ~e(}r~~d;LoHg¢Q,f ~1lii;\9is,cease4 ~9 e~i~t a~d eyeryLodge under its jurisdiction was bl9:tte,c;l out, t~at:llotexen'il trace was left. 1)1;l~ .cap~e o:f t~~ . c.<?;ll~ps~ pJ J1),is· GraqdLoflge :is not ~nown.

It

i~ \ige~rally c9i~si<;ler~9- t9~~ve :b~~n 4-~,e~91!he

~ti~~~~q1;lic f~:~linge~$titig. 'AJter Jthe coHa:pse of Jthe .Graad Lodge of Illinois, the Grand Lodge of Missot1riissue~.<;lispen~ations '~n,d ehart;ersthex:ein as fo1l9WS: Fta:qklin at .A:I~9n;'II~ony at l~c~~9iPyiU,e,;


Springfield at Springfield ; Temperance at Vandalia ; Far West, at Galena ; Mt. Morice, at Hillsboro; and cClinton atCarIisle. Lodges had~lso been chartered in Illinois, at this time by Kentucky. A convention of the representatives.of ~nearlyall of these Lodges was held at Jacksonville, January 39, 1840, at .which time the present Grand Lodge of Illinois was born. The Lodges heretofore mentioned transferr~4th.e~r al1~giance to it. The special Com11J.i ttee op :By-Laws s:ub~itted its report. These By-Laws cover three closely printed pag;esof the Pcoceedings, and do not differ much from the ones now in use. A few' exceptions are .noted: The permanent seat of the. 'Grand'Lodge was fixed in St. Louis and the annual session on the second, Monday in October. The Deputy Grand Master was an appointive Officer of the Grand Master, and in the event of the incapacity or death of the Grand Master, he succeeded to the office and he in turn to fill by appointment any office vacated ; the Lodges were required to send to the Grand Lodge an abridged report of the transactions of the Lodge for the year; the Grand Master or 路his Deputy were authorized to grant dispensations to fonn Lodges; the fee for dispensation to form a. Lodge was $20. ana for the Charter $10, each Lodge to pay annually twentycents per member into the charity fund and the sum of seventy-five cents per member to the Grand Lodge; suspension or expulsion was not路 to be made public, except in the minutes and proceedings. of the Grand Lodge; seven members constituted a quorum. Petitions could only .be received at stated meetIngs and must lie over for twenty days; at the conferring degrees the lecture of the Degree should not be omitted; Jurisdiction of lines were established by the air line route;. the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Warden, Grand Secretary, and Grand Treasurer constituted the Committee on Charities. By resolution, a Brother' from Virginia was requested. to


visit the Grand' Lodge ::tt its next annual Session and deliver a course of lectures to the Craft. Just what these lectures were to cover is not stated. The following corps of Officers were installed: "PRIESTLY H. McBRIDE ALEXANDER T. DOUGLASS JOHN ORRICK . ~ " " GEORGE H.C. MELODy RICHARD B. DALLAM GEORGE WILSON E. S. RUGGLES ESRO'M OWENS

Grand Master. S. G. W. J. G. W. G. Treas.

; .. "

G. See'y. S. G. D. J. G. D. G. Tyler."

Receipts for the year, $546.75, disbursements, $120.00, balance, $462.75. The Grand Treasury was b~girining to 100m up.


THE TWENTY-FIRSTAN'NUAL COM,MUNICi\TION. (The Thirty-Third Communication.) St. Louis, October 4, 1841,路A.L. 5841. Grand Master McBride presided in the East with all but one of the Gr~nd Officers present, and the representatives of fifteen Lodges present. This was the largest attendance in the history of the Grand Lodge up to the present time. MASONIC COLLEGE

A resolution was introduced by M. W. Brother Carnegy to establish a Masonic College, "for the education of the sons 路of indigent Masons and others," and also for the erection of a 1\tIasonic HaIL The Committee to which was referred the Masonic College matter reported favorably. It was adopted. . UNIFORMITY OF WORK

At this annual Session, the first step was taken to establish a uniform ritualistic work. A Committee consisting of Bros. Carnegy, Douglass, Foster, Coleman and 1\1urphy were appointed for this difficult task. Dispensation to establish Lodges at Burlington, Iowa路 Territory; Coleman Lodge, St. Louis; Troy Lodge, Troy, Missouri; Iowa Lodge, Iowa City, Iowa Territory; Cooper Lodge, Columbia; Shelby Lodge, Shelbyville; Bonhome Lodge, Manchester; Rabzett, Sparta, Missouri; Ozark Lodge, Springfield; Fayette Lodge, Fayette; Clinton Lodge, Clinton; and Clinton Lodge, Carlisle, Illinois. It will be observed that the Grand Lodge of Missouri was路 chartering Lodges in. the territory of Iowa. An amusing condition was found in Hillsboro Lodge, in which the E. A. and F. C. Degrees were conferred in a Lodge of Master 11asons and the Master"s Degree was conferred in a Lodge of Entered Apprentices.. Perhap,s the Officers did not know which was which, and as it made no difference to the candidate, all was serene. The Lodges under dispensation, heretofore mentioned, ex-69-


cept Fayette, Ozark, Columbia:- and Mineral Point, Wisconsin, were continued another year. The resolution looking toward a Masonic Hall at S't. Louis was unanimously adopted. The路 Proceedings for the first time contain a complete roster of the Lodges, a custom still in vogue in many路 Grand Jurisdictions. The elective and appointive Officers were duly installed. They were "M. W. W. W. W. W.

W. Pl. H. McBRIDE JOSEPiH FOSTER C. H. BOWER G. H. C. MELODy RICHARD B. DALLAM ESROM OWENS

G. M. S. G. W. J. G. W. G. Treasurer.

G. Sec. G. Tyler.1)

It will be路 noted that the noinenclature of the Officer was slowly assuming the same form as to-day.


THE TWENTY-SECOND AN:NUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Thirty-fourth Communication)

St. Louis, October 2, A.D. 1842, A.L. 5842. The Grand Officers were all in their stations with the representatives of six Lodges and a number of visitors were路 present. Dispensations had been granted to form- Lodges at Wyaconda, Liberty, Platte City, Richmond, Marshall, Osceola, Monticello, and Calhoun, Missouri, and to Belleville, Illinois. The Committee on Masonic College reported subscriptions of $3556.25 for sons, and $3926.25 for daughters and $185.00 for the Masonic .Hall. By resolution the State was divided into eight districts with a District Deputy in charge. This is the' first step for the appointment of District Deputy路 Grand路 Masters. MARION COLL~GE.

By a unanimous vote" the Grand . Lodge voted to purchase Marion College, in Marion County, near Hannibal. The college and two hundred acres of land being valued at $40,000; and a committee was appointed to. have this College chartered by the State of Missouri. The Grand Lodge approved of ' the convention' of Grand Lecturers to be -held in Baltimore in May, 1843, and delegates to this Convention were later appointed. The first statistical table of Lodges and their Officers appear this year. There were at this time 41 Lodges, 7 U. 'D. The Grand Lodge Officers were p路ublicly installed at the Second Presbyterian Church. They were "HON. P. H. McBRIDE reelected Grand Master. dI

JOSEPH FOSTER reelected CHARLES BROWN reelected JOHN' SIMONDS " RICH. B. DALLAM reelected JOAB BERNARD A.T. DOUGLASS -:-61-

S. G. W.

"

1. G.W. G. T. Grand Sec. D. G. M. G. V.


W" R. SINGLETON" .. ". " " JOHN D" SLEIGH" ".. "." E. S. RUGGLES JESSE LITTLE "

J..

E~GEN

A.LIGHTBUR E. OWEN

"

S" G. D. J. G. D. G. M. G. P. G. s. " ". 'G. S" B.

G. T.'} The total membership of the Grand Lodge was 1139. The Lodges varied in membership from 47 to 9 members. The revenues for the year amounted to $806" Among the list of Grand Offi<;:ers appears a new Grand Treasurer, John ,Simonds, and the name of that distinguished Ma.sonic'writer and. his.. torian, William R. Singleton, appears as S. G. D.

ADJOURNED SESSION OF THE TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION (The Thirty-Fi fth'Communication) St. L'ouis, April 10, 1843, A.L.5843. At this special or adjourned Communication, R. W. Joab Bernard, D" G. M., presided with the representatives of eleven Lodges present. Why this session was called it is a 'little hard to determine. It was, possibly, to consider fully the Masonic'College project. A ComJ1littee of four was appointed to be known as agents whose duty was to superintend, to take subscriptions, and donations for the College. The. Grand Visitor, (Lecturer) was requested to discontinue instructions in the 'Ritual, until after the action of the Baltimore Convention which was'to prepare an'd promulgate a universal Ritual.


THE TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION (The Thirty-Sixth Communication) St. Lou·is, October, A.D. 1843, A.L. 5843. The Grand Lodge was opened by W. Bro. Joseph Foster, S. G. W. with the representatives of twenty Lodges present. In this representation appears the name from Missouri Lodge, No.1, which disbanded under the anti-Masonic feeling in 1833. In 1842 upon a petition of the former members praying the Grand Lodge to permit Missouri No.1 to resume. labor under its old charter which ¥lasgranted. Many Lodges were organized from 1841 to the present. The space allotted in this history will not permit the mentioning and the history of individual Lodges. The committee appointed to attend the Baltimore Convention, Brothers Carnegy and Foster, reported and recommended the adoption of the ","ork promulgated by the Convention with slight modif.ications as follo\vs: The work of the First and Second Degree and the ·first section of the Third Degree Evidently there was a disagreement as to the second section of the Third Degree, and, possibly, Pennsylvania work was the stumbling block in this second section. It differed radically from other Grand Jurisdictions. THE NtW NAMS oJ! TH~ GRAND LODG~

The Grand Lodge was incorporated this year under the name of:

The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Ancient·Masons of the State of Miss 0. uri. This differs very much from the original name of HThe Grand Lodge of Missouri, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons." It is doubtful if the name, adopted· in 1843, had ever been used to any extent and few know the real name of the Grand Lodge. The name of the Masonic College, under .Charter was changed to read, "'fhe Masonic College of Missouri." The description of the seal of the College as found in the minutes is an ~Iaborate symbolic curiosity. A donation of certain proper-

-63--


ties to the Masonic College, other than the one selected were made, as Brother William R. Sjngleton was appointed to visit and examine the land of one thousand acres donated by Brother John DeBolle, also to inyestigate, and obtain title. The receipts for the year amounted to $2,708.72. The Officers installed for the ensuing year were: "M. W. HON. P. H. McBRIDE W.HON. J. W. S. MITCHELL W. W. E. RUGGLES W. W. F. L. BILLON W. RICHARD B. DALLAM W. WILLIAM R. SINGLETON' W. CHARLES LEVY R. w. JOSEPH FOSTER W. REV. HIRAM ,CHAMBERLAIN

G. M. S. G. M. J. G.. W. G. T. G. S. · G. S. D. G. J. D. D. G. M. G. C."

The Grand Lodge at the close· of the year had forty-seven Lodges under its jurisdiction. ...;\11. except two· of the Lodges of Illinois. had "\\J-ithdrawn to form the Grand Lodge of Illinois. Four Lodges were located in the territory of .Iowa and two in the territory .0£ Wisconsin. ADJOURNED· S'ESSIONOF THE TWENTY-THIRD

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION (The Thirty-Seventh Communication.) St. LoUis, April 1, A.D. 1844, A.L. ?844. _This adjourned S'ession of the Grand Lodge was held to complete the unfinished business of the annual Session of 1843. The chief matter being the report of the Committee on ConstitutionandBy-Laws,and the rules and regulations to govern,' ana a'course ·0£ study to be used, in the. Masonic College. The new Constitution ·made· the office of Deputy Grand Master elective; it required all permanent members of the Grand Lodge to have received the Past.. Master's Degree; it required, for the ~rst time, the Grand Master to submit a report or message of the .transactions of his office during the year to the Grand Lodge~ In nearly all other matters, this '-64--


Constitution and By-La"rs were very similar to those of to-day. The regulations for the Masonic College, required a preparatory school and a collegiate department. The Faculty to consist of a Professor for each of the following departments: .HOn Natural Philosophy and Astronomy"; "On Mathematics"; "On Mental and Moral Science"; and "Ancient. ~an足 guages and Literature." This is some course, even if not a very practicable one, .as seen in the eyes of this age. The conditions were, six D;1onths tuition free but charges for board. The Grand' Lodge to designate theJ;lumber of stuaents each subordinate Lodge could send free of charge. The College was chartered by the State. In those days $25.00 paid the board and washing of a student for a whole Session, and a cord of good wood could be purchased for a dollar.

-65-


THE TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL .

COMMUNICATION.

(The Thirty-Eighth Communica~ion.) St. Louis October 14, A.D. 1844, A.L. S844. Deputy. Grand Master Foster presided at.the opening of the Grand Lodge, with fifteen Lodges represented. Resolutions of respect were adopted on the death of Rev. J. H~ Fielding, Past Grand Chaplain. The new Ritual designated as the "Masonic Trestle Board" was finally adopted with a provision that destroyed its efficacy. This provision permitted the Lodges to do as they wished. The .Lodge could use "any other guide." In other words, a Lodge could use any ritual or lectures that caught its fancy, but the Masonic Trestle Board was recommended.' The new College started out with a total of forty-four students and from the report of the committee, the condition of the buildings was not the best as they had been used for pig stys and cattle pens. CRAND LODGE of IOWA

The three Lodges chartered in the territory of Iowa had forlned a Grand Lodge of Iowa and memorialized the Grand Lodge of Missouri 路for fraternal recognition.. 1\his was cheerfully granted. Thus路 was formed the second child of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The election of officers resulted as follows:

"J. W. S. MITCHELL

M. W. C. M. R. W. D.G. M. R. W. S. G. W. R. W. J. G. W. R. W. G. Sec. R. W. G. Treas.'~

F. L. BILLON E. S. RUGGLES J. F. L. JACOBy R. B. DALLAM JOHN S. WATSON

Kindly note the transposition of the honorary title. The retiring Grand Master McBride was the recipient of a Past Grand Master's jew路el and a commendatory resolution. The revenues for the year were $7,210.30. -66-


JAMES W. S. MITCHELL, Grand Maste,r, 1844 and 1845. ' Grand Secretary, 1847 and 1848. M. W. James W. S. Mitchell, the tenth Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri,· was born in the state of Kentucky Feb. 27, 1800. He was a self-educated man, and full of indomitable 'energy to succeed., This placed him in the, front rank as a Masonic authority of his day. In his native State he served sel'eral terms in 'the State Legislature and was an eloq\1ent and effective speaker. He becam~.a Mas€>n in 1826, moved to M~ssouri in 182.7, serving in the "Legislature one term, and held a position in the Land' Office Receiver at Fayette, Missouri. . lIe. assisted in organizing the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons in Missouri in 1846, and served as Grand High Priest for two years, ·1846-1847. He was a Charter memb,er of· St. Louis Commandery. in 1846.. For several years,.beginaing in 1848" he published the };fasonic Signet, one of the best of the Masonic Magazines. of.the day. He is also the author of a History of Freemasonry which attained a wide popularity. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1842, he representing Fayette Lodge. Served as Grand Senior Warden in 1843, and was elected Grand Master in 1844 and reelected in 1845. In October 1847 he was elected Grand Secretary, serving two years. He aied in Griffin, Georgia, November ·4th, 1873. The Grand Lodge and the Grand Chapter of Missouri erected a monument 0"£ Missouri granite at his grave in 1899. A cut of this monument appears in the Proceedings of the Grand Chapter of 1899 and in the Proceedings of ··the Grand 'Lodge of 1900.


ADJOURNED SESSION OF THE TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION (The Thirty-Ninth Communication.) Masonic College,lune 4, A.D. 1845, A.L. 5845. D~DICATION O~ 'rHt MASONIC COLL~Gt.

This adjourned Session was held for the purpose of dedicating the 1vlasonic College in Marion County. Grandi Master ~1itchell presiding \vith seventeen Lodges present. A procession was formed and proceeded to the Masonic Hall·where the ceremonies of dedication were held. The address was made by Brother J. W. Smith, President of the College and Rev. Brother Walker. . " The entire session was· devoted to College matters and to organize a female department. The Trustees were empowered to sell the 'College iand. On June 28, 1845, the Grand Lodge held memorial exercises in honor of Andrew Jackson, Past Grand Master of the •Grand Lodge of Tennessee and Ex-Presidenf of the United States.

-68-


THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Fortieth Communication.) · St. Louis, October 30, A.D. 1845 1 A.L. 5845. This Grand Annual Communication found Fred L. BiIlon, D. G. M. presiding with the representatives of seventeen Lodges present. On the second day, Grand Master Mitchell was present and read his message. It is the first address of a Grand Master in the history of the Grand Lodge~ The address was brief. In it he doubts the expediency of conferring the Past Master's Degree' on. Wardens of Lodges. This statement reveals an unheard of procedure. The balance of the address is devoted to the· Masonic College. The President of the College submitted an excellent report and laid special stress that religious exercises should be .held every Sunday and also calls the attention of the Grand Lodge that only one of the five Chaplains appointed .had performed his duty in this matter. The question of requiring documentary evidence of mem~ership, or a Grand Lodge certificate, for. the purpose of visitation, "tas adopted. The election of Grand Officers ·resulted as follows: M. W. G. M R.. W.D. G. M. R. ·W. S. G.· W.

HBrother J.W. S. MITCHELL

.,

JOHN D. TAyLOR EDWARD S. RUGGLES JOHN F. L. JACOBY JOHN S.· WATSON FRED L. BILLON

"

R. W.i.G. W. "G. Treas.

C.Sec." The number of Grand· Officers. not including District Deputies, was twenty-five, this. included seven Grand Chaplains~ The number of Lodges on the rollwith a total of 738 members ana this is based on incomplete r~turns.

-69-


THE T~rENTY-SIXTH·ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (TheForty~First·Communication.) St. Loui~, October 12, A.D. 1846; A.L. 5846. This annual Stession was opened by J. D.. Taylor, D. G. M., twenty-one chartered and six U. D. Lodges were represented. On the second day Grand Master Mitchell delivered his annual address. In it he expressed strong approval and spoke freely in favor of a General Grand Lodge, and that he did not fear· any of the evils that some predicted of such an organization. A committee was appointed to examine the books and accounts of the Grand Lodge, Usince its existence," and to examine the finances· of the Masonic College. The questions of the Ancient Landmarks were as hazy then as now, and in order to determine what they w,ere, a Committee was appointed to collate and report thereon. The committee on the sale of College lands reported that the sum of $5,043.53 as proceeds. A petition· to form and open a Lodge in Oregon City, Oregon. Territory, was received and a charter to be issued to it at the pleasure of the Grand Master. ·Westward the influence of the Grana Lodge was spreading. A resolution was adopted to issue a circular letter to the Lodges, setting forth that propositions would be received by the Committee, for a permanent location of the Masonic College, at or near any town in the State. Evidently the College in Marion County just established was too remote from some city or·town. The Committee on Correspondence presented a lengthy report, covering the several Grand Lodges in full and the Committee approved the formation of a General Grand Lodge. "the foIIo,ving Grand Officers ,vere elected: "Brother JOHN RALLS JOHN D. TAYLOR E. S. RUGGLES II

M. W. G. M. R. W. D. G. M. R.. W. s. C.W.


Brother JOHN F. L. JACOBY R. W. J. C.W. JOHN WATSON ..... G. Treasurer. FRED C. L. BILLON ........•... G. Secretary.'~ f

••••

f

••••

The retiring Grand Master was presented with a Past Master's jewel, and a vote of thanks.. Receipts for the year $1014.00; balance in Treasury $498.45. Total membership of the fifty-seven Lodges according to returns was 1135, althotlgh eleven Lodges failed to make returns.

JOHN RALLS, Grand Master 1846.

M. W . Brother John Ralls, the eleventh 'Grand Master, was born in Bath County Kentucky in Decemb"er, 1808. The family .moved to Missouri in 1817, settling in Ralls County. Brother Ralls received his education in the commOIl schools of that :day and later attended Colliege at . Owensville, Kentucky. He stUdied law and practiced ·in RaHsCounty. He was Clerk of· the Circuit Court and County Court. DttriHg the Mexican War he served as Colonel· of the Third Regimen:t of Missouri Mounted Volunteers. When be left the State with his Regiment he was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge.. He entered Freemasonry in the late thirties. No dates are obtainable, as to whether he was made a Mason in Palmyra or New-London. He served,·.h:owever, as Master of New London Lodge No. 21, from whichhedimitted to join RaUs Lodge No. 33. He received the Capitular ·Degrees iJiPaby.ra, "and served as High Priest of Ralls Chapter No. 55. He was a member of Royal· and Select Masters, at. Hannibal. He first appeared 'in Grand Lodge in 1841 as Ma.ster of New" London Lodge No. 21. In 1842 he was elected Grand Junior Warden and was a· Trustee of the MasonicOoliege. He was elected Grand ·Master in 1846, but was i~ Mexico with his ·.regiment most of his ter:m. He died July, 1882,·at the age of seventy-four years. ---71-


ADJOURNED SESSION OF THE TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Forty-Second Communication.) St. Louis, ,March 15, A.D. 1847; A.L. 5847. This adjourned S'ession of Hthe Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons~' was opened by R. W. John D. Taylor, D.G.M. 'I t will be observed that the Grand Secretary Billon makes free use of Titles, without any fixed rules, not only in applying the honorary title of HM. W." to the official title of Grand , Master and then again reversing the process. At this Communication,he introduces a new name for the Grand Lodge by adding the honorary title of "Most Worshipful" to the name of the' Grand Lodge as adopted in 1821, and not the title adopted in 1845. 'The Ritual was still giving trouble, as a. resolution was .adopted, requiring the work of the Baltimore Convention to be exemplified before the. Grand Lodge. The principal business before this adj ourned session, was to hear proposals for the location of the Masonic College. Proposals were proposed by four towns; Palmyra, Hannibal, Liberty and Lexington. After"a thorough discussion of 路the merits of each, the town of Lexington was selected. Committees were appointed to select a site, to be not. less than five, nor more than twenty acres; to start the building and to raise funds. A Committee was appointed to dispose by sale or rent the College property in Marion County. The Masonic .Hall proposition inSt.. Louis was reported upon by a Committee which advised. that such a structure be built .and advocated the building to be located at third' and Chestnut路 Streets, St. Louis, to be fire proof and to cost about $80),000. This proposition was referred to a Committee on site. The Grand Lodge adjourned to meet at Lexington in May,路1847. -72-


SECOND ADJOURNED SESSION OF THE TWENTYSIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The F orty-Third .Communication. ) Lexington., May 18, 1847, A.L. 5847. This adjourned "S'ession was held in Lexington for the purpose of laying the corner stone of the Masonic.路 College., R. W. Brother George H. C. Melody~ Past D. G. M., presided, representatives from nineteen Lodges were present. "The corner stone was laid according to the impressive ceremony of the Fraternity by George H. C~ Melody." Brother Worthington Smith, was the Grand Orator. His oration is published in full in the Proceedings. It is a fine address and applicable , to the conditions existing to-day.

-7~


T~E

St.

TvVENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

(The ~orty-Fourth Commtinication~) Louis,~October 11, A.D." 1847,A.L. 5847.

The annual session was' opened hyDe G. M. John D. Taylor with twenty permanent members and representatives of twenty-two Lodges present. The Grand Master was absent. An invitation was received from St. Louis 'Chapter No.1 Royal Arch Masons inviting the Grand Lodge toa joint installation路of the Officers of the Chapter, and of the Grand Lodge. Th~ invitation was accepted. The By-Laws of the Grand Lodge were路amen:ded, requiring the petitioner for the Degrees, to bea resident of the State for twelve months. A MILITARY LODGE

By resolution a Charter was granted to Missouri Military Lodge No. 86 in the Third Regiment of Missouri Volunteers, to be in force until such .regiment is disbanded. This Charter was in force during the Mexican War. The Masonic College received much attention, and work upon it was progressing rapidly and as the r,eport says, "The stupendous building is rapidly assuming shape." An agent was appointed to solicit funds for an endowment. The Brethren aid not hesitate or grow weary of giving," to build and pay for a College, to build' a Masonic Hall, and to give and create an endo"\vment for the College. It apparently seem~d an easy task.. but results are not always in the seeming. A nosing Committee was appointed to find out what prominent educators were Masons; in order to have a handy list to select from, when the College was completed. The By-Laws were amended, changing the annual Session from October to "First .Monday in May." The following Gran路d Officers were elected ~nd installed: "Brother JOSEPH .FOSTER "ELIJA S. RUGGLES

M. W. G. M .. R.. W . G. D.M.


Brother J. F. L. JACOBy " CYRUS OSBORNE JOHN S. WATSON J. V\T. S. MITCHELL

0

••

e •••••• •

R. W.S.G.W. R. W. J. G. W. G.Treasurer. G. Secretary.))

The Grand Secretary in ··his ·report publishes for the first time a list of suspended and expelled members. The Grand Lodge had. sixty-two subordinate Lodges, although many. failed to make returns. The largest Lodge. was Lexington No. 32 with S4 nlembers. No Lodges had as yet appeared in Kansas City. A note by the Grand Secretary informs the Lodges that they must collect three ,dollars· from all Masons \vithin its jurisdiction, vvhether affiliated or not.

]OS'EPH .FOSTER, GrandMaster 1847 and 1848. Gra.nd Treasurer 1853 and 1854. M.W. ·J3rother Joseph Foster's, the twelfth GrandMaster, . ·connection \vith .Freemasonry cannot. be traced ·farther back than 1839, when he was secretary of NaphtaliLodgeNo.25 which he represented in the Grand Lodge as its then Master. There is no personal history or date of his birth or birth place obtainable. He was a member of Missouri Chapter No. 1 Royal Arch Masons and served as its High Priest for six years. In .the Grand Chapter he served as Grand Treasurer, beginning in 1847, for eight years. He was the first Grand Recorder of the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters of Missouri in 1864. He .assisted .in organizing St.Louis Commandery No.1, Knights Templar in 1846 and served as its Commander for three terms. He was present at the formation of the Grand Commandery Knights Templar in 1860. In the Grand Lodge he served as Deputy GrandMaster for three terms, Grand Senior Warden for one· term, and elected GrandMaster in 1847,· anel reelectedin 1848. In 1853, he was elected Grana Treasurer, serving two years.. In 1843 h,eattended the famous Baltimore Convention. He died in· StLouis in 1878. -75-


THE 1\WENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Forty-Fifth Communication.) St.Louis, May 1, A.D. 1848; A.L. 5848. The Grand Lodge was opened by Grand Master Foster, with.twenty-seven permanent members and the representatives of twenty Lodges present. This annual Comnlunication is known as the short term, fr01TI October, 1847, to May, 1848. The Grand lVlaster delivered a 路constructive address. He granted a number of dispensations to Jorn1 Lodges, advocated the Masonic Hall proposition, ,expressed a belief that in the matter of physical qualification, that we should adhere to the land marks that King Solomon had set forth, deprecated the organization and manufacturing of degr.ees for men and women, basing its lnetnbership on Masonry, these organizations he considered as novelties of .the age. He makes a strong argtln1ent in favor of a National Grand Lodge and believes that the publication of the nan1es of those suspended or expelled is a bad practice. The Con1mittee on the Masonic Hall reported adVersely believing that it was inexpedient for the Grand Lodge to embark in any such project.. In reference to the collection of three dollars dues from non-affiliated Masons, .the Grand路 Lodge held, that if such nonaffiliates failed, or refused to pay the three dollars to the charity 拢una, they shall be refused the privilege of visitation. The .Comnlittee on collating the Ancient Land Marks, asked to he excused from the job. Granted. The COlnmittee on the路College at Lexington reported, that it had cost to date $8,759.27, that the cost of the College would be $15,000.. The Grand Lodge fixed the salaries of the President, Professors and teachers. The highest was $1,500 per annum. An amendment was adopted changing the . seat of the Grand Lodge from'St.Louis to Boonville, as the only means of trans-


portation was chiefly by boat or overland. Boonville was more centrally located. The corps of Officers for the ensuing year were: "Brother JOSEP'H FOSTER M. W. G. ]1. " E. S. RUGGLES R. w. D. G. M. CYRUS OSBORNE R. W. S. G. W. R. I¥. J. G. W. JOSEP'H MAGGUIRE " JOHN S. WATSON ~ G. Treasurer. ]. W. S. MITCHEL,L G. Secretary.)) '"fheGrand Lodge adjourned to meet in Lexington in July.

ADJOURNED SESSION OF THE TvVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Forty-Sixth Communication.) Lexington, JuJy 10, A.D. 1848; A.L. 5848. 'fhe purpose of this adjourned Session does not appear, t~As just why?" Grand Master Foster presided with only four Grand Officers present, and the representatives of forty-four Lodges. Past Grand Secretary Dallam received a .·belated vote of thanks for his services ·as· well as a belated salary due him. The special agent for the College endowment fund is to receive ten per cent on all moneys collected. The Grand Lodge proceeded to elect the ,Officers and the Faculty of the College. Brother Wilkens Tannehill of N ashville, Te'nnessee, was elected President; Brother Van Doren, Professor of Mathematics. Not content with organizing a classical College, a resolution was introduced to erect a Medical Department to the College, but the resolution contained a safety valve in the way of a J?roviso that this Medical Department should not cost the l\1asonic Fraternity anything. This was indeed a great and wonderfully bright scheme. Brother J: W. S. Mitchell was the recipient of a belated Past Grand Master's jewel. The membership of the Grand· Lodge remained about the same, although eight .new Lodges were charteredo Green Lodge No. 101 atSpringfieldbejng the last one. ----77-


THE T\l\TENTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Forty-Seventh. Communication.) Boonville, lvlay 7, .ltD. 1849; A.L. 5849. The Grand Lodge convened with GrartdMasterFoster in the Grand East. The representatives of twenty-four Lodges 'Vvere present. The Grand 11aster granted a· number of· dispensations, one to the Brethren at Santa Fe, N. M., which received its Charter under the natne of Santa Fe N<? 109. Gold~~n S'quare Lodge No. 107 at Westport and Heroine No. 104 at Kansas City. The Chairman.o£ the Committee on Dispensations, having never chugged up the Missouri River, did not realize that Kansas City was in Missouri, as he states in his report, "That a new Lodge at Kansas, called. Herrine Lodge, had received a dispensation." rf'he Grand Master's address was referred without .reading to the several coll1mittees, a custoln vvhich Brother John N. Ryland did not approve, as he. believed the address should be read and printed for the benefit of the Craft. The ritual still \vorried the Grand Lodge, as Grand Master Foster was requested to deliver the lectures of .the. three degrees. The committee on the College .reported, ninety-five students in attendance on the first term, and that the prospects of the College were very bright. In order to boost the finances of the College, the Curators were authorized to sell· scholarships. These scholarships· were to .be of three classes; fifty. dollars paid in advance, would entitle to instruction in any or all of the branches for five consecutive years, one hundred dollars entitles to instruction for ten years, three hundred dollars payable in installments would· entitle ·to the same as number one and number two. tfhe income. of the Grand Lodge for the year was· $2,537.70. The following. corps of6fficerswere'" installed: "Brother JOHN. F.RYLAND .. ,

"

E.S.RUGGLES -78-

M.W.G. M. R. W. D.G.M.


Brother JOSEPH MAGGUIRE "

P. D:RAP'ER."

"

JOHN M. REED C. D. W. JOHNSON

R. W. 1. G. fiV. R. ~V. S. G. ~V.

"

"

G. Treasurer. Grand Sccretary/'

JOHN F.RYLAND, Grand A1asterr 1849 and 1850. M. W. Brother John F. Ryland,· the thirteenth Grand Master, \\Tas born in Essex County, Virginia, November 2, 1797. The. fa1uity moved to Madison County, Kentucky, when he was eleven years of age. He "vas educated in Forest Hill Academy and was noted as one of the best classical scholars of his day. About 1820 he cam,e to· Missouri, settling at Old Franklin to practice la,v. In 1831, he was appointed Judge of the Fifth JudicialDistrictand held the office for eighteen years. He was then transferred to the Supreme Court on which he served nine years, becon1ing ineligible on account of the age limit of sixty years. The date of his early Masonic history is missing but he, doubtless, received his degrees· in Kentucky, the records only show that he served as High Priest of a Chapter in Howard County. He appeared in the Grand Chapter of ·Roya1 Arch Masons· in 185Zwhen he was elected Grand· High Priest. •He received the Orders of Christian Knight'hood in St.' Louis Commandery No. 1 and assisted in forming. DeMolayCommandery No.3 K. T.,·· at Lexington, Missouri. In the Grand Commandery he served as Grand Standard Bearer in· 1873. He first· received ·.offi';cial recognition in the Grand· Lodge in 1826, \vhenhe \ivas elected Grand Junior vVarden.After a lapse of twenty-three years, in 1849, he was elected Grand Master,servingtvvo years~ He ·died at Lexington, .Missouri, September 10, 1873. In his death the Masonic Bodies lost one of its strongest men. ~79-.-


c.

D. W. JOHNSON,

Grand Secretary, 1849, 1850 and 1851. R. vV. Brother C. D. W. Johnson was elected Grand Secretary it:l May, 1849, holding the office for three years. The Grand Lodge Proceedings do not furnish any data of his civil or Masonic History. He died August 9, 1853, at the age of . fifty-five years.

-80--


THE THIRTIETH ANNUAL COM1vlUNICATION. (trhe Forty-Eighth Comnlunication.) Boonville, lYfay 6, A.D. 1850; A.L. 5850. The attendance of this annual session \vas not large owing to an epiden1ic of cholera pr-evailing. Grand Master Ryland ,vas in the Grand East with the representatives of twentyeight Lodges present. The Grand Master's address is an excellent one. He called attention to . "the pestilence which walketh in darkness," and the gloom and fear resting on the people on account of· it; he believes that the District Deputy Grand Masters should be more diligent in their duties; and issued a circular letter against gan1bling and drinking among the Craft. lIe was opposed to granting dispensations to any hurry up process in conferring the Degrees and he speaks highly and very encouragingly of the Masonic ·College. The Committee on Correspondence· submitted the following impol~tant resolutions bearing on Masonic principles: "That any legally cOl1stitutedGrand Lodge has the right to confer either or all of the three degrees in Masonry, but it. is inexpedient to exercise the. right. "That under the present system of Grand Lodges, the Grand Master has not the right to make 'Masons at sight, nor convene a Lodge for that purpose, unless his power is given by the Grand Lodge over ~vhich he presides."

The Conlmittee on the Marion property reported its sale for $4,000 payable. annually in $1,000 installments. This money to be held in trust to purchase apparatus and a library for the College at Lexington. The income from the sale of scholarships an10unted to $9,400.00. The Grand Lodge. income was $1,036; to the College $1,251. The following Grand Officers were publicly installed in the Methodist Church: "1f. W. Bro. JOHN'F. RYLAND .i~

R.W. Bro. B. W. GROVER W. Bro. E. DRAP'ER W. Bro. ]. S. CURRIE W. Bro. J. 'T. JOHNSON

t

•••••

G. M. D. G. M. G. S. w. J. C.W. G. Treas'ttrer.


W. Bro. C. V. W. JOHNSON W. Bro. A. O'SULLIVAN W. Bro. O. STRONG ]. W.MURP'HY

Note another路 change路 in official title. had reached. ninety-one in numbers.

Grand Secretary. G. S. D. G. J. D. G. T),ler.)J

The list of Lodges


THE THIRT;Y-FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Forty-Ninth Communication.)

Boonville, May 1, A.D. 1851; A.L. 5851. This annual Session found all of the Grand Officers present \vith thirty-eight Lodges represented. Most of the business was purely routine. Rev. Bro. Shaver, President of the College, delivered "a most appropriate and thrilling address." Sufficient copies of this address vvere ordered printed and distribllted among the Lodges. 1~he address does not appear in the printed ·Proceedings. The proposition of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, to endow the preparatorial department of the College, vvas heartily approved. A resolution was adopted .making the "Cross's Masonic .Chart and hieroglyphic Monitor the text book of the Grand Lodge, and Anderson's Constitution as the guide to· legislation. The Masonic College showed receipts, $5,414.. 34 ; disbursen1ents $4,801.23, balance $612.. 06; liabilities $4,450.96 ;resources $1,658.67, leaving a deficit of $2,792.29. The Grand Officers for the ensuing. year. vvere p;ubIicly installed. G. M. R. W. E. S. RUGGLES P.G. M. R. W. P'.WILLI.A:MS s. C. vv. R. W. JNO. V. TURN:ER J.G. W. w. C. D. W. JOHNSON CrandSecretary. W. T. J. JOHN:SON ' Grand' Treasurer:" Behold .another .tvvist. on official titles .by· .extending the ((R.W." to the Grand Warden. The year of 1851 closed \lvith ninety-seven Lodges on the roll. HM. W. BEN}. W.GROVER

BEN]AMINW.GROVER, Grand Master., 1851 and····1852. M. W.·Bro. Benjanlin .W.o-rover, .the fourteenth Grand Master, was born in Xenia, Ohio, October 27, 1811. He served as Deputy· County Clerk under his father.. In 1834 he -83-


1110ved to Madison, Indiana. In 1842, he removed to St. Louis, remaining two years, then permanently locating at Warrensburg, Missouri. In 1848, he was elected Sheriff of Johnson County and in .1852, he \vas elected to the State Senate, and through his influence, the Mo. P. Railroad built through Warrensburg and Johnson Co. He afterwards becalne a Director in the Company. In the Civil War, Brother Grover espoused the Union cause, organized tlie 27th Mounted Infantry, Missouri Volunteers, and "vas commissioned Lieutenant Colonel. His regiment was mustered into the United States Service. He participated in the 'Battle of Lexington, under General Mulligan, fronl S'epte111ber 12 to the 20th. During this battle Colonel Grover was wounded, his right'路 leg being broken by a rifle bullet. After the surrender of Lexington, he vv-as paroled by General Price ana removed to St. Louis by boat, "vh,ere he died October 30, 1861, at the age of fifty years. He was buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery. He \vas n1ade a Master Mason at Madison, Indiana, affiliated vvith Napthli Lodge. No. 25,. St. Louis, assisted in forming Johnson Lodge No. 85 on April 13, 1846, at Warrensburg. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1844 and at the annual Session at Boonville, May, 1849, he represented Heroine I~odge No. 104, !ZansasCity, \vhich he had instituted. In 1850 he was elected D. G. M. and in 1851 elected Grand Master and reelected in 1852. I-Ie ,vas an aggressive leader in civil and J\.fasonic life.

-84--


"fHE rfHIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Fiftieth Communication.) Boonville) .L7t;[ay 3, A.D. 1852; A.L. 5852. The Grand Lodge entered the third decade of its history wi'th glowing prospects. The Grand Lodge had grown from a small Body, around St. Louis, until it now extended to Kansas City on the West and from the Northern to the Southern Border. Its influence had been spread into Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Ne\v Mexico and far away Oregon~ The Thirty-first annual Session was therefore an auspicious one vvith Grand Master Grover in the Grand East, with thirtyseven permanent members and the representatives of thirtythree Lodges p:resent. TEe Grand Master's address路 contained much interesting matter. ,He considered the condition of the Craft as excellent and attributed it路 to "The steadfast adhe1l'ence to the路 Ancient Landmarks." He ,vas not alarmed, as some held, that the Past Masters were an element of danger in the Grand Lodge, in trying to dictate its policies, and therefore di4 not look with favor upon any effort to deprive the Past Masters the privilege of permanent membership in the Grand Lodge. There always had been, and always will be some suspicious and tiresome mortals who are afflicted with the obsession, that somebody or bodies, are "trying to run the Grand Lodge." It is either the Grand Officers or the Past Grand. Masters, ,or the Past Masters, that are trying to do .this. awful thing. Suspicion is a foul beast and is often路 a r,eflectionfrom within. A goodly portion of this session was devoted to the Masonic College as heretofore. The President had traveled through the South collecting for the endowm,ent by the .sale of. scholarships, while the Subordinate Lodges were doing their share in its maintenance. Its income for the year amounted. to .$6,382.41 and its expenses exceeded the income, the liabilities being $3,857.60.


R. W. Brother George H. C. 11elody, on account of advancing years, resigned the Grand Lectureship, having devoted thirty years in the interest of the Craft.. The Comlnittee on the Past Master's question, reported in favor of the Past Masters· and sa"v rio danger in the 'physiognomy of this class of Inelnbers.~A Lodge of Past Masters was opened and the Degree conferred on a class·· of Masters elect. By resolution, the Lodges vvere requested to observe the centennial anniversary. of the initiation of Brother George Washington in Fredericksburg Lodge in 1752, the exact date to be determine'd later. The Officers elect for the ensuing year were installed : ":NL W. BENJAMINW. GROVER R. W. SAMUEL F. CURRIE R. W.J. H. TURNER R. W.. S. H.SAUN~DERS W. ]. T. JOHNSON W.A. O'SULLIVAN

G. M. D. G. M.

G. S . w. G. J. W. G. T.

G. S." The Grand Master was installed as usual in a Lodge of Past Masters by P. G. M.. McBride, the remaining officers by the Grand Master. A ne'Vv and prominent character appears in the Secretary's station. His issue in the Proceedings marks a decided improvement ·and better statistical tables. One hundred fifteen Lodges were on the rolL

A'NTHONY O'SULLIVAN, Grand Secretary, 1852 to 1867. R.· \"1. Brother Anthony O'Sullivan, the eleventh Grand Secretary, .was born in the. County of Kerry, Ireland, 011 N ovember 29, 1808. He came to A01erica in 1838, landing in New York City, where he reu1ained a year, then moved to New Orleans and on]\Jlarch .17, 1841, he located at ArrowRocl~) IVlissouri, where he lived until 1852 when he removed to St. Louis ; eight years later he took up. his residence· in Springfield, -86-


Missouri, remaining there several years before returning to

St. Louis. He was nlade a Master· Mason in Arrow Rock Lodge No. 55 June 20, 1846; made a Royal Arch Mason in Boonville Chapter No. 5 in 1849, received the Cryptic Degrees in Boonville and was Knighted in St. Louis Commandery No.1, K. T., August 1, 1852. He received the degrees of A, and A. St. R. in 1859 and vvas Sovereign Grand Inspector Generalo£ the Thirty-Third Degree for Missouri and the bordering .States. He served as High Priest of St. Louis Chapter No. 8 R. A. M. from ·1853 to 1859; was the first Master of St. Louis Council No. 1 R. and S. M., and at the organization of the Grand Council, in 1864, he became the first Grand Master serving three years. He was Commander of St. Louis Commandery No.1 K. T. and assisted in ·forming the Grand Commandery of J\Jlissouri, May 22, 1860. In the Grand Chapter ·R. A. M. he served as Gra~d Secretary from 1854 up to his death.. In " the Grand Commandery, K. T.,hewaselected Grana Recorder in 1863· and died in· office. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge, at the· annual· Session of 1849, as the representative of Arrow Rock Lodge No.. 55. He was ,elected Grand Secretary in 1852 and served for fifteen years.. He died in St. Louis August 11, 1866, from cholera, aged fifty-eight years. The Grand Lodge erected a monument to his memory at his grave in Bellefontaine Cemetery in 1868. The oration \vasdelivered by M.W:Brother .Thomas E.Garrett. Thus passed away, possibly, the Greatest Grand Secretary that ever served the Grand Lodge of Missouri.

-8·'1-


THE

THIR1.~Y-THIRD

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION.

(The Fifty-First Communication.) S""i t. Louis, June 6, A.D. 1853; A.L. 5853. The thirty-second annual Session opened as the "M. '.;V. Grand Lodge as Ancient Free and Accepted Masons," yet the constitution declared its natne is "The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Ancient Masons." S'omebody was constantly slipping on, nomenclature. This session was the largest in its history. Sixty-three Lodges were represented and a long list of permanent members. GrandMaster Grover in his address passed just censure on the non-affiliated Mason and characterized him as a "'drone." He ordered Montezuma Lodge No. 109, Santa Fe, N. M., to suspend labor until the charges against members for gambling and other immoralities could be investigated. His address, like the greater portion of the proceedings, deals' with the Masonic' College, and the President of the College glows with old time eloquence" as he describes the location of the new boarding house. He says: "Delicious breezes fan the fevered brow, and diffuse their refreshing influence to the thoughtful student, when the panting denizens along the dusty streets of the city, or the tired laborer sweats in the glowing furrows of the arid fields." If a boarding house can cause such an outbreak, what would a first class hotel ot 1921 have produced ?Theendowment fundoi the College had reached the neat sum of $53,198.00. PastGrand Secretary and Grand Correspondent Mitchell having arranged to remove from the State resigned as correspondent. . His last report is published in the Proceedings and is a valuable contribution to the history, traditions and jurisprudence of Freemasonry. It is worth careful perusal. The Proceedings contain a fullEst of scholarships sold, by "rhorn held and amount of nloney received.

--88-

t


The follo\ving Grand Officers were installed: "M. R. R. R.

vV. W. W. W. W. W.

RON.

WILSON BROWN

,

L. S. CORNWELL ]. W. CHENOWITH R. E. YILL JOSEPH FOSTER A. O'SULLIVAN

G. M. P. G. M. G. S. J/V. G. J. ~v. G. Treasurer.

G. Secretary."

vVILSON BROWN, Grand Master, 1853. M. \7\1. Bro. Wilson Brown, the fifteenth Grand Master, was born in Anne, Maryland, August 27, 1804. He received his Medical education in, and graduated from the Maryland Medical Institute, Baltimore; came to Missouri in 1820; settled in Cape Girardeau; was married· in 1830, then moved to Sikeston. He afterwards returned to Cape Girarcleau, where he remained until his death .August 27, 1855, aged 51· years. He served Scott County as State Senator for two years,State Auditor from 1849 to 1853, Lieutenant .Governor from 1853· and died during his second term of service. He was a charter member of the Lodge of Cape Girardeau, where a monument was erected to his memory by the State. He first appeared in the Grand· Lodge in· 1853, representing St. Marks Lodge No. 35. At this ·time he .was elected ·Grand Master. I-Ie had never appeared at any previous session of the Grand Lodge, nor did he ever again enter that· Body, at least no record appears. Evidently his election as Grand Master was due n10re to his being Lieutenant Governor than to any Masonic activity displayed.

-&9-


THE THIRTY-FOURTf-I ANNUAL COMMUNICAtfION. (The Fifty-SecondCon1n1unication.)

St. Lou'is, !vIay 22, A.D. 1854; A.L. 5854. At this annttal Comlnunicati;n R. W. L.S'. Cornwell, D. G. 11., presided. Grand Master Brown being out of the' State for May and June, therefore heing unable to be present and on account of it, sent in his resignation as Grand lvIaster. 'I\his is something new in Masonic jurisprudence for a Grand J\tlaster to resign. Deputy Grand 'Master Cornvvell submitted a brief report dealing chiefly with Masonic College affairs and announced that a lien had been made on the College Boarding House, the place where "refreshing breezes fanned the fevered brow," for tTIoney due on its erection. This lien ,vas later adj udicated. The Deputy Grand Master recomn1encled, that the Charter be returned to Montezulna Lodge No. 109 at Santa Fe,N. :1\1., as conditions there had been improved and \vere not as bad as reported. He states that the Grand Lodge of Missouri is 'the pioneer in establishing an educational institution and hoped that tin1e will add to it a luster as that of Yale and- Harvard. High hopes. The indebtedness of, the College at this time was $5,749.31, but if the outstanding an1QUnts due were paid indebtedness would only be $1,871.85. The ll1atriculants of the College were 175 and the average age vvasfifteen years. Much 'of the time ,of the Grand'Lodge was taken up with Grievances and 'discussing the report on Correspondence. The latter was not considered as the mere opinion of the Chairman of the Committee,but as ',expressing the opinion of the Grand Lodge, hence much of the time was taken by trivialities. ,The Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence ought to be considered as knovving the subjectn1atter of which he writes much better than the neophytes on such questions. -90-


These reports are always interesting and contain much information, especially, when prepared by such master hands as Mitchell, Foster and O'Sullivan. The following Grand Officers were installed: liM. W. L. S. CORNWELL G. M. R. W. D. P'. WALLINGFORD R. W. JAMES H. BRITTON R.W.OSCAR F. POTTER W. JOSEPH FOSTER W. A. 0' SULLIVAN

D. G. M. G. S. w.

G.I. W. G. Treasurer. G. Secretary.n

'fhe Proceedings contain memorial tablets to Past Grand Master Sinclair Kirtley and C. D. \V. Johnson, P'ast Grand Secretary. An an1endment \-vas introduced requiring the sum of one dollar to be paid as annual dues to the Grand Lodge by the membership. A total of 135 Lodges was on the rolls.

L. S.CORNWELL, Grand Master, 1854 and 1855. M. W.BrotherL. S. Cornwell, the sixteenth Grand Master, was harnin Todd County, Kentucky, December 8, 1811. He ,came to Lexington, Missouri, about 1836 and moved to C~lum­ bia where he organized a Lodge of which he was Master for several years. He represented Johnson County in the Legislature in 1856 and 1857. He lived at Olathe, Kansas, for several years, and served· in the Kansas Legislature in 1859. In 1861 and 1862 he lived at Westport, Missouri. In 1863, he moved to St. Louis \vhere he engaged in the hotel business at 12th and Olive Streets. He afterwards lived at Natchez, Mississippi, and in Louisiana.. He was a· veritable "bird . ·of passage" but always interested ,in Masonry. He "died in Natchez, Mississippi, S,eptember 10, 1888, at the age of seventy-seven years. He appeared in the Grand Lodge July 10, 1848, at an adjourned session. He was elected D. G. M. in 1853, and elected Grand Master in 1854 and· 1855. -91-


THE THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMiMUNICATION. (The FiÂŁty-Third Communication.) St. Louis, May 28, A.D. 1855; A.L. 5855. This annuat' Communication is especially distinguished by extending the borders of the Grand Lodge into the territory of Kansas. During the year, Charters were issued to Smithton Lodge No. 140 at Smithfield; Leavenworth Lodge No. 150. Leavenworth, and Kansas Lodge 153, Wyandotte, all in Kansas Territory. . All of the Grand Officers and the representatives of fiftythree Lodges were present with Grand Master Cornwell presiding. In his address the Grand Master calls attention to the chaotic condition of the Ritual and the necessity of a Grand Lecturer. This matter was referred and went over for a year. He took strong grounds against the so-called "Adoptive Masonry" or "female Masonry." He thinl(s it is "an attempted imposition upon the intelligence of the Craft." What would he say, if he were living to-day, and saw the great work of the Eastern Star in the Masonic Home? He regrets the necessity of placing a mortgage of $1,500 on the College property. Fully one-half of the Proceedings of the Session is taken up by the report on correspondence and nearly as much with College affairs. The College is causing some uneasiness; the liabiHties having increased to $7,511.38. Grand Master reported some difficulties in matters in la\v among the Lodges, but no decisions, so far, have emanated from any Grand Master. In the assignment on the Committee "on Work," the name of Grand Secretary O'Sullivan now appears. The Grand Officers elect for the ensuing year were: ltM. W.L.S. CORNWELL R. W. OSCAR F. POTTER R. VI. ]. W. CHENOWITI-I -92-

G. M. D. G. M. G. S. W.


R. W.. HENRY E. VANOSDELL W. JOHN D. DAGGETT W. A. O'SULLIVAN

G. J. W. G. T. G. S/'

A new Grand Treasurer appears in the person of John D. Daggett. An amendment was proposed, that when a Lodge had up its scholarship-, the Grand Lodge shall loan out such money and the Lodge be relieved from the payment of One Dollar for 路eachDegree conferred. The membership of the Grand Lodge had reached the 4,014 figure, with 672 exaltations for the year. Total receipts

$5,138.67.

-93-


THE THIRTY-SIXTI-I ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Fifty-Fourth Communication.) Lexington; M Q,y 26, A:D. 1856; A.L. 5856. This annual session was held in Lexington with Grand Master Cornwell in the Grand East and fifty-eight Lodges represented. The address of the Grand Master is interesting and lengthy. He calls attention to the death of the late Past Grand Master Wilson Brown; he is opposed to itinerant Lecturers who are traveling over the S'tate without authority ; criticizes the organization of 'Lodges in unsuitable places, and that too many are being formed; is opposed to the use of 'Masonic Halls by non-Masonic Bodies, and issues a warning, as to the expenses and deficit of the Masonic College. He was a wise Grand Master who saw and spoke wisely. The organization of Loages at every cross road, is still a sinaf commission, even in 1921. The Committee on Grand Lecturer reported of putting a Grand Lecturer in the field, who is to visit every Lodge and to devote as much time to each Lodge as possible. The Grand Lecturer is, to submit a report, of the conditions existing in the Grand Lodge, and shall receive a salary of three dollars per day; the Lodges to pay his actual expenses while visiting them. The Grand Lecturer was forbidden to teach anything else ,than the work of the three Degrees and to be qualified in the work of the Past Master's Degree. TH~ GRAND'LODGl; OF KANSAS.

During the year the Grand Lodge of Kansas \\ias organized, and M. W. Brother Richard Rees, Grand Master, visited the Grand, Lodge of l\fissouri., Ere received the right hand of fellowship from the, Missourians. The liabilities of the Masonic College had amounted to $8,450.00, with a slipping in attendance. The receipts for 'the year were $6,772.84; balance in treasury $6,043.79. -94-


The following Grand Officers were installed: G. M..

"Ivr. W. BEN}AMIN SHARP

R. W. W. A. CUNN'INGHA11

R. W. S. H. SAUND'ERS R. W. MARCUS BOYD ' W. JOHN D. DiAGGETT W. A. O'SULLIVAN

D. G. G. G. G.

G. M. S. W.. J. W.

T,路easurer. Secretary."

R. W. Brother Robert Morris G. J. W. of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, vvas present and delivered an address. The Grand Master appointed Anthony O'Sullivan, Grand Secretary, as Grand Lecturer. FraIn this time on the Ritual began to evolve from its ,nebulous and chaotic state. The total membership of the Grand Lodge was 5,329, number of exalted 792, number of Lodges chartered 150. 7

BENJAMIN SHARP, Grand Master, 1856. M. \"'Y. Brother Benjamin Sharp, the seventeenth Grand Master, was born in Jonesville, Lee County, ,Virginia, April 12, 1820. He' graduated from the Virginia "Military Institute, took up the profession of law, and ca1ne to Missouri in 1843, sett1~ng in Danville, where he took high rank as an attorney. His Masonic history is not obtainable, as the records of Danville Lodge No. 72 were destroyed during the civil' war. It is believed he was n1ade a Mason in this Lodge, it being organized in 1842. He represented this Lodge in the Grand Lodge in 1853. At the annual Communication in May, 1856, he was elected 'Grand :!'/[aster. His tragic death occurred July 18, 1861, being shot down in his buggy 'o/hile going to Martinsburg, Missouri. At this time a terrible condition existed in some parts of Missouri. He was a pronounced Union man and his death was doubtless due to partizan guerillas. It is a matter of history in Montgomery County touching his deatli, that, HBenjaminSharp kneeled down and prayed God to bless and protect his wife and children, to forgive his sins, and to grant .that the


armies 0'ÂŁ the Union might be successful and the Union itself preserved to posterity forever. He died as he had lived, brave as a lion, devoted to the Union cause, kneeling and praying to God alone."

His remains were interred in the Gregory cemetery" on'e mile west of Danville. The Masons of Montgomery County erected a monUlnent to his memory.


TI-IE THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNllAL COMMUNICATION. (1'he Fifty-Fifth Communication.)

St. Lou'is, lJ,fay 25, A.D. 1857; A.L. 5857. The attendance of representatives at this Session was excellent. Seventy-eight Lodges answered to roll call, .with Grand Master Sharp in the Grand East. He submitted a good address. He is the first Grand Master called upon to interpret laws and 'usages, is highly gratified with the work of the Grand Lecturer, issued. elev,en dispensations to form Lodges, expressed fear over the conditions of the Masonic College, and advised some action be taken to meet the increased expenses and debt. The expenses last year were $5,200 and there were only eight beneficiaries in attendance. .The question naturally aro'se, that if the College was organized to educate the children of indigent Masons, then the expense of $5,ZOO seemed out of proportion to the work .accomplished. The College had about 175 stud.ents of which only eight were beneficiaries, then the expense incurred was on behalf of others rather than the children of indigent Masons.. Th,e minutes of the Proceedings are full of College matters and a 'feeling of uneasiness is manifest, even in the face of the reduction. in the outstanding indebtedness. The liabilities for the year, 1857-1858, wer,e $7,022.98 with a credit of two issues interest, etc., of $3,636.00 with which to meet these expenses. The Con1mittee on Grievances, as usual, had its hands full. The ~eport of the Committee on Correspondence with Brother George Whitcomb, appears in the appendix. Receipts for the year $6,337.79, balance $4,097.87. The officers elected and installed ,vere: G. M.

"11. W. SAMUEL H. SAUNDERS R. W. P'.D'RAPER

~

R. W. MARCUS BOYD

-97-

D. G. M. G. S. W.


R. W. JOHN F. HOUSTON W. JOHN D. DAGGETT W. A. O'SULLIVAN'

G. J. W. G. Treas titre r. G. Secretary."

SAMUEL H. S'AUNDERS, Grand Master, 1857 and 1858. M.W. Brother Samuel H. Saunders, the eighteenth Grand Master, was born near Richmond, Virginia, August 1, 1813. He graauated from Bacon. College, Georgetown, Kentucky, ina classical, as well as, in a course of engineering. 路 He came to Missouri and settled in Pettis County on a farm. He lived in Cooper County for five years. In 1845, he took up the study of medicine, commencing his practice in 1847 and continued until 1887 in Otterville to which place he had moved in 1849. He died at Otterville February 11, 1897, at the age of eighty-four years. He was made a Mason in Relief Lodge No. 105, Georgetown, Missouri, while the Lodge was under dispensation. He appeared in Grand Lodge路 as proxy for the Master in 1850, and served as Master in 1851~ In 1853, he assisted in organizing Otterville Lodge No. 142 in which he served as Master. He was elected Grand S'enior Warden in 1856 ana. elected Grand Master in 1857 and reelected in. 1858. He received the Capitular and Cryptic Degrees in Boonville. A writer speaks of him as a gentleman of the old school, of large heart, always warm and tender. He prized Freemasonry, and the poor found in him a true friend and benefactor.

-98..;....


THE THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Fifty-Sixth Communication.) St. Louis, May 24, A.D. 1858; A.L. 5858. The attendance at this Session was excellent. Grand Master Saunders delivered an address that contained much good matter. He states that all reports indicated peace and harmony in the Grand Lodge; he advocated the appointment of District Lecturers under the Grand Lecturer, as the best Ineans to secure uniformity. of work. The College received lengthy attention and he did not view it in the·1ight of gloom and discouragement. A request ,vas received fronl the Mt. Vernon Association requesting assistance in purchasing the tOlnb of Washington. This question was referred to the Grand Lodge. :for the first time the reports of the District Deputy Grand Master were made to the Grand Master and puhlished in the Proceedings. The report on correspondence is again embodied in the Proceedings and is the product of Grand Secretary 0' Sullivan. Tbe Curators 'of the ·College reported a total liability of $6,023.12 \vhich with credits will reduce it to about $3,000. A GER},IAN LoDGE. By resolution, a dispensation ,vas granted to form and open a Lodge in St. Louis to work in the German language; also, that in a city or to\vn where two or more Lodges are located, a waiver of two-thirds of the Lodges must be obtained before permission to organize another Lodge. PRINTING LIST OF M~1iBERS.

By resolution the Grand Secretary was instructed to print the Roster of Membership· of the Subordinate Lodges in the Proceedings and that two thousand· copies be printed for distribution. The Proceedings of 1858 contains a memorial tablet to Archibald Patterson, President of the College; ·to R. W. Brother Richard DalIam, Past· Grand S'ecretary, and to .R. W. --99-


Brother Alexander T.Douglass, Grand Junior Warden. The financial statement shows receipts $7,822.12; disbursements $4,842.94; balance $2,979.18. The Grand Officers for 1858 were: HM. W. SAMUEL H. SAUNDERS R. W. 'MARCUS BOYD R. W. JOHN F. HOUSTON R. W. JOHN DECKER W~ JOHN D. DAGGETT W. A. O'SULLIVAN "

"

G. D. G. G. G. G.

M. G. M. S. W. J. W. Treasurer. Secretary.n

.T\venty-threeLodges were chartered at this Communication. The membership was about 6,000 with 140 Lodges and 688 exaltations..


THE THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. . (The :B~ifty-Seventh Communication.)

St. Louis, lit!ay 23, A.D. 1859; A.L. 5859. The attendance at this .session \vas large, with 88 Lodges represented, and Grand Mast~r Saunders in the Grand East. His address, like the former one,. was a thoughtful paper. His expression a~d just condemnation of the "Drones,'''-unaffiliated l\1asons,-are to the point· and received the ·commendationof the Grand Lodge. The idea that once a Mason, always a Mason, and entitled to all the rights and privileges of Freemasonry, is an exploded document.. The cordial greeting of the Grand Lodge was extended to the Grand Lodge of Canada and vvelcomed to the Sisterhood of Grand Lodges. A circular letter ·was ordered to he sent to the subordinate Lodges for contribution to the M t. Vernon Association, .to purchase the tonlbof George Washington. A goodly response came from the Lodges. The question of the use of the word "Masonic" by a club for social purposes was declared as imp.rop"er and misleading. DISPOSITION O:F TH~ COLLEC:e.

A prolonged discussion arose as to the Masonic College at Lexington. The minority report was finally adopted. It held that: UThat after many years experience it has become a fixed fact, that the Masonic College has failed to meet the reasonable aI'!d just expectation of the Grand Lodge, and of its warmest and· most ardent friends, thereby rendering no. wise necessary for the Grand Lodge. to put forth any further efforts for its sustenance, and whereas, the subordinate Lodges of the State are having their treasuries constantly drained for its support, thereby in a very great measure cutting off their. resources for dispensing their own charities, therefore be it ttResolved, That at the close of the present Collegiate year the College be closed, 'sine die,' and that no more of the funds of .this Grand Lodge be appropriated for its .sustenance;t· further than to meet its present liabilities; that all Scholarships held either by Lodges or in~101-


dividuals, shall at the -w-ish of the parties holding them, be cancelled, and such parties be released from all further obligations under the same."

So ends this unfortunate experience. The following offic路ers were installed: "M. W. 'MARCUS BOYD R. W. MARCUS H. McFARLAND R. W. WILLIAM R. PENICK

R. W. JOHN' DECKER "VI. JOHN D. DAGGETT W. A. O'SULLIVAN

G. D. G. G. G. G.

M. G. M. S. W. 1. W. Treasurer. Secretary."

Receipts $8,880.67; disbursetnents $5,339.38; balance $3,541.29.. Membership at the close of the year 6,916. One hundred eighty chartered Lodges and 18 Lodges U. D. with 812 exaltations. MARCUS BOYD, Grand Master, 1859. M. W. Brother Marcus Boyd, the nineteenth Grand Master, vvas born invVillialTIs County, Tennessee, in 1803. Just when he came to St. Louis is not known. In early life, he fitted himself to become a physician, but changed his plans and studied la\iV. He was Colonel of the 77th Regiment of Militia and at the close of the Civil War was Postmaster at Springfield, Missouri. His early Masonic history is meager. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge as Master of Greene Lodge No. 101, aftervvards Unity No.5, at Springfield. He served as District Deputy Grand Master. At the annual Communication . in May, 1857, was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced to Grand Senior Warden in 1858, and elected Grand Master in 1859. His was the first instance of regular promotion in the history of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. He was High Priest of his Chapter, assisted in the organization of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, and was elected Grand King. In 1858 he was elected Grand High Priest. A friend speaks of him as foIIows:-"Brother -102-


Boyd was a handsome man over six feet tall, of massive and splendid physique, with dark brown hair, broad forehead, blue eyes and an effeminate complexion. He had a musical, persuasive voice." He died at Springfield November 30, 1866, in the sixty-third year of his age.

-103-


THE FORTIETH ANNUAL COMl\fl' .... ICATION. (The Fifty-Eighth Commtn:i( .. :~on.) St. Lo路uis May 28, A.D. 18t .:-, ~ A.L. 5860. This al1nt1~l Session was opened by R. \V. Marcus H. McFarland, D. G. M. with all the other Grand Officers and the representatives of ninety-five Lodges pres路ent. Among this list appears the name of the" future Grand Master and distinguished Grand Secretary, Jobn D. Vincil, as one of th路e Grand Chaplains. The address of Grand 11aster Boyd was read by the Deputy Grand Master. The address deals at length with a convention. of Master Masons and of Lodges to be held at Lexington to protest against the abandonment of the Masonic College. The Grand Master characterized this proposed Convention as "irregular and unmasonic." He held that the action of the Grand Lodge is binding upon all. parties until such action is repealed or modified by the Grand Lodge at a stated or special session, and that any so-called convention to "condemn," to "discuss," to "denounce," or "repudiate" the action of the Grand Lodge is a rebellion and can not be countenanced, and is. an "unwarranted affair." This matter was referred to the Grand Lodge, which sustained the action of the Grand Master. The J\1asonic College was an unfortunate matter. The citizens of Lexington had given -freely to the. amount of $30,000 to sustain the College, and the Grand Lodge and subordinate Lodges had given even a larger amount, only to end in failure. Noone was to biame for the failure. It was merely an unfortunate premature venture, but it left sore spots for many years. Grand Secretary O'Sullivan submitted his report on Correspondence ,vhich is printed in the body of. the Proceedings. These early reports were reviews of' the transactions of Grand Lodges, with comments and discussions of the leading MasonIc questions. Viewed in the light of nearly a century, these J

-104-


reviews are indeed interesting, and well worth the careful perusal by the student of Freemasonry. It is unfortunate that not even excerpts thereof can be included in this history. To do so would mean a bulky volume. A very important decision was made, in reference to an inquiry as to the effect of the negative ballot for advancement to the second or third Degree. This decision held: that a candidate must pass a secret ballot before being advanced, and that a black ball rej eeted the candidate for one year. In other words, when a petition is balloted on, such ballot did not elect to all the degrees, but that a separate ballot was necessary for advancenlent to each degree. This ballot was secret and no one had the right to question it, whether it was based upon lack of proficiency or any other cause. The candidate had 110 recourse, even, as an Entered Apprentice or Fellow Craft. This rule remained in force for many years and its inj uS,tice was finally recognized and the rule abolished. Charters w,ere 'granted to many Lodges, among which is to Rocky Mountain Lodge No.20S, Camp Floyd" Territory of Utah, and to Bent Lodge No. 204, Taos, N.M. Among this list of chartered Lodges is Kansas City Lodge No. 220. A committee was appointed to consider the proposition of giving the Masonic College to the State of Missouri, as a Military Normal School. The question whether a Lodge U. D. had the authority to receive and act upon p:etitions for affiliation of Master Masons, was propounded by Brother Vinci1. The Grand Lodge decided the affirmative. This may seem a queer question to many, yet it is still held in som'e Grand Jurisdictions that a Lodge U. D. cannot receive and act upon petitions for affiliation. The State was divided into twenty-five districts. The new officers installed were: "M. W. MARCUS H. McFARLAND R. W. W. R. P1ENICK W. JOHN DECKER W. SAMUEL L. KEyS

-1&5-

Grand Master.

Deputy G'rand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden.


W. JOHN D. DAGGETT vV. A. 0' SULLIVAN P. DIRAP'ER A. L. McGREGOI{

Grand TreaSZtrc11'. Grand S'ecrefarj'.

Grand Seni'or Deacon. Grand JU1'zior Deacon. Grand Tyler.'~

A. STILLE Receipts for tl)e year $8,726.65; disburse111ents $7,284.84; balance $7,415.81. Under special rules is found the law, that, no Brot11er shall be permitted to deluit, except fqr traveling out of the jurisdiction, or for joining another ,Lodge. No luember being non affiliated for twelvemonths, can visit or participate in any public or Masonic demonstration. Membership, 7,262 divided into 193 Lodges with 725 exaltations, and 11 Lodges were chartered.

