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Gosport’s best of 2012 in photos ...

See pages 4-5 of this issue for a retrospective of Naval Air Station Pensacola’s top photos and events of the year in review.

Vol. 77, No. 1

VISIT GOSPORT ONLINE: www.gosportpensacola.com

January 4, 2013

Health, Safety and Fitness Community Service Award winners announced • NAS Pensacola wins 2012 Navy Project Good Neighbor Community Service Flag Award for Large Shore Command • By Ed Barker NETC PAO

Thirteen commands were recognized for community service excellence recently as the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) announced the Health, Safety, and Fitness Flagship awards for calendar year 2012 by Naval Administrative M e s s a g e (NavAdmin) 377/12. Sponsored by the Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) and executed by the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center (NETPDTC), the award recognizes commands with the best overall community service programs teaching and encouraging individuals, especially youth, to lead healthy and active lives. “The Navy’s Health,

Safety and Fitness Flagship uses command partnerships to promote healthy and fit lifestyles with schools and communities,” said Capt. Ann Burkhardt, NETPDTC commanding officer. “Commands around the world, both shore-based and afloat are out in the community, not only being good neighbors, but also helping to educate and set a good example for kids and their families.” Health, safety and fitness project initiatives are part of the Navy’s Community Service Program. The Health, Safety and Fitness program features Navy volunteers who visit schools and neighborhoods to share information and give practical training that focuses on nutrition, hygiene, mental health, disease prevention, leisure skills develop-

ment, personal safety, drug demand reduction, sports and recreation. Examples of commandsponsored health, safety and fitness events are Special Olympics, the Great American Smokeout, safety and health fairs, and the President’s Award on Physical Fitness and Sports. The Navy Community Service Program (NCSP) was launched in 1992 by then CNO Adm. Frank B. Kelso. The program’s goal is to foster and nurture community ties with the Navy and promote volunteerism while developing better Navy leaders through experience in the program. NCSP consists of five flagships, including the Health, Safety, and Fitness Flagship. The other four flagships are the Personal Excellence Partnership Flagship, Project Good Neighbor Flagship, Campaign Drug Free

Capt. Greg McWherter, former commanding officer and flight leader of the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, gestures to the crowd at the Blue Angels Homecoming Air Show onboard NAS Pensacola Nov. 3, 2012. Photo by Mike O’Connor

Blue Angels ‘Boss’ receives international air show award By Lt. Katie Kelly Blue Angels Public Affairs

During its annual convention in Las Vegas, the International Council of Air Shows (ICAS) board of directors honored former Blue Angels commanding officer/flight leader, as the recipient of the ICAS Special Achievement Award during the recent Chairman’s Banquet. Capt. Greg McWherter was chosen as this year’s honoree for his achievements and contributions during the 2012 air show season. McWherter, who led the team for a total of four years, was recognized for his efforts to integrate the team more fully into the larger air show community, as well as

the personal and professional sacrifices he made when he volunteered to serve a second two-year stint as the Blue Angels’ boss. “The work Greg did, the progress he helped the team make and the sacrifices he and his family have endured during the last four years are nothing short of extraordinary,” said John Cudahy, president of ICAS. “These last four years have been a remarkable gift to the air show community. The team is fundamentally different than it was in December of 2008 when Greg attended his first ICAS convention.” McWherter transitioned the team to

See McWherter on page 2

See Awards on page 2

‘Desktop virtualization’ highighted at Gulfport training center

Cmdr. Johnathan Vorrath, commander, Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Keesler Air Force Base, right, discusses the successful implementation of the virtual desktop initiative with Rear Adm. Don Quinn, commander, Naval Education Training Command, left. Photo by Ens. Alexander Perrien By Steve Vanderwerff NETC PAO

Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) announced Dec. 28 that the commander of NETC visited the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU)

Keesler Air Force Base to see firsthand how the learning site has successfully implemented a Virtual Desktop Initiative (VDI). VDI is a five-year plan to deploy the VDI to more than 36,000 daily users and will replace 80 percent of the more than 23,000 desktop computers

in more than 2,500 classrooms at 68 learning sites around the world. Rear Adm. Don Quinn, NETC commander, was briefed by Cmdr. Jonathan Vorrath, CNATTU Keesler’s commanding officer, about the learning site implementation of VDI and how they use it to train students. Desktop virtualization provides multiple student and instructor workstations from a centralized server environment, which eliminates physical workstations residing in an electronic classroom. “CNATTU Keesler is the first learning site to implement the virtual desktop initiative, which will expand throughout the NETC domain,” said Quinn. “We have thousands of computers. To keep pace with current technology, security risks and software, each computer currently has to be updated. When you virtualize a classroom you shift

from multiple updates to an update of a single server. In this case, we went from 152 computers to three servers. Now when we update, we only have to do it three times instead of 152. It’s a huge time and money saver.” Besides being a money saving

venture, Quinn says he is also pleased by how VDI saves electrical power and time, and benefits the students. “There’s also a power issue – instead of running 152 desktops

See VDI on page 2

NASP Arresting Gear Division preparing for certification By ABF2(AW/SW) Marla R. Chapa E-28 Arresting Gear Division

The crew of the E-28 Arresting Gear Division at Naval Air Station Pensacola (NASP) is starting the year off at full throttle to get ready for its annual certification. “Our gear certification and the air show are our busiest times of the year,” said Arresting Gear Division lead-

ing chief petty officer ABE1 O.J. Pitts. The certification inspection is scheduled for this month, Pitts said. The E-28 emergency runway arresting gear is designed to safely stop tail-hook equipped aircraft, from the T45 to the F-18, in the event of an aborted takeoff or an emergency landing.

See Gear on page 2

Published by Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Navy. Opinions contained herein are not official expressions of the Department of the Navy nor do the advertisements constitute Department of the Navy, NAS Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing’s endorsement of products or services advertised.


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January 4, 2013

Blue Angels release 2013 air show schedule The Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, have released the 2013 show schedule in which the Blue Angels are scheduled to perform. The 2013 show schedule is:

March 16: NAF El Centro, Calif. March 23-24: NAS Key West, Fla. April 6-7: MacDill AFB, Fla. April 13-14: NAS Corpus Christi, Texas April 20-21: Vidalia, Ga. April 27-28: MCAS Beaufort, S.C. May 4-5: Barksdale AFB, La. May 11-12: Jackson, Miss. May 18-19: Seymour Johnson AFB, N.C. May 22 and 24: U.S. Naval Academy fly-over May 25-26: Lynchburg, Va. June 1-2: Rockford, Ill. June 8-9: Ocean City, Md. June 15-16: Indianapolis, Ind. June 22-23: Bagotville, Quebec, Canada June 29-30: North Kingstown, R.I. July 6-7: Evansville, Ind. July 13: Pensacola Beach July 20-21: St. Cloud, Minn. July 27-28: Hillboro, Ore. Aug. 3-4: Seattle, Wash. Aug. 10-11: Fargo, N.D. Aug. 24-25: Kansas City, Mo. Aug. 31-Sept. 1: NAS Patuxent River, Md. Sept. 7-8: Eau Claire, Wisc. Sept. 14-15: Brunswick, Maine Sept. 21-22: NAS Oceana, Va. Sept. 28-29: NAS Point Mugu, Calif. Oct. 5-6: MCAS Miramar, San Diego, Calif. Oct. 12-13: San Francisco, Calif. Oct. 19-20: Fort Worth, Texas Oct. 26-27: NAS Jacksonville, Fla. Nov. 1-2: NAS Pensacola Demonstration objectives and in the interest of the armed services with safety as the primary consideration. Performances greatly assist in the recruiting and retention goals for the military services, enhance esprit de corps among uniformed men and women and demonstrate the professional skills and capabilities of the Naval services to the American public and U.S. allies. For information about individual air shows, please go to each air show’s official website. For more information about the Blue Angels, including the 2013 Blue Angel Air Show schedule, log on to www.blueangels.navy.mil. McWherter from page 1

a two-year scheduling cycle that has become the benchmark for performance scheduling in the air show industry. Since his first day on the job, McWherter also focused on making the team more flexible, more approachable and more deeply engaged in the fabric and culture of the air show community. McWherter accepted this award and credited his team for the accolade. “I’m honored, but the men and women whom I was fortunate enough to call myself their commanding officer deserve the recognition,” he said. “Their pride and professionalism continues to inspire me on a daily basis.” To watch the video detailing the achievements and contributions of McWherter, visit https://www. youtube. com/watch?v=jM1GF5eRHBg. For more information on the Blue Angels, visit www.blueangels.navy.mil.

