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14th Annual Downtown Issue

New Businesses

Shops, Bars &Restaurants

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A Vision for the Waterfront Enlivened Spaces

The Impact of Public Art

Downtown Development

Construction Booming

YOUNG GUNS Downtown Pensacola’s Emerging Entrepreneurs


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Owner Malcolm Ballinger Publisher Malcolm Ballinger malcolm@ballingerpublishing.com Executive Editor Kelly Oden kelly@ballingerpublishing.com Art Director Guy Stevens guy@ballingerpublishing.com Graphic Designer/Ad Coordinator Bara’ah Jaraiseh baraah@ballingerpublishing.com Editor Will Isern will@ballingerpublishing.com Assistant Editor Kaitlyn Peacock kaitlyn@ballingerpublishing.com Editorial Intern Gina Castro Contributing Writers David Fries, IHMC Scientist DeeDee Davis, Realtor Sales & Marketing Paula Rode, Account Executive ext. 28 paula@ballingerpublishing.com Geneva Strange, Account Executive ext. 21 geneva@ballingerpublishing.com

A Decade of Development What a year it has been for downtown Pensacola. For all the development the city has seen in the last decade, the past twelve months have been among the most transformative of any time in the city’s history. The Southtowne apartments are not only finished but fully occupied. A dozen new businesses line Palafox Street. New homes are being erected in every direction. The energy with which the city continues to evolve is remarkable. Growth, it seems, begets growth. It’s all the more encouraging that it is not just one or a handful of developers but a whole host of entrepreneurs, builders, business people – and yes, even politicians – whose combined efforts have transformed Pensacola into what it is today. It’s in this issue that we look back at all that has transpired in last year, as well as many projects that are forthcoming. The sheer number of residential developments going up in and around downtown today would have been unbelievable ten years ago. Quint Studer’s many commercial projects are setting the example for what communityminded development looks like. The new shops, breweries and restaurants that are popping up every week are quickly making the city a more interesting place to live. Perhaps most importantly, people want to be a part of Pensacola. Be they lifelong residents, transplants or visitors, folks know that something special is happening here. Change doesn’t come without its challenges, however. How a city as historic as Pensacola preserves its history in the face of rapid redevelopment is a question that we have not yet answered. Nor do we have answers for those who may soon find themselves priced out of areas where they have lived for years. These are issues we will have to address. Of all the questions posed by downtown’s ongoing transformation, the question of how long the momentum can be sustained is perhaps the most compelling. Quite simply, how much development and redevelopment will the market support? It’s well beyond my expertise to answer that question, but by all available evidence it seems clear that the momentum is picking up, not slowing down. I believe that’s true and I believe the city has a long way to go before it has reached its potential. For all the change we have seen in the past year, I look forward to what the next holds.

314 N. Spring St. | Pensacola, FL 32501 850.433.1166 | fax: 850.435.9174 ballingerpublishing.com

Will Isern, Editor

NW Florida’s Business Climate Magazine and Pensacola Magazine is locally owned and operated. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction or use of the contents herein is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Comments and opinions expressed in this magazine represent the personal views of the individuals to whom they are attributed and/or the person identified as the author of the article, and they are not necessarily those of the publisher. This magazine accepts no responsibility for these opinions. The publisher reserves the right to edit all manuscripts. All advertising information is the responsibility of the individual advertiser. Appearance in this magazine does not necessarily reflect endorsement of any products or services by Ballinger Publishing. © 2018

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 9


Contents AN INTELLIGENT PENSACOLA WATERFRONT AND THE BLUE ECONOMY 12

A vision for Pensacola’s evolving waterfront from IHMC scientist David Fries.

12

WHAT IS A WOONERF?

16

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT A survey of the dozens of projects large and

19

YOUNG GUNS

33

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

40

DOWNTOWN CONTINUES TO EVOLVE

45

OVERLAY DISTRICT

49

ENLIVENED SPACES What does Pensacola’s public art say

53

THE POWER OF SPORTS

57

Pensacola’s first “living street” has come to life on Intendencia Street in downtown Pensacola.

small that are transforming downtown Pensacola.

Meet the next generation of young business owners taking downtown Pensacola by storm.

19

Dozens of new businesses have opened their doors in downtown Pensacola in past year.

Realtor DeeDee Davis examines Pensacola’s rapidly evolving commercial real estate market.

33

The debate continues: do the overlay districts protect historical value or infringe on property owner rights?

about the city?

45 10 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

40

A look at the economic impact of sports in Pensacola.

53

COVER: (LEFT TO RIGHT) JUSTINE GUDMUNDSON-MCCAIN, CHRISTIN MATHIS, JEFF BERE, AND KAT ARMENTEROS PHOTOGRAPHED BY BARA’AH JARAISEH


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AN INTELLIGENT PENSACOLA WATERFRONT AND THE BLUE ECONOMY BY DAVID FRIES, RESEARCH SCIENTIST, INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN AND MACHINE COGNITION

12 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

Pensacola is a unique city containing natural maritime assets that few places in Florida or the Gulf of Mexico can match: a deep water port, waterfront access in a downtown center, the shortest distance to deep water in the state, crystalline white beaches and a long cultural history with deep maritime roots along with robust automation technology experience. This fusion of advantages allows the Pensacola area and waterfront to further grow and expand a “blue economy” around the

ocean as a resource and the ocean as business. Area waterfronts have seen a rise in visitors, entrepreneurs and organizations focused on growing the port city’s business climate. Water acts as a common thread and shared resource linking the coastal area to distant business locations and opportunities. Each of us benefits from the ocean, with nearly every product created and purchased today being touched by the ocean and maritime business in some way.


A PEOPLE-CENTERED APPROACH IS THE CONNECTING THREAD THAT ALLOWS AUTOMATION TO SERVE NATURE, BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS, SIMULTANEOUSLY.

to climate dynamics. Sustainable ocean resource extraction and management offers another business innovation opportunity within the push toward process and business automation in global shipping and oil & gas markets.

The Pensacola waterfront and diverse business activities (shipping, sports, restaurants, seafood, marinas, retail, startups) can benefit from the application of information and automation technologies for productivity enhancement, competitiveness and revenue generation. Since coastal areas can be highly reactive to natural events, the application of ocean automation technologies can further help the business community anticipate, prepare, interact, respond and recover from such variable events. Pensacola is evolving as a testbed for automation technology insertion to enable a “smart coast,” and has a unique mix of organizations that can drive actionable strategies to deliver resiliency and economic competitiveness to the community. For example, coastal water measurements must be automated for optimal understanding of Gulf of Mexico restoration efforts’ effectiveness and adaptive response mechanisms are needed for ecosystems management and resiliency

Pensacola is poised to be a leader as a smart waterfront city through its dynamic network of partners including the science and technology community, citizens, the port, government and local businesses. Smart cities will utilize information and automation to transform how we measure, respond, produce, manage and travel across the waterways. Increased digitization and automation of the oceans may be realized through not only research methods and practices at IHMC and UWF, but also unique positioning and relationships with city, state and federal agencies, NGOs (NOAA, DEP, Escambia County, FWC, Nature Conservancy, etc.) and the private sector. Integration of local government, citizens and maritime business in a progressive, collaborative approach can create a business

friendly climate leading to innovations and start-ups in automation, technology and data analytics. Sectors benefiting from having these ocean automation businesses and start-ups include: • Fisheries • Naval and Naval Air • Environmental Science • Oil & Gas Processing • Tourism • Waterway Transportation Networks Pensacola has the best mixture in the southeast to capitalize on the growth area of “intelligent infrastructure,” particularly as it applies to a sustainable waterfront. Ocean technology will need to support people, provide maximum benefit to the community and sustain workforce development, and enable company creations in the burgeoning areas of information technology, robotics, artificial intelligence and agile technology business development. All the while maintaining and facilitating growth in established job markets and bolstering efforts in environmental

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 13


AN INTELLIGENT PENSACOLA WATERFRONT research and policy. Pensacola has the critical mass of technologists, scientists, educators and entrepreneurs who can focus their expertise on the engineering/R&D, education and business development practices needed to enhance the waterfront and waterways. A people-centered approach is the connecting thread that allows automation to serve nature, business and community members, simultaneously. By incorporating businesses and educators, the entire development chain is created, from students to entrepreneurs to policy makers. This creates an environment where each group has insight into the other. Entrepreneurs, academics, students, citizens and policy makers, all threaded together by automation technology begin thinking how profitable ideas can lead to actionable impacts in the community and business climate. This in turn will facilitate a blue-economy business sector not only armed with valid research but also access to advanced analytics, community partners and platforms for information acquisition and distribution. Intelligent waterways can act as a crucible for entrepreneurial activity and business creation with the larger strategic goal to build a blue ecosystem of small, agile ocean related companies in the Pensacola area. Spawning multiple maritime technology-based companies will broaden the business mix in the Pensacola area and create a more diverse and robust business climate and workforce composition. Sustainable enterprises can arise in many different ocean/coastal market segments: • Natural Resource Management • Fisheries (Recreational and Commercial) Enhancement • Automated Aquaculture • Energy Processing Automation

14 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

• Ocean Health Management • Transportation on the Water • Multimodal Transportation Networks • Eco-Tourism Innovation • Ocean and Environmental Education Services • Ocean and Automation Skills Training Enhancement • Education Automation • Tourism Experience Development Through Technology • Interactive Smart Coastal Cities • Ocean Technology Development • Ocean Robotics and Automation • Automated Response Fleets and Networks • Intelligent Subsea Infrastructure • Advanced Manufacturing of Maritime Systems • Ocean Security Systems vSmart Infrastructure Technology • Transferring Ocean Innovations into Other Domains • Molecular Medicine and Medical Devices This blue business ecosystem can transform the Northwest Florida coastal area and its ocean resources into smarter waterways and enable the Pensacola community to effectively integrate with the coast and enable a more adaptive and resilient coastal population and business climate. Further, business driven ocean technology can allow community participation and help with the diffusion of a “smart ocean culture” in Pensacola. Data attained by businesses and government agencies, can be portrayed and be accessible to social media platforms for maximal outreach and impact and help spread the word and results of Pensacola as a rich waterfront business climate and a lead in waterfront business thinking.


WHAT IS A WOONERF?

BY WILL ISERN

Pensacola’s first living street has come to life in front of the downtown YMCA on Intendencia Street. The “woonerf,” as it’s called, is a Dutch term for a street designed for pedestrian traffic first. As opposed to the average American street with raised sidewalks on either side of a sunken driving platform, a woonerf is level from side to side, the driving area narrower and the whole street designed to be aesthetically pleasing. Many woonerf have separate lanes for automobile, bicycle and pedestrian traffic.

