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Μagazine

#9

January 2 0 2 0

Fine food and drinks of Greece

FETA CHEESE

The authentic Greek taste

07- 08 - 09

MARCH

2020 ATHENS • GREECE

ambrosiamagazine.com

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2

EDITORIAL


4

EDITORIAL

Editor’s

id

NOTE T

Publisher Nikos Choudalakis nx@forumsa.gr Publishing Director Thanassis Gialouris gialouris@forumsa.gr

they say: “Keep evolving.” We, at FORUM SA, say: “Keep evolving. Keep changing. Keep succeeding.” Case in point, the strategic takeover of FORUM SA, the leading exhibition firm in Greece, by the NÜRNBERG MESSE GROUP, listed among the 15 largest trade show organizers in the world. Working under a shared vision and a common set of values, the two companies will combine their know-how, operational experience and portfolio to usher a new era for the Greek trade show industry, turning Greece into an exhibition hub for the Balkans and Southeast Europe. We are proud that together, NÜRNBERG MESSE and FORUM SA, will be shaping the future not only of the Greek exhibition landscape, but also of the Greec economy in its whole. Within this context, FORUM has already started OUR VISION IS TO TURN to move forward by creGREECE INTO A TRADE SHOW ating GreekFoodNews. com, an online platform HUB FOR THE BALKANS & dedicated to specialty SOUTHEAST EUROPE food hailing from Greece and reporting on the latest news –including export opportunities, market analysis, product launches, technological and supply chain developments, etc.– as well as providing in-depth profiles to give anyone and everyone interested in Greek Food & Drinks the right ingredients to rise up and connect to new opportunities. We, therefore, invite you to become part of the platform’s growing community of Greek food aficionados. We also suggest you visit FOOD EXPO 2020, the ultimate trade fair for Greek, Mediterranean and specialty food and discover unique, exciting products from Greece and the world.

Deputy Publishing Director Tina Kouloufakou tk@forumsa.gr Sales Director Thanassis Panagoulias sales@forumsa.gr Creative Art Director Niki Galanopoulou ng@forumsa.gr Editor-in-Chief Vana Antonopoulou va@forumsa.gr Contributing Editors Eleni Donou, Eva Touna Art Director Evgenios Kalofolias Graphic Designers Lenia Chalkea, Nikos Kartalias Photo Retoucher Gogo Trikerioti Sales Department T. Belekoukias, A. Kaliantzi, I. Margelis D. Michalochristas, K. Molfeta, A. Mourati, G. Theodoropoulos Advertising Coordinators M. Spichopoulou, G. Patsari

Nikos Choudalakis

Publisher

Int’l Relations F. Papanastasiou Printed by Baxas SA

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FORUM SA: 328 Vouliagmenis Ave., 17342 Agios Dimitrios, Greece Tel.: +30 210 5242100 - Fax: +30 210 5246581

Published by FORUM SA

ISSN

2623-4661


THE FIN E S T S E LE C T I O N O F M EDITER R AN EA N B R E A D P R O DUC TS FOR H O R ECA A N D R E T A I L _ Privately owned facilities (Thessaloniki and Athens) 25.000 m² _ 10 Automatic production lines _ Capacity of logistic center 6.500 frozen pallet places _ 550 References of bread products


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EDITORIAL TABLE FETA CHEESE OLIVES

What is it that makes the authentic, Greek PDO Feta cheese so unique? Could it be its tangy albeit delicious flavor? The fact that it’s the perfect snack? How about its exceptional nutritional profile? Producers, food traders as well as scientists weigh in.