Vol. 77, No. 1

Awards from page 1

Flagship, and Environmental Stewardship Flagship. A separate Navy command sponsors and administers each flagship. As the Health, Safety, and Fitness Flagship sponsor, NETC is responsible for coordinating policy that encourages volunteer participation. NETC also provides flagship project information and technical support to Navy commands and holds an annual awards board to select and publicize Navy-wide flagship award winners. According to NETC Commander Rear Adm. Don Quinn, taking the time to devote to improving health, safety and fitness can have significant and lasting effects. “Getting out into the community, forming relationships and showing that we are good neighbors is extremely important,” said Quinn. “The commands that participate in VDI from page 1

we now have only 152 monitors and three servers. So we save on electricity, manpower, and time,” Quinn said. “In terms of mission effectiveness, the most important thing is speed. It’s so much better for the students. It’s reliable, it's faster, and instructors now spend less time fighting technology and more time teaching. It is clear that once we incorporate this change in more than 2,500 electronic classrooms containing more than 23,000 computers that this is a huge deal for NETC and the Navy.” Spearheaded by NETC’s Information Technology Services Department (N6), the initiative stemmed from a mission imperative requiring cost effective delivery of training content. During the planning process, the integrated proj-

ect team determined VDI should be phased in throughout the domain because of diverse training environments and multiple stakeholders with varying requirements. Because several training applications are learning site specific, the team needed to consider each site and decided which workstations, programs and applications could be delivered as a service to the student. The virtual system requires no desktop operating system or disk drives, and no virus or spyware monitoring requirement. It would also need to have full Universal Serial Bus (USB) capability to support thumb drives, and dual monitor capability but no refresh requirements due to software updates or new applications, and no media, graphics or memory restrictions. Desktop virtualization

The gears are seldom called into service. There were only five traps last year, Pitts said. But the equipment must be ready at all times. The arresting gear is an essential element to NASP; without a functioning emergency system aircraft cannot fly. The E-28 Arresting Gear Division is part of the Air Operations Department at Forrest Sherman Field. The crew consists of 30 aviation boatswain’s mates – equipment and handling experts – who man the airfield seven days a week. The Sailors work to ensure that the six sets of arresting gears are ready at all times. Daily operations follow a strict routine, Pitts said. The day starts bright and early at 5:30 a.m. with daily maintenance checks, followed by corrosion control on all 12 arresting gear engines. If there are any discrepancies on any of the engines, they are documented and corrected immediately.

January 4, 2013

The image on the right side is the Navy’s most modern fighter aircraft, the F-18 Super Hornet. Established in 1921 as the Air Station News, the name Gosport was adopted in 1936. A gosport was a voice tube used by flight instructors in the early days of naval aviation to give instructions and directions to their students. The name “Gosport” was derived from Gosport, England (originally God’s Port), where the voice tube was invented. Gosport is an authorized newspaper published every Friday by Ballinger Publishing,

mand – Naval Base San Diego and Training Support Center Great Lakes, Ill.; medium shore command – Precommissioning Unit USS Arlington (LPD 24) and Navy Medicine Professional Development Center, Bethesda, Md.; small shore command – Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Va. and U.S. Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station, Guam; medium sea command: Patrol Squadron One (VP 1) Award winners will receive commemorative plaques and units that merited honorable mention will receive certificates from NETC. Additional information on the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center is available through the NETPDTC website: https://www.netc.navy.mil/netc/Com mands/NETPDTC.aspx. For more information about NETC visit https://www. netc.navy.mil/ .

separates the different computing layers and executes all of them on a secure server, which allows end users to access all of the data and applications without being tied down to a specific hardware device. According to Cmdr. Sean O’Brien, NETC’s deputy chief information officer, it reduces desk-side support costs by up to 40 percent through centralized desktop and application deployment and management, and improved desktop reliability. “Productivity and flexibility is boosted by providing users with anywhere and soon ‘any-device access’ to their work,” O’Brien said. “Security of the user’s data is also bolstered, and it simplifies disaster recovery by separating processing and storage from desktop hardware and lowers operational expenses by extending the life of periph-

Gear from page 1

Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.: A Bicentennial Defense Community Commanding Officer — Capt. Christopher W. Plummer Public Affairs Officer — Harry C. White The Gosport nameplate pays homage to the 100th anniversary of naval aviation in 2011: the Centennial of Naval Aviation, or CONA. The image on the left side of the nameplate depicts Eugene Ely taking off in a Curtiss pusher bi-plane from the USS Pennsylvania Jan. 18, 1911. While Ely had taken off from the USS Birmingham two months earlier after his plane had been loaded on the ship, the USS Pennsylvania event was the first time a plane landed on and then took off from a U.S. warship.

the Health Safety and Fitness Flagship are leading by example and have demonstrated the importance of a healthy lifestyle. Good habits resulting from positive influences and their resulting changes can last a lifetime. These commands have my sincere appreciation for their personal commitment and support of our Navy’s Community Service Program.” The winners for 2012 are: shore command category, large command – Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga.; medium command – Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss.; small command – Trident Training Facility, Kings Bay, Ga.; large overseas command: USS Frank Cable (AS 40). Sea command category winners include: large command – USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75); medium command – USS Antietam (CG 54). Commands receiving honorable mentions include: large shore com-

ABE2(AW) Bryan L. Miller focuses on an arresting gear engine during a training session with ABH3 Jamel T. Agee. Photo by ABF2(AW/SW) Marla R. Chapa

Throughout the day, training is conducted on various aspects of the gear to include tool control, “3M maintenance,” arresting gear hazards, crash and rescue, hazardous material (HAZMAT), foreign object damage (FOD) and quality assurance (QA). On top of the regular routine, crewmembers take on some special missions.

The Rhodes Building, 41 North Jefferson Street, Suite 402, Pensacola, FL 32504, in the interest of military and civilian personnel and their families aboard the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Saufley Field and Corry Station. Editorial and news material is compiled by the Public Affairs Office, 150 Hase Road, Ste.A, NAS Pensacola, FL 32508-1051. All news releases and related materials should be mailed to that address, e-mailed to scott.hallford@navy.mil. National news sources are American Forces Press Service (AFPS), Navy News Service (NNS), Air Force News Service (AFNS), News USA and North American Precis Syndicate (NAPS). Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Department of Defense, United States Navy, officials of the Naval Air Station Pensacola, or Ballinger Publishing. All advertising, including classified ads, is arranged through Ballinger Publishing. Minimum weekly circulation is 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication must be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to rank, rate, race, creed, color, national origin or sex of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed rejection of this policy of equal opportunities by an advertiser will result in the refusal of future advertising from that source.

GOSPORT

eral desktop hardware.” “The benefits of virtualization are that it’s engineered to meet current requirement, it’s expandable for future demand and provides a standardized solution for student application loads,” he said. O’Brien says the successful implementation of VDI is the result of outstanding cooperation and teamwork. “The success of this project is the result of close collaboration of the dedicated VDI integrated project team and CNATT’s commitment and willingness to work closely with the team to ensure that all training delivery requirements were incorporated into the solution design.” Using the lessons learned from the initial roll out at the Keesler training unit, NETC can template the process across the domain.

Currently, the Arresting Gear Division is rigorously preparing for its annual certification, which is a full review of overall operations. The certification is comprised of an inspection and tests including a dyno pull test and a stall test in which the results must exceed 4,000 pounds. Pitts and his crewmembers are going through a detailed checklist to make sure everything is ready. “We rehab all of our engines and make sure everything is running like it should,” Pitts said. For the past three years, the NASP Arresting Gear Division has received outstanding scores on certification inspections and Pitts, who joined the division last year, hopes to keep up that record. The Arresting Gear Division also operates as the backbone of the setup and breakdown of the annual Blue Angels Homecoming Air Show at the air operations field. Throughout the year, Arresting Gear personnel stay on top of maintenance obligations in preparation for this signature event.

For classified ads, call: (850) 433-1166, ext. 24 For commercial advertising: Simone Sands (850) 433-1166, ext. 21 Simone@ballingerpublishing.Com Visit Us On The Web At: Ballinger Publishing.Com Mail To: Gosport, NAS Pensacola, 150 Hase Road, Ste.-A, Pensacola, FL 32508-1051

Gosport Editor

Scott Hallford 452-4466 scott.hallford@navy.mil Gosport Associate Editor

Mike O’Connor 452-2165 michael.f.oʼconnor.ctr@navy.mil Gosport Staff Writer

Janet Thomas 452-4419 janet.thomas.ctr@navy.mil


January 4, 2013

GOSPORT

COMMENTARY

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You can’t escape from the holiday backlash By Lisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist

“Is it time?” I thought to myself as I sipped my coffee and stared at our lifeless Christmas tree. I could flip the switch to electrify the tiny lights, top off the stagnant water in the stand, and blur my eyes to the curling branches and falling needles for one more week. Or, I could take the whole damned thing down. Positioning myself closer to the tree, I considered my options. I cocked my head sideways and sighed, remembering the lovely pine smell on that first night just after Thanksgiving break. This tree had been with us for a month of celebrating, shopping, eating, baking and gift giving. Shouldn’t I keep her for one more week? In my sentimental haze, I reached out to touch the lovely blown glass sailboat ornament my husband had given me years ago, and as my hand brushed against the branch, I set off a veritable avalanche of dead pine needles. “That’s it,” I thought, “she’s gotta go.” One by one, I removed and wrapped our tree decorations, packing them away in the storage closet under the stairs. The ornaments, the beaded garland, the lights, the skirt and the angel. Using a turkey baster, I sucked the scummy water out

