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on Campus Issue 10 • November 2013 • For daily updates visit www.uwc.ac.za

Inside UWC Rector receives international honour page 2

UWC students streets ahead in JSE investment competition

page 9

UWC heads CERN’s first South Africanled experiment page 11

A great golf day page 16

Your Source for University News

Science shows off its splendours, and a Nobel laureate

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he University of the Western Cape celebrated its rising scientific standing at the Faculty of Natural Science Research Open Day at the end of October. After the opening formalities, guests got down to business – two days of lectures and presentations from UWC postgraduate students conducting research in biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, nanoscience, cosmology and more, where they explained how their work helps to develop computerised tools to help translate sign language, supercomputer simulations of galaxy evolution, and mathematical models of HIV/AIDS. There was also a blue-ribboned guest. The 2012 Nobel Laureate for Physics, Professor Serge Haroche of the Collège de France and the École Normale Supérieure in France, was the special guest, delivering an open lecture – with plenty of school learners in attendance – on The Power and Strangeness of the Quantum World. Haroche argued that the usual understanding of the world does not apply to sub-atomic particles like electrons and photons operating in the strange and sometimes-paradoxical realms of quantum physics. Here the same object can exist in different states simultaneously or travel multiple routes to get somewhere all at once. Haroche explained how quantum theory opened up the microscopic world, giving scientists the keys to most modern technologies, be it computers, CD and DVD laser technology, and even the internet. He added that the biggest problems facing South Africa and the world, from climate change to health and socio-economic

Learners listen to Nobel laureate Prof Serge Haroche delivering his lecture on the weird wonders of quantum world. problems, can be understood, addressed and solved through science. But for that to happen scientists need to work in an environment where they are not pressured to produce specific results in a limited period of time, he said. “New technology is born from blue sky research, and time and trust is needed for this.” Haroche also had advice for young scientists starting out: “Don’t be intimidated by all the knowledge that is out there. You don’t have to know everything – you just need to know one thing before the others.” Research Open Day organiser and UWC nuclear physicist, Professor Nico Orce, hailed the event as a huge success. The real value of the Research Open Day lay not only in the sharing of scientific knowledge in academic presentations and exhibits, but also in the exposure to great minds and ideas, he said.

Special guest Prof Serge Haroche (second from right), 2012 Nobel Laureate for Physics, with (from left) UWC’s Prof Rob Lindsay, Prof Michael Davies-Coleman and Prof Ramesh Bharuthram at the 2013 Science Research Open Day. “It is a wonderful opportunity to motivate and inspire students, showing them that a Nobel Prize winner is also just an ordinary person like them,” he said. “Maybe one day they’ll be able to inspire others in the same way as Haroche.”


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UWC Rector receives international honour

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t wasn’t just meetings and presentations when Princess Astrid of Belgium and a high-level trade delegation visited the University of the Western Cape in October. Here to explore new ways to link business and academia across the two countries, the princess also took time to bestow a prestigious honour on UWC’s Rector and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian O’Connell. Princess Astrid presented O’Connell with the title of Commander of the Order of Leopold II, an honour awarded by royal decree to those in the civil service. The award was made to recognise O’Connell’s “tireless efforts” to not just strengthen ties between UWC and Belgium, but also to raise UWC’s profile, transforming it into the internationally respected institution it is today. Johan Maricou, Belgian Ambassador to South Africa, spelt out some of the many reasons the country had decided to make the award to the UWC rector. “When Professor O’Connell receives this award, it is not only because of his impressive achievements as the head of this university; more than that, it’s because of the kind of leadership he represents. His leadership is informed by vision and engagement – he is the kind of VC who leaves his office and talks directly to the students. He is a true humanist, and he has succeeded in bringing to UWC, and Africa, a commitment to the cause of human advancement.” Thanking the delegation, O’Connell explained that the long-term partnership with Belgium had benefited UWC students and staff alike, extending and enhancing the global reach and reputation of all parties. “The collaboration between UWC and our Belgian partners began more than 10 years ago, when the University’s future was uncertain in many ways,” he said. “The collaboration has opened so many doors, showing that we are stronger together than apart.” The princess and the Belgian delegation were attending a seminar that elaborated on these sentiments, particularly through a panel discussion titled Linking Business and Academia Through Mobility and Innovation: Celebrating Academic Mobility between Belgium and South Africa. Well-travelled

Princess Astrid of Belgium bestows the Order of Leopold on UWC Rector and Vice-Chancellor, Prof Brian O’Connell. academics from UWC, the University of Cape Town, the Cape Peninsula University of Technology and Ghent University, among others, highlighted the importance of international academic mobility for students, as well as the social and economic benefits these mobile graduates could trigger. Piet van Hove, director of the International Relations Office at the University of Antwerp, said that international mobility between universities is by no means a new concept, but that the importance of this mechanism is still not fully realised. “You can’t have high-quality research without making sure it has international application – international mobility in a university is key to successful research. While such mobility brings higher-quality outcomes, the process itself is also of benefit, as it often entails solutions on an international platform.” “Businesses want talent,” commented Chris Welan, CEO of Accelerate Cape Town, an initiative by business leaders to develop and implement a programme of long-term

sustainable, inclusive economic growth in the Cape Town city region, “and so should apply the rules of supply and demand to their approach. Business has a part to play by connecting with universities about what demand they have, so that their universities in turn can offer the supply.” Douglas Sanyahumbi, director of UWC’s Technology Transfer Office, also applauded the role that academic exchanges play in innovation. “Through travel, applications can be envisioned,” he said. “Travel teaches flexibility – international exposure shows a variety of ways of doing things.” Merle Hodges, director of International Affairs at Cape Peninsula University of Technology, provided an apt metaphor for the transformative impact of international mobility. “If you take a caterpillar and stick wings on it, what you get is an awkward caterpillar. But if you give it time, allow it to go into its cocoon and undergo the necessary processes and transform, it will emerge as a graceful butterfly. International travel can help our students become those butterflies.”

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Irish visitor brings glad tidings

n October, the University of the Western Cape hosted a visit from Professor Jane Ohlmeyer from Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) in Ireland, the stopover coming with news of growth in a fellowship programme honouring a much-loved South African. Vice-president for global relations at the TCD, Ohlmeyer was in South Africa as part of trade and investment mission funded by the Irish government. While at UWC, she spoke of the Kader Asmal Fellowship Programme for South Africa, which will provide 10 annual postgraduate fellowships to South Africans wishing to continue their studies in Ireland. The fellowship is part of the Irish government’s programme of development cooperation (Irish Aid) in South Africa, which aims to address educational needs in the country, particularly among those from previously disadvantaged communities. The Fellowship, established in 2012, is named in honour of the late Professor Kader Asmal, former minister of water affairs and, later, education in South Africa. Asmal had served as a professor of law at TCD for 27 years before returning to South Africa in 1990, taking up a professorship in law at UWC prior to moving into government. While in Ireland, Asmal founded the Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement and the Irish Council of Civil Liberties.

