AITC Blueprint Magazine - Edition 1, 2020

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

DREAM JOB AT BHP Meet recently appointed apprentice and AITC alumni Ruby Neisler FORGING FORWARD Our young people continue to forge forward despite trying times EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

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GLOBAL VIEW AITC students raise $120,000 to help struggling families in Cambodia P

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03 PATHWAY TO SUCCESS + 26

Why VET qualifications are more likely to lead to jobs

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ON THE RADAR + 27

upfront

Trades worth considering

FROM THE CEO + 4

It’s an inside job

Excerpts from ‘A letter to a Year 10 Student, from Australia’s Chief Scientist’

AWARD SEASON + 6

THE ENTREPRENEURS + 29

Making waves and winning awards

Gen Z set to become the most innovative generation of our time

DEAR JULIE + 28

LEARNING FROM HOME + 7

Innovation in a time of disruption

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features

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED + 12

WALKING WITH INDUSTRY GIANTS Page 8

FORGING FORWARD IN TRYING TIMES

DIGITAL FOOTPRINT + 31

LEADING OUR NEWEST CAMPUS + 13

HOLDING SPACE + 33

GLOBAL VIEW + 20

GIFT OF GIVING + 23

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Helpful hints and tips for students

The importance of ‘taking five’ SUPPORTING LEARNING + 34

Parenting teenagers

Our students travel abroad to help those in need

WELLBEING AT THE CORE OF CONSTRUCTION

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Challenging gender stereotypes and pursuing new pathways

Meet our Ipswich Principal, Tracey Millar

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endnote AROUND CAMPUS + 35


Blueprint, a term used widely in industry and education, is a detailed plan of action. Our role at the Australian Industry Trade College (AITC) is to formalise a young person’s ambitions and ensure they declare a strong sense of purpose, so that they can pursue a career of their choice. Martin Luther King Jr said a blueprint “...serves as a pattern, as the guide… for those who are to build the building. And a building is not well erected without a good, sound and solid blueprint”. Dr King went on to explain that the most important part of your life’s blueprint was a deep belief in your own dignity, own worth and own somebodiness. That’s why, at the AITC we don’t only teach education foundations and

FOREWORD

EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Our young people are in the process of building the structure of their lives and we are grateful for the opportunity to be part of their blueprint.

industry technical skills. We teach values and resilience. Our young people are in the process of building the structure of their lives and we are grateful for the opportunity to be part of their blueprint.

As a school started by industry,

Sometimes, our plan of action changes suddenly. COVID-19 has thrown many plans out the window. As a College we have designed, developed and implemented a Learning From Home program in a few short weeks, transforming our unique education and industry block model to a virtual platform. We no longer shake hands – a proud custom of the AITC community – and instead wave from a distance or through a screen. But we are not defined by COVID-19.

we respond to disruption that

for industry, our foundations lie in a response to an industry need. As a community, we are now faced with COVID-19 and it is how determines a fervent future.

A blueprint enables you to design with the big picture in mind. As we face these unexpected circumstances, it is time for us to redesign our action plan and lean in to the disruption. We commend you to read this first edition of Blueprint magazine for 2020 and hope you enjoy the reminder of our community prior to COVID-19.

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Mark Hands FROM OUR CEO

AN INSIDE JOB How do so many young people at the AITC achieve educational and employment success? One parent recently approached me on campus and thought he had the answer – “I now understand how you do it – it’s an inside job”. Somewhat perplexed I responded, “I’m not sure I know what you mean.” He went on to explain: “I’m a professional golfer and we use the same technique. I tell my trainee golfers that unless they have the right mindset and beliefs, they will not achieve success. You can be as talented as Tiger Woods; however, if their character and life priorities are not right, they will not succeed. That’s what you teach these young men and women, isn’t it.” It was a statement of fact, not a question. And he was right – but it’s no secret.

This successful ‘inside’ strategy begins the moment a young person joins the College. Rather than starting with skills in cutting timber or hair; rather than learning how to use a hammer or a kitchen paring knife, at the AITC, we begin with instilling beliefs in our young people, like You are responsible for your life make productive choices Respect for others starts by respecting yourself Fail forward - when life is unfair, get up and go on Safety is about you and others be a mate who cares Look people in the eyes, speak in sentences and show good manners Work hard - no matter the task

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

These beliefs are not rocket science but they are compelling qualities when evident in a young life about to enter the world of industry. And it’s these beliefs that ensure our young people are industry ready. This values-based philosophy, together with the development of capable and resilient young people, contributed to AITC’s extraordinary progress in 2019:

More than

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Our Sunshine Coast campus was named a Business of the Year finalist

99% of graduates completed their Queensland Certificate of Education

Two new campuses opened in Toowoomba and Ipswich

QCE

young people (across all campuses) were signed into an apprenticeship, traineeship or employment

A Redlands graduate was awarded an apprenticeship with industry giant

Gold Coast young person, Bray Warry was named Master Plumbers’ Association of Queensland School-Based Apprentice of the Year

BHP You can read about these achievements and more in this edition of Blueprint magazine. When a team of people (parents, young people and employers) all agree that ‘it’s an inside job’ which starts with who they are rather than what they know - magic happens! Thank you for believing with us.

