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I C E N I N O R F O L K

ISSUE 98

Focus On: Football

8 Hacks To...

Combat Loneliness

Audi RS 6 Avant Review

Let’s Not Forget The New Father

Socker Share Launches Its 3rd Edition Of Socks


Welcome To Iceni Magazine,

CONTACT DETAILS All Sales Enquiries

“Football is the most important of the less important things in the world.” Carlo Ancelotti Welcome to Issue 98 of Iceni Magazine! Given the Euro 2020 tournament starts soon, this month’s focus is on Football. Serena Fordham shares the unknown (to her and us!) history of football on Pages 34 and 35. What does football actually teach people? Susan Leigh gives her views on the importance of team sports and the associated lessons for children (Pages 36&37), while ways in which football can be incorporated into school subjects is tackled by Vicki Lowes on Pages 40 and 41. Elsewhere in this issue, Page 26 sees Nova Silver educating us on June’s birthstones (Pearl and Moonstone). Author, Cheryl Rickman shares eight ways to combat loneliness (Pages 18&19). On Pages 16 & 17, Tom from See What Mummy Says shares why music is so powerful to him – all of us here at Iceni Magazine are sending our love. Until July’s Issue 99, we hope you have lots of summer fun! The weather has definitely started to improve, so take in the sun safely - remember to maintain social distancing, keep yourself hydrated and keep applying sun cream regularly.

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CONTRIBUTORS Becca Hamling, Cheryl Cade, Cheryl Rickman , Jill Roberson, Keri Beevis, Matt Porter, Missy Hitchcox, Nade Ward, Patrick Arundell, Serena Fordham, Susan Leigh, Thomas Hamling, Tim Barnes-Clay, Vicki Lowes, Yellow Mysteries Entertainment.

Page 3 Image Benjamen Terry - www.definedetail.com

Disclaimer

Copyright © Iceni Magazine Limited. All rights reserved. No articles, adverts, content or design in this magazine may be used or reproduced either in whole or part, online or in print. The views and advice from contributors are not necessarily those of Iceni Magazine Limited. Every effort is made to ensure the contents are accurate, however Iceni Magazine Limited can not assume responsibility for errors, omissions or incorrect information. Iceni Magazine Limited accepts no liability for loss, damage or difficulties resulting from contracts between The Client and their customer. Inclusion within the magazine does not imply a recommendation.


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Contents 48

pages

Full of absolute dynamic

creative content!

“You Reap What You Sow”

36

18

8 Hacks To..

THE IMPORTANT LESSONS

Combat Loneliness

Team Sports Can Teach Your Child

24

14 38

NIBBLES & TIPPLES June

AUDI RS 6 AVANT Review

06

The Benjamin Foundation Monthly Update

20

Fake News & Greenwashing These Days There...

36

The Important Lessons Team Sports Can Teach...

09

Iceni News National Garden Scheme

22

The GadgetMan Review Creality Ender 3

38

Socker Share Launches Its 3rd Edition Of Socks

11

Iceni Columnist Keri Beevis

24

Motoring Review Audi RS 6 Avant

40

The Educational Value... Of Football

12

Let’s Not Forget... The New Father

26

Nova Silver June

42

Missys Article Footbal Mum

14

Nibbles & Tipples June

27

Best Of Norfolk Readers Images

44

Iceni Asks... Will You Be Watching...

16

See What Mummy Says The Power Of Music

33

Focus On: Football

45

Just For Fun 'Murder At Fever Pitch'

18

8 Hacks To... Combat Loneliness

34

I Never Knew This... About Football!

46

Iceni Horoscopes What Do Your Stars Hold?


THE BENJAMIN FOUNDATION

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Issue 98 2021

The Benjamin Foundation For over 25 years, children, young people and families across Norfolk and Suffolk have been supported by The Benjamin Foundation to overcome big challenges in their lives. Each night, we accommodate 100 vulnerable young people, equating to over 40,000 safe nights sleep a year for local young people. They can finally feel safe from youth homelessness. Each week, 150 young people access our emotional wellbeing support improving their mental health, increasing their self-esteem and to finally feel understood. Each year, over 250 young people attend our youth work in the community to gain new life skills, expand their horizons and finally feel confident. Overall, 2,000 local children and young people every year finally feel hopeful of a better future because of the work of The Benjamin Foundation.

Learning To Live Independently

Liam* had been sofa surfing for a few months, having had to leave his family home to help keep his mum safe, who is high risk of COVID. When he was referred to us by his Advice Worker at another charity supporting young people, Liam had just secured a short-term tenancy in a house share in Norfolk.

Liam was employed part time as a Kitchen Porter in a local pub. During the first visit by Juliet* a Tenancy Support Worker with The Benjamin Foundation, they discussed what support Liam felt he needed; along with budgeting. He expressed a wish to complete some training courses to enhance his CV, with a view to being able to eventually find a better paying job in a field he felt more passionate about. We have now been working with Liam for over six months. In that time, he has successfully completed SIA Security and Food Hygiene courses. We have also supported him to budget and manage his finances, helping him to manage his tenancy and live independently.

We believe no young person should be homeless. A gift from you today can help them to take their next steps to independence so they can finally feel at home and safe. Click here to make a donation. Thank you. *names have been changed.

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THE BENJAMIN FOUNDATION

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Issue 98 2021

Virtual Virgin Money London Marathon Get your running shoes on for The Benjamin Foundation! We still have a few places left for this year's Virtual Virgin Money London Marathon taking place on Sunday 3rd October. If you're keen to rise to the challenge and raise money for a local charity, we would love to hear from you. Get in touch on: events@benjaminfoundation.co.uk

The Summer Of Hope - Coming Soon! The last year has been one of the most difficult all of us have ever known as the pandemic has tested us in so many ways. At The Benjamin Foundation, we are proud to have been here throughout to support local people when they have needed us the most. However, as we emerge from the Covid-19 pandemic, the true impact of the last year on the mental health of young people is only just beginning to be felt and we want to do more to help.

That's why in the coming months we will be launching our Summer of Hope fundraising campaign. There will be plenty of opportunities to get involved. Will you pledge your support to our Summer of Hope to help local children and young people finally feel hopeful of a better future?

