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Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices Voices

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Issue 6 Summer 2016

Free in Norfolk

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 6 Summer 2016

B Me

Voices

Free in Norfolk

B Me

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 6 Summer 2016

Free in Norfolk

Voices B Me

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 6 Summer 2016

EU Local Authorities Integration Network Conference on Migration

A BME case of Domestic Violence - Victory’s Story ) Magazine promoting diversity A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME Free in Norfolk

B Me

Voices

£1 Donations elsewhere

Issue 6 Summer 2016

Introducing Norfolk’s New Police & Crime Commissioner Lorne Green

A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity

A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME ) Magazine promoting diversity

Also in this issue: Funeral in the Community – the late Dr. Rodgers Busayi

• 1. Adventures of a Refugee – Salah’s Story • 2. MARAC DV Conference • 3. Biometric Passports – Do you have one? • 4. Prim – A True Community Champion

A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity

The Bridge Plus+ launches a project to raise awareness about Domestic Violence in BME communities A Black & Minority Ethnic (BME) Magazine promoting diversity


To celebrate diversity and in honour of ….

Are you looking What we offer Address: • Providing 1-1 information advice and 44-48 Magdalen Street, Sackville Business Place, for Information & guidance on a wide range of issues Norwich, Norfolk, NR3 1JU Advice on a range of • Supporting your job search needs: CVs, issues? trainings, application forms and interview Facebook: Do you need help techniques https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus with your job • Addressing & Advocating for race equality related issues search? Appointments available: • Help with completing all sorts of forms The aim of The Bridge Plus+ is to improve community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery, with a focus on supporting Black/Asian and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities.

• Group networking workshops & trainings with time for peer-to-peer support

Mondays to Thursdays, 10am – 3pm • office@bridgeplus.org.uk

• Peer to peer support opportunities e.g. community lunches & community engagement activities

• http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk

• Signposting and referrals to local support services and community groups

Telephone: 01603 617076 Please leave a clear voice message if not answered.

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebridgeplus

Some of our regular front line staff & volunteers Beatrice

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Frances

Gervais

Jo

Pa Musa

Mo

Sue


EDITORIAL

Progress is hope and hope is promising, which is where we are at with the B-Me Voice magazine: it is progressing and we hope that is a secured promise for the future of the magazine. This is however possible because the magazine is managing to self-fund, thanks to the sponsored pages and adverts. We have received several suggestions from our readers that the magazine should become a monthly publication. The fact is, that is our wish, but of course it requires resources. For the meantime, we expect to continue to publish issue by issue and perhaps a monthly sometime soon. Advance apologies goes out to all for the fact that the limited print hard copies tend to run out fast, but you can always access the online version at http://www.bridgeplus.org.uk/ In this issue however, we introduce Norfolk’s newly elected Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC), Lorne Green, who launched his declaration of office with the public acknowledgement and recognition of the vital role played by voluntary sector organisations in keeping people safe and reducing demand on policing. You will also get to read about some of the flagged up fascinating cover stories including the story about Victory who is in the dilemma of looking for help after a painful broken relationship and mental health, yet because of her immigration status, the desired help is yet to come. As we go to print, one thing that is on everyone’s mind is the question of whether the UK will Stay-In or Leave the EU. But whatever the outcome, the issues of the economy and immigration will always remain. Time will tell. At least after all the referendum dust has settled, there is one hope we can still be able to hold onto: that there will still be a United Kingdom with The Queen as its Head of State. In the meantime, lest we forget, Refugee Week will be observed from the 19th – 25th June 2016, Ramadan is actually being observed by the Muslim community, Black History Month will be in October, and Christmas is already knocking on our doors. And until the next issue, we would welcome and appreciate your comments, feedbacks and support. Sincerely

Pa Musa, i6! Contact: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

Prim – A True Community Champion

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Lorne Green is Norfolk’s New Police & Crime Commissioner

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A BME case of Domestic Violence – Victory’s Story

INDEX

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10 Domestic Violence Conference in the East 12 Adventures of a Refugee - Salah’s Story 18 EU Local Authorities Integration Network Conferences on Migration 24 Police Stop & Search - a message to BME communities 29 Biometric Passports - Do You Have One? 32 Funeral in the community: The Late Dr Rodgers Busayi 34 Humphryes Moyo – Made in Norfolk

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Prim Uzor A true BME Community Champion of Norfolk Tell us about moving to England and living in Norfolk. What was your main drive to stay on? I came to England from Barbados in 1970 with my Nigerian husband, who was a student at the university. We later had two daughters, who were both born in the UK. Following the birth of my second daughter Maria, I decided that I wanted to be a nurse, as I was so impressed by the wonderful treatment I received from the nurses. Since qualifying, I worked on the Coronary Care Unit, have been a Marie Curie Cancer Care Nurse, worked as a drug counsellor at Ferry Cross Drug and Alcohol Unit, worked at the John Boag Probation Hostel, and I worked as a foster carer for 20 years, until my retirement two and a half years ago, due to ill health. A few many years ago now, I set up and worked for Che Jama, a sexual health promotion organisation, specialising in work with black and minority ethnic communities, which was funded by the NHS. I have also been the Vice Chair of the Norfolk Race Equality Council, and a member of the foster panel in Norfolk, which helps to approve and review foster carers. Tell us a little more about your role as a foster carer? I predominantly did long-term fostering, although I also did short-term respite from time to time. The age range of the children I have cared for are 12 to 18 and from all races. At times it has been a challenge especially as some of the boys I cared for got older and started to get criminal records. Some of my foster children were in longterm care and suffering from behavioural problems. Almost all of them are still in my life, still visiting, phoning, seeking advice, or sharing their problems with me. Some come back home to live with me when things go wrong in their lives, even though I am no longer fostering. I love them all equally, as if I had given birth to them. And I thank God for choosing my extended family... my foster children. My foster children bring their children around from time to time. It is always a pleasure when they come over with their children to visit.

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Caring is where my heart is, and I have a passion for working with people who are hurting. I sometimes wish I were 15 people, since there is so much work to be done in helping others. As a minority, what are the biggest changes you have seen in Norfolk between now and when you first arrived here? When I first arrived in Norfolk I found that people had a tendency to stare at you and call you names. Nowadays you are no longer stared at or called names as much, and people are a little more accepting of you, compared to years ago. I know that black people are still faced with racism because it’s still there, but there is more of an acceptance now. Even my brother, who has always visited me over the years from Barbados, noticed that. He said “I don’t see the people staring at you like they did years ago”. So that’s a positive thing. Tell us about your education. Most of my adult education has been here in the UK, but my O-levels were done in Barbados. When I came over to the UK I did my nurse training and then I went to the university to do a degree in Education and Professional Development. Do you see things happening now that didn’t happen before? For example, we are always getting requests from organisations looking to engage and meet people from minority backgrounds. That didn’t happen then at all. We just had each other to talk to when we were faced with racism in those days. There was nothing like the Race Relations Act, neither were there places for black people to go. I think there still aren’t many places in Norwich where you can actually go to meet and socialise with other minority groups and share a common ground, not like they do in London or the bigger cities. In the past we did have the International Club where we would meet or hold events, but whatever was set up in those days has since closed down.

Tell us about some of the minorities in Norwich in your early days that you can remember. In the early days there weren’t many minorities. I recall meeting two Africans: a man and his wife. They were both from Nigeria. The wife’s name was Rose, but I cannot think of the husband’s name. I also met an Asian bus conductor. We used to say hello, but that was about it. When did you feel that Norfolk was changing, becoming a little bit more diverse? I think over the past ten years there has been a vast surge of migrants coming into the UK. That’s the time when things began to change a lot more, because you were seeing more diverse groups from around Europe, Africa and Asia. Before that, I don’t think it changed much. Have you ever felt being discriminated against, particularly in your line of work? Yes, I think all black people have felt discriminated against, but it was nothing that I could not deal with. I have always been an active member of the community working with people from all ethnic backgrounds, and I have a mixture of friends from all races.


What has kept you strong and going despite the challenges? I think what kept me going was the fact that I know the truth. That’s another thing which is very important for black people: to be able to have an education and to learn the truth, because when you are faced with racism, and you are ill-informed, you actually believe everything they say about you. But when you are educated / knowledgeable and you know your true history, and you know the difference between “his-story” and history, you will realise that most of it is fabrication. It’s “hisstory”, not history. So when you know that, you are able to bring up your children with a positive attitude. I always say to my children “Don’t hate anyone”, and that’s one thing I will always say to black people. In spite of all the things that we go through, “don’t hate, be a realist but not a racist”. Because with hate comes a cocktail of emotions: anger, bitterness, and despair, to name a few. My daughter, Maria came home one day as a child aged seven, and said “Mummy, someone stopped me on the road and said nigger”, she replied “Have you got that word wrong, isn’t it supposed to be Negro?” (Laughter!) My children were all prepared. I’ve always said to them, “You must not hate.” I don’t care which race they marry, as long as he treats them with kindness and respect. We are all humans. We’re all from this world. So whatever someone tries to tell you about yourself, as long as you know the truth and you know your history, you don’t have to get angry. I believe in the phrase: “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do”. It’s easy to say ignore racist comments, but sometimes people are pushed, would you agree? Yes, but you must not let it turn to hate, because hate in your heart can consume you, and at the end of the day, the person who instigated those racist comments is happily going about their business and all this hate is eating you up. The other thing to tell the kids is that they have a right to choose a career. Don’t let anyone tell you that you cannot do anything academic. Some teachers tend to tell black children that they are very good at sport because they don’t want them to go into anything else. I am saying this from personal experience. My own children were almost influenced by a teacher to make a sports career choice, but I have always told my children about the importance of education. Not that there is anything wrong with striving for a career in sports, but it’s always good to have an education to fall back on.

All pictures features in this article are of Prima from the good old days.