THE FETA

FETA CHEESE IN NUMBERS (2017)

121,000

TONS OF FETA CHEESE PRODUCTION

56,760

TONS OF FETA EXPORTED

43.1%

OF FETA IS PRODUCED IN THESSALY


8

EDITORIAL FETA CHEESE

F

or centuries, Greeks have relied on cheese as their main source of protein, and since sheep and goats were the chief source of milk, Feta was the cheese that mostly covered such a need. But what makes it stand out? “Feta is an exceptional cheese with quite a distinct flavor, which is one the reasons it is so famous,” explains George Vanidis, Exports Director at Mevgal SA, one of the major Greek dairy product industries. “Greek Feta companies should stick to its intriguing character that creates added value, while educating consumers regarding its uniqueness.” Due to its status as a Protected Denomination of Origin product, Feta can only be produced from natural ingredients, while its production and processing adhere to strict quality control and safety procedures. And keeping in mind that sheep and goat’s milk is quite different from cow’s milk, sheep from one country are also quite different from the sheep in another (Greece in this instance), quite simply because the land is different and so are the breeds of livestock. Mr Vanidis reveals that “Any other cheese product made from non-Greek milk is just a cheese with no relation whatsoever –both in terms of taste and quality– to the authentic Feta.” “I believe that the main advantage of Feta cheese is the excellent quality of Greek milk paired with the know-how of Greek cheese and dairy producers, upholding tradition while adapting it to the

1 latest technological requirements,” acknowledges Konstantinos Nousias of Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. and third-generation cheese-maker. “Greek Feta is the only authentic Feta cheese; its roots date back to ancient Greece and only Greeks know its authentic recipe.” George Hotos, sales director at Hotos SA, another company, which combines almost a century’s worth of know-how, asserts that “Authentic Greek Feta PDO can only be produced from 100% sheep and goat milk from Greece at a percentage of at least 70% sheep and maximum 30% goat milk. Compared to cow’s milk, both goat and sheep milk contain more fat and casein, creating organoleptic characteristics specific to cheeses made from sheep and goat milk that make them stand out from other types of cheese.”

1 As a PDO product, Feta must be produced in particular areas in Greece, following specific traditional methods.

FETA PRODUCTION PER REGION*

43.1% 15.6% 11.9%

EASTERN MACEDONIA & THRACE

THESSALY

NOTHERN AEGEAN

EPIRUS

CENTRAL MACEDONIA

WESTERN GREECE

5.3% 1.1%

1.5%

PELOPONNESE

WESTERN MACEDONIA

CENTRAL GREECE

ATTICA *Source: Hellenic Agricultural Organization Elgo-Dimitra

3.7% 16% 1.2%

0.6%


The innovation

Crinkly traditional pie lactose free, dairy free

new product range Traditional crinkly pies are one of the most delicious Greek products that originate in the area of Epirus. Its vegan adaptation has a deliciously rich filling of wholesome vegan ingredients covered with crunchy freshly baked filo pastry and lovingly hand wrapped. Dairy and lactose free.

find us on

www.rodoula.gr

DOUGH & DESSERT PRODUCTS


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EDITORIAL FETA CHEESE

QUEEN OF EXPORTS Greek Feta sales are constantly increasing, proving that there is indeed a market for the genuine cheese.

E

xport opportunities for Greek cheese, and especially Feta cheese have encouraged a greater production, and have spurred the local dairy and cheese industry to evolve even further. In the last five to ten years, Greek Feta processing companies have been investing in innovation, cutting-edge technologies, marketing, and new product development, thus improving value for money and resulting in a more competitive marketplace. In Greece, there are many large companies shell-

Feta exports (2017)* In the EU Germany 37.4% UK 18.8% Italy 12.3% Sweden 7.3% France 5.7% Austria 4.7% Others 13.8%

*Source: Hellenic Agricultural Organization Elgo-Dimitra

Rest of the world USA 36% Australia 27.8 Switzerland 18.5% Canada 8.3 Others 9.4%