Contact Rachel or Jessica on 01603 886931. We are particularly keen to hear from fundraisers and businesses who may be interested in sponsoring our Summer of Hope campaign. PAGE

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ICENI - NEWS

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Issue 98 2021

Norfolk National Garden Scheme June 2021 June is possibly the busiest month of garden openings for the Norfolk National Garden Scheme, with 21 gardens opening their gates to visitors. Four of the gardens; Home Farmhouse, Bressingham Gardens, Highview House, and Warren house, are opening for us for the first time this year. Online booking for all gardens listed is currently open, and at some of gardens, it will be possible to turn up and pay at the gate. June open gardens will be allowed to serve refreshments outside, and entry for children is free. Gardens opening in June include:

Warren Farm

Sun 6 June 10.00 - 17.00 Grove House, Hight Street Docking PE31 8NH Sun 6 June 10.00 - 17.00 Home Farmhouse, 91 The Street, Hindringham NR21 0PS Sun 6 June 13.00 - 17.00 Oulton Hall, Oulton, Aylsham, NR11 6NU Sun 6 June 11.00 - 17.00 The Old Rectory, Creake Road, Syderstone PE31 8SF Sun 6 June 11.00 - 16.30 Wells next the sea - 2 gardens Wed 9 June 11-00-17.00 Mannington Estate, Mannington, NR11 7BB Sat 12 June 11.00 - 17.00 Blickling Lodge, Blickling, NR11 6PS Sat 12 & Sun 13th June 12.00 - 17.00 Church Cottage, 57 White Street, Martham NR29 4PQ Sat 12 & Sun 13th June 12.00 - 17.00 La Foray, White Street, Martham NR29 4PQ Sun 13 June 10.00 - 16.00 Elsing Hall Gardens, Elsing, NR20 3DX Sun 13 & 16th June 14.00 - 17.30 High House Gardens, Blackmoor Row, Shipdham IP25 7PU Wed 16 June 11.00 - 17.00 Thorpland Hall, Thorpland, Fakenham NR21 0HD Sun 20 June 11.00 - 17.00 Broadway Farm, The Broadway, Scarning NR19 2LQ Sun 20 June 11.00 - 17.00 Manor House Farm, Wellingham, PE32 2TH Sun 20 June 11.00 - 17.00 Walcott House, Walcott Greet, Walcott NR12 0NU Thurs 24 June 18.00 - 21.00 Bressingham Gardens, Low Road, Bressingham IP22 2AA Sat 26 June 11.00 - 17.00 Elm House, The Green, Saxlingham Nethergate, NR15 1TH Sun 27 June 13.00 - 17.00 Highview House, Norwich Road, Roughton, NR11 8NA Sun 27 June 12.00 - 16.00 Holme Hale Hall, Holme Hale, IP25 7ED Sun 27 June 11.00 - 17.00 Warren House, Narford Road, West Acre PE32 1UG Before planning a garden trip, all visitors should check our website for garden visiting details, such as accessibility, whether dogs are permitted and if refreshments and plants sales will be available. For more information visit: www.ngs.org.uk PAGE

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ICENI - COLUMNISTS

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Issue 98 2021

Curtain Twitcher Now I don’t want to get a reputation as a curtain twitcher, but I do tend to notice what is going on outside my window. Quite ironic, given that I am mostly the least observant person on the planet. If I am out walking, I miss Above: Keri Beevis everything. Well, I say everything, I am usually busy soaking up my setting, be it a woodland walk or a stroll by the river, plus I am often thinking through a plot. So while I am taking in some details, I am oblivious to others. I will spot the pretty bluebells or hear the birds chirping in the trees, but I swear, a mugging or a murder could take place right in front of me and I probably wouldn’t notice. At home though, it’s different. I am limited as to where I can write in my tiny house and my desk is in front of the window in my lounge, which looks out on the street. Therefore, it’s easy to notice anything going on outside and my writer’s imagination is often creating stories about the things I see and hear. Just what is the man up to who’s been parked across the road in his van for the last forty minutes, and the neighbour who has different women visiting while his wife is at work? Is he having an affair? And for God’s sake, don’t get me started on anyone working with a chainsaw. Being nosy does have its advantages. I have rescued hedgehogs from being squished, broken up territorial wars between the neighbourhood cats, plus rounded up my neighbour’s dog on more than one occasion after he has decided to go walkies by himself, but even so, I should probably be more focused on what is going on in my story than outside of my window.

I don’t need anything else giving me nightmares, so imagine my fright when, late at night, I went to close my bedroom blind and saw a ghostly figure in the garden across the road. It was about dressed in white, hovering above their wall, and as I watched, it’s big ghostly arms started flapping up and down. I thought it was going to take off. Thank goodness for camera phones, is all I can say, as I put the flash on and took a photo of it, thinking if it didn’t kill me I would have a picture that would be talked about for years to come. Except when I zoomed in, it was just my neighbour’s underpants blowing about on the line. I’m glad he didn’t see me taking the picture.

Last week though, I had the bejesus scared right out of me. Now, given the nature of the stuff I write about,

My new psychological thriller, Every Little Breath, is now out and available in kindle, paperback and audiobook. Follow me on Facebook or Twitter for more information.

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LET'S NOT FORGET...

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Issue 98 2021

Let’s Not Forget The New Father When a new baby first arrives, the focus is on the new mother and child, fussing over them, caring for their needs. And that’s understandable. Everyone wants to see and hold a new baby, check in on the new mum and ensure that all is going well. The flurry of activity from an ever-changing array of people in attendance, including midwives, mothers, sisters, friends can mean, though, that home is full of people and the new father can feel almost redundant. But men also undergo a radical shift in their circumstances after they’ve become a new father, and one in ten are diagnosed with some form of post-natal depression. The birth is likely to have turned their lives upside down. There is often support, at least at first, for a new mum, for when she feels uncertain, overwhelmed and out of her depth, resulting in her perhaps becoming preoccupied and immersed in caring for the baby and herself. Consequently, checking-in on her partner can sometimes be inadvertently put on hold. ● Several men have said how much they struggled to bond with their new baby. Whilst the mother has nine months or so to connect with the growing life inside her, the new father may only really appreciate that the child is

a reality once it’s been born and becomes a physical presence in their home. ● It’s not uncommon for men to say how overwhelmed they feel when faced with a helpless, crying baby. They’ve concerns about hurting it, don’t know how to engage and interact with it when it doesn’t ‘do’ anything, often finding a baby a rather unnerving presence. The men I’ve talked with felt they had very few outlets where they could discuss their concerns. Many found themselves having only brief conversations with friends or family, feeling disinclined to disclose too much about their personal apprehensions due to reticence about how they’d be perceived. ● Some men reluctantly volunteered that postbaby they saw their partner in a whole new light, especially if they were present at the birth. Singer Robbie Williams described the birth of his child as like ‘watching his favourite pub burn down’! It can be a shock for a man to see his partner giving birth, not knowing how to support her, seeing the pain she may be in, whilst witnessing the actual delivery. Then afterwards feeling bad, guilty, ashamed for having been so affected by it all. ● It’s inevitable that a couple’s relationship changes in practical terms. From being free

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agents, able to do whatever they want whenever they like their timetables are suddenly thrown into disarray, totally taken over as they focus completely on the new addition to the family. And home suddenly seems untidly full of baskets of lotions and potions, a pram, cot, children’s laundry and paraphernalia everywhere. A tiny baby apparently needs roomfuls of ‘stuff’ to support it. So, home becomes a nursery. ● The notion of free time, spare money, spontaneous breaks and time away usually have to be shelved, at least for the first twelve months or so, especially if the baby is being breast-fed and needs to settle into a regular sleep routine. A new mum often needs time to navigate her way into this different role, to physically and emotionally adjust, to feel more herself again. Her hormones need time to readjust, her body may have changed post-pregnancy and that can cause her concern and even distress. She may need love and reassurance from her partner to feel secure and confident about herself, that she’s still interesting and attractive. ● The financial balance of the relationship often shifts too, regardless of what was discussed and agreed in advance. A new mother’s focus may become less career-orientated, more homebased, whilst the new father may also discover his priorities have changed, juggling the desire to spend less time at work and more at home. ● This often results in men finding themselves torn between their old life of adventure holidays, fine dining and golf pulling against the desire to become a good provider, someone whose goal

