Issuu on Google+

3HQLQVXOD

:DUULRU J O I N T January 10, 2014 Vol. 5, No. 1

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

PROGRAMS

JBLE services help to fuel a fit 2014 — Page 3

JBLE 2013 A year in photos

COMBAT

– Page 12

Women continue to cross more lines — Page 16

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

$LU )RUFH 1HZV

LEADERSHIP CMSAF visits with Langley Airmen — Page 4


2

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

3

www.peninsulawarrior.com

BasePrograms

-%/( VHUYLFHV KHOS IXHO D ¿W QHZ \HDU By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

With the passing of 2013, Service members can look forward to new opportunities in 2014. For many, ringing in the new year means beginning resolutions and kicking bad habits to the curb. Whether making healthier decisions, improving finances or promising to volunteer, JBLE offers programs for Service members to start 2014 on the right foot.

Tobacco If “kicking the habit” of tobacco is at the top of the list, the Health and Wellness Center, located in the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base, offers a smoking cessation class to support both Airmen and Soldiers, dependents, retirees and contractors in their pledge to put down the tobacco pipe. “The class doesn’t concentrate on how bad tobacco use is for you,” said Jennifer Jacobs, 633rd Medical Group clinical pharmacist practitioner. “It focuses on behavior and lifestyle modification to successfully quit, and more importantly, stay tobacco-free.” The HAWC teamed up with the American Lung Association and created a program in which class participants may attend a one-hour seminar on smoking cessation. To promote continuing the healthy behavior they learn. Jacobs said once the course is over, participants then call the ALA once a week for 12 weeks to track their progress with a professional, the results of which are then e-mailed to the HAWC. “Being a quitter in this respect is positive,” said Jacobs. “Service members can finally part ways with one of the hardest habits to quit – tobacco use, with a little help of course.” For some Service members, shaking the tobacco habit can be a difficult road to travel alone, but thanks to resources available at JBLE, tobacco users can stop the use of tobacco.

Finances Whether trying to pay off debt or pre-

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Whether making healthier decisions, improving finances or promising to volunteer, JBLE offers programs for Service members to start 2014 on the right foot.

Photo by Senior Airman Kayla Newman

pare for retirement, and the New Year is the perfect time to start financial planning. The Airman and Family Readiness Center at Langley and the Army Community Service Center at Fort Eustis offer many programs to assist in getting out of debt, starting a saving plan or both. “TheAFRC staff is here to help,” said Maureen Elam, AFRC personal finance manager. “We are able to provide a spending plan that Service members can fill out themselves, but we suggest coming into the AFRC so we can guide you through the steps.” The AFRC and ACS provide services to help members understand their finances and information on lifestyle changes to improve. Both also assist members by providing free credit reports and scores. “By providing the one-on-one counseling, Service members gain a very good idea on where they stand financially.” said Paul Walker, Army Community Service Center financial readiness program manager. “We take everyone’s situation seriously. Everything is confidential and we are here to help, not to judge.”

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

Volunteering As the holiday fever dies down, some Service members may find themselves with more free time. A beneficial way to use that time may be volunteering in the local community. “There are many benefits to volunteering,” said Michelle Venzke, AFRC community relations specialist. “Service members and dependents have the chance to develop not only a professional network while volunteering, but also make friends while learning more about Langley and life in the Air Force.” Venzke said there are numerous base agencies that utilize volunteers other than the AFRC. The Airman’s Attic, American Red Cross, Langley Chapel, Langley Hospital, Sexual Assault Office, the Thrift Shop and Youth Sports are always looking for members to assist. According to Donna Cloy, Army Volunteer Corp coordinator, Fort Eustis Soldiers have the comfort of utilizing the USO, the transportation museum and other facilities located on post.

While juggling work and family life, it can be difficult to find time to volunteer, but both the AFRC and Army Volunteer Corps can help, added Venzke. “Busy families with children can research opportunities in the local area to see if there are family volunteer opportunities,” said Venzke. “Free childcare that is paid for by the Air Force Aid Society is available while the parent volunteers.” The opportunities to volunteer do not stop at the border of JBLE. Off base opportunities can be found by referrals. “The program on post will work with Service members specific schedules,” said Cloy. “The ACV can provide off post opportunities in the community schools around the area and boy and girl scouts of America troops.” JBLE offers many different services and tools to widen the arsenal for those trying to live a better and healthier 2014. Although results may not happen overnight, those who are setting goals have many assets to help them throughout the year.


4

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

JANUARY 10, 2014

CloseUp

&06$) YLVLWV ZLWK /DQJOH\ $LUPHQ Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody spoke with Airmen during his visit to Langley Air Force Base, Jan. 7. Cody visited multiple wings and discussed force management issues, budget concerns and the future of the enlisted force with Airmen.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson

Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody speaks to Airmen at the First Term Airman Center during his visit to Langley.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson

Cody is greeted by enlisted leaders from Joint Base-Langley Eustis at the Crossbow Dining Facility during his tour of Langley.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Cody (left) presents Staff Sgt. Jeremy Burnock, 633rd Medical Support Squadron histopathology technician, with one Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle of his challenge coins. Members of the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron speak with Cody during his visit to Langley Air Force Base.


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

5

AHRN becomes commercial housing web service By Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Automated Housing Referral Network online services are now no longer sponsored by the Department of Defense.The AHRN website, www.AHRN.com, now operates as a commercial website, and Military Housing Offices no longer manage rental listings or communicate with members and property owners through AHRN. Current members and property managers are encouraged to visit the website to read the new user agreement.

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Automated Housing Referral Network online services are now no longer sponsored by the Department of Defense. The AHRN website, www.AHRN.com, now operates as a commercial website and Military Housing Offices no longer manage rental listings or communicate through AHRN. Current members and property managers are encouraged to visit the website and read the new user agreement. In response to this change, the DOD will be transitioning to a DOD-developed public website that interfaces with the Enterprise Military Housing (eMH) database, which is currently in development. The website will allow public access for Service members, property managers and landlords 24/7. Property managers and landlords will have the ability to upload listings and provide Service members and their families the ability to view available homes. The website is anticipated to be functional

File photo

by July 30. Because of the gap between the AHRN termination and the deployment of the DOD-developed public website, a shortterm solution is being implemented with help from Global Schema. Continental United States locations, in-

cluding Alaska, will use Global Schema, a program which housing staffs will use the eMH referral component. Outside CONUS, housing offices will utilize eMH or the Automated Civil Engineer System with housing staffs operating the program manually. In all locations, Service mem-

bers will be required to visit a local housing office for their needs. Service members can still utilize both the Air Force and Army public housing websites, www.housing.af.mil and www.housing.army.mil, which provide a venue for members to obtain specific installation information on family, unaccompanied and privatized housing. The Langley Air Force Base and Fort Eustis housing offices continue to provide referral and relocation services as well as available rental listings using a government-managed system. Members and their families should contact or visit the housing office to receive assistance and can contact the Langley Housing Management office at 764-5040 or the Fort Eustis Housing Services Office at 878-2977. Property managers and landlords looking to list properties should contact David Kea at the Langley Housing Office and Lamberto Dascenzo at the Fort Eustis office.


6

www.peninsulawarrior.com • The Peninsula Warrior - Army LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY

Watts Family Dentistry

FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK

~ Caring Dentistry with An Artist's Touch ~

FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK

JANUARY 10, 2014

OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE

LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE

Dr. Jasper N. Watts • Dr. Kenneth Boyd • Dr. Adam Lane Dr. Elias Llerandi • Dr. Katherine Petersen • Dr.Jorge Pelaez

WELCOME MILITARY! We accept ALL Military Insurance

EVENING HOURS & SATURDAY HOURS • INVISALIGN AND BLEACHING OFFERED

907 Big Bethel Road • Hampton, VA 23666

(757) 838-5999 • www.wattsdentistry.com

LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK

OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE

LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK

OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE

LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK

OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE

LITTLE CREEK FT LEE LANGLEY FT STORY FT MONROE OCEANA LITTLE CREEK

OCEANA FT EUSTIS DAM NECK FT MONROE

We cover the bases. Call 222-3990 to advertise.

“A POWERHOUSE. ‘Lone Survivor’ laces action with moral questions that haunt and provoke. Ben Foster, Emile Hirsch and Taylor Kitsch add to the impact.” Peter Travers

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

“UNFORGETTABLE,

The new Community Commons will be moving into the old Youth Center, located near the Child Development Center and Housing Office. All Community Center programs will be included in the move. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 2:30 Jan. 24. For more information, call 764-2984

TENSE AND INSPIRING.

A singular true story of incredible courage when it counts the most. Brilliantly acted and directed.” Pete Hammond, MOVIELINE

$LUPDQ UHFLHYHV 67(3 SURPRWLRQ

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW

ONEOFTHEBESTFILMSOFTHEYEAR

UNIVERSAL PICTURES AND EMMETT/FURLA FILMS PRESENT A FILM 44/EMMETT/FURLA FILMS/HERRICK ENTERTAINMENT/ ENVISION ENTERTAINMENT/SPIKINGS ENTERTAINMENT/SINGLE BERRY/CLOSEST TO THEMUSIC HOLE/LEVERAGE PRODUCTION A PETERBERG FILM MARKWAHLBERG “LONESURVI V OR” TAYLORKI T SCH EMI L EHI R SCH BENFOSTER AND ERIC BANA BY EXPLOSIONSIN THESKY STEVEJABLONSKY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS GEORGEFURLA SIMONFAWCETT BRADENAFTERGOOD LOUIS G.FRIEDMAN STEPANMARTIROSYAN REMINGTONCHASE ADISHANKAR RANDALL EMMETT NORTON HERRICK SPENCER SILNA MARK DAMON BRANDT ANDERSEN JEFF RICE PRODUCEDBY PETERBERG SARAH AUBREY BASED ON BARRYSPIKINGS AKIVAGOLDSMAN MARKWAHLBERG STEPHENLEVINSON VITALYGRI G ORI A NTS THE BOOK BY MARCUSLUTTRELL WITH PATRICKROBINSON WRITTEN DIRECTED AUNIVERSALRELEASE BY PETERBERG BY PETERBERG SOUNDTRACK ON METROPOLIS MOVIE MUSIC

  <50=,9:(3 :;<+06:

S T A R T S F R I D AY, J A N UA RY 10 HONOR THOSE WHO SERVE at FlagOfHonor.LoneSurvivorFilm.com Photo by Airman 1st Class Areca T. Wilson

FIND WHAT YOU’RE E LOOKING FOR IN THE CLASSIFIEDS.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Darlene Rust, 633rd Force Support Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of personnel assistance, was promoted to the rank of technical sergeant through the Stripes for Exceptional Performers program at Langley Air Force Base, Dec. 20, 2013.The STEP program is designed to promote NCOs who demonstrate outstanding performance. Rust’s son Ethan and husband,Tech. Sgt. Nathan Rust, 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron air terminal supervisor, were in attendance to show their support. Darlene hails from Dededo, Guam, and Nathan’s hometown is Kenneth, Minn.


