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JUNE 2016

COMPLIMENTARY

Art

THE

ISSUE


FROM THE EDITOR

Inner

Artistry

I

f it's true that every child is an artist, as Pablo Picasso once said, "Where did it all go wrong?" Adolescence? Maybe college? When did most of us become typical working stiffs, admiring art from afar but not truly grasping its value? We know that when we see art we're either repelled from it or drawn to it. If we're drawn to it, we admire its colors, textures and revel in the emotions that it stirs in us. But do we really know why or how? We are all born with light receptors in our eyes that transmit messages to the brain showing us different colors that are reflected off of objects. But, how is it that some people are capable of not just seeing the colors, but the color within the color, shapes of the shadows, the fade and transition to the colors around it and the dimensions within the textures? It's all a bit overwhelming when you piece together the puzzle that is art. On a positive note, there are many people who truly do understand this puzzle of visual elements. These people are simply known as artists. Yet, there is nothing simple about it. Over the past few years, I spent a lot of time interviewing local artists. Although having immense admiration, I was often intimidated by who I thought they were, based on their dramatic works

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and the often no-touch, sterile gallery settings it was displayed in. Contrary to my initial impression, each artist I sat down with was open, friendly and passionate about their skill-set, and more than willing to share the process and the inspirations in life that drive them. They didn't want to be the elusive and unapproachable artist. They just wanted, more than anything, to keep creating. For this issue, we interviewed a local potter, a glassblower, mixed media artist and a painter. These were the child artists that grew up but never stifled their imagination and creativity like the rest of us. Instead, they nurtured it, trained for it like you would any career choice and created a business to support it. This was also not just some fun hobby they chose to do when inspiration struck. The need to create lived within them and refused to be extinguished. While they were walking me through their work, I was struck with how each artist seemed to have a deep desire to share their work with the community, even if it meant giving up hard-earned income. To compensate for this role, most have art that was made with the same passion, but was ultimately destined to create income. Not income so they would strike it rich and retire early but income so they could keep doing what they longed to do, which

was simply to create more art, this time on their own terms. Imagine that. A job that you do solely so you can have the means to keep doing that job. Interesting concept. With that, I leave you with Edgar Degas, "Art is not what you see, but what you make others see." Happy shopping!

TRACY NICHOLSON Associate Publisher/ Editor tracy@spotlightmediafargo.com


CONTENTS DESIGN&LIVING

JUNE 2016

COVER STORY

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FROM CANVAS TO CLAY: THE ART ISSUE

From glass and metal to canvas and clay, art is admired in the gallery, but truly inspired in the home. Meet four local artists who are making waves in the art community and creating stunning work that deserves a place in your home.

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GIVEAWAY OF A LIFETIME

This fall, Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead is once again, giving away a dream home to one lucky family. To give us the scoop on the $500,000 home giveaway, we caught up with Robert Leslie, president of Designer Homes, to talk about the project, how it came together, and how it changed the last family’s life.

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THE UPSIDE OF DOWNSIZING

If you don't want to compromise on the comfort of traditional home features, but are searching for a downsized lifestyle, this is a must-see. We show you how Hanson Brothers Construction and interior designer Monica Hart brought warmth and life to the middle unit of this Coventry Drive three-plex.

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PARADE OF HOMES RECAP

With 99 homes to tour on this year's spring Parade of Homes, we decided to sum it up with a photo recap, showing just a few of our favorite features.

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FINDING YOUR MATTRESS MATCH

Since the mattress-buying process can be daunting, intimidating or maybe just monotonous, we met with local mattress aficionado Darrell Hansen from Furniture for Less to help lay out the how-to’s and the donot’s for topnotch comfort and affordability.

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ON THE COVER

NEXT MONTH’S ISSUE

Featured on the cover is the abstract painting of local artist, Jessica Wachter. In Design & Living's 2015 People's Choice Awards, Wachter was named Best Local Artist. For more information on this artist, go to jessicawachter.com or visit her Facebook page at facebook.com/JessicaWachterArt.

Lakes Living Issue

Once again, Design & Living heads to the lakes to show some of the area's most beautifully designed lake homes, quaint seasonal cabins and fun, lake inspired boutiques.


DESIGN & LIVING JUNE 2016 Design & Living Magazine is a free publication distributed 12 times a year. Our mission is to showcase all that the Red River Valley has to offer in terms of interior design, architecture and landscaping; profiling the people that make these possible. We also strive to provide a quality and fun reading experience and improve the way of life in our community. The publication is mailed to homes across the US and has stand distribution throughout North Dakota and Minnesota.

PUBLISHER

Spotlight Media LLC

PRESIDENT

Mike Dragosavich

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Andrew Jason Tracy Nicholson

DESIGN/LAYOUT

Sarah Geiger, Soda Tran, Ryan Koehler

CONTRIBUTORS

Tom Spaeth, Trever Hill, Hailey Colbrunn, Christen Anderson, Tracy Nicholson

COPY EDITORS GENERAL MANAGER ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS OPERATIONS MANAGER MARKETING/SALES

SOCIAL MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY

DELIVERY

Erica Rapp, Hailey Colbrunn, Lauren Wilson Brent Tehven Nicole Houseal

Heather Hemingway Tracy Nicholson, Paul Bougie, Paul Hoefer, Tank McNamara, Jenny Johnson Tracy Nicholson Zach Davis Photography, J. Alan Paul Photography, Paul Flessland, Tracy Nicholson, Coldwell Banker, Ecce Gallery, Brad Bachmeier, Jon Offutt, Ashley Kunz, Jessica Wachter, Furniture for Less, McNeal & Friends, Eid-Co Homes, Titan Homes, Verity Homes, PK Construction, Building Concepts Mitch Rapp

Design & Living is published 12 times a year by Spotlight Media LLC. Print quantity exceeds 22,000 per issue. Printed in the U.S.A.

Spotlightmedia ADVERTISING: 701-478-SPOT (7768)

info@spotlightmediafargo.com spotlightmediafargo.com

Design & Living does not necessarily endorse or agree with content of articles or advertising presented. Design & Living assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Send change of address information and other correspondence to: Spotlight Media Inc. 502 1st Ave N. First Floor Fargo, ND 58102 or info@spotlightmediafargo.com


MEET THE TEAM MIKE

BRENT

BOUGIE

MICHAEL

SODA

NICOLE

TRACY

ERICA

JESSE

ANDREW

JOE

SARAH

PAUL

HEATHER

NATE

PAUL

RYAN

TANK

HAILEY

JENNY

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SPOTLIGHT MEDIA, GO TO spotlightmediafargo.com


CONTRIBUTORS DESIGN&LIVING

MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS At Design & Living, our goal is to create a publication that is just as much fun to read as it is to view. Here are the writers and contributors who so affably use their time and talents to tell a story and give our pages purpose.

TREVER

CHRISTEN

Trever Hill has been the owner of Trever Hill Design, formerly known as Home Suite Couture, in Fargo since 2009. He was also the Specialty Shop Manager of Scheels Home & Hardware. Hill works on both residential and commercial projects around the FM and lakes areas. He has been a valuable contributor, showing cutting-edge home design and utilizing furniture and décor from local stores in staging homes, remodels, new builds and historic renovations. In 2014, Hill was nominated for the “Top 5 Best of the Red River Valley” poll by The Forum.

Christen Anderson is a Minnesota native that has always had an eye for décor and design and was able to put her knack into practice while building her home in Moorhead. Christen brings five years of Seattle life and her world travels into her designs, making her space truly unique. Though a technology focused marketer by day, by night you can find her working on her next home project or prepping for one of her many dinner parties. She looks forward to sharing her tips to make your space a reflection of who you are. Connect with her on Facebook at Christen Joy Homes and Instagram at ChristenJoyHomes.

HILL

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ANDERSON

HAILEY

COLBRUNN

Hailey Colbrunn is an intern at Spotlight Media, the parent company of Design and Living, contributing to various projects among the company's publications. She graduate in May with a bachelor's degree in English and has had experience writing for The Spectrum at North Dakota State and has had art published with Northern Eclecta, NDSU's literary journal. Colbrunn looks forward to pursuing her MA in English and continuing to develop her writing.


HBA EDITORIAL DESIGN&LIVING

Tom Spaeth is the current HBA President and owns Accent Contracting with Mike Arnold. Their company provides designbuild remodeling services to the FM area. Spaeth has over 25 years of experience in the construction industry.

DIVERSION

WILL FAIL WITHOUT approval of JPA, PPA by local leaders

The Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead promotes an environment in which members and their businesses can prosper.

By Tom Spaeth, HBA President, Accent Contracting

T

The last three winters and springs in the Red River Valley have been dry. In the short-term, it’s easy to forget the major flood fights this community rallied just a few years ago to keep our cities safe. The flood will come again. The only question is, when?

The F-M Area Diversion project will likely fail without approval of two critical documents coming before our Fargo City Commission and the Moorhead City Council: local leaders need to sign off on a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) and a Project Partnership Agreement (PPA).

NO TIME TO PAUSE

Here’s why: time is of the essence. The F-M Area Diversion project is one of six new starts selected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for 2016. To begin construction in August, the PPA is required between local sponsors or the “new start” is sacrificed and

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federal dollars ($450 million) appropriated to help fund the project will not be disbursed. If federal dollars do not come, North Dakota’s funding ($450 million) will not be disbursed. The federal government appropriating funding for the F-M Area Diversion in the future is unlikely. Before the PPA can be signed, the Diversion Authority and its member entities need to approve a new JPA, which is the governing document between the entities including Fargo, Moorhead, Cass County and Clay County. This group forms the *Diversion Authority.

HOW TO HELP

As of press time, both the JPA and PPA were slated to come before the Fargo Commission and Moorhead’s City Council in early to mid June. Visit hbafm.com and click the image above to read an update and find links to contact your leaders. Ask them to expeditiously approve and sign both documents when they are presented.

FUNDING CONCERNS

Costs of the F-M Area Diversion increase (and will continue to increase) due to inflation at a rate of $60 million a year if we do not start construction this year. The Diversion Authority has released a financial plan showing how the $2.1 billion project will be funded through the use of local sales tax, state funds and federal appropriations. Part of the plan is to extend the current half-cent sales taxes in place for flood protection funding. The goal is to keep special assessments from having to be levied to property owners. Tom Spaeth owns Accent Contracting with Mike Arnold. Their company provides design-build remodeling services to the F-M area. Spaeth has over 25 years of experience in the construction industry.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

• hbafm.com • info@hbafm.com • facebook.com/HBAFargoMoorhead • twitter.com/hbafm • Blog: homebuildersassociation.areavoices.com


DESIGN&LIVING GOAL

Robert Leslie is the president of Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead.

Want to Win a $500,000 House? You’re in Luck.

O

ne lucky person’s life will change forever this fall when Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead gives away a $500,000 home. Design & Living Magazine is proud to be the media sponsor for this event. This giveaway, which was introduced four years ago when the Gilbertson family won their dream home, will start Saturday, July 9. People will be able to tour the home located at 4200 54th Ave. S. in the new District at the Pines development in South Fargo. We caught up with Robert Leslie, president of Designer Homes, to talk about the project, how it came together and how it changed the last family’s life.

How the Contest Works When people tour the house, they will be able to enter their names for a chance to win the home. Eight hundred names will be chosen from people who tour the house. One hundred names will be chosen via social media contests on Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead and Design & Living Magazine’s Facebook page and 100 more will be chosen at live events that are to be announced.