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C E L E B R AT I N G

award season

SPOTLIGHT ON THE AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRY TRADE COLLEGE Left to right Redlands Principal Toni Banfield with AITC students Greg McIntyre-Lilley (Runner-up), Bray Warry (Winner) and Daniel Hughes (Runner-up)

The award was unexpected by Bray, despite receiving positive feedback from his employer. WINNER

“I was very nervous when they said my name,” said Bray.

B R AY WA R R Y Gold Coast young person Bray Warry was awarded the Master Plumbers’ Association Queensland School-Based Apprentice of the Year last year. The AITC is immensely proud of Bray for winning this prestigious award. Bray commenced his school-based apprenticeship with EEP Plumbing in 2018.

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“I gave a little speech and thanked a few people,” he said. After the initial shock of winning, Bray is proud to have won the award saying, “It felt pretty good to be recognised as a young apprentice. You don’t really see many young people being recognised, it usually just happens when you get a job.”

Bray started at the AITC halfway through Year 10. “I wasn’t doing too well at my old school, and I just wanted to get ahead on work... I wanted to get my QCE, so [the AITC] was the best option.” Bray’s apprenticeship will take four years, after which time he will be fully qualified. Congratulations to Greg McIntyre-Lilley (AITC Redlands) and Daniel Hughes (AITC Gold Coast), who were awarded runners-up.


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

LEARNING FROM FINALIST

S U N S H I N E C OA S T The Sunshine Coast Campus was named a Business of the Year finalist in the Education and Training category of the Sunshine Coast Business Awards. Sunshine Coast campus has built and strengthened ties and partnerships in the local community, having welcomed countless businesses on to campus throughout the year.

HOME The AITC has leveraged its educational expertise, industry ties and technological infrastructure to develop a Learning From Home program for Term 2 in response to COVID-19. The newly formed Learning From Home program employs a blended learning approach, whereby teachers and industry consultants use a range of methods to deliver learning aligned to the College’s core curriculum and industry focus, including video interviews with employers, virtual work experience and online learning modules to develop employability skills. Learning From Home, although new to the AITC, has been designed to maximise continuity of learning by reflecting the College’s unique five-week education block and five-week industry block model each term. Building upon our young people’s digital fluency, the College invested in industry-recognised platforms to enhance young people’s knowledge and skillsets, and provide meaningful, structured learning opportunities that are relevant to industry and employability. As part of the industry education program, young people will also engage with other key parts of the AITC model, including: + Wisdom Talks

+ Site Meetings

+ Industry Connect

+ Wellbeing Connect

+ Strength and Fitness + Campus Leadership Connect

Despite our young people being distant from the campus, we are committed to ensuring they feel connected with their teachers, peers and school. We believe it is important to actively listen to our AITC community, so at the end of each day, young people are required to provide daily feedback in the form of three things they learnt, two things they enjoyed and ask one question they may have. As a school started by industry for industry, the AITC’s foundations lie in a response to an industry need, and it is with that perspective that the College teaches its future industry leaders. Our young people are encouraged to take responsibility for their own education and career pathways, so they are more prepared than many of their traditionally-schooled peers to face this significant change. P

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In 2019, Ruby Neisler went from Brisbane school student to BHP apprentice. We caught up with Ruby to reflect on her journey to achieving her dream job – an electrical apprenticeship with Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance (BMA) Blackwater, a union of BHP and Mitsubishi.

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Ruby’s love and talent for industry started well before she joined the AITC in Year 10. “My trade journey goes all the way back to when I was with my dad in the shed,” she explained. “We would fix little things, and those are some of my favourite memories from childhood. When I chose a school, I knew I had to come to the AITC.”

variety of trades that weren’t electrical before committing to an industry path. From construction, welding and auto mechanics, to plumbing, engineering and even hospitality, no trade fit as well as electrical. “I tried electrical and it just seemed so fun! I like the maths, and I like the finer details of things, so I pursued that,” said Ruby.

The Redlands graduate’s father – an electrical engineer following an apprenticeship in the Navy – may have been the source of Ruby’s love for tinkering, but he was also the reason she didn’t pursue electrical in the first place. “I didn’t want to be an electrician because my dad was an electrician, and I didn’t want to be a copy cat!”

Initially, she faced some push back on her decision to pursue an industry pathway, fuelled by people’s misconceptions about trades and tradespeople. “When I decided to come to the AITC, I had a few people say, ’You’re a tradie? But you’re smarter than that’. Actually, tradespeople are pretty smart. Lots of tradies go into engineering pretty soon after finishing school and you have to be a really smart cookie to do that. So, the misconception that tradespeople aren’t smart is pretty annoying.”

You don’t land your dream apprenticeship without grit and determination. And Ruby was certainly determined to try a

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Ruby completing work experience at Incitec prior to her apprenticeship

Fast forward two and a half years to July 2019, Ruby commenced the application process for her apprenticeship at BMA Blackwater, which involved a resume and online English assessment. Ruby’s Industry Consultant, Glenn English, provided advice and guidance throughout the application

“Ruby was full of energy and eager to work,” said Glenn. “Feedback from previous placements indicated that she had a good work ethic and a determination to succeed.” Making it to the next stage, she completed two more assessments in mechanics and maths before progressing to an online interview. Despite Ruby’s progress, she wasn’t confident that her performance was enough. “Up until this point, I didn’t think I had a chance, but I was determined to see it through,” she said. But all that doubt was put to rest when she received an email inviting her to an in-person interview; Ruby recalls screaming with excitement.

process.

