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social UILT Q

Visit www.QUILTsocial.com to download a PDF version of this issue.

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‌eat, sleep, quilt, repeat

IS S U E

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essential tips for * interfacing * quilting with denim * using templates * quilting modern placemats * illustrating proper tension * making your own bias tape * sewing with vinyl * NY Beauty the easy way * making pockets

* PLUS * Tea Time Set Curling Rocks Quilted Runner New York Beauty Quilting Retreat Bag Minion Mug Rug Pillowcase & Bedscarf

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PFAFF

Perfect for

Perfection starts here.™

Small Spaces & Going Places

passport 3.0

• Compact/Portable Sewing Machine (lightweight: 6.7kg) ™

• The Original IDT System • Thread Snips - Automatically cut top and bobbin threads • PFAFF® Original Presser Foot System • 100 Stitches

00©

At participating Canadian dealers. 2

http://pfaff.com/en-CA

©2015 KSIN Luxembourg 11.S.ar.l. All rights reserved. All statements valid at time of printing. PFAFF, PERFECTION STARTS HERE, IDT and PASSPORT are trademarks of KSIN Luxembourg 11, S.ar.l


editor's letter Tools, are our best friends, they make our quilting tasks so much easier. As I enjoy the process of making a quilt, I often try to imagine what our ancestors might have used to cut fabric, all those small triangles, squares and stripes, and so accurately cut using scissors. They used whatever little amount of tools they had. The rotary cutter was thankfully introduced to the quilter in the late '70s, allowing several layers of fabric to be cut with one precision cut. This allowed to cut our pieces in a different manner altogether, as a strip that would then be sub-cut, for example. In this decade, we now have the TrueCut System which has a guide on the ruler so the ergonomic rotary cutter doesn't veer off the straight line! I mean, how much better can it get? While I'm talking about one tool here, there are thousands of great products that make our quilting more enjoyable than ever before, not counting the evolution that has taken place in our sewing machines. Phenomenal. You could say, we are spoiled. This gives us greater freedom to create what we imagine. One of my goals on QUILTsocial is to show the many effective quilting and sewing tools and how to use them to make your quilting life more pleasant, or perhaps with less tears. I hope when you visit QUILTsocial, you discover new tools that improve not only your quilting experience, but make every one of your tasks that much easier.

Cheerfully,

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QUILTsocial .com

…for those who gather with thread and fabric to ‘eat, sleep, quilt, repeat’.

PUBLISHER, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, ART DIRECTOR Carla A. Canonico carla@QUILTsocial.com PUBLISHER, ADVERTISING SALES John De Fusco john@QUILTsocial.com PHOTOGRAPHERS John De Fusco, Carla A. Canonico, Alessia De Fusco BLOGGERS/CONTRIBUTORS Christine Baker FairfieldRoadDesigns.com Gail Berry-Graham thequiltstudio.ca Jackie White jabotquilt.blogspot.ca Jean Boyd patternsbyjeanboyd.com Jennifer Houlden quiltsbyjen.ca Sarah Vanderburgh sewjoycreations.com GRAPHIC & WEB DESIGN Carla A. Canonico carla@QUILTsocial.com Sandra Armas WEBSITE / BLOG : http://QUILTsocial.com Like us on Facebook : QUILTsocial Follow us on Twitter : @QUILTsocial WHERE TO GET YOUR COPY QUILTsocial is a quarterly eMagazine published by A Needle Pulling Thread. It is available free for personal use online at http://QUILTsocial.com. A limited number of printed copies of QUILTsocial are available for purchase at select quilt shops and specialty stores. Ask for it at your local shop. QUILTsocial is not available by subscription. QUILT SHOPS If you are interested in carrying QUILTsocial in your store, please email john@QUILTsocial.com. EDITORIAL Designers and other contributors who would like to be considered for future issues please email carla@QUILTsocial.com with a brief description of your work and your proposed project for the magazine. ©2016 QUILTsocial. All rights reserved. Issue #6. ISSN 2368-5913. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. All designs, patterns, and information in this magazine are for private, non-commercial use only, and are copyrighted material owned by their respective creators or owners.

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17 A Needle Pulling Thread Magazine 71 Brother 65 Business Directory 39 Coats 45 Country Concessions 25 CreativFestival 7 Gütermann Creativ 55 Northcott 2 PFAFF 4 QUILTsocial 45 Ruby Pearl Quilts 45 The Needlework Pages 72 UNIQUE Sewing and Quilting


QUILTsocial

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c o n t e n t s 6 Hooked on Books 8 Tea Time Set 14 Bedscarf and Pillowcases 18 Quilting with Denim 24 Tips on Piecing, Free-motion Quilting, and Binding 28 Elements of Modern Quilting 36 Curling Rocks Quilted Runner 46 3 Ways to Spark Your Quilting Creativity 48 New York Beauty Quilting Retreat Bag 50 Interfacing and Working with Templates 58 Interfacing 60 How to use Carefree Curves templates 68 Fusible Bias Tape Made Easy

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hooked on books

Quilting with a Modern Slant

10 Minute Blocks

Quilting with a Modern Slant: People, Patterns, and Techniques Inspiring the Modern Quilt Community Modern quilting allows artists the freedom to play with traditions and take liberties with fabrics, patterns, colors, stitching, and the ways in which they all connect. In Quilting with a Modern Slant, Rachel May introduces you to more than 70 modern quilters who have developed their own styles, methods, and aesthetics. Their ideas, their quilts, and their tips, tutorials, and techniques will inspire you to try something new and follow your own creativity wherever it leads.

Like speed cutting, the '10-minute' technique is revolutionizing patchwork. Anyone can sew large blocks in just 10 minutes. Sewers who previously avoided quilting because 'it just takes too much time' are getting involved. Fast and fabulous... with flair! That's what you get when you turn large blocks into speedy quilts using this handy technique. You can really make a 19" block in less than 10 minutes. That means you can sew a king-size quilt top in a day, a throw quilt in an hour or two! Imagine how many quilts you will finish this year!

by Rachel May

by Suzanne McNeill

32 pages, ISBN 978-1-57421-669-1 Fox Chapel Publishing www.thomasallen.ca

224 Pages, ISBN 978-1-61212-063-8 www.thomasallen.ca

Sew Scandinavian

Quilt Love

35 step-by-step sewing projects that encapsulate the simplicity and elegance of Scandinavian style. Scandinavian style is perennially popular due to its simplicity and elegance. Sew Scandinavian is a collection of beautiful hand-stitched projects inspired by her Swedish childhood. Included are projects to bring warmth to any interior, handstitched accessories, and adorable projects for the nursery. Finally, there are seasonal crafting ideas, such as forest friends, Christmas stocking and an eye-catching winter mobile to adorn your home. Each project is accompanied by step-by-step photographs and clear instructions.

Every quilt tells a story. But when scraps from personal items are incorporated--a baby blanket, a vintage T-shirt, Dad's favorite tie--that quilt becomes a cherished keepsake. "Quilt Love "offers today's quilters a modern twist on free-form, scrap, and patchwork quilting by combining a welcome blend of quilting technique and pattern ideas for incorporating fabric mementos into quilts large and small. And with inexpensive stash quilting gaining popularity, this contemporary resource is sure to please. Quilt Love shows quilters how to easily create modern heirlooms to be passed down from generation to generation.

by Kajsa Kinsella

by Cassandra Ellis

128 Pages, ISBN 978-1-78249-241-2 Cico Books www.thomasallen.ca

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144 Pages, ISBN 978-1-60085-501-6 The Taunton Press www.thomasallen.ca


cr cr eativ eativ

100% 100% cotton cotton thread thread A A fine, fine, strong, strong, high high quality quality sewing sewing thread thread for hand or machine sewing, no matter for hand or machine sewing, no matter the the stitch stitch type type or or fabric. fabric.

Gütermann Gütermann 50 50 wt. wt. Cotton Cotton Quilting Quilting thread thread is made of long staple 100% Egyptian is made of long staple 100% Egyptian mercerized mercerized cotton; cotton; it’s it’s versatile versatile and and gives gives seams a natural character. seams a natural character. •• Suitable Suitable for for hand hand or or machine machine sewing; sewing; the the perfect thread for your quilting perfect thread for your quilting projects projects •• Larger Larger cone cone sizes sizes are are excellent excellent for for long long arm arm quilting machines quilting machines •• Available Available in in 100m, 100m, 250m, 250m, 400m, 400m, 800m, 800m, 3000m 3000m and 5000m spool lengths and 5000m spool lengths •• 186 186 stunning stunning solid solid and and variegated variegated shades shades •• Ideal for ornamental stitches, decorative Ideal for ornamental stitches, decorative seams seams and and embroidery embroidery •• Soft and supple Soft and supple with with tear tear and and abrasion abrasion resistance resistance •• Colorfast: Colorfast:  fade fade resistant resistant to to UV UV rays rays and and multiple washings multiple washings

Look Look for for Gütermann Gütermann threads threads at at your your favourite favourite fabric, fabric, sewing sewing and and quilting quilting store! store! 7

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Tea Time Set

Husqvarna Viking® provided the following sewing machine and products to make the sample: HUSQVARNA VIKING® DESIGNER EPIC™ sewing and embroidery machine HUSQVARNA VIKING® PREMIER+™ ULTRA software Tea Cozy design is HUSQVARNA VIKING® Christmas lace kit INSPIRA® Stabilizers INSPIRA® Machine Needles INSPIRA® Scissors Robison Anton Embroidery Threads Sulky™ Threads Signature 40wt Cotton Machine Quilting Thread Hoops

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In this issue, and the next issues to follow, we’re going to explore many kitchen and home decorating accessories to sew for your home. Important to remember is that there are no barriers from season to season when it comes to fabric choices or embroideries. Visualize each project in its seasonal or all year round fabric choice. That means holiday seasons can be interchanged when it comes to embroidery. So if you would like to make this tea cozy in December with holidays in mind, you can easily switch the fabric and colours of thread! Or each accessory featured in the 2016 issues for that matter, can be made in all the same home decorating fabric to match your décor.

The beauty of these mug rugs and wraps is that they are quick to make, can be adapted to any décor and stitching, and make great little gifts to cheer anyone on your gift list throughout the year.

Because these are quick and delightful projects to make, create a set for yourself or for gift giving. Make more than one and enjoy a seasonal line-up of each item. The front and back this tea cozy, for example, are made in cotton print, and the cotton lace is added with a silk ‘scrunchy’ for the top. Explore using many other fabrics for the same project, such as wools, cottons, silks, laces, linens, satins and felts. Stay tuned for kitchen accessories in ANPTmag 2016 issues to include a table runner, cushions, sewing machine cover, and more home décor ideas. Watch for quilting, machine embroidery, serging, felting, specialty feet and stitches and of course software to be included in all of these future fun creations. Explore the freedom to adjust the patterns to your desired sizes and shapes if you like, and most of all have fun with it.

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skill level intermediate finished measurements 12” x 11” [30.5 x 28cm] materials fabric • 2 pieces 13” x 16” [33 x 40.5cm] printed cotton for front and back • 2 pieces 13” x 16” [33 x 40.5cm] printed or solid cotton for lining • 2 pieces 13” x 16” [33 x 40.5cm] batting, this can be cotton, polyester, thermal or wool • 2 pieces 3” X 16” [2.5 x 40.5cm] silk or satin for tea cozy scrunchy • 8” x 52” [20 x 132cm] light weight lace piece • 2 pieces 3½” x 8” [9 x 20cm] linen – mug cozies • 2 pieces 5½” x 5½” [14 x 14cm] linen – mug rugs • 2 pieces 4” x 11¼” [10 x 28.5cm] felt – mug cozies • 2 pieces 6¼” x 6¼” [16 x 16cm] felt – mug rugs

software • Husqvarna Viking® Christmas lace kit for the Tea Cozy design • PFAFF® Elegant cross stitch design #473 - embroidery designs used for the mug wrap and mug rug needles • INSPIRA® microtex needle size 80 or 90 • INSPIRA® embroidery needles size 90 threads • assorted colours of Robison- Anton® 40wt Rayon thread for machine embroidery • assorted colours of Sulky® 30wt Blendable threads for construction • assorted colours Signature® 40wt Cotton Machine Quilting threads for machine embroidery décor on tea cozy front

stabilizers • INSPIRA® Tear N Wash with graph for making pattern • INSPIRA® Stabilizer Cut Away for machine embroidery mugs and other requirements for mug wrap and mug rug rug • appliqué pressing sheet • INSPIRA® Stabilizer Fast & Easy Tear Away for decorative stitches • cutting tools to include rotary cutter, cutting mat, and INSPIRA® • INSPIRA® Stabilizer Aqua Magic for ornamental embroidery on scissors tea cozy • machine embroidery hoop 80 x 80 • machine embroidery hoop 120 x 120 • hot touch crystals tool Preparation Steps • 1 pkg ½” elastic 1. Prewash cotton fabrics. • ¼” bodkin Note: It’s also important to do tea pot fittings throughout the project • point turning tool to ensure your tea cozy is the correct fit. The tea cozy template in• marking tools cludes the seam allowance. • assorted buttons • 5” or 6” zipper 2. Trace the template on Tear N Wash stabilizer. Adjust the pattern according to the size of the tea cozy. This Tea cozy is for sewing feet used a large tea pot. The top edge of the pattern is a petal shape • embroidery foot for spring season. Create your own top edge design if desired. • general sewing foot Adjust to the size of your own tea pot. • topstitching foot with guide • S foot or sewing foot for directional stitches • zipper foot • ¼'' seam foot • button placement tool/foot

instructions

Layers for sewing

Quilted with omni-motion stitch

Elastic placement and pinning for fit

Instruction photos by Cheryl Stranges

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Front and Back Tea Cozy Make 2 1. Layer the fabric as follows: batting, cotton lining right side up and cotton print right side down. Place the template on the layered pieces. Pin into place. 2. Mark the top of the cotton print fabric for turning right side out later. This can be 3” to 4” opening. 3. Leave a 2” opening on the right and left side of the base of the cozy to create a channel casing for the elastic.

