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WINTER 2016

studio A publication of the University of Colorado Denver College of Arts & Media

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A new narrative

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Passion meets purpose: building this (music) city

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Dreaming up the unknown

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Lasting legacies CAM students use film to tell stories about social good. pg. 2


MUSEUM OF OUTDOOR ART: TIES FORWARD TODD SILER WORKSHOP

DISNEY MOANA CREATORS

DENVER FILM FESTIVAL NEXT STAGE COLLABORATIVE

NEW STUDENT CONVOCATION

LYNX CAMP

UNDERGROUND MUSIC SHOWCASE


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Underground Music Showcase and others. All three of those collaborations involve students and faculty at different levels.

A letter from the dean The College of Arts & Media (CAM) strategic platform (adopted in 2015) states, “Our students come to us with passion for artistic expression. Our goal is to send them out into the world confident of purpose, ready to succeed.” Finding success in the 21st century means moving past the traditional autonomous role of the artist, creator, designer or scholar into a more collaborative positioning that embraces and advances partnerships and relationships. Professional affiliations and relationships occur on numerous levels and are essential for student success and faculty attainment. At CAM, we’ve established a student agency which is yielding results very quickly. In less than two months, CAM students have taken on projects that advance “learning-whiledoing” with real clients and all that entails, such as negotiating price, confirming contracts, deadline dates, deliverables, etc. Civic and regional affiliations are numerous and include working with Denver Arts & Venues (to install and operate a new interactive exhibit space at the Denver Performing Arts Complex called The Next Stage Collaborative), sponsorships of the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts, Denver Film Society,

Educational associations include activities with the Denver School of the Arts, CAM membership in the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities and my own board membership with the Arts Schools Network and Strategic National Arts Alumni Project. In June 2017, CU Denver and the Music & Entertainment Industry Studies Department will host the 2017 National Conference of the Association for Popular Music Education. Creative collaborations happen on many different levels including Professor Melissa Furness’ residency in Mexico sponsored by the Biennial of the Americas; an exclusive and unique affiliation with Copenhagen’s INDEX: Design to Improve Life®; NBCUniversal’s commissioning of four short films by CAM film and TV students and faculty, and many other important activities. CAM has more than 70 partnerships and affiliations with organizations and entities that enhance the quality of life in Denver and beyond, demonstrate creative excellence and reaffirm how art research advances creative scholarship. The Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) sums up the essential nature of arts in higher education: “We value the arts as core to higher education, deep disciplinary knowledge and applied research in the arts, interdisciplinary creativity, durable collaboration, diverse community and the research university as a driver toward a better world.”

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A new narrative

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Notables

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Bringing art to life

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Passion meets purpose

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Dreaming up the unknown

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Lasting legacies

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From camp to campus

Publisher CU Denver College of Arts & Media (CAM) The University of Colorado Bruce Benson, President The University of Colorado Denver Dorothy Horrell, PhD, Chancellor Roderick Nairn, PhD, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs  he College of Arts & Media T Laurence Kaptain, DMA and FRSA, Dean Sam McGuire (MS ’04), Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs Tanida Ruampant, Assistant Dean for Outreach and Engagement  College of Arts & Media Department Chairs Brian DeLevie, Visual Arts David Liban, Theatre, Film & Video Production Richard Strasser, DMA, Music & Entertainment Industry Studies Managing Editor: Tanida Ruampant, Assistant Dean for Outreach and Engagement

Laurence Kaptain, DMA, FRSA Dean, College of Arts & Media University of Colorado Denver

Publication production by Orbit Design Special thanks to University Communications and Robert King Photography

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A new narrative By: Cory Phare Divisiveness and despair may dominate news headlines, but students studying film and television at the College of Arts & Media (CAM) are helping to tell a different story – one about the Denver community coming together to help each other and affect change when times are tough. This narrative about hope and helpfulness is what CAM students like Luke Austin believe in and the narrative that Austin and his peers told through Comcast-NBCUniversal’s Stronger Cities initiative. The project’s Mile High chapter, Stronger Denver, is a series of short documentaries detailing the people and places on the front lines of building inclusive, enabling communities. This includes Prodigy Ventures in Park Hill, the Commons on Champa and the Denver Center for Arts & Technology. “We saw a sense of elation and pride in being part of our community,” said Austin, who is studying television and film. “It matters to take a look at the way things are now and how they can be in the future.” It doesn’t hurt to have clips from a multinational client in your portfolio to help do that, either.

CAM film and video production students Nicolas Scroggins, Luke Austin and Colton McKee film a new Denver narrative for Comcast-NBCUniversal.

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From the beginning, it truly was an endeavor of educational entrepreneurialism, according to David Liban, chair of the Department of Theatre, Film, & Video Production in CAM. After exploring the feasibility and defining a list of local changemakers, Screen capture from Stronger Denver documentary


A finger on the pulse: Weaving the narrative Storytelling is a focus for the film program and is emphasized in the curriculum.

