BULLDOG BULLETIN: WINTER 2021

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Bulldog Bulletin

NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID CANTON, OH PERMIT NO. 1005

Canton City Schools 305 McKinley Avenue N.W. Canton, OH 44702

ECRWSS Postal Customer

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 3

DECEMBER, 2021

Superintendent’s Message Hello Bulldog Nation, I will start with thank you! Thank you for your partnership as we continue to strive to uphold our values of Excellence, Leadership and Community in all we do. We continue to stress that the safety and security of our staff and students is our top priority. Therefore, as we enter the flu season, it is time to double down on our safety protocols. It is important for all of us to do health checks each morning before venturing out and to take care of ourselves and others. Celebrate the Season

In This Issue School Board Members and Meetings, 2 Child & Adolescent Services, 4 McKinley, 5 Career Tech, 7 Passages @ Compton, 7 Early College High School @ Lehman, 8 Early Learning Center @ Schreiber, 8 Timken Career Campus BVA, 9 Crenshaw, 10

In this issue, you will find a listing of our Holiday programs. Our vocalists and musicians have worked hard preparing for their big shows and we welcome the community to join us. If you can’t make it, we will have all of the shows taped and available on-demand at CCSTV11.com.

STEAM, 11 ECMS @ Lehman, 12 AIM Academy, 12 Arts Academy, 13

We are also in the midst of the winter sports season. Please come out and support your Bulldogs in basketball, wrestling, gymnastics, bowling, swimming, diving, and speech and debate. Schedules are printed in this issue and are also available at McKinleyAthletics.org.

Cedar, 14 Clarendon, 15 Gibbs, 15

Winter is Here

B.A.R.K., 16 Harter, 18

That means snow days and sometimes cold days. Most school districts in Stark County use similar factors to help make this decision. First, the district attempts to determine if the weather is “hazardous.” This includes looking at forecasts to determine the predicted temperature, wind chill, and predicted snow accumulation. With regard to snow accumulation, we review whether the roads are hazardous to prevent buses from safely transporting students. We also consider whether the walking and waiting times at the bus stops are hazardous. Finally, we weigh the educational and physical needs of our students.

McGregor, 18 Belle Stone, 19 Worley, 19 Patrick, 19 Youtz, 20 Education Services, 21 Transportation, 22

As we have shared in the past, here is how you can help:

After School Program, 23 Special Education, 23

Holiday Shows Schedule, 32

SOCIAL MEDIA WHERE TO FIND US!

ccsdistrict.org

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Jeff Talbert

Winter Sports Schedules, 31

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Thank you and have a wonderful holiday season!

BE SAFE: Please make sure children have dressed appropriately for the weather. Hats, gloves, coats, and layered clothing will help ensure their physical safety while waiting for the bus or walking to school. Again, do not hesitate to call your school if an unusual situation arises as a result of the weather.

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BE PATIENT: Sometimes, transportation delays due to traffic or mechanical issues happen during inclement weather. Our first goal is to ensure students get to school safely. Be sure to download our transportation app to follow your student’s bus. That information is available at https://www.ccsdistrict. org/Page/221.

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BE ALERT: To find out if school is canceled. Please check the district’s webpage, ParentSquare, Twitter and Facebook. The information will also be available on the Canton Repository’s web page or you can tune to WHBC and Cleveland news stations. In addition, a phone call confirming the cancellation as well as information about the status of extra-curricular activities will come from the district to the phone number the district has on file for your child.

Sports, 24 Alumni Spotlight, 30

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School Board Members

330-417-6351 - rinaldi_j@ccsdistrict.org

330-575-8257 - russ_s@ccsdistrict.org

Kim Brown 1628 20th St., NE, Canton 44714 330-265-7674 - brown_k@ccsdistrict.org

David Kaminski 130 - 32nd St., NW, Canton, OH 44709 330-418-4402 - kaminski_d@ccsdistrict.org

Eric Resnick 1828 Grace Ave NE, Canton, OH 44705 330-454-4681 - resnick_e@ccsdistrict.org

John M. Rinaldi, President 217 - 2nd St., NW, Apt. 805, Canton, OH 44702

Board Meetings WATCH MEETINGS LIVE

Scott Russ, Vice President 3728 - 10th St. SW, Canton, OH 44710

The Canton City School District is accepting applications for:

SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVERS

REGULAR MEETINGS - 6:00PM STUDY SESSIONS - 5:30PM at Timken Career Campus 521 Tuscarawas St., W. Canton, OH 44702 (unless specified) All Archived Board of Education Videos

School Year 2021-22 Meetings

$15.81 per hour | will train

December 13, 2021: Regular Meeting

2022 meetings to be determined.

• All qualified candidates must have a High School Diploma or GED

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• Must be able to pass FBI/BCI background checks. • Must have CDL License

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Requirements:

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Interested applicants (INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL) should apply through TalendEd: https://ccsdistrict.tedk12.com/hire


Canton City Schools

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Child & Adolescent Services

Suicide in Children by Mary M. Kreitz, LPC

Mary M. Kreitz, LPC

Mary M. Kreitz, LPC, CDCA has over 20 years of experience working in the field of behavioral health. She is currently the lead therapist for the Trauma Program at Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, is a member of the Stark County Trauma and Resiliency Committee and is a member of the Unity Coalition to Dismantle Racism in Stark County.

ticles about suicide that include lists of risk factors and warning signs. These lists were compiled out of desire to identify who is at risk so that we can intervene before anyone gets hurt. Unfortunately, research shows that these lists aren’t very useful in predicting which specific individuals will think about suicide and which ones will make an attempt. The truth is that lots of stressful life events can increase a person’s risk for suicide. Suicide is never the result of just one bad thing that happened. People reach a point of thinking about suicide when they are experiencing so much psychological pain that they come to believe the only way to end their pain (or the burden they believe they have become to others) is through ending their life.

you can handle hearing whatever it is they have to say. If you have even the tiniest suspicion that your child might be suicidal, ask them about it. Don’t be afraid that bringing it up will backfire by planting the suggestion in their brain. It doesn’t work that way. If they aren’t thinking about suicide, they’ll let you know. If they are, then you’ve just opened the door to talking about it and getting them the help they need.

How to ask about it

Asking a person if they’re thinking about suicide is hard. Most of the time When we talk about when we’re asking the suicide, usually the disquestion, we are also cussion is about teens thinking inside our heads, and young adults. In fact, “Please say no. Please say many people believe that no. Please say no.” No younger children aren’t one wants a person they capable of intentionally The best way to know if care about to be suicidal. ending their own lives your child (or any child) is But we have to be brave because they assume at risk is to communicate enough to ask, because that children don’t really directly with the child. understand what it means Know what is going on in asking just might save that person’s life. to be dead. Unfortunately, their life, whether they’re A person who is suicidal this type of thinking is not under a lot of stress or might not be able to volonly incorrect, but also having a rough time. dangerous. Notice changes in the way unteer that information. They can’t walk up to you your child behaves and and say, “I really need reacts and notice when that changes – when they your help. I’m thinking about killing myself.” aren’t acting like themPre-adolescent children However, many people selves. Talk to your child. can and do die by suicide. who have attempted suiNot just when problems According to data from are occurring (if you wait cide and survived reportthe National Center for until then to start talking, ed afterward that they had Injury Prevention and been hoping desperately you’re already too late), Control, suicide is the but talk to them regularly. that someone would noeighth leading cause of tice and ask them. Be that Listen. Listen carefully. death for children ages someone who asked. Too often, parents min5-11 years. Research has imize their child’s probThere is no one right way shown that by age nine, lems (“Oh it can’t be that to ask. You can weave it most children have a bad”), rush to try to fix into the conversation: thorough understanding things (“Well all you need “You seem to be in a lot of both death and suicide. to do is . . .”), listen halfof pain right now. SomeRegardless, it isn’t necesway while also trying to times when people are in sary to be able to fully undo something else, or get that much pain, they think derstand what it means to distracted by disapproval about killing themselves. be dead in order to engage (“You did what?”). When Are you thinking of that?” in actions that could result that happens, children You can ask directly: “Are in death. don’t feel safe being open you thinking about killing and honest. The only way yourself?” What you don’t to get them to really tell want to do is ask in a way you what is going on in that telegraphs to them their life is to show them that you want them to say that they have your undiNo: “You aren’t thinking You can find lots of arvided attention and that

The hard truth

How to know if your child is at risk

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of killing yourself, are you?” And you don’t want to ask in a way that passes judgment: “You’re not thinking of doing anything stupid, are you?”

