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VOL. 1 — NO. 1

THE FIRST COLLEGE DAILY AN INNOVATION JUSTIFIED BY THE DULLNESS OF THE TIMES JAN. 28, 1878 — The innovation which we begin by this morning’s issue is justified by the dullness of the times, and by the demand for news among us. Ever since the Record and the Courant have changed from weeklies to semi-monthlies, or in other words, have become about as newsy and approachable as The Lit., there has been an apparent necessity of having an unpretentious sheet which should contain the latest news, and short, pithy articles of interest. It is our purpose to publish such a sheet daily, and we hope to have the cooperation and welcome so necessar y to its success. Our columns are open to free discussion on all subjects “consistent with decor um and morality,” and to contributions from any member of the University. All communications should be addressed to the YALE NEWS, Box 494, or left at Gullivers’. As the Courant remarked in its last issue, THE NEWS is to be published for a few weeks as an experiment. If it meets with success, it will be continued through the year. The price, per copy, is perhaps somewhat exorbitant, but it will be lowered as soon as we are assured of our financial support. There is a prevailing sentiment among the undergraduates that the day set apart for prayer for colleges should be rigidly obser ved by us at Yale. The Faculty, heretofore, have only partially acknowledged the day, but it is hoped that, this next Thursday, they will suspend all recitations and have appropriate services. Moody and Sankey, it is reported, will be in New Haven during the next moon. We hope that the Faculty will deem it advisable to omit a few recitations in order that the fruits of their coming may be enjoyed by “the digs,” and by all without detriment to our tempored welfare.

AS WWI IS WAGED, THE NEWS SUSPENDS PUBLICATION ENLISTMENT OF FIVE EDITORS IN MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS MAKES SUSPENSION IMPERATIVE

SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE REFUNDED OCT. 19, 1918 — 1541st Day of the great war. The YALE DAILY NEWS will suspend publication for the duration of the war with today’s issue, because of the fact that of the six editors at the University, five are enrolled in military organizations, while the sixth is leaving to enlist in the Service. The decision to suspend publication was reached only after every possible solution of the problem was discussed because the NEWS which was founded by Herbert W. Bowen on January 28, 1878 is “The Oldest College Daily.” It would be possible to continue publication by having it under professional management, but as such a procedure would not only be a deparure from tradition, but would also make the paper useless as an undergraduate publication, it was deemed advisable.

HEEL THE NEWS

NEW HAVEN, CT., JANUARY 28, 1878 — 2013.

YALE COLLEGE PLAN LAUNCHED TODAY, AS SEVEN COLLEGES SWING OPEN GATES SEPT. 25, 1933 — Made possible by the generosity of Edward S. Harkness, Yale '97, of New York City, and marking an outstanding milestone in the University's history. Yale today will inaugurate the College Plan by opening seven Colleges in which will be housed undergraduates in Yale College, the Sheffield Scientific School, and the School of Engineering. Each of the colleges will contain representatives of the three upper classes, and as the accommodations range from 175 to 200 men, about 65 men in each class will live in a college. The University is thus reverting in effect to thepractice which for many generations characterized Yale, housing in a single building of represetnatives of several classes. In designating the unites as "colleges," the University is again reverting to a practice prevalent in the latter part of the last century when buildings on the Campus were known as Farnam College, South College, North College, and Durfee College. At the head of each college are a Master and some ten Fellows who are members of the teaching staff of the undergraduate schools and who will give a large part of their time to meeting students individually or in small groups to direct their work in their particular subjects. Some of these men will reside in the colleges, while others who do not live on the Campus will be provided with studies in the colleges, where they will meet their students.

NAVAL BLITZ OPENS WAR JULY 10, 1942 — Sounds and fury filled the staid streets of New Haven last night as 1500 students and local youths stormed the center of the city in a spontaneous demonstration less than twelve hours after the first Japanese bomb had dropped in Hawaii. Originating on the Old Campus, a mob quickly gathered momentum, till it had enough personnel early in the evening to fill Elm Street for two solid blocks. As the amused citizenry looked on, the crowd shouted “Let’s go to Tokyo,” sang, “Over There,” and strewed the street with parking signs. By 10 the mob had reached President Seymour’s home on Hillhouse Avenue and after one stanza of the Star Spangled Banner yelled for a personal appearance of the President. Carl Lohmann, 1910, Secretary of the University, came to the door and led the singing of Bright College Years until President Seymour appeared to address the assembled students from the steps of his house.

KENNEDY DEATH SHOCKS YALE; ALL ACTIVITIES CALLED OFF HARVARD GAME MAY BE POSTPONED A WEEK NOV. 23, 1963 — At Liggett’s a man bought the New Haven Register and gave the man seven pennies for it. “You have to read something before it’s true,” he said “You have to read it.” At Mory’s the tables were empty. Should there be more people there at 4:30 on a Friday afternoon? “Oh, I don’t think that’ll keep people away,” David said. A shoe shine boy, in front of the empty building that was once the Co-op, asked the inevitable question. A man said yes, he would have a shine, but don’t say anything kid. The kid didn’t say anything. For a while some bells were tolling. For a while, only a few people knew. Then everybody knew. There

was heavy silence, a fog of silence, a numbness. While the rush hour blocked the intersection of College and Elm, two little men, old men, gesticulated and talked in Italian. After a while one of them threw up his arms. Then he cried. Then he walked across Elm Street. Yale men have dates, because it is — or was — Harvard weekend. They walked around this afternoon with their dates and looked very awkward. One said in front of the Fence Club that he wanted to apologize to her, but he couldn’t, and they would make do. And best they could, they would make do. On the Old Campus was a Yale man, throwing a football about six feet into the air and catching it. He went on throwing the ball ino the air and catching it. Then he stoppped and walked into Dwight Chapel and didn’t come out. —Robert Kaiser

YALE TO END ITS CELIBACY WOMEN TO ENTER CLASS OF 1973 SUMMER 1969 — The redoubts of Yale masculinity will finally be stormed this fall when 588 women officially enroll, thus bringing twoand-one half centuries of collegiate celibacy to a close. The 230 entering freshman coeds will join 1027 men from the Class of 1973, a class that includes the largest percentage of black students in Yale’s history — 7.6 percent — but still falls short of the Black Student Alliance’s (BSAY) 12 percent goal. Admission to the Class of 1973 was the chanciest bet in Yale history: one of five men who applied were admitted and only one of ten women who applied made it. But the freshman women are only half the coeducation story at Yale next year. The 358 female transfer students (204 into the Class of 1971, 154 into the Class of 1972) represents 86 different colleges and will provide Yale with “an intellectual cross-fertilization unprecedented in the histor y of private education,” says Mrs. Elga Wasserman, special assistant tot he president for the education of women. —Jefferey Gordon

NIGHT RIOTS FOLLOW RALLY ON CITY GREEN BLACK AREAS STAY COOL, EXPECT CONTINUED PEACE MAY 2, 1970 — Confrontations between rock-throwing demonstrators and New Haven police er upted late last night after false reports of arrests drew an angry crowd of onstrators to the Green. The police resorted to tear gas on several occassions in an attempt to contain the crowd, and National Guardsmen were utilized to seal off the campus for several hours late in the evening. An uneasy truce finally prevailed early this morning as the demosntrators withdrew into the campus for the night. The police reported 17 demonstrators arrested during the series of brief skirmishes, and five persons were treated for a minor lacerations, according to a spokesman at YaleNew Haven Hospital. The incidents last night were the first to mar the May Day organizers’ hopes for non-violence. A bombing at Ingalls Rink late in the evening caused some destruction but only three minor injuries. The confrontation on the Green was touched off by a speaker who took the microphone from Jerry Rubin at a workshop in Branford College to announce that “several brothers” had been arrested for going on the Green after dark. The speaker, who claimed to be a Black Panther, elicted chants of “To the Green” from his listeners. —Tom Marren

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

RICK LEVIN WILL BE NAMED PRESIDENT NAMING WILL END 10 MONTHS OF SEEKING SCHMIDT’S SUCCESSOR APRIL 15, 1993 — Dean of the Graduate School Richard Levin GRD ’74 will be named Yale’s 21st president at a press conference today. The appointment of Levin, a former chairman of the Economics Department and dean of the Graduate School since last spring, will end the troubled 10-month search to replace permanently Benno Schmidt Jr. ’63 LAW ’66, who abruptly resigned from the presidency last May. Levin, Acting President Howard Lamar, University officers and trustees all declined to confirm or comment on today’s appointment. Still, University officials have been actively preparing for the announcement all week, holding clandestine conferences in Levin’s office and meeting rush deadlines in the Office of Public Affairs. Professors in the Hall of Graduate Studies, where Levin’s office is located, have been excitedly discussing the prospect of the dean’s promotion for the past few days. —Stephen Lee and Amy Oberdoffer

WORLD TRADE CENTER FALLS IN ATTACK SHOCK RIPPLES THROUGH YALE’S STUNNED CAMPUS SEPT. 12, 2001 — It was a lovely evening, warm but ruffled by cool breeze, without a trace of humidity. Candles flickered in a thousand outstretched hands and floated in the Women’s Table, settling the falling water and plaza beneath gently aglow. The throng on Cross Campus saw none of it. Behind their closed eyes, another vision prevailed — the indelible image of a pall of ash, looming above once-towering buildings to obscure the blue late summer sky. Though people filled the lawn from the Sterling steps to the gates of Calhoun, Cross Campus remained as silent as when it had stood empty a few hours before. As silent as it had been since the news had come. —Rebecca Dana and Eli Muller

SALOVEY: YALE’S NEXT PRESIDENT? SEPT. 3, 2008 — In appointing Yale College Dean Peter Salovey as provost last week, University President Richard Levin selected for himself a new right-hand man. He also may have chosen his own successor. As Salovey prepares to take office next month, his appointment to the University’s number-two position has raised an unavoidable question among those in Yale’s chattering classes: Will the beloved dean be Yale’s 23rd president? Time will only tell, and administrators and longtime observers of the University caution against trying to forecast the future occupant of Woodbridge Hall years before Levin will likely step down (Levin has said the earliest he would step down is at the end of the Yale Tomorrow fundraising campaign in 2011). But they admit the 50-yearold Salovey will almost surely be president someday, be it here or at another school. — Thomas Kaplan

THE NEWS TURNS 135! SEE INSIDE PAGES FOR ORIGINAL CONTENT

YALE, SINGAPORE PLAN NEW LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE SEPT. 13, 2010 — One of the first liberal arts colleges in Asia will likely bear Yale’s name. If all goes according to plan, Yale and the National University of Singapore will jointly open a school, located adjacent to the NUS campus, in 2013. It will be named YaleNUS College, and its governing board will be evenly composed of Yale and NUS appointees — but NUS, not Yale, will grant the students’ degrees. Representatives from both schools met in New Haven on Friday to sign a non-binding agreement to continue planning the college, and University President Richard Levin announced the news to faculty in an e-mail Sunday night. “The liberal arts model is not the norm in most of the rest of the world, but there’s an increasing feeling in Asia that it’s giving the United States an edge in educating creative leaders,” Levin said in an interview. “This college in Singapore could provide a way to influence all of Asia.” — Nora Caplam-Bricker

THE OLDEST COLLEGE DAILY TURNS 135 THE TRADITION OF NEWS AT YALE WILL CONTINUE BEYOND US JAN. 28, 2013 — We are no longer justified by the dullness of our times. Indeed, as we’ve all experienced, the times are no longer dull. Our days are filled with chatter of academic scandals and mayoral races, of presidential elections and presidential searches. From a flippant four-page upstart with anonymous editors, the NEWS has grown to a broadsheet, magazine and website, cultivated by a managing board of 49 dedicated editors and business managers, and over 200 total contributors. We are united by our fundamental belief that the times are interesting and worth our consideration. We hope — in fact, we know — that the YALE DAILY NEWS will live 135 more years as a constant force in shaping and informing the dialogue on campus. We are proud to be a part of an institution that will outlive our Yale careers and our very lives. As always, tomorrow’s news awaits.


THE YALE DAILY NEWS, JANUARY 28, 1878 — 2013.

Yale Students, Editors Entered as second class matter at the 1HZ+DYHQ3RVW2IÀFH Founders Anonymous +HUEHUW:%RZHQ Frank McDonald January 28, 1878 — 2013

THE NEWS CELEBRATES 25 YEARS Chairman Albert Lamb

JAN. 28, 1903 — Twenty-five years ago today the first number of the NEWS appeared, and these years have seen the paper grow from a diminutive sheet whose existence was doubtful almost from day to day to a paper which, in addition to developing from itself a paper of such importance as the Alumni Weekly, has come to fill a necessary part in Yale undergraduate life—a position such as a daily paper must fill in a large college or university. The fac-simile of the first issue which is included on this morning’s issue gives a true idea of the beginnings of the paper, while the letters which are printed trace its development from its foundation in 1878, through its increase in size and importance, the beginnings of the Alumni Weekly and the gradual separation of the two papers, the improvement in the system of competition culminating in the assignment system, down to the present time. The two most serious problems which face NEWS editors of today are those, naturally enough, for which it is most difficult to find remedies. The first is the difficulty of covering all the news thoroughly and well without having men trained up to and following the reporting from one year to another. As it is now, as soon as the men are becoming qualified to do the work they are taken on the board and their activity in this direction ceases. In the competitions the men do as well as men in the two lower classes possibly can, and no one would think seriously of lengthening the competitions. The solution of this problem seems to lie in having the editors do more work in getting news. The advantage of this may be seen in the case of baseball or football where one editor follows the news throughout the season. Attempts have been made at extending this system farther and having each department of news covered by an editor, but as a general thing they have not been very successful—due, in part, to the editors’ lack of desire for doing this work, but perhaps more to the amount of time which one man must devote to the supervision of such a system. The difficulty is that college men have only a limited amount of time which they can devote to this work. The second great difficulty is in maintaining the continuity of the paper from day to day. Under the present system a different editor makes up the paper each night in the week. This causes lack of consecutiveness and a great deal of unnecessary repetition in the articles. Here, too the remedy is hard to find owing to the comparatively limited amount of time which the men can devote to the paper. The position of assignment editor has come to be extremely important both in supervising the work in the competition and in doing a large amount of work in keeping up the continuity of the paper. But it is impossible for one man to supervise the work each night. On the Harvard Crimson the paper is made up by the managing editor and his two assistants. The solutions of the problems on the NEWS may lie in uniting the two systems in such a way that the making up of the paper may be in the hands of two or three managing editors, while the other editors follow various departments of news.

FORTY-­TWO TO-­TODAY Chairman Britton Hadden

JAN. 28, 1920 —When a body gets beyond the age of forty, he (or it) does not expect birthday parties, but may be allowed, as the anniversary comes around, the indulgence of reminiscing. The memory of a college publication is short. On this birthday, the editors of the NEWS can make little of the campaigns which previous editors have hotly waged. We turn over the files and too often the emphatic dicta of ’82 or ’96 seem but as sound and fury signify-

ing nothing. The present editors can but speculate that long before their heads are grey, the issues of their college generation will have sunk into oblivion. But the University has permanent significance and the life of the paper consists in its contribution to the University. So,—forty-two, and still going strong!