After several weeks of preparation, Ruby and her father travelled to Blackwater for a group interview, hand tools assessment, team activity, and informal Q&A, followed by a nervous 10-day wait. Ruby’s resilience was tested even more during the medical tests for flexibility, N

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strength and mental capacity. “I was lifting 40 kilograms at one point!” said Ruby. “The entire time I persevered, knowing what was at stake. “When I received the positive medical results, I had to complete the electrical tests, which I passed with flying colours.” With graduation looming Ruby still had not had confirmation from BHP, Glenn began to have conversations with Ruby around ‘what if’. “She wouldn’t hear it. She was absolutely confident she would get the job offer. I had however, spoken with a few of her previous employers to discuss opportunities if she was unsuccessful with BHP,” said Glenn. Then, in the middle of October, Ruby received that life changing phone call while out in Industry block. “I promptly told my employer the good news, who told me to tell my parents and teachers. Now here I am, with my dream job!” Ruby’s Industry Consultant left her with some sage advice. “I told Ruby to be confident and believe in herself, but I also


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

I take life as it comes, and tackle any issues when they come, because they’re just obstacles, they’re not roadblocks.

told her that she is there to learn, she needs to listen to everybody around her, even apprentices, because there will be things that she needs to take on board and it’s important to keep an open mind,” said Glenn. “The apprenticeship with BHP has the potential to take Ruby all over the world, and even after finishing the qualification, further study and employment opportunities will become available to her that would not have been possible if she was working elsewhere,” he said. “The world really is her oyster as long as she commits to the long hours and hard work.” During work experience, Ruby noticed a lack of women in particular industries but believes that more women will be entering the electrical trade in the coming years. “BHP is aiming to achieve a 50/50 ratio of men and women by 2025,” said Ruby.

Ruby recently moved to Central Queensland to start her career with the industry giant and is feeling confident about her future. She is financially independent with the wages she earns working as an electrical apprentice and certainly doesn’t regret taking an industry pathway. “Tradespeople go straight into earning a wage, whereas for university students, it could take years and years before they earn as much as an electrician of the same age. “I take life as it comes, and tackle any issues when they come, because they’re just obstacles, they’re not roadblocks.” As she continues her apprenticeship journey in Blackwater, it is poignant to note that Ruby has paved the way for other AITC young people to follow in her footsteps, to one day work with industry giants.

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Expect   the

UNEXPECTED The Australian Industry Trade College has traditionally had a strong male cohort, but there are a growing number of girls at the school choosing to follow a path less travelled. Toowoomba campus young people, Jada, Emma G, Emma K, and Annabel are challenging gender stereotypes by pursuing trades one might not expect.

EMMA K “I was tossing up between two options, I either wanted to be some kind of mechanic or work in IT security. My dad’s in that industry, so it’s something that has always interested me. I’ve been offered some full time work experience with Heritage Bank, so I’ll start that soon, as well as my TAFE course.”

ANNABELLE

“I’m looking at pursuing fitting and turning. I will start a TAFE course in that and then look to find an apprenticeship.”

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EMMA G “I initially wanted to be an aircraft mechanic, so I did some work experience as a heavy diesel mechanic, but I didn’t really enjoy it. Now I’m thinking of becoming a paramedic, which means I’ll be doing a TAFE course and some work experience to make sure it’s what I really want to do.”

J A DA “I’ve always enjoyed hands-on activities, so I tried a mechanical course and liked it. Then I was talking to my mum about it, and she said I was probably better off going into heavy diesel. So I did some work experience, and I really enjoyed it.”


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LEADING OUR N E W E S T  C A M P U S Industry and education pathways is not a new concept to Australian Industry Trade College - Ipswich Campus Principal, Tracey Millar, who has enjoyed an extensive career in schools, registered training organisations and universities. Three months after joining the College and recruiting her hand-picked team of educators, the newest AITC

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Tracey in action Tracey speaks with our young people to welcome them on their first day of Term 1

The Campus Principal is no stranger to the Ipswich area, having started her teaching career locally at Ipswich Girls Grammar School, where Tracey worked for 12 years prior to a stint in universities. Tracey was then General Manager of a registered training organisation and Head of Studies at a technical college of 4,000 students. It was in this Executive role that she ran four divisions: Training; Resource Development; Student Services and a satellite campus in Brisbane City. But her desire to have a greater impact at the grassroots level grew stronger. Tracey believes it is her passion for industry-based training and her own experience as a mother that will enable her to lead the AITC Ipswich team to success. “The Australian Industry Trade College is the perfect fit for me - it is the best of both worlds,” says Tracey. “I have personal experience with both vocational and university pathways for young people, as one of my children went to university and the other pursued a VET qualification. They are both excelling in their chosen paths, and I am pleased to have been able to see them have equal opportunities.” Tracey connected with the principals from AITC’s other four campuses soon N

