Page 1


contents/INdice JanuarY-FeBruarY/gennaio-febbraio

2014

INterNIews 31

production produzione transpla stic/ transplastic a solid light /l uce solid a the origin of cooking/ al le origini del de signer t oys/ giochi d a designer

43

la cucina

project

ara ssocia ti l ondon, the busine ss pla yground room b y pul lman ho tel s nante s , the ho tel suite b y okk o chain shanghai, the merc at o re staurant light tha t make s de cor/ la l uce che arred a

56

on the co ver: shiny and pre cious like gold , the firs t issue of 2014 joins Intern i and Zano t ta in an impor tant moment: their 60 th annivers ar y. T he profile s of the mos t out standing produc t s of the comp any , true icons of Italian de sign, il l us tra te the bril liant career of Z ano t ta, narra ted in this issue b y Mar tino , Ele onora and F rance sc a Z ano t ta, the children of the firm’s f ounder, Aurelio . in coper t ina: è prezioso e l uccic ante co me l ’oro il nu mero che ina ugura il 2014 e a cco muna Intern i e Zano t ta in un’i mpor tante ricorrenza: il sessantesi mo co mpleanno . I profili dei prodo t ti più signific ativi del l ’aziend a, vere e proprie icone del design it aliano , delineano l ’incredibile percorso del l ’aziend a , ra ccont at o nel nu mero d a Mar tino , Ele onora e F rancesc a Z ano t ta, figli del f ond at ore Aurelio .

De Pado va, Milan c al ling Istanbul/ Milano chia ma Ist anbul duriniquindici milan is open house of light s/ la c asa del le l uci bul tha up in rome 70

workshop

72

fairs fiere

shere(d )esign in marrake

78 82 84 86 88 90 92

96 98

C_In638_P_24_28_sommario.indd 24

showroom

ch

An immersion in s tyle/ U n’i mmersione nel l o stile manila f ame dub ai: de sign on the s and /il design sul la sabbia prizes premi tribute s t o idea s/ tributi al le idee in brief brevi young designers giovani designer mel ting ho t exhibitions mostre 100 anos de t omie oht ake sustainable sostenibile mul ticomf or t house city project progetto città w orld greenhouse/ il giardino bo tanico di p ado va events eventi the thous and s tars of moritz/ le mil le stel le di moritz gran sera ta futuris ta perspectives prospettive in search of l os t cinema/ al la ricerc a del cine ma perdut o in bookstores in libreria

20/12/13 13.25


CONTENTS/INdice II 100

food design with briff

102

ard a t the market /con briff

fashion file

figura tive odditie s/ bizzarrie figura 104

tive

web&digital

new website and web app 105

info&tech

ard al merc at o

f or interni

soundb ars: comp act audio 119 cardesign the role of the c ar de signer/ il ruol o dei c ar designer wel lne ss on bo ard /il benessere a bordo C ross-o ver interior w orlds/ mondi interiori mo ving t ogheter/ muo versi insieme aut o-anal ysis/ aut o- analisi

2

INservice 144 162

translations traduzioni firms directory indirizzi

INtopics 1

editorial editoriale by/di gild a boj ardi

INteriors&architecture

dynamic contaminations

contaminazioni dinamiche edited b y/a cura di ant onel la boisi 2

shenzhen bao’an, new terminal 3/il nuovo terminal 3 de sign b y/proget t o di studio fuks as massimiliano & doriana fuks as pho t os cour te sy by/f ot o di le onardo fino text by/test o di mat te o vercel l oni

8

14 8

t ti

warwickshire, the parasitic castle

il castello parassita de sign b y/proget t o di witherf ord w at son mann archite pho t os b y/f ot o di hélène binet text by/test o di ale ss andro rocc a 14

20

ct s

bordeaux, the colors of teresa/ i colori di teresa de sign b y/proget t o di tere s a s apey studio pho t os b y/f ot o di mads mogensen s tudio text by/test o di ant onel la Boisi thailand, iniala beach house interior de sign b y/proget t o d ’interni di fernando & humber t o c ampana pho t os cour te sy by/f ot o di iniala bea ch house text by/test o di la ura ra gazz ola

20

26

26

sumatra, the cinnamon ‘lounge’

il ‘salotto’ della cannella de sign b y/proget t o di tyin te gne stue archite ct s pho t os b y/f ot o di pasi aal t o text by/test o di ant onel la boisi

C_In638_P_24_28_sommario.indd 26

20/12/13 13.26


CONTENTS/INdice III

INsight INscape 32

portable cosmology/cosmologia portatile by/di Andre a Br anzi INtoday

34

46

34

domaine de boisbuchet by/di olivi a crem ascoli

INdesign INproject 40

zanotta, 60 years of icons/60 anni di icone edited b y/a cura di Madd alen a Pado vani Crossover

46

bentley finds a home/trova casa by/di La ur a Ra g azz ol a

52

the transversal method/trasversalitĂ come metodo by/di C ris tin a Moro zzi

56 52

62

f/d by/di Stef ano Caggi ano

62

mixed-blood projects/progetti a sangue misto by/di Valentin a C roci

68

over-crossing by/di C hi ar a Ale ssi

70

erbamatta by/di Madd alen a Pado vani

72

techno-comfort by/di Madd alen a Pado vani

74

time for school/tutti a scuola by/di Valentin a C roci

74

78

78

assonance/assonanze by/di n adia lionel l o pho t os b y/f ot o di maurizio m arc at o

86

cross-carpet by/di n adia lionel l o pho t os b y/f ot o di miro z agnoli

94

time-lapse by/di k atrin cosset

a

INservice 102

86

C_In638_P_24_28_sommario.indd 28

translations traduzioni

94

20/12/13 13.26


Interni January-February 2014

INtopics / 1

EDiToriaL

A

decidedly important year begins, full of events and new developments from all points of view. In 2014 Interni celebrates its 60th birthday. Looking back on the career of this “decor magazine” that has evolved into a “magazine of interior and contemporary design” inevitably fills us with pride, prompting us to make an even firmer commitment to communicate and promote design culture on an international scale. This is why we have decided to focus every issue of 2014 on a specific theme to investigate the latest innovations and emerging problematic issues of the world of architecture and design. We wanted to start things off by talking about crossovers, namely grafts and contaminations between different visions. This is a particularly interesting theme for Interni due to the specificities of the role the magazine has assumed in recent years, that of an activator and facilitator of creative alliances between designers and companies, exponents of culture and project-oriented operators, in the widest sense of the term. To create new models of sharing and cooperation is fundamental today, just as it is important to identify new vantage points to observe the things that can no longer be invented and produced as they were in the past. This means that we have to break down disciplinary barriers, contaminate forms of knowledge, mix up genres and genders, absorb all the suggestions arriving from ‘other’ worlds. To make the ‘crossover’ both a mental approach and an operative method. This is what we wanted to express in this first issue of 2014, analyzing projects that opt for the hybrid formula to grapple in a positive way with future challenges. A theme that becomes an urgent hope: the hope for sharing. Sharing of ideas, projects and efforts, or simply sharing of emotions. ASTLEY CASTLE IN THE ENGLISH COUNTRYSIDE, PROJECT BY WITHERFORD WATSON MANN ARCHITECTS. PHOTO BY HéLèNE BINET Gilda Bojardi

C_In638_R_01_editoriale.indd 1

16/12/13 18.12


2 /INteriors&architecture

January-February 2014 Interni

View of the roof of the new T erminal 3, t o w ards the meeting point between the tw o or thogonal vol ume s. T he hexa gonal openings al l o w na tural light t o enter the interior, screened b y ano ther la yer bel o w.

C_In638_R_02_07_Shenzen Fuksas.indd 2

16/12/13 15.23


Intern i January-February 2014

INteriors&architecture / 3

Shenzhen Bao’an

With the new TERMINAL 3 of the international airport of SHENZHEN, the historic gate of entry to China from Hong Kong, Studio FUKSAS returns to the theme of LAND ARCHITECTURE approached for the Milan Fair (2005), fertile ground for EXPERIMENTATION on the infrastructures of the new millennium project Studio Fuksas/Massimiliano & Doriana Fuksas

photos Leonardo Finotti/courtesy Studio Fuksas text Matteo Vercelloni

C_In638_R_02_07_Shenzen Fuksas.indd 3

16/12/13 15.23


January-February 2014 Interni

4 /INteriors&architecture

View of the central three -st or y space , sho wing the archite cture of the terminal from abo ve. A w aiting area . In the f ore ground , the chairs de signed f or the f acility by F uks as. O n the f acing p age , a central perspe cti ve view of the route with the re staurant z one and the tw o-s t or y l ounge . View of a dep ar ture z one with the large variable -ge ometr y vaul t tha t wraps the entire sp ace .

T

owards the middle of the 1990s Deng Xiaoping, leader of the Chinese Communist Party and a pioneer of the economic reform that has brought China to its present state of development, drew an ideal circle around a place on the southern coast, the Pearl River Delta, at a zone known as Shenzhen. The first “Special Economic Zone” had the primary goal of becoming a manufacturing area for exports. Over the years, Shenzhen became a sort of ‘middle ground’ between Hong Kong and the continent, taking on a symbolic role as the ‘gate’ to China, for the entry of foreign investment and for business initiatives from all over the world. The growth of the country with the transition from a planned economy to a market economy, in keeping with the anomaly of a model of capitalism with Chinese characteristics, is reflected in the urban planning of the Shenzhen area. Twenty years ago the city had a population of about 30,000 inhabitants, with edification spreading over about three square kilometers; today the inhabitants are close to nine million, and the urban area extends for 79 square kilometers. This unprecedented, exponential growth has been substantially without unified orchestration, without an overall idea of urban design. The new Terminal 3 designed by Massimiliano & Doriana Fuksas also adds record-setting factors: it is the largest public building in Shenzhen, organized under a sculptural roof sheltering about half a million square meters of space, with 63 gates, to handle the movement of about 45 million passengers per year. A work of architecture on a territorial scale, about 1.5 km in length, an outstanding landmark of reference and order, thanks to the cruciform layout that is a reminder not so much of an airplane, Fuksas points out, as of a Fuksas “a manta, a ray that breathes, changes form, with its own gentleness, bending, undergoing variations, capturing light, emitting light, filtering

C_In638_R_02_07_Shenzen Fuksas.indd 4

the light that enters.” In effect, the project (winner of an international competition with participants of the caliber of Foster Associates, Kisho Kurokawa, GMP International, Foreign Office Architects, just to name a few) with its double white skin that forms, sculpts and develops the overall enclosure seems to welcome visitors into a zoomorphic space, which like the belly of the great fish that swallows the prophet Jonah functions as a filter between the voyage and the arrival in the new world. One feels protected under the great shaped vault, sculpted by hexagonal signs that filter the light from above, creating a play of reflections on the shiny floor. A single glance suffices to grasp the vastness of the space, the long perspective of the rectilinear route, the figure of the indoor street that opens at its ends with large glazings facing the runways and develops on three levels in the central point of intersection between the two orthogonal volumes of reference. The airport emphasizes its role as the gate to the city of the new millennium – a symbolic as well as functional place – which this project fully interprets on the scale of a convincing work of Land

Architecture. As Fuksas says: “The airport is the city of today […] it is a linear structure, a long route, a walkway. Today airports have to be macrostructures that restore the quality of life of people. Our Chinese clients asked us to make an airport, and to do it thinking about the people inside it, to create a place where you can feel good even if your flight has been delayed.” This is the world of infrastructures, which today as in the past offers a chance to experiment with new scales of intervention and new figures. Airports, of course, but also bridges and highways, tunnels, junctions and railway lines, are all functional features, ‘service architectures’ that have to stand up to increasingly intense flows while at the same time, and above all, giving them form, providing what are often the only elements of orientation and reference in a particular context. Constructions charged with identity in manmade landscapes, whose increasing size and globalization sometimes translate into dangerously anonymous standardization, a trend the design of Shenzhen Bao’an manages to firmly reject.

16/12/13 15.23


new terminal 3, shenzhen / 5

C_In638_R_02_07_Shenzen Fuksas.indd 5

16/12/13 15.23


6 /INteriors&architecture

C_In638_R_02_07_Shenzen Fuksas.indd 6

January-February 2014 Intern i

16/12/13 15.23


Interni

January-February 2014

new terminal 3, shenzhen / 7

View of the unified interior sp ace: light entering through the roof crea te s a pla y of refle ctions on the shiny fl oor, changing throughout the course of the d ay.

C_In638_R_02_07_Shenzen Fuksas.indd 7

16/12/13 15.23


January-February 2014 Interni

8 / INteriors&architecture

B

A

A

To reutilize without reconstructing: after a fire and forty years of abandon, the ruins of ASTLEY CASTLE become the enclosure of a new structure, in stone, brick and lamellar wood, for a unique vacation residence in the English countryside project by Witherford Watson Mann Architects

The parasitic castle B

0

1

2

5

N

Ground fl oor plan with the exis tin g masonr y, in gra y, and the new w al l s , in red . F rom the out side , the c astle – transf ormed a s a ho tel and then de stro yed b y fire in 1970 – conser ve s it s ima ge as a ruin immersed in the na tural set tin g of W ar wickshire .

C_In638_R_08_13_Astley Castle.indd 8

photos Hélène Binet text Alessandro Rocca

E

ngland can boast of an architectural culture that often runs the risk of being overshadowed, due to its complexity and diversity, by the skyscrapers of London and the impact of major events, from the works for the millennium to those of the Olympics. Because beyond high-tech, whose home can be said to be England, there are also many architects who know how to work discreetly, with empirical elegance, establishing a dialogue with tradition and reworking its elements in everyday construction. Among the English architects who cultivate a line of normality with refined awareness, of everyday, anti-heroic architecture, we should mention Caruso St John, Tony Fretton and Sergison Bates. To this group, we can also add the studio of Stephen Witherford, Christopher Watson and William Mann, an example worth imitating of expertise and equilibrium. Their project for Astley Castle has justifiably received the prestigious Stirling Prize for 2013, assigned by the Royal Institute of British Architects, and it is a convincing demonstration of how to make a work of architecture of great value, and great impact, with simple materials, ordinary technologies and limited expenditures. The theme of the project was launched in a competition in 2007, by the Landmark Trust, an organization that safeguards and manages English historical heritage through initiatives of civic solidarity. The goal was to recover, or more precisely to salvage, the ruins of Astley Castle.

16/12/13 14.34


INteriors&architecture / 9

The new w ork of archi tecture is seen from the ou tside almos t onl y on one w al l , f acing sou th, offering a glimpse of the windo ws of the bedrooms on the l o wer level , and the large glazing of the open sp ace on the level abo ve (pho tos Philip V ile) .

C_In638_R_08_13_Astley Castle.indd 9

16/12/13 14.34


10 / INteriors&architecture

C_In638_R_08_13_Astley Castle.indd 10

January-February 2014 Intern i

16/12/13 14.34


In terni

english countryside / 11

January-February 2014

Immersed in the greenery of Warwickshire, the old walls of sandstone blocks dated back to the 12th century. For hundreds of years they contained the residence of a noble family, after which the castle was converted, much more recently, for use as a hotel. But the long life of the building seemed ready to come to an end when a fire destroyed all the wooden parts in 1970, including the roof, the floor structures and casements. For the next forty years the age-old masonry, having lost its defenses, continued to crumble and yield. The project by Witherford Watson Mann is an experiment with extreme retrofitting, salvaging what could be salvaged and inserting all that was lacking, with clearly new architectural interventions that do not attempt to imitate the style of the previous structure. Following the dictates of contemporary restoration, which forbid stylistic fakery and recommend maximum neutrality in the completion of missing parts, WWM have utilized a very simple range of materials: brick, precast concrete parts in gray, lamellar wood with a natural finish. Outside, the result is a fascinating image in which the ruin maintains its look of an abandoned relic, even conserving the climbing

C_In638_R_08_13_Astley Castle.indd 11

11th - 13th

early 16 th

early 17 th

early 19 th

11th - 13th

early 16 th

early 17 th

early 19 th

The main room of the c astle , wi th the firepla ce at the cen ter, ha s been conser ved in i ts pre sen t state, like a large openair room or a p atio offering a p ass age be tween the house and the garden. The se ctions sho w the rela tionship be tween the exis ting ma sonr y and the new proje ct, done in brick , pre cast concre te and lamel lar w ood . V iew of the windo w of the living area , on the upper level , f acing the main hal l lef t as an ou tdoor sp ace .

plants that cling to the old stones, while at the same time revealing the presence of a volume that in spite of its genteel manners is inserted like a parasite, an alien presence that exploits the old walls as if they were the shell of a by-now extinct organism, an available leftover that can be recycled as the habitat of a new life form. As the architects put it, “We have not restored the castle, nor have we attempted to underline the ruin in a romantic way; instead, we have created a new unity, making it stable, reconnecting the parts.

16/12/13 14.34


January-February 2014 Interni

12 / INteriors&architecture

View of one of the f our large bedrooms on the ground le vel (pho t o J. Mil ler) . Det ail of a bedroom with the new ceiling made with lamel lar w ood beams (pho t o Philip Vile) .

C_In638_R_08_13_Astley Castle.indd 12

But we also wanted to conserve a sense of incompleteness, allowing the place to remain porous, breached by still gaping wounds.� A dual objective, then, that leads to emphasis not so much on the contrast between old and new, which combine to form a new unity, as between the two conditions of neglect and reuse that coexist in the same project. This choice is also very clear inside, where the renovated parts are in direct contact with others in which structural and safety issues have been addressed, without

making them into inhabitable spaces. Due to the obligatory but cumbersome presence of the existing masonry, the organization of the house has been reversed: on the ground level the existing spaces have been used for four large bedrooms and an ample foyer, at whose center stands an impressive lamellar wood staircase, like a sculpture of Arte Povera. On the upper level, free of the bulk of the large masonry remnants, a single zone contains the living area, the kitchen and the dining room.

16/12/13 14.34


english countryside / 13

The main s tairc ase leading to the living area; due to the exis ting ma sonr y, the in ternal la you t is upside -do wn, wi th the bedrooms on the ground fl oor and a large open living area , wi th ki tchen and dining area , on the upper level .

C_In638_R_08_13_Astley Castle.indd 13

16/12/13 14.34


January-February 2014 In terni

14 / INteriors&architecture

A loft in Bordeaux, France, in the converted spaces of a mechanical workshop, lights up with a bright, warm, sunny range of colors. To rediscover, between rigor and levity, around a hedonistic indoor pool, the character of glamorous, fluid living, free of pre-set schemes project Teresa Sapey Studio

The in ternal patio fea ture s a teak de ck and mural s of brigh t col ors de signed b y Studio Tere s a S apey, like the table wi th a w ooden top. Plan ters and chairs in bla ck me tal by Los Pe単o te s .

production Martina Hunglinger photos Mads Mogensen Studio text Antonella Boisi

on the f acing p age , View from the en trance ki tchen-dining le vel to w ards the re ce ssed li ving area . An unin terrup ted perspe ctive, underlined b y the o ak fl ooring and the fl uidi ty of the sp atial cons truc tion. O n one side , the ver y l ong whi te a cce ssorized w al l , lined wi th books , cus tom de signed; on the o ther, the gla ss vol ume tha t con tains the indoor swimming pool . In the f ore ground , the C l oe l ounger in pol ye thylene b y Myyour .

C_In638_R_14_19_Sapey.indd 14

16/12/13 14.24


Intern i January-February 2014

INteriors&architecture / 15

The colors of Teresa

“I

have always believed that houses have a soul and that spaces are alive, like people. I need to inhale a space before thinking of a project, because each space has its own identity.” This opening statement by Teresa Sapey, an Italian designer based in Madrid, sums up the meaning of her project in Bordeaux: the conversion of the 900

C_In638_R_14_19_Sapey.indd 15

square meters of an abandoned mechanical parts workshop to make a sunny Mediterranean loft for the glamorous lifestyle of a young French couple with one daughter. “When I visited the place for the first time,” she recalls, “there was still a strong smell of motor oil and sweat. My steps echoed in a sort of 20th-century cathedral of labor and you could still see Pirelli calendars hung behind the restroom. A masculine space of hard work and power.” She had carte blanche, so with a bit of humor and irony she was able to perform magic: conserving the original layout, thanks to the height

of the volumes she has managed to play with disorienting planes of perception, with incisive graphic signs that are also fluid, rigorous and light, inventing a “reversed” planimetric that leads to continuous surprises. In analogous terms, she has dismantled and reassembled ‘the machine for living’ like a compositional collage of mechanical parts. With many pieces made to measure. One arrives from a small entrance, a space with a low ceiling, almost Lilliputian, which extends over a cellar of age-old wines stored in the holes of a white wall, like soap bubbles.

16/12/13 14.24


16 / INteriors&architecture

C_In638_R_14_19_Sapey.indd 16

16/12/13 14.24


Interni

bordeaux, loft / 17

January-February 2014

Panoramic view from the l oft level , cont aining the island of the bil liards table o verl ooking the living area bel o w.

The next area is an enormous kitchen conceived as a “laboratory of flavors” that is actually just the prelude – together with the linear extension of the dining area – to an inviting promenade leading to what was the hardest, most industrial volume, now occupied by the pool: a covered belvedere, a new hedonistic skin that humidifies the various spaces organized and connected at different levels. The fitness room, the bath, the closet and the master bedroom, on one side, the side devoted to private life. On the other, the study-library and, at the center, like an enclave aligned with the base of the swimming pool, the continuous and uninterrupted ‘basin’ of the living area, with its islands for welcoming guests: the convivial and public zone, prolonged in the mezzanine which contains a cherry-pink billiards table, as if floating over the space below. The original structure of the enclosure marked by the metal framework of exposed beams and pillars has been intentionally emphasized with a new Taylorist gray color, which meets with dynamic counterpoint in the range of pearly white tones that unfurl on the walls to dynamically reflect the light. “I have broken free of the fear to dare to use color,” Teresa continues, “but I have learned to weigh it, to measure it, in relation to the materials and the light, which is a malleable, ductile material, just like the wood and the cement used for the floors. I felt a need for warm, vivid tones, strong accents. Fields of yellow, orange, saffron, capable of withstanding the peek-a-boo effects produced by the continuous pursuit of visual transparency of surfaces.

18,04 m2

HABITACIÓN

8,02 m2 2,36 m2

15,47 m2 29,88 m2

±0,00

VESTIDOR

HABITACIÓN 24,88 m2

trampilla de acceso a patio superior

CUARTO MÁQUINAS

BAÑO 26,78 m2

BAÑO

-1,94

2,46 m2 6,34 m2 2,14 m

PISCINA

22,59 m2

ESTAR

2

ACCESO A PORTAL

HABITACIÓN

ACCESO A VIVIENDA

9,33 m2

BAÑO

4,29 m2

PATIO 1

-1,94 101,20 m2

38,53 m2 3,64

Ventilación Forzada

C_In638_R_14_19_Sapey.indd 17

9,39 m2

COMEDOR

±0,00

±0,00

O n the f acing page , the living area with white u phol stered furnishings and a c ar pet , al l de signed b y T ere s a S apey. In the b ack ground , the dining area with the table and chairs from the Beam G la ss serie s b y Piero L issoni f or Porro . O il painting b y Alber t o Acina s. Teresa Sapey Estudio de Arquitectura S amurai fl oor lam p by Vibia .

FRANCISCO CAMPOS 13 28002 MADRID SPAIN T+34 917 450 876 F+34 915 644 300 WWW.TERESASAPEY.COM tsapey@teresasapey.com

Ventilación Forzada

1,40

0,30 1,40

3,33 m2

9,88 m2

HALL

BOTELLERO

VESTIDOR 2

52,60 m2 Ventilación Forzada

HABITACIÓN

COCINA

43,90 m2

2,54 m

Ventilación Forzada

DESPENSA

-0,91

GARAJE 47,54 m2

0,57 0,85

SALÓN COMEDOR 4,24 m2

7,61 m2

PATIO 2

-1,94

7,14 m2 Ventilación Forzada

S

L

2,20 m2

ASEO 2

BAÑO10,12 m

2,20 m

2

Det ail of the kit chen. In front of the white painted module s b y Sant o s and the Cal ligari s st ool s l ooms the ironic me ss age “I don’t like t o cook ” in orange vinyl , T ere s a S apey ’s tribute t o the client s. PROYECTO

PLANO

PROYECTO BASICO Y EJECUCION ACONDICIONAMIENTO DE LOCAL EN VIVIENDA EMPLAZAMIENTO

C/ GRANADA, 36 MADRID

PROPIEDAD

Frederic Camille Terrien

ESTADO REFORMADO PLANO SUPERFICIES MODIFICADO

FECHA

14/9/06

ESCALA

1 : 100

PLANO N°

P09

16/12/13 14.24


January-February 2014 Interni

18 / INteriors&architecture

The sal le de b ain , with the a cce ssorized monolith of fl uid f orms in DuPont C orian, cont aining the w ashs tands , al l cus t om de signed b y T ere s a S apey. O n the f acing p age: the indoor pool , cont ained in a transp arent gla ss vol ume f or an a qu arium effe ct.

The lack of windows and of a normal indooroutdoor relationship was evident in these spaces. The main source of natural light was and still is from above, and considering this fact the square outdoor patio becomes a privileged opening for the living area and the two bedrooms, a decisive factor. I like it when a place can offer multiple time frames, variations of notes, opportunities to compose different days, also with light.” Artificial light adds theatrical orchestration thanks to spotlights on the beams, fluorescent crevices and small spots to underline volumes. In a certain sense, as Gae Aulenti did in the Gare d’Orsay in Paris, imagining life inside the station, Teresa Sapey has thought of an architecture inside architecture, creating a small secret garden inside

C_In638_R_14_19_Sapey.indd 18

the workshop that becomes a vehicle of spatial depth and new energy. In the ship’s log of the design of the house, which for Teresa Sapey becomes “a false modernity, a contemporary classic, a dramatic, theatrical set, a mixture of tactile pleasure, comfort and functional quality, a beautiful woman ageing with dignity, in keeping with the evolution of her path,” in the end she was the one to be surprised. “The clients told me that they never eat at home. They can’t even boil an egg... What a disappointment, after having designed, inch by inch, a ‘laboratory of flavors’! So I asked them, with a rather shaky voice, if I could write, in block letters on the kitchen furnishings, in bright orange, the message: “je n’aime pas faire la cuisine.”

16/12/13 14.24


bordeaux, loft / 19

C_In638_R_14_19_Sapey.indd 19

16/12/13 14.24


January-February 2014 Intern i

20 / INteriors&architecture

interior design Fernando & Humberto Campana, Joseph Walsh, Jaime Hayon, Lazaro Rosa Violan, A-cero, Mark Brazier Jones, Graham Lamb, Eggarat Wongcharit

Iniala beach House

architectural design Graham Lamb photos Courtesy Iniala Beach House text Laura Ragazzola

C_In638_R_20_25_iniala_hotel.indd 20

16/12/13 15.33


Interni

INteriors&architecture / 21

January-February 2014

In Thailand, a high-profile resort in terms of comfort and design, done by a selected team of international designers. In the group, the Campana brothers once again reveal their focus on social issues

An o ver al l image f or a comp arison of the tw o spirit s of the re sor t: t o the left , the reno vated exis ting building, a typic al ex ample of l oc al archite cture; on the right , the penthouse suite , a gl ass vol ume with a contempor ar y image , f acing the be ach.

C_In638_R_20_25_iniala_hotel.indd 21

16/12/13 15.33


January-February 2014 Interni

22 / INteriors&architecture

U

nconventional, eclectic, sustainable: these words sum up the latest project by Humberto & Fernando Campana, two of the most highly acclaimed (and creative) people in the world of contemporary design. In an uncontaminated landscape, on a beach of rare beauty several kilometers from the airport of Phuket, in Thailand, the Brazilian duo has taken part in the creation of the Iniala Beach House, an exclusive residence for high-level tourism, involving a pool of renowned international designers. The Campana brothers decided to work on the Iniala Beach House because of its dual DNA: on the one hand it is a special place, offering a unique and above all ‘personalized’ experience of comfort, relaxation and hospitality; on the other, there is the need to create a strong, socially useful link with the place and the local community, still suffering from the consequences of the devastating tsunami of 2004. Environmental concerns and cultural sensitivity, as well as careful observation of local materials, climate and landscape, have

C_In638_R_20_25_iniala_hotel.indd 22

always been key factors in the life and work of the Campanas, ready to venture into the Amazon jungle or the favelas of Brazil to create furnishings, objects and spaces that subversively undermine the rules of traditional design. On Nati Beach, the Brazilian brothers have done the interior decorating of one of the three villas – the Collector’s Villa – of the resort (the interiors of the other two, the Thai Villa and the European Villa, are respectively by the Thai designer Eggarat Wongcharit and the Spanish studio A-Cero); but they have also focused on the spa, the cinema and the garden, completing the exclusive range of offerings of each residence.

Abo ve , the origin al building from the l ast centur y, f acing a pool of w ater: the new cons truc tions are arr anged around it . In the sm al l pho t o, bel o w, det ail of the mul ticol ored mos aic co vering the intern al w al l s of the vil l a. O n the f acing p age , the living room of one of the three vil l as , with interior de sign b y the Campan a bro thers . In the f ore ground , the G rinz a ch airs , co vered in bl ue t o m at ch the se a, par t of the col le ction of Edra .

16/12/13 15.33


Intern i January-February 2014

C_In638_R_20_25_iniala_hotel.indd 23

iniala beach house / 23

16/12/13 15.33


24 / INteriors&architecture

C_In638_R_20_25_iniala_hotel.indd 24

January-February 2014 Intern i

16/12/13 15.33


Interni

iniala beach house / 25

January-February 2014

Abo ve , det ail of a mirror in the sp a, al so by the C ampan a bro thers , like a stylized sun. T o the side , one of the bedrooms , with interior by the S panish de signer Jaime Hayon: in the f ore ground , the T udor Ch air he h as de signed f or Establish ed and S ons . O n the f acing p age , abo ve , a corner of the sp a; bel o w, over al l view of the cinem a se ating are a, f or 22 viewers . Ins te ad of the tr adition al se at s , the C ampan a bro thers h ave inser ted the Cipri a uphol stered furnishings de signed f or Edra , covered in e co-fur.

C_In638_R_20_25_iniala_hotel.indd 25

Their project establishes a continuous, positive relationship with the landscape, which is of rare beauty: light and air enter through the large windows of the living areas and bedrooms, while shadows and gilded reflections fill the more intimate spaces of the spa and cinema. The local artisan tradition comes to life in the abundant use of wood, the squared, tactful volumes of the spaces, but also in the beautiful ceramic facings of the walls, shifting from the kaleidoscopic colors of the mosaics inhabited by fantastic animal figures to the mother-of-pearl reflections that enhance the spaces, alternating with lively chromatic aplomb. Iconic (and ironic) furnishings have been chosen by the Brazilian designers from their own vast oeuvre: from upholstered pieces in eco-fur to create the unusual seating area of the ‘private’ cinema, to the armchairs with their covers left intentionally ‘oversized’ in the micro-lounges with marine shadings. Opened in December, the resort is an initiative of the British entrepreneur (and philanthropist) Mark Weingard (miraculously still alive after the tsunami in 2004): it includes three villas and an exclusive penthouse suite, created in

collaboration between Weingard himself and Graham Lamb, chief design director of Iniala Beach, and also the designer of the overall complex. The buildings are arranged around a central volume built during the last century, in keeping with the typical canons of the local architecture: the result is a successful mixtures of tradition and the contemporary, also seen in the interiors created by the international team of designers. There is also a refined gourmet restaurant run by the young Spanish chef Eneko Atxa, rated with three Michelin stars. Children also have a space of their own, with furnishings made to measure and designer playthings (making this the first kids-hotel in Asia). An art gallery open to the public promotes the local culture and crafts creativity of Phuket, opening its spaces to emerging Thai artists. But the social benefits of the resort (much appreciated by the Campana brothers) focus above all on the idea of setting aside 15% of its income for education, health care and sustainability, in both Thailand and Indonesia.

16/12/13 15.33


26 / INteriors&architecture

January-February 2014 Intern i

The cinnamon ‘lounge’ At Sungai Penuh, on the island of Sumatra, project in Indonesia, a training center Tyin Tegnestue Architects for the production of cinnamon. The result photos Pasi Aalto of a creative-poetic and socially sustainable text Antonella Boisi vision of design and construction

C_In638_R_26_31_tyin_architecture.indd 26

16/12/13 14.25


In terni

INteriors&architecture / 27

January-February 2014

The cen tral open p atio around which the whole composi tion ro tates , wi th the p anoramic view of the Kerinci L ake and , in the f ore ground , one of the w ater buff al oe s tha t transpor ted the trun ks from cinnamon tree s , used to ma ke the Y-shaped pil lars , casemen ts , door and windo w frame s. Toge ther wi th bric ks , cemen t and rivers tone , al l zero- km material s.

C_In638_R_26_31_tyin_architecture.indd 27

16/12/13 14.25


28 / INteriors&architecture

January-February 2014 Intern i

T

hey have done a number of projects in the poor, underdeveloped areas of Thailand, Burma, Haiti and Uganda. Young, with an original, courageous approach, Andreas G. Gjertsen and Yashar Hanstad, at the helm of the studio Tyin Tegnestue Architects since 2008 in the Norwegian city of Trondheim, have a humanistic and romantic outlook: their architecture is one of necessity, of fundamentals and social sustainability, involving local populations in the phases of design and construction. It is a viewpoint that has to do with carpentry more than with computers, with listening to people and places; or, as Johnny Plasma teaches, with a more empathetic way of transforming a habitat, which becomes an opportunity for mutual enrichment. They explain: “Human beings and quality of life are more important than the stylistic signature of a container. The project has a life of its own, which we cannot control. It brings marvelous errors along with it. We have developed a Toolbox containing the things needed to make useful, beautiful and necessary structures in any situation. It has been field tested in extreme conditions, and it can be shipped easily with any kind of transport. You don’t have to study too much before getting to work. But once you get started, you have to be very self-critical, repeating one question like a mantra: what are we doing?

C_In638_R_26_31_tyin_architecture.indd 28

16/12/13 14.25


In terni

The cinnamon ‘lounge’ / 29

January-February 2014

The en trance area of the Cassia C oop wi th, in the a trium, tw o durian tree s , around which five vol ume s in brick and w ood ha ve been buil t to con tain the differen t func tions of the training cen ter. Tw o pha se s of the cons truc tion: the brick and cemen t base (la ter polished ) and the framew ork of w ooden pil lars , almos t a s ymbolic tropic al f ore st. O n the f acing p age: overal l view of the simple bo x wi th shee t-metal roofing, the earmark of the archi tecture (600 m2) de signed b y Tyin Tegne stue Archi tects. W orksi te ske tch and planime tric done af ter cons truc tion.

C_In638_R_26_31_tyin_architecture.indd 29

Considering the fact that a poll in the UK reports that architects are the least happy with their work, while hairdressers are the most happy, we aim for immediate feedback.” That’s what happened in Indonesia, at the Cassia Coop training center for the production of cinnamon in Sungai Penuh, Kerinchi, Sumatra, sponsored by LINK Arkitektur, with a cost of about 30,000 euros, built in just three months (August-November 2011). “It all began with the visit of a French businessman, Patrick Barthelemy, to our studio in Trondheim. He sat down and told us a fascinating story, with a briefcase full of cinnamon. 85% of the world’s cinnamon comes from this zone in Sumatra. We designed nothing on our first trip. We just thought about how to make a hospitable training center that would convey an ethical standard of business management, with local workers and growers compensated in a fair way, and with a program of health care and education. All the ‘factories’ of Cassia Coop have to be safe, healthy and socially sustainable places to work. We won the trust of many people, including young international architecture students, 70 persons in all, who worked with us day after day. We used markers to report on the evolution of the project on a whiteboard, on a daily basis. All the drawings were done afterwards. When it was already built.

16/12/13 14.25


30 / INteriors&architecture

January-February 2014 In terni

The in terior of an office , f acing the raised mee ting area ou tside . O n the f acing p age , view of the sho wroom and , in the displa y frame , de tail of a cinnamon tree trunk . Al l the furnishings were made during cons truc tion, wi th the help of l oc al ar tis ans .