16 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

Having recently completed and filled the Southtowne apartment complex, Studer Properties wanted to rebuild Intendencia Street, which had been torn up by the heavy machinery used to build Southtowne. Proponents of the walkable cities concept, Studer Properties saw an opportunity in Intendecnia Street to demonstrate what a living street – a woonerf – could look like in Pensacola, said company president Andrew Rothfeder.


as among the best complete street initiatives of the year. Other communities where complete street initiatives have taken hold include Baltimore, Maryland, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Alexandria, Virginia and Bonita Springs, Florida. The Intendencia Street woonerf was designed by Jerry Pate Design and will be maintained by Studer Properties. The woonerf is level from side to side and features a brick roundabout in the middle of the street and landscaping on either side. The goal will be to slow vehicle traffic to a crawl as pedestrians traverse back and forth between the Southtowne garage, YMCA and Urban Core Office Building. Rothfeder said he hopes the street can serve as a model for future development in Pensacola. “Hopefully we will see them pop up in other areas of downtown,” he said.

“We’re seeing this push nationwide toward walkable cities,” Rothfeder said. “This concept is nothing new. Basically, what it’s doing is taking our streets and turning them into pedestrian plazas first and automobile traffic second. It’s just part of creating a walkable city where pedestrians take precedence.”

6,000 woonerf areas have been built to this day. In America, the idea of “complete streets” has begun to take hold in the last decade. According to Smart Growth America, roughly 1,350 communities across the nation have implemented complete street policies. That number is up from just 35 since 2005.

The idea of the woonerf dates back to the 1960s and first got its start in the Netherlands, where more than

In 2017, the Florida Department of Transportation’s latest roadway design manual was recognized Photo taken on Oct. 11, 2018. Constructruction to be completed by the end of October. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 17


STAGES OF

DEVELOPMENT

A SURVEY OF DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN AND AROUND DOWNTOWN PENSACOLA

BY WILL ISERN | PHOTOS BY BARA’AH JARAISEH & GUY STEVENS

In just twelve short months, so much has changed in downtown Pensacola. For all the development the city has seen in the last decade, the year been among the most transformative of any time. Take almost any turn off Palafox and you’re likely to see lots being prepared for new construction, or a project already underway. New homes and businesses are springing up every week. The downtown core is simply booming. From people like Quint Studer and Bobby Switzer leading the charge with their mega-projects like Southtowne and One Palafox Place, to entrepreneurs like D.C. Reeves at Perfect Plain Brewing Co. or Evan and Harry Levin at the Vinyl Music Hall, players big and small are contributing to the city’s growth. When you actually stop to tally all of the projects that were completed in the last year, as well as those under construction or about to break to ground, the scale of development taking place in and around Pensacola downtown core is astonishing. We’ve done just that in the following pages and are once again amazed at the energy with which the city is being transformed.

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 19


RECENTLY COMPLETED

SOUTHTOWNE

Easily the largest and most ambitious private construction project in downtown Pensacola in decades, the Southtowne apartment complex welcomed its first residents in December 2017. While the retail space on the ground floor remains under construction, leases for all 258 apartments were signed within nine months of Southtowne’s opening, demonstrating a strong demand for affordable rental properties downtown. Southtowne units range from studios starting at $750 to three-bedrooms for $2,700. All residents get access to the on-site amenities including the pool, game room, cyber cafe, fitness room and rooftop lounge and terrace. The $54 million project took roughly two years to complete and was the vision of philanthropist, developer and Blue Wahoos owner Quint Studer. The Studer Properties team did extensive research that found downtown Pensacola was lacking in affordable rental properties compared to its entertainment offerings.


RECENTLY COMPLETED

STUDER OFFICES

Another Studer Properties venture was completed across the street from the Southtowne apartments in January 2018. This four-story, $14 million office building is the new home of the Clark Partington law firm on the top floor and will soon house the Great Southern Restaurant Group’s new Angelena’s restaurant and Stay Spa on the ground floor. Wells Fargo will occupy the building’s second floor beginning in early 2019. Bay Design Architecture designed the building and the general contractor was Morette Co. The building was originally planned for three stories, but was expanded to four during construction due to high demand. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 21


RECENTLY COMPLETED

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

The first new hotel in downtown Pensacola in more than three decades opened its doors in December 2017. The 106-room, 65,000 squarefoot Holiday Inn Express now welcomes guests at the corner of Main and Jefferson Streets at the site of a former warehouse. The hotel’s stark brick exterior was designed to blend in with the downtown historic district. The hotel offers only a few amenities as a way to encourage guests to explore downtown. The $8 million project broke ground in 2015 and was led by Heeteesh Patel of Knoxville-based Siddiqi Investments. Patel’s development company purchased the property in 2014 for $1.5 million.

22 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com


RECENTLY COMPLETED

SERVISFIRST BANK

ServisFirst Bank opened its new Pensacola headquarters on Garden Street in July 2018. The five-story, 9,575 squarefoot building is home to the 21-member ServisFirst team on the first floor and offers class A office space on floors two through five. ServisFirst has seen doubledigit asset growth since opening in Pensacola in 2011, and now holds more than $385 million in assets. The bank simply outgrew its previous building, said regional CEO Rex McKinney. “With the growth we have experienced in the market, we needed more space to better serve our customers with easy access and parking,� McKinney said.

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 23


RECENTLY COMPLETED

701 S. PALAFOX

This $11 million condominium building overlooking the water was fully leased before construction was finished. Buyers jumped at the opportunity to live both downtown and on the water. The building’s developer, Ray Russenberger, occupies the penthouse, which takes up the entire fifth floor. The building overlooks Palafox Street and the Port of Pensacola to the east and the Russenberger-owned Baylen Slips Marina to the west. Residents of the upper floors can glimpse the Community Maritime Park and Blue Wahoos Stadium. The units feature high-end appliances and finishes and range in size between 1,670 square feet and 4,130 square feet. Units have sold for between $700,000 and $2 million.


Located within the Belmont-DeVilliers neighborhood, the 31 townhomes that will comprise the The Junction at West Hill are nearly complete. The project began as an offshoot of the Belmont-DeVilliers neighborhood plan. When the neighborhood plan involving the initial residential development fell through, A Door Properties successfully asked City Council to rezone the property, allowing for more units than were initially planned for.

IN PROGRESS

JUNCTION AT WEST HILL

The 1,300 square foot homes include two- and three-bedroom units with several different layouts — some with large decks and others with lofts — and are priced between $221,000 and $287,000. More than half the units have already sold.

CONVINGTON PLACE

The first of 25 units in this gated North Hill community are under construction. Called Covington Place, the development will occupy the site of a long-vacant motel on the corner of West Cervantes and North Baylen Streets. Local attorney Charles Liberis is developing the $12 million project. Each unit will be roughly 1,500 to 2,200 square feet , and will cost between $397,000 to $500,000. The units will also offer inward-facing garages, and a communal green space courtyard for residents. The target market for these townhouses is professionals who work downtown and adults looking to downsize. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 25


IN PROGRESS

The former Suntrust building on Garden Street was acquired by Studer Properties in April 2017 and is undergoing renovations to become the new headquarters of the Studer Community Institute. The renovations, estimated at $4 million, have included extensive work to the building’s exterior as well interior functionality elevators, lighting and mechanical and electrical systems. The renovations are set to be completed by the end of the year and reopening is tentatively planned for Spring 2019.

STUDER COMMUNITY INSTITUTE Construction on the first of nine homes at the site of the former YMCA building on Palafox Street is set to begin by year’s end. Local real estate firm Gunther Properties is developing the lots, priced between $149,000 and $169,000. Lot buyers will pay for construction of one of several model homes priced according to the buyer’s choice of home. A 7,000 square-foot building sits along the property’s northern side, which developers expect to lease as a restaurant space. A 2,000 square-foot office space in place of a former racquetball court is also a possibility for the property. 26 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

GALVEZTOWN


Townhomes have been going up at this five-acre site that was formerly home to Hallmark Elementary School.

IN PROGRESS

HALLMARK SUBDIVISION The school was closed in 2011 and nationwide homebuilder D.R. Horton later acquired the land. Horton will build 76 townhomes in total, all two-story with streetfacing garages. The townhomes will line the perimeter of the property, leaving an interior courtyard in the center. Prices start at $275,900.

The 2.2-acre parcel sits downtown, just north of Bayfront Parkway and across the street from the Aragon Court neighborhood.

HAWKSHAW

COMING SOON

After remaining vacant for almost 30 years, the Hawkshaw property is set for a transformation.

Bob Montgomery, a local developer, purchased the property from the city in November for $1.6 million. Montgomery has proposed a $35 million plan that includes a multi-story, mixed-used commercial and residential development offering 39 condominiums and 6,500 square-feet of office space, which would be anchored by Montgomery’s Wine and Craft Beer. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 27


COMING SOON

GIRARD PLACE

This 23-unit luxury residential development will occupy the property that was once the site of the John Sunday House, a historic home built by 20th century African-American homebuilder, John Sunday.

doors, crown molding and handmade cabinetry.

The homes will also offer ultra high speed internet, hardwood 8-foot-tall front

Prices will begin at roughly $559k and units will range in size from two to three bedrooms.

THE WARFIELD

Other amenities will include a swimming pool, fitness center, two-car garages, outdoor fire pits and entertainment areas.

A new three-story mixeduse building will soon adorn the corner of South Alcaniz Street in the Historic Seville Square District. In addition to restaurants, retail and office space, the building will also offer eight twobedroom condos for sale. The name of the development pays homage to the Warfield Grocery store, which was once located in a building that still remains on the site.

GARDEN DISTRICT COTTAGES

The Garden District Cottages are planned to occupy the long-vacant site of the former Blount Junior High School on West Gregory Street.

The condos range from 1,349 to 1,395 square feet and feature contemporary finishes, parking and outdoor storage. Sale prices will start at $472,000. Condo residents will each have a private balcony with views of the Historic Seville Square streetscape and access to a luxury amenity deck with an outdoor kitchen and pool.

THE LOFTS AT BELMONT DEVILLIERS

The 2.5-acre site is located on Gregory Street and is bound by Chase, C and D Streets. The cottages will offer two- and three-bedroom options. The 1,200 squarefoot homes will start at $199,000. The Blount School closed in 1982 and was demolished in 2012, with the site sitting vacant ever since. Plans for the property are expected to be completed by spring or summer of 2019. 28 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

Studer Properties’ next venture will be another apartment complex – this time in the historic BelmontDevilliers neighborhood. This 24-unit project will offer one- and two-bedroom units adjacent to the Devilliers Square building, which Studer Properties manages.