What was it like socialising in Norwich as a black minority ethnic person? Did you guys have a special place to meet, or a day of the week you looked forward to? No, there wasn’t anything like that. I used to have lots of dinners and lots of parties. I invited everybody. I have friends from all different races and walks of life. It wasn’t only for blacks, but there were loads of blacks, there were loads of people from the hospital and so on. And they all enjoyed it because it was something different. It was African and Caribbean music, that sort of thing. Racism has always been around – sometimes its subtle and sometimes its not. I remember going into Marks & Spencer one day and this woman saw me standing there and she picked up a brown scarf and said to her friend: “I don’t like nigger brown, do you?” How do you respond to that? If I were to respond they would say I’ve got a chip on my shoulder, they would say: “Well, I’m only talking about a scarf”. I walked away and I thought “Prim, bite your tongue”. This is the thing that gets me, because when they talk about black people having a chip on their shoulder, they don’t realise that there might be a trail of abuse before... It’s not what happened then, it’s what happened before that has brought you to this point. That ignorance is still there. Sometimes I think it is more than ignorance, its hate, to be honest, as I know a lot of smart people are very ignorant about black people, which is a pity.

If you could rewind your life back 10 years or more, what else would you have done in addition to what you have already done? I think I would still do the same: care for people. I think I probably would have even studied harder at school because there are so many things that I would love to do. But I loved my career. I have no regrets at all about going into the caring profession. I would still marry young, still care for people. I can’t think of anything that I would have done differently.

Is there anything you have missed about life back in Barbados? Family. I go home sometimes and I see the way people get together - the aunts and others come around, so you miss that part of it. It doesn’t matter how many friends you have here, and I have lots of friends, English friends, and all different races. There are times when I still would like to be with my family back home and I feel my children have missed out on that too. Because my children haven’t got anything to compare. They were both born here, and they have adopted more of the British way than they have my own culture. So I do speak to them a lot about it and we do go back to Barbados on a regular basis. I think it’s so important to keep that bit of you. Even now, as an older person, I look back and I think, oh I just wish my kids knew more about the Caribbean way of life.

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Introducing Lorne Green Norfolk’s Police and Crime Commissioner

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n 5 May 2016, Conservative candidate Lorne Green was elected to be Norfolk’s Police and Crime Commissioner, receiving 60,601 votes (including second preference votes). Lorne served for thirty years as a diplomat in some of the most troubled parts of the world including in war zones in Europe and South Asia. He was in charge of the Canadian Embassy in the former Yugoslavia during a period of conflict in the 1990s and previously served in Pakistan during a war with India. When he retired from the diplomatic service he became Secretary General of the World Nuclear Transport Institute in London for a further eleven years. Although Canadian by background, Lorne is a British citizen and whilst often serving overseas, he has maintained a home in West Norfolk for more than thirty years. He and his wife, Valerie, were married in Snettisham over forty years ago and two of their three children were born in the UK. In a statement, PCC Green said: “It was an honour and a privilege to be elected your Police and Crime Commissioner on 5 May 2016, and I would like to thank all those who took the time to vote; whoever you voted for. I am delighted to have been entrusted with the responsibility of representing you and I want to seek support from all quarters of our county – in the city, towns and villages – working with people of all backgrounds with the single goal of making and keeping Norfolk safe and secure. I invite all Norfolk residents to join me in a partnership, to bring the public and the police closer

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together and to ensure you have the opportunity to influence local policing priorities. My aim is quite simply to make Norfolk a safer and more secure county by helping the police and entire criminal justice system be strong in a time of unprecedented change at home and abroad. I am committed to holding the police to account for you. I will work full-time, with the PCC staff at the Wymondham office, to represent your interests and concerns with the police. We all want assurance that the police will be there for us when we need them most. These aren’t political issues; these are Norfolk community issues. I will be the Police and Crime Commissioner for every woman, man and child in our county.”

The first PCC elections took place in 2012, following the Government’s decision to dissolve police authorities and replace them with a Police and Crime Commissioner for each of the 41 constabularies in England and Wales. Each PCC term lasts four years. Your PCC’s responsibilities include: • Setting priorities for tackling crime and disorder in Norfolk • Representing the views of the public on crime and policing • Ensuring policing in Norfolk is efficient and effective, setting the budget and hiring (and if necessary firing) the Chief Constable • Providing local support services for victims and witnesses of crime


Meeting Guests at a Reception for the Signing of Declaration of Office of Police & Crime Commissioner At a separate event honouring Custody Visiting Scheme long service award recepients- (L-R) Paul Ellicker, Michel Rayson, & Bernard Clark

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Crying Out Loud in Vain A BME case of Domestic Violence and/ or No Recourse to Public Funds

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am witness to the facts of this case involving a young African woman with an infant baby who was arrested by the police on a Tuesday afternoon in April this year for disturbing public peace. It was obvious to me from her reactions that her mental health was questionable. Her crime was: going to city council and staying for hours on, repeatedly asking for help from morning to the closing hours. She was then arrested and later released to the care of her parents. Victory as I choose to call her became known to the police and children services recently when she and her partner of several years resulted to violent fights at home. Her partner was removed and she was asked to change the locks to make sure he doesn’t return to the property. After two days, she left the house claiming the partner was constantly around with his friend making lots of noise to provoke a quarrel again.

From then on, things didn’t get any better for her. On one occasion, she was seen screaming frantically in a shop when the partner walked in. This to her, confirmed that she was being stalked by her partner. She called her mum and fled to a friend’s house. The next day she was so disruptive that the police had to be called in again to ensure the safety of the child. Victory had been sleepless for nights on. The mental health crisis team were informed and involved. But Victory was screaming for help and wanted to run off with her child to safety. Desperate, she called her partner for help. Him being concerned that he could be arrested, asked her parents to take the lead instead. Another police intervention was triggered. Finally she got a GP referral for a hospital admission under a section of the Mental Health Act, and a 72 hours police protection order issued for the child to be looked after by her parents. However, soon after checking into the hospital, Victory found herself being escorted back to a friend’s house after being assessed by two doctors (psychiatrists) who deemed her not detainable. And then she found out from children services that she was not supposed to be anywhere around

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the baby who was, to her surprise, “being safe guarded”. This incident rocked her confidence and trust in the system. She claimed to have been tricked into giving up her child. Sadly Victory’s immigration status also meant she has no recourse to public funds and could therefore not benefit from being accommodated in a domestic violence refuge. Victory entered the UK several years ago as a teenager dependent on her parent’s residence visa. Years later, still as a teenager, she moved out to live with her baby’s father, while working, paying taxes, with the hope of living an independent life. However soon after the birth of the child, the relationship went sour. That was the earliest anyone can point to as when her problems actually began. Could it have been Post-natal depression? This was neither mentioned nor considered as far as the family is concerned. Her parents recall occasions when she would leave the child with them and get verbally aggressive when called to come back home for the baby. They put it down to her being rude and disrespectful to the rest of her family. Despite his liberal background, the father has never been supportive of the idea of her moving out at such a young age to live with a boyfriend. His deep rooted Christian beliefs and expectation of such a brilliant daughter leaving home with parental approval and a traditional church wedding was dashed by a series of unexpected outcomes. For weeks on, the family observed several out of character and paranoia behaviours. Children services’ proposed care plan to take the child into care only got her to change her mind at the last minute. During the most recent episode of her problems, the crisis intervention team were called in again with little success, because they could not get anywhere with her. This on-and-off and out of character seems to have become the norm for Victory. She would suddenly calm down asking where everybody was and that she cannot understand what was going on as everyone stayed away from her or stared as if there was something wrong. Then one afternoon, the family observed her crying out loud the whole day saying: “He WILL never agree. He will never sign

those papers for our baby to be taken away”. That afternoon, she got visibly upset, restless and suspicious of everyone. By sunset the police came to escort her to the local mental health hospital for another visit. Unfortunately she declined a voluntary assessment because she didn’t think there was anything wrong with her, claiming, “If I agree, it means there is something wrong with me. Am only interested in my baby and I would go to my GP if I feel unwell”. That was enough for her to be let go on her own accord and the family to pick up from there on. Her dad, already in tears, rushed to her assistance while she locked herself indoors in protest insisting on staying in until she gets her baby back. Again the police had to be called in, starting yet another cycle of hopeless hope, desperation, anguish and no end resolution… all because, I believe, there is no help for people with “no recourse to public funds who are victims of domestic violence”. Should Victory and her family continue to cry out loud in vain? Or must it take the worst case situation for any actual assistance to be provided to someone like Victory. Given that the best offer made to Victory was to take her child away from her, I would like to cry out loud on her behalf, and just wish and hope that someone out there will hear one of us. By A - a family friend

(Editor’s Note: This is an ongoing story which has still not been resolved. A, is a family friend who would like to stay anonymous but is available to discuss any support that can be provided to this proud and private family).


