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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 75 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY RAINY

36 48

CROSS CAMPUS

WINTRY WEATHER STORM COATS CAMPUS IN WHITE

ABORTION

M. BASKETBALL

M. SQUASH

Pro-life Yalies join thousands in D.C. for Roe v. Wade anniversary

MANGANO DOUBLEDOUBLE PROPELS YALE TO WIN

Days after historic triumph, Elis romp to pair of weekend wins

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 NEWS

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE B4 SPORTS

Focus returns to Hendrie

I know it’s today. Student

leaders who attend next week’s leadership training sessions will be entered into a raffle to win a $100 gift card for their organization, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Melanie Boyd ’90 said in a Friday email. Training sessions will be held today through Wednesday; registered groups who fail to send representatives will lose their registered status, with all its privileges.

SPENDING OUTPACES REVENUE GROWTH, LIKELY FORCING ADDITIONAL CUTS

He’s getting bolder. New Haven’s favorite anonymous graffiti artist, Believe in People, went to work this weekend in Room 211 of Linsly-Chittenden Hall. By Sunday morning he had produced an image on the room’s back wall of a young person struggling with his decision to pursue a career in finance. The young man in the image has repeatedly written that he will only work in finance for one year. Seven lines in, the writer changes his tone, and says he will only work finance for two years.

BY GAVAN GIDEON STAFF REPORTER While Yale has largely addressed the $350 million budget gap caused by the onset of the recession, Provost Peter Salovey said Sunday that the University still lacks a “long-term” plan to achieve sustainable finances.

We solved most of the $350 million problem caused by the $6.5 billion drop in the value of the endowment.

Woman of the people. Newly-

minted Ward 1 Alderwoman Sarah Eidelson ’12 was spotted this weekend mingling with the people at various New Haven eateries. She enjoyed brunch at Patricia’s on Saturday and a Sunday night meal at Atticus.

Reno recruits. Yale’s new head football coach Tony Reno has already started building his team — and some of his first picks for assistant coaches come from Cambridge. Harvard football players received an email informing them that Reno had hired three coaches — Joe Conlin, Dwayne Wilmot and Kris Barber — from the Harvard staff. Could have been. Joe

Paterno, the longtime head football coach of the Penn State Nittany Lions and the winningest in its history, died on Sunday at the age of 85. According to an obituary published in The New York Times, Paterno was offered a job as head coach of Yale’s football team in 1964, but turned it down to stay at Penn State. He became the Nittany Lions’ head coach two years later, and would go on to win 409 games in 46 years.

Crossing party lines. In a step away from their usual “Progressive Pong,” the Yale College Democrats faced off with various campus conservatives on Friday in a game of “Partisan Pong,” bringing the parties together. She’s ours. In honor of the

most important infant in the world, the Yale College Council will hold a baby shower for Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s newborn girl, Blue Ivy Carter, this Wednesday at Box 63.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1940 President Franklin Roosevelt nominates Dean Acheson 1915, a member of the Yale Corporation, assistant secretary of state. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Budget deficit foreseen

PETER SALOVEY University Provost

tice spaces and offices for undergraduate musical organizations, along with the School of Music’s brass, percussion and opera departments — one of their main goals. University President Richard Levin said Thursday that the project has raised more than half of its needed funds and that he is optimistic about future donations. Blocker said the project is critical to expanding Yale’s music programs at both

Though Yale has seen acrossthe-board budget cuts every year since the recession hit in 2008, Salovey told the News in September that he thought University units would only need to sustain their latest reductions and would “not likely need to make new cuts” in the near future. But Salovey and University President Richard Levin announced in a Wednesday memo to faculty and staff that a disparity between growth in expected spending and revenue will require “targeted reductions” to close a projected $67 million deficit in the 2012’13 budget. “We do not yet have a longterm financial plan in which revenue is projected to grow at

SEE HENDRIE PAGE 6

SEE BUDGET PAGE 6

YALE OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT

Plans for the renovation of the Music School’s Hendrie Hall include a four-story expansion of the current structure.

ADIMINISTRATORS’ ATTENTION BACK ON $45 MILLION PROJECT STALLED DURING ECONOMIC RECESSION BY TAPLEY STEPHENSON STAFF REPORTER A $5 million donation to the University in December for the expansion and renovation of Hendrie Hall will enable the project to resume soon, Vice President for Development Inge Reichenbach said.

As administrators reevaluate their fundraising objectives in the wake of the five-year Yale Tomorrow campaign, which concluded June 30, 2011, Yale College Dean Mary Miller and Yale School of Music Dean Robert Blocker have declared the $45 million renovation of Hendrie — which houses prac-

Medical school seeks volunteers BY MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS STAFF REPORTER The Yale School of Medicine is launching a campaign today to attract more clinical research volunteers. The Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI), created in January 2006 specifically for the purpose of supporting research and training across Yale’s medical campus, is formally beginning a “community-based research and engagement program” to increase the number of volunteers for clinical studies. The campaign — the largest that the YCCI has ever organized — aims to reach New Haven residents and Yalies alike through a new website and by reaching out to community organizations. “I’m excited about the potential of this initiative to bring researchers together with the community in a meaningful way,” said Margaret Grey, dean of the Yale School of Nursing and the YCCI’s director of community-based research and engagement. As part of the program’s launch, the YCCI has set up a booth at Woolsey Hall SEE YCCI PAGE4

V I R T UA L E D U CAT I O N

Open Yale seeks stability BY MADELINE BUXTON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Well before last semester’s course evaluations rolled in, Yale history professor John Merriman had already received a rave review. In early October, he opened an email that had been sent from the outskirts of Lahore, Pakistan: “You would be delighted to learn that at 5:00 pm, June 11, 2011, the first lecture of your Yale Open course ‘European Civilization 1648-1948’ was shown to the least privileged, but clearly the most motivated, students from suburban Lahore. [The students] could have never dreamt of acquiring Yale education but now they are learning about Enlightenment, French Revolution, etc.” Since Open Yale Courses began in 2006, Yale has released 994 individual class sessions to the online world and OYC has become one of the most frequently visited Yale websites, project director and art history professor Diana Kleiner said in an interview last fall. Although the program serves as a marketing tool for the University, Yale does not fund OYC. While

online course programs at both the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford are financially supported — at least in part — by their respective administrations, Kleiner said the initiative at Yale has survived on three consecutive $4 million grants from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The most recent grant, which lasts through the end of this year, will be the last that OYC receives from the foundation. The program has yet to find long-term funding, given that the Hewlett grant supports startups, rather than programs in perpetuity, Kleiner said. Kathy Schoonmaker, director of business operations for the Provost’s Office, said that the administration has refrained from providing funding previously because Kleiner had already secured grants independently. Kleiner said she plans to continue conversations with administrators about the potential for University funding this year. “It has always been that we have to find a way to sustain this over time,” Kleiner said. “Will the University be willing to support this in some way? I would hope that it

YALE

Will the University be willing to support this in some way? I would hope that it will. DIANA KLEINER PROJECT DIRECTOR, OPEN YALE COURSES

will.” OYC most recently announced a plan to sell printed books modSEE OPEN YALE PAGE 4


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Freedom of speech is a moral right, copyright is a legal artifice.” yaledailynews.com/opinion

‘BOOMSLANG’ ON ‘SOPA IS NO APOCALYPSE’

Advisers Paying for our vibrant future should care G U E ST C O LU M N I ST T E O S OA R E S

Y

ou might call it the Great Signature Trek. It’s that time of year when a Yale student searches for offices in buildings he never knew existed looking for a faculty adviser he can barely recognize. After a brief stab at awkward conversation, the student runs out with the adviser’s signature in hand, not to return for another semester. Advising at Yale is like a disappointing one-night stand: quick and emotionless. We would like to believe each student benefits from the guiding hand of a professor who helps shape a holistic path of study. In reality, too many undergraduates pick their classes with little academic support. Yale often assumes that creating institutions solves problems on campus. Case in point: Students file a public Title IX complaint. Next thing you know, we have Community and Consent Educators. Same goes for environmentalism and the Office of Sustainability, or diversity and the peer liaison program. Occasionally, these institutions work. More often, they paper over the underlying issues and let us think we’ve found a solution. Faculty advising is one such broken institution. The administration wants students to make informed decisions about their academic careers. And so we create a position (advisers), a form (your schedule), police everyone to hold all accountable, and we proudly tout our system to prospective applicants. (Preppy-but-peppy tour guide: “Yale faculty are invested in undergraduates, unlike at that school up north.”) But good advising is more than rote paper-pushing. It requires serious mentorship between faculty and students. It goes beyond shallow questions like, “So, what do you want to do post-college? PhD, med or law?” And a good adviser addresses more than just academic requirements — he or she helps students transition into different stages of their lives. Discussing “Should I go into finance?” requires a deeper examination of what is important: money, family, intellectual fulfillment, morality, to name just a few. A pre-med student asking an advisor, “Should I be a history or bio major?” is asking a question about life goals, not just academics. Unfortunately, we can’t mandate mentor-mentee bonds. Sometimes it happens naturally, often because of the faculty member’s personality. What makes a good adviser? Part character, part charm and part genuineness. They leave their office doors open and eat every meal in a dining hall. It just isn’t something you can teach.

They naturally give life advice alongside the academic. Freshman advisers are the NATHANIEL most variin qualZELINSKY able ity. Some college felOn Point lows enthusiastically embrace their role as a gurucum-confidant to young freshmen. They take their group of advisees to pick apples and schedule biweekly check-ins. By the end of the year, these engaged fellows know their students as people, not just schedules to be signed. And those students who experience good advising in the first year know what to look for in future advisers. Sadly, many more college fellows disengage themselves from their mentees early in the process, not providing the comprehensive guidance their students deserve. As a result, most of us accept bad advising as a norm, never knowing that good advising can exist.

FALSE ADVERTISING FOR EMPTY ADVISING It seems tempting to burden Yale students with some of the blame here. After all, if students want to talk to a professor, they can go to office hours. But people who need advice sometimes don’t know it. And even if want to seek help, it’s awkward to approach someone who barely knows you for the kind of meaningful advice inherent in every academic question. Is there a solution to the advising dilemma? Hiring professor who are teachers, not just researchers, might be a good start. Many of the qualities that make good teachers also make good advisers. And pruning the ranks of freshman advisers of the truly detached might guarantee a better experience for clueless frosh. But there likely isn’t an easy panacea. Real steps in advising reform will not be so simple. For now, we can only confront the facts: the current advising system is broken. Until we agree on the reality, we will keep convincing ourselves otherwise, patting our own backs for our supposedly intimate facultystudent relationships. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a junior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu.

W

hen President Levin and Provost Salovey updated the faculty and staff on the University’s financial situation last week, they had some good news — we’ll make it through the 2013 fiscal year without “deep acrossthe-board” cuts — and some bad news: Our piggy bank is still running low. It all began three years ago, when the U.S. economy collapsed spectacularly and took our endowment with it. The 2008-’09 fiscal year left a $350 million gap between our revenues and expenses, prompting a series of austerity measures. In the years since, we fired some people, froze some salaries and gradually chipped away at the deficit. But we’re still lagging behind. According to projections, Yale’s deficit will extend into the 2013 fiscal year. In this context, last week’s email from President Levin and Provost Salovey warned staff and faculty that the future will be “challenging,” and “targeted reductions” will be necessary. And, though a balanced budget may address the issue in the short term, the memo cautioned that merely balancing the books won’t be enough “to secure a vibrant future for Yale.” That is bad. It means that, if we don’t find a long-term solu-

tion to the budget problem, Yale may be unable to afford all the things we’ve grown accustomed to: fairly-traded foods at the dining halls, Master’s Teas with the almost-famous and the sort-offamous, and Yale Police’s walking escort service, 2-Walk. Such a fate must be avoided. But how can we bridge Yale’s budget deficit? The first option is to cut costs. In the 2010-’11 fiscal year, Yale’s operating expanses added up to $2.7 billion. Salaries and wages accounted for 46 percent of that sum, or $1.2 billion. Add in employee benefits, and we’re sitting at $1.6 billion. That’s a whopping 63 percent of our expenses. Granted, the University employs a lot of people: between faculty, postdoctoral associates, administrative staff and unionized service personnel, 13,217 people claim Yale University as their employer. But that’s where things get tricky: If all University employees — from President Levin to the janitor who cleans his office — were paid equally, individual compensation would be $90,792 in wages alone; factor in employee benefits, and we’re talking about $123,629. My math may be suspect, but that, I think, is a lot of money. With that in mind, the most obvious strategy would be to cut wages. However, as econ majors

will tell you, wages are sticky: because of expectations, contracts and other things, wage levels are as movable as the Great Pyramid of Giza. To tighten our collective wallet, then, we’ll have to look elsewhere. The bathroom might be a good place to start. In 2010-’11, utilities — water, electricity, etc. — accounted for 2 percent of our operating expenses, or $54 million. In an effort to reduce costs, we should implement a showerrationing system: seven showers per week in warm months, four when the winter sets in. Extra showers will be allotted to in-season athletes and other key student groups. That, however, won’t be enough. “Other operating expenditures,” a nebulous category that includes “services, materials and supplies, and other expenses” cost us some $594 million in 2010-’11, or 22 percent of our operating expanses. Toilet paper, I believe, falls under this category. To reduce costs, we should shift away from the twoply rolls found at most Yale bathrooms and supplant them with the single-ply stuff. According to some rough calculations, the sandpaper-like stuff will save us $1.1 million per year. But cost-cutting alone won’t cut it. Efforts should also be made to raise revenue. In the 2011, the

