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Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices

ÂŁ1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 3 Winter 2014

Anna Mudeka’s

Music Made in Norfolk

Indians In Norfolk celebrate ONAM

Meet Lady Dannatt BME High Sheriff of Norfolk in her own back garden

Leila

A Norfolk Star Shining in Australia

Benefit changes for EU Nationals

... with stories on immigration, fostering, health, community, equality & diversity etc... A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


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Information, Advice, Guidance & Training Services

The Bridge Plus

Need help and assistance with housing, health, education or a similar rights/ access to services issue?

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EDITORIAL

Merry Christmas and happy New Year to you all! While most of us will be sharing the festive holiday season with our families and love ones, there are many more who don’t have any family to go to. Which means, although Christmas can be a happy moment, it can also be a lonely moment. To all who don’t have family around we have you in our hearts and minds. It is an established fact that the very earliest writings were in the form of pictures, I therefore not just take the joy in being able to share community stories in pictures but to share the fact that our approach has broken the language barrier. The images we share in this magazine have the power to tell stories in the most common language known to mankind. Our stories, we were also told, were found to be relevant to the daily life experiences of BME people and of interest to our target readership. We thank you all for you feedbacks and comments. In this issue we bring you a musical legend made in Norfolk. Anna Mudeka is perhaps the most exposed BME person in Norfolk with her work taking her to places no one has ever been. Her music and dancing lesson takes diversity into schools and into the communities of rural Norfolk. Ask any Norfolk school going child the first black person they ever had a fun moment with, chances are, it would be Anna. She just not entertains, but inspires and educates young people about diversity. I have said in previous issues that the magazine is a pilot funded for three issues and that we are committed to making it a regular publication. Now is the time to work with us on making this wish a reality. As we look to the future, we hope you enjoy this issue as you did the previous ones. You can access the online version at www.bridgeplus.org.uk . Sincerely

Pa Musa, i3!

INDEX

Contact: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

4 Anna Mudeka’s Music Made in Norfolk 6 Meet Lady Dannatt MBE

High Sheriff of Norfolk in her own backyard

7 Community Cuisines New Years Lunch 10 Black History Month Messages 11 National Day of Countries of the World 12 Indians in Norfolk celebrate ONAM 15 Dos & Don’ts and Did you Know 17 Fostering by Sue Gee 18 Benefit changes for EU Nationals 20 Drinking & Your Health 23 International Days 24 Leila-A Norfolk Star shining in Australia 25 Red Cross Refugee Services 27 Do you have a Criminal Record 29 Time in Immigration Detention 33 Parental Responsibility 34 A Day at Carrow Road with Norwich City BME Footballers 35 How to say welcome in several languages

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Anna Mudeka’s Music Made in Norfolk • Tell us a little bit about yourself, your life growing up? Who is Anna Mudeka?

was the limit, and he was always trying to expose us to the future before we knew that those planes will be taking us to places that we ended up being now. I am not really sure. She is a mixture of Life growing up was so much fun. With everything. She is the granddaughter of no TV, but we still had lot of fun and I loved Anna Mudeka, her namesake. She grew being with my grandparents. Although I up in the industrial township of Rugare am originally from a family of musicians, I with her grandparents, about 10 miles have never set to become a musician. Music from Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. happens to be something I grew up believing I think that was the beginning of Anna. and as the years went by, I became more It was a wonderful household, full of life involved and passionate about it. and of music. My grandparents were not I remember when I was growing up, the very strict types. They had let us do I wanted to be a truck driver. I saw it what we wanted to do. So those are my challenging because I have not seen any first memories of the Anna women doing it. I like challenges. That is It was through Mudeka you see today. why having started my career as a dancer, my grandfather I tend to identify myself I knew I was going to go for the part through my grandmother that I saw the that men were always doing, so I took an rather my grandfather, he value of hard interest in drumming which was always was the serious one. He work and through seen as something for men. I was about was the type who wanted my grandmother fourteen when I started learning the drum his children to be driven I saw the value and achieve a better life back home in Zimbabwe. I have always of wanting to than he had. He came questioned why women were not doing become who you from the rural areas and this or that, and for some reason, culturally feel comfortable was the first of his family women are always seen as the dancers. But as my drumming skill were improving, at of being who moved to the city, about age sixteen, I started learning how found a job which gave to play the Mbira which probably only him a house. From there on he started a dozen women in Zimbabwe play. It is to build a future for his family. He was traditionally a male only instrument. I am a very simple but ambitious man and he not from the tribe that plays the Mbira knew he want more out of his life and that instrument, but one of my aunt was of his children and grandchildren. It was married to a man from the Shona through my grandfather that I saw the value of hard work and through I remember tribe who does, and he was quiet happy to teach me. my grandmother I saw the value of when I was My grandmother in particular wanting to become who you feel growing up, was a traditional musician comfortable of being. So it was a I wanted to who performed to entertain, very interesting combination. be a truck not for money but to continue The way my grandfather will driver with what has passed on from inspire us was by telling us stories, generation to generation. She help us read books and do our provided entrainment at parties, funeral homework. And as soon as any of us was and weddings and she loved it. She was a old enough, he taught us to drive, and it drummer as well, and I suppose I got the didn’t matter whether it was a boy or a inspiration from her. girl. He wanted us to be independent. One thing I remembered about him was he used to take us to the airport and show us • About your life journey? airplanes, and I think he was just trying to I am now 38 years old. I did both my tell us “You can do this.” For him the sky primary and high school in Rugare,

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Zimbabwe. I dropped out of high school because it was not offering the music experiences I was yearning for. So me and my young aunt who was of the same age as me decided that we wanted to pursue music as our fulltime careers. So we went on to join a dance group headed by an interesting character called King George who had just moved to our town from Bulawayo (another big city in Zimbabwe). Looking back, I think his background and style informed most of what am doing now in schools, because he opened our minds to a variety of music from all the other tribes. When my grandparents began to realise that this was getting serious, they were very concerned. They were concerned that if their daughters were going to be seen as professional dancers, where are men that would marry then. But I think this was probably more of a concern for my grandpa than for my grandma. To reassure them, King George agreed to sign a contract with us. It was a very interesting household, but they always had our best interest at heart. They wanted to see us protected, because the job involved touring and being exposed to adult audiences. It was a very big group called Idwala Elikhulu (meaning a big rock). I have learned stage life at a very early age and being part of the group meant we were earning money and contributing to the family. It came to the point that we knew that we need to grow, but there were limited opportunities within the group because of the internal politics, and with King George facing lots of challenges, we left after 3 years. It was sad to leave King George and Idwala, but it was the time to move on. I was specifically interested in studying at Ethno Music College (Hi Anna, this is what I found out about what I think you meant: ethnomusicology at Zimbabwe College of Music) where Ephat Mujuru, one of the most well known Mbira player in Zimbabwe at the time was teaching. It took me over two months to catch up with him and he was puzzled to be approached by a seventeen year old girl wanting to learn the Mbira. But it only took that one meeting for him to decide. My young aunty to join us, and that was it. Off we went with him to Japan for one month with the consent of our parents. It was more of a learning trip because he was always teaching me while on the road, but it was also paid work. Japan was my first trip on a plane and it reminded me of our trips to the airport with my grandfather. Back in Zimbabwe we continued to work with him but were touring less. Six months later, out of the blue, we got a phone call from Thomas Mapfumo’s manager. And knowing Thomas, there was no one higher than him musically in Zimbabwe. You either work with him or you are still finding your Photo by Simon Watson


people camped all around the field. After all the fun, the proceeds enable us to send a needy child to school. The festival takes place during the first week of August, next year’s date is Saturday 1st August 2015. Tents are set up the Friday before. Usually we have musicians from all over the world, but for 2015, we are having an interesting line. This is the first time am sharing this information that this year, world music would actually be coming from Norfolk. You have heard me mention a few Norfolk based musicians and there are many more around. We have also got local British talent It was nice in London but it did and Brazilian musicians, so in not have the peace Norfolk we have world music at our doorsteps. The event attracts that Norfolk a lot of families. gives you Mbira

way up. But we had a dilemma, because growing up in a large family with my cousins, there was this childhood rivalry with one set of us being fans of Oliver Mtukudzi (another Zimbabwean music legend) and they liked Thomas. So to get a call from the star of our rivals was a bit of a challenge. But the fact was, any aspiring musician in Zimbabwe would die to work with Thomas. We met him at the Queen’s hotel on a Monday and the next day we were working for him. I remember him asking in front of a room full of people, “I heard you can dance”. We worked for Thomas for eight months dancing and opening shows for him until I had another career move to the UK.

which I called their manager and he invited me to join his team of 45. This was a very well funded group with offices, and • Tell us about moving here? tour buses going up and down While working in Zimbabwe, I was also the country and performing registered with a talent agency called • About your experience of living for celebrities. I was with them when they Images Agency who were getting me jobs in Norfolk as a minority. performed for Maya Angelo at Dorchester in films. We have appeared in a film shot I have a lot of positive experience of living Hotel. It was really fascinating, and it was in Zimbabwe, “A Far Off Place” by Walt in Norfolk. Don’t get me wrong, I can’t say with them that I started learning dance Disney starring Reese Witherspoon. We that I have not come across any racism or moves from other parts of Africa. But it was also did a couple of Zimbabwean movies, discrimination, because I have, and it hurts. with a very heavy heart that I had to leave like “Aa The Future”. Where I experience it on the job, I speak and come back to Norfolk to I moved to the UK in 1994 to live in to the people directly and I have found re-establish myself. It was nice in London Norfolk and it was here that I started my that to be effective. The street level name but it did not have the peace that Norfolk first band at age eighteen, which I named calling type does not scare, because usually gives you. after my uncle-Baba Simba, (Simba, as in it is cowards that do that. I have always Now in 2014, the competition for the the Lion King means Power). said if anyone does not like me because kind of music am doing is growing. You of the colour of my skin, I would be more Norfolk really Back home it was more have got Seyfo Kanuteh from Gambia, than willing to give them the opportunity embraced me challenging as a woman to start he is fantastic, we have got Jose Ferrera your own band. Norfolk really to discuss it. We are all the same under the straight away and other story tellers who are coming in. embraced me straight away. We skin you know. Norfolk gave me the uniqueness I managed were doing shown everywhere. This is home now. I have two to create today, because it was here that We are There was curiosity, and I think people only Anna Mudeka became a product. So I daughters soon to be 8 and 5. In all the wanted to understand the culture. But there between taking care of them, I also decided to do a two year diploma in music, same was also lots of love. I think people really run my business and charity. But followed by a business course, which both appreciated what I was doing. I was also really I am a full time musician. under the helped me to better understand the written working with the schools where I felt very Although I am always busy, I try skin you music. I think education is very important well received. I loved that part of my work to make time for everything. I love know because it gave me the insurance that if and how it inspires young people. going for bike riding in my spare music did not work, I can go on to do You know some of them are very far time and I grow a lot of what I eat. something else, like be a sound engineer, removed from what Africa is like, and you but I would have been bored doing that. can hear it from their questions. • What would be impossible In 2001 I set up my own company called A big part of my job is going into schools for you to give up: Tambai Productions. It became more and giving children a real taste of Africa. Shoes professional. I employed accountants, had Going into the schools is not just about part time support staff and I changed my music. That would be missed opportunity if band a little bit, doing more school work. I • What can’t you stop talking about? it were just about music. Africa because it taught me a lot! If wasn’t produced teacher pack based on It is what you share with them for Africa I wouldn’t be playing music. I children ask very African music and culture that and the fascinating questions innocent questions, went into schools. Work started don’t meet many African who don’t have about Africa they ask that keep that “happy to see you” embracing smile. and if adults have coming from all directions. In reminding you how much such 2002, I was signed a two year the same approach, interactions are needed. I think • Awards there will be less contract with the Ministry of they really need to understand Defence to do work in their i. 2013-South African Business Magazine ignorance and what Africa is really like. And schools in Germany. –Most influential woman in government, racism you know the children ask very business & music in Africa (also innocent questions, and if adults have the • You mark on Norfolk reported in Norwich EDP http://www. same approach, there will be less ignorance I organise the annual Southburgh Festival edp24.co.uk/news/african_award_ and racism. of World Music which has been going on success_for_charity_leader_1_2827867) In the late 1990’s, I moved to London for for seven year now. It has two main aims: ii. 2014-Tesco mom of the Year finalist. a year to join a multi-national Ghanaian to bring music and culture to rural Norfolk I was one of 35 contestants, 2 minorities, dance group called “Adzido Ensemble” who and give people the experience of something but only one from the east of England. impressed me the first time I saw them after they are not exposed to as much; and the I think the winner was very deserving. other aim is to raise funds for a charity I set up in Zimbabwe to provide • People I worked with: education to HIV positive and other Leon Rosselson, Elisabeth Mansfield, disadvantaged children. Cara Dillon who are all big names in so in The festival is an opportunity to Norfolk we the UK music and theatre business. share experience. It is a weekend have world Ann’s new album “DENDENDE” event that attracts between 500music at our 700 people a day. There is food, will be out April 2015 doorsteps different cultures, and hundreds of