False alarms

going through and listen. You don’t have to fix their problems. Just listen and show that you care. 2. Tell them that you love them, and you want them to stay alive. This may be an obvious one to you, but it’s not obvious to a person who is suicidal. They need to hear the words.

Because we are talking about children here, it is necessary to acknowledge that children sometimes say things they don’t mean. It isn’t that unusual 3. Get professional help. for a child who is upset Call the National to say something like, “I Suicide Prevention hate my life! I wish I was Lifeline (800-273-8255) dead!” If this happens or text 741741 for free, with your child, don’t professional help 24/7. automatically dismiss it. They aren’t just there to There may be a pretty help the person who is good chance that the child suicidal. They can supis being dramatic. Howport you and help you ever, something is going through this difficult on. After your child has conversation with your calmed down, go back and child. check in, “Is that some4. Follow up by calling a thing you really think local counseling or beabout?” If it is not, help havioral health agency your child to find other, to begin services for more accurate words to your child. express the intense emotions they were feeling. 5. Take care of yourself. Your child is going to need you. This isn’t an easy conversation for any parent to have. Use If your child tells you that your self-care strategies they are thinking about and resources to take suicide, there are several care of yourself so that important steps to take you can continue to be next: there for your child. 1. Ask them to tell you about what they’re

What if they say yes?

CCSD employment: Now hiring: Substitute Child Nutrition - $14.57 Substitute Bus Driver - $16.86 Substitute Bus Assistant - $13.72 Substitute Custodian - $18.25 Requirements: All qualified candidates must have a High School Diploma or GED Must be able to pass FBI/BCI background checks. Interested applicants (INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL) should apply through TalentEd: https://ccsdistrict.tedk12.com/hire.


McKinley

#ReadytoRise Student Engagement: We hope to engage our students in all things McKinley! Outside of the athletic programs we proudly support, McKinley Senior High School boasts some of the best extracurricular programs in Stark County. Students have the opportunity to participate on our nationally recognized speech and debate team, or may be interested in joining us for Pep Club, National Honor Society, SAFE Zone, Chess Club, CAST, International Club, Band, Choir or our brand new Interact Club — that’s just to name a few. Students who would like to participate in our clubs during the traditional school day or may be interested in pursuing a personal passion, will certainly welcome our new program, Reconnect Wednesdays! Over the course of 13 Reconnect Wednesdays, McKinley students will have an opportunity to take a deeper dive into their personal interests and connect with their teachers in a unique way. Every quarter, students register for two personal-interest courses (or clubs) taught by none other than our CCS teachers during Reconnect Wednesdays. CAST students serving at Southeast Community Center

Over the last 18 months, we at McKinley Senior High School have faced unprecedented challenges that have required us to think about our practices in innovative ways in order to meet the needs of our students. While we anticipate that the effects of the pandemic will continue to impact our students, we will continue to respond to our students’ needs with creativity and intentional planning. We are confident that the programs and opportunities we’ve designed for the 2021-2022 school year support our students academically, increase their engagement in many of our extracurricular opportunities, and ensure that we all stay connected as a community. Academic Support: This year, McKinley is proud to provide dedicated time for students to receive English or Math support from a content specialist through our Writing and Math Labs. In addition, every student in grades 9-12 is assigned a support period, called Academic Assist. During Academic Assist, teachers provide students with content-area support, review their attendance and look for any credit deficiencies that need to be addressed. Our after-school enrichment and credit recovery programs are fully operational. Students can receive help from content teachers and are provided a cooked dinner before going home. As the year moves forward, we will be providing a myriad of after-school opportunities that will include tutoring, college placement test help, and athletic study tables.

CTE Welding Seniors

Community Connection: Community is at the heart of everything we do! This school year, we will continue to be purposeful about connecting with our community and families through our small group mentorship program and our on-staff family and support specialist. In addition, we are excited to welcome many guest speakers, like Rodney Dennis, a local barber and barber college owner, who will be visiting us for a program called Cuts and Conversation, or our guest teacher, Andrea McCormick of Cleveland, a professional artist in residency that joins us two days per week throughout the year, an opportunity provided through the Teach Arts Ohio Grant - A Year in the Life - Musical Theatre! In a few short weeks, our CTE students will be resuming their on-site work experiences and we can’t wait to welcome our community guests back to the All City Grille in November when we open. We don’t mind saying it’s still the best Smokehouse Burger in town! We started the school year strong and have already been able to provide students with school supplies through the STUFF the BUS program and look forward to additional opportunities to be an answer during a very difficult time. At McKinley, we are ready to help our students not only get back to some sense of normalcy, but more importantly, to rise above the challenges we’ve faced over the last year and a half. We are the McKinley Bulldogs! We are prepared and we are #ReadytoRise.

Pep Club getting ready for a playoff game

– Erin Ponn

Canton City Schools

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McKinley

Senior Showcase Takes Page to the Stage Every fall in the CTE Script Analysis course, students seek to learn and create through scene writing. Every day for a month, students write scenes based on prompts given in class. While learning about dramatic structure and writing, students also get the opportunity to transition the PAGE TO THE STAGE! They work out which scenes make the cut, which don’t, and then set out to make it a production. Students gather and make props/costumes/set pieces, and choose music, sound effects and lighting for the show. Students also create concept artwork to publicize, and of course — memorize, memorize, memorize their lines. The title of their show, This Is House, is a direct reflection of their individual and shared experiences as high school students, as well as a touch of humor, imagination, whimsy and a little dark humor. – Kristy McNally, Performance Arts Instructor

COMING THIS SPRING!

Memphis, The Musical | McKinley Senior High School | April 2022 Auditions are Dec. 13-17 | OPEN TO ALL CCSD STUDENTS GRADES 7-12 Memphis is set in the places where rock and roll was born in the 1950s: the seedy nightclubs, radio stations and recording studios of the musically rich Tennessee city. With an original score, it tells the fictional story of DJ Huey Calhoun, a good ole’ local boy with a passion for R&B music, and Felicia Farrell, an up-and-coming black singer that he meets one fateful night on Beale Street. Despite the objections of their loved ones (Huey’s closed-minded mama and Felicia’s cautious brother, a club owner), they embark on a dangerous affair. As their careers rise, the relationship is challenged by personal ambition and the pressures of an outside world unable to accept their love.

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Bulldog Bulletin


McKinley Career Technical Education

McKinley Construction Students Giving Back McKinley’s CTE Construction Technologies program has been very busy working on projects for the school district and in the community. CTE Instructor Ron Nunez and his seniors are currently building a shed and chicken coop for STEAMM Academy. Students visited the United Brotherhood of Carpenters training facility in Richfield, Ohio to learn more about industry requirements for carpentry. The McKinley CTE Construction Technology seniors did some work for Stark Education Partnership and are pictured with Dr. John Richard (President- Stark Education Partnership). Stark Education Partnership works collaboratively with Canton City Schools and all of Stark County to support educational initiatives in our community. Canton City Schools appreciates Khristopher Williams, Charles Phillips, Jesse Blackwell, Nicholas Hixson, Shawn Compton, Rosendo Maldonado and the work they are doing.

Passages @ Compton Learning Center

Rainy Gower

Mr. Burton and Dr. Watkins

Building Relationships One Event at a Time Building relationships is essential to our students’ success at Passages @ Compton. We believe that this connection is made in the classroom academically and personally outside of the classroom. Each month, we try to create an out of the classroom experience that the students will always remember. We started the journey this year with our Peace Day experience.

This past month, we did our Annual Chili Cook Off competition. Our staff created chili dishes in a friendly competition to see who had the best chili. Our students judged the chilis and it gave them the opportunity for fellowship with staff to debate which staff member was the best cook. Students were having discussions about which chili was the best and our

Mr. Burton

staff ’s competitive streaks were allowed to be expressed. The winner of the competition this year was our High School Math teacher, Mr. Burton. It was a fun day for both staff and students and hopefully it will be a positive lifelong experience that our students and staff shared.