Yale University Press generated a measly $32.2 million in revenue. Though its mission to aid in the “discovery and dissemination of light and truth” is admirable, the Press should also keep an eye on the demands of today’s readership. Thus, in order to increase its profitability, the Press should make immediate plans to acquire rights to a vampire book of some sort. More money can also come from students. Net student income — room and board, tuition and fees — accounted for $240.5 million in 2010-’11, or 8.6 percent of our operating revenue. That’s pretty good, but we can do better. Raising tuition is bad PR, so we should focus on some of the less-visible fees. Laundry revenue, for example, could be doubled by raising the per-load price from $1.25 to $2.50. Similarly, a 15-cent price hike on black-and-white prints could double the revenue of our copy machines. Neither the austerity measures nor the revenue-raising initiatives described above will meet universal approval. But they’re necessary. After all, our vibrant future hangs in the balance. TEO SOARES is a junior in Silliman College. Contact him at teo.soares@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST XIUYI ZHENG

Homecoming on the lunar new year W

hat does the Lunar New Year mean to me? Is it the 20-course meals, featuring delicacies procured and prepared weeks in advance, the inordinate piles of food of every kind? Is it the pocket money that came in crisp, brand new 100yuan bills, tucked into exquisitely designed red envelopes, that lay under my pillow, waiting to be opened? Is it the sound of firecrackers that permeated deep into the night, the pungent smell of sulfur in the crisp winter air, the quivering of my hand as I lit, with my father’s glowing cigarette, racks of fireworks that would soon dye the sky scarlet with their fiery blossoms? Ask any Chinese student on campus what Lunar New Year is about. They will enthusiastically tell you stories about dumplings, firecrackers, even the laughable annual CCTV Spring Festival Gala. Vietnamese and Korean students will proudly describe to you their own traditions and practices, each precious in unique ways.

Yet even without spring rolls and lanterns, people will still celebrate the Lunar New Year. Traditions are important, but the spirit of the holiday extends far beyond superficial accessories and feasting. Despite the unprecedented abundance of material goods these days, many people of the older generation remark that guo nian (the Chinese phrase for celebrating the New Year) just doesn’t feel quite the same. Perhaps that’s because our preoccupation with appearances has taken away from the spiritual experience. A few years ago on New Year’s Day, my family and I drove to my grandfather’s hometown, a quaint little place in western Zhejiang Province. We went up to a small mountain village where one of my great-aunts lived. After the customary meal, this great-aunt led my grandmother, my father and me on a trek into the mountains. We walked miles across the silent landscape, until on the side of a wooded hill we arrived at the grave of my great-grandfather. My grandmother took out fruits, wine, incense, paper

money and firecrackers from the basket she had around her arm. We laid the food and wine out for the spirit of my great-grandfather to consume. Then the incense was lit, and each of us paid our respects to the deceased, who had passed away long before I was born. My father burned the paper money, used to bribe officials in the underworld, and I lit the firecrackers. After the cackling of the firecrackers ceased, my grandmother waved away the smoke and said to me: “Xiuyi, one day you will have to be in charge of this. You will have to remember where these graves lie, and you will have to come visit them every year. While I’m still alive I can come in your place, but one day you will have to take over, and you mustn’t ever forget.” And I fear precisely because I can forget. As I look out the window into the snow-covered streets of New Haven, I think of my own identity, and I think of my folks back home. This year, just like the last, I will be spending Lunar New Year in a foreign

country thousands of miles away from home. Here I can find easily the same food and the same decorations — I can even watch the CCTV Gala online in real time. Yet something seems missing. Something seems wrong. Every year at the Lunar New Year, people go home. They crowd into trains, hitch rides — one way or another, they go home. There’s food waiting on the table for them, or they bring food to put on the table. There are decorations in the house, or they will come home and make them. The northerners will make dumplings together, and the southern folks will have their rice. They will visit the graves of their ancestors, and give pocket money to their children. They might be poor or rich, old or young, but the spirit of Lunar New Year, the spirit of homecoming, ancestry and inheritance, will live through them with the same persistence and vigor that has existed for thousands of years. XIUYI ZHENG is a sophomore in Davenport College. Contact him at xiuyi.zheng@yale.edu .

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For better or worse, indoctrination? A

few months ago, as this season’s Republican primary candidates began to seek the spotlight, I found that the loonier few had overshadowed some of the more familiar faces. Some of their views and personalities were so wild I was convinced that it didn’t matter whom I voted for as long as I was voting against them. While part of me wanted to regret the loss of productive political discourse, I was mostly happy to watch a seemingly drunk Rick Perry discredit himself at a press conference in New Hampshire. It was this part of me that was quick to dismiss Ron Paul as just another wacko after hearing him claim that “education is not a right.” Even if I wanted to avoid a philosophical debate on the topic, I thought the whole world had been in agreement since the 18th century that government-mandated education was a good thing to have. However, Ron Paul’s repeated arguments against No Child Left Behind and the Department of Education forced me to admit that even if these really were just the ravings of a wacko, my best argument in response to

his criticisms was that, c’mon, obviously the federal government should have a hand in education. Feeling unsatisfied with my response, I decided to look a little more closely into education policy. During this process, I discovered one particularly thoughtprovoking comment made, again, by Ron Paul. In March 2011, he claimed in a speech that the Department of Education wants to “indoctrinate children.” There are three things that I instantly associate with indoctrination: Nazis, “Jesus Camp” and “Brave New World.” I immediately sought to prove to myself why the American public school system was nothing like and infinitely superior to all my instinctive associations. Our schools do not teach Aryan superiority. They do not teach one faith as incontrovertible truth. They certainly do not play us recordings in our sleep, Huxley’s dystopian vision of hypnopedic indoctrination. Content I was right, I knew I had stoutly disproved Ron Paul’s claims: I was indoctrination-free. My peace of mind, unfortunately, was short-lived.

The uncomfortable thought soon popped into my mind that all the value judgments I had made about harmful indoctrination were perhaps colored by my own systematic indoctrination. Hadn’t I always been told that all men are created equal? Hadn’t I always been told that democracy was good? Hadn’t I always been told, long before I arrived at college and began to hear actual debate on the topic, that human rights exist and that they are good? Aghast, I admitted defeat. Ron Paul was right after all. Our educational system was a detestable juggernaut of indoctrination, filling children’s minds without offering them critical analysis. But again, the resolution to my internal debate was brief. I realized moments later that my heart was filled with gratitude for whatever kind soul had decided upon my indoctrination. Children, we all know, are impressionable; someone is going to be indoctrinating them, even if it is indoctrination in the ways of skepticism. So is the idea that our public schools are a “propaganda

machine,” as Paul suggested, such a bad one? I don’t have a problem with all the children in our country being forced to learn and accept that all men are created equal, that democracy is good and maybe even that Church should be separate from State. They will grow to question and to change their minds, but wouldn’t we be starting them off in a good spot? The questions surrounding the organization and accountability of our schools is a complex one, but if we allow the federal government no other role, perhaps letting it decide a set of principles with which to indoctrinate our children is a good idea. Would it really be a disservice to our nation to raise a generation that was steadfastly in favor of equal rights for all? If we could prove it works, I might even support some hypnopedia affirming that all humans have rights, and maybe even that one of them is a right to education. MATT ANTOSZYK is a sophomore in Calhoun College. Contact him at matthew.antoszyk@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS MONDAY, JANUARY 23

1

Approximate number of snow crystals, in septillions, that fall each winter

One septillion equals 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. Individual snowflakes each contain, on average, 1 million snow crystals.

City, Yale address snowfall

2:00 PM Chinese Literature Lecture Series. The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures welcomes Weihong Bao, who will be presenting a lecture titled, “Transparent Shanghai: Cinema, Architecture and a Left-Wing Culture of Glass” as part of the department’s Chinese literature lecture series. Bass Library (110 Wall St.), Room L01. 3:00 PM “Shakespeare at the Yale Rep.” Hosted by the gallery at the Whitney Humanities Center, this exhibit features production photographs and posters from the Rep’s staging of Shakespeare’s dramas. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.). 9:00 PM Sigma Psi Zeta Spring Rush 2012. Meet new people, munch on free food and learn more about Sigma Psi Zeta. This event, part of several during rush week, will feature cake pop making. Learn about Sigma Psi Zeta’s national philanthropy and make cake pops to sell as a fundraiser for the New York Asian Women’s Center. Sigma Psi Zeta Sorority, Inc. is a cultural, social, educational and community service oriented sorority. Sigma Psi Zeta is the first Greek-lettered sorority of its kind to be established on the East Coast and is one of the largest and most distinguished Asian-interest sororities in the nation. Silliman College (505 College St.), Sillikitchen.

Occupiers protest Citizens United BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER Following a march on the city’s federal court building Friday, New Haven’s Occupy protesters may soon receive some affirmation from the Board of Aldermen. Sixty demonstrators assembled outside the U.S. District Court on Church Street a day before the second anniversary of a Supreme Court decision they said gives corporations too much influence over electoral politics. The demonstration was part of a nationwide “Occupy the Courts” protest Friday criticizing the Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which held that corporations and labor unions may make unlimited political campaign donations, and Occupy protesters are demanding a reversal with the support of an aldermanic resolution sponsored by Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04. “This is the most egregious [Supreme Court ruling] since Dred Scott,” declared one of the event speakers who identified herself to the crowd as Jennifer. “I personally do not want Verizon electing my next senator.” With three children in tow at the march, Occupy supporter Billy Bromage said he hopes “Occupy the Courts” brings greater attention to the ruling, which he termed unjust. “This [decision] represents a power grab by corporations,” Bromage said. “The 1 percent is consolidating its political influence.” Although some policemen greeted protestors and a few passing cars honked in support, most pedestrians seemed to pay little attention to the boisterous crowd. Still, the protest received some notice from within City Hall. Hausladen submitted a resolution to the Board of Aldermen on the same day as the protest that denounces the ruling and would demand the Connecticut State Legislature to support a Constitutional amendment that would reverse it. Though Hausladen said he has not received feedback on his resolution from other aldermen, he said he had a “strong response” from residents of his ward. Jorge Perez, Ward 5 alderman and Board president, and Ward 1 Alderwoman Sarah Eidelson ’12 said they have not seen the resolution, but they both added that they do not support the Supreme Court ruling. Daniel Beniak ’11, however, argued in his Percival Wood Clement Prize-winning senior essay that the impact of the Citizens United decision on federal electoral politics has likely been minimal. Citing a history of loopholes in government regulations before the ruling that corporations had successfully exploited to support favored candidates, Beniak said the ruling has not actually enhanced corporate influence over elections. “I don’t really see how it’s

that much of a difference,” Beniak told the News. “The government can’t deliver a one-size-fits-all regulation [to block corporate advocacy].” When it was first delivered, the ruling drew significant criticism, and lower courts have already begun revolting against the 5-4 decision. President Barack Obama said in his 2010 State of the Union address that “the Supreme Court reversed a century of law that I believe will open the floodgates for special interests, including foreign corporations, to spend without limit in our elections.” Fifty city councils, including New York and Los Angeles, already support a constitutional amendment that would overturn the ruling, and the Montana Supreme Court and the U.S. Second Court of Appeals have already made contrary rulings, according to U.S. Politics Today. Fifty-four percent of U.S. voters have heard of the Supreme Court ruling, of which 65 percent believe it has been detrimental, according to a poll earlier this month by the Pew Research Center.

The 1 percent is consolidating its political influence. BILLY BROMAGE Occupy supporter De s p i te H a u s l a d e n ’s response to Friday’s protest, New Haven’s Occupy movement is facing new challenges as winter settles in. The movement remains reliant on donations that are currently insufficient, and the protestors still need more blankets, sleeping bags, clothing, hot food and water, said Occupy protester Roger Card. Card said 20 to 30 protestors remain from the several hundred occupiers who arrived on its first day, Oct. 15. At the group’s general assembly on Friday, Card suggested that the group was not completely unified. “It could be a bit better. I get a little discouraged at times.” Sanders said he wants to concentrate on making sure the camp lasts through the winter, and anticipates renewed activism and support in the spring. Despite the group’s troubles, Bromage said he believes Occupy remains a “really powerful movement,” with a huge Internet presence and many sympathizers backing its less substantial physical presence. As of early January, city officials estimated that the city has spent over $60,000 since October in overtime compensation for police officers ensuring the safety of the Occupy encampent on the New Haven Green. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .

VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

University and New Haven officials said that efforts to clean up pathways and roads after Saturday’s snowfall were going smoothly. BY DIANA LI STAFF REPORTER The University and city have been busy cleaning up streets and walkways after Saturday saw the first major snowfall of the year. The snow, which totaled roughly 8 inches and fell for about 14 hours beginning early Saturday morning, posed few significant problems for the Elm City. To aid the city’s cleaning efforts, which began Saturday morning, Mayor John DeStefano Jr. declared a snow emergency. A parking ban went into effect downtown from 2 a.m. to 6 a.m. Sunday to allow the Department of Public Works to clear city streets. “We had our plows out and we had a couple of contract crews out as we’ve been doing the last couple of years,” New Haven’s chief administrative officer Robert

Smuts ’01 said. Smuts added that the city was prepared to deal with the snowstorm, and said that the storm “wasn’t particularly large.”

