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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

STRONG WORK ETHIC Meet our first student set to commence an apprenticeship with Energex FULL CIRCLE From adventure camps to cocoa delights to commercial kitchens EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

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SYSTEM OF INFLUENCE Aligning our approach and curriculum to meet the needs of industry P

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upfront

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FROM THE CEO + 4

We get to do this AWARD SEASON + 6

Making waves and winning awards

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EDUCATION REFORM + 42

future focus

Leading industry body calls for reform in its post pandemic report

STRATEGIC CHANGES + 9

1 school, 1 system, 1 way

AHEAD OF THE CURVE + 45

SYSTEM OF INFLUENCE + 10

Advocating for equal focus and recognition of vocational pathways

Connecting students with industry

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features

hard work

WORK ETHIC

RISING STAR + 24

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BUSY AT WORK + 46

Taking our partnership to new levels

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Meet Oscar Comley, our rising motorsports star

connect

SNAP HAPPY + 26

SCOUT AND ABOUT + 50

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Featuring creative photographic work from our students

Students lend a hand

FULL CIRCLE

THE FIRST TRADIES ON MARS + 30

STUDENTS BUILDING SCHOOLS

SHINE-Y NEW FUTURE + 53 Page 15

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Fostering innovation and future-forward thinking

WORKING OUTBACK

OUTSIDE THE BOX + 39

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Creating opportunities for hands on learning during a pandemic

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Local businesses join together

endnote AROUND CAMPUS + 54


Despite the many challenges that lie ahead for what is an unprecedented school year, the energy, enthusiasm and intellect of our industry educators continues to fill classrooms. They continue to challenge our young people academically and technically, support them emotionally, and engage them socially with one purpose in mind: to educate tomorrow’s industry leaders.

EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. - Albert Einstein

The character of our young people deepens our resolve for a successful 2020 school year. In the pages that follow, you will read about acts of kindness, community, and intelligence. You will read about how a pandemic did not deter the College from delivering practical learning experiences with ‘out of the box’ thinking. You will read about how topical news turned into an opportunity to develop teamwork and an understanding of maths and science concepts. And you will read about how our young people jumped at the chance to be work-ready, ending up on multi-million dollar construction sites and hundreds of kilometres from home. Life is uncertain but the opportunities presented before us have been inspiring, not suppressing. While we have a long journey ahead, Einstein’s great wisdom is that within mystery lives the greatest of possibility within us.

Nicole de Vr ies E D I TO R P

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Mark Hands AITC C EO

I have the best job in the world. Watching young lives connect their talent to future opportunity always makes me want to cry out, “Yes!” In fact here at the College, we have a soundbite (or code) we as staff say to each other as a reminder of the privilege we hold in being a part of this magic moment - “We get to do this”. We say it often and we say it deliberately. We say it as a way of recognising the metamorphosis that takes place - from a young person finding their way to a confident and valued employee - this is a phenomenon that we should never become familiar with. For example -

B R YC E ( T O OWO O M B A C A M P U S )

loves the agricultural industry and is now mustering cattle with helicopters, building boutique weather stations for western Queensland properties as well as breeding cattle – while completing school. A L I C I A ( 2 0 1 0 A I T C G R A D U AT E C H O C O L AT I E R ) returned from Cologne in

Germany where she perfected the craft of quality chocolate making. She now operates an artisan chocolate company providing high-end products to corporate clients. DA N I E L ( 2 0 1 0 A I TC G R A D U AT E C A R P E N T E R ) arrived to meet me recently

in his new Mercedes. He has progressed through carpentry to site manager and now works with Multiplex as a Quantity Surveyor on multi-million dollar projects on the Gold Coast after completing a university degree in construction management.

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W E G E T T O D O T H I S . We get to nurture

the talents of young people and watch them take their place in the real world. Most young people who join the AITC are like a thirsty seed. Everything for success lies dormant in their lives due to the wrong learning environment. They just need drops of rain to reach them and they flourish. AITC is that rain for many of our students. W E G E T T O D O T H I S . We get to partner

with industry leaders like Energex and Shine Precision to deliver unmatched experiences in the world of work. W E G E T T O D O T H I S . We get to

celebrate a one year campus anniversary or a campus’ first sign-up with 100 young people, industry educators and administrators. W E G E T T O D O T H I S . It says it all - about

why we are so proud of our community, and this magazine, where we get to share the joy around.

T H A N K S T O A L L O U R PA R E N T S , E M P LOY E R S A N D S TA K E H O L D E R S F O R M A K I N G T H E M AG I C H A P P E N .

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awards season

ALAN KIEFER SCHOLARSHIP Alan Kiefer joined Skylight Financial Solutions in 2013 as a financial planner with an excellent work ethic and an infectious attitude. But several years later, Alan was diagnosed with melanoma, and, despite a brief period of recovery, sadly lost his battle with the disease in May of 2018. Alan was always a positive influence to those around him, living by the idea that there was always good to be found, even in the worst of situations.

Skylight Financial Solutions and BUSSQ established a scholarship in Alan’s name to be awarded to one Year 12 AITC young person from each campus who has successfully secured an apprenticeship or traineeship in industry. The successful recipients must have a sound academic record, be on track to receive their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE), and demonstrate their commitment to community service and leadership within the College. After numerous AITC young people submitted applications and participated in a panel interview, the College was proud to announce the winners of the 2020 Alan Kiefer Scholarship. The 2020 recipients are Tom Bisbas (Gold Coast), Cody Garland (Redlands) and Jack McNamara (Sunshine Coast).

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GOLD COAST

TOM BISBAS

Tom is pursuing a career in the plumbing industry, which he hopes will take him all over the world. He plans to work in different countries, and learn from diverse cultures with the ultimate goal of leading a team to create meaningful change in the developing world. Tom volunteers his time as a lifeguard at the Mermaid Beach Surf Life Saving Club on weekends and is also a member of the surf boat rowing crew. Tom strives to lead by example in every instance and embodies all of the AITC values.


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Skylight Financial Solutions was established by BUSSQ, a leading industry super fund for workers in building, construction and civil industries. BUSSQ’s goal is to ensure your finances work as hard as you do to secure your future. BUSSQ built Skylight to provide families in and around the building and construction industries with more affordable financial solutions for all stages of life. BUSSQ is a proud partner of the Australian Industry Trade College.