Issue 98 2021

is a nice home in a smart neighbourhood, with good schooling. Suddenly life’s more serious and adult with the desire to succeed and do well careerwise and be a good family man. Hopefully, it’s possible to accommodate both. ● Sexual intimacy can take a little while to resume. Men may feel cautious about taking the lead in initiating sex, not wanting to appear insensitive. A difficult pregnancy and birth may have resulted in physical changes and even pain, which needs time to heal from. Plus, sleepless nights and the exhaustion of coping with a new baby can mean that bedtime for both becomes totally focused on sleep and little else. Making time to talk, cuddle and be affectionate are important ways to reconnect and enjoy this next phase of the relationship. ● Being sensitive to what’s said as well as not said, accepting that some decisions made prebaby may need to be modified or changed are two other important considerations in supporting the transition to a positive parenting experience when you become a new father. Men and women face different challenges as they adjust to life as new parents, challenges that some people seem to comfortably sail through. For men, getting used to being a father, perhaps receiving less attention physically, emotionally and sexually may take a while to adapt to, but making time for each other, enjoying each other’s company, finding time to discuss each other’s needs can provide mutual support at this next stage in life, so that both feel equally involved in the new family.

Article By Susan Leigh Susan Leigh, counsellor, hypnotherapist, relationship counsellor, writer & media contributor, has published her third book, 101 Days of Inspiration #tipoftheday (ISBN 9781910275160) based on her social media series. A glossy, pocket-sized book, it's full of inspirational quotes & pictures, a treat to give or simply keep for yourself. For more information visit: www.lifestyletherapy.net PAGE

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NIBBLES & TIPPLES

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Issue 98 2021

Nibbles &Tipples June Article By Cheryl Cade, Beer Educator It rather feels like May has had an identity crisis, believing that it was April over the last month. Yet as we head further to summer, the spirits have been lifted, most of the hospitality industry have been finally able to open their doors. Beer, tea and coffee have been shared with friends and family. I also ventured out into the Norfolk countryside to seek out a hidden oasis. Just outside Acle is Moulton Nurseries. I had been told of a cheese delight secluded in its walls. I struggled to get past all the greenery without being tempted to update

the garden. This was harder than you can imagine as everything looked so verdant. Then in a small hut I found Lemon Tree Fine Foods. On entering this small yet perfectly formed deli, I was greeted by owner Marta with a broad grin (hiding under her mask). There was also a cheese counter bursting with a very carefully selected range of cheeses from Europe and the UK. I had to leave with a selection, including, two goat’s cheeses (Rachel & Rosary) and a sheep’s blue (Mrs Bells Blue). If you’re looking for local, jams, chutneys and biscuits, you will also find them here. The difficulty is then leaving with only cheese; I was very tempted by a metal giant hare! Moving onto a few nibbles (‘few’ is the right word). I recognise that the hospitality sector

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NIBBLES & TIPPLES

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Issue 98 2021

has faced some very tricky times but I have been very disappointed recently. I will happily pay for quality and local produce, but recently on a visit to a much-respected public house I selected a side of breaded chicken strips at £6 (I did not fancy chips or their new burgers). I was disappointed when three fish finger-sized strips arrived. They were certainly not worth £2 per piece, and I haven’t been back to the pub since. On a similar note, a good friend took her husband for a birthday lunch. They had booked a sunny Saturday to sit in a church garden for a pizza or sharing board. On arrival, they were told there were no pizzas, so they selected two sharing boards at £10 each. The boards arrived with meagre portions and substitute items.

great to see the Rosebery, The Walnut Tree Shades and White Lion open again with some above quality pub grub. This month, I started working in a deli to allow me more opportunity to immerse myself in the great food and drink our region has to offer.

She hates onions and peppers both were on the dish instead of the listed items. I support the ethos of growing your own etc, but when restaurants run out of food and substitute something, they should tell you.

Cheers, until next month. Cheryl Visit: https://cherylcade.com

With the range of allergies, it is dangerous when they don’t. Back to happier thoughts, I can verify puddings at the Angel Gardens are well worth the trek, with a Bakewell tart that oozes flavour. It’s also PAGE

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THE POWER OF MUSIC

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Issue 98 2021

The Power Of Music A few weeks ago, my dad had a song in the future and associate it with an awful day... and we all have songs that do just a stroke. I messaged my wife Becca a fair amount throughout the day with updates, but we didn’t actually talk much. However, I remember one particular conversation well. She told me not to listen to the radio. I didn’t, and I’m so glad I listened to her (don’t tell her that, she’ll start to think I actually pay attention sometimes!) The reason she told me not to listen to any music is because she didn’t want me to hear

that. For a long time, I couldn’t listen to “Stop Crying Your Heart Out” by Oasis. I love the song and it features at the end of one of my favourite movies The Butterfly Effect, but whenever I hear the lyrics, “You’ll see them some day”, it reminds me of our miscarriages. I also couldn’t listen to “Let It Be” or “Whatever” because they were played at friends’ funerals and I’d instantly be transported back to the days that surrounded finding out the news. One day, I deliberately sat with Becca and listened to all the songs that held painful memories. It was tough, but I now don’t feel like I have to avoid those songs and actually

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THE POWER OF MUSIC Issue 98 2021

for most, there are also very happy memories attached to those sad conclusions, so it’s nice to feel that I don’t have to turn the radio over. Equally, there are some songs that instantly take me back to some fantastic memories. Our wedding song, “A Thousand Years”, reminds me of an awesome weekend six years ago where I not only made my vows to Becca but I was surrounded by friends and family. Hearing “Apache” by The Sugarhill Gang puts me in the middle of a field at Kendal Calling festival with friends doing the dance from The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, and if I hear “Rhythm Of The Rain”, I’m back in playgroup when I was a huge Jason Donovan fan... perhaps I’m revealing a little too much now! Most days, we’ll hear a song and not think of it again, but I’m sure every one of us has a handful of songs that hold both incredible and incredibly sad memories. We’d love to know which songs evoke such emotion in you. Let us know through our social media accounts! Thanks for reading Tom www.seewhatmummysays.com @whatmummysaysuk PAGE

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8 HACKS TO...

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Issue 98 2021

8 Hacks To Combat Loneliness You don’t have to be by yourself to solitude also provides an opportunity to connect better with yourself which helps you connect feel lonely. You can be surrounded by people yet feel lonelier than when you are physically alone. So, when it comes to loneliness, it’s the quality of connections which matters more than the quantity. And that includes your relationship with yourself. By recognising and appreciating the benefits of solitude, you can learn to be alone without feeling lonely and use alone time to get to know what matters most to you. To combat loneliness, it’s also important to connect well with people who make you feel good.

better with others. Solitude gives you freedom to do as you please, to be your true self (away from others’ demands and judgements); to connect deeply with the present, work through worries, gain perspective, and make future plans. 2. Visualise. Less distraction provides more time to daydream; to plant seeds of ideas and watch them grow. Imagine your desired future in your mind’s eye, as if it’s already happening. Notice who’s with you and what you’re saying to them. See yourself living this life and feel the emotions you’d feel. Now see yourself in the process of achieving your goal and imagine yourself describing how you got there. Get better connections

Connect better with yourself 1. Reframe how you see solitude. See it as being ‘with yourself’ rather than ‘by yourself’. Too much time alone can lead to loneliness, yet

3. Connect with the right people. Relationships can energise or drain us. Consider who encourages you? Who’s your cheerleader? Who makes you laugh and feel most at ease?