MARCUS H. McFARLAND, Grand :Aiaster, 1860. M. \\'. Brother Marcus H. McFarland, the tw,entiethGrand Master, first appeared in the' Grand Lodge in 1845 as" a visitor and member of Clarksville Lodge No. 17. In 1848, he represented Ashley Lodge No. 75, as its Master, and was appointed on the credential and grievance comlnittees. In 1849, he was D.D. G. M. of the Third District and resided at Louisville, Missouri. He continued asD. D. G. M. for number of years. In 1859, he was elected Deputy Grand Master. At the annual Session of 1860 he presided over th路e Grand Lodge in the absence of Grand .Master Boyd and succeeded to the Grand Mastership that year. I t is unfortunate that so little of his personal history is available. He resided in Pike County for a while, afterwards in Lincoln County,\vhere hevvas a leading Physician and active in Masonic circles. Failing health caused him to re1110Ve to Texas, where he died October 4, 18~O. His remains were brought back tolVlissouri for interment.

a

-106-


1fASONICCOLLEGE AT LEXINGTON. As it appeared in 1855. (From an old cut).


rfHE FORtrY-FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Fifty-Ninth Communication.) St. Louis, May 27, 1861; A.L. 5861. The forty-first annual session found all of the Grand Officers present and the representatives of 57 Lodges. M.. W. Brother Marcus H. McFarland presided in the East. TEe address of the Grand Master is a thoughtful production, especially, for the trying times of the civil war that was i nlpen ding. He discussed at length the question of non-affiliation of the Masons, who wished to be recognized as Masons, but are unwilling to bear. any of the burden of· Lodge nlembership. He called attention to the Grand Lodge to the great loss sustained in the death of R. W. Brother George H. C.Melody, Past Grand Lecturer· and Past Grand. Treasurer.. The old Marion College land was still a cause of worry, as the persons who had purchased the property were unable. to nleet their obligations. In this connection, .as an attorney, appears thenalTIe of R.E.Anderson, who afterwards became a great outstanding figure in the Grand Lodge. Itappears that the D.D.G. Masters 'Vvere empowered, along with the Grand Master, to issue dispensations to form Lodges. ,This privilege or authority was very m'uch abused, as too nlany Lodges were being organized in all sorts of places. The committee to vvhichthismatter "vas referred sounded a loud note of \varning. This note of \varning ought to have. sounded in the ears of a great many GrandMasters oilater periods, who were and are still, guilty of· the saIne offense. The "boom spirit" is· always a curse, esp·ecially in Freemasonry. The question of the disposition of the College property at Lexington again comes to·the front. The committee appointed to look after this matter reported that the General Assembly of the State . 0£ Missouri had passed an Act accepting the property and College as a donation. The action of the committee was approved, and·· the Grand Master authorized to execute a deed of the propetty to the State. -107~


Judging from the report of Grand S'ecretary O'Sullivan, he was the "goat f ' to whom many questions of lavv vvere referred. The Grand JVlaster had an easy tilue in reference to jurisprudence, and there seemed to be no standing committee on this subj ect, but all doubtful questions were referred to a special committee for its digestion and absorption. The COll1111ittee to which was referred the tor111enting question of non-affiliation, after a laborious 路effort of two pages of printed ll1atter, saying nothing, passed it on to "a comlnittee of well informed Masons." These "three "vell inforn1ed Masons," \vere to sit on the Ancient Land Marks and incubate something bearing on the subject. 'fhe Scholarships issued in favor of the College at Lexington, '\vere a source of \iVOrry. A special Committee was appointed to ad just all such claims. I t appears that certain parties who had paid for scholarships, in view of the fact that the College had been closed, desired to have some adjustment made. The following interpretation of article 17 of the "old regulations" was lnade: "R esolved, That no one of the Officers of this Grand Lodge, .enu.merated in the Seventeenth Article of the 'old regulations,' shall, while holding office路 in this .Grand Lodge,. act as. Master or Warden in his subordinate Lodge."

1\ mell10rial to the rnetuory of R. W. George H. C. Melody was adopted. This tnenlorial recites his many excellent qualities .and zeal as a Mason. He was Grand Treasurer for nine years ;.thefirst Grand Lecturer, and one of the historic figures in the history of路 the Grand Lodge. CfIARITY FUND

i\t this session, steps were taken to establish路 a charity fund,

by setting aside one-third of the annual dues of each year. An appropriation was made by the Grand Lodge of $4,000 as a nest egg. 1~he charity fund to be invested and only the interest' accruing therefrom, to be used for charitable purposes. -108-


1~he

officers elect and appointed for the ensuing year were:

I'M. W. W. R. P'ENICK, St. Joseph Grand Master. R. W. JOHN D1ECKER, St. Louis Deputy Grand Master. R. vV. GEORGE WHITCOMB, Charleston .. SeniorG11'and Warden. R. W. A. L. McGREGOR, Medora Junior Grand Warden. R. W. JOHN D. DIAGGETT, St. Louis Grand TreaS'ttre1'. R. W. A. O'SUL,LIVAN, St. Louis Grand Secretary. W. P. G. ANDERSON, Steelville .. , Senior Grand ]}t.?acon. W. L. LOKER, St. Louis Junior Grand [)eacon. W. R. S. VOORHIS, St. Louis Grand Orator. W. R. E. AND1ERSONl, P'almyra Grand Orator. w. JOHN L. STEAD'MAN, Liberty Grand Marshal. W. SA:NIUEL RUSSEL, St. Joseph G. Standard Bearer. ISSAC TULEE G11'and Steward. W. PENIX Grand Steu'ard. Brother B. O. AUSTIN, New Bloomfield G. P. Brother A. STEELE, St. Louis G. T)'ler:"

tfhe honorary title of R. W.in this roster is extended to include the .G-rand Treasurer and路 Grand Secretary. Receipts for the year $2,499.25; disbursen1ents $2,185.96; balance $7,679.10. T\venty Lodges vvere chartered at this Session.

\\TILLIAM F. PENICK, Grand Master 1861. M. W. Brother William F. P'enick, the twenty-first Grand Master, was born in Boone County, Missouri, 路]\tlay 20, 1829. He was the first native Missourian to be elected GrandM'aster. He was made a Master Mason 路in S't. ]osep'h Lodge No. 78, , March 1, 1856, in which he served as Master in 1858 and 1859. He \vas President of the Masonic Board of Relief of St. Joseph for tvventy years. He was n1adea Royal Arch Mason in St. Joseph Chapter No. 14in 1856, served as High Priest in 1860, assisted in organizing 81. Joseph Council R. and S'.M. No.9 and served as Master for two years. He was Knighted in Weston Gon1mandery No.2, K.T. in 185~,路 assisted in organizing St. Joseph Con1mandery No. 4 in 1859, and \vas its first Commander. -109-


In the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons he served as Grand High Priest in 1861, Grand Master of the Grand Council R. andS. M. in 1877 and Deputy Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery Knights Templar in 1861. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge at the annual Session of 1857 as Senior Warden of his Lodge. In 1858, he represented his Lodge as Master and was appointed Grand Junior Deacon. In ]859,he,,~aselected Grand Senior Warden, and in 1861,. Grand Maste.r. However he never presided, as he entered the Union Army in the war of the Rebellion. He sent his address fron1 the field to the Grand Lodge Session in 1862. He died in St. Joseph, December 4, 1891. He was then the oldest riving Past Grand High Priest and the oldest member of St. Joseph Lodge No. 78.

-110-


THE FORtfY-SECOND ANNUAL COl\1MUNICATION. (The Sixtieth Comlnunication.)

St. Louis, lJfay 26, 1862 A.D.; A.L. 5862. . At this annual Session the Grand Master "vas absent, serving as an officer in the Union Arlny. The Deputy Grand Master ,;vas also absent, so that the Grand Lodge was opened by R. '1\1. Brother \t\Thitcon1b, Grand Senior Warden, with the representatives of only forty-five Lodges present. The absence of so many prominent members, and the s111aU·representation of Lodges, brings us face to face,vith the· conditions existing in Missouri during THE WAR OF THE

REBE~LION

Missouri was a bordering slave state. Even more, as an the Counties along the Missouri River, together with a fey; adjacent Counties, from St.Louis to St. Joseph, were slave holding Counties, the sympathies of ·a large portion of these Counties were .naturally with the South, while the Northern and a portion of. the southern part of the State, sympathized with the North. Missouri was a house divided against herself. This ~aturally and invariably·' arrayed the adherents of the Northand·the South against each other, fighting with n1agnificent valor, but too often with pitiless rancor. Each for a cause they held sacred, and for· which each were ,villing to die. Itbecan1e an internecine, even more,a fratricidal war. Brother. against Brother and Father against Son; families were divided and home ties ·severed.. Missouri suffered most during the first three years of the "var.. \iVhen Lincoln issued his first call for 75,000 lnen, after the firing on Ft. Sumpter, it lit the torch of war in Missouri. Annies began to assemble on ·each side, so that from the captureofCamp Jackson in St.Louis by General Lyon, until the decisive battle oiPea Ridge or Elk Horn Tavern in northwest ArI{ansas, Missouri was a .vast battle field. The skirmish at Booneville, the flight of Governor Jackson, the battle ofyVilson's Creek, ·of .Carthage, and of .Lexington, brought the con-111-


tending armies over nearly all of Missouri south of the river. It was a trial of strength on the issue, whether Missouri should remain in the Union or cast her fortune with the Confederacy. The North won and after the battle of P'ea Ridge, March 6, 1862, only three times did the Confederate troops invade the State. The battle of Pilot Knob, and Lone Jack in 1862 and the battle of Westport in 1864. After 1862 the sons of Missouri fought on both sides on the long flung battle line fronl Vicksburg and Nashville to Atlanta and Richmond. That Freemasonry should have suffered through such a period, is not· strange. The most wonderful· and aln10st incon1prehensible fact is, that Freelnasonry survived the avvful shock. Can one contemplate the picture of luen meeting in a Grand Lodge, or in a subordinate Lodge under such a stress, there to part only to tneetagain in the flame of battle and against each other, that the doctrine of the Brotherhood of n1an survived? In the face of this,· can anyone doubt that there is a Divinity that shapes the affairs of men, . and upholds great principles,rough hew them as man· may? The great outstanding fact is, that Freemasonry in Missouri survived. It lived and lives to-day. .The Proceedings of the Grand Lodge for 1861 and 1862 sho\v, that eighty-nine Lodges ceased, twenty-three Lodges lost their halls, furniture and records by being burned. Fifteen disappeared, leaving no trace, and· fifty-one failed to make returns and pay dues. Mail facilities and transportation were nearly entirely destroyed. Of the great figures in the Grand Lodge, Past Grand Master· Edward Bates was in Lincoln's Cabinet; Past Grand Master Gamble was Provincial Governor of J\1issouri, after the flight of Governor Jackson; Past Grand Master Grover, a Lieutenant Co10nelwas·.fatally wounded at the Battle of .Lexington ; .·Past GrandMaster Sharp, basely murdered for his staunch Union opinions by a band of Guerillas, and G-rand Master Penick sending his address from the tented field of the Union army. Yet amid it all, the Grand -112-


Lodge did not cease to meet and its S'essions, vvhile strained, gives strong evidence of charity, kindliness and brotherhood. The address of Grand Master Penick, sent to the Grand Lodge, after he had lard aside the peaceful pursuit, and. taken up the s\vord, was written to his Brethren, n1any of whom bitterly differed fromhilu on the great issues, yet this address breathes the" spirit of affection, conciliation, and lTIoderation. In the opening portion of his address he ·says : "You should all feel thankful to the Great :B.uler of the Universe, that amidst the scenes of ruin and· devastation, that surround you, He has once more pennitted you to 111eet together as Brothers and 11asons, to legislate for the future welfare and prosperity of the Order."

The address of Grand ~aster \\Thitcon1b in 1863, breathes the same devotion to the Fraternity, of toleration, forgiveness, and charity. 'He says: "With the history of our ancient Brethren before us, would it not be well, nay, is it not our duty, to throw the broad n1antle of Masonic charity over the foibles and errors of our Brethren, and, so far. as in us lies, endeavor. to carry out the principles of our Great Master, Peace on Earth and good will toward men?"

\Vhenwe find such a spirit emanating fron1 the Grand Masters of the Fraternity, luid the bitterness and passions of war, who can doubt the fact that a Divine hand was Inoulding its destiny? Freen1asons are hUlnan beings and it should not be a nlatter of harsh criticism that men's judgn1ent beco111e warped by the passions and prejudices engendered by a fratricidal vvar. This fact is well· illustrated in two instances. at this annual Communication. In· one instance. a Master elect refused, or rather tnodifieCl, the ancient charges as· Uto not being engaged in plots and conspiracies against the governnlent." I-Ie soon thereafter entered the army of the Confederacy. The District Deputy arrested the Charter of the Lodge on the ground tha.t the "tlan1e of a plotter against the Government," meaning thereby the Master elect, \vas carried on the rolls of the Lodge. 1'he cOlnmittee in reviewing the case held that "It is not for us who have personal relations of loyalty to our Govertunent, to pronounce ~entence of outlawry upon beloved Brethren, -113-


who, 'wherever they may be, are doubtless as conscientious in their actions, as we claim to be in our ovvn. If they are in error, they are still our Brethren, and they have the same equal rights with us, as Masons, to determine their own political destiny, and vie are not, the constituted judges. We may grieve that so many of our Brethren entertain cpnflicting sentiments, that lead to civil war and carnage, but, as Masons, we hope the day will never come vvhen our Lodge rooms will be closed against a worthy Brother on account, alone, of such conflicting political opinions."

This opinion of . the c0111mittee has the true Masonic ring" It speaks the principles of Freemasonry in a day of conflict and prejudice. It rises to a lofty height ·in the conception of Freemasonry.. It should be a matter of pleasure and satisfaction to the Masons of to-day to read such· inspiring sentin1ent. But there. is another instance that does not reflect the same lofty vie,v., Grand Master Penick in his address, paid a noble tribute to Past Grand Masters Sharp and Glover in the following language: "Since our last Communication death has taken from our ranks some of our most highly ·hol1ored anddistinguished··1fasons..... Past M. W. Grand 1fasters Benjamin$harp and Benjamin W. Grover are no more. In the . beginning -of our troubles, Brother Sharp. took a bold stand for the cause of law and order and offered his services to. the general Government. Brother Grover was a Lieutenant Colonel in the services of the United States and died from vvounds received at the Battle of Lexington, Missouri. They both lost their lives on account of·· their devotion to their· country,and both left families and numerous friends to mourn their loss." ..

In this excerpt, the careful reader \vill observe that the reference to Past Grand. Master Sharp is· incolnplete. Grand Master Penick expressed his opinion freely as to· the cowardly murder by partizan guerrillas of Judge Sharp and in a fevv places in the address, the GrandMaster obtrudes a "political opinion." . This reference to the. murder of Brother Sharp and the "political opinion" of Grand l\tIaster Penick, thecOll1mittee ordered stricken from the· address. This act of the committee is in such a marked contrast to the . other instance, that one wonders Over the acrobatic per-114-


BATTLE OF LEXINGTON FO UGHT IN SEPTElvfBER 186l. The Masonic College in the center with U. S. Flag, on the right, is the boarding house lnentioned in text, page 88.

011


formance of hun1an reason, when prejudice has it in full control. It depended very much as to which side your political opinions leaned· to make then1Masonic in the opinion of· some tnembers of the Grand Lodge. It is also worthy of notation that the nativity of a man does not necessarily determine a man's political' views. Bates, Gatnble and Sharp were Virginians and Penick was a native of Boone County, yet all were pronounced Union men. Grand Master Penick called .attention to a meeting of the North An1erican Masonic. Congress to be held in September, at Memphis Tennessee. He characterized it as the General Grand in disguise, and recommended non-intercourse with this organization. He reported that R.ocky Mountain Lodge No. 205 Territory of Utah had ceased to \vork and had placed its Charter and proper;ty .in his hands. The GrandMaster refused to grant the dispensation to confer· n10re than· one degree .onaCandidate at the same meeting. Grand Secretary O'Sullivan,. in his report, commends strongly the acts of several Officers in the Union Army who were Masons, for the protection of persons ·and property extended by them. The following Grand Officers Vlere installed: "M. W. GEORGE WHITCOMB, Charleston Grand Master.. Rt. w. JOHN H. TURNER, Glasgo'v D'eputyGrand Master. Rt. W. WILLIAM N'.LOKER, St. Louis Grand Se1'xiorWarden. Rt. W. SAlVIUEL RUSSEL, St. Joseph Grand Junior Warden. Rt. W. JOHN D. DAGGETT, St.Louis Gra''td Treasurer. Rt. W.A. O'SULLIVAN, Spri1;1gfield Grand Secretary. Rev. Brother J. D. VINCIL Grand Chaplai't. Rev. Brother R. H. WELLER ....•............ Grand Chaplain. Rev. Brother T. E.SHEP'HERD, Grand Chaplain. Rev. Brother S.BROWN Grand Chaplain. Rev.BrotherW.N.IRISH Grand Chaplain. Rev. J3rother P'.M. P'INKARD " Grand>ChapZain. Brother JAMES M. BURNS Grand Orator. Brother SAMUEL COLLIER Grand Senior Deacon. Brother L. W. MITCHELL Gra1td Junior Deacon." O'

---:-115-


'fotal receipts $7,338.85; disbursements $3,299.00; balance $4,039.85. Four Lodges were chartered in 1862.

GEOI{GE WHITCOMB, Grand J.V{aster 1862. J

1\1. W. Brother George \Vhitcomb, the t\venty-second Grand Master, was born in Keene, N. H., in 1814. In early life he moved to IVIassachusetts and engaged in the manufacture of combs. In 1837 he settled in Baldwinsville, now Belmont, Scott County, Missouri, and engaged in the路 practice of la\v. He afterwards moved to Charleston, Mississippi County, 'vvhere he served as Deputy Circuit and County Clerk for several years. In 1857 he established the Charleston Courier, being both editor and owner. He '~las made a lV'IasterMason in Constantine Lodge No. 129, Charleston, in 1850, and served as High Priest in Charleston Chapter No. 19R. A. M. He first appeared in the Grand 1-1'odge in 1854, as Master of his Lodge. He was Chairman of the Committee on. Correspondence for fOUf years beginning \vith 1855. He was also Chairman of the Committee onMasonic College in 1856. In 路1861 he was elected Grand Senior \\Tarden, and in 路1862~ ,elected Grand Master. He died in Charleston, July 10, 1872. His relnains vvere buried in Bellefontaine Celnetery, St. Louis.

-116-


'tHE FORTy"-TIIIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Sixty-First Comn1unication.) St. Lou/is, J");fay 23, A.D. 1863; A.L. 5863. This. annual COlnmunicatiol1 found nearly all of the Grand Officers, six Past Grand Officers, t\velve Past Masters, and the representatives of seventy-four Lodges, out of the two hundred and twenty-nine Lodges, present. Grand Master \Vhitcon1bpresided in the Grand East. The Grand Master presented an address covering in detail, the transactions of his office. He recites the unhappycondition of the State and Country; calls attention to the large number of Lodges which had ceased to exist, pay dues and make returns; and to the many halls and the property of Lodges destroyed by the \var.Yet amid it all he was optomistic, and cautioned the n1embers to be guarded in. their passions and prejudices, to follow the la\vof Freemasonry and to \valk in brotherly love and fello\vship. He recomn1ended leniency with the Lodges, that had failed to make returns or \vhich had seelningly gone down. Ninety-seven Lodges had . failed to n1ake returns, but nearly路 all were later put on their feet, and after sixty路 years, are still on the roll. He issued a dispensation to fortn a Lodge at Ft. Union" N. M. The GrandS'ecretary submitted a full report of the condition of the Craft in the State, giving in detail, the story of all the Lodges affected by the "var. In it, is the statement that I(ansas City, Golden Square at Westport, and the Lodge at Independence, were at "vork, but. asked路 remission of duesbe~ cause of losses sustained by the war. The gr,eat portion of the session \vas devoted to rehabilitating路 the Lodges and to grievances. The latter cases were more numerous than usual. At this eqrly date, the Grand Lodge held that a Lodge could not impeach, or try its ovvn Master, but the charges must be presented fo the GrandMaster for action.


CONSERVA'I'ORS OF MASONRY

The Grand Lodge took vigorous and .decisive .action on the so-called "Conservators of Masonry," or "Conservator's Association." This association sprang up in 1859 by one who professed to have discovered, what ,he called "the true PrestonWebb Work" and attempted to introduce it into various jurisdictions. He communicated the work to several persons, who were bound to use all efforts to secure its adoption. These persons styled themselv~s"Conservators of Masonry." The effort to introduce this \vork created considerable disturbance and ill feeling. The Grand Lodge of Missouri "solemnly de": clared, that said association, a corrupt organization, treasonable to the institution of Masonry, and subversive of its· sacred interests, honor and perpetuation." This is real strong language. A severe stricture was also passed: upon· the celebrated Robert Morris, the "chief Conservator.'"The Grand Lodge, furtner declared that, if any Freemason in Missouri, belonged to! this association,. he was requested to renounce all connection therewith. Following this .action, the Grand Lodge·reaffirmed its opinion in reference to the convention work adopted at Baltimore in 1843, and that no other Ritual or work to be used or taught under the Grand.Lodge of Missouri. Grand Secretary O'Sullivan was· permitted to remove his office from Springfield to· St. Louis and he also received some very complimentary resolutions on his efficiency as Grand Secretary and Grand Lecturer. The Grand Lodge endorsed and sustained the S't. Louis Board of Relief. The following Grand Officers vvere installed: HM. W. JOHN H.TURNER,Glasgow ..•... GrandMaster. R. 'V. WILLIAM N.LOKER, St. Louis Deputy Grand Master. R. W. Rev. JOHND. VIN'CIL, Glasgow Grand Senior Warden. R. W. ALLENL.McGREGOR,Vienna Grand JU1~ior Warden. R. W.. JOHN ·D.DAGGETT, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. R. W.A. O'SULLIVA~, St.Louis ......•.... .Grand Secretary. Brother W. B.WILSON, Cape Girardeau Grand Senior Deacon. Brother J. E.CADLE, Spring Hill Grand Junioy··Deacon.?J


The list of Grand Officers included six Grand Chaplains, two Grand Orators and two Grand Marshals. Receipts for the year, $3,030.. 85; disbursements $3,088..00; balance $7,280.85. Three Lodges vvere chartered· at this session. The Proceedings contain an old time Masonic oration by Charles C'. Whittlesey, Grand Orator. No tabulation of membership is included in the Proceedings..

JOHN H. TURNER, Grand Master, 1863. M. W. Brother John H.Turner, the twenty-third Grand Master appeared in the Grand Lodge for the first time in 1847, representing Livingston Lodge No. 51 by proxy. In 1851, he was elected .Grand Junior Warden, and advanced .to· .Grand SeniorV\Tarden, the year· following. He disappeared from the records of the Grand Lodge for a 'few. years, but in 1862 was elected Deputy: Grand Master and in 1863, he was elected Grand· Master. Of Brothe~ Turner's.early·1ife, personal, civil, or Masonic, nothing is obtainable. He" was a member of Fulton Lodge No. 48 in 1862, and died at Glasgow, Missouri, December 14, 1890.

-119-


THE FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL COMMUNICArrION. (The Sixty-Second Conl111unication.)

St. Louis, May 23, 1864; ./l.L. 5864. At this annualComlTIunication, Grand Master Turner, presided with ten Past lVlasters, five Past Grand Masters, and the representatives of eighty-nine Lodges present. lY!. \\1. Brother 1~honlas J. 1"'urner, Grand ~/[aster of Illinois, and Herman G. Reynolds, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, vvere received \vith .a hearty welcon1e by the Missourians. Grand Master Turner's address is a good document. He says, in reference to the conditions prevailing in Missouri: "In these unhappy tilues of turmoil and strife, the mystit: chain of Brotherhood, though severely tested, is as firm and enduring as the everlasting. hills."

He had divided the· State into nine Districts, but only four of the Deputies were able to qualify in the Ritual. He issued a severe stricture on Robert Morris, chief of the Conservator, for his attempted interferance in ll1atte1"s of the Grand Lodge. ·Hegranted six dispensations to fo1"n1 Lodges and arrested several charters. The· question of incorporating the Grand Lodge under a general Charter,arose and it was ordered done. The Conservator's Association can1e in for another severe drubbing by the COlumittee, with John D. Vincil as Chairman. It· would appear that funerals· were not conducted in a strict Masonic manner, so that the Grand Lodge ordered that the only regalia to be· worn was Hwhite gloves and aprons." The question naturally arises, vvhathad they been in the habit of wearing? Nevada Lodge No. 229 had initiated a man with only one arm, and for so doing lost its Charter. But there is no record anyvvhere of a Lodge losing its Charter for making a man a Mason, with a wooden head. 'rhe Charter granted by the s.tate Legislature en1po\vered the Grand Lodge to hold prop~120-


erty, both personal and real estate, to the an1ountof $50,000; this amount to be known as a charityendovvment fund. The Grand Lodge ordered the painting of the portraits of the Past Grand Masters, which CUStOll1 is still in vogue. The following Grand Officer.s vvere installed: "M. W. JOHN F. HOUSTON, Richmond .... Gra1"td Master. R. W. Rev. JOHND. VINCIL, Hannibal. .. Deputy Grand Master. R. W. ALLEN L.:NlcGREGOR, Vienna Grand Senior Warden. R. VV. MARTIN COLLINS, St. Louis Grand Junior Warden. W. W. N. LOKER, St. Louis Gf'and Treas'ltrer. VV. A. O'SULLIVAN, St. Louis GraHd Secretary. Brother W. D:. MUIR, Boonville Grand Senior Deacon. J. H. McALPINE, St. Louis Grand Junior Deacon. J. N. BURNS, Weston Grand Orator. R. E. AND'ERSON, P'almyra Grand Orator.'~

Receipts $3,325.85; disbursements $2,640.00; balance $7,445.55. The Proceedings contain lists of suspensions and expulsions, but there are no statistical tables ShO\iVing the number raised, n1embership of the Grand. Lodge, and judging from the list of Lodges, many\vere still comatose. . '*

JOHN F. HOUSTON, C;and Master, 1864 and 1865. lVI. \V. Brother John F.Hotlston, the twenty-fourth Grand Master, appeared first in the Grand Lodge in 1847, as the representative of Wakenda Lodge No. 52. He later transferred his membership to RichmondLodgeN o. 57, Richmond, in which he served as J\lIaster. He was elected Grand Junior \Varden in 1857, Grand Senior Warden in 1858 and was elected Grand Master in 1864 and reelected in 186:;. There is no history of his p1ersonal, or civil life. He was a charter member of Cyrus Chapter No. 36,R. A.M., Richmond, and its. first High Priest. In the路 Grand Chapter he served as Grand Scribe in 1857, Deputy Gran"dHigh Priest in 1858, and Grand High Priest in 1869. He died in St. Louis September 5,1870, in his forty-seventh year,.and路路was.buried in Richmond, Missouri. -121;...:...


THE FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Sixty-Third Communication.) St. L'ou,is, J.rlay 22, A.D. 1865; A.L. 5865. All of the Grand Officers were present, except the Grand Senior Warden, and in his place appears the name of Rufus E. Anderson; a future Grand Master. There were also present seven Past Grand Masters, fourteen Past Masters,and the representatives of 101 Lodges. The Grand Ma~ter presented a very lengthy address, but thorough in ·every.particular. Two itnportant features are found in his address. First, the brotherly and conciliatory reference. to the condition ·existing, il1cident to the Civil War which was still devastating the land. S'econd, a severe arraignment of lnany of·the members for drunkenness. Booze floweq freely in those days, and in too many conlmunities, the use of ardent spirits was considered the mark of a gentleman. The reports of the District Deputy GrandMastersareespecially interesting, as showing. the difficulties encotmtered by these faithful laborers, in these trying times. Military· or traveling Lodges were held as .clandestine organizations, and all Master Masons made therein,were considered, as irregular and clandestine. Action was taken looking toward· the habilitation of Lodges, that had ceased to exist, . or. were in a drooping condition,.· owing to the Civil vVar. This act and the one looking to· a brighter future of the Grand . Lodge, after the . fratricidal strife was over, are well worth· reading, but! are too long to insert here. The question of remunerating thosewiho had purchased scholarships· in the old College, was considered, but· owing to the lack· of funds, .. these claims· could not be met,and the whole matter went over for another year. The Grand Lodge did not, neither •. did it· indjcate . any desire,.· to repudiate . the claims on Scholarships. The Committee on Grievances and . Charity had their fun share of work and their reports filled much space. ----122-


The nUlnber of Districts was. increased to sixteen. The Officers for the ensuing year were installed, they were: W. JOI-IN~ F. HOUSTON, Richmond W. JOHN D. VINCIL, Hannibal W. MARTIN COLLIN'S, St. Louis W. R. E. ANDERSON, Palmyra R. W. 'VVILLIAM L. LOKER, St. Louis R.W. A. O'SULLIVAN, St. Louis Brother W. D. MUIR, St. Louis JOSEP'H TOLLMANN, St. Louis JOHN URE, Chillicothe C. II. SAMUEL, St. Aubert I'M. R. R. R.

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden. Grand Treasurer.. Grand Secretary. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. G?"a1路td Senior Stewa'rd. Grand Jun路ior S'teward.'J

Receipts $5,054.55. A complete Roster of aU the Lodges is pubIishedin these路Proceedings.

-123-


THE FORTY-SIXTII ANNUAL COMMU,NICATION. (The Sixty-Fourth Con1munication.) Louis}1v1ay 28, A.D. 1866; A.L. 5866. This was the largest annual Communication since the organization .of the Grand Lodge. ·All of the Grand Officers, five Past Grand 11asters, thirty Past Masters, .nine District Deputy Grand Masters, and the representatives of 161 Lodges· were present. The year had been a busy one for Grand Master Houston. His address takes on the form of an eloquent· oration, and the exultant note that war"s alarms were over,and that peace had come, IS prominent. He granted twenty-four dispensations to form Lodges. He recites the growth of the Grand Lodge from its organization until there. are now t,vo hundred chartered Lodges, with a membership. of ten thousand. He advocated a joint o\vnership in the Masonic Hall, now being builtin St. Louis, and he again calls attention to th·e abuse of overindulgence in intoxicating liquors. This Grand Master was the voice of one, crying in the wilderness of a more hopeful and better day, when the Grand Lodge would take the curse by the throat and strangle it. The reports of the District Deputy Grand Master are voluminous and make . up.a goodly portion of the Proceedings. The report on Correspondence, for the· first time, contains a review of Freemasonry in France and Gern1any, it is wrjtten by George Frank Gouley. 'fhe Committee on the question of acquiring burial lots in Bellefontaine Cemetery, reported thatstlch lots had been purchased at an expense of $484.00. "The White Glove and Apron" regulation for funerals\vas repealed. Why? Just what was behind it all isa mystery. A rather unique resolution appears in the minutes of this Session. It reads as follows: ~)t.

('Resolved, That any member of this Grand Lodge who shall die on his attendance on its Communication,. shall be buried in the.· lot in -124~


Bellefontaine Cemetery, provided his friends and relatives did not object."

Evidently the author of this resolution was looking for a safe resting place, should any catastrophy happen. In reference to the Scholarships out standing, .the Grand Lodge Inade provision for the liquidation of all such claims. The old College lands in Marion County Vv"ere still in the hands of a committee for adjustment. The Masonic Hall question came up for consideratioll, and the Comtnittee recon1mended the investment of $12,000 in the ne\vbuilding being. erected in St.路 Louis at S~venth and Market Streets. The following Officers were installed: "lvL W. JOHN D. VINCIL, Chillicothe Grand Master. R. W. \iVAI. E. DUNSCOMB,.]effersonCity. Dep~f,ty Grand.Master. R. \~r. R. E. ANDIERSON, Palmyra Grand Se1~ior Warden. R. W. ALLENL.McGREGOR,Vienna Grand Junior Warden. R. W. WILLIAM L. LOKER, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. R.W.A. O'SULLIVAN, St. Louis Grand Secretary. Brother R. B.RICE, Richmond Grand Sen拢orDeacon. ROBERT SHIELDS,Concordia Cratz,d Junior DeaC01t. TH01tIAS JOBSON,Bucklin Gra,~d Senior Steiwa1~d. ]. G. ANDERSON', Steelville Grand Jun'拢or Ste~uard. JOHN F. HOUSTON, Richmond Gra1td Lecturer. J. L. PHILLIP'S, Sedalia GrandOrator/~ H

Receipts $5,255.10; disbursements $5,756.81; balance $11,346.. 39. The statistical table shovvs that 1279,vere .raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason during the 路year and the total membership was 9,558.

JOHN D.VINCIL, GrandlY/aster 1866 and 1868. Grand Secretary 1877 to 1904. 11.vV.Brother John DavisVincil, the twenty-fifth Grand Master, was .born in Tazwell County; Virginia, August 24, 1830. He \-vas left an orphan in childhood; his educational advantages \vere, therefore, limited until he attainedhisma~125-


jority. He moved to Missouri in 1854, locating at Albany, where he taught school. In 1857 he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South,and followed it until he was elected Grand Secretary in 1897, and while not filling any stationary pulpit, he remained active in his Church until l1is death. He received the literary degree of D.D. in 1873, from the University of Missouri. He was made a Master Mason in Albany Lodge No. 127 August 12, 1854, in which he served as Master. Owing to the fact that the Ministers of the M. E.Churchare regularly changed, he carried his Masonic affiliations vvith him, from place to place, until he finally affiliated with Tuscan Lodge, No. 360, St. Louis.. He was made a Royal Arch Mason in Lone Star Chapter No. 30, Chillicothe. In the Grand Chapter, he served as Grand Chaplain. He received the Council Degrees at Hannibal, Missouri, and served as Master of Hiram Council NQ~ 1, R. & S. M., St.Louis. ' He was 路Knighted in Excalibar Commandery No.. 5 K.T., Hannibal, in 1864, serving as Commander in EnlnlanueL Commandery No.7, Macon, and in Cyrene Commandery.No. 13. He finally affiliated with St. Aldamar Commandery No. 18, St. Louis, December 24, 1889. In the Grand Conl1uandery, Knights Templar of Missouri, he served~s Grand Commander in 1871. He .first appeared in the Grand Lodge, representing S'pring Hill Lodge No. 155. In the Grand Lodge he served as Grand Chaplain, as Chairman of.many important committees, filling several elective stations, and elected Grand Master in 1866, serving what is known as a long ternl of .eighteen months. In 1868 he was reelected Grand Master. During . his last ternlas Grand Master,Grand Secretary AnthonyO'Sul1ivan died,whereupon, he appointed George Frank Gouley, as Grand . Secretary, pro teln.\JVhen the sad and tragic .death enoed the career of Brother~Gouley in 1877, -12'6-


Brother Vinci! was elected Grand Secretary, which position he held, until 1904. He died. one week after his twenty-seventh election as Grand Secretary.. Brother Vincil, as fraternal correspondent of the Grand Lodge, acquired National fame as one of the brilliant Masonic writers and was regarded as one of the highest orators that Masonry has ever produced. He died at his home, St. Louis, October 12, 1904. His remains were interred at Colulnbia, Missouri. Th,e Masonic Services were conducted by Grand Master Leroy B. Valliant. J

-127-


THE FORTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Sixty-Fifth Communication.) St. Louis, October 14, A.D. 1867; A.L. 5867. 'fhis annual Communication found all of the Grand Officers present, four Past Grand Masters, eleven Past Masters and the representatives of 109 Lodges. The addresses of the Grand Masters began to grow in space and took on the form of an oration, rather than a report. Grand Master Vinci! delivered an oration and report of thirty-three pages. It isa very comprehensive document, covering a large mass of matter that had come before him in his official capacity, such as discipline, decisions, grievances, etc. The year had been a sad one caused by the sudden death . of Grand Secretary O'Sul1~van; M. W. Brother Marcus Boyd, P. G.M.; Brother Hampton Woodruff, Grand Pursuivant, and Reverend S. S. Keadice, P. G. C. 1."\he Grand Master issued a long list of dispensations to form Lodges and appointed George Frank Gauley, Grand Secretary pro tern. on account of death of the Grand Secretary. In the death of Anthony O'Sullivan, Grand. S'ecretary, the Grand Lodge .• an'd Freemasonry of Missouri lost, possibly the greatest character of the. century. His writings. impressed one, that he was a man of the kindliest heart, of judicial poise, and possessed of a keen, incisive mind. He towered as a·giant among men.. He died August 11th, 1867 of cholera. His funeral was held . in the Protestant Episcopal Church, conducted·by the Grand Lodge and accompanied by an. escort of Knights Templar. Mrs. O'Sullivan tendered her husband's library to the Grand Lodge, according to his wish. . This . library was·. gladly accepted. The Scholarships again received attention, resulting in a final adjustment. The total outstanding claims amounted to

$3,656.65. ~128-


The edict by Grand Master Vincil against Masons appearing in public drinking saloon's, in their Masonic clothing, was sustained. The follovving Officers were installed: UM. W. Brother WILLIAM E. DUNSCOMB, J efterson City .... Grand Master. R. W.CLAUDIUS A. ROWLEY, St. Joseph, Deputy Grand Master. R. W. THOMAS E. G.ARRETT, St. Louis .. Grand Sen·ior Warden. R. W. WILLIAM D. 'MUIR, Boonville Grand Junior Warden. R. W. WILLIAM N. LOKER, St. Louis Grand Treasurer" R W. GEORGE FRANK GOULEY Grand Secretary. Brother GEORGE R. KEILL, Sedalia Grand Senior Deacon. It J. A. H. LAMPTON, St. Louis Grand Junior Deacon.. THOMAS E. GARRETT, St. Louis .. Grand Lecturer/'

Receipts $3,894.05; balance $5,423.30_ There were 250 Lodges on the roll, with a mem~ership of 12,200. During the year 2,211 were made Master Masons. Twenty-five Lodges failed to make returns.

, WILLIAM E. DUNSCOMB, GrandMaster,. ·1867. M. W. Brother WilliamE. Dllnscomb, the twenty-sixth Grand 1'4aster, is recorded in the journal of the Grand Lodge, as present in 1864, as the representative of Jefferson Lodge No. 43, ]effersonCity. At the annual Session held in May 1866, he was elected Deputy Grand Master, and at the annual Communication held in October, 1867, he was elected Grand Master. He presided at the laying of the cornerstone of Free Mason Hall,· at Seventh and Market Streets,· St. Louis; No personal history of the distinguished Brother is available. No.·· definite date of··his .death is known, but supposed to be about 1874.

GEORGE FRANK GOULEY, Grana Secretary, 1866 to 1877. R. W. Brother· George F.Gouley,th~ eleventh GrandSecretary, was bbrninWilmington, Delaware, February 15, 1832~ ---129-


He studied law and was admitted to the Bar. He served in the Land Departlnent, Washington, D.C., from 1850 to 1860. For a time he was private Secretary to Stephan A. Douglas, United States Senator. He came West in 1861, and settled in St. Louis, engaging .as a bookkeeper in a COlnn1ission House. During his residence in Washington, he was made a Master Mason, and affiliated with Missouri Lodge No.1, of which he was Master in 1866. He was a ll1ember of St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A. lVI., and St. Louis COlnmandery, No.1, K. T. He served as Commander in 1869. On the death of Anthony O'S'ullivan, Grand Secretary, whose assistant he was, he became Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge" Grand Secretary of the Grand Chapter R. A. M., Grand Recorder of the Grand Council R. and S. M., and Grand Recorder of the Grand COlnmandery, I(nights Templar. As such he served in all of these Grand Bodiesnpto his death. He was Grand COlnmander of the Grand Comn1andery for two years, 1866 and 1867. In these Grand Bodies he made himself a reputation of a very able writer all' fraternal Correspondence, and for a路number of years, ,edited and published The Freetnason. His death at the burning of the Southern Hotel, April 11, 1877, was a very sad one. His funeral was the most imposing one路 ever held in路St. Louis. His remains were conveyed to his old home, Wilmington, Delaware, for interment.

-130-


tfHE FORTY-EIGHTI-I ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Sixty-Sixth Communication. )

St. Lottis) 0 ctober 12, 1868; A.L. 5868. This annual $'ession \vas held in the new Masonic Hall at Seventh and Market Streets with the representatives of 147 Lodges present. Grand Master Dunscomb presented a brief address, but contained tnany excellent recon1mendations as to the condition of the Craft. He suggested· that a Committee on Jurisprudence be appointed. The Grand Lodge approved this reC01TI1Uendation, and for the first time in the history of the Grand Lodge, such a committee appeared. The College property at Lexington, had during the war, been permitted to drift. The battle at Lexington had wrought ruin to the p,roperty. Both the College and the boarding house had been badly wrecked by cannon fire. While the State Legislature had accepted the· property as ·a· donation from the Grand Lodge, the· deed was lost and· nothing had been done toward' establishing.a first-class n1i1itary, or normal school, as required in the transfer of the. property. Hence a Committee was appointed to attend the next session of the Legislature, investigate and report its findings to the Grand Lodge, at ·the next session. The Grand Lodges of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were recognized. The system of District Deputy Grand Masters ana District Deputy Grand Lecturers wer,e firmly establishea. The following Grand Officers were installed: "M. W.Bro. JOHN D.VIN-CIL, Macon Grand Master. R. W. U RUFUS E. AND'ERSON, Palmyra Deputy Grand Master. R. W. W. D. MUIR, Brookfield ". Grand Senior Warden. R. W. (I A. M. DOCKERY, Chillicothe ,Grand· Junior Warden. R. W. (I WILLIAM N. LOKER, St Louis. Grand Treasurer. " R. W. " GEORGE F.GOULEY, St. Louis. Grand Secretary." t(

-131-


Receipts $7,848.24 ; disbursetnents $8,681.68; balance $4,589.85. The report on Correspondence, the report of the Deputy Grand Master, and a roster of membership appear in the addenda and make quite a bulky volume. Number of Lodges 301; membership 14,497; raised 1,574; rejected 854. ;rhe Proceedings for 1868 contains the n1elnorial address by Thomas E. Garrett at the unveiling of the O'Sullivan. monument.

-132-


1:'HEFOI<.1"Y-NINTH ANNUi\L COMMUNICATION. (The Sixty-Seventh Comulunication.) St. Louis, October 11, A.D. 18q9 ; A.L. 5869. .A t this annual COlTI1TIUnication one hundred and sixty Lodges were represented with six Past Grand Masters, and a goodly list of Past Masters .present. 1~he Grand S'ecretary made another acrobatic jump on official titles so that, while the Grand Lodge closed in 1868 with M. W.Brother John D. Vinci! Grand Master, it opened in 1869 with Brother John D .. Vincil Most 'Worshipful Grand Master. But the machinery worked all right and ·it was a big annual Communication.. The address of Grand Master Vinci! is a formidable document, but·lnuch constructive' work .is embodied ·in it. It contains thirty-t\vO pages of closely printed matter. He calls attention to ·the death of Priestly H .. McBride, Past Grand Master; granted twenty-three dispensations· to fOrlTI . Lodges; made many visitations, and had much executive business to transact, chiefly to preside at trials. He called· attention to some. inconsistencies in the By-Laws and made a nun1ber of decisions. One decision is especially important which was not well recognized at that time, that the raising of a Brother in a Lodge, gives .him .membership in that Lodge, vvithout further ballot, except when done as an act of courtesy for some other Lodge. He also held to . the sensible view that· in opening. a Lodge on the third Degree, it was not necessary to open the ··first and second Degree, that· the first and second degrees were not a part of the third Degree; hence the ceremony of opening all of theln was unnecessary. A full set of By-Laws for the government of subordinate I.. .odges was adopted. The Grand'Lodge evidently did not lookaskant at associations using the name, Masonic, as it endorsed ,and commended "1'he Masonic Mutual Benevolent Association of ,Missouri," as presented by Martin Collins. -133__


'fhe action of the so called Scottish Rite Body of· France in establishing Lodges in . Louisiana, ,vas p·ut on the black list A most remarkable position was taken by the Grand Lodge in reference to Masonic standing. It held that when charges had been preferred against a Mason, such charges ,entertained by the Lodge, and a day set for trial, the accused ·Mason cannot be· considered in good standing, until his innocence has been established. This is som·ething new in Masonic Jurisprudence. A man is supposed· to be innocent until he is proven guilty, and not guilty until he proves his innocence. The following officers were installed: "Bro. WILLIAM D. MUIR,Boonville " THOMAS E;. GARRETT, St. Louis " ALEXANDER M. DOCKERY, Chillicothe " SAMUEL H. OWENS, California WILLIAM N. LOKER, St.Louis ie GEORGE F. GOULEY, St. Louis t(

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Gra1~d

Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden. G11'and Treasurer. Grand· Secretary..'"

Receipts $9,526.85; disbursements $5,475.54; balance $8,641.17 ; number of Lodges 324. Membership 16,390, raised

1635. WILLIAM D.MUIR, Gra.nd Master, 1869.. M. \V. Brother \i\Tilliam D. Muir, the twenty-seventh Grand Master, was born in Dinwiddie County, ··Virginia, September 12, 1825. The family moved to Cooper County, Missouri, in the fall 'of 1837, settling on a .farm three miles east of Boonville. He received. his ed~cation in the Kemper School at Boonville, and later graduated from· the law school at Lexington, Kentucky. He began the practice of his profession at Boonville. He was married in 1851 and also became a member of· the Methodist Church, South.. He was active·· in Politics and served as Circuit Attorney. During the· war he removed to St. Louis and later returned to Boonville. -134~


He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1864, representing Cooper Loage No. 36, and served as Grand Senior Deacon for one year. In 1867 he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced in 1868 and elected Grand Master 1869. His early Masonic record is inco"mplete, owing to the destruction of the Lodge records during the \var. He was made a Master Mason . in Cooper Lodge No. 36 at Boonville in which he .served as Master. He \vasalso made a RoyalArch Mason atBoonvilIe. His last Masonic \ivork was the conferring the Master's Degree on his namesake, vVilliam Muir vVilliams who later became Grand Master and a distinguished jurist. Brother Muir died November 7th, 1872, at the age of 47 years.


1'HE· FIFTIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Sixty-Eighth C01111nUnication.) October 10, A.D. 1870; A.L. 5870. The annualColnnlunications \vere increasing in interest and attendance, as the years progressed. At this COlnlTIUnication two hundred and forty Lodges were represented. GrandMaster Muir presented an address of SOUle length and states that he was frequently called upon to make decisions,. a total of twenty-three. He issued an edict against Palmyra Lodge for publishing and circulating a call for a Convention to protest against the action of the Grand Lodge in. reference to the Masonic Hall project, and the levying of one dollar. per capita tax .to pay for it. He suggested, in vievv of the fact that the State has failed to live up to the requirements, in accepting the Masonic College, that the College be donated to some religious organization. The Masonic Hall project started something, as R. E. Anderson requested the appointment of a ·committ~e to enquire into the legality of the vote, that adopted it. This comnlittee reported that the action of the Grand Lodge .last year in assunling to pay $200,000 worth of bonds of the Masonic Hall Association, "vas unauthorized by law, and therefore null and void. S'oendeth the story.

St.

Lo~£isJ

MA.SONIC COLLEGE

Once more the Masonic College is shaffied fore and back. The. State Legislature directed the Governor to execute a deed of the College property to the Grand Lodge. The cat canle back. 'iVith a College and a 11asonic flaIl on its·· hands, the Grand Lodge might well cry for deliverance. The Grand Master's edict against Palmyra Lodge. was sustained. An amendment was adopted fixing the date of the annual Conclave on the first Tuesday after the second Monday in October, provided the place of meeting may be changed by a majority vote. -136-


The following Grand Officers were installed: "M. R. R. R. R. R.

W. Brother THOJvIAS E. GARRETT .. Grand Master. W. RUFUS E. ANDERSON. "Deputy Gra1~d Master. W. SAMUEL H. O"VE:t~S Grand· Senior Warde1~. W. JOHN E. RYl,AN'D Grand Junior War~en. W. WILLIAM N. LOKER Gra.ndTrea.surer. W. GEORGE F. GOULEY Grand Secretary.u

Receipts $15,959.95; disbursements $12,063.86; balance $12,451.76. Number of Lodges 368; raised 1,665. Meinbership 18,443.

THOMAS E.. GARRETT, Grand Master, 1870 and 1871. M. W. Brother Thomas' E. Garrett, the twenty-eighth Grand Master, was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1828, and came to St. Louis in 1851~He was connected with the Inteligencer, the EveningN ews and' the M·issouri Republican. As a vvriter he took high rank and followed this' literary vlorkall of his life time. He is the author of the burial service in the Missouri Monitor and was an excellent Masonic ritualist,. not a phonograph, but a man with brains. He v~ras made a Master Mason in West Lodge No. 179, St. Louis, in which he served as Master in 1863 and 1867. He was exalted in Missouri Chapter No.1, R. A. M., in 1861, dimitted to St. Louis Chapter No.8, invvhich he served as High Priest. He was the first President of the Grand Convention of Anointed High .Priests, in 1868. He wasamenlber of Hiram Council No.1, R. and S. M., in which he served as Master. He was knighted in St. LouisCommandery No.1, June 10, 1862. He was Grand Master of the GrandCoul1cil R. and S.. M. of Missouri in 1867, and Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter R.·A. 11. ·in 1865. I-Ie first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1862 and in 1863 as Master of his Lodge. During all of his attendance he served on importantConlmittees. In 1867 he was elected Grand Senior ·vVarden and ·electedGrand Master in 1870 and ·reelected in 1871. He died in St.Louis June 30, 1905. -137-


THE FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL COM1fUNICATION. (The .Sixty-Ninth Communication. ) St. Louis, October 10, 1871, A.D.; A.L. 5871. The second half of路 the first century of the history of the Grand Lodge of Missouri found the Craft in excellent condition. The proceedings as fashioned by Grand Recorder Gauley took on the form, arrangement, and general make up, a~used to-day. Lodges were being organized in large numbers; some of which, as is generally the case, where Masonic booms are on, should never have received a birth certificate. This annual Communication found Grand Master Garrett presiding in the East,with seven Past Grand Masters,.and the representatives of two hundred and twenty-four Lodges in attendance. Grand Master Garrett's address is a very able and lengthy one, covering thirty-four pages and in six point type. It is more than words, as it contains very n1uch constructive matter.He calls attention to the death of Past Grand Master John F. Houston; indulges in "retrospect and prospect" in rwhich he considers the habit that Masons have, of recommending men for the Degrees merely, because they are "good fellows"路 and expresses the belief that these good fellows make very poorl\1aster Masons. For a while they seem to be like a child "pleased with a rattle," tickled with a straw, and then comes Masonic dry rot.'" He made forty-two decisions n1any of which, are in harmony with the laws of to-day. He ruled that a dimit obtained -under false pretense, that is for the purpose of. joining another Lodge, and the holder of thedimit makes no effort to unite with another Lodge, should be arraigned before a tribunal and tried for unmasonic conduct. He oecided that no Mason has a right to object to the initiation, advancenlent, or membership in a Lodge, .in which he is not a member, and that 110 Mason has a right to object to a melnber of his own Lodge sitting in his Lodge; that remission of fees, or donation to a candidate for the Degrees, is a violation of law. His ruling on physical qualifications, was strictly in line -138-


with the rulings of thirty years, ago. He condemns very strongly the practice of making speeches for, or against an applicant, before the ballot is spread. Evidently, something new was going on. Re· reported. fifty-two Lodges, working under dispensation. Amendments to the Constitution having been submitted to the Lodges for consideration, brought forth the usual report,· that a majority of the Lodges had not voted. The Masonic Hall proposition, like the Masonic .College, was constantly appearing to make trouble. 1~his tin1e it brought forth a majority and a minority report. The minority report declared that the Grand Lodge should not take any further stock in the Association. This minority report was overwhelmingly adopted. The report on Correspondence, and the report of the District Deputy Grand Master make a bulky appendix. The following Grand Officers were installed: "THOS. E. GARRETT, St. Louis Grand Master. RUFUSE. ANDERSON, Palmyra Deputy GrandMaster. SAMUELH. OWENS, California Senior .Grand Warden. JOHN E. RYLAND,Lexington Junior Grand Warden. WILLI.AM N LOKER, St. Louis Gra'Jrl.d Treasurer. GEO. FRANK GOULEY, St. Louis Grand Secretary. JOHN H. LINN, St. Louis G1~and Chaplain. JAS. 'M. HOLT, Canton.................. " D'. J. MARQUIS"Hanover.. fI FRANCIS J. BOGGS, Lexington.......... .. M. M.FISHER, Independence............ • TROS. E. SHEPHERD, La Grange....... .. H. W. EAGAN, Macon . R. B. KICE, Richmond Senior Grand Deacon. R. P'. FAULKNER, Rolla Junior Gra1''tdDeacon. ]. E. CADLE, Chillicothe Gra,nd Marshal. C. S. LEAVITT, Springfield Grand Marshal. IND. C. AN'DERSON, Canton Grand Sword Bearer. J. H. BEHUNE, Charleston ~ Gra''td Steward. C. A. Gee, Savannah Grand' Steward. ]NO.D. VINCIL, Columbia Grand Orator. SAM. H.OWENS, California Grand Orator. B. L. QUARLES, Huntingdale Gr~nd Pursuivant. l

-139-


JNO. GEEKIE, St. Louis ALLAN 1fcDOWELL, Greenfield GEO. FRANK GOULEY, St. Louis

Grand Tyler. Grand Lecturer. Committee on For. Cor/'

Receipts $10,288.00 ; disbursements $14,871.50; balance $7,868.26. N1:1mber of Lodges 408, membership 20,679; net gain 2)185; raised 1,736; rejected 998. Judging from the number" of rejections a large number of "good fellows" did not p"ass the ballot. ALLAN McDOWELL, Grand Lecturer, 1870 to 1906. When the Grand Lodge entered on the last half of the century of its history, a potent factor canle forward in the Grand Lodge: R. VV. Brother Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer,Brother McDowell was born in Randolph County, Arkansas, March 9, 1833, was raised in Dade County, Missouri, where he received his education in the. common school. While acting as a Deputy County Clerk in his fath"er's office, he studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 1859. He was made a Master Mason in Greenfield Lodge No. 87, Greenfield Missouri, in 1855, in which he served as Master in 1859 and 1860. He received the Capitular Degrees in Springfield Chapter No. 15, R . .L~. Mi., in 1859, and later served as High Priest in Greenfield Chapter No.. 38. In the .Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons he served as Grand Lecturer from 1870 to 1889. He was elected Grand路 High Priest in 1892. He was conse.. crated in the Holy Order of High路 Priesthood in 1870, and served as its Vice President up to his death. He was made a Royal and Select Master in Sedalia Council No.5, and was elected Grand Master of the Grand Council in 1872. In this Grand Body he served also as Grand Lecturer for many years. He was made a Knight Templar in O'Sullivan Commandery No. 15, K.T., at Nevada, in 1870, and was elected Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templarin -140-


1888. He' received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. from· the Fourth to the Fifteenth Degree from Albert Pike, in 1872 and later received the balance of the Degrees in St. Louis. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1867, attended regularly, and in 1870 was appointed Grand Lecturer and served up to the date of his death. He died May 20, 1906 in Kansas City, Missouri, his remains being laid to rest in Mount Washington Cemetery, where a handsome monument was erected to his memory by the Grand. Chapter and the Grand Lodge. At the dedication of this monument,. Past .Grand Master E. F. Allen presided and the address was delivered by Past Grand, Master, William F. Kuhn. Brother McDowell, while unassuming· and retiring, yet was a· forceful character; his hand and brain moulded the. Ritual of the Grand· Lodge to its present beauty and directness. His infIuenceonthe Ritual of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, and· that of the· Grand Council of Royal andS'elect Masters, was equally potent. H·e .was a genius in the· correct use of language. He understood every shade of meaning and the derivation of words. He might justly have been termed the etymological, literary, historical, and Masonic encyclopedia. He has had few equals, and no superiors. The greatest tribute that could be paid to him is, although he lived to a good old age, he never became fossilized, as so·many do, but he remained young in mind and heart, .aggressive and progres.ive~


THE FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Seventieth Communication.) St.. Louis, October 15, A.D. 1872; A.L. 5872. This annual ·Communication was held. in Freemasons Hall with Grand l\/[aster Garrett in the· Grand Eas~, with five Past Grand Masters, forty-five Past Masters, and the representatives of ·183 Lodges present. Grand Master Garrett presented an aadress of thirty-four pages. He paid loving tribute to Past Grand Master George Whitcomb, who "had died during the year. He gives a dissertation on business and Masonry, that· while both are speculative, they differ very much in their method. ((Business is severe and grasping in pursuit of its interests, Masonry is merciful and open-handed in the . performance of its charities." This is a fine distinction, .and .leads one to the conclusion, would it not be better for the··world, if more· of the principles of .Masonry were put into business? The greatest disgrace that has come upon Freemasonry istha.t it has little effect in moulding the character of the grasping business man. He was· called upon· to render twenty-seven decisions. He decided that when the objector to the advancement ofa candidate had lost his rights and .privileges in Freemasonry, the objection is null and void ; that a person who could. neither read,nor write, .was not competent to petition for the Degrees ;.• that .charges regularly brought in a· Lodge could not be withdrawn except .on error; that a LodgeU. D. ,vas competent to try non-affiliates who reside within its jurisdiction; that there is no limit of time to a petition foraffiIiation; that blank ballots couldnot.be' considered as ballot in trial. He reports· that fifty-two Lodges were working under dispensation. The following amusing report is found ·in his aCtdress: A S]tJlIOUS .JOKt~

Application. was· made to .me to allow· an applicant .for the. mysteries of Masonry to withdraw his petition from. the lodge;· he having signed the petition with his eyes open, and sent it in, fee inclosed, with his -142--


purse open, but afterwards reconsidered, and said it was all done. in a 4'joke." I .refused his very j ocular request, and instructed the lodge to inform him that Masonry was no· joke, and could tolerate no levity from otHers. He was said to be a good man,and he stood in imminent danger of election. If the ··brethren took him in, with his jovial proclivities, he ought to . make it lively for tpat lodge. FINAL £ND OF 1'HE·MASONIC

.COLLEG~

As heretofore noted, the Grand Lodge donated· the Masonic College and grounds to the Marvin Female Institute. The following report ended the matter for all 'time: From the 1st of February, 1872, the Marvin Female Institute at Missouri, will be .known by the name of "Central Female College," and the same obligations entered into between the Grand Lodge. and the Institute will. be carried out by the College, viz.: The Grand .Lodge has the right ,to keep constantly at the College thirty daughters of deceased indigent . Mast~r M'asons, free of tuition charge, .they boarding in the College and paying their own. expenses, except tuition. The religious proclivities of ·.these students are· not to ·be interfered with, contrary to .such . directions as their parents or guardians ·may dictate. Applications for admission of Masonic beneficiaries must be made through the committee appointed by the . Grand Lodge; and the fact of the .father having died while in good Masonic standing, or the father now living being such, can· be certified to by the nearest Lodge, or by. some brother. known to the committee. The undersigned are the committee for the current year, and application may be made to either of them,who will consult with the others. JNO. E. RYLAND, Lexington. ~xington,

GED. FRAN'KGOULEY, St. Louis. ALLAN McDOWELL,· Greenfield.

It is a pleasure to report,. that after ·all the.·vicissitudes of the Masonic College, it finally came into the: hands of those who have made.ita ·distiriguished . and justly. celebrated· College for women, known . as Central College .for Women.· The· old College building still forms .apartof the main structure.... ·The beautiful grounds, handsome ,bui~dings, and· excellent 'corps of --14:3-


Officers and Teachers, the college isa .credit to the Sta~ of Missouri. All is well that ends well. The Freemason's Hall again came before the Grand Lodg~ and after reference to a Committee it reported as follows: Whereas, In order· to secure peace and harmony· to the subordinate lodges of the State, and to sustain the plighted faith of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge· of Missouri, therefore be it Resolved) That this Grand Lodge assume the payment of the two hundred thousand dollars in bonds, isued by the Masonic Hall Association. Provided, That "preferred stock" in said association be issued to the Grand Lodge by said association to the amount of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($150,000), and that no further issue of stock, either preferred or any other kind, he ever made. by said association. Resolved, That an assessment be levied upon subordinate lodges,· for each member in good standing therein, of seventy-five cents per annum, to meet bonds and interest falling due. All. of which is fraternally submitted.

JOHN W. LUKE, XEN. RYLAND, JAS. E.. CARTER, F. C. GILLETTE, SAMUEL R. PETERS, . Committee.

This report was adopted by the Grand Lodge, .but. again reconsidered and referred to the subordinate Lodges for their action. The referendum was a convenient junk .pile. The Grand Lodge of· Utah was extended fraternal recognition. A number of amendments were proposed and all referre'd to. the subordinate Lodges for consideration. The following Grand Officers were installed: HSAMUEL ·H...OWENS, California, Grand Master. JOHN' E. RYLAND, Lexington, Deputy G1"and Master. JOHN w. LUKE, St. Louis, Senior Grand Warden. J. E. CAD'LE,. Chillicothe, Junior Grand iWarden. WILI:,IAM N. LOKER, St. Louis, <Grand Treasurer. GEO. FRANK ·GOULEY, St.Louis, Grand Secretary. THOS. E. SHEPHERD, La Grange, Grand .Chaploin. JOHN D. VINCIL,Columbia, Grand Chaplain.


JA'MES M. HOLT, Canton, Grand Chaplain. c. L. MAYO, Pleasant 'Hill, Grand Chaplain. JOSI~H McCARY, Knob Noster, Grand Chaplain. ELI OWEN, Moberly, Grand Chaplain. WM. L. GITHENS, St., Louis, Grand Chaplain. W. E. GLENN, Rolla, Senior Grand Deacon. J.M. AUSTIN, St. Joseph, Junior Grand Deacon. THEODORE BRACE, p'aris, Grand Marshal. . H. S. WITHERSPOON, Knob Noster, Grand Marshal. J. H. BETHUNE, Chq"rleston, Grand Sword Bearer. H. ]. DEMMING, Pleasant Hill, Grand Steward. C. H. GEE, Savanah, Grand Steward. JOHN D. VIN'elL, Columbia, Grand Orator. R. E. ANDERSON, P'almyra, Grand Orator. O. A. CRANDALL, Sedalia, Grand Pursuivant. JAMES X. ALLEN, St. Louis, Grand Tyler. ALLAN 11cDOWELL, Greenfield, Grand Lecturer. GEO. FR.A.NK GOULEY, St. Louis, Comn1,.ittee one orrespondence.l}

Receipts $10,408.30; disbursements $7,875.00 ; balance $10,401,60; number of Lodges 445; membership 23,118; increase 2,431. Number raised 1,398; dimitted 1,478; rejected 779. SAMUEL H. OWENS, Grand Master, 1872. M. W. Brother Samuel H. Owens, the twenty-ninth Grand Master, was born in Springfield, Illinois, May 8, 1835. The family moved to Cole County, Missouri, and settled on a farm. In 18519, he vvas admitted to the Bar and practiced law at California. He was' made a Master Mason in Jefferson City Lodge, in 1859, and on February, 1860, he affiliated with California Lodge ,No. 183, in which he served as Master for 1863, 1866 and, 1867. He ,vas made a Royal Arch Mason in 1859 and assisted in forming California ChapterN o. 58R. A. M. and served as its first High Priest and for several years'thereafter. He was, elected Grand High Priest of Royal Arch Masons in 1881 and died while in office. He "vas a member of Prince of -145-


Peace Commandery No. 23 at Jefferson City and served as its first Comnlander. He appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1860 as a representative of California Lodge No. 183. He did not appear again until 1864, when he served-on several committees and was appointed District Deputy Grand Master of the Seventh District. He served as Grand Junior Warden in 1869, Grand S'eniorWarden in 1870, and 1871, and was elected Grand Master in 1872. He died路 in St. Louis, February 22, in his forty-seventh year.

-146-


THE FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Seventy-First Communication.) October 14, 1873; A.L. 5873. At this annual Communication there were present five Past Grand Masters, forty-four Past Masters, and the representa-· tives of 245 Lodges with Samuel.H. Owens, Grand Master, in the East. His address is of the usual length. He pays due tribute to the memory of Past Grand Master William D. Muir, and Past Grand Master John F.Ryland, both having died during the year. He states that, "the business connected with this office is great." Many Grand Masters have had the same experience. He made thirty decisions and· says that this is only a few that p.e had selected from the list. He ,was called to define the Past lVlaster's Degree; decided that the Master of a new Lodge must not necessarily have been a Warden; that' a Mason not 'a member of a Lodge cannot object to the reception of a petition ;vvas not impressed very much with conducting a funeral service over a deceased Brother who had, been buried for several months; did not look kindly on the so caUed Lodges of Sorrow, and decided that a Candidate who had lost one or two toes from one foot; was physically qualified to receive the .Degrees., as he could not perceive just wherein the ceremony a candidate uses his toes. Grand Master Owens is the first one to fracture the ancient .landmarks on physical qualifications~ ,He should have been tried '. for. his. heresy?·He states ··that there are now thirty-nine Lodges .working under dispensation. As usual the referendum·. did ··.not work. on·· the proposed amendment and, judging from the report of the Committee on Grand Lecturer, many of the Lodges were poorly equipped in furniture and paraphernalia to confer the Degrees in aproper'manner. . The Masonic Hall proposition. at·· Seventh ·and Market Streets at St. Louis, came up again for discussion, and again. refused to assume the payment of two· hundred thousand dol~ lars in bonds. The report of the Committee on· Grievance St.LO~tisJ

~147--


growsa"pace, with the·sam.e nauseating contents. The ,Committee on Jurisprudence defined the meanil1g of a "specific Grand Lodge." This term :applies only to the·· communication of the Grand Lodge over which a District Deputy Grand Master,presides., and opened for a specific purpose, set forth in the law.. ,From this definition, we must conclude, that when the Grland l\1aster is present, and opens a ,. Grand, Lodge in. the .layit;lg ·of a corner stone, it is. nota "specific Grand Lodge," but a special Communication of the Grand Lodge. The followiD;g Grand Officers were installed: '4RUFUSE. ANDERSON, Palmyra, GrandMaster. JOHNW.LUKE,St. Louis,' Deputy GrandMaster. JAMES 'E. CADLE, Chillicothe, Senior Grand Warden. XENOPHON RYLAND, Lexington, Junior Grand Warden. W'ILLIAM: N.. LOKER, St. Louis, Grand Treasurer. GEO. FRANK GOULEY, St.Louis, Grand Sec1·etary.'~

!Receipts'$12,042.24; disbursements'$13,OO7.S5 ; balance $9,Number of Lodges 470 ; total membership .25,120; raised, 1~420 ;.net increase 2,002.

-3,13.;;2,5..

RUFUS E.. ANDERSON, GrandMaster, .1873. M. ·,W. Brother -Rufus E. Anderson,. the thirtieth, Grand ¥aster,"w'as born·atPalmyra, 'Missouri, January 22,·1833. He movedlto·Hannibal in 1877·· where he·· resided :up· to/'his death. He was a 'lawyer by Profession and rank,ed high· at the Bar. Het\vas'ma:dea·Master Mason in Palmyra Loqge No. 18 in 1859, in which he served as ,Master.. He t::tceivedthe Capitular D'egr~es··inRalmyraChapter. No. 2,R. A.-M. in 1863, served Qs:.High,'P~iest'for ten years, affiliated with Hannibal Chapter No.'7~ rand·· was its High Priest for several years. In the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch· Masons, after~ fi.lling'many·· sta~iona, he,!waselected Grand 'High Priest in '1874. In the Graftdr Commandery, Knights Templars ofMissouri,hesepved ~:1:Deputy- Grand Commander in. 1882. 'i:Her,fi:rstappeared in'tlte Grand Lodge in' 1861;representing i


PalmyraLodgeNQ. ,tS. ilIe was !'GrandOratorin 1'8-6a \_ 1864, was elected Grand Junior Warden in 1865,servedsev~ eral years in other stations, '. and was elected Grand· Master in 1873. He served on the· Board of DirectoFs of the Masonie Home from its. organization up'to the time of his death, which occurred February 27, 1909~ Brother Anderson was one· of the stalwarts in the Grand Lodge, a man· of ·great foree~;~keen i~tel1ect,and a thorou~ champion of the landmarks of the:Fraternity. He was of ~" kindly heart, a man of a unique and ··£orceful character.


THE FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Seventy-Second Communication.) St. Louis, October 13, A.D. 1874; A.L.5874. The G~and Lodge ·was opened by singing· an original hymn from the pen of Past Master Garrett. .It is here reproduced: Welcome, Brothers, 'round our Altar, Here, at duty's call; Fight the good fight-never falter, N ever faint or fall. Truth! forever 'our exalter, Leader, hope and all. Truth! forever, &c. Meet we on the' mystic. Level, Upright, equal there; Loving good, and shuning evil, In. our. daily prayer ; Yielding to the Master's. gavelp'arting on the square. Yielding to,. &c. Stand 'We on our ground forever, Where our fathers stood; Careless of·. our duty neverEach for other's good. Bound with ties no .power can sever, Strong. with· Brotherhood. Bound with, &c.

