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Jamaica

Port Handbook 2007-08




Contents 5 9 12 15 21 25 27 30 33 37 38 41 45 47 54 59 62 63

Maritime sector moves into major league Port Authority aims to steer maritime sector to success Location Jamaica A world-class hub for transhipment of containers Multipurpose terminal puts customers first A major force in keeping the shipping industry competitive Dynamic free zones provide a magnet for inward investment Helping Jamaica to achieve its maritime ambitions Statistics Port security goes state-of-the-art Maritime college helps boost regional knowledge Idyllic port of call for world’s top cruise ships Super marina with a touch of tradition Company profiles Port details Liner services Directory of services Directory of companies

This Jamaica Port Handbook 2007-08 was published by: Land & Marine Publications Ltd 1 Kings Court, Newcomen Way Severalls Business Park Colchester CO4 9RA, UK Tel: +44 (0)1206 752902 Fax: +44 (0)1206 842958 E-mail: publishing@landmarine.com Website: www.landmarine.com

Printed by: Norwich Colour Print The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor nor of any other organisation associated with this publication. No liability can be accepted for any inaccuracies or omissions. ISSN 1471-3357 Š 2007 Land & Marine Publications Ltd




Welcome to the world’s transhipment centre JAMAICA today is a leading centre of maritime trade – and the reasons are not hard to find. We are an island economy, blessed with a natural harbour of worldclass dimensions and located only 32 miles from the principal north-south and east-west shipping routes. Building on these natural advantages, we have achieved success through an enlightened approach to management, combined with that deep understanding of the maritime sector that is part of our seafaring heritage. Over the years since its formation in 1972, the Port Authority of Jamaica has seen strong and steady growth at Kingston and the main outports. This growth has been led by the container business, with container throughput of more than $1.5 million teu in 2005.

Highly efficient In addition to our superb geographical location, we offer highly efficient handling systems, a first-rate support infrastructure and a professional and stable shipping community. No wonder so many of the world’s leading container lines have chosen Kingston as their Caribbean hub. Transhipment is what we are about, first and foremost. Container operators have come to appreciate and exploit the outstanding advantages of the Port of Kingston for transhipment of cargo worldwide. Expansion works now under way at the Kingston Container Terminal will double its capacity to 3.2 million teu in 2007.

Jamaica’s four strategically placed free zones – two in Kingston and two others in Montego Bay and Portmore – continue to play a key role in stimulating commerce and attracting investment. Our cruise sector is stronger than ever, thanks to the excellent facilities for cruise ships and their passengers at the beautiful north coast ports of Montego Bay, Ocho Rios and Port Antonio, while the recently expanded Errol Flynn Marina in Port Antonio provides an ideal haven for leisure boats up to super yacht size. We are now proceeding to implement plans to improve existing facilities and construct additional waterside and landside facilities to accommodate even more of the mega vessels used in the cruise sector. This handbook will give you a useful snapshot of where we are today and where we aim to be in the years ahead. Welcome to the world’s transhipment centre. Welcome to Jamaica!

Noel Hylton President, Port Authority of Jamaica




Maritime sector moves into major league JAMAICA’S maritime sector has moved into the major league over the past few years as more and more cargo owners and shipping lines take advantage of its world-class facilities and top quality customer care. In 2005 the ports of Jamaica received over 3,700 ship calls and handled a total of 27.6 million tonnes of cargo. Total container traffic through the island’s ports in 2005 was in excess of 1.67 million teu. In the container sector especially, Jamaica and its principal port of Kingston have earned a reputation as one of the biggest and best transhipment centres in the Caribbean – with more brand-new container handling facilities on the way. Other types of cargo receive first-class handling, too, with modern facilities in Kingston and Montego Bay for a wide range of lo-lo and ro-ro traffic, including transhipment.

Meanwhile, the cruise sector is a major growth area for Jamaica, with more – and ever larger – passenger vessels calling each year at its three principal cruise ports on the north coast. In addition to port-of-call business, the island has witnessed the start-up of home porting operations by some cruise operators at the multipurpose port of Montego Bay. Jamaica has significant advantages as a hub for maritime trade thanks to its central location in the Caribbean and its proximity to the United States. On the major international trade routes of the Caribbean, both north-south and east-west, Jamaica is a “must” call for shipping and a nexus point of major significance.

Blessed From a geographical point of view, fortune has smiled on Jamaica. The island is blessed with a series of fine natural harbours and is home to some of the most spectacular scenery in the Caribbean. The biggest and best of these harbours is the Port of Kingston – the seventh largest natural harbour in the world. Today, Kingston offers world-class facilities for handling and transhipment of containers and many other types of cargo. The port has two major terminals, side by side. Kingston Container Terminals (KCT) is dedicated to container traffic, while Kingston Wharves Ltd (KWL) is a multipurpose facility. There is also a range of “sufferance wharves” owned by industrial companies and dedicated to specific cargoes. Kingston is served by a comprehensive range of liner and tramp shipping services, with deepsea links to major ports all over the world as well as feeder links throughout the Caribbean region.




Not surprisingly, Kingston is one of the region’s leading ports for handling of transhipment traffic. When it comes to containers, transhipment is very much the dominant activity of Kingston. About 90 per cent of all the container traffic handled by KCT is transhipment. In 2005 this terminal handled more than 1.5 million teu of which 1.3 million teu was transhipment. APM Terminals (Jamaica) Ltd operates KCT on behalf of the Port Authority through a management contract.

As might be expected in one of the Caribbean’s leading hub ports, the choice of maritime support services in Kingston is second to none. In particular, the area immediately next to the port estate – in Newport West and Port Bustamante – is home to a comprehensive array of cargo handlers, container repair companies, hauliers, logistics providers, shipping agents, stevedores and other specialist companies. Other major support companies have their offices in the centre of Kingston, while some companies also have offices in other Jamaican ports, notably Montego Bay and Ocho Rios. Providing the perfect complement to the support services sector is the network of free zones operated by the Port Authority of Jamaica. These four strategically positioned zones have played a key role in encouraging industry and commerce while attracting inward investment. The four zones are: Kingston Free Zone

In recent years, there has been major investment, both by the Port Authority of Jamaica and by the private sector, in expanding and upgrading the Port of Kingston to allow it to receive larger vessels and to handle higher volumes of containers and other cargo. The PAJ is currently undertaking the fifth phase of its expansion programme at KCT. The Port Authority is investing US$ 220 million in new facilities and equipment including a new West Terminal in addition to the existing North and South terminals. As a result, the total handling capacity of KCT will be boosted from 1.7 million teu to 3.2 million teu.

Invested Meanwhile, KWL, which owns the multipurpose terminal, has invested US$ 26.6 million in rebuilding and expanding two of its nine berths to handle large containerships. KWL has also recently invested millions of US dollars in new state-of-the-art mobile harbour cranes. Trucks hauling domestic freight now have much improved access to the port estate – particularly KCT – thanks to a major upgrading of the main access road as part of the Government’s Highway 2000 road improvement scheme.

Jamaica International Free Zone Portmore Infomatics Park Montego Bay Free Zone. The free zones have played a key role in attracting inward investment as well as providing port customers with a still wider choice of support services.




Port Authority aims to steer maritime sector to success FOR WELL OVER 30 years the Port Authority of Jamaica has played a key role in the successful development and expansion of the island’s maritime trade. Today, thanks in great part to its efforts, Jamaica can justly claim to have one of the Caribbean’s most modern and efficient networks of ports and harbours. The Port Authority is a statutory body, established by the Port Authority Act 1972. As Jamaica’s principal maritime agency, it is responsible for regulation and development of the ports and shipping industry. It is responsible for ensuring the safety of all vessels navigating the ports of entry and for regulating the tariffs charged on goods passing over the public wharves. The Port Authority has shown its commitment to capital investment and staff training as well as a willingness to embrace new ideas and working practices.

The organisation The Port Authority is headed by a president and chief executive officer supported by six senior vice-presidents. The executive reports to a board of directors comprising not more than 10 members appointed by the Minister of Transport and Works.

Guiding principles The Port Authority’s activities are guided and driven by its mission and vision:

Mission - To regulate the establishment and operation of all port facilities and related activities nationally - To develop and manage safe, secure and efficient world-class port infrastructure and related commercial operations that deliver sustainable growth while satisfying the needs of all stakeholders.

Vision - To become the leading hub port and the preferred cruise shipping and marina destination in the Caribbean and Central American region.


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The organisation’s main office in Duke Street, Kingston, is made up of the following divisions:

ment and maintenance of navigational aids – beacons, buoys and lighthouses – for safe navigation of vessels.

Finance & Information Services Engineering & Port Development Operations International Marketing, Cruise Shipping & Marina Services and Public Relations Legal, Regulatory & Corporate Affairs Group Internal Audit, Assurance & Risk Management Services Human Resource & Administration Department. Under the Operations Division, the Port Authority operates the Harbours & Port Services Department and the Pilotage Department. The Harbours Department, headed by the harbour master, is responsible for the deploy-

The Pilotage Department provides navigational assistance to all ships entering and leaving Jamaican ports. Pilotage is compulsory. Every ship navigating within the harbour limits must have a licensed marine pilot on board, who ensures safe docking of all types of vessels.

Main ports The Port Authority owns the following main ports and port facilities: Kingston Container Terminal Port of Montego Bay Cruise ship terminals at Ocho Rios, Montego Bay and Ken Wright Pier, Port Antonio Boundbrook Wharf, Port Antonio.


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Location Jamaica

J A MAICA




Terminal map key: 1 Approximate location of future toll plaza 2 Container inspection dog kennel 3 Customs warehouse 4 Open area for future railroad 5 Import/export storage area (Marcus Garvey area) 6 Unpaved potential expansion area 7 Existing diesel generators 8 Auto storage area 9 Auto parking 10 Administration office 11 Existing entry and exit gate 12 Truck scale 13 Container freight station 14 Outdoor breakbulk storage 15 Gate delivery and receipt clerk booth 16 Grade break perpendicular to the wharf 17 Reefer outlets 18 Existing fuel tanks 19 Maintenance and repair buildings 20 Existing sheds 21 Strad parking with storm tie downs 22 Leased area boundary 23 Open storage transfer between KCT and Kingston Wharves 24 Warehouse (leased) 25 Berths 8 and 9 are leased 26 Transhipment storage area 27 ‘Conair’ reefer stations

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49

Obsolete reefer plugs Seafarers’ center and transformer Container repair area Empty container storage Free trade zone. Possible C.Y. expansion area Crane rail extension & settlement between rails Gate to Gordon Cay Ro-ro pier - unused In-terminal road between North terminal and Gordon Cay Future fill and expansion area Port property - potential expansion area Future terminal expansion area (KCT) Monument and two flag poles Reefer outlets Potential future wharf and backlands Existing diesel generators 100 ft gauge post panamax cranes Septic drainage field Canteen Toilets Misc yard ops, Customs, maint and rest area Gordon Cay backlands under construction Roads (Causeway Road currently two lanes, is to be expanded to six-lane toll road) Boundary Constraints Opportunities 48’ gauge crane rails Open drainage ditch


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A world-class hub for transhipment of containers THE PORT OF KINGSTON is one of the Caribbean’s leading hubs for transhipment of containers. Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) is a worldclass complex, using state-of-the-art cranes and handling equipment to deal with a rated annual throughput of some 1.5 million teu. The terminal operates 24 hours a day throughout the year. Transhipment is the dominant activity of KCT, accounting for 90 per cent of its business. The remaining 10 per cent is domestic traffic.

Mainline services KCT is a global operation, providing a transhipment hub not only for the Caribbean but also for mainline services to and from North and South America, Europe, the Far East and Australia. The terminal complex is owned by the Port Authority of Jamaica and is operated under a management contract by the private sector company APM Terminals (Jamaica) Ltd. There has been massive investment by the Port Authority of Jamaica in a continuous programme of expansion at KCT, with more

What’s new at KCT A significant array of new facilities and equipment is being phased in at Kingston Container Terminal thanks to a major investment of US$ 220 million by the Port Authority of Jamaica. In terms of infrastructure, the new West Terminal will provide KCT with 475 metres (1,558 ft) of additional berthing, with 15.0 metres (49 ft) depth alongside, and 65 hectares (161 acres) of yard space. The West Terminal will also have 976 new reefer plugs. In terms of equipment, KCT has acquired six new empty container handlers and 24 straddle carriers up to July 2006, with six multi-trailer trucks and 10 multi-trailers to come in November 2006 and six super post panamax ship-to-shore gantry cranes (on the West Terminal) in October 2007. Other additional facilities include 55 high-mast lights and a 6,000 hp tug. A vehicle and cargo inspection station is available to the North and South terminals for Customs officers to make random checks. This facility is also used by Kingston Wharves.

Computerised KCT makes full use of the latest computerised management technology. The terminal complex is controlled by a single operating system, provided by Cosmos, using different modules. An electronic system is used to direct trucks to the right part of the terminal, thus smoothing the flow of road traffic in and out of KCT. There is also an appointment system that allows trucks to get in and out more speedily by requesting the container a day in advance. There is a separate entrance for trucks carrying domestic cargo, which also helps to keep the traffic flowing smoothly.


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berths, additional yard space and extra cranes and equipment to cope with the steady rise in container throughput. KCT already has two terminals – the North and South – and now a third, the West, is due to enter service by January 2008. KCT has a total of 13 ship-to-shore gantry cranes, including eight super post panamax units. Under Phase V of the port development programme – begun in November 2005 and expected to be completed by January 2008 – there will be a major boost in handling capacity, with an additional six gantry cranes and many more units of yard handling equipment (see panel story on ‘What’s new at KCT’).

Throughput at KCT KCT handled a total of 1,535,016 teu in 2005 of which 1,313,334 teu was transhipment cargo and 190,970 teu was domestic cargo. This compares with totals of 1,223,856 teu in 2004 and 1,035,598 teu in 2003. KCT received 1,575 ship calls in 2005 – equivalent to about 30 calls a week. This compares with 1,275 calls in 2004 and 1,450 ship calls in 2003.

On completion of Phase V, the total handling capacity of KCT will be more than doubled, from a rated capacity of 1.5 million teu to one of 3.2 million teu.

Main customers KCT has become a transhipment hub for some of the world’s leading containership operators. In addition to CMA and ZIM, its main customers now include Maersk, the world’s largest containership operator, which began calling in March 2006. The arrival of Maersk is a major boost for KCT, which expects to see a 40 per cent increase in throughput as a result. KCT handled 1.671 million teu from 1,812 vessel calls in the financial year 1 April 2005 to 31 March 2006 and was looking to handle more than 2 million teu in 2006. Maersk was attracted by the strategic location of KCT and the high standard of customer services offered by APM and the Port Authority.

World-class Kingston Container Terminal is a major facility with world-class levels of handling capacity and quality of operations. The two existing berth areas – North and South – have a combined storage capacity of 1.3 million teu. The North Terminal has 535 metres (1,755 ft) of berthing for vessels and 50 hectares (123 acres) of yard space for containers. The

terminal has four super post panamax shipto-shore gantry cranes, each with a lifting capacity of 65 tonnes and a reach across 22 rows. Depth alongside is 15.2 metres (49.8 ft). The South Terminal – also known as Gordon Cay – is the main focus of transhipment. The terminal has 1,300 metres (4,265 ft) of berthing and 41 hectares (101 acres) of yard space. There are nine gantry cranes on the South Terminal – four super post panamax of 65 tonnes capacity and five post panamax of 40 tonnes – all of which can reach across 22 rows. Depth alongside is 14.0 metres (45.9 ft).