ing out in the production of Feta cheese, and especially the one matured in tins. About 10 of them produce Feta in barrels, and according to a traditional recipe, while approximately 5 of them can accommodate large scale demand. Large and medium-sized Greek Feta companies have modern infrastructure, a fully organized distribution network, and offer a wide variety of products that could cater to the needs of super markets or delis all over the world. Smaller, however, production units, from family-owned dairy farms to small-sized businesses, are struggling to keep up with demand and are usually operating within their specific geographical area or market their Feta as a gourmet choice. According to Mr Hotos, “International consumers do not recognize the authentic Greek Feta cheese –there are many imitations that tend to confuse them.” “Both buyers and consumers alike should choose the authentic Greek Feta cheese; its quality is way superior than its cheap imitations,” concurs Mr Noussias of Vassilitsa. A significant trend in the cheese market is an increased demand for organic certification. Consequently, several Greek companies created new products featuring the “BIO” logo. “There is certainly a rise in the demand for organic Feta, but the ‘classic’ recipe still reigns supreme,” declares Mr Vanidis of Mevgal. “The international clientele wants to taste the authentic flavor of Feta.”


12

FETA CHEESE

FETA UNCHARTED NO MORE Scientists analyzed the famous cheese determining its properties & value and establishing its authenticity against imitations.

R

ecently, scientists at the Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA) have decoded the “DNA” of the authentic Feta cheese produced in Greece, unlocking its secrets at a molecular level. Dr George Tsangaris and Dr Athanasios Anagnostopoulos examined, using high resolution mass-spectrometry –namely a method they developed themselves and called “trophometry”– many types of commercially available PDO Feta cheese, analyzing in full their protein content and identifying their nutritional properties and value. The research revealed that all varieties of PDO Feta contain 489 different types of protein known, among others, for their antimicrobial activity and for

strengthening the immune system. The research also identified many proteins that benefit the nervous system, help maintain good kidney function, regulate arterial pressure and reduce cholesterol. As a result, the authentic Greek Feta cheese emerges as one of the most protein-rich cheeses in the world. “The first thing we noted was that Feta cheese is an extremely rich biological material,” clarifies Dr George Tsangaris. “We encountered an extensive range of proteins, each corresponding to a different action. Proteins we had absolutely no idea existed in Feta cheese. This proved that Feta is some kind of super food.” Dr Athanasios Anagnostopoulos acknowledges that “Our findings debunk the myth that Feta is a ‘dangerous’ food, with high fat and salt content.” He also adds that this research is important because it managed to give substance to a significant traditional Greek product. “We proved that Feta PDO has certain characteristics that make it unique,” Dr Tsangaris explains. “And any cheese without these characteristics cannot be called Feta. Feta is a cheese equal to other ‘great’ international cheeses, such as Parmigiano, etc.” Or as Dr Anagnostopoulos puts it, “Feta is a super star!”

RESEARCH proved that Feta PDO has certain characteristics that make it unique


at e! We pa rt ic ip

d Α02/B01 Hall 2 / Stan

7 - 9 MARCH 2020 AT H E N S • G R E E C E


14

EDITORIAL

VASSILITSA - G. & A. NOUSIAS G.P.

Organic matters Tradition and innovation go hand in hand in this familyowned business from Larissa, producing not only exceptional dairy, but also quality organic cheeses.

C

heesemaking is an art for Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P., a brand that has been creating, for approximately 40 years now, dairy products using traditional methods and combining them with state-of-the-art quality controls and packaging. With hard work, dedication and an extensive know-how, Vassilitsa has grown into a leader in the cheese business, producing Feta cheese, Manouri, Anthotyro, goat cheese, as well as a number of organic offerings.

Tradition meets state-of-the-art technologies Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P., located in Nea Lefki, Larissa, is a modern dairy production unit, with a significant presence in the region of Thessaly as well as the rest of Greece

and the world following extensive export activity. Its philosophy is centered on the quality of the products and is focused on customer demands. In addition, traditional cheese and dairy practices are combined with cutting-edge technology and an increased environmental awareness, thus creating the right conditions for the sustainable development of the company. Not to mention the production of organic cheeses.

