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Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices

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Issue 9 Winter 2017

Also in this issue:

Mama Mariam Retiring in Norwich

Norwich Civic Service 2017

Mo bids Farewell to Bridge Plus

UK Criminal Justice bias against ethnic minorities says MP

…with stories about Black History Month celebrations around Norfolk, and breaking immigration news… A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


Funded by

Our Domestic Violence Advice & Advocacy (DV-AA) Project is aimed at: • Raising awarenes about Domestic Violence in BME (black and minority ethnic) communities • Supporting BME people in increasing their confidence in reporting DV • Developing a BME Specialist Domestic Violence support service in Norfolk • Tackling cultural barriers to dealing with Domestic Violence • Ensuring the safety of victims by providing confidential advice and advocacy support

Please contact us if: • You are/know of a victim and you not sure how to get help and support • You are worried about going to the authorities e.g. Police • You are worried about your immigration status • You want to know more because everyone deserves a Volience-Free Life

Call: 01603 617 076

email: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

Are you looking What we offer Address: • Providing 1-1 information advice and 44-48 Magdalen Street, Sackville Business Place, for Information & guidance on a wide range of issues Norwich, Norfolk, NR3 1JU Advice on a range of • Supporting your job search needs: CVs, issues? trainings, application forms and interview Facebook: Do you need help techniques https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus with your job • Addressing & Advocating for race equality related issues search? Appointments available: • Help with completing all sorts of forms The aim of The Bridge Plus+ is to improve community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery, with a focus on supporting Black/Asian and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities.

• Group networking workshops & trainings with time for peer-to-peer support

Mondays to Thursdays, 10am – 3pm • office@bridgeplus.org.uk

• Peer to peer support opportunities e.g. community lunches & community engagement activities

• http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk

• Signposting and referrals to local support services and community groups

Telephone: 01603 617076 Please leave a clear voice message if not answered.

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus

Some of our regular front line staff & volunteers Beatrice

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Frances

Gervais

Jo

Pa Musa

Mo

Sue


EDITORIAL

Thanks to all those who continue to support this magazine which we started three years ago as a pilot project to promote equality and diversity in Norfolk.

We have been told that the magazine is seen to be accessible by people of all walks of life because of the stories it tell in images and prose, and above all, the personal stories of ordinary BME people living in Norfolk. In this issue, our cover story is about a mother to many African people living in Norwich. Auntie Mariam is my own adopted mother as she embodies a true enigma of a modernised African woman living in the UK. Her story shares the reality of living in the UK as a retired African woman which she described in a separate conversation in French which roughly comes out of google translate as “Culture being a way of life where you have to know how to live in all situations.” Also in this issue we publish a story: “The UK criminal justice system is bias against ethnic minorities says MP David Lammy.” Really! Is this really news or just something to remind BME people what many of them already believe? Sadly the reality on the ground for most BME people is that there is a serious concern about hate crime and discrimination. Last summer, the door of a shop owned by an ethnic minority person was smashed (see p31). This was less than a year ago when an Eastern European shop was damaged by arson attack on Magdalen street. However, both victims are relentless and determined to go on. We thank Norfolk County council who sent a personal rep to extend a message of support and disapproval of the shop attach which does not reflect the belief of the majority of Norfolk residents. We are also aware that the police have given the incident their utmost attention, which the shop owner said he appreciated and would like to thank them for their efforts. Finally we give a thumbs up to Norfolk for continuing to be a safe place to live in the UK. So do expect many of us to follow the footsteps of Mama/Auntie Mariam and many other BME retired people who choose to make Norfolk a place to retire. And as always, you can always access the online version of this magazine at http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk/. And until the next issue, we would welcome and appreciate your comments, feedbacks and support. Sincerely

Pa Musa, i9!

INDEX

Contact: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

4-5 Mama Mariam Retiring in Norfolk 6 Black History Month Launch Event 8 Lord Sheriff of Norwich David Walker @Norwich Gambian Women’s Cultural event 11 Norwich Congolese Community Celebrate Music Legend Papa Wemba 13 Criminal Justice - Bias against ethnic minorities 20 Black History Month featuring Kora Player Seyfo Kanuteh 21 Brits Abroad 29 More Immigration checks and controls 30 A Partnership of local organisations making a difference to people’s Lives 32 Refugees win elections in the USA

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Work life in the 1980’s

Mama Mariam My Life in UK as a senior citizen

I

came to the UK in 1984 on a work permit to work for an international NGO charity called ACORD. They needed someone with my skills and education background. The job involved a lot of travelling in and out of the country. I have also worked for the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), before moving on to working for an anti-slavery human rights organisation, and my final work assignment was with the African Development Bank, before retiring to come and live in Norwich.

Why Norfolk? When I retired back in 2005, I wanted to move to somewhere quiet. So I bought a book titled Great Britain to search for a place to move to. I had considered a few places including Bristol but I finally decided Norwich. I did not know Norwich or Norfolk, but I knew what I wanted, so I choose Norwich based on four criteria I had: a university town, a place with a mosque, somewhere not very far from London, and where accommodation is affordable. Fortunately, I had good savings and I could afford to live independently. So I put my things in storage and found my way to Norwich. It was the summer of 2005, and schools had closed. I had already found out that the University of East Anglia (UEA) does have accommodation for rent when the university closes for summer and that there was a mosque on campus. This

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idea was very appealing to me, because as a retiree and with my previous background in development work and education, moving to a university with a mosque was a natural choice. Besides, I always found solace in universities and education is something I thought I can never retire from. My life has always been about work, which meant attending meetings, conferences and workshops, and to retire all of a sudden, I felt I would die of boredom if I did not find something engaging. To keep up with that I reassured myself that Norwich and UEA was the place to go. Although rent in Norwich was cheaper than in London, as soon as the summer ended, I had to move out to a bed and breakfast. I was told that I had to wait for six months before I could be considered for a council house. Six months later I still couldn’t find permanent accommodation until a friend suggested I see my local MP who at the time was Charles Clarke.

Mr Clarke impressed me with one thing, by listening to me. He made me feel appreciated and right there he wrote a letter to the council and within weeks, I was offered this very apartment I am living in now in a block of houses for senior citizens in July 2006. The apartment was in a mess, but I took it in good faith, because I was determined to make Norwich my home.

How does it feel living in Norfolk as a retired black and ethnic minority African? Well this is not how older people in my culture retire. But being independent as I am, as soon as I found my own place, I started to socialise. I approached the local school near me to see if I can help in any way, but soon I moved onto


other things when that did not work out. I wanted to participate in social events at the school and talk about girls living in Africa, their education, scholarships etc. I am not the type that gives up, so I continued to look for other ways of socialising and engaging my community. Although on the one hand my network of contact through the mosques was thriving, I was equally determined to widen my links with my local host community. So I kept looking for things to be involved in by checking information boards, reading the local paper and attending meetings, any meetings just to keep myself busy. Interestingly, the one of the most socialising places is the bus journey, particularly at the bus stop or during the ride. You can easily start a conversation with a total strange, and make new friends without knowing their names. It’s very helpful sometimes. Then one day in 2006, I attended a meeting at County Hall for older people, and from that meeting they decided to set up a working group which is now the Norfolk Older People’s Forum. And I have been a member since. This was an important group for me because it was discussing older people’s problems, like transport, living alone and coping. I wanted to bring a lot of older people from ethnic minority background to attend such groups but because of language and other cultural barriers, they could not. Most of them were living with their families, but I still wanted them to share their experiences with the group because old age does not have colour. I have not given up my attempts to widen my experiences, but even with my persistence, as a person of minority background, I sometimes find it difficult to engage some groups. So you can just imagine how much more difficult it would be for other older BME people with no English.

How do you fit in rural Norfolk as a retired African woman? Living independently and being alone has always been part of me. And remember that I have left my country over 40 years ago and I did not move here with family, so this has always been my life since when I left to attend university in France. Over the years I have learned to appreciate the fact that if you decide to live in

the west, then you must accept part of the western culture. When I was a university student in France, I worked as a carer looking after older white people and that taught me a lot about understanding and accepting the way people live here. But of course I am not the only retired black person in Norfolk. However many black women, particularly Muslim women my age, tend to be living with their children in a family setting. But most of those people came here when they were already of retirement age to visit family members. And as I have already stated, I have lived in Europe, and the UK in particular for the most part of my adult life.

How did you become Mama Mariam? I think that has to do with my faith as a Muslim. My religion is very important to me. My daily routine involves going to the mosque for prayers. My primary place of engagement and social contact has been and still remains the mosque. At the mosque am always happy and people respect me. For example at the UEA mosque, which is now sadly closed, I had made many good friends and networked with a very diverse community of people. Many student found it rare to see an older African Muslim woman who speaks English and can share their experience. What they failed to realise was that it was both a learning and social experience for me too. So I really missed the UEA mosque. But that relationship with my community of contacts has always been ongoing, and it is why many consider me their mother and call me Auntie Mariam, Mama Mariam or Aja Mariam (Aja is the title given to someone who has performed the hajj in Mecca). But it also depends on how a person conducts themselves. I have my own children who are also career people doing fine and living their own lives with my grandchildren, but they are always happy and reassured to know that I belong to a very supportive community.

How challenging is it for you as a BME older person? To tell you the truth, if you are really independent, your problem is solved. And if anyone knows me from when I was young, they will tell you that I have always been independent. For example, to live in a place like her, you have to be independent, if not, you belong to a care home and that for me would be very sad, because I am not used to depending on people. But am very happy that I remain independent and I get to do what I want to do. Though some things

can be physically challenging, but that goes with the age. I really feel accepted and involved in my local community, which I found to be really good for my health and wellbeing.

