Issuu on Google+

T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 56 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

70 80

3D PRINTERS CEID PROMOTES RESEARCH

REACH OUT

THE GAME

Service trip program reforms, ramps up intensity and safety

A LOOK AT YALE’S OFFENSIVE LINE

PAGE 6-7 SCITECH

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 10 SPORTS

CROSS CAMPUS

Layoffs likely within next five years

DRAMA

Has anyone seen Kevin Daly’s peacoat? It’s J.Crew

cashmere. Daly ’14 left it at Toads in November 2010 … A particular Yale organization reached out to the entire campus this weekend, by sending a flyer out to over 100 panlists. Those looking to take on an international, or at least campus-wide, service project should inform certain members of the campus how to blind carbon copy.

BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS AND ADRIAN RODRIGUES STAFF REPORTERS

What’s in a name? At fair

115 Prospect St., where Rosenkranz Hall lay its scene, a prankster struts and frets his hour upon the stage. Alas, poor MacMillan Center! You knew him, but some fellow of infinite jest has replaced signs saying “Rosenkranz Hall” with ones that proclaim “Rosenkranz and Guildenstern.” To laugh or not to laugh, that is the question. KEN YANAGISAWA/CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

The brief wondrous life of Nom has come to an end.

The pop-up Asian fusion restaurant operated out of the Davenport College buttery has shut its doors for the season, after ending its run with over 50 students on the waitlist. Nom no more.

YALE DRAMAT MAINSTAGE “PARADE” rehearses at the University Theatre Monday night. The show, which opens on Wednesday, traces a dark episode in United States history — with song.

Brave new world. Anything

for science! According to a recent article from the Yale Alumni Magazine, Vivian Li GRD ’15 and Alex Shaw GRD ’13 conducted a psychology experiment by interviewing “some 60 children, half of them four years old and half six years old.” Red hot chili championships.

Yale Dining’s annual Chili Throwdown is scheduled for the coming Monday in Commons and chili recipe entries are currently being solicited. Plus “each chili entry will receive a certificate of participation,” Yale Dining announced, giving students the perfect last minute addition to their resumes and cover letters. Farewell, old friend. This

academic year will be the last year of visits from Monty, the library therapy dog at Yale Law School. In the past, students have been able to check out Monty for play sessions during high-stress periods like finals week. “He is now a 14-year-old dog and is beginning to show his age a little. He still loves his job, but is definitely slowing down,” the announcement read. Students are encouraged to erect a plaque in his honor at the end of the year. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1947 WYBC dedicates its new studios in Hendrie Hall. Submit tips to Cross Campus

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

SEE BUDGET PAGE 8

F R E N C H C U LT U R E

Bringing the dead back to life.

Today is the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the New Haven Museum is celebrating in the best possible way to celebrate anniversaries — a historical re-enactment. Daniel DayLewis was not available so renowned Lincoln re-enactor Howard Wright will be standing in.

The University will likely lay off administrative staff during the next three to five years, senior administrators told the News Monday. University President Peter Salovey and Provost Benjamin Polak said these cuts will be necessary to close the budget deficit that has plagued the University since the 2008–’09 recession. Though staff reductions are unlikely to occur before the end of the 2014–’15 academic year, layoffs will become increasingly probable after that time, they said. With the hope of eventually replacing the current $39 million budget deficit with a budget surplus, administrators said they will distribute three- and five-year budget targets to units across the University that will require reductions in personnel and non-personnel costs. “If we don’t deal with the deficit, we won’t be able to do the things we need to do to move forward,” Polak said. But, he added, “It won’t be pain-free.”

Marathon celebrates Proust

T

his weekend the French Department organized a 20-hour marathon reading of Marcel Proust’s “Swann’s Way” to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the literary masterpiece. Drawing Proust scholars and aficionados from all over the country, the marathon highlighted the long-standing ties between Yale and French culture. YI-LING LIU reports. If students happened to drop by the Saybrook Underbrook theater anytime last Saturday, they would have found an intimate audience gathered in a full-scale recreation of Mar-

cel Proust’s cork-lined bedroom. A single bed dominated the stage, sitting next to a chaise longue, against the backdrop of a projection of Paris to recreate the ambience where the famed

Campus rallies for Philippines BY LARRY MILSTEIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Since Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines nearly two weeks ago, members of the Yale community have mobilized to plan and implement a variety of relief efforts for the nearly 13 million people affected by the storm. Students, faculty, administrators and local residents are conducting a series of fundraising and awareness efforts this week, including online giving campaigns, a T-shirt sale, a benefit concert, a dinner and a candlelight vigil. Secretary and Vice President for Student Life Kimberly Goff-Crews ’83 LAW ’86 said donations to the Yale Relief Fund, which collects money for disaster relief on behalf of the University, have increased since University President Peter Salovey sent one of his SEE PHILIPPINES PAGE 4

French writer spent the last three years of his life. Around 10 a.m., John Palattella, a literary editor for the Nation sat on stage before the audience, reciting a passage from “Swann’s Way,” the first volume of Proust’s seven-volume chef-d’oeuvre, “In the Search of Lost Time.” Palattella was only one of 100 students, scholars and guests who took part in the Proust marathon organized this weekend by the French Department in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the publication of “Swann’s Way.” From 7:30 a.m. on Saturday to 3:30 a.m. on SunSEE PROUST PAGE 4

YDN

Some readers who participated in the marathon reading traveled significant distances to demonstrate their love for Proust.

New sculpture installed BY HELEN ROUNER STAFF REPORTER Last Tuesday, members of the Yale community noticed that Cross Campus had acquired a new resident. The sculpture, Max Ernst’s “Habakuk,” was installed outside of William L. Harkness Hall early last week in honor of University President Peter Salovey’s inauguration. The small dedication ceremony for the sculpture — which Jeffrey H. Loria ’62 donated to the Yale University Art Gallery in 2005 — took place on Cross Campus late yesterday afternoon. Yale College Dean Mary Miller described the statue’s historical significance, noting that Ernst created it in 1930s Germany, and Salovey explained the biblical origins of the statue’s name. Loria and his wife also attended the ceremony, along with roughly 20 other members of the Yale community. “This is the single most humbling gift that I could’ve imagined,” Salovey said during the ceremony. “It’ll be here with my name on it for the next 312 years.” The sculpture, which was cast in

STEPHANIE ADDENBROOKE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The new sculpture that was installed on Cross Campus on Tuesday has divided student opinions. bronze in 1970, is nearly 15 feet tall and weighs nearly 5,000 pounds, according to the Gallery’s catalogue. Miller said that Loria’s gift is one of the four bronze castings made of Ernst’s original 1933 “Habakuk.”

Ernst’s “Habakuk” is named after a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. Salovey began the ceremony by reading from the short Book of Habakkuk, in which God reveals SEE SCULPTURE PAGE 8


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Professors who try too hard to engage with their students are perceived yaledailynews.com/opinion

as disengaged with the archives”

'PROFESSOR X' ON 'A SCHOLAR'S KISS OF DEATH'

GUEST COLUMNIST LEO KIM

GUEST COLUMNIST CHRISTOPHER MARNELL

Big city, big money

Pinoy strong

I

n the first few weeks of school, I often heard my classmates speak of taking a weekend to get away from New Haven. They wanted to go somewhere exciting, somewhere like New York or Boston. They accepted New Haven as a second-tier city; Alpha Delta, they said, will never compare to, say, New York’s Tavern on the Green. Yet, after all this, I feel as if I owe New Haven gratitude, not disdain, because this city, with all of its flaws, acts as something remarkable: an equalizer.

NEW HAVEN'S BROADWAY IS NO FIFTH AVENUE. In the past, I’ve visited other colleges located in more metropolitan areas. There’s no denying that these huge, cosmopolitan cities offer a colorful variety of just about everything. Skyscrapers grandiosely tower over streets filled with various cafés, bars and clubs. The options are seemingly endless for someone living in a city brimming with elegant restaurants, high-fashion shopping and everything else imaginable. That is, if you have the money. It’s true that there is a huge income disparity within colleges, most notably Ivy League universities. Campuses host a diverse array of people — students ranging from wealthy princes to a family’s first high school graduate mingle together, as equals. But the truth of the matter is that while the University treats us as equals, socioeconomic differences do become apparent. And while that ought not to affect the relationships formed on campus, it’s an uncomfortable truth that it sometimes does, and in metropolitan cities, this phenomenon is merely exacerbated. Cities like New York can be unimaginably extravagant places if you have the income to support that kind of lifestyle. However, many don’t — particularly college students. For these people, life in big cities becomes a veiled existence where the good life is painfully visible, yet unreachable, seemingly taunting those who can’t partake by refusing to disappear, refusing to be forgotten. When someone’s peers frequent restaurants and shops that are out of his finan-

cial reach, he becomes selfconscious of his own financial position. Even worse, he stops seeing himself as equal to his peers. And without this equality, the concept of what it means to be peers can dissolve. So while many cities do offer spectacular activities that can inject excitement into the vein of life, they do not do so equally. And this is where New Haven finds its strength. As ridiculous as it may sound, the sheer grayness of New Haven acts as an equalizer. Wealth can only get one so far here. Yes, we may have stores such as a Gant and J.Crew, but Broadway here is nothing compared to Fifth Avenue, or for that matter, the Big Apple’s Broadway. We do have some large, expensive stores, but they haven’t become the center of our social lives. Money becomes much less of a factor in a Yalie’s social life by the mere fact that frankly, money doesn’t open many doors in New Haven — at least compared to more metropolitan cities. Instead, at Yale, social life becomes centered on campus. Rich or not, everyone can usually be found at the same parties, the same coffee shops and the same dining halls, and while many lament the boredom that can accompany this routine, I think it does more good than harm. And it’s not that we are trapped in New Haven either. With New York only an hour or two away, we’re situated in a place where we can live the fastpaced city life when we want to without being burdened by the implications, namely the visibility of economic differences, that it holds. Sometimes, it becomes too easy to forget this, and fall into the rut of believing that this city is somehow inherently subpar. But this shouldn’t be the case. New Haven isn’t only “not bad.” It’s a place where the impossible happens, where the sons of senators and farmers alike can be seen sharing a Wenzel. It’s a place where students live and learn together as peers, where one is not constantly reminded of one’s own financial situation, where the amount of money a student’s family makes is not a totally limiting factor on social life. And most importantly, New Haven is our home, and a place to love with all its flaws. LEO KIM is a freshman in Trumbull College. Contact him at leo. kim@yale.edu .

YALE DAILY NEWS PUBLISHING CO., INC. 202 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 432-2400 Editorial: (203) 432-2418 editor@yaledailynews.com Business: (203) 432-2424 business@yaledailynews.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Julia Zorthian MANAGING EDITORS Anya Grenier Jane Darby Menton ONLINE EDITOR Cynthia Hua OPINION Emma Goldberg Geng Ngarmboonanant NEWS Sophie Gould Amy Wang CITY Monica Disare Michelle Hackman FEATURES Lorenzo Ligato CULTURE Aleksandra Gjorgievska

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Daniel Weiner SPORTS Charles Condro Alexander Eppler ARTS & LIVING Jackson McHenry Elaina Plott Yanan Wang YTV Madison Alworth Raleigh Cavero Kevin Kucharski MAGAZINE Sarah Maslin Joy Shan COPY Adrian Chiem Ian Gonzalez Elizabeth Malchione Douglas Plume

PRODUCTION & DESIGN Emma Hammarlund Leon Jiang Jason Kim Jennifer Lu Daniel Roza Mohan Yin PHOTOGRAPHY Kathryn Crandall Henry Ehrenberg Brianna Loo Sara Miller

PUBLISHER Julie Leong DIR. FINANCE Joyce Xi DIR. OPERATIONS Yumehiko Hoshijima ONL. BUSINESS MANAGER Gonzalo Gallardo

COMM. MANAGER Abdullah Hanif MARKETING MANAGER Yuanling Yuan ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MANAGERS Vivian Wang Shannon Zhang

ILLUSTRATIONS Annelisa Leinbach DIRECTORS OF TECHNOLOGY Vincent Hu Soham Sankaran ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Clinton Wang

THIS ISSUE COPY ASSISTANTS: Isabel Sperry PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS: Samantha Bensinger, Aparna Nathan EDITORIALS & ADS

The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2015. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission. Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Emma Goldberg and Geng Ngarmboonanant Opinion Editors Yale Daily News opinion@yaledailynews.com

COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 56

L

ast week, Typhoon Haiyan carved a path of devastation through the scattered archipelago of the Visayas in the southern Philippines. Just weeks after an earthquake left dozens dead, tsunami-like storm surges and record high winds claimed the lives of thousands more and displaced millions. In a country that experiences as many as 10 typhoons a year — by far the most exposed nation in the world — word of impending storms is numbingly common. Three months earlier I was in Manila en route to return to Yale when Typhoon “Maring” (Trami) struck the northern Philippines, turning streets into rivers and washing away homes. I hailed a cab during what I later learned was the worst of the storm. Approaching the airport, we faced before us an underpass just beginning to flood. Behind us stretched a line of cars idling for what seemed like miles. The only way out was to trudge forward. Slowly the taxi driver pressed on the accelerator, the engine of the tiny cab

revving slowly, slowly, slowly … and then dying with a definitive clunk, the ignition clicking in vain as he tried restarting the engine. Instantly, water began to flood the cab. We escaped out the windows to try to push the taxi out of the floods, but the ceaseless rain and the rising floodwaters only allowed us to move inches. I surveyed the surroundings to find a police officer, but there were none around. Then, as if by a miracle, the car began to roll easily onto the drier land that lay ahead. I looked back in awe. With caring smirks on their faces and rubber slippers on their feet were four strangers. Seeing our struggle, they had left behind their rusty motorcycles to help us push our way out of the floodwaters. In my broken Tagalog I thanked them. “Walang anuman aking mga kababayan,” they replied — “it’s nothing, my fellow countryman.” As Typhoon Haiyan rumbled towards Cebu, my home, I prayed for my family, the families of friends, and all the Visay-

ans. My family was kept safe. Some friends have yet to hear from their family. But I also thought back to the devastation I had witnessed just a few months before by a storm many times weaker. Interspersed between the scenes of devastation after Haiyan are stories of sacrifice, of selflessness and of hope. Of an ABS-CBN reporter stationed in Tacloban, Atom Araullo, who helped children cross the floodwaters to the safety of another building. Of a British man, who kicked down doors in his devastated hotel and brought children and adults to safety. Of lives saved by rescue workers simply doing their jobs. Of the stormbattered doctors treating the injured in crumbling hospitals. We have a word for this in Tagalog — bayanihan — that describes the spirit of community Filipinos share in helping one another, even strangers, that so defines the resilience of our people. Bayanihan traces back to an early Philippine tradition where community members helped families

move by literally carrying their homes on bamboo poles to the new location. Bayanihan means even if you cannot do it alone, together with the help of others you surely can. Today, that help can come from you. Whether that means checking up with a friend whose family might have been affected by the typhoon, or joining us in remembrance of the lives lost at Thursday evening’s benefit concert and vigil, or even pledging a donation to the relief efforts — that’s up to you to decide. In spite of the destruction, the global outpouring of support for the Philippines, coupled with the hope of the Philippine people, is more tangible than ever. The rebuilding process after Haiyan may take many years, and the scars from such a devastating tragedy heal slowly — but with this global spirit of bayanihan, the Philippines will soon see a new day. CHRISTOPHER MARNELL is a senior in Pierson College. Contact him at christopher.marnell@yale. edu .