Good organic practices In the case of organic cheeses, Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. uses organic milk exclusively from Greek farms that respect nature’s balance and ensure the well-being of animals. Animals that produce this milk –be it sheep, goats or cows– are fed organic foods with no synthetic chemicals. In addition, farmers main-

VASSILITSA ORGANIC CHEESE PRODUCTION IN NUMBERS

34,390.56

25,311.62

KG

KG

ΟRGANIC FETA PDO

ORGANIC MANOURI PDO

ORGANIC GOAT CHEESE

201,132.93

KG


tain their grazing areas without any pesticides or chemical fertilizers, and refrain from using hormones or genetically modified organisms, as specified by the Greek legislation that prohibits the use of GMOs. Furthermore, before all organic products can be marketed, they are subject to strict inspections regarding animal farming and cheese production and have obtained all necessary organic certification.

The way to international markets The global organic food industry is a lucrative market, especially since the international clientele deems organic products as a healthy and ethical choice thanks to mounting evidence of the difference between organic and nonorganic, both in terms of nutrition and environmental impact. Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. has been developing its outward-looking orientation since 1967, when the first export of Feta cheese to West Germany, under the brand name “Vassilitsa,” took place. Since then, 95 percent of or production –both regu-

lar and organic, for that matter– is exported, mostly to Germany, the UK, Sweden, Belgium, France, as well as the US. Nowadays, Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. is ready to respond to increased customer demands, consolidating its leading place in the Greek market and searching for new markets not only in Europe but, also, in other parts of the world.

VASSILITSA - G. & A. NOUSIAS G.P. IN NUMBERS

95%

23

40

OF PRODUCTION EXPORTED

TONS OF SHEEP & GOATS MILK USED

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN CHEESEMAKING PUBLI


16

GREEK DESSERTS

From the delicate galaktoboureko to crunchy baklava to fluffy ravani and more, Greek oven-baked sweet treats offer their fair share of sinful pleasure. Made with semolina, phyllo pastry, honey, nuts and cream, these scrumptious treats are veritable temptations.

Baking the difference

T

he bakery market has been constantly growing due to the development of new technologies related to the preservation of natural ingredients. And as quality-conscious consumers continue to demand products of a home-made nature, Greek pastry producers have a great opportunity to improve profits by providing retailers with a diverse selection of baked and syrup offerings. With decades of knowledge and experience, not to mention the use of unique traditional recipes, Greek companies are a strong and reliable partner for international businesses to ensure that products meet customer expectations. As Athena Kolionasios, owner and Managing Director at Kolionasios Baklava Gold, specializing in baklava, specifies, “The rich pastry tradition in almost every part of Greece has helped a growing number of

local companies try their hand in the baked and syrup pastry market. We are using our best creative skills to offer products suiting the modern consumer dietary concerns and gastronomic preferences. Our vision is to use the great food traditions of the Mediterranean as a platform for new taste experiences.” Greek baked sweets companies are currently developing new varieties, while trying to create products as close to the consumers’ notion of home-made as possible in order to get a piece of the action –pun intended. “We have experimented extensively with an abundance of ingredients for the final product. In fact, we put our customers in the testing process because they are the ones in direct contact with the end-user and can convey consumer preferences,” says Ms Yiorkia Papa, owner of P. Papa SA, producing frozen desserts.


2


18

GREEK DESSERTS

Exporting the Greek know-how Tadition and innovation are the cornerstones of Greek baked sweets production, and the defining elements of its growing success in the global market. “There is profound knowhow. It is no coincidence that we are now targeting many different markets, both in Greece and abroad,” continues Ms Papa. “We use blast freezers to deep freeze our products so that all the flavor remains intact.” As a result, traditional Greek baked and syrup pastries have established a strong interest in international markets, especially from countries in the Middle East where desserts such as these are part of their culinary tradition, as well as parts of the world where there is significant Greek diaspora (Canada, Australia, the US, ect.). Maria Vrettou, Managing Director at Vrettos Sweets, a family business specializing in traditional syrup desserts, discloses that “Countries with a strong Greek element, such as Germany, have a large share of sales. In recent years, due to the increase of immigrants from the East, syrup and baked sweets are now placed in more and more countries.” “Baked sweets are part of the Greek tradition, which makes Greek companies experts in the field,” explains Mr Panagiotis Karachalios, President & CEO of Rodoula SA, one of the leading Greek companies in the sector.

in the Greek baked desserts sector, quality, safety and innovation go hand-in-hand

MOST POPULAR BAKED & SYRUP PASTRIES BAKLAVA There are many versions of the origins story of baklava. And whatever the historical controversies, the fact remains that baklava is a world-famous and quite delicious traditional dessert made of layers of crispy golden-brown tissue paper-thin phyllo pastry, filled with chopped nuts and garnished with lemon scented syrup.