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8 HACKS TO...

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Issue 98 2021

Equally, who makes you feel bad? Auditing relationships doesn’t mean cutting people from your life. Rather it can lead you to work on relationships, heal old wounds and consider your own patterns of response to create stronger connections. It also provides a compass of traits to look for when meeting new people. 4. Find time for connection. If busyness impedes connection time, you could synergise multiple tasks into the same time period. For example, if you need to walk the dog, exercise and post a parcel, invite a friend over for a coffee then continue your chat as you walk or jog (with the dog) to the post office. Connect better with others 5. Practise listening well. To be seen, heard and valued by others, you need to see, hear and value others yourself. Maintain eye contact and stay present. Don’t plan what you want to say in response. Look directly at them instead of at your phone. 6. Learn to respond well. We’re taught how to respond to people’s bad news - nodding and showing empathy, but not how to respond to people’s good news. Try encouraging them to relive the experience rather than shifting focus

Pictured: Cheryl Rickman

back to yourself or questioning the goodness of the news, which is common. For example, you might say: ‘Wow! How did you feel when she gave you the promotion? And what did she say next?’ Give and get support 7. Volunteer help. As a volunteer you can meet new people and feel part of a community working together for a good cause. What’s more, helping others has been proven to boost wellbeing and improve mental health. 8. Ask for help. Loneliness is nothing to be ashamed of or embarrassed about, like hunger or thirst, it’s merely an evolutionary prod, guiding us towards finding something that’s lacking, i.e. connection. There is plenty of support out there - from Mental Health Mates and The Marmalade Trust to The Motherload and Casserole Club. Go ahead and use it. Article By Cheryl Rickman, author of Navigating Loneliness: How to connect with yourself and others, Welbeck, £8.99

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FAKE NEWS...

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Issue 98 2021

Fake News & Greenwashing These days there are so many instances of misleading claims made around the eco and ethical products, not just by the manufacturers or retailers. It can be very confusing. Add to that, the fact that it is so easy for these claims to be spread on various social media channels, it is often difficult to work out what is fact and what is fiction. A classic example of false information being spread through social media that I came across recently was a ‘skincare guru’ with a huge following who would regularly be disparaging

about a particular brand. She denounced their method of carrying out their business, the sector they operated in, everything, the products, the language they used to describe and promote their products - in short, everything about them. The brand approached them to discuss their many concerns and discovered that the influencer had: • not carried out any independent research, • not even tried the products, and • just repeated claims they’d seen elsewhere, which were completely untrue. She has since revised her views slightly, and now doesn’t mention them at all. But in the

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FAKE NEWS...

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meantime, all her followers put their trust in her views, and she hasn’t exactly been shouting about her errors. So how can you avoid being hoodwinked? I have dealt with this previously in my own blog https://ecoqueenextraordinaire.wordpress. com/2020/08/27/how-to-avoid-thegreenwash/ but here are some other things to look out for. Influencers This is a difficult one as there are some very genuine and transparent ones out there who clearly do their research … and then there are the others. I would tend to be more sceptical of those who seem to regularly just post sales content, without offering any additional background information or show that they do their wider research. They are more likely to be using their platform as a method of earning, and so, you are unlikely to get truly unbiased information. They are obliged to let you know when they are earning from their social media content, but this doesn’t always happen. The bottom line is that if this is important to you, ask questions until you’re happy with the answers, and if you’re not, then just move on. Eco Phrases Phrases, such as vegan friendly, kind to animals, against animal testing, carbon balanced, chemical free, sustainable, eco-friendly are seen everywhere right now. Ultimately, they mean nothing as they have no legal definition - so you’ll need to then look for additional information that supports the claims. Accreditation Logos Carbon Neutral Peta Vegan Society Leaping Bunny (automatically applies to any skincare produced within UK & Europe) The Fairtrade Foundation

Issue 98 2021

Think Dirty App I promise you won’t get into trouble downloading this app (despite its name!), but it will give you an opportunity to understand what ingredients are in your day to day and more specialist skincare and cleaning products. It is an independent company reviewing the toxicity of ingredients and giving them a rating from 0 (being good) up to 10 (ouch). They provide and explanation of the analysis and links to relevant scientific papers/reports. One of the big challenges for small companies starting out is that the various accreditation schemes that cover products and services can be quite complex, time-consuming to negotiate and expensive. Initially, quite often, you need to find out if the business/products can work before you spend time and money on this aspect of things. In this situation, I would expect the business to be very transparent as to their aims, ambitions and how they are going about achieving this, so they can reassure their potential customers. The bottom line is that now more than ever, you can’t take any claims at face value - you need to look for some supplementary information, or in some cases maybe even a money back guarantee. Ultimately, pop over to my FB page @EcoQueenLiving and put any queries you have in there. There’s quite a community of people interested and experienced in a wide range of eco/ sustainability topics in there, so if we don’t know, we probably know someone who can advise. You just have to ask.

Article By Jill Roberson @EcoQueenLiving on FB and Instagram

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THE GADGETMAN

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Issue 98 2021

Creality Ender 3 - Exceptional 3D Printing On A Budget

For the past couple of weeks, I have jumped feet-first into the world of 3D Printing. I’ve been interested in it for a number of years and even designed a replacement knob for our cooker a few years back and then had it printed by a company in Holland. The price and quality of 3D printers always made me hesitate in buying one though, even the hobbyist’s version was expensive and I felt I couldn’t justify spending the money. Over the past couple of years, the price of personal 3D printers has dropped significantly and at the same time, quality has improved, so after seeing a few friends had purchased one and the results looked great, I decided to take the plunge. Being someone that doesn’t really like spending money, I spent quite a bit of time checking out

the different models. I settled on the Creality Ender 3. The Ender 3 uses a technology called FDM (fused deposition modelling) to produce models. FDM uses a reel of filament and squeezes it through an extruder controlled by 3 stepper motors to accurately lay down a 0.2mm (or less) layer of PLA (a vegetable-based plastic material) to gradually build those layers into a full-sized 3D model. The printer arrived semi-assembled with very quality parts. I spent about two hours assembling the Ender 3, but because the instructions weren’t great, I instead played, paused, rewound and played again a detailed video on YouTube which explained how to assemble the printer and make adjustments. When everything was assembled, I plugged it in and switched it on. The whole process of printing is quite complicated, so I will leave that for now.

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THE GADGETMAN

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Issue 98 2021

Oliver Hardy During Printing

Olive Hardy From Cults 3D

You design your own 3D models or download premade models from the internet; the files are then prepared in software called Ultimaker Cura (which you download and install), Cura makes amendments to the 3d model which adds supports to the model (which can be removed after printing) as you can’t print into thin air! You can also change the resolution of the print down to 10 micrometres or 0.01 mm which gives really smooth results. After running a few test prints and generally playing around with little fidget gadgets, I decided to print some more complex items. This is when you realise that 3D printing takes a lot of time; even simple objects can take hours to print. My longest so far is a small bust of Oliver Hardy which took 11 hours to print in marble effect material, but it does look awesome, Stan Laurel took seven hours!

