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Issue 8 Summer 2017

B Me

Voices

Rip Foday Suso

an Officer & a Gentleman

Meet Jo Richardson

Equality & Diversity Manager for Norfolk County Council

A profile of

BME community organisations in Norfolk Young BME people speak out …with stories about Brexit, Gambian Women’s event, UK’s 10 most influential black people…. A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


Norwich City Council Lord Mayor & Sheriffs’ Chosen Civic Charity for the year 2017-18 A partnership of three local organisations facilitating the intergration of Norwich’s migrant communities, helping them to become informed and welcomed citizens

THE BRIDGE PLUS +

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NEW ROUTES INTEGRATION

ENGLISH +


EDITORIAL

So Brexit has stolen the show again! And as if we can never have enough elections, we went to the polls again, either because elections are immune to austerity measures or was it to give the PM a mandate at any cost – or was it just another disguised Brexit election? It’s anyone’s guess! What we know now is that, no clear mandate was given, deals are being made and the PM is making more EU-Divorce promises and concessions as we go to press. On a developing story, in this issue, we are now able to publish the full list of BME community organisations with their contact details were available. All the organisations listed can be contacted directly. However, there is the sad cover story of the death of yet another dedicated Norfolk resident, Mr. Foday Suso, full story at page 4. You may also be interested in the quick snap survey which shares the views of some young BME people at page 5. Our attention was brought to a story published in the winter 2016 issue of this magazine, which was about migrants being prosecuted and deported for date rape, in which the word “victim” was used in relation to offenders. We understand that this word was misused in this context and does not reflect the real intention of the article which was aimed at informing new immigrants that being nice is not the same as giving consent. The true victims, we strongly believe are the women that have been violated. I convey our sincere apologies for any misunderstanding this may have caused. And finally, we would like to share the good news that as partners of the Norwich Integration Partnership (See opposite page 2), we are the Norwich Civic Charity for the year 2017-18, for which we are very thankful to the Lord Mayor and City Sheriff for choosing us. So watch out, as many events, including the Lord Mayor’s Parade day on 8th July 2017, will aim to raise funds to further support our work with BME communities. You can always access the online version of this magazine at http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk/. And until the next issue, we would welcome and appreciate your comments, feedbacks and support. Sincerely Pa Musa, i8! Contact: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

INDEX

4. RiP Mr Foday Suso - An Officer & a Gentleman 5. Norfolk Young BME Speak Out 6. Inspire Focus Thetford Youth Project 7. The Bridge Plus+ 2017 AGM 8. Norwich City Mayor Making Day 2017 11. Gambia Women New Year’s Event 12. Brexit -All You Need to Know 18. Meet Jo Richardson of Norfolk County Council 14. UK’s Top 10 Influential Black People 19-8. A profile of BAME Communities in Norfolk 32. Experience of Volunteering @Bridge Plus+ 35. Diversity in European Football

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Foday: An Officer & a Gentleman

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oday Suso was a native of The Gambia, and a British citizen. He sadly passed away on the 28th April 2017 at age 43. He is survived by his wife and two sons aged 6 and 3. Foday was not just an officer and a gentleman, but a community leader. A few people may have already known that he was a prison officer for more than 10 years until he passed away, the last three years being stationed at the Norwich Prisons. But in the community, Foday is best known as the coordinator of the Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk, based in Great Yarmouth. A truly positive and spirited “go getter”. For all the years he has lived and worked in the UK, Foday has brought joy and happiness to people around him. He was everywhere with everyone for every occasion. He would mobilise his drumming mates to grace other people’s occasion, and entertain children and families. I called him the “Eveready man”, a real action guy. Two year ago when he was diagnosed with cancer, for Foday, life was just about to begin. He refused to be defeated despite being told he had less than six months to live. In the two years since, one would have expected him to act differently, but not this action man. He continued to organise and host community events, participated in other people’s project and community activities, and continued to go to work despite being medically excused from work. The man was always on his feet. He was a hardworking man, who knew nothing but work and desire to make a decent and honest living. Foday, you may be gone but forgotten. You have left many friends behind and your memory shall live on. Foday’s wife and family would like to thank all those who have paid tribute to, and or attended his funeral, burial and prayer services. Foday was a devout practising Muslim.

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2014 September EMA event

2015 October EMA event with Mayor of Great Yarmouth


Norfolk Young BME Speak Out - A snap survey

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his snap survey was based on a representative sample of three young males from minority ethnic communities who share the specific experience of moving to Norfolk as children and living here for the last 5-10 years. All of them, a British, an EU national and an asylum seeker, were born outside the UK but speak fluent English. All participants wanted to stay anonymous for this interview and they or a responsible adult has given their consent to take part in the interview. 1. What do you like about living in Norfolk as a young black/minority ethnic person? A. 16yrs Male = For me my local community is very helpful. Not everyone is really prejudice they all accept you. B. 23yrs Male = People care about each other. Quiet nice. The whole community. And the local charities understand and support us. C. 24yrs Male = Clean city. Crime rate not that high. Good job opportunities. 2. What do you think is difficult to find or do as a young black/minority ethnic person living in Norfolk? A. 16yrs Male = Something fun to do. A place to go and hangout. There is really nothing or nowhere to go apart from the park or staying indoors watching TV or being on gadgets. There is no common place of fun to meet. Even if I know of a place transport will be difficult. Buses don’t go everywhere and you are not allowed to use your school bus pass during the weekend. And come the summer it will be more difficult to travel around. It is also difficult to find a job just coming out of high school. B. 23yrs Male = A suitable place of worship. For some personal reasons, none of the mosques are suitable for me and my family. C. 24yrs Male= Not that diverse. More awareness raising about minority people. I would like to see more multi-cultural events being organised to bring people together, and teaching people about different cultures, race and religion. 3. How do you spend your free time? A. 16yrs Male = Going around the village or go to some friend’s house to see if they want to come out. B. 23yrs Male = I go to historical place, like Strangers hall, cathedral, simply because I can access them for free. C. 24yrs Male = I do music, and sometime I go out at night, like clubbing.

meet and mingle with minority people because of where I live (mainly white). But once awhile I will meet up with a friend (our parents are from the same country) in town to hang out. B. 23yrs Male = I think there should be more fun places. There are hardly any fun places where young people can go to. Residential trips for young people. C. 24yrs Male = More jobs opportunities. 5. What is your best experience of dealing with someone working for a government organisation, example, in the education (schools), health (Hospitals, GP), housing (Council), and support (social services)? A. 16yrs Male = All my experience has been with teachers which has been very good. B. 23yrs Male = I had a very good experience with course advisors and my tutors. Being new to the education system, I needed good advice. Also the NHS wellbeing service helped me a lot. I have been through some terrible times of stress and depression and I was on heavy medication. Stressed by my immigration status. Eventually they coached me to get off medication by joining exercise classes, swimming and listening to music, all of which helped. C. 24yrs Male = It wasn’t very positive. I think they have a two face method of dealing with race issues. And they do it mentally not physically. I think they are racist toward young minorities. 6. What is your bad/worst experience if any with any government department? A. 16yrs Male = None. B. 23yrs Male = I think they give you appointments several day or weeks in the future and when you go for the appointments, they last for very short periods. This I can’t understand and it’s frustrating that you spend more time trying to get appointments than getting help. And it’s true for most departments, including GPs. C. 24yrs Male = I was jailed for a crime I did not do. I spent several months in custody before the trial because I refused to plead guilty. Eventually my solicitor said to plead guilty so that I could be let go. I think that was not fair to me. And the prison

life experience was very depressing and scary. I was basically a child in jail. I made good English friends in jail with whom I recently applied for a government funded support to help young people into employment, they were accepted, and I was refused. I felt discriminated. Since I came out, I have always worked. 7. What is your experience of dealing with the police and would you feel confident approaching the police for help? A. 16yrs Male = I meet the police at youth club and at school. They are very nice, polite, helpful and approachable. But I have to say they are very different from the police you see on TV. The police I encounter are more calm and mellow. B. 23yrs Male = I have never been in trouble so I do not have any bad experience with the police and the ones I met have always been helpful. C. 24yrs Male = I think the police need to improve their service and stop victimising and stereotyping young black people. They still don’t understand us. When they see a young minority, they automatically suspect you. There was this time when I was a victim, but when the police arrived, first they treated me like a suspect before they found out the truth. That did upset me. 8. Do you feel you have someone, other than your parents, friend and family that you can talk to when you are in trouble? A. 16yrs Male = Yes, my teachers. I tend to talk to teachers about any issues or questions about life in general. B. 23yrs Male = No. I only talk to my mother, brothers, or my friends. C. 24yrs Male = Me personally no, but my father is always supportive. I don’t know who to trust. 9. Did you speak English before coming to the UK? A. 16yrs Male = I was too young, English is the first language and only language I speak and understand fluently. But I do know a few words of my parent’s native language. B. 23yrs Male = No, I came with no English. C. 24yrs Male = Yes. I am from a majority English speaking country

4. What do you wish was available for young black/minority people in Norfolk? A. 16yrs Male = A place to meet and have fun with friends. I don’t get to

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A Norfolk Youth Project is launched

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With Mayor of Thetford

nspire Focus is a youth project, officially launched by SIMPLE Norfolk a community voluntary non-profit organisation. It is currently open to the community and operating its free services to the public, from a multifunctional office at the Charles Burrell Centre (CBC) in Thetford, Norfolk. Inspire Focus is aimed at young people of all backgrounds and walks of life, supporting them accessing education, training, volunteering and careers. It develops partnerships with professionals, education and training providers to give young people a real view of their career options and pathways. The support can be one-to-one or in a group as each case is unique and accessed at early stages for the appropriate support. As part of gaining skills and curriculum enhancement, Inspire Focus has various projects and initiatives in which youths can participate and gain skills though volunteering. Currently, there are various projects in video and film making, heritage, and the complete production of a fully youth-led magazine, amongst other initiatives. The magazine the youths produce is called ‘The Youth Gossip’ and is distributed free to the community in paper version as well as available to read online at www.inspirefocus.co.uk The project is growing and proving very successful with the community and other agencies alike. The organisation is on the developing stage of expanding the premises and in collaboration with the

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Volunteers at work

Inspire Focus Inauguration Day!

CBC and other agencies, creating a fully operational multimedia media hub. This will include a green room for photography, video and film, community radio, voice-over and recording music studio. This is an ambitious project that would greatly benefit the local youth, providing unique volunteering and training opportunities, as well as benefiting many other partner agencies and companies in the area, improving economic prospects for residents.

Core Youth Team

Inspire Focus counts on selffundraising and support from charitable grants, such as from the Norfolk Community foundation, to support its activities and keep them free and accessible to all. For that reason, and because of increase growth and community demand, we are looking forwards to forge more positive partnerships, with a range of diverse organisations and companies that share our vision. Also, the project continuously accepts more volunteers of all ages and abilities as well as young people to participate in our activities and invite everyone to visit our space and give it a try. Inspire Focus is a friendly group and is very welcoming to new members and visitors alike, feel free to drop-in! By Carla Barreto Coordinator

Portuguese Ambassador

Youth Team


Bridge Plus AGM held 26 January 2017

Information & Advice service user stats- June 2016- Feb 2017 #People seen

Jun-16 37

Jul-16 50

Aug-16 47

Sep-16 54

Oct-16 42

Nov-16 53

Dec-16 31

Jan-17 43

Interventions

71

90

90

90

76

117

64

80

Time/Minutes

55

61

52

65

61

83

59

68

Average Time #Nationalities

46

41

35

43

48

60

60

51

20

25

28

28

28

29

19

23

Guest Speaker Alan Walters Leader of Norwich City Council

The Chair & Coordinator (Gervais & Pa Musa)

Beatrice - Project Officer

Question Time

AGM & Networking reception

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Norwich City’s New Lord Mayor and City Sheriff

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Incoming & Outgoing Mayors

Sheriff David Walker signing the register with Mayor Fullam

he new Lord Mayor of Norwich, Councillor David Fullman and Sheriff, David Walker were formally elected at the colourful annual mayor-making ceremony at City Hall on the 23 May 2017. The new Lord Mayor and Sheriff have decided on a theme for their work during the civic year as: ‘Norwich – the welcoming city’, in recognition of the centuries-long local tradition of welcoming ‘strangers’*. Looking forward to the year ahead David Fullman said: “Norwich has a proud history of welcoming people, dating back many centuries. It is because Norwich welcomes people and gives them a safe haven that our city is so rich and vibrant today. I arrived in Norwich many years ago and have felt part of the city for a long time now. Both David [Walker, the new Sheriff] and I want to celebrate that feeling of living in a welcoming city during our year in office.” In line with their theme for the year, the incoming civic heads announced their chosen civic charity appeal as Norwich Integration Partnership, which comprises of New Routes, English+ and The Bridge Plus+. The three organisations offer services to people from ethnic minority communities, who are often isolated and marginalised, seeking to address the disadvantages and challenges faced by recently settled migrants with complex needs. A statement from the partnership reads: “Norwich Integration Partnership is honoured and grateful to have been selected as [the Lord Mayor & Sheriff’s chosen charity]; 201718 civic charity in recognition of the vital work that we do in supporting Norwich’s migrant communities, enabling their engagement as informed and welcomed citizens.” Text source extracted from Norwich City Council website.

