AITC Blueprint Magazine - Edition 4, 2021

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IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RIVIERA Luxury yacht export industry sails ahead with the AITC ON THE JOB Work experience prepares young people for the real world of work DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT. N

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AITC OPENS SIXTH CAMPUS Industry-driven schooling comes to Brisbane


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GREEN AND GOLD PATHWAY + 30 Brisbane’s Olympic Games set to create trade opportunities

upfront FROM THE CEO + 4 Not all schools are the same

RIVIERA AUSTRALIA + 32 Luxury yacht export industry sails ahead with the AITC

INDUSTRY RECOGNITION + 6 AITC young people awarded in WorldSkills Australia National Championships

CONSTRUCTION NEXT GEN + 33 The FKG Group welcomes Year 10 young people to work experience program

HELLO BRISBANE + 7 The AITC opens its sixth campus TOOLBOX BREAKFAST + 8 Ipswich campus hosts first event for schools

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WORK EXPERIENCE + 16 Learning in the real world about the real world of work

REFLECTION HELPS WITH BUILDING VALUES Page 11

SIGN-UPS + 22 Celebrating the outstanding performance of our young people

INDUSTRY IGNITES THE AITC CURRICULUM Page 14

COOKING UP SUCCESS + 26 Talent combined with a great attitude helps Lewis find his path PUTTING SAFETY FIRST + 27 Safety is not only a value for our young people it’s a way of being

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connect GIFT OF GIVING + 40 Young people lend a hand across the Ipswich region BENEFITS OF SPORT AT PLAY + 42 How sport provides young people with an opportunity to develop new skills and shine EXPLORING THE WORLD OF MICROBUSINESS + 44 Preparing young people to authentically connect in the real world

endnote AROUND CAMPUS + 46


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

Deliberately different.

We know our way of being is what sets us apart and drives us forward. The AITC has always been different. This year, a special project captured what this difference looks like and got to the heart of who we are and what we stand for. It gave us clarity around how we move forward, together, as one AITC. In the following pages and over the coming months, you’ll notice some shifts in the way we talk about our College and share our story. Importantly, what you read and see reflects the voices of those who know us best: our people, our industry partners and our community. Thank you to those involved for their input and for sharing their experiences. It was clear that the AITC community has a strong desire to do things differently and make a difference. And it’s this sentiment that has been captured in our guiding philosophy – Deliberately different. This succinct statement captures who we are and is designed to inspire. It means we are intentional about the things we do differently. About being curious and innovative. It means we are consistent in the experience we deliver here at the AITC, but we are deliberately different from the traditional education paradigms that other schools seem bound to.

e h  t s  i h t a The best p o  t e s o o h one you c low... At the AITC, we’re for hard workers in hard hats and high achievers in high vis. And we’re proud to be that way! It’s why our curriculum is contextualised for industry and our young people do more of what matters to the pathways they pursue. This edition of Blueprint brings into focus the achievements and examples of a deliberately different, industry-driven educational experience.

The best path is the one you choose to follow.

We tell our young people that character counts and mindset matters. Likewise, we know the way we show up is a big part of what we do. It’s why this process was so important and why I’m proud to share it with you.

Nicole de Vr ies EDITOR

FIND OUT MORE

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Mark Hands

99%

Not all schools are the same.

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AITC CEO

The Australian Industry Trade College came into being because young people needed us and Australia did too. And so we got started. On rethinking how we educate, equip and empower. On challenging the status-quo and redefining measures of success. On celebrating the path less celebrated and closing a growing gap. We started helping young people find their purpose and proudly pursue a pathway in industry, at school. Some might call it a trade. For us, it’s simply about finding what fits; about loving what you do. Our footprint was smaller then, our impact and reach is far greater now.

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YEAR 12S ACHIEVED THEIR QCE

SIGNED INTO SCHOOL-BASED APPRENTICESHIPS AND TRAINEESHIPS

It has been a significant year for the College. All five campuses have had graduating cohorts, with 99% of Year 12s achieving their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) and more than 420 young people across Years 10 to 12 were signed into school-based apprenticeships and traineeships. We were recognised by industry, with six gold, silver and bronze medals at the WorldSkills National Championships, four young people signed as the first school-based apprentices for Energy Queensland, and several alumni accepted awards at the Queensland Master Builders and Plumbing and Gas Awards. In addition to this success, a sixth AITC campus is set to open in January 2022 in Spring Hill, in the heart of Brisbane. We also invested in clearly defining who we are, what we stand for and why we’re here. After a significant period of growth and change, we


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

BRISBANE CAMPUS OPENING JANUARY 2022

New industry partnerships

Awards + recognition

DESIGNED TO CONNECT YOUNG PEOPLE WITH OPPORTUNITIES IN INDUSTRY, AND INDUSTRY WITH GREAT YOUNG PEOPLE

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE AND ALUMNI EXCEL IN INDUSTRY

felt it important to reflect on the work we do and how we best deliver an industry-driven educational experience. The process has provided us with clarity around planning for the future and how we can continue to strengthen the AITC experience, for young people and for industry. It brought into view our commitment to those we serve and how we deliver on our promise of connecting young people with opportunities in industry, and industry with great young people. You will read more about this on the pages that follow.

Every year, we carefully select young people into the AITC who want to learn in the classroom, within the workplace and on the job. For those who want to dig deep and build up. For those who want to find purpose and passion, here at the AITC and within themselves too. We’re for those young people who seek to start building real world strengths and skills now, not only in the future. We select young people who want to stand tall, stand proud and stand out. We select young people every year – and every year, we find young people who are so much more than we imagined.

In the pages that follow, you will read about young people who walk to beat of their own drum, doing what others don’t and loving what they do. Because they know it’s not about what you know but who you are and how you show up. Put simply, they found their reason to stand tall, stand proud and stand out. Not all schools are the same. At the Australian Industry Trade College, we’re deliberately different and proudly so.

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australian industry trade college See the WorldSkills competition in action LEARN MORE

upfront TOP TRADE TALENT FROM THE AITC BRING HOME GOLD, SILVER AND BRONZE MEDALS IN NATIONAL COMPETITION Queensland’s top trade talent from the Australian Industry Trade College received gold, silver and bronze medals after competing at the WorldSkills Australia National Championships. Seven students from the AITC were selected earlier this year to be part of the Queensland team for the national competition. Students from the Sunshine Coast and Redlands campuses trained hard for the trade Olympics which tested the skills of 50 trades across seven skill clusters. Due to travel restrictions the Queensland component of the competition was held locally at Alexandra Hills TAFE. The competition proved to be an extraordinary day of intense concentration and students showed their skills and exemplary AITC values. They were trained, prepared and ready for the challenges of their respective skills and kept their calm focus as time ticked away. With a set of tasks to complete in a certain amount of time, they worked methodically and kept their sights on working to high industry standards. As a result of their experience, six AITC students picked up medals for their amazing achievements. From the Sunshine Coast Jedidiah Roberston, 18, was awarded a gold medal in plumbing, Jake Marlow, 17, received silver in the automotive services trade area, Corey Hobbs, 17, was awarded a bronze medal in construction, whilst teammate Fletcher Patterson, 17, received a Certificate of Excellence. From Redlands, Levi Ehue, 16, was awarded gold in electrotechnology, Ryan Thomsen, 16, received silver in the electrotechnology trade and teammate Brayde TurrallPoulter, 16, was awarded silver in plumbing. N

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Levi says he feels ecstatic after winning the gold. “It feels pretty amazing. I secured first place which is what I was aiming for so it feels great.” “When I tell people about my WorldSkills success they are really excited for me and they’re so proud of me.” Eliza Lane, Head of Industry Education at the AITC, says, “We are extremely proud of all our 2021 AITC young people who competed at WorldSkills. It is a phenomenal result, and we value our staff, parents, TAFE Queensland and most importantly our employers who have all played an integral role in shaping and supporting the honing of their technical talent. Today we stand proud, and our young people stand out on a national stage. Today we celebrate walking to the beat of our own drum with a deliberately different education and championing industry pathways.”

Redlands team members Brayde Turrall-Poulter + Plumbing — with the highest score ever recorded for plumbing at the TAFE Alexandra Hills Campus Levi Ehue + Electrical Ryan Thomsen + Electrical

Sunshine Coast team members Jake Marlow + Automotive Fletcher Patterson +Carpentry Corey Hobbs + Carpentry Jedidiah Robertson + Plumbing


Congratulations to Campbell who was awarded his Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award in Brisbane by the Queensland Governor His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC CV. Campbell dedicated a significant amount of time throughout his high school years to achieve this prestigious award which can only be achieved through consistent hard work.

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

ACHIEVING GOLD FOR DUKE OF EDINBURGH

All participants must progress through their Duke of Ed levels—to work towards their Bronze, Silver or Gold Awards. Each level they work through takes six months (Gold takes 12 months) and has four sections:

Service + Participating as a volunteer to make a positive contribution to society Physical Recreation + Improving fitness and performance for a healthy lifestyle Skills + To broaden talents and abilities to improve self confidence and employability Adventurous Journey + Gain a deeper understanding of the environment and discover a spirit of adventure

Residential project (Gold only): Taking part in a worthwhile project and build new relationships with other young people while staying in an unfamiliar environment.