SUNSHINE COAST

REDLANDS

C O DY G A R L A N D

Cody aims to become a qualified electrician, a trade he is already excelling in, having won first prize at the regional World Skills contest. He spent five years volunteering at the Mt Gravatt Eagles Junior Rugby League Club, helping with the set-up for games, refereeing, fundraising and assisting around the clubhouse in general. Cody places great value on respect, believing it’s integral for one to respect themselves and others at work and school. For Cody, being respectful is also about being authentic and true to yourself and those around you. J AC K M C N A M A R A

Jack is pursuing a career as a mechanic and is a College leader at the AITC Sunshine Coast. Having had a strong interest in fixing cars since he was young, it is the perfect career choice. Jack has a passion for connecting with and supporting young people experiencing anxiety or depression, and has been working with Lives Lived Well this year. Jack embodies all of the AITC values and has a strong connection to the value of mateship. He always strives to include others, believing that everyone should be treated equally and nobody should be left behind.

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E M P LOYA B I L I T Y S K I L L S & VO C AT I O N A L TRAINING INSTITUTION OF THE YEAR 2020

AITC CEO FEATURED In August 2020, AITC CEO Mark Hands was recognised as one of the 50 most influential people in the education sector by The Educator. For 15 years, Mark has held the firm belief that success is not measured by ATAR scores or grades, but instead something far more important – character.

The Australian Industry Trade College was awarded the Employability Skills & Vocational Training Institution of the Year award by Corporate Vision for its innovation and thought-leadership in industry education. A dedicated research team granted the award based on various criteria including: dedication, innovation, business growth, longevity, online reputation, customer feedback and business performance.

His inclusion in the annual prestigious Hot List is recognition, not just of Mark’s outstanding work leading the College for the last 12 years, but of his calming and assured influence over the last six months of global turmoil. The AITC designed, developed and implemented a highly-regarded, successful Learning From Home program for Term 2, transforming its unique education and industry block model to a virtual platform in response to COVID-19. Mark also used this time as an opportunity to educate young people on the importance of having an agile approach to work and life, to meet the changing shape of employment and industry, while completing their senior school education. And it paid off! While apprenticeships nationally have plateaued due to COVID-19 restrictions and an economic downturn, industry has continued to see the value in AITC young people with more than 100 students signed-up to apprenticeships since February. In fact, the College had twice as many sign-ups year on year, at the height of restrictions. Mark continues to support young people to become tomorrow’s industry leaders and is passionate about ensuring vocational pathways are recognised equally alongside more traditional academic pursuits. N

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T O OWO O M B A T U R N S 1 !

On 15 July, the AITC’s Toowoomba campus celebrated its first birthday! The campus first opened its doors for Year 10 and 11 young people in Semester 2 of 2019. Since then, the campus has seen 11 sign-ups, and its foundational Year 10 students are looking towards their final year of high school next year. Toowoomba young people and staff celebrated the milestone by reflecting on the achievements of the past year, and indulging in a cake made especially for the event by Olivia Zavone, who was recently signed-up to a baking apprenticeship.


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

future focus THE AITC LEADERS HIP T EAM HAS I M P L E M E N T E D S T R AT E G I C C H A N G E S TO E N S U R E A L L C O L L E G E YO U N G P E O P L E C A N AC C E S S T H E B E S T P O S S I B L E I N D U S T R Y- F O C U S S E D E D U C AT I O N A N D C A R E E R O U T C O M E S .

1 SCHOOL, 1 SYSTEM, 1 WAY. The Australian Industry Trade College has grown rapidly in recent years, seeing four new campuses open since 2016, with sites at Redlands, the Sunshine Coast, Toowoomba and Ipswich. In response to ongoing growth, as well as a changing educational and industry landscape, the AITC leadership team has implemented strategic changes to ensure all College young people can access the best possible industry-focussed education and career outcomes. The new leadership system sees the College moving together as one school, with one system and one way. With young people spread across Queensland from Toowoomba to the Gold Coast, and all the way to Maroochydore, a consistent and strategic approach is vital to securing strong industry outcomes for all AITC young people. This new system has seen the introduction of Regional Principals and the appointment of several passionate educators, one being Dr Jamie Dorrington, who takes up the position of Regional Principal of the Redlands and Sunshine Coast campuses.

GOLD COAST

REDLANDS

SUNSHINE COAST

TOOWOOMBA

The system is already helping to strengthen industry outcomes for young people and support better collaboration and more innovative thinking and practices across our five campuses. IPSWICH

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SYSTEM OF INFLUENCE

When AITC Head of Education Eliza Lane is asked about the strategy behind the College’s curriculum, she says industry is at the heart of it all. “In our program, industry leads education. We don’t have education with just a flavour of industry,” she says. “Our strategic direction focuses on being a system of influence in education and we want to influence the way forward for industry education.” Eliza, along with Deputy Head of Education Lee Smith, and Education Quality and Compliance Manager Toni Banfield, make up the AITC’s central education leadership team. The trio are behind the College’s industry education strategy, driving the delivery of curriculum on each of the five AITC campuses. “We have a focus on synergy with everything we do,” says Lee. “This includes education, industry, partners, employers – everything.” Lee’s role is to operationalise the College’s education strategy. “It’s my job to ensure there is no separation between education and industry,” says Lee, who leads the Industry and Operations Officers on each campus.

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The third person in the trio, Toni, works directly with campus leadership to implement quality education with industry relevance. “I oversee the design and implementation of quality innovative curriculum and education programs, which support our young people to become future leaders of industry,” says Toni. The centralised education leadership team have a pivotal role in the AITC’s philosophy: 1 school, 1 system, 1 way. “This approach will ensure that what we do and what we deliver is the same on each campus,” says Eliza. “It won’t be cookie cutter, as we know the importance of a local focus in each community, but we will consistently deliver the same quality outcomes.” The trio work across South East Queensland to ensure each campus team is working towards a shared goal. “Working with the teams on each of the campuses is a really important part of our roles, and we are looking forward to a time when it is safe to move around more often,” says Lee. Eliza, Lee, and Toni come from comprehensive education and training backgrounds, with years of experience in leadership positions both at the AITC and beyond, giving them invaluable


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

insight into the goals and operation of the College. All three staff members have held the role of Principal at the Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast or Redlands campus, prior to their current roles. “Because we have all been AITC Principals, we understand what that job entails and what is required of that position,” says Lee. “It’s given us the insight into what we need moving forward, and it means we understand the connection between the young people and the College, which is the AITC’s core business.” Despite an extraordinary 2020, the future of AITC’s unique industry education model is secured under the leadership of Eliza, Lee and Toni.

“To meet the needs of industry, we must think like industry,” says Eliza.