5. Placing the embroideries on the tea cozy is exciting. Hand stitch them where desired on the front and back of the tea cozy. 6. Following manufactures instructions, use a Hot Touch tool, place crystals on the embroideries and secure. Omni-motion stitches Omni-motion stitches are wonderful to work with. These are a larger decorative stitch that use a special foot, and tear away stabilizer behind the fabric. They vary in size and even though the fabric is thick, the stabilizer is recommended for a great performance. Choose your favourite omni-motion stitch. 1. For the single omni-motion stitch to machine quilt the front and back tea cozy, use the 40wt Robison-Anton® Rayon thread in the needle, and a 60wt bobbin thread. Stitch it out in multiple locations, and in doing so, this will quilt the layers for your front and back tea cozy. 2. Tear away the stabilizer after completion.

Note: If you have a sewing advisor on your sewing machine, please set it to woven/heavy for this project. 4. Thread the sewing machine with cotton thread and stitching around the pattern close to the edge. Leave an opening for turning the fabric right side out. 5. Choose an edge finishing stitch and proceed to finish the edges. Trim away excess fabric from the finished edge. Clip into areas of curves on upper edge. Turn right side out. 6. Press. 7. Use a bodkin to pull the ½” elastic through the channels at the bottom edge of front and back pieces. Pull the elastic to desired width to fit over the tea pot base. 8. Stitch all of the open seams closed, including where the pieces were turned right side out. 9. Topstitch using a topstitching foot around all outer edges.

Zipper preparation 1. Choose a short zipper and install the zipper foot on the sewing machine, choosing thread to match the zipper. Lay the two completed quilted/embroidered pieces side by side. 2. Place the bottom of the zipper at the base of the cozy. This zippered edge is the opening for the spout. 3. This zipper application was simply stitched on top; it was not inserted into the seam. You may choose to insert the zipper. Pin the zipper on top of the front and back pieces and stitch the zipper into position with a zipper foot.

Machine Embroidery 1. Hoop the Aqua Magic stabilizer and load the embroidery design of choice. This particular design is an actual seasonal ornament, but this is a great example of seasonal crossovers. Christmas designs aren’t just for Christmas; it can be carried into other seasons. Another example of this is the Husqvarna Viking Decorate for Easter Kit. Embroidered eggs can be used for Christmas Ornaments. Watch for this in a future issue. 2. Thread your embroidery machine with Signature 40wt Cotton Machine Quilting Thread in the needle and 60wt polyester thread in the bobbin to match. 3. Embroider the designs and when complete trim away excess stabilizer. 4. Soak and rinse the water soluble stabilizer away and lay out to dry, following stabilizer manufacturing instructions.

Choose a lace piece you love

Lace preparation 1. The lace in the sample has a scallop design on one edge only. Another option is to embroider your own lace. 2. Fold lengthwise the unfinished edge of the lace ½” to the wrong side. Place a tear away stabilizer under the folded edge and stitch the hem in place. Then fold the lace piece in half lengthwise right sides together. Stitch the right and left sides. Turn right side out and slip this lace over the upper edges of front and back tea cozy pieces. Stitch lace in place.

Lace placement

Scrunchy sewn at the fold edge

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1. Cinch the lace in between the scallops and using a satin stitch with a width of 7mm and stitch length of 2, stitch the lace in its cinched position. Embellish this lace inlet with a small satin bow or other embellishment. 2. Repeat for each scallop. 3. Place your completed tea cozy on your tea pot for a fitting. Pin into positons that need to be stitched leaving an opening for the handle of the pot. Stitch. Also stitch the base together. Scrunchy for teapot 1. Cut the silk strip and press each long edge ½” to the wrong side. Press the strip in half lengthwise. 2. Stitch ¹⁄₈” along the fold and on the opposite side to close the edges of the strip lengthwise. Using a bodkin pull the elastic through the strip to desired fullness. 3. Press. 4. Pin elastic at each unfinished short edge. Place the unfinished edges together and stitch together. Finger press the seam down and stitch down. 5. Make more than one scrunchy if desired so you can change up the colours for different occasions.

7. Pin each into position and straight stitch into position first. Select a decorative thread choice to match the fabric. Select a very narrow satin stitch and edge stitching foot, and proceed to stitch embroidery design onto each felt piece. 8. Cut to desired sizes. 9. The mug wraps require an additional width of approximately 2” of felt on each side of the embroidered piece. 10. Fold one of these edges over 1” to wrong side. On this same side, clip a small hole into the center of the folded edge to place elastic loop. Place a stabilizer piece into the folded edge as well to add stability. Pull the folded elastic piece through the hole and stitch along the edge with the fold line. Repeat about ½” from that stitching line. The elastic is reinforced in the edge. 11. On the opposite side of the mug wrap position a button and stitch into place either by machine using the button placement tool/foot, or stitch by hand.

Machine embroidery for mugs and mug mat 1. Hoop the cut away stabilizer. This stabilizer will in fact not be cut away later. It will be left in to add stability to each item. 2. Thread the embroidery machine with 40wt embroidery thread and 60wt bobbin thread. 3. Hoop the linen fabric for these embroideries. 4. Select the embroideries, in this case a cross stitch design was chosen. 5. Embroider and cut embroidered fabric to desired sizes for mug accessories. Leave a small or large edge around the embroidery for satin stitching. 6. Place the embroideries on felt pieces for each accessory.

Cinching the lace

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Having fun with omni-motion stitches

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Tea TimeTemplate Set Enlarge to 200% to get actual size. Seam allowance included.

Cheryl Stranges

Product & Event Specialist, Husqvarna Viking husqvarnaviking.com seecherylsew.blogspot.com

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bed scarf & pillowcases Freshen up the bedroom with a new spring bed scarf and matching pillowcases. The out of the ordinary wedge design is easily achieved using the Sew Easy 10째 Wedge Ruler. The wedge design can also be used to make table runners and palcemats to match your home decor. Use the Clover Kanzashi flower maker to embellish the bed scarf with matching flowers.

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Sew Easy 10° Wedge Ruler

skill level easy finished measurements bed scarf 20” x 58” [51 x 147cm] pillowcase 20” x 32” [51 x 81cm] materials fabric • fabric 1: 2.7yd [2.5m] cotton for body of 2 pillowcases and wedges of bed scarf • fabric 2: 2.7yd [2.5m] cotton for 2 pillowcase bands, wedges and back of bed scarf • fabric 3: 20” [50cm] cotton for accent band on pillowcase and binding of bed scarf • 21” x 60” [53 x 152.5cm] quilt batting • 3 to 4 fat quarters for flowers

Bed Scarf

notions • Sew Easy 10° Wedge Ruler • quilting ruler 6” x 24” • 45mm rotary cutter • Heirloom Air-erasable marker • Kai Scissors 4½” • glass head pins • all-purpose thread • 30wt Sulky Cotton Blendables thread • Universal needle size 80/12 • quilting needle size 90/14 • 505 Temporary Adhesive • Clever Clips • Clover Kanzashi Flower Maker – Orchid Petal Large • Clover Kanzashi Flower Maker – Orchid Petal Small • assortment of buttons • Gütermann upholstery thread • hand needles • Gem Tac glue

Cutting fabric 1: Cut 2 – 21” x 21” for Wedges fabric 2: Cut 2 – 21” x 21” for Wedges Cut 2 – 21” x 31” for Back fabric 3: Cut 4 – 2½” strips for Binding

fabric 1: From the 21” x 21” pieces cut 11 wedges with the 10° Wedge Ruler fabric 2: From the 21” x 21” pieces cut 10 wedges with the 10° Wedge Ruler Machine set up Sewing Foot: Regular Sewing foot or ¼” foot Thread: Cotton or All purpose thread top and bobbin Needle: Universal size 80/12 1. Use a ¼” seam and sew a fabric 1 wedge “pointing up” to a fabric 2 wedge which is “pointing down”. Press seam open. Continue to add wedges until scarf is approximately 60” long pressing seams open as you go. 2. Use a ¼” seam and sew both pieces of back together to make a 21” x 60” backing. Press seam open. Make a quilt sandwich with the backing fabric, batting and scarf top holding the layers together with 505 Temporary adhesive.

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Pillowcase (hotdog pillowcase) When I learned how to make these pillowcases they were called Hotdog Pillowcases because of the way you roll up the body of the pillowcase (which becomes the wiener) and sew the band (the hotdog bun) around it. This way there are no exposed seams on the band. Note: If you sew the long edge and the end of the pillowcase with French seams there are no exposed seams on the entire pillowcase! Cutting (to make 2 pillowcases) fabric 1: Cut 2 – 29” x WOF for bodies fabric 2: Cut 2 – 9” x WOF” for bands fabric 3: Cut 2 – 1½” x WOF for contrast strips quilting Machine set up Sewing Foot: Regular sewing foot or open toe foot Thread: Sulky Cotton Blendable thread top and bobbin Needle: Quilting size 90/14 1. Choose a decorative stitch. I like to choose a stitch that is 7mm to 9mm wide. It’s a good idea to make a scrap quilt sandwich and audition the stitches. You may need to adjust the tension or stitch length to ensure a perfect stitch and when you find a stitch that you like, stitch along all of the seams in the scarf top. 2. Trim the scarf to approximately 20” x 58”. binding Machine set up Sewing Foot: Regular sewing foot or ¼” foot Thread: Cotton or all-purpose thread top and bobbin Needle: Universal size 80/12 1. Sew the 4 pieces of 2½” binding strips together to make one strip long enough to go all around the scarf. Press seams open. 2. Fold the binding in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. Press. 3. Using a walking foot or even-feed foot and a ¼” seam; sew on the binding. 4. Fold the binding over to the back and hand-stitch in place. At each corner, fold the binding to create a 45° mitred corner. Flowers 1. Use the fat quarters and upholstery thread to make an assortment of Kanzashi flowers both small and large following the directions in the package. 2. Glue buttons in the center of the flowers with Gem Tac glue. 3. Sew or glue the flowers onto the bed scarf as desired.

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Machine set up Sewing Foot: Regular Sewing foot or ¼” foot Thread: Cotton or All purpose sewing thread top and bobbin Needle: Universal size 80/12 1. Fold the 1½” strip of contrast fabric 3 in half lengthwise and press. 2. Pin the contrast fabric to long edge of fabric 2 band; raw edges together. 3. With right sides together pin body of pillowcase on top of contrast strip and band. 4. Sew together with a ¼” seam. 5. Lay pillowcase right side up on table with the band away from you. To put the wiener in the bun, start at the edge closest to you and roll the body of the case towards the band. Place the rolled body in the center of the band. Fold the band over right sides together and pin the edge. The wiener is now stuffed inside the bun. 6. Sew the seam just inside the previous row of stitching. 7. Pull the wiener out of the bun. 8. Press the band making sure the seam is flat and there’s a nice crisp edge. 9. With wrong sides together fold pillowcase in half matching up the contrast strip. Square up the pillowcase and trim the long edge. Pin and sew with a ¼” seam. 10. Trim seam to ¹⁄₈”. Turn inside out and press seam. With right sides together sew the long edge again with a ¼” seam. The raw edges are now trapped inside. (French seam). 11. Turn pillowcase right side out and press seam. 12. Follow steps 9 to 11 to sew the seam on the end of the pillowcase.

Donna Housley & Cathy McClean

www.hakidd.com

16


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Quilting with denim is a unique and fun concept. Denim is durable and so rugged that it's a great fabric to use in a quilt. It does come with a few challenges that can be overcome, and starting with these 5 essentials to quilting with denim, and the articles that follow, we'll explore brilliant solutions and two fun quilts you can make and an adorable little mug rug.