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

7

6HUYLFH PHPEHUV QRZ UHFHLYH H[SHGLWHG DLUSRUW VHFXULW\ VFUHHQLQJV By David Vergun ARMY NEWS SERVICE

Service members are now eligible for expedited pre-flight screening, meaning military passengers will be able to get into an express line where they don’t have to remove their shoes and belts or laptops from their baggage. All Service members, including reserve and National Guard members, will be eligible for the Transportation Security Administration Precheck Program. Those in the Guard and reserve do not need to be on activated status, and Service members do not need to be in uniform, said Mark Howell, TSA spokesman.

Service members are now eligible for expedited pre-flight screening, meaning millitary passengers will be able to get into an express line where they don’t have to remove their shoes and belts or laptops from their baggage. Personnel in the Individual Ready Reserve, military retirees and Army and Department of Defense civilians are not eligible, he added. Service members will enter their Common Access Card identification number into the “Known Traveler” field when booking airline tickets. All airlines have this field on their forms, as does the Defense Travel System. Military personnel should consult

their local DTS representative for more information. Once a Service member books his or her ticket, the airline sends the CAC ID number and the member’s information to TSA’s Secure Flight office, a program that maintains a criminal and terrorist watch list. When the Service member prints his or her boarding pass at the airport, a “TSA Secure Flight” logo will appear at the top,

which will inform TSA personnel the member into the expedited pre-flight line, Howell said. Non-military spouses are not eligible, nor are their children, except for those aged 12 and under. However, Howell said TSA will soon offer them and the precheck program to the general public, albeit with an $85 fee and a five-year eligibility window. Many in the TSA are excited about extending the program to Service members, he said, as veterans make up approximately 25 percent of TSA’s work force, including Howell, a U.S. Army veteran. “In the future, we’d like to facilitate expedited pre-flight screening for more and more Americans,” he said.


8

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014

EnduringResilience

-RXUQH\ IURP 6RXWK 6XGDQ UHIXJHH WR $PHULFDQ $LUPDQ By Staff Sgt. Antoinette Gibson CJTF-HOA PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Two million people died, four million were displaced and thousands fled civil war, but by faith and perseverance, one “lost boy” who is now a U.S. Air Force Airman returns home. At the age of 5, U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Deng Pour, a survivor of the 1983-2006 Sudanese civil war lived through years of near starvation and genocide, but he never gave up. His early life was marked gun fire, enemy attacks and moving from village to village to stay alive. But one night, Sudanese government troops ambushed his village forcing him to flee to Ethiopia. “The thought of leaving never really crossed our minds until that night,” Pour said. “My aunt and I left everything we had and headed for Ethiopia. My aunt told me my mom had to stay behind to take care of my grandmother, but little did I know that my mom had been actually captured.” Pour said they survived by eating grass and mud. They watched men, women and children being killed. When he got tired, his aunt would carry him on her back as they walked miles at a time, ran from troops and avoided bombs dropped from planes. After three months of hardship, Pour and dozens of others arrived in Ethiopia at a refugee camp where they were safe but often had little to eat. A year later, his mother joined them. They had food and felt as if it was going to be home, he said. “When I saw my mom, I was so happy. I just knew everything would be okay, and we would have a normal life,” he said. After three years, the Ethiopian government was overthrown. A civil war broke out causing them to flee back to war-torn Sudan. “People kept saying, ‘you have to leave; you have to leave.’ We heard the gunfire get closer. We felt like it was life or death,” Pour explained. “We knew the road ahead would be tough, but we had to go. My mom, uncle, cousins and I headed toward Sudan, and my aunt fled with others to Ke-

At the age of 5, U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Deng Pour, a survivor of the 1983-2006 Sudanese civil war, lived through years of near starvation and genocide, but he never gave up. His life was filled with gun fire, attacks and moving from village to village to stay alive. nya.” About half of the young people who fled Ethiopia, more than 500, failed to complete the journey back to Sudan, Pour said. Some were shot, killed by wild animals, died of hunger, thirst, disease or utter exhaustion, and some died crossing the crocodile-infested Pibor River, he said. “But once again, I made it. I survived.” Pour said their home was not how they left it. Their village had burned down, and the livestock had been killed, but they made due with barely anything. One day a plane flew in to deliver aid, and Pour and his cousin stood watching in amazement; but little did they know that it was their way “home.” Pour’s uncle asked the pilot if he would take Pour and his cousin to Kakuma, a refugee camp in northern Kenya. His mother said she wanted a better life for them; so she sent them alone. At the refugee camp the elders from their local village formed loose family groups and took care of them.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Antoinette Gibson

U.S.Air Force Staff Sgt. Deng Pour reflects on his journey from being one of the “lost boys” of Sudan to becoming an American Airman. Pour is currently deployed to the Combined JointTask Force - Horn of Africa as the religious affairs non-commissioned officer in charge.

Pour and thousands of other southern Sudanese children became known as the “lost boys of Sudan.” At the camp, they attended school and learned basic reading, writing and arithmetic. For the next five years, life got better. “Sept. 17, 1999, is a day I will never forget. That was the day my aunt adopted me as her son and sent for me to come to the U.S.,” said Pour with tears in his eyes. Against all odds, Pour was on his way to America. At the age of 16 he could barely speak English and found himself below the academic standard, but he worked day and night to continue to learn English, reading, writing and arithmetic.

“People kept saying, ‘you have to leave; you have to leave.’ We heard the gunfire get closer. We felt like it was life or death. e knew the road ahead would be tough, but we had to go. My mom, uncle, cousins and I headed toward Sudan, and my aunt fled with others to Kenya.” — U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Deng Pour non-commissioned officer in charge of religious affairs Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa

Pour graduated high school and was accepted into Lindsey Wilson College in Kentucky on a soccer scholarship, but it didn’t take Pour long to realize the Air Force was his calling. Joining the Air Force was something he said he always wanted to do, but was unable to because he didn’t have a green card. “I knew as soon as I got my green card that I would join the Air Force,” Pour said. In 2006, an Air Force recruiter traveled three hours to meet Pour at his home in Fergus Falls, Minn. The recruiter assured Pour he would do whatever he could to help him enlist in the military. Pour could either wait a year for the job he wanted or enlist right away by leaving his specialty open. Without hesitation, Pour took the first available job to enlist in the U.S. Air Force. “Services was my first job, but once I was able to retrain, I cross trained into the chaplain corps. I knew this was where God called me to be.” Pour has been in the military for seven years with assignments at Barksdale Air Force Base, La. and Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. He has deployed to Kuwait, Afghanistan, and is currently deployed in Africa. SEE JOURNEY PAGE 9


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

/DQJOH\ $LU )RUFH %DVH XQLWV WUDLQ GXULQJ +$=0$7 H[HUFLVH

New Year, New Goals! Start the journey toward earning a degree and finding the career you want – even in the midst of a hectic military lifestyle!

Download our FREE eBook at: du/ e . m a h t n a gr milspouse

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jasmine Clemons, 633rd Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technician, puts on her gas mask during a hazardous material exercise at Langley Air Force Base, Dec. 18.The HAZMAT exercise tested the teams’ reaction and accuracy to a chemical emergency. RIGHT: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zachary Day, 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron emergency manager, and Senior Airman Felicia Still, 633rd Aerospace Medical Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technician, test for explosive-borne contamination.

9

www.peninsulawarrior.com

Grantham University 7200 NW 86th St., Kansas City, MO 64153 Grantham University is accredited by DETC. The Mark Skousen School of Business at Grantham University has been awarded the status of Candidate for Accreditation by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE). Copyright © 2014 Grantham University. All rights reserved. Job# p.13.268

Photo by Senior Airman Brittany Paerschke-O’Brien

One-Stop Convenience Is Here!

d. Blv on gt hin W as

an

ge

Bl

St

e

.

vd

th

N

e. Av

th

on

St .

ry

.

m

er

sa

So

is

Ja ck s

.

13 m

TireQuote.com

.

m

t.

th

ll S

St

ve

12

757-234-7577

FORT EUSTIS

nA ve

B Amank eri of ca

ch

Co

Bldg. 1383, 13th(Behind St. Burger LeeKing)Blvd.

tto

Ex

Le

Ft. Eustis

Pa

st Po ice Off er rg Bu ing K

He said life hasn’t always been easy since leaving his country, but when he was ready to give up, mentors like Chief Master Sgt. Dayton Lowry reminded him there will always be better days. “Chief, as well as many others, motivate me; the Air Force is a community where everyone wants to help,” Pour said. “There is always a leader or mentor [to help] when you are ready to give up. I have faced many road blocks in my life, but I’ve been reminded that if you are determined you can accomplish anything.” Pour is currently the noncommissioned officer in charge of the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa religious affairs where he works in a variety of support roles by building morale amongst the combined forces as well as assisting partner nation militaries improve their military chaplaincies. “He is a valuable member of our team. With a past so rich in this region, he provides us with firsthand knowledge on customs and traditions with our partnering countries,” said U.S. Navy Capt. Dana Reed, Director of Religious Affairs.