ONE HURDLE LEFT Chairman Sargent Shriver Jr.

JAN. 28, 1937 —When a group of progressive spirits founded the Yale Political Union in January, 1935, there must have been in the mind of each a picture of the Union as it would be two years later. Not one year, for the original wave of enthusiasm would certainly carry the experiment past that anniversary. Two years would be the acid test. The acid test came last night. A packed house heard a distinguished guest discuss a vitally important issue. More than that, there was a real undergraduate speaking, perhaps not up to the standard of those early halcyon days, but worthy the name and most of it to the point. And above all there was a spirit of life. The guest of the evening was challenged, his conclusions tested. Truly the new administration had taken up the torch, and the Union’s value and its place at Yale were as secure as ever. Not so its financial situation. For still unsolved lies the problem of how to pay the University $1700 for the use of the house alone, not considering the expenses of guests, out of a maximum income of $1000 in dues. More than 200 active members the Union cannot, should not have; more than $5 per man it cannot reasonably charge. The budget simply does not come out, even with the aid of incidental subletting of the house to other organizations. In the last two years the inevitable deficit has been made up by voluntary contributions from alumni. It is embarrassing for an undergraduate organization to appeal directly to alumni; it is impossible as a long-range basis. The Union has now gone beyond that stage, and the time has come for some measure of support from the University itself. It would be repetition to give all the arguments for this move. As a forum, as the only institution where topics of the day can be discussed, it has a definite place and a definite educational value, especially since the unfortunate death of the Public Speaking course. Yale has other organizations that bring distinguished outsiders to New Haven, but none that gives the undergraduate as intimate a contact with the visitor. Yale has debating societies, but not for the many. Yale has extra-curricular activities galore, but none with as clear an educational application. The Union is unique, and of infinite worth. A financial milestone must not be hung around its neck for ever. Two years ago the NEWS enthusiastically supported its founding. Today, the periods of probation over and the hour of need at hand, the NEWS cannot but give its heartiest backing to the Union as it tries to remove the one remaining obstacle to permanent future success.

INDEPENDENCE AND RESPONSIBILITY

this, of course, has been generalized into exaggeration, for there is no unanimity within any age group. But accepting the generality with all its limitations, there is little to be surprised at. They studied and worshipped a European culture, we are introduced and educated to a new concept of indigenous American culture. They saw Britain ascend to unchallenged world power, we saw only a Britain which misused the ideals of 1919 decline by a policy of equivocation which was neither ideal nor strong. They knew the thrill and glory of the crest of the world crusade twenty-two years ago. We knew only the depravity and destitution of war's undertow. Small wonder that these different experiences should lead to different conclusions. And to our way of thinking it is not unfortunate that two equally valid and true experiences should contribute to the national decision. The upsetting thing is not the rift but the possibility that any group regardless of age should be buckled into numbness by a pall of fatalism. The events of the last three months, especially of this last, make it hard to hold to an opinion, harder still to persevere in its expression. The mere fact of being on call for the government takes the drive out of intellectual independence. That must not be if we are to be a truly self-willed people. This applies to us of fighting age particularly. The fact that we shall be the ones to man whatever first line of defense is chosen gives us more right than ever before to have a word in the choice.

NO IMMORALITY AFTER DINNER Chairman William F. Buckley

OCT. 6, 1949 — With an amazing spasm of leniency, the deans have liberalized an ancient and traditional ruling of the University: visitors, somewhat euphemistically termed ‘”lady guests,” will be allowed to remain in dormitory rooms until 6:30 instead of 6 o’clock as before. Students may, furthermore, entertain their feminine friends a while longer on football Sundays, as before. The reasons behind this extra thirty minutes of grace are veiled in mystery. Perhaps the authorities feel that two more drinks and three cigarettes can be consumed in comparative safety. Or maybe the psychology department has conducted a survey proving that Yale men are never aggressive before dinner. In a way, however, we wish the rule had not been tampered with the colloquial phraseology of the edict before this year had a certain amount of punch and euphony. “No sex after six” was a quick, neat way of dismissing the situation. The phrase which must now be used—“no sex after six-thirty”— is cumbersome. It lacks journalistic and conversational cadence, as it were. “Thirty” is a definitely prosaic anticlimax. Actually, the rule is rather anachronistic as far as college discipline is concerned. On the whole, students are treated as adults, as gentlemen who know how to conduct themselves in civilized society. Sometimes the leniency of this treatment backfires, of course, but on the whole it is an admirable modus vivendi, appreciated by those whom it affects. At Oxford and Cambridge the authorities follow such a policy through to its logical conclusion. Ladies are allowed in the students’ rooms until midnight. It’s a pity that Yale cannot likewise follow through, instead of imputing morality and then trying to check it by labored, shallow and petty restrictions.

THE 85TH: ONCE MORE WITH 'VIGAH' Chairman Joseph I. Lieberman

MAR. 5, 1962 —The 1964 board, known in some quarters as the twenty-eighth of January movement, hereby announces to the citizenry of the Yale community that it has just completed a successful coup and now controls the YALE DAILY NEWS. Registrar Marsh and Dean Powell breathe more easily. Messrs. Rose and Gergen are but memories now. Protocol dictates that there be some statement of policy from the new ruling junta. Traditionally, the pronunciamento of an incoming board has taken one of two paths. Either it has stated modestly the role of the NEWS and pledged to continue the fine –performance of the preceding board or it has announced that it would do its built to get this campus (if not this world) moving again. Perhaps we may find a middle ground between these two strategies, although the reader is warned that we tend toward the latter, and with “vigah.” On January 28, 1878, 85 years ago today, the first issue of America’s Oldest College Daily appeared. The earliest NEWS editors wrote that the new publication was “justified by the dullness of the times, and by the demand for news among us.” Yale, the NEWS, and the “times” have changed. Yet, the fundamental goals of this newspaper are quite the same today as they were in 1878 We, of the 1964 board, approach this year with great pride in the NEWS and much excitement over its potential. The YALE NEWS is a rare animal among college newspapers. Its independence and freedom from censorship are matched only by a few college newspapers and surpassed by none. In percentage terms, its readership is one of the largest of any college newspaper supported by student subscription payments. For the staff of the NEWS, this stimulates confidence, or perhaps hope, that we are being read. With this freedom and audience, of course, comes responsibility. the most promising possible candidates we can attract.” In response to this stated purpose of the University, we would hope that students consider their education with an eye to the “service” they may perform in society. We do not understand how this can be done intelligently if a student declares a four-year moratorium on study of the day to day events which are changing that society. The NEWS would be missing a great opportunity and indeed would be failing to service the University adequately if it became part of this silent consensus.

A Rare Animal A routine but basic form of this responsibility is to respond with accuracy and objectivity to the “demand for news among us.” We face a second, more unique, responsibility in the absence of student government at Yale. The NEWS should represent undergraduate opinion to the faculty and administration. The student with a gripe should turn to the NEWS and the NEWS, operating within the bounds of reason, should air the problem. In the grand tradition of independent journals, the NEWS also has a mandate to lead, to combat the “dullness of the times.” It can do this by mirroring the excitement of the times outside of the campus and by being a voice of responsible criticism on the campus.

The history of the NEWS is marked by a series of successful journalistic crusades—for a major reformation of Yale’s curriculum in 1923, for the abolition of a compulsory chapel in 1926, for the transformation of an anachronistic system of college allocations in 1954, and for the removal of the “subversive files” from the campus police office in 1962. The NEWS has been its best at these times when it has fought to better a University to which it is sincerely dedicated. We hope to continue this tradition, especially regarding academic matters. As an important facet of our mandate to lead, we shall speak out frequently and vigorously on major national and international events. This University’s responsibilities were defined by the Freshman Year Report in the context of Yale’s position as a “university of the twentieth century in one of the great nations.” “We must reassert,” the Freshman Year Committee stated, “a readiness to prepare for service in our society the most promising possible candidates we can attract.” In response to this stated purpose of the University, we would hope that students consider their education with an eye to the “service” they may perform in society. We do not understand how this can be done intelligently if a student declares a four-year moratorium on study of the day to day events which are changing that society. The NEWS would be missing a great opportunity and indeed would be failing to service the University adequately if it became part of this silent consensus.

Error and Inefficacy In proposing to comment on national and international events as well as campus news, we are quite conscious of our status as students. We are still very much in process of probing. We expect to present very few absolute answers, but to raise very many relevant questions. We do not expect to bring large numbers of students over to our way of thinking on every issue. Yet those fears of error and inefficacy will not cause us to be silent for we hold that our role is "not to set minds right but to set them aturning." It should be made clear at the outset that NEWS editorials represent the views of the chairman alone. In presenting student opinion to the administration, the chairman may find common cause with the great majority of undergraduates. However, in other areas of commentary, the views of the chairman will probably digress from some of the other members of the NEWS as well as from large groups of readers. We feel that this is an altogether suitable situation. Page two of the NEWS would have much less life if it were necessary, for example, to come to a consensus of the NEWS staff before writing an editorial. The editorial page will, however, always be open for columns of disagreement and letters of opposition. These, then, are our aims—to report accurately, to represent convincingly, and to lead forcefully. But let us not be overwhelmed with the seriousness of the enterprise. Peanuts is still around. Herblock returns to the NEWS today with his instant 'enlightenment.' We shall also be delighted to present Jules Feiffer, cartoonist and criticat-large, once a week on this page. "Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?" (asked Alice.) "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to." said the cat.

Chairman Kingman Brewster Jr.

SEPT. 30, 1940 —Last spring we were roundly scolded by many older than ourselves for holding that this nation should not participate actively in the war against Germany in Europe. Since we disagreed with them about the means of defending the things cared for, some of them averred that we cared for nothing at all. Mutual disagreement grew into mutual disapproval. Much has happened since then. Twelve nations have fallen, we have increased our aid to Britain, and now we are confronted with a world-circling triple alliance aimed to box us between the Atlantic and the Pacific. Perhaps, as the Alumni Magazine hints, many young minds have changed. But by and large there is still a cleavage between young and old on the question. We said last spring and repeat now that to us this is a difference of means not of ends. Americans, young and old alike are devoted to the same principles and hold a common faith. The best way of serving these principles and this faith is the point of divergence. Even

The Briton Hadden Memorial Building, home of the News since 1932


T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 76 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY SLUSHY

23 34

CROSS CAMPUS

135 YEARS COMMEMORATING THE NEWS

RIVER DON’T FLOW

MEN’S BASKETBALL

MIDYEAR REPORT

Grad students explore the wonderful world of theater outside of class

BULLDOGS AVENGE LOSS TO BROWN WITH OT VICTORY

YCC outlines extensive accomplishments, including salad study

THROUGH THE YEARS

PAGE 3 CULTURE

PAGE 12 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

Dwight Hall faces overhaul

Task force debates school safety

In memory. The Yale women’s ice hockey team held its third annual “White Out for Mandi” fundraiser on Saturday, raising more than $10,000 for the Mandi Schwartz Foundation. The event honored Mandi Schwartz ’10, who died in April 2011 after a 27-month battle with leukemia.

BY NICOLE NAREA STAFF REPORTER

of date and a little lax, and we’ve been able to update them thanks to [Archer-Simon]’s expertise.” Though all staff, students and board members interviewed declined to provide information about the specific practices that led to the overhaul, Jensen Reckhow ’13, co-coordinator for the 2011–’12 year, said the board previously had an “unclear direction” and inefficient communication. Archer-Simons said Dwight Hall has implemented a variety of procedures to ensure that its student groups follow consistent financial practices year to year despite the constant turnover in Dwight Hall student leadership. New initiatives include the creation of a cen-

Following the December shooting in Newtown, Conn., a state bipartisan task force is grappling with whether increasing armed security personnel at Connecticut public schools is necessary for ensuring student safety. The Connecticut General Assembly first established the bipartisan task force on gun violence prevention and children’s safety in early January, and the group convened for an initial public hearing last Friday. The task force announced 17 proposals, which include installing panic buttons in classrooms and complying with National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre’s call to increase the presence of armed guards at local public schools. Adam Joseph, director of communications for the state Senate Democrats, said members of his office were encouraged by the recent reintroduction of the assault weapons ban at the federal level as a means of improving school safety. He added that beyond federal policymaking, the state must take immediate action as well. “We can’t wait for Congress to act on these issues,” Joseph said, citing the leadership of state Sens. Donald Williams and Martin Looney on gun violence prevention. State Rep. Roland Lemar of New Haven said he hopes the task force’s upcoming conversations on school safety address urban violence, rather than simply responding to the Newtown shooting. He said he was open to improving security systems and increasing access to mental health services, but he added that he opposed a greater presence of

SEE DWIGHT HALL PAGE 5

SEE SCHOOL SAFETY PAGE 4

Say goodbye to your productivity. Since Friday,

Yalies have been able to stream live, high-definition television to their laptops for free through IPTV provider Tivli. All undergraduates living on campus will have access to 28 channels, ranging from the History Channel to Comedy Central. YDN

A star is born. The New Haven

Fire Department was featured in this weekend’s episode of “Saturday Night Live,” in which SNL actor Bill Hader threw a tantrum after seeing fellow firefighter, played by Maroon 5 lead singer Adam Levine, talking to Hader’s ex-girlfriend, who Hader dated nine years ago for two weeks. The situation gets so bad that Hader ultimately breaks down and is attacked by an inanimate Dalmatian that he tries to throw out the window. Not SNL’s best skit.

Watch your stuff. Morse College Master Amy Hungerford and Ezra Stiles College Master Stephen Pitti ’91 warned students in a Friday email to keep their doors locked and watch out for unfamiliar faces after a student’s wallet, phone and keys were stolen in a computer lab shared by the two colleges. At the time of the theft, a “strange man” was observed in the computer lab room, according to Hungerford. Question of the decade.

For those of you who do intramurals, you may be wondering: When was the Yale intramurals website last updated? According to a blog of the same name, it has been 72 days since the website last received a makeover, as of press time.

The public service organization Dwight Hall will oversee a significant update of its financial and communication practices. BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER For the first time in decades, Dwight Hall is undergoing a major overhaul to its operations. Following the retirement of former Executive Director Alex Knopp in September and former Financial Director Ray Bendici last spring, the public service organization hired Jeannette Archer-Simons as interim director to complete structural and organizational changes, said Constance Royster ’72, chair of Dwight Hall’s Executive Committee. Archer-Simons said Dwight Hall staff, students and board members are updating the organization’s financial management, communications, facilities and bylaws to make the organiza-

tion more efficient, while allowing for a “time of reflection” at Dwight Hall.