We had our plows out and we had a couple of contract crews out as we’ve been doing the last couple of years. ROBERT SMUTS ’01 Chief administrative officer, New Haven Within the University, cleaning crews were also busy clearing paths on campus of snow. When

asked about Yale’s response to the snowfall, Deputy Secretary for the University Martha Highsmith said Sunday morning that the University was handling the snowstorm without any problems. “Everything has been business as usual,” she said. The University’s emergency management website reported no closings of facilities or services and the Yale Shuttle remained operational on its weekend schedule through Saturday and Sunday. Meanwhile, students enjoyed the first snowfall of the academic year since last October. The Freshman Class Council sent out an email Saturday afternoon announcing a snowball fight on Old Campus later on Saturday at midnight. According to Issey Norman-Ross ’15, at around 12:20 a.m., about 300 people were spread out

on Old Campus. This weekend marked the first significant experience of snow for some freshmen, including Laura Munoz ’15, who lives in California’s Orange County. “I didn’t expect the snow to get so mushy,” Munoz said. “Besides last October, I’d only seen snow on TV, and you don’t see any of the cold or the snow flying into your face and hurting.” At this time last year, the campus saw an 18-inch snowstorm during which the University was similarly able to keep major services up and running. Administrators admitted, however, that they had taken too long to send an alert to students about the status of the University’s cleanup operations. Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu .

New course draws high-profile guest lecturers BY CHRISTOPHER PEAK CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Political science professor Jacob Hacker GRD ’00 is listed as the instructor for “Gateway to American Public Policy,” but by the end of the semester, he will have delivered only four of the lectures. The course — which will include lectures from former U.S. Sen. Chris Dodd, Democratic political strategist Stanley Greenberg and New York Times columnist Bob Herbert — is the latest to feature a series of visiting lecturers instead of a single professor. Hacker said he modeled this spring’s course after “Gateway to Global Affairs,” first offered by the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs in fall 2010. Administrators acknowledged that the unconventional format, which is also used by several science courses, sometimes sacrifices continuity, but they said it gives students valuable exposure to experts in a variety of fields. “The main benefit is that students get a relatively unmediated view of what makes public policymakers tick — what drives them, how they think about complex issues and how they do the analysis necessary to make tough decisions,” Hacker, who directs Yale’s Institution for Social and Policy Studies, said of his course. Hacker said he gave the first three lectures to provide context for the rest of the course, and

he will deliver the final lecture to review the topics covered. He has discussed themes of the course with the instructors, Hacker said, and he plans to film the guests and share the videos with subsequent lecturers. He added that lectures by experts provide insight into policy making processes that academic sources often struggle to convey. Lecturers for “Gateway to Global Affairs” have included retired four-star Gen. Stanley McChrystal, former New York Times reporter Sheryl WuDunn, former CIA director James Woolsey and Richard Goldstone, United Nations chief prosecutor for the Bosnian and Rwandan war crimes trials. “There is a real advantage to hearing about energy policy and national security from the former director of the CIA or having a set of classes on the war in Afghanistan run by the general who oversaw the war there,” said Jim Levinsohn, director of the Jackson Institute and instructor of “Gateway to Global Affairs.” Seven students interviewed who are currently enrolled in Hacker’s course said they are excited to engage with wellknown policy experts, but three of four students who have already taken “Gateway to Global Affairs” said while the visiting lecturers have much practical experience, they often struggle to deliver engaging lectures and build on previous material.

Gavin Schiffres ’15, who is taking “Gateway to American Public Policy,” said he was drawn to the visiting lecturer system because of the complexity of public policy issues. Nate Janis ’15 and Hamp Watson ’12, political science majors who are also taking Hacker’s course, said they enrolled for the opportunity to directly question the guest lecturers, who may not have had their ideas challenged by students.

There is a real advantage to … having a set of classes on the war in Afghanistan run by the general who oversaw the war there. JIM LEVINSOHN Director, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs “You don’t normally get to engage with the people you learn about,” Janis said. But some students who took “Gateway to Global Affairs” said while the lecturers are experts in their field, many of them lack strong teaching skills. Arvind Mohan ’14 said many of lectures in the fall 2010 course were “dry,” but he thought that the class had the potential to

succeed if professors selected the right guests. Margaret Zhang ’14, who took Levinsohn’s class in 2010, said the best lectures were given by guests who were already professors, and other lecturers struggled to clearly communicate their ideas, she said. Directed Studies, a yearlong freshman humanities program, is based on a similar model of lectures by experts in the field, but it draws only from Yale professors. “Yale has extraordinary resources among those teaching and lecturing in D.S., and where the humanities are concerned, there is no need to seek outside help,” said Howard Bloch, director of Directed Studies. “Every instructor attends every lecture, and the lectures, which develop as a coherent sequential conversation over the course of the semester and the year, are among the most meaningful students will encounter in their undergraduate days.” Jane Levin, director of undergraduate studies for Directed Studies, added that the involvement of Yale professors in survey courses allows students to discover teachers whose courses they wish to take in the future. “Gateway to American Public Policy” currently has 121 students enrolled, according to Course Demand Statistics. Contact CHRISTOPHER PEAK at christopher.peak@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

The Monty Hall problem

A game show contestant is told to pick one of three doors. Two of the doors have goats behind them and one of the doors has a car behind it. The contestant picks a door, and the host opens a different door, which has a goat behind it. Should the contestant now have the host open the originally chosen door, or the third door? (Answer: the third door.)

OYC looks to the future

Med school to lure study participants YCCI FROM PAGE 1

PA U L F R Y

K E L LY BROWNELL

STEVEN SMITH

OPEN YALE COURSE

ENGL 300 - Introduction to Theory of Literature, originally taught Spring 2009

DEPARTMENTS

Psychology, Epidemiology and Public Health. Director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity OPEN YALE COURSE

“Semiotics and Structuralism”

PSYC 123 - The Psychology, Biology and Politics of Food, originally taught fall 2008

“The Postmodern Psyche”

SELECTED LECTURES

SELECTED LECTURES

“The Political Unconscious” “The End of Theory?; NeoPragmatism” “Reflections; Who Doesn’t Hate Theory Now?”

OPEN YALE FROM PAGE 1 eled after the online programs — otherwise offered for free — this spring, but with the initiative fast approaching the end of its final grant, the program is determining how to find longterm funding that will allow it to continue in competition with other online initiatives. University President Richard Levin said the program is “not going to stop,” but added that its format may change.

LAUNCH AND RELAUNCH

Inside the Yale Broadcast & Media Center at 135 College St., Senior Producer and Post Production Manager Doug Forbush scrolls through recently edited video clips from OYC lectures. One of two technicians that OYC pays for the video editing, Forbush said he cleans up the video feed that is brought back to the studio. Editing video for a course requires anywhere from half a day to an entire month, he said. For Yale, each course costs between $30,000 and $45,000 to produce, with most of the money going toward videography. At MIT — whose online program, OpenCourseWare, is partially funded by the university’s provost — each course that has video lectures can cost, in total, up to $30,000, a price tag that covers site maintenance and intellectual property rights. “I think this is a real statement about the value that the provost sees internally to MIT for having done OpenCourseWare,” Stephen Carson, MIT’s external affairs director, said. The MIT provost’s office provides a $1.3 million budget annually. The other half of the program’s funding comes from a combination of donors, advertising links and grants. Since 2010, OYC has been funded largely by its third and final $4 million grant from the Hewlett Foundation that was intended to last for two years. As the program seeks to replace that funding, officials are exploring new options. Last December a “donate” button was added to the OYC website. Levin said he is also interested in exploring the potential of offering the courses for credit — as he said Yale Summer Session piloted last summer — before creating additional free

DEPARTMENT

Religious Studies

DEPARTMENT

English

DALE MARTIN

“Food Then, Food Now: Modern Food Conditions and Their Mismatch with Evolution” “Hunger in the World of Plenty” “Schools and Nutrition: Where Health and Politics Collide”

programming. “It’s hugely expensive, and we were fortunate to get outside support for it,” Levin said. “Most people who do this are generating revenue somehow from the online education. We were not generating revenue, but we wanted to demonstrate the high quality of what we could put out there.” Kleiner attributes OYC’s lack of administrative funding in part to the fact that the University still views OYC as an experiment, especially given that Yale already funded a previously unsuccessful online endeavor. In 2001, Kleiner began a collaborative effort with Stanford and Oxford called the Alliance for Lifelong Learning, or AllLearn. Each of the three universities offered content exclusive to the web. The Yale administration provided funding for the experiment, which also charged viewers a small fee for its material. AllLearn charges ranged from $99 to $300 per course, depending on the durations of the tutorials. Although Yale initially marketed AllLearn to alumni and later the general public, there was not enough interest to support the program. “We didn’t go into it to make money,” Kleiner said, “We went into it to see if we could be self-sustaining.” But when the former program never reached that level, she said, the University closed the initiative in 2006.

GOING TO PRESS

Before launching a second attempt at reaching a broad online audience, Kleiner said she needed to evaluate the missteps of AllLearn’s content and brainstorm what kind of model going forward would deserve external or University funding. She did not want to return to charging viewers for the material. While Yale was busy with AllLearn, MIT had embarked on an Internet project of its own. Its intention, according to Carson, is to publish as much material from as many courses as possible, including syllabi and practice problems with answers. After MIT’s success in attracting both prospective students and viewers across a wide age range, Kleiner decided to relaunch an online learning initiative at Yale, Open Yale

DEPARTMENT

Political Science OPEN YALE COURSE

PLSC 114 - Introduction to Political Philosophy, originally taught Fall 2006 Smith said he sees the upcoming publishing of his OYC book as an opportunity for both himself and the program to reach a wider audience. “This is a different kind of book,” Smith said. “It’s not a strictly scholarly book. It grows out of lectures to students and even though I’m revising it, I very much want to maintain the somewhat conversationalist tone of the lectures.”

Courses. “I think all of us are watching each other. I think every one of these projects is very distinctive to every university, its own culture,” Kleiner said, “but I think we definitely pay attention to what each other is doing.” Other schools have looked to decrease the gap between the classroom experience and the online experience, but OYC’s most recent financial support has steered its content from the online format to print. Three books, based on transcripts of the online courses, will be published this spring, followed by another four next fall.

We didn’t go into it to make money. We went into it to see if we could be self-sustaining. DIANA KLEINER Director, Open Yale Courses Just as Kleiner’s decision to begin OYC started as an experiment, so too are the books. Funded by the Yale University Press, Kleiner said that the books are one potential source of increasing both revenue and audience. Still, she acknowledges that it is unlikely that the collaboration will be substantially profitable, since most of the proceeds will go to the Yale University Press, with a small amount going toward OYC. Kleiner believes that there will be an audience interested in the print versions but added that some individuals may be deterred from purchasing the books because the transcripts are already available for free on the web.

LOOKING AHEAD

As OYC continues to move toward a more sustainable financial model, Levin did express interest in creating interactive material that further supports the recorded lectures, including online discussion forums and problem sets. Yale’s previous partner in the AllLearn project, Stanford, has already taken this approach. Every week last semester, approximately 50,000 people

OPEN YALE COURSE

RLST 152 - Introduction to New Testament History and Literature, originally taught Spring 2009 Martin said he has watched enrollment in his course decline from 100 students to 35 since it went online in 2009. “You know how the Yale culture is,” Martin said. “Yale students always want to take a lot of courses and I think sometimes they think, ‘Oh, that’s online, I’m not going to waste one of my course slots here.’ Of course, they’re never going to go watch it online.”

learned about artificial intelligence from Stanford instructors and Google researchers Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig. Apart from a short introductory lecture, students rarely saw their professors. Instead, they watched as pens glided across the screen and heard the instructors’ voices explaining the science behind backgammon or the probability of the Monty Hall problem, a puzzle based on the American game show “Let’s Make a Deal.” In an attempt to replicate the twice-weekly AI class held at Stanford for a global audience, the two professors spent 10 to 15 hours a week recording brief video segments — about one or two minutes long — for the online course. Stanford offered a certificate of achievement for course completion. Levin too expressed interest in providing ways to recognize completion of the courses, such as offering certificates or course credits. He added that granting credit for Yale’s courses have the potential of being self-financing. The success of the interactive Stanford program, as indicated by the surprisingly large enrollment and the “positive feedback” that Norvig said he received, was enabled by the university’s support. “We told the university this is what we’re going to do, and mostly they were supportive,” Norvig said. “Some universities are a multi-headed beast and some of those heads were worried that we don’t do things like this.” While Thrun and Norvig’s artificial intelligence course has attracted far more interest than either professor anticipated, their goals for the future include creating an even more classroom-like feel through a Stanford-sponsored discussion forum. They are also hoping to test how widely applicable their interactive platform is in other fields of study. Kleiner says that OYC is testing out “new approaches” to its online content, but she declined to comment further on specifics. Thirty-five courses are currently offered through OYC. Contact MADELINE BUXTON at madeline.buxton@yale.edu .

r e c y c l e yourydndaily

and at Yale-New Haven Hospital where people can sign up to volunteer. In the past, researchers advertised their trials independently, using fliers to attract volunteers. Under the new program, all the volunteer requests will be accessible at one location online. Volunteers for clinical trials are crucial to progress in medical research, said Tesheia Johnson, YCCI’s chief operations officer. But, she said, recruiting them is one of the most challenging aspects of clinical research, not only at Yale but throughout the medical research community as a whole. “We’re trying to create a sense of community around our clinical research activities by letting volunteers know how much Yale has to offer and making it easy and convenient for them to get involved,” Johnson said. On the new website, volunteers can build a profile, search for the types of research programs in which they wish to participate and receive notifications whenever opportunities to participate in clinical trials arise. The second main feature of the campaign involves enlisting the help of local organizations, like Junta for Progressive Action, an immigrant advocacy nonprofit, and the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, as ambassadors for clinical research programs. Johnson said the YCCI hopes that this strategy will increase the number of volunteers from minority communities, which is currently smaller than desired.

