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P E O P L E

S P O R T S

H E A LT H

A R T

AUGUST | SEPTEMBER 2017

F O O D

T R A V E L


Some communities offer memory care Beau Provence specializes in it.

“Beau Provence has been our father’s home for over two years, and every day it is abundantly clear that he is comfortable, happy, and excellently cared for. The Beau Provence team has been such a blessing to my family- their above-and-beyond attitude and genuine concern for my dad has made being part of the Beau Provence community a great experience for both my dad and those that love him.” - Don, L. III, son of resident Don L. (pictured)

Your loved one deserves the very best in experienced, customized care, and Beau Provence delivers. As the Northshore’s only memory care exclusive community, Beau Provence was built from the ground up specifically to meet the unique needs of residents with Alzheimer’s & Dementia. • 24-hour nursing staff and around-the-clock care • Extensive dementia care training for all staff members • Medication management and discharge, placement, and assessment assistance • Customized care plans tailored to each resident’s individual abilities and preferences • Enriching, abilities-based activities led by a full-time Activities Director • Delicious, nutritionist-prepared meals served restaurant style • Secure, spacious outdoor gardens in which residents can safely enjoy the outdoors • Exclusive Transition Program designed to support and guide families through the move-in process

Call or stop by today to experience what makes Beau Provence a community unlike any other!

(985) 778-0755 • www.BeauProvence.com 100 Beau West in Mandeville • Located off of Highway 22 across from Beau Chêne


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SCIENCE SOLAR ECLIPSE

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PEOPLE

COACH ORGERON

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BEAUTY

GAME DAY MAKE UP

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GIVING BACK MILNE FOUNDATION

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ARTIST

MARY CHRISTOPHER

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WORTH A DRIVE BOGUE CHITTO

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CUTTING EDGE OF FASHION FROM KENYA, WITH LOVE

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SPORTS

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

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SPORTSMAN’S EDGE ONE MEMORABLE DAY

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RESTAURANT REVIEW

MY TURN BY: OSMAN RODAS

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GETAWAY

VERMONT

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AROUND THE LAKE SOCIAL

From Kenya, With Love page 040 Photo Marshall Geier


PUBLISHER Sarah Cottrell

My father was such a wonderful story teller; my childhood memories are filled with the trips we would take and the stories he would tell. He was blessed with a full, diverse and wonderful life. It amazed me that even when he was in his 80’s, he still told stories that I hadn’t heard before. Living here on the Northshore, I am amazed at the people and places that make up the fabric of the area. We are excited to again bring you stories that show the diverse nature of the residents who live and work here. EDGE’s Style Director, Patty Beal, shares the story of the multitalented Sophia Omoro, whose journey started in Kenya and is as much inspiring as it is fascinating. To get ready for football season, our friend Tiger Toon’s Tom Sylvest Jr. caught up with Coach Orgeron who shared his thoughts on the upcoming LSU season and also what makes living on the Northshore so special for him and his family. The Lake 94.7’s Sports Director, Mike Pervel, takes a look at our local high schools’ upcoming football season and provides our readers with schedules for each team. Enjoy the issue and all the stories from around the Northshore,

PUBLISHER

EDITOR Jack Torrance ART DIRECTOR Fernanda Chagas Kirk STYLE DIRECTOR Patty Beal BEAUTY EDITOR Caitlin Picou CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rhett Allain Kim Bergeron G. Brent Brown Charles Dowdy John N. Felsher Leonard Gray Tom Sylvest Jr. Elizabeth Kennedy Wells STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Jerry Cottrell CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Yehleen Bacalso-Gaffney G. Brent Brown John N. Felsher Marshall Geier SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVES Eloise Cottrell Rick Clasen ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Blossman-Ferran Erin Bolton D’Ann Davis Michelle Wallis-Croas

ON THE COVER Bogue Chitto State Park Photo Jerry Cottrell

The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by EDGE Publishing. @ 2017 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Please email comments or story ideas to edgepublisher@yahoo.com. EDGE PUBLISHING • 69170 HWY 190. SUITE 1 COVINGTON, LA 70433 • 985.875.9691


GREAT COVERAGE FOCUSED ON THE NORTHSHORE

AND NOW BRINGING YOU

Listen to Mike Pervel Friday nights broadcasting live from a local high school football game. edgeofthelake.com

lake947.net


CONTRIBUTING WRITERS CAITLIN PICOU Licensed Makeup Artist, Caitlin Picou has been working in the beauty industry for nearly a decade. She has developed products for multi-billion dollar companies and has brought her expertise back home. Born and raised in Covington, Caitlin attended St. Scholastica Academy and received her Bachelor’s Degree from Louisiana State University. In 2013, she launched her boutique cosmetics line, Kismet. She and her brand gained national recognition by competing on CNBC’s Billion Dollar Buyer. Caitlin is also very active in supporting local communities by partnering with non-profits throughout the area. You will find Kismet Headquarters in picturesque Downtown Covington off Boston Street, and you can find her products throughout the Northshore at various specialty boutiques.

RHETT ALLAIN Rhett Allain is currently an Associate Professor of Physics at Southeastern Louisiana University and blogger at Wired Science Blogs. In his spare time he is also the Technical Consultant for the CBS show MacGyver and The Science Channel show MythBusters. He is the author of 4 books including Angry Birds: Furious Forces and Geek Physics. In his spare time, Allain likes to ponder the everyday applications of physics and spend time with his family.  He likes to take apart things, but can’t always put them back together.

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MIKE PERVEL Mike Pervel was born and raised in New Orleans, a 1970 Marion Abramson High grad and four-year baseball letterman. A sports “junkie,” he served as school newspaper sports editor. In 1972 he enlisted in the Army proudly serving 30 years as a military broadcaster with numerous overseas assignments in Germany, Korea and Thailand, closing out as the Army Broadcasting Service Sergeant Major in Washington, D. C., responsible for broadcasters stationed around the globe. Mike joined the News Banner/St. Tammany News and was Sports Editor for ten years before joining the Lake 94.7 as Sports Director in 2013. When not working, Mike enjoys spending time with his wife Nok, four children and 12 grandchildren.

TOM SYLVEST JR. TigerToons is a labor of love from the pencil and computer of Tom Sylvest Jr.. Tom and his wife, Kathleen, live in Baton Rouge, are graduates of LSU, and have been lifelong Tiger fans. Tom has always drawn cartoons about LSU sports. In 1996, he took advantage of the capabilities of the internet and developed TigerToons. Each year, Tom creates cartoons that depict some aspect of LSU sports. He most often draws images relative to football, but will sometimes draw about other sports. Tom distributes his cartoons via his website under tigertoons.org, a TigerToons Facebook group and by way of Twitter.


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SOLAR ECLIPSE

STORY RHETT ALLAIN

Surely you have heard everyone talking about the solar eclipse this summer on August 21, 2017. But what’s the big deal, right? Wasn’t there an eclipse last fall? Yes, there was, but that was a lunar eclipse and not a solar eclipse. Both a solar and a lunar eclipse deal with the relationship between the Earth, Sun, and Moon, but it’s easy to get things confused. Here is an easy way to remember the difference. If these objects are in order from Sun-EarthMoon, then the Earth’s shadow falls on the moon, and it is a lunar eclipse. If you have Sun-Moon-Earth, then the moon’s shadow falls on the earth, and it’s a solar eclipse. If you have Earth-Sun-Moon, then this would be very bad indeed as the Sun would be between the Earth and Moon and surely destroy everything on the surface. But maybe you saw the recent lunar eclipse and you weren’t too impressed. I can understand that, but a solar eclipse is completely different. There will be a total solar eclipse about every couple of years - however, since the moon is much smaller than the Earth, the eclipse can only be seen in certain locations. The good news this year is that the solar eclipse will be viewable from a large portion of the U.S. In southern Louisiana, the eclipse will begin right around noon, and there will be a partial blocking of the Sun for about 3 hours. If you are in Tennessee, you will be able to see the moon completely cover up the Sun, and you will observe a total solar eclipse. It will be just like night time — but in the middle of the day.

I know what you are thinking. If the solar eclipse happens when the moon gets between the Sun and the Earth, shouldn’t this rare astronomical event happen about once a month? While it is true that the moon takes about one month to orbit the Earth, there is another issue. The moon’s orbit isn’t nearly as perfect as people often think. It’s not a perfectly circular path and it’s not in the same flat plane that the Earth orbits the Sun. Instead, the moon has a slightly elliptical orbit that is tilted out of the plane of the Earth-Sun orbit. The result is that in most cases when the moon is between the Earth and Sun, its shadow falls into empty space and not on the Earth. Only in the special case when everything is lined up do you get an eclipse. Here is the really weird fact about a total solar eclipse — the moon is the same angular size as the Sun and it completely covers it up. Just think about it, and you can see how crazy this is. The Sun is huge and much further away than the moon, but from the surface of the Earth they have the same angular size — about half of an angular degree (which is about the angular size of your thumb when held at arm’s length from you eye). But not all solar eclipses are total eclipses. In some years the moon is a little bit closer to the Earth, such that its angular size is a tad bit smaller than the Sun. In these years (called an annular solar eclipse) the Sun can still be seen around the edges of the moon. It’s still cool, but not as interesting as a total solar eclipse.


LETTER FROM THE PARISH PRESIDENT

So, this solar eclipse is indeed a rare and magical event. But perhaps you can’t make the journey all the way to Tennessee. Don’t worry, you will be able to experience something right here in Louisiana. The moon will still obscure a significant portion of the Sun. Yes, it will get noticeably darker. It won’t be like night time, but it will still be awesome. Now for the important stuff. What do you need to do? Really, at the simplest level you just need to go outside and notice that it’s darker. But be very careful. You don’t want to look at the Sun — even during a partial solar eclipse, as you can damage your eyes. Sunglasses will not provide protection either (yes, I know they have the word “sun” right in the name). If you want to see the Sun during the eclipse, you will need special solar viewing glasses (they need to meet the standard ISO 12312-2 to be safe). There are several places that you can purchase these online — they cost around 2 dollars for a pair. If you want to go all out, you can also figure out the exact time that the moon starts to cover the Sun for your location. The details are pretty complicated, but there is a really nice smart phone app for both Android and iOS called Solar Eclipse Timer. This will help you plan out your solar eclipse viewing party. Just to be clear, the last time there was a total solar eclipse in the U.S. was 1979. After August 21, there won’t be another total eclipse until April 2024. Make sure you don’t miss it this year. It’s going to be great.

DEAR CLASS OF 2018, We stand at the beginning of another year of learning, as summer fades. You are embarking upon a thrilling and exhilarating journey into your final chapter of high school. When you close this chapter, a world of new opportunities will open for you as young adulthood begins. Here in St. Tammany, we have a deeprooted regard for every generation, but right now, I am speaking to you, a generation on the cusp of new adventures. Many of you will continue your journey through a four-year college, and possibly an advanced degree. Some of you will take advantage of the incredible opportunities offered at technical colleges, some will begin apprenticeships, and some may decide to serve our country proudly in the Armed Forces. Whatever the road you choose, we want you to remember that St. Tammany Parish would like nothing more than for you to come home and make your mark in the world, right here. Here, in the place you discovered your love for our pristine outdoors. Here, where our diverse economy offers a multitude of career opportunities, and where you too can be part of one of the most well-educated and wellprepared workforces in the South. Here, where our cultural arts are embedded in the fabric of our identity. Here, where you can choose to live in a town or village with an agricultural focus, or in an area that has a little more of an urabanesque edge. Here, where you can become civically active and shape the future of your community for the next generation. As you leave the safety of the St. Tammany nest and go out into the world, remember that here where you first learned to fly, we will always have a place for you. St. Tammany will always be your home. PAT BRISTER St. Tammany Parish President


one team one heart beat STORY TOM SYLVEST JR. PHOTOS LSU ATHLETICS

Being asked by my friends at EDGE of the Lake to interview Coach Ed Orgeron for a feature article ranks amongst the most special and interesting opportunities this cartoonist has ever had. When Coach O came to the phone and that deep, gravelly, Cajun-accented voice greeted me, I knew I was in for a treat. And what a treat it was.