FINALISTS NAMED FOR APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR Congratulations to Jarrod Pienaar who was announced as the School-based Apprentice of the Year at the prestigious Master Plumbers' Association of Queensland Plumbing & Gas Industry Awards. We are so proud. Charlie, Dylan and Jayden from the AITC Gold Coast campus were named as finalists in this category. Alumnus Mikael Abi-Fares was also a finalist for two awards, Second Year Apprentice and the Construction Skills Queensland Merv Harris Memorial Bursary. These outstanding young men demonstrate the AITC values and inspire their peers. Congratulations also to AITC alumnus Liam Carey from Kai Konstruct who won the Master Builders’ Apprentice of the Year award. We were delighted to see Liam presented with this coveted award which is testimony to the values instilled in AITC young people.

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Industry-driven schooling comes to Brisbane Industry leaders are thrilled that a new AITC campus, dedicated to producing high calibre, driven apprentices, is opening its doors in Brisbane in January. CEO Mark Hands, who is also a Brisbane Grammar School old boy, says it’s the first of its kind for Greater Brisbane. The Spring Hill campus will start the 2022 school year with a small Year 10 cohort to help young people to find their purpose and proudly pursue a pathway in industry. “Our offering is driven by industry, a word that is purposefully placed in the school’s name,” said Mr Hands. “The AITC’s unique learning model provides industry with work-ready, reliable apprentices and enables young people to find what fits and love what they do, all whilst completing high school. “We have young people pursuing pathways in construction, manufacturing, aviation, health, education, transport, hair and beauty, commercial cookery and more. “We’re for those who want to learn in the classroom, within workplaces and on

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STUDENT BREAKOUT AREA

the job, through work experience and a school-based apprenticeship,” said Mr Hands.

“The passion, pride, and enthusiasm of AITC students is demonstrable whenever they are on site,” Mr Hacking added.

The heavy vehicle industry, like many other sectors in the Australian economy, is suffering from a significant skills shortage. This shortage led the Heavy Vehicle Industry Association (HVIA) to seek new partners like the AITC, to open up a pipeline of talent.

A typical school term at the newest AITC campus will consist of 5 weeks in the classroom and 5-7 weeks out in industry in work experience and school-based apprenticeships or traineeships, learning firsthand about the world of work. Most schools allow their students out to work one day a week.

“HVIA is proud to partner with the AITC to connect interested students in a trade pathway, and what we hope will turn into a rewarding, fulfilling career in the heavy vehicle industry,” shared HVIA CEO, Todd Hacking. Mr Hacking says it is an opportune time for the AITC to open a Brisbane campus and that the heavy vehicle industry “looks forward to continuing our partnership to ensure we provide students with as many opportunities as possible.”

It has been encouraging to see a strong number of enrolment enquiries from Brisbane families, mirroring industry’s need for a school that connects young people with opportunities in industry and industry with great young people. The campus community – families, employees and industry – celebrated the launch of the new campus at an event held in early December at Newstead Brewery.


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

BRISBANE LAUNCH CELEBRATION

ABOVE: LEARNING SPACE + OUTDOOR BREAKOUT AREA 9


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NAWIC HOLDS FIRST SCHOOL TOOLBOX BREAKFAST AT AITC IPSWICH CAMPUS More than 100 people attended the inaugural school-based Toolbox Breakfast hosted by the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC). The event was held at the newly renovated Australian Industry Trade College - Ipswich campus. In attendance were vendor supporters from MEGT, Trade Tools, Apprenticeships Queensland, BUSSQ, TAFE Queensland and Hutchinson Builders. It provided a great networking opportunity for all attendees, with many young people making vital connections in the industry. The senior school Toolbox Breakfast is the brainchild of Rachael Price, volunteer committee member from NAWIC. Rachael believes having the breakfast on a smaller scale for high schools “will target females who wouldn’t be able to attend our traditional Toolbox Breakfast.” Rachael says the first school event at the AITC Ipswich campus - where young people complete their senior schooling and start a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship - has been exhilarating. “These young women are the future of our industry. Many tradesmen I have worked with say females bring another level of detail and professionalism to the industry.” Cr Kate Kunzelmann from the City of Ipswich says she was “particularly struck” by the encouragement of women into trades during the breakfast. “I think that’s really important,” she says. “One of the young women said, ‘No-one could tell her what she couldn’t do.’ I think that’s a really good message.” After taking a tour of the newly renovated Ipswich campus Cr Kunzelmann described the college as a “lovely premise” and an asset to the community. “Ipswich is going through a huge growth curve; we’re going to need all these apprentices and industry professionals, including carpenters and plumbers, to cope with the growth that we’re going to have.” Radmila Desic, from the NAWIC Women on Tools Committee says, “it’s amazing to watch the AITC grow. I wish something like this had existed when I was at school.” She believes “having a dedicated school focusing on trades is a really important part of our society. We can’t all do the same thing—we can’t be all things. It’s great these opportunities exist.” N

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AITC student, Hannah moved to the Ipswich campus to have more industry experience as well as focus on her education. Currently on work experience in the construction industry with a commercial cabinet maker, Hannah’s career interest in construction began at the age of five. “I’ve always enjoyed putting flatpacks together from Ikea when I was little — none of it has fallen apart yet! I’ve always shown an interest.” Hannah believes the Toolbox Breakfast “is very important for us because we need connections we can talk to; we need pathways we can go through. We need that support so we always know there is someone there if we’re struggling to find work experience, if we’re struggling to find an apprenticeship. It’s always good to have that support.” All AITC Year 11 young women pursuing a construction pathway are members of NAWIC, compliments of the industry-driven school.


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

Reflection helps with developing the AITC values WHEN A YOUNG PERSON BEGINS THEIR JOURNEY AT THE AITC, THEY ARE ENCOURAGED TO STRENGTHEN THEIR CHARACTER THROUGH VALUES, SHARED EXPERIENCES AND OVERCOMING CHALLENGES. THIS BEGINS DURING THE ROOKIES CHALLENGE AT EMU GULLY AND CONTINUES WITH CAMPUS ACTIVITIES INCLUDING THE REFLECTION WALK. TO DEVELOP A STRONG SENSE OF PURPOSE AND ACHIEVE GOALS, YOUNG PEOPLE ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONNECT WITH THEIR PEERS BY SHARING WHO THEY ARE, WHO THEY WERE AND WHERE THEY WANT TO BE.

who  am  I?  Where do  I   wan t    to  be?

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Dave Breeze REGIONAL INDUSTRY OFFICER — WESTERN

The Reflection Walk encourages young people to talk about themselves and their personal journey. It’s a walk where we go to White Rock which is local to the Ipswich campus. Young people talk about what they want to achieve and what they want to leave behind. Before heading to White Rock, the team talk about safety first. During the walk, we stop as a group and ask if anyone wants to share their story. We are hoping young people will start thinking about the future and have an idea about what they’re working towards. It’s nice when some young people start talking about where they’ve come from, their previous school, their behaviour, and they’ve started to understand what the AITC can offer. Hopefully some are inspired by their peers and have the confidence to discuss what they want to change and what they want to leave behind, who they want to make proud and what they want to be here for. At White Rock, there’s a beautiful view at the top with the horizon in the distance — it’s a beautiful backdrop. It’s powerful listening to a young person be honest with themselves and their peers. The reflection is a good time for us all to come together and after we leave we’ve bonded. Everyone has a back story and a journey. It’s about self-reflection and it’s powerful moving forward. One young lady really stood out during a reflection. At school she’s always smiling, always positive, she is great in class, just the perfect student in every sense. We knew she was committed to being here for the right reasons. During the reflection walk she stepped forward to talk about her journey. What she said blew us away. It wasn’t all positive. She said, ‘Dave, at my old school I was the one getting my friends into trouble, I was the one who was misbehaving, I was the one who had the poor attitude.’ I was gobsmacked because I couldn’t see that in this young lady. Her peers were gobsmacked too because they looked at her as a leader. She was very honest. She said ‘I want to be here for the right reasons, I want to get ahead and make my family proud, I want to make myself proud. I want to do this and I think this is the right place to do it.’ She said everything in that five minute talk and made an impact on everyone. Just understanding the change in behaviours and what we expect—she’s got it.

Being on that walk was kind of confronting. It was my first trip with the whole crew. It was a bit confronting because we didn’t know everyone. Seeing everyone share their stories really connected us all together. I feel like when you open a new adventure you need to leave your whole past behind. To share my story out in the open was to leave it behind and start a new journey. Rookies was really good and it was very challenging and made us see a different light of each other. Going through that really formed a strong bond through teamwork and made us who we are today. Dave expressed how much my story affected him and how much it inspired him. Everyone after me shared their stories and went into more depth which was really lovely to see. Hopefully the AITC will help me find my dream job and see me create a successful life. I want to be a nurse. I went into childcare and did a bit of vet work and I’m about to do some farm work but nursing has always been my dream job. I love helping people and seeing that I’ve made an improvement on someone’s life is what I live for.