People don’t usually know that clinical research does not mean using people as guinea pigs. LAURIE FELDMAN Project manager, Yale School of Medicine Laurie Feldman, study coordinator and the project manager for Type 1 diabetes studies at the School of Medicine, commended the YCCI’s campaign. She added that misconceptions about randomization and placebo trials, among other research techniques, tend to make potential volunteers wary about participating in clinical research. “People don’t usually know that clinical research does not mean using people as guinea pigs,” said Feldman. Johnson added that another common misconception is that volunteers have to be sick to receive trial medication, but that there are actually several research programs that require healthy volunteers. The website will include a feature debunking these myths, Feldman said. Twelve of 20 students interviewed said that they would be willing to participate in clinical research, and some added that they would be more likely to participate if a monetary incentive were offered. According to the Boston-based Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation, surveys show that even though 94 percent of the public recognizes that participation in clinical research is very important for advancing medical science, 74 percent say they have no real knowledge of the clinical research process. Contact MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS at mariana.lopez-rosas@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“It amazes me how people are often more willing to act based on little or no data than to use data that is a challenge to assemble.” ROBERT SHILLER PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS, YALE UNIVERSITY

Yalies join abortion protesters in D.C. BY CHRISTOPHER PEAK CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Over two dozen Yalies will march in Washington, D.C. today along with thousands of pro-life supporters in protest of the landmark Roe v. Wade decision which ruled that the Constitution protects abortion rights. As part of the 39th annual March for Life, 15 undergraduate members of Choose Life at Yale and 11 members of the Yale Divinity School’s Right to Life Fellowship (YDSRLF) will march from the National Mall to the steps of the Supreme Court in an event that has drawn over 200,000 people in past years. Students attending the march said the annual event, which falls on the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision, re-energizes them to promote their pro-life views, which are not widely held on Yale’s campus. “It’s an uphill battle when you’re a smaller group and you’re unpopular on campus,” Eduardo Andino ’13, CLAY president, said. “When you have a conscience that tells you that you’re fighting for something as precious as human life, it makes it much easier to continue.” Notable speakers at the event include Speaker of the House John Boehner, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and Allan Parker, lead legal counsel for “Jane Roe” of Roe v. Wade. Attendees interviewed said the march presents an opportunity to connect with other young people who share their views. The CLAY members will march with students from Harvard, Princeton and Columbia. Josh McCormick DIV ’12, a member of YDSRLF, said the fact that only a small portion of Yale’s student body opposes abortion drives him to actively voice his stance. Still, he said engaging with students who oppose his view actu-

ally helps him to better understand his own position. “Knowing that there’s people … who disagree with you is important,” he said. “Sitting down and talking with those people is an important part of answering the question of abortion for oneself.”

CA M P U S EVENTS ON ABORTION TRUST WOMEN WEEK

The event began last Friday and is sponsored by Seminarians for Reproductive Justice. The main event is called “All Options Clergy Counseling,” which trains 18 seminarians to bring pastoral approaches to the decision of choosing between adoption, abortion and parenting.

It’s an uphill battle when you’re a smaller group and you’re unpopular on campus. EDUARDO ANDINO ’13 President, Choose Life at Yale Some students interviewed who attended the march said they expect Roe v. Wade to be overturned eventually, though they said it would take time. Not every member in pro-life groups on campus agreed with the march’s message. Eric Gregory DIV ’13, former vice president of YDSRLF, disagreed with the movement’s stance that abortions are unwarranted in all circumstances. “I am associated with the group, but I do not seek to overturn Roe v. Wade, as I understand the necessity of terminating some pregnancies,” Gregory said. As the students journey to Washington, D.C., several student groups are organizing events on campus about the issue, such as a debate sponsored by the Yale Political Union on Tuesday. Zak Newman ’13, president of the Yale College Democrats, said he thinks the issue of abortion is often inappropriately used to achieve political objectives. “Abortion is a rallying point for conservatives at Yale, but it’s not an issue that many liberals are work-

PLANNED PARENTHOOD MOVIE SCREENING

“No Woman, No Cry,” which will be showed on Thursday, is a documentary that follows the efforts of four pregnant women from around the world in their efforts to find maternal healthcare.

PHILIP ELLSWORTH

More than two dozen Yalies will participate in the March for Life today in Washington, D.C. ing on,” Newman said. “The issue’s use as a political tool is disrespectful both to the difficulty of the decision for woman and to the seriousness of other issues like restoring our middle class.” Each of the six students interviewed who are attending the march expressed different reasons why they feel abortion is a issue worth addressing. McCormick said he hopes the march will attract national attention that he said has focused too

much on other movements, such as Occupy Wall Street. But Craig Ford DIV ’12, president and founder of YDSRLF who has attended March for Life six times, said his attendance was motivated by a desire to advocate for his values. “My pro-life stance is grounded in the notion of human dignity, accessible from religious and nonreligious backgrounds,” he said. “The pro-life ethic is a truly human ethic.” Lauren Hoedeman DIV ’13 said

she is attending the March for Life to support women’s rights. “It is imperative to work to build resources for women who are pregnant in difficult situations — for the sake of both woman and baby,” she said. Roe v. Wade, which overturned many state and federal restrictions on abortion, was decided by a 7–2 vote on Jan. 22, 1973.

YALE POLITICAL UNION DEBATE

At 7:30 p.m. in WLH 119, Timothy Goeglein, former special assistant to George W. Bush ’68 and executive for Focus on the Family, will discuss the Roe v. Wade decision. CHOOSE LIFE AT YALE VIGIL

Set to take place some time this spring, the vigil is intended to pay tribute to aborted babies.

Contact CHRISTOPHER PEAK at christopher.peak@yale.edu .

Shiller examines Wall St. in book BY ZEENAT MANSOOR STAFF REPORTER Robert Shiller currently serves as the Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics at Yale University. In his book, “Irrational Exuberance,” published at the height of the dot-com boom in 2000, he predicted the eventual dot-com crash later that year. He co-created the CaseShiller Index with Karl Case, which measures housing market trends and, in the second edition of “Irrational Exuberance” published in 2005, used his research to warn about a possible meltdown in the real estate market. Now, Shiller is about to publish his 10th book, about the role of Wall Street in our society after the 2008 financial crisis. start with your upcomQLet’s ing book. Could you tell us a little bit more about it?

A

It’s an introduction to finance, its morality and how it affects our society. We are basically discussing a culture where wealth is equated with intelligence. If a person is smart, he has to be rich. “Finance and the Good Society” is a commentary on just such a financial culture. Actually the idea stems from one of my classes at Yale, “Financial Markets.” For several years, I have been training future incumbents to take on Wall Street. A recent article in [the] New York Times claimed that [the] overwhelming majority of Ivy League graduates choose finance as a profession. I basically wanted to account for our attitude towards finance and its changing dimension in the wake of Occupy Wall Street.

a recent article in BloomQInberg, it was reported that

U.S. bond market could be in a bubble where the bond prices are not reflecting the true value of these financial products? What is your take on that?

A

I actually don’t think I agree with that. In my book, “Animal Spirits,” I defined a bubble in detail. It is basically a rampant price increase because investors are investing in a product in hopes of a rise in prices. One can define it as a psychological contagion. In that context, our bond prices should drop because of the recent decline in the invest-

ment ratings by [Standard & Poor’s] but they have remained high which shows that the U.S. is a strong investment. I think European debt crises may have led to an increase in the prices because [the] U.S. government is looking very strong relative to others. [The] U.S. remains a solid bet compared to other countries at the moment and it has come to play in the favor of bond market. Unlike Europe, it has never defaulted on its debt, which is actually a source of great American pride. conversations with QIntheyour media, you have been in

the favor of more borrowing by the government. How do you justify the idea of a U.S. government deeper in debt than ever?

A

It is indeed a difficult situation. There is Europe which could go into a doubledip recession, and the U.S. is also going through an economic slump. At a time like this, we really have to focus on creating jobs which could increase our consumption, and there are ample opportunities for government to do that. We have an aging infrastructure which could use some improvement. Look at I-95 and its traffic jams. Expanding that would sure create jobs!

Goldman Sachs’ QRecently fourth-quarter revenue has plunged 58 percent because of a plunge in trading revenues. Do you see a similar trend in the near future where there’s a long hiatus on stock market investment?

A

It’s a tough question, explaining these trends. The 1920s and ’90s were the most enthusiastic market times. But there was a boom in the market from 1932 to 1937 at the peak of Great Depression. I think Americans in general are entrepreneurial by nature. Our spending and investment ideologies are unique which can be hard to predict.

do you mean by QWhat “unique investment ideologies”? Is there a unique microeconomic phenomenon that has a macroeconomic effect on the economy?

YALE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

Yale professor Robert Shiller’s upcoming book examines the role of finance in American society.

A

In our society consumption is encouraged sort of as patriotism. Even in times of war when there’s reasonable incentive to save, U.S. consumption has shown dramatic increase. Governments all over the world encourage their consumers to save, which is not the case with American government. We have even been more forgiving of bankruptcy which carries a more severe stigma elsewhere. I think it may have something to do with our past history because the United States is populated with people seeking adventures. It is touted as a society where you can achieve anything given you have the drive. With this collective risk-seeking behavior, it seems natural to be spending money because in the long run, the demand will provide us with the means to produce more. Historian Sheldon Garon actually wrote a really interesting book [“Beyond Our Means: Why America Spends While the World Saves”] about this phenomenon which could be worth exploring. Contact ZEENAT MANSOOR at zeenat.mansoor@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

14

Further cuts needed BUDGET FROM PAGE 1 a pace that not only covers expenditures for current programs but provides funding for growth in some programs and important new initiatives in other areas,” Salovey wrote in a Sunday email. “Nevertheless, we are much closer to a sustainable budget than we were three years ago, even though the economic climate in which we operate continues to be extremely volatile.” As administrators work with deans, program directors, faculty and staff to trim expenses and locate alternate sources of revenue, Salovey and Levin said the process should avoid University-wide reductions seen in recent years. Salovey clarified in another email Sunday that he believed he was referring to “across-the-board reductions” when he speculated about the possibility of future cuts in September.

We are much closer to a sustainable budget than we were three years ago, even though the economic climate in which we operate contiues to be extremely volatile. PETER SALOVEY University Provost Without changes to anticipated spending and revenue levels, next year’s budget gap would amount to between $60 and $70 million, Salovey said. That expected budget gap does not go away in long-term projections, Salovey said, though he added that it is not unusual to anticipate a deficit in the early stages of the budget-planning process. Planning for the 2012’13 budget will extend into the coming fall. Spending is expected to grow by 6 percent in the coming academic

year, partly driven by the rising costs of utilities and employee health care benefits, according to Wednesday’s memo. But revenue is expected to increase by only 2.6 percent — despite Yale’s strong 21.9 percent return on investments in the most recent fiscal year — because the endowment’s smoothing rule keeps spending relatively consistent on an annual basis. “We solved most of the $350 million problem caused by the $6.5 billion drop in the value of the endowment,” Salovey said in a Wednesday email. “What we are seeing now is a related but separable challenge going forward.” Salovey said it is too soon to tell whether units will be able to draw on University reserves — income set aside in rainy day funds — when planning their annual budgets. Though the funds swelled in the years before the financial crisis, Salovey said they have since been depleted “for the most part.” He added that administrators try not to rely on the reserves to balance budgets, preferring to view them as a “cushion” to soften the impact of economic factors beyond Yale’s control. Salovey, Vice President for Finance and Business Operations Shauna King and Associate Vice President for Business Operations Stephen Murphy met with the heads of all academic and nonacademic units Thursday to begin planning for fiscal year 2013. Yair Minsky, chair of the Mathematics Department, said in a Sunday email that despite “cautious optimism” he knew before Wednesday’s announcement that it was possible University officials would call for additional budget reductions. The department has lost a few staff positions and now shares its business manager with the Statistics Department as a result of cuts in recent years, Minsky said, and its budget does not have room for additional reductions. Individual units are required to propose their own balanced budgets, Salovey said, but discussions surrounding the process rarely require

Number of areas in which instruction is offered at the Yale School of Music.