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Cartoon tigertoons.org by Tom Sylvest Jr. ©2017

oon after Coach O was appointed interim head coach at LSU, I talked to him on his radio show. That was our only previous encounter, so I needed to introduce myself. Of course, I told him I draw TigerToons. He said, “That’s awesome. That’s a good deal. And I really appreciate you doing that.” I was surprised and very honored that he remembered me. With rapport established, we had a conversation between friends. I suggested that readers might be interested in how he and his family came to live on the Northshore. Coach O said that when he signed on as the defensive line coach with the New Orleans Saints in January 2008, Saints head coach, Sean Peyton suggested the Northshore. Coach O recalled that when his family first set eyes on the Northshore, they knew immediately they had found a perfect place to live. It was clearly love at first sight. He said, “We purchased the first house we saw.” When Coach talked about living in Mandeville, he spoke of his community with his patented enthusiasm. He talked of his attraction to the area, including its beauty, the excellence of Mandeville High School, sports opportunities for his boys, and

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having so many wonderful friends close by. He said, “My wife and I love going to the lake. I like running along the lake and we like seeing the sunset there like everybody else.” I got a firm impression that when he and his wife plan to retire in the area, he could certainly find employment as a spokesperson for the Northshore. The “great recruiter” could become the “great spokesperson” one day. Coach made a point of telling me that his family worships at Church of the King in Mandeville. They have developed valuable and precious friendships with Pastor Steve Robinson and others from the church. It is obvious that his faith is very important to him. Our conversation turned to his boys, Tyler, Cody and Parker, and their sports. Pride drenched every word as he spoke of his sons. “We started out at Pelican Park just like everybody else,” Coach O recounted. “And then we were very fortunate to have Mandeville High School Head Coach Guy LeCompte.” Coach O considers LeCompte to be one of the best high school coaches he has ever been around. Coach LeCompte and his wife, Pauline, are very good friends of the Orgerons. I asked Coach O to elaborate on his memories of his boys as athletes, and then I just sat back and listened. Tyler, Coach O’s oldest, played wide receiver for the Mandeville Skippers his senior year. Cody, his second, played tennis and was a two-time state champion and then decided to play quarterback his senior year. Coach humbly explained, “To walk into that stadium and hear, ‘Orgeron! Orgeron!’ My wife and I were very proud.” He was obviously smiling as he spoke of his youngest, Parker, telling me that his son joined the Mandeville football team his freshman year. “I went to my first ‘7 on 7’ tournament with him,” he fondly recalled. After we explored his love for his community and his sons’ sports, I steered our remaining time together to LSU Football, another of his great passions. Coach O made it clear that when he became interim head coach he didn’t think of himself as someone in a temporary role. He said that his role was to be the leader, to take up the reins with confidence and without hesitation, and to help his players and coaches be successful. If you follow LSU football, you have heard Coach O profess, “One team. One heart beat.” The Tiger players have fully bought into this concept. I had to know the source of the expression and delighted in hearing his stories about relationships with various college football coaches for whom he worked, such as Arkansas’


“To walk into that stadium and hear, ‘Orgeron! Orgeron!’ My wife and I were very proud.” Ed Orgeron LSU Football Coach Ken Hatfield, Miami’s Jimmy Johnson and USC’s Pete Carroll. He explained that his rallying cry developed over time while he was with USC. And then he shared his coaching philosophy: “There are two things a coach needs. Number one, the team has to know that the coaches have their best interest at heart. And there’s no doubt I do. And number two, a coach has to have the knowledge to get them where they want to go. And I do believe we have that going for us at LSU.” Coach told me he really likes the players on his team — their athleticism, talent and attitude — and how much he is looking forward to fall camp. “I can’t wait,” he said. Speaking about his coaching staff, he said that he intends “to treat them with tremendous respect” and “let them be the managers of their positions.” He sees his job as an overseer, the person to fix what is wrong, but he won’t discipline a coach in front of the players. Coach O summed up his philosophy with a memory. He told me that during one of his backyard barbecues he watched his sons and their friends laughing and having fun. He said, “Right there I realized that if I treat my football team the same way I treat my sons, I’m gonna have success.” When I asked him about the upcoming season, he quite deftly responded with “one game at a time.” I told Coach O I was planning to have a good time drawing cartoons this season. He replied, “I appreciate those pictures, and anytime you want to come visit me, let me know.” So it’s time to quit writing. Time to start drawing.

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The City of

COVINGTON

AUGUST & SEPTEMBER 2017 EVENTS

Sunset at the Landing Concert Fridays, August 18 & September 15 • 6 pm to 9 pm Columbia Street Landing

Covington White Linen Evening Saturday, August 19 • 6 pm to 9 pm Historic Downtown Covington

Columbia Street Block Party Fridays, August 25 & September 29 • 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm Historic Downtown Covington

Hoops for Kids Saturday, September 9 • 7 am to 3 pm Reverend Peter Atkins Park

CELEBRATING LOUISIANA’S RICH CULTURAL HERITAGE

The Northshore’s Premier Outdoor Concert Series ~ Food | Wine | Music

2017 Fall Concert Series Kick-Off! Join us for the start of our Fall 2017 Season of Jazz’n the Vines! Food Trucks, Great Wine, Fireworks & Fun!

SEPT 16 CHARMAINE NEVILLE plus FIREWORKS!! New Orleans R&B Legend

St. Tammany Parish Cattlemen’s Classic Car Show Saturday, September 9 • 8 am to 3 pm • Covington Trailhead

Farmers Markets Every Wednesday • 10 am to 2 pm • 419 N. New Hampshire Every Saturday • 8 am to Noon • 600 Block of N. Columbia

Visit PontchartrainVineyards.com for More! OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES *All shows Saturday 6:30 to 9:00 pm. Gates open at 5:00 pm.

Admission: $ 10.00/person Pay at the gate . Children 17 & under FREE. Bring: Flashlight, umbrella, lawn chair, picnic dinner / Please do not bring: Outside alcohol, pets, fire or BBQ pits, sky lanterns Pontchartrain Vineyards wines and food from various Local Vendors will be available for purchase. Visit our website for more info and special offers - www.pontchartrainvineyards.com 81250 Old Military Road (Hwy. 1082) Bush, LA just north of Covington

www.covla.com | gottaluvcov@covla.com | 985.892.1873

985-892-9742


STORY CAITLIN PICOU PHOTOS YEHLEEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Let me guess, your typical tailgating day consists of eating, drinking and visiting family at one tailgate, then moving to the next tailgate to hang with friends. Oh, and getting your minimum 10,000 steps in by 2 o’clock. It’s impressive that you can do all of this in 90-degree heat.

MAKEUP CAITLIN PICOU MODEL BETH DOWDY

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MAKEUP TIPS FOR TAILGATING How can you be expected to look your best, especially with the new purse regulations? Well, I have a few tricks up my sleeve on how to keep you, and your purse, looking good during football season.

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1 A powder compact with a mini brush is always a great idea. Not only does this mean you have a mirror handy, but after blotting and removing unwanted makeup, you will need to retouch your foundation. Powder is a great travel alternative to a liquid base. (Glominerals pressed powder, $48, available at About Face in Mandeville & BareMinerals Tapered Face Brush, $24, available at bareminerals.com).

5 Shine eraser sheets are a must. These guys work wonders by soaking up excess oil and sweat that occurs during your long walks. I prefer Elf Mattifying Blotting Papers ($5 for 25, available at Target). The packaging is cute, and it gives you enough paper sheets to last nearly all season long.

2 Sun-safety is rarely thought about when it comes to football. Luckily, Sun Bum makes it easy to toss this must-have item in your purse. They make a precious, mini sunscreen stick that is easy to apply without making a mess. ($10, available at Target).

6 Cream concealer that is one shade lighter than your foundation. I use this to highlight features on my face. As a day of tailgating goes on, I find my under eyes become darker and my cheekbones seem to sag. Applying a few dabs of concealer that is slightly lighter will give you a brighter appearance and an instant facelift. (NYX Concealer in a Jar, $5, available at Ulta).

3 Kismet’s Hey Baby Lipstick to show your team spirit. We might not be able to dance like the LSU Golden Girls, but we can match their lipstick! ($16, available at Posh Boutique, Hemline & Shoefllé).

7 Let’s not forget the hand sanitizer. Probably one of the most essential items for any game day. It might not keep your makeup looking great, but it will keep you healthy. ($1, available at Target).

4 Almay eraser sticks are hidden gems. I came across these, and now I never leave home without them. You snap one end, and it releases a drop of oil-free makeup remover into the opposite cotton end. So if that mascara, eyeliner or shadow runs, you can quickly remove it. Just toss it when you are finished. ($5 for 24, available at Target).

8 Mini wallet or change purse. You don’t want the person next to you seeing exactly how much cash you have on hand. A mini change purse is a great way to keep this hidden. Try a festive color to coordinate with your team’s colors.

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LSU’S GEAUX CLEAR POLICY FOR PURSES

• CLUTCH PURSE NO LARGER THAN 4 ½”x 6 ½”

• CLEAR TOTE NO LARGER THAN 12” X 6”x 12” • NO BACKPACKS, EVEN IF THEY ARE CLEAR.

9 Complete your look with a cute, clear purse to carry all these essentials. I prefer SavvyRoot’s clear bags because they are just the right size, plus they come in black or nude. ($50, available at savvyroot.com)

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CAFÉ MILNEBURG 1065 Milne Circle Covington, LA 985.327.6550 Friday 4PM - 9PM (All you can eat catfish) Saturday 11AM – 9PM Brunch 11-2, Steak Special 4-9 Sunday 10AM – 6PM (Buffet) STORY ELIZABETH KENNEDY WELLS PHOTOS JERRY COTTRELL

I

n 1776, when Alexander Milne immigrated to the United States from Scotland, he would have had no idea that his dying wish would result in Milneburg, a residential community in Covington for intellectually challenged adults. Opened and operated by Alexander Milne Developmental Services, this intermediate care facility is the forever home for its residents, including Grace, who has been a beneficiary of Alexander Milne’s generosity for over 70 years. She is now 92. Alexander Milne was a Scott with a strong business acumen who settled in New Orleans and made a fortune through the hardware trade and a brick making business. With this fortune, Milne acquired vast real estate holdings in New Orleans, including 20 miles of shoreline on Lake Pontchartrain. He ultimately grew his fortune into what would have exceeded $50 million in today’s dollars. Milne lived until the age of 96 and was known as an honest man who was civic minded and socially conscious: he released his slaves, paid them a per diem and had homes

built for them on land he owned. It is what was in Milne’s will, however, that has ultimately made a difference to Grace and the other residents at Milneburg. It is published for public view on his monument in St. Louis Cemetery II: “It is my positive wish and intention that an asylum for destitute orphan boys and another for the relief of destitute orphan girls shall be established at Milneburg, in this parish, under the name of the Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Boys and the Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Girls.” Alexander Milne (1742 - 1838) It was this gift of seed money to help destitute orphans in New Orleans that ultimately helped Alexander Milne Developmental Services create Milneburg for 48 intellectually challenged adults. Starting as asylums for destitute orphans, the Milne organization languished in its early years as a result of the Civil War and outbreaks of yellow fever. But just after the turn of the century, Louisiana Governor Newton Blanchard (1904 - 1908) revived Alexander Milne’s

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wishes by appointing a talented social worker, Miss Jean Gordon, to lead the Milne organization. It was Miss Gordon who recognized the tremendous need to assist young girls and women with intellectual challenges, and under her leadership this became the focus of the Milne organization. The Times Picayune awarded Miss Jean Gordon “The Loving Cup” award in 1921. Under her watchful eye, the Milne facility in New Orleans underwent several expansions. The last was in the 1950’s when a large campus was built on Gentilly Boulevard adjacent to the New Orleans Fairgrounds. This new facility included four dormitories, recreation rooms, an infirmary and an on-site dental clinic. This was the first time that funds from the State of Louisiana were combined with Alexander Milne’s bequeath to assist the Milne organization. Fast forward to 2006, when in anticipation of Hurricane Katrina, the Milne leadership evacuated the residents and staff to Glade Baptist Church in Laurel, Mississippi. Three days later the Milne campus flooded, and what was expected to be a short stay turned into a very long one. Always ready with a Plan B, Milne Developmental Services undertook a $1 million renovation of an aging healthcare facility in Laurel. Waiting for the renovation to be completed, residents slept on air mattresses in the church gymnasium for 256 nights. After several years in Laurel, a decision was made to return to Louisiana. In order to bring the residents and staff back to Louisiana, the board and management carefully undertook several years of planning to create a well-designed and well-constructed 55acre community in Covington. This new community, called Milneburg, opened in April 2015 with 12 spacious four-bedroom homes, providing a private bedroom for each resident. Each home has a full kitchen and as well as a laundry room to provide resources for independent living.