“Employability is the key driver in everything we do. We are here to service the needs of industry and secure outcomes for our young people. We know we need to pivot with industry and ensure that we are preparing young people for what industry wants and needs.” “We are constantly developing an agile system,” says Toni. “We are creating a curriculum that is innovative, creative, and responsive to the needs of industry, with effective teaching and learning. We strive for continuous improvement in the curriculum space.” Big things are on the horizon to ensure the College continues to thrive long into the future. “What we have is good,” says Lee. “But we have only scratched the surface and our aim is to be great!” P

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WORK ETHIC KEY TO FIRST ENERGEX SIGN-UP DA M I E N G E N T N E R WA S T H E V E R Y F I R S T A I T C YO U N G P E R S O N T O C O M M E N C E WO R K E X P E R I E N C E W I T H E N E R G E X , A N D O N F R I DAY 1 5 M AY, H E B E C A M E T H E F I R S T C O L L E G E YO U N G P E R S O N T O B E S I G N E D - U P T O A N A P P R E N T I C E S H I P W I T H T H E O R G A N I S AT I O N !

Despite the challenges created by COVID-19 through the first half of the year, Damien’s outstanding work ethic resulted in his sign-up before Energex’s apprenticeship program had even opened for applications. The Year 12 Redlands young person was placed with Energex for work experience in January after Industry Consultant Glenn English began to forge a relationship between the College and the government-owned energy conglomerate. Glenn says the partnership with Energex started out with ‘one email and a bit of luck’. “As you can expect, work experience at Energex is highly sought after but I decided it would be worth reaching out,” said Glenn. He sent an email through to an address he found on the Energex website, explaining who the AITC is and how the College works. “About 20 minutes later I got a reply,” said Glenn.

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Multiple meetings and discussions between Energex and the College then followed, and a couple of months later, on Tuesday 28 January, the AITC saw young people from the Gold Coast, Redlands, and Sunshine Coast campuses begin work experience placements at local Energex bases. At that time, 39 young people from three campuses had submitted applications to complete work experience with the company. “That was a really exciting time for the College,” says Glenn. “Prior to this, Energex had not taken students for work experience placements. We were very aware that the opportunity presented the potential for Energex to change the way they recruited apprentices each year, as well as enable our young people to gain work experience in a huge company like Energex.” Damien was among the young people who completed work experience with Energex in the first round of placements in January. He received excellent

feedback from the team at Energex Cleveland and, after a brief hiatus due to coronavirus, Glenn received word in mid-May that Damien was officially being offered an apprenticeship with Energex, commencing in January 2021. “The official Energex apprenticeship program wasn’t open for applicants at that time,” said Glenn. “But Damien’s work ethic impressed the team so much he was offered a position before they had even advertised the program.” “Damien’s mum Vera was really excited when she heard, and thankful to the teaching and industry staff who supported him and helped prepare him for the workplace,” said Glenn. “We were really impressed by Damien’s excellent feedback, and we look forward to seeing him start in the position in January.” The AITC extends a big congratulations to Damien for his hard work. We look forward to seeing more young people from across our campuses signed-up into apprenticeships with Energex.


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SUNSHINE COAST

How many senior school students can say they

! n a c s Our

helped build a school? When FKG Group tendered to build three new schools in Palmview and Baringa, they committed to running a training program for local young people. More than 15 aspiring apprentices from the AITC Sunshine Coast campus followed a real-world process in securing their work placements with the industry giant by submitting an expression of interest and having an interview with FKG site managers.

of industry pathways, including carpentry, fabrication, engineering, education support and business.

“FKG was planning to only take 12 young people, but they ended up accepting all of them. It’s a fantastic opportunity for the young people, as they worked on-site for two weeks to immerse themselves in the world of work,” says Tony.

As a result of the comprehensive induction program at the AITC, the young people were work-ready in time to complete the work experience.

“It’s a great work experience and networking opportunity for our young people, because they will be working closely with local sub-contractors, which opens the opportunity for apprenticeships and traineeships down the line.”

“FKG ended up winning the tender, and we had more conversation about how our young people could get involved,” says Industry Consultant Tony Quinn. “The timing lined up well with our Year 10 Rookies Program in that the young people had completed their site safety training and were ready for work experience.”

Each young person spent the first three days on site with a mentor, and were then assigned to the sub-contractor in their preferred industry. “We had young people with a range of career goals working with FKG, as there are plenty of roles available under the umbrella of construction,” says Tony.

As part of their ‘job application’ to FKG, each young person wrote a small summary about themselves and why they were interested in the opportunity, and indicated their preference for site and trade. FKG Business Development Officer Andy Baxter and site managers then conducted short interviews with the students - all of whom are pursuing a range N

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These Rookies have had the unique experience of working on the building site of three schools, while still students themselves. When Palmview Sate School, Palmview Special School and Baringa State Secondary College open in 2021, it will be AITC young people who will say, “I worked on that site!”.


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Full circle In 2009, Alicia Chapman and Ben Scully commenced at the Australian Industry Trade College. The high school sweethearts from the Gold Coast went on to pursue culinary trades, and 11 years later are both thriving in their chosen fields; Alicia owns an artisan chocolate business and Ben is working in a commercial kitchen.

Images @littlecocoa_au

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australian industry trade college Indulge, gift or share Alicia’s business specialises in handcrafted and bespoke artisan chocolates for all occasions Below A gift, crafted with Little Cocoa, sent from the AITC to its community

While Alicia and Ben now live and work on the Gold Coast, travel took them across the globe after graduation. Alicia moved to Melbourne for a few years to gain valuable experience at a high-end hospitality venue and a Melbourne chocolate company. She then made the decision to make a much bigger move – to Germany! “I decided to move predominately for the excitement of living overseas, but also as a challenge for my career,” says Alicia. “I was working in a Greek/Portuguese bakery, which was an exciting mix of cuisines. I also spent some time learning chocolate making at the Chocolate Academy in Cologne.” Around the same time, Ben moved to Cambodia, where his dad was based, for three years. The two parted ways while travelling and living abroad, but reconnected when they both moved back to the Gold Coast.

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“After spending time overseas and in Melbourne, I realised that the Gold Coast was lacking some specialty chocolate businesses,” Alicia explained. So she set up her own artisan chocolate business, Little Cocoa. “Little Cocoa came about after finding a bean-to-bar chocolate shop in Berlin. This is where the chocolatier sources the cocoa beans, usually direct from the cocoa farmers, then roasts, winnows and grinds the beans into their own signature chocolate,” said Alicia. “Because they control the process, it means that they can toy with the flavours in the beans and create something truly unique. I really loved the whole concept of this and it was the inspiration for getting Little Cocoa up and running.”


