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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 115 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

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CROSS CAMPUS

M. LACROSSE LAST-MINUTE GOAL BEATS PENN

JOBS

MARKETING

BASEBALL

State’s unemployment rate falls for seventh consecutive month

SOM CENTER EXPLORES FACTORS OF CONSUMPTION

Yale bats stay quiet as Elis score only three runs in four-loss weekend

PAGE B3 SPORTS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

PAGE B4 SPORTS

Walters to speak at Class Day

Students join march for Trayvon Martin

Changing rules. In an email

sent to members of Saybrook College on April 1, leaders of Saybrook’s intramural teams announced a modification to the college’s rules: Freshmen would no longer be allowed to participate in intramural sports. “Adjusting to the rigors of college life is overwhelming, and forcing freshmen to engage in additional physical activity has proven to be far more traumatizing than originally believed,” the email stated.

BY TAPLEY STEPHENSON STAFF REPORTER When seniors don festive Class Day hats and march onto Old Campus on May 20, they will find Barbara Walters, Emmywinning television host and journalist, sitting on stage. In an early Monday morning email to the senior class, Kevin Adkisson ’12 and Ben Schenkel ’12, senior class secretary and treasurer, respectively, announced that Walters will speak at Class Day 2012. Adkisson told the News Sunday night that he thinks Walters’ experience as a leading journalist gives her insights not heard at recent Class Days.

More April Fool’s. As part of

a prank, State Rep. Stephen Dargan sent a text message to friends, family and colleagues on Sunday claiming that he had been in a car accident (he hadn’t) and needed medical assistance (he didn’t). A colleague in state government who wanted to “take the prank up a notch,” according to the New Haven Register, tweeted “Dargan in the hospital following accident.” Yale spokesman Michael Morand responded by tweeting “prayers for Steve.”

We wanted a female first and foremost, then we assembled a very large list of women leaders.

JAMES LU AND BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

Streamlining. Yale Dining

unveiled a new line of bowls on Friday. The new bowls are white, larger than previous bowls and stack neatly. Under investigation. Three

New Haven Police Department officers have been placed on paid administrative leave after an off-duty shooting incident outside State Street bar Christopher Martin’s Sunday morning.

Nothing doing. Last month,

Philadelphia-area high school senior Jackie Milestone gained minor Internet fame — 25,000 YouTube hits — for creating a video expressing her desire to gain admission to Yale. But according to comments on her YouTube video, Milestone did not earn admission to the University when decisions came out last week, and does not know where she’s headed. “I guess I’ll never really know what it is that gets someone into an Ivy League school,” Milestone wrote.

Save the Earth. Saturday night brought Earth Hour to Yale, as Yalies across campus turned out their lights from 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Even Harkness got in on the action, its lights dimming during those hours. Sex doctor. The much-adored

Dr. Ruth Westheimer was in New Haven on Saturday to receive a research advocacy award from the Yale School of Medicine, the New Haven Register reported. Preparations. The Joseph

Slifka Center’s Dining Room is closed this week in preparation for Passover. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1981 The Yale College faculty votes to allow pluses and minuses on Yale transcripts. New grades include A minus, B plus and B minus. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Yalies joined New Haven residents in protesting the death of black teenager Trayvon Martin, which has sparked a nationwide debate about racial profiling. Protesters wore hoodies in honor of Martin, who was wearing a hoodie when he was shot dead in February. BY SARAH MASLIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER On Saturday afternoon, Yalies and New Haven residents donned hooded sweatshirts and marched from Dixwell Avenue to City Hall to protest the fatal shooting of unarmed African-American teenager Trayvon Martin. The march, which was organized by the Black Student Alliance at Yale (BSAY) and co-sponsored by other activist groups from Yale, New Haven and elsewhere in the state, aimed to raise awareness about racial profiling and the need for unity among local

groups taking steps to combat it. Called “Hoodies Up New Haven,” the march and subsequent rally at City Hall commemorated Martin, a 17-year-old high school student who was shot by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in Sanford, Fla., on Feb. 26 while walking home from a convenience store wearing a hooded sweatshirt. Echoing nationwide demands for Zimmerman’s arrest and “an end to racial profiling,” Saturday’s march hoped to promote an additional message: that Yale and New Haven must join forces to address local problems of discrimination.

Budgetary concerns underscore letter

SEE FACULTY MEMO PAGE 6

SEE RALLY PAGE 6

SEE CLASS DAY PAGE 4

Prospective Yalies unfazed by crime GRAPH CRIMES ON CAMPUS PER STUDENT Brown Columbia Cornell Dartmouth Harvard MIT Penn Princeton Stanford Yale

Faculty and administrators say a memo released Thursday to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences by University President Richard Levin and Provost Peter Salovey is only the starting point in responding to concerns raised by professors this semester.

Levin told the News Sunday that he thinks the University’s tight financial situation since the onset of the recession in 2008 is the “common thread” among faculty concerns aired this semester. Salovey said in a Sunday email that he cannot “speculate too much” as to why faculty have begun to express concerns this semester, but he also noted that ongoing budget cuts have placed stress on faculty and staff. As a result of constraints imposed by the budget, Levin said faculty have perceived the University’s decision-making power as shifting to the administration. “The faculty are feeling the impact, and they’re also feeling that at a time of budget constraints, decisions have been made at the top more frequently than what would be the norm,” Levin said. After two controversial Yale College faculty meetings in February and March, Levin

“We haven’t had someone from journalism for a few years, and we certainly haven’t had a woman in almost a decade,” Adkisson said. “So we were looking for people, like Walters, who can inspire us, once they reach a

KEVIN ADKISSON ’12 Senior class secretary

ADMISSIONS

BY GAVAN GIDEON STAFF REPORTER

DOUBLE TAKE

“This is not a problem just for the black community,” said Nia Holston ’14, political chair of BSAY and an organizer of the march. “[Racial profiling] is something that affects all of us.” Holston said the tragedy in Florida has prompted BSAY to work toward calling attention to racial profiling in New Haven and become more involved in social causes within the city. Holston said she came up with the idea for a march and rally after a BSAY-hosted discussion about Trayvon Martin’s death and racial profiling last Tues-

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s the students accepted to the class of 2016 last Friday weigh their college options, questions about New Haven’s safety appear to be playing only a small role in their decisions, if any. ANDREW GIAMBRONE and JAMES LU report.

the fall. “Yale is a great school that always receives rave reviews from its students, and it seemed silly to base my decision on fringe statistics.” Edelman’s attitude is mirrored by 12 other applicants and five college guidance counselors interviewed, who all said New Haven’s crime rates played only a marginal role, if any, in their perception of Yale’s attractiveness as a school. Though those interviewed said there are safety concerns on any campus located in an urban setting, they added that the benefits of one day attending Yale outweighed the minor reservations they might have had about the city’s public safety. “Reputation is strong because reality is strong,” said Yale spokesman Michael Morand ’87 DIV ’93 of both New Haven and Yale. “When real people visit and check out the facts, they get it.” While New Haven has grappled with a reputation of violence for decades, this history appears to be far from the minds of the 1,975 students accepted to the class of 2016 as they weigh their college options.

A TROUBLED HISTORY

Newly admitted applicants to the Yale College class of 2016 now have until May 1 to decide whether they will spend the next four years of their lives in New Haven. But even after the Elm City registered a 20-year high homicide count with 34 murders in 2011, 13 applicants interviewed said the city’s crime rates did not influence their decision to apply to Yale and ultimately

would not influence their decision to matriculate. “Although I have gotten many comments since I was accepted in the line of ‘Try not to get shot,’ I didn’t really take the threat of high crime rates too seriously in my decision to apply to Yale,” said Zach Edelman ’16, a senior at Scarsdale High School who was admitted early in December and will attend Yale in

Despite the city’s high homicide count in 2011, overall violent crime — a U.S. Department of Justice category that includes homicides, forcible rape, assault and robbery — in New Haven is on the decline: it dropped 11 percent last year and is down about 20 percent so far this year. At the same time, an influx of new businesses such as the Apple SEE CRIME PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Stating what happened a hundred or more years ago is hardly relevant yaledailynews.com/opinion

The story of anti-Semitism T

his Friday marks the beginning of Passover, the eight-day holiday commemorating the Jewish exodus from Egypt. For me, the festival’s culinary aspects are less than delightful. Matzo begins to taste like cardboard after day three, and bagels — that Jewish staple forbidden during the holiday — look mighty tempting. Despite these shortcomings, many secular Jews, who typically avoid services and shun tradition, choose to celebrate Passover. They attend Seders (the Passover meal) and read the Haggadah (the story of the exodus). There is a relatively simple reason why the otherwise unobservant enjoy this particular holiday: The lessons of Passover — on their face — mesh well with a politically correct worldview. The Jews were enslaved, and then they were freed. God was the ultimate humanitarian interventionist, liberating the oppressed and restoring their dignity. For these Jews, Passover is a story of human rights circa 1300 B.C.E. Through this lens, the festival is linked to modern political issues, such as the American civil rights movement and LGBTQ rights. This year, Slifka will host both a gospel Seder and a queer Seder. At the end of the day, the Jewish experience becomes the human experience writ large. This universalist take on Passover has merit. Historically, during the 1960s, many black pastors and rabbis drew from the exodus to inspire the fight for racial equality. And as the Jews learned leaving Egypt, freedom is indeed a right inherent to those of all colors, creeds and sexual orientations. But in the haste to pigeonhole the holiday into a multicultural box, many Jews forget some of Passover’s other lessons — lessons that buck a politically correct narrative. Ultimately, Passover teaches us the importance of Jewish sovereignty and the necessity of the state of Israel for Jews, in biblical times and today. Passover is — first and foremost — the first story of Jewish oppression and Gentile anti-Semitism. According to the Haggadah, the Egyptians enslaved the children of Abraham because they feared Jews would one day become powerful and side with Egypt’s enemies. So began a trope of disloyalty that has resurfaced continuously in history. We know its high points by infamous names: The Inquisition. Pogroms. Auschwitz. Nor is global anti-Semitism abating in the 21st century. The recent shooting of Jew-

ish schoolchildren in France reveals that hatred to be alive and well. H a p pily, PassNATHANIEL over teaches ZELINSKY Jews how to combat On point this timeless oppression. The Haggadah culminates not with Jewish liberation but with the founding of Israel. For the ancient Hebrews, freedom was secured when they established their own country to defend themselves against their enemies. Today, Israel serves the same purpose. It is a sanctuary for Jews caught in the vice of anti-Semitism. A vibrant democracy committed to the rule of law, it is a place to which all Jews can flee in times of danger. In its short history, Israel has rescued Jews from Ethiopia and Arab countries who faced danger in their countries of origin. It continues to be a refuge for European Jewry facing resurgent antiSemitism on that continent.

PASSOVER IS A STORY ABOUT WHY THE JEWS NEED THE STATE OF ISRAEL.

MANAGING EDITORS Alon Harish Drew Henderson ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Serna OPINION Julia Fisher DEPUTY OPINION Jack Newsham NEWS David Burt Alison Griswold CITY Everett Rosenfeld Emily Wanger FEATURES Emily Foxhall CULTURE Eliza Brooke

SCI. TECH Eli Markham SPORTS Zoe Gorman Sarah Scott ARTS & LIVING Nikita Lalwani Brenna Hughes Neghaiwi Chase Niesner Erin Vanderhoof MULTIMEDIA Christopher Peak Baobao Zhang MAGAZINE Eliana Dockterman Molly Hensley-Clancy Nicole Levy PHOTOGRAPHY Zoe Gorman Kamaria Greenfield Victor Kang Henry Simperingham

Unfortunately, on college campuses — including ours — it is hip to deride the Jewish state’s existence and to hold Israel to a double standard. Many brand as illegal Israel’s self-defense against Islamic extremism, the newest host organism of anti-Semitism. Other nations can respond to aggression — just not the Jews. In an ideal world, Jews and supportive Gentiles should not need to defend the Jewish state against illegitimate critics who deny Israel its most basic rights. But because of their double standard, we must justify Jews’ existence in the international sphere. When we do, we should unabashedly look to Passover’s lessons for guidance that we might otherwise forget in our quest to universalize a holiday. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a junior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .

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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

Gay night in Singapore “Y

ou know that Sunday night is gay night, right?” My friend wanted to make sure I knew what I was getting into. I didn’t, but no matter. Three Sundays ago, a group of Yalies and I proceeded to Clark Quay, Singapore’s premier nightlife district, and owned the dance floor in a club at least three-quarters full of gay men. For young Singaporeans, Sunday night is gay night. A group of Yale professors has drafted a resolution demanding that Yale-NUS College “respect, protect, and further the ideals of civil liberties for all minorities, the principles of non-discrimination and full political freedom.” Part of the debate has concerned Singapore’s climate toward homosexuality and its potential effects on Yale-NUS. I applaud the Yale faculty for doing what any group of intellectuals ought to do in response to an undertaking as significant as Yale-NUS College: debate the merits, take positions and defend them. It’s disappointing, though, that the draftees’ defense and the ensuing dialogue in the News have mischaracterized Singapore as a place exceptionally intolerant of homosexuality. Moreover, the implication that the U.S. stands far ahead of Singapore in this regard reveals either blindness to — or denial of — the American reality. Yes, section 377A of Singapore’s Penal Code bans homosexual conduct between males. But let’s not forget that as of 1970, sodomy laws prohibited homosexual acts in every state in America except Illinois. In 1986, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of sodomy laws in Bowers v. Hardwick, a decision overturned only nine years ago. And even today, The New York Times says Kansas Statute 21-3505, a criminal sodomy law, is “used as justification to harass and

discriminate against people.” Did these laws render 1960s, ’70s and ’80s America unfit for liberal arts education? No. Did the Yale faculty abandon its pursuit of light and truth in 1986, when our highest court ruled against its ideals of openness and tolerance? Of course not. Has Yale severed ties with Kansas? Why, then, should section 377A preclude liberal arts education in Singapore? Perhaps some critics have conflated national policy and campus climate. The debate thus far has misleadingly compared Yale students’ and professors’ attitudes toward homosexuality with Singaporean law. Because the Singaporean government funds Yale-NUS, one may worry that, even beyond gay rights, national policies will dictate the campus climate at Yale-NUS. They won’t. Yale-NUS students, like the many NUS students who openly debate and criticize government and university policy in class and in publications such as the Kent Ridge Common, will make sure of that. Just like America, Singapore has laws and norms of which I disapprove. A vibrant gay party scene doesn’t mean that gays have equal rights — they don’t. Yet Singapore has seen notable liberalizations over the past 10 years, including the launch of high-profile gay rights organizations and government approval for large-scale gay festivals and gatherings. Notwithstanding its historical restrictions on free speech and assembly, I applaud Singapore’s steps toward equality. Now consider the American climate. I am proud that eight states have legalized gay marriage. But in recent months, millions of Americans have cast their Republican primary ballots for Rick Santorum, who says that “if the Supreme Court says that you have the right to

consensual [gay] sex within your home, then you have the right to bigamy … you have the right to adultery. You have the right to anything. Does that undermine the fabric of our society? I would argue yes, it does.”

THE LIBERAL ARTS WILL FARE JUST FINE IN SINGAPORE With this man as a serious contender for the presidency, how can anyone idealize the U.S. as a beacon of enlightenment? A vast swath of America remains deeply committed to intolerance. I’m not aware of a Singaporean politician who has campaigned for the nation’s highest office on the premise that homosexuality is wrong and that family values can fix the country’s ills. In this respect, I cannot see how Singapore is any more regressive than America. Santorum’s bigotry does not justify intolerance in Singapore, but it does make clear that the liberal arts can thrive in environments sometimes hostile to their principles. As a straight man who moved here only six months ago, I’m no expert on gay life in Singapore. But just as Yale promotes understanding and tolerance in America, Yale-NUS will do the same in Singapore. I support the ideals expressed in the professors’ resolution, but not the American exceptionalism and distortions of Singaporean society that have grown out of it. AUSTIN SHINER is 2011 graduate of Ezra Stiles College and an admissions officer at Yale-NUS College.

For more inclusive activism I

like to think I’m making a difference. Many of us activists do. We get up every morning, scan the headlines for topics that interest us, read articles that people send us and talk to people who have the same interests. Friends outside our interest groups also notice things for us, and for me, this means several copies of the same articles on immigration, Mexican cartels and Latin America when I get up each morning. I am an activist because I am frustrated. There are things I love about my communities and things that I would change about them. But unfortunately, the language that each of our social justice groups use often prevent us from engaging with our communities at large. Simply put, we are self-selecting, and we prefer to spend time with likeminded people. We find and surround ourselves with people who agree with us, who appreciate and understand our passions and interests. We don’t need to worry about being defensive or explaining our entire background that way. It’s more comfortable. For me, immigration is a really sensitive topic. I came here as an immigrant and I study here with the perspective of someone who doesn’t fit well into either of my worlds. It is easier for me to spend time with people from La Casa Cultural when I discuss immigration issues because they just get it. I don’t have to dredge out painful details from my past and lay them out for the world to scrutinize. But it also means that it took me a lot longer to present my mission in a way that was broadly understandable and brought more peo-

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ple into the conversations I was having every day. In the smaller circles of the Social Justice Network, a branch of Dwight Hall, activists at Yale learn how to talk to each other about these issues. I may read something in the morning, send it to the rest of my group and fume about it for the rest of the day while others from the same group agree with me. In this context, I don’t have to defend myself. I can express myself through art and imagery of the violence in my home country, and I can use rhetoric that pulls Spanish and English phrases together, but I lose sight of my target audience in these ways. We lose sight of the people who do not hear these stories in their daily routines.

AS ACTIVISTS, WE MUST SPEAK IN THE TERMS OF OUR LARGER SOCIETIES. Activists, we need to go beyond talking to our groups if we want to get anywhere. We need to learn to communicate in a language that goes beyond our experiences and makes a point. The presentation of our missions isn’t effective if we only see the same faces at every event, discussion and march. We need to bring in the rest of the community if we want to see change. And we are lucky, because the resources are all around us. As many of

Milton abhorred censorship NUS professor Rajeev Patke, a part of the team of academics planning the curriculum and hiring the new faculty for Yale-NUS, defended Singapore’s practice of censorship as an instance of “how a nation wishes to protect its citizens” (“More than banned books,” March 30). Books by Salman Rushdie and the Marquis de Sade may be banned in Singapore itself, Patke notes, but there are instances in which a book such as Rushdie’s Satanic Verses can be made available for study within the safe, cordoned-off space of Singapore’s university classrooms. Patke is disconcertingly sanguine about the firewall that prevents certain forms of bookinspired knowledge to cross the boundary from the NUS campus to the larger Singaporean society. And he urges all of us at Yale to celebrate the partnership with NUS by citing one of the most famous passages from the poet John Milton’s monumental treatise of 1644, Areopagitica: “I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her

us were told before we came to Yale, we are our own teachers. The best part of our time at Yale would be the community of students and the people that we would meet along the way. So go! Leave your groups and have conversations that make you uncomfortable, defend your views and consider them from someone else’s point of view. If you won’t reach out and do it yourself, who will? I have lost friends by compromising, but I’ve also made many others who teach me and challenge me in ways that I had never been before. In those moments, when I have realized that I’m having a conversation about immigration with someone who doesn’t feel connected to the topic in any way, I learn to see myself and others like me through the eyes of someone else. And they leave the conversation knowing a little more about why I get up every morning. I have learned the most from holding my convictions up for other people to scrutinize. I’ve learned to defend them and explain them in different ways. I’ve learned to compromise in ways that meant bringing others into the conversation without sacrificing the heart of what I want to do. We can’t hide behind our art and symbols and prose. For the change we seek to occur, understanding needs to be widespread, and we can’t do that from within our own carefully guarded communities. DIANA ENRIQUEZ is a junior in Saybrook College. Contact her at diana.enriquez@yale.edu .

adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.” Turning for support to seventeenth-century England’s greatest poet, Patke suggests that Yale needs to “sally out” and engage the adversary of Singaporean authoritarianism with the arsenal of Ivy League liberalism. Unfortunately for Patke, the sentence he has extracted from Milton’s sublime treatise can in no meaningful way be repurposed to support Yale’s partnership with NUS. The “cloistered virtue” of which Milton wrote was the falsely virtuous space that England’s authoritarian monarchy attempted to create when it employed censorship to “protect” its citizens from the dangerous ideas that can be found in dangerous books. We must leave the safe zone of the censorious church or university and “sally out” and meet with all the ideas and books we can, Milton insisted, if we are ever

to perform the hard but unavoidable labor of creating knowledge and finding truth. Perhaps the earliest and greatest defense of the freedom of the press, Areopagitica argued passionately for the dependence of the pursuit of truth on a freedom of expression extended as broadly as possible. Five years after writing Areopagitica, John Milton would write and publish two bold and learned treatises in favor of the regicide that would bring England’s authoritarian monarchy crashing down; those and many others of his intellectually and politically daring works would help prepare him to write Paradise Lost. He could never have countenanced any suggestion that the knowledge that arises from the liberal arts can flourish in an illiberal society. JOHN ROGERS April 1 The writer is a professor of English.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS MONDAY, APRIL 2 12:00 P.M. “Remaking Recycling in the United States: The Potential of Extended Producer Responsibility.” Kim Jeffery, president and CEO of Nestlé Waters North America, will speak. Part 8 in a series focusing on “Producers, Packaging and Public Policy.” Kroon Hall (195 Prospect St.), Burke Auditorium.

CORRECTIONS FRIDAY, MARCH 30

The article “Chilean academic probes class dynamics” misstated the name of the Latin American Students Organization. TUESDAY, MARCH 27

The article “Yale takes brand to Singapore” incorrectly stated that Bangladesh is in East Asia.

Unemployment declines again WARMER WEATHER, SHRINKING LABOR MARKET LEAD TO SEVENTH STRAIGHT MONTHLY DROP BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER For Ivan Sachs, owner of Connecticut-based Cherry Hill Construction Co., this year’s relatively warm winter has helped jump start his 55-yearold, family-run construction and demolition business for the 2012 season. “There was no real, lasting frost this year, so we were able to start post-winter work a bit early,” Sachs said. “Normally we start at the end of March or the first week of April, but this year we began almost a month earlier.” Sachs said his company provides an array of construction services from demolition to site development, and with the warm weather permitting an early start to business, they have already employed approximately 50 people this year. Cherry Hill’s situation is not unique in the state. According to Alissa DeJonge GRD ’00, director of research at the Connecticut Economic Resource Center, the mild winter has allowed construction projects across the state to move forward earlier this year than usual. This trend is reflected in recent job growth across the state. January brought an increase of about 7,000 jobs, and the Connecticut Department of Labor announced on March 29 that approximately 5,500 additional private sector jobs were added in the month of February. In New Haven, unemployment fell from 12.5 percent in January to 11.7 percent in February. “This is good news — for the seventh consecutive month, we’re seeing positive signs in the state’s economic recovery. The state is seeing a trend that we will fight to continue,” Gov. Dannel Malloy said in a March 29 press release. “Reclaiming the jobs that were lost will take time, but my administration is committed to do everything we can to put the state on a path that will lead to an economic revival.” Still, DeJonge noted that construction is a cyclical component in Connecticut’s economy, and the recent statistics suggesting growth in construction may not fully represent the sector. While mild weather and a slight pickup in demand for smaller projects may have created some jobs, large-scale construction work has not recovered as well since the recession, said Don Shubert, president of the Connecticut Construction Industries Association — the lobbying and informational organization representing the construction sector in the state. “There is still a tremendous amount of large, civil construction capacity that we aren’t using. Real heavy work like highway construction won’t start until later,” Shubert said. “What you are probably seeing is some kind of institutional construction, like private universities or hospitals, or smaller contracting work.” Shubert added that although the weather could allow for an

increase in smaller projects such as business and retail space renovations, double-digit unemployment still exists throughout the construction industry as a whole. The Department of Labor reported that unemployment in Connecticut dropped to 7.8 percent in February, down from 8.0 percent the month before and 9.3 percent in January of 2011. Nationally, February unemployment held steady at 8.3 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Aside from construction, the trade, transportation and utilities sector, as well as education and health services, all experienced “significant” job growth, according to the DOL. The sectors each grew by approximately 2,200 jobs in February. Government employment shrank by 600 jobs in February, a drop of 0.3 percent, constituting the largest single-sector job loss in the state last month. But the consecutive declines in unemployment are not fully attributable to job growth — the DOL reported that an increasing number of state residents has left the labor market. Connecticut’s seasonally adjusted labor force — which includes both employed state residents and unemployed residents seeking jobs — measured 1,914,300 people in February, down 1,700 from January and 7,500 over the past year. Connecticut’s labor force peaked a year ago in February of 2011, with an all-time high of 1,921,800 people. “Unemployment continues to decline, although the strength of the move is diminished somewhat by the second consecutive monthly decline in our labor force,” said Andy Condon, director of the Office of Research at the Connecticut Department of Labor. New Haven also experienced decreasing unemployment for the month of February — falling from 12.5 percent in January to 11.7 percent in February — though the figure still remains significantly higher than the state average. “While this is a very positive trend, unemployment in New Haven remains unacceptably high,” said City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton. “We need to remain focused on growing jobs and providing meaningful connections between New Haven residents and employment opportunities.” Benton added that New Haven must increase job training opportunities and push for school reform so that students are able to succeed in college. “There is no better job creation program, wealth creator or violence-reduction initiative than the success of our public schools,” Benton said. According to the DOL, Connecticut has recovered 39,100, or 33 percent, of the 117,500 total nonfarm jobs lost in the recession between March 2008 and February 2010. Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .

“The mere smell of cooking can evoke an entire civilization.” FERNAND BRAUDEL HISTORIAN

Rap showcase canceled `BY JAMES LU AND CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTERS A Saturday night rap showcase slated to feature eight New Haven and Yale rappers at the Afro-American Cultural Center was canceled after the Yale Police Department expressed security concerns. The event was canceled Saturday morning after Rodney Cohen, assistant dean of Yale College and director of the Af-Am Center, emailed co-organizer Ifeanyi Awachie ’14 that “by order of the Yale police, tonight’s WYBC Radio Rap event is canceled.” YPD Assistant Chief Michael Patten said his department was concerned about the venue’s ability to accommodate the showcase after it learned that the event was advertised, free and open to the public. “We had no idea how many people might come and were concerned about overcrowding and people loitering outside in this predominantly residential area,” he said in a Sunday morning email to the News. “Coupled with tensions we’ve seen between various groups in the city and recent incidents occurring outside events, we recommended to Dean Cohen that the event be canceled.” Cohen could not be reached for comment. Wesley Dixon ’15, a freshman

ambassador for the Af-Am Center, expressed disappointment at the event’s cancellation. He said he did not think the move was a good idea since he believed there is already a “very clear tension” between New Haven residents and the Yale community.