One thousand names will be selected to attend a special event in October. It will be narrowed down to 25 people who will come onstage. Each person will then draw a key and try to unlock a door onstage. Whoever’s key unlocks the door wins the house. Go to designerhomesfm.com/ giveaway-lifetime-2016 for more information.

By Andrew Jason

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GOAL DESIGN&LIVING

Q&A Why did you decide to do this massive giveaway? “Our passion, what we do and what we’ve been able to achieve is from the help of our community. It’s something that we’re really passionate about, something that all of us feel very blessed to do. You get to meet amazing people with different personalities, different tastes and, with the kind of homes that we build – whether it’s a $300,000 home or well over a million dollars – we allow our customers to really customize and bring their personality out in their house. You can truly say that you love what you do because, how can it not be fun working with people to make the most exciting purchase of their life?” Where did this idea come from? “There was a lot of conversations about things that we could do that would really get the community to come together and something that would be a great way to give back and, at the same time, showcase some great work that comes from within our community because all of our people involved in this project are local. A lot of different ideas were pitched and one of the ideas was the thought of giving a home away and give them the opportunity of either A) living in and enjoying that home or B) selling that home and taking the proceeds from that home to change their life for whatever it is that they want to do.” The two-story home features a finished basement, rec area, three stall garage and a wet bar.

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Talk about that moment when you gave away the house in 2012 when Michele Gilbertson unlocked the door onstage and won the house. “Imagine that you put a lot of work, time

and passion into something that takes a lot of time, ideas and a lot of work and all of a sudden it comes to fruition. It’s pretty freaking amazing when that door opened and I saw her expression.” Talk about this year’s house. “It’s going to be a rambler with over 1,800 square feet per floor. It’s threebedroom up, two-bedroom down, so five bedrooms total. It's got a beautiful kitchen, a lot of unique custom details in the home, a full bar downstairs. It’s on a nice cul-de-sac lot. It’s going to be valued around $500,000. It will be fully landscaped turnkey for the family to move right into or to put on the market.” What would you say to the person that’s going to eventually win this house? “Congratulations. Your life just took a very exciting change. One of the things that we always say is that it will change someone’s life forever. It’s not just the win, but it’s all the other things that come from it. “The Gilbertson family is, to me, a perfect template to what this should do to change your life. It’s not about the money. It’s about what that buys you the freedom to do. If you look at that family and the vacations they’ve been able to take that they weren’t really able to do before, fixing up their home that they live in, being able to pay it forward and help her sister’s kids go to school. Think about how many different people were touched by the way this positive thing has changed into many more positive things.”


ARTISTIC INTERPRETATION

We talked to the Gilbertson family. (Read the July Design & Living to find out their incredible story.) The son, Levi Gilbertson, was so excited about this ’86 Camaro his dad was able to buy him. It’s funny because they kept talking about how they got it for $1,500. Even though they have this huge financial security, they’re a lessis-more family. “It never changed them. That’s the beauty. People make these ridiculous comments that money is the root of all evil. Money isn’t the root of all evil. Evil is the root of evil. If someone has evil in them, they’re just able to show more of it when they have money. It doesn’t change you. You are who you are. They’re a prime example of that. They didn’t have a lot and now they have security. They haven’t changed a certain thing about their integrity or personality. The way they live their life is exactly the same. That is just a pure symbol of who they are as people. Money doesn’t change people, people change people. We’re all responsible for our own actions in my book.” For More Information designerhomesfm.com/giveawaylifetime-2016

Want to tour the house? Starting Saturday, July 9, you’ll be able to tour the house located at 4200 54th Ave. S, Fargo. Below are the hours they are open. Be sure to like Designer Homes of Fargo-Moorhead and Design & Living Magazine on Facebook to find other opportunities to enter your name to win the house. Monday: 4-7 p.m. Tuesday: 4-7 p.m. Wednesday: 4-7 p.m. Thursday: 4-7 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: 1-5 p.m. Sunday: 1-5 p.m.


DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

Loving the intricate details of their Titan Homes build, Danielle and David Erickson longed to put the icing on the cake. Tying in the woven details of the fireplace and playing off the farmhouse charm in the kitchen, designer Trever Hill helped the Erickson family create a finished look to match their beautiful new home.

BY Trever Hill & Tracy Nicholson PHOTOS BY J. Alan Paul Photography

TREVER HILL

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DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN

GETTING STARTED "When talking with Danielle and finding out her needs, I asked what her budget was and what she wanted the result to be. I found out that she wanted an airy, crisp and fresh feel," said Hill. "Then I noticed the flooring, which is so dark and the white trim, which is an awesome contrast. So, I thought for the furniture, I do want to go a bit lighter, but, at the same time, we couldn't go white because it was important to keep in mind their young children and pets."

Hill chose the Erickson's decor, keeping in mind their lifestyle, which included their two young children, Lucas and Samantha, as well as the family dog, Reggie. "I just looked online for hours and never pulled the trigger, or I'd go to stores and get totally flustered, and then I'd quit," explained Danielle Erickson. "I saw Trever in a story about The Aspens that had popped up on my Facebook and really liked what he did."

Focusing on the main floor of their fourbedroom, three-and-a-half bath home,

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DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

GET THE LOOK Cabinetry - Wendt Custom Cabinets Rattan bar stools - New Pacific Direct Herb boxes - Gordmans Cairn stone formation - HomeGoods

FINDING THEIR STYLE Playing off of Titan's design and cabinetry, the Ericksons wanted to take the look of the kitchen and make it universal throughout the remainder of the main floor. "We really didn't have a certain type of decor in our old home," said Erickson. "It was just furniture. For the new home, I wanted it to be light and airy. Fresh and not so traditional feeling. I like lots of different styles, so that's a problem when I'm trying to do shopping on my own. It was nice to have him come and pull everything together for me."

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KITCHEN Beautiful, espresso-stained and white painted cabinetry, quartzite countertops and a farmhouse sink set the tone for their cottage chic main floor. Choosing to focus their attention on their favorite details, the Ericksons asked Hill to create their home's style based on the kitchen design and woven stone texture of the fireplace. Mimicking the woven textures of the fireplace, Hill chose a rattan bar stool to tie the rooms together. To freshen up the space and add in earthy, textural elements, Hill used a Cairn stone formation on the window sill and herb boxes on the center island.

WONDERING WHAT A CAIRN IS? According to Wikipedia, "A cairn is a human-made pile (or stack) of stones. In modern times, cairns are often erected as landmarks, a use they have had since ancient times; but, since prehistory, they have also been built for a variety of other reasons, such as burial monuments and for defense and hunting, as well as ceremonial, astronomical and other purposes."


"I THOUGHT WORKING WITH A DESIGNER WAS REALLY EASY. HE REALLY WAS ABLE TO TAKE MY THOUGHTS AND PUT IT INTO REALITY." Danielle Erickson, Homeowner

GET THE LOOK Table and side chairs - Crate and Barrel Captains chairs - HomeGoods Metal branch centerpiece - HomeGoods Potted birch branches - Furniture Mart


DESIGN DESIGN&LIVING

FAMILY ROOM In the family room, 16-foot vaulted ceilings draw the eye to one of the Erickson's favorite details: the stunning, woven stone fireplace with charming built-ins. To complete this room's appeal, Hill Incorporated the Erickson's original coffee table, accenting the large size with a woven tray and beautiful preserved greens.

"In my search, I found these two swivel chairs with removable slipcovers. You can customize whatever color or slipcover you like and change them out as you want," explained Hill. "Those chairs became the inspiration for our coloring. It's very fresh (and) it has yellow, which is really inviting and those really soft greens. From there, I found different elements like the art. To keep that balance of budget, we went with a really high-end Hickory Chair sofa. Behind the sofa, I found a gorgeous, antique wedding table from India. We used Danielle's pillows for below and added new lamps above."

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"The rug is a woven jute; Jaipur (rug from the capital city of India's Rajasthan state) that was really reasonable. It was important to keep that balance, so I shopped high-end on some things and found art that was pretty inexpensive," said Hill. "The art flowed really well with the rest, so again, keeping that balance to make sure I was inside the budget that we were shooting for."


DESIGN&LIVING DESIGN

GET THE LOOK Jute rug - McNeal & Friends Woven stone, mantle tile - Floor to Ceiling Carpet One Coffee table - Hom Furniture Swivel slipcover chairs - Craftmaster, Furniture Mart Sofa - Hickory Chair, McNeal & Friends Art - HomeGoods Preserved greens - HomeGoods Indian wedding table - McNeal & Friends Brushed silver lamps - HomeGoods Side table between chairs - HomeGoods Woven coffee table tray - HomeGoods

"With her wishes to tie in the woven stone of the fireplace and the kitchen details, I wanted some elements of that woven feel. So, I did this with the rug and the yellow woven chair pillows," explained Hill. "I love using pillows from HomeGoods. They're high-quality and they have a down fill, generally for a lower price point. On the center of the coffee table and the mantel, to keep a really fresh look, I put some real preserved greens."

For more information contact: Trever Hill Design 701-715-3077 trever@treverhilldesign.com treverhilldesign.com Titan Homes 4631 40th Ave. S. Ste. 110, Fargo 701-793-6917 info@titanhomesonline.com titanhomesonline.com

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DESIGN&LIVING REAL ESTATE

Real Estate:

Taking Flight Drones, otherwise known as unmanned aerial vehicles, have recently taken this country by storm and are used in everything from agriculture to law enforcement and science. See how one local company has found a way to make use of the drone's aerial feats in real estate.

By Tracy Nicholson Photos by J. Alan Paul Photography and Coldwell Banker

E

ver wonder what your home looks like from 400 feet up in the air? No need to charter a flight, Coldwell Banker has you covered. We sat down with Travis Beauchene, Coldwell Banker Marketing Director and Alex Brant, Coldwell Banker drone pilot to find out what makes drones the perfect tool for flying high in real estate.