EQUALITY & DIVERSITY

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Domestic Violence Conference: Domestic Violence: barriers facing migrant women By Louise Gooch, East of England Strategic Migration Partnership Policy Officer-louise.gooch@eelga.gov.uk

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n 2 July 2015, I attended a south Suffolk Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC) as an observer. A MARAC is a meeting where information is shared on the highest risk domestic abuse cases between representatives of local police, probation, health, child protection, housing practitioners, Independent Domestic Violence Advisors (IDVAs) and other specialists from the statutory and voluntary sectors. After sharing all relevant information they have about a victim, the representatives discuss options for increasing the safety of the victim and turn these into a co-ordinated action plan. I recorded the following: - 23% of cases referred that day related to either victims or perpetrators who were non-UK nationals (as compared to 5.7% non-UK passport holders in Suffolk according to 2011 census). - In none of the cases was the immigration status of either the victim or perpetrator mentioned, despite some of the background information referring to victims as being ‘no recourse to public funds’ (meaning they are not entitled to any state benefit or support), which is only relevant to those subject to immigration control. - None of the migrant women victims accepted the offer of help of either an Independent Domestic Violence Advisor (IDVA) or the Domestic Abuse Outreach Service (DAOS). - In at least one case, the option of the ‘destitution domestic violence concession’ may have been appropriate but it was not mentioned. The DV concession policy allows the Home Office to grant visas to people on spouse visa whose relationship broke down with their partner as a result of domestic violence. The DV visa allows such people to access public funds. - One of the cases was a repeat incident and another the victim was expected to withdraw her complaint. The question I left with was: How can we make the system work better for BME victims in Norfolk and Suffolk? Six months later, we facilitated a regional conference on the 23rd February 2016 for MARAC professionals from Norfolk and Suffolk to review the approaches being taken to try to improve

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the take up of services available. The conference paid particular attention to the barriers faced by migrant victims of domestic abuse and the ways in which the specialist organisations have developed services to support them. However, what we discovered was that the pathways for support available to some migrants are not available to all. The DV Concession visa is only available to those who entered the UK on a spousal visa. For example, someone with a limited leave visa e.g. 2½ discretionary leave, who met and married an EU/UK citizen, though a spouse, is not considered to have entered on spouse visa. The DV concession visa grants such people on spouse visa 3 months extended stay visa in the UK while their domestic violence complaint is assessed and their immigration status may then be changed to give them permanent leave to remain in the UK in their own right. However, anyone who is experiencing domestic violence and whose right to remain in the UK is as spouse of an EU/ UK citizen, or as an EU worker herself faces the following barriers: - By parting from the working EU migrant, the victim of domestic violence may not have the right to remain in the UK, or if she does, it is often without recourse to public funds. Housing benefit is the public fund which pays for refuge beds and are therefore not available to someone in this position. - If she is eligible to public funds by virtue of her residency in the UK and being a worker, she only retains this status by continuing to work. Offering her a place in a refuge bed often requires her to be moved away from the perpetrator and could leave her unable to reach her workplace, so she cannot continue to work and she loses her right to public funds. - If she has children, social services support under the Children Act is not treated as a public fund – but their duty is just to the children, and there are some social services team who will therefore take children into foster care for their protection without supporting their mother. As a result, we are seeing these following responses: - Professionals using their own private funds to enable women to stay in a place of safety. - Women return to their abusive partners.

Our outline plan We have convened a meeting of Norfolk & Suffolk MARAC professionals and charities to work up a charitable response as this is the only way in which EU domestic violence victims will be able to safely leave a violent perpetrator. We would like to be able to fund 3-4 days of ‘fostering’ of women within the community – as they tend to present on a Friday, this enables them to have a weekend of safety. Then on the Monday, there would be support from an IDVA (Independent Domestic Violence Adviser), with an interpreter and an immigration legal adviser also working with the victim to make sure she understands the limited range of alternatives available to her – and grasping that the abuse is real and won’t go away. Depending on what she decides to do next, we would work with the Police to be able to serve a DV Protection Notice so as to be able to return home to recover papers that enable the victim to prove her right to remain in the UK – or work with the Home Office Immigration Enforcement to give her the means to return to her country of origin. We would need funds to: - Advertise the scheme and get enough people to volunteer spare bedrooms in Norfolk and Suffolk - Employ an administrator to link victims with bed spaces - Pay overnight food expenses to hosts - Pay for travel to get victims from place of referral to the safe house and back to the supported help on Monday. - Pay for immigration advice if level 3 needed as not eligible for legal aided immigration advice. - Travel to return to country of origin if Home Office won’t fund and that is the preferred option. We are working with the Soroptimists and Suffolk feminist society to secure suitable bed spaces and to help raise funds. PROJECT PARTNERS ARE: GYROS, Great Yarmouth & Lowestoft; Keystone Development Trust, Thetford; The Bridge Plus+, Norwich; Norfolk Community Law Service, Norwich; Ipswich & Suffolk Council for Racial Equality, Ipswich; Lighthouse Women’s Aid, Suffolk; Leeway Women’s Aid, Norfolk.


Delegates at Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC) Domestic Violence Conference held in February 2016

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Salah’s Story: Adventures of a Refugee

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alah Elnagar is a refugee and a writer from Egypt. New Routes is an integration project for refugees and migrants in Norwich. The article is an extract from a book idea he is working on, entitled “This is What I Saw: The Adventures of a Refugee”. This bit talks about his recent journey to establishing New Routes in the UK. On Saturday 23rd April 2016, New Routes prepared a leisure trip to the town of Beccles with Bahai friends. Our trip started at The Friends Meeting House where some people welcomed us with some tea with biscuits. We discussed the fact that it was St George’s day and an elderly man spoke with us about the poor situation in Africa, particularly about religious persecution in Sudan and Eritrea. He also asked us, “Have any of you suffered persecution?”, but no one answered him. I kept my thoughts to myself with a reflection on the dangerous journey that brought me to the UK. My arduous trip to Europe began on a ship in the Mediterranean Sea which took five days. In the dark of the raging sea, I lived Einstein’s theory of relativity as those five days seemed like five years. I had studied the physics of the dark sky but I did not find more darkness than that of the night time sea, which was accompanied by the symphony of crying women, children screaming and the waves hitting the ship. Five days of anxiety, insomnia, fear and grief. For five nights I did not know the taste of sleep, I closed my eyes but my ears stayed awake listening to the motor of the ship and the collision of the waves. Insomnia was killing me and I had the constant thought

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of “will I see tomorrow?” My second experience with a ship was on the English Channel between France and England after three months of fatigue, pain, endurance and risking my life in adventures not unlike those in a James Bond film. My lucky night came on the 14th October 2015. I was an unwelcome guest in a lorry on the ship. I stayed thirty six hours, lying still in the same position, sharing a one metre by two metre box with one other person unable to move an inch. Our eyes wide open, alert to the movements of the lorry, we had to mute our breathing in order to avoid the sniffer dogs. Eventually, we heard the announcement on the ship that we would arrive at our destination in ten minutes. We shook hands with happiness as if we had just won a prize. My prize was the greatest of all: liberty and security, two words I have always associated with the UK, a crown that should be on every individual’s head. Freedom is the greatest thing that God granted humans but its true meaning is unknown until lost, as I did in my home country. My third experience with a boat was during my trip to the town of Beccles, but this time was completely different from what came before. This time I was a welcome guest, the boat crew welcomed us with smiles and great interest. We moved on to Beccles Parish Church where we went up the church tower, Beccles Bell Tower, then the nearby park to play football briefly. Next was to The Friends Meeting House for lunch, the table prepared with delicacies and sweets, a lovely atmosphere of intimacy, affection, love and dedication. After lunch we made our way to a small boat ready for the trip on the broads

and when I saw the boat and the water I remembered my painful and bitter experiences with boats and the sea. My mind shook and my body shuddered! Light was finally visible after the long night. I concealed my emotion as I felt the spirit of the writer enter me once again, the buds of creativity beginning to flourish, enabled by the fertile lands of freedom and safety here in the UK. As usual New Routes surprised me with yet another wonderful trips to The Grange, about an hour’s drive from the city of Norwich, where we were the special guest of Ben, the di-rector, and his colleague Lucy. It was to be a wonderful day of respite working in the gar-den with Lucy who offered me gloves. But I choose use my bare hands because I missed the touch and smell of the mud, which brought back sweet memories of digging as a child. During the work I remembered my childhood when I played and had fun in the fields, and also what I have seen and read about agriculture in ancient Egypt and the walls of the ancient pharaonic temples and tombs. Rest time came after two hours of work and we sat down to drink tea with biscuits. After tea I changed my clothes and as we prepared to leave I dreamt that my homeland of Egypt would get better without the fascist authority of the army and religion. I am very happy having gone to The Grange as I have met new people who I have learnt from and gained experience of different cultures. I hope to go again and again and again. Thank you so much to New Routes, the team at the Grange and congratulation to myself for being able to sleep without insomnia on Wednesdays!


Photo: © Simon Rawles/BRC

The British Red Cross has a long tradition of supporting trauma and persecution.

THE RED CROSS and refugees

We are now the biggest single provider of this support in the UK – reaching out to more than 13,000 people every year, in 60 towns and cities. We help these people adjust to life here in a number of ways: from providing emergency food and clothing, to giving friendly advice to those settling in a new, unfamiliar place.

In Norwich we helped 468 asylum seekers & refugees last year completing over 1500 actions For further information about how the British Red Cross works with refugees, please visit www.redcross.org.uk/refugee British Red Cross, 11 Prince of Wales RD, Norwich, Norfolk Opening Hours: Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays 9am-4pm

DESTITUTION The British Red Cross helps over 9,000 destitute asylum seekers and refugees every year. They suffer from problems including lack of food, housing, money and poor health. Half of the destitute refugees and asylum seekers we saw in 2015 were penniless through no fault of their own due to administration problems in the asylum system.

Every year, thousands of asylum seekers and refugees find themselves cut off from government support and unable to meet even essential living needs. The government should remove the delays and errors in the asylum system that leave people destitute. Many refugees and asylum seekers come to us for basics such as food and clothes. Many have children.

Photo: © Simon Rawles/BRC

The British Red Cross helps over 9,000 destitute asylum seekers and refugees every year.

The government should ensure that people receive adequate housing and support throughout the asylum process, from beginning to end. We want to see an effective and efficient asylum system that treats people with humanity, ends destitution, and upholds the UK’s responsibilities to refugees.

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The Bridge Plus+ AGM held 28th January 2016 Quote: Chair:

Quote: Coordinator:

Since 2010, and after listening to our service users over the years, we have become more specialised on the provision of information and advice to BME communities in Norfolk. We are now better placed and more informed about the needs and aspirations of our people. As we continue to promote community cohesion through innovative community engagement activities and service delivery, I can tell you that today, The Bridge Plus+ stands out as a resilient BME-led organisation reaching out to minorities of diverse nationalities, ethnic, and religious backgrounds.