The Grand Lodge was opened ,vith Grand Master Anaerson in the Grand East. Four Past Grand Masters, forty-three Past Masters, and the Representatives of 149 Lodges were present. Grand Master .Anderson's address covered. twentyfour pages. Itis a strong document. He pays. due: respect to the memory of Past Grand TreasurerJohnD. Daggett and to Past Grand Master J.W. S.Mitchell~who had died during the year. He rendered thirty-four decisions,· some of which set . . aside former decisions. He decided that at a Masonic


trial, the wife .was a competent witness fOf, or against, the accused; that a Master Mason under charges was' presumed to be innocent until his guilt is .proven; that a Lodge eQuId not be opened, or Degrees conferred 'in the absence of the Master and the two' Wardens; that a notice' from a United States Attomey to witnesses not to testify in a Masonic trial, was a nullity; that a Master could rebuke a·member, but·not reprimand, for disorderly conduct; that· a candidate .could be held without the payment of another fee; that there is no such a thing as honorary membership in a Lodge; that a candidate who cannot learn the lectures is not entitled to further light." He granted .thirteen dispensations to form Lodges~ He notified the Grand Lodge that it had been sued in the United" States Court for failure to pay interest o~ the bonds of the Maso.nic Hall. He devotes some very interesting remarks, ,~hat.he . terms, Usanitary 'measures,'" in reference' to the purification of the' Fraternity. This portion of the address will receive attention later. He gives the important advice' to "Lodgesn.ot to elect a questionable occupation or character, tob~Master of a Lodge; not to elect Wardens of. whom the .Lodge ~ould . be ashamed when' they become Masters; that the hope and stay of a Lodge is to .have the right man for Master, the 'right sort of men, for the investigating Committee. The St.···Louis Masonic Historical S'ociety received a hearty endorsement .and a new book of Constitution was ordered print~d. The following Grand Officers were installed. tC

"JOHN w. LUKE, St. Louis, Grand Master.. XENOPHON RYLAND, Lexington, D'eputy GrinuJMaster. JAMES. E. CADLE, .Chillicothe, Senior Grand Warden. THOMAS C. READY, St. Louis, Junior Grand Warden. WILLIAMN. LOKER,St.. Louis, Grand Treasurer. GEO. FRANIC GOULEY, St. Louis, Grand .f)ecretary."

Among the appointive Grand Officers are found the names oiN. M. Givan, Harrisonville, as .Grand' Senior Deacon, and w. R. ·Stubblefield,.St. Louis, as Grand Marshal. Receipts $18,656.60; disbursements $10,649.25; balance


$8,()()7~5. The salary'of-the Grand Secretary was '$3,00Q, that

df the'Grand'Lectttrer $1,000.. Number of 路Lodge3.路490; membership'23,822; raised 1,576; loss in membership '1,,298. JOHN W. LUKE, Grand,Master} 1874. Grand Trsasurer 1878 to 1882. M. W. Brother Jbhn W. Luke, the thirty-first Grand Master, fin;t appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1857 representing Polar

'Star Lodge No. 79. He was appointed District Deputy Grand Master of the twenty-fourth District comprising St. Louis City, ,County, and Franklin County. This position he held for tnany years. In 1872 he was elected Grand Senior Warden, and in 路1874 Grand Master. He was appointed Grand Secre.. tary April 11, 1877, to fill the vacancy. caused by the death of Brother Frank George Gouley, Grand S'ecretary. He served as such until the annual election in 1877. In 1878 he was elected Grand Treasurer serving for four years. Little is known of his personal or early Masonic history. It is sUl),posed that he was made a Master Mason in Polar Star Lodge No. 79# There is no data as to his membership in the Chapter, Council or Commandery, except that he served in the Grand Council of. Royal and Select Masters, as. Deputy Grand Master in 1872, was elected Grand Recorder in 1877 serving' one year and served as Grand Treasurer in the Grand 'Councilfrom 1881 to 1884. He died October 4, .1888.andwa$ buried in St Louis. 1

1


THE FIFTY-FIFTH ANN'UALCOMMUNICATION. (The .Seventy-Third·· Communication.) $t. Louis} October 12, A.D. 1875; A.L. 5875. The attendance of the representatives to Grand Lod~ seemed to be diminishing during the past few years, as· there' were present the representatives of' only 179 Lodges out of 489. There were also present six Past Grand Masters, £orty~ fiv'e' Past· Masters·and. Grand Master Luke in· the .• East. Grand Master Luke presented a very efficient adtlress, but did') not equal his predecessor in the ··oumber of decisions. He decided that a person who had lost the sight of one eye could not be made. a Mason, the Committee on Jurisprudence said otthis decision, that it is safe, andthe Grand Lodge had better stand for safety, and, that while it is true that with one: good eye the faculty of sight remains impaired, but still ample' to conform to our ceremonies and the' Committee . sustained the Grand Master and old man "Landmarks" ruled; instead of commonsense. He decided that a cross mark for a'simtature does not fill the· requirements; .that the widow, of· a Master . Mason, when she marries a profane, loses thereby all claims on the Fraternity; that a· motion to. adopt the majority rep-ort of a Committee on investigation on a petition, is illegal. He was called ·upon like many of his predecessors to define the rights of an actual and virtual Past Master. The actual Past Master is one who has received the Degree as the Worshipful Master elect .0£ a legally constituted Lodge. A virtual Past Master is one who has received! it as one of the Cllapter Degrees, the latter has no .rights in the Grand Lodge as a Past Master. He decided that the Grange and Patrons of Husbandry, were exclusive moral and· benevolent organizations and could therefore ··meet in the Masonic Hall. He ' refuse·d a dispensation to hold burial services· over one wno liad been discussing the sanitary condi· buried for many months. tions of. Masonic Halls and their general appearance for neat~ ness· and cleanliness, he pays a compliment ~9 the" Eastern; Stat 1

In


by saying, that, if there was one great argument in favor of the Eastern Star, it would present itself in the beneficent effects that would follow their visitations to .the Lodge rooms, and thereby teach the Brethren the fifth cardinal virtue of cleanliness. Evidently the Lodge rooms and furniture and its general appearance did not conform to the first element of decency and cleanliness. He says: In a material point of view, there is also something to be said~ Some of you doubtless know of Lodges the approach to which is up a rickety staircase outside of the. building, not very safe for persons who may have been imbibing too much in a saloon not far· distant; the entrance into the Lodge-room being through an ante-room seemingly a .receptacle for all sorts of rubbish, into another with a ·floor covered with dirty saw-dust interspersed with cigar stumps' and tobacco-furniture all shabby in proportion, and air redolent with tobacco smoke, which is not dissipated even when· the Lodge is open. How could a visitor suppose that any teaching of profound moral truths would be effective in ,such a place? Surely, if cleanliness is next to godliness, such Lodgerooms are the· very antipo'des of it; and it may bean excuse for them, if they do take in bad· material, that they cannot get any decent persons to go to such· dirty places.

He cans .attention to a. particular condition existing, growing out of the rapid growth of the Fraternity, and the formation of ~o many Lodges; "that out of 440 Lodges, 282 have a membership of fifty .and les,s; and of these 282 Lodges, 165 have thirty-five members and some ·0£ these Lodges have only thirteen members." He further says: It would be safe to assert that the average attendance at meetings is not over one-fourth· the membership, unless some important local business is to corne up; and, while our roll is thus encumbered with many Lodges numerically weak, and others weak in attendants, .the wisest plan, in my opinion, would be to reduce· the· number by consolidation, instead of dissipating our strength by increase. The rapid formation of Lodges has stimulated the production of. Masons till we are overrun with a luxuriant growth of weeds. As a consequence, note. the frequent bickerings, dissensions and trials that occur, and the quiet withdrawal· of members who see things going wrong without the ability or nerve to oppose them ; and, when matters· come to the· worst, --154-


a new Lodge is required to correct the evil which should have been nipped in the bud.

The Grand Lodges of Manitoba, Quebec and Dakota were recognized. The' Grand Lodge" recommended the Washington Monun1ent proposition to the consideration of the Craft, and requested contributions to this worthy project. The Grand Lodge appointed aColnmittee to look after its interests in the United States Court, in reference to Freemason's Hall. The following Grand Officers \vere installed: "M.W. JA'MES E. CADLE, of Chillicothe .... Grand Master R. W. XENOPHONRYLAND, of Lexington, Deputy Grand Master R. W. THOMAS C. READY, of St. Louis Senior Grand Warden R. W. NOi"\.H M. GIVEN, of Harrisonville Junior GrandWq,rden R. W. WILLIAN! N.LOCKER,. of St. Louis .. Grand Treasurer R. W.GEO. FRANK GOULEY, of St.Louis .. Gra1zd Secretary."

Ampng the Grand Chaplains appointed appears the name of C. C. Woods, a future Grand Master. No list of Grand Deacons and ··Grand Stewards appears among the Appointive Officers. Receipts $11,275.75; disbursenlents .$11,796.44; balance $7,463.66. Number of . Lodges ·489; . membership 22,822; raised 1,050; net loss 1,010. The Grand Secretary calls attention to the fact that fifty-five chartered Lodges failed to make a return or pay dues. and fifty failed to make returns or pay dues until··. after the accounts were closed. These statistics. would indicate. there\vas a decay going on among the· Lodges.

JAMES ELVIS CADLE, Grand Master, 1875.

M. W. Brother James E. Cadle, the thirty-second Grand Master, was born in Jackson.County, Missouri" January 20, 1830. The fatuily. n10ved ·toGentry County, and ··in 1863 to Livingston County, which he represented in the· State Legislature for one. year. For three years he was the Secretary of the Masonic Mutual Benefit Association of Missouri at St. --155-


Louis. In 1866 he returned to King City and resumed the practice of medicine. He was tnade a Master Mason in Athens Lodge No. 127 at Albany, dimitted to Springhill Lodge No. 155 in 1858, and served as its Master in 1863 and 1864. He later affiliated with Friendship Lodge No. 89 at Chillicothe. He received the Capitular Degrees in St. Joseph, dimitted to I.fone Star Chapter No. 30, R. A. M., of Chillicothe, in which he served as High Priest in 1868 and 1877. He was . elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter,R. A. M., in 1880. He was a member of Paschal Commandery N 0.32, K. T., Chillicothe, 路and served as its Commander. He was Grand Patron of the Grand Chapter O. E. St. in 1877. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1863, attended regularly, and in 1872 he was elected Grand Junior Warden; in 1873 and 1874 he served as Grand Senior Warden and was elected Grand Master in 1875. He died June 8, 1.890. The funeral vvas held at Chillicothe, and conducted by Friendship Lodge No. 89, of which he had been a member for a quarter of a century. As a Physician, it is said of him, that, "his presence in the sick room was a benediction."

-156-


THE FIFTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Seventy-Fourth Communication.)

St. Louis, October 10, A,D. 1876; A.L. 5876. There were present at this annual Session six Past Grand Masters, thirty-nine Past Masters and the representatives of 183 Lodges. Grand Master Cadle presented his report in less pages than his predecessors, neither was he as prolific in decisions. He was called. upon to interpret the law only four times, the chief decision· being that a Master is amenable to the Grand Lodge during his term of office, bttt after his term expires he was amenable to his Lodge the same as any other member of the Lodge. The suit against the Grand Lodge that was pending in the United States Court was decided against the Grand Lodge, the judgment amounting to $1,772.. 25. He granted only four dispensations to form Lodges during the year, this is a decided decrease. He states that the general condition of the Craft is good, but it contains disturbers and idlers,- which should be eliminated. Grand Secretary Gauley was absent during the entire session, on account of sickness. It is interesting to note that out of the 490 'Lodges that 138 were in good condition in every way, 145 Lodges have good furniture, and a long list of Lodges are poorly furnished, doing no work, indifferent and· some in a low and bad ,condition., The Grand Lodge of Wyoming and the Grand Lodge of Prince Edwards Island were extended fraternal ~cognition. The· following Officers were elected: ttM. W.XENOP'HON RYLAN'D, of Lexington,Grand Master R. W. THOMAS C. READY, of St. Louis .. '... Deputy GrandMaster R. W. NOAH M. GIVAN, of Harrisonville .. Senior Grand Warden R. W. MARTIN J. HUBBLE, of Springfield .. Junior Grand Warden R. W.WILLIAM N.· LOKER, of St. Louis .' Grand Treasurer R. W. GEO. FRANK GOULEY;of St. I,.-ouis .. Grand Secretary."

i\mong the appointive ·Officers is found that of Lee A. Hall as Grand Junior Deacon, a future Grand Master; Brother Allan McDowell continues as Grand Lecturer. The Grand -15i-


Lodge still continued to appoint seven Grand Chaplains, but the attendance at the Grand Lodge was confined to Rev. John D. Vincil and Rev. C. C. Woods. Receipts $12,400.78; disbursements $6,434.19. The Chairman of. the Committee on Accounts was W. R. S'tubblefield, a future Grand Master. The Grand Lodge was divided into fifty Districts. Number of 'Lodges ·490, of which 46 failed to make returns and pay dues. Estimated membership 23,739. Number raised 935; the number dimitted and died 1,185. This year indicates a loss.. XENOPHONRYLAND, GrandMaster, 1876. M. W. Brother Xenophon Ryland, the thirty-third Grand Master, was born in Lexington, Missouri, June 1, 1844. His father was John F. Ryland, who was Grand Master in 1849 and 1850. When only a youth he entered the Union Army and fought at the Battle of Lexington under Colonel Mulligan. At the age of eighteen years, he was appointed First· Lieutenant in the 71st Regiment of Militia. He studied Law and was admitted to the .Bar; served as Presidential. Elector in 1880, and was Probate Judge for Lafayette County, in 1882 and 1883. .In 1890, he relinquished his chosen Profession and entered the ·Ministry in the· Southern Presbyterian Church,· in which he served as State Evangelist up to the time of his death. He was nlade a Master Mason ·in .Lafayette Lodge.No. 32, at Lexington, in which he served as Master, in 1869 and 1870. He served for several years as D. D.G. M. and D. D. G. L. He was made a Royal Arch· Mason· in Lexington Chapter No. 10, March 22, 1864, and served as High Priest. He was elected Grand· High Priest in the Grand Chapter in 1873. He received the Masonic Order. of .Christian Knighthood·· in DeMolay No.3, K. T., at Lexington, Missouri. He first appeared in· Grand.·Lodge in 1868, was a regular attendant,.and was elected Grand Junior Warden in 1873, elected --158--


Deputy Grand Master in 1874 and 1875, and elected Grand Master in 1876. He was a regular attendant on' the Sessions of the Grand Lodge until failing health compelled him to remain at home. He ,",'"as for many years the ranking Past Grand Master in point of service. He died at his home at Higginsville, October 1, 1920, the Masonic Services being conducted by the Grand Lodge.. At the age of seventy-six years he laid aside, the working tools of life. Age did not dim his Masonic life, nor did his zeal for the Fraternity diminish. As long as his body would permit, his venerable form could be seen at the annual Communi<;ations. He died'in the service of his Master" leaving behind him a rich and abundant legacy of Masonic work and religious life. He was truly a grand old man, eloquent in this century of Freemasonry.


'THE FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. St.

(The Seventy-Fifth Communication.) October 9, A.D. ~877; A.L. 5877.

Lo~£is,

The Grand Lodge was opened with the representatives of 140 Lodges out of 480. There \vere present nine Past Grand Masters and seventy-six Past Masters. The address of Grand Master Ryland partakes more of an oration . than a report; yet he did a great deal of effective ,york. This Communication was a sad one ovving to the recent death of George Frank Gouley,' Grand S'ecretary, and of William E. Dunscomb, Past Grand Master. Grand Master Ryland pays a beautiful tribute to Brother Gouley, whose sad and tragic death occurred April 11, 1877~ at the disastrous fire that destroyed the Southern Hotel. A steel portrait of this distinguished Brother is found in the Proceedings. Special memorial services were held by the Grand Lodge on October 11. The funeral was a notable demonstration .of the esteenl in which he was held. The funeral cortege consisted of the several Masonic Lodges of St. Louis, Knights Telnplar, Odd Fellows, and Knights of St. Patrick. Just what this last Order was, is not· stated. Among the list attending this funeral were many \vhose· names are kindly remen1bered at this day. The Grand Master appointed Brother John W. Luke as acting Grand Secretary. The Grand Master reported the formation of the Grand Lodge of New Mexico. Another child of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Grand 11aster Ryland rendered sixteen decisions, among the notable ones was one on PHYSICAL QUALIFICATIONS

He decided that the loss of two fingers on the left· hand did not constitute a· physical disqualification, but.afterwards, he evidently had an interview ~Tith old Mr. Landmarks, and in. view of the fact that GrandMaster Owens had decided that a· candidate vvith tvvo toes missing on his left foot,· was not disqualified, and another had decided, that a man· with one eye "\\ras disqualified, it appeared tohin1 that the law was ~160-


slightly mixed up, and therefore asked the Conlu1ittee on Jurisprudence to sit on it for a period. The Committee on Jurisprudence incubated a. remarkable finding. This committee, like the Grand Master, stood in awe of the "Ahiman Rezon," which was adopted by the Grand Lodge in 1850 and held to the absolute perfect youth theory. But as this rule had been bent and slightly.fractured, and evidently failing to read the Constitution of England, as promulgated in 1723, which clearly says: "Having no maim or defect in his body that \vould render him incapable of learning the art of serving his Master's Lord," the Committee concluded, that the best way out of the difficulty, that common sense must be used in the interpretation of the law. The Committee evidently felt that if this fracture of the perfect youth theory continued, the time might soon arise when wooden heads would be disqualified. Grand 11aster Ryland路 decided that in the funeral ceremony the Lodge must have absolute control over all non-Masonic Bodies. He made the following decision which seemed to have been lost sight of until it was reaffirmed in 1903 and is now a part of the Statutes : The record of a criminal court, of competent jurisdictior~,dtlly certified, showing indictment, arraignment, conviction and sentence of the accused, according to forms of law, for the same offence on \vhich he is being tried by his Lodge, is legal and competent evidence against the accused, and should be admitted at the trial.

In his last decision he delivers a strong tribute to. the necessities of ever considering the Holy Bjble as the Great Light in Freemasonry. Under trials, there comes to light certain members of Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, at St.}oseph, who had been defrauding the Government of revenues in the sale and traffic of whiskies and other liquors. All of the Degrees were exemplified by the Grand Lecturer with W. R.Stubblefield, a future Grand Master, as Senior Vlarden. The路 Grand Lodge of Egypt was accorded fraternal recognition. The indebtedness on Free.. mason's Hall, St. Louis,again路 can1e up. It appears that the --161-


Second National ~ank had attained a judgement against the Masonic Hall Association for the sum of $12,342, and as the Grand Lodge was a Stockholder, the Committee reported, that this indebtedness must be paid. The following .Grand Officers "vere installed: "M. W. THOMAS C. READY, of St. Louis Grand Master R. W .. NOAH M. GIVAN,.of Harrisonville Deputy Grand Mastef R.W. JOSEPH S. BROWNE, ofSt. Joseph .. Senior Grand Warden R. W. WM. R. STUBBLEFIELD, of' St. Louis,lunior Grand Warden R. W. WILLIAM N.LOCKER,·of St. Louis .. Grand Treasure'f. R.W. JOHN D. VINCIL,o£ Mexico Grand Secreta'f:;.))

It would be observed that in this election that the name of Joseph S. Browne appears among . the list of elected officers, and Past GrandJYlaster, John D: Vinci!, succeeded Gauley as Grand Secretary. The report on Correspondence· . was .about completed at Gouley's death and is submitted by the acting Grand. Secretary. Receipts $14,373~85; disburselnents $9,959.17 ; balance $10,848.87. Number of Lodges 480; number of Lodges failing to make returns 36; estimated tnembership 23,220; decrease in membership'·· 519; raised 780 ; ·dimitted 873.

THOMASC. READY, Grand Mas'ter, 1877. M. W. Brother Thomas··C. Ready, .the thirty-fourth. Grand Master,. was born in Georgetown,Kentucky~ July 11, 1828. The .family removed to Columbia, Missouri, where he received his education in the University and then attended Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky, where he graduated in Medicine, .at the age oftwenty--one years. .He located at Independence, 1\1issouri,in 1849,. to practice his profession. In 1852, he moved to St. Louis, where he, lived for thirty years, then lived for a short period at .Mexico, Missouri. Of his early Masonic record, little isknoV\Tn. He held mem~162-


bershipinGeorge Washington Lodge No.9," St. Louis, and then assisted iti路organizing Tuscan Lodge No. 360, in which-he served as M~ster. His interests were chiefly centered in the Lodge, although he was a member of St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A. M., St. l"ouis Council No.1, R . and S. M., and of St. Louis Commandery No.1, K. T. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1869, then again in 1871 and1873. In 1874 he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced regularly,and in 1877 was elected Grand Master. He died July 31, 1883, at St.Louis. The funeral ceremonies were conducted by the Grand Lodge and his remains buried in the cemetery at .Mexico.

-163-


1\HE FII~'TY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Seventy-Sixth C01TIlTIUnication.) , St. Louis, October 15, A.D. 1878; A.L. 5878. There were representatives of 160 Lodges, eight Past Grand Masters and sixty-six Past :I\1asters present, when Grand Master Ready opened the Grand Lodge. His report is a lengthy one; dealing chiefly ~Tith the transactions of his office. He reported that M. W. Brother Joseph Foster, Past Grand Master, had died during the year. GRAND ORI~NT OF FRANC~

The following notation will be of interest to those who have considered the question of .recognizing the Grand Orient of France. The Grand Orient of France, at its Annual Communication of 1877, adopted a resolution, originally introduced and discussed, to strike from the Constitution the vital principles of the Masonic Order, "a Belief in the Existence of God, and the Immortality of the Soul," and substituting in their stead the loose and vague expression, "Freedom of Conscience." Such a departure from the teachings, and such a palpable disregard of the landlilarks of the Institution, most surely deserves a prompt deliverance by this Grand Lodge 1 and, if persisted in, con1pels us to decree non-recognition of the Grand Orient and its dependencies. This is a blow at the very foundation of our Mystic Temple. A belief in the existence of God and of the immortality of the soul, is the very life and essence of the Institution. Remove those vital principles from our creed, and weare no longer Masons. The Grand Orient having stricken these fundamental pri~ciples from their Constitution, are no longer Masons; and I would recommend that Masonic recognition be withheld from the Grand Orient, and路 from all Lodges and every person claiming to be a Mason, who holds allegiance to that Grand Body.

Mi8souri Grand Lodge then, as now, stood against the recognition of a Godless Freenlasonry. Mrs. IVIary O'SulIivan,vvidow of the late Grand S'ecretary, reported to the Grand Lodge, that he had bequeathed in his will to the Grand Lodge of l\1issouri, theSt11nof three thousand ~164-


dollars for the purpose of founding a widows' and orphans' fund. This is the first movement toward organizing a Masonic Home.

An appeal for the yellow fever sufferers, was sent out by the Grand Master to the Lodges, which resulted in the neat sum of $3,414.45 being contributed to this cause. The Grand Master was caned upon to make thirty-six decisions. There is· nothing especially new in these decisions, with possibly the exception of one, that the ante-room, to the Masonic:. Hall, could not be rented to Doctors and Lawyers for offices. He issued sixteen dispensations for .the formation of Lodges and reports a long list of grievances and called attention to. delinquencies of Lodges ·making returns. His reflection on 'the condition of the Craft is very wholesome. Brothers Garrett and Vincil offered an amendment to the Constitution giving a Past Master of another Grand Jurisdiction the rights and privileges of .such the subordinate. and Grand Lodge, afterhisaffiiiation therewith. This amendment went out as a referendum and of course was lost. The follo\vingGrand Officers were installed:

in

u~.

W.NOAH M. GIVAN, of Harrisonville .. Grand Master W.. JOSEPH S. BROWN'E, of St. Joseph .. Deputy GrandMaster W. \VM. R. STUBBLEFIELD, of St. Louis, S'ettior Grand Warden W. JAMES E. CARTER, of Jefferson City, Junio.r Grand fVarden W. JOHN W. LUKE, of St.Louis Grand Treasurer W.. JOHN· D. VINCIL, 0'£ St. Louis Grand Secretary." Among the appointees may be noted the following well

R. R. R. R. R..

known Brethren, Lee A. Hall as Grand Senior Deacon, and John A. Parsons as Grand Marshal. Brother NoahM.Givan having been called home by the severe illness of his child was not installed until October 22. Receipts $10,295.10; disbursements. $11,489.20; balance· on hand $9,654.77. The Proceedings contain. an excellent oration on the Mission of Masonry by Oren Root, Jr., Grand Orator" Number of Lodges 496; number of Lodges not making returns 37 ; membershipesti.mated. 24,2196; raised 860; dimitted 856; suspended for non-payment of dues 415. --1'65-


NOAH···M. GIVAN,

Grand Master, 1878. M. W. Brother NoahM. Givan, the thirty-fifth Grand Master,was born in Indiana, December 1, 1840. He was reared on a farm and obtained his early education in the common school~, and afterwards, graduated from the Indiana State University. He taught school, and was Principal. of Schools at Lawrenceburg, Indiana. In the meanwhile he studied Law and was admitted to the Bar in 1864. In 1866, he moved to Harrisonville, Missouri, where he resided up to his death, except for a few years residence in St. Louis. He was elected Judge· of' the Seventh·Judicial District in·1877. He was made a Master Mason in Burn's Lodge No. 55, Manchester, Indiana, April 12, 1862, affiliated with Cass Lodge No. 147, October 19, 1867, at Harrisonville, and served as its Master. He received the Capitular Degrees in Indiana, and after,vards affiliated with Signet Chapter No. 68, Harrisonville, serving as its High Priest. He was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, Royal··Arch Masons of Missouri in 1878. In 1883, he was elected Grand Treasurer whichposition.he held up to his death. ' He was a member of Arcana Council No.16,R. and S. M., at Harrisonville, and was elected Grand. Master of the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters, in 1874, and in 1883 became its Grand Treasurer. He received the Orders of Knighthood in Palestine Commandery No.. 17 at Independence,. Missouri, assisted in· organizing Bayard CommanderyNo. 26, at Harrisonville, and was its first Commander. He was elected Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar in 1891. He was one of the few who presided over all of the four Grand Bodies of Missouri. At the organization of the Masonic Home,·he was elected its President, which . position he .held with ··great fidelity up to -166-"';


his death. He stands out prominently as the great organizer of the Masonic Home. He served as Grand Patron of the O. E. St. in 1890. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1868. In 1874, he was appointed Grand Senior Deacon, the following year, elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced year by. year until in 1878 he was elected Grand Master. From his entrance into the Grand Lodge and up to his death he always served on the most important Committees. He died suddenly in St. Louis, October 路3, 1907. Brother Givan was one of the great men in the history of Freemasonry in Missouri. His Christian character, his zeal for Freemasonry, not only in its great principles, but in the practical application of these principles, made him great. He was not a theori~t, but a practical expounder. In every agency that made the Fraternity. stand at the forefront, in civil and religious life, he was always leading the hosts. No- man ever wielded a greater influence in the .Grand Lodge than .he. In Jurisprudence he was one of the greatest of his age.. His name will always bea beacon路light in Freemasonry.in Missouri.

-167-


THE FIFTY-NIN'rH ANNUAL C,OMMUNICATION. (The Seventy-Seventh .Communication.)

St. Louis, October 14, A.D. 1879; A.L. 5879. The representatives of 176路 Lodges out of the 494 Lodges, eight Past Grand Masters, and fifty-nine Past Masters greeted Grand Master Givan, as he opened the Grand Lodge. He was a cons~rvative Grand Master and the Craft needed a wholesome regeneration. He granted only six dispensations to form Lodges, arrested four Charters and seven Charters were surrendered. He made nineteen decisions, among which were: that an officer of a Lodge after installation cannot resign ; that a Master elect must receive the Past Master's Degree before installation, and that a motion to reconsider a ballot was illegal. In reference to the Eastern Star he said: Masonic Lodges, as such, should neither .encourage nor discourage the organization of Chapters of the Order of the Eastern Star. They are doubtless useful to the families of .Masons, and the Order路 isa benevolent one, but it is no part of lvIasonry, and should not be regarded as such. Masons, as individuals, may encourage them by becoming members and路 active workers therein, as they may in any other secret benevolent order.

H,e deli vered a very strong reprimand against drunkenness and profanity among Freemasons and there seems to have been a surplus of this among the Lodges. He commended very highly the uniformity of work that had been wrought out by Grand Lecturer McDo\v,ell.He reported that the Supreme Court of the United States had rendered a decision in favor of the Grand Lodge, involving the liability of the Grand Lodge for about sixty thousand dollars worth of bonds, issued by the Masonic Hall Association of St. Louis. He recommended fraternal relations with the Grand.Lodge.of Indian Territory. He calls especial attention to the delinquencies of Lodges in making returns, and to the large number of weak and. sickly Lodges in the State, and, as a cure, recommendedconsolidation of many of the Lodges. -1'68--


R. \\,T. Brother Albert G. Mackey of Washington, D. C., the distinguished J\1asonic author and historian, was present and delivered an address. An interesting 'Jilquestion came before the Grand Lodge as to whether a Grand Officer could transfer his membership fr01TI one Lodge to another, and retain his official station during the transfer. The Grand Master gave a very learned opinion on the subJect in favor of the transfer, but the Grand Lodge believed that a Grand Officer in taking a dinlit, for the purpose ot uniting vvith another Lodge, loses his Masonic standing just the· sanle as an ordinary mortal, which is correct. The following Grand Officers were installed: "JOSEPH S. BROWNE, of St. JO'seph Grand Maste1'; W1L R. STUBBLEFIELD, of St. Louis Deputy Grand Master JA1fES E. CARTER, of Jefferson City .. Sen'ior Grand Warden ALEXANDER 11. DOCKERY, of Gallatin, Junior Grand Warden JOHN W. LUKE, of St. Louis Grand Treasurer ]OI-1"N D.VINCIL, of St. Louis Grand Secretary i\LLAN McD'OWELL, of Greenfield . Grand Lecturer CHAS. C. \VO 0 D'S, of Kansas City Senior Grand Deacon JNO. T. RUFFIN, of Carthage Junior Grand Deacon JAS. STANNARD, of Kansas City Grand Marshal JOHN W. FARRIS, of Lebanon Grand Marshal JOHN SHEPHERD" of Macon City Grand Sword Bearer WM. M. WILLIAMS, of Boonville ·Senior Grand Steward w. F. ROBERTS, of Hallsville luniorGrand Steward D. W. S..t\DLER, of St. Louis Grand Orator CHAS. F. LEAVITT, of Springfield Grand Orator CHAS. H. ZOLL, of Warrensburg Grand Pursuivant. GEORGE THORP', of St. Louis Grand Tyler." 'O

••••

In the list of appointive offices, the reader will recognize many familiar names. The list of seven Grand Chaplains is not repeated. Receipts $9,653.77; disbursements $10,641.52; balance $12,773.93; number of Lodges 494; number of Lodges failing to make returns 34; estimated membership 23,697; decrease 399; raised 673 ; dimitted 829; suspended for non-payment of dues 475; affiliated 671. -169-


JOSEPH S. BROWNE, Grand Master, 1879.

M. W. Brother Joseph S. Browne, the tbirty-sixth Grand Master, was born August 23, 1836, in Washington City, D. C. The family moved to St. Joseph,MissQuri, in 1857, where he resided up to his death.. For many years and, under various political administrations, he was .deputy Post Master at St. Joseph. He was made a Master Mason in St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, December 11, 1858, in which he served as Master for five years. He received the Capitular Degrees in St. Joseph Chapter No. 14, R. A. M. in 1858, and served as High Priest for three years. In 1876 he was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, Royal Arch Masons of Missouri. He received the Cryptic Degrees inSt.·JosephCouncil·No. 9, R. and S. M., while under dispensation, March 24, 1870 and served as· its Master. He was elected Grand Master of the Grand Council,R. and S'.. M., of Missouri in 1873. He received the Orders of. Knighthood in Weston Commandery No.2, Weston, Missouri, in.1859, assisted in organizing Hugh DePaynes, St. Joseph, in 1875, and served as its Commander in 1877. He was elected Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar, of Missouri in 1886. He was Grand Patron in 1896. He first appeared in Grand Lodge in 1867, in 1877 he was elected Grand ·SeniorvVarden, and in 1879 he was elected Grand Master. He died in St. Joseph, February'12, 1906, at the age of seventy years. He will al,vays be remembered by his kindly-nature and his patriarchal appearance. He was one of the few ·that had presidedovet all of the Grand Bodies, and was a member of the Board .of Directors of the Masonic Home from its organization.

-170-


THE SIXTIETH ANNUAL COM1IUNICATION. (1"'he Seventy-Eighth Communication.)

St. Louis October 12, A.D. 1880; A.L. 5880. Grand Master Browne was greeted at the opening of the Grand Lodge by seven Past Grand Masters, seventy-two Past Masters and the representatives of 172 out of the 494 Lodges. During the yearR.W. Brother James E. Carter, Grand Senior Warden and R. W.Brother James T . Johnson, Past Grand Treasurer had died. To each of these the Grand Master ·paid special tribute. Brother Browne did not make many decisions. He granted many dispensations for the election of officers and removal of Lodges. At this annual Communication Most Worshipful Brother John H. Brown, P.G. M. and Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, ,vas a visitor. The Grand Lodge made an· effort through a Committee, to prepare a Masonic History of the Past Grand Masters, but did not seem to .have been· very successful. The report of the Committee . on Chartered Lodges looks natural, and was prepared by· a future Grand Master, R.· F. Stevenson,. and the .report of the. Committee ·on Appeals and Grievances has the same aroma, as of later years. Amendmentsto the By-Laws vvere adopted fixing the annual dues to the Grand Lodge at fifty cents, and that, no din1it would .be granted exceptior the purpose of joining another Lodge, forming a new Lodge, or removing out of the jurisdiction, and the non-affiliates shall be subject to all of the disabilities ofa non-affiliate from the date of the dimit. The high cost of living had not struck <the hotels of St. Louis at this time, as one could live at the Laclede Hotel on the American plan at $2.50 per .day or at the Planters or Lindle for $3.00 per day. . J

A very interesting report appears in reference to the action of the Grand Correspondent who had 'criticized the P'ast·Grand Master and. the Grand Lodge: -171-


That, in our opInIon, Bro. VINCIL has overstepped the duties of a Committee on Foreign Correspondence when he undertakes to criticize the acts and rulings of a Grand Master which have already been reported to and acted upon by the Grand Lodge. Weare clearly of the opinion that prerogative of criticizing or reversing the rulings of the Grand Master belongs only· to the Grand Lodge. On the other hand, we hold it to be the duty of the Committee on Foreign Correspondence to defend the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge which constitute the supreme pO'wer within his jurisdiction, whether such action accords with his individual opinions or not. Actuated by this spirit, BRO. VINCIr... should have referred to the record \vhen he found his Grand Master attacked, and should not have contented. hhnself with the statenlent and. criticisms of a Foreign Correspondent. And whilst his explanation is good enough as far as it goes, still he should not have allowed himself to be drawn into such an error in the first instance. Our views above expressed have equal application to the statements complained of under·· the head of Georgia. We fraternally admonish Committees on Correspondence, in the future to steer dear· of those rocks that lie ahead.

This report was signed by three Past Grand Masters, with Brother Gari·ett as Chairman. The following Grand Officers were installed: "WM. R. STUBBLEFIELD, of S1. Louis .. Grand Master ALEXANDER M. D'OCKERY, of Gallatin, Deputy Grand Master CI-IARLES C. WOODB, of Kansas City Grand Senior Warden LEE A. HALL, of Louisiana Grand Junior Warden JOHN W. LUKE, of S1. Louis Grand Treasu,rer JOHN' D. VINCIL, of 81. Louis Grand Secretary ALLAN McDOWELL, of Greenfield Grand Lecturer W. G. WEAVER, of Bolivar Grand Marshal P. P'. ELLIS, of Ne\v Florence Grand Sword Bearer CH t\S. H. 20LL,of Warrensburg Grand Senior Ste'lvard J. M. Mc11URR.Y, of Palmyra Grand Junior Steward JOl-INE. RYLAND, of Lexington Grand· Orator REV.C. H. BRIGGS. of Springfield Grand Orator JOHN R. lIIID'DLETON, of Chillicothe .. GrandPursuiva1~t GEORGE THORP, of St.Louis Grand Tyler."

More familiar nanles are appearing annually an1ong. the list of appointive Officers. -172-


Receipts $12,516.10; disbursements $12,832.71 ; balance~12,颅 457,32. N umber of Lodges 494; number of Lodges failing to make returns 47; estimated Inembership 22,985; loss .702; raised 824; admitted 858; dimitted 880; died 296; suspended for N. P. dues 942. \i\lILLIAM R. STUBBLEFIELD, Gra1'1rd M aster 1880. M.Vl.BrotherWilliam R. Stubblefield, the thirty-seventh Grand Master, was born May 8, 1835, in Greenfield, Illinois. At the age of twenty-one, he engaged in the mercantile business in Carrollton, Illinois, came to St. Louis in August 15, 1856, and entered a clothing house until 1898, when he located at Salem, where he lived for two years, then returned to St. Louis and was connected with the .street railway system. He was made a Master Mason in Occidental Lodge 163, St. Louis, March 13, 1859. While living in Chicago during the civil ,var, he received the Cap,itular Degrees in LafayetteChap~ terNo. 2, R. A. M., in 1864, and in the same year he received the Cryptic Degrees in Chicago Council No.4, R. and S. M., and the Orders of Knighthood in Apollo Comlnandery No.1, K. T. Upon his return路 to St. Louis he affiliated with Kil\vinningChapter No. 50, R.A.M., in which he served as High Priest for four years. He assisted in organizing Tyrian Council No. 13, R. and S. M. and served as its Master. In Occidental Lodge No. 163, he served as Master in 1874 and in Ivanhoe Con1mandery No.8, IZ. T.,he served as Commander in 1875. He was Grand Patron of the O. E.S'. in 1871. He \vas elected Grand Master of the Grand Council, R. and S. M. in 1876 ; Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, R. A. M. in 1877, and served as Grand Lecturer from 1890 to 1897. He first appeared in the Grand. Lodge in 1874 and was appointed Grand Marshal. In 187? he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced yearby year, until in 1880 he was elected Grand Master. He died January 10, 1908, in St.Louis at the age of seventy-three years. 7

-173-


THE SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL

COM~1UNICATION.

(The Seventy-Ninth Communication.)

St. Louis, October 11,

A.D. 1881; A.L. 5881.

-When. Grand Master Stubblefield opened the Grand Lodge, there were present t\\Telve Past Grand 1\1asters, eighty-two Past Masters and the representatives. of 196 Lodges. The Grand Master had granted fifteen dispensations to form new Lodges and he out-classed all other Grand 11asters by making only one decision. This is in sharp contrast to his predecessors. He held as irregular the action of a Lodge in participating in a funeral service conducted by two non-Masonic Bodies,'"and he held that twelve members .could not cast fourteen ballots in an election. Evidently there was som,ething· crooked, but no one would indicate that some one would want to stuff the ballot box. He speaks very highly of the condition of the Craft and judging£rom all indications a normal condition had again risen in the Grand J~odge since. the close of the Civil War. A resolution was adopted. paying mileage and per diem ·to the Past GrandMasters. This is the first step taken. in p·aying mileage and per diem to any member of the Grand Lodge. Reverend BrotherC. H . Briggs delivered an oration on the uConserving. po"\tver and influence of Freemasonry." .It was short and to the point. The Grand Lodge purchased •thirtytvvo yolumes of Moore's Magazine. These may stillbe ..seen in the Grand Lodge Library. A good portion of the Session was taken up in discussing act of the Grand Lodge of. Mexico in declaring that, a Lodge· chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri ·which had failed ·to. unite with the Grand Lodge of Mexico, was a clandestine body, but the diffi<?ulty was amicably adjusted. The Procee-dings contain a memorial page to James A. Garfield, President of· the United ··States.Above his name appears the following: "The Patriot, the Statesman, the devoted Mason, the faithful Christian." The. following ·;Grand Officers were installed:


"ALEX M. D,OCKERY, Gallatin C. C.WOOD'S, Kansas City L. A. HALL, St. Louis o. R. F. STEVENSON, Clinton JOHN W. LUKE, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McD10WELL, Greenfield" R£v. JOHN E. BARNES, Licking, Rmr. H. Go JACKSON', Kansas City R~v. A. W. MILSTER, Caledonia REv. B. H. SMITH, Canton, REv. W. POP'E YEAMAN, Glasgow RE;V. C. H. BRIGGS, Springfield R£v. M. RHODES, St. Louis T. H. McMULLIN, Hillsboro J. R. MIDDLETON, Chillicothe F. W. MOTT, St. Louis G.L. FAULHABER, Sedalia P. C. FLOURNOY, Linneus JOHNH. D·EEMS, 51. Louis J. P . WOODS, New London JOHN SHEP'HERD, Macon City J. W. BOYD, St. Joseph P. H. CHAMBERS, Lexington JOHN H. OWEN', St. Louis 0

0.00

••••••

0

0

.0

0

Grand Master Deputy Grand Master Grand Senior Warden Grand Junior Warden Grand Treasurer Grand Secretary o. Grand L.ecturer Grand Chaplain Grand Chaplain ,Grand"Ckaplain Grand Chaplain Grand' Chaplain Grand Chaplain Grand Chaplain 'Crand,Senior Deacon Grand Junior Deacon Gran,d Marshal Grand Marshal G,rand Sword Bearer 0." • Grand Senior Steward Grand Junior Steward Grand Orator Grand Orator GrandPursuivant Grand Ty,.ler

•••••

0

'0

..

:

..

0

0

0

0

0

••

In this 'list of Grand Officers ,will be found a Grand Chaplain who afterwards became a Grand Master, and the name of thatvenerabI~ oldmallr, who served the Grand Lodge for so

many years as Grand Tylev,--]ohnH. 'Owens. Receipts $14~09892 ; disbursements $7,897.. 57; balance: $18,658.67. Estimated membership 23,045; number,' of ,Lodges 504; number '0£ Lodges failing to make returns fourteen; raised 971; dimitted 846; suspend@d, N. P.D~ 435. ALEXANDER M. DOCKERY, Grand Master" ,1881. M. W. Brother Alexander M.Dockery, the thirty-eighth GrandMaster, was born in Daviess.'County, Missouri, February 11, 1845. He was educated in Macon Academy, andgradu-


ated frotTI the St. Louis Medical College in March, 1865, attended special courses at Bellevue Medical Cpllege, New York City, and Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia; during the year 1865-66, practiced Medicine at Chillicothe, Missouri, until 1874, -when fie moved to Gallatin, Missouri, and assisted in organizing the Farmer's Exchange Bank and was its Cashier until elected to Congress. He served in Congress beginning with the forty-eighth, up to and inclu4ing the fifty-fifth Session, serving continuously for sixteen years. He was elected Governor of the State and took office January 14, 1901 and during the Presidency of Woodrow Wilson, he served as third Assistant Post Master General for eight years. He was made a 1VIaster Mason in Jackson Lodge No. 82, Linneus, served as Master in 1868, and after affiliating with Daviess Lodge No. 116, Gallatin, he again served as Master. He received the Capitular Degrees in Lone Star Chapter No. 30, R. A. M., at Chillicothe and was elected Grand High Priest of the 路Grand Chapter of Royal路Arch Masons in 1883. He is a Past Comn1ander of Kadosh Commandery No. 21, Cameron, Missouri. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1867, and in 1868 he was elected Grand Junior. Warden, and in 1869 was elected Grand Senior Warden. He does not .appear again until 1879, when he路 was again elected Grand Junior Warden, Deputy Grand Master in 1880, and Grand Master in 1881. He has been a m'ember of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home for many years. Brother Dockery is a man of wide and potent influence in .Freemasonry 路and in the State. He possesses strong executive ability and a winning personq.lity. I-Ieis an Ajax in all that he undertakes.

-176-


THE SIXTY-SECOND ANNU..f\L COMMUNICATION. (The Eightieth Communication.) St. Louis, October 10, A.D. 1882; A.L. 5882. The Grand Secretary in a note at the close of the Proceedings states that the report of the Committee on Credentials was lost, that it never reached his office, but to the best of his recollection, there were eleven Past Grand Masters and the representatives of 207 Lodges present. Grand Master Dockery submitted a very concise, business report. He granted eleven dispensations to fornl Lodges and refused several where he doubted the organization would be beneficial. He passed the record of the last Past Grand Master by making no decisions whatever. During the year the Grand Lodge lost two of its Past Grand Masters, M. W. Brother Samuel H. Owens and M. W. Brother John Ralls, to both of these the Grand 1YIaster paid due tribute. In the body of the Proceedings are nlemorials to these Brethren and a steel portrait of Brother Owens is includedin the Proceedings. Grand Master Dockery expresses a very hopeful·view. of thecondition of the Craft and of the Treasury as follows: It is gratifying, and the outlook for the most part, is encouraging for the future. I would add that the finances of the Grand Lodge have never been in so· sound and satisfactory a condition. Being out of debt, with a cash fund on hand of more than twenty tho'lf,sand dollars, I can speak with assurance and say that our fiscal affairs have been well and pruden tty managed.

The action of the Grand Lodge of last year, forbidding a Lodge to occupy a Lodge jointly with other organizations, was repealed. The Orator for the year, Brother James W.· Boyd, delivered an address on the "Philosophy of Freemasonry." The Committee on "Funeral Service" with Brother Thomas E. Garrett, as Chairman, reported. The service \vas· adopted· and is published in full. This service is the work of the Chairman of the Committee, and has been in use and published in all of Missouri l\1onitors ever since. It is a very impressive ceremony. -177-


ANTI-SALOON LEGISLATION.

. Anti-saloon legislation appears in the history of the Graiid Lodge for the first time WHEREAS, It is \vith shame that we acknowledge that there are Masons who so far forget their dignity as to get drunk, and thus bring .Masonry "into disrepute; therefore, be it Resolved} 1"hat it. is hereby made a violation of Masonic Morals to be engaged in the traffic of liquor as a dramshop-keeper, and all persons engaged in such business are declared to be ineligible as petitioners for the mysteries of Masonry within this Grand Jurisdiction. Resolved} further} That we instruct the District Deputy Grand Mas.. ter of this district to present this resolution to the . Grand Lodge at the next session and urge its adoption.

HERMAN FERGUSON ERWIN ELLIS J. A. BRADSHAW W. W. CUSHING JOHN TURRENTINE ].··M. BUTLER

This resolution was referred to a COlnmittee consisting of J. W. Boyd, Xen. Ryland and J.M. Sallee. This Committee later reported, vvhich report vvas amen~ed by Brother N. M. Givan. Just what the original report of this Committee was, is a conj ecture, but everyone knows where Brother Givan stood. The report of the Committee as amended reads as follovvs: The Special Committee,. to \vhom· was referred the resolution of Brother Ferguson, Ellis and. others, respectfully submit that, .in their opinion, itvvould be an innovation upon the principles of'Masonry for this . Grand Lodge, by legislation, to add to, or t~ke from,· the moral or . physical qualifications, the possession· of which has ever been· held requisite to entitle any profane to be initiated into the Mysteries of Masonry. The law declaring habitual drunkenness a Masonic offense is explicit, and any lodge refusing to sustainten1perance as one of the cardinal virtues of Masonry, is derelict in duty. If any of our Brethren becolne, or are, the victims of intemperance, they are·· subj ect to discipline for a violation of their moral. and" Masonic obligations~· . It follows, then, that those who keep saloons ought to be held amenable for the violations of the principle of Masonary. -t78,.-


We recommend the adoption of' the following resolution: Resolved, That the business of saloon keeping is hereby declared to be a Masonic offense, and those engaged in that business are liable to be dealt with for unmasonic condgct.

By reading this report carefully, it will be observed that it squints both ways, by. stating that "it would be an innovation upon the principles. of Jvlasonry for this Grand Lodge, . by legislation, to add to, or to take from, the moral or physical qualifications:" Yet the "resolve,'" at the: end of the resolution, does specify the moral qualification. Evidently, the Givan amendment vvhich is the "resolve,"· made the report of the Committee slightly inconsistent. This little piece of legislation, was merely the· entering wedge to some· drastic action in later years. With the death of Past Grand Master Owens, who had for many years filled with great satisfaction the position of Chairman of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances, he was succeeded by Brother N. M.. ·Givan.

The amendments to reduce the initiation. fee from thirty to twenty dollars, and the Grand Lodge dues, from fifty to twenty-five cents were defeated. .Evidently some of themembers had been reading the report that the ·Grand Lodge· had $20,000 in its treasury, so an assault on·· this treasury was organized, by a resolution to exempt· the subordinate Lodges from annual dues, forthe ensuing year, which Brother Dockery promptly declared out of order, but the Htight wads" were not dismayed,as they later came back .with the resolution·· to. refund seventy-five per cent of dues to the Lodges of the amount paid the past year. This raid on the treasury was victorious. The follo\ving Grand Officers were installed: "KEV. CHAS. C. WOODS, D.D., of Kansas City, Grand Master LEE A. HALL, of St. Louis . ~ .. " Deputy Grand Master ROBT. F. STEVENSON, of Clinton , "Grand Senior Warden JAMES W .. BOYD, of. St. Joseph" Grancl'Junior Warden SAMUELM. KENINARD, of St.. Louis G.,.,andTrpasu.tter REV. JOHN D. VIN'eIL, n'.D.,of St.. Louis' . ..Grand Se·cre.tary ALL.AN McDOWELL, of Gr'eenfield · Grand Lecturer


'Rsv. JOHN. E. BARNES, of Licking

C. H. BRIGGS, of Springfield Rltv. ALEX. P'ROCTOR, of Independence REV. H. G. JACKSON, -of Sedalia REV. H. B. BOUDIE, of Kansas City REV. P'. G. ROBERT, of St. Louis REV. J. M. CHANEY, of Pleasant Hill GEO. R. H"UNT, of Warrensburg A. 1L CROW, of Kansas City JOHN' H. D'EE"NIS, of St. Louis C. G. HUBBELL, of St. Joseph C. E. BUSHNELL, of Bolivar G. O. JACCARD, of Kansas City D. E. WRAY, of Versailles W. M. WILLIAMS, of Boonville J.P. WOOD, of New London J. B. TH011AS, of Albany " JOI-IN W. OWEN, of St. Louis REV.

Grand Chaplain Grand Chaplain Grand Chaplain Grand Chaplain Grand Chaplain Grand Chctplain Grartd Chaplain Grand, Senior Deacon Grand fun路ior Deacon Grand Marshal Grand Marshal Grand Sword Bearer Grand Senior Steward Grand Junior Steward Grand Orator Grand Orator Grand Pursuivant Grand Tyler: n

It will be noted that in 路the above- corps of officers there are seven Grand' Chaplains. Possibly' this large number was expedient and necessary. Receipts $13,330.27; disbursements $11,789.03; balance $20,199.91. Membership estitnated 24,000; number of Lodges 517; number of Lodges failing to report 28; raised 1,309; dimited 969 ; suspended for N. P. D. 476; net gain 744. CHARLES CARROLL WOODS, Grand Master, 1882. M. W. Brother CharlesC. Woods, the thirty-ninth Grand Master, was born July Fourth, 1838, at Rocky Mount,Virginia. He'came to Missouri in 1855, settled in Morgan County, attended Trinity .College in North Carolina, and afterwards graduated 路from Central College, Fayette,. Missouri. He received the literary degree of D.D. from Trinity College in 1878. He has been active in the ministerial work of the Methodist Church South, all his Ii fe, having been stationed, chiefly, at Warrensburg, Boonville, Springfield, Jefferson City and Kan-


sas City. He was editor of the Christian Advocate for a number of years. He has now retired from active work, but continues as Correspondent of the ··Grand Lodge, having succeeded Past Grand Master R. E. Anderson, in this important position. He petitioned Hickory Hill Lodge No. 211 for tlle Degrees, but received all of the D1egrees in Corinthian Lodge No. 265, \Varrensburg, in 1868. ·He affiliated later with Temple Lodge No. 29\9, Kansas City, of which he is still a member. He received the Capitular Degrees in De Molay Chapter No. 26, R. A. M., Warrensburg, in 1869, and is now affiliated with Orient Chapter No. 102, Kansas City, Missouri. He served as High Priest in Boonville Chapter No. 60, and was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons in 1884. He received the Cryptic Degrees in Arcana Council, No. 16, R. and S. M., Harrisonville, in 1871, and served as Grand Chaplain in the Grand Council for several years. The Masonic· Orders. of Christian Knighthood were conferred upon him in Bayard Commandery No. 26, K. T., at Harrisonville. He was a charter member of Oriental Commandery No. 3.5, Kansas City, and of Neosho Commandery No. 57, in the latter he served as Commander. In the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar· of Missouri, he served as Grand Prelate for thirteen years. He has the record of serving as Chaplain, or Prelate in seven different Masonic Bodies at one time. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1869, was appointed one of the Grand Chaplains in 1875, was appointed Grand Senior Deacon in 1879, elected Grand Senior Warden in 1880 and Grand Master in 1882. He is the first Grand Master who urged and advocated a Masonic Home in·· his annual address, and at the organization of the Home became one of its Directors, serving until 1898. . Brother Woods has not, and is not living in ~ain. The past -lS1-


has been replete with great deeds of a man fully embued with the great things of life. He has been, and is to.. day, one of the strong men in Freemasonry of Missouri. His eloquent tongue, his dignified presence, his exalted views, his sincerity, have left indelible impressions upon all whom he has met.

-182r.-


THE ·SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-First Communication.) St. LouisJOctober 9, 1883; A.L.S8S3. When Grand Master Wood opened the Grand Lodge there were present eleven Past Grand Masters, 152 Past Masters and the ,representatives· of 204 Lodges. GrandMasterWoodpresented quite a lengthy and important address. During the year M. W. Brother Thomas C.Ready, PastGrand Master had died. The Proceedings also contain a steel portrait of Past Grand Master Ralls who died the year previous. S'evendispensations to organize· Lodges had been granted. The Grand Master was happy to announce, that he had no decisions to report. He held that when a Lodge is organized in a city where there is more than one Lodge, the consent of the two-thirds of the Lodges was necessary, but it was not necessary that twothirds of the Lodges should passon the qualification·· of the Officers of the new Lodge as to the Ritual before adispensation was granted. Brother Wood was the first Grand Master to advocate the establishment of a Masonic Home, which he did as follows: WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' HOyt.

'Two years since· you appointed a committee to consider the proprietyof establishing an industrial home for indigent Masons, their widows and orphans., Last year this committee was· continued, with instructions to 'report to this . Grand . Lodge. Meanwhile the other Grand Bodies have not been idle. The Grand Commandery and Grand Chapter, at their respective Communications last May, appointed committees· to consider this question,and it is now time for us to go to work in 'earnest. Our charities, while genuine, have been too diffused in their nature, and· in the 'estimation of the .world we have pretended much· and acoomplishedbut little. To give· a loaf of bread .to a starving widow, and spend a hundred dollars . upon· a. 'hanquet. is not charity o-£·a very pronounced character. The amount we spend· during a single year in caressing defunct oysters, or .burning incense .to the. social penates in the shapeof·.costly cigars, wouldbuild·aflHome" that would go down to posterity, a perennial blessing. --1'83-


Let us begin at once to express ourselves in this monumental way upon the future, and coming generations will rise up and call us blessed.

This suggestion bore fruit before many years had passed. The Committee to which this suggestion was referred .recommended that as other Masonic Grand Bodies of the State were considering this same subject, that the Committee be continued, to report later. Memorial service in honor of Past Grand Master Ready was held. In the report of the Comtnittee on Charity are found several familiar names, to all of those ,vho have been attending the Grand Lodge for a third of a century. Each year their names appear as objects .of charity. The record book of Military Lodge No. 86 was presented. A short history of the Lodge is found in the Proceedings and is as follows: MILITARY LODGE NO.

86.

This Lodge was instituted by the late Col. John Ralls, who was Grand Master of 'Masons in Misouri at the time. The Charter was granted by him. The regiment, of which Grand Master Ralls was Colonel, was about to move from Independence, Mo., to Mexico, to join in that famous campaign. The Lodge was instituted at Independence, June 15th, 1847, and .500n after began .its march across the Continent, under the name of 1tIilitary Lodge, No. 86. Bro. James ]. Clarkson was the first Master; Jeremiah B. Vardeman, Senior Warden, and Joseph L. Gould, Junior Warden. The next meeting was held in Sante Fe, N',ew Mexico, with Bro. Clarkson, Worshipful Master,路 and the late Elihu Shephard, of St. Louis, as Senior Warden. "Missouri Military Lodge, No. 86," then began to receive petitions and to do work. Much and interesting information might be gleaned from the journal o路f Proceedings, but it cannot be embodied here. The last entry was made July 5th, 1848. The. Lodge . was still located in Sante Fe, and Bro. John Ralls was Worshipful Master. No further transactions路路 being found in the book it is. difficult to formulate the history of .the Lodge beyond the above date. The former Grand Secretary, Bro. Gouley, says the Lodge "closed with the 'Mexican "Tar." -184--


Under the head of Lodges U. D. the Committee granted a charter to Toltec Lodge in the city of Mexico, the Lodge to work in the English language or York Rite Masonry. As heretofore all of the degrees were exemplified by Grand Lecturer, Allan McDowell. The following. Grand Officers were installed: "LEE A. HALL, St. Louis ROBERT F. STEVENSON, Kansas City JAMES W. BOYD, St. Joseph GEORGE R. HUNT, Warrensburg SAMUEL M. KENNARD', St. Louis R~v. JOHN D.. \TIN'CIL, D.D., St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis R:ev. JOHN E. BARNES, Licking REV. W. B. P'ALMORE, Jefferson City REV. F. S. BEGGS Kansas City REV, ].F. JON'AS, St. Louis W. M. WILLIA'MS, Boonville ]. B. THOMAS,Albany 路 J. L. TOR,REY, St. Louis W. R. EDiGAR, Ironton . ~ J. M. RITCHEY, Newtonia HENRY L. ROGERS. 路St. Louis C. ]. BROOKS; Jefferson City REV. H. G. JACKSON, Sedalia ]. P. WOOD~ New London JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis J

Grand Moste." Deputy_ Grand Master Grand Senior Warden Grand !un'ior TiVa'rden Grand Trl?Gsurer Grand SeC1'etary Grand Lcchtrer Gra.nd Chaplain Grand Chaplain G1'"and Chtlpla-in Grand Chaplain GraHd Senior Deacon Grand !u1~ior Deacon G1路and Jlarshal Grand Marshal G1~a1'td Sword Bearer Grand Senior Steward Grand lu,nior Steward Grand Orator Grand Orator Grand Tyler/'

to

It \vill be observed that the Grand Secretary applies himself and to his Brothers in. the Ministry, the ecclesiastical and literary titles. But the butcher, the baker, the candle stick maker; the doctor and the lawyer do not have their occupation mentioned. Vanitas, vanitatum. Receipts $13,568.33; disbursements路 $18,670.61; balance $15,097.63; membership estimated 24,594 ; number of Lodges 522; Lodges not making returns six; raised 1,122; affiliated 1,200; dimitted 1,104, a slight increase in total membership. -185-


LEEA. HALL, Grand Master, 1883. M. W.BrotherLee A.Hall, the fortieth Grand Master, was bomNovember 26, 1832, in Warren County, Ohio. The family came to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1840, where he resided continuously, except for a f~w years. He adopted the~aw as his Profession, but he followed business pursuits for years. He was made a Master J\1ason in George Washington Lodge No. 9, St.Louis, April 25, 1854. He served as Master in several Lodges. He received the Capitular Degrees in St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A.,M., November 26, 1854, and served as High Priest in Bond Chapter No. 23, Louisiana, in 1867. He was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Missouri in 1885. He received the Cryptic Degrees in St. Louis Council No.1, R. and S. M., in 1863, and served as Master of Hiram Council after its consolidation with St. Louis No.1. '. He received the Orders of Knighthood in St. Louis CommanderyNo. 1, March 16, .1863. He first appeared in Grand Lodge in 1874, appointed Grand Junior Deacon in 1873, and Grand Senior Deacon in 1877. He was elected Grand Junior Warden in 1880 and ele~ted Grand Master in 1883. Previous to this he had served as Chairman in several importantCom-. mittees, and remained Chairman of the Committee路 on Chartered Lodges up to his death. He died in St.L~uis December 15, 1899. The services were conducted by the Grand Lodge. Brother .Hall was preeminently the technical business man of the Grand Lodge.


THE SIXTY-FOURTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-Second Communication.) St. Louis, October 14, 1884; A.L.5884. This annual Communication was strictly a business and legislative session. The address of Grand Master Hall is a strong constructive document. He did not hesitate. or mince matters on subjects of importance to the Fraternity. He made decisions, but· laid down a course of procedure for the government of Lodges, where the technical construction of the law was in doubt. But he was not free of judicial worry as the

no

CROSS EYED RESOI,.UTION ON SALOON

KE~PING

came up for consideration, as could readily have been predicted, when it was adopted. He held that the original resolutionsexcluded saloon keepers, as a class, from the . right to petition for the Degrees, but went no farther. The amendment as adopted, made saloon keeping a Masonic offence, the same as drunkenness or any other immoral conduct. ·He ·held that: "We see by this: (1) That the committee, initsdeclaration, says in effect, that drunkenness. and saloon-keeping are cognate offenses, both alike contrary to the spirit and in violation of the provisions of said Section 29. (2) That saloon-keeping being an immoral 'business, both in its nature and ~ffects, is within the prohibition of the provisions of Section 29, and has always been such a Masonic offense as would make it not only improper for a· Lodge to receive a petition for initiation from· such. a person, but that a Lodge was derelict in duty which failed to punish any Brother engaged in that business. Therefore the committee says: (1) Any. Lodge refusing to sustain temperance as one of the cardinal virtues .is derelict in duty. (2) Those engaged in saloon-keeping ought to be held amenable for the violation of the principle of Masonry."

and issued a circular letter setting forth his views .and, in pursuant to this ruling, he held that the Master elect of Meridian Lodge No.2 and the Senior Warden elect, of Itaska Lodge No. 420, both being saloon keepers, could not be installed. Grand Master Hall was sustained·bythe·Grand'Lodge based on the report. of the Committee on Jurisprudence with -187-


Past Grand Master Garrett as Chairman, and the Committee further recomended that Lodges, failing to enforce the law against saloon keeping, and other immoralities enumerated in S'ection 29, should have their· Charters arrested. This con~ struction of the law by the Grand. Master took the squint out of it, as originally adopted. The Grand Master brought another important matter before the Grand· Lodge, in reference to the neVi Grand Treasurer depositi?g GRAND LODGE FUNDS TO THE CREDIT OF HIS FIRM.

It appears that all previous Grand Treasurers had deposited the funds of the Grand Lodge in the bank, to the credit of the Grand Lodge, but this new Treasurer had "deposited the Grand Lodge money with a business company, in which he was a large stockholder and its President, crediting himself as Grand Treasurer, on their books, thereby, virtually making the Grand Lodge a creditor on the books of the Company, and of course subject, in case anything .should happen, to be treated the same as any other creditor." The Grand Master requested· action on this matter, so that the money of the Grand Lodge shall be deposited, ·as all pre~ vious Grand Treasurers had done, to the credit of the Grand Lodge. This matter was referred to a special Committee, which made a report, and . after discussion the report was recommitted. What the report of the Committee was, is blissfully omitted from the minutes. This important business matter, evidently, received a silent whitewash. This Grand Treasurer continued to use .theGrand Lodge Funds for twenty years, untilin 1903,·the Grand.Lodge by an overwhelming vote directed· that the Grand Lodge funds shall be·· placed in a Bank or Trust Company, to the.credit of the Grand Lodge, and the Grand Treasurer be required a surety bond, and·· not a private bona. The Grand Treasurer promptly refused to be reelected. ·Rather a . ·soft ·snap to use· twenty thousand •dollars ina private business. with. no interest to . pay, all for the -188-


glory of being Grand Treasurer. The Grand Treasurer was perfectly responsible, and always presented a detailed report of all of the funds of the Grand Lodge, but nevertheless it was a bad principle of doing business. Since that time the Grand Lodge has been receiving interest on daily balances. Grand "Master Hall was ··diligent in not .granting a dis.pensation to form a Lodge with less than fifteen petitioners~ He was nota booming· Mason. In his address he gives a beautiful. tribute to the Holy Bible. Grand Master Hall had the· courage of his ·convictions. No wishy-washy in his makeup. The Committee on the "Widows' and Orphans' Home" recommended that the. money was to be refunded to the subordinate Lodges, be set aside for the establishment of a Home, and that a Committee be appointed to take charge·.of this matter. Three hundred. dollars was appropriated for the erection of a monument over, the grave of Past Grand Secretary Gouley., The following. Grand. Officers were installed: UROBERT F.STEVENSON', Kansas City JAMES W. BOYDJSt. Joseph

Grand Mastetr Deputy·Gra':d Master GEORGER. HUNT, Warrensburg ..•..... Grand Senior Warden W'M. M. WILLIAMS, Boonville Grand Junior Warden SAMUEL M.KENNARD, St. Louis Grai~d Treasurer JOHN D. VIN'CIL, St. Louis ..•....•..... GrfJ,~d Secretary ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Gro1td Lecturer Rtv. C. H. BRIGGS, Neosho Grcl1td Chaplain RfW. ]. M. ·CHANEY, Pleasant' Hill Grand Chaplain R:€V. F. S. BEGGS, St.Louis Grand Chaplain ~v. M. M. GOODE, St. JQseph .......•.. (;rand Chap la-in R£v. W.· 13.. F A.RR, lndependen<:e Cral1,d Chaplai,,, R!v. ·JOHN E. BARN'ES Licking·· Gra,~d Chaplain ~. B. H. SMl'I'H,Canton Grand Chaplain J. P. WOOD, }IewLondon Grancl St?1'lior Deacon STEPHEN CH.:\.PMAN, Bloomfield Grand Junior Deacon JAYL.. TORREY, St. Louis Grand .Marshal WM. REDGAR, Ironton Gra'td Marshal C. S. GLASPELL, ~renton Grand. Sword Bearer SEYMOUR HOYT, Greenfield Gra1td Steward J

~189~


PHILIP RODAN, St. Louis ISAAC JACKSON, Kansas City L. C. KRAUTHOFF, Jefferson City .. ~ J.B. THOMAS, Albany JOHN W. OWEN, St."Louis

Grand Steward Gra?~d P~拢rs1,ivant

Grand Orator Grand Orator Grand Tyler."

Receipts $12,729.32; disbursements $11,382.90; balance $16,444.04; menlbership 25,509; raised 1,441 ;dhnitted 1,017; number of Lodges 525. The Proceedings for several years have become quite bulky. The report on Correspondence always required over two hundred pages and the minutes of the Proceedings less than one hundred pages.

ROBERT F. STEVENSON, Grand Master, 1884. M. vV. Brother Robert F. Stevenson, the forty-first Grand Master, was born July 25, 1843, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The family moved to a farm near Elgin, Illinois. After the death of his father, he was taken back to Philadelphia by his guardian, being then only fourteen years of age. In 1861, he returned to Illinois, and in 1866 came to Henry County, Missouri. He studied law and admitted to practice in 1869. He held various County offices until 1880, when he engaged in the banking business. He resided in Kansas City until he was elected路 Grand Secretary of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons in 1905; .Grand Recorder of the Grand Council, R. and S. M. in 1905, and Grand Recorder of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of Missouri in1906. He petitioned Clintonville Lodge, Illinois, in 1865 and received the first and second Degree. But the Master's Degree was conferred on him in Calhoun Lodge No. 184, Calhoun, Missouri, in 1869. While living in Jefferson City he affiliated with Jefferson Lodge No. 43, and served as its Master in 1878. He later affiliated with Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas City, Missouri. He received the Capitular. Oegrees in Jefferson City Chapter No. 34, R. A. M., in 1877, and served as its 'High .Priest. He entered the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons in 1881 , -190.--


and was elected Grand High Priest in 1886. He received the Cryptic Degrees in Shekinah Council No. 24, R. and S. M., Kansas City, S'eptember 12, 1894, in which he served as Master in 1889, and was elected Grand Master of the Grand Council, R. and S. M. in 1903. The Masonic Orders of Christian I{nighthood were conferred upon him ill:, Prince of Peace Commandery No. 29, K. T., Jefferson City. He assisted in organizing Boanerges Commandery No. 34, K . T., Clinton, and served as its first Commander. Later he affiliated with Oriental Commandery No. 35, Kansas City, and served as its Commander for two years, 1885 and 1886. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R.from the fourth to the thirty-second inclusive from Albert Pike, and served as \~lise Master of Arieopagus Chapter, Rose Croix No.2, Kansas City, in 1891. I-Ie was crowned an honorary thirty-third in Washington City, October,. 1915.. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1879, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1881, advanced yearby year and elected Grand Master in 1884. t'Bob" is still in the harness, his eyes undimmed and his vigor unabated.

