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JANUARY 2021

COMPLIMENTARY

Become a Giving Heart Elim Care is able to provide meaningful care for seniors thanks to your support. See how you can help Elim Care and seven other Giving Hearts Day charities make a positive impact on our community.


TABLEOFCONTENTS

FARGO MONTHLY // JANUARY 2021

COVER STORY

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BECOME A GIVING HEART

Giving Hearts Day is the longestrunning giving day in the country, having raised more than $90 million for area charities since its founding in 2008. There are nearly 500 hundred charities participating in this year’s Giving Hearts Day. 18 What Is Giving Hearts Day? 24 Fargo-Moorhead Community Theatre 31 FirstLink 36 Fargo Elim Rehab & Care Center 42 Red River Children's Advocacy Center 49 Diamond In The Ruff Pet Rescue 54 Volunteer Feature: Meals On Wheels/Valley Senior Services 56 Volunteer Feature: Big Brothers Big Sisters Of The Village 60 Volunteer Feature: Down Home 64 Giving Hearts Day Resources

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FEATURES 84 Brew Year's Resolution!

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80

RECURRING 78 Maker Of The Month 80 Health & Wellness 82 Think Global, Act Local RESOURCES 88 Drink Specials

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Volume 11 / Issue 1

JANUARY 2021

Fargo Monthly Magazine is published 12 times a year and is free. Copies are available at more than 500 Fargo-Moorhead locations and digitally at fargomonthly.com.

Publisher Mike Dragosavich Drago@SpotlightMediaFargo.com EDITORIAL Editors Jack Hastings, Nolan P. Schmidt Graphic Designer Kim Cowles Creative Strategist Josiah Kopp Contributors Alexandre Cyusa, Ashley Morken, Dr. Sue Mathison INTERACTIVE Business Development Manager Nick Schommer NickSchommer@SpotlightMediaFargo.com Social Media Content Specialist Emma Bonnet Videographers Tommy Uhlir, Laura Alexander Executive Sales Assistant Kellen Feeney Graphic Designer Ben Buchanan ADVERTISING VP of Business Development Paul Hoefer Paul@SpotlightMediaFargo.com Sales Representative Al Anderson Senior Leader of Digital Solutions Brady Sprague Client Relations ClientRelations@SpotlightMediaFargo.com Client Relations Manager Jenny Johnson Marketing Designer Christy German ADMINISTRATION VP of Human Resources Colleen Dreyer Account Strategist Cassie Wiste DISTRIBUTION Delivery John Stuber

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EDITORIALNOTE

EXPERIENCE THE JOY OF GIVING he definition of giving is far bigger than I once thought it to be. Of course, giving can entail financial donations and that's very important, but through putting this issue together I've realized how much of a capacity humans have for generosity and compassion. Giving can be using your time to benefit a cause. Giving can be using your voice to share the mission of a charity. Giving can be using your network to connect nonprofits with resources. The limits of our generosity are boundless. This special Giving Hearts Day issue of Fargo Monthly features the charities and nonprofits making an impact on the FargoMoorhead community and also acts as a guide for your own philanthropic giving and volunteering. The work of these charitable organizations is so valuable to our community and their dedication and passion for the greater good should not go unnoticed. It was a tremendous joy for me to see firsthand the positive impact of these organizations and meet the individuals working so hard to make a difference in this community and beyond. Also, as someone who has recently moved back to the FargoMoorhead area, this issue has become a very important resource for me as I learned about many of the area's charitable causes and discovered all the different ways I can contribute to our resilient community. I hope this issue will be a resource for our readers in the same way.

really stuck with me from this was that our actions were making a permanent change on the earth. Albeit a small change, but doesn't any big change begin with something small. No matter how you contribute, how much you can give or how long you can help, it does make a difference. If you feel driven to do more for your community, volunteering and charitable giving can be that sense of purpose. Every person has the power to help others. This Giving Hearts Day, we encourage you to find a nonprofit with a mission that is meaningful to you and give in some capacity, whether that be your time or resources. The joy of giving isn't just found in the end result, it's found in the experience of helping your neighbor. Thank you to the organizations that invited us in to learn more about their mission. And also a big thank you to every organization involved in Giving Hearts Day, your impact on the community does not go unnoticed. It's been an honor to share your stories and be a part of Giving Hearts Day 2021.

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It's important to view volunteering not only as a way to help your community but as a learning experience that can foster personal growth and create the foundation for large-scale changes. One of my favorite volunteering experiences was with the MarcyHolmes Neighborhood Association cleaning the banks of the Mississippi River to restore its native habitat. This involved removing invasive species and replacing them with native plants to reduce further erosion of the riverbank. The one thing that 13


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Much is made of the success North Dakota State has within the field of competition. Conference and national championships continue to take a rightful place at the forefront of our conversations. Occasionally, the term "studentathlete" gets lost in the shuffle as we are constantly praising the "athlete." Oftentimes, we fail to recognize that academics are held in incredibly high esteem at NDSU. This can be seen in cumulative GPAs and the copious amount of NDSU names on all-academic lists. When you arrive at North Dakota State, you are more than an "athlete." You are the definition of a "student-athlete."

A father’s day conversation with his father-in-law, Don Setter, 20 years ago was just about all it took for Doug Restemayer, current President and Owner, to get handed the keys to D-S Beverages. Just this past year, Doug’s son, Bill, had a similar conversation with his father about returning to the family business. In this issue, we take a look at the great culture that D-S Beverages has developed as well as the family succession plan that is slowly in the works.

Look For Us In February! Read all past issues at www.designandlivingmagazine.com

Look For Us In February! Read all past issues at futurefarmer.com


WHAT IS GIVING HEARTS DAY? 18 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


$19.2 MILLION

RAISED ON GIVING HEARTS DAY 2020 FOR REGIONAL CHARITIES.

34,711

GIVING HEARTS GAVE IN 2020

75,479 DONATIONS WERE MADE ON GIVING HEARTS DAY 2020

$1.4 MILLION $90 MILLION

RAISED BY THE ANNE CARLSEN CENTER ON GIVING HEARTS DAY 2020 RAISED SINCE GIVING HEARTS DAY'S FOUNDING IN 2008

irst held in 2008, Giving Hearts Day is a 24-hour online fundraising charity event. This charitable giving day is hosted by Dakota Medical Foundation (DMF), Impact Foundation and the Alex Stern Family Foundation. Together, these organizations offer resources that help nonprofits accomplish their missions, specifically by teaching them how to perfect the art of fundraising. Throughout the year, charities involved are provided the necessary tools to learn how to raise funds with more impact.Each year on Giving Hearts Day, their skills then get put to use. Over the course of 12 years, hundreds of thousands of givers have donated on this day, raising more than $90 million for nearly 500 regional charities. According to Impact Institute Director Scott Holdman, Giving Hearts Day was originally designed as an experiment to study an emerging trend. This trend saw people honoring their loved ones by supporting a charity instead of buying them presents. Jeana Peinovich, the Initiative Director of DMF‘s Lend A Hand Up program, came up with the idea to hold the event around Valentine’s Day. Valentine’s Day is famously dedicated to spreading love, whether that be to a special romantic partner or even valuable friendships. And what better way to spread love than to donate to a worthy cause? Though it began as a pilot for just a handful of medical-related charities, Giving Hearts Day has turned into a booming success for all sorts of charities, large and small. By nature, DMF is dedicated to building the fundraising successes of health-related nonprofits. When this pilot program exceeded expectations and gained momentum in the community, DMF began to receive interest from nonmedical related charities who wanted to

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GET INVOLVED

FEBRUARY 11 GIVINGHEARTSDAY.ORG

get involved as well. In the desire to help even more organizations, DMF partnered with the Alex Stern Family Foundation to form Impact Foundation. Together, these groups provide resources to any organization that is interested in taking part. While the actual fundraiser takes place on February 11, Giving Hearts Day is much more than just a 24-hour donation drive. Holdman said, “It’s about way more than just getting contributions. This is about creating community and paving the path forward.” Every organization that participates in Giving Hearts Day goes through a set of trainings together, planting seeds beyond the day itself. Organizations benefit year-round with one-on-one coaching provided by Impact, their team available to answer questions and facilitate connections with like-minded people and organizations. There’s even a private Facebook group where hundreds of organizations from across the region can join together to ask and answer questions. Those involved get an arsenal of training products and assets, all thanks to being part of the Giving Hearts Day network. “There’s a lot of fun energy around this day that allows people to experiment and figure out what works for them,” said Holdman. He said this day provides a time for these organizations to try something new and branch out. If those techniques go well, they can implement them yearround. If an organization has never done a social media campaign, this is a great

20 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

time to try one. Or if they’ve never raised a major gift, this is when they have a reason to ask for one. The day can kick off a mission of trying out a new tagline or campaign and really get creative with how to apply the tools they learned from DMF‘s training. While the charities involved in Giving Hearts Day benefit from it the most, the act of donating is an incredibly powerful experience. Holdman shared, “Getting involved with your community, getting connected to a cause and making a contribution are things that we all need to thrive and to benefit our psychological well-being.” With Giving Hearts Day, there is an opportunity to do just that. We need a place to make a contribution to so we can know the feeling of making a difference. “There’s a reason why philanthropy exists: we all need a cause bigger than ourselves and a purpose,” said Holdman. “We are built to join the community. But what you have to do in modern life is navigate the options,” said Holdman. For all donors, Holdman offers this piece of advice: use your “no” to empower your “yes.” You don’t need to fix the whole world, but you do need to embrace your “yes” by finding something to plug into and by finding a community. As part of their community engagement, Giving Hearts Day also uses the hashtag #CountMe across other social media

platforms. See who is supporting what organization and join in on sharing about this special day. With potential for match donations, it’s a perfect day to get started on a path of generous giving and inspire others to do the same. With Giving Hearts Day approaching, join the movement and find your own tribe. In preparation for the day, you can research organizations involved at GivingHeartsDay. org or ImpactGiveback.org to see which causes resonate most with you. Join thousands of people in one of the most generous regions of the nation as they rally to support nearly 500 organizations who will make a positive impact on the community throughout 2021.


Every February, the Fargo-Moorhead community comes together to experience the joy of giving. Giving Hearts Day is the longest-running giving day in the country, having raised more than $90 million for area charities since its founding in 2008. There are nearly 500 hundred charities participating in this year’s Giving Hearts Day with many ways to give, including donating, volunteering or simply sharing a charity’s mission. In this issue, we are profiling five charities and three volunteer stories to share

Fargo's Giving Hearts Day Lineup

Become a Giving heart 22 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


the widespread effects of charitable giving. All of the nonprofits featured in this issue are making tremendous positive impacts on our community, and you have the power to help those causes. This Giving Hearts Day we encourage you to find a charity working toward a cause you find meaningful and share your time and resources with it. By coming together to give February 11, we can create a culture of generosity and a

resilient Fargo-Moorhead community.

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ARTS AND CULTURE:

FARGO MOORHEAD COMMUNITY THEATRE Providing engaging, community-minded theatrical and educational experiences

Jim Jessica

Josie

Jimmy Kendall

24 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan Schmidt

They have this group that is providing them guidance and showing them how to work together toward a common goal. Those lessons are worth their weight in gold. I think theater is such a great experience for that.” - Jessica Kendall, Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre Volunteer

isfortune hit the Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre (FMCT) on two fronts in the past year, the first being the compromised structural integrity of The Stage at Island Park and the second being the pandemic leading to the cancellation of all live shows. The Stage has been closed since December 2019 when it was discovered that a roof beam was cracked and the building was declared structurally unsound. Despite these challenges, FMCT has ensured that the show goes on even without its stage. Operating out of a temporary downtown office, the theatre has continued to deliver on its mission to enrich the community through “engaging theatrical and educational opportunities.” FMCT’s 10 Minute Play festival and production of “Clue” went virtual. The organization is also holding acting and singing classes digitally.

FMCT is the longest operating community arts organization in the Red River Valley. Established in 1946, the FMCT will be celebrating its 75th anniversary in April. FMCT produces an average of 10 productions every year, bringing in more than 35,000 patrons in just 2019. The impact of FMCT on bridging the community together has been felt especially among families with the absence of community gatherings and entertainment events. The Kendall family has been heavily involved in many FMCT productions through the years in many roles. For parents Jim and Jessica and children Josie and Jimmy, FMCT is an integral part of their lives. The Kendall’s home is filled with theater and music, and that love of art drove the family to become involved in several theatrical productions. Jim and Jessica met at Concordia where they were both studying


music. Theater has been a lifelong piece of Jessica’s life, having participated in her first theatrical performance as a third grader. It only made sense for Josie to continue her mother’s passion for acting, and Josie’s younger brother Jimmy followed suit soon after. “When I was in ‘A Christmas Carol,’ I was a ghost, and we would always rehearse here,” Josie said about her favorite experiences among the many productions she's been involved in. “It was really fun to do and it was fun to just make something with people.” Jimmy’s first production was “A Christmas Story” in 2018. “I made it to the audition for the first time ever, so I was like, ‘Whoa what is happening, I've never done this before!’” For 75 years, FMCT has created community-minded educational experiences and artistic opportunities. FMCT has strived to create a place where people of all ages and backgrounds can create, learn and gather since its founding. “I like it because it brings people together,” Jessica said. “If they're doing something, it brings people together in our family and it brings other people together.” Perhaps that is where the power of theater lies, in its ability to bring a family together on stage while also bringing a community together in the audience. FMCT’s productions become traditions for community

members, such as families coming together for a meal before seeing the annual production of “A Christmas Carol.” These unifying experiences become precious memories for families and wouldn’t be possible without FMCT.

HOW TO HELP:

“It was ‘A Christmas Story’ when I first got to see Jimmy really do something on stage,” Jim said. “He and Josie were relatively near each other on stage for a while and I had tears in my eyes, just kind of welled up from a sense of pride. It was a pretty special moment to have all the kids on stage doing something that they love doing.”

• Donate • Purchase a membership • Volunteer • Attend fundraising events • Workplace giving • Legacy giving • Artist opportunities and auditions

Jessica, Josie and Jimmy were all cast in FMCT’s production of “Matilda,” which was put on hold amid pandemic restrictions. Hopefully, the day when the Kendalls can once again perform together on stage in front of the community isn’t too far away. “I'm really looking forward to just seeing the community again,” Josie said. “It's a fun experience to listen to them, hear them, laugh with them.” FMCT offers more opportunities for the community outside of just theatrical productions. As the very nature of theater encapsulates many elements of standard student curriculum (English, history, social studies, etc.), students can apply skills they’ve learned to hands-on situations. FMCT offers year-round classes for all ages and all skill levels, including week-long summer 27


camps, a month-long summer intensive program that culminates in a production and a theatre outreach program that brings theatre education directly into area elementary schools. These programs promote development in reading skills, language development, memorization and public speaking. FMCT’s educational programming also includes Silver Follies, which provides theatrical learning opportunities to those 55 years and older. “The kids have so many adults that they've worked and collaborated with and are learning from. It’s like this big extended community family looking after them,” Jessica said. “They have this group that is providing them guidance and showing them how to work together toward a 28 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

common goal. Those lessons are worth their weight in gold. I think theater is such a great experience for that. Having something like FMCT in our community is an incredible opportunity.”

Pankow, FMCT artistic director, said. “We're able to host and we're able to provide for the community, we feel really lucky and fortunate to get to do that.”

While FMCT’s primary mission to provide artistic opportunities and education, its reach and impact extends far beyond just the arts community. The Stage at Island Park has held corporate events, meetings and other special events like Emerging Prairie’s 1 Million Cups, serving as a supportive resource to local businesses in addition to being an artistic outlet.

FMCT currently has a $7 million fundraising goal to repair the 52-year-old-auditorium, the largest amount the organization has ever set as a goal. Community support is needed both figuratively and literally, to raise the roof of The Stage at Island Park. FMCT is looking at this event as an opportunity, rather than a tragedy, to upgrade the facility to better serve FMCT’s community-minded mission.

“Theater happens to be the main focus of what we do as an organization, but the building is bigger than that,” Adam

“Something that we want to focus on in the future is making this a community gathering place,” Colby Schwartzwalter, FMCT


Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre fmct.org 333 4th St S Fargo, ND 58103 community engagement intern, said. “We do more than just put on shows and have artistic education. We want this to be a place where people from outside of those areas come together too.” For generations, FMCT has been a vital part of our community, enriching the lives of thousands through theatre arts. The stage was originally built by a huge community effort 50 years ago, and now FMCT needs another community effort to open its curtains once again. “This is a community gathering place that happens to do plays and musicals and great education programs, but it’s

also is a place for our community to gather and engage and connect with their neighbors,” Pankow said. "It's important to us as an organization, that we keep that vision moving forward, so there are another 75 years that this organization can play a big part in the growth and the vibrancy of this community.”


By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan Schmidt

CRISIS INTERVENTION:

FIRST

LINK Linking people to resources 24/7

Cindy Miller Executive Director

Jennifer Illich Director of Helpline Operations

We're there for anyone, anytime, anywhere across the entire state. There are not many services like that.� - Jennifer Illich, Director of Helpline Operations

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ll it takes is the simple act of picking up the phone to change someone’s life. FirstLink’s mission is to be the first point of contact whether an individual needs resources or support if they’re feeling anxious, depressed or suicidal. FirstLink is a free, confidential call center available to anyone 24/7/365 for listening and support, referrals to resources and crisis intervention. “We're there 24 hours a day whether you need resources, whether you need someone to listen and support you if you're feeling anxious, depressed, suicidal,” Cindy Miller, executive director of FirstLink said. “If you have financial needs. If you just need to check in with someone, sometimes just having someone listen to you and tell you that they care and listen to what you're going through.” FirstLink was been operating for 50 years and is the only call center in North Dakota that answers the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, as well as the only 211 Help Center in the state. FirstLink serves the entire state of North Dakota and 19 counties in Minnesota. Someone can live in a small community in western North Dakota with few accessible resources and still have access to FirstLink. “We're there for anyone, anytime, anywhere across the entire state,” Jennifer Illich, director of helpline operations, said. “There are not many services like that.” “Think how many places close at five o'clock at night,” Miller said. “Say it's 5:05 and I'm really having a crisis right now or I need help with something, law enforcement or maybe an emergency room are your two choices. But we’re that other choice that’s there all the time.” Both Miller and Illich agree that it can be hard to ask someone if 32 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

they are contemplating suicide, but just talking to someone can make a big difference. That is where FirstLink comes in as an impartial resource providing a listening ear and connecting people to resources. People can even call together if that is more comfortable for them.