Pour said he uses his experiences to give back to those around him. “My goal in Africa is simple: to make a difference, whether it’s amongst my peers or in this country,” Pour said. “As I was going through my struggles, many people went out of their way to help me... The Air Force is a way for me to give back, to serve my adopted country because I know I’m representing something greater than myself.” For a long time, Pour felt he was unable to tell his story, but now feels he can use his experiences to motivate his fellow Service members. Reed said Pour encouraged him as well. “He told me his mother always used to tell him ‘eyes are for looking forward. I only hope my children have that kind of resiliency,” she said. Pour said his 25 year journey made him who he is today. “I will always remember my journey,” he said. “It is because of [it] I am where I am today; just a little faith, motivation and perseverance.” The road wasn’t easy for this Airman, but this “lost boy” understands the importance of resiliency.

13

JOURNEY FROM PAGE 8

Shop by brand, vehicle or tire size

Standard Oil Change

Standard Brake Service

Kendall® Motor Oil with Liquid Titanium. For the slickest oil change in town.

Suring-up stops since 1926. Precision brake repairs for your ride.

19

$

99

FREE Tire Rotation with any oil change

We’ll install new oil filter, refill up to 5 qrts. Kendall GT-1 High Performance Synthetic Blend with Liquid Titanium motor oil, lubricate chassis (if applicable). Most vehicles.

Ask about Premium Synthetic Oil Change S a v e t h r u 2 / 2 8 / 1 4 Valid at Ft. Eustis location Only!

Name Brand Tires

$

10% Off

We’ll install new brake pads, resurface rotors and inspect brake components. Price per axle. Ceramic brake pads may be extra. Most vehicles.

Select Bridgestone and Firestone Tires in stock. In store installation required. Savings off regular price. FREE Most vehicles. Alignment

9999

Ask about our Lifetime Brake Service S a v e

t h r u

2 / 2 8 / 1 4

Valid at Ft. Eustis location Only!

Chhectirek

wit purchase

S a v e

t h r u

2 / 2 8 / 1 4

Valid at Ft. Eustis location Only!

See store for complete service description and details. Redeem coupons at participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product or service and not to be used to reduce outstanding debt. No cash value. Offer void where prohibited.

0600 to 1800 Monday thru Friday • 0600 to 1700 Saturday • Closed Sunday


10

www.peninsulawarrior.com

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

â&#x20AC;˘

94 cents of every dollar supports programs and services for local military families.

JANUARY 10, 2014


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

11

LegallySpeaking

Understanding the landlord-tenant relationship By Brandi Smith and Capt. Alan Serrano 633RD AIR BASE WING JUDGE ADVOCATE

Most disputes between landlords and tenants are caused by one or both of the parties’ failure to meet its obligations related to the rental agreement. There are several steps tenants can take to ensure tenancy is peaceful and dispute-free. When concerned about a lease, or if a dispute arises during tenancy, Service members should seek legal advice. The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Legal Office is available to assist clients with disputes between military families and privatized housing.

Best practices for tenants Before signing the lease, read it thoroughly and ask questions if needed. Never assume the landlord will allow tenants to do things not in the lease, such as have a pet or paint the walls. Always seek legal advice if concerned or unsure of what lease provisions mean. It is best to clarify any questions before signing the lease to avoid being locked in to unfavorable terms or surprised when an issue arises. When reading the lease, look for military clauses that conform to the Service Members Civil Relief Act, which protects military members from forfeiting a security deposit and owing future rent upon receipt of Permanent Change of Station or Temporary Duty orders during



At participating McDonald’s. ©2013 McDonald’s. • 641793.1

tenancy. When making changes, ask the landlord to revise the lease or create an addendum. When signing a lease, the military member’s name must be on the lease to obtain full protection under SCRA, and spouses should not be the sole signatory on a lease. Also, when signing leases with non-military roommates, be aware that SCRA protections do not apply to civilians. While the military member may receive orders and sever the lease, the civilian may not be able to do the same. During move-in, take photos of the property before bringing in furniture. Pay particular attention to existing damage during walkthrough inspections, and be sure to retain copies of the inspection paperwork. Good photos will serve as a reference for the tenant and the landlord should a dispute about property conditions arise. Additionally, take photos of personal property after moving in, and obtain renter’s insurance. These photos will help renters with claims for damaged or stolen covered property. Also, when moving out, take photos of the property and keep records, as these photos can be useful when disputing a deduction to security deposits. Ask for all move-out inspection documentation in writing from the landlord, including an itemized list explaining deductions. Always provide a proper forwarding address to receive the deposit.

per delicious.

Maintaining the property A Service member tenant can be a “good” tenant by adhering to a few basic principles to ensure that he or she is not the cause of a maintenance dispute. First, strive to maintain the property in the same condition it was upon moving in. Normal “wear-and-tear,” such as the discoloration of window blinds from sunlight, is expected during any tenancy – therefore, by law, tenants are not financially responsible for it. However, damage to the property, such as holes in walls, is not considered normal wear-and-tear, and tenants are responsible for property damage. Naturally, accidents occur, and incidental damage is inevitable. When this happens, some tenants may be afraid or embarrassed to tell their landlord about the damage, and simply let the owner discover the damages during the walkthrough inspection on the last day of the lease. Do not be afraid to contact the landlord about the damage before moving out. Most landlords will appreciate the honesty, and may allow tenants to fix the damage or simply fix it for free themselves. Second, some leases include landscaping as part of required maintenance. The key to being a “good” tenant is maintaining the property in a way the landlord would want it to be maintained. Most landlords expect tenants to cut the grass or trim shrubbery at least a few times a

month. Make sure to ask the landlord for clarification if unsure of their expectations. It is always best to take photos of the property upon moving in, and ensure yard care requirements are included in the lease document. Finally, notify the landlord when something breaks as a result of normal daily use, such as a sink or toilet. Tenants are normally not responsible for this type of maintenance, but could be responsible for further damage caused by failing to notify the landlord of the issue in a timely fashion. Common examples include leaks in the ceiling or roof. If something breaks in the property, notify the landlord quickly to give them the opportunity to fix it before the damage gets worse. Notify the landlord of any damage well before moving out. Landlord-tenant relationships can become strained by preventable events. Service member tenants can achieve a good relationship with their landlord by respecting the landlord’s rights, meeting their tenant obligations under the lease and with questions or concerns. If a dispute does arise, the Service member should do their best to resolve it amicably, but if no resolution seems possible, or if a tenant is unsure on what to do, seek legal advice from the JBLE legal office. For more information or assistance, contact the Langley branch at 764-3277, or the Fort Eustis Branch at 878-3031.


12

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014

JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

13

2013 JBLE

Y

ear ea e

in pph photos

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

Photo by Senior Airman Jason J. Brown

U.S. Army Gen. Robert Cone, Training and Doctrine Command commander, cuts the Army and TRADOC birthday cake with Fort Eustis's newest Soldier, Spc. James Miller, TRADOC band member, and longest-serving civilian, Nelly Herbin,TRADOC management analyst, June 14, 2013 at Fort Eustis. A saber is traditionally used to cut the cake, harkening back to the beginning of the service when horse cavalry utilized sabers instead of bayonets in close combat.

U.S.Army Spc. Ryan Lewis (right), assigned to the 689th Rapid Port Opening Element, receives the Army Achievement Medal from Col. Charles R. Brown, 597th Transportation Brigade commander, during the brigade's annual Best Warrior Competition awards ceremony at the unit chapel annex at Fort Eustis, March 29, 2013. Lewis won top honors at the competition in the junior enlisted category, earning the title of 597th Trans. Bde. “Soldier of theYear.”

Photo by Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward

President Barack Obama greets the crowd at Langley Air Force Base, Feb. 26, 2013.The president shook hands with Service members and families from Langley before his visit to a Newport News shipyard.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Victo oria H. Taylor

Children from the Bethel Manor Chapel Protesta ant Youth Choir sing to the crowd during the Christmas tree e lighting ceremony at Langley Air Force Base, Dec. 3, 2013. This year marked the 46th year of the annual holiday traditiion.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Scott Kirchman, 128th Aviation Brigade instructor, demonstrates for Under Secretary of the Army Joseph W.Westphal how to troubleshoot a fault on a Chinook helicopter at Fort Eustis, Aug. 7, 2013.

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

Retired Service members fromVeterans of ForeignWars Post 824 salute the American Flag during the reciting of the Pledge of Allegiance during a 50th Anniversary Vietnam War Commemoration Flag revealing at the Langley Air Force Base commissary, Nov. 9, 2013.The ceremony was held to recognize the valor and sacrifice of Service members who served in theVietnamWar, and to present a new Department of Defense-sponsored Vietnam War 50th anniversary flag.

Austin Harvill Photo by A

RIGHT: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Elswick, 27th Fighter Squadron munitions training manager, embraces his family at Langley Air Force Base, Oct. 23, 2013, after returning from a six-month deployment. The 27th FS deployed to Kadena Air Base, Japan, in support of the Pacific Command’s Theater Security Package.

A Langley Airman plants an American flag in ho onor of a fallen Service member during the “Run for the Fallen” event in Hampton Roads, May 2, 2013. Familiess of fallen Service members stood by their respective hero o markers to thank the runners for their memorial run.

Photo by Senior Airman Brittany Paerschke-O’Brien

Photo by Staff Sgt. Wesley Farnsworth

U.S.Army Spc. Reuben Eldridge, 2013Army Soldier Show cast member, performs during the gold star tribute portion of performance at Fort Eustis, June 25. The gold star portion pays tribute to families whose loved one was lost in the line of duty.

Photo by Wesley Farnsworth

Members of the 7th Sustainment Brigade give Katherine Hammack, U.S.Army Installations, Energy and Environment assistant secretary, a tour of a Landing Craft Utility 2000 vessel at Fort Eustis, Sept. 25. During Hammack’s visit, she held meetings with leadership, had lunch with Soldiers and toured barracks and training areas.