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Students at work Our young people keeping busy building furniture for an outdoor break-out space

after she joined the College to draw on their knowledge and experience in the role. They each were, “someone who had been through the exact same process. There were times when I felt like I had such a steep hill to climb, it was very valuable to be able to call and talk to someone, and have them understand exactly what I was experiencing.” Two weeks after the Ipswich campus opened, Tracey was asked if there was anything she would go back and do differently. “No, I really wanted to focus on culture,” she said. “And it’s working. I wasn’t focussed solely on culture for the young people, but also on culture among the staff. Now I hear the staff talking about going into workshops and learning spaces rather than lessons and classrooms, and one of the Team Leaders [teachers] said he wasn’t going to talk about maths concepts anymore, and will instead call them ‘work skills’. I think that’s great!” Tracey’s unique and vast work experience, as well as her dedication to the education of local young people have made her the ideal person to lead the AITC campus based in North Ipswich. She continues to work tirelessly to ensure the campus – in terms of

people, experience and delivery – is the very best it can be for young people. “I have discovered that I thrive in complexity. It has been a challenging time commencing a school from scratch. My staff and I didn’t even see the campus until the day the students commenced. It has been a whirlwind with lots of challenges but I have thoroughly enjoyed it and have loved seeing how far our young people have come in such a short time,” Tracey reflects. After just 10 weeks (one term) as Campus Principal, COVID-19 threw a curveball at Tracey, but she’s shown no signs of intimidation. “This has undoubtedly been one of my most challenging times as a leader. I am very lucky that I have a strong background in online delivery from my RTO days and so I like to think that I have been able to assist my staff to transition to this delivery style. There have been very stressful moments for me and for my staff, but especially the young people and their families, and I hope that they have felt supported through my leadership.” It’s safe to say that the Ipswich campus is in the hands of extraordinary leadership during these extraordinary times.


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

FORGING FORWARD IN TRYING TIMES The Australian Industry Trade College is showing no signs of slowing down due to COVID-19, with 14 people signed up to apprenticeships over the Easter holidays, despite an ever-changing, economically uncertain climate.

“Our independent industry-focussed school model is forging forward as we continue to work closely with employers to deliver employment outcomes through trying economic times,” says CEO Mark Hands. While some industries are seeing a downturn, employment in trades and health care is still going strong. Although these are uncertain times, we can be certain of our success. Below are some of the employment success stories of our most recent sign-ups.

A L E X PAT T E R S O N 30 March 2020 + Carpentry

Alex has been a quiet achiever since arriving at the AITC, always receiving excellent feedback on his work experience. After tossing up between plumbing and carpentry, he decided on the latter and was offered an apprenticeship after completing work experience with his employer.

TO M B I S B A S 28 March 2020 + Plumbing

Although Tom’s employer was not planning to employ an apprentice for his small business, when he met Tom, he knew he had met the person for the job. Tom impressed with his strong work ethic and is enjoying his new role.

Leo tried many trades before discovering what he wanted to do. The feedback he received from his work experience was nothing less than exceptional, so it was no surprise when he was signed up into a meat processing LEO GREENING apprenticeship. 31 March 2020 + Meat Processing, Smallgoods & Retailing

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H O L LY U N I T T 1 April 2020 + Carer - Aged Care and Disability

H AY L E Y H O F M A N N 7 April 2020 + Hairdressing

Holly has always known what she wants and will stop at nothing to make it happen. She was offered a position as a Disability Support Worker after her employer said they could not see their business operating without her.

Hayley completed a recent block of work experience with her new employer, after which time they knew she would be a great addition to the team. Hayley is excited to gain exposure to both the hair and beauty industries in her new role. CHARLIE SECCOMBE 9 April 2020 + Electrical

Charlie’s employer knew that while the current climate is difficult, he needed to make decisions for his business beyond the pandemic. This involved hiring an apprentice to help expand the business, and Charlie was the perfect person for the job. LLEYTON B ENNET T

J AC K S O N K N OW L E S 8 April 2020 + Plumbing

6 April 2020 + Plumbing

Lleyton completed work experience with his current employer and impressed them so much that they offered him an apprenticeship.

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Jackson has always been committed to his chosen trade, having spent 12 months gaining valuable experience with several local plumbing businesses. His experience allowed him to develop his employability and technical skills, which, in combination with his fantastic attitude and strong work ethic made him the right choice for his new employer. 2020

JASPER ABEL 14 April 2020 + Diesel Engine Technician

Jasper is a hard worker with a positive attitude. He performed so well during his placement he was offered a school-based apprenticeship.


BAILEY BARTON 17 April 2020 + Plumbing

Connor was signed quickly into his carpentry apprenticeship. He connected with his employer from the start of his placement, and showed his commitment with enthusiasm on the job.

Bailey consistently put in the hours and showed his enthusiasm and commitment to plumbing in every work placement he completed. Bailey proved to his employer that he was the best fit as a school-based apprentice.

EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

C O N N O R R OW L E Y 9 April 2020 + Carpentry

R OY P E D E R S O N 15 April 2020 + Plumbing

After completing seven weeks of work experience, Roy’s employer was so impressed with his team attitude and skills on the job, that he offered Roy a plumbing apprenticeship. C O N O R FA H Y 14 April 2020 + Electrical

Conor’s employer wasn’t initially looking for an apprentice, but Conor’s good attitude, work ethic and keenness to learn saw the employer change his mind and Conor brought on board.