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Ben and Alicia recently met up with AITC CEO Mark Hands and his Executive Assistant Sandy Stegman. “I love how helpful and connected everyone at the AITC is, even years after graduating,” says Alicia. She and her business are still very much connected to the AITC, even taking on a young person from the Gold Coast campus for work experience in August. “It’s come full circle!” says Alicia, who is usually a one woman show at Little Cocoa. “It’s been great to have another set of hands, and the placement has enabled her to learn quite a bit about chocolate, and get some well-rounded experience working in a small business.” While the pandemic did mean Little Cocoa took a hit, Alicia says business is picking up again. “We are working towards and planning for Christmas now. We do a lot of orders for corporate businesses around Christmas time, as well as directly selling to customers.” “Before the pandemic hit, I had done a lot of leg work to provide businesses with gifts for speakers at their conferences, but of course those events were all cancelled,” says Alicia. “But business is getting back to normal, I have been getting orders ready for Father’s Day, and I am looking toward a busy period at Christmas.” At the end of Term 2, a special thank you gift - a box of chocolate bark made by Little Cocoa - was sent to all current parents, new families, staff, Board members and members of the company to say thank you for their trust and partnership with the AITC. The aim of the initiative was to show gratitude

to our community, who have been supportive of one another and the College during these extraordinary times, and the community response was very positive. “It was important that we thanked our families and staff for their support through a very significant time, which included the move to learning from home. And what better way than to do this with an AITC alum’s business.” “We received such wonderful feedback from our community and it was great to see so many parents share about the experience on social media,” said Head of Brand and Customer Experience, Nicole de Vries.

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Learning + working in

OUTBACK AUSTRALIA

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Opportunities often arise for young people interested in pursuing agriculture to travel to remote areas to complete work experience and start their apprenticeships away from home. Many of these young people will jump at the chance, giving up the comforts associated with living at home with their parents, to make their way to outback Australia to work on the land. To Toowoomba young people, Joe Anderson and Bryce Jacobsen, this is just a typical Industry Block, having spent significant time in outback Australia this year.

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800km

north west of Brisbane CLERMONT

400km

west of Toowoomba ST GEORGE

Bryce

Year 11 student Bryce, was offered an agricultural apprenticeship in St George, more than four hours’ west of Toowoomba. Bryce tried his hand at diesel fitting for a short time, but has always enjoyed working outside and with animals, so a career in agriculture was a better fit. Bryce’s mum reports witnessing a huge change in Bryce’s maturity and independence since he commenced his placement in St George. “Living and working almost 400 kilometres from home has given Bryce the opportunity to learn and grow in a completely new environment that is far removed from what he had previously known,” she said. Bryce regularly checks in with the College while out at St George, sending photos and updates from his daily life on the farm. The team at Toowoomba recently received a photo of Bryce on the property conducting pregnancy testing on cows, assessing the development of the calves. It’s safe to say not many of our young people will undertake this kind of task on work experience – it gives new meaning to ‘hands-on’ learning!

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Joe

Year 10 student Joe, travelled more than 800km north-west to his family’s farm in Clermont in Term 2. “The flexibility of the Learning From Home program gave Joe the opportunity to complete his online learning as well as assist his father around the farm with various tasks,” said Industry Consultant Chris McEwan. “Joe would get up early and get his school tasks completed, then head off to assist around the farm for a few hours, then return in the afternoon to spend a bit more time on school work.” The AITC team was impressed with Joe’s work ethic and willingness to take on farm work in addition to completing his school tasks. Joe consistently displays the hardworking attitude that industry leaders want in an apprentice. “When Joe returned to the campus, he was awarded one of our emerging leader roles,” said Chris. “Joe is a very hard worker with so much leadership potential. He represents our AITC values and consistently has a happy outlook on life. He is a great person to be around.”

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FUTURE-PROOFED

indust ry leader s Keeping students connected with industry during COVID-19: Online learning platform Video interviews with employers Virtual work experience

The AITC has applied learnings from COVID-19 to its programs and curriculum to ensure graduates leave prepared for a future, which may look different to the one they expected. “During COVID-19 restrictions, we had to adapt and change like everybody,” said Deputy Head of Education Lee Smith. “For a little while we had young people studying their education from home, but we didn’t want them to lose that exposure to industry. We created virtual work experience, online interviews with local employers, and an online learning platform.” The College was also committed to ensuring the needs of industry continued to be met throughout the lockdown

period in Queensland, during which time some young people were unable to physically attend work placements. The AITC is continuing to see young people begin in school-based apprenticeships and traineeships, and there are no signs of slowing down. The College selects young people who are hardworking, respectful, and take pride in their work, with a selection process that focusses on these elements, as young people who exhibit strong values and good character embody the qualities employers are looking for. It is more important than ever that young people looking to pursue a career in industry are prepared and work-ready. The College has created a list of 10

Employability Metrics, which are a strong focus of the industry education curriculum. These metrics have been created based on the needs of industry, and include soft skills like teamwork, initiative and self-management. The AITC is driven to producing good outcomes for both young people and industry, which involves ensuring young people are supported to become mature, trustworthy and capable tradespeople. While economic times remain uncertain, the AITC is committed to delivering a quality, future-proofed program that supports young people and industry.

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MOTOR RISING STAR Oscar Comley is a rising star in motorsport, and interested in pursuing a career in diesel fitting or diesel mechanics, so the Australian Industry Trade College Gold Coast campus seemed like the ideal choice for the Year 10 young person.

8 8 8 “The AITC has been really supportive of Oscar,” says mum, Trudy Lynch. “Occasionally he will need a Friday off to travel to the race destination, and sometimes a few days longer if he is going away for a time. The team at the AITC always support him in catching up on any school work he misses.”

competitive nature, Oscar is more interested in beating his previous times than the other drivers. “He competes against himself, he sees the other drivers as obstacles to getting to the finish line, rather than his direct competition. He is always trying to do better than he did last time.”

While Oscar is relatively new to racing cars, with only oneand-a-half years under his belt, he has been involved with motorsport for most of his young life. “Oscar really started his sporting career at six” says Trudy. “He always enjoyed a fast-paced lifestyle as a kid. We took him to a go kart racing track and from that moment he loved it, and just needed to participate.”