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Equality & Diversity

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DID YOU KNOW

Dos & Dont’s • Do you know your neighbour? Key findings: 1 in 6 people will call a neighbour a friend; Over 67% have not invited their neighbour for a tea; • 52% of all websites are in English but only 25% of the world’s population understands English.

Did you know that this week in history

(Source http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-radio-andtv-33011208 : • 29 June - 5 July - The week in which Hong Kong is handed back to China after 150 years of British rule, the world’s first cloned mammal, Dolly the sheep, is born, Arthur Ashe becomes the first black tennis player to win the men’s singles title at Wimbledon and Richard Branson’s Challenger smashes the world record for the fastest trans-Atlantic crossing. • 22 - 28 June - The week in which US president John F Kennedy gave his famous “Ich bin ein Berliner” speech, Mark Chapman confessed to the murder of Beatle John Lennon, Neo Nazi extremists in South Africa tried to disrupt talks to end apartheid and the link between smoking and lung cancer was established. • 15 - 21 June - The week in which the IRA mounted a devastating attack on the English city of Manchester, Berlin was restored as Germany’s capital, the heir to the throne, Prince William, was born, and Russia put a woman in space for the first time.

On This Day

(source http://www.onthisday.com/): 1989 • Apr 21 Thousands of Chinese crowd into Beijing’s Tiananmen Square cheering students demanding greater political freedom • Jun 4 Eastern Europe’s 1st partial free elections in 40 years held in Poland, Solidarity Party comes to power • Nov 10 Germans begin demolishing the Berlin Wall • Dec 3 Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and US President George H. W. Bush, declare the Cold War over • Dec 22 After 23 years of dictatorial rule, Romania ousts Nicolae Ceausescu 1990 • Feb 11 Nelson Mandela released after 27 years imprisonment in South Africa • Jul 2 Panic in tunnel of Mecca: 1,426 pilgrims trampled to death • Aug 25 UN security council authorizes military action against Iraq • Sep 20 Both East and West Germany ratify reunification 1999 • Feb 12 US President Bill Clinton acquitted by the Senate in his impeachment trial • Oct 12 The Day of Six Billion: the proclaimed 6 billionth living human in the world is born2001 • Sep 11 Two passenger planes hijacked by terrorists crash into New York’s World Trade Towers causing the collapse of both and deaths of 2,752 people • Oct 7 The U.S. invasion of Afghanistan starts with an air assault and covert operations on the ground

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The British passport is No.1 for visa-free travel In 2017, British passport holders are able to visit 175 of the world’s nations while Afghans can visit only 25 countries free of formalities. The British enjoy the widest range of visa-free travel on the planet. Along with citizens of Finland and Sweden, holders of UK passports are able to visit 175 of the world’s nations without applying for a visa. This is according to The Henley & Partners Visa Restrictions Index, a global ranking of countries according to the travel freedom that their citizens enjoy. The results show that membership of the European Union is a key determinant of ease of movement across frontiers. For example, 9 out of 11 of the top countries are EU member states, plus Finland (also in Europe) and the United States, the only other non-European country at number 11. Citizens of all these 11 countries can travel to more than 170 other nations visa-free. The second group of 10 countries includes Canada, Japan, Norway, New Zealand and Switzerland. The 3 least advantageous passports to possess are those of Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan with just 30 or less nations allowing visa free access. The compilers found out that there is a strong correlation between a country’s average wealth and access to open frontiers. The imbalance between ease of access for citizens of rich nations and the lack of openness displayed by those countries was revealed in a World Tourism Organization report, which reported that three-quarters of the world’s population requires a visa to enter a European country. Russians are allowed visa-free access to 105 countries. South Africa is the highest-placed African nation with visa free access to 97 countries. Citizens of the two most populous nations are placed low in the listing. India, with 1.2 billion people, issues a passport that opens doors to only 52 countries, whereas China, with 1.3 billion, rates only 50. Source & Edited version of original published at: http://www. independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/access-almost-all-areasthe-british-passport-is-no1-for-visa-free-travel-8854369.html


Gambia Women New Year’s Event

Guest of Honour

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BREXIT: All you need to know about the UK leaving the EU As the UK officially notifies the European Union that it is leaving, here is an easy-tounderstand guide to Brexit. 1. What does Brexit mean? It is a word that has become used as a shorthand way of saying the UK leaving the EU - merging the words Britain and exit to get Brexit, in a same way as a possible Greek exit from the euro was dubbed Grexit in the past. 2. Why is Britain leaving the European Union? A referendum - a vote in which everyone (or nearly everyone) of voting age can take part - was held on Thursday 23 June, 2016, to decide whether the UK should leave or remain in the European Union. Leave won by 51.9% to 48.1%. The referendum turnout was 71.8%, with more than 30 million people voting. 3. What was the breakdown across the UK? England voted for Brexit, by 53.4% to 46.6%. Wales also voted for Brexit, with Leave getting 52.5% of the vote and Remain 47.5%. Scotland and Northern Ireland both backed staying in the EU. Scotland backed Remain by 62% to 38%, while 55.8% in Northern Ireland voted Remain and 44.2% Leave. 4. What changed in government after the referendum? Britain got a new Prime Minister – Theresa May. Like Mr Cameron, Mrs May was against Britain leaving the EU but she played only a very low-key role in the campaign and was never seen as much of an enthusiast for the EU. 5. Where does she stand on Brexit? Theresa May had been against Brexit during the referendum campaign but is now in favour of it because she says it is what the British people want. Her key message has been that “Brexit means Brexit” and she triggered the two year process of leaving the EU on 29 March. 6. Why has she called a general election? Theresa May became prime minister after David Cameron resigned, so has not won her own election. She surprised everyone when she announced an election for Thursday, 8 June 2017. The reason she gave was that she needed to strengthen her hand in Brexit negotiations with European leaders. She feared Labour, the SNP and other opposition parties - and members of the House of Lords - would try to block and frustrate her strategy, making the country look divided to other EU leaders and making her government look weak.

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Mrs May inherited a tiny Commons majority from David Cameron, meaning that it only takes a few Conservative MPs to side with the opposition to vote down the government’s plans. The Conservatives began the election campaign with a big lead over Labour in the opinion polls. 7. What happened in the election? Mrs May’s gamble backfired and she lost her overall majority and ended up with fewer MPs than before the campaign, meaning she no longer has enough Conservative MPs to guarantee winning votes in the House of Commons. Because of that she is doing a deal with Northern Irish party the Democratic Unionists, which has 10 MPs, to enable her to form a minority government. The DUP are also in favour of Brexit but want to maintain the free-flowing border with EU member state the Republic of Ireland, which could mean continued membership of the customs union, the free trade area within the EU. According to her own election message - when she urged people to vote for her to give her a bigger majority and more strength in the Brexit negotiations - Mrs May’s hand is now weakened and she is vulnerable to being pushed about by MPs on different sides of the debate, when they come to vote on any divorce deal. She has said she wants to remain as prime minister to provide stability and certainty. 8. Will Brexit talks be delayed? No. They have started as scheduled on 19 June. 9. What if Theresa May’s government falls and Labour gains power? Brexit would still go ahead. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has ruled out a second referendum - but he has said MPs will get a decisive say on the final Brexit agreement with the EU, which means the UK might try to go back to the negotiating table to push for a better deal. 10. What is the European Union? The European Union - often known as the EU - is an economic and political partnership involving 28 European countries. It began after World War Two to foster economic co-operation, with the idea that countries which trade together are more likely to avoid going to war with each other. It has since grown to become a “single market” allowing goods and people to move around, basically as if the member states were one country. 11. What is Article 50? Article 50 is a plan for any country that wishes to exit the EU to notify the European Council and negotiate its withdrawal with the EU, that there are two

years to reach an agreement. It was created as part of the Treaty of Lisbon an agreement signed up to by all EU states which became law in 2009. Before that treaty, there was no formal mechanism for a country to leave the EU. 12. Why will Brexit take so long? Unpicking 43 years of treaties and agreements covering thousands of different subjects was never going to be a straightforward task. It is further complicated by the fact that it has never been done.

13. What do ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ Brexit mean?

There is no strict definition of either, but they are used to refer to the closeness of the UK’s relationship with the EU post-Brexit. So at one extreme, “hard” Brexit could involve the UK refusing to compromise on issues like the free movement of people even if meant leaving the single market. At the other end of the scale, a “soft” Brexit might follow a similar path to Norway, which is a member of the single market and has to accept the free movement of people as a result of that. 14. What happens to EU citizens living in the UK? EU nationals with a right to permanent residence, which is granted after they have lived in the UK for five years, should not see their rights affected. The Conservatives has declined to give a firm guarantee about the status of EU nationals currently living in the UK, saying this is not possible without a reciprocal pledge from other EU members about the millions of British nationals living on the continent. Labour has said it would guarantee the rights of EU citizens living in the UK to stay there on “day one” of a Labour government. 15. What happens to UK citizens working in the EU? A lot depends on the kind of deal the UK agrees with the EU. If the government opted to impose work permit restrictions on EU nationals, then other countries could reciprocate, meaning Britons would have to apply for visas to work. 16. Will I still be able to use my British passport? Yes. It is a British document - there is no such thing as an EU passport, so your passport will stay the same. In theory, the government could, if it wanted, decide to change the colour, which is currently standardised for EU countries, says the BBC’s Europe correspondent, Chris Morris. Source: By Alex Hunt & Brian Wheeler BBC News


HE SAW A WAY TO UNLOCK HIS FULL POTENTIAL YOU COULD TOO We are currently seeking applications from residents who live in the region who wish to join a forward thinking police force. Norfolk Police actively promotes an equal opportunities policy and applications are welcome from all sections of the community. For recruitment enquiries and an eligibility form email:

recruitment@norfolk.pnn.police.uk

Apply now: at norfolk.police.uk/join-us

Half Page Advert (Recruitment).indd 1

19/06/2017 15:07:40

Police Recruitment

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orfolk Constabulary has been taking a fresh approach to their police officer recruitment as phone lines opened for the second time this year in June. This new campaign focussed on the reality of being in the police service in today’s society. There were also opportunities to hear directly from those already serving with the Force through a series of short videos and viewers were also able to ask officers and staff directly any burning questions they may have around being a police officer via Facebook Live events held during the month. Norfolk’s Chief Constable Simon Bailey welcomed the renewed focus,

saying: “I am delighted that the Force is in a position to recruit new police officers this year. I can personally vouch for how rewarding and varied the role of a police officer is and if I had the opportunity I would start my career all over again. “The role can be both physically and mentally demanding but as our recruitment posters show it also gives people the opportunity to make an important difference to their local community and help the county feel safer.” Lorne Green, Police and Crime Commissioner for Norfolk, added: “There are few more rewarding careers than policing. The greatest reward of all comes from the satisfaction of

helping others and making a difference in the community. “Combine this with the rewards that come from being part of a close knit team and with every day different believe me, it’s brilliant. Are you up for it? We want you on the team.” Videos of officers already in the role talking about why they work for the police have been released throughout the recruitment opening times while new recruits can be followed on @NPoliceStudents. Those interested in applying are asked to visit the Constabulary website at www.norfolk.police.uk/ join-us for further information on how to apply and to request an application pack.