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REAL ESTATE DESIGN&LIVING

QA &

How does a real estate company go about getting a drone? Beauchene: The whole process was very tedious and specific where you had to make an official petition to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration). Once that petition was reviewed by lawyers it was submitted and it took about five and a half months to get approved. So, that's how it all started. When our petition was accepted we were told we were the second in North Dakota to get FAA approval for a drone and the first real estate company in North Dakota. Why are there such strict regulations for drones? Brant: The process of getting this approved is difficult because it's in the national air space and it's the same air space that any manned aircraft is in. So, if you have a bunch of people going around flying these unaware of the laws and the rules up there, you could potentially put 200 or more lives at risk on a passenger plane. With the height that these drones can fly, you could take out an engine on a plane, so there's definitely some issues with that. Legally we're only allowed to go up to 400 feet off the ground. This drone can actually go up to about 5,000

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feet; at 4,000 is where you typically see planes flying at. What can Coldwell Banker do with a drone? Beauchene: Lake properties will be amazing for this. Flying in from the water and being able to get shots that you cannot get without having a drone. That's where the drone is really exciting. It's, how do you produce images and create a different perspective that you've never seen before? That's what this technology allows you to do. So, it brings a technology standpoint, marketing and even artful standpoint. That's what really makes me excited about it. It's just a whole new view on the world. Is the drone capable of video in homes as well? Beauchene: The drone has a Gimbal system, which means it's just a steady cam. That's something that videographers are familiar with. With the drone it just works so elegantly with a gliding motion whether you're

indoors or outdoors. It's able to counterbalance the power that is needed for it to fly. One thing we make sure to do is to keep the privacy of others neighbors intact when we're shooting videos or photos. We take that very seriously. We are making sure to shoot only the house that we have been given permission to shoot and also notify the neighbors to tell them what we're doing. We also have this insured so we're not just winging around homes and hoping nothing happens. Who does the use of a drone benefit? Beauchene: It really benefits two types of people. The sellers because they're going to have all of these viewers looking at their house in a different way and checking out the videos. Homes with videos get a much higher viewing rate when they're online. But, then it also benefits the realtors here because we do not charge them. This is a free service to our realtors. That's a huge benefit to


DESIGN&LIVING REAL ESTATE

"LAKE PROPERTIES WILL BE AMAZING FOR THIS. FLYING IN FROM THE WATER AND BEING ABLE TO GET SHOTS THAT YOU CANNOT GET WITHOUT HAVING A DRONE. THAT'S WHERE THE DRONE IS REALLY EXCITING." Travis Beauchene, Coldwell Banker

envelope. This technology speaks toward that. There will be some monkey see, monkey do. It'll catch on fast, but that's ok. This is really a reflection of our company and how we are always trying to be in the forefront of innovation. them and a really cool perk with our 55 realtors. What other things will you be doing with the drone? Beauchene: We will be using it for commercial use as well. It will be great to use this to fly over and show huge lots and properties being built on. We can use this to fly inside of warehouses for our commercial branch. It will be really beneficial because in the past, to get a shot of someone's land, we had to hire a pilot and take a plane out. That's how you could show your 50 acres of commercial land. Now, it's a two hour process with a drone. With a competitive real estate market, what does this mean for Coldwell Banker? Beauchene: It is competitive so we always want to be pushing the

How does one become a drone pilot? Brant: The way it's set up right now for using a drone for commercial purpose is you have to have at least a private pilot license and that's more so you're familiar with the rules and laws of flying. To really become involved with your own piloting there's actually unmanned aircraft systems programs that are out there. UND has one and several other schools. That's kind of a different route than this one though; that's more military, sitting in a bunker somewhere and flying thousands of miles away. For something like this, you can learn to fly them on your own independently, that's more so what I did. Can you explain more about how the drone works? Brant: The drone uses a Lithium Ion battery and gets about 15-17 minutes

of battery time per flight. The way we use it is, the remote projects all of the info onto the iPad. So, DGI has an app versus just flying with the remote. A huge thing in aviation whether it be unmanned aircraft or manned is situational awareness. Everything on the app allows me to know what's going on with the drone at that very moment; number of satellites, how much time I have left on charge, height, feet and distance. If we were to lose the remote, this has the ability to fly back and land at this very point. We can also set a certain point and circle around that area in a perfect circle and even put it in following mode which can actually follow a car. You can also set waypoints on a map so we can set it to fly to those locations. Another huge thing with using the iPad versus the remote, is that it shows us exactly what the camera sees. For more information contact: Coldwell Banker First Realty Travis Beauchene / Marketing Director 701-293-3423 tbeauchene@coldwellbankerfm.com coldwellbankerfm.com

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DESIGN&LIVING BUILD

Building a

Family Tradition

Hanson Brothers Construction enlisted the expertise of interior designer Monica Hart to bring warmth and life to the middle unit of their Coventry Drive three-plex attached living project. The outside unit was purchased by Eric and Par Monson but the middle unit remained a shell. By bringing a design concept to the unit brought with it more than attention, a family tradition would soon ensue for the Monson's and their future neighbors.

By Hailey Colbrunn | Photos by J. Alan Paul Photography

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BUILD DESIGN&LIVING

H

art was given the task of staging the middle unit for potential buyers, while also accompanying the future owners on their home design journey.

“I researched and went through some of the other twin homes that Hanson Brothers had done and everything was very warm,” said Hart. “We went with neutrals and, because it was a middle unit, I wanted to keep everything very light. Then this lovely couple bought it and went totally opposite of everything.” Hart’s comment is followed by a hearty laugh shared by herself and the owners of the middle unit, Paul and Mary Jo Richard. After selling their Fargo home in the summer of 2015, they moved to an apartment downtown. “We were not really sure what we wanted in town,” said Paul. “But an

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apartment wasn’t the right answer for us.” The right answer was to not compromise on the comfort of traditional home features while still achieving the downsized lifestyle, an idea shared by the Monsons. The answer that both couples were looking for was townhome living. “These aren't just ordinary townhomes,” Hart commented of Hanson Brother’s three-plex project. “They are upscale, finely constructed, modern living homes that are

maintenance free for the owner.” The unit provides traditional home comfort through more than its structural features, however. Family is an integral part to the design and use of both units in that the Richard’s middle unit is attached to the Monson's home, who happen to be long-time family friends. Paul Richard and Pat Monson were classmates in law school at University of North Dakota and the Richard’s

daughter, Kristi, and the Monson’s daughter, Rachel, have been best friends since the first grade. Both units have large windows facing the south that open the space to natural light and a view of the lot’s mature trees. Each unit was designed by Hart and includes cabinets by Beth Kemmer, CKD at Wood Specialists, flooring from Carpet World, and all lighting features by Valley Lights. Although the units share many similar features, the two could not be more opposite in their design.


DESIGN&LIVING BUILD The Monson’s Home An open concept with corner windows is what drew the Monsons to this particular unit. The owners aspired to make the space a quiet, visiting area centered on family time, a different design concept than their previous home. Reds and gold were used throughout the Monson’s traditional, warm unit, using the couple’s existing furniture as the theme for the home’s classic design. “It all came together with a pop of red,” said Pat Monson. Red accents are

sprinkled through the home’s neutral gold and beige base, seen through the dining area's oriental rug, alternating red textured paints in the main-level bathroom, and various decorative accents in the kitchen. The unit’s lower level showcases a handmade bar, created by an artisan at Valerie’s Furniture in Cave Creek, Arizona. With a marbled tin countertop and a caramel wood finish, the piece brings warmth and character to the inviting entertaining area.

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The Richard’s Home Cobalt was the inspiration for the Richard’s unit, blue being the couple’s favorite color. Hues of blue and the unit’s accent color, gray, can be found in two paintings Paul has had since 1982 that adorn the large wall space of the dining area. Paul used a matte gray chalk paint to refurbish a frame mounting an art piece above the fireplace and light blue glass works as a cool accent to the gray and white wave-style backsplash in the kitchen.

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Hart describes the unit as “upscale eclectic modern”, which is exemplified through the unit’s mix of the couple’s furniture from their previous home with new, custom pieces. Contemporary dark finishes throughout the unit tie the gray and blue accents together to execute a sleek, modern tone such as with the unit’s laminate floor, a dark wood finish called French Bleed. The unit’s most unique feature, however, is the wine lounge that sits


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just off the front entrance. An Arhaus custom ottoman is situated in the direct center of the room with four tufted, dark leather club chairs. The room also includes a custom wine cabinet done by Schmidt Brothers, furbished with a fridge and wine racks. “An office just seemed too boring,” said Paul Richard. The Richard’s had a similar concept in their previous home but can now utilize the space for monthly wine nights with their neighbors, starting at the Monson’s custom bar and making their way to the comfort of the lounge’s conversational circle. Building a family tradition was not the original goal of Hanson Brothers Construction but the Coventry Grove

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three-plex has brought family together in a way that encourages traditional home living. For more information contact: Monica Hart Interior Design 701-235-4929 monicahartid.com monica@monicahartid.com Wood Specialists Beth A. Kemmer CKD, CLC 3221 4th Ave. S, Fargo 701-281-2427 woodspecialistsinc.com Hanson Bros. Construction 701-235-7971 stage.hansonbrosinc.com


PARADE OF HOMES DESIGN&LIVING HOMEBUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF FARGO-MOORHEAD

2016 SPRING PARADE OF HOMES RECAP

Each Spring and Fall the Homebuilders Association of Fargo-Moorhead brings us the Parade of Homes. This parade allows anyone to jump in their car and take a tour of 99 featured homes. If you missed out on this May event, here is a quick recap of just a few of our favorite features.

TITAN HOMES

EID-CO HOMES

VERITY HOMES

PLECITY KOWALSKI CONSTRUCTION

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DESIGN&LIVING PARADE OF HOMES KRUEGER CONSTRUCTION

HERITAGE HOMES, STAGING BY TREVER HILL DESIGN

DESIGNER HOMES, STAGING BY THE GREEN ROOM

SILVER LINE CUSTOM HOMES, STAGING BY MCNEAL & FRIENDS

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BUILDING CONCEPTS

SIGNATURE HOMES

HANSON BROS. CONSTRUCTION, DESIGN BY MONICA HART INTERIOR DESIGN

Hanson Bros. Construction, Beth Kemmer, CKD - Wood Specialists

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DIETRICH HOMES


PARADE OF HOMES DESIGN&LIVING URBAN PRAIRIE HOMES

SUNRISE CUSTOM HOMES, STAGING BY CHRISTY BRAWNER INTERIORS

THOMSEN HOMES, STAGING BY MARIA BOSAK, ECO CHIC BOUTIQUE

MONARCH HOMES, STAGING BY JULIE ALIN, SCHEELS HOME & HARDWARE

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THE ART ISSUE DESIGN&LIVING

THE ART ISSUE

TO CLAY By Tracy Nicholson and Hailey Colbrunn Photos by J. Alan Paul Photography, Paul Flessland, Jon Offutt, Ecce Gallery, Ashley Kunz, Mike Marth and Jessica Wachter

T

HE INTRIGUE OF ART HAS LONG SERVED AS A DEPICTION OF ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS, POP CULTURE, ROMANCE, DESPAIR, HAPPINESS AND EVEN MYSTERY. COLORS, TEXTURES AND TECHNIQUE USE THEIR POWERS TO STIR EMOTIONS AND CREATE FEELINGS WE HOLD NEAR AND DEAR. From glass and metal to canvas and clay, art is admired in the gallery, but truly inspired in the home. Meet four local artists who are making waves in the art community and creating stunning work that deserves a place in your home.

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DESIGN&LIVING THE ART ISSUE

Artwork by Kelli Nelson

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DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

JON OFFUTT

CAPTURING THE HORIZON

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T A YOUNG AGE, WE'RE TAUGHT THAT IF WE PLAY WITH FIRE, WE'RE BOUND TO GET BURNT. MEET LOCAL ARTIST JON OFFUTT, WHO DIDN'T HEED THE WARNINGS. TAKING INSPIRATION FROM THE COLORS OF NORTH DAKOTA'S HORIZON, OFFUTT'S GLASS-BLOWN MASTERPIECES HAVE BECOME A NECESSITY FOR ANY TRUE ART COLLECTOR.

THE GLASSBLOWER Starting out as a potter in high school and continuing this in college, Offutt discovered glass while studying at MSUM. After spending much of his life working with clay, why did he move to blowing glass?

Some of Offutt's most recognizable pieces include a horizon we are all familiar with. "I call them my Dakota Horizons. Anytime you're driving in North Dakota, that's what it looks like; you get that big horizon. The first ones were just blue and the bottom was green or a light tan," said Offutt. "Over the years, I've added clouds. A couple years ago, I added tree lines. Last year I started doing furrows. So, they're growing."