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Meet the High Sheriff of Norfolk

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he Office of High Sheriff is an independent non-political and voluntary Royal appointment for a single year. There have been High Sheriffs for at least 1,000 years and the origins of the Office date back to Saxon times, when the ‘Shire Reeve’ was responsible to the king for the maintenance of law and order within the shire, or county, as well as for collection and return of taxes due to the Crown. As these taxes were not popular and Sheriffs could be personally liable for any shortfall, many tried to avoid appointment. But the practice of the Monarch pricking their names from a parchment list prevented this, and the tradition still continues to this day! Nowadays, the main duties of a High Sheriff are supporting the Judiciary and the Magistrates, especially High Court Judges, as well as the Emergency Services i.e. the Police, the Ambulance Service, Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service, local authorities and all recognized church and faith groups. Many High Sheriffs also assist Community Foundations and local charities working with vulnerable and other people, both in endorsing and helping to raise the profile of their valuable work. The current High Sheriff of Norfolk is Lady Dannatt MBE. Lady Dannatt agreed to answer a few questions by inviting the B-Me Voices to his back garden. • A lot of people in Norfolk may already know what the High Sheriff of Norfolk does but how can you describe the role to people new to the County?

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I’m not sure many people do know what the High Sheriff actually does, so I will have a go at explaining. The County High Sheriff is one of the oldest appointments in the country. Basically for the period of one year (usually running from March to March) the HS is responsible to Her Majesty The Queen for all matters concerning law and order within his or her county. In the olden days this included attending executions and the like. I am glad that doesn’t happen any more! Instead I spend quite a lot of time trying to support the Judiciary and the Magistrates, as well as supporting the Emergency Services i.e. the Police, the Ambulance Service, and the Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service. • What does it mean for you to be the High Sheriff of Norfolk? It means a huge amount to me to be HS. It is a great honour and privilege, and both my father and my grandfather were before me. My father died ten years ago, but I like knowing I am wearing the Badge of Office he wore too. • How did you first hear about us? I first heard about you when I picked up your magazine in Norman Lamb’s office. In fact I think I inadvertently nicked his copy .. Sorry, Norman! • Your first reaction to the magazine I found your magazine very thought provoking. For the first time it made me wonder how I would have fared if it were me seeking refuge in a foreign country, a language I could not speak, customs and laws I couldn’t understand .... Not very

well, I suspect, so I have great respect for those of you who are showing such courage in taking charge of your futures. • Any comments about equality and diversity in Norfolk? I hope and believe Norfolk is an open, friendly and inclusive society, but as ever there will also be those who are challenged or possibly feel threatened by newcomers. I do believe education is the key, and my hope is that future generations will become more and more inclusive, understanding and welcoming to BME communities ... who have so much to offer us in cultural wealth and experience. I would just like to see everyone, from every ethnic background, have equal opportunity at school, at work, and in the community.


The Bridge + Community Cuisines New Year’s Lunch

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Latest News from Hate Free Norfolk

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he Hate Free Norfolk Network continues to develop and provide support for people experiencing hate incidents and hate crime in Norfolk. We are really pleased to announce that thanks to some funding from the Ministry of Justice, we have now recruited three Specialist Hate Crime Advocates. Between them the advocates cover the whole of the County. Their job is to provide a friendly face and a listening ear to anyone who is experiencing hate, bullying or harassment. They are each hosted in local community organisations and they are independent from the police, although they do work closely with the Police Diversity Liaison Officers, and can support people through the process of reporting hate incidents if that is what the person wants. Anyone can contact the advocates for help, and they are building relationships in local communities so that they can help people to navigate through all the complex systems and arrangements, to enable them to get the best help and support. You can contact our advocates by email or phone:

Peter de Oude Broadland, South Norfolk and Norwich peter@hatefreenorfolk.co.uk 07771 336667 Jonna Barry Great Yarmouth and North Norfolk jonna@hatefreenorfolk.co.uk 07754 305634 Marie Connell West Norfolk and Breckland marie@hatefreenorfolk.co.uk 07752 846694 8

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We also had a very successful week of events to mark National Hate Crime Awareness Week. We funded eleven community-led events across Norfolk, and engaged with many different people to spread the message about tackling hate and building a hate free Norfolk. You can see pictures from our events on the website. Please sign the Hate Free Norfolk Pledge and join the Network so you can work with others for a Hate Free Norfolk.

www.hatefreenorfolk.com Michelle de Oude Chair of the Hate Free Norfolk Network


Equality

& Diversity Images & Quotes

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Celebrating Black History: A Force For Change Message from Chair of Norfolk Black History Month Abraham Eshetu

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elcome to this year’s Norfolk Black History Month celebrations. It gives me great pleasure to present Norfolk’s 11th Black History Month (BHM) with over 100 exciting events which took place throughout Norfolk this October to celebrate Black History Past, Present and Future. Our theme this year is – A Force For Change to acknowledging the role Black History has played as a force for change in shaping and developing our present world. The month gives us all the opportunity to pay tribute to the tremendous contribution that generations of Black and Ethnic Minority people have made to our country and the world. I think it’s really important that we recognise the efforts and achievements of so many who have helped

to make our country vibrant, tolerant and diverse. Also, we are delighted to have been nominated for the 2014 Norfolk Arts Awards. This year marks the 110th Anniversary of Dr Allan Glaisyer Minns (1858–1930) as the first Black man to hold public office as a mayor of Thetford in Britain; the 50th Anniversary of The Civil Rights Act of 1964 in the USA and the following year the enactment of the first legislation in the United Kingdom to address racial discrimination. We have organised talks and discussions focusing on such pivotal events in our history to explore their context and consequences. This year Black Heritage and Culture Norfolk in partnership with Norfolk County Council, Norwich City Council and Norfolk Community Foundation – Safer Norfolk Fund have provided support to a number of community groups to enable them host events to celebrate this year’s theme. Norfolk Black History Month is supported by communities, art and education institutions, voluntary groups,

statutory agencies such as local authorities, museums, libraries, and criminal justice agencies. I would like to extend a special thank you to the support given by Norfolk County Council, Norfolk Constabulary, Norwich City Council, the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Writers’ Centre Norwich, Norfolk Library and Information Services, Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich (ZIMCAN), NEAD, University of East Anglia, The Bridge Plus+, Community Connections, Norfolk Jazz and Blues Society, The Forum Trust, Café Bar Marzano, CREB, Creative Arts East, Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, Cinema City, Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service, Broadland District Council, Norfolk FA, Norwich Mind, Cinema City, Norwich Arts Centre, Future Radio, and various organisations and community groups for their support in making Norfolk Black History Month one of the best and well organised BHM celebrations nationally. We hope to celebrate many more Black History Months which are observed every October. Norfolk you make us proud. Thank you.

Black History Month, October 2014 Launch event message from Chief Fire Officer Nigel Williams

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hange can be driven by many things a selfless act and terrible events and unfair laws – in each case it is an individual’s reaction to events that can be a catalyst for positive change. I want to pay tribute to two individuals who have been a force for change – making each of our lives better and fairer by their actions and example.

As you would expect my list starts with a firefighter. Women have been firefighters for longer than most people realize: in fact, for almost 200 years. The first woman firefighter we know of was Molly Williams, an African American woman who was a cook with Oceanus Engine Company Fire House in New York City in 1815. One wintry day in 1818 Molly heard the church bells signalling a fire, she rushed to be of help. This time, however, it was not food that was needed, but extra hands as sickness had severely limited the number of men who responded. Molly did not hesitate - donning a leather fireman’s hat, she pitched in to help. And help she did. She helped to pull the

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heavy tanker to the scene of the fire, passed water on the bucket brigade, worked on the pumper, manned a hose, and pulled down parts of burning walls with a hook. In the end she received the highest compliment she could hope for from the Fire Captain: “Molly, by golly, you’re as fine a fire lad as any!” From then on she was known as volunteer number 11. Her story is told in a children’s book – “Molly by Golly” – the Legend of America’s First Female Firefighter. Her heroics are recorded in the African American Firefighters Museum in Los Angeles. Today, women play a significant role in the fire service around the world. I am incredibly proud to follow in her footsteps and I hope Molly, looking down, is proud of me and my colleagues. Since 2014 marks the 100 anniversary of WW 1 it is only fitting that we celebrate the achievements and bravery of the UK’s first black combat officer, Second Lieutenant Walter Tull – British Officer Walter was also one of the first black professional footballers – playing for Tottenham Hotspur. When war broke out he volunteered for the 17th Middlesex, called the Football Battalion because of the number of players in its ranks. Once again he found himself the only black man in the team - and he proved himself all over again. By the time he finished his training he had been promoted three times After one daring night raid, in Italy in which Walter led 26 men across a swirling

river and brought them all back unharmed, he was mentioned in dispatches for “gallantry and coolness under fire”. Senior officers recommended Walter for promotion and he won his commission in May 1917 although military regulations forbidding “any negro or person of colour” being an officer. He became the first Black combat officer in the British Army. In contrast with his fellow officers – most of whom were from well-off families and public schooleducated he was a working class orphan. Lieutenant Tull was killed leading his men during the second battle of the Somme in 1918. He was such a popular officer that when he was wounded several of his men made valiant efforts under heavy fire to bring him back to the British trenches at the some cost of their own lives. However their efforts were in vain. He was recommended for a Military Cross but never received one. Campaigners are calling for the government to posthumously award him the medal. His accomplishment and sacrifice are being recognised and celebrated as part of the commemorations of the centenary of WWI. His portrait with a backdrop of infantry soldiers going “over the top” will feature in one of a set of six coins to remember the sacrifices made by many during the war. To-day our armed forces have 670 black and ethnic minority officers and racism is condemned. Lieutenant Tull I salute you.


