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BUILDING TOGETHER PROVIDING STUDENTS WITH THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NECESSARY TO BECOME PRODUCTIVE MEMBERS OF SOCIETY AND LIFE LONG LEARNERS

D15.US NEWS & EVENTS

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ALUMNI FEATURE

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FACILITIES UPDATE

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LETTER FROM SUPERINTENDENT


VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1 3

Letter from Superintendent

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News & Events

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Setting the Stage for Success

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Featured Alumnus: William Patrick Corgan

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Facilities Update

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Community Connections

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Flashback: G. Stanley Hall PTA Board Member Q & A: Connie Kelly

MARQUARDT MAGAZINE is published twice a year in winter and summer by MSD15’s communications department B O A R D O F E D U C AT I O N Jean Randazzo, President Enrique Arroyo, Vice President Danuta Polsakiewicz, Secretary Connie Kelly Luz Luna Rich Pugh James Vargas SUPERINTENDENT Dr. Jerome O’Shea

LETTER FROM SUPERINTENDENT DR. JERRY O’SHEA We make a promise to the children of our community--- from the nervous five-year-olds carefully stepping off the bus for the first time to the 13-year-olds walking confidently across the stage on promotion day, brimming with pride at their achievement and growth. Our promise is to implement an educational program that provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to become productive members of society and life long learners. Whether you’re reading the first issue of the Marquardt Magazine as a parent, neighbor, community member, alumnus, or business leader, know that your engagement helps us make good on this promise. We understand that our partnership with you is built on effective communication and shared interest in the future of our community, our children. Understanding what is happening in the District and getting to know our students and families better are critical to keeping this partnership strong. In the past, our District issued four commmunity newsletters each year. Moving forward, we plan to publish two magazines annually. Our new biannual magazine will replace the previous quarterly newsletter format, and we’re pleased to offer you this higher-quality communication piece, while staying in the same budgetary range for publication. We believe the magazine will better help us tell the District’s story, and it’s truly a story worth telling. Thank you for reading, for your partnership, and for the support you give to the children of our community.

EDITORIAL TEAM Rebecca Bald, rbald@d15.us Mary Ellen Graf, mgraf@d15.us C O N TA C T 1860 Glen Ellyn Road Glendale Heights, IL 60139 (630) 469-7615

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NEWS & EVENTS

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AUTHOR VISIT

OPERA FOR THE YOUNG

CHORAL TOUR

Children’s author Matthew Cordell visited elementary schools this fall in partnership with Glenside Public Library District. Mr. Cordell read one of his books and answered student questions like, “How long does it take you to write a book?” and “Do you ever make mistakes in your books?”

Each year, the District invites Opera for the Young to perform live, professional opera with 4th and 5th graders in chorus. Students appear onstage, performing for their classmates and teachers. Below, Reskin and Black Hawk rehearse for “Rusalka, A Mermaid’s Tale”.

Black Hawk and Hall’s Chorus traveled to Belmont Village Senior Living to bring holiday cheer to residents in December. Black Hawk also traveled to Cornelius Inc. to perform for employees. MMS’s orchestra, band, and choir performed for shoppers at Stratford Square Mall.

YOUNG CHEFS SHINE

DARE GRADUATION

Marquardt Middle School’s Young Chefs Club represented MSD15 at Bloomingdale’s 50 Men Who Cook and Divas Who Dish. Their menu? Spinach salad w/ mandarin oranges and strawberries; chicken stir fry with broccoli, carrots, and rice; and a healthy, applesauce-infused chocolate cake.

The D.A.R.E. program helps 5th grade students recognize and resist pressures around drugs, gangs, and violence. GHPD’s D.A.R.E. program focuses on self-esteem, communication skills, decision making, and positive alternatives to drug abuse behavior.

VETERANS DAY

SOARING WITH STEM

Fourth graders at Winnebago had the honor of welcoming Sergeant Wilber Seeley of the Roselle Police Department on Veterans Day. Sergeant Seeley spoke to students about his experience serving in the United States Army as part of the Military Police, and students asked questions about his experience.

This fall, 4th graders at Black Hawk, Hall, and Reskin participated in a 2-part learning lab made possible by the DuPage Children’s Museum. Students created cardboard automata, mechanical sculptures that feature cams, levers, and linkages. Final projects were displayed in the Museum’s Good Show! Gallery.