Prof Jane Ohlmeyer (right) of Trinity College, Dublin, on her visit to UWC.

CodeJam Exhibition: Apps That Matter

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n 11 October, CodeJam 2013 came to a close when a group of very talented young techpreneurs showcased some amazing apps and earned respect, recognition and amazing prizes for their efforts at the University of the Western Cape (UWC). The CodeJammers have spent the past months training, learning, coding and developing their potentially world-changing Apps That Matter, UCNF designed the best Apple iOS app for the theme for CodeJam 2013. These apps CodeJam 2013, and were rewarded with new will provide support for start-up businesses, iPads employment seekers and mathematics and economic challenges and needs. “Digital science learners, as well as better access to inclusion and social innovation go hand in public services and to integrated information hand,” explained UWC’s Institutional Planner, systems for public transport. Larry Pokpas. “With these apps, students have The CodeJam challenge, now in its second been given a way to develop and use skills and year, is one of several national initiatives aimed competence to link technological innovation at enhancing the digital competence of South with social innovation in the digital age, and to Africa at large. Over three months, participants create something that works, and could received regular technical, ‘ideation’ and entrepreneurial instruction through Western Cape CoLab, a joint undertaking by UWC and the national eSkills Institute (recently amalgamated with the National Media Institute of South Africa). CodeJam 2013 was all about developing young, local app talent, and a local app ecosystem that addresses South Africa’s socio-

The One Hit Wonders took home the prize for Android app at the CodeJam 2013 awards evening. change a community, or the world.” At the finale, the 18 teams presented their handiwork (for iOS and Android) and prototypes all for mobile phones. The day ended with a gala dinner and prize-giving, where the winners were rewarded with mobile devices and sponsorship to participate in a two month incubation process and potential internships at various businesses.


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Open Access: Sharing information to build a better South Africa

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he University of the Western Cape has formally committed itself to supporting the principles of open access and working to achieve openness in publicly funded projects. By signing the Berlin Declaration to Open Access in the Sciences and Humanities in October, the University has joined the international community of scholars working to make scholarly findings available to all, free of charge. As UWC Library director, Pateka Matshaya, explained, addressing a crowd of academics, library staff and others at the signing ceremony: “Universal and equitable access to information is vital for the social, cultural, economic and personal development of individuals and communities alike. Our goal is to transform South Africa by making information freely accessible to all.” Open access, also known as OA, is achieved through the deposit of peer-reviewed research papers in repositories or through publication in open access journals. The research is thus free for all to view and use, not just those who’ve paid for journal subscriptions or whose libraries – who have paid subscriptions – have allowed them access. In this way, researchers have their work read and discussed by a larger audience, industry is able to make use of academic work they might otherwise never have seen, and the public can see where their funds go – a win-win situation for all those who create, use or are interested in human knowledge, and for society as a whole. The keynote speaker at the signing ceremony, recently-appointed Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, Tshililo Masutha, expressed his appreciation for UWC’s signing of the Declaration. “Open access serves to level the playing field between the haves and the have-nots, especially in the developing world,” Masutha said. “Like the telephone or radio or tape recorder – without which, being partly blind, I would never have been able to pass my law degree so long ago – new technologies can make the world a fairer place.” But the benefits of open access do not end there, he continued. “I really feel that projects like this will facilitate the

Dean of Science, Prof Michael Davies-Coleman (left), and UWC Library director, Pateka Matshaya (right), witness the signing of the Berlin Declaration to Open Access by UWC Rector and VC, Prof Brian O’Connell, and Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, Tshililo Masutha. production not only of new knowledge, but also of new knowledge producers, who will themselves contribute in producing more knowledge and knowledge producers. Knowledge breeds knowledge, new knowledge breeds new possibilities. And new possibilities can change the world.” Professor Brian O’Connell, UWC’s Rector and Vice-Chancellor, spoke equally enthusiastically of the benefits of open access for South Africa. “For most of history, SubSaharan Africa has never benefited from the sharing of knowledge with other cultures,” he said. “But now we’re no longer isolated. Every South African can acquire all the knowledge that anybody else in the world can. And with this knowledge, and the right level of commitment, we can make this country something people will marvel at.” The moment O’Connell and Masutha signed the Declaration was described as the culmination of UWC’s long-time commitment to transformation through knowledge and empowerment. In 2005, UWC Library established an online repository for master’s and doctoral theses. In 2009, the University established the UWC Research Repository, for use by any researcher who wished to make their work open access. And after much discussion, UWC this year geared up to become a full member

of the global OA community, hosting monthly talks since July. “We are very excited that this day has come at last,” Matshaya concluded, “and we’re looking upon all of our researchers to grow our institutional repository, and help us move towards a full engagement with open access policies.”

The talks leading up to the signing helped prepare the university staff for the move to a more open form of scholarship. Prof Brian O’Connell opened the first OA seminar by explaining humanity’s majestic quest to share knowledge, and the benefits this could bring to our species. Dr Alma Swan, director of SPARC Europe and convenor of Enabling Open Access, Skyped from London to discuss the transition to an open access policy, and the benefits to universities and researchers. And Assoc Prof Laura Czerniewicz, director of the OpenUCT Initiative at the University of Cape Town, explored the new possibilities available through open scholarship.

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UWC’s Open Access Journals set knowledge free

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n November, the University of the Western Cape launched its first Open Access journals: the Journal of Student Affairs in Africa and Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning. These open access journals will publish peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary scholarly content and make it available for viewing by anyone, with no payments required to either publish or access the journals. Authors will retain copyright over their work. The articles may be used in teaching or shared further, as long as there’s attribution. With editorial boards consisting of both international and national academics of some renown, the journals are focused on the South African context, but welcome all submissions that are critical and well-researched, and address high-profile problems. Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (http://cristal.epubs.ac.za) will publish scholarly articles and essays on teaching and learning in higher education, with a particular interest in articles relevant to the South African educational context. “There is a real gap in the Southern African context for a journal that focuses on more critical accounts of teaching and learning, and we hope to play a part in filling that gap,” said journal manager Sherran Clarence, teaching and learning specialist as well as coordinator of UWC’s Writing Centre. The journal’s open access status is an important part of that plan. “We firmly believe in open access, because we want as many people within higher education as possible to read the journal and engage with the conversations we are opening up there, and with the authors and their work,” she explains. “Academics should not have to pay to read these papers or publish in the journal.” The Journal of Student Affairs in Africa (www.jsaa.ac.za) aims to be the foremost scholarly and professional journal dealing with the theory and practice of student affairs in Africa. “The journal will not only play a critical role in developing the scholarly field of student affairs, but also in professionalising its practice by targeting academics and student affairs professionals across the African continent,” said the journal’s editor-inchief, New York University’s Professor Teboho Moja. Journal manager Dr Thierry Luescher-Mamashela, senior lecturer in higher education studies at UWC’s recently-launched Institute of Post-School Studies, also believes that open access is a critical step. “Doing research is a bit like mining – and doing research at a public university and with philanthropic money is like mining with public money,” he said. “Publishing