Like Southtowne, the ground floor of The Lofts at Belmont-Devilliers will be occupied by commercial space. Studer Properties president Andrew Rotherfeder said the company expects to start construction in November.


While not new construction, the renovations to the historic Blount and Brent buildings on Palafox Street were among the largest projects to be completed in the last year.

FRESH LOOKS

ONE PALAFOX PLACE Bobby Switzer purchased the entire block of buildings bounded by Garden, Palafox, Romana and Baylen Streets in 2015. Renovations lasted nearly three years and have completely transformed the buildings inside and out. Most notably, Switzer opened a breezeway through the Brent Building where the former New York Nick’s once stood. Parts of the renovated building have been open for some time, but an official opening ceremony for all of One Palafox Place was held in August.

THE CIGAR FACTORY It was always a matter of time before someone reimagined the Palafox Street space formerly home to Consumer Credit Counseling Services of West Florida. It was cigar aficionado and businessman David Sharruf who took on the challenge and opened his fourth Cigar Factory Location in late 2017. The ground floor was completely renovated to accommodate a full-service bar, walk-in humidor and clubroom. Renovations are nearly complete on the second floor, which will feature space for private events and balconies overlooking Palafox and South Jefferson streets. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 29


FRESH LOOKS

PERFECT PLAIN

Quickly approaching its first birthday, Perfect Plain Brewing Co. opened on Garden Street in the former Vowell’s Printing building in late 2017. The renovations to transform the former print ship into a brewery and taproom meant stripping the building to its bare bones and installing

huge brewing tanks and a wraparound bar.

Perfect Plain has proven popular since its opening and the owners have announced plans for further renovations to add a private event space and “garden bar” in the rear of the building.

VINYL Earlier this year, Vinyl Music Hall underwent its first renovation since opening in 2010. Owners Harry and Evan Levin executed a quick two-month turnaround of a complete interior renovation that increased the music hall’s capacity from 525 to 860. The main addition was a wraparound mezzanine stretching from the rear of the venue around and behind the stage. The building’s entrance and box office were also completely redone. With the capacity for larger crowds, Vinyl will be able to pursue acts for whom the previous capacity would have made performing there economically unfeasible. 30 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com


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YOUNG GUNS DOWNTOWN PENSACOLA’S EMERGING ENTREPRENEURS

By Kaitlyn Peacock | Photos by Bara’ah Jaraiseh If you’ve spent any amount of time in downtown Pensacola, you’ll notice the colorful cultural icons, the ever-changing construction and the myriad of unique businesses that make up Palafox Street and beyond. Many businesses have been around for years, but there is also a steady stream of new businesses opening almost every week. Some of these businesses are ventures from long-time business owners in Pensacola, but some are from a different crowd. From delicious desserts to the perfect bridesmaid dress and many things in between, there are some new faces dominating the storefronts of Pensacola. With the average age of business owners around 50 in America, Business Climate set out to find the young guns striking out on their own business ventures in downtown. Some are new additions to Pensacola, but some have been around for a couple years. Either way, they are making a new mark on the downtown business scene. Business Climate got a chance to sit down with a few of Pensacola’s young business owners. They talk about their business philosophies, the advantages and disadvantages of being a young person in business, why they chose to open a business in Pensacola and much more.

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REVOLT FITNESS

KATARMENTEROS A little beyond Palafox Street, there are new and exciting business ventures to be had. Revolt Fitness, a CrossFit gym that opened in February 2018, is owned by husband and wide duo Katrina and Omar Armenteros. First started out of their home in 2012, Revolt quickly created a community around their CrossFit sessions. “My husband and I always stayed active either playing beach volleyball or road biking for miles,” Katrina said. “It wasn’t until he came home from a work trip and started talking about CrossFit that I became interested in trying it out myself. Our interest drove us to buy the necessary equipment so we could complete workouts at our house. Soon after, friends, neighbors and family participated in our “classes” which quickly transformed our home into “Revolt” which they treated as their gym.” Once their community grew

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too big for their home, the pair decided they needed to move into a larger space. Despite the change in scenery, however, Armenteros said the atmosphere of the classes is still the same and now they are able to reach out to more people. “Revolt has been an extension of my home – a place for others who are seeking self-improvement,” she said. “Physical fitness and healthy eating habits are some of the tools at our disposal to help them accomplish this. The payoff is in improving their quality of life now and well into their elder years. My husband and I noticed limitations running our classes from our home that created barriers for our community to grow. We simply wanted to provide a larger area centrally located in Pensacola, enclosed with air conditioning, bathrooms, shower and more hours

of operation so we can be accessible to more people in our community.” Another important piece of Revolt was the aspect of family and community. Armenteros said that many of Revolt’s members are older or are related, meaning families can help each other have a better, healthier lifestyle. It also means that more people are talking about, and realizing the benefits of, CrossFit. “First rule of CrossFit is you talk about CrossFit,” Armenteros said. “Our goal is to be the topic at the dinner table. At Revolt Fitness our goal is to improve the health and lifestyle one household at a time. We think it’s important for parents to work out next to their children, grandparents going to the same box as their grandchild. We can help anyone at any age build a strong foundation to have a fitter and longer life.” As for being a young

business owner, Armenteros doesn’t think much about it. She said she is just blessed to have the opportunity she has now, rather than having to wait 20 years to get where she is today. The business community around Pensacola in particular is of a younger generation as well, according to Armenteros. “The majority of business owners I have met in this area are under the age of 50,” she said. “I have seen young adults realize their strengths and passions who are determined to provided services that will elevate the lifestyle of the community and overall betterment of Pensacola. “ Along with growing Revolt’s community, Armenteros wants to promote healthier lifestyles throughout the Pensacolaarea through education and becoming the talk of the town in terms of a different kind of fitness.


RIDE SOCIETY

CLAIRE CAMPBELL One of the newest businesses to open their doors in downtown is the Ride Society, located at 1 Palafox Place. The owner is Pensacola native Claire Campbell, a former producer turned fitness lifestyle enthusiast and coach. From her cycling bike, she strives to create a new type of workout that acts as a cleanse from the daily grind and technological overload of today’s world. “I always made the joke

that working out became the new going out,” Campbell said. “Instead of going for drinks, my friends and I would go out to take a spin class or something, then go have brunch. So it became a really important part of my lifestyle.” After spending a few years in New York City, she was compelled to move back to Pensacola after multiple visits to her family in town. She saw the momentum of downtown and felt a drive to bring

home and investing in the community. I think that’s really been the biggest thing. There is an excitement of what’s happening downtown.” The rapid expansion of business, especially in downtown Pensacola, Campbell attributes to the changing environment of work. She said that work is different from what it used to be and that it’s easier for people who may not have as many resources or as much experience to jump into a new venture, making it easier for younger people to try their hand at owning a business. “How we work in today’s world is changing so much,” Campbell said. “The concept of work is changing, the concept of work in an office is changing so drastically and so fast. The idea of running a business from your home, from your living room, is not so far off. Ten years ago, it was not so accessible.” Despite knowing this, Campbell was surprised, and invigorated by the number of other young business owners throughout Pensacola. She was so grateful to have their support and the community to lean on when first building her storefront. She loves to see the continued expansion of new businesses all over downtown. “On Palafox Street alone there are a lot of young entrepreneurs, so that is super inspiring and I feel like I’m something new to the city. She not in it alone,” she said. “It’s founded Ride Society in August comforting to know that my 2018 and has been amazed enthusiasm and passion for by the continued excitement Pensacola is shared among in downtown and grateful for like-minded people and being so well received by the people in my age group.” community. Campbell has said she “There is incredible energy aspires to grow her business that is always vibrating either through creating a downtown,” Campbell second location or moving to said. “Everyone that I’ve a larger location that is bigger encountered has been very and better. In the meantime, positive and supportive. she continues to bring a People are really excited to new fitness experience to see young people coming Pensacola. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 35


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BARE HAND COLLECTIVE

Although the glitz and glam of restaurants, bars and retail spaces may get a lot of the spotlight on Palafox Street, there are many other businesses operating underneath the glitter. This includes a woodshop called Losobe Woodworks, owned by Jeffrey Bere. Along with Losobe, Bere is part of Barehand Collective, which is an artist collective and nonprofit. Bere runs both businesses out of the same workspace, and although they have slightly different objectives, both contribute to the same overall goal. “The desire to start this business was one out of necessity at first; that’s grown into an idea bigger than its origin in both ways,” Bere said. “With a desire to help make Pensacola better by being an organic art community that includes instead of excludes. That mantra is also for the woodshop, as they work intertwined… My goals for both businesses are to see new people feel a chance to be creative with helping design a piece of furniture or coming to the Collective or event and being a part of something.” Although the owner of two successful ventures, including one that sees many young people creating, working and building on their own, Bere doesn’t think his age is a significant factor in the running of a business. “The average age of owners is no consequence to me or the people I work with or for,” Bere said. “Competition is not something we ever bother with. If you’re worried about your competition, you are focused on the wrong thing. Good ideas and helping hands can come from 21 or 51 year-olds. The only downfall

JEFF BERE to being young in the South is you are just welcomed into the club of owners who don’t look outside their circles. So we made our own circles and want to continue to grow them with other small business owners and like-minded people.” In this like-minded community, Bere has found

Photo by Lloyd Anderson a place to call home in downtown Pensacola. As the city continues to grow and new people open new businesses, the community has an energy that stores like Losobe, which has been open for two years, is influenced and effected by. “My favorite part of owning businesses in Pensacola is

the opportunity to work with and for people,” Bere said. “Everyone brings a unique perspective and there’s always something to be learned. Pensacola is a growing city with great opportunities.” Bere is only one of many other young people who are part of Barehand Collective.


