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Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 7 Winter 2016

Free in Norfolk

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 6 Summer 2016

B Me

Voices

Leontina from Congo I AM A SURVIVOR

Free in Norfolk Issue 6 Summer 2016

Issue 6 Summer 2016

B Me

Voices

Alberto from Guinea Bissau BOOK LAUNCH

B Me

Voices

£1 Donations elsewhere

Free in Norfolk

£1 Donations elsewhere

) Magazine promoting diversity A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME

Salah from Egypt – ADVENTURES OF A REFUGEE A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity

A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity

Also in this issue:

Arrested & Deported after a night out clubbing

Norwich United against Arson Attack on Romanian Shop

…with stories about Brits abroad, the Filipino Community and Congolese Community celebrate… A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


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EDITORIAL

Summer has already gone by, the people have decided, and the United Kingdom still remain with the Queen still at the helm of things, albeit we still in but on the way out of the EU. I personally know a lot of people who are not happy with the Brexit results. But I also know a lot of people who did not vote. And now that the UK is home to many of us, voting and making sure our views are heard is the only way to ensure that our views count. So please vote and respond to consultations if you want to make a difference. Don’t let others decide for you!!! In this issue we bring you three inspiring stories of resilience and determination shared by Leontina from DR Congo, Salah from Egypt and Alberto a Portuguese national from Guinea Bissau. For each of them, life must go on regardless. Life is a journey through which we learn lessons but some we should not learn the hard way. So for the attention of all fellow new comers to the UK, please read page 13 about how people can easily get into trouble while out with someone they thought liked them. At pages 24-25 we share a list of BME community groups we have managed to identify through an ongoing mapping exercise. If you get to the page and did not see your group listed, get in touch. Domestic violence is a serious problem and especially for people from BME communities, most of whom are from cultures where it is not considered a crime. I urge victims not to suffer in silence. We understand that a person’s immigration status may be one reason why they would not like to report domestic violence, but there is help out there. Contact us as we are involved and linked to the network of support services that can help you. Throughout the magazine, we use quotes and statistics relevant to BME people which we credit to trusted sources available on the internet. You can always access the online version of this magazine at http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk/ And until the next issue, we would welcome and appreciate your comments, feedbacks and support. Sincerely

Pa Musa, i7! Contact: office@bridgeplus.org.ukI

INDEX

4. Leontina – I am a Survivor 5. Salah –Adventures of a Refugee 9. Changes in Immigration Rules 10. Lord Mayor’s Parade 11. Police & Crime Commissioner Consultation 12. Alberto’s Book Launch 13. Arrested & Deported 14. Congolese Community Celebrate Independence Day 18. Norwich in Solidarity with Migrants event 27. Employment & Benefits Update 28. Brits Abroad 33. Philippine Community Celebrate

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Leontina from Congo –

I am a survivor

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eontina was born in Kolwezi, an important city in mineral rich region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. She was a working in the big hospital when the war started. Living was dangerous in Kolwezi, because there was lots of fighting. Her husband was a soldier and he was killed, and many friends and family members too. Leontina herself suffered as a person from the Katangan region, and was tortured in her village. She showed the scars on her body, which still caused her pain. She was finally forced to leave the village, with her two older boys, Serge and Francis, and her baby Luiza. Four younger children were in school at the time, and Leontina still has no idea where they are or what happened to them. She is asking for help from the Red Cross to trace and find her children. Dead or alive she would like to know. Then began a terrible time for Leontina and her children, fleeing for their lives, and seeking help and shelter from other people also traumatised by the barbaric war. There were dangerous snakes in the forest, searching helicopters overhead and there were scared people who were so terrified of the military, that they drove her and her children onwards, dodging the soldiers and their guns, afraid that Luiza’s crying would give them away. There was no milk for the baby, and Leontina had no food herself. Her wounds caused her great pain and slowed their progress through the jungle. It was a time of great suffering, which she remembers with anguish. She and her family were given help at last, a boat across the river, the path to a village of nomads and their cows, and then finally, the road to Zambia. A Roman Catholic priest took them to an immigration post in Zambia, where they were questioned, along with many other refugees, and to whom Leontina told her story at last. They spent 3 days in detention, while enquiries were made at the UN, and then finally the family were taken to the camp at Mwenylunga, where Leontina and Luiza were taken to the hospital, to receive treatment for her neglected wounds and the baby’s malnutrition. The UN took care of Serge and Francis. The family were there for six months, recovering, and then were taken to the camp

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at Maheba. Here their life began to settle down a little. Among the hundreds of other refugees, it was noisy and chaotic and Leontina cried every night. There was dysentery in the camp. However, the refugees received counselling from US trauma healers, and the UN and the Catholic church tried to make sure that they had what they needed – food, clothes and schooling for the children. Widows like Leontina were visited and asked what they needed. There were tribal and language problems in the camp. Leontina settled with people from Angola, in their part of the camp. Gradually, life settled down for Leontina and her children. They built a house, with help from their neighbours, and after two years, she was given the responsibility of a plot of land to grow maize, potatoes and cassava. Regardless of the relative safety in the camp, she was still always afraid of what might happen, and of meeting soldiers from the Congo among many visitors to the camp. During her life in the camp, Leontina had training as a community health worker, and worked in the small camp clinic. She was also trained as a midwife by the UN. Her friends Elizabeth and Shalla were working with her. They taught midwifery skills in the camp, with the help of the YMCA. Leontina found herself travelling to other camps with her medical skills, and she always took as well, a message of peace to share. She had a responsible position in the camp, with the UN trusting her

with money to find the children most in need of food and schooling. The World Food Programme visited the camp, using Leontina’s help to group the refugees according to language and culture, and then provided flour mills for each community. Leontina had the job of distributing food and blankets and helping with the camp orphanage and adult education centre and of course the vegetable garden. Finally, in 2008, the UK government in collaboration with the UNHCR, offered Leontina the chance to come to the UK to resettle permanently, and she did. Life in Norwich was very different from Zambia, and not just the cold weather! Sadly, the family had to endure racism and insults when they arrived but she never gave up, as she had been through worst. Leontina sometimes feels very homesick and sad. And it took her time to come to terms with the fact that the houses in Norwich are so close to each other. It took her a while before she found a job and settled. Now however, we are very glad that she is a vibrant and cheerful part of our Bridge Plus community, and a regular visitor to the office and our community lunches. We are all very glad that Leontina is here in Norwich , and we join with her to give thanks to God that she came here, and we pray that here in this “good country” (her words) she will find peace. Leontina’s story, as told to Frances Middleton, a Bridge Plus+ volunteer, November 2016