New York University’s Professor Teboho Moja is editing the new Open Access Journal of Student Affairs in Africa. that knowledge in closed access journals is privatising knowledge that was produced for the public good. The knowledge should be for everyone.” Both of the new open access journals are hosted by the UWC Library, which already hosts two open access digital repositories – the Electronic Theses and Dissertation Repository, aka the ETD Repository, for student theses; and the Research Repository, where researchers can post papers that will be available to anybody. With this background, UWC Library will also be offering technical support and publishing expertise for the journals. “Open Access is a very important issue in our times,” explained Jill Claassen of the UWC Library’s Repository and Digital Scholarship Unit. “Open access allows articles to be disseminated more speedily and affordably, and to whoever wants to read them. This means that access to research findings has a global reach, and the results can impact society at a quicker rate, and potentially improve the lives of millions of people.”


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Dean hails top Arts students

Julius Nyerere Lecture: Higher education must transform

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he Faculty of Arts at UWC certainly wasn’t short of success stories when the Dean, Professor Duncan Brown, hosted the Faculty’s Merit Awards in October. There was a score of awards made on the evening, all celebrating the best performances in the first semester of 2013. Yuvna Muthy, scoring an average of 86.7% per subject, was named the best first-year and top Arts student for the semester. Dale May and Traci-Ann Davids picked up the prizes as best second- and third-year BA students, respectively. In turn, Franklin Hasso led the pack in the honours class, while Grace Nkomo topped the master’s class. Adan Zulu received the award as the top student in the Bachelor of Theological Studies class, and Danielle Kellerman was the pick of the Bachelor of Library and Information Studies class. Awards were also presented to the students who scored 80% and above – Muthy topping the list, of course – and to those with first-class passes (70% and higher). These performances all demand plenty of dedication, sympathised Brown, but bring rich rewards. “Study stress is part of being a student,” he told students, “but the key is to push through the difficult times, and you will know when you achieve your success.” While the awards are made to the students, their support networks also deserve some credit, he added. ” We should not forget that without the support of family, lecturers and faculty officers, the success of the students would not be possible,” he said.

Dr Saleem Badat, Rector and Vice-Chancellor of Rhodes University, talks about the role higher education can play in amplifying a learning culture.

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ifty percent of students entering higher education in South Africa will not complete university with a degree.” This alarming statistic was presented by Dr Saleem Badat, Rector and ViceChancellor of Rhodes University, who was speaking at the 10th Annual Julius Nyerere Lecture on Lifelong Learning, held at UWC in October. Badat delivered a keynote address on Higher Education, Transformation and Lifelong Learning. His talk addressed the core purposes of higher education, which has a role to play in amplifying a learning culture both within and outside of higher education institutions, he said. “People must be encouraged to realise that knowledge matters,” noted Badat. “Lifelong learning for human development builds a learning culture in every home, street, community, province and nation. Developing lifelong capabilities of literacy, numeracy and critical engagement with everyday problems – including learning how to learn – are integral to learning throughout life.” Higher education must engage in transformation, Badat argued, but universities must also make sure they are able to produce knowledge and serve students first. “Let us be clear,” he explained, “if a university is not good at research, and at teaching and learning, it cannot undertake real service to the communities. We must have something to offer first.” Transformation itself is about change, Badat clarified, “but not all change is transformation”. The changing of demographics, numbers and proportions of students and staffs, and pursuing and achieving ‘race’, gender and disability equity goals are important aspects of transformation, he continued. But so too are meaningful equity of access, opportunity and success for people of working class and poor rural social origins. Democratising access to knowledge is a major part of transformation for black and working class and poor rural people. It also means challenging the intellectual and daily legacies of colonisation, racialisation and patriarchy. This includes creating institutional cultures that genuinely respect and appreciate difference and diversity – whether class, gender, national, linguistic, religious, sexual orientation, epistemological or methodological in nature. To achieve transformation, citizens must be open to – and must embrace – learning throughout life. This is not including just formal education, but informal, non-formal, self-directed learning, too. Universities, in turn, must realise that they do not stand outside of society; they are subject to conflicts and contradictions and will tend to express the ideological struggles present in all societies. Universities need to be solid and dynamic enough to stand these tensions, and must be able to perform various roles and functions. “We must make sure our universities are healthy enough to maintain the role that society calls on us to play,” Badat concluded.

English lecturer Fiona Moolla (left) alongside Dr Maurits Van Bever Donker (centre) and Dean of Arts Prof Duncan Brown.

UWC’s Annual Lifelong Learning Lecture takes its name from Julius Kambarage Nyerere, first President of Tanzania, one of Africa’s great political leaders and most respected post-colonial thinkers. As a Mwalimu (Swahili for “teacher”) himself, Nyerere has been described as that rare type of intellectual who was open to new ideas and criticism, and yet displayed a profound independent-mindedness. He saw education as a means of bringing about human liberation and equality in society, and believed the main purpose of adult education was to inspire a desire for change. The lecture series honours these beliefs, and has drawn prominent speakers both nationally and internationally.

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Conference talks about preservation of African knowledge

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frican universities must be used as spaces to reclaim African identity, and must aid in decolonising the mind-sets of Africans if the indigenous knowledge accumulated on the continent is to be preserved. That was the message delivered at the 4th International Conference of the Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Project, hosted by the University of the Western Cape in October. The conference – themed Harnessing Indigenous Knowledge systems for Sustainable Development – aimed to address the growing worldwide outcry to learn from indigenous peoples how they preserved human health and knowledge, and how they occupied and made use of their environments for centuries without damaging them to the extent as has been done by heavily industrialised societies. The conference brought together experts from a variety of fields. Over the three days, they engaged in an intensive and engaging scholarly discourse, providing useful insights into the deeper issues surrounding indigenous knowledge and its relevance to the 21st century. Topics included integrating medicines into public health systems, integrating science with indigenous knowledge, and investigating indigenous knowledge for sustainable development. Professor George Sefa Dei of the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto said that African universities must

build capacity locally for the development of an indigenous knowledge-based school curriculum. Such an indigenous curriculum would be reframed to prioritise the critical interests of Africans, aimed at solving Africa’s problems (rather than prioritising questions that others find important), and re-evaluating the goals of the curriculum and the content in terms of the indigenous knowledge of Africans. “We must unmask hegemonic worldviews and knowledge systems masquerading as neutral, universal or singular, and provide students with tools to analyse where African knowledge is incompatible with other knowledge systems,” said Dei. He warned, however, that this would require a precise and careful definition of this indigenous knowledge, that it is not simply imagined in response to, in reaction to, or in opposition to other knowledge systems, especially hegemonic European knowledge systems. Dei added that the current direction of post-colonial education in Africa should be fully understood as a large part of the problem of education. “We have become extremely adept at mimicking Western and Eurocentric theories and methodologies, which hardly speak to African realities,” he said. UWC’s Professor Meshach Ogunniyi echoed these sentiments, arguing that the science curricula adopted by many African countries were transplants that were not suitable for