C_In638_R_26_31_tyin_architecture.indd 30

16/12/13 14.25


Intern i January-February 2014

The cinnamon ‘lounge’ / 31

Almost a paradox. This helped us to include as few details as possible in the design – just the essential things.” Actually the center is a simple box with a sheet-metal roof, brick walls, and casements, doors and window frames in cinnamon wood. At the center, an incisive rectangular ‘hole’ forms a patio, with two fruit trees, since the composition develops and rotates, also symbolically, around two durian trees. Zero-kilometer materials, obtained near the site, and locally crafted furnishings have gone into the concrete making of the work, which conveys the sensation of a successful osmosis with the environment and the spirit of the place. The wood, for example, from nearby cinnamon trees, was transported by eight water buffaloes and cut and assembled on the worksite. The design idea was thus translated into a construction formed by a system of light wooden Y-shaped pillars grafted onto a base of heavy bricks and cement. The main facade has a panoramic view of Mt. Kerinci, the highest volcano in Indonesia, and of the lake, while the back facade looks towards the forest of cinnamon trees. One important challenge was to create a naturally ventilated environment under the large surface of the roof, in an overall layout of 600 m2: five brick volumes with a small workshop at the center, classrooms, offices and a kitchen. The study of the thermal mass, the structure’s capacity to store heat, permitted the designers to achieve dynamic but controlled performance. “Another big challenge,” they say, “was that of standing up to the forces of nature, in a zone subject to frequent earthquakes.” The enclosure has already survived an earthquake of 5 degrees on the Richter scale, meaning that the construction system organized with a truly basic format, even in terms of materials, actually works.

C_In638_R_26_31_tyin_architecture.indd 31

16/12/13 14.25


January-February 2014 Intern i

32 / INsight INscape

Portable CosmoLoGY by Andrea Branzi

“ARCHITECTURE IS NO LONGER NECESSARY. The true job of the architect lies in REVEALING THE SPACE OF THE HUMAN MIND” Italo Rota writes in Cosmologia Portatile, where EVERYTHING IS RELATIVE AND FRAGMENTED by the “Big Bang of the Modern” that has disintegrated the alibi of functionalism, and that prompts readers to think deeply, rediscovering the primordial myths of their own continuously profaned being

2_C_In638_R_32_33_branzi.indd 32

17/12/13 13.16


Interni

INsight INscape / 33

January-February 2014

INsight On the se p age s , dra wings by Ital o Ro ta, taken fr om Cosmol ogia Por tatile .

F

ew books concentrate on ‘designing design’ instead of ‘design projects,’ looking at the field as a culture in evolution inside an evolving historical context. This indifference has continued for several decades, and the design culture of the 21st century moves along the trails left by an old heritage, without self-awareness, without understanding the deeper motivations that influence it and then scatter to the winds. The book by Italo Rota Cosmologia Portatile published by Quodlibet Abitare has a lucid introduction by Francesca La Rocca, a member of the school of criticism that has taken form in Naples around Patrizia Ranzo. The book includes, besides the writings, “drawings, maps, visions” traced by Italo Rota. Those who know the author appreciate his way of moving on an apparently discontinuous path, with bright flashes of intuition often followed by deep shadows of new generative materials, the result of omnivorous curiosity that never reaches the point of saturation and specialization, but expands like

2_C_In638_R_32_33_branzi.indd 33

the world of objects expands. Rota is a great collector, who gathers the infinite variety of the things of the world and of the civilization of objects: from Tibet to toys, books to science, relics of astronauts, military medals and any thing that shows traces of the work of human hands. A dandy who refines his image as the mirror of the infinite reverberations of the eccentricity of the world… Italo courageously confronts the central issue of our time: “Architecture is no longer necessary. The true job of the architect lies in revealing the space of the human mind.” A space where dreams, obsessions, nightmares, desires and projects coexist, projected onto and connected with the outside world, where the material and the immaterial coexist and nourish each other. This introspection of the dark space of the human mind as the central place of culture, not just of design, never strays into surrealism or psychoanalytic intimacy; instead, it puts us into contact with the infinite variants of the chaos that governs the universe.

In this book, Rota shows us the abyss of his own mind as a primordial territory, represented as that animated nativity scene shown at the Milan Triennale, at the time of the exhibition Kama, creating a landscape of dreamy symbols worthy of Hieronymus Bosch; a process of liberation from the tangles of the ego, projecting them outward while receiving them from the outside world. This extraordinary essay on today’s Portable Cosmology, where everything is relative and fragmented by the “Big Bang of the Modern” that has disintegrated the alibi of functionalism, forces readers to think deeply, rediscovering the primordial myths of their own continuously profaned being. A re-establishment that reminds us, in reverse, of the project of the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein for his sister Gretl, filling that metaphysical void with an unexpressed magmatic material, expanding and receding, which modernity has always avoided fathoming. In this plot, reality represents itself and, at the same time, “other than itself,” presence and absence. All this means living the project, giving a ‘temporary’ meaning to structures, fragments, materials. Just as in art everything renews itself and changes its sense, even space becomes formless, free of the ‘aphasia’ of functionalism, as everything finally becomes profoundly ‘human.’ It is no longer man at the center of the universe as the perfect measure of science, but instead his guts, his muscles, his endocrine secretions, i.e. that dark pit excluded from history and from glory. Rota’s essay turns like a great metaphor on the end of humanism seen as anthropomorphism of the world, becoming a humanism without form, similar to the elusive reality of life and death, overwhelmed by an evolution that has never ceased to move forward. A humanism that no longer seeks the ‘ideal man,’ but the frontiers of a new beauty.

17/12/13 13.16


34 / INsight INtoday

January-February 2014 Intern i

Domaine de boisBuchet by Olivia Cremascoli

C_In638_R_34_39_Boisbouchet.indd 34

17/12/13 15.35


Interni

INsight INtoday / 35

January-February 2014

HEAVEN FOR DESIGNERS and aspirants to that title, the refined, idyllic French estate welcomes, from June to September, a veritable who’s who of INTERNATIONAL DESIGN (since 1990, over 180 DESIGNERS AND ARCHITECTS of great renown) who for one week at a time teach young ‘apprentices’ to use their heads, hearts and hands

On the se p age s , fr om left: the cha tea u of Bois buchet with the final re sul t s of the w orksh op c onduc ted in 2010 by Moritz Walde meyer . Aerial view of the Do maine de Bois buchet (150 he ctare s). por trait by Alexander von Vege sa ck . T he cha tea u with the w ork crea ted by Augus t de l os R eye s during a w orksh op (2008) with Maar ten B aas .

C_In638_R_34_39_Boisbouchet.indd 35

A

t Lessac, a French town with a population of just 598, in the central region of Poitou-Charentes, over three hours from Paris by car, the very large – 150 hectares – yet concealed, isolated Domaine di Boisbuchet is a rural estate (cited in documents dating back to the 16th century) whose last owners were the noble Le Camus family, with a chateau (rebuilt in 1865) and about twenty buildings, both historic (restructured or now being renovated) and contemporary (including the pavilion created by Shigeru Ban, his first permanent work in Europe). The property was purchased in 1986 – in a state of abandon, “for a song” – by Alexander von Vegesack (born in 1945), who among many other roles has been the founder and director – from 1989 to 2010 – of the Vitra Design Museum of Weil am Rhein

(Germany), as well as a tireless traveler and collector of well-designed objects (“you simply fall in love with things,” he says), in a wide range of types (lights to furnishings, including a famous collection of Thonet chairs – most of which were sold to the Austrian state in order to purchase Boisbuchet – watches to cars, fabrics to tableware, carriages, saddles...), as seen in “Discovering Design. The Von Vegesack Collection,” the exhibition that made its debut in 2008 at the Pinacoteca Giovanni & Marella Agnelli in Turin, and is still touring Europe (bilingual catalogue published by Electa). This noble German gentleman has resided for two years now at his amazing estate in Lessac (countryside and woods, the Vienne River, a mill overlooking the waterway, a lake for swimming, wild horses and even two Baudet de Poitou donkeys,

17/12/13 15.35


January-February 2014 Interni

36 / INsight INtoday

On this page , fr om t op: buil t in ab out 1860, the exteri or of the depend ance of the Domaine de Bois buchet , which n ow c ont ains the kit chen, s ome r ooms with mul tiple beds , office s , a c onference r oom and Internet w orks tati ons . In the ima ge bel ow, the gal ler y inside the depend ance (p ar t of the f ormer s table s), fea turing Vitra furnishings , T honet chairs and , on the w al l , a w ork b y H umber t o & F erdinand o Campana . Bel ow, left , a moment fr om the w orksh op c onduc ted in 2009 b y the Campana Bro thers .

an ancient and rare breed that seem like part of the Von Vegesack collection), where Mathias Schwartz-Claus, curator of the Vitra Design Museum, organizes periodic exhibitions in the impressive chateau, and where from mid-June to mid-September young people from all over the world come and go – design lovers, of course, with plenty of dreams stored up in their computers. In effect Boisbuchet, also known as a “magical design retreat”, is famous for this: as a summer campus where 30 to 40 interdisciplinary workshops are organized every year (one week each, from Sunday to Saturday) on design, architecture and other creative disciplines, where since 1990 the tutors have included a myriad of big international names (just to mention a few: Toshiyuki Kita, Andrea Branzi, Michele De Lucchi, Ingo Maurer, Marcel Wanders, Maarten Baas, Yves Béhar, Atelier Oi, the Bouroullec brothers and the Campana brothers, Konstantin Grcic, Matali Crasset, Patrick Jouin, Arik Levy,

C_In638_R_34_39_Boisbouchet.indd 36

Jean-Marie Massaud, Ron Arad, Ross Lovegrove, Tom Dixon, Jasper Morrison, Peter Marigold, Tokujin Yoshioka, Barber Osgerby, Patricia Urquiola, Freitag, Oliviero Toscani). For the young students, a stay at Domaine de Boisbuchet is often an indelible experience, comparable to the sort of nostalgia known as ‘mal d’Afrique’: the idea of returning more than once is often mentioned, as written this year in his blog by the Quebecois-Parisian designer Samuel N. Bernier, a Boisbuchet veteran (last summer, thanks to a study grant from the Be Open Foundation, he took all the workshops, from June to September, a long stay on which he brought along two 3D printers). “The Domaine was exactly as I remembered, with its exotic trees, farm animals and Vitra furnishings.” Or, as the newcomer from Los Angeles Melanie Abrantes wrote in October, “It took a 13-hour flight to Paris, a 3-hour train ride to Poitiers, and a 2-hour bus ride to pretty much the middle of nowhere in France. But it had to have

been one of the most amazing places I have ever stayed at. Boisbuchet was an incredible experience. I met very talented people, and I am sure that in the future I will sign up again for some workshops!” As regular registered participants (the fee, which includes room and board, changes according to status: student or already practicing professional), or as volunteers who earn the right to take part by means of four weeks of labor (gardening, kitchen help, documentary photography, multilingual guides for visitors, etc.), young men and women cluster here, including a number of Italians fluent in English, and return every summer to Boisbuchet because it is a kind of fatal attraction. In effect it is very enjoyable, and I speak from firsthand experience: the particular nature of the Limousin hills is powerful and wild, a true inspiration for creativity. The architecture park, created in over twenty years thanks to the work of

17/12/13 15.35


Interni

January-February 2014

domaine de boisbuchet / 37

Par t of the archite cture park of the domaine de boisbuchet (150 he ctare s). F rom the t o p: the b amboo lake p avil l on by S imon Velez , 2001. le mane ge by Markus H einsdorff , 2007. the p aper p avil l on by S higeru Ban, 2001.

C_In638_R_34_39_Boisbouchet.indd 37

17/12/13 15.35


38 / INsight INtoday

January-February 2014 Interni

Par t of the archite cture park of domaine de boisbuchet (le ss ac, france) . F rom the t o p: the p yramid by Br端ckner & Br端ckner Architekten, 2007. the l og cabin by Br端ckner & Br端ckner Architekten, 2006.

C_In638_R_34_39_Boisbouchet.indd 38

17/12/13 15.35


Interni

domaine de boisbuchet / 39

January-February 2014

On this page , fr om t op: T he j apane se gue sthouse c ons truc ted in 1860 and offered a s a gift by t h e Japan es e komink o re search societ y. the smal l dome by Jörg S chlaich, 2006. the b amboo conference p avil on by S imon Velez , 2007.

the tutors and students, is quite astonishing (and leads to reflection on the relationship between nature, contemporary architecture and existing structures). The atmosphere is cosmopolitan and informal, enriching in both cultural and human terms. The little everyday rituals are pleasant, such as the forgotten sound of the gong that calls people to gather for breakfast, lunch, snacks and dinner, all together, on long tables and benches placed in a horseshoe arrangement, without divisions of rank (students and teachers) and even in the company of Alexander von Vegesack himself, who eats his meals with the group and clears the table afterwards with everyone else. A lesson in style that usually leaves Italians agape, accustomed as we are to the haughty posing of national ‘castes.’ To get back to the teaching, which is the most important and perhaps the best known feature of Boisbuchet, the main goal of the workshops

C_In638_R_34_39_Boisbouchet.indd 39

(practice, theory, discussion, presentation of results on the day prior to departure) is to stimulate creativity, to promote ‘alternative’ thought modes, to experiment with different techniques and materials, to understand the importance of different processes of production/ realization of a work. The interdisciplinary workshops, covering a very wide range of areas, approach the question of design from many different vantage points, based on the special capabilities of each individual tutor: industrial design, product design, interior design, furniture design, textile design, glass & porcelain design, fashion & jewelry design, food design, sound design, exhibition design, design & entrepreneurship, packaging, art direction... Apart from the period of dense population in the summer (about 100 beds are available for those who attend the workshops), during the rest of the year the Domaine is inhabited by the owner

and his permanent staff, and partially rented out to private clients and companies – like Hermès, for example – for meetings and presentations (favorite spots include the barn of about 300 square meters and the historic mill on the river, restored by the Kiev Polytechnic after the floods of 1993, and transformed into a café with a sunny terrace and Vitra furnishings). Given the size of area, sooner or later we hope Boisbuchet will also have outdoor installations, somewhere between ars topiaria and contemporary art, to bring alive an itinerary that could form the counterpart of the abovementioned architecture park. For a clearer idea of the estate and its multiple possibilities, readers can leaf through the beautiful illustrated book Domaine de Boisbuchet, published by Cireca/Boisbuchet and on sale at the estate (Domaine de Boisbuchet, 16500 Lessac, www.boisbuchet.org, info@boisbuchet.org, tel. 0033 (0) 5 45 89 6700).

17/12/13 15.35


January-February 2014 In terni

40 / INdesign INproject

60

The se cond genera tion of the Zano tta f amil y. C l ockwise from top : F rance sc a, ar t dire ctor; Mar tino , pre siden t; Ele onora , ar t dire ctor. L ef t: Aurelio , the f ounder of the comp any , who p assed aw ay in 1991.

years of icons

In 1954 Aurelio Zanotta founded the company that bears his name, which was to become a major player in the history of Italian design. His children Martino, Eleonora and Francesca, who now run the company, take stock of its career of innovation and future challenges edited by Maddalena Padovani

2_C_In638_R_40_45_zanotta.indd 40

“T

o produce profits and culture at the same time”: this is how Aurelio Zanotta, founder of the eponymous firm, explained the secret of its success, convinced that “the furniture industry has to make an effort to forecast future needs, not just to satisfy the passive demand of its public.” Just scan the selection of products shown on these pages, and you can understand how experimentation with new models of living has been a clear part of the entire history of the brand, which celebrates its 60th birthday this year. The adventure, in fact, began in 1954, in Brianza, when Aurelio Zanotta founded his company, initially to make upholstered furnishings. He soon came into contact with the architectdesigners of the first generation: the Castiglioni brothers, Gae Aulenti, De Pas D’Urbino Lomazzi, Ettore Sottsass, Marco Zanuso, Joe Colombo, Enzo Mari. With the Sacco chair designed by Gatti, Paolini and Teodoro, the company made a name for itself towards the end of the Sixties as the most ‘radical’ company in the Italian furniture industry. In effect, Zanotta’s products have always “stood out from the rest” and demonstrated that an object can take on cultural meaning thanks to the expressive qualities of the materials and the production technology, not just through innovative image.

It is impossible, in the catalogues of other brands, to find such a quantity of icons, like those the company from Nova Milanese has managed to develop year after year, decade after decade, first thanks to its enlightened founder, who passed away in 1991, and then under the guidance of his three children, Martino, Eleonora and Francesca, respectively president and art directors today. We asked them to retrace the main steps of an entrepreneurial history with solid roots in the past, and a renewed spirit of experimentation for the future. What have been the fundamental phases of the history of Zanotta, reflecting the evolution of the know-how and culture of our country? Eleonora: “Zanotta was founded in 1954, in a historical period dominated by the desire for renewal. The brilliant insight of Aurelio Zanotta was to perceive the fundamental node of the problem of ‘design-production,’ namely how to produce profits while also producing culture. The role of industry could be more incisive if, through production, it also offered the public tools for cultural growth. The 1950s and 1960s were a period of intense creativity and experimentation, as demonstrated by the innumerable works of the Castiglioni brothers, or the projects of Marco

20/12/13 19.36


Interni

INdesign INproject / 41

January-February 2014

’54-’63 ’64-’73 On this page: Zano t ta pr oduc t s fr om the c ate g orie s of his t oric al ic ons and l ongsel lers . cl ockwise fr om the t op: T hr ow -Aw ay (1965), the s of a with s truc ture in exp anded p ol yurethane , de signed b y W il lie L andel s; by Achil le & Pier G iac omo Castigli oni, Mezzadr o (1957), the s t ool with a chr omium-pla ted steel le g, a sea t painted in different c ol ors , and a bee ch b ase; S acc o (1968), the ana t omic al chair de signed b y G at ti, Paolini, T eodor o, wh ose c over c ont ains high-re sis tance p ol ystyrene pel let s; Quaderna (1970) , table with h ol l ow -c ore w ood struc ture clad in Print lamina te , screen-printed with bla ck che cks , de signed b y S upers tudi o.

2_C_In638_R_40_45_zanotta.indd 41

Zanuso, and the revolutionary Sacco and Blow seats. In the 1970s creativity was increasingly joined by the desire to experiment with different or new materials, like laminate for the Quaderna table series by Superstudio, taking a table with an elementary form into the avant-garde. The examples continue with the Sciangai in 1973 by De Pas, D’Urbino, Lomazzi, who gave an unconventional form to a coat rack through intelligent use of technique, producing an ironic, amusing object; or the Cumano table by Castiglioni from 1978, where the memory of form is wed to technology. In the 1980s the pursuit of technological innovation progressed, keeping pace with typological novelty, as demonstrated by the Servi family or the Joy shelf-unit from 1989 by Castiglioni. These are all examples of products that represented a typological response to the changing conditions of life, forecasting future needs.

Innovations that would last in time. In the 2000s the technological experimentation continued, with products like Fly, in carbon fiber, and Veryround, with 3D laser cutting, or with products in Cristalplant®, a new material with unusual expressive and formal possibilities, all the way to the Lungometraggio table series in acrylic resin-based composite, making lengths of up to 6 meters possible, which would otherwise have been unthinkable. These are all objects whose subversive impact has astonished people and triggered emotions, meaningful examples of how industry can change conventions of living, grasping stimuli from culture and experimentation done outside the traditional logic of the market. These are stories of products that narrate the know-how of our company, the ability to give form to the sketches of designers, making them into concrete products through skillful use of

20/12/13 19.36


January-February 2014 Interni

42 / INdesign INproject

’74-’83 constructive techniques. To sum up the evolution of Zanotta in a few key words, in chronological order: experimentation and avant-garde, technological innovation and typological-formal innovation. All under one main heading: creativity.” Behind the scenes of an icon. Are there any family anecdotes that tell an ‘unofficial’ history of certain projects? Eleonora: “Sacco is a true icon. Gatti, Paolini and Teodoro, in 1968, showed this revolutionary ‘anatomical’ armchair to Aurelio Zanotta, with a transparent PVC cover, based on the ‘pneu’ structures of that period. The filler of polystyrene pellets that shift upward when you sit down suggested the functional form of a ‘sack’ to which a handle was attached, in the first prototype, to make it easier to move the chair. This original transparent version, with an experimental, avant-garde character, was then modified in a more industrial

2_C_In638_R_40_45_zanotta.indd 42

variation, with an opaque cover and without the handle, which perhaps made the object a little too nomadic. Aurelio Zanotta, in this way, while sticking with a strong, innovative idea, made it into more of a ‘product,’ something consumers could more easily accept. This genesis sheds light on the ability of a brilliant, enlightened industrialist, who was able to transform an experimental object that would be hard to sell into a product that conserves its original innovative force, but has also managed to enter homes all over the world, becoming a bestseller.” The innovation and technological research of Zanotta have made a fundamental contribution to the history of design, becoming the identifying traits of the brand. What are the most important chapters in this history? Francesca: “The distinctive trait of the technological research of Zanotta is the result of the interpretation of techniques and materials from

Other his t oric ic ons and l ongsel lers of the brand . C l ockwise fr om the t op: S ciangai (1973) , by De Pas , D’Urbin o, Lomazzi, f old able c oat ra ck with bee ch s tr uct ure; C ele stina (1978) , by Marc o Z an us o, f olding chair with s tainle ss s teel str uct ure , sea t and b ack in nyl on c overed with c owhide; S er vomut o (1974), by Achil le & Pier G iac omo Castigli oni, side table with p ol ypr opylene base and s teel post; Cu man o (1978), by Achil le Castigli oni, f olding table with str uct ure and t op in s teel .

20/12/13 19.36


In terni

60 years of icons / 43

January-February 2014

’84-’93 The his toric icons of the de cade 1984-1993. Abo ve , Tonie tta (1985, al so a l ongsel ler) , the chair b y Enz o Mari wi th s truc ture in polished al u miniu m al l oy, sea t and b ack co vered in co whide or p ain ted nyl on. C en ter, Macaone (1985) , the table bel onging to “edizioni C ol le ction” de signed b y Ale ss andro Mendini wi th top in M DF and le gs in rigid pol yure thane wi th s teel struc ture p ain ted in differen t col ors . Top, O nd a (1985), by De Pas , D’U rbino , L o mazzi, monobl ock sof a wi th suppor t struc ture in s tainle ss s teel tubing, fil led wi th ther mobonded pol ye ster fiber and pol yure thane . R igh t, Joy (1989), by Achil le Castiglioni, book case wi th ro tating shel ve s in M DF , suppor t join ts in s teel or al u miniu m.

2_C_In638_R_40_45_zanotta.indd 43

industrial sectors other than that of furnishings. In some cases we are looking at a true reworking of relatively old techniques, reutilized in a complete way, while in other instances certain already familiar materials take on innovative roles in the product. There are many examples of this process, starting with the Sacco chair, or the Marcuso table that uses the technique of gluing of the attachments of automobile deflectors to fasten the legs of the table to the glass top. To continue, at the start of the Seventies, with the unprecedented application, in this sector, of velcro with which we created the first truly removable covers for upholstered furniture. In the Throw-Away sofa, on the other hand, the massive use of expanded polyurethane destructured the object, reducing frame assembly time by about 80%. And we should also mention the Blow armchair, on the wave of the first experiments with

inflatable objects, which was the first inflatable armchair, a model that has been widely copied every since. Which brings us to the present: the use of Technogel, a material originally patented by Bayer for medical purposes, has made it possible to create the Soft chaise longue, now in the collections of some of the world’s most important museums.” Zanotta has made the design-industry relationship into a strong point. How is this collaboration developed? Eleonora: “The charisma and personality of the young designers of the 1950s and 1960s were a result of the particular historical period, when the main goal was overall reconstruction of a new, better world. The daring and enthusiasm of that lively period, full of optimism, was fertile ground for creativity, leading to revolutionary, innovative results in design that probably cannot ever be repeated. Today I notice that the focus of young

20/12/13 19.36


January-February 2014 Interni

44 / INdesign INproject

’94-’03 designers is not so much on experimentation, the dominant character of the past, as on concreteness. We concentrate on projects, more than on choosing designers, trying to find the original proposals that present themselves, because the Zanotta continues to be first of all a catalogue of products. This is why we have no prejudices, and we are truly open to all ideas, from everyone: discovering new talents is particularly satisfying. The Zanotta repertoire has always been marked by a heterogeneity that reflects the different personalities of the designers, and this particular character belongs to the historic design companies, where the culture of the designer interacts with the culture of the businessman. This dialogue is what leads to the results. The different personalities of figures often having very different design philosophies generate aspects that may seem to be distant from each other, or even contradictory,

2_C_In638_R_40_45_zanotta.indd 44

but only on the surface: there is also a coherent logic that links all the choices. The leitmotiv of Zanotta’s production is to never lose sight of the poetic qualities products must have, that hard-to-define ‘something’ that goes beyond functional and commercial considerations. This is what makes Zanotta unique: this ‘leap of standards’ that always tries to go beyond the expectations of the client and the market.” Zanotta and communication: how has the image of the brand been transformed over the years? Martino: “In the past all the communication activities focused on the product. Our sector is product-oriented, by tradition. The products had to define the company, communicating its character, advertising themselves, so to speak. In recent years the rules have changed: if you make a good product but you do not distribute it and support it with

Abo ve , the Alf a sof a (1999, a be st sel ler) , de signed b y Emaf Proget ti: feet and s truc ture in s teel , el astic bel ting, thermobonded pol ye ster fiber and pol yureth ane fil ler. L eft , F l y (2002, re se arch and ex periment ation) , by Mark R obson, se at with tr ans parent co ated c arbon fiber struc ture . t o p, L ia (1998, be st sel ler/inno vation) , by R ober t o Barbieri, ch air with al uminium al l oy struc ture , se at and b ack padded with pol yureth ane .

20/12/13 19.37


Interni

60 years of icons / 45

January-February 2014

’04-’14 cl ockwise from the t op : Ver yround (2006, re search and experiment ation) , the sea t by L ouise Campbel l with s truc ture in 3 D la ser-cut steel , produced in an edition of nine signed and numbered pie ce s , in the p ainted version with a different col or; Eva (2013, new entrie s), the chair b y O ra Ït o with le gs in na tural oak , steel struc ture , cha ssis in pol yurethane , remo vable co ver, sea t padded with flexible pol yurethane; T od (2005, be st sel ler) , by T odd Bra cher, table with pol yprop ylene struc ture , gl oss y la cquer finish in the c atal ogue col ors; Blanco (2010 , inno vation/new ma terial s), the table b y Jacopo Zibardi with b ase and t op in C ris talplant®; W il liam (2010 , be st sel ler) , by Damian W il liamson, monobl ock sof a with s teel struc ture , ela stic bel ting and thermobonded pol ye ster fiber and pol yurethane fil ler.

2_C_In638_R_40_45_zanotta.indd 45

suitable communication, also in terms of brand values, it will very probably not achieve the level of success it deserves.” Which creative talents have contributed to the brand’s image? Martino: “Undoubtedly all the designers who have created products or displays. And, since the 1960s, also great creative talents from the world of communication in our sector: from the graphic designer Michele Provinciali to photographers like Aldo Ballo and Ugo Mulas. This tradition of research, also in graphics and photography, is still one of the distinctive features of Zanotta.” In your experience, how has our way of living changed over the last 60 years? And what signals of evolution do you see for the future? Francesca: “One of the spaces of the home that has changed most is the living room. The sofa,

which is its protagonist, continues to take on different configurations, with respect to the traditional 2 or 3-seat monoblock. Longer, deeper and lower seats, corner and terminal compositions, often without backs, that are transformed into islands and large hassocks, point to different ways of using the divan, which has to offer the possibility of a more informal way of living. Individual and independent furnishings have taken the place of accessorized walls, and are destined to become important, characteristic pieces. So the leading companies in the sector are working to respond to the needs of consumers that are increasingly well-informed and demanding, expressing a clear desire for personalization of their habitat. Customer service and product quality, in fact, will be the fundamental requirements, to adapt to the rapid changes happening on the market.”

20/12/13 19.37


January-February 2014 Interni

46 / INdesign Crossover

BenTLeY FInDs a Home by Laura Ragazzola

An exceptional partnership connects the historic British automaker to Luxury Living Group, which has created the exclusive Bentley Home collection, with an accent on fine craftsmanship and design made in Italy. The protagonists tell the story

On the f acing p age , Pre sident Alber t o Vigna tel li ph ot ographed in his office a t Palazz o Orsi Mangel li, the new headqu ar ters of the gr oup in Forlì. Above, the R ugb y chair fr om the Bentley Home c ol le cti on: the en vel oping f or m is crea ted by the cur vature of the cha ssis made with fine briar. T he l og o is e mbr oidered on the b ack .

C_In638_R_46_51_Vignatelli.indd 46

A

lberto Vignatelli, president of Luxury Living, has wagered (strategically, once again) on a successful brand: Bentley, in spite of the steep downturn of the automotive market, is going through a positive phase, in fact. In 2012 the company reported overall sales that rose by 22%, and in the collective imagination Bentley has pushed aside its British competitor Aston Martin, putting agent 007 behind the wheel of a sparkling

Bentley Continental (as Bond’s creator, Ian Fleming, had imagined from the start). So Alberto Vignatelli, born in Friuli but closely tied to the Romagna region since his early days as an entrepreneur (his headquarters is in Forlì, in a 17th-century palace), has found fertile ground in the ‘world of Bentley’ to create a new home collection, calling in the architect Carlo Colombo to bring to life the inimitable British style of Bentley’s creations. Interni met with Vignatelli and Colombo to talk about this new adventure. You were one of the first to create a liaison between fashion and furnishings. How are you able to ‘cross’ such different worlds, while conserving their specificities? AV: First of all, I know about design and its history. From the start of my activity, back in the 1970s, I have worked in close contact with designers of the caliber of Mario Bellini, Gaetano Pesce, Carlo Urbinati, Fabio Lenci, just to name a few. They all came to me, in Forlì, where they found the only R+D Center in Italy on the front line of the technology of expanded polyurethane and Dacron: here, they transformed their ideas into prototypes that later became icons of design made in Italy: sofas like the Coronado by Cassina or the Bambole by B&B Italia took their first steps right

17/12/13 17.39


Intern i January-February 2014

C_In638_R_46_51_Vignatelli.indd 47

INdesign Crossover / 47

17/12/13 17.39


January-February 2014 In terni

48 / INdesign Crossover

To the side , the archi tect Carl o C ol ombo , crea tor of the new Bentley Home col le ction. Bel o w, from top to bo ttom, several pie ce s: tw o H arl o w coffee table s , wi th lea ther tops; the S herbourne cabine t in the l o w version wi th fron ts in Burr W alnu t briar; the R ichmond chaise l ongue wi th ex ternal struc ture clad in quil ted lea ther (al so in briar) .

here. I approached the world of fashion towards the end of the 1980s, when I met the Fendi sisters: Club House Italia had already been started, with its well-structured brand, and an already international range. The world market was gradually changing: ‘furniture design’ was being joined by ‘furniture decoration’ and the simplest way to spread home decor, for me, was to develop a new decor philosophy: to offer a complete range of furniture, a 360-degree perspective on interiors, capable of creating the sense of a truly unique and special, refined and elegant home. A tailor-made place, just like the construction of a haute couture dress, also thanks to extreme attention to craftsmanship,

C_In638_R_46_51_Vignatelli.indd 48

details, materials. The result was Fendi Casa, the first home collection in the history of design. Other brands then followed, like Kenzo, and in a few months we will be seeing the involvement of another historic Italian “maison” – but the name is still top secret. News has appeared, though, about the Bentley Home collection, presented in Paris in January. From fashion to the world of luxury cars… AV: The passage happened because we were looking for a new lifestyle, and the world of Bentley, with its history of elegance and great craftsmanship, seemed perfect for a new and original home collection. For over 90 years Bentley has produced car interiors of great quality, some of the best in the world (it’s no coincidence that the British royal family uses their cars): with the Bentley Home collection we are addressing everyone who appreciates this kind of distinctive quality. This is a complete range of furnishings –

17/12/13 17.39


Interni

January-February 2014

bentley finds a home / 49

On this p age , image s of the craft smen a t w ork in the his t oric Bentley plant at C rewe , England . In p ar ticular, the hand s tit ching of the s teering wheel c overed in s oft lea ther (smal l ph ot os) and the cut ting of a pre ci ous sheet of briar.

from the living area to the bedroom, and also the office – which offers a balanced mixture of design and decoration, contemporary style and tradition. In Paris, at Maison&Objet, we have furnished an entire house with items from the new collection, including the garden and parking area (where, naturally, we put a Bentley). As an architect, how does it feel to be an ‘interiors car designer’? CC: I was thrilled when I entered the historic Bentley factory, in Crewe, and visited the museum with all the historic models. The home collection is the result of close contact with the British automaker, especially with the engineers in the Research Center, and precisely from this constant contact I have understood how many things these two worlds have in common. Starting with the materials, refined and precious, all the way to the methods of working. But also the aerodynamic lines of the most prestigious models can become a source of inspiration for domestic design: the Richmond sofa, for example, reflects the curve of the dashboard, including the briar.

C_In638_R_46_51_Vignatelli.indd 49

17/12/13 17.39


January-February 2014 Interni

50 / INdesign Crossover

Abo ve , cl ockwise , the Luxur y Living sho wroom in N ew York; the entr ance t o the Mil ane se space; the 17th-centur y f acade of Pal azz o O rsi Mangel li, he adqu ar ters of the comp an y in F orlì; the sho wroom in Paris . Bel o w, the G eorge bed from the new F endi Cas a col le ction: sumptuous vol ume s and an impre ssive he adbo ard w orked by h and with irre gul ar squ are mo tif s.

The British style of a successful brand like Bentley, then, meets with the Italian style of a company founded and developed in the heart of Romagna. Can those two worlds really communicate with each other? AV: Of course, and the common language is crafts. What people recognize, and what we can successfully export on an international scale, is precisely our know-how, our skill in making high-quality products… CC: …and, I might add, our creativity, the force of our ideas, our inspiration. In short, design made in Italy, which has made us famous all over the world. Luxury Living is a presence in many countries now: lately, for example, you opened a new showroom in New York, featuring the Fendi Casa, Bentley Home and Heritage collections. Is internationalization the true vocation of your company? AV: Absolutely yes. For over ten years we have been in great demand in Eastern Europe, and especially in Russia, but today we are also famous overseas: the countries where we have the most

C_In638_R_46_51_Vignatelli.indd 50

success are China, with 13 points of sale, and America, where we have reinforced the distribution network. We also do well in the Gulf States. At Doha, in Qatar, for example, we will soon open a Luxury Living showroom of 1500 square meters. And in the United Arab Emirates, at Ras Al Khaimah, we are making – again with design

by Arch. Colombo - 150 single-family homes, all ecosustainable units, completely furnished with our collections. So internazionalization and the encounter between different worlds and cultures: is this the formula to beat the crisis? AV: There’s no denying that we are going through a tough period, but the opportunities are there if you know how to grab them. Also by exploring and interpreting the demand that comes from growing markets, different from ours. Of course you need to have the skills to adapt, and lots of creativity. But that’s no problem for Italian entrepreneurs and designers.

17/12/13 17.39


Interni

bentley finds a home / 51

January-February 2014

Left , the Chiara Lamp by Fendi C as a, with brushed bra ss finish and f abri c shade in anthra cite gra y ab aca fiber. R ight , det ails of the crafting of furnishings f or F endi C as a, alterna ted with produ ct s from the new co llection: from the t op, the S mith ha sso cks with ve lvet covering in soft hue s t o combine traditiona l and contemporar y sty le; the love sea t from the S abrina line , combining maximum comf or t with tailor-made w orkmanship ; the T revi div an, in the new se ctiona l version, enhan ced b y a tab lea u crafted with tiny w oven ribbons: here the covering is in i ce-co lor melange f abri c.

C_In638_R_46_51_Vignatelli.indd 51

17/12/13 17.39


52 / INdesign Crossover

January-February 2014 Interni

The transversal method Maurizio Galante and Tal Lancman, fashion and product designers, nimbly cross disciplines and fields of knowledge, reconciling the conceptual with the playful and the fabulous by Cristina Morozzi A ceiling bris tling with col ored pencil s is the surprising ins tal l ation at the É cole de l a Ch ambre Syndic ale de l a Couture Parisienne during the f ashion sho w “Maurizio Ga l ante h aute couture ” in Janu ar y 2012. Arr anged on the fl oor, Tat t oo Cactus h assocks in soft pol yureth ane , co vered with te chnic al f abric printed with a cactus mo tif . Edition b y Cerruti B aleri .

C_In638_R_52_55_galante.indd 52

16/12/13 15.13


In terni

INdesign Crossover / 53

January-February 2014

To the side: a dre ss composed of 450 la yers of silk organza , in seven chroma tic shade s , from the Maurizio G alan te ha u te cou ture col le ction, 2009. Bel o w: por trai t of Tal L ancman (lef t) and Maurizio G alan te.