Adventures of a refugee by Salah Elnagar from Egypt These extracts are taken from a series of articles by Salah Elnagar and will form part of a book to be published by him in the near future called, This is What I Saw; The Adventures of a Refugee. Thoughts on the meaning of Homeland There are not enough lines, or even pages, to write about homeland; the meaning of which includes the entire universe, the simple and the complex. Home is the first breath of life, it is an identity. It is a beloved, who relieves my wounds and pain, and gives me peace, sun and air. The homeland of most people is their home town, the place of childhood, youth and adulthood, where their loved ones reside. Human life does not exist without a homeland protecting it, by offering various services such as education and health. A sense of belonging to a particular country is a natural instinct of man. The home is a place that educates the human, and imprints beautiful pictures in their mind: mountains, seas, rivers, sand, loved ones. Grandparents talk about the ruins and poets write about it. When you leave, and the borders keep you a thousand miles away, we leave behind our years of love and good times. Or we take all these recollections with a tremor of joy, a moment of sorrow; we are touched by melancholy…. This is the Meaning of Homeland. Appointment with Education… (from a visit to University of East Anglia-UEA) The purpose of higher education, in many countries, is as a measurement of the nation’s progress. Trailblazers for invention and discovery, universities are the means by which ideas become concrete and eventually benefit civilisation. Universities, then, are my place of worship; they are my mosque, my church, my temple. My prayers there, address the true origins of God: science, not ignorance. ….The Ancient Egyptians believed in science and translated this belief into creating a big civilization. We don’t know the religion of the workers who built the pyramids but we know the minds and hands were full of science. So I say and repeat to you, make science the symbol of your life. Humans are social beings, and contact is one of the most important bases of human life. The acquisition of knowledge, experience and culture only occurs by contact with one another and interaction between communities. This principle is advocated by civil and religious structures alike…..The Lord of all beings decided that we are all equal brothers and sisters, the issue of but one father and one mother despite our differences; and the Lord has made us differ in colours and languages in order to learn about each other, not to fight and destroy each other. My child says we should fight against terrorism, extremists and the enemies of

humanity with rockets and bombs. I tell him, no, no my child, the war with terrorism, rockets and bombs is not a solution; they increase problems and create more wars and fighting. My child asks me, “Ok, what is the solution?” I reply: “Peaceful intellectual war against extremism”. My child asks again, “How can we use this war?” I reply, “Europe suffered during World War One and World War Two, from racial discrimination and nationalism. And because of this racist war, millions died and countries were destroyed completely”. In the aftermath, all this changed with the European belief of freedom and human rights, because behaviour, aims and ideas replaced wars and weapons. Thinkers and creators should fight against terrorism with peaceful thought, awareness, and the principles of human rights, and governments should support them. The war with terrorism will produce more terror and destruction, which is not a solution at all. Appointment with Work…. (from a working visit to Grange farm with New Routes) I was to work in the garden, planting seeds. I welcomed the idea because I have missed the earth and because I have experience of agriculture, having inherited it from my father who was a farmer. I was shown the seed store to take seeds to be cultivated. I was asked, “Do you want gloves?” I did not, because I missed the touch and smell of mud, which would bring back sweet memories of digging as a child. Life is full of sweet and bitter memories and I wanted to keep hold of the sweet ones. I wanted my hands to be embraced by the mud, hoping that my giving of seeds and water would one day be reciprocated with flowers, fruits and plants. He was shy about asking me to do a heavier task, but I smiled and said “my friend, work is work”. Work is an essential part of human life, which gives people status, and the feeling of being part of society. The ancient civilizations undoubtedly did not come out of nowhere, but were the result of hard work.

Appointment with Life….. (from a group visit to Beccles, Norfolk) On arrival by bus, we were brought to a large building in the town, called The Friends Meeting House. Here we found some people waiting for us, who welcomed us, and everyone took a seat. They asked us our names, and brought us some tea with biscuits. We also discussed the fact that it was St George’s day. Two elders, Quakers, came and asked us where we are from. Most of us were from Sudan and Eritrea. The man spoke about the poor situation in Africa, particularly Sudan and Eritrea, and how many had suffered from religious persecution. He also asked, “Have any of you suffered this persecution?” No one answered him. I said to myself: “... for the purity of our journey, we do not talk about religion now. Religion in its true meaning is morality, science, work, reform, justice, mercy, faithfulness and assistance. What you and those who organised the trip are doing, with humble affection, is the essence of religion and truth done with a pure heart.” Later, we made our way to a small boat ready for the trip on the broads, and when I saw the boat and the water, I remembered my painful and bitter experience with the boat and the sea, my mind shook and my body shuddered! The arduous trip to Europe through the Mediterranean Sea took five days and one night, in the dark of the raging sea. Five days of anxiety, insomnia, fear and grief. For five nights I did not know the taste of sleep, I closed my eyes but my ears stayed awake listening to the motor of the ship and the collision of the waves. Insomnia was killing me and I thought “I do not know what tomorrow will bring, will I even see tomorrow? Or will I be food for the hungry fish?” My second experience was in the English Channel between France and England after three months of serious attempts, great effort and fictional adventures like James Bond, Arnold Schwarzenegger or Sylvester Stallone! My lucky night came on the 14th October 2015. I was an unwelcome guest in a lorry on the ship. I stayed thirty six hours, lying still, sharing a one metre by two metre box with one other person unable to move an inch. Our eyes wide open, alert to the movements of the lorry, we had to mute our breathing in order to avoid the sniffs of the dogs. Eventually, we heard the announcement on the ship that we’d arrive in ten minutes. We shook each other’s hands with happiness as if we’d won a prize. I didn’t want my adventures to be famous, on TV, or given an Oscar. Also, I didn’t want money in my bank account. My goal was the greatest prize of all: liberty and security, a crown that should be on everyone’s head. Freedom is the greatest thing that God granted humans, but its true meaning is unknown until lost, as I had experienced in my country.

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Affordable Highest Quality Immigration Advice Services • We are regulated by the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) and we have over twenty years of experience providing highest quality immigration advice services. • You can talk to one of our immigration specialists anytime convenient for you. • We strive for excellence in client care and we look after our clients’ interests as if they were ours. Feedback from our clients speaks for itself. • We operate a fixed-fee policy so you know from the start what your final bill will look like. Sackville Place, 44-48 Magdalen Street, Norwich, NR3 1JU Tel: 01603 927676 Fax: 01603 927879 info@angliaimmigration.co.uk www.angliaimmigration.co.uk

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Our immigration lawyers are ready to guide you through the UK immigration legislation and procedures concerning any immigration, asylum, humanitarian protection application or appeal: • Points Based System (PBS): Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 4 and Tier 5; • Family Visa Applications: Spouse, Partner, Fiancé(e), Children, Parents and other dependent relatives; • Visit Visa Applications; • EEA Applications: EEA family permit, EEA family member residence card, EEA permanent residence; • British Citizenship; • Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK; • Refugee and Humanitarian Protection Applications, Including Fresh Claims; • Immigration and Asylum Appeals.


Changes in Immigration Rules THIS IS A VERY BRIEF SUMMARY, PLEASE SEEK LEGAL ADVICE. • 2012 July

Before this date, all spouses/partners were issued with visas for 2 years after which they can apply for permanent residency. It was also possible then for spouses/partners who have been together for 4 years outside the UK to be given a Permanent Visa straight away. All of this has changed. Everyone now gets a 2½ year visa, followed by an extension for another 2.5 years, and are only give a permanent visa after 5 years.

• 2012 July

Family Life Visa, from this date on, people who do not meet the spouse/partner visa requirements but have a child in the UK, may now be able to successfully apply for a Family Life visa issued for 2½ years, followed by successive 2½ extensions and after 10 years, a permanent residency visa.

• 2015 April

The Immigration Health Surcharge was introduced to all immigrants except EU national and people from Australian and New Zealand.

• 2015 November

EEA Naturalisation - EEA nationals applying for naturalisation must first have obtained Home Office confirmation of their EEA permanent residence and have held that for a year before they can apply. This is an extra bureaucratic hurdle but may make the eventual citizenship application more straight forward.

• 2016 January

Naturalisation and Return of BRPs – from this date on, migrants who have naturalised as a British citizen and have been issued with a naturalisation certificate must now cut up and return their Biometric Residence Permit (“BRP”) to the Home Office within five days of the individual receiving their naturalisation certificate or face a fine of up to £1,000

• 2016 February

Right to Rent - all private landlords in England will have to check new tenants have the right to be in the UK before renting out their property.