Mama Hi-Tech, tell me about this? Ageing can be deceiving. Just because someone is old does not mean they don’t have a life before. Like I said, I retired in 2005 working for a United Nations organisation, and my work life had always involved using computers. My life with technology did not stop just because I have retired from active work. Sadly though when people see me dressed the way I do and because I am black, they assumed I know nothing about computers. I have had a few interesting situations. For example at the hospital, a couple of doctors made the mistake of assuming, and asked me, “Do you understand me?” and when I say yes, I have been to school up to university, they look surprised. Like I said before, they make wrong assumptions because of my age and looks. But I have got used to that, which is why I am not offended if people assume that I am not literate. Anyways, long story short, the name Mama Hi-Tech was given to me by someone at a phone shop because he was amazed to find out how much I was adept with technology. So whenever I go to their shop, everyone calls me Mama Hi-Tech. To be honest with you that both amuses and makes me feel good. Yes I am Mama Hi-Tech, I have an iPhone, I read most of my news online and I have the confidence to use the computer with ease.

In Conclusion, what do you want to say? How I was brought up helped me a lot. Simplicity and modesty build dignity. And no one should let people step on it. But respect and dignity is something people no longer have any regard for. So they stereotype you by making assumption based on your looks alone. I have been taught to be independent, taught to understand the meaning of being a friend. Friendship is sharing, supporting each other and not being a burden to a friend. I know cultures are different and around here people are friendly because they always offer help by saying,”If you need something just ask.” I think we can all learn from diversity. Overall, I am very happy with the life am living here, and I think I would have made the same decision to move to Norwich as I did several years ago.

PROFILE:

Mariam Ouattara is a British citizen originally from Burkina Faso in West Africa, where she was born 70 something years ago. A mother of three, she was a teacher in her native country in the 1960s before moving to France to pursue further education. She holds multiple degrees from prestigious universities in France with a Once upon a time when she was younger masters in Social Development, a Masters of Communication and Sociology of Development at the University of Villetaneuze, and an MPhil in Social Science and Sociology of Law at the University of Sorbonne. It was work that brought her to the UK where she choose to live and retire in rural Norfolk. Mama Mariam visits her country of birth every year to keep up with her society.

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Norfolk Black History Month Launch Event at Norwich City Council Friday 29th September 2017 The theme for 2017 October Norfolk Black History Month celebration: Rooted in the Past, Shaping the Future DANNY KEEN Chair of Black History Month with Lord Mayor David Walker

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lack History Month, also known as AfricanAmerican History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and in the Netherlands where it is known as Black Achievement Month is observed in the months of February and October to celebrate black culture, identity and community. This year marks 30 years of its celebration in the UK and Norfolk has never been left behind for the past 16 years.


2017 Black History Month in Great Yarmouth by Afroluso Dance Group

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Lord Sheriff of Norwich DAVID WALKER at The Norwich Gambian Women’s Cultural event 29 July 2017

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i am a migrant Maria

is from Spain, now living in Peru.

“My grandmother doesn’t understand why I am here – she fled from the Nazis.” “I grew up with all the Nazi-stereotypes. Even though I had studied German and knew it was not 1944 anymore, I was still surprised how content I was here. I felt very comfortable straight away.” “I was in Germany for the first time in 2008 as an exchange student, then in 2010 as an Au-Pair and since 2012 I am back to study for my master’s degree.” “My grandmother is from Friedrichshain, Berlin and my grandfather is from Austria. They both fled from the Nazis when they were young. I grew up with them and always knew they had an accent, but it was never discussed at home. I was raised with this demonised view on Germany. Nazis. Full stop. And with a lot of Holocaust history. And then, when I started college, I wanted to annoy my family, or to push the conversation, and I started to learn German. All hell let loose. By now my parents even visited me here. My grandma still does not understand why I live here. Our conversation always ends with ‘Do not marry a German’. Well, that’s the way it is. She is 90 years old.” “I had only studied German for two years before I arrived and all of a sudden I was at University with everything in German. I could hardly say a sentence and was very embarrassed.” “I notice that as a white female American I am privileged when dealing with authorities here, like the Aliens Registration Office. But they call out my family name, which is clearly Jewish, there is always that funny moment: I know that you know, that I know….and I can see it in their eyes. But by now I expect this, it has never been bad. Only that ‘ahaexperience’, this ‘Oh…are you okay in Germany’, this little ‘Sorry’- Moment.” “The culture in which I grew up had less boundaries by far. There it is more like ‘We’ll see, let’s just try’. I hope my readiness to do so is sometimes helpful.” If Alissa is ever to return to California, then it would be because she misses her family and the attitude towards freedom. To her home simply means ’love’.

“If migrants come to your country because they have to, it is likely that they had a hard life before and moving is for survival.” “I’m from Catalonia, and I left my country to learn English and look for a job. Now I live in Perú, after having lived in the UK for two years and a half where, among others, I started studying for a Masters degree at the University of Sussex and worked in different coffee shops. Along the way, this journey has meant changes, effort, new people, rebuilding my life in some aspects and supporting others — I think this is what migration means. Most of my friends were migrants like me (some were also from Catalonia) and we were a big family in London before I moved for my studies, so I would say that I have supported migrants by strengthening ties, but I haven’t collaborated with any NGO or activism for migrants solidarity. During my Masters, I took a module about Transnationalism, Diaspora and Migrant’s Lives, and did research for an academic essay about welcoming refugee movements in my own country. I hope to apply this knowledge in my future activities and work. In the meantime, I can speak to other migrants from experience. If you seek out positivity, you will find better experiences than what you were looking for at the beginning. Integration means going to a new country and feeling included: understanding the culture of this new home, learning the language and traditions without losing your own. Integration is not the imposition of rules, but understanding that we are all different and debating what is the best way to live TOGETHER, mixed, not merely in the same physical place. Look for people who love you for who you are and not for what you have. And love as much as you can every single day! I’ve seen so many people just looking for money and they are neither happy nor useful to the development of society. A few words for those from the host county: if migrants come to your country because they have to, it is likely that they had a hard life before and moving is probably the last option that they had to survive. Try to be sympathetic and understand that not everyone is as lucky as you are. Value your good fortune and help them to build their new life in your community. No one deserves to feel alone or lost. Unfairness and prejudices are what build insecurity. If migrants are in your country by choice, this means that they will probably love your home if they find people that accept them as they are. Let them feel at home, and they will learn new ways to look at the world and your culture. Living together means understanding our differences and learning from diversity.”

Original story by Christine Strotmann

Source: http://iamamigrant.org/

Alissa: in Germany.

Country of Origin: United States

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Do’s & Don’ts and Did You Know National Statistics figures show. It comes as net migration estimates show it remains near record levels, at 327,000 for the year to March. The figures - for the period before Britain voted to leave the EU - are down slightly on record levels. Net migration is the difference between the number of people coming to the UK for at least a year and those leaving. (source BBC News)

• Ethnic minority communities predominantly live in three main cities, with 50% living in London, Manchester and Birmingham alone. They are seven times more likely to live in an urban area than someone who is white. The Indian community is the most dispersed, the Bangladeshis the least. The Pakistani community is predominantly based in towns in the North and the Midlands, while over half of all the Black community lives in London. • Although all BME communities have higher levels of unemployment and low level of full time workers than the White community, Indians cluster in the highest skilled professions. Almost all minority groups, except the Indian community, have unemployment rates double the national average. Black Africans (18.3%) have the highest unemployment rate. 39% of Pakistani and 42% of Bangladeshi women have never worked. 24% of Pakistani men are taxi drivers and half of all Bangladeshi men work in restaurants. In contrast 43% of Indians work in the highest skilled professions. • People from ethnic minority backgrounds will make up nearly a third of the UK’s population by 2050. A Portrait of Modern Britain reveals that the five largest distinct Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities could potentially double from 8 million people or 14% of the population to between 20-30% by the middle of the century. Over the past decade, the UK’s White population has remained roughly the same while the minority population has almost doubled. Black Africans and Bangladeshis are the fastest growing minority communities with ethnic minorities representing 25% of people aged under the age of five. Source: http://www.policyexchange.org.uk/publications/ category/item/a-portrait-of-modern-britain • Black, African and Caribbean are ethnic 3% of population and 20% of the prison population • Poland has overtaken India as the most common non-UK country of birth for people living in the UK, Office for

Seeking asylum Seeking refuge 1685 Huguenots flee persecution from Louis XIV in France 1800s German refugees arrive in Bristol 1890s Jews escape Russia to settle in UK 1937 4,000 Basques flee Spain 1933-39 50,000 Jews escape Nazi Germany 1939 100,000 refugees run from the threat of war 1945-60 50,000 cross the Iron Curtain of the Eastern bloc 1956 21,000 Hungarians flee the Soviet invasion 1972 28,000 Asians expelled from Uganda arrive in the UK

1973-79 3,000 Chileans escape the Pinochet murder squads 1975-92 24,000 ‘boat people’ get out of Vietnam 1992-96 2,500 Bosnians flee war and ‘ethnic cleansing’ 1995-99 4,000 Kosovans flee war 2002 14,570 seek sanctuary from Saddam Hussein’s Iraq 7,000 flee the Taliban in Afghanistan 7,655 flee from Zimbabwe 2004-8 Claims for asylum in the UK fall dramatically 2008-today Conflict remains the main reason for people seeking refuge.

source: UNHCR 2012 Asylum Trends Report, South West Migrant Forum, Refugee Council, Home Office

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2 Germany

Those applying for refuge after fleeing a fear of persecution

1 USA takes the most asylum

64,500

applications with 83,400

3 France

Sweden 4

54,900

43,900

Asylum Seekers – UK 2012 14,062 enforced removals 29,265 voluntary departures 13,789 refused entry at ports

5 UK 27,400

£36.62 per week benefit payable to asylum seekers

0.3%

Asylum seekers are not allowed to work

One person in 370 in the UK is a refugee, asylum seeker or a stateless person source: HM Govt Immigration Statistics

Where do UK asylum seekers flee from? 2012 TOP TEN Pakistan 3,280 Iran 2,659 Sri Lanka 1,744 India 1,087 Bangladesh 1,057 Afghanistan 1,008 Syria 998 Nigeria 959 Albania 819 Eritrea 728

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Norwich Congolese Community Celebrate Music Legend PAPA WEMBA for Black History Month

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Volunteers & Refugees A story by Salar El Nagar, Egyptian writer, poet and refugee