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10 of UK’s Most Influential black people

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usinessman Ken Olisa has been named the most influential black person in Britain. The LordLieutenant of Greater London has topped the Powerlist 2016 (source), the annual list of the 100 most powerful people of African and African Caribbean heritage in Britain. Powerlist 2016 publisher Michael Eboda said: “I salute the truly inspirational men and women in this year’s magazine. Ken is a wonderful role model who highlights the exceptional talent in black communities.”

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Ken Olisa, OBE, founder, Restoration Partners and Lord-Lieutenant Greater London Born in 1951 of a Nigerian father and a British mother, and a native of Nottingham, Olisa’s technology career commenced in the 1970s at IBM after he won a scholarship while an undergraduate at Cambridge University, where he studied Natural Sciences and then Social, Political and Management Sciences at Fitzwilliam College. He is a British businessman and the first black LordLieutenant of Greater London. Mr Olisa, 64, is responsible for organising London’s royal events and advancing social inclusion in the capital. He was also the first black Briton to serve as a director at a FTSE 100 company, with Thomson Reuters.

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Sir Lenny Henry, comedian Known as Lenny Henry was born in Dudley, Worcestershire, on 29 August 1958, the son of Jamaican immigrants. One of seven children, he was the first to be born in the United Kingdom. He attended St John’s Primary School and later The Blue Coat School in Dudley before completing his schooling at W.R. Tuson College in Preston, Lancashire. Henry has been an outspoken critic of British television’s lack of ethnic diversity in its programming. During a speech at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts in March 2014, he called the lack of minorities “appalling,” and he has continued to raise the issue publicly since.

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Sharon White, chief executive of Ofcom White was born 21 April 1967 in east London and brought up in Leyton where she attended a comprehensive school. Her parents emigrated to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s, when her father was aged 15 and her mother 11. White attended Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, from where she received a BA degree in economics. She later earned an MSc in economics from University College London. She has been the chief executive of the British media regulator Ofcom since March 2015. She was the first black person, and the second woman, to become a Permanent Secretary at the Treasury.

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Steve McQueen, film director McQueen was born 9th October 1969 in London, is of Grenadian and Trinidadian descent. He grew up in Hanwell, West London and went to Drayton Manor High School. [14][15] In a 2014 interview, McQueen stated that he had a very bad experience in school, where he had been placed into a class for students believed best suited “for manual labour, more plumbers and builders, stuff like that.” Later, the new head of the school would admit that there had been “institutional” racism at the time. McQueen added that he was dyslexic and had to wear an eyepatch due to a lazy eye, and reflected this may be why he was “put to one side very quickly”. McQueen is the first black filmmaker to win an Academy Award for Best Picture

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Lewis Hamilton, Formula One driver Born 7th January 1985 and raised in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Hamilton was signed to McLaren’s young driver support programme in 1998, after he approached McLaren team principal Ron Dennis at an awards ceremony three years earlier and said “one day I want to be racing your cars”. After winning the British Formula Renault, Formula Three Euroseries, and GP2 championships on his way up the racing career ladder, he made his Formula One debut twelve years after his initial encounter with Dennis, driving for McLaren in 2007. Coming from a mixed background, with a black father and white mother, Hamilton is the first and only black driver to race in Formula One.


according to Powerlist 2016

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Baroness Doreen Lawrence, justice campaigner Lawrence was born in Jamaica in 1952. At the age of nine, she emigrated to England. She completed her education in southeast London, before becoming a bank worker. Years after the murder of their son Stephen in 1993, she founded the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust to promote a positive community legacy in her son’s name. Lawrence has been selected to sit on panels within the Home Office and the Police Service, and she is a member of both the board and the council of Liberty, the human rights organisation, as well as being a patron of hate crime charity Stop Hate UK.

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Dr Maggie Aderin - Pocock, scientist Aderin-Pocock was born in London on 9 March 1968. She attended La Sainte Union Convent School in North London. She has dyslexia and, as a child, when she told a teacher she wanted to be an astronaut, it was suggested she try nursing, “because that’s scientific, too”. She gained four A-Levels in maths, physics, chemistry and biology. She studied at Imperial College London, graduating with a BSc in physics in 1990 and completed her PhD in mechanical engineering in 1994.

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Mo Farah, athlete Farah was born on 23 March 1983 in Mogadishu, Somalia into a Habr Awal Isaaq family. His full name is Mohamed Muktar Jama Farah. He spent the early years of his childhood in Djibouti with his twin brother. He moved to Britain at the age of eight to join his father, speaking barely a word of English. His father, an IT consultant was born in London, England and grew up in Hounslow. Farah attended Isleworth and Syon School, and Feltham Community College. His athletic talent was first identified by a PE teacher.

Norfolk Black History Month CALLING ALL ARTISTS! ENTRIES WELCOME FOR THE BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2017 ART SHOW. This year’s Black History Month Art Show will be displayed in the Forum Norwich from Tuesday 26th to Saturday 30th September. The BHM Committee invite artists to offer one piece of work on the theme of Black History and Culture. We welcome the artist’s imaginative interpretation of this wide ranging and fascinating subject. Closing date for entries is 15th August 2017. Contact the Editor office@bridgeplus.org.uk

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Dr Sandie Okoro, global general counsel of HSBC Asset Management Okoro was born in Fulham, London, in 1964, and grew up in nearby Balham. Her father was a teacher from Nigeria, and her mother a nurse from Trinidad. At the age of nine she decided she wanted to become a judge, influenced by the television programme Crown Court, and undeterred by a school teacher, asking the class their chosen careers, who said “Sandie, little black girls from Balham don’t become judges.” She attended Putney High School and then studied law and politics at the University of Birmingham. After university she studied at the Inns of Court School of Law, now part of City, University of London, and joined Lincoln’s Inn, qualifying as a barrister in 1988. In a change of course she re-qualified as a solicitor and in 1990 joined Schroders as head of its trusts team.

Adrian Joseph, MD, customer solutions and innovation at Google for northern and central Europe Adrian has previously served as a director at Google with responsibility for driving advertising in Europe. In January 2012, he was appointed Chair of Race for Opportunity, the race campaign of Business in the Community, a Prince of Wales charity which stands for responsible business and strives to ensure that all ethnic groups are appropriately reflected in the UK workforce. In September 205, Adrian took up his appointment as a non-executive director for the Home Office, providing advice and bring an external perspective to the department.

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Come and work with us Recruitment Agency Are you looking for a new job? Something satisfying and rewarding? CompKey Healthcare’s major aim is to provide and deliver high quality of personalized care based on the philosophy of commitment, competence, caring and compassion. These are values that will drive and motivate the organisation to deliver an individualized, person centred service which respects dignity, independence, autonomy and privacy of the service user and the skills and experience of our multi-cultural staff.

If you are a compassionate, caring person then Come and join us!

Whether you are looking for a full-time, permanent post; part time work or hours which fit in with your other commitments, we would like to hear from you. Feel free to contact our friendly team for an initial chat about Compkey. Please call us on 01603 762318 and leave a message with your contact details; visit our website www. compkeyhealthcare.co.uk to find our job application form, or email us on admin@compkeyhealthcare.co.uk Compkey Healthcare Ltd, Office 16, Charing Cross Centre, 17-19 St John Maddermarket, Norwich NR2 1DN. The Management Team – L to R - Sue Gee, Humphrey Moyo, Vaida Moyo

Compkey Healthcare has vacancies for fulltime and part-time Care Staff, experienced or inexperienced.

We can offer you:• Competitive rates of pay and benefits • Induction and training • Uniform and protective clothing provided • Regular and consistent work • Fortnightly pay • Holiday pay, expenses • Pension scheme

2016-2017

Norfolk Model Calendar

This calendar applies to community schools, community special schools, VC schools and nursery schools and sets the days on which school transport will be provided. While most Foundation, VA, foundation special, free schools and academy trusts who are able to set their own dates, adopt the Norfolk Model, we advise you to check with your child's school before making holiday or other commitments.

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Five staff training days will be selected from yellow dates, we suggest 1 & 2 September and 4 January and two others of the schools choice. Some may choose to use twilight hours for staff training instead of some or all of these


WISE WORDS, WITS & HUMOURS

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Meet Jo Richardson from Norfolk County Council

T

he Bridge +is pleased to introduce Jo Richardson, who has a new role in Norfolk County Council to promote equality and accessibility for all residents in Norfolk. This includes working with people and communities to promote racial equality, as well as promoting equality for disabled people, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, men and women and people of different faiths and beliefs. Jo is always interested to hear your views about equality in Norfolk, or any issues or concerns you may have. Please contact her directly on jo.richardson@norfolk.gov.uk if there’s anything you want to say. Jo will always treat it confidentially. For those who don’t remember, in 2012, Jo and Bridge+ worked together on a race equality pilot project. Many of the issues highlighted in the project remain relevant today.

The seven priority action areas for Norfolk identified through the pilot were: • Priority 1: Positive staff attitudes – ensuring all staff and contractors have the skills and confidence to engage positively with people from ethnic backgrounds different to their own • Priority 2: Accessible information and advice to enable and empower BAME residents • Priority 3: Tackle racist incidents and crime against BAME people • Priority 4: Continue to enhance access to employment opportunities, career progression and the workforce experience for BAME people • Priority 5: Empower young BAME people to achieve their best in education and support them to make sense of their cultural and social identity • Priority 6: Accessible and safe housing • Priority 7: Racial equality routinely integrated into public service planning, commissioning and delivery (including health inequalities) For a reminder about the findings of the project you can click this link here http://www. equalitycohesionnorfolk.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/BAME-final-report.pdf or using the key search words Norfolk Race Equality Pilot Project 2012 Jo worked with Bridge + to produce the up-to-date profile of all Black, Asian and minority ethnic community groups in Norfolk – which you can find out more about starting on page 19 opposite.

Are you looking for Information & Advice on a range of issues? Do you need help with your job search?

What we offer

Address:

• Providing 1-1 information advice and guidance on a wide range of issues

44-48 Magdalen Street, Sackville Business Place, Norwich, Norfolk, NR3 1JU

• Supporting your job search needs: CVs, trainings, application forms and interview techniques

Facebook:

The aim of The Bridge Plus+ is to improve community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery, with a focus on supporting Black/Asian and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities.

• Help with completing all sorts of forms

Appointments available:

• Group networking workshops & trainings with time for peer-to-peer support

• office@bridgeplus.org.uk

• Addressing & Advocating for race equality related issues

https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus

Mondays to Thursdays, 10am – 3pm

• Peer to peer support opportunities e.g. community lunches & community engagement activities

• http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk

• Signposting and referrals to local support services and community groups

Telephone: 01603 617076 Please leave a clear voice message if not answered.