These include composition, conducting, guitar, harp, hearing, history and theory, music technology, organ, percussion, piano, quartet-in-residence, strings, voice and opera, and winds.

New Hendrie in the works HENDRIE FROM PAGE 1

YALE

Provost Peter Salovey told faculty and staff that “targeted reductions” are needed to balance the budget. units to compete against each other for resources. Instead, administrators consider all major sources of revenue and primary expense categories across the University when devising a budget strategy. As in years past, Salovey said administrators are working to choose budget trimming strategies that have the lowest impact on academics and student life. The coming year’s budget should also leave room for increases in faculty and staff salaries and wages, according to the memo. Administrators allotted approximately $2.8 billion for Universitywide expenses in the 2010-’11 academic year. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu .

GRAPH PROJECTED NEXT-YEAR DEFICITS, IN MILLIONS 350 300 250 200

the undergraduate and professional levels. “Hendrie is no longer functionally sufficient for the sophisticated programs that are housed there,” he said in a Sunday email. “Its condition is an impediment to recruitment of talented students and faculty who bring international attention to the University through their work.” The Hendrie renovation was one of seven major University construction projects frozen in December 2008 after administrators realized the endowment was on track to drop nearly 25 percent in fiscal year 2009. The project was fully designed by Canadian architecture firm Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg and ready to break ground when the recession hit.

Music is so central … in Yale undergraduate life that getting Hendrie renovated is a key part of improving the undergraduate experience. MARY MILLER Yale College Dean Levin said Hendrie was the cheapest of the six projects, which also included the new residential colleges, the Yale University Art Gallery renovation, the new School of Management campus, the new School of Drama building, the new biology building, and additions to the Kline and Sterling Chemistry laboratories. Only work on the Art Gallery and the SOM campus — funded by significant donations — have resumed since then. “We have pulled [Hendrie] back from the back burner and giving it a lot of focus, and our hope is that with this focus, and two deans, we will hopefully find the [fundraising] momentum to finish it up before too long,” Reichenbach said. The renovations will update student practice rooms, faculty studios, student lockers and rehearsal spaces to accommodate

the student organizations that use the building. The project will also include a four-story expansion of Hendrie’s existing structure, adding an orchestra hall, digital recording studio and common room-like areas. An indoor walkway will connect the expansion to the Music School’s Leigh Hall so that students and faculty can transport delicate musical instruments between the two buildings without exposing them to the weather. Tim Gladding ’13, newly elected drum major of the Yale Precision Marching Band, said the building is in dire need of renovations. “Occasionally we’ve had problems with the roof leaking in the past into the band room, and there’s also no handicapped accessibility to the upper floors,” he said. “None of our instruments have been ruined by it, but it’s a problem for woodwind instruments and things that are very water-susceptible.” Gabriel Zucker ’12, a music major and co-head of IGIGI, an organization for undergraduate composers, said that most of his experience in Hendrie has involved “prefab” practice rooms on the fourth floor that could often become hot and sticky due to poor ventilation. He added that extra practice rooms from the renovation and additions would help resolve overcrowding in the current practice rooms, which are split between undergraduate and graduate students. Blocker said the construction will make the building “highly functional” and a “nexus for music at Yale.” Currently, Yale’s music programs are split among Hendrie, Sprague Memorial Hall, Leigh Hall and Woolsey Hall. Miller said the project is also important to undergraduates, given that the Yale Concert Band, Yale Glee Club and Yale Symphony Orchestra are all based in the building. “Music is so central along with other kinds of performance in Yale undergraduate life that getting Hendrie renovated is a key part of improving the undergraduate experience,” she said. Completed in 1900, Hendrie Hall was named in honor of John Hendrie, 1851 GRD 1861, who donated funds for its construction. Contact TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .

S E V E N P R O J E C T S D E L AY E D BY THE RECE SSION

150

NEW CONSTRUCTION

Thirteenth and 14th residential colleges Biology building School of Drama building School of Management campus*

100

RENOVATIONS

Hendrie Hall Kline and Sterling Chemistry Lab Yale University Art Gallery*

50 2008-’09

2009-’10

2010-’11

2011-’12

*Resumed after funded by donations

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

cc.yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

A chance of freezing rain before 8am, then rain. High near 48, low around 40.

THURSDAY

High of 49, low of 29.

High of 46, low of 28.

SMALL TALK BY AMELIA SARGENT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, JANUARY 24 4:30 PM Yale-China Fireside Chat: “The Globalization of Chinese Cuisine.” Yale-China Association presents fireside chats: conversations that consider China’s heart and hinterland. Sidney Cheung, professor and chairperson of the Department of Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, will give the talk. Refreshments will be served. Yale-China Association (442 Tempe St.).

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25 7:00 PM “Fear, Inc.”: A Panel Discussion. “Fear, Inc.,” a 2011 report published by the Center for American Progress, describes the orchestrated propagation of Islamophobia in America by key groups and figures. Panelists will include: professor Muneer Ahmad (Yale Law School), professor Zareena Grewal (American studies) and professor Andrew March (political science). LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), Room 317.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

8:00 PM Wei-Yi Yang, Piano. Ravel’s “Valses nobles et sentimentales,” the composer’s elegant tribute to the waltzes of Vienna, and his enigmatic symbolist collection “Miroirs,” will be played by Yang at this concert, in addition to Schubert’s monumental late “Sonata in A major, D. 959.” Yang’s playing is “untiring, passionate and poetic, … a job to behold,” according to Classics Today. Sprague Hall (470 College St.), Morse Recital Hall.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 3:30 PM Dale Jamieson Talk and Discussion: Animal Ethics. Dale Jamieson, director of environmental studies and professor of philosophy at New York University, will lead this event. Jamieson is a contemporary pioneer of animal ethics. He will be giving a short talk followed by an open discussion. The event will be hosted by the Yale Animal Welfare Alliance and the Yale Philosophy Review. Branford College (74 High St.), Trumbull Room.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit PANCAKES AND BOOZE BY TAKUYA SAWAOKA

To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Max de la Bruyère, Editor in Chief, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE)

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Thumbs-way-up reviews 6 Knocks with one’s knuckles 10 Not feral 14 Low-budget, in company names 15 Happily __ after 16 October birthstone 17 Hexes 20 Dined 21 Twosome 22 Heart chambers 23 Positive thinker’s assertion 25 Cleopatra’s river 27 Surprised party, metaphorically 32 Beelzebub 35 Oboe or bassoon 36 Baled grass 37 “Jurassic Park” terror, for short 38 Meanspiritedness 40 Home plate, e.g. 41 Above, in verse 42 Apple computer 43 Showed on television 44 Destination not yet determined 48 Detest 49 Oscar-winning film about Mozart 53 End of __ 56 Yard sale warning 57 British mil. award 58 Beatles song, and a hint to the hidden word in 17-, 27- and 44Across 62 Opera solo 63 Like a steak with a red center 64 “That is to say ...” 65 Double O Seven 66 “P.U.!” inducer 67 Willy-__: sloppily DOWN 1 Satisfy, as a loan 2 Like most triangle angles 3 Chooses at the polls

CLASSICAL MUSIC 24 Hours a Day. 98.3 FM, and on the web at WMNR.org “Pledges accepted: 1-800345-1812.

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4 USNA grad 5 Slight trace 6 Symbol of financial losses 7 State firmly 8 For each 9 Málaga Mrs. 10 Best-seller list 11 Mimic 12 West African country 13 Jazzy Fitzgerald 18 Indian bread 19 “To your health,” to José 24 Big-screen format 25 Russian rejection 26 “That’s clear now” 28 Angels shortstop Aybar 29 Sear 30 Operate with a beam 31 Kept in view 32 Halt 33 Zone 34 Alaska, once: Abbr. 38 Obscene material 39 Glazier’s fitting 40 Tough spot

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42 Newton or Stern 43 Inundated with 45 Needle’s partner 46 Sadat’s predecessor 47 Leave out 50 ’50s Ford flop 51 Typical 52 Hot-headed Corleone brother in “The Godfather”

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53 Moby Dick chaser 54 Fiddling emperor 55 “__ Brockovich” 56 Flying prefix 59 Gold, in Granada 60 Insane 61 Record label initials across the pond

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T S

NASDAQ 2,786.70, -0.06%

S

S.C. twists GOP race

Dow Jones 12,720.50, +0.76%

Oil $98.10, -0.23%

PAUL SANCYA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY DAVID ESPO ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Newt Gingrich worked to capitalize Sunday on his upset victory in South Carolina’s Republican presidential primary, while Mitt Romney moved quickly to cut his losses before the next contest with a promise to release his income tax returns within 48 hours. Gingrich said in a round of television interviews that his win, both unexpected and unexpectedly large, showed he was the Republican best able to go toe to toe with President Barack Obama in the fall. “I think virtually everybody who looks at the campaign knows I represent the largest amount of change of any candidate, and I think that’s why they see me as representing their interest and their concerns, not representing Wall Street or representing the politicians of Washington,” he said. Romney argued that point, but not another, agreeing in a

television interview that he had made a mistake by refusing to release his tax returns before the South Carolina vote. “If it was a distraction, we want to get back to the real issues in the campaign — leadership, character and vision for America, how to get jobs in America, and how to rein in the excessive scale of the federal government,” he said. The former Massachusetts governor, who made millions in business, said he will make his 2010 return and an estimate for 2011 available online on Tuesday. The decision marked a concession, as if one were needed, that Romney had stumbled on his way through South Carolina, a state where he led handsomely in the polls several days before the primary. Florida votes next, on Jan. 31, a 50-delegate contest in one of the most expensive campaign states in the country, and one that Romney can ill afford to lose. The former governor was an

easy winner in the New Hampshire primary earlier in the month. Before that, he was a close runner-up behind former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum in Iowa caucuses where the vote count was so confused that he was originally announced the victor.

I think virtually everybody who looks at the campaign knows I represent the largest amount of change. NEWT GINGRICH Republican presidential candidate Despite his loss on Saturday, Romney remains the contender with the largest and best-funded organization. “Three states in now, we got 47 more to go,” he said, adding he was looking forward to the rest.

Pot-based med seeks FDA OK BY LISA LEFF ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO — A quartercentury after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first prescription drugs based on the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, additional medicines derived from or inspired by the cannabis plant itself could soon be making their way to pharmacy shelves, according to drug companies, small biotech firms and university scientists. A British company, GW Pharma, is in advanced clinical trials for the world’s first pharmaceutical developed from raw marijuana instead of synthetic equivalents — a mouth spray it hopes to market in the U.S. as a treatment for cancer pain. And it hopes to see FDA approval by the end of 2013. Sativex contains marijuana’s two best known components — delta 9-THC and cannabidiol — and already has been approved in Canada, New Zealand and eight European countries for a different usage, relieving muscle spasms associated with multiple sclerosis. FDA approval would represent an important milestone in the nation’s often uneasy relationship with marijuana, which 16 states and the District of Columbia already allow residents to use legally with doctors’ recommendations. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration categorizes pot as a dangerous drug with no medical value, but the availability of a chemically similar prescription drug could increase pressure on the federal government to revisit its position and encourage other drug companies to follow in GW Pharma’s footsteps. “There is a real disconnect between what the public seems to be demanding and what the states have pushed for and what the market is providing,” said Aron Lichtman, a Virginia Commonwealth University pharmacology professor and president of the International Cannabinoid Research

GW PHARMACEUTICALS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sativex contains marijuana’s two best-known components and already has been approved in Canada, New Zealand and eight European countries. Society. “It seems to me a company with a great deal of vision would say, ‘If there is this demand and need, we could develop a drug that will help people and we will make a lot of money.’”

There is a disconnect between the public and the market. ARON LICHTMAN Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University Possessing marijuana still is illegal in the United Kingdom, but about a decade ago GW Pharma’s founder, Dr. Geoffrey Guy, received permission to grow it to develop a prescription drug. Guy proposed the idea at a scientific conference that heard anecdotal evidence that pot provides relief to multiple sclerosis patients, and the British government welcomed it as a potential way “to draw a clear line between recreational and medicinal use,” company spokesman Mark Rogerson said. In addition to exploring new applications for Sativex, the com-

pany is developing drugs with different cannabis formulations. “We were the first ones to charge forward and a lot of people were watching to see what happened to us,” Rogerson said. “I think we are clearly past that stage.” In 1985, the FDA approved two drug capsules containing synthetic THC, Marinol and Cesamet, to ease side-effects of chemotherapy in cancer patients. The agency eventually allowed Marinol to be prescribed to stimulate the appetites of AIDS patients. The drug’s patent expired last year, and other U.S. companies have been developing formulations that could be administered through dissolving pills, creams and skin patches and perhaps be used for other ailments. Doctors and multiple sclerosis patients are cautiously optimistic about Sativex. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has not endorsed marijuana use by patients, but the organization is sponsoring a study by a University of California, Davis neurologist to determine how smoking marijuana compares to Marinol in addressing painful muscle spasms.

T

10-yr. Bond 2.00%, +0.03%

T Euro $1.29, -0.25%

Gabrielle Giffords to resign BY DAVID ESPO ASSOCIATED PRESS

Newt Gingrich waves to the crowd after speaking during a presidential primary night rally, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2012, in Columbia, S.C.