T

he approach to the Paris-based studio Interware, of Maurizio Galante and Tal Lancman, is a dialogue for two voices that chase each other and overlap to narrate the variegated mosaic of a duet of fashion and design. The start of the partnership between Maurizio, Italian, a student of Roberto Capucci, the visionary high fashion tailor (first show on the official Parisian haute couture calendar in 1992) and Tal, Israeli, a designer and trends expert, was in 2002. In 2003 they created the consulting firm Interware, active in the fields of fashion, product design and set design. Their solid alliance in life and work makes it hard to tell who has contributed what, though Maurizio has a clear talent for work with the hands, a taste for virtuoso craftsmanship that is the distinctive feature of his high fashion collections. They say their work is like ping-pong, between different forms of expertise. They gain nourishment from many sources and trigger constant transfers, shuffling the cards of disciplines. They make hybrids and mixtures with total freedom, grabbing stimuli from many different areas to create surprises and to transmit the emotions behind their creations, beyond current trends, always balanced between past and future, sentiment and technique. Together, they have invented a new vocabulary, rich and erudite, hard to classify according to traditional parameters, independent of the grammar of design and fashion,

C_In638_R_52_55_galante.indd 53

16/12/13 15.13


54 / INdesign Crossover

January-February 2014 Interni

Cl o ckwise from upper left: de sign sket che s f or the exhibition Lost in P aris , Paris , S eptember 2013. Designed b y Maurizio G alante and Tal L an cman, t ogether with o ther de signers , the obje ct s ha ve been sele cted t o en coura ge t ouris t s t o ‘get l os t in Paris ’ and t o obser ve the city from ano ther perspe ctive . L ol lipop in the f orm of the T our Eiffel , crea ted f or the exhibition Lost in P aris . F or the exhibition Lost in P aris G alante & L an cman ha ve al so invented a new col or, ‘Couleur de Paris ’, like tha t of the city ’s s t one s. It wil l no w be come par t of the f amous Pant one catal ogue . Danae suspension lamp made with transp arent pla sti c bags fil led with w ater and air. Edizioni Boffi B agno , Paris . Image of the insep arable chairs made f or the exhibition Lost in P aris , at Pla ce du T ro cadero , S eptember 2013.

C_In638_R_52_55_galante.indd 54

and they have applied it in a wide range of areas, trying to create emotions through clothing, objects and installations. Maurizio says that for him fashion is above all communication: “The garment,” he insists, “has to narrate the pleasure of dressing, offering dreams to the person who wears it. The construction of haute couture is a work of architecture to wear on the body, accompanying the body, constructing a magical aura around it. Embroidery, pleats and other skills of the dressmaker,” he continues, “are the tools we use to create this magic, along with a culture based on memories and futuristic visions. Accessories and furnishings have a soul that reveals itself in the relationship with users. My dresses are objects, with their own independent aesthetic, ready to be interpreted and enhanced by the person who wears them. Garments, like objects, come to life in relation to people.” Maurizio and Tal are 360-degree designers. For them, the project is a total idea that takes on different versions in different productions,

16/12/13 15.13


Interni

The transversal method / 55

January-February 2014

always with the same approach based on an ability to master drawing and to manipulate material; on the capacity to control the whole while applying painstaking attention to detail, thanks to a gaze that surveys and penetrates, seeing the overall effect but also the smallest particulars. The surprise effect in many of the creations comes from an ability to make contrasts coexist, nimbly crossing disciplines, reconciling the conceptual with the playful and the fabulous, grasped with intelligent irony. They borrow tricks from couture to tell stories in the design and decoration of spaces; they construct fashion with an architectural approach, making tailoring into a feat of structural prowess. In the recent exhibition Lost in Paris (Paris, Lieu du design, September 2013), organized by Lieu du design in collaboration with the Paris Ile-de-France Regional Tourism Office, with the support of the City of Paris, they presented an exemplary array of crossovers. Like eternal tourists, since they are foreigners in France, though adoptive Parisians at this point, they

C_In638_R_52_55_galante.indd 55

set the goal of helping tourists, and Parisians as well, discover what is there before their eyes every day yet somehow escapes their attention. “We have created, also with the help of other designers, a universe made of small objects, both useful and useless, that encourage you to get lost in the city: from the baguette tote to the lollipop in the form of the Tour Eiffel, the pair of inseparable chairs to put in exceptional places to the tandem version of the Vélib’ (the city’s bicycle sharing service).” For the opening, in collaboration with the Parisian markets, they set up a buffet of typical foods in the gallery courtyard, arranged on stalls with red and white striped awnings. The exhibition Lost in Paris, enhanced by a theatrical all-red setting, can be seen as an effective synthesis of their creative method. “Design,” they say, “has to get away from specialization and become part of everyday life. Its mission is to accompany us in every moment of life with object-talismans, capable of speaking an honest, emotional language even children can understand.”

Cl o ckwise from upper left: F lir t dining room, with table and chairs in p ainted and perf ora ted met al , embroidered with sili cone s trings . T he plea ted cur tain is made with te chni cal f abri c. Edition b y Mussi . Aura chair with flexible b ack , covered in te chni cal ss beads and tube s , f abri c embroidered with gla like garment s from the ha ute couture col le ctions . Edition b y Cerruti B aleri . Col le ct ors C abinet crea ted f or the exhibition Planet Manga at Centre Pompidou in Paris in 2012. Stru cture is in p ainted w ood , interior lined in vel vet , plea ted sliding cur tains in te chni cal 12 pie ces f abri c, made b y hand . A limited edition of by Cerruti B aleri .

16/12/13 15.13


56 / Indesign Crossover

January-February 2014 Intern i

Fashion and Design live in different worlds. While domestic projects thrive on semantic density, fashion loves speed. They are saying different things even when they try to speak the same language

F/D by Stefano Caggiano

D

esign works on pieces with patience, cultivating semantic density. Fashion runs on speed, offering glimpses of its operation only in its wake, absorbing and rejecting signs, alternating the anorexic or bulimic behavior not coincidentally often associated with models, those alien bearers of an all-too-perfect beauty and its merciless advance. To get good results, design should be left to rise, like leavened bread. Fashion has to boil, seething away from definitions, escaping the pull of gravity of meaning. The game of fashion is sophisticated, toxic and fascinating, going beyond the necessities of the body, immersing it in the fatuity of raiment. Where design seeks consistency, fashion feeds on contradictions, so much so that even when they seem to be using the same signs, fashion and design are actually speaking very different languages and saying very different things. The sign they seem to share is not, therefore, a moment of convergence, but a point of singularity in which the fashion universe and the design universe bounce off each other, like the balls on a pool table.

3_C_In638_R_56_61_design_fashion.indd 56

Visual Parts

What unites the spring/summer 2014 “Glam Punch!� collection by Co|te, the brand founded by Francesco Ferrari and Tomaso Anfossi, and the Pill sofa designed by Alexander Lotersztain for Derlot Editions, is the additive logic of the composition, conceived to underline juxtaposition rather than synthesis of parts. Both garment and object rest their components on each other with colorful softness, even in voluminous anatomies like upholstered pieces.

16/12/13 17.11


Intern i January-February 2014

Cubism without cubes

The Christian Dior Resort 2014 dresses and the Stock collection by Giorgia Zanellato for Galleria Luisa Delle Piane share a sense of open composition, based on the combination of elements that are not amalgamated under a unifying aesthetic skin, but display the sense of overlap and combination in a sensitive way, in a sort of Cubist breakdown free of the typical severity of that artistic style, leaning instead towards light, luminous defragmentation that leaves plexiglas sheets and fabric parts in a state of open, airy suspension.

3_C_In638_R_56_61_design_fashion.indd 57

INdesign Crossover / 57

Phase interference

Internet is in the air, connectivity is everywhere, files live on ‘clouds’: the space we live in is crossed by showers of electromagnetic waves with which we interact in an increasingly intense way. Phase interference thus becomes an aesthetic that deserves expression, both in the case of design, with the Orion table designed by Jarrod Lim for Bonaldo, and in the case of fashion, with a spring/summer garment by Anthropologie, both of which weave the material with its opposite, making the clothing and the object appear in filigree.

16/12/13 17.11


58 / Indesign Crossover

Smooth fragile spotted

The shades of the Fragiles lamps by Davide G. Aquini are made by applying cement and stucco to the surface of a balloon, which deflates after the material has set. The resulting forms combine smooth, polished surfaces and rough, spotty ones, as in a dress from the fall/winter 2012/13 collection by Ann-Sofie Back, also made by juxtaposing different materials that react to each other, granting a sense of thickness to two-dimensional surfaces.

3_C_In638_R_56_61_design_fashion.indd 58

January-February 2014 Intern i

The pursuit of invisibility

The Blur sofa by Marc Thorpe for Moroso and the OmbrĂŠ leggings of the brand BZR stand out for a dissolving chromatic motif that fades the product into the visual poetry of disappearance. Moroso, in particular, achieves this effect thanks to a fabric produced by the Dutch company Innofa, which works on multiple layers of material to make different chromatic intervals. The twisting of the upholstered volume generates an evocative uncertainty about the size of the product, which seems to dissolve and vanish.

16/12/13 17.11


Intern i January-February 2014

Open structures

While the logic of fashion is the opposite of that of design, dressing design consists of the application of design culture to garments. Comparing certain pieces from the fall/winter 2012/13 collection of Fabric Division, an emerging brand founded by Enrico Assirelli and Linda Crivellari, with the Face Value tables by Earnest Studio, we can seen the ability with which the young fashion design duo has conceived of the form of the garment as an object-like structure, almost a furnishing element whose parts have been skillfully broken down and ‘shifted’ to make a hybrid of fashion and dressing design. Composed of three parts in different materials, including Corian, marble, MDF and brass, the Face Value tables can be freely mixed to obtain solutions that are similar but diversified.

3_C_In638_R_56_61_design_fashion.indd 59

F/D / 59

Interaction of details

The garments of the fall/winter 2012/13 “Complex Overlay” collection by Vladimir Karaleev and the seats of the Yi collection designed by Michael Young for Eoq both exploit the measured interaction of details, generating a tactful dialogue and soft balance between different materials. The composition, though not in pursuit of blending synthesis, finds a serene harmony among the parts, reduced in number to further mute the semiotic background noise. The seating by Michael Young applies the strategy of the Hong Kong-based brand aimed at underlining the quality of Asian production. The use of ash wood has made it possible to create a deep back that slides in an extremely clean way as far as the front legs. Vladimir Karaleev concentrates on the interaction of materials, using gradual overlaps of fabrics and partially visible details to play with levels that are concealed or openly glimpsed.

16/12/13 17.12


60 / Indesign Crossover

Black storks

Yet another approach to open composition, this time with a more severe, controlled structure, also underlined by forceful colors, emerges in a comparison between the #11 unisex haute couture collection of Rad Hourani and the Traffic seat by Konstantin Grcic for Magis, where square cushions rest on a structure of steel rod stilts that seem to ‘rhyme’ with the stork-like legs of a model. Rad Hourani is the first designer in the history of fashion to be officially invited by the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture of Paris to design a unisex collection; Traffic, on the other hand, is the first upholstered furniture collection by Magis. “The simplicity of its concept,” Grcic explains, “gives the product a pleasing, natural feel, while the refinement of the details and the careful working of the proportion convey a sense of elegance.”

3_C_In638_R_56_61_design_fashion.indd 60

January-February 2014 Intern i

Death becomes you

The skull is now a veritable ‘meme’, i.e. a motif replicated in a viral manner in different media. In the field of fashion one of its elegant versions is the one proposed in the Shiva series by Aitor Throup, while in design the polyethylene chair Jolly Roger for Gufram underlines the histrionic character of the design rockstar Fabio Novembre, who explains: “When they ask me why I wear a skull ring on my finger, I always say it once belonged to my grandfather, a pirate, and I think I have managed to convince myself that it is true. Everyone should have at least one pirate grandfather in their family tree.” The Shiva collection, on the other hand, illustrates how the work of Aitor Throup concentrates on innovative methods of design and making of clothing, using sculptural features based on human anatomy as closure systems for the garments.

16/12/13 17.12


Intern i January-February 2014

Alien organic

Among the most extreme semantic research projects, we find the collection Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic, at the intersection of fashion and sculpture, with forms similar to those of the Cant porcelain containers by Aldo Bakker, with which they share a morphology that seems to be perched between vegetable and mineral, bone and fungus, almost like the mineral-metabolic product of organisms from another planet, not completely living, yet not entirely lifeless. Ana Rajcevic: “I am interested in ways of transforming the human figure through complex pieces of ornament or bodysculpture, challenging established notions of beauty and normality.” The porcelain container, on the other hand, reflects the typical style of the Dutch designer, the son of Gijs Bakker, cofounder of Droog Design, exploring forms that nimbly avoid any preset categorization.

3_C_In638_R_56_61_design_fashion.indd 61

F/D / 61

Exposed stitching

In the fall/winter 2012/13 collection of Ann-Sofie Back and the Airberg divan by Jean-Marie Massaud for Offecct the composition – again additive – is done by bringing out the lines of junction between the parts, underlined in the clothing by strips of black fabric, and in the series of divans by the different forms of the elements. This face-off also points to a shifted, asymmetrical logic, eluding stasis and implementing movement inside the very structure of the product. The result is a decisive aesthetic, underlined in the garments by the seams that link back to the idea of the paper pattern; in the upholstered furnishings, on the other hand, it gives rise to a true sculpture, a clean break with the divan archetype.

16/12/13 17.12


January-February 2014 In terni

62 / Indesign Crossover

Mixed-blood projects

The H aiku sof a f or Fredericia is inspired by the Japane se tradi tion, ev oking a sense of in timacy and pro tection. The Baffi broom f or Swede se is in solid w ood and horsehair. Made by hand , it expre sse s a minimalis t langu age wi th a touch of irony .

Partners in work and often in life, from different parts of the world. We asked these designers how their respective cultures find their way into products, and if they trigger hybrid design approaches by Valentina Croci

Gam Fratesi

They live on the road between their two native lands, Italy and Denmark: two historic design poles that deeply influence the work of Stine Gam and Enrico Fratesi. In particular, the crafts tradition of classic Danish furnishings and the intellectual, conceptual approach of the early days of Italian design. This ‘cross-cultural’ substrate is expressed in innovative furnishings that somehow seem familiar, created for Casamania, Fontana Arte, Fredericia, Gubi, Ligne Roset and Swedese. “A good example of the encounter between our two cultures is Baffi, because it comes from the idea of combining simple lines and practicality while updating an object that has always existed. It combines the Italian intellectual method and innovative perspective with Nordic aesthetic simplicity. If the Italian approach focuses more closely on the communicative force of the object, the Danish approach looks for a more honest relationship with nature. All the projects, then, come from an ongoing exchange, where it is impossible to say who started and who finished.”

C_In638_R_62_67_sangue_misto.indd 62

16/12/13 14.30


Interni

INdesign Crossover / 63

January-February 2014

Big-Game

Grégoire Jeanmonod is Swiss, Elric Petit is Belgian, Augustin Scott De Martinville is French. They share a mother tongue and an interest in simple, functional and, above all, optimistic objects. They founded a studio in Lausanne in 2004, and today they have done projects for Alessi, Hay, Karimoku New Standard, Moustache, Praxis and Galerie Kreo. “More than different cultures, we have different personalities, and the projects reflect this mixture. But there is something that comes from our native countries: Greg is a better skier, because he is Swiss, Elric is good at telling jokes, because he is Belgian, and Augustin is great at kissing, because he is French!” With an over-the-top sense of humor, the trio’s approach is one of teamwork and participation, interpreting useful objects that can adapt to the language of the commissioning company: from essential, familiar seats for Karimoku to an object holder for Alessi that is a reminder of the analog world of old toolboxes.

Abo ve: f or the Swi ss archite ct Guil l aume Burri, the trio h as cre ated Eclepen s, a serie s of cu st om furni shin gs in ser ted in the cr annie s of a hou se, based on the f orce of n atur al w ood . T o the side: su spended t o gether with the three de signer s, the Bold ch air f or Mous tache , with a met al core co vered by a continuou s pol yureth ane tube and f abric , one of the produc t s th at h as brou ght them reno wn. Bel o w: the Car go obje ct caddie f or Ale ssi ev oke s the image of the tr adition al t oolbo x.

C_In638_R_62_67_sangue_misto.indd 63

16/12/13 14.30


January-February 2014 In terni

64 / Indesign Crossover

A+A Cooren

She is Japanese, he is French. Aki and Arnaud Cooren founded their studio in 1999. They have created lamps for companies like Artemide, Metalarte, Tronconi, Vertigo Bird and Yamagiwa, small furnishing editions for La Redoute and YmerMalta, and have done installations for companies like L’Oréal and Shiseido. The lesson of Japanese design, especially of the master Sori Yanagi, is a constant reference point in their work, which has industrial and crafts qualities, contrasting rhythms and methods absorbed from the culture of Japan. This aesthetic establishes a fertile dialogue with the French tradition. For example, in the interior design of the Sèvres gallery the lightness of the metal and wood structures that seem to float gives force, by contrast, to the traditional ceramics. “The acumen of the Northern European spirit is combined with the genteel tact of Japan,” they say. “Our work always happens together, from the rough draft to the shop drawings, constantly clashing with different needs and viewpoints, not just in terms of culture, but also in terms of gender.”

Top : Mer ybench is a div andor meuse tha t can be used in differen t posi tions , made in col labora tion wi th the craf ts w orkshop of Philippe C oudra y (pho to: An thony Girardi) . Abo ve: ins tal la tion f or the Paris-b ased gal ler y Sèvre s – Cité de la Céramique . Over one hundred pie ce s , of grea t varie ty, are unified and enhanced b y the li gh t struc ture in metal and na tural w ood (pho to: L orenz C u gini) .

C_In638_R_62_67_sangue_misto.indd 64

16/12/13 14.30


Interni

January-February 2014

Mixed-blood projects / 65

CTRLZak

The creations of Katia Meneghini and Thanos Zakopoulos are inspired by their travels and, above all, by the rich background of their respective countries, Italy and Greece, in intentional pursuit of a cultural hybrid. “In Greece they say ‘one face, one race’ to emphasize the similarities between Italians and Greeks. But beyond stereotypes, in-depth study of two cultures so full of history and aesthetics is a way to enrich things. We start with our personal experience and then venture beyond our roots: in Flagmented and Hybrid the cultural contamination extends to Oriental and Occidental traditions in a single work.” Their projects express a wide range of references: the Greek and Roman forms of the classical world, the Turkish rule over Greece, the Italian Renaissance. “There is always a lot of research behind each project: we sift through historical, cultural and scientific sources. But each project is the result of the work of many hands, many professional contributions.” Abo ve: the tw o de signers with the edible T r ansubs tanti a Pag anus col le ction ( pho t o: Mimmo Capurso ). T o the side: the ins tal l ation f or iMuseu m, a conce pt st ore in Myk onos th at sel l s re plic as of ancient ar tif act s. T he dis pl ay fixture s are like archite ctur al fr ag ment s at arch aeol ogic al digs ( pho t o: L ouis a N ik ol aidou) . Bel o w: Quarz f or D3CO is a syste m th at bonds pent agon al and hex agon al w ooden s truc ture s with vol u mes in ex panded materi al (pho t o: T hors ten G reve) .

C_In638_R_62_67_sangue_misto.indd 65

16/12/13 14.30


January-February 2014 In terni

66 / Indesign Crossover

BCXSY

Boaz Cohen and Sayaka Yamamoto come, respectively, from Israel and Japan. They met during the course on Man & Identity at Design Academy Eindhoven in 2006, and then continued together in life and work. From the outset they have stood out for projects that come from the study and representation of crafts techniques and cultural identities. “The reference to our countries of origin, and to our personal past, is there from the concept to the final result. For example, in the case of Origin, we started with artifacts made in Japan and then in Israel. The hybrid of two worlds was disorienting for Japanese visitors, who could not identify with the screens of the Join collection, while others saw the ‘Japaneseness’ of the Balance carpets,” they explain. “Though we do gather suggestions from our roots, we try to keep a distance that helps us to maintain the fascination and the sense of discovery.”

Top : f or the Tex tielmuseum of Tilburg they expl ored the his toric al archive s to make a new col le ction. N ew Perspe ctive s ci tes his toric al technique s and de cora tions , rein terpre ted wi th the compu tercon trol led embroider y machine of the in-house w orkshop . Abo ve and bel o w: F os ter is the f our th chap ter of the O rigin proje ct. The obje cts in w ood and ceramic are made b y hand b y Ibuki, a group of young ma ster craf tsmen of S onobe ( N an tan-ci ty, K yoto), wi th the go al of conser ving tradi tional J apane se kno w -ho w.

C_In638_R_62_67_sangue_misto.indd 66

16/12/13 14.30


In terni

Mixed-blood projects / 67

January-February 2014

Doshi Levien

Nipa Doshi (India) and Jonathan Levien (England) live in London, where they founded their studio in 2000 with the aim of celebrating the contamination between cultures, industrial technologies and fine crafts. They have worked with companies like Moroso, Cappellini, Intel, Authentics, Camper and BD Barcelona, with a narrative approach and a recognizable stylistic image. “The Charpoy dormeuse for Moroso was the first project to combine the two worlds, bringing craftsmanship that is possible today only in India and combining it with Italian know-how. The Chandlo dressing table for BD Barcelona, on the other hand, works on the more visual plane of deconstructed surfaces, a citation of the European avant-gardes.” All the projects express two cultural backgrounds: “In India objects are seen as bearers of messages, an expression of the identity of their makers, beyond pure function. And in Great Britain the act of making is the expression of the idea, without social separation between those who make and those who design.”

Top : The W ool Parade f or Kvadra t is an ins tal la tion inspired by the Bauha us of twel ve elemen ts clad in wool . U pper righ t: the Camper Twins s and al s , with p atterns b ased on Indian school unif orms and graph p aper no tebooks . To the side: the C handl o dre ssing table f or BD Bar cel ona convey s , in i ts name and in the circular mirror, the reference to the Moon and to the Bindi, the do t Indian women pla ce a t the cen ter of their f oreheads .

C_In638_R_62_67_sangue_misto.indd 67

16/12/13 14.30


January-February 2014 Intern i

68 / INdesign Crossover

Over-crossing

For Italian design the crossover is first of all the genetic propensity of its protagonists to play many different roles, with results that go beyond the sum of the parts thanks to a rhizomatic process of hybrids and contaminations by Chiara Alessi

I

n biological terms – or the most widespread sense of the term – ‘crossover’ refers to the mechanism responsible for the variety of individuals belonging to the same species, the combination of genetic material from parents that leads to different ‘products’ each time. Shifted into a creative realm (music, literature, art) a ‘crossover’ means contamination, mixture, a hybrid of different genres. In contemporary design, it is clear that this mechanism of combination is becoming a widespread practice, even in the case of ‘processes’ that draw on different specificities and blend procedures, including random factors, eugenetic modifications, or inevitable choices. Hence we have products with an analog mother and a digital father, with artisan grandparents and techno-maker uncles, with eyes inherited from a focus on artistic experimentation and other genetic traits derived from familiarity with the industrial tradition. Furthermore, in Italy – an inclusive homeland for design – all these ingredients get mixed up with languages that pay tribute to the Nordic tradition while conforming to Mediterranean aesthetic codes, quoting from the

C_In638_R_68_69_alessi.indd 68

design of central Europe while keeping an eye on the Anglo-French aesthetic. Nor should we omit a touch of Japanese minimalism or of continental humor. On other planes, those who work for companies also have their own private production lines; the creators of bestsellers for the mass market often have small self-produced editions, shown in galleries. Certain designers can indulge in experimental research thanks to the fact that corporate commissions give them a chance to venture into uncharted regions. The examples abound. This makes it difficult to specify the boundaries of the profession, both in terms of projects and of processes applied to implement them. It can also lead to misunderstandings, when Italian design (seen from inside or outside) seems like a rather indistinct mass of replicas, with similar codes and few outstanding features. Which is not so different from the misunderstanding that makes people refer to the glory days of Italian design as the expression of a taste, a poetics, a uniform approach. This error has been costly for the middle generation, in historical terms. The hard part is to isolate and identify the different characters that cross paths in our design, precisely because of these remixes, and often it is an operation that can only be done a posteriori, starting with the reaction works trigger on the terrain where they touch down. It is an operation that cannot be done with full detachment, or without getting one’s hands dirty, as they say. This is especially true of contemporary Italian design, which does not lend itself to scholastic interpretation relying on the old categories, and yet is inevitably also a mixture of these different histories.

But the particular nature of our design, which is ‘mixed’ in this sense, does not lie only in products and processes, which in the international vocabulary, in fact, generally include even very distant and varied genres (immaterial design, design of services, interaction design, etc.), and to be honest it is anything but new. The true specificity of the crossover with respect to Italian design has to do, above all, with design people, with a tradition that has existed at least since the appearance of one architect, critic, designer and theorist: Gio Ponti. It is precisely this particular set of interlocking roles, of people and their professions, that makes Italian designers almost always the first narrators of their own work, as well as the work of others, acting as curators, teachers, theorists; even the critics are often also practicing designers; many entrepreneurs are former designers, and the art directors of most companies are still designers; the editors of many magazines are architects; press agents act as curators, and vice versa. It should come as no surprise that those who make are also asked to explain what they make, and in many cases also to sell it (more or less directly), and even to assemble it personally. For Italians, playing different roles is a heritage, notwithstanding origins, multiple influences, and in spite of the fact that not all the roles are remunerated. Also because the results, in the end, at least in the best cases which are the ones that interest us, are different from the sum of the crossed parts. There is always something more. Perhaps, instead of crossovers, when it comes to Italian design we should talk about over-crossing?

16/12/13 14.27


In terni January-February 2014

INdesign Crossover / 69

The Rabdic an ti se ries of vase s b y Fr ance sco Mae stri f o r Resign . (pho to: And rea Piff ari)

C_In638_R_68_69_alessi.indd 69

16/12/13 14.27


January-February 2014 Interni

70 / INdesign Crossover

A theme of existential reflection that becomes a disc and then also a carpet, wallpaper, a new material, a collection of objects in a state of becoming... The intrinsically ‘crossed’ vision of the designermusician Lorenzo Palmeri

by Maddalena Padovani

Erba matta

a por trait of Lorenz o Palmeri and the tw o carpet s produced by Nodus f or the Erb amat ta proje ct. Abo ve , the Tara ss aco mode l; be lo w, the C ent occhio mode l; bo th are availab le in tw o versions , a pop version in non-w oven f abric and a se cond on Yanve l, in co llabora tion with Vel cro It al ia.

C_In638_R_70_71_palmeri.indd 70

16/12/13 14.27


Interni

INdesign Crossover / 71

January-February 2014

Upper right: the co ver o f Erb amat ta, the la te st re cord by L orenz o Palmeri, due f or relea se in March. T o the side: the C icoria model of the Erb amat ta w al lp aper col le ction made b y Jannel li & Volpi .

V

arious factors make Lorenzo Palmeri an extremely contemporary design figure. Factors that do not only depend on his dual role as a designer and musician, but also have to do with his innate tendency to make every work into a shared project. Whether it is music, art direction or industrial design. The disciplinary boundaries tend to blur, perspectives widen through participation, goals go beyond the specificities of the particular project and take on more ambitious cultural connotations. After releasing his first solo record, Preparativi per la pioggia (see Interni 598 January-February 2010), Palmeri is ready to publish a second musical effort, Erbamatta, due for release in March, with an overall project that combines the immaterial dimension of music with the material dimension of design. For the first disc Lorenzo involved a group of designer friends to make an artistic cover in which the user also became a co-author. For the second he has aimed higher, making the disc into a collection of objects produced by different companies. The objective: to make the record into a manifesto of design thought,

C_In638_R_70_71_palmeri.indd 71

of a modus operandi to share not only with musicians but also with the entrepreneurs with whom he regularly works. “Today I think it is more interesting to design models,” Palmeri explains, “than to create products, which we need less and less. Models that put different thoughts into circulation, putting new viewpoints into focus. Since no one yet knows what the new paradigm of our society is going to be, I proceed by starting to eliminate everything I don’t like about the old paradigm: competition. For me Erbamatta, the dandelion, is a metaphor. It represents something pervasive, carried on the wind, that can settle down anywhere. I like the potentially negative side of this: it can become a problem, but only when it reaches the point of upsetting a pre-set order. This concept is typical of occidental culture, which tends to repress or deny the unexpected or the random element of disorder. Instead I am convinced that chance, imprecision and imperfection are part of the future paradigm, and I think that today a new cultural sensibility is emerging regarding these topics. This is why I have taken the dandelion as the emblem of a collective work, which I hope will gradually involve more and more people.” So the CD Erbamatta – which musically mixes different genres, ranging from the analog world of classical acoustic instruments to the digital realm of super-electronics, and has been produced with the help of many musician friends, including the omnipresent Saturnino – becomes the starting point for design reflection applied to multiple types of objects for the home: two lines of wallpaper for Jannelli & Volpi; two carpets for Nodus, presented first as limited editions and then as part of the catalogue; a new model of the Paraffina guitar designed for Noah; two flooring versions for Stone Italiana, one more decorative, the other more ‘substantial’ (DNA Urbano) made with a new material that recycles the dust from repaving of roads. These products, distributed in a perspective of commercial ‘crossing,’ will soon be joined by other objects like eyewear, footwear, tableware, all with the Erbamatta label. “This is not a matter of co-marketing,” Palmeri concludes, “but an operation that sets out to generate an unusual movement among worlds that generally never meet, through a project that becomes part of the heritage of each. The goal is to convey the message that it is possible to find new solutions and new orders in processes that seem to no longer contain them. In the end, the role of the designer has always been this: to disrupt sector balances, to introduce original viewpoints, in a game of disciplinary contaminations that first of all directly involve the designer himself.”

16/12/13 14.27


January-February 2014 Interni

72 / Indesign Crossover

The combination of the innovative vision of Audi Design and the fine craftsmanship of Poltrona Frau generates Luft, a chair that gives form to the domestic imaginary of Walter de Silva

Technocomfort by Maddalena Padovani

W

alter de Silva belongs to that category of designers who dream things first, then put them on paper with skillful signs made by hand, and finally create models and prototypes, because only by touching things is it possible to get a sense of their quality and of how to improve them. This happens for every new car De Silva designs, now as director of Design Volkswagen Group, but previously for other brands (Fiat, Alfa Romeo, Seat) for which he has created very successful models. It also happens for the domestic objects the car designer enjoys creating and imagining for his own home. Lamps, chairs, alarm clocks, furnishing complements that always have dynamic, almost streamlined forms, an immediate reference to the world of speed inhabited by their maker, but also to the drawings of their ‘grandfather’ Emilio de Silva, Walter’s father, the first creator of sci-fi comics in Italy. Today, for the first time, this imaginary domestic world takes on concrete form,

C_In638_R_72_73_desilva_frau.indd 72

technological value and great materic quality. In a true crossover, seen as contamination and integration of the forms of expertise of two leading brands from different industrial sectors, Luft is a chair that takes its place in the ranks of the classic icons of Poltrona Frau, focusing the advanced technological visions of the Audi Design division run by De Silva. Two years of collaboration, two different forms of know-how operating in harmony. Walter de Silva explains: “There was no real brief, no specific request, except that of experimenting with a combination of forms of expertise. I set myself a goal: to design the chair in which everyone would like to seek refuge in the home, to read a book or just to relax and think. This is why I thought about a chair that would not be constricting, something open, light, but capable of combining technology, crafts and comfort in keeping with an evolved industrial model.” Roberto Archetti, brand manager of Poltrona

sket ch of the A8 Audi , one of the mos t succe ssful cre ations of De S il va in the aut omo tive se ct or. abo ve an d bel o w the por tr ait of the designer, a sket ch an d the pro t otype of a sug ar bo wl , one of the dome stic obje ct s designe d by De S il va, which in the f orm of pro t otype s were incl u ded in the exhibition Aut oemociòn , Barcel on a, 2003 (pho t o: Mario Carrieri) .

16/12/13 14.26


Interni

Indesign Crossover / 73

January-February 2014

From the t op : the Lu ft chair by Pol trona Fra u de signed by Walter de S ilva in co llabora tion with Audi Design . T he s truc ture is in rigid mo lded po lyurethane , with side s padded in exp anded po lyurethane and po lye ster bat ting. In the centra l par t, t o increa se com for t, elastic be lting is a t tached t o a bee ch wood frame . T he outer s truc ture is in die -cast aluminium, painted in gra y or a luminium, also a vailab le in chromiumplated a luminium. An ar tis tic proje ct by De S ilva from 1978 : the F abio chair, with p aper sea t and b ack , “where you c an sit no t with the bod y, but with the mind ” (pho t o: Aldo Agne lli). T he L eica M9 T it anium Limited Edition o f jus t 500 pie ce s , de signed b y Walter de S ilva (pho t o: Stephan Pick) .

Frau, sums it up: “The project followed the steps of the car design process. We usually discuss things with designers through sketches, drawings or small models. We were amazed when we visited the Audi design offices in Munich for the first time and found ourselves looking at five models of chairs on a scale of 1:1, where we could sit down and try them out.” The hybrid of two cultures has led to a seat with a very new concept for Poltrona Frau. Luft has a structure in die-cast aluminium, in fact, brought to the outside to become a sculptural feature, a strong graphic sign that forms the profile of the chair from the back to the foot, becoming the base. Like the bodywork of an automobile, its material and lines are conceived to reflect light, to underline the effect of suspension of the seat and its image. While the precision is that of the automotive world, the comfort is that of an outstanding furniture brand that has deployed all its knowledge to fine tune the tension of the armrest, the sides, the

C_In638_R_72_73_desilva_frau.indd 73

fluid lines, evoking the idea of a ‘cloak’ that wraps the back and underlines the sensation of comfort. Roberto Archetti continues: “The automotive world works on solid shapes and severe forms. De Silva had a hard time accepting the idea that the stitching of the seat, which is in down and thus inevitably shifts its shape, would not always be taut and perfect. So we invented a large doubleneedle stitch that emphasizes the lines of the upholstery and keeps the shape from shifting.” The design concludes: “This experience demonstrates that industry cannot live without crafts. One can never do without the other. It is not true that everything has to be transformed into big machines, big numbers, big works. It also makes sense to think about the growth of our profession in terms of serial crafts and smaller production runs. We should never forget that industrial design comes from crafts; the two dimensions were only separated later, and in the future they will recombine. This too is crossover.”

16/12/13 14.26


January-February 2014 Intern i

74 / INdesign Crossover

Time for by Valentina Croci

school

Design is in a period of transformation. Design education is changing too, shifting towards a more interdisciplinary approach. Four new takes on teaching offer the designers of the future points of orientation, more than tools, to cope with the complexity of the world

C_In638_R_74_77_scuole_design.indd 74

16/12/13 15.18


Interni

INdesign Crossover / 75

January-February 2014

T w o sugge sti on s fr om the fir st-level Master s pr ogra m in R ela ti onal Design. Four teen module s taught online thr ough the W h oami pla tf or m, and inten sive monthl y w or ksh ops of three d ays ea ch. To the side , the module “C u st om Design. Pr oce ssing and the la w s of genetic s” taught by Marcel Bil ur bina with Confindus tria Cera mica ; bel ow, “T he craft sman and new semantic c ode s,” c onduc ted b y Andrea Miserocc hi and Ele onora O dorizzi with Centrale F ies and Mino ve (ph ot o: L es F il ms du Losange) .

On the f acing p age: South K orean de signer Bora Hong , a gradu ate of the Ma ster s pr ogra m in Co ntextu al Design a t the Design Acade my of Eindh oven, pre sent s Cosm etic Surger y Kingd om, a pr oje ct tha t exa mine s the increa singl y wide spread u se of pla stic surger y in S outh K orea . It u ses de sign obje ct s t o critic al l y addre ss the the me of modific ati on of the b ody, often done a s a statu s symbol . (Co ur te sy: Design Acade my Eindh oven)

C_In638_R_74_77_scuole_design.indd 75

T

he traditional figure of the designer is changing. Graduates of design schools today will most probably not be faced with a career path resembling that of Philippe Starck. The crisis of the markets and access to new technologies of communication and making are shaking up the disciplinary categories. So how should we train the designers of the future? Without claiming to provide the tools to solve problems, but by teaching them to handle complexity. At least this is the answer hypothesized by four new approaches to teaching, in Italy and Holland. The designers Jon Stam and Simon de Bakker (of the studio Commonplace) direct – with Claire Warnier and Dries Verbruggen (of the studio Unfold) and Tim Knappen (Indianen) – the course in Digital Crafts, part of the BA program of the Willem de Kooning Art Academy of Rotterdam. The program, in its first year, based on earlier experiments with the Maryland Institute College of Art (USA), is part of a larger overhaul of the school aimed at more interdisciplinary teaching. In the first two years the students approach basic theory in the fields of art, fashion and product design, and

then move on, in the third and fourth years, with the so-called ‘Domain studies,’ namely crossover areas like Open Design, investigating how to engage users in different ways in the various project phases or, in a wider sense, how to design participation; or they explore Hacking and Digital Crafts, examining the experience of new technologies and considering new application scenarios. The reorganization of the school starts with a design vision no longer oriented towards problem solving, opting for a meta-design method involving services and knowledge. “With respect to the Media Studies courses set on a more conceptual level, at the opposite extreme, on the performance of technology, we try to start with the user experience, transforming theoretical notions like illustration, fashion/product design and social studies into interactive objects or environments where technology shifts into the background in relation to its aesthetic or tactile perception, for example. The course will not train experts on digital making, but professionals who know how to interact with the world of IT and computer-driven engineering, taking a different vantage point.