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INDUSTRY CONSULTANT

Some of the things you hear young people say is impressive. Some young people have had trauma, or really bad things happen in their past but it’s really pleasing to see how they can be resilient and be hopeful for their future and be striving for success. Despite the things that have happened to them they’re not going to let it run their life and they’re going to move on and

move forward with confidence which is really good to see. The walk is a way to connect and show young people that we are approachable. I try to be as real as I can. I don’t try and act like someone who is unapproachable, I feel like if you wanted to ask me a question and approach me my answer is genuine and real. If I don’t know the answer I will go and find the answer. I don’t pretend to know something I don’t.

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

Lucy McIntyre

White Rock is a peaceful environment to reflect upon what they’re written for their self-analysis. At the top of White Rock, it’s like a blank canvas— symbolic of their life moving forward. It’s a chance for them to reflect in a peaceful environment on what they’ve written and share it with other people and take on board the things other people say.

The staff here all have real life experience and I don’t have any problem sharing parts of my life if there’s a moment when that needs to be said. That’s what makes the industry team at this school different.

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Industry ignites AITC curriculum IN 2021 THE AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRY TRADE COLLEGE CHOSE TO ENHANCE THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF CONNECTING EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY. THE AITC IS AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE ECOSYSTEM WHICH DETERMINES PROGRESS AND ADVANCEMENT OF SOCIETY – THIS INCLUDES INDUSTRY, BUSINESSES, COMMUNITIES, GOVERNMENTS, AND

ELIZA LANE HEAD OF INDUSTRY EDUCATION

In 2021 we orchestrated a review and redefined our senior (Year 11 and 12) vocational core courses delivered at the College. The key driving success factors of — ongoing industry immersive focus and built-in collaboration with industry — ensures our curriculum is agile, continuously evolving to reflect industry needs, and is always real-world relevant. This exciting project included a complete review, redesign and reapproval of the current AITC vocational courses delivered. Aligned and shaped to the current, and more importantly, future needs of industry. Through consultation and consideration the AITC committed to two new courses of qualification for 2022 and beyond:

MOST IMPORTANTLY OUR YOUNG PEOPLE. THE AITC CONTRIBUTES TO THE ECOSYSTEM BY PRODUCING CAPABLE AND CONFIDENT GRADUATES WHO POSSESS TECHNICAL SKILLS, VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS AND

Year 11 — (FSK20119) Certificate II in Skills for Work and Vocational Pathways

THEY ARE EQUIPPED TO LEAD THE Year 11 — (ICT20120) Certificate II in Applied Digital Technologies

INDUSTRY OF THE FUTURE.

Year 12 — (BSB30220) Certificate III in Entrepreneurship and Business. Note: (ICT20120) Certificate II in Applied Digital Technologies is delivered as an Industry Skillset, young people will not complete the full qualification.

Feedback received from our young people and industry played a major role in shaping and informing content development and consequent assessment. The AITC Industry Education team invested heavily in external curriculum designers with a history of engaging and shaping learning experiences for different industries, cohorts and sectors. The desire for a deliberately different focus in education is essential for transformation. N

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DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

Feedback received from our young people and industry played a major role in shaping and informing content development and consequent assessment. As we head towards 2022, and implementation of the new courses, the AITC can use this mandated change as an opportunity to shape and deliver a ‘new’ or different learning experience. This experience can shape and inform industry-driven practice in our other subject matter areas into the future. Ultimately the AITC will provide a deliberately different industry-driven educational experience enabling and empowering our young people. The AITC offering to our young people is unique, not only because we have strong industry partnerships and relationships, but because of our rich history of industry immersion. Our legacy is built on the shoulders of giants, and the impact is evident far beyond SouthEast Queensland. When we say we are a senior secondary school ‘by industry for industry’, we mean it – when we do this everybody wins.

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work experience

TANOU SIEBENMANN

INDUSTRY CONSULTANT

ESSENTIAL LESSONS FOR YEAR 10 A school-based apprenticeship doesn’t magically happen, it stems from hard work both in the classroom during Education Block and out at Work Experience (WEX) during Industry Block. Year 10 is a year of exploration and pivotal to finding individualised goals—personally and professionally. To succeed in the workplace, Year 10 young people take the first steps in identifying their likes and dislikes in trades by trying a series of unpaid WEX opportunities. This allows them to hone their skills, focus on goals, and network with businesses which, in the future, may offer a paid sign-up to their apprenticeship of choice. Tanou Siebenmann, Industry Consultant from the Sunshine Coast campus, discusses the importance of WEX for Year 10 young people. Work experience in Year 10 provides young people with the opportunity to explore various industries and vocations before they refine their focus on pursuing a particular traineeship or apprenticeship during Years 11 and 12. Safety and courage are two values AITC young people learn

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to embrace during this year, building an understanding of workplace health and safety and adopting some new confidence when engaging with industry. Most importantly, young people will learn something about their personal brand, motivation, self-empowerment and discovery of their “why?”. Work experience is a way for young people to begin to understand industry expectations in terms of employability skills, and how to put these into practice with their work experience providers. Young people also learn which industries appeal to them. They are empowered to secure their own work experience and equipped with some communication tools to support their efforts in sourcing and securing a placement. They are also presented with key industry contacts who have an established relationship with the Australian Industry Trade College and offer both work experience and schoolbased traineeship and/or apprenticeship positions. Young people are encouraged to use the Industry Team as a support


The Industry Team will open productive communication with young people and revisit aspects of their rookies training, to reinforce their motivation. The Industry Team will also tap into their bank of existing work experience provider contacts and give young people a “leg up” by connecting them with providers who are genuinely invested in the AITC model. Australia has a growing list of skill shortages and a wealth of emerging domestic talent. With its industry education model, the AITC is in a privileged position to empower young people to gain early exposure to growth industries while also successfully completing their Year 12 Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE).

Enthusiasm is always encouraged, particularly with a model that creates increased industry immersion, and with this some Year 10 young people wish to pursue employment outcomes prematurely. Whilst we appreciate a level of ambition, we also require a level of patience from young people so that they are not jeopardising momentum with their education and have a healthy amount of exploration time in work experience to support a well-informed decision when it comes time to pursue their chosen vocation. I think it is also important to acknowledge these are 15-year-old young people who are launching into, and being exposed to, an adult workforce. Keeping this in mind is also critical to their journey.

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

resource when obtaining their work experience and be reassured that the team will walk alongside them during their search for a placement.

Work experience is a way for young people to begin to understand industry expectations in terms of employability skills, and how to put these into practice...

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Ryan Hurley, Service Manager at Brown and Hurley—The Big Truck People, Darra, discusses the importance of work experience.

I’m going  to  keep going un til I ge t an appren ticeship of fer and hopefully pursue the career for the res t of my life... WORK EXPERIENCE KEEPS KAYNE’S CAREER IN THE FAST LANE Kayne in Year 10 is working at PJR Performance Gold Coast for work experience. “I’m helping build race cars and build high horsepower V8 for Holden and Ford. I come from a family of motorbike racers and they have built street cars and race cars. I was working on them from a young age so I have some experience. I called them up and they took me on. Kayne says he’s going to keep going “until I get an apprenticeship offer and hopefully pursue the career for the rest of my life.” His work experience at PJR has taught Kayne how everything works behind the scenes. “The quality they put into cars and how careful they are, how much effort they put in. They don’t miss a thing. They do everything from servicing to building,” says Kayne. The AITC values of courage and respect have helped Kayne along his career journey. “I had the courage to contact an exclusive business,” he says. “I also respect other people’s cars — they’re other people’s babies.” “I love work experience—I highly encourage it. If you think about doing mechanics it’s worth it. Work experience gives you a taste of your industry. You don’t know what you want to do until you’ve tried it.” The comments from the PJR team have been exceptional, “Kayne was excellent and we would gladly have him back again, he learnt quick and was eager to jump in and learn as much as possible. He was on time every day and followed the opening procedure with little help every morning.”

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LEARN MORE


The AITC partners with exceptional and established companies to help young people explore potential careers through work experience. In Year 10, this is a crucial step towards fulfilling their requirements in their Industry Block and paves the way to success for Years 11 and 12. It also helps our young people inch further towards finding their career path and defining and demonstrating their strength of character by using the AITC values. Young people are supported in those first steps to find work experience so they can gain confidence while finding their career footing. When they find their footing, they will be exposed to a series of life changing experiences with the ultimate aim of being signed-up as a school-based apprentice. Ryan Hurley, Service Manager at Brown and Hurley, Darra has been with the company for 19 years. His company is an active partner with the AITC for work experience opportunities. “Work experience is significant because most young people have just come out of school. They’re used to a school environment and we need to get them into the workforce and get them ready for it. So, a bit of practical experience is really good,” explains Ryan.