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The new West Terminal, now under construction, will have 475 metres (1,558 ft) of berthing with 15.0 metres (49 ft) depth alongside and 65 hectares (161 acres) of yard space for containers. There will be six super post panamax gantry cranes. KCT is well equipped to deal with refrigerated containers. There are 408 reefer plugs on the North Terminal and 334 plugs on the South Terminal. A further 976 reefer plugs will be installed in Phase V to provide KCT with a total of 1,670 plugs.

Road access The movement of truck traffic in and out of KCT is being made smoother and more efficient as part of the island’s Highway 2000 road improvement scheme. The main access road from Marcus Garvey Drive has been upgraded and also relocated, thus making room for APM to expand the terminal farther west under Phase V. New exit gates have been brought into service following the undertaking of roadworks.

Security Security is a matter of top priority for the Port Authority, which uses a combination of CCTV and mobile patrols to monitor all activities in the terminal complex. There are 32 cameras to provide visual information to officers in the surveillance centre. Surveillance of the perimeter fence and access points is especially important. The terminal has been ISPS certified since June 2004. For night-time operations, the terminal is brightly illuminated by 56 high-mast lights, each with a cluster of 12 lamps. Security checks on containers – particularly for hidden weapons – are a vital part of the security operation at Kingston. An important role is played by an Aracor Eagle high density

X-ray scanning machine that can see through 13 inches of steel. This US$ 5 million machine allows port staff and Customs officers to check up to three containers simultaneously with over 90 per cent accuracy. KCT also uses Vacis mobile gamma ray units to scan incoming and exiting containers. The Canine Section uses sniffer dogs to detect narcotics hidden in containers.

About the company APM Terminals (Jamaica) Ltd has been managing Kingston Container Terminal since 2002. The company, which employs about 750 people, is associated with APM Terminals, a leading international container terminal operator with activities in over 35 ports around the world. APM Terminals, in turn, is part of the A.P. Moller-Maersk Group.

Handling equipment at KCT - 13 gantry cranes (two more to come by March 2007 and four more by August 2007) - 74 straddle carriers (since July 2006) - 14 empty container handlers (since April 2006) - Four multi-trailer trucks (six more to come in November 2006) - Six multi-trailers (10 more to come in November 2006) - 30 stevedoring chassis - 22 yard tractors - 30 yard trailers - three mobile cranes for hire - two 4,000 hp tugboats (one more to come) - two empty stackers - 24 trailer trains - five fork-lift trucks


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Multipurpose terminal puts customers first ONE OF THE CARIBBEAN’S leading multipurpose terminals is operated by the private-sector company Kingston Wharves Ltd (KWL). Located at Port Bustamante, just east of Kingston Container Terminal, the KWL terminal is a public wharf dealing with all kinds of cargo including containers. The terminal operates continuously, 24 hours a day, all year round. KWL deals mainly with imports and exports for the domestic market. There are nine deepwater berths for ro-ro, lo-lo, container, general breakbulk and bulk shipping. Breakbulk cargoes include cement, lumber, motor vehicles and steel.

Vehicle imports All vehicle imports to Jamaica are handled by KWL, which also has plans to move into transhipment of vehicles for other islands. Lumber and steel products are imported by hardware companies and for use in construction. On the export side, the facility is widely used by Jamaican manufacturers and producers.

Who’s calling KWL Kingston Wharves Ltd received 638 ship calls in 2005. This compares with 642 calls in 2004 and 659 calls in 2003. KWL handled a total of 135,804 teu in 2005 of which 45,400 teu was transhipment cargo and 88,192 teu was domestic cargo. This compares with totals of 136,767 teu in 2004 and 102,200 teu in 2003.

Shipping services Shipping lines calling KWL include Seaboard and Seafreight. Seafreight operates various feeder services to the Caribbean islands, with transhipment being carried out by KWL.

KWL is located next door to Kingston Container Terminal and makes use of its transhipment facilities for domestic container traffic. But KWL also handles significant volumes of containers on its own terminal, and is looking to grow this business by investing in a major upgrading of two of its berths to handle large containerships (see panel story on ‘Berths upgrading’). The terminal covers a total area of 25 hectares. There is 22 hectares of open storage and 30,000 square metres of covered warehousing and cold storage. In addition, there is 53,000 square metres of secure off-dock storage for motor vehicles. The terminal has nearly 1,600 metres (5,249 ft) of continuous quay. KWL has a comprehensive range of handling equipment. Vessels are worked by three state-of-the-art Gottwald mobile harbour cranes. These cranes are nearly new and represent a major capital investment by KWL. The newest and most powerful of the three cranes has a lifting capacity of 40 tonnes with an outreach of 42.5 metres.


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KWL invested US$ 3 million (J$ 208 million) in this unit alone. KWL has also invested in staff training to ensure correct operation of the new equipment.

The terminal has seen productivity improve by over 100 per cent – from 10 to 15 container movements an hour in 2003 to 24 moves an hour in 2006.

Other handling equipment includes seven reach stackers, fork-lift trucks and yard trailers.

As a new service to customers, KWL has introduced real-time updating of information for containers. This will be expanded later to cover general cargo. There is also an interactive service that allows customers to check vessel schedules and pay for their services on-line.

All the stevedoring at KWL is carried out by the company’s own warehouse. In addition, KWL offers a range of support services for cargo owners: • Vanning and devanning of containers including reefer containers. • A deconsolidated cargo service for Jamaicans living overseas and sending items home. Containers are devanned by KWL staff and sorted into individual packages which can be either delivered to or collected by the consignee. • Refrigerated storage through a subsidiary called Harbour Cold Stores Ltd.

Computers The company uses the latest computer software for efficient management of its wharf and warehouse operations. Employees use hand-held and vehicle mounted computers linked to the Tideworks management system. This has helped to reduce vessel turnround times as well as producing more efficient yard operations and more accurate inventory control.

Investment KWL lays great emphasis on customer care. The company has invested in a range of improvements to speed up turnround times for vessels and to give cargo owners quicker access to information and a wider choice of support services. In a major programme of modernisation, KWL has upgraded the infrastructure of the terminal and dredged the harbour to allow the terminal to receive deeper-draught vessels.

Looking to the future, KWL has been buying land in Newport West with a view to expanding its terminal northwards all the way to Marcus Garvey Drive. The company also plans to consolidate all its warehousing into a single location. This will be a modern superwarehouse with a full range of amenities.

Co-operation There is good co-operation between KWL and its next-door neighbour, Kingston Container Terminal. The two facilities are complementary. For example, the container terminal provides KWL with a transhipment facility, while Kingston Wharves can assist KCT with handling of smaller vessels when necessary.

Subsidiaries KWL has two subsidiaries: - Harbour Cold Stores Ltd is a public cold storage facility - Security Administrators Ltd, partly owned by the Port of Authority of Jamaica, provides security services in the ports of Kingston, Montego Bay and Port Antonio. It also offers training in security administration for other Caribbean port authorities. The company provides security for the whole Port of Kingston including Kingston Container Terminals.


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Berths upgraded for container handling Container handling capacity at Kingston Wharves Ltd will be greatly enhanced by a key project to rebuild and expand Berths 8 and 9 to handle containerships. KWL has invested US$ 26.6 million (J$ 2 billion) in this project, which began in April 2006 and was expected to be completed by the third quarter of 2007. The main contractor is E. Pihl & Søn A.S. Maximum depth alongside the two berths has been increased to 15.2 metres (50 ft). This will allow KWL to receive larger vessels and to handle higher volumes of containers. At present, KWL can receive vessels with a maximum draught of 10.0 metres. Dredging was completed in August 2006 and the process of rebuilding the berths got under way in July 2006 with the driving of new piles. This project will increase KWL’s berthing capacity by 50 per cent. At present, containerships can be accommodated only at Berths 1 to 4. Container storage capacity will be increased by about 50 per cent. KWL currently handles about 104,000 teu a year. Its existing customers are looking to increase annual throughput to about 174,000 teu. The rebuilding of the two berths will also generate new jobs at KWL.


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A major force in keeping the shipping industry competitive A KEY ROLE in the ongoing development of Jamaica’s maritime sector is played by the Shipping Association of Jamaica (SAJ). Ever since it was founded in 1939, the organisation has been a major factor in helping the nation’s shipping industry to stay competitive and viable. With its offices in the Port of Kingston, the association has a wide membership that includes shipowners and ship operators, shipping agents, stevedoring companies and terminal operators as well as hauliers, NVOCCs, and providers of business support services to the port community.

Strategic The SAJ is registered as a trade union and one of its primary functions is to regulate the daily supply and management of certain categories of labour on the port. Over the years, the SAJ has negotiated mutually beneficial agreements with port workers and their trade unions. This has paved the way for various strategic changes on the waterfront as well as boosting the overall competitiveness of the port. There is a strong emphasis on productivity strategies aimed at greater efficiency and lower costs. The activities of the Association are supervised by a 10-member Managing Committee, while general administration is handled by a highly efficient and professional secretariat, with strong support from sub-committees of volunteers. The SAJ liaises with Government agencies and bodies, as well as with other private sector organisations, to advance issues that promote the shipping industry.

In addition to advocacy and lobbying, the Association provides a range of information technology (IT) services through a wholly owned subsidiary, Port Computer Services Ltd, which provides much of the IT support for the Port of Kingston. In the area of security, the SAJ has taken the initiative by providing anti-narcotic and contraband detection through its Canine Division, which is licensed by the Jamaica Constabulary Force. This is the only legally sanctioned private sector-operated canine sniffer service in Jamaica. The Shipping Association of Jamaica has gone from strength to strength. It sees its mission as developing a socially aware organisation, determined to provide value added service to its membership and to the wider port community.


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Dynamic free zones provide a magnet for inward investment FOUR strategically placed free zones, operated by the Port Authority of Jamaica, are playing a key role in encouraging industry and commerce while attracting inward investment. The four zones are: - Kingston Free Zone (KFZ) - Jamaica International Free Zone (JIFZ) - Portmore Infomatics Park (PIP) - Montego Bay Free Zone (MBFZ). These free zones are a magnet for inward investment. All four have flourished in a favourable commercial climate with attractive financial concessions. An educated and computer literate workforce is available at competitive rates and there is ready access to modern port facilities with efficient tele-

communications, forwarding services and connections by air and sea. The free zones are duty free areas where goods can be manufactured, warehoused and packaged for export – all free from normal taxes and Customs requirements.

Versatile Both the Kingston Free Zone and Montego Bay Free Zone contain versatile units for commercial activities. KFZ has standard modules, each of 558 square metres, for manufacturing or warehousing. MBFZ has office units, each of 465 square metres, for ICT activities. Portmore Infomatics Park has two-storey office modules of 4,654 square metres (50,000 sq ft). All units are built to international specifications and designed for safe and efficient operations.


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All the infrastructure is in place, so that investors can move straight in and start developing their business. Communications systems and services are readily available and each zone has 24-hour perimeter security. In 1998 the previously autonomous free zones merged under one authority to form a single management structure. This allows the free zones to be developed according to the needs of their users, providing a better service for customers. Kingston Free Zone (KFZ) – owned jointly by the Port Authority of Jamaica and the Government – is Jamaica’s premier offshore industrial estate. It offers modern facilities, efficient management and top quality services in one of the region’s best locations.

Pivotal role Covering about six hectares, KFZ has direct access to the Port of Kingston and lies within easy reach of Norman Manley International Airport. The free zone was established in 1976 as a warehousing operation in support of transhipment at the nearby container terminal. Today its main focus is on support services. The Port Authority is now to establish a commercial free zone and distribution centre that will give it a pivotal role as a distribution hub for the Americas. Jamaica International Free Zone (JIFZ) – located next to the Kingston Free Zone – is a new joint venture between the Port Authority and Zim Integrated Shipping Services Ltd. It is the first entity established in the PAJ’s thrust to develop comprehensive distribution hub capabilities at the Port of Kingston. JIFZ has a major client in the form of Kingston Logistics Centre Ltd, which provides logistics services for Jamaica and the wider Caribbean. Montego Bay Free Zone (MBFZ) was established by the Port Authority in 1985 to build on the success of KFZ.

The free zone covers 37 hectares and is located close to Jamaica’s second-largest seaport and just 15 minutes from Donald Sangster International Airport. Information and communications technology (ICT) is the largest sector in MBFZ. The free zone is home to various clients serving major companies in the United States. Services range from data processing to software development. Portmore Infomatics Park (PIP) was established by the Port Authority in 2000 as a dedicated site for offshore investment opportunities in ICT. The 5.5 hectare park is located in Portmore, the country’s fastest growing township, with a young, well educated, computer literate, English-speaking population. The park contains four office modules, one of which is used as a state-of-the-art call centre. Jamaica’s excellent geographical location – and its dramatic growth in the information processing industry – make this an ideal site for investors seeking major international markets.


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Helping Jamaica to achieve its maritime ambitions A STRONG ADVOCATE for Jamaica in its continuing pursuits as a sea trading state is the Maritime Authority of Jamaica (MAJ), which encourages the growth of the shipping industry while ensuring safe navigation, secure ships and implementing rules and regulations to protect the marine environment from shipsourced pollution. Since it was established, under the 1998 Shipping Act, as the national body responsible for the regulation and development of shipping, the MAJ has sought to streamline Jamaica’s national, regional and international maritime obligations.

Inspection The MAJ is responsible for ensuring that all vessels operating in Jamaican waters comply with rules on safety, security, pollution prevention and conditions of employment on board.

In the main water sports areas of Jamaica, the MAJ’s qualified surveyors and inspectors are a regular sight as they inspect vessels and verify the certification of their operators and generally provide guidance for efficient and safe operations, and help to develop a consciousness about clean seas. This inspection regime also extends to international vessels on the Jamaica Ship Registry. Vessels operating under the Jamaican flag are inspected before being admitted to the register. All registered vessels are also subject to random inspection on an annual basis to ensure that high standards of operation are maintained. At the regional level, the MAJ maintains Jamaica’s obligations under the Caribbean Memorandum of Understanding (CMOU) on Port State Control. Under this agreement, participating countries must annually inspect 15 per cent of vessels calling at their ports. The MAJ has ensured that Jamaica meets or exceeds this target, setting an example for other countries in the region.

Development of shipping Under the 1998 Shipping Act, the MAJ has a mission to encourage the development of shipping in order to achieve the vision of Jamaica becoming a maritime centre. The MAJ sees the accomplishment of this vision as an industry effort, with all sectors working together to achieve success. The MAJ works closely with the shipping industry while carrying out its regulatory functions and ensuring that Jamaica’s legal framework is solid. The MAJ is also responsible for setting the standards for certification and training of


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seafarers at the Caribbean Maritime Institute (CMI) in Jamaica. Accordingly, the MAJ approves the training seafarers, ensuring they conform with the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) STCW 78/95 Convention, conducts the examination process and issues Certificates of Competency to successful candidates. The MAJ advises the Government on maritime policy issues and recommends the adoption of international maritime conventions. Jamaica has ratified all the major IMO conventions, most of which are enshrined in national legislation.

Jamaica and the IMO Jamaica’s international image as a maritime state has been enhanced by the MAJ’s active participation at major IMO meetings. Jamaica has chaired the IMO Standards of Training and Watchkeeping (STW) SubCommittee for three consecutive sessions. It also regularly attends the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee, Flag State Implementation Committee, Legal Committee and Council and Assembly. As a result, Jamaica has been asked to host a number of IMO regional training seminars and two members of staff of the MAJ have been named on the IMO panel of competent persons. The MAJ lauds the progress made by Jamaica’s shipping industry in terms of port expansion and allied activities such as bunkering and container repairs. These are certain steps towards Jamaica’s development as a maritime centre. The MAJ remains committed to doing its part to ensure that the vision will become a reality.