ANTI-BULLYING RALLY Parents, staff, and community, including VOGH Mayor Linda Jackson, Chief of GHPD Doug Flint, and GFPD Deputy Rich Cassady, braved the cold to support our students at the anti-bullying rally. Each year, Hall empowers students and the adults who guide them to take a stand against bullying.

READING UNDER THE TREES Bilingual teachers and MSD15 staff volunteered to bring literacy workshops to students living at the Stonegate Apartments this summer. “I want my students to know that we care even when we don’t have their faces in our classroom,” teacher Maria Marquez said. “I also want them to see that we are willing to go to their worlds to get to know each one of them better.”

GENUIS HOUR AT MMS

Glenbard East’s AP Research students taught 8th graders how to develop high-quality research questions for their Genius Hour projects this fall. Genius Hour is a movement where students explore their own passions and creativity through self-directed projectbased learning.

MMS RAKE & RUN

MAKERSPACE

Ninety middle schoolers and 20 staff members took part in the 3rd Annual Serving Society Rake and Run this fall. Together, they raked the lawns of over a dozen senior citizens. The Marquardt Student Serving Society (MSSS) is a student organization devoted to empowering middle schoolers through service to others.

Several MSD15 Library Media Centers now offer students a Makerspace. There, students have the opportunity to explore their own interests, develop innovative projects, and use a variety of materials (yarn, duct tape, Legos, and more).

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S E T T I N G T H E S TAG E FO R S U C C ES S PERFORMING ARTS CENTER OPENS AT MARQUARDT MIDDLE SCHOOL

Wiggling third, fourth, and fifth graders squealed with

delight. Middle schoolers’ eyes widened and jaws dropped. One boy, looking toward the stage’s vibrant blue curtain, said to another, “This is legit.” After years of strategic planning and collaboration, the doors of the Performing Arts Center (PAC) at Marquardt Middle School opened this August, just in time for the start of the school. Designed to give students authentic experiences in project and performance-based learning, the PAC has a 500-seat auditorium with LED performance lighting, advanced audiovisual systems, and wood acoustic “clouds,” all of which inspire innovation and excellence in both students and teachers. Surrounding the auditorium are all-new art, choir, orchestra, and band classrooms, as well as the school’s first-ever drama room. Music classrooms are fitted with advanced audio recording technology so that students can recognize and refine their tone and tempo in real-time. Art rooms are structured so students can create both two dimensional art, such as painting and drawing, and three dimensional objects with height, weight, and depth, like sculpture and statues. A STEAM (i.e. science, technology, engineering, arts, math) lab, known to Marquardt Middle Schoolers as the “Innovation Space”, has glass walls with writeable surfaces and a separate resource lab to encourage collaboration and problem-solving skills that will give students a competitive edge in high school, college, and beyond. “We envisioned a space that would be inspirational and stateof-the-art,” said Board President Jean Randazzo, “classrooms with tools and technology that would not only encourage the application of learning and an authentic performance experience, but would also aid our students in finding new and exciting possibilities for their future.” 6

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A TRUE MIDDLE SCHOOL EXPERIENCE MULTIFUNCTIONAL, SHARED FACILITY UNITES DISCIPLINES, CONNECTS CAMPUS, AND EXPANDS OPPORTUNITIES

Those “possibilities” range from an expanded curriculum at the middle school --- programming has been redesigned around six-week exploratory courses so all students will experience fine/performing arts courses in the facility--- to a more secure, comfortable learning environment --- sixth graders will no longer need to walk outside mid-winter to get to the Commons for lunch. Elementary students, teachers, and families at Black Hawk, Hall, Reskin, and Winnebago also benefit from this shared resource, utilizing the PAC to elevate and enrich their own special events and performances. A PHYSICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSFORMATION As high-functioning school systems adapt to the demands of the 21st century, the State’s updated learning standards urge schools to better connect math, science, and the performing/ fine arts with technology and engineering. For the past two years, Marquardt Middle School principal Meredith Haugens has been working with Superintendent Dr. Jerry O’Shea, the District leadership, and her staff to address the philosophical and programmic changes that would accompany MMS’s physical transformation. Teams of teachers, administrators, and staff members worked on the master schedule, teaming structures, student advocacy, culture and community, and communication. “Last year, the entire year was spent working together as a staff to research the middle school philosophy and all it would take to align ourselves to that vision which we felt would put our students at the forefront of everything we did and offer them the very best,” Haugens said. “The staff at MMS engaged in hours of research, collaborative conversations, obtained feedback from multiple data sources, and used all that information to lay out a plan to get us where we are today.” Where are they now? Marquardt Middle School has a new master schedule providing rigorous, engaging academic programming. Added exploratory classes offer students the opportunity to engage in a variety of subjects and a range of experiences. This exposure sparks curiosity and prepares middle schoolers to make choices on what to pursue in the future.