About the columnist Lisa Smith Molinari, mother of three, has been a military spouse for 19 years (and running). Her humor column, “The Meat and Potatoes of Life,” appears weekly in newspapers and on Stripes Military Moms, a website associated with Stars and Stripes newspaper. She also writes columns for Military Spouse magazine and a blog at www.themeat andpotatoesoflife.com. Molinari and her family are currently stationed at Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Fla. of the tree stand, and detached the naked tree, lugging the dead carcass across our family room, out the back door and across the yard, finally heaving her into the gutter in front of

our mailbox. Fueled by a colossal sense of relief, I marched back into the house, going room by room to purge all evidence of Christmas. I shook the candy wrappers out of the stockings, packed away the Nativity scene, derailed the train, bubblewrapped the ceramic Christmas trees, stored the Santa mugs and silenced the jingle bells. I filled garbage bags with dying poinsettias, stale cookies, burnt candles, wrinkled wrapping paper, used doilies, broken candy canes, half a cheese ball, a whole fruitcake, a carton of egg nog and a stripped turkey carcass. Invigorated, I stormed out onto the porch and unwound the garland from the columns, plucked the light-up candy canes from the walkway, tugged until the twinkle lights gave way from the gutters and tore the wreath from the door, hurling it like a Frisbee into the gutter with the discarded tree. Then, I set my eyes on the enormous blow-up snow globe, faithfully regurgitating the tiny Styrofoam balls in a continuous flurry over the inflatable snowman and his

penguin sidekick. Yanking the outdoor extension cord from the outlet, I heard an electronic sizzle, then turned with sadistic satisfaction to watch the orb slowly suffocate and die on my lawn. I was infuriated to see that the blow up monstrosity failed to give up its last puff of breath, leaving one stubborn bubble trapped in its folds of Visqueen and nylon. With homicidal vengeance, I bounded across the yard and onto the bubble, stomping the last sign of verve from the wretched ornament. I exhausted the remainder of my cathartic frenzy by firing up the Shop Vac. With crazed eyes, I sucked up thousands of pine needles, glitter, crumbs, cookie sprinkles, red and green M&Ms, snips of ribbon, scraps of tissue paper and one or two gumdrops fringed with dog hair. I dumped the Shop Vac canister in the trash, and along with several boxes and bags, and wheeled the whole shebang out to the curb next to the tree cadaver. Then, I grabbed the mail from the mailbox before heading inside. I sat at the kitchen table in my freshly expunged house,

pleased to have wiped my slate clean and ready for a fresh start to the New Year. But then, I opened the credit card bill. As I leafed through a month of reckless spending memorialized on paper, I took a slurp from my coffee cup and a drop dribbled from the rim, plopping onto my gut. Moving the bill to one side, I stared down at the surprisingly large blob of flesh, dented in the middle where a cavernous belly button lay just under my shirt. A month of overeating had turned my middle-aged mom tummy into an embarrassing flop of overhanging flab. I realized that the real battle to purge myself of the holiday excesses had only just begun.

Commentary rules Commentaries are the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as official government, Navy or command policy statements. Reader submission are welcome but should not exceed 800 words. Submissions must be bylined and include a daytime phone number or e-mail contact for the writer. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with policy and standards. Address Commentary submissions to Janet.Thomas.ctr @navy.mil


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FEBRUARY: Two HH-60H Seahawks landed on the lawn of the Rescue Swimmer School onboard NAS Pensacola for educational tours to students in “A” school and in the rescue swimmer program. The Red Wolves, based in Norfolk, Va., were in the area for training at Hurlburt Field in Fort Walton Beach and flew in for a short training evolution. The squadron supports special vertical lift missions for combatant commanders. Dozens of student naval aviator hopefuls and classes from NATTC gathered for the landings and subsequent tours. Photo by Emily Benner JANUARY: ITC Otis Frazier makes a break down the field during the ninth annual Army vs. Navy flag football game onboard NASP Corry Station. The game is a local version of the national football rivalry between the Navy Midshipmen and the Army Black Knights. The Navy team took home the trophy with a 22-18 victory, their first victory since 2007. Photo by Gary Nichols

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MARCH: A NAS Pensacola police contact team prepares to enter former NASP headquarters (Bldg. 624) as part of an “active shooter” exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield. In the training scenario, a gunman took hostages and barricaded himself in one of the offices. Police tracked down the “suspect,” and victims with simulated injuries added to the realism. Photo by Mike O’Connor

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MAY: Former astronaut Neil Armstrong was one of the special guests at the opening of the National Flight Academy and the Honorary Naval Aviator induction ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum. Armstrong, who received his wings at Naval Air Station Pensacola in 1950, was the first person to walk on the moon. He was inducted into the Naval Aviation Hall of Honor at the museum in 2010. Armstrong died Aug. 25, 2012, due to complications from heart surgery. Photo by Janet Thomas

JUNE: Rear Adm. Donald P. Quinn, Commander, Naval Education and Training Command, presents a flag to Charles “Chuck” Wheeler during at 70th anniversary commemoration of the Battle of Midway. Wheeler, a former chief aviation ordnanceman onboard USS Enterprise (CV 6), helped load ordnance onto the aircraft that attacked the Japanese carrier forces during the battle. Photo by Mike O’Connor

APRIL: Navy Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (NJROTC) cadets align their ranks in preparation for a unit personnel inspection during 2012 NJROTC Nationals onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. Students from more than 25 high schools across the country competed for the best scores in athletics, unit inspections, academics and drill. Photo by Joy Samsel

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SEPTEMBER: International military students and instructors from Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NavSCIATTS) participated in waterborne training and exercises staged out of NASP’s Sherman Cove Marina. Swift, heavily armed small craft operations were conducted in the Intracoastal waterway. The training scenarios involving search-and-seizure exercises with NASP Port Ops and runs to Eglin AFB’s remote wooded areas. The crews onboard the vessels were international military students from friendly partner nations, working together with highly experienced NavSCIATTS instructors. Photo by Mike O’Connor JULY: Dressed as “Rosie the Riveter,” Carolyn Petersen, Naval Education and Training Professional Development and Technology Center (NETPDTC) accounting officer, explains the contributions of women to the war effort during the annual diversity festival. An estimated 3,000 service members and civilian personnel attended the festival. Photo by Ed Barker

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AUGUST: Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert speaks to more than 3,700 Sailors during an all hands call with the students and staff at Naval Education and Training Command at NAS Pensacola. Following his opening remarks, the admiral spent 40 minutes answering questions from the Sailors. Photo by MC1 Peter D. Lawlor

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OCTOBER: NAS Pensacola’s Training Squadron 86 (VT-86) received the first of 19 expected T-45 Goshawk trainer jets that feature modifications to support the new Virtual Mission Training System (VTMS). The new undergraduate military flight officer (UMFO) syllabus will allow students to transition directly from the T-6 Texan to the T-45 Goshawk, eliminating the aging T39 Sabreliner from the training pipeline. Photo by Lt. Matt Liashek

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NOVEMBER: Four of the Blue Angels F/A 18 Hornets streak across the the sky during the Blue Angels Homecoming Air Show at NAS Pensacola. The annual show marks the end of the season for the Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. In a classic diamond formation, pilots fly with as little as 18 inches of wingtip to canopy separation. Photo by Mike Rich

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DECEMBER: Santa arrives in Otto the Helicopter during the NASP MWR Holiday Tree Lighting and Trees For Troops event at the Radford Fitness Center. Hundreds of service members and their families came to enjoy hot cocoa, cookies, games and to meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. Photo by Gretchen DeVuyst


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FEBRUARY: Two HH-60H Seahawks landed on the lawn of the Rescue Swimmer School onboard NAS Pensacola for educational tours to students in “A” school and in the rescue swimmer program. The Red Wolves, based in Norfolk, Va., were in the area for training at Hurlburt Field in Fort Walton Beach and flew in for a short training evolution. The squadron supports special vertical lift missions for combatant commanders. Dozens of student naval aviator hopefuls and classes from NATTC gathered for the landings and subsequent tours. Photo by Emily Benner JANUARY: ITC Otis Frazier makes a break down the field during the ninth annual Army vs. Navy flag football game onboard NASP Corry Station. The game is a local version of the national football rivalry between the Navy Midshipmen and the Army Black Knights. The Navy team took home the trophy with a 22-18 victory, their first victory since 2007. Photo by Gary Nichols

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MARCH: A NAS Pensacola police contact team prepares to enter former NASP headquarters (Bldg. 624) as part of an “active shooter” exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield. In the training scenario, a gunman took hostages and barricaded himself in one of the offices. Police tracked down the “suspect,” and victims with simulated injuries added to the realism. Photo by Mike O’Connor

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MAY: Former astronaut Neil Armstrong was one of the special guests at the opening of the National Flight Academy and the Honorary Naval Aviator induction ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum. Armstrong, who received his wings at Naval Air Station Pensacola in 1950, was the first person to walk on the moon. He was inducted into the Naval Aviation Hall of Honor at the museum in 2010. Armstrong died Aug. 25, 2012, due to complications from heart surgery. Photo by Janet Thomas

JUNE: Rear Adm. Donald P. Quinn, Commander, Naval Education and Training Command, presents a flag to Charles “Chuck” Wheeler during at 70th anniversary commemoration of the Battle of Midway. Wheeler, a former chief aviation ordnanceman onboard USS Enterprise (CV 6), helped load ordnance onto the aircraft that attacked the Japanese carrier forces during the battle. Photo by Mike O’Connor

APRIL: Navy Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (NJROTC) cadets align their ranks in preparation for a unit personnel inspection during 2012 NJROTC Nationals onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. Students from more than 25 high schools across the country competed for the best scores in athletics, unit inspections, academics and drill. Photo by Joy Samsel