BLUE JAY’S BAKERY

Who doesn’t love a good cake? Or cookie? Or really anything sweet? Justine Gudmundson-McCain is the owner, founder, sometimes baker and always expert at the BlueJay Bakery located in the Blount Building on Palafox Street. Although her storefront just opened about a year ago, she started BlueJay’s out of her home in 2016, where she primarily built her brand at the Palafox Farmer’s Market. Since finishing culinary school, she knew she wanted to open a bakery, and Pensacola is where she found a good place to start. “I always kind of knew I wanted to do something on my own,” GudmundsonMcCain said. “I’ve worked for a lot of small businesses, so I’ve been able to see my bosses and the way they run things, what I liked and what I didn’t like. And at the end of the day, I knew that I wanted to be the boss. It definitely has its perks, at the same time we work your butt off.” Gudmundson-McCain doesn’t see her age as a disadvantage. She cited finding capital to open her business as

being the most difficult part, but she was able to offset this by just working her hardest. She was able to open the business with no help from her family or outside investors, meaning the bakery is wholly her own. She even got to design the bakery space. It was all possible because of simple hard work and countless hours put into the business. “Logistically, I’ve got no children so I have a lot more time on my hands to devote to this, which has turned out to be a good thing,” GudmundsonMcCain said. “I’ll put in 16 hours a day on average and not even think twice about it. And I can’t even imagine doing that while having a family. I can still run on four hours of sleep. Just drink down some coffee and call it a day!” Along with being able to put in the hours needed at her bakery, Gudmundon-McCain also said she enjoys surprising people who walk into the bakery. Often times, they are not expecting to meet a baker and owner who is under 30 years of age. “I’m never thought of to be the

person in charge, right off the bat,” she said. “Whether it’s because I’m a girl or because I’m so young, I have lots of business acquaintances or clients who come in who want to speak to the owner. They are always kind of kind aback when I tell them ‘You are. It is me.’ But that does provide its own little source of happiness.” Gudmundson-McCain is eager to see more young people jump into business ventures. She believes anyone at any age is more than capable of creating their own business and thinks young people establishing new brands will relate more to those in her generation. “I think it is time for young people to start taking risks,” she said. “You’d be surprised just how much you can pull off if you put the hours in. Granted, it’s hard for the first couple years and you don’t sleep at all. There were multiple nights where I was in bed at 1 am and up at 5 am. You just suck it up. But it pays off in the end. If you’ve got that hustle in you, you’ll pull it off.”

JUSTINE GUDMUNDSON -MCCAIN

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BELLA BRIDESMAIDS

CHRISTIN MATHIS Palafox Street sports a wide variety of independent stores that are owned and operated by locals, but there are a few franchised locations sprinkled throughout as well. One such location is the newly opened Bella Bridesmaids, a franchise with 52 locations throughout the U.S. The owner, Christin Mathis, opened the store in Pensacola after successfully operating another Bella 38 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

Bridesmaids in Mobile, Ala. Mathis said she saw a missed market in Pensacola, and her remedy was to bring what she knew so well from Mobile to downtown Pensacola. “When I was getting married and I went to go get bridesmaids dresses, I couldn’t find anything here,” Mathis said. “I went to Mobile, I went to Fairhope, and I couldn’t find anything.

So I ended up ordering dresses online. One of them came different than the other three. That was like the number one thing: it was annoying. Then, I go to a lot of functions around Pensacola, like galas, where everybody needs a long dress and nobody can find them. I got tired of going to the same thing over and over again, hearing people talk

about it, walking into an event then seeing the same dress on six different people… It’s been a missed market for a long time here.” Although technically a franchised location, Mathis said the storefront is operated and run by her and her business partner. The intimate space provides the atmosphere of an independent store and Mathis’ typically by-appointment schedule means clients get one-on-one treatment while visiting the store. Mathis said she is trying to create a space where people can come and feel confident that not only will they be looked after, but that they will certainly find everything they are looking for as well. “I just want Pensacola to have something like this that they feel confident that they can come in here and get what they want,” she said. “I don’t ever want anyone to ever walk out the door and think that they need to go somewhere else.” Mathis said that although retail is hard, she loves the idea of being to help people, especially after the experience she had with her own wedding. She enjoys providing a unique experience for the brides and bridesmaids who come in with doubts about seeing their visions come to life, plus she gets to enjoy all the fashion in the store. “I really love fashion in general and I kind of feel like I get to play dress-up all day,” she said. “That part is nice. And I love when brides come in here and they have this idea and they think it sounds crazy and they can’t bring it together and you make it happen. It really is neat to see. I love that part.” While most people get into business to make money or to create their own brand, Mathis said she just wants to help people have the smoothest, happiest wedding they can have. She is happy to play her small part in finding beautiful bridesmaids’ dresses.


OPEN FOR BUSINESS BY GINA CASTRO

Downtown Pensacola saw a surge of new businesses this year. Our ever growing city offers opportunities to try something new from brewing companies to juice bars to trendy exercises. Pensacola is steadily becoming a bold city full of unique opportunities. FRIOS GOURMET POPS 9 Palafox Place

Frios Gourmet Pops, a gourmet frozen popsicles business based in Gadsden, Alabama, opened a location in December 2017 in downtown Pensacola. Frios uses local farmers to supply their fresh ingredients, and wants to add to the tourism growth in downtown, said manager John Roberson. “People love our pops because of the simple ingredients used. You can taste the difference, and that’s one way to help you have a memorable time on Palafox,” said Roberson. Frios also offers sweet treats for your furry pals.

GRAFFITI PIZZA 210 S Palafox st.

Graffiti Pizza had its grand opening in August 2018. The business is the latest venture of Scott Zepp and Matt LaFon’s, the founders of World of Beer. Graffitti Pizza specializes in New York style pizza – their dough is made from scratch, and their pizzas, including single slices, are completely customizable. Aside from pizza, Graffiti Pizza offers happy hour specials as well as occasional student discounts. During football season, Graffiti Pizza partners up with Taco Agave, World of Beer and Blend Lounge to offer extensive drink specials. At Graffiti Pizza, they have displays of various works by local artists which can be bought straight off the walls.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF KR PHOTO


Since opening in the summer of 2018, Ride Society has added some spunk to Downtown Pensacola. This indoor cycle studio is designed to be a full mind, body and soul experience. They offer four different types of rides ranging from low intensity to high intensity. Claire Campbell, the owner, describes Ride Society as “pretty much a party on a bike.” Campbell wants Ride Society’s presence in Downtown Pensacola to support the thriving Pensacola fitness community and Downtown Pensacola’s efforts to expand by bringing new and interesting concepts to the community.

R FO S S EN I N E O PU S B

RIDE SOCIETY

3 South Palafox st. @one Palafox Place

PERFECT PLAIN BREWING CO. 50 E Garden St.

Perfect Plain Brewing Company is a brewery and taproom that opened in November of 2017. “I’m passionate for the product, but I’m just as compassionate about being community and locally driven and trying to make a big impact both through beer and charitable giving, not just through our industry but anyway we can make a positive impact,” co-owner D.C. Reeves said. Perfect Plain’s interior is 5,400 square feet and is designed with a modern take on the Industrial Age. The design retains most of its original structure to preserve the building’s history. There is a mural of Rachel Jackson, wife of President Andrew Jackson, who inspired the bar’s name. While staying in Pensacola, Jackson wrote a letter home where she described Pensacola as “a perfect plain.” Perfect Plain will be adding new additions in the back for 2019, which will include the Grainhouse and City Garden. The Grainhouse will be renovated from the 1900s feed and seed warehouse into a barrel room and event rental space. The City Garden will be a “beer garden” to honor the history of Garden Street. The garden will produce the ingredients used in their beers and cocktails.

THE PENTON HOUSE BARBERSHOP AT ARAGON 47 N 9th Avenue Suite C

The Penton House Barbershop at Aragon opened November of 2017. Penton House Barbershop’s downtown location marks their fourth location. They have two locations in Pace and a hair salon for women right beside this downtown location. Penton House is divided into two rooms: the Boardroom and the Shop. The Boardroom is the customer waiting room and is outfitted with flat screen TVs and comfortable seating. The Shop offers hot, lather shaves, coloring, cuts, manicures and massages.

MELOBAY BOUTIQUE 34 N Palafox St.

Melobay Boutique is a coastal casual style boutique that opened in December of 2017. This women’s clothing store offers everyday casual wear that is size inclusive. The owner Kandy McCloud orders Melobay’s clothes from California and New York. McCloud describes her clothes as streetwear that can be dressed up or down to fit any occasion. McCloud said she wants Melobay to supply unique clothes that cannot be found at the larger retail establishments.

INNERLIGHT SURF AND SKATE 114 Palafox Place

Innerlight Surf and Skate has been serving the Gulf Coast for 50 years. Yancy Spencer opened up his first surf shop on the Gulf Coast in 1969. In August 2018, Innerlight Surf and Skate opened its sixth store in downtown Pensacola. Innerlight brings a diverse assortment of products to men’s and women’s clothing in downtown. They sell all the attire you will need for the perfect surf or skate day.

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SOUTH MARKET 232 E Main street

South Market is one of many new downtown Pensacola restaurants. South Market offers an assortment of menu items from Creole Omelet to Vegetarian Reuben to Peppercorn Filet Medallion for brunch, lunch and dinner. They offer plenty of gluten free and vegetarian options as well. Their full bar offers refreshing craft cocktails and drink specials.

THE DISTRICT: SEVILLE STEAK AND SEAFOOD 123 E Government St.

This upscale American steakhouse officially opened in June 2018. The District is the newest business venture by Pensacola’s Mitchell family, owners and operators of Seville Quarter. The District offers fresh market seafood and custom-aged, hand-cut steaks. The District’s extensive wine list is stored in the perfect environment. Their red wines are stored in exactly 62 degrees in their temperature controlled wine armoire to create the perfect glass of wine every time. The District also takes pride in maintaining the historical richness of their 130 year-old building. The current owners transformed The District from the warehouse and storeroom it once was to a modern old world setting. The first-floor is lavishly decorated with exposed brick and dark wood. The upstairs portion of the building has a piano lounge, a private dining room and a balcony overlooking Government Street.

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R FO S S EN I N E O PU S B

DE LUNA WINERY 116 E Gonzalez St.

De Luna Winery is named after Don Tristan De Luna who sailed into the Pensacola Bay in the summer of 1559 marking Pensacola as the first European settlement in the New World. This winery and venue has indoor and outdoor event space. De Luna Winery’s grand opening on April 21, 2018, showcased their 25,000 square foot Court of De Luna, which features cafe lights, plenty of seating and a huge stage in the middle. De Luna Winery’s indoor event space offers a vintage man cave, a private bridal space and a tasting room. De Luna specializes in fruit wines and has several flavors such as strawberry kiwi, pomegranate and blueberry.

PHOTO BY BETHANY LAUREN

CIGAR FACTORY PENSACOLA

CASKS AND FLIGHTS

Cigar Factory Pensacola is a social club and smoking venue. David Sharruf, founder and owner of Cigar Factory, opened his first cigar bar on the Las Vegas Strip in 1987. Now, he has two locations in New Orleans and one location in Destin and he just opened his fourth location in Downtown Pensacola. Cigar Factory has been in the cigar business for 30 years. Over the last 30 years, they have created 25 different styles, shapes and blends of cigars. Their downtown location’s first floor interior area is 2,200 to 2,300 square feet. Their back courtyard features cozy seating and a fire pit. Cigar Factory also has two balconies overlooking Palafox and Jefferson Streets.