14

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014

InTheNews

DOD adds synthetic marijuana to random drug testing policy By Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

The Department of Defense has expanded its zero tolerance for the use of illicit drugs to include synthetic marijuana, also known as “spice,” the director of DOD’s drug testing and program policy announced in December. U.S. Army Lt. Col. Tom Martin said sythetic marijuana will be included in the broad range of drugs for which the military randomly tests Service members. “The message we’re getting out now is that when you participate in our random urinalysis program, synthetic marijuana products or synthetic marijuana will now be tested along with our other drugs,” he said. “It’s been known in the general population, both in the medical community and various media reports, that synthetic marijuana drug use is a serious health concern.” Martin noted that while the military typically has a much lower level of drug use than in society at large, synthetic marijuana “still poses a significant risk to both the safety and readiness of our force.” “Prior to synthetic marijuana being banned, the department did a random study looking at a sampling of military urine specimens from all the different services to see if synthetic marijuana was be-

ing used by our members,” he said. “At that time, the positive rate, or the number of Service members who tested positive, was about 2.5 percent.” To put that in perspective, he said, in 2012 the overall positive rate for all the drugs tested for in the urinalysis program was 0.9 percent. “In 2012, synthetic marijuana products were banned through legislation,” Martin said. “So we went back and did a similar study, and what we found is that the actual numbers went down.” However, he added, a high number of Service members are using synthetic marijuana. In addition to testing for synthetic marijuana, the military also randomly tests all Service members for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines and other drugs in the amphetamine class, including methamphetamines and the drug known as “ecstasy.” The test also looks for codeine and morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, Vicodin and different diazepines, such as Valium and Xanax. Martin said even deployed troops are subject to random drug testing. “They are still mandated to be tested under the military’s random urinalysis program,” he said. “However, the frequency

Courtesy graphic

The Department of Defense has expanded its zero tolerance for the use of illicit drugs to include synthetic marijuana, also known as “spice,” the director of DOD’s drug testing and program policy announced in December 2013. In addition to testing for synthetic marijuana, the military also randomly tests all Service members for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines and other drugs in the amphetamine class, including methamphetamines and the drug known as “ecstasy.”The test also looks for codeine and morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone,Vicodin and different diazepines, such asValium and Xanax.

is determined by the operational tempo.” If random drug testing detects the presence of illegal drugs, Martin said, troops are subject to punishment under military law guidelines. “Any Service member who tests positive for either an illicit drug or misuse of a prescription drug falls under any actions deemed appropriate under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, as well actions that are appropriate as deemed by their

commander,” he said. With the addition of synthetic marijuana to an already stringent drug testing policy, Martin reiterated the department’s commitment to zero tolerance for the abuse of illicit drugs. “All Service members participating in our urinalysis program will be tested for cannabinoids,” he said. “And if they do test positive, they will be dealt with according to the Uniform Code of Military Justice.”

3HQWDJRQ DQQRXQFHV XSFRPLQJ FKDQJHV WR LPPLQHQW GDQJHU SD\ By Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

The Department of Defense will implement changes to imminent danger pay, effective June 1. “This is a process that began [in 2011] that included in-depth threat assessment from the combatant commands,” said DOD spokesperson U.S. Army Col. Steven Warren. “It was made in coordination with the Joint Staff, combatant commands and military services.” Warren noted this policy change was not a budget-driven decision, but part of a

Periodic recertification of imminent danger pay ensures that imminent danger designations match the actual conditions of designated countries so that the department can provide fair entitlements and benefits. The last recertification was completed in 2007.

routine recertification that “happens every couple of years – it’s an ongoing process.” According to a Jan. 3 DOD news release announcing the recertification, the combatant commands conducted in-depth threat assessments for countries within

their areas of responsibility. Following the review, it was determined that the imminent threat of physical harm to U.S. military personnel due to civil insurrection, civil war, terrorism or wartime conditions is significantly re-

duced in many countries, resulting in the discontinuation of imminent danger pay in those areas. Periodic recertification of IDP, according to the news release, ensures that imminent danger designations match the actual conditions of designated countries so that the department can provide fair entitlements and benefits. The last recertification was completed in 2007. The news release noted the following areas would no longer be designated as imminent danger areas for IDP purposes: SEE DANGER PAY PAGE 15


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

15

www.peninsulawarrior.com

Air Force enlisted retention board

scheduled to convene in June By Debbie Gildea AF PERSONNEL CENTER PUBLIC AFFAIRS

A U.S. Air Force enlisted retention board will convene at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas in June to consider eligible senior airmen through senior master sergeants for retention, Air Force Personnel Center officials said. The enlisted retention program is one of several expanded force management programs that have been or will be implemented this year, said Lt. Col. Rick Garcia, the AFPC Retirements and Separations Branch Chief. Other fiscal 2014 programs include a chief master sergeant retention board, officer force-shaping board, enhanced selective early retirement boards, a reduction in force board and officer and enlisted voluntary separation pay incentives. Airmen eligible to be considered by the retention board can apply for voluntary separation, or retirement if they are eligible, in lieu of board consideration. Airmen approved must separate by Jan. 31, 2015, or retire by Feb. 1, 2015. AFPC will accept applications Jan. 14 through April 3, 2014. The retention board will review enlisted members’ records, consisting of enlisted performance reports, decorations and a retention recommendation form to select individuals for continued retention. The board will consider Airmen who are in overmanned Air Force specialties, Garcia said. Senior airmen, staff sergeants and

Airmen eligible to be considered by the retention board can apply for voluntary separation (or retirement if they are eligible) in lieu of board consideration. Airmen approved must separate by Jan. 31, 2015, or retire by Feb. 1, 2015. AFPC will accept applications Jan. 14 through April 3, 2014. technical sergeants who are in an overmanned specialty with a Jan. 1, 2013 or earlier date of rank may be eligible for this board. Eligible Airmen may be able to apply for voluntary separation and may be eligible for voluntary separation pay if they have more than six years of service. If they have more than 15 years of service, they may be eligible for early retirement under the Temporary Early Retirement Authority program. Airmen who apply for voluntary separation pay must agree to serve in the Individual Ready Reserve for at least three years following separation from active duty. Master sergeants and senior master sergeants who have at least 20 years of total active federal military service by Oct. 31, 2014, in an overmanned specialty and have a Jan. 1, 2013, or earlier date of rank, may be eligible for this board. Eligible master and senior

master sergeants who voluntarily retire must do so no later than Jan. 1, 2015. “While retention boards are not uncommon for officers, enlisted boards are new,” Garcia said. “So, senior raters should be aware that they must prepare and sign a retention recommendation form for each of their senior NCOs eligible for the board.” Squadron commanders must prepare and sign a retention form for all eligible senior airmen through technical sergeants. Airmen who apply for separation or retirement in lieu of meeting the retention board may be able to use the limited active-duty service commitment waiver process, which is described in PSDM 13-64, accessible on the myPers website at https://mypers.af.mil. In addition, Airmen can apply for separation or retirement if they have between 18 and 20 years of service by Jan. 30, 2015, even though they will not meet the retention board. No Airmen may apply if they are under investigation, under civil charges, pending disciplinary action, pending involuntary discharge, under appellate review, projected for separation or have submitted a separation or retirement application that has been coordinated by their commander and is pending approval. For complete eligibility requirements, application instructions and retention form information, visit myPers and enter PSDM 13-129 in the search window.

SPECIALISTS IN ORTHODONTICS

Braces For Adults and Children

• Thomas W. Butterfoss, D.M.D., P.C. • Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics

• Jennifer L. Butterfoss Barton, D.D.S., M.S. • New Patients Welcome Major Insurance Accepted • Invisalign Provider 3 LOCATIONS: • 2111 Hartford Rd., Hampton 838-3400 • 6882-A Main Street, Gloucester 804-695-2575 • 4310 George Washington Memorial Hwy, Grafton 898-5448 www.drbutterfoss.com

MENTION THIS PUBLICATION FOR COMPLIMENTARY EXAM

HARRY H. HEYSON III Attorney At Law

from $ Divorce, Uncontested ................ 175 Separation Agreement ................ $75

★Fault and Contested Divorces ★Custody Hearings Mariner Bldg., Suite 103 12388 Warwick Blvd., N.N

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

595-1155

HEALTHY TEETH

For a Lifetime

• Providing Dental Care For Your Entire Family • Military Insurance Provider • New Patients & Emergencies Welcome JEFFREY P. BOOTH, DDS • Provider of ClearCorrect Clear 757-827-0001 Braces for ALL Ages. 2212 Executive Drive – Suite A | Hampton, VA

DANGER PAY FROM PAGE 14 ■ The nine land areas of East Timor, Haiti, Liberia, Oman, Rwanda, Tajikistan, United Arab Emirates, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. ■ The six land areas and airspace above Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro. ■ The four water areas of the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, and the Red Sea. ■ The water area and air space above the Persian Gulf. “Of specific note,” Warren said, “imminent danger pay will remain in effect for the following: Iraq, Af-

ghanistan, Lebanon, Jordan, Pakistan, Syria, Yemen and Egypt.” Although 2013 statistics are not currently available, Warren noted the year prior, 194,189 personnel received imminent danger pay. “Approximately 50,000 [fewer] will receive imminent danger pay,” he said. “In [2012], we spent approximately $500 million on imminent danger pay. This will result in a reduction of approximately $100 million.” The benefit provides troops in imminent danger areas about $7.50 per day up to the maximum monthly rate of $225, Warren said.