Comcast-NBCUniversal provided $10,000 to cover production expenses. In addition to Austin, Colton McKee and Nicolas Scroggins were also selected to work on the project. And Liban said although he and fellow faculty member Craig Volk served as formal coordinators, he estimates more than 90% of the work was done without instructor involvement. From conceptualization to production and editorial processes, CAM students took the reins to develop and deliver a high-profile documentary series. The value is immediately apparent: demonstrable applied project experience tied directly to CAM’s mission. “Social consciousness is not innate,” said Liban. “With this project, we sought

to broaden awareness through a narrativedriven infectious mindset. It’s true art of consequence.” This vision wasn’t lost on their client, either. According to Jessica Clancy, vice president of social impact and responsibility with Comcast-NBCUniversal, the company remains committed to using film as a way to raise awareness of global issues at the local level and vice-versa. By using a far-reaching broadcast platform to amplify individual stories, the films give voice to those who might not otherwise be heard. For the organizations in this business of story, the work carries an additional advantage: innovation. New voices bring new ways of telling the stories being written right now. “Social change has played a big role in shaping the future of

media technologies,” said Clancy. “As a corporate citizen, it’s so important to help come up with solutions that help make communities better.” For CAM students like Austin, the end result is more than a series of clips. It’s having worked together with a crew to develop a real project for a client. It’s giving voice to those doing the hardest work right here in our communities.

For film and television faculty member Jessica McGaugh, film has always been about making the connection to people, place—or ideally, both. Which is precisely why the assistant professor joined forces with fellow CAM instructor Roma Sur on a forthcoming documentary about migrants weaving their past stories into new ones here in Denver. Pulse of the Mountains follows the stories of an Indian dancer, a West African drummer, and a Bosnian folk singer who now call Colorado home. “It’s really the story of being an immigrant and bringing cultures into the United States,” said McGaugh. “That’s through both preservation and celebration.”

“Ultimately, getting to the heart of the story is the most important thing,” said Austin. “That’s powerful. That’s where we really can make change happen.”

Part of that celebration will be during the film’s initial screening, featuring a collective performance of the three profiled artists together. According to McGaugh, the goal is to build the bridge between cultures and ultimately create a fusion of something new.

Comcast-NBCUniversal plans to distribute Stronger Cities through various online and broadcast platforms.

The performance and launch for Pulse of the Mountains will take place in 2017.

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Xandy

CAPRi 74145-2

Todd

father, and sister, were heavily on my mind during the session. in spite of the profound void that our family has suffered, my father encouraged me to go ahead with this recording. My mother, like my father, has always encouraged me to follow my dreams in my attempt to become a musician. My parents have always been indomitable mentors and friends to Juli and me as we travel through life. My love, admiration, and respect for them have no boundaries.

1  Bye Bye Baby 6:43

Jule Styne :: Music Sales Corp. :: ASCAP

6  Walkin’ My Baby Back Home 5:22

east   of   the   village          

Jeff Smith, associate director3

 Deep in a Dream keith 7:28 oxman

Fred Ahlert :: Chappell Co., inc. :: ASCAP

2  East of the Village 6:48

7  The Shorter Route 6:44

3  Deep in a Dream 7:28

8  Lucky to be Me

Hank Mobley :: Second Floor Music :: BMi

Fred Ahlert :: Chappell Co., inc. :: ASCAP

5:22

Leonard Bernstein :: Leonard 6:44 Bernstein Music 6:48 7  The Shorter Route Hank Mobley :: Second Floor Music :: BMi Jenkins :: JJRJEJ Music :: BMi Publishing Co. :: JeffASCAP Instructor Todd Reid was a part of a trio recording

A Vaunt Guard An authoritative drum intro launches the trio into this frolicking and twisting original composition by drummer Todd Reid. Based upon two twelve-tone rows, the form appears at the onset and again at the organ solo and outro. At the core of the tune is an interpolation of sorts that reveals a spry duel between tenor and percussion—quick flashes of call/response and intense rhythmic interplay are heard throughout. Bringing the tune home, a focused organ solo features dark, undulating bass lines, arrhythmic phrases and off-beat hits from Todd and Jeff alike. Watch for the double time moment in the outro that gives the song a perfect send off.

This recording was made possible through the efforts and support of several individuals. i first thank my musical collaborators and friends Jeff  Jenkins and Todd Reid. They are musicians beyond category.

Jule Styne :: Music Sales Corp. :: ASCAP

2  East of the Village

G

THANK YOU...

                  keith   oxman         east   of   the   village           CAPRi 74145-2

Walkin’ My Baby Back Home Perhaps the most identifiable standard on the record, subtle harmonizations of the melody in the organ voice lend a bit of playfulness, making this version light on its feet. Soloing begins with a precise, if not clever brush solo that could easily be compared to some of Fred Astaire’s finest work. The tenor solo follows, with featherweight 16th note runs that glide over the changes. Closing out the solo section is the organ, starting softly in the higher register and finishing with more complexity and volume at its conclusion as it ushers the band back into the head.