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

BROWN AND HURLEY GUIDE YOUNG PEOPLE THROUGH WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM

“It’s good to gauge what they’re like so that’s why we find it important to get them in and get their hands dirty and see if they enjoy it too.” “We start them off with a lot of observing but usually servicing — we’ll get them in there with a grease gun and greasing the vehicle. AITC students are very good at engaging with our mechanics. Our guys are always happy to have AITC work experience students here and have the next generation coming through.” Young people from the AITC already have some product knowledge, “so when we get them through it’s good to see them and see what they’re like. Hopefully at the end of it they will get an apprenticeship through us,” says Ryan. Brown and Hurley offer two specialised apprenticeships— one in an auto electrical role and the other in heavy commercial. A talented young person could be signed up to a four-year Certificate III in Heavy Commercial Vehicle Mechanical Technology or Electrical Technology. To achieve an apprenticeship Ryan says the company “will favour someone” who “shows enthusiasm and commits themselves 100% to the person they’re working with.”

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A gateway to a new era in industry with the AITC THE GATEWAY TO INDUSTRY SCHOOLS PROGRAM IS A KEY INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR THE QUEENSLAND DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT, SMALL BUSINESS AND TRAINING. IT ALIGNS WITH THE DEPARTMENT’S VISION FOR ALL QUEENSLANDERS TO HAVE THE SKILLS AND OPPORTUNITIES TO PARTICIPATE AND PROSPER IN THE ECONOMY. The program builds partnerships between schools and industry to enable young people to acquire the knowledge, skills and attributes to participate effectively in the Queensland economy. The program also provides opportunities for industry and the education sector to work together to deliver outcomes for students, local communities and businesses. Students participating in the program are exposed to a range of learning experiences to assist them in their career choices and pathways to employment. Each project is led by industry organisations which develop and implement tailored school engagement activities in line with their industry’s key skills and workforce priorities. Industry organisations choose how the industry specific projects operate and the type and level of engagement with participating schools.

There are 10 industry sectors involved in the Gateway to Industry Schools program: Advanced manufacturing Aerospace Agribusiness Building and construction

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Community services (new industry) Food, wine and tourism Health (new industry)

Information and communication technology (new industry) Minerals and energy

Screen and media (new industry)

IN AUGUST 2021, THE AITC WAS RECOGNISED AS A GATEWAY SCHOOL FOR THE BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY. Administered by the industry’s peak body in Queensland, Construction Skills Queensland, membership in the Gateway Schools program provides ongoing para-professional opportunities for Year 12 graduates. It also provides access to key stakeholders within the building and construction industry for current and future students at the AITC who are pursuing a career in the building and construction industry. This relationship is also expected to assist with structured work experience. Key industry stakeholders, such as Hutchinson N

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Builders, offer a unique placement program exclusively for young people attending a Gateway School for this industry. In September 2021, the Sunshine Coast campus of the AITC was recognised as a Gateway School as a member of the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy (QMEA). This is managed by the Queensland Resources Council, and supported by industry leaders such as BHP, Mt Isa Mines and BMA. Australia’s largest and most successful industry-led, schools/industry initiative, the Academy’s


QMEA constantly develops and refreshes exciting hand-on programs to keep pace with the skills needed for the careers of the future in trades and professions. They also support teachers to ensure they are confident in bringing STEM-based topics to students in an engaging way. The Community Services Gateway to Industry Schools project is designed to advance the opportunities for youth in Queensland’s growing community services sector through cohesive locally relevant partnerships. In October of 2021, with the consultation of campus leaders and members of this gateway schools program, the AITC has submitted an expression of interest for our Ipswich campus to join the program and provide ongoing opportunities in this industry for our young people. From community care to youth justice, from homelessness to disability support, the community services sector serves as an entrance to enduring diverse careers. However connecting to industry and gaining experience is often difficult for young people and schools.

Discovery – Boosting awareness of young people, their families and school professionals through access to current information and professional development on the community services sector. Experiential learning – Exposure to meaningful experiences to ‘learn and do’ and allow young people a real-life view of working with, and in, the community.

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programs and experiences broaden students’ and teachers’ knowledge of the resources sector. This too provides a talent pipeline of employees into VET and STEM-related careers, with a strong focus on female and indigenous students.

Connections that count – Access directly to prospective employers, vocational trainers and universities regarding ways to gain an advantage for futures in this sector. Clarity – Ability to plan the right pathways and navigate the immediate and future steps to gain qualifications and skills while still at school and post-school. Differentiation – Preparation that fast tracks school leavers for employment or tertiary specialisation and identifies participating schools as local launching grounds for community services careers.

Working with young people, schools, industry employers, trainers, universities and families to ensure a strong training and experiential pathway for tomorrow’s community services leaders, the project builds on the following principles:

Since September 2020, the AITC has been developing a relationship with Aviation Australia to assist in providing training and employment outcomes for our young people. During the process of working with key personnel at Aviation Australia, it was suggested that the AITC’s proposed campus in Brisbane, along with the Toowoomba campus, may benefit by joining the Aerospace Gateway to Schools industry program. In October 2021, after meeting with some of the companies who sit on the board of this project, the AITC has submitted an expression of interest for these campuses to join this gateway to industry program. The Queensland Government is committed to supporting the state’s rapidly developing and innovative aerospace industry. The Gateway to Industry Schools program for Aerospace has proven essential in meeting the Queensland Government’s aim of transitioning young people from school to work while completing school and gaining formal qualifications.

industries, tertiary education and training providers to inspire students to consider a skilled, diverse and sustainable career or pathway into to the exciting aerospace industry sector. Acceptance into this program will provide exclusive access to industry-based programs for young people, including managed work experience, as well as potential access to employment opportunities with supporting business such as QANTAS, Boeing and Airbus. The AITC Future Schools and Partnerships team are constantly investigating opportunities for our young people to develop industry specific learning outcomes whilst on campus as well as broadening access to training and industry opportunities off campus. Put simply, membership in Gateway School programs opens doors for everyone. We are incredibly excited to see how these initial relationships grow and develop.

Selected Queensland secondary schools (government and non-government) engage and partner with aerospace

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sign-ups Here we celebrate the outstanding performances of our young people, displaying a selection of sign-up photos during 2021. To see more of these momentous achievements, see our social platforms.

ADAM SENEKAL 13 September 2021 + Plumber

ALEX CORBETT 20 September 2021 + Electrical

Adam hit the ground running doing work experience—trying tiling and plumbing. His next work experience block was with a local plumber Steve Johansen at Water Leak Detective. Steve noticed Adam’s keenness to learn and that his enthusiastic personality would make him the ideal plumber’s apprentice.

Alex engaged with the work experience program with a positive and motivated attitude. Taking advantage of every opportunity to engage with Industry, Alex built her network and as a result her hard work paid off. Alex successfully achieved her goal with a sign-up into a school-based electrical apprenticeship with GrainCorp.

JACKSON COLES 9 August 2021 + Welder/Boilermaker Jackson set goals to work in the engineering industry. He worked with Dave and the team at Ipswich & District Welding for one industry block and demonstrated this was the trade for him. Dave saw that Jackson was a good fit for the team and quickly signed him up as an apprentice welder/boilermaker.

ELLIOTT PELL 6 September 2021 + Electrician Elliott worked hard, stayed motivated, and remained keen for an opportunity to find work as an apprentice electrician. He began doing some work experience with Dan the Sparky Man. Dan was impressed with Elliott’s hard work and dedication and now Elliott is a school-based apprentice.

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GEORGIA KELLAM 14 September 2021 + Automotive and Marine Trimming Technology Georgia explored her options in heavy diesel and decided to revisit automotive trimming, an idea she had considered but not tried when she first came to the AITC. After only a couple of weeks it was clear this was her perfect match with Chris and the team at Evan’s Trim Shop.

GEORGIA PHILLIPS 20 September 2021 + Carpentry Georgia came to the AITC with a clear objective; to secure an apprenticeship with an employer that does everything. Georgia was connected with an employer who builds houses completely from the ground up. Sureline Building was after someone with high standards and a keenness to learn. Together they make a great team.

CHLOE YOUNG 29 July 2021 + Animal Studies Chloe was signed-up into a school-based traineeship with Centenary Vet Clinic & Hospital. She completed her work experience placement with Dr Michael and the team and really enjoyed it. Chloe is now signed into a Certificate II in Animal Studies with the intention of becoming a vet nurse in the future.

JACK YOUNG 21 September 2021 + Light Vehicle Mechanical Jack made the most of each work experience opportunity throughout his time at the AITC. Taking the time to trial various industry opportunities allowed Jack to find the right career fit. Jack has been signed into a school-based apprenticeship —Certificate III in Light Vehicle Mechanical Technology with the Armstrong Auto Group.

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JACOB CLEELAND 20 September 2021 + Boilermaker Jacob liked the area of engineering and when he started his placement with J A Evans & Co he was comfortable from the start. Paul decided Jacob was a good fit for the company and now Jacob is signed-up as an apprentice boilermaker. JOSEPH ANDERSON 5 October 2021 + Metal & Engineering Growing up on a rural property in Northern Queensland meant that Joe came to the AITC with a wealth of experience, a great work ethic and a positive can-do attitude. It was only a matter of time before Joe found his ‘fit’ in industry with the team at Gessner Farm and Earthmoving Equipment.