Salah as a guest of Mustard TV

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here were many volunteers, both young and older from different European countries in the jungle, helping refugees, the majority were from England and France. They were wonderful and helped us a great deal. They had offices in the El-Salam which was a place of work; cooking food, hospitality, cleaning and medical assistance. Many friendships were formed between volunteers and refugees in the jungle. I saw their smiles and their hospitality and I was grateful for their help. In Islam, there is a saying “a smile adds flavour to life”. Every day I watch volunteers bring and share food with the refugees, play sports and cook with us. I saw many volunteers playing cards and music with refugees. Many of them recognised the refugees’ unique talent in music, sports, and art. There were many volunteer doctors in the Jungle who chose to live with us there to deal with emergencies. They often provided their own cars as ambulances to shuttle us to local hospitals because of the serious injuries from our attempts to reach England by jumping onto trains, and sneaking into lorries. Many of the volunteers focused on cleaning between the tents to lessen the health risks due to insanitary conditions. They gave us instructions and advice on how to get rid of rubbish. Certain volunteers

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were responsible for the administration of the Disco in the jungle every weekend, but best of all was their sympathy and empathy with refugees. I saw many of them designing and printing protest leaflets to the English and French governments, campaigning to allow refugees to reach England. Every weekend many cars came to the jungle to give refugees things like razors, tooth brushes, clothes, bottles of juice, cans, shoes, milk, tea, blankets, tents, biscuits, desserts, coffee, vegetables, fruit and food in tins. Despite everything, the Jungle was a vibrant society even though a place of great suffering and pain for refugees. The volunteers and charities in the jungle helped and supported the refugees and this is the true meaning of life.

The Jungle

The Jungle was a word for safety and security as well as an actual place. Refugees used to say, “the Jungle” when the police caught us or punished us with pepper spray The Jungle was a concept of security for us when we ran away from the French control in the port, when they used dangerous police dogs to scare us. It was our ‘home’ country although we had no families, business, education, future or houses. Our life in the jungle was both a very simple life and a very difficult one as well. Very simple because we had no

houses, money, businesses or work. We had only simple tents, clothes and some drink and food enough for a day. It was a difficult one because our life in the Jungle was full of painful, risky and terrifying adventures which could have led us to death. The people in the Jungle were like family members. They met to achieve one goal and that was to reach England from France for the possibility of a better life. It was amazing to think, I stayed in the Jungle for a long time yet I did not see any fights between refugees. On the contrary, they were friendly and helpful towards each other. If a refugee saw a new arrival, they would support and help him immediately with food, drink, blankets, clothes, shoes, tents and advice to survive in the best way. The main language in the Jungle was Arabic with Sudanese, Syrians, Iraqis and Egyptians making up around 60% of the total number of people in the jungle so they all spoke Arabic languages. Thus, communication, making contacts and friendships was easy between refugees and that friendship was a blessing that made life easier in the Jungle. The diversity of cultures and peoples created a kind of spirit and a sense of renewal every day to combat the miseries of life there. It was also interesting for me as writer to learn about such a diversity of cultures and migration stories.


Bias against ethnic minorities ‘needs to be tackled’ in justice system According to MP David Lammy, The criminal justice system has “deep-seated issues to address”.

Also, when in prison, many BAME men and women believe they are actively discriminated against, which Mr Lammy says “contributes to an atmosphere of ‘us’ and ‘them’ and an urge to rebel, rather than reform”.

Agencies must work together

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oung offenders from ethnic minorities will become “the next generation” of criminals unless the justice system is reformed, says MP David Lammy. A review led by him found the system in England and Wales is biased and discriminates in treatment of people from ethnic minority backgrounds. The Labour MP has made 35 recommendations, including delaying or dropping some prosecutions. The government said it will “look carefully” at the suggestions. People from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds make up 25% of the prison population in England and Wales and 41% of the youth justice system, despite these groups being 14% of the general population, the review says. It has highlighted various “concerning” statistics, including a rise in the proportion of first-time offenders from these backgrounds to 19% - up from 11% - in the past 10 years, and the same increase in the proportion of young people reoffending. Recommendations from the report included allowing low-level offenders to “defer” prosecution and opt for a rehabilitation programme before entering a plea, more gathering of data on the ethnicity and religion of offenders, and the introduction of targets for a more representative workforce within the justice system.

‘Actions matter most’

Mr Lammy said it was well established that there was an over-representation of people from minority backgrounds in the criminal justice system, but his report was about looking at their “treatment and outcomes”. Whilst he does not believe all of the blame lies at the door of the justice system, noting the “broadly proportionate” decision on charging by the Crown Prosecution Service, Mr Lammy said: “It is clear to me that BAME individuals still face bias.” Image caption MP David Lammy has made 35 recommendations to reform the criminal justice system Trust is one of the major issues, according to the report. It says individuals from these backgrounds do not trust the advice provided by their solicitors or police officers when it comes to pleading guilty. As a result, the rate of black defendants pleading not guilty in Crown Courts between 2006 and 2014 was 41%, compared with 31% for white defendants - leading to more trials and longer sentences.

By Danny Shaw, BBC home affairs correspondent The most striking recommendation in this detailed and well-evidenced report is the idea of deferred prosecutions. It’s similar to the “conditional cautioning” scheme under which people escape trial if they admit their offence and agree to undergo rehabilitation, do unpaid work or pay compensation. The Lammy report also referred to Operation Turning Point - a deferred prosecution pilot project run in the West Midlands which resulted in fewer violent offenders committing further crimes compared with those taken through the courts. If rolled out, the programme would be applied to offenders from all ethnic backgrounds, though those from BAME communities, who are disproportionately represented, could benefit most. But its success would depend on probation, health and justice agencies working together, and working intensively with offenders. And that requires investment at a time when budgets are tight. His biggest concern, however, is the youth justice system, as whilst youth offending has fallen significantly in the past 10 years, there is now a larger share of young people from ethnic minorities offending for the first time, reoffending and serving a custodial sentence. The report points out black children are more than twice as likely to grow up in a lone parent family, and black and mixed ethnic boys are more likely than white boys to be permanently excluded from school. Media captionWatch: Are ethnic minorities treated fairly? Mr Lammy said the youth justice system seemed to have “given up on parenting” - saying behind many young offenders are adults who neglect or exploit them. Mr Lammy said responsibility must be taken by adults - and the youth justice system “should be more rooted in local communities” where parents can play a stronger role. Prisons are products of society, he said: “The criminal justice system has deep-seated issues to address, but there is only so much it can do.”

Lammy report recommendations • More data should be recorded and published on both ethnicity and religion for better scrutiny of the Criminal Justice System’s approach • The Crown Prosecution Service should consider its approach to gang prosecutions, making sure people’s actions are punished, not their associations • Modern slavery legislation should be reviewed to see if it can help prevent the exploitation of vulnerable young men and women • Identifying information should be redacted to make for “race-blind” decisions on cases

• All sentencing remarks made in Crown Court should be published, along with a system of online feedback on judges • Hiring of new judges, with a national target of a representative judiciary of 2025, along with a more representative prison staff • Low-level offenders should be allowed to “defer” prosecution and opt for a rehabilitation programme before entering a plea - a model used in the West Midlands, which Mr Lammy says has “produced impressive results and should be rolled out across the country” • Young offenders should be assessed for their maturity to inform sentencing decisions • The prison service should take a “problem solving” approach for dealing with complaints and ensure fairness for prisoners when it comes to incentives and earned privileges, • Reformed offenders should be able to apply to have their criminal records “sealed” - so they need not disclose their offence to a employer Junior Smart, who founded the St Giles’ Trust SOS project - which supports young people in the justice system - after spending five years in prison for drugs offences, welcomed the report. He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “The cultural understanding amongst young people is you don’t trust the police and you don’t talk to the police. “There is that lack and we need them to come forward, and we need to make sure that victims are supported. “And the fact is the criminal justice system doesn’t reflect the diversity and how criminality is evolved over time... “It is not lack of will - these people have got the best intentions for these young people - but they don’t reflect the diversity that we are seeing and they don’t understand the complexity.” Malcolm Richardson, chairman of the Magistrates Association, said there was not sufficient evidence to pinpoint why the disparity occurs, but he agreed the lack of trust in the system needed to be addressed. Media captionYouth Justice worker Noel Williams says prison officers need diversity training The Equality and Human Rights Commission urged the government to respond “urgently” and put in place a comprehensive race strategy with targets to reduce race inequality. Labour shadow justice secretary Richard Burgon said Mr Lammy’s recommendations could “play an important role in eradicating discrimination”. Justice Secretary David Lidington said the government would “look very carefully” at the review’s findings and recommendations before responding fully. Gareth Wilson, the National Police Chiefs’ Council’s lead for equality and diversity, said he would work with the Home Office and College of Policing to make more data on ethnicity available for scrutiny - but also work on making the force more representative. Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders said the CPS would consider the review’s recommendations. Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41191311

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Norwich City Council Civic Service 2017 Norwich City Civic Service is a historic service held at the Cathedral Church to welcomes the new Lord Mayor David Fullman and Sheriff David Walker of Norwich to office.

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Police Support Volunteers Police support volunteers (PSVs) are people from various walks of life who dedicate some of their spare time to help make the county a safer place. We recognise that Norfolk is a diverse county, and would like to recruit more PSVs to better reflect the make-up of the community we serve. There are always PSV roles available, and we are keen to hear from anyone who would like to volunteer their time.

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What do people get out of volunteering? his November saw the launch of the new 3rd Party Reporting protocol called SHiN (Stop Hate in Norfolk).

Free training on how to become a SHiN reporting centre will start in January 2018. If you are an organisation that supports minority communities then please go to www.norfolk.police.uk/ stop-hate where you will find dates, times and locations of the training and who to contact to book your place. The protocol is a joint effort between Norfolk Constabulary and Norfolk County Council and is aimed at public, private and voluntary sector organisations to enable them to create a consistent standard for tackling hate incidents and crimes across Norfolk. Often victims of hate are not confident to report directly to the police, or they think that they won’t be believed or taken seriously. Some victims don’t even recognise that they have even been the victim of either a hate incident or crime. Victims should always report hate related incidents and crimes to the police even if they do not know who the offender is. If everyone reported it would help the police build up a picture of what is really happening across the county and put police officers into areas where they are really needed. Hate can take many forms and an incident or crime is anything that happens which is perceived by the victim, or any other person as being motivated by prejudice or hate. This means that if you think something has happened to you because of a difference and that could be the colour of your skin, the religion you practice, you live with a disability, how you identify your gender or who you choose to love and live your life with, you can report it to the police and they will do whatever they can to identify who the offender is.