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T E M M A FA L L O N E

The meerkat on Cross Campus L

ast week, a tall, dark intruder made his way onto the Yale campus. His presence did not go unnoticed for long. By Tuesday morning, hundreds of Yalies passing through Cross Campus were struck by an unfamiliar sight: a large, geometric black sculpture standing proudly in the grassy space behind William L. Harkness Hall. Ladies and gentlemen, meet “Habakuk,” the newest addition to Yale’s diverse collection of outdoor art. Though “Habakuk” has been on campus for only a week, he has already caused quite a stir among the student body. There has rarely been a time that I’ve walked across Cross Campus without overhearing snippets of discussion about it, between students, professors and tourists alike. I’ve spent several long brunches with my friends debating possible ways to interpret the sculpture. And the conversation has even spread to Facebook — the popular page “Overheard at Yale” has become the scene of a fairly intense debate over the work’s meaning, with over 50 posts ranging from the humorous to the argumentative. As an art history major myself, I could certainly give a scholarly response to this discussion. I could spend a great deal of time analyzing the possible symbolism of this piece. I could talk about its totemic nature, and draw parallels to African and Indo-Pacific art, and to the movement in postwar art to return to more simple and richly symbolic forms. I could delve into the use of the name “Habakuk” as a biblical reference — or deconstruct the work on a physical level, contrasting its darkness and weight with the way its slanted forms create an illusion of movement. And then, I would end with an analysis of the sculpture as a whole, what I believe to be the meaning that it conveys. But, I’m not going to do that. Why? Because that’s not really the point. I have already heard my peers give a vast array of unique interpretations of “Habakuk.” Some have meditated on how it could symbolize hope even for the downtrodden. A physics major offered astute commentary on its embodiment of motion through tilted planes. One friend even compared it to the meerkat from “The Lion King.” None of these are right — or rather, they all are. This is the beauty of sculpture, and of art in general. Each person comes to the piece with a unique perspective, and perceives and interacts with it differently. No two people experience a work of art in the same way — it evokes different emotions in each of us, awakening distinctive memories and

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

associations. What is important is not that we feel one specific thing, but rather the simple fact that we feel anything at all. The power of art is that it pulls us out of the everyday, briefly transporting us into a world of emotion and symbolism. This is not to say that intelligent discussion of the various ways that “Habakuk” can be interpreted is not valuable. It is always enlightening to hear a variety of different opinions and perspectives — hearing others’ thoughts can cause us to see a work in new and unexpected

ways. But it is absolutely useless to argue about the “right” way to interpret this — or any — work of art. The idea that all answers are correct may be a bit foreign in this academic environment, where we are used to being told the correct interpretation, the right way to view a set of data or a historical document. But in the sphere of art, this is often not the case. Knowing that you have the ability to interpret something exactly as you perceive it can be a bit daunting — but it is also freeing. So, the next time you walk by

WLH, do so with an open mind. Take the time to look closely at “Habakuk,” and be cognizant of your response. Maybe it’ll just make you think of something silly. Maybe, in the end, you still won’t really like the sculpture that much. But maybe, it will pull you out of the rush of everyday life for a moment, bringing with it a reminder of the beauty and uniqueness of our environment. And that is meaning enough. EMMA FALLONE is a sophomore in Ezra Stiles College. Contact her at emma.fallone@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Healing is a matter of time, but it is also a matter of opportunity.” HIPPOCRATES ANCIENT GREEK PHYSICIAN

CORRECTIONS MONDAY, NOV. 18

The article “More grads call New Haven home” misspelled the name of Christian Vazquez ’13.

Grant to boost technology acess BY POOJA SALHOTRA STAFF REPORTER New Haven Public Schools won a $2.7 million grant from the State Department of Education on Friday to fund additional computers in classrooms and increase the district’s Internet bandwidth. Gov. Dannel Malloy and State Department of Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor ’93 LAW ’98 announced the grant, which awarded a total of $24 million to 126 school districts. The grant will fund upgrades in technology that are necessary for schools to prepare for next year’s statewide rollout of Smarter Balanced Assessments – computer-based standardized tests that complement the recently adopted Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Districts were given different amounts of money based on town wealth, with New Haven receiving the largest award of $2,657,647. “Throughout my Listening Tour, I have heard about the need for more technology in schools and more equity of technology resources across the district,” Superintendent of Schools Garth Harries ’95 said in an email to the News. “This grant allows us to add thousands of computers to classrooms and will help students be better prepared for the way they will work and learn in the rest of their life.” In 2010, the State Board of Education adopted CCSS, which creates benchmarks for the mathematics and English Language Arts abilities that students should have at each grade level. To accommodate these higher standards, districts are planning to replace the old Connecticut Mastery Test with a standardized test that better aligns with the math and English lessons being taught under Common Core. These new tests, called the Smarter Balanced Assessments, will be administered on computers and other computing

devices starting in 2014. This computerized adaptive testing method adjusts the difficulty of the questions throughout the assessment and tailors questions to students based on how they answered previous questions. The grant will allow for schools in the district to acquire the technology resources they need to administer this test. In New Haven, the grant will fund nearly 3,000 computers that will be distributed among schools in the district and will increase bandwidth capacity tenfold, according to a press release from NHPS Director of Communications Abbe Smith. While the purpose of the grant was to assist in next year’s statewide rollout of the computer-based standardized tests, Smith said that the computers will also be used to enhance classroom instruction. “The ultimate goal is to strengthen student learning,” Smith said. When the grant was originally announced in July, the application process was competitive, and the state only planned to allocate 10 million dollars towards advancing technology in the state’s school districts, said Samaia Hernandez, a spokesperson for Gov. Malloy. B u t b e c a u s e re q u e s ts exceeded expectations, the state sought additional funds to ensure that all 126 districts that applied for funding would receive money and would become equipped to administer the new tests that require computers. Hernandez said that the additional money came from bond funding which otherwise would have gone to the state education department. Districts are required to use the awards they received to purchase new computing devices, inter-school bandwidth, or inter-district bandwidth. Contact POOJA SALHOTRA at pooja.salhotra@yale.edu .

Reach Out intensifies BY NICOLE NG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Starting next semester, following a series of changes in leadership and accountability, the popular Reach Out organization will lead more service-oriented experiences abroad. Currently in its 10th year of operation, Reach Out — an undergraduate organization that coordinates service trips for students to foster a sense of global responsibility — has developed a reputation in recent years for funding international vacations under the guise of service trips, said Reach Out Co-President Aobo Guo ’15, adding that many students return from these trips feeling unfulfilled. But by increasing organizational interaction and implementing more rigorous standards of leadership and service for trips, board members said they hope to improve the experience, safety and organization of each trip. “I hope that this will lead to more meaningful experiences for participants, in terms of actually gaining more knowledge about the community that they’ll be visiting and really expanding their minds,” said Evelyn Nunez ’15, who will be leading a Reach Out trip to the Dominican Republic over spring break. “I hope this helps participants define what effective community service is and what it means to be an effective participant in community service.” In order to increase the quality of service trips, Reach Out denied a greater number of trip applications this year than they have in the past, said Reach Out Co-President Billy Moran ’16. The organization is offering seven trips this spring, compared to nine last spring. Three trip destinations were denied this year, and another trip was accepted only under the condition that it met certain service stipulations. Guo said that in the past, board members remained largely uninvolved in the planning of the trips themselves, leaving most of the responsibilities up to the leaders — but this caused an imbalance in trip quality because some leaders were not as well-prepared as others to lead their groups. Some students returned from trips disappointed that their experiences did not measure up to the promised levels of service, Moran said. Guo said that this year, students will be immersed into local issues and will participate in meaningful handson service, unlike the “poverty tourism” of years past. In addition, in adherence with a new requirement from Reach Out’s umbrella organization Dwight Hall, all trips this year will be required to account for six hours of service out of each 12-hour day. Nunez said that five days of her 10-day Dominican Republic trip will focus purely on an impoverished immigrant community, with no tourism or city exploration. “We’re there for such a short period of time that we want to make sure we’re doing as much as we can, learning as much as we can and building relationships that are meaningful and hopefully can continue after the program,” Nunez said. Safety has also been a concern in the past, Moran said, adding that though Reach

KEN YANAGISAWA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Reach Out Co-President Aobo Guo ’15 is coordinating efforts to improve the service trips’ safety and accountability. Out board members expect trip leaders to have a solid knowledge of their destination, some groups in past years have found themselves in potentially dangerous situations. This year’s board denied a trip to a country that was listed on the U.S. State Department’s travel warning list, Moran said, but this may not have been caught in previous years. Moran added that at least one trip leader is required to speak the language of the destination country — a standard stipulated by Dwight Hall. Board members are also more hands-on with trip itineraries this year, keeping track of details such as bus transportation from one site to another. “We have less to worry about since we’re being so micromanaging this year,” Guo said. “We’re trying to cut down on a lot of potential international issues, and the changes this year are actually going to be really effective for minimizing problems.” Reach Out was also inspired to expand its mission this year, Moran said, aiming to emphasize a type of service that does not directly involve an immediate positive impact. He said service can also include learning about a country, then taking that education and inspiring change in other

communities. The organization will lead a trip to Iceland over spring break focusing on successful sustainable initiatives. Participants will hopefully return with new insights to share with the Yale community, Moran said. The Reach Out board — which is composed of Guo, Moran, two trip directors, a treasurer and an outreach coordinator — aims to foster a greater sense of community amongst the entire organization as well, Moran said, as participants from different trips often remain disconnected, despite having similar interests. Reach Out is also planning to coordinate fundraising efforts to cover trip costs. While Reach Out received funding from the Pierson College Master’s Office in past years, board members said they are not sure whether they will be able to do the same this year with the arrival of a new master. Over spring break, Reach Out will offer trips to seven destinations — Dominica, The Dominican Republic, Iceland, India, Jamaica, The Philippines and Sri Lanka. Contact NICOLE NG at nicole.ng@yale.edu .

Healthcare exchange a success in Connecticut BY J.R REED STAFF REPORTER The federal-run health care exchange, which launched on Oct. 1, has been largely underutilized in the 36 states that have adopted it. But Connecticut and a few of the nation’s other 14 state-run systems have fared much better. Of the 13,128 people who have signed up for coverage in Connecticut, 56 percent — 7,572 people — are enrolled in private insurance plans. The other 5,556 have signed up for Medicaid. While the Affordable Care Act continues to struggle with enrollment numbers, Connecticut has operated a relatively problem-free exchange through its provider Access Health CT. Starting in October, these exchanges, including Connecticut’s Access Health, began offering Medicaid programs and selling private insurance plans with discounted premiums subsidized by the federal government. The state has garnered 100 percent reimbursement for the exchange’s operating costs through the federal government. As of last Thursday, 13,128 people had signed up for health coverage through Access Health, but the small-business portion of the exchange’s activity has been smaller than expected, according to Access Health officials. The Affordable Care Act has provided federal grants for states to create healthcare exchanges: organizations created specifically to facilitate the sale of health insurance to state residents.

Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman praised Access Health CEO Kevin Counihan and his team for their efforts in creating an accessible system for the 344,000 uninsured Connecticut residents. “This cost us a lot of money, because hundreds of thousands of residents were getting their healthcare through the emergency room,” Wyman said. Access Health developed an easily accessible website available in 70 languages that allows users to compare plans offered from the three participating insurance companies — Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Connecticut, ConnectiCare, and HealthyCT, a nonprofit organization. Wyman noted that a four-person family that makes $60,000 a year right now is paying $600 a month for health care, but, using Access Health, that family would only pay $100 a month because by comparing plans, families can make more informed decisions. To ensure the state’s exchange was ready to launch Oct. 1, Counihan and his team conducted a series of tests early on — including system integration in July, user acceptance testing in August and testing a call center in September to answer concerns from customers. Counihan believes there are three reasons why the exchange has been reasonably effective thus far: a stable website in comparison with healthcare.gov, customer ease on the website and in the retail stores and outsourcing as many tasks as possible. “We knew that there could be some glitches but we were for-

tunate. Because of the work the exchange staff did, it turned out to be a great start for us,” Wyman said. “Right now, the companies that we have are giving quality insurance.” Access Health has employed 300 navigated assistors who speak 100 different languages to help customers navigate the online enrollment process, as well as independent brokers who routinely come to the retail stores to help customers pinpoint distinctions between insurance plans, Wyman said. She added that there are two retail stores, one in New Britain and another at 55 Church St. in downtown New Haven, in which state residents can explore their options and sign up for coverage with personal assistance. It is the only state in the country to offer such storefronts. “We believe that the ACA largely promotes constructive disruption — it basically says that the status quo needs to be changed and incentivizes states to be creative,” Counihan said. “We believe [the stores] are very much aligned with this goal.” The New Haven store location’s manager Mike Dunn believes that the stores serve as a great way to address the population of people not comfortable with computers or sharing their social security number over the phone. Counihan said that New Britain and New Haven were selected because these two areas have the highest concentration of uninsured residents and help cover the northern and southern sections of the state. “This was meant to be an

experiment — it’s an idea that we stole from the Apple Store,” Counihan said. “It’s been successful and we’re planning on expanding [the number of stores] but we need to make sure the criteria for success is met.” In a year or two, Wyman expects that more insurance companies will be added to the exchange. Connecticut has also rolled out enrollment fairs that cover areas that do not have Access Health stores within them — they set up a mobile office in these locations for a day in a library or town hall, Dunn said, adding that Access Health brings staff members in and provides another opportunity for state residents to participate in the enrollment process. Connecticut is the only state in which more people have applied for private coverage than Medicaid through the health insurance exchange, Wyman said. James Wadleigh, Access Health’s CIO, noted that the state began expanding Medicaid in 2010, shortly after the health law passed, which helps explain the comparatively low volume of Medicaid applicants in Connecticut. The Connecticut exchange has a customer satisfaction level of 96.5 percent, according to a survey of users in October, with more than 82 percent of enrollees either “extremely likely” or “very likely” to recommend the exchange to a colleague or friend. Contact J.R. REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

YDN

Connecticut has experienced one of the smoothest rollouts of federal health care exchange in the nation.


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“I am not worried about the deficit. It is big enough to take care of itself.” RONALD REAGAN 40TH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Yale French department flourishes PROUST FROM PAGE 1 day, Palattella and other illustrious guests — including Proust scholar William Carter, Egyptian-born writer André Aciman and Paris Review editor Lorin Stein ’95 — took turns reading their favorite passages from the masterpiece, each in a language of their choice. The marathon reading was organized by French professor Alice Kaplan GRD ’77, administrator of the French Department Agnès Bolton, and two undergraduate students, John Sununu ’15 and Benjamin Mappin-Kasirer ’14. “The Proust marathon is the big event of the moment,” Sununu said. “But it fits into this larger fabric of the French Department and is only one of the many brilliant events that the department sponsors.” According to students and professors interviewed, this weekend’s 20-hour marathon of Proust’s masterpiece was only the last of a series of undertakings that highlight the close ties between Yale and French culture. Given the University’s groundbreaking approach to teaching French, its curriculum firmly rooted in French literary analysis and its close-knit community of faculty and students, organizers said commemorating one of the masterpieces of the French literary tradition on campus seemed only fitting.

PROUST, A COMPANION TO INTROSPECTION This weekend’s Proust reading was not the first literary marathon held at Yale: Recent events include a marathon reading of Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina this September and a Shakespeare Sonnet Dessert last February. It was after the Shakespearean event that Kaplan first approached French majors Sununu and MappinKasirer with the idea of a Proust reading. Francophiles and Proust fans, both Sununu and Mappin-Kasirer were keen to see the marathon take shape: They visited the recreation of Proust’s bedroom at the Musée Carnavalet in Paris over the summer and started to work on this project upon their return to Yale this fall, Sununu said. Although they had high expectations, the organizers said the Yale community’s enthusiasm for this project took them by surprise. When sign-ups were opened a few weeks ago, almost every of the 80 slots were filled within three days and organizers had to create a waiting list. “We had people asking if they could read certain passages,” Sununu said. “People were asking things like, ‘Can I read from page 294 of the Montcrieff edition?’” Mappin-Kasirer, who is writing his senior thesis on Proust, attributed the the event’s successful turnout to the “Proustian” aspects of the collegiate environment: Because of Proust’s emphasis on notions of memory, the passage of time and the ability to connect with people, his works are particularly pertinent to college students. Kaplan echoed Mappin-Kasirer’s views, noting that “Reading Proust is a companion to introspection, and the age that college students are at is a great time for introspection.” According to Annabel Kim GRD ’14, a graduate student in

YDN

The overwhelming response received by the Proust marathon reading is representative of the French Department’s success as a whole. French who was involved in the marathon, the introspective nature of the piece comes from the “rich, dense and challenging” language of Proust’s prose. For that reason, Proust is considered by students and scholars alike an extremely personal read. “I think Proust touches everyone in a different way and everyone has a different moment that really speaks to them,” Kim said. At the reading, the audience members each clutched their own dog-eared and well-thumbed copy of the novel, listening to the reader intently, laughing as they recognized their favorite passages. According to Kim, a woman drove up all the way from New Jersey to New Haven to read because Proust “changed her life” and wanted to show people how deeply his works had touched her. Many members of the Yale community have been exposed to Proust academically: “Swann’s Way” is one of the fundamental texts taught in introductory literature classes as well as in Directed Studies, and the French Department faculty is full of Proust experts, Kaplan said. Organizers of the event said the popularity of the Proust marathon can be attributed to a thriving French culture and the strength of the French Department at Yale.

FROM FRANCE TO 82 WALL STREET Nestled behind Blue State coffee shop and Phil’s Hair Styles salon, the third floor of the brickwalled building at 82 Wall St. is home to the University’s widely recognized French Department. For decades, Yale’s French Department has been the topranked department for French studies in the nation. “We have this amazing amalgam of dedicated professors, we offer several courses in Paris every summer and we have this French In Action program which gets students speaking so rapidly,” Sununu said. French in Action, a languageimmersion program presented with a humorous teleplay with native speakers, was developed by French professor Pierre Capretz in the 1980s and since then has become a cultural phenomenon as well as one of the most widely used French language courses nationwide. “In contrast to the structured, grammar-based way of learning languages that I’m used to, French in Action challenges me to engage in everyday situations and learn through observation,” Emma Fredwall ’17, currently a student of L1 French, remarked, adding that this learning process can be likened to the way we learn

our native language as children. The strength of the French Department and the French In Action method is also evident in the number of undergraduates who have decided to pursue a degree in French. Out of all the foreign language and literature majors offered at Yale, the French major has historically attracted the largest number of students: A total of 22 students across all four years declared French as their major last year, compared to four students majoring in Spanish and three students majoring in German. According to both Kaplan and Sununu, the appeal of the major lies in its intensive focus on French literature and how the curriculum is designed for those who wish to study one of the world’s richest literatures in depth. Because the French Department is so focused on literature, the curriculum is, in contrast to other foreign language majors, more academic and less preprofessional, Sununu said. Professors will regularly bring students to the Beinecke Library or the Art Gallery to study artifacts so that they are able to engage with primary resources on a deeper level, he added. As a result, the department attracts students that intend to engage with the literary analysis of French texts and delve into academic criticism of French

culture, according to Sununu. Despite its emphasis on academics, the French Department hardly leaves its students illequipped for the job market outside Yale. “People think, oh, if you are a French major, there will be fewer opportunities for you outside Yale, but I completely disagree. French has showed me that you can study what you love and still be successful with it,” said Sununu, who worked as a translator for the U.S. State Department for the past two summers in Quantico, Virginia between U.S. forces and African counterterrorist paramilitary forces. According to Kaplan, French is also intellectually satisfying because it transcends cultural barriers: As she explained, the notion of French is expanded to the entire francophone world, encompassing regions like Quebec, Africa and the Caribbeans. Kaplan added that the department nevertheless loves to teach the canonical books of France’s literary tradition, as a thorough understanding of these works is crucial to becoming an educated person and a skilled writer. “You’d have trouble finding an important novelist today who hasn’t read ‘Madame Bovary’ and ‘Swann’s Way,’” Kaplan said. Because of its historical ties with French culture, the French Department at Yale has estab-

lished itself as the epicenter of French studies in academia. “You feel like you are at a place that has contributed to the humanities in such a significant way,” MappinKisirer said. While he admitted that this notion is consistent with the Yale experience in general, the French Department’s intimate environment and close-knit community offers a more “concentrated” version of that experience. The Proust marathon is only one of the many ways in which the francophone community has been opened up to the rest of the Yale campus, and as stated by Kim, “has made Francophilia broader than just merely personal interest.” Every day of the week, there is a French language table held in a dining hall, and the Ciné-club puts on film screenings once a semester. This year has also witnessed the relaunching and redesigning of L’Amuse Bouche, an undergraduate student-run French literary magazine that Sununu coedits alongside Mappin-Kasirer. “People have always been invested in French culture,” Kim said. “But now there is even more of a forum in which to express that investment together.” Contact YI-LING LIU at yi-ling.liu@yale.edu .

Yale aids typhoon relief efforts PHILIPPINES FROM PAGE 1 “Notes from Woodbridge Hall” emails Monday morning addressing Typhoon Haiyan, and donations now total nearly $20,000. In addition, student groups such as Kasama — Yale’s student Filipino club — are working on philanthropic endeavors. “Many of our students, faculty and staff have close ties to the Philippines,” Goff-Crews wrote in an email to Yale community last week. “Our focus now is on immediate relief.” On Thursday, Kasama will host a benefit concert in SheffieldSterling-Strathcona Hall that will feature a variety of student groups and performances. The goal is to both raise money and educate

community members about the disaster, Kasama Co-President Ulysses Isidro ’15 said. The name for the event — Bagong Araw — means “a new day” in Filipino, he said. Following the series of performances, which will include The Baker’s Dozen, Just Add Water, Mixed Company, Out of the Blue and others, Yale University Chaplain Sharon Kugler will lead a candlelit vigil. Kasama aims to raise roughly $15,000, said Christopher Marnell ’14, a member of Kasama who is involved in planning the event. The group has already raised $4,600 through online crowdsourcing efforts, he said, adding that corporate sponsors — many of whom are Kasama alumni —

have agreed to match donations up to $5,000. All funds raised by Kasama will go to AmeriCare, a nonprofit organization which is helping to provide emergency medical supplies to the Philippines, Marnell said. Christopher Dee ’15, whose family is currently in the Philippines, said that the willingness of people in the Philippines to help each other during this difficult time comes from the concept of “Bayanihan,” which he said means “the idea of a collective nation.” Dee said he hopes to promote a similar sense of altruism at Yale through the Kasama benefit concert. Of the four students interviewed working toward relief

efforts, all stated that they were impressed with the degree of support the Yale administration has offered. In his email to the Yale community on Monday morning, Salovey referenced his time studying in the Philippines and said Yale needs to unite as a community to aid our “neighbors, whether in New Haven or halfway around the globe.” “The administration has been phenomenal,” Dee said. “The ‘That’s Why I Chose Yale’ video has materialized before my eyes.” On Thursday, the Asian Network at Yale will host a fundraiser at the restaurant Bentara on Orange Street. There will be opportunities to donate as well as a presentation on local commu-

nity efforts to assist with typhoon relief, Goff-Crews wrote in an email to the News. AIESEC Yale will also be selling T-shirts for the Yale-Harvard Game in which buyers will have the option to pay $5 extra toward Typhoon Haiyan relief. The University has set up its own website to solicit donations, which allows individuals to donate using credit cards, GoffCrews told the News. Donations specified as “Philippines Relief” in the “purpose of payment” section will go to the American Red Cross, AmeriCares and Mercy Corps. Despite these philanthropic endeavors, the difficulty of the disaster continues to weigh on community members intimately

affected by the storm. “It is very personal. Not all [Yale students] have heard back from their families” said Marnell, who was unable to contact his family for two days after the storm. He said it was difficult for Filipino students to plan fundraisers when there is still so much uncertainty in their personal lives. Next semester, Kasama plans to hold another fundraiser to help with the rebuilding effort and may host a panel discussion on the disaster, Marnell said. Typhoon Haiyan is the seconddeadliest Philippine typhoon on record. Nearly 4,000 people have been reported dead. Contact LARRY MILSTEIN at larry.milstein@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“I am not a member of any organized political party. I am a Democrat.” WILL ROGERS AMERICAN COWBOY AND HUMORIST

West Haven teen leads Philippine relief efforts

Global health group takes on new name, challenges BY PHOEBE KIMMELMAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

