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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 81 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

28 32

CROSS CAMPUS

SNOWY CAMPUS GROUNDHOG EYES SHORTER WINTER

SHARE

O’NEILL PROGRAM

MEN’S HOCKEY

Center doubles staff, relocates to larger office to expand outreach

YALIES SUPPORT PLAYWRITING OF CO-OP STUDENTS

Elis defeat Princeton before falling 6-2 to Quinnipiac on Saturday

PAGE 10 THROUGH THE LENS

PAGE 3 SPORTS

PAGE 3 CULTURE

PAGE 12 SPORTS

RAVENS DEFEAT 49ERS, 34-31

Super Bowl Solidarity.

Twenty-six students from Sandy Hook Elementary School sang “America the Beautiful” during yesterday’s Super Bowl XLVII, marking a touching tribute to the 26 students and faculty members who were killed during the Dec. 14 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary. The students were joined midway through their performance by Grammy Award-winning singer Jennifer Hudson.

BY LORENZO LIGATO STAFF REPORTER

Speaking of the Super Bowl, New Haven’s very own

Union Station made a guest appearance last night when it was featured in a local Super Bowl commercial for the Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven. In the commercial, young singers from the Fairfield County Children’s Choir sang BoDeans’ “Closer to Free” as they participated in a flash mob held in the train station. Over the weekend, the Yale

College Council appointed Andrea Villena ’15 as the new YCC secretary. Villena, who will replace former YCC Secretary Leandro Leviste ’15, said she hopes to carve out a “more comprehensive image of YCC publicity” and keep better track of the YCC’s communication with the student body.

They are the 1 percent. More

than half of the 125 students implicated in Harvard’s cheating scandal were asked to withdraw temporarily from the university, Harvard administrators announced on Friday. The decision marked an end to the monthslong investigation that began after nearly half of the 279 students in Government 1310 “Introduction to Congress” were accused of collaboration on their take-home final exam last year.

Play it safe. Three New Haven

restaurants — Great Wall, Dee Asian Kitchen and Sahara Middle Eastern Cuisine — failed the city’s most recent round of health inspections, according to the New Haven Independent. Restaurants are ranked on a scale from 1 to 100 and need to receive at least an 80 to pass their inspection.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

RAY LEWIS ENDS CAREER ON A HIGH NOTE The Baltimore Ravens overcame a second-half surge by the San Francisco 49ers to win Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans. Beyoncé’s stunning halftime performance seemed to overpower the Superdome; a blackout of roughly 30 minutes followed the show.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1994 Yale College Dean Richard Brodhead ’68 GRD ’72 creates the Committee on Math Instruction to examine teaching and curricular issues with the University’s introductory math courses and how well they prepare students for quantitative or scientific majors. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Nearly 14 months after the fatal U-Haul crash at the 2011 Yale-Harvard tailgate, Brendan Ross ’13 has agreed to enter a probationary program that will allow him to maintain a clean record. At a Feb. 1 hearing in New Haven Superior Court, Ross was granted accelerated rehabilitation, a program that offers firsttime offenders a path to a clean record upon completion of probation without violation. Under the plea deal, his charges have been revised to reckless driving and reckless endangerment. Ross had previously pleaded not guilty to charges of negligent homicide with a motor vehicle and reckless driving — charges that would have precluded him from participating in the probationary program. Ross was driving a U-Haul into the tailgate area before the Yale-Harvard football game on Nov. 19, 2011, when the vehicle accelerated and swerved into the Yale Bowl’s D-Lot around 9:39

a.m., killing 30-year-old Nancy Barry and injuring Sarah Short SOM ’13 and Harvard employee Elizabeth Dernbach. As part of the resolution, the 22-year-old will have to complete a total of 400 hours of community service at a location “that seems acceptable to the state’s attorney office,” Ross’ lawyer William F. Dow III ’63 said. Dow told the News that he and Ross are “happy about the resolution,” which he said was reached in agreement with Barry’s family and the two other women involved in the crash. “Brendan Ross is an outstanding young man who was involved in a tragic accident,” Dow said in a statement last Friday. “He will emerge from this without a criminal record, but the memory of that tragedy remains. Brendan and his family have extended their condolences to Ms. Barry’s family when the accident occurred. Ms. Barry remains in their prayers.” Barry was transported to SEE RESOLUTION PAGE 4

Holder-Winfield joins mayoral race BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Two months after setting up an exploratory committee to consider a potential mayoral run, Connecticut State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield filed campaign papers with the city clerk Friday morning to formalize his bid for the mayor’s office. His candidacy now official, Holder-Winfield joins Ward 10 Alderman Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 and Sundiata Keitazulu, a plumber and New Haven resident, in the race to replace Mayor John DeStefano Jr., who announced last week that he will not seek an 11th term in office. That field of candidates is expected to widen in the wake of DeStefano’s announcement, as a number of prominent Elm City residents and city officials are considering a run.

Budget issues. Connecticut

Gov. Dannel Malloy is expected to unveil his budget plan on Wednesday, which will detail how he hopes to deal with a projected budget deficit of nearly $2 billion over the next two years. Malloy has said that his plan will not involve any new taxes.

Ross ’13 enters probation program

Holder-Winfield said he is running for mayor to help New Haven realize its full potential. “I see a city that has a lot of good things in it, but also a city where, for a long time, not everyone has been able to participate because of failing schools, poverty and violence,” he said. “I want to fix the issues in New Haven so that everyone can have a chance. New Haven has the potential to be the greatest city in Connecticut.” Education, economic revitalization and a lower crime rate will form the centerpiece of his platform, Holder-Winfield added. In advance of his official campaign kickoff party this Saturday, Holder-Winfield said he is working to build his staff, including hiring a campaign treasurer and spokesperson. Like Elicker, Holder-Winfield said his campaign will rely on public cam-

paign financing, limiting the total amount of money that HolderWinfield can fundraise to run for mayor. Holder-Winfield represents Connecticut’s 94th Assembly District, which comprises portions of New Haven and Hamden. He said his experience as a legislator and community activist has prepared him to be mayor. “People have asked the question about me, ‘Have you ever run anything?’” he said. “The answer is yes — I was chief electrical adviser for an engineering company called Alstom from 2000 to 2003 and controlled that whole sector of the project.” Before working for Alstom, Holder-Winfield served in the military, working as a nuclear electrician based in Virginia. In 2003, he went back to school, studying political science at Southern Connecticut State

ADMISSIONS

Exploring social media BY AMY WANG STAFF REPORTER Full of nervous anticipation, nearly 30,000 high school students sat down in front of their computers this year to submit applications to Yale’s class of 2017. A decade ago, students wrote out college applications by hand and mailed them around the country — but in today’s world, the admissions process has become almost fully digitized, and student engagement with technology is at an all-time high. Aware that some high school students may interact exclusively online with universities during their college searches, Yale’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions expanded onto various social media platforms last year and has maintained a strong online presence

ever since. “It’s really uncharted territory,” said Mark Dunn ’07, director of outreach and recruitment for the Admissions Office. “Social media is new for all who have been involved. There’s continual overhaul and change.” The Admissions Office currently runs its own Facebook page, Twitter account and Tumblr blog in addition to its official Yale website, offering formal admissions advice but also posting quirky insights into life at Yale. Compared to admissions offices at peer institutions such as Harvard and Princeton who do not have other outlets outside of their official university websites, the level of contact between the Yale Admissions Office and prospective students is unusually high. “I think the online presence of a school definitely reflects

what kind of school it is,” said M.J. Engel, a high school senior at Phillips Academy Andover who applied to Yale this year. “And really, just the fact that Yale was willing to venture into the social media outlets said a lot about it — that it was adaptable to change and adaptable to new technology.” With the Admissions Office’s recent push toward social media, Yale has overtaken its peers in reaching out to prospective students via the Internet. But as front-runners in a still-new field, admissions officers are still looking into the best way to increase potential student interest and connect with their intended audience.

UNIQUE AMONG PEERS

For an office already lookSEE ADMISSIONS PAGE 5

CHION WOLF/CONNECTICUT HOUSE DEMOCRATS

Connecticut State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield officially declared on Friday that he will be running to replace Mayor John DeStefano Jr. University. After starting a company called Quest Educational Initiative in 2004 and becoming involved in community activ-

ism, he ran for the state House in 2008, where he led the effort SEE CANDIDATE PAGE 4

ACIR considers divestment BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER With students at 234 colleges now urging their universities to stop investing endowment funds in the fossil fuel industry, members of the Advisory Committee on Investor Responsibility said Thursday they would “investigate” divestment as a possible path for the Yale Investments Office. At ACIR’s annual open meeting last Thursday at the Law School, four Yale students delivered a 45-minute presentation on the harms of carbon emissions and reasons that the University should not profit from the use of fossil fuels. The students — members of the Yale Student Environmental Coalition, the Yale chapter of

the Roosevelt Institute and the Yale Environmental Law Association — began to draft the fossil fuel divestment report last semester and hope to work with administrators to determine the best way forward. Following the presentation, members of the the ACIR — a committee responsible for making recommendations to the Yale Corporation to ensure the University’s endowment assets are invested ethically — said they would be willing to work with the students this semester to explore the issues raised in the report. “I think the verdict was that there’s not a verdict yet,” said Abigail Carney ’15, one of the presenters from the Roosevelt SEE ACIR PAGE 5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “There is still too much sexual harassment and discrimination at yaledailynews.com/opinion

VIEW

E

WARNER TO WOODBRIDGE

Leading on campus and in New Haven ing years, the program will need to be strenuously re-evaluated to ensure it consistently achieves results that fulfill Yale’s investment. In turn, ensuring the program’s success can help promote New Haven’s emerging high-tech, postmanufacturing economy. Yale’s physical presence in New Haven must also be evaluated. The Levin administration engaged in an aggressive plan to purchase property around campus and renovate business space. The revival of Broadway and the ongoing growth of Chapel Street are testaments to this program’s success. We hope to see Salovey develop a cohesive plan with University Properties that can revive economically depressed areas while simultaneously combating the challenges of gentrification. Some reforms must occur closer to campus. A strengthened and supported Dwight Hall should serve as a conduit between service-minded undergraduates and meaningful work in the city. President Salovey will need to define and exemplify a culture of service that translates into plentiful and institutionalized service opportunities in New Haven. Beyond addressing specific policy platforms, we hope that Salovey will, when appropriate, serve as an active voice in New Haven. The Elm City has increasingly found itself at the center of heated national debates — the role of affirmative action and diversity, the future of immigration reform — on topics that find parallels in campus life. As debate ensues on a national stage, we hope Salovey can take a stand for the University’s values in New Haven. With active and principled leadership, Salovey can build upon Levin’s successes to ensure greater prosperity for both Yale and New Haven.

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 81

'ANON' ON 'SEXUAL MISCONDUCT COMPLAINTS DECREASE'

The age of personality

NEWS’

The relationship between Yale and New Haven requires a special responsibility for the University president. Not only must he be a leader on our own campus, but he must be a leader in our city. Few universities have such an inextricable relationship with the city they call home. When Mayor John DeStefano Jr. steps down from office next January, it will be incumbent on President Salovey to establish a healthy relationship with the new mayor. But no matter how many mayors come and go during Salovey’s tenure, we hope to see him focus on the city itself and, given his limited time and resources, concentrate his efforts in areas where Yale can make a tangible difference. The current relationship between Yale and New Haven is far from guaranteed. Just over two decades ago, the University president did not even live full time in New Haven. The interests of the University were frequently considered at odds with those of the city. The mentality many at Yale have developed since — that what is good for New Haven is often good for Yale — is something that a Salovey administration must affirm in its decision-making. Similarly, Yale may not always experience the favorable political arrangement it has seen. In coming elections, Yale may find a mayor or Board of Aldermen less receptive to the University’s agenda. We hope Salovey will be ready to negotiate and navigate these challenges. We can thank President Levin for his efforts to build our current relationship, and we hope Salovey can continue this progress. Yet merely continuing Levin’s policies would not be enough to ensure a successful relationship, either. Levin’s commitment to New Haven Promise is laudable, but in the com-

Yale.”

d Koch died last week. He will be buried today. A former New York mayor who revitalized America’s greatest city, Koch was a largerthan-life personality. He had a signature catch phrase, “How am I doing?” and he was often blunt and undiplomatic. Two years ago, at a master’s tea in Jonathan Edwards, Koch called a student “stupid” without batting an eye. An outpouring of emotion and media attention surrounds Koch’s death. In a way, when the nation mourns Koch, we mourn a type of politics that revolved not around parties but around charismatic leaders who captivated our imagination and loyalty. The historian Warren Susman famously argued that America’s fascination with personalities emerged in the 20th century. We evolved from a 19th century culture defined by honor, integrity and reputation into a modern society intent on fame and uniqueness. Starting in the 1900s, we elected some distinctive personalities: Gun-toting, lion-killing Teddy Roosevelt; FDR, JFK and LBJ — each with his own three-letter acronym; Ronald Reagan, the epitome of political stardom. Ed Koch was such a

20th century personality, if there ever was one. In the past few years it seems our nation has NATHANIEL moved away the poliZELINSKY from tics of personality. Our leadOn Point ers blend into a mirage of dark suits, solid ties and flag pins — all seemingly identical in fashion and habits. Only failed politicians stand out for their quirks: Sarah Palin, hunting wolves by helicopter in Alaska; Herman Cain, the godfather of pizza; Howard Dean and his infamous yell. The successful candidate shuns personality. President Obama is academic, clinical and straight-laced. Joe Biden, with all his F-bombs, might be the one exception to this rule — and the administration has tried to keep his expletives out of public view. In the place of personality, 21st century leaders rely on ideology to define themselves. Their political affiliation becomes their identity. Without signatures of their own, politicians compete

to become more dogmatic, more of an ideologue to differentiate their names from the herd. As a result, a Congress that needs to seek pragmatism and compromise on so many issues — gun control, debt and entitlements to name just three — instead divides itself into two political extremes. And the American people follow that divide, splinting into equally extreme camps in order to define their own identities.