• 2016 March

The threshold at which cumulative debts to the NHS constitute a general ground of refusal of a visa has been lowered from £1000 to £500. Which means people who owe an NHS bill of £500 can now be refused a visa.

• 2016 April

The “points based calculator” will no longer exists and has been replaced by UK NARIC qualification conversion.

• 2016 April

Immigration Health Surcharge is to be extended to Australians and New Zealanders who must now pay the Immigration Health Surcharge if they plan to spend more than six months in the UK, or if they are applying from within the UK to extend their stay.

• 2016 October

Applications can now be refused if a litigation debt is owed to the Home Office

See them online at:

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www.mudekatribe.co.uk Or pop along to the Bond Street shop in Hingham

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Our Domestic Violence Advice & Advocacy (DV-AA) Project is aimed at: • Raising awarenes about Domestic Violence in BME (black and minority ethnic) communities • Supporting BME people in increasing their confidence in reporting DV • Developing a BME Specialist Domestic Violence support service in Norfolk • Tackling cultural barriers to dealing with Domestic Violence • Ensuring the safety of victims by providing confidential advice and advocacy support

Please contact us if: • You are/know of a victim and you not sure how to get help and support • You are worried about going to the authorities e.g. Police • You are worried about your immigration status • You want to know more because everyone deserves a Volience-Free Life

Call: 01603 617 076

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email: office@bridgeplus.org.uk


Equality & Diversity images and quotes

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The Bridge Plus+ raising awareness about Domestic Violence at the Lord Mayor’s Parade in Norwich on the 2nd July 2016

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Would you pay an extra 8p per week to help fund your policing service?

J

ust six months into his term, Lorne Green is preparing to make one of the biggest decisions for which Police and Crime Commissioners are responsible – setting the policing budget. Before he takes his budget proposals to the Norfolk Police and Crime Panel early next year, he wants to hear what our county’s residents think. Launching the annual police budget consultation at a public meeting in Great Yarmouth, the Commissioner invited people to share their views on whether or not they would support a rise in the policing element of the council tax they pay. “As Police and Crime Commissioner, it’s my job to set the policing budget for Norfolk”, Lorne said, “and, with it, how much Norfolk people contribute through council tax. “Less than 60% of our policing budget is funded by the Government; the rest comes from tax payers. With such a significant contribution coming from their pocket, I’m sure all Norfolk residents will have an opinion on how that funding is used.” Norfolk’s policing service faces an estimated budget gap of £3.5 million in 2017/18. The maximum council tax increase the PCC can consider is around 2% – equating to an extra eight pence per week or £4.23 a year, for a household in a Band D property. Each 1% council tax increase generates £0.6 million, so a 2% increase would reduce the budget gap to £2.3 million. “The consultation for my Police and Crime Plan found that, while people understand the financial pressures on our Constabulary, they want to see improvements in their police service. They want the police to be more visible in their local area and to engage better with communities. They also want more efficient investigation of crime and for the most vulnerable in our society to be protected. All of this poses

additional challenges in the context of austerity and the current financial outlook. “I applaud our police force for having made £30 million of savings in the last six years. I think we can still do more. The fact remains, however, that efficiency savings will only go so far. “The Chief Constable has stated categorically that, without a council tax increase, he will be left with no choice but to make further cuts to service, which will very likely affect neighbourhood policing. “I know how important neighbourhood policing is to the people of Norfolk so I’m reaching out for their views to help me make my budget decision.”

Have your say

The four-week consultation period will close on Friday 9 December. For more information and to have your say via the online survey, visit www.norfolk-pcc.gov.uk. You can also share your views with the PCC by telephone on 01953 424455, by email to TellLorne@norfolk.pnn.police.uk, or by writing to OPCCN, Building 8, Jubilee House, Falconers Chase, Wymondham, NR18 0WW.

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ALBERTO’S

BOOK LAUNCH The Guinea Bissau Portuguese Community in Norwich welcomes the launch of the first poetic book in their native “Creole” language.

B

-Me Voices witnessed the Portuguese community of Guinea Bissau ethic origin united in support of one of its own at the book launch by Alberto Coiaté. This book of poetry according to the author was inspired by his days working in the construction industry. According to Alberto, during his lunch breaks, he would be asking himself serious soul searching questions about what brought him to Europe. It was as a result of those questions and conversations he has been having with other immigrants, which further encouraged him to putting his thoughts into writing. Each proud member of the community bought a copy of the book, which one of them see as an opportunity for their children to keep up with the language. Easy to ready and suitable for children was another comment made. The book speaks of Guinea Bissau and indeed African culture. Below is a written response the author provided: “Contan kin ki bó”, the book title, in Portuguese means, “tell me who you are”. It is the first book of poetry in Creole by the Guinea Bissauan journalist Alberto Coiaté published in Norwich in July 2016 The launch event was attended by dozens of Guineans, Cape Verdeans and the representative of Minority Ethnic communities in

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Norwich, Mr Pa Musa. Alberto was born in Guinea Bissau where he did his primary and secondary education. He immigrated to Portugal in 2001 due to political situation in his country. He holds a degree in Communication Sciences and Culture at the Lusófona University of Humanities and Technology of Lisbon. His past work life included being a journalist and at some point working as a correspondent for Reuters News Agency in Guinea Bissau. The economic crisis and unemployment in Portugal forced him to look for new horizons. Keen to work, he moved to Norwich in July 2011 to exercise his Treaty Rights as an EU citizen to work and live in the UK. In the UK, Alberto changed a few jobs, but has always been in employment, before finally settling in his current job. Married and father of three children, Alberto dedicates his free time writing and looking after his family. “This book is my own aspiration and it was a surprise for a lot of people including my work colleague who did not see it coming. I’m already preparing the second edition in Portuguese and English, and if all goes well next year we will have the new edition,” he said. Alberto continues to work and live in Norwich and see this beautiful city as his future home.


Police & Community Safety Newsflash to happen is to be accused of rape, being arrested and deported. • Does “Right to Rent” check equals to Right to Discriminate? Has the government in effect given landlords the right to discriminate against visible minorities? Since February 2016, the government required all private landlords in England to check if new tenants have the right to be in the UK before renting out their property. This scheme requiring private landlords to check prospective tenants’ immigration status will make it harder for people with every right to be in the UK to find a place to call home, says Chartered Institute of Housing policy adviser John Perry.

• Jailed and deported after a night out clubbing. Your immigration status will not prevent deportation action if you are convicted of certain serious criminal offences. Be Aware and Be Warned!! We are aware of at least two people who have been jailed and then deported after a night out clubbing. Both individuals were accused of rape after meeting a girl in a club, and woke

up in a bed together the next morning only to be accused of rape. Do not be the next victim of a date rape case. Many young immigrants new to British culture have made poor judgment which cost them dearly. Just because a girl is being nice and smiling does not mean they want to sleep with you, especially if they appear drunk. Don’t learn the hard way and don’t be the next victim of a date rape. After a nice night out, the last thing you expect is

• Racial Prejudice. One third of Britons ‘admit being racially prejudiced’ - Nearly a third of people in Britain admit being racially prejudiced, research has suggested. The British Social Attitudes survey found the proportion had increased since the start of the century, returning to the level of 30 years ago. Some 30% of the 2,000 people polled by social research company NatCen described themselves as either “very” or “a little” race prejudiced. Penny Young, chief executive of NatCen, said the findings were “troubling”. The survey also found wide variations currently across the country: 16% of people in inner London admitted to prejudice but the figure was 35% in the West Midlands.