H AY D E N M A H Y 14 April 2020 + Light Vehicle Mechanical Technician

Hayden had completed six months of work experience with his employer, who was looking for the right apprentice to bring on board. Hayden’s employer says he has a great attitude and showed a keenness to learn all aspects of the trade.

ANNABELLE CURRIE 6 April 2020 + Mechanical Engineering

Annabelle has been a stand out and a quiet achiever since beginning at the AITC in 2019, so it was so surprise to the team when she was offered a position with her Toowoomba employer.

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Student wellbeing is so important to the AITC that Redlands, like many campuses, invests in a full time Personal Development Coach who, in addition to supporting students at the College, takes every opportunity to bring in experts and organisations to discuss the importance of wellbeing at school and at work.

WELLBEING AT T H E C O R E O F

CONSTRUCTION Earlier this year, MATES in Construction spoke with our young people about how to spot when your mates need support and where to go for help. MATES in Construction was established to reduce the high level of suicide among Australian construction workers following a major report within the Queensland Commercial Building and Construction Industry, which found suicide rates in the industry were 2.38 times more common than the national average.

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“I did try to bury and ignore the bad feelings, but eventually what happens is the same as if you try to push a beach ball underwater… it pops back up,” said Caine. With a large number of young people at the AITC pursuing a construction apprenticeship, the College takes its role in preparing students for full time work in industry very seriously. The presentation focussed on the importance of noticing when your mates’ behaviour is different to normal, whether in person or online. “If they’re posting stuff online that’s really sad or just a bit out of character, reach out and ask them if they’re okay,” said Caine. “All of you can look out for each other. You spend a lot of time at school so you might see your school mates more than you see your other friends, so you will get to know each other really well,” said Caine.

“You don’t have to be their best mate to be the one who asks if they’re okay,” he said.

Working together for wellbeing

After the presentation, the students were all provided a card that listed resources and organisations for them to reach out to, most of which are free services.

Brenda Rooney (AITC)

EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Justin Geange and Caine Ansell, who both worked in construction for a number of years, opened up to the Year 10, 11, and 12 students about their own past mental health struggles and shared some of the signs to look for when mates may need support.

Dave Breeze (AITC), Bel Kibbler (AITC), Caine Ansell (MATES), Justin Geange (MATES), and

“MATES [in Construction] is a soft-touch service,” said Justin. “We have a big network of support services, so if someone calls us, they can speak to our case workers, or even to one of us who have worked in the construction industry,” he said. “Sometimes, people just need to have a yarn with us, and they don’t want to be referred on to a support service. Others will be connected with our case workers, who will refer them on to the services they need,” said Caine. Students at the Redlands campus were left with a pertinent piece of actionable advice. “It’s much easier to reach out when you have a mate doing it with you,” said Justin. “So instead of encouraging your mate who is struggling to make a call to someone who can help them, suggest you make the call together. Just say, ‘Hey mate, how about we call someone to get some help together’.”

M O R E A B O U T M AT E S

MATES in Construction is a charity that was established to reduce the high level of suicide among Australian construction workers. Their program is based on the simple idea that ‘suicide is everyone’s business’; if industry is to improve the mental health and wellbeing of workers and to reduce suicide, then everyone must play their part.

facebook.com/MATESinConstruction

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GLOBAL VIEW O U R I N T E R N AT I O N A L S E R V I C E T R I P

Young Australian Industry Trade College apprentices raised more than

$120,000 to construct homes for struggling families and communities in Cambodia in 2019 The energy behind this generosity is the biannual International Service Project (ISP), which is central to the AITC curriculum, teaching young people how to give back and serve communities less fortunate. N

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

Established in 2013, ISP teams have visited Cambodia four times building houses, roads, water filtration structures and playgrounds. More than $450,000 has been raised and invested over six years. The AITC works in partnership with the New Hope Cambodia community development program to ensure support is provided to the areas that are most severely impacted. “The project involves help from local Cambodian tradespeople, which is always interesting to see, as their methods and tools vastly differ from what we use here in Australia,” says Lee Smith, Senior Advisor Education Services (Industry Education & Quality), who led the team in 2019. “The local tradespeople lead the projects we undertake, and our young people and employers are there to support them and work hard to complete the job.” For the most recent project, the team

completed maintenance work on a school, built and painted a toilet block, and erected homes and a shade structure for the community. But Lee says the experience moves beyond industry skills to one that is more selfless and introspective. “The young people who come on the International Service Project benefit greatly from taking part in the experience. For most, it is a new experience, and while they will experience some culture shock, they are ultimately humbled to know they were part of something so important,” says Lee. “They gained a lot, including a sense of altruism and perspective. It made them realise how much more there is to life than what’s in their small bubble. The young people were very respectful of the culture, particularly during a local ceremony we were invited to. We notice changes in attitude in the young people. They happen in a way that is quiet but

profound. A few days into the trip the young people start to realise how little the local community has, and how lucky they are in Australia.” And even after it was tools down and time to return home, the ISP team continued to reflect – this time not on the impact the trip had on them as individuals, but the significant impact they had on a small Cambodian community in just a few short weeks. “There are always moments of reflection. In this trip, it came when we were in the bus driving back after seeing a family move into a house we had just built. The young people were silent on the bus ride and we knew they were thinking about the significance of what had just happened,” Lee added. The ISP and it’s team – of young people and staff from the College, as well as AITC’s industry partners who accept the students for work experience, P

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apprenticeships and traineeships – epitomises the AITC values. “We are proud to offer this program for young people at the College as an international aspect of our Gift of Giving program, where we donate our time and resources more locally.” Young people who wish to join the International Service Project must do so by application, explaining why they are passionate about taking part. The onus is placed on each ISP team member to raise funds to cover the costs of their travel and accommodation, as well as make a financial contribution. Each team continues to surpass the minimum funds requirement, enabling additional funds to be contributed to the project for maximum benefit.