PERSONALITY MUST RETURN TO OUR POLITICS In contrast, the 20th century Ed Koch famously knew compromise. Because he possessed his own personality distinct from politics, Koch never needed his party’s stamp of approval. He broke ranks with fellow Democrats to endorse Republicans, like President George W. Bush in 2004. Today, many commentators remember Koch for his intellectual humility — he was not afraid to admit when his poli-

cies failed and co-opt ideas from across the aisle. Koch was his own man who thought freely, precisely because he was more than a collection of political dogmas. He embodied a world without ideological litmus tests. Koch’s death generates nostalgia for the old age of personality. While Americans know the 20th century had its elements of political extremism too (e.g. the ’60s), we can’t help but feel today’s gridlock is worse. There has to be some truth in the almost universal sense that the modern moment is uniquely and shrilly partisan. So, in our leaders, we want to see those quirks and whimsical mannerisms that make someone a real person, not just a party hack. America wants those little affectations like Harry Truman’s hat or John F. Kennedy’s thick Boston accent. We desire politicians who have their own identity, not merely those who regurgitate a fixed ideology. The folks in Washington should take note. Rest in peace, Mayor Koch. And may future statesmen channel your personality. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinksy@yale.edu .

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST K AT I E D O N L EY

A gift worth considering L

ast Wednesday marked the start of the 2013 Senior Class Gift campaign, an annual three-week opportunity for members of the senior class to give back to Yale. As one of four co-chairs for the campaign, I want to explain why I hope you join me in donating to the University. I also want to address some of the concerns I’ve heard about the class gift. When you talk with recent alums, they often remind you to appreciate your time at Yale — how your environment will never be the same again after. In these conversations, I always respond, out of habit: “Oh, of course, how could I not be appreciating it?” In truth, I usually get so caught up in the day to day that I take Yale for granted. Despite what I tell those alums, I don’t appreciate the experience. I think it’s normal. But in my eighth and final semester at Yale, I’ve realized how much I should have actively treasured my time here. Many things at Yale seem commonplace, but simply do not exist in

the outside world. I realize next year I won’t live somewhere where the guaranteed minimum wage is $12. Nor will I be able to walk less than a block — surrounded by beautiful Gothic architecture, no less — to see a Van Gogh. Next year, no one will be planning a study break for me during the most stressful time of the year. Nor will anyone fund my personal librarian and summer internships.

THIS YEAR'S GIFT WILL BE DIFFERENT This does not mean my Yale experience was perfect — far from it. There were times of stress, and moments when I felt frustrated. I’m sure that each of us could come up with a list of things we might want to change about this place. For me, the Senior Class Gift is not an endorsement of every choice

that Yale has made. But a donation can serve as part of the financial aid package that gives a student who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend Yale the opportunity to do so. The Senior Class Gift is a donation to the University’s unrestricted funding — money that goes toward immediate spending needs. We by no means expect huge monetary donations, and we hope to focus on the reflection behind the gift more than the amount given. This year, students will no longer have the ease of using bursar for their donation, and they also must make a minimum donation of $5 rather than $1. Donations can be given to a general giving fund or one of five specific subcategories, including financial aid, facilities and library resources. We do not want this to be a campaign that thoughtlessly nags seniors to donate for the sake of reaching a quota. We do not want this to be a campaign in which students feel undue pressure to give. Fundamentally,

both of these tones go against the meaning and mission of the Senior Class Gift. As a result, we have structured our campaign so as to avoid emphasizing competition or berating of those who have personal reasons for not giving. We hope the Senior Class Gift will be one way we reflect the sincere gratitude of our class toward the details that made our Yale experience just that: the Yale experience. Each of our individual Yale experiences has been radically changed by the generosity of past generations of students. They are the reason we have state-ofthe-art labs and libraries, and why someone’s means do not determine whether they could attend Yale. In just one month, the class of 2017 will be on campus for Bulldog Days. I hope you choose to join me in recognizing the importance of giving back for their benefit and saying “thanks” for all that we’ve received. KATIE DONLEY is a senior in Ezra Stiles College. Contact her at katie.donley@yale.edu .

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST JAC KS O N M C H E N RY

Trust the hog T

here are times when it is very easy not to trust your decision-making ability. The top of my list: mornings like last Saturday, when I woke up to the painful realization that, the night before, I’d had one too many Gourmet Heaven sandwiches. I began that morning in the throes of a fairly familiar existential crisis — the kind where I can’t look at my texts (sometimes not even my phone), and where the decision between brunch in a dining hall or breakfast at Blue State seems unbearably immense. Instead of choosing, I decided to lie on my common room futon, scavenge from an old supply of trail mix and try out this whole Tivli business — that’s where I found the groundhog. Punxsutawney Phil, at least according to the primarily German residents of southern Pennsylvania, can predict the future. Every Feb. 2, he emerges from his space-heated den, surveys the people around him and, depending on whether or not the sky is overcast, sees his shadow. If he does, winter continues for six more weeks. If not, spring comes early. Having no meteorological skill of my own, I cared very much about the advice of a small

woodland creature. (I blame Disney.) Phil did not see his shadow and I trusted him — I spent the next couple of minutes browsing for new pairs of Chubbies and boat shoes. The sort of experience I had Saturday morning is symptomatic of the sophomore slump, a decision-making paralysis where I question the worth of my work (check), spend hours mulling over my numerous flaws (check), and revert to nostalgia as a coping mechanism (check plus). I’m told that these flaws, given enough time, will develop into a “Lost in Translation”level of ennui: the Quarter Life Crisis. Around 25, I’ll drop out of a highly lucrative consulting career to find myself. This, supposedly, leads to me touring the world searching for meaning. By 27, I’m supposed to either be teaching English in a remote Thai village or running a failing, George Eliot-themed s’mores shop (“Middlemarsh”). The key word in all of this is “failing.” According to our own mythology, 20-somethings aren’t supposed to be good at things, and we’re supposed to hate the few skills we do have. The careers we start won’t be our last. And, unless we find “the one” early, the next 10 years

of dating will probably record more one-offs and false-starts than successes. And so, we slump. We spend the morning watching rodents on TV, avoiding confrontation, other people and, more accurately, reality. In college, this feat becomes even easier — what more does a good downward spiral need than central heating and a meal plan? But I have problems with the idea that we should be calling this experience a “crisis.” “Crisis” implies that something has gone wrong. Struggling to eat, being denied the protection of the law, serious medical issues — those are crises. Wondering whether or not your life will have meaning? That’s just being a person. Pretending that this kind of doubt will only come in the future minimizes the reality of the doubts we have now. People seem willing to say that they are taking a class with a professor they despise or doing an extracurricular they can’t stand because, in five years or so, they will hit the eject button and leave it all behind. That’s what happens in sit-coms. And what is minor college comfort compared to the big event? What is a dull Saturday morning compared to the

inevitable (according to this way of thinking) grand collapse of being 25, living my life like a character in “Girls,” and messing it all up? In my opinion, telling me that I’m going to have a “quarter life crisis” is just another way of predicting the future. And, like most ways of predicting the future, I don’t care. Of course growing up will be hard. Of course I will have doubts — I have them now. I don’t know how to avoid these melancholic weekend mornings, but do I want to recommend watching the Groundhog Day celebration. Thousands of people are on the television screen. The officiators wear funny hats. And, amidst the chaos, there is the sullen indignity of Phil himself. There’s something to the way the groundhog wriggles his nose at the crowd surrounding him and paws against the handler’s gloves as if to say: “Do you seriously trust me to tell the future?” This is followed by a frown at the camera. “Well, I guess I’m as good at it as anyone else.” JACKSON MCHENRY is a sophomore in Silliman College. Contact him at jackson.mchenry@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS SHARE doubles staff

“Also, I don’t know if this is harassment, but someone at the Today Show made me eat an unripe banana in front of her.” KENNETH THE PAGE “30 ROCK” CHARACTER

Intervention workshops conclude

BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER The Sexual Harrassement and Assault Response and Education Center has doubled its staff and relocated to larger offices over the past year as part of continuing efforts to expand its visibility on campus. SHARE hired two new full-time staff members in recent months: Assistant Director Jennifer Czinz, who officially joined the SHARE staff in July, and SHARE Associate Alison Doernberg ’99, who began last week. The center moved into a larger location on the lower level of Yale Health in September, a three-office space designed and constructed specifically for the organization, which now has four staff members. The primary focus of the center will continue to be “responding to students,” but SHARE hopes to offer more programs and events in the future that involve a larger portion of the campus, said SHARE Director Carole Goldberg. “We’d like to be well-known — the first thought that comes to someone’s mind with issues of sexual misconduct,” Goldberg said. “We want to offer a strong mix [of firstresponse services and other programming] and a larger staff will allow us to do that.” Yale has become a “pioneer” in providing sexual misconduct resources for students, Goldberg said, and other universities have approached the SHARE Center on multiple occasions to gather information on setting up sexual assault support and training programs. SHARE is continuing to expand its consent and sensitivity training programs and offered 14 sessions at Yale’s graduate and professional schools for the first time last fall, Goldberg said.

SHARE’s always been very accessible over the phone but it removes one more barrier to have the physical space. MELANIE BOYD ’90 Assistant dean, Student Affairs Calls and visits to SHARE grew from 65 in the 2010–’11 academic year to 82 in the 2011– ’12 academic year, according to SHARE Center reports. Goldberg and Czinz said they have spent the majority of their time taking calls from the SHARE hotline, but Doernberg’s arrival last week will allow them to be present at more events on campus. “Having been both a student and worked in the admissions office, there are aspects of the culture and community that feel familiar and will allow me to [better] engage with the community,” Doernberg said. SHARE aims to expand its campus presence in part by promoting its new location, staff members said. The area, designed by architect Rich Charney ARC ’76, is meant have a “home-like” feel and is designed to encourage walk-in visits, said Judith Madeux, deputy director of University Health Services. The center’s new offices are not shared with other departments and are more discreetly located than their previous offices on the first floor of Yale HEALTH, which Goldberg said makes the space more accessible and provides visitors with greater confidentiality. The center will use its new offices to host events, such as its new support group for undergraduate victims of sexual assault which begins the second week of February. SHARE is also planning several other new programs in an effort to be more active on campus and has met with various student groups as well as members of the Department of Athletics, Goldberg said. “SHARE’s always been very accessible over the phone but it removes one more barrier to have the physical space,” said Melanie Boyd ’90, assistant dean of student affairs, whose office addresses campus sexual climate issues. The SHARE Center was founded in 2006. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

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JACOB GEIGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The mandatory bystander intervention training sessions presented Yale students with scenarios they might face in everyday life. BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER All but two sophomores registered for mandatory bystander intervention training, which took place from Jan. 31 to Feb. 3. The 75-minute workshops — part of an ongoing effort by administrators to improve the campus sexual climate — taught students strategies for intervening in situations in which they notice that another person is at risk of sexual harassment or assault. The Communication and Consent Educators ran each of the 99 workshops for Yale’s 1,351 sophomores, which featured an instructional video and group discussions. Six students interviewed said they felt the training was largely effective but added that the workshops did not succeed in engaging all attendees. “I had several students say they thought it would be a total joke but the conversation was actually really

good,” CCE Matthew Breuer ’14 said. “Everyone has been jumping into the discussion — they’ve been really easy to facilitate.” Six of seven CCEs interviewed said responses to the workshops were positive, and three said they received strong feedback about the training afterwards. CCE Olivia Schwob ’14 said students were highly engaged and took the discussions in creative directions. The seven CCEs interviewed said attendance at the workshops was high and reported an average of two absences of registered students per meeting. CCE Kolu Buck ’14 said he saw mixed responses from students and noticed students were more engaged when they attended with friends or suitemates. “They’re the people you’re probably going to go out with on the weekends, so we want them to experience the workshop together,” Bucks said. Melanie Boyd ’90, assistant dean

of student affairs, said her office allowed students to choose their own timeslots in part to encourage sophomores to attend with friends. The trainings had a more serious tone than the freshman year CCE workshops because the bystander intervention workshops used group discussions instead of skits, said attendee David Shatan-Pardo ’15.