SUICIDE WARNING SIGNS

“When someone will get a phone call back from somebody and they say, ‘Thank you so much, I was in a really down and dark place last week and your staff helped me. Now I'm alive because of your staff because it gave me hope and led me to services.’ That is outstanding,” Illich said. “It makes it so real that we truly helped the person on the phone.”

These signs may mean someone is at risk for suicide. Risk is greater if a behavior is new or has increased, and if it seems related to a painful event, loss or change.

FirstLink provides both phone and text support where call specialists will actively listen without judgment and maintain confidentiality to provide referrals to professional support services. Anyone seeking services in their community is also encouraged to utilize FirstLink. This can include families seeking services for their children, teachers or clergy seeking help for those they serve, assisting disaster relief efforts and even seniors seeking volunteer opportunities. FirstLink offers a variety of programs to further serve the community. Through the Caring Contacts program, FirstLink receives referrals from area hospitals to check in with individuals who may be at greater risk of suicide to support them as they continue their journey toward recovery. A call specialist from FirstLink calls the individual within 24 hours to make sure that they're going to their medical appointments, check if they have any financial needs or do listening and support. Also through the Caring Contact program, FirstLink sends homemade caring cards in the mail to their clients. “It seems so simple but it's actually one of the only research-proven facts of preventive suicide and helps with addiction as well, just to get a

• Talking about wanting to die or kill oneself • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain • Changes in school or work performance • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live • Increased use of alcohol or drugs • Sleeping too much or too little • Talking about being a burden to others • Extreme mood swings • Withdrawing or feeling isolated • Abrupt changes in behavior • Giving away possessions • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly If you see these warning signs in someone you know, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)


card in the mail,” Illich said. In addition to these services, FirstLink is also a huge proponent of continued suicide prevention education and outreach. FirstLink promotes its services among nursing students to share with their patients who might need extra help and support. FirstLink also does training at beauty schools. Since many people see their hairdressers regularly and share personal information with them, the hairdresser will be ready to direct their clients to the proper resources should any concerns arise. FirstLink offers three accredited training programs for the community on mental health and suicide prevention: • SafeTALK prepares individuals to become a suicide-alert helper by recognizing invitations for help in someone’s words and actions. • Mental Health First Aid teaches individuals how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illness and substance use disorders. • ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training) enhances a caregiver’s ability to assist a person at risk of suicide.

support FirstLink, because they were there for me.” Rodacker is a member of the Midnight Riders, which organizes an annual motorcycle ride. In recent years, this motorcycle group has raised funds for FirstLink as well as facilitated open discussions to eliminate the stigma surrounding suicide and encourage people to reach out for help. “There’s too much suicide out there,” Rodacker said. “We're trying so hard to raise awareness and just get the word out there and say it's okay to go and get mental help.” Through Rodacker’s and the Midnight Rider’s efforts, the annual Ride to Silence the Stigma has raised thousands of dollars for FirstLink, in addition to promoting suicide prevention education among the public.

FirstLink also conducts suicide intervention training in schools.

“Know the signs of depression because I didn't see that with my son until after the fact,” Rodacker said. “If you know somebody that needs help, call somebody. If they won’t confide in you maybe there's somebody else that they will confide in. Try to reach out to them. Call a friend. Do whatever you need to do.”

Over the years, FirstLink has had an impact on thousands of lives. After her son took his own life in 1998, Cyndy Rodacker of Jamestown, North Dakota, attended the Suicide Survivors Support Group, which was organized by FirstLink at the time. Rodacker recognized the importance of a service like FirstLink and bravely shares her own experiences with suicide to help others in the community who may be facing similar challenges.

In 2019, FirstLink had a record year with 60,148 contacts, approximately 5,000 a month. This year has been an especially trying year with over 7,000 calls in each of the last three months. FirstLink has received an influx of calls regarding stressors of the COVID-19 pandemic, such as increased financial burdens, isolation and hybrid learning are adding more pressure to an already stressful and uncertain situation.

“They just helped me. They were there for me, they sent me material and got me connected with people,” Rodacker said. “Last year and this year, I suggested to our motorcycle group, Midnight Riders, to

“We never know what life's gonna throw at us, and we should just remember that we need this number in our phones, in our minds to share with others or to have ourselves,” Miller said.

34 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

FirstLink is a valuable community resource available for everyone to utilize. You can help FirstLink by donating, volunteering, sharing the hotline number and contacting legislators for support. Just offering a shoulder to lean on, a handwritten card or a spontaneous phone call or text can be enough to inspire change as well. “You don't have to be a therapist to be therapeutic,” Miller said. “Talking to someone can make a big difference in someone else's life.” FirstLink’s resources are accessible in the following ways:

24-Hour Helpline/Textline Dial 2-1-1 or 701-235-7335 (SEEK) Textline: Text your zipcode to 898211 Youth Line: text ND4ME to 898211 Call for information about referral to community resources, listening and support

24-Hour Suicide Lifeline 1-800-273-8255 (TALK)

Online Directory of Resources myfirstlink.org


HOW TO HELP:

We Speak Agri-Busines s

• Monetary donations • Volunteering • Call specialist internship • Reserve disaster volunteers • Community booth volunteers • Start a Facebook fundraiser • Donate items on FirstLink's Target wishlist

wr.cpa | Fargo, North Dakota


SENIOR SERVICES:

ELIM

REHABILITATION AND CARE CENTER Fostering fullness of life for elders

Renee Lundberg

36 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan Schmidt

Ceedy Mewszel

Jim Lundberg

Fargo Elim has that long history of faithbased care, doing what we do in the spirit of Christ's love. We maintain a high level of care for people. It's physical, it's medical, it's emotional, it's spiritual, it's multiple components.� - David Juve , Elim Care Chaplain

37


MATBUS Doing our part to keep travel safe in Fargo-Moorhead

Face Coverings are

REQUIRED on all MATBUS vehicles Buses are sanitized to CDC recommendations daily. We will continue to support an environment that protects both our passengers and staff. Thank you for your cooperation.

We can all get there safely TOGETHER matbus.com


im and Renee Lundberg were faced with a difficult decision when Renee’s mother Ceedy had a stroke. After Ceedy was in rehab for three weeks, Jim and Renee knew they would have to move her into a nursing home. Ceedy led a very active lifestyle and Jim and Renee didn’t want to compromise her quality of life in any way. “We had some ideas of nursing homes, and we'd heard a lot about how great Elim Care was,” Renee said. “The one thing we really liked is they have a wonderful rehab center here. It's been wonderful. It’s a very good home-feeling place and a Christian atmosphere is excellent.” Elim Care, a ministry of Cassia, provides quality, compassionate and innovative senior healthcare and housing in the spirit of Christ’s love. Elim Care is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for elders by offering skilled nursing care, rehabilitation therapies and assisted living services. Elim Care’s rehabilitation unit offers physical, occupational and speech rehab therapies. Ceedy has lived in Elim Care’s Pioneer House for the past five years. Pioneer House is an assisted living facility offering skilled nursing care and a greater sense of independence for its residents. Elim Care offers plenty of activities, including bible study, holiday bazaars, coffee hour, summer picnics and, Ceedy’s favorite, bingo. “We know not to visit during bingo,” Renee laughed. One of the reasons Jim and Renee chose Elim Care is that it hosts regular entertainment

opportunities that support Ceedy’s very active and social lifestyle. The atmosphere in Pioneer House is lively and active, bright with chatter and a sense of camaraderie among the residents and staff. This sense of community and togetherness that Elim Care fosters greatly contributes to the residents’ health and wellbeing. Jim and Renee visit three to four times a week, visiting not only Ceedy but other residents they have come to form close connections with. “You could see who didn't seem to have visitors all the time and stop in and just talk to them for a little bit,” Renee said. “You can see the ones that just yearned for somebody to pay attention to them or say hi.” “When you go to a nursing home visiting you get a lot of friends, meet a lot of families and other residents,” Jim said. “You get to know them and they're like your family.”

• Between 2015 and 2050, the proportion of the world's population that is over 60 years old will nearly double from 12 percent to 22 percent. • By 2020, the number of people aged 60 years and older will outnumber children younger than 5 years. • In 2050, 80 percent of older people will be living in low- and middle-income countries. • The pace of population aging is much faster than in the past. • All countries face major challenges to ensure that their health and social systems are ready to make the most of this demographic shift. Statistics provided by the World Health Organization

That sense of family became incredibly important when Elim Rehab and Care Center’s facilities were severely damaged by an electrical fire in January 2020. No one was hurt but 111 senior residents were displaced. Elim residents were relocated to new nursing homes in the Fargo-Moorhead area and surrounding communities. Jim noted the supportive reaction from Elim staff, who were without jobs following the fire but still visited the 39


displaced residents in their new facilities. Shortly after the fire, Jim and Renee were notified of an opening at Elim’s Pioneer House for Ceedy. They quickly jumped on the opportunity to bring her back to Elim Care. “I couldn’t have asked for a better place for her to be,” Renee said. “I knew she was in great hands and with familiar family, people that she knew.” “We know a lot of staff. It's like a big family,” Jim said. “Elim is small enough. Some of these care centers are really huge and I do not think you would have the same atmosphere within them.” Two of the people creating Elim Care’s caring and lively atmosphere are Renee Muhonen, campus administrator, and David Juve, chaplain. “Our mission at Elim is to serve all of those that need to be served,” Muhonen said. “There's a culture here that's been cultivated of a priority of care for residents, for the people that we serve and their families,” Juve said. “Fargo Elim has that long history of faith-based care, doing what we do in the spirit of Christ's love. We maintain a high level of care for people. It's physical, it's medical, it's emotional, it's spiritual, it's multiple components.” That mission is driving the construction of a new nursing home, replacing the facility damaged by the fire. Following a feasibility study, Elim Care determined there was a need for more nursing home beds in the community and promptly began collaborating with an architect on a new 40 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

state-of-the-art 88-bed facility with all private rooms. “Our vision is to make sure that the campus stays state-of-the-art so that the residents’ experience doesn't change when people leave rehab and move to assisted living,” Juve said. “We don't want them to have such a large dynamic change when they leave there and step into another part of the campus.” “We really have stood firm on our culture and tried to make a difference, and our residents and families feel the difference when they step inside,” Muhonen said. The high-quality personalized services that Elim Care provides is further evidenced by a five-star rating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In addition to providing excellent healthcare care for seniors, Elim also serves a role in the community as a crossroads. Many people have a connection to Elim, whether it be through an elderly relative or a friend of a friend. “Fargo Elim has its function here in this community to continue to reach out to people of all faiths,” Juve said. “We have people here from all kinds of backgrounds under this one roof. Fargo Elim is very important to this community because it's not just about medical care, so many people have a connection to Fargo Elim. This organization has brought strength, both medically and with the faith foundation, to this community.” Elim Care will be launching a capital campaign to raise funds for the

construction of the new facility that can provide the most current medical services to its residents. Construction is set to begin in early 2021. “Our elderly population often is a group of people who are forgotten but not gone,” Juve said. “Sometimes elderly are forgotten, but they're still here. They're a vital part of our community. They have an incredible amount of wisdom, history and knowledge. That is a treasure trove and we're trying to capture that just by hearing their stories and sharing them with others.”

HOW TO HELP: • Volunteer with Elim Care by • leading a group activity, • sharing musical talents, • guiding a Bible study, • helping at a special event • or simply visiting with a resident • Make a donation fargoelimcare.org


By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan Schmidt Anna Frissell Executive Director

HEALTH AND WELLNESS:

RED RIVER

CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER Facilitating healing and justice for victims of abuse

Anna Schimmelpfennig Assistant Mental Health Director

We are here to give kids an opportunity to come in and to disclose what happened to them in a safe, secure and compassionate environment.”

- Anna Frissell, Executive Director , Red River Children's Advocacy Center 42 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


he Red River Children’s Advocacy Center (RRCAC) provides healing and justice for children victimized by abuse, maltreatment and neglect. The RRCAC serves victims of child abuse across all socioeconomic levels, races, religions and cultures across eastern North Dakota, western Minnesota, northeastern South Dakota and four Native American reservations.

to figure out how they can work their way through trauma.”

“We are here to give kids an opportunity to come in and to disclose what happened to them in a safe, secure and compassionate environment,” Anna Frissell, executive director of the RRCAC, said. “Then we bring a team of professionals that form a body of minds that are thinking about how this child and family can best heal and they then make recommendations. All of those professionals come together to form a group that engages in helping these kids heal.”

• Medical Evaluations: ensure the health and safety of each child, identify any abuse and make referrals to additional care as needed.

The RRCAC utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach, where dedicated agency leaders work toward a common mission of facilitating a community response to child maltreatment through a team approach to investigation, treatment, prosecution and prevention. These professionals include experts from law enforcement, prosecution, social services, medical care, mental health and advocacy who work together to share resources and minimize trauma to children. “We have a free mental health clinic. We provide evidence-based trauma-focused care for kids and for their caregivers. We have the CARE Clinic, which is a Sanford Clinic, that does medical examinations and provides a pathway to good, healthy medical care,” Frissell said. “And we have our forensic interviewers and our advocates who meet with the families and help the families understand what some options are

The RRCAC’s scope of services include: • Forensic Interviews: forensic interviewers work with the multidisciplinary team to provide children a safe, legally sound and neutral setting to share their experience.

• Family Advocacy: help parents understand the system and professionals involved and connect children and families with resources in their community. • Mental Health Care: using trauma-specific and evidencebased screening, assessment and treatment proven in research to be effective to help the child and family heal. • Multidisciplinary Team Case Coordination: professionals from the RRCAC and multidisciplinary team work together and share their expertise to reach the best outcomes for children and families. “With the mental health program, our main role is to ensure that the children and families who come through our center are given access to an evidence-based traumaspecific assessment process to determine the needs of the children and families and to determine what treatment would be the best fit for them,” Anna Schimmelpfennig, assistant mental health director, said. “That's really important because the sooner that you can screen a child and get them started in services, the better their outcomes will be.”

HOW TO HELP: The Red River Children’s Advocacy Center is solely funded through grants and donations. Every penny donated helps make a difference in the lives of children. • Monetary donations • Hold a toy drive • Hold a supply drive • Gather a group for a service project at RRCAC (painting, cleaning, decorating) • Provide new items for silent or live auctions at fundraising events RRCAC holds throughout the year • Donate items on RRCAC's wishlist • Snacks (individually wrapped) • Water bottles • Juice boxes • Art supplies (crayons, paper, markers, colored pencils) • Coloring books (child and adolescent) • Chapter books and children’s books • Fleece/tie-blankets • New board games or card games • Play-doh, stress balls, fidget toys • Gift cards (gas, food, restaurants) • Journals • Notebooks • Gel pens • Disinfecting wipes • Keurig coffee pods • Copy paper (8.5 x 11) • Kleenex • Napkins

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The more trauma experiences and exposures a child has, the more longterm impacts there are on physical and mental health, occupational abilities and relationships. The RRCAC provides mental health services as soon as possible following the initial forensic interview to better prevent the long-term harms associated with trauma.

health therapy,” Frissell said. “There can be trauma and their assessment may allow them to not need the degree of therapy that another child might need, but every child that comes in here is going to have available to them all of these services. So they have an opportunity to disclose in a safe setting, they have a team that's looking at it from a lot of different disciplines.”

“What we see with kids is initially they're very resistant to therapy,” Schimmelpfennig said. “They're very avoidant, a symptom of PTSD is avoidance. It's hard for them to express feelings about those events. So we see a lot of avoidance initially and sometimes they can be pretty resistant to therapy at first. The best part of my job is to see those kids grow and change over the course of therapy, and really be able to be brave and confront the terrible things that have happened to them and learn and grow and build their resiliency, to the point where a lot of kids at the end of therapy don't want to be done.”

The RRCAC exclusively serves children who fall under their mission. Every child in the care of RRCAC was referred by either law enforcement or social services. “The reason the referrals are coming through law enforcement and social services in large part is that it's the only way we can be sure kids that have been put through these situations are safe,” Frissell said. “So there was a mandatory report made. This isn't just an agency open to the public to call to come in and start getting services. It's an agency that is set up specifically for those that fall under our mission.”

The goal of the mental health program is to promote evidence-based treatment for children and families. The treatments implemented by the RRCAC are backed by research and evidenced to help families heal. The RRCAC is continually working to expand the number of evidence-based therapies it can deliver as well as training the community and other providers in evidence-based therapies to broaden its supportive reach. The RRCAC’s primary goal is to maintain its current services while finding ways to reach more kids and families. The Center’s mental health program has grown significantly since it started in 2017. “We still have to rely on other community agencies to provide treatment to all these kids,” Schimmelpfennig said. “We can't provide every single child and family who comes through our center.” The mental health program is just one part of the RRCAC’s multidisciplinary team. “Not every child needs extensive mental 46 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

The Center needs the underlying foundation of the agencies that are responsible for children’s safety in the community. There is a gateway of professionals guarding the door so that every child coming into the system has a safety plan. No child ever goes through this process without the RRCAC and its multidisciplinary team making sure that they're completely safe. “90 percent or better of the kids that report the abuse to them, it's been perpetrated on them by someone that's in their inner circle. Someone they love. Someone they care about. Someone they know really well who groomed them to make them a victim,” Frissell said. “That's a very dangerous situation for a child when they begin talking about what happened to them because they're very likely to be amongst the people in their inner circle.” It’s important for the public to be able to identify warning signs of child abuse, but it is even more crucial for people to know how to respond to and report child abuse. The RRCAC is affiliated with the Stand to

Protect Campaign, which focuses on adult education surrounding child sexual abuse prevention in Cass and Clay Counties. Stand to Protect is a resource for adults to identify common abuser behaviors and learn protective action steps that empower children and prevent child sexual abuse. This resource can be accessed at standtoprotect.org. You can help the Red River Children’s Advocacy Center by educating yourself on child abuse prevention and by donating funds to the organization. The RRCAC is also looking for donations of supplies that are provided to the families they serve.