JORDAN WALKER 6 September 2021 + Carpentry With Jordan’s determination and spirit, we knew it wouldn’t be long until he impressed an employer. James from JT Building Projects noticed this during Jordan’s first work experience block and Jordan was signed-up as an apprentice carpenter.

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JORJI NICHOLSON 13 September 2021 + Automotive Electrical Technology

JORJIE COUGHRAN 6 September 2021 + Animal Care Services

Chris from Ultra Tune reached out to the AITC team looking for a new automotive apprentice. Jorji jumped at the opportunity and showed Chris she was the right person to fill that job. She exercises initiative with excellent self-management skills and has keen aptitude for technical matters.

Jorjie recently commenced her Certificate III in Animal Care Services with Pets Wonderland in Currumbin. From the outset Jorjie never failed to impress supervisors with her tenacious work ethic and ambitious attitude. Enrique from Pets Wonderland was thrilled to welcome Jorjie to the team, praising her hard work and initiative.

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Marjac Automotive – the Repco Authorised Car Service Maroochydore, was impressed by Josh. This employer stated it is “refreshing to have a young person like Joshua for work experience. He is switched on and adapts well to different situations.” He is now a school-based apprentice.

HARRY CHITTICK 23 August 2021 + Electrician

KEELEY TILBROOK 20 September 2021 + Electrical

Harry was signed-up into his Cert III Electrotechnology with Sparky 4 You. Harry has shown great courage, resilience and determination so far on his AITC journey. His new employer saw Harry’s potential from the first day of his placement and stated that it was Harry’s positive attitude and interpersonal skills that won him over.

Keeley had four different employers for work experience and each were impressed by Keeley’s work ethic and enthusiasm. Even though she had a couple of job offers Keeley felt like she fit best with the team at Dawson Electric and is looking forward to a bright future in the electrical trade.

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JOSHUA LEWIS 20 September 2021 + Light Vehicle Mechanical

LARZ VAN BENNEKOM 6 September 2021 + Carpentry What a journey Larz has been on—he has tried a few different trades including, electrical, fencing, auto, marine and gas. However after trying carpentry his career journey began. One work experience block with Maddison Constructions and he was signed-up as a carpenter’s apprentice.

OLIVER BERGMAN 27 September 2021 + Automotive Electrical Technology Oliver would often say “auto electrical is the future, and I want an apprenticeship”. After completing work experience at Car Sparks Australia, Oliver and his boss, Chris knew it was a good fit. Chris said “I am excited to have Oliver as a school-based apprentice in my growing business!”

RYAN COLLETT 22 September 2021 + Electrician With every work experience opportunity Ryan gained valuable skills on the tools and has always acted on the advice of his supervisors. It was Ryan’s hard work and motivation which impressed his current employer at Switch Box Pty Ltd. Ben commented that Ryan was a perfect fit for his company. 25


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Cooking up success with talent and a great attitude When Lewis believed his future career was in finding a trade, he made the switch to the AITC. Even though he needed to repeat Year 11 to take full advantage of the AITC industry and education program, Lewis was determined to find his path—and he also insisted on paying his own way. What began as finding a pathway turned into recognising his gifts and now his talents are sought after by others in his industry. Initially Lewis tried various trades at the AITC—like most young people he wanted to find the right fit. He tried construction and after two weeks the company talked about signing him up. However, they wanted Lewis to drop out of school which was not an option Lewis would consider as he believed that would be “wasting two years of education.” “Construction was alright but not for me,” says Lewis, so he tried cooking. “I do it a lot at home. I thought ‘Why not, what do I have to lose?’ I liked it.” However, at the time, Lewis didn’t know if it was what he really wanted to N

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do and needed encouragement. “Everyone said I would be silly not to because they said I was gifted at it.” He began his work experience at Jets Leagues Club Ipswich. “I was nervous as anyone would be. You turn up not knowing what’s in store for you. My first shift was three hours and all I did was prep veggies. I thought I could get used to this, low stress, cutting up vegetables. They threw me into the deep end but in a good way. It progressed me a lot faster because they put a lot of trust in me from the get-go.” With four main sections of the kitchen, Lewis progressed rapidly through food prep, salads, onto the frier and onto the pans. “That’s when things start getting a bit stressful because you’re cooking food instead of dropping it into hot oil. That’s when I thought, I’m doing quite well.” Before his sign-up he was called in to replace someone who was sick and worked in a team

of three to prepare for a huge event—the Football Grand Final night. “I was all they had. I had to do pans and we did 190 covers which was massive at the time. I was pretty excited about it afterwards.” Lewis admits he was “very nervous” leading up to the event. “Once I was there, I was fine. I used my head, tried to be as efficient as I could and it worked out smoothly. Now I don’t stress. You go there, head down, bum up and work—tackle it as it comes.” Lewis’s excellent reputation is gaining momentum throughout the food network. “I’ve had other kitchens contact me and ask me if I want to come for a day or check them out. But this is great for me, it’s convenient too and I’ll finish my apprenticeship with Jets.” With his culinary gift, and amazing work ethic, this star is on the rise. “I give my 100%. I don’t like to let people down.” His successful attitude comes from the AITC values he


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brings to his job such as teamwork and trust. “Jets is a team environment— everyone needs to work together and communicate together to get the job done. At the end of the night if you have one person not communicating it can be terrible. Teamwork is massive.” In the kitchen “I love being creative,” says Lewis. “I like to plate up and make it look nice and appealing to the eye. I love food.” His preferred meal of choice is making stir fries “they’re a favourite to make and a favourite to eat.” His home-made beef stir fry dish is his absolute favourite however he won’t share the recipe as it’s a “guarded secret”. His love of food comes from growing up with a big family and combined cultures. “My dad’s side of the family loved their cooking. There’s nothing better than sitting around the table sharing a home cooked meal with family and friends.” Food creates memories— like Christmas, “you put on a big feed and it’s great and you remember it. The food and smells make it memorable,” says Lewis. Initially some people didn’t support Lewis’ choice of career as a chef. “I had a lot of people who said: ‘Cooking? Why would you want to do cooking?’—even family members. But I did it. You can make decent money in it. I enjoy what I do and they saw I was doing well. I started making the same amount as my brother—he works full time and I’m still at school.” He says work experience is crucial and having the right attitude helps to find the best apprenticeship fit. “Dedicate yourself and give 100%. Have a smile when you’re at work experience and never turn up with a negative mindset,” advises Lewis. “Stick with it and try hard. It will better you—even if you don’t get the job—you still have to try.”

PIPELINE OF AITC APPRENTICES PUTTING SAFETY FIRST Safety is a vital value taught at the AITC to young people pursuing an industry pathway. It’s a fundamental cornerstone at the industry-driven school; young people must follow stringent safety protocols to protect themselves, their team and the community. Charlie, a Year 12 leader at the AITC and first year school-based plumbing apprentice, was a finalist in the Outstanding Apprentice category at the prestigious Master Plumbers’ Association of Queensland Plumbing & Gas Industry Awards. Charlie has been working with Cargo Plumbing since early 2020 while completing his secondary schooling, and takes safety seriously. At the AITC “safety is drilled into you from the start. This is what you need to do every day,” says Charlie. Standard safety protocol requires signing on whenever an employee arrives at a work site. Charlie says Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is the main priority to minimise risk to workers’ health and safety. “You’re always dealing with potential dangers

as a plumber. We work with a lot of chemicals — so masks, glasses and gloves are extremely important and used frequently.” The young apprentice also relies on the site manager who oversees and directs a variety of projects from the beginning through to completion. “When you get to site in the morning, the site manager lets you know what has to happen throughout the day and if there is anything to be aware of such as cranes or big trucks.” Showing wisdom beyond his years, Charlie says there’s no room for people who take shortcuts. “You have to step back and take the time to be safe otherwise things can go wrong.” Charlie says workers who are less safe are the ones who want to rush through their tasks to get home faster. However, it’s important to “always take that little bit of extra time. Think a few steps ahead to what you will be doing and make sure everything is safe because at the end of the day you want to go home in one piece.”

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A Personal Industry Coach (PIC) provides coaching and mentoring to young people throughout their Education and Industry blocks. The PIC can be seen as a conduit between Industry Consultants and young people and also Team Leaders and young people. Sunshine Coast PIC, Melanie Snow says, “We are often helping young people build confidence on how to call employers to gain work experience, how to show initiative on the worksite, and instil the AITC values and expectations in regard to positive attitude, behaviour and performance.” PICs also work closely with Campus Managers and Regional Industry Officers, attend parent/young people meetings and develop goal and action plans that a young person can work towards achieving.