16/12/13 15.18


January-February 2014 Interni

76 / INdesign Crossover

To hypothesize scenarios, to modify existing production processes, are the most important things in the world of design today,” Stam explains. Similarly, experimenting with ‘hands-on’ projects grants students independence in practice, and that individual experimental method that is fundamental in today’s world of work, as companies increasingly tend to delegate and gather research from outside the firm. “The tradition system of education is in a phase of change, not only due to the crisis that is altering the normal modes of access to work, but also because new technologies have accelerated a change in the cognitive paradigm of the generation of people in their twenties,” says Stefano Mirti, director of the new Online Masters in Relational Design of the ABADIR Academy of Catania. “Like YouTube, which gathers thousands of disconnected fragments, young people reason from the particular to the general, from induction to deduction. So teaching with traditional methods becomes ineffective.” Mirti has conducted experiments on the potential of social media and the management of online communities with the Whoami and Ceramic Futures projects, covering the functioning of a horizontal type of communication, or one based on different registers of relation and ranking among people, aspects that will be reflected in the teaching approach of the program. At first the course is subdivided into twelve modules of 24 days each, in very different disciplines (from basic

C_In638_R_74_77_scuole_design.indd 76

to automotive design, community design to crafts), with theoretical lectures and online reviews, conferences of experts via streaming, one weekend per month of workshops with partner companies, and two weekends of summer camp for a total of 500 training hours. A mixture of analog and digital, because the value of face-to-face relationships should not be underestimated. Again in this case, the masters focuses on a system of practical, hands-on workshops. “The graduates will not be sector experts. The school is conceived more like a phone book than as a toolbox: the students will learn to relate to a myriad of disciplines, developing social and relational skills, invisible but fundamental abilities for the contemporary designer,” Mirti concludes. Italian schools have few conceptual laboratories where students and teachers interact on the same level on the ontological and social

From the course in Digit al C ra ft s o f the B A program o f the Wil lem de Kooning Academie H oge school o f R ot ter dam, the proje ct “Mess age in the Bo t tle ” by Hilk o van Idsinga , Rose Gr oo t an d Ermi van O ers . T he s tu dent s ha ve incorpora te d in a me chanic al machine , a remin der o f tra ditional t ool s , a soun d sensor tha t makes the bot tle turn, et ching Morse co de me ss age s. Digit al com bine s with anal og in a poetic proje ct roo te d in the col le ctive imaginar y.

16/12/13 15.18


Inte rni January-February 2014

time for school / 77

Image s of IN Res ide nce w o rkshop #6, ent itled Ident ity Dete ct ors , coo rdinated by Bar bara Brondi and Marco R ainò . Wi th the p art ic ipat io n of the de s ig ners Ant on Al varez , Jean-B aptis te F astrez , Hild a Hel l strö m, Guus K us ters , Jon Stam and Gior gia Z anel la t o . (Pho t os: T ul l io Deo rsola)

themes pertinent to the world of design. This is why Barbara Brondi and Marco Rainò, thanks to the support of the IN Residence Design cultural association, have organized the IN Residence workshops for six years now: two days of non-stop work with six international designers under 35 and about thirty students from the four schools in Turin offering design courses. Objects are made with very humble materials – paper, adhesive tape and not much else – to trigger suggestions and short circuits, and to rethink everyday rituals. The theme this year was Identity Detectors. This complex topic was approached by making conceptual objects that when seen as a whole shed light on how different the relationships can be between things and individuals (the students working with Giorgia Zanellato and Guus Kusters created, starting with interviews and common objects, prototypes to symbolized individual

C_In638_R_74_77_scuole_design.indd 77

persons); how objects can convey symbolic meanings (the workshop conducted by Anton Alvarez and Hilda Hellström); or how common utensils can stimulate interpersonal relations in new ways (the workshop conducted by JeanBaptiste Fastrez and Jon Stam). The cultural context lies at the center of design, according to Louise Schouwenberg, director of the Masters in Contextual Design at the Design Academy of Eindhoven. “The course focuses on interpersonal relations with and through design. These relations have cultural, social, political and economic implications. Design is never just the making of a finished object; it is also the expression of cultural and social aspects, and the meanings it can take on over the course of time. Design bears witness, in fact, to a given context,” Schouwenberg explains. The program does not only address product design, but also the study of processes of

fabrication and strategic design. The professional figure that emerges from the training is a ‘critical author designer’ who focuses on his own subjectivity, capacity to interpret and imaginative talent, creative gifts that combine in a systematic research method. The course, which began in 2007, has produced product designers, talents working between art and design like the studio Formafantasma, but also design theorists and strategists. “If we design by starting with the physical nature of the object,” Schouwenberg concludes, “we run the risk of working only on its stylistic aspects. The notion of function changes with time, and depends on the geographical and cultural context of reference. Starting with this last aspect makes it possible to understand how design facilitates but also manipulates human actions. So the designer has to grasp the processes and find a role in this world in an ongoing state of becoming.”

16/12/13 15.18


January-February 2014 Interni

78 / INdesign Crossover

Assonance Similarities between lights and objects: a game of formal harmonies and graphic effects, between compositional and decorative versatility and everyday functional quality

by Nadia Lionello photos of lights by Maurizio Marcato

Jar R GB, a col le ction composed of a serie s of over turned chalice s com binin g the te chnique s of gla ss bl owin g with the R GB col or model . Design Arik L ev y f or Lasvit . O n the f acin g page, L es Endia blĂŠ s , serie s of bl o wn cr ystal cups , made by hand , ground and de cora ted with en gra vin gs , produced by SAI NT-LOUIS E.

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 78

16/12/13 14.49


Intern i January-February 2014

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 79

INdesign Crossover / 79

16/12/13 14.50


80 / INdesign Crossover

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 80

January-February 2014 Intern i

16/12/13 14.50


Interni

Assonance / 81

January-February 2014

Designe d by Luc a Bet t onic a f or Cini& N il s , F orma la is a f lexib le LED lamp compose d of one or more e lement s joine d t ogether t o give rise t o different graphic effe ct s. R iver, mo du lar upho lstere d sea ting s ystem with high b ack , cur ve d an d straight base s , co vere d in f abric or imit ation leather, an d f or contra ct. By Bar t o li Design f or se gis . O n the f acing p age , by R ober t o Pao li f or Modo L u ce, Mu ltib all is compose d of a serie s of opaline p lastic g lobe s of different , at tache d t o rigi d ro ds diameters , f or infinite groupings of different height s conne cte d by a mobi le met al bra cket . S imbo lo S eparĂŠ in a luminium with printe d pat tern, persona lize d with different co lors an d print s. Design G ari lab by Piter Perbe llini f or AL TREFO RME.

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 81

16/12/13 14.50


82 / INdesign Crossover

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 82

January-February 2014 Intern i

16/12/13 14.50


Interni

January-February 2014

Assonance / 83

Composition made with element s of the 57 col le ction, de sign O mer Arbel f or Bocci . T he sphere s are made b y in corpora ting air gaps in the gla ss , whi ch remain invisible when the lamp is off and are revealed when it is turned on. S et t’ ant a Dipint a, hide -aw ay sliding door in tempered fl oat gla ss , with transp arent de cora tion done with p ainted et chings and fros ted b ase , produ ced b y ca sali . O n the f acing p age , Bit ter C and y, ge ometri c element in transp arent pol ycarbona te , f or infinite compositions , available in tw o size s, de signed b y Doriana & Massimiliano F uks as f or Zonca . T ripty ch, three vase s in a single s tru cture , from the Dra wing G la ss col le ction produ ced b y Massimo L unardon in borosili cate gla ss . Design G iorgia Z anel la t o f or f abrica .

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 83

16/12/13 14.50


84 / INdesign Crossover

January-February 2014 Interni

One of the p ossible c onfigura ti ons of String L ight s , the c ol le cti on of LE D ceiling lamps b ase d on a bla ck ele ctric al cable tha t establishe s a rela ti onship with the archite cture of a sp ace . Design Michael Ana stassia des f or Fl os . Ikon bench with b ase in inje cti on-m oul ded pol ypr opylene an d ful l -c ol or la yere d lamina te sea t. Design Pio & T it o Tos o f or pedrali . On the f acing p age , Pre ci ous table with s truc ture in p ainte d steel wire an d t op in tempere d gla ss , in the s ame c ol or a s the b ase or with out c ol or. Design by C ĂŠdric R ag ot f or roche bobois . Devel ope d by Arik L ev y f or Vibia , W irefl ow is a serie s of suspensi ons wh ose s truc ture is f orme d by slen der c able s an d LE D terminal s with which t o make pers onalize d ge ometric c onfigura ti ons an d l umin ous ins tal la ti ons .

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 84

16/12/13 14.50


Intern i January-February 2014

C_In638_R_78_85_luci.indd 85

Assonance / 85

16/12/13 14.50


86 / INdesign Crossover

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 86

January-February 2014 Intern i

16/12/13 14.43


Interni

INdesign Crossover / 87

January-February 2014

by Nadia Lionello studio photos Miro Zagnoli

cross-Carpet

Serendipitous coincidences of resemblance between ideas and furnishings, with the carpet as the protagonist, a small work of crafts with the function of covering the floor, and a decorative role – not only in the home – to complete the environment Under w orld c arpet , 250x350 cm, a single model in hand-kno t ted w ool prod uced in N epal , de signed b y St udio Job f or NODUS. O n the f acing p age , based on the model s and mo tif s used in Persian carpet s , the pho t ographic w ork Anthropocene is composed of s atel lite image s taken from the Internet and proce ssed b y DAVID Th omaS SMITH .

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 87

16/12/13 14.43


88 / INdesign Crossover

Top : Bl o w Up carpe t, 210x210, 110x310 cm, in w ool or w ool/silk , kno tted by hand in N epal , seen here in the col ored (d aytime) version or bla ck and whi te (nigh t), de signed by StĂŠphane Maupin f or chev alier edition ; to the side , ES U Eame s Stora ge Uni ts , a s ystem of con tainers f or the home and office wi th s tr ucture in gal vanized me tal , shel ve s in pl yw ood wi th maple veneer or la cq uer finish, panel s wi th tex ture s , pain ted in differen t col ors , de signed by C harle s & R ay Eame s (1949) f or vitra .

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 88

January-February 2014 In terni

Abo ve: R ever b c arpe t 200x300 cm in p ure N ew Z ealand w ool , kno tted by hand , availa ble in tw o col ors , bl ue and khaki, de signed by C ĂŠdric R ago t f or roche bobois ; to the side , Deep S ea book c ase in transp aren t ex traligh t la yered and thermo welded gla ss , wi th transp aren t gla ss shel ve s in bl ue or gra y, de signed by N endo f or gla s it alia .

16/12/13 14.43


Interni

January-February 2014

cross-carpet / 89

Moss Po t purri sha g c ar pet , 200x300 and 170 x240 c m, in linen and ra w w ool , with a single mul ticol or version, tufted by hand , de signed b y G unil la L agerhe m U l lberg f or ka sthal l . Division self -su ppor ting book case in a single size , or f or positioning a gains t the w al l in three size s , made in 10 mm MDF with white embossed mat te paint finish, acce ssorized with al u miniu m bo xe s , mat te painted in f our col ors , crea ted b y Design L ab f or cal ligaris .

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 89

16/12/13 14.43


90 / INdesign Crossover

January-February 2014 In terni

Tul si c arpe t, 200x200,180x250 and 200 x300 cm, in blea ched hemp, Tibe tan w ool and b amboo silk wi thou t dye s , kno tted by hand , de signed b y Paol o Zani f or w arli . Ink table wi th bla ck p ain ted steel le gs and MDF top, co vered wi th digi tal -prin t f abric applied wi th re sin ( R ezina tessile速 ), wi th diamond p attern in the col ors mud and bla ck . Designed b y Emilio N anni f or zano t ta.

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 90

16/12/13 14.43


Interni

January-February 2014

cross-carpet / 91

Hockey carpet , 200x300 cm, in w ool and silk , tufted b y hand in 134 different catal ogue col ors , wit h cus t om density and t hickne ss . Designed by Kons tantin G rcic f or j ab ans t oetz . Par t of t he Ch ara cter col le ction. T os hi st ora ge c abinet system in different size s , in p ainted w ood; doors wit h engra ved ge ometric de cora tion, le gs in p ainted met al . Designed by L uc a N ic het t o f or ca samania .

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 91

16/12/13 14.43


January-February 2014 In terni

92 / INdesign Crossover

Top : Ak ari c arpe t, 170x240 and 200 x300 cm, in w ool and viscose , kno tted b y h and in N epal , de signed b y Yumi Endo f or NOW CARPET. Bol le h al ogen applique in whi te sin tered pol yamide , made wi th 3 D prin ting technol og y, de signed b y S el vaggi a Arm ani f or .exnovo.

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 92

Abo ve: Jean table wi th me tal base p ain ted whi te, bl ack , copper and pew ter, re ctangul ar or round gl ass top, de signed b y Carl o Bal l abio f or PORADA. Mesh c arpe t from the C on tempor ar y C ol le ction, in w ool and silk , kno tted by h and wi th the Tibe tan technique , cus tom me asuremen ts and col ors , de signed b y Fabrizio Can toni f or CC-TAPIS.

16/12/13 14.44


Int erni January-February 2014

cross-carpet / 93

Eth er c arp et in w ool and silk , kno t t ed and c ard ed b y hand , from th e L imit ed Edition col l ection, mad e t o m easur e with v eg etabl e dyes , design ed by K arim R ashid f or ILLULIAN. G ro wn susp ension lamp in p aint ed iron wir e, design ed by G iampaol o Al l occo Delin eod esign f or ZAVA.

C_In638_R_86_93_tappeti.indd 93

16/12/13 14.44


January-February 2014 In terni

94 / INdesign Crossover

time-lapse

by Katrin Cosseta

The lesson of the masters, more timely than ever. 2013 has been a year packed with reissues, or production of historic designs for the first time, as well as chromatic and materic updates of furniture and lamps that are already part of design history. Often true icons. Philological paths that combine today’s technology with yesterday’s genius

The apron de signed b y Achil le Castiglioni and Max H uber in 1967 as the ideal w orkwear f or any de signer. A proje ct never produced bef ore , a col labora tion be tween Fond azione Achil le Castiglioni and Yoo x.com (ex cl usive online s ale) .

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 94

16/12/13 15.03


Interni

January-February 2014

INdesign crossover / 95

Cubo chair de signed b y Achil le & Pier G iacomo C astiglioni (in the pho t o) in 1957, original l y made with paral lele pipeds of cel l ular f oam rubber with se ct ors of variable s tiffne ss . Merit alia put s this proje ct int o produ ction f or the firs t time , with a met al stru cture on wheel s , sea t in flexible variable -density pol yurethane . Covered in f abri c or lea ther.

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 95

16/12/13 15.03


96 / INdesign Crossover

January-February 2014 Interni

Stand ard C hair de si gned b y Jean ProuvÊ (in the pho t o) in 1934 and produced b y Vitra since 2001 , no w upd ated in col labora tion with the ProuvÊ f amil y and Dut ch de si gner H el la Jon gerius , al so in the Stand ard SP (S iège en Pla stique) version. T he sea t and b ac k col or are no l on ger in wood but in pla stic , f or different combina tions; the p ar t s are ea sy t o repla ce and coordina ted with the ma t te po wder-co ated met al base .

E15 reissue s several pie ce s of furniture b y the German modern archite ct and de si gner F erdinand Kramer (in the pho t os) . T hey incl ude the F K 10 Weissenhof chair de si gned in 1926 and used in one of the ap ar tment s of the his t oric Weissenhof siedl un g of Stut t gar t by Mies van der R ohe . F eet in walnut or o ak, pol yurethane f oam fil ler, f abric co ver.

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 96

16/12/13 15.03


Interni

January-February 2014

time lapse / 97

Pol trona Fra u offers new col ors f or the Dezza chair, designe d by G io Ponti in 1965. T he o pen- pore la cquere d ash s truc ture is no w al so available in Ponti green, Ponti bl ue an d soli d Canalet t o w alnut , in tune with the ma ster ’s ae sthetic langu age , as wel l as the white an d bla ck versions alrea dy incl u ded in the col le ction. At the out set this piece w as no t jus t an armchair, but a cons truc tion s ystem of f our finishe d par t s t o a ssemble a pos teriori, by re que st, as seen in the a ssembl y ins truc tions from tha t perio d. Dezza come s with b acks in three height s an d a 2-sea t sof a version.

T he TL 3 table b y F ranco Albini, designe d in 1953 an d pro duce d at the time b y Poggi, no w get s an a ccura te reissue in the I Mae stri col le ction by Cassina . T he s truc ture is in soli d na tural or bla ck s taine d ash, an d Canalet t o w alnut . T he t o p ha s a re ctangular, squ are or roun d f orm, in w oo d or gla ss . T he new fea ture s of the reissue are b ase d on archiv al dra wings .

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 97

16/12/13 15.03


January-February 2014 Interni

98 / INdesign Crossover

Bardi ’s Bo wl Chair, de signed by L ina Bo B ardi (in the pho t o) in 1951, ha s been indus trialized f or the firs t time by Arper in a limited re -edition of 500 pie ces , in col la bora tion with the L ina Bo and P.M. Bardi Ins titute . T he chair is composed of a semispheri cal stru cture covered in lea ther or f abri c, re sting on a met al ring stru cture , f or ea sy adjus tment , suppor ted by f our le gs .

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 98

16/12/13 15.03


Interni

time lapse / 99

January-February 2014

Past o e reissue s the Wire L ounge Chair (in the FM 06 and FM 05 versions , re spe ctive ly with and without ar mre st s) de signed b y Cee s Braak man with Adriaan Dekker in 1958. T he sea t co mes in b lack s tee l wire , with p adding and optiona l back cushion, and co mplete s the family tha t alread y cont ains a chair and s t oo ls.

TV Chair, de signed by Mar c N ewson for Moroso in 1993, no w co mes in ne w co lors and a ne w version with re movab le cover. Made in flameproo f po lyurethane foam with interna l stee l stru cture , it ha s a b ase with p ainted s tee l feet . O s aka cur ved div an de signed b y Pierre Pau lin in 1967, pro t otyped b y Mobi lier N ationa l and sho wn a t the U nivers al Exposition o f O s aka in 1970 . La Cividina reissue s this pie ce with a s tee l stru cture covered in shape -fast exp anded po lyurethane , with s tret ch fabri c cover. T he jointed modu les , as in the p ast (in the i mage fro m 1973, an ex cerpt fro m the bro chure o f Mobi lier N ationa l t o i llus tra te the co mpositions o f the div an) , per mit maxi mu m flexibi lity , changing the leng th fro m 180 t o 630 cm.

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 99

20/12/13 19.39


100 / INdesign Crossover

January-February 2014 In terni

W ith the R e-L igh ting G ino S arf atti. Edition n. 1 col le ction, Fl os reissue s several la mps de signed b y the f ounder of Ar tel uce , u pdated in technic al ter ms. O ne of the m is the Model l o 548, a table la mp f or refle cted and diffused ligh t de signed in 1951 . It is co mposed of an al u miniu m s potligh t on a tubular polished or burnished bra ss s tem, and a metha cr yla te diffuser. The original inc ande scen t bulb ha s been re pla ced b y an LED ligh t source .

The Stil novo brand is revived wi th new pro pos al s and the reissue of an iconic la mp col le ction. O ne of the piece s is Triedro , de signed by J oe C ol o mbo in 1970 , a la mp tha t can be adjus ted in any dire ction, wi th diffuser in whi te pain ted metal , available in cla mp, w al l and fl oor model s.

The Ma sters col le ction by Nemo con tains the reissue of the Proje cteur 165 de signed b y L e C orbusier in 1954 to ligh t the H igh C our t of C handigarh, India . Produced in a mini version, it ha s a bod y and bra cke t in al u miniu m and s teel , pain ted in bleu s ablĂŠ or li me whi te, and a fros ted gla ss shade . Available wi th cla mp, or a s a sus pension or w al l la mp.

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 100

16/12/13 15.03


Interni

time lapse / 101

January-February 2014

Mar tinel li L uce pre sent s a mini version, with L ED te chno log y, of the iconic Pipis tre llo designe d by G ae Au lenti in 1965. Minipipis tre llo ha s a s tain less s tee l struc ture , a diffuser in op al white metha cr ylate , an d a b ase in a luminium, painte d white or dark bro wn. In the pho t o, the ins tallation of the exhibition ‘G ae Au lenti - O bje ct s an d S pace s’, Milan T rienna le, Apri l 2013.

Ol uce reissue s the 275 tab le lamp designe d by Marco Zanuso in 1963. Cap in op al PMMA , ro tating on the b ase in white or bro wn painte d met al.

C_In638_R_94_101_riedizioni.indd 101

16/12/13 15.03


crossover

INtopics

INteriors&architecture

editoriale pag. 1

Shenzhen Bao’an pag. 2

Inizia un anno decisamente importante, che sotto tutti i punti di vista si prospetta denso di avvenimenti e novità. Nel 2014, infatti, Interni festeggia 60 anni. Rileggere il percorso che la testata ha compiuto da “rivista dell’arredamento” a “magazine of interior and contemporary design” è inevitabile fonte di orgoglio, che ci porta ad assumere un impegno sempre più deciso nell’attività di comunicazione e promozione della cultura del progetto a livello internazionale. Per questo abbiamo scelto di focalizzare ogni numero del 2014 su un tema specifico che metta in evidenza le evoluzioni ultime e le problematiche emergenti del mondo dell’architettura e del design. Abbiamo voluto iniziare parlando di crossover, inteso come innesto e contaminazione di visioni diverse tra loro. Si tratta di un tema che Interni sente particolarmente vicino per la specificità del ruolo che si è ritagliato in questi ultimi anni, che è quello di attivatore e facilitatore di alleanze creative tra progettisti, imprese, esponenti della cultura e operatori del progetto nel senso più ampio. Creare nuovi modelli di condivisione e cooperazione è oggi fondamentale, così come è importante individuare nuovi punti di vista sulle cose che non possono più essere pensate e realizzate come si faceva in passato. Questo vuol dire che bisogna abbattere le barriere disciplinari, contaminare i saperi, mescolare i generi, assorbire tutte le suggestioni che provengono dai mondi ‘altri’. In altre parole, fare del ‘crossover’ sia un approccio mentale che un metodo operativo. È quanto abbiamo voluto esprimere in questo primo numero del 2014, analizzando progetti che scelgono la formula dell’ibridazione per affrontare con positività le sfide future. Un tema che proponiamo come un augurio: quello della condivisione. Che si tratti di idee, progetti, imprese, o anche solo emozioni. Gilda Bojardi

progetto di Studio Fuksas/ Massimiliano & Doriana Fuksas

Astley Castle, casa di vacanza nella campagna inglese, progetto di Witherford Watson Mann Architects. Photo by Hélène Binet

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 102

foto di Leonardo Finotti/ courtesy Studio Fuksas - testo di Matteo Vercelloni

Con il nuovo TERMINAL 3 dell’AEROPORTO internazionale di SHENZHEN, la storica porta d’ingresso della Cina da Hong Kong, lo Studio FUKSAS torna al tema della LANDARCHITECTURE, affrontato per la Fiera di Milano (2005) e fecondo terreno di SPERIMENTAZIONE per le infrastrutture del nuovo millennio Verso la metà degli anni ’90 Deng Xiaoping, leader del partito comunista cinese e pioniere della riforma economica che ha portato la Cina allo sviluppo odierno, segnò un cerchio ideale attorno a un luogo lungo la costa meridionale, il delta del Fiume delle Perle, un luogo conosciuto con il nome di Shenzhen. Prima “Zona Economica Speciale” con l’obiettivo primario di diventare un’area manifatturiera per l’esportazione, Shenzhen si trasformò negli anni successivi in una sorta di ‘terra di mezzo’ tra Hong Kong e il continente, acquistando il ruolo simbolico di ‘porta’ della Cina per l’ingresso dei capitali stranieri e delle iniziative imprenditoriali provenienti da tutto il mondo. La crescita del Paese con la transizione da un’economia pianificata ad un’economia di mercato, secondo l’anomalia del modello di un capitalismo con caratteristiche cinesi, si ritrova nella pianificazione urbana dell’area di Shenzhen. Vent’anni fa la città aveva una popolazione di circa 30.000 abitanti con una superficie edificata di circa tre chilometri quadrati; oggi gli abitanti si avvicinano ai nove milioni e la superficie urbana raggiunge i settantanove chilometri di estensione. Una crescita esponenziale di difficili paragoni che ha conosciuto uno sviluppo edilizio a macchia d’olio senza una regia di pianificazione, nell’assenza di un disegno urbano complessivo. Anche il nuovo Terminal 3 progettato da Massimiliano e Doriana Fuksas tende a raggiungere fattori da primato: è il più grande edificio pubblico di Shenzhen esteso sotto una copertura scultorea per circa mezzo milione di metri quadrati, annumera 63 gates d’imbarco e si allinea a soddisfare la domanda di transito di quarantacinquemilioni di passeggeri all’anno. Un’architettura a scala territoriale, lunga circa un chilometro e mezzo, che si pone anche come un segno inequivocabile di riferimento e allo stesso tempo di ordine, raffigurato dall’impianto a croce che più che un aeroplano vuole ricordare, come afferma lo stesso Fuksas “una manta, una razza che respira, cambia forma, ha una sua dolcezza, si piega, subisce variazioni, prende luce, rimanda luce, la fa filtrare nell’interno”. In effetti il progetto (risultato vincitore in un concorso internazionale con partecipanti del calibro di Foster Associates, Kisho Kurokawa, GMP International, Foreign Office Architects, solo per ricordarne alcuni) con la sua doppia pelle bianca che forma, scolpisce e sviluppa, l’involucro comples-

19/12/13 11.34


Inter ni January-february 2014 sivo, sembra accogliere i visitatori in uno spazio zoomorfo, che, come il ventre del grande pesce che inghiottì il profeta Giona, funge da filtro tra il viaggio e l’arrivo nel nuovo mondo. Ci si sente protetti sotto la grande volta ad andamento variabile, scolpita da segni esagonali che filtrano la luce dall’alto creando un gioco di riflessi sul pavimento lucido. Mentre si coglie con un solo sguardo la vastità dello spazio, la lunga prospettiva del percorso rettilineo, la figura della strada coperta che nelle sue parti conclusive si apre con grandi vetrate sulla pista di atterraggio per svilupparsi su tre livelli nel punto d’intersezione centrale, tra i due corpi di riferimento ortogonali. L’aeroporto sottolinea il ruolo di porta per la città del nuovo millennio – luogo simbolico oltre che funzionale – che questo progetto restituisce in modo completo alla scala di una convincente landarchitecture. Come afferma Fuksas: “l’aeroporto è le città di oggi […] è una struttura lineare, un lungo percorso, una passerella. Oggi gli aeroporti devono essere macrostruttura che ridà qualità alla vita della gente. I nostri committenti cinesi ci hanno chiesto: fate un aeroporto, fatelo pensando alla vita della gente che ci sta dentro, un posto dove si possa stare bene anche se l’aereo è in ritardo”. E’ questo il mondo delle infrastrutture che oggi come ieri permette di sperimentare nuove scale d’intervento e nuove figure. Aeroporti, certo ma anche ponti e

INservice TRAnslations / 103

autostrade, gallerie, svincoli e rotonde, tracciati ferroviari; sono loro quei manufatti funzionali, quelle ‘architetture di servizio’ che non solo presiedono al funzionamento del mondo e allo scorrimento dei suoi flussi sempre più intensi, ma che sono chiamati, soprattutto, a ‘dargli forma’, presentandosi, spesso, come unici elementi di orientamento e riferimento. Costruzioni pregne di identità in paesaggi antropizzati, la cui crescente estensione e globalizzazione si traduce a volte pericolosamente in un’anonima progressiva omologazione, tendenza che il progetto di Shenzhen Bao’an ha saputo rifiutare con fermezza. - pag. 2 Vista della copertura del nuovo Terminal 3 verso il punto d’incontro dei due corpi tra loro ortogonali. Le forometrie esagonali permettono alla luce naturale di filt are nell’interno schermata da un ulteriore layer sottostante. - pag. 4 Una vista dello spazio centrale a tripla altezza che mostra dall’alto l’architettura del terminal. Una zona d’attesa. In primo piano, le poltroncine disegnate appositamente dai Fuksas. Nella pagina a fianco una p ospettiva centrale del percorso con la zona ristoranti e lounge d’attesa a doppia altezza. Vista di una zona d’imbarco con la grande volta a geometria variabile che avvolge lo spazio nella sua interezza. - pag. 6 Una veduta dello spazio unitario interno: la luce che filt a dalla copertura crea un gioco di riflessi che segue le ore del giorno sul pavimento lucido.

Il castello parassita pag. 8 progetto di Witherford Watson Mann Architects foto di Hélène Binet - testo di Alessandro Rocca

RIUTILIZZARE senza RICOSTRUIRE: dopo un incendio e quarant’anni di abbandono, i RUDERI di ASTLEY CASTLE diventano l’INVOLUCRO per una nuova struttura, in pietra, mattoni e legno lamellare, per una singolare RESIDENZA di villeggiatura nella CAMPAGNA INGLESE L’Inghilterra è un Paese che può vantare una cultura architettonica importante che spesso, a causa della sua complessità e diversità, rischia di appiattirsi nell’ombra dei grattacieli londinesi e dei grandi eventi, dalle opere del millennio alle imprese olimpiche. Perché oltre l’high-tech, di cui l’Inghilterra è luogo d’origine e patria d’elezione, esiste un gran numero di architetti che sanno lavorare in punta di mouse, con empirica eleganza, dialogando con la tradizione e rielaborando gli elementi tradizionali del costruire di ogni giorno. Tra gli architetti inglesi che coltivano con raffinata consapevolezza una linea di normalità, di architettura quotidiana, antieroica, ricordiamo Caruso St John, Tony Fretton e Sergison Bates, ed è a questo gruppo che si aggiunge lo studio di Stephen Witherford, Christopher Watson e William Mann, che è un esempio di competenza ed equilibrio da prendere a modello. L’intervento ad Astley Castle ha giustamente ricevuto il prestigioso premio Stirling, edizione 2013, conferito dal Royal Institute of British Architects, ed è una dimostrazione convincente di come si possa realizzare un’architettura di grande pregio, e anche di grande effetto, con materiali semplici, tecnologie ordinarie e costi contenuti. Il tema del progetto era stato lanciato con un concorso, nel 2007, dal Landmark Trust, un’organizzazione che si occupa di salvaguardare e mantenere il patrimonio storico inglese attraverso iniziative di solidarietà civile, e riguardava il recupero, o meglio il salvataggio, dei resti di Astley Castle. Immersi nel verde del Warwickshire, i vecchi muri in blocchi di arenaria risalivano al dodicesimo secolo, avevano accolto per centinaia d’anni la residenza di una famiglia nobiliare e poi, in anni più recenti, il castello era stato convertito in albergo. La lunga vita dell’edificio sembra però imboccare la dirittura di arrivo quando, nel 1970, un incendio distrugge tutte le parti in legno, tetto, solai, pavimenti, infissi, e per oltre quarant’anni le murature quasi millenarie, persa ogni difesa, iniziano a cedere e a disfarsi con numerosi crolli e cedimenti. Il progetto di Witherford Watson Mann è un esperimento di retrofitting estremo, cioè di recupero di tutto ciò che è recuperabile, e che non è moltissimo, e di inserimento e completamento di tutto ciò che manca con opere architettoniche ed elementi decisamente nuovi che non si preoccupano di mimetizzarsi all’interno della struttura precedente. Seguendo i dettami del restauro contemporaneo, che vieta la ricostruzione in stile e prescrive di completare le parti mancanti con inserti della massima neutralità, WWM utilizzano una palette di materiali di estrema semplicità: mattoni, elementi in cemento prefabbricato di colore grigio e legno lamellare con finitura al naturale. All’esterno, il risultato è un’immagine affascinante in cui la rovina mantiene l’aspetto del rudere in abbandono, conservando persino le piante rampicanti avvinte alle vecchie pietre, e nello stesso tempo dichiara la presenza di un corpo che, seppure in maniera gentile, si inserisce come un parassita, una presenza estranea che sfrutta le vecchie mura come il guscio di un organismo ormai estinto, come un residuo disponibile che si può riciclare come habitat per una nuova forma di vita. Come dicono gli architetti “non abbiamo restaurato il castello e neppure abbiamo voluto enfatizzare la rovina in modo romantico; abbiamo invece stabilito una nuova unità,

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 103

lo abbiamo reso stabile riconnettendo le parti ma abbiamo anche voluto che conservasse un senso di incompletezza e che rimanesse poroso, con le sue ferite ancora aperte. Un doppio obiettivo, quindi, che porta a evidenziare non tanto il contrasto tra vecchio e nuovo, che insieme compongono una nuova unità, ma piuttosto tra le due condizioni dell’abbandono e del riuso che convivono nello stesso progetto. Questa scelta è molto chiara anche all’interno, dove le parti rinnovate stanno a contatto diretto con altre in cui si sono semplicemente risolti i problemi statici e di sicurezza senza raggiungere l’abitabilità. Dovendo accettare la presenza ingombrante delle murature esistenti l’organizzazione della casa è ribaltata: al piano terra gli ambienti esistenti sono utilizzati per quattro grandi camere da letto e un foyer generoso al centro del quale troneggia, come una scultura di arte povera, un’imponente scala in legno lamellare. Al piano superiore, libero dall’ingombro delle grandi murature, si trova un unico ambiente indiviso che contiene il soggiorno comune, la cucina e la sala da pranzo. - pag.8 Pianta del piano terra con le murature esistenti, in grigio, e le nuove pareti, in rosso. Dall’esterno il castello, trasformato in albergo e poi distrutto da un incendio nel 1970, conserva il suo aspetto di rudere immerso nella natura del Warwickshire. - pag. 9 La nuova architettura si manifesta all’esterno quasi soltanto su una parete, rivolta a sud, dove si riconoscono le fine tre delle camere da letto, al piano inferiore, e il fine trone dell’open space al piano superiore. (Foto di Philip Vile). - pag. 11 La sala maggiore del castello, con il camino al centro, è conservata nel suo stato attuale, come una grande stanza a cielo aperto e come un patio che filt a il passaggio tra la casa e il giardino. Le sezioni mettono in evidenza il rapporto tra le murature esistenti e il nuovo intervento, per cui si sono adoperati mattoni, elementi in cemento prefabbricato e strutture in legno lamellare. Uno scorcio della vetrata che dal soggiorno, al piano superiore, affaccia sulla sala maggiore a cielo aperto. - pag. 12 Veduta di una delle quattro grandi stanze del piano terra, camere con soggiorno. (Foto di J. Miller). Particolare di una camera da letto con il nuovo soffit o in travi di legno lamellare. (Foto di Philip Vile). - pag. 13 La scala principale che conduce al soggiorno; a causa delle murature esistenti, l’organizzazione interna è upside down, con la zona notte al piano terra e una grande zona giorno, con cucina e pranzo, che occupa l’intero piano superiore.