Thanks to Colin Bricker for recording us and to Jeff and Xandy Whitesel for their diligence in mixing and mastering the recording. Thanks also to Todd for his design of the CD’s appearance, and to my wife and best friend, Susan, for her drawing that graces the CD cover. Thanks are due to Scott and Nicole  Mattson for giving the group its residency in the fall of 2015 at Nocturne in Denver, Colorado and also special thanks to Scott for writing this CD’s liner notes. Along with many musicians in this country, Jeff, Todd, and i owe a great debt to Tom Burns, owner of Capri Records, for releasing our recorded works to the world.

86:43 Lucky to be Me 7:23 6  Walkin’ My Baby Back Home

1  Bye Bye Baby

reat art can reveal the noble qualities of the people who create it. in the case of this trio, that noble quality is Honesty. it was easily identifiable, even palpable during their eight week residency at Nocturne last fall. Keith refused to use sheet music at any time during this eight weeks—insisting on playing only memorized material, he owned every note he played, and the band followed suit, taking an intense ownership of the material as well. A sense of earnestness accompanied these three men every time they took the stage. That same thread runs throughout this recording. The trio format exposes all things, it’s a true crucible for any musician—there is no better format imaginable for such honest music.

                  keith   oxman         east   of   the   village     

The Shorter Route Composed by organist Jeff Jenkins, this straight ahead work has interesting changes, strong hits, and evokes a feeling

Jimmy VanHeusen :: Scarsdale Music Corporation :: ASCAP

Jeff Jenkins :: JJRJEJ Music :: BMi

7:23

Jimmy VanHeusen :: Scarsdale Music jeff jenkins Todd reid 9  Brothers, Michel and  Corporation :: ASCAP Jean-Marc 4:22

8  Lucky to be Me

7:23

Leonard Bernstein :: Leonard Bernstein Music Publishing Co. :: ASCAP

           keith   oxman         east   of   the   village           CAPRi 74145-2

Faculty notables

father, and sister, were heavily on my mind during the session. in spite of the profound void that our family has suffered, my father encouraged me to go ahead with this recording. My mother, like my father, has always encouraged me to follow my dreams in my attempt to become a musician. My parents have always been indomitable mentors and friends to Juli and me as we travel through life. My love, admiration, and respect for them have no boundaries.

Bye Bye Baby The recording begins with an off the beaten path standard penned by Jule Styne. This rendition opens with a springloaded “two” feel at the top with the bandleader driving at the very front of the beat in a swinging performance of the melody. A substantial organ solo launches over a determined “four” feel and explores that magic space that lives between eighth and triplet. Keith’s solo follows with a well thought out series of swooping melodic lines, showing both bebop and post-bop influence. Todd, in tasteful flashes, takes his turn in trading 8’s, 4’s and finally 2’s with both players. The extended outro contains the most canny improvisation on the tune and lands squarely into a half time blues ending.

3  Deep in a Dream 7:28

This recording was made possible through the efforts and support of several individuals. i first thank my musical collaborators and friends Jeff  Jenkins and Todd Reid. They are musicians beyond category.

           keith   oxman         east   of   the   village           CAPRi 74145-2

THANK YOU...

           keith   oxman  

n. My parents have always been and friends to Juli and me as we y love, admiration, and respect for aries.

keith oxman

                        keith   oxman  

Lots of gratitude for this project! Thanks to Keith and Todd for the great playing, and for your energy creating this project! Thanks to Tom  Burns for believing in the music, and to everyone at Mighty  Fine  Productions for the great vibe, and the epic Hammond rig! And thank you Terri  Jo for putting up with the Hammond organs in every corner of our house, garage and lives!

Jimmy VanHeusen :: Scarsdale Music Corporation :: ASCAP

4  Breeze (Blow My Baby Back  to Me) 5:28

James Hanley (arranged by Keith Oxman) :: Shapiro, Bernstein & Co. :: ASCAP

5  A Vaunt Guard 5:39

i am grateful for the opportunity to work with such great friends and musicians as Keith and Jeff...you are both inspiring to make music with. Many thanks to my wife Nancy, my best friend and soulmate; my children David and Cathy, who i have the joy of sharing music with; and God, who blessed us with our talents. Thank you Tom  Burns for continuing to get music out there in people’s hands. And finally, to you the listener...you have a choice in what you listen to... thank you for taking time to listen to what we have to offer.

Keith Oxman :: isle of Capri Music :: ASCAP

10 (I’ve Got) Beginners Luck 4:07

George Gershwin :: W.B. Music Corp. :: ASCAP

Todd Reid :: DavCat Music :: ASCAP

Lots of gratitude for this project! Thanks to Keith and Todd for the great playing, and for your energy Lyn Watkins and Lenny Mazel, both of whom passed away recently, positively impacted my life over several decades. i count them, along with their widows Janis and Darcy, among my dearest friends, and four of the finest people i have known. They had an undeniable influence on this project.