Coupled with tensions we’ve seen between various groups in the city and recent incidents occurring outside events, we recommended to Dean [Rodney] Cohen that the event be canceled. MICHAEL PATTEN Assistant Chief, Yale Police Department “It seems like we’re afraid of New Haven infiltrating Yale and I don’t think that’s good for the relationship between both communities,” he said. “It kind of makes concrete the skepticism we both have of each other when [administrators] do things like cancelling the event.” The showcase, scheduled to begin at 9 p.m., was sponsored

by WYBC Radio and Middleman, an undergraduate organization that aims to connect Yale students to residents in neighborhoods beyond campus. Awachie said she filed a request with the University to hold the event at the Af-Am Center over spring break, but she said she did not receive a response until Saturday morning when she received notice about the event’s cancellation. Awachie added that she continued planning for the event after Cohen said she could put his name down for a request for Yale Security at the event. Alan Sage ’14, president of Middleman, said he was surprised by the cancellation of the show. He said he met with YPD Chief Ronnell Higgins and New Haven Police Department Chief Dean Esserman Friday afternoon and told Higgins about the rap show. Sage said he thought the show was an example of a positive thing his organization was doing to try to “bridge Yale and New Haven.” While Sage said Higgins “seemed upset that he hadn’t been informed” of the rap showcase, Sage added that the police chief “didn’t mention that there was going to be an issue.” Awachie said she had received confirmation from Yale Security that there would be several officers monitoring the event. Antonyo “Toney B” Streater

— one of the New Haven rappers scheduled to perform at the showcase — said he thinks administrators sometimes “stigmatize” New Haven locals and “assume” that something violent will happen. He added that the point of the showcase was to “integrate the city with the students” and was intended to be a peaceful event for students to enjoy. Streater himself has been the victim of violence at a music event — he was one of the two men shot at a rap showcase in Toad’s Place March 23 last year. Streater said there have been several misconceptions about that incident, including the notion that he was specifically targeted. “People are under the misimpression that somebody from another rap group shot me,” he said. “[That’s] not true, someone opened fire. [The Yale administration] thought I was going to be bring some type of stigma to the school, but I’m not that type of person.” The rap showcase would also have featured New Haven rap artists “Doberman Gang” and “T-Miz.” Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu and CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

Night Market draws students to Old Campus

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Approximately 500 students attended the “Night Market,” which featured performances and many Asian food options, Friday night on Old Campus. BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER The Taiwanese American Society and the Asian American Students Alliance kicked off Asian Pacific-American Heritage month Friday evening with a “Night Market” on Old Campus. Night Market, the winner of the Undergraduate Organizations Funding Committee’s “5K Challenge,” lit up Old Campus for three hours with dance and music performances, a hookah tent, and dozens of Asian food options. The event was styled after a Taiwanese night market and drew roughly 500 people, said Karmen Cheung ’13, head coordinator for the Asian American Cultural Center. Cheung said the event was a strong start to the month-long celebration of the culture, history and traditions of AsianAmericans, and nine students interviewed said they enjoyed the occasion. Whi le most parts of the country celebrate the annual Asian Pacific-American Heritage Month during May, Yale celebrates it in April before students leave for the summer. Cheung said the heritage month — which began in 1990 — aims

to bring together Asian-Americans from different cultural groups, and that she thought the Night Market supported that purpose. “[The market] was packed; there was lots of bustling activity and noise,” Cheung said. “It was how a Taiwanese night market should be.” Cheung said in a Sunday email that the Asian American Cultural Center provided some funding to the event, in addition to the $5,000 grant from the UOFC. UOFC Chair Allen Granzberg ’13 said the committee selected the winning event of the 5K Challenge based on its uniqueness, accessibility to all students and ability to encourage collaboration among several on-campus groups. He said the Night Market received a “substantial part of the vote” in the final election, with more than 50 percent of students choosing that option. Granzberg said the 5K Challenge was created this year, in part to help develop a popular, potentially annual event. He said the Taiwanese American Society and Asian American Students Alliance are considering holding the event again next year, and that the UOFC would

likely provide support again. “I was very impressed [with the Night Market],” Granzberg said. “It’s hard to get so many people to attend a new event, but they managed to attract a crowd and it was really acces-

[The market] was packed; there was lots of bustling activity and noise. It was how a Taiwanese night market should be. KARMEN CHEUNG ’13 Head Coordinator, Asian American Cultural Center sible.” Cheung said the Asian American Cultural Center has a “packed” schedule of activities to celebrate the heritage month throughout April, including different dinners and cultural shows each weekend and an Asian American hip-hop group performance on April 7. Actor John Chou, known for his role as Harold in the “Harold & Kumar” films, will deliver a keynote address on April 14,

she added. Nine students interviewed at the Night Market said they enjoyed the event. Three added that they do not regularly attend events hosted by the Asian American Students Alliance, but are more likely to attend events for the heritage month based on their experiences at the Night Market. Several students said they were drawn to event for its different types of Asian food, such as dumplings, onion cakes and Taiwanese rice. Shefali Jain ’13 said she missed dinner and came to the Market for its free food, and Jessie Garland ’15 said she attended specifically for the dumplings. Victoria Pierre ’15, who lives on Old Campus and said she stopped by the event because it was conveniently located, also said she was impressed by the food selection. “Lots of the food I’ve never even heard of, so it’s cool to be exposed to new things,” Pierre said. The UOFC has sponsored more than 60 events this academic year. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Success can make you go one of two ways. It can make you a prima donna — or it can … take away the insecurities, let the nice things come out.” BARBARA WALTERS JOURNALIST

New Haven crime deters few from Yale CRIME FROM PAGE 1 Store, which opened on Broadway last September, and Shake Shack, which is slated to open on Chapel Street next fall, points to the strength the Elm City’s growing economy, Morand said. But in the early 1990s, violent crime was at the center of New Haven’s reputation: the city was rife with drug-related crimes and saw three times as many shootings per year as there are today. Beginning in the late 1980s, more than 1,000 major crimes were committed annually on Yale’s campus and reported under the Department of Education’s Clery Act, a federal statute requiring all colleges and universities receiving federal funding to disclose information about campus crime. Major crimes, which includes reported cases of larceny, rape and theft, peaked in 1990 with 1,439. National media began to notice: headlines of stories about New Haven that ran in The New York Times included “Armed Youths Turn New Haven Into a Battleground” in 1991 and “Drug Gangs Thrive as Arsenals Expand” in 1992. The negative press damaged the Yale brand, University President Richard Levin said. “We suffered for some period of time the consequences of that bad publicity,” said Levin, who took office in 1993. “But I would say that since then there’s been nothing comparable, and since then the city has only improved in the quality of its downtown.” New Haven faced “terrible” crime that peaked in the early 1990s, said Yale historian Gaddis Smith ’54 GRD ’61. The low point in Yale’s public safety image came after Christian Prince ’91 was murdered on Feb. 17, 1991, on the steps of St. Mary’s Church on Hillhouse Avenue — just a block from the President’s House. In the years following Prince’s murder, Yale spent millions of dollars upgrading public safety apparatuses on campus and increasing

the number of police and security personnel. After the University commissioned independent consulting firms to examine its security procedures, Yale enhanced its security system, former YPD Chief James Perrotti told the News in February 2011. The improvements included the installation of 400 blue phones and a $2.5 million investment in outdoor lighting around campus. Shortly after Levin’s inauguration, he made bridging the towngown divide a top priority of his presidency — a contrast to the tenure of his predecessor, Benno Schmidt, who lived full-time in New York City rather than taking up residence in New Haven.

IMPROVED CONDITIONS

By 2010, Yale experienced less on-campus crime than its peer institutions on a per-student basis. According to figures reported by each college in compliance with the Clery Act, Harvard University saw roughly 4.7 crimes per 1,000 students, double Yale’s rate of approximately 2.3 crimes per 1,000 students. University spokesman Tom Conroy said he does not believe Yale suffers an “image problem” as a result of the city’s crime situation. To combat any negative perceptions people might have about the campus and city, Conroy said the facts speak for themselves. “It’s largely a matter of disseminating the facts or pointing people to credible sources of information,” Conroy said. When concern about the city’s safety resurfaced last May after 24/7 Wall Street, a financial publication, ranked New Haven as the fourth-most dangerous city in the country, the University joined the city in pushing back against the rankings. The rankings were misleading, city and University officials said, as the publication used an outdated figure for the city’s downtown population, ignored suburbs adjacent to downtown New Haven with lower crime rates and did not account for the high

influx of people arriving for work and nightlife. As students returned to campus in August, Yale Police Department Chief Ronnell Higgins sent a campus-wide email calling the ranking “dubious.” And last December, Yale College Dean Mary Miller sent parents an email including a graph of crime statistics at Yale and peer institutions. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel said professional staff in the Admissions Office and trained student tour guides address questions about safety in New Haven in a “straightforward way,” as they respond to questions about all subjects. “The straightforward answer is that New Haven is a vibrant city, so it has challenges like all cities do and continues to meet them in a positive and dynamic way,” Brenzel said.

WEIGHING OPTIONS

In the past several years, a number of crimes have occurred close to Yale’s campus: two men were shot at Toad’s Place last March, a man was shot on High Street in front of two Yale fraternities last April and, in November, police pursued a car with shattered windows to Elm Street from Dixwell, where shots were fired. Yet if admissions figures indicate confidence in applicants’ perception of Yale’s safety, then the University appears to be succeeding in overcoming New Haven historical reputation as a high-crime city. As the number of applications to Ivy League schools over the past decade have ballooned, Yale has kept up: This year, the College received a record 28,974 applications and posted an all-time-low 6.8 percent admissions rate. When colleges are evaluated by U.S. News and World Report, crime rates do not factor into rankings, since this is not a major statistic on the minds of applicants and their families, said Robert Morse, director of data and research for the publication. All colleges, Morse said, must

ZOE GORMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

While New Haven saw a 20-year high of 34 murders last year, crime does not appear to be a large factor in the decision of most prospective students to come to Yale. deal with occasional violent crime on their campuses. U.S. News ranked Yale third this year, behind Harvard and Princeton, as it has since 2008. “They all have their own highly publicized crimes that are outliers but not definitive of the campus environment as a whole,” he said of the colleges his publication ranks. Five admissions experts and college guidance counselors interviewed said they think New Haven’s reputation for crime has little impact on high school seniors’ decisions to apply. Jon Reider, the senior director of college guidance counseling at San Francisco University High School, said he has never seen a student “cross Yale off their list” of poten-

tial colleges because of New Haven’s crime rates. Chuck Hughes, president and founder of the college admissions consulting service Road to College, said the effect of crime on Yale’s application numbers is “marginal at best.” Brenzel said feedback from the Admitted Students Questionnaire, which all admitted students are asked to fill out once accepted to Yale, has shown that New Haven’s public safety reputation is “good and much improved over the past 20 years.” Robbie Flatow, a senior at Regis High School who was admitted early to Yale in December, said crime was the last thing on his mind. “Nearly every aspect of Yale mattered more to me than the

concerns about campus safety that I had,” Flatow said. Simone Policano ’16, a senior at Hunter College High School in New York who was admitted early and will matriculate in the fall, said the negative reports she had heard about New Haven did not deter her from deciding to come to Yale. “You have to be conscientious of general safety no matter where you go to school,” she said. “If anything, what I learned about New Haven spiked my interest in Yale’s intra-city community service efforts.” Contact ANDREW GIAMBRONE at andrew.giambrone@yale.edu and JAMES LU at james.lu@yale.edu .

Barbara Walters chosen for Class Day CLASS DAY FROM PAGE 1

CREATIVE COMMONS

Journalist Barbara Walters, shown above interviewing former President and First Lady Gerald and Betty Ford, will speak at this year’s Class Day.

point in their field where they are undeniably the best.” Previous Class Day speakers have included actor Tom Hanks, President Bill Clinton LAW ’73, political pundit Christopher Buckley ’75 and former U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair. Walters is the first female Class Day speaker since 2005, when District of Columbia congressional delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton GRD ’63 LAW ’64 gave the address. While Adkisson and Schenkel said they considered men and women in their search, they said the previous lack of diversity influenced their decision to pick Walters. “We wanted a female first and foremost, then we assembled a very large list of women leaders in every area,” Adkisson said. “From that list, we thought, ‘who would the class be most interested in

hearing from?’ ” Adkisson said he and Schenkel began discussing potential speakers in the summer of 2011 and compiled a list of roughly 100 names. While Adkisson and Schenkel were ultimately responsible for choosing the speaker, both said Penelope Laurans, special advisor to University President Richard Levin and Jonathan Edwards college master, helped them consider candidates and reach out to Walters through the University President’s Office. Laurans said Walters’ career included a collection of interviews that “few, if any, can match.” “She is unique — because of the time in which she lived, and the way she made use of opportunities during that time, she interviewed nearly every influential person in the world,” Laurans said. “There is unlikely to be anyone quite like her again.”

The announcement of the Class Day speaker came later than in past years — excepting the announcement of Tony Blair 11 days before he spoke at Class Day 2008 — but Laurans, Adkisson and Schenkel declined to comment on why there was a delay. Of seven seniors interviewed early Monday morning, four said they were excited about the choice, two said they were hoping for a more compelling speaker and one was indifferent. Nate Schwalb ’13, who will participate in graduation ceremonies this spring but officially graduate next winter, said he appreciated having a “big name person” with strong speaking abilities. “I think it’s appropriate to a liberal arts education because she’s someone that is intelligent [and] that has interviewed people from all walks of life in all sorts of fields,” Schwalb said.