GALAKTOBOUREKO Galaktoboureko is basically a custard pie –the name means literally “milk pie”– baked, covered with filo and soaked with a citrus-scented syrup. Galaktoboureko represents a melding of Middle Eastern traditions. Galaktoboureko comes in two forms, with phyllo pastry (galaktoboureko) or without (galatopita). The pastry version is a staple of Greek bakeries everywhere, from the new wave of designer patisseries to the small village bakeries of the islands.

ORANGE PIE “Portokalopita” is a Greek orange pie made with phyllo pastry, a custard and, of course, oranges. There are so many recipes and so many methods of making portokalopita. Some fold the phyllo sheets, others crush them to pieces. Some make the custard with milk, others with yogurt. Whatever the technique, the final product needs to be a light, airy, fluffy pie with the intense flavor of oranges. Orange pie is a staple in every Greek household.

RAVANI Ravani or revani as it is also known, is a semolina cake drenched in luscious sweet syrup, with Middle Eastern roots. The treat has many variations all over Greece. Semolina or farina is the primary ingredient. Sugar, vanilla extract, butter or virgin olive oil are laso used to make the cake batter. Once the cake is cooled completely, chefs create flavored sugar syrup that is poured over the cake.


20

GREEK OLIVE OIL

Olive oil

the organic

factor Organic olive oil is a high-end product with an elevated asking price, and Greek producers are keen to dive into a large and dynamically evolving market.


T

he market of organic food is growing strongly in Greece, after a long period of inactivity. This particular fact together with a significant increase in organic exports has led Greek growers to undergo a change in mentality. They’ve implemented organic methods in their production and work on obtaining GlobalGAP certification for their products and farming methods. In fact, with regard to organic farmland, Greece is currently in 10th place within the EU, accounting for 3.3% of total European organic crop area. As far as permanent crops, such as olives, are concerned, the organic area in the EU amounts to more than 1.2 million hectares. In 2015, olive groves represented 34% of all organic permanent crops in the EU-28, with 454,227 hectares. Most of them are located in Spain (197,136 ha), Italy (179,886 ha), Greece and Portugal (21,766 ha), while the largest part of the production of organic olives in Member States together is utilized for the production of oil. In Greece, 37% of organic farmland in Greece accounts for olive trees, making them the second largest bio cultivation in the country after cereal and rice. In fact, the number of organic olive area appears to have peaked in 2008 with 64,136 hectares, followed by a declining path.

Organic grove numbers, however, are currently fluctuating, amounting to 47,605 hectares in 2015 and representing 0.72% of total utilized agricultural area, while rising to 0.75% in 2016 according to the latest estimates by Eurostat.

What about Greek organic olive oils? In an organic olive grove, cultivation is done without chemicals, insecticides, hormones and pesticides and is controlled by approved certifications. At the same time, in Greece, organic farming is on the rise, and there are areas, such as Laconia in the Peloponnese, with particularly low levels of environmental pollution and, in general, ideal conditions for the cultivation and production of organic olive oil. According to Mr Kostas Liris, agronomic engineer/oleologist and judge at the prestigious NYIOOC World Olive Oil Competition, there has been a gradual increase in Greek organic EVOOs for many years now, but the rate remains very low. “Sometimes it is hard to find an organic olive oil with excellent chemical and organoleptic characteristics –in fact, occasionally, non-organic olive oils are better. And almost always, at least as far as Greek EVOOs are concerned, there are no pesticide residues, even in the non-organic ones. You see, Greeks never spray excessively their olive groves,” he explains. Mr Yiorgos Economou, General Manager at SEVITEL (Association of Hellenic Industries for the Standardization of Olive Oil) concurs that “even conventional olive groves are somewhat organic in Greece, since farmers employ