Prof Renfrew Christie, UWC’s Dean of Research, opens the 4th International Conference of the Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Project. the African indigenous soil (so to speak), and carried with them the baggage of imperialism. Ogunniyi added that an inclusive science/ indigenous knowledge curriculum is foundational to learners’ understanding of the relationship between school science and the worlds they inhabit in their lives outside of school. “A science/indigenous knowledge curriculum taught in inclusive ways tends to encourage cross-cultural interactions among all learners, and to enhance the development of social identity, especially among learners from marginalised indigenous communities,” he noted. This, he explained, promotes economic progress and social justice, in that no worldview is suppressed on account of science.

IBM meets UWC students

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group of high-level executives from multinational technology giant IBM visited the University of the Western Cape in August to present a public lecture to students in computer science and information systems. The group, hailing from IBM offices across the globe, was in South Africa doing pro bono work for the City of Cape Town, but made time to speak to UWC students – the lecture was open to students beyond the IT, IS and computer-science disciplines – about possible careers in these fields. They first spoke of

their own career trajectories, and then about career opportunities available to students, encouraging them to dream big and work hard. They also covered the importance of networking and continuous learning. Their visit was facilitated by Professor Sean McLean, who is the IBM university relations manager in the Department of Computer Science at UWC. He has had a good and longstanding relationship with IBM. Speakers included Barb Mathers, director of Workplace and Collaboration Solutions in the US; David Miller, distinguished engineer,

member of the IBM Academy Leadership Team and chief technology officer at IBM Canada; Greg Cassano, director of IBM Global Financing Australia and New Zealand; Sherry Comes, chief technical officer and distinguished engineer based in the US; and Jeffrey Erickson, senior project executive for IBM Global Technology Services in the US. In addition to their wise words, the visitors also presented a donation of R15,000 towards the Science Faculty Research Open Day, continuing IBM’s annual support for this event.


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Court tackles prosecution of human rights violations

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he University of the Western Cape and the South African-German Centre for Transnational Criminal Justice hosted the Africa and the International Criminal Court Conference on 22 and 23 November. The conference’s aim, over the two days, was to improve the framework for the prosecution of human rights violations in Africa. It focused on the controversies surrounding the prosecution of crimes from outside Africa, and on African approaches to serious human rights violations. The conference follows in the wake of charges that there is a bias in the International Criminal Court (ICC) against Africa, as most of the cases currently being heard by the ICC hail from Africa. The conference brought together a host of experts in the field, including promising young African lawyers and leading international practitioners and academics. Among those taking part were Judge Sanji Mmasenono Monageng, judge and first vice-president of the International Criminal Court (ICC); ICC judge Prof René Blattmann; Chief Justice Sam Rugege of the Rwandan Supreme Court; and Humboldt

Judges Etkarina Trendafilova, Sam Rugege and Sanji Mmasenono Monageng are pictured at the Africa and the International Criminal Court conference. University’s Professor Gerhard Werle, one of the foremost scholars in the field of international

faces. “We have challenges with amendments, with the lengths of ICC proceedings and with

criminal law, whose textbook The Principles of International Criminal Law is regularly cited by ICC judges Monageng commented on the charge that the ICC is being racist. “It is absolutely inaccurate to call the ICC racist, we reject that,” she said. She also listed some of the obstacles the ICC

finance – this is a painful one.” Mmasenono also noted that politicians tend to exploit the international community’s ignorance about the ICC. “People’s lack of understanding is often taken advantage of and through our outreach programme people are educated and made aware of this.”

New CHS Dean: Building a world-class faculty

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WC’s newly-appointed Dean of the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences, Professor José Frantz, believes that the work in her faculty touches the deepest concerns of society, be it chronic diseases of lifestyles, inter-partner violence or drug abuse. “All of those issues are at the heart of what it is that we as a faculty do,” she says, “and it’s possible for us to make a difference on these problems, if we have a strong vision guiding us.” Frantz’s academic and intellectual journey has centred around UWC. She completed her undergraduate degree here 20 years ago, and came back a few years later when Professor Ratie Mpofu requested that she join UWC to develop the Sports Clinic (still running) and the Department of Physiotherapy. While lecturing, she also completed her master’s and her PhD degrees, becoming the first black female researcher to obtain a PhD from the Department of Physiotherapy. Over time she rose through the academic

UWC’s new Dean of CHS, Prof José Frantz ranks, from lecturer to senior lecturer to head of physiotherapy and deputy dean for research. And now she’s been appointed dean, a move that seemed unlikely when she was just starting out. “I come from a family where I was the first one to go to university and graduate,” she says, “so I can empathise with students who come from a similar background.” Frantz’s research has focused on the prevention of chronic diseases of lifestyle among young people through appropriate

health education, a topic that has interested her for some time. Her PhD looked at the causes of physical inactivity among young people. Currently she is involved in implementing and evaluating the effects of a health education programme relating to risk factors for chronic diseases of lifestyle in schools in the Western Cape. As former deputy dean of research for CHS, she’s familiar with the great work being done across the faculty. She also values the building of connections between researchers. “My approach will be to empower,” she says. “When you’re empowered in your own identity, that will enable you to share more within the faculty.” Frantz believes the CHS Faculty has the potential to be a truly world-class faculty. “There is expertise within the faculty that can accomplish great things,” she says. “We just need to identify common interests and work together where appropriate, driven by a bigger vision to change the lives of people and society.”