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SEPTEMBER: International military students and instructors from Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NavSCIATTS) participated in waterborne training and exercises staged out of NASP’s Sherman Cove Marina. Swift, heavily armed small craft operations were conducted in the Intracoastal waterway. The training scenarios involving search-and-seizure exercises with NASP Port Ops and runs to Eglin AFB’s remote wooded areas. The crews onboard the vessels were international military students from friendly partner nations, working together with highly experienced NavSCIATTS instructors. Photo by Mike O’Connor JULY: Dressed as “Rosie the Riveter,” Carolyn Petersen, Naval Education and Training Professional Development and Technology Center (NETPDTC) accounting officer, explains the contributions of women to the war effort during the annual diversity festival. An estimated 3,000 service members and civilian personnel attended the festival. Photo by Ed Barker

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AUGUST: Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert speaks to more than 3,700 Sailors during an all hands call with the students and staff at Naval Education and Training Command at NAS Pensacola. Following his opening remarks, the admiral spent 40 minutes answering questions from the Sailors. Photo by MC1 Peter D. Lawlor

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OCTOBER: NAS Pensacola’s Training Squadron 86 (VT-86) received the first of 19 expected T-45 Goshawk trainer jets that feature modifications to support the new Virtual Mission Training System (VTMS). The new undergraduate military flight officer (UMFO) syllabus will allow students to transition directly from the T-6 Texan to the T-45 Goshawk, eliminating the aging T39 Sabreliner from the training pipeline. Photo by Lt. Matt Liashek

N a v a l

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NOVEMBER: Four of the Blue Angels F/A 18 Hornets streak across the the sky during the Blue Angels Homecoming Air Show at NAS Pensacola. The annual show marks the end of the season for the Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. In a classic diamond formation, pilots fly with as little as 18 inches of wingtip to canopy separation. Photo by Mike Rich

P e n s a c o l a

DECEMBER: Santa arrives in Otto the Helicopter during the NASP MWR Holiday Tree Lighting and Trees For Troops event at the Radford Fitness Center. Hundreds of service members and their families came to enjoy hot cocoa, cookies, games and to meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. Photo by Gretchen DeVuyst


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January 4, 2013

GOSPORT

NAMI reaches critical milestone in TBI research project Navy Medicine Operational Training Center Public Affairs

A team of researchers from Navy medicine, the Veteran’s Administration and a university working with the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) Hyperbaric Medicine Department in Pensacola announced recently that they reached a critical milestone in a three-year research effort that could significantly impact the future treatment of persistent post-concussive syndrome (PPCS), which impacts some injured combat personnel in Afghanistan. The research project “Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Post-Concussive Symptoms after mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized, DoubleBlinded, Sham-Controlled Variable Dose Prospective Trial” is a collaborative partnership with Dr. David Cifu and other researchers from the Virginia Commonwealth University and McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center in Richmond, Va., designed to help determine whether hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) might be an effective treatment for patients suffering from PPCS after mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). The researchers have completed a series of 705 chamber compressions, logging more than 146 man-days of “bottom time,” Dec.13. Capt. Brett Hart, the Navy’s

principal investigator on the project, said the study could yield positive results for a condition that has garnered widespread attention since the onset of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). According to Hart, the full impact of OIF/OEF-related mild TBI on service members is unknown, but conservative estimates place the number of individuals suffering from PPCS at more than 100,000. “As of now, there is no defined treatment for PPCS,” he said, though some scientists have proposed HBO2 as a potential treatment for PPCS based on the theory that marginally functioning brain cells in and around damaged areas of the brain may be revived by improving oxygen availability, stimulating cellular repair and, ultimately, restoring neurological function. “Our feasibility trial helps test whether or not volunteers with mild TBI can safely tolerate HBO2 exposure, will experience subjective reductions in their PPCS symptoms, and/or demonstrate objective improvements in their physiologic and neuropsychological performance,” Hart said. Setting what Hart believes are new standards for quality objective conduct of clinical hyperbaric research, the study includes 62 active-duty U.S. Marine volunteers who were randomly assigned to breathe one of three different oxygen concentrations

Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) Hyperbarics Department Leading Petty Officer HM1(FMF/DSW) Clint Guernsey moves gas cylinders during a NAMI research project Dec. 12 at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Guernsey and other NAMI Hyperbarics Chamber personnel have been involved in a research project designed to test the feasability of using hyperbaric medicine to treat lasting effects of mild traumatic brain injury. Photo by MC1 Bruce Cummins

(10.5 percent, 75 percent or 100 percent) at an absolute atmospheric pressure two times greater than that experienced at sea level. Because the study-breathing gasses were labeled only as gas “A,” “B” or “C” and all study volunteers were exposed to the same pressure in the hyperbaric chamber, both volunteers and researchers remained blinded to the volunteer’s specific exposure condition throughout

Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) Hyperbarics Department Diving Officer Lt. Greg Addison (left) and NAMI Hyperbarics Department Dive Med Tech David Francis supervise a dive in which mild traumatic brain injury volunteers are exposed to various concentrations of oxygen. Photo by MC1 Bruce Cummins

the HBO2 exposure phase of the study. Further, despite applying a battery of more than 25 symptom characterizing, neuropsychological and neurophysiologic tests, the researchers responsible for conducting baseline and postHBO2 exposure testing of Marine volunteers were also effectively blinded to the study gas assignments throughout the testing. “Such scientific rigor is critical to ensuring the veracity of the results we obtain,” Hart said. “Unlike previous unblinded, uncontrolled trials evaluating HBO2 exposure’s effects on PPCS, the results of our study are much less likely to be skewed by such confounders as researcher bias, Hawthorne and placebo effects.” Complete results of the research project are not expected until after March 2013, when the last group of Marine volunteers completes a three-month follow up testing, the study’s blinding code is broken and the accumulated study results are analyzed. Hart said that, regardless of outcome, the study provides significant value to Navy medicine and the Department of Defense, noting that hyperbaric team effort and resources provided during the course of the project are minimal compared to those required if HBO2 were to be accepted as a treatment for PPCS. “Objectively determining whether or not HBO2 therapy is an effective means of treating

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PPCS is critical,” Hart said. “This is the primary goal of our study,” as he believes is the case with the companion TBI trials recently completed by the US Air Force and soon to be completed by the U.S. Army. “If HBO2 therapy proves to be effective, then the DoD will have gained a viable treatment option for an injury that currently has few to no therapeutic alternatives. If, on the other hand, HBO2 therapy is found to be ineffective, then the DoD will have gained the insight needed to help refocus its efforts on indentifying other, more effective treatments.” NAMI reports to the Navy Medicine Operational Training Center (NMOTC), the recognized global leader in operational medical and aviation survival training, which in turn reports to Navy Medicine Education and Training Command (NMETC), which maintains oversight of Navy Medicine education and training. NAMI, NMOTC and NMETC are all part of the Navy medicine team, a global health care network of Navy medical professionals around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than 1 million eligible beneficiaries. Navy medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ships, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield.


January 4, 2013

PARTYLINE

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GOSPORT E-7 exam scheduled for Jan. 17

The Education Services Office (ESO) of Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) Pensacola will administer the Navywide enlisted advancement examinations for E-7 Jan. 17 at its new location, the conference facility, Bldg. 3249, aboard Pensacola Naval Air Station (NASP). The doors will open at 6 a.m. and close promptly at 7 a.m. Advancement candidates must wear the prescribed uniform of the day of their respective command and have military ID card to participate. Candidates were required to verify and sign the worksheet prior to Dec. 14. Special arrangements have been made for some commands in Pensacola. For additional information, contact PSD ESO at 452-3617, option 8 and then 1.

Premiere scheduled for documentary

The members of Zelica Grotto are presenting the first public premiere of the local documentary, “Pearl Harbor, One Last Goodbye,” at 6 p.m. Jan. 17. The documentary chronicles a journey to Hawaii by Pearl Harbor survivors from Pensacola. Tickets may be picked up at Grotto Hall, 1000 South K Street, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., tomorrow, Jan. 5, and Jan. 12. A limit of 300 tickets will be available. The spaghetti dinner will be served and a $5 dinner contribution can go towards the purchase of a DVD. The full cost of a DVD is $24.95. For more information, go to www.pearlharbor onelastgoodbye.com.

Dinner and dance scheduled for Jan. 26 American Legion Post No. 240, 8666 Gulf Beach Highway, is offering dinner and dancing Jan. 26. A steak dinner will be served from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $11. The dance is scheduled to begin at 8 p.m. The Mike Diamond Band will perform. Cost is $5. Both activities are open to the public. For more information, call 455-6111.

Gallery starts year off with new show

The New Blues 2012 member show will be features at Blue Morning Gallery, 21 Palafox Place, through Feb. 2. An opening reception is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 11. To make reservations or for more information, call 429-9100.

Embry-Riddle conducting registration

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is conducting registration through Jan. 14. The NAS

Submission guide You can submit information for possible publication in Partyline by sending an e-mail to Janet.Thomas.ctr@navy.mil. Submissions must include the organization’s name and details about events including times, dates, locations and any costs involved. Contact information also is required. All submissions are subject to editing to comply with established standards. Items should be submitted at least one week in advance. The deadline is noon Friday for the next week’s publication.

If you have questions or concerns, contact Doug Chastang with NAS Pensacola Public Works at 452-3131, ext. 3100.