I feel like being in a bystander situation is a lot more common, that more people can relate to. DAVID SHATAN-PARDO ’15 “I feel like being in a bystander situation is a lot more common, that more people can relate to,” ShatanPardo said. “With [the freshman

workshops] I had trouble relating to it and having skits made people not really take it seriously.” The workshop presented students with common scenarios, which made the training more relevant, he added. Attendee Pablo Napolitano ’15 said he did not feel the trainings were effective because they were mandatory and thus students were not enthusiastic. Napolitano said he also thinks student leaders could have been more sensitive when discussing sexual misconduct. “They act like talking about sexual misconduct is easy, but a lot of people would prefer not to talk about it,” Napolitano said. Make-up sessions for students who had scheduling conflicts last weekend will be held this coming weekend. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

O’Neill program creates ‘chain of mentorship’ BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER This past Friday and Saturday, students from the School of Drama came together at the Yale Cabaret to read nine previously unperformed plays, written by students from Yale College and the Co-Op Arts and Humanities High School in downtown New Haven. This “Annual Festival of New Work” was the culminating event of the O’Neill Playwriting Program, the flagship program of the Yale-Co-Op partnership. The program brings together playwriting master’s candidates from the Yale School of Drama with students from Yale College, who then work together to teach playwriting at the Co-Op, explained Kjerstin Pugh, the after-school and summer program manager at Co-Op. The undergraduate students also have the opportunity to meet with their Drama School counterparts to workshop their own pieces, creating a “chain of mentorship,” Pugh added. “[The reading] is very fun but also very professional,” Pugh said. “Everyone treats it as a big deal — because it is.” The program kicks off in the spring when the Yale mentors develop a weeklong intensive course on playwriting for the high school’s freshman theater students and sophomore creative writing students — the two departments whose students are eligible to take part in the O’Neill program. After this, interested students can apply to attend a weekendlong playwriting retreat at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn. Pugh said that, of roughly 60 students who apply, 18 are selected, adding that keeping the group relatively small ensures a high level of individual attention and fosters a sense of community. “[The retreat] is a transformational experience for students

because of the creative, artistic freedom and trust we give them,” Pugh said. Anyone from this group of 18 is then eligible to participate in the playwriting after-school program during the fall semester, with six choosing to enroll this past fall. These students then spend two hours a week working with the mentors on developing their own work, each producing a 10-minute play by the end of the semester. Jason Dunn, a Co-Op student in the Creative Writing Department, said he had always had an interest in playwriting and had even attempted it before, but that he “needed a little push” to make his work more successful. “It’s a heightened experience you don’t get from a normal classroom,” Dunn said. Eric Sirakian ’15, who worked as an undergraduate mentor this past year, said he wanted to get involved in the program as a way to engage with New Haven, as well as develop his interest in playwriting.

without fear, without awareness of what their work is doing in relation to every other play that’s existed,” Sirakian said. “That freedom is enviable.” The mentors adopted a different, more “playful” approach to playwriting exercises for the program relative to their own work at the Drama School, Jung said, citing writing scenes based on pictures as an example. Mentoring in the O’Neill program is a paid student job, Sirakian said. Former O’Neill program mentor Caroline McGraw DRA ’12 said the experiences she had teaching while in the Drama School helped her understand how she could use her craft in other ways. It

is nearly impossible to make a living in America only writing plays, and she realized she could supplement writing with teaching playwriting. Other past mentors are already drawing upon their experiences through the program in their postcollege life — Kenneth Reveiz ’12, for example, currently teaches playwriting at the Co-Op. “[Teaching] gives us the opportunity to be playwrights, and also earn a living by doing something we care about and bringing that to other people,” McGraw said. The Yale-Co-Op partnership is funded by the Beinecke Library. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

They write really openly and without fear. … That freedom is enviable. ERIC SIRAKIAN ’15 Hansol Jung DRA ’14 said she enjoyed the chance to get in touch with the larger Yale and New Haven communities, adding that the experience opened up her consciousness to the other realms of theater at Yale outside of the Drama School. Sirakian said he has learned from working with younger students who are tackling the same challenges in writing as him, and from their more “unfiltered” style of writing. “They write really openly and

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Through the O’Neill Program, School of Drama students and undergraduates teach playwriting at the Co-Op Arts and Humanities High School.


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 ¡ yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Ross ’13 finishes trial

Field of canidates grows

RESOLUTION FROM PAGE 1 the Yale-New Haven Hospital shortly after the crash and pronounced dead at 10:16 a.m. Short and Dernbach were treated at Yale-New Haven Hospital and St. Raphael’s Hospital respectively and released in the following days. Ross passed a field sobriety test at the scene of the accident and was taken to the New Haven Police Department headquarters for questioning. Immediately following the accident, the NHPD launched a forensics investigation, which concluded in early April. A day after the Yale-Harvard accident, Dow attributed the crash to an “apparent ‌ malfunctionâ€? of the U-Haul, which had been rented by members of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. But an NHPD mechanic determined the truck’s brake system to have been in proper working order. After the NHPD forwarded the results of its investigation to the state’s attorney’s office for review, Ross turned himself in for arrest on May 4, 2012, as part of a deal reached between Dow and the state’s attorney. Shortly afterward, he was released with a written agreement to return to court. According to the arrest warrant application prepared by the NHPD, Ross “applied no brakes [on the U-Haul] as he traveled through the crowdâ€? and “failed to maintain control of his vehicle, and, instead, accelerated into a crowd of people.â€? Last September, Ross pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge of negligent homicide with a motor vehicle, a criminal act that carries a maximum penalty of $2,500 fine and six months of imprisonment under Connecticut law. The court ordered Ross to report back in January, as his attorney worked to strike a deal with the state that would revise the charges and make Ross eligible for accelerated rehabili-

“Regina George is an evil dictator. Now, how do you overthrow a dictator? You cut off her resources.� JANIS IAN “MEAN GIRLS� CHARACTER

CANDIDATE FROM PAGE 1 to repeal the death penalty in the state and has since worked on transgender equality and juvenile justice issues.

DEFINING A PLATORM

YDN

The tragic U-Haul accident that occurred before the 2011 Yale-Harvard football game prompted Yale to tighten tailgating rules. tation. Dow said in Friday’s statement that Ross is grateful for “the compassion shown by the Barry family and the other two victims� and for the “understanding approach taken by the State� in the resolution of the case. “It was a long and difficult road,� Dow told the News Sunday night. “We did exceedingly well and part of our ability to do so was because of the compassion of the very family of the victims. While Ross will have no criminal record, he still faces at least two civil lawsuits. In April 2012, Short filed a memorandum with the New Haven Superior Court claiming that she had suffered “severe and painful injuries� from the crash and seeking at least $15,000 in damages from either Ross or the

U-Haul Company of Connecticut. Short declined to comment on the legal proceedings against Ross. Barry’s mother, Paula St. Pierre, also plans to file a suit after criminal proceedings conclude, according to Ralph Sbrogna, her Worcester, Mass.based personal injury lawyer. Barry’s family could not be reached for comment on Sunday. Yale tightened its tailgating regulations in response to last year’s crash, banning beer kegs and U-Hauls and containing tailgates to a “student tailgate village� zone that would be set up before 8:30 a.m. and closed by kickoff. Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

Education reform — and specifically school board reform — has emerged as a significant issue in the early days of the mayoral campaign. New Haven Public Schools Superintendent Reginald Mayo, who has worked extensively in the past two decades alongside DeStefano throughout the school reconstruction and change initiatives, is expected to retire when his contract expires on June 30, according to City Clerk Ron Smith. Mayo’s announcement comes as the city begins considering reforms to its charter, which could lead to sweeping changes in the way members of the New Haven Board of Education are selected. Currently, the mayor has absolute discretion to appoint all board members, which some have said prevents an independent-minded board. Both Holder-Winfield and Elicker said they support a hybrid board that would be comprised of some elected and some appointed members. “There’s a tendency just to swing to the opposite — if you think education’s going in the wrong direction and you aren’t being heard, you want the board to be elected,� Holder-Winfield said. “I’m for a hybrid version of the school board because it allows the people to have some say but still preserves the mayor’s power to make certain appointments based on expertise.� Holder-Winfield said the superintendent’s position is likely to remain appointed, adding that Assistant Superintendent Garth Harries ’95, who has overseen much of the district’s school change process, is expected to replace Mayo. But Holder-Winfield stressed the need for a thorough search process to identify the best superintendent, saying Harries’ appointment should not be a

“done deal.� “I’m looking to meet with Garth prior to winning the race to make sure we’re on the same page about schools,� Holder-Winfield said. “Whoever comes in as mayor, Garth is already going to be there. My intention is not to get rid of him but to make sure we get the best superintendent possible. Garth may be that person, but he may not be.� Beyond his plans for education reform — which he said would include a renewed push on early childhood education — HolderWinfield said he will work to strengthen community policing in the Elm City. Holder-Winfield also said he supports transparent budgeting as one way to manage the city’s ballooning deficit. He noted that safety and education tie into economic revitalization, as the perception of a safer city would help bring businesses and commerce to New Haven.

SURVEYING THE FIELD

According to Elicker, his and Holder-Winfield’s policy platforms are alike, resulting from a “similar vision for the city’s future.� The difference, Elicker said, comes down to experience. “I have a lot of firsthand experience dealing with the city’s budget and operations on a dayto-day level,� he said. “I’ve been doing that for my constituents as alderman in Cedar Hill and East Rock.� Elicker has previously touted his attendance record at a range of city meetings and community gatherings as one of his assets as a candidate, a record that he said differentiates him from HolderWinfield. Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04, who has endorsed Elicker, said while the two candidates’ policy platforms overlap, Elicker’s approach sets him apart. “Justin’s vision includes bottom-up participation. He wants to get input from the entire community,� Hausladen said. State Rep. Roland Lemar — whose district also includes part of the New Haven — declined to

make an official endorsement, saying he would wait until the field “crystallized.� Still, Lemar described HolderWinfield as a passionate community organizer and an effective legislator. “Gary knows how to build coalitions to move an agenda,� Lemar said. “He has a strong policy mind and an incredibly work ethic. He is willing to say or do anything to get progressive change accomplished.� Lemar said Holder-Winfield’s signature achievement in the Connecticut House was his leadership on the repeal of the death penalty. He also said the candidate has been an advocate for school reform, principally working on literacy rates among young children. Other possible mayoral candidates — all of whom have suggested they might be interested in a run — include Hillhouse High School Principal Kermit Carolina, Probate Court Judge Jack Keyes, State Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney, Board of Aldermen President Jorge Perez and State Rep. Patricia Dillon.

GA RY H O L D E R -W I N F I E L D HOUSE TENURE Holder-Winfield won an open seat to the Connecticut House in 2008, where he was a principal leader of the 2012 repeal of the death penalty in the Connecticut House. Also in 2012, he championed a bill combating racial profiling. During his time in office, he has worked on juvenile justice and transgender equality issues. He is vice chair of the Judiciary Committee and serves on the Appropriations and Human Services committees.

Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

TIMELINE GARY HOLDERWINFIELD 1994-2000 Serves in the military, based in Virginia working as a nuclear electrician. 2000-2003 Works as chief electrical adviser for Alstom, an engineering company located in Milford, Conn. 2003-2008 Returns to school, studying political science at Southern Connecticut State University. Simultaneously, Holder-Winfield becomes involved in community activism, working for local groups such as People Against Injustice. 2004 Starts a company called Quest Educational Initiative, which has since been taken over by HolderWinfield’s wife. The company runs diversity programs and job training. 2008-PRESENT Represents Connecticut’s 94th District, which comprises parts of New Haven and Hamden.

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT

“I couldn’t sleep a wink. I am so better fit for Yale than this ‘Rory.’” BLAIR WALDORF “GOSSIP GIRL” CHARACTER

Yale admissions ahead of the curve ADMISSIONS FROM PAGE 1 ing to broaden its outreach in every possible way, an initial expansion into social media was a logical next step. In 2010, the Admissions Office completely overhauled its website, reconfiguring its design and content for the first time in roughly a decade. Last year, with the launch of the Twitter and Tumblr — in addition to increased engagement with the Undergraduate Admissions Facebook page — the office moved to the forefront of all other Ivy League admissions offices in terms of online engagement. “We definitely have a more aggressive stance toward social media,” said Bowen Posner, senior assistant director of admissions. The Admissions Office’s Tumblr, which debuted over the summer, greets prospective students with bright snippets of campus life using images such as a dressed-up bulldog and Y-shaped pumpkin carving. Updated several times a week, the Tumblr has 140 posts so far that include images of campus, videos of student activities, memes and quotes from students. The idea for a Tumblr blog came out of a University-wide push toward social media integration that began last year, led by Yale’s Office of Public Affairs and Communications. Dunn said admissions staff members generated outlets to reach a potential audience of thousands of high school students on a variety of social platforms. Since then, he added, the office has been “thrilled with the results.” “Yale has a vibe that is welcoming and open-ended — we hope the vibe online is consistent with the sort of place Yale is,” said Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel, adding that he views the office’s social media presence as “tapping into the creativity” of the student body and the University. The generation of content within the social media sites is a task that falls to staff and students who work at the Admissions Office, Posner said. Though

it is uncommon for universities to allow students so much control in admissions-related material, Posner and Dunn said the student staff members contribute a great amount of “creative energy and willingness to experiment.” The majority of admissions offices at other Ivy League schools do not have a social media presence beyond a Facebook page. Princeton and Harvard, in particular, have no Facebook pages specifically designated for their admissions offices. Katherine Santos-Coy, senior assistant director for communications and media at the Dartmouth Admissions Office, said in an email to the News that her office is interested in branching out its social media as a way to remain accessible to high school students. The Dartmouth Admissions Office does not have a Tumblr, but it has a Twitter account that is updated every few days as well as a Facebook page. “We know that many of the students who are interested in Dartmouth can’t afford a visit, and if we give them a taste of the Dartmouth experience over the Internet, it’s a win-win,” SantosCoy said. She added that Dartmouth does not benchmark its social media presence against other admissions offices at peer institutions. Admissions offices at the six other Ivy League universities could not be reached for comment.