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

“WE MAK E A L IVING BY W H AT W E G E T, B U T W E M A K E A L I F E BY W H AT W E G I V E .” – WINSTON C HURC HILL

GIFT OF GIVING There is more to the curriculum than education and industry. At the Australian Industry Trade College, young people are encouraged to give back to and be involved in their local community by volunteering their time and skills. It’s a vital part of the unique program delivered at the school for industry, by industry to enable young people to acquire the necessary skills to be a contributing citizen. “We teach the young people the importance of giving back when they can. We try to ensure all of our young people take part in the Gift of Giving program at least once. What we are hoping to do is instil a sense of responsibility in the young people. Our hope is that when they graduate and later become fully qualified in their trade, they will use those skills to give back to the local community,” says Brad Pinch, Assistant Principal – Industry of the Gold Coast Campus. “The Gift of Giving program is not about ticking boxes. It’s about giving the young people a sense of community and belonging.” The project is managed much like a project out in industry, including a project framework, timeline, safety analysis and budget, to provide a consistency to the real world.

“Often we are in a sensitive or high-risk environment. For example, we did some work recently at a shelter for women and children who had experienced domestic and family violence. The project brief mirrors what many of the young people will experience in the workplace. The program incorporates a focus on improving employability skills, so we make it as close to a real work environment as we can. At the close of the Gift of Giving project, a debrief is equally important. “The project debrief provides a time for the young people to reflect on the difference they made by completing the activity. It’s important that we put weight on the impact the project has on the community, or the beneficiaries.” Experts say that volunteering and giving back to the community can have as great an impact on young people as it does the beneficiaries. As well as a sense of personal satisfaction, young people will often experience an increased sense of social awareness. It has been reported that giving back and volunteering can also build confidence in young people, and develop innovation, teamwork, communication, and responsibility skills, all necessary for a career in industry.

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Experiential leadership and team building programs, based on history and the values of Courage, Mateship, Sacrifice and Perseverance.

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EMPOWER

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

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PATHWAY TO SUCCESS Why those with a Vocational Education Training qualification are 2.5 times more likely to get a job

ON THE RADAR We explore a range of trades, across various industry sectors, crucial to the Queensland economy

THE ENTREPRENERS Generation Z set to become the most entrepreneurial generation the world has ever seen

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TIMES A U N I V E R S I T Y O F M E L B O U R N E S T U DY H A S F O U N D T H AT S T U D E N T S W H O H O L D VO C AT I O N A L E D U C AT I O N T R A I N I N G ( V E T ) Q U A L I F I C AT I O N S W E R E 2 . 5 T I M E S M O R E L I K E LY T O H AV E A J O B THAN THOSE WITH PHD OR MASTERS DEGREES.

Research suggests alternative pathway for long-term stability

The study, funded by the Australian Research Council and published in the Journal of Sociology, followed students who completed Year 12 in 2006 and chose various post-graduate pathways. These findings are not surprising, having seen the failure of traditional schools in preparing young people for a future in industry, by asserting tertiary education as the only path to success. Despite popular belief, the findings show there is not a strong correlation between tertiary studies and employment for graduates, and that ‘a relatively large proportion of highly educated young adults are experiencing underemployment and precarious work.’ “The traditional education model does not work for all Queensland young people. Employers want young people who have completed Year 12, have had experience on the job site, and who are prepared to work,” said AITC CEO, Mark Hands. Unable to rely on traditional education models, the Australian Industry Trade College was established by industry as a solution to Queensland’s shortage N

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of capable, skilled apprentices. The College opened in 2008 on the Gold Coast, and has since expanded to five campuses with a reputation as a gamechanger in education and a trail-blazer for industry.

History tells us that not every young person will thrive in a university environment, but they will thrive in an alternative environment when given the right tools, the right support, and a strong belief in their abilities.

“At the AITC, we take young people with technical intelligence and support them in completing their schooling, as well as connect them with industry leaders to secure an apprenticeship or traineeship in the area of their choice,” says Mark.

“Many of our young people come to the College thinking they are second-class citizens because they want to pursue a trade,” says Mark. “We show them that there is value in pursuing a trade, and our curriculum is designed to support them in becoming great tradesmen and women.”

And the results speak for themselves, with 99% of AITC graduates in 2019 completing their QCE and 90% graduating with a full-time apprenticeship. But it’s not all about technical skills and report cards - the AITC runs a valuesbased curriculum that gives students the skills that industry leaders are looking for: safe and reliable tradies who will look you in the eye and show up on time. These defining values were a direct result of feedback from industry leaders who highlighted the importance placed on values and community outreach in potential apprentices.

The study, titled Chasing rainbows: How many educational qualifications do young people need to acquire meaningful, ongoing work? states that many young people liken using their educational qualifications to secure employment, to ‘chasing rainbows’. At the AITC, university is not the only pathway to success.