Nationality Day of countries around the world January

Cameroon - January 1 Haiti - January 1 Western Samoa - January 1 Sudan - January 1 Burma - January 4 Chad - January 11 Australia - January 26 Nauru - January 31

February

Ceylon/Sri Lanka - February 4 New Zealand - February 6 Grenada - February 7 Iran - February 11 Gambia - February 18 Saint Lucia - February 22 Dominican Republic - February 27

March

Wales - March 1 Morocco - March 3 Mauritius - March 12 Ireland - March 17 Liechtenstein - March 19 Pakistan - March 23 Greece - March 25 Bangladesh - March 26

April

Hungary - April 4 Senegal - April 4 Denmark - April 16 Syria - April 17 Zimbabwe - April 18 Austria - April 27 Sierra Leone - April 27 Togo - April 27 Japan - April 29 The Netherlands - April 30 Israel - April or May

May

Czechoslovakia - May 9 Laos - May 11 Paraguay - May 14 Israel - May 15 Norway - May 17 Cuba - May 20 Argentina - May 25 Jordan - May 25 Guyana - May 26

June

Tunisia - June 1 Italy - June 2 Seychelles - June 5 Sweden - June 6 Portugal - June 10 Philippines - Independence Day June 12 Iceland - June 17 Kuwait - June 19 Luxembourg - June 23 Croatia - June 25 Mozambique - June 25 Madagascar - June 26 Djibouti - June 27 Republic of Congo (DRC)- June 30 Zaire - June 30

July

Burundi - July 1 Canada - July 1 Rwanda - July 1 Somalia - July 1 United States of American - July 4 Venezuela - July 5 Malawi - July 6 Argentina - July 9 Bahamas - July 10 Mongolia - July 11 Sao Tome and Principe - July 12 France - July 14 Iraq - July 14 South Korea - July 17 Colombia - July 20 Belgium - July 21 Poland - July 22 Egypt - July 23 Ethiopia - July 23 Liberia - July 26 Maldive Islands - July 26 Peru - July 28

August

Dahomey - August 1 Switzerland - August 1 Upper Volta - August 5 Bolivia - August 6 Jamaica - First Monday in August Ivory Coast - August 7 Singapore - August 9 Ecuador - August 10 Pakistan - August 14 Republic of Congo - August 15 India - August 15 Cyprus - August 16 Gabon - August 17 Indonesia - August 17 Afghanistan - August 18 Rumania - August 23 Uruguay - August 25 Trinidad & Tobago - August 31 Malaysia - August 31

September

Libya - September 1 Vietnam - September 2 Qatar - September 3 San Marino - September 3 Swaziland - September 6 Brazil - September 7 Andorra - September 8 North Korea - September 9 Bulgaria - September 9 Costa Rica - September 15 El Salvador - September 15 Guatemala - September 15 Honduras - September 15 Nicaragua - September 15 Mexico - September 16 Papua New Guinea - September 16 Chile - September 18 Belize - September 21 Malta - September 21 Mali - September 22 Saudi Arabia - September 23 Yemen - September 26 Botswana - September 30

October

People’s Republic of China October 1-2 Nigeria - October 1 Guinea - October 2 Lesotho October 4 Fiji - October 7 Germany - October 3 1990 Uganda - October 9 Republic of China/Taiwan October 10 Spain - October 12 Zambia - October 24 Iran - October 26 South Vietnam - October 26 St Vincent and Grenadines October 27 Turkey - October 29

November

Algeria - November 1 Panama - November 3 Dominica - November 3 Soviet Union - November 7 Cambodia - November 9 Angola - November 11 Rhodesia - November 11 Poland- November 11 Saudi Arabia - November 12 Comoros - November 12 Monaco - November 19 Lebanon - November 22 Suriname - November 25 Albania - November 28 Mauritania - November 28 Southern Yemen - November 29 Yugoslavia - November 29-30 Barbados - November 30

December

Central African Republic December 1 Thailand - December 5 Finland - December 6 Tanzania - December 9 Upper Volta - December 11 Kenya - December 12 Niger - December 18 Nepal - December 21

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Norwich Association of Malayalees (NAM) Indians

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AM is a Norwich based association of Indians from the south Indian state of Kerala. The organisation was founded April 2006, and every year they celebrate the Festival of Harvest known as ONAM, which attracts hundreds of people. NAM is a not-forprofit registered charity organisation with a wide membership most of whom are doctors and nurses working for the NHS, successful business men and women and IT professionals.

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Make your voice heard, share your opinions on local services and help shape your community. Join Your Voice

– we need more BAME people to join the Norfolk panel and have their say www.yourvoicenorfolk.co.uk

Your Voice Your Services Your Say B-Me VOICES

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No to Violence

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Did You Know & Dos and Don’ts • Great Britain comprises of England, Scotland and Wales, which together with Northern Ireland are known as United Kingdom. Scotland and England had separate Monarchs until 1603, when Queen Elizabeth I died without any heirs. Her successor was James VI, King of Scots who became known as James I in England. James was also King of Ireland and of France at the same time. Scotland, England and Wales were united by the Act of union passed by the Scottish Parliament and Westminster in 1707 to form the Kingdom of Great Britain. The Irish Parliament voted to join the Union in 1801 when the then Kingdom of Great Britain became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The full name of the UK then changed in 1922 when most of the Southern counties in Ireland choose independence and ultimately became what is now the Republic of Ireland, leaving the UK as the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Front Row Members Kicked Out

• With more than 2.3 million people in prison, the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world. One in 100 adults is behind bars, while one in 32 is on probations, parole or bail. Source: CNBC News • More than 250,000 young people under the age of 18 served in the British army during World War 2. • 20% of Premier League players are black • According to Digby Jones, head of the Confederation of British Industry, “a 1% increase in immigration brings a 1.5% increase in the nation’s wealth”…

The First Family

• The Mini car was designed by a Greek refugee, Alec Issigonis. • Fish and chips – fried fish was introduced as a Jewish tradition and chips came from Ireland. St. Patrick’s Saltire used to depict flag of Northern Ireland

Scotland Flag

Welsh Flag

United Kingdom Flag

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Are you planning to apply for

UK Citizenship? A new course is starting from Monday 5th January 2015 at City College Norwich.

Prepare yourself for citizenship by attending: Life in the UK Test Revision with Entry 3 or Level 1 Speaking & Listening

Mondays 2pm to 4pm and Tuesdays 2pm to 4pm

To find out more contact the Advice Shop on 01603 773 773 or visit our website www.ccn.ac.uk

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Dates shaded white must be open for pupils. Yellow shading indicates pupil holiday. Red shading indicates bank holiday. Five Professional Development days must be taken within pupil holidays, we suggest 3 September, 23-24 October, 5 January and 22 July.

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Fostering Black Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Children in Norfolk by Sue Gee-Retired Social Worker

chance to discuss what it would mean for you as a family to foster and what age of child would suit you best. You do need to have a bedroom for the child to sleep in. Q – Isn’t looking after someone else’s child expensive?

W

ith ever increasing numbers of children being looked after by Children’s Services in Norfolk, there has never been a more urgent need for foster carers, and there is a particular need for foster carers from people of all backgrounds to meet the needs of looked after children from a wide range of different countries and ethnic origins. In recent years Norfolk County Council has looked after children from Vietnam, China, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Congo, Zimbabwe, Iran, Iraq, Guinea Bissau, Portugal, Russia, Kosovo and Latvia to name a few. Sometimes children come into local authority care because they have been ill treated by their parents or carers or have found it difficult because of discord at home; because they have ended up in Norfolk without a parent to care for them; or because conflicts in home countries have made it difficult for them to live there. Some children, such as unaccompanied asylum seeking children, may have been traumatised by their previous experiences in their own country or on their journey to the UK. All these children and young people need positives in their lives; whether it’s young men from visible minority backgrounds who are already drifting towards gangs or a criminal sub-culture and need positive male role models that they can identify with. Or small children who cannot live with their own parents because they are unable to safely care for them, leading to neglect, accidental injury due to lack of supervision, or other abuses. It is really important for these children and young people to maintain their links with their own culture and, where possible, their own community. Even something as simple as appropriate care of skin and hair can be problematic if

children are placed with carers who have no experience of caring for black skin and hair and don’t understand their needs. Understanding the need for appropriate religious observance is also very important. If culturally appropriate or sensitive foster placements are not available, and these needs are not addressed, the young people can end up alienated from their own culture and from their family, yet not quite fitting in in the host community either. There can be identity problems; these young people may have few resources when they meet with racism and discrimination. These experiences can sometimes lead to long term trauma for the individuals concerned. Peter Ronan, Head of Adoption and Fostering Services for Norfolk County Council Children’s Services said “We are always keen to receive applications from members of the BAME Communities who have the time and skills to offer a home to vulnerable children”. Contact Norfolk County Council Fostering Services on 0344 800 8020 and a social worker will be in touch.

FOSTERING – Questions & Answers Q – What is fostering? A – Fostering is when a family look after someone else’s child in their own home, for an agreed period of time, at the request of social workers.

A – You will get a fostering allowance, which varies according to the child’s age, to cover food, clothing, pocket money, travel (for example to school), and the cost of any interests that the child may have. All of these things are agreed in advance, and at regular review meetings held with the child’s social worker and an Independent Reviewing Officer to discuss how things are going. Q- Are there a lot of meetings? A - Reviews are held one month after the child arrives; after three months and then every six months. Reviews can be held in your own home; in the child’s school or in a social work office, depending on what seems best. A social worker will visit the child in between, and talk to them on their own about how they are feeling, as well as talking to you about how things are going. Q – What about the child’s parents? Will they be angry with me if they want their child to live at home with them? A – How much or how little involvement the foster carer has with a child’s parents can be different for each child. Some foster carers have no contact at all with the parent. Others will take the child to see their parent regularly, and have a good relationship with the parent. It can be the case that some parents can find it difficult to see a child doing well with foster carers, when they have not been able to look after the child themselves, and parents may sometimes resent this. Parents are encouraged to think about what is best for their child, which is everyone’s aim.

Q – Do you have to be a married couple living in your own home to foster? A – No, anyone can apply to foster children, there will be a detailed assessment and a

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Benefit changes for EU Nationals

I

n November 2014, the government announced its plans to tighten the UK benefits system. In January 2014 the relevant EU Immigration laws were amended to bring the measures into effect.

• From 1 January all EU jobseekers have to wait for 3 months before they can get Jobseeker’s Allowance. This ensures that only people who have a clear commitment to the UK and plan to contribute to the economy have access to the welfare system. • After 3 months, jobseekers also have to take a stronger, more robust Habitual Residence Test if they want to claim Jobseeker’s Allowance. • If they pass the Habitual Residence Test, EU jobseekers will then only be able to get Jobseeker’s Allowance for 6 months. After 6 months, only those who have a job offer or compelling evidence that they have a genuine chance of finding work will be able to continue claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance. • From 1 April 2014, new EU jobseekers are no longer able to access housing benefits if they are claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance. This builds on the new rules introduced in January which mean EU migrants cannot claim Jobseeker’s Allowance until they have been in the country for three months.

Who is no longer entitled to Housing Benefit? From 1 April 2014 the Housing Benefit regulations have been changed so that being entitled to Jobseekers Allowance is no longer a passport to Housing Benefit for jobseekers from EU nationals. • The exclusion to Housing Benefit applies to all EU Jobseekers who claimed on or after the 01 April 2014, regardless of when they arrived in the UK. • It also applies to EU nationals who have

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been claiming Housing Benefit whilst working and then become unemployed on or after 01 April 2014 but do not retain their worker status. • This does not apply to UK nationals returning to the UK from abroad. But they will still need to satisfy the Habitual Residence Test. • People moving to the UK directly from the Common Travel Area (which are the Channel Islands, Isle of Man and the Republic of Ireland) are also not affected as they are British citizens and are treated as being habitually resident. However, if a national of the Common Travel Area moves to the UK from outside the Common Travel Area they will need to demonstrate they are habitually resident.