GREEK ORGANIC OLIVES & OLIVE OIL PRODUCTION

132,000 TONS OF ORGANIC OLIVE PRODUCTION IN 2017

47,605 ha OF ORGANIC OLIVE AREA IN 2015

8.7% OF GREEK OLIVE PRODUCTION IS ORGANIC


22

GREEK OLIVE OIL

Realizing its strong potential, Greek olive farmers have been switching to organic traditional cultivation practices with limited use of pesticides. In fact, in recent years, the most dangerous pesticides have been banned and aerial spraying of crops has stopped altogether.” “The cultivation of organic olive oil needs continuous training, monitoring of the markets and the latest developments in olive oil, constant presence in the olive groves, treating the olive trees with great care, as well as incredible dedication,” suggests Mr George Sakellaropoulos of Sakellaropoulos Organic Farming located near Sparta in the Peloponnese. “Since special formulations aka pesticides and insecticides are not allowed to fight any unwanted phenomena or to increase production, smart solutions, special attention and significant experience are needed. In addition, yields in organic farming are at normal levels and not at the abnormally high levels of conventional farming. Therefore, organic farming is a way of life, laborious but also very rewarding to those who succeed in it.”

KORONEIKI: THE BEST VARIETY FOR BIO

Due to restrictions on using chemical fertilizers and pesticides, the preferable varieties for organic cultivation are those which are highly resistant to diseases and adapting to the soil and climate conditions of each area. One of the best and most resilient olive varieties is Koroneiki, which shows relative production stability from year to year. Koroneiki is the most important olive variety in Greece and it gives one of the best quality olives in both flavor and yield.


24

GREEK OLIVE OIL

ORGANIC vs. REGULAR EVOO Is organic olive oil better than conventional olive oil? What are the distinctions between the two types and are they really all that different?

M

any consumers wonder what the differences are between Organic EVOOs and conventional ones. In terms of organoleptic characteristics, the difference is, unfortunately, not easily detectable as it happens with other fruit and vegetables. Therefore, you cannot spot differences in taste, odor and color. They both have the same requirements for acidity, chemical make up and sensory tests that allow them to be called Extra Virgin. The primary difference is that one is produced using Certified Organic olives, and the other is not. Despite this and

considering the great effort it takes to produce them, organic olive oils are usually in the highest range of quality and taste. “Organic products compared to conventional, non-bio ones, are noticeably superior in nutritional ingredients, are free from chemicals harmful to human and animal health, while offering distinct aromas and flavors,” discloses Mr Sakellaropoulos. Mr Liris reveals that “Undoubtedly, the public recognizes an organic product as healthy. And there are also people –a rising percentage, in fact– that buys organic products fanatically.”


26

GREEK MARKET

news

+

MORE

Feta cheese European Commission takes Denmark to court

The European Commission decided to refer Denmark to the Court of Justice of the EU. Companies based in Denmark produce and export white cheese to non-EU countries after labelling it as “Feta”. However, “Feta” is a registered PDO since 2002 and as such, it can only be produced in Greece according to a set of production specifications. This conduct violates current EU law and will likely frustrate trade negotiations.

Vivartia Group Greek company listed among Europe’s biggest foodservice players In an analysis of Europe’s leading foodservice players featured in the latest issue of Foodservice Europe & Middle East magazine, Greek Vivartia Group (owner of brands such as Everest, Flocafe, La Pasteria, Goody’s, Barba Stathis, Delta Foods, Vigla, etc.) ranked in 74th position. Namely, Vivartia Group reported sales of €291 million for 2018, showing a 0.6% increase compared to the previous year. Vivartia is the No1 foodservice brand in Greece, with 567 units with different brands and 6,000 employees. www.vivartia.com

15.5

million euro the value of Greek honey exports in 2018, with 30.2% going to Germany, 13.9% to France, and 10.8% to the US.