I would like to put it across that as long as black and minorities continue to exist in the UK, there will continue to be a need for charitable organisations like The Bridge Plus+ to address issues related to inequalities. I also believe that the introduction of the 2010 Equalities Act and the 2015 Immigration Bill have both given less importance to equalities in the UK. Both legislations, in my view, are clear sources of evidence for the need to have fully functional BME support service organisation in every part of the UK to champion minority rights. As a BME led organisation, we are very familiar with the cultural, language and other social needs of our people. We have also learnt from experience that the best way to promote community cohesion, diversity and understanding, is by working with individuals in addressing their daily needs.

Data presented by: Project’s Officer SERVICE USER STATs- June 2015 to Feb 2016 124 unique Service users (SU) 34% sessions for benefits related issues 437 one to one sessions, of 357 20% sessions were employment hours one to one support total support related 49 Minutes average time per 16% sessions were housing related session, ranging between 10 min and 3hrs+issues 203 sessions under 30 min or 46% 20% Sessions were immigration related issues 144 sessions 30-60min or 33% 8 SUs supported with racism/ discrimination issue 51 sessions 60-119 min or 12% 43% or 54 SUs were assisted with more than one type of issue 41 41 different nationalities. 53% or 66 of SUs visited more 48% women, 52% men. than 3 times

The
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Plus+
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number
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Chair of Bridge Plus

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Jo Richardson of Norfolk County Council

Beatrice, Projects Officer of Bridge Plus

Feb‐16



Did you Know, Dos & Don’ts

Norwich City & Non-metropolitan district

• Apparently according to the Independent, you can tell how corrupt your country is by how badly people drive. • FIFA appoints female African as secretary general • In China, there are almost 200 million single adults.

Coat of arms

• 2015 most expensive cities in the world are: 1. Luanda, Angola; 2. Hong Kong; 3. Zurich, Switzerland; 4. Singapore; 5. Geneva, Switzerland; 6. Shanghai, China; 7. Beijing, China; 8. Seoul, South Korea ; 9. Bern, Switzerland (source-BBC). • In England and Wales, the word “Lawyer” is not a protected title. “lawyer” is used to refer to persons who provide reserved and unreserved legal activities and includes practitioners such as barristers, attorneys, solicitors, registered foreign lawyers, patent attorneys, trade mark attorneys, licensed conveyancers, public notaries, commissioners for oaths, immigration advisers and claims management services. The Legal Services Act 2007 defines the “legal activities” that may only be performed by a person who is entitled to do so pursuant to the Act. • How to become a millionaire - According to HM Treasury budget analysis, the average gross income of one adult is £21,000, which is approximately £1,500 a month. So if you start saving at age 21, and assuming you earn the average salary, and can save £6.60 a day - or £200 a month, with a five per cent rate of return, you will be a millionaire....by age 82. • According to a recent report: “A different ending: Addressing inequalities in end of life care.” People from certain groups in society [BME included] are experiencing poorer quality care at the end of their lives than others because providers and commissioners do not always understand or fully consider their specific needs. This is attributed to the fact that health and care staffs are not always having conversations with people early enough about their end of life care. This means people don’t have the opportunity to make plans and choices with their loved-ones about how and where they would prefer to die.

Shown within Norfolk Country

United Kingdom

Constituent country

England

Region

East of England

County

Norfolk

Government • Type

Non-metropolitan district

• Local Authority

Norwich City Council

• MPs

Clive Lewis (Labour) Chloe Smith (Conservative)

• City & Non-metropolitan district

15.07 sq mi (39.02 km2)

Population (mid-2014 est.) • City & Non-metropolitan district

140,452 (Ranked 144th)

• Urban

213,166

• Urban density

8,770/sq mi (3,388/km2)

• Metro

376,500 (Travel to Work Area)[1]

• Ethnicity (2011 census)

White (90.9%) Asian (4.5%) Mixed (2.3%) Black (1.6%) Arab (0.5%) Other (0.4%)

Postcode

NR1–NR16

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15


Come and work with us Recruitment Agency

Whether you are looking for a full-time, permanent post; part time work or hours which fit in with your other commitments, we would like to hear from you. Feel free to contact our friendly team for an initial chat about Compkey.

Are you looking for a new job? Something satisfying and rewarding?

Please call us on 01603 762318 and leave a message with your contact details; visit our website www.compkeyhealthcare.co.uk to find our job application form, or email us on admin@compkeyhealthcare.co.uk

CompKey Healthcare’s major aim is to provide and deliver high quality of personalized care based on the philosophy of commitment, competence, caring and compassion. These are values that will drive and motivate the organisation to deliver an individualized, person centred service which respects dignity, independence, autonomy and privacy of the service user and the skills and experience of our multi-cultural staff.

Compkey Healthcare Ltd, Office 16, Charing Cross Centre, 17-19 St John Maddermarket, Norwich NR2 1DN. The Management Team – L to R - Sue Gee, Humphrey Moyo, Vaida Moyo

If you are a compassionate, caring person then Come and join us! Compkey Healthcare has vacancies for full-time and part-time Care Staff, experienced or inexperienced.

We can offer you:• Competitive rates of pay and benefits • Induction and training • Uniform and protective clothing provided • Regular and consistent work • Fortnightly pay • Holiday pay, expenses • Pension scheme

2016-2017

Norfolk Model Calendar

This calendar applies to community schools, community special schools, VC schools and nursery schools and sets the days on which school transport will be provided. While most Foundation, VA, foundation special, free schools and academy trusts who are able to set their own dates, adopt the Norfolk Model, we advise you to check with your child's school before making holiday or other commitments.

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31 Key : White dates - schools open to pupils Yellow dates - pupil holiday Red dates - bank holiday

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Five staff training days will be selected from yellow dates, we suggest 1 & 2 September and 4 January and two others of the schools choice. Some may choose to use twilight hours for staff training instead of some or all of these


7 Deadly Diseases That Strike Blacks Most

T

his article is a summarised version of expert findings which established that several deadly diseases strike blacks harder and more often than they do whites.

Key Facts: 1. Diabetes is 60% more common in blacks than in whites. Blacks are therefore up to 2.5 times more likely to suffer a limb amputation and up to 5.6 times more likely to suffer kidney disease than other people with diabetes. In addition, blacks with diabetes have more serious complications, such as loss of vision, loss of limbs, and kidney failure. 2. High Blood Pressure-Blacks develop high blood pressure earlier in life -- and with much higher blood pressure levels -- than whites. Nearly 42% of black men and more than 45% of black women aged 20 and older have high blood pressure. 3. Asthma-Blacks are three times more likely to die of asthma than whites. 4. Cancer treatment is equally successful for all races.Yet black men have a 40% higher cancer death rate than white men. African-American women have a 20% higher cancer death rate than white women. 5. Lung Scarring (Sarcoidosis)-Deaths from lung scarring are 16 times more common among blacks than among whites. 6. Lung Cancer-Despite lower tobacco exposure, black men are 50% more likely than white men to get lung cancer. 7. Strokes kill 4 times more 35- to 54-year-old black Americans than white Americans. Blacks have nearly twice the first-time stroke risk of whites.

Why? • Genes definitely play a role. So does the environment in which people live and their socioeconomic status. Naturally, diseases and responses to treatment do vary from person to person. But there are unique issues that affect black. • It is more likely to have to do with socioeconomics and political issues of bias as well as physiologic and genetic issues that go into that same bucket. Some racial differences are more nuances. But there are issues of disparity and there are issues relative to racism that operate in a very broad context. • Everyday life has a big impact on mental health, and black communities in the

Source: This article is from WebMD, best known as a leading health information services website with over 200million unique users per month. http://www.m.webmd.com/

UK are still more likely than others to face issues such as bad housing, unemployment, stress and racism, all of which can make people ill. • Lack of access to health care • Regarding Lung Diseases, it is established that 71% of black Americans versus 58% of white Americans live in communities that violate federal air pollution standards. • Another reason is that a higher percentage of black Americans than white Americans live close to toxic waste dumps -- and to the factories that produce this waste. • The environment is involved, and there is potential genetic susceptibility -- but we also have to talk about the fact that African-Americans’ social and economic status lags behind that of Caucasians • It’s not a simple question of access to health care itself, but access to specialists. According to a leading US Doctor, blacks get specialist referrals less often than whites Although the reason “why” may be different from one black person to another, this brief finding suggests that genetic and unhealthy environment may be the underlying reasons. The most basic means of fighting back would be to improve health education targeting blacks. And the evidence so far indicates such an investment will pay health dividends not just for racial minorities, but for everyone.

B-Me VOICES

17


EU Conference on Migration

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he ELAINE-project, European Local Authorities Integration Network, is a new initiative aimed at connecting five local and regional European countries on the theme of integration of migrants and refugees. The project features five separate conferences on the topic of integration in 5 different participating member states. Each conference will have its own specific focus on integration. The events will showcase presentations of good and relevant examples followed by workshops attended by people from the participating members states of Sweden, The Netherlands, Great Britain, Spain and Denmark.

CONFERENCE DATES & VENUES:

The Swedish Introduction Act & the integration process

Key Partners: Ministry of Employment- Public Employment Service (Arbetsförmedlingen); Ministry of Justice- Swedish Migration Agency Municipalities and Counties Public Employment Service (PES)

Sweden Migration Agency

Early mapping

1 Sweden in Kristianstad – Date: 13-15th April 2016. Theme: Integration through entrepreneurship and employment programs. 2 UK in Ipswich – Date: 13-15th June 2016. Theme: Integration through voluntary and public sector partnership. 3 Spain – Date: 8-10th September 2016. Theme: How culture and sports can be used for integration. 4 Denmark in Vejle – Date: 31 October to 2 November 2016 5 The Netherlands (Holland) in Maastricht – Date: April 2017 (More info to follow) 6 Finale conference in Brussels October 2017 (More info to follow)

Residence permit

County Administrative Boards

Introduction interview Place of residence

18

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Introduction plan Activities provided by PES, partners & municpalities

Introduction benefit – Swedish Social Insurance Agency

Sweden conference delegates

The UK team in Sweden

Public Employment Service


Ipswich conference delegates

B-Me VOICES

19


The spring came for the Bulgarians Everybody enjoyed music, flowers and a special gateau Galya Clark

W

hat could be better reason for celebrating than the coming of spring? Bulgarians in Norwich and Norfolk celebrated in style the three different special March days: The coming of the spring; The Liberation from the Turkish Yoke and the International Day of Women.