"Glass is more suited to my personality," said Offutt. "It's more intense, it's more focused. From clay I learned how to keep things on center, round things, symmetry, vessels, but glass has a much faster feedback loop. I can make something, I cool it overnight and the next morning I can look at it and it's done. The only thing I do cold is sign my name on the bottom. With clay, it might be months before you actually see what you're doing." THE PROCESS Starting out every morning at 5 a.m., Offutt unloads the cooling oven to find his masterpieces from the day before. After inspecting every finished color and texture, Offutt starts planning for a new day of glassblowing. "I spend most of my day standing in front of the reheating chamber making the glass soft. The hotter it is, the softer it is," said Offutt. By Tracy Nicholson | Photos by Paul Flessland and Jon Offutt 59


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"THE KEY TO BEING A GOOD ARTIST AT ANYTHING IS TO BE CONSTANTLY DISSATISFIED. I KNOW I CAN DO IT A LITTLE BIT BETTER, FASTER, BIGGER, BRIGHTER. I'M GOING TO MAKE A BETTER ONE TOMORROW." JON OFFUTT

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"These are all my colors. I spend a lot of time just standing here breaking glass color chunks off," explained Offutt. "I pick those up with my pipe and make my first little bubble out of that chunk of gray. That would be like the sky on that landscape. You're looking through the clear glass to the little layer of gray glass in the core. So everything's built in layers. I have a furnace full of clear glass at 2,000 degrees and I'll gather that out, that's the majority of my material, it's clear glass. But then I get glass as rods or little chips or ground into powder that I can roll onto the surface."

CRASH AND BURN To explain the art form further, Offutt likens it to playing the piano. "Anybody can sit down on a piano bench and play it, but you're clumsy, it's not the right tempo," said Offutt. "There's a gradual learning, you get better the more you practice. So, after 35 years I consider myself a pretty good glass blower now. But, I did not master it right away. There was a lot of crashing noises and several burns. It's a pretty steep learning curve. You really have to want to do it. You have to have that 'stick with it' attitude."


ON THE ROAD Spending about six months of the year in his studio, aptly named the House of Mulciber, Offutt talks of the name's ties to the Roman god of fire and how it's based on the use of constructive fire, not destructive. Working with fire sets the schedule, with Offutt using the colder months to create enough pieces to get him through his summer travels, where he sells his work. When it gets near 70 degrees, it's time to hit the road.


ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

Offutt typically sells flowers, ornaments, gourds and pumpkins for $20 to $40. Some of the bigger Dakota Horizon pieces are priced from $800 to $900 dollars, but that's only if he gets it just right. "I say I price emotionally, because I'm the artist," said Offutt. "It's how much I like it. It might be a tiny one but priced at $1,000 because I like it. I think it's just right. It might be a huge one and it's a dollar because I don't like it."

A Team Sport To create perfection, Offutt works with an assistant, taking roughly an hour and a half to make each piece. "See the accent color that I put on the lip?" said Offutt. "Somebody's got to pick a chunk of color out of the oven, get it hot while I'm working on the piece and then bring it to me so I can draw it on the lip. It takes a minimum of two people. Glass blowing is really a team sport. I've seen teams of up to 10 people working on one piece."

Against the Elements Looking closely at Offutt's more textural work, it's easy to see there's a lot more to it than just choosing the perfect colors; there's also chemistry and science. Over the years, Offutt has perfected the art of elements working against each other. This is depicted through the peculiar, organic texture of some of his pieces. "I've found that some powders don't like each other," explained Offutt. "At one point this was all red. Depending on how hot I get it, how much it will break up – that red wants to pull together, there's so much metal in it."

THE SECRET FORMULA Offutt believes the key to being a good artist at anything is to be constantly dissatisfied. Like a true artist, his daily goals are to create better, faster, bigger and brighter. "What isn't right in one of those? That's what I focus on," said Offutt. "It's the what can I do better part. I do a lot of textural stuff, just trying to take advantage of the personalities of the color. Each color's formulated differently, so it reacts differently. It gets sticky at a different temperature or softer at a different temperature."

WHAT IS THE STUDIO CRAWL? Established in 2004, the Studio Crawl was developed to bring awareness and appreciation for the quality and diversity of the visual arts to others in our region. During the free two-day event in October, the public is invited into the studios of the many working artists in the FargoMoorhead area. "The Crawl" is one of the only opportunities in our community to visit with visual artists in their studio spaces.

FIND THE WORK To find Offutt's latest work, visit The Rourke art museum in Moorhead and the Plains Art Museum in Fargo. Retail locations include The Underbrush Gallery, Reed & Taylor Antiques and Gallery 4 in the Black Building.

For more information Fargo-Moorhead Visual Artists 701-298-3936 info@fmva.org fmva.org/studio-crawl

STUDIO CRAWL If you're yearning for a glance behind the scenes, make sure to attend the Studio Crawl, which invites anyone to tour local artist's studio spaces. Offutt is the director of the Studio Crawl and was also the 2015 member of the year.

Contact the Artist Jon Offutt, House of Mulciber 701-298-3936 mulciberglass@hotmail.com facebook.com/Jon-Offutt-House-of-Mulciber

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DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

ASHLEY KUNZ

DEVELOPING HER CRAFT

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INDING A PASSION AND MAKING IT INTO A WAY OF LIFE REQUIRES THE RIGHT MIX OF SPUNK, TALENT AND DILIGENCE. FARGO-NATIVE ASHLEY KUNZ EXEMPLIFIED A LOVE FOR CREATIVE EXPRESSION AT A YOUNG AGE BUT HAD NO EXPECTATIONS THAT HER TALENT WOULD TAKE HER INTO A NEW REALM OF CREATIVE PRODUCTION. YEARS LATER, HOWEVER, HER PIECES HAVE ACCUMULATED INTO A BEAUTIFUL COLLECTION OF ABSTRACT REPRESENTATION. MUSHROOMS & ART “Now you have to make a hundred of them.” A few remnants of Fargo artist Ashley Kunz’s high school ceramic mushrooms inhabit a windowsill of her cozy home studio, a little family of personal trinkets and treasures that represent her creative character and journey into her craft.

painting four years ago as a way to supplement her income but has developed her creative process, from beginner to professional, as the basis for her work’s uniqueness and substance.

“The mushrooms, that was my first introduction into art,” said Kunz. “I took a ceramic class in high school and the first day my teacher told us we could make anything we wanted, so that’s what I decided to make, mushrooms. Later, he told me if I didn’t make a hundred mushrooms, I was not going to pass this class. I keep them as a reminder that you gotta stick it out, even if you don’t like what you’re doing.” Although Kunz’s craft has manifested into elaborate, abstract paintings, the mushrooms are the allegory from which her journey has blossomed. Kunz began

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CREATIVE PROCESS That creative process developed into an art because, for Kunz, painting was, and is, anything but a thinking game. “I don’t plan anything,” said Kunz. “I just pick up a brush and paint. Some days I’ll start with my left hand, grab the brush, put some color on it and just see what happens. The painting will take shape from those few little first marks.” Kunz’s abstract style gained recognition after she hit several milestones last year. Kunz participated in a contest last June through Liquitex Paint. The global paint company was picking 12 artists throughout the year, with Kunz as their winner. She was also asked to have her work displayed at Uptown Gallery and was accepted into the Plains Art Museum’s “Art on the Plains” exhibit. A turning point for Kunz was joining the Arts Partnership and Fargo-Moorhead Visual Artists and they proved an essential component for her moving forward.

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EMOTIONAL ABSTRACT Her paintings have since developed into something she hopes can be the landscape for viewers to project their own emotions and experience. “Abstract work is complicated in that you can’t really talk a lot about it,” said Kunz. “I don’t want to either. I want people to form their own opinion. That’s one of my favorite parts about it, that somebody else might look at it and see something completely different or get an entirely different feeling from it.” Her passion and technique demonstrate an emotional experience, for herself as well as her audience, created through images. “The way my daughter smiles, that can trigger what colors I’m going to use in a painting because that’s just how I feel at the time,” said Kunz. “A lot of it is really emotionally driven for me.”

AUTUMN INSPIRATIONS Kunz’s 8-year-old daughter is a driving factor for her work. She displays her work on her Instagram account, Autumn in December, named after her art studio and inspired by her daughter's name and birth month. “She’s just beautiful. She’s happy, she has such a kind heart and a huge personality. She just loves things so much. I want her to know that no matter how farfetched your dreams are you just have to do it.” As for now, Kunz continues to paint. A hundred plus works later, that just-do-it attitude has developed her creative passion for abstract art, from mushrooms to masterpieces, into a craft. “This year I’m just going to try and see what happens,” said Kunz. For more information about Kunz's work: Ashley Kunz 701-729-3667 rubyredcherry2000@yahoo.com ashleykunzartist.com facebook.com/AutumnInDecember

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DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

BRAD BACHMEIER

THROWING CLAY

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FTER 23 YEARS OF THROWING POTTERY, BRAD BACHMEIER WOULDN'T CHANGE A THING. HE'S COMBINED HIS 15 YEARS OF TEACHING IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND AT MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY MOORHEAD TO CREATE A THRIVING CAREER AS A LOCAL POTTER. INSPIRED BY POTTERY'S LINK TO ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS, BACHMEIER IS ALWAYS A STUDENT AND NEVER STOPS LEARNING ABOUT HISTORY, GEOLOGY AND HONING HIS CRAFT.

Arriving at the home and studio of Brad Bachmeier, we knew we'd made it to the right place simply based on the flower bed filled with broken pottery. As we stared down at the remnants in awe, Bachmeier laughed, "That's the pottery graveyard. It's all the mistakes from the past 30 years."

DISCOVERING CLAY A Milnor, N.D., native, Bachmeier entered college with no formal art training and having never touched a piece of clay. "As a junior, I didn't even know what 'Intro to Ceramics' was and I took the class because I needed another intro class. It was the only one that fit in my schedule," said Bachmeier. "It turned out that when I touched it and made something with it for the first time, I knew that was sort of my thing. Before that, I had always thought I was going to be a painter. That was kind of a life-changing moment. There's something pretty magical about clay. People touch it and just love it and want to do it the rest of their life once they've experienced it." SPINNING THE WHEEL Starting with a cylinder, Bachmeier can turn a simple piece of clay into almost anything. "That first step, the centering, is actually the hardest. It takes nine hours just to learn how to center a piece of clay. So the first time you're teaching it to college students, that's the part that's so frustrating," said Bachmeier. "When you're younger, when you're learning the skills, you have to be

a perfectionist to get everything right. As you get older, you get to loosen up because you have the skills and everything looks more casual and easy." "It's kind of fun to watch, and most people don't make plates like this. This is a really elegant, sort of daring plate. I don't want to sound arrogant, but you have to have some skill to drop something this thin down into a large plate without it flopping over." Having studied

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Islamic writing, Bachmeier finishes this piece using the beautiful language as art, giving the piece a sense of age and history.

Art commissioned by Bell State Bank for their corporate board room

"THIS IS THE BEAUTIFUL THING FOR ME, THAT CLAY IS AT LEAST 500,000 YEARS OLD, AND AS SOON AS YOU PINCH IT OR PUT YOUR FINGERPRINT ON IT AND YOU RUN IT THROUGH SOME HEAT, WHETHER IT'S A BONFIRE OR A KILN, YOU'VE CHANGED THAT PIECE OF EARTH FOREVER."