Housing Benefit. Check with your local authority. • An EU Worker who has claimed Housing Benefit but stops working and fails to retain their worker status will is no longer entitled to Housing Benefit. How is worker status retained? An EU national retains their worker status if they are involuntarily unemployed and are registered as a jobseeker and are actively seeking genuine and effective work. They will need to provide evidence to confirm that their previous work was genuine and effective. Worker status can be retained where a person is temporarily unable to work as a consequence of an accident or illness.

• Some EU Jobseekers who are “former workers” who have children in school may still be able to get Housing Benefit even if they do not retain their workers status. If this applies, they will need to prove that the child was resident in the UK whilst the parent was in genuine and effective work. Evidence of this may be required. How a change of circumstances will affect EU Nationals already claiming Housing Benefit • EU Jobseekers who were receiving Housing Benefit and Jobseekers Allowance on 31 March 2014 will be protected until they have a break in their claim. • EU Jobseekers who were receiving Housing Benefit and Jobseekers Allowance in one Local Authority and then moved to another Local Authority area may no longer be entitled to

The Minimum Earnings Threshold for EU Job seekers

The minimum earnings threshold has been set at £153 a week for the 2014/15 tax year which is equivalent to working 24 hours a week at National Minimum Wage. This is the same level at which workers start to pay National Insurance. Migrant workers must prove that they have been earning this amount in the UK for three consecutive months prior to claiming. They will need to provide appropriate evidence such as wage slips, contracts of employment or, if they have been self-employed, evidence of their earnings from their business records. If they satisfy the terms of the minimum earnings threshold their work will be automatically treated as ‘genuine and effective’. If the terms are not met then further consideration will be given to decide whether their work should still be considered ‘genuine and effective’. The minimum earnings threshold applies initially to income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA), Housing Benefit, Child Benefit and Child Tax Credit. It may be extended to other benefits later.


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27/11/2014VOICES 10:28

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A

recently released World Health Organisation (WHO) report details the levels of alcohol consumption across the world, revealing an interesting order of countries in the top-ten heaviest drinkers. All of the countries topping the list are in Europe. Belarus, in Eastern Europe, tops the list with an average consumption of 17.5 litres. The global average figure is 6.2 litres of pure alcohol per person every year, taking into account that the majority of the world’s population (61.7%) does not drink at all.

public health and policy responses. “More needs to be done to protect populations from the negative health consequences of alcohol consumption,” says Dr Oleg Chestnov, WHO Assistant Director-General for Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health. “The report clearly shows that there is no room for complacency when it comes to reducing the harmful use of alcohol.” Some countries are already strengthening measures to protect people. These include increasing taxes on alcohol, limiting the availability of alcohol by raising the age limit, and regulating the

the population (38.3%) actually drinks alcohol, this means that those who do drink consume on average 17 litres of pure alcohol annually. The report also points to the fact that a higher percentage of deaths among men than among women are from alcoholrelated causes - 7.6% of men’s deaths and 4% of women’s deaths – though there is evidence that women may be more vulnerable to some alcohol-related health conditions compared to men. In addition, the authors note that there is concern over the steady increase in alcohol use among women.

Drinking & Your Health The United Kingdom and Ireland do not make the top ten. The report revealed that Britons over 15 years old drink 11.6 litres on average every year, making it joint 17th position with Slovenia. Australia and Canada also failed to meet the top 10 but maintain high levels of drinking at 12.2 and 10.2 litres a year respectively. Worldwide, 3.3 million deaths in 2012 were due to harmful use of alcohol, says the report. Alcohol consumption can not only lead to dependence but also increases people’s risk of developing more than 200 diseases including liver cirrhosis and some cancers. In addition, harmful drinking can lead to violence and injuries. The report also finds that harmful use of alcohol makes people more susceptible to infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and pneumonia. The “Global status report on alcohol and health 2014” provides country profiles for alcohol consumption in the 194 WHO Member States, the impact on

marketing of alcoholic beverages. The report also highlights the need for action by countries including: • national leadership to develop policies to reduce harmful use of alcohol (66 WHO Member States had written national alcohol policies in 2012); • national awareness-raising activities (nearly 140 countries reported at least one such activity in the past three years); • health services to deliver prevention and treatment services, in particular increasing prevention, treatment and care for patients and their families, and supporting initiatives for screening and brief interventions. In addition the report shows the need for communities to be engaged in reducing harmful use of alcohol. On average every person in the world aged 15 years or older drinks 6.2 litres of pure alcohol per year. But as less than half

“We found that worldwide about 16% of drinkers engage in heavy episodic drinking - often referred to as ‘bingedrinking’ - which is the most harmful to health,” explains Dr Shekhar Saxena, Director for Mental Health and Substance Abuse at WHO. “Lower-income groups are more affected by the social and health consequences of alcohol. They often lack quality health care and are less protected by functional family or community networks.” Globally, Europe is the region with the highest consumption of alcohol per capita, with some of its countries having particularly high consumption rates. Trend analysis shows that the consumption level is stable over the last 5 years in the region, as well as in Africa and the Americas, though increases have been reported in the South-East Asia and the Western Pacific regions. Through a global network, WHO is supporting countries in their development and implementation of policies to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. The need for intensified action was endorsed in the landmark 2011 United Nations General Assembly meeting, which identified alcohol as one of four common risk factors* contributing to the noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) epidemic.

Source:

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/ releases/2014/alcohol-related-deathsprevention/en/

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Wise Words, Wits & Humours

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International Days

January

01: Global Family Day 04: World Braille Day 08: World Literary Day 11: International Thank-You Day 27: Holocaust Day 30: World Leprosy Day

February

04. World Cancer Day 21: International Mother Language Day 22: World Thinking Day

March 01: Zero Discrimination Day 08: International Women’s Day 14: World Book Day 21: Elimination of Discrimination

April

07: World Health Day 13: International Special Librarian’s Day 22: Earth Day 25: World Malaria Day

May

July

11: World Population Day 30: International day of friendship

August

12: International Youth Day 19: World Humanitarian Day 23: International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade & its Abolition

September

05: International Day of Charity 08: International Literacy Day 15: International Day of Democracy 21: International Day of Peace

October

01: Day of Older Persons 02: Day of Non-Violence 04: World Animal Day 05: World Teacher’s Day 10: World Mental Health Day 16: World Food Day 24: United Nations Day 29: International Internet Day

03: World Press Freedom Day 08: World Red Cross Day 12: International Nurses Day 15: International Day of Families 21: Cultural Diversity Day 31: World No-Tobacco Day

November

June

01: World AIDS Day 02: International Day for the Abolition of Slavery 03: Day of Persons with Disabilities 05: International Volunteers Day 10: Human Rights Day

14: World Blood Donor Day 16: International Day of the African Child 17: Elder Abuse Awareness Day 20: World Refugee Day 23: International Widows’ Day 26: International Day Against Drug Abuse & Traffick also Victims of Torture Day

11. Remembrance Day WW2 16: International Day for Tolerance 25: International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

December

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Leila Nazimi from Norwich, Norfolk embraces her new life in Australia Becoming a successful marine biology student, swimming star and a surf lifesaver.

L

part of Australian life than to sign up as a eila a 31-year-old marine biology surf lifesaver”. In swimming she has won a student, who comes from Norwich total of 13 first-placed medals that she has in the UK, has become a star of achieved at state level. surf rescue, pool and university The West Beach Surf Life Saving Club since arriving in Australia five years surf sports director was quoted as saying; ago. Her Parent live in Norfolk. Ms Nazimi is a “quiet, unassuming person” Mum who is from Norwich and her dad who is an “amazing competitor” and an who comes from Iran have lived in Norfolk “invaluable beach patroller, volunteer and for over 30 years now. Leila spent two years role model”. She is also an accomplished travelling around Australia, working on a student and was a strong farm and giving scuba contender in the academic diving instruction, before categories of the Study settling in Adelaide to Adelaide awards and is study, where she also now considering a career mentors undergraduates in marine research. Leila at Flinders University, stated, “I do Reef Watch Adelaide. surveys through diving, so A recently qualified I’ve found out a lot about swim teacher, and ‘Reef what’s out there in South Watch’ researcher, her Australian waters”. widespread contribution Font: Humanist The Education Adelaide to the community was chairman said; “Leila is recognised when she a shining example of a claimed ‘Study Adelaide’s student who is giving back International Student of to the South Australian the Year award’ back community. in November 2014. Anlike youwould would liketotocontact contacta acouncillor councilloryou youcan canwrite writetotothem thematatthe theaddresses addresses shownWe should be If Ifyou shown very proud that students articleor inor news.com.au phoneusing usingthe thenumbers numbersgiven. given. phone can write to them like this who choose noted; “there are fewat the addresses shown our city.” betterAlternatively, ways to become Alternatively,you youcan canemail emailvia viawww.norwich.gov.uk www.norwich.gov.ukororbybyusing: using:

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Originally published as Champion student takes to our lifestyle initial.surname@cllr.norwich.gov.uk initial.surname@cllr.norwich.gov.uk orwich.gov.uk or by using: Forexample exampletotoemail emailBrenda BrendaArthur: Arthur: For Bowthorpe Bowthorpe b.arthur@cllr.norwich.gov.uk b.arthur@cllr.norwich.gov.uk Bowthorpe Bowthorpe Theonly onlyexception exceptionis isCouncillor CouncillorBremner, Bremner, The emailis isb.bremner@cllr.norwich.gov.uk b.bremner@cllr.norwich.gov.uk hishisemail er, v.uk youare arenot notsure surewhich whichward wardyou youlive live If Ifyou inpleasecontact contactthe theelections electionsoffice office inplease Storie Mike Sands JoJo Storie Mike Sands 2 Braithwait Close 19C 19C The Swale 2 Braithwait Close The Swale CityHall Hallonon01603 01603212053/212055, 212053/212055, atatCity Norwich Norwich Jo Storie Mike Sands Norwich Norwich Sally Button Minicom212587, 212587, Minicom NR5 NR5 9HE 2 Braithwait Close 19C The Swale NR5 9EJ9EJ NR5 9HE 43 Stylman Road emailelections@norwich.gov.uk elections@norwich.gov.uk email t: 01603 747617 t: 01603 t: 01603 594995 Norwich Norwich t: 01603 747617 594995 Norwich NR5 9EJ NR5 9HE orvisit visitwww.norwich.gov.uk www.norwich.gov.uk NR5 9ET or

NORWICH CITY COUNCILLORS

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as at end 2014

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Paul Kendrick Paul Kendrick Boundary Road 3333 Boundary Road Norwich Alan Waters Norwich 64NR6 Heartsease NR6 5JF5JF Lane t: 07714 598755 Norwich t: 07714 598755 NR7 9NS t: 07774 229776

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Sally Button Sally Button Stylman Road 4343 Stylman Road Norwich Norwich NR5 9ET NR5 9ET t: 01603 322107 t: 01603 322107

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Marion Maxwell Marion Maxwell flatflat 44 Benedicts 3737 St St Benedicts St St Norwich NR2 4PG Norwich NR2 4PG t: 01603 615129 t: 01603 615129