16

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014

Women continue to cross U.S. Army combat lines By Marie Berberea FORT SILL

Women have been crossing the lines into combat for years, but for the first time the Army is taking mindful steps to train and integrate them for such positions. The Army recently completed its notification to Congress to allow female artillery officers to serve in positions throughout the Army excluding Special Operation Forces. They can now serve within direct support field artillery battalions, brigade combat teams and cannon battalions in fires brigades. These positions include fire direction officer (platoon and battalion), cannon platoon leader and executive officer. Fire support jobs at the company and battalion level are still closed and will not open until infantry and armored military occupational specialties accept females. Seventeen brigade combat teams are transitioning these Soldiers into their units in steps using the Women in the Army program. Steps 1 and 2 focus on the integration of female leaders and Soldiers at the battalion level. Steps 3 and 4 focus on the integration of female leaders and Soldiers at the company level. Currently nine brigades are at step 2 and eight others are at step 1. “The guidance changed in the beginning of September. I wrote a commander directly at Fort Campbell, and I brought up the [military personnel] message in saying I wanted the opportunity just like everyone else to expand my positions,” said 2nd Lt. Caitlin Stein. Stein is one of the first, along with her classmate 2nd Lt. Ashley Solonar, who are being placed in a brigade combat team directly after training. “I think it’s just like any branch integration that sooner or later it will become normal,” said Stein. For the women in the Field Artillery Basic Officer Leader Course the announcement answered a lot of their concerns about their futures, particularly the officers who aren’t branch detailed and able to switch from field ar-

Female artillery officers are now able to serve in positions throughout the Army excluding Special Operation Forces. Now they can serve within direct support field artillery battalions, brigade combat teams and cannon battalions in fires brigades. These positions include fire direction officer (platoon and battalion), cannon platoon leader and executive officer. tillery in the future. “Every time we had the commandant or battalion commander talk to us, I would raise my hand and ask what this means for females because it looked like we were at a dead end as soon as we made captain. Since we couldn’t take a platoon and we basically need to take command, our career stops here,” said 2nd Lt. Katrina Nathaniel. After completing the five-and-onehalf month training, the women are nervous about their futures, but they are certain they are capable of completing the mission. “I think any young lieutenant going out to the force has a right to be nervous because it’s our first duty station, it’s our first time being in front of people actually leading Soldiers,” said Solonar. “I think there will be proving to do, but at the same time we’ve received the same training, so it’s not like we’re any less proficient. Most of the females in our class were in the top of the class. It’s not that we don’t know what we’re do-

Photo by Marie Berberea

2nd Lt. Rachel Parker, Field Artillery Basic Officer Leader Course Class 7-13, leads a formation during the Red Leg War, Dec. 11, 2013. She will join other female officers as the first able to officially hold positions within direct support field artillery battalions, brigade combat teams and cannon battalions in fires brigades.

ing, it’s how we’ll be perceived,” said 2nd Lt. Haley Fisher. Those concerns were brought up while they were in training, and the women are fully aware of the pressure that comes with being part of the groundbreaking process for leading Soldiers. “The topic got brought up about women on the battlefield, and I know someone spoke up and was like ‘I don’t know if I could trust a woman to carry my weight if I were to go down. How could they carry my ruck and my gear and myself?’ and it was just hypothetical conversation, but it’s stuff like that that people are going to base their general opinions off,” said Stein. As part of FA BOLC, the Soldiers went to the field to learn the different jobs on the gunline. Nathaniel said she knew there were questions about whether or not the women would be able to handle the tasks when it came to loading

“Every time we had the commandant or battalion commander talk to us I would raise my hand and ask what this means for females because it looked like we were at a dead end as soon as we made captain. Since we couldn’t take a platoon and we basically need to take command, our career stops here. You guys are letting us in, but we’ll only get so far. When that came out and they said we get to take command now I was like there you go.” — 2nd Lt. Katrina Nathaniel Field Artillery Basic Officer Leader Course

the 95-pound 155 mm rounds into the guns, but she wanted to show it is possible, even with an injury. “[Field artillery] was my third choice, but if I can open up doors for females coming up I’m going to do it. So I was like ‘I have to lift this round. I don’t care if I’m hurt, I’ve got to lift it.’ One of the gun chiefs was watching me as I was forcing the round and dropping it and getting it set,” said Nathaniel. “I’m just trying to show that females [deserve] a chance. If they can do it let them do it.” “We’re going to be the trendsetters on how we handle the situation. That’s what they told me going through [Officer Candidate School], ‘Look you guys are the G.I. Janes going in.’ How we’re perceived by the younger enlisted Soldiers is going to make it easier for the females to come after us,” said Nathaniel. The officers may be some of the few females in a male dominated field, but they are excited about the glass ceiling shattering to allow enlisted women to join them as well. They all agreed that the standards to allow females to serve in combat roles do not need to be lower. On the contrary, they expect and appreciate being held to the same standards. “Look I’m a person. Expect me to do whatever the job requires me to do because that’s what I’m here to do that’s what I’ve been trained for and that’s what I’m going to do to the best of my ability,” said Solonar.


JANUARY 10, 2014

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

â&#x20AC;˘

www.peninsulawarrior.com

17

1HZ ODZ EULQJV FKDQJHV WR 8QLIRUP &RGH RI 0LOLWDU\ -XVWLFH By David Vergun ARMY NEWS SERVICE

The National Defense Authorization Act passed last month requires sweeping changes to the Uniform Code of Military Justice, particularly in cases of rape and sexual assault. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are the most changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen since a full committee studied it decades ago,â&#x20AC;? said U.S. Army Lt. Col. John L. Kiel Jr., OfďŹ ce of the Judge Advocate General Army Criminal Law Division policy branch chief. Key provisions of the UCMJ that were rewritten under the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014, signed Dec. 26, 2013, by President Barack Obama, are Articles 32, 60, 120 and 125. The law now requires the services to have judge advocates serve as Article 32 investigating ofďŹ cers. Previously, the Army was the only service in which judge advocates routinely did not serve as Article 32 investigating ofďŹ cers. Article 32 hearings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; roughly equivalent to grand jury proceedings in the civilian judicial system â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are held to determine if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough evidence to warrant a general court-martial â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the most serious type of court-martial used for felony-level offenses such as rape and murder. Congress decided that the services needed to have trained lawyers, judge advocates, consider the evidence, since in their view, trained lawyers often are in the best position to make determinations to go forward with general courts-martial, Kiel said. Judge advocates didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always serve as Article 32 investigating ofďŹ cers in the Army

el fraud. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the case of complex [temporary duty] â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are the most changes to fraud, for instance, you might want to have the Manual for Courts-Martial that a ďŹ nance ofďŹ cer as the IO,â&#x20AC;? Kiel said. Besides subject-matter experts being in weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen since a full committee the best position to be Article 32 investigatstudied it decades ago.â&#x20AC;? ing ofďŹ cers, he said, there simply might not â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lt. Col. John L. Kiel Jr. be enough judge advocates in the area of the policy branch chief installation. For example, U.S. Army Forces Command would have enough judge advocates to do Article 32 hearings, Kiel said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;largely because we try four times the num- but if a number of hearings came up at once ber of cases of any of the other services,â&#x20AC;? he at U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Comexplained â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an issue of not having enough mand installations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a smaller major comjudge advocates for the high volume of cas- mand â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they might come up short. es. That might jeopardize the right of an acArmy ofďŹ cials asked Congress to consid- cused to a speedy trial if the clock runs out, er its resourcing issue, he said, so the leg- he noted. And, if a judge advocate is ďŹ&#x201A;own islators wrote an exception, stating that in from another installation, travel costs â&#x20AC;&#x153;where practicable, you will have a judge would be incurred. advocate conduct the Article 32 investigaâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Those are very real situations that could tion.â&#x20AC;? impact the ability to get it done expediKiel explained what â&#x20AC;&#x153;where practicableâ&#x20AC;? tiously and cost effectively,â&#x20AC;? Kiel said. means, citing a number of circumstances Other attorneys on an installation cannot where it could apply. always be tapped for Article 32 investigatMany courts-martial were conduct- ing ofďŹ cer work, he said. On larger installaed over the years in Iraq and Afghanistan tions, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we have operational law attorneys where soldiers were deployed and some of that potentially could cover down on some those involved war crimes, he said. In these of these areas, but we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a lot of cases, the Army found it sometimes was those,â&#x20AC;? he added. best to have line ofďŹ cers be the Article 32 inOn other installations, Kiel said, adminvestigating ofďŹ cers, because they could best istrative law attorneys might have conďŹ&#x201A;icts put themselves in the shoes of the accused. of interest if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve previously rendered Those line ofďŹ cers â&#x20AC;&#x153;understood what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some kind of legal review on a case. like to make decisions in the heat of battle â&#x20AC;&#x153;And, our administrative law attorneys better than a lawyer without those expe- are always busy reviewing various sorts of riences,â&#x20AC;? Kiel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They added a level of investigations and helping the command judgment that sometimes judge advocates deal with such things as ethics and family could not.â&#x20AC;? readiness issues,â&#x20AC;? he continued. Another example, he said, might be travâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Then we have our criminal law advo-

cates, trial counsels and defense counsels,â&#x20AC;? Kiel added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all conďŹ&#x201A;icted out from being IOs, because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re actually tasked with presenting evidence during the [Article 32 hearing] as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re acting as counsel to the government or to the accused.â&#x20AC;? The ďŹ scal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act gives the services one year to phase in this change to Article 32, stipulating that where practicable, judge advocates conduct the investigations. This one-year time period provides needed time for the staff judge advocates to ďŹ gure out if they have enough judge advocates to ďŹ ll the requirement to cover down on all the Article 32 hearings and determine which installations are struggling to meet the requirements, Kiel said. Another impact to courts-martial practice is the new requirement for a special victims counsel to provide support and advice to the alleged victim, Kiel said. For example, the special victims counsel must inform the victim of any upcoming hearings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; pretrial conďŹ nement, parole board, clemency and so on â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and inform the victim that he or she can choose to attend any of those. The victim also will be notiďŹ ed in advance of trial dates and be informed of any delays. Furthermore, Kiel said, the special victims counsels may represent the alleged victims during trial, ensuring their rights are not violated, as under the Rape Shield Rule, for example. The Rape Shield Rule, or Military Rule of Evidence 412, prevents admission of evidence concerning sexual predisposition and behavior of an alleged victim of sexual assault. For more of this story, visit www.jble.af.mil

   

    


18

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014

HealthCare

9LFWLPV RI VH[XDO DVVDXOW µVDIH ZLWK PHGLFDO IRUHQVLF QXUVHV¶ By David Vergun ARMY NEWS SERVICE

It’s important for victims of sexual assault to know that they are safe with the medical personnel, said a nurse who’s a sexual assault medical forensic examiner. “We will take care of their emotional, safety, medical and forensic care with the understanding that victims have been through a traumatic event and are still emotionally distraught,” said Kelly Taylor, Womack Army Medical Center adolescents and adult sexual assault nurse examiner at Fort Bragg, N.C. Taylor said recent changes in Army medicine have made the process smoother for victims than before. Previously, victums might have had to re-tell their story four to six times to different health care providers, law enforcement and victim advocates. “It’s re-victimizing and traumatizing to have to relive that experience over and over,” she said, explaining that now, she and the 28 forensic doctors and nurses she supervises provide continuity of care to every victim so they only need to tell their story once and the navigation through law enforcement and medical is helped along for them. She described this process as “patientcentered care.” In this process, victims will usually be seen by victim advocates, who often ac-