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus

Some of our regular front line staff & volunteers Beatrice

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Frances

Gervais

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A profile of BAME (Black Asian and Minority Ethnic) Communities identified in Norfolk as at end May 2017 For several months, we have been working with BME (black/Asian and minority ethnic) community groups to collate a database of groups active in our area. We understand that some of the information is subject to change, however, the information below is accurate at the time of publication. Please let us know as soon as you notice any inaccuracies which can then be updated on our website. 1. AFROLUSO (Portuguese Dance Group in Great Yarmouth)

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Bulgarians in Norwich & Norfolk (BNN)

Afroluso is a traditional African dance group for young people based in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. The group was founded in 2012 by a group of seven Black Portuguese people as there were limited cultural activities available for minority communities living in Great Yarmouth, and they had identified a need to help improve their local community. The aim of our group is to share our culture through music and dance, involving young people in active, positive pursuits. Our style of dance originates from Africa with influences ranging from classic artists to modern hip hop and contemporary dancehall. Afroluso participates in different cultural events around Norfolk. • Contact: Ana Moreira, Tel.: 07427662455 Email: afroluso@hotmail.co.uk Facebook: Afroluso GY The community group was founded in 2011 with the aim to organise activities for its members such as the celebration of Bulgarian national days; facilitating the Bulgarian Sunday school and participation in other events such as Festival of Cultures. • Contact: Galya Clark Tel.: 0798 605 3330 Email: gclark@abv.bg Facebook: Bulgarians in Norwich and Norfolk Mailing Address: Methodist Church, Heartsease Lane, Norwich, NR7 9NR

3. CHINESE - Norwich Chinese Community Centre (NCCC)

This group was founded and registered in January 2016. It has a membership of over 200 people. NCCC aims to promote Chinese culture. It is an open, transparent and non-political charitable community group, striving to serve the local Chinese community in various aspects of life. NCCC aims to promote the benefit of the community of Norfolk particularly but not exclusively the Chinese community, by helping the Chinese people, local authorities and other organisations to associate in a common effort to relieve poverty and sickness, advance education, promote racial harmony and provide facilities for recreation and leisure-time occupation with the object of improving the conditions of life in the community. The group holds public meetings open to all every Thursday at 930am. • Contact: Cindy Meng; Tel.: 07917850238 Email: cindymeng@me.com Facebook: Norwich Chinese Community Centre Mailing Address: 5-7 Dereham Road, Norwich, NR2 4HX

4. Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk (EMA in Great Yarmouth)

EMA was founded in 2012 in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, by five members. We now have over 100 members. The passion driving Norfolk EMA came about from the challenges, tension and hostility many of our initial members faced as immigrants arriving in Great Yarmouth. Our aim is to overcome inter cultural tensions in the most positive way possible. We work to reduce the fear of the unknown by bringing people together to celebrate the best of human nature, through music, dance, food and connecting together. We are striving to build upon the positive outcomes of our success in working with communities by cementing the new found understanding between different cultures. We also offer drumming workshops to people in the community who may not usually have access to such activities. • Contact: Paul (best contact through Facebook) Email: norfolkema@gmail.com Facebook: EMA Norfolk

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5. Filipino Community Group in Norwich – PINAS (Pinoy in Norwich Aksyong Samahan

The group was founded in 2005 with the aim of building stronger social bonds between members of the Filipino community in Norwich. Though many of its members have been around much longer, the original members of the group saw the need to come together as the Filipino community was growing with the arrival of mainly nurses and their partners in the area. The group works towards promoting its culture and tradition and the Filipino language. The organisation now hosts two major annual events: a Christmas Family party and the annual summer Filipino Barrio Fiesta (village fair) which together attract thousands of people. Both events showcase Filipino talents with local artists from within UK and back home. The group has a management committee of 10 with a new President elected in March of each year. The groups raises funds from its events to pay for the venue and catering costs. • Contact: Maricar (Current President); The best way to get in touch is though Facebook Messenger; Facebook: PINAS Norwich

6. Gambian Women’s Network Norwich

The group has been active since 2013 as a social network group for Gambian women in Norfolk. The aim of the group is to tackle isolation through a support network of women, mainly Gambians, but its membership includes other African women and women married to or who are friends of the Gambia. The network members meet every two weeks at the house of one of its members to socialise over food and snacks, teach their children Gambian culture and tradition and have fun. The group also organises occasional festive events including the celebration of Eid and New Year parties. The best way to contact the group is by sending a text message to the main contact. • Contact: Sona Beyai; Tel.: 07925455369

7. Ghana (Gyenyame) Norwich Residents Group (Ghana Community Network)

This is a network of Ghanaian nationals’ resident in Norwich aimed at building positive relationship with other Norwich and Norfolk residents as well as supporting each other. The Ghanaian population in Norfolk is very small with most people in some form of full time employment or education. This is a very informal network with links to other African community groups. The network supports its members in finding work, accommodation and sharing knowledge about the basic essentials of living and working in Norfolk. The best way to contact the group is by sending a text message or email. • Contact: Ali; Tel.: 07757592087; Email: denkyeembuda@yahoo.co.uk

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Hala’s House 2 Home

Hala is a trained Arabic speaking interpreter with strong links to the Arabic speaking community (both Christian and Muslim). With the assistance of volunteers, she provides ongoing integration support to new arrivals by signposting and referring people to the appropriate organisations; providing friendship support and coordinating volunteers to assist new arrivals. Hala helps with many things including online benefit claims, housing problems; job searches; completing forms; moving house; interpreting and translation from Arabic to English; finding a suitable place of worship; and helping people apply for small grants for school uniform and furniture. • Contact: Hala Marie; Tel.: 07808135376 Email: halasamir@live.com Mailing Address: 52 St Augustine Street, NR3 3AD

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Italiani a Norwich & TUTTO Norwich

This is an informal Italian community social media support network group with an active presence on Facebook. Set up in 2014, with nearly 500 network members on social media. The membership is managed mainly through a closed Facebook group. Members share information and ideas about settling in Norwich. The network is a good place for any new Italian arrival to learn about where to find out about jobs or free English classes and about how to find a home. The group has two Facebook pages provided which is the best way to get in touch. • Contact: Giancarion Antonietti; Facebook: TUTTO Norwich or Italiani a Norwich

10. NAGO (Norfolk Alliance Gender Organisation)

NAGO is a Not for Profit community based organisation formed in July 2014 to promote the rights and welfare of Ethnic Minority Community’s children and women in Norfolk. Our main objective is to sensitize Africans, and other immigrants about the legal consequences of practicing harmful traditional practices in Norfolk, especially Female Circumcision/Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, arranged marriage, child trafficking, witchcraft and juju or black magic. NAGO intends to work with families within the communities to raise awareness and educate its people about issues that affect the livelihood and welfare of children and women. NAGO aims to explore the effects of FGM through research into African, and other minority communities to improve the policies and practices by working closely with policy and decision makers to ensure that this is achieved. The services NAGO strive to offer include: Awareness raising through house to house and town hall meetings; to promote the status of women and children; to contribute towards preventing family breakdowns. Explaining the importance of safeguarding and protection of children to men and women and how to bring up children in the UK and help to train them in these areas. • Contact: Alhagie Saidykhan; Tel.: 01603743506 Email: nagonorfolk@gmail.com ; Website: www.nagonorfolk.com Facebook: NAGO Norfolk

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11. (Namibian) Community of Namibians in Great Britain (CNGB)

CNGB was founded in 2013. It is a network of Namibians in Great Britain with a mission statement to foster greater integration amongst Namibians and other communities in the UK and abroad. CNGB promotes Namibian culture and fosters a support network for its members by building bridges between Namibians in Great Britain, forging strong bonds of communication and providing useful information in the areas of education, health and social welfare, laws of the country, culture and entertainment. CNGB collaborates with other organisations who are promoting the social welfare of Namibians in the UK and abroad, such as the Friends of Namibia, (Catherine Bullen Foundation), ANUK, Churches, Governments and NGOs. The group has an active membership of over 200 people throughout the UK. The groups are managed through active chapter members based in different parts of the UK who are the designate key links to Namibians in each area. The group organises Namibian Independence Day, Namibian Heroes day, and sports activities (not yet hosted in Norwich) • Contact: Lawrence Kavezepa Email: lawrencekavezepa@hotmail.co.uk Website: www.cngb.info Facebook: Community of Namibians in Great Britain CNGB

12. Norwich Nepali Samaj (Nepalese Community Network)

This is a network of Nepalese community members who organise events to celebrate special occasions/festivals and to integrate with the wider society. Its active members are mainly Nepali and British, with a membership of around 100 people. • Contact: Dev Ghimire; Tel.: 07590065816; Email: devghimire@gmail.com

13. NORFRESA (Norfolk French Speakers Association)

The group was set up in 2004 to help people of French Speaking countries, mainly Africans, to settle in Norwich and Norfolk by organising community events, French speaking class, outings and orientation tours. The group has a membership of about 50 people from diverse backgrounds, ages and nationality. • Contact: Gervais Kouloungou-Mambs; Email: koulounger@yahoo.fr

14. Norwich Association of Malayalee(NAM) Indians

Norwich Malayalee Association (NAM) was founded in April 2006 by people from Kerala, South India who live in Norfolk mainly in Norwich. The organisation’s objectives are: to further such charitable purposes for the benefit of the public in particular the benefit of the Malayalee community in the east Anglia region including, the advancement of education (in particular but not exclusively the education of Malayalee children in the Malayalam language); of health; of citizenship or community development; of the arts, heritage and culture; the promotion of racial harmony, equality and diversity; the relief of those in need, by reason of youth, age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or other disadvantage; and the provision of facilities for recreation and other leisure-time occupation for the public benefit As a group we are all volunteers and NAM is a non-profit making organisation. The organisation has approximately one hundred members, which includes doctors and nurses working in the local NHS and IT professionals. Members are mainly Malayalee Indians from the region of Kerala, but all welcomed. • Contact Tony Palakalam; Tel.: 01603461374 Email: norwich.malayalees@gmail.com Website: http://norwichmalayalees.co.uk/ Facebook: Norwich Association of Malayalees

15. Norwich Congolese Community Group

This is the main Congolese community organisation which was created in 2006 at the time when Norwich welcomed the first Congolese Gateway Programme refugees. The aim and objectives of the organisation are: to work for the benefit of the Congolese community and others in Norwich to (i) help them learn English and other key skills; (ii) help them integrate and get involved in the local community; and (iii) provide support and promote self-help. The main focus of the group is to bring people together and share cultural understanding. The group has a membership of over 100 people. • Contact Odon Kasera; Tel.: 07404469157 Email: kaseramurhula@yahoo.co.uk; Facebook: Norwich Congolese Community Group

16. Norfolk Congolese Association (NOCA)

NOCA. Norfolk Congolese Association (NOCA) is a voluntary and community organisation founded in 2013 by Elvis Beya who saw the need for such an organisation with the growing number of Congolese. The organisation is dedicated to improving the life of Congolese in Norfolk. NOCA is a membership and representation organisation for Congolese and those supporting its aims and partners. Elvis has been working with various organisations in Norfolk and the East of England such as MENTER, Africa Health Organisation, AFREKID, British Red Cross, MIND, Probation Services and local authorities including Norwich City Council, Norfolk County Council and other service providers. • Contact: Elvis Beya or John Nondo; Tel.: 01603290015 Email: elvis@noca.org.uk; Website: www.noca.org.uk Facebook: Norfolk Congolese Association NOCA

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17. Norwich International Youth Project (NIYP)

The group started in 2002 and became a registered charity in 2003.The group was initially formed to support young refugees/asylum seekers from the war zone ethnic break-up of the former Yugoslavia and has continued to welcome young asylum seekers/refugees since. Aims to provide support to young (14-18+) asylum seekers and refugees resident in Norfolk. We run a weekly youth group which offers English language support, positive activities and social-cultural development activities. Also from our office as part of Norwich City College Student Support Services we support young asylum seekers/refugees through education. The best way to reach the group is through the coordinator. Membership comprises of 12-18 year olds from all nationalities and religions. Average weekly youth group attendance 20 from a group of 30 members. • Contact: Mike Clemo (Project Coordinator); Tel.: 07415 734896 Email: m.clemo@niyp.org.uk Website: www.niyp.org.uk Mailing Address: NIYP, c/o City College, Advice Hub, Student Services, Ipswich Road, Norwich. BNR2 2LJ