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Statistics Jamaica received a total of 3,865 ship calls in 2003, 3,528 calls in 2004 and 3,767 calls in 2005. Kingston Container Terminal received 1,450 ship calls in 2003, 1,275 calls in 2004 and 1,575 calls in 2005. Kingston Wharves received 659 ship calls in 2003, 642 calls in 2004 and 638 calls in 2005. Kingston sufferance wharves received 422 ship calls in 2003, 420 calls in 2004 and 378 calls in 2005. Montego Bay received 420 ship calls in 2003, 368 calls in 2004 and 343 calls in 2005. Ocho Rios received 345 ship calls in 2003, 327 calls in 2004 and 338 calls in 2005. Port Antonio received 58 ship calls in 2003, 47 calls in 2004 and 46 calls in 2005. Port Esquivel received 193 ship calls in 2003, 151 calls in 2004 and 138 calls in 2005. Port Kaiser received 110 ship calls in 2003, 99 calls in 2004 and 100 calls in 2005. Port Rhoades received 114 ship calls in 2003, 100 calls in 2004 and 110 calls in 2005. Rio Bueno received 10 ship calls in 2003, 12 calls in 2004 and 10 calls in 2005. Rocky Point received 74 ship calls in 2003, 70 calls in 2004 and 82 calls in 2005. Other ports received eight calls in 2003, 15 calls in 2004 and seven calls in 2005.

Ship calls and tonnage in 2005 Jamaica received a total of 3,767 ship calls in 2005 with a total tonnage of 94,347,126 grt. This compares with a total of 3,528 ship calls in 2004 with a total tonnage of 86,147,560 grt. Kingston received a total of 2,591 ship calls in 2005 with a total tonnage of 40,249,110 grt. This compared with a total of 2,337 ship calls in 2004 with a total tonnage of 34,769,108 grt. Outports received a total of 1,176 ship calls in 2005 with a total tonnage of 54,098,016 grt. This compares with a total of 1,191 ship calls in 2004 with a total tonnage of 51,378,452 grt.


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Container handling Jamaican ports handled a total of 1,670,820 teu in 2005, of which 1,358,734 teu was transhipment cargo and 279,162 teu was domestic cargo. This compares with totals of 1,360,623 teu in 2004 and 1,137,798 teu in 2003. Kingston Container Terminal handled a total of 1,535,016 teu in 2005 of which 1,313,334 teu was transhipment cargo and 190,970 teu was domestic cargo. This compares with totals of 1,223,856 teu in 2004 and 1,035,598 teu in 2003. Kingston Wharves Ltd handled a total of 135,804 teu in 2005 of which 45,400 teu was transhipment cargo and 88,192 teu was domestic cargo. This compares with totals of 136,767 teu in 2004 and 102,200 teu in 2003.

Total cargo handling Jamaican ports handled a total of 27,647,976 tonnes of cargo in 2005. This compares with 25,926,790 tonnes in 2004 and 25,077,923 tonnes in 2003. Kingston Container Terminal handled a total of 9,024,427 tonnes of transhipment cargo in 2005 compared with 8,927,635 tonnes in 2004 and 7,598,629 tonnes in 2003.

Outports handled a total of 13,166,370 tonnes of domestic cargo in 2005. This compares with 12,062,002 tonnes in 2004 and 12,497,987 tonnes in 2003.

Number & type of ships to Kingston The Port of Kingston received a total of 2,591 ship calls in 2005 (2,337 in 2004 and 2,531 in 2003). This included: Containerships – 1,812 (1,550 and 1,626) Ro-ro ships – 118 (122 and 121) General cargo ships – 129 (152 and 170) Dry bulk ships – 200 (172 and 180)

The Port of Kingston handled a total of 5,457,179 tonnes of domestic cargo in 2005. This compares with 4,937,153 tonnes in 2004 and 4,981,307 tonnes in 2003.

Tankers – 171 (248 and 318) Other – 161 (92 and 114).


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Port security goes state-of-the-art AS MIGHT BE expected in one of the Caribbean’s leading centres of maritime trade, the issue of port security is high on the agenda for Jamaica and especially Kingston. In common with other port authorities around the world, the Port Authority of Jamaica has introduced more stringent security measures in response to 9/11 and the general threat of global terrorism. In particular, the Port Authority is fully compliant with the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) which came into effect on 1 July 2004.

Specialist The Port Authority employs a specialist contractor to keep a close watch on the movement of cargo and personnel using the very latest technology. Security Administrators Ltd – a subsidiary of Kingston Wharves Ltd – provides security services in the ports of Kingston, Montego Bay and Port Antonio. It also offers training in security administration for other Caribbean port authorities. The company, in which

the Port Authority of Jamaica holds a stake, provides security for the whole Port of Kingston including Kingston Container Terminals. As part of a major upgrading of security, the Port Authority recently invested millions of US dollars in new state-of-the-art scanning equipment at the ports of Kingston and Montego Bay. This is aimed at reducing the flow of illicit cargo, arms and other illegal contraband through the ports. Delivered in 2004, this equipment consists of: Five mobile gamma ray Vehicle and Cargo Inspection Systems (VACIS) for scanning containers Five VACIS pallet systems for inspecting cargo packages One Eagle mobile X-ray unit for inspecting high density cargo such as refrigerated goods. The VACIS systems, supplied by Science Applications International Corporation, can penetrate steel of 158 mm (6.25 in) thickness while the Eagle unit, supplied by Advanced Research and Application Corporation, is capable of penetrating 300 mm (14 in) of steel. The new security measures were stipulated by the United States to prevent terrorists from smuggling weapons or other destructive material into the US. The new measures make it easier to detect arms, explosives and drugs. The new systems can detect materials packaged and embedded within cargo shipments and can tell whether false compartments or walls have been built into the container. They can also detect human cargo.


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Maritime college helps boost regional knowledge HELPING TO BUILD a pool of expert knowledge for Jamaica and the wider region is the Caribbean Maritime Institute (CMI), one of the most respected marine training schools in the western hemisphere. The institute was established in 1980 as a joint venture between the Jamaican and Norwegian governments as a centre for further education, specialising in maritime education and the training of seafarers. Originally called the Jamaica Maritime Institute, it was renamed in 2001 to reflect its wider sphere of influence. Today, about 40 per cent of the college population is made up of foreign students, mainly from other Caribbean islands. For incoming students, the CMI could hardly be better located. It stands on the Palisadoes peninsula, just five minutes from the Norman Manley International Airport and 30 minutes from the centre of Kingston. The institute is flanked by Gun Boat Beach and the Royal Jamaica Yacht Club and enjoys a magnificent view of Kingston harbour.

Fine location That fine location close to the sea, together with its extensive facilities, provides an ideal environment for learning and training. In addition to classrooms, laboratories and workshops, there is residential accommodation for students and staff. Students also have access to the institute’s gantry crane simulator. The CMI offers both part-time and full-time courses on a range of maritime related subjects – everything from fire-fighting and first aid to logistics, marine engineering,

navigation and ship technology. Training of officers, ratings and pilots is a core part of the institute’s activities. The institute also offers distance learning courses via e-mail and internet leading to a Diploma in International Shipping and Logistics.

Accreditation Recently, the CMI has been looking to raise its standards still further by seeking accreditation for its activities and courses. The institute is in the process of obtaining NCTVET accreditation for its courses that will allow it to issue National Vocational Qualification certificates. The CMI is also in the process of getting its short courses (from one week to three months) accredited by the University College of Jamaica. Meanwhile, the institute is currently engaged and well advanced in the process leading to ISO 9001-2000 quality certification. The CMI is supported and partly funded by the Government, the Port Authority and the Shipping Association of Jamaica. Additional funding accrues from course fees and consultancy activities.


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Student population The CMI currently has 420 enrolled students from Jamaica and the other Caribbean islands. The number of graduates has increased by about 20 per cent a year. A total of 120 students graduated from the institute’s core disciplines in September 2006. The CMI employs 40 staff, many with extensive merchant and naval marine experience. The core courses cater for about 120 full-time students, while a range of part-time courses attract a further 600 students.

Fisheries and LNG A project to train Jamaican fishermen in new methods of fishing, fish preservation, packaging and marketing has been launched by the CMI, which has been collaborating with the Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA) on fisheries technology. The CMI has its own fisheries research and training vessel, a new 45 ft boat commissioned in May 2006, and its nine instructors will provide courses for Jamaican fishermen in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture (Fisheries Division) and the University of the West Indies Centre of Marine Sciences. Meanwhile, in the field of marine engineering, the institute has launched a course in liquefied natural gas (LNG) operations to prepare Jamaicans for their role in the impending thrust to replace a substantial percentage of the oil now used for energy with LNG.


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Idyllic port of call for world’s top cruise ships WHEN IT COMES to the perfect destination with the ideal ports of call for a Caribbean cruise, Jamaica could hardly be better qualified. In terms of location, Jamaica is on the main westbound route of the Caribbean, conveniently close to home ports in southern Florida, while in terms of visitor appeal, the island has an unrivalled choice of natural wonders, all within easy reach of cruise ports on the north coast. Jamaica’s appeal was recognised by the travel industry in September 2006 when the island was voted World’s Best Cruise Destination at the 13th World Travel Awards in the Turks & Caicos Islands. In 2005 Jamaica had been voted Best Caribbean Cruise Destination, an accolade which was retained in 2006. Two of Jamaica’s three main cruise ports, Montego Bay and Ocho Rios, are equipped

to handle the largest cruise ships afloat as well as offering a full range of passenger facilities and services. Port Antonio, the third cruise port, is smaller than the other two, offering an idyllic port of call for ‘boutique’ cruise ships and mega yachts.

Montego Bay Montego Bay, on the north-west coast, is Jamaica’s premier tourist destination and its second-largest port after Kingston. The port is managed by the stevedoring company Port Handlers Ltd on behalf of the Port Authority of Jamaica. The Port Authority sees a bright future for Montego Bay as a multipurpose cruise port, handling both port-of-call and home porting business. A major programme of expansion is planned at Montego Bay to maximise its potential as a multipurpose cruise facility. In June 2006 the world’s largest cruise ship, Royal Caribbean Cruise Line’s ‘Freedom of the Seas’, began calling Montego Bay on a weekly basis. And her sistership, ‘Liberty of the Seas’, will call Jamaica in 2007. While the ‘Freedom’ class vessels are 160,000 gt

Cruise ship calls Ocho Rios received 321 cruise ship calls in 2005 and handled 804,825 arriving passengers. Montego Bay received 181 cruise ship calls in 2005 and handled 308,953 passengers. Port Antonio received nine cruise ship calls in 2005 and handled 4,019 passengers.


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Home porting Home porting is a small but growing part of the cruise scene in Jamaica. This activity is focused on Montego Bay, which has all the necessary facilities including a recently privatised and expanded airport. While home porting generates additional revenue for the Port Authority in terms of loading, ticketing and support services, there are obvious benefits, too, for local hotels as well as for suppliers of fresh produce. The Port Authority believes there is a bright future for this line of business at Montego Bay, which has home ported the ‘Aida’, of Aida Cruises, for the past three years and is expected to provide similar services for the ‘Sea Princess’, of Princess Cruises, in autumn 2007. Home porting passengers are encouraged to spend more time in Jamaica at the start or end of their cruise, thus generating more business for local hotels. For example, Aida Cruises offers a sail-and-stay programme that allows passengers to spend a week in Jamaica before or after their cruise. This activity fits neatly into the vessel handling schedules at Montego Bay, since home porting normally takes place at weekends when the port is less busy. For example, the ‘Aida’ calls Ocho Rios on a Friday before going on to Montego Bay on the Saturday for a full passenger exchange and loading. The Port Authority is in talks with other European lines about home porting.

in size, the next generation of RCCL vessels, under Project Genesis, will be giants of 220,000 gt. The Port Authority plans to expand both marine and shoreside facilities at Montego Bay to handle the current and next generation of mega cruise ships. Port facilities will be expanded to allow Montego Bay to handle two ‘Freedom’ class and one ‘Vision’ class vessels simultaneously. On the shoreside, the Port Authority will create a second terminal building that will be designed for home porting operations. The Port Authority hopes to start work on the first phase of expansion in early 2007. Montego Bay has three berths for cruise ships up to 213 metres (700 ft) in length. Maximum depth alongside is 10.36 metres (34.0 ft). Two of the berths (Nos 5 and 6) are used exclusively by cruise ships. There is a total of 427 metres (1,400 ft) of berthing for cruise ships. The cruise terminal building covers 2,694 square metres (29,000 sq ft) and contains gift shops, snack bars, a telecommunications centre and other facilities for passengers.

Ocho Rios

Both types of cruise business have a positive impact on the local economy. Port-of-call business helps the entertainment, food, retail and excursion sectors, while home porting benefits the airports and hotels and operators of transfer services.

Ocho Rios, on the north coast east of Montego Bay, is promoted as Jamaica’s “capital of cruise” and is used entirely for port-of-call business.

In this way, the Port Authority has achieved a good mix of different types of cruise business.

Ocho Rios has three berths for cruise ships up to 274.3 metres (900 ft) in length. Two of the berths were built specifically for passenger vessels. There are two main facilities for cruise ships. The Cruise Ship Pier is a dedicated facility, with two berths, owned by the Port Authority and managed by Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd. Berth 1 is 222 metres (728.3 ft) long with 9.0 metres (29.5 metres) draught and Berth 2 is 274.3 metres (900 ft) long with 9.75 metres (32 ft) draught. The multipurpose Reynolds Bauxite Pier can also be used to berth cruise ships. It has 274.3 metres (900 ft) of berthing with a draught of 12.2 metres (40 ft).


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Natural wonders Jamaica, with its spectacular geography, offers a choice of visitor attractions and natural wonders that is unmatched by any other Caribbean island. Ocho Rios, on the north coast east of Montego Bay, is close the spot where Christopher Columbus first set foot on the island over 500 years ago. Ocho Rios is the gateway to Jamaica’s most photographed natural attraction, the spectacular Dunn’s River Falls. The falls are an unforgettable experience for visitors who choose to make the 600 ft climb from the shore up its limestone tiers, gently battling against a torrent of tumbling water. Over the years, many rich and famous people have made their home in the area around Ocho Rios. Oracabessa is the location of Goldeneye, the former home of thriller writer Ian Fleming, and a nearby beach has been named after his most famous creation, James Bond.

The Port Authority is looking to ways of expanding its berth capacity at Ocho Rios to meet the ever growing demands of cruise ship operators. There are plans to enhance and extend Reynolds Pier to allow it to receive larger cruise ships as well as making it more suitable for a passenger guest experience.

Port Antonio Port Antonio, located east of Ocho Rio on the north coast, is Jamaica’s third cruise port. Port Antonio has developed a niche role as a port of call for ‘boutique’ cruise vessels and yachts. Port Antonio is especially popular with European cruise ships because of its compact size and exclusive low-key atmosphere. Regular callers include Fred. Olsen’s ‘Braemar’ as well as Hapag-Lloyd and Silver Seas vessels. Port Antonio is a haven for mega yachts with a range of new dedicated facilities. Port Antonio has two berths: the main Ken Wright Cruise Ship Berth and Boundbrook Wharf. Facilities include a covered walkway from the vessel. There is a beach bar and grill and there are various private beaches nearby.