19/12/13 11.34


104 / INservice translations

January-february 2014 Inter ni

I colori di Teresa pag. 14 progetto di Teresa Sapey Studio produzione di Martina Hunglinger foto di Mads Mogensen Studio - testo di Antonella Boisi

Un loft a Bourdeaux, in Francia, negli spazi riconvertiti di un’officina di ricambi meccanici, che si anima di una palette cromatica accesa, calda e solare. Per ritrovare, tra rigore e leggerezze, intorno a un’edonistica piscina coperta, il carattere di un’abitabilità glamour e fluida, libera da schemi precostituiti “Ho sempre creduto che le case abbiano un’anima e che gli spazi siano vivi come le persone. Ho bisogno di respirare uno spazio prima di pensare un progetto, perché ogni spazio ha la sua identità”. L’incipit di Teresa Sapey, progettista italiana di base a Madrid, distilla al meglio il senso del suo intervento a Bourdeaux: la riconversione di ben 900 mq complessivi di vecchie officine di ricambi meccanici in disuso in un loft solare e mediterraneo dedicato all’abitare glamour di una giovane coppia di francesi con una figlia. “Quando le visitai per la prima volta” ricorda “si sentiva ancora fortemente l’odore dell’olio del lubrificante dei motori e il sudore degli operai. I miei passi echeggiavano in una sorta di cattedrale del lavoro novecentesco e si vedevano ancora i calendari Pirelli attaccati dietro il bagno. Uno spazio maschile di sacrificio duro e di potere”. Carta bianca e lei, con una certa dose di ironia e divertissment, è riuscita a realizzare la magia: ha conservato l’impianto complessivo originario, ma grazie all’altezza significativa dei volumi, ha giocato con piani percettivi spiazzanti, grafici per incisività del segno ma altresì fluidi, rigorosi e leggeri, inventandosi una planimetria “rovesciata” foriera di sorprese continue. Per analogia, ha smontato e rimontato ‘la macchina da abitare’ come fosse un collage compositivo di elementi meccanici. Con molti pezzi appositamente disegnati su misura. Si entra così da un piccolo ingresso, uno spazio con soffitto basso, quasi lillipuziano, che si protende su una cantina di vini centenari accolti nei buchi di una parete bianca come bolle di sapone. Poi si giunge in un’enorme cucina concepita come un “laboratorio del sapore” che risulta però, di fatto, soltanto il preludio – insieme al prolungamento lineare della zona pranzo – di un’invitante promenade verso quello che era il volume più hard e industriale ora conquistato dalla piscina: un belvedere coperto, una nuova pelle edonista che idrata i vari spazi distribuiti e raccordati a quote differenti. La palestra, il bagno, il guardaroba, la camera padronale da un lato – quello dedicato alla vita privata. Dall’altro, lo studio-biblioteca, e al centro, come in una ‘enclave’, allineata con la base della piscina, la ‘vasca’ continua e ininterrotta del living con le sue isole di accoglienza degli ospiti: la zona conviviale e pubblica, che si prolunga nel soppalco dove si trova lo spazio con il tavolo da biliardo rosa-ciliegio come fluttuante sul salone sottostante. La struttura originaria dell’involucro segnata dall’intelaiatura metallica di travi e pilastri a vista è stata volutamente enfatizzata con un nuovo colore grigio ferro taylorista, che trova un contrappunto dinamico nella palette dei bianchi madreperlacei srotolati sulle pareti per riflettere in modo dinamico la luce. “Mi sono liberata dalla paura di osare il colore” continua Teresa “ma ho imparato a pesarlo, dosarlo, nel rapporto con i materiali e con la luce che è stata un materiale malleabile e duttile, alla stregua del legno e del cemento impiegati per i pavimenti. Sentivo il bisogno di tonalità calde e accese, di accenti forti. Campiture di giallo, arancio, zafferano in grado di sostenere gli effetti di vedo-non vedo prodotti dalla ricerca continua di trasparenze visive delle superfici. La mancanza di finestre e di un rapporto dentro/fuori canonico in questi spazi era infatti evidente. Il principale serbatoio di luce naturale era e resta zenitale, e considerato questo fatto, il taglio di un patio quadrato en plen

iniala beach house pag. 20 progetto d’interiors Fernando e Humberto Campana, Joseph Walsh, Jaime Hayon, Lazaro Rosa Violan, A-cero, Mark Brazier Jones, Graham Lamb, Eggarat Wongcharit progetto architettonico Graham Lamb foto di Courtesy Iniala Beach House - testo di Laura Ragazzola

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 104

air, diventato apertura privilegiata per il living e due camere da letto, si è rivelato significativo. Mi piace che un luogo possa offrire più temporalità, variazioni di note e l’opportunità di scrivere giornate differenti, anche con la luce”. Quella artificiale l’ha affidata alla regia scenografica degli spot sulle travi, delle gole fluorescenti e dei faretti a sottolineatura dei volumi. In un certo senso, come già fece Gae Aulenti nella Gare d’Orsay parigina, immaginandosi una vita dentro la stazione, Teresa Sapey ha pensato un’architettura nell’architettura e ha innestato un piccolo giardino segreto dentro l’officina, che è diventato veicolo di respiro spaziale e di nuova energia. Nel diario di bordo che è stato, alla fine, per Teresa Sapey il progetto della casa “un falso moderno, un classico contemporaneo, una teatralità drammatica, un mix di tattilitàcomfort-funzioni, una bella donna invecchiata con dignità seguendo l’evoluzione del suo percorso” alla fine, proprio a lei, è stata riservata la sorpresa. “I committenti mi confessarono che loro non mangiano mai in casa. Non sanno neanche preparare un uovo...Che delusione, dopo aver disegnato centimetro per centimetro un ‘laboratorio del sapore’! Fu così che gli chiesi con voce non proprio ferma… se avessi potuto scrivere a carattere cubitali sui mobili della cucina, in uno squillante arancione: “je n’aime pas faire la cuisine”. - pag. 14 Il patio interno, con il pavimento in teak e il murales dai colori accesi su disegno dello studio Teresa Sapey, come il tavolo con piano in legno. Fioriere e sedie in metallo nero di Los Peñotes. Nella pagina accanto: vista dalla quota dell’ingresso-cucina-pranzo verso la zona ribassata del living. Un cannocchiale visivo ininterrotto, sottolineato dalla pavimentazione in parquet di quercia e dalla fluidità della co truzione spaziale. Da un lato, si nota la lunghissima parete bianca attrezzata e foderata di libri, su disegno; dall’altro il volume vetrato che accoglie la piscina interna. In primo piano, lounger Cloe in polietilene di Myyour. - pag. 17 Scorcio panoramico dal soppalco, che ospita l’isola del biliardo sul living organizzato al livello sottostante.Dettaglio della cucina. Al cospetto dei moduli bianchi laccati di Santos e degli sgabelli di Calligaris spicca l’ironica scritta ‘Non mi piace cucinare’ in vinile orange dedicata da Teresa Sapey ai committenti. Nella pagina a fianc , focus sull’area del living con imbottiti bianchi e tappeto disegnati appositamente da Teresa Sapey. Sul fondo, l’area-pranzo con il tavolo e le sedie della serie Beam Glass di Piero Lissoni per Porro. Dipinto ad olio di Alberto Acinas. Lampada da terra Samurai di Vibia. - pag. 18 La salle de bain, con il monolite attrezzato dalle forme fluide in Corian®DuPont, che accoglie i lavabi, completamente realizzato su disegno di Teresa Sapey. Nella pagina accanto: lo specchio d’acqua interno della piscina racchiusa in un volume di vetro trasparente ad effetto acquario.

In Thailandia, un resort d’alto profilo per comfort e design, nasce dall’incontro di un selezionato team di progettisti internazionali. Fra tutti, i fratelli Campana, che anche in questo lavoro rivelano la loro vocazione al sociale Anticonvenzionale, eclettico, sostenibile: può essere riassunto così l’ultimo progetto di Humberto e Fernando Campana, tra le più celebrate (e creative) figure del design contemporaneo. In un paesaggio incontaminato, su una spiaggia di rara bellezza a una manciata di chilometri dall’aeroporto di Phuket, in Thailandia, il duo brasiliano

19/12/13 11.34


Inter ni January-february 2014 ha partecipato alla realizzazione dell’Iniala Beach House, un esclusivo residence per turismo d’alto livello, nato dal lavoro collettivo di un pool di designer di fama internazionale, fra cui appunto i fratelli Campana. É stato il doppio Dna dell’Iniala Beach House a convincere i Campana a parteciparvi: da un lato l’idea di creare un luogo speciale, in grado di offrire un’esperienza unica, ma soprattutto ‘personalizzata’, di comfort, relax e ospitalità; dall’altro l’esigenza di creare un legame forte e socialmente utile con il luogo e la comunità locale, che ancora oggi patisce le conseguenze del devastante tsunami del 2004. Perché le preoccupazioni d’ordine ambientale e di sensibilità culturale, nonché l’attenta osservazione dei materiali locali, del clima e del paesaggio hanno da sempre caratterizzato la vita e il lavoro dei fratelli Campana, pronti ad avventurarsi nella giungla amazzonica o nelle favelas brasiliane per creare arredi, oggetti e ambienti che provocatoriamente scardinano le regole del design tradizionale. Sulla spiaggia di Nati Beach, i fratelli brasiliani hanno firmato il progetto d’interior decorator di una delle tre ville - la Collectors Villa - che compongono il resort (gli interni delle altre due, la Thai Villa e L’European Villa, sono state progettati rispettivamente dal thailandese Eggarat Wongcharit e dallo spagnolo A-Cero); ma si sono anche occupati della Spa, del cinema e del garden, che completano l’offerta esclusiva di ciascuna residenza. Il progetto dei Campana stabilisce una continua e felice relazione con il paesaggio, di rara bellezza: luce e aria filtrano attraverso le ampie vetrate dei living e delle camere, mentre ombre, penombre e riflessi dorati riempiono gli spazi più intimi della Spa e del cinema. La tradizione artigianale locale rivive nell’uso abbondante del legno, nei volumi squadrati e gentili degli ambienti, ma anche nei bellissimi rivestimenti ceramici delle pareti: si passa dai colori caleidoscopici di mosaici abitati da fantastiche figure di animali ai riflessi madreperlacei che impreziosiscono gli spazi, alternandosi con estro e felice senso cromatico. Iconici (e pieni d’ironia) i pezzi d’arredo, scelti dai progettisti brasiliani all’interno della loro vasta produzione di design: dagli imbottiti in pelliccia ecologica che creano l’inusuale platea del cinema “privato” alle poltroncine dal rivestimento lasciato volutamente “abbondante”, che animano microsalotti con sfumature marine. Aperto il dicembre scorso, il resort è nato su iniziativa dell’imprenditore (anche filantropo) britannico Mark Weingard (lui stesso si salvò per miracolo dallo tsunami del 2004): comprende tre ville e un’esclusiva penthouse suite, nata dalla collaborazione dello stesso Weingard con Graham Lamb, chief design director dell’Iniala Beach, che firma il progetto di tutto il complesso. Gli edifici si sviluppano intorno a un corpo centrale, costruito nel secolo scorso secondo i canoni della tipica architettura locale: il risultato è un mix riuscito di tradizione e contemporaneità, che caratterizza anche gli interni curati dal team di designer internazionali. Non manca un ristorante per raffinati gourmand, che può contare sull’estro culinario di un giovane ed emergente chef spagnolo, Eneko Atxa, premiato con tre stelle Michelin. E anche i bambini hanno un ambiente loro dedicato con arredi a misura e giochi-design (in Asia è il primo kids-hotel). Non solo. Una galleria d’arte

Il ‘salotto’ della cannella pag. 26 progetto di Tyin Tegnestue Architects foto di Pasi Aalto - testo di Antonella Boisi

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 105

INservice TRAnslations / 105

aperta al pubblico, promuove la cultura e la creatività artigianale locale di Phuket, aprendo i suoi spazi ad artisti emergenti thailandesi. Ma la vocazione al sociale del resort (tanto apprezzata dai fratelli Campana), si concrettizza soprattutto nel devolvere il 15 per cento degli introiti a progetti educativi, di difesa della salute e di promozione della sostenibilità sia in Thailandia che in Indonesia. - pag. 21 Un’immagine d’insieme che mette a confronto le due anime del resort: sulla sinistra l’edificio esi tente, opportunamente ristrutturato, che rivela la tipica architettura locale; sulla destra, la penthouse suite, un volume di cristallo dal taglio contemporaneo affacciato sulla spiaggia. - pag. 22 In alto l’edificio origina e del secolo scorso, affacciato su uno specchio d’acqua: intorno si sviluppano le nuove costruzioni. Nella foto piccola in basso, un dettaglio del mosaico multicolor che riveste una delle pareti interne della villa. Nella pagina a fianc , il living room di una delle tre ville, che porta la fi ma dei fratelli Campana per il progetto d’interiors. In primo piano si riconoscono le poltroncine Grinza, qui vestite in azzurro per celebrare il mare, che fanno parte della collezione di Edra. - pag. 25 Sopra, il dettaglio di uno specchio nella Spa, sempre dei fratelli Campana, che richiama un sole stilizzato, e nella foto accanto, una delle camere da letto, che porta la fi ma del designer spagnolo Jaime Hayon: in primo piano la Tudor Chair che ha disegnato per Established and Sons. Nella pagina a fianc in alto un angolo della Spa, mentre in basso, una veduta d’insieme della platea del cinema con 22 posti a sedere: invece delle tradizionali sedute i fratelli Campana hanno proposto gli imbottiti Cipria, disegnati per Edra, con rivestimento in pelliccia ecologica.

A Sungai Penuh, isola di Sumatra, in Indonesia, un CENTRO DI FORMAZIONE per la PRODUZIONE DI CANNELLA. Risultato di una visione creativa-poetica e socialmente SOSTENIBILE alla progettazione-costruzione Hanno realizzato diversi progetti nelle aree povere e sottosviluppate di Thailandia, Birmania, Haiti e Uganda. Giovani, con un approccio originale e coraggioso, Andreas G. Gjertsen e Yashar Hanstad, alla guida dal 2008, nella città norvegese di Trondheim, dello studio Tyin Tegnestue Architects, sostengono una visione umanista e romantica: l’architettura è quella della necessità, dei fondamentali, della sostenibilità sociale che coinvolge le popolazioni locali sia nella fase progettuale che in quella costruttiva. È un punto di vista che ha a che fare con il carpentiere più che con il computer, con l’ascolto dei luoghi e delle persone; o come Johnny Plasma docet, con una modalità più empatica di trasformare un habitat che diventa occasione di arricchimento reciproco. Spiegano: “L’uomo e la qualità della vita sono più importanti della cifra stilistica impressa al contenitore. Il progetto vive una vita sua che non possiamo controllare. Porta con sè meravigliosi errori. Abbiamo messo a punto una Toolbox che contiene gli strumenti necessari per costruire strutture utili, belle e necessarie in qualsiasi circostanza. Testata sul campo in condizioni estreme può essere facilmente spedita con ogni mezzo di trasporto. Non bisogna indugiare troppo prima di cominciare. Una volta partiti, però, bisogna essere molti auto-critici e come un mantra, ripetersi la domanda: cosa stiamo facendo? Considerato che da un test nel Regno Unito è emerso che gli architetti sono i meno felici del proprio lavoro, mentre i parrucchieri i più felici, noi abbiamo il privilegio di un feed-back immediato”. È andata così anche in Indonesia, nel centro di formazione per la produzione di cannella Cassia Coop a Sungai Penuh, Kerinchi, Sumatra, sponsorizzato da LINK Arkitektur, costato l’equivalente di 30 mila euro e costruito in soli tre mesi (agosto – novembre 2011). “Tutto è iniziato con la visita di un uomo d’affari francese, Patrick Barthelemy, nel nostro ‘tegnestue’ (‘salotto’) di Trondheim, che si sedette di fronte a noi con una storia affascinante e una valigetta piena di cannella, l’85% della quale viene fornita a livello mon-

19/12/13 11.34


106 / INservice translations

January-february 2014 Interni

diale proprio da questa zona di Sumatra. Non abbiamo disegnato nulla prima della trasferta” continuano. “Pensavamo soltanto a come realizzare un centro di formazione ospitale che restituisse uno standard etico nel modo di gestire un’impresa; con lavoratori e agricoltori locali retribuiti in modo corretto, con un programma di assistenza sanitaria e con accesso a scuole e istruzione. Tutte le ‘fabbriche’ di Cassia Coop dovevano essere luoghi di lavoro sicuri, igienici e socialmente sostenibili. Abbiamo conquistato la fiducia di molti, compresi giovani studenti internazionali di architettura, 70 persone in tutto, che ci hanno seguito. Su una lavagna bianca riportavamo day by day con dei pennarelli l’evoluzione dell’intervento. Tutti i disegni sono stati fatti dopo. A realizzazione compiuta. Quasi un paradosso. Ci ha aiutato prevedere meno dettagli possibili nel progetto - solo gli essenziali”. Di fatto, il centro è una semplice scatola con copertura in lamiera, muri di mattoni, infissi, porte e finestre in legno di cannella. E, al centro, un incisivo ‘buco’ rettangolare che identifica un patio, segnato da due alberi da frutto, perché la composizione si sviluppa e ruota, anche simbolicamente, intorno a due esemplari di durian. Materiali a km zero, recuperati nelle vicinanze del sito, e arredi di artigianato locale hanno concretizzato l’opera, che regala la sensazione di un’osmosi riuscita con l’ambiente e lo spirito del luogo. Il legno, ad esempio, proveniente dai tronchi di alberi di cannella dei dintorni, è stato trasportato da otto bufali d’acqua e tagliato/assemblato in una segheria in cantiere. L’idea del progetto si è così tradotta in una costruzione formata da un sistema di leggeri pilastri lignei a Y innestati su una base di pesanti mattoni e cemento. Il fronte anteriore regala una vista panoramica del monte Kerinci, il più alto vulcano dell’Indonesia e del lago, quello posteriore della foresta di alberi di cannella. Una sfida importante è stata quella di prevedere un clima venti-

lato naturalmente sotto l’estesa superficie del tetto che racchiude l’impianto complessivo di 600 mq: cinque volumi in mattoni e al centro un piccolo laboratorio, le aule, gli uffici e una cucina. Lo studio della massa termica, la capacità di immagazzinamento del calore della struttura, ha permesso ai progettisti di raggiungere prestazioni dinamiche ma controllate. “Un’altra grande scommessa” ricordano “è stata quella di superare la prova delle forze della natura, in una zona soggetta a frequenti terremoti”. L’involucro è già sopravvissuto a scosse di grado cinque sulla scala Richter: segno che il sistema costruttivo messo in campo con un format davvero basic, anche in termini materici, funziona.

INsight/ INscape

lo spazio della mente umana”. Uno spazio dove convivono sogni, ossessioni, incubi, desideri e progetti che si proiettano e si connettono con un mondo esterno, dove ciò che è materiale e ciò che è immateriale convivono e si alimentano reciprocamente. Questa introspezione dell’oscuro spazio della mente umana come luogo centrale della cultura, non solo del progetto, non sconfina mai con il surrealismo né nell’intimismo psicoanalitico; al contrario, ci mette in connessione con le infinite varianti del caos che governa l’universo. In questo libro Rota esibisce il baratro della propria mente come un territorio primordiale, rappresentato come quel presepe animato esposto in Triennale, in occasione della mostra Kama, creando un paesaggio di simboli onirici degno di Hieronymus Bosch; un processo dunque di liberazione dei grovigli del proprio ‘io’, proiettandoli all’esterno e insieme ricevendoli dall’esterno. Questo straordinario saggio sull’attuale Cosmologia portatile, dove tutto è relativo e frazionato dal “big bang del moderno” che ha disintegrato l’alibi della funzionalità, spinge il lettore a una riflessione che lo coinvolge nel profondo, riscoprendo i miti primordiali del proprio essere, continuamente profanato. Una rifondazione che ricordo in forma rovesciata il progetto del filosofo Ludwig Wittgenstein per la sorella Gretl, riempiendo quel vuoto metafisico con un materiale magmatico inespresso, in espansione e ripiegamento, che la modernità ha sempre evitato di indagare. In questo intreccio, la realtà rappresenta se stessa e insieme “altro da se stessa”, presenza e assenza. Tutto questo significa vivere il progetto dando un significato ‘provvisorio’ alle strutture, ai frammenti, ai materiali, e come nell’arte tutto si rinnova e muta di senso, e anche lo spazio diventa informe, libero “dall’afasia” del funzionalismo e dove tutto diventa finalmente profondamente ‘umano’. Non c’è più l’uomo al centro dell’universo come misura perfetta della scienza, ma piuttosto le sue viscere, i suoi muscoli, le sue secrezioni endocrine, cioè quel pozzo oscuro escluso dalla storia e dalla gloria. Il saggio di Rota ‘ruota’ come una grande metafora sulla fine dell’umanesimo inteso come antropomorfismo del mondo, per diventare un umanesimo informe, simile alla realtà sfuggente della vita e della morte, travolto da una evoluzione che non si è mai fermata. Un umanesimo che non ricerca più ‘l’uomo ideale’ ma le frontiere di una nuova bellezza.

CosmoLoGIa PorTaTILe pag. 32 di Andrea Branzi

“L’ARCHITETTURA NON È PIÙ NECESSARIA. L’autentico mestiere dell’architetto risiede nel RIVELARE LO SPAZIO DELLA MENTE UMANA”, scrive Italo Rota in Cosmologia portatile, dove TUTTO È RELATIVO E FRAZIONATO dal “big bang del moderno”, che ha disintegrato l’alibi della funzionalità, e che spinge il lettore a una riflessione che lo coinvolge nel profondo, riscoprendo i miti primordiali del proprio essere, continuamente profanato

- pag. 27 Il patio centrale aperto intorno al quale ruota la composizione d’insieme con, sullo sfondo, la vista panoramica dello specchio d’acqua del Kerinci Lake e, in primo piano, uno dei bufali d’acqua che hanno trasportato i tronchi dei duttili alberi di cannella adottati per realizzare i pilastri a Y, gli infissi le porte e le fine tre. Insieme a mattoni, cemento e riverstone, tutti materiali a Km zero. - pag. 29 L’area d’ingresso al Cassia Coop con, nell’atrium, i due svettanti alberi da frutto durian, intorno ai quali sono stati costruiti i cinque volumi in laterizio e legno che accolgono le differenti funzioni del centro di formazione. Due fasi di realizzazione dell’intervento: la base di mattoni e cemento (poi levigato) e l’intelaiatura di pilastri lignei, quasi una simbolica foresta tropicale. Nella pagina a fianco vista complessiva della semplice scatola con l’estesa copertura in lamiera, che identific , l’architettura (600 mq) progettata da Tyin Tegnestue Architects. Uno schizzo in corso d’opera e la planimetria eseguita dopo la realizzazione. - pag. 30 Lo spazio interno di un uffici . Prospiciente, in esterno e sopraelevata, l’area degli incontri. Nella pagina a fianc , una vista dello showroom e, nella cornice espositiva, un dettaglio del tronco dell’albero di cannella. Tutti gli arredi sono stati realizzati in corso d’opera con il contributo di artigiani locali.

Sono rari i libri che non si occupano di ‘progetti di design’, ma piuttosto di ‘progettare il design’, inteso come parte di una cultura in evoluzione, all’interno di un contesto storico in evoluzione. Questa indifferenza si protrae da diversi decenni e la cultura del progetto nel XXI secolo si muove sulle tracce di vecchie eredità, senza coscienza di se stessa e delle profonde motivazioni che la muovono e insieme la disperdono. Il libro di Italo Rota Cosmologia portatile pubblicato da Quodlibet Abitare si avvale di una limpida introduzione di Francesca La Rocca, membro di quella scuola critica che si è formata a Napoli attorno a Patrizia Ranzo. Il libro comprende, oltre agli scritti, anche “disegni, mappe, visioni” tracciate da Italo Rota; chi conosce l’autore, apprezza il suo muoversi in maniera apparentemente discontinua, con lampi folgoranti spesso seguiti dalle ombre profonde di nuovi materiali generativi, frutto di una curiosità onnivora, che non raggiunge mai la saturazione, la specializzazione, ma si espande come si espande il mondo degli oggetti; grande collezionista che raccoglie l’infinita varietà delle cose del mondo e della civiltà oggettuale: dal Tibet ai giocattoli, ai libri, alla scienza, ai reperti degli astronauti, ai distintivi militari e a qualsiasi reperto delle tracce umane. Un dandy che gestisce la propria immagine come specchio degli infiniti riverberi dell’eccentricità del mondo… Italo affronta con coraggio il nodo centrale del nostro tempo: “L’architettura non è più necessaria. L’autentico mestiere dell’architetto risiede nel rivelare - pag. 33 In queste pagine, disegni di Italo Rota estrapolati da Cosmologia Portatile.

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 106

19/12/13 11.34


Interni January-february 2014

INservice TRAnslations / 107

INsight/ INtoday

DomaIne de BoIsBucHeT pag. 34

di Olivia Cremascoli

PARADISO DEI PROGETTISTI e degli aspiranti tali, l’estesissima e idilliaca proprietà francese accoglie, da giugno a settembre, il GOTHA INTERNAZIONALE DEL DESIGN (dal 1990, più di 180 TRA DESIGNER E ARCHITETTI di chiara fama sono passati di lì) che, per una settimana, INSEGNANO a giovani ‘apprendisti’ A PROGETTARE CON LA TESTA, CON IL CUORE E CON LE MANI Lessac, comune francese di 598 anime, nella centrale regione del Poitou-Charentes, a più di tre ore d’auto da Parigi, sorge estesissimo – 150 ettari – e allo stesso tempo celato e isolato, il Domaine di Boisbuchet, bucolica proprietà (che viene citata in documenti risalenti al XVI secolo e i cui ultimi proprietari sono stati i conti di Le Camus) con tanto di castello (riedificato nel 1865) e quasi una ventina di corpi di fabbrica, storici (ristrutturati o in via di ristrutturazione) e contemporanei (tra cui il padiglione firmato da Shigeru Ban, il suo primo lavoro permanente in Europa), nel 1986 acquistata – abbandonata e “per pochi soldi” – da Alexander von Vegesack (classe 1945), tra le molte altre cose fondatore e direttore – dal 1989 al 2010 – del Vitra Design Museum di Weil am Rhein (Germania), ma anche indefesso viaggiatore e incontenibile collezionista di cose di design (“semplicemente, t’innnamori delle cose”, usa dire), quest’ultimo inteso nella sua accezione più ampia (da luci e arredi, tra i quali la celebratissima collezione di sedie Thonet – gran parte della quale è stata venduta allo Stato austriaco per acquistare, appunto, Boisbuchet – a orologi, auto, tessuti, stoviglie popolari d’uso, carri, carretti, selle...), come ha ben palesato Scoprire il design. La collezione Von Vegesack, mostra che ha debuttato nel 2008 alla pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli di Torino, tutt’oggi itinerante per l’Europa (catalogo bilingue di Electa). Questo blasonato gentiluomo tedesco vive da due anni in pianta stabile nella sua stupefacente proprietà di Lessac (campagna e bosco, con il fiume Vienne che la lambisce, un mulino che vi si affaccia, un lago natabile, cavalli allo stato brado e persino due asinelli Baudet de Poitou, razza antica e rara, che, in un certo senso, sembrano fare parte anch’essi della collezione Von Vegesack), dove Mathias Schwartz-Claus, curatore del Vitra Design Museum, organizza periodiche mostre presso il suggestivo castello, e dove, da metà giugno a metà settembre, c’è una gran viavai di giovani, provenienti veramente da mezzo mondo, va da sé tutti innamorati del design e con un sogno nel computer. In effetti, Boisbuchet, che è stato anche definito “magical design retreat”, è conosciuto per questo: come campus estivo dove ogni anno vengono organizzati fra i trenta e i quaranta qualificati workshop interdisciplinari (della durata di una settimana ciascuno, da domenica a sabato) su design, architettura e quant’altro di progettualmente creativo, dove – dal 1990 – s’è avvicendata, come tutor, una pletora di grandi firme del design internazionale (solo per citarne alcune: Toshiyuki Kita, Andrea Branzi, Michele De Lucchi, Ingo Maurer, Marcel Wanders, Maarten Baas, Yves Béhar, Atelier Oi, i fratelli Bouroullec e i fratelli Campana, Konstantin Grcic, Matali Crasset, Patrick Jouin, Arik Levy, Jean-Marie Massaud, Ron Arad, Ross Lovegrove, Tom Dixon, Jasper Morrison, Peter Marigold, Tokujin Yoshioka, Barber Osgerby, Patricia Urquiola, Freitag, Oliviero Toscani). E, fra i giovani, il soggiorno al Domaine de Boisbuchet lascia sovente un’impronta indelebile, in qualche modo paragonabile a una sorta di nostalgico ‘mal d’Africa’: infatti, l’idea di tornarci più e più volte è un leit-motiv tra loro: come ha scritto quest’anno nel suo blog il quebeccheseparigino Samuel N. Bernier, un benemerito di Boisbuchet (la scorsa estate, grazie a una borsa di studio di Be Open Foundation, s’è iscritto a tutti i workshop, da giugno a settembre, e, data la lunga permanenza, s’è pure portato appresso due stampanti 3D), “Il domaine era esattamente come me lo ricordavo, con i suoi alberi esotici, gli animali da fattoria e gli arredi di Vitra”, oppure, come ha scritto lo scorso ottobre la neofita losangelina Melanie Abrantes, “ho impiegato 13 ore di volo da Los Angeles a Parigi, quasi tre ore di treno da Parigi a Poitiers, poi due ore di bus da Poitiers a Lessac per alla fine trovarmi in Francia in the middle of nowhere (...), ma Boisbuchet è stata un’esperienza formidabile, ho incontrato delle persone veramente talentuose e so per certo che in futuro m’iscriverò di nuovo a qualche workshop!”. Da iscritti regolari (la quota, che comprende anche vitto e alloggio, cambia a seconda del proprio status: studente o già professionista), oppure da volontari che si guadagnano la frequentazione gratuita di un workshop con quattro settimane di lavoro sul campo (coltivatori d’orto, aiuti in cucina, fotografi documentaristi, addetti all’officina-magazzino, guide multi-lingue per il pubblico esterno che d’estate visita la proprietà, eccetera), c’è un nugolo di giovanotti e donzelle, tra cui anche diversi italiani dall’inglese fluente, che quasi ogni estate torna un po’ a Boisbuchet perché l’attrazione è fatale. In effetti, ci si sta molto bene, chi scrive lo può testimoniare essendoci stata di persona: la natura, peculiare delle colline del Limousin, è possente e selvatica – e può peraltro diventare musa ideale per la creatività – il parco delle architetture, creato in oltre

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 107

vent’anni e grazie in particolare al lavoro di tutor e studenti, è strabiliante (e porta a riflettere sul rapporto tra natura, architettura contemporanea e pre-esistenze), l’atmosfera è cosmopolita e informale, arricchente sia dal punto di vista culturale che umano, e le minuscole ritualità quotidiane sono piacevoli, come, ad esempio, il dimenticato suono del gong, che convoca a tavola per colazione, pranzo, merenda e cena, tutti insieme, su lunghi tavoli e lunghe panche disposti a ferro di cavallo, senza divisioni gerarchiche di sorta (studenti e docenti) e persino in compagnia di Alexander von Vegesack, che consuma comunitariamente i suoi pasti e, alla fine, sparecchia come tutti gli altri. Una lezione di stile, che di solito lascia stupefatti noi italiani, avvezzi all’altezzosa prosopopea delle ‘caste’ nazionali. Per tormare alla tuition, che è la parte più importante ma forse anche la più conosciuta di Boisbuchet, l’obiettivo primario dei workshop (attività pratiche e teoriche, integrate da confronti, discussioni e presentazione degli esiti finali il giorno prima della partenza) è sollecitare la creatività degli iscritti, promuovere modalità di pensiero ‘alternative’, sperimentare tecniche e materiali diversi, capire l’importanza dei diversificati processi di produzione/realizzazione di un lavoro. I workshop interdisciplinari, che da sempre spaziano grandemente nei loro focus, affrontano la questione progettuale da innumerevoli punti di vista, determinati dalla specializzazione dei singoli tutor: industrial design, product design, interior design, furniture design, textile design, glass & porcelain design, fashion & jewelry design, food design, sound design, exhibition design, design & entrepreneurship, packaging, art direction... Ma, fatta eccezione per la popolatissima estate (la disponibilità di posti-letto per chi frequenta i workshop è all’incirca un centinaio), il domaine nel resto dell’anno viene abitato dal proprietario e dal suo staff permanente, e in parte anche affittato a privati e società – quali, ad esempio, Hermès – per consessi e presentazioni varie (particolarmente richiesti, il fienile-granaio di circa 300 metri quadrati e lo storico mulino sul fiume, restaurato dal Politecnico di Kiev dopo le inondazioni del 1993, e trasformato in un café dall’assolata terrazza e con arredi Vitra). Data l’estensione dell’area, ciò che, in più, ci piacerebbe prima o poi vedere a Boisbuchet sono delle installazioni en plein air, a cavallo tra l’ars topiaria e l’arte contemporanea, che diano in pratica vita a un parco che facesse da contraltare a quello, già citato, delle architetture. Un’idea più reale della proprietà e delle sue multiple possibilità la si può avere sfogliando il bel libro illustrato Domaine de Boisbuchet, pubblicato da Cireca/Boisbuchet e acquistabile in loco (Domaine de Boisbuchet, 16500 Lessac, www.boisbuchet.org, info@boisbuchet.org, tel. 0033 (0) 5 45 89 6700). - pag. 35 In queste pagine, da sinistra: il castello di Boisbuchet con gli esiti finali del orkshop condotto nel 2010 da Moritz Waldemeyer. Vista aerea del Domaine de Boisbuchet (150 ettari) ritratto di Alexander Von Vegesack. Ancora il castello di Bosibuchet con l’opera che August de Los Reyes ha creato durante un workshop (2008) di Maarten Baas. - pag. 36 In questa pagina, dall’alto: edific ta intorno al 1860, esterno della dependance del Domaine de Boisbuchet, che oggi ospita la cucina, alcune camere da letto multiple, gli uffici una sala conferenze e le postazioni d’accesso a internet. Nella sottostante immagine, la galleria interna alla dependance (parte delle ex-scuderie), che è risolta con arredi Vitra, sedie Thonet e, a muro, un’opera di Humberto e Ferdinando Campana. Sotto, a sinistra, un momento dei lavori relativi al workshop del 2009 dei Fratelli Campana. - pag. 37 Parte del parco delle architetture del Domaine de Boisbuchet (150 ettari). Dall’alto: The bamboo lake pavillon by Simon Velez, 2001. Le Manege by Markus Heinsdorff, 2007. The Paper Pavillon by Shigeru Ban, 2001. - pag. 38 Parte del parco delle architetture del Domaine de Boisbuchet (a Lessac, Francia). Dall’alto: The pyramid by Brückner & Brückner Architekten, 2007. The log cabin by Brückner & Brückner Architekten, 2006. - pag. 39 In questa pagina, dall’alto: The Japanese Guesthouse constructed in 1860 and offered as a gift by the japanese Kominko Research Society. The small dome by Jörg Schlaich, 2006. The bamboo conference pavilon by Simon Velez, 2007.