Canton City Schools

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Early College High School @ Lehman

Early College High School Seniors Finish College Visits Early College High School Seniors were able to visit seven colleges. Mount Union, Kent State, University of Akron, Malone, Walsh, Hiram and Youngstown

State make up the Big 8 colleges that agreed to host our students with specialized tours and face-to-face presentations because of what ECHS students have to offer.

Our students have at least 40 transferable college credits and would greatly benefit any of these schools. The colleges provide the lunch and most of them

help reimburse transportation costs to get to their campus. CAMP (CAST Apprenticeship and Mentorship Program) community partnership helped to

make this possible. They also participate as chaperones while at the college visits. Some of these schools also offer scholarships that are unique and specific to EC students.

Early Learning Center @ Schreiber

Play and Pre-Academics Go Hand in Hand in Preschool Preschoolers, in our new Early Learning Center at Schreiber, are learning routines and procedures, how to play and share with others, language development, gross motor skills, and many pre-academics, such as letter and number recognition, shapes, colors, and social-emotional skills. Most of the learning is done through play. Play allows children to use their creativity while developing their imagination, dexterity, physical, cognitive and emotional strength. Play is important to healthy brain development, and it

is through play that children, at a very early age, engage and interact in the world around them.

The Center is growing and two more classrooms were recently added to provide 15 preschool classrooms total. It is the dream of CCSD that every child receives a high-quality preschool experience. A child’s early years are the foundation for his or her future development, providing a strong base for lifelong learning and learning abilities! For additional information about the program, feel free to call 330-580-3033.

There’s something for everyone!

McKinley

Presidential Library & Museum • McKinley Monument • McKinley Gallery • Discover World • Street of Shops

• Planetarium • Stark County Story • Keller Gallery • HO Train Layout

ADMIT ONE CHILD FREE When accompanied by one adult admission Not valid with any other discount Expires: 9/30/2022

McKinley Presidential Library & Museum

800 McKinley Monument Dr NW • 330-455-7043 • McKinleyMuseum.org

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Bulldog Bulletin


Timken Career Campus BVA K-8

Students at BVA are LEVELING up BVA @ Mason students look forward to every second and fourth Wednesday of the month. This is when students and teachers meet for clubs and events! Students are able to choose from multiple

events — some virtual and some face-to-face. At BVA @ Mason, we recognize the importance of relationships — not just from teacher to student, but also friendships

between students. For this reason, we provide structured ways for kids to get together and practice friendship skills. Some activities include field trips, book clubs, writing clubs, drawing, board, and other

structured games, virtual escape rooms, and even a virtual cooking club!

because they are in a contest to get 100% of their classes in selfies!

Once Level Up is over, students can work on Moby Max and teachers complete home visits

Students enjoy this time with their teachers and each other. You can tell by their smiling faces!

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Crenshaw

Crenshaw Shines!

It’s been an exciting first quarter at Crenshaw. Students are preparing for upcoming performances to celebrate the winter season and have already completed a collaboration for Veterans Day that included the band, choir and Media Arts classes. As a way to thank our veterans, students and staff raised $742.15 for the Wounded Warrior Project. We are also excited about our first performing arts presentation of The Grumpy Elf, in collaboration with our middle school band. Our student set designers, make-up artists and performers are hard at work getting ready for their first production. We are so excited to showcase so many talented students here @TheShaw!

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Bulldog Bulletin


STEAMM

STEAMM Students Take First and Second Place in Stark Parks “The Great Trash to Treasure Hunt Upcycled Art Contest” STEAMM Students fared well in the Stark Parks “The Great Trash to Treasure Hunt Upcycled Art Contest.” Students were challenged by art teacher Kathy Pugh to construct a piece of art using recyclable materials. They were allowed to use glue, tape and/or string to hold their piece together. The art was allowed to be a sculpture or a functional piece of art, as long as it was creative. This is a yearly competition for Coach Pugh’s art students. Eighth grade student Za’Nya Williams took first place in the grades 6 - 8 category, while seventh grade student De’Jhone Barnes took second place in the same category. The fashionista pair of Za’Raye Watson and Roussion Medlock took second place in the classroom competition, which allowed for a small group of students to work on the same project. Students in Coach Pugh’s art class look forward to the competition each year. De’Jhone loves to draw architecture and was excited to get to build a house for this project. He said, “building the furniture inside was [his] favorite part because [he] really likes to do stuff like that.” When asked which part of the project likely caused him to win, he responded, “the stairs really make the house pop.” Although De’Jhone is celebrating his

Za’Rae Watson and Roussion Medlock (seventh Grade) - Starburst wrapper fashion design

project, Za’Nya reminisced, “I had never worked with jeans before and I was up at least two nights until 4 a.m. working on it.” Za’Nya was shocked to find out that she won first place in her grade category. Her response to the fame, “It feels good. I was surprised.” All of the artists interviewed for this story did not report being born with an innate skill. Although Za’Nya wanted to be an artist in elementary school, she admits that she has had to work hard at her skill. She wants to make sure others understand that anything is possible when you try and have a good person to support you. Za’Nya wanted to thank Coach Pugh for all her support. “Coach Pugh has a lot going on, she has an art gallery, is a teacher and everything, and that is so inspirational.” Although Za’Nya isn’t sure she wants to be an artist as a career anymore, she wants to be able to paint well enough to decorate her house and maybe sell a few paintings for money one day. Perhaps, she will be able to pay for her college education with art as a side hustle. In regard to what they want people to know about the experience, Roussion says that she wants people to know, “there is always a chance to do something.” Za’Raye adds, “Art doesn’t have to have a filter. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” STEAMM Academy at Hartford wishes to express gratitude to Stark Parks for holding this competition and taking the time to recognize our budding artists.

Za’Nya Williams (Eighth grade)- self portrait made of denim on a recycled canvas

win this year, he is already thinking about his submission for next year. He wouldn’t share details, but he does say it’s going to be even bigger and better than this year’s project. When asked how they decided to make a dress out of starburst wrappers, Roussion and Za’Raye said it started as store bags, but they thought that was too simple. They weren’t sure how many licks it takes … starburst wrappers the dress took to make, but it was a lot. Teachers helped them save wrappers by buying starbursts as treats for their students and then reminding students to save their wrappers. They admit, they couldn’t have eaten that many pieces of candy alone. “We had help from most of the school and even another school.” When asked what their favorite part of the project was, Za’Raye chuckled and said, “I’m not gonna lie, my favorite part was eating the starburst.” A bit more seriously, Roussion stated that, “creating the skirt was [her] favorite part.” They are both looking forward to participating again next year. Za’Nya’s self portrait of denim took her out of her comfort zone. The denim came in all different shades and shapes and it was a bit difficult to put it all together. When asked about the hard work that went into the

De’Jhone Barnes (Seventh Grade) - architectural design made of old CD cases

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ECMS @ Lehman

Bulldog Pride at ECMS Bulldog Pride is alive and well at ECMS. For McKinley/Massillon spirit week, the students of ECMS competed in a door decorating contest here at Lehman. Each homeroom competed in the competition with the winning homeroom earning a donut party. It was great to see the students so excited to show their Bulldog Pride and working so hard. Students did such a great job that all the homerooms ended up getting a reward. Speaking of the hard work of students here at ECMS, I would like to congratulate all of our students on a successful first grading period. For the first grading period, we had over 102 students on the honor and merit roll. Students were rewarded with an ice cream social last Friday. Great job to all of our students, keep up the hard work.

AIM Academy Although the calendar said that AIM was on break from Oct. 4Oct. 22, AIM Academy was anything but on break. Our classrooms were filled with fun and learning as AIM Teachers and staff hosted Bulldog Bonus Days. What are Bulldog Bonus Days? Those are the days embedded in our breaks where students and families can sign up to attend the programming. The programming includes breakfast, academics in the morning, lunch and enrichment activities in the afternoon. AIM offers Bonus Days for two weeks during fall break and two weeks during spring break. That’s four extra weeks of

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learning for our children! The AIM Team is so excited to pilot the Balanced Calendar for Canton City Schools. The Balanced Calendar includes cycles of nine weeks of learning followed by three-week breaks and a longer fiveweek break during the summer. Research has concluded that for students to truly excel, some breaks should include high-quality learning and enrichment. AIM is excited to embrace all the expectations of the Balanced Calendar to ensure that our community gets the highest quality of education for their children.