The Thinker From Scan The World

of filament, it’s a reasonably affordable hobby or even business, if you want to go that way. You can purchase the Creality Ender 3 from Amazon using the following QR Code.

So, you can print some pretty amazing things with an Ender 3. In fact, you can print stuff that could never be manufactured using traditional methods, but you have to be patient, REALLY patient as sometimes the prints fail halfway through a job and the preparation to print can be tedious. That said, you can produce some pretty awesome stuff using a 3D printer, and for around £200 for the printer and around £20 for 300 metres

See you next month, stay safe! Matt www.thegadgetman.org.uk

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MOTORING REVIEW

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Issue 98 2021

Audi RS 6 Avant Review

Follow motoring journalist, Tim Barnes-Clay on Instagram: @tbarnesclay and Twitter: @carwriteups. It’s mad; it’s bad, and it’s freakin’ terrifying. But terrifying in a good way - know what I mean? Actually, no, maybe you don’t. You see, you need to have bottomless pockets to afford this Audi. Buying a car this expensive and this close to allelectric vehicles taking over the world would be madness. Or would it? I mean, maybe the latest RS 6 will become a collector’s item - a rare V8 gem left in the cold, clinical world of automotive electrification. Ok, so I’m being a tad dramatic, but you do need to view big performance lumps like this as the last of a dying breed. So, you’ll either make a return on the newest RS 6 when it becomes a sought after “classic”, or you’ll lose a wad of your money. Yep, I like to point out the obvious. Seriously, though - will you care either way? I’m not sure I would because I wouldn’t want to let my RS 6 go - ever.

Heck, I didn’t even want to let my press demo go. It’s an addictive estate car that just works. You get all your family in – and you can still burn all the pimply boy-racers off at the lights without trying. Yes, you can drive this Audi Sport infused motor like a complete nutter, but the truth is, you won’t. Why? Well, why would you need to? What have you got to prove? Absolutely nothing. Because anyone with ears that work will fathom that the growling sound emanating from this estate car means something special lurks under the bonnet. I never got more than early 20s mpg out of the RS 6 during the week I drove it. I even stuck some of my own money into the tank. I don’t do that often with press cars - but the RS 6 is worth it. It’s not a car you want to leave outside your house unused - it’s a proper, spacious family motor with all the practicality of the regular Audi A6 - so it begs to be driven. Ok, it’s not that practical fuel-wise, but I’ve touched on that, and

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MOTORING REVIEW

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Issue 98 2021

I’m not going to bang on about it. If you buy a V8, you know you’re not going down the beansoup sipping “green” road. Perhaps half the fun of running a gas-guzzling V8 these days is the fact you’re going against the grain. You’re a rebel – or something like that. So, the RS 6 is a five-seater, five-door estate - or “Avant”, as the Germans call it – and this fourth version is perhaps the best yet. Prickling with the technological achievements already supplied by the A6 Avant, the hottest addition to the Audi Sport stable combines daunting twin-turbo TFSI clout with features that make running this car slightly less painful. These include cylinderon-demand technology and a mild hybrid drive, which help to deliver blockbusting performance as “responsibly” as possible. Sorry, I said I wouldn’t bang on about the efficiency side of things. My bad. The 4.0 TFSI engine delivers 600PS and will do 0-62mph quicker than you can say “self-isolate”. Well, it’s 3.6 seconds, but you get my point. Better still, and where conditions allow (which is nowhere on a public road in the UK), you can see 124mph by the time 12 seconds have ticked by. The Audi’s top speed has had its “wings” electronically clipped to 155mph. But, come on, do you need it to go any faster? Actually, if you need to, then the Vorsprung variant will carry you to 174mph.

The RS 6 sticks to the bends like no estate car has the right to. The car’s body is 20 millimetres lower than in the standard A6 Avant - and at speeds of 74mph and beyond, it’s lowered by a further 10 millimetres. At the other end of the spectrum, a lift mode is on hand to raise the Audi by 20 millimetres for low-speed motoring. The broad spread of the RS sport air suspension offers you a free choice between long-distance contentment and all-out performance. Throughout the 25-year RS history, Audi’s RS 6 Avant is one of the German firm’s unadulterated icons and boasts a massive global fan base. You won’t go far wrong if you buy one - and, let’s face it if this pandemic’s shown us anything, shouldn’t we realise our dreams when we have the opportunity? After all, none of us knows what’s around the corner. Fast Facts - Audi RS 6 Avant Quattro Tiptronic as tested: • Max speed: 155 mph • 0-62 mph: 3.6 secs • Combined mpg: 22.6 • Engine layout: 3996cc eight-cylinder turbo petrol • Max. power (PS): 600 • CO2: 283 g/km • Price with options on this test car: £100,035 PAGE

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NOVA SILVER

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Issue 98 2021

Nova Silver June’s birthstones: Those born in June are lucky enough to have 2 semi-precious stone options for their birthdays: pearl and moonstone.

Pearls

Pearls are organic gems, grown within a living mollusc. A timeless jewellery choice, pearls have held many meanings in different cultures. In ancient China, they were thought to be formed in the brains of dragons, while ancients in the Middle East thought they were teardrops fallen from heaven. More recently, pearls have been associated with purity and innocence as well as loyalty and generosity. Most pearls that you will find nowadays are cultured, but naturally they form when a tiny grain of sand or grit gets inside the mollusc’s shell and they create layers of smooth nacre around it to stop it irritating. Did you know that a good way to test whether a pearl is real or simulated is to rub it on your teeth? Real pearls have a gritty feeling, while simulated pearls will feel suspiciously smooth. Obviously, we don’t recommend trying this out on other people’s pearls, especially at the moment. Here at Nova Silver, we have everything from classic strings of pearls (and we’re able to make strings to your own specification too!) to more contemporary takes on a timeless classic.

Moonstone

Moonstone is perhaps the most famous of all the feldspars, and is valued for its gorgeous iridescence. With a clear to white base colour, moonstone can show flashes of blue, green and even peach. Historically, moonstone is tied to the powers of the moon (perhaps unsurprising, given its name!) and is thought to represent the cyclical changes in nature. It is thought to be a powerfully feminine stone, tying the wearer to the pull of the moon. It is also a wonderfully wearable stone for jewellery, with a subtle colour that matches well with a wide variety of styles but still with a bit of uniqueness. One of our favourites!

Contact Details:

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Email: info@novasilver.co.uk

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BEST OF NORFOLK Issue 98 2021

Best Of Norfolk - Through The Lens Of Our Readers Thanks to a huge influx of photographs from our followers on Facebook, have a look at these marvellous May images of our stunning region.

Gavin James - Stormy Skies Over Blickling Lake

Nadine Gray - Blickling Great Wood PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK Issue 98 2021

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Angie Castle

Denise Brady - First Wedding Of The Year PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK Issue 98 2021

Helen Chapman - Happy Days In Happisburgh

Gavin James - Bluebells At Blickling PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK

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Issue 98 2021 Nadine Gray - The Bear Shop In Norwich

Gavin Jaynes - A Bishy Barnabee Hiding In The Bluebells At Blickling PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK

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Vicki Lowes - Beetley Wood Umbrellas

Issue 98 2021 Sara Brown - Ladybelt Country Park Ketteringham

Rachel Farrow - Diss Mere

To be in with a chance of having your own photographs featured in the future, look out for our regular Facebook posts where you can add your images. Alternatively, send an email with your image and caption to: submissions@icenimagazine.co.uk PAGE

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Focus On:

Football

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I NEVER KNEW...

