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t h e o l d e s t c o l l e g e d a i l y  ·   F o u n d e d 1 8 7 8

New haven, connecticut  ·  mondAy, october 28, 2013  · Vol. CxxxVI, no. 41  ·  yaledailynews.com

inside the news morning evening

sunny 60 cold 35

cross campus The After Party. Expectations

are high for Yalies entering politics. Two years ago, Steve Berke ’03 ran for mayor of Miami Beach as a member of the ‘After Party’ with a platform focused on legalizing pot. Berke went so far as to parody Macklemore’s ‘Thrift Shop’ with the music video, ‘Pot Shop,’ as part of his campaign. This year, Berke is running once again, and a camera crew from MTV2 is chronicling his bid for the mayoral seat, according to the Yale Alumni Magazine.

Pirate law. Prior to the final public debate of the mayoral election last Tuesday, two men dressed up as pirates — with full attire and accents to match — passed out fliers to attendees. The literature raised allegations that Renaissance Management — the real estate company currently owned by the son of mayoral candidate Toni Harp ARC ’78 — poorly maintained its properties and has, so to speak, plundered the finances of citizens. The protestors also invited citizens to a ‘Slumlord Party.’ Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!

football bulldogs fall to upenn

student groups

ballet

Organizations face potential loss of recognition by Yale

local dance City leaders, community program for members move to disabled children introduce two-way traffic

page b1 sports

page 3 news

page 3 city

By marek ramilo Staff reporter At 3:31 a.m. on Saturday, shots were fired inside the Key Club Cabaret on 85 Saint John St., and over 100 patrons rushed out of the club’s main doors, giving way to several New Haven Police Department officers. They found six gunshot victims inside. Continuing a recent trend of violence in the city’s nightlife, five were wounded and Erica Robinson, a 26-year-old West Haven resident, was killed at

the nightclub. The incident increased the Elm City’s 2013 homicide count to sixteen. It appears that Robinson was not the intended victim of the shooting, and investigators believe that they have identified the shooting’s true target, said NHPD Chief Dean Esserman. NHPD detectives have interviewed several witnesses, though an official suspect has not been named. “I offer our condolences to [Robinson’s] family for this completely senseless murder,” Esserman said at a Satur-

day press conference. “I believe that New Haven Police detectives will honor the promise we made [to her] father and mother this morning in the emergency room when they asked us to please bring justice to this guy.” All available NHPD officers, along with many firefighters and emergency medical technicians from the New Haven Fire Department, were dispatched to the scene immediately following the incident. The shooting took place in the Key Club’s “after-hours” area, where patrons are allowed to

By isaac stanley-becker Staff reporter

Baseball and brains. In a

princesses in a new web series from Taylor Vaughn Lasley ’12 are not waiting around for their knights in shining armor. ‘Black Ops: Disney Princesses’ stars Jasmine, Belle, Ariel and Snow White as members of a Central Intelligence Agency team dedicated to international counterterrorism. Here’s hoping for their happily ever after.

App for everything. The 2013 New Haven mayoral election — turns out there’s an app for that. Democratic candidate Toni Harp ARC ’78 unveiled a new campaign app on Friday.

isaac stanley-becker/contributing photographer

The two candidates vying to become New Haven mayor faced off for the penultimate debate of the election.

Dean search begins Two weeks after Woodard’s death, calhoun dean’s office marches on, looks for successor By Yuval Ben-David Staff Reporter Two weeks after the passing of Calhoun College Dean Leslie Woodard, administrators are beginning to discuss the appointment of an acting dean to replace Woodard for the remainder of the academic year. Though there is currently no deadline for the appointment, Yale College Dean Mary Miller said she and Calhoun Master Jonathan Holloway GRD ’95

will sit down early this week to formulate a timeline for the search process and selection. A committee, chaired by Holloway and composed of Calhoun fellows and students, will soon be convened to conduct the search, Miller said. “When you have to replace a dean quickly, you act quickly,” Miller said. Still, Miller said the immediate goal is to select a temporary dean. A persee calhoun dean page 4

this day in yale history

1964. The Inter-fraternity Council pledges to curb pranks from their pledge members. The move comes after members of Beta Theta Pi were caught stealing wood from a faculty member. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

online y more goydn.com/xcampus

bring alcohol after 2 a.m., when the club is required to stop serving liquor. Drug paraphernalia and packaging were found at the scene, which reeked of marijuana, according to a Saturday press release from the NHPD. Jahad Brumsey, a 29-yearold New Haven resident, remains in critical condition. Additionally, one victim — 19-year-old Amanda John — was underage. The incident was captured on video, which has helped the investigation move “very

rapidly,” Esserman said. Also speaking at the press conference were New Haven Mayor John DeStefano Jr. and Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy. Despite increased security, DeStefano warned that the nightclub scene in New Haven is becoming increasingly dangerous. Four of this year’s homicides have been nightclub-related shootings. “To not see the connection with the clubs is to misunderstand what is happening. With see homicide page 4

Mayoral debate gets heated

expect to be overrun by a pack of identically-dressed freshmen counselors on Halloween. The frocos are coordinating their holiday costumes and donning spots, ears and tails in the likeness of 101 Dalmations. Freshmen, beware —now the frocos on duty will be even more adept at sniffing out alcohol and tomfoolery.

Girls carrying guns. The

page 5 city

Six shot at Elm City nightclub

101 Frocos. Old Campus can

Red Sox vs. Tigers game last week, FOX broadcaster Tim McCarver referred to Craig Breslow ’02 as the most intelligent player in the Major League. Breslow has the degree to back it up, with a major in molecular biophysics and biochemistry under his belt. “Breslow uses words in a normal conversation that I’m not used to,” admitted Red Sox manager John Farrell, according to an article in the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

two-way streets

Joyce xi/staff photographer

A search committee composed of Calhoun fellows and students will be convened to find a permanent dean following Dean Leslie Woodard’s passing.

The gloves came off last Tuesday when the two candidates vying to become New Haven’s next mayor faced off for the penultimate debate of the election season. Exactly two weeks before voters go to the polls, Toni Harp ARC ’78 and Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 took turns pummeling one another with attacks, feeding off a negative atmosphere aided by heckling and booing from an audience of roughly 250 at Gateway Community College. Elicker went on the offensive right off the bat, answering a question about his own experience as Ward 10 alderman by lambasting Harp’s 20-year tenure as a state senator. Harp dispensed with the play-it-safe strategy she had adopted following her victory in the Democratic primary and swung back: She said her opponent lacked governing experience and cannot build consensus, having failed to win the support of his colleagues on the Board of Aldermen, most of whom have endorsed Harp. Questions put to the two

candidates by New Haven Independent Editor Paul Bass ’82 and New Haven Register Reporter Rachel Chinapen drew on the race’s most controversial disputes and pointed to the candidates’ perceived largest weaknesses: Elicker’s lack of administrative experience and Harp’s dealings with her top campaign bundlers, as well as her family’s real estate business.

This is the kind of politics we’re trying to move beyond as a city. justin elicker FES ’10 som ’10 Candidate, New Haven mayoral election In the midst of a heated exchange over the candidates’ respective experiences and abilities to actualize policy ideals, Elicker interrupted the debate to ask, “Can we take a quick breath?” In answer to a question about nine doctors from Connecticut Orthopaedic Specialists who gave $1,000 apiece to Harp’s see debate page 6

Yale to offer shortest MBA/MPH program By hannah schwarz staff reporter With the announcement Wednesday of the new 22-month joint degree MBA/MPH program from the Yale School of Management and Yale School of Public Health, the University is the first in the nation to offer the degree in such a short amount of time. While Yale currently offers the same degree in 34 months, the new track is geared at students who do not have the flexibility to spend nearly three years and around $170,000 in tuition for the current program. The inaugural class size will likely be around 2-3 students with a long-term target of 10-12 students, said Howard Forman, director of the health care management program at the School of Public Health. “This is a program that will embrace the principles of the three-year program, add an extra summer and ask students to carry a slightly [heavier] workload,” Forman said. “I don’t want to deceive anyone and say there’s magic happening, but it’s worth the extra effort you put in.” In the current 3-year program, students spend one year at the School of Management, one year at School of Public Health and the final year taking elective courses from both schools. In contrast, students in the new program will spend a summer semester at the School of Public Health, the academic

ken yanagisawa/contributing photographer

Yale will be the first in the nation to offer the MBA/MPH join degree in merely 22 months. year at the School of Management, the summer interning in the field and the final academic year taking electives at both schools, said senior associate dean of the School of Management Anjani Jain. Applicants for both dualdegree programs must be accepted to see mba/mph page 4


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yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com

Opinion

.comment “Africa isn't ready for Yale and Yale may not be ready for Africa.” yaledailynews.com/opinion

Rescuing heroism M

y faith teaches me that I can be a saint, if I will it. It teaches that you can be a saint, too. But that’s a hard thing to believe. It’s easy to doubt our own potential to be heroic. There’s a saying by Nathaniel Hawthorne that goes, “A hero cannot be a hero unless in a heroic world.” I wonder if he’s right. And if so, does my doubt come from living in a decidedly nonheroic world? If you’re getting ready to call my bluff, don’t worry. I’ll do it. This isn’t going to rapidly devolve into a tired, conservative philippic against the failure of the modern age and a clarion call to return to classical virtue. Actually, heroes are everywhere today. They’re starting nonprofits for forgotten causes, abandoning their livelihoods for dangerous projects overseas and they’re proving themselves every day on the battlefield in our armed forces. I remember being little and hearing about the man who jumped in front of a moving subway train to save a rider who had fallen onto the tracks. These aren’t random acts — people of faith and of science (and quite a few of both) will tell you that an inclination towards heroism is programmed into our minds, and it’s not going away. But Hawthorne’s observation isn’t entirely wrong: We live in a time that doesn’t make heroism readily accessible. The generations that came before us in the 20th century all had inescapable tests — of strength, of character — that they knew they would have to confront. We know about them through family stories and great novels. The characters who grappled with questions of faith, identity and loyalty against the backdrop of the world wars became the stuff of legends. After them came the Vietnam War and the social movements of the ’60s and ’70s, with their moral demands of young people on and off the battlefield. Those who acted with courage and bravery were noted, honored and remembered. People were asked to take stands in trying times, and they did. The modern “rebel without a cause” wants to be as extraordinary, but it’s not nearly as clear how. We don’t need war to summon our creative, or heroic, attributes. Opportunities are everywhere: in community service, in our families and especially in our friendships, where just loving unconditionally can be a heroic act in a world where expressing brokenness is awkward and taboo. A lesser-known Hawthorne expression goes, “The greatest obstacle to being heroic is the doubt whether one may not be going to prove one’s self a fool; the truest heroism is to resist the doubt.” He’s on

point. One of my best friends at Yale — she’s since g ra d u ated and John joined Aroutiounian t h e Marines Johnny Come — heard about a Lately d i s ta n t friend of a friend in a bad place in life and drove, that very same night, hundreds of miles to help. I was flabbergasted when I heard. While I was still reeling, she was already driving. Our culture isn’t set up in a way that engenders heroic thinking. Heroism is driven chiefly by a sense of duty, a reactionary feeling that we have an obligation toward someone in need. Members of our generation structure our lives around choices, not duties. Take Yale life. It starts with the little things, like how we talk about the projects and activities we devote our time to. “What I’m most interested in is …” or “I really could not care less about …” are some of the operative phrases we’ve all used. That Yale gives us so many choices is a testament to how lucky we are to be here. But that so many activities we do are based on our own free choice, and that we stick around only because we want to, is a sign of a problem. It translates into relationships with people, too. It’s easy to get a meal with a friend you see once every few months. It’s a staple of life at Yale. But it’s much harder to really invest time in getting to know someone and watching their personality unfold in different settings over the course of years. To see friends in the context of a single conversation is important, but what’s more important is to see their loyalty tested in trying situations. In a world centered on options, opportunities to show true character don’t occur frequently. No, we don’t need a war to understand that we should cultivate loyalty, duty and depth in our relations with the people and the projects we are close to. Heroism, if we still want it, demands a sense of obligation toward others. But do we want heroism? Is our apathetic, if peaceful lull worth it, if it comes at the cost of losing the virtues that make life worth living? But more fundamentally: Do we want to be more than simply what we want to be?