Examples of hate incidents might include name calling, bullying, making noises when you walk past, someone kicking your rubbish bins over or leaving rubbish on your door step. Examples of hate crime might include physical assaults, criminal damage to your property or car or damage to the place where you worship. Besides using a 3rd party reporting route you can contact the police in other ways such as 999 if you need immediate assistance, online at www.norfolk.police.uk , 101 if it’s not an emergency, text on 07786 20077 or minicom 0845 345 3458. If you have any questions or concerns regarding SHiN please contact either:

JULIE INNS Equality & Diversity Manager County Policing Command Norfolk Constabulary Jubilee House Falconers Chase Wymondham Norfolk NR18 0WW Tel: 01953 424021 E-Mail: innsj@norfolk.pnn.police.uk

JO RICHARDSON Equality and Diversity Manager Communities & Environmental Services Norfolk County Council County Hall Martineau Lane NR1 2DU Direct Dial: 01603 223816 E-Mail: jo.richardson@norfolk.gov.uk

• Opportunities to gain or develop skills in the workplace and to work as part of a team in a professional environment • An increased sense of belonging to a group or community • The chance to give something back and make a positive difference to their local community • Personal development and growth • Meet and make new friends • Engage and interact with people from different backgrounds • Find out more about policing to determine whether they would be interested in joining the organisation as a permanent member of staff.

What can police support volunteers do? Here are some of the areas where police support volunteers currently work: • Safer neighbourhood team support – assisting with administration, minutes, police surgeries, street meets, forming links with local communities and assisting with surveys and other research activities • Town centre CCTV monitoring support • Police Cadet Leaders • Involvement in community speed watch schemes

Who can volunteer? • You must be aged over 16 years, although many roles require you to be over 18 years • No upper age limit • People from anywhere in the county

Who to contact You can visit our volunteer pages at: https://www.norfolk.police.uk/join-us/ volunteers Or contact Sue Goode goodes@norfolk.pnn.police.uk for more information

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Norfolk County Council

Consider Adoption

Lots of children in Norfolk need loving homes

Find out more 01603 638343 • adoption@norfolk.gov.uk

www.norfolk.gov.uk/adoption Consider Adoption A5 advert.indd 1

10/10/2017 08:00

2017-2018

Norfolk School Calendar

This calendar applies to community schools, community special schools, VC schools and nursery schools and sets the days on which school transport will be provided. While most Foundation, VA, foundation special, free schools and academy trusts who are able to set their own dates, adopt the Norfolk Model, we advise you to check with your child's school before making holiday or other commitments.

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Key : White dates - schools open to pupils Yellow dates - pupil holiday Red dates - bank holiday

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Five staff training days will be selected from yellow dates, we suggest 4 & 5 September, 20 October, 3 January and 29 March. Some may choose to use twilight hours for staff training instead of some or all of these.


WISE WORDSs, WITs & HUMOURS

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Lord Mayor’s Parade NORWICH 8 JULY 2017

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Black History Month featuring Kora Player

SEYFO KANUTEH

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BRITS ABROAD: how many people from the UK live in other EU countries?

Where UK-born people lived in 2015 Spain is again top of the list: an estimated 310,000 UK-born people lived there in 2015. Ireland is second with 250,000 and France third with 190,000.

1.2 million people born in the UK live in other EU countries, according to 2015 estimates from the United Nations (UN). Around 900,000 UK citizens were long-term residents in other EU countries in 2010 and 2011, according to census data across the EU collated by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). There are two alternative estimates, and neither is perfect Recent figures on Brits abroad have been compiled by both the UN and the ONS. Both are based mainly on census data gathered from EU countries in 2010 and 2011. The difference between them lies in what’s been done to those numbers. The ONS looks at both UK-born people and UK citizens. It brings together mainly census figures from across the EU from 2010 and 2011. The figures just cover people who live abroad for at least a year, rather than just short-term emigrants. The UN looks just at UK-born people. It takes the census figures as a starting point and then ‘ages’ the figures a few years up to 2015, estimating how many people have immigrated to and emigrated from those countries during that period. The UN data isn’t a perfect measure, as different counties define “immigrant” differently. Some define their migrant population as those born abroad; others count foreign citizens. As the House of Commons Library comments, this is an “unavoidable limitation” of using these figures to compare countries. So the UN estimate is more up-to-date; the ONS estimate is more certain. In the context of the Brexit debate, the figures on citizenship are arguably more relevant. That’s because free movement rules are based on which country you’re a citizen of, rather than where you’re born.

Those 1.2 million people place the UK fifth among EU countries for the size of their expat population in other EU member countries. Poland has the most: an estimated 3.5 million Poles live elsewhere in the EU. Romania, Germany and Italy also have higher expat populations than the UK.

Where UK citizens lived in 2010 and 2011 Spain hosts the largest group of UK citizens living in the rest of the EU at an estimated 309,000. France is second with 157,000 and Ireland next with 112,000.

The University of Oxford’s Migration Observatory produced similar research in 2011, which has since been updated.

Previous estimates have placed the figure higher, but these aren’t the best or most recently available figures An older estimate by the IPPR think tank estimated that 1.8 million UK nationals lived in other EU countries for at least a year in 2008. This rose to 2.2 million when including people who lived abroad for at least part of the year. This was produced before all the census data used by the UN was available, so the researchers filled in the gaps using various assumptions. This estimate has been used as recently as last month by the government, but the IPPR itself no longer uses it. It now says that the figure is 1.2 million. Correction 29 March 2017 We have updated this to say the ONS collated information rather than the ONS collecting information. Source –FullFacts.org

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ZIMBABWE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION NORWICH

celebrates Black History Month with a talk by Dr Thomas Haizel Managing Director of Anglia DNA

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Dr Thomas Heizel


Brexit and EU citizens right to stay in the UK? “Under current arrangements, citizens of other EU countries get the right to stay in the UK indefinitely if they’ve lived here legally and continuously for five years. They have to meet certain criteria to qualify, broadly speaking whether they’re working, looking for work, self-employed, studying or self-sufficient. People can apply for a card as proof of permanent residence. Permanent residence as a concept comes from EU law, as opposed to ‘indefinite leave to remain’ which is the route to settlement for non-EU citizens. When the UK leaves the EU, ‘permanent residence’ status will no longer apply.” (fullfact.org). However, according to a recently published document form the Home office and the Brexit Department – the following paragraphs out of a 25 points paragraph document are more reassuring for EU citizens in the UK. @Para 1- The UK will be bound by the obligations set out in the Withdrawal Agreement as a matter of international law. The citizens’ rights chapter of this Agreement will be incorporated in UK law, which means that the UK authorities will be required to confer the status and rights defined in the Withdrawal Agreement upon those EU citizens and their family members who fall within its scope, and EU citizens will be able to enforce their rights on that basis. @Para 7 - The fee for applying for this status will not exceed the cost of a British passport. The cost will not be linked to other Home Office immigration application fees, for example, the fee for indefinite leave to remain or

naturalisation as a British citizen. @Para 8 - For those who already hold a valid EEA permanent residence document, there will be a simple process to exchange this for a settled status document, subject to ID verification and submission of a photograph, a security check and confirmation of ongoing residence. The previous residence assessment will not be re-done. We intend to charge a reduced fee to these individuals. @Para 13 - Applicants who are not yet able to evidence the five years’ continuous residence necessary to obtain settled status, but who can evidence that they were resident before the specified date, will be given temporary status. This will enable them to remain in the UK until they have built up five years’ continuous residence allowing them to apply for settled status. And according to Louise Gooch of EELGA’s, this in a nutshell means, anyone with a permanent residence card will be asked to confirm their identity and can then be moved into settled status in UK – the status checks which were undertaken when applying for permanent residence won’t be re-done. Those without a permanent residence permit will need to pay a fee no greater than the cost of applying for a British passport to obtain their settled status – those applying who have a residence permit will also need to pay, but it will be a reduced rate. KEY SEARCH WORD: Technical note: citizens’ rights, administrative procedures in the UK Source Link: https://www.gov.uk/ government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/file/657694/ TECHNICAL_NOTE_CITIZENS__ RIGHTS_-_ADMINISTRATIVE_ PROCEDURES_IN_THE_UK.pdf

Newsflash from Migrant Rights Network – key facts • Study finds migrant workers take less sick leave - Migrant workers are over three times less likely to be absent from work than home-grown UK workers, according to new research. • School hate crimes spike following Brexit vote - Reports of hate crimes and hate incidents in schools rose by 89 per cent in the middle of the Brexit campaign, a Times Educational Supplement investigation reveals. • No new immigration system by 2019, says think tank - Free movement of people will have to be kept for several years after Brexit because a new immigration system will not be ready in time, a new report has warned. • Rights Clinic challenges UK denial of permanent residence to EU nationals - The EU Rights Clinic plans to bring a complaint to the EU so it can bring an end to the restrictive policy of the UK authorities which currently deny EU citizens permanent residence if they do not have comprehensive sickness insurance (CSI). • Cops report crime victims to immigration enforcers - Migrant groups – including MRN - have slammed the Metropolitan police which has been referring victims of crime to the Home Office for immigration enforcement. • Anti-migrants unhappier than promigrant people - People who want to stop more immigration to the UK are less happy than those who welcome it, and politicians are part of the reason for this, new research shows. • Migrants boost London’s economy and support job creation outside the capital – report - On average, a migrant worker in a full-time job in London contributes an added £46,000 each year to the economy, according to a new report from London First, the capital’s business promotion body. Source: Migrant Rights Network blog: The full story for each articles above can be found using the title as key search word.