Red River Children’s Advocacy Center rrcac.org 100 4th St S #302 Fargo, ND 58103


10 STEPS TO PROTECT Stand to Protect focuses on adult education regarding child abuse prevention in Cass and Clay counties and offers 10 steps to prevent child abuse. 1. Teach many ways for children to show love and affection, and let them choose, so they have practice controlling who enters their personal safety zone. 2. Use proper anatomical terms for body parts, so children have the words to tell about unsafe or uncomfortable touches. 3. Establish specific rules about private part safety, so children begin to build personal boundaries. 4. Teach that secrets about private parts are never allowed, so this kind of secrecy is resisted and encourages disclosure. 5. Teach about physical privacy and respecting privacy, so children have protective boundaries and behaviors. 6. Caution children that adults don't need dressing, bathing and bathroom help, so children override inclinations to obey authority in these inappropriate situations. 7. Identify five trusted adults so children readily know whom to tell when they are hurt, scared or confused. 8. Teach children to keep telling adults when something feels wrong so the one person who misses a cue isn’t the last to hear a call for help. 9. Always keep close supervision to safeguard your child in situations when they are one-on-one with an adult or older child. Use supervision in your child’s relationships. 10. Ask about supervision practices in youth programs you’re considering for your child so you know that protections are in place for your child and others around them. For more information, visit standtoprotect.org


By Jack Hastings

DIAMOND IN THE RUFF

Photo by Nolan Schmidt

ANIMALS:

Fostering and rehoming abandoned animals

It's a lot of work. It's a lot of heartbreak too but once you see an animal go into their adoptive home and we get these text messages and these happy pictures sent back it's just all worth it.� - Heather Mitchell, Board of Directors, Diamond in the Ruff

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6.5 million cats and dogs enter shelters each year (down from 20+ million in 1973)

pproximately 6.5 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year. Of that 6.5 million, only 3.2 million animals are adopted annually into homes, according to The Humane Society of the United States. Many of these pet shelters are working at max capacity and are unable to accept additional animals. Animal fostering organizations like Diamond in the Ruff are working to ease that strain on pet rescues by rehoming more displaced animals into caring foster homes. Heather Mitchell serves on the board of directors for Diamond in the Ruff and is also a veterinarian at Animal Health Clinic in Fargo, so it’s a given that she loves being surrounded by animals. She is currently fostering Raina, a five-year-old dog that’s ready for fun at a moment’s notice. Raina’s owners divorced and neither owner was able to care for her. That is how Raina came to be in the care of Diamond in the Ruff, a nonprofit pet rescue dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and placement of abandoned animals into foster homes in the Fargo-Moorhead area. Diamond in the Ruff doesn’t have a brick-and-mortar facility to house the animals that come into its care. Instead, all of the rescued animals are placed directly into foster homes as they await adoption. Diamond in the Ruff has provided fostering services to 662 animals since it began operating in 2015. “[The animals] don't have anywhere else to go,” Mitchell said. “What are the alternatives? Most of the alternatives are pretty bleak. It's just one little thing we can do to help and I love animals anyway so it was just a no-brainer.” The animal rescue depends entirely on donations and a small volunteer

base of foster homes for its continued operation. In addition to providing temporary caring homes for rescued animals, Diamond in the Ruff also educates the public on proper animal care, pet diseases, the importance of spaying and neutering to combat overpopulation, animal socialization and the prevention of breed discrimination. “Fostering is really just offering a place for the animals to stay, while they're looking for their adoptive family,” Mitchell said. Fostering through Diamond in the Ruff is completely free. The rescue provides the needed food, toys, supplies and veterinary care so their volunteers only need to provide a loving home. Fostering is so important because it helps pet shelters take in more animals, which prevents the unnecessary euthanization of healthy cats and dogs. Many of the animals that come into the care of Diamond in the Ruff are a result of owner surrendering, which is when an owner is no longer able to care for their pet. This could be due to health issues the owner couldn’t handle, problematic behaviors, aggressive behaviors or the animal grew to be larger than expected among other problems. Some of the animals are pulled from area pounds as well. Diamond in the Ruff takes in cats and dogs from around the Red River Valley, sometimes even taking in animals from the BismarckMandan area, Minneapolis and Turtle Mountain Animal Rescue. The ages of these animals range from just mere weeks old to grown adults. “We're 100 percent based on donations and volunteers,” Mitchell said. “The number of animals that we can help is directly dependent on how much money we can raise and how many foster families we

4 million cats and dogs are adopted from shelters each year

Of the 3 million cats and dogs euthanized in shelters each year, approximately 2.4 million (80%) are healthy and treatable and could have been adopted into new homes Diamond in the Ruff has provided fostering services to 662 animals since it began operating in 2015

Estimated number of brick-and-mortar animal shelters in the US: 3,500

Estimated number of rescue groups and animal sanctuaries in North America: 10,000 Statistics provided by The Humane Society of the United States 51


HOW TO HELP: Register on Diamond in the Ruff's website to volunteer. What you can donate: • Money • Crates – wire or plastic, small to extra large • Collars – martingale style only, please • Leashes – nylon, leather, or canvas only, please • Gentle leaders • Front-clip harnesses • Bowls for food and water – stainless steel only, please • Buster Cubebeds or mats • Waterproof beds or mats • High-quality food – preferably grainfree/limited ingredient • High-quality treats –made in US only, please • Pill pockets • Dog toys – Kongs, Nylabones, tennis balls, frisbees, tug ropes • Dog brushes or fur removers • Dog nail trimmers • Paper towels • Dog shampoo • Thundershirts • Towels • Peanut butter • Triple antibiotic ointment • Gauze • Rubber gloves • Vet wrap • Forever stamps • Plain white envelopes • Printer paper • Gift cards for general supplies at places like Target

52 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

have available.” The rescue is always looking for foster homes for animals and donations from the community. These donations are used to supply the foster homes as well as provide medical care and training for the rescue animals. Volunteers that are experienced with pets and have the capacity to take in an animal are encouraged to foster, but there are more ways to help than just fostering. “We are always looking for volunteers,” Mitchell said. “We have something for anybody. We’re looking for cat foster homes and dog foster homes, doing the administrative aspect of rescue work is needed. Financial contributions are always helpful. Even following our social media, Instagram and Facebook, can be helpful.” Mitchell began volunteering with Diamond in the Ruff a few years ago to fulfill her desire to help the community in a greater capacity. Through Mitchell’s care and compassion toward these rescued animals, it is evident that volunteering and charity is a very big aspect of who she is. “It's a lot of work. It's a lot of heartbreak too but once you see an animal go into their adoptive home and we get these text messages and these happy pictures sent back it's just all worth it,” Mitchell said. Loki was Mitchell’s first foster pet. He was a six-month-old rambunctious puppy with endless energy who frequently jumped on the countertops. Seeing the potential in Loki, Mitchell and her family were determined to work with Loki to increase his chances of finding an adoptive family by teaching him basic obedience. After a few months, Loki became less nervous and understood better how to behave. Three different people wanted to adopt Loki but each adoption failed as Loki fell back into his hyper-excited

behavior. Mitchell recognized it as a sign that Loki belonged with her family. “We failed and kept him,” Mitchell said with a laugh. Mitchell’s family, like many others, found that their foster animal was meant to be permanent rather than temporary. Of the many benefits of fostering an animal, bringing a family together through a shared goal of wanting to see an animal succeed may be one of the most powerful. By interacting with a family, the dog or cat will likely learn more social skills and basic house manners, making them more appealing to potential adopters. Fostering can be flexible too to accommodate your lifestyle. Many pet rescues are able to work with your schedule, such as if you can only foster for a limited number of weeks or within a specific time frame. Bringing a foster pet into your home has a tremendous impact. For every pet that is fostered, a spot opens up in an animal rescue for another abandoned animal to receive care. “We can't do it alone and we have to rely on the community to help as well and we're lucky to have such a great community that's willing to promote it too,” Mitchell said. If you have the space, time and love to give to an animal, fostering is a great way to give back to the community. Diamond in the Ruff is currently looking for more foster homes and volunteers.

Diamond in the Ruff diamondpetrescue.org Diamond in the Ruff Pet Rescue @diamondintheruffrescue


VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

MEALS ON WHEELS By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan P. Schmidt 54 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Delivering hot meals and smiles to area seniors


rik Kiesz had a desire to help his community in a deeper capacity. After hearing an ad on a radio station in Sioux Falls looking for volunteers for the local Meals on Wheels program, he decided to give it a shot. That was in 2007. Now 14 years later, Kiesz is still delivering hot meals to seniors through Meals on Wheels. “I was wanting to do it and I just fell in love with it,” Kiesz said. “I love the people. I’ve met some great volunteers. This is something I definitely want to do, so I kept doing it on a weekly basis.” When a new job brought him to Fargo, he contacted Valley Senior Services, the organization that coordinates Meals on Wheels in North Dakota, to find his next route. Valley Senior Services delivers Meals on Wheels to more than 600 seniors Monday through Friday in Cass, Steele, Traill, Ransom, Sargent and Richland counties. Meals on Wheels routes typically only take one hour to complete, delivering to eight to 12 clients. Kiesz now delivers along a route in North Fargo every Friday afternoon. “One person would actually be standing holding the door open for me,” Kiesz said. “She knew I was coming. People like that have just been absolutely wonderful.”

few seconds, really makes their day,” Kiesz said. “I can definitely hear it in their tone and see it in their faces. That's impactful, to share stories and have some fun. Meals on Wheels is a big part of my life. It's totally had a huge impact on me.”

“MEALS ON WHEELS REALLY SHOWED ME THAT I CAN BE CLOSER WITH SERVING THE PUBLIC. THERE'S A NEED OUT THERE FOR DELIVERING MEALS AND THERE'S A NEED OUT THERE FOR PEOPLE TO HAVE THAT EYE-TO-EYE CONTACT AND HAVE THAT CONVERSATION.”

Services like Meals on Wheels allow seniors to maintain their independence and stay in their homes later into life. This makes Meals on Wheels an invaluable asset to the FargoMoorhead community and surrounding counties as it benefits the quality of life of our senior residents.

- ERIK KIESZ, MEALS ON WHEELS VOLUNTEER

“The big thing for me is to go out and make a difference,” Kiesz said. “That's what gets me out of bed and drives me through the day and I take that approach to everything I do. Just seeing a smile on their face when you hand them the meal, it speaks volumes in its own right. You know that you made their day.”

Meals on Wheels (701) 293-1440 valleyseniorservices.org

Although the visits are brief, the meal deliveries are a bright spot in the day for the clients as well as Kiesz. “I think just to have that eye-to-eye contact and that conversation, even though it only lasts a

One can hear the joy and the passion for serving the community in Kiesz’s own voice. Kiesz noted that many of those he delivers to don’t have family around, they’re isolated. Just saying hello can have a tremendous impact. “Meals on Wheels really showed me that I can be closer with serving the public. There's a need out there for delivering meals and there's a need out there for people to have that eye-to-eye contact and have that conversation.” There is an increased need for services like Meals on Wheels in the community with the current pandemic. Many senior citizens may want to remain in their homes and minimize trips outside, like to the grocery store, to stay safe and healthy as they are a more vulnerable demographic. Valley Senior Services has been committed to providing those housebound with hot meals and taking safety precautions, including wearing masks and gloves and sanitizing regularly, to ensure the continued health of Meals on Wheels’ clients and volunteers. “The ability to spend an hour delivering meals to these people that need it, who wouldn’t get food otherwise, always leaves me feeling really gratified,” Kiesz said. The number of meals and volunteers needed for Meals on Wheels has grown as the number of referrals to the program increases, resulting in more delivery routes. Each volunteer delivers 10 to 12 meals, which tends to take about an hour. “Just go and take that first step,” Kiesz said about volunteering with Meals on Wheels. “You will be blessed beyond blessed, and it only takes an hour. I'm sure if you can find an hour, you will want to do it again and again.”

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VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan P. Schmidt 56 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Creating positive mentoring relationships for children


iving our time and companionship can have an incredible impact on someone’s life. Such is the case with the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) of The Village program, which provides role models for youth by matching them with mentors in the community.

all different backgrounds and range in age from six to teenagers. The programming of BBBS is designed to create positive, measurable outcomes for youth, including educational success, avoidance of risky behaviors, higher aspirations, greater confidence and better relationships.

Josh Andres became involved in BBBS during college. Stemming from a desire to do something more with his time outside of his studies and in the community, Josh was referred to BBBS by a friend. Since the volunteer program only asks for a one-year commitment, Josh figured he’d give it a go.

BBBS employs a thorough matching process to bring together Bigs and Littles with similar personalities to foster a strong and natural friendship. After getting past the initial nervousness of their first meetings, the two hit it off. Since Josh and Welsere were first paired eight years ago they’ve been able to watch each other grow as individuals.

Josh was paired with Welsere eight years ago by BBBS. Welsere, then seven years old, was in second grade. They would meet every week at school, either during lunch or after school. Once Welsere passed that fifth-grade mark, he graduated into the community-based program, so the two would meet for a couple hours two to three times a month outside of school. “I found out that was easily the best part of my days, and my weeks and my years. History has shown that I've stayed much much longer than one year,” Josh said. BBBS matches Little Brothers and Little Sisters with mentors in the FargoMoorhead community to form safe, caring friendships. Littles come from

“When I was younger I used to be, like, a real bad kid,” Welsere said. “If I didn’t meet Josh I would still be that kid.” “Welsere has gone from needing a lot of support at school and not doing well to now passing classes and caring about school,” Josh said. “We talked about plans after high school and what that looks like and I'm just so proud of the growth he's made. I’ve been able to see that for so long, his ability to think about complex questions and ask real life stuff.” “Back then we just talked about my day,” Welsere said. “Now we just talk about personal things and stuff.” BBBS has positioned itself as an important resource for youth in the


Fargo-Moorhead community. It not only provides mentorship and emotional support, but also serves as a bridging tool across generations. For Josh, it’s been an incredibly rewarding experience to watch Welsere grow up and provide him with the resources to become his best self. “Our conversations have gone from typical second grade conversations, as he’s becoming an adult our conversations have changed a lot over the years too,” Josh said. “I think that’s really cool. I’m not working with a second grader for eight years, I’m working with a growing person and it's wonderful to see that growth.” The two have made many special memories together, from winning a Halloween costume contest at the Fargo Theatre to trips to Valleyfair and Detroit Lakes, and sharing a Haitian meal cooked by Welsere’s mother. Through all of these fun experiences, Josh was making an impact on his Little Brother’s life. The role of a Big Brother or Big Sister can extend past just offering support and stability to a Little, it also includes showing the Little their own potential, introducing them to new experiences and showing them the limitless possibilities available to them in the world. “This is really why I stay in the program too,” Josh said. “When you build such 58 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

“YOU'LL GET MORE OUT OF IT THAN YOU EVER ANTICIPATED. I MADE A FRIEND WITH SOMEONE THAT I HOPE I'M AT HIS GRADUATION OR IF HE GETS A FLAT TIRE I HOPE HE KNOWS HE CAN CALL ME. THIS IS A RELATIONSHIP THAT I NEVER THOUGHT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED." - JOSH ANDRES, BIG BROTHER VOLUNTEER

Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Village Family Service Center thevillagefamily.org/ content/big-brothers-bigsisters-village 1201 25th St. S. Fargo, ND 58103

a connection, I want to show him those experiences I really enjoy.” The opportunity to bring out the potential in a child is available to everyone. There are many children in the community eager for the mentorship and companionship that anyone can provide. This small investment of time can make a real and significant change in someone else’s life. “You'll get more out of it than you ever anticipated,” Josh said. “I made a friend with someone that I hope I'm at his graduation or if he gets a flat tire I hope he knows he can call me. This is a relationship that I never thought would have happened. Along the way, Big Brothers Big Sisters is such a support too.” Anyone that is over 18 years of age and interested in becoming a Big Brother or Big Sister can apply on The Village Family Service Center’s website.


VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Kristie Eid (left), Board of Directors, and Chris Wesland, Marketing Volunteer

DOWN HOME Furnishing the homes of those emerging from homelessness aving a pillow and bed of one’s own is often taken for granted, but for those emerging from homelessness who have recently secured housing, furnishing a home is another significant challenge.

By Jack Hastings Photo by Nolan P. Schmidt

According to the F-M Coalition to end homelessness, on any given night there are 1,022 individuals estimated to be experiencing homelessness in the Fargo-Moorhead metro. Of this number, there are 393 people experiencing

60 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

homelessness in shelters, 113 people going unsheltered and 516 people staying with friends or family. As of April 2020, 555 students were identified as homeless in our metro school districts. Down Home furnishes and decorates homes for families that are emerging from homelessness in the Fargo-Moorhead area. Since its beginning in December 2017, Down Home has transformed 68 empty spaces into homes for 218 men,


women and children in Fargo-Moorhead. Down Home furnishes approximately two homes a month. Prior to the founding of Down Home, there wasn’t a service filling the need to furnish homes that Down Home currently fills. Volunteers Chris Wesland and Kristie Eid are active in many facets of the organization. Wesland coordinates the marketing efforts and assists with moveins. Eid serves on the board of directors and organizes the behind the scenes efforts to fulfill the furnishings for clients. All of the furnishings Down Home gives to families are donated by the community, with the exception of mattresses which are purchased new for clients. Down Home works hard to personalize the spaces they furnish for clients by taking into consideration factors like their favorite colors. “They may have gotten a piece or two of furniture from a friend, may have a few belongings that they were able to keep in a car or items they got from wherever they may have been staying, but really have nothing except the desire to do better for themselves,” Wesland said. Wesland recently revisited one of the first families Down Home served to photograph it and was amazed to see how their space has grown. “It is amazing to see their space, and how they have flourished within it, and to see how it's just become a space that they embrace,” Wesland said. There is no doubt that the services Down Home provides have become even more valuable during the pandemic, where the home has become a necessary place of safety and sanctuary. “It amazes me how strong the universal desire to provide the best for your children no matter what your circumstances are, and that always comes through with these parents, priority is what the kids need,” Wesland said. That is where Down Home comes in. The organization’s mission isn't just to give

these families and individuals stuff, it's to give them items to help them create a secure, stable environment for their family.