'antiyale' on 'Fix African studies'

Yale’s glass floor A

little less than a month ago, Richard Reeves, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, published a column in the New York Times that turned some heads. “If we want a competitive economy and an open society,” he wrote, “we need the best and the brightest to succeed. This means some of the children of the affluent must fail.” Reeves was writing about one of the dirty little secrets limiting social mobility: the glass floor. Unlike the oft-discussed “glass ceiling,” whereby women or minorities or other marginalized populations are unable to climb the economic ladder, the glass floor prevents those at the top of the ladder from falling below the privileged rung on which they were born. As Reeves wrote, “It is a stubborn mathematical fact that the top fifth of the income distribution can accommodate only 20 percent of the population. If we want more poor kids climbing the ladder of relative mobility, we need more rich kids sliding down the chutes.” Rather than telling wealthy and educated parents to let their own less gifted kids fail, Reeves and other scholars attack “institutional frameworks” that hold up the glass floor. One of these institutional frameworks is the American system of higher education. In other

scott stern A Stern Perspective

words, Yale. Reading Reeves’s piece, I was repeatedly struck by how hard and durable the glass floor is at a place like Yale. It’s not just that Yale gives all of us remarkable opportunities; it’s that Yale works hard not

to let us fail. “Students at places like Cleveland State, unlike those at places like Yale, don’t have a platoon of advisers and tutors and deans to write out excuses for late work, give them extra help when they need it, pick them up when they fall down,” former Yale instructor William Deresiewicz explained in a controversial piece in The American Scholar. If we’re having a hard time at Yale, we are told again and again that there are resources to help us out. In the case of sickness, difficulty or tragedy — get a dean’s excuse, go see a writing tutor or meet a counselor. If all else fails, talk to the professor. Many professors are more lax at places like Yale than at other schools, because they know the kids are smart and will do the work — eventually.

“Extensions are available for the asking … students at places like Yale get an endless string of second chances,” wrote Deresiewicz. From the moment we arrive on campus, Yale’s remarkable safety net kicks in. We are greeted by our FroCos, our big sibs, our masters, our deans. If you need time off, Yale is there for you too. Every couple years someone writes a column in a Yale publication entitled, “Time away provides perspective” or “Knowing Yale’s right, but perhaps not right now.” It is not nearly so easy to take a break — to obtain a leave of absence with practically guaranteed readmission — at most other schools. (It appears this may not be true for withdrawals from Yale for mental health reasons, but, while bizarre and troubling, this is the exception and not the rule.) For the record: This safety net is great. It is amazing. It is what makes Yale one of the best schools in the world. In pointing out that failure is difficult at Yale, I am not advocating that we let more people fail, that we diminish these remarkable resources. Rather, I am advocating that, so long as this glass floor exists, we must make it accessible to more than just the elite. To start, Yale should eliminate policies such as giving legacy preference, which serve to help propagate social and eco-

nomic immobility. Legacy gives an advantage to those who need it the least, and it prevents less privileged applicants from gaining access that would mean much more to them. A 2011 study from Princeton found that students from privileged backgrounds who attended second-tier schools did just as well later in life as similar students who attended elite schools. For minority and lowincome students, though, attending elite schools made a significant difference. We should also address the deficiencies in Yale’s recruitment of these outstanding low-income students. As Caroline Hoxby, an economist at Stanford calculated, 70 percent of low-income students at elite colleges are from just 15 large metropolitan areas. Yale needs to expand its recruitment of low-income and first-generation students in general, particularly in areas that usually don’t receive ample attention or resources. For better or for worse, a degree from Yale or other elite institutions leads to unparalleled opportunities. As long as Yale provides such an extraordinary safety net, we should make sure it’s there to catch the most deserving students possible. SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. Contact him at scott. stern@yale.edu .

g u e s t c o l u m n i s t J O A N R H EE

Beyond the Halloween Show

john Aroutiounian is a junior in Jonathan Edwards College. His column runs on alternate Mondays. Contact him at john.aroutiounian@yale.edu . annelisa Leinbach/illustrations editor

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A

s a musician, there’s nothing quite like the feeling of smiling out into a full house, standing and clapping, after a performance. Throughout the Yale Symphony Orchestra’s 10-day Brazil tour, we had the joy of sharing our love and excitement for music with audiences in incredible venues such as Sala São Paulo and Igreja de Candelária. After concerts, many attendees would stick around, some in the hopes of taking pictures with us; others to get autographs; most just to talk to us and say “Congratulations” and “Thank you.” This incredible experience was a stark contrast to the YSO’s experiences at home. Back in our beloved Woolsey Hall, we experience financially rocky times due to the huge lack of enthusiasm for most of our concerts. After taking into account our numerous costs — rental, recording and custodial expenses, just to name a few — we need to sell about 800 out of the approximately 2,600 seats of the Hall in order to break even. And for us, meeting this low number is a constant challenge. The only YSO performance that riles up the campus in any way comparable to those in Brazil is the annual Halloween

Show. As everyone knows by now, we sold tickets online for the first time two weeks ago — and all available Woolsey seats were claimed seven minutes into the sale. The event was so popular that many friend groups were forced to sit in different sections, or did not get tickets at all. With this very surprising demand came controversy. A noticeable number of students began complaining about the amount of money that the YSO seemed to be raking in from this single production. The number of morally dubious students who have chosen to scalp tickets has increased. A prank email about void tickets went out setting some hopes high, making others absolutely terrified and sending YSO members scrambling to fix a problem we never thought we’d have to face. All in all, a general air of discontent about ticket distribution settled throughout campus. While it seems like we might make a sizable profit off our Halloween show, we only net about $17,000 from the Halloween Show. Our costs are extremely high, since we pay extra to hire security personnel for the undoubtedly rowdy crowd and custodians to work the special Halloween hour. In

the end, our profit of $17,000 is distributed throughout the year to break even on our other concerts. From a pragmatic standpoint, as a relatively poor student organization, the YSO has used the funds from the Halloween Show for the past 37 years to balance its budget. As our finances suggest, the Yale community shows a general apathy for the arts. Halloween Show aside, the YSO sells its tickets at a very low price — $3 — to make our classical music performances as accessible to as many as possible. But we do not get anything close to a full house. As a member of the YSO and a producer of this year’s show, I wish students would care about the YSO beyond the Halloween revelries. The apathy can also be seen in attendee behavior at the Halloween Show. Starting with last year’s concert, disorderly conduct from show attendees have forced us to forgo selling seats with partial views — making the Show even more inaccessible to students. This conduct demonstrates that for many attendees, the Halloween Show is not centered on the performance or the music. To them, it is a social venue, a gathering place to see friends in costumes. The art is

secondary. When it comes to the Halloween Show, students should care more about how the performance exemplifies the true magic of the arts. Art allows people to feel emotions vicariously. The Halloween Show allows attendees to experience the emotions of the characters in the silent film through music, from the ominous Imperial March to the overwhelmingly triumphant finale of Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite. However, since the Halloween Show is only rehearsed three times beforehand, the quality of its music is far from what the YSO typically offers. Those who are moved by the Halloween Show’s music will be even more changed by the YSO’s performance in other concerts. When you come to Woolsey this Thursday night, remember that the performance is bigger than the event. The Halloween Show will be more enjoyable if you give the art on stage — and the Mahler or Handel played — the respect and appreciation it deserves. JOAN RHEE is a sophomore in Davenport College and the producer for the Yale Symphony Orchestra’s Halloween Show. Contact her at joan. rhee@yale.edu .


yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com 

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News

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Ballet reaches disabled students By george saussy contributing reporter For six years in a row, disabled students in New Haven have been given the chance to dance through the New Haven Ballet’s Shared Ability performance, in which students from the New Haven Ballet will be paired with students with physical or mental needs. This year’s show, scheduled to take place in June, will feature approximately 25 students from the New Haven Ballet and 19 special-needs children across the range of the autism spectrum, in addition to having other physical and mental disabilities. Brad Roth, an instructor from Dancing Days, Inc., will direct the show. “The program is a wonderful way for the children to experience the music,” said Beth Peters, the mother of a disabled participant in the Shared Ability performance. “I think it’s great for the children to get together with students from the New Haven youth ballet.” She added that she also thinks it is a great opportunity for the mentors to work with specialneeds children, emphasizing the importance of the relationship between ballet students and children with disabilities. The Shared Ability performance benefits both New Haven ballet students and those partaking with disabilities, Roth said, as Ballet students learn to love ballet again instead of practicing under pressure, and disabled performers get a chance to experience working in the high arts. Lisa Sanborn, interim director of the New Haven Ballet, said the program is a chance for children with disabilities to participate in the arts, and has a positive impact on the performers. “There’s a huge difference that’s made,” she said. The students who participate in the Shared Ability performance from the New Haven Ballet range in age from 13 to 18 years old and are some of the studio’s most advanced ballet students. Each of these students are paired with a student with disabilities four weeks into the nine

Number of countries with travel warnings

The U.S. State Department issues travel warnings when conditions for a country become dangerous and unstable. A warning is also issued due to embassy closure and staff drawdown.

Student groups may lose status

week rehearsal schedule, which tends to create a bond between partners. “The learning goes both ways,” Roth said. “The key to the whole thing is the relationships formed.” Roth, who has been choreographing for 40 years, said he began working with people with disabilities since 1990 when he first choreographed a dance for a friend who had been in a paralyzing accident. Roth added that his first experience working with a disabled performer showed him that there is a lot of possibility for creative choreography.

You have to work with the limitations of movement, but there’s a lot to discover. Brad Roth Instructor, Dancing Days, Inc. Roth instructs New Haven Ballet students to artistically mirror the behavior of students with disabilities. As an example, Roth pointed out that many of the children with autism will jump when excited and that New Haven Ballet students should find a way to incorporate that into the dance. “You have to work with the limitations of movement, but there’s a lot to discover,” Roth said. Roth said his experiences choreographing for those with physical disabilities led him to create Dancing Days, an organization that helps people with physical and mental limitations experience dance. Roth said he eventually became involved in the New Haven Ballet when the founder of the New Haven Ballet, Noble Barker, asked him to organize the first Shared Ability performance in New Haven six years ago. The New Haven Ballet will perform the Nutcracker beginning on Dec. 13. Contact george saussy at george.saussy@yale.edu .

Philipp Arndt/staff photographer

Roughly half of Yale’s nearly 600 undergraduate groups have not sent any representatives to mandatory leadership workshops. By Wesley Yiin Contributing Reporter Approximately half of all registered student groups are in danger of losing their official status for failing to comply with Yale College Dean’s Office requirements. To reregister for the 2013-’14 academic year, all student groups must send three representatives to leadership workshops and complete an online application. Groups that do not complete the leadership workshop requirement or fail to reregister by the end of this month will lose their registered status, according to an Oct. 18 email to student leaders from John Meeske associate dean of student organizations. Unregistered student groups are not eligible to receive funding and support from the University, set up tables at the annual extracurricular bazaar or reserve classroom space for meetings. Though groups that lose their registered status may reapply with the Dean’s Office, Meeske said they must attend the next round of leadership training sessions, which will not be offered until spring 2014, and apply as a new organization. New organizations are eligible for half the funding of returning organizations, Meeske added. “I don’t think it should come as a total shock to [student leaders],” Meeske told the News, adding that he and Marichal Gentry, dean of student affairs, sent multiple notices to groups informing them of the mandatory workshops. As of Oct. 18, 277 out of Yale’s nearly 600 undergraduate groups had not sent any representatives to a leadership workshop yet, and 113 groups had sent only one or two officers to a workshop. More than

250 organizations had yet to apply online to reregister for the 2013-’14 academic year. Meeske said that more groups have registered or sent representatives to the training sessions since his Oct. 18 email, though he said he is not sure about the exact numbers. Administrators sent individual notices to groups that were just shy of completing the requirements to prevent active groups from losing their registration, he said. These efforts saw positive results, he said, as more groups fulfilled their requirements to stay registered. Still, Meeske said that the Oct. 31 deadline is firm. Part of the system is computerized, he said, so all groups that have not reregistered will be removed from the system automatically. Groups that have reregistered but have not met the leadership training requirements will have their registrations manually removed, he said. Though students have complained about insufficient warning, Meeske said that these requirements for remaining a registered student organization were also in the Undergraduate Regulations last year. Margaret Coons ’14, co-chair of the Singing Group Council, said though she appreciates the administration’s efforts to support student leadership, she does not think that the new workshops are being handled well. She said that the workshops, enforced during the height of midterm season surrounding fall break, are a “heavy time demand, especially when they are perceived [as being] or are irrelevant to many groups.” “I think that many groups will fail to meet the [Oct. 31] deadline,” Coons said. “It would be in the administration’s best

interest to provide alternate [options or exceptions] rather than driving student organizations out of registered status, which gives the University less control over their actions and leaves them with even less support.” Coons said that the workshops should be conducted in a online seminar setting in the future, adding that student leaders should be able to complete the workshops on their own schedules and with sufficient warning about deadlines. Helen Fang ’15, president of the Phoenix Dance Troupe and treasurer of Team U, an endurance running club that raises awareness about global health and poverty issues, said that the leadership workshops were helpful because they sparked discussion about important group issues, but were also poorly timed. Though Fang said she attended a workshop about hazing to fulfill the training requirement, she added that the workshop took place after most initiations had already happened. Yale College Council Student Organizations Director Ben Ackerman ’16 said the Undergraduate Organizations Committee sent an email to student leaders last week reminding them of the deadline. “We certainly do not want any student group that is adding to the vibrancy and diversity of campus life to become defunct,” he said. Looking forward, Ackerman said the UOC is aware of student dissatisfaction over the workshops and will meet with student leaders to discuss the current registration policies and provide feedback to administrators. Contact Wesley Yiin at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .

Safety concerns force YIRA trip cancellation By Jack Newsham Contributing Reporter After the University raised safety concerns, the Yale International Relations Association has cancelled its plans for a student group trip to Pakistan over winter break. About 20 students had applied to go on the trip, which was meant to take place this winter and focus on women’s rights in Pakistan. But two weeks ago — several weeks after the planning for the trip began, according to YIRA board members — applicants were notified by email that the trip was cancelled. YIRA board members declined to comment on the specific details around the trip’s cancellation, but acknowledged that the trip had initially been planned without checking with the University. “After discussion with the Yale administration, YIRA agreed that this was not the best time to run a trip to Pakistan,” said Ben Della Rocca ’16, YIRA’s vice president, in an email to the News. Marjorie Lemmon, the manager of Yale’s Office of Risk Management, said in an email to the News that she advised YIRA to first speak with administrators about its trip plans because FrontierMEDEX — the travel assistance program that covers Yale students when they go abroad — currently ranks Pakistan among the most high-risk countries in the world for travelers. Lemmon said she referred the group to Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry and Dean of International and Professional Experience Jane Edwards, who could not be reached for comment over the weekend. The Yale undergraduate travel policy, which is posted on the website of the Center for International and Professional Experience, states that Yale “will not fund, award credit for, or

countries deemed travel risks by U.S .State department

otherwise sponsor or support any international undergraduate academic or extracurricular project” in countries determined to be unsafe by the U.S. State Department or FrontierMEDEX. The policy also states that no exceptions will be made. The Pakistan trip is not the first that YIRA has tried to organize to a volatile country. In 2012, six students visited Egypt during a tumultuous period between the country’s revolution and new political elections. Because the U.S. State Department had issued a temporary travel alert and not a long-term warning for the country, Yale administrators still approved the trip and

requested travelers to take precautions, such as staying away from protests, said Marc DeWitt ’15, one of the trip organizers. “Basically [Yale] said, ‘We’ve got a concern,’ but it was a very helpful concern,” DeWitt said, adding that though administrators voiced unease about the safety risks of going into Egypt at the time, they did not actively prohibit the trip. According to Della Rocca, YIRA and the Yale administration “have not always had full communication” — though he added that the cancellation of the Pakistan trip marks a broader effort to increase conversation between YIRA and University

administrators.

I didn’t think [the trip leaders] would take me anywhere I could be potentially killed. Christine Houle ’15 Member, Yale International Relations Association

Since August 2013, the State Department has urged American travelers to avoid visiting Paki-

stan, due to the threats posed by terrorists and criminal groups. Just last week, the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad announced that its employees are prohibited from visiting a new shopping complex in the city because of unspecified “security concerns.” The Pakistan trip had included a visit to Islamabad and interviews with government officials, said Christine Houle ’15, a YIRA member who applied for the trip. The group also planned to visit a Model UN conference in Lahore, she said. “I didn’t think [the trip leaders] would take me anywhere where I could be potentially killed,” Houle said. “I honestly

don’t know why Yale made this decision.” Both trip leaders — Meiryum Ali ’16 and Hannia Zia ’16 — declined to comment. According to YIRA member Suyash Bhagwat ’15, a student trip planned for India over winter break is still going ahead as planned. “India and Pakistan are totally different security risks,” Bhagwat said. “It’s as simple as that.” In the 2012-’13 academic year, YIRA funded group trips to China, Ghana, Greece, Costa Rica, Georgia and Japan. Contact Jack Newsham at jack.newsham@yale.edu .


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from the front

58

Shootings in New Haven over the past year

College to search for acting dean calhoun dean From page 1

Joyce xi/staff photographer

Since Dean Leslie Woodard’s death, three administrators with previous dean experience have shared duties within Calhoun.

manent dean will not be chosen yet because some candidates for the deanship may be locked into a full-time job that they cannot leave in the middle of year, she said. The search for a Calhoun dean raises the total number of imminent searches for new residential college deans at Yale to three. Both Silliman College Dean Hugh Flick and Timothy Dwight College Dean John Loge ’66 will leave their posts at the end of this academic year. Holloway, who also announced in late September that he will be stepping down as Calhoun master in June, said in an email to the News that Woodard’s passing has not altered his decision. Holloway said that currently, three administrators are sharing the responsibilities of the Calhoun deanship: Yale College Dean of Academic Affairs Mark Schenker, formerly the dean of Branford, along with Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs George Levesque and Paul McKinley DRA ’96, the former deans of Berkeley and Saybrook colleges respectively. This “platoon of three former residential college deans,” as Miller calls them, has rotated through the Calhoun dean’s office in the past two weeks to provide academic support. While Holloway said these administrators will be able to bear the weight of Woodard’s former duties through the fall term, he added that “the students will need a full time dean as soon as is reasonable.” As early as Oct. 14, the night of Woodard’s passing, Holloway sent an email to Calhoun students announcing that Schenker and Levesque would be staffing the dean’s office. Miller said that Schenker is uniquely qualified to fill in for Woodard at this time because his regular position as a so-called “dean of deans” entails providing training for residential college deans. McKinley, who currently serves as Yale College Director of Strategic Communica-

tions, said that having backgrounds as residential college deans has allowed him, Schenker and Levesque to smoothly transition into the Calhoun office. All residential college deans receive the same training, and that training can ably translate to students in any of the colleges, he said. “Any student can go talk to a dean and can know that she or he is going to get the same kind of support that’s available to students at any of the other colleges,” McKinley said, adding that dean’s duties are more standardized than those of residential college masters.

Everyone has a full time job, but when there is an emergency of this sort, people step up and support the college. Mary Miller Dean, Yale College All three substitutes have remained academic advisors in their respective colleges, Miller said. The resilience of Yale’s residential college structure is such that “the system continues to work, even as it has to go on without Dean Woodard,” Miller said. When Dean Loge was injured after being hit by a car three years ago, the other residential college deans provided similar support to the TD dean’s office, she said. “Everyone has a full time job, but when there is an emergency of this sort, people step up and support the college,” Miller said. Leslie Woodard was 53 years old when she died unexpectedly on Oct. 14 at her home in Calhoun. Contact Yuval Ben-David at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .

SOM and YSPH to offer joint degree mba/mph From page 1 both the School of Public Health and School of Management programs. Forman said the three-year program can be costly for students both for its tuition and amount of time out of the workforce. The cost of the two-year program will be “substantially less” than that of the three-year program, he said. However, Forman said students have less flexibility in choosing electives their final year, must spend a summer in classes when they could work, and manage a more intense workload.

By subtracting, we may be adding. paul cleary Dean, School of Public Health The MBA/MPH degree is aimed at students pursuing careers in health care management, where they can help expand access to health care across the nation and work to keep costs down, Forman said. “People say ‘management

is management,’ but that’s not really true with the health sector,” said dean of the School of Public Health Paul Cleary. In the past, Jain said students in the three-year program who arrive without strong analytical skills have had to complete additional quantitative training to prepare for the work at the School of Management. Jain said the 22-month program will benefit this kind of student because many of the quantitative courses they take during the first summer at the School of Public Health will prepare them for the statistics, economics and modeling courses at the School of Management in the following academic year. Cleary said many students without the ability to complete a three-year program have had to decide whether to pursue an MBA or MPH, each of which take two years to complete individually. Now, these students can pursue both degrees in a shortened amount of time. “By subtracting, we may be adding,” Cleary said. The three-year joint program was originally established in the early 1980s, Jain said. Contact hannah schwarz at hannah.schwarz@yale.edu .

comparing mba and mph degrees by tuition

$114, $112, 400 330 2-year MBA Degree

Violence in local nightclub homicide From page 1 these clubs … there’s an environment that contributes to the risk of the people who are in it or near it,” DeStefano said. DeStefano proceeded to discuss the various security measures imposed on local nightclubs. One such measure is a requirement for licenses such as the Key Club’s cabaret license, which allows for after-hours areas like the one where Saturday’s shooting took place. DeStefano also said that the city cannot currently afford to station police outside all New Haven nightclubs, even though on Saturday there was a police officer stationed directly outside of Key Club Cabaret. DeStefano said he has sought the authority to levy a fee on nightclubs to increase police presence. “As we think about not only dealing with this issue, but how we can prevent this from happening, we can do more as a community to engage the club

owners, particularly those who are not responsible,” DeStefano said.

With these clubs … there’s an environment that contributes to the risk of the people who are in it or near it. John DeStefano Jr. Mayor, New Haven DeStefano said that in light of this incident, addressing the recent spike in nightclub-related violence has become increasingly important. Malloy also shared plans for stricter nightclub standards throughout the state, citing protocol in cities like Hartford that have sought to address similar issues of nighttime violence

at entertainment venues. The governor said that he is ready to work with DeStefano, Esserman and other local leaders to pass stricter laws for nightclubs statewide. “Although any number of homicides is too many, we are making some progress over the last two years in New Haven,” Malloy said. He added that the state has already begun measures to improve public safety, such as Project Longevity. Malloy closed the conference by encouraging parents to carefully consider the dangers of the nightclub scene and situations like this before allowing their children to visit such places. He added that there is no reason for underage patrons to be at these clubs late at night. Ten of 58 New Haven shootings in the past year, including fatal and nonfatal, have occurred at nightclubs. Contact marek ramilo at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

2-year MPH Degree

?

$170, 000

Accelerated 22-months MBA/MPH degree

3-year MBA/MPH degree


yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com 

page 5

News

“Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.”  Frederick Douglass African-American social reformer

Pilot program pushes CT reading By Sarah Bruley Staff reporter To combat Connecticut’s achievement gap in reading levels — which is the largest in the nation — the Connecticut Commission on Children has launched a pilot program to improve educational standards in 15 public schools across the state. The pilot program, now spreading to more schools in its third year, aims to train teachers in innovative methods of teaching literacy and to develop more accurate assessments to measure students’ reading levels. The program, which is targeted at low-income school districts, currently exists in New Haven, Windham and Naugatuck, among others. Elaine Zimmerman, executive director of the Connecticut Commission on Children, said the organization’s biggest challenge in narrowing the achievement gap is not lack of resources, but of motivation to effect change. “We know how to bake the bread and how to make the bread rise. It’s just a matter of having cooks in the kitchen,” she said. Margie Gillis, the founder and president of Literacy How, said

that the program was spurred by frustrations over teachers not being able to address students’ particular needs because the assessments used to determine their reading levels were not adequately detailed.

We know how to bake the bread and how to make the bread rise. It’s just a matter of having cooks in the kitchen. Elaine Zimmerman Executive director, Connecticut Commission on Children She added that results of these assessments could come a month or more after they were first administered, leaving teachers without necessary information to instruct their students. The new assessments being developed under the pilot program will use computer technology to deliver results faster, Gillis said. “This was an attempt to bring educators into the 21st century,” she added.