We’ll … have all our policies and practices updated by the time the new executive director comes in. JEANNETTE ARCHER-SIMONS Interim director, Dwight Hall “We’re strengthening the financial oversight and practices,” said Will Redden ’14, Dwight Hall’s current co-coordinator. “Our standards and practices … were out

Dept of Defense training center proposed BY JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTER The closest most Americans come to the U.S. Special Operations Command is through action movies or headlines splashed across newspapers revealing covert operations after they occur. But if the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of

Medicine opens a training center with the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Yale students and professors may share a campus with soldiers who have come to New Haven to develop their interviewing skills. Charles Morgan, a psychiatry professor at the Yale School of Medicine who has worked with the government on scientific

Stanley McChrystal speaks.

The retired general and senior fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs said yesterday that he thinks women will eventually become part of special operations units, including the Navy SEALs and Army Rangers. In addition, McChrystal told CNN’s “State of the Union” that he supported the Pentagon’s recent decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1914 The Inter-Fraternity Council updates its pledging rules, which include prohibiting fraternity or society members from visiting a freshman’s room “except for the purpose of soliciting subscriptions or selling articles of merchandise.” Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

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research in the past, said the proposed center — the USSOCOM Center of Excellence for Operational Neuroscience — remains in the development phase because it is still under contractual negotiation. The training center, which would be a joint venture between the Department of Defense and the University, would serve as an educational institution to teach

soldiers the skills to read and question people. If approved, the center could open as early as April, added Morgan, who said he would direct the program and teach interviewing to soldiers. “[The Center would function] really to build a cadre, or cohort or group of people who are skilled in interviewing so they can move forward and train other people,” Morgan said.

“They call it a force multiplier in the military.” While the funding for the center would come entirely from a $1.8 million grant Morgan received from the Department of Defense to establish a site for teaching, conducting research and advising, classes will take place in Yale facilities SEE DEFENSE PAGE 4

UCS expands international programs BY AMY WANG STAFF REPORTER Undergraduate Career Services will ramp up the number of international internship programs it offers this summer, providing students with work opportunities in new fields and geographic areas. UCS, which currently offers the World Fellows International Experience and International Bulldogs programs as structured, Yale-sponsored summer work opportunities, will expand both programs to include more locations and also debut a number of new positions to students in fields such as engineering and global health, said Jeanine Dames, director of UCS and associate dean of Yale College. Dames said UCS’s increased offerings this year reflect the student body’s growing interest in

international experiences. “If we offer a strong program in international internships, students will take advantage of it,” Dames said. “I think our peer schools who’ve had the resources to offer similar programs have found much success with it.” Dames said there will be a total of 170 international opportunities offered this year through UCS. UCS is increasing the number of positions offered to students participating in International Bulldogs by 47 percent. Additionally, UCS will offer 18 positions in its World Fellows program this year, compared to the six offered last summer. Dames said many of the opportunities — such as international projects with Lawyers Without Borders and three SEE UCS PAGE 5

ALLIE KRAUSE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

UCS Director Jeanine Dames said the organization will offer 170 international opportunities this year.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Are any of these people ever caught? Middle aged. No hair color? yaledailynews.com/opinion

'LAKIA' ON 'THEFT STRIKES MORSE, STILES COMMUNITY'

An invitation to the Corporation

NEWS’

D

VIEW WARNER TO WOODBRIDGE

Growing student life with the colleges If University administrators choose to continue the development and construction of the two new colleges, then they will be responsible not only for maintaining the quality of Yale’s academic offerings, but also the quality of student life and its supporting services. Expanding access to Yale education means sharing the best we have to offer — including our thriving Old Campus, college system and our student resources — to a greater number of Yalies without diluting the quality of these offerings. For generations of students, Old Campus has been the initial heart of Yale. As we walk through Phelps Gate, we learn from our first day on campus that our social groups will extend beyond our residential colleges, and that we are connected with our peers, regardless of the communities they will inhabit or the clubs they will join. An equalizing force, Old Campus provides freshmen a shared space for socialization, conversation and friendship. Freshmen of the new colleges deserve to live on Old Campus. Perhaps more than any other first-year students, these freshmen deserve a year to connect with students from every college, rather than being hidden away on Science Hill. Without a year to connect with the rest of their class, students may find themselves isolated on a social island along the Prospect-Sachem Triangle. Of course, not all freshmen live on Old Campus, and those of Timothy Dwight and Silliman colleges can face a feeling of isolation. The problems with first-year student life in four-year colleges will only be exacerbated by the increased distance of these new colleges from Old Campus.

Height? Glasses?”

Making space for these freshmen on Old Campus will in turn solve another space-related issue. Annex housing proves a burden and challenge for numerous Yalies, who are unable to spend a year living in the residential college communities that they call home. Therefore, the new colleges must also help alleviate the problem of annex housing. With increased space, a rebalancing of college populations will allow for annexing to be limited or discontinued. In turn, McClellan Hall and other spaces on Old Campus can become homes for the future freshmen of the new colleges. It will take self-control on the part of a Salovey administration to prevent the expansion of the student body to beyond the colleges’ capacities. It is also important to consider that the increase in student body size created by the new colleges will overcrowd already strained services on campus. Yale Health, mental health services, fitness centers, theaters and study spaces — resources integral to the health and happiness of the student body — are already burdened by high demand. The addition of two new colleges may provide some answers to these issues through an increase in physical space, but for an entire student body to truly enjoy the benefits of these facilities, Yale must create a standardized, campuswide system for sharing student resources across the colleges. If these goals cannot be met, then the new colleges will fail to achieve their purpose. Expanding the Yale experience to a greater audience should not require fundamentally changing or denying what it means to live at Yale.

uring the presidential search, I wrote that the Yale Corporation lacks our trust because it rarely interacts with the university community. Prior to the slew of emails from Ed Bass ’67 ARC ’72, students and faculty would have been hard pressed to name a trustee. With President-elect Peter Salovey’s appointment and the passage of a few months, the Corporation has again receded from view. And there is no indication that the trustees intend to engage with campus until another crisis dictates their public appearance. This model for the Corporation is a mistake. The trustees cannot govern effectively if Yale perceives them as out-of-touch. The presidential search was a relatively routine matter — but even its routineness created rumblings of discontent. Imagine how difficult it would be for the Corporation to rally support around a future, potentially controversial issue (say, a crackdown on free speech at Yale-NUS, to name just one hypothetical, if far-fetched, situation). Indeed, it is not clear that Bass and his colleagues could effectively lead Yale through a tumultuous moment, should one arise, because they lack popular legitimacy. And, in addition to the issue

of optics, how can the Corporation make informed decisions about Yale if they divorce themselves NATHANIEL from campus? It is easy to ZELINSKY harangue Bass & Co. for their On Point failures without offering solutions, so let me suggest three actions the Corporation could take, starting as soon as Salovey assumes office this June. First, individual trustees should meet with groups of students multiple times during the year. As they meet average Yalies, the trustees can tailor their priorities to the realities that exist in New Haven. There is historical precedent for this scheme. During the turbulent 1970s, then-President Kingman Brewster ’41 required each Corporation member to eat lunch with undergraduates, selected by lottery, in college dining halls. Admittedly, the trustees were not always so willing. A wealthy patrician, John Hay Whitney ’26, was once so afraid to interact with “radical,” long-haired Yalies that

he had to be cajoled into attending a meal. But despite Whitney’s reluctance, his lunch and others like it led to tangible changes at Yale, such as the Corporation’s support for the creation of an African-American studies department. Salovey clearly understands the importance of interacting with students, something he managed to do even as a Provost — no easy feat given the job focuses on budgets and other administrative duties. He should encourage the Corporation to follow his lead by reinstating Brewster’s trustee-student lunches, beginning next fall. And, to be most valuable, these meetings should be between a representative sample of Yalies (read: not the Yale College Council) and a single Corporation member. Second, the Yale Corporation should consistently communicate with campus. Recently researching in Manuscripts and Archives, I came across statements released by the Brewster-era Corporation or its members dealing with issues from the mundane to the serious. It would behoove the modern-day trustees to do the same. Steady correspondence, even trivial expressions of support for Woodbridge Hall and other banalities, would

demystify the Corporation and familiarize it to students. (Note that this is an entirely different proposal than the call by self-styled student activists to release minutes of Corporation meetings — a wholly unreasonable demand. In any organization, certain sensitive matters require secrecy.) Third, Ed Bass and his fellow trustees should use the pomp of Salovey’s inauguration this fall to vault themselves into Yale’s public consciousness. (Yes, there is a ceremony for the new president. And, yes, I can’t wait.) Most of the current Corporation members are unknowns, business executives who blend in with other suits on the streets of New Haven. Find some way — a series of speeches, interviews, a procession, anything really — to make the trustees recognizable and to articulate their role in the university. If the Corporation interacts with the community, it will better govern Yale during Salovey’s tenure. And, should moments of unpredictable crisis arise, the trustees will be able to lead our University’s ship through the waves. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinksy@yale.edu .

Fish from Fishing Island T

his weekend, at a local food fair in Shanghai held not far from where I live, crowds of eager customers huddled around a booth selling fish. The fish were caught near a disputed island chain known in China as the Diaoyu and in Japan as the Senkakus (the main island is called “fishing” in both languages). The 1,000-kilogram batch reportedly sold out within hours. Recently, the Chinese government has encouraged fishermen to venture into this politically gray area, in an aggressive move to assert its claims of sovereignty. Chinese media reports of the story emphasized the patriotic fervor of the locals buying the fish. Indeed, those interviewed voiced enthusiastic support for the Chinese government’s claims over the Japan-controlled islands, with several stating they are buying the fish specifically because it’s from the Diaoyu. Over the years, the Chinese government has enjoyed remarkable success in convincing the people that the Diaoyu Islands are central to China’s national interests, that the dispute is a matter of sovereign principles and that the islands are worth defending at all costs, even war. None of these assertions are true. Although the seaboard sur-

rounding the islands is said to contain rich oil and gas deposits, the decadeslong standoff has prevented either counXIUYI try from tapZHENG ping into these resources. As Propergandist it stands today, the island chain resembles little more than tiny specks in the East China Sea. Meanwhile, consider the dangers of imprudent action. Two weeks ago, Chinese and Japanese warplanes went head to head above the disputed islands. China had sent a civilian surveillance plane to fly near the area, and Japan responded with F-15s. China promptly launched fighter jets of its own. Now military hawks in China are talking about war, and Shinzo Abe, Japan’s nationalistic prime minister, seems determined to hold his ground. At stake is the potential disruption of the world’s second- and third-largest economies — the largest one too, if we count the U.S., which has a mutual defense pact with Japan. Japan is China’s third-largest trading partner, behind only the European Union

and the U.S., while China has been Japan’s largest for five years running. The two countries depend on one another for trade, and both are essential to maintaining world economic order. Perhaps more valuable — and certainly more fragile — is the mutual respect and friendship that the two peoples have managed to build over the past 40 years through travel, cultural exchanges and eventually, the Internet. When I went to Osaka last summer, almost every store along Shinsaibashi-suji, the main shopping street in the city, put out signs written in simplified Chinese welcoming tourists from the mainland. In Kyoto, in front of Kyomizu-dera, a world-famous Buddhist temple and UNESCO World Heritage Site, my friend and I asked a man to take a picture for us. He opened his mouth, and out came perfect Shanghainese. In Hakodate, Hokkaido, where I studied Japanese for two months, my Japanese host family loved to show me pictures of the exchange students that had lived with them throughout the years. The students came from all over the world, but over half were Chinese. I’m sure many of them left with the same unforgettable impressions of the Hokkaido summer as I did — the delicious briny breeze, the salmon slices that melted

instantly in your mouth and the bright pink azaleas that seemed to light the streets on fire. Hopefully my hosts will also remember me, for the Chinese dishes I made for them and for my watercolor paintings that should still be hanging in their living room. The peoples of China and Japan have too much in common and too much to lose by engaging in a feud over these tiny islands. The two governments know this simple truth, but the nationalistic rhetoric and aggressive threats that they employ can easily lead to consequences that are sure to be disastrous. Yet neither party can back down now, as the issue has become too closely tied to national prestige and domestic politics. That’s why the only solution will be the joint development of the islands. The faster both countries can take their warplanes out of the skies and embrace a shared future for the islands, the faster they will be able to send in more fishing boats and prospecting ships. Hopefully the next time fish from the Senkakus are sold in China, people will take them for what they are — just fish. XIUYI ZHENG is a junior in Davenport College. Contact him at xiuyi.zheng@yale.edu .

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST M O N I CA D I L E O

Necessary change in New Haven?

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C

hange. Ever since President Obama’s 2008 campaign brought it to the forefront of American politics, this six-letter word has become the mantra for many in our society, particularly of our own up-and-coming generation. We’re excited to get rid of old, antiquated polices and ideas and bring forward new, progressive ideas and candidates. Growing up around New Haven, I was constantly surrounded by the enthusiasm that comes with such change. I tagged along to quirky coffee shops as a kid and walked in rallies and marches in high school. As a fourteen-year-old volunteering at Yale-New Haven Hospital, I had a front-row seat to see just how great the changes brought about by President Obama’s 2008 election could be. Both Alderman Justin Elicker’s recent announcement that he will be entering New Haven’s upcoming mayoral race and State Representative Gary Holder-Winfield’s formation of an exploratory committee are making change a possibility for New Haven. This city appears to be the perfect place for

this infectious idea to manifest itself. Mayor John DeStefano is currently in his tenth term, making him the longest-serving mayor of New Haven. A younger, newer candidate can unseat the twentyyear incumbent. But every resident of New Haven should wonder: Is change necessary? Mayor DeStefano has brought the high school graduation rate up from 58.1 percent in 2009 to 70.5 percent in 2012 according to a recent article in the News, and a quick walk through any of the beautifully renovated public schools shows the results of his 1.5 billion dollar investment in education. He has also made New Haven a model for progressive immigration policy, something that I came to understand while volunteering at an immigration clinic in Fair Haven. Change can be a powerful thing, but only in situations that warrant it. It seems that blindly advocating for a change can be just as detrimental as not pushing for a change when it is needed. Being in office for twenty years is not a reason for a mayor to be replaced if he is continuing to excel in his posi-

tion. So for now, my allegiance still undeniably lies with Mayor DeStefano. He deserves credit for the Elm City Resident Card, and the improvements that immigrants have seen in their quality of life. He deserves respect for his commitment to revitalizing New Haven’s economy. However, our mayor has often come under criticism for running a so-called “political machine.” My friends’ parents, longtime employees of the city under DeStefano’s leadership, often spoke of the necessity of being friendly with the Mayor to get tasks accomplished or complaints addressed. And so despite my reluctance to cast a ballot for a candidate other than Mayor DeStefano, this entrenchment could be a reason to consider the merits of a new candidate. There is a possibility that Holder-Winfield or Elicker could do even more than DeStefano, and perhaps with a more a more transparent style. It is also possible that a fear of uncertainty is playing a part in my reluctance to adopt a

new candidate as my choice for New Haven. But I am more concerned that if they do not succeed in office, our deserving immigrants will suffer the consequences of a mayor who does not effectively advocate for them, or that the high school graduation rate will fall back down to lower levels. Our Elm City certainly needs to continue improving, and Mayor DeStefano has proved that he can make a positive impact. If nothing else, a competitive mayoral race will certainly be good for DeStefano and the city. Having to run against strong candidates will force the mayor to knock on doors, to talk to people and listen to their concerns. As we begin to consider this election, I hope that we will remember that change can be good, and fear of change can hold our community back. However, I also hope that we can remember that change for the sake of change can be equally harmful. MONICA DILEO is a freshman in Calhoun College. Contact her at monica.dileo@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“I have a very strict gun-control policy: If there’s a gun around, I want to be in control of it.” CLINT EASTWOOD ACTOR, DIRECTOR AND POLITICIAN

CORRECTIONS FRIDAY, JAN. 25

The article “CT senators support weapons ban” mistakenly stated that Sen. Chris Murphy spoke to the News, when in fact he was quoted speaking on Capitol Hill. FRIDAY, JAN. 25

The article “Elicker seeks mayor’s office” mistakenly stated that individual contributions may not exceed $375 in the city’s public campaign financing system. In fact, individual contributions may not exceed $370.