What we’re trying to do with social media is take down that wall between us and prospective students. GARRETT BRINKER Director of undergraduate outreach, University of Chicago Chuck Hughes, president of college admissions consulting service Road to College and a former admissions officer at Harvard, called the Yale Admis-

YALE UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS BLOG

The Admissions Office engages with admitted students through a variety of social media, including Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr.

Students weigh fossil fuels ACIR FROM PAGE 1

YALE UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS BLOG

The Yale Admissions Office’s recruitment initiatives rely heavily on social media, such as posting memes to its Tumblr blog. sions Office’s move toward social media a “smart business play.” Eric Hoover, senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education, said he has seen conflicting opinions from various admissions officers at different schools nationwide on the topic of social media outreach. “A lot of schools are hesitant, and others are kind of wading into it and trying to figure out ‘what’s the best use of our time,’” Hoover said. “I think the challenge is [using social media] in a way that feels genuine and not forced, just like any other form of marketing.”

BROADENING LINES OF COMMUNICATION

Past the colorful pictures and catchy videos, admissions officers say that having a presence on social media sites is ultimately about dispersing information. Andover applicant Greg Wang said he enjoyed browsing the Admissions Office’s Facebook updates during the application process, especially for comments from other excited applicants and alumni. “I found it interesting how much information was out there,” he said. But ultimately, he said, his first and foremost sources for college information were the official university websites. Though the Admissions Office’s website remains the “primary source of information and point of contact” for its audience, Dunn said, social media has become a way to connect users in a quicker and oftentimes simpler way. Because students are “sophisticated communicators,” Brenzel said, the office aims to provide as much first-person access on as many platforms as possible. “We see the social media piece as a bridge piece,” Dunn said. “It directs people toward some of the important [website] content, and also adds a dynamic, up-to-theminute news piece. When some-

thing exciting happens, we can roll it out on social media really quickly.” In a world where online college forums such as College Confidential “have a lot of power” in student communities, Hoover said, colleges feel like they “may as well join the conversation” and “have two feet in that world.” Still, there are potential drawbacks. Since the takeoff of social media platforms is still relatively new, few institutions have formally discussed its place in the admissions world. Because of the rapid turnover of content, Posner said, the Admissions Office sometimes finds it difficult to “[create] the content and [keep] the energy behind the creative process going.” Santos-Coy said a potential drawback is that the admissions offices “don’t always have control of the conversation.” Garrett Brinker, director of undergraduate outreach and senior assistant director of admissions at the University of Chicago — a school whose admissions office has experimented with various platforms such as Pinterest and live webcasts on Google Plus — said that since high school applicants spend a lot of their time on social media sites, reaching out on those platforms can really be beneficial. “What we’re trying to do with social media is take down that wall between us and prospective students, and give them an opportunity to interact with us on a genuine basis,” Brinker said. The Admissions Office plans to continually grow its online presence by adapting to changing trends in social media, Dunn said. “What Yale is doing now might be different from what we’re doing in six months,” he said. “The same may be true of our peers as well.” Contact AMY WANG at amy.wang@yale.edu .

Institute. Carney said that the singlespaced, roughly 50-page report covered topics such as the social harms caused by climate change, specifics about the fossil industry and information on Yale’s history of socially responsible investing. The version of the report presented Thursday recommended that Yale divest from the 200 companies with the largest carbon reserves, 100 of which are oil and gas companies and 100 of which are coal companies, Carney said. Patrick Reed ’15, president of YSEC, said the meeting went much better than he expected, adding that the presenters had been unsure whether the report would be “rejected outright.” Organizers said they consulted the Ethical Investor, a 1972 book that the Yale Corporation consulted to determine guidelines for divestment, while compiling the report in order to apply the ethical frameworks discussed in it to the issue of fossil fuels. Alice Buckley ’15 said they not only had to prove that fossil fuels constitute a “grave social injury” but also that Yale has the capacity to “do something about it.” The students who presented Thursday are affiliated with Fossil Free Yale, the Yale chapter of the national movement to divest from fossil fuels officially launched last week. Fossil Free Yale follows a pre-determined national agenda and emphasizes student activism — their current activities include circulating a petition to the Yale Corporation’s Committee on Investor Responsibility, or CCIR, the committee of the Yale Corporation to which the ACIR reports, and educating the campus community about the harms of fossil fuels.

Buckley said the report is important for Fossil Free Yale because it demonstrates that the presenters had committed time and energy to researching the issues. “The report was really fundamental for the campaign because it gives [Fossil Free Yale] legitimacy,” she said. “We’re not just stomping our feet on the ground, we’re not a tree-hugging direct action group.” Members of the ACIR told the presenters they were impressed by the presentation. “At this point, it’s obviously a big movement,” Daniel Shen ’14, the undergraduate representative on ACIR, said to the News. “It’s in our interests to hear the concerns of the Yale community and see what we can do.” Shen said while the ACIR has not met privately since the open meeting Thursday, it has three possible ways to proceed — the committee could mention the fossil fuel group in its annual report to CCIR in late February, bring up the issue to CCIR on a separate occasion or do neither. Shen said that the ACIR must not only decide whether to bring the fossil fuel case to the CCIR but also whether to modify the presenters’ proposal. ACIR could choose to recommend that Yale divest from the top 12 fossil fuel companies instead of the top 200, for example, or could offer an alternative strategy other than divesting, he said. The final decision lies with the CCIR, which recommends investment policy to the Corporation as a whole, he said. Unity College, located in Maine, and Hampshire College, located in Massachusetts, have both agreed to divest entirely from fossil fuels. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T

Dow Jones 14,009.79, +149.2

S NASDAQ 3,179.10, +36.97 S Oil 97.77, +0.12

S S&P 500 1,513.17, +15.06 T

10-yr. Bond 2.01, +0.025

T Euro $1.3632, -0.0021

Lights out: Ravens beat 49ers

MARK HUMPHREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Baltimore Ravens players celebrate after defeating the San Francisco 49ers 34-31 in the NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game in New Orleans. BY BARRY WILNER ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW ORLEANS — From blowout to blackout to shootout, Joe Flacco and the Baltimore Ravens had just enough power to survive one of the most electric Super Bowls ever. The outage flipped a switch for the San Francisco 49ers, but the Ravens used a last-gasp defensive stand to hold on Sunday night, 34–31. America’s biggest sporting event came to a half-hour standstill in the third quarter when most of the Superdome lights and the scoreboards went dark. By then, the Ravens had a 22-point lead. Everything changed after that, though, and the 49ers staged a sensational rally before Ray Lewis and Co. shut it down. But there were plenty of whiteknuckle moments and the Ravens (14-6) had to make four stops inside their 7 at the end. For a Super Bowl with so many subplots, it almost had to end this way. Flacco’s arrival as a championship quarterback coincides with Lewis’ retirement — with a second Super Bowl ring no less.

The win capped a sensational month since the star linebacker announced he was leaving the game after 17 Hall of Fame-caliber years. The sibling rivalry between the coaching Harbaughs went to John, older than Jim by 15 months. “How could it be any other way? It’s never pretty. It’s never perfect. But it’s us,” John Harbaugh said. “It was us today.” At 4 hours, 14 minutes, it was the longest Super Bowl ever. Among the most thrilling, too. The loss of power delayed the game 34 minutes and left players from both sides stretching and chatting with each other. It also cost Baltimore whatever momentum it built, and that was considerable after Jacoby Jones’ 108-yard kickoff return and game MVP Flacco’s three touchdown passes made it 28–6. Back came San Francisco (13– 5–1) in search of its sixth Lombardi Trophy in as many tries. Michael Crabtree’s 31-yard touchdown reception on which he broke two tackles made it 28–13. A couple minutes later, Frank Gore’s 6-yard run followed a 32-yard punt return by Ted Ginn Jr., and the 49ers were

within eight. Ray Rice’s fumble at his 24 led to David Akers’ 34-yard field goal, but Baltimore woke up for a long drive leading to rookie Justin Tucker’s 19-yard field goal. San Francisco wasn’t done challenging, though, and Colin Kaepernick’s 15-yard TD run, the longest for a quarterback in a Super Bowl, made it 31–29. A 2-point conversion pass failed when the Ravens blitzed. Tucker added a 38-yarder with 4:19 remaining, setting up the frantic finish.

It’s never pretty. It’s never perfect. But it’s us. It was us today. JOHN HARBAUGH Head coach, Baltimore Ravens Kaepernick couldn’t get the Ravens into the end zone on the final three plays — there was contact on Crabtree on the final pass that appeared incidental, and Jim Harbaugh insisted it was pass interference. Ravens punter Sam Koch took

Iraq vet charged in ex-SEAL shooting BY CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN AND JAMIE STENGLE ASSOCIATED PRESS STEPHENVILLE, Texas — An Iraq War veteran charged with murdering former Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle and a friend turned a gun on the pair while they were at a Texas shooting range, authorities said Sunday. Eddie Ray Routh, of Lancaster, was arraigned early Sunday in the deaths of Kyle, who wrote the best-selling book “American Sniper,” and Chad Littlefield, 35. They were killed at a shooting range at Rough Creek Lodge, about 50 miles southwest of Fort Worth. Travis Cox, the director of a nonprofit Kyle helped found, told The Associated Press on Sunday that Kyle, 38, and Littlefield had taken Routh to the range to try to help him. Littlefield was Kyle’s neighbor and “workout buddy,” Cox said. “What I know is Chris and a gentleman — great guy, I knew him well, Chad Littlefield — took a veteran out shooting who was struggling with PTSD to try to assist him, try to help him, try to, you know, give him a helping hand, and he turned the gun on both of them, killing them,” Cox said. Capt. Jason Upshaw with the Erath County Sheriff’s Office said Routh had not made any comments that might indicate a motive. “I don’t know that we’ll ever know. He’s the only one that knows that,” Upshaw said. Sheriff Tommy Bryant said Routh was unemployed and “may have been suffering from some type of mental illness from being in the military himself.” Bryant didn’t know whether Routh was on any medication or had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. Routh was being held on one charge of capital murder and two charges of murder. Upshaw said Routh used a semiautomatic handgun, which authorities later found at his home. Upshaw

said ballistics tests weren’t complete Sunday, but authorities believe it was the gun used in the shootings. Upshaw declined to give any more details about the gun. The U.S. military confirmed Sunday that Routh was a corporal in the Marines, serving in active duty from 2006 to 2010. He was deployed to Iraq in 2007 and Haiti in 2010. His current duty status is listed as reserve. Routh is being held on $3 million bond. Bryant said he believed Routh was in the process of seeking a public defender. A knock on the door at Routh’s last known address went unanswered Sunday. A for-sale sign was in front of the small, wood-framed home.

I don’t know that we’ll ever know [Routh’s motive]. He’s the only one that knows that. JASON UPSHAW Captain, Erath County Sheriff’s Office Kyle’s best-selling book, “American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History,” detailed his 150-plus kills of insurgents from 1999 to 2009. Kyle said in his book that Iraqi insurgents had put a bounty on his head. According to promotional information from book publisher William Morrow, Kyle deployed to Iraq four times. Bryant said Kyle, Littlefield and Routh went to the shooting range around 3:15 p.m. Saturday. A hunting guide at Rough Creek Lodge came across the bodies of Kyle and Littlefield around 5 p.m. and called 911. Upshaw said autopsies were still pending and he could not say how many times the men were shot or where on their bodies they were hit.

a safety for the final score with 4 seconds left. His free kick was returned by Ginn to midfield as time ran out. In the first half, Flacco was as brilliant as Tom Brady, Joe Montana or Terry Bradshaw ever were in the NFL’s biggest game. The only quarterback to win a playoff game in each of his first five seasons — his coach holds the same distinction — was nearly perfect. It was typical of Flacco and Baltimore’s postseason run. The Ravens stumbled into the playoffs with four defeats in its last five regular-season games as Lewis recovered from a torn right triceps and Flacco struggled. Harbaugh even fired his offensive coordinator in December, a stunning move with the postseason so close. But that — and every other move Harbaugh, Flacco and the Ravens made since — were right on target. Just like Flacco’s TD passes of 13 yards to Anquan Boldin, 1 to Dennis Pitta and 56 to Jones in the first half, tying a Super Bowl record. New Orleans native Jones, one of the heroes in a doubleovertime playoff win at Denver, seemed to put the game away

GERALD HERBERT/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Beyonce performs during the halftime show of the Super Bowl between the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens. with his record 108-yard sprint with the second-half kickoff. Soon after, the lights went out — and when they came back on, the Ravens were almost powerless to slow the 49ers. Until the final moments. “The final series of Ray Lewis’ career was a goal-line stand,” Harbaugh said. “It’s no greater way, as a champ, to go out on your last ride with the men that I went out with, with my teammates,”

Lewis said. “And you looked around this stadium and Baltimore! Baltimore! We coming home, baby! We did it!” It was a bitter loss for Jim Harbaugh, the coach who turned around the Niners in the last two years and brought them to their first Super Bowl in 18 years. His team made a similarly stunning comeback in the NFC championship at Atlanta, but couldn’t finish it off against Baltimore.