Leonard Bernstein :: Leonard Bernstein Music Publishing Co. :: ASCAP

Produced by Thomas C. Burns Recorded on April 9, 2016 at Mighty Fine Productions Mixed and Mastered at Mighty Fine Productions Recording Engineer: Colin Bricker Tracking Engineer: Xandy Whitesel Mixing and Mastering: Jeff Jenkins Liner Notes: Scott Mattson Cover illustration: Susan Oxman Graphics and Design: Todd Reid Studio Photos: Keith Oxman & Todd Reid

TOTAL TiME: 60:41

Keith Oxman: tenor saxophone Jeff Jenkins: Hammond B3 organ Todd Reid: drums

      east   of   the   village           CAPRi 74145-2

for Capri Records called East of the Village. The jeff jenkins Todd re 4 B   reeze (Blow My Baby Back  9  Brothers, Michel and  east 9  Brothers, Michel and  of the National Center for 4  Breeze (Blow My Baby Back  recording, set to release in early 2017, explores jazz of Jean-Marc 4:22 Billboard Magazine mentioned Associate to Me) 5:28 Media Forensics, was featured to Me) 5:28 Jean-Marc 4:22 r this project! Thanks to Keith the and tin pan alley standards that are lesser-known. Thanks to Colin Bricker for recording us and to Jeff and Xandy Whitesel for their diligence in mixing and mastering the recording. Thanks also to Todd for his design of the CD’s appearance, and to my wife and best friend, Susan, for her drawing that graces the CD cover. Thanks are due to Scott and Nicole  Mattson for giving the group its residency in the fall of 2015 at Nocturne in Denver, Colorado and also special thanks to Scott for writing this CD’s liner notes. Along with many musicians in this country, Jeff, Todd, and i owe a great debt to Tom Burns, owner of Capri Records, for releasing our recorded works to the world.

James Hanley (arranged by Keith Oxman) :: Shapiro,

Keith Oxman :: isle of Capri Music :: ASCAP

Bernstein & Co. :: ASCAP creating this project! Tom  Burns for:: Shapiro, (I’ve Got) Beginners Luck Professor Stan Soocher in its article on Hanley (arranged James by Thanks Keithto Oxman) Keith Oxman of Capri Music 4:07 :: ASCAP in a Westword article about the village::10 isle believing in the music, and to everyone at Mighty  your energy 5  A Vaunt Guard 5:39 George Gershwin :: W.B. Music Corp. :: ASCAP The album cover work was also done by Reid. Todd Reid :: DavCat Music :: ASCAP Fine  Productions for the great vibe, and the epic Bernstein :: ASCAP notable U.S. music business programs with & Co.Hammond impact of media forensics on rig! And thank you Terri  Jo for putting

eat playing, and for TOTAL TiME: 60:41 ct! Thanks to Tom  Burns for 10 (I’ve Got) Beginners Luck 4:07 up with the Hammond organs in every corner of our significant music law curricula. solving house, garage and lives!crimes. sic, and to everyone at Mighty  5 A    Vaunt Guard 5:39 George Gershwin :: W.B. Music Corp. :: ASCAP Produced by Thomas C. Burns Lyn Watkins and Lenny Mazel, both of whom passed Keith Oxman: tenor saxophone Recorded on April 9, 2016 at Mighty Fine away recently, positively impacted my life over several i am grateful for the opportunity to work with such Professor Gregory Walker traveled to Todd Reid :: DavCat Music :: ASCAP Jeff Jenkins: Hammond B3 organ or the great vibe, and the epic Productions decades. i count them, along with their widows Janis great friends and musicians as Keith and Jeff...you Mixed and Mastered at Mighty Fine Productions Todd Reid: drums and Darcy, among my dearest friends, and four of the are both inspiring to make music with. Many thanks Recording Engineer: Colin Bricker the New West Electronic Arts and Music thank you Terri  Jo for putting finest people i have known. They had an undeniable to my wife Nancy, my best friendAssociate and soulmate; Professor TiME: 60:41 Tracking Engineer: TOTAL Xandy Whitesel influence on this project. my children David and Cathy, who i have the joy of Mixing and Mastering: Jeff Jenkins Organization Festival in Tokyo where he nd organs in every corner of ourCatalinThisGrigoras, sharing music with; and God, who blessed us with our Liner Notes: Scott Mattson Storm Gloor was CD is dedicated todirector my parents, Fannie-Rose of theandNational Cover illustration: Susan Oxman Louis  Oxman, who together shaped the individual talents. Thank you Tom  Burns for continuing to get performed Mourning Cloak, a work by Graphics and Design: Todd Reid finally, to youpresident ves! elected i am. Mom and Dad gave their time and devotion to music out there in people’s hands. And Center for Media Forensics, was appointed Studio Photos: Keith Oxman & Todd Reid This CD is dedicated to my parents, Fannie-Rose and Louis  Oxman, who together shaped the individual i am. Mom and Dad gave their time and devotion to my sister Juli and me, and set prodigious examples for us to follow. Sadly, my mother passed away less than a month before this recording date, and she, my

P.O. Box 892 Bailey, CO 80421-0892 www.caprirecords.com

© & p 2017 Capri Records. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws.