5

Ready to dig out the denim and embrace it in your quilting life?

essentials to quilting with denim Jackie White

Tips on sewing with denim All types of denim are fine to use when making quilts. If you're going to use stretch denim, be sure to back it with a stabilizer. When working with any denim, but particularly the heavier and thicker denim, be sure to use what they call a jean needle.

The story on denim Denim gets its ruggedness from the weave, the ‘twill weave’ to be exact. The yarns are woven so that one set of yarns sit on top of 2-4 sets of yarns at regular intervals to create a diagonal textured fabric. This gives it the lasting effect of the fabric. You can also buy different types of denim as well. There's a stretch denim that has spandex yarn added to it to give it a bit of elasticity, heavy denim you find on jeans, printed denim and a lighter thinner denim to use. One of the most fun things about denim is that no two pieces are alike. Especially when cutting up old jeans. They have been washed different amount of times, worn more or less and each piece of denim is completely unique and each has a story!

Wash and dry your denim before using to combat any shrinkage issues. If you can choose between lightweight and a heavier weight denim, choose the lighter, it's easier to quilt. Use the walking foot for better control. Take your time. Due to the fact that denim is a heavier fabric to work with, you don't want to be shoving it under your machine. Go slow and set a nice pace so that the fabric is not being pulled or pushed through your sewing machine causing uneven stitches or needle breaks. Be aware that denim can fray.

Try pairing denim with quilting cotton to ease up on bulk and weight. Denim really is a fun fabric to use in quilting because it has so many unique characters to it. The various shades, types, and all the different ways you can use it in your quilting. You don't have to make a quilt out of it, think of the quilted accessories it would be wonderful for!

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Quilt blocks of denim and cotton fabric

Photos by Jackie White

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Denim pieces cut out of jeans ready to be turned into quilt blocks.

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steps to turn old jeans into new quilts There's nothing more satisfying than taking denim and recycling it into a beautiful quilt thereby giving that denim a second life. Jeans are the most common and easily accessible denim to recycle into quilts and have history, different shades of blue depending on their previous life. Where can you find this denim or jeans to reuse? Start by looking right in your own closet or your partner’s! I bet you'll find at least two pairs that you haven’t worn in a few years! Other places to pick up denim are rummage sales, thrift stores, or second hand stores. When looking for used denim or jeans to be more specific, look for the larger sizes, you get more denim out of them. As well make sure they aren’t too worn or thin or have many stains. Once you get your denim home, begin by washing the denim, and drying it to get rid of any stains and take care of any shrinking issues.

Binding your denim quilt If you like the look of binding, use a nice cotton that corresponds with the denim. You might also consider using denim from shirts which are lighter fabric yet sturdier than quilting cotton to bind a denim quilt. Other options are, instead of binding your quilt, consider a machine appliqued edge or rather a pillow case method. Those extra pieces you cut out such as pockets, are great to use for embellishments on bags, purses and even quilts! Kids love having a jean pocket on a quilted backpack as it not only adds character but provides functionality too! Now you have your denim pieces ready to be turned into a quilt! Start planning (or should I say dreaming) how to use all that scrumptious denim in a quilt.

Cut apart the fabric and discard seams as they're too bulky, unless you're using certain components in the quilt such as a back pocket, then save those. Once you've cut out your large denim pieces, look over to ensure there are no holes, thinning or stains on the denim. Now you can start cutting the shapes that you need for your quilt. Remember denim does fray so you may have to consider having larger seam allowances to account for that if using a lot of denim. Using a variety of pieces of denim can provide a pleasing effect as well, especially if you have a lot of different shades. Often if you have a full denim quilt, you don’t need a heavy batting, use a thin layer such as bamboo batting or flannel will work perfectly as well.

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Jeans with seams and pockets cut out.

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jeans Cut a denim square in half with a gentle wave shape.

jeans A denim block with cotton wave following same line as other piece of denim.

Do up a

Finished denim quilt block with cotton wave running through it

denim quilt block the right way

Are you ready to do up a denim quilt block in style? Here's how to make a quilt block with cotton and denim, combining the two the right way. Start with a 5½” denim square and make a gentle wave cut through it. Put a 2” x 5½” solid colored cotton fabric strip under one piece of the denim and follow the wave to cut out the cotton piece. Right sides together stitch the cotton fabric to the one denim piece along the wave cut. Remember to use your denim needle and slowly feed the fabric through easing the curves along. Then press to the cotton side so the denim lays flat. Right sides facing up, lay the wavy edge of the remaining piece of denim on the cotton so to leave a ¾” to 1” width piece of cotton showing. Cut out the wave from the cotton using the wave in the denim piece as a guide. With right sides together sew the remaining denim piece to the cotton. Press towards the cotton. Trim to a 5” block. Imagine if you made a bunch of these blocks and turned them into a quilt? Remember denim is heavier than cotton fabric so you don't need a heavy batting in the middle. Try a bamboo batting or flannel works wonderful as the batting as well. When quilting, consider putting the walking foot on and off you go! Here's a sample using different shades of denim and solid colored cotton fabric.

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Sample pattern of denim quilt

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2 quilt blocks with a denim circle in the middle.

While solid denim quilts are heavy and warm, adding a bit of color by using cotton not only brightens it up but also makes it a bit easier to work with as cotton is so thin compared to the denim. Here are two quilt blocks that are similar using cotton and denim fabrics and then reversing these. We're using 5" squares and 3" diameter circles.

5" denim squares with 3" cotton circle in middle

Cut out 5" squares from cotton fabric.

Photo by Jennifer Houlden

Then cut out 3" circles from denim. If you don't have the TrueCut 360 circle cutter, make a template from the bottom of a coffee cup, drinking glass or tea cup.

denim dots make a great quilt

You can attach the circles in a variety of ways. Fusible applique is the quickest method, or raw edge stitching is another way. If doing raw edge circles and want the fabric to fray, then stitch around the perimeter Âź" inside the edge to allow for fraying. Notice I didn't put the circles centered in the square. You may find it more fun to have them off center. By combing denim and cotton in your quilt, no matter how you design it, it allows for much more color and fun! Try putting a cotton circle in the middle of a denim square for a different look as done below. I used the EQ7 to design a quilt with the 5" cotton squares of modern solid colors with denim circles attached off center. You can see that this will be a bright modern quilt! There are so many possibilities when working with denim and cotton. Try using some print fabrics such as chevrons or dots to create a fun quilt! Denim dots and cotton squares or vice versa make great quilts! Use your imagination to create a nice mixture of denim and cotton in a gorgeous quilt!

Design of denim and cotton quilt created on EQ7.

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Make a Minions and mug rugs? How much fun can one quilter have? Throw in some denim and you have a fun project! This post highlights how perfect denim can be in making a minion mug rug for a child. Minions are a smashing hit and denim is the perfect stand-in to make a mug rug last against the adventures a child will bring to it!

denim

minion mug rug

Start by gathering a 6" square of both denim and yellow print fabric, some bits of grey, white and black felt. You could also use fabric for the grey, white and black. I chose felt as I wanted a 3D effect. Don't forget a bit of batting and backing. With your 6" denim square, cut a small rectangle out of the bottom, to create pants for the minion, as shown below. Cut out shapes for body and head of minion.

Cut the yellow square into a dome shape for the head of the minion. Stitch the body and head together along the middle and press to head. Cut out a ¾" x 6" band from the black felt and cut out 3 circles as shown from the grey, black and white felt, with a ¼" difference in size between the circles.

Cut out 3 circles from felt to make the eye of the minion.

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Layer black, white and grey and lay on top of band and pin to head of minion. I stitched right through all the layers of the circles a small circle to affix to the head. Layer the batting and backing under the minion. Quilt along black headband and outer perimeter of the minion. I straight stitched ¼" in as I would like it to fray a little. If you prefer no fraying, do a tight zigzag stitch along outside edge. How fun would it be to make up a bunch of minion mug rugs for a birthday party or give out as Christmas presents? The denim totally makes it! You could also increase the size and turn them into place-mats! I hope you enjoyed quilting with denim in this feature. Look to your creativity and explore the many more possibilities to use denim in quilts.


Q U I LTs o c i a l b l o g g e r s

Jennifer Houlden

Christine Baker

FairfieldRoadDesigns.com

sewjoycreations.com

Jennifer runs Quilts by Jen, a fantastic educational resource for quilters with many great free tutorials ranging from how to choose fabrics, understanding the value of fabrics, pressing, building Bargello runs, pinning, binding, sandwiching, couching, quilting, and much more. Check them out!

Christine has been designing and publishing quilt patterns for the last 10 years under the business name Fairfield Road Designs. Her patterns range f r o m f u s i bl e a p p l i q u e a nd piecing to felted wool applique and punchneedle. You can see all her patterns on her website.

Sarah loves to play with color and quilts are her playground! A self-taught quilter, She's been designing her own quilts for almost 20 years. She's inspired b y h app y f a br ic s , se lv a ge s, traditional blocks and nature. She's also a wife, mother, and elementary school teacher, and enjoy drinking coffee on my front porch in northern Ontario.

Gail Berry-Graham

Jackie White

Jean Boyd

Never one to back down from a challenge it took her 20 years to finish her first quilt. There wasn't one big moment that led to quilting but rather a series of paths that all ended up in one place. She learned to quilt and never looked back. She found a love for long arming and machine e mbroide r y, a nd i s a H a nd y Quilter and PFAFF representative.

Jackie is a quilter who loves qui lting outside the box especially when it comes to 3D and embellishments. Her work has been published in books and magazines and she currently sits on the Board of Directors for t he C a n ad i a n Q u i lte r s’ A ssociation. W hen she's not in her studio, she's work ing a s a Soc i a l Med i a Ma nager.

Jean has been designing and publishing patterns since 1997. Her work has been published in severa l magazines across North America. Jean holds a Fiber Arts Certificate in quilting a nd h a s t aught e x tensive ly throughout Canada, including s i x n at ion a l Q u i lt C a n a d a conferences. She was named "Canadian Teacher of the Year" in 2003 by the Canadian Quilters A ssociation and has won numerous awards for her quilts.

quiltsbyjen.ca

thequiltstudio.ca

jabotquilt.blogspot.ca

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Sarah Vanderburgh

patternsbyjeanboyd.com

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tips

on piecing with the

PFAFF Passport 3.0

I'm currently working on my charity quilts which gives me the opportunity to break in my new PFAFF Passport 3.0 sewing machine. I get to work on one of my favorite parts of quilting - piecing! I LOVE piecing! It’s quiet and takes me to my Zen place. Using the IDT (built-in walking foot) on my PFAFF Passport 3.0, piecing my quilt blocks just doesn’t get any easier! Since the IDT feeds both layers of fabric at the same time, I can achieve perfectly pieced blocks and I don’t have to spend time pinning! Did I mention I hate pinning? I did all my pressing and cutting ahead of time. I press and starch all of my fabric, then do all of my cutting (and repress the cut pieces if necessary). I then organize the cut pieces so when it’s time to sit down at my machine I can piece to my heart's content. The first thing I do is wind a couple of bobbins with the same thread I'm going to use in the top. Bobbin winding is super easy on the PFAFF Passport 3.0 and it gave me a perfectly wound bobbin the first time I used it.

The perfect 1/4" foot by PFAFF allows you to adjust your needle position to achieve either a scant or generous 1/4" seam depending on your preference.

A perfect ¼" seam achieved through moving the needle over and using a standard presser foot.

Two of the five ¼" feet available from PFAFF

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When I have enough bobbins wound for my project, I shorten my stitch length for piecing. While not everyone does this, I prefer a 2.0 or even a 1.8 stitch length when I’m piecing, especially if they're small pieces. I think it just gives me a more secure seam, especially for those baby quilts that are going to see lots of use and take frequent trips to the washing machine. Because the buttons on the front of the machine are easily accessible it’s really easy to shorten the stitch length on the PFAFF Passport 3.0. Simply press the “-“ button until you're desired stitch length is showing on the screen. The ¼" foot, with and without the guide Next I choose which of my ¼" feet I want to use. PFAFF has a really good selection of ¼" feet to choose from. Check all the cool tools and accessories at http://www.pfaff.com/accessories .