WORK EXPERIENCE CAN BE A BUZZ FOR OUR PERSONAL INDUSTRY COACHES

A typical day for a PIC is to visit young people while out on work experience and see how they are going, “learning about their industry and letting them know we support them.” Working one on one or in small groups with young people who may need coaching or mentoring on a variety of topics (employability metrics, career planning, goal setting, wellbeing). Meeting with staff to see if there are any young people who may need extra support. Checking-in with young people to see how their day is going, and popping into their education classes from time to time to see what they are learning. “Every day is different,” says Melanie. “I thoroughly enjoy making a personal connection with each young person and watching them grow and mature across their years at the College. It’s also great to work with such an amazing team here on the Sunshine Coast. It takes a village and we truly do that every single day. Working closely with multiple staff, young people and parents is what allows the AITC young people to flourish.” “The favourite part of my job is seeing young people in action when they are out on work experience or at their traineeship/apprenticeship workplaces. It allows me to see the young people in their element. When they are passionate about their work, it clearly shows! I also enjoy seeing them at graduation—all dressed up with QCEs and apprenticeships—such a proud moment for them, their parents and for staff who work with them every day.” Recently Melanie visited young person Ava who is learning the apiarist trade (beekeeper) at Beyond Honey. Even though Melanie admits she’s “kind of scared of bees (I just don’t like them buzzing around me)” she couldn’t wait to visit Ava out on her work experience. “I tried to show courage, don the bee suit and get up close and personal while taking photos of her in action. The focus and skill she showed was amazing.” N

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“There is always something new to learn every day as a PIC like how to ethically source honey,” says Melanie. “Beyond Honey is going above and beyond with their hives in every natural way they can. Each of their hives produces honey of varying colours and flavours depending on where it’s located and what types of nectar and pollen those bees bring back to the hive.” Under the careful eye of Cooper (owner of Beyond Honey), Ava checked the hives for several things; if the queen is still there, if there are any eggs, how the bees are doing and if any pests have tried to invade the hive. They keep track of their hives on an app where they monitor important factors including temperament, production and genetics. The queen bee is the one that is blue. They slightly mark the queen bees with a pen/marker and then track them by colour on their beekeeping app. It also makes it easier to locate the queen when they are checking the hives. They currently have 90+ hives located across various paddocks on the Sunshine Coast.


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GREEN AND GOLD

WORKING TOGETHER

INFLUENCED + INSPIRED

Brisbane 2032 creates trade opportunities across the region

Luxury yacht export industry sails ahead with the AITC

Heavy Vehicle Industry Association CEO attends our Rookies Challenge

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Olympics to provide green and gold pathway for trade opportunities HOSTING THE GAMES WILL CREATE AN OLYMPIC LEGACY FOR BRISBANE THAT MEANS MORE THAN A FEW WEEKS OF SPORT – IT WILL PROVIDE A 10-YEAR ‘GREEN AND GOLD’ RUNWAY TO 2032 AND A 10-YEAR LEGACY AFTERWARDS. According to Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner “Brisbane will benefit from jobs, tourism, trade, and an estimated $8.1 billion boost to the Queensland economy.” This means our AITC young people, and supporting employers, have the potential to benefit across a variety of trades including construction, hospitality, marketing and events.

With many venues in close proximity to the AITC campuses, there will be partnership businesses already bidding for contracts in the areas listed below (masterplan outline). This opens up an opportunity to align the AITC with those partners (e.g. Cross River Rail) and linking AITC values to Olympic ethos.

Brisbane will be home to 18 of the 32 Olympic competition venues and key non-competition venues including the International Broadcast Centre, Main Press Centre and Olympic and Paralympic Games Athlete’s Village.

City-shaping projects like the Brisbane Metro, Green Bridges and the transformation of Victoria Park are already underway and will be important infrastructure, ensuring Brisbane is ready for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

MASTERPLAN OUTLINE 8.

Brisbane Showgrounds. Equestrian.

Brisbane Arena (also known as Brisbane Live). Aquatics (Swimming, Water Polo). Major development – construction planned for 2027-2030. Built on top of existing surface rail, the new underground Cross River Rail and underground Brisbane Metro busway.

9. Ballymore Stadium. Hockey. Planned redevelopment to build permanent grandstand. Games capacity 15,000.

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Brisbane Football Stadium. Rugby, Football (Finals).

11. Brisbane International Shooting Centre. Shooting.

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Brisbane Cricket Ground. Athletics (Track and Field), Ceremonies. Major development – demolition of existing stadium and construction planned for 2026 – 2030.

12. Anna Meares Velodrome. Cycling (Track), Cycling (BMX Racing).

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10. Brisbane Indoor Sports Centre. Basketball. Planned new facility for inner city Brisbane – Construction planned between 2026 and 2028.

13. Chandler Indoor Sports Centre. Gymnastics. Planned new venue – construction 2024 – 2026.

4. Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre. Table Tennis, Fencing, Taekwondo, Badminton.

14. Redland Whitewater Centre. Canoe (Slalom). New planned venue – construction in 2024-2026.

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15. Manly Boat Harbour. Sailing.

South Bank Cultural Forecourt. Archery.

6. South Bank Piazza. 3 x 3 Basketball.

16. Brisbane Entertainment Centre. Handball

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17. Moreton Bay Indoor Sports Centre. Boxing. Planned new – construction in 2025 – 2027.

Victoria Park. Cycling (BMX Freestyle), Equestrian (Cross Country).

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19. Wyaralong Flatwater Centre. Rowing, Canoe (Sprint).


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20. Brisbane Olympic Village (10,729 beds). Major development – Located at Northshore Hamilton. The village is part of Queensland’s largest waterfront urban renewal project. The site is owned by Economic Development Queensland (EDQ), the Queensland Government’s specialist land use planning and property development agency. In legacy mode (after the games), the village will deliver a mix of housing supply including social housing, hotel stock and market housing in line with long-term needs. This legacy for the site has been planned since 2008. To date, around 3,000 apartments have been delivered with the remaining 11,000 (including around 1,750 for the village) planned to be delivered by 2050. International Broadcast Centre (IBC): A temporary 57,000m2 venue. IBC location proposed for 99 Montague Road, South Brisbane. 100% of required land still to be acquired (7ha). Site preparation would require capital investment which is guaranteed by the Queensland Government. It includes demolition of existing industrial buildings, site remediation and construction of permanent utilities, including a new substation. 21. Main Press Centre (MPC). 30,000m2 have been secured in the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, 800m from the International Broadcast Centre. Shuttle buses between the IBC and MPC would allow shared services to ensure efficiencies. 22. Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre. Volleyball, Weightlifting. 23. Broadbeach Park Stadium. Volleyball (Beach). Temporary stadium with 12,000 capacity.

24. Royal Pines Resort. Golf. 25. Gold Coast Sports & Leisure Centre. Judo, Wrestling. 26. Coomera Indoor Sports Centre. Volleyball. 27. Broadwater Parklands. Triathlon, Aquatics (Swimming Marathon). 28. Gold Coast Stadium. Football (preliminaries/QF). 29. Gold Coast Olympic Village (2,600 beds). Major development – Planned for Robina Town Centre. The site is fully owned by Queensland Investment Corporation (QIC), a Queensland Government owned Corporation. In legacy mode, the village will deliver a mix of residential housing and commercial facilities. 30. Sunshine Coast Indoor Sports Centre. Basketball (preliminaries). Planned new venue. 6,000 games capacity. 31. Sunshine Coast Stadium. Football (preliminaries/QF). Existing – upgrade works required. Games capacity 20,000. 32. Alexandra Headland. Cycling (Road), Athletics (Marathon, Race Walks), Sailing (Kiteboarding). 33. Sunshine Coast Mountain Bike Centre. Cycling (Mountain Bike). Sunshine Coast Satellite Village (1,374 beds). Major development – part of Maroochydore’s new Central Business District. In legacy mode, the village will deliver a mix of residential housing and commercial facilities.

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Luxury yacht export industry sails ahead with the AITC RIVIERA AUSTRALIA IS THE LARGEST LUXURY YACHT BUILDING FACILITY IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE. FOR MORE THAN 41 YEARS THEY HAVE BUILT OVER 5,700 LUXURY MOTOR YACHTS AT THEIR PURPOSE-BUILT, STATE-OF-THE-ART, 16.8 HECTARE SITE AT COOMERA ON THE GOLD COAST.

With an 800+-strong team, they have a comprehensive apprenticeship program which attributes to the beauty of these handcrafted yachts. Apprentices are highly valued and regarded nationally and internationally such is the depth of skills and life training offered through the unique Riviera apprentice training program.

One of the other major benefits is that AITC apprentices work for block periods. “We get these young people for four, five, six, seven weeks at a time. Their ability to improve and take on the role and become part of the team is enhanced by the fact that we get them for that big chunk of time.”

Internationally feted for their peerless quality, build materials, structural strength, ease of operation and fine luxury finish, our AITC young people contribute their skills and help create something special.

Taking on an AITC apprentice Adam says, “we know we’re getting a young person who knows what they want. They know what part of industry they want to move into.”

Adam Houlahan, Safety, Training and Recruitment Manager of Riviera Australia says the team is referred to as “the Riviera family”. Management staff have all come through as apprentices. “People from our senior executive team, who have been with the company for 20-30 years, they’ve come through our training programme,” says Adam. “There’s a lot of opportunity for development. People join us in the early stages of their career and certainly progress throughout their career life.” Riviera has worked with the AITC for the past six years in the apprentice program. “They deliver fantastic apprentices who want to work with us and be part of our team,” says Adam. He heard about the AITC’s trade ready students “who want to get into a trade field, who want to work with their hands, and who want to work in our industry.” Adam felt this partnership would be the perfect fit. “The AITC told us about the type of young people they have working there. They talked to us about the type of families who come to the AITC and we basically said — ‘We want these people!’.” N

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Riviera offers nine different trades — “boat building, electrical, cabinet making, engineering, composite machinists, composite technicians. We offer apprenticeships in furniture finishing, as well as spray painting, and boiler-making.”