NRA criticizes universal checks

SUSAN WALSH/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the NRA, sits at the witness table during the Senate’s gun violence hearing. BY KEVIN FREKING ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The National Rifle Association’s executive vice president continued to oppose background checks for all gun purchases despite polls indicating that most NRA members don’t share his position. The NRA’s Wayne LaPierre said on “Fox News Sunday” that background checks for all gun purchases would lead to a national registry of gun owners. Critics say such a registry could lead to taxes on guns or to confiscation. Mark Kelly, a gun owner and husband of Gabrielle Giffords, the former Arizona congresswoman who survived a 2011 shooting, asked LaPierre to listen to his members. He said the current system prevented 1.7 million gun purchases since 1999. However, those potential buyers had other options because many gun sales don’t require a background check. “Members of the NRA tend to be very reasonable on this issue,” Kelly said, who also appeared on the Fox

show. As Congress responds to the spate of mass shootings in recent years, most notably the December massacre of 20 children and six adults in a school in Newtown, Conn., some are calling for a ban on certain semi-automatic weapons and on high-capacity ammunition magazines. However, calls for expanding background checks appear to have gained the most bipartisan support.

[Background checks for gun purchases are] going to affect only the law-abiding people. Criminals could care less. WAYNE LAPIERRE Executive vice president, National Rifle Association LaPierre said that requiring checks for all gun purchases would be a bureaucratic nightmare.

“It’s going to affect only the lawabiding people,” he said. “Criminals could care less. LaPierre was pressed about his contention that gun checks would lead to a national registry, when no one from the Obama administration is calling for that. “And Obamacare wasn’t a tax until they needed it to be a tax,” LaPierre said. Kelly and LaPierre agreed on one point: More people seeking to buy guns illegally should be prosecuted. “They should be prosecuted and there should be stiff penalties,” Kelly said. A key player in the coming gun debate in Congress, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, said on ABC’s “This Week” that he’s willing to take a look at legislation that would ban certain semi-automatic weapons, but he also noted that he voted against a ban on such weapons in 1994 because it “didn’t make sense.” He was more definitive on the issue of background checks, saying “everyone acknowledges we should do something with background checks.”


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Increasing clouds, with a high near 34. West wind around 15 mph. Low of 20.

WEDNESDAY

High of 33, low of 22.

High of 34, low of 22.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 3:00 PM Alexander Purves: Roman Sketches Unfortunately, no, this “Roman” does not pertain to either Nicki Minaj or her song “Roman’s Revenge.” Instead, we are forced to contemplate and eventually come to terms with our peculiar positionality within the Greco-Roman tradition vis-a-vis architectural legacy. Join Professor Alexander Purves in a tell-all exhibition of his sketchbooks, which contain impressions of buildings from Rome. There will not be refreshments. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), The Gallery. 4:00 PM Todai-Yale Lecture: “Digital Natives in Japan: Why Do They Tweet and Not Send Mail?” And with that provocative subtitle, this lecture promises to interrogate the issues surrounding the Japanese techno-socio-cultural complex. Tadamasa Kimura will be delivering the lecture, and he has engaged in digital native research since 2007. Come find out why Japanese digital natives tweet and text and blog instead of sending mail! Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Room 203.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

5:00 PM Maxim D. Shrayer on “Jewish-Russian Poets and the Price of Bearing Witness to the Shoah” This fascinating intersection between those human beings that are Jewish and Russian and — additionally — who write poetry has proven to be fertile ground for Professor Maxim D. Shrayer of Boston College. As the title of the lecture indicates, he will also be talking about the Holocaust. Yes, that is what “Shoah” means in Hebrew. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Room 208. 7:00 PM Presentation: “Zen Buddhism’s 10 Ethical Precepts” Presented by Steve Kanji Ruhl, who is the interim Buddhist advisor for the Chaplain’s Office, this discussion will center around those Zen precepts that serve as practical guidelines in life. How do we atone for our failures? How do we live in accordance with Zen principles when we have things like agency and freedom and discernment? The flyer advises partipants to expect to be “stimulated and surprised,” which is certainly promising. Branford College (74 High St.), Buddhist Chapel.

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By Bernice Gordon

5 Have inside 6 Take a break 7 Flu-like symptoms 8 Pokes 9 Three racing Unsers 10 Colorful garden shrub 11 Wife of a 6-Across 12 Ancient Peruvian 13 Turns blue, perhaps 18 Campus residence 19 Like someone pacing back and forth 23 Forehead 24 Rim 25 Comical Soupy 26 Material 27 Cheese city in northeast Italy 28 End of Rhett’s sentence that begins “Frankly, my dear” 29 Like a newborn 30 Relative worth 31 Put forth, as effort 32 Le Carré character

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

2/4/13

SUDOKU BASIC

7 1

(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Tokyo’s former name 37 Puts money (on) 38 Songwriter Jacques 40 Wears at the edges 41 Social network for short messages 43 Bids 44 Male offspring 47 Old Russian monarch

3

4 6 7

5 4 8 7 4 5 3 2 4 2 6 1 3

2/4/13

48 Prefix with sphere 49 Guitar ridge 50 Volcanic output 51 City west of Tulsa 52 Does some sums 53 Ashen 54 Hurries 55 Legal memo opener 57 Carpentry tool 58 Feel bad about

6 8

5 2

4 5 7


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

22

Months of Syrian Civil War

In March 2011 protestors across Syria began demanding the resignation of President al-Assad as part of a wider movement known as the Arab Spring. The Syrian Army was dispatched in April 2011 to quell demonstrations — a move that was widely condemned by international organizations.

Israel suggests responsibility for Syria airstrike BY DAVID RISING AND JOSEF FEDERMAN ASSOCIATED PRESS MUNICH — Israel’s defense minister strongly signaled Sunday that his country was behind an airstrike in Syria last week, telling a high profile security conference that Israeli threats to take pre-emptive action against its enemies are not empty. “We mean it,” Ehud Barak declared. Israel has not officially confirmed its planes attacked a site near Damascus, targeting ground-to-air missiles apparently heading for Lebanon, but its intentions have been beyond dispute. During the 22 months of civil war in Syria, Israeli leaders have repeatedly expressed concern that high-end weapons could fall into the hands of enemy Hezbollah, the powerful Lebanese militants. For years, Israel has been charging that Syrian President Bashar Assad and Iran have been arming Hezbollah, which fought a monthlong war against Israel in 2006. U.S. officials say the target was a convoy of sophisticated Russian SA-17 anti-aircraft missiles. Deployed in Lebanon, they could have limited Israel’s ability to gather intelligence on its enemies from the air. Over the weekend, Syrian TV broadcast video of the Wednesday attack site for the first time, showing destroyed vehicles and a damaged building identified as a scientific research center. The U.S. officials said the airstrike hit both the building and the convoy. Turkey, which seeks the ouster of Assad and supports the opposition that is fighting against his regime, harshly criticized Israel regarding the airstrike in Syria. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Sunday that Israel engaged in “state terror” and he suggested that its allies have nurtured wrongdoing on the part of the Jewish state.

“Those who have from the very beginning looked in the wrong direction and who have nourished and raised Israel like a spoiled child should always expect such things from Israel,” Turkey’s Hurriyet Daily News quoted Erdogan as saying. Erdogan, who also criticized Iran for supporting Syria, is a frequent critic of Israel, a former ally of Turkey. Relations hit a low in 2010 when Israeli troops raided a Gaza-bound Turkish aid ship, and nine activists on board were killed. Both sides accused each other of initiating the violence. In his comments Sunday in Munich, Barak came close to confirming that his country was behind the airstrike. “I cannot add anything to what you have read in the newspapers about what happened in Syria several days ago,” Barak told the gathering of top diplomats and defense officials from around the world.

We don’t think it should be allowed to bring advanced weapons systems into Lebanon. EHUD BARAK Defense minister, Israel Then he went on to say, “I keep telling frankly that we said — and that’s proof when we said something we mean it — we say that we don’t think it should be allowed to bring advanced weapons systems into Lebanon.” He spoke in heavily accented English. In Syria, Assad said during a meeting with a top Iranian official that his country would confront any aggression, his first comment on the airstrike. “Syria, with the awareness of

ABDULLAH AL-YASSIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Syrian man carried his sister who was wounded in a government airstrike that hit the neighborhood of Ansari in Aleppo, Syria, on Sunday. its people, the might of its army and its adherence to the path of resistance, is able to face the current challenges and confront any aggression that might target the Syrian people,” Assad was quoted as saying by the state news agency SANA. He made the remarks during a meeting with Saeed Jalili, the head of Iran’s National Security Council. Iran is Syria’s closest regional ally. Jalili, on a threeday visit to Syria, has pledged Tehran’s continued support for Assad’s regime. Jalili, who also serves as his

country’s top nuclear negotiator, condemned the Israeli raid, stressing that it has proven the “aggressive nature of Israel and its threat of the region’s security and stability.” The chief of Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guards said Sunday that Tehran also hopes Syria will strike back against Israel. Syrian opposition leaders and rebels have criticized Assad for not responding to the airstrike, calling it proof of his weakness and acquiescence to the Jewish state. The Syrian defense minister,

Taliban peace talks flounder BY KATHY GANNON ASSOCIATED PRESS KABUL, Afghanistan — The Afghan peace effort is floundering, fraught with mistrust and confusion among key players even though the hard-line Taliban militants show signs of softening and their reclusive, one-eyed leader made a surprise offer to share power in a postwar Afghanistan. The U.S. and its allies hope the peace process, which began nearly two years ago, will gain traction before most international forces withdraw from the country in fewer than 23 months. But although the Taliban appear more ready to talk than ever before, peace talks remain elusive because of infighting among a rising number of interlocutors — all trying to get some kind of negotiations started. Members of the Taliban are in contact with representatives from 30 to 40 different countries, according to senior U.S., Afghan and other officials The Associated Press interviewed in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Moreover, the relationship among the key players — the U.S., Afghanistan and Pakistan — is marked by distrust that keeps tugging momentum

away from the peace process. Many of the officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the sensitive contacts with the Taliban.

There were no preconditions to their release and we are getting criticism from our own people. ISMAIL QASEMYAR Member, Afghan High Peace Council Finding a path to the negotiating table will be a topic when Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Pakistani President Asif Zardari hold a series of meetings beginning Monday with British Prime Minister David Cameron. The meetings in London come amid fresh tensions between Kabul and its western allies. Karzai recently warned the West not to use peace talks as a lever against his government. As well, both Kabul and Washington are frustrated that Pakistan is not monitoring the whereabouts and activ-

ities of Taliban prisoners it released in recent months. Miffed by the criticism, Pakistan says it freed the prisoners at the request of the Afghan government and doesn’t have the resources to keep tabs on them. No one in either Pakistan or Afghanistan seems to know where the dozens of released prisoners have gone. Last week, the Taliban issued a statement by freed former Taliban Justice Minister Mullah Nooruddin Turabi on behalf of all the prisoners — an indication that at least some might have rejoined the ranks of the insurgency. “There were no preconditions to their release and we are getting criticism from our own people inside Afghanistan about that and it is valid criticism,” said Ismail Qasemyar, a senior member of the Afghan High Peace Council. The peace council, which Karzai set up to carry out peace negotiations, handed Pakistan the list of prisoners, including Turabi, which it wanted freed. They have also asked for the release of the Taliban’s former second in command, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, but Washington has urged Pakistan not to release him, U.S. and Afghan officials said.

ANJA NIEDRINGHAUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Afghan President Hamid Karzai turns around after reviewing the guard of honor during the first day of Eid Al Adha celebrations.

Gen. Fahd Jassem al-Freij, said Israel attacked the center because rebels were unable to capture it. Al-Freij called the rebels Israel’s “tools.” He told the state TV, “The heroic Syrian Arab Army, that proved to the world that it is a strong army and a trained army, will not be defeated.” Ahmad Ramadan, an opposition leader, said Syria’s claim that the rebels are cooperating with Israel “is an attempt by the regime to cover its weakness in defending the country against foreign aggression.” He spoke by telephone from Turkey.

While Israel has remained officially silent on the airstrike, there seemed little doubt that Israel carried it out, especially given the confirmation from the U.S., its close ally. Israel has a powerful air force equipped with U.S.-made warplanes and has a history of carrying out air raids on hostile territory. In recent years, Israel has been blamed for an air raid in Syria in 2007 that apparently struck an unfinished nuclear reactor and an arms convoy in Sudan believed to be delivering weapons to Hamas.