Scarlett Lee ’12 said she had seen several of Walters’ interviews, and she thinks a majority of the senior class is familiar with her work. But Tal Shachar ’12 said he disapproved of the choice because he thought Walters would not relate to a younger generation. “I recognize she’s done some amazing things and broken many barriers, [but] to me, she’s not a very compelling speaker,” he said. “It would have been interesting to hear someone with a fresher, younger take on the world today, someone who comes from an era that is dealing with our problems.” Walters gave the commencement address at Sarah Lawrence College in 2001. Cynthia Hua contributed reporting. Contact TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“Yoga powers. To make oneself invisible or small. To become gigantic and reach to the farthest things. To change the course of nature.” JIM MORRISON WRITER, ACTOR, YOGA TEACHER

Students seek solace with yoga BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER This year, some students seeking an escape from their often hectic lives at Yale have sought respite in new, free yoga classes offered by the Chaplain’s Office. The Chaplain’s Office has begun offering free classes in “hatha” yoga — an ancient practice focused on relaxation rather than aerobic exercise — at noon on Fridays in Battell Chapel. University Chaplain Sharon Kugler said the program is part of her office’s efforts to create stress-free settings for students on campus. Nathaniel DeLuca GRD ’06, the Chaplain’s Office program coordinator and a certified yoga instructor who leads the sessions, said each class attracts roughly six students, adding that the small class size enables him to teach in a conversational manner and encourages attendees to share their own feelings and experiences. “We are happy to offer students the opportunity to seek balance in their lives in the midst of the busyness of Yale,” Kugler said. “Yoga is one of the many ways we try to do this.” The Chaplain’s Office also sponsors Breathing Space, a technology-free area in the basement of Welch Hall, and Global Grounds, which offers free food and social activities on weekends. DeLuca said these programs embody one of the Chaplain’s Office’s goals of exhibiting “radical hospitality” — welcoming everyone and providing a place where students can reflect on their personal and spiritual lives apart from the pressures of Yale. The yoga classes include chanting, medi-

tation and “deep relaxation,” he said, adding that they are open to people from all religious backgrounds. DeLuca, who said he has integrated yoga into his spiritual life since the age of 15, said he believes the ultimate aim of yoga is “reuniting with a cosmic consciousness” — a concept he said is compatible with many people’s religious practices and beliefs. “We are really focused on the creation of a particular environment where people feel safe, nurtured and cared about,” DeLuca said. “Life has to be in balance and we are trying to create space for this.” He said a handful of students attend the classes every week, and others come irregularly out of curiosity. Grace Chiang ’15, who said she hopes to attend the class though she has not yet had time, said she was glad the Chaplain’s Office was offering the classes because it would be a good way for students to exercise in a “relaxing way.” Cristina Poindexter ’13, the president of Yogis at Yale, a club that offers yoga classes and workshops, said yoga has been crucial in helping her turn off an “achievement-oriented” mindset and focus on what matters most while in college, adding that knew of the program offered through the Chaplain’s Office but had not attended a session. “Participating in yoga is a particularly effective way for students to recharge because it addresses both physical issues and mental insecurities,” Poindexter said. Sharon Kugler has served as University Chaplain since July 2007. Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .

KISSINGER TALKS CHINA AT YALE

YALE OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNICATIONS

KISSINGER SPEAKS AT CONFERENCE ON CHINA Nobel Peace Prize laureate and former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger delivered opening remarks on Friday at a conference on U.S.-China relations hosted by the Johnson Center for the Study of American Diplomacy.

SOM profs probe ‘consumer insights’ BY DAN WEINER STAFF REPORTER A group of School of Management professors is trying to bridge the gap between academic and corporate research. More than seven years after two professors founded the Center for Consumer Insights (YCCI) at the Yale School of Management, the center has established ties with more than a dozen major companies and capitalized on these relationships to promote research and to create an MBA course at SOM that presents students with corporate problems. Companies pay the center to answer market research questions using academic methods, providing the SOM faculty with engaging real-world research questions and the funds to pursue them. Ravi Dhar, SOM professor of marketing and director of the YCCI, said the center has made itself relevant to top executives at Fortune 500 firms, including Visa, I.M.B. and PepsiCo, by answering the question that “keeps them up at night.” Dhar said firms often feel that research conducted at business schools is not readily applicable to problems facing corporations and YCCI hopes to make research at the SOM more relevant by turning corporate questions about consumer behavior into academic questions for research. He said the center’s services have experienced overwhelming demand, reflecting the attractiveness of the YCCI model for firms, which pay an annual membership fee between $100,000 and $250,000 for YCCI’s services, according the center’s brochure. “We found the business community was very receptive to [the YCCI],” Dhar said. “And we think the reason they were receptive to it was because they weren’t getting their answers from their traditional places, like consultants and partners.” While other business schools

have similar programs for researching various aspects of consumer behavior, Dhar said no other program takes a similarly comprehensive research approach. Eric Bradlow, co-director of the Wharton Customer Analytics Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania, also said the YCCI is unique in its interdisciplinary approach. For example, he said, the Wharton center focuses on quantitative and statistical analysis of data sets provided by companies, while the YCCI plays to Yale’s “broad-based” strength by integrating approaches from a variety of areas, including empirical and observational data, as well as managerial expertise. “The YCCI provides this really unique combination of both [an] academics perspective on marketing problems blended with practitioners’ perspectives of marketing problems,” said David Edwards, chief customer officer at the retirement insurance provider TIAACREF, a longtime YCCI partner. “You can get both in various places, but putting them together is what I think makes it a little more unique and therefore desirable.” Apart from corporate partnerships, Dhar said the most exciting development in recent years at the YCCI has been the founding of the MBA Insights Projects, where small teams of business school students spend a semester researching a consumer question for a firm. The program began approximately four years ago, and roughly 35 students participate every year. Many SOM students report that the Insights Projects are their most valuable experience during business school because the corporate question and ensuing projects are so “messy and unstructured,” Dhar said. Edwards said that TIAA-CREF benefited in the fall from a team of MBA students in the Insights Projects, and he said that he hopes to work with more groups in the

future. “The team did really great work doing a little deeper dive into some research on pension customers and understanding their attitudes and perspectives and behaviors,” Edwards said, adding that the MBA team and Dhar are scheduled to present their findings to the TIAA-CREF CEO within the next month. “[It’s] an external and fresh perspective without the biases we have here internally.” In the fall, Christina Bruno SOM ’12 researched smartphone usage among millennials for Visa as part of an MBA Insights Project. She said that the project was valuable in multiple ways, including the access to high-level executives at Visa, close collaboration with senior School of Management faculty, including Dhar, and the chance to work with a small team for the semester. “What the [YCCI] is bringing is the opportunity to work with a client like Visa,” Bruno said. “They have that relationship already built with the company, so that access is really valuable.” The YCCI has also established an international presence though the 2008 founding of the China India Insights Program. K. Sudhir, director of the CIIP and professor at School of Management, said that the center fills a void of academic research about developing markets. Dhar said that while the YCCI has become the most successful business school customer behavior group, the center is still working to reach its target level of recognition among firms as a premiere team for consumer research. Sudhir said he wants the YCCI to be viewed as a “think tank for marketing research.” YCCI co-founder Dick Wittink died in June 2005, approximately five months after opening the center with Dhar. Contact DAN WEINER at daniel.weiner@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“We are not myths of the past, ruins in the jungle or zoos. We are people and want to be respected, not to be victims of intolerance and racism.” RIGOBERTA MENCHÚ UNESCO GOODWILL AMBASSADOR

Hundreds rally for Trayvon Martin Faculty optimistic following memo

RALLY FROM PAGE 1

day. BSAY worked with numerous other activist groups both from Yale and beyond, including several NAACP chapters, to plan the march. Holston also enlisted the support of local community organizers such as Rev. Scott Marks, who led marchers from the Q House in Dixwell to the New Haven Green, and Barbara Fair, who introduced each speaker at the ensuing rally on the steps of City Hall.

FACULTY MEMO FROM PAGE 1

Do not underestimate my generation. Don’t underestimate our strategy and [...] our tools. JOSHUA PENNY ‘13 President, Black Student Alliance at Yale Holston said organizers chose to gather at the Q House, a former community center, rather than an on-campus location, to ensure that Saturday���s event was “a New Haven march, not a Yale march.” In total, over 400 people attended the rally, Holston said, of which only a quarter were Yale students. A small group of Washington, D.C., natives, including T-shirt vendor Thaddeus Jackson, who had attended another march for Trayvon Martin earlier that morning in Hartford, said they have been “following the Trayvon Movement” across the country for the past few weeks. Still, Yale’s presence at the protest was prominent, and several student groups used public excitement about the event as an opportunity for advocacy. The Yale College Democrats and MEChA de Yale, a student group that seeks to “promote Chicano empowerment” through education and political activism, teamed up to collect signatures for a petition demanding that the city “take an active stance against racial profiling.” The petition called for an increase in police officer walking beats, “more curricula about racial profiling and community relations” in police training programs and ongoing discussion about relations between the community and the New Haven Police Department. By the end of the day, MEChA moderator Diana Enriquez ’13 said, the petition had 264 signatures. Enriquez added that although calling attention to racial profiling with a march is important, “it should never end there.” Dems President Zak Newman ’13 agreed, and cited the importance of local events like Satur-

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Protesters at a Saturday rally decried what they said was the racial profiling that led to Trayvon Martin’s death. day’s protest in initiating conversations about race among people with different backgrounds. Will McPherson ’15, one of 40 “volunteer marshals” at the events, said he attended the march because, “as a white male who’s not profiled,” he felt the need to “support my friends who shouldn’t have to live through this.” In his speech at the rally, BSAY President Joshua Penny ’13 addressed those who assume that college students are “band-

wagoners, quick to repost a status on Facebook” but unwilling to take real action. “Do not underestimate my generation,” he told the diverse crowd gathered on the steps of City Hall. “Don’t underestimate our strategy, and don’t underestimate our tools,” Penny continued, looking out over scores of painted signs. Marks, who is also a cofounder of the Connecticut Center for a New Economy, a progressive social policy advo-

cacy organization, commended BSAY organizers and Yalies who attended the protest. “[The Yale administration] would like [students] to stay inside of the ivory towers, but they’re in this community fighting,” he said in his speech. A Florida grand jury is scheduled to review the Trayvon Martin case on April 10. Contact SARAH MASLIN at sarah.maslin@yale.edu .

and Salovey spent recent weeks meeting with professors in 17 academic departments and programs to discuss their concerns. The two administrators then released Thursday’s memo, which addresses restructuring to departmental staffing, budget constraints on construction and faculty hiring, and faculty involvement in University-wide decisions. Salovey said the memo is intended as one step toward discussing issues of concern to faculty. Much of the memo focuses on increasing communication between faculty and the administration. Levin and Salovey recommended that more regular meetings be held between administrators and faculty, including additional meetings between departmental administrators — chairs, directors of graduate studies and directors of undergraduate studies — and Yale College Dean Mary Miller and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Thomas Pollard. The memo also proposes holding meetings of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences once or twice a semester in the coming academic year on a trial basis. The Yale College faculty currently meets on a monthly basis, but Levin and Salovey said those meetings are designed to address issues involving Yale College in particular, whereas the FASwide meetings would aim to give faculty an opportunity to consider issues that affect the University as a whole. Meg Urry, chair of the Physics Department, said in a Sunday email that faculty are eager to be a part of University plans and “to contribute our knowledge and expertise” as Yale exits the budget crisis. Yair Minsky, chair of the Mathematics Department, said he approves of the suggestions aimed at improving communication. He said it will be important to make sure any additional meetings are “substantive” so they can affect decision-making. Christopher Miller, professor of French and African-American studies, said the language in the memo with respect to the proposed FAS meetings is “imprecise.” Miller, who has been a critic of University governance with regard to Yale-NUS College, said it remains unclear how the faculty will be able to exercise deliberative powers at the meetings, such as bringing items on the agenda to a vote. Yale College Dean Mary Miller, who chairs Yale College

faculty meetings, said a general “framework” for the FAS meetings has yet to be established, including details on how the agenda will be set, whether votes will be taken and what significance they would hold. She said the FAS meetings would provide faculty an appropriate venue to discuss matters that involve the FAS as a whole “but that do not pertain directly to Yale College,” citing shared services as an example.

We have perhaps narrowly avoided some potentially very damaging changes to staffing structure that had been envisioned. JILL CAMPBELL Professor, Department of English Yale’s move to shared services — a business model intended to streamline administrative services — is among the larger University issues addressed in the memo. Levin and Salovey wrote that the initiative aims to cut costs and improve services for departments, but they also recognized that the model has caused stress and “raised many questions” among some faculty members. Salovey said Sunday that he and Levin “believe strongly” that changes to staff in departments “should come out of a collaboration between the Shared Services team and the faculty of that department.” Professor of English Jill Campbell, who has been a critic of the effects shared services has had on departments, said in a Friday email that the memo demonstrates a “serious response” to concerns aired by faculty this semester and an adjustment in the University’s description of shared services. “This represents a real and important change in how the Shared Services initiative is being described, and I am relieved and (cautiously) optimistic,” Campbell said. “We have perhaps narrowly avoided some potentially very damaging changes to staffing structure that had been envisioned.” In the wake of a nearly 25 percent drop in the Yale endowment during fiscal year 2009, the University faced a $350 million budget deficit. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming sunny, with a high near 54..

WEDNESDAY

High of 60, low of 40.

High of 62, low of 38.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, APRIL 3 11:00 AM “Endangered Alphabets.” Tim Brookes of the Endangered Alphabets Project will show examples of his endangered alphabet woodcarvings. Sterling Memorial Library (120 High St.), lecture hall. 6:00 PM “Wrap Your Wenzel!!” Want to win a free Wenzel and learn more about condoms, female condoms, dental dams and lubrication? Come to one of four mini-programs at 6 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7 p.m. or 7:30 p.m. for a chance to win one of many free Wenzel vouchers through an interactive safer sex demonstration and sexpert trivia. Dwight Hall (67 High St.), common room.