18. Norwich United Karate

The group was set up in 2010. The aims are to provide sports activities to young people and families from diverse backgrounds who may otherwise not have access to such opportunities. It has 20 regular participants mainly children and young people from BME backgrounds, from both genders. Offers free karate classes. • Contact: Odon Kasera; Tel.: 07404469157 Email: kaseramurhula@yahoo.co.uk

19. One Love United Football Club

One Love United Football Club is a multi-cultural/multi-ethnic group of members and players from both inside and outside the UK. We aim to continually interact and work closely with the larger community and are keen to get involved in and help with local community projects. We welcome input and support from anyone interested in working with One Love Community. We are more than a football team, we are a community support network inspiring young people mainly from minority communities. The group is run by a team of volunteers. During their heydays, they had two football teams: one in Division 2 of Norwich & District Saturday League and the other in Division 2B of the Norwich & District Sunday League. The group is in the process of reconstituting after a period of absence. The best way to contact the group by is through Facebook. • Contact: Rickey or Gordon Facebook: One Love United Football Club

20. (Polish Community Support Group) Nauczanie Jezyka Polskiego Thetford

The official name of the group is ‘Nauczanie Jezyka Polskiego Thetford’ (Translation: Learn Polish in Thetford), which is a Polish community support group based in Thetford. We provide Polish language lessons as a way of promoting Polish tradition, literature and history. Our school promotes multilingualism, which has an enormous impact on the positive development of intellectual and academic achievement. We promote tolerance and understanding amongst children and encourage multiculturalism as a positive means to adapt to new situations. To achieve our aims we emphasise the need for positive attitudes towards bilingualism and emotional support - particularly from parents and teachers. We are planning to organise football teams, scouts, social clubs, family days out, events, a celebration of our culture, etc. The group has more than 100 members who are mainly Polish, but the group is open to all. • Contact: Iwona Paciorkowska; Tel.: 07923297325 Email: iwona77@live.co.uk Website: http://nauczaniejezykapolskiego.co.uk/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nauczanie.jezykapolskiegothetford?fref=ts

21. Sikh Society - Norfolk and Norwich Sikh Society

The society was founded 11 years ago to bring the Sikh community together for social and religious events. Social events have included summer barbecues, camping and parties to celebrate Diwali. We organise religious events to celebrate the birthdays of the gurus and the birth of the Khalsa. We have raised money for the local hospital, and for charities linked to head injuries and cancer by doing walks and bike rides. A member of the committee visits offenders in Norwich prison. We go into schools to talk about Sikhism. A member has recently supported a young family in the hospital during their bereavement by using their nursing and religious skills. There are about 60 active members who are mainly families of Indian origin, many of whom are already British citizens. • Contact: Gurnam Uppal (Current President); Tel.: 07585 977032 Email: gsuppal@hotmail.co.uk

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22. Society Alive

Society Alive (SA) is a community group which is not-for-profit based in Bowthorpe. SA was established in 2012 by a couple who are passionate about bringing positive change into their community. SA seeks to inject life and vitality into every aspect of our community. It is open to all irrespective of race, gender, sexual affiliation or religious inclination. Our central mission is to strengthen and create a cohesive and integrated community in Bowthorpe and Norwich at large. SA has a special interest in assisting children academically and providing mentors and role models for children from deprived backgrounds to enable them to live up to their full potential. SA work with all members of the family, we also have activities for women, men and the whole Community. SA is a socially inclusive group and operates an equal opportunity policy. • Contact: Godwin Unozi; Tel.: 07832972166 Email: society.alive@yahoo.co.uk Website: http://societyalive.org/ Facebook: Society Alive

23. Sudanese Community Network

This is a very informal group involving a network of Sudanese nationals in Norwich. The network members are mainly linked through social network platforms, by personal telephone and through their association with other local community support services around Norwich. The aim of the network is to support each other as they settle in Norfolk. Members help each other access local support services, find a place to stay, access English language classes, find employment and build up their social networks. There is a growing number of young and single Sudanese nationals, some of whom have been in Norwich for more than ten years. The network members are working towards setting up a registered community group. The network has an estimated membership of about 30, and is known to be a good source for understanding Sudanese culture and tradition. • Contact: Ali Musa Mohammed; Tel.: 07734038580 Email: ali44384@yahoo.com

24. Tambai Promotions & The Mudeka foundation

The Anna Mudeka band is a five piece band playing a fusion of music driven from the Mbira (thumb piano) music of Zimbabwe. Tambai are an African dance troupe made up of some of the most innovative performers and dancers specialised in African music in the East of England. Anna Mudeka is the lead vocalist, dancer and mbira player of the group for more than 10 years now. Anna has also set up the Mudeka Foundation in 2009 to support AIDs orphans back in Zimbabwe. The group organises the Annual Summer Southburgh Festival (near Dereham, Norwich) which attracts over 500 people. They also offer music and dance lessons, workshops around team building, teacher training & conferences. Workshops are tailor-made to fit with all age groups from play groups to universities, colleges, high schools and primary schools. • Contact: Anna Mudeka; Tel.: 07879493843 Email: info@annamudeka.co.uk Website: http://annamudeka.co.uk/ Facebook: Anna Mudeka band; Twitter: @annamudeka

25. The Bridge Plus+

The Bridge Plus+ is a Norfolk based Black/Asian and minority ethnic (BME) organisation aimed at improving community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery to promote race equality and community cohesion. The Bridge Plus+ is a leading BME led organisation providing a dedicated advice and advocacy support to BME communities with issues related to access to services such as housing, education, employment and immigration status.. The organisation is overseen by a management committee of people from BME backgrounds. It has established links with most of the Norfolk based BME communities and with key statutory and voluntary sector organisations in Norfolk. It publishes a B-Me Voices magazine distributed throughout the county and beyond. It has been a key source for statutory organisations linking and consulting with communities on race equality and diversity related issues. It also hosts a monthly Community Cuisines gathering which provides networking opportunities between BME community members and other support agencies and stakeholders. The Bridge Plus+ is a Level 1 immigration law advice organisation registered with the Home Office Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC). We also provide domestic violence advice and advocacy support to BME victims. • Contact: Tel.: 01603 617 076 Email: office@bridgeplus.org.uk Website: www.bridgeplus.org.uk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus/ Mailing Address: 44-48 Magdalen Street, Norwich, NR3 1JU

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26. The Neesa project

The Neesa Project is a community group for women and children. We provide and facilitate social and educational activities. Founded in 2007 we are staffed entirely by volunteers. Group activities are held all over the city and in particular at the UEA. The group has 9 Committee members of different nationalities and religions. The group reaches over 350 other network members. Members are mainly female and children. Predominantly Muslim but open to all nationalities and religions. The Neesa Facebook page is a closed group - please send a request to join. • Contact: Hajira Ben Moussa; Tel.: 07852 732 799 Email: theneesaproject@yahoo.co.uk Website: http://theneesaproject.co.uk/ Facebook: The Neesa Project

27. WORD Trust International

WWORD is a registered charity founded in 2004 by the Zimbabwean Diaspora members. Launched in 2005 and formerly registered in 2008.Our aim is to bring local communities together and enhance their capacity to actively participate in tackling the root causes of poverty and deprivation faced by widows, widowers, single parents, orphans, asylum, seekers and refugees and other deprived communities. Our objectives include strengthening the capacity of individuals and local communities and supporting them to engage in projects that transform the lives of these underprivileged members of the community. The organisation is managed by a team of 7 Trustees. Locally WORD Trust does not have any membership but internationally WORD has a membership of over 8000 people. Our members are mainly women who comprise 80%, 5% widowers and single parents and 15% are members of the public who support our work. Locally we offer Parenting classes, Computer training and the back to work programmes, Zumba classes, Swimming classes, Women’s support group and a young women’s support group as well as general youth programmes. We organise Development Awareness on themed events like International Women’s Day and International Widows’ Day events aimed at sharing learning and experience of our work within the local community. We recruit and send volunteers abroad to work in our established programmes internationally. 82 volunteers have participated so far. • Contact: Everjoice Makuve; Tel.: 07780364154 Email: wordorphan2003@yahoo.co.uk Website: www.wordtrustinternational.com Facebook: WORD Trust International for Widows and Orphans (Official)

28. Zimbabwean Community Association of Norwich (ZIMCAN)

Founded on 31st October 2009 by a group of concerned individuals in the wake of a tragic road traffic accident in which 3 members of the local BME community lost their lives. A committee of members was elected to take forward its aims. The Aims of ZIMCAN are-(1)The advancement of education for members of the Charity and the Community through culturally appropriate activities; promoting closer integration and potential for development within the community, by fostering closer ties between members and the general public. (2) The promotion of health and social care through a range of activities intended to promote the well-being of individuals within the community of people of African origins, specifically Zimbabweans. (3) To facilitate the relief of poverty, sickness and distress through a network offering support, advice and assistance, including prison visiting to members and relevant others of African origins who are in distress. (4) To promote the cultural richness and history that supports development of cultural and personal identity, particularly for children and isolated individuals in Norfolk. The organisation also manages the ZIMCAN Burial Society with the aim of assisting bereaved members. More details about the society can be accessed at http://www.zimcan.btck.co.uk/BurialSociety. Management committee of 8-10 people which meets every third Saturday of the month. Members of the Executive Committee are elected on an annual basis at the Annual General Meeting which is held in October each year. • Contact: Francis Nhamo (Current Chair); Tel.: 07956437813 Email: zimcan@live.co.uk Website: http://www.zimcan.btck.co.uk/ Facebook: Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich Mailing Address: Fourways Community Centre, Stevenson Rd, Norwich, Norfolk, NR5 8TN

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Faith Based BME Support Networks 29. Jewish Community - Norwich Liberal Jewish Community (NLJC)

Aims to provide a meeting place for people of the Liberal Jewish faith and those with an interest. The group is a registered charity founded in 1989 as a synagogue for members of the Liberal Jewish faith and those interested and provides a warm, welcoming, and inclusive environment for Jews of all kinds and their friends. Management committee of 8 council members. With 56 members and & friends + 15 young people under 18. We have between 40 & 50 people at our regular monthly services. We are always open to talking to other groups and we have a council of 8 members who are particularly happy to do outreach work. We have an interfaith Sukkot every October to which we invite people of all faiths and none. Members are mainly Jewish. • Contact: Annie Henriques; Tel.: 07764170652 Email: enquiries@norwichljc.org.uk Website: www.norwichljc.org.uk

30. Living Waters Pentecostal Fellowship

The Group was started in 2010 and is registered with the Charity Commission, registration number 1155066. Its main aim is to: spread the good news about Jesus Christ; have a place where Christians from all walks of life can come worship in fellowship; build a multicultural church that meets the physical and spiritual needs of a diversified community. The group occasionally organises community events and is a good source for community networking opportunities. The organisation has strong links to the Zimbabwean Community Network in Norfolk. The best way to contact the group is by email or calling. Management committee of 6, with an active membership 30. • Contact: Tapiwa Kundoro (Pastor); Tel.: 07960300567 Email: info@livingwaterspentecostalfellowship.org Website: https://livingwaterspentecostalfellowship.org/ Facebook: Living Waters Pentecostal Fellowship

31. Norwich & Norfolk Muslim Association

Norwich & Norfolk Muslim Association (NNMA) is a faith based registered charity organisation. NNMA defines its aims as catering for the needs of the local community by engaging in community cohesion activities, providing assistance to local authorities and educational institutions about Islam and Muslims, empowering women and children to take more active roles in society, tackling issues of racism and discrimination, and raising the profile of ethnic minority communities in Norwich and Norfolk. NNMA’s vision is to provide a centre of excellence, with a view of providing a range of holistic and inclusive services for all sectors of the community. It is also listed as the Norwich & Norfolk Community Centre, and commonly known as the Dereham Road Mosque. The mosque is in the heart of Norwich, home to more than three thousand Muslims. NNMA works actively to promote tolerance and understanding. We are a member of the Norfolk County Council network which binds together Muslims from different backgrounds and strands of Islam. We enjoy excellent interfaith relations. Several times each year we will open the doors of the centre, inviting people to visit and view an exhibition about Islam and Muslims. Our members encourage constructive engagement in society and a rejection of extremism in all its forms. We unequivocally reject all terrorism. Members are mainly Muslims from all nationality backgrounds. The organisation is a listed member of the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) • Contact: Tel.: 01603 626661 Email: info@norwichmuslims.org.uk Website: http://www.norwichmuslims.org.uk/ Address: 286 Dereham Road, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 3UU