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‘Active Citizens Together’ (ACT) Project –

Sue Hay & Rachel Heathcock, East of England Local Government Association

I

t seems that every time we tune in to any form of media there’s a news item about migration. But you could be forgiven for not knowing that we have something in the East of England called the ‘Strategic Migration Partnership’. Maybe not something that’s on everyone’s lips or minds most of the time, but there are six of us working for the partnership across the region, supporting those of you out there in its cities, towns, villages, neighbourhoods and communities concerned with the safety, wellbeing and integration of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees. You might be reading this thinking, for instance, about our work on the Syrian Resettlement Programme, or on Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children. But, just in case you haven’t heard of it, we want to tell you about a project we ran from 1st October 2015 until 30th September 2017. Funding for this project came from the European Commission’s ‘Rights, Equality and Citizenship’ Programme 2014-2020’ to encourage ‘Mobile European Citizens’ (or MECs) to become active citizens here in the UK. Known for our love of snazzy acronyms (our previous project was ‘ACCESS’ – Acquiring Cultural Competence, Equalities, Successful Safeguarding!), we decided to call our new arrival ‘ACT’ – ‘Active Citizens Together’.

So what was ‘ACT’?

The four-woman, part-time project team was led by Malgorzata (better known as ‘Gosia’) Strona, with support from Louise Gooch, and the two of us running the project day-today, and night-to-night on occasion – oh, and weekends. In short, we ran workshops on active citizenship, offering mentoring support, and linking up with English language tutors to incorporate active citizenship into their classes. Everything was geared toward people from any/all other 27 EU countries, aiming to enhance their understanding of, and interest in

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becoming more civically and community-active. The English language teaching link was initiated by Gosia and Louise who wrote a two-hour teaching module for ESOL classes which included material on voting rights, knowing how to register to vote, and introducing some of the distinctive ‘language’ surrounding the political process. What’s a ballot box? Is it to do with ballet dancing? What’s the difference between the political parties? What’s a polling booth? Is it for Poles only? Why bother voting if you might be back in your home country this time next year? What’s the difference between a County Council and a Borough Council? And why do we have Town and Parish Councils as well? And if we’ve got all these councils doing things for us, why the heck should we be active citizens anyway? We had a lot of laughs and a lot of discussion, and people from 22 EU countries took part, as well as others from further afield, including China, Kenya, Turkey, Russia, Afghanistan to name just a few.

What about the outcomes?

Obviously we all love a good outcome, and we think these are extremely good outcomes! Activity Workshops Workshop Participants ESOL Classes ESOL Class Participants Mentoring Meetings Numbers involved in Mentoring Network Members

Targets Delivered 20 24 200 256 20 47 200 280 20 24 40 60 50 111

What about the people?

Perhaps better still was the joy of meeting so many inspiring European and global citizens. People often with so many competing pressures and demands on their time, but still keen to be active in their communities. Here are some examples from our mentoring project: Anna wants to become a teacher. Having taken her to meet the Volunteer Coordinator at her local primary school she said: “It was a great step for me going to that school. And it’s a good opportunity for me to be with my three children at half term and the summer etc. I’m going to do Level 1 childcare course because of that meeting we had. I hope that when I finish the course maybe I will have a job at that school.” Alex, a banking advisor from Poland took part in one of our workshops and then joined the mentoring programme. She will be starting a new volunteering role on 1st October with a local community sports organisation. Carla, Magda and Ela also took part in our mentoring programme, spending the day in Court, learning about the highs and lows of being a magistrate, and sitting in on three different cases. Carla said: “Thank you for the interesting day. I really enjoyed it and will think about becoming a magistrate in the near future”. And we very much hope that the few Migrant Europeans who have made it to the role of local councillor across the region might well be joined by others as a result of this project.

Any downsides?

Whilst becoming more actively engaged in community life, groups and organisations can help people feel

more integrated, many other factors in their lives can be far more demanding. We had some unexpected feedback from a project participant who came along to a mentoring meeting with a voluntary organisation and discovered an opportunity to become a befriender for people with learning disabilities at a local charity. As a result of this meeting he said that he would also search on the ‘Do-It.org’ website for additional opportunities around his other main interests which also included social media and working with older people. So far so good….. Four months later, having not heard from him for a while, we received this email (in his own words): “Good evening, I’m really sorry I didn’t answer. It was many changes in my family life. We decided go back to Poland. My wife with kids are in Poland and I will go there in next Sunday. For the meantime I am again move to my sisters. All our things are in Poland. I need close all matter yet. Probably we are newer come back to England. We come back to Poland because we are not happy here. Kids all the time miss for somebody and didn’t happy. When they was here pine for grandmother. When they was in Poland, pine for me. And I with my wife want be with our moms. We want see all family together. I would like to acknowledge You for Your support and Your time.” So while we’re pleased with all we achieved through the ACT Project, we also have to ask ourselves how easy or difficult we find it ourselves to give up our time for free to help out at a school, a community group, a church, a charity shop, a foodbank and so on. And then, how much more difficult is this for many mobile Europeans, struggling to secure their and their families’ futures at the same time?

Want to know more?

This was still a far-reaching project, with activities going on right across the region. Many aspects can be rolled out locally. So please do look through our project legacy documents: http://smp.eelga.gov.uk/ migrant-workers/act-project.aspx. Could you help someone take a step toward to being a more active, engaged citizen?


Norfolk World Music Drum Camp in Bungay July 2017

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HEALTH

As summary of charges for secondary healthcare services which have come into effect this year • Primary healthcare (GP practices, NHS Walk ins, minor injury units) remain free of charge and can be accessed by everyone, regardless of immigration status. • Secondary healthcare (Provided by NHS Trust – planned hospital care, surgery, mental health services, community health – whether in hospital or in community) must be paid for by any person ‘not ordinarily resident’ in the UK. A person from outside EEA must have settled status to be ordinarily resident unless they are “Exempt”. There is a list of Exemptions but these include - Refugees / persons granted Humanitarian Protection, Asylum Seekers, Refused AS on s.4 support, Victims of Trafficking, and people who have LTR and have paid the NHS surcharge or have had that charge waived. Otherwise they are an OVERSEAS VISITOR. • Therefore any Visa overstayers, Illegal entrants and refused AS not in receipt of NASS Support are considered Overseas visitors and must pay for treatment • If a person requires treatment and cannot afford to pay – a clinician will decide if urgent or immediately necessary – if yes, the treatment will be given and that person will accrue the NHS debt. • NHS trusts will provide the HO details of any NHS debts not paid within 2 months of person being invoiced. • A person who accrues a debt and then subsequently makes an application for LTR - the immigration rules state that such applications will “normally be refused” if debt is > £500.00.

The changes which have recently come into effect are that from 23rd August 2017 • Any secondary healthcare services provided by an NHS Trust can now be charged – prior, it had to be a service provided in an NHS hospital of by hospital staff. Therefore community services such as school nursing, community midwifery, mental health services, abortion services and from 23/10/2017 charitable services wholly funded by NHS are now chargeable. • There are exceptions for contagious diseases (HIV) and treatment of physical

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or mental condition caused by torture, FGM, domestic and sexual violence these will be provided Free of Charge. • There is now a legal REQUIREMENT to record whether someone is an overseas visitor and liable for charging on patient records.

We will need to consider the impact on our own service users but this will include:• Far more debts being incurred by persons accessing treatment and reporting of unpaid debts to the HO. • Anyone who has no status / application pending / not reporting to HO and who is considering accessing secondary services – if possible (treatment not urgent) can they access immigration advice in the 1st instance. As accessing treatment could not only mean they are reported to the HO -for non-payment of debt – but that the debt could affect their future applications. • In referral to community services we need to consider who is providing their funding as there could be a requirement on them (even support groups and advocacy services) to charge and report accrued debts to the HO. • Are healthcare providers actually able to distinguish the correct status of our service users? Please note that other proposed charges are for Ambulance and A&E services and this is with the Government awaiting a decision. Source Red Cross. On patient registration for GP practices, according to Migrant Children’s Project, new guidance from NHS England has been published which clearly states that no one can be turned away from a doctor’s surgery for failing to provide ID or proof of address. The Standard Operating Principles for Primary Medical Care (General Practice) also confirms that ‘there has not been any change in national policy in respect of patient registration for primary medical care services’ – but that the guidance ‘clarifies the rights of patients and the responsibilities of providers in registering with a GP practice’. For the Doctors of the World press release on the guidance, click here. See also the Migrant Children’s Project fact sheets on healthcare.


THE BRIDGE PLUS+ COMMUNITY CUISINES a selection of images

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13. Mumbai, India

Urban area: 17.7 million people Population density: 32,400 people per square kilometer Mumbai–called Bombay until the name was changed in 1995–is the commercial and movie capital of India and has attracted millions of migrants from the countryside. With high birth rates and the continued influx of migrants, Mumbai’s population is expected to grow rapidly in the future. It is the second most densely populated megacity.

14. Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto

Top 20 megacities in the world by population 1. Tokyo-Yokohama, Japan

Urban area: 37.8 million people Population density: 4,400 people per square kilometer Greater Tokyo is the largest urban agglomeration in the world, swallowing up the neighboring cities of Yokohama, Kawasaki, and Chiba. Despite its size, Tokyo has very efficient public transportation, which accounts for almost 80% of all journeys.

2. Jakarta, Indonesia

Urban area: 30.5 million people Population density: 9,500 people per square kilometer Jakarta has been booming since 2005 after suffering economic crises and disasters like floods and earthquakes in recent decades. Jakarta’s economy has boosted Indonesia’s economy to a growth rate of 6 percent.

3. Delhi, India

Urban area: 24.9 million people Population density: 12,100 people per square kilometer Delhi is India’s capital and recently overtook Mumbai as the biggest city by population size. It’s a place of striking contrasts. Mosques, bazaars, and narrow lanes mark the old town. New Delhi, the capital, features grand boulevards, business centers, and shopping malls.