SMALL TALK BY AMELIA SARGENT

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4 3:30 PM “When Mosquitoes Monkey Around: Prospects for Emergence of Sylvatic Dengue Virus.” Kathryn Hanley of New Mexico State University will speak. Sponsored by the Mrs. Hepsa Ely Silliman Memorial Fund and the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Class of 1954 Environmental Sciences Center (21 Sachem St.), room 110. 4:00 PM “Journeys to the West: Buddhism and the Japanese World Map.” Max Moerman of Barnard College will give a talk analyzing the earliest Japanese map of the world, painted by a 14th-century monk and based on fifth-century Indian and seventhcentury Chinese Buddhist texts. Hall of Graduate Studies (320 York St.), room 217A.

THURSDAY, APRIL 5 6:00 PM A Different Drum Dance Company presents: “Synesthesia.” Join A Different Drum Dance company for its jam-packed hour-and-a-half spring show. There will be two performances on Saturday, at 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students and $8 for adults ($5 for adults in groups of five or more). Reserve tickets at yaledramacoalition.org/synesthesia. Off-Broadway Theater (41 Broadway).

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Max de La Bruyère, Editor in Chief, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Jon of “Mad Men” 5 Knight fights 11 Roll of dough 14 Slangy prefix meaning “super” 15 Oust from office 16 Ornamental climbing plant 17 Roller coaster feature 18 Batter’s position 19 Anonymous John 20 One completely lacking morals 23 Small batteries 24 Sound preceding “Oof!” 25 2009 Will Ferrell dinosaur movie 32 Vaudeville show 33 Landlord’s contract 34 Paid athlete 36 “__ it now”: “Understood” 37 Writer H.H. or Alice 38 Security breach 39 Place for pickups 40 They may be cracked using stethoscopes 41 Abacus pieces 42 Woman with varying roles in Arthurian legend 45 __ guzzler 46 Indian bread 47 What exacting judges follow 55 __ Mahal 56 Political fugitive 57 Delude 58 Big fuss 59 Singer Bette 60 Team on a farm 61 Alphabet ender 62 Animals for 5Across 63 Call to a queue DOWN 1 Boat’s bottom 2 “Peek-__!” 3 Siamese sound 4 Longtime logo with a top hat and monocle

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5 Exactly right 6 Suspicious of 7 Defense gp. with pilots 8 Mailed 9 Gadget measuring rpm 10 Church high point 11 Hairline’s midpoint, perhaps 12 Swear 13 Change the color of, as hair 21 “Smooth Operator” singer 22 Lav in Leeds 25 Word before pad or tender 26 Common man with a six-pack? 27 Plump (up) 28 Basic principle 29 Severe 30 That, in Tijuana 31 Swap 32 You might brush barbecue sauce on one 35 Approves

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

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Dow Jones 13,212, +0.50% NASDAQ 3,091.57, -0.12%

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S S&P 500 1,408.47, +0.37% T

10-yr. Bond 2.22%, +0.06

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Dems sharpen attacks as Romney solidifies lead BY STEVE PEOPLES AND BETH FOUHY ASSOCIATED PRESS MILWAUKEE — President Barack Obama’s administration launched a multi-pronged assault on Mitt Romney’s values and foreign policy credentials Sunday, while a fresh set of prominent Republicans rallied behind the GOP front-runner as the odds-on nominee, further signs the general election is overtaking the primary season. A defiant Rick Santorum outlined plans to leave Wisconsin the day before the state’s contest Tuesday, an indication that the conservative favorite may be in retreat, his chances to stop Romney rapidly dwindling. “I think the chances are overwhelming that (Romney) will be our nominee,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “It seems to me we’re in the final phases of wrapping up this nomination. And most of the members of the Senate Republican conference are either supporting him, or they have the view that I do, that it’s time to turn our attention to the fall campaign and begin to make the case against the president of the United States.” Both Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden went after Romney Sunday, underscoring the belief inside Obama’s Chicago re-election headquarters that Romney will - sooner than later - secure the right to face Obama this fall. Romney largely agreed, telling a Madison, Wis., crowd Sunday night that the nominee “will probably be me.” The Obama officials’ involvement comes as both sides sharpen their general election strategy, perhaps weeks before the GOP contest formally comes to an end. “I think Gov. Romney’s a little out of touch,” Biden told CBS’ “Face the Nation” in an interview broadcast Sunday. “I can’t remember a presidential candidate in the recent past who seems not to understand, by what he says, what ordinary middle-class people are think-

STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks to a crowd at a town-hall style campaign event in, Madison, Wis., on Sunday, April 1. ing about and are concerned about.” The line of attack is likely to play prominently in the Obama campaign’s general election narrative. While Obama is a millionaire, Romney would be among the nation’s wealthiest presidents ever elected. And he’s opened himself to criticism through a series of missteps. Romney casually bet a rival $10,000 during a presidential debate, noted that his wife

drives a “couple of Cadillacs,” and lists owners of professional sports teams among his friends. His personal tax records show investments in the Cayman Islands and a Swiss bank account. Obama’s team on Sunday also seized on Romney’s foreign policy inexperience. Biden said Obama was “stating the obvious” when he told Russian President Dmitry Medvedev that he would have more

latitude on missile defense after the November general election. The two presidents did not realize the exchange, during a meeting in Seoul, South Korea, last weekend, was being picked up by a microphone. Romney called it “alarming” and part of a pattern of “breathtaking weakness” with America’s foes. He asked what else Obama would be flexible on if he were to win a second term. “Speaking of flexible, Gov.

Nations pledge cash for Syrian opposition

Romney’s a pretty flexible guy on his positions,” Biden said. Romney’s GOP opponents have accused the former Massachusetts governor of “flip-flopping” on issues such as health care and abortion. Clinton seized on Romney’s comment that Russia is America’s “No. 1 geopolitical foe,” calling the statement “dated” and suggesting there were more pressing matters of concern in global affairs.

Wisconsin primary to test GOP momentum BY THOMAS BEAUMONT AND BRIAN BAKST ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Burhan Ghalioun, leader of the opposition Syrian National Council, speaks during a news conference following a meeting on Syria in Istanbul, Turkey, on Sunday, April 1. BY CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA AND BRADLEY KLAPPER ASSOCIATED PRESS ISTANBUL — A coalition of more than 70 partners, including the United States, pledged Sunday to send millions of dollars and communications equipment to Syria’s opposition groups, signaling deeper involvement in the conflict amid a growing belief that diplomacy and sanctions alone cannot end the Damascus regime’s repression. The shift by the U.S. and its Western and Arab allies toward seeking to sway the military balance in Syria carries regional risks because the crisis there increasingly resembles a proxy conflict that could exacerbate sectarian tensions. The Syrian rebels are overmatched by heavily armed regime forces.

The summit meeting of the “Friends of the Syrian People” follows a year of failed diplomacy that seems close to running its course with a troubled peace plan led by U.N.-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan. Indeed, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and other participants at the conference in Istanbul uniformly expressed concern that Annan’s plan might backfire, speculating that Syrian President Bashar Assad would try to manipulate it to prolong his hold on power. Clinton said she was waiting for Annan’s report to the U.N. Security Council on Monday on the status of his peace plan. “There cannot be process for the sake of process. There has to be a timeline. If Assad continues as he has, to fail to end the violence, to institute a cease-fire, to withdraw his troops from the areas he has been

battering ... then it’s unlikely he is going to ever agree,” she said. “Because it is a clear signal that he wants to wait to see if he has totally suppressed the opposition. I think he would be mistaken to believe that. My reading is that the opposition is gaining in intensity, not losing.” Clinton said the United States is providing communications equipment to help anti-government activists in Syria organize, remain in contact with the outside world and evade regime attacks. The Syrian regime agreed last week to Annan’s plan, which calls for an immediate cease-fire, humanitarian access to besieged civilians and a political negotiation process led by Syrians. Since then, there have been daily reports of violence, including shelling Sunday in the central city of Homs that activists said killed more than two dozen people.

“I think it’s somewhat dated to be looking backwards instead of being realistic about where we agree, where we don’t agree,” Clinton told CNN Sunday. “He just seems to be uninformed or stuck in a Cold War mentality,” Biden added. “It exposes how little the governor knows about foreign policy.” But the administration’s comments may have been overshadowed Sunday by Romney’s ballooning Republican support.

MILWAUKEE — Wisconsin voters are just warming up. The national political spotlight promises to be hotter than normal this year, considering the series of contests in the state that serve as tests on issues confronting the country as a whole. And that’s after Tuesday’s Republican presidential primary, which effectively could end the race for the nomination. Energized Republicans sense opportunities they haven’t seen in a generation to complete a turnaround. “You have an incredibly engaged and active electorate right now in Wisconsin,” said Mark Graul, a Republican strategist in the state. “That will certainly hold through to November.” They see the chance to turn back a national effort to recall Gov. Scott Walker in a June election stemming from the first-term Republican’s aggressive effort to strip public employee unions of power, and to pick a strong U.S. Senate nominee in August whose victory in November would give Wisconsin two GOP seats for the first time since 1957. Ultimately, they see this sequence of votes, starting this coming week, as test runs they hope will build toward a Republican carrying Wisconsin in the general election, which hasn’t happened since 1984. “We’ve never been so optimistic. We have a chance like I’ve never seen in this state,” John Kleczka, a 68-year-old Republican from Brookfield who attended a rally for GOP presidential front-runner Mitt Romney on Milwaukee’s south side Friday. Walker’s recall dominates, despite Romney’s chance of putting away conservative rival Rick Santorum on Tuesday.

The recall is the culmination of a fight over the cost of public worker benefits amid austere budget times. Wisconsin’s traditionally strong labor movement has attracted national help to fight Walker, elected in 2010 on a promise to get tough with public employee unions. Other states such as Indiana have pushed to curb public-sector union benefits. But Walker’s move, which led to huge demonstrations and national attention in Madison last year, has made Wisconsin the national test case. It’s also seen as an emotional turning point for both sides in a dispute that has raged since Walker jumped into the race three years ago. The intensity of the battle is clear while cruising around the state of 5.7 million people. Lawn signs with competing “I Stand With Governor Walker” and “Recall Walker” messages offer indications of the deeper philosophical rift. To initiate the recall, Walker’s foes accumulated more than 900,000 valid signatures, almost twice the number they needed. On a labor row on the edge of Milwaukee, where several unions have their state headquarters, recall and solidarity signs are plastered over windows. But Wisconsin has weathered the recession better than its Rust Belt neighbors. Personal income has risen $2,000 since 2008, faster than the national average. Unemployment was 6.9 percent in February, well below the 8.3 percent national average and better than Illinois’ 9.1 percent, Michigan’s 8.8 percent and Ohio’s 7.6 percent. Wisconsin’s agricultural output remains robust while the state’s manufacturing sector has also been stable, marked by success stories such as the revival of HarleyDavidson motorcycles in Milwaukee.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

“A live concert to me is exciting because of all the electricity that is generated in the crowd and on stage. It’s my favorite part of the business, live concerts.” ELVIS PRESLEY SINGER

T H E C O R N E L L D A I LY S U N

Taio Cruz to headline Slope Day 2012 BY DAVEEN KOH AND ZACHARY ZAHOS STAFF WRITERS Year-long suspense — tinged with hope for such acts as Avicii and with dizzying dread for Nickelback rumors — ended with two radio-friendly picks that have been heard, well, everywhere. Taio Cruz and Neon Trees are probably as crowd-pleasing as you can (viably) get. “We know you’ve been wanting big name headliners; we also did understand a lot of students were getting tired of rap and hiphop artists,” said Sam Breslin ’12, selections director of SDPB. “A lot of people wanted a pop artist who is on the radio all the time — someone you could sing along to.” While it is arguable how different Cruz truly is in his musical approach from the Slope Day headliners of recent years, he does command a similar, broad base of fans that guarantees a bustling day on Libe Slope. Cruz narrowly missed the chance to sing on Rihanna’s 2007 hit “Umbrella,” but that snub did not stop him from finding an immediate fanbase upon the release of his self-produced 2008 debut, Departure. He has become nearly omnipresent since his 2010 album Rokstarr. It’s hard to think of a more appropriate anthem for the last day of classes than Cruz’s number one single, “Dynamite,” which, of course, exhorts everyone to “throw (their) hands up

in the air sometimes” and “celebrate and live life.” Cruz has an expansive cataCORNELL logue of equally commanding and suitable songs. Leading among those is “Break Your Heart”; repeat “break break your” in your head over and over again if you have trouble remembering it. These songs, as well as other hits such as “Telling the World” (from last year’s animated film Rio), “Higher” and “Hangover,” will slide perfectly into the Slope Day vibe — especially that latter hit. Cruz’s style may not be groundbreaking and his lyrics remain remarkably simplistic, but, for the mass of shambling bodies soon to fill Libe Slope, the man is about perfect as it gets. Neon Trees is similar in that you have almost certainly heard the band before. “Animal,” the lead single off its debut album Habits, invaded all analog frequencies and lossy file types back in early 2010 and is the bestknown of the band’s vociferous dance-rock tunes. This synthpop band from Utah sure has some killer instinct. Since winning over alternative rock titans The Killers, Neon Trees has gone from opening act (most memorably for the North American leg of The Killers’ 2008 Day and Age tour) to full-fledged new wave

revivalists. Neon Trees sounds like a mix of The Killers, Duran Duran, Jason Mraz and Foster the People, with frequent throwbacks to 60s doo-wop. The band’s sundrenched vocals, accompanied by fleet-fingered and friendly guitar melodies, would be perfect for a day out on the slope. Its laidback vibe might present a happier, and still danceable, alternative for those who do not quite take to Cruz’s pounding numbers.