Iraq stock sale good sign for economy BY KARIN LAUB STAFF WRITER BAGHDAD — An Iraqi telecom company raised nearly $1.3 billion Sunday on Baghdad’s small stock exchange in one of the region’s biggest share offers in years — a sign of investor confidence in the fledgling private sector despite violence that still plagues the country. In a reminder of Iraq’s volatility, several suicide attackers on foot and in two explosivesladen cars assaulted a provincial police headquarters in northern Iraq, killing at least 15 people and wounding 90. Rescue workers led away dazed survivors, including veiled women climbing over debris, and pulled several mangled and scorched bodies from the rubble. The level of violence has dropped sharply since the worst sectarian fighting in 2006–2007, yet bombings and shootings still kill dozens of people every month. Investors say the continued security risks, along with concerns about official red tape and corruption, have restricted the growth of Iraq’s private sector. Iraq sits on vast oil reserves, and foreign investment has focused heavily on the government-controlled energy sector. So it was good news for the Iraq economy when nearly twothirds of the money raised by the telecom company came from foreign buyers. “Iraq is a very difficult place to do business in,” said Shwan Taha, head of Rabee Securities, the brokerage firm that organized Sunday’s share float of Asiacell, one of Iraq’s three main mobile phone service providers. “Iraq came out of a long dictatorship. We had 30 years of war and sanctions. We missed a lot of trains, not only one.” Iraq is now catching up, he said. “No foreign investors come to Iraq thinking they are investing in Switzerland, and for Iraqis themselves, these bombings are becoming daily occurrences.” Sunday’s share sale by Asiacell

more than doubled the market capitalization of the low-volume Iraq Stock Exchange in a single day, from $4.7 billion to $9.65 billion, said Rabee Securities. Asiacell had offered a quarter of its shares, or 67.5 billion. The initial share price was set at 22 Iraqi dinars, or just under 2 cents. Foreigners bought about 70 percent of the float and Iraqis bought 30 percent, for a total of $1.24 billion, the brokerage firm said.

It’s not easy to change … the mentality. There are delays. They are not in a hurry. TAHA AL-RUBAYE Executive Director, Iraq Stock Exchange Regular trading of the shares is to begin Monday. It was the first stock float on the ISX, which was set up in 2004, a year after the U.S.-led invasion that toppled Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. Taha al-Rubaye, the head of the exchange, said he believes it’s also the largest initial public offering, or IPO, of shares in the Middle East in nearly five years. Al-Rubaye said he hoped the Asiacell deal will send a signal to the government that investor interest is high and that it must do more, such as carrying out regulatory reforms, to encourage private business — in not just energy. Iraq has a Gross Domestic Product of some $130 billion, largely due to its oil wealth, and 95 percent of the state budget comes from the proceeds of oil exports. “It’s not easy to change … the mentality,” al-Rubaye said of Iraq’s decision-makers. “There are delays. They are not in a hurry. But I believe it’s also time because the relationship between Iraqis and the world is growing up.”


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

“[Blue Ivy]’s starting to talk. … It’s just such a beautiful time in my life to have a child and every day see something new and see her learn something new.” BEYONCE KNOWLES SINGER

C O L U M B I A D A I LY S P E C TAT O R

T H E D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

Student committed against will

Profs voice discontent with lack of diversity

BY ABBY ABRAMS STAFF WRITER After cursing at a professor during a Spanish final, former Columbia-Juilliard student Oren Ungerleider was involuntarily committed to St. Luke’s Hospital and kept there against his will for 30 days, according to a lawsuit he filed against the University this month. On Jan. 17, Ungerleider filed suit in the southern district of New York federal court, claiming that Columbia and Continuum Health Partners — the organization that owns St. Luke’s — falsely arrested and imprisoned him. The complaint also says that Continuum Health and four doctors involuntarily medicated him over the course of his hospitalization, which occurred in December 2010. The claim names Columbia and current and former administrators as defendants, as well as Continuum and the St. Luke’s doctors. According to the complaint, Ungerleider became angry after Spanish professor Ruth Borgman gave him an unfairly low grade on a final project and called her a bitch in front of his class during the final exam. He emailed Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Hazel May to say he was sorry and explain that he was being unfairly graded, but she told him to see a psychologist, it says. The complaint says that May directed Stephanie Nixon, then the director of residential programs, to visit Ungerleider’s Wien dorm room. She did so at 12:30 in the morning, accompanied by campus security officers, who unlocked the door. When Ungerleider resisted, Nixon called the New York Police Department, and three officers handcuffed Ungerleider and escorted him to the hospital. When he arrived at St. Luke’s, Ungerleider was interviewed by a

BY SETH ZWEIFLER STAFF WRITER

DOUGLAS KESSEL /COLUMBIA DAILY SPECTATOR

After cursing at his professor, former Columbia student Oren Ungerleider was involuntarily committed to St. Luke’s Hospital, where he was medicated against his will, according to a lawsuit he filed against the University this month. series of psychiatrists, and he refused to answer their questions, the complaint says. When he tried COLUMBIA to leave, three doctors tackled him and forcibly injected him with the drug Haldol. The lawsuit says that Dr. Tara Malekshahi met with Ungerleider and described him as having “grandiose and paranoid delusions” and an illogical and incoherent thought process. Malekshahi and other doctors medicated him against his will and kept him in containment, it says. Although he asked to leave repeatedly over the course of his monthlong hospitalization, he claims, Underleider was not allowed to. His twin brother, also a Columbia stu-

dent, tried to check Oren out of the hospital, but doctors would not release him. Ungerleider eventually requested a court date to challenge his hospitalization, but the appearance did not result in his release. Instead, he remained at St. Luke’s until doctors released him on Jan. 21, 2011, the complaint says. He took a year and a half away from school when Columbia refused to let him return, it states. Ungerleider, now a student at The Ohio State University, declined to comment, as did Columbia and Continuum Health, and May. Nixon did not respond to request for comment. “We want to get justice for Oren, we want to stop this happening to other people, and to get him compensated for the harm caused to him,” Ungerleider’s lawyer, Daniel Rubenstein, said.

Penn President Amy Gutmann is still under fire over claims that she has not done enough to promote diversity across the University administration. Africana Studies Department Chair Camille Charles — one of the six Africana Studies professors who signed a guest column to the president in The Daily Pennsylvanian on Wednesday — called a response by Gutmann in Thursday’s DP “disappointing.” “I would say that historically we have tried to be patient with administrative diversity because we have thought that President Gutmann’s heart is in the right place,” said Charles, a former chair of the Faculty Senate. “But over time, as the inconsistency and incongruence between what she does and what she says persists, it just hasn’t been enough. It’s very frustrating.” The column on Wednesday was spurred by the recent appointment of Senior Vice Provost for Research Steven Fluharty as the next School of Arts and Sciences dean. Last year, Charles said that she and a few colleagues had recommended a number of minority candidates for the position. Although she declined to specify who she recommended, she is “fairly certain” that one of the candidates made his or her way to the final round of decisions by Gutmann and Provost Vincent Price. The column — which has prompted heated reactions from many at Penn — also centered around a series of comments Gutmann reportedly made at an annual diversity dinner last spring. The professors were troubled by a response that Gutmann gave at the dinner to a question about why she has never appointed a “person of color” to a deanship of one of Penn’s 12 schools. “Her response was that she would not

just bring in someone who is not qualified, a comment implying that none of the people in the room were qualified to serve in these PENN positions, even though many of them serve in administrative capacities in departments and centers,” the professors wrote. “In her closing remarks [at the dinner], President Gutmann reiterated her dedication to diversity within Penn’s administration, admitting that ‘a show beats a tell.’” The faculty members said they would not be attending this year’s dinner.

There are areas, such as academic administration, where progress has been slow. AMY GUTMANN President, University of Pennsylvania Although Gutmann’s response to the column on Thursday reaffirmed her commitment to diversity, she did acknowledge that Penn has lagged behind in employing diverse candidates in the top ranks of University leadership. “There are areas, such as academic administration, where progress has been slow and where we need to work even harder,” Gutmann wrote. “We are unequivocally committed to doing just that.” According to data provided by Vice President for University Communications Stephen MacCarthy, 87 of the top 100 administrators on campus today are white. Seven of those administrators are black, while three are Asian and one is Latino.


PAGE 10

THROUGH THE LENS

P

unxsutawney Phil did not see his shadow this weekend. If we believe his prediction, we will soon bid adieu to the winter wonderland that has enveloped the Elm City. PHILIPP ARNDT, JENNIFER LU and ANNELISA LEINBACH document Yale’s campus before the snow gives way to spring.

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

SUPER BOWL Baltimore 34 San Francisco 31

NBA Boston 106 L.A. Clippers 104

SPORTS QUICK HITS

YALE-QUINNIPIAC COMMANDS HIGH PRICE RESALE TICKETS LISTED FOR $200 The Battle for Whitney Avenue did not end in Yale’s favor, but the game was one of New Haven’s biggest draws in years. Connecticut Post writer Chris Eisberry reported Sunday that tickets were available before the game on StubHub for $200.

NBA L.A. Lakers 98 Detroit 97

NHL Pittsburgh 6 Washington 3

NHL New Jersey 3 N.Y. Islanders 0

MONDAY

NFL AND HARVARD PLAN $100 MILLION STUDY Last week, the NFL Players Association announced a deal that will give Harvard $100 million over the next 10 years to study football player injury and illness. Dr. Lee Nadler, a dean at Harvard Medical School, told CNN the study is unique because it will examine the “player across his whole life, not just his brain.”

“We had a quick start, but we knew [Quinnipiac was] a top-ranked team.” ANDREW MILLER ’13 CAPTAIN, MEN’S HOCKEY YALE DAILY NEWS ·MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Yale crushes the Tigers, falls to the Bobcats BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER Less than three minutes into Friday night’s home game versus Princeton, men’s hockey starting goalie Jeff Malcolm ’13 was charged in the net and struggled to get up. As teammates helped him off the ice, Nick Maricic ’13, who had not played since Dec. 28, took to the crease, knowing he’d need a strong performance to bring the Bulldogs up from a 1–0 deficit.

MEN’S HOCKEY And he did just that. Yale (13-6-3, 9-5-1 ECAC) came back from behind to beat Princeton 4–2, with Maricic stopping 20 of 21 shots. The No. 8 Bulldogs started out strong again on Saturday in a highly anticipated match-up against crosstown rival No. 2 Quinnipiac (193-4, 12-0-2 ECAC), but they could not maintain their two-point lead and ultimately fell to the Bobcats 6–2. “As a back up goalie, you know it can happen at any point,” Maricic said. “This late in the year, you don’t want to go in because the only time you’re going in is if something bad happens. You try to focus on one shot at a time and don’t let things snowball.” Friday’s game started with a bang: the Tigers (7-10-4, 5-6-3 ECAC) got a wrister from the right circle past Malcolm just 20 seconds in. But the Bulldogs responded at 2:59 when Jesse Root ’14 took advantage of the Tigers’ “charging the goalie” penalty, scoring his seventh goal of the season and tying the game early — but not for long. Princeton forward Michael Sdao got one past Maricic at 3:16 and regained the lead for the visiting team. SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B3

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale came back from behind to beat Princeton 4–2, with Nick Maricic ’13 stopping 20 of 21 shots.

Bulldogs struggle on the road

Elis out of running for Ivy title BY FRANCESCA COXE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The No. 5 women’s squash team emerged from its most important weekend to date with its hopes for an Ivy League title evaporated but the chances of a national championship still alive.

WOMEN’S SQUASH

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Matt Townsend ’15 scored a career-high 16 points against Dartmouth on Saturday, but the sophomore’s offensive efforts could not save the Elis from a 71–62 defeat. BY ALEX EPPLER STAFF REPORTER While Yale’s campus buzzed with excitement over the men’s hockey games at Ingall’s Rink this weekend, the men’s basketball team went on the road with a chance to boost its conference record early in the Ivy League season. But the Bulldog faithful found little relief from the hockey team’s 6–2 loss to No. 2 Quinnipiac, as the basketball team dropped games to nemesis Harvard and bottomfeeder Dartmouth.