Bulldog Bulletin

Enrichment fun in second grade at AIM Academy. Mrs. Bickel and Miss Wakefield brought money management and fun to life as students earned “money” through hard work and great behavior for Friday’s food truck.


Arts Academy

Community Service Projects Benefit Community

One of many community outreach programs taking place at the Arts Academy @ Summit is the donation and collection of socks for the Refuge of Hope in Canton. Each grade level classroom competed for the important cause of helping those in need to have warm socks for the upcoming winter months. In late October, the entire school gathered to bring the collection and donate socks to the gym for a PBIS Sock Hop & Sundae event. There were 2,800 pairs of socks collected! Ice cream sundaes and sock hop dancing topped off the event as a celebration of the first grading period, a giving spirit and positive behavior! Congratulations to our Arts Academy students, staff, PTO and families for their incredible turn-out at the annual Walk-A-Thon! The event raised $4,583.50! Under the leadership of PTO President Angela Bonfine (a CCSD preschool teacher!), the group took $700 and purchased food for the McKinley-Massillon Food Fight! Top fundraisers were Matthew Berg ($536), Marty McNally ($315) and Raylan Bonfine ($220). The top earning class was Mrs. McPhillen’s class with $816! They’ve earned a pizza party. Principal Bowling said she is so grateful for her PTO!

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month From Sept. 15 – Oct. 15, Mrs. Crone’s and Mrs. Pisani’s Grade 5 CHAP (Canton High Ability Program) students from the Arts Academy @ Summit used their academic, as well as artistic abilities and talents, to research, celebrate and present their findings on Hispanic Heritage. The spotlight included developing a five-paragraph research essay, along with a presentation. The numerous and varied Hispanic topics covered geography, technology, entertainment, education, literature, sports, arts and festivals! A few of the areas of focus were: The Uyuni Flats of Bolivia, Claribel Alegria, Roberto Clemente, Lyn Manuel Miranda, Guillermo Gonzalez, Jennifer Lopez, Hispanic Population Census Data and Dia de los Muertos.

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Cedar

Growing Readers at Cedar By Ronda Tomovcik, Principal As we continue to experience one of the most challenging periods for education in our lifetime, the concern about “learning loss” becomes more apparent. The importance of learning how to read is something that cannot be argued with, even more so with the impact COVID-19 has had on education across the nation. The last “normal year of school” for our students was when our current third graders were in kindergarten!

instruction of reading so that we strategically address student needs.

In September, we assessed all of our K-3 students using Acadience Reading and it was determined that 76% of the students at Cedar are not on track for reading success. While we realize that number is high, we have created a plan to address the instructional needs of every student in our school.

You may be wondering, what are the “Big Ideas of Reading?” There are five “Big Ideas of Reading;” Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary and Comprehension.

You may ask, “What is Acadience Reading?” Acadience Reading is “a set of standardized indicators of literacy skills, designed for universal screening and progress monitoring.” Acadience Reading helps our teachers identify students who are at risk for reading difficulties and determine the skills to target for instructional support. Once all of our students were assessed, grade level teams met to analyze and discuss the Acadience Reading data. From there, teachers created grade-level instructional plans. These plans helped us create grade-level instructional goals that are aligned with the “Big Ideas of Reading” and the Ohio state standards. Our plan includes whole group and small-group

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Additionally, each grade level has 30-40 minutes P.A.W.S. (Providing All With Success) Time, where students receive intervention or enrichment based upon their individual needs. This plan will help us ensure that every child receives grade-level instruction with a special focus on reading interventions that will help them to become a stronger reader.

Phonemic Awareness is the ability to identify and manipulate individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words. For example, the spoken word “cat” has 3 sounds /k/ /a/ /t/. Phonics is the ability to decode (or put together) the relationship between the letters (graphemes) of written language and the sounds (phonemes) of spoken language; 26 letters make 44 different speech sounds. For example, the letter C makes the /k/ and /s/ sound, depending on its placement in a word (cake, face). Vocabulary words are the words we must understand to communicate effectively. There are four types of vocabulary: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Listening vocabulary refers to the words we need to know to understand what we hear. Speaking vocabulary consists of the words we use when we speak.

Bulldog Bulletin

Kindergarten teacher, Ms. Natalie Chappie, teaching phonemic awareness and phonics through whole group and small group instruction. Featuring kindergarten student Judah Stokes.

Reading vocabulary refers to the words we need to know to understand what we read. Writing vocabulary consists of the words we use in writing. Fluency is the ability to read words quickly, automatically and accurately so that our brain can focus on the meaning of the words in the text. Listening Comprehension is the ability to understand the words heard and relate to them in some way. For example, when hearing a story, the

child should understand the story, remember it, discuss it and retell it in their own words.

tion. Additionally, all of our teachers have been engaging in ongoing LETRS (Language EsReading Comprehension sentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling) is the ability to decode professional development what is read; make conand gaining more innections between what depth knowledge based is read, and what they on the most current already know; and think research in the “Big Ideas deeply about what has of Reading.” Our teachers been read. are applying their learnCedar teachers use the ing in the classrooms at five “Big Ideas of ReadCedar every day. Working ing” listed above when together, we CAN and planning their daily WILL change the reading whole group and small outcomes for our stugroup reading instrucdents!


Clarendon

Beginning Each Day with Positive Routines Students and staff at Clarendon Intermediate begin every day with a live segment of Bulldog TV broadcasting in every classroom and office. Our morning news covers everything from the CCSD vision, mission and values to weather, lunch and school rules. Another segment celebrates our creative and open-minded bulldogs at Clarendon. Students love sending art, quotes and memes to be showcased! Bulldog TV gives us a platform to celebrate all the good things happening in our school by

spreading “Paw-sitivity” and kindness.

To keep this a student-led project, Principal Herberghs takes the mobile TV studio to a new classroom every 2 weeks. This allows all students that want to participate as a news anchor a chance to be a star on our Morning News. We can always count on our behind-the-scenes Director Jocelyn Kollmorgan, a grade 6 student, who updates Bulldog TV slides each day! The best part about Bulldog TV is that it gives

Principal Herberghs a chance to teach positive behavior interventions strategies (PBIS) to the entire school. These

lessons give us shared expectations and common language throughout the building. Lessons are centered around our

B.A.R.K. Rules — Being Prepared, Acting Responsibly, Respecting Self and Others, and Keep Learning!

Gibbs

Fierce Females at Gibbs! This year at Gibbs Elementary, Mrs. Pelger (Third Grade Numeracy Literacy Specialist) and Mrs. Grater (School Counselor) have put together a third grade girls group called Fierce Females. The program is modeled off the Fierce Females group created in Plain Local by fourth grade teacher, Maggie Hatcher.

The goal of Fierce Females is to partner with empowering women to inspire young girls to DREAM BIG, set high expectations and encourage each other on their way to the top. Every other week, the group meets to discuss kindness, work on service projects or to hear presentations by female leaders in our community. Students were able to share some of their career aspirations and speakers have been chosen to come in based on student input. The group has been joined by a female veterinarian and a female dance company owner/instructor. Later in the year, the group will be joined by a female nurse, a female fashion designer, and will even get to work with some top female administrators in the Canton City School District. Mrs. Pelger and Mrs. Grater are so excited to continue this work and to develop this program year after year. The girls love participating in Fierce Females and are already living out the group’s motto of being kind!

Canton City Schools

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What do BUL We B.A.R.K

All students and staff in Canton C iors that fit right into our BULLD practice B.A.R.K. behaviors. You when Bulldogs B.A.R.K., they le

This all falls into our district/state re havior Interventions & Supports ( in all schools helps all BULLDOGS we want to be modeled by all for a build

• There is a focus on teac

• We pay attention to those positiv force them, so we see an increas

• Buildings reward students to mo their best for themselves

We invite you to carry our PBIS B our buildings and into our commun could have if we all carrie

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Bulldog Bulletin


LLDOGS do? K., of course!

City Schools use a guide for behavDOG theme! All schools teach and might ask what that means. Well, earn and practice the following:

equirements of having Positive Be(PBIS) in place district-wide. PBIS focus on the positive behaviors that all. What does this look like in our dings?

ching positive behaviors.

ve behaviors and find ways to reinse from one month to the next.

otivate them to always strive to be and each other each day.