We know you’ve been wanting big name headliners; we also did understand a lot of students were getting tired of rap and hip-hop artists. SAM BRESLIN ’12 Slope Day selections director

TAIOCRUZ.COM

Taio Cruz, famous for his 2010 album “Rokstarr,” will headline Cornll’s Slope Day festivities on May 4.

After failing to become the darling of hipster critics, Neon Trees has carved its own home on DJ sets and our little sisters’ iPods (an arguably larger and louder contingent). Besides, the Pitchfork loyalists have their own Neon Indian to illuminate them in its plasmaglow. At any rate, Neon Trees deserves boundless respect for its startling ability to channel

the crooners of old whenever the occasion calls for it. In a 2010 Billboard performance, the band rendered fellow label mate Justin Bieber’s smash hit “Baby” unrecognizable, then smoothly segued into Ben E King’s classic “Stand By Me.” Bobby Darin and Buddy Holly would have been proud. The road to the Slope Day artist announcement bumps into

few optimists over its treacherous length, and seemingly none right after. Fans of Weezer, Avicii and Flo Rida — the three artists who were fruitlessly pursued by Slope Day — were disappointed. Both Taio Cruz and Neon Trees lean heavily on past and present influences and may not represent the highest artistic heights of their genre. But they are cer-

tainly heard. Think back a recent Collegetown memory. Among the clip-clop of stilettos, clatters of beer bottles, guttural hurls and random ambulance siren, there is that distant echo of “Ayo, baby let’s go.” It seems to loop ad infinitum. And it will return, louder than ever and amplified by your peers, along with the rest of the that aural sampler, on May 4.

T H E D A I LY P R I N C E T O N I A N

THE DARTMOUTH

Childish Gambino to headline lawnparties

Visual arts center gets $48 million boost

BY ALICE KILPATRICK STAFF WRITER Rapper Childish Gambino will headline this spring’s USG-sponsored concert at Lawnparties, according to a representative of Glassnote Records, who declined to be identified. Donald Glover, who uses Childish Gambino as a stage name, is well-known for his premier studio album, “Camp,” released this past November. Glover stars as Troy Barnes on NBC’s hit show “Community.”

It’s incredible how vividly split the campus is in terms of its preferences of music. BENEDICT WAGSTAFF ’14 USG Social Chair He was previously a writer for NBC’s “30 Rock” and Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show.” His writing on the third season of “30 Rock” earned him the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Comedy Series. He is also well-known as one of the three leads in the sketch comedy group Derrick Comedy. USG social chair Benedict Wagstaff ’14 explained in an email that Childish Gambino was chosen partially because he was popular within the student body. Wagstaff said that two students surveys the USG sent out — one last spring and one this past fall — were

PRINCETON

BY NOAH REICHBLUM STAFF WRITER Leon Black ’73 and his wife Debra Black have donated $48 million for the new visual arts center, set to open in September 2012, the Office of Public Affairs announced in a press release on Thursday. The 105,000 square-foot Black Family Visual Arts Center will house the studio art department, film and media studies department and the recently established digital humanities program. “The Black Family Visual Arts Center will be a powerful force at Dartmouth for years to come,” Provost Carol Folt said in the press release. “We are indebted to Leon and Debra for their vision, passion for the arts and generosity.” Black founded Apollo Global Management, a private equity firm with an estimated $100 billion in assets, and he currently serves as the chairman and chief executive officer of the company. Black served as a trustee of the College from 2002 to 2011. The $48-million contribution will also fund a featured piece of art for the center, to be designed by abstract artist Ellsworth Kelly, according to the press release. The work will be installed on the Hopkins Center east facade prior to the Black Family Visual Arts Center’s September dedication. The Hopkins Center and the Hood Museum of Art are currently undergoing separately funded construction projects to jointly form Dartmouth’s new “arts district,” the press release said. “The work enabled by the Black Family Visual Arts Center — the artistic explorations, interdisciplinary collaborations and discovery of new ideas and modes of expression — will have a lasting impact on our students and our understanding of the role of the visual arts across disciplines,” College President Jim Yong Kim said in the press release. Boston-based firm Machado and Silvetti Associates designed the three-story VAC to be LEED Gold certified. The center will feature a threestory atrium called the “Arts Forum,” a new Lowe Theatre, a 50-seat screening room, a gallery

“extremely useful” in the search. “It’s incredible how vividly split the campus is in terms of its preferences of music,” Wagstaff said. “It became clear that our artist would work best if they were some kind of hybrid. This is why Childish came

out on top.” Jonathan Schwartz ’14 said he is excited about the selection of Childish Gambino as the Lawnparties artist, noting that “Community” is one of his favorite TV shows. “Instead of like at previous Lawnparties when we have had acts with Top 40 hits, it’s refreshing to have an act that it is only breaking right now,” Schwartz said. “I like his acting better, but his raps are better due to the fact that he is a comedy writer. He is clever and witty.” Glover transitioned into music in 2008 when he released his first album, “Sick Boi.” Three years later, Glassnote Records released “Camp,” his most recent album. His most popular tracks include “Heartbeat” and “Bonfire.” The name Childish Gambino, Glover explained to Jimmy Fallon in 2011, was created through a Wu-Tang Clan Name Generator. Princeton won’t be the artist’s only college stop this spring. Childish Gambino will also headline Spring Fling at George Washington University on April 15 and Spring Weekend at Brown on April 20, according to their college newspapers. Lawnparties will be held on May 6.

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

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The College’s new Visual Arts Center will be renamed in honor of Debra and Leon Black ’73, who donated $48 million to fund its construction. and a digital humanities media laboratory, among other features. A lawn DARTMOUTH and terrace will form the Arts Plaza that will connect the Black Family Visual Arts Center with the Hopkins Center and Hood Museum of Art.

The Black Family Visual Arts Center will be a powerful force at Dartmouth for years to come. CAROL FOLT Dartmouth Provost Construction on the VAC began in spring 2010 following design concerns raised by the College’s Liaison Committee, which serves as a liaison between the College and the local community. Initially, some Hanover residents believed the urban design of the building conflicted with

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existing New England architecture. In addition to their $48-million gift, the Black family has previously sponsored professorships in Shakespearean studies and Jewish studies and supported the Dartmouth College Fund, Kemeny Hall, the Roth Center for Jewish Life and Morton Farm, Dartmouth’s riding center, according to the press release. Over 25 percent of Dartmouth students take courses in the visual arts, film studies and digital humanities departments each year, according to the press release. Black graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College, majoring in philosophy and history. He later received an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1975 and currently sits on the board of the Museum of Modern Art, the Mount Sinai Hospital, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Faster Cures and the Asia Society, according to the press release. Black also serves on the board of directors of Apollo Global Management, AP Alternative Assets and Sirius Satellite radio. Leon and Debra Black cofounded the Melanoma Research Alliances, where Debra Black currently serves as the chair of the board of directors.

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THROUGH THE LENS

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riday night, students flocked to Old Campus for a Taiwanese market-inspired night of food, games, crafts and live performances. The event was the winner of the $5K UOFC Challenge. Staff photographer JENNIFER CHEUNG reports.

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Thunder 92 Bulls 78

NBA Celtics 91 Heat 72

SPORTS QUICK HITS

TRACK AND FIELD EIGHT WINS BETWEEN BOTH TEAMS Both track teams piled up wins at Saturday’s UConn Spring Invite. The men won the 200m, 1500m and 4x400m relay, while the women won the pole vault, 1500m and 4x100m relay, and took both the 100m and 800m races by 0.02-second margins.

NHL Senators 5 Islanders 1

NHL Edmonton 2 Anaheim 1

SOCCER Tottenham 3 Swansea 1

MONDAY

TENNIS WOMEN ROUT RUTGERS The No. 26 women’s team turned in another dominant performance Friday, beating Rutgers 6-1. The men’s team lost on Saturday to St. John’s 4-3, ending their streak of four wins. Both teams will begin the Ivy League season this week. See tomorrow’s paper for the full story.

“I’m really proud of these guys... they just stuck with it and kept grinding, and it worked. ANDY SHAY HEAD COAHC, M. LACROSSE YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

ELIS HOLD OFF PENN IN IVY THRILLER

MEN’S LACROSSE

Down by three goals heading into the fourth quarter, Penn came roaring back to tie the game at nine. But Deron Dempster ’13 netted his fifth goal of the contest with 11.9 seconds remaining to win the game for the Elis. PAGE B3

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite having 23 turnovers to Penn’s 15, the men’s lacrosse team came away with a victory on Saturday thanks to standout offensive performances by Deron Dempster ’13, Greg Mahony ’12 and captain Michael Pratt ’12.

Lightweight crew takes Johnson Cup

Bulldogs raided by Colgate BY EUGENE JUNG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Elis took to the road again on Saturday only three days after returning from a big win against Marist but fell to Colgate in Hamilton.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE COLGATE 16, YALE 12 The Bulldogs came four goals shy of a victory against Colgate.

The team fought fiercely but failed to fend off the ferocious attacks of the Raiders (3–3, 2–1 Patriot) and ultimately succumbed in a 16–12 loss. Although seven Yale players recorded goals during the match, and five scored two apiece, the effort was not enough to overwhelm Colgate. “Today was a tough game,” attacker Meghan Murray ’14 said. “Colgate’s attack was on top of its game yesterday and able to capitalize on our defense.” SEE W. LACROSSE PAGE B2

CAROL HSIN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The varsity eight took the Johnson Cup against the Naval Academy on Saturday with a time of 6:09.3. Navy finished in 6:18.3. BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER On Saturday afternoon, the lightweight crew team swept its first regatta of the season, beating Naval Academy in four races on Lake Carnegie in New Jersey to take home the ninth annual Johnson Cup. Head coach Andy Card said it was the first time Yale has taken every race in the nine-year series.

LIGHTWEIGHT CREW EUGENE JUNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Midfielder Reilly Foot ’15 scored twice for the Bulldogs against Colgate this weekend.

This was a promising start for the defending national champions, who placed first in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association last June. The rain held off all afternoon, but the Bulldogs had to contend with a strong head crosswind to win against the

STAT OF THE DAY 11.9

Mids in the freshmen 8+, both junior varsity 8+’s and the all-important varsity 8+. Varsity oarsman David Kahan said the team “had a solid race” against Navy, an opponent it takes very seriously. He added the regatta provided the first opportunity of the season to see the squad’s strengths and weaknesses. Team captain David Walker ’12 and varsity oarsman Brendan Harrington ’13 said they were particularly proud of the two sophomores in the varsity boat, Josh Mann ’14 and Joe Hanlon ’14, who won their first race at the varsity level, stepping up from the freshman boat last year. “Props to [Mann and Hanlon],” Harrington said. “We’re all really proud of how they’ve stepped up this semester, and they’ve both made a fantastic transition to the varsity.”

Hanlon said it was exciting to represent Yale at the varsity level and that he is pleased with the win, although he is just happy to have the first race of the season under his belt. In the first race of the day, Yale’s second junior varsity eight took an early lead against its Navy counterpart and the Navy second freshman boat, and maintained that lead for the rest of the 2000m race. The Bulldogs ultimately crossed the finish line at 6:35.1 — 2.6 seconds ahead of Navy’s 2JV 8+, which finished the course at 6:37.7. The second Navy boat came in just behind at 6:38.4. Card said the 2JV performed particularly well given the lineup changes that took place in February and March. SEE LIGHTWEIGHT CREW PAGE B2

THE NUMBER OF SECONDS LEFT IN SATURDAY’S MEN’S LACROSSE GAME WHEN DERON DEMPSTER ’13 SCORED THE GAME-WINNING GOAL. Penn held the ball on the final possession, but goalie Jack Meyer ’14 was able to make the save and send it to midfield for a quick turn and score.

Th


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Novak Djokovic beats Andy Murray, wins Sony Ericsson Open No. 1 Novak Djokovic beat No. 4 Andy Murray for the third time this year, 6-1, 7-6 (4). It was Djokovic’s second trip to a finals this year following his victory over Murray at the Australian Open. Since then he lost in the semis of Dubai and Indian Wells, to Murray and American John Isner. Djokovic has revealed a vulnerability in the second set that wasn’t present in last year’s 43-match win streak.

Lightweight crew dominates Navy the fastest time of the day, 6:09.3 compared to the Navy varsity’s 6:18.3.

LIGHTWEIGHT CREW FROM PAGE The freshmen boats took to the water next, and the Blue and White steadily advanced throughout the race to finish a whopping 25.6 seconds ahead of the Midshipmen. In their first official race for Yale, the freshan eight timed in at 6:25.1 — well ahead of Navy, which finished in 6:50.7. The pattern of winning continued into the junior varsity and varsity races. Yale’s JV 8+ started strongly and pulled ahead of Navy at the beginning of the race, finishing at 6:16.5. Navy crossed the finish line at 6:20.7. In the varsity race — which determined the winner of the Johnson Cup — Yale’s varsity eight steadily gained distance on Navy throughout the course and finished nine seconds ahead of its opponent. The Elis posted

I’m very happy that every boat got a win early in the season, but we still have a lot of work to do as a team. DAVID WALKER ’12 Captain, men’s lightweight crew This weekend, the lightweight crew team followed in the footsteps of the heavyweights, who opened their season at home last weekend with a three-race victory over Brown. “I’m very happy that every boat got a win early in the season, but

Elis go one for four

we still have a lot of work to do as a team,” Walker said. “We had a great start to the season, but we can always improve overall speed and consistency throughout the race. The goal is to get eight guys moving perfectly together, which will be a constant focus all season.” Next weekend, the lightweight team will travel to MIT to compete against the Engineers and Georgetown for the Joy Cup. The heavyweights will resume their race schedule after a break this weekend as they host Dartmouth at the Gilder Boathouse in Derby — their last home regatta of the season. The heavyweight races will begin at 10 a.m. and buses will depart for the boathouse from the Payne Whitney Gym at 9 a.m. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu.