“IT AMAZES ME HOW STRONG THE UNIVERSAL DESIRE TO PROVIDE THE BEST FOR YOUR CHILDREN NO MATTER WHAT YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES ARE, AND THAT ALWAYS COMES THROUGH WITH THESE PARENTS, PRIORITY IS WHAT THE KIDS NEED.” - CHRIS WESLAND, DOWN HOME VOLUNTEER

“The first time you hear the phrase, ‘I've never had my own …,’ whether it be a bed, a couch or a pillow, those are always impactful,” Eid said. Eid also detailed a recent client that left a significant impact on her. “It was a mother with two teenage children, of which I have, and to do a move with someone in very much the same shoes as me just really hit home for me that it's all types of families. The same issues my kid might have with someone teasing them is the same issues these kids have, but I can only imagine it's amplified.” A lot of teenagers that Down Home serves want bunk beds so they can have friends over for sleepovers, something that would have previously been impossible if they were living in a homeless shelter. Instances like this demonstrate how much we can take for granted. Simple things are what mean the most to these families, whether it be a bed, a couch or a kitchen table to sit around. By providing this resource, new opportunities and experiences are given to these teenagers and children and they are empowered to grow. “One of the first families that I helped with the move-in was a mom, dad and three children. The gentleman broke down crying when he touched the bed. It was just so emotional. He said, ‘I've never had a bed that's been off the floor,’” Wesland said. In addition to furnishing the homes of those recently emerging to homelessness, Down Home also conducts the Good Night’s Sleep Campaign. The campaign brings awareness to the importance of having a bed by challenging the public to sleep on the floor, something many homeless people have to do every night. Participants of the challenge quickly realize how essential a mattress is in having a comfortable and fulfilling life. Down Home also provides Christmas tree packages to their clients around the holidays and partners with Box of Balloons, which gives birthday party supplies to children in need. 61


Down Home works with community agencies such as Churches United, the Jeremiah Program and the Perry Center that refer families to its services. “We had a gentleman who had been incarcerated and then went through the F5 Program, and needed to have his space furnished and decorated so that he could have his young daughter with him,” Wesland said. “So if you have a place but you have no bed for her, he couldn't have custody. He had a job, he was able to secure housing and then needed it furnished. We were able to help him with that.”

Down Home down-home.org Fargo, ND 58102 701.532.1488

Down Home also provides the Empower Up program, which equips those emerging from homelessness with the tools to identify thoughts and behaviors that have led to negative outcomes and how to develop new thinking habits that will create positive outcomes. If you would like to donate to Down Home their current wishlist can be viewed on their website down-home.org.

After furnishing a home for a client, Down Home continues to follow up with them for a year, referring the client to agencies and people in the community that can be resources for them. “Maintaining those connections and helping boost our clients further and then helping them to pay it forward is a key part of what Down Home hopes to achieve,” Eid said. 63


WHAT GIVES? A dollar goes a long way on Giving Hearts Day. See how donations of all shapes and sizes are being utilized by non-profits in the community. Regardless of if you choose to donate $1 or $100, it will be used to help drive these charities forward.

$44

$140 to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Red River Valley covers one week for a family to stay at the House.

to the YWCA Cass Clay provides one night of shelter costs and will change the life of a woman or child.

$25 to the Fargo Public Schools Development Foundation pays for lunch for one elementary student for two weeks.

to the Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch helps provide specialized therapy that addresses a child's unique hurts and struggles.

$25

$60 to the New American Consortium for Wellness and Empowerment helps provide supplies for English classes for New Americans in our community.

$10

$100

A month to Village Family Service Center could pay for materials used in early childhood therapy.

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to CCRI pays for one individual to participate in the local adaptive.

$15 to HOPE Inc. helps pay for an hour of hockey ice time for one person with mobility challenges.

$5 to the American Federation for Suicide PreventionNorth Dakota Chapter provides a Lifesavers guide to a classroom of students

$5 to K9 Crew buys one day of dog treats needed for training so that at-risk children can learn independence and life-skills from the act of training dogs.

$15 To Farm In The Dell pays for an adaptive garden tool for their special needs employees.


$25 To PATH of North Dakota pays for a college application fee for a child in foster care.

$50 To Homeward Animal Shelter provides the wellness exam for one animal.

$100 To Presentation Partners in Housing (PPiH) pays a utility bill to keep the electricity and heat on for those transitioning out of homelessness.

$350 To North Dakota Association of the Blind pays for a week at their Adult Summer Camp, which is their primary educational program.

$26 To Friends of the Children covers the costs of activities and outings for a child for an entire month $25 To Productive Alternatives helps a person with disabilities get a ride to and from work for a week.

$50 To Zach's Foundation buys 10 travel pillows to give to kids to take to cancer treatments.

$140 To Valley Christian Counseling Center covers the costs needed to provide a place for a teen to find hope through counseling.

$200

To the American Cancer Society provides wigs for three patients in treatment.

$100 To Lakes and Prairies Community Action Partnership (CAPLP) outfits a newly employed welder, manufacturer or certified nursing assistant for their new job.

$75 To the Optometric Foundation of North Dakota ensures that one North Dakota four to five-year-old in need would receive a free comprehensive eye exam.

$150 To Hope Blooms creates 50 repurposed bouquets that will bring joy to community members.

$440 To Redemption Road Ministries provides a month’s rent to a new resident starting an addiction-free life.

$100 To CHARISM allows a child to go to one week of CHARISM programming's STEAM clubs.

$188 To Down Home provides a twin mattress for a child of a family transitioning out of homelessness.

$500 To Centre Inc.'s Veteran Programming pays for an air conditioning unit upgrade for one apartment in Veteran’s Manor.

$3750 To Dakota Children's Advocacy Center provides evidence-based trauma counseling to one child. 65


On February 11th, be counted as a

Giving H e a r t How to Get Involved Give online at GivingHeartsDay.org Write a check out to your chosen charity dated February 11, 2021. Give the Gift of Giving - Encourage others to give by gifting them a Giving Hearts Day gift card. Giving Hearts Day Gift Cards are available in any amount of $10 or more. Note that your gift will be matched up to the amount of match funds raised by each charity. You can donate to as many charities as your giving heart desires! In 2018, the average donor gave to 2.3 charities. Become a Charity Champion - Text CountMe to the number 345345 or email GHDInfo@dakmed.org to get started.

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M o r e Way s To G i v e

This year, donors will be able to preschedule their gift(s)! All you have to do is visit GivingHeartsDay.org anytime between now and February 10 and be sure to select the "Schedule This Gift" option during checkout. By doing this, the gift will be processed on Giving Hearts Day and will count towards the day's grand totals and matching initiatives. Returning this year are the Giving Hearts Day gift cards. These gift cards can be purchased in any amount of $10 and up. Gift cards are available online at GivingHeartsDay.org with options for electronic, mail or inperson pick-up. By giving someone a gift card, the recipient can make a donation to their charity of choice on Giving Hearts Day. Gifting a gift card is a great way to encourage giving to those who might not have participated in Giving Hearts Day before!

You can learn more about these charities at GivingHeartsDay.org

With projected record participation, Giving Hearts Day 2021 is sure to be a historic one. Thirty schools will be participating in giving and over 180 businesses are slated to help guide their employees to realize the joys and benefits of giving. With new ways of getting individuals, companies and schools involved, it will be exciting to see just how this day will make a huge impact on our community.

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Giving Hearts Day Charities


Gander at all the non-profits that could use your support this Giving Hearts Day! 31:8 Project 4 Luv of Dog Rescue 4-H Foundation of North Dakota A Wife Like Me Abused Adult Resource Center Adapt Music, Inc. Adult & Teen Challenge, North Dakota Alpha Opportunities Altru Family YMCA Altru Health Foundation Alzheimer's Association American Cancer Society American Diabetes Association American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) ND American Gold Gymnastics American Heroes Outdoors American Red Cross Amistad Worldwide Anne Carlsen Center AO1 Foundation Arthritis Foundation of MN Assumption Abbey Audubon Dakota Ave Maria Village Badlands Ministries Barnesville Area Community Fund Best Friends Mentoring Program Bethany Retirement Living BIO Girls Birthright FM, Inc Bis-Man Mentor Squad Bismarck Art & Galleries Association Bismarck Cancer Center Foundation Bismarck Public Schools Foundation Bismarck State College Foundation Bonanzaville USA Boy Scouts of America, Northern Lights Council Boys & Girls Club of Detroit Lakes and Perham Boys & Girls Clubs of the Red River Valley Brady Oberg Legacy Foundation Brave the Shave Bridging the Dental Gap

Camp Bentley Camp Joy Camp of the Cross Ministries Camp ReCreation CAPLP - Lakes & Prairies Community Action Partnership Care and Share of Crookston, Inc. Cassia - Fargo Elim Cathedral Elementary School Catholic Charities North Dakota Cats Cradle Shelter CCRI, Inc. Central Cass Dollars for Scholars Central Dakota Children's Choir Central Dakota Humane Society Chahinkapa Zoo Association CHI Friendship CHI Health at Home - Hospice CHI Lisbon Health Foundation Child Evangelism Fellowship of Fargo/Moorhead Christian Adoption Services Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Ministry Churches United, including Dorothy Day House, Micah's Mission Shelter, and Dorothy Day Food Pantries Circle of Friends Animal Shelter Community Ambulance Service of New Rockford Community of Care Concordia College Connect Medical Clinic Cooperstown Bible Camp Cooperstown Medical Center Foundation Cru Northern Plains Campuses Crystal Springs Camp Cullen Children’s Foundation Cultural Diversity Resources CVIC Cystic Fibrosis Association of North Dakota Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch Dakota Children's Advocacy Center Dakota Hope Clinic Dakota Zoo Dear NICU Mama Designer Genes of North Dakota, Inc. Detroit Mountain Recreation Area Devils Lake Public Schools Development Fund 69


Diamond in the Ruff Pet Rescue Down Home Ducks Unlimited North Dakota Eastern North Dakota Synod, ELCA Elks Camp Grassick Emergency Food Pantry Emerging Prairie Empire Arts Center Empowering Kids Perham Essentia Health Fargo Foundation Essentia Health St. Mary's Foundation Ethos Home Care and Hospice Eventide Living Center F5 Project Faith in Action Health Coalition Faith4Hope Scholarship Fund Family HealthCare Center Family Policy Foundation of North Dakota Family Voices of North Dakota Family Wellness Fargo Air Museum Fargo Angels Hockey Fargo Invaders Football Fargo Moorhead Community Theatre Fargo Moorhead Opera Fargo Park District Foundation Fargo Public Schools Development Foundation Fargo Youth Hockey Association Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra Farm in the Dell of the Red River Valley Farm Rescue Father's Farm Feed My Starving Children Fargo Challenge First Care Health Center First Care Medical Services Foundation FirstLink Fix It Forward Ministry, Inc F-M Coalition to End Homelessness FM Raise Your Spirits Inc FMBallet Fore UND Golf Fraser, Ltd. Freedom Resource Center for Independent Living, Inc. Friends of Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge Friends of the Children Fargo-Moorhead

Furniture Mission of the Red River Valley Furry Friends Rockin' Rescue Gateway to Science GiGi's Playhouse Fargo Girl Scouts - Dakota Horizons Gladys Ray Shelter Global Friends Coalition Global Neighbors Good Samaritan Society - Lakota Good Samaritan Society Park River Grace Lutheran School Grand Forks Foundation for Education, Inc. Grand Forks Park District Grand Forks Senior Center Great Plains Food Bank Growing Hope in Pembina County Guardian Angels Inc. Habitat for Humanity Northern Lights Haiti Eye Mission Haiti Medical Mission of Fargo-Moorhead Haley's Hope Handi-Wheels Transportation Harvest Hope Farm HC Community Care Center & Food Pantry Headwaters Animal Shelter Healing Vets Initiative Health Resources - Detroit Lakes Health Resources Center Fergus Falls Heart of Clay (Correctional Ministry of Clay County) HEART Program HeartSprings Heartview Foundation - Bismarck Heartview Foundation Cando Heavens Helpers Soup Cafe HERO Healthcare Equipment Recycling Organization Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County Holy Rosary Catholic School Home Builders Care of Fargo-Moorhead Foundation Home On The Range Homeward Animal Shelter Hope Blooms Hope Center HOPE, Inc. Hopeful Heart Project

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Hospice of the Red River Valley Humane Society of the Lakes Humanities North Dakota Immigrant Development Center Inspiration Point Christian Camp and Retreat Center Jacobson Memorial Hospital Foundation Jail Chaplains James River Senior Citizens Center, Inc. James Valley Youth For Christ Jamestown Fine Arts Association Jamestown Gymnastics Club Jamestown Regional Medical Center Jasmin Child Care and Preschool Jeremiah Program Fargo Moorhead Jessy's Toy Box Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest K9 Crew Kamp KACE Keeping the Promise Kicks Band of Fargo Moorhead Lake Agassiz Concert Band Lake Agassiz Habitat for Humanity Lake Region Healthcare Foundation Lakes Crisis & Resource Center Landon's Light Foundation LB Homes Legacy Children's Foundation Lend A Hand Up Life 97.9 - KFNW-FM Light of Christ Catholic Schools Little Red Reading Bus - West Fargo Lost and Found Recovery Center Lutheran Brethren Seminary Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota Lutheran Sunset Home Make-A-Wish North Dakota Martin Luther School Master Chorale of Fargo Moorhead Mayville State University Foundation Memory Cafe of the Red River Valley Micah Cornerstone Ministries, Inc. Mind Shift Ministry on the Margins (Benedictine Ministries) Minnesota Flyers Gymnastics Minn-Kota PAAWS Minot Area Men's Winter Refuge

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Minot Youth For Christ Missouri Slope Missouri Slope Areawide United Way Missouri Valley Family YMCA Moorhead Legacy Education Foundation Moorhead Police Athletics and Activities League Moorhead Youth Hockey MSUM Foundation National Kidney Foundation Serving the Dakotas ND FFA Foundation ND Women's Network NDAD (North Dakota Association for the Disabled) NDFB (North Dakota Farm Bureau) Foundation NDSU Bison Strides Equine Assisted and Activities NDSU School of Nursing Nelson County Health Services Foundation New American Consortium for Wellness and Empowerment New Life Center Nexus PATH Family Healing North Country Food Bank North Dakota Assistive North Dakota Association of the Blind North Dakota Autism Center, Inc. North Dakota Dental Foundation North Dakota Dollars for Scholars North Dakota Museum of Art North Dakota Open Foundation North Dakota Right to Life Educational Trust North Dakota Safety Council North Dakota State College of Science Alumni Foundation North Dakota State Fair Foundation North Dakota United Northern Plains Children's Advocacy Center Northern Plains Dance Northland Christian Counseling Center Northland Health Centers Northlands Rescue Mission Northwestern Minnesota Synod of the ELCA Northwood Deaconess Health Center


Oak Grove Lutheran School Open Door Center Optometric Foundation of North Dakota Our Redeemer's Christian School Outdoor Adventure Foundation Park Christian School Park River Bible Camp Pathways Lutheran Outdoor Ministries Pembina County Memorial Hospital Foundation Pembina Gorge Foundation / Frost Fire Park Peoples Rising Academy Perry Center Maternity Home Pink It Forward Plains Art Museum Prairie Grit Adaptive Sports Prairie Harvest Mental Health Prairie Learning Center Foundation Prairie Public Pray for Gray Prescription Assistance Program Presentation Partners In Housing (PPiH) Project HART Project Ignite Light Pulse Rape and Abuse Crisis Center of FargoMoorhead Rebuilding Together Fargo-Moorhead Area Red River Children's Advocacy Center Red River Dance & Performing Company Red River Human Services Foundation Red River Valley Community Action Red River Valley Dental Access Project Red River Valley Fair Foundation Red River Valley Habitat for Humanity Red River Valley Veterans Concert Band Red River Youth for Christ Red River Zoo Red Willow Ministries Redemption Road Richland-Wilkin Kinship Youth Mentoring Riverside Christian School RiverView Health Foundation Ronald McDonald House Charities of Bismarck Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Red River Valley

Rural Cass County Emergency Food Pantry Rural Enrichment and Counseling Headquarters, Inc. REACH Sacred Heart Benedictine Foundation Sacred Heart Foundation Safe Alternatives for Abused Families Sanford Health Foundation Hillsboro Sanford Roger Maris Cancer Center Scottish Rite Speech and Language Center for Children Scripture Circles SENDCAA Service Dogs for America ShareHouse Shiloh Christian School Souris Valley Animal Shelter Southeast Senior Services Special Olympics North Dakota St. Alphonsus Catholic School St. Ann's Indian Mission St. Benedict's Health Center St. Bernard's School St. Gerard's Community of Care St. Gianna's Maternity Home St. John Christian Preschool St. John Paul II Catholic Schools St. John's Academy - St. James Basilica St. Joseph Catholic School Devils Lake St. Joseph's School - Moorhead St. Joseph's Social Care and Thrift Store St. Mary's Catholic School St. Michael's School, Mahnomen St. Paul's Newman Center St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center Stand to Protect Sunrise Foundation The ALS Association MN/ND/SD Chapter The Arc of Cass County The Banquet The GOD’S CHILD Project The Longspur Prairie Fund The Lotus Center, INC. The Salvation Army Bismarck-Mandan The Salvation Army Fargo The Salvation Army Grand Forks The Salvation Army Jamestown The Salvation Army Minot The Salvation Army Williston