Port Antonio offers a wide choice of activities including a spectacular range of natural wonders such as the Blue Mountains, dramatic waterfalls, the mysterious Blue Lagoon and the Nonsuch Caves with their ancient stalagmites and stalactites. More energetic passengers can take a bamboo raft down the Rio Grande or go for a swim in the refreshing pool at the base of Somerset Falls. For cruise passengers who just want to spend the day relaxing, the ideal choice might be a spot of sunbathing on the smooth sand of Frenchman’s Cover or at any or Port Antonio’s splendid beaches.

Who’s calling Jamaica The following cruise lines called at Jamaican ports in 2005 (total numbers of passengers in brackets):

Carnival Corporation • Aida Cruises (23,242) • Carnival Lines (390,561) • Costa Cruise (40,201) • Holland America (33,092) • P&O Cruises (9,785) • Princess Cruises (132,704) • Other members (251)

Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines • RCI (356,289) • Celebrity Cruises (52,578) • Island Cruises (0)

Star Group • NCL (27,159)


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Super marina with a touch of tradition WITH ITS IDEAL location in the heart of the Caribbean – yet only a 90-minute flight from Miami – Jamaica is perfectly placed to serve the region’s multi-million-dollar leisure boat market, both as a holiday destination and as a permanent base.

provided, including 24-hour security, 24-hour Customs & Immigration services, electricity and fresh water, telephone and TV connections, pump-out facilities at each berth, shower and laundry facilities, and a swimming pool.

Jamaica’s role in the leisure boat market received a huge boost in 2002 with the opening of a super yacht marina at Port Antonio, on the north-east coast – one of the world’s most beautiful harbours, offering good shelter and ease of access via a deepwater entrance channel.

The marina is an ideal complement to Port Antonio’s cruise ship terminal at Ken Wright Pier, with its shopping complex and other facilities. The seaside town of Port Antonio, with its shops, restaurants and bars, is just a short walk away.

Famous Owned by the Port Authority of Jamaica, this facility has been named the Errol Flynn Marina in summer 2006 in honour of one of the island’s most famous maritime visitors who established a home nearby. The marina has 32 European-style fixed dockage berths, with a minimum depth of 30 ft, able to accommodate yachts of up to 350 ft in length. A full range of facilities is

Modern boatyard The Errol Flynn Marina has a modern boatyard offering a similar standard of service to east coast United States, with professional services and first-rate equipment. The boatyard is equipped with a 100-ton marine travel lift – the only one of its kind in the northern Caribbean – which can accommodate 30-ton yachts up to 95 ft in length. The marina is a designated free zone and offers hull repairs, custom fitting, engine service, out-of-the-water boat storage and modern fuelling facilities.

In the wake of Flynn Ever since the days when Hollywood actor Errol Flynn would sail to Jamaica for a fun weekend or longer break, the island has been a favourite with yachting enthusiasts. Jamaica is the perfect stopping point or base for yachts en route from the southern United States to the Cayman Islands and Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, while southern Cuba is just 90 miles away.


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Company profiles

Aegean Bunkering (Jam) Ltd Allied Trucking & Maritime Services Ltd (ATMS) Aegean Bunkering (Jam) Ltd has provided bunkering services in the Port of Kingston since March 2005. The company operates a fleet of three modern double-hull supply vessels providing services at Kingston, Montego Bay and Ocho Rios. Staff are available 24 hours a day to deal with customers’ requirements. Aegean Bunkering (Jam) Ltd provides quality bunkering services on behalf of Aegean Marine Petroleum SA, one of the world’s leading independent bunker suppliers. Aegean Marine Petroleum provides fuel at main ports worldwide, either directly or through approved local contractors. It has an international reputation for efficiency and reliability. In addition to Jamaica, the company has developed its own bunkering stations and infrastructure in Piraeus, Gibraltar, Singapore, Instanbul and Khor-Fakkan/Fujairah in the United Arab Emirates. As a trader and supplier, the company is totally responsible for the products it supplies and continuously monitors product quality. Its expertise and purchasing power help to ensure competitive pricing. Aegean Marine Petroleum is a member of IBIA and carries international ISO 9002 quality certification. www.aegeanoil.gr

Allied Trucking & Maritime Services Ltd (ATMS) is a transport and logistics company based in Kingston and offering stevedoring, trucking and related services to charterers’ agents, shipping agents, ship operators, forwarders and shippers. As a haulage contractor, ATMS offers island-wide trucking services on behalf of importers and exporters, transporting containers and breakbulk. The company has its own large fleet of radio-linked tractor units together with 20 ft and 40 ft chassis and flatbeds. Under ATMS or the Port Services Ltd brand-name, the company provides stevedoring services at Kingston Wharves Ltd Multipurpose Terminal, where it is involved in loading and discharging of bulk, breakbulk, container and ro-ro vessels. As a terminal equipment contractor, Port Services can also arrange to provide heavy-duty forklifts, trucks and shore cranes as required. ATMS can also act as a port agent, organising husbandry services for vessels calling at the Port of Kingston and any other Jamaican ports. Another important service offered by ATMS is stevedoring consultancy services to shipping lines, terminal operators, ship charterers, freight forwarders and importers and exporters.

Arnold L. Malabre & Co Ltd

Caribbean Maritime Institute

Arnold L. Malabre & Co Ltd was established by Charles Arnold Malabre, a French national who emigrated to Jamaica in 1842.

The Caribbean Maritime Institute (CMI), formerly the Jamaica Maritime Institute, is one of the most respected marine training schools in the western hemisphere.

The company, named after his grandson, began as a ship agency, shipbroker and commission agency as well as a dry goods merchant. In 1966 R.S. Gamble & Son Ltd took over the share capital of Arnold L. Malabre & Co Ltd, which continued to operate purely as a ship agent for tankers, liner services and cruise lines. The shares of Arnold L. Malabre & Co Ltd again changed hands in January 1999 and the company continues its long tradition in the Jamaican shipping industry.

The institute was established in 1980 as a joint venture between the Jamaican and Norwegian governments as a centre for further education, specialising in maritime education and the training of seafarers. The institute is supported and partly funded by the Government, the Port Authority and the Shipping Association of Jamaica. The balance of funding comes from course fees and consultancy activities. CMI is located at Palisadoes Park, overlooking Kingston Harbour, and just five minutes from Norman Manley International Airport. In addition to classrooms, laboratories, workshops and a gantry crane simulator, there is residential accommodation for students and staff. CMI employs 40 staff, many with extensive merchant and naval marine experience. The core courses cater for about 120 fulltime students, while a range of part-time courses attract a further 600 students. www.cim.edu.jm


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Damen Shipyards Gorinchem Deryck A. Gibson (Group) Ltd

E. Pihl & Søn A.S.

Damen Shipyards was established in 1927 and has its head office at Gorinchem in the Netherlands.

E. Pihl & Søn A.S. (Pihl) is a Danish building and civil engineering company founded in 1887. With its head office in Copenhagen, the company has activities worldwide and employs about 2,500 people.

Since 1969 the company has specialised in the construction of multipurpose workboats, highspeed patrol craft, fast ferries and shortsea cargo vessels according to its modular building principle. Newbuildings of up to 130 metres length, 14,000 hp and 15,000 dwt are produced by Damen Shipyards Gorinchem and over 3,000 such vessels have been delivered to customers in 120 countries. Deliveries to Jamaica include i.e. two tugs for the Port Authority and three Patrol Vessels for the Jamaica Defence Force. The company’s vessels have found their way into every sector of the marine industry, including dredging, towage, harbour duties, law enforcement and port authority work.

Deryck A. Gibson (Group) Ltd is a diverse group of companies operating in the civil engineering, industrial and maritime sectors. The company, which marked its 50th anniversary in 2006, was founded by its present-day chairman, Deryck A. Gibson. Gibson began by supplying materials and equipment for the building boom of the 1950s. In the 1970s and 1980s the group diversified into the supply of container handling equipment and heavy plant machinery for the bauxite industry. Today, the various divisions of Deryck A. Gibson (Group) Ltd. are involved in a range of activities: The Port Division supplies leading brands of container and cargo handling equipment. One of its main clients is Kingston Container Terminal.

Damen Shipyards Gorinchem also supplies vessels as completely knocked down (CKD) kits with equipment and assembly training included in the package.

The Bridges Division manufactures and installs road bridges on behalf of the Jamaican Government in co-operation with the UK firm of Mabey & Johnson Ltd.

The company is a member of the Damen Shipyard Group, which offers a range of maritime services including chartering, design, delivery of parts and components, field services, second-hand trading, technical co-operation and training.

The Industrial Division supplies machinery, spare parts and tools for the industrial sector.

www.damen.nl

The Valuations Division assesses the value of machinery and equipment. The Service Division installs and services all the equipment, spare parts and tools sold by the group. The Energy Division supplies power plants for industrial clients. www.deryckgibson.com

Over the years Pihl has carried out projects in about 40 countries around the world including the Caribbean, North America, the North Atlantic Area, Africa, the Middle East, the Far East and Europe. The projects carried out range from building works such as offices, factories, dwellings and administrative buildings to major infrastructure works such as harbours, bridges, tunnels, roads, airports, water supply and sewage projects and hydro-electric power plants. In 2005 Pihl was ranked 75th on the ENR list of Top 225 International Contractors and sixth on the ENR list of Top 10 International Contractors in Marine and Port Facilities. A large part of the projects are carried out as design and build contracts. In addition, project management contracts and BOT projects are performed. www.pihl-as.dk

Gateway Shipping Jamaica Ltd / GraceKennedy Shipping Ltd Gateway Shipping was set up in January 2005 to manage GraceKennedy Shipping after the GraceKennedy Corporate Group decided to reduce its role in the maritime sector. GraceKennedy Shipping is one of Jamaica’s leading providers of port and agency services, with a wide portfolio of principals including container lines, cruise ships, tramp ships and NVOCC operators. The company provides services for the Chilean container line, CSAV, and its Libra, Montemar and Norasia Lines brands. It is agent for the Japanese carrier K-Line and also represents the NVOCC interests of Braid, Panalpina and Simba Logistics for liquid bulk cargoes, air freight and LCL respectively. As a well established port agent for tramping operations, Grace Shipping’s principals include such major oil companies as Petrojam, Shell, Stolt and Texaco. In the cruise sector, Grace is agent for Celebrity Cruises and Royal Caribbean International. The company is strategically located in the major terminals of Jamaica, with offices in the ports of Kingston, Montego Bay and Ocho Rios. www.graceshipping.net


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International Shipping Limited International Shipping Limited (Intership) provides a wide range of general agency services including liner and tramp operations, vessel husbandry, claims facilitation, Customs clearance, freight forwarding, inland haulage, container control and freight consolidation/deconsolidation. The company was part of the Maritime Division within the GraceKennedy Group of companies and plays a prominent role as a member of both the Shipping Association of Jamaica and the Caribbean Shipping Association. With over 20 years in business and a skilled and experienced staff, the company offers a number of strategic advantages. It is located in the Caribbean’s premier transhipment hub and is directly associated with a wide range of transport and logistics services. In addition, the fully computerised office is linked to communication systems that allow customers online access. International Shipping’s principal customers include Hoegh Auto Liners, Spliethoff and Trans-continental Express Shippers (NVOCC).

Jamcor

Jamaica Freight & Shipping JAMPRO

Jamcor (Jamaica Container Repair Services Ltd) is a multi-service company offering a range of support services for shipping lines, cargo owners and vessel operators. The company, a fully registered entity, is a subsidiary of Zim Israel Navigation Co Ltd.

The full service shipping agency Jamaica Freight & Shipping has been operating for 30 years. It is part of the Jamaica Fruit and Shipping Group, founded in 1919.

In addition to its dry container repair facility in the Port of Kingston, Jamcor has diversified into reefer management, cargo lashing, chassis rental and shiprepair services (including emergency repairs). Located within its own Free Zone, the company has direct access via a secured gate to Kingston Container Terminal. Jamcor maintains and repairs empty and loaded containers for shipping lines calling Kingston. Its main customers are Zim and CMA-CGM. Jamcor is experienced in the repair, maintenance and servicing of reefer containers and temperature monitoring of loaded reefers. Cargo lashing is another speciality of Jamcor, which is actively marketing this service. Other services: - Jamcor has a fleet of 65 roadgoing chassis available for rent to haulage contractors for inland distribution of containerised imports. - Washing, steam cleaning and repair of tanks and containers - Shipboard repairs of deck gear and refrigeration equipment - Sandblasting - Chassis repairs - Vessel surveys.

The company represents a wide portfolio of principals, including Jamaica Producers Shipping Company, Mitsui OSK Lines, China Shipping Container Lines, Costa Container Lines and Maybank Shipping Company. It is also the representative for Miami Freight & Shipping Company, an NVOCC, and for various tramp vessels. Jamaica Freight has its own stevedoring company, Shipping Services (Stevedoring) Ltd, which provides stevedoring for, among others, Seaboard Marine, Jamaica Producers Shipping, Maybank and Mitsui. Through its associated companies, Jamaica Freight offers a range of services including marine equipment hire, port agency, ship management, charter broking, ship surveying, P&I representation and drydocking. Jamaica Freight is the exclusive port agent for Windalco at Port Esquivel, handling all its bulk vessels and third party business, and the exclusive agent for banana vessels at Boundbrook Wharf in Port Antonio. Jamaica Freight and its associated companies handle about 500 vessels per year. www.jashipco.com

Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO) was established by the Government in 1988 to promote exports and investment by providing first-rate business advisory services. With its head office in Kingston, the organisation also has offices in London and New York. JAMPRO has an experienced team of professionals to help with investment, trade, training, export promotion and industry modernisation. In recent years, JAMPRO has played a key role in attracting higher levels of foreign direct investment, particularly in hotels and tourism, information technology and manufacturing. Among its services, JAMPRO carries out research on national development issues and provides technical support for the Cabinet. It also does consultancy work for the Government, deals with external co-operation agreements and talks to funding agencies. JAMPRO provides information on investment opportunities in Jamaica and offers support to potential investors. The organisation has a good reputation for helping new investors to get started with a minimum of bureaucracy. The World Bank recently named Jamaica as one of the 10 best countries to do business. www.investjamaica.com


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Jan De Nul Group

Kingston Wharves Ltd

The Jan De Nul Group is a world leader in dredging, reclamation works and specialised services for offshore pipelines, rock dumping, salvage and heavy lifting.

Kingston Wharves Ltd (KWL), founded in 1945, is one of the Caribbean’s leading multipurpose port operators.