Allied Forces Soccer team reloads

All soccer players are welcome to join Allied Forces Soccer for a new year of pick-up or league play. The group plays recreationally and competitively in adult leagues. There are two teams, 11-aside and 7-a-side. Pick-up games are played at various locations including NAS Pensacola. Due to the ongoing transition of military players, the teams are always looking for new players to join. For more information, contact Lt. Cmdr. David Toellner at 382-5494 or send an e-mail to kiwi_soccer@yahoo.com.

Write your life story with a little help Pensacola office, 250 Chambers Ave., Bldg. 634, Suite 033, is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. The NAS Whiting Field office, Bldg, 1417, Room 163, is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday. Late registration and add/drop refund deadline is Jan. 14 to Jan. 20. The office will be closed Dec. 24 to Jan. 1. Classes begin Jan. 14. Orientation is 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 9 at the NAS Pensacola office. For more information, send an e-mail to pensacola@erau.edu or call 458-1098. You can also go to www.embryriddle.edu/pensacola.

Southern Illinois offers online classes

Registration is open for Southern Illinois University’s Workforce Education and Development (WED) or Health Care Management (HCM) bachelor’s degree programs. The new semester begins Jan. 12. For more information, contact Wendy Spradlin at 458-6263 or by e-mail at wspradlin@siu.edu for WED, or Beth Huston at 455-2449 or by e-mail at bhuston@siu.edu for HCM.

Sewer smoke testing continues at NASP

Smoke testing of the sanitary sewer system continues at NAS Pensacola. The Public Works Department (PWD) contracted with AH/BC Navy Joint Venture to conduct a wastewater sanitary sewer evaluation study. Smoke testing will identify possible defects in the system. The smoke testing machine creates a chemical smoke that is non-toxic, non-staining and has a low odor. Crews will operate from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Be aware of field crews as they will be working on or near roadways.

A new Footprints! class, a program that helps people write their life story, starts Jan. 7 and will meet at 9:30 a.m. each Monday at the Gulf Breeze United Methodist Church, Fairpoint campus, room 11. Cost of book is $25. For more information, call Carolyn Pfeiffer at 932-3256, or e-mail her at carolynpf@mchsi.com.

Free flu shots available for veterans

Seasonal flu vaccine is available and free to all enrolled veterans at any of the Department of Veterans Affairs Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System facilities. Veterans seeking a flu shot should contact their Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT). Veterans who have received the shot elsewhere should let their PACT know. The hours at the VA’s Pensacola Joint Ambulatory Care Clinic are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 912-2000 or 1 (866) 927-1420.

Fleet and Family plans world fair

The Naval Air Station Pensacola Fleet and Family Support Center is presenting an Around the World in a Day Adventure Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 9 at the National Naval Aviation Museum. The event will focus on cultures of the world. Event sponsors will share knowledge, experiences and exhibits with DoD personnel and dependents who anticipate traveling abroad. A special station will be set up for Kids on the Move and Kids & Deployment. Admission is free. The deadline for event sponsors to sign up is Jan. 20. For more information, call Work and Family Life Specialist Pam Banks at 452-8453 or 452-4277.


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January 4, 2013

GOSPORT


SECTION

LIFE

B

January 4, 2013

NATTC commissions a new CWO; See page B2 Spotlight

GOSPORT

Simple tips for getting fit in the new year By Laura Garrett

(NAPS) – For many, controlling their weight starts with getting control of impulse eating. Often, in order to change behaviors, people must first acknowledge the patterns of behavior that lead them to eat impulsively. It starts with a list One of the biggest culprits is going to the grocery store without a list. Supermarkets set up their aisles for impulse buying and quick hunger fixes. Breaking the behavior chain that leads to bad decisions often starts with changing routines. For example: • Eat a piece of fruit before shopping. • Create a shopping list template – keep copies in the car and add addi-

tional items as needed. • Stick to the shopping list. • Use coupons only for items on the list. Learn how to lunch Workday lunches can be another opportunity for impulse eating to take hold. If you’re one of those workers who waits until 11:30 a.m. (after hunger has already set in) to decide where to go out for lunch or what to order in, you may find yourself often resorting to high-fat, high-calorie options like fast food. Here are some suggestions to make better choices: • Have fruit at 10 a.m. • Pack a brown-bag lunch the night before. This will also save money. • Pack or purchase lunches on sliced bread. Rolls can have twice the calo-

ries of sliced bread. • Salads are great, but measure the salad dressing or use vinegar. Make mealtime meaningful Sometimes, simple things can make a difference at mealtime. For instance: • Choose carbohydrates that are low on the glycemic scale, such as fruits, veggies and whole grains. • Count to 10 before grabbing something to eat. • Make the slogan “The kitchen closes at 9 p.m.” a mind-set. Today is a good day to begin Making positive behavior changes to avoid impulse eating is an essential factor in health and weight management. Start today by becoming aware of those behaviors that lead you astray from your weight management goals.

NMOTC service members, civilians attend holiday nutrition seminar From Navy Medicine Education and Training Command Public Affairs

Service members attached to Navy medicine’s recognized global leader in operational medical and aviation survival training attended a seminar recently designed to showcase basic nutrition and maintaining an eating plan during the holiday season which is applicable the whole year. Navy Medicine Operational Training Center (NMOTC) personnel; including those from NMOTC component commands Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI), Naval Survival Training Institute (NSTI) and the Aviation Survival Training Center (ASTC) Pensacola, attended the course, taught by Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Portside

Fitness Center Fitness Specialist Nicole Gilchrest. She hosted an open forum, soliciting questions from the more than 50 service members attending, focusing on basic nutrition, finding a metabolic rate, forming an individual eating plan, and shopping for groceries, as well as creating a healthy diet centered around moderation. “Nutrition is important all year round but it seems we throw caution to the wind when it comes to the holidays,” she said. “We eat for social reasons not because our body needs it, and this is the time of year we can get into real trouble with weight gain.” During the class, Gilchrest explained strategies designed to assist personnel in remaining lean, but still enjoying holiday foods. “I believe with a nutritionally sound eating plan you can fit

NAS Pensacola Morale, Welfare and Recreation Fitness Center Specialist Nicole Gilchrest instructs Navy Medicine Operational Training Center personnel in proper nutrition during a two-hour seminar at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute. Gilchrest hosted the seminar in an effort to provide tips on healthy eating and proper nutrition during the holiday season. Photo by MC1 Bruce Cummins

all types of foods into your diet,” she said. “You must follow the 80/20 rule – stick to a plan 80 percent of the time focusing on lean meats and lots

Plan for getting and staying healthy in 2013 live. This may help get some items checked off your “to do” list and clear your mind. • Set goals for healthy eating and physical activity. Motivate yourself with fun activities that you can do with others, like flag football. Physical activity • Be active every day and make time for physical activity. Work activity into your day, whether by parking farther away from stores to do your holiday shopping or walking around the mall or outdoor shops one full time before you buy anything. Balance, balance, balance • Share healthful recipes with family members and friends. Often, alternatives that are lower in fat, sugar, salt or cholesterol can be substituted for ingredients in even the most traditional recipes.

(NAPS) – The new year is a perfect time to focus on family and friends, not food. It’s also an important time to move more and eat better. To help, the Weight-control Information Network (WIN), a national information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, offers the following tips so you can stay fit in 2013: Time management • Plan and prepare meals and snacks. Shop ahead of time for ingredients. Reach for quick snacks that are healthy, such as whole-grain crackers and peanut butter or veggies with low-fat dip. • Go for a walk after a meal. Run some holiday errands or take a quick stroll where you work or

Word Search ‘Organized in 2013’ D G F E R O Z K U R M U W K H

K R L T O O L S P E A Y V V N

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F R I T E R K S Z Y B N G W N

C O M B T P V T X O B J F Y Q

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P C R W W U H Y Y F P C H D R

D I V P X N L K F Y F J L K M

S D R O C E R C H Z L P J L H

S A B S T M P Z G C R S M O P

Z T Q N Y P A U U H S H O K F

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F X V U E O D B C L E F H R F

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F E U O V W F I L D D K G L Q

F K N R U W K O S O M I L F U

of vegetables, fruits and whole grains and good fats while eating those ‘forbidden’ foods only 20 percent of the time.” Gilchrest, who also serves as an MWR Fitness Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS) instructor, said there are a variety of methods service members can employ to control their caloric intake. “I hope I provided a common sense approach to nutrition and the template on how to make an individual successful with nutrition and fitness goals,” she said. “I want to make people self-sufficient and confident about nutritional choices so they are not dependent on the next new dieting fad to hit the internet or any other source of media. We eat right and train because we love our bodies not because we hate it.” Gilchrest also highlighted

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NOFFS during the class, citing the two-hour course as a method of teaching active duty personnel how to train and focus on proper body mechanics. “This program helps to reduce the risk injury of our active-duty men and women while teaching them how to become efficient at their job while in the line of duty,” she said. “This program also offers a nutrition template with a listing of foods to go along with the template. The eating system is to fuel our military athletes for optimal performance.” Gilchrest said Pensacola MWR Fitness offers several courses to beneficiaries of the facilities, including a two-day course entitled Mission Nutrition, an in-depth offering expanding on the nutritional information presented at the NMOTC seminar. NMOTC reports to NMETC, the sole point of accountability for Navy Medicine education and training. NAMI, NSTI, ASTC Pensacola, NMOTC and NMETC are all part of the Navy medicine team, a global health care network of Navy medical professionals around the world who provide highquality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ships, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield. For more news from Navy Medicine Education and Training Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/nmsc/.