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I'm going to use two feet on my quilt. I like the perfect ¼" foot with right guide when I start my piecing, it helps me achieve that perfect seam quickly and efficiently since I can move my needle to give me either a scant ¼” seam or a perfect ¼” seam allowance. Once I’ve accomplished some of the initial piecing, I switch to a ¼" foot without the guide, which I like to use when I'm piecing my blocks together and working with lots of seams. I have a great sight line and can ensure my seams aren’t flipping over on me. The light on my PFAFF Passport 3.0 also helps to see where I'm stitching. Wait! What if you don’t have a ¼" foot?! Don’t despair! On the PFAFF Passport 3.0 you can move your needle to 29 different needle positions. So move your needle over to the right until you find your perfect ¼" spot and stitch away. I also press a lot when I quilt. I press and starch before I cut. I then press and starch each and every seam I piece. I wait until I have my initial piecing all done and then I press all of my seams. Lately, I’ve been pressing all of my seams open and I’m really liking the nice flat quilt top that results in pressing these. If you prefer pressing to one side, go ahead, just make sure you press it well. And no, finger pressing does not count. When I'm ready to free motion tomorrow, I'll be happy I took that extra time to press. I love the perfect piecing I get with my PFAFF Passport 3.0. IDT, the ¼" feet, being able to select a shorter stitch length and the great lighting on my PFAFF Passport 3.0, all add up to another perfect day in my sewing room during one of my favorite weeks of the year. It doesn’t get much better than that!!

Gail Berry-Graham

Photos by Gail Berry-Graham


•

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Get in early at 9am & enter to win 1 of 2 $1000 shopping sprees!

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sew. knit. bead. stitch. quilt. scrapbook+ more 1.800.291.2030 1.855.723.1156 II www.creativfestival.ca 25


3

key elements

Extension Table for the PFAFF Passport 3.0

to successful

free motion quilting PFAFF Passport 3.0

PFAFF Passport 3.0 with the spring action free motion foot attached

The tension dial on the PFAFF Passport 3.0 is easy to use.

A great picture illustrating proper tension.

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My passport to free motion quilting I want to have the charity quilt I'm working on finished quickly, so I really need to finish the FMQ in one day so I can get the binding on the next. I believe there are 3 key elements to successful free motion quilting on any domestic sewing machine. I have yet to meet another quilter who doesn’t want to improve her free motion quilting skills. I not only want to get better at it, I have wonderful fantasies of actually becoming good at it and merging those skills into exquisite works of thread painting! There's only one thing holding me back - and that’s me. I need to practice, and practice some more, and quit beating myself up over my free motion quilting. So with my PFAFF Passport 3.0 ready to help me achieve my fantasy, let’s get started. 1. Have a flat surface luckily I have an extension table that was made for my PFAFF Passport 3.0. It slips on and off easily, giving me a great work surface with really good visibility. 2. A good quilting foot is essential - I prefer the spring action type of foot like you see below. This is an optional accessory for my PFAFF Passport 3.0 but worth it’s weight in gold for free motion quilting.

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3. TEST, TEST and TEST your tension. I can’t say enough about this step! It doesn’t matter how good you are or how artistic you are in your quilting! If you don’t have a good quality stitch then it doesn’t matter if you have perfect FMQ feathers or pebbles, the stitches won’t hold up in the long run. The tension is so easy to adjust on the PFAFF Passport 3.0 that it’s a dream to do free motion quilting on it. Just adjust the dial until you find the tension that's right for your quilt. The weight of your fabric, batting and thread could all affect your tension, so always, and I mean always, run a small sample through your machine. Don’t be intimidated by adjusting your tension. Once you figured out the correct tension settings through testing you'll be amazed at your results. Rule of thumb: If you see top thread showing on the bottom your top tension is too loose, if you see bobbin thread showing on the top your top tension is too tight. I’ve run my tension tests, lowered my feed dogs and now it’s time to actually start the quilting. 3 key elements to successful free motion quilting are very helpful in achieving my mission. I really will be ready for the binding tomorrow. Another great day in my sewing room.


Consider these

4

The ultimate finish to any quilt—binding! These are the last few days of the year and I'm celebrating the past year by finishing a quilt I’m making for charity. I’m part of a group that makes over 200 quilts a year that are donated to different organizations in our city. By finishing the quilt I mean I have to put on the binding. There are so many ways you can approach binding and there isn’t one right way or one wrong way, it's important to consider these 4 before binding your quilt. It doesn’t matter which method you choose I think we can all agree on one thing. Binding is the ultimate finish to any quilt - it's not finished without the binding and attaching my binding with the PFAFF Passport 3.0 sewing machine with IDT makes it easier, let me show you why.

Applying binding with the ¼” foot and IDT system.

Decorative stitch to secure the binding to the front of the quilt

Using a decorative stitch and the A Presser Foot to apply binding to the front of a quilt

before binding your quilt There are some basic questions you have to ask yourself before you take that final step of binding your quilt. 1. What fabric will you choose for your binding? Will it be one (or more) of the fabrics used in the quilt top? Will it be the same fabric as the backing or will it be a completely separate but coordinating fabric? Print? Plain? Stripe? 2. Will you cut your strips on the bias or straight cut? Usually this is personal preference. I believe that occasionally this decision is made for us based on the quilt top itself. If the quilt top has lots of curves on concave and convex points then you'll likely go with Bias Cut. 3. How wide will you cut your strips? Most people fall into will choose either the 2½” width or 2¼”. Some people even use a 2” strip. For me it depends on the thickness of the quilt, and the method I'm going to use to apply it. 4. How are you going to attach the binding to the quilt? This can be the cause of some serious debates in the quilting world. I’ve noticed that most people one of two options on this issue. »» Option one - attaching the binding to the front of the quilt by machine and hand stitching the quilt to the back. »» Option two - attaching the binding to the quilt back by machine then flip the binding over and machine quilt the binding to the front of the quilt. These are just some of the questions - there are so many others. Flanges? Prairie Points? Piping? OR you don’t even need to cut strips you could leave extra fabric on the front or back of the quilt to fold over and use as binding…

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My favorites I love a striped fabric binding, cut on the bias at 2¼” wide and I use my machine with IDT to attach the binding to the front of the quilt. I press it to the back of the quilt and hand stitch the back down. I tried lots of other methods and this is the one I like the most. For very special quilts I’ll add a flange or piping. Today however, I’m going out of my comfort zone. I'm using the same fabric that is prevalent in the quilt. The quilt I'm working on came as a kit so the binding has actually been cut for me at 2½". I'm going to apply the binding to the back of the quilt, using my ¼” foot with the IDT system. Then I'm going to flip the binding over to the front of the quilt and apply the binding to the front of the quilt using my regular A foot with IDT. I'm going to choose a decorative stitch for this step. I’m doing this because my PFAFF Passport 3.0 has so many decorative stitches to choose from AND because I’m up against a self imposed deadline. I want the binding finished this morning so I can make preparations for Holiday Celebrations with some of my Quilting Friends. If I don’t apply that binding by machine it won’t be done by this evening, I’m not a fast hand sewer! Using the PFAFF Passport 3.0 sewing machine to make a quilt for charity has been a real treat! I love the IDT system, the great lighting, the quality stitching, the extension table—everything. I love everything about this machine and it’s light weight and portable so I’ve moved it every day to the dining room table so I can enjoy my holiday decorations while I pieced, quilted and bound my quilt. It was a great finish to the year and an ultimate finish for this quilt.

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Modern quilting – what’s it all about? Are modern quilts really so different from traditional or art quilts? Everyone has his/her own definition of modern quilts, but there are a few techniques and styles that seem to appear in most of them. Are you ready to make it modern? Let’s see if we can learn more about this relatively new genre of quilting. 5 elements for modern quilt making to help you with the process. Modern quilts began to appear on web sites and blogs just a few years ago. Interest was high and with the ease of using social media, modern quilters were able to see what others with similar interests were creating. Modern Quilt Guilds were soon formed and many of them have on-line sites as well. Do a Google search for a Modern Quilt Guild in your area and you’ll probably find one! Many books, magazines and patterns for modern quilts are now available. Check out your local bookstore or on-line source and you’ll find a long list of them. Here are a few of my favorite books.

Let's look at some general guidelines for modern quilt making. Negative Space Modern quilts tend to have more negative space, or background, around the pieced or appliqued elements. These negative spaces also allow you to showcase your quilting designs. Simplicity of Design Simple shapes and fewer blocks are commonly seen in modern quilts. Asymmetrical Designs Modern quilts often feature off-kilter or not-quite-square blocks or designs. Improvisational piecing is very common. Fabrics Fabrics with stylized flower shapes, bright, clear colors and over sized geometric designs are found in many modern quilts. Solid colors are also used extensively. To get a feel for these great fabrics, check out a few of my favorite designers: Jane Sassaman, Amy Butler and Kaffe Fassett, to name just a few. Quilting Straight line quilting, echo quilting and graphic designs are often found on modern quilts. But the quilting style is definitely not limited to just those designs. Be brave and try something new and different for you! To give you a feel for modern quilt making, I’ve designed some placemats with a modern look. Here’s your chance to make 4 small "quilts" and learn something new! I chose to make my placemats with solid colors, but of course you can use whatever makes you happy. It’s all part of modern quilt making. I had small pieces of fabric left over from my Fiesta quilt. Just the right amount for my placemat set!

Quilting Modern by Gering and Pedersen, Quilting With a Modern Slant by Rachel May, Lucky Spool's Essential Guide to Modern Quilt Making by Susanne Woods and 100 Modern Quilt Blocks by Tula Pink

5

Jean Boyd

elements for modern quilt making

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Making your first modern quilt placemat Let’s put these general guidelines for modern quilt design to work in making your first modern quilt placemat. I started with one of my favorite blocks (#60) from the 100 Modern Quilt Blocks book by Tula Pink. All the blocks in this book are 6" square. I wanted a 12" x 18" placemat, so I drew the block using EQ7 and then re-sized it to the correct size. This program also told me the size to cut each piece. If you don’t use EQ, you can draw the block on graph paper (all the measurements are given in the book) and then enlarge it to the right size by using a photocopier or scanner. Here’s the original 6" block.

Cut these pieces for placemat #1 and you can get started right away! Of course, you can use different fabrics if you wish. Red Blue Yellow Orange Green Purple

1 – 3" x 12½" 1 – 4" x 12½" 1 – 6½" x 6½" 1 – 3½" x 8½" 1 – 3½" x 12½" 1 – 2½" x 6½" 1 – 2½" x 3½" 1 – 2½" x 3½" 1 – 4½" x 6½"

Sew the pieces together to make vertical rows. Press seams as desired. Sew the rows together to make the place mat. It should measure 12½" x 18½". Press seams as desired. And there it is – your first modern design! Making your first modern quilt place mat is really easy. Join me tomorrow to get the cutting and sewing instructions for 3 more modern quilt placemats.

And here’s how the 12" x 18" placemat will look.

Cut these pieces for placemat 1.

Block #60 re-sized to 12" x 18"

Photos by Jean Boyd

Sew the pieces together to make vertical rows.

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Let’s cut out the pieces for these 3 patterns for modern quilt placemats and then we’ll get to the quilting.

3

Again, you can use different fabrics if you wish. This is a great opportunity to use up some of those leftover scraps! Cut these pieces for placemat 1: 1 – 3½" x 6½" Blue: Yellow: 2 – 2½" x 18½" Orange: 2 – 2¾" x 8½" 1 – 8½" x 11" Green: Purple: 1 – 3½" x 2½" Sew the pieces together to make the placemat. Press seams as desired. It should measure 12½" x 18½".

more patterns for modern quilt placemats

Cut these pieces for placemat 2: Blue: Yellow: Orange: Green: Red:

2 – 3½" x 6½" 2 – 1½" x 6½" 2 – 3½" x 12½" 2 – 2½" x 6½" 1 – 6½" x 12½"

Sew the pieces together to make 3 rows.

Are you starting to feel like a modern quilter yet? Then sew the rows together. Press seams as desired. Your placemat should measure 12½" x 18½". You must be feeling very proficient with this type of modern design now! Cut these pieces for placemat 3: Blue: Yellow: Green: Red: Purple:

1 – 2½" x 12½" 1 – 6½" x 8½" 1 – 3½" x 8½" 1 – 6½" x 4½" 1 – 3½" x 2½" 1 – 9½" x 10½"

Sew the pieces together in units. Sew the units together to make the 12½" x 18½" placemat. Now you have 3 modern quilt placemats.

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1

Modern placemat 1 all sewn together

Cut these pieces for placemat 1.

Placemat 2 should measure 12½" x 18½".

2

Cut these pieces for placemat 2.

3

Modern placemat 3 should measure 12½" x 18½".

Cut these pieces for modern placemat 3.

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Quilting your modern placemats You now have a total of 4 little quilt tops to practice modern quilting on! Layer the placemat top, batting and backing and you're ready to quilt. There are many quilting designs being used in modern quilts: straight line quilting, echo quilting and graphic designs to name just a few. I decided to quilt each of my place mats in a different design. Here’s what I came up with for the first placemat. I used a variegated thread and quilted with lines ½" apart. There are many beautiful variegated threads available now in different weights. Look in your thread collection and see what you have!