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UWC scholar lands national research honour

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he University of the Western Cape’s Dr Lindiwe Khotseng is one of the country’s leading researchers. So says the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), which presented Khotseng with the Outstanding Black Researcher Award, made under its capacity-developing Technology and Human Resources Programme (THRIP), at a ceremony at the iNkosi Albert Luthuli International Convention Centre in Durban on 17 October. Khotseng’s work fits the theme of this year’s awards ceremony – Broadening Participation through Technology. She joined UWC in 2003 as a postdoctoral fellow, then became the director of its Eskom Centre for Electrocatalytic Research (ECER), part of the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry (SAIAMC) at UWC. As ECER director, she organises teaching and training in the field of applied catalysis, electrocatalysis and electrochemistry, trains students and researchers on using sophisticated equipment, conducts and supervises fundamental research, and organises workshops. She is also the first black female researcher to be awarded R2 million in support from THRIP. Khotseng is passionate about her work at ECER. “From fuel cells to batteries to gas treatment, the work we perform is always interesting to me,” she says. The purpose of the DTI Technology Awards is to raise awareness about the benefits of using technology to improve the competitiveness of enterprises. “They are also aimed at inspiring and encouraging creativity and technological innovativeness amongst business people by rewarding those that make use of technology to advance their business,” says Minister of Trade and Industry, Rob Davies. Khotseng credits her own work ethos, the support of colleagues such as the SAIAMC’s Professor Vladimir Linkov, and that of funders like ESKOM. “They’ve helped me achieve great things,” she says.

UWC’s Dr Lindiwe Khotseng accepts the DTI award as THRIP Outstanding Black Researcher of the Year.

From left to right: Athenkosi Mjebeza; Trevor Chatukuta; Zeona Jacobs of the JSE; Prof Heng-Hsing Hsieh, head of Finance at UWC; Mzwakhe Dube; Abonga Sodawe; and Julian Dallamore of Liberty at the competition’s awards ceremony.

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UWC students streets ahead in JSE investment competition

n winning the 40th annual JSE/Liberty Investment Challenge this year, a team of thirdyear finance students from the University of the Western Cape (UWC) kicked some serious dust in their rivals’ eyes. The JSE/Liberty Challenge, which ran from March to September, saw a record 41 university teams – totalling an incredible 4,320 students – tasked to invest a hypothetical R1 million in shares listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE). The UWC Sky Divers team – Trevor Chatukuta, Athenkosi Mjebeza, Dube Mzwakhe and Abonga Sodawe – recorded a stunning return of 114% over the Challenge, well ahead of the second-placed University of the Witwatersrand’s Tripod Traders (with returns of 86%), and the University of Cape Town’s White-Hare Capital (68%). The team received invaluable mentoring from Professor Andy Heng-Hsing Hsieh, head of UWC’s Department of Finance. At a gala awards ceremony in Sandton, the team was presented with a R25,000 cheque, as well as an all-expenses-paid trip to Brazil. “We are very excited to congratulate the winners of this year’s JSE/Liberty Investment Challenge,” said Idris Seedat, manager of corporate social investment in the JSE’s Education Division. “This is a momentous moment for our Investment Challenge. It’s very encouraging to play a part in helping people become financially responsible. We foresee another 40 years of sharing of knowledge with our youth.” The JSE/Liberty Investment Challenge aims to create interest in the dynamic environment that is the stock market, teaching students the fundamentals of investment strategy, how to research and strategise issues surrounding the trading of JSE-listed shares, and about the larger role that investment plays in the South African economy. Hsieh attributes the Sky Divers’ stellar performance to three things: their hard work, the way they applied their classroom knowledge, and their ability to base their decisions on fact rather than emotion. He encourages all students to participate in the competition. “The Challenge is a perfect platform for finance students to practice what they learned in class, and for other students to learn as well. They gain invaluable real-life experience with virtual money, so they’re allowed to make mistakes. It’s a game that you can only win, even if you lose.” The Sky Divers made the decision to enter the competition last year, after coming across an advert on the notice board in the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences. They wanted to put their theoretical knowledge into practice, solve a few problems and help put UWC in the spotlight, they said. They believe that the game format allowed them to have fun, while applying the knowledge and skills they had acquired during their studies in the real world of investment. “We’ve learned a lot in our undergrad studies, and we were able to reap the rewards in the JSE Liberty Challenge,” says Chatukuta. “But we’re still keen on advancing our skills with regards to finance and investment, and postgraduate studies will equip us with those tools to gain that competitive edge that will help us lead successful careers. And now we’ve seen what we can do with a million rand and a trading platform…”


10

News

UWC bids farewell to health reformer Prof Ratie

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he University of the Western Cape mourns the loss of one of its leading lights, Emeritus Professor Ratie Mpofu, who died on 19 October at the age of 68, following a long illness. Mpofu recently retired as dean of the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences (CHS). She had been responsible for many reforms at the University, notably in the fields of rehabilitation, community-based education, inter-professional education and physiotherapy. Born in Zimbabwe, Mpofu married shortly after completing school. But her young husband was arrested by Ian Smith’s government only one month into their marriage, and a pregnant Mpofu had to go into exile in England. The couple endured a seven-year separation. But Mpofu used her exile to good effect, obtaining a diploma in physiotherapy, a teacher’s diploma, and a BA in social science – all while working as a physiotherapist. When Zimbabwe won independence, Mpofu returned to work in the new government’s

Ministry of Health as principal tutor for rehabilitation. She then chose to serve her country by joining the University of Zimbabwe as a lecturer in physiotherapy. She moved to the UK again, to earn a master’s in physiotherapy from the University of Southampton, but returned to Zimbabwe to continue her career as a lecturer. In 1993, Mpofu relocated to South Africa, joining UWC’s Department of Physiotherapy. While completing her PhD, she was appointed as chairperson of the department, where she implemented a straightforward, practical and goal-oriented approach to improving its management structures. It came as no surprise when she was appointed as dean of CHS in 2001, taking the opportunity to promote a curriculum that ensured students would work in and understand the needs of local communities. She served the University in several capacities, and despite a desire to retire and put her feet up, returned time and again to lend a helping hand whenever her experience and expertise was requested.

Former Dean of CHS, social and educational reformer and emeritus professor, Ratie Mpofu, passed away recently. She will be missed. Her steady resolve, passion and skills will certainly be missed at UWC, and the University’s condolences go out to her family. . A funeral was held on 25 October at the Claremont Baptist Church.