Casks and Flights is a wine bar, tasting room and lounge that opened on Palafox Street in July 2018. They specialize in brewing mead, a honey-based wine. Co-owners John Wilson and John McCorvey partnered to create the 1,770 square foot space. The interior design is meant to reflect the old fashioned nature of creating handmade mead. Casks and Flights offers eight pour-it-yourself wine-serving systems with 72 different bottles of wines to select from and a frozen wine machine. They plan to partner with local brewers to serve craft beer from 12 taps.

14 S Palafox St.

121 S Palafox St.

BIG TOP BREWING PENSACOLA 21 West Romana St.

Sarasota-based Big Top Brewery made its presence known in Downtown Pensacola during the summer of 2018. In Sarasota, Big Top Brewing’s atmosphere soaked up the town’s historical association with The Ringling Circus. In their new Downtown Pensacola location, they will acknowledge Pensacola’s historically rich atmosphere as well. Big Top Brewery is known for its creative beer flavors such as Honey Jalapeño and Mango Wit, but that is not all they offer. Their restaurant offers lunch and dinner. Their menu includes many foods that pair well with beer such as pizza, wings and deli sandwiches.

LIVE!

532 Garden Street Live! had its official grand opening in the spring of 2018. The building previously housed the Garden Street Car Wash. Today, Live! is a restaurant and event space serving juices, smoothies and vegetarian food paired with art, yoga and music. “Between our health conscious menu and flexible event space, we are committed to supporting the community through art, food, music, and education,” owner Ric Kindle said.

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DOWNTOWN

CONTINUES

TO EVOLVE BY DEEDEE DAVIS | OWNER/CEO NAI PENSACOLA PHOTO BY BARA’AH JARAISEH

While commercial space, office in particular, is moving city wide in Pensacola, there is no doubt that Downtown is the engine that is driving the train. During recent months existing offices have quickly been absorbed. The new office space coming on line is driving tenants into existing, moderately priced buildings due to much higher rates. Construction costs are astronomical right now, clearly reflected by the rates being charged. Tenants are faced with the choice of moving into Class A beautiful new space, often as high as twice the rate for existing space, or spending a bit to improve their current space and keep lower rates.

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DOWNTOWN

CONTINUES

TO EVOLVE

All of Pensacola will benefit as the growth spreads beyond just downtown and the commerce district of Cordova.

New construction has also contributed heavily to increased vacancy rates. There is little doubt that these new buildings will lease, but it is going to take a lot longer to find the right tenants who can and will pay for them. Businesses from other large cities are used to the higher costs, but locals are not. This situation makes it all the more important to focus on issues such as workforce development and creation of higher paying jobs in order to attract new business. Fortunately for us, we have a University and College that respond to specific workforce requirements. We have to be in a position to react quickly if an employer is seriously considering a move into this region. While new construction means much higher asking rates, landlords are offering some concessions to attract tenants. Those willing to make a move into one of the new buildings are able to negotiate build out and even obtain some free rent if they sign longer leases. Meanwhile, rates on existing space seem to be inching up due primarily to scarcity. One year ago base rates were stable at $11 to $12.50 per square-foot. Today the same space is listed at $12 to $15 per square foot. Not a bad deal when you consider $27 to $30 for new space. Watch for exciting plans for Pensacola’s waterfront now that a creative model of a public/private partnership was recently launched. 46 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

The Mayor’s office along with Studer Properties have teamed up to create a master plan for the Community Maritime Park parcels, Bruce Beach and the former ECUA property. Working together, we will see much needed progress on empty parcels, all planned with oversight by City Council. The joint effort will address not only having the right businesses in place, but also a parking situation that makes sense. Additionally, we are finally seeing more buildings available for sale. Owners are gambling on the fact that strong property values wont stay that way. Pensacola has never really had an abundance of strong investment properties, but more opportunities have appeared in 2018. Find a good building with solid leases in place in a city going through a renaissance such as ours, as you are making a wise real estate investment. Of course, a knowledgeable real estate broker can make solid recommendations and is highly advisable in your search. In a market this size, it is not unusual to see good properties move as quickly as they come available so it makes sense to have a pro looking out for your interests. Investment also means far more than just your personal portfolio. We applaud those who, despite high construction costs, are banking on continued economic growth for Pensacola. The Spearman Center on Main Street, the ServisFirst

building on Garden Street and Quint Studer’s mixed use building on Jefferson Street are clear examples of individuals putting their resources into creating opportunities for new business and for business expansion in Downtown. All of Pensacola will benefit as the growth spreads beyond just Downtown and the commerce district of Cordova. The CiviCon speaker series has been another valuable tool in managing/planning the responsible growth and development of our city. Buildings go up but consider the issues that need to be addressed simultaneously. Parking, walkability, amenities, environmental compatibility – all critical components. Experts who have dealt with similar conditions and opportunities in other cities provide much guidance to us and shame on us all if we don’t listen. The most recent speaker shared that one of the most important lessons he has learned from studying hundreds of cities is that a vibrant downtown is the pulse for the economic health of a city. Without it, communities falter and decline. Never has it been more important to pay attention to what local candidates have to say and offer. Take advantage of the many forums that are scheduled and ask the important questions. It’s a great time to be a part of Pensacola.


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OVERLAY DISTRICTS: Protecting Pensacola’s history or standing in the way of property owner rights? BY KAITLYN PEACOCK Pensacola is known as the first settlement in the New World, a city that has seen hundreds of years of development, destruction and redevelopment, as well as the architectural styles of several cultures smashed into one location. You can see balconies reminiscent of the Creole-styled buildings in New Orleans, Gothic-inspired churches and hospitals, old English homes and much more within a small

area of Pensacola. Each neighborhood in Pensacola claims something of these styles, with residents proud of their neighborhood’s heritage. After concerns from residents about the conservation of local architecture and overall design of individual neighborhoods, the City of Pensacola has proposed the use of overlay districts to help preserve their historical feel, with mixed reception from the community.

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Overlay districts can more simply be defined as an area overseen by certain zoning rules that pertain not to the use of the land – either commercial, residential or otherwise – but rather the design and look of the actual buildings. For example, you can build something new on this piece of land, however it can only be so large, use up a certain amount of the lot and must respect the architectural flavor of the neighborhood around it. At its simplest explanation, if your neighbors live in a Spanish-inspired home, you cannot build a Victorian mansion next to them or you cannot build an add-on to your home or business that is incongruous with the local architecture. This overlay district aims to give more

50 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

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0.1

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This map was prepared by the GIS section of the City of Pensacola and is provided for information purposes only and is not to be used for development of construction plans or any type of engineering services based on information depicted herein. It is maintained for the function of this office only. It is not intended for conveyance nor is it a survey. The data is not guaranteed accurate or suitable for any use other than that for which it was gathered. L:\GIS\Map_Archives\CRA\DPZ\overlay_district_REVISED092718_withrevisions.mxd

power to the city to protect the historical value and design of neighborhoods while not impeding on new growth. Currently, major overlay districts have been proposed for Eastside, Westside and parts of downtown Pensacola. As of Sept. 28, some of the districts have been reduced or expanded, including a large commercial area of downtown, which is no longer inside the boundaries of the proposed overlay districts. Other areas have been proposed to be removed from overlay districts, including Pensacola’s port and an area east of 9th Avenue and south of Cervantes Street.

East Hill residents in particular were not convinced about the use of the overlay districts. Some were worried about being able to expand their businesses and homes or build to their specific likings. Others were opposed to the regulations overlay districts imposed on the community and worried about the rights of property owners being overridden by the city. “It’s no secret at this point that the majority of people in East Hill don’t want an overlay,” Chris Phillips, a business owner in East Hill, said. “Historic preservation is important, but so are private property owner rights.”


“Design guidelines work well in existing communities by defending and codifying the area’s – the neighborhood’s – existing DNA. That’s what we’re trying to do, is to preserve the traditional character (of these areas).” - M. Helen Gibson Concerns were raised on the East Hill Neighborhood Association Facebook page when residents were unaware if all of East Hill was included in the overlay district and what that meant for the development of their community. Requests from the East Hill Neighborhood Association for an overlay district were discovered, however the strong backlash against has caused the reconsideration of the neighborhood’s inclusion. East Hill is currently under proposal for being removed from the overlay district, however all of Westside and Eastside remain in the overlay plans. Pensacola’s Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), the board who is overseeing the overlay districts, was given a $40,000 grant for community development from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. With the money, CRA hired an urban development company called DPZ to design new zones for the overlay. While the overlay map has changed since its initial drawing, it has been the major guide for most of the city’s plans. During a presentation to the Pensacola City Council and CRA in March, DPZ partner Marina Khoury proposed the changes needed to preserve the character of the Pensacola neighborhoods. Even in March, Khoury was anticipating pushback. “We understand this is a change, and change is hard,” she said during the same meeting. “And it’s a change in mentality that has to be developed, and you’re doing a lot of this anyways in your downtown. We just think it should be extended to the CRA areas for very good reason.” City regulations are nothing new to Pensacola. As Khoury eluded to, downtown Pensacola has many regulations in place

to help protect the historical value of many of its sites. The expansion of these regulations to residential areas has stirred more controversy, but it may not all be bad news. Preserving the different characters of Pensacola’s neighborhoods can provide a better feel for the history of the city, and residents will benefit from more controlled expansion and construction in their neighborhood. This would help to keep property values stable and could increase the overall values of the neighborhood. East Hill Neighborhood Association Board Member Mike Thomas said he thought the overlay would be good for the neighborhood to help keep construction projects within reasonable guidelines. Projects such as personal home improvements like RV garage attachments and commercial ventures like dense multi-unit buildings detract from the neighborhood’s character and value, according to Thomas. With the property value of East Hill continuing to rise and as Pensacola continues to expand, Thomas said the best way to keep the growth healthy and stable is to support the overlay districts. While the new regulations would not necessarily ban projects such as these, they would put in guidelines to help scale the projects to fit the neighborhood’s standards. “Pensacola is growing. East Hill is growing,” he said. “I would like to see East Hill grow and prosper. You’re not going to do that if you’re building an RV garage on a house with a lot big enough to support that.”