YCC releases midyear report BY KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG STAFF REPORTER In its second annual midyear report released Sunday night, the Yale College Council outlined its completed projects while looking ahead to initiatives it hopes to work on this semester. The report outlines the YCC’s completed and ongoing work in 12 sections that include the presidential search, dining, financial aid and off-campus life. The report cites 10 new projects the YCC completed in the fall semester as well as several initiatives YCC members have planned but are still pending administrators’ approval. Students said they are happy the midyear report brings transparency to the YCC but that they hope the organization increases its efforts at publicizing its initiatives. “The most important thing included in the midyear report was the Presidential Search report, which took up a lot of the YCC’s time last semester,” YCC Secretary Leandro Leviste ’15 said. “In terms of upcoming projects for the spring, it is very difficult to know what will most work out.” The report highlights several areas in which the YCC has begun new initiatives, including expanded meal options during breaks, a “Yalies on Rails” student technology program and the “STEM Sibs” program. Leviste said the YCC based this year’s midyear report on last year’s, which was released in January 2011. YCC President John Gonzalez ’14 said that two proposals discussed under the report’s “Academics” section — the Credit/D/ Fail proposal, which would allow students to convert a class from Credit/D/Fail later in the semester, and the course withdrawal proposal, which push back the deadline to drop a class — are still sitting with the committee on honors and academic standing. The report also details several other incomplete projects, such as the events calendar, financial aid report, financial literacy workshops and expansion on credits earned for study abroad. Gonzalez said he wanted

to include pending projects in the summary of last fall’s work because students might not be aware of them. YCC executive board members interviewed said several projects that debuted last fall will continue into the next academic year. YCC Events Director Bryan Epps ’14 said the new fall break activities — including a block party, discounted movie tickets and bus trips to New York City — will also occur during next year’s fall break. The report does not include larger policy recommendations and projects the YCC thinks are not possible to complete during the 2012-’13 academic year, Gonzalez said. He added that the YCC will submit these points to Peter Salovey, who will assume the University presidency on June 30, later this spring. Students interviewed said they hope the YCC increases its efforts to make students aware of its new projects and initiatives. “The midyear report reminded me of many things that maybe didn’t apply to me, but could’ve been helpful to know about,” Guadalupe Gonzalez ’15 said. “I didn’t know about the mental health resources sheet, so maybe they could publicize that better with videos or something, instead of just writing about it.” Kate Byron ’14 said she appreciates the YCC’s efforts to see what students thought of the tradeoff between fall break and a longer reading period, even if there is not an easy solution to the problem. Sunny Jones ’13 said she thinks the YCC did a good job of gathering student input during the presidential search and hopes the Council will continue to send out surveys. Two authors of the midyear report — Leviste and former YCC Vice President Debby Abramov — recently announced they will not be at Yale for the spring semester and will be leaving their YCC executive board positions. Contact KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG at kirsten.schnackenberg@yale.edu .

Looney pushes gun laws BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER Targeting both mass shootings like the Dec. 14 massacre in Newtown, Conn., and the day-to-day gun violence that plagues cities like New Haven and Hartford, State Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney has introduced 17 bills calling for increased regulation of firearms. Looney, who hails from New Haven, announced the bills in advance of Monday’s meeting of the gun violence working group of the Gun Violence Prevention and Children’s Safety Task Force, an attempt to tackle gun violence on multiple fronts. The proposed pieces of legislation include new regulations on ammunition, semi-automatic weapons like the one used to kill 26 in Newtown, and handguns, which account for most homicides in cities. Monday’s public hearing in Hartford, scheduled to last all day, is expected to draw hundreds of law enforcement officials, gun violence victims and experts in addition to private citizens on both sides of the debate. “Newtown has opened up the ability to have a reasonable conversation [on gun control],” said State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, who expressed support for Looney’s proposals. Noting “pushback by gun advocates” who oppose new regulations, Holder-Winfield, whose district includes part of New Haven, recognized the importance of tomorrow’s hearings in assuring Connecticut residents that legislators do not intend to infringe upon their Second Amendment rights. The hearing on Monday is one of four public hearings organized by the Gun Violence Prevention and Children’s Safety Task Force, which is divided into three working groups: school safety, gun violence and mental health, each comprised of 16 state senators and representatives. The group on school safety met on Friday, and the mental health group will meet on Tuesday. The entire task force will then hold a public hearing at Newtown High School on Wednesday evening. Gun advocacy groups, both local and national, have already come out against further regulation. The National Shooting Sports Foundation, a national trade association for firearms manufacturers headquartered in Newtown, announced Friday that it would hold a press conference shortly before the hearing and in the same building. “Monday might be the only chance for your voice to be heard before legislators craft legislation that will seriously affect not only your Second Amendment rights, but also rifles and magazines you currently own,” the foundation said in a statement last week encouraging supporters to attend. Despite the staunch opposition, Holder-Winfield said he

ASSOCIATED PRES

State Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney has introduced 17 bills tightening regulation of firearms. expects many conservative legislators to take a discussion of new regulations seriously as a result of the shooting in Newtown. “What I expect to see from the Republicans is turning around to gun advocates and at the very least saying, ‘Let’s have a reasonable conversation,’” HolderWinfield said.

Newtown has opened up the ability to have a reasonable conversation [on gun control]. GARY HOLDER-WINFIELD State representative, Connecticut Looney’s proposed legislation — which includes provisions requiring background checks on buying ammunition, the banning of armor-piercing bullets, a stricter assault weapons ban than the one currently in place in Connecticut and the elimination of a loophole that allows guns to be purchased at gun shows without a background check — stands a better chance of success due to public outcry over the shooting in Newtown to accomplish longstanding legislative goals. “Over the last several years we’ve seen mass shootings in Arizona, Wisconsin, Colorado and now Newtown, in addition to the gun violence that plagues our cities,” Looney said in a statement earlier this month. “It is imperative that we act now.” In 2001, the state Senate passed a bill banning magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition before the state House voted down the mea-

sure. Twelve years later, the same ban is one of Looney’s proposals. Furthermore, a gun offender registry, for which New Haven officials such as Mayor John DeStefano Jr. and former Police Chief Frank Limon have advocated, is included among the legislation. DeStefano, a long-time gun control advocate, has also already called for other regulations introduced by Looney: stricter licensing and purchasing standards, and licensing requirements for ammunition purchases. In a statement earlier this month, DeStefano noted that of the types of gun violence experienced in New Haven, drug and gang-related shootings are by far the most common. While emphasizing that all forms of gun violence need to be addressed, DeStefano said that most shootings in New Haven “tend to be committed with handguns that do not carry a lot of ammunition.” As a result, the mayor has stressed the need for gun-control

regulation beyond banning the semi-automatic weapons commonly used in mass shootings. “While the mayor is supportive of all gun-control proposals that are being put forth in the wake of Newtown, New Haven’s gun violence is different,” City Hall spokeswoman Anna Mariotti said. Holder-Winfield also said that legislation on gun trafficking and ammunition will have a greater effect on “day-to-day” gun violence in cities like New York, Chicago and New Haven. He remained doubtful, however, whether or not the current conversation on gun control will extend to such legislation. Of the 34 murders in New Haven in 2011 — the highest homicide rate in nearly two decades — 29 were committed with guns. Contact MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

LOONEY GUN PROPOSALS EXPAND Connecticut’s existing assault weapons ban BAN large-capacity magazines ESTABLISH a Gun Offender Registry REQUIRE a permit to purchase ammunition LIMIT handgun purchases to one per month REQUIRE background checks for private gun sales, including at

gun shows

BAN armor-piercing bullets

Grad students seek more chances to perform BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER Last weekend, Trumbull College’s Nick Chapel theater was host to an unusual collaboration: “the river don’t flow by itself no more,” written and directed by Klara Wojtkowska GRD ’13. Unlike most shows on campus, “river” brought together graduate and undergraduate students, as well as an actor from Quinnipiac University. Wojtkowska said her project initially ran into obstacles, from recruiting actors to finding a performance space. The experience made her realize how limited the performance resources available to graduate students are, she explained. “I became frustrated because I realized grad school wasn’t a place people came to put on plays and collaborate,” Wojtkowska said. Un d e rg ra d u a te s t u d e n t Cosima Cabrera ’14 auditioned for the show after seeing it posted on the Yale Drama Coalition website, and then took on the role of producer. Cabrera was able to help get the production off the ground, from booking a residential college theater to working with past contacts in the under-

graduate theater community to recruit a sound and lighting designer. Wojtkowska said many of her fellow students feel unable to participate in artistic extracurricular activities due to the academic and emotional demands of graduate school. She found she could not assemble a full cast without turning elsewhere. “Extracurricular activities are different in grad school because people are so singularly focused on research,” Elizabeth Wiet GRD ’17 said. “They’re things you really have to go out of your way to pursue.” While the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences does not have a Ph.D. program in theater or performance studies, Lucian Ghita GRD ’13, a student in the Comparative Literature Department, said he has found an intellectual home in the Performance Studies Working Group. Established by a 2003 Mellon Grant to promote the discipline at Yale, the seminar unites graduate students from various schools and departments who all study theater. But six graduate students interviewed who are focusing their research on the performing arts said they would welcome more readily

available opportunities for practical involvement. Xavier Buxton GRD ’13, a visiting student in the English Department who acted in “river,” said he has found practical experience helpful to his theoretical understanding of authors like Sappho and Shakespeare.

I became frustrated because I realized grad school wasn’t a place people came to put on plays and collaborate. KLARA WOJTKOWSKA GRD ’13 Playwright and director “There’s a big space for performance as research,” Buxton said. “It gives you a sense of what it is to be inside the play, to get inside the language of the play in a way that wouldn’t otherwise be possible.” Wiet, who is studying 20th century American theater through the English Department, said she has yet to get practical

experience in the field, despite her involvement in the Performance Studies Working Group. Danielle Bainbridge GRD ’18, an African American Studies Department student who studies theater, said she got involved in “river” by happenstance, but that she would welcome more opportunities for direct involvement in productions — whether through the Yale Cabaret or other paths. Nevertheless, Buxton said the Graduate School does not have the same culture of theater involvement as the College, adding that the opportunities that do exist may not be apparent to many. Ghita said that by taking on an intellectual, research-focused role, many graduate students may feel divorced from any practical role in theater. He added that the Graduate School does not offer any performance or practice-oriented courses in theater. “I’d say the impetus is clearly theory,” Ghita said. Lila Ann Dodge GRD ’14, who also participated in “river,” said practicing dance helps her better approach research on dance in the Council on African Studies. But while Dodge participates in the primarily undergraduate Yale

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

“the river don’t flow by itself no more” was staged last weekend at Trumbull College’s Nick Chapel theater. Dance Theater and the off-campus Elm City Dance Collective, she said finding a studio rehearsal space to practice on her own remains an obstacle since graduate students are not allotted specific studio spaces. Wojtkowska said that while “river” does not directly relate to her research on African theater, having creative outlets is something that can help her process the information she confronts as

a graduate student. “You learn about things that hurt,” Wojtkowska said, citing a course on South African postapartheid as an example. “I need a space to deal with it, and I don’t think that’s a classroom.” There are currently 11 graduate students in the African Studies Department. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

26

Conn. mulls armed guards

Years since the establishment of USSOCOM

President Ronald Reagan approved the establishment of the United States Special Operations Command on April 13, 1987, in response to the failure of Operation Eagle Claw in 1980. The operation was ordered in attempt to rescue 52 American hostages held in Tehran, Iran.

Yale partners with Defense DEFENSE FROM PAGE 1 and instructors may come from within the University faculty. Morgan said the Yale Office of Grant and Contract Administration is working with the Psychiatry Department to finish paperwork securing the grant funding, which was delayed due to both congressional budget issues and the need for more time to work out funding for administrative expenses.

In my profession, there are lots of doctors who have no idea there’s a war going on. CHARLES MORGAN Psychiatry professor, School of Medicine

BRIANNE BOWEN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The Newtown shooting has ignited a debate over whether armed security personnel should be increased at public schools. SCHOOL SAFETY FROM PAGE 1 armed guards at local public schools. “I haven’t heard from a single teacher or administrator who feels like they need more guns in schools,” said Lemar, who has two children in New Haven public schools. “I don’t think their primary concern is that a person is going to show up at school with an AR-15. But the possession of illegal handguns and not obeying traffic laws — that’s the kind of the daily violence that takes the lives of children.” Lemar said 30 New Haven residents have been victims of gun violence in the last two months alone. Meg Staunton, co-founder of March for Change, an advocacy group which is planning a Valentine’s Day anti-gun march in Hartford, said her organization is “driven by concerned parents,” many of whom

oppose the implementation of more armed guards in public schools. “We don’t want our kids in a feardriven culture,” said Staunton, a mother of two children in Fairfield public schools. But Curtis Lavarello, executive director of the School Safety Advocacy Council, said he saw no reason why schools should not fortify with armed guards immediately, likening such an initiative to how the federal government placed guards outside plane cockpits within a matter of days of the 9/11 hijacks. Lavarello added that schools should mandate crisis plans and training for faculty and staff as a low-cost method of improving safety, citing about 25 percent of schools nationwide that have not implemented such measures. Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04 said his conversations with parents have convinced him that a combination of gun

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violence prevention measures, increased access to mental health services and structural changes to schools, such as magnetic locks and ballistic glass, should be on the negotiating table at upcoming hearings. But as the state government continues to accrue deficits, Lemar said cost remains a limitation to security improvements. The New Haven Independent reported that hiring an armed police officer for every state public school could cost more than $60 million if each of Connecticut’s 1,236 public schools were provided a budget of $50,000. Hearings will continue Jan. 28 and run through Jan. 30, addressing the topics of gun safety and mental health. Contact NICOLE NAREA at nicole.narea@yale.edu .