World-renowned philanthropist Dr Pat Gorvalla passes away

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Well-known businesswoman and philanthropist Dr Pat Gorvalla, who served UWC in numerous capacities, died in November after a long illness.

he University of the Western Cape and its community at large mourn the death of renowned businesswoman, philanthropist and humanitarian Dr Pat Gorvalla, who died on 12 November 2013. Gorvalla, a former member of the UWC Council and the UWC Gender Committee, passed away at her home, having suffered from cancer for the past couple of years. A founding director of 11 companies and three close corporations, Gorvalla was appointed to the UWC Council in June 1990 by former President FW De Klerk, and served terms as councillor and on a number of sub-committees until March 2012. She also served on UWC’s Membership Committee of Council, the Senior Appointments Committee of Council and the Student Appeals Committee. UWC gratefully acknowledged her contribution, awarding her an honorary doctorate in commerce in 1996. Gorvalla qualified as a teacher at Hewat Training College, but in 1955 began work as a taxi driver to supplement her meagre teacher’s salary. Her business expanded when she was asked

to transport patients to and from Karl Bremer Hospital. Ultimately, her transport company served hospitals as far afield as Kimberley. As her taxi fleet expanded, so did her maintenance costs, leading her to diversify her Bellville-based businesses and launch Pat’s Motor Spares, Pat’s Service Station, and Pat’s Body Works. In the early 1960s Gorvalla began assisting Coloured families to raise collateral for housing bonds. She assisted victims of the Group Areas Act, prompting the launch of a Home Owner’s Association and the development of a housing complex to foster community living. Her business and development expertise was acclaimed internationally , and she was invited to speak in many countries. Gorvalla was a member of the SA-USA Committee on Trade and Development, and she accompanied former President Nelson Mandela on trade missions to the UK, Malaysia and the Philippines. Gorvalla, who sat on numerous community, charity and corporate boards, is survived by three children and three grandchildren.

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Science

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Prof Nico Orce (centre, bright blue shirt) with students from the UWC MANUS programme and other South African institutions during the 2012 Tastes of Nuclear Physics symposium at UWC.

UWC heads CERN’s first South Africa-led experiment

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team from the University of the Western Cape will lead the first African experiment in nuclear physics – studying the mysteries of nuclei – to be granted beam time at the Isotope Separator On Line DEvice (ISOLDE) facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) on the Swiss/ French border. While many South Africans are involved in studies on the CERN colliders, this is the first South African proposal in any field of physics greenlit for one of the booster accelerators of the famous Large Hadron The MINIBALL gamma-ray spectrometer at the ISOLDE Collider (LHC) at CERN. Experimental beam facility at CERN (as seen from above), where UWC time on the ISOLDE facility is hard to come researchers will carry out their measurements. by, and only the most promising research ‘shape conundrum’ – how nuclei change proposals get the go-ahead. their shape and how this may influence the It fell to UWC’s Professor Nico Orce, abundance of elements produced in stellar spokesperson for the South African project, to explosions. defend the project proposal – looking at the The experiment proposes looking at the shape of the nucleus of an isotope (a type of shape of nuclei at extremely tiny scales of a atom) belonging to the element selenium – at few 10-15m – a few millionths of a millionth CERN in October 2012. The physics was found of a millimetre, too small even for the most to be “interesting and relevant”, and after powerful electron microscopes. It will be a full simulation of the experiment, UWC examining a very exotic isotope of selenium was awarded five days of beam time in 2016. produced in the explosion of binary star Those five days are worth their weight in gold, systems composed of a giant star and an explains Orce. extremely dense neutron star – a powerful but “Each day of beam time at ISOLDE is worth extremely common occurrence on a galactic about R1 million – that we don’t have to pay!” scale. The nucleus of this isotope can change The experiment aims to shed light on the

its shape, moving from roughly cigar-shaped to a more rugby ball-like form or vice versa. How it does this is not understood, says Orce, but the nuclear shape affects the decay properties of nuclei – and thus the abundance of the elements as seen today. UWC has been preparing for the project since launching its Master’s in Accelerator and Nuclear Sciences and Material Sciences (MANuS/MatSci) programme in 2008, funded by the National Research Foundation (NRF). Students are lectured in the field of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, and are trained to carry out experiments such as the one proposed at CERN. UWC is, in fact, already running its first CERN-like experiments at iThemba LABS this November, and others will follow shortly, explains Orce. “Along with the keys that will open the most famous scientific laboratory in the world, we are providing South African students with the keys to unlock the mysteries of the heavens,” he says. “We shall be prepared when the time comes for this novel experiment at CERN and we expect more South African students to join in and share with us such exciting times. By doing these kind of measurements, our students will gain self-confidence, initiative and achieve greatness. And when they realise what they’re capable of, what can stop them then?”


12

Education

HIV/AIDS programme hailed by communities

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ne hundred community members reaped the rewards of months’ of dedication when they recently received certificates of participation, commemorating their part in the UWC/USAID HIV&AIDS Programme. Overseen by UWC’s Dr James Lees, the programme is run in a number of Western Cape communities, including Eerste Rivier, Kuilsriver and Mfuleni . The project sets out to provide training and workshops for community members – some 500 at the moment – infected and affected by HIV and AIDS. Among those at the ceremony were representatives from USAID, a longstanding supporter of this and related programmes. Speaking at the event, executive assistant to the Rector and Vice-Chancellor, Mr Larry Pokpas, hailed the programme as a breakthrough in university-community relations. “This programme speaks to the kind of impact that this University wants to make in our communities,” he said. “This is what universities should be about – relevance to the social challenges facing the communities.” He also praised Lees, an American who has been at UWC since 2002, for his vision and persistence. “Dr Lees is a deeply passionate person and anybody can see the communities in which he works appreciate his work,” said Pokpas. For his part, Lees thanked the communities for their efforts and devotion to the programme. It is these communities which give life to universities, he said, and that community members must take ownership of their universities. “Your devotion to this programme is what brought us here today. This is your university; your programme.”

Dr James Lees shares his passion for the HIV/ AIDS Programme.

Learners put their paper-jet engineering skills to the test at the 2013 SLCA Sakhikamva Paper Jet Competition.

SLCA Paper Jet Competition: Learners fly further with STEM

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nyone who’s ever made and tossed a paper jet knows that it’s not as easy as it might look. A decent paper jet employs principles of engineering, mathematics and aviation, taking into account design, shape, size, wind, and sometimes just the obstacles likely to get in its way. To celebrate this special brand of knowledge, the University of the Western Cape’s Science Learning Centre for Africa (UWC-SLCA), together with the NGO the Sakhikamva Foundation, hosted its annual Paper Jet Competition at Victoria Park Primary School in Worcester on 12 October. Grades 6-9 learners from 15 schools in the Breederiver-Overberg region participated in the event, with up to three teams from each school vying for honours in three categories. Fatima Jakoet, SAA pilot and founder and CEO of the Sakhikamva Foundation, was on hand to give encouragement and advice. The paper jet competition was a way to encourage learners to do research, to learn to think outside the box and to work in teams, to develop as individuals, to fulfil UWC-SLCA’s objectives of promoting science education in schools, and expose the learners to careers in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields. At the same time, it also met Sakhikamva’s aims to encourage aviation awareness. “Through this competition we strive to improve the collective interest of learners in science and mathematics in order to improve the culture of learning in those learning areas that are currently in crisis in South Africa,” Professor Shaheed Hartley, director of UWC-SLCA, explained. Hartley was impressed with the effort and initiative of the schools involved. At Worcester RC Primary, for example, the principal and science teacher staged trials to identify the best students. “Needless to say, this school did extremely well in the competition,” reported Hartley. But the school, which took home the prize for the jet that covered the longest distance, didn’t have it all its own way. Team 2 from FJ Conradie Primary won the honours for the longest flight duration, while its Team 3 was judged to have the best design, following a presentation by learners on their research and development process to a panel of adjudicators.