Red and white of Baba Marta

1st of Mach is called Baba Marta (Baba is the Bulgarian word for “grandmother” and Mart is the Bulgarian word for the month of March). On the day, Bulgarians exchange Martenitsa – which are white/red woollen badges or bracelets. They are worn from March 1st until around the end of March, or at the first sighting of a stork, swallow, or budding trees. It is a way to welcome the arrival of spring. Legend has it that Baba Marta reflects the changes in mood of every woman, which is believed to be the reason why some days in March are sunny and wonderful but others are with pouring rain or even snow storms. Happily, the guest of the party had tried different traditional Bulgarian food such as banitsa, pitka, and baklava. The culinary delights were crowned by a glorious cake, sort of gateau, iced with the colours of the national flag: white, green and red. The master of this very tasty cake was Dessi, who is transforming her hobby into a small business, run via social media. 3rd of March is the Bulgarian National Day of Liberation from the Ottoman Empire. For five centuries Bulgaria was under Ottoman rule and on 3rd of March 1878 the Liberation came with the signing of a treaty between Russia and the Ottoman Empire after the end of Russian – Turkish war 1877 – 1878. 8th of March is International Day of Women and Bulgarians love and celebrate it with parties, flowers and presents for the women – mothers, colleagues and girlfriends. Ivo was in charge of our carnations while Vanya, dressed as Baba Marta, gave out Martenitsas. Each participant also received a surprise present from the Bulgarian club.

Presents and poetry

The Bulgarian Club and Norwich Mind were the co-organisers of the celebration. Paola Colombo, from Nowich Mind, gave a small talk on wellbeing. Also supporting Paola was Anne providing head and hand massage. Galya Clark, of The Bulgarian Club spoke about the meaning of the three special days for the Bulgarians. The music teacher Svetla played the accordion and sang Bulgarian songs. Children from the Bulgarian Sunday school recited verses from Bulgarian national poets. Among the guests of the party were a few Ukrainian and English friends.

20

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London, the South East and the East of England

million

In 2012 596,000 people moved into this region from other parts of the UK

31% Polls show that on average people think there are far more immigrants than there really are

13%

of the resident population of England and Wales was born abroad

22.7

people live in London, the South East and the East of England, a rise of

9.6% from 2001

9.2

608,000 people moved out

million households in this region

In 2012 240,000 moved into the region from abroad In 2012 162,000 people from the region moved abroad

Net migration into the region in 2012 was +66,000

sources: Ipsos MORI poll for the Royal Statistical Society and King’s College London 2013, ONS Census 2011

2035 2035

retired person oneone retired person

retired person oneone retired person

2.61 workers 2.61 workers to to

20%20%

peak waswas thethe peak yearyear 15%15% births. Fewer for for births. Fewer babies have been 10%10% babies have been born since then. born since then. in global TheThe riserise in global 5% 5% population population is is expected to level expected to level 0 0 as this peak off off as this peak diesdies out.out. 4 4

source: ONS 2011 source: ONS 2011

12,320 12,320

of all of all people people aged between aged between 2222 and and 3030 who who leftleft their their home home town town in in thethe UKUK moved moved to to South thethe South andand most never most willwill never return home. return home.

Meads Meads in in Eastbourne Eastbourne has the has the oldest resident oldest resident population population in in England & Wales England & Wales England & Wales England & Wales average average ageage Meads Meads

39.771.1 39.7 71.1 years years years

source Brighton Argus

1990 1990

Percentage population Percentage of of population aged over aged over 6565

AA third third

source Brighton Argus

Women around Women around world thethe world having areare having fewer babies. fewer babies.

In 1981, there were In 1981, there were 2,420 people aged 2,420 people aged over. 100100 andand over. 2012 By By 2012 figure thethe figure waswas

source Guardian and Centre for Cities report 2014

Peak Peak baby baby

source Guardian and Centre for Cities report 2014

3.14 workers 3.14 workers to to

source: ONS

2013 2013

source: ONS

Ageingpopulation population Ageing

years

B-Me VOICES

21


Wise Words, Wits & Humour

22

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It’s time for supporters of refugees to talk about integration By Stephen Hale - chief executive of Refugee Action.

I

help them learn our language. There have been steep cuts in government funding for English language classes. It’s madness. Local volunteers and charities like Refugee Action can and do play a vital role in enabling people to practice English through social contact with local communities. But this is no alternative to formal accredited tuition, particularly for written English. Second, the government should set clear and ambitious goals for getting refugees into employment. The voluntary sector and businesses can play vital roles in this. There is considerable interest in supporting refugees to gain employment over the past six months. World Jewish Relief and a number of businesses are keen to develop programmes to help refugees into work, many inspired by the plight of Syrians fleeing to Britain. But to succeed voluntary initiatives need to be part of a national strategy. In 2015 the UK gave refugee protection to 11,500 people. They want to work and pay taxes. Our government must help them. The alternative is a huge waste of talent and tax revenue. Third, the government must actively support local authorities and the voluntary sector to build strong communities at local level. When the floods hit Britain recently, Syrian refugees were among those that stepped up to help. There could be far more of this. With the right support, refugees will be enthusiastic volunteers in their new communities, and members of sports clubs and community groups. But there is currently no role or funding for local authorities or the voluntary sector to promote dialogue and integration. It’s difficult to think of a worse way to foster the successful integration of refugees. It’s time to establish an effective integration strategy for refugees who have fled war and persecution. The EU referendum has taken the fog of misinformation and occasionally hysteria hoTspoTs about refugees to a new level. It makes it all the more urgent that we support refugees in the UK to integrate and contribute to our societies. The incoming coalition government in 2010 deprioritised this. The result is a system that neglects the talents of refugees, and in the long-term could weaken social cohesion. It is a lost opportunity for us all.

t’s been clear for a while now that Britain doesn’t know what its refugee policies are for. But there’s finally an opportunity to put this right. The home secretary announced at the Conservative Party conference in October that the government would publish a new asylum strategy. This strategy should focus on integration. We urgently need to reform Britain’s asylum and refugee policies so that they work for refugees and for Britain. The current debate is dominated by numbers. Die-hard opponents of welcoming refugees argue that Britain’s primary goal should be to minimise the number of people reaching the UK. Some government policy points in this direction too. But there’s also a more humane strand, including the prime minister’s commitment to resettle 20,000 Syrian refugees. Britain should welcome more refugees from countries like Syria, but the success of Britain’s refugee policy should not be measured only by the number of refugees arriving here. We also need to be clear what we aim to achieve after their arrival, both for refugees and for Britain. The current system often fails asylum seekers and the This article was originally published on Monday, communities in which they settle. It’s in all our interests to enable 18 April 2016 in and accessible at: asylum seekers and refugees to rapidly build links with the http://www.politics.co.uk/comment-analysis/2016/04/18/ communities around them and contribute to our economy and supporters-of-refugees-need-to-talk-about-integration See Annex Table 2 for detailed notes. our society. Current policies actually obstruct Turkey the ability of refugees to integrate and We are witnessing a paradigm 11.0% 126,800 Pakistan contribute. Refugees desperately want to change, an unchecked slide into 10.5% Over the course of 2014, 126,800 refugees learn English, but are frequently unable an era in which the scale of global returned to their countries of origin. 54.6% 8.0% Lebanon Half of these returned to the Democratic to access language classes. There’s no forced displacement as well as the Republic of the Congo (25,200), Mali (21,000), or 6.8% support for refugees to help them access response required is now clearly Afghanistan (17,800). This figure was the lowest Islamic Rep. 4.6% of Iran level of refugee returns since 1983. the job market or set up businesses. 4.5% dwarfing anything seen before. Ethiopia Others Asylum seekers are placed in temporary Jordan AnTÓnio GuTerres, un HiGH Commissioner accommodation, often in areas of high for refuGees social deprivation. There is little or no 232/1000 attempt to build relationships between A record high of nearly 1.7 million individuals Lebanon hosted the largest number of them and existing communities. 34,300 submitted applications for asylum refugees in relation to its national For all our sakes, this must change. or refugee status in 2014. UNHCR offices population, with 232 refugees per 1,000 Some 34,300 asylum applications were lodged by registered 245,700 or 15 per cent of these inhabitants. Jordan (87) and Nauru (39) ranked Refugee integration should be supported, unaccompanied or separated children claims. With 274,700 asylum claims, the Russian second and third, respectively. in 82 countries in 2014, mostly by Afghan, not ignored or obstructed. To succeed, Federation was the world’s largest recipient Eritrean, Syrian, and Somali children. This was the of new individual applications, followed ministers in the Home Office and highest number on record since UNHCR started by Germany (173,100), the United States of collecting such data in 2006. the Department of Communities and Top America (121,200), and Turkey (87,800). Local Government must work with the origins years 46% 18-59 voluntary sector and businesses in 6 three areas. 1. Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million) First, we must fast-track newly arrived 2. Afghanistan refugees into high quality English classes. (2.59 million) During the year, UNHCR submitted 103,800 refugees to States for resettlement. refuGees Rapid progress in English is essential 3. Somalia (1.11 million) According to government statistics, 26 countries for refugees to form relationships with More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide Children below 18 years of age constituted admitted 105,200 refugees for resettlement 51 per cent of the refugee population in 2014, up came from just three countries: the during 2014 (with or without UNHCR’s assistance). existing communities, as well as to seek from 41 per cent in 2009 and the highest figure in Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan The United States of America admitted the work. In our experience, refugees find it more than a decade. (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million). highest number (73,000). very difficult to access the support they need for this. At present we grant refugees UNHCR Global Trends 2014 3 the right to remain in the UK, but don’t <18 year s

