__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


TA B L E O F

CONTENTS

3

College Mission

4

Overview of the IB Diploma Programme

7

How Are Students Assessed?

8

Award of the IB Diploma

9

University Courses and Careers Group 1 - English Language A: Language and Literature (HL/SL)

16

Group 1 - School-Supported Self-Taught Language A: Literature (SL)

17

Group 2 - Chinese Language B (HL/SL)

19

Group 2 - Korean Language A: Literature (HL/SL)

21

Group 2 - Mandarin Ab Initio (SL)

22

Group 2 - Spanish Ab Initio (SL)

23

Group 2 - Spanish Language B (SL)

25

Group 3 - Economics (HL/SL)

27

Group 3 - Geography (HL/SL)

29

Group 3 - History (HL/SL)

31

Group 4 - Biology (HL/SL)

32

Group 4 - Chemistry (HL/SL)

33

Group 4 - Computer Science (HL/SL)

34

Group 4 - Environmental Systems and Societies (SL)

36

Group 4 - Physics (HL/SL)

37

Group 5 - Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches (HL/SL)

39

Group 5 - Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation (HL/SL)

41

Group 6 - Music (HL/SL)

43

Group 6 - Theatre (HL/SL)

45

Group 6 - Visual Arts (HL/SL)

47

Core: Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

48

Core: Extended Essay (EE)

49

Core: Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS)

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

13

2


College Mission At Dulwich College Seoul, Students Come First. Together, we strive to be the Kindest School in the Universe. We are proud of our Dulwich heritage and, as One Family of Schools, we celebrate our connection with the Dulwich family. We move forward, with a Pioneering Spirit, encouraging our students to Build Bridges to the World.

Students Come First Kindest School in the Universe One Family of Schools Pioneering Spirit Building Bridges to the World

Because Students Come First: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

We provide a safe and stimulating environment. We allow every individual to realise their full potential. We promote the development of the whole child through a holistic approach to learning. We recognise that meaningful learning involves taking risks. We prepare children to live in an ever-changing world. We emphasise the benefits of working together. We celebrate diversity in our local and international community. We encourage respect for the environment. We develop compassionate, caring individuals with respect for themselves and others.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 3


Overview of the IB Diploma Programme The IB Diploma The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), founded in 1968, is a non-profit educational organisation based in Geneva, Switzerland. The IBO is a recognised leader in the field of international education and is currently working with 3,500 schools in 143 countries to develop and offer IB programmes to more than 1,000,000 students aged 3 to 19 years. The IB Diploma Programme is a challenging two-year programme of international education for students aged 16 to 19 years old. The IB Diploma Programme prepares students for university and life in a global society and encourages them to: • • • •

Ask challenging questions. Learn how to learn. Develop a strong sense of identity and culture. Develop the ability to communicate and understand people from other countries and cultures.

Entry Requirements Students who have completed an International GCSE programme are required to have achieved a minimum of 3 x B grades and 2 x C grades to be accepted onto the IB Diploma Programme. For most HL courses, students are required to have achieved a B grade at International GCSE level. The exceptions are HL Mathematics and HL Physics, both of which require an A grade at International GCSE level Mathematics. If a student has not studied a particular subject at International GCSE level, or under another examination system, it is sometimes possible to start the subject without any prior knowledge at IB Diploma level. Students are advised to consult the appropriate Head of Department or the IB Diploma Coordinator if they are considering a subject they have not studied previously. Should a student not meet the minimum entry requirements, either for the IB Diploma in general, or for a specific subject, we will look carefully and considerately at a student’s circumstances, attitude and academic record. The IB Learner Profile As an IB World School, Dulwich College Seoul aims to develop internationally minded people who, recognising their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

Inquirers: Students develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable: Students explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers: Students exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognise and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators: Students understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

4

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

IB Diploma students strive to be:


Principled: Students act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded: Students understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring: Students show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers: Students approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Balanced: Students understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Reflective: Students give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

The IB Diploma Programme Core Subjects The Core is compulsory and central to the philosophy of the IB Diploma Programme. The Core requirements are:

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 5

The Extended Essay (EE) - This asks students to engage in independent research through an in-depth study of a question relating to one of the DP subjects they are studying. The EE has a prescribed limit of 4,000 words and equips students with the independent research and writing skills expected at university.

Theory of Knowledge (TOK) - The interdisciplinary TOK course develops a coherent approach to learning that unifies the academic disciplines. In this course on critical thinking, students explore the nature of knowing and deepen their understanding of knowledge as a human construction.

Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) - Participation in the school’s CAS programme encourages students to be involved in a range of activities alongside their academic studies throughout the Diploma Programme. Creativity encourages students to engage in the arts and creative thinking. Activity seeks to develop a healthy lifestyle through physical exertion complementing academic work elsewhere in the DP. Service within the community offers a vehicle for a new learning with academic value. The three strands of CAS enhance students’ personal and interpersonal development through experiential learning and enable journeys of selfdiscovery.


Subjects on Offer The table below indicates the subjects on offer at Dulwich College Seoul. Students must select three Higher Level (HL) and three Standard Level (SL) subjects and must choose one from each group. We encourage students to ensure that the subjects they select are appropriate for university entrance, will maximise their potential, and provide satisfaction and enjoyment. IB Diploma Group

Courses

1

Studies in Language and Literature

• •

English Language A: Language and Literature (HL/SL) School-Supported Self-Taught (SSST) Language A: Literature (SL)

2

Language Acquisition

• • • • •

Chinese Language B (HL/SL) Korean Language A: Literature (HL/SL)* Mandarin Ab Initio (SL) Spanish Ab Initio (SL) Spanish Language B (SL)

3

Individuals and Societies

• • •

Economics (HL/SL) Geography (HL/SL) History (HL/SL)

4

Experimental Sciences

• • • • •

Biology (HL/SL) Chemistry (HL/SL) Computer Science (HL/SL) Environmental Systems and Societies (SL) Physics (HL/SL)

5

Mathematics

• •

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches (HL/SL) Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation (HL/SL)

6

The Arts

• • • •

Music (HL/SL) Theatre (HL/SL) Visual Arts (HL/SL) Students may also choose: Another Experimental Sciences or Another Individuals and Societies subject in this block

* Completion of Korean Language A: Literature (HL/SL) as a Group 2 course - Students will be awarded a bilingual IB Diploma if they achieve level 3 or higher for this course and their Group 1 course.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

Note: • Some courses may not be offered due to insufficient student enrolment. • It is not always possible to accommodate all course selections due to scheduling conflicts. Every effort will be made to accommodate student preferences but on occasion it may be necessary for students to modify their option choice. This is very much the exception rather than the rule.