The Center’s annual schedule will be broken into trimesters, with two one-week “teaching modules” focused on a specific subject per trimester. Morgan said he hopes to teach up to 20 soldiers per trimester with three instructors, including himself. The curriculum aims to provide soldiers with interpersonal skills such as ways to determine whether scientists are offering legitimate benefits when offering to sell the Army products, Morgan said. In addition to the educational component, Morgan said he wants the center to include a “very focused” science research project roughly every year and a half on topics such as the ability to sustain focus under stress and other concerns of the military. Morgan added that these research activities are not covered by the $1.8 million grant, and would require future funding. The Center would also serve as

an advisory body for the Army by providing reviews of new technologies as they relate to enhancing military function, such as which laboratories show promising research results in topics like improving people’s sleep, he added. Besides supporting Special Operations Commands in the military, Morgan said the flow of military personnel and soldiers into New Haven for classes with the Center would give members of the Yale community a chance to meet people who have had a “very different career” than they have. “In my profession, there are lots of doctors who have no idea there’s a war going on,” Morgan said, “and it would be nice for them to meet doctors who were deployed or in a war zone.” University spokesman Tom Conroy and Chief Communications Officer Elizabeth Stauderman said they do not have information about the possible USSOCOM Center, and the University has not made any announcements about the Center. Morgan said the Center’s program will include instructors from outside the University’s staff, including well-known pickpocket Apollo Robbins. Robbins, who gained fame after pickpocketing former President Jimmy Carter’s Secret Service agents, would serve as an adjunct instructor if the plans for the Center are approved, he added. The USSOCOM is the part of the Department of Defense, which oversees the Special Operations Commands for the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, which perform atypical military operations and missions. Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT Organization reviews policies DWIGHT HALL FROM PAGE 1 tral data network and a reporting system intended to measure the impact of Dwight Hall service programs on participating students and communities, Archer-Simons said. The organization intends to require constituent student groups to write annual reports assessing the effect of their work, she added. Dwight Hall also plans to improve the organization’s risk-management pro-

DWIGHT HALL N E T WO R KS Dwight Hall has four networks used to link and provide support to student service groups on campus.

cesses, with increased insurance protection for students, and streamline a variety of organization practices, such as paying students through the Yale University payroll and facilitating the use of Dwight Hall facilities for on-campus service groups, Archer-Simons said. “We’ll finish our budget for next year and have all our policies and practices updated by the time the new executive director comes in,” Archer-Simons said. “He won’t have to deal as much with structure and will be able to talk about vision and moving the organization forward.” Reckhow said new policies will ensure Dwight Hall committees meet more regularly, take minutes and increase their productivity. The organization is also updating its bylaws, including policies about how jurisdiction is distributed in the organization, Reckhow said, adding that revisions to job descriptions

will allow more flexibility in the organization because, in the past, “people have had problems being stuck in boxes in terms of what they can or can’t do, so we’ve been developing infrastructure to be more flexible.” Though plans for Dwight Hall to move from its present location on Old Campus to a facility at 143 Elm St. have been in place since 2006, the move came to a halt during the 2008 financial downturn. Reckhow said the organization aims to renovate its current offices, as concrete plans for the move remain undetermined. Planned renovations include painting, cleanup efforts, new furniture and a layout change, ArcherSimons said. Dwight Hall has an annual budget of roughly $900,000. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

EDUCATION NETWORK

The Education Network encompasses groups that work with youth and runs the Suzanne Jovin Education Resource Room, a children’s playroom on the first floor of Dwight Hall. Member groups include Community Health Educators and FOCUS on New Haven. SOCIAL JUSTICE NETWORK

The Social Justice Network focuses on social change and includes groups such as the Yale chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Yale Humanist Society. PUBLIC HEALTH COALITION

The Public Health Coalition Network includes groups dealing with public health advocacy issues, as well as cultural groups and individuals interested in health awareness, such as AIDS Walk New Haven. INTERNATIONAL NETWORK

The newest Dwight Hall network, the International Network, provides support to groups that manage trips abroad, including Engineers Without Borders and Reach Out.

Morning Checklist [x] Brush teeth [x] Wash face [x] Comb hair [x] Grab a cup of coffee [x] Read the Yale Daily News

Get your day started on the right page.

CHRISTOPHER PEAK/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Plans to relocate Dwight Hall from Old Campus to a facility at 143 Elm St. have been stalled since the 2008 economic downturn.

“Rule #17: There are three things you never turn your back on — bears, men you have wronged and a dominant male turkey during mating season.” DWIGHT SCHRUTE CHARACTER IN “THE OFFICE”

UCS eyes STEM, arts UCS FROM PAGE 1 positions with an alumni-chartered group in Lusaka, Zambia — were built out of long-standing relationships with employers. UCS hopes to increase the number of students participating in the most rapidly growing areas of interest, which Dames said include the arts, global health and the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. She added that UCS plans to increase student participation in these areas by 66 percent, 35 percent and 24 percent, respectively. Daniel Obst, deputy vice president of international partnerships in higher education at the Institute for International Education, said he thinks increasing access to international opportunities will be beneficial for students. “Going abroad for internships is definitely a resume-builder,” Obst said. “It sets you apart from the rest and it also shows that you can deal with intercultural issues on a global basis. This is what employers want — especially in a globalized world.” Because many science-oriented students are unable to go abroad during term, Obst said many students flock to summer internships — and as the number of science-oriented students increases at a university, the more competition there will be for limited spots. Student interest in international summer programs at Yale, in both the educational and career fields, has made those programs competitive in recent years. International Bulldogs summer programs received roughly 1,200 student applications in both 2011 and 2012 and

accepted around 120 participants each year. Students interviewed who had traveled internationally through Yale said spending time in a foreign country increased their interest in that country’s culture and politics. After spending the summer in China on a Richard U. Light Fellowship, Christian Rhally ’15 said he will seriously consider pursuing a career in China after graduation. Rhally added that he thinks there has been a rise in interest in both educational and professional international opportunities because they are growing increasingly accessible.

The education market is getting more global — students just have more opportunities to go abroad. I think it’s also that the job market is getting more and competitive in America. CHRISTIAN RHALLY ’15 “I guess the education market is getting more global — students just have more opportunities to go abroad,” he said. “I think it’s also that the job market is getting more and more competitive in America.” The application deadline for most International Bulldogs and World Fellows programs is Feb. 1. Contact AMY WANG at amy.wang@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION & WORLD

T

Dow Jones 13,895.98, +0.51%

S NASDAQ 3,149.71, +0.62% S Oil $95.91, +0.05%

S S&P 500 1,502.96, +0.54% T T

10-yr. Bond 1.95%, +0.10 Euro $1.35, 0.63

230 die in Brazil nightclub fire BYJULIANA BARBASSA AND MARCO SIBAJA ASSOCIATED PRESS SANTA MARIA, Brazil — A fast-moving fire roared through a crowded nightclub in southern Brazil early Sunday, within seconds filling the space with flames and a thick, toxic smoke that killed more than 230 panicked partygoers who gasped for breath and fought in a stampede to escape. It appeared to be the world’s deadliest nightclub fire in more than a decade. Firefighters responding to the blaze at first had trouble getting inside the Kiss nightclub because bodies partially blocked the club’s entryway. Witnesses said a flare or firework lit by band members started the blaze in Santa Maria, a university city of about 260,000 people. Officials at a news conference said the cause was still under investigation — though police inspector Sandro Meinerz told the Agencia Estado news agency the band was to blame for a pyrotechnics show and that manslaughter charges could be filed. Television images showed black smoke billowing out of the Kiss nightclub as shirtless young men who had attended a university party joined firefighters using axes and sledgehammers to pound at windows and hotpink exterior walls to free those trapped inside. Bodies of the dead and injured were strewn in the street and panicked screams filled the air as medics tried to help. There was little to be done; officials said most of those who died were suffocated by smoke within minutes. Within hours a community gym was a horror scene, with body after body lined up on the floor, partially covered with black plastic as family members identified kin. Outside the gym police held up personal objects — a black

purse, a blue high-heeled shoe — as people seeking information on loved ones looked crowded around, hoping not to recognize anything being shown them. Guido Pedroso Melo, commander of the city’s Fire Department, told the O Globo newspaper that firefighters had a hard time getting inside the club because “there was a barrier of bodies blocking the entrance.” Teenagers sprinted from the scene after the fire began, desperately seeking help. Others carried injured and burned friends away in their arms. Many of the victims were under 20 years old, including some minors. “There was so much smoke and fire, it was complete panic, and it took a long time for people to get out, there were so many dead,” survivor Luana Santos Silva told the Globo TV network. The fire spread so fast inside the packed club that firefighters and ambulances could do little to stop it, Silva said.

There was so much smoke and fire, it was complete panic, and it took a long time for people to get out. LUANA SANTOS SILVA Survivor, Kiss nightclub fire NABOR GOULART/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Another survivor, Michele Pereira, told the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper that she was near the stage when members of the band lit flares that started the conflagration. “The band that was onstage began to use flares and, suddenly, they stopped the show and pointed them upward,” she said. “At that point, the ceiling caught fire. It was really weak, but in a matter of seconds it spread.” Guitarist Rodrigo Martins told Radio Gaucha that the band,

A woman cries over the coffin of her boyfriend at a gymnasium where bodies were brought for identification. Gurizada Fandangueira, started playing at 2:15 a.m. “and we had played around five songs when I looked up and noticed the roof was burning” “It might have happened because of the Sputnik, the machine we use to create a luminous effect with sparks. It’s harmless, we never had any trouble with it. “When the fire started, a guard

Morsi calls state of emergency

passed us a fire extinguisher, the singer tried to use it but it wasn’t working” He confirmed that accordion player Danilo Jacques, 28, died, while the five other members made it out safely. Police Maj. Cleberson Braida Bastianello said by telephone that the toll had risen to 233 with the death of a hospitalized victim. He said earlier that the

death toll was likely made worse because the nightclub appeared to have just one exit through which patrons could escape. Survivors said security guards briefly tried to block people from exiting the club. Brazilian bars routinely make patrons pay their entire tab at the end of the night before they are allowed to leave. Officials earlier counted 232 bodies that had been brought for

Obama praises Clinton as she finishes up BY PHILIP ELLIOTT ASSOCIATED PRESS

MAYA ALLERUZZO/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi declared a state of emergency in response to mass protests. BY HAMZA HENDAWI ASSOCIATED PRESS CAIRO — Egypt’s president declared a state of emergency and curfew in three Suez Canal provinces hit hardest by a weekend wave of unrest that left more than 50 dead, using tactics of the ousted regime to get a grip on discontent over his Islamist policies and the slow pace of change. Angry and almost screaming, Mohammed Morsi vowed in a televised address on Sunday night that he would not hesitate to take even more action to stem the latest eruption of violence across much of the country. But at the same time, he sought to reassure Egyptians that his latest moves would not plunge the country back into authoritarianism. “There is no going back on freedom, democracy and the supremacy of the law,” he said.

The worst violence this weekend was in the Mediterranean coastal city of Port Said, where seven people were killed on Sunday, pushing the toll for two days of clashes to at least 44. The unrest was sparked on Saturday by a court conviction and death sentence for 21 defendants involved in a mass soccer riot in the city’s main stadium on Feb. 1, 2012 that left 74 dead. Most of those sentenced to death were local soccer fans from Port Said, deepening a sense of persecution that Port Said’s residents have felt since the stadium disaster, the worst soccer violence ever in Egypt. At least another 11 died on Friday elsewhere in the country during rallies marking the second anniversary of the antiMubarak uprising. Protesters used the occasion to renounce Morsi and his Islamic fundamentalist group, the Muslim

Brotherhood, which emerged as the country’s most dominant political force after Mubarak’s ouster. The curfew and state of emergency, both in force for 30 days, affect the provinces of Port Said, Ismailiya and Suez. The curfew takes effect Monday from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. every day. Morsi, in office since June, also invited the nation’s political forces to a dialogue starting Monday to resolve the country’s latest crisis. A statement issued later by his office said that among those invited were the country’s top reform leader, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Mohammed ElBaradei, former Arab League chief Amr Moussa and Hamdeen Sabahi, a leftist politician who finished third in last year’s presidential race. The three are leaders of the National Salvation Front, an umbrella for the main opposition parties.

identification to a gymnasium in Santa Maria, which is located at the southern tip of Brazil, near the borders with Argentina and Uruguay. Federal Health Minister Alexandre Padhilha told a news conference that most of the 117 people treated in hospitals had been poisoned by gases they breathed during the fire. Only a few suffered serious burns, he said.

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama lauded Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as one of his closest advisers and said their shared vision for America’s role in the world persuaded his one-time rival — and potential successor — to be his top diplomat while he dealt with the shattered economy at home. During a joint interview that aired Sunday, Obama and Clinton chuckled as they described their partnership and stoked speculation that Obama may prefer Clinton to succeed him in the White House after the 2016 elections. Clinton is leaving Obama’s Cabinet soon, and speculation about the former first lady and senator has only grown more intense after a heated appearance last week on Capitol Hill. Both Obama and Clinton batted away questions about future campaigns, but the joint interview — the president’s first with anyone other than first lady Michelle Obama — was only likely to increase the fascination with Clinton’s future. “The president and I care deeply about what’s going to happen for our country in the future,” Clinton said. “And I don’t think,

you know, either he or I can make predictions about what’s going to happen tomorrow or the next year.” Obama, who suggested the joint interview as Clinton prepared her exit from the State Department, lavished praise on his rival for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination. He called her a friend and an extraordinary talent, and praised “her discipline, her stamina, her thoughtfulness, her ability to project.” It teetered on an endorsement of a 2016 presidential bid that is still an open question. Clinton advisers say she has not made a decision about a run, while Democratic officials suggest Clinton would be an early favorite if she decided to mount another campaign. Obama and Clinton laughed when asked about the political future. “You guys in the press are incorrigible,” Obama said when pressed on another Clinton presidency. “I was literally inaugurated four days ago. And you’re talking about elections four years from now.” The possibility of a presidential campaign for Vice President Joe Biden did not come up during the interview, taped Friday at the White House. Obama described why he insisted Clinton become his secretary of state.

CBS FILE PHOTO

President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speak with ”60 Minutes” correspondent Steve Kroft.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Snow and sleet with accumulation of less than 2 inches. High of 34 low of 31.

WEDNESDAY

High of 44, low of 38.