“(Sexual assault medical forensic examiners are) doing this for all the right reasons. They really want to help people and make the process as smooth and as painless as possible for them. They’re an amazing group.” — Kelly Taylor sexual assault nurse examiner for adolescents and adults at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, N.C. company them to the emergency triage unit where a medical screening takes place. Only after needed medical care is provided will victims be offered the choice of having a forensic exam, the details of which are fully explained to them. The exams are held in a room specifically dedicated only to forensic exams, she said. Taylor said the forensic exam can take roughly four to six hours and the exam itself can often be traumatic because victims are reliving the assault as they provide all of the details of what happened in a 14-page document, known as the DD2911. The details include personal questions about drinking, drug ingestion, threats

made and so on, she said. The exam documentation then goes into a box which also contains all of the tools for the exam. The box comes sealed and isn’t opened until the forensic nurse and the patient are in the forensic exam room, she explained. Separate consents are required for each level of the exam – photography, drawing blood, swabs, fluorescence imaging for fluids, fingernail cuttings and scrapings, collection of clothing and a full genital exam and photography, she said, adding that some of the procedures can be a bit painful, such as pulling a hair sample. “I always tell patients ‘I’m doing the kit but you’re in control of it,’” said Taylor. Each piece of evidence collected has a separate envelope, all of which are placed in the box. Once the exam is completed, the box is resealed to protect the “chainof-custody” of the evidence, she said. Patients who receive forensic exams include not only victims but also the accused, and these patients can include men, women and children. Taylor added patients must consent to the exam and can opt out of any part at any time, even after signing the consent form. Victims and the accused are seen in different sections of the medical treatment facility and they are seen by different forensic nurses, she said. “[Victims as well as the accused] receive the same level of care,” said Tay-

lor. “We’re not an arm of law enforcement or of the courts. We’re forensic providers who are neutral and unbiased.” Although taking the forensic exam is strictly voluntary and can be long and somewhat painful, Taylor said most of the victims, as well as those accused, opt to consent to undergo the entire exam. Part of being honest with the patients, Taylor added, is not giving them false hope. “We’re never going to look at a victim and say definitively, ‘you were assaulted or you were not assaulted,’” she said. “What I can do is say, ‘there are findings consistent with sexual assault.’” She compared the process to putting together a puzzle with different pieces such as the victim’s account, evidence collected, witness statement, creating a picture of the scene. “To get definitive evidence, [nurses look for] blood or body fluid from the alleged suspect found on the victim that indicates unwanted sexual contact has occurred,” she said. “[We] also look for injuries.” Once the exam is over, the forensic nurse might not see the victims again unless they opt for an unrestricted report, meaning involving the courts and law enforcement. Should they choose that route, the same forensic nurse who examined them will testify in court, she said. SEE NURSES PAGE 19

U.S. Army courtesy photo

The U.S. Army’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention program is a key component of efforts to make the force ready and resilient.The Army is committed to preventing sexual assault and providing assurance to all sexual assault victims that offenders will be held appropriately accountable.


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

19

Blood program director urges to join ‘arms race’ By Jim Garamone AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

U.S. Air Force Col. Richard H. McBride asked all Service members to be part of a new “arms race.” McBride, Armed Services Blood Program director, wants Service members to roll up their sleeves and donate blood to help their fellow Service members and their families. Historically, blood levels shrink around the holidays, and since 1970, January has been declared National Blood Donor Month. “January, just like the summer months, is a time when there is a decrease in the blood supply, primarily because people are preoccupied with the holidays,” said McBride. “This is a great time to encourage donors and keep them aware that we need donations 12 months a year, not just in the summer.” The ASBP is dedicated to ensuring Service members who need blood get it. The fighting overseas has consumed blood resources, and one injured Service member may need 40 units in order to get back home, said McBride. The program’s staff wants to ensure that every wounded warrior who can make it home, does. “It’s a sacred mission that we hold in our hearts,” said McBride. “We never want to hear that they didn’t come home because they didn’t have enough blood.” The program also provides blood products for stateside Service members and their families. “Right now we collect about 10,000

NURSES FROM PAGE 18 Whether they choose restricted or unrestricted, the victims will be offered follow-up care by doctors, nurses, healthcare providers and victim advocates, Taylor said. She also said that while coming in for the forensic exam sooner is better than later, victims should not hesitate to come in, even days later and even if they bathed or

units per month – or about 120,000 a year,” said McBride, who hails from New York City’s borough of Queens. “In peacetime, it can go as low as 90,000 [units] per year, but at the height of Operation Iraqi Freedom we were collecting about 150,000 to 160,000 a year.” One blood donation can result in four products. Red blood cells are used when a Service members is in danger of bleeding to death. Blood plasma is liquid used to prevent bleeding. Platelets are blood cell fragments and also help accelerate clotting. The final product is cryoprecipitate, which is also used to accelerate clotting. Doctors use whole blood and there have been times during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan where doctors had to transfuse whole blood to wounded warriors. In times of crises, doctors sometimes must turn to “the walking blood bank.” This is an emergency whole-blood collection from Service members. “It’s definitely not planned, but we train for it,” McBride said. “In those cases, we ask everyone to roll up their

File photo by Staff Sgt. Jeff Nevison

The director of the Armed Services Blood Program wants Service members to roll up their sleeves and donate blood to help their fellow Service members and their families. Historically, blood levels shrink around the holidays, and since 1970, January has been declared National Blood Donor Month.

sleeves and donate at a moment’s notice. Our troops donate, and those deployed have no problem rolling up their sleeves if they are available to save another warrior’s life.” The blood program follows all Food and Drug Administration rules, even when in a war zone, McBride said. The Armed Services Blood Program has 21 blood centers in the United States and

“January, just like the summer months, is a time when there is a decrease in the blood supply, primarily because people are preoccupied with the holidays. This is a great time to encourage donors and keep them aware that we need donations 12 months a year, not just in the summer.” — Air Force Col. Richard H. McBride director of the Armed Services Blood Program

showered, although doing the latter isn’t recommended. Science and technology for extracting DNA is constantly improving and evidence can still be gleaned days later, so Taylor encourages patients to come in. Taylor’s team of 28 forensic examiners are on call 24/7, 365 days a year, so someone will always be there for the victim, she said. All have volunteered to do forensic ex-

ams and all have received forensic exam training that includes counseling skills, she said, adding that it’s a collateral duty with most working as emergency room doctors and nurses. “They often dedicate extra hours after they’ve done their normal shift to provide forensic care,” she said. As to why anyone would want to do extra hours in work that can only be described as arduous, she said “they’re do-

overseas. Blood donors must be 18 or older, in good health and free of any bloodborne infectious diseases. The armed services program accepts donations from service members, family members, DOD civilians, contractors and veterans. The typical donation takes about 45 minutes and could save the lives of several military members thousands of miles away, he said. “You can help bring them back to their families,” McBride said. Service members at Joint Base Langley Eustis can give to the cause during the next ASBP blood drive at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m Jan. 22. Registration will take place in the 1st floor atrium located in the main entrance of the hospital. For more information, visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil or e-mail Ralph.peters@med.navy.mil.

ing this for all the right reasons. They really want to help people and make the process as smooth and as painless as possible for them. They’re an amazing group.” Taylor is helping to ensure the same level of care and training is provided elsewhere around the Army and she provides forensic exam training for other installations twice a year, along with post-training follow-ups.


20

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity

JANUARY 10, 2014

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Tuition assistance changes

Community Events Council

Effective Dec. 31, 2013, the goarmyed.com education portal placed a hold on the records of all Soldiers who had not met the one year of service requirement for tuition assistance. Soldiers are prohibited from using TA until after one year completing initial entry training, advanced individual training or the basic officer leadership course. For active duty Soldiers, the basic active service date was compared in the integrated total Army personnel database for 18 months prior. For reserve component Soldiers, the pay entry basic date was compared in ITAPB 30 months prior. Soldiers with holds on their accounts who do not fit into the categories listed above can call the Bateman Army Education Center at 878-2083 for more information.

The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Community Events Council will meet from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 22 at the Fort Eustis Club.The council serves as a communication link to increase awareness for community residents concerning initiatives, programs, activities and facilities.The Installation Volunteer of the Quarter recognition ceremony will take place during the meeting. All Soldiers, spouses and civilians are invited to attend. For more information, contact Donna Cloy at 878-3042 or Sharon Rector at 878-3129.

MLK Jr. Birthday observance The 93rd Signal Brigade will host a Martin Luther King Jr. birthday observance from 2 to 3 p.m. Jan. 10 at Jacobs Theater. The guest speaker is Maj. Gen. LaWarren V. Patterson, U.S. Army Signal Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon commanding general. For more information, contact Sgt. 1st Class Ronald Moore at 878-2546.

Home buying and selling seminars The Fort Eustis Housing Referral Office will host a Home Buying Seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 14 and a Home Selling Seminar from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 16. Both seminars will take place at the Civil Engineer Division conference room at 1407 Washington Blvd. Industry speakers will include a realtor, mortgage lender, attorney and home inspector. The seminars are free and open to the public. Please RSVP at least three business days prior to attending the seminar of your choice. To register for the seminar, call 878-2977/5687/5579.

Red Cross blood drive The U.S. Army Medical Department Activity will sponsor an American Red Cross blood drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 22 at the U.S. Army Reserve Center, Bldg. 1034 on the corner of Schultz st. and 24th st. The event will provide the opportunity for Joint Base Langley-Eustis personnel to donate blood and support this critical cause. For more information, contact Capt.Vidhika Persaud at 3147584 or vidhika.m.persaud.mil@mail.mil.

Scholarships for military children Applications for the 2014 “Scholarships for Military Children” program are available at commissaries worldwide or at www.militaryscholar.org. The application deadline is Feb. 28 and packages can be hand-delivered or mailed to a commissary. Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted. Applicants must be a dependent or unmarried child of an active duty, reserve or National Guard Service member or retiree, or a survivor of an active duty or retired military member. Applicants and sponsors must also be enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a Department of Defense identification card. For more information, call (856) 616-9311 or visit online at militaryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com.