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The Milneburg community was also designed to allow the residents and staff to stay on-site during a hurricane: The homes and common buildings are built to withstand a level 5 hurricane and the community is self-contained with its own power plant and generators, sewage and waste water treatment and drinking water. Walkways at Milneburg connect the homes to the other buildings, the most popular of which is the community center. This is where the residents gather for organized events, general socializing, and for meals when they want to “eat out.” In fact, the food is so good at Café Milne that it is open to the public! The menu is created by Executive Chef Ricky Rascon who also prepares the food. Residents are active at Café Milne as hostesses, wait staff and dishwashers. The restaurant — which offers full wine and alcohol service — is open Friday through Sunday, and bakery items can be ordered over the phone through Pastry Chef Jordan Waguespack (985.327.6579). Executive Director Frank D. Lamier says that their mission statement is the heart of what they do. “We want our residents to live in the least restrictive environment possible and we provide that to our residents, not only through what we do onsite, but also by providing transportation so they can get out and do things like grocery shopping, go to festivals, attend church, or whatever they want to do.” But Milneburg provides its residents with much more than all of this. A comprehensive individualized plan is prepared for each resident by an interdisciplinary team of qualified professionals — medical, psycho-social, intellectual and adaptive behavior. These plans include measurable goals and objectives, and the classes and programs at Milneburg help the residents meet these goals and objectives by learning new skill sets. These skill sets include grooming and hygiene, housekeeping, budgeting and money management, cooking, pre-vocational skills (punctuality, attendance), vocational skills, social skills, current events,


LETTER FROM THE MAYOR

accessing transportation, and lawful behavior. Lamier emphasizes that “enabling intellectually challenged adults to live their lives to the fullest is what we do 24/7.” Not only do residents learn vocational skills, there are job opportunities for them right there in the neighborhood. In October 2016, the Milne Work Opportunity Project (MWOP) was initiated by staff members, making it apparent that those who work for Alexander Milne Developmental Services, from top to bottom, assume responsibility to ensure that the mission statement is accomplished: They want “each resident to achieve the optimum level of independence, self-determination, and self-fulfillment consistent with their abilities.” Through MWOP, residents work regularly scheduled hours at Café Milne, in the administration building, and in maintenance. These jobs provide a source of pride for the residents, and those in the MWOP program enjoy participating in off-campus marketing and fundraising efforts to raise awareness for mental health. The team at Milneburg says that “the talents of MWOP employees become clear as we challenge their abilities, not their disabilities.” While Alexander Milne’s generosity almost 200 years ago has vastly improved the quality of life for so many, his bequeath is not sufficient alone to operate Milneburg. Medicaid is the main source of revenue for the facility, and because Medicaid payments are funded by both the federal and state government, budget cuts at both levels affect Milneburg. Currently, Alexander Milne Development Services taps into $1.5 million of its own funds each year to cover operating expenses. The board and management of Alexander Milne Development Services invite all who want to learn more about Milneburg to contact them for a tour. Efforts to help, through volunteering or donations, will enhance the lives of the residents at Milneburg. For information, contact Megan Galey directly at 985.327.6550 or mgaley@milneds.org.

Greetings! As summer comes to a close, so does the completion of some of our prominent infrastructure projects. I am happy to report that as your children return to school, driving in and around Covington should flow easier with the completion of the S. Tyler Street/HWY 21 Bridge Project, the West 11th Avenue Bridge Repair, and the 15th Avenue Culvert Washout Repair. I welcome all who have not visited downtown Covington lately to enjoy the easier traffic flow to visit and enjoy our upcoming events. This August and September brings Sunset at the Landing on August 18th and September 15th at the Columbia Street Landing, Final Friday Columbia Street Block Party on August 25th and September 29th, and Covington’s White Linen Evening on August 19th. With Labor Day on the horizon, it is fitting to mention that the City of Covington has, for the 3rd year in a row, been chosen as a nola.com/Times Picayune Top Work Place for 2017. This honor was voted on by our own City of Covington employees, all of whom I have the pleasure of working with each day. I am proud to have a great team of employees who love their jobs as much as they love to serve the citizens and businesses of the great City of Covington! In closing, I invite all of you to like Covington’s Facebook pages: City of Covington, City of Covington-Cultural Arts and Events, and City of CovingtonRecreation Department, or please visit our website at covla.com for information and updates. MIKE COOPER City of Covington Mayor


Sometimes a totebag isn't the gift you need. Keesler Federal doubled my direct depo sit to $2,000! I didn't think it was real. –O livia M., Vanc leave

While other financial institutions give trinkets, Keesler Federal enters you to win a number of monthly prizes. In fact, 35 members every month each win a prize from car payments to mortgage notes, doubled direct deposits up to $2,000 and more. Why do we do it? Because we believe in giving back. Learn more at www.kfcu.org/giveback.

M E M B E R 1338 Gause East Blvd | Slidell • 4250 Hwy 22 Unit C | Mandeville Coming soon to Covington! Federally insured by NCUA. Membership eligibility required.


STORY KIM BERGERON PHOTOS MARY CHRISTOPHER

Is a zebra black with white stripes or white with black stripes? If you ask Mary Christopher, the answer is “neither.” Because through the eyes of this artist, nothing in this world is simply black or white. It’s an infinite palette of colors. In Mary’s world, a zebra is white with red stripes — unless you see it the other way around. That palette is accented by a southern drawl, the product of a child born and reared in Beaumont, Texas. A self-professed tomboy in her youth, she was happiest “playing outdoors and getting dirty,” while it was her sister, Nancy, who showed more artistic tendencies.

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Following high school graduation in Beaumont, Mary attended Oklahoma State University, where she majored in art education. Spring break took her to New Orleans, where her cousin lived, and a visit to Jackson Square changed her life. “I had never seen anything like it,” she said. “The artists, the people eating in outdoor cafes…” She was hooked. Following her graduation from OSU, she moved with a friend to Metairie. Then, in 1981, she married Joe Christopher, and the newlyweds moved to Slidell, enticed by affordable homes and the energizing ozone-rich air. She began her career designing t-shirts at Massey’s Outfitters, a sporting goods store, then made the shift to creating advertising layouts for Schwegmann’s grocery store. This was followed by a stint serving as a technical illustrator at Martin Marietta. But her caring heart led her to the field of social work as the program director of the YWCA, which included counseling programs for victims of sexual assault and more. In 1986, she had her first son, Matt, followed by Andy in 1988. Two years after Andy’s birth, Mary returned to social work, serving as a program director at the Sunshine House, a day treatment program for adults with mental illness. Because her sister had been diagnosed with schizophrenia, the program was near and dear to her heart. She expresses regret and frustration that the much-needed program is no longer funded by the state. In 1991, she began working at Northshore Regional Medical Center, advancing from volunteer director to patient advocate, and, eventually, the community relations manager. She especially loved having the responsibility of writing articles and taking photographs, claiming “art always finds a way.” Her third son, Joey, was born in 1996, and after taking time off to be with him, she resumed working at the hospital. But the artist within her was stirring, and she decided to revert to Plan A, renewing her teaching certificate at Southeastern Louisiana University. “I was ready, and the art exploded, almost overnight,” she said. “It had percolated all those years and the bliss was euphoric and meteoric! I remember during those art-dormant years,

sometimes before going to sleep at night, colors and shapes would march across my mind’s eye. It was patient but it finally couldn’t stop itself !” It wasn’t until she began teaching art 11 years ago that she began to think of herself as an artist, asserting that before then, it felt like she was just practicing. She started out at Cypress Cove Elementary School in Slidell, and over the next ten years, she taught students ranging in age from kindergarten to third grade at Honey Island, Brock and Lyon elementary schools. “There are so many different reasons I loved teaching art,” she said. “I loved how the kids were completely unconcerned about the end product and were so fearless about the adventure of the process. It was a privilege to be the first person to share with them the wonders of King Tut’s tomb and the cave art paintings of Lascaux, and I was delighted to watch their eyes grow wider and wider! I valued the opportunity to tell them about the personal struggles of famous artists and how so many had expressed what they felt inside even when people made fun of them. It was a great way to let the students know it’s okay to be who they are.” The teacher enjoyed incorporating geography and sociology and history and math into her lessons, saying all of these disciplines are relevant and a natural part of the lesson. She found much satisfaction in concocting her own unique projects and lessons based on the principles of art education — aesthetics, history, critique and production. “I knew what I was doing and didn’t have to follow someone else’s specific recipe,” she says. “And that provided so much joy.” While she expressed gratitude for how supportive and appreciative her colleagues and administrators were for her efforts, it’s when she speaks of the importance of arts education that she really gets fired up. “Don’t even get me started on that,” she exclaims. “Now more than ever, students need to develop higher order thinking if they are going to compete in such a fast paced, changing world. Yes, they need to memorize and regurgitate and practice, to focus on the ‘3 Rs’ (reading, writing and ‘rithmetic.) But in art, students can take that knowledge and apply it, experiment to find


out what happens. In art, no two products are alike. As they create, students follow directions and learn new concepts, but they interpret them on their own terms and learn by doing. It’s a confidence builder at the very least. Art education is not fluff. It is an essential tool for developing the most complicated type of brain activity.” Equally pivotal, she says, is the role arts play in society. She says art documents history, addresses critical issues and helps people relate to each other. She believes that art provides meaning in an otherwise chaotic world, and helps us remember our humanity and connections to shared experiences. “We all know what it feels like to gaze at a beautiful scene and it just makes us stop and realize that we are here,” she says. Mary considers art an exploration, stating that hers is a crooked path that has been enriched by the many people she has met along the way. What has resulted is a massive assortment of wonderful, diverse and vivid memories. Her medium of choice remains oil, but she enjoys a change of pace with acrylic, the latter of which she sometimes combines with stained glass. What results are truly unique, multifaceted works of art. More recently, she has turned to pottery, which she throws on the wheel in her garage. “Let me tell you, a centered piece of clay is such a miracle,” she declares. “You have to focus like nothing else matters — if you think about anything other than the clay you just lose it.” Every summer, she joins her family at their red cottage on Van Ettan Lake in Oscoda, a town on Lake Huron in Michigan. The home was built by her great grandfather, Charles Sumner Pierce, in 1901. The land on which it sits forms a natural ledge which the family has dubbed ‘Pierces Point.‘ Charles built two more cottages in the 1920s to ensure that each of his children had a home on that beach. The family has grown in size quite a bit since then, and all look forward to their annual retreat. Because the cabin has no TV, the group spends their time putting together jigsaw puzzles, playing cards and simply rejuvenating, reveling in the nostalgic memories built by the many generations who have graced the sanctuary through

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the years. Every night, they light a fire by the water and watch the sun go down. And while Mary doesn’t paint while there, she certainly draws inspiration from those visits, found in the symmetry of blades of grass, the vibrant colors and extravagance of flowers, and the golden hues of the sun as it sinks into the horizon. While her art has evolved over time, the one thing that hasn’t changed is that she has never wanted to create art for a living. She creates for the sake of creating, with no desire to be affected by what other people want, calling such a distraction. She wants to be free to explore, and, with her recent retirement, is waiting to be inspired by a new phase. “Retirement is magnificent, but it also alters the way people function and see the world,” she said. “I am still processing this next new era.” That era includes volunteering in the community. For years, she has served on the City of Slidell’s Commission on the Arts and helped to feed the needy at the Mount Olive soup kitchen. More recently, she completed CASA volunteer training, a throwback to her passion for social services. And she continues to paint. Mary acknowledges that at some point in time, she will have to start selling her work because her walls are filled to capacity with the art she has created over the years and the many memories she has translated to canvas and glass. “What I search for more than a style is that Zen feeling,” she says. “I like to feel like I am in the flow of a current where time and place kind of evaporate and the art takes on a life of its own. When that happens, I’m pretty much along for the ride. Art is a 24-hour phenomenon and it’s not always about the production. Sometimes it’s about letting things soak in and evolve over time.” Whether it’s a collection of miniature works of foliage, oversized flowers or nature captured in stained glass and paper, the artist brings a sense of peace to those who have the privilege of seeing her work. And unquestionably, in the path she has blazed from social services to teaching to painting red and white zebras, Mary has earned her stripes.