6


How Are Students Assessed? Students are assessed both internally and externally in ways that measure individual performance against stated objectives for each subject. Internal Assessment The IBDP curriculum requires that students complete a major “project” in each IB Diploma subject. Such projects are formally called Internal Assessment (IAs) because they are assessed “internally” by subject teachers. To ensure consistency, IA projects are also moderated by IB examiners. The moderation process is an important part of maintaining consistency, fairness, high standards, and accountability in the IB Diploma Programme. Some assessment tasks are conducted and overseen by teachers without the restrictions of examination conditions, but are then marked externally by examiners. Examples include Works in Translation assignments for Language A, Written Tasks for Group 2: Language Acquisition, Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essays. External Assessment In May of the second year of the IB Diploma Programme, students will sit IB Diploma examinations based on two years' worth of teaching materials. Due to the degree of objectivity and reliability provided by the standard examination environment, externally marked examinations form the greatest share of assessment for each subject. IBDP students follow six courses: three at Higher Level and three at Standard Level. The points awarded for each course range from 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest). Students can also be awarded up to three additional points for their combined results on the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge. The highest total score for the IB Diploma that may be awarded is 45 points. The IB Diploma is awarded to students who gain at least 24 points, subject to certain minimal levels of performance across the whole Diploma and to satisfactory completion of Creativity, Activity and Service requirements.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 7


Award of the IB Diploma All assessment components for each of the six subjects and the additional IB Diploma requirements must be completed in order to qualify for the award of the IB Diploma. The IB Diploma will be awarded to a candidate if the following conditions are met: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

CAS requirements have been met. The candidate’s total points are 24 or more. There is no “N” awarded for Theory of Knowledge, the Extended Essay or for a contributing subject. There is no grade E awarded for Theory of Knowledge and/or the Extended Essay. There is no grade 1 awarded in a subject/level. There are no more than two grade 2s awarded (HL or SL). There are no more than three grade 3s or below awarded (HL or SL). The candidate has gained 12 points or more on HL subjects. The candidate has gained 9 points or more on SL subjects. The candidate has not received a penalty for academic misconduct from the Final Award Committee.

A maximum of three examination sessions are allowed in which to satisfy the requirements. Do all students follow the full IB Diploma Programme? Students entering into Year 12 will begin the full IB Diploma Programme and progress will be closely monitored. Some students may be advised that the full Programme may not be the appropriate option for them. In these situations, the College will direct the student to follow an individualised set of Diploma Programme courses, designed to best meet their needs and abilities. The College will identify students who may need to follow such a route and meetings will be set up with the individual students and their parents to discuss the options available.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 8


University Courses and Careers University Courses Dulwich College Seoul students apply to a range of universities throughout the world; past destinations have included the UK, the USA, Canada, Hong Kong, Japan and mainland Europe. Admissions requirements vary depending on the country and course. For some courses, students must take specific Higher Level subjects, and for others only total points matter. Some universities will assess internal marks and progression over time, whereas other universities will look simply at the total points awarded at the end of the IB Diploma Programme. Although it would be sensible to choose the subject a student is thinking of studying at degree level as a Higher Level subject, it is not essential in many cases. The main exceptions will be scientific or mathematical subjects, plus languages or those involving particular technical skills such as the Fine Arts or Performing Arts, i.e. those subjects where a student will need to build on what has been studied at IBDP level.

Medical Degrees For Medicine, applicants must take HL Chemistry. Most medical schools will also require a second Science subject or Mathematics Analysis and Approaches at HL, and some will specify Biology. It is very unusual for medical schools to require all HL subjects to be three Sciences or two Sciences and Mathematics Analysis and Approaches, although the University of Cambridge in the UK does prefer this. There are many other factors to be considered to study Medicine. These include: • • •

Medicine is largely a graduate degree programme in most countries outside the UK. Most medical schools require an interview before they are prepared to offer a place. Most medical schools will require applicants to sit an external assessment as part of the application process (e.g. UKCAT or BMAT in the UK, UMAT or GMAT in Australia).

Science and Engineering Degrees Science and Engineering degrees will require a largely scientific/mathematical set of HL subjects, the exact combination depending upon which subject a student wishes to study at degree level. HL Mathematics Analysis and Approaches and Physics and/or Chemistry are highly recommended for any Engineering degree. IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

Economics, Finance and Accountancy Degrees Many degree programmes will be interested in a student’s skill level in, and knowledge of, Mathematics. A strong score (5+) in Higher Level Mathematics Analysis and Approaches or a top score (7) in Higher Level Mathematics Applications and Interpretations is desirable. Many students also take HL Economics if the intention is to study Economics at university, but this is not essential for most universities.

Business and Management Degrees There are no specific requirements for these degrees. Candidates will certainly need to show some ability in Mathematics because of the quantitative nature of some of the modules, so it is important to investigate Mathematics requirements. There are universities in the USA that expect students to have taken the most rigorous mathematics course available to them, even if it does not specify this in their requirements.

9


Psychology and Sports Science In the UK, Psychology and Sports Science have a strong scientific base and therefore at least one Science subject among your HL choices will be essential. A student does not need to study Psychology at school to get onto a Psychology degree programme.

Art and Design or Performing Arts Any student wishing to enter these fields will need to choose the appropriate subject at HL that they are hoping to study further at university. They must also produce a portfolio of work or be prepared for an audition; this may well be more important than the IB Diploma result in getting a place at their chosen college.

Law or Media Studies There are no particular subject requirements for these degrees but for Law it is helpful to study a course at HL that requires analysis of texts, e.g. English Language A or History. Outside of the UK, Law is largely a graduate option. For the USA, students should select a Humanities / Social Sciences degree or Liberal Arts programme as a first degree.

Careers Gap Years Gap years are useful as long as there is a clear goal and plan for the year. It is important that any student taking a gap year considers how this will support their university studies when the gap year comes to an end. Gap years may be necessary if a student’s initial choice of university does not work out or if they need to reapply. There is plenty of advice available as to constructive use of gap years.

Many universities will offer the opportunity to take part in summer programmes on campus. This provides the opportunity to explore an interest or develop a skill as well as to live for a week or more in the university, explore the local area and come to a decision whether this is the place to spend the next 3-4 years. Our University Guidance Counsellor can provide detailed information on available options.