Oscar moved from go karts to race cars in 2019, when he started racing in his Hyundai Excel. “He achieved a podium finish of fourth place overall in his first year of racing,” says Trudy. “It was a huge achievement, as he was competing against drivers who had been in the game for much longer.”

Trudy says that Oscar was and still is a natural on the track. “Racing really suits him, because he is good at thinking quickly when things are moving fast. He is also very competitive, so it’s a great sport for him.” Trudy says that when it comes to his N

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Oscar is often the youngest driver in his races, as there are not many young people participating in the sport. Trudy says that since Oscar moved from go karts to race cars, there have been more young people making the same move. “A lot of people stick to go karts and don’t transition to race cars like Oscar did, but in recent years racing has been more affordable


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GOLD COAST

in cars than in go karts. We have been approached by quite a few families who are involved in go karts and were looking to make the move to cars.” “Racing has taught Oscar a lot,” says Trudy. “He has learned the importance of taking responsibility for his actions from racing. He will always own it if something goes wrong, and he knows his decisions will affect his outcome.” Oscar has secured some sponsorships, which help him pay for the many expenses associated with motorsports. “It’s quite an expensive sport,” says Trudy. “All the drivers are responsible for buying and maintaining their cars, and Oscar has been invited to race in events across Queensland, so sponsors help a lot with the travel expenses. We’re very lucky to have some great sponsors.”

Images facebook.com/oscarcomley/

a year now and has only just gotten his licence,” says Trudy. “We have done a couple of hours on the road for his learners, and he is a good driver. He’s said to me that he notices that lots of drivers on the road often aren’t paying attention. His experience racing with mature drivers who are all hyperfocussed during races has taught him to see that, which has carried over to his experience now that he is driving on the road.” Typically, drivers continue to race for many years, even decades, which is what Oscar is looking forward to most. He recently met an 85 year old woman, who took her Mini for a spin around the track! The AITC looks forward to seeing where Oscar’s racing career takes him in the coming years. Who knows, maybe we’ll see him speeding around the track at 85!

Oscar only recently turned 16 and received his learner driver’s licence. “It’s odd to think that he’s been out racing for over P

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RILEY JENSEN Riley took first prize in the first round of Toowoomba’s photo competition for this moody black and white shot. With a local photography business as the subject, this shot is very meta.

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There’s more to the AITC curriculum than education and work experience. Young people have the opportunity to complete a Certificate III in Information, Digital Media and Technology during their time at the College. This term, one project took the Year 11s out and about in the community on the hunt for the best photo. The project gave the young people the opportunity to be thoughtful about composition, and capture their subject from a new perspective.

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C O O P E R S TA F F O R D Cooper’s image is an architect’s dream with leading lines and pleasing symmetry. The warm colours contrast to the bright blue of Toowoomba’s sunny winter sky.

ERICSON MARANGO Ericson takes a look from a different perspective with this disorienting shot. The sharp angles and corners of the building contrast sharply with the curves of the opposing structure.

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ALISHA DI RUGGIERO Alisha’s snap is a nod to the iconic streetscape of Los Angeles, with giant green palm trees and distinct lamp posts lining the street. The large palms cast interesting shadows below.

BLAKE WILLIAMS Blake’s photograph shows what might be the perspective of a small creature navigating the world around it. Every building and structure appears monstrous from down low.

J A XO N M C C A L L U M Jaxon captured a shot that takes us to a simpler time; with the low contrast and de-saturated hues, this photograph has an ethereal feel. The image is a nod to the old film photos you might find in your grandparent’s lounge room.

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F U T U R E - F O R WA R D T H I N K I N G

The first tradies on Mars Increased interest in growing fresh produce prompted by the pandemic, and a desire to foster future-forward thinking, resulted in the idea for a cross-subject curriculum. The First Tradies on Mars unit, established by AITC Team Leader, Rhys Cassidy got its namesake from the founder of FutureWe Jonathan Nalder, who has radish seeds that have orbited the Earth. RESILIENCE

C R E AT I V I T Y

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S YS T E M S T H I N K I N G

S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

PROBLEM S O LV I N G

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“[The unit] is designed to take young people out of their comfort zone to think about a future scenario that requires new skills that are applicable here on Earth, right now; skills like creative problem finding and solving, resilience, systems thinking, sustainability and interdisciplinary thinking,” says Rhys. Young people from the Gold Coast and Redlands campuses have been undertaking a number of futuristic projects in the past months at the College. “Such a project utilises the ‘maker mindset’ that we encourage here at the AITC,” says Regional Operations Officer Nathan Reynolds. “It facilitates the showcasing of constructivism theory into practice.”

The radish seed experiment aimed to inspire young people to investigate the idea of becoming sustainable on Mars, should the need for colony food production be required. The challenge was more than simply keeping the seeds alive, it was also designed to prepare young people for the quick-changing nature of a future in industry.

The first future-focussed project was undertaken by young people at the Redlands campus, who grew radish seeds as part of their Learning From Home program when COVID-19 restrictions first impacted Queensland schools. The students were tasked with tending to their seeds and logging the progress via pictures uploaded to the College’s Learning From Home platform. “The photos we received from the young people were incredibly insightful,” says Rhys. “They collected significant data throughout the experiment.”

Some weeks later, after young people had returned to campus, Gold Coast team leaders organised the inaugural AITC Greenhouse Challenge. The challenge saw young people work in teams to build a model Martian greenhouse structure where their crops would thrive.

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Leading up to the challenge, young people researched methods to grow microgreens in a hydroponic system; a method used to grow plants without soil, instead using only


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

water infused with mineral nutrients. The young people had been conducting additional research into how plants adapt and change in different environments, including in space and space-like conditions. The teenage researchers found that Mars has an extremely inhospitable environment, including very cold temperatures, less sunshine than Earth, and a thin atmosphere that does little to trap any heat or prevent the build-up of radiation and carbon dioxide. Following this discovery, young people spent time looking at methods employed by scientists who have successfully grown plants in low-gravity environments, such as on the International Space Station.