The Group also provides largescale environmental services through its subsidiary, Envisan. Thanks to a massive expansion policy, Jan De Nul has the most modern and flexible dredging fleet in the world, able to carry out dredging and reclamation works of all kinds and all sizes. Major projects in Jamaica include deepening of the access channel and Port Bustamante basin in the Port of Kingston; maintenance dredging at Kingston Container Terminal; maintenance dredging at the Petrojam Terminal in Kingston; and maintenance dredging at Port Esquivel. Other prestigious projects include major land reclamation and port development works in Dubai and Qatar; river deepening and maintenance works in Argentina; the NorFra pipeline project in France; and land reclamation projects in Singapore. The Group’s services are underwritten by ISO 9001: 2000, ISO14001: 1996 and OHSAS18001: 1999 quality certification. www.jandenul.com

The company operates a 24-hour public wharf at Port Bustamante, just east of Kingston Container Terminal, handling a wide variety of cargo, including containers. This terminal covers a total area of 25 hectares, including 22 hectares of open storage and 30,000 square metres of covered warehousing and cold storage, and has 1,600 metres of continuous quay. The company also has over 53,000 square metres of secure off-dock storage for motor vehicles. KWL has invested US$ 26.6 million in a project to rebuild and expand Berths 8 and 9 to handle vessels with a draught of 15 metres. This is expected to be completed by July of 2007. KWL has two subsidiaries. Harbour Cold Stores, which is a cold storage facility, and Security Administrators Ltd, a security company providing security services in the ports of Kingston, Montego Bay and Port Antonio. www.kingstonwharves.com.jm

Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd is a multi service company with its head office in the Port of Kingston and offices in Ocho Rios and Montego Bay. The company provides agency services for all kinds of vessels, including cruise, liner and tramp ships. It offers husbandry services throughout Jamaica. In the liner trades, its main principal is Evergreen, which it has represented for over 30 years. It also represents SeaFreight, which operates full container feeder services to and from south Florida. In the cruise sector, Lannaman & Morris is agent for Norwegian Caribbean Line and also represents Carnival Cruise Lines. At Ocho Rios, the company manages and operates the Cruise Ship Pier on behalf of the Port Authority. Lannaman & Morris has its own logistics centre [??in Kingston??] with a fleet of chassis for road haulage of containers. In addition to liner, chartering and port agency, the company is involved in: • Freight forwarding • Consolidation of cargo • Management consultancy • Marine equipment repairs • Logistics and supply chain management. www.lannaman.com

A.P. Moller-Maersk Group The A.P. Moller-Maersk Group employs more than 110,000 people in over 125 countries, including its container shipping and related activities. It is a market leader in worldwide container services, agency, logistics and terminal activities under the brand names Maersk Line, Maersk Logistics, Safmarine and APM Terminals. Maersk Line and Safmarine operate more than 500 container vessels, of which more than 200 are owned. APM Terminals operates more than 40 terminals with an annual throughput of more than 24 million teu. In addition to container shipping A.P. Moller-Maersk is active in oil and gas production and exploration all over the world, as well and also operating a fleet of supply vessels, jack-up rigs, salvage and towage vessels under the brand names Maersk Tankers, Maersk Supply Services, Maersk Contractors, SvitzerWijsmuller and Norfolk Line. A.P. Moller-Maersk is also involved in shipyards, container production and other industrial activities. www.maerskline.com


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Marine Consultants (Trinidad) Ltd

Maritime & Transport Services Ltd

Maritime Authority of Jamaica

Marine Consultants (Trinidad) Ltd, founded in 1971, offers a range of world-class products and services. Customers include government agencies, the oil and gas industry, ships, ports and pleasure craft.

Maritime & Transport Services Ltd is a multi service company based in the Port of Kingston. The company began in 1966 as a steamship (liner) agent but has expanded its range of services while embracing a number of subsidiaries and associated companies.

The Maritime Authority of Jamaica (MAJ) was established under the Shipping Act of 1998 to develop shipping and to ensure that maritime activities are conducted in accordance with national and international standards of maritime safety, security and pollution prevention.

With its head office in Port of Spain, Trinidad, the company employs a team of master mariners and professionals certified in maintenance of life-saving equipment, navigational aids and more. Products include: • Supply, installation, repair and recertification of inflatable liferafts, lifeboats, dinghies, fast rescue craft. • Installation, maintenance and refurbishment of buoys, channel markers, lighthouse beacons, etc. • Agents for British Admiralty charts and publications. Other regulatory items include Solas, Col Regs, Marpol, STCW, OCIMF. • Marine electronics – compasses, epirbs, GMDSS, GPS, radar, Sart, satcoms, VHF. • Supply and installation of single point mooring hawsers, stand-by and storm moorings systems, mooring chains and anchors, fenders, etc. • Load testing telemetry equipment, wire ropes, lubricants, cargo nets, slings, lifting baskets. • Flag state inspections, vessel risk assessments, on/off hire surveys, vessel lightering. Stockist of marine pyrotechnics, fire-fighting equipment, fire suits, etc. www.mcl.co.tt

Today the group employs about 80 staff. The steamship agency has a list of distinguished principals including Alcoa Steamship Co, Hyundai Merchant Marine Co, Maersk Line and United Bulk Carriers. The agency also has experience in handling project cargo assignments. Other activities include bunker supplies, marine insurance, port agency, port management, stevedoring and warehousing as well as the supply of oil spill equipment. The company has three main subsidiaries: - Maritime Brokers Ltd

General

Insurance

- Maritime Towing Company Ltd - Seaport Equipment Ltd, providing pilot boat, launch and general marine services. In addition, A.E. Parnell & Co Ltd, one of Kingston’s leading independent stevedoring companies, is an associated company and close business partner. www.mariland.net

As the maritime administration of Jamaica, the MAJ has the following responsibilities: • To administer the registration of ships through the Jamaica Ship Registry • To regulate the certification of seafarers • To regulate the safety of shipping, both in construction of ships and in navigation • To determine the policy for development of shipping in general • To conduct port and flag-state inspection of ships in the interests of maritime safety and prevention of marine pollution • To set the standards for maritime training and safety • To hold inquiries into shipwrecks and other shipping casualties and to examine charges of incompetence or misconduct on the part of seafarers in relation to such casualties. www.jamaicaships.com

Port Antonio Port Antonio, on the north-east coast of Jamaica, is one of the world’s most beautiful harbours and home to the Errol Flynn Marina, a super yacht facility opened in 2002 and owned by the Port Authority of Jamaica. Recently enlarged and upgraded, the marina has 32 Europeanstyle fixed dockage berths, with a minimum depth of 30 ft, for yachts of up to 350 ft. A full range of facilities is provided, including 24hour security, 24-hour Customs & Immigration services, electricity and fresh water, telephone and TV connections, pump-out facilities at each berth, shower and laundry facilities, and a swimming pool. There is a modern boatyard offering top quality services up to United States standards, with professional services and first-rate equipment. The boatyard is equipped with a 100-ton marine travel lift for yachts up to 30 tons and 95 ft. The marina is a designated free zone and offers hull repairs, custom fitting, engine service, out-of-the-water boat storage and modern fuelling facilities. www.portantoniojamaica.com


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Port Handlers Ltd Port Handlers Ltd, a subsidiary of the Hart Group of Companies, operates the Port of Montego Bay on behalf of the Port Authority of Jamaica. The Port of Montego Bay has seen a significant investment in recent years to upgrade its facilities. These facilities include 428 metres (1,404 ft) of berthing for cruise ships, a modern cruise terminal, ro-ro facilities, refrigerated and dry container storage and other warehousing. The channel is approximately 400 metres in length and 160 metres wide with a minimum of 10.4 metres depth. Berthing facilities are available for both home porting and port-of-call vessels bringing cruise passengers to the friendly city of Montego Bay. Cargo Handlers Ltd, another company within the Hart Group, provides a complete range of stevedoring services at the cargo and cruise ship terminals in the Port of Montego Bay. www.portsofjamaica.com

RCM Customs Broker Services Ltd

Royale Ocean Shipping Company Ltd

RCM Customs Broker Services Ltd, based in the Port of Kingston, offers Customs clearance, import and export processing, Customs consultancy and haulage services.

Royale Ocean Shipping Company Ltd (ROS) is a registered steamship agency incorporated in December 1999.

RCM offers its clients a processing time of just two days. The firm is looking to extend its Customs consultancy service in order to facilitate this rapid delivery time. Customers can expect top quality service from staff at RCM thanks to a combination of experience and continuous training. All customers receive the same level of attention, whether they are corporate clients, small businesses or individuals. Team members use IT tracking to provide clients with up-to-date information on when they can expect to access their goods. RCM is a member of the Fast Track system, operated by Customs House, which is available only to firms with an error rating of five per cent or less in their transactions. The firm has its own travelling team of Customs brokerage clerks, linked to the office by radio. www.rcmcustomsbroker.com

By offering knowledgeable and customer focused representation, ROS is able to provide shipowners and ship operators with an efficient and professional agency service. ROS provides ship agency services for a range of vessels – including containerships, breakbulk ships, dry bulk carriers and tankers – and is also involved in special projects and non-cargo operations. The company provides LCL representation on services between St Maarten/Kingston and Miami/ Kingston. In Jamaica, the company provides port agency services at Wherry Wharf, Kingston, and Rio Bueno, Trelawny. ROS has expanded its range of services to meet the demands of today’s dynamic transport sector. They include: - Customs brokerage and haulage - Ship brokerage and chartering - Stevedoring consultancy - Crewing agency. ROS has strengthened its collaborative efforts with associated companies and trading partners, recognising the need to constantly review its operations in order to remain relevant as a ship agency and logistics provider. www.royaleoceanshipping.com

R.S. Gamble (1998) Ltd R.S. Gamble (1998) Ltd is a firm of ship agents and marine insurance claim settling agents based in Kingston. The company took over the assets of R.S. Gamble & Son Ltd, which had been established in 1897. Today, R.S. Gamble (1998) Ltd handles a range of activities: - Ship agency - Insurance surveys - NVOCC agency - Freight sales - Customs clearance & forwarding - Haulage - Warehousing. As a ship agency, Gamble represents major clients such as Atlantic Maritime, BP Shipping, Essco Maritime, China Ocean Shipping, Hapag-Lloyd Kreuzfahrten and Texaco Marine Service. For insurance surveys, Gamble represents the International Underwriters Association of London, Lloyd’s of London, the Swedish Club, the United States Salvage Association and W.K. Webster as well as other European and Far Eastern insurance companies. Gamble is NVOCC agent for Locker Freight, Panfine Shipping International and Transocean Distribution. The company has 11,000 sq ft of covered storage and 14,000 sq ft of open storage available for shippers.


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Seaboard Freight & Shipping Jamaica Ltd Seaboard Freight & Shipping Jamaica Ltd, with its offices in Newport West, Kingston, is the local representative for Seaboard Marine Ltd. Seaboard Marine, with its head office in Miami, Florida, operates liner services between the United States and the Caribbean basin, Central America and South America. The company operates three sailings a week for dry and refrigerated cargo between Miami and Kingston. This service also calls Montego Bay, providing the only direct service between Montego Bay and Miami. Seaboard Marine also operates a weekly service to Kingston from Philadelphia calling Fernandina Beach, Florida. In addition, there is a weekly Caribbean service covering Antigua, Barbados, Trinidad, Guyana and the Dominican Republic. Seaboard is the only carrier to offer a direct service to the Cayman Islands. Fixed-day schedules allow customers of Seaboard Marine to co-ordinate manufacturing schedules and maintain inventories at cost-efficient levels. Seaboard Marine’s system of procedures for exports is certified by various international governing bodies. Seaboard Marine is an active member of the Business Anti-smuggling Coalition. www.seaboardjamaica.com

SeaFreight SeaFreight, with its head office in Jacksonville, Florida, offers regular and reliable feedership services between south Florida, Kingston and other major ports in the Caribbean. The company has a fleet of five pure container carriers operating in rotation on this route. These 1,100 teu feedership are fast, reliable and ultra-modern vessels, all built within the past four or five years. SeaFreight operates a fixed day weekly service between the Florida ports of Jacksonville and Port Everglades and the Caribbean region including Jamaica, Aruba, Curaçao, Venezuela, Trinidad, Guyana and Barbados. This service calls Kingston every Monday morning. The local agent for this service is SeaFreight (Jamaica) Ltd, which operates from the same offices as Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd. SeaFreight has been operating its Caribbean service since 1995. www.seafreightagencies.com

The Shipping Association of Jamaica

Transocean Shipping Limited

The Shipping Association of Jamaica (SAJ) was established in 1939 as a registered trade union, with the primary function of managing the supply of labour for the Port of Kingston.

Transocean Shipping Limited (TSL) is an independent, privately owned and operated firm of stevedores, port and steamship agents and logistics providers established in Kingston in 1982.

Over the years, the Association has charted developments in Jamaica’s maritime history and supports activities to reinforce the competitiveness of Jamaica’s shipping industry.

TSL is committed to delivering excellent service to its customers and has pursued its vision for success with proactive leadership. The company offers a wide range of transport-related services to liner shipping companies, freight forwarders, importers, exporters, dry bulk cargo operators, charterers and shipbrokers.

With offices near the port, the SAJ maintains a cadre of 310 skilled workers and represents and has some 70 organisations on its membership list including hauliers, ship operators, shipowners, shipping agents, stevedoring contractors and terminal operators. The activities of the Association are supervised by a 10-member managing committee, while general administration is handled by a highly efficient secretariat, supported by a committee of volunteers. In addition to advocacy and lobbying activities, the Association provides specialist information and training opportunities; a range of information technology services through Port Computer Services Ltd; and anti-narcotic and contraband detection through its Canine Division. www.jamports.com

TSL is known as a provider of comprehensive and high quality maritime transport, inland trucking and logistical services. The company has extensive experience in handling a variety of vessels and in efficient cargo movement throughout the island. TSL’s clientele includes several leading, long-standing commercial entities in Jamaica. The company has earned the loyalty and respect of discerning business people determined to maintain their relevance in the face of rapid global change. TSL has diversified its operations and has invested in expertise in the management of the supply chain as critical to maintaining its own relevance in a dynamic field. www.shippingja.com


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Port details XARS Equipment & Trucking Co Ltd XARS Equipment & Trucking Co Ltd, founded in 1982 and based in the Port of Kingston, is a logistics and haulage specialist offering a range of ancillary services to shippers of containerised and general cargo. The company employs about 40 experienced management and staff. The core business of XARS is haulage. It operates a fleet of eight tractor heads plus a range of chassis and flatbed trailers for containers and breakbulk. This is complemented by logistics and warehousing. XARS has a total of 30,000 sq ft of warehousing for storage of non-bonded goods and offers a vanning and devanning service for containers. Fork-lift trucks are available. XARS deals mainly with import and export companies. It offers a one-stop solution for movement of freight between consignor and consignee including ship agency. For exports, the company takes care of freight consolidation and shipping of goods to overseas destinations. For imports, it can arrange final delivery of containers and other cargo to any part of Jamaica. www.xarstrucking.com

General information Authority: The Port Authority of Jamaica has jurisdiction over all ports in Jamaica. Port Authority of Jamaica 15-17 Duke Street, Kingston Tel: +876 922 0290-8 Fax: +876 924 9437 Email: paj@portjam.com Web: www.portjam.com Airports: Norman Manley International Airport is 20 km from Kingston. Tinson Pen Aerodrome is 1 km from Kingston. Sangster International Airport is 3.1 km from Montego Bay and 102 km from Ocho Rios. Small landing strip 5 km from Montego Bay. Spring Garden is 9.6 km from Port Antonio. Other air services available at Boscobel Domestic Airport and St Ann’s Bay Domestic Airport. Emergency numbers: Police: 119, Fire: 110, Ambulance: 110. Lloyd’s agent: R.S. Gamble (1998) Ltd, Kingston. Pilotage: Compulsory. Available from Kingston. Agents should alert Pilotage Department of ship’s ETA and ETD at least three hours in advance (24 hours in advance for Ocho Rios and 12 hours for Port Kaiser). Radio information: Radio frequency: VHF 11 (working channel: VHF 17). Road links: Jamaica has an extensive road network for inland transport.

Stevedores: The management and supply of labour at Kingston is regulated by the Shipping Association of Jamaica, which organises a workfroce of nearly 400 labourers. Water: Fresh water is available at all ports. Limited at Port Kaiser. Weather: Maximum rainfall in April and May and between September and November. Hurricane period is from June to November inclusive. On the north coast, prevailing winds N through ESE and 11-16 knots. Windiest months are November to March. Strongest wind from NE. On the south coast, prevailing winds are generally E through NW and 10 knots. Windiest months are March and June to August. Strongest winds from ESE. Working hours: Kingston: 24 hours a day, all year round, Montego Bay: 24 hours a day, all year round, Ocho Rios: 24 hours a day, all year round, Port Antonio: [??24 hours a day, all year round??], Port Esquivel: 24 hours, Monday to Saturday. Port Kaiser, Port Rhoades and Rocky Point: 24 hours, Monday to Saturday. For further information contact the harbour master via the Port Authority.