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The new Performing Arts Center gives every student an opportunity to explore a variety of career paths. The experiences within this space will equip students with the confidence, knowledge, and skills that they need to become productive members of society. DR. JERRY O’SHEA, SUPERINTENDENT, MARQUARDT SCHOOL DISTRICT 15

MMS has also implemented a course called “Connections” that gives teachers time to support students’ social-emotional growth. Students work on building meaningful and effective relationships with other students and learn soft skills that will help them thrive in their personal, academic, and professional lives. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY MEETS LONG TERM VISION The District was able to make the Marquardt Middle School expansion a reality after pursuing and being awarded the cost-effective Qualified School Construction Bonds (QSCBs). Out of 193 applicants in Illinois, Marquardt School District 15 was one of 29 recipients selected to receive a QSCB as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the only district in DuPage County. The District will receive a refund on the interest for the QSCBs from the federal government, which means that the bonds can be sold with little to no interest expense. In other words, the District was able to invest in a building project that will provide rich, dynamic, and numerous additional educational opportunities for students, all without increasing the annual debt-service tax rate of the District. “We shape our buildings;” Winston Churchill once said, “thereafter, they shape us.” Behavior, engagement, relationships, and achievement--all are shaped by the buildings, streets and neighborhoods in which we live, work, and learn. The skillset and the knowledge required to contribute meaningfully in today’s society is dramatically different from those needed in 1893 when the original Marquardt School was built. By investing in Marquardt Middle School’s future, the Board of Education will enrich the educational experience and expand opportunities not only for today’s students, but for generations of children to come.■

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MSD15 FEATURED ALUMNUS

MUSICIAN, POET, & ENTREPRENEUR

WILLIAM PATRICK CORGAN

After releasing his second solo album this fall, Ogilala, which Corgan made alongside renowned producer Rick Rubin, the prolific musician headed to L.A. to work on new projects. Ogilala is a rich addition to an already impressive catalogue of albums, including the influential Siamese Dream and Melon Collie and Infinite Sadness. As part of Corgan’s three-decade long music career, he has sold over 20 million albums in the United States alone. Along with the ability to stay highly organized at a young age and his intrinsic motivation to learn, Corgan says his teachers served as catalysts for accomplishments later in his life. “I really benefited from a very forward-leaning, self-empowering, demanding education,” Corgan said of his time in Marquardt School District 15. “And I was a person who excelled with those sort of demands.”

I R E A L LY B E N E F I T E D F R O M A V E RY FO RWA R D - L E A N I N G, S E L F - E M P O W E R I N G, D E M A N D I N G E D U CAT I O N . W I L L I A M PAT R I C K C O R G A N Halfway through elementary school, Corgan’s family moved to a different part of Glendale Heights, and he transferred to G. Stanley Hall Elementary. There, administrators determined that Corgan would benefit from skipping ahead and starting 6th grade a year early. After passing his 6th grade classes, however, Corgan was surprised to learn that due to a paperwork issue, he would need to take the 6th grade coursework again the following year. Corgan’s teachers, who were empathetic to his situation, supported him through that next year to ensure it would be positive and productive. “If they [teachers] saw me bored, they were like, ‘Okay, go tutor this student.’ Or, ‘Here’s a book that’s not on the curriculum that I think you would like. Why don’t you read this book?’” Corgan said. “And then, they would pull me aside between periods and say, ‘Did you read the book? What did you think?’ They’d sit down and have a conversation with me.”

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Photo courtesy of William Patrick Corgan

t was the early 70s when Smashing Pumpkins frontman William Patrick Corgan first walked the halls of Charles G. Reskin Elementary. His family had left Cicero after threats were made against his father, a blues/rock guitarist, for playing with musicians who were not white. Corgan, his little brother, stepmother, and father sought refuge and a fresh start in Glendale Heights.