High of 52, low of 40.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, JANUARY 28 4:00 PM “‘A Damnable Cruelty and Folly’: Woodrow Wilson, World War I, and the Legacies of Reconstruction” Samuel L. Schaffer, assistant dean of faculty, history and athletics at the St. Albans School in Washington, D.C., will give the fifth annual Cassius Marcellus Clay Lecture. Sponsored by the Department of History. Free and open to the general public. Hall of Graduate Studies (320 York St.), Room 211. 4:00 PM “Imaging Instruments for Dark Energy and Dark Matter” Juan Estrada of Fermilab will review the current technology used for wide-field optical imaging in astronomy. He will discuss how this field is being transformed to allow future astronomical instruments with unprecedented scientific potential. Sloane Physics Laboratory (217 Prospect St.), Room 57.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 6:30 PM “Decoding the American Health Care System” Yale’s Public Health Coalition will be hosting a panel on the American health care system and what changes pre-med students, medical students and others interested in health professions can expect under the Affordable Care Act. The event will feature Nathan Moore, recent author of “The Health Care Handbook.” Other panelists include Dr. McLean, governor of the American College of Physicians; Dr. Olson, National Physicians Alliance chairman; and Victoria Veltri, the state of Connecticut’s healthcare advocate. The panel will be moderated by Dr. Howard Forman, director of Yale’s M.D./M.B.A. program. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.) Room 102.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

7:15 PM Bad Boys and New Waves: The Cinema of Susumu Hani The films “Children in the Classroom” and “Children Who Draw” will be shown in Japanese with English subtitles. Screenings will be followed by a round-table discussion with director Susumu Hani. Co-sponsored by the Council on East Asian Studies at Yale and the Japan Foundation. Free and open to the general public. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

CLASSIFIEDS

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Paper used for envelopes 7 Teensy kitchen invader 10 Thick-bodied river fish 14 Lessened 15 Critical hosp. area 16 Take down with a wrecking ball 17 Trade for cash 18 Musical based on ABBA songs 20 Golfer Snead’s nickname 22 “I don’t care which” 23 Naval petty officer 27 Lasting mark 30 __ and gown 33 John, Paul, George or Ringo 34 Go without food 36 “True __”: Wayne film 39 CFO’s degree 40 One on a board 43 Swiss peak 44 Gas in a sign 45 Knocks for a loop 46 Scallion relative 48 Space-saving abbr. 50 Team statistic 51 Finale 54 Selling fast 56 Whale or dolphin 63 Campbell’s soup slogan, and a hint to the puzzle theme found in 18-, 20-, 40- and 56-Across 66 “Seinfeld” woman 67 Albany’s canal 68 Actress Hagen 69 Sticky-toed lizards 70 Tadpole’s breathing organ 71 LPGA star Se Ri __ 72 Be agreeable DOWN 1 Red planet 2 Ill-fated Biblical brother 3 Diddly, to Dalí 4 To-do list entry

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CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

1/28/13

By Gareth Bain

5 Oscar winner for “Cat Ballou” 6 Part of FDA: Abbr. 7 Gets in one’s sights, with “at” 8 Campus sports org. 9 Tot’s belly 10 Tot’s drawing tool 11 Clumsy actor 12 Special forces weapon 13 Arthur who played Maude 19 Marseille Mrs. 21 The Big Apple, initially 24 Latin ballroom dances 25 Orange-yellow gemstones 26 Gets warmer, in a game 27 Taken in a breakin 28 Slept next to the trail, say 29 Upper limb 31 Sales rep 32 Opposite of post34 Weighing device 35 Somme summer 37 Global currency org.

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU BASIC

5 4 6 7 2 9 1

(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Stretch the truth 41 Bathwater tester 42 Dairy farm sound 47 Late-night host Jimmy 49 Revolutionary Guevara 52 Inveterate faultfinder 53 Word with hug or therapy 55 Alpha’s opposite 57 Teensy amount

1/28/13

58 Fargo’s st. 59 Apples with screens 60 Karaoke prop 61 Many a folk song, composer-wise: Abbr. 62 “__ we forget” 63 Ryan of “Sleepless in Seattle” 64 Hosp. scan 65 1,000 G’s

7 5

1 8 7

4 7

6 1

2 6 9 4

9

2 4 2 1 6 5

4


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“If I had a son, I’d have to think long and hard before I’d let him play football.” PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA, INTERVIEWING WITH THE NEW REPUBLIC ON FOOTBALL SAFETY

Halejian boasts career night BY DINÉE DORAME CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The women’s basketball team traveled to Providence for a rematch with the Brown Bears on Saturday, and a career-high performance from guard Sarah Halejian ’15 propelled the Elis to a 59–41 victory.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Bulldogs (6–10, 1–1 Ivy) were looking for a win against Brown (7–9, 1–1 Ivy) after a close one-point loss to the Bears last week in both teams’ conferenceopener. Halejian led the team in scoring with 14 in the first matchup against Brown and was a driving force for the team on Saturday. The sophomore guard posted her first career double-double, with 21 points and 10 rebounds. “I was more aggressive attacking the hoop instead of settling for outside shots,” Halejian said. “I also took less shots than I did in the last game, which forced me to focus on making each one really

YALE 59, BROWN 47 YALE

26

33

59

BROWN

20

27

47

S. HALEJIAN (YALE): 21 pts (9–16), 10 rebs, 3 stls N. BALL (BROWN): 10 pts, 5 rebs, 2 asts, 3 stls, 2 blks

count.” The Bulldogs were slow to start on Saturday, making only five of their first 20 shots, including a five and a half minute stretch without a point, and Brown bounced back from an early 12–6 deficit to take a 15–12 lead with 8:30 left in the first half. The Elis shot only 1–10 from the 3-point line in the first half, forcing the team to rely heavily on its inside shooters.

I was more aggressive attacking the hoop instead of settling for outside shots. SARAH HALEJIAN ’15 Guard, women’s basketball The Elis managed 30 points in the paint by the end of the game, and guards Amanda Tyson ’14 and Janna Graf ’14 each put up 8 points in support of Halejian’s 21-point performance. After struggling with their defensive effort in the last matchup with Brown, the Bulldogs were looking to make some effective stops this time around. “I think we redeemed our loss. We still didn’t play a great game, but we played a lot smarter,” captain Allie Messimer ’13 said. “Allowing them to score 20 more points the first game really hurt us.” Going into halftime with only a

six-point lead at 26–20, the Bulldogs kicked their defensive efforts into gear for the second period. Brown made a 7–0 run early in the second half to cut Yale’s lead to three with 16 minutes left. But the Eli defense clamped down, holding the Bears to 30.8 percent shooting in the second half and shutting down Brown leading scorer Lauren Clarke. The junior forward scored only two points on 0–4 shooting while playing all 20 minutes of the second half. Yale converted Brown’s 21 turnovers into 20 points over the entire game and had 11 steals, sealing Brown’s fate and holding the Bears to just 11 points in the last 13 minutes of the game. “We took to heart what our coaches told us about our defensive game last time and executed it the second time around,” Messimer said. Halejian scored five points as part of a 10–0 Yale run with six minutes left to play that ended Brown’s hopes of a comeback. The Bulldogs will continue conference play as they face both Harvard and Dartmouth on Friday and Saturday. “Every game means a lot to all of us,” Messimer said. “We know that this is it. We love this sport and want to win.” The Bulldogs will take on Harvard this Friday in Payne Whitney at 7 p.m. Contact DINÉE DORAME at dinee.dorame@yale.edu .

Yale prevails at home M. BBALL FROM PAGE 10 game’s first eight points. Led by two 3s from guard Austin Morgan ’13, the Elis retook the lead with a 10–0 run. The Elis would slowly build on that lead for the rest of the half before taking a 31–21 advantage into the break. Held to just two points in the first half, guard Matt Sullivan helped the Bears claw back into the game. He drained a 3-pointer, then stole the ball from Javier Duren ’15 to set up a thunderous two-handed dunk on the fast break by center Jon Schmidt that cut the deficit to 35–32. The Bulldogs were able to stave off the Brown charge with the play of forward Justin Sears ’16. Though Jones said that the freshman still has room to improve on his endurance and free-throw shooting, he praised Sears’ performance. “He played well defensively,” Jones said. “[Sears] blocked a few shots and helped give us a chance to win the game. He really added a presence in the inside for us when we didn’t have much of one for most of the game.“ Sears scored 11 points in the second half, but they were not enough to hold off the Bears as Sullivan’s 3 with 2:03 remaining knotted the game at 56. With just one second remaining on the shot clock, forward Nick Victor ’16 snagged forward Greg Kelley’s ’14 lob on the inbounds pass and tossed it into the hoop to take a 58–56 lead.

freshman forward Janelle Ferrara ’16 for the team lead in goals. Ferrara still leads the team in points. After a scoreless second period, defender Jamie Gray ’13 took a long slap shot, which was deflected into the goal by Zupon with two minutes remaining in the third period. “We as defensemen did a great job yesterday of getting our shots through and on net,” defender Kate Martini ’16 said.

Our forecheck and power play were great in helping us generate momentum. TARA TOMIMOTO ’14 Defenseman, women’s hockey

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale picked up a stellar performance from goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15, who recorded 31 saves en route to her first shutout since the team’s Oct. 26 showdown against Colgate (7–15–3, 2–9–3). “Everyone did their job in front of the net and really minimized Colgate’s opportunities,” Leonoff said. The Elis were able to match Colgate shot for shot, and both teams finished with 31 shots on goal. It was just the second time this season that the squad had as many shots as its opponent. “Our forecheck and power play were great in helping us generate momentum,” defender Tara Tomimoto ’14 said. “We were also moving the puck quickly, which helped us generate shots.” Additionally, Colgate’s physical style did it no favors, giving the Bulldogs five power plays, one of which the Elis converted into a goal. Friday’s action against No. 4 Cornell did

not go as well as Saturday’s game. The Big Red scored early and often with three first-period goals and finished with a 5–0 victory. Leonoff had 36 saves, but the story was again the shot differential: The Elis were outshot 41–13. Tomimoto and Martini both agreed that the team moved the puck much more quickly against Colgate than they did in the previous day’s game. “It was something we struggled with a bit on Friday, and it made a huge difference in our ability to generate offense,” Martini said. With the win, the Bulldogs vaulted into a tie for the eighth and final ECAC playoff spot with Colgate. The Elis hold the tiebreaker over the Raiders thanks to their two head-to-head wins. “If we come out and battle for 60 minutes … we can beat any team in the ECAC,” Martini said. Yale has two road games against Princeton and Quinnipiac this week. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

YALE 2, COLGATE 0 YALE

1

0

1

2

COLGATE

0

0

0

0

G: Alyssa Zupon 1 (Yale), Jamie Haddad 1 (Yale) A: Tara Tomimoto 1 (Yale), Jamie Gray 1 (Yale), Janelle Ferrara 1 (Yale) S: Jaimie Leonoff 31 (Yale)

CORNELL 5, YALE 0 CORNELL

3

2

0

5

YALE

0

0

0

0

G: Brianne Jenner 2 (Cornell) A: Jillian Saulnier 4 (Cornell) S: Jaimie Leonoff 36 (Yale)

With just one second remaining, Nick Victor ’16 snagged Greg Kelley’s lob on the inbounds pass and tossed it into the hoop to take a 58–56 lead.

Brown’s Tucker Halpern would force overtime, however, by sinking two free throws with 55 seconds remaining. The Bears kept the game close for the first three minutes of overtime until Duren came off a screen and drained a straight-on 3 on the pass from forward Matt Townsend ’15. “It was just part of our motion offense,” Duren said. “Towards the end of the game I tried to calm

YALE 76, BROWN 64 YALE

31

27

OT 18

76

BROWN

21

37

OT 6

64

J. SEARS (YALE): 18 pts, 8 rebs, 3 asts M. SULLIVAN (BROWN): 13 pts, 7 rebs, 3 stls

Win vaults women’s hockey into playoff spot WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 10

One of our most valuable attributes is our depth. WILL CHILDS-KLEIN ’15 Center, men’s basketball

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Guard Megan Vasquez ’13 scored seven points in the Elis’ convincing 59–47 victory in a rematch against Brown.

down, focus on my defense and just let the offense come, so the 3 I hit — it was in rhythm, it was in motion and everything was just smooth, so I let it fly and it went in.” Duren and center Will ChildsKlein ’15 agreed that Yale’s depth was key in wearing down the Bears. Ten Bulldogs played 12 or more minutes as the Bulldogs’ deep bench wore down the Bears. Guard Sean McGonagill played all 45 minutes for Brown to lead four Bears logging more than 30 minutes. “One of our most valuable attributes is our depth,” center Will Childs-Klein ’15 said. “Everybody on this team is more than capable of helping us win games. Some teams keep rotations of only seven or nine guys,

but we almost always play at least 11.” McGonagill, who scored 20 points to lead Brown over Yale last weekend, managed just nine points on eight attempts from the floor. He is fourth in the Ivy League and second on the Bears with an average of 14.6 points per game. “I don’t think there’s a guy in the league much better at using the ball screen,” Jones said. “At least he showed that to us last week. We did a better job at hounding him and making sure everything he got was tough.” Yale begins a four-game road trip next weekend at Harvard on Friday, Feb. 1. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs saw their highest attendance of the season on Saturday as they faced off against Colgate in the third annual “White Out,” a fundraiser in honor of Mandi Schwartz ’10.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

SPORTS

Rajon Rondo out for season with torn ACL After suffering an injury on Friday in a game against the Atlanta Hawks, the Boston Celtics announced Sunday that point guard Rajon Rondo will be benched for the rest of the season with a torn ACL in his right knee. It is unclear when Rondo will be able to return. He was slated to be the starting point guard for the Eastern Conference in the upcoming All-Star Game on Feb. 17.

Elis split road weekend

MEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

OVERALL

SCHOOL W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Yale

8

4

1

0.654

12

5

3

0.675

2

Dartmouth

7

5

1

0.577

11

7

2

0.600

3

Princeton

5

4

3

0.542

7

8

4

0.474

4

Cornell

4

6

2

0.417

8

9

2

0.474

5

Brown

3

6

4

0.385

7

9

4

0.450

6

Harvard

3

11

0

0.214

5

13

1

0.289

WOMEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

OVERALL

SCHOOL W L T

%

W

L

T

%

1

Harvard

14

1

0

0.933 17

2

1

0.875

2

Cornell

12

2

0

0.857

16

4

0

0.800

3

Dartmouth

7

6

2

0.533

12

7

3

0.614

4

Yale

3

10 1

0.250 4

16

1

0.214

5

Princeton

2

10 2

0.214

6

12

2

0.350

Brown

3

11

0.214

4

14

1

0.237

0

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Nicholas Weberg ’15 assisted Yale’s lone goal in a 4–1 losing effort at Colgate a night after defeating Cornell 3–2 in overtime. MEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 10 the referees video-reviewed the shot. The goal tied the game back up just over a minute into the third. A scoreless rest of the third period sent the game to overtime — just where the well-conditioned Bulldogs like to play. The Elis are unbeaten in six overtime games this season. A brief two and a half minutes into overtime, Wilson picked up a rebound from Ryan Obuchowski’s ’16 shot from the point and smacked it past Iles to clinch the Elis’ 12th victory of the season. “It was a great character win for us,” head coach Keith Allain ’80 said to yalebulldogs.com. “We battled back and battled back, and we had to kill some big penalties down the stretch. … We gradually took the game over and deserved to win in overtime.” The following night, the Bulldogs jumped on the Raiders (13–9–2, 5–6–1) early, going up 1–0 when Miller hit Agostino for a one-timer at the top of the right circle six minutes into the contest. The remainder of the first period

passed scoreless and Colgate was able to tie the game with the sole tally of the second period, a power-play goal from forward Tylor Spink.