Each team was supplied with newspaper, masking tape, solar panels, mirrors, an oxygen capturer, water storage, and water recycling mechanism to construct a geodesic dome. In addition to the hands-on learning experience that came with constructing the model dome, each team was tasked with explaining how their greenhouse operated and how they would arrange the crops. The unit required critical thinking, collaboration and communication in teams, while applying theory learned in Science, Maths and English. As well as constructing the model dome, each team was tasked with explaining how their greenhouse operated and how they would arrange the crops. The project was created to provide young people the opportunity to learn across subject areas through the hands-on experience of taking an idea, designing, developing and prototyping it. P

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I P S W I C H ’ S F I R S T S C H O O L- B A S E D A P P R E N T I C E

PAINTING THE WAY, ONE MILESTONE AT A TIME The AITC Ipswich campus celebrated its first school-based apprentice, Billy Mole, who commenced his career in painting just in time for National Skills Week in August. With fanfare in tow, including a presentation by CEO Mark Hands, Head of Education Eliza Lane and Regional Principal Tracey Miller, the confident and reliable Year 11 student was signed-up by local Ipswich business Kendall Custom Painting for the campus’ inaugural school-based apprenticeship. “Billy’s work experience feedback was perfect, he scored straight 10s,” says Industry Consultant Jason O’Halloran. “Billy’s employer Shane Kendall said he had never seen a happier young guy who just got in and worked.” “Shane was very impressed with Billy, saying he was never distracted by his phone, and actively engaged Shane and his team in conversation

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over lunch,” says Mr O’Halloran. “When I placed Billy with Shane, I knew their personality would be a match.” Billy has commenced his Certificate III in Painting and Decorating and will work with Shane five to seven weeks out of each term, in alignment with the AITC’s curriculum, and will move into full-time work upon his graduation. “Billy is a great example for all our young people, he is proof that doing the small things well and living by our AITC values will see you snapped up quickly by an employer in your chosen industry,” says Mr O’Halloran. When Billy first entered the College, he was interested in engineering, but after trying some painting and building tasks during the AITC’s induction program, Billy chose house painting for his first work placement. New AITC students have the opportunity to try a selection of trades when they first enter the

College, which helps young people determine the industry they may be interested in pursuing. Many AITC young people, like Billy, will wind up in a different career than they initially planned. Upon enrolment, each AITC young person is assigned an Industry Consultant who will support them in securing work experience and an apprenticeship or traineeship over the course of their senior schooling. Young people are encouraged to be proactive in seeking work experience opportunities for themselves, however their Industry Consultant is never more than a phone call away. The Ipswich campus is excited to see many more young people follow in Billy’s footsteps and achieve apprenticeships and traineeships in the coming months and years.


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CELEBRATING OUR SIGN-UPS GOLD COAST REDLANDS J AC K TAY LO R 31 August 2020 + Plumbing L I N D E N F LO R Y 22 July 2020 + Electrical Engineering

Linden entered the College with a goal to become a locksmith, something his grandfather passed down to him. He was signed-up after only a few weeks of work experience.

AMBRA CANU 15 July 2020 + Childcare

After a few days at Bluebird Early Childhood Centre, the director could see Ambra was a natural in childcare, and offered her an apprenticeship.

Daniel from Yates Plumbing decided back in July that he wanted to offer Jack an apprenticeship, but wanted the moment to be a surprise and have the whole team present. Jack was asked to come to a café, where the Yates Plumbing team and his mum were waiting to surprise him with an offer of an apprenticeship.

M A D I S O N H E AG N E Y 27 August 2020 + Childcare

Madison’s employers saw how caring she was when working with children, and knew she would be a great addition to the team. J AC K G A P E S 6 August 2020 + Electrical

Jack’s employer wasn’t looking to hire an apprentice when Jack completed work experience, but his work ethic, attitude, patience and persistence changed the employer’s mind, and he was offered an apprenticeship.

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TYE WICKHAM 12 August 2020 + Welding

Tye’s work placement feedback was excellent, with the employer saying he ‘could not fault’ Tye. It was no surprise Tye was signed-up shortly afterwards!

F LY N N DA U T H 4 September 2020 + Electrical

Flynn completed a few work experience placements, and was signed-up after his employer saw Flynn’s potential.


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B E N J AC K S O N 17 August 2020 + Engineering - Heavy Machinery

Ben trialled a few different trades before choosing to work with Shine Precision to complete a Certificate III in Engineering. The team at Shine say he is a fantastic addition to the team.

SUNSHINE COAST

C H R I S T I A N H E LY E R 27 August 2020 + Plumbing

While walking his dog one day, he saw an O’Brien Plumbing vehicle, and promptly called them to request a work experience placement. The employer was impressed with Christian’s initiative and attitude on the job, and offered him an apprenticeship a few weeks later.

K A L A N D OW D L E 21 August 2020 + Locksmith

Kalan has completed a number of work placements at two locksmith businesses owned by the same employer, and impressed with his hard work, dedication and attitude.


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BRANDON KERSWILL 13 August 2020 + Welding/Boilermaker

Brandon began at the AITC in January in Year 10, and has already been snapped up by an employer! This speaks volumes about Brandon’s work ethic and employability skills.

J O R DA N C A R R 20 August 2020 + Tiling

Jordan was signed-up into his apprenticeship after only two days of work experience.

O L I V I A Z AVO N E 18 August 2020 + Patisserie

After showing the industry team one of her cakes, Olivia started thinking baking and patisserie might be more than a hobby. Her employer was so impressed, they offered her an apprenticeship straight away.

TOOWOOMBA

M AT T G E L DA R D

DA R B Y B A N K S

RILEY BRODRICK

11 August 2020 +

2 September 2020 + Electrical

19 August 2020 + Carpentry

Carpentry - Cabinet Making

Darby lives the College values and has a strong work ethic, both of which paid off when he was signed-up into an electrical apprenticeship.

Riley’s sign-up came as no surprise, as he has made a strong commitment to his career since beginning at the AITC. We know he will continue this commitment throughout his career.

Matthew was offered an apprenticeship after only three weeks of work experience.

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thinking OUTSIDE

THE BOX When young people were unable to attend campus or work experience out in industry due to COVID-19 restrictions, the College pivoted the curriculum, thinking outside the box to deliver an industryfocussed practical project to keep students motivated and engaged in learning.