Jokes & Groaners Quotes for a new year Youth is when you’re allowed to stay up late on New Year’s Eve. Middle age is when you’re forced to. – Bill Vaughn A New Year’s resolution is something that goes in one year and out the other. – Anonymous An optimist stays up until midnight to see the New Year in. A pessimist stays up to make sure the old year leaves. – Bill Vaughan People are so worried about what they eat between Christmas and the new year, but they really should be worried about what they eat between the New Year and Christmas. – Anonymous Many years ago I resolved never to bother with New Year’s resolutions and I’ve stuck with it ever since. – Dave Beard May all your troubles last as long as your New Year’s resolutions. – Joey Adams We spend Jan. 1 walking through our lives, room by room, drawing up a list of work to be done, cracks to be patched. Maybe this year, to balance the list, we ought to walk through the rooms of our lives ... not looking for flaws, but for potential. – Ellen Goodman


PAGE

B2 GOSPORT

SPOTLIGHT

January 4, 2013

NMCRS volunteers NATTC commissions a new CWO of the quarter praised Story, photo by Lt. Jonathan Bacon Naval Air Technical Training Center PAO

From NMCRS

Each quarter the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Pensacola honors two dedicated volunteers with the Volunteer of the Quarter award. For the July through September 2012 quarter; the awards went to Ken Webb at the NMCRS Thrift Shop and LeAnna Clarke at the NMCRS office. These volunteers helped clients in any way they could, while providing them with extra-special service. Webb started volunteering at the thrift shop in 2009. Since then, he has contributed more than 800 volunteer hours and received two awards for his contributions. In April 2010, he received the Volunteer of the Month award at the thrift shop and last month he was honored with the Volunteer of the Quarter award. “Ken is such a

hard-worker,” said Mattie Kirk the chair of the thrift shop. “When we had our volunteer luncheon this past October, Ken stayed to help out at the store. He knew people come from all over to get here and he didn't want them to be disappointed to find it closed when they arrived.” The thrift shop was not the only part of NMCRS Pensacola blessed with a remarkable volunteer who provided special service to NMCRS clients. Client Services Assistant (CSA) LeAnna Clarke was selected as the office Volunteer of the Quarter because of her consistent, professional service as the face of NMCRS that clients first experienced. In addition to being extremely dependable, readily available and courteous, she welcomed clients, guests and potential volunteers by making them feel

welcome, at ease and valued. According to Chair of Volunteers Ginny Goodman, Clarke is “totally reliable and is good with everybody.” Since Clarke started volunteering in 1998, she has provided more than 2,000 volunteer hours of caring, compassionate service. N M C R S Pensacola appreciates all of its volunteers, especially those who really want to help service members and their families. If you are caring, compassionate, considerate, dedicated and empathetic, and are interested in becoming a very special NMCRS Pensacola team member, call 4522300 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and ask for Ginny, Amanda, Chloe or Jackie. Make sure you tell the person who answers the phone that you are calling to inquire about volunteering.

ATC Scott Ouellette, an instructor at Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC), was commissioned a chief warrant officer (CWO) recently during a ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. With his family, friends and fellow staff members in attendance, Ouellette passed his chief’s anchors down to the next generation of chiefs. Afterward, with the help of his family he put on his new officer’s uniform. His mother and mother-in-law placed his warrant officer shoulder boards on his shirt and his father helped him into his new dress blue jacket. Ouellette’s 3-year-old daughter, Olivia, with a little help from his wife Holly, placed his combination cover on his head. “The support of my family, and the values my parents instilled in me growing up, brought me the success I have had to this point in my career,” said Ouellette. “It’s important that the best Sailors in the fleet come back as instructors to training center’s such as NATTC, as I did, to pass their experience down to the next generation of Sailors. “As a warrant officer I intend to continue to lead and train Sailors to do their best work for our Navy, and to be ready to someday relieve me as a chief petty officer or as a chief warrant officer,” he said. NATTC’s Commanding Officer Capt. James Daniels presided over the ceremony and former NATTC staff member retired CWO5 Marv Wimpee was the guest speaker and administered the oath of office to Ouellette. “Chief Warrant Officer Ouellette is the third mustang to be commissioned at NATTC in 2012,” said Daniels. “For almost 70 years Naval Air Technical Training Center, since it’s commissioning in 1943, has had outstanding instructors such as Ouellette training technical experts in support of the Naval Aviation Enterprise.” NATTC graduates approximately 15,000

Naval Air Technical Training Center’s ATC Scott Ouellette’s mother and mother in-law apply his new chief warrant officer shoulder boards during his commissioning ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum.

Navy and Marine students each year. The largest part of the student body is comprised of enlisted personnel attending “A” schools designed to provide them with the knowledge and skill levels required to perform as technicians at the apprentice level. Advanced schools provide higher level technical knowledge for senior petty officers and specialty schools offer specific skills not particular to any one rating, such as airman apprentice training, maintenance, personal financial management and shipboard aircraft firefighting. NATTC also conducts technical training for officers in aviation fuels, carrier air traffic control center operations, aircraft launch and recovery equipment, shipboard aircraft fire fighting and amphibious air traffic control center operations. For more information about Naval Air Technical Training Center, visit https://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/cnatt/nattc/De fault.aspx.

February/March 2013

COULD YOU BE OUR NEXT COVER MODEL? We’re looking for the perfect wedding model for the cover of Pensacola Magazine Weddings 2013, and that model could be you.

Weddings 2013

Submit up to three wedding photos —high resolution please— to weddings@ballingerpublishing.com, and you could be featured on the cover of the February 2013 issue. Candid shots by your professional photographer are best. Please include Bride, Groom and Photographer’s name. For more information, visit www.pensacolamagazine.com or email us at the address above.

Please send us the high resolution photos by January 25, 2013.

Winner 2012


GOSPORT

PAGE

January 4, 2013

B3

You should call Simone Sands and advertise your business in this spot. 433-1166 ext. 21 Business Climate Magazine

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PAGE

OFF DUTY

B4

GOSPORT

January 4, 2013

Morale, Welfare and Recreation

The IMAX film “Rocky Mountain Express” features scenes such as this view of a steam-powered locomotive passing through a section of the Canadian Rockies.

New IMAX film on track at museum By Janet Thomas Gosport Staff Writer

A new IMAX movie is scheduled to debut today, Jan. 4, at the IMAX Naval Aviation Memorial Theatre at the National Naval Aviation Museum. “Rocky Mountain Express” takes audiences on a steam train journey through the Canadian Rockies and highlights the challenges that engineers faced when they were building the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), the transcontinental railway that was completed in 1885. Retracing the railway’s original route, the film weaves together aerial cinematography, rugged landscape vistas and archival images and maps to tell the story

“Rocky Mountain Express” Now showing: 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. daily. It is 40 minutes long. Rated G, suitable for all. Where: IMAX Naval Aviation Memorial Theatre. On the web: Museum information, www.navalaviation museum.org; information on film, www.rockymountainexpress film.com. Details: 452-3604 or 453-2025.

of the epic engineering feat. Spanning thousands of miles and several natural barriers, the grand project and its wandering ribbon of steel shaped a new

nation. The film, which was released in September 2011, was directed by Canadian filmmaker Stephen Low. It features the Canadian Pacific Railway’s restored 4-6-4 H1b Hudson steam locomotive 2816. Low also directed “Rescue,” another IMAX film that has been featured at the museum. The museum’s IMAX theater is one of the largest IMAX theaters in the world and has the largest screen in Florida. The screen is 10 times larger than a traditional cinema screen. The projector passes 70mm film at 24 frames per second over a three-foot diameter rotor turning at 180 mph, projecting an image on the screen magnified 273 times the size of the film frame.

At the movies FRIDAY

“Life of Pi” (3D), PG, 4:45 p.m.; “Red Dawn,” PG-13, 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m.; “Rise of the Guardians” (2D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Killing Them Softly,” R, 7 p.m., 9:15 p.m.

SATURDAY

“Wreck it Ralph” (3D), PG, 12:30 p.m.; “Life of Pi” (3D), PG, 3 p.m.; “Skyfall,” PG-13, 5:45 p.m.; “Lincoln,” PG-13, 8:45 p.m.; “Red Dawn,” PG-13, 2:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m.; “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2,” PG-13, 6:45 p.m.; “Killing Them Softly,” R, 9:15 p.m.

SUNDAY

“Rise of the Guardians” (3D), PG, noon; “Wreck it Ralph” (3D), PG, 2:15 p.m.; “Life of Pi” (3D), PG, 4:45 p.m.; “Killing Them Softly,” R, 7:30 p.m.; “Red Dawn,” PG-13, 12:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m.; “Skyfall,” PG-13, 4:30 p.m.; “Flight,” R, 7:15 p.m.

MONDAY

CLOSED

TUESDAY

“Red Dawn,” PG-13, 5 p.m.; “Lincoln,” PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Man With the Iron Fists,” R, 5:15 p.m.; “Killing Them Softly,” R, 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY “Killing Them Softly,” R, 5 p.m.; “Skyfall,” PG-13, 7 p.m.; “Red Dawn,” PG-13, 5:15

p.m.; “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2,” PG-13, 7:15 p.m. THURSDAY COST

“Life of Pi” (3D), PG, 5 p.m.; “Man With the Iron Fists,” R, 7:30 p.m.; “Red Dawn,” PG13, 5:15 p.m.; “Flight,” R, 7:15 p.m.