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

Summer Programmes

10


Group 1

English Language A: Language and Literature (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance English Language A: Literature and Language is recommended for the first language student or for those students who have a high level of fluency in English. Any student interested in selecting English Language A: Literature and Language at HL or SL must have had previous formal literary experience and training and be confident and capable of writing critical essays about texts. Course Aims The aims of all subjects in studies in language and literature are to enable students to: • • • • • • • •

Engage with a range of texts, in a variety of media and forms, from different periods, styles, and cultures. Develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, presenting and performing. Develop skills in interpretation, analysis and evaluation. Develop sensitivity to the formal and aesthetic qualities of texts and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings. Develop an understanding of relationships between texts and a variety of perspectives, cultural contexts, and local and global issues and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings. Develop an understanding of the relationships between studies in language and literature and other disciplines. Communicate and collaborate in a confident and creative way. Foster a lifelong interest in and enjoyment of language and literature.

Course Content 1. 2. 3.

Readers, writers and texts Time and space Intertextuality: connecting texts

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 13


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours) • • •

External Assessment (3 hours)

Weighting 70%

Paper 1: Non-fiction textual analysis of one text (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2: Comparative literary analysis (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

40%

Individual oral (15 minutes)

SL Assessment Component

• •

60%

Paper 1: Non-fiction textual analysis of two texts (2 hours 15 Minutes) Paper 2: Comparative literary analysis (1 hour 45 Minutes) Higher level essay (written in class)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

30%

Individual oral (15 minutes)

For Further Advice Contact Frank Ventham, Head of English: Francis.Ventham@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 14


Group 1

School-Supported Self-Taught Language A: Literature (SL)

The IBO and Dulwich College Seoul firmly encourage and support the study of mother tongue languages. Students whose first language is not English and who have experience studying literature written in their mother tongue may wish to consider the school supported self-taught literature programme (SSST). This is a study of literature written in the student’s mother tongue. The course is offered at Standard Level Literature only and as the name suggests it involves the students studying independently with the support of experienced Language A: Literature teachers at Dulwich College Seoul who will act as the SSST supervisor. Students will also have a tutor in the students first language who can assist in areas where the SSST supervisors cannot. Course Aims This course aims to help students: • • • • •

See how the literary works are relevant to the students' world and their experiences. Make connections between works studied in the course. Make connections with Theory of Knowledge (TOK), the approaches to learning and international mindedness. Make connections with other subjects. Become a flexible and critical reader.

Course Content The course is organised into three areas of exploration which blend together while each providing a focus of investigation: • • •

Readers, writers and texts introduces the notion of literature, its purposes and the ways in which texts can be read, interpreted and responded to. Time and space draws attention to the fact that texts are not isolated entities, but are connected to space and time. Intertextuality: connecting texts focuses on the connections between and among diverse texts, traditions, creators and ideas.

Assessment Outline

External Assessment (3 hours) • •

Paper 1: Unseen text (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 30 minutes)

Alternative Oral Examination (15 minutes)

For Further Advice Contact Rebecca Gardner, Assistant Head (IB Diploma Coordinator): Rebecca.Gardner@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

SL Assessment Component

16


Group 2

Chinese Language B (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance The Chinese Language B course is designed for foreign language learners or second language learners with some previous experience of learning the language, typically at both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4. Students who have completed the International GCSE Chinese as a Foreign Language course or International GCSE Chinese as a Second Language course will be eligible. Course Aims This course aims to: • • • • • • • •

Develop international mindedness through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance. Enable students to communicate in the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of a variety of perspectives of people from diverse cultures. Develop students’ understanding of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar. Develop students’ awareness of the importance of language in relation to other areas of knowledge. Provide students, through language learning and the process of inquiry, with opportunities for intellectual engagement and the development of critical- and creative-thinking skills. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language. Foster curiosity, creativity and a lifelong enjoyment of language learning.

Course Content The course comprises five prescribed themes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Identities Experiences Human ingenuity Social organisation Sharing the planet

Additionally, at HL, students must read two works of literature. IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 17


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (3 hours 30 minutes) • •

External Assessment (3 hours)

Weighting 75%

Paper 1: Productive skills - writing (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2: Receptive skills - listening and reading (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

25%

Individual oral commentary

SL Assessment Component

• •

75%

Paper 1: Productive skills - writing (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 2: Receptive skills - listening and reading (2 hours)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

25%

Individual oral commentary

For Further Advice Contact Ying Wen, Head of Mandarin: Ying.Wen@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 18


Group 2

Korean Language A: Literature (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance Korean Language A: Literature is recommended for the first language student or for those students who have a high level of fluency in Korean. Any student interested in selecting Korean Language A: Literature at HL or SL must have had previous formal literary experience and training and be confident and capable of writing critical essays about texts. Completion of Korean Language A: Literature (HL/SL) as a Group 2 course - Students will be awarded a bilingual IB Diploma if they achieve level 3 or higher for this course and their Group 1 course. Course Aims The aims of all subjects in studies in language and literature are to enable students to: • • • • • • • •

Engage with a range of texts, in a variety of media and forms, from different periods, styles, and cultures. Develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, presenting and performing. Develop skills in interpretation, analysis and evaluation. Develop sensitivity to the formal and aesthetic qualities of texts and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings. Develop an understanding of relationships between texts and a variety of perspectives, cultural contexts, and local and global issues, and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings. Develop an understanding of the relationships between studies in language and literature and other disciplines. Communicate and collaborate in a confident and creative way. Foster a lifelong interest in and enjoyment of language and literature.

Course Content The focus of the course is to explore the role of context in the construction of meaning of a text. 1. 2. 3.

Readers, writers and texts Time and space Intertextuality: connecting texts

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 19


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours) • • •

External Assessment (3 hours)

Weighting 70%

Paper 1: Guided literary analysis (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2: Comparative essay (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

20%

Individual oral

SL Assessment Component

• •

80%

Paper 1: Guided literary analysis (2 hours 15 minutes) Paper 2: Comparative essay (1 hour 45 minutes) HL essay: Students submit an essay between 1,200 and 1,500 words

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

30%

Individual oral

For Further Advice Contact Mikyung Cho, Teacher of Korean: Mikyung.Cho@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 20


Group 2

Mandarin Ab Initio (SL)

Entry Guidance The Mandarin Ab Initio course is designed for student who meet one of the following requirements: • • •

Who has no prior or has had very limited previous exposure to Mandarin. Who has studied Mandarin for less than two years or less and didn’t take International GCSE exam. Who is on the learning support register for language needs.