Kingston Location: Located on Jamaica’s south-east coast in position 17°58’N, 76°48’W.

Tides: Average tidal range is less than 0.5 metre.

Approach: Main channel is maintained to 13.0 metres depth with minimum width of 250 metres. Rocks in east middle ground, 13 cables SSW of Plumb Point lighthouse.

Towage: Available only at Kingston and Montego Bay.

Accommodation: Facilities include 12 quays, four tanker berths and 10 private wharves.


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Kingston Wharves Ltd operates Berths 1 to 9 and APM Terminals (Jamaica) Ltd operates Berths 10 and 11. South Terminal (Gordon Cay) has 1,200 metres of berthage, a 12.8 metre turning basin, [??21.64 km of container warehousing space and 13 hectares of paved land??]. Anchorage: The following positions are specified anchorages: Port Royal: 19°56’.65N, 76°50’.83W; 16 metres A: 17°57’.42N, 76°47’.73W; 12.2 metres B: 17°57’.4N, 76°47’.2W; 13.4 metres

Ro-ro facilities: Berths 1 and 9 have ro-ro ramps. Berths 10 to 11 are dedicated to containers.

C: 17°57’.37N, 76°46’.68W; 12.8 metres D: 17°57’.13N, 76°44’.43; 16.5 metres

Towage: Provided by Maritime Towing Co Ltd. Tel: +876 923 8728/9 Fax: +876 923 5077/8720

E: 17°57’.12N, 76°44’.95W; 16.5 metres. Radio frequency: Channel 11. Bunkers: Supplied ex-berth. All types of fuel available from three suppliers.

Montego Bay

Medical aid: Kingston Public Hospital is 5 km from the Port of Kingston. University Hospital is 10 km from the port.

Location: Located on Jamaica’s northwestern shore in position 18°28’N, 77°56’W.

Largest vessel: Maximum length 305.3 metres LOA; maximum draught 13.0 metres.

Approach: Marked channel. Port Handlers berths are reached via channel, 457 metres long, 122 metres wide, dredged to 10.36 metres depth. Accommodation: Three berths operated by Port Handlers Ltd. Berth 2 can take vessels up to 213 metres with 9.1 metres draught. Berth 3 can take vessels up to 160 metres with 6.2 metres draught and Berth 4 can take vessels up to 160 metres with 5.9 metres draught. Two cruise berths, Nos 5 and 6, can each be used by vessels of 198 metres in length with 9.6 metres draught or one vessel of 268 metres length. Berth No 3 is available for container traffic and has 5.2 hectares of storage. In addition there is one berth with 10.36 metres depth for tankers and LPG carriers.


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Berths in Kingston Berth No North Terminal

Length Depth (metres) (metres)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

165 188 188 188 183 183 183 183 183 183 183

8.9 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.6 13.0 13.0

300 300 300 300

13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0

229 167.6 167.6 152

11.1 8.1 9.9 9.1

112.7 107 107 229 183 172 185 167.6 112.8 152

5.0 6.8 6.8 11.1 9.1 8.5 8.1 9.9 5.0 10.3

South Terminal 1 2 3 4 Tanker berths Petrojam Texaco East Pier Esso Bunker Pier Shell Pier Private wharves Antilles Dock Rapid Sheffield Wherry Wharf Petrojam Oil Refinery Shell Wharf Jamaica Gypsum Pier Texaco East Pier Esso Bunker Pier Esso Dry Cargo Pier Carib Cement Pier


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Liner services AGENTS

LINES

A. J. Barned & Sons

Shipping & International Three times per month Tanker Trading Operators

Arnold L. Malabre & Co. Surinam Navigation Exxon Mobil

FREQUENCY

On Inducement Irregular

TYPE OF SERVICE

Breakbulk Tanker

PORTS OF CALL Houston, Surinam, Puerto Rico, Puerto Limón, Costa Rica, Panama, Santo Domingo, Venezuela, Kingston Paramaribo (Surinam), Kingston Montego Bay, Caribbean Islands

A. E. Parnell & Co. ECS Compagnia Weekly NVOCC Maritime Marfret Every 11 days Containers

USA Marseille, Rotterdam, Dunkerque Le Harve, New York, Norfolk, Savannah, Kingston, Panama, Papeete, Auckland, Noumea, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Jakarta, Sydney, Melbourne, Jakarta, Singapore, Colombo, Suez, Port Said

Carib Star Shipping Zim Container Service Weekly (Mainliner) Zim Container Service Weekly (Caribbean Gulf Feeder) Zim Container Service Weekly (Tricoven Feeder) Zim Inter-America Service Every eight days (ZIAS) Central American Express Weekly Feeder Services Weekly Asia USA Express Service Weekly (AUX) Round the World Services Weekly (RTW) Asia Gulf Express Service Bi-weekly (AGX) North Europe-Caribs Weekly Express Service (NCX) South America East Coast Weekly Express Service (SAX)

EASTBOUND: Haifa, Piraeus, Livorno, Trieste*, Naples, Marseille*, (Fos), Cadiz*, Alicante*, Valencia*, Barcelona, Halifax*, Toronto*, Montreal*, Boston, Philadelphia*, New York, Savannah, Kingston WESTBOUND: Kingston, Los Angeles, San Fransisco*, Xiamen, Shekou, Hong Kong, Ningbo, Shekou, Keelung, Pusan, Inchon*, Kaoshiung, Manila*, Singapore*, Bangkok*, Chinese Ports*, Osaka, Kobe*, Nagoya*, Yokohama GULF LEG: Kingston, Veracruz, Tampico (fortnightly), Houston, New Orleans, Kingston CARIBBEAN LEG: Kingston, San Juan, Santo Domingo, Port-au-Prince, Kingston Kingston, La Guaira, (alternate weeks), Port of Spain, Puerto Cabello, Guanta, Kingston NORTHBOUND/SOUTHBOUND: Brooklyn, Norfolk*, Savannah, Miami, Kingston, Fortaleza, Rio de Janeiro, Santos, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Rio Grande, Itajai, Santos, Vitoria, Fortaleza, Kingston Kingston, Puerto Cortez, St. Thomas de Castilla, Belize, Kingston Castries, Port of Spain, Bridgetown, Kingstown, St. Georges, Rosseau, Aruba, Curaçao, Paramaribo, Georgetown, Nassau, Dominican Republic, Haiti Shanghai, Ningbo, Quingdao, Colon, Kingston, Port Everglades, Savannah, Norfolk, Colon, Kingston Shanghai, Ningbo, Xiamen, Chiwan, Singapore, Port Keelang, Mundra, Nhava Sheva, Tuticorin, Colombo, Suez Canal, Damietta, Felixstowe, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Hamburg, New York, Norfolk, Charleston, Kingston Shanghai, Ningbo, Pusan, Colon, Kingston, Tampa, Mobile, Houston, Kingston, Colon, Shanghai Rotterdam, Bremerhaven, Antwerp, Le Havre, Kingston, Cartegena, Puerto Limon, Puerto Cortes, Santo Tomas De Castilla, Kingston Kingston, Puerto Cabello, La Guaira, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande, Itajai, Santos, Vitoria, Fortaleza, La Guaira, Puerto Cabello, Kingston

CMA-CGM Jamaica CMA-CGM (PEX 1) Service Weekly Fully Containerized CMA-CGM (PEX 2) Weekly Fully Containerized CMA-CGM (NCS) Mainliner Weekly Fully Containerized Eurosal Service Weekly Fully Containerized NCS/Eurosol Feeder Weekly Fully Containerized CMA-CGM Cagema Service Weekly Fully Containerized CMA-CGM Cagema Shuttle Weekly Fully Containerized CMA-CGM (Brazex) Weekly Fully Containerized CMA-CGM Caribraz Service Weekly Fully Containerized Cuban Shuttle Weekly Fully Containerized

Miami, Savannah, Wilmington, New York, Norfolk, Kingston, Panama, Fast East Shanghai, Chiwan, Hong Kong, Keelung, Pusan, Manzanillo (Mex), Manzanillo (Panama), Kingston, Houston, Manzanillo (Panama), Far East Rotterdam, Hamburg, Tilbury, Rotterdam, Le Havre, Trinidad, La Guiara, Puerto Cabello, Willemstad, Oranjestad, Cartegena, Puerto Limón, Cartegena, Kingston, Caucedo, San Juan, Europe Bilbao, Rotterdam, Tilbury, Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, Bilbao, Kingston, Cartegena, Panama, Buenaventura, Guayaquil, Callao, Arica, Valparaíso, Paita, Guayaquil, Buenaventura, Panama, Cartagena, Kingston, Bilbao Kingston, Santo Tomas de Castilla, Puerto Cortes, Kingston Kingston, Miami, St. Martin, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, Dominica, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Barbados, Trinidad, Kingston Kingston, Puerto Cabello, La Guiara (fortnightly), Kingston, San Juan, Caucedo (fortnightly), Kingston Kingston, Santos, Rio de Janiero, Itajai, Trinidad, Kingston Manaus, Belem, Trinidad (Port of Spain), Guadeloupe, Dominican Republic (Rio Haina), Kingston Havana, Santiago de Cuba, Port-au-Prince (Fortnightly)

Coastal Shipping

Salerno, Livorno, Genoa, Barcelona, Valencia, San Juan, Kingston

Compania Chilena de Navegacion Interoceanica (CCNI)

Fortnightly

Containerized Service

Grace, Kennedy & Co. CSAV (Shipping) 1. Eurosal Service (Sling 1) Weekly Fully Containerized (Sling 2) Weekly Fully Containerized 2. NCS Weekly Fully Containerized Mediterranean Service Fortnightly Fully Containerized Norasia Weekly Fully Containerized

Valparaíso, Buenaventura, Manzanillo (Panama,) Cartagena, Kingston, Rotterdam, Tilbury, Hamburg, Antwerp, Kingston, Cartagena, Manzanillo (Panama), Buenaventura, Valparaíso Callao, Paita, Guayaquil, Manzanillo (Panama), Kingston, Rotterdam, Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Harve, Kingston, Cartagena, Manzanillo (Panama), Guayaquil, Callao Rotterdam, Hamburg, Tilbury, Rotterdam, Le Harve, Port of Spain, La Guaira, Puerto Cabello, Willemstad, Oranjestad, Cartagena, Puerto Limón, Kingston Fos-sur-Mer, Salerno, Livorno, Genova, Barcelona, Valencia, San Juan, Cartagena, Kingston Elizabethport, Newport News-Hampton-Williams, Charleston, Kingston, Long Beach


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AGENTS LINES FREQUENCY TYPE OF SERVICE Grace, Kennedy & Co. LIBRA LINE Weekly Fully Containerized (Shipping), Cont’d. K-LINE Twice per month Break Bulk (Lumber) CONTI LINE Infrequent LCL/Containerized NVOCC 1. Panalpina Weekly LCL/Containerized 2. Simba Logistics Weekly LCL/Containerized

PORTS OF CALL Buenos Aires, São Francisco do Sul, Paranagua, Santos, Rio de Janeiro, Puerto Cabello, Kingston, Elizabethport, Norfolk, Baltimore, Charleston, Savannah, Miami, Puerto Cabello. Far East to Kingston Northern Europe

Hapag-Lloyd New Caribbean Service Every 7 days Fully Containerized (Jamaica) Feeder Rotation Every 7days Fully Containerized Eurosal Every 7 days Fully Containerized Every 7 days Fully Containerized Caribbean Feeder Service Every 7 days Fully Containerized BGX Service Every 10 days Fully Containerized CFS – Gulf Mexico Every 10 days Fully Containerized Mediterranean Service Every 7 days Fully Containerized ZCS Service Every 7 days Fully Contanerized BEX Service Every 10 days Fully Contanerized

SOUTHBOUND: Hamburg, Tilbury, Rotterdam, Le Havre Port of Spain, La Guaira, Puerto Cabello, Willemstad, Oranjestad, Cartagena, Puerto Limón, Kingston NORTHBOUND: Kingston, Caucedo, San Juan, Rotterdam, Hamburg, Tilbury, Le Harve FEEDER SERVICE ROTATION: Kingston, Puerto Cortes, Santo Tomas, Kingston SOUTHBOUND: Rotterdam, Tilbury, Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre, Bilbao, Kingston, Cartagena, Manzanillo, Buenaventura, Guayaquil, Callao, Arica, Valparaíso, Paita NORTHBOUND: Arica, Valparaíso, Callao, Paita, Guayaquil, Buenaventura, Manzanillo, Cartagena, Kingston, Bilbao, Rotterdam, Tilbury, Hamburg, Antwerp, Le Havre Kingston, La Guaira, Puerto Cabello, Port of Spain, Guanta, Barranquilla, Belize, Port-au-Prince, Bridgetown SOUTHBOUND: Rio de Janeiro, Itajaí, Santos New Orleans, Houston, Veracruz, Tampico NORTHBOUND: Kingston, Barcelona, Fos, Livorno, Vado Ligure, Valencia SOUTHBOUND: Barcelona, Fos, Livorno, Vado Ligure, Valencia, Kingston NORTHBOUND: Halifax, New York, Savannah, Kingston SOUTHBOUND: Kingston, New York, Savannah, Halifax SOUTHBOUND: New York, Norfolk, Savannah, Miami, Kingston, São Francisco do Sul, Santos, Sepetiba

Interseas Mitsui Container Lines Weekly Containerized Service (MCL)

ACE (1) Port Rotation: New York, Norfolk, Savannah, Port Everglades, Kingston, Puerto Cabello, Fortaleza, Santos, Montevideo, Rio Grande, Itajaí, Santos, Fortaleza, Kingston, New York, Norfolk, Savannah, Port Everglades ACE (2) Port Rotation: New York City, Norfolk, Savannah, Port Everglades, Kingston, Puerto Cabello, Rio de Janeiro, Santos, Montevideo, Rio Grande, Itajaí, Santos, Vitoria, Kingston, New York, Norfolk, Savannah, Port Everglades

Jamaica Freight & Miami Freight & Freight Weekly Consolidated / Full loads Shipping Co (MFS) - NVOCC Jamaica Producers Weekly Break-bulk, Containerized Shipping Co. Ltd. (JPSC) and Refrigerated Cargo China Shipping Container Weekly Containerized Service Lines (CSCL) Costa Container Line Weekly Containerized Service (CCL) Maybank Shipping Monthly Ro/Ro Barge Service Break-bulk, heavy equipment Mitsui (O.S.K.) Line Monthly Car Carrier (MOL)

USA via Miami, Kingston

World-wide World-wide

Portsmouth (UK), Zeebrugge, Kingston, Puerto Limón Pusan, Quingdao, Xiamen, Yantian, Hong Kong, Manzanillo, Kingston, New York, Norfolk, Savannah, Felixstowe, Antwerp, Bremenhaven, Rotterdam – Santo Tomas, Puerto Limón, Puerto Cortes Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Coluobia, Cuba, El Salvador, Uruguay, Venezuela, Italy, Spain, Turkey Mobile (USA) Nagoya, Yokohama, Hiroshima, Santo Domingo, Nassau, Aruba, Bridgetown, Port of Spain, Kingston, Curaçao, Cristobal