“Design guidelines work well in existing communities by defending and codifying the area’s – the neighborhood’s – existing DNA,” Gibson said. “That’s what we’re trying to do, is to preserve the traditional character (of these areas).” The battle for the overlay districts has been ongoing since the beginning of the year, and the city still has public meetings planned heading into November 2018 for community members to voice their opinions. Since the beginning, the city has had these open forums about the districts, and has asked for feedback from the community. Feedback has guided the changes to the districts, including the recent proposal to remove portions of East Hill from the overlay. As the fight continues on, there is one thing to be certain. Pensacola is a city of many people, many opinions and many passionate voices. Locals know the value of their neighborhoods, both in terms of its heritage and the seemingly endless expansion of new businesses and homes. The overlay districts stem from a desire of the people to help preserve a part of the city the community felt was important: its history. Whether or not they are the end solution remains to be seen, but the city continues to seek more input on what the residents want for the preservation of their neighborhoods in the meantime.

CRA Administrator M. Helen Gibson thinks these districts are exactly what residents want, even if there is some confusion and worry over the new regulations.

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 51


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ENLIVENED SPACES PHOTO BY BARA’AH JARAISEH

BY WILL ISERN | AN INTERVIEW WITH AMY BOWMAN-MCELHONE, CURATOR OF THE PENSACOLA MUSEUM OF ART

When you hang a painting on the wall in your living room, you make a decision about what the room will say about you, both to yourself and to those who see it. In the same vein, a city’s public art can reflect the city’s spirit. Downtown Pensacola has long been a home to artists, but only recently has art started to show up on the streets. We talked to Amy Bowman-McElhone, Assistant Vice President of the UWF Historic Trust Museums and the Director and Chief Curator of the UWF Pensacola Museum of Art, about what Pensacola’s public art says about us. Pensacola has seen a number of public art projects in recent years, including the CUBED and Umbrella Sky projects as well the Jefferson Street garage mural. What’s the value of projects like these to the wider community? First, I would like to give credit where credit is due. Evan Levin and Ashton Howard are the masterminds behind the Jefferson Street garage mural and CUBED. They are very

creative people who are passionate about mural painting and street art and they really broke the mold with these two projects. The PMA has joined up with Evan again this year to bring the next iteration, CUBED: Luminous, a digital art festival during Foo Foo Fest. I would say public art generally, and the projects that you mentioned specifically, are extremely valuable and unique in that they use visuality to create a sense of place and create an identity that can be seen by all. Public art intervenes in the landscape and streetscape and makes us pay attention to our built environment. Spaces that would otherwise be overlooked now become activated providing a sense of curiosity, interest, affiliation and association. These aesthetic objects and aesthetic spaces provide platforms that can uniquely promote dialogue and build community within a city or town.

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 53


ENLIVENED SPACES What are some of the different roles of public art in society and how would you describe Pensacola’s public art scene in that context? Public art has existed for thousands of years and has been utilized in many ways throughout time. Some of the most well known historical works of public art typically take the form of monuments and memorials that commemorate or call to remembrance a person, place or event such as Egyptian obelisks or Roman bronze horseback statuary. In contemporary art, public art has a multitude of roles in addition to commemoration including the beautification of urban spaces, or the demarcation of space as is the case with graffiti and gang murals, or as a social tool and community process that promotes causes. This is especially true when artists invite participation from viewers in the production of the work of art. Public art can also serve to tell narratives and communicate stories about communities whether the work is supporting the dominant narratives or presenting counter-histories and narratives that run against dominant histories as a way to amplify the voices of the marginalized. Public art can also be temporary, creative interventions within the landscape that serve to promote unexpected and joyful interactions. Pensacola, with its growing ecosystem of public art, has works that represent many of these different genres of public art including monuments for remembering, graffiti and street art that are about making one’s mark on the built environment, murals that are able to beautify banal streetscapes, and temporary interventions like the Umbrella Project that are able to make people excited and bring joy in its playfulness, its unexpectedness, and the fact that it was temporary. The Umbrella Project was an event that people wanted to participate in. This leads into your next question.

54 | Business Climate | nwflbusinessclimate.com

When the Umbrella Sky project was installed over Intendencia Street, thousands of people came downtown to take pictures of themselves under the umbrellas. How has the social media changed how we interact with public art? The Umbrella Project was an event because people wanted to be part of the experience through the act of taking a selfie and sharing it with their community on social media. We see the same process unfold with the CUBED murals. People spend as much time looking at the murals as they do photographing them. This speaks to the importance of social media and technology and the way in which these platforms extend the reach of the artwork into the digital realm giving it an afterlife of sorts. Critical to this dynamic is the way in which social media invites the viewer to participate in the artwork and take ownership of the work through their experience of visiting it and photographing it. This also points to a larger trend whereby Instagram has transformed the artworld. Before, the commercial galleries were the gatekeepers, but Instagram has allowed for everyone who wants to be taken seriously as artist to set up their own digital shareable gallery online that sidesteps brick and mortar galleries and their owners. Artists are now more able to be their own agent and promote their own work through their social media networks. I think it’s fair to say the Graffiti Bridge is probably Pensacola’s best known public art project. Is it common for projects to grow out of tradition like the Graffiti Bridge has? Absolutely. Graffiti Bridge, aided in part by social media, is very well known in Pensacola, but also serves as a landmark for the city that attracts tourists while foregrounding Pensacola’s rich history of underground subcultures. There are many instances around the world where spontaneous mural and street art is fostered including the murals in Northern Ireland. I would also draw

PHOTO BY BARA’AH JARAISEH


PHOTO BY GUY STEVENS

connections between Graffiti Bridge and Wynwood Walls in Miami in the sense that both are designated sites for street art that attract viewership. But, Graffiti Bridge is unique in that it is self-perpetuating. There is no curator. Anyone can make their mark. Assume a community wants to grow its arts scene, what are steps that local government or non-profit organizations can take to foster that growth? For me, this is a very straightforward answer. If a community wants a vibrant art scene, it needs to support and incubate art organizations, artists, and artist-run projects through financial, community, and conceptual means. Allowing creative people to make creative ideas a visual reality is at the heart of, to use a buzzy art term these days, creative placemaking. To quote the NEA’s definition, “creative placemaking is when public, private, not-for-profit, and community sectors partner to strategically shape the physical and social character of a neighborhood, town, tribe, city, or region around arts and cultural activities.” Developing cultural clusters is proven to promote quality of life in cities, generate revenue, and helps create equitable and sustainable communities. When a city has an active creative community from top to bottom, it is a win-win for everyone. The PMA has hosted a number of interesting exhibits recently. The Andy Warhol Myth/Maker and Hustle exhibits come to mind. What’s been your vision for the museum since taking over as curator? I am very humbled and honored to have been able lead the UWF PMA and the UWF Historic Trust Museums this past year. I see the PMA in particular as a local museum with a global reach as well as a hybrid communityacademic museum. Our team aims to explore innovative ideas and practices in visual culture, provide an inclusive and welcoming community space, produce dynamic, fun and educational programming for visitors of all ages and

backgrounds, and leverage the amazing energy and work of students and faculty at UWF to create a museum that people enjoy visiting. How can a museum like the PMA engage and support the city’s wider arts scene and vice versa? I think the PMA can engage and support the city’s wider art scene in a number of ways. 1.) incubate the creative community in Pensacola by providing opportunities for artists to show their work and interact with audiences through our pop up exhibition spaces, 2.) develop creative community and industry partnerships that provide support for ideas and programs that serve the mission of the museum and cultivates a richer cultural community, 3.) curate ambitious and thought provoking exhibitions and create meaningful educational programming that promotes the love of the arts in our community. Conversely, a supportive community and membership base goes a long in way in helping us provide a space for hyperlocal creative communities to exhibit, to congregate, and get introduced to new and engaging art from across the world that will hopefully spark conversations and dialogue through creative means. If there were one installation, exhibit or artist you would love to bring to bring to Pensacola, who or what would it be? This is a very difficult question. So hard to choose, but if I am thinking big, I would say the artist Theaster Gates. Gates is a social practice installation artist based in Chicago. His works are unexpected and creative and are centered on community participation and development through aesthetic means. He incorporates performance, music, and theater into his work that makes for a dynamic and multivalent experience that aims to promote participation and the building of communities for the greater good. Ultimately, Gates uses art as an effective social tool that demonstrates the arts as necessary, meaningful, and beneficial for our society at large. nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 55


Wolfgang Hucklenbroich Broker Associate | Realtor 911 Gulf Breeze Pkwy. Wolfgang@kw.com C: 850.530.5133 O: 850.916.5800

Check out what sellers and buyers have to say about their experience with Wolfgang!

In just under two months, we had sold our house and purchased a bigger home and I couldn’t have asked for someone better to walk us through this stressful process. If I ever need to do anymore dealings in real estate, Wolfgang is going to be my first choice!”

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Your excellent service, frequent communication, professionalism and dependability made the sale process so very smooth. Your attention to detail as well as your knowledge of the current market helped us a great deal. ” Wolfgang was patient, extremely attentive, went above and beyond, as well as offering sound advice during the entire process.”

It was the smoothest real estate purchase and closing that I could recall. Much of that was due to your outstanding efforts and solid understanding of the business.”