-191-


THE SIXTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-Third Communication.) St. Louis, October 13, A.D. 1885; A.L. 5885. This annual Communication \vas devoted chiefly to· the usual routine business. Grand Master Stevenson delivered a practical· address with several excursions into Masonic philosophy. He rendered no decisions, invested as directed by the Grand Lodge $8,000 in bonds, delivered a dissertation on the necessity of Lodges carrying fire insurance, and warned the Lodges not to expect the Grand Lodge to be charitable with them, when they neglected this important duty. He took strong grounds against Masonic peddlers vlith secret cypher rituals. He defined. Freemasonry in the following philosophical language: Freemasonry is but another name·· for theology. IvIodern preachers treat theology exoterically,. endeavoring to secure proselytes through an abstract presentation. Freemasonry pursues the same object, but esoterically through legend and symbol-the ancient and primitive method. It develops by a logical philosophical induction. It is not coercive but submissive, and therein consists its freedom.

In reference to the 'Masonic Home he gives the following prophesy: The wisdom of this course is ·now manifest; and thisl nursling,· which was so nearly strangled in parturition, may, with·· tender care, increase ill vitality. and grow, through a vigorous youth. to be a giant of usefulness.

In reference to the indigent Mason and . those dependent on them· he says: These are you-,.. brothers, your widows· and your orphans in charge. If you take them in the manner proposed, .duty will not permit· you, by acts of omission, to suffer them again to fallupon the cold charities of the world around. them. Now is the time for. you to determine what duty requires of you. 'If the command is "Advance/'theremust be no halting, faltering or falling by the way. If it is . HRetreat,"your position at this time gives a reasonable assurance that, if you abandon it, you may save the equipage. Deliberate consideration should precede . definite· action ; and I desire the Committee on the GrandMaster's

-192-


Address to formulate this matter. in such a way as will enable the representatives of Lodges to give emphatic expressions of sentiment.

I

should name the resources of the Institution as follolws:

PRIDE: SUBSCRIPTION} DONATION" ENDOWMENT} LEGACIES, INDUS'tRIES, INDIVIDUAl, TRUSTS.,

Pn

MrrE

BOXES, INTEREST ON INV~SJtMENT,

CAPITA ASSltSSMENTJ ROYAL ARCH BODI~S"KNIGHTS TEMPLA:R.S.

The Grand Secretary justly· complained of the delinquency. in making returns. This san1e old story of delinquency continued until a Grand Master was found who had nerve enough to enforce the law and arrested their Charters. This soon cured the evil. The Grand Secretary asked permission to form a registry of the membership. The card index system was not then known. The·· Committee· on Grievance made two important declarations, that.LodgesU. D. have the power to try Masons, whether affiliated or non-affiliated: That penal jurisdiction of· a Lodge is determined by the place where the offence is committed, and not by the place where the accused resides. M. W. Brother C.C. Woods, Chairman of the Committee, to whom the question of the Masonic Home had been referred, reported as follows: Your Committee on Industrial Masonic Home, respectfully report that they have effected a permanertt organization by the election of M. W. Bro.C.C. Woods, Chairman; M.W. Bro. R. F. Stevenson, Vice-Chairman, and W. Bro.L. C. Krauthoff, Secretary thereof. Upon a full consideration of the matters submitted to them, your committee conclude that in view of the importance of the· project, a most careful examination of the same should be practically made, so that it may be thoroughly understood and intelligently acted upon. \Ve recommend that this committee be empowered. to make· a .thorough examina.tion· of the question; to visit· similar institutions in other jurisdictions; to ascertain what propositions can be received; to investigate the merits of the several offers so made; to see what, if any, change in the act of incorporation of this Grand· Lodge will be required to permit this undertaking, and generally, to gather all other. infortlfation .that may be· of interest in the premises. Your co·mmittee believe that, when all the information has·. been gathered, it should be submitted. to the sub-193-


ordinate Lodges and the Craft of the State, together with an exhibit of the funds subj ect to be resorted to as resources for the undertaking, to the end that, when a definite report and recommendation is presented by y;our committee, all the details of the matter will be fully understood. Your committee believe that the matter is one of importance and merit, and worthy of the careful consideration of the Craft, and believe that the course recommended will best tend to present the same in an intelligent manner.

The question of severing relations with the Grand Orient of France came before the Grand Lodge and the following was adopted: Your Committee on Foreign Correspondence would submit the following, and ask its approval: WaltRSAS J The Grand Orient of France, some years since, by an official act, eliminated from the Ritual and Constitution of Freemasonry in that country, the name of God, and repudiated all allusions to Him as the Grand . ~. rchitect of the Universe; and, WHEREAS, 'Most of the Grand Lodges of the '\vorld have proclaimed non..intercourse with the Grand Orient of France, on account of its atheistical deliverances; and, WH~S" FreemasonrYJ without God, is nothing; and, WH!REAS" We must regard all Masons and Lodges who acknowledge and accept the atheistical and unmasonic doctrines, promulgated by said Grand Orient, as unworthy of our recogni?on; and, WHEUAS" There are Masons who hail from Lodges in that jurisdiction who disclaim and repudiate all and every sentiment of atheism enunciated by said Grand Orient of France, and, being good men and Masons, are entitled to recognition and consideration; therefore be it Resolved, By the Grand Lodge of Missouri, that all Masons hailing from Lodges acknowledging allegiance to the Grand Orient of France, who may apply to visit Lodges in this jurisdiction, be required, in addition to the usual test, to solemnly declare an unfeigned belief in the one living and true God. Resolved, that 1.-1nless said proposed visitor shall express his willingness to make such declaration, in advance of any test presented, that his claims to examination be ignored; arid, further, that he must affirm that he was made a Mason in a Lodge in said jurisdiction before the Grand Orient proclaimed its atheistical creed, and that the Lodge required and he assumed the obligations of Masonry in the name of God. JOHN D. VINCIL. --194-


The following Grand Officers . were installed: "JAMES W. BOYD, St. Joseph Grand Master GEO. R. HUNT, Warrensburg Deputy Grand Master WM. M. WILLIAMS, Boonville Grand Senior Warden JAMES P. WOOD, New London '" . Grand Junior Warden SA'M'L M. KENNARD, St. Louis Grand Treasurer JOHN D.VINCIL, St. Louis Grand· Secretary ALLAN McD10W'ELL, St. Louis Grand Lecturer HEN'RY L. ROGERS, .St. Louis Grand Senior Deacon LOUIS C. KRAUTHOFF, Jefferson City .. Grand Junior Deacon R£v. J. F. COOK, L.L.D., La Grange Grand Chaplain REV. M. M. GOODE, St. Joseph Grand Chaplain REV. H. M. BOUD,E, Richmond Grand Chaplain REV. H. G. JACKSON, Glasgow Grand Chaplain REV. STEP'HEN HULL, Kansas City Grand Chaplain REV. W. B. FARR, Independence Grand Chaplain ~v. H.B. DAVIS, Canton Grand Chaplain REUBEN BARNEY, Chillicothe Grand Marshal GEO. E. WALKER, Bonne .Terre Grand Marshal JOHN W. FARRIS, Lebanon Grand Sword Beare,. C. A. HIBBARD, Kansas City Grand Senio-r Steward JOHN MICHEL, St. Joseph Grand Senior Steward JAMES A. GORDON, Marshall Grand Pursuivant JAY L. TORREY, St. Louis Grand Orator REv..GED. J. WARREN, Gallatin Grand Orator JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis Grand Tyler.;}

Receipts $13,322.00; disbursements $18,961.38; cash balance $10,804.66. The seeming large amount dispersed is due to the purchasing of eight thousand dollars. worth of County bonds. Membership estimated 25,821, number of Lodges 531 ; number of Lodges not making returns fifteen; raised 1,000.

JAMES' W. BOYD, Grand Master, 1885. 11. W.Brother James W. Boyd, the£orty-second Grand Master was born September 24, 1847, in Laurens County, S'outh Carolina, graduated from Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina, June 26, 1871, studied law at Abbeville, North Carolina and. moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, in May, -195-


1874, where he has practiced his Profession ever since. He ,vas elected Prosecuting Attorney in 1885 and 1886. He was made a Master Mason in Clinton Lodge No. 43, Abbeville, North Carolina, in 1874, and upon his removal to St. Joseph, he affiliated with Zaradetha Lodge No. 189,September 14, 1875, in whi~h he served as Master in 1880 and 1881.

He was' exalted in St. Joseph Chapter No. 14, R. A. M., October 14, 1882, and served as its High Priest in 1884. The Cryptic Degrees were conferred on him in St. Joseph Council No.9,R. and S. M., November 17, 1893, and was Knighted in St. }osephCommandery No.4, K. T.,March 19, 1886. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1881, and was appointed Grand Orator. In 1883, he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced year by year, and elected Grand Master in October, 1885. His rise in the Grand Lodge in four years to the路 Grand Mastership is remarkable and very .fewmen were ever elected from the floor to the station of Grand Junior Warden. Brother Boyd has been a member of the Board of Directors of the 11asonic Home for years. He was a man of strong personality, affine presence and a forcible speaker. He died April 19, 1921, at his home in St. Toseph.

-196-


THE SIXTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-Fourth Communication.)

St.Louis, October 12, A.D. 1886; A.L. 5886. Twelve Past Grand Masters, eighty Past Masters and the representatives of 179 Lodges greeted Grand Master Boyd, when he opened the Grand Lodge. He submitted an excellent and eloquent address-report. He· put snap into his administration~ The delinquent Lodges felt a strong hand fall upon them and their belated returns were immediately forthcoming. If he had arrested, permanently, the Charte'rs of many of them, they would not have been a malodorous offense for years afterwards. He organized nine new Lodges, just nine too many. He arrested several Charters for \vorthy reasons, chiefly, for failing to clean out bad material. Booze and saloon keeping. drug stores, .were the chief cause of offense. One Lodge found two of its members' guilty,· but refused to inflict any penalty, even a reprimand.. ltis, possibly, that a majority of the members·hadpartaken from the same bottle in theaccused drug store. Regives a good account of the condition of the Craft. In his meditations, on the signs of the times, and of the fast age in which the people were living, he says: Such a day is a propitious time for the growth of false .doctrines, dangerous ideas, erroneous theories, pernicious fallacies, destructive and ruinous tendencies and practices. Things old,. are .discarded because they are old; things new, are accepted because· they are· new. The ruthless hand. of innovation would strike .down everything sacred,. and destroy everything "two years old" or upward. From the. sowing of these seeds we may expect to reap the harvest of the cyclone. Among the most pernicious doctrines which grow in such·. a soil, is Agnosticism. Already it is spending much time and wasting much talent in vainly endeavoring. to dethrone God, and to enthrone in. His stead a sort of omnipotent, blind·Nothing, by which it hopes to remove the foundation of aU· morality, virtue, obligation,duty, law, order, obedience, and thus·. to leave the. world ,in doubt, perplexity, distrust and chaos, follo,ved by disorder, disaster, ruin and death.

-197-


From the report of the Grand Secretary, even after the vigorous action by the Grand Master, twenty~tvlo Lodges failed to make returns, and thirty-t\vO more failed to pay dues. A total of fifty-four Lodges were remiss in their duty. The .cause for this condition lay somewhere, but it was not in evidence.

The distinguished Freemason, Rob Morris, was present and delivered an address, which is printed in the Proceedings. The Masonic Home was getting on its feet, but the Directors needed some instructions, judging from the following resolutions that were adopted ; Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Lodge, that the Board of the Masonic Home should, during the ensuing year, confine their labors within the following lines, viz: Soliciting contributions and bequests from Lodges, Chapters, Commanderiesand individuals. Investigating the claims of different localities for the site of the Ho,me, and carefully tabulating all propositions, with the advantages and disadvantages connected with each. Investigating plans for buildings and methods for the erection and maintenance of the Home, with the general plan to be pursued in its government and control. Di"sseminating throughout the Fraternity in this Grand Jurisdiction all possible information upon the general路 subject, to the end that all may be inf.ormed of the general purposes of the incorporation. And, in general, to carefully consider the whole question, even to minutest details, and publish to all in路 printed form their conclusions, that at the next annual路 meeting of this Grand Lodge a full understanding may be had路 and an intelligent vote secured upon any propositions submitted for indorsement or direction. It is understood that no investment in lands or buildings is to be made before the next Annual Communication.

The matter contained therein was worthy of thought, but fortunately, did not receive the attention that it should. The following Grand Officers were installed: "GEORGE R. HUNT, Warrensburg w. M. WILLIA'MS, Boonville JAS. P. WOOD, New London HENRY L. ROGERS,St. Louis

-198-

"

un~

GrandMaster Deputy Grand Master Grand Senior Warden Grand Junior Warden


SAMUEL M. KEN,NARD, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McD10WELL, St. Louis REv. THOS.. E. SHEP'HERD, Buffalo ~v. JOAB. SPEN'CER, Warrensburg REv. lAS. E. SHARP, Marshall, R~v. JAMES H. SHIELDS, St.Louis REV. A.M. COCKRILL, Blue prings REV. ]. J. WILKINS, Sedalia GEO. E. WALKER, Bonne Terre SEY'MOUR HOYT, Greenfield WM. H. CARPENTER, Centralia A. B. MARTINDALE, Williamsville GEO. C. DONEHOWER, Hannibal HARRY KEENE, St. Joseph JAS. A. AD,AMS, Columbia G.P. BIGELOW, King City THEODORE BRACE, P'aris O. H. TRAVERS, Springfield JOHN W'. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand

Treasurer Secretary Lecturer Chaplain Chaplain Chaplain

Chaplain Chaplain Chaplain Senior Deac.on Junior Deacon Marshal Marshal Sword Bearer Senior Steward lunior Steward Pursuivant Orator Orator Tyler. JJ

Receipts $13,640.60; disbursements $11,353.15 ; total assets

$22,527.11. Men1bership 26,571 ; number of Lodges 528; raised 947; affiliated 725 ; dimitted 841; suspended N. P. D. 524; net gain 889.

GEORGE R. HUNT, Grand Master, 1886. M. W." Brother George R. Hunt, the Forty-Third Grand Master, was born in Clark County, Ohio, November 28, 18~6. In early manhood he moved to Warrensburg, Missouri, and entered in the practice of Medicine. For a short period he was located in California, Missouri, but in 1850 returned to Warrensburg. He. was .made a Master Mason in Johnson Lodge No. 85, July 19, 1850, serving as Master in 18'52. Later he assisted in forming Corinthian Lodge No. 265, in 1868, in which he served as Master for eight years. He served as High Priest of -199-


DeMolay Chapter, R. A. M., in 1859, 1860 and 1861. The Chapter did not work during the Civil War, but on September 25, 1867, the Chapter was reorganized under the same name, and number, 'vhen he was elected High Priest, and reelected four years in succession. In the Grand Chapter he held the office of Grand Scribe in 1860 and Grand King in 路1861. He received the Cryptic Degrees in Cryptic Council No. 11, Warrensburg, and served as its Master. He received the Orders of Knighthood in St. Orner Commandery No. 11, at Sedalia, and afterward assisted in organizing Mary Commandery No. 19, at Warrensburg, October 26, 1872, in which he served as first Commander and served for eight years. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1869 and ~rved as District Deputy Grand Master. In 1883 he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced year by year and elected Grand Master in 1886. He died October 3, 1897, at Montrose, Missouri.

-200-


THE SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (Th Eighty-Fifth Communication.)

7

St. Louis, October 11, 1887 A.D.; A.L.. 5887. This annual Communication was the largest in attendance and will always stand as one of the most important and tense sessions in the history of the Grand Lodge. Grand Master Hunt made Masonic History. FIN AL~ TO SAI.,OON K~EPING.

Since Grand Master Lee A. Hall's decision as to the construction of Section 29, in reference to saloon keepers, as found in the Proceedings of 1884, it has been a disturbing factor in the Lodges. This was partly due to the cross eyed amendment that needed a judicial operatiot;l before it would focus. While the Grand Lodge, under the ·decislon of Grand Master Hall, held that saloon keeping was a Masonic .offense, yet, as hereafter shown, it. was held by some that· the abuse of saloon keeping,· only, was a Masonic offense, and that· the business of saloon keeping is liable to be dealt with; that the inte~pretation placed on this Section by the Grand Lodge· did not, and should not, make the law retroactive. This negative view came to a climax at this .session, and, as a result, forever settled this question in Missouri. Grand Master Hunt issued a c:ircular letter to the Lodges, in reference to the question of saloon keeping and requested that the law be strictly enforced.. ·10 .Napthali Lodge No. 25, charges were preferred against several Brethren who were engaged in the saloon business. The trials were a farce. There was no doubt of the facts alleged, yet aU·were acquitted bya large vote.. Thereupon the.· Grand Master arrested the· Charter of the Lodge. The circular letter and the arrest of the Charter vJerereferred taa special Committee consisting. ofNoahM. Givan, J.. W.Boyd, J. P. Blanton, Theodore Brace and R~ F . Stevenson. The Committee reported as follows: ~201-


"That the circular letter of the Grand Master is a plain and forcible statement of what the law of the Grand Lodge is in regard to saloon keeping, j.nd is also a. strong appeal to the Lodges to enforce the law. The Grand 11aster does not discuss the propriety of the law, but insists that while it is the law, it should-be obeyed. With this sentiment all must agree. Defiance of law is disloyalty to the Order. The Constitution of the Grand Lodge declares that 'the Grand Lodge shall be the supreme authority in the State of Missouri.' As such it must be respected. "With respect to Naphtali Lodge, the facts seem to be that there has existed a sentiment among many O'f its members that the law in regard to saloon keeping should not apply to those who were engaged in the business before 1882; that there was strong opposition to any prosecutions .under the law until it should be determined that the Grand Lodge would not modify it, so that it should not apply to saloon keepers who were in the business when they were made Masons, or who were such prior to 1882; that the Master "vas in sympathy with this sentiment, but, believing it to be his duty to enforce the law directed that charges should be preferred, which was accordingly done. At the trial many ludicrous scenes were enacted, much excitement prevailed and many foolish things said. Your Committee have listened patiently to all that has been said' by the members, and we are assured by all that if the Charter be restored the Lodge will respect and enforce the law. That its former action was not the result of any intentional disloyalty to the Grand' Lodge, but rather of a combination of circumstances. N aphtali is one of the oldest Lodges in the State, being nearly a half-century old, and contains among its membership some who have spent the greater portion of their .1ives within its sacred portals. These facts appeal strongly for a charitable view of the errors committed by them, for which their Charter was properly arrested. However venerable it may be with age, it should know that defiance of law cannot be tolerated; that the interpretation placed upon any law by the Grand Lodge must be the law to the subordinate Lodge; that when the Grand Lodge has declared, in express terms,. as it has repeatedly done, that saloon-keeping is a Masonic offense, then that is the law for the government of the subordinate Lodge upon that question. When charges are preferred against any member for that offense, and there is no questiol1: of guilt, a refusal to so find and inflict adequate punishment is a defiance of the authority of the Grand Lodge. Such conduct places a Lodge in contempt of the Grand Lodge. It thereby arrogates to itself the prerogatives of the Grand Lodge. It becomes a law unto itself, and does not deserve existence t>

-202-


as a Lodge. In view of the circumstances of this case, and especially with the assurances that the la,v of the Grand Lodge in rega.rd to saloon-keeping Masons will be enforced in N aphtali Lodge, we recommend that its Charter be resto-red. "The restoration of this Charter must not be construed as a disapproval of the action of the Grand Master in arresting it, but is simply a merciful exercise of the prerogatives of the Grand Lodge in its sovereign capacity in dealing with its subordinate Lodges. Its laws must be enforced, and while the Grand Lodge will not interfere with the reasonable discretion with which each Lodge is invested in enforcing the law, at the same time each Lodge beheld responsible· for the manner in which that duty is performed. When charges are preferred against· a Brother for any· 'Masonic offense, then the Lodge has no alternative but to go on ,vith the trial, and if it fails to punish when guilt is clearly established, that will be such defiance o·f the law of the Grand Lodge as will forfeit the right of the Lodge to exist."

M.. W .. Brother Rufus E. Anderson offered a substitute report for that of the Committee. This substitute was as follows: "As a substitute for· so much of the report of the Committee as refers to· the circular of the Grand .Master, it is the sense of this Grand Lodge that the Grand Master in said circular was mistaken· in his interpretation of the .law and· the tights of subordinate L.odges in this Grand Jurisdiction. The circular, while it proposes to promulgate the law on the subject of saloon-keeping, goes farther·· than the law, and if enforced takes from the subordinate Lodge a right and privilege which we are satisfied this Grand Lodge has· ever regarded as sacred and has never sought to interfere with, and that is the inherent right to judge of the worthiness of its melnbers, and determine for itself when and to what extent it shall discipline them. The law (if law it can be termed), referred to in the circular, does not say that the saloon-keeper shall be dealt with for unmasonic·· conduct, and we regret that the Grand Master did not quote the whole of the resolution and add the· clause which says, 'And tho'se engaged in that business are liable to be dealt with for unmasonic conduct.' The force and effect of this r~solution has been interpreted by this Grand Body, and its last utterance on that subject was made·in 1884, when, upon the report of five of its Past Grand Masters as the Committee on Jurisprudence which was unaniraously adopted, it said: 'Under the terms of the declaration it is con:petent for any Lodge t6 try its saloonkeepers for unmasonic conduct, although it does not,· except by implication, say they shall be so disciplined.' In 1870, when there was no

-203-


agitation outside 'on this subj ect, and the true spirit of Masonry, unbiased by outside pressure, was uppermQst in the hearts of its mem.. bers, this Grand Lodge endorsed the· views of its Grand Master on this subj ect as follows: 'Although having no·· special commendations to pass on the business of dram-shop keeping, yet as to those therein engaged as well· as to all others, the rule ought to be fairly applied. Noone is bound to patronize it, and if any shall choose this evil way and pursue it to habitual drunkenness, such, of course, bring them.. selves under the penalty of our ·law. * * * At the same time I should be far from saying that a Mason in this business may not so conduct it, in reference to individuals, as to violate the positive duty he owes his Brother, and in such wise as to call forth the discipline of the Lodge. To instances of. wilful enticement be offered to or advantage taken of a Brother . to lead him astray, .such conduct would be within the scope of Lodge discipline; not as a charge against a general business, but as criminal .conduct practised by one Mason against another, to his injury.' This we regard as the only true, fair and Masonic interpretation of the resolution in question 'when it says the saloon-keeper· is l,iable· to be dealt with. .This 'circular' goes beyond what we believe to bea fair interpretation of the law, and not only requires the Lodge, at its peril and without· discrimination, to declare anyone who directly deals in liquor a saloon-keeper, and deprive him of his Masonic life, but demand that the members of the Lodge shall, whatever may be their· conscientious convictions on the subject, vote him guilty and punish him, or lose their Masonic life, and this, too, notwithstanding the Brother was· engaged in the business at the time he .was made a Mason and before the resolution, was adopted. We cannot think· the Grand Lodge intended it to be retroactive in its operation, or that it is consonant with the true spirit of Masonry to so interpret it. Be it therefore resolved that the action of the Grand Master in issuing. said circular be not concurred in."

While the report of the" Committee· and the substitute. are lengthy, yet they . are given, to show clearly, asamatter of history,· the :views prevailing. on this all-absorbing and might be justly termed, a National Masonic issue.. The substitute motion was defeated. Its ·defeat sounded·· the death· knell of .saloon keeping in Freemasonry in Missouri. . One year after this action, in 1888, all saloon keepers in .Freemasonry in Missouri . . had·quit the business or had taken their dimits. The vote on this question, ~204-


both the individual lnenlbers, such as Grand Lodge . Officers, Past Masters, Masters and Wardens, and the Lodges by numbers, is given in the minutes 'in the Grand Lodge. The Lodge vote stood: for substitute, forty-nine Lodges, with 245 votes; against substitute, .123 Lodges with 615 votes; Grand Officers: for substitute, Henry L. Rogers; against .substitute, William M.Williams, JamesP. Wood, S. M. Kennard,. J.• D.' Vincil, Allan McDowell, C. H. Briggs, GeorgeE.Walker, Seymour Moyt, W. H.Carpenter, Harry Keen- and Theodore Brace. ·Past Grand Masters: for .substitute, R. E. Anderson and S. H. Saunders; against substitute, Joseph S. Browne, N. M. Givan, C. C. Woods, Lee A. Hall, James W. Boyd, and James E. Cadle. The .vote of the Past Masters, Masters, and Wardens stood as follows: for substitute 96, against substitute 166. Total vote, for substitute 350, against substitute 800.. If anyone is intere?ted as to which side the members present voted, consult the Proceedings of 1887 pages 64-65-66-67 where .their names are enrolled. The only Grand Officer vvho voted for the substitute disappeared from the list of the Grand Officers at the annual election. MASONIC HOME

The Committee on Masonic Home, withM. W. Brother N. M. Givan as Chairman, reported that as the result of a circular letter sent out on behal£of organizing. a ·Home, the receipt from Lodges, individuals, Chapters, and Commanderies amounted to $24,942.00. This with the appropriation of the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter, and Charity Day collections brought the total amount up to $69,442. TRe Committee on the erection· ·of .proper buildings and management of a home, recommended a.· cottage plan with a manager, matron, lady teacher, a cook, and a farmer in charge. ~ut no action was taken until a sufficient fund had been se'cured, and a suitable location selected. -·2(}5~


The following Grand' Officers were installed: "WILLIAMM. WILLIAMS, Boonville: Grand Master. JAIMES P . WOOD, New London Deputy Grand Master. THEODORE BRACE, Paris Grand Senior Warden. GEORGE E.WALKER, Potosi Grand Junior Warden. SAM'LM. KENNARD, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN D.VINCIL, St. Louis Grand Secretary. ALL.AN McDOWELL, St.Louis Grand Lecturer. Rev. C.. H.. BRIGGS, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. Rev. B. G. TUTT, D.D., Liberty Grand Chaplain. Rev. J. J. WILKINS, Sedalia Grand Chaplain. Rev. J. M. CHAN,EY, D.D., Independence .. Grand Chaplain. Rev. CHARLES B. POWERS, St. Joseph .. Grand Chaplain. Rev. ALFRED E. ROGERS, Fulton Grand Chaplain. Rev. T. E. SHEPHERD, Buffalo Grand Chaplain. TRUSTEN P. DYER, St. Louis Grand Senior Deacon. B. ·H. INGRAM, Sedalia Grand Junior Deacon. W. R. EDGAR, Ironton Grand Marshal. JAY·L. TORREY, St. Louis GrandMarshal. CHARLES J. WALKER, Wentzville Grand Sword Bearer. R. E. WITT, Fayette Grand Senior Steward. W. A. THOMS, Springfield Grand Junior Steward. F. E. BRUTON, Sturgeon Grand Pursuivant. ]. P. BLANTON, Kirksville Grand Orator. JOHN W. FARRIS, Lebanon Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN, St.Louis Grand Tyler/I

Receipts $18,951.89; disbursements $12,155.22; balance $19,888.78; total assets $23,888.78; membership 25,728; decrease 438; number of Lodges 534; raised 893; dimitted 894.

WILLIAM MUIR WILLIAMS, c;.rand Master, 1887. M. W. Brother William·M. Williams, the forty-fourth Grand Master, was born February 4, 1850, in Boonville, Missouri, and was named after his relative, Past Grand Master William D. Muir. He was educated in Kemper College,· Boonville. After graduation he studied Law and commenced practice in 1873. He attained the position of one of the ablest Jurists in the State and ·reluctantly accepted an election to the Supreme -206-


Court. This position he filled with the greatest satisfaction to .the people. He was made a Master Mason in Cooper Lodge No. 36, Boonville, in 1872, and served as its .Master.. He received the Capitular Degrees in Boonville Chapter N 0.60, R. A. 1\1:., and served several years as High Priest. He received the Masonic Order of Christian Knighthood in .Temple Commandery No. 38, Fayette, and at the organization of Olivet Commandery, K. T., Boonville, he ,vas elected its first Commander. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1875, was appointed Grand Orator in 1882; appointed Grand S'enior Deacon in 1883. He was elected Grand Junior Warden in 1884, advanced yearly and elected Grand Master in 1887. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home fora number of years but declined further election. After retiring from the Grand Mastership, Brother Williams achieved distinction as Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence. Many of his findings were路 notable and. became a part of the organic lavv of the Grand Lodge, He was a lovable character, unobtrusive and modest, but his name and reputation are indelibly fixed in the history of the Grand Lodge. He died at his home in Boonville, September 18, 1916, while the Grand Lodge was in session. I-lis funeral was conducted by the Grand Lodge.

-207-


THE SIXTY-EIGHTH· ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-Sixth Communication.)

St. Lou.is, October 9, 1888 A.D.; A.L. 5888. This session of the Grand Lodge might be classed as .the optimistic one. Grand Master William's address was full of high hopes. The tide that had been running out in Masonic matters, for many years, in· Missouri, had reached its ebb, and the white caps of the waves of returning gro\vth could be seen coming. After the Civil War, Freemasonry in Missouri had six· years of phenominal growth; the ebbing tide set· in and for years there was a loss, then a slight recovery,withanother loss. But in 1888, after the memorable session of 1887, everything Masonically looked· bright. The saloon question had been settled and as Grand Master Williams said: "The res~tlt is,. that no member of· any Lodg~ under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge in }Jissouri, is now engaged in the business of saloon keeping." ~rASONlC HOM~

The Masonic Home received a hearty endorsement, and,···as the Grand Secretary puts it,. there was a. regular love feast over the accomplishment of a definite establishment of the Home. .The COlnmittee· on· the Home reported,· that several 10'cations with strong inducements had been offered, but it was the unanimous opinion of the Committee, that the Home should be located in St. Louis.· ··The Committee also reported that during the Triennial. Session of the Grand Encampment Knights Templar, held in St. Louis in 1886, a Knights Templar Endowment fund of $35,000 had been raised and presented to the Home. The revenues were increasing and the outlook seemed ·bright. The only· feature .. 0£ establishing. the Home on a firm.basis had so farbeenomitted,-a permanent source of income. It has long ago been demonstrated that, "The passing of the hat" will not produce permanency. Grand .Master Williams announced a decision, which ·was -208-


approved, that was far~reaching and established a. legal procedure of much importance. It is as follows: Where· the pleadings in a civil suit, to which a 'Mason is a party, and in which he has the right, as wen as the opportunity, to appear, present the sole issue as. to his .guilt or innocence of a crime, the judgment or decree therein is competent evidence in a Masonic trial for the same offense.

The distinguished visitors present at this Session were M. W. Brother Edwin C. Blackman, GrandMaster and R. W. Brother Theodore S.Parvin, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Iowa. The following Grand Offiters were installed: "Bro. JAMES P. WOOD, New London M. W. Grand Master. Bro. THEODORE BRACE, Jefferson City. D. Grand Master. Bro. GEO. E. WALKER, Potosi. .........• Grand Senior Warden. Bro. B. H. IN~GRAM, Sedalia Grand Junior Warden. Bro. SAMUEL M. KENNARD, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. Bro. JOHN D. VI NCIL, St. Louis .....•.. Grand Secretary. Rev. C.H. BRIGGS, Independence Grand Chaplain. Elder JACOB HUGLEY, Paris Grand Chaplain. Rev. J.L. LAWLESS, St. Joseph Grand Chaplain. Rev. J. J. WILKINS, Sedalia Grand Chaplain. Rev.. B.. G. TUTT, Liberty ~ Grand Chaplain. Rev. A. E. ROGERS, Fulton Grand Chaplain. Elder THOS. E.. SHEPHERD, Buffalo Grand Chaplain.. R. E. COLLINS, St. Louis Grand Senior Deacon. ]. P. BLANTON, Kirksville " Grand Junior Deacon. JAY L. TORREY, St.Louis o • • Grand Marshal. R. E.·WITT, Fayette Grand· Marshal. E. W.BLISS, Potosi. Grand Sword Bearer.. F.E. BRUTON, Sturgeon o ••• Grand Senior Steward. J. M. LAN'GSDALE, Independence Grand Junior Steward. JOHN R. FERGUSON, Springfield Grand PursuifJant. CHAMP CLARK, Bowling Green Grana Orator. W. R.EDGAR, Ironton Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis Gra1~a .Tyler." 0

•••

An amendment to the Constitution was introduced by Brother. A. M. Hough,. reducing the number of Grand Cliaplains f.rom seven to two. Receipts $17,401.71 ;..·.disbursements $25,897.00; balance $11 1393.49..


Membership 26,169. Number of Lodges 537; number of Lodges failing to make returns fourteen; raised 1,088; affiliated 848; dimitted 911; suspended for N. P. D. 641; net gain 854. In the Proceedings appears a memorial tablet to M. W. Brother John W. Luke who died during the year.

JAMES P. WOOD, Grand Master, 1888. M. W . Brother James P. Wood, the forty-fifth Grand Master, was born in Ralls County, Missouri, July 6, 1854. He graduated from the Christian College, Canton, Missouri, at the age of twenty years.. He was admitted to the Bar in 1875, began practicing law in New London, elected Prosecuting Attorney in 1880 and 1882, elected to the State Senate in 1884 and while in the Senate he championed the famous "Wood Local Option Law." He received the Master's Degree in Monroe Lodge No. 64, Monroe City, after\vards affiliated ,vith N evv London Lodge No. 307, in which he served as Master for three years. He received the Capitular Degrees in Ralls Chapter No. 55, R. A. M., in 1880, and served as High Priest one year. He appeared in the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons in 1883, and was elected Grand High Priest in 1891. He was Knighted in Excalibar Commandery No. 5,"1<. T .. Hannibal, and later affiliated with Cyrene CommanderyNo. 12, Bowling Green. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1879. In 1881, he "vas appointed Grand Junior Steward,. appointed Grand Orator in 1882-1883, appointed路 Grand S'enior Deacon in 1884, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1885, and reached the Grand Mastership in 1888. He died June 18, 1895, as the result ofa railroad accident. Brotner Wood was comparatively young, .. and had he lived he would have been a strong factor in the history of the Craft. -21()-


THE SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL C01iMUNICATION. . (1"'he Eighty-Seventh Communication.) St. Louis;1 October 15, A.D. 1889; A.L. 5889. This annual session continued in the same optimistic vein as the previous one. Grand Master Wood in his address said: Lodges that have been Hdormant" for several years, report an awakening to new life, increased attendance, and an influx of candidates for our mysteries. This is encouraging, and a sure precursor of still better days to follow, and even more prosperous times to come.

All the reports of the Officers and of the Committees bear out the Grand Master's statement. DEDICATION OF THE HOME

The most important event of the year, and of which the Grand Master was justly proud, was the dedication of the Masonic Home. This dedication occurred June 15, 1889, with elaborate and interesting ceremonies. The Directors of the Home, as per authority of the Grand Lodge, 'had purchased fifteen acres of land situated on, Delmar Avenue, near Union Avenue, in western St. Louis; on which was a large two story . brick mansion with twenty rooms, stables and out buildings. 路Thepurchase price was $40,000;, $15,000 paid in cash, the balance in December following. Had these fifteen acres remained in possession of the Grand Lodge, until twenty years later, they would have been a bonanza. The full ceremonies of the dedication are published in the Proceedings of 1889. As a full history of the Masonic Home will appear 路under a separate head in this volume, all ,reference, except legislative, will be omitted hereafter. The Grand Master made two important decisions in reference to a quorum of the members voting on a ballot, the Grand Master held: The Tyler shall, by his presence in his place at the outer door, as... sist in forming a quorum. And the failure or refusal of theW.. M. to invite the Tyler in to vote on the advancement of a candidate whose

-211-


examination he had not heard, does not vitiate the result of the ballot In such a case, although only sir· halls appear in the ballot box-allof them being white~the candidate is duly elected.

In reference to the use of a "Summons," he decided: Although the· Master, or the Lodge has the RIGH'!' to summon any member of the Lodge, for any purpose within the scope and business of Masonry ; yet, this right of summons must not be exercised except in cases of. extreme· emergency. It· follows, therefore, that the summoning of members to attend Lodge meetings on ordinary occasions, is manifestly· improper and unreasonable, and the Master, or the Lodge guilty of such arbitrary action, should be held responsible therefor.

The following Grand Officers were installed: "THEODORE BRACE, Jefferson City "M. W" G. Master. GEO. E. WALKER, Potosi. Deputy Grand Master. B.H.. INGRAM, Sedalia Grand Senior Warden. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis ".. Grand Junior Warden. SA'MUEL M. KENNARD, St.. Louis ... .•. Grand Treasurer. JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis Grand Secretary. ALLAN McDOWELL, St.LQuis ".....• Grand Lecturer. Rev. C. H. BRIGGS, Independence ......... .• Grand Chaplain. Elder FREDERICK V. LOOS, Higginsville, Grand Chaplain. LEROYB. VALLIANT, St. Louis Grand Senior Deacon. CHAMP CLARK, Bowling Green Grand Jun,ior Deacon. H. PENNFIELD, N:evada Grand Marshal. WILLIAM RICHARDSON, St. Louis Grand Marshal.. SAMtLC.. RHODES, Kansas City Grana Sword Bearer. JAMES T. DUNN, Stanberry ·Grand Senior Steward. WILLIAM· B.. WILSON, Cape Girardeau Grand Junior Steward. E. F. HARTZELL, St. Joseph Grand Pursuivant. P. J. COSTON, Carthage Grand Orator. IA'YES E.DRAKE, Carrollton Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis Grand Tyler.

Receipts $13,683.87; disbursements $16,257.35 ; balance .$8,820.01. It will be observed that the Masonic Home had begun its milking process on the revenues of the Grand Lodge as the balance would indicate. Membership 26,945. Number of Lodges 542 ; raised 1,165;.affiliated 827; dimitted 922; ,.suspended N. P. D. 587;.net gain .776. -212-


THEODORE BRACE, Grand Master, 1889. M. W. Brother 'fheodore Brace, the forty-sixth Grand Mas-ter, was born in the State of Maryland June 10, 1835. He engaged in the· wholesale Grocery business, also served as ·a Clerk in the Circuit Court and in the Bank. He studied law during his spare time and was admitted to the Bar·in 1856 in Bloomfield, Iowa. He came to Missouri in 1857. and located in Paris, Missouri, where he followed his profession. In 1861 he entered the Confederate Army and emerged a Colonel at the close of the War. He returned to his Profession in Paris, when in 1874 he was elected S'tate Senator, in' 1880 elected Judge of the Sixteenth· Judicial District. In 1886, he waselected to the Supreme Court, and reelected until the age limit compelled his retirement. .Since thOen-he has resided in his old home in Paris. He was'made a Master Mason in.Paris Union Lodge No. 19, Paris, in 1864, and served as its Master in 1886a:nd' reelected for four. terms. In .the Chapter of Royal Arch . Masons he served as High Priest in 1870, and Commander of his Commandery in 1886. He first· appeared in .the Grand Lodge in 1866.· He was appointed Grand Marshal in· 1872 and Grand Orator in 1886. In 1887, he was elected Grand Senior Warden, advanced regularly and elected Grand Master in 1889. Brother Brace rarely attended the Grand Lodge for many years. He died May 27, 1921, aged 86 years.


THE SEVENTIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-Eighth Communication.)

St. Louis, Octobe1" 14, 1890 A.D.; A.L. 5890. Grand Master Brace's year Vias an administrative one and not mere sentin1ent. For years Lodges had been delinquent in making returns. The Grand Lodge resolved and re-resolved, on this matter, but the Grand Masters did nothing. Grand Master Brace took action by arresting the Charters of these delinquents, 路and imn1ediately there was a rattling of dry bones. 'The lesson was so healthy, that the Grand Secretary reported-only two Lodges delinquent, instead of a dozen or more. Delinquency in making returns is too often due to incompetency in the Officers of subordinate Lodges, as well as in Grand Masters not enforcing the law. On Jurisprudence, he outlined for. the subordinate Lodges eleven abstract propositions. In reference toUdomicile" and "residence" he held: Domicile and residen.ce are not, however, strictissime j-ttre, synonymous, although in many enactments for all practicable purposes, they may be treated as convertible terms. In a general way domicile may be defined as a place where a man has his "true, fixed and permanent home, and principal establishment to which, whenever he is absent, he has the intention of returning." Residence, the place where a man has "a fixed and permanent abode路 or dwelling-place for the time being." It will be observed from these definitions, a man may have his domicile at one place in the State and his residence at another. A proper observance of this distinction would seem to relieve the question of all difficulty. '

He called attention to the condition of the finances of the Grand Lodge, that the balance in the Treasury was not sufficient to meet the expenses, that this deficit was due to having paid for the Masonic Home, since 1888 the sum of $25,500. That in view 0-拢 this fact, the . Grand Lodge could not make an appropriation to the Home this year. He also stated that the Home could not be sustained by depending on the subordinate Lodges to make voluntary contributions. There must -214-.


be a permanent source of income. Brother Brace spoke prophetically, but it evidently fell on deaf ears. He expressed much satisfaction of the condition of the Craft and paid due tribute to the memory of M. W. Brother James E. Cadle, Past GrandMaster, who died July 8, 1890. Grand Secretary Vinci! endorsed the words of the Grand Master as to the low condition of the finances of the Grand Lodge, and 'said" "If an appropriation is made to the Home, it cannot be paid." The following important amendment to the By-Laws was submitted by W. Brother Leslie O'Rear of Marshall. This amendment will come up in 1891 and reads as follows: Be it resolved by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State Missouri~That the By-La\vs be amended by adding a new Section to Article XV!., entitled, "Chartered Lodges/' as follows: SEC. 21 (a) . Every chartered Lodge under this Jurisdiction shall pay to the Grand Lodge, for the benefit of the ~fasonic Widows' and Orphans' Hornet the sum of fifty cents for each Master Mason reported as a member in the Annual Returns, except those \vhose dues have,Ior good causet been remitted; said dues to be paid at the same time as the dues provided for in Section 21, of this Article..

of

Ali honor to Brother O'Rear who had the foresight of doing something tangible for the Home.. Fifty cents in cash is worth tons in mere sentimental wind. Look out for next year when the Cltight-wads'" will call together their cohorts. From the report of the' Committee on Ways and Means, the, expenses of ,the Grand Lodge were nearing the nine thousand dollar figure. The Grand S'ecretary received $2,500 plus $500 for reportoD Correspondence, while the Grand Lecturer received $2,250. The report of the Treasurer of the Home' showed assets of $104,838.22; amount disbursed during the year $33,155.68; cash balance $6,148.72; 25 were, admitted to the Home, 6 of whom came from one Lodge, 4 from another, and 3 from another. The Home was a fine thing for three Lodges at least. The following Grand Officers were installed: -215-


dBro. Geo. E. WALKER, St. Louis

Grand Master. B. H. IN路GRAM, Sedalia Deputy Grand Master. " JOHN R. PARSONS, St. Louis Senior Grand Warden. et EIARRY KEENE, St. Joseph Junior Grand Warden. SAM'L M. KENNARD, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. U JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis Grand Secretar:>'. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Grand Lecturer. Rev. C. H. BRIGGS, Nevada Grand Chaplain. U JNO. W.ROBINSON, Fredericktown. Grand Chaplain. J. B. THOMAS, Albany Granq, Senior Deacon. JOHNW. F.A.. RRIS, Lebanon.. " Grand Junior Deacon. R.. E. CULVER, St. Joseph Grand Orator. LESLIE O'REAR, 'Marshall .. " Grand Orator. WM.RICHARDSON, St. Louis Grand Marshal. A. M.. HOlTGH, Jefferson City Grand Marshal. ELWYN PRICE,'-' Versailles Grand Swo1'd Bearer. J. E. EATON, Caledonia Grand Pursuivant. GEO. E.MAYHALL, New London Gra'ltd Senior Ste'loard.. E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City Grand Junior Steurard. JOHN W.OWEN, St. Louis Grand T:>'ler." U

U

Receipts 路$13,841.85; disbursements $16,232.79; balance $6,429.07. Membership 27,824. Nun1ber of Lodges 548; delinquentLodges 2; raised 1,482; affiliated 1,017; din1itted 1,OO5;suspended N.P. D. 430. Net gain 879.

GEORGEE. WALKER, G.rand ]Vlaster, 1890. M. W. Brother George E. Walker, the forty-seventh Grand Master,\\ras born in November, 1850, at Tappahannock, Virginia. In the late sixties he moved 路to 1fissouri and lO'cated at Potosi, entering the Inercantile business. In 1876 he was connectedwith a large. mining and manufacturing corporation, and moved to Bonne Terre. In 1886 he entered the wholesale hat business in S1. 路Louis. He was made.a Master Mason in Samaritan Lodge. No. 424, at Bonne Terre, April 8, 1882, and served as its Master for three years. He received the Capitular Degrees. in CopeStone Chapter No. 33, 1<..A. 11., at. DeSoto, October 24, 1882; -216-


past the Circle in Hiram Council No.1, R. and S. M., St. Louis, May 12, 1886, and Knighted in St. Louis Commandery No.1, K. T., August 8, 1883. No information as to any official station having been held by him in these Bodies is at hand. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1882. In 1886 he was appointed Grand S'eniorD:eacon. In 1887 he was elected Grand Junior Warden, ,advanced regularly until in 1890 he was elected Grand lVlaster. He appeared only a few times in the Grand Lodge after he retired from the Grand Mastership. He died' July 8, 1919.


THE SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Eighty-Ninth Communication.) Kansas City, October 13, A.D. 1891; A.L. 5891. This annual Comlnunication is an historic one, as it was the first annual Session held in Kansas City, and the· first farther west than Boonville. Early in the history of the Grand Lodge, several adjourned sessions were held in Lexington in reference to the. College. This session was also the largest in point of attendance, in the history of the Grand Lodge, as well as the important legislation enacted in reference to the Masonic· Home. The Session was held in Strope's Hall, on Central St., near Ninth, and the crowd tested the capacity of the HalL On the evening of the second day, the Lodges of Kansas City gave a banquet to the Grand Lodge, which was a decided innovation of the usual program of the session. This banquet ,vas served on the second floor of the Market House,known as Vineyard's Hall, at Eighth and McGee, ,vith the usual elaborate menu and oratorical. stunts. It ,vas a· great event THE HOME AND FIFTY CENTS

The chief event of the session was the adoption of the O'Rear amendment, levying a fifty cent assessn1ent on the membership. for the supporto£ the Home. Judging from the apparent. elnotional state of many of the members over the Home, at former sessions, it did not appear that any opposition to this amendment would materialize. But, alas, to many, charity is a good thing "if it does not· cost anything. The battle over the amendment, waged long and fur~ous, resulting in its adoption by the small majority of 39, out of a total of 1565 votes. The vote by Lodges stood: for, 535 ; against, 625 ; individual vote, for, 267; against, 138. The vote of the Past Masters decided·the issue for the Home. This nleager majority is astounding. The names of the Lodges and of the individuals, as to how they voted, are· not given in the minutes of the Proceedings. If it \vere given, the perversity of human -218-


nature might have shown that some Lodges whos~ indigents \vere in the Honle, voted against assessing themselves for th,eir support. Charity, benevolence, and a Masonic Home, are grand and glorious things in the minds of some, provided, some one else pays the bilL, Sentimental wind is all right, but it needs cash to make it go.

Tt is hurniliating, that this practical demonstration, of Freemasonry, the greatest enterprise ever launched, or ever can be launched, in a Grand Lodge of Masons,received so slnall a Inajority. It is well that the Grand Secretary did not publish the names of the negative voters,'because, after seeing their names on record, and after considering their action in the true light of Freemasonry; the suicide list might have been increased in Missouri. . The only objection that could have been urged against the amendment v\ras, that the anlendillent should have been two dollars, instead of fifty cents. $14,000 will not maintain and buildupa Masonic Home very long, without resorting to llpassing the hat," which the Grand Lodge has ,done, too long. Yet" possibly, a small bite is better thana big bite, in happy anticipation. An amendluent was introduced by Harry Keene and S'. H. Black, looking toward a contribution of five dollars 'to ,the Jiome froIn, each applicant to the Mysteries. It failed, but the amendment was, a forerunner â&#x201A;Ź)f the action ofthe Grand Lodge in 1920, "then the Grand Lodge reached the top of:Pisga's Mount, in a grand halleluJah. The' Grand Master, Deputy GrandMaster, Grand Senior W<l,.rdenandGrand Junior Warden, were made eX-Qfficio memv,ers of the Board of Directors of the Home. Grand Master Walker's" address was .aggressive and' oonstr:1\Ictive. 'He paid due' tribute to the memories of M. W. BrotherM.H. MacFarland, P.G. M., andM. W. Brother


John H. Turner, P. G. M. who had died during the year. He presented the follovving interesting relative statistics: The population of Missouri in 1820, according to the census, was

66,557. The Grand Lodge was formed in April, 1821, by three Lodges, with a membership of eighty-four. In 1890, the State had within its bo~ders, 2,679,184 souls, while the Grand Lodge has to-day on its roll 556 Lodges, chartered and under Dispensation, with a melnbership in round figures of 28,000.

The Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge of I(ansas came to visit their l\tIissouri Brethren viz., Andre\v W. Callahan, G. M.; David B. Fuller, D. G.M. ;Vlilliam D. Thompson, G. S. W.; Christian Beck, G. T.; John 1-I. Brown, G. S.; Jacob DeWitt, G. S. D.; B. H. Beatte, G. S. B., and Dwight Byington, P. G. D. M. The follovving Grand Officers \vere installed: "B. H. IN:GRAM, Sedalia JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis ' Hl\RRY KEENE, St. Joseph }. B. THOMAS, Albany SAM. M. KENNARD, St. Louis JOHN D'. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Rev. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette Rev. J. W. ROBIN'SON, Bridgeton A. M. HOUGH,Je:fferson City D. A. JAMISON, St. Louis D. A. DEARMAND, Butler GEO. F. P'UTNAM, Kansas City E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City WM. RICHARDSON, St. Louis W. V. Hi\. Y, Lamar ]. C. HEARNE, St. Joseph C.. D.McCOY, 'Independence A. H. KOLLMEYER, New Florence JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Master. Deputy Gral"td Master. Grand Senior Warde1h Grand Junior Warden. Grand Treasu1'"er. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Gra1''J,d Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. Grattd Senior Ste'lvard. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Tyler.

The Committee on Revision of the Code was given another year to complete its report. Receipts $14,429.00; disbursements $11,287.60; balance $9,570.47. Membership 28,816. Number of Lodges 544; raised 1,692; affiliated 1,044; dimitted 1,061 ; 'suspended' N.P. D. 484; .net gaain992. -220~


BENTON H. INGRAM, . Grand Master} 1891. M. W. Brother Benton H. Ingram, the forty-eighth Grand Master was born in Green County, Missouri, November 24, 1838. His early life. ,vas spent on a farm. Later he lived in Springfield and engaged in the mercantile business, until he moved to Sedalia. In 1872, he was elected Collector of Pettis County, afterwards elected Circuit Clerk for a number of years, until 1887 he engaged in the Insurance business He was made a Master Mason in Sedalia Lodge No. 236, in 1864, in which he served as l\1aster for four years. There are no data as to his connection with any other Masonic Bodies. In.later years he resided in Kansas City. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1866. He served as D. D. G. M.and D. D. G. L. for a number of years. His reputation as a ritualist was excellent. In 1888 he was elected Grand Junior ,\i\Tarden, advanced yearly, and in 1891 was elected Grand Master. He died suddenly, November 10, 1900. His remains were interred at S'eClalia. His obsequies were conducted by the Grand Lpdge.

--221-


trHE SEVEN'TY-SECOND·ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Ninetieth Communication.) St. Louis, October 11, A.D. 1892; A.L. 5892. After the strenuous Sessions of 1891, this one "vas COll1paratively calm with a good attendance of representatives from Loages and Past Masters.. 1~he address of Grand 11aster Ingram was a business document. He paid due tribute to the luen10ries of M. "\i. B:rother William R. Penick, P. G. M. and M. W. Brother Stephen "'AT. B. Carnegy, who died during the year, the latter died. at the ripe age of ninety-five years., Nine dispensations had been granted to .forlll Lodges. He called attention of the Grand Lodge to the nlany weak Lodges in the State as follows: We have in the State, as shown by last year's returns to the Grand Secretary, more than seventy-five Chartered Lodges, with a membership of twenty-five or less to the Lodge, some of them as low as fourteen to eighteen. We have also about fifty Lodges with m'emberships ranging between hventy-five and· thirty-five.· Most of them are-outlying Lodges, .located in small. villages, or in the country away from railway lines; many of them are made up ahnost entirely of the better class of citizens residing in their· respective vicinities. They are, as a rule, good, earnest,·· zealous Masons, but, as Lodges, they are poor and are having a hard struggle to maintain an existence.

This condition might have been expected from the nunlerous Lodges given a birthright each year, it had the appearance of each Grand M:aster trying to make .a record. He requested that the legal title of the Masonic Hotne should be transferred to the Grand Lodge,. but the Committee on the Home did not agree with him as it would involve a legal investigation of the po\vers and scope of the Grand Lodge. and thatthe subj ect should receive more careful consideration. In reference to the Toltec Lodge in the Republic of Mexico, he took a· very untenable position. In.view of. the fact, that a Masonic Orgallizationknown as the "Grand Symbolic Dieta/' had been organized in Mexico, he advised·· ToltecLodge to


come under the jurisdiction of this new Masonic;, Body, yet the Grand Lodge of Missouri had never recognized this ephetneral organization. It is rather peculiar to recommend a Missouri Lodge to come under the jurisdiction of a Grand Lodge that had no 1Vlasonic. standing in Missouri. The Committee to \vhich this \vas referred, . requested further consideration before any action was taken, The Committee on the Revised Code reported.1.'\he revision was adopted with only minor changes.. . tfhe Grand Lodge of Iowa inforn1ed the Grand Lodge of l\fissouri, that all commissions of Grand Representatives had been witbdravvn, as the Grand Representatives systen1 was fraught \vith danger and very little benefit. This withdrawal of representatives did, not ilnply that the fraternal comity existing bet\veen the Grand Lodges and Io\va ,vas to be interrupted. The follovving Grand Officer~ were installed: "JOHN R. PARSON HARRY KEENE }.. B. THOMAS A. 1'1. HOUGH SA11'L M. KENNARD JOI-IN D. VINCIL."

"

.A.LLAN' McDOWELL Rev. C. H" BRIGGS Rev. ]. W.ROBIN'SON D. A. JAMISON F. J. 路TYGARD

WILLIAM路 RICHARDSON E. F. ALLEN J. W.BOULWARE A. H: KOLLMEyER " R. S. BROWNE REUBEN BARNEy WILLIAM F. KUHN LESLIE O'REAR " J. W. OWEN' ,.

Grand Master. Deputy Grand路 Master. GrandSenio?'Warden. G'Ya1~d Junior Warden. Gra1td T,'easurer". Grand Secretary. ,. Grand Lecture-y. ",. .. Grand Ch.aplain. ".. Grand Chaplai1t" Gtand Senior Deacon: Grand Junior Deacon. Grand-Marshal.

Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearar. Grand Senior Steward. Gra1td J~t1'tiorSteward. Pursuivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand T').ller. n

Receipts $10,542.97; disbursem.ents$11,813.1S; balance $24,683.82; nlembership 29,724. Number of Lodges 5'58;


raised 1,768; affiliated 1,071; dimitted 1,029; suspended for N. P. D. 635; net gain 908.

JOHN R. PARSON, Grand Master, 1892. Grand T,'easurer, 1903; Grand Secretary, 1904-1921. M. W. Brother John R. Parson, the forty-ninth Grand Master, "vas born in Buffalo, New York, February 24, 1839. He received ·his education in the public and High School of the City. In his early manhood, he came to Chicago, then to St. Louis, where in 1859, he entered his Father's establishment of Secret Society Supplies, to which business, he vvith his elder Brother Timothy T., succeeded. He was tnade.a Master· Mason in Aurora Lodge No. 267, St. l"ouis, in which he served as Master in 1878, and Treasurer frOlTI 1879 for fifteen years. He received his Capitular Degrees ··in Bellefontaine Chapter, No. 25 R. A. M. in 1871, in which he served as High Priest for four years. In the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, after serving in several stations, he was, in 1892 elected Grand High Priest, serving as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge at the same time. He passed the Circle in Old Hiram Council No. 10,R. and S. M., October 21, 1871, serving as Master for two years and as its Recorder for several years. In the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters he was elected Grand Master in 1881. He was created a Knight .Templar in St. Aldamar Commandery, No. 18K. T., August 15, 1871, in which he served as Commander in 1874 and Recorder in 1892 and 1893. In the Grand Commandery Knights Templar of Missouri he "Tas elected .Grand Commander .in 1877 and· served as Grand Drill Master for ten years. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R.· from the Fourth to the Thirty-second inclusive from Albert Pike in 1881, and -224-


served as Master of Kadosh from 1885 to 1894. He was crowned Hon. Thirty-third Degree in 1890. He served as Grand Patron of the Grand Chapter of the O. E. S. in 1888 and 1889 and its Grand Secretary from 1875 to 1887. He assisted in forlning the General Grand Chapter of the O. E. S. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1876. In 1878 and 1879 he served as Grand Marshal. In 1889 he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced year by year, and in 1892 \vas elected Grand Master. In 1903 he was elected Grand ~rreast1rer, reelected in September, 1894, and served until October 10, when up,on the death of Grand Secretary Vincil, he \vas appointed Grand Secretary by Grand Master Valliant, which position he held until May 20, 1,921, when the infirmities of age con1pelled him to resign and was made Grand S'ecretary Emeritus. Brother Parson has always been a great friend of the Masonic Home, serving for tnany years on the Directory and as its Secretary. His greatest triumph for the Home,came in 1885, vvhen~he was Chairman of the Triennial Committee of the Grand Encanlplnent Knights Templar which held its Session in St. Louis in 1886. His indefatigable energy resulted in an entertainment that netted thirty-five thousand dollars as an EndoWll1ent fund for the Ramee. His record as a mlan and a Freelnason \vill stand as. an .enduring monument.

-225-


1\HE SEVENTy-'rHIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (;rhe Ninety-First Communication.) St.Louis, October 10, A.D. 1893; A.L. 5893. At this annual Cotnnlunication there were present sixteen Grand Officers, fourteen Past Grand Masters, 116 Past Masters and the representatives of 216 Chartered Lodges. The· Grand Lodge ,vas· opened byR. W. 'Brother Harry Keene, Deputy Grand Master, owing to the illness of M. W. Brother John R. Parson, GrandMaster. This situation is fuUyexplained in the brief address of the Deputy Grand Master. He said: He who should have prepared such a report lies languishing upon a

bee of. sickness. Most Worshipful John R. p'arson, Grand Master of Masons of Missouri, ""vas,· on the 14th day of August, stricken down with a typhoid fever,. and since that time has been confined to his bed. The Angel of D:eath is even now hovering over his couch,and· the all-wise and all-merciful One, in who'se hands are the issues of life and.· death, alone knows the nnalresult. Every· heart in this Grand Assembly, every Masonic heart in Missouri, isupHfted in fervent prayer and supplication to the Father· of Mercies, that,. if it be His gracrous will, He will restore to us our Brother, companion, and friend, that we may again grasp his hand in fraternal greeting, that he may again be permitted to mingle vvith us in our councils and share inaur labors, and that many years of usefulness, many years of happiness,may be allottee. as his portion.

Grand Secretary Vincil presented a synopsis of the transactions of the Grand Master's office, from what he could glean from the papers in his office. PERPETUAL JURISDICTION.

A controversy arose between the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and the Grand Lodge of 11issouri ··over .the question of perpetual jurisdiction. It appears that a Lodge in Missouri had made a Mason out of material rejected by the Grand Lodge . . of .Pennsylvania, the latter claiming jurisdiction over the candidate. ,In response to a letter of inquiry from the GrandMaster of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, as .to the fact, GrandMaster Parson adn1itted the fact and stated that


as the party in question had gained citizenship in Missouri, he was herefore, eligible to petition, and, if elected, to receive the Degrees. The Grand 11aster of Pennsylvania replied stating that the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania clainled perpetual jurisdiction over a rejected candidate, and that rejected candidate remained the property, Masonically, wherever he may be located, and that no Lodge could confer the Degree upon him without a waiver from the. Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. 'fo this letter Grand lVlaster Parson made a spirited reply. The correspondence is vvorthy of perusal, but is too long to be inserted here. The matter was referred to a special CommIttee of which R. P~. Stevenson, Past Grand Master, was Chairman. The COIUulittee fully sustained, the Grand Master. The report of the Committee standing as follows: Masonry in 1tIissouri does not .put the mark of .Cain upon the brow of any human being ,vho has unfortunately incurred the displeasure, ~vitp accompanying malice, "of ·his fellow, but after a reasonable reflection permits both provocation .and retaliation to be condoned. Our Brother Cochrane, though regularly made·· and duly. accredited, is interdicted and proscribed·· throughout the entire ,Masonic. jurisdiction of Pennsylvania. O~urGrand Master· has investigated· and pronounced that no wrong was perpetrated in his being made· a }'1ason. We .would .like to protect him in the rights and privileges we .have accorded to him as a member of the Masonic family. Oar condition, however, is that in whi'c h the GrandMaster of Pennsylvania finds himself involved concerning his protege, "perpetual jurisdiction." He says, HOf course we cannot force it upori other Gralld Lodges, it will force itself upon thenl." Adopting his sugg-estion,· we admit it has forced itself upon· us. But it is an unwelcomed monstrosity. There is not a recognizable Masonic feature in. its •make-up. Ts,e Gra,11d Master of Pennsylvania sent it to us and stands sponsor fo,rits· character. His recommendation. has failed in .convincing your cOtnmittee of investigation, and wereport unfavorably as to its admission intooldr family. We retu'rn perpetual jurisdiction to him as rejected material,and suggest~,-that he deal "vith it under Pennsylvania usage ; that is. strike


it from the roll, and consider it forever expelled from the Masonic household.

The orator for the year was W. Brother \J\Tilliam F. Kuhn. Although not a member of the Grand Lodge, as he had not served as Master in the State, delivered an address on "Ptactical Freemasonry." It is published in full in the Proceedings. TOLTEC LODGE.

The matter of Toltec Lodge No. 520 in the City of Mexico received the attention of a Committee. This Committee, in view of the fact that an effort was being made in the Rep,ublic of Mexico, to organize legitimate Masonry, under the Grand Dieta S'ymbolica, recommended that the路 incoming Grand Master, if he found it expedient, to withdraw and annul the Charter of Toltec Lodge, so that no hindrance could come from the Grand Lodge of Missouri to a union of legitimate Masonry inJ\tIexico. This step by the Grand Lodge was an unfortunate error, ana Toltec Lodge, the innocent sufferer from this action, as the Grand DietaSyn1bolica proved to be merely a paper or;.. ganization and soon came to naught. The following Grand Officers were installed: "HARRY KEENE, St. Joseph J. B. THOMAS, Albany A~M. HOUGH, Jefferson City D. A. JAMISON, St. Louis SAM'L M.KENNARD, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, 路St. Louis Rev. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette Rev. ]. W. ROBINSON, Bridgeton Rev. J. S. PARMER, Columbia F. ']. TYGARD, Butler E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City L. B. VALLIANT, St. Louis M. T. DAVIS, Aurora W. M. TRELOAR, Mexico WM.RICHARD'SON, St. Louis -228-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden. Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior D'eacon. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal.


WELTON O'BANNON, N'ew Madrid D. M. WILSON, Milan A. L. ROSS, Versailles GEO. E. MAYHALL, New London lNG. W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Ste'lvard. Grand Tyler.

Receipts $27,906.75; disbursements $25,731.84; balance $26,858.73; melnbership estimated 30,000, as 22 Lodges had failed to make returns. Number of Lodges 561; raised 1,452; affiliated 888; dimitted 1917; suspended N. P. D. 568; net gain 812.

HARRY KEENE, Grand Master, 1893. M. W. Brother Harry Keene, the fiftieth Grand Master, was born in Bristol, England, September 18, 1847. After arriving at manhood, he was an employee of the Bristol and Exter Railway, until he departed for America in 1867. He came to St. Joseph, lVIissouri, where he was employed as an engineer on the K.C., St. J. andC. B.Railway. H~ resigned in 1877 and engaged in the mercantile business until 1888, when he ,vas elected County Judge of Buchanan County for two years.. He after\vards became an officer in Uvalde Irrigation, Manufacturing Water Company. He was ll1ade a Master Mason in St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, St. Joseph, Septelnber"" 21, 1875, serving as Master in 1883. He was exalted in St. Joseph Chapter No. 14R. A. M. April 14, 1876; passed the路 Circle in St. Joseph Council No.9 R. and S'.M.November 27, 1880, in which he served as Master in 1884 and 1885. He was Knighted in St. Joseph路 Commandery No. 29 K. T. July 15, 1876. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1886, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1890, advanced yearly and elected Grand Master in October, 1893. He was reputed as one of the few, exceptionally proficient in the Ritual of Symbolic Masonry. He aied athisholne 1n St. Joseph, Missouri, July 2, 1900_ -229-


THE SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL COJYll\fUNICATION. (The Ninety-Second Communication.) St. Louis, October' 9, A~D.1894; A.L. 5894. Grand Master I(eene submitted a practical business report. He had been an effective Grand Master. He had the usual disagreeable trouble over unmasonic conduct in Lodges, and 路two complaints of invasion of jurisdiction in neighboring Grana Lodges. He refused Lodges to parade on the Fourth of July and Memorial Day, as ,not 1Vlasonic occasions. The Grand Lodge ov"nSSOlne property at Canton, vvhich the Grand Master recoffiluended to be deeded to the Daughter of Past Grand Master Carnegy, and also to cancel an obligation that she o\ved of five hundred dollars to the .GrandLodge, as she had') given for years her entire care and devotion to her aged Father. The Grand Lodge perlnittedher tQ live in the property free of rent. PAST 1\1ASTER~S DEGREE.

An an1endment looking toward the abolition of the Past 1faster's Degree, as obligatory on' a Master elect, was offered by "R. W. Brother Allan McDovvell, Grand Lecturer. This amendment to lie over for one ,'year. It reads as follows: Atnend Section 1, Article III., of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge, by striking out the words "have attained to the Degree of P'ast Master,"and inserting in lieu thereof, "have been duly elected and installed as Masters of Lodges,", so that section as amended will read: HSection 1. Who are eligible as.-N'one except such as have been duly elected and installed as Masters of Lodges and are at the time of their election or appointment ,members of' SOine Lodge, shall be eli"gible to any 'office in the Grand Lodge; and no one shall he eligible ,to the office of 'Grand Master more than, two years' in any' period of six years." Amend Clause 1, Section '13, Article XI., of the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge, by striking out the 'Nords, "together with the ceremonies necessary to the qualification of apresidingofficer,denorninatedthe Degree of Past 'Masters," so that the clause, as amended, vviU read: "1. Acquaint himself thoroughly with the work and ',lectures of the three degrees of Ancient Craft ' Masonry."

-2c30-


11. W. Brother

J. 路P.

\'Tood introdtJced a resolution, that no

nlileage or per dielu shall be paid to anyone, unless, so ex-

pressed in the By-Laws. It appears that this had been done to the Past Grand Masters, without authority, except by a resolution. A resolution on the question of paying mileage or per dietn was introduced and referred to a Committee to report the following year. It reads as follows: Resolved, That this Grand Lodge 'will 路hereafter pay a per diem of two dollars for a period 'of three days, and a mileage of three cents per mile coming to, and returning from its stated communications, to each Past Grand Master, Dlistrict Deputy Grand Master and to one Representative in, attendance from each Lodge in its Grand Jurisdiction whose Grand Lodge dues are full paid at the time of said stated, communication. Pro1/ided, That' the amount paid to such Representative' shall not exceed one-fourth of the amount paid in by such' Lodge.

The Visiting Committee of the I-Iome, through its Chairman, Martin, ,Collins, made a lengthy report as to conditions existing_The special point, being 'the presence of the old peopIe among the children of the Home. It wisely said: There have been some expressions of dissatisfaction, not with the management nor Matron of the Home, but that there had been placed there quite a number of people who were much older than the class whom the institution was intended to benefit. These were occupying the institution along with the young, and a number of them proved to he ,a serious disturbing element. Such, however, by the wise manage... ment of the Directors, have been expelled, and their expulsion has shown to those who remain the absolute路, necessity of abiding by the wholesome rules and regulations laid down by' the Directors. Of the older persons that remain, some' are of service in conducting the Home, while the others are quiet ,in their conduct and' cause no trouble nor" disturbance. Your, committee is of the opinion that the Home would be of greater' benefit to the children, for whose good it was created, .if no old persons. were adlnitted. Yeur comlmitteewould therefore recommend that the Directors of the. Home be instructed" by resolution of your Most Worshipful Body, that no more people of advanced yea.rs be received, into' the institution, but that it be so conducted as to confer its benefits on only that class lor' which it vvas originally intended; ,'that those now .in the' institution


be permitted to ren1ain until such time as the proposed Sanitarium is completed, in ,vhich all such persons of advanced years, as may be indicated by the Directors, should be placed, thus keeping the young separate from the old, which your committee believes to be indispensably necessary.