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The Summer Performing Arts Company (SPA) The Village Family Service Center The Women's Fund Theatre B Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation Third Street Clinic TNT Kid's Fitness Tobacco Free North Dakota Tracy's Sanctuary House Tricity United Soccer Club Trollwood Performing Arts School Turtle Mountain Animal Rescue UC Hope uCodeGirl UND Alumni Association & Foundation United Way of Crookston United Way of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks & Area Unity Medical Center Foundation University of Jamestown University of Mary Unseen Upper Missouri Ministries Valley Christian Counseling Center Valley City State University Foundation Valley Lake Boy's Home, Inc. Valley Senior Living Valley Senior Services Veterans Honor Flight of ND/MN Victory Christian School Villa St. Vincent/The SUMMIT Vocational Training Center Welcome House, Inc. Wellspring for the World West Fargo Educational Foundation West Fargo Events West River Health Services Foundation Williston Basin Youth for Christ Williston Trinity Christian School Women's Care Center Women's Pregnancy Center YMCA of Cass and Clay Counties Youthworks YWCA Cass Clay YWCA Minot Zach's Foundation

DMF Funds DMF - 3 BOYS Fund DMF - Al and Sharon Carlson Family Fund DMF - All Children Embraced (ACE) Endowment Fund DMF - Allan & Judy Dragseth Family Fund DMF - Ben's Helping Hand Fund DMF - Benton's Hope Fund DMF - Care Seats Fund DMF - Casselton Community Medical Foundation Fund DMF - Christine Butler Mullen Endowment Fund for Children DMF - Crosses for Cameron Fund DMF - Doug and Sally Larsen Family Fund DMF - Doug Anderson Family Fund DMF - Doug Burgum Family Fund DMF - Dr. David and Janice Glatt Family Fund DMF - Dr. Fadel and Heidi Nammour Family Fund DMF - Dr. Kevin and Jean Melicher Family Fund DMF - Dr. Lance and Ruth Bergstrom Family Fund DMF - Dr. Walter and Renee Johnson Family Fund DMF - Drs. Hope Yongsmith and Christian Albano Family Fund DMF - Duchsherer Endowment Fund DMF - E and S Fund DMF - G.R.O.M.: Giving Real Opportunities to the Mobility-Challenged Endowment Fund DMF - Garrity Family Fund DMF - God's Work Endowment Fund DMF - Goldmark Fund DMF - Hauge Memorial Fund DMF - Haugen-Thorne Family Endowment Fund DMF - Healthy Living Bike Fund DMF - Heat Transfer Warehouse Healthy Community Fund DMF - Henrik's Heroes Fund DMF - Jeromy Brown Family Fund DMF - Jim Holdman Impact Institute Fund DMF - John and Rosemary Tucker

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Charitable Gifts Fund DMF - Justin's Break the Silence Fund DMF - Katherine Kilbourne Burgum Fund DMF - Kevin and Courtney Ritterman Family Fund DMF - Kid's Health Fund DMF - Larry and Julie Leitner Family Fund DMF - Lenertz Family Health Fund DMF - Live Like Rach Fund DMF - M. Donald Larsen Family Fund DMF - Mack V. Traynor, MD Endowment Fund DMF - Mark E. and Trish Paulson Family Fund DMF - Marv Bossart Foundation for Parkinson's Support Fund DMF - Matto Foundation Fund DMF - Michael and Charleen Solberg Family Fund DMF - Mike & Peggy Bullinger Family Endowment Fund DMF - Mike and Patty Evans Family Fund DMF - Mission Physician Fund DMF - Norberg Family Fund DMF - North Dakota Academy of Family Physicians Foundation Endowment Fund DMF - Novak Family Fund DMF - Oral Health Endowment Fund DMF - Pam Solseng Ovarian Cancer Endowment Fund DMF - Paul Finstad Legacy Endowment Fund DMF - Phil and Dianna Hansen Family Fund DMF - Recovery Reinvented Fund DMF - Rick and Tracy Berg Family Fund DMF - Rob & Leanne Jordahl Family Giving Fund DMF - Robert and JoAnn Vollrath Family Fund DMF - Robert G. Rogers, MD Scholarship Endowment Fund DMF - Robert M. Arusell and Janelle C. Sanda Fund DMF - Rod & Diane Jordahl Community Benefit Fund DMF - Rust Sales, Inc. Charitable Endowment Fund DMF - Shine On Fund

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DMF - Sinner Bresnahan Healthy Kids Initiative Fund DMF - Solberg Family Donor Advised Fund DMF - Soul Solutions Recovery Center Fund DMF - Sr. Mary Louise Jundt OSF Legacy Fund DMF - Strive Fund DMF - Susan Mathison MD / Catalyst Cares Fund DMF - Swanson Health Products Healthy Community Fund DMF - Trinity Lutheran Church Preschool Donor Advised Fund DMF - Vision Initiative Endowment Fund DMF - Whitney Endowment Fund Impact Funds Impact - altures Endowment Fund Impact - Badges of Unity Fund - Fargo Police Department Impact – Cando Connection Fund Impact - Charles and Carol Iten Family Endowment Fund Impact - Clubs Fore Kids Fund Impact - Community Improvement Fund Impact - Dakota Business Lending Fund Impact - Excite Music Fund Impact - Fill the Dome Fund Impact - Financial Literacy Initiative Fund Impact – Par 4 Youth Golf Fund Impact - Philanthropy and Youth Fund Impact - POWER Fund Impact - Red River Market Fund Impact - Rodger Johnson FundImpact – Sandhills Archery Club Fund Impact - She Overcomes. Fund Impact - Spirit of Fargo Fund Impact - Support Our Veterans (SOV) Fund Impact - Tech4Kids Impact - The Next Step ND Impact - Water Works Impact - Women's Impact Fund List updated 12.1.20. This list is subject to change.


MEET THE

Wildflower And Co. A

s part of our giving back focus this month we couldn’t wait to interview Sarah of Wildflower & Co. who we met this year! Her unique business empowers women in need and we are totally obsessed with the apparel designs she creates to pair with the organizations she works with.

Tell us about yourself: My name is Sarah Connell, I am originally from Alexandria, MN, and currently live in Fargo, ND. I moved to Moorhead in 2013 to study psychology at Minnesota State University Moorhead. I went on to get my master’s degree in clinical mental health Counseling and have been working as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor ever since. I spend most of my free time at local coffee shops, creating for Wildflower & Co., spending time with friends and obsessing over my French Bulldog, Ruby. Describe what you create under Wildflower & Co.: We make a variety of handmade goods at Wildflower & Co., including our embroidered tees, sweatshirts and long sleeves. We also carry enamel pins, stickers, engraved necklaces and handpainted signs.

By Ashley Morken, Unglued

78 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

How did you start your creative business?

I started Wildflower & Co. the summer of 2020 out of pure necessity. Through COVID-19 and being a full-time mental health counselor, I needed an outlet and somewhere to focus my creative passions. Starting my own business was something I always wanted to do, so jumping into it wasn’t all that surprising. Embroidery is something I’ve loved doing, and it didn’t appear to be something already done like this in the area. I knew I wanted a strong presence with my company, having a focus on things that matter to me such as mental health and women empowerment. Tell us more about the give back aspect of it? Every purchase at Wildflower & Co. helps to empower women in our community. A portion of each sale goes into a scholarship fund to help women achieve and reach their educational goals. Each month I also pair up with an organization in the community to give back. I create a shirt design related


to the organization, and a portion of the sales for that shirt go directly to supporting their mission. It has been so fun learning about different resources we have right in our area, and sharing that on our Wildflower platform! Some organizations we have worked with so far include The Jeremiah Program, Hope Blooms, The Hopeful Heart Project and Abused Persons Outreach Center. Your personal favorite product you've created so far? My personal favorite product is 'A Peony for Your Thoughts' Crewneck. I love the classic embroidery feel with a modern twist, and who doesn’t love a comfy and soft crewneck? With your full-time work and also running your business what advice would you give to someone wanting to try doing both? My advice to anyone wanting to add a creative business on top of a full-time job is to not be afraid of jumping into it! I thought to myself, I would

rather think back and say, “Wow that was crazy, I can’t believe I did that” than think back and have regrets about not trying. Having a self-care plan is also very important. Burnout can happen to anyone in any profession, and turning your creative passion into a business doesn’t mean it’s going to be fun all the time! Finding new coping skills, and outlets for yourself is just as important. Have a plan and stick to it when it comes to your own mental health. Make time for yourself, and the things that make you truly happy. I have to remind myself often that it’s okay to be doing nothing, and that things won’t fall apart if I take a night off to myself. Know yourself, know what you can handle, and absolutely don’t hesitate to ask for help if needed. What is your favorite thing about having your own business? My favorite part about owning my own business is the freedom to do and share

the things I love. I can share my thoughts, my passions, my creativity and my experiences through my business, and be open about the important things, like mental health and women empowerment. What is a word that best describes you? One word that I think best describes me is resilient. Resiliency is important to have in my work and my personal life. Life can be difficult, and downright suck sometimes (thanks 2020!), but having a resilient mind to process your feelings and continue forward is something I strive to do at all times. What advice would you have given yourself 10 years ago? Looking back ten years ago, I was 16 and in high school. I remember being confused and stressed about what to go to college for, and deciding the rest of my life. My advice would be that one decision does not define what you will do for the rest of your life. I have changed paths many times to lead me to where I am today. I wouldn’t be the

same person if I hadn’t taken a few wrong turns and changed my mind a couple of dozen times. Do what makes you happy, and don’t be afraid if it’s not the easy option. Where can people find your work? People can find our work at our website wildflowerandco.org or at Unglued in downtown Fargo! We hope to be at events and popups soon! How can our community support you - especially in this time? I would like to ask for the community's help in finding more organizations to support! Any organizations that are either women run, support women or are mental health-focused we would love to help! If you know of any organizations you think we should work with, send us an email or reach out to us on social media! How can people connect with you? Our website, wildflowerandco.org Also find us on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok at Wildflowerandco.design

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HEALTH & WELLNESS SPOTLIGHT

Being A Giving Heart Helps You Live Well, And Maybe Longer

BY Dr. Sue Mathison Catalyst Medical Center and Clinical Spa Founder PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen 80 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

orth Dakota's longest-living citizen, Iris Westman, age 115 years, passed away recently. Reading her story, you can tell she lived a life of service. She was a UND graduate, taught school all over North Dakota and Minnesota and later earned another degree to become a librarian. She had no children of her own but was close to her nieces and nephews, and their offspring, gifting savings bonds along with college encouragement. I’ll venture to say that her giving spirit had something to do with her longevity.

Science reveals that generous behaviors, from formal volunteering and monetary donations to random acts of everyday kindness, promote well-being and longevity. Studies show, for instance, that volunteering correlates with a 24 percent lower risk of early death – about the same as eating six or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day, according to some studies. What’s more, volunteers have a lower risk of high blood glucose and a lower risk of the inflammation levels connected to heart disease. They also spend 38 percent fewer nights in hospitals than people who shy from involvement in charities. You might wonder if healthier people are able to volunteer more or, perhaps, work more so that they have the finances to give more. But even when scientists control for differences


Dr. Sue Mathison is the founder of Catalyst Medical Center and Clinical Spa. She is a Stanford educated, triple-board certified physician who has received numerous accolades for leadership and Top Doctor for her clinical skills. Dedicated to the community, she is involved in the Dakota Medical Foundation, TedXFargo, The Choice Financial Board and more!

in health, generosity still seems to add bonus years of living. A study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics followed a group of high school students in an urban Canadian city. Half volunteered weekly to tutor elementary school children for two months, while the other half was put on a waitlist for the same activity. Both groups had check-ups and blood tests. Compared to those on the waitlist, highschoolers who actively tutored the younger kids had lower levels of cholesterol, as well as lower inflammatory markers such as interleukin 6 in their blood, which plays a role in cardiovascular health and the immune response to viruses. Even a random act of kindness, such as buying coffee for a stranger, can result in a measurable reduction in inflammatory blood markers. Imagine if you were treating them to a Dairy Queen Blizzard! One of the best holiday stories happened in Brainerd, Minn., on December 8 and 9, 2020, when 900 cars passed the drive-through window and paid for the order of the car behind them. This happened over two and a half days. Transactions totaled over $10,000. Studies also show that donating blood seems to hurt less than having your blood drawn for a medical test, even though the needle may be twice as big when you donate. Stories of kindness abound despite the stress of the

pandemic. Millions of homemade masks were shared. Hundreds of teddy bears and thousands of hearts filled windows to cheer children and parades became an innovative way of celebrating birthdays and graduations. Steaming hot pans of lasagna were made and delivered all over the country, including Fargo, through a group called LasagnaLove.com. My family and I signed up and included Christmas gifts for the family we served. We can’t wait to deliver several pans soon to our local fire stations. The dishes may be high in calories, but maybe some of that is wiped out by the caring that created it. My favorite holiday is Giving Hearts Day, February 11, 2021. Businesses, schools and individuals get to choose charities to love with time, talents, treasure and voice. In doing so, they foster health and well-being. I get teared up thinking back to the first GHD in 2009, bringing my son Grant, just a few months old in his car seat. He’s been part of it ever since and is an ambassador at his school. He loves the red balloons and the joy and learning about all the creative ways that people show love and care. Live well, live long and live generously. Love,

Dr.Sue


THINK GLOBAL, ACT LOCAL

‘Home’

AS AN EVER-CHANGING CONCEPT Umwaka Mushya Muhire w'amata n'ubuki (Happy New Year wishes in kinyaRwanda) I hope this year 2021 will be positive a reflection of all the lessons learned in 2020! It is said to feel smart or to expand your world views it is vital to surround yourself with smarter people, this is why when I was thinking of who to connect with for this month: it became evident that Lady Zeina Abouelazm was the ideal person to kick us off for 2021. It is my distinct pleasure and honor to introduce Lady Zeina Abouelazm, an Egyptian national gracing us with her presence and shaping the Red River Valley with her many talents. She spent her life moving between countries until she settled in Fargo in 2017 to attend NDSU. Zeina is a senior with a dual degree in emergency anagement and management communication, Zeina enjoys volunteering, jogging, travelling and staying active in the community and is currently a Red Cross Disaster Caseworker. Her time in Saudi Arabia and her early exposure to traveling grew her interest in different cultures. Her love for journeying and curiosity about the international system drives her desire to earn a master’s degree in international development and pursue a career in humanitarian affairs. 82 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

The Valley is fortunate to have her call here home away from her beautiful ancestral home on the shores of the legendary Nile river. I wish you a great start for 2021! Keep smiling at life! - Cyusa

Where do you call home? What is your journey of growth and lessons learned in the F-M area? Growing up, I experienced living in UAE (1 year), Egypt (9 years), Saudi Arabia (8 years) and America (4 years) in the listed order. ‘Home’ has always been an ever-changing concept for me but Cairo, Egypt, is where my family is and therefore where my heart will always be. When people ask me why I chose NDSU for university, I truly have no answer besides ‘it chose me, and I am thankful for that.’ I am known for getting in trouble because of impulsive decisions and accepting my admission to NDSU is by far the most impulsive, yet best decision, I ever made. Adapting to a new world region, culture and weather was not an easy journey; however, it has been a character-changing and confidence-boosting one and continues to be every day. Through living in the F-M area, I made friends that became a second family, experiences that will forever make me grateful, learned how to function in a kitchen alone without burning the place down and started a professional path in the humanitarian affairs field which I absolutely love and hope to help people all around the world with.


The story of your passion for traveling People often remember their ‘first flight,’ but that is not the case for me. My mom sat me on her lap two months after I was born as we headed toward Dubai, and it never stopped ever since. I was raised in a family that had an outstanding passion for travel and made sure that my brother and I got to experience the world with them. Over time, I started setting my own destinations, planning trips and saving money to make them happen. I have traveled to 13 countries and no matter where I go, I leave the place with lessons learned, appreciation for god’s creation, friendships and excitement for my next journey. So far, Jinja, Uganda, is my favorite destination, with its incomparably kind people, rich nature, history and culture. My trip to Uganda made it clear that Africa has the most to offer; the world just needs to look there. Once COVID’s days are in history, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania are my top three destinations.

Why should people care about things outside the Midwest world? What is the importance of interconnectedness between worlds? Living in the F-M area meant that I was often the only person of color, international student, Muslim and bilingual person in the room. This lack of representation drew my attention to what the typical Midwest community is missing out on: knowledge about the outside world. Being a global community is not only having people of different backgrounds in a room, but truly learning from them. The F-M area is an environmentally and economically rich one, which means that interconnectedness between worlds is inevitable. People should invest time in learning more about what is happening outside of the Midwest to advance their growth and to learn how to adapt to, respect and serve our ever-changing, beautiful and diverse world. Read a book written by a foreign author, talk to someone who recently

moved here or open a global news channel and I guarantee you will discover something new about the world and yourself every time you do that.

What are some misconceptions or clichés of the MENA region? The Middle East and North African (MENA) region has endless overlapping religions, cultures and ethnicities which makes it so hard to put such a dynamic into words. Unfortunately, the media often chooses to sum it all up with the biggest misconception of being a terrorism-filled desert and freedom-suppressing area for women and non-Muslims, which is nowhere close to reality. There are instances of wars, terrorism and other social injustices that we continue to fight daily, but these are present everywhere you go in the world. While some countries are harder to live in as a woman or a religious minority, most of the MENA region is extremely advanced, respects personal freedom and is home to some of the most beautiful green mountains, beaches and natural sceneries.

are surrounded with. It can be as simple as a shared favorite sport, food, career aspiration, etc. Finding a common point helps people humanize each other, and slowly learn how to accept differences because in the end we are all living in one interconnected world.

What is your vision 2030? Where will you be and why? Ten years ago, if someone told me that I would be leaving the Middle East and going to North Dakota out of all states for university, I would have said they are crazy. I have learned to accept that unexpected things often happen for the best. I am not sure where exactly in the world I will be in ten years or what I will be doing, but my hope is that I will be somewhere closer to home working with an international NGO, traveling in my free time with family and loved ones and, as cheesy as this sounds, helping make the world a better place every day.