4. Manila, Philippines

Urban area: 24.1 million people Population density: 15,300 people per square kilometer Manila’s colonial past is reflected in its architecture. Intramuros, the historic center, is surrounded by a massive wall built by the Spanish in the 16th century. Its parks and historic buildings have become a major tourist attraction.

5. Seoul-Incheon, South Korea

Urban area: 23.48 million people Population density: 10,400 people per square kilometer Seoul has grown rapidly since the Korean War (195053). Today, nearly half of the country’s population lives in and around Seoul. Seoul has made remarkable progress in combating air pollution and is one of the cleanest cities in Asia.

6. Shanghai, China

Urban area: 23.41 million people Population density: 6,100 people per square kilometer Shanghai has become China’s financial and commercial center and is ranked as the planet’s largest city proper. It has one of the world’s busiest ports and the world’s most extensive bus system with more than one thousand lines.

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7. Karachi, Pakistan

Urban area: 22.1 million people Population density: 23,400 people per square kilometer Students attend a rooftop evening class in a private school in a slum area in Karachi, the largest city, main seaport and financial center of Pakistan. Karachi is the third most densely populated megacity and accounts for about 20% of Pakistan’s GDP. It is growing rapidly due to rural-urban migration.

8. Beijing, China

Urban area: 21 million people Population density: 5,500 people per square kilometer China’s capital hosted a spectacular if controversial Olympic Games in 2008. Despite spending billions to clean the city’s air, average air pollution levels remain five times above WHO safety standards.

9. New York, USA

Urban area: 17.4 million people Population density: 5,400 people per square kilometer Made up of the commercial and industrial city of Osaka, the port of Kobe, and the ancient cultural capital of Kyoto, the Kansai megacity encompasses all aspects of Japanese life from the neon lit Dotonbori shopping district in Osaka pictured here to the Zen gardens and geisha houses of Kyoto and is home to about 15 percent of Japan’s population.

15. Moscow, Russia

Urban area: 16.1 million people Population density: 3,500 people per square kilometer By far Europe’s biggest city, Moscow has been swelled by rising numbers of migrants from other parts of Russia and the former Soviet states, attracted by higher living standards. Russia’s expanding economy has attracted people to the capital which is becoming richer.

16. Dhaka, Bangladesh

Urban area: 15.66 million people Population density: 43,500 people per square kilometer One of the fastest growing cities in the world, Dhaka has attracted economic migrants from all over Bangladesh. As many as one quarter of Dhaka’s residents live in crowded slums, according to the World Bank. It is by far the most densely populated megacity. Urban Detail: Dhaka is known as the rickshaw capital of the world as many people get around using cycle rickshaws or autorickshaws

Urban area: 20.6 million people Population density: 1,800 people per square kilometer New York City, especially Manhattan, is arguably a role model for balancing urban development with good public transport and access to open spaces. New York is the only American city where most households do not own a car. Somewhat surprisingly, however, it has the least dense population of any megacity due to the many outlying suburbs.

17. Cairo, Egypt

10. Guangzhou-Foshan

Urban area:15 million people Population density: 2,400 people per square kilometer Los Angeles is the second biggest city in the United States by land size. An extensive grid of freeways, boulevards, and smaller neighborhood roads spans the city.

Urban area: 20.5 million people Population density: 6,000 people per square kilometer Historically known as Canton, Guangzhou is China’s third largest city and located on the Pearl River in southern China about 120 kilometers northwest of Hong Kong. It is a critical trading port and capital of China’s industrial and manufacturing province of Guangdong, which has been one of the fastest urbanizing areas of the world for many years.

11. Sao Paulo, Brazil

Urban area: 20.3 million people Population density: 7,500 people per square kilometer Sao Paulo is Brazil’s richest city and the most important financial center in Latin America. Poverty and crime, however, remain a problem. An average of 6,000 people are murdered annually in Sao Paulo.

12. Mexico City, Mexico

Urban area: 19.4 million people Population density: 8.8 million people Mexico City is ten times the size it was in 1940. The Mexican capital generates a quarter of the country’s wealth. However, with low population growth, the number of people in retirement is expected to rise rapidly.

Urban area: 15.6 million people Population density: 8,900 people per square kilometer Located on the banks of the Nile River, Cairo is the biggest urban area in Africa and in the Arab world. Bustling bazaars and narrow lanes, the smells of spices and pipe smoke, the call to prayer five times a day and the cacophony of horns–this is Cairo.

18. Los Angeles, USA

19. Bangkok, Thailand

Urban area:14.9 million people Population density: 5,800 people per square kilometer The capital of Thailand has grown rapidly in recent years, propelled by its status as a regional hub for tourism, transport, healthcare and the automotive industry. Many multinationals located their regional headquarters in the city during the 1980s and 1990s. It is by far and away Thailand’s largest city.

20. Kolkata, India

Urban area: 14.6 million people Population density: 12,200 people per square kilometer Kolkata, known as Calcutta until 2001, was the capital of Imperial British India until 1912. Renowned as a center of Indian arts, culture, and political revolution, Kolkata is also known as the home of missionary Mother Teresa. Source: Reuters


More Immigration checks and controls BANK CHECKS: People without current immigration status likely to have accounts closed or frozen

Since December 2014, UK banks and building societies have been prohibited from allowing people without any current immigration permission from opening new current accounts. This is one measure of the UK’s immigration policy to create a compliant environment (formerly referred to as the ‘hostile environment’), which aims to encourage people without any immigration permission to leave the UK voluntarily, having disrupted their ability to self-support. As of 30 October 2017, these measures will be extended so that banks and building societies will be required to check the details of all current account holders against the list of disqualified persons held by Cifas, and must notify the Home Office if a person is recorded on that list as having no immigration permission and provide details of their accounts, including regular payments into accounts of over £200. If the person does not have leave to remain in the UK then this will result in one of the following two outcomes: • The Home Office may apply to the courts for a freezing order for the current account and any other accounts held by the person, which if granted will mean they can no longer access their funds, although limited access may be permitted for reasonable living and legal expenses. • If a freezing order is not applied for or granted then the Home Office must notify the bank and require it to close all accounts that the person holds, including joint accounts. The bank will return the remaining funds to the account holder. The government’s draft code of practice, Freezing Orders (Bank Accounts Measures), states that the Home Office will not usually consider applying for a freezing order if the level of funds in a person’s combined bank accounts is less than £1,000, unless the account holder presents a high risk of harm or criminality, or has a history of immigration offending including noncompliance with removal. From 1 January 2018 banks will be required to undertake these checks on a quarterly basis. Details of the process banks must follow are set out in the code of practice and schedule 7 of the Immigration Act 2016.

Impact on social services & what social services need to do This measure is expected to disrupt the ability of people, who do not have any current immigration permission, to selfsupport in the UK. The draft code or practice does not make any mention of what action the Home Office might take when they are notified of a person who does not have any current immigration permission, beyond freezing or instructing a bank to close an account. In October 2016, the Chief Inspector of Immigration found in his report on the hostile environment measures relating to bank accounts and driving licences, that the Home Office had no method of evaluating the impact of specific hostile environment measures on voluntary returns, enforced removals, and on the ‘pull factor’ for individuals considering settling illegally in the UK. Where people’s living arrangements are disrupted, this may lead to increasing demand for social services’ support that must be provided to safeguard the welfare of children and vulnerable adults who face destitution and have a legal or practical barrier preventing them from returning to their country of origin. The removal of bank accounts from people without current immigration status is also likely to impact on those who are already receiving financial support from social services. It is unlikely that banks will start to undertake checks until early next year, so local authorities have some time to prepare for this. As the Home Office will only apply for accounts with a balance of under £1000 to be frozen in limited circumstances, it is most likely that people receiving social services’ support will not have this level of funds and so will have their account closed and the balance returned to them. However, it is possible that a person could have over £1000 in their account on a temporary basis, for example, in order to pay for an immigration application (which costs £1473), and so need to be aware that in such instances their account could suddenly be frozen. Where social services’ provide financial support directly into bank accounts, this system may need reviewing and potential people who may be affected should be identified and notified about what to do to obtain their support if their account is closed or frozen. Local authorities using NRPF Connect must ensure full details of any financial support that is being

provided is added to the database, in order to demonstrate why a person is receiving regular payments into their account. Local authority practitioners also need to be aware of how this measure could affect people when they are assessing need and establishing a person or parent’s financial circumstances. Going forward, fewer people who do not have current immigration permission will have access to a bank account, so cannot be expected to provide bank statements. Local authority practitioners using NRPF Connect are requested to inform us about any problems they encounter due to this new measure so we can monitor whether this is having an impact on NRPF service provision.

Upfront charging for NHS healthcare now in force In August we (National NRPF) reported on new regulations which make significant changes to NHS charging for certain migrants living in England. All the changes have now been implemented. Prior to the changes that were implemented by the regulations in August and on 23 October 2017, only hospital treatment or community services provided by hospital staff could be charged for and payment was usually required after treatment had been administered. Since 23 October, certain migrants, and some British citizens who normally live abroad, will be required to pay for most types of secondary and community NHS healthcare, including NHS funded services provided by charities and local authority public health services, unless the treatment required is exempt from charging. The Department of Health has published new guidance for healthcare providers: Upfront charging operational framework and has updated its Guidance on implementing the overseas visitor charging regulations, which provides some clarity about what community services may be charged for at pages 24 and 32-33: • Maternity care provided in the community • District nursing services • Drug and alcohol treatment • Mental health services Full payment for a course of non-urgent treatment must be made up front before any services can be provided. However, if the service required is exempt from charges, for example, mental health or maternity services to treat conditions caused by sexual violence, then a person will not have to pay for this. The charging guidance also confirms that services provided by school nurses and health visitors remain free of charge to all. Full details of what healthcare remains free, what must be paid for, and who is required to pay, are set out in our updated factsheet accessible at http://www.nrpfnetwork.org.uk/Documents/ NHS-healthcare.pdf Source NRPF Network

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Norwich Integration Partnership (NIP) 3 Norwich Organisations Making a difference to local people’s lives