3 Tips for straight-line quilting

1. Always use a walking or even-feed foot. 2. Draw lines with a ruler using a fabric marking tool - chalk marker, washout marker etc. It's a good idea to test your marker on scrap fabric to make sure it can be removed. 3. Use the quilting guide bar that comes with most machines. It’s probably tucked away with all those extra gadgets that you have never used! The little bar is attached to your walking or even-feed foot. You sew while tracing the previous quilting line with the quilting guide bar.

And here’s my little quilt all quilted.

Here’s a great little video you can watch to show you how to use the quilting guide bar. I decided to use a different quilting design on each placemat. They’re all straight lines, but you can use wavy lines or free motion designs if you wish. Now you can start quilting your modern placemats and use the new techniques you learned. Quilting with a guide bar.

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don't miss these projects & tutorials online!

QUILTsocial

make a quilted stained glass

.com tips you'll want to save for perfect Y seams

wall hanging READ NOW

make fun cube pillows READ NOW

READ NOW

READ NOW

and there's so much more!

how to make a rag quilt 33

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Bind and finish your quilted placemats Now it’s time to bind and finish your quilted placemats. You’re almost finished your little modern quilts! First, trim excess batting and backing, and then square-up the placemat. You can use one fabric for the binding or join some of your leftover pieces to make a multi-colored binding.

Modern placemats with solid-color binding

I like to cut my binding strips 3" wide and then sew them on with a ½" seam. Here’s how my solid color bindings look. And here are my placemats with multi-colored bindings. You can see how 4 modern-style designs have been made by starting with some simple 6" block designs. And now you have a very contemporary set of placemats! Now that you've had a taste of modern quilting, you'll probably want to try something larger.

Modern placemats with multi-colored bindings

4 modern placemats

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Return Trip by Jean Boyd

Central Square by Jean Boyd

Here are some modern quilts that I've recently completed. You can have a closer look at them on my website. They are also available for immediate download from my Craftsy store. I hope you have enjoyed making, binding and finishing your modern placemats. Make it Modern might just become your new quilt making theme!

Jean Boyd

www.patternsbyjeanboyd.com

Zentangled Garden by Jean Boyd

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Curling Rocks Quilted Runner Sarah Vanderburgh

Today I'm sharing the first part of a tutorial for a quick gift for the season. I'm calling it Curling Rocks Quilted Runner. You could put an exclamation point in there if you want to and add some of that excitement and loud encouragement that some curlers are known for: Curling Rocks! Quilted Runner :)

Then I had to make a decision. Did I really have time - and the right fabrics - to try this out? My husband went out to the garage to practice his guitar playing and I quickly decided to give it a go.

Inspiration rocks! This runner was inspired by several things. One morning at breakfast I showed my husband a new block being shared by another designer and he said how it kind of looked like a curling rock. It was for a small kitchen appliance!

The block size is 81/2" x 8" unfinished. In the photo you can see I built up the background to turn it into a 121/2" unfinished block. (In the photo my curling stone is actually half an inch shorter than the one I'm going to share with you. I decided to make it look a little bigger!)

I took a second look and immediately started seeing how to change the block to make it into one. What a neat idea!

It passed my husband's approval and now it was on to the next phase.

The second part of the inspiration is a quilting friend of mine who I met online. She just recently finished quilting one of my quilts for me! This is the first time I've had someone quilt one of my quilts and, being a friend, she's not charging me normal quilting fees.

What would be a good gift to make with this block?

I have been racking my brain to figure out a way to show my gratitude. And guess what? She LOVES curling!

I decided to try it out as a runner. You can adjust the length of the runner by changing the length of the background fabric between the two blocks. For this runner, I added 12" between the two blocks.

This is what I came up with:

Of course, traditionally there are two colors of stones usually red and yellow - so a design that incorporated both would be best.

Make it reversible with neutral backing fabric.

My husband really likes the idea of a curling quilt. His stepdad was a huge curling fan and my husband watched a lot of curling growing up. The curling quilt he envisioned would look like a curling sheet with the different color stones on each side at the bottom with black center and hog lines and of course, with the target at the top. I think it's a neat idea too, but all that plain white background doesn't interest me! Maybe you want to give it a try! I think a pillow or zippered bag would also be fun ways to use this block. A set of placemats could be fun too! Photos by Sarah Vanderburgh

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A black fabric binding completes the look of the Curling Rocks Quilted Runner.

Fabric requirements You don't need a lot of any of the colors to make this block. •• light grey - fat eighth •• dark grey - fat eighth •• red piece - 61/2" x 51/2" •• yellow - piece - 61/2" x 51/2" •• white/background fabric - 1/2 yard •• backing fabric - 1/2 yard •• batting - 20" x 36" I used jelly roll strips for my fabrics. Finding two grey fabrics that have contrast between each other will really help to define the curling stone. One of my grey fabrics is from the Stonehenge Mother Earth line and I think it really mimics the look of the rocks well. I wasn't convinced until finishing the runner that adding binding would be necessary. I like to do quick finishes for projects this size and usually use the envelop method to stitch runners closed. Instead the idea of adding the black to look like the curling sheet convinced me to include this design element.

Original Curling Rock block

You will need black - one fat quarter to make 21/2" binding strips This is a fun project that doesn't take too long, an hour a night will get this runner completed in a week!

Have fun looking through your stash - hurry, hurry HARD! : ) 37

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There's almost more cutting than sewing to do for this project! Let's get started. To make 2 curling stone blocks cut the following pieces from each fabric specified: light grey fabric Cut TWO 2" squares Cut TWO 81/2" x 2" pieces Cut TWO 61/2" x 11/2" pieces dark grey fabric Cut TWO 81/2" x 21/2" pieces

Light grey fabric pieces for curling rocks

Dark grey fabric pieces for curling rocks

red fabric Cut TWO 2" squares Cut ONE 61/2" x 11/2" piece Cut ONE 41/2" x 11/2" piece Cut ONE 21/2" x 11/2" piece yellow fabric Cut TWO 2" squares Cut ONE 61/2" x 11/2" piece Cut ONE 41/2" x 11/2" piece Cut ONE 21/2" x 11/2" piece

Red fabric pieces for one curling rock block

Yellow fabric pieces for one curling rock block

white/background fabric Cut SIX 2" squares Cut TWO 51/2" x 11/2" pieces Cut TWO 21/2" x 11/2" pieces Cut TWO 11/2" squares In addition to the runner background there are a few more pieces: Cut ONE 121/2" x 101/2" piece Cut TWO 141/2" x 21/2" pieces Cut ONE 6" x 8" piece and subcut into FOUR - 11/2" x 8" strips backing fabric Cut into ONE 14" x 34" piece binding fabric Since you're in cutting mode, why not cut your binding strips now too! Cut 21/2" strips the width of the fabric. If you know you like your binding thinner on runners, cut strips your desired width. For me, cutting the binding this size works.

Cutting instructions for Curling Rocks Quilted Runner White fabric pieces cut for Curling Rocks

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Next, we'll be making the curling rocks or stones. What do you call them?


Designed

for the details. Featuring Dual Duty Plus® Hand Quilting Thread.

For more information visit:

makeitcoats.com 39

Pattern “Modern Traditional” courtesy of Cheryl A. Adam 15-023 © 2015 Coats. Coats is a registered trademark. All rights reserved.

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Half square triangles make Curling stone blocks

Now that you have your fabrics cut, we piece the fabrics together to make the two curling stones we need to make the Curling Rocks Quilted Runner. Notice today I'm calling them stones? To make construction go quicker, I chain piece my units and use a 1/4" seam allowance. I like to lay out my block pieces on a design wall or flat surface so I'm less likely to sew pieces together in the wrong order. I don't like so much cleaning my design wall/flat surface so I apologize in advance for the excessive strings you'll see in these photos : )

First let's make all the half square triangle (HST) units we need that make the Curling Stone Block possible. Draw one diagonal line on the wrong side of the six white 2" squares. Sew 1/4" away from each side of the diagonal line on all six squares. Cut on the drawn line. Press the seam to the darker fabric. Trim each to 11/2" square. Lay out the HST in their correct positions in each block.

Prep squares for making Half Square Triangles.

Sew on each side of the drawn line to make two HST units at once.

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Now we're ready to start sewing the block units together!

Press HST seams to the darker fabric.

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Make the stone unit The next easiest thing to sew is the two 81/2" pieces of the two grey fabrics together. Press the seam to the darker grey.

Light grey HST units added

Sew the light grey HST units to the end of the light grey 61/2" pieces. Press the seams to the strip.

Sew longest grey strips together

Sew the grey strip with HST units added to the bottom of the dark grey strip. Press the seam to the dark grey.

Make the handle unit Sew the red HST units to the ends of both the 41/2" and 61/2" strips. Press the seams to the strips Sew the 11/2" white square to the right end of HST on the 41/2" strip. Press the seam to the white square. Sew the 21/2" red piece to the 51/2" white strip. Press the seam to the red strip.

Red HST units added

Sew the red and white strip to the 41/2" red strip with HSTs added to it. Press the seam to the red and white strip. Sew the 21/2" white piece vertically to the left side of the unit you just made. Press the seam to the white piece. Sew the third red strip to the bottom of the 2 strip red unit. Press the seam to the bottom red strip.

Sew white and red units together.

Top portion of the handle

Join the units to make the block Sew the grey unit to the bottom of the red strip unit with the light grey at the top. Press the seam to the grey unit. The red Curling Stone Block is complete! It should measure 81/2" wide x 8" tall. Repeat the same steps replacing the red pieces with yellow pieces to make the yellow curling rock. Next more piecing as we put together the runner top for now, enjoy the fact that you made two Curling Stone Blocks!

Curling Stone Block pieces laid out

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Join the final red strip to the handle unit.

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Sewing together the Curling Rocks Quilted Runner Let's put to good use the two Curling Stone Blocks we just finished join them by a middle piece of background fabric with some small borders to make sure the rocks are the stars of the piece!

Yellow Curling Stone Block

Red Curling Stone Block

Sew one 11/2" x 8" strip to each side of both Curling Stone Blocks. Press the seams to the strips. To sew the two pieces together evenly, it's helpful to sew with the curling stone block on top. Here you can see I put a pin near the end to keep the two pieces lined up.

Put the stone block on top of the border strip.

Add borders to Curling Stone Block.

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Sew the 121/2" x 101/2" background piece to the top edge of each curling rock unit along the 101/2" edges. Press the seams away from the curling rocks. Here again you can see it's helpful to have the Curling Stone block on top to help keep the two pieces lined up. I always like to have the piece with more seams in it facing me - that way I can watch and help the seams lie correctly as they go under the needle! Sew one 121/2" x 21/2" strip along the bottom edge of each curling rock unit. Press the seams to the strips. Bonus time - prep your binding With the runner top completed, we'll be moving on to quilting it. If you're like me, you'll be switching to a quilting needle in your machine to do the quilting. While you still have your universal needle in, why not get your binding ready? Then you'll have no excuse not to finish! Sew your binding strips together to make a continuous binding strip; I usually do this at a 45째 angle. Then I cut off the excess seam allowances and press the seams open. Whether you decide to prep your binding at this point or not is up to you; sewing together the Curling Rocks Quilted Runner top was the goal!

Sew the Curling Stone Blocks to the middle of the runner.

Black binding for Curling Rocks Runner

Add bottom border to yellow Curling Stone Block.

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Quilt and bind the

Now we can change to a quilting needle. I honestly just started to change my needle consistently and have consistently seen better stitches. Huh, imagine that!

Curling Rocks

After you change your needle you can change your thread - if you want to. I recommend a color that blends in with your background fabric. I used a variegated grey thread for quilting : )

Quilted Runner

If you have a walking foot, you can switch to it now too. Assemble the runner Lay the backing right side down and secure it so it can't move (painter's tape works well). Put the batting on top - check for and remove any excess strings or pet hair from the batting you can see; the runner has a light background and dark strings/hair might show through! Place the runner on top of the two layers, centering it or at least ensuring some of the other two layers are exposed 1-2" all the way around the runner. Depending on how you choose to quilt the runner, put in your pins to secure the layers. I found for this project that I was moving pins as I quilted and that's okay on a small size project like this. Quilt the runner I don't have much sage advice here. Relax and enjoy the process. Don't overwhelm yourself - or the project - with quilting that's too complicated. I'll tell you a secret - I used the design on the background fabric to help me space my quilting lines. Why not! I quilted straight lines about 1/2" apart in the middle of the runner. I went around - in the ditch - each of the curling stones and in between each of the grey sections of the stone.

Red curling stone pinned and ready for quilting.

When you're finished quilting, remove the pins and trim the backing and batting even with the runner top. Easy. Done. Next! Bind the runner Bind your runner using your preferred method. For this one I chose to use my sewing machine, sewing the binding to the backing first then folding it over and sewing it to the front using a decorative machine stitch. I learned this method from Pat Sloan and she has a great video to watch if you need a little convincing to try it out.