The following Grand Officers were installed:

"J. B. THOMAS,

Albany ARTHUR M. HOUGH, Jefferson City DORSEY A. JAMISON, St. Louis F. J. TYGARD, Butler JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McDIOWELL, St. Louis Rev. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette Rev. JOHN W. ROBINSON, Clayton E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City GEO. E. MAYHALL, New London WrM. M. TRELOAR,路 Mexico A. L. ROSS, Versailles WM. RICHARDSON, St. Louis CHAS. S. GLAPELL, Kansas路 City F. P'. GRAVES, Doe Run A. FISHER, La Belle " H. CA1f WELLS, Platte City :rvI. T. DAVIS, Aurora " JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Senior Grand Warden. Junior Grand Warden. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. G1"and Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. G1"and P~~rsuivant. , .. Senior Grand Steward. Junior Gra1zd Steward. Grand Tyler."

Receipts $23,769.00; disbursements $27,293.60; balance $28,594.63 ; membership 30,122; number of Lodges 554; raised 1,393; affiliated 912; dimitted 862; suspended N. P. D. 656; net gain 499.

JOSHUA B. THOMAS, Grand Master, 1894. M.W. Brother Joshua B. Thomas, the fifty-first Grand Master, was born near Liberty, Kentucky, June 18, 1849. At the age of路 t'Atenty-two he located at Albany, Missouri, where he resided. up to his death. He served Gentry County as Collector, County and Circuit Clerk for fourteen years. In 1889 he entered the business of real estate, and in 1891, was chosen cashier of the Bank of Albany. -232-


He was made a Master 1\1ason in Casey Lodge No. 424, I<entucky, September 24, 1870. He affiliated with Mount Pleasant Lodge No. 312 in 1872, transferred his membership to Athens Lodge No. 127 and later assisted in forming Island City Lodge No. 109 at S'alisbury. He served as Master in Athens Lodge No. 127, Albany. He was exalted in Bethany Chapter No. 80 R. A. M., Bethany, in 1880, later affiliated with Albany Chapter, No. 116 R. A. M. He passed the Circle in HiralTI Council, No.1, R. and路S. M., St. Louis, in 1882. He was Knighted in Kadosh Commandery, No. 21 K. T., at Cameron, January 5, 1882, and at the organization of Bethany Commandery, No. 42, at Bethany, he became a Charter Member. Later he assisted in forming Albany Commandery. He received the degrees of the A. A. S. R. in St. Louis, in 1884 and 1885, and transferred his membership to 'iVesternConsistory No.2 at Kansas City in 1889. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1882, filled various appointive Stations, and in 1891, was elected Grand Junior Warden, and elected Grand Master in 1894. .For many years ,after retiring from the GrandMaster's chair, he was Chairmtan of the Comrm'ittee on Ways and Means. He died November 15, 1907, and was buried by the Grand Lodge.

-233-


THE SEVENTY-FIFTI-I ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Ninety-Third Communication.) Jefferson City, October 15, A.D. 1895; A.L. 5895. For the first time in the history of the Grand Lodge an annual Communication \vas held ····at the State Capital. The 'Grand Lodge met in the J~al1 of the House of Representatives. The representatives of 201 Lodges, fifty Past Masters and fourteen Past Grand Masters vvere present. The address of Grand Master Thomas was 1?urely a business document, much routine business having passed through his office. He paid a loving tribute to the memory of M. \""1. Brother Perry P. WOOd, P. G.M., who died June ~8, 1895. On the afternoon of the first day's session, the members of the Grand Lodge visited the· penitentiary, but whether all returned or not, is not stated in the Proceedings. The ?ration on "Freen1asonry in the United States" was delivered by W. Brother A.L. Ross, it is published in the Proceedings. 1t.rIL~AGE ANDPltR Dle~l.

TheC0111mittee on the subject of paying mileage and per dieln, reported favorably .andpresented the following amendn1ent ~rhich was adopted: Section 93a. The P'ast Grand 'Masters, Grand Officers, and one Rep... resentative from each Subordinate Lodge shall be paid the sum of two dollars ($2.00) for each day they may be in. actual attendance upon the Annual Communications of this Grand. Lodge, and two· cents per mile for each mile necessarily traveled in. going to and returning therefrom. P'rovided,· that no Representative shall receive either mileage or per diem unless all dues from his Lodge to the Grand Lodge have been paid, and that no Representative shall receive more than one-fourtho£ the sunl paid as dues by his Lodge for such year, and no one. shall receive mileage· or per diem ·in· a double capacity, and pro.. videa· further, that the dues 0'£· fifty. cents per member now provided by law for the support·· of the Masonic R'ome shall be . collected and paid over for that purpose, and no part of the same shall ever be used for the payment of such tnileage or per diem, or any expense of the Grana·· Lodge.

___234-


~XIT PAST. MASTER'S DEGREE.

l'he following alnendment exterminating the Past Master's Degree, as an official grade, to be conferred on the Master elect, before his installation into Office, was adopted: Amend Section 1, Article III., of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge, by striking out the words "have attained to the Degree of Past lvlaster," and inserting in lieu thereof, "have been duly elected and installed as 1fasters of Lodges," so that section, as amended, will read: "Section 1. ,Who are eligible as.-None except 'Such as have been duly elected and installed as Masters -of Lodges and are at the time of their election or appoint1nent melubers of some Lodge, shall be eligible to any office in the Grand Lodge; and no one shall be eligible to the office of Grand Master more than two years in any period of six years." Amend Clause 1, Section 13, Article XL, of the By-Laws -of the Grand Lo~ge, by striking out the words, Utogether with the ceremonies necessary to the qualification of a presiding officer, denominated the D-egree of Past Masters," so that the clause, as amended, will read: ttl. Acquaint himself thoroughly with the work and .lectures of the three degrees of Ancient Craft 'Masonry." Amend the By-Laws -of the Grand Lodge bystriJcing out the whole of Section 114, Article VI.

The follo\ving Grand Officers were installed: "A. M. HOUGH, Jefferson City D. A. JAMISON, ,St. Louis F. ]. TYGARD, Butler E. F. ALLEN, I(ansas City JOHN D.VINCIL, 81. Louis ALL.A.. N McD,OWELL, St. Louis Rev. JOHN W. ROBINSON, Clayton Rev. JOHN H. MILLER, Rich HilL Rev. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette CAMPBELL WELLS, Platte City 1. V.. McMILLAN, Maryville JOHN C.YOCUM, Kansas City WM. RICHARDSON,St. Louis CRAS. S. GLASP'ELL, Kansas City WELTON O'BANNON', New Madrid J. C. FINAGIN, St. Louis l

-235-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden~ Gr8nd Junior Warden. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chapla~"n. Grand Chaplain. Grand Se1'Lio1" Deacon. Grand JU11,ior Deacon. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Marshal. Gra?~d Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Senior Steward.


LESLIE O'REAR, }'farshall H. H. HOHENSCHILD, Rolla JOHN W. OWEN, St.Louis

o.

o.

Grand Junior Steward. Grand Pursuivant. Grand Tyler."

Receipts $30,296.77 ; disb~rsemen~s $25,572.19 ; balance $33,319.16. Membership 30,728; number of Lodges 563; raised 1,286; a~liated 895; dimitted 871; suspended N. Po D. 823; net

gain 228.

ARTHUR MIDDLETON HOUGH, Grand Master, 1895. M. W. Brother ArthurM. Hough,' the fifty-second Grand Master, was bornin Jefferson City, 1\1issouri,]anuary 9, 1848. He received his, education in the Public Schools of the City. At the age of twenty-two he began the study of Law, and was admitted to practice in 1872. He followed his Profession in the City of his nativity, where he built up' a lucrative business. He" served as special, Judge' for the. Circuit, Court. He \vas a progressive citizen and the fine' public library was ,established through his labor. The City Park which he gave to the 'City, and the five thousand dollar endowment to the Masonic ,Home, are a" few of, his benefactions. He was made a Master Mason in Jefferson Lodge, No., 43, Jefferson City, i\ugust 5, 1881, in which he served as Master, for three years. He" vvas exalted in ,Jefferson City Chapter, No. 34 R. A. M., March 24, 1882, and served as its High Priest for five years. TheOrders'of Knighthood were conferred upon him in Prince of Peace Commandery, No. 29, Jefferson City, 11ay 15, i882, in which he served as Commander seven years. He passed the" Circle in S'hekinahCouncil,No. 24R. and S. M.,Kansas City; October 20, 1900, assisted in organizing "Ezra Council,N0.. 22, Jefferson City, April ,23,' 1902, and served as its Master. He was elected Grand'路 High Priest of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons ,of Missouri in 1900. --236-


He was elected Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar, in 1909. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1883, was appointed Grand Marshal in 1890, Grand Senior Deacon in 1892, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1893, advanced yearly and elected Grand Master in 1895. Brother Hough was an expert on jur"isprudence an~ served on the COlnmittees on the revision of the Code of all the Grand Masonic Bodies in the past twenty-five years. Much of .theCode now in use is the result of his painstaking labor. He was a man of retiring disposition, thus often misunderstood, big of heart, and always actuated by the highest ideals. At the time of his death, he was a member of the Board of Directors of the l\1asonic Home and its Treasurer. He died July 3, 1920, the funeral was largely attended and conducted by the Grand Lodge.

-237-


THE SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Ninety-Fourth Con1munication.) St. Louis, October 20, A.D. 1896; A.L. 5896. This annual Communication was largely attended and the Grand Lodge met in Germania Theater with Grand Master A. M. Hough in the Grand East. His address ,vas one of the shortest to date. It is purely a business document. He recommended that tvvo copies of the annual Proceedings be sent to each Lodge, and he entered a .protest against the lax manner in which Lodges are ~orlned, and recommended that the number of petitioners for a dispensation be increased from fifteen to twenty. The Committee on Jurisprudence approved both recomn1endations, and offered an1endments to the ByLaws accordingly. For the first time, and pursuant to a By-Law adopted last year, mileage and per dienl vvere paid amounting to $3,245.16. An amendment was adopted reducing the fee fronl thirty to twenty dollars. This an1endment was unfortunate as cheapness of degrees has interfered \vith the dignity of the Fraternity. The following Grand Officers \vere installed: HDORSEY A. JAMISON, St. Louis Grand Master. F. J. TYGARD, Butler Deputy Grand Master. E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City Grand Senior Warden. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette Grand Junior Wardea. SAM'L M.路 KENNARD, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis '" G'rand Secretary. ALLAN' McDOWELL, St. Louis Grand Lecturer. Rev. lNG. W. ROBINSON, Clayton Grand Chaplain. Rev. lNO. H. MILLER, Rich Hill Grand Chaplain. CAMPBELL "VELLS, Platte City Grand Senior Deacon. JOS. C. FINAGIN, St. Louis " Grand Junior Deacon. WM.RICHARDSON, St. Louis Grand Ma1'shal. CHAS. S. GLASPELL, Kansas Ciity Grand Marshal. WELTON O'BANNON, New Madrid Grand Sword Bearer. JOHN C. YOCUM, Kansas City Grand Senior Steward. H. H. HOHENSCHILD, Rolla Grand Junior Steurard. A. L. ROSS, Versailles Grand Pursuiva1-tt. ]NG. W. OWEN, St. Louis Grand Tyler."


Receipts $31,011.00; disbursements $25,468.16; balance $38,862.00. Membership 30,060; l1ulnber of Lodges 563; number of Lodges delinquent 52; raised 1,325; affiliated 871; dimitted 839; suspended N. P. D. 817; net gain 277.

DORSEY A. JAMISON, Grand Master, 1896. M. \\T. Brother Dorsey A. Jamison, the fifty-third Grand Master, was born near Murfreesboro, Tennessee,November 27, 1853. He was educated at Union University in Murfreesboro, and graduated from the Law Department of Washington University in St. Louis. He has practiced his Profession in St. Louis ever since and has attained distinction as an Attorney. He \V~as made a Master Mason in Occidental Lodge No. 163 January 24, 1884, serving a:s its Master in 1887 and 1888. He was exalted in St. Louis Chapter, No.8 R.A. M., March 31, 1886 and presided as High Priest in 1891; passed theCircle in Hiram Council, No.1, R. and S. M., March 23, 1893; Knighted in St. Louis COlumandery, No.1, K. T., in 1886 and affifiated with St. AldelnarCommandery, No. 18, K. T., March 26, 1889. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. in the Bodies of the Rite in St. I."ouis in May, 1890. He was crowned an honorary thirty-third Degree in Washington, D. C., October 19, 1905. He is a Past Patron of Occidental Chapter, No. 185, O.E. S. He was elected to the directory of the Masonic Home in 1901 and has served continually thereon. He has been Attorney for the Home . since 1900 and in all litigations into which the Board has been compelled to enter, he has nevet lost a case. Several in1portant Will cases have been won, through his efforts, involving bequests to. the I-iome 0 f over One hundred thousand dollars.


He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1885, served as District Lecturer for St. Louis in 1888. In 1891,. he was appointed Grand Junior Deacon, in 1892 appointed Grand Senior Deacon, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1903, advanced yearly and elected Grand Master in 1896. He· served as Chairnla.n of the Committee ·on Appeals and Grievances, from 1898 to 1907, when he resigned. He afterwards served as Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence tram 1912 to 1916. The great triumvirate on Appeals and Grievances in· the history of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, is S'amuel H. Owens, Noah M. Givan, and Dorsey A. Jamison. JOHN HENDERSON MILLER, Grand Chaplain} 1896 to R. W. Brother Reverend John Henderson Miller, D.D., Grand Chaplain, was born at Mansfield, Ohio, May 11, 1845, son of John K. and Ellen Wise Miller. The family settled in Kansas City,.·Missouri, March 18, 1857. His prelilninaryeducation was attained in the Schools 0,£ Kansas City, graduating from ~ittenburg College, Springfield, Ohio, in June, 1868, and from Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, N. J., in May, 1871. He ,vas ordained a Presbyterian Minister May 9, 1872, in the .-Presbyterian Church of United States of America. He filled, very acceptably, pastorates in Sedalia, Rich Hill, Nevada, Kansas City, and Junction City, Kansas; has been Clerk of the Presbytery of Kansas City for eighteen years and Clerk of the Presbyt.erian Synod of Missouri, since 1884, ana still holds down the j ob.He was married to Miss Emma Francis Orr, .Novemher 11, 1879,. He was made a Master Mason in Rich Hill Lodge, No. 479, in May, 1890, in which he served as Master in 1898, then affiliated with South Gate Lodge, No. 547, Kansas City, and has served as Chaplain .for many years. He was exalted in Rich -240--


Hill Chapter, No. lOS, in August, 18t90; Knighted in Gauley Commandery, No. 30, Butler, in September, 1890; made a Royal and S'elect Master in Butler Council, No. 22, R. and

S. M.; was one of the early members of Ararat Temple, Mystic Shrine, his number being 192; received the Degrees of the A. A. S.. R.. in the Bodies of the Rite in St. Louis in June, 1890. He was crowned an. honorary thirty-third in the Supreme Council, in October, 1917. He is, possibly, the only Minister of' the Gospel, in Missouri, who路 has received the honorary Degree of the thirty-third. In the Grand Lodge he was appointed Grand Chaplain in 1895,. and has served continuously for a period of twenty-six years. In the Grand路 Commandery, Knights Templar, of Missouri, he was elected Grand Prelate in 1897 and reelected ever since. He was appointed. Grand Correspondent of the Grand , Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Missouri in 路路1909. He is a member of South Gate Lodge, No. 547, Orient Chapter, No. 102 R.A. M., ShekinahCouncil, No. 24 R.and S.M., O'SullivanCommandery, No. 15, K.T., Nevada and the S'cottish Rite Bodies of .Kansas City. The highest tribute that can be paid to any man is that h~istheservantof God C;lnd loves his fellowman. Such is Bro. Miller.

-241-


T}IE SEVENrry-SEVENTH ANNUAL (1~he

COMMUNICATION. Ninety-Fifth" Communication.)

St. Louis, October 19, A.D. 1897; A.L. 5897. 1

The "singing section" of Erwin Lodge, No. 121, of St. LouIs, consisting of eighteen voices, made n1elodious the opening of the Grand I~odge, v'lith Grand lVlaster Dorsey A.Jamison "in the Grand East. The Grand Master presented a lengthy, but a thoroughly progressive address. He paid due tribute to the memoty of M. W. Brother Samuel H. Saunders, P. G. M., who died February 11, 1897, at the age of 83 years, and to 1'1. VV. Brother George R. Hunt, who died October 3, 1897, at the age of 73 years. A great portion of his address dealt with the usual routine business, and he had his "11ands and head full looking after Lodges. and making a long list of interpretations of the Code, called decisions. Mexican Masonry received several pages of careful attention and路路 recommended definite actio'n in reference to the Grand Dieta Symbolica, and called attention to the anomalous position the Grand Lodge had placed itself, in taking away the Charter of TqltecLodge, and advising it to accept路 a Charter from the Grand Dieta Symbolica, yet at the same. time had failed to recognize this Mexican organization as a legitImate l\1asonic Body. The Grand Master vvascorrect in his position. He also investigated the corporate name of the Grand Lodge of 11issouri, and found, that by virtue of an Act of the Legislature, approved February 17, 1843, .the corporate name of the Grand Lodge -is, "Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted, Ancient Masons of the S'tate of Missouri." Expressed in initials it is "1'he Grand Lodge of F. and A. A. M. of Missouri and not, "A. F. and A. 11." The Grand Master advised, "that the corporate name be路 used, vvherever practical, in order that our rights under said Charter be maintained. He also rec-242...".".


ommended the appointment of a Committee on Ritual which was accordingly done by the following amendment: "( 120). Ritual. A Committee on Ritual to whom shall be referred all proposed changes in the Ritual before action is had thereon, and said committee shall report at the next Annual Communication such changes and additions or elirninations of the Ritual as they may think proper for the action -of this Grand Lodge, and they are especially directed to recommend a set work for those portions of the work for "which the· claim has been made that they are optional."

The following resolution introduced by W. Brother William F. Kuhn in 1906 was adopted: Resol'ZJed, That a Committee of three (of which the Grand Secretary shall be one) be appointed by the incoming Grand Master, to' secure and prepare biographical sketches and half-toned portraits of the P'ast Grand Masters, Grand Secretaries and Grand Treasurers of this Grand Lodge, from its organization. That such biographical sketches and portraits shall be ready for publication at the Annual Communication· in 1898. That beginning with 1897, there shall be inserted in the published proceedings of each year the biographical sketch and half-toned portrait of the out-going Grand Master.

This was the first effort· to prepare· and preserve for the future the portraits and biographies of the Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge. This work was not completed unti11900. The follovving Officers for 1898 were installed: UF. J. TYGARD, Butler Grand Master. E. F. ALLEN, Kansas City C. H. BRIGGS,. Fayette CAMP'BELL WELLS, Platte City S..A MUEL 'M. KENNARD, St. .Louis JOHN' D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Rev. JOHN: W. ROBIN80N, Clayton Rev. JOHN H. MILLER, Rich Hill JOSEP'H C. FINAGIN, St. Louis CH.A•. S. S. GLASPELL,Kansas. City 1-I. H. HOHENSCHILD, Rolla WILLIAM RICHARDSON, St. Louis JOHN C. YOC.UM, Kansas City A. FISHER, LaBelle

Deputy Gra'Jil.d Master. Grand Senior Warde1~. Grand lunior Warde1t. G'randTreasurer. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer.. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Marshal. GrandMarshal. Grand Sword Bearer.

·Grand Senior Steward.


LESLIE O'REAR, Marshall LEROY B. VALLIANT, St.Louis A. S. HOUSTON, 'Mexico A. L. ROSS, Versailles JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis .•............

Grat£d Grand Grand Grand Grand

Junior Steward. Pursuivant. Orator. Orator. Tyler."

Receipts $30,610.33; disbursements $28,623.66; balance

$40,848.67.

.

Membership 30,616; number of Lodges 563; raised 1,164; affiliated 643; dimitted 754; suspended N. P. D. 970; loss 173.

FLAVIUS J. TYGARD, GrandMaster, 1897. M. W. Brother Flavius J. "Tygard, the fifty-fourth Grand Master, was born in Monongalia. County, Virginia, November 10, 1839. He received his education in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In early manhood he moved to Butler,Missouri, and there organized theNational Bank of Butler in 1871. A few years later he organized another Bank at Rich Hill, Missouri, which he managed for many years. He· was. made a Master Mason in Virginia in 1862, assisted in forming the Lodge at Holden, Missouri,. and later affiliated with Butler Lodge, No. 254, and served as its Master for three .years. He was exalted in Miama Chapter, No. 76 R .. A. M., Butler, in which he served as High Priest in 1881. He receivedtheCryptic Degrees in Butler Council, No. 22 R. and S. M. and served as· its Master for several·years. TheOrders of Knighthood were conferred upon' him October .1,'1875, in Bayard Commandery, No. 26 K.T., Harrisonville, and later assisted in forming Gauley Commandery, No.. 30, K. T.,ButJer, <in .which he served as Commander. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. -R. in the Bodies of the Rite in St.Louis, in July, 1890. In the Grand Council of Select Masters, he was elected Grand Master in 1890. In· the Grand Co1l1111andery,Knights Templar of . Missol.1ri,he served as Grand Commander in 1883. 111·1888 he was elected· Grand"'Treasurer of. the Grand -244---


Commandery, \rvhich position he held up to his death. He \vas one of the active prolnoters of the Masonic Honle serving as Director and Treasurer for路路 many years. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1873, appointed .Grand Junior Deacon in 1892, Grand Senior Deacon in 1893, elected Grand Junior vVarden in 1894, and in October, 1897, he was elected Grand Master. He died September 3, 1911.

-245-


THE SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COIVIMUNICATION. (The Ninety-Sixth Communication.)

St. Louis) October 18, A.D. 1898; A.L. 5898. The address of Grand Master Tygard is brief and deals purely with routine business. He reported the dedication of the Chapel at the 11asonic Home, ,vhich had been erected by the Grand. Chapter of the Eastern Star, issued dispensations for the formation of eight Lodges and refused a dispensation to forn1 an "Army Lodge." Two decisions were made of more than usual importance. He held that a petition for the Degrees frotTI a man seventy years old, while not debarred by law, yet it was a doubtful expediency to receive such petitions. He also held that a petition from one \vho had lost a leg at the thigh, lost a right foot, or wore a cork leg was ineligible under the law. This decision was the last one under the "AhilTIan Rezon" physical qualification. An amendment in reference to the subj ect of physical qualification had been offered by Bros. William F. Kunn and Allan McDowell at the annual COtTItTIunication of 1897. This amendment came up for action and reads as follows: It is incompetent for any Lodge in this jurisdiction to confer either of •the three degrees· of Ancient Craft -Masonry on any person whose physical defects are such as to prevent him from receiving and imparting the ceremonies of the several degrees. Provided, that nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to render anyone ineligible to the privileges of Masonry, who can, by the aid· ,of artificial appliances, conform to ~he necessary ceremonies.

This amendment provoked prolonged discussion, but was adopted. Exit. the perfect youth idea. A new era had dawned when cork legs stood an equal chance in the future with cork heads. This. amendment was sarcastically referred to by the writer on Correspondence, as, "Missouri's Cripple Law" and the persons initiated ,under this law were jocularly dubbed, as "Kuhn Masons," but- the defenders of the amendment· lived


to see it become the law in several of the large and progressive Lodges in the United States. An amendment placing the District Deputy Grand Masters, and District Grand Lecturers on the pay roll was adopted. Brother Allan McDowell's amendment in reference to advancement was adopted. It reads as follows: SEC. 164. Objection to Advancement.-N 0 candidate shall be passed or raised in any Lodge lNithin the time hereinafter stated, when any member thereof shall object. Such objection shall stand as a bar against the candidate for sixty days, unless sooner withdrawn by the objector, or unless he shall previously cease to be a member in good standing of said Lodge.

An amendment looking to ~he transfer of melnbership without loss of standing, and the necessity of documentary evidence for visitation was approved by the .Grand Lodge. The Committee on the recognition of the Grand Dieta Symbolica of Mexico, asked for further time. The following Officers were installed: "E. F.. ALLEN, Kansas City c. H. BRIGGS, Fayette CAMP'BELL WELLS, Platte City J. C. FINAGIN, St. Louis SAMUEL M. KENNARD, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN'McD'OWELL, St. Louis RItv. J. W. ROBINSON, Clayton REV. JNO. R.MILLER, Rich Hill JOHN C. YOCU'M, Kansas City CHARLES S. GLASPELL, Kansas City A. FISHER, La. Belle LESLIE O'REAR, Marshall H. H. HOHENSCI-IILD', Rolla WM. RICHARDSON, St. Louis .'~ L. B. VALLIANT, St. Louis A.L. ROSS, Versailles A. S. HOUSTON, Mexico RltV. W. W. BOYD, St. Louis ]N'O. W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden. Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. GrandChapZain. Grand Senior" Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshat Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Tyler/'


Receipts $31:389.16; disburselnents $28,982.18; balance $43,255.65; Membership 31,360; number of Lodges 564; raised 1,736; affiliated 855; ditnitted 8l3; suspended N. P. D. 901 ;" net gain 699. ETHELBERTF. ALLEN,

Grancj Master} 1898.

I

M. W. Brother Ethelbert F. Allen, the fi.fty-fifth路. Grand lVlaster, ~ras born in Endfield, Connecticut, December 31, 1854. He received h'is education in the Hartford High School, and Hopkins Gramnlar School from" vvhich he graduated in 1870. He moved for a short time to the Dakotas, engaging in the cattle business, and then canle to Kansas City, Missouri, in 1881, and engaged in the Real Estate and Loan business, and President of the Allen "Investment Company, in which business he continue.d up to his deqth. He received the Master's Degre~ in Heroine Lodge, No. 104, Kansas City, in June, 1884, in which he served as Master in 1887 and 1888. He was made a Royal Arch Mason in Kansas City Chapter, No. 28, June 30,1885, serving as High Priest in 1888. He was Knighted in Oriental Commandery, No. 35, K. T., Kansas City, in which he served as Commander. He received the Degrees of the A. A."S. R. in Western Consistory No" 2, I{ansas City, serving as Master of Kadosh for several . years and: was crowned an honorary "thirty-third in .Washington, D. C.!'He was the chief spirit of "the organization o~ Ararat Temple, Mystic Shrine, in 1888, and was its first Potentate. He later served as the Imperial Potentate of the Imperial Council of the United States. He first appeared in the" Grand Lodge in 1892 and "vas appointed Grand J\1arshaL In 1894 he served as Grand Senior Deacon, elected Grand Junior \Varden in 1895, advanced yearly and elected" Grand Master in 1898. Brother" Allen succe~ded"Brother "Giv?-n, as President of the Board. of the Masonic" Home," and under his administration -248-


as President, a vast amount of advanced and progressive work of the Home was completed and inaugurated. The Hospital Building stands as a monunlent to his energy. He was inees...; sandy on the job. He died suddenly S'eptember 9, 1913. His remains were laid to rest in Mt. Vlashington Cemetery, under the auspices of the Grand Lodge.


THE SEVENTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Ninety-Seventh Communication.) Kansas City, October 17, A.D. 1899 ;A.L. 5899. Kansas City greeted the Grand Lodge for the second time in its history, and Grand Master Allen, was greeted by a very large attendance. For the first time the representation from the Lodges passed the three hundred mark. This Session found 350 Lodges represented. The Session was held in an "old building called, the Academy of Music, on McGee Street, between Twelfth and Thirteenth Streets. Grand Master Allen's address was one of the best constructive aocuments subn1itted. He heartily endorsed the asking for dispensations to attend Divine Services by the Lodges; recommended that the election of Officers be held on the secona. day of the Session, instead of the thi'rd day; reported the laying of the corner stone of the Masonic Temple, known as theOdeon, in St. Louis, on July 8, with elaborate ceremonies and a great parade. In commending the work of the Eastern Star in connection with the Masonic Home, he recommended that the visiting Committee on the Home, consisting of five melnbers of the Grand'Lodge, be changed by adding three ladies to the Con1mittee. This recommendation was referred to a Committee which brought in a resolution that squinted in all directions, side stepped the recommendations and said nothing, as follows: Your special committee to whom Vias referred the, suggestion of the Most Worshipful Grand Master with reference to changing the composition of the uRome Visiting Committee," would ,respectfully report that we fully realize and appreciate the valttable assistance rendered the Honle by the ladies, one lasting and tangible evidence of which is the splendid Chapel erected by the Order of the Eastern Star.

It was just a little soft soap for the O. E. S.,nothingelse . was intended, but Grand Master Allen started the movement by his recommendation, for the admission of the Eastern Star to the privileges and responsibilities of the Honle. One of --25,0-


the irreconcilables to '''vornan Freemasonry," in attacking the Grand Master's recom111endation said, that it would be dangerous to the IIolne to have women on the.Colnmittee. As the worst thing that any person could do was to "telegraph, telephone, and tell-a-woman." For this remark he received a scorcher .that he never forgot. Two days thereafter, the Grand Chapter of the O. E. S.路 drafted an ultimatum to the Grand Lodge to the effect, that if the Grand Lodge did not desire to give them certain privileges, the Grand Chapter of the O. E. S'. vlfould organize a charity of its own. This ultinlatum later bore fruit. Grand lVlaster Allenrecomnlended that the Constitution be amended perluitting Past Masters of other Grand Jurisdictions, \vho vvere affiliated in Missouri, to be elected to membership in the Grand Lodge. An anlendment to this effect "",as presented. The Grand Officers of the Grand Lodge of Kansas were introduced and heartily greeted. The oration for the year was delivered路 by Reverend VV. W. Boyd and is published in full The Grand Dieta Symbolica was,' on路 account of the disturbed condition iii Mexico, refused recognition. Toltec Lodge, the child of the Grand Lodge of. Missouri, wondered where "It was at," disowned by its mother, and the mother even disowning the foster mother. A Comluittee \vas appointed to investigate the corporate title of the Grand Lodge, and report at the next annual Session. The Committee having in charge the Mitchell monument, reported the work con1pleted. A cut of thislnonument appears in the Proceedings. It was made of Missouri granite tlnd erecteq. over the grave of Past GrandMaster J. W. S. Mitchell at Griffin, Georgia. The following Officers were installed: "REV. C. H. BRIGGS, Fayette Grand Master. CAMPBELL \iVELLS, Platte City Deputy Grand Master.. JOSEPHC. FINAGIN, St. Louis Senior Grand Warden. JOHN C. YOCU'M, Kansas City J~tnior Grand Warden. -251-


SAMUEL M. KENNARD, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN DI.. VINCIL, St. Louis Grand Secretsry. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Grand Lecturer. REV. JOHN W. ROBINSON,. St. Louis Grand Chaplain. REV. JOHN H. MILLER, Nevada ' Grand Chaplain. CHARLES S. GLASP'ELL, Kansas City .. Grand Senior DeGC(Jn. H. H. HOHENSCHILD, Rolla Grand Junior Deacon. A. FISHER, LaBelle Grand Sel1,ior Steward. LESLIE O'REAR, Marshall Grand Junior Steward. LEROY B. VALLIANT, St. Louis Gra11td Marshal. A. L.ROSS, Versailles ' Grand Marshal. A. S. H'OUSTON, Mexico Grand Sward Bearer. E. B. JACOBS, Carthage Grand Pursuivant. R~v. w. F. P~CKARD', St Joseph Grand Orator. HON. C. G. BURTON, Nevada, Grand Orator. JOHNI W. OWEN, St. Louis G1~and Tyler."

Receipts $31,604.10; disbursements $24,340.13; balance $44,102.10. Membership. 32,153; nurnberof Lodges 556; raised 1,5S9; affiliated 825; dimitted 765; suspended N.P. D. 781 ; net gain i

598.

CORONA H. BRIGGS, Grand路Master, 路1899. M. W. Corona H. Briggs, the fifty-sixth Grand Master, was born in Elkater, Iowa, July 29, 18~9. The family moved to Centralia, Missouri, in 1856, where he received his education in the graded schools~ In 1868, he moved to Barton County, Missouri, and at the 'age of t,venty-one years, 路in 1870, entered the Ministry of the M. E. Church, South, in which he has always been an efficient, hard working and leading member. His .labors have been .confined, chiefly, to the Western portion' of the State, filling the leading pulpits of his Church in the principal cities. He has .served for. many years as Presiding Elder of several Districts. He received the Degree of D.D. in 1894 from Central College, at Fayette, of which he路 had been Curator and Trustee. -252......


He was made a Master Mason in Cooper Lodge No. 36, Boonville, June 9, 1880, in which he served as Master. He received the Capit1.;l1ar Degrees in Springfield Chapter No. 15, R. A. M., May 26) 1883, affiliated with Independence Chapter No. 12, Independence, in which he served as High Priest in 1891. He was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Missouri in 1894. He passed the Circle in Arcana Council No. 16, R. and S. M., Harrisonville,March 30, 1888, was Knighted in St. John's Commandery No. 20, K .. T., Springfield, in August in 1883, affiliated with Palestine Commandery No. 17, Independence, and served as its commander. He received the Orders of the Red Cross of Constantine and Appendant Orders in St. Andrew Conclave No. 11, Joplin, Missouri.. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1881, and served as Grand Chaplain to 189S, when he was路 appointed Grand Senior Deacon, elected Grand Junior Warden 路in 1896, advaaced yearly, and elected Grand Master in 1899." After retiring from the Grand Master's Chair, he has been Chairman on Necrology on all the Masonic Bodies. Brother Briggs has been an indefatigable worker in Freemasonry. Few have addressed as many assemblies of the Craft as he has. He is untiring, al\vays路 ready, and never fails. He is a stalwart in the Grand Lodge.

---253-


THE EIGHTIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The Ninety-Eighth Communication.) St. L'o~tis, October 16, A.D. 1900; A.L. 5900. The Grand Lodge met in the new Masonic Temple, the Odeon, at Grand and Finney Avenues, with the representatives of 327 Lodges, 19 Grand Officers, 116 Past Masters and 15 Past Grand J\tlasters present,\vith M. W. Brother Briggs in the Grand East. In his annual address, he paid due tribute to M. \V. Brother Lee A. Hall, P. G. M., who died December 15, 1899; M.. V\T. Brother Harry Keene, P. G. M., who died July 2, 1900; VV. Brother Rev. John W. Robinson, Grand Chaplain, \vho died Septelnber 22, 1900; and W. Brother Leslie O'Rear, Grand Junior Steward, who died Jurie 26, 1900 at the age of forty-six years. In his dispensation, the Grand Master refused .permission to Lodges, as Lodges, to attend Divine S'ervices,. thus reversing the . . action of Past Grand' Master Allen;路 he also refused to permit the laying of a corner stone on Sunday. His action was based on the law: "That no Lodge meeting shall be held on the First day of the week, commonly called Sunday." He was obliged to take vigorous action in' the case of the joint ownership of a Masonic Hall, where all of the Masonic Bodies, including the Shrine, \vere interested. The Shrine had served intoxicating liquors during the ceremonial; and the Officers of the Shrine claimed the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge did not include the Shrine. It overlooked the fact that the Grand Master had jurisdiction over Master Masons who were members of the Shrine. The action of the Grand Master was sustained by the Grand Lodge, and booze was no longer served in the Hall. The Grand Master attended the meeting of the National George Washington Memorial Association at Alexandria, Virginia, and recommended that the Grand Lodge assist in building and' sustaining this contemplated memorial. --254-


The historical Committee made the final report that the work had been finished and distributed. It, contains the portraits and biographical sketches of the Grand Masters, Grand Treasurers and Grand Secretaries from 1821 to 1900. The Committee recounted the difficulty in the preparation of this work in their preamble as follows: To obtain the "half-tone portraits" required by the resolution, and secure and "prepare biographical sketches" of our brethren, especially our "departed worthies," was more than lira labor of love." It required "time, patience and perseverance," and imposed a heavy tax upon all these Masonic qualities. To range the field of the past,covering a period of eighty years, and gather desirable data for the work, has laid under tribute the best efforts known to the Committee. A lesson has been learned in the preparation of the work now submitted. The undertaking was delayed, if not neglected, too long. The Grand Lodge should have appointed a "Historian" in the years agone, charged with the duty of securing and preserving all necessary matter connected with the lives and labors of its chief office~s. Thus fullness and completeness of detail would路 now be at command路路 for the history of honored brethren whose memory and deeds should be perpetuated. How much has been lost concerning many will never be revealed. The work' now furnished is far short of what the committee desired and what the Grand Lodge expected, when authorizing its preparation and puQlication. The very best has been done that could be accomplished under the circumstances. The Committee secured the services ot Brother W. P. Rickart as its .Secretary, as such assistance was absolutely required, owing to the death of Brother Lee A. Hall. Acknowledgments are due him for valuable aid rendered, without which we vvould have been delayed in our labors indefinitely.

D. VINCIL., ALLAN McDoWELL,

JOHN

WILLIAM

F.

KUHN.

The restriction heretofore existing in reference to funerals was modified as shown in the following resolution: A Lodge, as such, may attend the funeral of a deceased Brother and accompany the remains being conveyed to the place of. interment, whether the Lodge, or any other 'Masonic Body, perform the Masonic funeral rites at the grave. But nothing herein containe,d shall be construed to prevent the appointment of non-Masonic pall-bearers by the family of the deceased, or prevent any church or ~oral .and benevolent


society from uniting in the funeral pro~ession, or from rendering its ceremonies at the grave, or prevent any civic or public demonstration of respect for the deceased Brother. .

The following Grand. Officers were installed: WELLS, Platte "City .. ~ Grand Master. JOS. C. FINAGIN, St. Louis Deputy Grand Master.

"CAMPBELI~

JNO. C. YOCUM, Kansas City

Senior Grand Warden. Grand Warden. Secretary. Lecturer. Chaplain. Chaplain. Senior Deacon. Junior Deacon. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Tyler:"

.WM. F. KUHN, Kansas City Junior JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis .o, G'rand ALLAN MeD'QWELL, St. Louis o,o, .•... Grand REV.. JOH.N Ho, MILLER, Nevada Grand R£,v. J. T.. M. JOHN,SON, St. Louis Gra'lt.d LEROY B. VALLIANT, St. Louis Grand A. FISH:ER, La Bene Grand A. S. HOUSTON, Mexico E. B. JACOBS, Carthage FRED, A.KAGE, Cape Girardeau ]NO. T. SHORT, Jefferson City

E. F. HARTZELL, St. Joseph CYRUS H. JONES, Rolla WALTER WILLIAMS, Columbia T. A. DUNN, Bethany JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis f

•••••••••

Receipts $34,450.62; disbursements $31,525.67; total assets

$46,916.64. Membership 33,366; number of Lodges 550; decrease in Lodges 7; raised 2,128; affiliated 991 ; dimitted 913; suspended for N. P.D. 611 ; net gain 1,396.

CAMPBELL WELLS, Grand Master, ·1900. M.· VV. Brother Campbell "VeIls, the fifty-seventh Grand Master, was born in Platte County, .Missouri, May 23, 1864, where 11e continually. resided up to his death. He obtained his. education in Bethany College, West Virginia, graduating therefrom in 1884. He returned ·to Platte City and engaged with his father in the banking business which he 'followed up to th~date of his death. -2i6~


He was made a Master Mason in Platte City Lodge No. 504, July 17, 1888, and served as its Master in 1892-1893-1894. He received the Capitular Degrees in Platte City Chapter No. 21, R. A. M., in 1888, and served as High Priest in 1897. He passed the Circle in S'hekinah Council No. 24, R. and S. M . , Kansas City, April 22, 1899. The Masonic Orders of Christian Knighthood were conferred upon him. in Belt ·Commandery No.9, K. T., Platte City, in May, 1889, serving as Commander in 1898. ~ He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. in Western Consistory No.2, Kansas City, itlNovember, 1897, serving as Master of Kadosh, and Crowned an honorary thirty-third in Washington, D. C. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1892. In 1894 he was appointed Grand Senior Steward.. In 1895, he was appointed Grand Junior Deacon, and Grand Senior Deacon in 1896, advanced yearly, and elected GrandMaster in 1900. He had the. distinction of being the youngest .m€mbe,r ever elected to this high position. Brother .Wells was a perfect ritualist. He served as Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar, of Missouri in 1906. He was an active, zealous member of the Board of directors of the Masonic Home and serv@d . up to his death. He died December 14, 1916. His funeral was conducted by the· Grand Lodge and was largely attended.


THE EIGHTY-FIRST ANNUAL COM11UNICATION. (The Ninety-Ninth COn11TIUnication.) ~C:;t. Louis) October 15, A.D. 1901; A.L. 5901. Grand Master Wells was greeted by the representatives of 357 Lodges, twenty Grand Lodge Officers, 149 Past l\1asters and sixteen Past Grand Masters vvhen he opened the Grand Lodge. The session was held in the Scottish Rite Cathedral on S'eventeenth Street and Lucas Place. His annual report was lengthy, but a thorough business document. He was active in looking after delinquent and weak Lodges; arrested several Charters for cause, and directed $500 to be sent to the Galveston sufferers. The most important event, from a legal standpoint, \vas his action in reference to a trial held路 in Missouri Lodge No. 1, by setting aside the verdict of the Lodge, and taking jurisdiction of the case from the Lodge to the Grand Lodge. It appears that in the trial, much ill feeling and vindictiveness appears and the Master very arbitrary. Hence the verdict of suspension for one year was set aside and directed that no further action be taken until the n1atter had been brought before the Grand Lodge for its approval or disapproval. The setting aside of a verdict in a Lodge, instead of appealing such verdict to the Grand Lodge, by the aggrieved party,was an unprecedent act by Grand Master. In this particular case, the accused was a Grand Officer in several Grand Masonic Bodies, and in the ordinary course of an appeal, the accused would for the tilne being, be deprived of his membership in the Lodge, until the judglnent of the Lodge be affirmed or disapproved by the Grand Lodge. This implied loss of Masonic standing, with its attendant disqualifications. The case required immediate action and this action of the Grand Master was sustained by the Grand Lodge and the accused cited to appear before the Grand Lodge for trial. The Comn1ittee on Jurisprtldence held that the Grand Master, during the interim of the Sessions of the Grand Lodger was clothed with un-258-


limited authority, provided, that he could not abrogate any of the laws of the Grand Lodge. In other words, the Grand Master vvas the Grand Lodge during the interim ofS'essions. This \vas a wise deduction and a correct conclusion. The Grand Master recommended action, as a Grand Lodge, in reference to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, to he held in St. Louis 1!903-1904. $2,000 were appropriated toward the erection of a Fraternal Building. The oration for the year was delivered by Walter Williams of Columbia, on "The Value of Life." It is published in full. Several ineffectual efforts had been made for a number of years, to alnend the laws, making the stations of the Grand Deacons and Grand Stewards, elective, but failed. The Officers for the year 1902 were as follows: "JOSEPH C. FINAGIN, St. Louis JOHN C. YOCUM, Kansas City WM. 路F. KUHN, Kansas City L. B. VALLIAN:T, St. Louis $. M. KENNARD, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, RJW. J. H. MILLER R:ev. K. M. DEANE A. S. HOUSTON D. M. WILSON FIOWARD, WATSON T. A. DUNN JOHN T. SHORT

E. F.. HARTZELL CYRUS H. JONES H. T. WRIGHT EDWIN KRAUTHOFF W. F. JOHNSON JOHN W. OWEN

~

Grand Master.. Deputy Grand Master. Seni(lr Grand Warden. Junior Grand Warden. Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Crand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Purs'tf,ivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator.. Grand Tyler."

Receipts $33,932.00; disbursements $44,633.00 ; balance cash $3q,214.98. Membership 34,707; number of Lodges 562; raised 2,085; affiliated 863; dimitted 1,021; suspended N. P . "D. 545; net gain 1,057. -259-


JOS'EPH C. 'FINAGIN, Grand Master~ 1901. M. W. Brother Joseph C. Finagin, the fifty-eighth Grand Master, was born May 2, 1855, in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, where he received his education in the public schools. He had been associated with a large wholesale boot and shoe business in the City. He was made a Master Mason in Occidental Lodge No. 163, . December 20, 1886, serving as Master in 1890. He was exalted in St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A. M., May 4, 1888; passed the Circle in Hiram Council No.1, R. and S.. M., October 12, 1892; Knighted in St. Aldemar Commandery No. 18, K.· T., May 14, 1889, and served as its Commander in 1895. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S'. R. in 1800. He served·· for years as D. D. G.L. in St. Louis and had the reputation of being an unexcelled Ritualist. He was appointed Grand Senior Steward in 1895; Grand·Junior Deacon in 1896; Grand Senior Deacon in 1897; elected Grand]unior Warden in 1899; and Grand Master in 1901. Brother Finagin for a number of years had been living in Mexico,. and was a strong factor in the recognition .0£ the York Grand· Lodge of Mexico by the Grand Lodge of Missouri.


THE EIGHTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundredth Communication.) Kansas City, October 21, A.D. 1902; A.. L. 5902. The representatives of 364 Lodges, 142' Past Masters, and 16 Past Grand Masters were present at the opening of the Grand Lodge by Grand Master Finagin. M. W. Brother Thomas E. Dewey, Grand Master and R. W. Brother Albert K. Wilson, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, were introauced and heartily welcomed. 'The address of Grand Master Dewey is published in the Proceedings. The address of Grand Master Finagin is a brief stateme~t of the business of his office. Following the precedent, established in 1901, he set aside the verdict of the Lodge, but oraered a nevv .trial to be held. by the Lodge. The celebrated case of Missouri, No. 1 came again before the Grand Master as to ·the status of the accused. He replied. that the Lodge could not retry the accused· as·· long as ·the charges were· pending against him in the Gran:d Lodge; that the .trial·would be held at 'the eoming Session of the Grand Lodge. The accused was tried before a special Committee of five members appointed by the Grand Master. The majority report of the Committee was for one year's suspension. One member of the C('}mmittee favored an acquittal, and theotl1er believed that while the accused had committed an offense, but having made restitution, mercy should hie extended. The maJority report was amended, changing the one year. suspension to a repntnand. This was adopted. Th.e accused was brought before the Grana Lodge and reprimanded in a most dignified manner byM. W. BrotherXenophon Ryland, Past Grand Master. This was one of the most distressing evemts in the history of the Grand Lodge. Owing to the enforced .absence from the State for a .brief period, the Grand Master req1;leste<i R. W.Brother Jaha C. Yocum, Deputy GrandMaster to take charge. He submitted -2'61-


a brief report. of routine business. The indifference and carelessness of Lodges'in making returns, was shown in the statement of the Deputy Grand Master, that 200 Lodges had failed to n1ake returns, as required by law. This was a distressing condition, but it must not all be laid at the door of the officers of subordinate Lodges, some of the Grand Officers might have had something to do with it. A large number of amendments was introduced, and several came up for action. The chief one before the Grand Lodge was, the including of wholesale Liquor dealers, brewers, and agents thereof, into the list of The following amendment was prohibited occupations. adopted by an overwhelming majority: Unmasonic Conduct.-All Lodges in this Jurisdiction shall enforce the lYfasonic law in reference to unmasonic conduct, and more especially against saloon keeping, brewers, \vholesale liquor dealers, distillers, gambling, blasphemy, pro.fanity and practices of a kindred character. Provided, nothing in .this section shall be so construed as to make it retroactive in the election and initiation of brewers,路路 whole.. sale liquor dealers and distillers.

The saloon-keeper no longer stood alone, but the nobility of the liquor interests came into the same class of outlaws. Tlie referendum relating to the amendment to the Constitution, which had been enforced since the organization of the Grand Lodge, had brought every effort to amend this instrument to naught. It required a majority of all Lodges to approve or disapprove any amendment.N at one-third of the Lodges cared whether the Constitution was amended or not, and .therefore did not vote. Amendment ,vas路 introduced requiring the approval or disapproiVal'of a majority of the Lodges voting. This was afterwards adopted and the old form of referendum consigned to the junk pile. The following' Grand Officers were installed: "JOHN C. YOCUM, Kansas City WM. F. KUHN, Kansas City LEROY B. VALLIANT, Sf. Louis A. S. HOUSTON, Mexico

-262-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden.


JOHN' D. VINCIL, St. Louis SAM'LM. KENNARD, St. Louis ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis REV. J. H. MILLER, Nevada REv. K. M. DEAN, Mexico D. M. WILSON, Milan " HOWARD WATSON, St. Louis T. A. DUNN', Bethany JOHN T. SHORT, Jefferson City E. F. HARTZELL, St. Joseph l. v. McMILLEN, ~aryvil1e ~ ED. MILLER, Keytesville C. C. BIGGER, Laclede WM. SOUTHERN, JR., Independence WM. R. GENTRY, St. Louis JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis "

Grand Secretary. Grand Treasurer. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand. Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon.

Grand. Senior Steward. Junior Steward.

Grand Grand Grand Grand G1 and

Marshal. Marshal. Sword Bearer.

Pursuivant.. Grand Orator.. Grand Orator. 0

Grand T'Yler.'~

Receipts $35,108.25; disbursements $32)673.24; balance $38,673.24. Membership 36,138; number of Lodges 565; raised 2,303; affiliated 911; dimitted 1,071 ; suspended N. P. D.- 592; net gain 1,289. JOHN CAMPBELL YOCUM, Grand Master, 1902. M.W. Brother John C. Yocum, the fifty-ninth Grand Master, was born in Pennsylvania, April 23, 1854. He came to Kansas City in 1887, and began the practice of Law in which he continued up to the date of his death. He was n1ade a Master Mason in路 Catawissa Lodge No. 349, Catawissa, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1885. He affiliated with Temple Lodge No. 299, K~nsas City, Missouri, in which he served as Master in 1893 and for five years was its Secretary. He was exalted路 to the l{oyal Arch i.n Orient Chapter No. 102, R. A. M.,Kansas City, Decelnber 29, 1891, and served as High Priest in. 1899. He was greeted as S'elect Master in路 Shekinah Council No. 24, R. and S. 1vI., I{ansas City, February 25, 1892, serving as its Master in 1898. He \~laS knighted in Oriental -263-


Commandery No. 35, K. T., Kansas City, February 18, 1898, serving as its Commander in 1902. He first appeared in th'e Grand Lodge in 1892 and was present at every annual Communication up to his death. He served as D. D. G. L. of the 25th District for seven years. He was appointed Grand S"enior Steward in 1896, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1899 and elected Grand Master October 21, 1902. He died April 26,' 1903 after a lingering illness which had rendered him incapacitated as Grand Master from March 1, 1903. His renlains were tak~n to his old home in Pennsylvania for interment, where the obsequies were performed by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

-264-


THE EIGHTY-THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and First Comm:unication.) ,St. Louis, Oc'tober 20, A.D. 1903; A.L. 5903. Tne chair of the Grand Master was vacated by his death. The Deputy Grand Master R.. W" Brother William F~ Kuhn, acting ·Grand Master, opened the Grand ·Lodge. The acting Grand Master paid tribute to his Chief, who had. been €aHed to his eternal· Home April 26, 1093, after a lingering illness for many months. Early in the year the Grand. Master went to Phoenix,Ari~ona, stating that he would conduct the affairs of the Grand Lodge from that place. Matters became chaotic, and the question of assuming the Office of Grand Master, by the Deputy became a serious problem, and the mental conditio~ of the Grand Master was precarious. Acting under the advice of the' Chairman of the Committee on Jurisprudence, Past Grand Master William M. Williams,. the· Dieputy Grand Master refused to interfere· until the Grand Master was pronoumiced incapacitated by a compete,nt Committee. This was done and the Deputy Gran,d .Master assumed the Office March 16, 1903. The records in the Office were in a tangled condition. Very little of it could be put in shape for a report. The report of the acting ,. Grand Master covered in detail the transactions of his office. He paid due tribute to Dr. Reuben Barney, D.D. G. M. of the Eleventh. District, who died July 15, 1903. Dr: Barney had always been a prominent figure· in Freemasonry in all of its branches, and at .one time a m,ember of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home. The. acting Grand Master reported the laying of the corner stone of the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Kansas City which event was .largely attended. Also that of the Missouri \¥orld"s Fair Building in St. Louis at which event the celebrated George Washington Gavel, brought by a sp€~ial Committee from Potomac Lodge No.3, Washington, D. C., was used. The addresses 'on this occasion were· made by Brother David R. -265-


Francis, Ex-Governor and President of the Exposition; M. W. Brother A. M. Dockery, P. G. M. and Governor; and Joseph w. Folk, Circuit Attorney of St. Louis, a future. Governor. The acting Grand Master issued a circular letter calling attention to the forms of petitions that in it the occupation must be definitely stgted, and that the use of the word, "merchant," "salesman," "clerk," "bookkeeper," were not definite, and too general in their application. He also forbade smoking in the 1tIasonic Hall during the cerenlonies. This edict against making a smoke house out of a Masonic Hall, was another invasion of the rights of some Masons, but it was generally obeyed, only to fall into inocuous desuetude for some time later. After several years this edict was enacted into a law. He took strong grounds against the public appearance of Lodges, except on Masonic occasions, he said: This habit of parading has and is growing, and is chiefly due to trying to compete, or imitate, the various and multitudinous fraternal insurance societies. Many of the Brethren have felt aggrieved over the·· fact that the Masonic Lodge cannot parade, while other organizations can appear on every occasion. This appearance, on other than Masonic occasions, unless it be of National or State importance, has a tendency to render common and cheap a fraternity that has always been exclusive and dignified. If this mixture of the Masonic Order with the ephemeral societies of the day continues, we will lose that' character and high standing that has characterized us. I had one request to parade with a society which, in Kansas City at least, is made up of the lowest class of citizens, and whose annual debauch is ahvays held on the Sabbath Day. O.

~.

S.·· AND

TH~

HOME.

The Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star had asked, for several years, admission to the rights and privileges of the ·Home, and the Order ·.was admitted during the year. While the admission of the O. E. S. had been bitterly opposed by some, but time has demonstrated the wisdom of the -266-


act. The women of the Order have contributed more than one hundred and fifty thousand dollars since its recognition, and without the aid given it in furniture, carpets, beds, bedding and other supplies, the Hotne would not have survived without a heavy increase assessment on the members of the Lodges. The acting Grand Master in reference to the admission of the O. E.S'., says: We all rejoice that the endOWlnent fund has reached the goodly sum of one hundred thousand dollars, and that its finances are so ably conducted. I think it is a source of congratulation that a new and. effective agency has been enlisted under the banner of our Home. Since our last Annual Communication, that which a few years ago seemed as a 'wild chitnera of an iconoclast, or a fitful dream of a wrecker of ancient landmarks, has become a reality; and woman's hand has been enlisted in the service of the Home. Her kindliness is aiding the Board in the labor of love. The Order of the Eastern Star has been given that due recognition so befitting our wives, mothers and daughters in contributing to the maintenance of the Home and advice in many of the problems that confront the Directors. The "Advisory Board" of ladies of the Eastern Star has come路 as a benediction~ The contribution of $3,000 in cash. to the Eloine proves their faith by their works. The annual contribution of a fifteen cents, per member, tax for the support of the Home, is another active demonstration of the interest of the twelve thousand nlembers of the Eastern Star feel in the Ho'me. Our St. John's D'ay in June has been set apart as Masonic Home Day, and their first efforts this year were manifest in carpets, rugs, bed linen, towels, chairs, sewing machines, furniture, etc., etc., that you wiJl find at the Home when you visit it today. This observance of Masonic Home D'ay has not been merely productive of oratory and picnics, but路 a voluntary offering from wQman's hand and heart. May this influence invade every Masonic Lodge in our State, and our watch-word be: That an institution is truly great that hath a great charity.

In reference to the recognition路 of certain Grand Lodges he said: I have been unable to find that the Grand Lodge has ever extended recognition to the Grand Lodges of Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria, N'ew South W:ales, New Zealand, Cuba and Valle del Mexico.

-267-


The first six Grand Lodges work under the English Ritual, and are legitimate descendants of the 'Grand Lodge of England, whom we claim as our mother. These Lodges speak our language and use the same Ritual. There should be no hesitancy in extending to them fraternal recognition, and exchange representatives. Anglo-Saxon blood is one, and Anglo-Saxon 1tlasonry is our own. As far as I am able to learn these Grand Lodges have been universally re~ognized. The Grand Lodge of Cuba has had a hard struggle for existence. Crushed under the heel of civic and church tyranny it languished, but since freedom has been given them by the boys in blue, it has rapidly grown in strength and power. This Grand Lodge lies at our very door, and if found regular, should have our aid and fraternal assistance.

rthis recommendation was referred to a Comn1ittee which reported in favor of recognition, and that the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico be .approved conditionally. The law in reference to the Grand Treasurer was amended, requiring the Grand Treasurer to deposit all of the funds of the Grand Lodge in some Bank or Trust Company, to the credit of the Grand Lodge, and requiring him to give a surety bond 路for the faithful discharge of his duties. This adoption of the anlendment, promptly brought a refusal from the Grand Treasurer for further election. This refusal was wholly gratuitous. The following resolution in reference to the Home was offered by Past Grand Master Boyd and adopted: 1. That the Board of Directors of the Mason.jcRome be and it路 is hereby instructed not to sell or convey any part of the land purchased for our 1vfasonic Home, without the permission of the Grand Lodge. 2. That said Board ought not to construct any building or additions to any building of said Home, without the consent and approval .a f this Grand Lodge.

3. That any additional improvements in Home, should be made in accordance. with designed with the purpose of making one that when the Home is completed it may Ancient Free and Accepted Masons.

-268-

the way of building to said a suitable architectural plan consistent, united whole, so resemble the handiwork路 of


The following Grand Officers were installed: "WM. F. KUHN" Kansas City M. W. Grand Master. LEROY B. VALLIANT, St. Louis ".. " Deputy G'rand Master. ". Grand Senior Warden. A. S. HOUSTON, Mexico." D. M. WILSON, Milan " Grand Junior Warden. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis " Grand Treasurer. JOHN D. VINCIL, St. Louis Grand Secretary. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Grand Lecturer. HOWARD WATSON, St. Louis Grand Senior Deacon. TANDY A. DUNN, Bethany Grand Junior Deacon. REv. JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. Rtv. K. M. DEANE, Mexico Grand Chaplain. REV. W. J. WILLIAMSON, St. Louis Grand Chaplain. R. R. KREEGER, 'Kansas City Grand Marshal. C. C. BIGGER, Laclede Grand Marshal. . WM. A. HALL, St. Louis Grand Sword Bearer. JOHN T. SHORT, Jefferson City Grand Se1'l.ior Steward. E. F. HARTZELL, St Joseph Grand Junior Steward. MARTIN T. BALSLEY, Joplin 'Grand Pursuivant. WM~ R. GENTRY, St. Louis Grand Orator. R.. E. L. SMITH, Marshal Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis ~~ Grand Tyler."

Receipts $36,795.85; disbursements $34,576.25 ; balance $40,692.94. Membership 37,684; number of Lodges 565; raised 2,434; affiliated 819; dimitted 1,1~9; suspended N. P. D. 548; net gain 1,314.

WILLIAM FREDERICK KUHN, GrandMaster, 1903. M. W. Brother William F. Kuh;n, the sixtieth Grand Master, was born near Lyons, New York, April IS, 1849. His parents were born in AIsace, then a French Province, but the family are of German descent. The family moved into' Kalamazoo County, Michigan, in 1858 and settled on a farm near Mendon. He received his early. education in the country schools, and prepared himself for college, at spare times. He entered Wittellburg CoIIege, Springfield,Ohio, in 1871, graduating there-


from in 1875, with the Degree of A. B., and the second honors of his class. In 1878 he received the Degree of A.M. from his Alma Mater. After graduation he was principal of Schools in Belle Center, and DeGraff, Ohio, until he entered Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, graduating therefrom with honorable mention in 1884. He located in ElDorado, Kansas, where he practiced his Profession for four years. He came to Kansas City, Missouri, in the fall of 1888, where he has resided ever since. Teaching is a second nature to him, as he has been Professor of Materia JVledica and Therapeutics for two years, and Professor of Physiology for fifteen years in the University Medical College. President of the. Kansas City College of Pharmacy for eight years, Special Lecturer on Nervous Diseases in the \i\T estern Dental College, and for the past fifteen years has been Professor of Mental and Nervous Diseases in the Medical Department of the University of Kansas. He was Superintendent of State Hospital No. 4 for the Insane, Farmington, Missouri, from .1905 to 1907 and Superintendent of State Hospital No.2, St. Joseph, froin 1907 to 1909 inclusive. . He. was made a Ma§ter Mason in Belle Center Lodge No. 347, Belle Center, Ohio, Apri130, 1877; affiliated with Patmos Lodge No. 97, EI Dorado, Kansas and served as its Master for three years, and is a Charter member of York Lodge No. 563, Kansas City, lVlissouri, and its first Master in 1895. He was made a Royal Arch 1tIason ·in Lafayette Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M., Bellefontaine, Ohio, in February, 1882, affiliatedwith El Dorado Chapter No. 3S in 1886, then affiliated with Orient Chapter No. 102, Kansas·· City, in 1888, and served as its High Priest for 1891, 1892 and 1893. He passed the Circle in Hiram Council No.. 1, R.· and S. M., St. Louis, November, 1891, and became a Charter member of Shekinah Council No.4, Kansas City, and was its first Master in 1892. He received the Masonic Orders of Christian Knight-270-


hood in El Dorado Commandery, No. 19, K. T., EI Dorado, Kansas, June 8, 1887 and served as its COlnmander in 1888, affiliated "vith Oriental Comn1andery No. 35, K. T. Kansas City, Missouri, in October, 1889, and served as its Commander in 1893. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. in the Bodies of that Rite in Western Consistory No.2, Kansas City, serving as Prior in the Consistory for seven years. He was installed a Knight of the Red Cross of Constantine and Appendant Orders, March 17, 1898, serving as the first Sovereign of Mary Conclave No. S, and Grand Sovereign of the Grand Imperial Council of the Order in 1,902. He received the Grand Cross in the Supreme Grand Chapter of the Order in Boston in 1899. GRAND OFFICES

In the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Chapter of Missouri, he was appointed Grand Royal Arch Captain in 1893, elected Grand King in 路1895 . and elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter in 1897. In the Grand Council of. Royal and Select Masters of Missouri, he \vas elected Grand Master in 1893, two years after he had received the Degrees. In the Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of Missouri, he was elected Grand Commander in 1910. G~NltRAL

GRAND BODIES.

In the General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the United States he was elected Grand Master of the First Veil in 1896, at Baltimore, Maryland, advanced regularly and at the Triennial Convocation of the General Grand Chapter held at Asheville, North Carolina,September 28, 1921, he was elected General Grand High Priest. He was Chairman of the Committee that prepared the General Grand Chapter Ritual adopted at Baltimore in 1918. In the General Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the United States, he has served on the Ritual Committee for twenty years, and is the author of the arrangement of the ---271-


Superexcellent Master's Degree, adopted at Indianapolis in 1912. In the Grand Encampment Knights Templar of the United States, he has served on the Committee on Jurisprudence since 1910, acted as its Chairman at the Triennial Session held in Philadelphia, in 1919, and a member of the Committee to revise the Ritual appointed in 1919. In the 0.. E. S. he served as Grand Patron of the Grand Chapter in 1900, and elected M. W.Grand Patron of the General Grand Chapter in 1006. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge, although not a member thereof, as Grand Orator in 1893. In 1896 he appeared as Master of York Lodge No. 563. He served on several important Committees until 1900, when he was elected from the floor to the station of 路Grand Junior Warden, advanced yearly, and elected Grand 11aster in 1903. Owing to the death of Grand Master Yocum, he was obliged to serve,as Acting Grand Master, for a goodly portion of the years of 1902-03.. Since his retirement from the Gr~nd Mastership' he has served as Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations, and was a member of Board of Directors of the Masonic Home for five years. He is the author of "A Small Basket of Chips from the Quarries," and prepared a large pamphlet for 路gratuitous distrihution on "More Light," or the relation of the Orders of Christian Knighthood, the, Cryptic, and the Royal Arch Degrees to Ancient Craft .Masonry. Of this pamphlet, fully two hundred thousand copies have been published and distributed in the various Grand Jurisdictions. He was appointed to write this Centennial History of the Grana Lodge'.

-27,2;-


THE EIGHTY-FOURTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Second Communication.) St. Louis, September 27, A.D. 1904; A.L. 5904. This annual S'ession outstripped others in attendance. The representatives of 389 Lodges, 140 Past Masters and nineteen Past Grand Masters were present. The Session was saddened by the absence of the GrandSecretary,]ohn D. Vinci!, who was at his home suffering from a fatal illness. A resolution of sympathy was offered by Past Grand Master R. E. Anderson, adopted by; a unanimous standing vote, and transmitted to him. Preliminary to the opening of the Grand Lodge, the children of the Masonic Home appeared on the platform~ under the direction of Superintendent Redd and Mrs. Redd and entertained the Brethren with an excellent program. The Grand Master, appointed W. Brother F. W. Matt, Grand Secretary, pro tern. ,Grand Master. Kuhn p,resented a lengthy and ·.·interesting adaress, which was ordered printed in pamphlet form for distribution among the Lodges. He paid due tribute to the memory of R. W. Brother Kenneth M. Deane, Grand Chaplain, who died December 30, 1903, at Mt?xico, after a lingering illness; and to W. Brother Henry Lihu, who had served as Chairman of the Comn1ittee on Pay Roll for many years. Muchbusiness of the· usual routine matter had been transacted by the GrandMaster. Under decisions, a·· few of special'interest may be mentioned. He .decided : that only ·those who were present during the entire trial, and had heard all of the testimony, were entitled to vote· on the guilt ·or innocence of the accused; that, even if a Masonic Hall had been dedicated to Masonry, by the A" A.S. R., it .was necessary that it be dedicated by t~eGrand Master or his Proxy, before· it could be· occupied. by a Lodge, the dedication by a so called "higher Body" does not set aside the express law.of the Grand Lodge; the term dotage is a term applied to a condition, and is not -273-


limited by age, as long as a candidate can intelligently comprehend and understand the vvork, and learn the lectures, he is not in his dotage, even though he be as old as Methuselah; that the transcript of testimony given in a Court of Records is competent in a Masonic trial, where the issues are the same. He gave an interesting account of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Grand Secretary Vincil's being made a Master Mason. He reported the arrest of a number of Charters for cause. He took vigorous action against drug store saloons and drunkenness in men, who by their prominence in the community considered themselves immune. All vvere expelled and were taught that there was "a God in Israel." GRAND HONORS

In reference to giving the Grand Honors, he said: The question of how to give the Grand Honors has been a debatable one for some time. In my visitations I have seen them given to various official ranks, and in many ways. I have been received with the Royal Arch Grand Honors, the Grand Lodge Grand Honors, ,and several tin1es with the Funeral' Grand Honors. The latter may have been appropriate, but tome, were a little unseemly and previous. A fter my successor is elected and installed, it might not be so objectionable to me. The Grand Honors accorded to the Grand Master is not a personal compliment, but a courtesy due his official station. Lodges are often very much embarrp.ssed, as to what constitutes the Grand Honors and to whom they shall be given. I have seen them given to 11asters of Lodges, to' Past Grand Masters, to P'ast District Deputies, on up through the various official grades, until this special greeting and, honor shown the station of the Grand Master has' become a joke. I ~m of the opinion that the Grand Honors" except as required in Grand Lodge ceremonies, such as installation of officers, dedication and, consecration of Halls, laying corner-stones, should only be given to the Grand J\.1:aster or his immediate Deputy on an official visitation. DELINQUENT LODGES

In reference to the delinquency in Lodges in making returns, he took heroic measures. All Lodges were .. notified through a special letter 路from the Grand Secretary's Office and rein___274-


GRi\ND MASTER'S JE"WEL Presented to The Grand I.. odge of Missouri By Wm. F. Kuhn, Grand Master, September 21, 1904.


forced by direct instructions to the D. D. G. M.'s that the Lodge returns must be in the hands of the Grand Secretary by September First, or their Charters would be arrested. This caused a commotion among the dry bones. The Grand Master was criticized by a Grand Lodge Official for such stern measures, this criticism readily revealed the cause of previous delinquencies. But the age of official sugar lump policy was over. While this delinquency had averaged from twenty-five to fifty per cent of the Lodges, the first of S'eptember found less than two per cent delinquent, and the Charters of sixteen Lodges were promptly路 arrested. This action, and the policy, of the incoming Grand Secretary, abolished delinquency. CONDITION OF MASONIC HALLS.