32. Shiite Muslims Al-Mustafa Organisation for Education

This is a Shiite Muslim community support organisation founded in 2012 and managed by a group of volunteers, with the aim of reducing isolation between families and individuals by organising events and activities for Shiite people. Membership is open to all, which includes Shiite Muslims from Pakistani, Iraqi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Bangladeshi. • Contact: Mr. Ali Al-Asadi Email: serge_bas@yahoo.com

33. East Anglian Bangladeshi Islamic Centre (Norwich)

The East Anglian Bangladeshi Islamic Trust and community centre is a registered charity with its aims and activities listed as: To promote Islamic culture social & religious gatherings and teach Islamic culture and history. It promotes awareness about multicultural society, building up relationships with other faith communities by organising events and meetings. The centre has a place of worship open and accessible to Muslims from all nationalities. The centre has existed in Norwich since 1995. The organisation occasionally organises Islamic conferences and exhibitions. The centre also has a Burial Society to support Bangladeshi community members and other Muslims. The centre is open to all Muslims regardless of nationality. • Contact: Mr Sirajul Islam; Tel.: 07908 252246; Email: info@norwichmosque.co.uk Website: http://norwichmosque.co.uk/ Mailing Address: 70-72 Rose Lane, Norwich, Norfolk, NR1 1PT

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34. Bethany Tamil Church

Bethany Tamil Church was founded on 17 January 2009 by Pastor Thasan and Mrs Balesh Thasan to serve the growing Indian and Sri Lankan community who are moving into the city for several reasons such as university, starting a business etc. The main objective of the church is to help people in the community. The Services are held on Sundays at 3pm followed by fellowship with a meal (most weeks). Services can be translated from Tamil to English. Every Thursday there is a Tamil School which teaches the Tamil language, spoken mainly in Sri Lanka and South India, for anyone who wishes to learn including the children of parents who have settled in the UK. Every Wednesday there is a Life Group which studies teachings from the Bible. If anyone is unable to understand English the leaders would help accompany them to wherever they need to go such as a hospital, visa office, job centre and translate into Tamil for them. The church also provides support with: Counselling; Assisting people with paper work for visas/Immigration; Any kind of emotional needs; Kids Club on the last Saturday of every month with variety of games and fun activities as well as learning from the Bible; Women’s Group meet on the last Tuesday of each month; Annual Sporting Event, trip to Butlins, Summer Fete, BBQ, seaside trips. The church’s head office is in Southall, London, and we also support the work of St Pauls Church of England with their events. Currently there are 30 members which comprises of several men and women and boys and girls from Sri Lanka, India and England. People are welcome into the church from all different religious backgrounds. The Church and its Services are open to anyone from any Nationality. • Contact: Mr Thasan and Mrs Balesh Thasan; Tel.: 07946317120 / 07449886983 Email: jthasan2005@hotmail.co.uk Website: www.bethanychurches.org Facebook: Tamil Church Bethany Norwich Mailing Address: C/O St Pauls Church, Sherwood Road, Tuckswood, Norwich NR4 6AB

35. UEA Mosque (part of UEA Multifaith Centre, Norwich)

This is a Multifaith community place of worship within the University of East Anglia campus with a capacity for 200 plus congregates. The centre is a spiritual meeting place and community centre. It is open to staff and students of the University from 10am to 4pm, Monday to Friday during semester time and on Sunday evenings for services. The Multifaith Centre at UEA exists to serve the University. Its mission is: To serve the spiritual and religious needs of the University community; To provide pastoral care, friendship and support for all staff and students of the University, regardless of their faith; To support the academic life of the University by exploring meaning, faith, peace and justice in a safe and respectful environment; To provide a ‘mutual place’ where staff and students can encounter people of a different culture or set of beliefs. • Contact: Tel.: 01603 592168 Email: chaplaincy@uea.ac.uk Mailing Address: Chancellor Drive, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, NR4 7TJ

Our Domestic Violence Advice & Advocacy (DV-AA) Project is aimed at: • Raising awarenes about Domestic Violence in BME (black and minority ethnic) communities • Supporting BME people in increasing their confidence in reporting DV • Developing a BME Specialist Domestic Violence support service in Norfolk • Tackling cultural barriers to dealing with Domestic Violence • Ensuring the safety of victims by providing confidential advice and advocacy support

Please contact us if: • You are/know of a victim and you not sure how to get help and support • You are worried about going to the authorities e.g. Police • You are worried about your immigration status • You want to know more because everyone deserves a Volience-Free Life

Call: 01603 617 076 email: office@bridgeplus.org.uk 26

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THE BRIDGE PLUS +

NEW ROUTES INTEGRATION

ENGLISH +


Non-BME led providing support to a majority BME community population 36. New Routes

Works with individuals and communities through activities which build self-esteem, develop new skills, and strengthen existing skills. Sets up projects which build individual capacity, and also bring people together across differences in age, ethnicity, gender, culture and social groups. Improves social and ethnic cohesion by building positive images and new connections amongst people of different backgrounds, thereby integrating marginalised people into the wider community. Activities provided include Children’s Stories from Around the World; International Families Club; Adult Mentoring & Befriending; Women’s Dance Fitness Class; Craft & Conversation; Homework Support Club; The New Routes Youth Mentoring Project; International Women’s Friendship Group; International Workshop. • Contact: Dee Robinson, Project Co-ordinator Tel.: 01603662648 or 077 99 66 1009 Email: info@newroutes.org.uk Website: http://www.newroutes.org.uk/ Facebook: New Routes Mailing Address: Norwich Social Centre, Catherine Wheel Opening, Norwich, NR3 3BQ

37. GYROS Great Yarmouth Resettlement & Orientation Services

GYROS was founded in 1998 to support newly arrived asylum seekers and refugees to the Great Yarmouth area. We now work predominantly with EEA nationals and other newcomers to the Great Yarmouth area. More recently we have expanded and opened another office in Lowestoft. GYROS can offer general information advice and guidance in a wide number of popular languages in the area including but not limited to: English, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Russian, Latvian and Polish. We are accredited to give Immigration Advice to OISC Level 2 (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner) The organisation consist of a Board of Trustees and three members of senior management team. Members are mainly of mixed gender, nationality and faith. We do some work with young people who have English as a second language or whose parents have English as a second language. We run an activity club on a Saturday and a Youth Café. More info on this available on our website. Events and activities organised by the group include Pre-ESOL classes/Reminiscence Boxes Training/ Talking Café/ Skills Swap etc. More info on this available on our website. • Contact: Tel.: 01493 745260 Email: admin@gyros.org.uk Website: www.gyros.org.uk Facebook: GYROS Mailing Address: 26-27 King Street, Great Yarmouth NR30 2NZ

38. ACCESS

Access is a registered charity (formerly known as Kings Lynn Area Resettlement SupportKLARS) was set up in 2000 by a group of local people in Churches Together who wanted to help asylum seekers and refugees beginning to arrive in the area, and it was staffed entirely by volunteers, who ran one drop-in session per week. With the expansion of the European Union (May 2004) the number of people seeking support increased quickly, and additional drop-in sessions were organised. Access exists to help migrants settle into their local communities. We work in partnership with stakeholders to further community cohesion, to offer multi-lingual advice services and to provide practical support to overcome language barriers for our clients. At the core of our service now are four busy advice clinics every week, spread between King’s Lynn and Wisbech. These are run by our highly trained multilingual Project Workers and volunteers and provide support for migrants across a wide spectrum of issues. • Contact: Emma Humphrey (Director) Tel.: 01553773905 or 07727957815 Website: http://www.accessmigrantsupport.org.uk/ Mailing Address: 41 Old Hospital Mews, Hospital Walk, King’s Lynn, Norfolk, PE30 5RU

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39. NASREF (Norwich Asylum Seekers and Refugees Forum)

NASREF has been running since 2002. The overall purpose of NASREF is to improve the well-being of asylum seekers and refugees (ASR) in Norwich. NASREF is principally a virtual group with around 120 contacts including individuals, community groups, statutory and other organisations working with people from BME backgrounds in Norwich and Norfolk. The aim of the network is to: share information and good practice; ensure the equal participation of ASR; inform regional and local policy; improve awareness and understanding of ASR in all sectors; support effective partnership working; contribute to and build links with initiatives to support community cohesion in Norfolk; contribute to and build links with initiatives which promote the well-being of migrant workers. There is no Management Committee. The current Chair is Sue Gee. The Vice Chair is Bert Bremner. The main contact is Rob Cooper. Membership is open to any organisation or individual involved with support, advice or delivery of services to asylum seekers and refugees within Norfolk. The Forum meets once every two months and also acts as an information sharing network. Members are mainly: network members includes individual and support organisations with an interest in the welfare of migrant communities (ASR, BME and EU nationals). Organisations involved in the forum include The Red Cross, Bridge Plus, New Routes, English Plus, Norfolk International Youth Project, Norfolk County Council, Norwich City Council, Norfolk police, voluntary & statutory educational providers; NHS providers, and the regional Local Government Association migration leads • Contact: Rob Cooper; Email: nasref1@gmail.com

40. Amnesty International (Norwich Group)

Amnesty International was founded in 1961 by Peter Benenson, who in an article in The Observer urged people to write to the Portugese authorities urging them to release two students who had been imprisoned for toasting “freedom”. Since then millions of letters have been written on behalf of other “prisoners of conscience”. We also campaign for other related causes, including women’s rights, the rights of ethnic minorities, and currently refugees and the retention of the Human Rights Act. Campaigning for human rights worldwide. The group meets at the Charing Cross Centre, Norwich every third Wednesday of the month at 7.30pm. The local group is managed by a committee of eleven. Membership is open to all. The group holds monthly open meetings and stalls where we collect signatures on petitions, occasional fundraising events. • Contact: David Huband (Chair); Tel.: 01603 271698 Email: chair@norwichamnesty.org.uk or David.huband@yahoo.co.uk Website: http://www.norwichamnesty.org.uk/ Facebook: Amnesty Norwich

41. City Saints In Action

Saints In Action was started in 2009 with the aim of helping people build new social networks by working together to help others and to build an integrative community Opportunities for volunteering, social groups, storage and resources to share with others. Managed by an unincorporated group of 5 people. Membership is approximately 120 per week. Members are of mixed origins, and they encourage people of faith to work together for peace love and harmony. The groups’ events and activities include open table meals, storage of goods to donate, micro funding people into work, food distribution, work parties, shared equipment. • Contact: Carrie Sant; Tel.: 07523909798 Email: carrie.stchap@yahoo.com

42. Ormiston Families at HMP Norwich

Ormiston Families is a leading charity for children, young people and families in the East of England. The Ormiston Families team is based in the visitors’ centre just outside the perimeter walls of Norwich prison. We provide support, information and a personal induction for first-time visitors to help them access the services available to them. The Ormiston Families team also provides additional services. Children’s visits - special visits for children in a dedicated playroom; Story Book Dads: Prisoner dads can apply to record a story on to disc for his child/children. This is open to dads, step-dads and granddads; Babybonding visits for prisoner, partner and new baby soon after birth; Parenting courses for dads or stepdads; Play Space. This is an ‘open access’ facility available each visit session, for children to play whilst accompanied by their responsible adult. In addition we can sometimes, depending on staff availability, offer to pick up your child from the visits hall and bring back to the Play Space for supervised play until the end of your visit. We may also sometimes be able to offer a full creche service. Please speak to staff for more details. Family liaison work with information and signposting on a wide range of issue. • Contact: Debbie Campbell; Tel.: 01603 702301 Email: debbie.campbell@ormiston.org Website: http://www.ormiston.org/help-centres/ormiston-hmp-norwich.html Mailing Address: Ormiston at HMP Norwich, Knox Road, Norwich NR1 4LU