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AITC staff weren’t deterred by Queensland’s restrictions in April and May, working quickly to organise engaging industry learning, including a mystery building project for young people to assemble at home. “The project closely aligned with our entrepreneurial vision here at the AITC,” said Industry Consultant Jay Harris. “Our College prides itself on thinking outside of the box to help our young people learn in a different way. As they were unable to go out to work experience, we needed a project for them to complete from home, which got them away from the computer screen and working with their hands.” The AITC teamed up with Align Design and Fitout on the Sunshine Coast, who made quick work of the task, producing 800 project kits within a week. The AITC is very grateful for their timely response and partnership on this project. Young people in Industry Block were asked to pick up their kit of materials, unaware of what they were going to be building and only to find out once they got home. They soon discovered that they were crafting a game board. There were many parts in each kit (and no instructions), so the future industry leaders had their work cut out for them. With more than 400 pathways available at the College, the

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industry team wanted to incorporate a creative element into the project. Following the practical assembly of the game boxes, young people were given the opportunity to flex their creative muscles by designing a logo. “Even though they were completing the project from home, our expectation for good craftsmanship was still high. Knowing what our young people are capable of, we anticipated some great game boards, and we weren’t disappointed,” said Jay. But the mysteries continued. Once completed, they were given another kit of the same materials, but this time were provided an instructional video detailing how to construct the project. Young people presented both boxes for feedback and marking to the campus when it was safe to return to site, then chose one of their boxes to donate to a charity or person in the community. “The young people had the opportunity to select which box they would donate, a decision that would test their character,” said Jay. “It was up to them to decide which project showcased better workmanship, and whether they would give away the one they believed was of higher quality.” Unique projects like this are what makes the AITC stand out from traditional schooling models. The College quickly adapted to overcome the challenges that the pandemic presented, without sacrificing the practical industry learning experiences and values-based education of our young people.


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EDUCATION REFORM The Australian Industry (Ai) Group releases post pandemic policy

AHEAD OF THE CURVE Advocating for equal focus on and recognition of vocational pathways

BUSY AT WORK Encouraging greater industry skills and employment outcomes

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INDUSTRY BODY CALLS FOR

EDUCATION RE Rapid and intense education and training will be a key driver for Australia’s economic recovery, states the Australian Industry (Ai) Group in their post pandemic policy.

Published in August, Ai Group states that if Australia is to rebuild and provide access to jobs in all emerging and continuing industries, the education and training outcomes must align with the opportunities in industry. As a school that is by industry, for industry, the AITC has been aligning its education program with the needs of industry for more than 12 years. “I spoke to more than 100 leaders in industry prior to opening the College,” says AITC CEO Mark Hands. “And the curriculum and values-based program was created based on their input.” The Ai policy recognises that COVID-19 has occurred at a time when the nation was already suffering from a range of skills shortages and facing challenges in developing relevant and quality skills in the timeframes required by industry. The AITC recognises the impact COVID-19 has had on industry, and the need (and growing demand) for quality apprentices to help rebuild the economy.

in short:

Young people at the College have been introduced to a set of 10 Employability Metrics that include soft skills like communication, taking initiative and timekeeping. The metrics sit at the core of our industry education program and have been introduced to ensure young people are prepared to excel in their chosen industry. Ai Group reports that the pandemic forced many industries to quickly pivot to use new technologies, creating an urgency for skilled staff. The AITC understands this urgency will continue in coming years and has a strong focus on creating an innovative and agile program that will pivot with industry. The industry body stresses the importance of having education and training that aligns with industry’s needs and growth strategies, as well as systems that are innovative and anticipate skill priorities in the short, medium and long term. The AITC is proud to be a leader of this change in Queensland, having placed technically talented and work-ready young people in apprenticeships and traineeships since 2008.

Industry skills will be critical to economic recovery

Australia must be ready to respond to a growing demand for industry skills

With many industries forced to pivot due to COVID-19, a shortage of skilled workers is already impacting industry

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EFORM

And have initiatives in place like our It’s why we align the education and training opportunities we provide with industry needs

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COMPLETION: THE KEY TO SUCCESS A report by the National Centre for Vocational Educational Research (NCVER) has found that when it comes to industry training, completion is the key to success. Results of the study suggest that most apprentices who don’t complete their training cite employment-related reasons for leaving, which highlights how crucial the support of an employer is for young people undertaking training. These findings support the College’s unique model, providing technically talented young people with the opportunity to complete their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) alongside an apprenticeship or traineeship. The AITC curriculum was built upon industry leaders’ advice who indicated they seek out apprentices and trainees who have completed their senior schooling. The study further showed that those who had not completed their training reported lower satisfaction with working conditions, supervision, pay, types of work and their relationships with co-workers.

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A national report has joined the AITC in advocating for equal focus on and recognition of vocational pathways by Australian schools, who traditionally favour university entrance.


AHEAD OF THE CURVE The Education Council Review of senior secondary pathways into work, further education and training was published in July, with an aim to help senior students better understand and be enabled to choose the most appropriate pathway to support their transition to work, further education, or training. The report echoes the AITC’s core beliefs and acknowledges that the “Vocational Education Training (VET) pathway is not seen as equal to or complementary to a university one. All students should be… made to feel that their educational preference or their choice of career is legitimate, and that whatever career path they choose, they have an important role to play in a wellfunctioning society,” and that “...those who are more interested in pursuing vocational learning or structured workplace learning often feel that they are inferior or their decisions are less valid.” Our College has placed a strong focus on supporting all young people in feeling as though their chosen industry path is just as valid as pursuing tertiary education. Generations of Australians

have been made to feel as though their apprenticeship or traineeship was inferior to a university degree, when in reality statistics indicate that 50% of 25 year old Australians with a university degree are unable to secure full-time employment. The July report found that school-based career advisers have more information about university selection procedures than they do about apprenticeship requirements, and were often inadequately resourced, stating that “...more flexibility is needed in designing and constructing learning structures that do not privilege particular pathways.” As a school by industry, for industry, our College is the answer to a gap left by traditional senior school education. That’s why at the AITC, we have Industry Consultants – to learn about a young person’s passion and strengths, build their character and resilience, and guide them to employment in an industry career of their choice.

The report states that “...it is essential that schools and industry engage more systematically with employers in order to help senior secondary students gain an understanding of the world of work, undertake effective career planning, and access opportunities for employment and training.” The AITC places high importance on connecting and building partnerships with industry bodies and local industry. The AITC engages thousands of employers for work experience and apprenticeships, most of whom are vocal supporters of the industry education model. We pride ourselves on being innovative and ahead of the curve when it comes to education and employment outcomes for young people. But it’s also nice to have the support of national data and the Education Council in our pursuit to elevate industry-based education and educate tomorrow’s industry leaders.

The Education Council report highlighted the importance of schoolindustry partnerships, another aspect where the AITC is a thought-leader.

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THE AITC GETS

BUSY

A PA R T N E R S H I P T H AT W I L L E N C O U R AG E G R E AT E R I N D U S T R Y S K I L L S A N D E M P LOY M E N T O U T C O M E S F O R Q U E E N S L A N D YO U N G P E O P L E

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At an official launch complete with confetti cannons, an historical bell, and industry teams from across all AITC campuses, the College celebrated a big milestone with BUSY At Work, an Australian Apprenticeship Support Network provider.