Curling Rocks Runner layered and pinned

Pat Sloan's Machine Binding Video I used black thread on the spool and left the variegated grey thread in the bobbin. With machine binding, the bobbin line of stitching will show on the back, but by choosing a thread that blends in my stitching becomes an accent - instead of an eyesore!

It's my hope you quilt and bind your Curling Rocks Quilted Runner Getting ready to do binding by machine.

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in time to enjoy it - along with the curling! 44

Sarah Vanderburgh


www.TheNeedleworkPages.com

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There’s been a lot going on in my world lately. Between extra shifts at work, extra medical appointments to drive to and conferences, there has been little time left over for my quilting and other creative outlets. And, if you’re like me, the longer it’s been since you quilted, the harder it is to get back in the groove. So, I was very happy when Carla asked me to make a project using Northcott’s NEW ColorWworks Concepts line of fabric. I knew that having a deadline would give me the push I needed to get back in my sewing room, but I also needed to use some of my tried and true techniques to get me in the right mindset. So, here they are – 3 ways to spark your quilting creativity!

3

ways to spark your quilting creativity!

1

My clean working space

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Cleaning your creative space is a great way to get rid of creative “cobwebs” When life gets busy, my sewing studio tends to get messy! The left over bits from projects I’ve worked on may be left in a pile on my cutting table, rulers, threads and scissors may be on the ironing board, magazines that haven’t been read may be stacked on my chair, purchases that made at my local quilt shop may be on the floor, still in the bag. The result is a stifling clutter that makes it impossible to create. When my studio is messy and I happen to have a moment to work on something, I’ll walk into the room, stand there for a minute and then walk back out, overwhelmed by the mess. So, the first thing I did when Carla asked me to submit quilting project, was to tidy and clean my room. It’s not perfect, but now I feel like I can actually work in there!!!

Browsing magazines and Pinterest for inspiration Whenever I’m stuck in a rut, I dig out some quilt magazines or search through Pinterest for projects that inspire me. I almost NEVER want to make something exactly the way someone else did, but their ideas are great stepping stones to coming up with great ideas of my own. New color combinations, unusual ways to set a quilt block or new machine quilting designs may find their way into my projects in unexpected ways. Follow me on Pinterest to see some of the great pins I’ve found.

Photos by Christine Baker

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3

Fabric ALWAYS inspires me!! I have to hand it to fabric designers, because they come up with some of the most beautiful designs for their fabric lines. And no matter what frame of mind I'm in, when I look at fabrics I can’t help but get ideas! So when I was told to go on the Northcott website to pick out the fabrics I wanted to use this week I was a bit like a kid in a candy store. What to choose??? The ColorWorks Concepts line has some really amazing panels that can be used as is or cut up into any shape. Nellie and I had already designed one quilt with this line, but we designed it in EQ7 with digital images, without seeing or touching the actual fabric. Our pattern is called Modern Vibe and when we actually received the fabrics and made the quilt we just LOVED it!! Northcott hung our sample in their booth at last year’s Fall Quilt Market. This time I was going “old school” and was going to get the fabrics to play with BEFORE I designed something with them. I was so excited and when I looked at the website I knew that I wanted to use the panel with the New York Beauty design.

ColorWorks Concept Panel #20813-99

Now to wait for the fabric… So I emailed Elaine at Northcott to give her my list of fabrics. Although I have no idea what I’m going to make I asked for one panel and 1 yard of four other fabrics. I figured that would give me enough variety and enough yardage to make SOMETHING. Now to wait for the fabric to arrive. But at least I’m now in the mood to create and I can’t wait to get started. Hopefully you can use some of my 3 ways to spark your quilting creativity.

Christine Baker

Northcott, Modern Vibe by Upper Canada Quiltworks 51" x 77" Mod Squad Panel

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When Northcott ColorWorks Concepts fabrics arrived at once I started to think of ways to use them in a project. I came up with a few ideas…a table runner…a tote bag…an apron…a lap quilt. But I wanted to make something that I actually needed. It hit me when I was looking at my cutting table. I need a bag big enough to carry my cutting mat when I go to quilting classes and retreats. Do you also need a great way to get organized for your next retreat? Then making a tote for your quilting tools is the solution.

Making a tote for your quilting tools Now…how to make it? The first thing I did was to gather all the supplies I like to take along to quilting retreats. A cutting board, rotary cutter, rulers and other small tools. This gave me an idea of what size the bag and pockets would need to be. My cutting board measures 24" x 18" so my bag is going to measure 26" wide x 20" tall. I’ve made large tote bags before, but one of the things I don’t like about them is that everything gets lost at the bottom of the bag or lost in the pockets. I recently made some tote bags with vinyl pockets on the outside and I love how you can see everything in them, so I'll want to add some clear vinyl pockets to my bag. I also want to make sure that the cutting board stays flat when it’s in the bag. An idea is starting to come together...

Supply List If you would like to follow along to make your own retreat bag, here's a list of supplies you'll need: •• 1 panel ColorWorks Concepts # 20813-99 (New York Beauty) •• 30" ColorWorks Concepts # 20792-99 (flying geese) •• 1yd ColorWorks # 9000-640 (teal) •• 1yd ColorWorks Concepts # 20804-44 (rainbow diamonds) •• 1yd ColorWorks Concepts # 20826-98 (black print) •• 4" ColorWorks # 9000-71 (lime green) •• 60" fusible heavyweight interfacing such as Fast 2 Fuse •• 28" x 28" piece of medium weight clear vinyl •• 1 - 15" long zipper •• 60" of 1" woven black strapping •• 4 - 1" rectangular rings

But to make this bag, I’m going to use some notions I usually don’t use in my quilting; things like hook and loop tape, heavy fusible interfacing, woven strapping, clear vinyl and rectangular strap rings. How to cut the fabric? My stack of ColorWorks Concepts fabrics looks SO inviting! I can’t wait to cut into it, but what am I going to do with it? To decide which layout to use and which fabrics to use for each block, I find it helpful, and playful, to lay the fabrics out on my cutting board and previewing what of the fabrics look like beside each other and how they 'interact' together. I fold the fabrics into long borders, squares or triangles and lay them out to see what I like best.

My stack of ColorWorks Concept fabrics

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Different ways to preview fabrics.

Cutting the fabrics I'm certain I want to use squares from the New York Beauty panel as the center of the design on both sides of the bag, so I'm going to fussy cut two sections of 9 squares allowing for a ¼" seam on all sides. Each of my squares turned out 14⁵∕₈" square. I want to use the flying geese fabric to make borders, so I’m going to cut one strip 20" x WOF and then I’ll cut down the center of each striped section to make four strips that are 3⁵∕₈" x 20". For the rest of the fabrics cut as follows: •• Teal – Cut one strip 1½" x WOF (width of fabric). From this cut two 1½" x 15½" strips •• Cut one rectangle 38½" x 25½" •• Rainbow diamonds – Cut one strip 7" x WOF. From this cut two 7" x 14" rectangles. •• Cut one rectangle 32" x 25½". •• Cut three strips 2½" x WOF. From these cut three 2½" x 15" strips and two 2½" x 14½" strips •• Black print – Cut six strips 1½" x WOF. From these cut four strips 1½" x 15½" strips and eight strips 1¼" x 20" •• Cut one strip 2" x WOF. From this cut two strips 2" x 15½" •• Cut two strips 3" x WOF. Set these aside for the binding. •• Cut one strip 2½" x WOF. From this cut one 2½" x 25½" strip and one 2½" x 14½" strip •• Lime green – Cut four strips 1" x WOF. From these cut four strips 1" x 14 5∕8" and four strips 1" x 15½" •• Fusible heavyweight interfacing – cut two pieces 26" x 20" •• Vinyl - cut one piece 14" x 25½" and one piece 12" x 15"

The center section of the front of the bag

Cutting the flying geese fabric into strips.

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I’ve always wanted to make a New York Beauty quilt and just recently quilted one on my long arm for a customer, but they are a lot of work. I’m not big on paper piecing although I hear there are new, improved ways of doing it, however, I’ve never gotten around to making my own. That’s why I was super excited to use this panel – all the beauty of the New York Beauty quilt block made easy!

New York Beauty quilt block made EASY Start with the main block •• Trimmed two blocks from the panel and add a border to each of them. •• Sew one of the 1" x 14⁵∕₈" strips of lime fabric to each of the blocks and then sew another one to the opposite sides of each block. •• Press towards the borders. •• Sew the 1" x 15½" strips of lime fabric to the remaining sides of the two blocks and press. Sewing the borders onto the New York Beauty block.

New York Beauty block with strips sewn to top and bottom

Flying geese borders I love, love, love flying geese and although I have a pretty good method for making them, it does involve a lot of cutting and piecing. This fabric from Northcott makes flying geese borders fast and easy! •• Take the four 20" strips of flying geese fabric cut yesterday and sew one black 1¼" x 20" strip to each of them. •• Sew another black strip to the remaining long sides of the flying geese strips to make a total of four borders. Sew it all together Sew the 1½" x 15½" strips of teal fabric to the 1½" x 15½" strips of black fabric to make two sections. Sew one of these sections to the top of each of the New York Beauty blocks. Sew one 2" x 15½" strip of black fabric to the bottom of each New York Beauty block. Sew one flying geese border to each side of the New York Beauty blocks to complete the front and back sections of the bag.

Amazing flying geese borders

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Protect your ironing board cover with a silicone pressing sheet.

Machine quilting with a walking foot

Now we quilt! •• Center the front and back of the bag on the two pieces of interfacing and iron in place. •• Place a silicone pressing sheet under the interfacing to prevent it from fusing to the ironing board cover. If you don’t have one of these sheets, then cut two pieces of scrap fabric 26" x 20" each and pin them to the back of the interfacing and iron all three layers together. Use a walking foot to quilt the layers together if desired. I just quilted around the center blocks and down the edges of each flying geese border, but you can add as much quilting as you like. If you have any excess interfacing around the tops, trim it away now. Place the front and backs of the bag right sides together and sew along the bottom edge using a ½" seam. Sewing the front and back of the bag together along the bottom.

Wow! Look at this block!

New York Beauty block with strips sewn to top and bottom

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Now that my plan is in place, I’m going to start sewing! Since I want my retreat bag to hold a variety of different tools, I want to have an assortment of different sized pockets. It would be easy to make all of the pockets the same way, but where would be the adventure in that? I’m going to show you 4 easy ways to make pockets that can be used in any of your sewing projects.

easy ways to make fabric pockets 1

2

the folded fabric pocket OK, so let’s start with the easiest pocket first and if you don’t want to try the others, you could just use this one (in different shapes and sizes) for all of the pockets in your tote bag. •• Take the two 7" x 14" rectangles of rainbow diamonds fabric and fold in half with right sides together to make a 7" square. •• Sew ½" in from the three raw edges, leaving a space 2" long unsewn for turning. •• Turn each of the pockets right ride out and press. •• Topstitch along the edge with the unsewn section to close the seam and reinforce to the top of the pocket. •• Set these pockets aside for now.

the large cutting mat pocket •• Take the 32" x 25½" rectangle of the rainbow diamonds fabric and fold it in half right sides together to make a rectangle 16" x 25½" •• Sew ½" in from the long raw edge. Turn right side out, press and topstitch along this sewn edge to reinforce to top of the pocket. The two raw edges will be encased in the binding of the bag, so we don’t need to finish them at this time.

Sew the pocket along three sides leaving a space open for turning. Topstitch along the sewn edge of the large pocket.

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3

the clear vinyl zippered pocket Vinyl is easiest to sew if there's fabric between it and the presser foot and the bed of the machine. In order to accomplish this in our project we're going to make fabric covers to sew onto all of the edges of the vinyl. Using tissue paper to help vinyl glide, also works.

Slide the edge of the vinyl into the fold of the fabric - topstitch

Take the 2½" strips of rainbow diamonds fabric and fold and press as per these 4 steps: Step 1 Fold in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. Press. Step 2 Fold one edge in to meet the crease made in step 1. Press. Step 3 Fold in the remaining edge to meet the center crease. Press. Step 4 Fold in half lengthwise again and press.

•• Repeat with all five of the 2½" strips. When all strips are one, ••

•• •• ••

Slide one of the covers onto the edge of the zipper - topstitch.

we now have covers to sew onto all four edges of the vinyl pocket and the top of the zipper. Take one of the 15" long covers and slide the long edge of the 12" x 15" piece of vinyl inside of the cover, lining up the two ends. Topstitch along the edge of the cover. Sew another 15" long cover over the opposite side of the vinyl. Using the zipper foot on your sewing machine, sew one of the 15" long covers to the zipper in the same manner as above. Sew the zipper to the top of the pocket by topstitching the edge of the pocket cover onto the zipper. Sew the remaining two covers to the remaining sides of the vinyl pocket, but tuck in the raw ends of the covers so that the edges are finished after they are topstitched.