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Issue 98 2021

I Never Knew This About Football! Love it or loathe it, football is important in the UK and the wider world. Apparently, it’s not the national sport of England, it’s the most popular, with cricket being the national sport - I thought it was football! To be clear, I’m talking about ‘association football’, the game in which two teams of 11 players try to manoeuvre the ball into the opposing team’s goal using any part of their bodies, except their hands and arms - but you knew that!

Football is the world’s most popular ball game based upon the numbers of participants and spectators. It’s estimated (by FIFA) that at the turn of the 21st century, there were approximately 250 million football players and over 1.3 billion people interested in football, whilst a combined television audience of some 26 billion watched the 2010 World Cup finals. We probably all know someone who is mad about their football, I certainly do, but do you reckon they know the origins of the sport - they may think they do, but actually, do they? Going way back before medieval times, a version of football known as ‘folk football’ (how

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I NEVER KNEW...

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Issue 98 2021

cool does that sound?!) was being played in towns and villages. These games had minimal rules and were largely played according to local customs. Folk football was a far more violent game, much more like rugby than football today. The games were also sometimes known as ‘mob football’ and even today some villages and towns still allow this far more chaotic and wilder version of football to be played (but within a more controlled, health and safety focused environment)!

Modern football originated in Britain in the 19th century. Football was taken up as a winter game between public schools such as Winchester and Eton. Each school developed its own rules.

Folk football developed out of the ball games that were played in England from as early as the 14th century, having few rules and involving large numbers of people. The ‘players’ may even be from different villages, or two teams from the same village. The games were often played around important dates such a Shrove Tuesday. Quite often, the goals would be the house of the team captains and the distance involved could be two or three miles, even different villages.

In 1866, a game between London and Sheffield saw the teams agree upon an acceptable ball size, and it was the first game to be played over 90 minutes.

Whilst kicking the ball was allowed in folk football, kicking other players was more normal and the ball used was usually too large and heavy to kick.

Either way, I’m still not a huge fan - but I do love the idea of anything that promotes team working, togetherness and health/fitness/ wellbeing, so I will give the game its dues!

Eventually, King Edward III even banned the version of the game that was popular in 1363, with it remaining banned until 1667, but that didn’t stop people playing it.

What do you love or hate about football?

In as early as 1843 an attempt to standardise the rules was made at the University of Cambridge, and in 1863, the ‘printed rules of football’ were established, notably, preventing the carrying of the ball. The Football Association was founded in 1863.

So, football has come a long, long way from its origins, over hundreds of years, from being a free-for-all involving as many people as wanted to play, to being the structured game that supporters know today.

Or is there another sport you prefer? I’d love to know!

Article by Serena Fordham, Founder and MD of HER Business Revolution, Glow Virtual Assistants and Mums Empowerment Movement CIC. www.herbusinessrevolution.biz www.glowva.co.uk www.mumsempowermentmovement.co.uk

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THE IMPORTANT LESSONS

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Issue 98 2021

The Important Lessons Team Sports Can Teach Your Child Learning to function as part of perfect and our children need to develop a team is an important lesson resources to enable them to cope with the knocks that life will send their way. for children. Becoming part of the wider world requires accommodating, compromising and getting along with others. Let’s consider some of the important benefits of team sports. We all want the best for our children. We want them to be strong and healthy, achieve their full potential and above all be happy and contended with their lives. But life isn’t always

Let’s look at the important lessons team sports can teach your child: ● Commitment. Many teams will only pick players who commit to regular training. They need players to be dedicated, train regularly and turn up when and wherever required. Commitment means being loyal and demonstrating that being a member of the team is important.

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THE IMPORTANT LESSONS

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Issue 98 2021

● Competitive spirit. In the first instance, competing with other team members in order to gain a place on the squad and then secondly against the opposing team, through showing effort and determination to win the match. ● Compromise. Sometimes passing the ball to another child and giving them the opportunity to achieve glory is necessary; an appreciation that being part of a team means compromising self-interest and allowing another player who is better placed to take the shot. It is an important lesson in understanding the bigger picture, not just focusing on individual success. ● Rejection. Learning to cope with life not always being fair, with sometimes not being picked and others less deserving being chosen on occasion. The skill is in not taking rejection personally but instead becoming confident enough to persevere. Use rejection as a way to obtain feedback and improve rather than become de-motivated and give up.

Passion and enthusiasm, love of sport and winning are all important aspects of life. ● Learning to lose with a good grace. Not everyone can be a winner and doing one’s best, competing to the best of one’s ability whilst still losing happens at times. Being able to appreciate how well the other team has performed and congratulate them with genuine good humour or even on occasion deal with bad decisions is a valuable lesson for later life. ● Observe how adults handle themselves in competitive situations. Children look to their parents as role models, examples of how adults behave. Witnessing first-hand how their parents behave, their manners, levels of restraint and general demeanour at sports events is a valuable experience. Passion and enthusiasm, love of sport and winning are all important aspects of life. But so too is enjoying the game, the joy of doing one’s best, the buzz from playing well, even if the result is not what was hoped. That and learning to cooperate and co-exist with others are all valuable skills learned from participating in team sports.

Article By Susan Leigh Susan Leigh is a Counsellor and Hypnotherapist who works with stressed children and adults to promote confidence and self-belief, with couples in crisis to improve communications and understanding and with business clients to support the health and motivation levels of individuals and teams. Further help, advice and articles are available, for more information see: www.lifestyletherapy.net PAGE

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SOCKER SHARE

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Issue 98 2021

Socker Share Launches Its 3rd Edition Of Socks

Since my cousin Connor and I launched Socker Share in October 2020, matching every purchase with a donation of socks to an underprivileged child, we have been overwhelmed with the amount of support we’ve received. Our community grows stronger each day, with our donated sock count rising every week. We recently took another big step forwards on our journey, as we announced our 3rd edition of socks… South Africa!

United Through Sport, our charity partners, have again helped us to execute this collaboration, with their excellent relationships that they have developed from working in the country since 2005. 62.1% of children in South Africa are multidimensionally poor. This means that essential items of clothing, such as socks, are not affordable to families. Whilst charities do receive football boot donations, they never receive any socks!

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SOCKER SHARE

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United Through Sport have said that their South Africa programmes are no different. Nick Mould, Director and Co-Founder of UTS, said “The socks are making sure that our kids can wear their donated football boots and hockey boots, and therefore they can focus on participation and having fun.” We exist to make a difference and it would not be possible without our amazing community. To have so many people playing their part in helping those in need is absolutely incredible. Not only that, but we are also seeing other businesses and charities support us, to the point where we have even secured our first corporate sponsors and brand ambassador Source One Associates and Ben Clarke, World FootGolf Champ!