Lannaman & Morris Evergreen Round the Weekly Fully Containerized (Shipping) World Service Evergreen Caribbean Weekly Fully Containerized Service (CAN) Evergreen (CAS) Weekly Fully Containerized Service Evergreen (AUX )* Service Evergreen, Panama, West Coast, South America, Panama (PWS) Evergreen (NUE) Service

Asia, US East Coast – Europe pendulum TRANSHIP VIA: Colon to Charleston, Norfolk, New York, Thamesport, Rotterdam, Bremerhaven, Le Havre, Colon, Los Angeles, Oakland, Toyko, Osaka, Pusan, Shanghai, Nagoya, Shimizu

Lasocean Agencies

Miami, Kingston Grand Cayman - Kingston

Spartan Shipping Inc. IMP Agency Limited

Weekly On inducement

LCL*/NVOCC** LCL*/NVOCC**

CARRIERS: Evergreen, Italia Maritima and Hatsu Marine TRANSHIP VIA: Colon Container Terminal to Puerto Limón, Caucedo, San Juan TRANSHIP VIA: Colon Container Terminal to Puerto Cabello, La Guaira, Curaçao, Barranquilla, Cartagena FAR EAST: US East Coast (Direct) Service ALL WATER SERVICE: Shanghai, Ningbo, Qingdao, Kingston, Colon, Port Everglades, Savannah and Wilmington TRANSHIP VIA: Colon to Buenaventura, Guayaquil, Callao, Iquique, Valparaíso, Matarani, Paita

Maritime & Transport EUKOR On Inducement Car Carrier Services Maersk Sealand Weekly Containerized Ben Federico Freight Weekly NVOCC** Consolidators

Far East to Jamaica

Perez y Cia Jamaica Hamburg-Süd (Eurosal) Weekly Fully Containerized

Bilbao, Rotterdam, Hamburg, Zeebrugge, Felixstowe, Antwerp, Le Havre, Kingston, Cristobal, Buenaventura, Guayaquil, Callao, Arica, Valparaíso

TRINIDAD FEEDER: Jamaica, Trinidad, Surinam CUBA FEEDER: Jamaica, Havana OCEANIA: Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, USEC, Belgium, UK, Germany, Netherlands NASA 1: Brazil, Jamaica, USEC ANDEAN: Spain, Netherlands, UK, Belgium, Jamaica, Panama, Chili ASIA-CARIBBEAN: China, Korea, Japan, Panama, Colombia, Jamaica DOMINICA REPUBLIC -PUERTO RICO FEEDER: Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic VENEZEULA - GULF : US Gulf, Mexico, Costa Rica, Jamaica Miami, Kingston


61

AGENTS LINES FREQUENCY TYPE OF SERVICE Perez y Cia Jamaica Hamburg-Sud (New Weekly Fully Containerized Cont’d. Caribbean Service) Alianca Line Weekly Fully Containerized Caribbean Feeder Service Weekly Fully Containerized

PORTS OF CALL Rotterdam, Hamburg, Felixstowe, Le Havre, Ponce, Santo Tomas, Rio Haina, Port-au-Prince, Puerto Cortes, Port of Spain, La Guaira, Puerto Cabello, Willemstad, Oranjestad, Cartagena, Santa Marta, Puerto Limon, Kingston Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Rio Grande, Itajai, Paranagua, Santos, Salvador, Fortaleza, Port of Spain, Cartagena, Kingston, Vera Cruz, New Orleans, Houston, Altamira Kingston, La Guaira, Port-of¬Spain, Guanta, Puerto Cabello, Cartagena, Barranquilla, Cristobal, Kingston

Port Contractors

Speed Cargo Services Weekly a Division of Crowley Logistics Inc. Consolidated Freight and Weekly Shipping Inc. Crowley Logistics Inc. Weekly Round the World Logistics Weekly Corp.

All 52 States via Jacksonville, Miami, Port Everglades to Kingston, also offering service to and from all major ports in Central and South America and the Caribbean Miami, U.S. Golf Ports, U.S. East Coast, U.S. West Coast, Toronto, Montreal and Europe Covering North, South and Central America – all ports Covering all five continents - We can move your cargo from and to anywhere in the world

R. S. Gamble (1998)

Texaco Marine Service Hapag-Lloyd Kreuzfaharten Sohtorik Shipping & Trading Inc Essco Maritime Inc.

Fully Logistic Services for Containerized and Consolidation. NVOCC*/LCL/Fully Containerized Logistic NVOCC service Full Logistic Service/ NVOCC/FCL LTL

Irregular Tanker Two to three times per year Cruise Vessel On Inducement Break bulk Irregular

Bunker and crew change

Port of Spain, Several US ports, Georgetown (Cayman), Kingston, Port-au- Prince Caribbean Islands and Europe European/Caribbean/USA No set Port of Call

Sea Freight Jamaica Sea Freight Lines Weekly Containerized Break Bulk

Jacksonville, Port Everglades, Kingston, Aruba, Curacao, LaGuaira, Trinidad, Suriname, Guyana, Kingston, Jacksonville Port Everglades

Seaboard Freight & Seaboard Marine Twice Weekly Ro/Ro, General and Shipping Jamaica Refrigerated Cargo Seaboard Marine Fortnightly Ro/Ro, General and Refrigerated Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly Lo/Lo, General and Refrigerated Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly Ro/Ro, General and Refrigerated Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly Lo/Lo, General Cargo and Refrigerated Cargo Seaboard Marine Twice Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro and Lo/Lo, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Every 10 Days (Via Miami) Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro and Lo/Lo General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro and Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Twice Weekly (Via Miami) Lo/Lo General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly (Via Miami) Lo/Lo General Cargo Seaboard Marine Twice Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine 3 Times Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Daily (Via Miami) Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly (Via Miami) Ro/Ro, General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly (Via Miami) Lo/Lo General Cargo Seaboard Marine Weekly Lo/Lo General Cargo Europe West Indies Line Weekly Lo/Lo General Cargo (EWL)

Miami, Kingston, Miami

Transocean Shipping Ltd. Clipper Group Americas Fortnightly Carotrans International Weekly Xpress Freight Services Weekly Seaspeed Overseas Weekly Thompson Shipping Monthly Company Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines Monthly

Miami, Kingston, Montego Bay, Grand Cayman, Miami CARIBBEAN: Kingston, Haiti, Miami, St. Maarten, Antigua, Barbados, Trinidad, Kingston, Miami Miami, Kingston, Grand Cayman, Miami N/EAST COAST: Penn Terminals, Fernandina Beach, Port-au-Prince, Kingston, Rio Haina, Penn Terminals N/CENTRAL AMERICA: Miami, Puerto Cortez, San Tomas, San Salvador, Managua, Miami S/CENTRAL AMERICA: Miami, Puerto Limón, Cristobal, Panama City, Managua, Miami W/SOUTH AMERICA: Miami, Callao, Arica/Iquique, Antofagasta, Valparaíso, Miami COLUMBIA/VENEZUELA: Fernandina Beach, Miami, Barranquilla, Cartagena, Santa Marta, Puerto Cabello, Miami VENEZUELA: Miami, La Guaira, Guanta, Isla Margarita, Guaranao, Maracaibo, Miami DOMINICA REP.: Miami, Boca Chica, Rio Haina, Puerto Plata, Miami HAITI: Miami, Port-au-Prince, Miami GRAND CAYMAN: Miami, Cayman, Miami BAHAMAS: Miami, Nassau, Miami BAHAMAS: Port Everglades, Freeport, Port Everglades N/CENTRAL AMERICA: New Orleans, Houston, Belize City, Santo Tomas, Puerto Cortez, Managua, San Salvador, New Orleans W/COAST SOUTH AMERICA: Houston, Callao, Arica/Iquique, Antofagasta, Valparaíso, Houston Houston, Cartegena, Cristobal, Maracaibo, La Guaria, Puerto Cabello, Houston Hamburg, Bremerhaven, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Felixstowe, Le Harve, Bilbao, Port of Spain, Kingston

Break Bulk LCL FCL/LCL FCL/LCL Break-bulk

Mobile (Alabama), Kingston Miami, Kingston Miami, Kingston New Jersey, Kingston Kingston, Cayman

Car Carrier

Japan, Korea, USA, Venezuela, Kingston

Zim Container Service Carib Star Shipping Weekly (Caribbean Gulf Feeder) Zim Container Service Weekly (Tricoven Feeder) Feeder Services Weekly

GULF LEG: Kingston, Veracruz, Tampico (fortnightly), Houston, New Orleans, Kingston CARIBBEAN LEG: Kingston, San Juan, Santo Domingo, Port-au-Spain, Kingston Kingston Port-au-Prince, Kingston Kingston, La Guaira, (alternate weeks), Port of Spain, Puerto Cabello, Guanta, Kingston Castries, Port of Spain, Bridgetown, Kingstown, St. Georges, Rosseau, Aruba, Curaçao, Paramaribo, Georgetown, Nassau, Dominican Republic, Haiti

NCS/Eurosol Feeder

Kingston, Santo Tomas de Castilla, Puerto Cortes, Kingston

CMA-CGM Jamaica Ltd

Weekly

Fully Containerized

Feeder Rotation Hapag-Lloyd (Jamaica) Ltd Every 7 days Fully Contianerized Caribbean Feeder Service Every 7 days Fully Contianerized

Kingston, Puerto Cortes, Santo Tomas, Kingston Kingston, La Guaira, Puerto Cabello, Port-of-Spain, Guanta, Barranquilla, Belize, Port-au-Prince

Maersk Sealand

TRINIDAD FEEDER: Jamaica, Trinidad, Surinam CUBA FEEDER: Jamaica, Havana

Maritime & Transport Services

Weekly

Containerized

Caribbean Feeder Service Perez y Cia Jamaica Weekly Fully Containerized

Kingston, La Guaira, Port-of-Spain, Guanta, Puerto Cabello, Cartagena, Barranquilla, Cristobal, Kingston


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Directory of services Airline

Air Jamaica Cargo

Marine surveyors

Bonded warehousing Universal Freight Handlers

Caribbean Inspection Co Murray Fenton Mariserve (Jamaica) Ltd SGS Supervise Jamaica Ltd Shipowner’s P & I Services Ltd

Bulk tramp service

Shipbuilders

Bunkering

Shipowners

Port Cold Ltd

Aegean Bunkering (Jam) Ltd Petcom (Petroleum Co of Jamaica Ltd Shell Jamaica

Civil engineering E. Pihl & Søn AS

Communications

Mike Jarrett Communications Ltd Consultancy

Consultancy

Marine Consultants (Trinidad) Ltd

Container haulage

Inter-Transport Services Ltd Xars Equipment & Trucking Co

Container repair

Jamaica Container Repair Services

Cruise operator Grace Tours

Customs

Caribbean Freight Forwarders & Customs Brokers Ltd R.C.M. Customs Broker Services Ltd

Dredging

Jan De Nul Group

Equipment

Port Computer Services Equipment Care Ltd Deryck A Gibson Ltd

Fork-lift hire

Inter Transport Services Ltd Jamaica Co-op Forklift Society

Free zone

Montego Bay Free Zone & Kingston Free Zone

Freight consolidators

B L Williams & Co Ltd Fatt Freight Handlers Ltd Fidelity Trading Services Ltd Global Cargo Consolidators Interfreight Agencies Ltd Island Cargo Services Ltd Jamaica Trading Services Ltd JLB International Ltd Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd Xars Equipment & Trucking Co

Freight forwarders

Caribbean Freight Forwarders & Customs Brokers Ltd Island Cargo Services Ltd Jamaica Trading Services Ltd JLB International Ltd

Insurance

Royal Marine Insurance International Maritime Services Ship Management Services Ltd

Damen Shipyards Ltd

Road haulage

Allies Trucking & Maritime Services Ltd Xars Equipment & Trucking Co Ltd

Shipbuilders

Damen Shipyards Ltd

Stevedoring

Coastal Shipping Ltd Cold Port Ltd

Cargo Handlers Ltd Maritime & Transport Services Ltd Port Services Ltd Transocean Shipping Ltd

Shipping agents

Terminal operators

A E Parnell & Co A J Barned & Sons Ltd A L Malabre & Co Ltd Adolph Levy & Brother Ltd Aero International Shipping Ltd Arnold Malabre & Co Ltd Carib Star Shipping Ltd Caribbean Maritime Services Ltd Freight Handlers Ltd R.S. Gamble Ltd Gateway Shipping Jamaica Ltd Grace Kennedy & Co (Shpg) Ltd Green Cove Maritime (Ja) Ltd H. Macaulay Orrett Ltd Hamburg-Sud/Columbus Ja. Ltd Hapag-Lloyd Jamaica Ltd International Shipping Ltd Jamaica Freight & Shpg Co Ltd Jamaica Fruit & Shpg Co Ltd Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd Lasocean Agencies Ltd LSK & Co Ltd Maritime & Transport Services Ltd Ocean Air International Ltd Port Contractors Ltd Royale Ocean Shipping Co Ltd Seaboard Freight & Shipping Ja Ltd Transocean Shipping Ltd

Shipowners

Coastal Shipping Ltd Shipping Lines Jamaica Producers Group Ltd Jamaica Producers Shpg Co Kent Line Maersk Producers Shipping Co Ltd Zim-Israeli Navigation Co Ltd

Stevedores

A E Parnell & Co Ltd Port Services Ltd Shipping Services (Stev) Ltd Shipping Services Ltd Terminal Services Ltd Transocean Shipping Ltd

APM Terminals (Jamaica) Ltd Port Handlers Ltd Kingston Wharves Ltd

Warehousing

Adolph Levy & Bro Ltd Harbour Cold Stores Ltd Maritime & Transport Services Ltd Newport W’housing (1974) Ltd Western Freight Services Ltd Xars Equipment & Trucking Co

Wharf operators Kingston Wharves Ltd Western Terminals Ltd

Useful addresses Caribbean Maritime Institute Palisadoes Park, PO Box 8081 CSO Kingston Tel: +876 924 8150 Fax: +876 924 8158 Email: information@emi.edu.jm www.cmi.edu.jm

Caribbean Shipping Association

4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West PO Box 40, Kingston 15 Tel: +876 923 3491 Fax: +876 923 3421

Jamaica Promotions Corporation (Jampro)

18 Trafalgar Road, Kingston 10 Tel: +876 978 7755, 978 3337 Fax: +876 946 0090 Email: jampro@investjamaica.com www.investjamaica.com

Maritime Authority of Jamaica

Logistics

Lannaman & Morris (Shipping) Ltd Transocean Shipping Ltd Xars Equipment & Trucking Co Ltd

4th Floor, Dyoll Building 40 Knutsford Boulevard Kingston 5 Tel: +876 929 2201 Fax: +876 754 7256 Email: registrar@jamaicaships.com www.jamaicaships.com

Miscellaneous

Port Authority of Jamaica

Antilles Freight Corp. BWIA International Eagle & Whale Ltd Freight Handlers Ltd Hart Group Island Cargo Services Ltd Jamcor Mariserve (Ja) Ltd Murray Fenton Mariserve (Jamaica) Ltd Seaboard Marine Sisu Zoukie Trucking

15-17 Duke Street, Kingston Tel: +876 922 0290/9 Fax: +876 924 9437; 922 6516 Email: paj@portjam.com

Shipping Association of Jamaica

4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West, Kingston 15 Tel: +876 923 3394 Fax: +876 923 3421 Email: saf@jamports.com www.jamports.com


63

Directory of companies A J Barned & Sons Ltd

28 Third Street, Newport West Tel: +876 923 6773-4; 6788 Fax: +876 923 4720 Email:hhgs@ajbarned.com

Adolph Levy & Brother Ltd

83-87 First Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 5023; 923 5025 Fax: +876 923 8709 Email: maxine.bryan@ssl.com.jm

Aegean Bunkering (Jam) Ltd

Suite 1, 9th floor, 63-67 Knutsford Boulevard, Kingston 5 Tel: +876 754 1771 Fax: +876 754 1772 Email: aegeanjam@cwjamaica.com

Aero International Shipping Ltd

89 East Street, PO Box 528, Kingston Tel: +876 922 2537; 7798; 7646 Fax: +876 922 7466 Email: aero@cwjamaica.com

Air Jamaica Cargo

Palisadoes, Kingston Tel: +876 924 8243-6 Fax: +876 924 8288 Email: cargobookings@airjamaica.com

Antilles Freight Corp.