N

ew Routes, English+ and The Bridge Plus+ are three organisations in Norwich that work with communities at grassroots level. Together they form the Norwich Integration Partnership (NIP). They provide holistic, joined-up support to ethnic minority individuals and families navigating the many problems they face between arrival and living a full functioning life in the Norwich community. With barely any English language skills, cultural awareness or local knowledge, it’s almost impossible to get a new life up and running. NIP service users, particularly those who are asylum seekers and refugees, would most likely have experienced trauma, family separation, disrupted education and employment, and health issues, worsened by anxiety about their immigration status and future safety. To address these complex challenges, NIP creates individual pathways of support: information, advice, advocacy and race equality work provided by The Bridge Plus+, language development from English+, and group activities to build language and skills plus skill-building groups and one to one support provided by New Routes. NIP is a 3 year Big Lottery project funded until June 2018. To give you an indication of its work track record, in Year 2, NIP supported over 700 ethnic minority service users from over 40 nationalities and diverse backgrounds. All 3 organisations are committed to ensuring equality and diversity for all ages and gender, able-bodied or disabled. The central locations in which the organisations are based enables easy access for service users. Through individual specialist service provision, each member of the partnership has a unique approach to supporting the integration and settlement needs of service users. For example, The Bridge Plus+ provides drop-in access to information and advice service covering a range of issues from, employment, education and housing and any other issue relevant to an individual’s settlement needs. With strengthened links to other support organisations, such as Equal Lives and MIND, they ensure that service users with long term health problems and or disabilities access full support. English+, in addition to providing tailored English language support classes, co-ordinates the monthly INN (Integration Norwich Network) group, which is a forum to raise awareness of issues, publicise events and activities, meet others working in the sector and create connections with others working in this field. New Routes on the other hand, has developed a multitude of integration programmes and activities. They have coordinated and hosted Sexual Health workshops for ethnic minority men and women, and are working with others around the issue of asylum seekers’ access to Mental Health support, as well as

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coordinating Refugee Week in Norwich. NIP information flyers, activity timetables and the Bridge Plus+ magazine, B-Me Voices, are available in all of the 47 libraries in Norfolk, in schools, at local networks and doctors’ surgeries. All NIP partners work very closely with British Red Cross and City Reach, the local health support team working with newly dispersed asylum seekers, by providing on-going support to refugees. Service users are also signposted to NIP organisations from Norfolk County Council Social work team, Norwich City Council housing team, City College, Children’s Services, Job Centre Plus, CAB and by local residents seeking help for their neighbours. New Routes and English+ are currently working with others local network members to coordinate the Norwich City of Sanctuary initiative, which was initiated over a year ago and is increasingly gaining momentum and countywide support. All 3 organisations deliver awareness raising talks to schools, religious institutions, youth groups and local organisations. The 3 organisations have also been selected as the Civic Charity of Norwich for the year 2017-18 which further increases NIP access to those in need of the services offered.

What has worked particularly well?

As a result of the partnership, information sharing has become more effective and widespread through other local stakeholder groups. And as participants/service users have become accustomed to accessing different partners for different issues and are aware that information is shared within NIP, there has been less duplication and “fishing” for different advice from each organisation. This also means better data collection, and more collaborative working and planning of events and activities. Qualitative data gathered through project monitoring as well as through a separate consultation exercise carried out in May 2017 clearly shows the difference that the Partnership has made to the lives of beneficiaries. People most value the “one stop shop” approach to The Bridge Plus+ information and advice, which means they do not have to visit a range of different agencies to discuss problems in the first place; and the very strong “community feel” to all of the group activities delivered by New Routes and English+. Local agencies and services working with BME communities in Norwich have also recognised the difference made by the Partnership. All 35 service providers who responded to a NIP survey in May 2017 reported that NIP benefits their service users (with 85% “greatly” benefit to service users); all reported that if the Project did not exist, it would negatively impact on their clients (with 71% stating it would have a “severe” impact). Networking with other stakeholders through INN and other meetings has resulted in several new initiatives such as the Sexual Health and Relationship programmes, with a Participatory Action

Research Programme (PAR) planned for next year in collaboration with University of East Anglia School of Education, to evaluate the changes in attitude of those engaging in the programme. The NIP project coordinator has been recruited to UNESCO Chair steering group to liaise with international organisations and share best practice. Although the rising profile of NIP has resulted in many positive opportunities, it has also necessitated staff attending more meetings and events. The reality however is that for all the NIP partners, trying to manage a partnership with part time staff for a service for which there is a full time demand and need, has added a great deal of pressure to already tight schedules. For New Routes, premises remains a challenging, as the number of people attending their activities has increased exponentially, while English+ has to operate from multiple locations to cater for the rising demand which is a transportation and logistics challenge. Volunteers are a life line for any functional charitable organisation, which means recruiting and supporting more volunteers is an ongoing challenge for The Bridge Plus+ team as staff are all part time and have no spare capacity for additional volunteer coordination tasks. Cultural misunderstandings and misconceptions around sex and relationships has been a very challenging issue, particularly for single migrants. The feedback from the project delivered last summer was very interesting, as participants clearly valued the opportunity to discuss cultural differences and expectations and to understand the legal implications. The opportunity to collaborate with UEA and to have an ongoing evaluation of this initiative is much welcomed. The PAR findings will be published and disseminated widely through the School of Education and the UNESCO Chair programme. New Routes’ Mentoring & Befriending project was re-evaluated by NCVO in June 2017, and has successfully passed the Approved Provider Standards. This is the third successful evaluation of the programme which has been running since 2007 and is the only mentoring project for asylum seekers and refugees in the Eastern Region. And finally we are proud to mention again that the recognition of NIP as the Norwich Civic Charity for the year 201718 will undoubtedly lead to numerous opportunities to share learning and good practice with a wider audience. This however has not changed the fact that our core funding which is provided by Big Lottery will end in June 2018, making the future uncertain. How to donate to Norwich Civic Charity appeal 2017-18 If you wish to make an online donation to the Lord Mayor’s charity appeal, visit the Norwich Integration Partnership website. http://norwichintegrationpartnership.org. uk/?page_id=18


VOICES

• I speak not for myself but for those without voice... those who have fought for their rights... their right to live in peace, their right to be treated with dignity, their right to equality of opportunity, their right to be educated. By Malala Yousafzai

• Throughout history, it has been the inaction of those who could have acted; the indifference of those who should have known better; the silence of the voice of justice when it mattered most; that has made it possible for evil to triumph. By Emperor Haile Selassie • I never made it to the school choir because the music teacher didn’t like my voice. I was pretty sad. But he was probably right; I did have a voice a bit like a goat, but my dad told me to never give up and to keep going, and it’s paid off. By music superstar Shakira • Sekinat’s story. Sekinat is from Nigeria, she is now in Niger, which is 1825 k m away from her home country. This is a story cullied from http://iamamigrant.org/ “Many of us died in the desert. I am so grateful that I don’t count myself among the dead. This road isn’t good for anyone.” “I have four younger brothers and sisters, and a very sick mother. As the oldest, I feel it’s my responsibility to provide for my siblings. When a friend invited me to go to Libya, I thought I could try my luck as a fashion designer. This is what I studied back in Nigeria, but I never had money for a sewing machine. On our way there, I started blaming myself for choosing this road. I was told before I left that I was going to travel by plane. When we finally reached Agadez,

I called my friend and told her that the road was terrible and that I couldn’t do it anymore. She told me everything was going to be fine. When I saw that we were about to travel like goats, I finally understood that this how the whole journey was going to be. I called my mum and told her everything was fine; I didn’t want to scare her. When we reached the desert, the driver dropped all forty of us there. We spent more than two weeks in the desert. We had nothing but milk. When they gave us water, it was petrol water; we had no choice but to drink it. People started getting very sick because of it. The driver finally came back and told us to get ready, but we had nothing to eat or drink and we were being told that there was still a week to go. We started our days with the sun on top of our heads and that’s how we ended them. It was freezing cold at night and we had no blankets, nothing. One day, the driver dropped us off in another part of the desert and asked us for more money. I asked him how he expected

us to have any money after two weeks in the middle of nowhere. He said he wouldn’t take us unless we found the money. We started begging, telling him we wouldn’t survive if he left us there. He finally took us up to the Libyan border. That’s when soldiers started shooting at the car; he told us to get out, and drove off with everything we had left. They don’t care that you are a human being. They just abandon you there. The day the driver came to pick us up, I saw that I had been sleeping on a skeleton. It scared me to death. How could I had been sleeping on another human being?! Many of us died in the desert. You can’t survive with any food or water. I have never seen anything like it: so many corpses in the desert, skeletons, fresh corpses. I am so grateful that I don’t count myself among the dead. This road wasn’t good for me, and it’s not good for anyone.”

A BME shop smashed last summer

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Two Former Refugees Won Elections in the USA

Kathy Tran originally from Vietnam elected to Virginia State House of Delegates. Elections across the country on 8th November 2017 brought victories for many first-time public office holders. In the US states of Montana and Virginia, it was also an historic election night for two candidates who came to the United States as refugees. Their winning campaigns represent the immense contributions of refugees who are welcomed to this country after fleeing violence and persecution. The Huffington Post’s Willa Frej and Philip Lewis have a thorough recap of all the notable candidates who won office last night, including Mayor-elect Wilmot Collins in Helena and Delegate-elect Kathy Tran in Virginia’s 42nd district. Collins, 54, defeated his opponent in a nonpartisan race and will become the first black mayor in Montana’s history. He arrived in Helena as a refugee 23 years ago after fleeing civil war in his home country of Liberia.