P.O. Box 892 Bailey, CO 80421-0892 www.caprirecords.com

Produced by Thomas thankC. you Burns for taking time to listen toof what we have Osaka, president of the Japan Society the Music and Keith Oxman: tenor Naotoshi saxophone Recorded on April 9, 2016 at Mighty Fine Entertainment Industry for Sonic Arts. In October, he performed with e opportunity to work with suchand Technology (NIST) Video/Imaging B3 organ Productions Educators Association. Jeff Jenkins: Hammond two-time Grammy winner Terrance Simien & The usicians as Keith and Jeff...youTechnology and Analysis Subcommittee, Mixed and Mastered at Mighty Fine Productions Todd Reid: drums Zydeco Experience. make music with. Many thanksone of 23 forensicRecording science subcommittees. Engineer: Colin Bricker my best friend and soulmate; Tracking Engineer: Xandy Whitesel Assistant Professor Benom Plumb was interviewed nd Cathy, who i have the joy of Mixing and Mastering: Jeff Jenkins Instructors Cat Dale’s and Jeremy Dehn’s feature-length script, Beasts Undiscovered, has by investment news magazine FINAlternatives for an nd God, who blessed us with our Liner Notes: Scott Mattson P.O. Box 892 Associate Professor been reviewed and is currently Black illustration: List’s Top Scripts. After a successful article about investing in music royalties. Susan Oxman om  Burns for continuing to get listed under The Cover Bailey, CO 80421-0892 Hans Rosenwinkel visit to the And American Film Daleand andDesign: Dehn are in talks Graphics Todd Reid with several www.caprirecords.com eople’s hands. finally, toMarket you in early November, had his most recent distributors andyou are listen currently fundraising to takeStudio the film into production in summer 2017. Photos: Keith Oxman & Todd Reid e a choice in what to... Art History Lecturer Michael Paglia received my sister Juli and me, and set prodigious examples

the listener...you have a choice in what you listen to...

for us to follow. Sadly, my mother passed away less to the National Institute ofdate, Standards than a month before this recording and she, my to offer.

time to listen to what we have

© & p 2017 Capri Records. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws.

the DAM Key Award, presented by the

Theatre, Film & Denver Art Museum Contemporaries, in Associate Professor David Bondelevitch© & p 2017 Capri Records. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Video Production recognition for his significant contributions sound engineered the documentary Chair David to art in Colorado. Southwest of Salem. The film is about four Liban’s most Latina lesbians who spent 15 years in prison for a crime that never happened. They have now finally been exonerated, partly because of the outcry after the release of the movie.

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recent film Feral was featured during the California International Shorts Festival in Hollywood.

broadcast feature film premier on

BBC Dec. 5, called Titanic’s Tragic Twin: The Britannic Disaster. Hans was the co-producer

Instructor Jeremy Dehn’s short film, Happy F-ing Valentine’s Day has played at 13 film festivals across the country this year. It has won two audience choice awards and two juried awards.

and director of photography/ cinematographer for the film.


n

eid

keith oxman In November, the College of Arts & Media turned the the University of Colorado Denver into the site and host for the 2016 Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) National Conference. More than 250 attendees gathered to engage in workshops and presentations about arts-integrative research and programs. Keynote speakers included renowned choreographer Liz Lerman and author, inventor and artist Todd Siler.

jeff jenkins Todd reid

east of the village

Student notables

east of the village

Students Isabella Musser, Dalton Lynch, Aaron Daniels and Kelly Kramarik received a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shadow the band The Fray during their rehearsal before kicking off their national tour. The students also got to be backstage with the band when their tour came through Denver in November.

Music and Entertainment Industry Studies

Associate Professor Rian Kerrane and her students put on an Iron Pour in Greenwood Village, Colorado. It was

students Elysia Smith and Emily Irwin traveled to the Midwest Clinic in Chicago to represent the college and make key industry connections.

Film students Kelly Spencer (Rat Nest) and Bryce Thomas-Hoogland (Terrene) had films that premiered during the Denver Film Festival.

featured on the Denver Fox affiliate KDVR. Associate Professor Maria Elena Buszek’s book, Pin-Up Grrrls:

Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture inspired the documentary Pin-up: La revanche d’un sex-symbol, which continues to pick up accolades and publicity with the debut for both French and German markets on the

More than 100 CAM students took part in a design-thinking workshop led by renowned artist, Todd Siler.

Visual Arts students Katey Marquette and Robert Fikes IV had digital works projected on large screens in Downtown Denver as part of Supernova, Denver’s first major outdoor digital festival.

European ARTE network.

Associate Professor Leslie Gaston Bird was elected to the Board of Governors for the Audio Engineering Society where she will serve as Vice President Western Region, US & Canada. Assistant Professor Melissa Furness will be included in the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2016. The Biennale will run

Lark has been nominated for six 2017 A Cappella Video Awards. The winners will be announced Feb. 4 at a live awards ceremony at the Los Angeles A Cappella Festival.

for 108 days starting Dec. 12, 2016 and is the largest and longest contemporary art biennial in South Asia.