LETTER FROM THE MAYOR

DEAR CITIZENS, St. Tammany Parish President Pat Brister and I recently announced that the City of Slidell and St. Tammany Parish will be working together in a joint effort to clean the W-14 and W-15 drainage canals in Slidell. The W-14 and W-15 canals run through the City of Slidell, but drainage issues affect all residents in Slidell, whether they are inside or outside the city limits. That’s why it is imperative that these canals be cleaned and maintained. I am grateful that President Brister and St. Tammany Parish will be assisting us with this project. At the W-14 Canal, the Parish will clear the right-of-ways at accessible locations along the top bank of the canal, allowing the City to resume cleaning and reshaping the middle reach, from Florida Avenue to the Cousin Street bridge, which is an estimated 3,400 linear feet. The Parish and the City will be working together and both will provide crews and equipment to complete the project. At the W-15 Canal, the Parish will clear the right-of-ways at accessible locations along the top bank of the canal, allowing the City to resume cleaning and reshaping the drainage channel, from the I-10/I-12 junction near John Slidell Park to the I-10 bridge crossing, which is an estimated 3,500 linear feet. The Parish and the City will work together and both will provide crews and equipment to finish the project. Barring any unforeseen circumstances, both projects should be completed by mid-August. For more information about City of Slidell news and upcoming events, visit the City’s website at myslidell.com and sign up for the email news list. Also, visit the “City of Slidell, Louisiana” on Facebook.

FREDDY DRENNAN City of Slidell Mayor


Crafted to your personal measurements and style options


Save the Date

Deo Gratias Benefit Gala for Saint Joseph Seminary College Saturday, October 28, 2017 Vespers begin at 6 p.m. Gala to follow from 7-10 p.m. Dining, entertainment and silent auction on the beautiful grounds of Saint Joseph Abbey and Seminary College. “Abbey Reflections” by Frankie De Melo

Buy tickets online at: www.sjasc.edu Sponsorships available!

Mandeville Live! Free Saturday Concerts

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Sept. 9

DEACON JOHN 60 Years of Music

Sept. 16 CHRISTIAN SERPAS & GHOST TOWN Sept. 23 ROBIN BARNES Sept. 30 WITNESS *No outside food, beverages or coolers. Concessions provided for purchase by local restaurants and non-profit organizations.

The Mandeville Trailhead 675 lafitte Street Historic Old Mandeville

www.cityofmandeville.com

(985) 624-3147


BOGUE CHITTO

LAT 30° 77’ N, LAT -90° 16’ W

STORY LENNY GRAY PHOTOS JERRY COTTRELL


G

etting tired of all the traffic and noise? Bogue Chitto State Park — open seven days a week — is far from it all, yet close to home. Located 10 miles north of Folsom and 6 miles south of Franklinton on Hwy. 25, this wellmanaged facility offers a variety of fun activities for the whole family, with all the privacy you could want. Park Manager Katie Secott, who grew up in Holden, boasts about all there is to do here on 1,786 acres with small streams, cypress swamps, a hardwood forest and rolling landscape vistas. The Park Service has added seven miles of nature trails, a ninehole disc golf course, picnic pavilions and two playgrounds — one of which is a water playground! If you are looking for an outdoor activity with more adventure, the Bogue Chitto State Park offers tubing, canoeing and kayaking. To set up a trip, contact Rocky Bottom Tubing and Canoeing at 985.515.1477. Trips depart all day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. You can even rent a tube for your ice chest. With 14 miles of horseback riding trails — separate from the hiking trails — exploring the park in a saddle is one of the best ways to relax and take in the beauty of nature. You can bring your own horse or go on a guided ride with horses provided by Robbie Thomas. For one or two hour guided rides, contact Thomas at 985.516.4975. Reservations are recommended, but not required. Fishing is also a favorite pastime at Bogue Chitto State Park. Fish frequently caught here include largemouth bass, channel catfish, perch, choupique and bluegill. And the best part may be that when the sun goes down, you don’t have to leave. Bogue Chitto State Park offers premium campsites with RV hookups, cabins that sleep up to eight people and a lodge that sleeps up to fourteen.

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If you are coming with a large group, consider renting an outdoor pavilion, a dormitory style lodge that sleeps up to 52 people and/or the conference center meeting room with capacity for 150 people. Not only does the park itself offer a cornucopia of activities, but it attracts outdoor enthusiasts who are willing to share their interests and skills. One frequent visitor to the park is John Warner, president of the Bogue Chitto Dutch Oven Cookers, who says he “grew up out here.” The Bogue Chitto Dutch Oven Cookers have been coming out to the park on the second Saturday of each month for the past three years. They educate, organize, promote and enjoy the pleasure of Dutch oven cooking, which is outdoor cooking using open coals and Dutch ovens. And why haven’t you heard about all of this, you ask? Bogue Chitto State Park is the newest addition to the Louisiana State Park system. It will be celebrating its seventh anniversary on August 28th.

BOGUE CHITTO STATE PARK 17049 State Park Blvd. Franklinton, LA 70438 reservelastateparks.com 985.839.5707 Sunday - Thursday 7AM - 9PM Friday, Saturday and days preceding holidays 7AM - 10PM Day admission is $3 FREE for persons under 3 and over 62. Online reservations for cabins, campsites, lodges and group camps (as much as 13 months in advance). Gift cards are also available, which are good at any Louisiana state park.

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Marshall Geier Photography


STORY PATTY BEAL PHOTOS MARSHALL GEIER

As a young girl and a member of the Luo Tribe in Kisumu, Kenya, her father told her, “Be the first in everything you do!” Meet Dr. Sophia Omoro who obeyed her father and did just that. Sophia became a successful surgeon, fashion designer, philanthropist and one of the most moving souls I’ve had the opportunity to interview. She and her husband live in Covington.

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PATTY BEAL: So you grew up in Kenya. Tell us about the Luo people. SOPHIA OMORO: Yes. I am from the Luo Tribe, one of 33 tribes in Kenya. Our village is in Kisumu. It was a very poor and distinct way of life, with our own unique language and livelihood. The Luo are known as fisherman. Every day men would go fish and the women would stay in and sew. They were seamstresses. I have six sisters and two brothers. We were quite poor, but my father pushed education very strongly. PB: How did you end up as a doctor in the United States? SO: At age 12, I witnessed a child succumb to death because there was no hospital close enough to care for the child. I thought, ‘This cannot be!’ Right then I knew I wanted to be a doctor, a surgeon. PB: And you never wavered from that? SO: No, not at all. My parents encouraged education, and my father very strongly told me to be the first in everything I did. Wanting to please my father, I said ‘Okay!’ And I did. I became first in all my subjects at school, took advanced courses and finished early. I earned a full scholarship to study in Canada. I was only 15. My village gathered $500 together and sent me on my way.  PB: 15?! That is very young. SO: Yes, and sadly my father was killed in a car accident three months after I left Kenya. I did complete the twoyear IB — International Baccalaureate — program. Then my mother gave me two choices: (1) return to Kenya and (2) attend Oakwood University in Alabama in the United States. I chose Oakwood. PB: Sophia, what a difficult time for you especially at that age. He’d be very proud. SO: Thank you. His lessons remained and  my determination prevailed. I tested out of many classes, like French and physics, and finished college in 2 1/2 years. PB: Was that education also a part of a scholarship? SO: No, I worked at Crystal Hamburger and cared for an elderly gentleman to pay for college. PB: Wow! So what happened after college? SO: A professor who knew me well suggested that I apply to Tulane University in New Orleans, as they offered a M.D./PhD combo program. He knew that I wanted to be a doctor AND get a PhD to teach. PB: So Tulane it was for this double degree? SO: Yes, but I never lost my desire for designing. My sketchbook was always with me. I would go back to Kenya and have the seamstresses in my village create garments from my sketches. I didn’t know that custom clothing was a luxury! PB: Intelligent and creative!! What happened after Tulane? SO: I did my residency at the University of Washington where my sister lived. It was a six-year program, but after four years Katrina happened, and Tulane called and asked me if I’d come back and finish my remaining two years of residency in New Orleans to save the program. They needed only two students to

maintain the curriculum. I didn’t hesitate. I came back right away and brought my boyfriend, now husband, with me. PB: Well, we are so fortunate you did. And you now live in Covington! SO: Yes, since 2008. I worked with Ochsner. After graduation, I was offered positions in ten different cities in the United States and we chose Covington. It was here on the Northshore that we held my first fashion trunk show in 2014 showcasing my designs from Kenya. PB: How do you segue from a doctor/surgeon to a fashion designer? SO: Like I said, I never lost interest in sketching and designing. I feel very strongly about giving back to my country. While I was practicing medicine I continued EDGE Aug | Sep 2017

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od AOMO 839 Chartres St.,New Orleans odamomo.com BLOOMING LILY FOUNDATION bloominglily.org

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to have the Luo woman make my designs into a reality. Eventually, I had a collection of the most unique and beautiful dresses and accessories. A friend suggested I hold a trunk show at Maison Lafitte in Mandeville. I did, and everything sold out in two hours. Everything! Then my friend said, “you need a shop!” PB: I’ve been to your shop, odAomo in the French Quarter. How did you come up with the name? SO: odAomo means ‘House of Aomo’ in my tribal language. Aomo is my name — I carry my matriarchal grandmother’s name; it means ‘time of harvest.’ PB: Your shop is fabulous and one of my favorites. I love the handcrafted materials, patterns, prints, and unique designs. SO: We opened in 2014. I have very unique accessories, handbags and clothing, all curated by the Luo women.  It took a couple of years to streamline my single designs to offer a ‘sized’ collection in the United States. We had to work on scaling the American sizes. I now employ several fulltime Luo people. Everything is done in-house. There’s so much talent at hand in Kenya: the detail work, the beading. It’s becoming a lost art due to the mass market. It feels good to give back to my people. One woman was able to buy a car. Another was able to send her child to college. It’s part of my purpose. PB: You must feel very accomplished. SO: I have a dream to accomplish 4 things: (1) to be a doctor, (2) to have a fashion brand, (3) to create a foundation, and (4) to write. So far I have three out of four! PB: How do you do it all? SO: In 2015, it was obvious that I needed more time to devote to my growing fashion label. I was grateful to find an opportunity as an otorhinolaryngology (ENT) doctor/surgeon in Ohio for part of the week and then I returned

to Louisiana for the other half. PB: That’s great! So you commuted to Ohio?! SO: Yes, with sketchbook in hand! I’ve adopted the philosophy: LIVING CONCURRENTLY. Do what you dream now. Do not wait. PB: I love that! SO: My mother has passed, and I lost my dear sister, Lily, to cancer. She had personal challenges and struggled to find her purpose. It was difficult for her to overcome her obstacles, but what she gave me was inspiration for my foundation. PB: Tell us about it! SO: It’s called Blooming Lily, based out of Covington. Our mission is to empower women, girls, people to find their purpose in life and to fulfill it. We are all buds of a flower. All flowers are destined to bloom. As to whether or not we bloom, it depends on our purpose and the obstacles. If you know them, you can solve them. PB: That is so inspirational. How do you spread your message? SO: I hold a retreat in Kenya for 25 underprivileged girls. I take them away from their impoverished surroundings to help them find their purpose and to teach them how to get there: identify the obstacles and how to overcome them. PB: Wow! And your foundation covers all the expenses? SO: Yes, we hold an annual gala locally to accomplish three things: (1) provide sanitary supplies for girls — $36 provides a year’s supply to one girl, (2) provide clean water — $22 pays for a clean water filter for one family that lasts three years, and (3) sponsor a girl for the retreat — $25 for a week. PB: Keep us posted, as EDGE would be happy to keep our readers informed about the work you are doing with these girls. Sophia, you’re such a talented and giving soul!  SO: That’s my whole purpose in life. I’m here to give hope and give back. I can only do it if I am fulfilled. It’s a dual obligation for myself and others. That’s it. That’s why I’m here!