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As a career Military Man, I appreciate hard work and dedication and believe in giving recognition. Thank you Wolfgang “Hucky” Hucklenbroich for everything you did to help me find a home in Pensacola.” - Keith DeVinney, Senior Chief Petty Officer, USN (Retired) Buyer

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nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 57


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his may not come as a surprise, but Pensacola is beautiful. Tourists come to Pensacola all year to soak in all of its beauty. Practically every corner in downtown Pensacola calls for a photo op from the view of the Pensacola Bay to the French Quarter style balconies to the street art. Downtown Pensacola was made for Instagram, but as locals, we sometimes forget just how lucky we are to live in the perfect vacation spot. So, take a break and be a tourist in your own town. Here are our five favorite Instagrammable spots downtown. By: Gina Castro Photos: Dylan Molina Design: Bara’ah Jaraiseh

nwflbusinessclimate.com | Business Climate | 61


At EDS we dream BIG... Come take a tour of our campuses and discover how you can become a part of the #EDSdreamteam 850.434.6474 | www.edscc.org | 223 N Palafox St, Pensacola, FL 32502


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service member NASP Fleet and Family Job Fair is open to all Fair Oct. 12 ... . (off Farrar Rd). The TAP a FFSC TAP Job Classroom, Bldg. 741 NASP_TAMP@NAVY.MIL NAS PensacolJob Fair Oct. 12 at 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the TGPSs. For more information, call 452-7788 or e-mail (TAP) Assistance Program spouses and family member ts, guardsmen, retirees, on active duty, reservis

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September 28, 2018

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on Training Squadr n U.S.A.F. 359th Ru ce an br em m Re hosts POW/MIA VISIT GOSPORT

Vol. 82, No. 39

ONLINE: www.go

action for the largely sified as missing in attending the event, student population s of sacrifices but to ensure the memorie s from years made by service member . the 359th TrainService members of a 24-hour Pris- past are not forgotten held captive 24 d “Prisoners of war are year,” he said. ing Squadron organize Action (POW/ in days a oner of War/Missing Run Sept. 20 to hours a day, 365 wn day well-kno as not a “This is MIA) Remembrance Techniyear, Air that we recognize every this 21 around the Naval start (NATTC) and we wanted to cal Training Center and Naval run today (Sept. 20) to courtyard onboard la continue it for 24 hours Air Station Pensaco vigilance symbolize the (NASP). those POWs Air courage U.S. and 300 More than held Marine must have daily while Force, Navy and s atin captivity.” Corps service member event openGuest speakers at the tended the Vigil Run retired several of included former POW ing ceremony, with s volunDoremus, U.S. Navy Capt. Robertspent nearly those service member circuits of the officer who run or intercept walk to radar a teering in Vietnam and Sept. 20 through courtyard from 3 p.m. shifts in an effort 2,800 days in captivity captivity during Op3 p.m. Sept. 21, taking flag in motion for was released from Feb. 12, 1973, and IA eration Homecoming to keep the POW/M PenMario Rivers, the NAS the 24-hour event. n Instruc- CMDCM chief. Training Squadro Mario Rivsacola command master to eject from Master Chief CMDCM the 359th 359th Matthew Barnes said s, who was forced Sgt. (NASP) Command Doremu Tech. la during tor flag an Pensaco F-4 Phantom II Action (POW/MIA) Naval Air Station to not only create McDonnell-Douglas of War/Missing in Sept. 20 in the Naval the event served 131,000 U.S. his North Vietnam on Aug. 24, 1965, ers carries the Prisoner red POW/MIA Remembrance Run U.S. Air Force, awareness of the nearly clas- over d onboard (NASP). Training Squadron-sponso of the service members who have been (NATTC) courtyar circuits run Center or 2 more walk page Training to war and the Air Technical s volunteered See POW run on in order to keep sified as prisoners of Corps service member members clasSept. 21, taking shifts Navy and Marine 20 through 3 p.m. than 82,000 U.S. service by Greg Mitchell from 3 p.m. Sept. By Ens. Scott Reagh Affairs NAS Pensacola Public

850.380.7946 steve607@cox.net

ing (CART) of Readiness and Train ander’s Assessment systems, providing holes in our response ipates in two-day Comm nder, and fill the for all those while NAS Pensacola partic scenarios, is a Comma quality of base services possible real-world mandat- a higher

event. Photo courtyard in motion for the 24-hour the POW/MIA flag

base.” Command (CNIC)they are onboard the nder, Navy Navy Installations CNIC and Comma During the event, ed certification event. rs assessed the time we need to idenst (CNRSE) evaluato “CART gives us the and Region Southea response capabilities through a cy in our training syllabus

By Ens. Scott Reagh Affairs NAS Pensacola Public

Pensacbase’s emergen tify our needs g suspicious Air Station (NAS) NAS we may have had Naval Pen mined tests, includin cy sacola emergen scenario, to correct any mistakes Burt Fenters, the series of predeter hos security, fire and Demon ola’s stratio front gate, a gate runner Beach t- ts Blue Angels n Squadron, the two day event,” surveillance of the ents during theparticipa ent departm Blue Angels Hom cy manager said. exercise at the Mustin sed managem days ecomin at 8 a.m. Assessment , will close the 2018 season and admiss g Air are a live shooter trainingand NAS atPensacola emergen nder’sion the Comma disabling of an improvi and their ed in parking for all shows deal is critical if weShow Nov merou the realHomec the.finding forannual s concessssion and (CART) g 2 Club and “Trainin oming Training our are and for stands s Show onboa free. Areas will be 3 ... The Navy’s Flight . Pets and coolers standardAir of Readine level rd NAS Pensac inform reserv a high 2 are ation ed of

for the er teams not permitted. Securi on page to maintain on the26show to 27.and ola Nov. 2 and CART See3. ally here exercise Sept. challenged. Food reserv cy respondphysic Gates open both ty person ed seating emergen and physical nel and and memorabilia security and signs daysdirect to find was specta CART, an administrative participants , go to www.naspens will be available at these two will acolaairshow over tors to parking areas .com. to provide nuat NASP. Our goal near the show site. g exercise designed For additional environment involvin an in-depth learning

a awarded NAS Pensacol Recreation 2018 National ciation gold and Park Asso Ind.

the U.S. Navy battle

service members

of Naval Air Stap ... Service members nship held onboard ll championshi end, Softball Champio of service. At series’ NASP hosts softba Men’s Armed Forces

napolis, 2018 from all branches the Corps during the Mitchell nt consists of teams of the U.S. Marine NASP’s receipt of silver. Photos by Greg The three-day tourname and Air Force took a thorough Pensacola (NASP). champions; Navy GOSPORTtion award caps off VISIT ONLINE: www.g team were crowned Corps d’s osportpensacola.c the U.S. Marine review of the comman om panel of y application by a October 5, 2018 The American Academ recreation Oct. 13 in the National on five park and held be Recreati will Ball and recogfor Park 2018’s U.S. Navy Birthday ) professionals, each Sea” is the theme for Ball .... The 243rd la. “Forged By The black U.S. Birthday Navy Administration (AAPRA nized for their experience whites (military) and onboard NAS Pensaco NaNaval Aviation Museum and a 7 p.m. dinner. Attire is dinner dress more go to https://www. in partnership with the recreation d. For Park in parks and gala with 6 p.m. cocktails Air Wing Six Comman national tional Recreation and colaNavyBall. ). Hosted by Training an- on both local and levents.com/events/Pensa tie equivalent (civilians By Ens. Scott Reagh Association (NRPA) go to https://www.acce levels. vyball. For tickets, age of behind but also nounced Naval Air Station one of four beneficiaries over the facebook.com/pensacolana NAS Pensacola Public Affairs was TRICARE to NASP for reinfor (NHP) the as ce the a flu vaccination Pensacola important roletheir to receive Pensacola (NASP) the award, teammembe available at Naval Hospital Medicine should visit service vaccines are Medal finalists for play in defense not enrolled Medical Home Port In Family or Internal to a rs Flu vaccines ... Flu 2018 National Gold Medicine tion with Marine Corps to associa Gold 3:30 p.m. Beneficiaries of the nation.through Friday from 8 ies enrolled ce in edging out Mothe “One 8 a.m. toStar r’s Friday of the 6 months. Beneficiar and from (MCAS) Clinic Monday Award for Excellen Family tionprimar through y reasonavailability ’s vaccine Day, at the ent Monday of the vacNaval Man- Air Station we Immuniza flu have theclinic AircanStation on the s without an appointm receive the to check Park and Recreation Clinics Star event Pensacola’s their Gold Japan; Portscontact to the Pediatrics is call 505-6257. should to (NASP enrolled Clinic more, remem Forces Iwakuni, or For Heath ) Team Fleet noon. ber (Armed to Branch and Family Supa.m. who chose to agement to a Naval Shipyard in Oct. 13 from 8all enrolled port serve at the hospital Center Clinic ) Sept. mouth Naval a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients (FFSC Flu Vaccine ough ) hosted a tarily their nation, who volunRecreation category a Drive-Thr Bells Across Americ put on the uniform ancine. NHP is holding 25 during the NRPA ,” he en Service Memb a for Fall- said. “Those service See Gold on page 2 Indiaers members nual conference in Sept. 27 at the Aviatioceremony are remembered rial Chapel onboar n Memo- and they showed and honored, a love of their d NAS Pen- nation sacola. by being willing to serve. It means a tremen Conducted throughout the concurrently to me for them dous amount United States to under the auspice bered and honore be rememd.” s of the Navy Gold Star Progra Bells Navy, NAS m, Bells annual Across Americantsisconstitute an Department of the Across Americ nor do the advertiseme Navy collabo a recogn rative effort Department of the of theizes military not official expressions between U.S. contained herein are service members who lations around military instalof the Navy. Opinions died while on active with the Department the world and firm in no way connected duty. The the Publishing, a private or services advertised. bell products Navy was of t tolled Published by Ballinger Gold as Star Program, Publishing’s endorsemen Pensacola or Ballinger sacola, Florida the 124 Pen- an entity design ed to serve the -area service familie members’ names were read tive s of all who died on acaloud to honor duty, regardless their commitof service or cause of branch ment and sacrific e. Naval Air Station The program provid of death. Cmdr. Bryan Pensacola (NASP Sept. 27 as part ) honored the NAS Pensacola Crittendon, ing family membe es survivof the nationw sacrifices of service ide program Bells ents the flag as chaplain and event command port, information rs with supmembers and Across Americ bell ringer AN their families and services guest speak- for a. (Above) DC3 Cole Spaid, officials er, as long as they desire. said the sombe Sammy Cohen and participants r occasion pres- served look on. Photo Since 1936, the not only to by Mike O’Con last Sunday in nor family members recognize the of those left See Bells on page By Lt. John Laughr 2 ey Information Warfar now at 35 years. e Training Comma Every session of Corry Station Public nd program the exposure typically draws Affairs to people that have between 40 to 60 staff and different experiences and Every Saturday students and open their eyes starts off with the Information Warfar to a tor having menwhole new world e Training Com- a different elementary school breakfast at the mand (IWTC) of possibi is chosen school. lities Corry each Once the kids arrive, that they might not they will they will off another iteratio Station will kick dents range time. The stuhave play n of the Saturda from grades 3 wise known about,” other- games like kickball, Scholars Progra y to 5, and each put puzzles togethe ITC Bill and m at r Kelley, IWTC Corry math relay races The Navy’s Flight Corry Station Chiefs orientation in the signed their student is as3 ...through StationNov. 2g. and ’s mornin out theboth own mentor. This Mess tomorrow, SaturdayAir The biggest open ScholaShow Oct. 6 at 9 a.m. 3. Gates rs coordinator iteration’s school ing la Nov. 2 andweeken d of the six-wee Pensaco NAS is Montcl k program “The mentor lsair Homecomsaid. at nuonboard Ange Show is a will Corry Station has available s truly trip to bethe Elemen ming Air s Blue care al Naval bilia tary School Nationhost about these the acol annual Homeco a and memora longest running ,2018 their part at Aviatio Food of student ed. al the season n Saturda Escam Museu Pens s challeng addition and ly the bia County m.site. For y Scholars Progra dedicat NAS physical will close three to for show School “This fourthe Blue Angels, m inn,the Distric areas is a near theU.S., hours every Saturdars toe parking great the t. Areas will be reserved opportunity for free. are spectato “Thefor y shows six Demonstration Squadro for direct student all Sailors will weeks to s at these schools break the monoto to ensure that the el and signs on and parking personn ny of being on base receive student has the best experie days at 8 a.m. and admissi are not permitted. Security . nce possible.” ow.com stands. Pets and coolers to www.naspensacolaairsh merous concession See Scholars on reserved seating, go and show the on page 2 information Vol. 82, No. Scott By Ens. 40 Reagh NAS Pensacola Public Affairs

Bells Across Am erica toll at NASP

IWTC Corry Statio n

ola NAS Pensac

Notes ...