In commenting on condition of Masonic Halls, the Grand Master said: It is very gratifying to know that so Inany Lodges own their own halls.' There is a decided advance in their furnishings and equipments. It can be safely said that three-fourths of our Lodges have. wellfurnished, beautiful halls, one-eighth have fair halls and one-eighth are absolutely bad, poorly furnished, very little Lodge paraphernalia and the halls filthy. I have seen the hall of a Lodge in a wealthy neighborhood, whose Charter nates back half a century, where a filthy, ragged ingrain carpet lies on the floor, the altar made of two one-inch boards nailed upright to the floor, and another board nailed across the top; the whole thing had the appearance of a farmer's milk stool in blue; the pedestals were of the same kind, not a curtain at the windows, but the willdo\vs painted blue. The entire furnishings of the room in the rough ,vould not cost over ten dollars. I know of another, where no carpet or rug lies on the floor, the cheapest ax-and-hand-saw, homemade furniture, no paraphernalia of any kind, except a wooden trowel. So bad is it that the birds, the "Mud Dauber,"mistook this Masonic Hall for a dilapidated old ruin and built its nest behind the Charter and the chronlos on the ,vall. Here they reared their young for many summers unmolested; as in each succeeding year the old nests were torn down and built anew, the kind and sympathetic Tyler would 路 not touch the dirt, straw and rubbish with his unhallowed broom.

-275-


Go on, little CtfMud Dauber," rear your young, that we may s,ee a little evidence of life in this Masonic Hall.

The Grand Master held that a Master of a Lodge should be prohibited for serving more than two years in succession, that in several Lodges, Masters insisted on being reelected, some of them for seven and eight years, until they' had become Uthe old man of the sea," sitting on the neck of the Lodge, hindering the growth of the Lodge and refusing to let go. 'l'H~ VISIBL~ PRSS~NCE

OF'

TH~

CHARTER.

Marcus Lodge, No. 110, at Fredericktown, reported the loss of its Charter in rather an amusing and peculiar way. It appears that this Lodge kept its Charter in at least a sacred spot, if not a secure one, between the leaves of the Bible. It happened, as it frequently d,oes, that one of the Brethren died, and while on the way to the cemetery the Bearer of the Great Lights fell down and unceremoniously spilled the Great Lights all over Madison County. A very strong wind was blowing, many of the leaves of the Bible being loose, as is very common in Lodge Bibles, the wind spread the· Gospel, and along with it the Charter, to the four quarters of the earth. leonId not understand why the Charter should be taken to the funeral, unless the dogma of the "visihle presence" of the Charter had, like an ancient landmark, such a firm hold upon the members that they believed that the deceased would not rest well. \vithout a strict· constitutional interment. I was informed that it was customary to keep the Charter in the Bible, and if· the Brother had not fallen all would have been well. The Secretary volunteered the timely information that the Bearer of the Great Lights was not intoxicated when he fell, .as he was a minister of the Gospel. I ordered strict· search to be made in and·. about Fredericktown to see it the Charter might not be hidden in the recesses of the rocks. Search .was made, the Charter found, brought up and placed in a frame, no more to wander a.way. I have since learned that some Lodges· do carry the Charter to the cemetery under the delusion that even the last Rites could not be paid the deceased unless the Charter was. present.

The Grand .Lodge extended Fraternal recognition, upon· rec,ommendation of the Committee,· to the following Grand Lodges: Valle de Mexico, Mexico; Queensland,Australia; The· Three Globes, Royal York, Saxony, Eclectic Union,Zur-27'&-


sonne,Zur Eintracht of Concord, Germany; Denmark at Copenhagen; Sweden at Stockholm; Norway at Christiania, and Netherlands, (Holland) . The oration was delivered by W: Brother William R. Gentry and is published in full in the Proceedings.. The, Committee on Appeals and Grievances, with M. W. Brother D. A. Jameson, Past GrandMaster, as Chairman, had under consideration the appeals, as ordered by the Grand Master, of several notorious boodlers which had been exposed by Brother Joseph W. Folk, State's Attorney, St. Louis. Thisexposure of grafters and boodlers had caught in its net six members of Masonic Lodges, several of th,em were men of wealth and influence, but when the Committee had finished with its work, all except one had been expelled. The one escaping, through political "connivance, by the officers of his lodge misplacing the endictment. The case was referred to the incoming Grand Master, but nothing was done. R.' W. Brother Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer, was brought to the platform and properly caned with an ebony, gold headed cane, by the Grand Master, as a token of appreciation. The following Grand Officers were installed: "LEROY B. VALLIANT, St. Louis A.. S. HOUSTON, lvlexico ~ D.M. WILSON, Milan HOWARD WATSON, St. Louis JOHN R. P'ARSON, St. Louis JOHN D. VINCIL, ALLAN 'McDOWELL, St Louis 1. H. MILLER, Nevada GEO. W. JAMES,St Louis JOHN T. SHORT, Jefferson City E. F. HARTZELL, St. Joseph C. C. BIGGER, Laclede W:M. A. HALL,路 St. .Louis R.. R. KREEGER, Kansas City MARTIN T. BALSLEY, Joplin R.E. L.SMITH, Marshal

W'M. E. HOKE, St. Louis

Grand Master.

Deputy Grand Master. Senior .Grand Warden. Junier Grand Warden. Grand Treasurer. " Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand .Chaplain. Grand Chaplain.. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand luniorDeacon. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand .Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant.


ARTHUR A. JOHNSON, Springfield ~ . Grand Orator. W. T. JAMESON, Kansas City Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis Grand Tyler. N. B.-R. W. Bro. John D. Vinci!, Grand Secretary, was too ill to be present at the installation."

At the conclusion of the installation, Past Grand Master Kuhn presented to the Grand Lodge a Grand Master's Jewel, pinned it on the coat of Grand Master Valliant, and requested that it be transmitted to each succeeding Grand Master. Receipts $39,049.75; disbursements $31,876.41; balance $40,-

755.87. Membership 39,080; number of Lodges 569; raised 2,824; affiliated 1,042; dimitted 1,104; suspended N. P. D. 628; net gain 1,704.

LEROYB. VALLIANT, Grand Master} 1904. M. W . Brother Leroy B. Valliant, the sixty-first Grand Mas. .labama,· but in his early life, the family ter, was born in . A moved to··Mississippi, where he grew to manhood. He graduated from the University of Mississippi with a Degree of A.B. and afterwards . from the Law Department of Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, with the Degree of LL.D. During the civil war he served in the Confederate Army as Captain in the 22nd Mississippi Regiment. In 1874 he moved to St. Louis, where he resided up to his death. In 1886, he was elected Judge of the ·Circuit Court, and reelected until 1898, vvhen he was elected Judge on the Supreme Bench, serving up to the date of his death. He was made a Master Mason in Polar Star Lodge No. 79, and served as its Master in 1889. He was exalted .in I(ilwinning Chapter No. 50, R. A. M., in August, 1886,. serving as High Priest in 1892-1893. He was ·Knighted in S't. Louis CommanderyNo. 1, K. T. and served as Commander in 1896. He received the Degrees of the A.A. S.R. in St. Louis, in

March,· 1"000.. -278-


In the Grand Lodge, he was appointed Grand Pursuivant in 1897, Grand Marshal in 1898, Grand Senior Deacon in 1900. He was elected路 Grand Junior Warden in 1901, advanced regularly, and elected Grand Master in 1904. He died in St. Louis, March 3, 1913. Judge Valliant "vas a gentleman of the old s.chool. Dignified, modest and gentle. A lover of the race; a stauncH defender of his faith, and above all a man.

-2791-


THE EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One IIundred and Third Communication.) St. Louis, September 26, A.D. 1905; A.L. 5905. The mileage and per diem law brought up the attendance at the Grand Lodge to a considerable degree. This annual Communication found the representatives of 367 Lodges, 245 Past Masters, and 18 Past Grand Masters present. Grand Master Valliant, in his address, paid a loving tribute to the late J ahn D. Vincil, Grand Secretary, who died at the beginning of the year, October 12, 1904. His death created a vacancy in the Grand Secretary's position, which the Grand Master filled by the appointment of M. W. Brother John R. Parson, Past Grand Master, who resigned the position of Grand Treasurer to accept the Grand Secretary"s ship. ~o the vacant position of Grand Treasurer, the Grand Master appointed W. Brother Alphonso C.S'tewart. He also paid due tribute to the .late M. W. Brother Thomas E. Garrett, P. G. M. who died June 30, 1905. Owing to the fact, that at the close of the World's Fair many im1pe'cunious men, claiming to be Masons, were attempt.. ing to visit Lodges, and a clandestine organization was endeavoring to organize Lodges, the·· Grand Master issued an edict against this· clandestine BadY,and required. documentary evidence, in adaition to the usual examination, for visitation. While the edict expired with the close of his administration, an 'amendment was offered embodying the essential features of the edict, and was the forerunner of our present law on visitations. The Grand l\tlaster being a lawyer and a Judge made fortythree decisions. In reference to splitting up a· Lodge, to confer several sections of. a Degree at one, and the same time, he ruled: There is no authority in Masonic law for such a course. A degree can be conferred only in a Lodge. A Lodge is a unit;·· it cannot be in two places at the same time. If that which is in one room con-289.-


ferring part of the degree is the Lodge, that which is in the other room assuming to confer another part is not the lodge and has no authority to act as such.

The Grand Master closed his admirable address with an eloquent ~plea for the pure principles of Freemasonry, as against special and disastrous propaganda. This Session was very prolific in the production of amendments to the Code, very few of which were ever adopted. , Memorial services were held on the second day to the memory of the Grand Secretary and Past Grand Master Vincil.. The Committee on Past Grand Master's jewels, reported ana submitted a design thereof. The report was adopted and the jewels ordered made and to be presented at the next annual Communication. This .jewel can be seen, on the proud breasts of the Past Grand Masters ·at every Session.. It is a wee bit large, but it can be seen. The mileage and per diem 'amount had crept up to $5,691.30atthis Session. The following Officers for the ensuing year were installed. "A. S. HOUSTON, Mexico D. M. WILSON, Milan JOHN T. ·SHORT, Jefferson City ROBERT R.KREEGER, Kansas City A. C. STEWART, St. Louis

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand Junior Warden. Grand Treasurer. JOHN R.. P'ARSON,St. Louis Grand Secretary. ALLAN McDOWELL, St. Louis Grana Lecturer. W. C. ATWOOD, Brookfield Grand Chaplain. H. P. BOND, Clifton Hill Grand Chaplain. EMANUEL F. HARTZELL, St. Joseph Grand Senior Deacon. C. C. BIGGER, Laclede " ".. Grand ·lunior ·Deacon. WM. A. HALL, St. Louis Grand Senior.Steward. R. E. L. SMITH, Marshal Grand Junior Steward. ALFREDI REYNOLDS, Joplin Grand Marshal. WM. E. HOKE, St. Louis Grand Marshal. ARCH.. A. JOHNSON, Springfield· Grand Sword Bearer. WM. SOUTHERN, ]R.., Independence Grand·· Pursuivant. SIDNEY BEERY, Platte City Grand Orator. FRANK W. SMITH, Palmyra Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN,· Sf. Louis Grand Tyler.}' l

-2'81-


M. W. Brother Rufus E. Anderson, P. G. M., presented his first report on Correspondence. It is a finished and interesting document and not polemic. Receipts $40,631.18; disbursements $31,973.83;, balance

$43,878.58. Membership 40,983; number of Lodges 574; raised 2,736; affiliated 888; dimited 1,055 ; suspended N. P . D. 579; net gain 1,624.

ALGERTON SIDNEY HOUSTON, Grand Master, 1905. M. W ..Brother Algeron S. Houston, the sixty-second Grand Master, was born in Monroe County, Missouri, in 1852. He graduated in Civil Engineering in Bethany College, West Va. But he engaged in the lumber business in Mexico, Missouri, where he represents large manufacturing interests. He was made a Master Mason in Hebron Lodge No. 354, Mexico, September 8, 1881, serving as its Master in 1888 and 1889. He was exalted in Mexico Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., and served as its .High Priest for four years, 1895-1899. He was Knighted in Crusade COlnmandery No. 23, K. T., Mexico, and served as its Commander in 1900. He first appeared in the Grand Lodge in 1888, was regular in his attendance, and was appointed Grand S'word Bearer in 1899, Grand Senior Steward in 1900; Grand Senior Deacon in 1901, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1902, advanced yearly, ana. elected Grand Master in 1905. Brother Houston is a man of sterling worth, always active in Freemasonry and a strong exponent of the highest ideals.

-282-


THE EIGHTY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Fourth Communication.)

Kansas City, September 25, A.D. 1)906; A.L. 5906. This Session was held ·in the Shrine Hall at 14th St.. and , Grand Avenue, with the representatives of 401 Lodges, 182 Past Masters and 18 P'ast Grand Masters present. The address of Grand Master Houston was brief, yet a condensed statement of his offi:cial activities. During the year two distinguished pillars in Freemasonry of Missouri had fallen. Of these the Grand· Master spoke as follows: This subj ect will be ably presented by the proper committee and it is, therefore, unnecessary fo.r me to dwell on it at length. I desire, however, to pay tribute to two officers of this Grand Lodge who have passed to the Great Beyond since our last meeting. R. W. Bro. Allan McDowell, Grand Lecturer, died in Kansas City,. May 20, 1906. He had served the Grand Lodge as Grand Lecturer .for nearly forty years. He was, perhaps, more . widely known than any 'M:asonin the State of Missouri~ and not only in Missouri will hisIoss be felt,but all over. our country, wherever men appreciate the beauties of symbolic teachings, his death will cause profound regret. No man has done more for ritualistic Masonry than he. We· buried him on the 24th day of May at Mt. Washington Cemetery, in Kansas City. p'ast Grand Master Joseph S. Browne died on the 12th day. of February, 1906, at his home in St. Joseph. "Uncle Joe," as he was . familiarly and affectionately called by his·· wide circle of acquaintances, had approached the three score and ten years . allotted to man. His fidelity was unquestioned and his integrity·. unexampled. His genial spirit triumphed over the weakness of a frail body, and the sunshine· of his ·presence was refreshing to all who knew him. We shall miss him in. this Communication.

In the death of R. W.Brother Allan McDowell, the Grand Lodge .1ost its. great Lectur~r, and progressive leader in the Ritual. The Grand Master appointed to this important position, W. Brother James R. McLachlan. Sufficient time has passed to prove conclusively, that .no mistake was made in the appoilltment. -283-.-


1'he Grand Master reported that the Lodges, in response to a circular letter, had contributed $10,000 to the earthquake sufferers, San Francisco, California. He reported the adoption, through persistent labor, of the amendment modifying the referendum to the Constitution. A consummation devoutly to be wished. He called attention to the organization, as a private enterprise, a "l\1asonicSanatarium" and believed that the name Masonic Vlas questionable. The Committee to which this matter was referred, reported adversely to the use of the name, in private enterprises, and later an amendment was introduced and adopted prohibiting the use of the word, HMasonic" in inaividual. enterprises. Grand Secretary Parson's report on delinquent Lodges had a different sound from what the Grand Lodge had in the past so often heard. He said: I am very much pleased to report that with the· kind assistance of District Deputy Grand Masters I have succeeded in getting returns and Grand Lodge dues from every Lodge in the State. . We have received over $3,000 more for Grand Lodge dues than in any previous year.

The Con1nlittee on Foreign Relations reported adversely on the recognition of the Grand Lodge, Alpina, Switzerland. The COlnmittee on Codification, with M. W. Brother A. M. Hough,· Chairman, requested further time, to complete the work. The Jewels that had been prepared for the Past Grand Masters were presented by Rev. Brother John H. Miller in an amusing address and the Past Grand Master looked dignified. The following Grand Officers were installed: "DAVID M.WILSON, Milan Grand Master. JOHN T. SHORT, Jefferson City Deputy Grand Master. ROBERT R. KREEGER, Kansas City Grand Senior Warden. WM. A. HALL, St. Louis ...........•.... Gl'and Junior Warden. A. C. STEWART, .St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN R. P'ARSON, St. Louis Grand Secretary. J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. -284-


R~v. J. H. MILLER, Nevada R:ÂŁv. T. M. S. KEENEY, Albany C. C. BIGGER, Laclede : , R. E. L. SMITH, Marshall ARCH. A. JOHNSON, Springfield J.~COB LAMPERT, St. Louis MARTIN T. BALSLEY, Joplin C. A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph WM. SOUTHERN, JR." Independence J. W. BEALL, Malden JOHN' E. SWANGER, Jefferson City W. C. ATWOOD, Brookfield JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Senior Steward.. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grana Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand Tyler."

Receipts $41,245.00; disbursements $48,321.38; balance $38,360.42. Membership 42,954; number of Lodges 585; raised 2,930; affiliated 1,081; dimitted 1,257; suspended N. P. D. 527; net gain 1,857.

DAVID McCONAUGHY WILSON Grand Master, 1906. M. \J..I. Brother David M. Wilson, the sixty-third Grand Master, was born at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, September.26, 1853. He is of Scottish parentage and of the old Covenanter stock. T~e.family, his father being a Presbyterian Minister, moved to Potosi, Missouri, in 1860, and in 1871 settled in Milan, Missouri, which has been Brother .Wilson's home ever since. He is a graduate of the .State University of Missouri, receiving the Degree of A.B . in 1875, and the Degree of A.M. in 1878. He was admitted to the Bar in 1881 and served as Prosecuting Attorney in 1884, 1886 and 1888. Brother Wilson isa very successful attorney. He was .made a Master Mason in S'eaman Lodge.No.. 126. Milan in 1876, and served as Master in 1887 and 1888. He was exalted in Milan Chapter, R. A. M. in 1883, serving as High Priest in 1886. He passed the Circle in Shekinah Coun-


cil No. 24, R. and S. M., Kansas City in 1894, becanle a Charter member. of Solomon Council No. 26, Milan, and served as its first Master in 1894. He \vas Knighted in Couer de. Lion Commandery.No. 14, Brookfield, in 1884, becam~ a Charter member of St. Bernard Commandery No. 52, .K. T., Milan, and was its first Commandei· in 1889. He was a Charter melnber and first· Patron of Olive Chapter No. 65, o. E. S., at Milan. He was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri in 1907, and Grand 1Viaster of the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters of Missouri in 1899. He is now, and has been for fifteen years, President of the Convention of Anointed High Priests. In the ··Grand Lodge, after serving on ·several appointive positions and on Comn1ittees, he \;vas elected Grand Junior vVarden in 1903, advanced yearly, and elected Grand Master September 26, 1906, on his fifty-third birthday. Brother Wilson has ·alvvays .been recognized as an 'expert in the Ritual and in Jurisprudence. He has been a tnember of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home for a number of years. Brother Wilson is characterized for his modesty and unassuming nlanner, but under it lies a. dynamo for action, and a plodding that always brings returns. He prepared the History of the J\tlasonic Home in this Centennial Volume.

JAMES ROBERT McLACHLAN, Grand Lecturer. R. W. Brother JamesR. McLachla-nwas born in Clermont County, Ohio, January 2, 1858. In the fall of 1872, he came to Clark County, Missouri, and has resided in Kahoka ever since.. For a number of years he was a teacher, and in 1887 was elected County School Commissioner, which office he filled with credit for four years. He. then engaged in the -286-


business of examiner of titles at Kahoka, and continued in it, until appointed Grand Lecturer in 1906. He was made a 1\laster Mason in Hiram Lodge No 362, Kahoka, December 19, 1891, serving as Master in 1894 and 1895. He received the Capitular Degrees in Kahoka. Chapter No. 126, R.A. M., March 12, 1906, serving as High Priest in 1909. He received the Cryptic D~grees in S'olomonCouncil No. 26, R. and S.路 M., in 1907, serving as its Master in 1~8. In the Grand Council Royal and Select Masters of Missouri, he was elected Grand Captaif!. of the Guard'in 1921.. He was Knighted in Melnphis Commandery No. 41, K. T., M~mphis, November 9, 1906. He received the Degrees of the k. A. S. R. in the Bodies of the Rite in St. Louis, in February, 1908. He is a member of Kahoka Chapter, No. 40, O. E. S., and of MoolahTemple, Shrine, St. Louis. rIe was appointed D. D. G.L. -of the First District, and reappointed for eight years~ He was appointed Grand Lecturer upon.the death of Grand Lecturer McDowell, by M. W. Brother A. B. Houston, GrandMaster, July 1, 1906. In making the appointment} the Grand Master said: HI determined that the appointee should be of unsullied character, thoroughly posted in the Ritual, and路 unswerving in his devotion to the principles for which Freemasonry stands. Such a one, 路only, r was satisfied, would be acceptable to the Craft."

This statement of the Grand Master has been fulfilled in every respect. He has won the confidence and路 respect of the Craft and, as a teacher of the Ritual, he has no superior.

-287-


THE EIGHTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Fifth Communication.) St. Louis, Septernber 24, L"1.D. 1907; A.L. 5907. Another Lawyer was at the helm in the person of M. W. Brother David M. \\lilson. His address, ,,,hile containing much routine matter, is decidedly legislative. He broke the record on decisions, having sixty-six to his credit. They are all clear and explicit interpretations of the law. He paid tribute to \V.. Brother Jahn W. Beall, D. D.. G. M., and D. D. G. I ..., of the Fifty-First District, who was foully assassinated by a Drugstore Saloon Keeper, because of the enforcement of the Masonic Law, in reference to saloon keeping. The Grand Master said: "The deep dan1nation of his taking off has so indelibly impressed itself upon the minds 'and conscience of South East Missouri, that the liquor traffic, unwittingly struck itself a most violent and staggering blow, from which it is hoped that it may never recover." He made a number of good recommendations: uThat the funds of a Lodge be deposited in a Bank, in the name of the Lodge"; "That in the petition for a new Lodge, only the names of those residing within the territory of the proposed Lodge be included, the custom of borrowing members, outside of its jurisdiction is vicious." The Committee on Ways and Means was instructed to make an appropriation of a sufficient amount which together with that of the Grand Chapter, to erect a monument to R. W. Brother Allan McDo,vell. The oration by R. W. Brother W. C. Atwood on "Freemasonry Mission to the \VorId," and the oration by R. W. Brother John E. Swanger, "The Field of Masonry," are published in the Proceedings. A somevvhat unique incident occurred in the presentation of a set of jewels marked HGrand Lodge of Missouri," by M. W. Brother George W. Kendrick, Jr., Grand Master of the -288-


Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. The facts on which this incident is based is reported by Grand Secretary Parson as follows: While visiting the Masonic Temple in Philadelphia the past summer, in company with the Grand Master of p'ennsylvania, he noticed in one of the cases in the Library a set of Jewels marked uGrand Lodge of Missouri," and said to Grand Master Kendrick: "George, I am going to replevin them." M. W. Bro. Kendrick replied that it was not necessary, as he would be glad to send them to the Grand Lodge of Missouri. The explanatio'n of the manner in which the Philadelphia Masons came into possession of the Jewels was, that some years ago a stranger brought them and offered them for sale; and on being closely questioned as to how he had -obtained them, and about his right to dispose of them, replied that he had not time to explain just then, but would return later and do so. He then departed,leaving the Jewels in the Library, and had never been seen or heard of since.

An amendment was adopted closing the Masonic year路 June 30 instead of July 31, and the time limit for the returns to be in the hands of the Grand路 Secretary, was changed from September 1 to August 1. The Committee on Code were instructed to print and distribute copies of .the revised Code, sixty days before the next annual Communication for the information of the Craft.. The following Grand Officers were installed: "JOHN T. SHORT, Jefferson City ROBERT R. KREEGER, Kansas City WM. A. HALL, St. Louis C. C. BIGGER, Laclede A. c. STEWART, St. Louis JOHN R. P'ARSON, St. Louis J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka. REv. JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City REV. C. E. HICKOK, Farmington ARCH. A. JOHN'SON, Springfield JACOB L.A MPERT, $1. Louis VAN. F. BOOR, Kansas City C. J,~. 'MOSMAN, St. J oseph ~ T. W. COTTON, Van Buren JOHN M. DORAN, Memphis

-289-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Grand luniorWarden. Grand Treasurer. Grand Secretary. Grand Lecturer.. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain.. Grand Senior Deacon. Gra1~d JU1'tior Deacon. Grand Senior Steward. Grand Junior Stezoard. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal.


WM. SOUTHERN, JR.~ Independence FRANK R. JESSE, Mexico 1. N. EVR:ARD, Marshall WM. G. MAN'LY, Columbia JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand

Sword Bearer. Pursuivant. Orator. Orator. Tyler."

Receipts $43,538.00; disbursements .$42,105.73; balance

$41,062.05. Membership 45,348; number of Lodges 593; raised 3,115; affiliated 1,034; dimitted 1,312; suspended N. P. D. 475; net gain 1,931.

JOHN THOMAS S'I-IORT,

Grand Master} 1907. M. W. Brother John T. Short, the sixty-fourth Grand Master, was born at Carlisle, Illinois, November 4, 1857. He received his education at the 路路High Schools, of that place. In March, 1876, he located at Jackson, Missouri, where he resided for eleven years, teaching school. in the Winter and working at the carpenter trade in the summer. He .moved to Jetferson City in 1887. In 1894 he was elected to the State Legislature. Since 1890 he has been a contractor and builder, having been .supervisor of many of the large State buildings. :fie, was made a Master Mason in Excelsior Lodge No. 441, at Jackson, in which he served as Master for three years. In 1888, n.eaffiliated with Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City, in which he served as Master in 1890. He received the Capitular Degrees in Jefferson City Chapter No. 34, R. A. M., received the Cryptic Degrees in Ezra Council N'o. 32, R. and S. M., and Knighted in Prince of Peace Commandery No. 29, K. T., in which he served as Commander. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. in the Bodies of the Rite in St. Louis. He was appointed District Deputy GrandMaster in 1892, andGrandS'enior Deacon in the Grand Lodge in 1904. He was elected Grand Senior Warden in 1905, and Grand Master in 1907. -290-


Brother Short is a Ritualist, nota 路talking machine, or a parrot. But a true Ritualist who feels and interprets the Ritual to the Candidate. He was pronounced by one of the Grand Masters as the best Senior Deacon in the Slate.

-291-


THE EIGHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (One Hundred and Sixth Communication.) St. Louis, September 29, A.D. 1908; A.L. 5908. At .this Session the representatives of 385 Lodges, 247 Past lvfasters, and 15 Grand Masters were present. It was a full house. Grand Master Short presented a very short address. As his predecessor had made all of the decisions, he took the opposite tack and made none. During the year, the Grand Lodge had lost by death four of its old and prominent members; M. W. Noah M. Givan, P. G. M. and President of the Masonic Home Board, died suddenly October 3, 1907; M. W. Brother Joshua D. Thomas, P. G. M: died November 15, 1907; M. W. Brother WillialTI R. Stubblefield, P. G. M., who died January 10, 1908, and R. W. Brother Martin Collins, Past Grand Senior Warden, who died May 25, 1908. To each of them, the Grand Master and the Committee on Necrology paid due tribute. The principal business before the .Grand Lodge was the revision of the Code which had been in the hands of the Committee for three years. The revised Code was adopted with a few changes. The principal legislation was: the issuing a card receipt for dues, attested by the local secretary and the Grand Secretary; raising the assessment for the benefit of the Home from fifty to seventy-five cents per member. The Home had become so thoroughly established that no opposition to the increase arose. The liquor interests received another shock in the adoption . of the following: No Lodge shall receive a petition for the Degrees or for affiliation from any person who is engaged in the manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage, either as distiller, brewer, brewery agent, wholesale liquor dealer or .salesman for such dealer, saloon keeper or bartender. Any lfason who may hereafter begin such business shall be expelled,

-292-


MONUMENT ERECTED TO ALLAN McDOWELL. Grand Lecturer.

1,fount Washington Cemetery, Kansas City.


In reference to documentary evidence in visitation, the following was adopted: Documentary evidence shall路be receipt for dues for the current year, bearing the seal of .the Lodge and the signature of the Secretary of the Lodge, together with the signature of the Grand Secretary of the Grand Jurisdiction from which such visitor may hail; or a diploma, duly authenticated by the seal and signature of the Grand Jurisdiction. All of which designates a Lodge under the jurisdiction of a Grand Lodge recognized by the Grand Lodge of Missouri. And such "documentary evidence" shall bear date not more than t,velve months last past.

Tl1e needs of a Monitor owned and published by the Grand Looge had become imperative. The following resolution by W. Brother Francis A. Leach was introduced and adopted: Resolved, That a committee of five he appointed by the incoming Grand Master whose duty it shall be, with the assistance of the Grand Lecturer and under the control of the Committee ,on Ways and Means, to prepare, copyright, cause to be published and sell to the Craft a Monitor of the written work of the路 first Three or Blue Lodge Degrees of this Grand Jurisdiction, to be designated as the authorized Missouri Monitor, at a price to be determined by such committee.. Any profit from the sale of such Monitors shall go to the Masonic Home.

The Committee on the McDowell monument made its final report and a cut of this monument is included in the Proceedings. The monument stands in M t. Washington Cemetery, Kansas City, and was dedicated September 20, 1908, the dedicatory address was delivered by M. W. Brother William F. Kuhn, Past Grand Master. The following officers were installed: "ROBERT R. KREEGER, Kansas City WILLIAM A. HALL, 81. Louis CLAY C. BIGGER, Laclede ARCH. A. JOHNSON, Springfield ALP'HONSO C. STEWART, St. Louis

JOFIN R. PARSON, St. Louis ]. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka REV. JOHN H. 1IILLER, Kansas City

Rltv. W. C. BITTING, St. Louis

-298-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Senior Warden. Gra1ltd ! unior Warden. Grand Treasurer. Gra11-d Secretary. Gra'nd Lecturer. Grand Chaplain~ Grand Chaplain.


JACOB··LAMP'ERT, St. Louis ....... ...•. Grand Senior Deacon. VAN. F. BOOR, Kansas City Grand Ju,nior Deacon. C. A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph G1~and Senior Steward. TOLMAN W. COTTON, Van Buren Grand Senior Steward. FRANK R. JESSE, Mexico Grand Marshal. W. A. CLARK, Jefferson City G1"and Marshal. G. D. ALLEE, Lamar Grand Sword Bearer. EDWARDHIGBEE, Kirksville Grand· Pursuivant. FRANCIS A. LEACH, Kansas City Grand Orator. J. WEST GOODWIN, Sedalia Grand ··Orator. JOHN W. OWEN, St.Louis Grand Tyler.))

Receipts $46,105.50; disbursements $44,210.67 ; balance $46,788.87. Membership 47,430; number of Lodges 601; raised 3,036; affiliated 963; dimitted 1,253; suspended N. P. D. 504; net gain 1,837.

ROBERT ROCHESTER KREEGER, Gra,nd Master~ 1908. M. \V. Brother RobertR. Kreeger, the sixty-fifth Grand Master, was born near Blue Springs~ Jackson County, Missouri, November 16, 1856. His boyhood was spent on a farm. He attended the State University of Missouri, and then taught school for a number of years. In 1883, he was assistant in the Office of Sheriff of Jackson County. In 1887, he moved to Kansas City, where he still resides. For the past thirty years, .he has been engaged in the Custom Service of the United States and at present is Deputy Collector of Customs, in charge of the Kansas City Offi'ce.He is considered an expert on Custom .Laws and Tariff Acts. He was made a Master Mason in Temple Lodge No. 299, Kansas City, June 19, 1888, and served as its Master in 1900. He was exalted in Orient Chapter No. 102, 'R. A.M., May 23, 1899, and served as its High Priest. He was greeted as a Select Master in Shekinah Council No. 24, R. and S. M., Kansas City, December 29, 11902. He received the Masonic Orders of Christian· Knighthood in Oriental CommanderyNo. 35, K. -:294-


T., in February, 1921. The Degrees of the A. A. S. R. were conferred upon him in Western Consistory~No. 2, Kansas City, in November, 1908, and was crowned an honorary thirty-third in Washington, D.C., in October, 1919. In the Grand Lodge he was appointed D. D. G. L. in 1902 to 1907. In 1903 he "vas appointed Grand Marshal. In l~OS he was elected Grand Junior Warden, advanced yearly, and in 1908 was elected Grand Master. He has done faithful service in the Dire~tory of the Masonic Home for many years. Brother Kreeger is one of the old reliables in the Grand Lodge. His biographer has well said: In every call to duty Robert R. Kreeger has been faithful and conscientious, and his course as Grand Master has been marked with diligence and efficiency.

-295.-:-


THE EIGHTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Seventh Communication.) St. Joseph, September 28, A.D. 1909; A. L. 5909. For the first time in the history of the Grand Lodge, an annual Session was held in St. Joseph. The S'ession was held in the Auditorium on Fourth and Faron Streets. The attendance was ex~ellent, with the representatives of 392 Lodges, 208 Past Masters, and fifteen Past Grand Masters. Grand Master Robert R. Kreeger presented an able address. His year of service had been a busy one. He paid a loving tribute to M. W. Brother Rufus E. Anderson, Past Grand Master and Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence who died July 27, 1909. He reported at length his visit to the ltOccasional Session" of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, called at Cincinnati to confer the Degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry, at sight, on President elect, William H. Taft. The Grand路 Master made a splendid reply to the critics who thought he had violated the ancient landmarks, by being present in his official capacity at the making of a Mason "at sight." The Grand Master's opinion on the subject is well worth reading. He was absolutely right. He reported the consolidation of ~he Grand Lodges of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. He advocated a closer relationship between the Grand Lodges and suggested the appointment of the Grand Master or a Past Grand Master to attend the meetings of the Grand Masters of the United States. He advocated the erection of a Hospital in connection with the l\路iasonic Home. It was a much needed adjunct in which the "afflicted with incurable diseases and incapable of caring for themselves, may be adtnitted." The Grand Master justly and vigorously condemned a circular letter sent to the members of the Grand Lodge, intended to influence the election, by. stirring up class and race hatred. This circular letter recoiled heavily on its authors.


-297-


It is to be regretted that much of the self-styled Masonry of the Old World and of South America (chiefly of the Latin race), outside of the Dominion of Great Britain and Germany, has so¡ little of Masonry in it that the name Masonry is a misnomer. By specious pleadings, ,the Holy Bible has been banished from their altars and a belief in God is not deemed essential. While all honorable and liberty-loving men will applaud their labors in behalf of civil and religious liberty, and the tolerance and charity toward one another in matters of conscience, yet we nlust protest against the prostitution of Masonry to political and anti-church purposes, and the elimination of its very fundamental principles. MASONIC HOSPITAL.

The Committee to which the erection of the Hospital was referred, reported favorably, and concluded this report with, Your Committee, therefore,. heartily approves of the plan and recommends that the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home be authorized and empowered to erect a Hospital on the Home grounds, and that the necessary steps, both legal and otherwise, be immediately taken to make the Hospital a credit to the Craft. in the fulfillment of its mission.

In this connection it is but proper to state, that the building of a Hospital at the HOll1e, and $16,000 collected from the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter and Grand Commandery, about ten years ago came to naught. The Board of Directors, accustomed to a hand to mouth policy, in the maintenance of the Home, used this Hospital money for other buildings at the Home. The Committee on Monitor reported at length, recommending certain changes, among which was the substitutiol1of the word "Freemason" for "Mason," and the \vord "Freemasonry" for "Masonry.'" The Committee was directed to publish the Monitor. The pay roll at this Session amounted to $7,777.20. The following Grand Officers were installed: "WILLIAM A. HALL, St. Louis GrandMaster. eLAY C. BIGGER, Laclede ..........â&#x20AC;˘... Deputy Grand Master. ARCH. A. JOHNSON, Springfield Grand Senior Warden. JACOB LAMP'ERT, St. Louis Grand Junior Warden. ALPHONSO C. STEWART, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis Grand Secretary. -298-


J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City W. C. BITTING, St. Louis VAN' F. BOOR, Kansas City CHESLEY A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph TOLMAN W. COTTON, Van Buren FRANK R. JESSE, Mexico WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City EDWARD HIGBEE, Kirksville JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan GEO. M. SARGENT, Kansas City AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla ]. H. THARP, Gallatin JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

REV. REv~

Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand G1"and Grand

Lecturer. Chaplain. Chaplain. Junior Deacon. Senior Deacon. Orator. Tyler/'

Senior Stewara. J'ttnior Steward. Marshal. Marshal. Sword Bearer. Pursuivant. Orator.

Receipts $60,829.98; disbursements $41,543.89; balance $62,074.96. Membership 49,088; affiliated 955; dimitted 1,370; suspended N. P. b. 703 ; net gain 1,4Q9.

WILLIAl\1 ALLAN路 HALL, Grand Master, 1909. M. W. Brother William A. Hall the sixty-sixth Grand Master, was born in Nottinghe+rn, England, May 9, 1848. The fatuily luovedto. the' United States and located at Worcester, Massachusetts. At the age of fourteen, he entered theG'volunteer service of the United States, serving during the Civil War, and came out as a non-columissioned Officer. He started to become aprinter,but after three years of experience, he engaged in the manufacture of surgical elastic goods at N eednam, Massach~setts,. in 1881. In 1888 he came to St. Louis, engaging in the same business, under the name of "William A. Hall Mfg. Company." In this business he has continued ever since. He! was made a Master Mason in Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40, St. Louis, June 7, 1890, serving as Master in 1894 and 1895. He "vas exalted in Bellefontaine Chapter No. 25, R. A. M., St. Louis, October 10, 1890, serving as High Priest in 1895. He -2e9-


passed the Circle in Hiram Cou~cil No. 1.R. and S. M., April 18, 1896, serving as its Master in 1899.. The Orders of Knighthood were conferred upon him in Baldwin Commandery No. 50, St. Louis,in 1890, and served as its Commander in 1893. ; He was appointed D. D. G. L. of the Thirty-Third District in 1895, serying until 1901. In the Grand Lodge he ,vas appointed Grand Sword Bearer in 1903, and after filling several other ,appointive positions was elected Grand Junior Warden in 1906, advanced yearly, and elected Grand Master in 1909. Brother Hall was, and is, one of the perfect Ritualists in the State, and was considered by many as the logical successor to the lamented McDowell. Yet who can not say, that in the exalted position of GrandMaster, he achieved even greater honors? At the close of his term, it was said of him: "He has been one of the purest, tenderest, sincere and consci~ntious of the Grand Masters, that the Grand Lodge' has ever had." This sentiment finds confirmation in the heart of each man who has been fortunate enough to know William A. Hall.

-aoo~


THE NINETIETH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Eighth Communication.) St. Louis, Septernber 27, A.D. 1910; A. L. 5910. The attendance of· the representatives of 520·· Lodges, 258 Past Masters, and 17 Past Grand Masters, greeted GrandMaster Hall at the opening of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master presented a strong business address. In speaking of the condition.of the Craft he said: I .am glad to report that. throughout our Grand Jurisdiction the spirit of true Fraternity is in .abundant evidence, and peace and harmony prevail and have prevailed through all the year. Scarcely a ripple has appeared on'the calm surface of events and the only contention known to your Grand· Master has been ltthat noblecontention, or rather emulation, of \vho can best work and best agree."

The question of the legality of using the natTIe, "Masonic," to designate a social club formed in St. Louis, ·came to him for solution. It was referred to a Committee, which reported adversely.. He gave a· detailed account of his attendance at the. Baltiluore Convention of GrandMasters, and the dedication 'of the Masonic Temple, at Baltinlore, November 16-18, 1909, also his attendance on a meeting of the George Washington Na'tional Masonic Memorial Association. The meeting of. the Grand Masters was productive .. of tTIuch good in' the interchange of ideas, but no general basis of agreement on Grand Lodge policies was reached at the Convention. The perpetual jurisdiction question was considered,· and as a compromise, the plan of a five years jurisdiction was presented. It seemed to meet with· favor, but nothing was done. He called attention to the growing evil of remitting dues of members,. under the "inability to pay" clause, but it really vvasa method resorted . to ··by some Lodges to evade paying Grand Lodge and Masonic Home dues. Dishonest schemes will develop even among men who claim to be Freemasons. ~The Directors of the Masonic Home, with the approval of the Grand Master, sent out a circular letter, appealing for


subscriptions for the expectations, but the raised near the close the estimated cost of

Hospital. The returns were not up to subscriptions, together with the amount of the S'ession, amounted to $57,857.75, the Hospital was placed at $100,000.

R~COGNITION of GRAND LODGES.

The Committee on Foreign Relations reported, that as schiS1TI had arisen in the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, in a real Mexican fashion, by a minority of the Lodges withdrawing in a disorderly manner, because the majority had adopted a certain 'Code and because the election of the Grand Master, the seceders set up a new Lodge and took the narne of the parent Lodge. The Committee reported non-recognition of the rebellious organization. The list of questions submitted to the Grand Lodge Alpina, 1. The Swiss Grand Lodge of Alpina is supreme in its control of the three degrees. 2. The greater part of the Swiss Lodges had their original Charters from English Grand Lodges. . 3. "By initiation, we ask of our candidate, 'What do you think of the Divinity?' 4. "The Bible is 011 the altar for all P'rotestant Lodges, but two Lodges, fornled of liberal Catholics, have been authorized to substitute for the Bible a book with white sheets, because you know the Catholic IChurch interdicts the Bible to its adherents."

The answer to No.4 will. naturally provoke a smile. Committee commenting on these answers said:

The

The answers to 1 and 2 are satisfactory. The answer to question 3, as to the belief in Deity, is not clear and may possibly be due to the translation. I t appears that the candidate is not required to give assent to a belief in D1eity prior to his initiation; but during, or. in the initiation, he is asked "what he thinks of Divinity." The candidate's reply may mean a theological discussion or. a路 metaphysical speculation; the question does not demand a categorical affirmation or denial in a belief in God. ," Therefore, possibly by want of clearness, in expression, this answer is. unsatisfactory. The answer to question 4 seems to indicate that a "book with wltite sheets" is all that is required on which to obligate some of the candi... dates.


The committee is of the opinion that "white sheets" do not constitute "a rule and guide to faith and practice" for Mohammedan, Jew or Gentile. ...I\n obligation on white sheets of paper may bind some persons and may have a greater potency than on some men '\vho take their !vows on the Holy Bible, yet a candidate who is bound, o路r is under obligation, to an organization or a church that will not permit him to be obligated in the Great Light, is not of suitable, material to be made a Mason. t While your committee realizes that the Swiss Grand Lodge of rAlpina is doing a great work, especially in the cause of civil and religious liberty, yet to be charitable in thought, and deed, to be a foe to such civil and religious despotism as is fastened upon the Latin 'race by Romish priestcraft, these do not constitute Freemasonry of themselves. The great underlying principle, the Brotherhood of Man and the Fatherhood of God, must be maintained and defended. The Brotherhood of Man can not exist, can路 not even be conceived in the mind of man, independent of the Fatherhood of God. We recommend that the fraternal relations with the Swiss Grand Lodge of Alpina be denied.

The oration was delivered by W. BrotherAl1stin L. McRae and it is published in the Proceedings. The Comtnittee on Monitor reported its\vork finished and the Monitor in the hands of the Grand Secretary. The following Grand Officers were installed: "CLAY C.BIGGER, Laclede ARCH A. JOHNSON, Springfield JACOB LAMP'ERT, St. Louis VAN FREMONT BOOR,'Kansas City ALPHONISO C. STEWART,St. Louis JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis ]. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka REV. JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City REV. WM.C. BITTING, St. Louis CHESLEY A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph TOLMAN,W. COTTON, VanBuren FRANK R. JESSE, Mexico WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City ED/WARD HIGBEE, Kirksville JOHN W. BINGHAM, ,Milan GEORGE M. SARGENT, Kansas City

-303-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. Grand Sel1/ior Warden. Grand Junior Wa1"de1t. Grand Treasu1"er. Grand Secreti.l路ry. Grand Lecture,". Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Se1~ior Deacon. Grand Junior Deac()'!'t. Grand Senior Stc'lvard. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Marshal." Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer.


JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis FRED S. HUDSON, Chillicothe P':ERCY J.~. BUD'D, Kansas City JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

Grand Grand Grand Grand

Pursuivant. Orator. Orator. Tyler."

Receipts $65,906.36; disbursemen,ts $59,273.91; balance $68,707.41. Membership 51,086; number of Lodges 611; raised 3,400; affiliated 1,040; dimitted 1,300; suspended N. P. D. 748; net gaIn 1,885.

CLAY ClCERO BIGGER Grand Master, 1910. M.W. Brother Clay C. Bigger, the sixty-seventh Grand Nlaster, was barnne-ar Linneus, J\tlissouri, August 17, 1855. 'the family having moved from Kentucky to Linn County, Missouri in 1840. I-Ie qualified himself as ateacher in the country schools, which occupation he followed for six years, and during the summer worked on the farnl. His, great desire was to be a lawyer, and to this· end, he pursued a course of study, at his spare moments, and was admitted to the Bar at the age of 25. He is truly a self-madelnan, and overcame obstacles for an education that few men conquer. He began his profession in Laclede,. where he practiced and lived ever since. lIe was made a .Master Mason in Cypress Lodge No..227, Laclede, in 1886 and served as its Master for six years beginning in 1889. He received the Capitular Degrees in Linn Chapter No. 41, R. A. M., BrookfJeld,.in 1900. He was greeted ;n Solon-l'on"sCouncil No. 26, R. and S.M., Milan, 1902 and Knighted in COtler de Lion Commandery No. 14, K.T., Brookfield,·.in 1904. He is a Inemher of Laclede ·Chapter No. 18, Q. E. S. and served as Grand Patron of the Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star of Missouri in 1916. He served as p.D... G. ·M. of the Twelfth District for ten years. In. the Grand Lodge he ,vas appointed Grand Senior Steward.in 1904, and Grand S'enior Deacon in· 1905. In 1907,

in

-304:-


he was elected Grand Junior V\Tarden, advanced yearly and elected Grand Master in 1910. His Biographer said of him: Our Brother is in the very prime of his physical and intellectual life. He iSI a power for good in the community in which he lives. His love for Freemasonry is intense, and it is the ardent wish of those who know him best that for ~any, many years to come he may live to favor us with his ripe experience路 and wise counsel.

-305--


THE NINETY-FIRST ANNUAL COl\1MUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Ninth Comn1unication.) St. L01ttis, Septe路11tLber26, A.D. 1911; A.L. 5911. The address of Grand Master Clay C. Bigger is a lengthy document and combines the elements of an oration and a business report: The Grand Lodge mourned the death of M. \V. Brother Flavius J. Tyga"rd, P. G. M., who died April 3, 1911. M. W. Brother Dorsey A. Janlison asked to be relieved of the Chairmanship 路of the Con1111ittee on Appeals and Grievances, which the Grand Master reluctantly accepted, and appointed W. Brother Joseph S. McIntyre to the position. Alnong the notable events of the year was the laying of the corner stone of the Masonic Hospital. Its ceremonies were attended by more than five thousand people. The Grand Master reported that the women of the O. E. S. would supply all the furnishings for the Hospital, which the Sisters did with much satisraction arid pleasure. The Grand Master rendered twenty-one decisions, which, he being a lawyer) \vere correct interpretations of the lav/. The subscriptions to the Hospital, as .reported by the Grand Secretary, anlounted to $78,676.00, to which the Grand Lodge added at this Session $7,800, nlaking a total of $86,576.00. THIt YORK GRAND LODGE OF MEXICO.

The Committee on Foreign Relations, reported, that, owing to the rebellion ,in the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, in which a tninority withdrew and organized a Grand Lodge, taking the name of the parent Grand Lodge, the legitimate Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico had changed its natne to the "York Grand Lodge of Mexico." The Committee recommended that the name, Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico, be stricken from the list of recognized Grand Lodges and the nan1e York .Grand Lodge of Mexico be substituted therefor. It 路was adopted. The orations for路 the year were delivered by the Grand Orators, W. Brother Fred Sf. I-Iudson on, "Ideals of Masonry," ana W . Brother Percy D. Budd on, "Who comes here ?" -306-


An amendment was introduced giving another ·boost to the assessment of the Masonic Home, from seventy-five cents to One dollar and tvventy-five cents per member, to come up for action next year. On motion the photogravures and biographies of Grand Lecturer McLachlan and Grand Tyler Owens were'published in the Proceedings. A resolution was adopted, that in the event of the death of a Past Grand Master, the obsequies shall be performed by the Grand Lodge and the expenses incurred by the Grand Officers and Past Grand Masters, shall be paid by the Grand Lodge. The following Grand Officers VI ere installed: "ARCH. A. JOHNSON, Springfield JACOB LAMPERT, St. Louis VAN' FREMONT BOOR, Kansas City CHESLEY ,A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph ALP'HONSO C. STEWART, St. Louis JOHN R. P'ARSON, St. Louis J., R. McLACHLAN, I<'ahoka JOHN H.'1fILLER, Kansas City WM. C. BITTING, St. Louis ].M. BOON, St. Charles TOLMAN' W. COTTON, Van Buren FRANK R. JESSE, Mexico WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City ED'WARDHIGBEE, Kirksville JOHN W. BINGHAM, 'Milan JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. ··Louis W. F. JOHNSON, Boonville O. A.LUCAS, Kansas City THOS. L. RUBEY, Lebanon eRAS. B. BOVINrG, Hannibal JOHN W. OWEN, St. Louis

GrandMaster. Deputy G,'and Mastelr. Grand Senior Wardetz,. Grand Junior Warden. Grand TreaSt6rer. G1'and Secretary. Grand Lectur·cr. G,'and Cha.plain. Grand ChapIa'in. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deaco11. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Senior Stc1C (Zrc! 1

Gra~d Junior Stc'l(!Ql'd.

Grand Grand Grand Grand Grand Gra·nd Grand

J.VfaY'shal. l'(loyshal. S'leJC1'd, Bearer.

Pu.rsuiva1:,t. Orator.

Orat(lY. Tyler.."

Receipts $67,920.67; disbursements $66,394.04 ; balance $70, 234.04. Membership 53,218; number of Lodges 618; raised 3,510; affiliated 986; dimitted 1,291; suspended N. P. D. 793; net gain 1,877. -307-


ARCH A. JOHNSON, Grand Master, 1911. M. \\T. Brother Arch A. Johnson, the sixty-eighth Grand Master, vvas born in McLean County, Kentucky, July 9, 1869. The family lTIoved to-Laclede County, Missouri, when he was eight years old. He lived on a farm until he was twentyone years of age, during this time he had attended. the Public Schools and studied Law. In 1890 he moved to Springfield, Missouri, and' was admitted to the Bar. He was elected City Attorney in 1898 and 1900.. He was elected Circuit Judge of the Twenty-Third District, in 1911, serving two terms. He is one of the leading attorneys in Southwest Missouri. He ,vas Inade a -Master Mason in Solomon Lodge N o. 27~_, Springfield, November 16, 1894, and served as its Master in 1903 and 1004. He "vas exalted in Springfield Chapter No. 15, R. A. M., November 7, 1903, greeted as a Select Master in Zabud Council No. 25, R. and St. M., February 21,1905, I{nighted in St. John's Commandery No. 20, K. T., December 6, 1904. He isa lnember of the Mystic Shrine. In the Grand Lodge, he "vas appointed Grand Orator in 1904. In 1905 he was appointed Grand Sword Bearer, in 1906, Grand Junior Ste,vard, in 1907, Grand Senior Deacon, and in 1908, he "vas elected Grand Junior Warden, advancedyea.rly, and elected Grand Master in 1911. Brother Johnson has served on itnportantCommittees, especially "'There the question of jurisprudence was involved. He has served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home for tn,any years. He .is one of the youngest Past GrandMasters,. and may he live long to bless the Grand Lodge \vithhis presence.

-308-


1~HE

NINETY-S'ECOND ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Tenth Comn1unication.) St. Louis} ))eptember 24, A.D. 1912; A.L. 5912. At this annual Session the representatives of 426 Lodges, 311 Past Masters, and 19 Past Grand Masters were present. The opening of the G·rand Lodge was preceded by music by Moolah Orchestra and an interesting program by· the children of the Masonic Home. Grand Master Johnson delivered a brief business address. He reported the laying of many corner stones, the chief one being that of the Masonic Temple at Ninth and Harrison Streets, Kansas City. He made thirteen decisions, one of vvhich was, whether 'the members of a Lodge could, as such, sign a recommendation for some political appointment? His reply Vias, no. He was also called upon to inform a Masonic Journal, published in Kansas City, that the publication therein ofpolitical . advertisements by giving their Masoni~ standing, \vasa violation of Masonic Law. The report of the. Grand Secretary,· on the Hospital subscription showed that it had attained the neat sum of $97,367.29. The goal was in sight. The amendment increasing the Masonic Home dues from seventy-five cents· to One twenty-five ,vas defeated, owing to a previous adoption ofa. resolution levying an assessment of fifty cents per member for four years, to erect a new Administration and Children's building, to cost approximately $100,000. HOSPITAL AND NOT INFIRMARY.

The Board of Directors of the Masonic Home had changed the name of the Hospital to ulnfirmary,"contrary to the spirit of the resolution, as adopted, when th~ Hospital plan was originated. ··The Grand··Lodge by motion, directed that the term, HInfirmary," wherever it appears in the Masonic Home report, be stricken out, and the \¥ord, "Hospital," be inserted. -809-


The Committee on Foreign relations recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of Porto Rico. It was adopted. The following Grand Offi.ters were installed: "J ACOB LAMP'ERT, St. Louis Grand Master. VAN FREMONT BOOR, Kansas City Deputy Grand Master. CHESLEY A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph Grand Senior Warden. TOLMAN W. COTTON, Van Buren Grand Junior Warden. ALP'HONSO C. STEWART, St. Louis .. (Jrand Treasurer. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis Grand Secretary. J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. WM. C. BITTING, St. Louis Grand Chaplain. JAMES 'M. BOON, Chillicothe Grand Chaplain,. FRANK R. JESSE, Mexico Grand Senior Deacon,. WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City Crend Junior Deaco11. EDWARD HIGBEE, Kirksville Grand Senior Stewa'rd. JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan CrandJuniorSteward. JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis Grand Ma1"shal. W .. F. JOHNSON, Boonville Grand Marshal. O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City Grand Sword Bearer. BERT. S. LEE, Springfield Grand P'ltrsuivant JOEIN PICKARD, Columbia Grand Orator. JOHN H. LUCAS, Osceola Grand Orator. JOHN "W. OWEN, St. Louis Gran,d Tyler.?)

The report on Correspondence by M.路 W. Brother Charles C. vVoods, P. G. M., was ordered printed in sufficient quantities to supply all the .Lodges with Copies. Receipts $70,550.56 ; disbursements $70,280..29; balance $70,504.31. Membership 55,737; number of Lodges 624; raised 3,926; affiliated 927; dimitted 1,196.; suspended N.P.D. ~70; net gain 2,381. JACOB LAMPERT,

Grand Master} 1912 M. W. Brother Jacob Lampert, the sixty-ninth Grand Master, was born in London,. England, March 6, 1856. The family n10ved to Nevv York City in 1858, and came to St. Louis in -310-


1876. He attended the Public Schools, and at the age of twelve years served as an apprentice to a cigar maker for three years. He started in the business, as a manufacturer of cigars, in St. Louis in 1884. His success has been based on the principle of always being square, honest, upright, and courteous. He was made a Ma~ter Mason in Itaska Lodge No. 420, St. Louis, May 22, 1878, in which he served as Master in 1885 and 1886. He received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. in the Bodies of the Rite in St. LdUis, in May, 1902. He was elected aKa C. C.A. in 1905 and crowned an honorary thirty-third by the Supreme Council, in October, 1907. He was a member of Moolah Temple, Mystic Shrine, and one 路0拢 the organizers of the celebrated MoolahOrchestra. In the Grand Lodge, he was first recognized by-being appointed District Deputy Grand Master in 1905. In 1906 he was appointed Grand Junior Steward. In 1907, Grand Junior Deacon and in 1908, Grand Senior Deacon. He was elected Grand Junior Warden in 1909, advanced yearly,and elected Grand Master in 1912. The effort to defeat him for advancement, because of his Jewish descent, made him more friends than ever, and the conspirators, some of which were of his own race, failed disastrously. Brother Lampert died sudde1!-ly, February 20, 1921. His funeral on February 22, was the largest Masonic expression ever given to any Mason. Everybody loved "Jake." His vvholeheartedness, his genial courtesy, and broad philanthropy made him a unique and .distinguished character.. His donations to the Masonic Home of which he. was a Director for many years were large. In his will he left $25,000 besides a former contribution of $5,000 to the Home as an expression of his love for the Institution. His benefactions in his will to various charities amounted to $70,000. Every member of the Grand Lodge will miss his hand clasp and perpetual smile.

--'311-


THE NINETY-THIRD ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Eleventh C0111munication.) St. Louis} SepterlLber 30, A.D. 1913; A.L. 5913. Preliminary to the opening o~ the Grand Lodge, an elabQrate program by Moolah Orchestra and the children of the Masonic Home was given. The presence of the Orchestra "vas a tribute to Grand Master Jacob Lan1pert, he being a n1ember thereof and one of the violinists. . "rhe address of the Grand Master is a voluminous docttn1ent. It gives every indication of a very busy year. He paid due respect to the late M. vV. Brother Leroy B. Valliant, P. G. M., vvho died 11arch 3, 1912; to M. VV. Brother Ethelbert F.AUen, P. G. M. and President of the Masonic Home, who died Septenlber 9, 1913, and toR. \\T. Brother Tandy .~. "~--nunn, D. D. G. lYl. of the F.ifth District. He called attention to two crying evils existing in the Lodges; insufficient dues路 to pay running expenses, 路and 路the disgrace of smoking in the路 Hall while the Degrees were being conferred. He also gave a timely warning about unnecessary waste of Lodge funds in '~lunches and cigars." This is a pronounced evil in too many Lodges. The Grana Secretary reported that the subscription to the Masonic Hospital had gone over . the limit, making a total of $102,975.22; and the Masonic Improvement Fund had reached in one year, $40,000. The oration. was delivered byR. '-IV. Brother John Pickard on Ulmmortality." The Committee on Foreign Relations recommended the recognition of the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Islands which had just been formed. In referenceto a letter from the Grand Lodge of Costa Rica to the GrandMaster, the Committee said: 3rd. A lengthy communication to the Grand 'Master from a body calling itself the Grand Lodge of Costa Rica was ref~rred to your Committee. -312-:-


The Committee find that this camm unication consists of an hysterical appeal to the Grand Master, asking him to use his good offices to protest against the government of the United States forming a protectorate over the Central, American countries. Evidently this so-called Masonic Grand Lodge of Costa Rica has had a bad attack of political nightmare. The United States Governnlent is attending strictly to its own · business, and the Grand Lodge of Missouri is doing likewise. The protest is based upon an absurd delusion. This pseudo Grand Lodge of Costa Rica is not recognized by the Grand Lodge of Missourias a Masonic body; we, therefore recommend that the matter be dismissed.

The following' Officers for the ensuing year' were installed: "VAN FREMONT BOOR, Kansas City Grand Master. *CHESLEY A. MOSMAN, St. Joseph Dep~tty GrandMaster. TOLMAN W. COTTON, Van Buren Grand 'Senior Warden. FRANI{R.JESSE, l\.fexico Grand J~nior Warden. ALP'HONSO C. STEWART, St. Louis · Grand Treasurer. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis Grand Secretar'J'. J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. JAMESM. BOON, Chillicothe ...•....... Grand Chaplain. EDWARD' HIGBEE, Kirksville .; Grand Senior Deacon. WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City Grand Junior Deacon. JULIUS C. GARRELL, S1. Louis ' Grand Senior Steul ard. JOHN W. BIN:GHAM, '!\tIiIan Gra1~d JuniorSteu1ard. O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City '.. Grand Marshal. WM. F. JOHNSON', Boonville .. Grand Marshal. BERT S.LEE, Springfield Grand Sword Bearer. JOSEPH S.MclNTYRE, St. Louis Grand P'Ltrsuivant. HERBERT S.HADLEY, Kansas City Grand Orator. WlvL C. BITTING, St. Louis Grand Orator. JOHN W. OWEN,St. Louis Grand Tyler." l

•••••••••

Receipts $73,959.24; disbursements $70,.437.95; balance $73,950.14. Membership 58,237. Number of Lodges 631 ; raised 4,091 ; affiliated 947; dimitted 1,281 ; suspended N. P. D. 856; net gain 2,324. *Rt. W. ,Bro. Chesley, A. Mosman, "Deputy Grand 'Master-elect, not being present by reason of illness, will be installed later at his home in St.' Joseph.

-313-


VAN FREMONT BOOR, Grand Master, 1913. M. W. Brother Van F. Boor, the Seventieth Grand Master, was born in Wayne County, Illinois, June 26, 1861. He was educated in the Public Schools and in the Normal School of Ohio, where he taught school for a number of years. He returned to Illinois, where he took a course in the Gem City Business College, and after moving to Kansas, he took a course of Law in the University of Kansas, receiving the Degree of LL.D. in 1885. During this time he was one of the proprietors of the Lawrence Business College, in which he was teacher of Commercial Law. He was made a Master Mason in Acacia Lodge No.9 Lawrence, Kansas, in 1884. He affiliated with Rural Lodge No. 316 after moving to Kansas City, Missouri, in 1886, in which he served as Master, in 1893. He received the Capitular Degrees in Lawrence Chapter 4, Lawrence, Kansas, affiliated with Orient Chapter 路No. 102, R. A. M., Kansas City, in .which he served as High Priest in 1895. He received the Orders of Knighthood, DeMolay C0111mandery 6, K. T., Lawrence, Kansas, in 1885, affiliated with OrientalCommandery No. 35,K. T., in Which he served as Commander. He was greeted as a Select Master in Hiram Council No. 24,R. and S'. M., St. Louis, and was one of the nine who petitioned for the Degrees to form Shekinah Council No. 24, R.and S. M., Kansas City. He was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Missouri in 1909. He received the Degrees of theA. A. S. R. in Western Consistory No.. 2,. Kansas City, and received路 the 路honorary Degree of K. C. C. H., in the Supreme Council. In the Grand Lodge he was appointedD. D.G. M. from 1893 to 11909. In 1907 he was appointed Grand Senior Steward; in 1908, as Grand Junior Deacon; in 1909, as Grand


Senior Deacon; elected Grand Junior Warden In 1910 and Grand Master in 1913. His work for Freen1asonry has been extensive. For eighteen years he ,vas Secretary-Treasurer of the Kansas City Board of Relief and P'resident for several years. He was Chairman of the COlnn1ittee that built the Masonic Ten1ple at Ninth and Harrison Streets, !(ansas City. Brother Boor is a zealous Craftsman, big hearted, generous, one who will go any distance to relieve those in want and distress. An ideal Freemason.

-315-


THE NINETY-FOURTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Twelfth Conlmunication.) Kansas City, Septe1nber 29, A.D. 1914; A.L: 5914. The representatives of 485 Lodges, 279 Past Masters and 20 Past Grand Masters. greeted Grand 11aster Van F. Boor at the opening of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master broke all records as to the length of his address. It took fifty-eight pages of roonl in the Proceedings, for this address to spread itself. The Grand Master had a very busy year. and he gave much titne to the Craft. He paid due tribute to the grand old man, R. W. Brother John ,"tV. O\vens, Grand Tyler, who had for so many years guarded the outer door. He died December 4, 1913, at the good old age of 88 years. During the year, R. \\7. Brother Chesley A. Mosman, Deputy Grand Master, had closed his earthly career, dying at his hOlue,St. Joseph, January 31, 1914, at the age of 72 years. The Grand Master elaborated at length, on a plan to increase the endowment· fund of the Honle. The plan was rather intricate, and ,;vhile not adopted, it . pointed toward a later legislation of requiring a certain amount, from all petitioners for Degrees for the Masonic Home. Being a Lawyer, he made. thirty·.decisions. Some of which did not pass the Overseer's Square of the Comlnittee on Jurisprudence. He gives an interesting account of the ·National Meeting of the Grand Masters at St. Louis, in May, 1914; the Session closing with the laying of the corner stone of· the Administration .Building at the Home. The Grand .Master proposed several amendments to the Code. Although a revised Code had been ·adopted but a fe\v years previous, this Session was especially prolific of amendments. One of the amendlnents was directed at Grand Masters, prohibiting. them from filling any vacancy in the Official Line, except Grand Treasurer, Grand Secretary and Grand -316-


Lecturer, all other vacancies to be filled pro ten1pore at the opening ~f the Grand Lodge. This law prevented a Grand Master from boosting someone in li~e,an act which had ended disastrously, and had engendered much ill feeling. The National Independent Grand Lodge of France was accorded recognition. The la"v permitting a petition for the Degrees to be withdrawn after it had been received and referred was changed to prevent the withdrawal of a petition. The old law had been made an avenue of escape for undesirable material. The pay roll had reached the amount of $8,900.00. The question as to the manner of voting having been referred to a Committee, it reported as follows: Resolved, That in the election of Grand Lodge officers that the vote shall be taken by ballot, and that each officer and member of the Grand Lodge present shall cast one vote and no more;. provided~ that the vote may be taken by Lodges, if demanded by the Representatives of ten Lodges.

The following Grand Officers were installed: "TOLMANW. COTTON, Van Buren Grand Master. FR.A~.NK R. JESSE, Webster Groves Deputy Gra'nd Master. EDWARD HIGBEE, Kirksville Grand Senior Warden. W1vr. A.CLARK, Jefferson City Grand 1unior Warden. ALPHONSOC. STEWART, St. Louis Gra·nd Treasurer. JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis Grand Secretary. ]. R. McLACHL.A.N, Kahoka ........•.~ •.... Grand Lecturer. JOHN H.· MILLER, ·Kansas City GrandChaplt;ti1~. JAMES 'M. BOON, Chillicothe Grand Chaplain. JOHN' W. BINGHAM, Milan ........... .• GrandSenior Deacon. JULIUS C.GARRELL, St. ·Louis Grand Junior Deacon. WM. F. JOHNSON, Boonville Grend.Senior Steward. O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City Grand Junior Steward. BERT S. LEE, Springfield ,; Gra11,d Marshal. JOS.S. McINTYRE,St. Louis Grand Marshal. ORESTES MITCHELL, St. Joseph Gra11,d Sword Bearer. AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla '.Grand Pursuiviant. WM. ]. WILLIAMSON, St. Louis Grand Orator. ELLIOTT W. MAJOR, Jefferson City Grand Orator. JIARRY A. KRUEGER, St. Louis Grand Tyler. JJ

-317-


Receipts $81,512.25; disbursen1ents $80,245.36; balance $77,079.61. Membership 61,522; number of Lodges 636; raised 4,654; affiliated 1,075; dimitted 1,337; suspended N. P. D. 731; net gain 3,147. TOLlVIAN \tVRITE COTTON, Grand }\,1Ctster, 1914 M. \tv. Brother Tolman W. Cotton, the seventy-first Grand Master, was born in Reynolds County, Missouri, August 12, 1868, of Scotch Irish ancestry. 'He grew to manhood on the farm and prepared himself for a teacher, which occupation he . follo\ved for several terms. He was a路 student in Carleton College, Farmington, Missouri, for three years, then entered and graduated from Beaumont Hospital Medical College, St.~ Louis, in 1893. He has been an active practitioner ever since and has held responsible positions in local and State Medical Societies, and on the State Board of Health. He was made a 1\tIaster Mason in Barnesville Lodge No. 455, Ellington, Missouri, November 2, 1889, affiliated vvith Van Buren Lodge No. 509 in 1890, serving as Master for nine years beginning in 1894. He received the Capitular Degrees in St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A. M., in 1892, passed the Circle in Cape Council No. 20, Cape Girardeau, in 1894, Knighted in Cape Girardeau Commandery No. 55, K. T., in 1895, received the A. A. S. R. Degrees in St. Louis in 1899. In 1894 he was appointed D. D. G. M., serving as such until 1907, vvhen he vvas appointed Gral1d 11arshal.He was advanced regularly through the subordinate positions, and elected GrandMaster in 1914. Brother Cotton stands at the 路head of the School of Masonic Prophets and Sages in Southeast Missouri. A quiet retiring disposition, but bubbling over with zeal for Freemasonry.

-318-


Laying Corner Stone, State Capitol, Jefferson City, By wI. VV.