LETTER FROM THE MAYOR

Hurricane season is upon us and I am urging all of our citizens to be prepared. Tropical Storm Cindy gave us a trial run and it is important to be ready as we head into the halfway mark. On our website homepage we have a link entitled “Hurricane Preparedness.” It provides the latest update from the National Hurricane Service as well as plenty of information for home, family and even pet protection. I encourage everyone to sign up for free E-Briefs on our website so that you are up-to-date during any storm event or other emergency. This is also the time of year we prepare the budget for our upcoming fiscal year, beginning September 1st.  The Administration presented the proposed budget for 2018 to the City Council on June 30th, and meetings will now begin to discuss the proposal and move forward to approval.  The budget includes continuing programs for roadways, drainage, flood protection, cultural arts, efficiencies through automation and other programs. There is a copy available for everyone on our website homepage. Our fall concert series will begin in September and more details will be covered in our next article. But for now, look for  the series kickoff on September 9th with Deacon John, who will be celebrating 60 years in the music industry. DONALD VILLERE City of Mandeville Mayor


ORTHOCARE URGENT CARE CENTER Specialty Orthopedic Walk-in Center Medical care has changed in the past 10 years; traditional personal doctor-patient relationships are less frequent. Patients are more of a consumer searching for quality and convenience. Increasing bureaucracy means less direct access to qualified specialists. The growth of urgent care centers has allowed greater access to timely medical care, but they do not have the expert consultants for more complex injuries. The traditional route of an emergency room visit means little convenience and significantly greater costs. The professionals at Pinnacle Medical Network have recognized there is a need for a better service to our community. This was the driving force behind the formation of OrthoCare Urgent Care Center. Conveniently located in the Pinnacle Medical Center, the OrthoCare clinic is a one-of-a-kind walk-in orthopedic clinic. Imagine direct access to a board-certified orthopedic bone and joint expert. In addition to the physician's evaluation, onsite diagnostic services include x-ray and MRI. Suddenly, the search for a bone and joint specialist is over. Many of us have been told by primary care practitioners or urgent care centers that we need a follow up with an orthopedist, only to have to search for a timely appointment afterwards. Now, one can be seen the same day without even the need of a phone call thanks to OrthoCare. As the world of medical care continues to evolve both nationally and locally, the basic concepts of quality care, patient access, cost control and patient satisfaction are not always aligned. The Pinnacle Medical Network and its latest addition of the OrthoCare Urgent Care continue to bring a higher level of quality and service to our area.

1200 Pinnacle Parkway Pinnacle Medical Center Covington, LA Hours: Monday - Friday 10 a.m. to 5p.m. (985) 674-1700


FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS STORY MIKE PERVEL


ARCHBISHOP HANNAN HAWKS

BOGALUSA LUMBERJACKS

Archbishop Hannan moved up in classification, competing in Class 3-A, featuring a four-game district schedule. Third-year coach Scott Wattigny (11-10) guides the Hawks. Hannan 4-6, barely missed the playoffs, dropping four games by only 18 points. Wattigny 7-4 his first year, earned a playoff berth as a 13seed. The Hawk’s 74-player roster includes 12 seniors. Wattigny said, “We’ve played competitive teams the last couple years which should prepare us, moving up.” After reclassification former Hannan district rivals NCS and STA are no longer on the schedule. PJP II is a week three non-district opponent, continuing the rivalry. Wattigny added, “I like what we have and where we are as a program, based on our experience level.” Coaching: Wattigny’s staff is complete hiring offensive coordinator Steve Soper, Tim Salter O-line, Carmen Moore receivers and Jay Faucheux outside linebackers. Bryan Villa returns as defensive coordinator. The Hawks may have five players going both ways. Offense: The Hawks return six starters. Sr. Chris Rabensteiner, the Hawks’ new QB, transitions from RB. Sr. tight end/DL Seth Caillouet, with four college offers from Air Force, Houston Baptist, McNeese State and Texas State, is a primary target. Sr. O-lineman Christian Hoz (6-5, 308), has nine college offers, verbally committing to Arkansas State. Defense: The Hawks return five starters. Sr. LB Zach Easterling, juniors CB Evan Brouillette and lineman Frank Bretey are keys to the Hawks’ defense.

Bogalusa head coach David Roberts returns for his third season running the Lumberjacks’ program. Bogulusa struggled through a difficult 1-9 campaign last season after posting a very promising 7-6 record in Roberts’ first season. In 2015 Bogalusa put it all together advancing to the state quarterfinals. Roberts said his Lumberjacks have put last season’s tough year behind them, working extremely hard. The players have regrouped following last year’s disappointing season. Roberts said his Lumberjacks are working on their conditioning, striving to be in better shape, which should help keep his team competitive, especially in the latter stages of ball games. Bogalusa participates in District 7-3A this season featuring four other teams including new participant, Archbishop Hannan’s Hawks, who have moved up in classification, competing in 2A last season. Bogalusa will also square off with Albany, Loranger and Jewel Sumner in district action, looking forward to reversing last year’s disappointing season. Offense and Defense: Bogalusa will be counting on a number of players to perform on both sides of the ball this season. One of those talented two-way performers, who will be counted on to deliver consistently, is senior quarterback Deonte Lenoir as Bogalusa will operate out of multiple formations. Lenoir will also roam the Lumberjacks’ secondary, playing strong safety. Senior lineman Cody Sumrall another strong two-way player, needs to be on his game, anchoring the Lumberjacks in the trenches.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Independence (H)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Northlake Christian (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Central Catholic (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Chalmette (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Pope John Paul II (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Franklinton (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Christian Life (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Salmen (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

St. Michael (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

South Plaquemines (A)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Jewel Sumner (H)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Albany (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Thomas Jefferson (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Loranger (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Albany (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

TBD

Oct. 27

7 PM

Loranger (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Jewel Sumner (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Bogalusa (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Archbishop Hannan (H)

046

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017


COVINGTON LIONS

FONTAINEBLEAU BULLDOGS

Covington coach Greg Salter (26-21), enters his fifth season, guiding the Lions to four straight playoff berths. Covington finished 5-6, falling in the first round as a No. 25 seed. CHS features 26 seniors. Salter hopes his sophomore class can step up with some big contributions. Salter said, “We like where we are and we’re optimistic on where we can end up this season. We have the tools and the commitment to be competitive.” Coaching: Defensive coordinator Glenn Salter, the younger brother of head coach, Greg Salter, are grandsons of legendary Hall of Fame CHS football coach Jack Salter, Mr. CHS football. R. T. McDaniel returns as offensive coordinator. Offense: Sr. record-setting RB Devin Brumfield, the go-toguy, rushed for 1,194 yards, establishing the all-time school rushing record with 4,242 yards, breaking Paul Nixon’s mark. Brumfield with 52 career TDs, 20 last year, is poised to break the Lions’ school record of 56, set by Vincent Alexander. Sr. signal caller Joshua Alfaro has passed for 2,360 yards in his career, hoping to eclipse the school mark of 3,787 yards held by Corey Leonard, a former CHS four-sport athlete (2001-04). Sr. receiver KeJohn Batiste topped the Lions with 36 catches, averaging 16.2 yards per reception. Defense: The Lions’ defense centers around three seniors; strong safety Ralph Crandle (52 tackles, 3 interceptions), tackle Cody Turner (63 tackles, 2 sacks) and LB Derron Thompson.

Fontainebleau coach Chris Blocker enters his third season (11-11), leading his Bulldogs to two consecutive playoff berths. FHS features 20 seniors. Each year the Dawgs’ coaching staff lets the players select a team slogan. This year’s theme, “Never Defeated.” Blocker feels this year’s club has a chance to be very competitive. “I like our youth, but at the same time they are somewhat inexperienced. We have some young, talented guys and we’re counting on our underclassmen to see lots of playing time so they will get a quick baptism of fire.” Blocker added, “This is one of the faster Bulldogs’ squads in recent years. The team’s excited and looking forward to our third consecutive playoff appearance.” Coaching: Blocker named Ryan Dieck as new offensive coordinator, replacing Hutch Gonzalez, a former CHS Lion and SLU Lion, who accepted the head job at St. Thomas Aquinas. Dieck, a Slidell grad and former football player, coached the O-line and was the Bulldogs’ special teams’ coordinator last season. Stephen Gremillion enters his third year as the defensive coordinator. Blocker hired Phillip Banco, former Cleveland Browns’ assistant defensive coach and former head coach at East St. John, rounding out his staff. Offense: Sr. receiver Darrell Tott and Jr. RB Jaden Davenport lead the Dawgs’ offense. Defense: Sr. DB Jordan Burke, a 4-year starter, and Sr. defensive lineman Jacob Cross, a former linebacker, lead the defense.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Lakeshore (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Holy Cross (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Franklinton (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Dutchtown (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Denham Springs (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Ponchatoula (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Slidell (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Northshore (A)

Oct. 06

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Covington (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Northshore (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Slidell (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017

047


FRANKLINTON DEMONS

HAMMOND TORS

Franklinton second-year head coach Steve Burris (44) said this year’s Demons’ philosophy is “One Team, One Family.” Burris, a 1991 Franklinton grad, is a fixture with Demons’ football, having served as defensive coordinator for 17 years under former longtime head coach Shayne Smith before taking over last season. Burris said the Demons face a brutal pre-district schedule with strong Class 5A teams, Covington and Fontainebleau along with Class 4A powers Neville and St. Thomas More. The Demons (56) made the playoffs as a No. 20 seed, falling in a 47-27 roadshootout to No. 13 seed Warren Easton. Franklinton competes in District 8-4A, facing Lakeshore, Pearl River and Salmen for district honors. The Demons have a 90-player roster and 21 seniors. Coaching: John Lambert serves as Franklinton’s offensive coordinator with Johnathan Barber calling the defensive signals for the Demons. Offense: Franklinton returns five starters counting on highly regarded Sr. QB Taj Magee, an athletic, dual-threat athlete, who skillfully operates the Demon’s spread offense. Magee, who can beat you with his arm and his legs, hopes to keep opposing defenses on their heels during the season with his electric, proven ability. Sr. offensive guard Lance Stermer returns to solidify the Demons’ front line. Defense: The Demons’ have three returning starters, featuring Sr. linebackers Lamount Harris and James Bickham, roaming in Franklinton’s 3-4 defensive alignment. Jr. free safety Kian Connerly leads the secondary.

Hammond first-year head coach Steve Jones (63) coached running backs at Amite last season also serving as the AD. Jones takes over a 1-9 program, hoping to change the Hammond football culture. Jones served 22 years as the head coach of Harrison Central High School in Mississippi. Jones played DB for two years at Mississippi State before hurting his neck. Jones ran track for four years with the Bulldogs, competing in the (100 and 200-meters), participating in the 1976 pre-olympic trials held in Eugene, Ore. Jones said the players worked hard during the spring focusing on inter squad play as opposed to participating in any 7-on-7 tournaments. The Tors have 65-70 varsity players with 16 seniors, featuring good team speed. Jones’ wife Jo’el is a Hammond High grad and his parents reside in Hammond so it’s a homecoming of sorts for the Jones’. Coaching: Jones will handle the Tors’ play calling. Rory Bell, a new addition, is the defensive coordinator, joining six other new assistants hired by Jones. Offense: Hammond employs a multiple formation with Jr. QB Kevin Primus (5-11, 170) calling the shots. Sr. OL/DL Chris Hart (6-2, 315) anchors the line along with Sr. Kaleb Thorn (6-5, 325) and Jr. C/G Devin Johnson (6-0, 235). Defense: Jr. CB Jarod Poole (6-0, 175), Sr. CB/H-back Teddy Cyprian (6-0, 180) and Jr. LB Trent May (6-1, 210) highlight the defense.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Covington (A)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Denham Springs (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Woodlawn B.R. (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Bogalusa (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

TBD

Sep. 22

7 PM

Slidell (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

St. Thomas More (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Fontainebleau (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Neville (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Lakeshore (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Salmen (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Covington (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Pearl River (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

048

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017


LAKESHORE TITANS

MANDEVILLE SKIPPERS

Lakeshore’s Craig Jones (22-22) begins his fifth season leading the Titans, with four consecutive playoff berths, still looking for that elusive first post–season victory. Lakeshore (56) entered the playoffs as a No. 26 seed, falling to No. 7 Rayne. The Titans posted Jones’ career-best mark of 8-3 in his second season. Lakeshore’s 80-player roster features 23 seniors. Jones likes his team’s experience level and the team’s character, calling them a focused group. Lakeshore hosted its annual 7-on-7 tournament, featuring 17 schools, providing a showcase for a number of St. Tammany Parish teams and schools from throughout the Metro New Orleans area. Coaching: Craig Jones said he he’s lucky to have his experienced coaching staff back. “They do an outstanding job and have a good rapport with their players, providing a positive learning environment.” Richard Guillot, a former PJP II player, is the second-year offensive coordinator, operating the spread. Defensive coordinator Chris Womack calls the plays in his fourth-year. Offense: Sr. QB Chris Penton, out two-games due to concussion, returns, joining Jr. WR Jacob Bernard, who coach Jones calls his best player. Sr. Jalen Willis, out with an ACL injury, is healthy. Defense: Sr. nose guard Tylan Driver (6-2, 295), a four-year starter, already has seven college offers, including one from Texas Tech. Sr. LB Zach Womack, son of the DC, returns with Sr. CB Michael Gautier, a four-year starter.