MEN’S BASKETBALL On Friday, a spirited second-half

comeback by the Bulldogs fell short as they lost 67–64 to the Crimson in Boston. The next night against Dartmouth, though forward Matt Townsend ’15 scored a career-high 16 points against the Big Green in Hanover, the Bulldogs dropped the contest 71–62. “We need to have the same sense of urgency when we’re trying to come back at the end of the game in the first five or 10 minutes of the game,” captain Sam Martin ’13 said. “Sometimes I don’t think we do that.” The Bulldogs certainly dug themselves into a hole early on Friday. Behind a 10-point first half effort from Crimson SEE MEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE B2

STAT OF THE DAY 3

Saturday and Sunday featured two must-win Ivy matches for the Bulldogs (9–3, Ivy 2–2) against No. 1 Princeton (8–0, Ivy 4–0) and No. 3 Penn (10–2, Ivy 3–2). The Elis, now out of the running for the Ivy League title, fell to Princeton 5–4 and Penn 7–2. Going into this do-or-die weekend, the Bulldogs suffered a devastating blow this week in practice when Kim Hay ’14 suffered a season-ending injury. Hay, ranked No. 6 in the nation, has been crucial to the success of the team so far this season. Hay’s teammates and coaches agree that Kim’s injury was one of the worst things that could happen during the season. “The loss of Kim was really a significant setback [for us]. She is not a player that we can replace with anybody near her level. Losing to Princeton without Kim shows that with her in the lineup the chances of [us] winning would be very high,” head coach Dave Talbott said. “With everyone moving down a spot, we are confident we would have won that match.” In front of cheering fans in a capacity-filled Brady Squash Center on Saturday, Yale was upended by the top-ranked Tigers in what proved to be a thrilling matchup. While the Bulldogs lost 5–4, the close score reflects a hotly contested match. Yale steadfastly won the first two matches, including a victory by Shihui Mao ’15 at the third position in five furious games. Losing the first game 11–4, Mao took the court in

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

No. 5 Yale was upended by the top-ranked Princeton Tigers in what proved to be a thrilling matchup. the second with a renewed focus and precision in her play, leading to an 11–5 win. In a seesaw battle, Princeton’s Nicole Bunyan took the third game and Mao responded to take the fourth. The match came down to the wire in the fifth and final game, where the impressive Mao dominated with composure and guile. After a few per-

sonal errors, her opponent crept back into the game with a score of 9–9. Mao produced the crucial match winner (12–10) off of a shot with difficult placement in the backcourt and gave Yale its first victory of the day. “Mentally, I usually just remind SEE WOMEN’S SQUASH PAGE B2

NUMBER OF BULLDOGS WITH TWO POINTS IN THE MEN’S HOCKEY 4–2 WIN AGAINST PRINCETON. Andrew Miller ’13 and Kenny Agostino ’14 each had a goal and an assist, while Tommy Fallen ’15 helped out with two assists.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS TIM TEBOW Despite not playing in the Super Bowl, Tim Tebow still found his way into the news Sunday. ESPN’s Adam Schefter reported that the New York Jets plan to hold onto Tebow with hopes of trading him, instead of releasing the QB at the beginning of the league year in March.

Men’s squash defeats the Quakers MEN’S SQUASH FROM PAGE B4 ber in the Ivy scrimmages. Credit to [Princeton] — they played extremely well and despite our best efforts came out on top.” The next day the Bulldogs turned it around with a 6–3 win over the Quakers (4-8, Ivy 1-4). Yale swept the first six spots, and Chan, Martin, Zachary Leman ’16 and Charlie Wyatt ’14 all won in three sets. Spots seven through nine were taken by the Quakers in long, drawn-out matches. Joey Roberts ’15 fell in five to Tyler Odell at No. 7. At the No. 8 position, Sam Haig ’13 fell in four to Daniel Judd and Sam Shleifer ’15 lost to Justin Ang in four. Robinson said he was proud of the way his team came back focused on Sunday and prepared to compete again. The Elis’ next match series will be at home. On Wednesday they will host the No. 18 Brown Bears and on Saturday the No. 8 Dartmouth Big Green. Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu .

KATHRYN CRANDALL/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Saturday’s loss against Princeton, the defending national champion, was No. 4 Yale’s first loss at home and in the Ivy League.

Ivy title hopes diminished WOMEN’S SQUASH FROM PAGE B1 myself that I have already trained so hard and I owe it to the team and myself to play my best in the match — that meant going after every ball and playing smart,” Mao said. The lead extended to 2–0 with the strong play of Issey NormanRoss ’15 at No. 6 with a four-game win. After a slow start, NormanRoss gained momentum with her agility and technique. Quick crosscourt switches, combined with her ability to always return to central court, led to wins in both the first and second games. Norman-Ross dropped the third game, 11–5, but swiftly recovered in the fourth to eventually win 11–8 and take the match. Despite 2–0 lead, the light at the end of the tunnel darkened as the Tigers would not back down. Princeton fought back with three wins at the No. 9 spot against Georgia Blatchford ’16, No. 2 spot against captain Katie Ballaine ’13 and No. 5 spot against Gwen Tilghman ’14. With Princeton now up 3–2 in the second round of play, Annie Ballaine ’16 came through for the Elis at the eighth position with a hard-fought four-game win to bring it even. Relentless play by the Tigers led to Yale’s losses in the fourth and seventh spots. Anna Harrison ’15 at No. 7 and Lilly Fast ’14 at No. 4 valiantly

pushed back, but were taken down in straight matches, securing Princeton’s win with a score of 5–3. Breathing life into the Bulldogs, No. 2 Millie Tomlinson ’14 played for pride and emerged with a decisive three-game win in the first position. The crowd roared as their home team continued to dig deep, but to no avail. With a 5–4 win, Princeton emerged victorious and took control of the Ivy League race. The sting of Yale’s loss will be fresh as Princeton returns in two weeks to the Brady Squash Center for the 2013 Howe Cup national team championships. Pressing on the very next day, the Bulldogs faced the Quakers in a match focused on national ranking. Penn dominated the day. The only wins for Yale were at spots five and one with Tilghman and Tomlinson, respectively. With Penn up 4–0, Tilghman picked up the pace, scrambled the full length of the court and convincingly pulled off a three-game win to keep the Bulldogs in the match and make the score 4–1. The Quakers capitalized in subsequent matches at spots seven and four, capturing the win by hitting the five-point mark. It was only Tomlinson, who won the last contest of the day in a relentless four-game battle, improving her individual season record to 6–1.

Yale women tie QU

At No. 2, Ballaine fiercely rallied for five tough games and created a presence on the court through her attacking precision, instinct and power. It came down to the fifth and final match, where the determination in both players was tangible. Ultimately, even though Ballaine lost 14–12, her play served as a model for her teammates of Bulldog passion and pride. “She pressed her opponents in both matches, losing in a tight three to Princeton and in a very tight five to Penn against players much higher ranked than her. [She has] shown the other players that we can step up and still contend against the top teams without Kim,” Talbott said. “[Katie] Ballaine has been an outstanding captain all year and has not let the team get down about or discouraged by her [Hay’s] injury.” Despite the losses this weekend and the Ivy League title out of reach, the Elis still have an opportunity to win the national championship. With two weeks and three more Ivy opponents, including Harvard, to use as preparation, the women are more focused and determined than ever. Ivy League play continues for the Bulldogs this Wednesday, Feb. 6 at 6 p.m. against Brown at the Brady Squash Center. Contact FRANCESCA COXE at francesca.coxe@yale.edu .

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Two quick first-period goals from Yale forced Quinnipiac to reinsert its starting goalie, but Elis could not find the net again. WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite the Ivy League title out of reach, the No. 5 Bulldogs still have an opportunity to win the National Championship.

including one from forward Kelly Babstock, the seventh-leading scorer in the nation. Babstock’s score, with just 30 seconds remaining in regulation, tied the game at two apiece, and after a scoreless overtime period, the game ended in a draw. “Losing the lead in the last 30 seconds of a game is really hard,” Leonoff said. “I’d rather us tie a game coming back from a deficit than giving up a lead.” Haddad agreed, saying that it was heartwrenching to let the win slip through the team’s fingers in the final minute. The third period collapse undercut a strong performance from Yale’s penalty-killing unit, which stopped three Quinnipiac power plays and has stopped 19 power plays in a row over the past five games. “We need to be tougher in the third period,” Leonoff said. “The opportunities that [Quinnipiac and Princeton] scored on in the third period — those are opportunities we prevented the whole game.” In order to get back into the playoff hunt, the Elis will need to earn some points in this week’s games at No. 3 Harvard and Dartmouth. “Hopefully we can take the fire that we

came out with during the first period on Saturday and carry that through the whole 60 minutes this weekend,” Haddad said. Yale has six games remaining in the season. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

QUINNIPIAC 2, YALE 2 YALE

2

0

0

0 (0T)

2

QU

0

0

2

0 (OT)

2

G: Astrom 1 (Yale), McGauley 1 (Yale), Babstock 1 (QU), Boulton 1 (QU) A: Kosta 2 (QU) S: Leonoff 34 (Yale)

PRINCETON 3, YALE 1 PRINC

0

0

3

3

YALE

0

1

0

1

G: Butler 1 (Princeton), Laing 1 (Princeton), Shanahan 1 (Princeton), Mock 1 (Yale) A: McGauley 1 (Yale), Butler 1 (Princeton), Four others with 1 (Princeton) S: Newell 28 (Princeton)


YALE DAILY NEWS · FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

Bob Schieffer, CBS News:“Would you want your children to play football?” “Absolutely.” ROGER GOODELL, NFL COMMISSIONER, RESPONDING TO COMMENTS MADE BY PRESIDENT OBAMA

Elis stay No. 2 in ECAC MEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE B1 The excitement of the first three minutes of play settled down and Yale found a rhythm. At 13:39 forward Kenny Agostino ’14 evened the scoreboard with a backhand goal off a rebound shot by defender Tommy Fallen’15. “They scored on their first two shots and I liked that our guys didn’t get rattled,” head coach Keith Allain ’80 said. “Also, our goalie got hurt early and was out of the game. We just stuck with the plan and were able to break through at the end.” Allain added that Agostino played one of the best games of his career on Friday and that after the Bulldogs tied the game at 2–2, they took over the momentum and did not relinquish it for the rest of the game. Clinton Bourbonnais ’14 gave Yale the lead for the first time all night with a goal three minutes into the second period. Princeton pushed hard in the third period, trying to bring the game into overtime at least, but team captain

Andrew Miller ’13 secured the Elis’ win with a goal off a rebound at 16:42. The Bulldogs outshot the Tigers 42–22. On Saturday night, with Malcolm off the roster and Maricic starting in net for the first time since Dec. 1, the Bulldogs took an early 2–0 lead against hockey powerhouse Quinnipiac. The Bobcats took three penalties in the first 10 minutes of play, and Trent Ruffalo ’15 and Stu Wilson ’16 capitalized on two of them. But the gameplay shifted in favor of Quinnipiac halfway through the first period. Yale took three penalties in the last half of the first period and two in the second, while the Bobcats cleaned up their play. The Bobcats scored a series of six unanswered goals, two in each period. Yale outshot Quinnipiac 13–8 in the first frame, but was ultimately outshot 39–32. “We had a quick start, but we knew they were a top-ranked team,” Miller said. “They weren’t going to shy away and just lie down.” Sophomore goalie Connor Wil-

son ’15 stepped in to relieve Maricic for the third period, but the Elis could not bring down their local rival, which has an 18-game undefeated streak.

We just stuck with the plan and were able to break through at the end. KEITH ALLAIN ’80 Head coach, men’s hockey Team staff have not disclosed the nature of Malcolm’s injury and it is unclear whether he will play next Saturday, as the Bulldogs travel to Brown (8-9-5, ECAC 4-6-5). “It’s really hard, I was a goalie myself and I give Maricic a ton of credit,” Allain said. “He hasn’t played a lot but he works extremely hard. I always told him you will get an opportunity, and when you do make sure you’re ready.” The Bulldogs will play their last

MEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

home regular season games on March 1 and 2 against Colgate and Cornell, respectively. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

YALE 4, PRINCETON 2 YALE

2

1

1

#

4

PRINC.

2

0

0

#

2

G: Bourbonais 1 (Yale), Miller 1 (Yale), two others 1 (Yale), Maugeri 1 (Princ.), Sdao 1 (Princ.) A: Fallen 2 (Yale) S: Condon 38 (Princ.), Maricic 20 (Yale) Goalie J. Malcolm (Yale) left game at 2:41 in first period (injury, return uncertain). Princeton scored twice in first 3:16.