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Bringing art to life

Alumni notables

Guest Contributor: Vivian George, Senior Instructor, Visual Arts Department In August 2015, the College of Arts & Media (CAM) became the first higher education institution in the United States to have access to the intellectual educational property of Danish nonprofit, INDEX: Design to Improve Life®. Earlier this year representatives from INDEX traveled to campus to train CAM faculty and alumni. Guest contributor Vivian George, a senior instructor in the visual arts department, provided an overview of the session from a faculty perspective: For 10 days, CAM faculty and alumni were captivated by and engaged with two highly enthusiastic educators from Denmark’s INDEX: Design to Improve Life®. The training team brought energy, fun, contemplation and a new outlook to the education process. The INDEX learning model directly addresses the skills needed in the 21st century. “Societies need critical, smart, innovative, engaged and responsible citizens,” Associate Professor Michelle Bauer Carpenter said of her experience using INDEX’s COMPASS method, a learning module within INDEX. “I noticed my students were more focused while researching problems. I think it’s effective because it’s a timed exercise.”

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The COMPASS method is a map for design thinking that teaches students to navigate their research efforts through four phases: Prepare, Perceive, Prototype, Produce. Each step is designed to keep the student engaged and focused on their material. INDEX challenges young people to find solutions to challenges in their communities – they take on issues such as food waste, elderly care and CO2 pollution. Challenging our students to solve societal issues in their local communities teaches them the social value their talents hold. Students engage in nontraditional problem-solving through critical thinking, creativity and personal discovery.

was hired at Universal Music and will be working with copyright.

Carsyn Rogers (’15) now works in the licensing department at Warner/ Chappell music.

Geoff Velando (’16) and his team were runners-up out of 120 entries in the Life of Meth 2016 Video Contest.

A collaborative film project (Less Than Angels) by Christa Apone (’16), Adam Loehr (’16), Geoff Velando (’16) and Matt Shrimlin (’16) was featured at the Denver Film Festival. The CAM film class also contributed to the work.

Kelly Hodges (’02) established the Wolf Foundation Visual Arts Scholarship in support of CAM students. The scholarship awards up to $20,000 of academic aid to students in the visual arts program.

“This is a way of engaging students in collaboration… it’s not about a particular medium or discipline,” Brian DeLevie, visual arts department chair said about the program. “They’ll use this in every facet of their life. It’s about empathy, communication and bringing problems down to a local scale.” Bringing art to life is one of the many contributions CAM hopes to make to the community. Using the INDEX methods, CAM faculty plan on engaging with educators within the city to teach them how to integrate the INDEX models into their classrooms and beyond.

Zach Wiles (’15)

Ken Walker (’14) was a Taylor Balkissoon (’14) co-curated the Bodacioussss exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. Fellow graduate Alexander Page (’15) also had two pieces in the show.

featured artist in CU Denver Today and had his art installation on display in the Dean’s Office Alumni Gallery in the Arts Building. The Gallery features rotating exhibits by alumni artists and is curated by CAM faculty.


Passion meets purpose: building this (music) city “It’s exciting to see how music can bring dollars into an economy and inject new energy into a community,” enthused Storm Gloor, assistant professor of music and entertainment industry studies at the College of Arts & Media (CAM). “We help our students understand the residual benefits of developing community-based music scenes as well. A thriving music scene can be the reason someone moves to one city over another. Successful festivals and storied venues – like Red Rocks – can generate tourism. In fact, the health and general welfare of communities can measurably improve.” Gloor moved to Denver from Austin, Texas. With him, he brought 13 years of experience in the music industry as the director of music operations for Hastings Entertainment, a multifaceted entertainment retail and wholesale company. Through his Music Cities class and previous experience, Gloor is able to give students an insider’s perspective of how beneficial music scenes are on local economies. “Music scenes add jobs and small business opportunities proportional to the number of artists in a given population. Incorporating community-based organizations builds economic sustainability by diversifying revenue streams that directly benefit all districts involved,” Gloor said emphatically.

Storm Gloor and his students visit Youth on Record in Denver.

Students like Mackenzie Everitt exemplify the personal effect this class has on its participants. “As musicians and industry workers, we know we impact the economy in positive ways, but it is not easy to quantify or explain this without tools like the ones provided in this [Music Cities] class,” Everitt said. “I think I benefit most from the experiential parts of this. It offers me a chance to work intimately with music professionals from Denver.” “Perhaps what I’m most proud of is the number of graduates from CU Denver who are now putting the Music Cities strategies and principles to work,” Gloor said. “We’ve been effective at getting students, faculty and administration involved in recent years and have helped the local music scene move forward.” CAM students and alumni currently work in local organizations like Balanced Breakfast Denver, Youth on Record and Levitt Pavilion that aim to build the music scene’s effect on Denver’s economy. The Music Cities class and Gloor’s principles teach students that being socially responsible doesn’t always mean working in a soup kitchen or starting a homeless shelter. They learn to intertwine their passions with the social causes they believe in: to foster the growth of both the general and artistic communities.