STEPHANIE SIOW/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Geordann Daguplo, a Filipino-American senior at West Haven High School, has been organizing Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts. BY STEPHANIE SIOW CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When Geordann Daguplo, a Filipino-American senior at West Haven High School, learned of the devastation in Typhoon Haiyan’s wake, he began gathering donations from New Haven, Hamden and West Haven schools and the Filipino community in Connecticut. Daguplo’s family lives in Mindanal, in the southern Philippines, and his fundraising campaign has raised thousands of dollars so far. Daguplo said that he has been impressed by the compassion and support Connecticut’s Filipino community has shown his project. A few of Daguplo’s relatives in Tacloban were missing, but are now accounted for in a hospital. His mother’s first cousin barely survived the storm. “When water rushed into [my mother’s first cousin’s house], he climbed up to the roof, jumped onto a tree and held on for two hours. The water was rushing over his body,” Daguplo said. Despite being stabbed

in the leg by a large nail, his relative later made his way to the hospital alone, as there was no help available. Such stories moved Daguplo to initiate a fundraising campaign back in the New Haven area by reaching out to schools, friends and other Fillipions in Connecticut. Last Saturday, hundreds of Connecticut Filipinos gathered for a fundraising drive at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Hamden. They packed medical supplies, clothes, toys and other nonperishables into hundreds of boxes, which will be shipped to the Philippines by Operation Blessing, a nonprofit organization that channels disaster relief. The Philippine-American Association of Connecticut (PAAC) is also helping him implement these projects. “At the event, I felt like we all knew each other,” he said. “The Philippines is one big community; we understand that we need to help each other. Everyone is so welcoming.” Many of his non-Filipino friends were also moved to contribute to the campaign. He has received dona-

tions from organizations within West Haven High School, including half of the swim and football team’s 50/50 raffles. Teachers at the high school put out boxes to collect money and a librarian at the school helped him hang flyers in the hallway. Additionally, at his school’s football home game last Friday, representatives from the PAAC set up a donation table outside the ticket booth. Daguplo said that many people at the game donated money. Beyond his school, Daguplo has reached out to friends from Hamden High School and Notre Dame High School (West Haven) who have put up posters around their schools or driven to Hamden to deliver and unload boxes of supplies. Stop & Shop has allowed him to hold a fundraiser outside their store and Staples has donated the boxes in which they will pack donations. Although his campaign efforts have received considerable attention in the past week, Daguplo said that his campaign is similar to other Phillipine relief fundraising efforts. “All the campaigns have the same

motive: to help out the Philippines,” he said. “We have to help them build from the bottom up again, but it’s going to take a while.” Aside from the thousands of dollars he has already raised, Daguplo is organizing and performing for a fundraising concert organized at Edith E. Mackrille School. Daguplo’s father has helped transport donations, including clothes and shampoo, to Hamden, and said he is proud of his son’s accomplishments. News of Daguplo’s campaign has reached the Yale community. “Hearing this, I feel proud to be part of the Filipino community. I’m sure that the efforts will snowball and culminate into something much greater,” said Chris Dee ’15, former political chair of KASAMA. While there is no specific donation target, the deadline for the donation drive in West Haven High School is Dec. 14. Contact STEPHANIE SIOW at stephanie.siowsulyn@yale.edu .

State leaders weigh health agenda BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Mental health services, early childhood education and a minimum wage bump are three issues that could see legislative attention in the next session of the Connecticut General Assembly, two state legislators said Monday evening. Connecticut State Sen. Martin Looney and State Rep. Roland Lemar joined members of the Yale College Democrats to debrief on the 2013 municipal elections and preview the state’s upcoming work, asking for continued student input as they prepare to return to Hartford next February. Adjustments to the current biennial budget will drive the legislative agenda, Looney said. However, he added that midyear changes could afford the opportunity for a number of public policy initiatives with major impacts in New Haven and across the state. Looney invoked the Newtown shooting — the first anniversary of which looms less than a month away — and said the state remains committed to broadening mental health services, particularly for children. “Children’s mental health is not what it should be in Connecticut,” he said. “Many severe psychological problems manifest themselves at a very early age, and developing ways

for kids to get access to a clinician or a professional outside of the school system remains a challenge for us.” Looney said the state began addressing mental health in the comprehensive bill passed this April in response to the Newtown shooting, which also tightened gun control and contained provisions to strengthen security in Connecticut schools. Administrative hurdles prevent children from getting the mental health assistance they need, Looney said, adding that co-pays on services tend to be higher for young children. He said many physicians only treat people over 12 or 13 years of age. Lemar said legislation aimed at addressing the state’s widening achievement gap could also see attention from the state government next year. “A lot of legislators want to do something this coming session to find a way to fund and implement early education across the board,” he said, part of which includes simplifying the process of school enrollment. “Parents should be able to say, ‘I want my kid to go to school tomorrow — where can they go?’” Lemar said he thinks the state could also take further strides in increasing the minimum wage, which will rise to $9 per hour starting in 2015. Citing President Barack Obama’s embrace of a national $10 minimum wage, Lemar

said Connecticut could take the lead and be one of the first states to meet that target. In response to a question posed by Dems president Nicole Hobbs ’14, Looney and Lemar said they foresee only minor tweaks to the state’s health care provisions following the nationwide rollout of the Affordable Care Act. They dismissed the prospect of a special legislative session to craft law protecting state residents’ current insurance plans, a move their colleague, gubernatorial candidate and Connecticut State Sen. John McKinney, said is necessary due to national confusion over the implementation of the health care mandate. “Connecticut’s exchange is actually working quite well,” Looney said. “It’s being used as a national model.” Responding to a report issued this week by the legislature’s nonpartisan fiscal office that predicts more than $1.1 billion in state deficits for three straight years beginning in 2016, Looney said the General Assembly will have to look into further cost savings if the economic recovery remains sluggish. He said one enduring drag on the state’s finances that could be eased is Connecticut’s oversized corrections budget. The state’s prison population tripled between 1980 and 2007, which he said has led to mas-

sive criminal justice expenditures. Removing incarcerated individuals from prison and putting them into supervised release programs would allow the state to reinvest that money into programs that would otherwise be on the chopping block should projected deficits come to pass. “When you have [a] $1.1 billion deficit, it hurts the most vulnerable,” Lemar said. “One way to ease that impact is to change the income tax structure to have higher rates for higher-income earners.” Both lawmakers said they were looking forward to collaborating with mayor-elect Toni Harp ARC ’78 once she takes office this January. Because of her own experience as a state senator, Lemar said, she will know how to set priorities and leverage relationships in Hartford to win state support for New Haven. Looney said opening up a second garage at Union Station and procuring funds for the Coliseum redevelopment project are two of Harp’s immediate priorities that will be furthered by her clout at the state capitol. “We trust her,” Lemar said. Looney has served as majority leader of the state senate since 2004. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

OPINION. YOUR THOUGHTS. YOUR VOICE. YOUR PAGE.

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com

In an effort to expand its mission and broaden outreach, the student-run YaleEcuador HIV Initiative is in the process of renaming itself and adding more global health opportunities to its scope. The group — which was founded in 2011 and has recently changed its name to Student Partnerships for Global Health — has organized trips to Ecuador for students to conduct survey-based research on HIV and other medical topics. According to Adam Beckman ’16, co-director of the group, many of the students in last summer’s program wondered if they could expand beyond HIV, which led the organization to expand the purview of the program to other medical issues in Ecuador such as hypertension and teenage pregnancy. Next summer, the group will expand its work to a clinic in Nicaragua, and group members said they also hope to focus on a greater number of health issues in a wider variety of countries in the future.

An overarching theme has been these collaborative student teams and these long-term partnerships. ADAM BECKMAN ’16 Co-director, Student Partnerships for Global Health

According to Nora Moraga-Lewy ’16, the group’s other co-director, the name change from Yale-Ecuador HIV Initiative to Student Partnerships for Global Health is emblematic of the program’s dedication to global health at large. “The name before limited us to doing one specific thing, and we realized after this past summer, based on some need-assessment surveys, that working on HIV in Ecuador specifically was not the best use of our resources,” Moraga-Lewy said. Magdalena Wilson SPH ’14, who was with the group in Ecuador for 10 weeks working with the other students on mixed method research, health education in local high schools and local HIV testing, said she is using research that she collected on the trip for her thesis at the School of Public Health. The group was originally established in 2011 by Sam Vesuna ’12, who spent a summer in Ecuador working in a governmentrun hospital. Vesuna worked with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to set up an HIV testing clinic, and he started the group in an attempt to have Yale students travel to the clinic each summer for research. As of this summer, the group has partnered with NGOs Future Valdivia and Ayuda, among others. Beckman said he has high hopes for expanding the group’s wider emphasis on global health. “An overarching theme has been these collaborative student teams and these long-term partnerships — a global health project should only be as good as the relationship you have with the people in the country,” Beckman said. Looking beyond global health, MoragaLewy said she is optimistic about the potential of setting up interdisciplinary teams to do research. Such a setup might yield productive research in fields beyond global health, she added, such as environmental studies or microeconomics. “There is a lot that can come out of these multidisciplinary groups of students doing guided and relevant research in different locations,” she said. According to the group’s web site, students can receive individual funding for the trips from Yale fellowships, such as the Yale-Collaborative Action Project and the Yale College Fellowship for Research in Global Health Studies. Contact PHOEBE KIMMELMAN at phoebe.kimmelman@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“What is pride? A rocket that emulates the stars.” WILLIAM WORDSWORTH ENGLISH PHOTO

3-D printers promote research, experimentation BY RACHEL SIEGEL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER New 3-D printers in the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID) are turning out kneecaps and neurons. University researchers, physicians and engineers are collaborating to print out breakthrough models for biomedical research and clinical application with the CEID’s five 3-D printers, which reproduce physical objects by printing layer after layer of material, often plastic or metal. Beyond faculty research, more than 500 students have already been certified to use the entry-level 3-D printers, said Joseph Zinter, CEID’s assistant director. “[The printers] are as modern as you can get,” said Vincent Wilczynski, deputy dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science. “There’s definitely a role in creative usage. When students print out a product, they see the innovative and creative ways in which it can be used.” For Gordon Shepherd, a professor of neurobiology at the Yale School of Medicine, the printers helped magnify miniscule mice neurons. This fall, Shepherd created what he suspects is the first model of a neuron with a 3-D printer, hundreds of times larger than the actual biological counterpart.

As far as future plans go, Shepherd has his eyes on printing small networks of neurons, which would allow him to see how clusters of neurons, as opposed to one singular nerve cell, process information. “Seeing a model of a nerve cell in 3-D is a little bit like you and me looking at each other in 3-D,” Shepherd said. “It’s obviously so much better than if we just looked at each other’s picture. This is a whole new way of thinking about nerve cells in their 3-D structure and in their 3-D environment.” Shepherd’s neuron was inspired in part by the work of Mark Michalski, a radiology resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital. He approached the CEID in the fall of 2012, looking to print 3-D organs to use as models for preoperative planning and to educate patients about their specific conditions. Among his most successful projects was the reproduction of a patient’s kneecap wrapped by a tumor. Michalski said he first experimented with the printers out of interest alone. Gradually, he began to see the technology’s potential in terms of printing organs that could be used to improve doctor-patient communication. “With a 3-D reconstruction, you can communicate some things very clearly that you couldn’t otherwise,” Michalski

said. Though his aspirations include printing actual human organs, Michalski’s near-term focus is on improving patient education. To print complex organs, Michalski said the printer tackles the project segment by segment. Some body parts are easier to segment, like a bone that is relatively homogenous. Others, like a liver entangled with arteries, veins and bile ducts, are on the trickier side, he said. In order to use the printers, students are required to complete a CEID training course. This certification gives them access to use any of the center’s three entry-level machines. The other two machines — which printed the neuron and knee — require further training. Jedidiah Thompson ’17, who uses the printers frequently and recently constructed a model of a rocket, said the neuron and kneecap demonstrate the power of the 3-D printing, though he added there is still room for improvement in the technology. “We still have a long road ahead in terms of cutting costs, increasing resolution and decreasing failure rate,” Thompson wrote in an email to the News. The CEID opened in September 2012. Contact RACHEL SIEGEL at rachel.siegel@yale.edu .

LEON JIANG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The 3-d printers in the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID) are helping researchers create breakthrough models that assist in biomedical research and clinical application.

Bloom talks infant morality BY SARAH ECKINGER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale developmental psychologist Paul Bloom has written several books about pleasure, morality and infant psychology. His most recent, “Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil,” discusses his new research on infant morality and the innate sense of right and wrong that appears early in childhood. The News talked with Bloom about his new book, his research partnership with his wife and the impact of his work on our philosophical understanding of instinctive morality.

Q A

Where did the inspiration come from to write Just Babies?

Well there are two main sources. One is the research that I have done with my colleague and wife Karen Wynn, which is what we did with morality and babies in the [Yale] cognition center. We made some really striking discoveries about babies’ early knowledge, and I was just dying to talk about them and to tell the story of our research. The second reason, more generally, was that I have always been interested in morality. A lot of my research performed with children and with adults concerns the nature of overall existence. The motivation for writing the book was to give a broad theory about moral ways, looking at how we began and what we end up as, looking at what is universal and what is different.

Q A

Did your research begin with your interest in childhood behaviors and lead to researching morality, or vice versa? I have always been interested in morality, and for many years I’ve been doing research with adults, looking at the nature of moral judgments, looking at the nature of political differences in liberals and conservatives, the role of disgust and of sexual arousal, and our moral feelings. But at the same time I have also been doing research with babies, looking at their

social understanding and their judgments of other people. So one way of looking at it is that the two interests came together in this book.

Q

In your book you argue that babies have an innate sense of morality. How does one go about testing this in a research setting? If I want to know what your morals are like I can just ask you, but it is different with babies. There are different ways of studying babies, but what we did was construct one-act plays, with a main character struggling to get up a hill. A second character would help gently nudge him upwards, and a third would push him downwards. Then we showed the baby the two other characters, and you can see which ones the babies prefer [by] the one they reach for. When they get older you can see which one they want to reward and who they want to punish. You can see what they think about other characters who punish the bad guy or reward the bad guy. The main result we get from all of these studies is that the babies have a moral sense and are able to judge right from wrong.