In the pilot program’s first year, the Connecticut Commission on Children conducted studies that found vast disparities between the test performances of children from low-income and middle-class households. The studies also show that three-quarters of African-American and Hispanic students are not reading at their grade level. Now, in its third year, the program is combining its findings into a model that will be available for schools across the state to use in January, Zimmerman said. Zimmerman explained that the Reading Pilot Program operates on a two-tiered strategy. The first tier is directed at improving the quality of education for all students and more directly identifying students’ reading levels. The second tier targets students who are struggling by giving them specific instruction. After conducting research, the pilot program tested new assessment technology and trained teachers and principals in more proactive and friendly teaching methods, Zimmerman said. west haven public schools

Contact Sarah Bruley at sarah.bruley@yale.edu .

Savin Rock Community School in West Haven will be one of many affected by the new reading initiative.

City considers converting streets to two-way T ST SPEC PRO

OUSE

HILLH

REET

streets in proposal to be converted

By Akash Salam Contributing reporter

NEY

E

WHIT

AVENU

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U AVEN

TO WE

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PK WY

TEMPLE STREET

GROVE STREET

WALL STREET

BRO AD WA YA VE

COLLEGE STREET

YORK STREET

PARK STREET

HOWE STREET

HIGH STREET

CHAPEL STREET

CROWN STREET

GEORGE STREET

CHURCH STREET

ELM STREET

ELM STREET

The New Haven Department of Transportation is considering converting 10 downtown one-way streets into two-way streets. The Department of Transportation has brought on Fuss & O’Neill, an engineering consulting firm, to create a new road grid to reflect a pedestrian, bike and car-friendly transportation system. After the firm conducted initial research, it held several charrettes — intense periods of architectual planning — last week at the New Haven Public Library to present its plan and invite comments from New Haven residents. The charrettes opened on Monday with a presentation on the firm’s initial proposal, held several input sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, and closed on Thursday with a modified plan that incorporated feedback from local residents. The plan will involve repainting roads to indicate lanes going in opposite directions, painting in bike lanes and posting new signs — a process that will take one to three years, according to Jim Travers, the city’s transportation chief. “New Haven has a wonderful block streetgrid system, and setting that up as two-way makes it a whole lot easier for visitors to navigate for the first time,” said Ted DeSantos, senior vice president of Fuss & O’Neill. “The city becomes more walkable and more enjoyable for those who live downtown.” For years, the Transportation Department had received numerous complaints about the city’s system of one-way streets, DeSantos said. Motorists voiced frustration at having to take indirect routes to get from one point to another. Bicyclists complained that they did not feel safe opposing the direction of traffic. Pedestrians were concerned that one-way streets promoted speeding. After new federal dollars became available, the Transportation Department sought ways to address some of the complaints. That effort resulted in a plan to convert ten streets downtown, including Park, York and College Streets from one-way to two-way. Hundreds of New Haven residents attended

the input sessions last Tuesday and Wednesday. Some talked with the seven-member engineering team and learned about the project. Others participated in Open Design Studios — handson sessions where they drew and marked up suggestions of conversions on maps of the city. Though the proposed plan identifies several significant changes, many New Haven residents pushed for more streets to be included in the conversion plan. Many pointed out Elm St. as an example not addressed in the plan. However, many streets in the city connect to multiple streets, meaning that converting them would require engineers to convert all secondary streets, as well. For example, Elm, Edgewood and Chapel Streets would need to be simultaneously converted, DeSantos said. The team explained that more complex changes would be addressed — funds permitting — after phase one recommendations were implemented. DeSantos said the amount of community support for the idea was surprising, and dramatic. Locals interviewed at the charrette favored the proposed changes. Many residents expressed optimism that driving, biking and walking would become a lot easier and safer. However, Yale students interviewed expressed indifference to the proposed changes. Jesse Li ’17 said, though she did not hold a personal opinion, she could see how the conversion might benefit drivers in the city. Bernard Stanford ’17 said that streets on Yale’s campus were dangerous enough to cross now, so converting them to two-way streets would make little difference in pedestrian safety. “I don’t think this change will affect my life at all, because I’ve mostly just been rushing out into traffic blindly with full confidence that God will protect me from harm anyway,” he said. The plan proposed identifies 10 streets to be converted: Dwight, Howe, Park, York, College, Church and Hillhouse Streets on the northsouth axis, and George, Crown and Grove Streets on the east-west axis. Contact akash salam at akash.salam@yale.edu .


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yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com

from the front

“No part of the education of a politician is more indispensable than the fighting of elections.”  winston churchill british politician

Elicker and Harp square off in debate debate From page 1 campaign following fraudulent dealings that lost them a major city contract, Harp defended the medical group as one of the best in the state and said their clients should not lose out simply because one doctor had doublebilled at the expense of taxpayers. “This is the kind of politics that we’re trying to move beyond as a city,” Elicker said in response. “When big money influences politics, we get inefficient government that gives contracts to people that, in some cases, are even fraudulent.” Bass asked Harp about “two controversial figures from the 1980s and 1990s” who have served as advisors to the Harp campaign. One was former Connecticut senator and city development commissioner Anthony Avallone, who resigned in 1992 after he was implicated in multiple zoning and tax-relief scandals. The other was Sal Brancati, a former development chief under outgoing New Haven mayor John DeStefano Jr. who left city hall around the turn of the century amid corruption scandals involving officials taking advantage of their public posts to enhance their personal wealth. “Will they have your ear?” Bass asked the candidate. “I’m willing to hold them accountable,” Harp said. When pushed further, she added, “Frankly, as a Christian, I believe in redemption,” over calls of “guilty” and “evasive” from audience members. Elicker, too, was heckled by the crowd, in particular by one Harp supporter who shouted “But we don’t know you,” from the back of the room as Elicker described his accomplishments during two terms on the Board of Aldermen. While Harp’s ties to a handful of big-name supporters were scrutinized, the debate called Elicker’s ability to motivate support in general into question.

isaac stanley-becker/contributing photographer

Two weeks before voters go to the polls, Toni Harp ARC ’78 and Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 took turns pummeling one another in a debate at Gateway Community College. Bass asked how Elicker can govern with “no appreciable support from African-Americans or Latinos.” As mayor, Elicker said he would govern free from considerations of race and class.

The reality is that I’m not a part of my family’s business. Toni harp ARC ’78 Candidate, New Haven Mayoral Election “I think it’s important for me to acknowledge that I didn’t do as well as I would have liked to in the African-American and Latino communities,” Elicker said. “I

have worked tirelessly reaching out to everyone in this city.” Harp used her 30 seconds allotted for a rebuttal to launch a separate attack, criticizing Elicker for flat funding education while voting for a teachers’ contract that increased salaries. She used the indictment to trumpet her experience in the state legislature, which she said makes her uniquely capable of lobbying the state for more money for the city. “If I raise salaries, I’m going to make sure I have the money to back it up,” she said. “That comes with experience.” Elicker said he knows the city’s budget “through and through,” arguing that this experience is more important than knowledge of the minutiae of the Connecticut General Assembly.

The candidates differed on their willingness to consider long-term borrowing to make up for short-term holes in the city’s finances. Elicker said he would not accept borrowing as a way to offset the city’s deficit, while Harp said “we might need to borrow to catch up.” During the debate, Harp had two opportunities to counter attacks on Renaissance Management, the real estate company owned by her son and formerly by her husband, who is now deceased. Elicker pointed to the business’s tax delinquency and accused it of taking advantage of low-income residents, citing safety and sanitation problems as evidence of the landlord’s negligence. Harp addressed her son, who was in the crowd, saying she

trusted him to sort out the business’ taxes. “I’m really baffled by this question,” Harp said. “The reality is that I’m not a part of my family’s business.” The 50-minute debate was punctuated by a few questions that drew more straightforward policy responses from the candidates. Elicker came out in favor of turning many of the city’s oneway streets into two-way streets, while Harp said a single flow of traffic might have its virtues in some neighborhoods. The evening also reprised the race’s ongoing clash over the role of public financing in city elections. Elicker signed on to participate in the Democracy Fund during the Democratic primary, and has continued to abide by

its rules. The public finance system awards participating candidates grants in return for limiting individual contributions and disavowing PAC money. During the debate, Elicker vowed to be “the most honest mayor the city has ever seen.” Harp, who abstained from public money, said the Fund is a drain on the city’s finances and trades off with investments in youth services and neighborhood improvements. A final debate is scheduled for the Sunday before the election, a televised dialogue in WTNH News 8 studios that will air live from 8 to 9 a.m. Contact isaac stanleybecker at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

The City Desk at Yale Daily News presents: Sarah Eidelson and Paul Chandler in an aldermanic debate over issues facing Ward 1

Monday, October 28 7:30 pm SSS 114


yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com 

page 7

nation Adoption battles for evangelicals By DAVID CRARY associated press To many Christian evangelicals, their commitment to finding homes for the world’s orphans is something to celebrate — and they will, gathering at hundreds of churches across America to direct their thoughts and prayers to these children. But the fifth annual Orphan Sunday, this coming weekend, arrives at a challenging time, and not just because the number of international adoptions is dwindling. The adoption movement faces criticisms so forceful that some of its own leaders are paying heed. The gist: Some evangelicals are so enamored of international adoption as a mission of spiritual salvation — for the child and the adoptive parents — that they have closed their eyes to adoptionrelated fraud and trafficking, and have not fully embraced alternatives that would help orphans find loving families in their home countries. Some adoption advocates in evangelical circles have angrily rejected the criticisms. But the president of the coalition that organizes Orphan Sunday, Jedd Medefind of the Christian Alliance for Orphans, has urged his allies and supporters to take the critiques to heart even though he disputes some aspects of them. Alliance partners, he says, should be eager to support a broad range of orphan-care programs and to avoid the temptation of viewing adoptive parents as saviors. “When the dominant feature of our thinking becomes ‘us

as rescuers,’ we’re in grave danger,” Medefind wrote on the alliance website. “What often follows is the pride, self-focus and I-know-better outlook that has been at the root of countless misguided efforts to help others.” One leading critic of the movement comes from within evangelical ranks — professor David Smolin, director of the Center for Biotechnology, Law and Ethics at the law school of Baptist-affiliated Samford University in Alabama. Smolin plunged into the debate after he and his wife adopted two daughters from India in 1998, then learned that the girls had been abducted from an orphanage where they’d been placed temporarily by their mother.

When the dominant feature of our thinking becomes ‘us as rescuers,’ we’re in grave danger. Jedd Medefind Christian Alliance for Orphans The evangelical movement “uncritically participates in adoption systems riddled with child laundering, where children are illicitly obtained through fraud, kidnapping or purchase,” Smolin wrote in a law journal article. “The result is often tragically misdirected and cruel, as the movement participates in the needless separation of children from their families.”