Issue 98 2021

throws at us on a daily basis, I don’t think there has ever been a better time to look out for one another. A better world begins with empowering the future generation and sport can do just that. As Nelson Mandela once famously said - “Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair.” To purchase and donate a pair of socks, simply visit our website: www.sockershare.co.uk! You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter - @SockerShare.

The plan now is to make the children in South Africa just as proud as we have been making those in Saint Lucia and Mauritius. After such a difficult time dealing with the pandemic, on top of all the other things that life

We are building an incredible community and would love for you to join us! Article By Nade Ward, Co-founder of Socker Share www.sockershare.co.uk

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THE EDUCATIONAL...

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Issue 98 2021

The Educational Value Of Football It has long since been a habit of mine to evaluate news topics and forthcoming events to determine whether they hold educational value. With Euro 2020 coming up soon (despite it already being 2021!), my attentions have turned to the tournament and associated memories filled with disappointment. Does football really merit a place in schools? Yes! I hope others are offering a resounding affirmative response, too, for the subject matter provides an awful lot more than just PE. When it comes to the Euro sweepstake, Ukraine was the team allocated to me. To say I was disappointed was an understatement. However, at the same time, it struck me that I know (knew!) very little about the country, and so I set out to change that. In just a few minutes,

I learnt that the flag is half blue (top) and half yellow; a little boring perhaps, but memorable. I was also able to remember how to say ‘Yes!’ and discovered that it is the same in Poland and Belarus. Worst of all, perhaps, I found out that the odds of Ukraine winning the tournament are 50/1. While nothing earthshattering was unearthed, it certainly made me think about how lacking my knowledge of the European nations is. What an amazing opportunity to set about learning more about the countries that surround us! Maths is one of my favourite subject areas (yet I didn’t really enjoy it when I was at school). It would be silly not to integrate the tournament into maths sessions! Statistics could cover goals scored, average attendances (mean, median, mode and range), goal differences, squad numbers, fouls, red and yellow cards, substitutions, time of goals scored... and so on.

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THE EDUCATIONAL... Issue 98 2021

You could engage children in learning to work out area and perimeter, analysing the difference between the different football grounds involved in the tournament. Did you know that the size of a Premier League football pitch can be between 90 and 120 metres long (though 105m is the recommendation)? Imagine the difference a long pitch could have on the distance players cover during a match. Euro ’96, for me, evokes strong emotions. I can vividly remember sitting in a science class, discussing the merits of Alan Shearer and Rob Lee (as a Newcastle fan, I cannot tell you how excited I was when the former left Blackburn that summer!). Children could interview their parents (or grandparents) about what they remember of this tournament, using the information to create diary entries, pretending to be someone else, or newspaper recounts, including quotes from players after watching videos. Finally, education does not need to be purely academic, despite many people’s best efforts to destroy those whose talents lie in the arts and sports. Those aside, however, and emotional literacy could be viewed as one of the most valuable lessons to be learnt. Feelings drive life, and learning to deal with disappointment, feeling crushed following defeat in a penalty shootout, is something that could be applied to many situations. As an England fan, it is all too easy to get carried away with our nation’s excitement, the St George’s flags flapping rapidly on cars and vans. Ultimately, though, our hopes and dreams die quicker than the lager runs out in the pubs screening the matches. Maintaining hope is important but being realistic could also serve our future generations well. I’ll whisper... *come on, England*!!! Article By Vicki, from Blossom Education www.blossomeducation.co.uk PAGE

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FOOTBALL MUM

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Issue 98 2021

Football Mum Unless coaxed into putting my feet up with a cold beer, or placing a bet with a potentially hefty return, I am generally uninterested in watching or talking about football. However, as the mother of a three-year-old boy whose strongest inclination is to tirelessly boot a ball around, I have recently become a selfproclaimed ‘football mum’. As a bystander of his football sessions, I watch him engage with the sport and feel the same sense of glowing pride I have in previous years as a ballet mum, dance show mum, and gymnastics mum. It is joyous to watch a child thriving in their natural ability for something. So many parents observe a natural instinct within their small child to kick or play with a ball, that it surely signifies a connection with developmental benefits. Movement obviously plays a crucial part in the healthy development of every child. But aside from basic physical activity, football combines fundamental movement skills with more complex skills and coordination, aiding in the development of problem solving, tactical skills and strategic thinking. Practising something as part of a team helps children to grow in confidence, strengthening their communication and social interactions. And regular practice of any sport encourages self-discipline and commitment. My son is less than one month into his official involvement with football. And while I anticipate

witnessing these benefits as he continues to learn and progress, it’s too soon to observe any noticeable changes. So, I asked some friends and fellow parents about their experiences as football mums and dads. Q“How long has your son been playing football?” A“He’s been playing since he was 5 or 6 years old.” Q“Have you noticed any positive changes in your son that you believe are attributed to football?” A“His confidence is massive, and he gets lots of social interaction from meeting new kids all the time.” Q“Do you have any hopes for your son’s involvement in the sport? Do you encourage him to take it seriously, or view it as extracurricular fun?” A“All parents want their children to do well in whatever they do, as long as they enjoy it. That’s the main thing in my eyes. It takes talent and a lot of hard work to achieve a certain level. I love just watching him train and play, that’s enough for me.” Q“Do you both support the same team?” A“Yes, Norwich City. But also anyone Ronaldo plays for.”

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FOOTBALL MUM

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Issue 98 2021

Ryan Thomson - Father of Harry, 9 years old.

game and enjoys playing, but I’m sure if his friends didn’t play so much, he wouldn’t either. Whereas my youngest is football mad, it doesn’t matter who he’s playing with or where, as long as he’s playing. He’s always loved it, from the moment he could walk. He has never been the type to say “I want to be a footballer when I’m older.” But I know for sure if his love of football carries on, he will be a very happy chappy to do it for a living. Either as a footballer or a coach, wherever it might lead him. I do encourage them to always attend training and go to bed early before matches, and put in 100% when they are there, but if for whatever reason they stopped enjoying it, they could stop altogether. I don’t think either of the boys would play half as well if weren’t enjoying it anyway.”

Q“How long have your sons been playing football?” A“My eldest has been playing since reception at school, around 5 years old. My youngest has been playing from when he could walk and joined a football club at 3 years old. My eldest started football mostly because his friends played at school, whereas my youngest was born with a strong interest in the game. But that’s possibly because he was around my eldest playing it.” Q“Have you noticed any positive changes in your children that you believe are attributed to football?” A“I’m sure my children wouldn’t be such good team players if it wasn’t for football. They understand being part of a team and working together, they also understand that sometimes despite their best efforts, they can’t always win. They understand that they have responsibility, they know they have to go to bed at a reasonable time in order to be able to play their best, and to be there not only for themselves but for their team too. Having dedication to the game has taught them well for their future.” Q“Do you have any hopes for your sons’ involvement in the sport? Do you encourage them to take it seriously, or view it as extra curricular fun?” A“My eldest plays more for fun. He loves the

Q“ Do they both support the same team?” A“Absolutely not, my eldest is a Chelsea fan, and my youngest is an Arsenal fan. It’s fine most of the time and they have a bit of friendly banter, but if Chelsea ever play Arsenal, I tend to leave the room!” Katie Garbutt, mum of Connor, 11 & Max, 5. My son takes part in Futures Academy football courses aimed at 3-6 year olds. Provided by Future Football Elite at The Arena, Avian Way, Norwich NR7 Instagram: @futurefootballelite @thearenanr7