Blake Rotheram, Year 12, is a first-year apprentice engineer at Riviera. Blake says that everyone in the team gets along and works well together, “we build boats, and that’s something to be really proud of.” Blake believes Riviera provides an outstanding apprentice training program and he offers advice for young people thinking about this industry. “Apply yourself would be my best tip. Don’t sell yourself short. You can probably do a lot more than you think you can. Use all the knowledge you’ve learned from the AITC.”

LEARN MORE


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FKG GROUP DEVELOPING NEXT GENERATION OF CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONALS The FKG Group welcomed an opportunity to partner with the Australian Industry Trade College (AITC) for a bespoke Year 10 work experience program. Initially derived from the Best Practice Principles initiative from the Queensland Government, the program helped over 20 young people participate in work experience across various disciplines and further their industry careers.

FKG was prompted to look at better ways of engaging with trainees and apprentices on their projects. Through that process, they identified the AITC as a suitable partner based on location of the projects they were targeting, which included the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast regions. Andy Baxter, Senior Business Development Manager, with the FKG Group, works with a team of estimators, design managers, and a submissions team to identify and secure new projects for the business. “We made contact with the AITC to suggest a bespoke program for work experience for Year 10 students. The team were really helpful and made it easy to facilitate the program.” His first point of contact at the AITC Sunshine Coast campus was experienced Industry Consultant Tony Quinn. “He was very forthcoming and welcomed the opportunity to partner with FKG to provide opportunities for the Year 10 program. The partnership would give students an opportunity to try different trades through major

construction on a project in their own neighbourhood,” explains Andy. “What struck me initially with the AITC was the flexibility and eagerness to develop a bespoke plan that worked for us. They followed that through, very organised, very structured, yet brought a personal touch to the process as well.” Initially FKG held an introduction information session for over 40 AITC young people. “We invited expressions of interest, or job applications, from students.” Placements were offered to 12 young people on each of the projects — Baringa State Secondary College and Palmview State Special School — for a two-week block. “From the day I facilitated the introduction, students were polite, well mannered, well spoken and keen. It was obvious the AITC ran a really good program. Students came up individually after the information session to thank us for the opportunity. They all presented very well, and very professionally, and I was impressed with the initial contact.”

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Young people showed interest in a range of different trades from electrical, plumbing, carpentry, mechanical engineering and even diesel engineers. They spent the first week of work experience with the FKG team in various roles— from site managers to foreman, the safety managers to the contract administrators.” With exposure to the project and the site, the young people were then teamed with suitable trade partners. They spent their second week with sub-contractors following their interest, some trying one trade, others trying two or three areas of interest. “AITC students turned up well prepped with what they needed to bring. There was never an issue with students turning up and not bringing PPE or at the wrong time or at the wrong location,” explains Andy. “They were organised and professional.” Andy says there are many benefits of the program, “many of the work experience students have since secured apprenticeships with

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our sub-contractors after proving themselves. Not just with skills but with diligence, and their work ethic. That has now flowed into FKG engaging apprentices directly from the program as well.” “To have the potential for them to roll into a formal apprenticeship, doing work experience, or if it’s an apprenticeship with us, or our sub-contractors, it’s developing the next generation of construction professionals.” The next generation of industry professionals at the AITC also have a focus on obtaining their Year 12 certificate of education. “For a schoolbased apprentice to have the fall-back of a Year 12 certificate, as well as going on to a trade certificate, it gives them a really well-rounded platform to enter the workforce.”


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

TODD HACKING

- In terview -

HEAVY VEHICLE INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

Rookies Challenge influences industry CEO The Rookies Challenge at Emu Gully provides a powerful experience allowing our young people to take risks, try new things and make lasting memories. Each year we welcome industry supporters to come along and share in the activities. Todd Hacking, Chief Executive Officer from Heavy Vehicle Industry Association (HVIA), joined the mid-year 2021 Rookies for a wisdom talk and he also joined the Rookies for a couple of days during their challenges.

At the end of Rookies each young person said hello, shook my hand and looked me in the eyes.

HVIA and the AITC have a long relationship dating back about 10 years. “I’m excited about extending that into the future. It really is a vital partnership for us and we’re so excited to be a part of it,” says Todd. There’s lots of highlights from Emu Gully and Todd admits he’s pushed himself out of his comfort zone during the trip. “I’ve gone into caves, I’ve gone across a watercourse, climbed a cliff I would never have climbed otherwise. It’s the young people who inspired me to do that. Seeing them do that and being a part of that has been an amazing experience personally,” says Todd. “It’s been great to see the young people step outside their comfort zone. There’s about 100 students who didn’t know each other at the start of the week. You see them mature and show some great employable skills that we’re looking for in industry. “At the end of Rookies each young person said hello, shook my hand and looked me in the eyes. 35


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“There’s no distractions here, no phones, no social media. You’ve got their attention and it’s great to have in-depth conversations with those young people and find out what they’re looking for in a career. “It’s been great to see them come together as a team, see the comradery, and the mateship that’s obviously been formed over the week. It’s obviously been a life changing experience for them and it’s been an amazing opportunity for me to witness.” During the wisdom talk Todd had a great opportunity to get in front of the young people. “It’s different on the outside world. When you go back to your home and to your friends, and to your outside influences and you get your phone back, you can very easily drift back into your old ways. “My message was you’ve got a choice as to whether or not you take the life skills, and the values and the character development that you’ve earned this week, into your future weeks. Or, whether you leave it here and go; ‘well that was a fun five days!’. “It’s their choice. They’re 14, 15, 16 year-olds. I was trying to instil in them if they make the right choice there are people who will help them, and guide them, and instruct them, and advise them and really look after their best interests. “Bring your best self, be your best self, and make that right choice.” Thank you to Todd for his perspective.

The Rookies Challenge is all about transformation and recognising your own value. See our young people in action at the challenge. LEARN MORE

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DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

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GIFT OF GIVING

BENEFITS OF SPORT AT PLAY

AROUND CAMPUS

Our young people lend a hand and get involved in their local communities

Sport provides an opportunity for individuals to shine, here we feature Josh Pratt’s story

College life captured across our five campuses and beyond

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gift of

giving STUDENTS HELP OUT AT HELEN’S HAVEN BRINGING HISTORY TO LIFE IN IPSWICH CONSTRUCTING COMMUNITY GARDENS

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DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

HELEN’S HAVEN

THE GIFT OF SERVICE The gift of giving is a major component of the Year 10 program. Its benefits are many, while training young people in aspects of industry, the biggest advantage is helping the community with the AITC service program. This year our Ipswich Year 10 young people have been exceptionally busy doing groundworks at Goodna Street Life — Helen’s Haven as well as helping out the Cooneana Heritage Centre prior to their Open Day. At Helen’s Haven our young people rolled their sleeves up and helped with the gardens. They replanted donated plants, turned over soil in the vegetable patch, cleaned out chicken coops, raked and made the gardens look aesthetically pleasing. AITC Personal Industry Coach, Nikki, says “I think it’s important for students to see how other people’s lives are and how organisations like this can make an impact in the community.” Our AITC young people can “come in and help by beautifying simple gardens which will help people, who are hard on their luck, feel a bit better about where they are staying in their crisis accommodation.” There is a steep learning curve when helping with community projects. “I think our young people have learned a bit about how to prioritise their time and tasks. They’ve also learned a bit about permaculture with the vegetable patch. It’s good for character building as well — it’s been great to hear that they have enjoyed being out and about and doing something different.”

Year 10 Ipswich young person, Blade, says “It’s important to help the community, especially those who have lost their belongings, or people who don’t have anywhere to sleep.” “I love helping the community and making the place better. We’ve cleaned the gardens, rejuvenated the soil and planted more seeds —that helps the people who are here —they are growing food. We helped clean up the back as well. There will be pods out there for the homeless. We’re making it look nice so people feel welcome here. I feel great helping out.” Steve Purcell, Vice President of Goodna Street Life and General Manager, says, “Homelessness can happen to anybody at any time, it’s called crisis for a reason—it’s because we don’t expect it.” “During COVID we helped people who had no support in Queensland, and no income. We had a young gentleman who was an international student from China. His parents lost everything in China because of COVID. They weren’t able to financially support him and he wasn’t able to study here. He had no accommodation, no income, and wasn’t allowed to work because of his visa so he was in this real black hole.” Steve says it’s one of these situations where “he fell through the cracks in the system and this happens to a lot of people.” The team were able to find him accommodation and, once restrictions slowly started lifting, “we helped him with the ability to work in Australia so he could start earning

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an income for himself and then get back. Now he’s moved out and he’s on his own feet.” Helen’s Haven is the reason there are a lot of good news stories like this. “This centre is about helping people in a wholistic wrap around support… I love the idea of having young people here helping out and working, seeing what it is that we do and getting a broader understanding of the world around us,” says Steve. “Everybody who comes into Goodna Street Life whether they are from the AITC or a volunteer, every small gesture adds up to something amazing.” It’s the first time the AITC has been here and Steve says they’ve helped the Haven look “inviting and homely.” Being involved is a way to recognise “that they can make a contribution and change the world.” “Our mantra is we teach people how to take pride in themselves and with that little bit of self-respect and self-worth they can overcome anything.”