B.A.R.K. like a BULLDOG beyond nity. Imagine the positive impact we ed our B.A.R.K. city-wide.

Canton City Schools

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Harter

Harter Bulldogs Celebrate Veterans Harter Students and staff rallied together on Veterans Day to honor veterans within our community. Mrs. Gen Hallas coordinated a team that decorated the building with artwork, practiced poems and songs to perform, provided a homemade patriotic goodie for our guests, and set the stage for our entire Harter family to pay tribute to special Harter family and friends. The celebration included Miss Murray’s and Ms. Paige’s classes

reciting poetry and Mrs. Sisson’s class performing the Pledge of Allegiance in American Sign Language.

After recognizing our veteran visitors, the finale brought together our entire building of students (who had been watching remotely) in the hallways, decorated by Mrs. Converse and her art students, to sing our veterans out with the song, “Oh I Love America,” taught by music teacher, Mrs. Ulrich. It was a day of patriotism

and pride as our young Bulldogs showed their appreciation to our special veterans that they know as Mom, Dad, Grandma, Grandpa, Auntie, Uncle, etc. Their service to our country can’t be measured or even fully understood, but we can take days like Veterans Day to show appreciation, and Harter Bulldogs did just that on Nov. 11. Harter Bulldogs say THANK YOU to our veterans on Veterans Day and every day!

Mrs. Hallas hosted the Harter Veterans Day Program.

Jesslynn McMasters and BJ Moore were our greeters.

McGregor

McGregor Events - The first of many!

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Bulldog Bulletin


Belle Stone

Scooping Into Science Third grade students at Belle Stone Elementary had to roll up their sleeves and dig into their lesson on the six steps of the Scientific Method. Mrs. Radabaugh and Mrs. Brinton’s students were each given a pumpkin as part of the assignment. Students made predictions about their pumpkin’s weight, circumference measurement, the number of seeds inside, and whether the pumpkin would sink or float. There were 21 students who hypothesized that the bigger pumpkins would have more seeds, while 12 students thought the smaller pumpkins would have more seeds. The student scientists then conducted the actual measurements and experiments to com-

Third grade students enjoyed digging into science and conducting pumpkin experiments. pare to their predictions. Student Dimas Escobar Rivera says that his pumpkin had so many seeds! Dimas said, “It was very sticky and very fun!” Another student, Jen-

nifer Pelico Hernandez, said, “We got to pick out our pumpkin, check its height, then when it got cut open, we put our hands in there. It was cold and gooey! We had to wash our hands for a long time when we were done.”

Worley

Bulldog Book Buddies

Prior to the Bulldog Book Buddies day, the sixth-grade students create lesson plans with engaging reading activities with our kindergarten pups. They are teaching the kindergarteners main ideas, plot studies, story retelling and more. This, in turn, gives them confidence in their own reading abilities as they prepare their plan.

Our littlest pups and our oldest bulldogs have partnered to form Bulldog Book Buddies. The Bulldog Book Buddies meet every Wednesday with one main goal; to promote reading. There are many wonderful outcomes that come from this peer mentoring opportunity. In addition to building community between kindergarten and sixth grade students, it also allows our

developing readers to see what being fluent looks and sounds like as they have a peer demonstrating reading skills. They also have an opportunity to acquire a positive role model with some intentional pairing. The older students strengthen their social and emotional skills, like patience and empathy, as they work with their little buddies.

Kent State University student teacher Rebecca Hugg says, “The students of both sixth grade and kindergarten look forward to Wednesdays when we do our book buddies, and every time we have to end, students ask for more time with their buddies. I am also seeing an increase in the sixth graders’ fluency and confidence. They are doing a fantastic job!”

All of the students said that they really enjoyed the science experiment, as well as the s’mores treat afterwards. The pumpkins and treats were donated by Mr. Reith, owner of Stony Creek Farm in West Salem. Mrs. Radabaugh’s

husband works there and made the special truckload delivery to the school. We thank both of them for their generosity and help in making learning fun and inspiring budding young scientists!

Patrick

Loving Our Community Partner: Tiqvah Hands of Hope Patrick sends thanks to the staff at the Tiqvah Hands of Hope program for their kindness. Director Maquitta Stokes and her team purchased a goody bag and a

Walmart gift card for each classroom teacher. This act of kindness was right on time and energized our team to finish out the last leg of this quarter!

Patrick staff is thankful for their goody bags from Tiqvah Hands of Hope

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Youtz

Not All Friction is Bad!

Joey Boles, Shawn Solomon and Cody Holcombe Ms. Brittney Hall is a new and exciting STEM teacher at Madge Youtz Intermediate School. She has been a great fit! Her classes are talking a lot. They are laughing and sometimes loud. But it is a good loud. They are really engaged and debating during the classes. The students do many hands-on projects, such as creating roller coasters in the classroom. They really enjoy the challenge! The following is a description of one of their projects: In STEM at Youtz Intermediate School, the sixth graders have been learning about friction, gravity, acceleration and momentum. From their

background knowledge with these vocabulary terms, the students had to determine a design that would form a working roller coaster. The students worked in teams to create roller coaster supports and track pieces out of paper and created a roller coaster that could support a marble as their “car.” The students had to keep in mind the above terms and how they played a part in their coaster, while being able to explain why their coaster worked or determine what needed to be fixed. The students shared their work with their peers and were able to see the successes of all groups!

Nitro Miller, Troy Foraker and Willie Baker

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Bulldog Bulletin

Marianna Roberson, Juana Leon-Hernandez, Kaden Henning and Ms. Hall

Leah Jennings, Makenna Anderson and Jozie Henry Even if one of the roller coasters would have failed for the students, none of the students failed to learn. Ms. Hall

makes sure each of the students is learning and growing every day. Some students have not

had a class with her yet, but all will, eventually, and they will learn that friction can be a friend!


Education Services

Football Helps Teach Disciplinary Literacy at CCSD Professional Development Day Lynn Rudd, Ph.D, Department of Education Services 6-12 Curriculum Specialist

the simulation, but most importantly, everyone had the opportunity to reflect on their classroom instruction and their students’ emotions and experiences. We look forward to extending our learning and our community partnership with the Professional Football Hall of Fame as we refine our instructional practices for more student success.

On Friday, Oct. 29, 2021,

the Educational Services Department partnered with the Professional Football Hall of Fame to provide a simulation in football disciplinary literacy. The exercise was inspired by the dissertation research of Dr. Lynn Rudd, Curriculum Specialist for grades 7-12, and bolstered by the collaborative thinking of Canton City Schools administrators, McKinley High School football coaches, Pro Football Hall of Fame Educational Coordinators and community volunteer coaches. High school and middle school teachers engaged in studying, discussing and executing football plays within predesigned offensive and/or defensive units. The experience was designed to plunge teachers into a unique type of disciplinary understanding with specific ways of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and visually representing. Teachers were encouraged to experience the simulation as a student might experience classroom instruction in school. Disciplinary literacy focuses on the needed skills of students unique in each content area and/or discipline. Teachers and coaches had a great time jumping into

We asked two participants to share their experience:

Lori Sexton McKinley Title I Reading Support Teacher:

Ever since our Canton City Schools Oct. 29th professional development at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, I have not stopped talking about it to my friends, family and colleagues. It was so memorable, a once in a lifetime experience, and the lessons embedded in the experience will impact my outlook on teaching and learning for the rest of my life. The bonus about this professional development was what I also learned about football, which gave me a whole new appreciation for the game that I already love. When we arrived at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, each of us was given a name tag with a football position written on it. I noticed other teachers, along with myself, trying to figure out what the letters on our tag meant. I was a WLB. I had no idea what the W was for, but I

knew that I was on defense, and I thought I was a linebacker. I began to get the idea of the objective of this professional development, as our coaches assumed that we knew more about the game than what we did. They quickly went over football plans using football lingo that I had never heard before. I knew this must be how our students feel when we talk to them quickly about our area of expertise and use content area terms with which they are unfamiliar. In my football student position, I was wanting to learn, but I was worried that I wasn’t going to be able to know what to do. Our coaches were very knowledgeable about the game and had high expectations for us to perform in our positions. The next segment of the professional development was our opportunity to practice our position with our coach. I did not fully understand what the W was for in my position, but I now know my position was to work as the weak linebacker, which would mean I would not have as much of the field to cover as the S or the strong linebacker. Next, we went into a game situation with the offense and my coach decided to change my position to the middle linebacker. This was a once in a lifetime experience for me to view the game facing the offense, facing the quarterback, and having the opportunity to decide whether the ball was being handed off or passed. Depending on the way the offense took the ball, I had to determine which way I was to move. In this position, I had an absolute blast playing the game and it seemed my coach was never going to substitute anyone else. In fact, he told me he was going to give me the MVP. I had to take a break, but this made me want to play more and more. During the final portion of this professional development, we worked in our teams to discuss several questions to debrief and reflect on the experience and apply it to our teaching profession.