By giving Corgan opportunities to manage numerous projects at once, he was able to strengthen his capacity to multitask, a skill set that has served him well throughout his career. Aside from Corgan’s work as a founding member of the alternative rock bands Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan, he has also pursued many ambitious, non-music-related projects including several professional wrestling ventures, most recently purchasing the National Wrestling Alliance. His book, Blinking With Fists: Poems, was a New York Times bestseller, and in 2012 he opened Madame Zuzu’s Tea Shop and Art Studio in Highland Park, IL, which doubles as a music venue and gallery space. At Reskin and Hall, Corgan excelled academically, but also athletically, finding success both on the baseball field and as a starting center on the basketball court, even winning a conference championship. Middle school, though, brought on a new set of challenges for Corgan and he spent more time on the bench.

Early on, the two-time Grammy Award winner was identified as a highly able learner. By the time he was in the 2nd grade at Reskin, teachers were pulling him out of class for enrichment and asking him to tutor his peers. “Learning came easy to me,” Corgan said over-the-phone during a long drive from Taos, NM to Los Angeles, CA, “and I loved learning.” Corgan had just spent New Years on a family vacation with son, Augustus, 2, and long-time partner and accomplished fashion designer, Chloé Mendel. And he brought music to Taos with a surprise performance at KTAOS Solar Center, a world-class concert venue.

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Corgan, like many young teens, also struggled to find his place socially and, at times, felt outcast. “I was very distracted by where I fit in or where I didn’t fit in,” Corgan said. “Maybe that is why I turned back to teachers and to education because it was a sort of refuge. I thought, well at least I can manage this book and this task.”

As for his first teachers, the ones who had such a huge impact on his formative years, “I go back to some of the great teachers that I had that told me very early on that being creative and honoring your creative spirit was very, very important,” Corgan said. “Some teachers recognized that in me quite early on and encouraged that.”

The athletic and social challenges of early adolescence were compounded by a difficult home life. Looking back on his middle school years, Corgan, who turned 50 this year, is reflective.

“And they didn’t always do that in ways that would seem apparent,” Corgan explained. “But they recognized that I had an individual take on the world and would encourage me to not only explore that but to use critical thinking, to channel rebelliousness into productivity, into something that would ultimately yield something positive.”

“I think what sticks with me sometimes is not what my teachers said, but it was sort of what was in their heart,” Corgan said. “I had a very rough situation at home. The teachers that I connected with, the fact that they would even take time to pull me aside and ask if I was okay, or try to interrogate me to find out what was really going on behind this façade that I was throwing up, that’s what sticks with me more than their words.”

SOMEWHERE IN THE BACK OF MY MIND THOUGH, I HAD THE IDEA THAT I COULD PLAY MUSIC W I L L I A M PAT R I C K C O R G A N

Almost forty years after 8th grade graduation, the mission of his elementary school district — to provide students the skills and knowledge necessary to become life long learners and productive members of society — still resonates with Corgan. “I think productivity is absolutely related to passion,” Corgan said. “I think what’s critical, whether it’s your family or your friends or your school, [is] that the people around you help you identify what you’re good at, and then support you in pursuing it with great zeal.”

In the context of Corgan’s homecoming, “something positive” means that in addition to visiting with Marquardt’s school community during the day, Corgan plans to host a public benefit concert in the school’s new Performing Arts Center that night. Funds will help to launch an education foundation at Marquardt School District 15. Based on the belief that every student has the extraordinary power to excel, innovate, and lead, the education foundation will help to create opportunities and secure resources for students that will help them to identify, develop, and pursue their passions. Corgan is looking forward to his Marquardt return and eager to connect with the students who walk the same halls he passed through so many years ago. “I’m happy to even say it’s possible,” Corgan explained. “That you can take what you learn here and take it into the world and affect change. That if you want to be part of the world that you want to see, well then, that’s how it works, you know? I’m living proof that it actually can happen.” ■