All final decisions on the appropriateness of the course for which students are entered, are taken by the IB Diploma Coordinator. Course Aims This course aims to: • • • • • • •

Develop students’ intercultural understanding. Enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures. Develop students’ awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge. Develop students’ awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language. Provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of an additional language.

Course Content The course comprises five prescribed themes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Identities Experiences Human ingenuity Social organisation Sharing the planet

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

Assessment Outline SL Assessment Component External Assessment (2 hours 45 minutes) • •

75%

Paper 1: Productive skills - writing (1 hour) Paper 2: Receptive skills - listening and reading (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

Individual oral commentary

21

For Further Advice Contact Ying Wen, Head of Mandarin: Ying.Wen@dulwich-seoul.kr

25%


Group 2

Spanish Ab Initio (SL)

Entry Guidance For students with little or no prior experience of Spanish. Students who have studied Spanish in Year 7 to Year 9 or completed an International GCSE Spanish qualification are not eligible for this course. Students are advised to contact the IB Diploma Coordinator if they wish to discuss their eligibility for this course. Course Aims This course aims to: • • • • • • •

Develop students’ intercultural understanding. Enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures. Develop students’ awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge. Develop students’ awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language. Provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of an additional language.

Course Content The course comprises five prescribed themes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Identities Experiences Human ingenuity Social organisation Sharing the planet

Assessment Outline SL Assessment Component

• •

Paper 1: Productive skills - writing (1 hour) Paper 2: Receptive skills - listening and reading (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

75%

Individual oral commentary

For Further Advice Contact Carolina Taboada, Head of European Languages: Carolina.Taboada@dulwich-seoul.kr

25%

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

External Assessment (2 hours 45 minutes)

Weighting

22


Group 2

Spanish Language B (SL)

Entry Guidance The Spanish Language B course is designed for genuine foreign language learners with some previous experience of learning the language, typically 4 to 5 years for HL and 2 to 5 years for SL. Any students who have completed the International GCSE Spanish course will be eligible, depending on results. Course Aims This course aims to: • • • • • • • •

Develop international-mindedness through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance. Enable students to communicate in the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of a variety of perspectives of people from diverse cultures. Develop students’ understanding of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar. Develop students’ awareness of the importance of language in relation to other areas of knowledge. Provide students, through language learning and the process of inquiry, with opportunities for intellectual engagement and the development of critical- and creative-thinking skills. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language. Foster curiosity, creativity and a lifelong enjoyment of language learning.

Course Content The course comprises five prescribed themes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Identities Experiences Human ingenuity Social organisation Sharing the planet

Additionally, at HL, students must read two works of literature.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 23


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment (3 hours 30 minutes) • •

70%

Paper 1: Productive skills - writing (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 2: Receptive skills - listening and reading (2 hours)

Internal Assessment •

30%

Individual oral commentary

SL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment (3 hours) • •

Paper 1: Productive skills - writing (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2: Receptive skills - listening and reading (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

75%

25%

Individual oral commentary

For Further Advice Contact Carolina Taboada, Head of Modern Foreign Languages: Carolina.Taboada@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 24


Group 3

Economics (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance No prior study of Economics is required but ideally HL students should have studied International GCSE Economics. Students interested in taking this course should have an interest in current affairs and enjoy contributing to lively, well-informed debate about current issues and be prepared to follow these in the on-line media. Course Aims The aims of the course are to enable students to: • • • • • • •

Develop an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theories and concepts and their realworld application. Develop an appreciation of the impact on individuals and societies of economic interactions between nations. Develop an integrated understanding of economics as a discipline. Recognise the main global challenges and how these can be addressed using an Economics lens. Make connections between different areas of the syllabus using concepts, case studies or real-world issues. Demonstrate a holistic and critical understanding of how economics helps us understand real world issues with the help of theories, models, examples and inquiries from the course of study. Develop an awareness of development issues facing nations as they undergo the process of change.

Course Content The HL/SL syllabus consists of four sections: • • • •

Introduction to Economics Microeconomics Macroeconomics The global economy

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 25


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours 45 minutes) • • •

External Assessment (3 hours)

Weighting 70%

Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

20%

Three commentaries: maximum 800 words each

SL Assessment Component

• •

80%

Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) Paper 3 (1 hour 45 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

30%

Three commentaries: maximum 800 words each

For Further Advice Contact Steven Green, Head of Humanities: Steven.Green@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 26


Group 3

Geography (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance While the course is designed to support any student regardless of their past experience, it is recommended that students seeking to take Geography at HL have completed the International GCSE Geography course or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims This course enables candidates to: • • • •

Develop an understanding of the dynamic interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment at different scales. Develop a critical awareness and consider complexity thinking in the context of the nexus of geographic issues. Understand and evaluate the need for planning and sustainable development through the management of resources at varying scales. Learn transferable learning skills through a variety of teaching and learning styles, interpreting maps and materials, as well as organising ideas and presenting arguments through extended writing.

Course Content HL and SL students will study the following core topics: • • •

Population distribution - change and possibilities Global climate - vulnerability and resilience Global change in resource consumption, security and stewardship

The teacher will select three optional units for HL students and two for SL students from the following options: • • • • • • •

Freshwater - drainage basins Oceans and their coastal margins Extreme environments Geophysical hazards Leisure, tourism and sport Food and health Urban environments

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

Higher Level students only will study the Global Perspectives - Global Interactions core extension: places, power and networks; development and diversity; global risks and resilience.

27


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) • • •

External Assessment (2 hours 45 minutes)

Weighting 75%

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour 15 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

20%

Fieldwork written report

SL Assessment Component

• •

80%

Paper 1 (2 hours 15 minutes) Paper 2 (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 3 (1 hour)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

25%

Fieldwork written report

For Further Advice Contact Steven Green, Head of Humanities: Steven.Green@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 28


Group 3

History (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance While the course is designed to support any student regardless of their past experience, it is recommended that students seeking to take History at the HL have completed the International GCSE History course or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims The main aim of History at IB is for students to develop a broad and sophisticated historical understanding. It requires students to study the past of more than one region of the world, as well as to engage with different perspectives and interpretations of topics and periods. Through this, students will start to: • • • • •

Critically evaluate and analyse information that sources put before them. Make balanced, reasoned judgments on historical factors and events. Master bodies of knowledge in order to critically explore the past. Write sophisticated analysis around historical questions. Actively engage with and challenge differing historical perspectives on past events.