S S&P 500 1,315.38, +0.07%

WASHINGTON — Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona announced Sunday she intends to resign from Congress this week to concentrate on recovering from wounds suffered in an assassination attempt a little more than a year ago that shook the country. “I don’t remember much from that horrible day, but I will never forget the trust you placed in me to be your voice,” the Democratic lawmaker said on a video posted without prior notice on her Facebook page. “I’m getting better. Every day my spirit is high,” she said. “I have more work to do on my recovery. So to do what’s best for Arizona, I will step down this week.” Giffords was shot in the head and grievously wounded last January as she was meeting with constituents outside a supermarket in Tucson, Ariz. Her progress had seemed remarkable, to the point that she was able to walk dramatically into the House chamber last August to cast a vote. Her shooting prompted an agonizing national debate about supercharged rhetoric in political campaigns, although the man charged in the shooting later turned out to be mentally ill. In Washington, members of Congress were told to pay more attention to their physical security. Legislation was introduced to ban high-capacity ammunition clips, although it never advanced. Under state law, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer must call a special election to fill out the remainder of Giffords’ term, which ends at the end of 2012. President Barack Obama on Sunday called Giffords “the

very best of what public service should be.” “Gabby’s cheerful presence will be missed in Washington,” Obama said. “But she will remain an inspiration to all whose lives she touched — myself included. And I’m confident that we haven’t seen the last of this extraordinary American.” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said he saluted Giffords “for her service and for the courage and perseverance she has shown in the face of tragedy. She will be missed.” In a statement, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California said that “since the tragic events one year ago, Gabby has been an inspiring symbol of determination and courage to millions of Americans.” Democratic officials had held out hope for months that the congresswoman might recover sufficiently to run for re-election or even become a candidate to replace retiring Republican Sen. Jon Kyl. The shooting on Jan. 8, 2011, left six people dead, a federal judge and a Giffords aide among them. Twelve others were wounded. A 23-year-old man, Jared Lee Loughner, has pleaded not guilty to 49 charges in the shooting. He has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and is being forcibly medicated at a Missouri prison facility in an effort by authorities to make him mentally ready for trial. In the months since she was shot, Giffords, 41, has been treated in Houston as well as Arizona as she relearned how to walk and speak. She made a dramatic appearance on the House floor Aug. 2, when she unexpectedly walked in to vote for an increase in the debt limit. Lawmakers from

both parties cheered her presence, and she was enveloped in hugs. More recently, she participated in an observance of the anniversary of the shooting in Arizona. In “Gabby: A Story of Courage and Hope,” a book released last year that she wrote with her husband, the astronaut Mark Kelly, she spoke of how much she wanted to get better, regain what she lost and return to Congress.

Since the tragic events one year ago, Gabby has been an inspiring symbol of determination and courage to millions of Americans. NANCY PELOSI House minority leader She delivers the last chapter in her own voice, saying in a single page of short sentences and phrases that everything she does reminds her of that horrible day and that she was grateful to survive. “I will get stronger. I will return,” she wrote. Giffords was shot in the left side of the brain, the part that controls speech and communication. Kelly commanded the space shuttle Endeavour on its last mission in May. She watched the launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Kelly, who became a NASA astronaut in 1996 and made four trips into space aboard the space shuttle, retired in October.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

“Learning sleeps and snores in libraries, but wisdom is everywhere, wide awake, on tiptoe.” JOSH BILLINGS AMERICAN HUMORIST

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

Harvard libraries plan staff cuts BY JUSTIN WORLAND STAFF WRITER

MATTHEW D MOELLMAN/THE HARVARD CRIMSON

Harvard is reducing the size of its library workforce.

The Harvard University Library system will seek to reduce the size of its workforce as part of an ongoing restructuring process, according to a transcript of remarks made by Harvard University Library Executive Director Helen Shenton at one of three town hall meetings held Thursday. “The new organizational design has not yet been approved, but it is certain that it will be different from the current one,” said Shenton at one of the town hall meetings. “A key change: the Library workforce will be smaller than it is now.” The University is considering both voluntary and involuntary options to reduce the staff size, but would prefer voluntary methods, Shenton said. While Harvard has laid off employees in the past, the University has at times also offered some staff voluntary early retirement packages or waited for attrition to reduce staff. University Librarian Robert C. Darnton ’60 told The Crimson in the fall that the goal of restructuring was increased efficiency. “We are consolidating the libraries in a way that will save money, and that money saved will be plowed back into acquisi-

tions and expanded services,” said Darnton told The Crimson at the time. “It will make the library much stronger.” Prior to Thursday’s meetings, HARVARD rumors and speculation circulated amongst library employees about the implications of the library restructuring. “All of Harvard library staff have just effectively been fired,” read one tweet that circulated on Thursday after the first town hall had begun. Others suggested that the restructuring would require that all library employees reapply to keep their current positions. The University strongly refuted this statement, but recommended that all employees file an Employee Profile “to state job preferences, to articulate skills and to provide a resume.” Still, library officials left many other questions unanswered, according to Director of Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers Bill Jaeger. “There were vague references made to reductions in the size of the staff,” said Jaeger. “Despite persistent questions from the

audience the [library] leaders were not able or willing to provide anything more specific than that.” Though Jaeger said that he does not see the rationale for staff cuts, he recommended that the University employ “more enlightened” voluntary methods if staff is to be reduced.

All of Harvard library staff have just effectively been fired. ONLINE TWEET “Our contract with the University requires union-management consultation when a department is considering [such changes],” said Jaeger. “We’re pretty confident that as this goes forward we’ll continue to hear from them.” The staff reduction comes as part of a larger reorganization of library personnel that will be presented for approval next week to the Library Board, the body overseeing the library’s long-term transition. The Board will then be responsible for presenting the plan to University President Drew G. Faust.

THE DARTMOUTH

T H E C O R N E L L D A I LY S U N

Univ. sees app increase

Frat loses status after hospitalization

BY STEPHANIE MCFEETERS STAFF WRITER Although some institutions, including Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania, have reported a decrease in applications for the Class of 2016, Dartmouth admissions officers estimate a 3 to 3.5 percent increase this year, with a record 23,052 applications processed for early and regular decision applicants combined, according to Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Maria Laskaris. The College intends to accept roughly 2,100 students — approximately 9 percent of applicants — making this “the most selective year we’ve had in terms of the admissions process,” Laskaris said. The applicant pool has grown by approximately 25 percent in the past two years, according to Laskaris. The College has already offered admission to 465 students in the early decision process. Laskaris said admissions officers were impressed by the “unusual strength” of the early decision pool this year, which led them to accept more students than they have in previous years, she said. “By taking a few more in early, we recognized we would put pressure on the regular decision process,” Laskaris said. Admissions officers have already started to consider methods, including alumni-sponsored events and Dimensions of Dartmouth, to compel regular decision students to accept Dartmouth’s offer of admission, she said. The recent return to early action programs by both Harvard University and Princeton University eliminated a portion of Dartmouth’s regular applicant pool, as more students “have already made up their minds” and chosen other institutions, Laskaris

said. The “modest growth” in applications was expected, she said. Several peer institutions DARTMOUTH experienced dramatic changes in the number of applications they received this year. The total number of applications to Columbia University decreased by 8.9 percent, following a record-breaking 33.4-percent increase in applications last year, Jessica Marinaccio, dean of undergraduate admissions at Columbia University, said in an email to The Dartmouth. The University of Pennsylvania saw a 1.7-percent drop in overall applications, according to The Daily Pennsylvanian, while the number of applications to Yale University rose by 5.8 percent, according to the Yale Daily News.

By taking a few more in early, we recognized we would put pressure on the regulardecision process. MARIA LASKARIS Dean of admissions and financial aid, Columbia University Other Ivy League institutions have not yet published application numbers. Stanford University application rates experienced a 7-percent increase, according to The Stanford Daily. Duke University saw a 6-percent increase in applicants, while Northwestern Uni-

versity saw a 3.5-percent increase, according to the institutions’ student newspapers. The demographics of Dartmouth’s Class of 2016 will likely be “comparable” to the Class of 2015, Laskaris said. “It won’t be significantly different from what we saw last year,” she said. The average composite SAT score of the Class of 2016 is 2080, reflecting a slight increase over last year’s composite of 2068, Laskaris said in an email to The Dartmouth. Trends among applicants for the Class of 2016 include attendance at virtual schools and participation in online courses, according to Laskaris. Students’ tendency to take classes supplementing their high school curricula may present a new challenge for admissions officers, especially “when it comes to evaluating letters of recommendations from teachers that students haven’t physically met in a classroom,” she said. The number of students applying for financial aid — which has amounted to approximately two-thirds of applicants in the past — is expected to remain consistent or grow slightly this year, according to Laskaris. The deadline to apply for financial aid is Feb. 1. To reduce the stress students may be experiencing, the Admissions Office plans to continue its tradition of sending likely letters to “stand-out students,” Laskaris said. The first batch of “likely letters” will be sent in early February and will give applicants a clear indication that they will likely be admitted if they continue performing at the same level, she said. “There are some students whose files immediately rise to the top in terms of academic and personal achievements and who strike us as exactly the kind of students we’d like to see at Dartmouth,” she said.

BY JEFF STEIN STAFF WRITER Cornell will revoke its recognition of Tau Kappa Epsilon for at least three years following reports of an alcohol-related hospitalization of a freshman, according to Travis Apgar, associate dean of students for sorority and fraternity affairs. Apgar said the University rejected the fraternity’s appeal of the decision. In a memo obtained by The Sun on Jan. 5, University administrators faulted TKE for reportedly failing to ensure the safety of a highly intoxicated individual — the same oversight that officials say led to the death of George Desdunes ’13 last spring. Sixteen former pledges of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the fraternity in which Desdunes died, joined TKE a few months later. Cornell’s Fraternity and Sorority Review Board was troubled by the hospitalization and by other reported violations of Greek and University policy, according to the report, which was sent

on Dec. 20 from Apgar to Susan Murphy ’73, vice president of student and academic services. The freshman, who had been CORNELL consuming alcohol before attending TKE’s event, arrived at a recruitment dinner hosted by TKE at the China Buffet on Nov. 11. While it “remains unclear if he continued to consume alcohol at the dinner,” TKE did provide both beer and hard alcohol at the event, the report states. A member of TKE then “transported the freshman student to his residence hall, assisted him inside, and left him in his room, where he was found by hall mate(s) and subsequently transported to the hospital by ambulance … [with] a dangerous blood alcohol level,” according to the review board’s findings, which it said were “based on the preponderance of the evidence.”

SHAILEE SHAH/CORNELL DAILY SUN

Fraternity TKE has been faulted by Cornell University for an alcohol-related incident.

Morning Checklist

[x] Brush teeth [x] Wash face [x] Comb hair [x] Grab a cup of coffee [x] Read the Yale Daily News

Get your day started on the right page.


PAGE 10

THROUGH THE LENS

E

arly Saturday morning, clouds moved over New Haven and dropped eight inches of snow on the city for 14 hours. While the snowstorm did not cause severe disruptions on or off campus, it did provide an abundance of snowy scenes. Staff photographer JACOB GEIGER and photography editors KAMARIA GREENFIELD and VICTOR KANG ventured out to capture the first major snowfall of the season.

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


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NFL Patriots 23 Ravens 20

NFL Giants 20 49ers 17

SPORTS QUICK HITS

WOMEN’S TENNIS BULLDOGS SPLIT TOURNAMENT The women’s tennis team split their singles and doubles matches against Purdue and Tulsa on the first day of their season-opening tournament. No. 16 doubles pair Vicky Brook ’12 and Hanna Yu ’15 beat their Tulsa opponents to take the lead in the standings.

SAILING YALIES IN MIAMI Alums Stuart McNay ’05 and Sarah Lihan ’10 have already earned their spot in London with their performance at the Olympic trials, but this week both Bulldogs will compete in the Miami Olympic Classes Regatta where they will have the chance to improve their rankings.

MBBALL Florida St. 76 Duke 73

MBBALL Notre Dame 67 Syracuse 58

NHL Penguins 4 Capitals 3

MONDAY “I think we did a lot better job of handling their pressure. And our defense helped us to maintain the lead... GREG KELLEY ’14 FORWARD, M. BASKETBALL YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

MEN’S HOCKEY

ELIS DROP BELOW .500 Slumping Yale’s freefall gained momentum this weekend as it dropped both its games and mustered just two goals in the process. PAGE B3 BRIANNE BOWEN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yale’s loss to Union Friday was a tale of teams on opposite trajectories. The Elis, who beat Union 4–0 in November, have gone 4–8–1 since then and lost their national ranking. Union has lost just three times and climbed to No. 12.

Harvard coaches may follow Reno BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER New head football coach Tony Reno may not be making the move south from Harvard alone.

FOOTBALL Crimson assistant coaches Joe Conlin, Dwayne Wilmot and Kris Barber ’97 are in negotiations to join the Bulldogs’ coaching staffm according to an email sent to Harvard players this weekend. Wilmot, who just completed his first season as Harvard’s defensive line coach, said that he is in the “preliminary stages” of discussions with Yale and Reno to become Yale’s defensive line coach with recruiting responsibilities. “I have a great amount of respect for coach Reno,” Wilmot said. “I owe it to myself and my family [to consider the offer].” Although he said he was unsure what the next stage in the hiring process would be, Wilmot added that he hoped to come to Yale’s campus in the near future and

tour the facilities. Before joining Harvard’s staff, Wilmot worked for five years as

I have a great amount of respect for Coach Reno. I owe it to myself and my family [to consider the offer.]