“One chord is fine. Two chords are pushing it. Three chords and you’re into jazz” Lou Reed rock musician

Lou Reed, dead at 71 By HILLEL ITALIE associated press NEW YORK — Lou Reed was a pioneer for countless bands who didn’t worry about their next hit single. Reed, who died Sunday at age 71, radically challenged rock’s founding promise of good times and public celebration. As leader of the Velvet Underground and as a solo artist, he was the father of indie rock, and an ancestor of punk, New Wave and the alternative rock movements of the 1970s, `80s and beyond. He influenced generations of musicians from David Bowie and R.E.M. to Talking Heads and Sonic Youth. “The first Velvet Underground record sold 30,000 copies in the first five years,” Brian Eno, who produced albums by Roxy Music and Talking Heads among others, once said. “I think everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies started a band!” Reed and the Velvet Underground opened rock music to the avant-garde - to experimental theater, art, literature and film, from William Burroughs to Kurt Weill to Andy Warhol, Reed’s early patron. Raised on doo-wop and Carl Perkins, Delmore Schwartz and the Beats, Reed helped shape the punk ethos of raw power, the alternative rock ethos of irony and droning music and the art-rock embrace of experimentation, whether the dual readings of Beat-influenced verse for “Murder Mystery,” or, like a passage out of Burroughs’ “Naked Lunch,” the orgy of guns, drugs and oral sex on the Velvet Underground’s 15-minute “Sister Ray.” Reed died in Southampton, N.Y., of an ailment related to his recent liver transplant, according to his literary agent, Andrew Wylie, who added that Reed had been in frail health for months. Reed shared a home in Southampton with his wife and fellow musician, Laurie Anderson, whom he married in 2008. His trademarks were a monotone of surprising emotional range and power; slashing, grinding guitar; and lyrics that were complex, yet conversational, designed to make you feel as if Reed were seated next to you. Known for his cold stare and gaunt features, he was a cynic and a seeker who seemed to

mark goff/associated press

Lou Reed performs at a benefit concert for Amnesty International in Chicago. embody downtown Manhattan culture of the 1960s and `70s and was as essential a New York artist as Martin Scorsese or Woody Allen. Reed’s New York was a jaded city of drag queens, drug addicts and violence, but it was also as wondrous as any Allen comedy, with so many of Reed’s songs explorations of right and wrong and quests for transcendence. He had one top 20 hit, “Walk On the Wild Side,” and many other songs that became standards among his admirers, from “Heroin” and “Sweet Jane” to “Pale

Blue Eyes” and “All Tomorrow’s Parties.” An outlaw in his early years, Reed would eventually perform at the White House, have his writing published in The New Yorker, be featured by PBS in an “American Masters” documentary and win a Grammy in 1999 for Best Long Form Music Video. The Velvet Underground was inducted into the Rock and Roll of Fame in 1996 and their landmark debut album, “The Velvet Underground & Nico,” was added to the Library of Congress’ registry in 2006.


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world

yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com


yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com 

page 9

world

“You can’t make war in the Middle East without Egypt and you can’t make peace without Syria.”  Henry A. Kissinger american statesman

Watchdog: Syria details weapons plans By MIKE CORDER AND DIAA HADID ASSOCIATED PRESS THE HAGUE, Netherlands — Syria has filed details of its poison gas and nerve agent program and an initial plan to destroy it to the world’s chemical weapons watchdog, the organization said Sunday. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons said in a statement that Syria completed its declaration as part of a strict and ambitious timeline that aims to eliminate the lethal stockpile by mid-2014. The group, based in The Hague, said Syria made the declaration Thursday. The announcement provides “the basis on which plans are devised for a systematic, total and verified destruction of declared chemical weapons and production facilities,” the group said. Such declarations made to the organization are confidential. No details of Syria’s program were released. Syria already had given preliminary details to the OPCW when it declared it was joining the organization in September. The move warded off possible U.S. military strikes in the aftermath of an Aug. 21 chemical weapon attack on a Damascus suburb. Syria denies responsibility for the deadly attack. OPCW inspectors were hastily dispatched to Syria this

month and have visited most of the 23 sites Damascus declared. They also have begun overseeing destruction work to ensure that machines used to mix chemicals and fill munitions with poisons are no longer functioning. Syria is believed to possess around 1,000 metric tons of chemical weapons, including mustard gas and sarin.

Iraq and its security forces have nothing to do with the fighting at the Syrian border crossing. saad maan ibrahim Interior Ministry spokesman, Iraq It has not yet been decided how or where destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons will happen. Damascus’ declaration includes a general plan for destruction that will be considered by the OPCW’s 41-nation executive council on Nov. 15. Norway’s foreign minister announced Friday that the country had turned down a U.S. request to receive the bulk of Syria’s chemical weapons for destruction because it doesn’t have the capabilities to complete the task by the deadlines given. The announcement came

among renewed fighting in Syria. Al-Qaida-linked rebels battled government troops for control of the Christian town of Sadad north of Damascus, activists said. The rebels have been trying to seize the town for the past week, and residents in the rebel-held western neighborhoods of Sadad are trapped in their homes, said Rami Abdurrahman of the Britain-based Syrian Observatory of Human Rights. The rebels appear to have targeted Sadad because of its strategic location near the main highway north from Damascus rather than because it is inhabited primarily by Christians. But extremists among the rebels are hostile to Syria’s Christians minority, which has largely backed President Bashar Assad during the conflict. The official Syrian news agency said troops wrested back control of eastern parts of Sadad, but were clashing in other areas. Also Sunday, Syrian Kurdish gunmen were trying to secure their hold over a major border crossing with Iraq after capturing the captured the Yaaroubiyeh post in northeast Syria on Saturday. Abdurrahman said the Kurdish gunmen were fighting pockets of fighters from extremist rebel groups in southern Yaaroubiyeh. Syria’s chaotic more than 2 1/2 year-old conflict pits Assad’s forces against a disunited array of

Peter Dejong/Associated Press

A car arrives at the headquarters of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. rebel factions. Al-Qaida-linked hard-liners have fought other rebel groups as well as Kurdish militias who have taken advantage of the government’s weakness to cement control over territory dominated by the ethnic minority. The main Western-backed opposition group, the Syrian

Israel hit by cyber attack By DANIEL ESTRIN ASSOCIATED PRESS HADERA, Israel — When Israel’s military chief delivered a high-profile speech this month outlining the greatest threats his country might face in the future, he listed computer sabotage as a top concern, warning a sophisticated cyberattack could one day bring the nation to a standstill. Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz was not speaking empty words. Exactly one month before his address, a major artery in Israel’s national road network in the northern city of Haifa was shut down because of a cyberattack, cybersecurity experts tell The Associated Press, knocking key operations out of commission two days in a row and causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage. One expert, speaking on condition of anonymity because the breach of security was a classified matter, said a Trojan horse attack targeted the security camera system in the Carmel Tunnels toll road on Sept. 8. A Trojan horse is a malicious computer program that users unknowingly install that can give hackers complete control over their systems. The attack caused an immediate 20-minute lockdown of the roadway. The next day, the expert said, it shut down the roadway again during morning rush hour. It remained shut for eight hours, causing massive congestion. The expert said investigators believe the attack was the work of unknown, sophisticated hackers, similar to the Anonymous hacking group that led attacks on Israeli websites in April. He said investigators determined it was not sophisticated enough to be the work of an enemy government like Iran.

The expert said Israel’s National Cyber Bureau, a two-year-old classified body that reports to the prime minister, was aware of the incident. The bureau declined comment, while Carmelton, the company that oversees the toll road, blamed a “communication glitch” for the mishap. While Israel is a frequent target of hackers, the tunnel is the most highprofile landmark known to have been attacked. It is a major thoroughfare for Israel’s third-largest city, and the city is looking to turn the tunnel into a public shelter in case of emergency, highlighting its importance.

Every sphere of civilian economic life ... is a potential or actual cyberattack target. benjamin netanyahu Prime Minister, Israel The incident is exactly the type of scenario that Gantz described in his recent address. He said Israel’s future battles might begin with “a cyberattack on websites which provide daily services to the citizens of Israel. Traffic lights could stop working, the banks could be shut down,” he said. There have been cases of traffic tampering before. In 2005, the United States outlawed the unauthorized use of traffic override devices installed in many police cars and ambulances after unscrupulous drivers started using them to turn lights from red to green. In 2008, two Los

Angeles traffic engineers pleaded guilty to breaking into the city’s signal system and deliberately snarling traffic as part of a labor dispute. Oren David, a manager at international security firm RSA’s anti-fraud unit, said that although he didn’t have information about the tunnel incident, this kind of attack “is the hallmark of a new era.” “Most of these systems are automated, especially as far as security is concerned. They’re automated and they’re remotely controlled, either over the Internet or otherwise, so they’re vulnerable to cyberattack,” he said. Israel, he added, is “among the top-targeted countries.” In June, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Iran and its proxies Hezbollah and Hamas have targeted Israel’s “essential systems,” including its water system, electric grid, trains and banks. “Every sphere of civilian economic life, let’s not even talk about our security, is a potential or actual cyberattack target,” Netanyahu said at the time. Israeli government websites receive hundreds and sometimes thousands of cyberattacks each day, said Ofir Ben Avi, head of the government’s website division. During Israel’s military offensive on the Gaza Strip last year, tens of millions of website attacks took place, from denial of service attacks, which cripple websites by overloading them with traffic, to more sophisticated attempts to steal passwords, Ben Avi said. Under constant threat, Israel has emerged as a world leader in cybersecurity, with murky military units developing much of the technology. Last year, the military formed its first cyberdefense unit.

Dan Balilty/associated press

In this Tuesday Oct. 20, 2013 photo, Israel’s electric corp vice president, Yasha Hain, works on a computer at the ‘CyberGym’ school.

National Coalition, accused Iraqi forces of fighting moderate Syrian rebels at Yaaroubiyeh, and shelling the area in cooperation with Kurdish militants. Iraq’s Interior Ministry spokesman, Saad Maan Ibrahim, rejected the accusations, saying they are “baseless because Iraq and its security forces have noth-

ing to do with the fighting at the Syrian border crossing.” In neighboring Lebanon, another two people were killed by sniper fire during fighting between rival sects in the northern city of Tripoli, the official state news agency reported. It said that a soldier in the city also died Sunday of his wounds.

Ant-American images appear in Tehran By ALI AKBAR DAREINI associated press TEHRAN, Iran — Banners that suddenly cropped up around Tehran in the past week depict an American diplomat dressed in a jacket and tie, while under the negotiating table he is wearing military pants and pointing a shotgun at an Iranian envoy. The anti-American images were ordered taken down Saturday by Tehran authorities. But they made their point. It was another salvo by hardliners who are opposed to President Hassan Rouhani’s pursuit of better ties with Washington and worried that Iran could make unnecessary concessions in its nuclear program in exchange for relief from Western sanctions. The banners and posters were something of a warm-up to the main event: Rouhani’s critics are planning major anti-U.S. rallies ­— and amped-up “Death to America” chants — on the Nov. 4 anniversary of the U.S. Embassy takeover in 1979 following the Islamic Revolution. Anti-American murals have long been part of the urban landscape in Iran, and include images of the Statue of Liberty transformed into a creepy skeleton and bombs raining down from the Stars and Stripes. The storming of the U.S. Embassy is marked every year with protests outside the compound’s brick walls. Now, however, the images reflect internal divisions in Iran and suggest more intrigue ahead. Rouhani’s groundbreaking overtures to the U.S. appear to have the backing of Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. This means that — at least for the moment — he has the ultimate political cover to try to reach a nuclear deal and perhaps find other ways to cross the 34-year diplomatic no man’s land between the countries. However, the criticism and protests by hard-line resisters, led by the Revolutionary Guard, are as much directed at Rouhani’s government as they are intended as a message for the supreme leader. The Guard and others know that Khamenei does not want to risk an open confrontation that could sow further discord in Iran. The subtext of the posters and banners: More pressure could come if Rouhani’s government is perceived as moving too fast toward concessions when nuclear talks resume next week in Geneva with the U.S. and

other world powers. The signs had an ad-agency quality that is rare compared with the usual anti-American fare of simple fliers and handlettered placards. “American Honesty,” read one in Farsi and slightly mangled English, showing the U.S. negotiator with the shotgun under the table. Another depicted an American negotiator in a suit, a black attack dog by his side. The third one showed an open hand facing the open claws of what appeared to be an eagle, the symbol of the U.S. On Sunday, with most of the images taken down, new posters popped up around Tehran. They contained just one sentence, in Farsi: “We don’t oppress and don’t allow to be oppressed.” The high production values of the banners and posters suggest possible connections to the powerful propaganda machinery of well-funded groups such as the Revolutionary Guard or its nationwide paramilitary network, known as the Basij.

Our people have seen nothing but ... betrayal and back-stabbing by Americans. Hamid Reza Taraqi Hard-line politician, Iran

Mohsen Pirhadi, head of Basij’s Tehran branch, said he ordered the posters put up, but gave no further details on the designers or financial backers. “These posters were in line with the interests of the (ruling) system,” the Bahar newspaper quoted him as saying Saturday. A day earlier, protesters trampled posters of Wendy Sherman, the chief U.S. nuclear negotiator with Iran, who said earlier this month that past experience suggests “deception is part of the DNA” of the nuclear talks. Iran’s hard-line media, however, added “Iranian” to the quote and stirred outrage. “Our people have seen nothing but dishonesty, deception of public opinion, betrayal and back-stabbing by Americans during the past years … Therefore, there is no way they can trust American promises and deceiving smiles,” hard-line politician Hamid Reza Taraqi told The Associated Press on Saturday.


page 10 

yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2012  ·  yaledailynews.com


yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com 

page 9

Bulletin board

today’s forecast

tomorrow

Sunny, with a high near 60. Partly cloudy later, with a low around 35.

wednesday

High of 53, low of 37.