A

Q

Since there seems to be a right and wrong answer in this situation, or a correct choice in character to reach for, does this lead to conclusions that some babies are morally “bad” and others morally “good”? We often get questions about the children who don’t choose good characters. Some babies don’t give us the results we are looking for, but our results do tend to be very strong in these studies: The vast majority of kids behave morally. I do think though we are born with differences in empathy, certain differences in compassion, but this research suggests the capacity to judge right from wrong — the basic moral understanding — is universal.

A

Q

There are many different perspectives on the innate morality of babies. Do

you find that your research supports the theories of any one movement? The findings from the baby lab support a nativist conception of human psychology, where fundamental capacities are inborn. But at the same time, I should emphasize that the innate morality we have is incomplete. It is tragically limited in certain ways. This leaves a lot of room for learning and for development. You and I believe that sexism is wrong, we believe that slavery is wrong and that every human being has rights. All of these beliefs are the product of development. So a substantial amount of our moral understanding is learned later, but a lot isn’t. A lot of my book focuses on the story of how we come from being just babies to being fully moral beings.

A

Q A

How did you get started as a developmental psychologist? Did you always want to work with children? My wife and I have two teenagers, and when they were younger we did experiments on them, but I don’t think they were harmed by having developmental psychologists as parents, nor do I think we had any special insights to help them.

Q

What is it like to be married to and work with one of the most famous developmental psychologists today?

A

I love it. I love the fact that I am married to someone who is a brilliant scientist and a terrific writer. I don’t know what it would be like to live my life in a different way. That said, it has its pluses and minuses, but the arrangement we have where we do some of our work together has been wonderful. When we are home together at night we do what most people do which is gossip, but we also talk shop and talk about our research. Contact SARAH ECKINGER at sarah.eckinger@yale.edu .

ALLIE KRAUSE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Paul Bloom’s most recent book explores the early development of morality in infants and the implications this has for the origins of the human ethical sense.

Polio in Syria alarms

Rockets launch at Yale

BY SAHELI SADANAND STAFF COLUMNIST The ongoing Syrian civil war has led to the deaths of over a hundred thousand Syrians and the displacement of millions. The conflict has also led to the disruption of basic services including previously regular vaccination campaigns for children. In October, the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) confirmed that ten cases of child paralysis in Syria were due to poliovirus, a disease last detected in Syria in 1999. This suffering may seem insignificant in light of how many Syrians have died, but polio is a highly contagious viral disease with no cure. The best defense against polio is to prevent infection altogether and this can only be accomplished through robust vaccination campaigns. Unfortunately, most of these children and others who may have been paralyzed due to poliovirus infection were not vaccinated at all or incompletely vaccinated. According to the WHO, the child vaccination rate against polio in Syria prior to the start of the civil war in 2011 was eighty-three percent. One year later, it had fallen to fifty-two percent. With Syrian refugees in many surrounding countries, the disease could easily spread further. To address this potential health crisis, UNICEF and the WHO launched a massive vaccination campaign at the beginning of November to immunize 20 million children across the Middle East against polio.

VACCINES ARE...ONE OF THE GREATEST TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN HUMAN HISTORY Polio has been completely eliminated from most of the world with the exception of three countries: Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. Its persistence can be attributed to poor healthcare and sanitation systems, the difficulty of vaccinating isolated and warring populations and the local distrust of internationally led vaccination campaigns. In Taliban-controlled parts of Pakistan, polio vaccinations have been banned and vaccine workers have been killed, prompting the UN to stop polio vaccination work in Pakistan last December. Reduced vaccinations in Pakistan may seem irrelevant to the recent outbreak in Syria, but the poliovirus strain found in Syria is genetically similar to a strain that circulates in Pakistan. Additionally, similar poliovirus strains had been found prior to the Syrian polio outbreak in Egyptian and Israeli sewers. It is unclear how poliovirus spread from Pakistan to other, non-neighboring countries, but its spread demonstrates just how dangerous reduced vaccinations in Pakistan have become. Vaccines are indisputably one of the greatest technological advances in human history. Happily, the scale of loss and suffering inflicted by polio and other diseases is being removed from living memory. We have succeeded in completely eradicating only two diseases — smallpox and rinderpest — but we can and should be able to eliminate more. Earlier this year, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative announced a plan to completely eradicate polio by 2018. The spread of polio to Syria threatens this goal and illustrates the importance of childhood vaccination campaigns. It is imperative that leaders of Middle Eastern countries – including the leaders of the Syrian rebel forces – do not hinder this mass polio vaccination campaign and that all countries continue to meet robust vaccination rates. If not, more children may get infected with polio not only in Syria, but across the Middle East. Saheli Sadanand is a graduate student in the immunobiology department. Contact SAHELI SADANAND at saheli.sadanand@yale.edu .

Study questions innateness of endowment effect BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

GENEVIEVE FOWLER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Yale Undergraduate Aerospace Association successfully launched Artemis, their prototype rocket in upstate New York. BY CELINE TIEN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Rockets are taking flight at Yale this fall. On Nov. 9, the Yale Undergraduate Aerospace Association (YUAA) successfully launched their prototype rocket, Artemis, at the Connecticut Tripoli Rocket Association launch site in upstate New York. The 4,829-foot launch was in preparation for a national competition in June. Beyond the organization, YUAA alumni have branched out from the association to innovate with sustainable rocketry. “We’re still constantly pushing our limits and learning new things,” said Ari Brill ’15, co-president of YUAA. “It’s all about pushing the frontier of rocketry at Yale.” The team only started building Artemis at the beginning of the semester, said Bolun Liu ’16, head of the YUAA rocket competition team. He attributed Artemis’s successful launch to a lot of thoughtful planning on the part of the team. The team built the rocket out of carbon fiber in the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design in the first floor of the Becton Center. “I’m very impressed with the team and how they were able to design and build on such short notice,” said Liu, adding that the majority of the team members had never launched a rocket before. The launch helped to prepare the team for the Intercollegiate Rocket Engineering Competition (IREC) in June, Liu said. At that competition, the team hopes to launch the rocket more than 10,000 feet at faster than the speed of sound, Brill said. Not all rocketry initiatives are shooting for competition wins. Former YUAA members Glen Meyerowitz ’14 and Patrick

Wilczynski ’16 designed and successfully tested Yale’s first hybrid rocket engine this fall. While traditional rocket engines use either solid or liquid fuel, these forms are more dangerous as solid-fuel rockets cannot be turned off and liquid-fuel rockets must be stored at extremely low temperatures and high-pressure environments, Meyerowitz said. Since hybrid engines use both types of fuel, they are both simpler and safer to build and fly, Wilczynski said. While they are not as powerful as traditional engines, Wilczynski said their practicality makes up for lagging in performance. In addition to the hybrid engine, the duo also designed a hybrid rocket struc-

It’s all about pushing the frontier of rocketry at Yale. ARI BRILL ’15 Co-president, YUAA ture. While traditional rockets shed components of the structure during flight, which are no longer useable after a launch, the hybrid rocket will be designed with recoverable parts. The team plans to build the rocket structure soon and launch it along with the engine. While Meyerowitz and Wilczynski do not anticipate developing the rocket commercially, they said hybrid technology will drive down the cost of space travel and make such trips more accessible to citizens. The YUAA was founded in 2010. Contact CELINE TIEN at celine.tien@yale.edu .

New research suggests that the widely observed endowment effect — a phenomenon in which humans value an item more if they possess it than if they do not — may be a product of modern society and not our evolutionary roots, as was previously suspected. In the study, researchers ran an experiment on Hadza hunter-gatherers in Tanzania, and found that they did not exhibit the endowment effect. The hunter-gatherer population exists in an egalitarian society that features complete redistribution of goods. By contrast, Hadza that lived closer to a town or village with a market structure did show the effect, demonstrating that it may arise from exposure to a society where goods are traded for money. The research has implications for public policy in providing a greater understanding of how the mind makes suboptimal decisions, said Nicholas Christakis, study co-author and Yale professor of sociology. The authors sought out the Hadza because their isolated way of life approximates most of our evolutionary history, said Coren Apicella, study coauthor and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. In recent years, tourists have increasingly visited areas inhabited by a small subset of Hadza, and often pay the Hadza money in exchange for hunting tours or bows and arrows, effectively creating a market. In the study, Apicella gave both isolated and marketexposed Hadza either a biscuit or a lighter and asked each whether they would like to trade their item for the other gift. Apicella found that 53 percent of isolated Hadza decided to trade, but just 25 percent of Hadza living in market regions chose to trade when asked the same question. In contrast to the Hadza in the market environment, the isolated group did not display the endowment effect because they did not show a preference for the good they were given initially. Christakis said the research did not conclusively determine

the exact mechanisms through which the endowment effect is either created or suppressed. He said market interactions could potentially make people suspicious of trades. “When they’re offering you money for something you have, you think that maybe they’re trying to get it for less than it’s worth.” Christakis said. Apicella said it is also possible that the endowment effect is part of our evolutionary psychology, but that the egalitarian norms of the isolated Hadza suppress this effect. A large body of previous research had found evidence for the endowment effect. In 2008 at Yale, professor of psychology Laurie Santos found evidence for the endowment effect in capuchin monkeys. But just as the market may have caused the endowment effect in Hadza, the simulated economy of the capuchin study may have induced the endowment effect in monkeys, said Apicella. The study is one of many in the relatively new field of behavioral economics, which examines irrational biases in consumer decisions. Christakis said that understanding biases like the endowment effect is important for shaping public policy. By studying the ways the mind makes decisions, the institutions can change the ways options are framed and “nudge” people to make better choices for themselves. “In order to do that, we need to understand how people are led astray,” Christakis said. “If we really understood why people procrastinate, for example, maybe you could design assignments or work out the timing of assignment to minimize the adverse effects of procrastination on students.” Yale professor of psychology David Rand said he hoped the researchers explored the mechanism underlying the endowment effect, adding that they could expose isolated Hadza to market conditions to see if they could induce the endowment effect. There are fewer than 1,000 Hadza living in northern Tanzania. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“What is pride? A rocket that emulates the stars.” WILLIAM WORDSWORTH ENGLISH PHOTO

3-D printers promote research, experimentation BY RACHEL SIEGEL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER New 3-D printers in the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID) are turning out kneecaps and neurons. University researchers, physicians and engineers are collaborating to print out breakthrough models for biomedical research and clinical application with the CEID’s five 3-D printers, which reproduce physical objects by printing layer after layer of material, often plastic or metal. Beyond faculty research, more than 500 students have already been certified to use the entry-level 3-D printers, said Joseph Zinter, CEID’s assistant director. “[The printers] are as modern as you can get,” said Vincent Wilczynski, deputy dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science. “There’s definitely a role in creative usage. When students print out a product, they see the innovative and creative ways in which it can be used.” For Gordon Shepherd, a professor of neurobiology at the Yale School of Medicine, the printers helped magnify miniscule mice neurons. This fall, Shepherd created what he suspects is the first model of a neuron with a 3-D printer, hundreds of times larger than the actual biological counterpart.

As far as future plans go, Shepherd has his eyes on printing small networks of neurons, which would allow him to see how clusters of neurons, as opposed to one singular nerve cell, process information. “Seeing a model of a nerve cell in 3-D is a little bit like you and me looking at each other in 3-D,” Shepherd said. “It’s obviously so much better than if we just looked at each other’s picture. This is a whole new way of thinking about nerve cells in their 3-D structure and in their 3-D environment.” Shepherd’s neuron was inspired in part by the work of Mark Michalski, a radiology resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital. He approached the CEID in the fall of 2012, looking to print 3-D organs to use as models for preoperative planning and to educate patients about their specific conditions. Among his most successful projects was the reproduction of a patient’s kneecap wrapped by a tumor. Michalski said he first experimented with the printers out of interest alone. Gradually, he began to see the technology’s potential in terms of printing organs that could be used to improve doctor-patient communication. “With a 3-D reconstruction, you can communicate some things very clearly that you couldn’t otherwise,” Michalski

said. Though his aspirations include printing actual human organs, Michalski’s near-term focus is on improving patient education. To print complex organs, Michalski said the printer tackles the project segment by segment. Some body parts are easier to segment, like a bone that is relatively homogenous. Others, like a liver entangled with arteries, veins and bile ducts, are on the trickier side, he said. In order to use the printers, students are required to complete a CEID training course. This certification gives them access to use any of the center’s three entry-level machines. The other two machines — which printed the neuron and knee — require further training. Jedidiah Thompson ’17, who uses the printers frequently and recently constructed a model of a rocket, said the neuron and kneecap demonstrate the power of the 3-D printing, though he added there is still room for improvement in the technology. “We still have a long road ahead in terms of cutting costs, increasing resolution and decreasing failure rate,” Thompson wrote in an email to the News. The CEID opened in September 2012. Contact RACHEL SIEGEL at rachel.siegel@yale.edu .

LEON JIANG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The 3-d printers in the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID) are helping researchers create breakthrough models that assist in biomedical research and clinical application.

Bloom talks infant morality BY SARAH ECKINGER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Yale developmental psychologist Paul Bloom has written several books about pleasure, morality and infant psychology. His most recent, “Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil,” discusses his new research on infant morality and the innate sense of right and wrong that appears early in childhood. The News talked with Bloom about his new book, his research partnership with his wife and the impact of his work on our philosophical understanding of instinctive morality.

Q A

Where did the inspiration come from to write Just Babies?