1 3

Sewing the zipper to the top of the vinyl pocket.

2 Slide the end of the zipper into the folded fabric strip and tuck in the ends.

4

Topstitch the side covers onto the vinyl pocket.

Making the double folded fabric strip covers

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the clear vinyl ruler pocket •• Following steps 1 through 4 listed in pocket 3, fold and press the 2½" x 25½" and 2½" x 14½" strips of black fabric. Sew the long cover onto one side of the 14" x 25½" piece of vinyl. •• Press under ½" on one end of the shorter cover. •• Using a ruler and a marker, draw a line down the vinyl to divide it into two pockets. My line was approximately 8" from the edge in order to accommodate my 6" x 24" ruler. •• Before layering this pocket on the large fabric cutting mat pocket, fold up the bottom ½" edge of the fabric pocket and press. ...You’ll see why in a minute. •• Lay the vinyl pocket on top, sliding the bottom edge of the vinyl pocket into the fold in the fabric pocket. •• Pin these together at the top edge of the vinyl pocket and lay the short black folded strip onto the line that was drawn with the marker, lining up the edge that was folded under with the top of the vinyl pocket. •• Topstitch this fabric strip through all layers (the black dividing strip, the vinyl pocket and the fabric pocket).

Mark a line across the large vinyl pocket from top to bottom to divide the pocket into two.

Place the black divider strip along the drawn line and topstitch through all of the layers.

Fold up the bottom 1/2" of the pocket and press.

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Oasis • 57" x 75" • By Christine Stainbrook of Project House 360 • www.projecthouse360.com

ColorWorks Concepts is a completely innovative program featuring colorful panels and prints that coordinate with our ColorWorks Premium Solid line. The panels are printed to look like complex piecing projects. Since there is no piecing you can move onto adding borders, quilting and embellishing, making this an ideal collection for quick sew projects.

Join the fun!

w

orthcottFabri c w.N

.com rcle Ci

w

ColorWorks Concepts is divided into Phase I & II and there are 7 coordinating 24” Panels for this collection.

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Now that the individual parts of the quilted tote are ready, it's time to put them together. I'm loving how everything looks so far and I'm excited to get the bag done. How about you? Are you ready for finishing up the quilted retreat tote?

Finishing up the quilted retreat bag 1

Laying out the pockets on the lining •• Fold the 38½" x 25½" rectangle of teal fabric in half. •• Press along this fold to mark the center (bottom) of the bag. Lay all of the pockets on top of the lining until you like their placement and pin in place. Keep in mind that the top of the pockets should all be pointed towards the far ends of the lining.

2 3

Sewing in the lining and making the binding •• Place the front of the bag right side up on the table. •• Place the lining on top, right side down and pin along the two short edges. •• Sew in 1/2" from the ends, securing the strap tabs. •• Turn right side out and press. Topstitch along both of the pressed seams. Pin the unsewn edges of the bag. •• Measure the length of the edge of the bag, add 2" to this measurement and cut the two 3" strips of black fabric this exact length. Press the binding strips in half lengthwise and press in 1" on the ends of the binding.

•• Topstitch along all four edges of the zippered vinyl pocket.

•• Topstitch along the folded bottom

edge of the large fabric pocket through all of the layers (folded fabric, vinyl pocket and lining). •• Topstitch the sides and bottoms of the small folded fabric pockets.

4

Making the strap tabs Step 1 Cut four pieces of strapping that are each 4" long. Step 2 Slide one rectangular ring onto each piece of strapping and fold the strapping in half. Step 3 Topstitch through the strapping 1/4" away from the ring. Step 4 Repeat to make four strap tabs

•• Pin the binding strips to the two long •• •• ••

Pin the strap tabs Measure in 7" from the side of the bag along the two top edges and pin the strap tabs in place.

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edges of the tote bag, aligning all of the raw edges. Sew them together using a scant 1/2" seam. Fold the binding to the front of the bag and topstitch along it along the length. Decide how long you want your straps to be and then add about 3" to this length. Slide the ends of the strap into the rectangular rings and then fold the end over twice and topstitch.


Inside of the bag showing all of the pockets

The finished bag Now that we have straps, the bag is basically finished. I added some strips of hook and loop tape to the inside edges of my bag to help keep it closed when I'm carrying it. You could also put magnetic closures or ties on the sides if you want. Here's my finished retreat bag with all of my supplies packed inside. Everything is organized and easy to see. I love it!! Thanks for spending this week with me. I really enjoyed experimenting with Northcott's ColorWorks Concepts fabrics and I really love my new quilted tote bag! I wonder if I have time to make another one for a birthday present for one of my quilting buddies! Check out your local quilt shop to find more of Northcott's great fabrics.

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Interfacing:

woven vs non-woven, fusible vs sew-in, which is better? Jennifer Houlden

Therm-O-Web non-woven fusible interfacing

Which is better, fusible or sew-in interfacing?

I was so impressed with the Lone Star templates , which I used to create the tree skirt, that I decided to highlight another set of templates for this Qs Issue and see what I can create. I didn't really start out with any preconceived project and decided to just wing it and use the different shapes that the Carefree Curves templates make. Along with the templates I also need to use interfacing for this project since I'm working with curves and bias edges. So many options of interfacing: woven vs non-woven, fusible vs sew-in, let's see which is better?

The benefit of the fusible is that once it has been heat activated to the back of the fabric it won't move but it still can wrinkle the top fabric when fused. I've had this happen once or twice but not enough to not use the fusible version. The sew-in interfacing is pinned to the back of the fabric and sewn in place with the possibility of shifting during sewing. It allows the fabric to drape nicely where as the fusible can distort the fabric changing how it drapes. Both versions add stability, thickness and stiffness to the fabric making the fabric easier to work with.

First of all I gathered up a few bits and pieces to get me going on the project as well as some of the usual tools that are standard for any quilting project.

Neither is really any better than the other but rather it depends on the project and your personal preference.

The feature fabrics are a bundle of 6 coordinating fat quarters that I purchased at my LQS. The only thing about using fat quarters is that I'm now limited in the amount of fabric I have to create my project but I really like these so it will be a challenge for me to see what I can come up with and not run out of feature fabrics. I auditioned them with a couple of different background colors and decided that I liked the brown the best. Brown is not my favorite color by any means but it works best with these fabrics and makes them pop.

What is the purpose of interfacing?

There are several purposes of interfacing and the interfacing may be performing one or more in the project. Purpose 1 - to stiffen fabric - such as in shirt cuffs Purpose 2 to strengthen fabric - such as for buttonholes Purpose 3 to add loft to fabric - such as for a fabric bag Purpose 4 prevent stretching - such as for bias cut pieces and Purpose 5 prevent tearing - when doing embroidery work or thread play.

Interfacing

I'm using Therm-O-Web made by HeatnBond, a fusible nonwoven interfacing offered in three different weights - light, medium and heavy for varying degrees of stiffness to the fabric. The different weights are used with different types of fabric. Each package outlines which fabrics it works best with and for what kind of applications they should be used.

I'm using the fusible version since I'm using templates and don't need it to slip and slide on the back of my fabric when the template is in place. Plus I don't need the pins to get in the way with the template as I'm going to need the template to lie flat. Since I'm using the fusible version I also need to use pressing sheets to protect my ironing surface and iron from any unwanted glue. Trust me, getting the glue on the iron is no fun at all! Last summer I was making a memory quilt and neglected to use the pressing sheets and ended up with an extremely messy iron.

What is the difference between non-woven and woven interfacing?

Woven interfacing looks and acts like fabric and needs to be cut along the grain. While non-woven interfacing looks more like paper and can be cut in any direction. Both can be found as either a fusible product or sew-in product.

Photos by Jennifer Houlden

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Carefree Curves templates

There are 3 different templates in the Carefree Curves Collection which make at least 4 different shapes. The hearts & gizzards template This template makes 5 different sizes ranging from 8'' - 16''. All the measurements are found on the template for each size. I'm not quite sure what gizzards look like but I'm very familiar with hearts. The circle template This template makes both Âź-circles and full circles in 3 different sizes ranging from 6'' - 11''. And looking at the template you could even make half circles with it. All the measurements are provided on the template for each size and the booklet of instructions gives the how-to. The instructions are easy to follow and very well written. The wagon wheel & fan template The wagon wheel ranges from 16'' - 24'' and the fan from 8'' - 12''. Once again all the measurements except one are found on the template for each size. I'll get to that measurement a little later.

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2 strip sets each made with 4 fabrics of varying widths from the feature fabrics.

One nice thing about working big is that the project sews together quickly and progress can be seen with the first few blocks. Let's get started and make some curved shapes.

How to use the Carefree Curves circle template Circle template ready for marking with blue chaco liner.

Full circle The Circle template can be made in 3 different sizes. Each size of circle is color coded on the template. I'm using a strip set of my feature fabrics for each circle. I thought that the circles would be more interesting made up of a variety of fabrics rather than just one fabric. Originally, I planned to use the largest circle but my strip set isn't big enough so I'll use the middle size. Once the strip set was made I fused a piece of interfacing to the wrong side of the strip set. Remember to use a pressing sheet so as not to get any unwanted glue on your iron.

Cut circle along marked lines with scissors.

I altered how the interfacing is used in the directions. I decided to fuse it to the back of the fabric and keep it in the project giving my feature fabric a bit more stiffness. The instructions, cut it away so that the interfacing is only at the edge of the piece rather than covering the whole back. By attaching the interfacing this way a different method of construction is required which is outlined in the instruction booklet. Place the circle template on the interfacing and use a fabric marking pen to draw lines in the cut out grooves onto the interfacing. I used the Clover Chaco Liner to draw the lines of the middle sized circle. I started out using the blue Chaco liner but found that I couldn't see it very well on the interfacing so switched to the red Chaco liner. The Chaco liner comes in 2 other colors - white and yellow. I love this marking tool and one of my favorite things about it is that it has refills! Cut out along the marking lines with either a rotary cutter or scissors. I used scissors just in case I wandered off the lines. Place on a background square. The circle is 8½'' in diameter and is placed on a 12½'' square.

A circle from one of the strip sets on the brown background

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Reference lines for cutting in quarters are marked.

Ruler aligned on top and bottom reference lines.

Circle cut in quarters.

Quarter circle I'm making the smallest circle for the ¼-circles which requires a 7'' square. Placing the template on the wrong side of the fabric I marked the same lines as I did above but this time I also added in the reference lines at the top, bottom and sides of the circle. These reference lines are used to cut the circle into quarters. Line up a ruler with the top and bottom lines and cut with a rotary cutter. Repeat with the other 2 horizontal lines to cut the circle into 4 equal pieces. With scissors or a rotary cutter cut along the curved lines to make the quarter circles. Two half circles could also be cut by only cutting the top and bottom lines. Place the ¼-circles on a 4½'' background piece and arrange the pieces. I pinned it in place with glass headed pins until I know how I'm going to stitch it to the background. That way if I have to iron it the pins can stay in place and the heads won't melt. Use an arrangement from the instruction book such as the drunkards path block, Mohawk Trail block, Fools Puzzle block or make your own design.

Secure ¼-circle to background fabric with glass headed pins.

Alternate arrangements Combine the ¼-circles with the circle to create a frame. Or use the off cuts to create the frame.

Off cuts in each corner surrounding the center circle

Circle in the centre with ¼-circles in each corner.

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This template is great for cutting circles and ¼-circles. It's always a bonus when a template has more than one use or shape associated with it. Tune in tomorrow when I continue with how to use the Carefree Curves template and highlight another template in the collection.

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Making the pieces

Step 1: Starting at the yellow line measure up to the line of the size of block you wish to make. I'm going to make an 18'' block so I'll need to cut my strips 5'' x WOF.

easy steps to perfect wagon wheel quilt blocks

Step 2: Place the template on the fabric and mark out the cutting lines using a marking pen such as the Clover chaco liner. The template needs to be flipped back and forth a 180째 as you work along the piece of fabric.

The second template, Wagon Wheel & Fan, is the one that caught my eye when I was looking at the pictures of the projects on the package. I'm quite excited to give it a whirl and see what I can create with it. Wagon Wheel If you recall a few pages back I said that this template had all the measurements needed on the template except for one. The exception is what size to cut the strip of fabric needed. To determine this measurement use a ruler or tape measure and measure from either the yellow line at the bottom of the template or the next line up which is orange. This will determine the size of the circle in the middle of the wagon wheel. I've decided to go with the bottom line which is a 6'' circle.

Step 3: I had all my lines marked on the strip of fabric when I realised that I hadn't fused the interfacing to the fabric. I thought well I'll fuse it now and see if I can see the lines. Yes, indeed I could see the lines so I didn't have to redraw anything - bonus.

Carefree Curves

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So technically step 2 & 3 should be swapped around and the interfacing fused in place before the marking is done.