QUINNIPIAC 6, YALE 2 QU

2

2

2

#

6

YALE

2

0

0

#

2

G: Dalhuisen 1 (QU), K. Jones 1 (QU), four others 1(QU), Wilson 1 (Yale), Ruffolo 1 (Yale) A: Federico 2 (QU), Langlois 2 (QU) S: Hartzell 30 (QU), Maricic 25 (Yale)

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Yale

9

5

1

0.633

13

6

3

0.659

2

Dartmouth

7

6

2

0.533

11

8

3

0.568

3

Princeton

5

6

3

0.464

7

10

4

0.429

4

Brown

4

6

5

0.433

8

9

5

0.477

5

Cornell

4

8

2

0.357

8

11

2

0.429

6

Harvard

3

12

0

0.200

5

14

1

0.275

WOMEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Harvard

14

1

1

0.906

17

2

2

0.857

2

Cornell

14

2

0

0.875

19

4

0

0.826

3

Dartmouth

7

6

3

0.531

12

7

4

0.609

4

Princeton

4

10

2

0.312

9

12

2

0.435

5

Yale

3

11

2

0.250

4

17

2

0.217

6

Brown

3

13

0

0.188

4

16

1

0.214

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

guard Wesley Saunders, Harvard opened up a 13-point lead on Yale going into halftime. The Crimson also drained six 3-pointers in the opening half, including three from captain Laurent Rivard. “In the first half we weren’t guarding the perimeter very well,” Townsend said. The Bulldogs increased their intensity in the second half, outscoring the Crimson by 10 points in the period, but their effort fell just short. With 19 seconds remaining in the game, guard Armani Cotton ’15 converted a lay-up to cut Harvard’s lead to three at 63–60. But as the Crimson players made their free throws down the stretch, the Elis were unable to get any closer. “It’s always a tough place to play, especially when it’s us playing there,” Martin said. “It was a tough game, but it was a fun place to play.” Although the close loss to rival Harvard certainly stung the Bulldogs, perhaps the more troubling result came the next night in Hanover. The Elis faced a Dartmouth squad that features only one upperclassman on its roster and that had won only one conference game in the last three years prior to Saturday’s matchup. Yet the Elis were dominated from start to finish by the Big Green in the nine-point loss. The Bulldogs ended the first half down seven points, 27–20, and the Dartmouth lead ballooned to as many as 15 points in the second half. For-

HARVARD 67, YALE 64

W L

%

W L

%

Harvard

4

0

1.000

12

6

0.667

Princeton

3

0

1.000

10

7

0.588

Cornell

2

2

0.500

10

11

0.476

Brown

2

2

0.500

8

10

0.444

5

Penn

1

2

0.333

4

16

0.200

6

Columbia

1

3

0.250

9

9

0.500

Yale

1

3

0.250

7

14

0.333

Dartmouth

1

3

0.250

5

13

0.278

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

We need to have the same sense of urgency when we’re trying to come back at the end of the game in the first five or 10 minutes of the game.

W L

%

W L

%

1

Princeton

3

0

1.000

12

5

0.706

2

Harvard

3

1

0.750

12

6

0.667

Dartmouth

3

1

0.750

5

13

0.278

4

Penn

2

1

0.667

9

8

0.529

5

Cornell

2

2

0.500

10

8

0.556

6

Brown

1

3

0.250

7

11

0.389

Yale

1

3

0.250

6

12

0.333

Columbia

0

4

0.000

2

16

0.111

8

MEN’S SQUASH

SAM MARTIN ’13 Team captain, men’s basketball

IVY “As a team we relied a little too much on our 3-point shots,” Morgan said. Morgan added that the Elis must look to pass more to its scorers in the paint on the second game of back-to-back contests, as shooters’ legs tire by the second contest. The Bulldogs will try to rebound next week with another set of games on the road. The team will take on Penn on Friday before challenging Princeton on Saturday. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

40

27

#

#

67

DART.

27

44

#

#

71

YALE

27

37

#

#

64

YALE

20

42

#

#

62

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

1

Princeton

4

0

1.000

8

0

1.000

2

Harvard

4

1

0.800

13

1

0.929

3

Yale

3

1

0.750

9

2

0.818

4

Cornell

3

2

0.600

12

3

0.800

5

Columbia

1

3

0.250

6

6

0.500

Dartmouth

1

3

0.250

5

6

0.455

7

Penn

1

4

0.200

4

8

0.333

8

Brown

0

3

0.000

6

6

0.500

IVY

G. Maldunas (Dart.): 16 pts, 8 rebs A. Mitola (Dart.): 12 pts, 5 rebs, 2 asts A. Morgan (Yale): 20 pts, 4 asts M. Townsend (Yale): 16 pts (career high), 6 rebs

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Over the weekend, the men’s basketball team was overpowered by two Ivy League rivals: Harvard and Dartmouth.

Comebacks fall short The shooting was spread between the Elis, with four different Bulldogs netting at least two 3-pointers. Guard Megan Vasquez ’13 led the scoring with 13 points, followed by guard Halejian and forward Janna Graf ’14, who each added 10. Graf led the team in rebounding with nine boards, leaving her just short of a double-double. The Bulldogs came out firing on all cylinders, and a 3-point shot and jumper from Halejian gave them the 5–4 lead early. The Crimson regained their footing and were able to shut down the Elis, charging ahead to a 14-point lead behind the offensive efforts of 6-foot2-inch sophomore forward Temi Fagbenle. Fagbenle had a career-high 20 points in the

OVERALL

WOMEN’S SQUASH

HARVARD

W. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B4

OVERALL

SCHOOL

DARTMOUTH 71, YALE 62

L. Rivard (Harvard): 5-7 3PM-A, 15 pts W. Saunders (Harvard): 15 pts, 11 asts, 4 rebs A. Cotton (Yale): 14 pts, 3 rebs M. Townsend (Yale): 8 pts, 6 rebs

OVERALL

SCHOOL

3

ward Gabas Maldunas led the Big Green in scoring, tallying 16 points off the bench. While the Bulldogs generated open shot attempts, Martin said the team was unable to convert its chances. The team missed 19 of its 24 3-point attempts, including eight misses by sharp-shooting guard Austin Morgan ’13.

OVERALL

1

1

Bulldog drop two on road

OVERALL

game, 10 of which came in the first half. Trailing 21–7 at the 10:15 mark in the first, the Bulldogs called a time out to regroup and came back prepared to close the gap. Six consecutive points from Vasquez jumpstarted the Elis’ 13–7 run to pull within eight. Two free throws and a layup gave the Crimson a 32-20 advantage heading into halftime. “As to our slow starts, the only thing I can figure is that my halftime talks must be better than my pregame talks,” head coach Chris Gobrecht said. The Bulldogs carried their momentum into the second half. Graf drained two 3s in the first two minutes of play, and the Elis continued to challenge the Crimson from outside. A 3-pointer from Messimer

brought the score the 47–44 in favor of Harvard, but the Bulldogs were unable pull any closer. Fagbenle scored eight points in the final eight minutes to secure a 67–54 win for the Crimson. Despite the Elis’ strong performance from beyond the arc, particularly in the second half, they shot only 27.8 percent (20 for 72) from the field. The Bulldogs were only able to score 12 points in the paint compared to 40 for Harvard. “Looking forward, we need to just make sure we do all the little things right like rebound the ball, hit open shots and play great defense,” Messimer said. “We are a good team. We just need to play our game and work hard all 40 minutes.” The Bulldogs are back in action next weekend when they host Ivy League rivals Penn and

Princeton at home. Contact SARAH ONORATO at sarah.onorato@yale.edu .

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

1

Princeton

4

0

1.000

8

0

1.000

2

Harvard

4

1

0.800

9

1

0.900

3

Penn

3

2

0.600

10

2

0.833

Cornell

3

2

0.600

10

3

0.769

5

Yale

2

2

0.500

9

3

0.750

6

Brown

1

2

0.333

10

3

0.769

7

Dartmouth

0

4

0.000

4

6

0.400

Columbia

0

4

0.000

3

7

0.300

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

HARVARD 67, YALE 54 HARVARD

32

35

#

#

67

YALE

20

34

#

#

54

Temi Fagbenle (Harvard): 20 pts (9–12), 9 rbds Megan Vasquez (Yale): 13 pts, 4 rbds, 4 asts

DARTMOUTH 63, YALE 48 DART

30

33

#

#

63

YALE

15

33

#

#

48

Faziah Steen (Dartmouth): 19 pts (7–11), 3 rbds, 2 blocks Tia Dawson (Dartmouth): 10 pts, 11 rbds, 3 blocks Allie Messimer (Yale): 14 pts (3–5 3-ptrs), 4 rbds


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · FEBRUARY 4, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Power outage delays Super Bowl for 34 minutes In one of the strangest live television events in recent history, more than half of the lights in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome suddenly turned off early in the third quarter of the Super Bowl, leaving the dome in partial darkness for 34 minutes. Players milled about trying to stay loose, and the press box was without power for a majority of the time. Despite a furious 49ers comeback, the Ravens won 34–31.

Tough split at home BY ADLON ADAMS STAFF REPORTER The No. 4 Yale men’s squash team (9-2, 3-1 Ivy) hosted two nationally ranked Ivy League rivals this weekend at the Brady Squash Center.

MEN’S SQUASH

KATHRYN CRANDALL/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The No. 1 Princeton Tigers (8-0, 4-0 Ivy) overpowered the Elis on Saturday morning with a 6–3 win, but Yale came back against No. 12 Penn with a 6–3 victory the next day. Despite the strong comeback, the Elis no longer have a chance to win the Ivy title this season. “Princeton came out strong with two wins off the bat that swung the game in their favor,” Kenneth Chan ’13 said. “We played well as a team. All our players left everything on the court and can be proud of their effort.” Saturday’s loss against Princeton, the defending national champion, was Yale’s first loss at home and in the Ivy League. The first round of matches went in Princeton’s favor with wins at the No. 9 and No. 3 spots. Ricky Dodd ’13 put up a hard-fought battle at the third spot but fell in three close games in a tense competition against Princeton’s Tyler Osborne. The second round of matches evened the score for the Elis to 3–3 with wins at the No. 2 and No. 5 spots. Team captain Hywel Robinson ’13 won at No. 2 in four sets and Neil Martin ’14 won at No. 5 in three. Eric Caine ’14 fell at No. 8 to Vivek Dinodia amidst encouragement from the Eli’s roommates and aggressive cheering from the Princeton parents. “We wanted to win the Ivy League for our seniors,” Caine said. “We really liked our chances given that we had beaten the Tigers in Novem-

No. 1 Princeton came out strong on Saturday with a 6–3 win, but No. 4 Yale came back against No. 12 Penn with a 6–3 victory the next day.

Elis drop late leads BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Twice this weekend, the Yale women’s hockey team took a lead into the third period. And twice, the Bulldogs failed to hold on, losing 3–1 at Princeton on Friday and tying Quinnipiac 2–2 on Saturday.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY The Elis (4–17–2, 3–11–2 ECAC) could not capitalize on their leads, and the team now sits in 10th place in the conference, two points shy of Princeton and the eighth and final ECAC playoff spot. “If we’re going to make the playoffs, we have to be better in the third period,” defenseman Tara Tomimoto ’14 said. In Friday’s contest against Prince-

ton (4–10–2, 9–12–2 ECAC), Stephanie Mock ’15 broke a long scoreless streak for both teams just over a minute before the second period ended. But the Tigers were able to strike back with three goals on 14 shots in the final period, including an emptynet goal after the Bulldogs pulled goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15 in an attempt to generate more offense. The outcome against Quinnipiac on Saturday was in many ways a tougher pill for the Elis to swallow. Yale struck first again, scoring twice in the first period on goals from forwards Hanna Åström ’16 and Patricia McGauley ’14. After the period ended, Quinnipiac switched goalies, bringing in regular starter Victoria Vigilanti, who did not allow a goal the rest of the game. “It’s always great when the opposing team realizes they’ve underesti-

mated you and regrets putting their backup goalie in,” forward Jamie Haddad ’16 said.

SEE MEN’S SQUASH PAGE B2

Bulldogs live and die by the 3

It’s always great when the opposition team realizes they’ve underestimated you and regrets putting their backup goalie in. JAMIE HADDAD ’16 Forward, women’s hockey The Bobcats finally broke through with two goals in the third period, SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B2

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Guard Megan Vasquez ’13 scored a team-high 13 points and was one three Bulldogs in double figures against Harvard, but the Elis shot only 27.8 percent from the floor. BY SARAH ONORATO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale women’s basketball team thrilled the home crowd with secondhalf surges against Harvard and Dartmouth this weekend, but was unable to complete the comebacks and came up short in both games.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Defender Aurora Kennedy ’15 and the Eli defense held Quinnipiac scoreless for two periods but could not seal the shutout.

On Saturday night, the Elis (6–12, 1–3 Ivy) fell to Dartmouth 63–48 at the John J. Lee Amphitheater. The Bulldogs got off to a slow start, ending the half at a 30–15 disadvantage. The Big Green (5–13, 3–1 Ivy) controlled the pace in the half, challenging the Bulldogs’ defense making 48.3 percent of their field goals compared to only 23.1 percent for the Elis. After coming out to a slow start, the Bulldogs turned things around in the second half. In the first seven minutes, guards Sarah Halejian ’15 and captain Allie Messimer ’13 combined for 16 points to close the gap. “It is in our nature to come out relaxed and not exactly ready to play,” Halejian said. “We have to find a way to play the full 40 minutes with a high level of intensity.”

The Bulldog defense came out energized to start the second half and applied much more on-ball pressure on the Big Green. They were able to hold Dartmouth to only two points in the first six minutes, cutting the deficit to 32–29 at the 14:51 mark. The Elis were never able to inch any closer, and Dartmouth pulled away behind a 19-point performance from senior guard Faziah Steen. Halejian led the scoring for the Elis with 15 points, with all of her points coming in the second half. Messimer added 14 of her own and pulled down four rebounds for the Bulldogs. In Friday night’s game against Harvard (12–6, 3–1 Ivy), the Bulldogs’ second-half rally fell short despite an impressive team 3-point shooting performance. The Bulldogs were 6–12 from 3 in the second half and shot 34.6 percent from behind the arc over the course of the game. “I think we rely way too heavily on the 3,” Halejian said. “When it’s not dropping, we need to attack the basket more on the drive and find people inside as opposed to continuing to force outside shots. We can’t live and die by the 3.” SEE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE B3

Today's Paper  

Feb. 4, 2013

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