What did you learn growing up between many cultures that you can apply in Fargo? Many people tend to focus on disparities when looking for common factors is what we really need for a more empathetic and caring community. Growing up between multiple countries and cultures taught me that no matter how different a person is on the outside; you can always find something in common, which helps you overcome the endless stereotypes and misjudgments we 83


RGSETH BROS E B Y B U O Y O BROUGHT T ew Year's to break your N are afraid shing brew but staying true to In need of a refre enjoy while also to s er be 11 e ar e er Resolution? H seth Bros. s courtest o Berg your 2021 goal

ho doesn't love a good beer in the dead of winter? Everyone, right? While January is the time of year where we all choose to make resolutions and set goals for the new year, that can often come at the expense of our favorite brews. However, what if there was a way to stay true to your New Year's Resolution while also enjoying an adult beverage. Seems a little oxymoronic, no? Thanks to the folks at Bergseth Bros, these low-calorie options will be found at your favorite liquor store or establishment. These beers do not skimp on flavor either. While they hold a low caloric and carb mark, they are as flavorful as your favorite craft beer. 84 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM


Summit Brewing Co. Triumphant Session IPA ABV: 4% Calories: 95 Carbs: 3.5g Flavor Notes: Citrus, clean and hoppy. Dogfish Head Slightly Mighty Lo-Cal IPA ABV: 4.0% IBU: 30 Calories: 95 Carbs: 3.6g Flavor Notes: Fruity, aromatic and balanced. Grain Belt Elite Super Premium Light Lager ABV: 4.2% Calories: 94 Carbs: 2.8g Flavor Notes: Light, balanced and crisp. Blue Moon Light Sky Citrus Wheat ABV: 4.0% IBU: 10 Calories: 95 Flavor Notes: Citrus, light and easy to drink. Bell’s Brewery Light Hearted Lo-Cal IPA ABV: 3.7% Calories: 110 Carbs: 8.7g Flavor Notes: Citrus, pine and balanced. Lagunitas Brewing Co. DayTime Session IPA ABV: 4.0% IBU: 31 Calories: 98 Carbs: 3g Flavor Notes: Light, crisp and hoppy Other Low-Calorie Beers To Try: Odell Brewing Co. Good Behavior Crushable ABV: 4.0% IBU: 48 Calories: 110 Flavor Notes: Citrus, light and crisp 85


Lagunitas Brewing Co. Hoppy Refresher Zero Alcohol Zero Calories Zero Carbs Flavor notes: Sparkling, lime and hoppy.

Dogfish Head Brewery Lemon Quest Non-Alcoholic Wheat Beer 0.5% Alcohol content Calories: 96 Carbs: 20g Flavor notes: Fruity, wheat and balanced.

Heineken 0.0 Non-Alcoholic Beer Calories: 69 Carbs: 16g Flavor notes: Balanced, malty and fruity.

Coors Edge Non-Alcoholic Beer Calories: 41 Carbs: 8g <0.5% Alcohol content Flavor notes: Malty, balanced and simple.

different take on low-calorie adult beverages are nonalcoholic beers. While the common assumption is that these beers have little to no flavor, Bergseth Bros is changing that misnomer. Each of the following non-alcoholic beers is revolutionizing the way we enjoy a drink. Drink these and you won't even realize there is zero alcohol.

86 | JANUARY 2021 | FARGOMONTHLY.COM

Lagunitas Brewing Co. IPNA 0.5% Alcohol content Flavor notes: Hoppy, citrus and easy to drink. Other Non-Alcoholic Beers To Try: Samuel Adams Brewery Just the Haze Non-Alcoholic Hazy IPA Guinness Draught 0.0 Alcohol-Free Stout


CHECK OUT OUR GUIDE TO LOCAL DRINK SPECIALS! FOR A MORE IN-DEPTH LISTING, VISIT FARGOMONTHLY.COM

FARGO

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46 North Pints & Provisions 635 2nd Ave N, Fargo

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

$2.50 Wells, Calls, and Premium Drinks, Domestic Bottles, $3 22oz Tall Domestic Beer, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. All Day Everyday: $3 Jack Fire Shots, $3.25 Jag Shots, $5.25 Local Craft Beers. Wednesday’s $5 Trash Cans

Alibi Lounge and Casino 1340 21st Ave S, Fargo

$2.50 wells/calls/ domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$2.50 wells/calls/ domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$2.50 wells/calls/ domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$2.50 wells/calls/ domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$2.50 wells/calls/ domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$2.50 wells/calls/ domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$2.50 wells/calls/domestic bottles $3 22oz domestic and $3 Jack Fire. $3 22oz Select Craft Beers

$3.75 Jack Daniel's, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$3.25 import & craft bottles, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$2.75 Windsor, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$2.95 Captain Morgan, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

$3.50 Crown Royal/ Crown Apple, $2.95 Bloody Marys and Caesars until noon

$3.25 Stoli, Happy Hour 4-8pm: 50¢ off everything

4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

10 p.m.-Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

10 p.m.-Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.Midnight: 50% off all drinks & apps.

Closed.

Closed.

Closed.

Closed.

2-4-1s 5 p.m.-2 a.m.

2-4-1s 5 p.m.-2 a.m.

Any Monday of your birthday month: receive a free 40oz. bucket of booze, 8-11pm: $2 domestic bottles for everyone

8-11pm: $2 tall taps, wells & teas

50¢ taps, $1 Captain Morgan and teas 8pmmidnight

2-for-1 domestic bottles, Jack & Jack Honey 8pm-midnight

7-9pm: $7 all you can drink, 9-11pm: $2.50 tall taps, teas, Morgans & bomb shots

7-9pm: 79¢ teas, 9-11pm: $2.50 tall taps, teas, Morgans & bomb shots

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

$3 Captain Morgan, Bacardi, Chuck Norris & Ninja Turtle Shots, $3.50 Tito’s Vodka, $4 Jack Daniel's and Crown Royal

Pull Tab Happy Hour 4-7pm, Patron shots $3.50 all day

Happy Hour 4-7pm, $3.00 domestic pounders from 9 to 11pm. Ice Hole shots $3.50 all day

Happy Hour 4-7pm: drinks as low as 50¢, pull tab Happy Hour replay 9-11pm. Goldschlager shots $3.50 all day

Happy Hour 4-7pm, Captain Morgan at $3.00 from 9-11pm. Jagermeister shots $3.50 all day

Happy Hour 4-7pm, Windsor at $3.00 from 9-11pm. Romana Sambuca shots $3.50 all day

Happy Hour 4-7pm, Tito's Vodka $3.50 from 9-11pm. Jose Cuervo shots $3.50 all day

Happy Hour 4-7pm, $6.00 pitchers from 9-11pm. Rumpleminze shots $3.50 all day. Service Industry Sunday

Bulldog Tap 4265 45th St. S, Fargo

$3.50 tall domestic taps 6pm-close

$2.75 domestic bottles 8pm-midnight

$3.50 UV and Bacardi 8pm-midnight

$3.25 Captain Morgan, $3.75 Crown Royal 8pm-midnight

$3.75 Stoli and Jack Daniels 8pm-midnight

$3.50 Smirnoff and Windsor 8pm-midnight

$3.50 tall domestic taps and import bottles all day

Chub’s Pub & Package Place 421 University Drive N, Fargo

Ladies Night: 7-10 p.m., ½ Priced Mixed Drinks, Chub’s Mugs: $5.95 New Mug, $3.95 Refills 7 p.m.-Close

Game Night, $1.00 Off Taps & Wells (Including Craft Beers), Free Pool & Darts 8 p.m.-Close

Chub’s Mugs Wednesday: $5.95 New Mug, $3.95 Refills, $1 Off Shots 8 p.m.-Close

Busch Light Tap Night, $1 Off Ice Hole & Fireball 8 p.m.-Close

Beer & A Bump Night, Beer and an Ice Hole for $7.00, $3.95 Chub’s Long Island Teas, $3.95 Stumplifers 8 p.m.-Close

$1 off Bloody Mary’s & Caesars, 8 a.m.-Noon, $1 off Crown Royal, Tito’s & Craft Taps 8 p.m.-Close

Sunday Funday: $1.00 Off All Drinks In Your Chub’s Gear 12 p.m.-Close

The Bismarck Tavern

522 Broadway N, Fargo The Boiler Room 210 Broadway N, Fargo * This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

Bomb Shelter 325 10th St. N, Fargo Borrowed Buck’s Roadhouse 1201 Westrac Drive, Fargo The Bowler 2630 University Drive S, Fargo The Box 1025 38th St. SW, Fargo (Inside the Fargo Inn & Suites)


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Cork ‘N Cleaver 3301 S University Dr, Fargo

2-4-1 bottles of house wine; Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

2-4-1 glasses of our featured wine; Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

½ price long island teas; Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

Wine Club - $15/year, every Wednesday at 5:30pm; Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

Weekly Patio Specials; Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

2-4-1 bottles of house wine; Happy hours 4-6pm, 9-11pm: $1 off Tap beers, well drinks, glasses of house wine

Cowboy Jack's 506 Broadway N, Fargo

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. & 10 p.m.-Midnight

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. & 10 p.m.-Midnight

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. & 10 p.m.-Midnight

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. & 10 p.m.-Midnight

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. $3 Grape Apes, Chuck Norris & Sprees 10 p.m.-Midnight

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. $3 Grape Apes, Chuck Norris & Sprees 10 p.m.-Midnight

$2 Taps, Bottles & Well Drinks from 3-6 p.m. & 10 p.m.-Midnight

Dempsey’s 226 Broadway N, Fargo

$3.50 Bacardi, Malibu and Morgan starting at 9pm

$2.50 domestic taps and well drinks starting at 9pm

Old School Night starting at 9pm: $3 Old Style, High Life and Hamms

$4 specialty or import bottled/tap beer starting at 9pm

$3.50 Old Style and $5.25 Jameson starting at 9pm

$3.50 Old Style and $5.25 Jameson starting at 9pm

Happy Hour prices 4-7pm, employee prices for all 7pm-close

D’Woods Lounge 3333 13th Ave. S, Fargo

$2.75 domestic bottles, $3 Bacardi

$2.75 domestic bottles, $1 off Martinis

$3.50 Stoli and domestic taps

$3.50 Crown Royal and taps

$3.75 teas, $3 Windsor

$3 Smirnoff and Captain Morgan

½ off all bottles of wine 4-11pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$2 off Beer flights 3-9 pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$2 off Crafted cocktails 3-9pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$3 off wine flights 3-9pm, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off all tap and bottled beer, cocktails and wine by the glass

$1 off Bloody Marys, Mimosas and Screwdrivers noon5pm

$1 off Bloody Marys, Mimosas and Screwdrivers noon-5pm

Drumconrath Brewing 630 1st Ave N, Ste 6

$1 off pints 4-6 p.m.

$1 off pints 4-6 p.m

$1 off pints 4-6 p.m

$1 off pints 4-6 p.m

$1 off pints 4-6 p.m

Empire 424 Broadway N, Fargo

Crown Royal $3.75

Bacardi $3.25, Tito’s $3.50

Windsor $3.25

$3.75 Jameson

Stoli $3.75, Jack $4.25

Imports $3.75, Captain Morgan $3.50

$2.75 Rail vodka, $3.25 Windsor

$4 pints 4-6pm

$4 pints 4-6pm

$4 pints 4-6pm

$4 pints 4-6pm

Fort Noks Bar of Gold 52 Broadway N, Fargo

Happy Hour 4-7pm: $1 off all Taps, Wells & Domestic Bottles. Bucket of Beers $15 (Any 5 Beers). $4.50 Long Islands & Margaritas

Happy Hour 4-7pm: $1 off all Taps, Wells & Domestic Bottles. $3.50 Tap Beers all day (Pint glasses)

Happy Hour 4-7pm: $1 off all Taps, Wells & Domestic Bottles. $3 Select Whiskeys and $3 Import and Domestic Microbrew bottles all day. ½ price bottles of wine

Happy Hour All Day ($1 off all Taps, Wells, and Domestic Bottled Beer). 3 for 1’s from 7-10pm Domestic Taps and Well Drinks (made in plastic cups)

Happy Hour 4-7pm: $1 off all Taps, Wells & Domestic Bottles. $3.50 Stoli Flavors (adding some juices and energy drinks is an up charge). $3.50 Icehole Flavors and Fireball shots. $2 Well Drinks & Domestic Bottles (8-10pm)

$4 Bloody Mary’s and Caesar’s (2-6pm). $3.50 Chuck Norris & Jag Bomb Shots. $3.50 Select Rums (Morgan, Bacardi Flavors, Don Q, Sailor Jerry and Malibu). $2 Well Drinks & Domestic Bottles (8-10pm)

All Specials from the week apply (excludes $2 wells and Domestics)

Frank’s Lounge 2640 52nd Ave. S, Fargo

½ price burgers with purchase of a beverage. Service Industry Night: $1 off all drinks

½ price wine

$4.50 Tito Pours

$1 off bottle or can beer. $4 flavored teas

$4.50 Crown Royal and Grey Goose Pours

11am-4pm: Bloody Mary and mimosa bar

11am-4pm: Bloody Mary and mimosa bar. ½ price taps all day

Front Street Taproom

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off pints & snacks - 7-close Service Industry $1 off all Pints

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off pints & snacks 7-close $1 off all snacks

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off pints & snacks 7-close $2 Grain Belt Pounders

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off pints & snacks - 7-close $10 Select Pitchers

Happy Hour 2pm-6 p.m.: $1 off pints & snacks

Golf Addiction 4474 23rd Ave. S, Fargo

Two-for-One’s on Taps and $1 Off Captain Morgan

$2.50 Domestic Bottles and $1 Off Tin Cup Whiskey

½ Off Wine and $3.50 Wells

$1 Off Tall Taps and $1 Off Titos

$8 Domestic Pitchers and $10 Premium Pitchers

Granite City 1636 42nd St. S, Fargo

$5 cocktails 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails and $6.75 growler fills and $7.50 pitchers 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails and $6.75 growler fills and $7.50 pitchers from 3-6pm and 9pm-close

$5 cocktails 3-6pm and 9pm-close

All Day Happy Hour $1 off Drinks & $2 off Appetizers

7-Close: $3 Bud & Bud Light Pints

7-Close: Mug Night. $5.75 first fill $3.75 domestic refills. First fill free on the week of your birthday

7-Close: $3.50 Long Island Teas & $3 Well Drinks

Happy Hour 3-5

Doolittles Woodfire Grill 2112 25th St. S, Fargo

Fargo Brewing Company 610 University Drive N, Fargo

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

614 Main Ave., Fargo

Herd and Horns 1414 12th Ave. N, Fargo

2-4-1 Schell’s Beer

$1 Off Tall Taps

$12 Domestic Buckets and $4.50 Bloody Mary’s & Caesars

Bottomless Mimosas noon5pm for $7.99

$3 Mimosas, $4 Bison Bombs, $5.50 Green Tea Cocktails

$11 for 5 Pounders. Add $2 more for premium


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Holiday Inn 3803 13th Ave S, Fargo

Happy Hour all day $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $4 crown all day, every day!

Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $4 crown all day, every day!

Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $1 off Prood Distillers & Far North spirits cocktails. $4 crown all day

Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $2 off Tall Taps, ½ priced bottles of wine. $4 crown all day

Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $1 off signature and classic cocktails, $4 bomb shots 9-11 p.m. $4 crown all day

Happy Hour 11-4 p.m. $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $4 crown all day, every day!

Happy Hour all day $3 domestic talls, $1 off well drinks and wine by the glass. $4 bloody mary & mimosa bar 12–4 p.m. $4 crown all day, every day!

Labby’s Grill & Bar 1100 19th Ave. N, Fargo

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m. $3.50 wells, $1 off all pints, $1 off craft taps, $1 off wine. $1 off Morgan and all tap beers.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m. $3.50 wells, $1 off all pints, $1 off craft taps, $1 off wine.$3.50 teas and top-shelf all day. $1 off Tito's drinks and tequila 7 p.m.-Close.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m. $3.50 wells, $1 off all pints, $1 off craft taps, $1 off wine. $1 off all whiskey.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m. $3.50 wells, $1 off all pints, $1 off craft taps, $1 off wine. $2.95/$3.95 pounders.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m. $3.50 wells, $1 off all pints, $1 off craft taps, $1 off wine. $1 domestic bottles and wells 9 p.m.-close.

$3.95 Bloodys, Caesars, Screws and Mimosas 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $1 domestic bottles and wells 9 p.m.-close.

Lucky’s 13 Pub 4301 17th Ave. S, Fargo

$2.50 short domestic beers. $2 off all Mules 3-close

3pm-close: ½ Price Margaritas & $3.00 Coronas & Dos Equis Amber

$3.50 tall domestic taps 3pm-close

½ bottles of wine, $2.50 PBR, Hamms and Busch Light Pounders 3 p.m.-close

Happy Hour 3-6pm, $1.25 off all drinks

9am-4pm $3 Mimosas and $6.75 BLT Bloody Marys

Luna Fargo 1545 University Drive S, Fargo

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & ½ price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & ½ price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & ½ price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & ½ price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & ½ price cheese plates

Happy Hour 5-6pm & 9-10pm: $2 off wine or beer by the glass & ½ price cheese plates

$3 Mexican Bottled Beer

1/2 price Jumbo Margaritas

$2 off Patron

Unlimited Taco refills with the purchase of a taco plate & $2 off Long Islands.

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm: $3 select beer and drinks

Mexican Village 3155 45th St South, Fargo Mezzaluna 309 Roberts St. N, Fargo

Happy Hour all day, $1.25 off all drinks and $3 Mimosas

Happy Hour 5-7 p.m., 2-4-1 appetizers

Happy Hour 5-7 p.m., 2-4-1 Burgers

Happy Hour 5-7 p.m., $9.75 8oz Steak Dinner

Happy Hour 5-7 p.m., $6.50 Fried Chicken Dinner

Homestyle Lunch Buffet from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., Happy Hour 5-7 p.m.

Happy Hour 5-7 p.m.