Residential Real Estate, Property Management & Association Management Sandra J. Ward realty 224 E. Garden St., Ste. 1, Pensacola, FL 32502

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NASP Notes ...

U.S. Birthday Navy Ball .... The 243rd be held Oct. 13 U.S. Navy Birthda in the y Ball will Pensacola. “Forged National Naval Aviation Museu m onboar By The Sea” is 6 p.m. cocktails the theme for 2018’s d NAS and gala with NAS Pensacola (military) and black a 7 p.m. dinner. Attire is dinner Commanding Officer Capt. Christo tary and commu Wing Six Comm tie equivalent (civilians). Hosted dress whites nity pher Martin (cente and. For more, by Awareness Month. leaders as he signs a proclam go to https://www.fa Training Air r, seated) is joined pensacolanavyball. ation recognizing Photo by Mike For tickets, go to by milicebook O’Connor October as Domes events/PensacolaNa https://www.acceleve .com/ tic Violence vyBall. nts.com/ Flu vaccines ... Flu vaccines are October 12, 2018 available at Naval (NHP) for TRICAR Hospita E beneficiaries over enrolled to Family the age of 6 months l Pensacola sportpensacola.com www.go : Medicine or Internal . Beneficiaries ONLINE By Ens. GOSPO ScottRT receive a flu vaccina Medicine should VISIT Reagh visit their tion resolve and commi NAS Pensacola an appoint 41 from 8 a.m. to 3:30 Vol.without 82, No. ment Monday throughteam to tment to be p.m. Benefic Friday ending domestic done in regard Public Affairs iaries not enrolled Team or enrolled to stopping to a Medical Home violenc to the Port abuse amongst Sailors e and domestic violence Immunization Clinic Pediatrics Clinics can receive the and abuse all flu and their togethe Monday through families. tients enrolled to Friday from 8 a.m. vaccine at the October is Domes r. a Naval tic check on the availabi Branch Heath Clinic should contactto 4 p.m. Pa“It is Domestic Violen Awareness Month Violence lity of the vaccine their ce Aware- derstan extremely critical to unclinic (DVAM to Flu Vaccine Clinic ) ness Month . and d that domestic onboar ap-d Naval Air at the hospital Oct. NHP is holding a Drive-Through recognition ons) for violence Station board call 505-6257. 13 from 8 a.m. to mander (TYCOMPensac and abuse NASP began three Each ola is noon. For more, (NASP) Comm Story, photo years but it often not just physical, plication information. ing appli-Capt. Christo and- ago and was designed Officer is extremely emoown by Ed Barker to honor tional Fire Prevention TYCOM has theirMartin pher important Week is next and mental as well,” n and Training individuals both week (Oct. a proclamation Naval Educatio “LOOK. LISTEN. cation procedure. during signed Lau7 toent on rie Darmo 13). This year’s LEARN. Be aware. and off the base Developm ge thattheour fal, a victim themeknowled third is ProfessionalFire who have done sage from Fire & can happen anywhere.”“The re- annual Com- incredible work Emergency Service (VA) with the Family advocate ) Public Affairs to the munity For bring a mesRespon Center (NETPDC experts s Gulf helping victims Coast, see Gosporfleet it en- se to Domes- of domestic cy Program at NASP Advocat page A2. ticable, Violen is irreplace abuse. The ceremo ce ceremony Fleet and E-9) in- views Oct. ny and to remain 2, addres Navy chiefs (E-7 to future ables the exams signing also highlig - Family Support Center (FFSC sing the ) s Sailors,the Navy’s firm that there ht identifie and terested in shaping is still much work needed to relevant right skills to select to of their ratings are the See DVAM on page Matter Ex- with 2 ment,” said Naval serve as Subject upcoming for advance n and Training Properts (SMEs) for Advance- Educatio Development Center Fiscal Year 2019 ss fessional Readine Master ation nd ment Examin (NETPDC) Comma (SS) Gregory Reviews (AERRs). Mes- Chief, ETNCM Naval Administrative 221/18 Prichard. “AERRs give chiefs Published by Ballinger sage (NAVADMIN) sched- a tangible, direct input toward– Pensacola or Ballinger Publishing, a private firm in no waythe ity AERR Publishing’s endorsem ed connected with the Departme shaping their commun announc ent of products De- nt of the Navy. Opinions a say in what or services advertised contained herein . nts have ule for October through are not official on this participa expressions of Based to know. the Department 2018. need cember of the Navy nor mem- their reliefs do the advertisem a ents constitute participation is also schedule, AERR panel Department of the Navy, NAS SMEs for AERR nt experience and rebers work as Fleet to de- significa potheir respective ratings ment sume builder that has the chief velop E-4 to E-7 advanceNavy tential to benefit every cycles. ut the Navy.” exams for future on active througho vary in length bechiefs (E-7 to E-9) AERRs (FTS) are duty, Full Time Support Duty tween one to two weeks and for their rating exam ut the year, with prepare questions and reservists on Active t Submarine AERR (ADSW) held throughobeing reviewed on Culinary Specialis for Special Work ratings Chiefs from the latest from every rating are needed for AERRs. take part most to E-9) are encouraged to bank. Chiefs (E-7 out See SMEs on page 2 in the process by reaching Type Comto their respective the statement. FurSOU and agrees to the Sailor said. instructions will guide Development Center upgrades include to know about ther website (https://mil“Our recent NCMIS Here are three things to the milConnect ) to to the Post-9/11 GI ments: dmdc.osd.mil/milconnect/ By Ed Barker the latest updates the NCMIS enhance Training acknowledgement 1 GI Bill Pro- connect. benefits. All Transfer of EduNaval Education and Bill, including online 1. Updated Post-9/1 transfer Center Benefits MIN ent n NAVAD Developm Educatio in requests must be Professional of Transferability of cess: As announced cation Benefit (TEB) Improvements to l Command required to sign ents; are Personne (NETPDC) Public Affairs Sailors requirem Navy all by (TEB) ion including 236/18, nding (SOU) to approved der, Navy Reserve Forces e the MyEducation Applicat Statement of Understa Comman a backbon or and software unused Sailors; the transferring can see the status of As part of al notifications to begin the process of Command. Sailors functionality of the individu d Education Vouchinto milConnect. n Benefits to family used to support the website and Upgraded Advance n Voucher (AEV/ GI Bill Educatio a- their TEB by logging Navy College Program ate Educatio Once logged into MyEduc Education Center er/Gradu Ramey, members. Program page 2 Navy College Virtual functionality,” Steve the Navy College See Navy college on College Manage- GEV) the the Na- tion from for Navy reviews the ), manager member (NCVEC the service (NCMIS) is NCMIS program Professional website, ment Information System val Education and Training continually updated.

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NASP Notes ...

Ball will U.S. Navy Birthday Ball .... The 243rd Aviation Museum onU.S. Birthday Navy 13 in the National Naval 2018’s be held tomorrow, Oct. Sea” is the theme for la. “Forged By The Attire is dinner dress board NAS Pensaco and a 7 p.m. dinner. gala with 6 p.m. cocktails tie equivalent (civilians). Hosted by Trainblack and ww.facebook. whites (military) d. For more go to https://w Wing Six Comman ww.accelevents. Air ing https://w to go For tickets, National Naval com/pensacolanavyball. vyBall. greet visitors at the USS Nimitz will soon com/events/PensacolaNa storied aircraft carrier The flight deck of NNAM at Naval Hospital Pensacola Photo courtesy of ies vaccines are available Aviation Museum. Flu vaccines ... Flu age of 6 months. Beneficiar to beneficiaries over the should visit their team (NHP) for TRICARE or Internal Medicine through Friday enrolled to Family Medicine an appointment Monday without n Home Port receive a flu vaccinatio of gray. enrolled to a Medical ed by various shades at the p.m. Beneficiaries not 3:30 to carrier a.m. 8 aircraft cale from receive the flu vaccine nuclear-powered Pediatrics Clinics can As one of the largest-s 4 p.m. NHP is Team or enrolled to the From Malerie Shelton Friday from 8 a.m. to an aircraft of lead ship of her class. through and tations Oct. , Monday deck rep- represen Immunization Clinic the hospital tomorrow Naval Aviation Museum The 200-foot flight Flu Vaccine Clinic at flight deck in the world, holding a Drive-Through more, call 505-6257. d of more carrier Foundation it is like to For lica will be comprise visitors will see what 13 from 8 a.m. to noon. of three-foot-by-threeNASP Fleet and across the flight deck Aviation than 600, tomorrow Oct. 12 ... than 1,000 walk The National Naval ’s most recoge Program a FFSC TAP Job Fair foot tiles and more America Assistanc Pensacol soon of NAS one will Transition ) a in various p, Museum (NNAM (FFSC) will be holding symbols of peacekee with individual pieces Family Support Center 2 p.m. in the TGPS Classroom the real-life nizable on Oct. 12 at 10 a.m. to welcome museum visitors to all service members (TAP) Job Fair today, flight colors that match supercarrier ing machinery. The TAP Job Fair is open and family members. the to add a custom-designed replica Bldg. 741 (off Farrar Rd). spouses (CVN markings on “We are very excited , guardsmen, retirees, catapults, arrestto the deck of the USS Nimitz active duty, reservists NASP_TAMP@NAVY.MIL. uare-foot ship. Nimitz’s this impressive exhibit call 452-7788 or e-mail 68). The 8,800-sq jet blast deflectors, For more information, be fea- ing gear, 2 hundreds of airvinyl-tile flooring will page and on hatches Nimitz See the side of are all representtured along the east to the craft padeyes museum lobby – a tribute

lica at t deck floor rep USS Nimitz fligh al Aviation Museum the National Nav

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