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13

Education

Tutors – a great but under-supported resource

Sherran Clarence, coordinator of UWC’s Writing Centre, explains why tutors might just be a university’s greatest resource.

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hat does it mean to be a tutor? And how can universities help tutors be the best they can be and, in so doing, help the students they

serve? These were the questions explored by Sherran Clarence, coordinator of the Writing Centre at the University of the Western Cape (UWC), in an October seminar titled Creating Enabling Environments for Tutor Training and Support. The talk, the last for the year in a seminar series sponsored by the Directorate of Teaching and Learning, presented a brief overview of a new approach to tutor training and support piloted in the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences at UWC. There was also feedback from a tutor-training retreat held last year, and a survey of tutoring at UWC that covered 40 academic departments across all faculties. The training had mixed theoretical and practical knowledge, and had adopted an active and interactive approach that built on and incorporated tutors’ own experiences and knowledge, reported Clarence. New and returning tutors got together to tell their own stories from past tutorials, to explain what had motivated them to sign up as tutors (money, the chance to consolidate knowledge of their fields, and more), to discuss what they found most important and most challenging in tutorials, and

to try to get a better sense of what was required of them as tutors. What emerged from those discussions was an interesting look at the life and needs of a tutor. “Tutors are responsible for many things,” Clarence noted. “They are instruments of student learning, called upon to provide students with knowledge and skills. Many are even tasked with giving formative and summative training. To do this, they must have particular core skills and knowledge, and the flexibility to adapt to the many situations they may encounter. But it’s not clear that current training is meeting all of these needs.” There were just over a thousand tutors identified at UWC in 2012, with a similar tally in 2013, reported Clarence. Tutors are found in every department, in every faculty – but they don’t all have the same responsibilities and duties. “There are different understandings of what counts as tutor and tutorial – and they require different kinds of training and support.” Clarence explained. “And we can’t treat third- and fourthyear students like PhDs; they have different relationships to the material and the students they’re tutoring.” Sometimes students were just given answer sheets, sometimes they had regular support meetings (from once a week to a couple of times a semester) with lecturers, with whom they

got to raise issues and discuss solutions. There was also a tendency to make tutorials more participatory, more open-ended and flexible – which meant that tutors had to have a better grasp of the work. “A lot of tutors struggle with how I break down this information or understand that, or how I can get them to do this,” Clarence remarked. “And tutor training can be weak on theory, especially on learning theory. With only a contextual approach, some things will work, some won’t – and tutors won’t know why.” Having served her time in the trenches as a tutor, Clarence is well aware of these difficulties. “When I was a tutor at the University of Cape Town,” she recalled, “I was terrible at it. I had no real tools or skills to draw on, and I didn’t really know how to teach what I did know. It was only through moving on from my honours degree and experiencing new environments that I developed my own real tutoring skills. We can’t expect students just to know how to be good tutors right away.” What it boils down to is that tutors have to be given something to work with. “If we want them to engage students, we need to engage them,” said Clarence. “If we want them to include students, we need to include them. Only then will they have a well-developed sense of what they should be doing, and how they can go about doing that.”


14

Education

Award-winning physiotherapy lecturer is a tech junkie

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’m a teacher; why wouldn’t I want to be as good at it as possible?” It’s that ambition – and his love of information and communication technology – that has earned Dr Michael Rowe, lecturer in the University of the Western Cape’s (UWC) Department of Physiotherapy, a commendation at the 2013 Higher Education Learning and Teaching Association of South Africa (HELTASA) awards. HELTASA annually presents awards to academics for their excellence in teaching and learning. Applicants are subjected to a rigorous selection process, and are marked on their contributions to university teaching and learning, and their ability to share their philosophy, insights and innovative ideas with academics across the sector. Rowe is a worthy winner. Part of a national research project on Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Learning, funded by the National Research Foundation, he has published widely and to acclaim on teaching and learning, and regularly presents at national and international universities and conferences. In his five years of teaching at UWC – he holds three degrees from the University – Rowe has been a strong advocate of the use of technology to enhance classroom learning. His students are allowed, even encouraged, to use whatever “techie” devices they wish in class. His courses make liberal use of filesharing service Google Drive for real-time collaboration, sharing and feedback. He teaches physiotherapy students to use the department’s private social network to share experiences and build their portfolios, and provide course feedback. And above all, he tries to teach them how to use all the technology available to them to evaluate information critically, and find the right answers. “There’s really no such thing as the Net Generation,” Rowe says. “Young people may know how to use Google or Facebook, but they don’t always know how to use it for work purposes, or to get the most out of it. I spend a tremendous amount of time improving their understanding of how technology works – and it pays off in the end.” Pushing the envelope in 2013, he offered a groundbreaking massive open online course (MOOC), offering free online training in

UWC physiotherapy lecturer Dr Mike Rowe delivers a presentation on the use of Google Drive to facilitate a blended learning approach. the professional ethics of health care for interested students from all over the world. (‘Only’ 90 signed up, so Rowe dubs it “more of a Mini-OOC”.) A UWC first, it was an interesting exercise. “It was really exciting to be able to connect our students with qualified physiotherapists from all over the world,” he reports. “I’m busy gathering data, and the preliminary findings are fascinating.” Not surprisingly, technology-based teaching was the subject of his recent doctoral thesis, for which he was awarded his PhD in March. Titled Blended Learning in Physiotherapy Education: Designing and evaluating a technology-integrated approach, it investigated (among other things) how to promote critical reasoning for physiotherapy students, and used design-based research to incorporate practitioners and colleagues’ involvement in the study. “Being a student helped me gain a better understanding of what my own students are going through, which I think is an important

UWC lecturers have won HELTASA awards for four years running: Prof Delia Marshall of the Faculty of Science won in 2010; Prof Vivienne Bozalek, director of Teaching and Learning, did so in 2011; and Prof Wendy McMillan of the Faculty of Dentistry was a winner in 2012.

aspect of being a teacher,” Rowe shares. “Sometimes we forget how difficult it is as undergraduates, so constantly being challenged was a good reminder that learning is a process that students need to go through, rather than something they receive from us.” Like any self-respecting fanatic, he also offers his teaching and learning expertise to his fellow lecturers. He is one of two academic staff members who now work once a week for the Directorate of Teaching and Learning, assisting with both the face-to-face professional development of lecturers and online resources, and in wider interactions with higher educators. “My main advice to anyone interested in changing their teaching and learning practices is simply to start small,” he says. “If it feels overwhelming, then scale back a bit. Once you’ve made some small change and integrated it into your baseline activities, it’s no longer as daunting. Over time, these incremental changes will add up, and there’s no telling what you can do in the end.”