Police Stop and Search data for Norfolk APRIL 2015 – MARCH 2016 The police conducted 5,838 stop and searches under PACE Section 1 across the area covered by Norfolk Constabulary. This was a reduction of 43% from the previous year. There were 45 stop and searches under Section 60 Criminal Justice & Public Order Act, a power which doesn’t require individual reasonable suspicion.

APRIL 2014 – MARCH 2015 The police conducted 9,461 stop and searches under PACE Section 1 across the area covered by Norfolk Constabulary. This was a reduction of 29% from the previous year. There were 0 stop and searches under Section 60 Criminal Justice & Public Order Act, a power

Who is getting searched? Black people were stopped and searched over 8 times the rate of white people; this is up from 7 times in 2014/15 and represents a two-year consecutive increase. People from mixed or Asian backgrounds were searched at approximately double the rate of whites. Those from White, Chinese and ‘other’ backgrounds were the only groups under-represented in searches. In 2013/14, a total of 22,340 recorded stop and accounts were carried out across the force. Of these 494 were of blacks. This means that blacks were encountered at 4.3 times the rate of whites, Asians at 2.1 times that rate, mixed people at the same rate as whites, and those from Chinese or Other backgrounds were accounted at 0.7 times the rate of whites. The Policing Accountable Officers for Norfolk are: Mr. Lorne Green (Conservative), Norfolk Police & Crime Commissioner & Mr. Simon Bailey, Norfolk Police Chief constable. Source: StopWatch, a coalition of legal experts, academics, citizens and civil liberties campaigners.

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Congolese Community Celebrate Independence Day

Chairman Mr. Odon Kasera of Norwich Congolese Community Group

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The Late Mr Harold Bodmer

T

he late Mr Harold Bodmer was the director of adult social services at Norfolk County Council. He suddenly died at age 61 on the 20th July 2016. Harold was born in Bulawayo in Zimbabwe, where he did his early education before moving to England in 1977. He will be deeply missed in the community.

DID YOU KNOW,

DOS & DON’T • 33 million people visit the UK, bringing in over £22 billion to the economy

• All iPlayer users, on all devices, must now own a TV licence, regardless of whether or not they watch programmes live • British people text more than any other people in Europe • Almost half (45%) of young people are checking their mobile phones after they have gone to bed, a poll suggests. A survey of 2,750 11- to 18-year-olds found one in 10 admitted checking their mobile phones for notifications at least 10 times a night. The poll was carried out by Digital Awareness UK and the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference. • In a BBC one programme “The Truth about dementia”, it was stated that speaking a second language delays dementia. It also shared that 40 million Brits speak only one language. • You may know already or tend to forget that there are four countries in the UK with different laws. • It is reported that more women in their 40s are having more babies than the under 20s for first time. Find our more online… • Drunk before going our clubbing, you could be refused entry. This policy was introduced in Norfolk back in November 2013. The police have provided door staff with breath tester to monitor and refuse entry to anyone found to be already drunk. • A father is claiming the government’s new rules on school absences breaches his child’s right to participate in family life. The father was fined by the council after he took his child on a holiday to the USA during school term, without permission from the school. He won the case at the High Court. According to his solicitor, “This decision has provided much needed clarity for parents…, …, it gives parents the freedom and comfort to continue to take their children out of school during term time provided that they have secured regular attendance on the whole.” (Story widely reported using key search words online). • “Revenge Porn” law came into force on 13th April 2015. The 2015 act created a new criminal offence of revenge pornography, by making it a criminal offence to disclose private sexual photographs and films without the consent of an individual who appears in them and with the intent to cause the individual embarrassment or distress. The offence applies to both online and offline images which are shared electronically including the uploading of images on the

internet, sharing by text and e-mail, or showing someone a physical or electronic image of another person. So Be Aware B4 You Share!! And Be Warned!! (Story widely reported using key search words online). • Migration Observatory analysis of 2014 data found that 43% of British nationals who are employees do not earn enough (£18,600 minimum set by the Home Office in July 2012) to be able to bring/sponsor a partner/spouse or family member to join them in the UK. The figures are higher for people in lower incomes, such as women (57% not eligible), young people in their twenties (60%) and ethnic minorities (51%). Ironically, EEA citizens living in the UK do not have to meet the income requirement if they want to bring in their non-EEA spouse. Source: https://fullfact.org/ Full Fact is the UK’s independent fact checking charity. • BME inequality is real, and it’s time to fight, that’s according to Graham Scott, Editor of Nursing Standard magazine. The same editorial article also stated that: A Nursing Standard survey of 50 NHS organisations across the UK found there are BME nurses aplenty on the lower pay bands, but rather thinner numbers higher up the career ladder. In 19 of the trusts and health boards, there were none on pay band 8 at all. A generation or two ago, there were arguments that staff from BME backgrounds lacked the experience to progress. That case was always thin, and it is nonsense now. The only reason ambitious BME staff fail to climb the ladder nowadays is discrimination – intentional, institutional or otherwise. Source link: http://journals.rcni.com/doi/pdfplus/10.7748/ ns2014.01.28.22.3.s1 • All ethnic minority groups have a higher trust in Parliament and politicians in general than the White population, except the Black Caribbean community where only 1 in 5 trust politicians. Trust in the police is high among all communities except Black Caribbeans, with only 42% saying they have faith in the police. • All minority groups have higher proportions of students staying on in formal education, especially university, at 16 and 18 than the White population. All minority groups have higher proportions of students attending Sixth Form and then staying in some form of education post A-levels than the White population. Bangladeshi are the fastest improving group at Key Stage 5 (GCSE) and 70% of Indian students go to university, compared to 43% of White students. • All BME communities – regardless of age and social class - strongly support the Labour Party, but Indians are up to four times more likely to identify with the Conservatives. 17% of Indians identify with the Conservatives compared with 4% of Black Africans, 7% of Black Caribbeans, 8% of Bangladeshis and 9% of Pakistanis.

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Come and work with us Recruitment Agency

Whether you are looking for a full-time, permanent post; part time work or hours which fit in with your other commitments, we would like to hear from you. Feel free to contact our friendly team for an initial chat about Compkey.

Are you looking for a new job? Something satisfying and rewarding?

Please call us on 01603 762318 and leave a message with your contact details; visit our website www.compkeyhealthcare.co.uk to find our job application form, or email us on admin@compkeyhealthcare.co.uk

CompKey Healthcare’s major aim is to provide and deliver high quality of personalized care based on the philosophy of commitment, competence, caring and compassion. These are values that will drive and motivate the organisation to deliver an individualized, person centred service which respects dignity, independence, autonomy and privacy of the service user and the skills and experience of our multi-cultural staff.

Compkey Healthcare Ltd, Office 16, Charing Cross Centre, 17-19 St John Maddermarket, Norwich NR2 1DN. The Management Team – L to R - Sue Gee, Humphrey Moyo, Vaida Moyo

If you are a compassionate, caring person then Come and join us! Compkey Healthcare has vacancies for full-time and part-time Care Staff, experienced or inexperienced.

We can offer you:• Competitive rates of pay and benefits • Induction and training • Uniform and protective clothing provided • Regular and consistent work • Fortnightly pay • Holiday pay, expenses • Pension scheme

2016-2017

Norfolk Model Calendar

This calendar applies to community schools, community special schools, VC schools and nursery schools and sets the days on which school transport will be provided. While most Foundation, VA, foundation special, free schools and academy trusts who are able to set their own dates, adopt the Norfolk Model, we advise you to check with your child's school before making holiday or other commitments.