If you're wondering how Bachmeier creates his largescale pieces, often four to five feet tall, it begins with a much bigger bat and a lot more muscle. "I start with a real big piece of clay, fighting it and trying to get it centered and then starting to pull it into a form. Then I start adding huge coils on, smooth it together and keep building," said Bachmeier. "To stiffen it up a bit, I'll literally take a weed blower and blow flames or start a fire on the inside of it to stiffen it up and keep building. That piece was so big I think two or three of us lifted it and carried it. At one point to take it out, we had to get a forklift to move it. Some of the larger-scale ones are actually made in three pieces and fired separately and then reassembled." ANCESTRAL EXPERIENCE Well known for his authentic techniques and antiquated-looking pottery, Bachmeier did not gain the experience to create these pieces overnight. "I've spent a lot of time the last few years doing artist-in-residencies and seeing how clay has been used all over the globe by different people. I've been investigating a lot of prairiefiring techniques, how people used to do it a thousand years ago," said Bachmeier. "This is the beautiful thing for me, that clay is at least 500,000 years old and as soon as you pinch it or put your fingerprint on it and you run it through some heat, whether it's a bonfire or a kiln, you've changed that

piece of earth forever. You can go throw it in a lake or bury it, and it's going to be there a million years later with your fingerprint on it. That's what's so interesting about studying clay around the globe. You've got this record of mankind for 20,000 years or so. It's like changing the earth and putting your mark on it." DIGGING FOR CLAY For Bachmeier, Finding clay is as simple as exploring the bank of a river or a farmer's field. "If you've ever heard a farmer say their tractor got stuck in gumbo, it's like that. It's a slippery porcelain. Minnesota has more clay than any state in the nation, so it's everywhere," said Bachmeier. EXPLORING INSPIRATION Not bending his career toward trends or other artist's work, Bachmeier does what he loves, even moving his wheel outside in the summer to be closer to his inspiration. "I love the outdoors and as a kid, I had a ton of freedom. My greatest joy with my family is traveling, hiking and exploring," said Bachmeier. "I did an artist-in-residency at the National Petrified Forest in Arizona. Then, all of a sudden, I had back-door access that no one else has to their permanent collections of Southwest pottery. They'll let you collect rocks and things in the park. I learned how to polish rocks and make them into lids. So lately I've been doing a lot more that's informed by geology. At school, I happen to be on the same floor as the anthropologists, so it's a perfect fit. It's getting to explore how people have used pottery for 20,000 years and how that earth turns into clay."

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Board room of the Offutt Center for Business at Concordia College

RARE ROCKS With his biggest inspiration being the outdoors, Bachmeier showed us his collection, pointing out sea glass, dessert rose, marble and a colorful array of unique stones. "I've got bins and bins of rocks and then I'll start to polish them and work on them," said Bachmeier. "Every one of these gives me an idea for a piece. In these bins is inspiration for the next 10 years. You know what's so humbling about this? For every one I pick up, I can say, 'This is more beautiful than anything I could ever make.'" BRICK SCULPTURES Gaining fame for his vessels, most don't realize the large-scale, site-specific installation work he's now taken on. Working with local companies, Bachmeier just installed one piece at Bell State Bank and one at Concordia College. This type of intricate work makes Bachmeier one of only a couple dozen brick sculptors in the country.

When Bachmeier does Raku firing, he fires the kilns up to 2,000 degrees. Donning a fire jacket, he opens them up, using his tongs to pull out the glowing red pieces and puts them outside in cans to smoke them.

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AFFORDING ART After 23 years of creating, Bachmeier learned the business of being an artist, paying close attention to price points. "If I go to an outdoor art fair, I don't want just rich people to be able to afford my work. I've even fought with galleries to keep the prices down because I'm a teacher. I'd like my friends to be able to afford them," said Bachmeier. With an array of pieces from $75 to $3,000, Bachmeier keeps his work accessible, which he considers vital in encouraging people to become art collectors. "One of the questions people ask all the time is if I'm selling a vessel for $500. They'll say, 'How long did that take?' The bottom line is that on the wheel it might only take an hour, but then it's drying, it's firing, it's glazing, firing again, finishing all of that," said Bachmeier. "A friend of mine that's an artist said the answer he always gives when someone asks how long that takes. He says, 'Well, about 25 years and two hours.'"

THE POWER OF THE ARTS One of Bachmeier's main career goals has been to work on improving the atmosphere for the arts and artists in the community. Having a firm belief in the power of the arts to create more vibrant and attractive communities, as well as creating a more well-rounded education for all children helps Bachmeier get involved. Here are just a few of the areas he's touched: non-profit art and culture boards (FMVA founding board member, Center for Creativity at the Plains Art Museum founding board member, Rourke Art Museum board and later president, The Arts Partnership board and later president, North Dakota Council on the Arts governor-appointed current board member.) UPCOMING PROJECTS Keep your eye out for Bachmeier's two upcoming largescale projects. One is for Sanford in Sioux Falls and in Fargo and the other is a Fargo public art project, a brick sculpture for a playground. FIND BACHMEIER'S WORK You can find pieces by Bachmeier at the Underbrush Gallery in Fargo and, on occasion, at the Rourke Art Museum and Rehfeld's Art & Framing in Sioux Falls. Contact the Artist Bachmeier Pottery & Sculpture bachmeierpottery.com


UNIOUE SENSE OF PLACE B r i n G i ng o utd o o r r o o m s to l i f e Pelican Lake Residence

LANDelements S C A P E a r c h i t e c t s

210 Broadway, Suite 302 Fargo | 701.235.3990 | landelements.com L a n d s c ap e A rc h i t e cture | De s i g n | P l a nni ng


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DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

MIKE MARTH

TEXTURAL DEPTH

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ITH EVERY VISIT TO ECCE ART GALLERY IN DOWNTOWN FARGO, IT'S IMPOSSIBLE TO NOT BE CAPTIVATED BY ARTIST MIKE MARTH'S WORK. EVEN TO THE NOVICE ART ENTHUSIAST, MARTH APPEARS TO BE IN A LEAGUE AND A MEDIUM ALL HIS OWN. MEETING UP WITH MARTH AT HIS HOME AND STUDIO IN MOORHEAD, WE FOUND THE ARTIST BEHIND THESE TEXTURAL MASTERPIECES TO BE EVERY BIT AS INTRIGUING AS HIS WORK. Everything you'd expect to see in a typical artist's studio, you likely won't find here. Construction tools are employed more often than paintbrushes and one can search, but will be hard-pressed to find an easel in Marth's work space. Tire treads, birch bark, concrete, plastic, wood scraps and basic construction materials are just some of the tools Marth uses in his arsenal of artistry.

"MOST OF THE TIME WHEN SOMEONE WALKS IN AND I'M PAINTING, I'M HOLDING A DRILL, SCREWDRIVER OR SOMETHING ELSE. NOT VERY OFTEN A BRUSH AND TRADITIONAL SORT OF PAINTING." MIKE MARTH 75


DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST "This is the working wall, you can see the years of drips and accumulations," said Marth. "I don't do easels, it's either on the wall or on the floor right here. Some people tell me I should paint my wall, but to me that's the history of since I've been here, which was 16 years. So, I don't want to disturb that wall." "That black thing sitting behind my chairs, that was part of a display I found behind Scheels by the dumpster. I use so much other material, that I can't walk by a dumpster. They're goldmines. Not like McDonald's though," laughs Marth. "You need to go to places like hardware stores. You have to look and dig. It's really amazing what you can find." "I really find old, rusty surfaces beautiful. Anything that's been weathered and aged. I like to get sort of a mix between organic and industrial. Part of what I love about an old rusty tool is the texture, not just the visual but the physical texture too. I think texture is just as important as color," said Marth. "Texture has the power to make your body shiver or invite you to touch or not to touch. It's really a powerful element of art and design that I love to use."

"PART OF WHAT I LOVE ABOUT AN OLD RUSTY TOOL IS THE TEXTURE, NOT JUST THE VISUAL BUT THE PHYSICAL TEXTURE TOO. I THINK TEXTURE IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS COLOR."

"I don't name my pieces," said Marth. "In my head I have some type of a working title, that'll guide the direction of the piece, but I don't feel stuck with it. I made it because it just came out, man. I think it deserves to exist."

IN THE BEGINNING Although each piece of Marth's is entirely different in shape, texture, materials and color, even Marth himself can see the thread of continuity through the years. "I would say my color sense or palette has been there from the beginning. But, I was much more interested in Analytic Cubism, that still is my favorite part of art history," Marth said. "I did other things searching for the path that I went down. I started straight painting and drawing, was a print maker, primarily in undergraduate, but that was just too much of a process. The introduction of other materials just slowly crept in. One day I stepped back and said, 'Wow, paint is only a part of it now.'"

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ARTIST DESIGN&LIVING

BEFORE

IN PROGRESS

SALVAGED ART One of Marth's latest discoveries in salvaged material are these cast paper pieces used in packaging. Having walked by them and ignoring them in the past during clean-up week, this year Marth was quickly drawn to the unusual texture and shape. Now, these cast paper pieces have undergone a transformation worthy of a place on Marth's wall of ongoing projects, just waiting for their finishing touches. To complete this piece, Marth explains that he will likely spend hours digging around, laying it on the floor, adding in and taking out elements to finally finish his composition. "I work on a lot of things at one time because I know the general direction but I don't know exactly what should be there yet. Sometimes I'll get a pretty vivid picture of something in my head, like the birch bark pieces. Other times, I just want to use the material, but I'm not really sure what it can do, unless I try some things and see what's successful." "I wouldn't say I wait for inspiration. The idea of waiting for the muses or inspiration to bite is magical, but it's still a job," explained Marth. "Everyday I come in here and push the work, maintain the practice; if you just stay receptive eventually you might just notice two things laying together and realize that's the solution, that's what I've been looking for." "I do occasionally take on commissioned pieces, but I'm very selective about that because I want to do what I do," explained Marth. "Sometimes I've been sorry for taking on a commission because I want the work to have the freedom to go where it goes. But, if someone wants to talk about something, I tell them to just give me a call or send me an email." THE BIRCH SERIES Going away from the canvas and toward his roots, Marth's birch series, was a phase surrounding the loss of his father. On his trips back home by Itasca park, Marth spent a lot of time taking walks through the woods. Noticing beautiful, birch bark on the forrest floor, inspiration struck. "I just thought, let's pick some up, this is as good as rusty metal - just a really cool surface. So, I did two years of making pieces with it," said Marth. "The first year things stayed rectangle. The second year, that group of work was more irregular based on whatever chunk of bark I found. It's kind of like rusty metal, the way moss would grow on it and the knots, it's just really interesting."

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DESIGN&LIVING ARTIST

CREATIVE GARDENING Showing us his second love and sanctuary just beyond the studio, Marth took us on a tour of his expansive garden where he grows an array of vegetables and seems to specialize in hot peppers, the hotter the better. "You know, through my 20's, 30's and 40's it was work every day. That's all I did," said Marth. "Now I've hit a point that I just feel like I need to stop once in a while, go out in the back and grow hot pepper plants or something. Everywhere I can I try to squeeze in, some ghost peppers, purple cayennes, yellow cayennes, those are great." For an artist like Marth, simple garden gnomes don't stand a chance. An array of intricate sculptures display wood, metal and stone amid a garden stand-off with godzilla and a chicken. It would take hours to discover every ornament of humor and whimsy this garden has hidden beneath the foliage. "I love gardening. It's my second love," said Marth. "Some of the sculptures around the yard are just things I've done over the years for my own enjoyment to have. The rock stack is a Jay Pfeifer piece."