Course Content The course focuses on world history, with a HL focus on Asia, in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It is currently divided into the below, though this can change based on student preference year on year: •

The Move to Global War 1931-1941 (HL & SL) In this unit, students learn about two case studies (Japan and Italian/German foreign policy) in the years leading up to World War Two.

The Cold War: Superpower Tensions and Rivalries (SL & HL) In this unit, students gain an overview of the Cold War and analyse its effect on two countries, the impact of two crises, and the role of two leaders.

20th Century Authoritarian States (SL & HL) Examples include: Hitler’s Germany, Mao’s China and Castro’s Cuba.

20th Century Asia (HL Only)

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 29


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (5 hours) • • •

External Assessment (2 hours 30 minutes)

Weighting 75%

Paper 1: Source based (1 hour) Paper 2: Essay based (1 hour 30 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

20%

Historical investigation

SL Assessment Component

• •

80%

Paper 1: Source based (1 hour) Paper 2: Essay based (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 3: Regional options (2 hours 30 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

25%

Historical investigation

For Further Advice Contact Steven Green, Head of Humanities: Steven.Green@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 30


Group 4

Biology (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance For students interested in taking HL Biology, it is recommended that they have successfully completed International GCSE Biology, International GCSE Coordinated Science, or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims There will be an emphasis on the nature of science running through the course, to be addressed through a practical approach. This approach will promote an understanding of how scientists justify knowledge claims and an understanding of the scientific world view. Through experience, knowledge and reflection, the student will become better trained to approach uncertainty scientifically and will develop aspects of the learner profile. Course Content • • •

Core content/SL: cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, ecology, evolution and biodiversity, human physiology Additional higher level/HL content: nucleic acids, metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis, plant biology, genetics and evolution, animal physiology The options, of which students only have to study one, include: neurobiology and behaviour, biotechnology and bioinformatics, ecology and conservation and human physiology.

Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) • • •

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

External Assessment (3 hours)

Weighting 80%

Paper 1: Multiple choice (45 minutes) Paper 2: Data, theory and extended questions (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 3: Practical and option material (1 hour)

Internal Assessment •

20%

Scientific investigation

SL Assessment Component

• • •

80%

Paper 1: Multiple choice (1 hour) Paper 2: Data, theory and extended questions (2 hours 15 minutes) Paper 3: Practical and option material (1 hour 15 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

Scientific investigation

For Further Advice Contact Sancho Cheung, Head of Science: Sancho.Cheung@dulwich-seoul.kr

20%

31


Group 4

Chemistry (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance For students interested in taking HL Chemistry, it is recommended that they have successfully completed International GCSE Chemistry, International GCSE Coordinated Science, or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims There will be an emphasis on the nature of science running through the course, to be addressed through an active approach. This approach will promote an understanding of how scientists justify knowledge claims and an understanding of the scientific world view. Through experience, knowledge and reflection, the student will become trained to approach uncertainty scientifically and will develop aspects of the learner profile. Course Content • • •

Core content/SL: stoichiometric relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding and structure, energetics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, redox processes and organic chemistry Additional higher level/HL content: atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding and structure, energetics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, redox processes and organic chemistry The options, of which students only have to study one, include: materials, biochemistry, energy and medical chemistry.

Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) • • •

Weighting 80%

Paper 1: Multiple choice (45 minutes) Paper 2: Core material (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 3: Core and optional material (1 hour)

Internal Assessment Scientific investigation

For Further Advice Contact Sancho Cheung, Head of Science: Sancho.Cheung@dulwich-seoul.kr

20%

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

External Assessment (3 hours)

20%

Scientific investigation

SL Assessment Component

• • •

80%

Paper 1: Multiple choice (1 hour) Paper 2: Core material (2 hours 15 minutes) Paper 3: Core and optional material (1 hour 15 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

32


Group 4

Computer Science (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance For students interested in taking SL and HL Computer Science, it is recommended that they have successfully completed the International GCSE Computer Science course or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims The course aims to provide students with a deep understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. Underpinned by conceptual thinking, it aims to draw on a wide spectrum of knowledge to enable and empower innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. It will allow students to explore how computer science interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave, and the ethical issues involved. Course Content • • •

Core content/SL: system fundamentals, computer organisation, networks, computational thinking, problem-solving and programming Additional higher level/HL content: abstract data structures, resource management and control systems. A case study is conducted on a topic which is announced each cycle, and forms the basis for questions in Paper 3. The options, of which students only have to study one, include: databases, modelling and simulation, web science and object-oriented programming.

Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) • • •

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

External Assessment (2 hours 30 minutes)

Weighting 70%

Paper 1: Core material (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 2: Optional material (1 hour)

Internal Assessment •

20%

Solution

SL Assessment Component

• •

80%

Paper 1: Core material (2 hours 10 minutes) Paper 2: Optional material (1 hour 20 minutes) Paper 3: Case study (1 hour)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

Solution

For Further Advice Contact Sancho Cheung, Head of Science: Sancho.Cheung@dulwich-seoul.kr

30%

33


Group 4 Environmental Systems and Societies (SL) Course Aims Through the exploration of cause and effect, Environmental Systems and Societies investigates how values interact with choices and actions, resulting in a range of environmental impacts. Students develop an understanding that the connections between environmental systems and societies are diverse, varied and dynamic. The complexity of these interactions challenges those working towards understanding the actions required for effective guardianship of the planet and sustainable and equitable use of shared resources. The aims of the Environmental Systems and Societies course are to enable students to: • • • • • • • • •

Acquire the knowledge and understanding of environmental systems at a variety of scales. Apply the knowledge, methodologies and skills to analyse environmental systems and issues at a variety of scales. Appreciate the dynamic interconnectedness between environmental systems and societies. Value the combination of personal, local and global perspectives in making informed decisions and taking responsible actions on environmental issues. Be critically aware that resources are finite, and that these could be inequitably distributed and exploited, and that management of these inequities is the key to sustainability. Develop awareness of the diversity of environmental value systems. Develop critical awareness that environmental problems are caused and solved by decisions made by individuals and societies that are based on different areas of knowledge. Engage with the controversies that surround a variety of environmental issues. Create innovative solutions to environmental issues by engaging actively in local and global contexts.