Well there are two main sources. One is the research that I have done with my colleague and wife Karen Wynn, which is what we did with morality and babies in the [Yale] cognition center. We made some really striking discoveries about babies’ early knowledge, and I was just dying to talk about them and to tell the story of our research. The second reason, more generally, was that I have always been interested in morality. A lot of my research performed with children and with adults concerns the nature of overall existence. The motivation for writing the book was to give a broad theory about moral ways, looking at how we began and what we end up as, looking at what is universal and what is different.

Q A

Did your research begin with your interest in childhood behaviors and lead to researching morality, or vice versa? I have always been interested in morality, and for many years I’ve been doing research with adults, looking at the nature of moral judgments, looking at the nature of political differences in liberals and conservatives, the role of disgust and of sexual arousal, and our moral feelings. But at the same time I have also been doing research with babies, looking at their

social understanding and their judgments of other people. So one way of looking at it is that the two interests came together in this book.

Q

In your book you argue that babies have an innate sense of morality. How does one go about testing this in a research setting? If I want to know what your morals are like I can just ask you, but it is different with babies. There are different ways of studying babies, but what we did was construct one-act plays, with a main character struggling to get up a hill. A second character would help gently nudge him upwards, and a third would push him downwards. Then we showed the baby the two other characters, and you can see which ones the babies prefer [by] the one they reach for. When they get older you can see which one they want to reward and who they want to punish. You can see what they think about other characters who punish the bad guy or reward the bad guy. The main result we get from all of these studies is that the babies have a moral sense and are able to judge right from wrong.

A

Q

Since there seems to be a right and wrong answer in this situation, or a correct choice in character to reach for, does this lead to conclusions that some babies are morally “bad” and others morally “good”? We often get questions about the children who don’t choose good characters. Some babies don’t give us the results we are looking for, but our results do tend to be very strong in these studies: The vast majority of kids behave morally. I do think though we are born with differences in empathy, certain differences in compassion, but this research suggests the capacity to judge right from wrong — the basic moral understanding — is universal.

A

Q

There are many different perspectives on the innate morality of babies. Do

you find that your research supports the theories of any one movement? The findings from the baby lab support a nativist conception of human psychology, where fundamental capacities are inborn. But at the same time, I should emphasize that the innate morality we have is incomplete. It is tragically limited in certain ways. This leaves a lot of room for learning and for development. You and I believe that sexism is wrong, we believe that slavery is wrong and that every human being has rights. All of these beliefs are the product of development. So a substantial amount of our moral understanding is learned later, but a lot isn’t. A lot of my book focuses on the story of how we come from being just babies to being fully moral beings.

A

Q A

How did you get started as a developmental psychologist? Did you always want to work with children? My wife and I have two teenagers, and when they were younger we did experiments on them, but I don’t think they were harmed by having developmental psychologists as parents, nor do I think we had any special insights to help them.

Q

What is it like to be married to and work with one of the most famous developmental psychologists today?

A

I love it. I love the fact that I am married to someone who is a brilliant scientist and a terrific writer. I don’t know what it would be like to live my life in a different way. That said, it has its pluses and minuses, but the arrangement we have where we do some of our work together has been wonderful. When we are home together at night we do what most people do which is gossip, but we also talk shop and talk about our research. Contact SARAH ECKINGER at sarah.eckinger@yale.edu .

ALLIE KRAUSE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Paul Bloom’s most recent book explores the early development of morality in infants and the implications this has for the origins of the human ethical sense.

Polio in Syria alarms

Rockets launch at Yale

BY SAHELI SADANAND STAFF COLUMNIST The ongoing Syrian civil war has led to the deaths of over a hundred thousand Syrians and the displacement of millions. The conflict has also led to the disruption of basic services including previously regular vaccination campaigns for children. In October, the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) confirmed that ten cases of child paralysis in Syria were due to poliovirus, a disease last detected in Syria in 1999. This suffering may seem insignificant in light of how many Syrians have died, but polio is a highly contagious viral disease with no cure. The best defense against polio is to prevent infection altogether and this can only be accomplished through robust vaccination campaigns. Unfortunately, most of these children and others who may have been paralyzed due to poliovirus infection were not vaccinated at all or incompletely vaccinated. According to the WHO, the child vaccination rate against polio in Syria prior to the start of the civil war in 2011 was eighty-three percent. One year later, it had fallen to fifty-two percent. With Syrian refugees in many surrounding countries, the disease could easily spread further. To address this potential health crisis, UNICEF and the WHO launched a massive vaccination campaign at the beginning of November to immunize 20 million children across the Middle East against polio.

VACCINES ARE...ONE OF THE GREATEST TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN HUMAN HISTORY Polio has been completely eliminated from most of the world with the exception of three countries: Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. Its persistence can be attributed to poor healthcare and sanitation systems, the difficulty of vaccinating isolated and warring populations and the local distrust of internationally led vaccination campaigns. In Taliban-controlled parts of Pakistan, polio vaccinations have been banned and vaccine workers have been killed, prompting the UN to stop polio vaccination work in Pakistan last December. Reduced vaccinations in Pakistan may seem irrelevant to the recent outbreak in Syria, but the poliovirus strain found in Syria is genetically similar to a strain that circulates in Pakistan. Additionally, similar poliovirus strains had been found prior to the Syrian polio outbreak in Egyptian and Israeli sewers. It is unclear how poliovirus spread from Pakistan to other, non-neighboring countries, but its spread demonstrates just how dangerous reduced vaccinations in Pakistan have become. Vaccines are indisputably one of the greatest technological advances in human history. Happily, the scale of loss and suffering inflicted by polio and other diseases is being removed from living memory. We have succeeded in completely eradicating only two diseases — smallpox and rinderpest — but we can and should be able to eliminate more. Earlier this year, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative announced a plan to completely eradicate polio by 2018. The spread of polio to Syria threatens this goal and illustrates the importance of childhood vaccination campaigns. It is imperative that leaders of Middle Eastern countries – including the leaders of the Syrian rebel forces – do not hinder this mass polio vaccination campaign and that all countries continue to meet robust vaccination rates. If not, more children may get infected with polio not only in Syria, but across the Middle East. Saheli Sadanand is a graduate student in the immunobiology department. Contact SAHELI SADANAND at saheli.sadanand@yale.edu .

Study questions innateness of endowment effect BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

GENEVIEVE FOWLER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Yale Undergraduate Aerospace Association successfully launched Artemis, their prototype rocket in upstate New York. BY CELINE TIEN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Rockets are taking flight at Yale this fall. On Nov. 9, the Yale Undergraduate Aerospace Association (YUAA) successfully launched their prototype rocket, Artemis, at the Connecticut Tripoli Rocket Association launch site in upstate New York. The 4,829-foot launch was in preparation for a national competition in June. Beyond the organization, YUAA alumni have branched out from the association to innovate with sustainable rocketry. “We’re still constantly pushing our limits and learning new things,” said Ari Brill ’15, co-president of YUAA. “It’s all about pushing the frontier of rocketry at Yale.” The team only started building Artemis at the beginning of the semester, said Bolun Liu ’16, head of the YUAA rocket competition team. He attributed Artemis’s successful launch to a lot of thoughtful planning on the part of the team. The team built the rocket out of carbon fiber in the Center for Engineering Innovation and Design in the first floor of the Becton Center. “I’m very impressed with the team and how they were able to design and build on such short notice,” said Liu, adding that the majority of the team members had never launched a rocket before. The launch helped to prepare the team for the Intercollegiate Rocket Engineering Competition (IREC) in June, Liu said. At that competition, the team hopes to launch the rocket more than 10,000 feet at faster than the speed of sound, Brill said. Not all rocketry initiatives are shooting for competition wins. Former YUAA members Glen Meyerowitz ’14 and Patrick

Wilczynski ’16 designed and successfully tested Yale’s first hybrid rocket engine this fall. While traditional rocket engines use either solid or liquid fuel, these forms are more dangerous as solid-fuel rockets cannot be turned off and liquid-fuel rockets must be stored at extremely low temperatures and high-pressure environments, Meyerowitz said. Since hybrid engines use both types of fuel, they are both simpler and safer to build and fly, Wilczynski said. While they are not as powerful as traditional engines, Wilczynski said their practicality makes up for lagging in performance. In addition to the hybrid engine, the duo also designed a hybrid rocket struc-

It’s all about pushing the frontier of rocketry at Yale. ARI BRILL ’15 Co-president, YUAA ture. While traditional rockets shed components of the structure during flight, which are no longer useable after a launch, the hybrid rocket will be designed with recoverable parts. The team plans to build the rocket structure soon and launch it along with the engine. While Meyerowitz and Wilczynski do not anticipate developing the rocket commercially, they said hybrid technology will drive down the cost of space travel and make such trips more accessible to citizens. The YUAA was founded in 2010. Contact CELINE TIEN at celine.tien@yale.edu .

New research suggests that the widely observed endowment effect — a phenomenon in which humans value an item more if they possess it than if they do not — may be a product of modern society and not our evolutionary roots, as was previously suspected. In the study, researchers ran an experiment on Hadza hunter-gatherers in Tanzania, and found that they did not exhibit the endowment effect. The hunter-gatherer population exists in an egalitarian society that features complete redistribution of goods. By contrast, Hadza that lived closer to a town or village with a market structure did show the effect, demonstrating that it may arise from exposure to a society where goods are traded for money. The research has implications for public policy in providing a greater understanding of how the mind makes suboptimal decisions, said Nicholas Christakis, study co-author and Yale professor of sociology. The authors sought out the Hadza because their isolated way of life approximates most of our evolutionary history, said Coren Apicella, study coauthor and professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. In recent years, tourists have increasingly visited areas inhabited by a small subset of Hadza, and often pay the Hadza money in exchange for hunting tours or bows and arrows, effectively creating a market. In the study, Apicella gave both isolated and marketexposed Hadza either a biscuit or a lighter and asked each whether they would like to trade their item for the other gift. Apicella found that 53 percent of isolated Hadza decided to trade, but just 25 percent of Hadza living in market regions chose to trade when asked the same question. In contrast to the Hadza in the market environment, the isolated group did not display the endowment effect because they did not show a preference for the good they were given initially. Christakis said the research did not conclusively determine

the exact mechanisms through which the endowment effect is either created or suppressed. He said market interactions could potentially make people suspicious of trades. “When they’re offering you money for something you have, you think that maybe they’re trying to get it for less than it’s worth.” Christakis said. Apicella said it is also possible that the endowment effect is part of our evolutionary psychology, but that the egalitarian norms of the isolated Hadza suppress this effect. A large body of previous research had found evidence for the endowment effect. In 2008 at Yale, professor of psychology Laurie Santos found evidence for the endowment effect in capuchin monkeys. But just as the market may have caused the endowment effect in Hadza, the simulated economy of the capuchin study may have induced the endowment effect in monkeys, said Apicella. The study is one of many in the relatively new field of behavioral economics, which examines irrational biases in consumer decisions. Christakis said that understanding biases like the endowment effect is important for shaping public policy. By studying the ways the mind makes decisions, the institutions can change the ways options are framed and “nudge” people to make better choices for themselves. “In order to do that, we need to understand how people are led astray,” Christakis said. “If we really understood why people procrastinate, for example, maybe you could design assignments or work out the timing of assignment to minimize the adverse effects of procrastination on students.” Yale professor of psychology David Rand said he hoped the researchers explored the mechanism underlying the endowment effect, adding that they could expose isolated Hadza to market conditions to see if they could induce the endowment effect. There are fewer than 1,000 Hadza living in northern Tanzania. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Budget cuts ahead BUDGET FROM PAGE 1 Despite a strong investment return of 12.5 percent this past fiscal year, Yale’s endowment has not returned to its pre-recession level. Meanwhile, operating costs have risen by 5.8 percent within the past year and the University spends about $1 billion of endowment funds annually. Without any action, the deficit will continue to expand, Polak said, adding that the University’s reserve funds can only cover the gap between revenue and expenses for three more years. In an email sent to the entire faculty and staff Monday afternoon, Salovey and Polak provided a broad outline of Yale’s budget woes and their vision for the way forward. They invited faculty and staff to respond to the email with any suggestions as to how to implement savings throughout the University. Vice President for Finance and Business Operations Shauna King told the News that it would be nearly impossible to eliminate the deficit without affecting personnel, noting that 60 percent of Yale’s expenditures come from “people costs.” Still, she pointed to ways to reduce administrative costs other than forced layoffs. For the past several months, the University has intentionally left numerous faculty and staff positions vacant, which has allowed Yale to save significant funds on salaries and benefits, King said. Salovey, Polak and King said funds cut from administrative functions will be reallocated toward teaching and research, which all three described as the core missions of the University. “Every dollar you spend on administration is a dollar not put toward the mission,” King said. Though budget restrictions will prevent the faculty from growing in the coming years, administrators did not indicate any plans to reduce the size of the faculty. Still, Polak said the University has to be careful with its spending “right across the board.” While the consequences of cuts to the

administrative sectors of the University are yet to be determined, Salovey, Polak and King said they plan to give substantial autonomy to University “units” to allow them to determine how they will cut costs. “We will leave each unit enormous responsibility,” Salovey said. “One size doesn’t fit all.” Salovey and Polak did not provide any concrete measures in their note to faculty and staff, though they highlighted the need to make spending more efficient. But Salovey and King said leaving positions unfilled as well as finding goods and services at lower prices are likely strategies for cutting costs in the immediate future. In a slightly longer time frame, King said that looking at productivity and “whether work can be reorganized, done in a different way or eliminated altogether” will produce significant savings. Bringing Yale’s expenditures in line with its revenues is important for the long-term fiscal health of the University, the three administrators said, adding that the University needs to make room in the budget to introduce new initiatives in order to remain relevant and attract students and faculty. Despite the deficit, Polak said the University remains committed to its time line for major capital projects, including the Yale Biology Building, the new residential colleges — which will be gift-funded — and the renovation of the Hall of Graduate Studies. Though Polak said Yale took the financial situation of the University into account when deciding on target completion dates for these projects, Salovey said the new buildings will nevertheless add to the University’s operating expenses. If the University had not made significant budgetary cuts in the wake of the 2008–’09 financial crisis, Polak said the current budget deficit would likely stand at $350 million. Contact ADRIAN RODRIGUES AND MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at adrian.rodrigues@yale.edu and matthew.lloydthomas@yale.edu .