19/12/13 11.34


108 / INservice translations

INdesign/INproject

60 anni di icone pag. 40 di Maddalena Padovani

Nel 1954 Aurelio Zanotta fondava l’omonima azienda destinata a diventare una grande protagonista della storia del design italiano. I figli Martino, Eleonora e Francesca, che oggi guidano il marchio, fanno un bilancio del percorso d’innovazione e delineano le sfide future

60

“Produrre profitto e cultura contemporaneamente”: così Aurelio Zanotta, fondatore dell’omonima azienda, spiegava il segreto del suo successo imprenditoriale, convinto che “l’industria dell’arredamento debba sforzarsi per anticipare bisogni futuri non limitandosi a soddisfare la domanda passiva del pubblico”. Basta guardare la selezione di prodotti presentati in queste pagine per capire come la sperimentazione di nuovi modelli dell’abitare faccia parte dell’intero percorso del marchio che quest’anno compie 60 anni. L’avventura imprenditoriale inizia infatti nel 1954, in Brianza, quando Aurelio Zanotta fonda la sua azienda che inizialmente realizzava imbottiti, venendo presto in contatto con gli architetti-designer di prima generazione: i fratelli Castiglioni, Gae Aulenti, De Pas D’Urbino Lomazzi, Ettore Sottsass, Marco Zanuso, Joe Colombo, Enzo Mari. Con la poltrona Sacco disegnata da Gatti, Paolini e Teodoro, l’azienda si afferma già alla fine degli anni Sessanta come l’industria più ‘radicale’ dell’arredamento in Italia. In effetti, i suoi sono sempre prodotti che “si differenziano dal resto” e che dimostrano come un oggetto possa assumere un significato culturale grazie alle qualità espressive dei materiali e della tecnologia di produzione, e non solo attraverso l’innovazione del segno. Impossibile trovare nel catalogo di altri marchi così tante icone come quelle che l’azienda di Nova Milanese è riuscita a mettere a punto anno dopo anno, decennio dopo decennio, prima per merito del suo illuminato fondatore, scomparso nel 1991, e poi per quello dei suoi tre figli, Martino, Eleonora e Francesca, rispettivamente oggi presidente e art directors. A loro abbiamo chiesto di ripercorrere il significato e le tappe salienti di un percorso imprenditoriale che affonda saldamente le radici nel passato e si rivolge con rinnovato spirito di sperimentazione al futuro. Quali sono state le tappe fondamentali della storia Zanotta che meglio hanno restituito l’evoluzione del saper fare e del saper fare cultura del nostro Paese? Eleonora: “La Zanotta nasce nel 1954 in un periodo storico in cui imperava la volontà di rinnovamento. L’intuito geniale di Aurelio Zanotta fu quello di cogliere il nodo fondamentale del problema ‘design-produzione’, ovvero che si poteva produrre profitto e cultura contemporaneamente. Il ruolo dell’industria poteva essere più incisivo se riusciva, attraverso la propria produzione, anche a offrire al pubblico gli strumenti per crescere culturalmente. Gli anni ‘50-‘60 sono stati un periodo di intensa creatività e sperimentazione, lo dimostrano gli innumerevoli esempi progettuali dei fratelli Castiglioni o i progetti di Marco Zanuso, le rivoluzionarie sedute Sacco o Blow. Negli anni ’70 alla creatività si affianca sempre più anche la voglia di sperimentare materiali diversi o nuovi, come il laminato per la serie dei tavoli Quaderna di Superstudio che hanno reso d’avanguardia un tavolo dalla forma elementare. E gli esempi continuano con lo Sciangai del ’73 di De Pas, D’Urbino, Lomazzi che hanno saputo dare una forma anticonvenzionale ad un appendiabiti attraverso un uso intelligente della tecnica dando vita ad un oggetto ironico e divertente; o il tavolino Cumano di Castiglioni del ’78 dove la memoria della forma si sposa con la tecnologia. Negli anni ’80 prosegue la ricerca dell’innovazione tecnologica, di pari passo con quella tipologica, come dimostrano la famiglia dei Servi o il mobile Joy degli anni 1989 di Castiglioni. Sono tutti esempi di prodotti che hanno rappresentato una risposta tipologica nuova alle mutate esigenze dell’abitare, anticipando i bisogni futuri. Innovazioni destinate a durare nel tempo. E negli anni 2000 la sperimentazione tecnologica continua con prodotti come Fly in fibra di carbonio e Veryround tagliato a laser tridimensionale o con i prodotti in Cristalplant®, nuovo materiale dalle

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 108

January-february 2014 Intern i inedite possibilità espressive e formali, per finire con la serie dei tavoli Lungometraggio in materiale composito a base di resine acriliche che ha reso possibile lunghezze di 6 metri, prima impensabili. Sono tutti oggetti che con la loro carica trasgressiva sono capaci di stupire e dare delle emozioni, esempi significativi di come l’industria possa modificare le convenzioni abitative cogliendo gli stimoli provenienti dalla cultura e da una sperimentazione progettuale al di fuori delle logiche tradizionali del mercato. Sono storie di prodotti che raccontano il saper fare della nostra azienda, il saper dare forma agli schizzi dei progettisti, rendendoli concretamente prodotti attraverso un uso sapiente delle tecniche costruttive. Se dovessimo sintetizzare in parole chiave l’evoluzione di Zanotta, queste sarebbero, in ordine cronologico: sperimentazione e avanguardia, innovazione tecnologica e innovazione tipologica-formale. Una parola su tutte: creatività”. Dietro le quinte di un’icona. Vi sono aneddoti tramandati in famiglia che raccontano una storia ‘non ufficiale’ di alcuni progetti? Eleonora: “Sacco è un’icona indiscussa. Gatti, Paolini e Teodoro presentarono nel ’68 questa poltrona rivoluzionaria ‘anatomica’ ad Aurelio Zanotta, con un rivestimento in PVC trasparente, ispirato alle strutture pneu di quel periodo. Il riempimento con le palline di polistirolo espanso, che sedendosi si spostano verso l’alto, suggerì la forma funzionale di un ‘sacco’ al quale venne applicata nel primo prototipo anche una maniglia per rendere agevole il trasporto. Questa versione originale trasparente, di carattere sperimentale e d’avanguardia, venne poi modificata in una variante più industriale, con rivestimento opaco e senza maniglia, che dava forse un carattere un po’ troppo nomade all’oggetto. Aurelio Zanotta in questo modo, pur rispettandone l’idea fortemente innovativa, lo rese più ‘prodotto’, più accettabile dal consumatore. Questa genesi forse poco conosciuta evidenzia la capacità di un industriale illuminato e geniale, di aver saputo trasformare un oggetto sperimentale poco vendibile in un prodotto che, pur mantenendo la carica innovativa originale, è riuscito ad entrare nelle case di tutto il mondo e a diventare un bestseller”. L’innovazione e la ricerca tecnologica di Zanotta sono state un contributo fondamentale alla storia del design ed elementi identificativi del marchio. Quali sono stati i capitoli più importanti di questo percorso? Francesca: “Il tratto distintivo della ricerca tecnologica di Zanotta passa attraverso l’interpretazione di tecniche e materiali provenienti da settori industriali diversi da quelli dell’arredo. In alcuni casi ci si trova di fronte a una vera e propria ripresa di tecniche mature, riutilizzate in modo integrale, in altri, invece, alcuni materiali già noti assumono nel prodotto valenze innovative. Numerosi sono gli esempi di questo processo, a partire dalla poltrona Sacco al tavolo Marcuso che utilizza la tecnica di incollaggio dei nottolini dei deflettori delle automobili per rendere solidali le gambe del tavolo ai piani di cristallo. Per continuare, all’inizio degli anni Settanta, con l’applicazione inedita del velcro, con cui abbiamo creato i primi imbottiti realmente sfoderabili. Nel divano Throw-Away, invece, l’utilizzo del poliuretano espanso in modo massivo ha destrutturato l’imbottito abbattendo di circa l’ottanta per cento i tempi di assemblaggio del fusto. Senza dimenticare la poltrona Blow che cavalca i primi esperimenti di oggetti gonfiabili, calando nell’arredo, il primo esempio di seduta gonfiabile poi ripetutamente copiato. Fino ad arrivare ai giorni nostri: l’uso di Techno Gel, materiale brevettato originariamente da Bayer per usi medicali, ci ha permesso di realizzare la chaise longue Soft, presente ancora oggi in alcuni tra i più importanti musei del mondo”. Zanotta ha fatto del binomio designer / industria un punto di forza. Come si sviluppa oggi questo rapporto? Eleonora: “Il carisma e la personalità dei giovani designer degli anni ’50 e ’60 sono figli di quel particolare periodo storico, quando l’obiettivo imperante era la ricostruzione generale di un mondo nuovo e migliore. L’audacia e l’esuberanza di quel periodo effervescente e ricco di ottimismo, terreno fertile per una creatività che nel design

’54 -’63 19/12/13 11.34


Interni January-february 2014 ha avuto esiti tra i più rivoluzionari e innovativi, penso rimangano irripetibili. Oggi riscontro che l’attenzione dei giovani designer più che alla sperimentazione, carattere imperante di un tempo, sia rivolta alla concretezza. Prima dei designer selezioniamo i progetti, cerchiamo di cogliere le istanze inedite che si dovessero presentare, perché il catalogo Zanotta continua ad essere prima di tutto un catalogo di prodotti. Per questo non abbiamo preclusioni e siamo veramente molto aperti verso tutti: scoprire nuovi talenti è motivo di particolare soddisfazione. Il repertorio Zanotta è caratterizzato da sempre da un’eterogeneità che rispecchia le differenti personalità dei progettisti e questa peculiarità appartiene alle aziende storiche del design, dove la cultura del progettista si confronta con la cultura dell’imprenditore. Da questo dialogo nasce il risultato. Le differenti personalità di personaggi anche molto diversi fra loro come ideologia di progetto, hanno generato aspetti a volte apparentemente lontani tra loro, addirittura contraddittori, ma in modo solo apparente: c’è una coerenza di base in tutte le scelte. Il filo conduttore della produzione Zanotta è il non perdere mai di vista le qualità poetiche che un prodotto deve avere, quel ‘quid’ non definibile a parole che va oltre le considerazioni funzionali e commerciali. È quello che fa l’unicità di Zanotta: questo ‘scarto di norma’, ovvero il tendere sempre ad andare oltre la soglia di aspettativa sia del committente che del mercato”. Zanotta e la comunicazione: come si è trasformata negli anni l’immagine del marchio? Martino: “In passato tutta l’attività di comunicazione ruotava intorno al prodotto. Il nostro settore è per tradizione “prodotto-centrico”. Questo da solo definiva l’azienda, la comunicava e si auto-comunicava. Negli ultimi anni le regole sono cambiate: se si fa un buon prodotto, ma non lo si distribuisce e supporta con una comunicazione adeguata anche dal punto di vista dei valori del brand, è molto probabile che il prodotto non raccolga il dovuto successo”. Quali creativi hanno partecipato alla sua costruzione? Martino: “Sicuramente, tutti i designer che hanno firmato il progetto di prodotti o allestimenti. Ma, sin dagli anni Sessanta, anche grandi creativi del mondo della comunicazione del nostro settore: dal grafico Michele Provinciali ai fotografi Aldo Ballo e Ugo Mulas. Questa tradizione di ricerca anche nella grafica e nella fotografia è tutt’ora uno degli elementi distintivi di Zanotta”. Secondo la vostra esperienza, come è cambiato in 60 anni il modo di abitare? Quali segnali di evoluzione futura state cogliendo? Francesca: “Uno degli ambienti della casa che più si è trasformato è il soggiorno. Il divano, che ne è il protagonista, sta sempre più assumendo configurazioni diverse dal tradizionale monoblocco a 2 o 3 posti. Sedute allungate, profonde e basse, composizioni ad angolo e terminali spesso senza schienali, che si trasformano in isole e grandi pouf, evidenziano il diverso modo di utilizzo del divano, al quale si richiede la possibilità di vivere in maniera più informale. I mobili singoli e autonomi, poi, hanno preso il posto delle pareti attrezzate e sono destinati a diventare pezzi importanti e caratterizzanti. Quindi le aziende leader del settore si stanno adoperando per soddisfare le esigenze di un consumatore sempre più attento e preparato con una manifesta voglia di personalizzazione del proprio habitat. Il servizio al cliente e la qualità del prodotto saranno, infatti, i requisiti fondamentali da soddisfare in modo flessibile per adeguarsi ai cambiamenti veloci del mercato”.

INservice TRAnslations / 109 Teodoro il cui involucro contiene palline di polistirolo espanso ad alta resistenza; Quaderna (1970), tavolo con struttura in legno tamburato placcato in laminato Print, stampato in serigrafia a quad etti neri, design Superstudio. - pag. 42 Altre Icone storiche e Long seller del marchio. Dall’alto e in senso orario: Sciangai (1973), di De Pas, D’Urbino, Lomazzi, appendiabiti chiudibile con struttura in faggio; Celestina (1978), di Marco Zanuso, sedia pieghevole con struttura in acciaio inox e sedile e schienale in nylon ricoperti in cuoio; Servomuto (1974), di Achille e Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, tavolino di servizio con base in polipropilene e asta in acciaio; Cumano (1978), di Achille Castiglioni, tavolino pieghevole con struttura e piano in acciaio. - pag. 43 Le icone storiche del decennio ’84 – ’93. Sopra, Tonietta (1985, anche long seller), la sedia di Enzo Mari con struttura in lega di alluminio lucidato e sedile e schienale ricoperti in cuoio o in nylon verniciato. Al centro, Macaone (1985), il tavolo della collezione Edizioni fi mato da Alessandro Mendini, con piano in MDF e gambe in poliuretano rigido con struttura in acciaio verniciato in vari colori. In alto, Onda (1985), di De Pas, D’Urbino, Lomazzi, divano monoblocco con struttura portante in tubo di acciaio inox e imbottitura in poliuretano/fib a poliestere termolegata. A destra, Joy (1989), di Achille Castiglioni, mobile a ripiani rotanti dai piani in medium density fibeboa d e snodi portanti in acciaio o alluminio. - pag. 44 Sopra, il divano Alfa (1999, Best Seller), disegnato da Emaf Progetti: presenta piedini e struttura in acciaio, molleggio su nastri elastici e imbottitura in poliuretano/fib a poliestere termolegata. A sinistra, Fly (2002, Ricerca & Sperimentazione), di Mark Robson, seduta con struttura in fib a di carbonio verniciata trasparente. In alto, Lia (1998, Best seller/Innovazione), di Roberto Barbieri, sedia con struttura in lega di alluminio e sedile e schienale imbottiti in poliuretano. - pag. 45 Dall’alto e in senso orario: Veryround (2006, Ricerca & Sperimentazione), la seduta di Louise Campbell con struttura in lamiera di acciaio tagliata con laser tridimensionale e prodotta in nove esemplari numerati e fi mati in versione verniciata con colore diverso; Eva (2013, Novità), la poltroncina di Ora Ïto con gambe in rovere naturale, struttura in acciaio, scocca in poliuretano integrale e rivestimento sfoderabile con sedile imbottito in poliuretano flessibile; Tod (2005, Best seller), di Todd Bracher, tavolino con struttura in polipropilene e laccatura lucida; Blanco (2010, Innovazione/ Nuovi materiali), il tavolo di Jacopo Zibardi con basamento e piano in Cristalplant®; William (2010, Best seller), di Damian Williamson, divano monoblocco con struttura in acciaio, molleggio su nastri elastici e imbottitura in poliuretano/fib a poliestere termolegata.

’04-’13

- pag. 40 La seconda generazione della famiglia Zanotta. Dall’alto in senso orario: Francesca, art director; Martino, presidente; Eleonora, art director. A sinistra: Aurelio, il fondatore dell’azienda scomparso nel 1991. - pag. 41 Nella pagina, prodotti Zanotta appartenenti alle categorie Icona storica e Long Seller. Dall’alto e in senso orario: Throw-Away (1965), il divano con struttura in poliuretano espanso disegnato da Willie Landels; di Achille e Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, Mezzadro (1957), sgabello con gambo in acciaio cromato, sedile verniciato in vari colori e base in faggio; Sacco (1968), la poltrona anatomica sviluppata da Gatti, Paolini,

INdesign/Crossover

bentley trova casa pag. 46 di Laura Ragazzola

Una partnership d’eccezione lega la storica azienda automobilistica britannica a Luxury Living Group, che crea per l’occasione l’esclusiva collezione Bentley Home nel segno dell’artigianalità e del design made in Italy. Ecco il racconto dei protagonisti Alberto Vignatelli, presidente di Luxury Living, ha puntato (ancora una volta strategicamente) su un marchio di successo: la britannica Bentley, infatti, nonostante il mercato dell’auto sia in grave recessione, sta vivendo un momento felice: nel 2012 ha aumentato il suo fatturato globale del 22% e nell’immaginario collettivo ha scalzato la connazionale Aston Martin, portando 007 alla guida di una fiammante Bentley Continental (come del resto il suo creatore, Ian Fleming, aveva sin dall’origine immaginato). Così Alberto Vignatelli, friulano di nascita ma legatissimo alla terra romagnola

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 109

sin dal suo esordio imprenditoriale (è a Forlì, in un palazzo seicentesco, il quartier generale), ha trovato nel ‘mondo Bentley’ il terreno fertile per creare una nuova home collection, affidando all’architetto Carlo Colombo il compito di far rivivere l’inconfondibile British Style delle fuoriserie Bentley. Interni li ha incontrati per farsi raccontare questo nuovo viaggio. Presidente, lei è stato il primo a creare una liaison fra moda e arredamento. Come è riuscito a “incrociare” mondi così diversi, preservando la specificità di ciascuno? AV: Innanzitutto conosco bene il design e la sua storia. Sin dall’inizio della mia attività, parliamo degli anni Settanta, ho lavorato a stretto contatto con progettisti del calibro di Mario Bellini, Gaetano Pesce, Carlo Urbinati, Fabio Lenci, solo per citarne alcuni. Venivano tutti da me, a Forlì, dove c’era l’unico Centro di ricerca e sviluppo esistente in Italia all’avanguardia per la tecnologia del poliuretano espanso e del Dacron: qui trasformavo le loro idee in prototipi che sarebbero poi diventati le icone del design made in Italy: divani come il Coronado di Cassina o le Bambole di B&B Italia hanno mosso i primi passi proprio qui. Al mondo della moda mi sono avvicinato alla fine degli anni 80, quando ho incontrato le sorelle Fendi: era già nata la Club House Italia con un suo brand ben strutturato e dal respiro già internazionale. Il mercato mondiale stava a poco a poco cambiando: al ‘design del mobile’ si affiancava il ‘decoro del mobile’ e il viatico più semplice per diffondere l’home decor è stato per me svilup-

19/12/13 11.35


110 / INservice translations

pare una nuova filosofia d’arredo: offrire cioè una proposta di mobili completa, che abbracciasse gli interni a 360 gradi, capace di creare il senso di una casa davvero unica e speciale, raffinata ed elegante. Aggiungerei, sartoriale, proprio come la confezione di un abito d’alta moda, anche per l’estrema attenzione della fattura, dei dettagli e dei materiali. Così è nata Fendi Casa, la prima home collection nella storia del design. Sono poi seguiti altri brand, come Kenzo, e fra qualche mese ci sarà il coinvolgimento di un’altra storica “maison” italiana. Ma il nome è ancora top secret. È invece fresca di stampa la notizia della collezione Bentley Home, presentata a Parigi nel mese di gennaio. Dalla moda al mondo delle auto di lusso… AV: Il passaggio è avvenuto perché eravamo alla ricerca di un nuovo lifestyle e il mondo-Bentley, che può esibire una storia di eleganza e di grande maestria artigianale, mi sembrava perfetto per inaugurare una nuova e originale home collection. Da oltre 90 anni Bentley produce interni per auto di qualità artigianale tra i più curati al mondo (non a caso se ne serve la famiglia reale britannica): con la collezione Bentley Home ci rivolgiamo a tutti coloro che apprezzano questa qualità distintiva. Si tratta di una proposta completa di arredi - dall’ambiente giorno a quello notte, passando anche per l’ufficio – che propone un mix calibrato di design e decorazione, contemporaneità e tradizione. A Parigi, a Maison&Objet, arrediamo un’intera casa con i mobili della nuova collezione, inclusi garden e parking area (dove naturalmente c’è una Bentley). E lei architetto, come si sente nei panni di un ‘interiors car designer’? CC: Ho provato una grande emozione quando sono entrato negli storici stabilimenti della Bentley, a Crewe, e ho visitato il museo che raccoglie tutti i modelli d’epoca. La collezione home è nata a stretto contatto con l’azienda automobilistica britannica, soprattutto con gli ingegneri del suo Centro di ricerca, e proprio da questa assidua frequentazione ho capito quante cose esistono in comune fra questi due mondi. A cominciare dai materiali, raffinati e preziosi, sino ad arrivare alle modalità di lavorazione. Ma anche le linee aerodinamiche dei modelli più prestigiosi diventano motivo di ispirazione per il design domestico: il divano Richmond, per esempio, cita proprio la curvatura del cruscotto, radica compresa. Lo stile britannico di un marchio di successo come Bentley, dunque, si incontra con quello italiano di un’azienda, nata e cresciuta nel cuore della Romagna. Presidente, secondo lei i due mondi si parlano? AV: Certo, nel segno dell’artigianalità. Quello che ci riconoscono e che possiamo esportare con successo in campo internazionale è proprio il nostro savoir faire, la nostra bravura nel realizzare prodotti d’alta qualità… CC: …e, aggiungerei, la nostra capacità creativa, la forza delle nostre idee, dell’ispirazione vincente. Insomma, in una sola parola, il design made in Italy, che ci ha reso e ci rende famosi in tutto il mondo. Luxury Living è ormai presente in molti Paesi: ultima, per esempio, l’apertura del nuovo showroom a New York dove sono presenti le collezioni Fendi Casa, Bentley Home ed Heritage. Presidente, l’internazionalizzazione è la vera vocazione della sua azienda? AV: Assolutamente sì. Da oltre dieci anni siamo richiestissimi nell’Est d’Europa, soprattutto in Russia ma oggi siamo famosi anche Oltreoceano: i Paesi dove abbiamo maggior successo sono la Cina, che vanta ben 13 punti vendita, l’America, dove abbiamo rafforzato la rete commerciale, e quelli che si affacciano sul Golfo Persico. A Doha, nel Qatar, per esempio, è prossima l’apertura di uno showroom Luxury Living di 1500 meri quadri. E negli Emirati Arabi, a Ras Al Khaimah, stiamo realizzando, sempre su progetto dell’architetto Colombo, 150 ville unifamiliari con caratteristiche di eco sostenibilità e arredate con le nostre collezioni. Quindi, internazionalizzazione e incontro tra mondi e culture diverse: è questa la formula per battere la crisi? AV: Non si può negare che stiamo vivendo un periodo difficile ma le opportunità ci sono per chi sa coglierle. Anche esplorando e interpretando la domanda che viene da mercati in crescita e diversi dal nostro. Certo bisogna avere padronanza dei propri mezzi e tanta creatività. Ma sicuramente questo non manca a imprenditori e designer italiani.

Trasversalità come metodo pag. 52 di Cristina Morozzi

Maurizio Galante e Tal Lancman, stilisti e designer, traversano con leggerezza discipline e saperi, conciliando il concettuale con il ludico e il fiabesco L’incontro con lo studio parigino Interware di Maurizio Galante e Tal Lancman è un colloquio a due voci che s’incalzano e si sovrappongono per raccontare il mosaico variegato di un lavoro a quattro mani nella moda e nel design. L’inizio del sodalizio tra Maurizio, italiano, allievo di Roberto Capucci, visionario sarto d’alta moda (la sua prima sfilata nel calendario ufficiale dell’alta moda parigina fu nel 1992) e Tal, israeliano, designer ed esperto di tendenze, avviene nel 2002. Nel

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 110

January-february 2014 Interni

- pag. 46 Nella pagina a fianco il p esidente Alberto Vignatelli fotografato nel suo ufficio Palazzo Orsi Mangelli, la nuova sede direzionale del gruppo a Forlì. Sopra, la poltroncina Rugby della collezione Bentley Home: la forma avvolgente è disegnata dalla curvatura della scocca realizzata con pregiate radiche. Sullo schienale è ricamato il logo. - pag. 48 A fianc , l’architetto Carlo Colombo, che fi ma la nuova collezione Bentley Home. Qui sotto, dall’alto in basso, alcuni pezzi: due coffee tables Harlow con piano rivestito in pelle; il cabinet Sherbourne nella versione bassa con frontali in radica Burr Walnut; la chaise longue Richmond con struttura esterna rivestita in pelle trapuntata (anche in radica). - pag. 49 In questa pagina alcune immagini delle lavorazioni artigianali negli storici stabilimenti della Bentley, a Crewe, in Inghilterra. In particolare, la cucitura a mano del volante rivestito in morbida pelle (foto piccole) e il taglio di un prezioso ‘foglio’ di radica. - pag. 50 Qui sopra, in senso orario, lo showroom Luxury Living a New York; l’ingresso dello spazio milanese; la facciata seicentesca di Palazzo Orsi Mangelli, dove ha sede il ‘quartiere generale’ dell’azienda a Forlì; lo showroom parigino. In basso, il letto George della nuova collezione Fendi Casa: volumi sontuosi e testiera importante lavorata a mano con motivi a riquadri irregolari. - pag. 51 A sinistra, Chiara Lamp di Fendi Casa con finitu a ottone spazzolato e paralume realizzato con tessuto in fib a di abaca grigio antracite. A destra, i dettagli delle lavorazioni artigianali per gli arredi di Fendi Casa si alternano ai prodotti della nuova collezione: si riconoscono, dall’alto, i pouf Smith, con rivestimento in velluto dalle morbide nuance che coniugano tradizione e contemporaneità; il loveseat della linea Sabrina, che abbina massimo comfort a una lavorazione sartoriale; il divano Trevi, nella nuova versione sectional, che si arricchisce di un tableau lavorato con minute fettucce intrecciate: qui il rivestimento è realizzato con tessuto melange color ghiaccio.

2003 creano la società di consulenza Interware, attiva nell’ambito della moda, del design e della scenografia. Nella solidità del loro legame di vita e di lavoro, difficile stabilire confini tra gli apporti, anche se appartiene a Maurizio, appassionato cultore del lavoro manuale, una tendenza al virtuosismo esecutivo, nota distintiva delle sue elaborate collezioni d’alta moda. Definiscono il loro lavoro un ‘pingpong’ tra differenti competenze. Si abbeverano a varie fonti e operano continui transfer, scompigliando le ordinate carte delle discipline. Ibridano e mixano in totale libertà gli spunti colti negli ambiti più diversi per creare sorpresa e per trasferire al pubblico le emozioni che alimentano le loro creazioni, al disopra delle tendenze, sempre in equilibrio tra passato e futuro, tra sentimento e tecnica. Assieme hanno inventato un nuovo vocabolario, ricco ed erudito, difficile da classificare secondo i tradizionali parametri, indipendente dalla grammatica del design e della moda, e l’hanno applicato negli ambiti più diversi, cercando di creare emozioni, attraverso abiti, oggetti e allestimenti. Maurizio dichiara che per lui la moda è, prima di tutto, comunicazione: “L’abito” afferma, “deve narrare il piacere

19/12/13 11.35


In tern i January-february 2014 di vestirsi e regalare sogni a chi lo indossa. La costruzione della haute couture è un’architettura da portare addosso, che accompagna il corpo, costruendogli attorno un’aura magica”. “Il ricamo, il plissé e gli altri artifici sartoriali” prosegue Maurizio “sono, assieme alla cultura nutrita di memorie e di proiezioni futuribili, gli strumenti per creare questa magia. Gli accessori e gli arredi possiedono un’anima che si svela nel rapporto con gli utilizzatori. I miei abiti sono degli oggetti, dotati di una propria estetica autonoma, destinata ad essere interpretata ed esaltata da chi li indossa. Gli abiti, come gli oggetti, prendono vita nel rapporto con le persone”. Maurizio e Tal sono progettisti a 360 gradi. Per loro il progetto è un’idea totale che si declina nelle diverse realizzazioni, sempre mantenendo il medesimo approccio, basato sulla disposizione a dominare il disegno e a manipolare la materia; sulla capacità, sia di controllare l’insieme, sia d’intervenire con ossessiva pazienza nella minuzia dei particolari, grazie ad uno sguardo che sorvola e perfora, in grado di vedere l’insieme pur scandagliando il dettaglio. L’effetto sorpresa di molte realizzazioni deriva dalla loro abilità nel far coesistere i contrasti, nel traversare con leggerezza discipline e saperi, nel saper conciliare il concettuale con il ludico e da un’attitudine fiabesca che coltivano con intelligente ironia. Rubano artifici alla couture per rendere narrativo il design e decorativi gli spazi; costruiscono la moda con un approccio di tipo architettonico, rendendo strutturali i virtuosismi sartoriali. Nella recente mostra Lost in Paris (Parigi, Lieu du design, settembre 2013), promossa da Lieu du design in collaborazione con il Comitato Regionale del turismo Paris Ile-de-France, con il sostegno del Comune di Parigi, hanno offerto un saggio esemplare della loro trasversalità. Da eterni turisti, in quanto stranieri in Francia, anche se ormai parigini d’adozione, si sono posti l’obiettivo di aiutare i turisti, ma anche i parigini, a scoprire ciò che ogni giorno è sotto i loro occhi, ma che non sanno vedere. “Abbiamo creato” dicono all’unisono “anche con la collaborazione di altri designer, un universo fatto di piccoli oggetti, utili e futili, che invitino a perdersi nella città: dal porta baguette, al lecca lecca a forma di Tour Eiffel, dalla coppia di sedie inseparabili da disporre nei luoghi d’eccezione, alla versione tandem dei Vélib’(le biciclette comunali)”. Per la serata inaugurale, in collaborazione con i mercati generali parigini, hanno allestito nel cortile della galleria un buffet di cibi tipici, disposti su banchi con tende a righe bianche e rosse. La mostra Lost in Paris, esaltata da uno scenografico allestimento tutto rosso, è da considerarsi una efficace sintesi del loro metodo creativo. “Il design” concludono “deve uscire dall’ambito specialistico per entrare a far parte del quotidiano. La sua missione è di accompagnarci in ogni momento della vita con oggetti-talismano, capaci di parlare una lingua schietta ed emozionale, comprensibile anche ai bambini”. - pag. 52 Un soffit o irto di matite colorate è il sorprendente allestimento alla …cole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne in occasione della sfil ta “Maurizio Galante haute couture”, gennaio 2012. Disposti sul pavimento, alcuni pouf Tattoo Cactus in poliuretano morbido, rivestiti in tessuto tecnico stampato con motivo di cactus. Edizione Cerruti Baleri. - pag. 53 Accanto: abito composto da 450 strati di organza di seta, in sette gradazioni di colore, collezione Maurizio Galante haute couture, 2009. Sotto: ritratto di Tal Lancman (a sinistra) e

INservice TRAnslations / 111

Maurizio Galante. - pag. 54 Dall’alto a sinistra in senso orario: schizzi di progetto per la mostra Lost in Paris, Parigi, settembre 2013. Disegnati da Maurizio Galante e Tal Lancman assieme ad altri designer, gli oggetti esposti erano pensati per invitare i turisti a ‘perdersi a Parigi’ e ad osservare la città da un altro punto di vista. Lecca lecca a forma di Tour Eiffel, creato per la mostra Lost in Paris. Per la mostra Lost in Paris Galante e Lancman hanno anche inventato un nuovo colore, il ‘Couleur de Paris’, che caratterizza le pietre parigine e che ora entrerà a far parte del famoso catalogo Pantone. Lampada a sospensione Danae, realizzata con sacchetti di plastica trasparente, riempiti d’acqua e di aria. Edizioni Boffi Bagn , Parigi. Un’immagine delle sedie inseparabili realizzate per la mostra Lost in Paris collocate nella piazza del Trocadero, settembre 2013. - pag. 55 Dall’alto a sinistra, in senso orario: sala da pranzo Flirt, con tavolo e sedie in metallo laccato, traforato e ricamato con stringhe di silicone. La tenda a plissé è realizzata in tessuto tecnico. Edizione Mussi. Poltrona Aura con schienale flessibile e rivestimento in tessuto tecnico, ricamato con perle e tubicini in vetro, al pari di alcuni abiti delle collezioni haute couture, edizione Cerruti Baleri. Mobile contenitore, Collectors Cabinet, creato per l’esposizione Planet Manga al Centre Pompidou di Parigi nel 2012. La struttura è in legno laccato, l’interno è rivestito in velluto e le ante sono costituite da tende scorrevoli plissettate in tessuto tecnico, realizzate a mano. Serie limitata di 12 esemplari. Edizione Cerruti Baleri.

F/D pag. 56

di Stefano Caggiano

Fashion e design abitano mondi diversi. Mentre il progetto domestico coltiva la densità semantica, la moda vive di velocità. Dicendo cose diverse anche quando sembrano parlare lo stesso linguaggio Il design lavora il pezzo con pazienza, ne coltiva la densità semantica. Il fashion vive invece di rapidità, si lascia intuire solo come scia di se stesso, assorbe i segni e li rigetta con lo stesso fare tra l’anoressico e il bulimico non a caso spesso associato alle modelle, aliene portatrici di una bellezza piuccheperfetta che incede senza pietà. Per venire bene il buon design va lasciato lievitare, come il pane. La moda deve sempre ribollire, schivare le definizioni, svincolarsi dalla forza di gravità del significato. Gioco sofisticato, quello del fashion, tossico e affascinante, che trascende la necessità del corpo immettendolo nella fatuità della vestizione. Dove il design coltiva la coerenza, il fashion si nutre di contraddizione, al punto che, anche quando sembrano usare lo stesso segno, moda e progetto parlano in realtà da sistemi linguistici diversi, dicendo cose diverse. Il segno che sembrano avere in comune non sarà allora momento di convergenza ma punto di singolarità in cui l’universo fashion e l’universo design rimbalzano l’uno sull’altro come biglie su un tavolo da biliardo. Visual Parts Ad accomunare la collezione spring/summer 2014 “Glam Punch!” di Co|te, marchio fondato da Francesco Ferrari e Tomaso Anfossi, e i sofà Pill disegnati da Alexander

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 111

19/12/13 11.35


112 / INservice translations

Lotersztain per Derlot Editions è la logica additiva della composizione, pensata per sottolineare la giustapposizione piuttosto che la sintesi delle parti. Sia l’abito che l’oggetto appoggiano le loro componenti le une sulle altre con colorata morbidezza, anche quando presentano anatomie voluminose come nell’imbottito. Cubismo senza cubi Gli abiti Christian Dior Resort 2014 e la collezione Stock di Giorgia Zanellato per la Galleria Luisa Delle Piane hanno in comune la composizione aperta, derivata dall’accostamento di elementi che non vengono amalgamati sotto una pellicola estetica unificante ma esibiscono con sensibilità il senso della sovrapposizione e dell’accostamento, in una sorta di destrutturazione cubista priva della severità tipica dello stile artistico, a favore invece di deframmentazioni leggere, luminose, che lasciano le lastre di plexiglas e le parti di tessuto in uno stato di sospensione aperta e ariosa. Interferenze di fase Internet è nell’aria, la connettività è ovunque, i file alloggiano su una ‘nuvola’: lo spazio che abitiamo è attraversato da una pioggia di onde elettromagnetiche con cui interagiamo in maniera sempre più fitta. L’interferenza di fase diventa allora estetica che merita di essere detta, sia nel caso del design, con il tavolino Orion disegnato da Jarrod Lim per Bonaldo, sia nel caso del fashion, con un abito primavera/estate di Anthropologie, che parimenti tessono la materia con il suo contrario facendo apparire l’abito e l’oggetto in filigrana al vuoto. Liscio fragile maculato I diffusori delle lampade Fragiles di Davide G. Aquini sono ottenute applicando cemento e stucco sulla superficie di un palloncino, che viene meno dopo la solidificazione del materiale. Ne risultano forme che combinano superfici lisce e levigate con superfici ruvide e maculate, come in un abito della collezione fall/winter 2012/13 di Ann-Sofie Back, ugualmente composto per giustapposizione di eterogeneità che reagiscono l’una sull’altra attribuendo un senso di spessore alle superfici bidimensionali di abito e oggetto. La ricerca dell’invisibilità Il divano Blur di Marc Thorpe per Moroso e i leggings Ombré del marchio BZR sono caratterizzati da un motivo cromatico digradante che mette il prodotto in dissolvenza facendolo sfumare nella poesia visiva della sparizione. Moroso, in particolare, ha ottenuto questo effetto grazie a un tessuto prodotto dall’olandese Innofa, che ha lavorato più strati di materiale per realizzare intervalli cromatici diversi. La distorsione della massa imbottita genera una suggestiva incertezza delle dimensioni del prodotto, che sembra dissolvere e svanire. Strutture aperte Mentre la logica del fashion è contrapposta a quella del design, il dressing design consiste nell’applicazione della cultura del progetto all’abito. Dal confronto di alcuni pezzi della collezione fall/winter 2012/13 di Fabric Division, brand emergente fondato da Enrico Assirelli e Linda Crivellari, con i tavolini Face Value di Earnest Studio, emerge l’abilità con cui il giovane duo di fashion designer ha concepito la forma dell’abito come una struttura oggettuale, quasi fosse un elemento d’arredo le cui parti sono state sapientemente scomposte e ‘spostate’ facendone un pezzo tanto di fashion quanto di dressing design. Composti da tre elementi in diversi materiali, tra cui corian, marmo, MDF e ottone, i tavolini Face Value possono essere liberamente mescolati per ottenere soluzioni finali simili tra loro ma diversificate. Interazione di dettagli Sia gli abiti della collezione fall/winter 2012/13 “Complex Overlay” di Vladimir Karaleev che le sedute della collezione Yi disegnate da Michael Young per Eoq sfruttano l’interazione misurata dei dettagli, facendo dialogare con garbo e morbidi equilibri materiali tra loro diversi. La composizione, pur non cercando la sintesi

Progetti a sangue misto pag. 62 di Valentina Croci

Partner nel lavoro e spesso anche nella vita, vengono da differenti parti del mondo. A questi designer abbiamo chiesto quanto le rispettive culture di origine pervadano i loro prodotti e se questi rappresentino l’ibridazione di approcci diversi al progetto Gam Fratesi Vivono in viaggio tra i due paesi di origine, Italia e Danimarca: due poli storici del

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 112

January-february 2014 Intern i uniformante, individua un serena armonia tra le parti, ridotte in numero per abbassare ulteriormente il rumore semiotico di fondo. La seduta di Michael Young valorizza la strategia del brand di Hong Kong volta a evidenziare la qualità della produzione asiatica. L’utilizzo del legno di frassino ha permesso di creare uno schienale profondo che scorre in maniera estremamente pulita fino alle gambe anteriori. Vladimir Karaleev si concentra sull’interazione dei materiali, utilizzando sovrapposizioni graduali di tessuti e dettagli parzialmente a vista per giocare su livelli che occultano e lasciano vedere. Cicogne nere Una declinazione ancora diversa della composizione aperta, questa volta a struttura più severa e controllata come sottolineato anche dai colori duri, è quella che emerge dal confronto tra la collezione #11 unisex haute couture di Rad Hourani e la seduta Traffic di Konstantin Grcic per Magis, in cui i cuscini squadrati poggiano su una struttura a palafitta in tondino d’acciaio che sembra ‘rimare’ con le gambe a cicogna di una modella. Rad Hourani è il primo designer nella storia del fashion ad essere stato ufficialmente invitato dalla Chambre Syndacale de la Haute Couture di Parigi a disegnare una collezione unisex; Traffic, invece, è la prima collezione di imbottiti di Magis. “La semplicità del suo concept”, spiega Grcic, “attribuisce al prodotto una piacevole naturalezza, mentre la raffinatezza dei dettagli e l’accurata definizione delle proporzioni conferiscono un senso di eleganza”. La morte ti fa bello Il teschio è oggi un vero e proprio ‘meme’, cioè un motivo replicato in maniera virale su diversi media. Nel campo del fashion una sua elegante declinazione è quella proposta dalla serie Shiva di Aitor Throup, mentre nel design la poltroncina in polietilene Jolly Roger per Gufram ribadisce il carattere istrionico della rock-star del design Fabio Novembre, che spiega: “Quando mi chiedono perché porto al dito un anello a teschio, rispondo sempre che apparteneva a mio nonno pirata, e credo ormai di essermene convinto anch’io. Tutti dovrebbero avere almeno un nonno pirata nell’albero genealogico”. La collezione Shiva, invece, illustra come il lavoro di Aitor Throup si concentri su metodi innovativi di progettazione e realizzazione dell’abito, utilizzando tra l’altro elementi scultorei ispirati all’anatomia umana come sistemi di chiusura per gli indumenti. Organico alieno Tra le ricerche semantiche più estreme la collezione Animal: The Other Side of Evolution di Ana Rajcevic si colloca all’intersezione tra fashion e scultura, con forme simili a quelle del container in porcellana Cant di Aldo Bakker con il quale ha in comune una morfologia che sembra posizionarsi a uno stadio intermedio tra vegetale e minerale, osseo e fungino, quasi fosse il prodotto minerale-metabolico di organismi appartenenti a un altro pianeta, non del tutto viventi ma nemmeno del tutto privi di vita. Spiega Ana Rajcevic: “Sono interessata ai modi di trasformare la figura umana attraverso pezzi complessi di ornamento o corpo-scultura, mettendo in discussione le nozioni consolidate della bellezza e della ‘normalità’”. Il container in porcellana esibisce invece lo stile tipico del designer olandese figlio di Gijs Bakker, cofondatore di Droog Design, esplorando forme che schivano abilmente ogni collocazione precostituita. Cuciture a vista Nella collezione fall/winter 2012/13 di Ann-Sofie Back e nel divano Airberg di JeanMarie Massaud per Offecct la composizione, ancora una volta additiva, viene risolta mettendo in evidenza le linee di giunzione tra le parti, sottolineate nell’abito da strisce di tessuto nero e nella serie di divani dalle diverse forme degli elementi. Anche da questo confronto emerge una logica spostata, asimmetrica, che rifugge la staticità preferendo implementare il movimento all’interno della stessa struttura del prodotto. Ne risulta un’estetica decisa, sottolineata negli abiti dalle linee di sutura che richiamano l’idea del cartamodello; negli imbottiti, invece, dà origine a una vera e propria scultura in aperta rottura con l’archetipo del divano.

design che influenzano profondamente il lavoro di Stine Gam ed Enrico Fratesi. In particolare la tradizione artigianale dell’arredo classico danese e l’approccio intellettuale e concettuale del design Italiano degli esordi. Tale substrato ‘cross-culturale’ si esprime negli arredi innovativi, ma dal sapore famigliare, realizzati per Casamania, Fontana Arte, Fredericia, Gubi, Ligne Roset e Swedese. “Un buon esempio dell’incontro tra le nostre due culture è Baffi, perché nasce dall’intuizione di combinare linee semplici e praticità ma rinnovando un oggetto che esiste da sempre. Combina metodo intellettuale e la prospettiva innovativa italiana con la semplicità estetica nordica. Se il modo italiano è più improntato alla forza comunicativa dell’oggetto, quello danese ricerca una più onesta relazione con la natura. Tutti i progetti nascono comunque in uno scambio continuo al punto che è impossibile stabilire chi ha iniziato e chi ha terminato”.