Alan Waters Alan Waters Heartsease Lane 6464 Heartsease Lane Norwich Norwich NR7 9NS NR7 9NS t: 07774 229776 t: 07774 229776

David Bradford David Bradford Timothy Close 2020 Timothy Close Norwich Norwich NR1 4NG NR1 4NG t: 01603 437786 t: 01603 437786

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Caroline Ackroyd Caroline Ackroyd Greenways 3030 Greenways Norwich Norwich NR4 6PE NR4 6PE 01603 502429 t: t: 01603 502429

Simeon Simeon Jackson Jackson 3737 Esdelle Esdelle Street Street Norwich Norwich Simeon Simeon Jackson Jackson NR3 3BN 3BNStreet 37NR3 37 Esdelle Esdelle Street t: 01603 t: 01603 670512 670512 Norwich Norwich Simeon SimeonJackson Jackson NR3 NR3 3BN 3BNStreet 3737 Esdelle Esdelle Street t: 01603 t: 01603 670512 670512 Norwich Norwich Simeon Simeon Jackson Jackson NR3 NR3 3BN 3BNStreet 37 37 Esdelle Esdelle Street t: t: 01603 01603670512 670512 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3BN 3BN t: 01603 t: 01603 670512 670512

Amy Amy Stammers Stammers 6 Anchor 6 Anchor Quay Quay Norwich Norwich Amy Amy Stammers Stammers NR3 NR3 3PR 3PRQuay 6 Anchor 6 Anchor Quay t: 07581 t: 07581 231234 231234 Norwich Norwich Amy AmyStammers Stammers NR3 NR3 3PR 3PRQuay 66 Anchor Anchor Quay t: 07581 t: 07581 231234 231234 Norwich Norwich Amy Amy Stammers Stammers NR3 3PR 3PRQuay 6NR3 Anchor 6 Anchor Quay t: t: 07581 07581 231234 231234 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3PR 3PR t: 07581 t: 07581 231234 231234

Mancroft Mancroft Mancroft Mancroft

Lakenham Lakenham Lakenham

Victoria Victoria MacDonald MacDonald Greenways 4848Greenways Norwich NR4 6PE Norwich NR4 6PE 07792 664326 t: t: 07792 664326

Lucy Lucy Howard Howard 8787 Portland Portland Street Street Norwich Norwich Lucy Lucy Howard Howard NR2 3LE 3LE Street 87NR2 87 Portland Portland Street t: 01603 t: 01603 627176 627176 Norwich Norwich Lucy LucyHoward Howard NR2 NR2 3LE 3LE Street 8787 Portland Portland Street t: 01603 t: 01603 627176 627176 Norwich Norwich Lucy Lucy Howard Howard NR2 NR2 3LE 3LE Street 87 87 Portland Portland Street t: t: 01603 01603627176 627176 Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3LE 3LE t: 01603 t: 01603 627176 627176

Vivien Vivien Thomas Thomas 6 Northumberland 6 Northumberland St St Norwich Norwich Vivien Vivien Thomas Thomas NR2 NR2 4EZ 4EZ 6 Northumberland 6 Northumberland St St t: 07916 t: 07916 819213 819213 Norwich Norwich Vivien VivienThomas Thomas NR2 4EZ 4EZ 6 Northumberland 6NR2 Northumberland StSt t: 07916 t: 07916 819213 819213 Norwich Norwich Vivien Vivien Thomas Thomas NR2 4EZ 4EZ 6NR2 Northumberland 6 Northumberland St St t: t: 07916 07916819213 819213 Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 4EZ 4EZ t: 07916 t: 07916 819213 819213

Mancroft Mancroft Mancroft

Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson

Nelson Nelson

Denise Denise Carlo Carlo 213 213 College College Road Road Norwich Norwich Denise Denise Carlo Carlo NR2 NR2 3JD 3JD Road 213 213 College College Road t: 01603 t: 01603 504563 504563 Norwich Norwich Denise DeniseCarlo Carlo NR2 NR2 3JD 3JD Road 213 213 College College Road t: 01603 t: 01603 504563 504563 Norwich Norwich Denise Denise Carlo Carlo NR2 NR2 3JD 3JD Road 213 213 College College Road t: t: 01603 01603504563 504563 Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3JD 3JD t: 01603 t: 01603 504563 504563

Andrew Andrew Boswell Boswell 2323 Havelock Havelock Road Road Norwich Norwich Andrew Andrew Boswell Boswell NR2 3HQ 3HQ Road 23NR2 23 Havelock Havelock Road t: 01603 t: 01603 613798 613798 Norwich Norwich Andrew Andrew Boswell Boswell NR2 NR2 3HQ 3HQ Road 2323 Havelock Havelock Road t: 01603 t: 01603 613798 613798 Norwich Norwich Andrew Andrew Boswell Boswell NR2 NR2 3HQ 3HQ Road 23 23 Havelock Havelock Road t: t: 01603 01603613798 613798 Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3HQ 3HQ t: 01603 t: 01603 613798 613798

Thorpe ThorpeHamlet Hamlet Thorpe Hamlet Thorpe ThorpeHamlet Hamlet

Susan Susan Sands Sands 19C 19C The The Swale Swale Norwich Norwich Susan Susan Sands Sands NR5 NR5 9HE 9HE 19C 19C The The Swale Swale t: 01603 t: 01603 594995 594995 Norwich Norwich Susan SusanSands Sands NR5 NR5 9HE 9HE 19C 19C The The Swale Swale t: 01603 t: 01603 594995 594995 Norwich Norwich Susan Susan Sands Sands NR5 NR5 9HE 9HE 19C 19C The The Swale Swale t: t: 01603 01603594995 594995 Norwich Norwich NR5 NR5 9HE 9HE t: 01603 t: 01603 594995 594995

Thorpe ThorpeHamlet Hamlet Thorpe ThorpeHamlet Hamlet

Lesley Lesley Grahame Grahame 7 Railway 7 Railway Cottages Cottages Hardy Hardy Road Road Lesley Lesley Grahame Grahame Norwich Norwich NR1 NR1 1JW 1JW 7 Railway 7 Railway Cottages Cottages t: 01603 t: 01603 632228 632228 Hardy Hardy Road Road Lesley LesleyGrahame Grahame Norwich Norwich NR1 NR1 1JW 1JW 77 Railway Railway Cottages Cottages t: 01603 t: 01603 632228 632228 Hardy Hardy Road Road Lesley Lesley Grahame Grahame Norwich NR1 NR1 1JW 1JW 7Norwich Railway 7 Railway Cottages Cottages t: t: 01603 01603 632228 632228 Hardy Hardy Road Road Norwich Norwich NR1 NR1 1JW 1JW t: 01603 t: 01603 632228 632228

JoJo Henderson Henderson 7272 St St James James Close Close Norwich Norwich JoJo Henderson Henderson NR3 1NT 72NR3 72 St1NT St James James Close Close t: 01603 t: 01603 622162 622162 Norwich Norwich JoJoHenderson Henderson NR3 NR3 1NT 1NT 7272 StSt James JamesClose Close t: 01603 t: 01603 622162 622162 Norwich Norwich Jo Jo Henderson Henderson NR3 NR3 1NT 1NT 72 72 St St James James Close Close t:University t: 01603 01603622162 622162 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 1NT 1NT t: 01603 t: 01603 622162 622162

University University University University

Ben Ben Price Price c/oc/o City City Hall Hall Norwich Norwich Ben Ben Price Price NR2 1NH 1NH c/oNR2 c/o City City Hall Hall t: 01603 t: 01603 621709 621709 Norwich Norwich Ben BenPrice Price NR2 NR2 1NH 1NH c/o c/oCity CityHall Hall t: 01603 t: 01603 621709 621709 Norwich Norwich Ben Ben Price Price NR2 NR2 1NH 1NH c/o c/o City City Hall Hall t: t: 01603 01603621709 621709 Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 1NH 1NH t: 01603 t: 01603 621709 621709

VACANCY VACANCY VACANCY VACANCY VACANCY VACANCY

Mile MileCross Cross MileCross Cross Mile Mile Cross Ralph Ralph Gayton Gayton 5252 Aylsham Aylsham Road Road Norwich Norwich Ralph Ralph Gayton Gayton NR3 3ES 3ES Road 52NR3 52 Aylsham Aylsham Road t: 01603 t: 01603 466776 466776 Norwich Norwich Ralph RalphGayton Gayton NR3 NR3 3ES 3ES Road 5252 Aylsham Aylsham Road t: 01603 t: 01603 466776 466776 Norwich Norwich Ralph Ralph Gayton Gayton NR3 NR3 3ES 3ES Road 52 52 Aylsham Aylsham Road t: t: 01603 01603466776 466776 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3ES 3ES t: 01603 t: 01603 466776 466776

Sewell Sewell Sewell Sewell

Deborah Deborah Gihawi Gihawi 9696 Eade Eade Road Road Norwich Norwich Deborah Deborah Gihawi Gihawi NR3 3EJ 3EJ 96NR3 96 Eade Eade Road Road t: 01603 t: 01603 499346 499346 Norwich Norwich Deborah Deborah Gihawi Gihawi NR3 NR3 3EJ 3EJ 9696Eade EadeRoad Road t: 01603 t: 01603 499346 499346 Norwich Norwich Deborah Deborah Gihawi Gihawi NR3 NR3 3EJ 3EJ 96 96 Eade Eade Road Road t: t: 01603 01603499346 499346 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3EJ3EJ t: 01603 t: 01603 499346 499346

Sewell Sewell

Julie Julie BrociekBrociekCoulton Coulton 159 159 Angel Angel Road Road Julie Julie BrociekBrociekNorwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3HX 3HX Coulton Coulton t: 07786 t: 07786 694325 694325 159 159 Angel Angel Road Road Julie JulieBrociekBrociekNorwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3HX 3HX Coulton Coulton t: 07786 t: 07786 694325 694325 159 159 Angel Angel Road Road Julie Julie BrociekBrociekNorwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3HX 3HX Coulton Coulton t: t: 07786 07786 694325 694325 159 159 Angel Angel Road Road Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 3HX 3HX t: 07786 t: 07786 694325 694325

Town TownClose Close TownClose Close Town Town Close

Kevin Kevin Barker Barker 190 190 Silver Silver Road Road Norwich Norwich Kevin Kevin Barker Barker NR3 NR3 4TJ 4TJ Road 190 190 Silver Silver Road t: 07515 t: 07515 434500 434500 Norwich Norwich Kevin KevinBarker Barker NR3 NR3 4TJ 4TJ Road 190 190 Silver Silver Road t: 07515 t: 07515 434500 434500 Norwich Norwich Kevin Kevin Barker Barker NR3 NR3 4TJ 4TJ Road 190 190 Silver Silver Road t: t: 07515 07515434500 434500 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 4TJ 4TJ t: 07515 t: 07515 434500 434500

Ash Ash Haynes Haynes 7575 Heath Heath Road Road Norwich Norwich Ash Ash Haynes Haynes NR3 1JW 1JW 75NR3 75 Heath Heath Road Road t: 01603 t: 01603 477885 477885 Norwich Norwich Ash Ash Haynes Haynes NR3 NR3 1JW 1JW 7575 Heath Heath Road Road t: 01603 t: 01603 477885 477885 Norwich Norwich Ash Ash Haynes Haynes NR3 NR3 1JW 1JW 75 75 Heath Heath Road Road t: t: 01603 01603477885 477885 Norwich Norwich NR3 NR3 1JW 1JW t: 01603 t: 01603 477885 477885