Course Content Students will study the following topics: • • • • • • • •

Topic 1: Foundations of environmental systems and societies Topic 2: Ecosystems and ecology Topic 3: Biodiversity and conservation Topic 4: Water and aquatic food production systems and societies Topic 5: Soil systems and terrestrial food production systems and societies Topic 6: Atmospheric systems and societies Topic 7: Climate change and energy production Topic 8: Human systems and resource use

SL Assessment Component External Assessment (3 hours) • •

75%

Paper 1: Case study (1 hour) Paper 2: Short answers and structured essays (2 hours)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

Scientific investigation

For Further Advice Contact Sancho Cheung, Head of Science: Sancho.Cheung@dulwich-seoul.kr

25%

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

Assessment Outline

34


Group 4

Physics (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance For students interested in taking HL Physics, it is recommended that they have successfully completed International GCSE Physics, International GCSE Coordinated Science, or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims The IB Physics course aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the nature of science, by studying the fundamental principles of physics illustrated with a practical approach. Through a variety of topics, the course promotes an understanding of how scientists justify knowledge claims and an understanding of the scientific world view. Through experience, knowledge and reflection, the student will become trained to approach uncertainty scientifically and will develop aspects of the learner profile. Course Content • • •

Core content/SL: measurements and uncertainties, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, circular motion and gravitation, atomic, nuclear, and particle physics, energy production Additional higher level/HL content: wave phenomena, fields, electromagnetic induction, quantum and nuclear physics The options, of which students only have to study one, include: relativity, engineering physics, imaging, astrophysics.

Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) • • •

Weighting 80%

Paper 1: Multiple choice (45 minutes) Paper 2: Core material (1 hour 15 minutes) Paper 3: Core and optional material (1 hour)

Internal Assessment Scientific investigation

For Further Advice Contact Sancho Cheung, Head of Science: Sancho.Cheung@dulwich-seoul.kr

20%

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

External Assessment (3 hours)

20%

Scientific investigation

SL Assessment Component

• • •

80%

Paper 1: Multiple choice (1 hour) Paper 2: Core material (2 hours 15 minutes) Paper 3: Core and optional material (1 hour 15 minutes)

Internal Assessment •

Weighting

36


Group 5

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches at SL and HL is appropriate for students who enjoy developing their mathematics to become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments and to develop strong skills in mathematical thinking. They will also be fascinated by exploring real and abstract applications of these ideas, with and without the use of technology. Students who take Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches will be those who enjoy the thrill of mathematical problem solving and generalisation. This subject is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects with substantial mathematics content such as Mathematics, Engineering, Physical Sciences, or Economics. Course Aims The mathematics courses aim to contribute to students' personal attributes, subject understanding and global awareness by enabling them to: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Develop a curiosity and enjoyment of mathematics, and appreciate its elegance and power. Develop an understanding of the concepts, principles and nature of mathematics. Communicate mathematics clearly, concisely and confidently in a variety of contexts. Develop logical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem solving to instil confidence in using mathematics. Employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalisation. Take action to apply and transfer skills to alternative situations, to other areas of knowledge and to future developments in their local and global communities. Appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics influence each other. Appreciate the moral, social and ethical questions arising from the work of mathematicians and its applications. Appreciate the universality of mathematics and its multicultural, international and historical perspectives. Appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines, and as a particular “area of knowledge” in the TOK course. Develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others. Independently and collaboratively extend their understanding of mathematics.

Course Content IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

All topics are compulsory: • • • • • •

Algebra Functions and equations Circular functions and trigonometry Vectors (HL only) Statistics and probability Calculus

37


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment (5 hours)

80%

Paper 1: No technology required (2 hours; 110 marks) Section A - Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus Section B - Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus

30%

Paper 2: Technology required (2 hours; 110 marks) Section A - Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus Section B - Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus

30%

Paper 3: Technology required (1 hour; 55 marks) Two compulsory extended-response problem solving questions

20%

Internal Assessment • •

20%

Mathematical exploration This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics (20 marks)

SL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment (3 hours)

80%

Paper 1: No technology allowed (1 hour 30 minutes; 80 marks) Section A - Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus Section B - Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus

40%

Paper 2: Technology required (1 hour 30 minutes; 80 marks) Section A - Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus Section B - Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus

40%

Internal Assessment • •

20%

Mathematical exploration This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics (20 marks)

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

For Further Advice Contact Emma Chamberlain, Head of Mathematics: Emma.Chamberlain@dulwich-seoul.kr

38


Group 5

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation SL and HL is appropriate for students who are interested in developing their mathematics for describing our world and solving practical problems. They will also be interested in harnessing the power of technology alongside exploring mathematical models. Students who take Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation will be those who enjoy mathematics best when seen in a practical context. This subject is aimed at students who will go on to study subjects such as Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Statistics, Business, Psychology, and Design. Course Aims The mathematics courses aim to contribute to students' personal attributes, subject understanding and global awareness by enabling them to: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Develop a curiosity and enjoyment of mathematics, and appreciate its elegance and power. Develop an understanding of the concepts, principles and nature of mathematics. Communicate mathematics clearly, concisely and confidently in a variety of contexts. Develop logical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem solving to instil confidence in using mathematics. Employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalisation. Take action to apply and transfer skills to alternative situations, to other areas of knowledge and to future developments in their local and global communities. Appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics influence each other. Appreciate the moral, social and ethical questions arising from the work of mathematicians and its applications. Appreciate the universality of mathematics and its multicultural, international and historical perspectives. Appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines, and as a particular “area of knowledge” in the TOK course. Develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others. Independently and collaboratively extend their understanding of mathematics.

Course Content The course consists of the study of five compulsory topics: IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

• • • • •

Number and algebra Functions Geometry and trigonometry Statistics and probability Calculus

39


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment (5 hours)

80%

Paper 1: Technology required (2 hours; 110 marks) Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus

30%

Paper 2: Technology required (2 hours; 110 marks) Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus

30%

Paper 3: Technology required (1 hour; 55 marks) Two compulsory extended-response problem solving questions

20%

Internal Assessment • •

20%

Mathematical exploration This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics (20 marks)

SL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment (3 hours)

80%

Paper 1: Technology required (1 hour 30 minutes; 80 marks) Compulsory short-response questions based on the syllabus

40%

Paper 2: Technology required (1 hour 30 minutes; 80 marks) Compulsory extended-response questions based on the syllabus

40%

Internal Assessment • •

20%

Mathematical exploration This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics (20 marks)

For Further Advice Contact Emma Chamberlain, Head of Mathematics: Emma.Chamberlain@dulwich-seoul.kr IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23 40


Group 6

Music (HL/SL) Please note: Course content is under review and may change.