Here are a few things that impacted me: • As teachers, we can never assume that our students already know any portion of what we will be teaching. We must make our disciplinary language clear and accessible to our students. We must equip them with the background knowledge and vocabulary that they need to enter into our discipline. We cannot take this portion lightly, nor can we skim over it or go too rapidly. We must make sure our students have a clear understanding. • Practice is how the real learning takes place. In this football example, it was in the practicing of the position and the repeating of the steps, the active involvement of our physical bodies in this practice, that brought clarity to what we were learning. However, it was playing in the actual game that solidified our learning. It gave me a priceless perspective on the game of football and I can only hope that I can give my students this depth of understanding in my discipline. • Additional takeaways from this experience are that people learn so much more deeply when they are involved in real-life scenarios and they have the opportunity to interact with others and to have fun.

Bill Robinson, STEAMM Academy 8th Grade ELA McKinley Sr. High, Class of 1988 Even though this is my 28th year teaching in Canton City,

I certainly had a low level of anxiety and discomfort as I walked into the Pro Football Hall of Fame for our professional development day, not knowing what to expect. When I got my nametag at the check-in table, I noticed that other than my name, my name tag also had my team and football position on it. I saw that I was on “the offense” (cool!), “team 3” (ok) and my position was “wide receiver” (I’m 7 feet tallNO WAY!) Having played basketball for McKinley, at that point in the day I was wishing I was in Springfield, Massachusetts at the Basketball Hall of Fame. That certainly would have been much more in my comfort zone! As the day went on, I was taken much further out of my comfort zone as we covered football offensive strategies and the basic responsibilities of our respective positions. To take many of us WAY out of our comfort zones, we even started a somewhat “live” walkthrough of “offense” versus “defense” that actually ended up turning out to be a light full-contact scrimmage! At the end of the day, though, I was extremely thankful that I had been taken so far out of my comfort zone. Through the experience, I was reminded of what a lot of our students feel when they walk into our rooms each day and we speak the language that is all so familiar to us, but is oftentimes foreign to them. I was also reminded that it is important for us to teach with clarity and care, to teach with passion and patience, and to have a lot of fun as we do it! This professional development day was such a blessing to me!

Canton City Schools

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Transportation

Twas The Night Before a Snow Day

Meet Our Mechanics

By Nicole Kiser, Transportation Supervisor

Twas the night before the snow day when all across Canton city, Not a creature was stirring, not even a kitty The bus keys were all hung on the board with care In hopes that the drivers would soon be there Students and teachers were all snug in their beds While visions of a snow day danced in their heads When out in the parking lot, there arose such a clatter Jeff Talbert sprang from his bed to see what was the matter Away to his window he flew like a flash Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash The moon glistened bright on the new fallen snow It gave a luster of midday to all the buses below When what to his wondering eyes did appear 90 busses and 147 transportation employees in full gear! With a team of drivers and aides so lively and quick He knew in an instant that they can drive when it’s slick! More rapid than eagles, the school busses they came And whistled and shouted and radio checked out by name! Now, bus 80, bus 30, bus 21 and bus 3! On Angie, on Patty, on Dawn Baker and bus 23 They sprang to their busses and their horns gave a whistle And away they all drove like the down of a thistle And he heard Nicole Kiser exclaim as they drove out of sight No snow day to all and to all a safe flight!

Chris Reichel, Chad Youg, and Ron Curati

Every day in education begins and ends with transportation! That is our motto here at the Canton City Schools bus garage. This month, we would like to take the opportunity to recognize our three amazing mechanics that keep our fleet of almost 90 buses and several district vans up and running each and every day. Their day starts early at 5:00 a.m. and they are here until the last bus rolls into the lot. Ron Curati our head mechanic, has been with the district for over 28 years. Ron says that it brings him a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction to fix and repair equipment that provides a safe ride for our students daily. Chad Young, who has been with the district for 10 years, likes that each day is a new challenge and enjoys “cleaning things up!” Chris Reichel has also been with the district for 10 years and appreciates getting things done and working with others. Our mechanics do all of our fleet repairs “in house.” From body work to engine repair, they can do it all. All Ohio School Buses are inspected a minimum of twice a year by the Ohio State Highway Patrol, and the Patrol can come in on any given day for a surprise spot inspection on our buses. Canton City has an exemplary record with the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s School Bus inspection program. Each bus is subject to an over 100-point inspection that takes close to an hour. Buses can be taken out of service for a faded light cover or a hole in a bus seat! If there is a bus break down in the middle of a school route the mechanics spring into action to bring out a new bus and retrieve the broken bus right away. We would like to thank our mechanics for doing such a great job keeping our kids safe during their ride to and from school. Keep up the good work, gentleman!

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Bulldog Bulletin


After School Program

Things Are Off to a Great Start for 21st Century Learning The Nita M. Lowey 21st Century Community Learning Centers are off to a great start for the 2021-22 school year, at 15 sites across the district. Students are receiving academic enrichment on reading and math, along with support in social-emotional learning. In addition, our sites are collaborating with community partners to provide enrichment opportunities, such as creating ceramic art at Crenshaw with Glazed and Amused. In addi-

tion, through MentorStark at McKinley High School, students will first learn what a mentor is, then meet their mentors, and finally spend time with mentors at their workplace. Our elementary buildings are also working with partners such as the YMCA for additional games and physical activities and the Stark County Library for literacy enrichment. As the year progresses, we plan on working with additional community partners to

provide all of our students with experiences and skills to support youth development, leadership and academic achievement. We appreciate our hardworking 21st CCLC staff members across the district and local community organizations for their dedication to this great program! – Charla Malone, Extended School Day/Year Enrichment Coordinator (K-6)

Special Education

Celebrating Our School Psychologists

Top Row: Sarah Brady, Dan Lelless, Jessica Nagy, Samantha Barsa, Amanda Furr and Pat Lobritz Bottom Row: Ted Woolumas, Paul Soska, Lindsay Werner and Ashley Hostetler. Not Pictured: Jon Young On Nov. 12, 2012, then Governor of Ohio John Kasich signed a resolution declaring the week surrounding Nov. 12 as School Psychology Week. These unsung heroes support our students, staff and parents to enhance the total environment in which children learn. As school psychologists, they are trained to support the intellectual, social and emotional needs of all children. Their work reduces barriers to learning and assists staff in identifying preventions and interventions to meet the needs of our students. The Canton City School District would like to take this opportunity

to thank our very own School Psychologists that strive to improve the educational outcomes for all of our students! We are fortunate to have an entire School Psychologist Department serving the children in our district! Our school psychologists have earned their degrees from Kent State University, University of Akron, The Ohio State University, John Carroll University and Indiana University of PA. Collectively, our 11 school psychologists have been practicing for 166 years! We are truly thankful for the work that they do to help our students!

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Sports

Facilities Update

Crenshaw

The turf field at Crenshaw is now complete and will be the home to our middle school football team beginning next season. The turf field will also allow us the opportunity to provide practice and game space to some of our youth football teams. Additionally, we can also host soccer and football workouts and camps throughout the year. Unfortunately, the weather did not allow the all-weather track surface to be laid before the cold arrived. As soon as the weather cooperates in the spring, we will have a first-class track facility for our middle school and youth programs to use for practices and meets.