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B-Me VOICES

Five staff training days will be selected from yellow dates, we suggest 1 & 2 September and 4 January and two others of the schools choice. Some may choose to use twilight hours for staff training instead of some or all of these


• A third (32%) of BME people report experiencing either a moderate amount or a lot of discrimination from within their own communities because of their mental health. There is little variation across the groups with Caribbeans at 35%, Africans at 31%, Indians at 36% and Pakistanis/Bangladeshis at 29%. • A third (32%) of respondents say they are treated less favourably, either moderately or a lot, by their own communities as compared to the general population, because of their mental health issues. There is clearly an urgent need for more work to address the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental ill health. • Three quarters (73%) of BME people report having experienced some form of racial discrimination. Worryingly, more than a quarter (28%) have experienced it in the past 12 months. This should be of concern to everyone.

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Solidarity with Norwich Migrants @City Hall

Katy

George

Pa Musa

Your presence here today has proven to me, and I hope for the many immigrants, that we are welcomed here….fact is, we were all once strangers before.

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Migration comes in many forms: refugees, students, highly-qualified professionals, people setting up new productive lives and people doing menial jobs at rock-bottom wages under dreadful conditions. There are those who came sixty years ago, like me, and those just arriving freshly and those packed into the jungle in Calais. We are various. We have various faces and names and histories.

The UK and, indeed, East Anglia have long traditions of immigration. We currently have some 8 million foreignborn people in the UK, about 1-in-8 of us. But, more than that, many of us, if not recent migrants, have Roman, Viking, Norman, Saxon, Dutch, African, Caribbean or Indian ancestors. Ironically, Brexit Boris Johnson has Turkish and Franco-German ancestry and was born in the USA…, …we live in a global community…,. It is community cohesion and communication we need to build to counter fear, hate, and prejudice. In the 16th century, Norwich welcomed Dutch and Flemish ‘Strangers’, till they made up a third of our population, bringing new skills that enhanced our then status as England’s second most prosperous and prestigious city. Before that, back in the 12th century, Norwich was 7% Jewish but after the killing of a teenager, posthumously to become St William, that was falsely blamed on the local Jews, and so began the Blood Libel. A persecution and killing of Jews that spread across East Anglia and to Europe, from our fine city of Norwich. By the end of the 13th century all remaining Jews had been expelled from Britain. …, slavery, empire, and commonwealth’s, often coerced, contributions to wars, trade, and labour, mean that Britain’s success owes a moral debt to people from around the world. Economically we have, and continue to thrive on, migrant people’s hardworking and entrepreneurial spirit. Economic studies show that immigration is a net benefit, that immigrant people are more likely to be in work or starting their own trades, paying tax, and not claiming benefits, than people of longstanding British heritage.

Pa Musa of Brdge Plus+

George Szirtes, former UEA professor & writer

Leader of Norwich City Coumcil, Cllr Alan Waters

Marcia X is a Afro-Latinx visual Mo Ameen artist and writer from Chapelfield Mosque

Rebecca Tamas, Event organisaer from UEA

The Daughter of Romanian Shop owner with Katy Jon Went

Annie Henrique form Liberal Synogue

Dr Becky Taylor of University of East Anglia

Timothy N Hughes

Samantha Rajasingham

B-Me VOICES

Katy Jon Went

Fern Richards


following Arson Attack on Romanian Shop

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UK Government Structure & The Royal Family Tree

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Asian Bazaar

Specialised in Indian, African, Caribbean, Chinese, Thai, Philippines and Sri Lankan Groceries • Fruits & vegetables • Frozen meat, Fish, Chapatis, Pastry and ready to eat Products • Pickles, Sauces, Curry Pastes and delicious snacks • Chilled Drinks, Dairy Products, and Indian Sweets • Herbs, Spices, Beans, Lentil • Oil, Rice & Flour • …and lots more in store… Home Delivery Provided Car Parking (limited space) We are located in the most diverse street of Norwich accessible to all public transport, and within walking distance of all major spots around the city centre. Contact us:

Asian Bazaar

43 Magdalen Street Norwich NR3 1LQ Manager: Shaju Joseph Land Line - 01603 665 917 Mobile - 07737 129 612

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WISE WORDSs, WITs & HUMOURS

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I AM A REFUGEE Chol’s Story

“It was something like an accident when I ran away from my village. We were playing at about 5 o’clock when these people, the soldiers, came. We just ran. We didn’t know where we were going to, we just ran. The soldiers divided into two groups; one for the village, one for our herds of cattle. My brother helped me to run. We didn’t know where our mother and father were, we didn’t say goodbye. When there is shooting, when you hear BANG! BANG! BANG! You don’t think about your friend or your mother, you just run to save your life. I didn’t see the soldiers, I just heard the shooting, the screaming and the bombing that went DUM, DUM, DUM, DUM like this and killed many people. It all just happened like an accident, and we ran without anything – nothing – no food, no clothes, nothing.” Source: Sybella Wilkes

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Directory of BME Community Organisations in Norfolk

Open Letter to All: You may be aware that The Bridge Plus+ publishes a list of BME community groups in Norfolk on our website and in this magazine which is distributed throughout Norfolk-in all the 47 Libraries, GP Practices, NHS offices and at key community hotspots, at events and in selected voluntary and statutory sector organisation offices. This list has continued to generate a lot of interest from different sources. Our aim is to further develop the list to include all categories of groups, registered or not, big or small, formal or informal, or any community support networks linked to people’s nationality, religion or culture. As a result, since July 2016 we have embarked on conducting a mapping exercise of BME community groups in Norfolk. We sent out questionnaires, email, and conducted interviews with the main contacts of several community groups. I am happy to say that during the period leading to the publication of this issue, we have identified over 45 active BME groups/organisations/association, as listed on the next page. Over 95% of the groups have returned our entry form providing detailed information which will be published in full on our website and in a separate report which will be publicly accessible. Our ultimate goal is to put together a comprehensive DIRECTORY of BME (Black/Asian and Minority Ethnic) Communities in Norfolk and possibly beyond. This list is not exhaustive and this will be an ongoing exercise. We would like to welcome and encourage more groups around Norfolk to complete the entry form below and return to us by email or post. Entries are also welcomed from key community contacts/individuals who are known to have a strong network of contacts to people from a particular nationality, culture and or religious background. We may have already been in touch with some of you, but if you are involved with or you know of such a community group, association, organisation, individual or network, we would like to hear from you. Your inputs will greatly assist us in presenting a clearer picture of BME communities in Norfolk. Please feel free to pass this message around and don’t hesitate to contact me should you have any questions.

Below is the information we would need for group entries: 1. Name of Group (if any): 2. Brief History/Profile (Date founded + Aims, Objective & Services provided): (200 words max) 3. Management committee (number of people involved, if any): 4. Membership (how many people involved or are reached by group): 5. Members are mainly: (1) Male/Female/both; (2) Religion (3) Nationality (4) Young 6. What kind of events does your group organise: 7. Main challenges for the group: 8. Main contact person (if applicable): 9. Telephone: 10. Email: 11. Website: 12. Facebook: 13. Address We expect the benefit of the directory to include, but not limited to the following: To raise the profile of BAME community groups in Norfolk “be known”; To serve as a reference document for organisations/funders interested in supporting/engaging BME communities in Norfolk; Identifying particular ‘communities’, as well as groups, key community contacts because some communities may not be represented by a group. Yours sincerely, Pa Musa Respond to: office@bridgeplus.org.uk or call 01603 617 076

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B-Me VOICES


List of BME Community Organisations in Norfolk All of the groups listed below have provided detailed information except for three which have been verified to be active and their details were sourced from/or obtained at their direction from information already within the public domain such as websites and other social media sites. Our new web based list which will be made available soon, will be designed with a built in interactive search function.