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Step 4: Using a ruler and rotary cutter I cut along the straight lines and then with a pair of scissors I cut the curves.

Step 7: Sew the pairs together to create halves.

Sewing the pieces together

Step 5: First things first I laid the pieces out in the order I wanted them to be in the wagon wheel. Each wagon wheel needs eight pieces. I could have used only 2 fabrics per wheel and alternated them. I decided that I would use 4 fabrics to get a more varied wheel.

Step 8: Sew the halves into a whole to create the wagon wheel.

Step 9: Place on the background fabric and add a 6'' circle to the center of the wheel.

Step 6: Sew the pieces into pairs along the straight edges.

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Fan

Use 2 blocks to create a half circle.

The fan pieces are made the same as above and sewn into pairs. The pairs are placed on the background square.

Create a ribbon like design with the fan shapes alternating along a line.

A Âź-circle is placed at the corner to cover up the remaining background fabric to create the fan shape.

These shapes and blocks can be used alone or together to create various projects from table runners to baby quilts, wall hangings and even full size bed quilts.

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These 9 easy steps to perfect wagon wheel quilt blocks make this a simple block for all skill levels. I really like the look of this block. The fan block is great as well. But I still have one more template to test out before I make my decision on what shapes to use in my project - one, two, three, four or maybe all of them.

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Creating the pieces To cut the shapes from this template a strip of fabric is cut along the WOF. Each size is color coded on the template and states what width of strip to cut. I've cut a 6'' strip to make the smallest size of heart.

Perfect hearts with the

This time I made sure to fuse the interfacing to the back of the fabric before I started tracing out the shape. Align the orange line which is the first solid line marking from the point of the template along the edge of the fabric. The pointed tip of the template will be at the other edge.

Carefree Curves

heart template The third template is the Hearts & Gizzards template. I do like hearts and occasionally use them in the odd piece but I do find them hard to draw as each side is never quite equal. Maybe with this template I will have even hearts. Check out the steps below to make perfect hearts with the Carefree Curves heart template.

Trace the outside edge of the template along with the curved cut-outs using a marking pen that will show up on the fabric and interfacing. To draw the next piece flip the template 180 degrees and align with the diagonal line already drawn. Continue this way until the strip of fabric is full.

Cut out the pieces using a rotary cutter and ruler on the straight edges and scissors or rotary cutter on the curve. Arranging the heart pieces

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Arrange 2 pieces to create a heart in the corner of a piece of fabric.or

Using 8 pieces put a heart in each corner of a background block.

A second shape Using the template place it over the heart shape with the first curved line about 2∕3 of the way down from the top edge of the shape. Trace the curved line onto the heart shape. Using the rotary cutter cut along the line to create a small petal shape and a triangle.

Add a circle to the center of the background block for the hearts to surround.

Combine 8 together to create a wreath by leaving the middle open. Or add a small circle for the center piece to create a flower. Make 3 of these blocks and use them for a table runner.

Another option is to use 2 different fabrics for the heart and background to create a positive/negative effect. Use the smallest size and make a mug rug for Valentine's Day or a quilted postcard. Use 8 heart pieces to create a flower. Sew them together along the straight edge the same as the wagon wheel shape was made. Dress it up by putting a button in the middle. Make a throw pillow out of it or use it for one side of a tote bag.

After using all these templates I still need to make a decision on which shapes to use in my project. Perfect hearts with the Carefree Curves heart template every time but I don't think the hearts have won a spot in my project even though they are perfectly shaped.

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Fusible bias tape made easy with Clover Bias Tape Maker Jennifer Houlden Since I didn't fold over the edges of my pieces on any of the shapes I made with the Carefree Curve templates the last couple of days, I now need to find a way to secure the edges so that they do not fray or lift. I could use a stitch such as satin or blanket to secure each piece in place but those won't stand out very well. I want something to stand out and create an edge on the curved shapes I created, so I'll use fusible bias tape to edge each piece. I could buy fusible bias tape or I could make my own to match the fabrics exactly, since fusible bias tape is easy with the Clover bias tape maker. First things first is to choose the fabric that I want to make the tape with and dark teal matches the deep teal in the feature fabrics. It also goes well with the dark brown background. I'm also going to need a bias tape maker and a roll of fusible which I conveniently found at my LQS. I bought the 10mm width of fusible tape which means I have to use the ½'' bias tape maker from Clover. If I had purchased the 5mm fusible tape then I could have used a ¼'' bias tape maker. The ½'' tape will outline the shapes very nicely.

The best part about making my own bias tape is that I can have it in any fabric and any color I want. The readymade fusible bias tape comes in very limited colors.

Cutting the bias fabric strips

To begin I need to cut some bias strips at a width of 15/16'' - just under an inch. The packaging for the tool gives the width to cut for bias and straight. I have to make bias tape as I'm going to be easing it around curves and the bias tape is much more 'mouldable' than the straight tape to curves. To cut the strips I use a square piece of fabric. This one I just happened to cut at 20'' as I know I'm going to need a bit of fusible bias tape. I thought I would work small for this week's project and once again I'm working at a larger size. Well, I'm going to blame it on the templates because the smallest they went was 6" plus I didn't want any feature fabric left. Trim off one corner at a 45° angle and then cut the strips at the desired width. Once all the strips have been cut they need to be sewn together to make one long continuous piece. Place together at right angles with right sides of fabric together and a quarter inch hanging over each end. Sew with a quarter inch seam allowance. Press and trim off the dog ear.

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Cutting the bias fabric strips.

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Making the bias tape

Step 1: Feed the fabric through the bottom hole on the fusible tape maker. It feeds through much easier if the fabric end is pointed. Sometimes the fabric gets stuck. If it does turn the tool over and there's a slit in the bottom that a pin can fit in and push the fabric along. Step 2: Feed the fusible tape through the top hole on the fusible tape maker. I recommend giving the tape a pointed end as well as it has to be fed through a small opening by the fabric and the pointed end will make this go much smoother. Step 3: Feed the pointed end under the metal bar above the fabric. Step 4: Lay the fabric on the ironing surface with the fusible tape centered on the fabric. I like to use a hot iron with steam. Caution though as the steam does billow up around the tool and fabric. Step 5: Lift the tape maker up at a slight angle to the ironing surface and drag it backwards. This motion will feed out the tape and fabric together. At the same time that the tape maker is being dragged backwards with the iron towards the tape maker to fuse the fusible tape to the fabric.

Feeding fabric into tape maker.

Fusible tape being fed through the top hole.

TIP

It's best to go slow otherwise the fabric can go askew as it's in the top of the picture below. At the bottom of the picture is how the fusible bias tape should look.

Feed tape under metal bar above fabric.

Making the fusible bias tape.

Bias tape made - some areas aren't as smooth as others.

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Use a hot iron to secure tape to curve.

Peel back paper backing to reveal glue. Align bias tape on curve.

Attaching the bias tape

A light teal rayon thread adds contrast and shine to the bias tape

Notice I have a few dangling thread ends on the circle that I'll get to use my favorite self-threading needles and pull to the back of the block to secure and hide from view. Most people think I'm absolutely crazy to enjoy pulling threads through and hiding them but I find it very relaxing especially while watching my favorite movies.

Peel back the paper on the bias tape to reveal the glue which is shiny. Place the bias tape on the edge of the curve at the edge of the square.

With a hot iron and steam press the bias tape in place. Cut the bias tape off at other end of curve.

I did decide to use the circle, ¼-circle and fan shapes for this project. Here's a picture of what I have come up with so far. I even did a good job of using up the feature fabrics with very little left over. My scrap bin will be happy to take what's left.

Sew the bias tape in place with a matching or contrasting thread depending on the look you want. I used a lighter colored rayon thread from Sulky as I wanted it to stand out on the dark teal bias tape. I also used three rows of stitching since the bias tape is a ½'' wide.

I'll be back next issue with the finishing touches like quilting, embellishing and binding along with adding the bias tape to all of the curves. Fusible bias tape is easy with the Clover Bias Tape Maker and any fabric in any color can be used - perfect for customizing your work.

Here's one of the ¼-circle blocks sewn together as well as a circle block.

Until the next QUILTsocial issue, Happy Quilting.

Blocks laid out on the design wall

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YOUR QUEST FOR MORE YOUR QUEST FOR MORE STARTS HERE. STARTS HERE.

Brother introduces the fabulous new Q-Series, Brother fabulousquilting new Q-Series, the nextintroduces generationthe of sewing, and Brother introduces the fabulousquilting new Q-Series, the next generation of sewing, and embroidery machines with amazing embroidery the next generation ofwith sewing, quilting and embroidery machines amazing embroidery speeds, super-sized workspaces and awesome, embroidery machines with amazing embroidery speeds, super-sized high quality sewing workspaces functions. and awesome, speeds, super-sized high quality sewing workspaces functions. and awesome, high quality sewing functions.

NQ1300 - Designer NQ1300 - Designer NQ1300 - Designer

Machines Machines that’ll that’ll leave leave you you Machines with that’llexcitement. leave you quivering quivering with excitement. quivering with excitement. Five exciting models designed to quench your creativity.

Five exciting models designed to and quench your creativity. Choose from combination sewing embroidery machines Five exciting models designed to and quench your creativity. Choose from combination sewing embroidery machines with tons of beautiful built-in designs (including Disney Choose from combination sewing and embroidery machines with tons of beautiful built-in designs (including Disney characters), to a specialized embroidery-only model to with tons of beautiful built-in designs (including Disney characters), to a specialized embroidery-only modelabove. to three fashion-focused machines, like the Designer characters), to a specialized embroidery-only modelabove. to three fashion-focused machines, like the Designer three fashion-focused machines, like the Designer above. The Q-Series - it’ll leave you quivering with excitement. The Q-Series - it’ll leave you quivering with excitement. The Q-Series - it’ll leave you quivering with excitement. Find out more at brother.ca/inspiration or visit your local Find out more at brother.ca/inspiration or visit your local authorized Brother dealer Find out more at brother.ca/inspiration or visit your local authorized Brother dealer authorized Brother dealer

INSPIRING INSPIRING CREATIVITY CREATIVITY INSPIRING CREATIVITY FOR GENERATIONS. FOR GENERATIONS. FOR GENERATIONS. Award-winning sewing machines, embroidery machines, sergers, Award-winning sewing machines, embroidery machines, sergers, and a whole lot of company. Award-winning sewing machines, embroidery machines, sergers, and a whole lot of company. and a whole lot of company. Photos are for illustration purposes only. The embroidery designs built into these embroidery machines are for personal use within the home only and may not be used for business or industrial purpose. Brother and its logo are trademarks of Brother Ltd.,purposes Japan. All specifications are subject change without notice. All machines registeredare trademarks referenced herein are the property of not theirberespective companies. The embroidery in this brochure has Photos areIndustries, for illustration only. The embroidery designstobuilt into these embroidery for personal use within the home only and may used for business or industrial purpose.machine Brother shown and its logo are trademarks been manufactured Brother Industries, Ltd., under with Disney Enterprise Inc., through which Brother has permission to use Disney images. ©Disney of Brother Industries,byLtd., Japan. All specifications arelicensing subject agreement to change without notice. All registered trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective companies. The embroidery machine shown in this brochure has Photos Brother are for illustration purposes only. The embroidery designs built into these embroidery machines are forH9B personal use within the home only and may not be used for business or industrial purpose. Brother and its logo are trademarks ©2015 International Corporation (Canada) Ltd. 1, rue Hôtel de Ville, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec, 3H6. been manufactured by Brother Industries, Ltd., under licensing agreement with Disney Enterprise Inc., through which Brother has permission to use Disney images. ©Disney of Brother Industries, Ltd., Japan. All specifications are subject to change without notice. All registered trademarks referenced herein are the property of their respective companies. The embroidery machine shown in this brochure has ©2015 Brother International Corporation (Canada) Ltd. 1, rue Hôtel de Ville, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec, H9B 3H6. been manufactured by Brother Industries, Ltd., under licensing agreement with Disney Enterprise Inc., through which Brother has permission to use Disney images. ©Disney ©2015 Brother International Corporation (Canada) Ltd. 1, rue Hôtel de Ville, Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec, H9B 3H6.

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Canada’s most trusted notions brand

is getting a makeover! Our new UNIQUE® brand packaging

is as beautiful and practical as our ne products!

Find all of your favourite UNIQUE® Sewing and Quilting products in more alluring and informative packaging. With lifestyle images showing application suggestions and detailed instructional diagrams, it has never been easier to nd and use the products you need to make your very best work.

Look for UNIQUE® Sewing and Quilting products at your favourite fabric, sewing and quilting store!

QUILTsocial | Issue 6  
QUILTsocial | Issue 6  

Welcome to our 6th issue of QUILTsocial kicking off spring with a 'bookful' of helpful quilting and sewing tips! This issue focuses on the h...