Munson Stadium

In a joint venture with the City of Canton, work is ongoing to renovate and revitalize Thurman Munson Stadium. A turf surface is currently being constructed on the main field and work will soon begin to turf the second field. An indoor pitching and batting facility is also being built. The final product will be a state-of-the-art baseball facility unlike any in the area. In addition to being the home of McKinley baseball, Munson Stadium will host youth, college and adult teams for games and practices. – Joe Bogdan, Director of Athletics, Facilities and Partnerships

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Bulldog Bulletin


Football

Canton McKinley Bulldogs 2021 edition The Bulldog Football Team fought with pride and tenacity all season. With a record of 8-5, the Bulldogs made it to the third round of the OHSAA Division 1 Playoffs, something that has not been done since 2009. The Bulldogs had several All Federal League performers including Stefan Monahan, Harold Fannin Jr, Kris Williams, Cynceir McNeal, Nehimiah Saipaia on 1st Team. 2nd Team included Creed Patterson, Bryan Foster, Amarion Williams, Alaa Saad and Colin Ruffin. Honorable Mention includes Caleb Ruffin, Stefan McNeil and Treyton Mackey. Harold Fannin Jr earned Federal League Player of the Year. We had a fantastic night at Benson Stadium on Oct. 15 celebrating the 1981 State Championship Bulldogs! Players and coaches were introduced on the field before the McKinley 34-26 win over GlenOak! – Head Coach Antonio Hall Harold Fannin Jr., Federal League Player of the Year

Volleyball We ended the season at 5-17. Highlights were defeating Akron Firestone and Kent Roosevelt. Our team is young, with two freshman and two sophomores being major contributors to the team. We are looking for big things next year out of these girls. Thank you to our three seniors A’Niah Culler, Frankie Campbell and Taliyah Johnson. – Coach Patricia Rafailedes

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Girls Tennis We played some very competitive and quality tennis throughout the year. Due to some key injuries, many players were forced to play out of their normal positions. However, we continued to play hard and improve throughout the year. This hard work did not go unnoticed. Our #1 Singles Player: Allie Mayberry was named Honorable Mention for the All-Federal League team as well as Honorable Mention for the All-County Team. Our #1 Doubles Team: Eliana Shaheen and Lauren Rogers won 8 out of their last 10 matches and advanced to the quarter-finals of the Sectional Tournament. They also were named Honorable Mention for the All-County Team. – Coach Jim Puky

Girls Soccer Through a season of ups and downs, my players truly represented what it means to persevere. Despite the adversity the girls faced, we had the following players recognized by the Federal League and Stark County: Federal League: 1st Team - Brittany Garner 2nd Team - Cassidy Hight HM - Kenna Loukas, Allea Graves All Stark County: 1st Team - Brittany Garner, Cassidy Hight 2nd Team - Kenna Loukas, Allea Graves HM - Lexis Anderson, Serenity Powell

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Bulldog Bulletin

Out of our 16 players, five were goal scorers this seasons: Brittany Garner, Cassidy Hight, Celebrity Daily-Brown, Kenna Loukas, Savannah Brunner Out of our 16 players, five players provided assists: Brittany Garner, Cassidy Hight, Allea Graves, Chloe Hall, Kenna Loukas Highlights: - Scored in a tournament game for the first time in five years - Four games were decided by only one goal - First tie in three years - Lost 5-3 in a game we played two players down – Coach Allan Brown


Boys Soccer McKinley Boys Soccer finished with a 4-10 record. This is the first time in over a decade that they have had four wins. Led by Seniors Jamal Mohammed (eight goals, three assists, season) and Riley Miller (five goals, six assist, season), the Bulldogs battled hard for their first Federal league win in a long time defeating Glenoak 2-1 on Senior night. Newcomers, So. defender Jose Amaya and Jr. Goalkeeper Darwin Perez, proved that language is no barrier to success. Other standouts were Jr. defender Logan Maranakis and So. striker, Malachi Christian (five goals, one assist). Coaches Jon Mathewson, Jensen Miller and Nassor Khalid were proud of their players and look forward to next year with optimism. – Coach Jon Mathewson

Girls Cross Country It was a tough season. Our numbers were much smaller than usual and we have not been able to go to camp for the past two years. We fought through the season and ended up with all-season best performances at the end. – Coach Stephanie Lepley

Girls Golf We had seven players come out and golf this season, with four of them being returning players. Our three new players began in the middle of the summer and worked really hard. Despite us losing every match, we played hard and put in a lot of effort. We had a lot of rain at the beginning of the season, but it did not stop them from going out there and giving their all. – Coach Amanda Wisor

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Boys Golf

We had a lot of young first-year players on the team that worked hard and continued to get better as the season progressed. We wrapped up our season with our banquet at Fronimos downtown. We look forward to continuing to work in the off-season to get ourselves prepared for next year. – Coach Bryan Herberghs

Carter Demetro

Delaney Hoskins

Boys Cross Country

Middle School Cross Country Congratulations to Lehman Early College eighth grader Elijah Corrin for finishing third in his race at the OHSAA Middle School Cross Country Invitational. Full results are available here: http://live.finishtiming.com/ meets/439841/events/686 Elijah Corrin

Middle School Seventh Grade Volleyball This seventh-grade team was determined and dedicated to this sport. They finished the season with six wins and nine losses. This team can, and will, be a force to recon with. I am very proud of these young ladies! – Coach Yvonne Lewis

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Bulldog Bulletin


Middle School Football The seventh grade football team went undefeated in Federal League play finishing the season with seven wins and one loss for the second year in a row. We were lead all season by Arius Lucius, Shad Davis, Javier Moore, Trey’mere Lane, Christian Culler, Edward Webster, Cameron Jamerson, Gabe Hinkle, Darius Hill and Jayon Tate. The eighth grade team went undefeated in Federal league play, also two years in a row, finishing 7-0-1, with a season-ending defeat of arch rival Washington Middle School, 14-8! We were lead all season by Xion Culver, Jamir Pierce, Devon Chester, Marques Jackson, Cameron (6) Burton, Naz Brown, Logan Hayes, Mark Springer, Mike Fowler, Trey Smith, Damere McCullem, Thomas Mankowski and Isaac Brooks! We had a total of 80 boys on the team between the seventh and eighth grade. We started off with an explosive off-season weight room and conditioning program, which was the driving force for us throughout the season. This season marks four (two 7th two 8th) Federal League Titles for Head Coach Franco Jamerson in just two years! The coaching staff with five (payed) members offensive coordinator Carlos (Binks) Parish, defensive coordinator Lemonte Chenault, Todd Shanks, Daniel Mercer, two (volunteers) videographer Ebon Smith and equipment manager Dan (double D) Davis was amazing! The fans and administrators both showed major support throughout our season. We look forward to next season. The Bulldog varsity future looks bright! Go Dogs! – Head Coach Franco Jamerson

Middle School Fundraiser Football Fundraiser Honors Sister of Teammate Members of the Middle School Football team representing Crenshaw, Hartford and Lehman gathered at Lehman Wednesday with their coach Franco Jamerson to present money raised by a fundraising event to Akron Children’s Hospital. The fundraiser was in honor of Ayanna Culler, sister of player Christian Culler, who passed away in February of 2020 after a long and courageous battle with cancer. The kids sold athletic compression arm sleeves and also took financial contributions. The Culler family and staff from Akron Children’s were on hand to accept the donation. We are very proud of their service to others.

Canton City Schools

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Alumni Spotlight

Shakeer Abdullah, Ph.D.

The district was pleased to host Dr. Shakeer Abdullah, a 1995 McKinley graduate, on his visit to Canton during the McKinley-Massillon Rivalry Week. A former McKinley Bulldog, he spoke with the football team at the Turk, met with kids at his former middle school, Crenshaw, and then spoke with and read to third graders at Harter, where he has great memories of attending elementary school. Since August of 2018, Dr. Abdullah has served as the Vice President of Student Affairs at Clayton State University. Dr. Abdullah earned his undergraduate degree from Wittenberg University, his M.A. in higher education and student affairs from the Ohio State University, and his Ph.D. in the administration of higher education from Auburn University. His education includes extensive international study, including travel to Lumbadzi, Malawi and participation in programs at the University of Cairo (Cairo, Egypt) and Lancaster University (Lancaster, England). His impressive resume includes founding Practical Diversity Associates with his wife, Alida. This is a full-service consulting firm that addresses Diversity, Equity and Inclusion opportunities for organizations of all sizes. We asked him five questions:

1: What was your first job and what did you learn from it?