Town TownClose Close Stephen Stephen Little Little 5252 Arnold Arnold Miller Miller RdRd Norwich Norwich Stephen Stephen Little Little NR1 2JH 2JH 52NR1 52 Arnold Arnold Miller Miller RdRd t: 01603 t: 01603 622795 622795 Norwich Norwich Stephen StephenLittle Little NR1 NR1 2JH 2JH 5252 Arnold Arnold Miller Miller RdRd t: 01603 t: 01603 622795 622795 Norwich Norwich Stephen Stephen Little Little NR1 NR1 2JH 2JH 52 52 Arnold Arnold Miller Miller RdRd t: t: 01603 01603 622795 622795 Norwich Norwich Wensum NR1 NR1 2JH 2JH t: 01603 t: 01603 622795 622795

Wensum Wensum Wensum Wensum

Paul Paul Neale Neale 6363 Swansea Swansea Road Road Norwich Norwich Paul Paul Neale Neale NR2 3HU 3HU Road 63NR2 63 Swansea Swansea Road t: 01603 t: 01603 477248 477248 Norwich Norwich Paul PaulNeale Neale NR2 NR2 3HU 3HU Road 6363 Swansea Swansea Road t: 01603 t: 01603 477248 477248 Norwich Norwich Paul Paul Neale Neale NR2 NR2 3HU 3HU Road 63 63 Swansea Swansea Road t: t: 01603 01603477248 477248 Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3HU 3HU t: 01603 t: 01603 477248 477248

Wensum Wensum

University University VACANCY VACANCY

Mile MileCross Cross

Patrick Manning Patrick Manning CityRoad Road 5959City Norwich Norwich NR13AS 3AS NR1 07950 260179 t: t: 07950 260179

Town TownClose Close

University University James James ‘Bert’ ‘Bert’ Bremner Bremner 12 12 Morello Morello Close Close James James ‘Bert’ ‘Bert’ Norwich Norwich NR4 NR4 7NF 7NF Bremner Bremner t: 01603 t: 01603 471134 471134 12 12 Morello Morello Close Close James James ‘Bert’ ‘Bert’ Norwich Norwich NR4 NR4 7NF 7NF Bremner Bremner t: 01603 t: 01603 471134 471134 12James 12Morello Morello Close Close James ‘Bert’ ‘Bert’ Norwich Norwich NR4 NR47NF 7NF Bremner Bremner t: t: 01603 01603 471134 471134 12 12 Morello Morello Close Close

Mansfield Lane 2929 Mansfield Lane Norwich Norwich NR12JT 2JT NR1 01603 632320 t: t: 01603 632320

Sewell Sewell Sewell

Nelson Nelson Nelson Claire Claire Stephenson Stephenson 16 16 Merton Merton Road Road Claire Claire Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3TT Stephenson Stephenson 3TT t: 01603 t: 01603 631776 631776 16 16 Merton Merton Road Road Claire Claire Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3TT Stephenson Stephenson 3TT t: 01603 t:Merton 01603 631776 631776 16 16 Merton Road Road Claire Claire Norwich Norwich NR2 NR23TT 3TT Stephenson Stephenson t: t: 01603 01603 631776 631776 16 16 Merton Merton Road Road Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 3TT 3TT t: 01603 t: 01603 631776 631776

Mile Mile Cross Cross Keith Driver Keith Driver

JudithLubbock Lubbock Judith 422 Unthank Road 422 Unthank Road Norwich Norwich NR4 7QH NR4 7QH 01603 504126 t: t: 01603 504126

Brenda Brenda Arthur Arthur 6969 Gipsy Gipsy Lane Lane Norwich Norwich Brenda Brenda Arthur Arthur NR5 8AX 8AX 69NR5 69 Gipsy Gipsy Lane Lane t: 07786 t: 07786 702022 702022 Norwich Norwich Brenda BrendaArthur Arthur NR5 NR5 8AX 8AX 6969 Gipsy Gipsy Lane Lane t: 07786 t: 07786 702022 702022 Norwich Norwich Brenda Brenda Arthur Arthur NR5 NR5 8AX 8AX 69 69 Gipsy Gipsy Lane Lane t: t: 07786 07786702022 702022 Norwich Norwich

Caroline Caroline Brimblecombe Brimblecombe 49 49 St St Benedicts Benedicts St St Caroline Caroline Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 4PG 4PG Brimblecombe Brimblecombe t: 01603 t: 01603 613806 613806 49 49 St St Benedicts Benedicts St St Caroline Caroline Norwich Norwich NR2 NR2 4PG 4PG Brimblecombe Brimblecombe t: 01603 t: 01603 613806 613806 49Caroline 49StStBenedicts BenedictsStSt Caroline Norwich Norwich NR2 NR24PG 4PG Brimblecombe Brimblecombe t: t: 01603 613806 613806 49 49 St01603 St Benedicts Benedicts St St

Wensum Wensum

Lucy Lucy Galvin Galvin Neil Neil Blunt Blunt 1616 St St Philips Philips Road Road 188 188 Dereham Dereham RdRd Norwich Norwich Norwich Norwich Lucy Lucy Galvin Galvin Neil Neil Blunt Blunt NR2 3BL NR2 3AJ 3AJ RdRd 16NR2 16 St3BL St Philips Philips Road Road NR2 188 188 Dereham Dereham t: 01603 t: 01603 477439 477439 t: 01603 t: 01603 387150 387150 Norwich Norwich Norwich Norwich Lucy LucyGalvin Galvin Neil NeilBlunt Blunt NR2 NR2 3BL 3BL NR2 NR2 3AJ 3AJ 1616StStPhilips PhilipsRoad Road 188 188Dereham DerehamRdRd t: 01603 t: 01603 477439 477439 t: 01603 t: 01603 387150 387150 Norwich Norwich Lucy Lucy Galvin Galvin Norwich Norwich Neil Neil Blunt Blunt NR2 NR2 3BL 3BL 16 16 St St Philips Philips Road Road 188 NR2 NR2 3AJ 3AJ B-Me 188 Dereham Dereham RdRd VOICES t: t: 01603 01603477439 477439 Norwich Norwich Norwich t: t: 01603 01603 387150 387150 Norwich

25


THE BRITISH RED CROSS

Refugee Support Services

T

he British Red Cross in Norwich celebrates Refugee Week every year as part of its Refugee Support Project work which provides support to vulnerable migrants. Annually, we mark Refugee Week alongside other leading refugee and asylum charities in Norfolk. The Red Cross has a long tradition of providing practical and emotional support to vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers in the UK. As a leading humanitarian organisation, we often need to respond quickly and effectively to crises. For example, we can support large-scale arrivals or give emergency provisions to those facing severe hardship.

How do we help people? The Red Cross supports refugees in a wide variety of ways, from offering emergency provisions to those facing severe hardship to providing help in settling in their new homes through the provision of support and friendly advice. Orientation -We provide short-term support to help vulnerable and newly arrived refugees adapt to life in a new country. Since many of our trained volunteers are refugees themselves, they speak a wide range of languages and can offer valuable support and advice. Wherever possible, all our information materials are translated into the main refugee languages. Family Reunion -Sometimes people flee persecution in their own country only to find that the country in which they seek asylum cannot offer protection or basic human rights. In such cases, resettlement to a third country is often the only safe option. The Red Cross plays a specific role in bringing around the reunion of families who have been separated around the world, and who have been allowed by the Home Office to join their families in the UK.

26

B-Me VOICES

The story of Therese After her husband was killed, Therese was forced to flee the Ivory Coast and leave her children behind – but now the British Red Cross has helped bring about a very special family reunion. Therese lived with her husband and five children in the West African country until her husband was killed during the Ivorian civil war in 2004. She recalled: “I left my home because of political problems. I tried to carry on for the children – but then more trouble came and I had to leave.” Therese visited the British Red Cross refugee support orientation centre when she was granted indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Throughout her time in the UK, the Red Cross has helped her overcome language and cultural barriers, and provided practical assistance – such as advice on dealing with household bills and a donation of household items – to help her settle in a new country. And after seven painful years spent separated from her children, the Red Cross also helped Therese organise the travel arrangements for an emotional reunion with her children, and provided emotional support on the day. When she first fled the country, Therese couldn’t speak to her children because they didn’t have a phone and she didn’t even have a current address for them. It took a year for her to get a letter – and photograph – to them, and gradually she was able to speak to them occasionally. Shortly before her family arrived, she said: “The youngest was one-year-old when I left – I don’t know if I will recognise them properly. I can’t explain how I feel now, knowing my children will soon be with me. I can’t eat or sleep, I’m just counting the days.” Therese’s family finally flew in to a snowy British welcome arriving at Gatwick Airport, London in December 2013. A joyful Therese said: “The British Red Cross has done a lot for me. I’m so happy – it’s too much!”

Refusing to ignore people in crisis Red Cross Refugee Support-Norwich 11 Prince of Wales Road Norwich, Norfolk NR1 1BD 01603 623041


Do you have a Criminal Record?

T

he Criminal Record Bureau (CBR) has now become the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), following the merger of the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) with the CRB. The DBS is an agency of the Home Office which has since December 2012, taken over all criminal record checks. In the UK, you can find out if you actually have a criminal record. For most people however, a criminal record check is required whenever you apply for a job that involves work with children and or other vulnerable people. A basic CRB check is for disclosure of convictions and cautions only and even then, it is subject to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. After a relevant period, most convictions become considered ‘spent’ and would not be disclosed. A spent conviction is a conviction which, under the terms of the Act, can be effectively ignored after a specified amount of time. The period of time until they are ‘spent’ varies by offence type and the longer the conviction the longer will be the period until ‘spent’. There are however offences that cannot be spent. For example, if you have received a prison sentence of more than four years, the conviction will never become spent, but cautions become spent immediately (apart from conditional cautions which will become spent after three months).

Who sees the certificate?

There are two types of checks -

From 2013, the check results are sent to the applicant only and not to their potential employer. This will give you the opportunity to challenge any information in the certificate, before your potential employer sees it. Although your employer will be the one to request a DBS check on you upon a successful job application, they can withdraw a job offer if the results show anything that would make the applicant unsuitable

1. Standard – an employer can ask for a standard DBS check if the position you are applying for involves regular work with children or vulnerable adults. 2. Enhanced – An employer can ask for this type of check if the position you are applying for involves greater contact with children or vulnerable adults or for jobs connected to security and the law. For example, teachers, doctors, social workers, medical students, and some other professions will need an enhanced check. The DBS certificate will show records of criminal offences linked to your name which could include, police cautions, reprimands and final warnings. Information relating to mental health is unlikely to be appropriate for disclosure on its own. An employer can also check if you have been barred from working with children or vulnerable adults. Most people will be barred only if they have committed a very serious crime and if they have worked, are working, or might work in the future in a regulated activity. In some cases, you can put forward your views to the DBS to dispute being barred.

You can find out what information the police hold about you by making a Subject Access Request, under the Data Protection Act 1989. The Data Protection Act allows you to access information that is held about you. You should put your request in writing. There is a standard form that you can request from your local police force. Story collated from different web sources.