Mandeville, a force in District 6-5A under coach Guy LeCompte, enters his 12th season, hoping to chart another steady course. The Skippers, the model of consistency, have made two state semi-final appearances, falling just short of the Dome. Mandeville (7-5), a No. 17 seed, bowed out in the regional round, suffering a heart-breaking, 37-36, loss to No. 1 seed Destrehan. MHS took second in the USA Football’s 7-on-7 state qualifier presented by the Saints, conducted at their Metairie training facility, advancing again to the Hoover Ala. annual tourney this month. The Skippers 2-1 in pool play finished 4-1 in tourney play, falling to Mississippi’s Shannon High in the championship game. The Skippers also finished second in the SLU 7-on-7, falling to East St. John. Coaching: LeCompte’s entire staff returns. “It’s a blessing. Their knowledge, commitment and interaction with players are tremendous. They’re great coaches and positive role models for our kids. Our players have character and a desire to succeed.” Defensive coordinator Josh Buelle, a Slidell High LB, returns for his third season calling signals. Offense: Sr. QB Darren Steele, a dual-threat, triggers the Skippers’ vaunted spread offense joined by Terron Jones and Roland Wallace. Jr. back Charles Quinn is expected to contribute as well. Defense: Lineman Malcolm Johnson and LB Sawyer Poulsen return with CBs Nick Jones and Devon Seiver roaming the secondary along with new addition, Jr. safety Ben Bonner.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Sep. 01

7 PM

University Lab (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

East Jefferson (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Live Oak (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Hancock, MS (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

TBD

Sep. 22

7 PM

Loranger (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Fontainebleau (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

KIPP Renaissance (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Lake Area New Tech (A)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Northshore (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

H.L. Bourgeois (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Slidell (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Pearl River (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Covington (A)

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017

049


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NORTHLAKE CHRISTIAN WOLVERINES

NORTHSHORE PANTHERS

Northlake Christian School’s Anthony Agresta (5524, 3-7) enters his ninth season. NCS (7-3) bowed out in the first round as a 15 seed. NCS faces two new District 8-2A opponents, Amite and Independence. “With those additions, an already tough district, becomes that much tougher. This year’s squad is very talented, but extremely young. Our underclassmen will have to step up,” Agresta said. NCS may have five or six two-way performers, featuring 11 seniors. NCS finished 4-1-1 in the Lakeshore 7-on-7. “Overall it was a quality weekend and served us well. Our new offensive players are learning, while our defense appears to be ahead of schedule,” Agresta added. Coaching: Agresta runs the offense with defensive coordinator Mark Robert returning for his fifth season, calling signals. Chris Chetta, from Archbishop Rummel, runs the O-line. Aaron Agresta, coach’s son, works with RBs and DBs. NCS grad Jake Springer, a former Wolverine, handles linebackers. Offense: Sr. Nick Morman, a first-team all-district RB and safety, returns, learning a new position as the starting QB, a twoway player again. Sr. RB Wesley Brown, first-team all-district, bolsters the running game. Sr. linemen Chase Appe and Matt Howell solidify the front. Jr. TE/LB Ian Lopez plays both ways. Defense: Morman will see time in the secondary and Brown starts at LB. Sophomore CB Bailey Desselles and freshman CB Trenton Remonenq must shore up the Wolverines’ youthful secondary.

Northshore’s Mike Bourg (50-74) in his 13th season, hopes its “Lucky 13” for the Panthers. Northshore faces tough predistrict opponents. Zachary on the road, followed by a trip to cross-town rival Salmen in the Spanther Bowl, then hosting Mississippi’s Biloxi High. NHS (4-6) went 2-4 in district. The Panthers participated in 7-on-7 tournaments at Southeastern, Lakeshore along with PJP II. Bourg figures at least four players will play on both sides of the ball. Coaching: Bourg runs the offense and Jeff Mills handles the defense. Tom Gainey, rejoins Bourg, coaching DBs. Bourg expects strong special teams play with Sr. CB/receiver Khalil Fleming, a West Point commitment, handling returns. Jr. PK Andrew Stein and Jr. punter Austin Dunlap return. Dunlap earned top kicker and punter awards at the Ray Guy/Prokicker.com Top Prospect Award competition. Sr. deep snapper Beaux Gaines, son of Scott Gaines, RBs coach, took the long-snapper award. Offense: Returns five starters led by Sr. QB Walter Harris, a verbal commitment to West Point, operating the spread. Jr. RBs Dwayne Jones and Branyan Bounds, experienced players, join Harris in an athletic backfield. Sr. receiver Ethan Swann is back from his torn ACL. Defense: The Panthers return eight starters. Sr. safety Jeremiah McDonald has verbally committed to Northwestern University in Chicago. Sr. CB/WR Mikell Harvey and Sr. LB/ WR Cole Cavallo is another two-way player along with Jr. offensive/defensive lineman Kenny Trinh.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Bogalusa (H)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Zachary (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

False River (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Resurrection Catholic (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Biloxi (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Springfield (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Amite (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Independence (A)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Mandeville (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

St. Thomas Aquinas (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Pine (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Covington (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Pope John Paul II (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Ponchatoula (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

St. Helena (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Slidell (H)

052

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017


PEARL RIVER REBELS

PINE RAIDERS

Pearl River’s new coach is no stranger as Jarrod “Boomer” Danford (40), takes over the Rebels. Danford, from Lulling, attended Hahnville High, a three-year starting center, graduating in 1996. He loves his Rebels’ hard work ethic and their honesty, wanting to be successful. The Rebels (47), made the playoffs as a No. 31 seed, falling to Karr, the eventual Class 4A state champion. PRHS has 8 seniors and will need their underclassmen to step up early as Danford said, “Throwing them to the Wolves. We have great kids, who do their absolute best, and are a fun group.” The Rebels went 2-4 in both the Southeastern and Lakeshore 7-on-7 tournaments. Coaching: Danford, the Rebels’ offensive coordinator the past two seasons, continues calling plays. Danford also coaches power lifting, track and gymnastics. Danford stays busy at home, caring for his 4 year-old twins, Benjamin and Ruby, keeping him on his toes. Tony Jurich, the Rebels’ new AD, serves as the defensive coordinator. Offense: The offense centers on Sr. RB Courtney Moore (5-9, 180) with Jr. QB Justin Dean running the Wing-T. Sophomore RB Corey Warren came on strong late in the season. Sr. left tackle Blake Baird (6-2, 265) anchors the line. Defense: Pearl River is really young defensively, operating out of a 4-2-5 scheme. Sr. DB Matt Elsensohn returns along with Jr. ends A.J. Muntz and Zach Ussery.

Pine head coach Bradley Seal enters his sixth season with the Raiders, having posted a 24-27 record. Seal has guided the Raiders to six consecutive playoff berths in his tenure, registering a 2-4 mark. Pine (7-4) fell in the second round of the playoffs, after earning a No. 15 seed. Seal said his club wants to build off of last year’s success, wanting to improve on that record. The Raiders have a 60-player roster, including 17 seniors. Coaching: Seal calls the offensive signals for the sixth consecutive season since his arrival, while defensive coordinator Matt Milton returns for his sixth season under Seal, giving the Raiders’ continuity in their play calling. Offense: Pine’s a power team, running a flex-bone triple option, employed by Seal three years ago. Sr. QB Joey Seal (5-10, 170), no relation to his coach, operates the Raiders’ runoriented offense. Pine’s offensive line is huge, averaging over 300 pounds, spearheaded by Sr. tackle Brendon Kelley (65, 330), who has a scholarship offer from McNeese State. Sr. FB Jakyran Handy (6-0, 220) provides power in the bruising running game. Sr. Evan Sinopoli and sophomore Jordan Anderson are the top receivers. Defense: Pine operates out of various fronts, switching from a 3-4 to a 4-4 scheme. Srs DT Donovan Kreyssig (6-0, 290), MLB Hunter Temples (6-0, 195), CB Delvic Dillon (5-9, 165) and Brendon Kelley, are the Raiders’ leaders.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Cohen College Prep (H)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Central Catholic (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Sci Academy (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Varnado (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Pine (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Pearl River (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Riverdale (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

St. Helena (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Haynes Academy (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Springfield (A)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Hahnville (H)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Amite (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

TBD

Oct. 13

7 PM

Independence (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Salmen (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Northlake Christian (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Lakeshore (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

St. Thomas Aquinas (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Pope John Paul II (H)

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017

053


PONCHATOULA GREEN WAVE

POPE JOHN PAUL II

Ponchatoula long-time head coach Hank Tierney enters his 10th year guiding the Green Wave, coming off a 10-2 season. Ponchatoula, a No. 3 seed, fell to Acadiana in the second round after beating them in week one. Tierney is in his 40th season in the football coaching ranks, starting with Archbishop Shaw back in 1977. Tierney said he’s a little worried about his team’s inexperience, but the program’s winning tradition should help keep the players focused. Ponchatoula’s had a tremendous run during the past four years, winning 38 games, enjoying tremendous success in District 6-5A. Ponchatoula has an 81-player varsity roster with 17 seniors. Tierney figures he’ll have three to five athletes playing both ways. Green Wave players wear t-shirts under their jerseys with the statement, “Do Your Job” on the back of the shirts, borrowing a page from the Super Bowl champion New England Patriots and their old-school head coach Bill Belichick. Coaching: Offensive coordinator Trey Willie is back for his fourth season calling the Green Wave’s plays. Defensive coordinator Tim Walters, also in his fourth year, handles the Ponchatoula 4-3 defensive alignment. Offense: Ponchatoula returns six starters operating out of a double-slot option, featuring senior RB Joquan Johnson and WR Salan Weber. Defense: The Green Wave lost nine starters and a wealth of experience, hoping for strong seasons from returning seniors DE Jade Coker and safety Avery Rogers.