NoBull Smokehouse 609 NP Ave, Fargo

$3 Any Bourbon 4 pm -Close

$2.50 Tap Beers 4 pm-Close

Swine and Wine, Buy a bottle/glass of wine, second one is one penny 4 pm-Close

Bucket Special 4-10pm: buy 3 bottles get two free. Bones, Beer, Bourbon-$12.99

2-4-$1s Single Shot Drinks, Taps and Teas 10 pm-Close

2-4-$1s Single Shot Drinks, Taps and Teas 10 pm-Close

O’Kelly’s 3800 Main Ave., Fargo

$6 Domestic Pitchers

$3 Long Island Teas and $3 Rum

$1 off Whiskeys

$3 Deep Eddy’s Vodka

BOGO domestic bottles

Happy Hour all day and $3 shot

Pay the Day taps 7-9 p.m.: Pay the Day tapswhatever the date is, that’s your tap price! (Ex: Nov. 2nd=2 cents!). 9-11 p.m.: $2.75 beers, booze and bombsselect drinks on special

9-11 p.m.: $2.75 beers, booze and bombsselect drinks on special.

Wine Night 4-10 p.m.: ½ priced wine by the glass and bottleexcludes reserve wine list

9-11pm: $2.75 OB Beers, Booze & Bombs

$2.95 drink special 11 a.m.-2 p.m: $2.95 Bloody Marys, Bloody Caesars & Mimosas

11am-2pm: $2.95 Bloody Mary’s & Mimosas

Old Broadway City Club 22 Broadway N, Fargo Old Broadway Grill 22 Broadway N, Fargo

Happy Hour all day

OB Sport Zone 22 Broadway N, Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. and 9-close: $2 select drinks, select taps and select bottles, $4 glasses of wine, $5.95 pitchers. 6-10 p.m.: $5.95 select pitchers of beer

$2 select drinks, select taps and select bottles, $4 glasses of wine

$2 select drinks, select taps and select bottles, $4 glasses of wine *Extended Happy Hour 6-10 p.m. (same specials as 3-6pm)

$2 select drinks, select taps and select bottles, $4 glasses of wine

$2 select drinks, select taps and select bottles, $4 glasses of wine. 9-11 p.m.: $2.75 beers, booze and bombs- select drinks on special

9-11 p.m.: $2.75 beers, booze and bombsselect drinks on special

$11 Domestic Bucket 11 a.m.-close

Pickled Parrot 505 3rd Ave. N, Fargo

$3.50 Fireball & Ice Hole All Day

$3.50 Fireball & Ice Hole All Day

$3.50 Fireball & Ice Hole All Day

$3 Domestic Bottles, $3.50 Domestic Taps & Wells, $8 Well Jars

7 p.m.-12 a.m. $3.50 Domestic Bottles, $4 Crown Royal

7 p.m.-12 a.m. $3.50 Domestic Bottles, $4 Titos, $4 Chuck Norris

$3.50 Fireball & Ice Hole All Day

Porter Creek Hardwood Grill ​1 555 44th St. S, Fargo

½ draft beer 3pm-close, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

½ bottles of wine 3pmclose, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

$2 off wine and liquor flights 3pm-close, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

$2 off culinary cocktails 3pm-close, Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pmclose: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour 3-6pm and 9pm-close: $1 off cocktails, beer and wine

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. 9-12 a.m. - $3 Summer Teas, $3 Lil Fruitopias, $3 Spiked Capri Suns

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. 9-12 a.m. - $3 Summer Teas, $3 Lil Fruitopias, $3 Spiked Capri Suns

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. 9-12 a.m. - $3 Summer Teas, $3 Lil Fruitopias, $3 Spiked Capri Suns

Happy Hour 4-6 p.m. 9-12 a.m. - $3 Summer Teas, $3 Lil Fruitopias, $3 Spiked Capri Suns

10 p.m.-12 a.m. - $2 LilFfruitopias, $2 White Claws, $2 vodka, rum, whiskey, gin, $2 berry lemon drop shots

10 p.m.-12 a.m. - $2 LilFfruitopias, $2 White Claws, $2 vodka, rum, whiskey, gin, $2 berry lemon drop shots

All day Happy Hour - $3 Summer Teas, $3 Lil Fruitopias, $3 Spiked Capri Suns

Pounds ​6 12 1st Ave. N, Fargo

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

The Northern 325 10th St. N, Fargo


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

4 -6 pm, free chips & salsa, $1 off all drinks

4 -6 pm, free chips & salsa, $1 off all drinks

4 -6 pm, free chips & salsa, $1 off all drinks. All day: Wine Wednesday, ½ price bottles of wine

4 -6 pm, free chips & salsa, $1 off all drinks

Rhombus Guys 606 Main Ave., Fargo

Happy Hour 2-5 p.m.: $1 off draft & can beer, $1 House Wine by the Glass, $1 off single pour drinks. Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light

Happy Hour 2-5 p.m.: $1 off draft & can beer, $1 House Wine by the Glass, $1 off single pour drinks. Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light

Happy Hour 2-5 p.m.: $1 off draft & can beer, $1 House Wine by the Glass, $1 off single pour drinks. Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light. 2-4-1 House Wine by the Glass 5-10 p.m.

Happy Hour 2-5 p.m.: $1 off draft & can beer, $1 House Wine by the Glass, $1 off single pour drinks. Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light. $4 Rhombus Brewing Company Pints 8-10 p.m.

Happy Hour 2-5 p.m.: $1 off draft & can beer, $1 House Wine by the Glass, $1 off single pour drinks. Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light. 12" Single Topping and either a pitcher of pop for $20, a pitcher of Iconic Blonde for $25, or a pitcher of Greenway for $30 9 p.m.-Midnight.

Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light. Specialty Bloody Marys and Build Your Own Mimosa Buckets 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 2-4-1 Well Drinks and $4 Draft Pints 9 p.m.Close.

Pounder Special: $2 Hamms & High Life, $3 PBR & Busch Light. Specialty Bloody Marys and Build Your Own Mimosa Buckets 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $4 You-Call-Its for Service Industry.

Rick’s Bar 2721 Main Ave., Fargo

4:30-Close $3.95 Tall Taps, $3.35 Morgan and Bacardi

4:30-Close $4.05 Crown Royal, $4.25 Crown Black

4:30-Close $3.75 Tito’s Vodka

4:30-Close $4.05 Jack Daniel’s, $4.25 Long Island Teas, $4.25 34oz Taps

4:30-Close $3.50 Import Beers, $3.50 UV Vodka

$3.50 Pounders All Day, $3.50 Ice Hole 4:30-Close

$3.95 Tall Taps All Day, $3.05 Well Drinks 4:30-Close

Rooter’s Bar 107 Broadway N, Fargo

$2 12-ounce domestic draws all day

$2.50 domestic bottles all day; 9pm – 12a.m.: Late Night Happy Hour 2-for-1 Drinks

$2.50 Captain Morgan and Windsor all day; 9 pm – 1 am $3 PBR Pounders

$3 Rooter’s Root beers and $7.50 Domestic Pitchers all day

9 pm—1 am $2.50 12 oz Domestic Draw Beers

11 am – 4 pm $2.50 Homemade Bloody Mary w/Beer Chaser; 9pm-1am $2.50 12 oz Domestic Draw Beers

Rosey’s Bistro 212 Broadway N, Fargo

Happy Hour 3 - 6 pm ½ priced apps & $2 off all drinks, Happy Hour 9 pm - Close $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3 - 6 pm ½ priced apps & $2 off all drinks, Happy Hour 9 pm - Close $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3 - 6 pm ½ priced apps & $2 off all drinks, Happy Hour 9 pm - Close $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3 - 6 pm ½ priced apps & $2 off all drinks, Happy Hour 9 pm - Close $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3 - 6 pm ½ priced apps & $2 off all drinks, Happy Hour 9 pm - Close $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour 3 - 6 pm ½ priced apps & $2 off all drinks, Happy Hour 9 pm - Close $2 off all drinks

Happy Hour all day

Local Night: $3.30 Proof’s 2 Docks Vodka and $1 off local brews from N.D., S.D., and Minn., Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$3.30 Captain Morgan, $3.85 Crown Royal, Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$3.30 Deep Eddy Vodka, $3.85 Jack Daniels, Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$3.25 domestic bottles; $3.85 Icehole, Fireball and Dr. McGillicuddy’s, Happy Hour open-7pm: $1 off all drinks

$4.30 Bloody Marys and Caesars, $3.30 Mimosas

$4.30 Bloody Marys and Caesars, $3.30 Mimosas

Shotgun Sally’s Rock & Roll Saloon 1515 42nd St. S, Fargo

$10 Domestic Pitchers, $2 Pounders 6 p.m.midnight. $3 Tall Domestics & $5 Tall Crafts, $3.50 Bacardi flavors & Smirnoff flavors, $4 Jack Daniels & Dubliner Honey, $2 Apple Pie Shots 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

$3 Tall Domestics - $5 Tall Crafts 6 p.m.-midnight. $3 Tall Domestics & $5 Tall Crafts, $3.50 Bacardi flavors & Smirnoff flavors, $4 Jack Daniels & Dubliner Honey, $2 Apple Pie Shots 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

$4 Jumbo Long Island Teas, $2 Captain Morgan, $5 Domestic Pitchers 9 p.m.-midnight. $3 Tall Domestics & $5 Tall Crafts, $3.50 Bacardi flavors & Smirnoff flavors, $4 Jack Daniels & Dubliner Honey, $2 Apple Pie Shots 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

$2 Domestic Taps & Well Drinks 9 p.m.-midnight. Ladies Night 9 p.m.-midnight $5 at the door/Includes – Well Drinks & Domestic Taps. $3 Tall Domestics & $5 Tall Crafts, $3.50 Bacardi flavors & Smirnoff flavors, $4 Jack Daniels & Dubliner Honey, $2 Apple Pie Shots 3 p.m.-6 p.m.

$2 Well Drinks & Domestic Bottles, $4 Crown Royal & Titos, $5 Patron 9 p.m.-midnight. $3 Tall Domestics & $5 Tall Crafts, $3.50 Bacardi flavors & Smirnoff flavors, $4 Jack Daniels & Dubliner Honey, $2 Apple Pie Shots 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

$15 Bottomless Mimosas, Bloody Marys/Caesars and domestic taps 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $2 Well drinks & Domestic Bottles, $4 Crown Royal & Titos and $5 Patron 9 p.m.midnight.

$15 Bottomless Mimosas, Bloody Marys/Caesars and domestic taps 11 a.m.-2 p.m.2 for 1s 6 p.m.-midnight.

Sickies Garage 3431 Fiechtner Drive S, Fargo

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka, $4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas, plus 2 happy hours

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka,$4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas, plus 2 happy hours

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka, $4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas, plus 2 happy hours

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka, $4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas, plus 2 happy hours.

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka, $4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas, plus 2 happy hours.

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka, $4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas

All day every day drink specials: $3 Sailor Jerry, Svedka Vodka, $4 Red Bull Vodkas, $4 Jack Daniel’s and $5 El Jimador Margaritas, plus 2 happy hours.

Sidestreet Grille & Pub 404 4th Ave. N, Fargo

$4 All Irish Whiskeys, $.75 off Craft & Import Beers, $6 Sidestreet Teas Happy Hour 2pm-7pm $.50 off all drinks and beers, $1 off all pitchers, $3.00 mystery shots

All Day Happy Hour 11am - Midnight: $.50 off all drinks and beers, $1 off all beer pitchers. Happy Hour 2-7pm: $.50 off all drinks and beers, $1 off all pitchers, $3.00 mystery shots

$4.00 Jameson Irish Whiskey. Happy Hour 2pm-7pm: $.50 off all drinks and beers, $1 off all pitchers, $3.00 mystery shots

Happy Hour 2pm-7pm: $.50 off all drinks and beers, $1 off all pitchers, $3.00 mystery shots

$4 Stoli, $4 Summit pints. Happy Hour 2pm.-7pm: $.50 off all drinks and beers, $1 off all pitchers, $3.00 mystery shots

$4 Jack Daniels and Jim Beam, $1 off ALL local beers and spirits

Service Industry Sunday Funday! (With valid server ID): $1 off “You Call Its” for all of our Service Industry Family, $2 off All Pitchers

$3.15 Miller High Life bottles $3.40 Bacardi Limon and Sailor Jerry’s

$3.15 Bud and Bud Light bottles

$3.15 Bud and Bud Light bottles $3 White Zin and merlot wines

$3.15 Coors Light and Mich Golden Light bottles

$3.15 Bud and Bud Light bottles, $3.40 Captain Morgan

$3.75 Bloody Marys and Caesars, all day well specials $2.75

$2.80 all wells, $5.25 Busch Light pitchers

Radisson 201 5th St. N. Fargo

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

The Round Up Saloon 4501 Urban Plains Drive, Fargo

Slammer’s Sports Bar & Grill 707 28th Ave. N, Fargo

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

½ appetizers 4-6pm and 9-11pm; $1 off beer, well and wine drinks


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

All Day Happy Hour: $1 off all beer and liquor. 9 p.m. to close: $2.50 domestic taps, $3 Fireball and Icehole.

$4 Moscow Mules all day. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off all beer and liquor. 9 p.m. to close: $2.50 domestic taps, $3 Fireball and Icehole

Half-price wine all day. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off all beer and liquor. 9 p.m. to close: $2.50 domestic taps, $3 Fireball and Icehole

$4 jumbo teas all day. Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.: $1 off all beer and liquor. 9 p.m. to close: $2.50 domestic taps, $3 Fireball and Icehole

Midnight to close: $2.50 shots

Midnight to close: $2.50 shots. During Bison game: $1 off all beer and liquor

11 a.m.-noon: $2 you call its. Starting at noon: $3.50 Ceasera, bloodies and mimosas. $3.75 domestic taps

$3.25 Beer pounders, free pool and darts

$3.25 Windsor and Black Velvet, free pool and darts

$3.25 Captain Morgan, $4 Jack Daniels

$3.25 domestic can beers, $3.25 Bacardi

$3.50 Import and craft beer

$3.50 UV Vodka and Dr Mc

$3.85 22oz taps, $3 well drinks, free pool and darts

All Day Happy Hour: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day.

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m.: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day. $2 off any Tequila cocktail/drink

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m.: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day. $2 off all Proof Distillers and Far North cocktails/drinks

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m.: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day. ½ priced bottle wines and $2 off all Jumbo Taps

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m.: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day. $2 off Signature and Classic Cocktails, $4 bomb shots 9-11 p.m.

Happy Hour 11-4 p.m.: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day

All Day Happy Hour: $1 off all single pour liquors and glasses of wine, $2 off all Jumbo Taps. $4 Crown all day every day

Sports Bar 619 NP Ave. N, Fargo

$2.50 tap beer pints, $3.50 talls

$2.50 Stoli and $3.50 Stoli with energy drink

College Night: Half price domestic pitchers

$2.95 Jack Daniel's, Captain Morgan, Bombay Sapphire and Grey Goose

½ off pitchers 7-10 pm

½ off pitchers 7-10 pm

$3 pounders, $3.50 Bloody Marys

Tailgators Sports Cafe 1322 Main Ave, Fargo

6-10pm: $3.50 tall Crown Royal, $3 UV Vodka

6-10pm: $3.25 Happy Hour bottles, $3 Captain Morgan

6-10pm: $8.50 domestic pitchers, $3 wells and Ice Hole shots

6-10pm: $2.75 Schnapps shots, $3.75 Gator Teas and import bottles

6-10pm: $3 Bacardi and Windsor, $3.50 Chuck Norris or Jag Bombs

Noon-10pm: $3.25 Happy Hour pints and bottles, $1 off whiskeys, $4.25 Bloody Marys

Noon-10pm: $3.25 Happy Hour pints and bottles, $1 off whiskeys, $4.25 Bloody Marys

Best Brews and BBQ: Two free tap pints and free apps from 5:30-7pm

Buy one mug, get one half off tap beer

SouthTown Pourhouse 4281 45th St. S, Fargo Speck’s Bar 2611 Main Ave., Fargo

Spirits Lounge 3803 13th Ave. S, Fargo

True North Bistro 5064 23rd Ave. S, Fargo

Server industry night (one free half pint of beer with proof of server training card.)

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. & 9-12 a.m.: $2 Domestic Beers & Cheap Shots, $3 Tap Beers & Rail Cocktails, $4 Wine of the Moment, Shots, & Premium Liquor, $5 Classic Cocktails, $6 Cocktail of the Moment, $8 Patron Margaritas all day.

All whiskeys half-price from open to close. Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. & 9-12 a.m.: $2 Domestic Beers & Cheap Shots, $3 Tap Beers & Rail Cocktails, $4 Wine of the Moment, Shots, & Premium Liquor, $5 Classic Cocktails, $6 Cocktail of the Moment, $8 Patron Margaritas all day.

$10 bottles of select wines and half off all other bottles of wine. Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. & 9-12 a.m.: $2 Domestic Beers & Cheap Shots, $3 Tap Beers & Rail Cocktails, $4 Wine of the Moment, Shots, & Premium Liquor, $5 Classic Cocktails, $6 Cocktail of the Moment, $8 Patron Margaritas all day.

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. & 9-12 a.m.: $2 Domestic Beers & Cheap Shots, $3 Tap Beers & Rail Cocktails, $4 Wine of the Moment, Shots, & Premium Liquor, $5 Classic Cocktails, $6 Cocktail of the Moment, $8 Patron Margaritas all day.

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. & 9-12 a.m.: $2 Domestic Beers & Cheap Shots, $3 Tap Beers & Rail Cocktails, $4 Wine of the Moment, Shots, & Premium Liquor, $5 Classic Cocktails, $6 Cocktail of the Moment, $8 Patron Margaritas all day.