Regular: $3 adults, $1.50 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger 3D shows: $5 adults, $3 children ages 6-11, free for 5 and younger

Details: 452-3522 or www.naspensacola-mwr.com

The NASP Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department has a number of upcoming events and activities that the whole family can participate in. For more information, call 452-8285 or visit the MWR website: www.naspensacola-mwr.com. • Boot Camp Resolution: A 12-week program designed to help you start and stick with your New Year’s resolution begins Jan. 15 at Radford Fitness. Sessions are 8 a.m. or 6 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Trainers will lead you through a 12-week program getting you comfortable with weights, cardio, group exercise classes and nutrition, setting you up with the tools for a fit and healthy future. Pre-register by calling 452-9845. • Commit to Fit: Portside will present eightweek program designed to hold each person accountable for their own fitness routine. It will kick off Jan. 7 with an open house event filled with ongoing group classes, prizes and info needed to get started. Once registered, each participant will receive points for each class, trainers session and regular workout session attended. Prizes will be awarded to the top two female and male participants. For more information, call 452-7810. • Wenzel Fit Camp Possible Mission: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, Jan. 7, through March 28. Your assignment if you choose to accept it ... Attend at least 16 of 24 sessions. You will earn prizes along the way. • Pool closure: The MWR Indoor Pool aboard NAS Pensacola will be closed for repairs through Jan. 28. • Crowʼs Nest room rental: Located at Bayou Grande Marina on NAS Pensacola, rental includes the entire upper deck of Bayou Grande Marina. Crow’s Nest seats 60 inside and another 40 outside. Cost is $250 for room rental with $150 refundable cleaning deposit. For more information, call 452-4152. • Runners welcome: The NAS Pensacola Runners Club invites all runners, walkers and joggers to run along with members of the group at 6 a.m. Tuesday and 4:30 p.m. Thursday. The meeting location is the Radford Fitness Center aboard NAS Pensacola. For more information, call 452-9845. • RV park expansion: The RV site at Blue Angel Recreation Park has announced the addition of 40 sites. For more information, call 453-9435. • Auto Skills Center (ASC): Do-it-yourself car repair and save money. The knowledgeable staff at ASC are there to assist you. The center offers covered stalls, overhaul bays, five drive-on lifts, three frame lifts, two motorcycle lifts, two car wash bays, hundreds of tools and nitrogen tire inflation, all for very affordable user fees. For more information, call 452-6542. • Information, Tickets and Travel (ITT): Your discount headquarters for cruises, hotels, beaches, local attractions and most Florida attractions including Disney World, Busch Gardens, Sea World and more. For more information, call 452-6354.

Liberty activities Liberty program events target young, unaccompanied active-duty military. Regular events are scheduled at the main Liberty Center in the Portside Entertainment Complex. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and holidays and 10:30 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday. Off-base trips leave from the NASP Liberty Center, but you must sign up in advance. For more information, call 452-2372 or visit www.naspensacolamwr.com/singsail/liberty. htm.

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Community Outreach NASP Community Outreach is seeking volunteers for opportunities including: • Northwest Florida Blood Services: Volunteers are needed to help in everyday operations. For information, contact Jamie Hudson at 473- 3853, ext. 132, or e-mail at jhudson@fbsblood.org. • The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society: Organization provides financial, educational, and other assistance to activeduty and retired Navy, Marine Corps personnel and their families. Call or stop by the NASP office, 91 Radford Blvd., to fill out a volunteer form or complete one online at https://www. cnic.navy.mil/Pensacola/AboutCNIC/Other Activities/MilitaryServiceOrganizations/

Worship schedule NMCRS/VolunteerWorkOpprotunities/index. htm. For more information, call 45-2300. • Adopt-A-Highway: Clean & Green is a state program that involves adopting a 2-mile section of a state highway and remove litter at least four times each year. The sponsor agrees to dedicate two years to the program. Several local locations are available. For information, call Jill Cleaver at 438-1178. • Young Marines of Pensacola: A youth education and service program for boys and girls, ages 8 through high school. Adult staff members not required to be Marines. For information, visit: www.youngmarines.com. You can also contact retired Gunnery Sgt. Pete Belanger at ymopxo@gmail.com.

• American Red Cross of Northwest Florida: Volunteers are needed for disaster relief efforts. There are currently no disasters but help is always needed for other projects. For information, call 432-7601. • Youth Works: The Children’s Home Society of Florida is seeking volunteers to mentor young people. To learn more, contact Melanie Slotter at 266-2715.

For more information, contact NASP Community Outreach at 452-2532, e-mail NASPensacolaCommunityOutreach @Facebook.com or find information on Facebook at NAS Pensacola Community Outreach.

Fleet and Family Support Center The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC), 151 Ellyson Ave., Bldg. 625, is offering the following life skills classes: • Parenting: Zero to Two Years of Age: A class to help prepare for the arrival of a new baby is offered quarterly. Classes are scheduled for 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 9 and 10 a.m. to noon March 13. To register, call 452-5990, ext. 3122. If you have specific questions, call 452-5900, ext. 3143. Peer to Peer Support Group: Talk through issues that occur when you experience a traumatic (wartime) event.

Discussing problems with peers is proven to be more successful to well-being than discussing it with others. For service members and veterans, this is an opportunity to share experiences. Meetings are from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. If you would like to attend, call 452-5990, ext. 3122. Anger Control: Learn how to express your feelings without attacking the other person. The next two-session class is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 8 and Jan. 15. Other classes are scheduled

for 10 a.m. to noon March 13 and March 20 and 10 a.m. to noon May 7 and May 14. For details, call 452-5990. Stress Management: Participants will learn specific tips and coping mechanisms to managing stress. Classes are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon on the first and third Thursday of each month. For details, call 452-5990. Dealing with Difficult People: Tips on how to deal with difficult people. Class is scheduled for 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Jan. 25. For details, call 452-5990.

Note: The Naval Aviation Memorial Chapel and the Lady of Loreto Chapel are closed for renovations. During renovations, Sunday services will be held at the auditorium at Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC), Bldg. 633. NAS Pensacola Protestant • Communion service, 8 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Protestant Sunday School, 9 a.m. Sunday, J.B. McKamey Center. • Worship service, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, NASC auditorium. • Contemporary service, 6 p.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. • Women's Bible study, 9 a.m. Tuesday, J.B. McKamey Center. • Fellowship dinner, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. • Bible study, 6 p.m. Wednesday, J.B. McKamey Center. Roman Catholic • Sacrament of Penance, 3:45 p.m. Saturday, All Faiths Chapel. • Mass, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, All Faiths Chapel. • Mass, 8:30 a.m. Sunday, NASC auditorium.

• Mass, noon Monday, Thursday, and Friday, All Faiths Chapel. Latter Day Saints • Service, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, All Faiths Chapel. NASP Corry Station Protestant • Adult Bible study, 9 a.m. Sunday, chapel conference room. • Chapel choir, 9 a.m. Sunday, sanctuary. • Worship service, 10 a.m. Sunday. • Fellowship, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. • Praise and worship, 7:30 p.m. Sunday. • Bible study and dinner, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, fellowship hall. Roman Catholic • Mass, noon Sunday. • Mass, 11 a.m. Tuesday, small chapel. Whiting Field Chapel Roman Catholic • Mass, 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday. Protestant • Bible study, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. • Weekly chapel service, 11:30 a.m. Thursday. For more information, call 452-2341.


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GOSPORT

To place an ad go online at www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext.24.

Military Marketplace ★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

Merchandise Articles for sale For Sale. 7.5 ft. pool table, accessories, $550. Couch, loveseat, $300. (541) 6611815

Real Estate Homes for rent Perdido Key townhouse. 3/2 ½, pool, covered parking, outside storage, stainless steel appliances. $1,250/month. (601) 498-3014. 3/2 fireplace, utility room, recreation room, inground pool. 2car carport, separate garage. $925/month. $700 deposit. No pets. 944-7197.