BME led Organisations/Groups 1. AFROLUSO – Portuguese Dance Group in Great Yarmouth 2. Bethany Tamil Church - faith based serving the growing Indian and Sri Lankan community 3. Bulgarians in Norwich & Norfolk (BNN)

25. Norwich United Karate – Congolese Youth support group 26. One Love United Football Club – Young BME footballer support network (reforming) 27. OTTO Norwich & Italia a Norwich – Italian Community support network 28. Polish Community Support Network – Nauczanie Jezyka Polskiego Thetford (Learn Polish in Thetford) 29. Saudi Society Club of Norfolk – 30. Shiite Muslims: Al-Mustafa organisation for Education – faith based support network 31. Sikh Temple: Gurduwara Shri Guru Ram Das Prakash Norwich – faith based support network

4. Community of Namibians in Great Britain (CNGB)

32. Society Alive – Nigerian led African Community Support Network

5. East Anglian Bangladeshi Islamic Centre (Norwich) – faith based support network

33. Sudanese Community network

6. Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk (EMA - in Great Yarmouth)

34. Tambai Promotions – African music & dance group

7. Filipino Association of West Norfolk

35. The Bridge Plus+ – info, advice support organisation to promote equality & diversity

8. Filipino Community Group in Norwich – PINAS (Pinoy in Norwich Aksyong Samahan)

36. The Neesa project – Muslim Women’s support network

9. Gambian African Network (GAN)

37. UEA Islamic Centre (Norwich) – faith based support network

10. Ghanaian (Gyenyame) Norwich Residents Group 11. Hala’s House 2 Home – Arab Speaking support network 12. Living Waters Pentecostal Fellowship – Zimbabwean Led faith based support network 13. NAGO (Norfolk Alliance Gender Organisation) – focused on FGM 14. Nepalese Community Network 15. Norfolk Congolese Association (NOCA) 16. NORFRESA (Norfolk French Speakers Association) 17. Norwich and Norfolk Hindu Cultural Society 18. Norwich and Norfolk Muslim Association aka the Dereham Road Mosque - faith based support network 19. Norwich Association of Malayalese – (NAM) Indians 20. Norwich Chinese Community Centre (NCCC) 21. Norwich Congolese Community Group 22. Norwich Gambian Women’s Network 23. Norwich Ihsan Mosque aka Chapelfield Mosque – faith based support network 24. Norwich Liberal Jewish Community (NLJC) – faith based support network

38. WORD Trust International – Widows & Orphans Relief and Development Trust 39. Zimbabwe Community Association of Norfolk (ZIMCAN)

Non-BME Led providing support to a majority BME community population 40. Amnesty International (Norwich Group) 41. City Saints In Action 42. GYROS – Great Yarmouth Resettlement & Orientation Services 43. KLARS (Kings Lynn Area Resettlement Support) 44. New Routes Integration Project 45. Norwich Asylum Seekers and Refugees Forum (NASREF): a multi-agency support network of organisations 46. Norwich International Youth Project (NIYP) 47. Ormiston Families at HMP Norwich Compiled by The Bridge Plus+ a Norfolk based black/Asian and minority ethnic (BME) organisation. Tel 01603 617 076 or office@bridgeplus.org.uk

B-Me VOICES

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COMMUNITY

CUISINES a selection of images

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B-Me VOICES


Employment & Benefits Updates!! Have you found work? This is great news but beware, it is your responsibility to let the council and other agencies know about your CHANGE OF CIRCUMSTANCES. If you were on benefits such as Job Seeker’s Allowance (JSA), Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) or Income Support before you got a job, it is very important that you tell your Local Authority (Norwich City Council, South Norfolk District Council, Broadland District Council etc.) that you are starting work. If you don’t, there is a risk that they pay you more Housing Benefit than what you are entitled to and they may ask you later to pay back the overpayment. So, as soon as you have started work, let your Council know and bring your first payslip(s) to them as soon as possible so that they can recalculate how much Housing Benefit you can get.

If you do not tell them about a change, for example, you’re working more hours or someone has left or moved in, you may be paid too much and HRMC will ask you to repay the overpayment once they have been informed of the change(s). Sometimes, it may be that you could get more help than you do if you informed these agencies about what has changed in your life!

Minimum wage. Just a reminder that since April 2016, the national minimum wage (now called National Living Wage) for anyone who is 25 years old and over is £7.20 per hour.

Lower Benefits cap reduced from £26,000 to £20,000. Since November 2016, the maximum amount that households outside London in which no one works at least 16 hours per week can receive in certain benefits, has been reduced. It is now £20,000 per year (or £384.62 per week) for couples or for single parents with children living with them. Key benefits taken into account for the calculation of the cap include Housing Benefit, Job Seekers Allowance, Income Support, and Child Tax Credits. Personal Independence Payments (PIP) – previously Disability Living Allowance (DLA) are NOT included. It is most likely that those who will be affected will see their Housing Benefit (or Local Housing Allowance) cut.

Do you receive Child and/or Working Tax Credits? Do not forget to keep HMRC informed. HRMC is Her Majesty Revenues and Customs and they manage Tax Credits claims. If your family circumstances change (for example: you had a baby; one of your children has left full time education; you were single parent and now you live with your partner, etc.), or your working hours or income change, you need to tell them as soon as possible after the change has happened. This is because the amount of money paid to you varies according to each family’s circumstances.

Bulgarian Community Club back in action

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or three years now, the Bulgarian community club has been inactive because we could not find a suitable venue to meet. We use to meet at The Bridge Plus’ community centre located at the Blue House on Muspole Street, but then they had to move out due to lack of funding. However, since October 2015, the Bulgarian club has been back in action with 13 pupils who are learning the Bulgarian language. The tutor is Violeta Vladova. In addition, the club have started two English classes. One in Norwich which started in November 2015 with the support of tutor David Street, and another in Wymondham, steered by tutor Galya Clark since March 2016.

By Galya Clark

The Bulgarian Club also continues to organise its annual national celebration events and every year we continue to participate in the Festival of Cultures event in Norwich.

Bulgarian school

We are currently running afternoon classes once a week which take place at Heartsease Lane Methodist Church every Sunday, says Violeta Vladova. The number of students fluctuates between 8 and 12 children per session and they are of different ages. Violeta also underlines that she really enjoys teaching children to read, write and speak Bulgarian, because it is important to keep their mother tongue alive and help them build their cultural heritage.

The English course

According to the tutor David Street, about 20 students are registered for the English classes, but that the average attendance is about 14-15. The students have made good progress, and have become more confident in their speaking.

B-Me VOICES

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Number of EU citizens living outside their home country

EU Member States

Brits abroard in the EU

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Trying to understand the root causes of UK political parties and their position towards Immigration Summarised by Sue Mackey (of The Bridge Plus+) Original article by Kenan Malik entitled ‘Diversity and immigration are not the problem. Political courage is’, Sunday Observer 5.4.15), attempts to untangle the complex causes of why immigration has become such a high profile issue.