“All good ideas arrive by chance.” MAX ERNST SURREALIST ARTIST

Ernst sculpture comes to campus SCULPTURE FROM PAGE 1 the end of the world and the prophet responds with a pledge to uphold his faith. Salovey said that the statue reminds us to “stand by our righteousness,” whether religious or otherwise. Miller explained that Ernst made the sculpture in Germany during Adolf Hitler’s rise to power. She called it one of his most political works of art. Loria said that ever since he donated the sculpture to the YUAG in 2005, he and the Gallery have been waiting for the appropriate occasion to install it on campus. The inauguration of the University’s 23rd President last month was just that occasion, he said. Loria has donated a number of other works of art to the University, including a 30-foot Roy Lichtenstein sculpture that was installed on Science Hill in 1994 in honor of former President Richard Levin’s inauguration. “I collect a lot of sculptures,” Loria said. “Giving them to Yale is one of the things I like to do.” YUAG Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Cathleen Chaffee said that the sculpture is an avian figure, adding that Ernst, a 20th-century German artist prominent in the Dadaist and Surrealist movements, was fascinated with birds. Chaffee said that the Gallery, the University administration and the Yale Office of Facilities discussed many potential locations for “Habakuk’s” installation. Roughly 40 locations were considered, Miller said. Miller said she thinks the final location is perfect not only because it makes the sculpture

STEPHANIE ADDENBROOKE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The new sculpture, “Habakuk” was dedicated yesterday. It was created in 1933. highly visible, but also because it puts it into meaningful conversation with the architecture of Cross Campus. “Habakuk,” which was made in 1933, stands between Berkeley College, which was built in 1934; Calhoun College, which was built in 1933; and WLH, which was built in 1927, Miller explained. “We see the high modernism

of that moment with Yale’s faux past,” Miller said, adding that in the 1930s Yale was trying to construct a history for itself by creating “faux gothic” buildings. The sculpture was moved to Cross Campus from a West Campus storage facility last Tuesday. Contact helen rouner at helen.rouner@yale.edu .

500,000+ VISITS TO YALEDAILYNEWS.COM EACH MONTH

PROGRAMMERS & DESIGNERS WANTED 202 YORK ST.

technology@yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 ¡ yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Sunny, with a high near 46. Breezy, with a northwest wind 14 to 21 mph.

THURSDAY

High of 44, low of 30.

High of 49, low of 36.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19 9:00 a.m. �A Thousand Hills to Heaven: Love, Hope and A Restaurant in Rwanda.� The Yale Global Health Leadership Institute presents a talk on the hope of foreign aid programs to end poverty with Josh Ruxin, director of the Access Project, Rwanda Works, and the Millennium Villages Project. LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 211. 5:30 p.m. “Still Waiting for Barbarians after 9/11? Cavafy’s Reluctant Irony and The Language of the Future.� Come for a talk by Maria Boletsi, assistant professor for the Department of Film and Comparative Literature, who will expound on the connections between poet Constantine Cavafy’s poetry and concept of barbarism. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Rm. 202.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20

THAT MONKEY BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

7:00 p.m. “Progress for Women in the Physical Sciences: How Far Have We Come, What More Can We Do?� Women in Science at Yale is hosting a panel on the challenges that women face in the field of science. Some panelists include Sara Demers, assistant professor in Physics; and Nilay Hazari, associate professor in chemistry. Becton Engineering and Applied Science Center (15 Prospect St.), Davies Aud.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21 2:00 p.m. Guided tour of the Cushing Center The center features more than 400 specimen jars of patients’ brains and tumors and orignal surgical illustrations and photographs that belonged to Dr. Harvey Cushing. Sterling Hall of Medicine (333 Cedar St.), Cushing Medical Library 5:45 p.m. “Colors of Math� Screening of 2013 film and Q&A session with Yuri Tschinkel, professor at NYU Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. The film’s director, Ekaterina Eremenko, will also be available for comments on the work. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 4322418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 19, 2013

Interested in drawing cartoons for the Yale Daily News? CONTACT ANNELISA LEINBACH AT

annelisa.leinbach@yale.edu

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Trapping device 6 Official records 10 Got an A on 14 Restriction at some fitness clubs 15 Mark from a healed wound 16 Fancy fabric with metallic threads 17 Coral ring 18 Metal to melt down 20 State Department’s purview 22 Anxious feeling 23 Olds Cutlass model 26 Pulp comic that transformed Nick Fury into a superspy 31 British noblewomen 34 Soda fountain orders 35 Try to win 36 Happy hour pints 37 Sorceress jilted by Jason 38 Ireland’s Sinn __ 39 Dream state letters 40 Suffix with Beatle 41 Theater access 42 Entertainer with many fans? 45 Cling wrap brand 46 “Queen of Soul� Franklin 50 “War of the Worlds� attack 55 Inning-by-inning runs summary 57 Hedren of “The Birds� 58 Bldg. annex 59 Slimmest of margins 60 Actress Falco et al. 61 Gravy vessel 62 Very 63 Like some populations

&/$66,&$/086,& +RXUVD'D\ )0DQGRQWKHZHEDW :015RUJ |3OHGJHVDFFHSWHG } 7XHVGD\LV2SHUDQLJKW

CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

11/19/13

By David Poole

DOWN 1 Major mix-up 2 “__ your life!� 3 Passion, in Pisa 4 Issues 5 Signs up 6 Part of PGA: Abbr. 7 Letters on a Soviet uniform 8 Islands tuber 9 Kazakhstan border sea 10 Keys at the keys 11 Westley portrayer in “The Princess Bride� 12 Punk rock subgenre 13 Bear lair 19 Ancient Britons 21 Belg. neighbor 24 Do more work on, as a persistent squeak 25 In unison 27 Revise 28 Gymnast Comaneci 29 Collect bit by bit 30 LAX posting 31 Has the nerve

Want to place a classified ad?

Monday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

32 Billy Joel’s musical daughter 33 Reminder notes 37 Apple computer 38 Roosevelt’s chat spot 40 Short-short skirts 41 Like soda water 43 Natural ability 44 Cleveland NBAer 47 Easy basketball score

SUDOKU EASY

11/19/13

48 Aspirations 49 Herb that tastes like licorice 51 Reverberation 52 Ark helmsman 53 Spring flower 54 Rex Stout’s stout sleuth Wolfe 55 Chocolate dog 56 Wedding vow words

3 1 8 7 4 1 4 2 1 9 7 6 7 6 3 8 9 1

9 6 9 8

6 6 3 5 7 4 5 8

4 3


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS ·TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

THE GAME

“We are the O-Line, we set the examples, we LEAD FROM THE FRONT.” GREY RUEGAMER NFL OFFENSIVE LINEMAN

‘Five fingers, one fist’

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Behind a veteran offensive line, the football team has become the third-best rushing offense in the Ivy League at 202.8 yards per game. BY JAMES BADAS AND GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS When wide receiver Deon Randall ’15 or running back Candler Rich ’17 celebrates in the end zone after a touchdown, five men in the trenches are often overlooked. Yale’s offensive line has been stout to say the least, allowing just nine sacks in as many games this season. That pass-blocking prowess puts them third in the Ivy League in sacks allowed and has provided time for the Yale signal callers, primarily Henry Furman ’14, to sit back in the pocket and go through their progressions. The well-oiled machine that is the O-Line has grown progressively more cohesive over the past two years. The same five linemen have suited up and started for the Bulldogs in each game this season, and the veteran crew has started in

Yale uniforms for a combined 102 games. “Experience has been a big key for us this year in terms of chemistry,” left guard Will Chism ’15 said. “The offensive line depends a lot on how five guys work together as a unit. ‘Five fingers, one fist’ is a common metaphor that we use.” The line has excelled in the Ivy League despite being relatively small, an idea exemplified by the play of center John Oppenheimer ’14. Oppenheimer is one of only three offensive linemen in the entire Ivy League listed at 6’0” or shorter, and was passed over by every other Ivy Leage team during recruiting, but his talent garners praise from numerous people associated with the team. “I was definitely underrecruited, which put a chip on my shoulder, and that motivates me every single day to work harder,”

Oppenheimer said. “But I also need to have better technique and watch more film, to know my opponent better than he knows me.” Technique has been a major point of emphasis for the entire unit, said offensive line coach Joe Conlin. With regards to Oppenheimer specifically, Conlin noted that he is one of the smartest players he has ever been around. This team chemistry and technique has proven central in the Bulldogs’ zone blocking scheme, a system that places a greater emphasis on footwork and agility than sheer power, Conlin said. “We focus on techniques which would make guys who aren’t the biggest guys able to make quick movements on the line,” right tackle Luke Longinotti ’16 said. The proof is in the pudding for the Bulldogs, as Yale’s rushing offense is third-best in the Ancient

Eight at 202.8 yards per game, nearly 50 yards per game higher than the conference average. Conlin said that the unit embraces its role as an underdog. “They understand that they aren’t the biggest, and they don’t try to be anything that they’re not,” Conlin said. “They communicate a lot on the field, but I think they can do a lot of it non-verbally at this point.” Because the team cannot do heavy lifting during the season, the linemen rely on sheer calories to keep up their size between games. They eat breakfast every morning in Commons and try to eat at least every two hours, Chism said. He added that his usual breakfast in Commons consists of one or two omelettes, yogurt, hard-boiled eggs and two bagels. He noted that the team supplies the linemen with Muscle Milk and

PowerBars to eat between meals. “We always have protein around us,” Chism said. Strength and conditioning coach Emil Johnson weighs each lineman every week to see if any of them have gained or lost weight. Conlin noted that the coaching staff gives each player an ideal weight to maintain in order to maximize athletic ability. “But at the same time I’m not standing over their shoulder at the dining hall looking at what they eat,” he said. “They do a good job of handling that on their own.” The Eli linemen are also among the most disciplined on the field, having committed just five holding penalties this season. Longinotti said that the linemen practice keeping their hands inside their defenders’ pads in order to avoid holding calls. Heading into the season’s final

game against Harvard, the five men on the line are hoping to give seniors Oppenheimer and left tackle Wes Gavin ’14 a proper send-off with a win. Oppenheimer said that the line is especially motivated because of their intense camaraderie. “Every group spends a lot of time together, but I think we probably spend the most time together as far as outside of football,” Oppenheimer said. “We really do like each other a lot and have a lot in common. The main thing that brings us so close together is how we need to be close to have success.” The Game will kick off at 12 p.m. on Saturday. Contact JAMES BADAS AND GREG CAMERON at james.badas@yale.edu and greg. cameron@yale.edu.

Explosive Randall a jack-of-all-trades BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale football team has seen some uncertainty at quarterback this season, with four different players taking snaps under center. But no matter who directs the offense, one playmaker remains constant: wideout Deon Randall ’15. Randall’s playmaking ability extends to all facets of the game. Not only does he lead the team in all receiving categories, with 78 catches for 725 yards and eight receiving touchdowns, but he has showcased his breakaway speed taking handoffs as well. He has rushed for 148 yards and a pair of scores, including a 32-yard gamewinning touchdown against Brown. “He reminds me of one of the better players I’ve seen in the Ivy League, and I’ve been coaching here for 20 years,” assistant head coach and running backs coach Larry Ciotti said. “He’s certainly at the top of my list.” Randall has even contributed on the other side of the ball and on special teams as well, taking snaps as a defensive back and a kick returner to boot. Against Brown, the 5 foot 8 dynamo swatted away the Bears’ last-gasp Hail Mary attempt to clinch the Yale victory. Whether lining up out wide, in the slot, in the backfield or coming in motion across the formation, Randall has proven his versatility to be a major factor in his success. Ciotti noted that wherever Randall plays, he creates matchup nightmares for opposing defenses. “The defenses that we play know that he is a major threat whenever he touches the ball,” Ciotti said. “They will shift their secondary and favor it toward the side he is motioning to … he’s capable to break one at any given time.” Randall agreed, saying that it is hard for teams to game plan

against him. Playing multiple positions is nothing new for Randall. In high school, Randall starred all over the field. He started at quarterback for Francis W. Parker High School in San Diego and put up numbers straight out of a video game. He threw 41 passing touchdowns and just eight interceptions for his career, along with 4,131 rushing yards and an astonishing 69 rushing touchdowns. He also returned kicks and intercepted 21 passes as a cornerback throughout his career and even took over part-time duties as the team punter in his sophomore season. “He’s so skilled and focused,” Ciotti said. “A true football player.”