% rs 3 yea 0+

26 countries

51%

1.7 million

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23


Independent Stop Search Scrutiny Panel (ISSSP)

List of BME Community Organisations This list is subject to change and is constantly been updated. Please check our website www.bridgeplus.org.uk for the full and updated version of the list. 1 AFROLUSO (Portuguese Dance Group in Great Yarmouth) afroluso@hotmail.co.uk 2 Amnesty International (Norwich Group) info@norwichamnesty.org.uk 3 Anna Mudeka’s Tambai Promotions African music & dance - http://www.annamudeka.com 4 Bulgarians in Norwich & Norfolk (BNN) gclark@abv.bg T:0798 605 3330 5 Ethnic Minority Association of Norfolk (in Great Yarmouth) -Norfolkema@gmail.com 6 Filipino Community Group in Norwich – PINAS (Pinoy in Norwich Aksyong Samahan) tess.ward@hotmail.com

W

ould you like to help Norfolk Constabulary shape the future of Stop Search? We are currently reviewing the membership of the above group as we are trying to attract a more diverse and representative membership, who would like to be on the panel to help Norfolk Police shape the future of Stop Search. The purpose of the ISSSP is three fold, to ensure that stop search powers used by Norfolk police officers are lawfully conducted. To improve trust and confidence of the community in the way police conduct stop searches by being sensitive to the impact of these powers on individuals and; to reduce disproportionality between searches of communities in Norfolk. The role of the panel is very important in scrutinising Norfolk’s performance in relation to stop search. As a panel member you will examine stop search forms to ensure that searches have been lawfully carried out and you will be given the opportunity to discuss issues arising as a result of a complaint you will also scrutinise all finalised complaints. You will be able to contribute to our Stop Search policies and procedures and be able to raise wider issues relating to diversity. As a panel member you will be encouraged to spend time observing police officers as they go about their daily business and report your observations back to the rest of the panel, you will also act as a constructive friend to the constabulary by providing advice and guidance to improve our performance around stop search.

7 Gambian African Network (GAN) Contact: Mr. Abdoulie Mendy c/o office@bridgeplus.org.uk 8 Great Yarmouth Resettlement & Orientation Services (GYROS)- admin@gyros.org.uk 9 Hala’s House 2 Home halasamir@live.com 10 NAGO (Norfolk Alliance Gender Organisation) nagonorfolk@gmail.com 11 Nepalese Community Network devghimire@gmail.com 12 New Routes info@newroutes.org.uk 13 Norfolk Congolese Association (NOCA) - info@noca.org.uk 14 NORFRESA (Norfolk French Speakers Association) -koulounger@yahoo.fr 15 Norwich Association of Malayalese (NAM) Indians www.norwichmalayalees.co.uk/ 16 Norwich Asylum Seekers and Refugees Forum (NASREF) nasref1@gmail.com 17 Norwich Congolese Community Group kaseramurhula@yahoo.co.uk 18 Norwich International Youth Project (NIYP) m.clemo@niyp.org.uk 19 Norwich United Karate kaseramurhula@yahoo.co.uk 20 One Love United Football Club gt21@talktalk.net 21 Ormiston Families at HMP Norwich debbie.campbell@ormiston.org 22 Polish Community (Norwich) iwona77@live.co.uk

T

he panel is open to everyone over the age of 16 irrespective of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, gender and gender identity and religion and we particularly welcome members from underrepresented groups. If you would like to be part of this exciting panel then please contact Julie Inns (details below) and she will send you further details of future meetings. Julie Inns, Force Equality and Diversity Advisor. innsj@norfolk.pnn.police.uk

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23 Saudi Society Club of Norfolk umkhaled5@gmail.com 24 The Neesa project theneesaproject@yahoo.co.uk 25 WORD Trust International wordorphan2003@yahoo.co.uk 26 Zimbabwe Community Association of Norfolk (ZIMCAN) zimcan@live.co.uk 27 The Bridge Plus+ office@bridgeplus.org.uk


CELEBRATING WOMEN IN MUSIC

WITH SUPPORT FROM:

JORDAN JACKSON THE MUDEKA SISTERS / LES FIFI SONGS NOIR / KLEZMERIZED TAKEDA / GEORGE CHEETAM SAMIA MALIK / SONRISA HEIDILBERGH AND VELASSIERA MissRITA AND DJ QUEENIE BROAD HORIZON THEATRE MICHAEL CLARKE THEATRE (Friday Night) GARLIC THEATRE

WORKSHOPS

FEATURING

NAMVULA SOUTHBURGH FESTIVAL OF WORLD MUSIC 2016 SOUTHBURGH, NR DEREHAM NORFOLK, IP25 7SU 10.30am-11.30pm (Gates open 9.30am)

BODHRAN DRUMMING / SAMBA DRUMMING INDIAN SINGING / SCANDANAVIAN SINGING AFRICAN DANCE / MBIRA SINGING AFRICAN DRUMMING KIZOMBA DANCE CIRCUS WORKSHOP REGGAETON DANCE

TICKETS Adult Camping £30 / Adults Day £16 / Children 6-12 years £8 / Under 6s Free Licensed bar and stalls proceeds go to The Mudeka Foundation reg number 1143733 Enquiries and Debit payment: 01362 822194 www.southburghfestival.co.uk Cheques: Tambai Community Projects, Burton Manor Barns, Southburgh, Norfolk, IP25 7SU

Workshops, Stalls, Food, Licensed Bar, Two Stages. Camping available from Friday 4pm to Sunday 12 noon.

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Jonathan from Hopi Into Action giving a talk

Sara from Norwich Mind giving a talk

Community Cuisines A selection of images

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Nick from HealthWatch Norfolk giving a talk


Premiums Carer ___________________________________ 34.60 Disability – single _________________________ 32.25 – couple_________________________ 45.95 Disabled child ____________________________ 60.06 Enhanced disability – single person/lone parent _ 15.75 – couple ________________ 22.60 – child __________________ 24.43 Family __________________________________ 17.45 Pensioner – single (JSA only) ________________ 82.50 – couple _______________________ 122.70 Severe disability – per qualifying person _______ 61.85

• Employment and Support Allowance Basic allowance(a) – single/lone parent ________ 73.10 – couple___________73.10 / 114.85 Work-related activity component _____________ 29.05 Support component _______________________ 36.20 Carer, enhanced disability, pensioner(b) & severe disability premiums paid at same rate as Income Support/JSA

• Pension Credit Minimum guarantee Single _________________________________ 155.60 Couple_________________________________ 237.55 Additional amounts Severe disability (per qualifying person) _______ 61.85 Carer ___________________________________ 34.60 Savings credit Threshold – single _______________________ 133.82 – couple _______________________ 212.97 Maximum – single_________________________ 13.07 – couple ________________________ 14.75

• Universal Credit (c) Standard allowances Single – under 25 _______________________ 251.77 – 25+ ___________________________ 317.82 Couple – both under 25 ___________________ 395.20 – one or both aged 25+ _____________ 498.89 Child elements Only/eldest child _________________________ 277.08 Other children ___________________________ 231.67 Disabled child elements Lower rate______________________________ 126.11 Higher rate _____________________________ 367.92 Limited capability elements For work _______________________________ 126.11 For work and work–related activity __________ 315.60 Carer element _________________________ 150.39 Childcare costs elements (maximum) 1 child _________________________________ 646.35 2+ children ___________________________ 1,108.04

• Attendance Allowance Lower rate_______________________________ 55.10 Higher rate ______________________________ 82.30

• Bereavement Benefits Bereavement Allowance aged 45–54 _____________________ 33.77–104.67 standard rate __________________________ 112.55 Widowed Parent’s Allowance ________________ 112.55 child dependant _________________________ 11.35 (f)

• Carer’s Allowance

___________________ 62.10

Adult dependant __________________________ 36.55 Child dependant __________________________ 11.35 (f)

• Child Benefit Only/eldest child __________________________ 20.70 Other children ____________________________ 13.70

• Disability Living Allowance Care component Mobility component

lower rate ___________ 21.80 middle rate __________ 55.10 higher rate __________ 82.30 lower rate ___________ 21.80 higher rate __________ 57.45

• Employment and Support Allowance Basic allowance(a) _________________________ 73.10 Work-related activity component _____________ 29.05 Support component _______________________ 36.20

• Guardian’s Allowance________________ 16.55 • Incapacity Benefit Long term ______________________________ 105.35 age addition under 35 ____________ 11.15 aged 35–44 ___________ 6.20 adult dependant ________________________ 61.20 child dependant _________________________ 11.35 (f)

• Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Standard rate _____________________ 33.60–168.00

• Jobseeker’s Allowance Under 25 ________________________________ 57.90 25+ ____________________________________ 73.10

• Maternity Allowance Standard rate ___________________________ 139.58

• Personal Independence Payment Daily living component Mobility component

standard rate ________ 55.10 enhanced rate ________ 82.30 standard rate ________ 21.80 enhanced rate ________ 57.45

• Severe Disablement Allowance

_____ 74.65

Age addition

aged under 40 _______ 11.15 aged 40–49 ___________ 6.20 aged 50–59 ___________ 6.20 Adult dependant __________________________ 36.75 Child dependant __________________________ 11.35 (f)

• State Pension

• Housing Benefit(d) Personal allowances Single person/lone parent – aged 65+ ________ 168.70 Couple – both under 18 ____________________ 87.50 – one under 18 ____________________ 114.85 – one or both aged 65+ _____________ 252.30 Premiums Family – lone parent rate ___________________ 22.20

• Working Tax Credit(e) Basic element _________________________ 1,960.00 Couple/lone parent _____________________ 2,010.00 30 hours element ________________________ 810.00 Disability element ______________________ 2,970.00 Severe disability element ________________ 1,275.00 Childcare costs (70% of up to) 1 child (weekly rate) ____________________ 175.00 2+ children (weekly rate) ________________ 300.00

New state pension (from April 2016) _________ 155.65 Retirement Pension Cat A ________________________________ 119.30 Cat B late spouse’s or civil partner’s NI _____ 119.30 Cat B spouse’s or civil partner’s NI __________ 71.50 Cat D non contributory, aged 80 or over______ 71.50 Age addition (aged 80 or over) ______________ 0.25 Adult dependant (with Cat A) ______________ 65.70 Child dependant (with Cat A and B) _________ 11.35 (f)

• Statutory Adoption, Maternity,

Paternity and Shared Parental Pay _ 139.58

• Statutory Sick Pay

___________________ 88.45

(a) Paid at a reduced rate to certain claimants during 13 week assessment phase. (b) Reduced where claimant entitled to ESA component.