Bulldogs sweep Bears BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER Any worries that Brown would avenge its loss to Yale last week proved fruitless as the Bulldogs handled the Bears a 73–60 loss Saturday in Providence, R.I.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

the defensive line coach for the University of Maine. Conlin said in an email to the News that “nothing is official yet,” and declined to comment further. This fall was his first season as the Crimson offensive line coach. Previously, he worked for seven years as an assistant coach for the University of New Hampshire. At various times throughout his

The Elis (12–4, 2–0 Ivy) did not hold a lead in the second half until less than two minutes remained when Brown (5–13, 0–2 Ivy) visited the Lee Amphitheater Jan. 14. This time, the Elis held the lead for all but 24 seconds after the break on the way to their victory. “I think we did a lot better job of handling their pressure,” forward Greg Kelley ’14 said. “And our defense helped us to maintain the lead for most of the second half.” Captain and forward Reggie Willhite ’12 led the attack in the first half, scoring 11 of his 13 points as the Bulldogs took a 38–35 lead into the break. Foul trouble sidelined him for much of the second half, but guard

SEE FOOTBALL PAGE B2

SEE M. BASKETBALL PAGE B2

DWAYNE WILMOT Harvard assistant football coach

STAT OF THE DAY 45

JACOB GEIGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Michael Grace ’12, right, and the Bulldogs are now 2-0 in Ivy play after sweeping their season series with Brown.

THE NUMBER OF SAVES THAT RPI GOALIE BRYCE MERRIAM HAD IN THE ENGINEERS’ 2-1 VICTORY OVER YALE. The Elis outshot RPI 46–18, but could not score until late in the third period. Yale also struggled against Union goalie Troy Grosenick the previous night, scoring once on 30 shots.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Dutch teen sails around world At age 16 and four months, Laura Dekker broke Jessica Watson’s unofficial record for youngest solo circumnavigation by six months. It was unofficial because Guinness decided to no longer recognize youth-sailing records when Dekker declared she would attempt the circumnavigation at age 13. Dekker finished her journey one year and a day after setting sail from St. Martin, doing schoolwork as she piloted.

Reno seeks Harvard staff FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1 career, he has served as a coach for safeties as well as for both the offensive and defensive lines. Barber spent last year as the wide receivers coach for the Crimson. He played for Yale for three seasons after transferring in from Fort Scott Community College in Kansas. He played professionally in Sweden until 2002. He served as an assistant coach at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 1997 and from 2007-’10 for Division II Colorado School of Mines. Barber could not be reached for comment. Harvard senior Matthew Hanson, a defensive back for the Crimson football team, told the

Basketball rolls out Brown

News that an email was recently sent out to all Harvard football players informing them that Reno hired the three coaches away from the Harvard staff. He added that the email reported that the trio “left for more lucrative offers.” Reno could not be reached for comment, and three Yale football players said they had not been informed of any updates in the hiring process. The three assistants helped the Crimson to a 9–1 season in 2011, including an undefeated Ivy League record and a 45–7 victory over Yale in The Game. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

JACOB GEIGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain and guard Reggie Willhite ’12 scored 13 points against Brown on Saturday, contributing to the Bulldogs’ ultimate 73-60 victory over Brown. M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1

CHARLIE CROOM/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The three Crimson assistant coaches helped lead Harvard to a 45-7 victory in the 2011 edition of The Game.

Jesse Pritchard ’14 and the Yale bench were there to fill the void. Pritchard scored all of his careerhigh nine points after intermission, including four during an 8-0 run early in the second half to help the Elis pull away. “It was just a matter of opportunity,” Pritchard said about his performance. “Coach knows I can produce given the opportunity.” The Bulldog bench outscored the Bear reserves 16-8, and all eight of Brown’s bench points came from guard Jean Harris. Key to this matchup against Brown was defense. Brown shot only 32 per-

cent from beyond the arc Saturday compared to more than 52 percent in the first meeting. Brown guard Sean McGonagill was held to only 11 points after he went off for 23 in the first contest. Yale also had an improved effort on the boards on Saturday, out-rebounding Brown 44-27. Forward Greg Mangano ’12 said that rebounding is especially important in Ivy League play because it gives you more possessions. “[Rebounding] is something we’ve been successful at all season,” Mangano said. “We do have a lot of size.” Mangano led the effort with 11 rebounds while Pritchard and center Jeremiah Kreisberg ’14 chipped in with eight apiece. Mangano also led the team

with 18 points for his eighth doubledouble of the season. Yale next takes the court Friday, Jan. 27, when No. 24 Harvard pays a visit to the Lee Amphitheater. Tip-off will be 7 p.m. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

YALE 73, BROWN 60 YALE

38

35

#

#

73

BROWN

35

25

#

#

60

Patriots in Super Bowl, beat Ravens 23-20 BY BARRY WILNER ASSOCIATED PRESS FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Tom Brady got all the help he needed to get the New England Patriots into the Super Bowl. Thank you, Billy Cundiff. The Baltimore Ravens kicker shanked a 32-yard field goal with 11 seconds left and the Patriots escaped with a 23-20 victory in the AFC championship game on Sunday. Usually, vintage Brady doesn’t need much assistance in championship settings, but the Patriots muchmaligned defense came through, and Brady’s 1-yard touchdown dive with 11:29 left proved to be the winning points. “Well, I sucked pretty bad today, but our defense saved us,” Brady said after throwing for 239 yards, with two interceptions and, for the first time in 36 games, no TD passes. “I’m going to try to go out and do a better job in a couple of weeks, but I’m proud of this team, my teammates.” Brady waited out the final tense minutes on the sideline, and then celebrated with the rest of his team when Cundiff’s attempt went wide left. The Ravens looked on in stunned horror. Cundiff had no excuse. “It’s a kick I’ve kicked probably a thousand times in my career,” Cundiff said. “I went out there and didn’t convert. That’s the way things go.” Next up as the Patriots chase their fourth Super Bowl trophy in Brady and coach Bill Belichick’s tenure in New England is the New York Giants, who beat the San Francisco 49ers 20-17 in overtime Sunday night. The Patriots were installed as 3-point favorites for the Super Bowl on Feb. 5 in Indianapolis. In their last trip to the big game, the Patriots had an 18-0 record when they were stunned by the Giants four years ago. They won the NFL championship for the 2001, 2003 and 2004 seasons. This time, they head to the Super Bowl with a 10-game winning streak. Before Cundiff missed, the Ravens had a chance to go ahead two plays earlier, but wide receiver Lee Evans was stripped of the ball in the end

zone by backup cornerback Sterling Moore, who earlier was victimized for a touchdown that gave Baltimore (13-5) the lead 17-16.

It’s a kick I’ve kicked probably a thousand times in my career. I went out there and didn’t convert. That’s the way things go. BILLY CUNDIFF Kicker, Balitmore Ravens On his touchdown, Brady took a huge hit from Ravens star linebacker Ray Lewis, then emphatically spiked the ball as he walked away. Earlier, Brady showed his fire by barking at Lewis following a hard tackle on a 4-yard run. “It’s a pretty mentally tough team,” said Brady, whose fifth trip to the Super Bowl will equal John Elway’s achievement with Denver. “There’s really some resiliency. We’ve shown that all season. Even in the games we’ve lost, the three games we lost, we fought until the end. We’re always going to fight to the end. It’s great to be a part of a team like this.” Baltimore had the touted defense in this matchup, but New England’s unit, ranked 31st overall, was just as powerful. “We stepped up,” Pro Bowl nose tackle Vince Wilfork said. “We all stepped up big time. Being in this situation is a great moment. You have to cherish this moment.” The Patriots shut down Ray Rice, the league’s total yardage leader, who was limited to 78 yards. Brandon Spikes made a fourth-quarter interception of Joe Flacco, who played well before that and threw for two touchdowns. And when the Ravens were threatening to score a late touchdown to win their first conference title in 11 years, New England clamped down. “It’s two great football teams, two gladiators, I guess, just kind of going at each other at the end, and I’m proud of our guys,” Harbaugh

CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Baltimore Ravens kicker Billy Cundiff (7) misses a 32 yard field goal in the closing seconds of the second half of the AFC Championship NFL football game Sunday night. said. “You know, we’ve got 53 guys, mighty men, as we like to call them — and they fought, and we came up a little bit short, as 53. You know, 53 win and 53 lose.” With Rice a nonfactor, Baltimore had to rely on Flacco, and he delivered one of his best performances. Flacco has led the Ravens into the playoffs in all four of his pro seasons, but not to the Super Bowl. He was 22 for 36 for 306 yards and touchdowns of 6 yards to Dennis Pitta and 29 to rookie Torrey Smith. The loss hardly could be blamed on Flacco. “I don’t know if I ever will prove anything,” he said. “I just play the same way. We lost; someone has to. But we laid it all out on the field.” Operating against a porous secondary missing its top cornerback, Kyle Arrington, who left in the second quarter with an eye injury, Flacco gave Baltimore its first lead. His short

pass on third down to explosive receiver Smith turned into a 29-yard scamper down the right sideline after Moore completely whiffed on the tackle. Danny Woodhead’s fumble on the ensuing kickoff set up Baltimore at the Patriots 28, but a third-down sack forced Cundiff to kick a 39-yard field goal, making it 20-16. New England didn’t flinch. Brady took the Patriots 63 yards in 11 plays, and seemed to score on a 1-yard run. The call was overruled by replay, though, and on fourth-down, he dived just high enough over the line for the winning points. “Every inch counts in this game and every foot counts in this game,” said 12-year veteran guard Brian Waters, who joined the Patriots this year and is headed to his first Super Bowl. Defense was particularly dominant early on. The Patriots held Bal-

timore to minus-4 yards on its first three first-down runs and forced the Ravens to go three-and-out each time. Meanwhile, the Patriots put together a methodical 13-play, 50-yard drive helped greatly by an illegal contact penalty on Lardarius Webb that negated a tipped interception by Bernard Pollard. But Brady was sacked for the first time by Paul Kruger and Stephen Gostkowski kicked a 29-yard field goal. Late in the first quarter, the Ravens changed tactics after Webb picked off a pass intended for Julian Edelman at the Baltimore 30. Flacco rolled right on first down and threw deep down the sideline to a wide-open Smith. Had the pass not been short, Smith likely would have sprinted into the end zone. Instead, it was a 42-yard gain, not bad at all given Baltimore’s previous ineptitude with the ball.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS JOE PATERNO Former Penn State head coach Joe Paterno died of lung cancer on Sunday at age 85. Paterno was diagnosed just days after being fired from the program he coached for 46 years, led to 409 wins and two national championships.

Elis skid to losing streak

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

MEN’S HOCKEY IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

5

1

2

.750

11

4

4

.684

Princeton

2

4

1

.357

6

10

5

.405

Brown

2

2

0

.500

8

8

3

.500

Yale

2

2

0

.500

8

9

2

.474

Harvard

1

2

2

.400

4

6

8

.444

Dartmouth

1

2

1

.375

8

8

2

.500

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

SATURDAY, JAN. 21 Rensselaer 2, Yale 1

FRIDAY, JAN. 27 Yale at Harvard, 7:30 p.m.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

BRIANNE BOWEN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

No. 12 Union, led by goaltender Troy Grosenick, stonewalled forward Brad Peltz ’14 , center, and Yale in a 3–1 victory Friday night. BY KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTER An offensive power outage hit the men’s hoceky team at Ingalls rink this weekend, and the Elis limped to a pair of defeats against conference foes.

MEN’S HOCKEY Yale (8–9–2, 5–6–1 ECAC) dropped below .500 for the first time in four seasons by dropping games to Union and RPI. The defeats continued the team’s recent slide into sixth place in the conference. Over their past 11 games, the Elis are 3–7–1 and have gone 0–3–1 over the past two weekends. At this point, the team’s only chance of going to the NCAA tournament is to secure an automatic bid by winning the ECAC postseason tournament, a feat the Elis accomplished last year with a decisive 6–0 victory over Cornell in the championship game. In order to claim the ECAC title, Yale will need to step up its game and head into the conference playoffs with some momentum. “We have 11 games left,” captain Brian O’Neill ’12 said in an interview with the New Haven Register. “At this point, we know what we need to do. Everyone has to look in the mirror and bring it every night.” On Friday night, the Elis fell

RPI 2, YALE 1 RPI

0

0

2

2

YALE

0

0

1

1

UNION 3, YALE 1 UNION

2

1

0

3

YALE

1

0

0

1

3–1 to No. 12 Union (13–6– 6, 7–3–3). The Bulldogs had defeated the Dutchmen by a comfortable 4–0 score on Nov. 12 during a road trip. But since then, the two teams’ destinies have diverged. Union has gone 8–3–3 and climbed to No. 12 in the national polls, whereas the Elis have gone 4–8–1 and fallen out of the national rankings. Head coach Keith Allain ’80 said he was not happy with Yale’s performance on Friday night. “I thought we had a good first period,” Allain said. “I thought we lost our way in the second; then I thought we battled in the third, but we weren’t good enough to win the hockey game, so it was not a step forward for us, that’s for sure.” Two moments in particular turned the tide of the game for the Elis. The first came with about five minutes remaining in the first period. Just after defenseman Kevin Peel ’12 tied the game at one, the Bulldogs went on the power play. But instead of putting the man advantage to good use, the Elis allowed a shorthanded goal to Union forward Daniel Carr to give the Dutchmen a lead they would not relinquish. The second pivotal moment came early in the middle frame. Forward Kenny Agostino ’14 was awarded a penalty shot after he was brought down from behind during a one-on-one with the keeper. As he took the penalty, Agostino deked left but was stuffed by keeper Troy Grosenick in his attempt to bring the puck across the crease and finish on the right side of the net. The sophomore Union goalkeeper, first in the nation in save percentage and goals-against average, was solid in the net for the Dutchmen. He saved 29 out of 30 shots and came up big on several would-be-promising Yale chances. Allain said after the game that the Union defense was

due as much credit as Grosenick for Union’s win. “He’s good [in net],” Allain said. “His team plays really well in front of him. They make it hard to get the second shots. When we were playing well, we got some pucks to the net and there were some rebounds, but the defenders make you really work to get a stick on those pucks.”