FIND MARTH'S WORK Marth's work can be found at Ecce Gallery in Downtown Fargo. Beyond his studio, Marth is currently an adjunct art professor at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn.

Ecce Gallery 701-298-3223 216 Broadway N, Fargo info@ecce216.com Contact the Artist Mike Marth 218-359-0058 m.art@ideaone.net

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GALLERIES DESIGN&LIVING

Light Across the Red Pastel and charcoal on paper Bob Crowe Ecce Gallery

East Oil on Canvas Kelli Nelson Ecce Gallery

Scraped wood sculpture Paul Hedman Underbrush Gallery

ART SHOPPING GUIDE On a mission to show you Fargo-Moorhead's most notable artists, we've toured the galleries showcasing artists who are doing groundbreaking techniques and stunning masterpieces. If you're looking to create a truly inspired home, look no further.

Ascension Encaustic Dennis Krull Gallery 4, Ltd

The Portal Acrylic on Upcycled Screen M. Koskela Parallel Galleries 80

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By Tracy Nicholson Photos by Paul Flessland, Ecce Gallery

Lifting Rain Acrylic Michael Dunn Underbrush Gallery

Assemblage 36 Paper cuttings with nori paste on paper Amber Fletschock Ecce Gallery

Blue Stem Acrylic Susan Boyd Underbrush Gallery


Ceramic base lamp Epoxy glass cloth and carbon fiber shade Will Richards Underbrush Gallery

Trailer Obscura Silver gelatin print Meghan Duda Ecce Gallery

Lakeview Series III Oil on Wood Zhimin Guan Ecce Gallery

One in one hundred and one Photograph Jesse Olson Parallel Galleries

Livewire Acrylic Elizabeth Schwankl Gallery 4, Ltd


DESIGN&LIVING GALLERIES

Original Oil Robin Scott Underbrush Gallery

Autumn Woven glass (plate) Jaci Trefz Underbrush Gallery

Returning Herd Watercolor Michael Dunn Underbrush Gallery

Fieldscape 22 Acrylic on wood panel Kelly Thompson Ecce Gallery

Pattern Form Birch bark, wood glue Mike Marth Ecce Gallery

Copper weaving Jan Campbell Underbrush Gallery

Technicolor Dreamcoat Watercolor Barbara Bend Nagle Gallery 4, Ltd

Raku Vase Tim Axtman Pottery Underbrush Gallery

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GALLERIES DESIGN&LIVING

Bad Jack Oil paint, wire, steel, wood on panel Mike Marth Ecce Gallery

Gateway of the Solar Moon Vortex Steel Karman Rheault Gallery 4, Ltd

Cheryl Cassman Acrylic on canvas Parallel Galleries

Jigsaw Acrylic on canvas Sandi Dahl Underbrush Gallery

Red Shed & Silo Oil Doug Stuckle Gallery 4, Ltd

Cassie Baasch Parallel Galleries

Headless & Necklace Whitney Nielsen Gallery 4, Ltd

Somber Musings Mixed Media on Canvas Beata Weber Parallel Galleries

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Jon Offutt

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Gallery 4, Ltd


GALLERIES DESIGN&LIVING

ART & GALLERY DIRECTORY

W

ant to start your own collection of art? Use this directory to find museums, galleries, studio exhibits, art retailers and upcoming gallery

events. Many of these places showcase the work of regional as well as local artists with a potpourri of featured artists that often change from month to month. Underbrush Gallery 1450 25th St. S, Fargo 701-235-2228 underbrushgalleryfargo.com facebook.com/underbrushgallery Hours of Operation: Mon-Wed: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thu: 9:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri: 9:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat: 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Gallery 4, Ltd. 114 Broadway N, Fargo 701-237-6867 gallery4fargo.com facebook.com/Gallery4 Hours of Operation: Mon-Sat: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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Ecce Gallery 216 Broadway N, Fargo 701-298-3223 ecce216.com facebook.com/eccegallery Hours of Operation: Tue-Sat: Noon - 6 p.m. Sun: Noon - 5 p.m. Plains Art Museum 704 1st Ave. N, Fargo 701-551-6100 plainsart.org facebook.com/plainsartmuseum Hours of Operation: Tue-Wed: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thu: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

By Hailey Colbrunn, Tracy Nicholson Photo by Paul Flessland

Rourke Art Museum 521 Main Ave., Moorhead 218-236-8861 therourke.org facebook.com/RourkeArts Hours of Operation: Fri-Sun: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Art Bazaar 118 Broadway N, Fargo 218-329-1184 Hours of Operation: Mon-Sat: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Red Raven Espresso Parlor 916 Main Ave., Fargo 701-478-7337 redravenespressoparlor.com facebook.com/Red-Raven-EspressoParlor Hours of Operation: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sat: 10 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sun: 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Ochre Creative Studios 1114 Main Ave., Fargo 701-739-0338 facebook.com/OchreCreativeStudios Gallery dates announced on Facebook page.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! 2016 Corks & Canvas - Art and Wine Walk Summer is the perfect time to enjoy an evening stroll through Downtown Fargo with wine sampling, live artists and endless shopping! Thursday, June 9 Thursday, July 21 Thursday, August 11 Thursday, September 8 downtownfargo.com/events/article/ corks-canvas-art-and-wine-walkdowntown 41ST ANNUAL DOWNTOWN FARGO STREET FAIR Join the fun in North Dakota's largest free, outdoor event. Thursday, July 14 - 10a.m. - 9p.m. Friday, July 15 - 10a.m. - 9p.m. Saturday, July 16 - 10a.m. - 5p.m. downtownfargo.com


DESIGN&LIVING GALLERIES

Hjemkomst Center 202 1st Ave. N, Moorhead 218-299-5515 cityofmoorhead.com/departments/ parks-and-recreation/hjemkomst-center Hours of Operation: Mon–Sat: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun: Noon to 5 p.m. Concordia - Cyrus M. Running Gallery 901 8th St. S, Moorhead 218-299-3130 Hours of Operation: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Sun: 1 - 4 p.m. MSUM Art Gallery Roland Dille Center for the Arts 801 13th St. S, Moorhead 218-477-2930 Hours of Operation: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. -9 p.m. Sat: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. (when classes are in session) mnstate.edu/art/gallery.aspx

Mark Weiler is the owner of Ecce Art Gallery in Downtown Fargo.

WANT TO SUPPORT THE ARTS? Become a member, donate or simply buy a ticket to join in the fun with an array of art programs, classes and social events that help keep our art community thriving.

5foot20 Design Lounge & Art Studio 1424 1st Ave. N, Moorhead 701-388-9634 5foot20.com facebook.com/5foot20-design-lounge dkrull@5foot20.com

The Arts Partnership 1104 2nd Ave. S. #315, Fargo 701-237-6133 theartspartnership.net dayna@theartspartnership.net TAP Events & Programs: Chalkfest, CSA (Community Supported Art), The Corporate Artist in Residence Program, Fargo Art Marathon, #SupportLocalArt T-shirt Program

Parallel Galleries 114 Broadway N, Fargo 701-478-9636 parallelgalleries.com parallelgalleries@gmail.com Hours of Operation: Mon-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists 4824 12th St. S, Fargo 701-298-3936 fmva.org Info@fmva.org FMVA Events: Studio Crawl, Art Educators Exhibition, The Big Art Show, The Little Art Show, Constraint Show, Holiday Art Sale

c.lizzys 410 Broadway N, Fargo 701-235-4902 clizzys.com facebook.com/c.lizzys Hours of Operation: Mon-Wed: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thu: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Reed & Taylor Antiques 806 Main Ave., Fargo 701-241-4520 reedandtaylorantiques.com facebook.com/Reed-Taylor-Antiques Hours of Operation: Thu and Fri: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Unglued 408 Broadway N, Fargo 701-205-1597 ungluedmarket.com facebook.com/ungluedmarket Hours of Operation: Mon-Wed: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thurs-Fri: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 1 - 5 p.m. The Red Silo 12 Broadway N, Fargo 701-478-3822 theredsilo.com facebook.com/theredsilo Hours of Operation: Mon-Sat: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Rando Studio 8th St. S. #11, Fargo 701-235-2381 randostudio.com lathroprandy@yahoo.com Contact through email for gallery times Spirit Room 111 Broadway N, Fargo 701-237-0230 spiritroom.net facebook.com/SpiritRoomFargo Hours of Operation: Mon & Sat: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

NDSU Memorial Union Gallery + Store 258 Memorial Union, NDSU 1401 Administration Ave., Fargo 701-231-7900 Summer Hours: Mon-Fri: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Or by appointment ndsu.edu/mu Addictions Tattoo and Piercing 1623 University Dr. S, Fargo 701-235-8282 addictionstat2.com facebook.com/addictionstat2 Hours of Operation: Mon-Fri: Noon - 8 p.m. Sat: Noon - 10 p.m. Sun: Noon - 5 p.m. The Bee's Nest Tattoo & Art Studio 14 8th St. S, Fargo 701-205-4190 thebeesnesttattoo.com Search "The Best Nest Tattoo and Art Studio" on Facebook Hours of Operation: Tues-Thurs: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fri-Sat: 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Creatively Uncorked Studios Moorhead Studio: 510 Center Ave. #31, Moorhead West Fargo Studio: 715 13th Ave. E. Ste. 101, West Fargo 218-477-1987 creativelyuncorked.com creativelyuncorked@gmail.com

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Art Collection Starting Your Own

TIPS FROM AN ART LOVER

H

ello, Design & Living readers. I’m Christen, a homeowner who works in the tech space during the day, and by night, I’m geeking out over décor and design. My goal is to give tips that will stick with you and bring joy to your space when it comes to collecting art. Enjoy my first article around all things art. BY Christen Anderson | PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland

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Starting to collect artwork can be overwhelming and downright intimidating. Many decide to head to the local department store, select a piece that every other neighbor has and call it a day. However, that piece you quickly selected rarely ever pops or fills your soul with joy. Am I right? I’m here to tell you that you can collect art, inexpensively and easily. Read on to learn how.

1. Where to buy art you'll love for a lifetime

• Life Jacket by Kelly Thompson Kellythompsonmail@gmail.com

LOCALLY: Have you sat at the Toasted Frog noshing on those sinfully delicious pickles thinking how much you love the art piece hanging on the wall? You may never have guessed that the artwork is for sale. Tip: Though not always noted, most artwork in public places can be purchased. At the minimum, you can contact the artist for works that are for sale. EVENTS: We are so lucky to have events like Corks & Canvas, a reccurring summer event where you peruse boutiques for artwork and do wine tastings. Can it get any better? In the fall, head to Grand Forks for TAG (The Art of Giving) to have access to more than 300 original pieces of artwork. Tip: Search Facebook for local art events. There are tons, especially in the summer.

• Mask by Zaka Wi of St. Maarten • Flowery by Lily Marneffe lilymarneffe.com

TRAVELING: When traveling, consider pieces you see at markets. Even duplicates can feel like original artwork back home. Tip: I always travel with a poster tube so I can easily and safely transport gems I find.


DESIGN&LIVING ART AT HOME

2. What to keep in mind when looking for artwork LOVE IT: My number one rule is, if you love it and it fits your budget, buy it. Don’t settle for something that “fits the fireplace” – you’ll never be fully satisfied with it. Wait for the piece you see and instantly think, “I love that.” It’ll eventually happen. LOCATION: If you’re shopping for a room, make note of the area’s dimensions, colors and lighting. Decide whether you want a piece of art to be the focal point. If not, it’s best to choose art with neutral colors that will complement the room but not own it. PRICE: Determine what you’re comfortable spending before shopping. Keep in mind that art doesn’t need to be expensive. If you find a piece that is out of your price range, ask the artist if they have anything that fits your budget. Artists may also offer to create a new piece for you at a less expensive price. This is called a commission. Discuss what you liked about the original piece and be sure you’re comfortable before moving forward, keeping in mind no piece will be exactly alike.