To find read more of Dr Michael Rowe’s thoughts on teaching and learning, check out his blog at http://www.mrowe.co.za/blog/ or follow him on Twitter on @michael_ rowe.

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15

Sport

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Athletes go for gold

hile most UWC students are heading for a well-deserved summer break, a host of their classmates are preparing, instead, to represent the University at sport events around the country. The Volleyball Club, whose men’s team won the Geness Consulting Volleyball South Africa Championship for a third successive year a few months ago, will be among the busiest. Both the men and women’s teams will participate in the University Sport South Africa (USSA) National Institutional Beach Volleyball Championship, to be hosted by UWC at Camps Bay beach from 25 to 27 November. Two days later, on 29 November, the team will feature in the second edition of the Varsity Beach Volleyball, also at Camps Bay, ending on 1 December. Over the same three days and at the nearby Camps Bay Sports Club, the UWC Sevens Rugby team will take part in the Varsity 7s tournament. UWC will also host the USSA National Institutional Boxing Championships in Bellville from 5 to 8 December. Elsewhere, the men’s and women’s soccer teams will hope to maintain their winning ways when they head north to take part in the USSA National Football Club Championships at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) from 2 to 6 December. At about the same time, the cricket team heads for the USSA National Institutional Cricket Championships at the Vaal University of Technology (VUT) in Vanderbijlpark. UWC athletes will also participate in a score of other USSA tournaments in early December, including bodybuilding at the

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University of Zululand (UZ); karate at the Durban University of Technology (DUT); aerobics at TUT; aquatics in Durban; fencing at the University of Free State; yachting/sailing at Theewaterskloof Dam; chess at TUT; softball at UZ; supa-pool (a variation of the beloved cue sport) at the Western Cape Pool Academy in Mitchell’s Plain; table tennis at VUT; tennis at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology; climbing at Wits University; swimming at DUT; rugby sevens at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; and badminton at TUT.

WC footballers Cleo Pokpas and Robin Swartz coordinated an outreach programme called Sport Skills for Good to introduce and highlight how sport can be used for good. A number of young boys – aged eight to 18 – from disadvantaged communities were brought onto the UWC campus to be trained in a safe environment and in high-quality facilities, providing an unobstructed learning experience through sport.


16

Sport

A great golf day

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t was a great day for a great cause by a great institution. So raved Bashkar Latchman, an independent trustee and principal officer of the UWC Pension and Provident Funds, about UWC’s 37th Cape Town Golf Day, which took place at the King David Golf Club in Montana on Thursday 14 November. His enthusiasm was justified. The weather was perfectly cool, the participants seemed to have enjoyed every moment and a significant amount of money was raised for the Students’ Bursary Fund which supports needy students. The winners for 2013 Cape Town Golf Day were Marius Hayes and Newton Kies, while Noel Gaffley and Melvyn Sinclair were the runnersup. Neels Scheepers and Morné Arendse finished third. Organised by the Department for Institutional Advancement (IA) and co-ordinated by Marlene Scholtz, the annual event aims to promote relationships between UWC alumni and the Board of Trustees. The main objective is to enable students from historically disadvantaged communities, who have demonstrated academic potential, access to Bursaries, Achievement-based Scholarships, Post-Doctoral Fellowships, Prize and Merit Awards and Work Study Programmes. This year it served its purposes. R400 000 from the profitable Golf Day entity was awarded by the Donor Relations Unit to the Jakes Gerwel Endowment Fund. On the course, a full field of 144 players, divided into 36 teams, took part. The Golf Day’s three silver sponsors were Sanlam Investment Management/Sanlam Multi Manager International, Santam Limited and Old Mutual Investment Group. Watering Hole sponsors were Neotel, Old Mutual Corporate, Nashua Communications, Pro Events, Securitas, KPMG, NBC Holdings, Business Connexion and Community Life Insurance Consultants. “I was very impressed with the event; I think it was professionally organised,” said Garfield Hendricks, who studied at UWC in the mid1980s. “The atmosphere was good and was quite enjoyable. It was one of the best golf events I’ve ever been to.” Pro Vice-Chancellor for IA, Patricia Lawrence expressed UWC’s gratitude to the sponsors. “Thank you so much for your support; this means a great deal for us,” Lawrence said at the presentation function. “This means there is a community First prize co-winner of the 2013 UWC of people out there Cape Town Golf Day, Marius Hayes to support and make alongside UWC’s Pro Vice-Chancellor sustainable contributions Patricia Lawrence and competition participant Bashkar Latchman. to UWC”.

Vuyo Mkhabela joins teammate Kaylin Swart in the national under20 women’s team.

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Kaylin Swart is providing inspirational leadership to the national team looking to qualify for the 2014 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup.

UWC duo don SA soccer colours

t has become a habit for UWC athletes to feature prominently in the national sporting teams, and the inclusion of two players in the South African national under-20 women’s football squad, nicknamed Basetsana, keeps to that proud tradition. UWC Ladies Football Club captain and defender Vuyo Mkhabela and her goalkeeper teammate Kaylin Swart played a key role in the team’s 2-0 victory over Botswana in the FIFA U20 Women’s World Cup qualifier at the Bidvest Stadium in Johannesburg early in November. The win, which followed a 5-2 away victory a week earlier, helped Basetsana to progress to the next round of the qualifiers 7-2 on aggregate. Seventeen African countries have been squaring up for what will be three round-robin qualification stages. Only two teams will represent the continent in the 2014 edition of the FIFA U20 Women’s World Cup, set for Canada from 5 to 24 August. Swart, a BA student at UWC, is the captain of Basetsana, while Mkhabela, a second-year BA Sport Recreation and Management student, is the vice-captain. The team is the first national squad that Swart has captained. She was “honoured” to be entrusted with such responsibility, she says, but her teammates made the occasion a breeze. “It was easy to lead a team of players of such a high calibre,” the Port Elizabeth-born Swart commented. “They helped me a lot, were willing to learn and made communication easy.”

UWC MEDIA OFFICE

Do you have any important UWC stories to share? Do you know of an event on campus that you’d like to see featured? Have you heard of UWC alumni who’ve done amazing things, which you think the world should know about? Or maybe you have a few suggestions, comments or questions about something in this newsletter? Whatever the case may be, the UWC Media Office would really like to hear from you. Just email us on ia@uwc.ac.za , call us on 021 959 9566, or drop by our offices. UWC CONTRIBUTORS

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Oncampus 10th edition