Article By Missy Hitchcox Missy Hitchcox is a Norfolk mother of two. She has a background of English Literature and Creative Writing studies. Her professional career has centred on the Beauty industry, and she now home educates her children. PAGE

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ICENI ASKS

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Issue 98 2021

Will you be watching the Euro 2020 tournament? What do you think will happen? “Definitely not. I don’t know why they have to show that pile of crap on TV. It means the soaps aren’t on normally. Why should football take priority?” Karen

“If I’m honest, I’m not a big football fan. However, I like the atmosphere when the nation pulls together to support England, so I will be watching with my family. Exciting that Scotland and Wales will be there, too!” Jayne

“Absolutely! Football has played a large part in my life and has created such a bond between me and my grandad. Come on, England!” Dee

“I think England will disappoint us yet again. But I’m still gonna watch it. Hopefully, the restrictions will have lifted almost completely, and I’ll be able to meet my mates down the pub to drown my sorrows!” Bry

“Nope, nope and nope. What a load of rubbish. I hate football. Pointless watching grown men kick a ball around and get paid an extortionate amount of money. How is that fun?” Dave

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JUST FOR FUN Issue 98 2021

Think you know the answer? Let us know via our Facebook page and we will reveal the answer at the end of the month. PAGE

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ICENI - HOROSCOPES

www.icenimagazine.co.uk

Issue 98 2021

Horoscopes For June Aries 21 March - 20 April

Gemini 22 May - 21 June

Taurus 21 April - 21 May

Cancer 22 June - 23 July

You’ll be brilliantly persuasive when you need to be, and ready to put some savvy ideas to work. The focus on Gemini brings fresh opportunities, especially around the time of the Solar Eclipse on the 10th. Your fun-loving and creative side gets a boost as fiery Mars enters Leo on the 11th. From June 21st, the Sun’s move into a private zone is a chance to unwind and enjoy some self-care where possible. And with Mercury forging ahead, any recent delays can slowly ease. Ready to enhance your income? A focus on your money zone reveals there are many ways you could ramp up your earnings, and put the extra cash towards something you really want. With an eclipse on June 10th, this can be a great time to get started on a project that might be a real money-spinner. But you’ll also benefit from reaching out, enhancing your social media presence and connecting with friends and family. One encounter may prove truly inspirational Taurus.

You’re all fired up, and with so much on offer you won’t be short of things to do. But one special opportunity can show up around the 10th, with a Solar Eclipse in your sign bringing a game changing proposition. If it feels right, go for it Gemini, and you might experience a positive upturn in your affairs. Stuck in a rut? An edgy Saturn/Uranus tie could coincide with a brilliant breakthrough. With Mercury pushing ahead from the 22nd, you’ll be on a roll and loving it. The Sun’s annual journey through a private zone, is a chance to tap into abilities that have lain dormant. Your dreams may be informative and vivid, and worth writing down. Most of all, this is a great time to tie up loose ends and find closure on emotional issues. As the Sun enters your sign on the 21st, you’ll be in your element. Reach out to others and get moving on projects that have the feel-good factor. The Full Moon on the 24th could empower a key relationship.

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ICENI - HOROSCOPES

www.icenimagazine.co.uk

Issue 98 2021

Leo 24 July - 23 August

Sagittarius 23 November - 21 December

Virgo 24 August - 23 September

Capricorn 22 December - 20 January

Libra 24 September - 23 October

Aquarius 21 January - 19 February

Scorpio 24 October - 22 November

Pisces 20 February - 20 March

With a fabulous Solar Eclipse on June 10th, you may be ready to act on a plan you’ve been nurturing for some while. An event could kickstart the process, and it might be a journey to bigger things. Plus, with dynamic Mars moving into your sign on the 11th, your energy, confidence and courage will be greatly enhanced. From the 21st, you’ll enter a quieter phase and a chance to unwind and recharge. A key relationship may have reached a turning point Leo.

It’s your time to shine, with the Sun in a prominent zone encouraging you to promote your skills, successes and experience. The Solar Eclipse on June 10th, reveals you may be catapulted onto a new path. It might be challenging, but perfect for you and what you’ve wanted all along. With the Sun in a secluded zone from the 21st, get ready to tie up loose ends and find closure on lingering issues. The pace picks up from the 22nd, when Mercury turns direct, boosting productivity.

Options for travel, adventure, fresh challenges and learning, look promising. It’s time to take a leap of faith and try something different. You may feel this push at the time of the Solar Eclipse on the 10th. Nervous to try something new? An edgy tie between sobering Saturn and electric Uranus, can inspire you to have a go anyway, as a breakthrough could be imminent. Get ready to shine bright as the Sun moves into Cancer on June 21st. Your place in the spotlight awaits!

The Sun in an intense zone may bring one or two secrets into the open. Ready for a dynamic change? With a Solar Eclipse on the 10th, it’s time to release the old and embrace the new. And with fiery Mars powering through a highflying zone from June 11th, you’ll be ready to showcase your skills in a bold and powerful way. Need a break and a chance to travel? The Sun’s move into Cancer on the 21st, can find you eager for new places, faces and wonderful experiences.

What you can’t manage alone, you may be able to accomplish by pairing up with another or working as part of a team. And a potent Solar Eclipse on the 10th, could see one partnership brimming with promise. This might be a collaboration or a romantic connection, but either way, it can be significant for some time to come. Ready to jettison emotional baggage? As a more intense zone comes into focus, letting it go may be such a relief and the key to future progress.

All set for change? With an emphasis on work and wellness issues, it’s time to get organised. And the Solar Eclipse on the 10th, can be the catalyst for major change. A few tweaks could streamline your routines, making it easier to reach your goals. Mind, an edgy Saturn/Uranus tie hints at the need for financial restructuring. Keen to take a small risk and invest in your future. It’s certainly worth experimenting. From the 21st, you’ll have a chance to supercharge your love life.

Whatever skills and talents you possess Aquarius, this is the time to let others see you in action. If you’ve been keeping a creative project under wraps, dynamic influences encourage you to put it boldly on display. And the Solar Eclipse on the 10th, suggests doing so could lead to major developments. From June 21st, you may benefit from reorganising your routines, streamlining your affairs, and making room for opportunities that can be very satisfying and lucrative.

Home sweet home may be a place of refuge until June 21st, as a quieter focus encourages you to take a step back from life to unwind, recharge and nurture yourself. Want to give your place a makeover? Browsing through magazines and online, can reveal some brilliant schemes that could get your creative energies flowing. Mind, with Mercury rewinding until June 22nd, avoid rushing into anything. Ready for a touch of romance? Sizzling options appear from week three, Pisces.

Astrologer Patrick Arundell provides a unique take on Horoscopes and Astrology. Join him daily for your Daily Horoscope and his penetrating insight into this fascinating subject. Also FREE Horoscope Videos. PAGE

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Profile for Iceni Magazine

Iceni Magazine Norfolk Issue 98  

Free Lifestyle Magazine For Norfolk. This Month - We Focus On: Football.

Iceni Magazine Norfolk Issue 98  

Free Lifestyle Magazine For Norfolk. This Month - We Focus On: Football.

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