“My first job was as an assistant softball coach with the JTP summer program. I was 14 at the time and I learned the value of work, no matter what the job is.” 2: What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given?

“The best advice that I ever received was ‘Have faith in God and do good work.’” 3: Favorite place to visit and why?

“My favorite place to visit is Cairo, Egypt. Just being welcomed so warmly and getting to see so much history in person was amazing. I’m not sure if I ever envisioned myself visiting Africa untilI actually got there, and it was much more than I ever imagined.”

Dr. Abdullah with Head Football Coach Antonio Hall

4: Something people would be surprised to know about you?

“I think people would be surprised to know that I’m the fourth oldest of 20 siblings.” 5: What is your dream job?

“My dream job would be to serve as the head football coach of the Ohio State Buckeyes or the Cleveland Browns.”

30

Bulldog Bulletin

Dr. Abdullah speaking with Harter students


Winter Sports Schedules

Red = Home Game

Boys Varsity Basketball

Girls Varsity Basketball

Date Start

Opponent

Date Start

Opponent

11/6/21

10:00 AM

Mentor HS

11/6/21

SCRIMMAGE N. Phil/Kenmore Garfield

11/9/21

5:30 PM

Cardinal Mooney HS

11/10/21 6:00 PM

SCRIMMAGE Aurora/Gilmour Academy

11/13/21 9:00 AM

SCRIMMAGE (Stow-Munroe Falls HS)

11/27/21 2:30 PM

Berea-Midpark HS

11/16/21 5:30 PM

Hudson HS and 1 other

12/1/21

7:15 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

11/18/21 6:00 PM

Boardman HS

12/3/21

6:00 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

11/20/21 3:00 PM

Central Catholic HS-Canton

12/8/21

7:15 PM

GlenOak HS

11/24/21 7:15 PM

East HS-Akron

12/11/21 2:30 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

11/27/21 12:35 PM

Northland HS

12/15/21 7:00 PM

Norton HS/MS

12/3/21

7:30 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

12/18/21 2:15 PM

Green HS/MS-Uniontown

12/7/21

7:30 PM

11:00 AM

GlenOak HS

12/28/21 4:30 PM

Magnificat HS-OH

12/10/21 7:30 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

1/3/22

7:00 PM

Solon HS/MS

12/11/21 7:30 PM

Wooster HS

1/5/22

7:15 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

12/18/21 4:00 PM

Moeller HS

1/8/22

7:15 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

12/21/21 7:30 PM

Brecksville-Broadview Heights HS

1/10/22

7:15 PM

Copley HS

12/31/21 2:00 PM

Massillon Washington HS

1/12/22

7:15 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

1/4/22

7:15 PM

Green HS/MS-Uniontown

1/19/22

7:30 PM

GlenOak HS

1/8/22

3:15 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

1/22/22

7:15 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

1/11/22

7:15 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

1/24/22

7:00 PM

Northwest HS/MS Canal Fulton

1/14/22

7:00 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

1/26/22

6:30 PM

Lutheran East HS

1/21/22

7:00 PM

GlenOak HS

1/29/22

7:15 PM

Green HS/MS-Uniontown

1/25/22

7:15 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

1/31/22

7:00 PM

Massillon Washington HS

1/28/22

7:30 PM

Louisville HS/MS

2/2/22

7:15 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

2/1/22

7:00 PM

Green HS/MS-Uniontown

2/5/22

7:00 PM

Chippewa JR/SR HS

2/4/22

7:15 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

2/9/22

7:00 PM

Stow-Munroe Falls HS

2/8/22

7:15 PM

Wadsworth HS/MS

2/11/22

7:00 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

2/12/22

7:15 PM

Thomas Worthington HS

2/19/22

7:15 PM

Warren G Harding HS

Boys & Girls Varsity Bowling Date Start

Opponent

11/24/21 4:00 PM

United HS

11/30/21 4:00 PM

Carrollton HS/MS

12/2/21

4:00 PM

GlenOak HS

12/7/21

4:00 PM

Canton South HS

12/9/21

4:00 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

12/14/21 4:00 PM

East Canton HS

12/16/21 4:00 PM

Central Catholic HS-Canton

1/4/22

4:00 PM

Minerva HS

1/6/22

4:00 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

1/11/22

4:00 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

1/13/22

4:00 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

1/15/22

12:30 PM

Louisville HS/MS

1/18/22

4:00 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

1/19/22

4:00 PM

GlenOak HS

1/24/22

3:45 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

2/1/22

4:00 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

2/4/22

4:00 PM

Green HS/MS - Uniontown

2/10/22

4:00 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

Girls Varsity Gymnastics Date Start

Opponent

12/8/21

Wooster HS and 1 other

6:00 PM

12/14/21 6:00 PM

Triway HS/MS

1/18/22

6:00 PM

Wadsworth HS/MS

1/25/22

6:00 PM

Cloverleaf High/MS

2/9/22

TBD

NEGC Winter Classic

CANTON CITY

SCHOOL DISTRICT Canton City Schools

31


Winter Sports Schedules - cont.

Red = Home Game

Boys & Girls Varsity Swimming Date Start

Opponent

12/1/21

TBA

6:00 PM

12/10/21 4:30 PM

Green HS/MS-Uniontown

12/11/21 8:00 AM

TBA

12/18/21 12:00 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

12/29/21 6:00 PM

TBA

1/7/22

4:30 PM

Alliance HS/MS and 1 other

1/8/22

12:00 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

1/15/22

9:00 AM

TBA

1/21/22

4:30 PM

Perry HS-Massillon and 1 other

1/28/22

4:30 PM

Orrville HS/MS and 1 other

1/29/22

12:00 PM

GlenOak HS and 1 other

2/5/22

9:00 AM

TBA

2/12/22

9:00 AM

TBA

2/23/22

9:00 AM

TBA

Boys Varsity Wrestling Date Start

Opponent

11/29/21 5:00 PM

TBA

12/10/21 5:00 PM

WIT Wrestling Tournament

12/11/21 9:00 AM

WIT Wrestling Invitational Tournament

12/17/21 3:00 PM

54th Hudson Holiday Wrestling Tournament

12/18/21 9:00 AM

54th Hudson Holiday Wrestling Tournament

12/29/21 9:00 AM

TBA

1/6/22

6:00 PM

North Canton Hoover HS/MS

1/8/22

10:00 AM

Janet Stammen Memorial Wrestling Tournament

1/13/22

6:00 PM

Perry HS-Massillon

1/20/22

6:00 PM

GlenOak HS

1/22/22

10:00 AM

Dave Rohr Memorial Invitational

1/27/22

6:00 PM

Massillon Washington HS

2/3/22

6:00 PM

Uniontown Lake HS/MS

2/5/22

9:00 AM

TBA

2/10/22

6:00 PM

Jackson HS-Massillon

2/12/22

9:00 AM

TBA

2/16/22

6:00 PM

Green HS/MS-Uniontown

3/10/22

6:00 PM

TBA

Canton City School District

Holiday Shows Dec. 7 Dec. 8

Early College Middle School Band and Orchestra 6 p.m. | Lehman Arts Academy Candy Cane Concert 6:30 p.m. | Downtown Campus Auditorium

Arts Academy Holiday Instrumental Concert 1 p.m. | Arts Academy

32

Dec. 15

McKinley & Early College High School @ Lehman Holiday Band Concert 7 p.m. | Umstattd Hall

Arts Academy Band & Strings Holiday 2 p.m. | Arts Academy Crenshaw Winter Showcase 5 p.m. | Crenshaw

Dec. 9

Dec. 14

McKinley & Early College High School Guitar, Orchestra & Music Tech. 7 p.m. | Umstattd Hall

AIM Academy Holiday Show 6:30 p.m. | Downtown Campus Auditorium McKinley & Early College High School @ Lehman Holiday Choir 7 p.m. | Umstattd Hall

Bulldog Bulletin

Dec. 16

Arts Academy Christmas Choir 7 p.m. | Umstattd Hall Worley Holiday Concert 6:30 p.m. | Worley Steamm Christmas Concert 5:30 p.m. | Steamm Academy @ Hartford