• Pom poms by artist unknown Purchased in Peru

• Striped Bass School by Joe Higgins Contact via Fished Impressions on Facebook

• Artist unknown, purchased in St. Maarten

• Cherry Blossoms by Adam Kemp Contact via Facebook

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3. How to get the most out of your collection FRAMING: Framebridge is an online company I use that makes framing a cinch. Upload an image of your artwork to see what dozens of frames would look like with it. Or skip the work and have a professional provide three recommendations. Once you decide, they ship you packaging to safely send your artwork to be framed. Tip: Use the promotion code created just for Design & Living, FARGO15, for 15 percent off your first purchase. Enjoy!

• Fused glass by Anne Nye annenye.com

PLACEMENT: Hang your pieces where you’ll be able to see and enjoy them. If you have multiple pieces, think about placing items together to create a vignette, which is interior speak for grouping objects together. Mix and match pieces with candles, photos and other objects. Swap items out until you love what you see. MOVE IT: After you’ve had your pieces in the same spot for a while, switch it up to keep things fresh.

• Tulips by Katie Lee gallerybykatielee.com

I hope you enjoyed these tips and tricks I’ve learned throughout the years of collecting. For more information, contact:

• Various pieces, artists unknown

Christen Anderson christenjoyhomes@Outlook.com Connect with me on Facebook at Christen Joy Homes or Instagram at ChristenJoyHomes

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DESIGN&LIVING ASK THE EXPERT

FINDING THE

Perfect Mattress A

ll too often we focus on the fun parts of decorating a room and the defining component of the bedroom becomes a last minute and seemingly arbitrary purchase. If you've caught yourself on the search for a 'cheap' mattress for the lake or guest bedroom, assuming that any inexpensive option will do, here are some reasons you may want to rethink your buying strategy. BY HAILEY COLBRUNN | PHOTOS BY PAUL FLESSLAND

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DESIGN&LIVING ASK THE EXPERT

S

ince the mattress-buying process can be daunting, intimidating or maybe just monotonous, we met with local mattress aficionado Darrell Hansen from Furniture for Less to help lay out the how-to’s and the do-not’s so your getaways can be at topnotch comfort and affordability. WHY THEY’RE IMPORTANT Among the list of reasons why buyers should be more involved in their mattress purchase, the most discussed is quality sleep. “You spend a third of your life in bed,” said Hansen, who has 35 years of experience in the industry. “You want to get something that gives you back support and allows

“GET THE INFO ABOUT THE BED BECAUSE IF YOUR ONLY CRITERIA IS, IS IT COMFY TO ME RIGHT NOW? YOU MAY MAKE A BAD BUYING DECISION.” - Hansen

you to get rest. You wake up in a better mood the next day, you’re sharper the next day. A lot of of factors carry over from a bad night’s sleep.” WHY IT’S CHALLENGING Buying a mattress has obtained a certain reputation for being an accessory task, an add-on that’s more closely related to a spec sheet than a design rendering. But, why? “Mattresses are not a fun thing to shop for,” said Hansen. “Mattresses all look alike.” The outer appearance of mattresses is not significant to the quality or to the design of the room they will be placed in but the result of informed buying is well worth the process. Informed buying for mattresses, however, is very different than it is for other household essentials. “Every store will have the bed with a different name on it,” said Hansen. “It makes it tough to challenge based on model.”

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This is a wired tied coil system. As Hansen explains, these coils are connected at the top with wire and do not offer as much independent movement as the individually encased coils.

Instead of searching a variety of stores for the right price based on what model you think you found and liked, you have to get the information about why you liked the mattress. “All the important stuff is covered up,” said Hansen. “So you gotta know what’s inside the bed” INSIDE THE BED Hansen provided a guide of what components to ask about when comparing mattresses. The first information piece to get is what type of coil the bed contains. “There are two radically different types of coils out


Why Adjustable Beds? An up-and-coming trend in mattress purchasing is the adjustable bed. “Nowadays people buy an adjustable bed as a lifestyle choice," said Hansen. If you're one of the many who like to sit up and read or watch TV in bed, put this on the top of your list. According to Hansen, some even use it to help with health reasons like Acid Reflux or spouses that snore. When the snoring strikes, they can hit a button to adjust the bed and help stop it. Whatever you need it for, finding a position where your feet and upper part of your body are elevated can take a lot of pressure off of your back, providing a much better night's sleep.

there,” said Hansen. The two types of coil are the wiretied coil, where the coils are connected at the top with a wire, and the individually encased coil. According to Hansen, pocket springs are precompressed, individually encased coils. Individual encasement enables each spring to adjust independently of the others to perfectly support your body in any sleeping position. Pocket coils relieve pressure points because the coils can adapt to your body’s unique shape. Pocket coils have a very low "bounce yield," making motion transfer very low. When one person moves on the bed, the other person will feel little to no movement.

The second aspect to question is what type of material the mattress has over the top of the coil system. “If they use memory foam or latex, they have some big advantages to those items; less body impressions and less pressure points,” said Hansen. Third, look for foam encased edge support. “It’s fairly standard these days but if you feel the outside edge of the bed, if you don’t feel springs, you’ve got a nice edge support,” said Hansen. “Look for that because any bed without that would be a red flag that it’s a little bit of cheaper quality.”

DESIGN&LIVING ASK THE EXPERT

Lastly, but most important, is that you have to be comfortable in it. “A lot of beds will have triple choice so they’ll have one model in firm, plush and pillowtop,” said Hansen. Since comfortability is the number one element to pay attention to when purchasing a mattress, use your information about type of coil, topping material and the other specs to focus on the one that feels right.

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BUILD DESIGN&LIVING

MAIN LEVEL

HOUSE #1

UPPER LEVEL

Heritage Homes, Santa Monica Plan Style: Modern Contemporary Residence of Michael Noffze, The Wilds in West Fargo 4,311 square feet including basement

LOWER LEVEL

ONE PLAN Two Styles

W

hen builders take one house plan and execute it two completely different ways, the results can be truly unique to the homeowner. Showing us two homes based on Heritage Homes' Santa Monica plan, Leslie Wood and Mari Santoyo Perry give us an inside perspective of one homeowner's craftsman approach and the others more contemporary approach. This is proof that one house plan done two different ways can create the personalized design homeowners strive for.

MAIN LEVEL

BY Tracy Nicholson | PHOTOS BY Paul Flessland

PERSONALIZING THE SANTA MONICA PLAN The plans featured in this article are owned by HERITAGE HOMES and are protected by trademark and U.S. Copyright Laws. HERITAGE HOMES has the exclusive right to use the plans, make or distribute copies of the plans, construct a building based on the plans and prepare derivative works from the plans. A person or entity that uses the plans, makes or distributes copies of the plans, constructs a home based on the plans or prepares derivative works from the plans is violating U.S. Copyright laws. Copyright infringement can subject you to damages, including attorney fees and the lost profits of HERITAGE HOMES.)

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Altering the original plan, Heritage angled the stairwell to accommodate the new upstairs, loft style. Floor to ceiling stone details give the stairwell and fireplace a dramatic, contemporary appeal putting the focus on the almost 20-foot ceilings.


DESIGN&LIVING BUILD An aviation enthusiast, homeowner Michael Noffze had Heritage Homes base his home design on the Aviator Series by world-renowned photographer Peter Lik. These stunning, limited edition photos with dramatic landscapes in blues and greys, create the perfect inspiration for his contemporary design.

DINING & KITCHEN AREA In the dining area, Noffze chose a dropdown ceiling detail with LED up lights as an upgrade to the original plan. He also eliminated pendants from the quartz kitchen island, keeping with the clean lines and providing an unobstructed view of the TV.

"EVERY LIGHT IS LED AND DIMMABLE IN THE SAME COLOR HUE AT 3,000 KELVINS. THAT WAS A SPECIAL FEATURE, SO THAT WHEN EACH LIGHT IS TURNED ON YOU DON'T GET A DIFFERENT HUE OF LIGHTING OR CHANGE OF COLOR."

Michael Noffze Homeowner

GREAT ROOM On the original plan, the entertainment wall detail was much smaller. With the inclusion of a 75" TV and smart home system fully integrated, Noffze needed customized storage to camouflage the receivers, automation and speakers. The Peter Lik Aviator Series photograph above the entertainment wall was the inspiration for the entire home, and is one of only 10 in existence.

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DESIGN&LIVING BUILD

MASTER SUITE Using the original flex space on the main level, Heritage created a master suite wing. With the master suite expanded, they were able to add a water resistant, wood trimmed soaking tub, walk-in custom tile shower and large walk-in closet with LED-lit rod design and LED-lit drawers by Smart Spaces.

SHOWER For Noffze's master shower, computers control every function via three panels. The water temperature is controlled to a perfect 100 degrees with multiple body sprays, massage, a rainshower head and a separate waterfall head from Ferguson. This shower is designed so that two people can be in here with three different zones on each one, with the temperature fully controlled.

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UPPER LEVEL

Noting some of the interior changes to the original plan, Noffze asked for the upstairs to have an open, loft-style effect with a catwalk. To do this, Heritage eliminated one of three bedrooms to create the loft with the hammock and office area. This would leave Noffze with two bedrooms up and two bedrooms down with a master bedroom on the main level.

OFFICE What was originally an additional bedroom and bathroom became Noffze’s new loft-style office. Adding industrial flair to his contemporary space, Noffze had an airplane wing desk fabricated by California based MotoArt, then added a tempered glass top made by Fargo Glass & Paint.

Lesli Wood Heritage Homes

"IT'S ALWAYS REWARDING TO SEE HOW SOMEONE WILL TURN ONE OF OUR PLANS INTO THEIR OWN SPACE. WE ENCOURAGE HOMEOWNERS TO PUT THEIR HOBBIES AND PASSIONS INTO THEIR NEW HOME."

GUEST SUITE Re-envisioning the original plan, Heritage turned a smaller guest bedroom and media space or den for kids into a guest suite with a spacious bathroom.

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DESIGN&LIVING BUILD

LOWER LEVEL

POWER PANEL

Theater and smart home system - Smart Home Technology Maple wood flooring - Floor to Ceiling Poplar cabinetry and entertainment wall - Mill Creek Custom Cabinets

On this panel, Noffze has his security system cameras, centralized computer control, wireless router, amplifiers and internet music sources streaming in satellite radio. This house consists of over four-and-a-half miles of wire controlling most every function of the home.

THEATER ROOM / WET BAR In the lower level, Noffze had one of the bedrooms turned into a gym and the other into his son's bedroom. The remaining space is utilized as an open theater room with bar and pool table areas. With built-in subwoofers, Noffze also had a feature installed that would appease any gamer with a place for plugging in any gaming system, directly connecting it to internet connection and sending the video right to the projector.

POOL TABLE

To complete his contemporary space in blue tones, Noffze had his Olhausen pool table custom made with the same blue cloth he'll use to camouflage his speakers inset in cabinetry.