Pope John Paul II’s Brett Bonnaffons returns for his second season, leading the Jaguars to a 4-6 record, 4-2 in District 8-2A. PJP II features 13 seniors. Bonnaffons lost lots of talent from last year, but feels this year’s group, although younger, is more athletic, hoping the new starters can develop. Coaching: Bonnaffons calls the shots in the Jags’ spread offense. Mark Jeanmard, the defensive coordinator, the Jaguars’ AD, calls signals in the 4-2-5 alignment. Jags’ coach Joe Schiro, a long-time fixture with PJP II, returns to the defensive line. Offense: The Jags return four starters. Sr. QB Reese Satterlee (5-11, 160) handles the spread offense. Sophomore receiver/CB Logan Klotz, a two-year starter as an eighth grader and freshman, is a key fixture on both sides of the ball. Jr. WR Chase Bergeron, coming off an elbow injury, will also see time in the secondary. Defense: PJP II brings back eight starters with an experienced front seven, expecting big things along the line. Sr. LB Joshua Philips (6-2, 190), a four-year starter, spearheads the defense, topping the Jags with 91 tackles, 28 stops for losses. Coach Bonnaffons said PJP II’s defense will go as Philips goes. Sr. defensive linemen Tony Hattier (5-11, 210) and Peyton Smith (6-0, 190), three-year starters, anchor the end positions with five and four sacks. The Jaguars have a young secondary, but have quickness and athleticism.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Barbe (A)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Westminster Christian (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Denham Springs (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

St. Patrick (A)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Loranger (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Archbishop Hannan (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Covington (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

St. Thomas Aquinas (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

St. Helena (A)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Slidell (A)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Springfield (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

St. Paul’s (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Amite (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Fountainebleau (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Independence (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Northlake Christian (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Pine (A)

054

EDGE Aug | Sep 2017


SALMEN SPARTANS Salmen long-time coach Jerry Leonard enters his 15th season with the Spartans, running the program since 2003. Leonard (92-44), hopes for a strong season to break the 100-coaching victory plateau. The Spartans (5-5), a No. 24 seed, fell in the first round. Leonard said he’ll have some two-way performers, but hopes to keep that to a minimum, hopefully no more than three or four. Salmen has 16 seniors, competing in District 8-4A, going against Franklinton, Lakeshore and Pearl River. Leonard said his club is filling some holes and the team is starting to come together. “We had a good spring continuing into the summer with the puzzle coming into place. Some of our question marks have been answered and the team is still developing,” Leonard said. Coaching: Leonard returns his complete coaching staff and continues calling the Spartans’ defensive signals, also serving as the school’s athletic director. Offense: Salmen features six starters with Sr. QB L.J. Leonard, the coach’s son, returning as the Spartans’ signal caller, running the spread. Leonard completed 67-of-141 passes for 917 yards with 11 touchdowns and eight picks. Leonard is joined by fellow seniors, wide receivers Eddie Smith and Braden Gable. Defense: The Spartans return five starters expecting big things from Sr. LB Jimmy Hudson and Sr. defensive end/outside linebacker Garrett Crawford along with Eddie Smith, who will see double-duty, playing DB in the Spartans’ secondary.

SLIDELL TIGERS Slidell head coach Larry Favre, in his fifth year, running the Tigers’ program, went 4-7 last season. The Tigers, a No. 26 seed, were ousted in the first round by No. 7 St. Amant, 3824. The Tigers graduated 24 seniors, while this year’s squad features 20 seniors. Slidell competed in the USA Football’s 7-on-7 tournament sponsored by the Saints at their Metairie training facility with Favre saying the coaches, players and their parents were excited about the competition level, going against strong opponents. The Tigers also competed in the Southeastern 7-on-7. Favre wants his Tigers to learn from their tournament mistakes, improving as a team. The Tigers’ offensive and defensive lines should be strong points with Favre saying games are won in the trenches and likes his experience level on both sides. Coaching: Favre added three coaches, hiring Jeremy Lynch (defensive backs), Latrell Peterson (linebackers) and DJ Appe (backs/slot receivers). Offense: Tigers’ go-to-guy is Jr. Tito Simmons, the team’s leading returning rusher and receiver. Two juniors Tylor Harris and Jacob Guidry are competing at quarterback along with sophomore Beaux Adams. They’ll have big targets in senior receivers Kaleb Joseph (6-3) and Tirrell Sylvas (6-2). Defense: Sr. LB Darrius Tillman, a four-year starter, leads the Tigers. Coach Favre refers to Tillman as one of the Tigers’ strongest athletes and a great team leader. Jr. CB Ishmael Burdine leads the Tigers’ secondary.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Madison Prep (A)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Destrehan (A)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Lake Area New Tech (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Walker (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Bogalusa (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Hammond (H)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Loranger (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Covington (A)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Franklinton (H)

Oct. 05

7 PM

Ponchatoula (H)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Archbishop Shaw (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Pearl River (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

St. Paul’s (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Franklinton (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Fontainebleau (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Lakeshore (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Northshore (A)

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ST. PAUL’S WOLVES

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS FALCONS

St. Paul’s, the defending, unbeaten District 6-5A champs (70), a perennial playoff team, looks to continue its dominance under Kenny Sears (132-64), entering his 18th year. The Wolves went 10-2 overall, falling in the quarterfinal round as a No. 4 seed, being edged by Evangel Christian, the eventual Division I select state champion, 28-21. Sears says his Wolves are poised for another solid season after winning 10 games last year, returning even hungrier. “We are still a work in progress, building chemistry and it will be interesting to see who emerges as the team leaders.” St. Paul’s conducted its 12th straight training camp at Nicholls State. Coaching: Lee Pierre, the defensive coordinator, enters his 11th season. Former St. Paul’s standout all-district LB and SLU Lions’ player Tyler Tourelle, returns, his second year, coaching outside linebackers. Offense: St. Paul’s spread returns six starters led by Jr. Johntae McDowell who passed for 2,356 yards, 31 touchdowns and just four interceptions. McDowell (181-for-268), a dualthreat, rushed for 295 yards. Sr. RB Corey Williamson joins McDowell in the Wolves’ productive backfield along with Sr. WR Cameron Vidal. Defense: Returns six starters led by Sr. LB Zach Bodenhiemer, the youngest and last of the Bodenheimer trio (brothers Kirk and Jordan), returns to anchor the defense. Bodenheimer is joined by Sr. LB Taylor Lacoste and Sr. CB Jack Bonaldi, providing valuable experience.

St. Thomas Aquinas first-year head coach Hutch Gonzales assumed his initial high school head coaching job at the end of May. Coach Hutch is raring to go, bringing a wealth of offensive experience, and is no stranger to St. Tammany Parish fans. He starred as a Covington High Lions’ wide receiver then the Southeastern Louisiana University Lions, playing one season in the Canadian Football League with the Saskatchewan Roughriders. Gonzales said his dream of becoming a high school head coach has finally been achieved. STA has a 44-man roster with 15 seniors and coach Gonzales figures the Falcons might have four or five guys playing both ways. Coaching: Gonzales serves as the offensive coordinator calling plays in the spread offense as he did last season with Fontainebleau and Lakeshore before that. Defensive coordinator Boomer Nunez enters his first year triggering the Falcons’ defense after coming over from St. Charles Catholic. Offense: Sophomore WR Dustin Dyson (6-5, 206) has run a 4.48, 40-yard dash and has scholarship interest from LSU and Mississippi State. Sr. Kade Bleakley (5-11, 165) and Jr. Ryan Dawsey (5-10, 170) are battling for the Falcons’ starting QB job. Defense: Sr. strong safety Will Hetzinger (6-4, 205) solidifies the secondary and is a returning All-State punter. Sr. middle linebacker T. J. Jackson (5-9, 240) and Sr. backer Luke Dibenedetto (6-0, 170) help anchor the base 3-4 defensive alignment.

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

Sep. 01

7 PM

Edna Karr (H)

Sep. 01

7 PM

Christian Life (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Jesuit (H)

Sep. 08

7 PM

Episcopal (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Christian Brothers (H)

Sep. 15

7 PM

Catholic N.I. (A)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Northshore (H)

Sep. 22

7 PM

Pope John Paul II (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Hammond (A)

Sep. 29

7 PM

Independence (H)

Oct. 06

7 PM

Covington (H)

Oct. 06

7 PM

St. Helena (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Ponchatoula (A)

Oct. 13

7 PM

Northlake Christian (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Slidell (H)

Oct. 20

7 PM

Springfield (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Mandeville (A)

Oct. 27

7 PM

Pine (H)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Fontainebleau (A)

Nov. 03

7 PM

Amite (A)

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Saint Paul’s School / St. Scholastica Academy

OPEN HOUSE saturday

OCTOBER 28

NOVEMBER 2

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St. Scholastica Campus

1 pm

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985-892-3200 ext. 1003 www.StPauls.com 917 S. Jahncke Ave. Covington, LA

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For Shadow Day information Call 892-3200 ext. 1003

To Schedule a Shadow Day Go to www.ssacad.org

Non-discriminatory on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin


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STORY AND PHOTOS JOHN N. FELSHER

September in south Louisiana means teal season! Blue-winged teal migrate much earlier than most other ducks and usually begin arriving on the Gulf Coast in late summer. Therefore, the state opens a brief special season to increase the harvest of these small, quick waterfowl. I enjoyed many great teal hunts over the years, but on one of the most memorable, I didn’t bring home a single bird. On a sweltering September afternoon many years ago — when I was a teenager — I set out to hunt at a shallow pond in what is now part of Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge near Slidell. To reach the pond, I had to paddle my pirogue through a myriad of narrow channels, some barely wide enough to permit the boat to pass. As I paddled, various chirping, croaking and splashing creatures went about their daily fight for survival in a beautiful, yet unforgiving wetland where death could come from anywhere without warning. In this land of life or death, alligators reign supreme, fearing nothing — except man! In September, the big cold-blooded reptiles soak up the warm sunshine before cooler weather sends them to their dens. As I rounded a bend in a narrow slough, my boat nearly bumped into two alligators sunning themselves on a muddy bank, barely a few feet away. As surprised and startled by the encounter as I was, the smaller gator, about a 3-footer, quickly plunged into the water and disappeared. Perhaps a little more curious, sluggish or fearless, one about six feet long remained motionless for a while as my little boat drifted toward it. Resting on the mud bottom, the smaller alligator probably believed it found sanctuary. However, it chose a poor hiding place directly beneath a boat carrying a mischievous Louisiana

teen! In the crystalline water barely two feet deep, I could easily see the gator as the boat glided above it. I didn’t show the best sense either. Just to see what would happen, I gave the prehistoric beast a less than subtle nudge on its leathery back with my paddle. The alligator didn’t appreciate my greeting. It ripped through the channel — or did it tear a new one — doing the 100-yard thrash to get as far away from this crazy kid as possible! After fighting my way through alligators and cockily showing them who was the real King of the Marsh, I finally reached the pond. However, a tree root quickly brought me back to earth — quite literally. As I stepped from the boat, I tripped and splattered face first into the muck. Somewhere in the distance, I thought I heard an alligator laughing. Upon opening my eyes, I quickly remembered that alligators shared this marsh with other reptiles that also enjoyed the sunshine. To my horror, I stared into the eyes of a 4-foot-long cottonmouth coiled not more than two feet from my nose. Closing my eyes tightly and bracing for the inevitable strike, I waited for “the big one!” “Lord, this is it. Make a place for me. I’m coming soon,” praying for forgiveness for all sins real and imagined, past, present and future. After several years — or so it seemed — I slightly cracked open one eye. Yes, the enormous coiled black monster (in my mind it had grown 15 feet) was still poised to take a fatal strike at my face. I slammed my eyes shut again. “Ah, Lord. It’s me again. I was just thinking. Nothing has happened yet — not like I’m in a big hurry or anything — but if you’re going to take me, please do it now. This waiting is awful.” EDGE Aug | Sep 2017

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Still, no fangs pierced my flesh and no venom coursed through my veins. Mustering some courage, I peeked with both eyes and noticed something odd about the snake. It never moved. Curious, I got up and poked it with a stick. Nothing! I don’t know what killed it. Perhaps, it suffered a massive heart attack as a stout teen-aged football lineman nearly fell on top of it, but whatever killed it, better it than me! Getting back to serious business, I placed the teal decoys in the pond and fashioned a blind from native vegetation. Then, I waited for waves upon waves of teal to inevitably whistle into range. I waited and waited. Full of accumulated adrenaline and nine months of anticipation, I caught the silhouette of a faint black flying object in my peripheral vision. I jumped up to swing my gun on a — mosquito! While waiting for Mr. Teal-wing, six otters appeared, playing merrily among the decoys. Periodically, the clever aquatic creatures snatched fat blue crabs from the pond bottom. Floating on their backs, they held the crabs with their two front hand-like paws, crunching the shells and eating the crustaceans as if devouring sandwiches. My crude blind did not fool the otters. These highly intelligent animals took turns eating and watching. One otter at a time would approach close to the blind and watch me while the others feasted on crabs. After a while, the sentinel disappeared and the next shift took over. Had I made the slightest move in their direction, they all would have vanished instantly into the vastness of the wetlands. Eventually, they ate their fill or grew tired of watching a soggy, muddy, sweating camouflaged hunter trying to sit motionless in some bushes while being slowly devoured by mosquitoes. Soon after the otters departed, more visitors arrived. Nonmigratory mottled ducks live in the marsh all year long. Not legal to hunt during teal season, something they apparently knew, two mottled ducks circled the decoys and landed right in front of me — kind of the avian version of making a rather rude gesture at my expense. After making their point, the pair quacked their disapproval of me and headed elsewhere. As the waning sunlight painted the clouds in various shades, four blue-winged teal darted over the pond. Firing a quick shot, I splashed one. With little time before shooting hours ended, I let the teal float in the pond, hoping to put others in the same situation before sunset. I could easily retrieve it later as I paddled back to the truck. The duck floated undisturbed for a few minutes. Then, all of a sudden, the pond erupted in a huge commotion as a giant toothy head snatched my bird. In a flash, any evidence of a successful hunt vanished. Again, I thought I heard an alligator laughing, possibly my former reptilian nemesis seeking revenge for the less than courteous greeting I rendered earlier. The last rays of the sun illuminated the radiant hues of a drake wood duck zooming near the blind moments after shooting hours ended. Not legal game at this time either, it flew away. The day ended with the greatest free show on Earth, a dazzling kaleidoscope of color. Paddling back in darkness empty-handed, I pondered the truly wonderful memory of a day that could never be repeated. I would see better and worse hunts, but never another one exactly like this.