B-Me VOICES

27


issues of immigration and populationare arehotly hotly TheThe issues of immigration and population debated affect how people treatedatatwork workand and debated andand affect how people arearetreated in our communities. Trade unions speakupupforforworking working in our communities. Trade unions speak people. That means protecting wagesand andconditions conditions people. That means protecting wages from being undercut. It also means supportingworkers workers from being undercut. It also means supporting when they are being exploited by employers and gangmasters. when they are being exploited by employers and gangmasters. So we have a duty to arm trade union representatives withthe the So we have a duty to arm trade union representatives with facts on population and migration. facts on population and migration. booklet tries bridge the gulf betweenhow howpeople peoplethink think ThisThis booklet tries to to bridge the gulf between the population of our region is made up and how it really is. the population of our region is made up and how it really is. It challenges scaremongering andracist racistviews viewsofofsome some It challenges thethe scaremongering and groups and newspapers. groups and newspapers. We take for granted our freedom to travel. Migration brings We take for granted our freedom to travel. Migration brings economic benefits and the richness of economic benefits and the richness of diversity but it can unsettle people. People diversity but it can unsettle people. People least likely to meet a migrant are most least likely to meet a migrant are most likely to believe the scare stories. We likely to to believe thethe scare We and need address fearsstories. with facts need to address the fears with facts the problems with solutions. I hopeand this thebooklet problems with I hope this helps do solutions. that. booklet helps do that. Megan Dobney Megan Dobney Regional Secretary, the TUC in London,

62%

10

th

%

O

er

17% Study

There are many universities and colleges in London, the South East and the East of England with a world class reputation. 184,355 students paid to study in the region in 2011-12, 19% of the student population. Nine of the UK’s top recruiters of international students in 2012-13 were universities in our region.

The most common non-UK born residents in The most common non-UK born residents in our region come from India, Poland, Bangladesh, our region come from India, Poland, Bangladesh, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa, Germany, USA, France Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa, Germany, USA, France and China. and China. English is the first language of 92% of the resident English is the language of 92% of the resident population of first England and Wales. Only 138,000 population of England and Wales. Only 138,000 people resident in not main language English main language people in English English not main language English main language Englandresident and Wales 8% 92% England and Wales 8% 92% in 2011 did not Speaks English . . . in 2011any didEnglish not speak Very well Well Some English Speaks English . . . speak 1.6 million 726,000 Verymillion well Well Some English 1.7 at all. any English 1.6 million Doesn’t speak 726,000 1.7 million English at all. 138,000 source: ONS from BBC

60

WORK 56.5 million 31.1 million

visits to the UK by overseas residents

source: ONS

has the highest proportion of foreign-born residents in the EU. England ranks

5.5 4.2

761,000

British nationals resident in Spain but estimates put the true figure up to

1 million

foreign nationals in England and Wales

Older people tend to migrate to Spain whereas younger – and fitter – migrants come here. Despite health insurance and UK charges, the British cost Spanish health services some

€ 300 million a year.

9th

7 Source: SERTUC

B-Me VOICES

Luxembourg

1 10

3

Almost in British citizens live overseas. million The majority live in Australia, Brits Spain, the US and other abroad compared English-speaking nations. to Like migrants who come here, most go to work. There are at least million

The Brits are poorly integrated into Spanish society. A survey of 340 British migrants in Málaga, found that one third rarely or never met Spanish people, apart from in shops and restaurants, and that 60 per cent did not speak Spanish well.

source: UKCISA, UK Tourism Survey 2010

28

Doesn’t speak English 138,000

source: ONS from BBC

The main reason for migration is WORK. especially in jobs at the top and bottom of the labour market. Health % professions, IT, food production, construction, services and care are 54 % UK nationals sectors where most migrants work.

visits abroad by UK residents in 2012

4

Born abroad abroad and Born and resident residenthere here

Comings and goings Family 8%

reality reality % %

source: IPPR, ONS source: IPPR, ONS

Regional Secretary, theEastern TUC inRegion London, the South East and the South East and Eastern Region

Seeking work 5%

experience,but buton onnewspaper newspaper experience, scare scarestories storiesand andgossip. gossip. Myths Mythshave havefar farmore morepower power than thanthe thetruth. truth.

perception perception

source: ONS Census 2011, European Commission, ESRC

Truth, Truth,lies lies and andmigrants migrants

Opinionpolls pollsshow showthat thatpeople peopleare are Opinion share share of confused about population and confused about population and migrants migrants migration.Strong Strongopinions opinionsare are migration. asylum asylum seekers formed,based basednot notupon uponlife life formed,

3


Time in Immigration detention by Nayanah Siva

C

oncern has been rising about the state of immigration detention centres in the UK following the release of several reports. Abdul Khan pressed the emergency button again. It was after 6 am and his roommate Muhammad Shukat was groaning in agony, clenching his chest, and sweating profusely—he had collapsed for the second time that morning. Nursing staff came in, unlocked the door to the small window-less room, picked Shukat up, put him back in his bed, took his temperature, administered medication, and left the room. After three separate similar visits by nursing staff and ten different frantic calls of the emergency button by 19-year-old immigration detainee Khan, an ambulance was called at about 7·20 am—nearly 2 hours after Khan’s initial call for help. Paramedics attempted to resuscitate Shukat but the 47-year-old was pronounced dead on arrival to hospital. His body was flown from the UK back to his family in Pakistan. This was Kahn’s account of a tragic morning at Colnbrook immigration detention centre, Middlesex, UK, at an inquest in 2012. Serco, the company that manages the Colnbrook centre, and the Home Office’s UK Border Agency (UKBA), have said that all recommendations from the inquest have been implemented. But people working and researching health care in immigration detention centres in the UK are troubled that things are not getting better, and that more concerns are being highlighted over time. With refugees and asylum seekers representing some of the most vulnerable people in society, with the majority of them fleeing ruthless conflict in their home countries, there is evidence that the process of detention itself can further damage their health. Many people many may have a history of torture, rape, or mental ill health, and a substantial number of people will have been separated from their family. In the past year, concern has risen about asylum seekers with a history of being tortured being unnecessarily detained, and this breaking Rule 35 of the 2001 Detention Centre Rules. A report by Medical Justice—a charity that supports the health rights of immigration detainees—published in May, 2012, states that “Rule 35, which should prevent torture victims being locked up in all but very exceptional cases, is routinely flouted”. In their investigation of 50 asylum seekers (36 men and 14 women) who were detained between May, 2010, and May, 2011, all reported some history of torture—16 had been raped in their home countries. 43 individuals cited past torture during their screening, on their statement of evidence form, or at interview, and yet only one person was released due to the Rule 35 process. “It [Rule 35] sounds wonderful in

principle but is blatantly and repeatedly not working in practice to protect vulnerable people from detention and the Chief Inspector’s report of these various centres repeatedly highlights the failures of these centres to implement this practice and we have asked UK borders to audit this”, said Juliette Cohen, head of doctors at the non-governmental organisation, Freedom from Torture. “UKBA insist that they are learning lessons, but have not been able to say what their mechanism is for that”, explained Sabina Dosani, consultant psychiatrist and medical adviser for Medical Justice. There is Home Office are not taking the issue of immigration detention seriously. In the past year, there have been three separate High Court judgments that found that three asylum seekers with mental illness were unlawfully detained in immigration centres in the UK. In one case, the High Court judgment found that Serco, by shackling a detainee in hospital for 8 days (including while using the toilet, showering, and during medical consultations), subjected the man to “inhuman and degrading treatment”. Over the years, concern has been expressed about the detention of children and families, and finally the family wing at Yarl’s Wood detention centre in Bedfordshire was closed. Although the closure has reduced the number of children being detained, some disturbing issues still remain. Emma Fillimore, a consultant paediatrician and designated doctor for children in care in Nottingham, points out that she knows several children who have wrongly been considered as being more than 18 years of age and are being held in detention centres. “The physical health of young people who have been through detention is often of great concern. I have recently assessed and treated at least two young people who were found to be under 18 years old. Both clearly gave a history of seizures that they had had since childhood with previous medication use. Neither had any medication whilst in detention and both developed significant seizures without any medical help. Another young person had clinical presentation of AIDS with positive HIV screen identified by our health team, but he had not been identified in detention…he missed 4 months of treatment whilst in detention”, she says. Children are not the only vulnerable people affected by the poor quality of

health care in immigration detention centres. A 2011 HM Inspectorate of Prisons report of Yarl’s Wood detention centre stated that “too many pregnant women, who should only have been held in exceptional circumstances, were detained”. Miriam Beeks, a volunteer doctor with Medical Justice, “There were a lot of women in detention who had mental health problems, who were pregnant.” She also talks of three pregnant women with HIV, of which “two had missed medication”. Furthermore, “in two cases removal was attempted before they had the results of the viral load to show that the treatment was being effective in pregnancy”. Clearly several problems still exist with the quality of health care in immigration detention centres in the UK despite the publication of several critical reports by charitable organisations and the Inspectorate of Prisons over the past few years. “It’s not like this is a prison population where there is a punitive reason for justifying the detention”, says Cornelius Katona, Medical Director at The Helen Bamber Foundation, a human-rights organisation based in the UK. “In contrast with imprisonment, the only justification for immigration detention is administrative. One can perhaps understand the rationale for detaining people who would otherwise abscond. Pregnant women are at very low risk of absconding. The evidence is that the majority of pregnant women who are detained are in any case subsequently released from detention.” A 2012 House of Commons report— Rules governing enforced removals from the UK—made several recommendations to the Home Office with regards to restraining detainees. The report also noted that there was a high level of evidence of detention staff using racist language in front of UKBA staff and the HM Inspectorate of Prisons. “It is possibly the result of a relationship between the Agency and its contractors which had become too cosy”, stated the report. A Dec 12 joint report by the inspectors of prisons and immigration stated that there was insufficient evidence for detention in about a quarter of cases. The inspectors also highlighted their concern over the number of people who were detained for lengthy periods of time. In the first quarter of 2012, 3500 people were being detained in immigration detention centres but more than 40 people had remained in detention for more than 2 years. Nick Hardwick, Chief Inspector of Prisons, and John Vine, Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, said: “Despite much effort at improving the system, it is questionable whether the length of detention in some cases was necessary or proportionate to the legitimate aim of maintaining immigration control.” Serco refused to comment for this piece and the Home Office declined a request from The Lancet to visit any of their immigration detention centres. Source: The Lancet

B-Me VOICES

29


www.NEAD.org.uk 30

B-Me VOICES

Looking Forward to

2015

Youth Groups &

After School E T C Clubs FOR

NEW 5 201

Ages 11 – 19 Develop communication skills, building, team working & problem solving FREE training & resources for youth leaders Adaptable – delivered to your time frame Compatible with Norfolk Youth Awards FREE outdoor trip, optional – Hautbois Hall, Barton Turf or How Hill

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E

BME VOICES

xtracts of BME Voices from Mind UK Mental health crisis care briefing paper for Clinical Commissioning Groups March 2013- “Commissioning excellence for Black and minority ethnic groups.”

• I’ve been in crisis so many times and none of the mental health people know it... Because they just don’t listen to me... I wish they could hear me say I’m in crisis without me saying those words... But they won’t because they’re never around long enough to get to know me and my signs.

• Encourage more social and interactive activities run by exinpatients. Because it brings hope and solidarity when you see people who have been in the same situation facilitating creative activities in the hospital.

• Staff do not know about how racism can affect one’s mental health and generate a crisis.

• When I am ill my health deteriorates fast. Within two days. There is no longer any emergency response. Just routine referral. This means you get worse than necessary before getting help.

• I have lived in the UK long enough to know that majority of the people are good, so I refuse to let the few bad ones change my positive view about my life in the UK.