That inner drive to create and produce has long helped Corgan to move past small failures and disappointments. When Corgan, who considered himself a jock through middle school, did not make the basketball or baseball team at Glenbard North High School, he was “crushed” but kept moving forward. “I need something to do, something to put my energy toward because I can’t just sit at home, I’ll bounce off the walls,” Corgan remembers thinking at the time, “so I picked up the guitar.” Apart from his time in the middle school choir and his general music classes, Corgan had no formal music training. His father, despite his own career as a musician, never encouraged Corgan to follow the same path. “Somewhere in the back of my mind though,” Corgan said, “I had the idea that I could play music.” He started playing in bands in high school, learning and honing his new craft. Upon graduation, Corgan decided to pursue music full-time. This pursuit would lead him to form the Smashing Pumpkins, one of the most critically-acclaimed and influential bands of the 1990s. Corgan’s voice, once one of many in the Marquardt Middle School choir, would become singular and iconic, the sound of a generation. With the release of his newest album, Corgan spent the fall touring. This spring, he will share his story with current Marquardt Middle School students, returning for the first time since 1981. Corgan will spend the day meeting and working with students in small workshops and at a school assembly. In addition, the rocker will meet with the teachers responsible for guiding today’s middle-schoolers, any of whom, with that magic alchemy of attention, guidance, and passion, might very well be the next “Billy” Corgan. 12

Photo courtesy of William Patrick Corgan

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FAC IL ITI ES U PDATE EX PA N S I O NS AT HAL L AN D W IN N EBAGO

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INCREASING OPPORTUNITY FOR YOUNGEST LEARNERS

ccording to a September 2017 study by the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee, half of all preschool-aged children in the United States are not enrolled in formal education. The importance of high-quality early learning and care cannot be overstated. Decades of developmental research show that early childhood education is a key factor in students’ long-term academic success. When students start kindergarten without the proper foundational skills, they face an uphill battle academically and socially. The Congressional study found that children who attend preschool show an increase in college attendance, future earnings, and employment. The power of early education is so great, in fact, that the Committee found that each dollar spent on early learning and care will ultimately generate $7.30 in benefits to society. In other words, students in early education programs are not only better equipped for their future, but they will also make their community and country stronger. Marquardt School District 15 is addressing this disparity head on. This fall, the District began construction at Hall and Winnebago Schools to expand its early childhood program. The building expansions will allow the District to educate more children, earlier. By securing cost-saving Qualified School Construction Bonds (QSCBs) in 2015, the District is now able to invest in the future of children in the community without increasing the annual debt-service tax rate. The project will also allow the District to make other needed improvements to the physical learning environment at Hall and Winnebago. The expansions at each school will feature: SIX NEW EARLY CHILDHOOD CLASSROOMS - The District will expand its 3 and 4-year-old early childhood program, which currently enrolls 80 students. It intends to then add 80 more students over the next several years to reach an enrollment capacity of 280 by 2024. FULL-SIZED GYMNASIUM - A larger gym will allow the District to offer a broader range of activities and an enhanced physical education experience for students year-round. Because the lunchroom will now be separate from the gym, teachers will have more time and flexibility to utilize the larger, higher-quality facility. In the future, the gym will give the school the opportunity to provide additional after school activities and form new community partnerships.

EDUCATING MORE CHILDREN, EARLIER Currently, the District runs an 80-student preschool program at Winnebago. Funded in part by a grant from the Illinois State Board of Education, the District’s half-day program helps children develop the skills they need to succeed in school and later in life.This program is designed to meet the developmental needs of each child aged 3-5 and are offered in many public and private schools, child care centers, community and faith-based organizations, Head Start, and other settings. At the start of the 2018-19 school year, the District is looking to add 120 students to its preschool program, and then 80 more students over the next several years to reach an enrollment capacity of 280 by 2024. The District plans to partner with Metropolitan Family Services (MFS) of DuPage on the expansion of programming. MFS is a not-for-profit organization that has served families in Chicago and its surrounding area since 1857. It provides a wide variety of programs and services designed to strengthen families and communities. Though the District will more than triple enrollment of preschool aged students, the partnership with MFS will allow the District to utilize shared resources. Beyond shared resources, the partnership will: - Identify and serve children with especially high needs and multiple risk factors - Serve the geographic area covered by the District - Continue to provide a morning (2 hr and 45 min) and afternoon session (2 hours and 45 min) in each classroom The District and MFS plan to begin recruitment for the program this spring. Please check the District website in the coming months to find out more about eligibility and enrollment.