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ccording to Malik, multicultural policies started in the 1980s in response to anger within minority communities created by racism. A new strategy of designating specific organisations or community leaders to represent different ethnic or cultural groups was devised in an attempt to make Britain a “community of communities”. Often the most conservative figures came to be accepted as the authentic voices and over time, a more insular sense of identity evolved, often further alienating other groups, particularly the youth. The failure of these policies to promote better integration, has led many to blame diversity itself as the problem. The root cause of the political divide on immigration policies, is not necessarily old-fashioned racism, it comes more from a deeper sense of fear and insecurity about working class identity in Britain today. Over the past three decades, the combination of a declining manufacturing industry, crumbling of the welfare state, coming of austerity, increased inequality, erosion of trade union power and distancing of the Labour party from its working class base, has damaged the social bonds that once provided strength, identity and status for them. The result has been described as the creation of the “left behind” working class who now feel politically abandoned and without a voice. Many have come to feel and express this marginalisation more as a cultural loss, rather than acknowledging the economic and political causes. And once class identity comes to be seen as a cultural feature, then those who are culturally different have come to be seen as a threat and cause of all their problems. Build up to the 2015 elections - When former prime minister, Tony Blair was brought back to the campaign

trail, he urged the Labour leader Ed Miliband to ‘stand up’ and take on Nigel Farage. He said Mr Miliband had to ‘stand firm’ in the face of growing demand and ignore pleas from within his party to take a tougher stance on immigration. Mr Blair said swinging to the right on Europe and immigration would only ‘confuse’ Labour voters. Mr Blair added that Mr Miliband had to be ‘prepared to stand up, to lead, to take them on’ and ‘confront and expose reactionary forces’. He said to allow a trend of ‘anti-immigrant feeling’ would be a ‘huge mistake for the country’. Mr Blair’s warning was echoed by the veteran Tory Cabinet minister Ken Clarke - who also lashed out at UKIP for pandering to anti-immigration rhetoric. Mr Clarke accepted immigration needed to be ‘controlled’ but added

that Britain needed foreigners to help the economy. He added: ‘We need some people to do jobs that British people somehow can’t be persuaded to do.” Malik stated that most politicians today still defend multicultural policies but his article suggests that what we need is to defend diversity and immigration, while challenging failed multicultural policies of the past. He also recommended engaging with the concerns of far right voters to challenge their prejudices. Will any politician have the courage and vision to do this, Malik asks, this remains to be seen. At the time of publishing this article in the B-Me Voices Magazine, the UK has voted to exit the EU, Donald Trump is Presidentelect of the United States of America, and we are yet to know what “Brexit means Brexit” really means.

EU Citizens Living in the UK: What you can do

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f you are an EU citizen living in the UK, these are worrying times. The BREXIT referendum on 23rd June 2016 has led to uncertainty about what the future holds for you. For the moment the UK is a full member of the European Union (EU) and participates in the European Economic Area (EEA). The UK is also bound by EU arrangements with Switzerland. Until the UK leaves the EU, which will be months if not years after it has triggered the Article 50 (of the Treaty on European Union) procedure, EU rights of free movement continue. There is time in which periods of UK residence may be built up on the way to securing a right permanent residence here. While there is no guarantee that if the UK leaves the EU, such rights will be respected, it is still sensible to do what you can to entrench your position. Analyse your position and prepare, if necessary, seek legal advice.

There are a number of key things you ought to think about doing: 1. RESIDENCE DOCUMENTS: Get UK Home Office residence documents if you do not have one EU/EEA nationals exercising EU/EEA free movement rights in the UK may apply for a Registration Certificates, family members from countries outside the EU/EEA may apply for Residence Cards. – If you do not have, or have not applied for, residence documentation, you may be worse off, if and when the UK leaves the EU. Remember also that residence documents are only evidence of a right, they do not confer it; you will have an EU right of residence because of what you do, not because you have the Home Office document. 2. PERMANENT RESIDENCE: Check to see if you have acquired the EU right of permanent residence in the UK and if so apply for a Permanent Registration Certificate (EU citizens/EEA nationals) or a Permanent Residence Card (non-EU/non-EEA family members). – Those people who have acquired documents recognising permanent residence may be better off than those who have not, if and when the UK leaves the EU.

Seek Legal Advice

Article Source: http://nationality-migration-blog.tumblr.com/post/150066733162/eu-citizens-living-in-the-uk-a-self-help-guide

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Myth Busting

5 Facts about immigration that may surprise you 1 26% of NHS doctors are foreignborn. The BMA advises that without immigrants “many NHS services would struggle to provide effective care. 2 Almost 5.5 million British people live permanently abroad. 3 Immigrants are 60% less likely to claim benefits than a British-born person. 4 Between 1995-2011, EU immigrants contributed ÂŁ8.8 billion more than they gained. 5 Most studies suggest that immigration has no significant effect on overall employment, or British unemployment.

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B-Me VOICES


B-Me Voices

· The Great British Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain has said racial abuse is part of her life - and has been “for years”.

background, which got him to finally cry out: “Please take me back to Norwich, England, I don’t want to live in India.”

· Below is a selection of images by Oxford University students from ethnic minority backgrounds highlighting the prejudiced comments they say they receive:

· “Mom why did you take me back to India?” This was the question posed by a little boy the next day after their overnight journey move to Birmingham from Norwich. They were met on arrival in Birmingham by an Asian landlord who gave them the key to their apartment, then at the GP’s office, all the front desk staff were Asian and when they went to register at the school, he noticed that almost every teacher and student were of ethnic minority

B-Me VOICES

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Top Universities in the World 2016/17 Ranking

Top universities in the world by country

The QS World University Rankings 2016-2017 showcases over 900 of the

®

top universities in the world out of an estimated 20,000 universities worldwide. Below is an overview of the very top universities in the world this year…

1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Leading the list for the fifth consecutive year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is proving difficult to shift from the top spot, thanks to its strong international reputation, highly influential research, and healthy faculty/student ratio.

2. Stanford University - Based in Silicon Valley, Stanford University climbs one place in the ranking this year, overtaking Harvard in the process. It scores well across all of the indicators used in the ranking, particularly the global reputation surveys of academics and employers. 3. Harvard University - It may no longer be at the top of the ranking (which it led between 2004 and 2009), but Harvard University remains one of the world’s mostrespected institutions across a broad range of subject areas – and in fact it’s still number one in both of the reputation surveys.

4. University of Cambridge - Breaking the US monopoly, the UK’s University of Cambridge is another former table-topper. Scoring well across all metrics assessed in the ranking, it has a particularly strong faculty/student ratio – reflecting its longstanding commitment to smallgroup tuition. 5. California Institute of Technology (Caltech) - Though much smaller than most of the top universities in the world, Caltech punches well above its weight, particularly in the science and technology subjects on which it is focused.

Impressively, it beats both halves of Oxbridge on faculty/student ratio, and also stands out for its high research impact.

6. University of Oxford - Never far apart, the two halves of ‘Oxbridge’ are almost neck and neck on each of the six indicators assessed, with Oxford in fact narrowly beating Cambridge for its proportion of international students and faculty, as well as claiming a slightly better faculty/student ratio.

7. UCL (University College London) The UK’s third representative, UCL claims to be “London’s Global University” – and this assertion is well-founded. It has one of the most international student bodies amongst the top universities in the world, as well as being highly rated by both academics and employers.

8. ETH Zurich - The highest-ranked institution from outside of the US and UK, Switzerland’s ETH Zurich has been steadily climbing the table – this year improving its position by one. Its strongest scores are for international diversity of faculty and research impact, reflecting its status as a global research powerhouse.

9. Imperial College London - Though one place further apart than previously, Imperial College London is still hot on the heels of fellow London institution UCL, and remains renowned for its work in scientific and technical subjects, as well as its prestigious business school.

10. University of Chicago - Stable in 10th place, the University of Chicago rounds out the top 10 once again. Scoring particularly well in the academic reputation survey, it is further bolstered by its strong reputation with employers, and its high research impact.