THE BRIDGE PLUS+ VOICE

M

anaging a voluntary sector organisation during these hard economic times is one of the biggest challenges for any organisation big or small. We take this opportunity to share the following targeted thank you messages. • To Love Norwich, on behalf of our beneficiaries, we would like to say a big thank you for your generous donation of Christmas hampers which went to some of our most disadvantaged families in Norfolk. They all walked away with big smiles! “I was not expecting anything from anyone and this will be something I will always remember.” Said one beneficiary. • To Norfolk Community Foundation, the managers of the different small funding pots which enabled us to be able to

continue to provide the needed support to BME communities in Norfolk, from organising community lunches, to providing BME voice representation at strategic levels and for supporting our business continuity needs. • To Norfolk County Council, as recipients of the Living Well Health Partnership Fund, we were able to organise an end of year healthy eating community lunch fashioned along our trademark Community Cuisines events. Over 30 people were in attendance and many felt that that was their Christmas celebrated with the only families they may have around. • To Norfolk County Council for the Workforce Forward Grant which enabled us to provide further training to our staff and volunteers’ and to the County Planning, Performance

& Partnership team who continue to support our development needs. • To the British Red Cross for your continued commitment on humanitarian matters. We are aware of several beneficiaries who have said thank you to you through us. We hereby extend their unheard gratitude. • To New Routes for the use of the Norwich Social Centre and the ongoing partnership work we have been developing together. • A big thank you to all our magazine article contributors and page sponsors for believing in the difference that such a medium can make in reaching all members of the diverse communities. • Finally a special thanks to all our committee members, staff, and volunteers without whom there will be no Bridge Plus+

B-Me VOICES

31


The NHS would close before breakfast if it wasn’t for the work of migrant doctors, nurses and other staff

Migrants and the NHS You are far more likely to be treated by a migrant worker than meet one in the waiting room. Migrants use the NHS less as they tend to be younger and fitter than UK nationals

In the NHS, and community health sector, 11% of all staff are not British, 14% of all clinically qualified staff are not British and 26% of all doctors are not British.

18 hospitals alone earned

£42m in 2010 from

source: The Guardian

overseas patients

£

A8 migrants pay

34%

If Polish people and other ‘A8’ migrants went home, it would cost us

more in than take out in services source: University College London 2008/9

22 billion source: OECD Report

forced to admit “no evidence” for “benefit tourists” story:

52,000 came to the UK for treatment and spent £219m on hotels, transport,

shopping, etc

63,000 travelled to hospitals and clinics abroad source: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and York University 2010

10

Being born abroad doesn’t mean foreign Many people born abroad are UK citizens. We are Norwich The top countries where British citizens were born

Poland (1)

Croatia

Romania (1)

Bulgaria

Lithuania

Slovakia

Hungary

Finland

Czech Republic

Slovenia

Portugal (1)

Netherlands

Malta

France

Denmark

Sweden

United Kingdom

Italy

Greece

Ireland

Germany

Belgium

Austria

Spain

Estonia

Latvia

Cyprus

Luxembourg

EU-27

40 include Germany, Ireland, India and The English Defence League announced its intention to march in South Africa, a legacy of Britain’s past role around Norwich in the summer of 2012. In response the local community the world. 30 formed ‘We are Norwich’; a diverseCitizens coalition of trade unions, of non-member countriestrades councils, politicians, individuals, anti-racists, anti-fascists, Citizens of other EU Membercommunity States 20 groups and faith groups. Over 25 groups and hundreds of individuals pledged their support. When 200 EDL supporters did march in 10 city, in November 2012, ‘We are Norwich’ organised a peaceful the counter-demonstration of 2000 people, who rejected the politics of hatred and came out to defend their city’s reputation. Subsequently 0 ‘We are Norwich’ has continued to work to build community cohesion. It has produced an information leaflet about migrant workers. It has sought to welcome migrants to Norwich and to celebrate and build multiculturalism, through events featuring music, food and arts.  

(1) Provisional source: Eurostat (online data code: migr_pop1ctz)

50

Whatmany do you think? Born or abroad? Here here or abroad? How did you know?

Boris Johnson Boris Here c Johnson Abroad c Here c born in Abroad New York

Duke of Cliff Helen Ed Ashley Joanna Edinburgh Richard Mirren Miliband Cole Lumley Duke of Cliff Helen Ed Ashley Joanna Here c Here c Here c Miliband Here c Here Here c Edinburgh Richard Mirren Cole c Lumley Abroad c Abroad c Abroad c Abroad c Abroad c Abroad c Here c Here Here c Here Here Here born in born c in Born Ilyena born c in bornc in bornc in Abroad Abroad Abroad Abroadson Abroad Greece Lucknow, Vasilievna London, London Abroad Srinigar,

a

Source: SERTUC

32

B-Me VOICES

a

a

India

a

Mironov in London

a

of Jewish refugees

a

a

India

Saint David Nick George Cameron Clegg Saint David Nick Here c Cameron Here c Here c George Clegg Abroad c Abroad c Abroad c Heresaint c bornHere c Here Patron London born in Abroad c descendant Abroad Abroad of England Buckingwas born in of King on hamshire Answers page 19

a

East Turkey

a

William IV

a 5 19


Your rights as unmarried fathers WHAT IS PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY AND DO I HAVE IT? When a baby is born, his or her mother automatically gets Parental Responsibility (PR). PR is a legal term which means ‘all the rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and authority’ that go with being a parent. It is a duty to care for and protect a child. As a dad, you automatically get PR if: • You are married to the baby’s mother • Your baby was born after December 1st 2003 (when a new law was introduced), and you are named as his or her father on the birth certificate. If you fall into one of those categories, then you won’t need to worry about applying for PR. If your situation is different, or you want further information about PR, read on to find out more. WHY DO I NEED PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY? You don’t need PR for your day-to-day role as a dad. Most of the time you wouldn’t even think about it - you and your partner probably make the small, everyday decisions together about how your child is brought up. However, PR does give you the legal right to be consulted about the big decisions in your child’s life. And that stands until he or she reaches the age of 18. Among other things, PR allows you to: • give consent to medical treatment for a child • choose which school he or she goes to • apply for a passport for him or her • choose his or her religious upbringing • decide where he or she will live • consent to his or her marriage if he or she wants to marry before turning 18 • look after a property on his or her behalf For many families, PR simply confirms, by law, the way they view themselves - as a secure unit. In tragic circumstances, it can be a very important thing to have. If the child’s mother were to die, for example, having PR would make you the obvious person to look after the child and be the legal parent and guardian. Although the court would almost certainly favour you in this situation, it is not guaranteed. Sometimes other relatives apply for PR, and things can get complicated. If you and your partner are living together as if you were married, sharing PR probably seems like the right and natural thing to do.

I HAVENT GOT PR AT THE MOMENT. HOW DO I GET IT? If you are the child’s natural father, PR can be obtained by: • marrying his or her mother • making a PR agreement with his or her mother • re-registering his or her birth - ensuring that you are named as the father on the birth certificate • applying to the court for an order (if the child’s mother has refused to make an agreement with you, or you’re unable to add your name to the birth certificate). HOW DO WE MAKE A PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY AGREEMENT? You will need one form for each child which you find on the HMCS website. You will have to sign the forms at the Family Proceedings Court, or a County Court. Alternatively, you could go to the Principal Registry of the Family Division in London - the address is on the form. Make sure you take the correct documents with you. These are listed on the form. If you can’t find your child’s birth certificate you will need to get a replacement. Once you have signed the forms you must send two copies of each to the Principal Registry. Provided everything is in order, the Registry will record the agreement, stamp the forms and send them back to you. There is no fee for this. HOW CAN WE CHANGE OUR CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE SO MY NAME IS ON IT? If you’re the child’s natural father and you want your name to be added to the birth certificate, you will have to re-register his or her birth. CAN I APPLY FOR PR WHEN I AM NOT THE CHILD’S REAL DAD? If your partner has a child already and you play a big parenting role in his or her life, you probably feel that this should be formally and legally recognised. So yes, it is possible for you to apply for PR. And because PR can be shared by more than two people, there’s nothing to say you can’t have PR for a child whose natural father also has PR. This can create separate, personal problems which will need to be resolved. To get PR for your partner’s child, you’ll need a ‘residence’ order from the court. This says that the child’s home should be with you, and it gives you PR as well.

APPOINTING A GUARDIAN If you don’t manage to get PR, or you decide not to apply for it, you may be worried about what would happen to your child if his or her mother died. If your partner thinks it would be better for him or her to live with you, she needs to appoint you as his or her legal guardian. Read our article on writing a will for more information. IF WE SPLIT UP, DOES HAVING PR MEAN I HAVE TO PAY MAINTENANCE? Child Support and PR are not connected. They are set out in separate laws. All parents (either by birth or by adoption) have a duty to support their child financially, whether or not they have PR. PR has no effect on the amount that you can be made to pay. DOES HAVING PR MEAN I HAVE THE RIGHT TO SEE MY CHILD? No - that’s a separate issue. PR does not give you extra rights, or strengthen your claim for contact with your child if you and his or her mother ever decided to split up. CAN PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY BE TAKEN AWAY FROM ME? Yes, but only by a court. I’M A MUM. AM I GIVING SOMETHING AWAY IF I SHARE PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITY WITH THE FATHER OF MY BABY? No. Your rights as a parent aren’t reduced if you share PR but the law does expect that both parents will, wherever possible, make joint decisions about their child’s future. MY PARTNER’S PREGNANT AND WE’RE NOT MARRIED. HOW DO WE SHARE PR? As long as you’re named as the baby’s father on his birth certificate, then you will get PR. Source: http://www.consumeruk.co.uk/32.asp

B-Me VOICES

33


A Day at Carrow Road with Norwich City BME Footballers

34

B-Me VOICES


Fines issued to parents for taking children out of school during term time.

M

ore parents are being fined for taking their children out of school without permission since the government tightened rules on term-time holidays. According to a BBC finding, almost 64,000 fines have been issued since the law changed in September 2013, a rise of about 70%. Norwich Evening News reported that previously, head teachers could grant up to 10 days leave in a school year in “special circumstances”, but since September government regulations have said no term-time leave is now allowed unless there are “exceptional circumstances”. It went on to further share that ,there have been concerns that some parents are tempted to book holidays during school time because they are often cheaper than those during school holidays. Under the scheme, local authorities can issue fines of £60 for unauthorised absences, increased to £120 if it is not paid on time. Norfolk County Council said it issued 11 fixed penalty notices in autumn term 2013, compared to just one in the same period the previous year. The head teacher of Thorpe St Andrew School, said the school did not want to target fines at parents who only took pupils out of school on holiday, but could if this was combined with persistent absences.

The school however meets with parents and pupils to set targets to improve on the problem. Fines, he said, would only be considered as a last option. Hewett School said it did not use fines, but there are reports of parents elsewhere sending in holiday request forms with a cheque attached to cover the cost of a fine, suggesting families consider the fines to be cheaper than expensive trips during the holiday periods. Story collated from different internet sources

How to say welcome in several languages

B-Me VOICES

35


Please use NHS services wisely

Need urgent health care

when your own GP Practice is unavailable?

Call 111 for the right help, whatever the time

1 minute*

Pharmacists can help with many conditions

Under 5 minutes*

Walk-in Centre Timber Hill Norwich 9am-7pm, 7 days a week

Pharmacy

28 minutes* * average/estimated waiting times

B-Me Voices issue 3-winter 2014  
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