Army Community Service classes Army Community Service classes and workshops for January will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays at 501 Madison Ave. ■ Credit Reporting, Scores and Debt Management – 9 to 10 a.m., Jan. 21. ■ Developing Your Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., Jan. 14 and 28. ■ Effective Conflict Management, Civilian Professional Development – 1:30 to 3 p.m., Jan. 23. Registration is required. ■ Effective ResumeWriting – 9 a.m. to noon, Jan. 17. ■ Evenings with Army Family Team Building – 6 to 8 p.m., Jan. 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. ■ Federal Employment – 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 23. ■ Financial ReadinessTraining – 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Jan. 17. ■ Job Search Strategies – 10 to 11 a.m. on Mondays. ■ ManagingYour Checking Account – 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., Jan. 19. ■ Military Knowledge for Military Spouses – 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., Jan. 29; 9 a.m. to 2:45 p.m., Jan. 30; and 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Jan. 31. Registration is required. ■ Play Mornings Play Group – 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays at 1102 Pershing Ave. ■ Spouse ResilienceTraining – 9 a.m. to noon, Jan. 12-16. ■ Volunteer ManagementTraining for FRG Leaders and Liaisons – 10 to 11:30 a.m., Jan. 21. Registration is required. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Fort Eustis USO events The Fort Eustis United Service Organization is offering the following events at 833 Monroe Ave. ■ Super Bowl XLVIII Party – 5 p.m., Feb. 2. Light refreshments will be served. ■ Family Movie Night – 7 p.m., Feb. 7. The PG movie “Epic” will be shown and parents must stay with their children. Crafts will be provided and light refreshments will be served. ■ Winter Olympics Viewing – 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. The events listed above are open to all military identification card holders and their families. Please RSVP at Facebook.com/USOHRCV/Events. For more information, call 878-2415.

Army Career and Alumni Program The Army Career and Alumni Program is offering the following classes and workshops: ■ Boots to Business Training Workshop – 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 11-12. The workshop is geared toward transitioning Soldiers pursuing entrepreneurship opportunities and small business ownership. To register, call 878-4955. ■ Career Expo – 1:30 to 3 p.m., Jan. 22. Employers, college recruiters and other transition service providers are invited to come and network with transitioners and their family members. Job seekers should dress for success and bring resumes. Featured employers will include those in the areas of towing, shipbuilding, law enforcement, power and electricity, and more. Various colleges and universities will also be represented. ■ Employer Days – 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Jan. 15 and 29. The event will feature networking and interfacing with employers seeking to hire transitioning military members. ■ Informational Recruiting Event – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 28. The featured employer has vacancies in the aerospace industry for rotary wing pilots and maintainers, and supply, contracts and strength management personnel. To view open positions, visit http:// careers.utc.com/text and click on “Sikorsky.” To RSVP, email Reba Gordon at reba.d.gordon.civ@mail.mil or Danita Johnson at danita.a.johnson.ctr@mail.mil. ■ Informational Recruiting Event – 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Jan. 30-31. The featured employer is seeking personnel with electronics skills, training and experience in Ohms Law. To view open positions, visit www.mcdean.com. To RSVP, email Reba Gordon at reba.d.gordon.civ@mail.mil or Danita Johnson at danita.a.johnson.ctr@mail.mil. ■ Lunchtime Workshop – 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Jan. 22. ACAP and Civilian Personnel Advisory Center staff will provide training on executive interviewing. For more information and access to handout materials, call 878-4955. ■ Transition GPS (TAP Workshop) – 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 27-31. The executive class will take place from 7:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 13-17. This training provides transitioning Soldiers and their family members with the skills necessary to succeed in civilian employment and educational pursuits. Topics will include financial planning, resume writing, interviewing techniques, job search tips, VA benefits (disability ratings, filing claims, and vocational rehabilitation) and MOS Crosswalk. ■ Veterans Benefits – A Veterans Affairs Claims Office representative will be available from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 21 to provide assistance with preparing claims packets; walk-ins are welcome. The VA Claims Workshop will be held at 9 a.m. Jan. 21 at 804 Lee Blvd. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place at 705 Washington Blvd., suite 71. For more information, call 878-4955.


JANUARY 10, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity

www.peninsulawarrior.com

Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

Order of Daedalians lunch meeting The Langley Air Force Base chapter of the Order of Daedalians, the Fraternal Order of Military Pilots, will hold its monthly luncheon Jan. 16 at noon at the Langley Club. For more information, contact Maj. Joe Stallings at Joseph. Stallings@us.af.mil or langley.daedalians@verizon.net.

Community Commons opening The new Community Commons will be moving into the old Youth Center, located near the Child Development Center and Housing Office. All Community Center programs will be included in the move. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 2:30 Jan. 24. For more information, call 764-2984

Free financial education seminars Langley MPF Customer Service Office hours Beginning Jan. 2, 2014, the Langley Customer Service Office will utilize “Military in Uniform Priority hours” on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at the Langley Air Force Base MPF. To better support customers and provide quicker processing for Active Duty personnel, an updated category of “Active Duty in Uniform” will be available on the sign-in computer located in the Customer Service waiting area. For more information, contact Michael Halacy at 7642270 or michael.halacy.ctr@us.af.mil.

Armed Services Blood Program Drive

Home buying seminar

The Armed Services Blood Program will conduct a blood drive at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 22. Registration will take place in the first floor atrium located in the main entrance of the hospital. For more information visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil or e-mail Ralph.peters@med.navy.mil.

The 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron Housing Office will host a home buying seminar on the first or second Monday of each month from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. until Nov. 3. Three industry representatives, including a realtor, lender and home inspector, will host each class and aim to help participants understand Virginia state laws and procedures. Children and pets are not allowed to attend these classes. For more information and specific class times, contact David Kea at david.kea@langley.af.mil, or at 764-5040.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration A Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration ceremony at the Langley Base Theater Jan. 17 at 11 a.m. The event will feature Mrs. Edith G. White, Urban League of Hampton Roads president and CEO, as the keynote speaker. For more information or to RSVP, visit einvitations.afit. edu/inv/anim.cfm?i=179186&k=03664B087351.

Upcoming HAWC classes ■

‘Correct your Weakness’ – Beginning Jan. 28, the Health and Wellness Center will host “Correct your Weakness” at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base. The course will go through April 1, 2014, and consists of four classes which address issues that occur during strength training. Attendees are required to wear physical training gear to the program. ■ ‘Weighting onWomen’ –The Health and wellness Center will host “Weighting on Women” every second Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base.The class will address women interested in becoming leaner or stronger. Attendees are required to wear PhysicalTraining gear to the class. For more information, contact Tiffany Owen at Tiffany. owen.3.ctr@us.af.mil or call 764-8141.

2013 ACC HQ Medallion Ceremony The Air Combat Command headquarters Medallion Ceremony will be held March 7 at 9 a.m. at the Static Display Hangar at Langley Air Force Base. For more information about the ceremony, contact Master Sgt. Christopher McDougal at christopher.mcdougal@us.af.mil or 679-5978.

Volunteer drivers needed Volunteer drivers are needed to transport disabled veterans to appointments in Richmond and Hampton. A van will be provided for transportation. For more information, contact Richard Moore at 804-815-0730.

21

Bateman Library hours of operation

The Langley Federal Credit Union will host free financial-education seminars at the Langley Member Education Center in Newport News. The classes include: ■ Tax update seminar – Jan. 16 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The seminar aims to prepare tax payers for new and changing tax laws. ■ AARP Driver Safety Class – Feb. 3 and 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants are required to attend both classes. The seminar will cover rules of the road, operating vehicles in challenging environments and adjustments to common, age-related change in vision, hearing and reaction time. This course will cost $12 for AARP members and $14 for nonmembers. ■ Fraud and scam seminar – Jan. 25 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The seminar will cover identifying theft schemes, fraud defense, common scams and victim response. ■ Homeownership seminar – Jan. 25 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The seminar will cover credit reports, lenders’ roles, budgeting and managing personal finances, relationship with the real estate agent, home inspection and the closing process. For more information or to register for a seminar, visit www.langleyfcu.org/community/seminars or contact Kitty Simon at 825-7112.

King Street construction

Discounted tickets and season passes to local amusement parks are available through Langley Information,Tickets and Tours. For more information, call 764-7176.

Traffic flow outside the King Street Gate at Langley Air Force Base will change due to continuation of the city of Hampton’s North King Street Corridor Improvement Project. For the safety of the workers and the public, one lane in each direction will be closed while installation of a center lane and sewer improvements occur, and the improvements are estimated to take four months to complete. Commuters are advised to follow the work signs, drive slowly and consider taking an alternate route if possible.

Langley USO move

Challenger Little League

The Uniformed Services Location of Hampton Roads is moving from their location in the Langley Community Center. A location has yet to be determined, but more information will be released when it becomes available.

The Virginia Peninsula Challenger Little League will host registration for the coming Spring Season at Newport News Midtown Community Center from Jan. 25 and Feb. 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 26 from 6 to 8 p.m., and March 15 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For more information, contact Pat Swett at 660-8054 or KimCat74@gmail.com.

The Bateman Library’s hours of operation are now Tuesdays throughThursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, contact the Bateman Library at 764-2906.

Discounted tickets and passes

DD Form 214 hard copy no longer available Copies one and four of the DD Form 214 hard copy are no longer mailed to Service members.The policy will only affect forms filed at the Air Force Personnel Center-Total Force Service Center. For individuals who began terminal leave before Dec. 1, 2013, hard-copy DD Form 214s will still be mailed. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Darlene Rust at 574-5611 or 1st Lt. Robert Washburn at 574-8598.

Airmen’s Attic accepting donations The Airmen’s Attic is accepting gently used donations. Housewares, kitchen items, linens and clothing are needed, and items such as large couches, mattresses or box springs will not be accepted. The Airman’s Attic will not accept broken furniture. For more information, call 764-1363.

Travel vouchers available on MyPay Travel vouchers paid by means other than the Defense Travel System (DTS) will now be available in MyPay. Travelers with MyPay accounts will receive e-mail notification advising the vouchers are available. For more information, call the 633rd Comptroller Squadron Financial Services Office at 764-3333.