GRAND 1rIAsTER

T. VV. COTTON, June 24, 1915.


THE NINETY-FIFTH ANNUAL CO~I.lMUNICATION. (The O"ne Hundred and Thirteenth Communication.) St. Louis} September 28, A.D. 1915; A.L. 5915. The Mayor of St. Louis extended· greetings to the Grand Lodge, to which· Past Grand Master Boyd responded. As the Grand Lodge had met so often in St. Louis, the address of welcome by the Mayor seemed superfluous, but Brother Kiel made a good· speech. " The Committee on Credentials reported the representatives of 461 I.-(odges, 542 Past Masters, and 21 Past Grand Masters present. This was a largely attended· Session. The address of Grand Master Tolman W. Cotton was brief, yet thorough. The Grand Lodge, through the Grand Master, was presented vvith a handsome ivory gavel by Temple Lodge No. 299, I(ansas City. The great event of the year was the laying of the corner stone of the nevv State Capitol at Jefferson City, in the presence of the largest assembly in the history of that city. Being a physician, ·he made only eight decisions, some of the nature of a cathartic, to purge a few Lodges of undesirable material. He reported the condition of the Craft as excellent, and gave a just tribute to the O. E. S. for its loyal work for the Home. The grand total received for the Masonic Home In1provement Fund, to date, was $99,516.39. This made a remarkable sho\ving, that above the annual assessment, the Craft had contributed over $200,000 in four years to buildings for the Home. The dedicatory ceremony of the new adtninistration·building of the Home was an elaborate and interesting event. Addresses were delivered by W.BrotherSol. E. Waggoner, President of the Home, Grand Master Cotton, Mrs. Lillian L. Fletcher, Grand Matron, of the Grand Chapter of the O. E. S., and M. W. Brother Willian F. Kuhn, P. G. M., responded on behalf of the Board, for the elegant furnishings of the. Administration Building by the O. E. S. These furnishings amounted -319-


to over $10,000. The addresses are published in full. a red letter day for the Home.

It was

The amendment to the By-La\vs, increasing the per capita tax from seventy-five cents to one dollar and twenty-five cents, for the Home, was considered and adopted. The address n1ade for the amendment was by M. W. Brother Willialn F. Kuhn, P. G. M. The address was by nlotion, ordered printed in full in the Proceedings. No opposition appeared against the amendment when the vote was .taken. The Committee on revision of By-Laws, governing appeals, V\rith M. W. Brother Archie Johnson, P. G. M., as Chairman reported, which report was laid over for one year, and then adopted. It was a much needed legislation. The pay roll for the S'ession amounted to $9,354.45. Officers for the ensuing year were installed: "FRANK R. JESSE, Webster Groves EDWARD HIGBEE, Kirksville WM.. A. CLARK, Jefferson City JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan ALPHON'SO C. STEWART, St. Louis JOHN R. PARSON, St. Louis J. R.. McLACHLAN, Kahoka JOHN H. MILLER, Kansas City WM. J. WILLIA:MSON, St. Louis JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis WM. F.··JOHNSON, Boonville.· O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City BERT ·S. LEE Springfield JOSEPH S. McINTYRE, St. Louis ORESTES MITCHELL, St. Joseph AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla WoW. MARTIN, Doniphan KARL 'M. VETSBURG, St. Louis GEORGE F.RIXEY, Gallatiti HARRYA. KRUEGER, St. Louis o

The

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. ,. Grand Senior Warden. Gran.d Junior Warden. Grand Treasurer. Gra1td Secretary. Grand Lecturer. Grand Chaplain. Grand Chaplain. Grand Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand Senior Steward. Grand. Junior Steu!ard. Grand1vfarshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant.. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. . Gran,d Tyler/?

••••

Receipts $81,590.15 ; disbursements $67,392.57; balance $82,507.61. __320--


Melnbership 63,966.. NUll1ber of Lodges 639; raised 4,306; affiliated 1,054; dimitted 1,322; suspended N. P. D. 1,185; net gain 2,269.

FRANKR.USSELL JESSE, Grand Master~ 1915.

M. W . Brother Frank R. Jesse, the seventy-second Grand l\'Iaster, was born in Audrain County, Ivlissouri, May 19, 1863. He gre\¥ to manhood on a farln, \vent to the country school until sixteen years of age. He attended the ·I-ligh School in 1\·1exico, from which he graduated. He took a year's course in English in \iVilliam Jewel College, Liberty, then entered the Lavv School of the State University of Missouri, took his Degree and was admitted to the Bar.. He began the practice of his Profession in Mexico, was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Audrain County for 18,99 and 1893. He later removed to Webster Groves where he nOVl resides. He was made a Master Mason in Mexico Lodge No. 544, March 27, 1896, seTving as Master in 1890 and 1891. Hewas exalted in Mexico Chapter No. 27, .Royal Arch Mason, in 1901, served as High Priest in 1903.. He received the Cryptic Degrees in Solomon Council No. 26, R. and S'. M.,Milan, July 25, 1907, became a Charter'lnember of Centralia Council No. 34, Centralia. He received the .Orders of Knighthood in Crusade Commandery No.. 23, in April 1902, serving as Commander in 1906. He first received recognition in the Grand Lodge in 1007, being appointed Gra.nd Pursuivant, appointed Grand Senior Deacon in 1912, elected Grand Junior Warden in 1913, advanced .yearly and elected Grand· Master in 1915. Upon the resignation of John R. Parson, Grand Secretary, May 20,.1921, he was· appointed to fill ,the vacancy. Brother Jesse is one of the younger Past Grand Masters~ full of .Masonic zeal and •everywhere . active, of a genial nature, he makes and holds friends. -321-


TI-IE NINE'fY-SIXTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATIO}J. (The One Hundred and Fourteenth C0111ffiunication.) St. Louis, Septe1nber 19, A.D. 1916; A.L. 5916. This annual COlumunication vvas delightfully introduced by a fine entertainnlent by the children of the Masonic HOlne and the Olive Branch Quartette. Grand Master Frank R. Jesse delivered an oration and a report ot twenty-one pages. He had been a busy Grand Master. I-Ie paid due tribute to R. W. Brother Alphonso C. Stewart, Grand Treasurer, who died suddenly on April 21, 1916. He announced the appointn1ent of M. W. Brother \;\TilliatTI A. Hall, P. G. M., as Grand Treasurer. In reference to finallce, he reported that there had been paid to the Grand Secretary since the last annual S'ession, the sunl of $201,000.00, of this amount $154,000.00 had been paid to the Masonic Home. He reported a l1U111ber of Lodges in arrears 011 the Ilnprovement Fund; a fe'\v being in arrears for three years, and SOlne ·for tV10 years. \i\lhy the delinquency, if Grand Masters had done their duty? He. rendered twenty decisions, among which, the following is vvorthy of record, as proving the skill of the Grand Master and lawyer in making proper deductions and estimates: No. ·16. Question.· Is one ,;vho is engaged in the manufacture of Weiss beer containing 2 per· cent alcohol eligible . . to petition for the degrees' Weiss beer is not considered an intoxicating liquor. Answer. No. Ten drinks of beer containing 2 per cent of alcohol is just as intoxicating as one drink of whiskey containing 20 per cent of alcohol, andtllakes you feel a great deal worse.

In reference to an inITIate of a Penitentiary who is still in good standing· in his Lodge, and who had been convicted of burglary, the Grand Master made the following sage remark: Early in my official year it was brought to lUY· attention that a member of one of our lodges vvho had been caught robbing the U. $. mail and. had pleaded guilty and was serving a term in the penitentiary was still a member of theloclge in good standing. A Masonic lodge is not a reformatory, especial1y for inmates of

-322-


penitentiaries. What a spectacle it would be for a Masonic Lodge, clad in white gloves and aprons, to have to go into a penitentiary and conduct the Masonic funeral of one of its members. I am路 not one to shut the door of hope against a brother who has been compelled to pay the penalty for his evM deeds. It is sufficient time after he has paid the penalty and shown by his life and deeds that he has truly repented and reformed to again knock at the door of Freemasonry, and if found worthy he will gain admission.

Near the conclusion of the first day's session the Grand Master announced the sad intelligence, that M. W. Brother WilliatTI M. Willian1s, P. G. M., had just died. A Committee consisting of Past Grand Masters C. H. Briggs, C. C. Woods, J. W. Boyd, Arch A. Johnson, T. W. Cotton and R. R. Kreeger were appointed to attend the funeral at Boonville. On the afternoon of the first day, the Grand Secretary read a letter from M. W. Brother Arthur M. Hough, P. G. M., donating $5,000 to the permanent Endowment Fund of the HOtTIe. Not to.be outdone in generosity, M. W. Brother Jacob Lampert, P. G. M., arose and handed the Grand Secretary a check for $5,000 to be added to the Endowment Fund of the Hon1e. Modesty fuespoke their merit, as both of the donors expressed a desire that no publicity be given to the donation. The orations for the year were delivered by R. W. Brother Karll\1. Vetsburg and R. \lV. Brother George F. Rixey: A resolufion was adopted preventing a Lodge from splitting itself into several Lodges to expedite work. It reads: Resolved, That the Grand Lodge does hereby forbid any lodge to confer more than one of the degrees or 'sections of a degree at one and the same time, in the same Lodge. The Grand Master is hereby empowered to enforce this edict.

'rhe total attendance at the S'ession was 1,014, with a pay roll of $9,579.59. The following Officers for the ensuing year were installed: "ED路WARDHIGBEE, Kirksville WM. A. CLARK, Jefferson City JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis

-323-

Grand Master. Deputy Grand Master. G1'andSeniorWarden. Grand Junior Warden.


W1'L A. HALL, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN R. P'ARSON, St. Louis G~and Secretary. J. R. McLi\CHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. JOHN' H. 'MILLER, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. R. W. LILLEY, Kirksville Grand Chaplain. B. F. JONES, Cameron Grand Chaplain. WM. F.JOHNSON, Boonville Grand Senior Deacon. O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City Grand Junior Deacon. BERT S. LEE,,'Springfield...â&#x20AC;˘............ Grand Senior Steward. JOSEPHS. McINTYRE, St. Louis Grand Junior Steward. ORESTES lYIITCHELL, St. Joseph Grand Marshal. AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla Grand Marshal. \""1. W.~'MARTIN, Doniphan Grand Sword Bearer. CHARLES C. GARDNER, Kirksville Grand Pursuivant. C. J. ENGLISH, Brookfield Grand Orator. E. COMBIE SMITH, St. Louis (}rand Orator. Hi\RRY A. KRUEGER, St.Louis Grand Tyler/'

Receipts $36,271.76; disbur~~ments $88,376.38; balance $38,371.66. Membership 66,853; number of Lodges 644; raised 4,662; affiliated 1,049; dimitted 1,426; suspended N. P. D. 1,178; net gain 2,495. EDWARD HIGBEE, Grand },;[aste'Y', 1916. M. "W.BrotherEdward I-ligbee, the seventy-third Grand Master, was born in i\.shland, Ohio, January 1, 1847. He attended school in Johnson County, Iowa, and the Iowa State University, the fatl1i1y having moved to Iowa in 1~49. He V\ras a school teacher for sixteen years, studied La\v and was admitted to practice in September, 1867. He moved to Lancaster, Missouri, where he practiced unti11905, when he moved to 'Kirksville where he still resides. He ranks high as an Attorney, and in the election held in November, 1920, was elected. to the Supreme Bench. , He was made a Master Mason in Love. Lodge No. 259, Lancaster, March 22, '1869, serving as its J\1aster for eight terms. He was made a ,Royal 'Arch Mason in Eastern Star Chapter ~324-


No. 29, Melnphis, Dece111ber 4, 1882, affiliated with Cald\vell Chapter No. 53, R.A. M., Kirksville, June 22, 1906. He was Knighted in Melnphis C0111111andery No. 41, K.T., January 30,1883, affiliatedvvith Ely Commandery No. 22, K. T., Kirksville, May 9, 1907, serving as its Commander in 1911. He \vas greeted as a S'elect Master in Centralia Council No. 34, R. and

s. M.,April 10, 1914.

In the Grand Lodge he was appointed D. D. G. M. in 1894, serving a total of nineteen years as 'Such. He served on the Committee on Appeals and Grievances for six years and was one of the stalwarts on this Committee. He was appointed Grand Marshal in 1909; Grand Senior Deacon in 1913; elected . Grand Junior Warden in 1914 and Grand Master in 1916. Brother Higbee has been a strong figure in the Grand Lodge since his entrance. He did not need any official distinction to mark him as a power in the .Grand Lodge in all luatters affecting the welfare of the Fraternity. He is known and respected by all members of the Craft.

-325-


THE NINETY-SEVENTH ANNUAL COl\IMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Fifteenth Comn1unication.) St. Louis, Septe1nber 18, 1917; A.L. 5917. This annual Session was held under the stress of the World's War and the entrance of the United States into the conflict. Inlmediately after the opening of the Grand Lodge, the following message to the President of the United States was adopted, by a unanimous rising vote, and sent to him: St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 18, 1917. To Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States:

The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted 'Masons of the State of Missouri assembled in its ninety-seventh annual session, with its 70,000 members, pledges to you its loyal support, and prays that when peace comes it will come with righteousness, the triumph of democracy in the world, and that the doctrine of the Fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man may become universal.

The follo\ving distinguished visitors were introduced: M. W. Brother Ralph Wheeler, Grand lVIaster, and R. W. Brother Isaac Cotter, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Illinois; and M. W. Brother Frank E. Whitaker, Past Grand Master of lo~ra. The address of the Grand Master, Edward Higbee, took second rank as to length, covering fifty-one pages of the Proceedings. It is an address, a report, and an encyclopedia on Freemasonry, rolled into路 one. Re paid a loving tribute to M. W. Brother Campbell Wells, P. G. M., who died Decetnber 15, 1916. He made a strong plea for the George \i\Tashington MasonicNational Memorial Association. He reported his actions of appointing a Committee to prepare a program of the Bi-Centennialof the organization of the first Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge of England, ouSt. John's Day, June 24,1717. -326-


He rendered thirty-six decisions, many being of a constructive nature. He passed a severe, but just stricture, on a Masonic paper in Kansas City, for using its pages in an unmasonic manner in advertisements; and rebuked a dancing Inaster forusi~1g his Masonic affiliations as an advertisement in this paper to secure pup~Is. Grand Master Higbee was a hard working Gr~nd Master. The grand total of the Masonic Honle Ilnprovement Fund had. reached the neat amount of $124,824.83.

A resolution was adopted, establishing a roll of honor for all J\tlasons, and the sons of Masons, who had entered the Service of their Country in the World's War. BI-~ENTENNIAL CEL~BRATION.

On the evening of the first day's Session, the Bi-Centennial of the formation of the first Grand Lodge, June 24, 1717, was celebrated. An elaborate program was given, with music by a double quartettefrOlTI St. Louis. The addresses were delivered by M. W. Brother A. M. Dockery, P. G. M., on "Our Country"; by R. W. Brother Rev. E. Combie Smith, "The uloral and religious aspect of the first half of the 18th Century"; and by M. W. Brother vVilliam F. Kuhn, P. G. M., on (tThe Evolution of the Operative into the Speculative Craft,the I{evival of 1717." These addresses are published in full in the Proceedings. A very handsonlely engrossed set of Resolutions, bound in calf, and stamped in gold,were read by W. M. Brother C.H. Briggs, P. G. M., and transmitted to the United Grana Lodge of England. The question of organizing n1ilitary Lodges in connection with the- Missouri Regiments, was reported adversely by the Committee on Jurisprudence. The Committee路 on Jurisprudence reversed the Grand Master in the Robinson case and expelled said Entered路 Apprentice Robinson, from the rights and privileges of Freen1asonry. -327-


The following amendment in reference to signing a petition for a saloon license \vas offered by M. \V.Brother Briggs and adopted. Section 182~ Same. No Lodge shall receive a petition for the Degrees or for affiliation from any person who is engaged in the Inanufactureor sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage, either as distiller, brewer, brewery agent, wholesale liquor agent or salesman for such dealer, saloon keeper or bartender, or who signs a petition for a ,dram-shop license. Any Mason who may hereafter begin such business shall be expelled.

The following Officers for the ensuing year were installed: "'vVM. A. CLARK., Jefferson City ...•...... Grand Master. JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan peputy Grand Master. JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis G'rand Senior Warden. WM. F. JOHNS'ON, Boonville Grand Junior Warden. ~vVNI. .l\. HALL, St. Louis Grand· Treasurer. JOHN R. PARSON,St. Louis Grand Secretary. J. R. ·McLACHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. JOHN H. MILLER t Kansas City Grand Chaplain. _ARTHUR MATHER, St. Louis Grand Chaplain. o. J.~. LUCAS, Kansas City Grand Senior Deacon. BERT S. LEE, Springfield Grand Junior Deacon. JOS. S. McINTYRE, St. Louis Grand Senior Steu.'ard. ORESTES MITCHELL, St. Joseph Grand Junior Ste'u,ra1·d. .A .USTIN L. 1vIcRAE, Rolla Gran'd Marshal. W. W. MARTIN, Doniphan Grand Marshal. CHAS. C. GARD'NER, Kirksville Grand Swo'rd Bearer. JNO. PICKARD, Columbia Grand Pursuivant. FRED'K D. GARDINER, St. Louis Grand Orato1!'. \IVM. C. HECK, California Grand Orator. HARRY A. KRUEGER, St. Louis Grand Tyler."

Receipts $126,941.25; disbursements 121,225.13; balance $44,077.78. Membership 70,944; number of Lodges 644; raised 5,028; affiliated 1,209; dimitted 1,363; suspended N.P. D. 1,006; net gain 3,357.

c-328-


WILLIAM ALFRED CLARK, Grand Master, 1917. M. W. Brother William A. Clark, the seventy-fourth Grand Master, was born at Clarksburg, Missouri, September 11, 1865, of Scotch Irish ancestry. He was a farmer's boy, remaining on the farm until twenty years old. He graduated from the Clarksburg Academy in 1888, entered Waynesburg College, took a Classical Course, and graduated in 1889. He was a teacher for five years, then entered Washington University Medical School,. from which he graduated in 1897, locating in Jefferson City, where he .has路 resided ever since. He was made a l\tIaster Mason路 in Tipton Lodge No. 56, Apri115, 1890, affiliated with Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City and served as its Master in 1901 and 1902. He received the Capitular Degrees in California Chapter, No. 59 R.A. M.. May 7, 1892, affiliated with Jefferson .City Chapter, No. 27, serving as 路High Priest in 1903 and 1904. He was greeted a Select Master in Ezra Council, R. and S. M. Jefferson City, I<:nighted in Oliver Oom,mandery No. 53, K. T. BoonvilIe, . affiliated with Prince of Peace Commandery,. No. 2.9 K. T. Jefferson City serving as Commander in 1910 and 1911. He .received the Degrees of the A.. A. S. R. in the Bodies of the Rite in St. Louis. The Orders of the Red Cross of Constantine were conferred upon him in St. Chryssostom Conclave No. 36, Columbia. In the Grand Lodge, he served in the usual appointive positions from Grand Marshal, and elected Grand Master in 1917. He has always been active in Freemasonry.

-329-


THE NINETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATIQN. (The One Hundred and Sixteenth Communication.) St. Lou'is} September 16, 1918; A.L. 5918. This annual Session was preeminently a ~war session. Our boys were in the training camp over seas, and in the trenches. Every heart beat with patriotic fervor, and every Freelnason stood behind the Stars and Stripes with all their energy and zeal. The spirit of the occasion is shown in the following greeting to,the President: To the President of the United States: The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 1fasons of the State of 'Missouri, assembled in its 98th路 Annual Communication, renews its pledge made one year ago; to support the Administration in all its efforts to win the war, to establish Delnocracy throughout the earth, and that peace, justice and righteousness may everywhere prevail. There are no slackers, hyphenates 路or traitors among the Freemasons of Missouri. WM. F. KUHN, A. M. HOUGH.

The address of Grand Master William A. Clark breathed a spirit of patriotism. It covered the transactions of his office and other matters that had come to his attention. Owing to the fact that Inany Freen1asons from Missouri were in France, and desired to visit Masonic Lodges, this brought up the question of the recognition of the Grand Orient, and the Grand Lodge of France. The Grand Master made a plea for this recognition, basing his arguments upon a misconception of the history of these organizations. In reference .to the anti-liquor law adopted last year, he considered the clause, in reference to "signing a saloon petition'" as vague, and recommended that it be路 amended. In reference to it, he places himself strongly in favor of such a law by saying: I made this decision very much against Iny own inclination, and entirely in behalf of what seemed tome to be the best interests of the Fraternity. Personally I feel that the路 question of strong drink is a cess-pool in the pathway of human existence, which should be filled in, .smoothed down and sodded over, and the exigencies of the times make it necessary that it be done quickly. '-330-


I yield to no· man in the delight I shall feel on that day when Imperial Missouri shall lift alaft, higher than her mountain tops, the bC;l.nner of white, proclaiming to the world her freedom from the tyranny of intemperance, and debauching of her manhood by the legalized sale. of intoxicating liquors.

He advocated strongly the adoption of the 'I'rial Code as a solution of n1any difficulties. He also discussed at length the question of '\i\rar "vork .through an over seas Commission. In reference to "signing a saloon petition," before the Committee on Jurisprudence could act thereon, .M. W. Brother Briggs offered the .following which was adopted and rendered null, any report the Cornmittee on Jurisprudence might make ': Vvhereas, It was the evident purpose of this Grand Lodge, in amending Section 182 of the By-Laws, to prohibit Freemasons from signing petitions for dram shop licenses, as pointed out by the Grand Master in his ~ddress, therefore,be it Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Lodge that Section 182, .as. amended, should be construed in accordam:ce with the· evident purpose of the Grand Lodge in adopting it; that is, that Freemasons shall not sign. petitiQus for dram shop licenses.

The Committee on Foreign Relations took .strong ground against the Grand Master'srecommenda~ions for the recognition of the Grand Orient and the Grand Lodge .of France. 1'he report of theCon1n1ittee was unanimously adopted. FRENCH' ORPHkNS

M.\!V.·· Brother Kreeger offered a resolution advocating the adoption, by .the" Grand Lodge, of' fifty fatherless children in France. The resolution was adopted and an appropriation was made to carry into effect this purpose. The Grand Lodge also adopted a' resolution, appointing an over seas' committee, a.s. expressed' in the following: Bee'· it Resolved, that the Grand Lodge of Missouri •establish a Masonic headquarters in France and other foreign countries, as the need may. appear, and that for" such . purposes there be appropriated the sum of $5,000.00 in cash by this Grand Lodge, and that the Master Masons of Missouri be requested by the Grand Secretary' to contribute $1.00 1=>er ca~ita, per annum, to be paid immediately' through the various Lodges in'this jurisdiction, and the sum so .collected be' immediately

-331-


remitted to the Grand Secretary. Such fund shall be at the disposal of this committee to carry out the aims and purposes of this resolution and, be it Further Resolved, That the incoming Grand :NIaster appoint a committee, to be known as the Missouri Freemasons' Fraternal and Social Service Overseas Committee, which committee shall consist of five menlbers and which shall be authorized and empowered to do all things necessary to carry into effect the spirit and purpose of these resolutions, and be it Further Resolved, That the said committee shall ask the co-operation of the "National Independent Grand Lodge of France and her colonies" in this work.

The Committee to carry out the purpose of this resolution were: George S. lVIcLanahan, C. H. Briggs, R. R. Kreeger, C. C. Bigger and Jacob Lampert. A special testitnonial wa; presented to M.W. Brother John R. Parson, P. G.. M., for his long and effective service for the Masonic Home and the Craft. GENERAL JOHN

J.

PERSHING.

General Pershing having been born at Laclede, Missouri, and being a Freemason, the following cablegram was ordered sent to him: St. Louis, Mo., September 17, 1918. General John ]. Pershing, France: Masonic Grand Lodge assembled in Annual Session, send greetings to you and your heroic American army, confident you wiU路lead them to triumphant victory.

c.

C.

BIGGER.

REP'LY FROM GENERAL PERSHIN'G. Via London, September 18, 1918. C. C. Bigger, Masonic Grand Lodge, Saint路 Louis, Missouri: Express to 1'1asonic Grand Lodge deep appreciation -of cablegram. P'ERSHING.

-332-


The following Grand Officers for 'the ensuing year were installed: "JOHN W. BINGHAM, Milan Grand Master. JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis · Deputy Grand Master. WM. F. JOHNSON, BoonviUe Grand Senior Warden. O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City · Grand Junior Warden. WM. A. HALL, St. Louis " G1"and Treasurer. JOHN R. ,P'ARSON, St. Louis Grand Secretary. J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. JOHN' H.MILLER, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. ARTHUR MATHER, St. Louis Grand Chaplain. FRED V. LOOS, Liberty..•.............. Grand Chaplain. BERT S. LEE, Springfield ~rand Senior Deacon. JOSEPH S. McINTYRE, St. Louis Grand Junior Deacon. ORESTES MITCHELL, St. Joseph Grand Senior Steward. AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla Grand Junior Steward. W. W. MARTIN, Doniphan Grand Marshal. CHAS. C. GARDNER, Kirksville Grand Marshal. JOHN PICKARD, Columbia Grand Sword Bearer. ANTHONY F. ITTNER, St. Louis Grand Pursuivant. WM. F. WOODRUFF, Kansas City Grand'Orator. J. E. DILLARD, St. Joseph Grand Orator. HARRY A. KRUEGER, St. Louis Grand Tyler/'

Receipts $132,871.42; disbursements $131,881.19; balance $45,050.36. Membership 74,201; number of Lodges Q4S; raised 5,514; affiliated 935; dimitted 1,121; suspended N. P. D. 727; net gain 4,072.

JOHN WILLIAM BINGHAM, Grand Master, 1918. M. W. Brother John W. Bingham, the seventy-fifth Grand Master, was born in Livingston County, Missouri, December 14, 1867. He is of Old English Stock. He attended the common schools of the County and, Humphreys' Academy. He afterwards' attended the State Normal School at Kirksville for three years, took a special course in Mathematics at the State University, and was S'uperintendentofSchools for sev-333-


eral years. In 1893, he entered the Law School of the University of Missouri, graduating therefrom in 1895. He located in Milan for the practice of his Profession where he still resides. His biographer says of hjm : Most Worshipful Brother Bingham was initiated at Lancaster,Mo., in the Lodge of Love, N'o. 259, October 19th, 1892, and raised December 7th, 1892. After returning to Milan he affiliated with Seaman Lodge, No. 126, Milan, Mo., May 19th, 1894. He served as Worshipful Master in 1898. He received the Capitular degrees in Milan Royal Arch Chapter 103; in 1903, being exalted November 23rd. He was High Priest of his chapter in 191LHe was knighted in St. Bernard Commandery, No. 52, 'Milan, July 2, 1908, and served路 as its Commander in 1912. He passed the Circle in Solomon Council, No. 26, at Milan, on December 8, 1903, and was its Master in 1905. He received the order of High Priesthood at Kansas City, April 25, 1911. Most Worshipful Brother Bingham, although leading a very active civil life, which of necessity demanded a great portion of bis time, has .been most active in the Masonic bodies with which he has been connected. He has been for. many.路 years one路路 of their most regular attendants and has always taken part in the conferring of the degrees. His devotion tD Masonry and for what it stands has been very seldom, if ever, excelled; and although in the past year his health has been none of the best, yet. his administration just closing has been a most commendable one and has met the approval of the Craft.


THE NINETY-NINTH i\NNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One I-Iundred and· Seventeenth Communication.) St. Louis, September 16, A.D. 1919; A.L. 5919. The representatives of 373 Lodges, 331 Past Masters and 17 Past Grand Masters greeted .Grand Master John W. Bingham at tne opening of the Grand Lodge. M. W. Brother GeorgeL. Schoonover, Past Grand. Master of Iowa was introduced and accorded the Grand Honors. The address of the Grand Master was purely a business document. He commented on the rernarkable infIux·into Freemasonry, and that the number of Master Masons made during the year, was far in excess of all previous years. The l\1asonic Over Seas Commission, and the Wards of the Grand Lodge ·in France, received his attention. THE MASONIC SERVICE ASS0CIATION OF THE UNITED STAT~S.

The Masonic Service Association received the endo·rsement of the Grand Lodge by the adoption of the follo\ving resolutions: Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Missouri,A. F. & A. M., in 99th Annual Communication assembled,heteby endorses and approves the Constitution of the Masonic Service Association of the United States, adopted at the Conference of GrandMasters, held in Cedar Rapids, Io\va, November 27, 28 and 29, 1918, and associates itself as a member th.ereof, assumillg the privileges and responsibilities of such membership. MASONIC TEMPLE; IN ST. LOUIS

The Masonic Ten1ple·Association of St.Louis .presented.a proposition to. the Grand Lodge and asked its approval. The Temple Associationagreein'g to erect a Masonic l'emplewith an adequate auditorium for theComn1unications of the Grand Lodge,· and offices, \Jvith fire proof vault, for the offices. of the Grand Lodge, on the condition that the Grand Lodge agrees to pay· $10,000, annually for· fifteen years towards the project. Thi'S. proposition was referred to· a Committee, which presented a majority report, favorable, and a minority report unfavorable, the majority report •. was adopted.


The Committee on Necrology reported the death of M. W. Brother George E. Walker, P. G. M., who died July 10, 1919. The orations were delivered by R. W. Brother Rev. Arthur Mather and R. W. Brother William F. Woodruff. ovttRsEAS COMMISSION.

The Committee on Missouri's Overseas Service made a very full and detailed report by M. W. Brother Kreeger. The report recited the work of the Commission and the loss by death of Honorable Brother William C. Borland, M. C., in France, while on duty for the Commission. The Commission sent W. Brother George S. McLanahan and Brother W. C. Borland to France, but before their· arrival the Armistice had been signed, and only a small amount of work could be done. The Commission reported ·r~ceipts for the service of $14,636.83, with a balance in the Treasury of $12,905.28. The Committee on Fatherless Children in France submitted a full report giving a list of the names of the fifty children adopted by the Grand Lodge. The Committee on the roll of honor reported that 185 Lodges were not interested enough to report the names of their members, if any, in the Service of their Country. But from reports received from·the remaining Lodges, they showed that 3,643 Brethren and 1,350 sons of the Brethren were in the servi ceo The following Officers for the ensuing year were installed: "JULIUS C. GARRELL, St. Louis Grand Master. WM. F. JOHNSON, Boonville Deputy. Grand Master *0. A. LUCAS, Kansas City Grand Senior Warden. BERT S. LEE, Springfield Gra11td Junior Warden. WILLIAM A. HALL, St. Louis Grand Treasurer. JOHN R. P'ARSON, St. Louis ...........• Grand Secretary. J. R. McLACHLAN, Kahoka Grand Lecturer. JOHN H. 'MILLER, Kansas City Grand Chaplain. ARTHUR MATHER, St. Louis Grand Chaplain. *Absent from session-Installed at K'ansas City.

-336-


FREDI V. LOOS, Liberty JOSEP'H S. McINTYRE, St. Louis ORESTES MITCHELL, St. Joseph AUSTIN L. McRAE, Rolla W. W. MARTIN, Doniphan CHARLES C. GARDNER, Kirksville JOHN PICKARD, Columbia ANTHONY F. ITTNER, St. Louis BYRN-E· E. BIGGER, Hannibal JAMES HARDIN SMITH, St.· Louis A. T. D'UMM, Jefferson City HARRY A. KRUEGER, St. Louis

Grand Chaplain. G1t'and Senior Deacon. Grand Junior Deacon. Grand· Senior Steward. Grand Junior Steward. Grand Marshal. Grand Marshal. Grand Sword Bearer. Grand Pursuivant. t;rand Oyator. Grand Orator. Grand Tyler. n

The newly installed Grand Master, Julius C. Garrell, was the recipient of a gold v\latch by the Warden's Club of the thirty-third and fifty-first Districts. Receipts $143,799.88; disbursements $141,002.43; balance $48,281.96. Membership 79,440 ; number of Lodges 644; raised 6,759; affiliated 1,008; dimitted 1,117; suspended N. P.D. 610; net gain 5,202.

JULIUS CAESAR GARRELL, Grand Master,. 1919. M. W. Brother Julius C. Garrell, the seventy-sixth Grand· Master, ,vas born in the City of St Louis, February, 1862. His Father died when Julius was eleven years old, so that his opportunities to obtain an education were limited, he being obliged to contribute to the support of the family ·by \vorking. He attended the Public School and obtained two years of High School training. He is President of the St. Louis 1"itle Company. A well established business. He lives in Webster Groves. He was made a Ma&ter Mason in Occidental Lodge No.. 163, St. Louis, May 9, 1898, serving as its Master in 1904. He received the Capitular Degrees in Oriental Chapter No. 78, R~ A. M., October 20, 1898,. serving as High Priest in 1902. He was greeted a Select Master in Hiram· Council No.1, R. and -337-


S. M., February 4, 1903.~ l(nighted in St. AldemarCommandery No. 18, K. T., December 29, 1899 and received the Degrees of the A. A. S. R. in the Bodies . of the Rite in St. Louis in 1902, 1903. He "first appeared in the Grand Lodge as Junior Warden of his Lodge in 1902. In 1904 he was appointed D. D. G. L. and reappointed in 1905, and in 1906 was appointed D. D.

G.M. In 1910 he was appointed in the line of th'e Grand Officers, advanced yearly and elected GrandMaster in 1919. Brother Garrell is the silent man of the Craft, but a man of positive views and convictions, and when he speaks he expresses himself vvith vigor and force. Modest and retiring by nature, yet withal, carries a silent influence for great good.

-338-


International Film Service.

Missouri's Son and Mason,

GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING and His Command On their triumphal march through Washington, September 17, 1919


THE ONE IIUNDREDTH ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Eighteenth Communication.) Kansas City, September 21, A.D. 1920; A.L. 5920. The Ninety-ninth Session was ushered in with the .representatives of 451 Lodges; 496 Past Masters, and 20 Pa?t Grand Masters present. It was a house full, when Grand Master JuliusC. Garrell opened' the Grand Lodge. It is worthy of note that the annual Communications1n.eld in Kansas. City were more largely attended .than in any other portion of the State. The address of the Grand Master was a plain, clear cut, business paper. It revealed that he had been one of the most active Grand Masters .in the history of the Grand Lodge. He' visited ninety-four Lodges and nearly every District. He paid a loving tribute to our late Past Grand Ma-ster, M. W. Brother Arthur M.Hongh, "\tvho died at his home: in Jefferson City, July 2, 1920. He participated in many cornerstone layings, chief ofwhicID. was that of the new Temple of Ivanhoe LoageNo. 446, Kansas City, on the afternoon of the first day's Session. CJ;NT~NNIAL

.CELEBRATION ..

He reported that the Committee appointed last year to make arrangements for the Centennial Celebration at this annual Communication\vasunable to proceed, owing to the fact, that no appropTiation had been made by the Grand Lodge. He recommended that the COlumittee be enlarged: and continued ; and that .theCentennial be observed at the annual S'ession in 1921, and that the Grand. Lodge' appropriate. sufficient funds, to make it an occasion of distinguished meri,t. He made a number of ··recommendations,. chief of which were: Enacting such "legislation as will make it obligatory for every applicant. for the. degrees to deposit. with his petition fee,. a111 additional sum, such as·· may be Qetermined by this Grand Lodge, ·to be paid .to the Masonic Home for its benefit.

-339-


Careful observation in my visits throughout the state during the year, convinces me that our law as to the time that must elapse between the conferring of the degrees, needs revision, and I therefore respect-. fully recommend that a period of at least one month be required to elapse after the reception of the first degree, in order that the candidate may serve a lawful time as an Entered Apprentice before he is eligible to be passed to the Degree of Fellowcraft; and that a similar period be required to pass before the candidate is eligible for the Master Mason Degree. I further recommend that the dignity, solemnity and importance of the three degrees of Ancient Craft 1Jfasonry be protected by making it a Masonic offense in this jurisdiction to solicit or to propose a Master Mason for membership in any organization, for which that standing is a qualification, until he has been a Master Mason for a period not less than three months after he has passed a satisfactory examination in the Master Mason Degree.

The later recommendation was disapproved. TWENTY DOLLAR FEE FOR MASONIC HOME.

R. W. Brother Arthur Mather offered the following amendment in reference to increasing the revenues of the Masonic Home: To amend Sec. 42 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws by adding Sec. 42a and Sec. 42b thereto: Sec. 42a. Same. Each petition for the degrees, and each petition for affiliation from a Grand Jurisdiction other than Missouri, in addition to the fee required by the by-laws of the Lodge, shall be accompanied with the sum of twenty dollars for the use and benefit of the 'Masonic Hom,e. In the event of the election of the petitioner, the Secretary, of the lodge shall immediately remit such sum to the Grand Secretary, who in turn shall immediately pay the same over to the' Secretary of the Masonic Home. I f the petitioner be rej ected such amount shall. be returned to him. Sec. 42b. The money so obtained by virtue of the preceding section shall be set aside and used for the purchase of additional grounds and buildings for the Home and for the erection of buildings on the grounds so purchased, and for the maintenance of the .Home; the balance of such moneys shall be set aside DY the Home Board to the Endowment Fund.

This amendment after having been referred to the Committee on Jurisprudence reported it back, recommending that it be ~340-


adopted, but striking out the word Htwenty" and inserting the word "ten.'" After a thorough discussion a motion to strike out the ten, and reinsert the word "twenty" was adopted by a large majority. This action by the Grand Lodge is the greatest and most important ever taken on behalf of the Masonic Home. It puts the Home out of the Hpass-the-hat" class. Th1s action should have been taken ten years ago. The Grand Lodge of ~1issouri is behind the Home, and if the Board of Directors will have, and manifest faith in the Grand Lodge, the Grand Lodge will reply--"Ask and ye shall receive." FOREIGN RELATIONS.

The Comnlittee on the recognition of Grand Lodges, to which was again referred the recognition of the Grand Orient of France, the Grand Lodge of France, and the relation of the German Grand Lodge, made a report. It is the most exnaustive report ever submitted along this line. In brief, it reaffirms the recognition of the York Grand Lodge of Mexico, and denied recognition to the Grand Lodge Valle de Mexico. It again refused recognition of the Grand Orient of France, and the Grand Lodge of France, and submitted abundant and unanswerable arguments therefore. The Committee requested further. time on the German Lodges, as matters in reference to these Lodges were stiUin chaos. OVltRSEAS COMMISSION.

The Committee on the Missouri Overseas Service submi.tted its final report, recommending the balance of the fund remaining to be pro-rated to the donors. This amount was $11,112.64. The spirit of the Lodges was manifested in a remarkable manner, when more than two-thirds of them requested, that the amount due, be given to the Endowment Fund of the Home. It was noticeable, that a few Lodges which were profuse in their patriotism, and loud in their charity, were not among those路 which gave their balance. to the Home.Noise and work do not always go hand in hand. -341-


The Committee on reVISIon of the Code, made a partial report, which was adopted. One of the changes was a ne-vv fornl of a petition for the Degrees. A very searching set of questions is a part of the petition, which the petitioner is required to answer. The Committee on T17iaJ Code" through W. Brother Thad. B. Landon, submitted a thorough report, which vvillcome up for action in 1921. The amendment permitting five candidates to pass through certain portions of the ceremonies of each Degree, at one and the same time, was again defeated, after a debate lasting four hours. Prejudice and habit won over argument. The Comittee on Fatherless Children in France, through M. W.Brother R. R. Kreeger, made an interesting report. The work was ordered continued. The pay roll for the Session路 amounted to $15,790.25; $6,000 was appropriated for the observance of the Centennial. of the Grand Lodge. The Committee appointed. to make the. necessary arrangements were: R. W. Brother Willianl A.Sommers, R. W. Brother Karl M. Vetsburg, M. W. Brother William F. Kuhn, M. '""1. Brother D. M. Wilson and M. \V. Brother Arch A. Johnson. The following Officers for 1921 were installed: C'WILLIAM F. JOHNSON, Boonville O. A. LUCAS, Kansas City BERT S. LEE, Springfield.. " "

Grand Master. Deputy 'Grand Master.

Grand Senior Warden. JOSEP'H S. McINTYRE, St. Louis ". Grand Junior Warden. ';VII~LIAM A. HALL. St. Louis Gra1td Treasurer. JOHN RPARSON, St. Louis " Grand Secretary. J.. R. McLACHLAN Grand Lecturer. JOHN H. MILLER " Grand Chaplain. ARTHUR 'MATHER. Gra1td Chaplain. ,FRED V. LOOS, Grand Chaplain. ORESTES MITCHELL, Grand Senior Deacon. AUSTIN L. ~rcRAE Grand' Junior Deacon. W. W. MARTIN Grand Senior Steward. JOHN PICK.A.RD .. " G?~and Junior Steward. -3.4:2-


ANTHONY F. ITTNER BYRNE E. BIGGER ROBERT A. MAy SAMUEL R. FREET FLETCHER HOMAN J AMES HARDIN SMITH HARRY A. KRUEGER

Grand Marshal. GrandMar~hal.

~

Grand· Sword Bearer. r;;rand Pursuivant. Grand Orator. Grand Orator. Grand 1~yler.JJ

Receipts$lc66,525.80; disbursements $158,030.08 ; balance $56,777.68. Membership 90,416; number of Lodges 651; raised 12,007; affiliated 1,521; dimitted 1,847; suspended N. P. D. 609; net gain 10,653. .

\VILLIAM FOREMAN JOHNSON, Grand Master, 1920. M. W. Brother vVilliam F. Johnson,. the seventy-seventh Grand Master, was born in Shelbyville, Missouri, February 8, 1861. IIis parents \vere Kentuckians, and both were educators. He received his education in the. private schools. of Kentucky and Missouri. He taught one year in Brandenburg, Kentucky, was a tutor one year in Shelbina College, and in 1880 was assistant Principal of S'chools at Shelbina. In 1882, he was at the head of the Pilot Grove Collegiate Institute and remained therefor five years. He\vas also·· an Editor and member of the State Legislature. He was admitted to th.e Practice of I.,awin 1889, moving to Boonville in 1894, where he has resided ever since in the practice of his Profession. In 1906, 1908 and 1910 ·he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of the County. He was·made a Master Mason in William Muir Lodge No. 277, Pilot ,Grove, in 1882, serving as its Master in 1891, dimitted to Cooper Lodge No. 36, Boonville, in 1897, serving as its Master in 1900. He received the Capitular Degrees in Boonville Chapter in 1883, serving as its High Priest in 1902, 1903, and 1904. He received the Cryptic Degrees in Ezra Council -343-


No. 32, Jefferson City in 1901, and vvas knighted in Olivet Commandery No. 53, K. T., Boonville, June 28,1889. He was elected Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Missouri, in 1/913. In the Grand Lodge he was appointed D. D. G. M. ana served from 1902 to 1912. He served on several important Cotnmittees in the Grand Lodge, and was appointed Grand Sword Bearer in 1911, Grand Marshal in 1912 and 1913, advanced in the appointive stations annually, and elected Grand Junior Warden in 1917, advanced yearly, and elected Grand lVlaster of the Centennial year in September, 1920. The history of Brother Johnson's year of service remains to be written. He entered upon his duties with a vigor that is characteristic of him. His year will close with unbounded credit to himself and the Craft.

-344-


THE ONE HUNDRED AND FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. (The One Hundred and Nineteenth Communication.) St. Louis~ September 20, A.D. 1921; A.L. 5921. The history of the One Hundred and First Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will have to be written by the historian of the Second Century. It marks the beginning of the Second Century of the life of the Grand Lodge. The One Hundredth year is distinguished, not by any unprecedented growth in路 numbers, but by a steady and firm advancement in the principles of the Fraternity. This is marked by the erection of several1arge Masonic Temples; the formation of new Lodges in the centers of large Lodges; the organization of a bureau for the dissemination of Masonic knovvledge and furnishing speakers to the smaller country Lodges; for instruction and abetter conception of Freemasonry; the adoption of a revised set of By-Laws, in which is incorporated a Trial Code, a distinctive advance step, to simplify and reduce the troublesome factor that enters in all Masonic trials. Grand Master Johnson has been exceedingly zealous in his labors for the Craft. His visitations have been many, and have excee8ed the record of his predecessors. The centennial will be observed in a manner befitting the occasion, with a public as well路 as a purely Masonic celebration. ~rhe year has been marked by the death of.three Past Grand Masters: M. VV. Brother Theodore Brace who died at his home in Paris, Missouri, May 27, 1921, at the ripe age of 86 years; M. W. Brother James W. Boyd died at his home, St. Joseph, Missouri, April 19, .1921; M. W. Brother Jacob Lampert died in St. Louis, February 20, 1921, at the age of 65 years. Brothers Boyd and Lampert .will be greatly missed by this generation, as they have been present and active at every session of the Grand Lodge for the past twenty years. --345-


GROWTH FOR 1921. The growth for the Centennial year, ending June 30, 1921, may be included among the surprises. The estimates furnished from the Grand Recorder are as follows: Returns from Lodges received 99,646 2 Lodges delinquent, estimated 86 3 Lodges U. D. member.ship reported 76 7 Lodges 路路U. D. m1embership not reported 217 20 Estimated growth of 9 Lodges

100,045

Total membership

Net gain 9,629 These statistics make the year a Centennial in name and m,embership.Thenet gain shows a decrease compared with last year. This decrease has occurred since .abo'ut ]'an. 1. The total income to the Masonic Home, as based on the law enacted last year, requiring a fee of $20.00 for the Home to accompany the petition, has amounted to $74)400.00 showing that out of the gain of 9,629 only 3,658 were elected to the-Degrees since October 15, 1920. In other words, 6,116 were elected to receive the Degrees from July 1 to October 15, 1920. There may be, and evidently is, a bug under the chip, in the number of petitions rushed into the Lodge prior to October 15, in order to escape the Masonic House donation. If this is true, it is a disgrace .on the Lodges VJho are guilty of suchanunmasonic act. The close of. the first century of the Grand Lodge is full of hope and promise for the future. The n1en of the past have builded well. The Brethren of the present will remain faithful to that which they have inherited, thus leaving to the future a Freemasonry. founded upon eternal truth. Freemasonry now and in the future must remain true to its aims. It 'has 110 dogma, par creed, other than a belief in Deity, and the promulgation of the doctrine of the Father-346-


hood1 of God and Brotherhood of man, and its prayer is, Thy KingdolTI come in the hearts of men until "Righteousness shall cover the earth as the waters cover the sea." Freemasonry will become universal when it makes.the home, the community, the state and nation Masonic in spirit by meriting the commendation of the Great Master when he路路said, "ForI was hungry, and yegave me meat to eat ; I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink; I was a stranger and ye took rile in ; naked, and ye clothed me ; I was sick, and ye visited me; I路路was in prison, and yecame unto me. In as nluch as ye did it unto one of these my brethren, even these least, ye did it unto me." This is the mission of Freemasonry. It has no other propaganda. "We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, hot breaths. He most lives \lVho thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best."

-347-


SIDE LIGHTS.

As we glean the. history of the Grand Lodge from the old and often imperfect records, one is impressed with the precarious and unstable condition existing in the life of the Grand Lodge for several years. Organized with three Lodges, with a total mEmbership of less than one hundred, and two of the Lodges located in small hamlets in a moving, shifting population, where the pioneer with his ax and ox team was endeavoring to establish a home, where the miner with his .pick and shovel searching for his Eldorado, and the hunter with his traps and old flint lock, these n10ved restlessly about with no definite abiding place. The Louisiana purchase was just emerging from a wilderness to a stable condition as the territory of Missouri, and w'hile opportunities lay beyond thhe Mississippi, they were attracting the attention of every class of society with its hoard of undesirables. The Gran~f-todge was organized among this shifting, restless, struggling hUlnanity. Our fore fathers in Freemasonry, in J\tlissouri, must have looked with apprehension, yet in faith, to an ultimate success. Lodges were formed only to disappear in a year or two. The original Lodges save one withered and died within two years. Often it was a question whether a sufficient number of Lodges would .be living at the end of the Masonic year to perpetuate the Grand Lodge. Lodges were organized路 as far west as Boonville, Columbia and Fayette, only to live a few years and then disappear. It was not until after 1840 that the Grand Lodge reached a firm. basis safe from disaster. Of the old Lodges only a few remain: Missouri No. 1, Tyro No. 12 at Caledonia, Palmyra No. 18, Paris Union No. 19, at Paris, St. Louis No. 20, St. John No. 28 at Hannibal, Cooper No. 36 at Boonville and Naphthali No. 25 at St. Louis, with possibly a few others. During the century 954 Lodges had been organized by the Grand Lodge in Missouri, up to the路 close of the .Masonic year -348-


of 1920. Of this list nearly one-third, or 303 Lodges have disappeared and are enrolled among the dead. The reader of the annals 0'1 the Grand Lodge .wust路 feel that" more honor should be paid to those who .stood by and guided the destiny of the Grand Lodge in its early history. Among such were, Edward Bates, Frederick Bates, Nathaniel B. Tucker, Archibald Gamble, William Rensha,v, George H. C. Melody, H. R. Gamble, Fred L. Bi1lon,Sinclair Kirtley, Thornton Grimsley, John D. Daggett, S. 'V.B. Carnegy, Priestly H. McBride, Joseph Foster and others. These men deserve our profound admiration. A few of the salient events and conditions might with interest be enumerated. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER.

For twenty years after the organization of the Grand Lodge, the office of Deputy Grand Master was an appoIntive one. In the event of the death or incapacity of the Grand Master, the Deputy became Grand Master, possessed of all the rights of such. This rule is of English origin, where .the Grand Mastership is held by one of the Royal Family. As such, he rarely exercised the authority of Grand Master, except through his Deputy, whom he appointed. The Deputy Grand Master virtually being the Grand Master. As we have no member of the Royal Family holding the office of Grand Master during his lifetime, the office. of Deputy Grand Master is really a remnant of a custom t4at has no place in any Grand Lodge in America. The office is supernumerary and should be abolished, having been engrafted, without reason, on the American system of Freemasonry. The office became elective in .the second decade. It was not until 1845 that the Grand Master was required to deliver an address or make an annual report. Of course, some cynic will say: "What a pleasure and satisfaction it must have been to路attend the Grand Lodge in those days.. " Prior to this time the Grand Master merely presided and appointed -S49-


Committees. The Grand Secretary made all reports and often was the arbiter on points of law. It ,vas the custom in the early history of the Grand Lodge to require all Lodges to send up a transcript of its, minutes for the year, for inspection by a Committee. These inspections reveal many amusing conditions. ,In one instance,aLodge cqnferred theE. A. Degree when open on the Master's Degree, and the Master's Degree was conferred ina Lodge of Entered Apprentices. The happy deduction from such' a condition is, that ,if",the,officersdid not know the difference, the candidate did not suffer any inconvenience, nor loss of wisdom. TliE DEGREE OF PAST l\fASTE;RS.

The Past Master's Degree occupied a prominent part in the ceremonies of the Grand Lodge from its organization, do\vn to 1895. The history of this degree, 'or official grade, ~ interesting. "rhe degree is an old one. The expression, "Past 1Vlaster" ,vas used in 1774, and implied one who "having passed the .chair through some ceremony." The Constitution of the GrapdLodge of England,'1723, speaks of the installed' Master passing tliroughcertain "significant ceremonies." There can therefore be no doubt of its antiquity and, that it dates from the birth of speculative Freemasonry. As an official grade, to be conferred upon the Master elect oia Lodge, asa part of the installation ceremony, c~n1e, as an inneritance in the ,formation of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. 'This grade or degree, was ,conferred in a Lodge of ,Past Masters, and was a secret ceren10ny known only to Past Masters. The ,early .records 'of' the Grand Lodge. show that,not Qnly \vere the, Masters elect invested vvith this official degree, but even the Grand Masters \vere installed in a Lodge of Past Masters, andq,fter the secret ceremony, the Grand Master elect, installed the ,.other Grand Officers. This method prevailed down to 1853, when 110 further record of such a ceremony,_ in ref~r.~nce to the Grand Master appears in the record. Why it was.discontil}u~d,is,'notstated, but it appears. as a superfluous


ceremony as each Grand Officer had been invested with this official. grade upon?is installation as Master of a Lodge. In later years, the custom of conferring the Past Master's Degree· upon· Masters elect gradually ceased, and was honored more in the breach than in the observance, until in 1895, upon an amendment offered by R. W. Brother Allan McDowell, the degree of Past Masters ceased 'to exist as a prerequisite· to the installation of the Master. \iVhen the Royal Arch. Degree became a part of Ancient Craft Masonry and was conferred under a Lodge warrant, the prerequisite to the Royal Arch, was that the solicitant must be a Past Master. This restriction of the Royal Arch, to thos.e who were Past Masters, seemed unjust to a large portion of the Brethren who desired to become Royal Arch Masons. It then becalne the custom to confer the Past Master's Degree by dispensation. This continued until the Past .Master's degree became a part. of the Capitular Systeln· .and the anomalous condition arose as to the Past Masters of a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, and a Past Master who had been elected and installed as a Master of the Lodge. From this arose the name of the two classes of Past Masters, ,the "virtual," and "actual" Past Masters, which designation has continued to this date. It appears from· the records of the Grand Lodge that some difficulty arose over the question as to the rights of·.a virtual Past Master being a member of the Grand Lodge and entitled to vote. In 1875, Grand l\faster Luke settled the controversy by a decision, that only actual Past Masters were members and possessed of the rights in the Grand Lodge~ N01vfINATI,ON FOR oFFICE.

In the first half of the century, in the life of the Grand Lodge, promotion in line was unkno\vn. Rarely, if . ever before the sixties, "vas a Grand Senior .Deacon elected to the Station of Grand Junior Warden. Even Grand Wardens hCl.d no "varranty deed on the Grand. Mastership, for the Grand Lodge had. the strange unhappy obsession of tumbling Deputy

-3~i-


Grand Masters and Grand Wardens out of their stations, and electing someone else. No line officer carried a deed, issued by some Grand Jvlasters, for the Grand Master's Station, so that in the event that he lived long enough he might ascend from Grand Pursuivant to the head of a Fraternity. In those good old days, the Grand Officers did not belong to the silent, shut-in, shut-up class, but their voices were heard in all matters relating to the business of the Grand Lodge. They, evidently, thought that silence did not of itself denote wisdom, or gain votes. For anyone to advocate to-day the nomination of a Brother for a certain office would be looked upon as Masonic heresy and fit for the inquisition, yet, in those old fogy days, nominations for office prevailed, and no mistakes were made. A different method no\v exists, as each incoming Grand Master nominates a Brother who in the course of eleven years will occupy his seat. In the last fifty years, in only a few instances, has the official line been broken, and a Brother elected from the floor. In the first decade of the history of the Grand Lodge we find the surprising and astounding fact of a Brother refusing the office of Grand Master, after he had been elected. It is worthy of remark, hO\Jvever, that no such an unhappy event could happen to-day. Not much. GENERAL LAFAYETlfE.

The visit of General Lafayette to the Grand Lodge of Missouri is a great event in the history of the Grand Lodge. That he,on his second visit to the United States, was the guest 0'ÂŁ the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and of Pennsylvania is a \vell-known fact, but that he came as far west and visited the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and was elected to honorary membership therein, is not mentioned in Masonic IIistory. It has been overlooked, or possibly this visit was unknow{l, except to a fe,,, and no record of it appears anywhere, except in very brief minutes of the Grand Lodge. -352-


This distinguished Frenchman, co-patriot and friend of Washington, made a visit with his son, George Washington Lafayette, to St. Louis in 1825. The Grand Lodge was called in special communication to honor this distinguished Mason. This special Session was held in. St. Louis, April 29, 1825, with R. V\T.George H. C. Melody,D. G. M. presiding.. The General was received with befitting honors, the Grand Lodge standing at his reception. The address of greeting was made by R. W. Brother A. Gamble, to which Lafayette responded. He and his son were elected to honorary membership. The Session was brief, yet路 impressive. When and where General Lafayette received his Masonic Degrees are not knovvn. That he received them in the United States is unquestioned. That there was a Military Lodge connected with Washington's Army is a well attested fact. A celebrated English Historian states that while the Continental Army was @ncamped in Morristown, Washington took special delight in communing with, and interest .in the .affairs of a Masonic Lodge. It is therefore a natural and .reasonable conclusion that Lafayette received the Degrees in this Lodge under the guidance of \Vashington. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania received him with distinguished honor, but before doing so, appointed a Committee to investigate and report on Lafayette's Masonic regularity. The Committee reported favorably, but gave no dates or place where he received the Degrees. That he received the Degrees in a regular Lodge in the United States is forever settled by this report. Anyone knowing the punctilious care that the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania always exercises in matters Masonic, cannot doubt the findings of this Committee. Genera"l Lafayette was present at a special Communication of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts on the occasion of laying .the corner stone of the Bunker Hill Monument, July 17, 1825. Reacted as one of the Grand Officers in applying the working tools to the stone. The apron that he wore on this -353-


occasion is preserved in the library of the Masonic Temple at Boston.. On this memorable· occasion, there were present, the Grand Lodge Officers of New Hampshire, Connecticut. and Vermont, the Grand Chapter of·Royal Arch. Masonsiof Massachuset~s and· the Knights Templar of Massachusetts. Missouri shares with these. older and' well· established Grand]urisdictions in paying honor . and tribute to Brother· L~fayette, whose steadfast assistance to our own Washington, made the freedom of the Colonies a possibility. NAME OF GRAND· I~ODGE" HONORARY AND OF:b"ICIAL TIT~ES.

The original name of the .Grand.·' Lodge was, "The Grand Lodge of Missouri, of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons.'" \Vhenthe Grand Lodge was incorporated in 1843, its .name was chahged to "The Grand· Lodge' oiFree and Accepted, Ancient Masons of the State of Missouri." This is its name to-day, although never used. .The corporate name ·•. neyerappears in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge, but thepriginal name '\\rith a.transposition of a phrase is used, as: HTheGrand Lodge of Ancient, Free and' Accepted l\1asonsof Missouri." In recent years the honorary·. title of. "Most WOFshipful," has been prefixed to the name..The· use' of this honorary title is without authority, and not sanctioned by any act of the Grand Lodge. It is an example of the whimsical disregard of honorary titles, so prevalent 'in the Proceedings· of the Grand ,Lodge during the century. What was the· cause and why the corporate name of 'Grand Lodge was changed from that {)f the original name, and why the corporate name is not used, is merely ·a matter of conj ecture. It is possible that the customary use of the phrase, "Ancient Masons," used in Pennsylvania and Virginia had its influence. This is clearly indicated "rhen' Grand Master H. R. Gamble addressed the Grand' Lodge as·t'Ancient .. York' Masons," an expression peculiar to Pennsylvania. Honorary and official titles were used without any· definite method. S'ometimes the honorary title of "Most Worshipful" -354-


was applied to the name of the Grand Master as "M. W. Brotner Edward Bates, G. ]\:1." and again as "Brother Edward Bates, M. W. G. ]\1." The folIovving are examples of the use of titles: "Brother T. F. Riddick, M. W.G. M."; "M. W. Brother Thomas F. Riddick, . G. M.'" "Nathaniel B. Tucker, G. M." ; "Brother Sinclair Kirtley, G. M."; "Priestly H. McBride, G. M."; "M.. W. Priestly If. McBride, G. M."; "Hon. P. H~McBride,G. IvI."; "M. W. I-Ion. P.H. McBride, G. M."; "Priestly H. McBride, M. \VG. M." These citations show the varied.. forms of. the use of titles. It is a strange mixture of honorary, official and civil titles. It remained for Grand Secretary O'Sullivan to bring some regularity out of this chaos. He applied, correctly, the honorary title of M. W. to the name of the Grand Master and not to the official title, as, "JVI. Vl. Brother Priestly· H. McBride, Grand Master." The civil titles of Hon., Rev.,D.D.,etc., appear several times, but as a .rule, the English custom of giving an offiicer his professional and business titles was not used. "The butcher, the baker, ··and the candle stick n1aker," were not listed, but the Clergy paraded their titles freely,. both as Grand Master and Grand Secretary. The honorary and official titles in reference to\iVardens, Treasurer,. Secretary, Deacons and Stewards were equally varied. The official title of R. W. was not used until about the second decade. The official title of G. S. W. or S: G.W., G. J. W., or].G.\V. were. used in discriminately, although the official title ofG. S. W. andG.J. W. appeared to be the favorites. Even to-day, we have the anomalous condition of a G. S. D. and a G. J. D., but .we have an S. G. \V. and a J. G. W.The only safe rule to follow is to use the official title of the Officers of the Lodge and then in the Grand Lodge, prefix the word •. Grand to it, as Grand Master, Grand Senior Warden, etc. The honorary title of M. \V.,V. W., and R. W.havetheir origin in ecclesiastical titles, dating back, possibly, to the -355-


Fourth Century of the Christian Era. Freemasonry has in all of its branches, borrowed these ecclesiastical honorary titles, and applied them to indicate rank. Right Rev. has become Right V"orshipful; Very Rev. to Very Worshipful and Most Rev. to Most \i\Tofshipful. As Right Rev. indicated a Bishop, so our Right \Vorshipful indicates in our Grand Lodge an officer below the Grand Master. While 110st Rev. indicated an Arch Bishop, so 110st Worshipful is the honorary title of the highest Officer in the Grand Lodge. In路 ecclesiastical nomenclature, thehol1orary title is al\vays used as a prefix to the name of the individual, and never as a prefix to the official title. An Arch Bishop is known as Most Reverend John Jones, but never as John Jones, Most Reverend Arch Bishop. Hence in Freetnasonry Most \"1orshipful William F .. Johnson, Grand 11aster, is the correct title. If Freemasonry is to follow ecclesiastical nomenclature it should use it correctly and not in a haphazard manner. ANTI-MASONIC EXCITE1vlEN't.

It becomes necessary to briefly refer to the anti-Masonic feeling, that swept over the Country from 1836 to 1840. It arose over the disappearance of one Morgan, whom it was alleged the Masons had caused to disappear, to prevent hin1 from publishing an expose of Freemasonry. This exciterpent vvas fanned in a furious flame by the politicians and which resulted in a National anti-Masonic party which nominated candidates for the Presidency. The excitement wasespecially severe in the States of N ew York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New England. An historian says: "Freemasonry was fiercely denounced, con1munities were in a whirlpool of passion, politicians came to the front and procured the passage at public meetings of路 resolutions against voting for Freemasons for any office ,vhatever. It ,vas voted to hear no Masonic preacher, unless they boldly denounced Freemasonry as 路a. bad institution. Masonic路 Clergymen were dismissed frotn -356-


their charges and Masonic meetings were prevented by force of arms." This quotation gives a good description of conditions in the Eastern States. This anti-Masonic furor caused several Grana and Subordinate Lodges to cease to work and meet. In Vermont not a single Lodge continued its work. The Grand Lodge of Maine ceased to meet for several years. 'fhe Grand Lodge of New York with its 480 Lodges had but 90 Lodges left. The newly formed Lodge of Illinois succumbed. This anti-masonic feeling extended chiefly to the cities and larger towns in .the west. The Grand Lodge of Missouri felt its effects severely. Missouri Lodge No.1, the oldest and strongest Lodge, went down, surrendering its charter October S, 1833, and remained quiescent for ten year~ But the Grand Lodge weathered this storm of fanaticisn1 vlith the loss of only one annual Communication, that of 1835. Several Masonic writers claim that this disastrous result on Lodges by the anti-masonic crusade, was due to the popularity and rapid growth of Freemasonry up to 1826. In this popularIty, much unworthy material came into the Fraternity, which not only reflected discredit upon Freemasonry, but \vhen the storIn broke, this class of Freeluason, hot having the courage to withstand the attack, broke for shelter to the di~-:;颅 credit of the Fraterniy. The路 'anti-masonic propaganda was popular and seetued tn be winning the day, but, 路it is no\v only existing as a faint malodorous event out of which Freelnasonry emerged triumphant. THE RITUAL.

The origin and evolution of our Ritual is an intricate, possibly, utlsolvdble problem, yet \vithal, an interesting one. The three Lodges that entered into the formation of our Grand Lodge were 0'拢 Tennessee origin, yet this does not imply that the Tennessee Ritual "vas used. The charter mernbers of these Lodges came from many states; Pennsylvania, Virginia and Kentucky predominated. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania was the first in the field, and chartered two or Inore Lodges, -357-


yet while these Lodges went do\vn, many of the sGl:me men became charter meulbers of the new Lodges. The influence of Pennsylvania and Virginia was potent in the Grand Lodge for twenty years. This is sho\vn in its jurisprudence and nomenclature. One of the early Grand Masters addressed the Gran:; Lodge, as "Ancient York 11asons," an expression peculiar to Pennsylvania. Our early Grand Masters came fronl Virginia, and \vere Virginia-made 11asons. The .influence of Kentucky "ras no small factor as expressed in GrandMaster Carnegy. Two of Otlr Grand Secretaries, v.rho were kno\vn for their zeal, came from Maryland and one. of the early Grand Lecturers and Grand Secretaries came from Delaware, and Brother Billon, vvhose services in the Grand Lodge, possibly exceeded all others, vvas a Pennsylvanian. In-1840, the Grand Lodge requested a learned Brother fron1 Virginia tocon1e and give a course of lectures. In 1843, the Grand Lecturer vvas withdrawn and all instruction i.n the Ritual stopped, until a Committee consisting of Carnegy and Foster returned from Baltilnore, where a convention路 of Grand I.fodgeshad been called to secure a uniformity of Work. This Committee in 1844 reconlmended the adoption of. the Baltimore Convention Work with one exception. This work vlith one. exception, continued in use until 1863. What this Convention Work ~ras, no one now living knows. This Convention ,vas attended by representatives fromN. H., R. T., N.Y., Md., D. C., N. C., S. C., Ga., Ala., Fla., Tenn., Ohio, Mo., and La. It \vill be observed that Pa., Vir., and路 Ky., v,ere not represented in this Convention. This fact may explain. why a part of the Baltimore work路 "vas not adopted. The Committee recommended the adoption of the Convention Wark, except the second section of the Master's Degree. Why? The answer to it \vould solve the riddle. A 路few suggestions may point the \;vay.Pa. and Va. have always been closely allied Masonically. The n1ajority of the I../odgesthat formed the Grand Lodge of Virginia were chartered by Pennsylvania. The second section -358-


of the Master's Degree in the Pennsylvania Work differs very much from the salne section in other Grand Lodges. Pennsylvania and Virginia were not a party to the Convention Work. With this evidence,.路 it is not unreasonable to suppose that the early Ritual of Missouri was to a great extent that of Pennsylvania and Virginia. The .refusal to adopt. the second section of the Master's Degree of the Convention Work, was evidently based upon too radical a change in th(;l.t practiced from the formation of the Grand Lodge. .The influence of Pennsylvania is also shown in the use of the "Ahiman Rezon," instead of the Anderson Constitution of 1723. But in 1851, Cross' Masonic Chart and hieroglyphic 11onitor, and Anderson's Constitution were adopted. At this period Anthony O'S'ullivan, one of the greatest characters in the history of the Grand Lodge appeared. As Grand Secretary and Grand Lecturer, matters began to路 take a different shape. Fron1 the time of his entrance, down through Gouley, and finally through the hands of that master builder of a Ritual, Allan McDowell, the evolution of our路 Ritual was completed. The present form of our Ritual, its .directness, .its clearness of expression, the beauty and simplicity of its diction, came chiefly from the hands of Allan McDowell. The story of our Ritual, of which only faint traces can be obtained from the records, is a "wil1-of-the-wisp," yet its genealogy is. doubtless as herein framed. GRAND MASTERS.

Tlie records of the Grand .Lodge show that seventy-seven Brethren are listed as having served as Grand l\1:aster. 路This is an error as only seventy-six,..in the past one hundred years, have been elected, installed, and presided as 'Grand Master. In 1834 Brother A.B. Chambers was elected GrandMaster. He was not present at his election, was never installed, and it does not appear' that he was present in the Grand Lodge after his .election. There was 110 session of_the G~and ~odge in -359-


1835. M. W. Brother Sinclair Kirtley \vas elected Grand Master in 1833, he held over until 1836, when Brother Stephen W. B. Carnegy was elected Grand Master. M. W. Brother Kirtley should be credited vvith three years' service instead of one and the name of Brother A. D. Chambers removed from the list of Grand Masters. It is of interest to note the nativity, occupation or profession, and positions held by the Grand Masters. The records show that twenty were native born, thirteen were born in Virginia, nine unknown, six in Kentucky, four in Ohio, four in Illinois, three in Pennsylvania, three in England, two in Maryland, two in N ew York, two in Tennessee, one in New Hampshire, one in Indiana,one in the District of Columbia, one in South Carolina, one in Connecticut, one in Iowa, and one in Alabama... The early Grand Masters were chiefly from Virginia. The first native son appeared in 1861, then not again until 1873. Of late years thenun1ber of native sons has rapidly increased. The professions or occupations have been varied. As expected, the lawyers lead with thirty-two, nine profession unknown, fifteen were business men, ten physicians, four Ministers of the Gospel, two editors, one a historian, one an engineer, and three bankers. Of this list t"vo were路 Governors, seven Judges of the Circuit Court, six Judges on the Supreme Bench, one Attorney General.in Lincoln's Cabinet, one Congressman. While thirty-two of the Grand Masters have been lawyers, and in the face of the fact. that many of the Grand Masters were, at some time jn their career, members of the State Legislature, yet the general morale has been good, owing to the aperient and hygienic effect of the presence of ten doctors, while the four ministers of the Gospel have been the little leven that has rendered the whole batch wholesome and sweet. -360-


JURISPRUDENCE.