On a day many Americans feel true hope reading news for 1st time in a year, this is 1 of the more inspiring tales: Wilmot Collins, a Liberian refugee, elected mayor of #Helena, Montana! https://t.co/26GboojDSG “The country is still not what Mr. Trump wants it to be,” Collins told HuffPost. In the aftermath of the Trump administration’s first executive order banning refugees, Collins told a local television station that “coming here provided me a second chance. A second chance at life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” “The process is intense,” he added in reference to refugee vetting measures. “The process I went through took me two years and seven months to go through.” In Virginia, Kathy Tran, a former Vietnamese refugee, became the first Asian-American woman to join Virginia’s House of Delegates and the first Vietnamese-American elected at any level in the state. Kathy Tran came to the U.S. as a refugee from Vietnam when she was an infant. Tonight, she became the first Asian American woman elected to the Virginia House of Delegates. Congrats @ kathykltran! pic.twitter.com/NSynRwHJ7d Last week, The Washington Post included Tran in a piece about several women running for local office in Virginia, and featured this inspiring anecdote: Her fourth child was born shortly after Trump’s inauguration. Concerned about the new president’s anti-illegal-immigration platform, she and her husband, Matthew Reisman, chose the name Elise, inspired by Ellis Island, through which Reisman’s family immigrated to escape anti-Semitism. The middle name, “Minh Khanh,” is Vietnamese for “bright bell,” inspired by the Liberty Bell. Within a few weeks of her daughter’s birth, Tran decided she wanted to live up to her daughter’s aspirational name. So she became a candidate. As the administration continues to admit fewer and fewer refugees, the election-night victories for Collins and Tran are a timely reminder of the benefits derived from America’s proud tradition of offering safe haven. Source -https://www.hias.org/blog/two-former-refugees-wonelections-last-night

Countries in the EU you can travel to with your Refugee Travel Document without a Visa

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Sweden; Switzerland; Vatican; Trinidad and Tobago (only for nationals of countries entitled to visa free entry) *

The holders of the Refugee Travel Document issued under the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees can travel visa free to many countries all over the world. However, many counties changed their internal policies and now require the Refugee Travel Document holders to obtain visas even for short-term tourist visits. The travellers should always check the visa requirement of the country of their destination prior to the trip. Also, a valid UK residence permit confirming their refugee status in the UK must be taken for the overseas trips with the Travel Document. The following countries DO NOT require visas for the visitors with the Refugee Travel Document issued under the 1951 UN Convention:

The following countries require visas for the visitors with the Refugee Travel Document issued under the 1951 UN Convention: • Armenia; Austria; Azerbaijan; ;Belarus; Brazil; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Dominican Republic; Estonia; Georgia; Hungary; Italy; Ireland; Kazakhstan; Macedonia; Montenegro; Poland; San Marino; Serbia; Turkey; Ukraine

• Albania; Andorra; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Denmark; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Iceland; Kosovo; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Moldova; Monaco; ;Netherlands; Norway; Portugal; Romania; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain;

• Qatar – Doha

B-Me VOICES

List of Countries that DO NOT ALLOW ENTRANCE for the visitors with the Refugee Travel Document issued under the 1951 UN Convention: • UAE – Dubai This list is subject to changes so please check information on the visa requirements before your travel arrangements.


What is Universal Credit?

U

niversal Credit is a new type of benefit designed to support people of working age, who are on a low income or out of work. It will replace six existing benefits and is currently being rolled out across the UK. It started in Norwich on 7th December 2015 for new single claimants only (i.e. any single person without dependent children) who are of British nationality. The latest information we have from the Department of Work and Pensions who is in charge of welfare benefits is that Universal Credit will not be implemented in Norwich until October 2018. But here is some information about what things will look like WHEN Universal Credit is rolled out in our area.

• Universal Credit will replace some of the benefits you are already receiving such as income support, income based JSA, income based ESA, housing benefit, working tax credits/child tax credits, social fund budgeting loans. Basically all your benefits will be paid as a single monthly amount. • This means that the housing benefit element will now be paid directly to you the claimant – not to the landlord. Some exceptions will apply • All applications have to be made online

What may be good about this new system?

Potential problems, Issues & challenges

Smoother transition from out of work to in work.

• Monthly payments, including housing benefit can result in non-payment of rents and rent arrears (pilot areas show a rise in such problems)

• Because everything will be online, you will be able to access your account from anywhere and not have to wait for a helpline adviser to answer your telephone calls • Work coaches should spend more time assisting you the claimant to meet your individual needs • If you, the claimant, don’t have IT skills, you could ask for help from digital champions at your local JobCentrePlus • Childcare support – currently you have to work over 16 hours to get help with childcare but the new system will be more flexible, which may be good news for lone parents doing “mini jobs” (small number of hours every week)

• New claimant commitments are more stringent and sanctions attached to it can be detrimental. • Because all applications have to be done online, voluntary support organisations may have to help clients but there is no additional funding to compensate for the expected additional workload • All the payments will go into one account, usually the head of household. This is a major shift from previously when one partner could receive certain benefits and the other partner could receive child tax credits. Domestic problems and disputes could arise. If you would like to know more about Universal Credit, come and speak to a member of the Bridge Plus+ team.

Mo Boyd our longtime volunteer says goodbye after 10 years in Norwich

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Bowthorpe

Your 39 Norwich City Councillors

Sue Sands 19C The Swale Norwich NR5 9HE t: 01603 594995

Catton Grove

Mike Stonard 337a Dereham Road

Norwich NR2 3UT t: 07880 500268

Paul Kendrick 33 Boundary Road Norwich NR6 5JF t: 07714 598755

Caroline Ackroyd 30 Greenways Norwich NR4 6PE t: 07941 259502

Gail Harris 6 Raven Yard King Street Norwich NR1 1PQ t: 01603 661102

Marion Maxwell c/o City Hall Norwich NR2 1NH t: 01603 615129

Martin Schmierer 9 West Parade Norwich NR2 3DN t: 07769 222249

Judith Lubbock 422 Unthank Road Norwich NR4 7QH t: 01603 504126

Chris Herries 21 Oak Street Norwich NR3 3AE t: 07929 636193

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B-Me VOICES

Denise Carlo 213 College Road Norwich NR2 3JD t: 01603 504563

David Bradford 20 Timothy Close Norwich NR1 4NG t: 01603 437786

Keith Driver 29 Mansfield Lane Norwich NR1 2JT t: 01603 632320

Patrick Manning 59 City Road Norwich NR1 3AS t: 07950 260179

Mile Cross

David Fullman 115 Somerleyton Gardens, Norwich NR2 2BP t: 01603 626024

Charmain Woollard 5 Gresham Road Norwich NR3 2QP t: 07757 704987

Nelson

Tim Jones 9 Highland Avenue Norwich NR2 3NP t: 01603 447623

Alan Waters 64 Heartsease Lane Norwich NR7 9NS t: 07774 229776

Lakenham

Mancroft

Simeon Jackson 37 Esdelle Street Norwich NR3 3BN t: 01603 670512

Sally Button 6 Cossgrove Close Norwich NR3 2SR t: 01603 569996

Crome

Eaton

James Wright 56 Helena Road Norwich NR2 3BZ t: 01603 858564

Mike Sands 19C The Swale Norwich NR5 9HE t: 01603 594995

Vaughan Thomas 6 Northumberland Street, Norwich NR2 4EZ t: 07877 885194

Vivien Thomas 6 Northumberland Street, Norwich NR2 4EZ t: 07916 819213

Sewell

Hugo Malik 33 Denbigh Road Norwich NR2 3HH t: 07517 166495

Matthew Packer 17 Branksome Close Norwich NR4 6SP t: 07841 745773

Julie BrociekCoulton 159 Angel Road Norwich NR3 3HX t: 07786 694325

Ed Coleshill c/o City Hall Norwich NR2 1NH t: 07766 063395

Font: Human


Thorpe Hamlet Thorpe Hamlet

Lesley Grahame 7 Railway Cottages Lesley Grahame Hardy Road 7 RailwayNR1 Cottages Norwich 1JW Hardy Road t: 01603 632228 Norwich NR1 1JW t: 01603 632228

Jo Henderson 72 St James Close Jo Henderson Norwich 72 St1NT James Close NR3 Norwich t: 01603 622162 NR3 1NT t: 01603 622162

Town Close Town Close

Ben Price c/o City Hall Ben Price Norwich c/o City NR2 1NHHall Norwich t: 01603 621709 NR2 1NH t: 01603 621709

Ash Haynes 75 Heath Road Ash Haynes Norwich 75 Heath NR3 1JW Road Norwich t: 01603 477885 NR3 1JW t: 01603 477885

University University

James ‘Bert’ Bremner James ‘Bert’ 12 Morello Close BremnerNR4 7NF Norwich 1201603 Morello Close t: 471134 Norwich NR4 7NF t: 01603 471134

Roger Ryan 13 Claremont RogerNorwich Ryan Road, 13 Claremont NR4 6SH Road, Norwich t: 07831 337088 NR4 6SH t: 07831 337088

David Raby 44 Bishop Bridge DavidNorwich Raby Road, 44 Bishop NR1 4ET Bridge Road, Norwich t: 01603 610529 NR1 4ET t: 01603 610529

Karen Davis 61 Pettus Road Karen Davis Norwich 61 Pettus NR4 7BY Road Norwich t: 07968 126834 NR4 7BY t: 07968 126834

Wensum Wensum

Sandra Bogelein 136 Northumberland Street Sandra Bogelein Norwich 136 NorthumberNR2 land 4EH Street Norwich t: 01603 478512 NR2 4EH t: 01603 478512

Martin Peek 57 Woodhill Rise Martin NorwichPeek 57 NR5Woodhill 0DW Rise Norwich t: 01603 479713 NR5 0DW t: 01603 479713

Kevin Maguire 333 Earlham Road Kevin Maguire Norwich 333 NR2Earlham 3RQ Road Norwich t: 01603 452540 NR2 3RQ t: 01603 452540

Please don’t ask your GP for medicines which can be bought at the pharmacy By caring for yourself you help to save valuable NHS time and money which can be spent on life saving treatments.

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09/10/2017 10:30:00

B-Me VOICES

35


Norwich City Council Lord Mayor & Sheriffs’ Chosen Civic Charity for the year 2017-18 A partnership of three local organisations facilitating the intergration of Norwich’s migrant communities, helping them to become informed and welcomed citizens

THE BRIDGE PLUS +

NEW ROUTES INTEGRATION

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B-Me Voices issue 9 Winter 2017  

B-Me Voices issue 9 Winter 2017

B-Me Voices issue 9 Winter 2017  

B-Me Voices issue 9 Winter 2017

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