MULTIPURPOSE ROOM WITH KITCHEN - Once completed, this versatile space will allow the MSD15 Food and Nutrition Services Department to more efficiently and effectively meet the nutritional needs of students. With the expanding breakfast and lunch programs, the new kitchen will better equip our staff as they nourish students’ bodies and minds. In addition, this multipurpose space will provide space for indoor recess for the early childhood students during the cold winter months. ADDITIONAL PARKING - With the goal of making each school safe, convenient, and accessible, the District will create additional parking. The new parking will greatly improve the day-to-day operations of the school, as well as reduce traffic congestion and improve commuter flow for neighbors and community. 14

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COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS Strong communities make for strong schools. Generosity by local churches, businesses, and civic organizations help the District keep its focus on student learning and growth. Below are just a few vital Marquardt School District 15 partnerships that made a difference in our students’ lives this school year. CORNELIUS INC. Cornelius Inc. gives every student in grades K-5 a backpack filled with supplies to start the school year. Employees from Cornelius, a global supplier of beverage dispensing and cooling equipment, hand out the colorful backpacks and meet excited students and families at Back-to-School Night. MISSION CHURCH Mission Church empowers middle schoolers by providing backpacks and school supplies to those who need them. In addition, they donated 1,000+ gifts to the MSD15 annual toy drive to make the season bright for children in the District. GLENDALE HEIGHTS BARANGAY LIONS CLUB This fall, the Glendale Heights Barangay Lions Club again sponsored the Lions International Peace Poster Contest for Marquardt Middle School, St. Matthew School, and Glenside Middle School. The art contest encourages students to express their visions of peace. Each poster was judged on originality, artistic merit, and expression of the theme, which was “Kindness Matters.” GLENDALE HEIGHTS KIWANIS CLUB This year, Glendale Heights Kiwanis worked with the Marquardt Middle School Student Council to start a Builder’s Club. Builder’s Club is an international student-led organization providing members with opportunities to perform service, build character, and develop leadership. The vision of Builder’s Club is to develop competent, capable, caring leaders through the vehicle of service. ILLINOIS STATE POLICE DISTRICT 15 In the spirit of giving, Illinois State Police troopers from District 15 took over 30 Hall Elementary School students to a Build-A-Bear Workshop where troopers helped them pick out a new furry friend before also treating students to lunch. Illinois State Police promote the values of Integrity, Service, and Pride to promote public safety to improve the quality of life in Illinois. ST. ISIDORE PARISH St. Isidore Parish stepped up to help keep MSD15 students safe and warm this winter. The parish provided gloves, hats, scarves, and winter jackets to be distributed to students in need throughout the District. Thankfully, when children’s basic needs are met, they are able to better focus on learning.

FLASHBACK: G. STANLEY HALL PTA 1

Charm Course, 1969-1970 Mrs. Bradley Elkin, hair stylist (center), was guest speaker at the first program of the Charm Course. Mrs. Jean Mosley, Health Chairman (left), and Mrs. Nancy Rich, Director of the course (right), were also present to discuss proper hair care.

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Kids ‘N’ Dad’s Night, 1969-1970 A special program for the fathers and their children was hosted by Efishunt Sportsmen Club.

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Fun Fair, 1969-1970 The PTA of G. Stanley Hall school planned a circus theme for the Fun Fair, held on a Saturday, with special guest Miss Elizabeth, of WGN-TV’s Romper Room.

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Bowling Day, 1971-1972 Wilkins’ PM class was treated to an afternoon of bowling at Brunswick Bowl after winning first place in the PTA membership drive. 70% of the parents in this class enrolled in the PTA.

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Bluebirds, 1971-1972

Looking to make an impact? Go to DonorsChoose.org and type in the zip codes 60139 and 60108 to find current MSD15 teacher projects in

Bluebirds were the junior organization to the Camp Fire Girls and were part of the program from the

need of funding. DonorsChoose.org is a nonprofit organization that allows individuals to donate directly to public school classroom projects.

early days. Their motto was: Sing, Grow, Help!

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B OA R D M E M B E R Q & A

C O N N I E K E L LY

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M E E T T H E M S D 1 5 S C H O O L B OA R D

Q: Tell me a little bit about yourself. A: My husband Greg and I just celebrated our 20th anniversary. We have two kids, both of whom graduated from MSD15. Our daughter is 19 and our son is 17. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Finance/ Business Management, and I currently work as a Program Manager for Northrop Grumman. Q: How did you end up in Glendale Heights? A: We bought a fixer upper home in Glendale Heights when we were just getting started. It’s walking distance from the elementary school and near a park. We put a lot of ourselves into making this house wonderful again and have never left. I can remember conversations we used to have about how someday our kids would walk up the hill to school. We started planning then regarding how we would be part of it.