11206 N.W. 36th Avenue, Miami FL 33167-3307, USA Tel: +1 305 688 5488 Fax: +1 305 688 9651 www.antillesfreight.com

APM Terminals (Jamaica) Ltd Port Bustamante PO Box 1122 GPO Kingston Tel: +876 923 5142 Fax: +876 937 7916 Email: peter.ford@kctjm.com

ATMS Port Services

Kingsport building, Third Street Newport West Tel: +876 923 8488, 923 9418, 937 37401 Fax: +876 923 2029 Email: alva.wood@ckco.com

B.L Williams & Co Ltd 48-52 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +923 923 1974 Fax: +876 923 9491 Email: blw@infochan.com

Carib Star Shipping Ltd

4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West Tel: +876 923 8407; 923 8507; 923 9444 Fax: +876 923 8527 Email: patrick.burgess@gkco.com

Caribbean Freight Forwarders & Customs Brokers Ltd 6-12 Newport Boulevard Newport West Tel: +876 9373800, 937 6994 Fax: +876 937 4797

Caribbean Inspection Co

24 Trafalgar Road, Kingston 10 Tel: +876 929 6673 Fax: +876 920 4965

Caribbean Marine and P&I Services Ltd

Fidelity Trading Services Ltd

Caribbean Maritime Services Ltd

Freight Handlers Ltd

4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West Tel: +876 758 9651 Fax: +876 758 9654

57a East Queen Street, Kingston Tel: +876 967 3743/4 Fax: +876 967 3743 Email: carmar@wtjam.net

Caribbean Shipping Association

4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West PO Box 40, Kingston 15 Tel: +876 923 3491 Fax: +876 923 3421

Coastal Shipping Ltd

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9271-4 Fax: +876 923 4091 Email: its@cwjamaica.com

Cold Port Ltd

75 First Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 7425 Fax: +876 923 5713

Courtleigh Hotel & Suites

85 Knutsford Boulevard, New Kingston Tel: +876 929 9000 Fax: +876 926 7744 Email: courtleigh@cwjamaica.com www.courtleigh.com

Damen Shipyards Ltd

Industrial Avelingen West 20 PO Box 1, 4200 Gorinchem The Netherlands Tel: +31 183 63 99 11 Fax: +31 183 63 21 89 Email: americas@damen.nl www.damen.nl

Deryck A Gibson Ltd

7 Haining Road, PO Box 11 Kingston 5 Tel: +876 926 2250/9, 926 6768, 929 7744/5 Fax: +876 926 7061 Email: dagl@cwjamaica.com www.deryckgibson.com

Eagle & Whale Ltd

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 937 3409 Fax: +876 923 5262 Email: fidelity@infochan.com

4 Fourth Street, Newport West Kingston 13 Tel: +876 937 3418-21 Fax: +876 937 5857 Email: dlynfatt@freighthandlersltd.com

R.S. Gamble Ltd

40 Second Street, Newport West Kingston 13 Tel: +876 757 5168, 757 5170, 757 8556 Fax: +876 937 1441 Email: admin@rsgamble.com

Gateway Shipping Jamaica Ltd Kingport Building, Third Street, PO Box 307 Newport West Tel: +876 923 7305 Fax: +876 937 7520 Email: robert.kinlocke@gkco.com

Global Cargo Consolidators Shop #3, Ocean Boulevard Kingston Mall Tel: +876 922 5325 Fax: +876 922 5612 Email: globalc@infochan.com

Kingport Building, Third Street Newport West Tel: +876 923 0454/5, 923 5716 Fax: +876 923 9407

Interseas Ltd

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 6973 Fax: +876 923 0523

Island Cargo Services Ltd

77 Port Royal Street, Kingston Tel: +876 922 9480-1 Fax: +876 948 2330 Email: wchueics@cwjamaica.com

Jamaica Container Repair Services (Jamcor)

Fourteenth Avenue 1037 Kingston 15 Tel: +876 937 2096/7 Fax: +876 901 5403 Email: rawilliams@cwjamaica.com

Jamaica Co-op Forklift Society 15 Third Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 6404

Kingport Building, Third Street Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 8581-7 Fax: +876 923 6536 Email: loxleytulloch@gkco.com

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9271/4; 923 9371/3 Fax: +876 923 4091 Email: jfs@jashipco.com

Grace Tours

Jamaica Fruit & Shipping Co Ltd

19 Knutsford Boulevard, Kingston 5 Tel: +876 920 8133 Fax: +876 920 8139

Green Cove Maritime (Ja) Ltd

4 Port Avenue, Newport West Tel: +876 923 0400/2 Fax: +876 923 0420 Email: gcmjamaica@cwjamaica.com

H. Macaulay Orrett Ltd

King Port Building, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 54518 Fax: +876 923 5459

Equipment Care Ltd

Harbour Cold Stores Ltd

4 Fourth Avenue, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 56067 Fax: +876 937 5857

International Shipping Ltd

Jamaica Freight & Shipping Co Ltd

Hapag-Lloyd Jamaica Ltd

Fatt Freight Handlers Ltd

King Port Building, Third Street Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 8798 Fax: +876 937 3672

Grace Kennedy & Co (Shipping) Ltd

6-12 Newport Boulevard Unit 5, Newport Commercial Centre Kingston 15 Tel: +876 901 4473/4 Fax: +876 901 4475 80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 4277

International Maritime Services

6 St Lucia Avenue, Courtleigh Centre, Kingston 5 Tel: +876 920 9301, 968 0820 Fax: +876 920 2814

Third Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9031-4 Fax: +876 923 9081 Email: michael.buckland@gkco.com

Hart Group

14 Montego Freeport Shopping Centre, PO Box 302, Montego Bay Tel: +876 979 8124, 979 8143 Fax: +876 979 8552

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9271-4, 923 9371-3. Fax: +876 923 4091, 923 4409 Email: jfs@jashipco.com

Jamaica Producers Group Ltd 6a Oxford Road, Kingston 5 Tel: +876 926-3504-6, 926 3503/7 Fax: +876 929 3636 Email: jpgroup@infochan.com

Jamaica Producers Shipping Co 80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9271-4, 923 9371/3 Fax: +876 923 4091, 923 4409

Jamaica Trading Services Ltd 37 Second Street, Newport West Tel: +876 757 7313 Fax: +876 923 6348

Jan De Nul Group

Office Jan De Nul NV Tragel 60, 9308 Hofstade-Aalst Belgium Tel: +32 53 73 17 11 Fax: +32 53 78 17 60, 77 28 55 Email: info@jandenul.com www.jandenul.com


64

JLB International Ltd

191 Hagley Park Road, Kingston 11 Tel: +876 937 1623-7 Fax: +876 937 2026, 924 5761

Kingston Terminal Operators Ltd

PO Box 1122, Kingston 15 Tel: +876 923 5141-5, 923 5279 Fax: +876 923 9195, 923 6678

Kingston Wharves Ltd

Kingport Building Third Street, Newport West PO Box 260 Kingston Tel: +876 923 9211-8 Fax: +876 923 5361 Email: grantley.stephenson@kwljm.com www.kingstonwharves.com.jm

Lannaman & Morris Shipping Ltd

2 Seventh Avenue, Newport West PO Box 1012, Kingston 15 Tel: +876 923 4811-4 Fax: +876 923 9091 Email: fritz@lannaman.com www.lannaman.com

Lasocean Agencies Ltd

80 Third Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 6421-4 Fax: +876 923 6130 Email: erol.smith@ssl.com.jm

LSK & Co Ltd

Suite 204, Newport Commercial Center, 6-12 Newport Boulevard, Newport West Tel: +876 923 3491/2 Fax: +876 923 3421 Email: lsk@toj.com

Arnold L. Malabre & Co Ltd

40 Second Street, Newport West Kingston 13 Tel: +876 923 8728/9 Fax: +876 901 6120, 923 8695

Marine Consultants (Trinidad) Ltd 43 Charles Street Port-of-Spain, Trinidad Tel: +868 625 2887. 625 1309 Fax: +868 627 3349 Email: mcl@mcl.co.tt www.mcl.co.tt

Mariserve (Ja) Ltd

24 Trafalgar Road, Kingston 10 Tel: +876 960 4465 Fax: +876 920 4965 Email: carinco@infochan.com

Maritime & Transport Services Ltd 40 Second Street, Port Bustamante PO Box 22, Kingston 11 Tel: +876 923 8728/9/0 Fax: +876 923 5077 Email: operations@mariland.net www.mariland.net

Maritime Towing Co Ltd

Montego Bay Free Zone & Kingston Free Zone

27 Shannon Drive, Kingston 15 (Kfz) Tel: +876 923 5274 Fax: +876 923 6023 Email: kfzclsvc@infochan.com

Montego Bay Free Zone & Kingston Free Zone

Montego Freeport, Montego Bay St. James (Mbfz) Tel: +876 979 8092 Fax: +876 979 8088

Ocean Air International Ltd

4 Fourth Avenue, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 7491; 923 7499 Fax: +876 923 5210 Email: wrhoden@cwjamaica.com

A.E. Parnell & Co Ltd

40 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 8728/9/0 Fax: +876 923 5077, 923 8695 Email: admin@aeparnell.com

Perez y Cia Jamaica Ltd

Kingsport Building, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 901 0800 Fax: +876 937 5583 Email: cdonaldson@perezyciaja.com

Petcom (Petroleum Co of Jamaica Ltd) 695 Spanish Town Road PO Box 8856, Kingston 11 Tel: +876 934-6682/7 Fax: +876 934-6690

E. Pihl & Søn AS

Nybrovej 116, DK - 2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark Tel: +45 4527 7200 Fax: +45 4527 7100 Email: pihl@pihl-as.dk www.pihl-as.dk

Port Computer Services

Kingport Building, Third Street Newport West , Kingston 15 Tel: +876 923 7901 Fax: +876 923 4233

40 Second Street Newport West Tel: +876 901 3923, 757 5168 Fax: +876 937 1441 Email: rsg@cwjamaica.com

Terminal Services Ltd

40 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 0899 Fax: +876 923 0018

The Port Authority of Jamaica 15-17 Duke Street, Kingston Tel: +876 922 0290/9 Fax: +876 924 9437; 922 6516

Royal Marine Insurance

Transocean Shipping Ltd

Royale Ocean Shipping Co Ltd

Turnel Shipping Services

8300 Executive Center Drive Suite 102, Miami, Florida 331666 Tel: +876 001 305 477 3755 Fax: +876 001 305 477 3858

Newport Commercial Centre 6-12 Newport Boulevard Newport West, Kingston 13 Tel: +876 757 9227; 757 8143 Fax: +876 757 9221 Email: operations@royaleoceanshipping.com www.royaleoceanshipping.com

Seaboard Freight & Shipping Jamaica Ltd

90-92 First Street, Port Bustamente Tel: +876 923 5719; 923 4276 Fax: +876 923 9301 Email: rh@transoceanshipping.com Montego Bay Wharf Montego Freeport Tel: +976 953 6051/2 Fax: +876 979 8612

Universal Freight Handlers

Garmex East, 76 Marcus Garvey Drive, Kingston Tel: +876 923 6674, 923 6556 Fax: +876 923 4798 Email: scross@cwjamaica.com

80-82 Second Street, Newport West, Kingston 13 Tel: +876 923 0054 Fax: +876 901 6763 Email: corahann.sylvester@seaboardjamaica.com

Western Freight Services Ltd

Seaboard Freight & Shipping Ltd

Western Terminals Ltd

PO Box 133, Freeport Shopping Centre Montego Bay Tel: +876 684 9701/3 Fax: +876 684 9643 Email: turnship@cwjamaica.com

LOJ Complex, Montego Freeport, Suite M75, Glouchester Avenue, Montego Bay Tel: +876 979 8446, 979 8556 Fax: +876 979 8556 Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9211-9 Fax: +876 923 5361

Xars Equipment & Trucking Co

26 Trafalgar Rd, Kingston 10 Tel: +876 960 2410, 920 0718 Fax: +876 960 5311 Email: sgs_jamaica@sgsgroup.com

Port Handlers Ltd

Shell Jamaica

Zim-Israeli Navigation Co Ltd

Ship Management Services Ltd

Zoukie Trucking

14 Montego Freeport Shopping Centre, PO Box 302, Montego Bay Tel: +876 979 8815 Fax: +876 979 8552 Email: jtsltd@cwj.com

Port Services Ltd

SGS Supervise Jamaica Ltd

Rockfort, Kingston 2 Tel: +876 928-7301 Fax: +876 938-5080

Kingport Building, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 8487/8, 923 8410 Fax: +876 923 2029

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9371-3, 923 9271 Fax: +876 923 4091, 937 5825

Precision Enterprises Ltd

Shipowner’s P&I Services Ltd

Metro Investments Ltd

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9271-4 Fax: +876 923 4091

2 Seventh Avenue, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 4811-4 Fax: +876 923 9091 Email: harrymaragh@cwjamaica.com

R.S. Gamble 1998 Ltd

c/o Deryck Gibson Agencies 7 Ω Haining Road, Kingston 5 Tel: +876 876-926-2250 Fax: +876 876-926-7061

4 Fourth Avenue, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 937 5820/3 Fax: +876 937 5588

Port Contractors Ltd

126 Third Street, Newport West Tel: +876 923 7425 Fax: +876 923 5713, 7354

Metro Shipping Ltd

4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West Kingston 13 Tel: +876 757 0983 Fax: +876 758 3933 Email: info@rcmcustomsbroker.com www.rcmcustomsbroker.com

Sisu

126-132 Second Street, Port Bustamante PO box1813 Kingston 8 Tel: +876 923 7594 Fax: +876 923 6050 Email: xars@cwjamaica.com

40 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 8720, 923 8728/9 Fax: +876 923 5077 Email: mts@infochan.com 2 Seventh Avenue, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 5541-4, 923 4811-4 Fax: +876 937 5588

R.C.M. Customs Broker Services Ltd

Producers Shipping Co Ltd

80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 9271-4 Fax: +876 923 4091

Shipping Services (Stev) Ltd 80-82 Second Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 937 5693, 937 6812/3 Fax: +876 937 6815

Shipping Services Ltd

80 Third Street, Port Bustamante Tel: +876 923 6421-4 Fax: +876 923 5021

140 First Street, Newport West Kingston Tel: +876 923 4900 Fax: +876 937 5303

118 Third Street, Newport West Kingston 13 Tel: +876 923 9549 Fax: +876 923 4542


Jamaica Port Handbook 2007-08

The Port Authority of Jamaica 15-17 Duke Street, Kingston, Jamaica, W.I. Tel: +876 922 0290/9 Fax: +876 924 9437 Telex: 2386 PORTOPS JA Email: paj@portjam.com Website: www.portjam.com

Jamaica Port Handbook  

Jamaica Port Handbook