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Refugee Week - Different Pasts, Shared Futures

Amelia of New Routes (event organiser) with Guest Speaker

Guest at the Norwich Refugee Week Launch event at City HAll Norwich on 16 June 2017

Guest Speaker Rabab from Sudan with Lord Mayor and Sheriff looking on (R-L)

World Refugee Day is here and is being observed from the 19-25 June, giving us a moment to celebrate the achievements of refugees, and also gives us time to reflect on what else we need to do to make sure their lives here are respected and valued. BY FIZZA QURESHI

Tragedies here & Positivity from Abroad

Last week, we heard of the tragic death of Syrian refugee, Mohammed Alhajali in the Grenfell Tower fire. A sad indictment considering he fled the bombs and fires of Syria only to succumb to a fire in his new home. Fortunately, his parents have been granted a visa to attend his funeral after an online petition reached over 85,000 signatures. Highlighting just one of the sad realities refugee families face when separated. In spite of all the tragedies, recently charities have become the target of the right wing press and politicians. Claims are being made that humanitarian rescue ships are taxis without borders, encouraging refugees to make the perilous journey across the Mediterranean, because they will rescue them. However, a report by Goldsmiths University, refutes these allegations and rightly points out that: “The argument against NGOs deliberately ignores the worsening economic and political crisis across several regions in Africa that has driven up the numbers of crossings in 2016”. And as refugees continue to flee to Europe’s border, the European Commission has finally stepped up to its mark and launched infringement proceedings against the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland for their refusals to take their quota of refugees. The Commission stood firm stating that “the implementation of the Council Decisions on relocation is a legal obligation, not a choice”. Further positive news has come from the settlement the Australian government made to the refugees detained on Manus Island and Nauro, which was equivalent to £41 million pounds. But, what will happen to those who will not be

transferred to the USA, and will remain unfairly and inhumanely detained on those islands? What next for refugees and asylum seekers in the UK? The Conservative Party in their recent manifesto stated their intentions to redefine the definition of refugees and asylum. This continues the two-tier system created that categorises refugees into good ones (resettlement programme) and bad ones (those who have fled and made perilous journeys to reach the shores of Britain). While it will be near impossible to redefine an internationally recognised term, the disregard to ensure we offer protection to all those to who seek it is indefensible. So what can we do in the mean time?

Continuing the campaigning for asylum seekers & refugees Destitution - A committee of the Scottish Parliament commissioned a report into the impact of destitution on asylum seekers and those with insecure immigration status, whilst looking at the reasons why destitution occurred. The sensible and positive recommendations from the report should be used by refugee and migrant groups to launch renewed efforts to ensure that those who come here seeking protection are not left in desperate situations. For a start, a demand needs to be made for asylum seekers to be allowed to have the right to work, supporting their mental and physical health. Family reunification - Family reunification for refugees is still a hurdle they have to jump. Without legal aid to support them to bring in their family members the fees for applications and

Lord Mayor with guest @ Refugee Week Norwich

appeal become increasingly inhibitory, and divide families. Alongside this, unaccompanied minors are left without any opportunity to be reunited with any of their family members because they don’t have the right to bring over any family members. Keep your eye out for campaigns on this issue coming soon. Child Refugees - UNICEF, and UNHCR have both recently issued reports highlighting the increasing number of refugees, especially as at least half of those are child refugees. They urge the UK and others to take responsibility and do more. But will this government do that? Here in the UK, the Dubs Amendment remains unfulfilled, and somewhat now off the radar due to other events, like the General Election and Brexit negotiations. We, now have many unaccompanied minors remaining in the woods around Calais in unsafe conditions awaiting their chance to flee to the UK. Only 550 children were transferred to the UK, so a legal action against the Home Office is being brought with regards to allegations of inconsistencies in how they dealt with the clearance of the Calais camp. At least 400 remained behind who have claims of family in the UK. The legal case will be one to watch. Accessed from: http://www. migrantsrights.org.uk/blog/2017/06/20/ refugee-week-different-pasts-sharedfutures/?mc_cid=24e3e3d113&mc_ eid=c37a077eba

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IN PRAISE OF HOPE

Salah El Nagar, Egyptian writer, poet and refugee. Extract from a factual story of his time in the ‘Jungle’ refugee camp, Calais, accompanied by a poem of his inspired by Hope.

‘I left my tent. The dark was full of the sounds of dogs and firing of guns. I followed the familiar roads to meet the smugglers. I walked for nearly two hours alone. I looked to either side of the road through the darkness. I heard the barking of police dogs that seemed so close. I remembered my bitter memories, my time on the Mediterranean Sea and my sixty days in the jungle. To overcome this sadness, I remembered better days of joking and laughing with the smugglers. I remembered the humorous times watching lorry drivers with their surprised faces. I watched the stars which made me remember my time studying physics at university in Cairo. I laughed. Finally, I found one friend who agreed to travel with me through the long dark routes. I found him in my desperate situation. His name was Hope. Without Hope we have nothing to help us carry on. Hope gives us happiness and safety. Hope motivates us to withstand and persevere. It takes us away from laziness, depression

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and frustration. Without Hope we remain in the darkest room, consumed by bad situations and a negative outlook. This prevents us seeing the beauty, the goodness and joy of the world. We become isolated in our sadness. The words of Hope from others are like gold. They empower us. They intensify the beauty of the world. I spoke with Hope and asked: “When is the end of my suffering? I try every night to escape without success. I am tired!” “You should embrace me, have you encouraged others to embrace me?” Hope asked. “Yes, I have written about you, but I am human, sometimes I have much weakness and despair.” I said. “Yes, I know, do not worry I am with you always, Hope answered. “Your journey will be fruitful in the future. Your journey will be honourable to you and your family in the future for your children and grandchildren. Keep faith in hope and be optimistic. This night may be the last of your struggles.” Do not let anything stop you Anything imposed unacceptable.... prove to the world that you exist Do not let anything stop you.... Do not let life lock you up Close the door of your sorrow fully

Open the door of opportunity and keep on working hard The whole thing is to exert, some effort. Do not let fear steal the innocence of your soul, imprison its determination and courage, destroy ambition and power….. and control you. Your human inner strength will overcome the obstacles of life. You can make it straight if it is tended… You can beat it… Power is always in your hands Do not let anything stop you.... Do not let life lock you up Close the door of your sorrow fully Open the door of opportunity and keep on working hard.


B-ME VOICES: Is there a lack of diversity in the student community?

• “Within a week at Oxford in my first year, I had already been told by one of my peers he ‘did not like black people because it was the way I [he] was brought up.’ Over the course of my degree, many other people have justified their racism with the excuse either that their families say far worse things behind closed doors or that growing up they were unexposed to people of other ethnicities. Sometimes both excuses were used at once, as though together they were enough to excuse the person’s casual racism.”

Below are extract from the 100 Voices campaign conducted by Oxford University BME students’ Campaign for Racial Awareness • “I was excited about meeting people and Equality (CRAE), a group from other cultures at oxford, and dedicated to creating a more just hoped that other cultures and inclusive student experience would be excited through action and engagement about meeting me. with racial diversity and difference. But what I found • “I think I’ve successfully made myself fit in [to Oxford] and, in that process, I’ve actually lost myself.” • “Although I am white, I want to see a more equal representation and equal opportunities for ALL ethnic groups here at Oxford. Racism isn’t just about those who are discriminated against: it is the responsibility of those who benefit from white privilege to redress those inequalities.” • “I was told of an incident during the college photoshoot where, upon seeing the two students he was going to be photographed with, a tutor responded ‘ah excellent, a woman and an ethnic’.”

was hegemony and the dominant culture here was something I could never have prepared myself for.”

• “Most of my issues with race revolve around my subject. My degree is almost exclusively white, and I know it has been a problem for black or Indian friends. Although there is a lot of scholarship on the topic of race in the classical world and in classical studies, it is often not on reading lists and not discussed. Race issues are so prominent in the ancient world, yet in my Oxford experience have been largely swept under the carpet, and I would say that this problem is increasing.”

• “In my college I’m known as the (black) guy that always wears a suit. It’s funny because one of my best friends in college, a white guy, always wears tracksuits. People always ask jokingly, ‘Shouldn’t you be switched around’? It was all in jest but you know there are underlying expectations implicated by these statements.” • “I think there is more recognition for people of one particular background, or a mixture of two, than those of us who have two mixed race parents. The problem for people, like me, who have to go back three generations to find an ancestor who identifies with one specific country and culture, is that you can end up affiliated to no particular group - and so neither recognised, nor supported by any measures in place to prevent racism.” • BME students often say that they feel like they struggle with issues of race and racism by themselves, with very few or no one else in their communities (college, department, or administration) to turn to for help. 57.75% of BME respondents reported that they believed that racism is a problem at Oxford, as compared to 38.5% of white respondents. 81.2% of BME respondents reported that they did not feel that race and ethnicity were adequately discussed at Oxford, as compared to 69.7% of white respondents. Only 42.5% of BME students replied that there were enough, if any, safe spaces in Oxford to discuss race, as opposed to 64.3% of white respondents. • Conclusion Race is a concern not only to BME students, but also to students from a variety of backgrounds. Though this report focused largely on the experiences of BME students at Oxford, it captured voices from students across the University from a variety of backgrounds and heritages. Its findings highlight a growing sense of conviction that this is an issue that needs to be addressed by a multitude of voices. We believe that the University should take a strong stance in addressing the issues discussed above to send a clear message that every member of the Oxford community is equally valued. Such commitment to action would constitute one of the most important factors in creating this vital cultural shift.

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Experiences of volunteering @ The Bridge Plus+

Sue

I

was drawn to joining the Bridge Plus team as a volunteer some five years ago when I heard there was a non-profit community organisation, working to support people from minority groups. I’ve spent a lot of years working and travelling in different countries during my disability and development work for NGOs (non-governmental organisations) in, Kenya, Ghana, China, Lao, and South Asian countries such as; Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and wanted to stay connected with those worlds now that I was back home in Norwich. I also feel that as we are very privileged in the UK generally to have a comfortable way of life, it is important to be aware of the stories and difficulties that people from less economically developed countries are facing. Now that I’m back in Norwich, it’s a way of trying to still play a part in helping those people from overseas but in my own country. It has made me realise the difficulties they face in negotiating visas, the right to remain and just surviving what can be a very bruising government system. How difficult it is to find any kind of job, never mind one that matches the skills they have to offer. How easy it is for your life to de-rail when benefits are cut suddenly in a complicated welfare system that often seeks to sanction rather than assist people through their problems, all in another language too! But of course, it’s not all doom and gloom! It’s so enjoyable to greet and chat to people from so many walks of life. And despite their difficulties, most people still manage to smile and joke. For me it’s a privilege to be able to meet people from overseas and remember the things of their country or culture if I’ve lived or worked there in the past, so it’s a pleasure and not just work. Although that too gives me a great deal of satisfaction, having the opportunity to use skills learnt from my background work and still learn new things. Of course, the social aspects are very important to a volunteer as well, like having great colleagues and clients, not forgetting the awesome community cuisine lunches!