• Child Tax Credit(e) Family element __________________________ 545.00 Child element _________________________ 2,780.00 Disabled child _________________________ 3,140.00 Severely disabled child __________________ 1,275.00

2016/2017

Personal allowances Single – under 25 _________________________ 57.90 – 25+ _____________________________ 73.10 Lone parent – under 18 ____________________ 57.90 – 18+ ________________________ 73.10 Couple – both under 18 ______________57.90 / 87.50 – one under 18 _______ 57.90 / 73.10 / 114.85 – both aged 18+ ___________________ 114.85 Dependent children________________________ 66.90

• Income Support & income-based JSA

non means tested

(c) Monthly amounts. (d) Where different to Income Support, income-based JSA, ESA or Pension Credit.

benefit and tax credit rates

means tested

(e) Annual amounts. First threshold £6,420 (£16,105 if not entitled to WTC). (f) Reduced for an eldest/only child where CB is payable.

rightsnet.org.uk

news case law discussion advice support jobs training welfare rights debt employment housing community care

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I

n furtherance of its aims and objectives, ZIMCAN organised a Quiz Night on the 21st May 2016 which saw the young and older test their knowledge about history and culture. It was like a mini Life in the UK test. The Aims of the Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich are: 1. The advancement of education of members of the Charity and the Community through culturally appropriate activities; thus promoting closer integration and potential for development within the community, by fostering closer ties between members and the general public. 2. The promotion of health and social care through a range of activities intended to promote well-being of individuals within the community of people of African origins, specifically Zimbabweans. 3. To facilitate the relief of poverty, sickness and distress through a support network offering support, advice and assistance, including prison visiting, to members and relevant others of African origins who are in distress. 4. To promote the cultural richness and history that supports the development of cultural and personal identity, particularly for children and isolated individuals in Norfolk.

The next ZIMCAN event will be their annual BBQ event to be held on the 23rd July 2016.

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Do You Have a Biometric Passport? In 2006, the biometric passport was launched by the UK-IPS (Immigration & Passport Services). A biometric passport is also known as an electronic passport or ePassport.The biometric passport has new designs and improved security features which were not present on previous passports. The new pages have intricate designs, complex watermarks and an embedded electronic chip which contains information about the passport owner. In 2010 the IPS issued an updated style, ePassport (version 2). The personal details page (which includes the photograph) and the observations page have been moved to the front. The electronic chip, which includes the same information as printed on the personal data page, is now embedded in the back cover. Biometrics is all about the analysis of physical characteristics that are unique to a person. It can include fingerprints, retinal scans and signatures. The idea behind the new design is that it would be difficult for criminals to forge or clone your passport with the new security features in place. If the passport is not genuine or has been tampered with, government agencies should be able to detect any wrong doing. The facial biometrics on the chip will help link the passport holder to the passport.

The Great EU Welfare Benefits Scam.

Real or imagined? Claims that EU migrants see Britain’s welfare benefits as a ‘pull’ factor have been consistently demolished by study after study. But this hasn’t laid these clearly bogus claims to rest. What’s going on? - asks Alan Ali. The government’s February deal with the EU introduced a ‘four-year ban’ on new migrants from the EU claiming in-work benefits. This is meant to counter the perceived problem of EU nationals relying on the benefits system and seeing it as an attraction to moving to Britain. But is this what’s really happening? Only about 2.2% of the DWP’s benefit claimants are from the EU. And 6.8% of tax credit claimants had a grown-up from an EU country, which means that the other one is from Britain or somewhere else. Very few claim pensions because most are too young anyway. A study from University College London found that EU migrants pay £1.34 in tax for every £1 they get in state assistance. But you don’t see this shouted from the rooftops in the current debate about the impact of EU migration too often. Very little contact with benefits system - Interviewing scores of people for a study, a research team at Glasgow University concluded that removing state support from EU migrants will not reduce inward migration. They found that most postaccession EU workers: • have very little contact with the benefits system, despite being in low-paid jobs.

How can I tell if my passport is machine readable or an ePassport? • A biometric British passport will have your personal information page (the page containing your photo, your name and your date of birth) on the inside front page of the passport rather or on the inside back cover. • A machine readable passport has two lines of text as letters, numbers and chevrons (<<<<<) at the bottom of the biodata page of your passport (the page containing your photo and personal information). • It will have a digital photo which is a picture that is printed directly on the biodata page (not a photo that is glued or laminated into the passport). • There will be a biometric symbol (like this) on the front cover of your passport, which looks like a camera.

Travel Warning: • British citizen passport holders intending to travel to the USA under the visa waiver program are required to present a machine readable passport upon entry into the USA. • Those travelling without a machine readable passport must apply for a valid USA entry visa. This applies to both adults and children.

• few had more than a basic awareness of the British welfare system, although most had been settled for two years or more. • lack of information was not the only reason they weren’t claiming. Many said they were surprised at the level of social support available when they moved to the UK.

And • they often chose to go home for medical treatment rather than rely on the NHS Europe-wide research backs this showing that the claim that EU citizens are coming from new EU member states to older member states in order to get benefits is essentially untrue. THEY COME TO WORK AND EARN, NOT SIT AND CLAIM - The fact is that a large majority of EU migrants are in work and so are paying taxes rather than living off out-of-work benefits, but they are also more likely to be claiming in-work benefits than others in the workforce. Overwhelmingly, the evidence shows that EU nationals come to work and earn, not sit and claim Still not convinced? Well, in 2013, parliament passed a law that denied out of work European Economic Area (EEA) citizens jobseekers’ allowance, child benefits, child tax credits, and housing benefits for their first three months in Britain. The next year the number of EEA migrants rose significantly. NO REAL EVIDENCE - There is no real evidence that immigration decisions are made on the basis of welfare entitlements. In many countries, migrants claim fewer benefits than the home-grown population. Welfare was rarely mentioned, and it seems clear why: EU nationals — who come seeking work are actually more likely to be employed than British citizens. So, can it be fair or right that people working in essential jobs in areas like health and social care and agriculture and the food processing industries should be denied the levels of social compensation which we think are due to our own citizens? Source: http://www.migrantsrights.org.uk/

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Kanda Bongo Man in Norwich by Bridge Plus+

Promoting Diversity through Music. Kanda Bongo Man is a musical legend from Congo. This was a sold out crowd event attended by over 250 people at the Open Youth Venue. 30

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BME VOICES • I speak not for myself but for those without voice... those who have fought for their rights... their right to live in peace, their right to be treated with dignity, their right to equality of opportunity, their right to be educated. Malala Yousafzai

• I have never been to school in my life before? It was in UK that I learned to read and write, in the privacy of my bedroom. I don’t even know how to read in my own native language. It is amazing how being in the UK has made me so knowledgeable. I am so grateful for such an opportunity to change my life around.

• I have lived in another foreign country before in Africa, and within the first month I can recognise all my neighbours. Within a year I knew the name of each of them and have been invited or have visited the house of nearly half of them for one social related issue or another. In the UK I have lived in the same neighbourhood for over 15 years, been into my next door neighbours backyard once, with their permission, to collect an item that fell over the fence. At most, I can recognise 5 people as my neighbours and only know the name of two. Our children sometimes paly together, but the parents never acknowledge you when they see you. Now, call it nagging, but that’s something I find tough to get used to.

• I feel less isolated and depressed now that I found new opportunities to engage with the wider community, a comment made by YP

African countries top the list of best food diets in the world Eating plenty of fruit and vegs, the citizens of Chad have world’s healthiest diet, while those in Armenia have the worst, according to new research comparing global eating habits as published in The Lancet Global Health Journal. . The research was led by Dr Fumiaki Imamura, of the University of Cambridge and the study revealed a worldwide rise in the consumption of healthy food, including fruit and vegetables, but this was overtaken by a worrying increase in the amount of junk food being eaten.

The countries with the healthiest diets overall were:

• To be honest with you, I don’t come to your events for the food. I realised that anytime I come I learn something new. For example for weeks I have been worrying about an issue for which I could not find simple answers from people who are supposed to know, until I spoke to one of you. Soon more knowledgeable doors were opened. Once again the power of social networks is working. Problem solved. Now where else could I have such results? By M

• I am a Muslim and I live in Norwich with my young family. I cannot afford to socialise much because it cost money to get anywhere. But one place I find happiness is the church near my house. Ever since I was told by an older neighbour about the children activities at the church, I never stopped going. When the neighbour invited me to a church service, he was surprised to know that I was a Muslim. I was equally surprised that church preaching was nothing different to preaching in a Muslim mosque: spreading the good words of a God for all people.