JEAN RANDAZZO

ENRIQUE ARROYO

DANUTA POLSAKIEWICZ

President - jrandazzo@d15.us

Vice President - earroyo@d15.us

Secretary - dpolsakiewicz@d15.us

Elected April 2017

Elected April 2017

Elected April 2017

Q: How did you first get involved with Marquardt School District 15? A: I first got involved with the District over 15 years ago when my daughter started Kindergarten. I started as a room mom for classroom parties, then joined the PTA and before I knew it, I was the PTA treasurer. I was involved with the PTA for several years before I ran for a position on the Board. Q: What do you admire most about the MSD15 community? A: One of the things I value most about our community is our diversity. I believe we learn and grow faster when we have the opportunity to interact with a diverse group of people. We notice the differences easily, but quickly learn we have a lot in common as well. While it can present unique and challenging problems, I believe the long term benefits make Marquardt unique. Q: Where does your passion for education and the community come from? A: I have always believed that parent involvement is the key to student success. I got involved because I wanted to be able to provide that support system to my children. I grew in my role within the District to learn and understand the education process better because you can’t be part of improving the process if you don’t fully understand the challenges being faced.

CONNIE KELLY ckelly@d15.us

lluna@d15.us

LUZ LUNA

RICH PUGH

Elected April 2015

Elected April 2017

Elected April 2015

FO R M O R E I N FO R M AT I O N , V I S I T

Q: How does your professional background impact your work with schools? A: I have found that my professional skills and the skills I have gained as a board member are often transferrable and I have benefited in both roles as a result of my involvement on the Board. In my professional career, I interface with the US Government frequently and understand the rigor and compliance necessary when engaging with the government. This has helped in my role on the Board, to avoid an immediate emotional reaction when changes in government policy impact the District plans for obtaining our goals. I often approach problem solving by restating the goal, then discussing what we can do versus what we can’t do. Q: What’s the most rewarding part of the MSD15 Board of Education? A: For me, the most rewarding part of being on the Board has been being a part of a system whose sum is greater than its parts. We have an amazing staff of teachers and administrators that are constantly bringing new ideas and solutions forward to improve our students and our community. I am one very small cog in the system and feel very proud to be a part of all we do and accomplish at MSD15.

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rpugh@d15.us

W W W. D 1 5 . U S / B OA R D - O F - E D

JAMES VARGAS jvargas@d15.us

Elected April 2017

MSD15 is governed by a locally elected, seven-member Board of Education. Members serve without compensation and are elected to four-year terms in April of odd-numbered years. The school board, per Illinois law, governs the school district.

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MARQUARDT SCHOOL DISTRICT 15 1860 North Glen Ellyn Road Glendale Heights, IL 60139

C O N TACT U S

MSD15 ADMINISTRATION CENTER

MARQUARDT MIDDLE SCHOOL

1860 North Glen Ellyn Road, Glendale Heights, IL 60139

1912 Glen Ellyn Road, Glendale Heights, IL 60139

(630) 469-7615 www.d15.us

(630) 858-3850 www.middleschool.d15.us

BLACK HAWK ELEMENTARY

CHARLES G. RESKIN ELEMENTARY

2101 Gladstone Drive, Glendale Heights, IL 60139

1555 Ardmore Avenue, Glendale Heights, IL 60139

(630) 893-5750 www.blackhawk.d15.us

(630) 469-0612 www.charlesgreskin.d15.us

G. STANLEY HALL ELEMENTARY

WINNEBAGO ELEMENTARY

1447 Wayne Avenue, Glendale Heights, IL 60139

195 Greenway Drive, Bloomingdale, IL 60139

(630) 469-7720 www.gstanleyhall.d15.us

(630) 351-3416 www.winnebago.d15.us

Marquardt Magazine Volume 1: Issue 1  

The MSD15 Magazine is published twice a year by the district’s communications department and mailed to every resident within the boundaries...

Marquardt Magazine Volume 1: Issue 1  

The MSD15 Magazine is published twice a year by the district’s communications department and mailed to every resident within the boundaries...