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Helen Youngberry set up Goodna Street Life in 2015. She was attending the Footprint in the Park and wanted to do more. Helen wanted to try and get people off the street and give them extra support so she set up Goodna Street Life. It was always her vision where she would set up W a place the full wrap-around I S DtoOprovide M support people would need to escape homelessness or crisis. Helen’s Haven is culmination of hard work from volunteers and the team for over five years. The old Baroona Hotel has been converted into a space where the team can provide crisis accommodation, drug and alcohol counselling, mental health support, food aid and material aid to help people overcome the obstacles of accessing life that a lot of people might not understand.


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

COONEANA

GIFT OF GIVING BRIGHTENS UP IPSWICH HISTORICAL COMMUNITY After visiting Helen’s Haven, Year 10s helped the amazing volunteers at Cooneana Heritage Centre. It was great timing as they needed help preparing for their Open Day ‘Back in Time Family Fun Day’ on Sunday 29 August. Margaret Taylor, volunteer at Cooneana says, “the young people have been a tremendous help over the past couple of days. They did an amazing job mulching all the gardens out the front and up the back. That would have taken us three ladies weeks to complete that particular task. Some other young people are scraping down the railings of the old house. They’re also scraping down the bird aviary as well and they’re going to paint that for us. We’re grateful to have them here. We would welcome them back any time.” More exciting community projects are coming in the future, Dave Breeze, Regional Industry Officer (Western) says, “We’ve had some discussions with the Ipswich Hospital. The stroke ward has a big garden out the back, which is a therapy garden; it’s a little bit untamed at the moment. There are patients who have been there for about six months who need to go out and use the garden. We’re really keen to get into that project as soon as we can and help out that great cause too.

EUMUNDI + DISTRICT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

Four hard-working Sunshine Coast young people gave back to the community as they worked closely with Project Director, Bruce Molloy, from the Eumundi and District Community Association. The aim of the project was to build and construct raised garden beds for community members to utilise. Bruce supported our young people while they were on the project and was an incredibly caring role model for Colby, Angus, Nav and Jody. Our young people applied their education learning to industry by using Pythagoras theorem from maths to construct a number of hardwood frame garden beds for the community gardens. The work will continue as part of the AITC Gift of Giving project and was organised by Sarah Bentley (Regional Industry Officer— Northern), in conjunction with Bruce Molloy, an avid supporter of the Eumundi Community and Tanou Siebenmann (Sunshine Coast Industry Consultant), who was involved on the tools and supervising our young people during their project week.

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Taking part in sport can help you feel healthier and mentally strong, and that is just the beginning. Sport can develop great leaders and provides an opportunity for individuals to shine, whether it is playing for a local club or at an international level. At the AITC we have many young people who shine in their chosen sport or activity. They demonstrate the AITC values to achieve their best. Here we share Josh’s story.

Ipswich young person, Josh Pratt, is a dedicated Target Rifle shooter focusing on his talent since the age of 12. Target shooting is one of the oldest organised sports in Australia with records dating back to 1788. Target shooters are positioned lying down and are required to wear a shooting coat and sling to assist with support.

told me I’d won it. I was in shock. I never thought I’d be able to do it. I got carried in the chair—it made me feel amazing. All the hard work I’d done to get there—in that moment I knew I’d done it.”

Competitions are held throughout the year and in May 2021 Josh competed and won the North Queensland Rifle Association (NQRA) Queens Prize Competition. This is a threeday competition over ranges varying from 500m to 900m.

He is a member of the Natives Rifle Club at Belmont where the club issued this statement following his success. “Josh’s shooting has gone from strength to strength ... he has not yet found a plateau.... What impresses most is not the upward trajectory of his fine shooting, but the hard work, good humour and steely resolve that has underpinned these results.”

With some tough competition, including previous Queens winners and the current world champion, Josh used his skill and calm temperament to overcome and win the A grade competition. He is the youngest person in the history of Australia to win the North Queensland Queens. “I couldn’t believe it,” says Josh. “At the last range, when I finished shooting, my mum was waiting for me and

There’s more to pulling the trigger to win. There’s an incredible amount of preparation before, and during, an intense competition. During a competition Josh will focus on his breathing to try and make the rifle remain still. “I want to relax my muscles so there’s no shaking. I try to clear my mind as much as possible and focus on the target — making sure everything is centred. Then when I’m

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releasing the shot everything goes out of my mind and I slowly let the shot go and focus on trying to get it as dead centre as possible.” The next major competition is Queensland Rifle Association Queen’s (State Championships). Josh will be up against tough competitors from around Australia. “Usually in my grade (Grade A) there’s over 100 competitors.” To mentally prepare during the competition Josh says, “I try not to overthink it too much. I try to really focus on what I’m doing. I don’t worry what anybody else is doing. “I make sure my gear is right. Anything to take my mind off things. If I start to get nervous I focus on my breathing and that takes my mind off everything else and it helps me get back into the rhythm.” It’s an intense and exhausting competition which lasts for three days with 10 ranges. “We move up the ranges starting at 300 yards. We have 40 targets with eight people per


target. Each range usually takes one to two hours.” Josh says his abilities help his concentration in the classroom and in the workplace. “My abilities have developed my motivation. I can focus on what I’m doing and get it done to the best of my ability.”

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

“... I was in shock. I never thought I’d be able to do it. I got carried in the chair— it made me feel amazing. All the hard work I’d done to ge t there—in that momen t I knew I’d done it.” His next goal is to make the National Australian Team for the World Championships which may be in South Africa in 2023. Trails will be held in the lead up and selectors will gauge everyone’s skills to compile the Australian team. We wish Josh all the best —his hard work is demonstrated in everything he does!

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Microbusiness leads to maximum benefits inside and outside the classroom The AITC has a strong focus on preparing young people to authentically connect with the ‘real world’. In 2021, across all five campuses, the Year 12 cohort have undertaken a Certificate III in Business and unleashed their entrepreneurial and business skills. One of the core projects in the delivery of the qualification required is that our seniors develop and run their own microbusiness. Key criteria of the microbusinesses was to operate without loss and focus on raising money for a charity. All profit from the campuses (over $3,000) was donated to the New Hope Cambodia Fund. The AITC has a long history with New Hope Cambodia – a charity providing education, food and housing to families from some of Siem Reap’s most underprivileged areas. Our young people ran numerous successful microbusinesses in different teams across

all campuses. Groups created the best business ideas to maximise reach and create profits for charity. Not only did our young people learn how to run a business but they also put their cooking skills, car detailing and handyperson skills into practice. Groups found that cooking a hearty breakfast or lunch provided a successful business pathway. Sunshine Coast and Redlands organised a successful ‘Wash ‘n Go’ carwash – inside and outside as well as a wheel polish.

microbusiness in small groups, with a focus on entrepreneurship, requires different skillsets.” The subjects at the AITC are not silo subjects— they are used across platforms in real world situations, in both a professional and personal manner. Creating a microbusiness allows young people to further develop math skills, writing skills, it also looks at promotion, how to innovate as well as learning to work in a team environment with different personality types.

Melissa Moxley, Ipswich Team Leader, says students’ attitudes towards running a business developed from their entrepreneurial activities, and learnings developed throughout their Year 12 journey.

According to the Foundation for Young Australians’ New Work Order research, “enterprise skills are just the skills young people need most to thrive in an uncertain future. The next generation will likely navigate 17 jobs across five different careers. By teaching enterprise skills, a young person can transition more easily from education to work.”

“It was an exciting project for our young people as they completed their Certificate III in Business. Creating a

Other benefits for learning about a microbusiness: •

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provides services and products tailored to the local community;

better prepares students for the future of business in industry;

trains students to be optimistic with a focus on solutions;

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explores commercial innovation;

coming up with a business idea, validating it, and seeing it through provides a unique, fulfilling experience for young people;

entrepreneurship provides practical and hands-on experience which makes for great project-based learning.


The New Work Order Series

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

FOUNDATION FOR YOUNG AUSTRALIANS

VIEW SPECIAL REPORT

“Our Year 12s had to be creative as they set about running their business without loss. Profits from all five campuses will be donated to our International Services Project — New Hope Cambodia. New Hope Cambodia provides education to children and young people from some of the poorest families in Mondul Bai village, Siem Reap. Many students come from families living on less than $100 a month.”

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around camp

Aviation Australia visit

Sunshine Coast young people in action

To learn more about the AITC visit www.aitc.qld.edu.au or connect with us via social @aitc_qld N

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R U OK Day - Sunshine Coast


DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT.

pus Gold Coast Trade Olympics

Toowoomba young people recieve academic awards

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R U OK Day - Redlands

R U OK Day - Ipswich


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