Entry Guidance HL and SL Music is designed for students with a background in musical performance and composition. In most cases it is recommended that students have studied an instrument or voice for 4 consecutive years. In addition, they should have some experience in composing and an understanding of Western music theory, for example gained through the International GCSE Music course. HL and SL students will be required to purchase a copy of the relevant notation and sequencing software, and HL students and SL performing candidates will need to arrange individual music lessons on their selected instrument. Students will take a leadership role in music across the College and are expected to regularly participate in musical ensembles. Course Aims The Diploma Programme Music courses prepares the 21st century music learner for a world in which global musical cultures and industries are rapidly changing. Through its integrated approach, the course will equip Music students with strongly developed creative thinking skills, holistic mindset and flexible design- and project-based skills, all of which are highly sought after by universities and employers. This course enables candidates to: • • • • • • • • •

Explore the diversity of music across time, cultures and contexts. Develop as imaginative and skilled creators and collaborators. Express musical ideas creatively and with competence. Critically reflect on the process of creating and experiencing music. Develop as informed, perceptive and analytical practitioners. Enjoy lifelong engagement with music. Explore a range of musical contexts and make links to, and between, different musical practices, conventions and forms of expression (inquiry). Acquire, develop and experiment with musical competencies through a range of musical practices, conventions and forms of expression, both individually and in collaboration with others (action). Evaluate and develop critical perspectives on their own music and the work of others (reflection).

Course Content Throughout the course, students embody three roles: the researcher, the creator and the performer. In these roles, they inquire, create, perform and reflect on the course’s three musical processes: IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

• • •

Exploring music in context in personal, local and global contexts Experimenting with music Presenting music

The exploration of diverse musical material is focused on four Areas of Inquiry: • • • •

Music for sociocultural and political expression, e.g. protest songs, liturgical music, national anthems Music for listening and performance, e.g. Western Art music, cool jazz, experimental music Music for dramatic impact, e.g. music for film, ballet and musical theatre Music technology in the digital age, e.g. electronic dance music, technology in popular music tradition

41


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment

50%

Exploring music in context • Exploring as a researcher Written work demonstrating understanding of two diverse musical material • Exploring as a creator and performer One original composition One performed adaptation of music from local or global context for students’ own instrument

20%

Presenting music • Presenting as a researcher • Presenting as a creator • Presenting as a performer

30%

Internal Assessment

50%

Experimenting with music • Experimentation report as a researcher and as a creator and performer

20%

The contemporary music-maker • Multimedia presentation documenting a real-life project

30%

SL Assessment Component

Weighting 70%

Exploring music in context • Exploring as a researcher Written work demonstrating understanding of two diverse musical material • Exploring as a creator and performer One original composition One performed adaptation of music from local or global context for students’ own instrument

30%

Presenting music • Presenting as a researcher • Presenting as a creator • Presenting as a performer

40%

Internal Assessment

30%

Experimenting with music • Experimentation report as a researcher and as a creator and performer

30%

For Further Advice Contact Mark Knights, Head of Music: Mark.Knights@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

External Assessment

42


Group 6

Theatre (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance The Theatre course at both HL and SL requires no previous experience in Drama or Theatre but it is recommended that students wishing to study Theatre have successfully completed the International GCSE Drama course or a course of similar rigour. Course Aims This course enables students to: • • • • •

Experience and participate in a wide and varied range of theatre activities and develop proficiency in more than one area of theatre technique. Become familiar with forms of theatre from their own and different cultures. Explore different theatre traditions in their historical contexts. Develop the confidence to explore, to experiment and to work individually and collaboratively on innovative projects, which should involve challenging established notions and conventions of theatre. Understand the dynamic, holistic and evolving nature of theatre and the interdependencies of all aspects of this art form.

Course Content HL and SL: At the core of the Theatre Arts course lies a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis - all of which should be achieved through practical engagement in theatre. • •

Practical performance and production components that consist of participation in at least three productions and numerous projects developing both performing and making skills. Theoretical components which consist of creative practical research into various forms of theatre, both cultural and historical.

Students will keep a journal of work throughout the course that records the various stages of their development and practice.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 43


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component External Assessment: No examination • -

Task 1: Solo theatre piece Students create and present a solo theatre piece (4-8 minutes) based on a theatre theorist they have not previously studied

• -

Task 2: Director’s notebook Develop ideas regarding how to stage a play they have not previously studied for an audience

• -

Task 3: Research presentation Plan and deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes) to their peers in which they present and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied

Internal Assessment •

Creating: Three pieces of coursework, with recordings and written work

Solo performing: A recording selected from pieces presented during one or more public performance(s) (20 minutes)

SL Assessment Component External Assessment: No examination • -

Task 1: Director’s notebook Develop ideas regarding how to stage a play they have not previously studied for an audience

• -

Task 2: Research presentation Plan and deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes) to their peers in which they present and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied

Internal Assessment •

Weighting 75%

25%

Weighting 65%

35%

Collaborative project: Create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 13-15 minutes) IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

For Further Advice Contact Matthew Readman, Head of Drama: Matthew.Readman@dulwich-seoul.kr

44


Group 6

Visual Arts (HL/SL)

Entry Guidance Some prior experience of making art is recommended but curiosity about the work of artists; or fascination with the culture of art exhibitions, galleries, art museums, the built environment, visual culture or heritage, is expected. Course Aims Art at this level is a challenging and wide-ranging field of study as well as a way to enjoy looking at, making, and discussing art. This course enables students to: • • • •

Investigate past, present and emerging forms of visual art; engage in researching, discussing and evaluating art; and produce personal creative statements as a personal response. Understand local, national and international contexts through visual art and culture. Develop the skills, techniques and strategies necessary to make personal statements in traditional and new media. Take responsibility for making relevant contemporary art inflected by personal experience.

Course Content There are three course components: 1. 2. 3.

Comparative study: A comparison of artists’ works from more than one cultural context. Process portfolio: A journal of research interests in techniques and processes seen in other artists' work and developed through individual experimentation. Exhibition: A curated exhibition of a selected group of finished works produced during the course accompanied by a text outlining the rationale for the exhibition.

Students learn to work independently developing their own projects. They demonstrate their ability to adapt by making use of several different types of media. Their ideas are challenged and refreshed by encounters with new art from different cultures and by confronting and exploring technical possibilities. The course culminates in an exhibition where the juxtaposition of selected works will support a student’s purpose outlined in a statement. The Process Portfolio and the Comparative Study are submitted for assessment in digital form. IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3 45


Assessment Outline HL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment: No examination

60%

• -

Part 1: Comparative study Analyse and compare different artworks by different artists. Submit 10-15 screens which examine and compare at least three artworks, at least two of which should be by different artists. Students submit 3-5 screens which analyse the extent their work has been influenced by the art and artists.