Greek kiwi fruit in Thailand market Greek kiwi fruit has found a new export market after Thailand’s Agriculture Ministry recently approved its importation into the Asian country. The approval came after a four-day inspection by Thai government officials who toured kiwi plantations in Northern Greece, including facilities where the fruit was selected and packaged for shipping. The officials also visited the official phytosanitary services to confirm health requirements for import into Thailand. Inspections were carried out at Thessaloniki, Imathia and Pieria prefectures.


30 28

EDITORIAL GREEK MARKET

news

+

MORE

Chipita €510 million turnover and a new factory in Slovakia Sales at Chipita for 2018 were up and turnover reached almost €510 million. In addition, a new plant in Slovakia –producing croissants and Bake Rolls– is already underway and expected to be fully operational during the first trimester of 2020, while a production unit in India, following the ChipitaBritannia joint venture, is also in the works. Finally, all investments in the company’s Poland factory are concluded, thus doubling its size Spyros Theodoropoulos, and production CEO of Chipita capacity. www.chipita.com

CHIPITA IN NUMBERS (2018)

€0.5 bn. SALES GLOBALLY

Market News

10.67% €28.8 m. REVENUE PROFIT INCREASE

Kalamata olives Healthiest in the world! spectacular findings of new clinical study Kalamata table olives were examined by a team of Greek researchers and scientists. They conducted a clinical study in which twenty healthy people were put on a diet consisting of Kalamata olives for sixty days. The results of this study were spectacular, since the volunteers showed a significant increase in HDL (good cholesterol) and the ratio of total to LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) showed a significant reduction in the ratio of total HDL cholesterol and LDL / HDL as 95% of statistical correspondence was observed.

70%

of total Chios mastiha sales account for exports and are expected to reach €15 million by the end of 2020.

AFTER TAX

Palirria’s ready meals go to Germany Palirria, the No 1 dolma producer in the world, intends to export ready meals from the company’s production unit in Greece. Namely, the brand is working to export its “Homemade” range to Germany, while within 2020 a limited number of supermarkets will be put on trial to determine if there is sufficient interest from German consumers. The “Homemade” range of traditional Greek ready meals, which started with 5 product codes, has now up to 10 and Palirria’s main goal is to expand sales points, both in Greece and abroad. www.palirria.com


30 32

EDITORIAL GREEK MARKET

news

+

Market News

MORE

Helios pasta Helios pasta puts emphasis on exports & organic products

In 2018, Panagiotis Dakos Mills’ (one of the major pasta and flour producers in Greece) international sales amounted to 10% of the company’s turnover. The company, which produces Helios pasta, exports to 30 markets in all five continents and looking closely at the organic sector with international growth prospects, since they are interested in developing on the Scandinavian market. www.heliospasta.gr

Pindos: 10% rise in sales the Ioannina Agricultural Poultry Cooperative is investing €20 million for upgrades For the Ioannina Agricultural Poultry Cooperative – Pindos sales were up 10% in the first eight months of 2019. The cooperative is currently realizing a 5-year investment plan (2018-2022) totaling €20 million in order to increase productive capacity. The construction of a new plant for pre-grilled products is underway and expected to start operating in April 2020. In addition, €5 million will also be invested in the Pindos processing plant, granting the possibility for the slaughter of approximately 8,000 chicken/hour. www.pindos-apsi.gr

530

million euro were Greek EVOO exports for 2018, registering an increase of almost €117 million compared to the previous year.

Greece in top non-cow milk producers According to data from the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery Statistics 2019 review by Eurostat, Greece is one of the top producers of non-cow milk in the EU. Namely, in 2018, Spain produced 1 million tons of milk from ewes and goats, with Greece and France both producing 0.8 million tons. And whereas the collection of these other milks was dwarfed by that from cows in most countries, there were some exceptions. In fact, a majority (57.1%) of the milk delivered to dairies in Greece came from ewes and goats in 2018.