19/12/13 11.35


Interni January-february 2014

INservice TRAnslations / 113

chi e il Rinascimento italiano. “C’è sempre tanta ricerca alla base di ogni progetto: setacciamo fonti storiche, culturali e scientifiche. Ma ogni progetto è il lavoro di tante mani e contributi professionali”. BCXSY Boaz Cohen e Sayaka Yamamoto provengono rispettivamente da Israele e Giappone. Si incontrano al corso di Man & Identity della Design Academy di Eindhoven nel 2006 per poi proseguire insieme nella vita e nel lavoro. Sin dagli esordi si distinguono con progetti che nascono dallo studio e rappresentazione di tecniche artigianali e identità culturali. “Il riferimento ai nostri Paesi di origine, così come al nostro passato personale, è insito dal concept al risultato finale. Ad esempio, nel caso di Origin siamo partiti da artefatti realizzati in Giappone e poi in Israele. L’ibridazione dei due mondi ha determinato uno straniamento nei visitatori giapponesi che non si sono riconosciuti nei paraventi della collezione Join, mentre altri hanno visto la ‘giapponesità’ nei tappeti di Balance”, ci spiegano. “Anche se raccogliamo suggestioni dalle nostre origini, cerchiamo di mantenere quella distanza che ci consente di rimanerne affascinati e sempre alla scoperta”. Doshi Levien Nipa Doshi (indiana) e Jonathan Levien (inglese) sono di stanza a Londra dove hanno fondato lo studio nel 2000 con l’intenzione di celebrare la contaminazione tra culture, tecnologie industriali e alto artigianato. Hanno collaborato con aziende come Moroso, Cappellini, Intel, Authentics, Camper e BD Barcelona rispecchiando un approccio narrativo e una riconoscibile cifra stilistica. “La dormeuse Charpoy per Moroso è stato il primo progetto a combinare i due mondi, apportando un’artigianalità che oggi è possibile solo in India combinata con il saperfare italiano. La toeletta Chandlo per BD Barcelona lavora invece sul piano più visivo delle superfici decostruite che citano le Avanguardie europee”. Tutti i progetti esprimono due assunti culturali: “In India gli oggetti sono considerati portatori di messaggi ed espressione dell’identità di chi li realizza, al di là della mera funzione. E in Gran Bretagna l’atto del fare è espressione stessa dell’idea senza separazione sociale tra chi fa e chi progetta”.

Big-Game Grégoire Jeanmonod è svizzero, Elric Petit è belga, Augustin Scott De Martinville è francese. Li uniscono la lingua madre e l’interesse per oggetti semplici, funzionali e soprattutto ottimistici. Per questo fondano lo studio a Losanna nel 2004 che, a oggi, ha progettato per Alessi, Hay, Karimoku New Standard, Moustache, Praxis e la Galerie Kreo. “Più che diverse culture abbiamo diverse personalità e i progetti riflettono questo mix. Ma c’è qualcosa che viene dai nostri Paesi di origine: Greg è un miglior sciatore perché è svizzero, Elric è bravo a raccontare barzellette perché è belga e Augustin è un buon baciatore perché è francese!”. Spesso ironici e sopra le righe, il trio lavora sempre in compartecipazione, interpretando oggetti d’uso capaci di adattarsi al linguaggio dell’azienda partner: dalle sedute essenziali e famigliari per Karimoku, al porta oggetti per Alessi che richiama il mondo analogico della vecchie cassette per gli attrezzi. A+A Cooren Giapponese lei, francese lui, Aki e Arnaud Cooren fondano il loro studio nel 1999. Hanno realizzato lampade con aziende quali Artemide, Metalarte, Tronconi, Vertigo Bird e Yamagiwa, piccole edizioni di arredi per La Redoute e YmerMalta e curato istallazioni per aziende come L’Oréal e Shiseido. La lezione del design giapponese, in particolare del maestro Sori Yanagi, è un riferimento costante del loro design che presenta qualità sia industriali sia artigianali, ritmi e modalità contrastanti assorbite nella cultura del Sol Levante. Questa estetica ben dialoga con la tradizione francese. Ad esempio, nell’interior design della galleria di Sèvres la leggerezza delle strutture in metallo e legno che sembrano fluttuare danno forza, per contrasto, alla ceramiche tradizionali. “L’acume dello spirito del nord Europa si congiunge alla gentilezza del Giappone”, dicono. “Il nostro lavoro è sempre congiunto dalla fase dei bozzetti agli esecutivi e si scontra di continuo con esigenze e punti di vista diversi, non solo culturali ma anche di genere”. CTRLZak Le creazioni di Katia Meneghini e Thanos Zakopoulos si ispirano ai loro viaggi e soprattutto al ricco background dei rispettivi Paesi, Italia e Grecia, ricercando espressamente un ibrido culturale. “In Grecia dicono ‘una faccia, una razza’ per sottolineare le somiglianze tra italiani e greci. Ma al di là degli stereotipi, indagare a fondo due culture così dense di storia ed estetica è un arricchimento. Partiamo dall’esperienza personale per poi sconfinare oltre le nostre origini: in Flagmented e Hybrid la contaminazione culturale va a toccare tradizioni orientali e occidentali in un solo manufatto”. I loro progetti esprimono svariati riferimenti: le forme greche e romane della classicità, la dominazione greca da parte dei Tur-

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 113

- pag. 62 Il divano Haiku per Fredericia si ispira alla tradizione giapponese nell’evocare intimità e protezione. La scopa Baffi per Swedese è in legno massello e crine di cavallo. Realizzata con processi di manifattura artigianale, esprime un linguaggio minimalista non privo di ironia. - pag. 63 In alto: per l’architetto svizzero Guillaume Burri il trio ha realizzato Eclepens, una serie di arredi su disegno che vanno a inserirsi negli interstizi della casa e puntano sulla forza del legno al naturale. Accanto: sospesa assieme ai tre designer, la sedia Bold per Moustache, con un’anima metallica ricoperta da un tubolare continuo di poliuretano e stoffa, uno dei prodotti che li ha resi più celebri. Sotto: richiama la tradizionale cassetta degli attrezzi il porta oggetti Cargo per Alessi. - pag. 64 In alto: Merybench è un divanettodormeuse, utilizzabile in varie posizioni, realizzato in collaborazione con l’atelier artigianale di Philippe Coudray. (foto: Anthony Girardi) Sopra: allestimento per la galleria parigina Sèvres – Cité de la Céramique. Gli oltre cento pezzi, molto eterogenei, sono unific ti ed esaltati da un allestimento leggero in metallo e legno al naturale. (foto: Lorenz Cugini) - pag. 65 Sopra: i due designer con la collezione edibile Transubstantia Paganus (foto: Mimmo Capurso). Accanto: l’allestimento per iMuseum, un concept store a Mykonos che vende repliche di manufatti antichi. Gli elementi espositori richiamano i lacerti architettonici degli scavi archeologici (foto: Louisa Nikolaidou). Sotto: Quarz per D3CO è un sistema che accoppia strutture pentagonali ed esagonali in legno con volumi in materiale espanso (foto: Thorsten Greve). - pag. 66 In alto: per il Textielmuseum di Tilburg hanno investigato l’archivio storico al fine di ealizzare una nuova collezione. New Perspectives cita tecniche e decori antichi riletti con la macchina ricamatrice controllata al computer del laboratorio interno. Sopra e in basso: Foster è il quarto capitolo del progetto Origin. Gli oggetti in legno e ceramica sono realizzati a mano da Ibuki, un gruppo di giovani maestri artigiani di Sonobe (Nantancity, Kyoto) con lo scopo di preservare il saper-fare tradizionale giapponese. - pag. 67 Sopra: The Wool Parade per Kvadrat è un’installazione, ispirata al Bauhaus, di dodici elementi rivestiti in lana. In alto a destra: i sandali Camper Twins, con pattern che si ispirano alle uniformi scolastiche indiane così come ai quaderni a quadretti. Accanto: la toeletta Chandlo per BD Barcelona porta nel nome e nello specchio circolare il riferimento alla Luna e al Bindi, il punto che le donne indiane portano al centro della fronte.

19/12/13 11.35


January-february 2014 Inte rn i

114 / INservice translations

Over-crossing pag. 68 di Chiara Alessi

Per il design italiano il crossover è, innanzitutto, la predisposizione genetica dei suoi protagonisti a svolgere ruoli diversi tra loro, con risultati che vanno oltre la somma delle parti grazie a un processo rizomatico di incroci e contaminazione In termini biologici – ovvero nel suo utilizzo più diffuso – il ‘crossing over’ indica quel meccanismo responsabile della variabilità degli individui che appartengono a una medesima specie, per cui si ricombina il materiale genetico proveniente dai genitori dando vita ogni volta a ‘prodotti’ diversi. Traslato nell’ambito creativo (musicale, letterario, artistico) con ‘crossover’ si intende contaminazione, mescolamento, incrocio di generi e modi diversi che produce ‘prodotti’ misti. Nel design contemporaneo, è evidente come questo meccanismo di ibridazione stia diventando una prassi comune e diffusa anche quando ci si riferisce ai ‘processi’, che sempre di più attingono a diverse specificità e le ricombinano attraverso procedimenti a volte casuali, a volte eugeneticamente modificati, a volte inevitabili. Da qui prodotti con madre analogica e padre digitale, coi nonni artigiani e gli zii techno-fabbricatori, con gli occhi ereditati da un’attenzione per l’ambito artistico/sperimentale e altri caratteri genetici che vanno a pescare nella consuetudine con la tradizione industriale. In più, in Italia, che si sa è una patria inclusiva per il design, tutti questi ingredienti sono mescolati con linguaggi che salutano la tradizione nordica e insieme rispondono a codici estetici mediterranei, che citano il design mitteleuropeo, ma insieme ammiccano anche all’estetica anglo-francese, e vuoi farci mancare un tocco di minimalismo nipponico e di ludico continentale? E ancora, da sempre: chi lavora per le aziende lavora anche per produzioni proprie; chi disegna bestseller per il mercato di massa ha quasi sempre anche una piccola collezione autoprodotta in serie limitata in qualche galleria; chi può dedicarsi a ricerche sperimentali spesso lo fa grazie al fatto che altre commesse aziendali gli permettono di sbizzarrirsi; chi accorda la sua preferenza al design straniero, non può quasi mai fare a meno di citare un Maestro italiano; etc. etc. Questa difficoltà a delineare i contorni della professione, sia sotto il profilo dei progetti che dei processi messi in atto per realizzarli, spesso ha condotto all’equivoco per cui il design italiano (visto da dentro e da fuori) sarebbe una massa abbastanza indistinta di repliche, con codici simili e poco emergenti. Non è molto diverso dal malinteso per cui, nell’immaginario, l’epoca dell’Italian Design viene citata come se fosse l’espressione di un gusto, una poetica e una politica uniformi, e non è così lontano dall’incomprensione per cui questa grave rimozione storica pesa anche sulla generazione di mezzo. La difficoltà sta nell’isolare i diversi caratteri che si incrociano nel nostro design, proprio per via di questi rimescolamenti, e spesso è un’operazione che non può che essere fatta a posteriori, a partire dalla reazione che scatenano sul terreno su cui impattano, e che non può neanche essere condotta esternamente, senza – come si dice – sporcarcisi le mani. E questo è specialmente vero per il design italiano contemporaneo, che è quanto di più lontano da un’interpretazione scolastica delle vecchie categorie da una parte, ma dall’altra è inevitabilmente risultato misto anche di queste storie diverse. Ma la peculiarità del nostro design in questo senso

‘misto’, non sta solo nei prodotti e neanche nei processi, che nel vocabolario internazionale anzi includono abitualmente anche generi molto più lontani e vari (come il design immateriale, quello dei servizi, l’interaction design, etc.) e, per dirla tutta, non è neanche una novità. La vera specificità del crossover rispetto al design italiano riguarda innanzitutto la gente del design, con una tradizione che vive almeno a partire dall’architetto, critico, designer, teorico Gio Ponti. Proprio per questo particolare gioco di incastri che riguarda le persone e le loro professioni, i designer italiani sono quasi sempre anche i primi narratori del loro lavoro, ma anche di quello altrui, come curatori, insegnanti, teorici; i critici stessi spesso sono anche progettisti militanti e con pari valentia un giorno scrivono e l’altro disegnano; tanti tra gli imprenditori sono ex designer e gli art director nella maggior parte dei casi sono ancora i designer; i direttori di tante riviste sono architetti; gli uffici stampa sono curatori e viceversa. Non sorprende che chi fa sia anche chiamato a presentare quel che fa, in molti casi anche a venderlo (più o meno direttamente), e spesso assemblarlo con le sue mani. Per l’italiano tuttofare, indossare cappelli diversi è, questo sì, parte del suo dna, indipendentemente dal codice genetico proveniente dai suoi genitori, indipendentemente da quanti genitori riconosce o rievoca e indipendentemente dal fatto che possa poi elencare tutte queste voci in fattura. Anche perché il risultato, alla fine, almeno nei casi migliori di cui ci interessa occuparci, è diverso dalla somma delle parti che si incrociano. Ed è sempre qualcosa di più. Forse, più che di crossover, a proposito del design italiano varrebbe allora la pena di parlare di over-crossing? - pag. 69 Serie di vasi Rabdicanti di Francesco Maestri per Resign. (foto: Andrea Piffari)

Erbamatta pag. 70 di Maddalena Padovani

Un tema di riflessione esistenziale che diventa un disco e poi anche un tappeto, una carta da parati, un nuovo materiale, una collezione di oggetti in divenire... La visione intrinsecamente ‘crossing’ del progetto del designer-musicista Lorenzo Palmeri Ci sono diversi elementi che fanno di Lorenzo Palmeri una figura estremamente contemporanea del progetto. Fattori che non dipendono solo dalla sua duplice figura di designer-musicista, ma anche da una connaturata attitudine a fare di ogni lavoro un’operazione di progetto condiviso. Sia che si tratti di musica, di art direction o di industrial design. Con il risultato che gli ambiti disciplinari vengono inevitabilmente a sfumare, le visioni si allargano in un’ottica partecipativa, le finalità trascendono le specificità del progetto in questione per assumere una più ambiziosa connotazione culturale. Come già era avvenuto per il suo primo disco da solista, Preparativi per la pioggia (vedi Interni 598 gennaio febbraio 2010), Palmeri si appresta all’uscita della sua seconda fatica musicale Erbamatta, prevista il prossimo marzo, con un progetto integrato che declina la dimensione immateriale della musica a quella materiale del design. Nel primo caso Lorenzo aveva coinvolto un gruppo di amici designer nella realizzazione di una copertina artistica di

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 114

19/12/13 11.35


In tern i January-february 2014 cui anche l’utilizzatore diventava coautore, nel secondo il progettista punta più in alto e fa diventare il disco una collezione di oggetti realizzati da aziende diverse. Obiettivo: fare dell’erba matta il manifesto di un pensiero progettuale e di un modus operandi da condividere tanto con i musicisti che con gli imprenditori con cui collabora abitualmente. “Oggi come oggi” spiega Lorenzo Palmeri “ritengo più interessante progettare dei modelli, piuttosto che dei prodotti di cui c’è sempre meno bisogno. Dei modelli che mettano in circolo pensieri diversi tra loro allo scopo di focalizzare nuovi punti di vista. Siccome nessuno sa, ancora, quale sarà il nuovo paradigma della nostra società, allora procedo iniziando a eliminare quello che non mi piace di quello vecchio: la competizione”. “L’erba matta” prosegue Palmeri “per me è una metafora. Rappresenta una cosa pervasiva che viene portata in giro dal vento e dagli agenti esterni e attecchisce ovunque. Mi piace l’elemento potenzialmente negativo che esprime: può infatti diventare infestante, ma solo nella misura in cui arriva a turbare un ordine prestabilito. Questo concetto è tipico della cultura occidentale, che tende a rimuovere e negare l’imprevisto o l’elemento casuale di disordine. Sono invece convinto che la casualità, l’imprecisione e l’imperfezione faranno parte del paradigma futuro e mi sembra che oggi stia nascendo una nuova sensibilità culturale nei confronti di questi argomenti. Per questo ho assunto l’erba matta a emblema di un lavoro collettivo in cui spero di coinvolgere via via sempre più persone”. Ecco allora che il disco Erbamatta – che musicalmente mescola vari generi, che spaziano dal mondo analogico dei classici strumenti acustici a quello digitale della super-elettronica, ed è realizzato con il coinvolgimento di tanti amici-musicisti tra cui l’immancabile Saturnino –

INservice TRAnslations / 115

diventa il punto di partenza di una riflessione progettuale declinata in più tipologie di oggetti per la casa: due linee di carte da parati per Jannelli & Volpi; due tappeti per Nodus che verranno dapprima presentati in edizione numerata e poi entreranno a catalogo; un nuovo modello della chitarra Paraffina disegnata per Noah; due versioni di pavimentazione per Stone Italiana, una più decorativa e l’altra più di ‘sostanza’ (DNA Urbano) realizzata con un nuovo materiale che recupera le polveri di scarto delle lavorazioni di asfaltatura delle strade. A questi prodotti, che verranno distribuiti in un’ottica di ‘crossing’ commerciale, seguiranno altri nuovi oggetti come occhiali, scarpe, complementi per la tavola, tutti targati Erbamatta. “Non si tratta di co-marketing” conclude Palmeri “ma di un’operazione tesa a generare un movimento inedito tra mondi che generalmente non si incontrano, attraverso un progetto che diventa patrimonio di ciascuno. L’obiettivo è veicolare il messaggio che è possibile trovare nuove soluzioni e nuovi ordini in processi che sembrano non possederne più. In fondo, il ruolo del designer è sempre stato questo: scardinare gli equilibri settoriali e introdurre punti di vista inediti, in un gioco di contaminazioni disciplinari che coinvolgono in prima persona il designer stesso”. - pag. 70 un ritratto di Lorenzo Palmeri e i due tappeti realizzati da Nodus per il progetto Erbamatta. In alto, il modello Tarassaco; sotto, il modello Centocchio; entrambi sono disponibili in due versioni, una pop in tessuto non tessuto e una seconda su supporto Yanvel in collaborazione con Velcro Italia. - pag. 71 In alto a destra: la cover di Erbamatta, l’ultimo disco di Lorenzo Palmeri in uscita il prossimo marzo. Accanto: il modello Cicoria della collezione Erbamatta di carta da parati realizzata da Jannelli & Volpi.

Tecno-comfort pag. 72 di Maddalena Padovani

Dall’incontro tra la visione innovativa di Audi Design e il sapere artigianale di Poltrona Frau nasce Luft, una poltrona che dà forma all’immaginario domestico di Walter de Silva Walter de Silva appartiene a quella categoria di progettisti che le cose prima le sognano, poi le fissano sulla carta con abili segni fatti a mano, infine le realizzano in modelli e prototipi, perché solo toccandole dal vero capiscono se hanno senso e come migliorarle. Succede così per ogni nuova automobile che de Silva progetta, oggi nel ruolo di direttore Design Volkswagen Group ma prima per altri brand (Fiat, Alfa Romeo, Seat) con cui ha firmato modelli di grande successo, succede così anche per gli oggetti domestici che il car designer si diletta a disegnare e a immaginare nella propria casa. Lampade, sedie, sveglie, complementi di arredamento, accomunati sempre da linee dinamiche, quasi bolidiste, che rimandano con immediatezza al mondo della velocità frequentato dal loro autore, ma ancor prima ai disegni del loro ‘nonno’ Emilio de Silva, padre di Walter, primo fumettista di fantascienza in Italia. Oggi, per la prima volta, questo immaginario mondo domestico prende forma concreta, diventa prodotto, assume valore tecnologico e grande qualità materica e manifatturiera. Da una vera e propria operazione di crossover, intesa come contaminazione e integrazione delle competenze di due marchi leader appartenenti a diversi ambiti dell’industria, nasce Luft, una poltrona che si colloca tra le icone classiche di Poltrona Frau ma concentra le avanzate visioni tecnologiche della divisione Audi Design capitanata da de Silva. Una collaborazione durata due anni in cui, in un rapporto di grande sinergia, due diversi saperi si sono confrontati tra loro. Spiega Walter de Silva: “Non c’è stato un vero briefing o una richiesta specifica, se non quella di sperimentare assieme le proprie competenze. L’obiettivo me lo sono dato io: quello di disegnare la poltrona dove ognuno di noi ama rifugiarsi in casa, per leggere un libro, per stare solo con se stesso, per rilassarsi, per riflettere. Per questo ho pensato a una seduta non costrittiva, aperta, volante, leggera, in grado però di coniugare tecnologia, artigianato e comfort secondo un modello industriale evoluto”. Precisa Roberto Archetti, brand manager di Poltrona Frau: “Il progetto ha seguito l’iter e le modalità del processo automobilistico. Noi siamo soliti discutere con i designer attraverso schizzi, disegni o piccole maquette. Siamo rimasti sbalorditi quando, per la prima volta, ci siamo recati negli uffici design di Audi, a Monaco, e ci siamo trovati, in un grande spazio, davanti a cinque poltrone realizzate in scala 1:1 dove ci si poteva tranquillamente sedere”. Dall’in-

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 115

nesto delle due culture è nata una seduta con una concezione decisamente nuova per Poltrona Frau. Luft adotta infatti una struttura in alluminio pressofuso che viene portata all’esterno e diventa un elemento scultoreo, un forte segno grafico che disegna il profilo della poltrona dallo schienale al piede, fino a diventare basamento. Come nella carrozzeria di un’automobile, la sua matericità e le sue linee plastiche sono pensate per riflettere la luce, per sottolineare l’effetto di sospensione della seduta e per marcarne il contenuto segnico. Se la precisione è quella dell’automotive, la definizione del comfort è quella di un brand d’eccellenza dell’arredo che mette in gioco tutto il suo sapere per mettere a punto la tensione del bracciolo, la sciancratura, la fluidità delle linee, proponendo l’idea della ‘mantella’ che avvolge lo schienale e sottolinea la sensazione di comfort. Racconta Roberto Archetti: “Il mondo automobilistico lavora sull’indeformabilità e sulla severità della forma. De Silva faceva fatica ad accettare che la cucitura del cuscino della seduta, che è in piuma e quindi si deforma inevitabilmente, non fosse sempre tirata e perfetta. Ci siamo così inventati una grande cucitura a doppio ago che sottolinea la

19/12/13 11.35


116 / INservice translations

linea dell’imbottito e ne garantisce l’indeformabilità”. Conclude il progettista: “Questa esperienza dimostra che l’industria non può vivere senza l’artigianato. Uno non potrà mai fare a meno dell’altro. Non è vero che tutto deve trasformarsi in grandi macchine, grandi opere, grandi numeri. Ha senso pensare allo sviluppo della nostra professione anche in termini di artigianato seriale e di produzioni di dimensioni più contenute. Non dimentichiamoci che l’industrial design nasce dall’artigianato; in seguito si è arrivati alla separazione di queste due dimensioni, che in futuro, però, arriveranno a ricompattarsi. Il crossover è anche questo”. - pag. 72 Uno schizzo della A8 Audi, uno dei progetti di maggiore successo di de Silva nel

Tutti a scuola pag. 74 di Valentina Croci

Il design è in trasformazione. E così la formazione del settore, mirata a un insegnamento più interdisciplinare. Quattro nuovi approcci alla didattica per fornire ai progettisti del futuro non tanto strumenti quanto punti di orientamento per gestire la complessità del mondo La figura del designer tradizionale sta cambiando. Difficilmente coloro che escono dalle scuole di design faranno un iter alla Philippe Starck. La crisi dei mercati e l’accessibilità delle nuove tecnologie di comunicazione e fabbricazione stanno facendo vacillare le categorie disciplinari del progetto. Come formare i designer del futuro? Senza pretendere di fornire gli strumenti per risolvere i problemi, ma imparando a gestire la complessità. È la risposta di quattro nuovi approcci didattici in Italia e in Olanda. I designer Jon Stam e Simon de Bakker (studio Commonplace) dirigono con Claire Warnier e Dries Verbruggen (studio Unfold) e Tim Knappen (Indianen) il corso in Digital Craft all’interno del BA della Willem de Kooning Art Academy di Rotterdam. Il programma, al primo anno di vita, nato da precedenti esperimenti con il Maryland Institute College of Art (USA), si inserisce nella più generale riforma della scuola, mirata a un insegnamento più interdisciplinare. Se, nei primi due anni, gli studenti approcciano le teorie basilari nel campo dell’arte, del fashion e del product design, dal terzo e quarto anno si confrontano con i cosiddetti ‘Domain studies’, ovvero si spingono in studi trasversali in aree quali l’Open Design, indagando come coinvolgere diversamente l’utente nelle varie fasi del progetto o, in senso lato, progettare la partecipazione; oppure l’Hacking e il Digital Craft, esaminando l’esperienza delle nuove tecnologie e ipotizzandone nuovi scenari applicativi. La riforma della scuola parte da una visione del design non più problem solving ma metologia metaprogettuale sui servizi e il sapere. “Rispetto a corsi di Media Studies che si ponevano su un livello più concettuale oppure, all’estremo opposto, sulla performance della tecnologia, noi cerchiamo di partire dall’esperienza dell’utilizzatore, trasformando le nozioni teoriche come illustrazione, fashion e product design e social studies in oggetti o ambienti interattivi dove la tecnologia passa in secondo piano rispetto, ad esempio, a una percezione estetica o tattile di essa. Il corso non creerà esperti di fabbricazione digitale, ma professionisti che sapranno interagire con il mondo dell’IT e dell’ingegneria informatica propo-

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 116

January-february 2014 Inter ni settore automotive; sopra e sotto il ritratto del designer, uno schizzo e il prototipo di una zuccheriera, uno degli oggetti domestici disegnati da de Silva che, in forma di prototipi, hanno dato vita alla mostra Autoemociòn, Barcellona, 2003 (foto: Mario Carrieri). - pag. 73 Dall’alto: la poltrona Luft di Poltrona Frau disegnata da Walter de Silva in collaborazione con Audi Design. La struttura è realizzata in poliuretano rigido da stampo con fian hi imbottiti in poliuretano espanso e ovatta poliestere. Nella parte centrale, per aumentare il comfort, molleggio con cinghie elastiche fiss te a un telaio in legno di faggio. La struttura esterna è in alluminio pressofuso verniciato grigio e alluminio, disponibile anche in alluminio cromato. Un progetto artistico di de Silva del 1978: la sedia Fabio con seduta e schienale di carta “dove ci si siede non con il fisico ma con la men e” (foto: Aldo Agnelli). La Leica M9 Titanium Limited Edition, realizzata in soli 500 pezzi su progetto di Walter de Silva (foto: Stephan Pick).

nendo un punto di vista diverso. Ipotizzare scenari, modificare i processi produttivi esistenti è ciò che oggi è più importante nel mondo del design”, conclude Stam. Analogamente, sperimentare progetti facendo, ‘hands on’, conferisce allo studente quell’autonomia nella pratica e quell’approccio sperimentale individuale che è fondamentale nel lavoro odierno, in quanto sempre più le aziende delegano o raccolgono la ricerca all’esterno. “Il sistema di insegnamento tradizionale è in una fase di cambiamento non solo a causa della crisi che sta stravolgendo le tradizionali modalità di accesso al lavoro, ma anche perché le nuove tecnologie hanno accelerato un mutamento di paradigma cognitivo nella generazione dei ventenni”, introduce Stefano Mirti, direttore scientifico del nuovo Master online in Relational Design promosso dall’Accademia ABADIR di Catania. “Come YouTube che raccoglie migliaia di frammenti scollegati, i giovani ragionano dal particolare al generale, dall’induttivo al deduttivo. Insegnare con le tradizionali metodologie è quindi poco efficace”. Mirti ha svolto precedenti esperimenti sulle potenzialità dei social media e sulla gestione di comunità online con i progetti Whoami e Ceramic Futures, comprendendo il funzionamento di un tipo di comunicazione orizzontale, ovvero basata su differenti registri di relazione e gerarchie tra le persone, aspetti che saranno riflessi nel metodo didattico del master. Ai blocchi di partenza, il corso è suddiviso in dodici insegnamenti di ventiquattro giorni l’uno in discipline diversissime (dal basic all’automotive design, dal community design all’artigianato in bottega), con lezioni teoriche e revisioni online, conferenze di esperti in streaming, un weekend al mese di workshop nelle aziende partner e due weekend di summer camp per un totale di cinquecento ore di stage. Tra l’analogico e il digitale, dunque, perché il valore delle relazioni vis-à-vis è insostituibile. Anche in questo caso, il master punta su un sistema di laboratori pratici e ‘hands on’. “Non usciranno esperti di settore. La scuola è concepita più come una rubrica del telefono che come una cassetta degli attrezzi: gli studenti impareranno a relazionarsi con una pletora di discipline, sviluppando competenze sociali e relazionali, facoltà invisibili ma fondamentali per la figura del designer contemporaneo”, conclude Mirti. La scuola italiana ha pochi laboratori concettuali in cui studenti e docenti si confrontano sullo stesso piano su tematiche ontologiche o sociali che riguardano il mondo del progetto. Per questa ragione Barbara Brondi e Marco Rainò, grazie al supporto dell’Associazione Culturale IN Residence Design, organizzano da sei anni il workshop IN Residence: due giorni di lavoro non-stop tra sei designer internazionali under 35 e circa una trentina di studenti provenienti dalle quattro scuole torinesi con corsi di design. Si realizzano oggetti con materiali poverissimi – carta, nastro adesivo e poco più – al fine di evocare suggestioni, cortocircuiti e mettere in discussione i rituali del quotidiano. Il tema di quest’anno è stato Identity Detectors. Un così complesso argomento è stato affrontato realizzando oggetti concettuali che, messi insieme, hanno evidenziato quanto siano diverse le relazioni tra le cose e i singoli individui (gli studenti di Giorgia Zanellato e Guus Kusters hanno creato, partendo da alcune interviste e oggetti comuni, prototipi che simboleggiavano una singola persona); quanto gli oggetti siano portatori di significati simbolici (il workshop seguito da Anton Alvarez e Hilda Hellström); oppure quanto degli utensili comuni possano stimolare in modo inedito l’interrelazione tra le persone (il laboratorio di Jean-Baptiste Fastrez e Jon Stam). Il contesto culturale è dunque al centro della progettazione. Ne è convinta anche Louise Schouwenberg, direttrice del master in Contextual Design alla Design Academy di Eindhoven. “Il corso si focalizza sulle relazioni tra le persone con e attraverso il design. E queste relazioni hanno implicazioni culturali, sociali, politiche ed economiche. Il design non è mai solo la realizzazione di un oggetto finito quanto l’espressione degli aspetti sociali e culturali e dei significati che esso assume nel corso del tempo. È la testimonianza, appunto, di un dato contesto”, spiega Schouwenberg. Il master non è volto al solo product design ma anche allo studio dei processi di fabbricazione e al design strategico. La figura professionale che ne emerge è un ‘critical author designer’, che punta sulla sua soggettività, capacità interpretativa e talento immaginativo, doti creative che si uniscono a una metodologia sistematica nella ricerca. Il corso, nato nel 2007, ha prodotto product designer, progettisti a cavallo tra l’arte e il design come i Forma Fantasma, ma anche teorici e design strategist. “Se si progetta a

19/12/13 11.35


Interni January-february 2014 partire dalla fisicità dell’oggetto” conclude Schouwenberg “si rischia di curarne solo gli aspetti stilistici. La stessa nozione di funzionalità cambia nel tempo e dipende dal contesto geografico e culturale di riferimento. Iniziare da quest’ultimo aspetto consente di comprendere quanto il design abiliti ma anche manipoli le azioni umane. Il designer deve quindi capire i processi e trovare un ruolo in questo mondo in continuo divenire”. - pag. 75 Due suggestioni dal master di primo livello in Relational Design. Quattordici moduli insegnati online attraverso la piattaforma Whoami e workshop intensivi mensili da tre giorni ciascuno. Accanto, il modulo Custom Design. Processing e le leggi della genetica tenuto da Marcel Bilurbina con Confindustria Ceramic ; sotto, L’artigiano e nuovi codici semantici di Andrea Miserocchi ed Eleonora Odorizzi con Centrale Fies e Minove. (foto: Les Films du

INservice TRAnslations / 117 Losange). Nella pagina accanto: il sud-coreano Bora Hong, diplomato al master in Contextual Design della Design Academy di Eindhoven, presenta Cosmetic Surgery Kingdom, un progetto che evoca la sempre pi˘ diffusa pratica della chirurgia estetica nel suo Paese. Utilizza oggetti di design per richiamare, criticamente, il tema della modificazione del corpo spesso utilizz ta per questioni di status symbol. (Courtesy: Design Academy Eindhoven). - pag. 76 Dal corso Digital Craft del BA della Willem de Kooning Academie Hogeschool di Rotterdam, il progetto Message in the bottle di Hilko van Idsinga, Rose Groot ed Ermi van Oers. Gli studenti hanno incorporato in una macchina meccanica, che richiama gli utensili della tradizione, un sensore di rilevamento del suono che fa girare la bottiglia incidendovi dei messaggi ad alfabeto Morse. Il digitale si unisce all’analogico in un progetto poetico e comune all’immaginario collettivo. - pag. 77 Immagini del workshop IN Residence #6 dal titolo Identity Detectors, curato da Barbara Brondi e Marco Rainò. Hanno partecipato i designer Anton Alvarez, Jean-Baptiste Fastrez, Hilda Hellström, Guus Kusters, Jon Stam e Giorgia Zanellato. (foto: Tullio Deorsola).