UNA MCBURNEY/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Saturday’s regatta was the first time Yales swept Navy in the nine-year history of the Johnson Cup.

Raiders defeat Yale by four

PATRICK HULCE/DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

The Bulldogs managed to pull one victory over Columbia this weekend. EUGENE JUNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

the potential that we had, but the scores do show something, We’re pretty disappointed.” After a fairly promising preseason, the Bulldogs said losing to their first Ivy League competitors was crushing. Janes added that Ivy League games are “pretty much all that matter” to the team. The Elis will have another chance to take on Ivy teams this weekend, when they face Princeton (5–18, 2–2 Ivy) on Friday and Cornell (12–11, 3–1 Ivy) on Saturday, both at home. Last year, Yale split with the Tigers but was swept by Cornell. Despite these losses, players remain confident the team can come back against its Ivy opponents next weekend. “I think we know that we have what it takes to do well in Ivy League play,” Leung said. “We have the skills, the ability and the confidence. We just need to focus and bring it together for next weekend.” On Wednesday, the Bulldogs will play Rhode Island (9–15) away at 3 p.m.

SOFTBALL FROM PAGE B4 But the team’s performance to a downward turn against the Quakers (19–10, 4–0 Ivy) on Saturday. In the first game, the Bulldogs held Penn to one run but could not manage to score. Yale left a runner on base for five of the seven innings played, but the team had only three hits and could not bring its runners home. Chelsey Dunham ’14 (5–5) pitched a good game against Penn, giving up only one run in six innings. In the second game, the Quakers took an early lead and held it until the end. After four innings, the Bulldogs found themselves down 14–0 and on their third pitcher, Alex Lucas ’14. An impressive three runs in the top of the fifth were not enough to stave off the mercy rule, and the Bulldogs fell 14–3 after just five innings. “Eight hits over two games against Penn is never going to do it, especially when they don’t come at the right times,” Janes said. “The scores don’t show all

Contact MASON KROLL at mason.kroll@yale.edu .

PENN 14, YALE 3 PENN

6

2

6

0

X

-

-

14

YALE

0

0

0

0

3

-

-

3

PENN 1, YALE 0 PENN

0

0

1

0

0

0

X

1

YALE

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

YALE 4, COLUMBIA 3 YALE

1

2

0

1

0

0

0

4

COLUMBIA

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

3

COLUMBIA 4, YALE 1 COLUMBIA

0

1

0

2

1

0

X

4

YALE

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

Attacker Devon Rhodes ’13 scored Yale’s first goal of the game loss to Colgate on Saturday. Rhodes scored again in the first half.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE FROM PAGE B1 Last season, despite Yale’s losing 3–12 record, the Elis still managed a 10–7 victory against the Raiders. Yale (3–6, 0–3 Ivy) looked fit at the beginning of the game, with midfielder Christina Doherty ’15 winning the faceoff and attacker Devon Rhodes ’13 scoring a goal with a fantastic assist by fellow attacker Jen DeVito ’14 just 45 seconds in. Midfielder Ashley McCormick ’14 also dominated the draw and controlled the first 27 minutes of the match until a Raider scooped up a ground ball at 27:23, and Colgate held on to it for about a minute. After regaining control, Yale’s captain Caroline Crow ’12 and Rhodes took aggressive shots toward Colgate’s net, only to be stopped short by goalkeeper Jennie Berglin. “When you are down early in the game, it’s easy for a team to just accept defeat and hang their heads but we never gave up,” attacker Devon Rhodes ’13 said. Soon afterwards, the Raiders took advantage of a foul and dominated the next three minutes with four shots, one of which soared into Yale’s net. At 20:28, DeVito found an opportunity, but her ambitious shot bounced off the home team’s goalpost. The Raiders capitalized on the four more Yale fouls in the following three minutes by adding another goal to the tally. Although DeVito succeeded in leveling the score at 2–2, Colgate replied by scoring two goals. Crow narrowed the gap again to 4–3 22 minutes into the game, but the Raiders again doubled the goal difference in the next two minutes. Despite Rhode’s second goal and Crow’s closer before the whistle, the first half ended with a score of 8–5 Colgate. “At the beginning of the game we struggled a little bit on defense, we were fouling a lot and gave the other team multiple free position shots,” midfielder Courteney Rutter ’14 said. “In the second half we played a lot better and adjusted to the calls that were being made against us,” she added. Determined to turn the tide of the game, the Bulldogs initiated the attack as soon as the second half kicked off. Midfielder Reilly Foote ’15 controlled the draw after the faceoff and raced straight into the Raider’s zone to secure the Elis’ sixth goal. Murray said Yale’s offense was strong throughout the game. “We were able to get both assisted and unassisted goals, making it harder for [Col-

gate] defense to play against us,” Murray said. But after four minutes into the second half, Colgate came back strong by taking advantage of Yale’s turnover, recording three straight goals to get ahead with a fivegoal difference over the visitors. The Bulldogs returned the compliment by firing in three goals of their own into the hosts’ net within a matter of a minute, with midfielder Erin Magnuson ’15 scoring two and attacker Kerri Fleishhacker ’15 putting in the third.

Colgate definitely came out with a high level of intensity, and we found ourselves in a hole for most of the game. ERIN MCMULLAN’14 Goalkeeper, women’s lacrosse For the next 12 minutes, both teams exchanged goals. Shortly after Colgate’s captain Courtney Miller changed the score to 12–9, Foote replied with Yale’s 10th goal, and when Miller added another one for her team, Bulldogs’ attacker Megan Murray ’14 again responded to turn the score board to 13–11 with eight minutes remaining in the regulation. The Elis failed to utilize the remaining precious minutes, even allowing a hat trick by Colgate’s key player Katie Sullivan. “Colgate had a number of experienced players who played well yesterday,” head coach Anne Phillips said. “Obviously we just didn’t play well against them defensively.” Although Fleishhacker succeeded in scoring a goal with Crow’s assist 30 seconds before the whistle, Yale fell 16–12 to the host team. Phillips said the team scored easily when Colgate was in an unsettled defensive situation but was impatient in running its set offense, which did not generate the scoring opportunities it was designed to create. In the last couple of matches, the Elis showed strengths in draw controls and shots, as demonstrated in Saturday’s match. Yale equaled its opponents in saves with 10–10 and even outdid the Raiders 16–14 in draw control.

“Colgate definitely came out with a high level of intensity, and we found ourselves in a hole for most of the game,” goalkeeper Erin McMullan ’14 said. Although the team has been improving in turnovers, shots and clears, it did not continue this trend Saturday. The Elis recorded 18 turnover to Colgate’s 13, 24 shots to Colgate’s 39 and 13 clears to the Raiders’ 17. Phillips said the team needs to play a more disciplined defense and focus on reducing turnovers this week in practice. Accuracy in shots, as Philips emphasized in an interview with the News last Thursday, showed some weaknesses. “Our shooting percentage was much better against Colgate, 12 for 24, but we were not patient enough offensively and could not create enough scoring opportunities,” she said. Furthermore, the amount of fouls committed proved to be a catalyst to Yale’s defeat, as the penalties led to free position shots, and four of Colgate’s goals, the entirety of the game’s scoring margin. Phillips added that unforced turnovers and fouls really hurt the Bulldogs’ chances. The Bulldogs also led 20–15 in ground balls. While Yale has been faring better in comparison to last season, the team failed to secure a victory against a team the Bulldogs generally beat. “This week in practice we plan to continue to work on our drives to goal as well as our passes, as we prepare for Princeton,” Murray said. McMullan added that team is going to watch some film and tweak a couple of things in preparation for its next game. The Bulldogs will travel again next weekend to take on the Tigers in Princeton, N.J., on Saturday. Contact EUGENE JUNG at eugene.jung@yale.edu .

COLGATE 16, YALE 12 COLGATE

8

8

16

YALE

5

7

12


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS GEORGE WHITFIELD JR. The quarterback guru, who is working with Andrew Luck as the prospect prepares for this month’s draft, recently stated that if the Colts “over-think this,” and pick alternative prospect Robert Griffin III, “they’re going to make a mistake they’ll regret for years.”

Elis snatch first Ivy win

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

MEN’S GOLF IVY

BY JOHN SULLIVAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Attacker Deron Dempster ’13 scored his fifth goal of Saturday’s game with 11.9 seconds remaining in the contest off a pass from defenseman Peter Johnson ’13 to give the Bulldogs a 10–9 victory over Penn at Reese Stadium. The Elis’ (3–4, 1–2 Ivy) first win of the Ivy League season snapped a losing streak that included a heartbreaking five-overtime defeat against No. 13 Princeton last Saturday and a tough one-goal loss at No. 5 Cornell the week before. “It’s huge for us,” Dempster said of the victory. “We’d lost four in a row, and we were looking for that win to turn our season around. Every team is good in this league, so we took the time to study the other games, and we just wanted it today.” After attackman Tim Schwalje equalized for the Quakers (1–6, 0–3 Ivy) with under six minutes to play, the two teams traded missed shots and possessions, but neither was able to break through for the decisive goal. But with 2:28 remaining in the fourth quarter, Penn goalkeeper Brian Feeney saved Matt Gibson’s ’12 wraparound shot from the right side of the net, and the Quakers cleared the ball into their offensive end with the score knotted at nine. Yale called timeout off of a Penn missed shot with 1:25 to go, and Penn held the ball behind the net to try for the last shot in regulation. With 30 seconds remaining, Quaker attackman Dan Savage dodged from behind the net. Two passes later Penn’s John Conneely ripped an open shot at Bulldog netminder Jack Meyer ’14 from 12 yards out. Conneely had already found the net once that day, but this time Meyer snatched the ball out of the air and hit Johnson sprinting up the field for a fast break. Johnson flew across the midfield line ahead of the Quaker midfielders and when the Penn defense rotated to pick him up, he found Dempster waiting on the back pipe. Dempster worked his way towards the front of the cage with a Penn defenseman on his back and a referee’s flag flew up for a penalty on the Quakers, but a second later the junior slotted the ball past Feeney for the gamewinning goal. Dempster, who had been out with an injury for the past three games, was the spark plug for the Eli offense on Saturday. In the first half he scored two straight extra man goals on passes from Gibson to break a 2–2 tie for the Bulldogs. During Yale’s next man-up opportunity, the Quakers locked off Gibson, hoping that the Bulldog offense would stall without the team’s top playmaker. The tactic failed, as midfielder Shane Thornton ’15 found Dempster in the middle for his third tally of the day. Later, in the third quarter, Gibson located Dempster near the goal again, this time with the Penn defense at full strength, and

the Bulldogs, as Ohio State traveled to the Gilder Boathouse to take on the Elis last year. Though the Elis finished ahead of three out of four of Ohio State’s boats in last

W

RANK AVG. SCORE W%

1

Yale

2

151

75.73

66.971

2

Columbia

1

186

75.67

65.102

3

Penn

2

169

75.44

67.536

4

Princeton

0

171

76.11

65.592

5

Harvard

1

200

76.55

53.247

6

Dartmouth

0

209

76.17

50.476

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

TUESDAY, MAR. 13 9th place

SATURDAY, APR. 7 Yale Spring Opener

SOFTBALL IVY W L

%

W L

%

1

Penn

4

0

1.000

19

10

.655

2

Harvard

3

1

.750

15

8

.652

Cornell

3

1

.750

12

11

.522

Brown

2

2

.500

5

13

.278

Princeton

2

2

.500

5

18

.217

Yale

1

3

.250

7

15

.318

Columbia

1

3

.250

7

18

.280

Dartmouth

0

4

.000

7

12

.368

6 BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team snapped its four game losing streak with a win against Penn on Saturday.

the junior put in his fourth goal to put Yale up 8–5. All of Gibson’s team-high three assists were to Dempster on Saturday, and the Bulldogs will look for this chemistry — and Dempster’s stellar play — to continue for the rest of the season. “I’ve been hurt the last two weeks so I haven’t played with [Gibson] a lot, but we worked well together on extra man,” Dempster said after the game. “Somehow it just clicked today.”