32

EDITORIAL

7 - 9 MARCH 2020 ATHENS • GREECE

THE PREMIER

food & DRINK TRADE SHOW IN S.E. ΕUROPE

FOOD EXPO 2020 will once again provide an overview of the Greek and international F&B stage, as well as all the latest trends and innovations. FOOD EXPO 2020 KEY FIGURES FORECAST

1,350

ΕXHIBITORS

300

INT'L EXHIBITORS

5,000

INT'L VISITORS

950

HOSTED BUYERS

75,000 VISITORS


MEDITERRANEAN GASTRONOMY FORUM GASTRONOMY AT ITS BEST! With the signature of international chefs, the Forum will highlight the culinary treasures of Greece and the Mediterranean.

NEW ORGANIC PRODUCTS SECTION

T

FOOD EXPO, responding to the exponential growth of the organic sector, introduces a distinct section filled with organic products. Exhibitors in this section will

he wealth of Greek Food & Beverages will be presented in a unique way through the Mediterranean Gastronomy Forum, an innovative event that will last all three days of the trade show and will feature the participation of critically acclaimed Greek and international chefs. Using a great variety of excellent products from every corner of Greece the chefs will showcase to Greek and international trade visitors unique culinary ideas., and through interactive culinary demonstrations, professionals from the foodservice and hospitality sectors will be able to discover a wide range of products from all over Greece, consolidating, at the same time, the role of Greek gastronomy as an important vehicle for the promotion of exports. Finally, on the stage of the Mediterranean Gastronomy Forum, chefs from Lebanon, Egypt, Tunisia and many more countries will hold various gastronomic shows, showcasing the affinity of Mediterranean cuisines.

88%

OF LAST YEAR’S VISITORS WERE DECISION MAKERS

section be spread throughout Hall 2 and will have the opportunity to present their products and make contact with Greek and int’l visitors interested in including organic food and beverages in their businesses.

91%

OF INT’L VISITORS FOUND WHAT THEY WERE LOOKING FOR


7 - 9 M A R C H 20 2 0 M E T R O P O L I TA N E X P O

JOIN THE HOSTED BUYER PROGRAM AND ENJOY EXCLUSIVE BENEFITS

F

OOD EXPO has designed a comprehensive Hosted Buyer Program for major international Food & Beverage traders to help them discover new suppliers and build networks. With all or part of their travel and accommodation expenses paid for, qualified Hosted Buyers simply have to show genuine purchase responsibility and attend a minimum number of B2B meetings that are scheduled through the Matchmaking Platform, an intuitive online platform allowing visitors to book meetings in advance with the exhibitors of the trade show.

Get impressive benefits By joining the Hosted Buyer Program of the trade show, you enjoy the following benefits: • 2 or 3 nights hotel accommodation • Round trip economy air ticket • Complimentary day cruise to the Greek islands / Athens tour • Access to the int’l buyers Meeting Area.

18,000

COMBINE BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE Take advantage of your visit to FOOD EXPO 2020 to explore Greek products and do business with suppliers from around the world in a professional & efficient environment. In addition, why not enjoy some downtime to discover Athens and its surroundings, and live an authentic Greek experience? FOOD EXPO is offering its int’l visitors the chance to experience the beauty, historic sights and culinary treasures of Greece. Enjoy a day cruise to the Saronic Gulf or take a guided tour around Athens and its monumental landmarks.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT OUR TEAM

Filippos Papanastasiou • fp@forumsa.gr Marilena Galani • gm@forumsa.gr Ioanna Lalia • il@forumsa.gr Ioanna Polychronopoulou • ip@forumsa.gr

B2B MEETINGS BETWEEN EXHIBITORS & INT’L VISITORS

94%

OF HOSTED BUYERS WERE SATISFIED BY THE B2B MEETINGS


Cactu s Mare Hotel

Crete islan d - Greece


36

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Ambrosia #9 - 36 pages  

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