At this point, we know what we need to do. Everyone has to look in the mirror and bring it every night. BRIAN O’NEILL ’12 Captain, men’s hockey

On the Elis’ side of the ice there was a new face in the net. Nick Maricic ’13 started for the first time this season and made 33 saves on 36 shots. Allain said he was pleased with Maricic’s performance and remarked that he thought the California native improved as the game went on. Union opened up the scoring seven minutes into the game when Simpson flicked an unexpected wrist shot from the right side of the net that caught Maricic off guard on the near post. But on Saturday night Jeff Malcolm ’13 came back in net for the Bulldogs as they returned to Ingalls for a matchup with RPI. Although they fell to the Engineers 2–1 the Elis looked much better on the ice than they had the previous night and outshot RPI by a 46–18 margin. “I was real proud of the way we played,” Allain said. “I thought we had a great start, and I thought we dominated the second and third periods. I thought we deserved to win tonight.” Although Union’s Grosenick

appeared to be the goalie to watch heading into the weekend, it was RPI’s Bryce Merriam who stood out the most. The Bulldogs offensive assault was turned away time and again by Merriam, who recorded 45 saves that night. He was particularly brilliant in the third period and stopped a few pucks that appeared to be headed for the back of the net. In spite of his performance, Merriam deflected praise onto his teammates after the game. “We had some big blocked shots at the end of the game that might have even bailed me out, so props to the guys on the ice,” Merriam said. Although Merriam looked impenetrable all night, forward Kevin Limbert ’12 found a chink in his armor with about two minutes remaining in the game. With the Elis down 2–0 and scrambling to get back in the competition, Limbert wound up for a powerful shot but mishit it and put a dribbler past a surprised Merriam. After two scoreless periods for both sides, the Engineers broke through about six minutes into the third period. Forward C.J. Lee intercepted a pass near mid-ice and slid the puck over to a waiting RPI forward, Marty O’Grady, who deposited it for a 1–0 lead. “Tonight we played average, but we found ways to win,” RPI head coach Seth Appert told the News. “I thought our guys exhibited a lot of heart in the third period. It wasn’t pretty, and it was quite ugly at times, but I thought there was a lot of ‘want to’ in terms of trying to play the right way.” The Elis will take to the ice again next weekend when they travel to Harvard and Dartmouth for an Ivy League doubleheader.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Princeton

3

0

1.000

13

4

.765

Harvard

1

0

1.000

8

7

.533

Brown

1

1

.500

10

6

.625

Yale

1

1

.500

9

7

.562

Cornell

1

1

.500

7

9

.438

Penn

0

1

.000

7

8

.467

Dartmouth

0

1

.000

2

13

.133

Columbia

0

2

.000

2

14

.125

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

FRIDAY, JAN. 20 Brown 60, Yale 55

FRIDAY, JAN. 27 Yale at Harvard, 7:00 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Harvard

2

0

1.000

16

2

.889

Yale

2

0

1.000

12

4

.750

Penn

2

0

1.000

10

9

.526

Princeton

1

1

.500

10

8

.556

Columbia

1

2

.333

12

7

.632

Cornell

1

2

.333

6

11

.353

Brown

0

2

.000

5

13

.278

Dartmouth

0

2

.000

4

14

.222

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, JAN. 21 Yale 73, Brown 60

FRIDAY, JAN. 27 Harvard at Yale, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

7

1

0

.875

18

2

0

.900

Princeton

5

2

1

.688

8

10

4

.455

Dartmouth

2

2

1

.500

12

6

2

.650

Brown

1

3

0

.250

6

7

7

.475

Harvard

1

4

0

.200

12

6

1

.658

Yale

0

4

0

.000

1

19

0

.05

Contact KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, JAN. 21 Union 2, Yale 0

TUESDAY, JAN. 24 Yale at Brown, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S SQUASH IVY SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Harvard

3

0

1.000

10

0

1.000

Yale

2

0

1.000

10

0

1.000

Penn

2

1

.667

4

1

.800

Cornell

2

1

.667

7

3

.700

5

Brown

1

1

.500

6

2

.750

6

Princeton

1

2

.333

5

2

.714

7

Dartmouth

0

3

.000

3

3

.500

Columbia

0

3

.000

3

4

.429

1

3

LAST WEEK

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Charles Brockett ’12 and the Yale offense mustered only two goals in their two games this weekend.

OVERALL

FRIDAY, JAN. 21 Yale 9, Wesleyan 0

NEXT WEEK

TUESDAY, JAN. 24 Yale at Brown, 6:00 p.m.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Oregon’s Chip Kelly moves to the NFL Chip Kelly finalized a deal to become the head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday. Former Tampa Bay coach Raheem Morris was fired the same day Kelly won Oregon’s first Rose Bowl since 1920 early this month. Kelly went 35-8 in his three seasons as Oregon’s head coach, while the Bucs lost their last ten games in 2011.

W. basketball falls to Bears BY JOHN SULLIVAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Poor shooting doomed the Bulldogs Friday night as they tried to complete a season sweep of Brown for only the third time since 2003.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The team shot only 36.5 percent from the floor in its 60–55 loss to the Bears after beating the Bears 75–65 the week before. For each of the past 10 seasons the Elis and the Bears have met on the first two weekends of Ivy League play, and Brown currently holds a 13–9 advantage in the series. But Yale had won seven of the last nine going into this weekend and hoped for a repeat of last season’s sweep. It was not to be, however, as a cold shooting night and Brown’s strong defense produced the Bulldogs’ third-lowest scoring output this season. “We didn’t shoot the ball well,” forward and captain Michelle Cashen ’12 said. “The numbers don’t lie. We had about the same number of rebounds and turnovers, the possession battle was pretty even and we just didn’t make enough shots.” The teams’ stat lines were nearly identical, with the two sides separated by two or less in rebounds, assists, turnovers and free throws made. With such parity everywhere else, the Bears 41.5-36.5 percent shooting advantage accounted for the slim margin of victory. Yet the week before at Brown, the Bulldogs actually shot a worse percentage

BROWN 60, YALE 55 BROWN

26

34

60

YALE

24

31

55

while still securing a 10-point victory. That game, however, Yale dominated the offensive and defensive glass and committed far fewer turnovers than the Bears did. This time Brown closed the gaps in possession between the teams, and Yale was unable to make up the difference in shooting. With every game of critical importance for the Ivy League title, the team must learn how to weather off nights, Cashen said. “We can’t rely on shooting all the time, and when we have [a poor shooting performance] as a team we have to figure out ways to compensate, Cashen said. “If we’re not shooting well we need to win with defense, for example.”

We struggled against the zone. They covered us well and we ended up taking a lot of shots with the shot clock winding down. SARAH HALEJIAN ’15 Guard, women’s basketball Some credit for Yale’s poor shooting must be given to the Brown defense, which made significant adjustments since the teams’ meeting last week. The Bears played zone for much of the game, slowing the pace of the game and forcing the Elis to shoot from the outside. Guard Sarah Halejian ’15 said the zone stifled the Bulldogs and prevented them from playing their favored uptempo style of basketball. “We struggled against the zone,” Halejian said. “They covered us well, and we ended up taking a lot of shots with the shot clock winding down.” The two teams traded blows the entire game, with neither

MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Megan Vasquez ’13 took the lead in scoring for the Bulldogs on Saturday, scoring a total of 14 points. ever able to gain a clear advantage. The Bears held a 26–24 lead at halftime, but Yale came back to take a 45–44 lead with four minutes remaining in the game on Megan Vasquez’s ’13 free throws. Vasquez led the Bulldogs in scoring with 14 points while Cashen and Halejian added 13 each. From

this point on Brown took over the game, and made six free throws in a row in the final 30 seconds to close out the game. The team travels to Harvard this weekend for its third Ivy League game. The Crimson, at 1–0 in the conference, are currently second in the Ivy League

behind Princeton. The Bulldogs’ chances for the conference title would be seriously hurt by a loss this week. “Every game is important from here on,” said guard Aarica West ’13. “But this one especially both because its Harvard and because they’re always one of the better

teams in the league. They are a tough team to guard and we have to be really on our game on Friday.” Tip-off Friday is scheduled for 7 p.m. Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.j.sullivan@yale.edu .

Squash teams continued undefeated run BY JAMES HUANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER After last Wednesday’s historic defeat of Trinity College, the Yale’s men’s and women’s squash teams continued their undefeated rampage this weekend.

SQUASH Friday, the No. 2 men’s team traveled to Rochester, N.Y., and defeated the No. 11 University of Western Ontario. Then, on Saturday, the team returned to the Brady Squash Center to host the No. 4 University of Rochester and won a close victory, which brought the Elis’ season record to 9–0. Meanwhile, the No. 2 women’s team traveled to South Hadley, Mass., for the Pioneer Invitational, where it defeated No.

12 Mount Holyoke, No. 22 Colby and No. 20 Wesleyan. The wins brought the Elis’ perfect season to 10–0. Yale won every match. Last year’s individual championships winner Millie Tomlinson ’14 played her usual No. 1 spot against Mount Holyoke and Wesleyan, but in the matches against schools that are not as competitive as Yale’s usual opponents, head coach David Talbott sometimes decided to move more players up to the top nine. “Although only nine players compete in each match, we have 18 players on the team who all play an equally important role,” Tomlinson said. “Our team [has] incredible depth, and I feel that we are very strong all the way down the ladder.” Tomlinson added that every member is motivated to achieve the team’s goal of a second con-

secutive national championship this season. The teams to watch out for include Penn, Princeton, Harvard and Trinity, Tomlinson said. Earlier this season, Yale lost to Harvard in an Ivy scrimmage’s final, but Tomlinson said the team took the loss as motivation to improve for the regular season. Against Western Ontario, the men’s team mostly followed their usual lineup, but Joseph Roberts ’15 played No. 9 instead of Charlie Wyatt ’14. Yale won the contest 8–1. But on Saturday against Rochester the score came much closer. Yale managed to win five matches early on, but Rochester held the final score at 5–4. The Elis fought hard to win at the No. 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 spots. At the No. 3 spot, Yale’s Richard Dodd ’13 played Roches-

ter’s Adam Perkiomaki in a close match that went to five games. Rochester took an 8–1 lead in the first game, but Dodd came back for a 12–10 overtime victory.

We won a few big matches — Cornell, Trinity and Rochester — 5-4, and that is a huge start. RYAN DOWD ‘12 Similar Yale comebacks were scattered throughout the evening. Having lost his first two sets, Yale’s No. 6 Neil Martin ’14 won the next three to take the match. No. 2 Hywel Robinson ’14 also

managed to come back from a 0–2 start and win the next three sets. But not every player managed to come back from a rough start. At the No. 9 spot Wyatt lost 0–3 to Rochester’s Juan Pablo Gaviria. At No. 8, Rochester’s Mohamed Maksoud defeated Yale’s Sam Clayman ’12 3–1. At the No. 5 spot, captain Ryan Dowd ’12 swept his set 3–0 against Rochester’s Matt Domenick. Dowd brought Yale’s score to 4–2. No. 7 Robert Berner ’12 finished the meet when he also swept his match. The Yellowjackets also showed themselves capable of sweeping sets and took two matches 3–0, including the No. 1 spot. Dowd said he was happy with the outcome overall. “Our season so far has been great. We won a few big matches — Cornell, Trinity and Rochester

— 5–4, and that is a huge start,” Dowd said. “We need to continue the rest of the season and play with more confidence at the beginning of the match.” Dowd added that the Elis have yet to play two of their toughest opponents, Princeton and Harvard. Playing out his last season, Dowd added that he is confident the younger players will carry on Yale’s tradition of squash excellence. “We have a few young guys who are just really great. Neil Martin and Charlie Wyatt, who usually play at six and nine, both pulled some great wins,” Dowd said. Next Tuesday, both teams will take on Brown in Providence, R.I. Contact JAMES HUANG at jianan.huang@yale.edu .

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s squash team, left, is ranked second nationally with a 10–0 record. The men’s squash team, right, claimed a 9–0 record this weekend with defeats of Western Ontario and Rochester.


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