We’d lost four in a row, and we were looking for that win to turn our season around. DERON DEMPSTER ’13 Attacker, men’s lacrosse The Bulldogs also got big performances out of midfielders Greg Mahony ’12 and Dylan Levings ’14. Mahony scored his first goal less than five minutes into the game when he worked his way open from 12 yards out and ripped a shot past Penn goalkeeper Brendan Engelke. Engelke started the game but was replaced at halftime by Feeney. Mahony’s second score, another rocket from a few yards inside the restraining box, broke an 8–8 tie with 9:43 remaining in the fourth quarter. Levings, meanwhile, had his best game of the season, winning 17 of 22 faceoffs for the Elis. The sophomore took a beating

from the Quaker defenders every time he had to take the ball over the midfield line and even had to sit out after a particularly vicious hit, but came right back onto the field after missing only a single faceoff. Levings also drew the penalty that led to Dempster’s third goal when he was hit in the helmet coming out of the scrum. “He was unbelievable,” head coach Andy Shay said of his faceoff specialist. “We knew he had that kind of game in him, and he was on fire.” Between Levings’ dominance at the X and their 28–19 ground ball advantage, the Bulldogs should have controlled possession easily. But the Elis committed 23 turnovers — 15 in the first half alone — and were successful on only 14 of their 23 clears. After attackman Brandon Mangan ’14 and Mahony put Yale up 2–0 only five minutes into the contest, it looked like the game would be a blowout. But Penn scored its first goal later in the first quarter when Meyer, who otherwise played well en route to nine saves on Saturday, turned the ball over on the clear, leading to an easy one-onone goal for Quaker midfielder Ryan Parietti. Captain Michael Pratt ’12 said that Yale overcame these mistakes by winning ground balls and working hard on defense. “It’s really important to hustle and get ground balls when you’re not playing well, and we did a great job of that today,” Pratt added. His coach took a slightly more critical view of the situation. “It was ugly,” Shay said, “but

8

we’ll take it.” Pratt scored to give Yale a commanding 7–3 lead going into halftime, but the Bulldogs’ mistakes allowed the Quakers to climb back into the game. Savage and Schwalje scored three straight times for Penn at the start of the final quarter to tie the game at eight. But just as the Tigers ruined the Bulldogs’ comeback last weekend, Dempster and the Elis stopped the Quakers in their tracks on Saturday. Saturday’s matchup came after three straight games against teams ranked in the top 13 in the country. While the Elis pushed their opponents to the edge in the last two of these contests, they came away with two losses. Already 0–2 in the Ivy League heading into Saturday’s matchup, the Bulldogs recognized their season could slip away with a loss to Penn. Shay credited his players for staying dedicated to the team. “I’m really proud of these guys,” Shay said. “They haven’t deviated from the plan at all, they just stuck with it and kept grinding, and it worked out for them today.” The Bulldogs travel to Providence on Tuesday to take on the Friars in a 7 p.m. game. Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.j.sullivan@yale.edu .

season’s matchup, this year the Buckeyes swept the Bulldogs. In the first race of the day, Ohio State’s varsity eight took an early lead over the Elis and never relinquished it. The Buckeyes crossed the line at 6:23.66, besting Yale,

CAROL HSIN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

After travelling last weekend, the women’s crew team will face Dartmouth and Cornell next weekend at home.

which finished in 6:32.38. The second varsity eight race followed a similar script with the Buckeyes opening up an early lead that held up for the entire race. Ohio State’s boat finished in 6:25.25, while Yale clocked in at 6:34.66. “We are disappointed with our performance and did not rise to the challenge,” captain Kathleen O’Keefe ’12 said. “Across the board, our boats were unhappy with our results.” The Buckeyes’ varsity four also glided into the win column with a 7:11.43 mark, finishing nearly six seconds ahead of the Bulldogs. Ohio State completed the sweep of Yale by capturing the second varsity four and the novice eight races. The Elis took to the water to face Michigan in the second session, falling in all but one race. The lone bright spot of the day came from Yale’s varsity four, who crossed the line at 7:20.10, which was more than four seconds ahead of Michigan. “They started off behind, and they were just very determined to get ahead,” Porter said. “They raced until they got their nose

OVERALL

SCHOOL

4

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

WEDNESDAY, APR. 4 Yale at Rhode Island, 3:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAR. 31 Penn 14, Yale 3

BASEBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Penn

2

0

1.000

10

9

.526

Columbia

2

0

1.000

8

13

.381

3

Princeton

3

1

.750

9

10

.474

4

Cornell

1

1

.500

14

5

.725

Dartmouth

1

1

.500

4

11

.267

6

Harvard

1

3

.250

3

19

.136

7

Brown

0

0

.000

2

14

.125

Yale

0

4

.000

6

17

.271

1

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

TUESDAY, APR. 3 Sacred Heart at Yale, 3:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, APR. 1 Penn 8, Yale 1

MEN’S LACROSSE

YALE 10, PENN 9

IVY

YALE

3

4

1

2

10

PENN

2

1

2

4

9

Women’s crew falls short on road trip WOMEN’S CREW FROM PAGE B4

SCHOOL

out in front. They did a great job showing their competitive spirit.” In the varsity eight race, the Wolverines bested the Bulldogs 6:16.70 to 6:28.92. Similarly, Michigan’s second varsity eight rowed to an eight second victory by clocking in at 6:25.62. Yale’s second varsity four and novice eight also suffered defeats at the hands of the Wolverines. Despite the losses, O’Keefe and Porter both said racing against two nationally ranked teams was beneficial because it allowed the team to see how much improvement is necessary in the coming weeks. “I think Michigan is the standard right now,” Porter said. “If they’re not the fastest crew in the country, they are in the top three, and that’s how much work we have to do as a team. It’s doable, but we’ve got to find a combination that works. We’re not there yet.” The Bulldogs return to action this weekend when they host Cornell and Dartmouth at the Gilder Boathouse in Derby, Conn., on Saturday. Contact MARIA GUARDADO at maria.guardado@yale.edu .

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

3

0

1.000

7

1

.875

Princeton

3

0

1.000

6

2

.750

Harvard

2

0

1.000

5

4

.556

4

Yale

1

2

.333

3

4

.429

5

Brown

0

2

.000

3

5

.375

Dartmouth

0

2

.000

2

5

.286

Penn

0

3

.000

1

6

.143

1

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

TUESDAY, APR. 3 Yale at Providence, 7:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAR. 24 Yale 10, Penn 9

WOMEN’S LACROSSE IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Penn

4

0

1.000

6

3

.667

Dartmouth

3

0

1.000

7

1

.875

3

Cornell

3

1

.750

7

2

.778

4

Princeton

2

1

.667

4

4

.500

5

Brown

1

2

.333

5

4

.556

Harvard

1

2

.333

4

5

.444

Yale

0

3

.000

3

6

.333

Columbia

0

5

.000

1

8

.111

1

7

LAST WEEK

SATURDAY, MAR. 31 Colgate 16, Yale 12

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, APR. 7 Yale at Princeton, 1:00 p.m.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“I’m a man. If somebody calls me out, I have to go. He was calling me chicken. He was calling me names.” UBALDO JIMENEZ INDIANS’ PITCHER, AFTER PEGGING ROCKIES’ SHORTSTOP, NAME-CALLER TROY TULOWITZKI

Baseball swept in Ivy opener

MONICA MARTIN/DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Yale lost all four games this weekend and scored only three runs total. The Bulldogs fell to Columbia 3–1 and 3–0 on Saturday and to Penn 4–1 and 8–1 on Sunday. BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPOTER Yale’s bats went out like a lamb in the opening weekend of Ivy League play with four straight losses this weekend.

BASEBALL Yale fell to Columbia University 3–1 and 3–0 on Saturday and to the University of Pennsylvania 4–1 and 8–1 on Sunday. “[It was] one of those things where we didn’t start off like we wanted,” pitcher Rob Cerfolio ’14 said. “[But] you can’t let four games dictate how you play all year.” Yale (6–17–1, 0–4 Ivy) surrendered three runs in each

game against the Lions (9–14, 3–1 Ivy), but managed to score just once all day on a sacrifice fly by first baseman Kevin Fortunato ’14 as the Elis attempted to come back in the top of the seventh and final frame. Fortunato’s fly brought in outfielder Charlie Neil ’12, who had led off the inning with a triple, but that was all for the rally. Pitcher Chris O’Hare ’13 took the loss to fall to 1–3 despite striking out four over seven strong innings. He and the Bulldogs were hurt by a call reversal that helped the Lions score three runs in the bottom of the third. Cerfolio said that the home plate umpire overruled the first base umpire’s ruling that the

COLUMBIA 3, YALE 1

batter was out by saying that the first baseman’s foot came off the bag after Columbia’s coach argued the call. “It was a tough call for them,” Cerfolio said. “But I don’t think that they should have overruled it.” With one out, Columbia catcher Mike Fischer was originally called out at first on a grounder to third baseman Chris Piwinski ’13, but he was then awarded an infield single. Fischer’s hit turned out to be the first of four straight for the Lions until O’Hare induced an inning-ending double play to staunch the bleeding. Cerfolio was solid on the mound for the Elis in the second half of Saturday’s twin bill,

COLUMBIA 3, YALE 0

but Columbia’s David Speer and Harrison Slutsky shut out the Bulldogs in the nine-inning loss. Cerfolio scattered three runs over seven innings, but the Columbia duo combined to strike out 12 Elis for the victory. “Robby Cerfolio pitched one hell of a game,” designated hitter Josh Scharff ’13 said in an email, “Battling every inning and never getting phased.” Yale fared no better on Sunday at Penn (10–9, 2–0 Ivy), when the Bulldogs scored just two runs in the doubleheader. Starter Pat Ludwig ’12 allowed just one earned run over six innings, but an error by shortstop Cale Hanson ’14 led to three unearned runs in the bottom of the first inning. Back at

bat, Hanson drew a walk with two outs in the top of the second inning, but both he and second baseman David Toups ’15 were left stranded after Toups’ double moved both runners into scoring position. The Elis had another scoring chance in the top of the seventh, when Robert Baldwin ’15 hit a pinch-hit double in place of Fortunato, and outfielder Joe Lubanski ’15 singled and went to second on an error by the center fielder to put runners at second and third. But Piwinski grounded out to short, ending the threat and the game. Yale left five runners on base for the game and scored its lone run on a home run to center by

PENN 4, YALE 1

Lubanski. “Joe [Lubanski] went up to the plate and didn’t hold anything back,” Ludwig said. “I’m sure it was quite a moment hitting his first collegiate home run in his home town.” The Quakers stormed out to an 8–0 lead after three innings in second half of the doubleheader thanks to 10 hits and two errors by Yale. Yale will take a break from the Ivy League to host Sacred Heart University (9–16, 7–5 Northeast Conference) on Tuesday for a doubleheader at Yale Field starting at 3:30 p.m. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

PENN 8, YALE 1

COLUMBIA

0

0

3

0

0

0

X

3

COLUMBIA

1

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

X

3

PENN

3

0

0

1

0

0

X

4

PENN

4

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

X

8

YALE

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

YALE

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

YALE

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

YALE

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Bulldogs disappoint in Ivy play BY MASON KROLL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In its first Ivy League games of the season, the softball team came up short with only one win in four games this weekend.

SOFTBALL The Bulldogs (7–15, 1–3 Ivy) split their doubleheader against Columbia on Friday but lost both games to Penn on Saturday. The team has won only two of its last 10 games. “We need to figure out a way to change our approach to the plate and the game in gen-

eral and come out with a killer instinct,” infielder Riley Hughes ’15 said. “We have the abilities, we just have to back those up.” In the first game against Columbia (7–18, 1–3 Ivy), the Bulldogs did not score for the first five innings and found themselves down 4–0 in the top of the sixth. A single by Meg Johnson ’12 brought home Tori Balta ’14 and took the score to 4–1. Captain Christy Nelson ’13 singled and Kelsey Warkentine ’13 walked, leaving the bases loaded with two outs, but the Bulldogs could not deliver any more runs. Hughes said the team needs

to start each game strong rather than hope to come back against its opponents. “We need to always come out hard in the beginning and not wait for the game to progress before we put some runs on the board,” she said. “We need to be more aggressive because it will really help our attitude and how we approach the last innings of the game.” Though tempered by their recent loss, the Bulldogs went into the second game against Columbia feeling energetic, Kristen Leung ’14 said. For the first time in several games, the Bulldogs took an early lead and turned the tables on the Lions.

We need to always come our hard in the beginning and not wait for the game to progress before we put some runs on the board. RILEY HUGHES Infielder, softball

PATRICK HULCE/ DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Chelsey Dunham ’14 pitched a complete game against Columbia and struck out five batters for Yale’s only win of the weekend.

Jennifer Ong ’13 started the first inning with a single and made it around the bases with a sacrifice bunt and fly from Balta and Nelson respectively. The Lions responded with a run in the bottom of the first, but the Elis scored two in the second and one more in the fourth to bring the score to 4–1. A lastminute push by Columbia was not enough to grab the win, and Yale finished with a one-run lead. “It was a total team effort in our wins and losses. As a group, we were good when we were good and bad when we were bad,” catcher Chelsea Janes ’12 said. (Janes is a staff columnist for the News.) SEE SOFTBALL PAGE B2

Michigan, Ohio State outrace Elis

CAROL HSIN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s crew team struggled against high-caliber competition in Ohio over the weekend, losing to No. 3 Michigan and No. 10 Ohio State. BY MARIA GUARDADO STAFF REPORTER

together and find a combination that works moving forward.”

On Saturday, Yale women’s crew faced off against two other top 10 teams in the nation but struggled to keep up with the competition. The No. 9 Elis were edged by both No. 3 University of Michigan and No. 10 Ohio State on the Scioto River at Griggs Reservoir in Columbus, Ohio.

I think...we have a big challenge before us to see if we can pull things together and find a combination that works moving forward.

WOMEN’S CREW The Buckeyes took all five races against the Bulldogs, while the Wolverines captured four out of five races in the second matchup. The Elis’ lone win came in the varsity four race against Michigan. They were the first losses for the Yale team this spring, as the team had opened the season by sweeping Ivy League rivals Columbia and Penn last weekend. “This weekend we had the worst losses our program has had since 2006,” head coach Will Porter said. “I think as a program we have a big challenge before us to see if we can pull things

WILL PORTER Head coach, women’s crew Because the competition was structured as a double dual meet, each crew raced twice, first against Ohio State and then against Michigan. Porter said the format is much more common on the West Coast and in the Midwest than in the Northeast but added that the structure did not change the way boats approached races. The Buckeyes were not unfamiliar foes for SEE WOMEN’S CREW PAGE B3


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