We gradually took the game over and deserved to win in overtime. KEITH ALLAIN ’80 Head coach, men’s hockey Despite an early lead and a tight second period, the Elis were unable to hold off the Raiders in the final period of action. Colgate put away three more goals for a total of four unanswered to close out the game. The second and third of these scores came at even strength from defender Kevin Lough and forward John Lidgett. Tyson Spink, twin of Tylor Spink, closed out the scoring with the Raiders’ fourth goal, and the Spink twins fittingly bookended Colgate’s scoring with power-play goals. Next weekend, the Bulldogs come back home to take on Princeton and No.

1

2 cross-town rival Quinnipiac in a pair of ECAC matchups at the Whale.

3

Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

7

YALE 3, CORNELL 2 YALE

0

1

1

OT 1

3

CORNELL

1

1

0

OT 0

2

round, the Bantams maintained their 14-season winning streak at home.

This loss was a blessing in disguise since we will be able to take away many lessons from it. KENNETH CHAN ‘13

“I think we did not play to our full potential [against Trinity],” Kenneth Chan ’13 said. “To some extent, losing at

W

L

%

W

L

%

Harvard

2

0

1.000

10

6

0.625

Princeton

1

0

1.000

8

7

0.533

Columbia

1

1

0.500

9

7

0.562

Cornell

1

1

0.500

9

10

0.474

Brown

1

1

0.500

7

9

0.438

Yale

1

1

0.500

7

12

0.368

Penn

0

1

0.000

3

15

0.167

Dartmouth

0

2

0.000

4

12

0.250

IVY 1

COLGATE 4, YALE 1 COLGATE

0

1

3

4

YALE

1

0

0

1

3

S. FINNEY (G, COLGATE): 35 saves K. AGOSTINO (F, YALE): 1-0-1

Mixed results for the Bulldogs Trinity made us realize what we need to do to be competitive at the top and have a shot for the national title. This loss was a blessing in disguise since we will be able to take away many lessons from it.” On Saturday, the Bulldogs swept the Midshipmen 9–0. Last year, Yale came out victorious 7–2 against Navy on the road. The Elis only gave up three games in nine matches, six of which were won in three games. The lineup remained similar to that against the Bantams, with Chan, Robinson and Dodd at the No. 1, 2 and 3 spots, respectively. Fenwick has also been a consistent force on the court for the Elis after competing at the Welsh nationals and making it to the semifinals back at the

SCHOOL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

S. WILSON (F, YALE): 2–0–2, OT game-winner J. MALCOLM (G, YALE): 25/27 saves B. FERLIN (F, CORNELL): 1–0–1 A. ILES (G, CORNELL): 31/34 saves

7

MEN’S SQUASH FROM PAGE 10

OVERALL

beginning of January. “Sam Fenwick has been an absolute rock so far this year,” Robinson said. “He shows great control over the ball and has the ability to mix the pace, breaking the rhythm of his opponent. He is a nightmare to play in challenge matches, and I’m happy I’ve managed to avoid him in practice thus far.” The Bulldogs are set to continue Ivy League play at home this coming weekend against No. 1 Princeton on Saturday and No. 12 Penn on Sunday at Brady Squash Center in New Haven. Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu .

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

2

0

1.000

10

6

0.625

Princeton

1

0

1.000

10

5

0.667

Harvard

1

1

0.500

10

6

0.625

Brown

1

1

0.500

7

9

0.438

Yale

1

1

0.500

6

10

0.375

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

3

13

0.188

Penn

0

1

0.000

7

8

0.467

Columbia

0

2

0.000

2

14

0.125

MEN’S SQUASH IVY 1 3 5

7

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Princeton

2

0

1.000

6

0

1.000

Yale

2

0

1.000

8

1

0.889

Harvard

2

1

0.667

10

1

0.909

Cornell

2

1

0.667

11

2

0.846

Columbia

1

2

0.333

6

5

0.545

Dartmouth

1

2

0.333

5

5

0.500

Brown

0

2

0.000

6

5

0.545

Penn

0

2

0.000

3

6

0.333

WOMEN’S SQUASH IVY 1 3 5

7

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Princeton

2

0

1.000

5

0

1.000

Yale

2

0

1.000

9

1

0.900

Harvard

2

1

0.667

7

1

0.875

Cornell

2

1

0.667

9

2

0.818

Brown

1

1

0.500

10

1

0.909

Penn

1

1

0.500

7

1

0.875

Dartmouth

0

3

0.000

4

5

0.444

Columbia

0

3

0.000

3

6

0.333

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Sam Fenwick ’16 has been a consistent force on the court for the Elis after competing at the Welsh nationals and making the semifinals.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA (F/2OT) Boston 100 Miami 98

NBA L.A. Lakers 105 Oklahoma City 96

SPORTS QUICK HITS

FOUR-STAR RECRUIT FOR YALE FOOTBALL The San Jose Mercury News reported Saturday that linebacker Victor Egu has decommitted from Cal and will instead play football at Yale. Egu no longer wanted to play for the Golden Bears after coach Jeff Tedford was fired. He also had offers from Notre Dame and Nebraska, among others.

NCAAB No. 7 Indiana 75 No. 13 Mich St. 70

NHL (F/SO) Pittsburgh 2 Ottawa 1

AUS OPEN FIN. Djokovic 6 7 6 6 Murray 7 6 3 2

MONDAY

NHL PLAYER VISITS ‘WHITE OUT FOR MANDI’ A special guest stopped by Ingalls Rink on Saturday to help raise money for the Mandi Schwartz Foundation. P.K. Subban, a restricted free agent previously with the Montreal Canadiens, took photos and signed autographs for fans. Subban is a friend of goalie Jaimie Leonoff ’15, who made 31 saves in the 2–0 win.

“[Sam Fenwick ’16] is a nightmare to play. … I’m happy I’ve managed to avoid him in practice.” HYWEL ROBINSON ’13 CAPTAIN, MEN’S SQUASH YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Elis get OT win, but split weekend BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER Forward Stu Wilson’s ’16 rebound goal past Cornell goaltender Andy Iles gave the Elis their fifth straight win and third overtime victory this season Friday in Ithaca. But Yale’s five-game winning streak was snapped the next night when Colgate upset the Bulldogs 4–1 in Hamilton, N.Y.

MEN’S HOCKEY On Friday night, the No. 8 Bulldogs (12–5–3, 8–4–1 ECAC) made the four-and-a-half hour trek northwest to take on No. 18 Cornell in front of a full Lynah Rink. The Elis downed the Big Red (8–9–2, 4–6–2) 3–2 in overtime but were unable to complete three straight sweeps, splitting the weekend 1–1 after the loss to the Raiders. The Big Red held a lead over the Bulldogs throughout most of regulation, starting with an early goal from Cornell forward Brian

Ferlin just under two minutes into the game. Wilson opened the scoring for the Elis in the second with an even-strength goal when he picked the puck up off the boards on a bounce pass from defenseman Colin Dueck ’13 and skated above the top of the circles, blasting a low-wrist shot past Iles to tie the game. About nine minutes later, the Big Red pushed ahead again when defenseman John Esposito converted Cornell’s third man advantage of the game for a goal to go up 2–1. Esposito scored on one of only three shots taken by the Big Red in the second period. Despite the teams’ equal scoring totals in the period, the Bulldogs outshot the Big Red 11–3 and the momentum tilted in the visitors’ favor as the third period started. Leading scorer Kenny Agostino ’14 caught a pass from captain Andrew Miller ’13, walked to the high slot and ripped a shot over Iles’ shoulder so hard SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 9

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis outshot the Big Red 34–27 en route to a 3–2 overtime victory, but fell to the Colgate Raiders, 4–1, the following night.

Shutout in the ‘White Out’

Bulldogs notch first Ivy win

BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER With a season-high crowd in attendance, the Yale women’s hockey team knocked off Colgate 2–0 in Saturday’s “White Out for Mandi,” the third annual fundraiser in memory of Mandi Schwartz ’10.

BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER It took five extra minutes, but the Elis were able to avenge their loss in Providence last weekend.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY A day after falling to No. 4 Cornell, 5–0, the Elis put together a complete performance in honor of their former teammate, who died in 2011 after a 27-month battle with acute myeloid leukemia. “It meant so much to us to get the win at the ‘White Out’ — for Mandi, our fans, alumni, each other and to keep our playoff dreams alive,” team captain Alyssa Zupon ’13 said. The Bulldogs (4–16–1, 3–10–1 ECAC) scored in the first period at the 17:25 mark when forward Jamie Haddad ’16 was able to take advantage of a power-play opportunity by knocking the puck past Colgate goaltender Ashlynne Rando. With the goal, Haddad tallied her seventh goal of the season and broke a tie with fellow SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 8

MEN’S BASKETBALL Yale (7–12, 1–1 Ivy) squandered a 10-point halftime lead over Brown (7–9, 1–1), but pulled away in the last minutes of overtime to earn its first Ivy win of the season 76–64. Head coach James Jones attributed the victory to improved effort from his players on Saturday. “Sometimes as a coach you look out at the floor and you see guys in your uniforms and you wonder who they are,” Jones said. “That was the way I felt last week. Our energy was much better this week, especially defensively — we guarded them much better.” From the tip, it appeared that the Bears would continue their success of the previous week as they scored the

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Defender Aurora Kennedy ’14 helped a strong defensive effort that gave Yale its first shutout since it defeated Colgate in the teams’ last meeting on Oct. 26.

SEE MEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE 8

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale squandered a 10-point halftime lead over Brown, but pulled away in the last minutes of overtime to win its first Ivy game of the season 76–64.

Tough split for men’s squash BY ADLON ADAMS STAFF REPORTER The No. 4 Yale men’s squash team split this week’s matches against two teams ranked in the top 20 in the nation.

MEN’S SQUASH

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

On Saturday, the Bulldogs swept the Navy 9–0 after their first loss of the season to Trinity.

STAT OF THE DAY 31

The No. 2 Trinity Bantams (11–0) overtook the Bulldogs on Wednesday with a 7–2 victory at Trinity’s Kellner Center. Last year, Yale (8–1, Ivy 2–0) defeated Trinity 5–4 in a historic victory, ending the Bantams’ 252-match winning streak. On Saturday,

Yale turned its luck around and held onto its perfect record at home with a 9–0 win against No. 15 Navy (24–5). “We expected Trinity to be a very good team, and they were,” Eric Caine ’14 said. “We expected them to have a lot of fans and a big home-court advantage, and they did. We learned a lot from the experience, and hopefully will get another chance to play them in the national championships.” The Bulldogs and the Bantams entered Wednesday’s contest undefeated. All but one of the matches ended in three games or more. In the first round, Yale lost

at the No. 6 and No. 9 positions. Richard Dodd ’13 at No. 3 kept the Elis in the fight with a four-game victory over Trinity’s Miled Zarazua. Trinity was able to jump ahead in the second round after Yale team captain Hywel Robinson ’13 and Charlie Wyatt ’14 lost at the No. 2 and No. 8 spots, respectively. Rookie Sam Fenwick ’16 put one more tally up on the board for the Bulldogs with a win at No. 5 over Trinity’s Vrishab Kotian in three games. After winning all three matches in the last SEE MEN’S SQUASH PAGE 9

SAVES MADE BY WOMEN’S HOCKEY GOALIE JAIMIE LEONOFF ’15 IN YALE’S 2–0 WIN OVER COLGATE DURING THE ‘WHITE OUT FOR MANDI.’ The shutout was Leonoff’s second of the year — the other, coincidentally, was another 31-save effort at Colgate.


THE YALE DAILY NEWS, JANUARY 28, 1878 — 2013.

CHAMPIONSHIP WON: FOOTBALL TEAM DEFEATS HARVARD 8 – 0 COY’S PUNTING THE DECIDING FACTOR; HARVARD GAINS MORE BY STRAIGHT RUSHING, BUT POOR GENERALSHIP OFFSETS IT NOV. 22, 1909 —By defeating Harvard in the Stadium at Cambridge on Saturday afternoon by the score of 8 to 0, the University Football Team proved that the faith of the University that it would develop into a championship eleven was not misplaced. The game, which brought out all sorts of football, both good and bad, was tense and spectators and players alike felt that every play was of vital importance. The game was won by superior football strategy. Harvard although she gained by straight football much more ground than did Yale, was kept pretty constantly on the defensive, and did not have the opportunity to use her powerful offense to teh best advantage. Coy’s punting was for superior to that of Minot, and this was a factor which had no small share in determining the outcome. The generalship shown by O’Flaherty, the Harvard quarterback, was not of the best. A fumbled punt at the start of the game which almost resulted in a Yale score, seemed to rattle him, and he played nervously for the rest of the time he was in the game. Fish interrupted him several times, and this did not help him to pull himself together. He showed rather poor judgment in choosing his plays when Harvard was within striking distance of the Yale goal, and persisted in running plays out directly in front of his own goal instead of running them up the side lines. Minot was unable to place his punts at such times and this gave Coy many good chances for goals from field. He tried six of these from various angles, putting two beautiful ones cleanly over the bars and barely missing a third. Harvard was unfortunate in the number of penalties which were imposed upon her. Her team seemed to get nervous at critical points and penalties resulted frequently. Twice was she put back when almost within striking distance of the Yale goal, and a number of times she was penalized half the distance to her own goal when within the 15-yard line.