11 a.m.-3 p.m. bottomless bloodies and mimosas

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Captain Morgan $3.25 & Miller High Life $2.50

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7 p.m. E&J Brandy $3.25 & PBR $2.50

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Windsor $3.25 & Truly $4.00

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Jim Beam/ Jack D. $3.75 & Heineken $4.25

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Long Island Teas $3.25 & Angry Orchard $4.00

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Jose Cuervo $4.00 & Corona $4.00

Happy Hour Beer Buckets (6) for $18

$2 off jumbo 32oz. Margaritas

$2 off PBR pounders, $1 off Mojitos

$1 off Proud Mary Pina Colada

$2 off all tequila shots

$1 off Cadillac Margaritas, $2 Margaritas 9pm-close

$1 Let’s Get It On Lemonades, $1 Sangria, $2 off Margaritas 9pm-close

Wild Terra Cider and Brewing 6 12th St N, Fargo

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off Ciders and starters, two glasses of wine $7

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off Ciders and starters, two glasses of wine $7

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off Ciders and starters, two glasses of wine $7

Happy Hour 4-6pm: $1 off Ciders and starters, two glasses of wine $7

Happy Hour: 2-6pm: $1 off Ciders and starters, two glasses of wine $7

The Windbreak 3150 39th St. S, Fargo

4-7pm and 9-11pm: $1 off all drinks

4-7pm and 9-11pm: $1 off all drinks

4-7pm and 9-11pm: $1 off all drinks

Ladies Night: Ladies drink free (select taps and wells) 9pmmidnight, 9-11pm: guys get $2 drinks, $2 bomb shots

9-10pm: $1 drinks, 1011pm: $2 drinks

9-11pm: $2 drinks and bomb shots

9pm-midnight: $3 drinks and 2-for-1 shots

Happy Hour All Day ($1 off all drinks)

$3.30 Captain Morgan, $3.30 Bacardi and Flavors

$3.30 Deep Eddy Vodka, $3.30 glasses of bota box wine

$3.85 Crown Royal, $3.85 Jack Daniel’s

$3.30 Captain Morgan, $3.50 Long Island Iced Tea

$3.30 Bloody Mary and Caesars, $3.30 import bottles

$3.30 Bloody Mary and Caesars, $6 domestic pitchers, $8 import pitchers

Twist 220 Broadway N, Fargo

VFW: Downtown

202 Broadway N, Fargo

Vinyl Taco 520 1st Ave. N, Fargo

Woody’s Bar 1550 32nd Ave. S, Fargo

Brunch 11AM-3PM, Bottomless Mimosas

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. & 9-12 a.m.: $2 Domestic Beers & Cheap Shots, $3 Tap Beers & Rail Cocktails, $4 Wine of the Moment, Shots, & Premium Liquor, $5 Classic Cocktails, $6 Cocktail of the Moment, $8 Patron Margaritas all day.


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Happy Hour 3pm6pm: $1 off all taps, bottles, pounders, wells and wines; $3 Captain Morgan, $1 off all domestic taps, Shot of the Day: $3 Rumpleminze

Happy Hour 3pm6pm: $1 off all taps, bottles, pounders, wells and wines; $3 Bacardi, $1 off all craft pounders, Shot of the Day: $3 Doctor McGuillicuddy's

Happy Hour 3pm-6pm: $1 off all taps, bottles, pounders, wells and wines; $1 off Crown, $1 off domestic bottles, Shot of the Day: $3 Fireball

Happy Hour 3pm6pm: $1 off all taps, bottles, pounders, wells and wines; $3 Tito's, $1 off craft taps, Shot of the Day: $3 Icehole

Happy Hour 3pm-6pm: $1 off all taps, bottles, pounders, wells and wines; $3 Deep Eddy's, $1 off craft/import bottles, Shot of the Day: $3 Jagermeister

$4 Mules, $1 off domestic pounders, Shot of the Day: $3 UV Bombs

$3.75 Bloody Mary's and Caesar's, $3 Mimosas, $1 off all taps, Shot of the Day: $5 Patron

Happy Hour from open to 8 p.m. - $1 off apps, taps, bottles, wells and wine. 8 p.m. to close - $3.00 Domestic Pounders & Wells

Happy Hour from open to 8 p.m. - $1 off apps, taps, bottles, wells and wine. 8 p.m. to close - $1.00 off All Taps, Bottles & Pounders

Happy Hour from open to 8 p.m. - $1 off apps, taps, bottles, wells and wine. 8 p.m. to close $4.00 Domestic Beer Mugs

Happy Hour from open to 8 p.m. - $1 off apps, taps, bottles, wells and wine. 8 p.m. to close $1.00 off Domestic Taps & $3.00 Wells

Happy Hour from open to 8 p.m. - $1 off apps, taps, bottles, wells and wine. 8 p.m. to close $3.50 Captain Morgan & Bacardi

Happy Hour from open to 8 p.m. - $1 off apps, taps, bottles, wells and wine. 8 p.m. to close - $4.00 Titos & $3.00 Well Vodka

All day- $8.00 Domestic Pitchers, $3.00 Fireball, Icehole, Wells & Domestic Pints

Blarney Stone 1910 9th St. E, West Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-Close: $1 off Draft Beers, $ 1 off House Wine, 2 for 1 Dublin Pours (Bar Pours)

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-Close: $1 off Draft Beers, $ 1 off House Wine, 2 for 1 Dublin Pours (Bar Pours)

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-Close: $1 off Draft Beers, $ 1 off House Wine, 2 for 1 Dublin Pours (Bar Pours). $4.50 Trash Cans 5 p.m.-close

Happy Hour 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-Close: $1 off Draft Beers, $ 1 off House Wine, 2 for 1 Dublin Pours (Bar Pours)

5 p.m.-Close: $5 Clawritas

Happy Hour 9 p.m.Close: $1 off Draft Beers, $ 1 off House Wine, 2 for 1 Dublin Pours (Bar Pours). Free trip through Bloody Mary or Mimosa Bar with a Breakfast Entree Purchase. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Happy Hour 11 a.m.-Close: $1 off Draft Beers, $ 1 off House Wine, 2 for 1 Dublin Pours (Bar Pours). Free trip through Bloody Mary or Mimosa Bar with a Breakfast Entree Purchase. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Blvd Pub 3147 Bluestem Drive, West Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6p.m.; 6 p.m.-close: Talls for shorts and $3.50 Bacardi

Happy Hour 3-6p.m.; 6 p.m.-close: $3.25 Long Island Teas

Happy Hour 3-6p.m.; 6 p.m.-close: 2 for 1 Domestic pints and wells

Happy Hour 3-6p.m.; 6 p.m.-close: 1/2 price bottles of wine and $1 off mules

Happy Hour 3-6p.m.; 7 p.m.-close: $1 off Captain Morgan and Titos

8 a.m.-noon: Bloody Bar, $4 Bloody's and Mimosa's; 7 p.m.-close: $3.50 Fireball and Icehole shots.

Hooligans 3330 Sheyenne St, West Fargo

Mug Night: $7 mug and fill, $3 domestic and $5 non-domestic refills

$4 tall domestic taps, half-price bottles of wine

$2.50 domestic bottles

Tea Night: $5 colossal teas

$3.50 well drinks all day

$2 pounders, domestic pitcher and a large pizza for $20

$8 pitchers of beer, $8.99 ultimate Bloody Marys, $3 Mimosas

MacKenzie River Pizza 819 24th Ave W E, West Fargo

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

3pm- 6pm: $3 wells, $3.50 craft pints, $2.50 domestic pints, $1 off wine glasses, 75 cent wings

The Piggy BBQ 816 24th Ave E, West Fargo

Happy Hour All Day: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4 beers.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m.: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4 beers.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m.: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m.: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4 beers.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m.: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4 beers.

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m.: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4 beers.

Happy Hour All Day: $2 off glasses of wine and 1/2 off bottles of wine, $5 mixed drinks, $3 off all signature Piggy cocktails, $4 beers.

Pub West 3140 Bluestem Drive, West Fargo

$3.50 tall domestic beer, $4.50 tall craft beer

$3.50 Captain Morgan and Bacardi

$3.50 Jack Daniel's, Jim Beam and Jameson, $4.50 Crown Royal

$3.50 UV, Wave and Tito's Vodka

$3.50 Windsor, $3 solo cups: Bud Light, Coors Light, Miller Lite

$3 solo cups: Bud Light,Coors Light, Miller Lite

Happy Hour all day, Service Industry Night: $3.50 you-call-its

Rookies 715 13th Ave. E, West Fargo

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $7.50 Coors Light pitchers and $3.75 Crown Royal

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $7.50 Miller Lite pitchers, $3 Jack Daniels and Jag, $3.75 Long Island Teas

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $7.50 Bud Light pitchers, $3.50 Windsor and Smirnoff

Happy Hour 3-6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $3 domestic pitchers and Shiner Bock bottles, $3.50 Deep Eddys, $4 Angry Balls shot

8pm-midnight: $3 Fireball, $3.50 Tito's Vodka, $5 Vodka Red Bulls, $3.50 Chuck Norris, Ninja Turtles and Jag Bombs

Happy Hour noon6:30pm, 8pm-midnight: $3 import bottles and Tarantula Tequila, $3.50 Captain Morgan, Bacardi and Jameson

Happy Hour all day, Service Industry Night 10pm-close: $3 well drinks

Silver Dollar Flying Pig 221 Sheyenne St, West Fargo

Happy Hour 4 p.m.6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. 6:30-Close: All drink specials roll over into Monday.

Happy Hour 4 p.m.6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. $2 off tap pints.

Happy Hour 4 p.m.6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. 6:30-Close: $3 Lord Calvert, Windsor and Black Velvet.

Happy Hour 4 p.m.6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. 6:30-Closer: $3.50 all pounders, $4.75 Patron, $4.50 Crown Royal.

Happy Hour 4 p.m.6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. 6:30-Close: $3.75 Captain Morgan, $3 Fireball shots.

Happy Hour 4 p.m.6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. $4.75 Bloody Marys & Caesars. 6:30-Close: $3 Fireball shots.

Happy Hour 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m. $3.50 PBR & Busch Light pounders all day. $4.75 Bloody Marys & Caesars and $2 off all pitchers all day.

Three Lyons Pub 675 13th Ave. E, West Fargo

Mug Night! 7pm to close $2 buys the 32oz mug. Fills for pint price.

All day: $4 classic long islands and $5 specialty teas. $3 Icehole and Fireball shots

All day: $1 off pounders and $5 bomb shots

All day: $6 martinis, $3 glasses of wine, $3 McGillicuddy shots

8pm-close: $3.50 Jameson. All day: $1 off all canned and bottled beers

11am - 6pm: $3.50 Bloodys and Mimosas. All day: $3 Captain Morgan and Titos

New Happy Hour specials all day long

WEST FARGO

Barcode 835 23rd Ave. E, West Fargo

Bar Nine 1405 Prairie Pkwy., West Fargo

* This is not a full list of specials. Specials subject to change. For updated and entire list of specials, go fargomonthly.com.


MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Town Hall Bar 103 Main Ave. W, West Fargo

$3 Captain Morgan, $3.50 Crown Royal & Washington Apples 7-11pm

$3 32oz. domestic Mongo Mugs, Ladies night $1 off drinks, $3 shots 7-11pm

Happy Hour 3-7pm, $3 Windsor and Wu Tang shots 7-11pm

$3 Cristal & Limon, domestic pitchers $6 7-11pm

Fireball Friday $3, Extended happy hour 3-8pm and 7-11pm

Sex with Strangers $3, 10am-1pm $4 Bloody Marys & Caesars 7-11pm

$2.75 pounders all day, Service Industry Special: $2 well drinks & domestic beer 7-11pm

​Tru Blu Social Club 915 19th Ave. E, West Fargo

$5 Tru Tap Mules, 3-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.-1am: $1.25 off all liquor, wine and beer

$3 off all Martinis, 3-6pm and 10pm-1am: $1.25 off all liquor, wine and beer

½ bottles of wine, 3-6pm and 10pm-1am: $1.25 off all liquor, wine and beer

$2.75 16oz. domestic taps, 3-6pm and 10pm1am: $1.25 off all liquor, wine and beer

3-6pm: $1.25 off all liquor, wine and beer

11am-4pm: $6 Deviled Bloody Mary's, $2.50 Mimosa Flutes, $9 Mimosa carafes

11am-4pm: $6 Deviled Bloody Mary's, $2.50 Mimosa Flutes, $9 Mimosa carafes

​VFW: West Fargo 308 Sheyenne St., West Fargo

$2.50 regular domestic beers and Windsor

12 inch pizza and a pitcher of beer for $11

$3 Bacardi, Morgan, Mike’s Hard Lemonade or Wine Coolers

$3 domestic 25oz taps, $3.50 25oz Shock Top, $5 25oz Stone's Throw, $3 import bottles

Work Zone 701 Main Ave. E, West Fargo

$3 Jag shots, $3 Tuaca, Mug Special $6.50 with $3.50 refills

$3 Bacardi and Ice Hole

$3 Dr. Mac shots, Mug Special: $6.50 with $3.50 refills

$3 Captain Morgan, Malibu and Jag

$3 Jack and Jims

$3 Bloody Marys and Caesars, $3 craft and imports

$5.50 domestic pitchers, $3.50 Buccas, $3 Bloody Marys and Caesars

Happy Hour: 4-6:30pm- $2.50 Domestic Bottles & Wells, 50 Cents off all other drinks "Margarita-Monday" 6-10pm, $3 well or $5 premium

Happy Hour: 4-6:30pm- $2.50 Domestic Bottles & Wells, 50 Cents off all other drinks. "Happy Hour All Day", 11am-Midnight: $2.50 Domestic Bottles & Wells

Happy Hour: 4pm-6:30pm- $2.50 Domestic Bottles & Wells. 8pm-Midnight: $4 Busch Light Mug Fills, $5 Domestic Mug Fills, $5 Kettle One Long Island Teas

Happy Hour: 4pm-6:30pm- $2.50 Domestic Bottles & Wells, 50 Cents off all other drinks. 8pm-Midnight: $1 OFF Import Pints

Happy Hour: 4pm-6:30pm- $2.50 Domestic Bottles & Wells, 50 Cents off all other drinks. 5pm-12am: $3.50 Fireball; 8pm-10pm: $3 Domestic Bottles, $3 Captain Morgan

11am-4pm: $2 Mimosas, $5 Bloody Mary's & Bloody Caesars

$5 Bloody Mary's & Bloody Caesars All Day

Legends Bar and Grill 803 Belsly Blvd, Moorhead

$3.50 Domestic Pounders. 3pm-6pm: $1 off drinks. 8pm-10pm: $1 off drafts.

$3.50 Domestic Pounders. 3pm-6pm: $1 off drinks. 8pm-10pm: $1 off drafts

$3.50 Domestic Pounders. 3pm-6pm: $1 off drinks. 8pm-10pm: $1 off drafts. $3 wine night from 3 p.m.-12 a.m.

$3.50 Domestic Pounders. 3pm-6pm: $1 off drinks. 8pm-10pm: $1 off drafts

$3.50 Domestic Pounders. 3pm-6pm: $1 off drinks. 8pm-10pm: $1 off drafts

$3.50 Domestic Pounders. $5 Bloody Mary's/Bloody Caesar’s, $3.50 Mimosas, $1 off Legendary Drinks

Service Industry Night: 10 percent off all beverages

Mick’s Office 10 8th St. S, Moorhead

$2.50 Captain Morgan, $4 domestic mug fills, $4 bomb shots 8pmmidnight

$3 domestic pints, $3.50 select import pints 8pm-midnight

Ladies Night 8pmmidnight: $2.50 pounders and youcall-its

$2.75 wells, $4 domestic mugs, $3 Busch Light and Old Style mugs, jell-o shot raffle 10pmclose

$2.75 pounders, $3 Ice Hole 8pm-midnight

$5 endless Mimosas 11am-4pm, $8 pitchers 11am-4pm

Happy Hour all day: 50¢ off all drinks, $4 Bloody Marys and Caesars

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour 5-6pm and 9-11pm, $3 select beer and drinks

Happy Hour: 3-4 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. 4-5 p.m. – $2 domestic pints and bottles. $2 mixed well drinks. 5-6 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. $5.75 25 oz Michelob Golden Light Mugs All Day, $4.50 Scratch Teas 7-11 p.m.

Happy Hour: 3-4 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. 4-5 p.m. – $2 domestic pints and bottles / $2 mixed well drinks. 5-6 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. $5.75 25 oz Michelob Golden Light Mugs All Day

Happy Hour: 3-4 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. 4-5 p.m. – $2 domestic pints and bottles. $2 mixed well drinks. 5-6 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. $5.75 25 oz Michelob Golden Light Mugs All Day, $3.75 Morgans (8 p.m.-2a.m.)

Happy Hour: 3-4 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. 4-5 p.m. – $2 domestic pints and bottles. $2 mixed well drinks. 5-6 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. $5.75 25 oz Michelob Golden Light Mugs All Day

$3.75 Bloody's All Day, $5.75 25 oz Michelob Golden Light Mugs All Day

$8.25 Domestic Pitchers, Free Games and TouchTunes All Day

2-for-1 drink specials from 4-6 pm and $2 domestic bottles 7pmmidnight

2-for-1s 4-6pm

$5.25 pitchers of Budweiser, Mich, Amber Boch, Bud Light, Miller Light and Foster, drink specials 4-6pm

$2.75 22oz grande beers, $4 Sam Adams, Red’s Apple and Bell's specials 4-6pm

$6 pitchers of Bud Light, Shock Top, Miller Light, Coors Light and Nordeast, drink specials 4-6pm

$6 pitchers of Bud Light, Shock Top, Miller Lite, Coors Light and Nordeast 9pm-close

Grand beers $2.75 (all day)

$3.25 Morgan

2 for 1's 9-midnight

$1.00 off All Whiskey

Happy hour all day till 7/ ladies night 9-midnight

Late night Happy Hour 9pm-midnight

$8.50 pitchers all day

Bloody Mary special

MOORHEAD JC Chumley’s 1608 Main Ave., Moorhead

Rustica Tavern 315 Main Ave., Moorhead

O’Leary’s Pub 808 30th Ave. S, Moorhead

Speak Easy 1001 30th Ave., S, Moorhead Vic’s Bar & Grill 427 Center Ave, Moorhead

Happy Hour: 3-4 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. 4-5 p.m. – $2 domestic pints and bottles. $2 mixed well drinks. 5-6 p.m. – $1 off domestic pints and bottles. $1 off mixed well drinks. $5.75 25 oz Michelob Golden Light Mugs All Day,


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