20%

• -

Part 2: Process portfolio Students submit 13-25 screens which evidence their sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of art-making activities. Students work must be in at least three art-making forms.

40%

Internal Assessment

40%

• -

40%

Part 3: Exhibition Students submit a selection of resolved artworks. Pieces should show evidence of their technical accomplishment. Students submit a curatorial rationale (700 words), 8-11 artworks and exhibition text for each selected artwork.

SL Assessment Component

Weighting

External Assessment: No examination

60%

• -

Part 1: Comparative study Analyse and compare different artworks by different artists. Submit 10-15 screens which examine and compare at least three artworks, at least two of which should be by different artists.

20%

• -

Part 2: Process portfolio Students submit 9-18 screens which evidence their sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of art-making activities. Students work must be in at least two art-making forms.

40%

Internal Assessment

40%

• -

40%

For Further Advice Contact Daniel Hickey, Head of Art: Daniel.Hickey@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

Part 3: Exhibition Students submit a selection of resolved artworks. Pieces should show evidence of their technical accomplishment. Students submit a curatorial rationale (400 words), 4-7 artworks and exhibition text for each selected artwork.

46


Core: Theory of Knowledge (TOK) What is Theory of Knowledge? Theory of Knowledge is a part of the Diploma core, and is compulsory for all students. With the Extended Essay, it provides the extra three points available from the core to Diploma students. Theory of Knowledge (TOK) is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing, rather than about learning a specific body of knowledge. It plays a special role in the Diploma Programme by providing an opportunity for students to reflect on the nature of knowledge, to make connections between areas of knowledge and to become aware of their own perspectives and those of the various groups whose knowledge they share. The overall aim of TOK is to encourage students to formulate answers to the question “How do you know?” in a variety of contexts, and to see the value of that question. This allows students to develop an enduring fascination with the richness of knowledge. Course Aims The course aims to: • • • • • • •

To encourage students to reflect on the central question, “How do we know that?”, and to recognise the value of asking that question. To expose students to ambiguity, uncertainty and questions with multiple plausible answers. To equip students to effectively navigate and make sense of the world, and help prepare them to encounter novel and complex situations. To encourage students to be more aware of their own perspectives and to reflect critically on their own beliefs and assumptions. To engage students with multiple perspectives, foster open-mindedness and develop intercultural understanding. To encourage students to make connections between academic disciplines by exploring underlying concepts and by identifying similarities and differences in the methods of inquiry used in different areas of knowledge. To prompt students to consider the importance of values, responsibilities and ethical concerns relating to the production, acquisition, application and communication of knowledge.

Assessment Outline Assessment Component IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

• -

Part 1: Essay on a prescribed title Maximum length is 1,600 words

• -

Part 2: TOK Exhibition Students select one IA prompt and three objects. Students write a 950 word commentary explaining how it links to the IA prompt. Students must exhibit their items and commentaries.

For Further Advice Contact Rebecca Gardner, Assistant Head (IB Diploma Coordinator): Rebecca.Gardner@dulwich-seoul.kr

47


Core: Extended Essay (EE) The Extended Essay makes up one part of the IB Diploma core and is therefore compulsory to achieve the IB Diploma. It is an independent, student led piece of research, finishing with a 4,000-word paper. What is the significance of the Extended Essay? The Extended Essay provides: • •

Practical preparation for undergraduate research. An opportunity for students to investigate a topic of special interest to them, which is also related to one of their six Diploma subjects.

Through the research process for the Extended Essay, students will develop skills in: • • • •

Formulating an appropriate research question. Engaging in a personal exploration of the topic. Communicating ideas. Developing an argument.

Participation in this process develops the capacity to analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge. How is the study of the Extended Essay structured? Students will be supported throughout the process of researching and writing the Extended Essay, with advice and guidance from a supervisor who is a teacher at Dulwich College Seoul. Following the completion of the written essay students will complete a short, concluding interview with their supervisor. This is known as viva voce. The Extended Essay and interview can be a valuable stimulus for discussion in countries where interviews are required prior to acceptance for employment or for a place at university. How is the Extended Essay assessed? All Extended Essays are externally assessed by examiners appointed by the IB. They are marked on a scale from 0 to 34. The score a student receives relates to a band. The bands are: A - Work of an excellent standard B - Work of a good standard C - Work of a satisfactory standard D - Work of a mediocre standard E - Work of an elementary standard

For Further Advice Contact Rebecca Gardner, Assistant Head (IB Diploma Coordinator): Rebecca.Gardner@dulwich-seoul.kr

IB D IP LO MA PRO GRAMM E 20 21 -23

• • • • •

48


Core: Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) CAS makes up a part of the IB Diploma Core and is compulsory to achieve the IB Diploma. What is the significance of CAS? CAS is a range of enjoyable and significant experiences, as well as a CAS project. Students will participate or lead weekly activities of their choosing, involving Creativity, Activity and Service. Creativity is exploring ideas leading to original interpretive product/performance. Activity promotes healthy lifestyle or wellbeing. Service is a collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community in response to an authentic need. CAS is an experiential journey of self-discovery, reflection, collaboration and most importantly, fun. Students will learn about themselves, about working with others, and about the world around them in real-life experiences. It is also an opportunity for students to take what they learn in their subjects and apply this knowledge into the real world. How is CAS structured? Students will design a personal CAS programme, which needs to be completed over 18 continuous months. Students are encouraged to participate in fun and meaningful activities that will challenge them, but also allow them to keep a balance between each CAS aspect. Each CAS experience should last for a minimum of 1 month, allowing the student to reflect and grow from their experiences. Students need to reflect on their learning, emotions, growth and experiences throughout the time of the IBDP, and on how their CAS experiences and CAS project have met all of the compulsory seven learning outcomes. How is CAS assessed? CAS is assessed as a pass or fail. There are no IB points available, but completion is necessary for the Diploma to be awarded. In order to pass, students must: • • • •

Record their CAS experiences on Managebac, with evidence and meaningful reflections showing how they have grown from their activities. Have a balanced CAS profile. Complete at least 1 CAS project. Complete CAS for 18 continuous months.

IB DIP LO MA P ROGRAM ME 2 02 1-2 3

For Further Advice Contact Alistair Marshall, CAS Coordinator: Alistair.Marshall@dulwich-seoul.kr

49


Profile for Dulwich College Seoul

IB Diploma Programme 2021-23  

IB Diploma Programme 2021-23