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Dreaming up the unknown

“As a business owner, you have to be creative,” Angela Buckley, CAM’s scholar in residence for entrepreneurship and enterprise, said. “You’re basically dreaming up the unknown.” The entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in CAM’s curriculum. Faculty and staff members like Buckley, Michael Seman, PhD and Amy Foss play large roles in fostering this environment. Seman, the director of creative industries research and policy at CAM, tracks the successes of current students and alumni in local creative professions. He also works alongside the Denver cultural plan, IMAGINE 2020, which provides a collective framework for innovation and advancement in the arts. “The creative economy is so broad and diverse. We can learn from Seattle and Austin and drive Denver’s economy forward.” Seman said about how arts affect local communities. Seman works with city policymakers to create small business opportunities in Denver’s music industry. His professional research details the catalyzing benefits of music scenes on local economies, especially in terms of redevelopment and job creation.

“We love to help budding entrepreneurs on their way to success.” - Amy Foss

Amy Foss, CAM academic advisor with a focus on career development, pays special attention to each student’s career goals. Along with the entire CAM advising team, they offer experiential opportunities such as organizing events to network, connect and find internships. “Our goal is to collect data to give all of our creative students access to entrepreneurial opportunities,” Foss said. “We love to help budding entrepreneurs on their way to success.”

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Amy Foss Academic Advisor-Career Emphasis

Foss sees herself as a liaison between CAM students and their career goals. “I like to think I’m helping these students draw their own roadmap to success,” she said warmly. “It’s such a great time to be in Denver. There is so much opportunity here.” Over 70 percent of CU Denver graduates choose to establish their careers in the city. “One reason is that CAM teaches its students how to be agents of change in the community, thus helping them capitalize on Denver’s vibrant startup market,” Buckley asserted. She teaches from her hands-on, professional perspective as the

Michael Seman, PhD Director of Creative Industries Research and Policy

owner of a local portrait business. Her award-winning photography has been featured in more than 30 group exhibitions. In class, Buckley often holds roundtable discussions with local industry professionals to give a practical, first-hand experience to her students. Buckley also runs a student talent agency in CAM and is involved in many initiatives that foster entrepreneurship in all CAM students. “It’s one thing to have an idea in your head, and another to make a roadmap from it,” Buckley said. “For instance, Tomas Bernal, a freshman student at CAM, just took the tools, forethought and courage of an

Angela Buckley Scholar in Residence for Entrepreneurship and Enterprise

entrepreneur to make an action plan. He even landed a gig with Unique Venues out of Edwards, Colorado to do a cover shoot.” Buckley also helps the students follow through to negotiate payment for their work. Creativity and the entrepreneurial spirit go hand-in-hand at CAM. The drive to become agents of change in the community is facilitated by a faculty and staff that works tirelessly to help students see their projects through from concept to actualization in the marketplace.

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Lasting legacies: Kelly Hodges (’02) For Kelly Hodges (’02), executive director of the Wolf Family Foundation, a fulfilling life is grounded in her grandmother’s advice, “with the privilege of being part of a community comes the responsibility and pleasure of giving something back.” As the granddaughter of the foundation’s founders, this belief is a powerful family legacy with a lasting impact on future generations. An alumna of the College of Arts & Media (CAM), Hodges is an artist/entrepreneur running the Lone Torch Studio, as well as a small ranch in Sedalia, Colorado where she raises alpaca, sheep and llamas on 15 acres. “My favorite media to work in are wool, steel and paint,” remarked Hodges with an open, friendly demeanor. “We invite art lovers to drop by and take a farm tour if they happen to be passing though Sedalia.” Hodges admits that CAM challenged her throughout her education. “The labs, studios and practical application assignments really took my work to the next level. I can say confidently that I still use everything that CAM taught me in my professional career,” she said.

ufund.org/annualgifts | 303-541-1200

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“CAM holds a special place in my heart,” said Hodges. “I was studying English literature, but as a senior I gravitated toward CAM, fell in love with sculpture and switched majors. My work at CAM helped me learn the connection between art and the community, which has become a valued life lesson and career for me.” In the spring of 2016, Hodges stepped forward to positively and creatively impact the lives of students in the visual arts program at CAM. She established the Wolf Foundation Visual Arts Scholarship which awards up to $20,000 in academic aid to eligible students enrolled in the sculpture program.

In addition to the scholarship, Hodges also stages an annual benefit for students to show their work. Hodges explained, “I designed this event to teach both how to prepare for an art exhibition and how important a role art can play in giving back to the community.”

“CAM was instrumental in opening up a whole new world of possibility for me. I want to help usher students into a new creative world of their own,” Hodges said. “I want to give to students what CAM gave to me; the artistic wonder, joy and enlightenment inherent in the drive to create,” said Hodges. “I love challenging young artists to take on what amounts to the most ambitious, the most emotional and the strongest projects of their young careers.”

Living out her family’s legacy through her own passion has been a dream come true for Hodges. “Anyone who’s met me can tell I’m passionate about this,” Hodges said with a laugh. “The Foundation wants to contribute to widespread change and affect as many people as possible. That’s something I do in my personal life, juggling so many jobs. In my work, I always begin by envisioning something my community needs. It’s all about building a better community. It always has been, and always will be.”