1. Chad; 2. Sierra Leone; 3. Mali; 4. Gambia; 5.Uganda; 6. Ghana; 7. Ivory Coast; 8. Senegal; 9. Israel; 10. Somalia

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The Late Dr Rodgers Mlambo Busayi 01/01/1951 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 14/02/2016

R

At North Norfolk Horse sanctuary

odgers Mlambo Busayi was born in Mount Silinda Hospital, Chipinge, Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia) the second son of Aaron Mlambo Busayi and his wife Marian (Mbuya Dziya). He is one of 9 full siblings, and has 15 half-siblings. On the early demise of his father during the war, Rodgers and of his elder brother Joseph became the Head of the extended family. Initially, after completing his early education Rodgers took on two roles, firstly as an apprentice in joinery and bricklaying for one year, leading to a love of carpentry that lasted throughout his adult life. Rodgers actually built a wing of student residences with his own hands, a building which survives to this date. At the same time he was a part time teacher, teaching Math at Mt Silinda High School to Form 1 students. However, Rodgers was aspirational and thus became a pioneer in colonial Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), in that he was determined to train for medicine in some form. At that time in Zimbabwe such a course was impossible for someone from his background, and so he had to leave the country in order to fulfil his dream. At the same time, Rodgers had a long term love of animals, and in 1975 he went to Pong-Tamale Veterinary College in Ghana to pursue his joint ambitions of studying in the medical field and working in animal welfare; working in this field across West Africa. He then went further, attending the University of Ibadan in Nigeria, in order to become a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and by 1984 he was a Government Veterinary Officer and Public Health Veterinarian. He went on to head the Department of Veterinary Medicine in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. During this period he married his first former wife, Zivisai

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Mlambo with whom he had four children. In 1986 he arrived in the UK for Rodger in the early days the first time, to study at the World famous Dick Vet School at the University of Edinburgh, where he achieved a Master of Science Degree in Tropical Veterinary Medicine. In 1987 he became Professional Assistant to the Director of Veterinary Services in the Zimbabwean Ministry of Lands, Agriculture, Rural and Water Development and from this important national post became the Provincial Veterinary Officer for Matabeleland Province managing 41 Veterinary Staff. In 1992 he took his high level skills to the University of Zimbabwe Faculty of Veterinary Science, teaching Veterinary Medicine and providing a consultation service to clients patronizing the FVS Veterinary Hospital. Ever one to innovate, he introduced Veterinary Ambulatory Services enabling local villagers to obtain free treatment for their animals and providing students with real, practical on the ground experience. By 1996 Rodgers was Head of the In Dimire Homestead, Zimbabwe 2015

Department of Clinical Veterinary Studies. At the same time he acted as a voluntary visiting lecturer and external examiner for Gwebi and Chibero Agricultural Colleges and was a Lecturer in animal health, husbandry production and welfare for the Zimbabwe Open University. Between 1989 and 2006 he published more than 30 papers in professional journals, and contributed to 6 International Conferences held all around the World. In September 1999 Rodgers was again studying in Edinburgh at the Dick Vet where he gained a further Master of Science Degree in Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare. Whilst studying in Edinburgh he also worked in the NHS at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary Hospital, where he followed up an interest in the subject by taking a Certificate in Forensic Medicine. Rodgers first came to live in Norwich in 2007 to marry for a second time, following a whirlwind romance with his second wife, Sue. He very quickly established a life which included commitment to the community and voluntary work, becoming active in various groups. He became a regular weekly attendee and member of his local Methodist church in Costessy, where he later became a Steward and was in the process of developing himself further as a Methodist Lay Preacher. Throughout his time in the UK, Rodgers had a significant role to play in the lives of his young nephew Blessing and nieces Kuda, Tendaka, Uthando and Vimbai living in the UK where he fulfilled a role as Sekuru - favourite Uncle, father figure and grandfather all rolled into one. He loved being around the young people and considered them to be his children; never failing to give advice amidst much joking and laughter during their many long telephone calls together. Rodgersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; commitment to continuing professional development and continuing education never faltered; whilst in Norwich he attended numerous veterinary seminars and also undertook a Certificate in Creative Writing at the Village on outskirts of Hwange National Patk Victoria Falls - 2013


In Wales looking for dolphins 2009

Wedding DaySue & Rodger 2007

University of East Anglia, and a BTEC Award at Milton Keynes. In 2010 he took his commitment to voluntary work a step further, returning to the University of Zimbabwe under the umbrella of the WORD International Diaspora Volunteering Programme as a volunteer Visiting Lecturer in the School of Veterinary Medicine between February and April 2010, thus enabling 27 Vet students to graduate and 26 students to progress to the next level at a time of acute staff shortages. Whilst living in Norwich Rodgers has also worked in sexual health promotion, and with adults with learning difficulties; Rodger in the early days has been a volunteer for Norwich Mind and engaged in a wide range of community activities. He is a founder member of ZIMCAN (the Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich). Throughout his life he has made many enduring friendships along the way. Rodgers is survived by his four children living in Zimbabwe; Simbarashe, Marian, Memory and Tatenda; by their mother and by two grandchildren; and by his second wife Sue. Following a Memorial Service at Chapelfield Methodist Church, Norwich on Saturday 20th February, a party of family and friends escorted Rodgers to Zimbabwe where Memorial Services were held in Harare on 29th February and then in Chipinge on 1st and 2nd March encompassing over 300 people.

According to his wishes, he was cremated in Mutare, and his ashes interred in the family cemetery in the beautiful setting of his Dimire Homestead, Mount Silinda, Zimbabwe with much love and respect from assembled family and friends. Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note-This article was provided by a close family member. Published articles on the subject of veterinary science by Rodgers can be verified/ accessed on the world wide web under the title: History of veterinary services in Zimbabwe. Serialised Parts I to III. Also listed at http://www.pubfacts.com/author/ Rodgers+Mlambo+Busayi In Norwich 2014

Rodger in scrubs, Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

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Individual Profile

HUMPHREY MOYO – Made in Norfolk

O

riginally from Zimbabwe, Humphrey Moyo came to Norwich in 2002 to make a new life for his family; his wife Vaida and three children. A Head Teacher in Zimbabwe, Humphrey soon realized that further study was required to teach in the UK and he undertook several courses of study in the field of education, including a TESOL Certificate (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), a Diploma in Further Education and a Master’s Degree in Education which he achieved in 2005. At the same time, Humphrey volunteered in the Community, most notably with NEAD (Norfolk Education and Action for Development) where he taught on a range of issues including diversity, leadership, conflict resolution, human rights and refugee issues. He is a founder member of Zimcan (Zimbabwean Community Association Norwich). Looking around for opportunities to progress, Humphrey became interested in starting his own business. During his studies he had become familiar with the social care sector which offers a range of shift patterns conducive to successful studying, and knew of the high level of need for carers in Norfolk. His experience in this work complemented his own ethical approach to working with elders. Humphrey says ‘I think about what I would want someone to do if they were providing care for my own Mum or Dad.’ Starting a Care Agency is a demanding process, with a run-in period of up to 18 months, including provision of an office base

and having systems in place, in preparation for registration with the Care Quality Council and accreditation by Norfolk County Council Adult Social Care, before the Agency takes off. Humphrey was prepared to work hard with no money coming into the Agency during this period, preparing the necessary documentation and getting everything ready, including his own registration with the CQC as the Registered Manager. Humphrey named the Agency Compkey Healthcare, referring to his core value, that compassion is the key to good quality care. Humphrey says ‘Although caring can be demanding, it is also very satisfying. Seeing the improvement in people due to good quality care is just brilliant.’ The compassionate approach extends to staff members, as Humphrey reasons ‘How can you expect staff to look after the service users in a compassionate way, if you as an employer don’t look after your staff?’ Humphrey is a ‘hands on’ motivational leader, and after a very positive first year in business, the feedback from service users has been really positive. One family said ‘We had carers in before but it felt really intrusive, and we stopped them after a couple of weeks. Your carers are completely different, they are fantastic! ‘ Humphrey and his family have made Norfolk their permanent home, and family members have brought their professional skills in nursing into the business. Humphrey looks forward to developing the business into other aspects of health and social care, building for a successful long-term future.

How to contact your MPs 1. Keith Simpson MP

6. Chloe Smith MP

2. Brandon Lewis MP

7. Clive Lewis MP

3. George Freeman MP

8. Richard Bacon MP

4. Norman Lamb MP -

9. Elizabeth Truss MP

5. Henry Bellingham MP

Member of European Parliament (MEP)

Broadland Conservative Tel: 01603 865763 email: keithsimpson2015@gmail.com

Great Yarmouth Conservative Tel: 01493 652928 email: brandon.lewis.mp@parliament.uk Mid Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01953 600617 email: george.freeman.mp@parliament.uk

North Norfolk Liberal Democrat Tel: 01692 403752 email: norman.lamb.mp@parliament.uk North West Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01553 692076 email: bellinghamh@parliament.uk

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Norwich North Conservative Tel: 01603 414756 email: chloe@chloesmith.org.uk Norwich South Labour Tel: 01603 510755 email: clive.lewis.mp@parliament.uk

South Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01379 643728 email: richardbaconmp@parliament.uk

South West Norfolk Conservative Tel: 01842 757345 email: elizabeth.truss.mp@parliament.uk

Richard Howitt

Labour Tel: 01223 240202 e-mail: richard@richardhowittmep.com


Our Domestic Violence Advice & Advocacy (DV-AA) Project is aimed at: • Raising awarenes about Domestic Violence in BME (black and minority ethnic) communities • Supporting BME people in increasing their confidence in reporting DV • Developing a BME Specialist Domestic Violence support service in Norfolk • Tackling cultural barriers to dealing with Domestic Violence • Ensuring the safety of victims by providing confidential advice and advocacy support

Please contact us if: • You are/know of a victim and you not sure how to get help and support • You are worried about going to the authorities e.g. Police • You are worried about your immigration status • You want to know more because everyone deserves a Volience-Free Life

Call: 01603 617 076 email: office@bridgeplus.org.uk

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OPEN THE BAG

Before you leave the pharmacy.

An estimated £4.7m of unused medicines are wasted every year in Norfolk and Waveney. Once an unwanted medicine has left the pharmacy, it cannot be used even if hasn’t been opened. By reducing the amount of medicines wasted each year, we could increase the funding available for other vital health services.

Please OPEN THE BAG – if you don’t need all the medicine please hand it back at the counter or to the delivery driver. For more information visit: http://tiny.cc/YourMedicines_YourNHS

B-Me Voices Magazine- i6 Summer 2016  

B-Me Voices Magazine- i6 Summer 2016

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