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

UNDER ON THE RADAR Mention the word ‘trade’ and your mind likely goes to carpentry, electrical, plumbing, perhaps hospitality or hairdressing. But there is an abundance of apprenticeships available across a whole range of industry sectors; some of which you may not have considered, but all of which are crucial to the Queensland economy.

Blast Coater Cleaner / Industrial Spray Painter / Finisher

Landscaper

Glass and Glazing

Planting, building landscape features with a number of materials, installing irrigation and drainage, operating equipment and supervising landscape maintenance.

Manufacturing, processing, moving, and installing glass products, as well as glass processing and glazing in commercial and residential settings.

Waterproofing

Prepare surfaces for painting, blast clean surfaces, or apply liquid or solid polyamide protective surface coatings.

Apply waterproofing to below ground, internal, and external wet areas.

Dental Assistant

Signwriting

Assist dentists, dental hygienists, dental therapists and oral health therapists through infection control and administration.

Design, create, paint and install signs for a multitude of structures, displays and hoardings.

Stonemason

WHICH

Work with marble, sandstone and limestone to create building components like floors, walls, stairs, benchtops and more.

WILL Marine trades Specific to the marine industry, including marine craft construction, marine mechanic, marine engine driver and diesel fitting.

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“... build a solid foundation to keep the doors of opportunity open”

Dear Julie, E XC E R P T S F R O M ‘A L E T T E R T O A Y E A R 1 0 S T U D E N T, F R O M A U S T R A L I A’ S C H I E F S C I E N T I S T ’

You lamented that you are anxious

about your subject choices for Years

11 and 12. You’re not alone! These are

important decisions and there’s lots of confusing advice around.

In my career I’ve been an academic researcher, a businessman, a university chancellor and now a government adviser. Based on this experience, some warm advice… For starters, build a solid foundation to keep the doors of opportunity open. This means building your expertise in the two fundamental subjects: English and mathematics. Neither can be picked up easily later in life. They are best learned layer upon layer, from prep school through to Year 12. Mastery of language is crucial to succeeding in whatever you do – whether it’s writing a report to advise the government on electricity markets or a job application. Your ability to “win friends and influence people” will only be as good as your language

skills. The best way to hone them is to read a lot, and read some more. Novels, histories, science-fiction – it doesn’t matter, just read!

through which you can practise these

Mathematics is the language of science and commerce. I can’t overemphasise that for many tertiary study fields you must have strong knowledge of mathematics. These include medicine, science, engineering, economics and commerce. If you like, you can look at it from a fundamentalist point of view: in the beginning, there was mathematics, and mathematics begat physics, and physics begat chemistry, and chemistry begat biology, and biology begat commerce.

you won’t make the team.

You’ll hear lots of talk about “21st Century skills”, such as resilience, clear thinking and collaboration. These are important, but truth is, these were 20th Century skills, too. I learned them, a long time ago. They are important, but they are useless unless you study demanding subjects

to one or the other and you will be

skills. It’s like playing basketball – you need to know the rules and on-court behaviour – but unless you practise There is no substitute for raw knowledge, even in the age of internet search. After all, there is no use learning to collaborate if you don’t have anything distinctive to contribute. Be aware that employers look for “T-Shaped” individuals, where the vertical pole of the T represents deep discipline-specific knowledge and the horizontal bar of the T represents 21st Century skills. Restrict your focus limiting your employment options. There is, of course, much more to a fulfilling life than these suggestions, but I trust that they will help. With warm regards, The Incurable Engineer

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

THE ENTREPRENEURIAL GENERATION Many studies, statistics, and experts say that Generation Z (those born between 1997 and 2010) are set to become the most entrepreneurial generation we have seen.

According to experts, this is likely due to three things: •

The fragile job market for young people;

The increase in apps like AirTasker that make it easier to sell your services than ever before; and

Social media platforms that give anyone and everyone a voice and a place to promote themselves, or their products and services.

Studies suggest the entrepreneurial Gen Z have goals to ‘take matters in their own hands’ when it comes to social issues, as they are not just

starting up small businesses, but also not-for-profit organisations and social enterprises. Rather than waiting for big companies or government to make changes, this generation are doing it themselves. Born with an inherent knowledge of technology and understanding of social media, Generation Z have a head start in many aspects. Social media has given businesses a free and accessible way to promote products and services to customers and potential customers, and nobody has a better knowledge of social media than Generation Z.

While Generation Y created ‘side gigs’ to supplement the income from their permanent positions, Generation Z are more interested in working for themselves full time. It is no coincidence that this has come about for the generation who are having the most trouble finding work. In a difficult job market, this generation are creating jobs and work for themselves. Many young people at the Australian Industry Trade College are interested in starting their own businesses after gaining their qualifications, rather than being ‘on the tools’ for the foreseeable future.

W H AT O U R YO U N G P E O P L E A R E S AY I N G

Why do you want to have your own business one day?

So I can pass the knowledge I’ve learnt onto other young people.

To be able to have a connection with your own clients.

To be able to build a strong and positive reputation for my work, and strong relationships between other trades and customers.

Choose what employees you work with, therefore you can build a positive working environment.