High of 58, low of 37.

science hill  by spencer katz

on campus

Monday, October 28 4:00 p.m.  “The Quest for Naturalness at the LHC.” Raman Sundrum, an American theoretical particle physicist at the University of Maryland, will review and discuss themes in the world of particle physics — including the Higgs boson discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Sundrum will base his talk on the principle of Naturalness. Sloane Physics Laboratory (217 Prospect St.), Rm. 57. 6:00 p.m.  “21st Century Children Need Nature: Designing Natural Play Areas.” The Urban Resources Initiatives is sponsoring a talk by David Sobel, who belongs to the senior faculty at the Education Department at Antioch University. Sobel will present on his research on integrating natural spaces into urban play areas, highlighting the positive impacts on children’s development. Free to the general public. Kroon Hall (195 Prospect St.), Burke Aud.

that monkey tune  by michael kandalaft

Tuesday, October 29 9:00 a.m.  Talk with David De Ferranti. President and Co-Founder of Results for Development David De Ferranti will be lecturing in the Strategic Thinking in Global Health course. Open to the Yale community. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 211. 8:30 p.m.  Open Drawing. Let your creative juices flow with the Yale School of Art. Materials and models will be provided at this workshop. Yale School of Art (1156 Chapel St.), Rm. G-01.

Wednesday, October 30 5:00 p.m.  “Communicating Science to the Public.” Robert Bazell, Yale adjunct professor and former NBC chief science and health correspondent, will host a talk about the importance of scientific conversation with the public. There will be an information session about becoming a speaker in the Science in the News lecture series. Free to the general public. Bass Center for Molecular and Structural Biology (266 Whitney Ave.), Rm. 305.

doonesbury  by garry trudeau

y submit your events online yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Julia Zorthian at (203) 4322418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 28, 2013

Interested in drawing cartoons for the Yale Daily News? Contact annelisa leinbach at annelisa.leinbach@yale.edu

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Forget where one put, as keys 7 Pedro’s eye 10 Golf great Ballesteros 14 Crumbly Italian cheese 15 Lao Tzu’s “path” 16 Slangy prefix meaning “ultra” 17 Computer storage medium 19 When repeated, island near Tahiti 20 Male sibs 21 Kadett automaker 22 Apple music players 23 Vintner’s prefix 24 Quick-on-theuptake type, in slang 26 Athenian walkway 28 Otherwise 29 Persian rulers 31 Irene of “Fame” 33 Used-up pencils 37 Cartoncushioning unit 40 Latin being 41 Latin love word 42 Muslim pilgrim’s destination 43 Tombstone lawman Wyatt 45 Mischievous trick 46 Showy authority figure 51 Facebook notes, briefly 54 Put back to zero 55 Orator’s place 56 Vivacity 57 Fitzgerald of jazz 58 Tense predeadline period ... or when to eat the ends of 17-, 24-, 37- and 46Across? 60 Bedframe part 61 Notes after dos 62 Pop singer Spector who fronted a ’60s girl group named for her 63 Alley prowlers 64 Function 65 Chuck who broke the sound barrier

Want to place a classified ad?

CLASSICAL MUSIC 24 Hours a Day. 98.3 FM, and on the web at WMNR.org. “Pledges accepted: 1-800345-1812”

call (203) 432-2424 or e-mail business@ yaledailynews.com

10/28/13

By Steve Blais

DOWN 1 Up-tempo Caribbean dance 2 River of Grenoble 3 Kids’ imitation game 4 Vietnam neighbor 5 Part of USDA: Abbr. 6 Multiple Grammywinning cellist 7 Catchall option in a survey question 8 They’re related to the severity of the crimes 9 Caveman Alley 10 Summoned as a witness 11 Novel on a small screen, perhaps 12 “Falstaff” was his last opera 13 Wipe clean 18 Tax pro: Abbr. 22 Cyclades island 24 Nothing to write home about 25 Applaud 27 Feats like the Yankees’ 1998, ’99 and 2000 World Series wins 29 Opposite of NNW

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

30 6’3”, 5’4”, etc.: Abbr. 31 Close associates 32 Roadside assistance org. 34 Preparing to use, as a hose 35 Tampa Bay NFLer 36 RR stop 38 Jamie of “M*A*S*H” 39 Arabian leader

SUDOKU world 1 ­— stage 1

10/28/13

44 Play a part 45 Discern 46 Take by force 47 “Is anybody here?” 48 Quran religion 49 Underlying reason 50 Relatives 52 Mrs. Eisenhower 53 Snide smile 56 Sicilian volcano 58 French vineyard 59 Earth chopper

4 6 8 5 9 2

1 3 5 2 3 9 4 6 7 1 6 1 8 3 5 8 3 6 7 6 7 9 5 8 2 9

8

6 9

2 3 6 2 5 5 2 8 6 1


page 10 

through the lens Y

alies trekked across the country to enjoy the second year of the University’s newly instated fall break. Some took the train down to DC while others wandered around New England to take in the fall foliage. Sarah

Eckinger, Alexandra Schmeling, Wa Lin and Brianna Loo

report.

yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com


If you missed it scores

MLB Boston 4 St. Louis 2

NFL Denver 45 Washington 21

sports quick hits

Bulldogs keep rolling Volleyball After winning its first seven Ivy League games, the volleyball team began the second half of its Ivy slate by dropping Brown in straight sets, 3–0. The Bulldogs took the sets by scores of 25–21, 25–14 and 25–21. Setter Kelly Johnson ’16 led all players with 11 kills.

Nfl New England 27 Miami 17

nfl Detroit 31 Dallas 30

NFL NY Giants 15 Philadelphia 7

Monday

Craig Breslow ’02 Boston Red Sox The “smartest man in baseball” has had a rough past three games on baseball’s biggest stage. Despite allowing no runs in his first seven postseason appearences, Breslow has surrendered three earned runs, including two earned runs, in three World Series appearences.

“It was a phantom free kick call … The only person that saw it was the referee.” Head Coach Rudy Meredith women’s soccer yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com

Early deficit too much for Yale football

grant brondson/contributing photographer

In the first start of his Yale career, quarterback Morgan Roberts ’16 (No. 19) threw for 193 yards and two touchdowns. The Clemson transfer tossed two touchdowns, but also had two interceptions, in the fourth quarter. By Grant Bronsdon Contributing Reporter In a game marked by the absences of starting quarterback Hank Furman ’14 and starting running back Tyler Varga ’15, the Yale football team fell 28–17 to the Penn Quakers (4–2, 3–0 Ivy). Eli quarterback Morgan Roberts ’16 threw for 193 yards and two touchdowns, but a 28–3 def-

icit entering the fourth quarter proved insurmountable as two costly fourth quarter interceptions halted the Elis’ last-gasp comeback bid. “Those kids don’t quit,” head coach Tony Reno said of Yale’s comeback attempt. “We finish and we play hard no matter what the score is.” Roberts made his first career start for the Bulldogs (3–3, 1–2

Ivy), but disaster almost struck early. Candler Rich ’17, starting after Varga was injured in last week’s game against Fordham, fumbled on the Bulldogs’ first play from scrimmage. Though Yale recovered, the fumble signified a larger problem; the Penn game marked the third straight week that the team has lost at least two fumbles. The Elis got a gift on the

Bulldogs split tourney games

Quakers’ next possession. On first down, running back Spencer Kulcsar fumbled after a gain of six, and Cole Champion ’16 recovered at the Penn 27. Kicker Kyle Cazzetta ’15 nailed a 32-yard field goal to put the Bulldogs up three. On the next possession, Yale gave away a big play of its own. After a Penn three-and-out highlighted by a big sack from

Champion and Jordan Jefferson ’14, the Quaker punt hit a Bulldog blocker, and Penn recovered in Yale territory. Two plays later, quarterback Ryan Becker — pressed into service after an injury to starter Billy Ragone — hit Kyle Wilcox on a wheel route for a 29-yard touchdown to take a 7–3 lead. The teams traded punts, and eventually the Elis took over at

their own 41. However, the fumbling woes that have plagued the Bulldogs in recent weeks struck again as Khalil Keys ’15 turned over the football on the squad’s first play. “Fumbles aren’t acceptable,” Reno said. “We spend countless hours on it during practice. We’re hurting ourselves that see football page B3

Elis fall out of contention

By Frederick Frank Staff Reporter The No. 6/7 men’s hockey team began its season with a pair of games in the Garden State over the weekend at the Liberty Invitational Tournament. The Bulldogs (1–1–0, 0–0–0 ECAC) opened with a 4–1 loss to Brown (2–0– 0, 0–0–0 ECAC) but rebounded with a 3–2 win against Princeton (1–1–0, 0–0–0 ECAC). The event was held at the Prudential Center in Newark, NJ.

men’s hockey While both of Yale’s games were against ECAC opponents, the matchups were played as nonconference games and thus only counted towards the Bulldogs’ overall record. The Elis started the tournament on Friday versus Brown. Rookie goalkeeper Alex Lyon ’17 made his first appearance for Yale in a regular season game along with three of his classmates, forwards John Hayden ’17, Mike Doherty ’17 and Frankie DiChiara ’17. “The tournament is always good competition and useful for us moving forward,” defenseman Ryan Obuchowski ’16 said in a message to the News. “It’s nice to play against quality opponents because you cannot recreate the level of competition in practices and it’s good to get freshmen acclimated to the ECAC competition.” Yale started strong against Brown, recording 11 shots in a scoreless first period. The Elis broke the deadlock on the power play with just over five minutes

james badas/contributing photographer

Forward Paula Hagopian ’16 (No. 4) scored her third goal of the season on Saturday against Penn. Hagopian’s goal opened the game’s scoring, but the Quakers answered to end the second half.

ydn

Forward Nicholas Weberg ’14 (No. 26) scored two goals on Saturday. gone in the second period. After Brown took a five-minute major for a hit from behind on forward Matt Beattie ’16, DiChiara found Stu Wilson ’16 alone on the goal line, where the sophomore was able to light the lamp with a wrist

shot that snuck just inside the far post. The Bulldogs’ early lead was undone by a series of penalties in the second period. After forward

stat of the day 3

see men’s hockey page b3

By James Badas Contributing Reporter After two thrilling overtime periods, the women’s soccer team came 21 seconds short of achieving victory in a must-win matchup against Penn, settling for a 1–1 tie.

women’s soccer Yale (7–5–1, 2–2–1 Ivy) saw victory snatched away in the final moments of regulation as a questionable foul call resulted in Penn forward Kerry Scalora lining up and

banging home a penalty kick to tie the game at one. With the tie at Penn, the Elis fell out of contention for the Ivy League title. The equalizer was the source of much controversy. Called with 21 seconds left in the second half, the penalty came as players on both sides fought for the ball on a throw-in in front of the Bulldogs’ net. Head coach Rudy Meredith said he still does not know why the penalty kick was administered. “It was a phantom free kick call,” Meresee women’s soccer page b3

Number of consecutive weeks that the football team has lost at least two fumbles. The Bulldogs lost two and three fumbles, respectively, against Dartmouth and Penn earlier this month before turning the ball over twice on three fumbles against Penn this weekend.


page b2 

yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com

sports

200 B.C.

Yale drops heartbreaker

Hockey-like game emerges in Ancient Greece, played with a horn and a ball-like object.

football Ivy

Overall

School

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

3

0

1.000

5

1

0.833

1

Penn

3

0

1.000

4

2

0.667

3

Harvard

2

1

0.667

5

1

0.833

3

Dartmouth

2

1

0.667

3

3

0.500

5

Brown

1

2

0.333

4

2

0.667

5

Yale

1

2

0.333

3

3

0.500

7

Cornell

0

3

0.000

1

5

0.167

7

Columbia

0

3

0.000

0

6

0.000

volleyball Ivy

maria zepeda/senior photographer

Forward Henry Albrecht ’17 (No. 16) notched the first goal of his Yale career on Saturday by scoring in the 45th minute. men’s soccer From page b4 ball fell to a Penn forward, who passed the ball to Baker for an easy conversion into an empty net.