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LAW OFFICE OF Peyton B. Burkhalter PERSONAL INJURY CRIMINAL DEFENSE FAMILY LAW 213 N. Vermont Street Covington, La. 70433 (985) 307-0112 (By Appointment Only)

2540 Severn Avenue, Suite 129 Metairie, La. 70002 (5 (504) 266-2044 Pete@peytonburkhalterlaw.com


My turn: by Osman Rodas

Anna, wife of Vinnie LeDonne, one of the owners of Meribo, greeted us at the door when my wife and I visited for dinner. The place was jumping for a Wednesday night, not surprising since they have a great happy hour, half price pizzas, specialty cocktails, and $5 glasses of wine. On our first visit, I thought we were going to an upscale pizza restaurant. I was glad to be wrong. The menu expands way beyond pizza. And all the dishes have been perfected, not just for the palette, but also visually. Chef Gavin Jobe is a big city talent with a progressive vision toward his food. While Meribo is certainly family friendly, unlike our previous visit, this evening we had no kids and plenty of time. We settled in on one side of the airy room and ordered. The calamari we started with was crispy and peppery, served with a shaved fennel and Calabrian chili marmelata. It was delicious. Our second appetizer was octopus, served with black-eyed-pea salad and a lemon aioli. Octopus is a hard dish to execute. Too long cooking and it becomes tough. Ours was tender and the salad complimented the octopus perfectly. Our third appetizer was the Grow Farm Salad, a combination of roasted beets, fresh figs, and pickled jalapeños. We had tried this salad the last time we were in Meribo and there was no way we were not going to indulge in this awesome salad of locally harvest produce. Yes, we did get a pizza called The Nocca. I honestly can’t find myself just

calling it pizza. Ham hock, caramelized sweet onions, olives, fontina, and toasted pistachios, it is making my mouth water just writing about it. As a chef, nothing makes me feel better than when someone tastes one of my dishes and says “I would have never order that I am glad I did”. That was exactly what I thought about the gourmet pizza’s at Meribo. I probably would not have ordered it if I had been left to my own devices, but it would have been a shame to miss it. Just to round out the gluttony we got two more entrées. My wife had the cured pork tenderloin with garlic broccolini. I had the lamb ravioli. The pork was cooked to perfection. I’m not sure what ingredients he used to cure the loin but it showed very well. The lamb was amazing. It was braised lamb stuffed ravioli with wild mushrooms and green peas. We finished our meal with two cappuccinos. Overall, Meribo is an Italian restaurant with strong southern influences, a wonderful combination of old world cuisine meets new. I would like to offer congratulations to both Vinnie LeDonne and Chef Gavin Jobe, for following their hearts and showing off their passion for food. And if that isn’t reason enough to visit, Meribo is also one of the few local upscale restaurants to keep late weekend hours. We are surely looking forward to our next visit.


ABOUT OSMAN RODAS

MERIBO 326 Lee Lane, Covington, LA 70433 meribopizza.com 985.302.5533

Every issue EDGE of the Lake Magazine invites a local restaurateur to visit another eatery on the Northshore. For this issue, Osman Rodas from Pardo’s visited Meribo in downtown Covington. Osman grew up with his grandparents in upstate New York where they owned three restaurants and two bars, with one of those restaurants being named after him. After working for Emeril and running his own place on Frenchman Street, Osman grew tired of commuting and decided to open a restaurant closer to his young family on the Northshore. Pardos opened in May of 2012, followed by Forks and Corks, and Tchoupstix’s.


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Falling for Color

STORY AND PHOTOS G. BRENT BROWN

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A visit to see the Autumn leaf change in New England is a wonderful trip, especially for us fall-color challenged Southerners. And perhaps nowhere in the Northeast is as magical as Vermont. The small villages, back roads, and vivid colors make for one of the best areas to enjoy the many splendors of fall. Boston, MA or Manchester, NH are usually the best airports to fly into the upper New England area. Both are serviced by several airlines, however the only non-stop flight from New Orleans is on Jet Blue into Boston. Once you are there, traveling in a rental vehicle makes for a much more flexible trip. From Boston, it’s about a 2 1/2 hour drive (I-93, I-89 and Route 4) to the town of Woodstock. Not “that” Woodstock — it’s in New York — this is Woodstock, Vermont, one of the most pleasant villages in the state. White picket fences, grand Federal and Greek Revival homes, several sharp-steeple churches, and a story-book worthy village green all contribute to the town’s allure. With numerous inns and bed and breakfasts, it makes the perfect central location for your stay. The leaf change in Vermont begins in mid-September and lasts through the second or third week in October. You will want to reserve your lodging well in advance. Your location in Woodstock will allow easy trekking north, south, and or west — changing location and elevation to allow for a good viewing of some wonderful fall colors.

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Spend a day exploring your home base in Woodstock, strolling the green and enjoying the fall colors against the white background of the buildings. Your inn or B & B will probably fill you up for breakfast, but if not, look for one of the many pancake breakfasts that are common throughout the area, organized by local charity organizations raising money by feeding hungry travelers. Then make a quick drive east to Quechee, VA to start your fall color tour. Stop at the Quechee Gorge (Lat 43.637484, Long -72.407923) and enjoy the colors from the bridge, or to work off that big breakfast, take the scenic 20 minute hike through the forest to the stream at the bottom of the gorge. While passing through Quechee many of the numerous shops may catch your eye. Back on Route 4 west near Woodstock is the Billings Farm and Museum. Here visitors will find examples of Vermont’s past farming methods, handmade Vermont cheeses and strawberry shortcake, and maybe even the chance to try your hand at milking a cow. Continue west on Route 4 to Bridgewater Corner for a stop at the Long Trail Brewery. Visit the beer garden by the river for a taste of what many consider Vermont’s number one craft brewery, and perhaps erase the memory of the failed cow milking earlier. Now that you have your bearings for the area, it’s time to wander along Route 100 for the splendor of it all. LONGTRAIL BREWING COMPANY longtrail.com BEN AND JERRY’S benjerry.com/waterbury COLD HOLLOW CIDER MILL coldhollow.com

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Head through Killington, Vermont’s largest ski area, to Route 100. From there it’s a colorful drive North on one of Vermont’s most scenic byways to Waterbury. There are roadside waterfalls — Moss Glen Falls (Lat 44.018109, Long -72.850365) is just north of Glanville, numerous small villages to enjoy, and many side roads to explore that lead into the Green Mountain National Forest. This route would take an hour and a half without stops, but allow plenty of time to explore and stop along the way. At the end of this route is quite the reward. The Ben and Jerry’s Factory is on the north side of Waterbury. Take the tour of the production facility and enjoy the free sample, but don’t fill up too much, as the next stop just up the road is the Cold Hollow Cider Mill. The mill has a working cider press and the fresh cider is wonderful, but their Cider Doughnuts may be the best bite you have had this side of a beignet. Before you leave Waterbury, stop at one of the many cheese shops in town for some Vermont Cheddar, then it’s a quick and easy drive down I-89 back to Woodstock. Now you are poised to go out hunting the best colors in the area. Locals are well versed in the art of Leaf Peeping, as they call it in the Northeast, so get some recommendations, get out on the back roads, get lost, and find your own colorful corner of Vermont.


631 N Causeway Blvd Mandeville, LA 70448

125 E 21st Ave Covington, LA 70433


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1 Nearly $85,000 was raised at this year’s 25th anniversary of Jazz on the Bayou. Ronnie Kole distributed the funds at a special wrap-up dinner. STARC received $51,500, Easter Seals of Louisiana receiving $25,500 and the balance shared between the City of Slidell Dept. of Cultural and Public Affairs, Safe Harbor and the Tammany Trace. 2 The Professional Women of St. Tammany awarded scholarships to eight well deserving Northshore students at a luncheon held at Tchefuncta Country Club. Marie Rudd Gregory gave a moving tribute to her daughter, Brooke Posey, before presenting the first ever ‘Brooke Posey Memorial Scholarship’ an award named in her daughter’s honor, to Youngone Kim. The other recipients of scholarships were Caroline Bilbe, Jessica Coalson Hailey Crausby, Melissa Mankin, Hannah Miller, Hannah Tonry and Margaret Wetzel. 3 The EDGE of the Lake team enjoyed a day out at the Crawfish Cookin’ for a Cause on the Mandeville Lakefront. 4 Leadership St. Tammany celebrated its 2017 graduating class. The 35 graduates, who were joined by family members, friends, LST alumni and

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local dignitaries, were applauded for completing the 10-month program that offers participants an in-depth look into the inner workings of government, business, civic and cultural organizations in St. Tammany Parish. 5 The 3rd Annual Seersucker and Sazeracs fundraiser for the St. Tammany Art Association was held at the Southern Hotel in historic downtown Covington. Patrons enjoyed Sazeracs, a southern cocktail, along with food provided by local restaurants. (Photos by Dan Cobb) 6 The Covington Business Association brought the beach to downtown Covington with the first annual Kokomo Stroll. Flip flops, beach music and boat drinks were aplenty as crowds filled the downtown streets to sample scrumptious summer drinks at CBA member businesses. (Photos by Dan Cobb) 7 EDGE of the Lake enjoyed a hike in Costa Rica. 8 The Dudes take EDGE of the Lake to Florida. 9 Fans joined Four Unplugged for their annual FloraBama summer concert 10 EDGE of the Lake visited Colorado. 11 St. Scholastica Royalettes Dance Team participated in the Universal Dance Association Camp. The team

was awarded 1st Place Home Routine, Superior Trophy for All Routines learned at camp, and Drill Down Team High Point Winner. 12 St. Scholastica Academy rising senior, Hailey Rowbatham was selected to receive the Emmy Noether Award. This prestigious STEM scholarship is award to a female future scientist.   13 East St. Tammany Habitat for Humanity works alongside Lowe’s volunteers and all-female construction crews for Habitat for Humanity’s 10th annual National Women Build Week. 14 Habitat for Humanity St. Tammany West celebrated with the McHugh & McGee Families at their home dedications. The construction of the two homes began in October as part of Habitat STW’s annual fundraiser, Women Build 2016. 15 Tribal storyteller Grayhawk Perkins was the guest speaker at Covington Heritage Foundation’s Wine, Cheese and Native American Folklore: An evening with Grayhawk Perkins, held at the Fuhrmann Auditorium in Covington. Send a picture of you with EDGE of the Lake magazine to edgepublisher@yahoo.com


Profile for EDGE of the Lake

EDGE of the Lake August | September 2017  

EDGE of the Lake gives a fresh edgy look at the parishes north of the lake and the unique mix of people that make up our community. Expect t...

EDGE of the Lake August | September 2017  

EDGE of the Lake gives a fresh edgy look at the parishes north of the lake and the unique mix of people that make up our community. Expect t...

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