Having worked together for 12 years, the event marked the beginning of a preferred partnership between the AITC and BUSY At Work, which will encourage greater industry skills and employment outcomes for Queensland young people. The AITC and BUSY At Work have a shared goal of improving career outcomes and skills for industry in Australia, making the partnership a natural fit. “The partnership is an initiative ahead of its time. When industry becomes directly involved in the educational and employment outcomes for young people we are witnessing real leadership,” says AITC CEO Mark Hands. The two organisations have and will continue to work together to secure positive employment outcomes for AITC young people, local employers and industry, and support the increase of skill development and career opportunities

in Queensland. “BUSY At Work is extremely pleased to form a preferred partnership with AITC that will enable us to holistically support more career opportunities for young people in Queensland and skills development for industry,” Managing Director for BUSY At Work, Paul Miles, stated. BUSY At Work has more than 40 years’ experience in recruitment and skills support in Queensland, and has named three dedicated account managers to service the five AITC campuses. These account managers will work closely with AITC industry staff in supporting young people transition into apprenticeships or traineeships. The AITC is excited to continue this partnership with BUSY At Work, and to see positive outcomes created for young people, local employers and industry.

Partnering for a skilled Queensland! BUSY At Work is the preferred provider of Apprenticeship Support Network Services for Australian Industry Trade College. Our partnership equates to a holistic career support service for young people, jobs-matching for business, and skills for strong industries, now and into the future. Find out what opportunities are available for you.

Call 13 28 79 or visit busyatwork.com.au

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SCOUT AND ABOUT Students roll up their sleeves to provide much needed help

SHINE-Y NEW FUTURE AITC and Shine Precision join with businesses from the Redlands region

AROUND CAMPUS A snapshot of what’s happening across our five campuses

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Scout and A team of young people spent two weeks in Term 3 working full-time for the Mount Cotton Scout Group, to provide much-needed groundskeeping, painting and repair work. The new students from the Redlands campus painted two buildings as well as several benches on the property. The Rookies also re-filled the steps leading from the road with gravel to make the walk down the hill safer for visitors and Scout members. The Scout leaders explained that as a result of the work carried out by the Redlands campus team, the group would get another 10 years out of the buildings that were previously looking dated and run down. Year 10 young people on all campuses typically complete shorter community projects through the College’s Gift of Giving program, often only lasting a couple of days. The benefits of a longer project like the Mt Cotton Scout Group enable the team to fully immerse themselves in the project, giving them a taste of what it would be like to work on a jobsite full-time. The young people were able to see their progress each day, and at completion of the project, took pride in how their hard work transformed the area. N

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d about On the job!

The AITC team gets stuck into the task while Alexandra Curtis Moreno heads

inside to give the walls a new lease of life

Scout groups like Mount Cotton are run completely by volunteers and rely on members and the community for donations and working bees. The Scout group secured donations of paint, and together with the volunteer hours of AITC young people, they were able to make significant improvement to their Scout site. Although the team were tired at the end of a fortnight of physical work, the Rookies were kindly acknowledged by the Scout leaders with words of appreciation and a barbeque lunch on the last day of work. A second group of young people returned to the Mount Cotton Scout Group to undertake more work, this time on the campsite. A representative from Scouts Queensland also attended the final day of the project and was so impressed with the Rookies’ work that an ongoing partnership between the AITC and Scouts Queensland is a possibility. Additionally, plans have been made for young people from the Sunshine Coast campus to undertake a similar project with a local Scout group.

The AITC’s Gift of Giving program teaches young people the importance of giving back and supporting the community; it is part of our DNA. The AITC’s valuesbased curriculum is not only designed to develop great apprentices, but also has a strong focus on character development. Young people are offered opportunities to use their skillset on several community projects throughout their AITC journey and we look forward to supporting local community groups long into the future. P

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Partnering up: AITC Industry Consultant Jay Harris, Deputy Head of Education Lee Smith and Shine Precision Industries’ Ian Boileau. Image credit: Redland City Bulletin

A shine - y future for the AITC Off the back of a strong industry relationship, the AITC Redlands campus and Cleveland-based engineering firm Shine Precision hosted a barbeque breakfast for businesses in the Redlands region.

Young people manned the barbeque on a chilly Friday morning to provide local businesses with a free breakfast burger and drink, and College education and industry staff were on deck to answer questions and speak to local industry leaders about the benefits of hiring an AITC apprentice. In addition to hosting the barbeque, the team at Shine have been great supporters of the College’s industry education curriculum. Shine leaders Ian and Mike are future-focussed and entrepreneurial in their thinking. The team at Shine assisted Redlands young person Sullivan Hebel in building his game box, one of the projects the College launched during the Learning From Home period, using computer-aided design (CAD) drawing. The team at Shine has been a vocal supporter of the AITC’s unique industry curriculum, saying that learning should reflect the needs of industry. Shine has even built a classroom where some of the Redlands young people can complete their College work while in an industry environment, an activity that has been shown to motivate young people in completing work they may struggle with at times.

Shine Precision has been an incredibly supportive employer of the College, with 30 young people having completed work experience with the business. Three young people from the Redlands campus have been accepted as school-based apprentices with Shine, and young people all rave about completing work experience there, due to Shine’s commitment to coaching. P

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around cam blueprint

australian industry trade college

GOLD COAST

Emu Gully work experience

SUNSHINE COAST

AITC staff and young people recognise R U Ok? Day on campus

Ringing the bell at Roof Shout to celebrate a sign-up

AITC DISCOUNT APPLIES HUGE RANGE OF BOOTS 5 MINUTES FROM AITC MON - FRI 8AM - 5PM SAT 9.00AM - 1.00PM www.nationalworkwear.com.au

UNIT 3/5 CASUA DR, VARSITY LAKES QLD. TEL 07 55937299

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(Just off Reedy Creek Road)

REDLANDS

Microbusiness week


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

mpus In the kitchen at TAFE

Loving being on the tools at TAFE

IPSWICH

Speaker making

TOOWOOMBA

Student leaders

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TAFE QUEENSLAND IS READY FOR BUSINESS

CHOOSE TRAINING YOU CAN TRUST

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RTO No. 0275 | CRICOS No. 03020E

FP1185

AITC’S training partner of choice

Profile for Australian Industry Trade College

AITC Blueprint Magazine - September, 2020  

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