GARAGE

Noffze, a surgeon by day and helicopter and private airplane pilot in his off-time, extended his passion for flying to the garage. One of Heritage Homes' most interesting requests, Noffze requested a garage large enough to accommodate building airplanes.

GUN ROOM

Not on the original plan, Noffze had a room made for his gun storage and safe that was dropped in prior to framing. This room also serves as a safe room with its concrete walls.

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HOUSE #2

Heritage Homes, Santa Monica Plan Style: Traditional Craftsman Residence of Dereena and Daniel Thompson, Mapleton 4,401 square feet

MAIN LEVEL

KITCHEN/DINING ROOM Although the Thompson's are now empty nesters, they needed to make sure they had ample space to seat their whole family and future grandchildren. A change from the first home, they opted to take space from the great room and also added additional square footage to the kitchen and dining room to seat 10. They then created even more seating by going with an L-shaped, granite island design. Designing for their more traditional style, the Thompson's used the same Espresso stained poplar cabinetry but took the cabinets from floor to ceiling with lit, display cabinets above. One of their favorite features in the kitchen is the apron front farmhouse sink with oil-rubbed bronze fixtures. Adding to the warm tones, the Thompson's chose a stacked stone backsplash with elegant, stained glass pendants.

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Cabinetry - Mill Creek Custom Cabinets Blinds - Budget Blinds


DESIGN&LIVING BUILD

GREAT ROOM Creating the great room's focal point is the rustic, stone hearth with step up, using 3-D imagery to finalize the look. "I wanted a more rustic feeling and going straight up was just a bit too modern. It was a huge bonus to have the 3-D visuals from Eric (Smith) and Nichole (Schaffer) on the design team, to be able to really know what it was going to look like," said homeowner, Dereena Thompson. "I'm very much French country and my husband is very much country, so I thought we could do a blend of both in our home, so both of us are comfortable in it."

FOYER In the foyer, a high-end laminate complements the espresso stained, poplar banister with glass inserts on the angled staircase.

MASTER BEDROOM Just like the contemporary home, the Thompson's used the original flex space to expand the master suite adding a patio off of the bedroom. Instead of an LED lit ceiling, this more traditional space has a deep trey ceiling with darker contrasting paint color. The additional footage went to a larger walk-in closet and upgraded master bath with enclosed steam shower and soaking tub.

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UPPER LEVEL

ENTERTAINMENT LOFT Upstairs, across the catwalk, the Thompson's also chose to forgo one of the planned bedrooms to create an open, entertainment loft with pool table and seating area. On the other side, a spacious guest bedroom, bathroom and small office complete the upstairs space.

"DEREENA REALLY KNEW WHAT SHE WANTED STYLEWISE. I WAS THERE TO HELP WITH LOOKING AT DIFFERENT Mari Santoyo Perry OPTIONS, Heritage Homes ASSISTING WITH COLORS THAT COULD GO TOGETHER AND HELPING CHANGE THEIR FLOOR PLAN TO FIT THEIR LIFESTYLE."

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DESIGN&LIVING BUILD

LOWER LEVEL

THEATER ROOM On the lower level, the Thompson's put their own spin on the original layout with an open family living space and separate theater room. In the remaining space, the Thompson's have a large guest bedroom, bathroom and dual functioning utility and dog washing station.

DOG WASH STATION A unique feature to their home, the Thompson's found this large dog washing station and tub online. With two golden retrievers and a yorkie, this home is paradise for the pups. From the wash station, the dogs can go thru a separate entrance direct to the garage, which is unique to the Thompson’s home design. "We love to travel, so one of our concerns is if the dogs are ok," said Daniel Thompson. "We actually have the home designed with a doggy door, fenced in yard, plumbed in dog feeding station, and insulated garage with heated floor so it never gets below 65 degrees for them."

HOUSE #1 VS. HOUSE #2

If comparing the two homes at nearly the same square footage, using the same Santa Monica plan, it would be pretty hard to do an apples to apples comparison. “Our team prides itself on being able to deliver our homeowners a home that is designed to their lifestyle and price point. We want homeowners to first fall in love with the livability of one of our 21 floor plans, then start creating their dream home based on their design preferences and the way they live," said Leslie Wood, Director of Marketing at Heritage Homes. For more information contact: Heritage Homes New Home Sales Specialists 701-281-7184 sales@heritagefargo.com heritagefargo.com

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ARTISTIC S By Tracy Nicholson Photos by Zach Davis Photography

ince 1960, the Rourke Art Museum has showcased regional talent with artistic excellence. Known among art enthusiasts and the well-connected, it’s been a hidden gem for many others, just waiting to be discovered. Longing to further expose its masterpieces, the museum is now opening its regal doors to accommodate those on the search for an inspiring venue. Setting the scene to show how the museum’s space can be transformed, Carrie Brusven of Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events gave us a glimpse of the vintage inspired, wedding masterpiece she created.

GATHERED AT THE ROURKE Collaborating with the museum and inviting us on a tour, Brusven explained the services Gathered. offers. “We’ve recently rebranded from our original name, Rustic Trunk. It was good for me when we started, but it had kind of pigeon-holed me into one specific style. I wanted to better communicate that I do more than just rustic. We’re doing modern themes now, mid-century mod, vintage, rustic, old world, farmhouse and all kinds of different things.”

ABOUT THE ROURKE ART MUSEUM Founded as an art gallery in 1960 by James O’Rourke, the Rourke Art Museum is located in the historic Federal Courthouse and Post Office built in 1915 by federal architect Oscar Wenteroth. Since 1966, it has served as a center for the visual arts, housing the Red River Art Center, the Plains Art Museum and now the Rourke Art Gallery Museum. The museum’s permanent collection consists of approximately 4,000 works. It includes a significant regional art collection, important 20th century artists and art movements and global collections.

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MUSEUM DESIGN&LIVING "Rentals and styling is my specialty. We have a warehouse now for rental furniture," said Brusven. "We can have people come in and choose furniture or I can have an area staged to show different styling options. We've also recently branched out into staging homes and apartments. We've done proms, corporate events and would love to do more small, intimate events." "We can rent furniture and other items for a very reasonable price," said Brusven. "They can do it themselves and just rent out items or they can hire us to go through the styling process with them. We also help with a lot of event logistics too."

In this space, Brusven chose her own lime toned, tufted chairs to create the second social area, contrasting with deep purples, rich browns and pops of fresh green. “Nothing here is overdone. It’s tasteful, simple and intentional. We wanted it to be minimal, but still very beautiful,” said Brusven.

STYLING THE ROURKE: Courtyard Retaining much of its original architecture, the Rourke's exterior bodes a palatial, front columned portico, which leads the way to an elegant, cafe lit courtyard with a winding staircase. Aiming for a more sophisticated, artistic feel, Brusven created a mature setting suitable for personalities with an appreciation for art. "We didn't want it to be real trendy or kitschy," said Brusven. "So there's not a lot of extra fluff, but tasteful. We have some vintage and modern furniture styles throughout."

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DESIGN&LIVING MUSEUM

"This is furniture that was already here, so we wanted to dress it up a little bit and help people imagine sitting around and enjoying a glass of wine in the courtyard. We wanted to cozy it up and create a living space outdoors," said Brusven. Elevating the museum's outdoor courtyard, she chose fresh lilacs, ferns and potted plants from Holland's in Moorhead.

"I'm absolutely in love with the bar table we have. It's an old store counter and display table," said Brusven. "For our upcoming events, we're trying to encourage outdoor bars and bar set ups that are different; something interesting and unique. The bar doesn't have to be boring."

Utilizing local vendors, Brusven chose gorgeous cakes from Nichole's Fine Pastry and specialty wines from Crate & Compass. "Crate & Compass imports a lot of wine from Italy and very unique wines, things you can't otherwise get," said Brusven. "They have wine tastings every now and then. They just launched last fall in Moorhead."

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Utilizing the museum's charming wood chairs, Brusven staged a ceremony scene within the courtyard. Seeded eucalyptus trails down the museum's winding staircase lending a softer feel to the aged brick surround. For an added touch of rustic charm, Brusven used authentic wine barrels as resting areas for guests to linger.

Instead of having a bridal party stand as is, Brusven opted to create a styled seating area with a stately linen sofa, vintage settee and potted plants.

“I have a special love for old world and vintage. I like the feeling of things that have age, history and a story add to our own stories.� Carrie Brusven, Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events 120

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MUSEUM DESIGN&LIVING

INSIDE THE GALLERY For cooler temps or rainy days, events can be moved indoors to the Rourke's neoclassical, gallery setting. A movable wall on the main floor of the museum helps to transform its art displays into a top-notch venue for weddings, meetings or intimate dinners. When the space is rented out, guests are welcomed to the entire gallery main floor and upper level with the original marble staircase.

Setting an exquisite scene amid the art, Brusven staged the Rourke's gallery for celebration and socializing in an open-house layout. Taking a cue from the museum's rich architecture and historic character, she evoked romance with vintage settees and farmhouse inspired floral complementing the gallery setting. "We're doing more and more of these types of receptions where you don't have to do a sit-down, formal dinner," said Brusven. "It's a really fun concept and I like the idea of doing something different, not doing it a certain way because that's the way weddings are supposed to be. For the Rourke to now be a venue is exciting. It really fills a need in our community for more mid-sized venues."

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Take a walk up the original marble and wood staircase to a serene space overlooking the main floor gallery. The loft-like, second-floor gallery features original wood flooring and trim with stunning arched windows.

EXPOSING ART "By opening the space up to guests through events, we are getting a lot of people inside that may not have ever been here. We want to get people acquainted with other venues of art. That's something that's really important to the Rourke, getting more people educated about art and artists in our region," said Regan. "So many of the exhibits are local artists, many people don't realize the amazing artists that we have in the Fargo-Moorhead area. So, we want to celebrate that and allow other people to take advantage of the space." CATERING IN If you're someone who wants the freedom to choose any unique food or beverage without restriction, the Rourke allows a caterer of your choice for a fully customizable event. "You can even bring in musicians or really whatever your heart desires," said Regan. "For weddings, we don't charge by the hour or include hidden fees for things like chairs. It's really all included and you can set up and tear down as you need to that day." Rourke Event Pricing: Non-profit / meeting rate $50 per hour Retail events $200 per hour Weddings $2,000 HIDDEN GEM What was once used only for board member's gatherings, the Rourke has now realized the importance of showcasing their extraordinary space. "Board members have in the past utilized this space for weddings and we've had very intimate dinner receptions here," said Rourke Events Coordinator Jodi Regan. "It's been one of those best kept secrets, where if you know people you know that it could be used. It's a great price-point between the standard ballroom and other museums in the vicinity. It's that middle ground. So, we wanted to open it up, let the community know that events are something that the Rourke can accommodate."

For more information contact: Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events 210 Broadway N, Fargo 701-412-3782 rustictrunk.com facebook.com/gatheredrentalsandevents

Credits: Women’s Attire: Your Day by Nicole Hair & Makeup: Adae Salon Men’s Attire: Fowlers Heritage Rings: Aerow Invites: Mirth Paperie

Rourke Art Museum 521 Main Ave., Moorhead Jodi.regan@therourke.org 218-236-8861 facebook.com/RourkeArts Instagram@rourkemuseum

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Profile for Spotlight

Design & Living June 2016  

From glass blowers to painters, meet four local artists who are making our community beautiful. You'll also find a list of all the art galle...

Design & Living June 2016  

From glass blowers to painters, meet four local artists who are making our community beautiful. You'll also find a list of all the art galle...