Hispanic Heritage committee meetings The Hispanic Heritage committee meets the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Langley bowling alley activities room. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Jose Perez at 764-1735 or the Equal Opportunity Office at 764-5878.


22

www.peninsulawarrior.com

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate

JANUARY 10, 2014

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

International Auto Show The 2014 Hampton Roads International Auto Show will be held Jan. 10-12 at the Virginia Beach Convention Center at 1000 19th Street. Admission is $12 for adults and children ages 13 and older, $9 for children ages 12 and under, free for senior citizens ages 65 and older and $6 for military with identification. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Jan. 10-11, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 12. For more information Hampton Roads International Auto Show, call 631-6700 or visit www.visitvirginiabeach.com.

Fort Boykin walking tours Visitors to Fort Boykin will be offered a walking tour of the site at 3 p.m. Jan. 12 and Feb. 9 at 7410 Fort Boykin Trail in Smithfield. The event is free and open to the public, and reservations are not required. The tour will last approximately 45 minutes and visitors should wear comfortable walking shoes. Fort Boykin, built to protect the Jamestown colonists, is on the Virginia Birding and Wildlife Trail and is home to Virginia’s second oldest black walnut tree.The fort is open daily from 8 a.m. to dusk. For more information about the Fort Boykin walking tours, call 357-0115 or visit www.historicisleofwight.com.

Virginia Living Museum ■ Star Party and Laser Light Shows – Free star observing begins at sunset Jan. 11 at the museum. Take a tour of the current night sky in “Virginia Skies” at 7:30 p.m., followed by three laser shows: “Laser Pop” (family) at 8:30 p.m., “Laser Doors” (hard rock) at 10 p.m., and “Dark Side of the Moon” at 11:30 p.m. All shows are $6. The Wild Side Café will be open from 6 to 9 p.m. ■ Family Astro Camp-in – Families can camp overnight at the museum to learn about all things astronomy. The event starts at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 17 and ends at 9 a.m. Jan. 18. Other activities will include stargazing at the Abbitt Observatory, planetarium shows, crafts and sleeping among the exhibits. Scout troops are welcome. The cost is $35 for children ages 4-17 and $25 for adults.To register in advance, visit thevlm.org or call 595-9135. ■ Story Time at the Museum – The third Saturday of the month is story time at the museum. Bring the kids at 10 a.m. on Jan. 18 to hear “Opossum at Sycamore Road” by Sally M. Walker and see a live opossum. Recommended for ages 2 and above (included in museum admission). ■ Winter Planetarium Shows – Choose among three shows in the museum’s Abbitt Planetarium through March 14. Introduce your little astronomer to the wonders of the sky with “Friendly Stars.” A staff astronomer takes a tour of the current night sky in “Virginia Skies.” “Dark” is a full dome movie that explores the nature of dark matter. The planetarium is open Wednesday through Sunday. The cost is $4 in addition to museum admission.

■ Homeschool Day – The museum offers homeschooled students ages pre-K through grade 12 a selection of fun and engaging classroom programs that highlight natural science and earth science concepts. Discounted rates will be available for this one-day program scheduled for Jan. 29. Natural science programs are available for elementary age students and environmental science labs are available for grades 5-12. Space science programs in the planetarium are available for all ages. Parents may accompany children into the programs at no additional cost. To register in advance, call 595-9135. The Virginia Living Museum is located at 524 J. Clyde Morris Boulevard in Newport News. Admission is $17 for adults, $13 for children ages 3-12, and free for children ages two and under. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m., Sunday. For more info, call 595-9135 or visit www.thevlm.org.

Isle of Wight County Museum Children ages three to five and their families are invited to visit the Isle of Wight County Museum from 10 to 10:30 a.m. for “Tell Me a Story,” a free monthly program designed to introduce children to the symbols of Isle of Wight County through books, games and crafts. The themes for each program are as follows: ■ Jan. 16 – Black Bears ■ Feb. 20 – Spices ■ March 20 – Alpacas ■ April 10 – Country Stores ■ May 15 - Herbs Reservations are not required; groups of 10 or more must contact the museum prior to the event. Guests can also visit the museum’s free exhibits featuring prehistoric fossils, Native American and Colonial artifacts, a country store and the world’s oldest edible cured ham. The museum is located at 103 Main Street in Smithfield. For more information museum events, call 356-1223 or visit www.historicisleofwight.com.

Military Appreciation Night The Norfolk Admirals hockey team presents Military Appreciation Night at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 7 at the Norfolk Scope at 201 E. Brambleton Ave. The Admirals will play

the Hartford Wolf Pack, an affiliate of the New York Rangers. Single game tickets purchased at the Scope Box Office are $11 with valid military identification. Group tickets are $9 each for 15 or more (purchased through the Admirals Group Sales office seven days in advance). To purchase tickets, contact Charlie Colon at charlie@ norfolkadmirals.com or call 640-1212, ext. 23.

Master’s degree information session The University of Virginia is hosting an accelerated master’s degree information session from 6:15 to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 16 at its new Academic Center at 600Thimble Shoals Blvd., in Newport News.The event is free and open to the public. Come join us and learn how you can earn a master’s degree in Systems Engineering in one year, while working full-time. To register, visit http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/AMP_ informationevents2013-14 or e-mail accmp@virginia.edu. For more information, contact Alan Fiorello at 594-0792 or apf6x@virginia.edu.

Gardening short-course The Virginia Cooperative Extension-York and Poquoson, in conjunction with the York County Public Library, is offering a gardening short-course for residents of York County and Poquoson. The classes will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Tuesdays, Jan. 21 through March 11 at the Tabb Library at 100 Long Green Blvd.The course fee is $50, which includes a manual, curriculum and a pair of hand pruners. Registration is required and checks should be made payable to “VCE-York.” To register or to receive more information, call 890-4940 or e-mail ex199@vt.edu.

Cabin Fever Concert Series York County will sponsor the sixth annual winter “Cabin Fever Concert Series” at 7 p.m. Jan. 23 through March 6 inside the Freight Shed located at Riverwalk Landing in historic Yorktown. The concerts are free and open to the public. Audience members will have the opportunity to interact and engage with local musicians throughout each concert. The schedule is as follows: ■ Jan. 23 – LP and the 8-Tracks (1960s music) ■ Feb. 6 – The Winds of Grass (bluegrass band) ■ March 6 – Poisoned Dwarf (traditional Celtic music) Advance tickets and reservations will not be offered. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. and seating is on a firstcome, first-serve basis. For more information about the concert series, call 8903500 or visit www.visityorktown.org.

Florida Tech tuition discount Florida Institute of Technology offers a tuition discount to active-duty military through its Wisdom Warrior Program. The program provides a capped tuition rate of $250 per credit hour for graduate degree programs and is available through the university’s extended studies sites and virtual campus. Military spouses enrolled in FIT’s graduate programs will receive a 10 percent tuition discount. For more information, visit www.fit.edu/hamptonroads or call 887-2488.


JANUARY 10, 2014

â&#x20AC;˘ The Peninsula Warrior - Army

â&#x20AC;˘

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

BY PHONE:

BY FAX: (757) 853-1634

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Wanted To Buy

For Rent-House (All)

WWII Relics. Retired Vet seeks WWII helmets, medals, daggers, etc. 757-869-1739

Hampton/Olde Wythe: 2 BR cottage with water view Fresh paint, Remodeled BA, New cabinets, New W/D. Shed in bkyd. Yard maintenance and utils pd. for up to 2 people. $1100 a mo/ $1100 dep. 757-218.5693.

Articles For Sale Amana front load washer & dryer, 5 yrs old, $400 cash, must pick up. Call 757-812-2742. Fender Road Worn Jazz Bass, Barely used,$900.OBO MUST SELL. 919-809-4345 . Pillow top Queen Mattress, box & frame. Like new. No stains, can e-mail pics 223-4230 $125

i>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;i Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192; Â&#x153;v `iÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; >Â&#x2DC;` Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022; Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152; Li >LÂ?i Ă&#x152;Â&#x153; Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x203A;i Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;i Â?Â&#x2C6;vi Â&#x153;v Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022; Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;i° /Â&#x153; vÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;` Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i V>Â?Â? ÂŁÂ&#x2021;nnnÂ&#x2021;xÂŁÂŁÂ&#x2021;-6 Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;`>Ă&#x17E;° Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x203A;i°Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}

Furniture-Household Living Room Elegant Table purchased from Haverty's - $300 (Hampton). Brand New, tags still on 63"L x 34W" glass top stunning table. Call 201-803-3482

Brand New Layaway Available MATTRESS SETS Full- $99, Queen- $129, King- $169 40% Military Discount on all other sets!

23

www.peninsulawarrior.com

BY MAIL:

DEADLINE: Reader & Display Thursday 5:00 p.m. (week prior)

BY EMAIL:

PENINSULA WARRIOR adswork@militarynews.com CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

Call 222-3 990 today!

go red. anyway you want... eat red - apples, cherries, tomatoes. leave red kisses on someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheek. laugh so hard your face turns red. but whatever you do, do it for your heart. take a moment everyday and put your hand on your heart. and then make your own promise to be heart healthy. www.goredforwomen.org 1-888-MY-HEART

Can deliver. 757-706-3667

Free!

!!                              

Get online! Submit your classified ad and advertise for FREE Restrictions do apply see below for details

Qualifications:

Fast! Easy!

YOU JUST BLEW $10,000. Buzzed. Busted. Broke. Get caught, and you could be paying around $10,000 in fines, legal fees and increased insurance rates.

Buzzed driving is drunk driving. buzzeddriving.adcouncil.org

Submit online at: www.forteustiswheel.com/free

â&#x20AC;˘

For active-duty, retired military, their eligible family members and active or retired civil service employees If you are retired military or retired DOD civilian, include current employer and work phone number on the application.

Restrictions: â&#x20AC;˘ Only 5 ads per week, per household â&#x20AC;˘ Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted â&#x20AC;˘ Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue â&#x20AC;˘ Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year â&#x20AC;˘ Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. â&#x20AC;˘ Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. â&#x20AC;˘ Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. â&#x20AC;˘ When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s publications


24

www.peninsulawarrior.com

CFC # 27963

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

JANUARY 10, 2014

G A R Y S I N I S E F O U N D AT I O N . O R G


Peninsula Warrior Jan. 10, 2014 Army Edition