Help support CAM students

cufund.org/annualgifts | 303-541-1200


The freedom to do my best work

Wolf Foundation Visual Arts Scholarship Recipients SCOTT BURGESS Senior Transmedia Sculpture and Digital Design

“Sculpture is often times expensive and capital is a subject in a lot of my work. I regularly utilize discarded materials as assemblage and try hard to think sustainably. This scholarship helped me access materials necessary to finish my best collection to-date, which exhibited at Pirate – one of Denver’s oldest and most respected cooperative galleries.” CARTER DAUGHTREY Senior Transmedia Sculpture

“The scholarship relieves a lot of stress that many art students experience. I have taken a more meticulous approach to my art. The scholarship gives me the time… the freedom to do my best work. My work now shows much more detail and craftsmanship.”

BRENNEN TURNER Junior Transmedia Sculpture

“This scholarship made me realize that I needed to take my artistic endeavors to another level…make bigger projects… develop more thoughtful ideas to expand the range of my creative intentions.”

“CAM was instrumental in opening up a whole new world of possibility for me. I want to help usher students into a new creative world of their own” Kelly Hodges

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From camp to campus

What are you studying?

By: Cory Phare Summer camp is typically a rite of passage that invariably means longer days, unbridled exploration, and, for the College of Arts & Media (CAM), rock & roll.

JON MICHAEL SULLIVAN

Thanks to the college’s LYNX National Arts & Media Camp, the traditional summer experience has been turned on its head. Going into its fourth year, the immersive summer program brings high school students interested in music and arts to the Auraria campus, where they explore the different programs offered by CAM. Residential attendees receive a personalized schedule with hands-on classes and take part in evening cultural events on- and off-campus, culminating in a talent showcase at the session’s end. More than a summer of memories, LYNX Camp functions as a pipeline for students into arts and media at CU Denver. We highlight former attendees who found their way into CAM via the one-of-a-kind summer camp experience – with no insect repellant or sunscreen required.

BROOKE OMERIGIC

I’m currently studying film and television and I love it! We jumped right in to learning filmmaking, and all of my professors are great at what they do; I’m learning so much.

I’m currently on track for illustration, which I think is a perfect fit for me. JONI WOOD

2017 LYNX CAMP: June 18-30, July 9-21 and July 31-Aug. 4 Find out more at www.cam.ucdenver.edu. DANIEL CORADO

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I am studying the singer/songwriter pathway right now, but I may switch to performance so I can be more focused on jazz piano. I am enjoying it immensely!

I’m currently taking all general education classes. I enjoy lectures and the independence one has in college. I like how the professors are available and accessible for every student who needs help in any subject. One of my future goals is to have an internship at one of the recording studios here in Colorado.


What was your LYNX Camp experience? The LYNX Camp is actually the reason that I came to CU Denver. I decided that the faculty was exactly what I needed to progress as a musician and I also really enjoyed the curriculum. It certainly prepared me by accentuating my musical strengths and definitely showed me the areas I needed to improve in!

The LYNX camp was about fun and exploration, but it also gave me more knowledge about film.

I had already decided to go to CU Denver; I went to the LYNX Camp to get to know the school better and to get a feel for how the arts are taught here. Plus, animation really intrigued me - it was really fun learning how it works!

The LYNX Camp helped me transition because I became familiar with the campus. I took part in the music industry session of the camp because I love music and I wanted to know if it was something I could study in the future; I was excited the camp included a recording arts section, too. I also got to meet some of the staff that works here at CU Denver.

What advice would you give to others considering CAM and the LYNX Camp? If you are interested in real-life application of music, then most definitely go to the camp/CU Denver! You will find a very positive group of professors who are also professionals in their fields and are very passionate about what they do. As long as you are willing to work hard and hold yourself accountable, CU Denver could take you incredibly far. To anyone thinking about LYNX Camp: if it interests you in the least, then go! You’ll make lifelong friends there and learn an incredible amount. It’s worth every penny, and the scholarships they give out can help out a lot. To anyone thinking about CU Denver: A big part of why I chose to attend was Denver itself. Make sure you can see yourself living here in the Mile High City, walking down 16th Street Mall, visiting Voodoo Donuts at 2 a.m., tailgating at Broncos games, driving to Lookout Mountain and everything in between.

Do research into what interests you most and see what it takes to do that. Also, research what each major is about and the classes you have to take for each. And, if you are going into an art major, keep an open mind to new opportunities.

Attending the LYNX Camp influenced my decision to come here. I was drawn to attend by the friendly staff and the equipment and resources that are available to students. I’d advise someone considering coming to CU Denver to learn how to manage time and to stay on top of all deadlines.

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Campus Box 162 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364

NEXT STAGE COLLABORATIVE A new partnership between CU Denver and Denver Arts & Venues has paved the way for a new interactive gallery. The Next Stage Collaborative activates a formerly vacant space in the Denver Perfoming Arts Complex and engages patrons in work created by CU Denver students, alumni and faculty. The current exhibit features virtual reality and augmented reality projects from the College of Arts & Media.

Visit the Next Stage Collaborative, located in the Denver Performing Arts Complex at 1325 Curtis Street (across from the Buell Theatre)

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Denver, CO Permit No. 831


Studio | Winter 2016