Assonanze pag. 78

di Nadia Lionello - foto luci di Maurizio Marcato

Similitudini tra LUCI e OGGETTI: un gioco di armonie formali e di grafismi tra la VERSATILITÀ compositiva e decorativa e la FUNZIONALITÀ quotidiana - pag. 78 Jar RGB, collezione composta da una serie di calici rovesciati in grado di coniugare le tecniche del vetro soffi to e il modello di colori RGB. Design Arik Levy per Lasvit. Les Endiablés, serie di coppe in cristallo soffi to a bocca, molato e decorato con incisioni realizzate a mano, prodotto da Saint-Louise. - pag. 81 Disegnata da Luca Bettonica per Cini&Nils, Formala è una lampada Led flessibile composta da uno o più elementi uniti fra loro con cui dare vita a diversi giochi grafici River, sistema di sedute imbottite modulari accostabili a nastro, con schienale alto, caratterizzato da elementi base curvi e rettilinei, rivestiti in tessuto o similpelle e per contract. Di Bartoli Design per Segis. Nella pagina accanto, di Roberto Paoli per Modo Luce, Multiball si compone di una serie di globi in materiale plastico opalino di differenti diametri aggregabili all’infini o e fiss ti ad aste rigide di diverse altezze, collegate fra loro da una staffa di giunzione mobile in metallo. Simbolo, separé in alluminio con pattern stampato, personalizzabile con colori e stampe. Design Garilab by Piter Perbellini per Altreforme. - pag. 83 Composizione ottenuta con elementi della collezione 57. Design Omer Arbel per Bocci. Le sfere sono realizzate includendo nella matrice in vetro vuoti d’aria che restano invisibili a lampada spenta, per poi svelarsi all’accensione. Sett’anta dipinta, anta scorrevole a scomparsa in vetro float temperato, con decoro in trasparenza con incisioni dipinte e fondo sabbiato, prodotta da Casali. Nella pagina accanto, Bitter Candy, elemento geometrico in policarbonato trasparente, componibile all’infini o e disponibile in due misure. Design Doriana e Massimiliano Fuksas per Zonca. Triptych, tre vasi in unica struttura, della collezione drawing glass, realizzato da Massimo Lunardon in vetro borosilicato. Design Giorgia Zanellato per Fabrica. - pag. 84 Una delle possibili confi urazioni di String Lights, collezione di lampade led da soffit o defini e da un fi o elettrico nero che entra in relazione con l’architettura di uno spazio. Design Michael Anastassiades per Flos. Ikon, panca con base in polipropilene stampato ad iniezione e seduta in laminato, stratific to full colour. Design Pio e Tito Toso per Pedrali. Nella pagina accanto, Precius, tavolino con struttura in fi o d’acciaio verniciato e piano in vetro temperato nello stesso colore della base, o incolore. Design di Cédric Ragot per Roche Bobois. Sviluppata da Arik Levy per Vibia, Wireflow è una serie di sospensioni la cui struttura è formata da sottili cavi e terminali Led con cui dare vita a confi urazioni geometriche e installazioni luminose personalizzate.

Cross-CarPeT pag. 86

di Nadia Lionello - foto sala posa di Miro Zagnoli

Rapporti di SOMIGLIANZE fortuite fra idee e arredi con PROTAGONISTA il TAPPETO, Piccola opera artigianale, Funzionale nel RICOPRIRE il pavimento e DECORATIVA per completare L’ARREDO non solo di casa - pag. 87 Underworld, tappeto 250x350 cm, in lana annodata a mano in unica variante prodotta in Nepal. Disegnato da Studio Job per Nodus. Nella pagina accanto, ispirato dai modelli e motivi usati per i tappeti persiani, l’opera fotografica Anth opocene, si compone di immagini satellitari tratte da internet ed elaborate da David Thomas Smith. - pag. 88 In alto: Blow up, tappeto 210x210, 110x310 cm in lana o lana e seta, annodato a mano in Nepal, qui nella versione colorata (giorno) o bianco e nero (notte). Disegnato da Stéphane Maupin per Chevalier Edition; a fianc , Esu Eames storage units, sistema di contenitori per casa o uffici con struttura in metallo zincato, piani in multistrato impiallacciato acero e laccato, pannelli con texturee laccati in vari colori. Disegnato da Charles e Ray Eames (1949) per Vitra. Sopra: Reverb, tappeto 200x300 cm in pura lana della Nuova Zelanda annodata a mano, disponibile in due varianti colore, blu e kaki. Disegnato da Cédric Ragot per Roche Bobois; a fianc , Deep sea, libreria in cristallo trasparente extralight stratific to e termosaldato con ripiani in cristallo trasparente colorato nei toni dell’ azzurro o grigio. Disegnata da Nendo per Glas Italia. - pag. 89 Moss potpurri, tappeto 200x300 e 170x240 cm a pelo lungo in lino e

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 117

19/12/13 11.35


118 / INservice translations lana grezza, nell’unica variante multicolor, taftato a mano. Disegnato da Gunilla Lagerhem Ullberg per Kasthall. Division, libreria autoportante, in unica misura, o a muro in tre misure, realizzata in MDF, 10 mm di spessore, laccato goffrato opaco bianco attrezzabile con box in alluminio verniciato opaco in quattro colori. Disegnata da Design Lab per Calligaris. - pag. 90 Tulsi, tappeto 200x200,180x250 e 200x300 cm in canapa sbiancata, lana tibetana e seta di bamboo senza tinture, annodato a mano. Disegnato da Paolo Zani per Warli. Ink, tavolino con gambe in acciaio verniciato nero e piano in MDF, rivestito con tessuto stampato con tecnica digitale applicato con resina (Rezinatessile®), con decoro a rombo color fango o nero. Disegnato da Emilio Nanni per Zanotta. - pag. 91 Hockey, tappeto 200x300 cm in lana e seta, taftato a mano realizzabile in 134 varianti colore da catalogo, densità e spessore personalizzabili.Disegnato da Konstantin Grcic per Jab Anstoetz. Fa parte della collezione Character. Toshi, sistema di mobili contenitori, in diverse dimensioni, in legno laccato, con

Time lapse pag. 94 di Katrin Cosseta

La lezione dei maestri è quanto mai attuale. Il 2013 è stato un anno ricco di RIEDIZIONI, messa in produzione di INEDITI, aggiornamenti cromatici e materici di MOBILI e LAMPADE densi di storia. Spesso vere ICONE. Percorsi filologici innestano la tecnologia di oggi nel genio di ieri - pag. 94 Grembiule, disegnato da Achille Castiglioni e Max Huber nel 1967 come ideale indumento da lavoro per ogni designer. Un inedito realizzato dalla collaborazione tra Fondazione Achille Castiglioni e Yoox.com (vendita online in esclusiva). - pag. 95 Cubo, poltrona disegnata da Achille e Pier Giacomo Castiglioni (nella foto) nel 1957 realizzata in origine con parallelepipedi di gommapiuma cellulare con settori a differente resistenza meccanica. Meritalia mette in produzione l’inedito, con struttura metallica con ruote e seduta in poliuretano flessibile a differenti densità con portanze calibrate. Rivestimento in panno, tessuto o pelle. - pag. 96 Standard Chair, disegnata da Jean Prouvé (nella foto) nel 1934 e dal 2001 prodotta da Vitra, viene oggi riattualizzata, in collaborazione con la famiglia Prouvé e la designer olandese Hella Jongerius, anche in versione Standard SP (Siège en Plastique). Il sedile e lo schienale, non più in legno ma in materiale plastico, possono essere combinati in diversi colori, facilmente sostituiti e coordinati con la base metallica provvista di verniciatura a polveri opaca. E15 riedita alcuni mobili disegnati dall’architetto e designer modernista tedesco Ferdinand Kramer (nelle foto). Tra queste la poltrona FK 10 Weissenhof, disegnata nel 1926 e inserita in uno degli appartamenti della storica Weissenhofsiedlung di Stoccarda di Mies van der Rohe. Piedini in legno di noce o quercia, imbottitura in schiumato poliuretanico, rivestimento in tessuto. - pag. 97 Poltrona Frau propone nuovi colori per la poltrona Dezza, disegnata da Gio Ponti nel 1965. La struttura in frassino laccato a poro aperto è oggi disponibile anche in verde Ponti, azzurro Ponti e in massello di noce canaletto, affini al lin uaggio estetico del maestro, che si aggiungono al bianco e al nero già in collezione. Alla sua nascita, non era solo una poltrona ma un sistema di costruzione di quattro componenti fini e da assemblare a posteriori, secondo le richieste, come evidenziato nelle istruzioni di montaggio d’epoca. Dezza è disponibile con schienali in tre altezze e in versione divano 2 posti. Il Tavolo TL3 di Franco Albini, disegnato nel 1953 e prodotto allora da Poggi entra, con una riedizione fi ologica, nella Collezione Cassina I Maestri. La struttura è in massello di frassino naturale o tinto nero e noce

C_In638_R_102_118_traduzioni.indd 118

January-february 2014 Interni ante con decoro geometrico inciso, gambe in metallo verniciato. Disegnato da Luca Nichetto per Casamania. - pag. 92 In alto: Akari, tappeto 170x240, 200x300 cm in lana e viscosa, annodato a mano in Nepal. Disegnato da Yumi Endo per Now Carpet. Bolle, applique alogena in poliammide sinterizzata bianca realizzata con tecnologia 3d printing, disegnata da Selvaggia Armani per .exnovo. Sopra: Jean, tavolo con base in metallo verniciato bianco, nero, rame e peltro, piano rettangolare o tondo in cristallo, legno o marmo. Disegnato da Carlo Ballabio per Porada. Mesh, tappeto della contemporary collection, in lana e seta annodate a mano con nodo tibetano, misure e colori personalizzabili. Disegnato da Fabrizio Cantoni per CC-Tapis. - pag. 93 Ether, tappeto in lana e seta annodato e cardato a mano, della collezione Limited edition, realizzato su musura e in colorazioni vegetali. Disegnato da Karim Rashid per Illulian. Grown, lampada sospensione in fi o di ferro verniciato. Disegnta da Giampaolo Allocco Delineodesign per Zava.

canaletto. Il piano è disponibile in forma rettangolare, quadrata e tonda, in legno e anche cristallo, novità della riedizione supportata da disegni d’archivio. - pag. 98 Bardi’s Bowl Chair, disegnata da Lina Bo Bardi (nella foto) nel 1951, viene per la prima volta industrializzata da Arper, in una riedizione limitata di 500 esemplari concordata con l’Istituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi. La poltrona è composta da una seduta semisferica rivestita in pelle o tessuto appoggiata, e dunque orientabile, a una struttura metallica ad anello, sostenuta da quattro gambe. - pag. 99 Osaka, divano curvilineo disegnato da Pierre Paulin nel 1967, prototipato da Mobilier National ed esposto all’Esposizione Universale di Osaka del 1970. La Cividina lo riedita con struttura in acciaio rivestita in poliuretano espanso indeformabile e rivestimento in tessuto stretch. I moduli snodabili, come già in passato (nell’immagine datata 1973, un estratto della brochure di Mobilier National che illustra la componibilità del divano) consentono la massima flessibilità della seduta, che da un minimo di 180 cm può raggiungere la lunghezza di 630 cm. Pastoe riedita la Wire Lounge Chair (nelle versioni FM06 e FM05 rispettivamente con e senza bracciolo) disegnata da Cees Braakman con Adriaan Dekker nel 1958. La seduta è proposta in fi o d’acciaio nero, con seduta imbottita e cuscino schienale opzionale, e completa la famiglia già comprensiva di sedia e sgabelli. Tv Chair, disegnata da Marc Newson per Moroso nel 1993, è ora proposta in nuovi colori e in una inedita versione sfoderabile. Realizzata in poliuretano espanso schiumato ignifugo con struttura interna in acciaio, ha basamento con i piedi in acciaio verniciato. - pag. 100 La collezione Masters di Nemo accoglie la riedizione del Projecteur 165 disegnato da Le Corbusier nel 1954 per illuminare l’Alta Corte di Chandigarh, India. Prodotto in versione mini, ha corpo e staffa realizzati in alluminio e acciaio, verniciati bleu sablé o bianco calce, e diffusore in vetro sabbiato. Disponibile a morsetto, a sospensione e parete. Rinasce il marchio Stilnovo, con nuove proposte e la riedizione di una collezione di lampade-icona. Tra queste Triedro, disegnata da Joe Colombo nel 1970, una lampada orientabile in ogni direzione, con diffusore in metallo verniciato bianco, disponibile nelle versioni a morsetto, da parete e da terra. Con la collezione Re-Lighting Gino Sarfatti. Edition n. 1, Flos riedita alcune lampade disegnate dal fondatore di Arteluce, attualizzate dal punto di vista illuminotecnico. Tra questi il Modello 548, lampada da tavolo a luce riflessa e diffusa, disegnata nel 1951. Si compone di un faretto in alluminio su uno stelo tubolare in ottone lucidato o brunito, e un diffusore in metacrilato. La lampada incandescente originale è sostituita da una fonte led. - pag. 101 Martinelli luce edita una versione mini con tecnologia led della iconica Pipistrello, disegnata da Gae Aulenti nel 1965. Minipipistrello ha struttura in acciaio inox, diffusore in metacrilato opal bianco, base in alluminio verniciato nel colore bianco o testa di moro. Nella foto, l’allestimento della mostra Gae Aulenti - gli oggetti e gli spazi, Triennale di Milano, aprile 2013. Oluce riedita la lampada da tavolo 275, disegnata da Marco Zanuso nel 1963. Calotta in pmma opale rotante sulla base, proposta in metallo verniciato bianco o castano.

19/12/13 11.35


on line

N. 638 gennaio-febbraio 2014 January-February 2014 rivista fondata nel 1954 review founded in 1954

www.internimagazine.it

direttore responsabile/editor GILDA BOJARDI bojardi@mondadori.it art director CHRISTOPH RADL caporedattore centrale central editor-in-chief SIMO NETTA FIORIO simonetta.fiorio@mondadori.i consulenti editoriali/editorial consultants ANDREA BRA NZI ANTO NIO CITTERIO MICHELE DE LUCCHI MATTEO VERCELLO NI

Nel l ’immagi ne: casa a treia ( MC), nel le marche , proget t o di we spi de meuro n rome o architet ti. IN THE IMAGE: HOUSE AT TREIA (MC), IN THE MARCHES, DESIGNED BY WESPI DE MEURON ROMEO ARCHITETTI. (FOTO DI/phOTO BY H annes H enz)

Nel prossimo numero 639 in the next issue

il dentro e il fuori del progetto Design inside and out

Interiors&architecture case italiane Italian homes

INcenter scene da un esterno scenes from an exterior sedute passepartout passepartout seating

INdesign le qualità nascoste delle cose the hidden qualities of things progetto superficie surface design

2_C_In638_R_119_colophon.indd 119

redazione/editorial staff MADDALE NA PADO VANI mpadovan@mondadori.it (vice caporedattore/vice-editor-in-chief) OLI VIA CREMASCOLI cremasc@mondadori.it (caposervizio/senior editor) LAURA RAGAZZOLA laura.ragazzola@mondadori.it (caposervizio/senior editor ad personam) DANILO SIG NORELLO signorel@mondadori.it (caposervizio/senior editor ad personam) ANTO NELLA BOISI boisi@mondadori.it (vice caposervizio architetture/ architectural vice-editor) KATRI N COSSETA internik@mondadori.it produzione e news/production and news NADIA LIO NELLO internin@mondadori.it produzione e sala posa production and photo studio rubriche/features VIRGI NIO BRIATORE giovani designer/young designers GERMA NO CELA NT arte/art CRISTI NA MOROZZI fashion ANDREA PIRRUCCIO produzione e/production and news DANILO PREMOLI hi-tech e/and contract MATTEO VERCELLO NI in libreria/in bookstores TRA NSITI NG @MAC.COM traduzioni/translations grafic /layout MAURA SOLIMA N soliman@mondadori.it SIMO NE CASTAG NINI simonec@mondadori.it STE FANIA MO NTECCHI internim@mondadori.it segreteria di redazione editorial secretariat ALESSANDRA FOSSATI alessandra.fossati@mondadori.it responsabile/head ADALISA U BOLDI adalisa.uboldi@mondadori.it assistente del direttore assistant to the editor FEDERICA BERETTA internir@mondadori.it contributi di/contributors CHIARA ALESSI STE FANO CAGGIA NO VALE NTI NA CROCI MASSIMO DE CO NTI CECILIA ERMI NI ENRICO LEO NARDO FAGO NE ANTO NELLA GALLI CRISTI NA MOROZZI ALESSANDRO ROCCA MATTEO VERCELLO NI fotografi/photographs H ÉL ÈNE BINET LEO NARDO FINOTTI MAURIZIO MARCATO MADS MOGE NSE N STUDIO PEDRO PEGE NAUTE MIRO ZAG NOLI progetti speciali ed eventi special projects and events CRISTI NA BO NINI MICHELA NGELO GIOM BINI

corrispondenti/correspondents Francia: O li vier R enea u olivier.reneau@gmail.com G ermania: LUCA IACO NELLI radlberlin@t-online.de G iappone: SERGIO PIRRO NE utopirro@sergiopirrone.com G ran Bretagna: DAVIDE GIORDANO davide.giordano@zaha-hadid.com Portogallo: MARCO SOUSA SANTOS protodesign@mail.telepac.pt S pagna: LUCIA PANOZZO luciapanozzo@yahoo.com Taiwan: CHE NG CHU NG YAO yao@autotools.com.tw USA: Dror Be nshetrit

studio@studiodror.com

AR NOLDO MO NDADORI EDITORE 20090 SEGRATE - MILA NO INTERNI The magazine of interiors and contemporary design via D. Trentacoste 7 - 20134 Milano Tel. +39 02 215631 - Fax +39 02 26410847 interni@mondadori.it Pubblicazione mensile/monthly review. R egistrata al Tribunale di Milano al n° 5 del 10 gennaio1967. PREZZO DI COPERTINA/COVER PRICE INTER NI + de sig n index € 10,00 in Italy PUBBLICITÀ/ADVERTISING Mondadori Pubblicità 20090 S egrate - Milano Pubblicità, S ede C entrale Divisione L iving C oordinamento: S ilvia Bianchi Agenti: Margherita Bottazzi, Alessandra C apponi, O rnella Forte, Mauro Z anella Tel. 02/75422675 - Fax 02/75423641 e-mail: direzione.living@mondadori.it www.mondadoripubblicita.com S edi Esterne/External Office : LAZIO /CAMPANIA CD -Media - C arla Dall’O glio C orso Francia, 165 - 00191 R oma Tel. 06/3340615 - Fax 06/3336383 mprm01@mondadori.it LIGURIA Alessandro C oari Piazza S an G iovanni Bono, 33 int. 11 16036 - R ecco (GE ) - Tel. 0185/739011 alessandro.coari@mondadori.it PIEMO NTE /VALLE D’AOSTA L uigi D’Angelo Via Bruno Buozzi, 10 - 10123 Torino C ell. 346/2400037 luigi.dangelo@mondadori.it EMILIA ROMAG NA/SAN MARI NO/TOSCANA Marco Tosetti / Irene Mase’ Dari / Gianni Pierattoni Via Pasquale Muratori, 7 - 40134 Bologna Tel. 051/4391201 - Fax 051/4399156 irene.masedari@mondadori.it UM BRIA / AREZZO M.G razia Vagnetti C olle U mberto I, 59 - 06070 Perugia Tel 075 /5842017 - Monpubpg@mondadori.it TRI VENETO (tutti i settori, escluso settore living) Full T ime srl Via Dogana 3 - 37121 Verona Tel. 045/915399 - Fax 045/8352612 info@fulltimesrl.com TRI VENETO (solo settore L iving) Paola Z uin - C ell. 335/6218012 paola.zuin@mondadori.it; Daniela Boscaro - C ell. 335/8415857 daniela.boscaro@mondadori.it ABRUZZO/MOLISE L uigi G orgoglione Via Ignazio R ozzi, 8 - 64100 Teramo Tel. 0861/243234 - Fax 0861/254938 monpubte@mondadori.it PUGLIA /BASILICATA Media T ime - C arlo Martino Via Diomede Fresa, 2 - 70125 Bari Tel. 080/5461169 - Fax 080/5461122 monpubba@mondadori.it CALA BRIA /SICILIA /SARDEG NA GAP S rl - G iuseppe Amato Via R iccardo W agner, 5 - 90139 Palermo Tel. 091/6121416 - Fax 091/584688 email: monpubpa@mondadori.it MARCHE Annalisa Masi, Valeriano S udati Via Virgilio, 27 - 61100 Pesaro C ell. 348/8747452 - Fax 0721/638990 amasi@mondadori.it valeriano.sudati@mondadori.it

ABBONAMENTI/SUBSCRIPTIONS Italia annuale: 10 numeri + 3 Annual + Design Index Italy, one year: 10 issues + 3 Annuals + Design Index € 84,00 Estero annuale: 10 numeri + 3 Annual + Design Index Foreign, one year: 10 issues + 3 Annuals + Design Index Europa via terra-mare/Europe by surface-sea mail € 120,20 via aerea/air mail: Europa/Europe € 143,40 USA-C anada € 166,60 R esto del mondo/rest of the world € 246,70 Inviare l’importo a/please send payment to: Press-Di srl S ervizio Abbonamenti, servendosi del c/c. postale n. 77003101. Per comunicazioni, indirizzare a: Inquiries should be addressed to: INTER NI - S ervizio Abbonamenti C asella Postale 97- 25197 Brescia Tel. 199 111 999 (dall’Italia/from Italy) C osto massimo della chiamata da tutta Italia per telefoni fissi 0,14 € iva compresa al minuto senza scatto alla risposta. Tel. + 39 041 5099049 (dall’estero/from abroad) Fax + 39 030 7772387 e-mail: abbonamenti@mondadori.it www.abbonamenti.it/interni L ’editore garantisce la massima riservatezza dei dati forniti dagli abbonati e la possibilità di richiederne gratuitamente la rettifica cancellazione ai sensi dell’art. 7 del D.leg.196/2003 scrivendo a/The publisher guarantees maximum discretion regarding information supplied by subscribers; for modifications or cancel ation please write to: Press-Di srl Direzione Abbonamenti 20090 S egrate (MI) NUMERI ARRETRATI/BACK ISSUES Interni: € 10 Interni + Design Index: € 14 Interni + Annual: € 14 Modalità di pagamento: c/c postale n. 77270387 intestato a Press-Di srl “C ollezionisti” (tel. 199 162 171). Indicare indirizzo e numeri richiesti. Per pagamento con carte di credito (accettate: Cartasì, American Express, Visa, Mastercard e Diners), specifica e indirizzo, numero di carta e data di scadenza, inviando l’ordine via fax (+ 39 02 95103250) o via e-mail (collez@mondadori.it). Per spedizioni all’estero, maggiorare l’importo di un contributo fisso di € 5 70 per spese postali. L a disponibilità di copie arretrate è limitata, salvo esauriti, agli ultimi 18 mesi. Non si accettano spedizioni in contrassegno. Please send payment to Press-Di srl “Collezionisti” (tel. + 39 02 95970334), postal money order acct. no. 77270387, indicating your address and the back issues requested. For credit card payment (Cartasì, American Express, Visa, Mastercard, Diners) send the order by fax (+ 39 02 95103250) or e-mail (collez@mondadori.it), indicating your address, card number and expiration date. For foreign deliveries,add a fi ed payment of € 5,70 for postage and handling. Availability of back issues is limited, while supplies last, to the last 18 months. No COD orders are accepted. DISTRIBUZIONE/DISTRIBUTION per l’Italia e per l’estero for Italy and abroad Distribuzione a cura di Press-Di srl L ’editore non accetta pubblicità in sede redazionale. I nomi e le aziende pubblicati sono citati senza responsabilità. The publisher cannot directly process advertising orders at the editorial offices and assumes no responsibility for the names and companies mentioned. Stampato da/printed by ELCOGRA F S.p.A. Via Mondadori, 15 – Verona S tabilimento di Verona nel mese di dicembre/in December 2013

Questo periodico è iscritto alla FIEG This magazine is member of FIEG Federazione Italiana Editori G iornali © C opyright 2014 Arnoldo Mondadori Editore S.p.A. – Milano. Tutti i diritti di proprietà letteraria e artistica riservati. Manoscritti e foto anche se non pubblicati non si restituiscono.

20/12/13 19.36


on line

N. 638 gennaio-febbraio 2014 January-February 2014 rivista fondata nel 1954 review founded in 1954

www.internimagazine.it

direttore responsabile/editor GILDA BOJARDI bojardi@mondadori.it art director CHRISTOPH RADL caporedattore centrale central editor-in-chief SIMO NETTA FIORIO simonetta.fiorio@mondadori.i consulenti editoriali/editorial consultants ANDREA BRA NZI ANTO NIO CITTERIO MICHELE DE LUCCHI MATTEO VERCELLO NI

Nel l ’immagi ne: casa a treia ( MC), nel le marche , proget t o di we spi de meuro n rome o architet ti. IN THE IMAGE: HOUSE AT TREIA (MC), IN THE MARCHES, DESIGNED BY WESPI DE MEURON ROMEO ARCHITETTI. (FOTO DI/phOTO BY H annes H enz)

Nel prossimo numero 639 in the next issue

il dentro e il fuori del progetto Design inside and out

Interiors&architecture case italiane Italian homes

INcenter scene da un esterno scenes from an exterior sedute passepartout passepartout seating

INdesign le qualità nascoste delle cose the hidden qualities of things progetto superficie surface design

C_In638_R_120_colophon.indd 120

redazione/editorial staff MADDALE NA PADO VANI mpadovan@mondadori.it (vice caporedattore/vice-editor-in-chief) OLI VIA CREMASCOLI cremasc@mondadori.it (caposervizio/senior editor) LAURA RAGAZZOLA laura.ragazzola@mondadori.it (caposervizio/senior editor ad personam) DANILO SIG NORELLO signorel@mondadori.it (caposervizio/senior editor ad personam) ANTO NELLA BOISI boisi@mondadori.it (vice caposervizio architetture/ architectural vice-editor) KATRI N COSSETA internik@mondadori.it produzione e news/production and news NADIA LIO NELLO internin@mondadori.it produzione e sala posa production and photo studio rubriche/features VIRGI NIO BRIATORE giovani designer/young designers GERMA NO CELA NT arte/art CRISTI NA MOROZZI fashion ANDREA PIRRUCCIO produzione e/production and news DANILO PREMOLI hi-tech e/and contract MATTEO VERCELLO NI in libreria/in bookstores TRA NSITI NG @MAC.COM traduzioni/translations grafic /layout MAURA SOLIMA N soliman@mondadori.it SIMO NE CASTAG NINI simonec@mondadori.it STE FANIA MO NTECCHI internim@mondadori.it segreteria di redazione editorial secretariat ALESSANDRA FOSSATI alessandra.fossati@mondadori.it responsabile/head ADALISA U BOLDI adalisa.uboldi@mondadori.it assistente del direttore assistant to the editor FEDERICA BERETTA internir@mondadori.it contributi di/contributors CHIARA ALESSI STE FANO CAGGIA NO VALE NTI NA CROCI MASSIMO DE CO NTI CECILIA ERMI NI ENRICO LEO NARDO FAGO NE ANTO NELLA GALLI CRISTI NA MOROZZI ALESSANDRO ROCCA MATTEO VERCELLO NI fotografi/photographs H ÉL ÈNE BINET LEO NARDO FINOTTI MAURIZIO MARCATO MADS MOGE NSE N STUDIO PEDRO PEGE NAUTE MIRO ZAG NOLI progetti speciali ed eventi special projects and events CRISTI NA BO NINI MICHELA NGELO GIOM BINI

corrispondenti/correspondents Francia: O li vier R enea u olivier.reneau@gmail.com G ermania: LUCA IACO NELLI radlberlin@t-online.de G iappone: SERGIO PIRRO NE utopirro@sergiopirrone.com G ran Bretagna: DAVIDE GIORDANO davide.giordano@zaha-hadid.com Portogallo: MARCO SOUSA SANTOS protodesign@mail.telepac.pt S pagna: LUCIA PANOZZO luciapanozzo@yahoo.com Taiwan: CHE NG CHU NG YAO yao@autotools.com.tw USA: Dror Be nshetrit

studio@studiodror.com

AR NOLDO MO NDADORI EDITORE 20090 SEGRATE - MILA NO INTERNI The magazine of interiors and contemporary design via D. Trentacoste 7 - 20134 Milano Tel. +39 02 215631 - Fax +39 02 26410847 interni@mondadori.it Pubblicazione mensile/monthly review. R egistrata al Tribunale di Milano al n° 5 del 10 gennaio1967. PREZZO DI COPERTINA/COVER PRICE INTER NI + de sig n index € 10,00 in Italy PUBBLICITÀ/ADVERTISING Mondadori Pubblicità 20090 S egrate - Milano Pubblicità, S ede C entrale Divisione L iving C oordinamento: S ilvia Bianchi Advertising Manager: S tefania G hizzardi Agenti: Margherita Bottazzi, Alessandra C apponi, O rnella Forte, Mauro Z anella Tel. 02/75422675 - Fax 02/75423641 e-mail: direzione.living@mondadori.it www.mondadoripubblicita.com S edi Esterne/External Office : LAZIO /CAMPANIA CD -Media - C arla Dall’O glio C orso Francia, 165 - 00191 R oma Tel. 06/3340615 - Fax 06/3336383 mprm01@mondadori.it LIGURIA Alessandro C oari Piazza S an G iovanni Bono, 33 int. 11 16036 - R ecco (GE ) - Tel. 0185/739011 alessandro.coari@mondadori.it PIEMO NTE /VALLE D’AOSTA L uigi D’Angelo Via Bruno Buozzi, 10 - 10123 Torino C ell. 346/2400037 luigi.dangelo@mondadori.it EMILIA ROMAG NA/SAN MARI NO/TOSCANA Marco Tosetti / Irene Mase’ Dari / Gianni Pierattoni Via Pasquale Muratori, 7 - 40134 Bologna Tel. 051/4391201 - Fax 051/4399156 irene.masedari@mondadori.it UM BRIA / AREZZO M.G razia Vagnetti C olle U mberto I, 59 - 06070 Perugia Tel 075 /5842017 - Monpubpg@mondadori.it TRI VENETO (tutti i settori, escluso settore living) Full T ime srl Via Dogana 3 - 37121 Verona Tel. 045/915399 - Fax 045/8352612 info@fulltimesrl.com TRI VENETO (solo settore L iving) Paola Z uin - C ell. 335/6218012 paola.zuin@mondadori.it; Daniela Boscaro - C ell. 335/8415857 daniela.boscaro@mondadori.it ABRUZZO/MOLISE L uigi G orgoglione Via Ignazio R ozzi, 8 - 64100 Teramo Tel. 0861/243234 - Fax 0861/254938 monpubte@mondadori.it PUGLIA /BASILICATA Media T ime - C arlo Martino Via Diomede Fresa, 2 - 70125 Bari Tel. 080/5461169 - Fax 080/5461122 monpubba@mondadori.it CALA BRIA /SICILIA /SARDEG NA GAP S rl - G iuseppe Amato Via R iccardo W agner, 5 - 90139 Palermo Tel. 091/6121416 - Fax 091/584688 email: monpubpa@mondadori.it MARCHE Annalisa Masi, Valeriano S udati Via Virgilio, 27 - 61100 Pesaro C ell. 348/8747452 - Fax 0721/638990 amasi@mondadori.it valeriano.sudati@mondadori.it

ABBONAMENTI/SUBSCRIPTIONS Italia annuale: 10 numeri + 3 Annual + Design Index Italy, one year: 10 issues + 3 Annuals + Design Index € 84,00 Estero annuale: 10 numeri + 3 Annual + Design Index Foreign, one year: 10 issues + 3 Annuals + Design Index Europa via terra-mare/Europe by surface-sea mail € 120,20 via aerea/air mail: Europa/Europe € 143,40 USA-C anada € 166,60 R esto del mondo/rest of the world € 246,70 Inviare l’importo a/please send payment to: Press-Di srl S ervizio Abbonamenti, servendosi del c/c. postale n. 77003101. Per comunicazioni, indirizzare a: Inquiries should be addressed to: INTER NI - S ervizio Abbonamenti C asella Postale 97- 25197 Brescia Tel. 199 111 999 (dall’Italia/from Italy) C osto massimo della chiamata da tutta Italia per telefoni fissi 0,14 € iva compresa al minuto senza scatto alla risposta. Tel. + 39 041 5099049 (dall’estero/from abroad) Fax + 39 030 7772387 e-mail: abbonamenti@mondadori.it www.abbonamenti.it/interni L ’editore garantisce la massima riservatezza dei dati forniti dagli abbonati e la possibilità di richiederne gratuitamente la rettifica cancellazione ai sensi dell’art. 7 del D.leg.196/2003 scrivendo a/The publisher guarantees maximum discretion regarding information supplied by subscribers; for modifications or cancel ation please write to: Press-Di srl Direzione Abbonamenti 20090 S egrate (MI) NUMERI ARRETRATI/BACK ISSUES Interni: € 10 Interni + Design Index: € 14 Interni + Annual: € 14 Modalità di pagamento: c/c postale n. 77270387 intestato a Press-Di srl “C ollezionisti” (tel. 199 162 171). Indicare indirizzo e numeri richiesti. Per pagamento con carte di credito (accettate: Cartasì, American Express, Visa, Mastercard e Diners), specifica e indirizzo, numero di carta e data di scadenza, inviando l’ordine via fax (+ 39 02 95103250) o via e-mail (collez@mondadori.it). Per spedizioni all’estero, maggiorare l’importo di un contributo fisso di € 5 70 per spese postali. L a disponibilità di copie arretrate è limitata, salvo esauriti, agli ultimi 18 mesi. Non si accettano spedizioni in contrassegno. Please send payment to Press-Di srl “Collezionisti” (tel. + 39 02 95970334), postal money order acct. no. 77270387, indicating your address and the back issues requested. For credit card payment (Cartasì, American Express, Visa, Mastercard, Diners) send the order by fax (+ 39 02 95103250) or e-mail (collez@mondadori.it), indicating your address, card number and expiration date. For foreign deliveries,add a fi ed payment of € 5,70 for postage and handling. Availability of back issues is limited, while supplies last, to the last 18 months. No COD orders are accepted. DISTRIBUZIONE/DISTRIBUTION per l’Italia e per l’estero for Italy and abroad Distribuzione a cura di Press-Di srl L ’editore non accetta pubblicità in sede redazionale. I nomi e le aziende pubblicati sono citati senza responsabilità. The publisher cannot directly process advertising orders at the editorial offices and assumes no responsibility for the names and companies mentioned. Stampato da/printed by ELCOGRA F S.p.A. Via Mondadori, 15 – Verona S tabilimento di Verona nel mese di dicembre/in December 2013

Questo periodico è iscritto alla FIEG This magazine is member of FIEG Federazione Italiana Editori G iornali © C opyright 2014 Arnoldo Mondadori Editore S.p.A. – Milano. Tutti i diritti di proprietà letteraria e artistica riservati. Manoscritti e foto anche se non pubblicati non si restituiscono.

18/12/13 14.30


C_In638_disegno.indd 1

18/12/13 14.29


Moritz Waldemeyer per Dra wings col

C_In638_disegno.indd 2

le ction

18/12/13 14.29

Interni 638 - January / February 2014  

A decidedly important year begins, full of events and new developments from all points of view. In 2014 Interni celebrates its 60th birthday...