- NICHOLAS WILKINS

To discover new ideas and be able to try them as it’s your own store. - DAKOTA TOOTH

I’d like to run my own business one day because I like the way you can work on your terms when you want to and have that flexibility you don’t often get in normal jobs. - BROCK HOWE

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DIGITAL FOOTPRINT Resources to help students navigate social media and ensure employability

HOLDING SPACE Our resident expert discusses the importance of parents holding space for their teenager

SUPPORTING LEARNING Helpful tips for parents on how to support learning during the senior schooling years

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

australian.industry.trade.college Queensland, Australia

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YOUR DIGITAL FOOTPRINT

Online bullying is a very real and very serious problem, and toxic online friendships can affect young people in a serious way. Blocking and deleting these unpleasant accounts can provide some relief. Muting or unfollowing simply removes the content from the muted account from your newsfeed.

03 australian.industry.trade.college Given the current environment, below are some helpful resources on how to navigate social media and ensure employability. Many of us think we know social media back to front. But there is more to online safety than phishing – it’s about personal brand. Your digital footprint can and will walk with you forever and it is up to you to control what that footprint looks like in 5 or 10 years’ time.

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CHOOSE YOUR CONTENT WISELY In today’s digital age, it can be tempting to document every move you make and upload it to social media, but you should think twice before uploading content that you may regret in a few days, months, or years. Remember that the internet never forgets and neither will a prospective employer.

BLOCK, DELETE, AND MUTE The block, delete, and mute functions on social media are useful and can be utilised to make platforms a more pleasant experience. For young people at school, friendships can be more difficult to navigate than ever, as the day no longer finishes at the end-of-school bell.

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LOCK IT DOWN Keeping your profiles set to private will help to protect your privacy. It is, however, important to remember that even a private account is never truly private, and it is still recommended that you adhere to these points regardless of your privacy settings.

STAY EMPLOYABLE Your future employers will scan your social media profiles. For some hiring managers, it will be the first place they go to check out a potential employee. If you wouldn’t say it in front of your grandma, your boss, or your friends, don’t post it online. Social media has given us the opportunity to be somewhat anonymous, but don’t be fooled. Assume everything you upload is going to be attributed to your name forever, including controversial opinions.

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EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

HOLDING SPACE MICHELLE MCTEGG + P E R S O N A L D E V E LO P M E N T C OAC H

The demands on your time and energy are different now that you have a teenager. In the early years, you needed to feed, bath and comfort your little one. Today, your teenager is older and more independent, but they still need active parent engagement in their learning and life. So, what does it mean to ‘hold space’? “I’m not just talking about physical space,” says Michelle. “Rather, focussing on being patient, putting their needs above your own and really listening. Holding space means being available. Not just being there, but making time and being present in your young person’s life. You have to create space to do this successfully.” In the digital age, it is more important than ever to take time to disconnect from our devices and spend quality time with family. It will come as no surprise that this may require some serious negotiation, but Michelle says your teenager is more likely to put their device down if they are following your lead. “As parents, we are constantly modelling behaviours to our children. They are always watching and learning from us.” Once you’ve negotiated some tech-free time with your teenager, the next step is to find something in common. “Do activities together, whether that be cooking, eating, or watching a TV show,” says Michelle. “You have to fully engage with them, gift them your full attention; without judgement or criticism.

In this edition we take five minutes with Michelle McTegg, Personal Development Coach, to discuss the importance of parents holding space for their teenager.

“Get into the habit of modelling healthy habits and building family traditions. Find what is right for your family. Movie night in the house or out and about, old fashion games night with Scrabble, Monopoly or on the Xbox. Whatever works for your family, take the time and space and be together.”

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YEARS 10 TO 12

Ways to support your teenager’s learning

01 Keep up-to-date by reading information provided by the school (e.g. newsletters, emails, social media) and attending events whenever possible like information evenings and parent orientation evenings.

WORK WITH YOUR TEENAGER TO MONITOR SCREEN TIME AND MAINTAIN GROUND RULES TO ENSURE CONSISTENCY.

02

04

Talk with your teenager about their goals and aspirations and communicate high but realistic expectations about their education and career.

05 Ask your teenager about their learning and school day. This shows your child that you are interested in their learning and their wellbeing.

This article has been adapted from an article by Queensland Government Department of Education

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GOLD COAST

Work with your teenager to establish appropriate study arrangements at home or another location (e.g. library, homework club) and develop a routine to assist them to balance school, personal and/ or work commitments.

Parent orientation

PROMOTE A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INCLUDING ADEQUATE SLEEP, EXERCISE, HEALTHY EATING, AND POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH.

06

Ask the school about opportunities to be involved in discussions with your teenager about subject planning and selection, further education and career options.

08

Year 3 maths excursion

07

Access local services including local community health services, parenting programs and libraries that can support your child’s learning and development.

Roof Shout


EDUCATING TOMORROW’S INDUSTRY LEADERS

E N D N OT E

around campus Women in construction IPSWICH

TOOWOOMBA

REDLANDS

Rookie Wheelbarrow Race

Pendulums in maths

SUNSHINE COAST

Learning from home

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TAFE QUEENSLAND IS READY FOR BUSINESS

CHOOSE TRAINING YOU CAN TRUST

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RTO No. 0275 | CRICOS No. 03020E

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AITC’S training partner of choice