FOOTBALL EXPERTS NOMINATE KELLEY BEST IN COUNTRY SELECTED BY WIDE MARGIN FOR HEISMAN TROPHY, TOP GRID HONOR DEC. 2, 1936 —After a victory in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament, the women’s volleyball team’s run has come to an end at the hands of the defending champions. The Bulldogs (21-6, 13-1 Ivy) defeated Ohio University (24-8) on Friday, only to fall to No. 1 Penn State (34-0) the following day. After receiving a bid to the tournament by winning the Ivy League, the Elis proved with their win over the Bobcats that they can compete on the national level. “We wanted people to know that there is good volleyball played in the Ivy League,” outside hitter Cat Dailey ’10 said. “And we proved that we deserve to be there.” The first game of the tournament opened with a kill by Dailey and was followed by an early run by the Bulldogs, building to a 10-5 lead. Ohio took its first timeout, trying to end the Elis’ momentum. But Yale would not be denied, stringing together a series of plays to push the score to 19-12. It was only then that the Bobcats went on their own run, cutting the lead to four with the Elis up, 21-17. A timeout by Yale gave the Bulldogs a minute to regroup, and the Elis came out of their huddle ready to end the first set, and went on a 4-2 run to end the set, 25-19. With the first set under their belts, both teams seemed to find a rhythm in the second set. Exchanging points for the entire set, the Bulldogs and

Bobcats were deadlocked at 23-23. It was only then that Ohio took its first lead of the match. The Bobcats connected on two plays to win the final points of the set, tying the match at one game apiece. After the intermission, the two teams once again went for point for point. Although the Elis took the third set, the Bobcats countered by stealing the fourth. In the decisive fifth set, Yale and Ohio found themselves tied at 13-13. The Bobcats hit an off-pace shot that fooled the Elis, giving them the lead at 14-13. The next rally ended with an Ohio shot that landed out of bounds, bring the game to another stalemate. After an error by the Bobcats, the Bulldogs were one point away from victory. Outside hitter Alexis Crusey ’10 hit the final shot cross court, and the Bulldogs advanced to the second round. Head coach Erin Appleman had taken a timeout when the Elis were down 13-11. She told her players to just worry more about having fun and playing together than about the numbers on the score board. “I just wanted to remind them to enjoy the moment,” she said. “And they went out and did just that, fighting for every point to get the win.” Dailey led the team with 20 kills and 15 digs, while Crusey contributed to the Bulldogs’ victory with 14 kills and 16 digs. Captain and setter Ally Mendenhall ’09 dished out 36 assists, in addition to a team-high 18 digs. The win was the first by an Ivy squad in the NCAA Tournament since the Bulldogs’ last postseason appearance in 2004. In that season, the Elis won their first match only to see their run ended by No. 4 Minnesota in the second round. On Saturday, the Bulldogs followed a similar script, losing to the defending champion Penn State. The Nittany Lions have not lost this season, including in a match against the Bulldogs on Sept. 19. Although the Bulldogs lost the match against Penn State, the team has established a presence both in the Ivy League and on the national level. Losing only one starter, Mendenhall, after this season, the Elis will certainly be back next year. The return of Ivy League Player of the Year Dailey, as well as Crusey and libero Kelly Ozurovich ’11, should make the Bulldogs just as successful next year.

BUSH NAMED NEW BASEBALL CAPTAIN; GARFIELD TO LEAD CREW NEXT SPRING FIRST BASEMAN BOASTS .283 BATTING AVERAGE; OARSMAN ROWS AT FOUR SEPT. 22, 1947 — After the baseball team and had completed their commencement week clashes with Harvard, respective captains were elected for the 1948 campaign — on the diamond, George H. W. (Poppy) Bush, 1947M, and in rowing, Wyatt Garfield, 1947M. Bush, who hails froom Greenwich, Connecticut and is a member of DKE, Torch Honor Society, and Skull adn Bones, has held down the varsity first base slot for the last two seasons. During the Bulldogs’ title-bound EIL season he maintained a .283 batting average in circuit competition — a total of 13 hits in 46 trips to the plate. Included in his total were: nine runs scored, six runs batted in, and a pair of two-base hits. He is generally considered as one of the flashiest fielding first basemen in collegiate circules. Garfield, successor to Alec Brown as crew captain, hails from Concord, Massachusetts and is a member fo the Fence Club and Berzelius. The six-foot one-inch number four oar rowed in the varsity shell which lost to a great Harvard crew by a length and a half on June 18 and also filled the same berth at the Seattle Sprint Regatta. He had been elevated from the jayvee shell about at midseason. Slated for managerial assignments are R. Hatch in baseball adn Alberg G. Edwards fro crew, with Robert B. Congdon acting in the capacity of assistant rowing manager. The naming of these two leaders completed the slate of spring sports leaders. George Cook III, of Westfield, New Jersey was named track captain just prior to Commencement, while John Moses of Scarsdale, New York was selected to succeed Bill Ylvisaker as tennis captain next spring.

George H.W. (Poppy) Bush, baseball captain, meeets legend Herman “Babe” Ruth.

CAGERS TOP INDIANS, CANTABS; MADDEN STARS IN YALE FINALE TEAM CLINCHES POSITION IN NCAA TOURNAMENT ELI CAPTAIN NETS 32 POINTS IN LAST HOME GAME MAR. 5, 1962 — Led by Captain Bill Madden, Yale’s basketball team trounced both Dartmouth (81-66) and Harvard (82-63) in the Payne Whitney Gym last weekend. However, only in the second half of the Harvard game did the Bulldogs play like the Ivy League champions they became by beating the Indians. In that second half Yale played some of its finest basketball of the season. Trailing 34–30 at the intermission, the Elis flattened the upset-minded Cantabs with a 52 point closing burst. Madden scored 20 points in this surge and sophomore Rick Kaminsky tossed in 15 more. Yale took a 42–21 lead on a Lynch-assisted lay-up by Steve Goulding. Harvard held on until consecutive three point plays by Kaminsky and Madden gave Yale breathing room. From then on the game became a slaughter with Madden the chief executioner. The Eli Captain finished the night with a total of 32 points. Most of this total came on long one-handers and jump shots which loosened up the Harvard zone defense. Madden could not have asked for a better end to his regular season career. Not only did he surpass 1,000 points and lead the Blue in scoring in both games, but in his final game he poured through his college career high both for a game (32) and for a half (20). He hit 15 of his 26 field goal attempts for a .577 percentage. With Friday’s win over Dartmouth the Elis qualified for a spot in the NCAA tournament. They must face a Wake Forest team led by 6’10” all-American Len Chappell in Philadelphia next Monday. —Pete Bradford

VICTORY IN NCAA OPENER VOLLEYBALL DEC. 10, 2008 —After a victory in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament, the women’s volleyball team’s run has come to an end at the hands of the defending champions. The Bulldogs (21-6, 13-1 Ivy) defeated Ohio University (24-8) on Friday, only to fall to No. 1 Penn State (34-0) the following day. After receiving a bid to the tournament by winning the Ivy League, the Elis proved with their win over the Bobcats that they can compete on the national level. “We wanted people to know that there is good volleyball played in the Ivy League,” outside hitter Cat Dailey ’10 said. “And we proved that we deserve to be there.” The first game of the tournament opened with a kill by Dailey and was followed by an early run by the Bulldogs, building to a 10-5 lead. Ohio took its first timeout, trying to end the Elis’ momentum. But Yale would not be denied, stringing together a series of plays to push the score to 19-12. It was only then that the Bobcats went on their own run, cutting the lead to four with the Elis up, 21-17. A timeout by Yale gave the Bulldogs a minute to regroup, and the Elis came out of their huddle ready to end the first set, and went on a

4-2 run to end the set, 25-19. With the first set under their belts, both teams seemed to find a rhythm in the second set. Exchanging points for the entire set, the Bulldogs and Bobcats were deadlocked at 23-23. It was only then that Ohio took its first lead of the match. The Bobcats connected on two plays to win the final points of the set, tying the match at one game apiece. After the intermission, the two teams once again went for point for point. Although the Elis took the third set, the Bobcats countered by stealing the fourth. In the decisive fifth set, Yale and Ohio found themselves tied at 13-13. The Bobcats hit an offpace shot that fooled the Elis, giving them the lead at 14-13. The next rally ended with an Ohio shot that landed out of bounds, bring the game to another stalemate. After an error by the Bobcats, the Bulldogs were one point away from victory. Outside hitter Alexis Crusey ’10 hit the final shot cross court, and the Bulldogs advanced to the second round. The win was the first by an Ivy squad in the NCAA Tournament since the Bulldogs’ last postseason appearance in 2004. In that season, the Elis won their first match only to see their run ended by No. 4 Minnesota in the second round. Although the Bulldogs lost the match against Penn State, the team has established a presence both in the Ivy League and on the national level. Losing only one starter, Mendenhall, after this season, the Elis will certainly be back next year. The return of Ivy League Player of the Year Dailey, as well as Crusey and libero Kelly Ozurovich ’11, should make the Bulldogs just as successful next year. —Efren Bonner

ELIS DEFEAT HARVARD FOR NATIONAL TITLE W. SQUASH FEB. 21, 2011 —Ranked second in the nation all season, on Sunday the women’s squash team finally proved that they deserved to be on top. In a repeat of last week’s contest for the Ancient Eight crown, the Elis defeated formerly top-ranked Harvard (11–2, 5–1) with the same score as last weekend, 5–4, to win their first national title in five years. “A national championship, Ivy title, and undefeated season speaks for itself,” head coach Dave Talbott said. “It was the culmination of a great season,” En route to the Howe Cup title, Yale (17–0, 6–0 Ivy) also defeated No. 8 Dartmouth (9–8, 1–5) and No. 5 Princeton (10–5, 3–3) in the quarterfinals and semifinals, respectively. “It feels incredible,” captain and 2011 Betty Richey Award recipient Logan Greer ’11 said. “As a freshman, I made it my goal to win a national championship. As a senior class, we have worked for four years with this end in mind. It is the best feeling in the world, finishing this season undefeated as a team, winning the Ivy League and national titles.” To begin their quest for the title, the Bulldogs took on the Big Green, who have struggled against

Ivy League opponents. While Greer’s victory took five games, the rest of the team easily won in straight 3–0 matches. “Dartmouth was a great match to start with and get used to the courts,” Sarah Toomey ’11 said. Yale next took on the Tigers on Saturday. Princeton had the home court advantage in the tournament, and were able to pull off the upset against No. 4 Penn the previous night. The next day, Princeton gave the Bulldogs a much closer contest than earlier in the season when Yale won 7–2 at home. But the Elis still captured victory relatively easily with a 6–3 victory, led by Greer who won in straight games at the No. 1 position. Freshman Gwendoline Tilghman ’14 lost her second match of the year against Princeton in five closely contested games. “Princeton was playing much better squash this weekend than when we played them earlier in the season,” Toomey said. “Combined with their home court advantage, we had to play well to win, and it prepared us for the intensity of the final.” After last week’s match against Harvard, both teams knew they were in for a battle with the national title at stake. Lillian Fast ’14 and Toomey got Yale off to a quick 2–1 lead in the first set of matches against the Crimson. At the No. 6 position, Katie Ballaine ’13 lost in four close games, 1–3. In the next three matches, Yale won two out of the three contests with big wins from Mille Tomlinson ’14 and Rhetta Nadas ’12. Tomlinson won her match in straight games and finished her season undefeated. She was pushed to four games only once against No. 3 Trinity last month. Nadas, who according to Toomey had the best match of her career, pulled out a huge 3–2 victory for the Bulldogs. “Heading into the third game, I realized that my match was crucial for the win,” Nadas said. “At that moment, I just thought about the team and all we have given this season, and I was able to find the motivation to win in five games.” However, despite a 4–2 advantage going into the last three matches, Yale quickly found itself on the verge of defeat as Harvard tied the score at 4–4 with wins at the No. 1 and No. 7 positions. Greer pushed the No. 1 player in the nation Laura Gemmell to five games after being defeated in straight games last weekend. However, she was unable to pull of the win against Gemmell, who picked up her play on the final points in the match. Caroline Reigeluth ’11, who was the hero last weekend against Harvard, lost to Sarah Mumanachit at the No. 7 spot. The last match, between Kimberley Hay ’14 and the Crimson’s June Tiong, would decide the outcome. “Watching the rest of the team go on before me was definitely nervewrecking,” Hay admitted. Hay beat Tiong last weekend in straight games, but Tiong made it tougher for Hay on Sunday, forcing four games. Still, Hay came out victorious and sent Yale to its fourth national title in ten years. “It was an awesome feeling to be the one to clinch it and know that we had won,” Hay said. “But at the same time I knew how much effort that all of my team had put in and how much they wanted it so it was great to be able to win for them and share the experience with them.” Yale next heads to the College Squash Association individual championships in Hanover, N.H. on March 4. —Preetam Dutta

Our fine canine mascot, Handsome Dan


THE YALE DAILY NEWS, JANUARY 28, 1878 — 2013.

JFK DEATH SHOCKS YALE

NOV. 23, 1963 — In wake of Ken-

nedy death, activities are called off, Harvard game may move to next Saturday.

NAVAL BLITZ OPENS WAR: 1500 RIOT

Titanic disaster told by eye witness from dock

9 arrested outside gay/lesbian conference, sparking protests

DEC. 8, 1941 — A crowd of 1,500 demonstrate for three hours, finally calling forth President Charles Seymour on his porch steps for a speech.

RALLY HITS RACISM BREWSTER IS ELECTED: LONG LIVE THE KING

APRIL 19, 1912 — Karl H. Behr reports from dock of the remarkable bravery and discipline by crew … 200 sailors killed at first crash.

OCT. 26, 1989 — Students protest

outside of the New Haven Police Station after arrests.

SPRING WORKOUT IN CAGE

COXE MEMORIAL CAGE OPENS

Brewster elected 17th president at meeting today. A MEAN STREAK

YALE MEN GO NAKED

MARCH 19, 1930 — The Track and Baseball squads have been holding

BRITON HADDEN DIES UNEXPECTEDLY

PRESIDENT LEVIN

NOV. 23, 1963 — Assistant Profes-

sor Kenneth Mills addresses crowd of approximately 10,000.

76 ARRESTED AS SHANTIES FALL

APRIL 14, 1968 — Yale police officers arrested pro-divestment protestors early this morning after they refused to leave the shantytown on Beinecke Plaza.

FRESHMAN RIOT ATTEMPT FIZZLES INTO SEMINAR

regular practice in Coxe Memorial Cage in preparation for the outdoor schedules.

THE YALE COLISEUM

streaking.

APRIL 15, 1991 — The fate of Yale’s oldest and prestigious secret society is in doubt after current Skull and Bonesmen tapped seven junior women.

MAY 11, 1961 — An evening of sporadic freshman rioting outside of Durfee Hall ends with a sober discussion about Freshman hours.

OCT. 12, 1963 — Kingman

FEB. 18, 1974 — Yale men go

ALUMS LOCK TOMB AFTER BONES TAPS WOMEN

Bush named new baseball captain

FEB. 28, 1929 — The former News’ APRIL 15, 1993 — Richard Levin

was named Yale’s 21st President.

chairman and founder of Time Magazine dies in Brooklyn hospi-

CITY POLICE ARREST 50 FOLLOWING STREET SIT-­IN

APRIL 9, 1918 — The hope of all

who suffer. — The dread of all who wrong. — John Greenleaf Whittier

Instant devastation on Old Campus: WYBC, Record, Banner lose Bladderball 738-­zip

SEPT. 22, 1947 — Poppy Bush … first baseman named captain of Bulldog nine.

MAY 10, 1972 — Four New Haven policemen clear traffic for 500 dem-

onstrators who marched into the city streets to voice disgust at Richard Nixon’s decision to blockade Haiphong.

BOOLA BOOLA

NOV. 4, 1963 — The beginning of the end for WYBC, the Record, the

Banner, and its remote-controlled apes from the Scientific.

NOV. 23, 1914 — Panorama of the Bowl during Saturday’s Game


Today's Paper  

Jan. 28, 2013

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