He reminds me of one of the better players I’ve seen in the Ivy League, and I’ve been coaching here for 20 years. LARRY CIOTTI Assistant Head Coach and Running Backs Coach In Randall’s freshman year at Yale, he was listed as running back, recording 29 carries for 154 yards and grabbing 10 passes for 13 yards out of the backfield. In 2011, Randall switched to wide receiver and excelled immediately, leading the team in catches with 48 and finishing second on the team in both yards, with 523, and receiving touchdowns, with 3. He was named an Honorable Mention AllIvy player after the season. But Randall was forced to miss the 2012 campaign with a shoulder injury, and after undergoing surgery and taking a semester off to rehab, he returned this season

improved and more prepared. “During my time off, I got a chance to understand the coaches and get up to speed as far as what they like to run,” Randall said. “It gave me enough time to understand defenses in the Ivy League.” This year, Randall has shown the ability to take over games. In Yale’s 38–23 victory over Cornell, Randall had 11 catches for 148 yards and four total touchdowns, including one rushing. Last week against Princeton, he caught a career-high 13 grabs for 127 yards and a score. Though Randall is getting increased carries as a running back now, he says that his play at the position has been part of the game plan all year. “It’s been in the offense,” Randall said. “I think that’s one of the ways our offense is complimentary to my skill set.” Ciotti added that Randall has also seen a heavier workload because of injuries suffered by Tyler Varga ’15, a preseason AllAmerican at running back. With The Game against Harvard coming up on Saturday, Randall still has a chance to break modern Yale school records. His 78 catches rank third in Yale single-season history, behind only Eric Johnson ’01 and Ralph Plumb ’05, who had 86 and 79, respectively. He also ranks third in career catches behind the same two receivers. Randall noted how much the rivalry against Harvard means to the team and to Eli fans. “It’s going to be a really fun game,” he said. “Harvard’s a good team and we’re a good team and I hope we play really well. We’re very capable of competing.” Yale’s game against Harvard will kick off at noon on Saturday and will be televised on NBC Sports Network. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 2 Deon Randall ’15 leads the football team in all receiving categories.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

“To reach a port we must set sail—Sail, not tie at anchor. Sail, not drift.” FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 32ND PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Swimming drops first ivy meet BY SYDNEY GLOVER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams went into this weekend’s meet against Columbia looking for vengeance after finishing one place behind the Lions at the Ivy League championships last spring, but the Elis came up short once again.

SWIMMING On Friday, the men’s team lost to the Lions 153–147, while the women fell 185–115 in New York. The men’s team fought a heated battle with the Lions as they traded the lead throughout the entire meet. The Bulldogs suffered a loss in the final event, the 400-meter freestyle relay, which gave Columbia the necessary points to pull out the overall victory. Though the Bulldogs fell, there were several memorable victories. Brian Hogan ’16 achieved victories in the 500- and 1000-meter freestyle events. Rob Harder ’14 won the 200meter freestyle and 200-meter backstroke, earning points that the Bulldogs needed to stay close with the Lions. Andrew Heymann ’15 came in first in the 200-meter individual medley, the 100-meter breaststroke and the 200-meter breaststroke, the highest number of individual victories at the meet. “Going into a dual meet, every member of the team has a job to do, and I just focused on doing mine,” Heymann said. On the diving side, Tyler Pramer ’14 won the three-meter dive and James McNelis ’16 placed third in both the three-meter dive and the one-meter dive. Pramer won the event with a final score of 318.23, more than 15 points ahead of second-place finisher Micah Rembrandt from Columbia. McNelis posted a final score of 282.46. The three-meter dive was the first diving event of the meet, and Pramer said that it was important to start the meet off well to give the Elis momentum. “I knew that it was important for the team to start the meet on a good note and I was excited that we were able to do so with the first place finish in the three-meter,” said Pramer.

In the last event of the day, the 400meter freestyle relay team of Harder, Alwin Fimansyah ’15, Victor Zhang ’16 and Aaron Greenberg ’17 came in just .22 seconds behind the Lions, a win that would have given the Bulldogs the overall victory in the meet. Although the Bulldogs lost, Pramer said that the team gained experience in the meet that will help it throughout the season. Anthony Mercadante ’17 added that the team is tight-knit and that his teammates would band together to support each other and move on after the loss. “Close losses bring teams together,” Heymann said. “We are focused on fixing small mistakes and excited for another opportunity to race this weekend at the Bucknell Invitational.”

Going into a dual meet, every member of the team has a job to do, and I just focused on doing mine. ANDREW HEYMANN ’15 Men’s Team Swimmer

The women had a disappointing meet as well, falling to the Lions despite several victories. Lilybet MacRae ’17 started the day with a win in the three-meter dive, scoring 319.73 points. The first swimming victory came from Eva Fabian ’16 in the 1000meter freestyle and she later won the 500-meter freestyle. Isla Hutchinson-Maddox ’17 won the 200-meter butterfly and Kina Zhou ’17 won the 100-meter freestyle. Yale pulled out a victory in the 400-meter freestyle relay with the all-freshman team of Zhou, Michelle Chintanaphol ’17, Olivia Jameson ’17 and Ana Wujciak ’17. This weekend, the women will face off against the University of Bridgeport Knights and the men will compete at the Bucknell Invitational in Pennsylvania. Contact SYDNEY GLOVER at sydney.glover@yale.edu .

YDN

The men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams dropped their contests this weekend.

’Dogs place third, sixth SAILING FROM PAGE 12 the case for many other schools that could not consistently handle Crab Bank, substitutions ensued. Skipper Ian Barrows ’17 and crew Charlotte Belling ’16 took over for the remaining 10 races, putting together some impressive results. The young group ended just two races outside the top 10 and managed to tally four top-five finishes. Landy said that the team’s efforts this season were still admirable. “I don’t think this regatta discounts how we have done this fall,” Landy said. “We finished a respectable third [place] in incredibly trying conditions.” As for the women, racing on Cayuga Lake in Ithaca, N.Y. proved troublesome. Captain Marlena Fauer ’14 skippered Yale’s A division dinghy for 10 of 11 races before being relieved by Urska Kosir ’15. Crew Eugenia Custo Greig ’14 remained on board for the duration of the weekend’s races. The A division squad had some bright moments, including a second-place result in the third race of the regatta. The Elis struggled with inconsistency though, finishing outside the top 10 six times. Yale’s A division team ended up in 11th place in the 18-school field. Fauer said she was still searching for answers, as the result did not meet the team’s expectations. “I am still processing everything that happened this weekend, but the conditions were very tricky,” Fauer said. “We started on Saturday in very light wind that was unstable and kept dying. The wind eventually came up, and as a team we just struggled with adjusting.” Yale’s B division saw more success behind skipper Morgan Kiss ’15 and crew Amanda Salvesen ’14, finishing fifth place overall in the division and winning two races. Custo Greig stepped in at crew for the final of the 11 races, which resulted in a third and final race win for the Elis. Yale’s 182 points were not enough though to crack the top five overall, however, and No. 3 Dartmouth edged out No. 1 Boston College for the championship. While the women’s fall season ended sourly, the team still had an

Elis sweep the weekend WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 12 The Bulldogs again struck first at Union with a goal by forward Janelle Ferrara ’16 in the beginning of the opening period. Near the end of the frame, Union capitalized on a powerplay opportunity to equalize the score. Union went up 2–1 with a goal early in the second period, but forward Hanna Astrom ’16 would not let the Dutchmen keep the lead for much longer. She scored a goal just 13 seconds after the Union tally. At the end of the second period, Union forward Mac Purvis was given a five-minute major for hitting from behind. But the Elis made the Dutchmen pay, scoring three goals in the five-minute power play. One of the goals came from forward Jamie Haddad ’16 and the other two from Martini. Just after the five-minute penalty was up, the Bulldogs committed a penalty of their own and allowed the Dutchmen to score two goals in their power play. Yale warded off Union for the rest of the third period, however, and an empty net goal by Haddad at the end of the game made the final

score 6–4. Though it was a high-scoring game, the shot count was just 22–21 in favor of Yale. “Something we have to keep working at is burying pucks,” head coach Joakim Flygh said. “We want to score a lot more on five on five. Our power play was great, and that gave us an opportunity to score some goals, but I don’t think we want to rely on our power play to win those games.” Four of Yale’s eight goals over the weekend, and three of Union’s four goals on Saturday, came on the manadvantage. Leonoff said that Yale worked heavily on its power play last week in practice. “It’s good to see that the work we’ve been putting into it is helping us in the games,” Leonoff said. “The game was decided off of special teams, for the most part.” The Elis now prepare for a set of home games against No. 1 Minnesota (13–1–0, 11–1–0 WCHA) on Saturday and Sunday. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

While the women’s team finished its season this weekend, the coed team will compete once more next weekend. impressive season. Besides holding the top spot in the national polls for six consecutive weeks, the Elis also had a five-regatta winning streak. With the spring season ultimately holding more importance, Fauer said she is optimistic that the Bulldogs can right their wrongs. “I think we had a great season regardless of our result at ACCs,” Fauer said. “It is just a matter of peaking at the right time. Now that we had a sort of “wake up” moment

this past weekend, we are more motivated going into the spring season to really prove ourselves and perform to our potential.” As for the coed team, they will have one more crack at victory when the match racing team travels to Florida for the ICSA Match Racing Championship, an event in which Yale finished second last year. Contact JAMES BADAS at james.badas@yale.edu .

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis scored four of their eight goals on the power play this weekend, including three on Saturday against Union.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Portland 108 Brooklyn 98

NBA Chicago 86 Charlotte 81

NCAAB Michigan St. 82 Portland 67

SPORTS QUICK HITS

y

JAVIER DUREN ’15 MEN’S BASKETBALL The St. Louis, MO native captured Ivy League Co-Player of the Week honors for his performances in losses at Connecticut and Rutgers this past week. He scored 15 in the first game and 22 in the second. Brown guard Sean McGonagill also received the honor.

KYLE CAZZETTA ’15 AND DEON RANDALL ’15 FOOTBALL Cazzetta, from Little Rock, AK, and Randall, from San Diego, CA, were both named to the Ivy League honor roll for their performances in Yale’s 59–23 loss at Princeton. Cazzetta accounted for five Eli points, while Randall earned 155 yards and a touchdown.

NCAAB Duke 91 UNC Asheville 55

NCAAB Syracuse 56 St. Francis 50

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“It’s a great feeling [to win]...It was long overdue, and it feels good to have it under our belts.” KATE MARTINI ’16

WOMEN’S ICE HOCKEY

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Elis secure first wins WOMEN’S HOCKEY

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s ice hockey team captured its first wins of this season this weekend, defeating Rennselaer and Union. BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The women’s hockey team snagged its first wins of the season this past weekend in away games against ECAC opponents Rennselaer and Union. The weekend’s games played out in different fashions, as the win over Rennselaer (4–8–1,

3–3–0 ECAC) was a 2–1 defensive battle, while both offenses exploded in the 6–4 victory over Union (5–9–0, 2–4–0). The Bulldogs’ six goals in the latter were the most that Yale (2–5– 1, 2–3–1) has scored in a game since 2009. “It’s a great feeling [to win],” defender Kate Martini ’16, who scored twice against Union,

said. “It was long overdue, and it feels good to have it under our belts. Going into a big weekend against Minnesota, it gave us a lot of confidence.” Against Rennselaer on Friday, Yale managed just 12 shots, while allowing the Engineers to take 40. Goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15 saved 39 of those, however, and raised her season

total to 254. Two weeks before the game, the Engineers beat Harvard, currently ranked second in the ECAC, 2–1. Defender Taylor Marchin ’17 put Yale up early with a powerplay goal just three minutes into the game. Her goal was one of just two shots that the Bulldogs took in the entire period.

Rennselaer engineered a response early in the second period, as forward Toni Sanders put the puck past Leonoff after a scramble in front of the net. Forward Krista Yip-Chuck ’17 scored with five minutes to go in the second period to put the Elis back on top, 2–1. The score would remain that way for the remainder of the second and

third periods. “Our game against RPI was not one of our best efforts, but we still found a way to win,” Martini said. “We capitalized on our opportunities, and coupled with a good effort by Jaimie Leonoff, we pulled out an ugly win.” SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 11

No wind in Yale’s sails at ACCs BY JAMES BADAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Despite each having held the No. 1 ranking for longer than any other school in the country, the No. 2 coed sailing team and No. 2 women’s sailing team both came up short at the Atlantic Coast Championships this weekend.

SAILING The coed team claimed third place at the event, which was hosted by the College of Charleston. The women had anything but smooth sailing, recording a sixth-place finish at the Cornell-hosted regatta. In Charleston, S.C., the coed team faced difficult conditions thanks to a strong current and a light but volatile wind. When all was said and done, the Bulldogs finished well behind champion and No. 1 Georgetown, but were able to squeak out two-point advantages over both No. 3 Dartmouth and host No. 6 College of Charleston. Yale’s A division was sailed by skipper Gra-

ham Landy ’15 and crew Katherine Gaumond ’15. Though the duo finished sixth, they were a mere two points out of fourth, signaling how tight the action was between the top teams from the Atlantic seaboard. The A division tandem got off to a hot start, winning two of the first five races, but five finishes outside the top 10 prevented a higher finish. Landy said that some of those poorer finishes were due to the team’s risk-taking mentality. “We struggled most in risk management, trying to make up all of the points at once instead of chipping away at the lead that Georgetown developed early in the regatta,” Landy said. The Bulldogs’ B division team saw some turnover, as two different pairs sailed for Yale. Captain Chris Segerblom ’14 skippered the first four races alongside crew Sarah Smith ’15. The experienced duo had some difficulties on the tricky water, as their best result was a 10th-place finish in the first race. As was SEE SAILING PAGE 11

STAT OF THE DAY 2

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The coed sailing team placed third at the Atlantic Coast Dinghy Championship while the women’s team placed sixth.

NUMBER OF SHOTS TAKEN IN THE FIRST PERIOD BY THE WOMEN’S HOCKEY TEAM IN FRIDAY’S GAME AGAINST RENNSELAER. The Bulldogs managed to find the net on one of those shots, a power play goal by defenseman Taylor Marchin ’17 at 3:14, and left the stanza with a 1—0 lead.


Today's paper