It’s definitely a setback, but I think we are still in contention [for the League title]. Nick Alers ’14 “It’s frustrating to give up the goals the way we did, but we played well for long stretches of the game,” captain Max McKiernan ’14 said. “We’re still playing well enough to win the rest of our games, so we’re just focused on trying to do that the rest of the way.”

Yale fell in large part because of its poor defending on set pieces, a running theme for the Elis this season. The Quakers were able to get back into the match on two set piece opportunities and undo the Bulldogs’ hard work on offense. For the men’s soccer team, who had snatched victory late in league contests against Harvard and Dartmouth, the overtime loss was a bitter pill to swallow, according to Alers. “Giving up two set piece goals was pretty painful, especially since we’ve had problems with those all season,” Alers said. Despite the loss, the Bulldogs are only three points off the league lead and will have the chance to face off against Colombia, Brown and Princeton before the end of the season. Next up for the squad, however, will be a matchup against Central Connecticut State in the Bulldogs’ final non-Ivy

League game this season. The Blue Devils have won four of their last five games and should pose a stiff test for the Elis. The Yale offense, which has scored only four goals in its last five games and has been shutout six times this year, will need to be clinical on offense, as CCSU has kept seven clean sheets thus far. Yale takes on Central Connecticut State in New Britain on Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Contact Frederick Frank at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

Overall

School

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Yale

8

0

1.000

14

3

0.824

2

Harvard

5

3

0.625

10

7

0.588

3

Penn

4

4

0.500

10

9

0.526

3

Brown

4

4

0.500

8

11

0.421

5

Dartmouth

3

5

0.375

10

10

0.500

5

Cornell

3

5

0.375

7

11

0.389

5

Columbia

3

5

0.375

5

12

0.294

8

Princeton

2

6

0.250

6

12

0.333

women’s soccer Ivy

Penn 3, Yale 2 Penn

0

2

1

3

Yale

1

1

0

2

Elis fall in shootout

Overall

School

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Harvard

5

0

0

1.000

9

3

2

0.714

2

Penn

3

1

1

0.700

10

1

4

0.800

2

Brown

3

1

1

0.700

8

4

1

0.654

4

Dartmouth

3

2

0

0.600

7

5

3

0.567

5

Yale

2

2

1

0.500

7

5

1

0.577

6

Cornell

1

4

0

0.200

7

6

1

0.536

7

Columbia

0

3

2

0.200

7

5

3

0.567

8

Princeton

0

4

1

0.100

5

5

4

0.500

men’s soccer

field hockey From page b4

Ivy

The pressure then fell to the Eli captain, midfielder/back Georgia Holland ’14, to attempt to tie the game. But Holland was tripped on her shootout attempt by Sokach, and was then awarded a penalty stroke, which was denied by the Penn keeper to give the Quakers the victory. “[The shootout] is something we practice,” Stuper said. “We scored one of five. One of our players slipped and didn’t even have the chance at scoring. The goalie took out one of our players, who was then awarded a penalty stroke. The goalie did the same thing to another player, who could have also been awarded a penalty stroke, but wasn’t. We were unlucky.” The way in which the Elis dropped the contest symbolized a disheartening trend that has followed the team throughout the year — this is the fourth one-goal loss for Yale this season. The Elis face Columbia on the road on Friday in an attempt to bring their Ivy League record to an even .500.

0

0

1 (2)

1

Yale

0

0

0

0 (1)

0

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Penn

3

0

1

0.875

6

6

1

0.500

2

Harvard

3

1

0

0.750

4

7

2

0.385

3

Princeton

2

1

1

0.625

5

7

1

0.423

3

Yale

2

1

1

0.625

3

9

1

0.269

5

Columbia

1

1

2

0.500

7

4

2

0.615

5

Brown

1

1

2

0.500

4

6

3

0.423

7

Cornell

0

3

1

0.125

6

4

4

0.571

8

Dartmouth

0

4

0

0.000

5

4

4

0.538

Ivy

Penn 1 (S0), Yale 0 0

School

field hockey

Contact Ashley Wu at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

Penn

Overall

jennifer cheung/senior photographer

Saturday’s 1–0 loss to Penn marked the Elis’ second consecutive overtime game.

Overall

School

W

L

%

W L %

1

Princeton

5

0

1.000

10

4

0.714

2

Penn

4

1

0.800

11

3

0.786

3

Cornell

3

2

0.600 9

6

0.600

4

Dartmouth

2

3

0.400 6

8

0.429

4

Yale

2

3

0.400 6

8

0.429

4

Columbia

2

3

0.400 6

9

0.400

7

Brown

1

4

0.200

6

8

0.429

7

Harvard

1

4

0.200

5

8

0.385

Lightweight crew ends Fall season with success men’s crew From page b4 point of the race. Card noted that passing at this level of competition is rare. “The start was an important moment for us,” captain Matt O’Donoghue ’14 said in an email to the News. “We wanted to get right into our rhythm. Our stem pair of Austin Velte ’16 and Brendan Harrington ’14 did a great job of getting us on pace and driving it all the way down the course.” Harvard, the second place finisher at the Head of the Charles, missed a buoy near the end of the race, and the one-minute penalty knocked the crew down to 21st place out of 31 boats. At last year’s Princeton Chase, Yale finished second, less than two seconds behind the Harvard crew. The Crimson would go on to win the IRA championships in

the spring. “[The] key to success [on Sunday] was having the whole crew commit to charging hard from start to finish,” O’Donoghue said. “Cohesion and boat unity go a long way, and we stuck together today.”

We had the fastest time of any crew on the lake today, including the heavyweight men. Andy Card Head coach, Lightweight crew Yale’s B boat in the varsity eight rowed to an eighth place finish, ahead of the A boats from Colum-

bia, Dartmouth, Georgetown and Harvard. The Eli C boat finished in 24th. The freshman boat got its first experience racing as a group in the freshman eights event and finished 10th overall, but was fifth among the lightweight boats in an event that featured both heavyweights and lightweights. “Those guys have great attitudes and work ethics, so I’m excited to see them come together as a unit in the spring,” O’Donoghue said. Though the regatta hosted heavyweight races, Yale did not send any heavyweight boats to the event. The Eli lightweight four boats finished second, fourth, 10th and 21st out of the 32 crews in the fours event. Most of the lightweight team is done for the fall, but Yale’s nov-

ices will get to race in the freshman-only Green Monster race at Dartmouth next weekend. The Elis did not participate in the race last season. According to O’Donoghue, each school at the Green Monster will race two boats that are close in speed to give the freshmen as much competitive racing experience as possible. “The aim is for each team to race two shells that are of equal speed, then add the time of both shells to get an overall winner,” Card said. “This is a great race for the walk-ons, and we are really looking forward to going up to the North Country and throwing down.” The race begins at 10:00 a.m. in Hanover, N.H. on Saturday. Contact Greg Cameron at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

catherine foster/contributing photographer

Sunday ended the fall season for most of the lightweight crew team.


yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com 

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sports

“You may get skinned knees and elbows, but it’s worth it if you score a spectacular goal..”  mia hamm

Bulldogs fall into fifth in Ivy League football From page b1 way.” Given new life, Penn failed to take advantage. After big plays set Penn up at the Bulldogs 6, two penalties pushed the Quakers back, and kicker Connor Loftus missed a 28-yard field goal wide left. Another stalled Yale drive gave the ball to Penn at its 39-yard line, but the Quakers failed to capitalize and punted to the Bulldogs deep in Yale’s own territory. But three plays picked up only seven yards for the Elis, and a 10-yard return for Penn off of Cazzetta’s punt allowed Penn to open its drive at the Yale 40. Three plays later, the Quakers went for it on fourth down, and a QB sweep by Adam Strouss — who took five snaps but ran on each — moved the chains. On the very next play, Becker hit Conner Scott on the right sideline for a 29-yard touchdown to increase the Penn lead to 14–3, where it would remain at the half. Even after the halftime break, the Elis could not get their offense on track. The squad started with the ball in the second half, but it was stopped in its tracks, and Cazzetta punted yet again, his sixth of the game. Penn used its deep passing game to get on the scoreboard again. A 42-yard pass over two defenders set Penn up in Yale territory, and another 20-yard toss brought the Quakers to the Yale six yard line. Two plays later, Kulcsar ran it in from two yards out to extend the Penn lead to 21–3. “We need to improve and get

better,” Reno said of the secondary. “We have a lot of young kids out there, and there are growing pains that go along with them.” A facemask penalty on the kickoff return started the Bulldogs at the Yale 40, and Roberts began to get the passing game going. After picking up Yale’s first third down conversion of the game, Roberts hit Deon Randall ’15 over the middle for another 10 and a first down. The drive stalled, however, and a fourth down pass fell incomplete, giving Penn the ball at its own 30. Aided by a late hit penalty on the Elis, the Quakers marched down the field with precision. A series of running plays brought Penn into the red zone, and a pass interference penalty on third down gave the Quakers a new set of downs. Strouss punched it in on a QB draw on the next third down, and the Quakers took a 28–3 lead with 1:33 left in the third quarter. Coming into the drive with only one third down conversion, the Bulldogs netted three on this drive alone, culminating in a touchdown toss from Roberts to Grant Wallace ’15 to reduce the deficit to 28–9. Wallace emerged as the top target for Roberts on the day, catching eight passes for 104 yards and a score. “We’re a no-huddle offense,” Reno said. “When we get in a rhythm, we’re a tough offense to stop. Our biggest problem was that we put ourselves in a hole.” On the Quakers’ next drive, the offense ran downhill, rushing for 51 yards before Kyle Wilcox fumbled on the Yale 25-yard line and the Bulldogs recovered.

grant brondson/contributing photographer

Quarterback Hank Furman ’14 (No. 7) missed Saturday’s game due to injury. The Yale offense answered, with Roberts delivering perhaps his best drive in a Yale uniform. He completed all six passes he attempted for 57 yards, including the eventual touchdown strike to Randall over the middle. Sebastian Little ’16 snagged the two point conversion pass to make it 28–17. A roughing-the-passer penalty pushed the kickoff to midfield, and Yale attempted — and recovered — an onside kick from Bryan Holmes ’17 at the Penn 41.

However, Roberts’ first pass of the drive was intercepted deep downfield, and the Quakers took over at their own 16. “[Roberts] kept grinding along,” Reno said. “I don’t think it was a pretty performance but he was able to get a foothold midway through [the game].” Penn picked up a first down, but three running plays failed to draw a new set of downs, and Yale used its timeouts to stop the clock at 2:41, ultimately taking over at its 23-yard line.

Though the Eli offense moved downfield, helped by two 15-yard penalties, another of Roberts’ passes was intercepted inside the red zone, and Penn was able to run the clock out. The loss extended the Yale losing streak to three games. “No matter how much losing hurts, you can always control how you respond in your next opportunity,” captain Beau Palin ’14 wrote in an email to the News. “We plan to learn from our mistakes.”

Yale plays next Saturday at the Yale Bowl against Columbia. Kickoff is at noon. Contact Grant Bronsdon at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

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Elis follow Friday loss with Saturday triumph men’s hockey From page b1 Charles Orzetti ’16 was whistled for hooking — a type of penalty — the Bears tied the game just 11 seconds into their manadvantage opportunity. Lyon had amassed 14 saves before Brown’s eventual breakthrough. Yale and Brown traded opportunities until the Bears scored the go-ahead goal with four minutes gone in the third. Forward Mark Naclerio, who had tied the game on the power play in the second, notched his second tally of the night with a redirection that evaded Lyon’s reach. Despite limiting Brown to five shots on net for the remaining 16 minutes, the Bulldogs could not find the back of the net. The Bears’ goalkeeper, Marco Del Filippo, had 12 third period saves, shutting the door on any potential equalizer. Brown scored a third unanswered goal at 12:51 to make the score 3–1 and put the contest effectively out of reach for the

Elis. With just over a minute and a half remaining, the Bears would add another goal on an empty net after Lyon had been pulled for an extra skater. Lyon finished with 27 saves on 30 shots in his collegiate regular season debut. “I definitely give credit to Brown for playing well, but especially after seeing our effort on Saturday, I think we could have given a lot more in the first game,” defenseman Mitch Witek ’16 said. “Knowing our potential, I think we have the power to win every game and I think we need to have that mentality moving forward.” On Saturday night, Yale took on Princeton in the final game of the tournament. Head coach Keith Allain ’80 handed Patrick Spano ’17 the start between the pipes for the Bulldogs and changed the lineup by adding forward Chris Izmirlian ’17 to the team. Yale scored just three minutes into the contest when Beattie gathered a Witek pass and skated

into the offensive zone. Beattie, a New Jersey native, released a low wrist shot at the top of the left circle that found the netting.