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Frances Middleton

I

have been a volunteer at Bridge Plus for several years now. Some of you may remember the old office in the Blue House? That was where I first met the friendship and help that is on offer from Bridge Plus to anyone who comes through the door. I was glad to be part of the organisation which offered this to people from all over the world, a bit lost and alone in our city. And I still am! Now we have the splendid rooms at Sackville Place. Different premises, but the same warm welcome and instant sympathy and support are there. One of the best things for me is the Community Cuisine or Lunch. Every month, usually the last Thursday of the month (the next one is on 22nd June, during Refugee Week) Bridge Plus hosts a convivial meal, with home-cooked dishes from across the world. So much delicious food from so many talented cooks - Jojo’s Gambian Jollof Rice, Anna’s Congolese Benye, Felice’s Italian Foccaccia, Parri’s Iraqi tasty stuffed vine leaves, Po’s Chinese noodles and many, many others..........we have an amazing and different experience every time! We meet and eat, we talk and laugh, and we listen and learn. New friends are made, old friends are caught up with, life in Norwich becomes better and begins to feel a bit like home (with rain, of course!) I love our community dining and so does everyone who comes. Do join us next time! The rest of my work as a volunteer – meeting and greeting, offering black tea or water, toys for the children, filing and answering the phone - is equally interesting because of all the lovely people I meet from such varied cultures and countries. But of course I am also very involved in making the regular calls to assist clients with the benefits, Councils and problem solving issues - and of course, again the long waits before anyone will answer calls, for example the notorious 45 minutes for call to the DWP. My latest task has concerned the important questionnaires you have all kindly filled in. I have read how appreciated Bridge Plus is for its endlessly available staff and tea and sympathy, and the very practical, down-to-earth advice and support that is always on offer. As a volunteer, in the office one day a week, I salute my regular colleagues and their 24/7 approach to all our clients. So I shall continue to come to Bridge Plus, and be a small part of this important service to those we welcome to our city from across the world. Come in and meet us all one day!


The Immigration Acts of 2014 & 2016 in Plain English

O

n 12 May 2016, the Immigration Act 2016 came into force, making it officially UK law. Here are the key changes in plain-English: • Employers who hire illegal migrants and the workers themselves face criminal sanctions. • Migrants who do not have permission to be in the UK can have certain privileges revoked. For example, their bank accounts can be frozen and their driver’s license can be seized. • It will be a criminal offence for a landlord to knowingly rent premises to an illegal migrant. If found guilty, the landlord can face up to five years in prison. This law will take effect when the Secretary of State creates regulations that state the law’s ‘start date’. • The Government’s so-called ‘deport first, appeal later’ scheme has been extended to all migrants (before it only applied to convicted criminals with no residency rights or to those people the Secretary of State considered it ‘conducive to the public good’ to remove). Any migrant that has made a human rights or asylum claim can now be removed to their home country pending the outcome of their appeal against the decision to remove them. That is, unless such removal would cause them ‘serious, irreversible harm’. This law will also take effect when the Secretary of State creates regulations stating the law’s ‘start date’. • Pregnant women can now only be detained by immigration authorities for up to 72 hours (or one week with special permission). • Arrangements will be made to relocate unaccompanied refugee children from other countries in Europe to the UK (this backs up the Prime Minister’s previous statements – see our piece about it here). By Sian Lea (source https://rightsinfo.org/ immigration-act-2016-plain-english/)

The Immigration Act 2014 What it actually means 1. Rights of appeal For migrants and immigration lawyers this aspect of the Act has the potential to be the most significant. Currently if the Home Office refuses an application for an extension of leave because they have misunderstood the person’s circumstances or because a document has been overlooked that person can usually appeal to the First Tier Tribunal and

argue that the decision is inconsistent with the immigration rules or that discretion should have been exercised. The Act will remove rights of appeal and replace them with a right to seek an administrative review of the Home Office decision. On the face of it, this change may seem minor as applicants can still argue the original decision was flawed albeit under a different process. However previous figures have suggested that around 50% of immigration appeals before independent judges are successful whereas 18% of administrative reviews carried out by the Home Office are successful. Appeals will still be possible in asylum cases and where a human rights claim has been refused. However where it is a question of the application of the immigration rules or Home Office guidance then it would appear there will be a lower chance of success in challenging the decision as the Home Office will be reviewing their own decisions under the administrative review procedure. 2. Landlord immigration checks The Act will not only impact upon migrants but it will also have a significant impact on anyone who is renting out private accommodation. Originally it was intended to require all landlords to confirm a tenant’s right to remain in the UK before agreeing to rent property to them. Due to a number of political concessions it has now been agreed that this aspect of the Act will initially be a pilot scheme restricted to one geographical area. Where the pilot scheme will take place has not yet been announced but this potentially onerous requirement may eventually come into force UK wide and landlords should ensure they keep up to date with developments. 3. Access to the NHS The Act will also allow for temporary migrants to be charged for using some NHS facilities. The Government will be able to add a “health surcharge” to the cost of applications for entry clearance or leave to remain. The exact details of this scheme are currently being worked on and will be announced at a future date. Previous Government responses to consultations indicated that the likely cost of the surcharge would be around £150 - £200 however it is not clear what services, if any, would incur additional costs beyond this. It is also unclear how this aspect of the Act will apply to Scotland as health is a devolved matter and the Scottish Government has previously issued its own guidance on NHS charges to migrants.

4. Article 8 right to family and private life The tension between the Government and Immigration Tribunals on how the human right to a private and family life should be applied in cases has previously been the subject of much discussion. Whilst in 2012 the Government amended the immigration rules to reflect their view of Article 8 rights tribunals have continued to apply previous case law in many cases. The Immigration Act aims to strengthen the “public interest” argument used by the Government in some cases by including it in primary legislation. The impact of this aspect of the Act will need to be assessed once it has come before the tribunals and courts. Tribunals will continue to have to apply the Human Rights Act 1998 and European Convention on Human Rights however they will need to reconcile previous law with the new stronger “public interest” argument. Whether judges will consider that this public interest justifies interference with human rights is likely to be dependent on the facts of any given case. 5. Deprivation of citizenship The final issue debated by Parliament in relation to the Immigration Act was the Government proposals to deprive naturalised British citizens of their passport where their conduct was considered to be “seriously prejudicial” to the interests of the UK. This power would essentially allow the Home Office to make some people stateless. As a result of Parliamentary debate the Government introduced an amendment only allowing the power to be used where the Secretary of State has “reasonable grounds” to believe the person can acquire another nationality, however the Act does not require the Government to demonstrate that the person can acquire another nationality and this is likely to be the subject of future litigation. By Stuart McWilliams-Source: http:// www.morton-fraser.com/knowledgehub/immigration-act-2014-what-itactually-means

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June 2017 Elections – “Oh No! Not another one!” was the reaction of Brenda, which became the most popular catch phrase reflecting the feeling of many voters. But here we go with the results:

How to contact your MPs 1. Keith Simpson MP

6. Chloe Smith MP

2. Brandon Lewis MP

7. Clive Lewis MP

3. George Freeman MP

8. Richard Bacon MP

4. Norman Lamb MP -

9. Elizabeth Truss MP

Broadland Conservative Tel: 01603 865763 email: keithsimpson2015@gmail.com Great Yarmouth Conservative Tel: 01493 652928 email: brandon.lewis.mp@parliament.uk

Mid Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01953 600617 email: george.freeman.mp@parliament.uk

North Norfolk Liberal Democrat Tel: 01692 403752 email: norman.lamb.mp@parliament.uk

5. Henry Bellingham MP

North West Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01553 692076 email: bellinghamh@parliament.uk

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Norwich North Conservative Tel: 01603 414756 email: chloe@chloesmith.org.uk

Norwich South Labour Tel: 01603 510755 email: clive.lewis.mp@parliament.uk

South Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01379 643728 email: richardbaconmp@parliament.uk

South West Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01842 757345 email: elizabeth.truss.mp@parliament.uk


The France National Football Team –Diversity in Action

DIVERSITY IN EUROPEAN FOOTBALL The African Stars of European Football Below is a snap shot of some of the footballs of African descent playing for their European national teams. Belgium 1. Jordan and Romelu Lukaku - The Lukaku brothers, Romelu who plays int eh English League and Jordan are of Congolese origin. 2. Moussa Dembele - Moussa Démbéle has a Malian father and a Flemish mother. 3. Divock Origi - The son of former Kenyan international Mike Origi, Divock plays for Liverpool, and represents the Belgian national team. 4. Dele Alli - The Tottenham midfielder, son of a Yoruba Nigerian father, and an English mother. 5. Marouane Fellaini - Machester United’s big-haired midfielder was born in Belgium to Moroccan parent. 6. Michy Batshuayi - Batshuayi is of Congolese descent and a Chelsea player, who represent his native Belgium. 7. Christian Benteke - Benteke is a striker in the English Premier League who was born in DR Congo. He moved to Belgium with his family as a child. 8. Jason Denayer - Denayer has a Congolese mother and a Belgian father. 9. Christian Kabasele - Kabasele is a Belgian national who was born in Lubumbashi, DR Congo. He plays for Belgium.

France 1. Dimitri Payet - Payet is from Réunion, a French island between Madagascar and Mauritius. 2. Paul Pogba - Pogba’s whose parents are Guinean, is in the French First Team. 3. N’Golo Kanté - Kanté born in France

is of Malian descent, and an English Premier League player. 4. Patrice Evra - Evra was born in Dakar, Senegal, but has been a starter for France since 2004. His father was Senegalese of Guinean descent. 5. Bacary Sagna - Sagna was born in France to Senegalese parents. 6. Blaise Matuidi - Matuidi is of Angolan and Congolese heritage. 7. Moussa Sissoko - Sissoko was born in the suburbs of Paris to Malian parents. 8. Adil Rami - Rami was born in Corsica, France, to Moroccan parents. 9. Steve Mandanda - Mandanda is France’s second choice goalkeeper. He was born in Kinshasa. 10. Eliaquim Mangala - Mangala is of Congolese descent, but was born in France and lived most of his life in Belgium.

Germany 1. Jerome Boateng - Boateng was born in Germany to a Ghanian Father and an german mother. He palyes for the German national side. 2. Sami Khedira - Khedira was born in Germany to a Tunisian father and a German mother. He has played for the German senior team since 2009. He plays as a midfielder for Juventus. 3. Jonathan Tah - Tah has an Ivorian mother and a German father. He plays for Germany. 4. Leroy Sané - Sané is the son of former German rhythmic gymnast champion Regina Weber and former footballer and Senegalese international Souleyman Sané.

Italy 1. Stephan El Shaarawy - Stephen has an Egyptian father, and a Swiss-Italian mother. He plays for Italian national team.

2. Angelo Ogbonna - Ogbonna was born in Italy to Nigerian parents. He only managed to obtain Italian citizenship after turning 18.

Portugal 1. Nani - Luís Carlos Almeida da Cunha (his full name) was born in Praia, Cape Verde, plays for the Portugal national team. 2. Renato Sanches - Sanches was born to a father from São Tomé and Príncipe, and a mother from Cape Verde. At only 18 years, he’s the youngest player to play the Portuguese national team. 3. William Carvalho - Carvalho was born in Angola and plays for the Portuguese national team. 4. Eliseu - Eliseu Pereira Dos Santos was born to a Cape Verdean mother and a Portuguese father. 5. Danilo Pereira - Pereira was born in Guinea-Bissau, but moved to Portugal when he was five. 6. Éder - Éderzito António Macedo Lopes was born in Guinea-Bissau, but moved at a young age to Portugal.

Switzerland 1. Gélson Fernandes - Fernandes was born in Cape Verde, but has played all of his international career for Switzerland. 2. Breel Embolo - Embolo was born in Yaoundé, Cameroon and plays for Switzerland. 3. François Moubandje - Moubandje was born in Douala, Cameroon and plays for Switzerland. 4. Johan Djourou - Djourou was born in Ivory Coast to Ivorian parents, but was adopted by his father’s first wife, a Swiss woman. Source: http://www.okayafrica.com/sports/ the-african-stars-of-european-football/

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OPEN THE BAG

Before you leave the pharmacy.

An estimated £4.7m of unused medicines are wasted every year in Norfolk and Waveney. Once an unwanted medicine has left the pharmacy, it cannot be used even if hasn’t been opened. By reducing the amount of medicines wasted each year, we could increase the funding available for other vital health services.

Please OPEN THE BAG – if you don’t need all the medicine please hand it back at the counter or to the delivery driver. For more information visit: http://tiny.cc/YourMedicines_YourNHS

B-Me Voices magazine Summer 2017  

B-Me Voices magazine Summer 2017

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