Bulletin Board

Merchandise

Announcements Depression glass, varied collection, 100 New Donors 4 ruby red glasses, Needed Save a 4 lt. green salts, 3 life. Make a yellow swirl Difference New saucers and more. donors can donate Priced to sell. life saving plasma 456-3609 and receive $100 compensation in 2003 US Cargo two donations. Enclosed trailer. Talecris 17'x7' with 3810 Barrancas Ave backdrop ramp 850-456-0975 and side door. www.Grifolsplas Extras. 255-5591 ma.com Walk-ins welcome Sealy full size Current picture bed w/frame. Like ID, Social new. $100. 261Security Number 8794 required Merchandise "Ashley" Ashton bedroom set, Queen size. Articles for Sale I n c l u d e s Moving! Must d r e s s e r / m i r r o r, sell. Coffee/end n i g h t s t a n d , table, computer bedposts and table, antique end headboard. A real table depression must see. $400. glass, couch, Text or call 345lamps and 8021. miscellaneous. 456-3609

Merchandise

Merchandise

Merchandise

US Cargo enclosed trailer. 17'x7' with Vnose. Drop down rear ramp, side entrance. $3,500. 255-5591

Bose noisecancellation h e a d s e t w/helicopter plug/case, $550 Gentex helicopter helmet w/bag, $500. Sporty's leather jacket large, $100. Nomex fireresistant suit, 48L, gently worn, $50. Helicopter exhaust cover, $50. 417-0042

Toy poodle. Small, black, neutered, $110. Select comfort Sleep Number bed, $200. Far infra-red massage capsule, $1,200. Capri by Getzen trumpet, $125. 456-1368

Treadmill Welso Cadence 255 DR. D i s p l a y cal/speed/time/dis tance. Purchased new. Asking $100. 456-6687

HP ink cartridges #02 series. 1 black, 4 Lincoln ark pink, 1 yellow, 2 welder. 220 amp, light blue. $20 for used twice. $240. all. 944-7177 206-6464. Ashley brand bedroom set Ashton Castle that I have to let go of. Modest wear and tear. Dresser/large mirror, headboard, towers. Leave message if no answer. 346-8021

Merchandise

Solid oak entertainment c e n t e r , accommodates 32”x27” TV. Oakframed glass door over shelves. Bottom storage & storage drawer. No particle board. E x c e l l e n t Cobra 2-way condition. $150. radio. 25-mile radius. New, asking 497-9780 $45. 944-7177 26” fan/light $25. Mens size 9 regular 21”Philis tv $50. steel toe work boot. 12 karat/14 karat rings New, black, asking Shriner’s $200/$300. Two $40. 944-7177 level computer Mens size small center $50. Florida Gators Bentwood rocker coat/jacket. New, mahogany $50. asking $50. 944- Mayan calendar 7177 $100. 455-0237

Want to rent one third row seat for ’08 Suburban. Cargo Two weeks: US enclosed trailer. January 8-22. 17'x7' with V-nose. (509) 680-6813. Drop down rear ramp, side entrance. $3,500. 255-5591

Ring, ladies 10k yellow gold. Size 6. Jade ring. $175. 944-8886 or 4184614.

Merchandise

Merchandise

Viking 30” gas r a n g e VGIC3054BSS, four burners, convection oven, 400 CFM hood, 30” shelf, full backsplash, all stainless steel, e x c e l l e n t condition, $2,500. 497-9780

Dresser, white wicker with matching mirror, excellent condition. $175. 944-8886 or 418-4614

K o l c r a f t Travelin’ pot, folding playpen with bassinet and bottom pad. Z i p p e r e d storage/carrying bag. 30x40x30. Like new condition and clean. $50. 4979780

Burgundy sofa $300. Sofa, table, wrought iron with top $85. Black rocker. $35. 2066436

End tables, two matching, solid wood with storage. E x c e l l e n t condition. $250. 944-8886 or 418Metal clad 4614 insulated front entry door, white Sphynx kittens, w/frame, frosted Russian bloodline. glass design. CFA registered, up36x80 no rust. to-date shots, Great condition. neutered. $1,200. $50. 497-9780 776-0419

Portable home generator, 3000/3500 watts. New in box. $240. 549-3549

Advertise with us! Call Simone Sands at 433-1166 ext. 21

Too much stuff? Here’s the best and cheapest way to clear out the garage. List your stuff in a Gosport Classified. Rates are $9 for the first ten words and fifty cents for each additional word. Over 25,000 people see the Gosport every week. Go online to www.gosportpensacola.com or call 433-1166 ext. 24 to place your ad today.


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Ads placed by the Military are FREE To place a FREE Military Marketplace classified ad

go online at www.gosportpensacola.com

Military Marketplace ★ Motor ★ Merchandise ★ Employment ★ Real Estate ★ and more

Merchandise Scuba spear fishing. Spear gun and separate bane stick, 12 gauge. $100 for both. 497-1167 Pecans, medium size, in shell, $2 per pound. Call 476-3592 I t a l i a n Greyhound pups. All shots, excellent c h a m p i o n background, male $350, females $450. 981-0228 Deluxe riding lawnmower. Floating deck and 0 turn. 3-year transferrable warranty. Used three times. E x c e l l e n t condition. $850. 981-0228 Melody in Motion Santas by Waco. Porcelain, all move, play music. All are retired and boxed. $100 each and will discount for multiple. 9810228

Motor

Motor

Real Estate

Real Estate

white Dodge pickup, quadcab, longbed, w/toolboxes. $3,000 firm. 2012 Coral Creek Dr. 255-3811

House for rent near I-10/Pine Forest Road. 3 b e d / 1 bath/fenced/garag e $700/month. 706-566-4577

2,288 SF, 4/2 house for rent in Milton. $1,550/month. 5010121 for more info.

Misc. Motor

2/1 cottage home for rent in Mertyl Grove. Big yard, shed, $525 per month. Call Jeanie, 341-4352, or email taximom3@cox.n et

Motor

Autos for sale 1987 Corvette - 1998 2002 red V8 Ford T-bird. Two tops, power steering, power brakes, power windows, leather interior. AM/FM/CD. Individual temperature control and cruise. $18,500. 380-5062 2004 Mitsubishi Eclipse 112K no accidents, runs good $5,000 obo. 384-1900

All original, can be seen at Pensacola, NEX shopping mall auto lot, $5,895 obo. 941-0340

2006 Toyota Avalon Limited. Silver w/grey leather. One owner, never damaged, always serviced by Toyota dealer. All options & new Michelin tires. Great car. $16,500 obo. 916-4879

2003 Chevy Malibu. 52,100 Trucks/Vans/ SUVs miles. Excellent 1997 condition, runs Clean great, cold AC. Honda Odyssey. $5,500. 626-5900 New battery, alternator. $2,900 2010 Ford Taurus obo. 206-6436 SHO. 4-door sedan Chevy all wheel drive. 2007 Twin turbos, 6- Tahoe LS, garage cylinder, 365 kept, 69,900 horsepower. Good miles, excellent mileage, loaded. condition, leather, 35,000 miles. One $17,900. 626owner. NADA 5900 w h o l e s a l e $25,000. 433-4440

2008 16 feet Funfinder X Camper. Like new, sleeps five, non-smoker, lots of extras. Asking $9,500. 206-9211

Real Estate Homes for rent Osceola Estates 2/1, golfing, shopping, NAS & Corry Field. Wa s h e r / d r y e r , k i t c h e n appliances, fans, alarm available. Garage, carport. Non-smoking, no pets. Nice trees/yard. $650/month. 817268-5498, 5163556

311 Chaseville St. 2/1 house $650/month, $650 deposit. Fenced yard, central h&a. Screened porch, storage building. Credit report copy required. Pet deposit. Year lease, recent referrals. 4927852 4/2 house in Pace behind Walmart. Rent is $850/month, $450 deposit. 6-month lease. 207-9291

Misc.

4/2 in Gulf Breeze. Great location and school district. New paint, new 4/2 1/2 home in windows/move in gated golf ready! 619-1644 community in remodeled Pace, FL. Many 2/2 upgrades. Master mobile home near on ground floor. Big Lagoon State $1,600/month plus Park and Johnson $800 deposit. Small Beach, front and pet okay. 313-9213, back covered 313-1484 decks, W/D connection, 5445 2/1 ½ bath, living, McGrits Blvd. dining room, $ 6 0 0 / m o n t h , kitchen, extra deposit. 941-0340 room. Refrigerator, rent/sale: oven, stove. For $600/month. $400 large 3/2 home deposit. $250 non- and 8 acres with refundable pet fee, barn in Pace. 1.5 small dog/kitten. miles north from 5 7 2 - 0 7 0 6 . Hwy 90. Warrington near $ 1 , 5 0 0 / m o n t h . NAS Military discount. 516-2100 Efficiency apartment with 2/1 condo on the kitchenette, full bay. Close to bath, utilities and e v e r y t h i n g . internet included. Hardwood floors, $550 furnished, pool, laundry $500 unfurnished. room, elevator. 291-6471 for $700/month. $500 appointment to see. deposit. 516-1096

Misc.

Misc.

3/2 brick w/garage. Convenient to bases. 6508 Dallas Ave. Fenced yard, good school d i s t r i c t s , $800/month, $650 deposit. 968-6076 or 375-2991

$18,700, sold, remodeled, house trailer double-wise. Offer information. 206-6436

3/2 brick w/garage and carport. Complete renovation. Convenient to Homes for sale bases. 6508 Dallas Ave. Fenced yard, school Waterfront, 1/2 good districts, $83,500. acre with bungalow 968-6076 or 3752/l, one mile of 2991. navy. ch/a, tiled screened in porch, 2/2 condo. galley kitchen, Fireplace, garage, security lights, new paint, new fence yard, carpet. $110,000. a p p l i a n c e s Behind Cordova included. $99,900. Mall. 206-6436 456-3609. Home for sale by owner. 9518 Like-new house Lorikeet Ln for sale, MLS Heron’s Forest. 3/2 433851, 2,325 sqft, custom home. all brick, 3/2, $255,000. Call for double garage, VA appointment: 696FHA Conv 2113 USDA~personal Lots for sale view. 221-5955 25 acres Lakeview, surveyed, Vag/VR. S t r e a m s , hardwoods. Must see, $125,000 obo, 438-4416.

2.3 acres, 310 foot road frontage on Willard-Norris Rd Pace, FL Approx 5 miles north of 5-Points, $38k. 313-1484


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GOSPORT

Gosport - January 04, 2013  

Weekly newsletter for Naval Air Station Pensacola