After seeing our effort on Saturday, I think we could have given a lot more in the first game. Mitch Witek ’16 The Bulldogs would double their lead just over three minutes later after a series of passes that connected four of the six Yale players on the ice. Obuchowski found forward Carson Cooper ’16, who skated into the zone before passing to linemate Trent Ruffolo ’15. The junior fired towards the Tigers’ net, where Nicholas Weberg ’15, waiting on the crease, redirected the shot past Princeton goaltender Sean Bonar. Shortly after, Yale was whis-

tled for three straight penalties, forcing the Bulldogs to play a man down for most of the remainder of the first period. The Tigers pounced on the second of their man-up opportunities with a one-timer at 14:42 to halve the deficit. Midway through the second period, Yale scored the eventual game-winning third goal thanks to a brilliant effort from Wilson. The forward, who earned a spot on the All-Tournament team, was on the ice helping to kill a Princeton power play after defenseman Rob O’Gara ’16 was sent to the box for cross-checking. After pressuring a Princeton player in the Tigers’ defensive end, Wilson won the puck and skated around a defenseman before finding Weberg who finished off the pass to earn Yale a 3–1 lead. The goal, Weberg’s second of the game, firmly put the Elis in the driving seat. Princeton forced Spano into just two saves in the second period and could not muster any opportunities against

a resolute Yale team. Princeton regrouped after the second intermission and put pressure on the Bulldogs in the final 20 minutes. The Tigers forced Spano into 11 saves but could not break through until 19:52 with a twoman advantage — Princeton had both a power play opportunity and an empty net. While Princeton narrowed the difference to one goal, the Bulldogs were able to safely see out the final eight seconds and etch their first win of the season in the record books. “I thought our level of competition against Princeton was the difference in the two games,” captain and forward Jesse Root ’14 said. “We played with desperation and intensity and that needs to be our mindset every single game.” Saturday night’s effort marked a significant turnaround from the Elis’ previous game against Brown. The Bulldogs dominated almost all facets of the game and secured a 30–24 advantage in shots. Wilson and Weberg were the top two stars of the game, and

Root dominated the faceoff circle by going 11–14 in addition to tallying four shots. The Bulldogs open their conference slate with four straight ECAC contests, a stretch that will begin with the Elis hosting St. Lawrence at Ingalls Rink on Friday. Contact Frederick Frank at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

Yale 3, Princeton 2 Yale

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Late Quaker penalty proves controversial women’s soccer From page b1 dith said. “None of our team saw it, none of the other team saw it. The only person that saw it was the referee.” The referee appeared to call the penalty on defender Christina Bradley ’16 for pushing a Quaker in the box. With Yale stunned and Penn (10–1–4, 3–1–1) elated, Scalora managed to squeak the penalty kick just past the outstretched fingertips of diving goalkeeper Elise Wilcox ’15. “It was such an emotional roller coaster,” captain and defender Shannon McSweeney ’14 said. “I went from excitement that we were about to get our third win in the Ivy League, to anger about the call and then I was ultimately so upset that we ended in a tie.” The late Quaker goal thwarted what seemed to be inevitable so late in the contest: Wilcox’s third straight shutout. With goalkeeper Rachel Ames ’16 scheduled for concussion tests this week, Meredith said it looks as though Wilcox will remain in net for the near future.

“Elise made a couple big-time saves for us,” Meredith said. “I was frustrated for her that she couldn’t get that third shutout in a row.” The first half of action saw neither side gain an advantage on the scoreboard, though Penn seemed to have the upper hand on the field. The Quakers outshot the Bulldogs nine to four, but Wilcox’s seven first-half saves kept the game scoreless. In the 76th minute, Yale broke through and appeared destined for its highest-profile win of the season. Forward Melissa Gavin ’15 directed a corner kick into the box, where players on each side got a piece of the ball. Eventually, forward Paula Hagopian ’16 caught hold of the loose ball and fired it in for the score. The goal was notable, not just because it gave the Bulldogs the lead, but because of Penn’s robust defensive effort this year. It was the first goal surrendered by the Quakers in six October games, and just the sixth goal that Penn has allowed all season. Hagopian’s third goal of the season looked as if it was going to be the game-winner, just as

her other two goals this year have been. However, the 90th minute penalty kick sent the Bulldogs to the third overtime game of their campaign. Yale was 2–0 in overtime matchups this year heading into Penn, and the Bulldogs managed to have another strong overtime showing. Mere moments after the Elis felt as though the game had been robbed from them, the team showed pride and resilience in extra time. “Going into overtime, I think we showed a lot of character in the way everyone refocused on the game and didn’t dwell on Penn tying it,” Gavin said. “We stayed composed and stuck to the game plan, which killed Penn’s momentum pretty quickly.” Yale outshot Penn 4–2 in the overtime periods, but a gamewinner was not in the works for the Bulldogs. As time ran out, a frustrated Yale team had no choice but be content with the tie after pushing Penn, who is second in the Ivy League, to its limit. Despite now being mathematically eliminated from contention for the Ivy League title, the Bulldogs have exceeded expec-

tations. After one website predicted Yale would finish last in the conference, citing “a nondescript recruiting class and little returning talent,” Yale embarked upon a mission to prove the critics wrong. “That has been in the back of our minds all season,” Hagopian said. “We want to win out and finish second. Proving the naysayers wrong about us finishing in last place is huge motivation for us.” The Bulldogs will return to Ivy League action on Saturday as they travel to New York to take on Columbia (7–5–3, 0–3–2). The Bulldogs will have to fend off a hungry Lions team, seeking its first conference win of the season. Kickoff against Columbia is slated for 1 p.m. Contact James Badas at james.badas@yale.edu .

Yale 1, Penn 1 Yale

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james badas/contributing photographer

Defender Colleen McCormack ’17 (No. 15) played 45 minutes on Saturday.


page b4 

yale daily news  ·  monday, october 28, 2013  ·  yaledailynews.com

sports

71

Quakers slap Elis

Shots on goal this season for the Men’s Soccer team.

Yale falls in double overtime By Ashley Wu Contributing Reporter After 100 minutes of scoreless action, the Yale field hockey team found itself in a shootout against an Ivy rival. But the Elis were unable to muster a goal against Penn on Saturday, falling in double overtime 1–0 and 2–1 in the shootout.

field hockey Yale (6–8, 2–3 Ivy) had a chance to improve its record to .500 on the road against Penn (11–3, 4–1) on Saturday, but the game remained scoreless throughout regulation and two 15-minute overtime periods. The game went to a best-of-five shootout where the Quakers scored two goals to the Elis’ one, resulting in the final score of 1–0. “We fought hard but sometimes tight games like that don’t go your way,” Emily Schuckert ’14 said. The Bulldogs had opportunities throughout the game and a decided advantage in shots, taking 27 shots to Penn’s 14, but the Quakers’ outstanding goalkeeper Carly Sokach totaled 15 saves during the game, keeping Yale from scoring. Just as the Elis were unable to find the back of the net, the Bulldog defense also kept the Quakers from scoring

before the shootout. “I think, as far as our play, we did what we needed to give ourselves the opportunities to score,” head coach Pam Stuper said. “We dominated in the stats column in terms of shots. Our defense was outstanding; we held Penn, who has scored 50 goals, and 38 by their front three, scoreless over 100 minutes … it was a tremendous effort to keep them off the scoreboard.” The Bulldog pressure paid dividends in the second half when the team generated nine penalty corners to Penn’s five. This effort came after the Elis earned only two penalty corners in the first half to Penn’s six. Even as Yale kept piling on shots and applying pressure, the Elis were unable to get one into the back of the cage. “We just struggled to find the back of the net and it carried over from regulation to overtime and the shootout,” Stuper said. “If one of our 16 shots on goal had fallen in, the game would have been over.” After 100 minutes of intense play, the game came down to a shootout. Neither team scored in the first two rounds, but Penn scored first in the third on a goal by attacker Elizabeth Hitti. Schuckert scored a goal in the fourth round to bring the score to 1–1. In the last round, Penn attacker Julie Tahan scored. see field hockey page b2

maria zepeda/senior photographer

Forward Cameron Kirdzik ’17 (No. 20) tallied his fourth goal of the season on Saturday, scoring in the 58th minute. By Frederick Frank Staff Reporter The men’s soccer team had a taste of its own medicine on Saturday night, falling to Penn after allowing two late goals. With the 3–2 overtime defeat, the Bulldogs (3–9–1, 2–1–1 Ivy) fell three points behind the Ancient Eight-leading Quakers (6–6–1, 3–0–1 Ivy).

men’s soccer “It’s definitely a setback, but I think we are still in contention [for the League title],” defender Nick Alers ’14 said in an email to the News. “There are a lot of games left to be played.” Yale missed its chance to pull ahead in the conference standings, but the team’s first loss in the Ivy League has not eliminated the Elis’ chances at an Ivy Championship.

The Bulldogs led twice in the game but surrendered both leads before falling in overtime. With their late game heroics, the Quakers mirrored the Elis’ success in the clutch: Yale has scored late in two Ivy games to claim victory. Yale first went ahead just before the end of the opening half. Henry Albrecht ’17 scored the first goal of his Yale career on a free kick with 51 seconds remaining before halftime. Shortly after the intermission, however, the Quakers evened the score on a corner kick in the 53rd minute. The Elis’ offense responded just over five minutes later. Albrecht played a ball to his classmate Cameron Kirdzik ’17 at the far post, where the forward was able to tap the ball in for a 2–1 lead. Kirdzik now leads the Ivy League in shots with 35, and the goal was the freshman’s fourth this season, putting him into a tie for top scorer on the team with forward Peter

Jacobson ’14. But Penn came back again, scoring in the 87th minute to tie the game. Stephen Baker, who assisted on the Quakers’ previous goal, sent a cross into the box, where defender Johnny Dolezal headed the ball into Yale’s net. Both teams had chances to win in the final minutes of regulation. Yale goalkeeper Blake Brown ’15 was forced into a save in the 89th minute off of a Penn forward’s shot. The Bulldogs’ chance quickly followed as winger Cody Wilkins ’14 had his effort saved with just four seconds remaining in regulation. Just three minutes into overtime, the Quakers scored an odd goal to give Penn a crucial win and hand Yale a heartbreaking loss. Brown attempted to clear the ball out of the Bulldog end, but the effort was blocked. The see men’s soccer page b2

jennifer cheung/senior photographer

The field hockey team dropped a heartbreaker to Penn on Saturday, falling 1–0 after a 2–1 shootout.

First Place at Princeton Chase By Greg Cameron Contributing Reporter With one last chance to set the stage for the spring season, the Yale men’s lightweight crew team made its final regatta count.

men’s crew The Eli varsity crew won the lightweight eights race at the Princeton Chase regatta on Sunday over a field of IRA crews that included Princeton and Harvard, both of which placed above Yale at the Head of the Charles last week. “We had the fastest time of any crew on the lake today, including the heavyweight men,” head coach Andy Card said in an email to the News. “An unexpected result, and I hope that it shows the speed of our league to everyone.” Yale’s time of 13:05.743 was fastest of the lightweights by nearly 15 seconds. Princeton finished the course in 13:20.601 for second place, and Cornell came in at 13:22.461 for third. The event was a head race, meaning the crews staggered their starts and raced against the clock instead of each other. Harvard was the first to start the varsity eight race, followed immediately by the Yale crew. The Bulldog eight were fast enough to overtake their rival just before the halfway see men’s crew page b2

catherine foster/contributing photographer

The men’s lightweight crew team took first place in the lightweight eights race at the Princeton Chase.

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