While Masonic Jurisprudence was well established at the organization of the Grand Lodge, as evidenced by the first Constitution and By-Laws adopted, yet new conditions arose as the years .passed on, new legislation and new interpretations of existing legislation became necessary, until we have, to-day, that "rhich nlight be termed a finished product. By the process of evolution from primitive law there has arisen a nearly perfect jurisprudence. It is clearly evident in our records that often, too much unimportant legislation was enacted, all of which was gradually eliminated. The men who stand out preeminently in the first century of the history of the Grand Lodge, in developing the jurisprudence as we have it to-day, are Edward Bates, N. B. Tucker, H. R. Gamble, Anthony O'Sullivan, Samuel H. Ovvens, Noah ]VI. Givan, William M. Williams, Dorsey A.Jamison,.and A. 路M. Hough. THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MASONIC TIDE.

The unprecedented growth, and influx, not only in the Lodges, but into all grades of Freemasonry in the past three years, has caused the members of the Fraternity to think, wonder and inquire into the cause, and attempt to analyze its effect upon the future. Some have looked upon this rapid growth with alarm, while others have rejoiced and exclaimed, "The more Masons, the better it will be." It must not be forgotten that there is a vast difference between making men Freemasons, and making rrren members of a Masonic Lodge. It cannot be disputed that there are many good men vvho ought to be Freemasons, and the entrance of such,means much to the Fraternity. But in this onrush, as has occurred in the last few years, we must not forget the old saying, "A pig's tail will not make a whistle." The trem"endotls tidal wave that has been sweeping toward Freemasonry" necessarily has carried路 with it much driftwood, foam, and dross. This tidal wave has, unfortuna"tely, taken on the booming, hip-hurrah .spirit, and men have been carried -361-


away by it. The anchor of "My ovvn freewill and accord," in many instances was thrown overboard and cut off, and the good old ship, Freemasonry, carried away on the tide. Admitting all of this, there is no cause for alarm, as matters always adjust themselves and a proper level will be obtained. History is merely repeating herself, and he who r~ads the lessons and studies the philosophy of history approaches the future with fortitude and hope. This tidal wave reached its n1aximum about January 1, 1921, ana that a recession is 110\JV going on, is apparent to all. S'ome attribute this recession to the qction of the Grand Lodge· requiring each petitioner for the Mysteries to pay twenty dollars to the Masonic HOlne. Others see in it but the natural lavv of a calm, foIlo\ving a storn1. Is it because of the t\venty dollar requiren1ent, or is it a natural recession following such an influx? \\That does the history of Freelnasonry, and of our own Grand Lodge offer on this. question? As previously stated under the head of the Anti-Masonic excitelnent, many sincere students of Freelnasonry attribute that disaster to the abnormal growth prior to 1826 and much of it was attributed to bad n1aterial that gained entrance into the Fraternity. In the history of our Grand Lodge, we find .that at the first annual Communication held at the close of the Civil War, in 1866, the membership of the Grand Lodge was 9,558, vvith 225 Lodges. In· the six years following, at· the annual Con1munication of 1873, the membership had .grown to 25,120 and the· Lodges had increased to 470. ·1n six years the membership had increased one hundred and sixty-two per cent ana the number of Lodges had increased ninety per cent. The annual increase for these six years averaged more .th·an fifteen per cent, while the phenominalincrease of 1920 was only eleven per cent. This high tide ended \vith 1872, a rapid recession set in and low tide "vas reached in 1877 with a membership of 21,346, a loss of 3,774. It was not until 1884, a period ---362-


of twelve years, before the melubership again equalled that of 1873, with 25,509 luelnbers.A tidal wave extending over six years, an influx greater in its aggregate than that of 19181920. The recession of six years showed a loss of fifteen per cent of the membership and then a slow recovery to 1884. In the face of these facts, what of the lovv tide that is to follow? The .influx at the close of the· Civil War ·was identical with the causes that produced the tidal wave of 1918 to 1921. The recession froll1 1872 to 1878 could not have been due to higher fees, Masonic. Home tax or to any 1~.gis1ation of the Grand Lodge, but it was entirely due to a falling off of the petitions for the ll1ysteries, dimissions and· suspensions. Many were carried into Freen1asonry by the boom following the Civil War~ These did not find Freelnasonry congenial, they mistook it. for. a mere social organization, a club, a selfish goodfellowship. This drift vvood,· this foam, dropped off and was left on the shore. Suspensions and dimissions were easy modes of egress. Froln 1866 to 1872 the grovvth ip. Lodges was 201 with a loss only of five Lodges. In. the six years· of recession, the increase in Lodges was only ninety-t\vO and from 1882 to 1884 ,only eight. More than double the ntunber of Lodges '\i\Tere organized during high tide than during the ebb. The arrest of. charters forthe ten years following 1872 was nearly ten times as great as that £1"01111866 to 1872. What story adorns this tale? Grand Master Vincil, in 1869, in prophetic vision"saw the coming decadence and sounded analarln.. Grand Master Garrett in 1873, predicted a lO"\N tide wherihe stated that too many newly made J\ilasonsvvere, "Like a chHdwith a· rattle, or tickled bya ·straw, . follo\ved bya Masonic dry rot.. ".. Grand Master . t \nderson,· in 1874, advocated' "Sanitary measures," for the Lodges, bothmorally·andphysically. Grand Master Luke, ill·1875,vvhen the recession was in··· full swing gives agraphic report of the demoralized condition of the Craft. He characterized the Fraternity as overrun with "..~ luxuriant growth 01 \\Teeds." He condemned the converting .of Lodge rooms -363-


into mere social entertaintnents and debaucheries. That some o£ the Lodge room floors were covered with dirty sa\vdust interspersed with cigar stumps and toba~co, and the . ~tairways leading to the hall were so rickety, that he wondered ho\v many of the men1bers hurrying from a nearby saloon. could navigate them, either up or down. The records show that the number ·of men raised to the Degree of Master Masons had dropped from 2,000 to 613,_ arid Grand -Master Luke ren1arked, "That decent men did not care to join such places." Itis in1possible for history to. repeat herself in all these phases. The Fraternity has made wonderful stride in a higher standard of mor(;l.lity and character and equipment of our Masonic Halls, and there will not be so. great a. recession from the high ideals of the Fraternity. Yet, the ebbing of the tide has begun and the boom spirit is gradually receeding, low tide is approaching, but it will not be due to fees, or 'Masonic Home tax. It is but following a natural law of activity and rest, the boom .and its collapse. \;Yill the recession be as great ·as that in 1873? No, the number of suspensions and ditnissions will increase; the nU111ber of petitioners vlill decrease; the drift wood "rill· lodge on the sand banks, although the extraneous Societies that" have attached themselves to Freemasonry, will hold" in the Fraternity some of the vvaste and·" foam, put the current of the .stream of Freemasonry willfiow on within {ts banks, purer than ever and a low tide· may prove a blessing in disguise. CIVIL WAR.

The history of the Grand Lodge during the Civil War, as told in these pages, is of absorbing interest. No one can co~­ si,der .the conditions existing during· this period of civil and political rancor and bitterness, and not wonder how Freemasonry in.Missouri, of which the Grand Lodge was its exponent, could have survived. Yet, it stood the. test. Not an annual Communication ,vas missed. The Grand Lodge sur-364~


vivedand emerged from the stornl of contending passions·into a purer and better life. \Vas it a Divine· Hand guiding the destinies of Freemasonry? Civil and State governments were rent·· asunder, the Church became divided, but Freemasonry stood solid, undivided and majestic. Not only in our own State, but everywhere, between the North and the South, the hand of Freemasonry was extended· in fraternal grasp" while the echoes of contending armies were fading in the distance. V\Tould it seem presumptuous to say that Freemasonry is -Divine? The doctrine of the Fatherhood of God and the Brother~_ hood of Man bears the Divine mark, even if the instruments or organization that should bear it onward and upward to an endless day, are human and frail. 11en may thwart, men n1ay tear down, but above and behind the wreck· and chaos is revealed the Divine po\ver, superintending and controlling, to one end and purpose, the .reign of His Kingdon1 in the hearts of men. If Freemasonry is of God it will stand. If of man it will fall. TH~ FUTUR~.

In the onward march of civilization, in the upward tread to..: \Nard a higher standard of morality and ethics, for the enlightenment of humanity, I see a greater and more influential future· for 1Iasonry than at any period ·of the past. 'The Mason of to-day cares .less, far less, for the non-essential, but more for the essential. The martinet of steps, grips and words is· rapidly disappearing, bu! the student of the life· of Masonry is increasing; the Mason of the future', will care still less for idle speculation. He ,vill believe and practice that" humanity needs less of abstract philosophical cob-webs, but more of cheer; less of Egyptian Rites, now mummified, but· more .of good will; less imaginary· symbolism, hut more. of love. Starting vvith love to God, he must end in love to man. He will pay less "tithes· of ;nint and anise and cummin," but more attention to the weightier matters : mercy, faith and charity. He


,vill recognize 1110re fully the beautiful life and doctrine of Him who was set as a "Plumb line in the midst of my people .. Israel."

The doctrine of hearts made lighter and of lives made brighter, will outlive all abstract speculation, all official distinction, all self aggrandizement. The Mason of the future ,vin worry and \vrite less· over what may constitute the "ancient landmarks," but he will live and believe the three essential landmarks; Faith in God ; Hope in immortalitY,and the daily application of the Golden Rule. He will kno'v that..:."GeJd is a Father, Man isa Brother, The Earth is our 11other. Life is a mission and not a career. Knightship is service, His Scepter is gladness, The Least is the Greatest, Saving is dyingGiving is livingLife is Eternal and Love is its Essence."

,The unseen player on the golden harp of Masonry has touched a sweeter chord; its notes speak of love, •of joy, of gladness; \,vhose harmonies will touch the heart of this cold, selfish ,varld. Its seraphic sweetness will be carried, as on the wings of the" morning, to the uttermost parts of the earth; to hamlet and palace; to the rich and to the poor; that it will rollback in a mighty chorus from royal men, repeating the angelic song of Bethlehem's Plains :""Glory to God in the Highest, peace 011 earth, good-will to men."

-366--


In conclusion, may I be permitted to paraphrase Longfellovv's "Launching of the Ship" by saying: S'ail on, oh, Freetnasonry, thou Ship of State ! Sail on, Oh, Brotherhood, strong and great! e know what Master laid thy keel, What Cr<:tftsmenwrought thy ribs of steel, What anvils rang, "vhat hammers beat, In what a forge and \vhat a heat '\Tere shaped the anchors of our hope. Fear not each sudden sound and shock, 'Tis of the wave and not the rock; 'Tis but the flapping of the sail, And not a rent made by the gale! In spite of rock or tempest"s roar, In spite of false lights路 on the shore, Sail on, nor fear to breast. the. sea! . Our hearts, our hopes, are路alIwith thee. Our hearts,ourhopes, our prayers, our tears, Our Faith triumphant o'er our fears, Are all with thee-are all with thee.

'''I

-367-


] ewish Hospital.

Hospital. Old People's Quarter. THE MASO IC HOME as it now appears, 1921. On the left is the ]e\路ish Ho pital and ground recently purchased. On the right i the Admini tration Building with the Children's quarters.

Admini tration Building.


A History OF THE

Masonic Home of, Missouri From its Inceptio~ to th~Pre~e~t.

-----.--------

FOR THE COMMITTEE BY

DavidM. Wilson Past Grand Master

1921.


History of the Masonic Home One of the sweetest as well as one of' the dearest of all the words in our language is Honle. Around and about it cluster and are entwined the tend.erest elnotions of the human heart, and onr fondest and 1110st cherished recollections, for it is founded on love, and without love a true home 路cannot be. I-lome calls to the uTind of the young a mother, a father, sister, brother; to that of the middleaged. and old, wife, husband, S011, daughter. Upon it rests the safety and the permanency of' the state. The poet has sung- that be it ever so humble there is 110 place likeholne, and no truer saying" \vas ever nttered. I have been asked to vVTite the history of a hOlne-of a Missouri home-of a hanle to \vhich today luore than ninety thollsand good men and true of this great state 'of ours point with an honest pride----The lV1asonic Honle of1Vlissouri. It is with pleasure that I now address myself to this pleasant duty.

It was during the Annual Communication ot the Grand Lodge held'in St. Louis, in 1881, and, at", its closing session, to be exact, on October 13th, 1881, that Bros. Henry",B. Butts of Perseverance Lodge No. 92, Louisiana, Mo., and George M. DeGrote of Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas ;City, offered the following resolution: "RESOL"\TED: That a co~nn1ittee of three be appointed by this Grand Lodge to consider the propriety and practicability of establish ing an &Tndustrial lion1 e' for' thevvidows and, orphans. of d_ec'eased members, said comnlittee to report at the next Annual Communi... cation of the Grand Lodge"

1'he resolution \vas adopted and Grand Master Stubblefield appointed as the committee, Bros. Butts, DeGroteand W. H. Mayo.

-370-


A year later E1882) the conlmittee reported that they had been unable to mature any plan by which could be carried out the establishment of the institution suggested. Believing, however, the subject to be \vorthy of consideration and to avoid hasty action, they recommended that the committee be continued to' report the next year, and this being adopted, at .their instance Past Grand Masters Cadle and Vincil were added to the committee. When the Grand Lodge met in 1883 the committee reported that the other Masonic Bodies . had also appointe4 sinlilar cOlumittees, and the Grand Lodge 'Committee was continued to conf'er with them. At the Annual Communication in 1884 Grand Master Hall in his address referred to the fact that there was a surplus on hand, and he recommended that each Lodge be given· back the one-third of what it had paid in. The Grand Lodge, however, did not take kindly to this suggestion, but acting on the request of the committee set that sum aside as a fund to aid in the establishment of a ·Home. And the incoming Grand Master was authorized to appoint a special committee "in whose hands the fund was to be placed" ..to be invested by then1 in ready cash convertible securities, and with power to frame and adopt rules atId regulations for the· management of the Home, which "must have in view toa great degree, the ultimate perpetuity of said Home on ·a. self-sustaining plan." But owing to the fact .that at the same meeting ·the Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer and the ChaOft;.. man of the Ways and Means· Committee had been constitute<l a standing Board of· Finance, and instructed to· invest all sums of money in excess of fifteen hundred dollars over and above the. an10unt necessary to nleet the annual'expenditure uf the Grand Lodge. as estimated by the Committee on Ways and Means, in 'United States, State or Municipal Bonds, Grand Master Stevenson did not .app'oint

-371___


this Special Committee until the Grand Lodge met in 1885. He then appointed Bros. C. C. Woods, "N. M. Givan, A."M. Dockery, T. P. Dyer, L.C. Krauthoff, R. E. Anderson, J. D. Vinci! and Joseph S. Browne as the Committee on Masonic Home, to which on motion of1VI. W. Bro. Browne} Grand Master Stevenson was added. This committee lost. no time getting to work. The next day they reported that a permanent organization had been, effected by the election ofM. W. Bro. Wood as Chairman,' M. W. Bro. Stevenson as Vice-Chairman, and \V. Bro. Krauthoff as Secretary. They recommended that the committee "be empowered to make a thorough examination of the question; to visit similar institutions in other jurisdictions; to ascertain what propositions can be received; to investigate the merits of "the several offers so made; to see what, if anY,change in the act of incorporation of this Grand Lodge will" be required, to permit this undertaking, and generally to gather all other information tha~l11ay be of interest in the" prenlises."

The recommendCition was approved and the' report adopted. Ere this the reader will have. noticed路 no .doubt the change, tha,t had b~en silently, going. on in the minds of those 'Yho were back, of the movement. At first it 'vas, to be an indus..: trial home, and it was to be for the widows and. Qi'phaps only. Then the industrial feature was made less prom~nen~, to' be finally dropped. Later on the Home was' to be for indigent Masons as. well as路 for the widows an~ orphans~ Just when these changes. ca111e about isuncer~aill, but, probably the more the matter was talked o~~r a broader, vie\v ,vas taken, and gradually the . changes gr~'YV in and in time were adopted though the Grand Lodg~, . proceedings make no note of them. ' , .Soon afte~ the com111ittee was organize9- a circular l~~ter ,vas prepared and, sent out to the lodges to see tovv:h~.t e:x;tent contributions vvould be made. By the time Grand

favor

-372-


Lodge nlet in l886 contributions amounting to $300 had been paid and $18,525 pledged in installments. In December, 1885, four of the committee visited and inspected. the Orphans' Home at Louisville, Kentu·cky. This visit ,vas both pleasant and profitable. In May, 1886, the Annual Meetings of the Grand Commandery and Grand Chapter vvere attended, and a memorialpresented to each body. The Grand Commandery pledged its substantial aid, and the Grand Chaptercontributed $500. As the Special Act of the Legislature incorporating the Grand Lodge, approved by Governor Hamilton R. Gamble, a Past Grand Master of our Grand Lodge, contained no provision for the ~establishment and maintenance of a Masonic Home of any kind, and as all special legislation .of that character was forbidden by the Constitution of 1875) and as the committee had been directed to take the necessary steps to make the Honle a legal body, Articles of Association were drawn up, signed and filed in the Circuit Court of St. Louis City, and on the 28th day of June" 1886, by the decree of that Court the signers became a. legally organized corporation under the nanle Masonic Home of Missouri, the objects being: "To establish and maintain a Home for indigent Masons of Missouri, and for resident' needy widows. and orphans of deceased Masons, and to . receive by donation, devise, bequest, gift or purchase, and to hold such property, and conduct st;lch ." bU$ine,ss as may be necessary for the successful maintenance of. said H()m~."

In February, 1908, these· articles w:ere changed· so .as to admit "Indigent Masons of' Missouri.and their wives and needy widows and orphans of deceased Masons of this state, and needy members of the Order of the Eastern Star." It was further 'provided in the Articles that the membership Qf the corporation should consist solely of thirteen Master Masons in good. standing and members of'·· Missouri Lodges; that the sign,ers of the Articles, R. E. Anderson, --373-


J.

S. Browne, Reuben Barney, A. M. Dockery, T. P. Dyer) Erwin Ellis, N. M. Givan, L. C. Krauthoff, W. H. Mayo, R. F. Stevenson, F.]. Tygard, J. D. Vinci! and C. C. Woods should constitute the first Board of Directors until a'etober 12th, 1886, and until their res.pective successors .were elected and assumed their duties; that their successors should. be chosen in three classes, two of four each and one of five, and for the term of one, two and three years, and that thereafter the designated number of new members should be annually elected for the term of three years by the Grand Lodge; that the officers should -consist of a President,oIlfaVice-President, a Treasurer, a Secretary, a Superintendent, the first three of which must. be members of the Board" and such subordinate officers as may be provided from tim~ to time by the Board, all ·to be elected fOf the term afone year, unless a shorter time was. specified at the tim·e of election ; and that C. C. Woods should be President; R. F. ·Stevenson, Vice-President; F. J. Tygard, Treasurer, andL.C. Krauthoff, Secretary, until the election of their successors.. But this was by no means all that had been done. A most gloriousi· achievement remains yet to be told. In 1883, the Grand Encampment .0£ Knights Templar of the United States voted to hold its 23rd Triennial Conclave at St. Louis. To prepare for its reception. and entertainment the Grand Commandery of Missouri at its Annual Conclave in May, 1884, created a Triennial.Committee. -This committee composed of twenty-two knights, organized by electing as its chairmanM.. W. Bro. John Rolph Parson, a Past Grand Commander. Filled with an undying love for the Home, Bro... Parsoll conceived the idea of setting apart one. day during. the' meeting of" the Grand Encampment, fixed later as Wednesday, September 21st, 1886, as Charity Day, to celebrate it in the old Fairgrounds, to charge an admission fee, and to place the entire net -374-


proceeds at the disposal of the Grand Lodge to aid in the establis.hing of the Home. Under his magnetic leadership the committee fired with zeal and enthusiasm carried the scheme through. to a most successful conclusion. The day was a beautiful one. There were drills by crack drill corps of a number of Commanderiesfrom other states, and· a concert given by . a grand band made up of the visiting bands and comprising over two thousand instruments. Visitors and resident Masons of the city, with their families, attended in large numbers, and after all bills were paid there was turned over the munificent sum of $35,114., which became the nucleus of the Endowment Fund, and will be forever known and distinguished. as the Knights Templar Fund. In closing·his address in 1886 to the Grand Lodge, Grand . Master Boyd expressed the hope that "May the time soon come when her widows and orphans shall find a Home for their torn and bleeding hearts" and a sweet resting place for their tired, weary feet.'; . The report of the Committee on Masonic Home,- to be found printed in full in the Appendix to the Proceedings of 1886, pp. 231-236, after reciting what had been done during the past year, gave it as their opinion that the time had come when the Grand Lodgeshoulq do all in its power to establish the long wished and hoped far Rame, andrecommended that appropriate measures to that end be taken. Their report was presented on the afternoon of the second day and was discussed at consid.erable length. A· mationto defer its further consideration until the nextAnnual Communication ·was lost, the vote standing· 445 ·Lodge and 125 individual votes against to 90 Lodge and 16 individual votes for the motion, and the report was then adopted by an almost unanimous vote. Tnenext day at the morning.session

-375-


the Grand Lodge proceeded to elect the BC?ard of' Directors, and the follo\ving were chosen: Rufus E. Anderson, Joseph S. Browne, Trusten P. Dyer, Alexander M. Dockery, N oahM. Givan, 路Satnuel ~1. Kennard, Louis' C. I(rauthoff,

William H. Mayo, John R.Parson, John Q. Roach, Flavius ]. Tygard, John D. Vincil, Charles C. Woods.

The Board was instructed to confine its labors for the eD-suing year to soliciting contributions and bequests, to

investigating claims for the site of the Home and plans. for buildings and the maintenance, governnlentand control of the Home, disseminating all possible infornlation upon the subject, and in general, to carefully consider the whole question, even to minutest details, no investment in lands or buildings to be made. The Board reported for information before' Grand Lodge \vas closed that it had organized by electi~g NoahM. Givan, President; John R. Parson, Vice-President; F. J. Tygard,Treasurer;T. P. Dyer, Secretary,and'C'. C. Woods, Superintendent; that lots had then been cast, and to Bros. Dockery, Mayo, Parson, Roach and Vincil had fallen the three year term, to Bros. Browne, Givan, Krauthoffand Vinci! the two year term, and to Bros. Anderson, Dyer, Kennard and Tygard, the one year. The Grand Lodge, then pledged out of the securities then on ha.nd the sum of $10,000 for the Home. During the next twelve nlonths little more was, done than mark time. However, an appeal was printed and circulated, resulting in quite a number of voluntary pledges being received, thesuDscriptions, donations from the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter, with the Charity Day receipts, totaling up\vards of $70,000, some $50,000 of which 路路路was available for immediate use; and the President of the Board was of the opinion that with one-half' of the assets


property could be secured which would be suitable and ans\ver every purpose of the Home for a fe"v years. -The following November, the Board held a meeting at which offers of donations from several localities were received" the most liberal money proposition coming from the citizens of Liberty, Mo., but no 路final action "vas taken until the Grand Lodge' met in 1888, when by the unanimous vote of eleven of the directors, all that were present, the Board. determined that the Honle should be located at or near St. Louis. In so deciding there is no question but that the Board and the Grand Lodge acted wisely and well. To their minds location involved not simply the present benefits to the Home, but its permanent prosperity and success. In arriving at their decision they took into account these things.. The Home ought to be locate<l where it could, be easily visited by the largest number of Masons; where the"Grand "Bodies could visit, it at their annual sessions; where there were the best of facilities for educating and caring f'or its inmates; \vhere in emergencIes, money could be easily raised; 'where the' greatest advantages were offered for finding employment for the young, as well as where there were the greatest opportunities for their engaging in business when they leave the Home, and these things\vere,wisely considered to~ be of far greater ~0rrIent tnan ,any ofter of money for a location whichdiduDtpossess, 'these advantages. 'The time was now at hand when a decision ha9 to be made as to the exact location of the Home. In or near St. Louis 'it must be, and finally the choice narrowed down' to two, one a forty acre tract,in "St. , Louis County, near Webster Groves, to be had fnr $50,000; the other a fifteen acre tract on the outskirts of the city, west of Union Avenue, and<f~t1tting Delmar Boulevard, on the" north, "and p.hced at, $40;000. The scales were quite evenly balanced between'" the two} if indeed not inclined to the forty aC,re -377-


tract, when three of the directors proposed that if the fifteen acre tract was chosen, and at any time \vithinfive years the Board wanted to dispose of it, they would take it off their hands and pay then1 what they had paid for it, with six per cent interest This carried the day, and the fifteen acre tract ~as bought," but the three directors were never called on to make their offer. good and take over the property. There was on it a large two story brick residence with mansard roof, and a good sized barn. There was also a fine garden and a vineyard. Von Versen Avenue had not been opened then, and there was a splendid apple orchard on the north portion of" the tract. A little more than eleven years thereafter, on the 18th day of July, 1900, 203 feet off the west side of the original tract, running north from Delmar Boulevard almost 422 feet to Von Versen Avenue was sold to the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis for $16,500, $5,000 cash路路 and the balance in three notes, two for $4,000 each, due January 1st and April 1st, 1901, and one for $3,500 due July 1st, 1901. In January, 1903, two and a half years later, the nine acres lying north of Von Versen Avenue was sold to Washington University for $50,000 cash, and on which was built Smith Academy. The buildings and grounds. having now been acquired, next in order was the selecting of a Superintendent and ' Matron. This important .duty was delegated by the Board to its members residing in St.路 Louis. Their choice was as happy as the location of the Home had been wise. It fell upon Dr. Morris. I-Ieftwich and his good wife, Ella. He was a graduate of the University of\Tirginia and of Bellevue Hospital College, Ne\vYork. He "vas atone tin1e an assistant surgeon in the United States army. He was mad.e a Master Mason,. in Wakanda Lodge, No. 52, Carrollton, Mo., and served as its. Master for two years. On moving to St. Louis he affiliated with Occidental Lodge -378-


THE :NIANSION. Purchased by the Board of Directors for a Masonic

HOl11e.

It is described

011

page 211, in the History.


No. 163. He continued to serve the Home as Superintendent for ten years, vvhen ill health 路forced him to resign. I t has been well said of him: "It was in the discharge of this office that he impressed the traits of his character upon Masons of Missouri in the exhibition of wonderful executive ability, a kind and sympathetic heart,patience, forbearance and perseverance, so essential to the discharge of the duties of the office. A,S a result the Masonic Home of Missouri became to the widow and orphan a 'Home' in the true sense of the word. The bright and cheerful countenances of the children looked up to him as a father. His kind words, his sympathetic and tender conduct towards them was indelibly stamped upon the hearts. of the many orphans who were inmates of the lIolne during his administration."

FIe and his wife took possession of the Home April 1st, 1889. On the 15th of the following June, the Home was dedicateq and 'consecrated with . solemn ceremonies by the . offieers of the Grand Lodge. It was a day most memorable in "the .annals of Missouri Masonry. It was the month of roses, and nature had arrayed herself in beauteous attire. Her smiles were e'verywhere;The sky was clear and blue and the gentle breezes carried sweet odors. 路The spacious grounds were thronged with fair ladies and their escorts. 1~he exercises took place in. the afternoon. Vocal music was rendered at appropriate intervals. The Master of Cerenl0nies introduced the Mayor of the City,whoresponded in an address of .welcome. ]udgeGivan .. presented the Home for dedication and it was received by the Grand Master, James Perry Woods. Then followed the solemn and impressive ceremonies of dedication and consecration. The orator of the day was M. W. ,Bro. Xenophon Ryland. The Chairman of' the Committee on Arrangements was of course M.W. Bro. Parson. Securing the aido拢 the twenty-nine lodges in .St.路 Louis ,City and. County he had a large.tent put up in the grounds, .in which each lodge hadta.bles and -379-


assisted by the Sisters of the Eastern Star served refreshments. 1'he proceeds amounting to over $7,000 was turned over to the Home. So far the Home had depended for its support and maintenance solely on voluntary contributions. At the Annual Communication of 1890, Bro. Leslie O'Rear, of Marshall, offered an amendment to the by-laws by adding a new section, requiring each chartered lodge to pay to the Grand Lodge for the benefit of the Home hfty cents for each Master Mason reported as a member, except those \vhose d,ues had been remitted for good cause. It was taken up and discussed at the last day's session, and its further consideration postponed until the next annual communication. At this time a special committee of five, consisting of M. W. Bros. Boyd and Dockery and Bros. Geo. W.peatherage, L. B. Valliant and Erwin Ellis, was appointed to report upon the interests of the Home. In their report they recommended in substance the O'Rear Amendment as a substitute to Sec. 21, Art. 16, the section as amended to read as follows: "Every Chartered Lodge under this jurisdiction shall annually pay to the Grand Lodge the sum of One Doilar for each Master J\.1ason returned as a member in the annual returns except those whose dues have been for good cause remitte<J, one-half of which sum shall be for the Masonic Home, unless the Grand Lodge otherwise orders."

This portion of the report gave rise to a very animated discussion with the opposing forces very· evenly divided. A vote by Lodge was. ordered. The total vote cast .was 1,565, the majority in favor 39. The 'vote was as follows. Aye. Lodge Vote Individual Vote

No. to

•••

535 267

Lodge Vote Individual Vote

802

625 138 763

A motion then made to adopt the report as a whole was carried unanimously. -380-


Following thi~ action the Board at the same session decided to open the Home for Indigent Masons. To carry this out it became necessary to build a house away from the children, as there was no room in the Home as it then was for them.. Accordingly a good substantial brick building was erected on a stone foundation, containing eighteen rooms.. A new kitchen w'as also built, the total cost of the improvenlents being a little over $5,300. As we have seen, Dr. Leftwich and his wife moved into the Home April 1st, 1889, and it was. dedicated June 15th following. At that time and for SOUle two, years after\vards, the Home was practically in the country, and the only transportation to it was the narrow gauge railroad that ran qn what is now the Hodiamont Street Car Tracks. Up to the meeting of the Grand Lodge in October, 1890, twenty-five had been admitted.. Of these, twelve were girls, seven were boys, five were widows and one 路wasa maiden lady., Their ages ranged from four to seventy. Fifteen of the children were going to school. Just when the first came the records do not disclose, but it was probably not before the Fall of 1889, as the report shows that twenty-five had been admitted during the year, none of whom had died or been discharged. And the good matron had not been idle.. She had her heart set on having an organ. So there being no money in the treasury for that purpose, she sent out路 a circular letter to the Lodges asking for a mite from each. One hundred and forty-five responded, enabling her not only to buy the organ and song books, but to turn over one hundred dollars to the general fund. During the next year fifteen more were admitted, the total number in October, 1901, being thirty-eight; eighteen were girls,路 eleven boys, eight widows and one maiden lady; two were from the city and thirty-six from country lodges. And it was easier getting down town and back, for the -381-


Lindell Electric Road which passed the front gate, "enables us" to reach Broadway and Washington Avenue in thirty-eight minutes." To 'show the growth of the Home and how it increased in membership the follo\-ving table has been prepared: Year. Girls. 1890 , . . . . . . .. 12 1891 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 18 1892 27 1893 .. \ 30 1894... .. . . .. 32 1895 ". . . . . . . . 43 1896 ".â&#x20AC;˘ . .. . . . . .. 50 1897 " 52 1898 " 51 1899 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 1900 51 1901. . . . . . . . . . . .. 55 1902.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 1903 .. " 39 1904 43 1905 39 1906 , 42 1907 ".. â&#x20AC;˘ . . . . . 33 1908.. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. 38 1909 " 33 1910 .. 30 1911 31 33 1912. . . . . . . . . . . . 1913... . . .. . . . .. 37 1914. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 1915 ' 50 1916 " 54 1917. . . . . . . . . . . .. 51 57 1918. . . . . . . . 1919 57 '1

II

q

H

1'''

1920

"

"

71

Boys. 7 11 19 22 19 28 33 33 27 26 26 32 35 30 36 39 43 40 39

37 40 32 30 31 33 42 42 41 35 44

Old I.Jadies. Old Men.. Total. 6 25 9 38 14 3 63 15 5 72 14 5 75 13 7 91 12 9 104 17 22 124 16 13 107 20 19 117 22 20 119 21 21 129 27 32 139 32 34 135 33 34 146 34 34 146 33 39 157 31 37 141 40 39 156 49 40 159 48 33 . 151 52 39 154 61 52 176 66 58 192 73 70 ~14 77 83 252 77 85 258 88 104 284 89 105 286 91 97 289

49

89

96

309

From the above it will be seen that the number passed thelOOth in 1896; the 150th in 1906; the 200th in 1914; the 250th in 1915, and the 300th in 1920. That up to 1905 the -382-


girls always outnumbered the boys, and in 1905 they w!ere even-39 each. That from 1906 to 1912 the boys outnumbered the girls, when the g.irls again forged ahead, and have been ahead ever since. It also appears that up to 1908 the children were more than the old people, but that year there were two more old people than children, and that they have been steadily gaining until in 1915 there were just 100 more old people than ,children, although. it decreased until in 1920, there were only 6S more. Until 1903 there were al": ways more old ladies than old men. That year the men numbered 34 and the old ladies 32. In 1905 they were even. In 1908 there were more old ladies, 40 to 39, and they kept ahead until 1915, since which year the old men have outnumbered the old ladies, in 1920, it standing 96 to 89. For the first three years, the Home was supported and maintained by voluntary donations atl:<l su:bscriptions, but the ever swelling tide of applications, and with it th,e lessening and restricted ,room in which to put thosieadmitted) led in 1891, as we have seen, to theadoptiou' by the Grand Lodge of a fifty centsJ?er, capita tax. In 1908 this tax was increased to seventy-five cents, and in 1915 to one dollar and twenty-five ,cents. Noueof these increases, however, were made until after mature deliberation, and in each instance the existing conditions and the reasons calling for the increase fully stated.. " The Grand Lodge of MissoU:Fi has al\vays responded willingly and in no uncertain terms to the needs of the destitute widow and helpless orphan, an路ci if. any just criticism can be made of the Board) it is its'seeming lack of faith at ,certain times in the generous hearts and full purses of Missouri's Freemasons. As we have seen the grounds for the Home were bought in 1889. On them stood a suburban mansion of twenty rooms; built some sixteen years before, and" a large' brick barn. In 1891 things became too. crowded 'in the old build-" ing, and lhebarn was converted into a dining room, and ,a


new kitchen built. The dining room \vas also us.ed as a place in which to hold religious services ana entertainments, and in the spring of that year the City Lodges \\Tere invited to take charge of these Sabbath services and cheerfully did so. Bro. V. O. Saunders opened a Sunday School for the children, coming in the afternoon, and continued to do this good work until the Maple Avenue Methodist Church beg_an to hold Ineetings in the Arcade Building, a short distance from the Home. It might be well to add in this connection that at the present time there are a number of churches of different denominations near the Home, and the children attend the Sunday School of their own creed and desire. After the fifty cent tax was passed in 1891 the Board decided to admit indigent Masons. To do this it was necessary to erect another building. It was a good substantial brick on a stone foundation and ,vas路 constructed in the rear of the old building, and was used for the old people and for hospital purposes. A new chapel was built in 1895, and in. October of that year services were held in it. In 1895 Bro. Norman J. Coleman gave the Home a frame cottage and Bro. Thomas Wright a smaller one. These two buildings. were moved on the grounds and placed so as to . face Von Versen Avenue. The Coleman cottage had 路thirteen rooms besides a laundry room, a路 dairy and vegetable and provision storage room. It was used for the old ladies. The Wright cottage had three rooms, and was fitted up for the old men. They were strictly old people's quarters, having separate yards, walks., etc. When the cottages were put in order the building built in. 1892 was used as the boys' department. The cyclone of May 27th, 1896, did considerable damage to the Home property, which was mostly covered by insurance. Serious inconvenience, however, was caused by the unroofing of the dining room. A new addition to the Home was completed in 1896, thereby add-384-


iug greatly to its convenience and to the-comfort of the intnates. A heating .plant for all of the buildings was. also constructed. The cost of the new building was $22,705.46; of improvements to the old buildings ,adjoining and attached to the ne\v $503.47; of the heating plant $3,331.83; architect's fees $843.64. There was also expended for changing and remo~eling the infirmary and old dining room $1,029.12. The main building was three stories high with a splendid basement, in which was a large kitchen, supply and storage room,cold storage room, sewing room with stowaways and merchandise rOOlU attached, toilet and rooms for cook and housekeeper. The dining room, 36 by 86 feet, was on the first floor, with cloak rooms, sewing room, office and a spare room, with wide halls entering the building from three sides, and in the halls were broad stairways leading to the upper floors. On the second floor were nine dormitories, ten by fifteen feet each with room for three in each, and two nurseries each fifteen by thirty feet, bath and toilet rooms, closets, etc. On the third floor were fifteen d.ormitories, also ten by fifteen feet each, toilet and bath roo~, closets, etc. Each floor had wide halls) fire escapes and porches. The building connecting the old with the main building was also three stories high, being thirty feet long and the sam"e width as the old building.. North of the main building was a one story addition sixteen by thirty-two feet. The brick built in 1892 was then used more exclusively as an infirmary. The new building of the Old People's Division of the Home was built under the supervision of Bro. S. E. Waggoner and was completed in 1901. The contract was let to forty-nine different contractors. 'rhe total length of the building was one hundred forty-five feet and two inches. The West Section covering the same size as the old frame house - (Coleman Cottage), was 路fifty feet long by fortyfour and a half路 feet wide. In it is a large reception hall -385-


used by the old people to sit in during inclen1ent weather. The East Section was ninety-five feet two inches long by thirty-two feet wide_, The number of rooms on the first and second floors was fifty-three. 1"'here were several large porches adjoining the building for those \\Tho could not go out and use the grounds. The building cost $20,890.31. Another ne,v building was conlpleted in February, 1906. It was furnished in its entirety, including" the hospital department, by the Eastern Star, and it \vas occupied March 1st. It cost $28,629.27. The increase in the 111embership of the Home in a few years, however, was so great that it became necessary to build a hospital. It was proposed to erect the building by voluntary contributions, and in that \\Tay, it "vas carried to a successful completion under the leadership of Past Grand Masters Parson and Allen. It and a nevI powerhouse were finished itl1911. The total amount paid in: including interest on daily balances was $126,181.12, of which sum the various Masonic bodies, Grand and constituent, contributed $102,769.32. It \vas dedicated on the afternoon of the first day's session of the Grand Lodge, September 24th, 1912. At this Annual Communica'tion of the Grand Lodge, GrandMaster ArchA. Johnson appointed the following as the Committee on Masonic Home: A.C.Stewart, Chairman; Geo. E.. Mayhall, Frank W.Smith, L. M. Haydon, Wm. A.Pinerand Chas.. 路C. Gardner. The rext day the committee, through its chairman, made its report. It called attention to three things: the danger from fire to the children's and administration building; the need of a covered passageway from the old people's building to their dining . room in the new hospital building; and the need of beautifying the Home grounds, and they earnestly insisted that these defects and shortcomings should be done away with and to that end,路 they recommended that an adm~nistration -386-


Second Stage of the Masonic Home.


ouilding and the children's building be rebuilt and made fireproof; that a covered passageway be built, the grounds beautified, and that the Board of I)itectors be instructed to proceed and do all these things as rapidly as. possible, and that the funds be obtained by the levy of- a special per capita improvement tax of fifty cents per annum for the next succeeding four years, and the report with all of its recommendations. was adopted. Some of the' lodges were d~latory in paying the tax, but the "Father of the Masonic Home," M. W. Bro. Parson, was coll~ctor. His patience was unlimited and his perseverance such that finally it all was collected, amounting to the" munificent sum of $126,515.08. And so today there stands on the north side of Delmar Boulevard our Masonic Home. The city has spread far beyond it to . the west. Across the boulevard are great apartment houses. Our Home, the Masonic HQ,meaf Mis... souri t is beautif'ul to look upon, spacious and commodious, comfortable and safe, <a fit companion for the splendid edifices which surround it, and an ever-abiding source of pride· to the Masons of Missouri. But the· good work will not. be suffered to stop here.. Additional grounds and· buildings will soon be needed, and steps have already been taken to acquire them. Adjoining the Home on the west is the Jewish Ho~pital built on the ground sold to it by the Ramie in 1900. The grounds alone which were sold scarcely more than twenty years ago· for $16,500, are. today <conservatively worth $300 a front£oof~ or over $60,000. The buildings cost more than $375,000, and it would take now nearly, 'if not quite, twice that sum to replace them. A new site for the Jewish Hospital has been purchased near Forest Park, and God put it in the hearts of our Jewish brethren to offer the whole of the plant to the Board for $150,000, with four years,i£' it takes so .Iong, in which to pay for it. This offer could· not be


turned Gown. An option contract was drawn up and signed. At the last Annual Communication (1920), the Grand Lodge ratified and approved the action of the Board and provided the means to buy it, by requiring each candidate for initiation to pay in addition to the fee for the degrees, the sum of twenty dollars for this purpose. In this fund has already been paid, up to date of this writing, the sum of $57,000. It is now forty years since the longing for a Home was publicly expressed in the Grand Lodge. It is' now more than thitry-two years since the Home was instituted and became a reality. During this time there have been but three 'presidents of the Home, Judge Noah M. Givan, Ethelbert F. Allen, and Sol. E. Waggoner. Judge Givan was Presid,ent of the Board for t\venty-one years from June 28th, 1886, up until his death, October 3rd, 1907. ,Bro. Allen was president nearly six years, from October 19th,.. 1907, to his death, .L-\ugust 26th, 1913. Bro.. Waggoner has been president since October 1, 1913. Each of' these men \vere of different characteristics and temperaments, and yet peculiarly and pre-eminently adapted for the work. I do not think there was another man in the state who could have filled the place as well as Judge Givan ,did. He was a man of commanding appearance, of engaging manners. well liked, a fine talker, and possessed of rare tact and most excellent judgment.. Just the very man to be at the head of. the Home in its formative period ana at a time when its battles had to be fought in the Grand' and constituent bodies.. Bro. Allen was a man of fine business talent and large experience. He had the faculty of obtaining what he desired. His heart was set on 'having mbre buildings and of the right kind. He lived to see the hospita~ cnmplete<l, and the work started on the administration and children's building, and the means for financing the undertaking secured. -388-


Bro. \Vaggoner is also a business Ulan, with many years of extensive training, and experience. A man of unusual administrative and executive ability, thoroughly conversant with the Home in every detail" and an untiring worker. Such was his pre-eminent fitness for the place that on the resignation of Mrs. Baker as Superintendent, that office was held 路in abeyance, and ever since its onerous duties along with those of the President discharged by Bro. Waggoner. Judge Noah M.Givan was born in Indiana, was a graduate of the Indiana State University, \vas admitted to the bar in Indiana and was made a Mason in Indiana. He came to Missouri in 1866, when 25 years old, and became a citizen of Harrisonville, Cass County. He. was the first Master of Cass Lodge No. 147, which was set to work under its charter, October 19, 1867. He was Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit for more than eight years, when he resigned. In 1878, he was elected Grand Master; in 1878 Grand High Priest; in 1875. Grand Master of the Grand Council R. & S. Masters; in 1891 Grand Commander and in 1890 Grand Patron of the Eastern Star. Of him it has been well said: "For forty years Bro. Givan had been active and prominent in Missouri Masonry. He filled with honor and distinction the highest offices in the gift of all the Grand Masonic bodies of our state. But his crowning work was the Masonic Home to which twenty years of devoted service were given and which he did more to bring and keep before the craft probably than any other man. For years Moderator of the Blue River Association of the Baptist Church, prominent at the bar, and filling with honor 拢oor more than eight years the offic~ of Circuit Judge. As a man, a lawyer, a .Mason and a Christian gentleman, he filled a large place in Missouri Masonry, and is missed and sincerely mourned by a host of friends." -389-


Ethelbert F. Allen was a native of Connecticut. After graduating at Hartford I-ligh School, he moved to" Kansas City and engaged in the real estate and investment business, and became prominently identified with many of the successful enterprises of the city. He was made a Mason in Heroine Lodge No. 104 in 1884, and served as its Master in 1887 and 1888. He was elected GrandMaster· of Missouri Fr,eemasons in 1898. He was elected President of the Home in 1907 and remained such to the day of his death, August 26, 1913. He assisted in organizing Ararat Temple, serving as its first potentate. In JtIne, 1888, he was chosen Imperial Potentate of the United States. "When Judge Givan was called from labor there "Vvere sante among us who feared that his successor could hardly meet in equal·1}leasure the delicate and important. responsibilities of that high office. But Bro. Allen proved to be the providential man to take the place of his illustrious predecessor and lead the work forward to still larger success. The new hospital· at the Home is his .;rnonument and·his busy brain was working out other plans for the success of the Home when the hand of disease was laid upon him." Solomon Ephraim Waggoner was born in Richland County, Ohio, March 8th, 1851. He isa graduate of Oscalaasa College, Iowa. After graduating, he went West and had charge of the Western Union lines along the Union Pacific then being built to Fort Granger. In 1870, he came to Missouri and ~ade Macon his home, and soon became engaged in the fire· insurance business as special agent, adjuster, secretary and in 1895, manager of the Citizens Insurance·C·ompany of St. Louis, and in I899,its·president. He was made a Mason in old Macon Lodge No. 106, in 1872, succeeded by Censer ~"odge No. 173, ,of which he was Master in 1876. He was· Knighted in. Emanuel.· Commandery No.7 at Macon in June, 1873, and served as its CoIUmander in 1877 and 1878. In May, 1880,he was elected ---390-


Gran<l Commander. He became a member of the Board of Directors of the Home in 1891, and has been a member continuously ever since. The following is a list of the Superintendents and Matrons of路 the Home with dates of service: 1. Morris Leftwich and Ella D., his wife,' from April 1st, 1889, to Oct., 1898. (Resigned.) 2. Charles C. Wood and Anna M., his wife, from Oct., 1898, to Sept. 1st, 1902. (Resigned.) 3.E. B. Redd and Mattie, his wife, from Sept. 1st, 1902, to March 1st, 1907. (Resigned.) 4. Edgar W. Deane and Dixie M., his wife, from March 1st, 1907, to MarGh 1st, 1912. (Resigned.) 5. John T. ~fason and wife, from March 1st, 1912, to Sept. 1st, 1912. (Resigned.) 6. Clifford C. Baker and Harriet E., his wife, from Sept. 1st, 1912, to January 13th,路路 1915. (Died.) 7. 'Harriett E. Baker from Jan., 19-15, to Feb. 8, 1918.. (Resigned.)

Since which. time the office of .Superintendent has been left vacant, and the duties of the office discharged by the President of the Board. In 1912 the number of the old people and children had become so great it was thought best to have two matrons, one for the children .and one for the old people.. Mrs. Harriet E. Baker vvas elected Matron of the Children in August, 1912. Upon the death of Bro. Baker, January 13, 1915, she became acting Superintendent and the路 following September was elected to that office, and continued. to act as both Superintendent and Matron until her resignation February 8th, 1918.. At the same time of her election as Matron, Mrs. Annie Lee was elected Matron of the Old People, and remained such until May 16th, 1915, when she resigned to become Superintendent of the Odd Fellows' Home at Liberty, Mo.. She was succeeded by Mrs. May C. Stevenson, who resigned February 10th, 1916. The same day, Mrs. Mabel E.. Engel was elected to succeed her, -391-


who was matron of the Old People until February 8th" 1918, when upon Mrs. Baker's resignation, lVIrs. Engel was elected Matron of the Children, and remained such until ] uly 9th, 1920, when she resigned. On that day, Mrs. Wilmoth Waller becalue acting Matron and the following September ,vas elected to that office. February 8th, Mrs. Nona E. Collins was elected Matron of the Old People to succeed IvIrs. Engel, which position she still holds. THE ENDOWMENT FUND. ]'his table shows its gro\vth from year to year: 1892 $ 35,800.00 1911 . 121,253.49 1893..................... 45,500.00 1912 $ 121,819.23 1894. . . . . . .. . . . . 1895. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . 1903. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . 1904. . . . 1905.. . . . . . . . . ... 1906 "" 1907.. .. 1908. . .. .. . . . . ... .. . .. 1909. . .. 1910... .. .. ..

50,000.00 50,000.00 105,133.34 105,198.34 105,698.34 106,315.94 111,365.94

1913 1914 1915 1916 1917. : 1918 1919 1920 1921...

. . . . . . . . .

~

126,238.59 127,348.59 130,948.59 132,448.59 143,148.59 146~428.59

186,436.25 192,442.11 . .

115,261.83 "' 121,153.49 .. . .. 121,153.49 [The exact amounts for the years 1896 to 1902, included, cannot be obtained.]

The following is a list of the

PRESENT DIRECTORS: Years of Service. Sol. E. \Vaggoner................. . . . .... . .. 30 A. :LvI. Dockery 路.................... 21 D. A. Jatnison..........................

D. M. Wilson.........................

20 13 12 11

1891 1886 1905 1901

H. Gundlach.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .

4

C.. C. Bigger................................. C. T. Kornbrodt...........................

3

1908 1909 1910 1914 1916 1917 1918

1

1920

John T. Short.... . .. ..... . .. .. . . . .. .. . . R. R. Kreeger.............................. A. A. Johnson............................

T. W.Cotton................................

J.

-392-

7 5

to to to to to to to to to to to to

1921 1891 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921 1921


The following is a list of the FORMER DIRECTORS: Years of service. V. O. Saunders............................ 26 . R. E. Anderson........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 23 NoahM. Givan ". 21 F. I. Tygard ·... 21 W.M. Willianls............................. 19 ]. D.. Vincil.................................. A. C. Robinson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . Jobn R. Parson

18 18 17

James \V. Boyd ". . . .. Joseph S. Brown............. S. M. Kennard............................ . . Campbell Wells C. C.Woods ~................................ E. F. Allen...................................... H. Ely " B. F. Nelson.. Geo. L. Hassett .T. B. Thomas....................................... Wm. F. I(uhn .'.. . . .. .. . W. H. Mayo " .... R. K.. Roach.................................. Jacob Lampert............................. S. C. Bunn.................................... A. M. Hough 10;' ••••• '" ••• T. R. Morrow................................ T. P. Dyer................................. Jacob Furth ~ . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . R. F.. Stevenson.... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . H .. H . Hohenschild.'O . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L.C: Krauthoff...............................

17 16 15 15

1!

H.

13 13 10 9 8 6 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 1

1888 to 1914 1886 to 1909 1886 to 1907 1886 to 1907 1888 to 1898 1907 to 1916 1886 to 1904 1898 to 1916 1886 to 1888 1890 to 1891 1903 to 1907 1904 to 1921 1886 to 1904 1886 to 1901 1901 to 1916 1886 to 1899 1900 to 1913 1891 to 1901 1891 to 1900 1908 to 1916 1901 to 1907 1913 to 1918 1886 to 1891 1886 to 1891 1916 to 1921 1887 to ··1891 1916 to 1920 1906 to 1909 1886 to 1889 1891 to 1894 1886 to 1888 1898 to 1900 1886 to 1887

And now my story of the Home is drawing to a· close. Yet it is not ended. To be frank, there has been a little secret all alongthe way. I have kept the best of the story for the last! There cannot be a home, you know, a real, -893-


true home without there is a woman in it-it 'may be a mother, a wife, a daughter, a sister, one or more, or perhaps all-and so this story cannot close until sonlething has been said about the Order of the Eastern Star and the Advisory Board, and what it and they have done for the Home. From the very organization of the Home the sisters of the Eastern Star have been its fast friends. They were there at its opening and at its dedication, .and from that time on their f'riend,ship and their love has never failed. In 1903, it was mutually agreed between the Grand Chapter of the Eastern Star and the Home Board that they should be entitled to two lady advisory members, whose privilege and duty it would be to attend the meetings of the Board and advise in regard to ·the managenlent of ·the Home. Mrs. Lillie L. Fletcher, of St. Louis, and Mrs. Mattie P. Barney, of Chillicothe, were .the first two. selected, audin a few months, the number being increased to three, ]\ilrs. Louisa J. Moore, of St. Joseph,was added. They all served long and faithfully, ]\fIrs. Fletcher and Mrs. Barney until their death, ·Mrs. Fletcher passing from .this to the better land, December 26th, 1917, and 1\1rs." Barney, August 14th, 1918. Mrs. Moore, after ·joining in the Advisory Board's report to the Grand Lodge in 1902, refused to accept a re-election owing to her declining health. Mrs. Etl1el· C. Stansberry, of St.. Louis, was appointed to fill the vacanf'y by the death of Mrs. Fletcher, and Mrs. Ella Jean Flanders, of Excelsior Springs, to take Mrs. Barney's place. At the meeting of the Grand Chapter in 1920, both Mrs. Stansberry "and Mrs. Moore decliliing to serve further, Mrs. EdithV.Bader and Mrs. Edith E. Ambruster were elected their successors. In their report made to ,t,heHome Board in 1909, the Advisory Board says: "We have examined the proceedings of the Grand Chapter from the time the Home was organized and find contributions of $35,037.75" have heen received frolnEastern Star Chapters and -394-


expended on the I-I0111C and fanli1y, and an approxil11ate value of $14,000 upon the furnishings contri'buted by various Eastern Star Chapters throughout the State."

BlJt this \vas, as it \vere, only the comlnencenlent. In 1910 the per capita tax alone \vas $3,006.60. In 1911 the an10unt received for the Hospital Fund \vas ahnost $5,000. '"fa date in 1912 approximately $7,500 had been spent on the furnishings. In 1913 there vvas spent $5,583.. The approxi111'ate expenditures路 for 1915 were $12,000, the receipts far exceeding those of any previous year. In 1920 the list of disbursen1ents contained itellls of furniture, etc., at a cost exceeding $8,000. Out of these funds the I-Iospital Building \vas con1pletely furnished, and then the f\dnllnistration Building and then the Children's Building, and long before that the Old People's Building. J-\nd so it has ever be'en. There is no lin1it to what kind hearts and vvilling hands and full purses can do. And yet great as the all10unt has been, the tnouey given has been the very slnallest part of the beneficence. If the JVlasons of this state could only know and realize the kind \vords, the loving acts, the wonlanly care and devotion, the luany hours and days spent in cheering the disconsolate and heavy hearted, in brightening the countenances of the children, the doing of so many deeds of kindness and ll1ercy, then there would be erected in their hearts to the n1emory路 of these noble, generous \VOlnen, a monUll1ent 111 ore enduring than that of the finest Parian Marble. What may be iII store for the I-Iolnein the next forty years, vve know not. The future is not ours. OUf fathers laid the foundations deep and strong. It is for us to improve the present hours. The past should be an incentive for the future. "Act well our part, there all th~honor lies."

-395-


LIST OF" ILLUSTRATIONS

Ed'ward Bates T.F. Riddick Iv[asonic College Battle of Lexington 1fcDo\vell Monument Grand ~1asterts ]e\veL Laying Corner Stone. State Capitol Gavel of Temple Lodge Masonic HOlne Buildings The Mansion The Home, second stage General Pershing ~

Between pages VIII and IX Bet\veen pages XIV and XV Between pages 1?6 and 107 Between pages 114 and 115 Between pages 292 and. 293 "" Between pages 274 and 275, Between pages 318 and 319 Between pages 322 and 323 Between pages 368 and 369 Bp,tween pages路378 and 379 Between pages 386 and 387 Between pages 338 and 339


INDEX SUBJ~CT

PAGE

Administration. Building 309, 316, 319 394 .A.dvisory Board of Home Al1yman Rezon 8 Allen, Ethelbert F 248, 390 Ancient Landlnarks 70, 108 148 Anderso11, Rufus E Anti-Masonic Excitetnent 39, 44,356 Bates, Edward .. 18 Bates, Frederick 2 Baltimore Work 63 Bellef ontaineCemetery 124 Beginning, The..................................................... .. .• x Bilton, Frederick L...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 33 Biographical Sketches 243, 255 Bigger, Clay Cicero 252 .327 Bicentennial Celebration .333 Bingham, John William Boyd, Marcus.o ~ 102 Boyd,]ames ·W 195 Boodlers 277 Bo·or, Van Fremont , .314 Brac€, Theodore 0 0'" .213 Brown, Wilson ,. . ·.oo • • 89 Browne, Joseph S , 170 Bllildillg . "Bug"" ". . .. . . . . . 5 By-Laws, The first " , xvi Cadle, James E , .155 Carnegy, StephenW. B , oo 46 Centennial Celebration " 339 Charity Ftlnd 0.' •••• ' ~ ••• 108 Cham'1:lers, A.B ". . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 42 Oark, William Alfred 329 Coltlmbia, Permanent Seat '~ 42 Conyers, . Thomas 43 Constitution. The First xi Convention, Preliminary x. Cornwell, LoS 91 Conservators of Masonry : / , 118, 120 Condition of Masonic Hall ".' , 154, 274 Corner Stone,' Missouri's World's Fair Building.................• '.265 0

•••••••••

0

•••

0

- •••••••••

0

..

••

0

0

0

0

0

..

0

0

••••

0

:

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

'.'

0

0

0

0

0

..

..

..

0

••

..

..

..

..

'.'

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

..

0

••••

,

••••••

,

0

'.0

,

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

'.'

0

0

..

0

,

..

..

..

••

O'

0

"

0

••

0

,

O'

0

0

..

,

••

••••••

0

,

••

••

..

••


SUBJECT

PAGE

Corner Stone, State Capitol 00 0319 Corner Stone, Hospital 306 Corner Stone, Administration Building 316 0•••••• 0••• 0• 0•••••• 318 Cotton, Toltnan White Daggett, John D 19 Dallam, Richard B.............................................. 46 273 Dedication of 1<fasonic Halls 319 Dedication of Administration Building Deputy Grand Master made elective............................... 64 District Lecturers.................................................... 99 District Deputy Grand Master's power of 107 Diu1it, Purposes of 171 Directors of the Home .. 392, 393 175 Dockery, Alexander M Douglass, Thompson 11 Documentary Evidence for visitation 247 DUllsconlb, William E 129 Election for Degrees and advancement 105 Endowment Fund of Home 319 Extracts froul Records .IV Expense of Refreshluents 13 Fees for Initiation 179 Fees for Masonic Home 218, 340 First Grand Officers, elect .. , xiv First Lodge Organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .... ii Finagin, Josepl1 C 260 Foreign Correspondence, Reprimand 171 French Orphans 331, 336 Funeral Requirements 50, 120 Future, The 365 39 Gamble, HamiltonR Garrett, Thomas E 137 Garrell, Julius C 337 German Lodge ~ 99 German Grand Lodges 276, 341 General Lafayette. ' 15, 352 6, 70, 76 General· Grand Lodge 166, 38~ Givan, Noah M Grand -Lodg@, Alpena 0.' 284 GrandDieta Symbolica 222 Grand Lodge, Costa Rico 312 Grand Lodge, England 327 Grand Lodge of France ' 341 Grand Lodge Funds 188, .268, 288 0

0

0

0

0

•••••••••••••

0

••••

0

0

0

•••••••

0

0

0

,

0

0

0

••

•••••

,

eo • •

0

••••••••••••••

eo • • • • • • • • • e o '

0

0

0

eo • • •

0

••

0

0

0

0

..

0

..

..

..

..

,

•• ,

••

..

..

0

0'" 0

eo

0

,

0:

0

..

• • ..

•.•

••

0

0

••••••••••••••

0:

0

0

0: 0:


PAGE

SUBJECT

Grand Lodge 0 f Io'\va....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .• . . . •. 66 94 Grand Lodge of Kansas..................... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Grand Lodge of Illinois, First 12 Grand Lodge of Illinois, Second................................... 56 Grand Lodge of Illinois, Controversary....... .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Grand Lodge 0 f Indiana ,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. . . . . iii Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania ii Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, Controversary 226 Grand Orient. of France 164, 194, 341 Grand Lodge, "Specific" 148 Grand Lodge Valle de 11exico 276, 305, 341 Grand Lodge, York of Mexico 305, 341 Grand' Lodge, The right to confer Degrees 81 Grand Lecturer 5, 94 Grand Honors . 274 Grand Masters ~ 359 Greeting to General Pershing 332 Greeting to President \Vilson 326, 330 Growth for 1921 346 Grover, BenjaminW.. 83 Gouley, George Frank..............................•............ 129 Guilty until proven innocent 134 Hall, Lee A .. 186 Hall,' William Allan 298 Higbee, Edward 324 History of Masonic Hotne 370 Hough, Arthur Middleton 236 Houston, John F 121 Houston, Algeron Sydney 282 Hunt,. George R 199 Ingratn, Benton H 221 Intoxicating Liquors , 122, 124 Introduction ii Jackson, .Andrew " " 68 Jamison, Dorsey A 239 Jesse, Frank Russell 321 Jewisll Hospital 387 Joachim Lodge No. 25 ·............................. iji Johnson, C. DoW ~ ; 80 Johnson" Arch A 308 Johnson, William F........................... . 343 Kansas Territory, Charters issued ~ 92 K.ansas Grand Lodge 94 Keene, Harry.· 22'9 fl.

0

0

••

0

0

•••••••

0

••••••

0

0

••

0

0

.'

0

••••••••

0

••

0

••••••••••••••••

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••••••••••

0

••••••

'• • • •

_

0

0

••••

0

0

••••••••••

••••••••••••••••••••••

0'

0

00

••

00.

0

•••

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

0

0

• • • • • "• • • • • • • • • • •

0

0

••••••••••••

0

••••••••••••

l'

0

o ••••

0

0

••

••

••

0

••••••••••• '

..

••

••

..

"

..

••


SUllJECT

PAGE

Kirtle}r, Sillclair................................................... 42 Kreeger, Robert Rochester 294 ., 269 I(uhl1, vVilliam Frederick

Latl1pert, Jacob 310 I al1e,Hardage 29 Lodge of Past 1fasters 3, 86 Louisiana Lodge No. 109 ii Ltl1<:e, JOhl1 \\T 152 "Mason" or ."Freemason" . 298 IvIasonic College 59 11asonic College, Marion County 61, 63, 65, 68, 69,81, 107 11asonic College, Proposal for ~ 72 l\1asonic College: Lexington 74, 76, 77, 85, 88, 90, 97, 101, 104 106, 131, 136, 143 1{ ason ic HOIne, First contribution .... , .........................• 164 1Jfasonic Home 183, 189, 192, 198,205, 208,211, 231, 266, 370 11asonic Honle, Assesstnent 215, 218, 340 1/f asonic HOlne Statistics 382 1fasonic flospital .298,309 lvfasonic. Halls, .Condition 154, 275 Nfasonic Hall, St.Louis 73, 125, 136, 139, 144~ 147, 161, 168, 335 11asonic Lottery 55 Masonic Publicity 51 1fasonic, Use' of word 284 Masonic Overseas Cotnnlissiono 332 335, 341 1'Yfasol1ic Tide 361 Melnbership 133 11ilitary Lodge 75, 184 Mileage and Per Dielu o' 174,231, 234 67 Mitchell, JanlesW.. S " Miller, John Henderson ". "." 240 Missouri Lodge No.1 viii, 38, 258 11issonri Lodge No. 12 iii 11onitor 293, 298 Mosman, Chesley A 316 Muir, Williall1 D .. ~ 134 JYI:ysticShrine .. ~ 254 rvlcBride, •. Priestly H 53 McDowell, Allan " 140 McFarland, :NIarctls H 106 1'fcLachlan, James Robert ' 286 xiii NatTIe of Grand Lodge Nanle a f Grand Lodge, Incorporate" ~ '," '" ,,63, 242 0

0

••••••••••

0

•••••••

0

••

0

0

••

0

••

••••••••••••••••••••••

0

••

••

0

0

0"

••

o ••••••••

0

0

••••••••••

0

0

0

0

0

00

0

••••••

0

0.0

0

0

••••••••••••••

••••••••••

0

•••

0

"

0

0

0

0

..

••

••••

0

•••••••••••••••••••••

..

..

••

..

..

••

0

o' ••

0

0

••••••

0

0

0

0

••••••

0

••••••••••••

0

0

H

:

"

0,

0

•••


SUBJECT

PAGE

National Independent Grand Lodge) France . New Mexico................... . .•.. . 78 Nomination for Offioe................... . 45 Objection to advancetnent. 247 Opel1ingof the Lodge : 133 Order Eastern Star 92, 153, 168, 250, 266, 318, 394 Oregon Territory : . O'Sullivan; Anthony ,. ,. . . O'Sullivan Library.............. . O'Sullivan .Bequest. . . . .. . . .. . .. . . O\vens, Samuel H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O\vens, John VV . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 316 1

'O.

Parson,

J01111

R

'. .....•

2'24

<01

Past J\JIaster'sDefinition of. : "" 86, 153 Past 1faster's Degree, Necessity of 168 Past 1!aster's Degree abolished " 230, 235 Past Grand :Nfaster's JeweL 281 Penick, \Villiam F ~ ,. . . . . . . 109 Pershing, General. John J., Perpetual' Jurisdiction . . Ralls, John Ready, Thomas C.............. . Recognition of Grand Lodges, . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .' . Refere11dtlIn Renshaw, vVilliam, . to Gralld Lodge . dead, ThePenrisylvaniaGabriel.................... 27 F ·xx n

1'

•• • ••

••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••.••••••.••

.................... 59,66, 72,83,94,243 S,ource of

. Lodge No.1 . Hiram Lodge No.3 . JOhl1 F . X,enophon . Grand Secretary . Legislation 124, 178, ::,.<a;1t.t;t)'<ter,s, Samuel, H , ..................•........! Rite Body of France ~

................ "

Sh6·rt, John Thomas St.CnarlesLodge No. 48

.

12'2,

Sharp, Side Lights .. ~

••••

. . ~............•....... ~


SUBJECT

PAGE

Ste. .Getlevieve ( ~ St. Louis Lodge No. 111 State Capitol Corner Stone Stevenson, Robert F Stubblefield, William R. Superintendent and Matrons of the Hotne. Titles, Honorary and OfficiaL T oltec Lodge Trials,who may vote Transfer of Membership. Tucker, Nathaniel B .. TUf1Ier, John H.o Thomas, Joshua B Tygard, Flavius J Unity l ..odge No.6 Uta!l Territory Valliant, Leroy B Vincil, J ohnD Visible Presence of Charter ".. Visitation, Documentary Evidence Vote on Saloon Question .. Vote on Masonic Home Support .... Waggoner, Sol E." .. War of the Rebellion Washington George, Monument 0

..

0

ii iii 319 .190 173 391 354 185, 222, 228, 242, 251 .273 .169, 247 3 .119 232 ,.

••••••••

0

0

0

•••••

0"

0

0

0"

0

•••••

0

0

0

0

0

00

••

0

0

0

0

o

0

0

0

0

0

•••••••

•••••••••

0

0

0

•••••••

0

0

0.

0

•••••••

0

'0

0"

•••••

0

•••••••••

0

0

0

0

•••

.......

o.

0

00

0

• • • • • • •'

0

0

••

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

o.

..

0

00

•••••

0

••••

0

o' o' ••••

••••

0

0

0

0

••••

0

•••••••••

'

0

••••••

••.•

..

0

..

0

,

••••••••

o

0

•••••

••••••••

0

•••

0

0

•••

"

•••••

'

co.•

,' • • • •

,

••

0

••

o ••

0

•••

ST.LOUIS

••

0

0

0

,

••••••

0

o

206 0

0

MENDLE PRTG.

278 125 276 293 205 .218 390 111, 364 17, 87 216 256 116 153

0

0

iii

115

•••••

0

0

0244

o.

••

•••••••••

0

••••

"

~

•••••••••

•••

0

,,"....................

~

"..

•••••••••••

"0

••• :

•••••••••

•••••

••

•••••••••

0

0"

0

0

0

0

••

0

••••

0

•••••••

....

0

••

0

0

0

0"

••

•••••••••

0

, 0

0

••••••

••

0

•••••••••••

0

•••

•••••• -

0

o ••

0

••••••••••

0

'"

0

.......

•••••••••

0

0

0

0

•••••

0

o' o ••••• "

0

0

••••••••

~

0

0

0

••

o • • • • • • • • • • • • • "." • • • • • • • • ,

WeIts,Caropbell " \Vhitcomb, George Widow's Claims o. Williams, \Villialn Muir Wilson, David Woods, Charles Wood, James P ..... \"ocum, John York Grand

o.

o •••

••••

••••••

0

George E ..

••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••

00

Wal1~er,

0

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

••••

0

0

••••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••••

0

0

••••••

0

0

••••••

•••••••••••••••••

0

0"

0

0

0000

•••••

••••••

0

0

••••••

o'

0

0

0

o

•••••••••••••

CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF THE GRAND LODGE  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you