Excluding the US, UK and Switzerland – whose top universities all feature within the global top 10 – here’s an at-a-glance review of the highest-ranked institutions in each of the countries represented in the top 100: Top in Argentina: Universidad de Buenos Aires (joint 85th) Top in Australia: Australian National University (22nd) Top in Belgium: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven; 79th) Top in Canada: McGill University (30th) Top in China: Tsinghua University (joint 24th) Top in Denmark: University of Copenhagen (joint 68th) Top in Finland: University of Helsinki (91st) Top in France: Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris (ENS Paris; 33rd) Top in Germany: Technische Universität München (TUM; 60th) Top in Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong (27th) Top in Ireland: Trinity College Dublin (joint 98th) Top in Japan: University of Tokyo (34th) Top in the Netherlands: University of Amsterdam (57th) Top in New Zealand: University of Auckland (81st) Top in Singapore: National University of Singapore (12th) Top in South Korea: Seoul National University (35th) Top in Sweden: Lund University (73rd) Top in Taiwan: National Taiwan University (joint 68th)

Source: http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings-articles/world-university-rankings/top-universities-world-201617

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B-Me VOICES


Norwich Filipino Community Association

N

orwich Filipino Community Association also known as Pinoy In Norwich Aksyong Samahan (PINAS), celebrate the Filipino Barrio Fiesta (village fair) in East Tuddenham on the 14th August 2016 with hundreds of people in attendance. Several musicians performed including a new comer Ivy Grace Paredes who auditioned during X-Faxtor 2016. Ivy impressed the judges and received a resounding comment from Simon Cowell, who described her as “one of the best we’ve ever had”. But Ivy Grace Parades was sadly forced to quit the X-Factor as she was refused an American visa which meant she could not travel to join Judge Sharon Osbourne in the USA.

Outgoing President Tess Ward

Tess with an official of the organisation

XFactor 2016: Ivy Grace Paredes amazing audition shocks judges

Management Committee member & onetime President

Ivy Grace Paredes (center) later went on to perform at XFactor audition

Ivy Grace on the XFactor

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The UK’s highest paid politicians:

as reported by the BBC (March 2015) Source: BBCNewsbeat

1. Scotland’s First Minister tops the list. Entitled to £144,687. After members of the Scottish parliament voted through a rise that means her salary for being an MSP and minister will increase to £144,687. She now officially earns more than the UK Prime Minister, but only claims £135,605 as part of the voluntary pay freeze Scottish ministers introduced in 2009. 2. Speaker of the House of Commons: £142,826 John Bercow gets paid £75,766 for being the Speaker, on top of his salary for being MP for Buckingham. He’s the man who keeps order in the Commons and call MPs to speak. He also tells them to keep quiet so that others can be heard. The Speaker is the chief officer of the House of Commons and has to be politically impartial. He’s the highest authority in the commons, and earns just a few hundred pounds more than the PM. 3. Prime Minister: £142,500 -The Prime Minister gets paid less than his predecessor and his cabinet ministers did when they were in office. Gordon Brown’s salary was £197,689, and his ministers earned £141,647. Mr Brown reduced his salary to £150,000, but this wasn’t made public until after Parliament had been dissolved for the 2010 general election. When the new Cabinet met in May 2010, Ministers agreed they would be paid five per cent less than those in the previous administration. 4. Welsh First Minister: £134,723, £135,260 from next month The First Minister of Wales, Carwyn Jones will have a little more in his pay packet next month, and it could go up significantly more next year. The Remuneration Board, which sets salaries for the Welsh Assembly, says members could get a £10,000 pay rise after the 2016 election. The increase

would be 18% more than their current basic pay of around £54,000. Carwyn Jones and members of his cabinet would see their pay rise to £140,000 and £100,000 respectively. 5. Deputy Prime Minister and Cabinet Ministers: £134,565. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg is entitled to £134,565. Other senior cabinet ministers, including the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, and First Secretary of State, William Hague get paid the same amount. 6. Leader of the Opposition: £129,500- Ed Miliband earns £67,060 for being an MP. In 2013-2014 he was paid an extra £62,440 for his role as leader of the opposition. 7. Northern Ireland First and Deputy First Ministers: £120,000-Peter Robinson and Martin McGuiness get paid £120,000 each for their roles in charge of the Executive Committee of the Northern Ireland Assembly. Other politicians including council leaders and ministers in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland can also earn around the £100k mark for extra roles and responsibilities. 8. MPs can earn more in addition to their basic annual salary of £74,962 as at 1 April 2016. MPs can have second jobs and some earn considerably more than Nicola Sturgeon. There are no rules banning them from holding other sources of employment, but they have to declare their financial interests in the Register of Members’ Financial Interests. More than 100 MPs do so, and some have recorded payments in the hundreds of thousands. They can also earn money for things like occasional TV appearances, book royalties and giving speeches.

How to contact your MPs 1. Keith Simpson MP

6. Chloe Smith MP

2. Brandon Lewis MP

7. Clive Lewis MP

3. George Freeman MP

8. Richard Bacon MP

4. Norman Lamb MP -

9. Elizabeth Truss MP

5. Henry Bellingham MP

Member of European Parliament (MEP)

Broadland Conservative Tel: 01603 865763 email: keithsimpson2015@gmail.com

Great Yarmouth Conservative Tel: 01493 652928 email: brandon.lewis.mp@parliament.uk Mid Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01953 600617 email: george.freeman.mp@parliament.uk

North Norfolk Liberal Democrat Tel: 01692 403752 email: norman.lamb.mp@parliament.uk North West Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01553 692076 email: bellinghamh@parliament.uk

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B-Me VOICES

Norwich North Conservative Tel: 01603 414756 email: chloe@chloesmith.org.uk Norwich South Labour Tel: 01603 510755 email: clive.lewis.mp@parliament.uk

South Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01379 643728 email: richardbaconmp@parliament.uk

South West Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01842 757345 email: elizabeth.truss.mp@parliament.uk

Richard Howitt

Labour Tel: 01223 240202 e-mail: richard@richardhowittmep.com


Championing the rights of Black/Asian Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in Norfolk Race Equality flyer.indd 1

06/10/2016 14:04

Are you looking What we offer Address: • Providing 1-1 information advice and 44-48 Magdalen Street, Sackville Business Place, for Information & guidance on a wide range of issues Norwich, Norfolk, NR3 1JU Advice on a range of • Supporting your job search needs: CVs, issues? trainings, application forms and interview Facebook: Do you need help techniques https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus with your job • Addressing & Advocating for race equality related issues search? Appointments available: • Help with completing all sorts of forms The aim of The Bridge Plus+ is to improve community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery, with a focus on supporting Black/Asian and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities.

• Group networking workshops & trainings with time for peer-to-peer support

Mondays to Thursdays, 10am – 3pm • office@bridgeplus.org.uk

• Peer to peer support opportunities e.g. community lunches & community engagement activities

• http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk

• Signposting and referrals to local support services and community groups

Telephone: 01603 617076 Please leave a clear voice message if not answered.

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus

Some of our regular front line staff & volunteers Beatrice

Frances

Gervais

Jo

Pa Musa

Mo

Sue

B-Me VOICES

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OPEN THE BAG

Before you leave the pharmacy.

An estimated £4.7m of unused medicines are wasted every year in Norfolk and Waveney. Once an unwanted medicine has left the pharmacy, it cannot be used even if hasn’t been opened. By reducing the amount of medicines wasted each year, we could increase the funding available for other vital health services.

Please OPEN THE BAG – if you don’t need all the medicine please hand it back at the counter or to the delivery driver. For more information visit: http://tiny.cc/YourMedicines_YourNHS

B me voice magazine 2016 november  

B me voice magazine 2016 november

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