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P E O P L E | TRAV E L | DESIGN | FA SH IO N | ST Y LE | DÉCOR

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EQUESTRIAN LIVING

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2O19

CLEMENTINE GOUTAL BALANCING A PASSION FOR EDUCATION, PHILANTHROPY, AND HORSES

OCT/NOV 2O19

DISPLAY UNTIL DEC 12, 2019


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES ERIC STRIFFLER

O C TO B E R | NOV E M B E R 2 0 1 9

CABIN STYLE

36 A fresh look at exclusive architect-designed cabins, ranch houses, and lodges nestled in a broad spectrum of locations. MIA SUKI

42 Designer Mia Suki creates collections that honor the equestrian heritage, while modernizing them for today’s woman. A SEAL OF APPROVAL

46 The EQUUS Foundation established the Guardians program to screen charities and ensure they are operating at the highest standards of horse-care practices.

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WHAT’S NEXT FOR CLEMENTINE GOUTAL?

74

STROKES OF WONDER

WHAT’S NEXT FOR CLEMENTINE GOUTAL?

48 An accomplished and avid equestrienne, Clementine has other passions, which extend well beyond the equestrian realm. HELGSTRAND DRESSAGE

56 Dressage champion Andreas Helgstrand has built one of the most recognized sales and training facilities for dressage horses. THE NEXT GENERATION

64 Athletes attending this year’s Adequan FEI North American Youth Championships in North Salem, New York, represent the future generation of U.S. equestrian sports. THE QUIET GRANDEUR OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

66 Guests of this meticulously restored 18th-century chateau, inspired by the Palace of Versailles, can enjoy an array of experiences while staying in the heart of Normandy, France. STROKES OF WONDER

74 Artist Karen Bezuidenhout’s vibrant paintings are inspired by her lifelong love of nature, horses, and an appetite for adventure.

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WHAT SWIT ZERL AND DID FOR THE LUXURY WATCH,

B&D BUILDERS DO FOR THE EQUESTRIAN FACILIT Y.

ba n d d b u i l d e r s . c om â—† 7 1 7. 6 8 7.02 9 2


EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS O C TO B E R | NOV E M B E R 2 0 1 9

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14

STYLE

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Talented jewelry designers are incorporating classic equestrian elements into sophisticated pieces with a modern twist. FASHION

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Walk Western style in boots that pair fashion and functionality. FAVORITES

16

Phone apps for equestrians keep getting better and better.

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28

18

The Washington International Horse Show is dedicated to bringing horse sport to the masses.

22

Pablo Dorignac, the club manager at Hobe Sound Polo in South Florida, welcomes players of all levels to enjoy world-class facilities.

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Read an excerpt from The Great Sweepstakes of 1877, a true story of southern grit, Gilded Age tycoons, and a race that galvanized the nation, by Mark Shrager. GIVING BACK

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See the winners of Brooke USA’s inaugural summer photo competition designed to raise funds for working animals in the developing world.

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FOOD+DRINK

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Chef Nathan Rich of Twin Farms in Vermont, shares his recipe for fall root vegetable salad.

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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A selection of holiday gift ideas for the discerning equestrian. PEOPLE

30

ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE Clementine Goutal, an accomplished equestrian and the founder of Upper Echelon Academy, was shot on location by Eric Striffler at her training barn in Water Mill, New York.

EDITOR’S NOTE 8 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES

95

Look for CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95 to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 98 Meet Doobert, the cat that inspired a website that connects animal rescue organizations to volunteers and transports.

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Suzanne Perkins has been an influential leader in equestrian real estate in Santa Barbara, California, horse country.

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Clementina Brown has helped to guide the historic National Horse Show into a new era. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

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Fabulous farms and ranches. MASTERING PARTNERSHIP

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Jim Masterson addresses the issue of head-shy horses and notes things you can do to release tension and ease discomfort.


T h e A r t, E x c e l l e n c e & C r a f t s m a n s h i p O f M E TA L & W O O D Ca b i n e t ry

L’ A t e l i e r P a r i s

- H a n d c r a f t e d L u x u ry C o o k i n g S u i t e s , A p p l i a n c e s , M e ta l C a b i n e t ry & F i n e W o o d W o r k i n g

PA R I S

• NEW YORK • MIAMI • LOS ANGELES 1 800.792 3550 w w w. L e A t e l i e r P a r i s . c om


EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

PHOTO NICKY WYMAN

WELCOME

EQ editor Stephanie Peters launches on her first hot air balloon ride from the grounds of Chateau de Courtomer, in Normandy, France.

I

t’s mere coincidence that I started drafting this letter on International Day of Charity. It perfectly coincided with the philanthropy focus of this issue and presented the ideal segue into the theme of the power of giving. I find fall to be a season of optimism. It signals the start-up of new initiatives and possibilities. Collectively, we’ve had a tough year with an all too frequent stream of tragedies and natural disasters. In response, however, are brigades of rollup-your-sleeves responders that show up and tackle the aftermath—whether it’s impacting humans or animals. Most of us within the equestrian community recognize the countless individuals and organizations that are accomplishing great things daily. They are unheralded, under the radar, yet consistently making inroads.

In a recent New York Times article highlighting the Hampton Classic horse show, considerable focus was on the wealth surrounding the sport, its spectators, and the athletes—two- and four-legged—and made note of the caravan of Maseratis, Lamborghinis, and luxury horse trailers that inched their way toward the show grounds. While this portrays a small population of the event, the article doesn’t highlight the fact that many of those who are from considerable means innately understand there is a responsibility that comes with advantage, and that understanding manifests itself in innumerable, charitable ways. Several of the names that we see repeatedly and mentioned in the article—Bloomberg, Springsteen, Gates—are committed to their philanthropic causes, as are Clementine Goutal and Brianne Goutal-Marteau, also longtime fixtures at the classic. Additionally, legions of equestrians in all disciplines across the country are contributing to causes close to their hearts. Continuing with this theme, we hear from Lynn Coakley, the founder of the EQUUS Foundation, the only national U.S. charity dedicated solely to horse welfare and promoting myriad types of collaboration between humans and horses. EquuStars, including the aforementioned high-profile riders, help to spread the foundation’s message and motivate other equestrians and horse lovers to take action. In our cover story, Clementine Goutal candidly talks to us about her philanthropic pursuits, of which she

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has many. Her passion for learning and equestrian sport motivated her to found Upper Echelon Academy in Wellington, Florida, which provides an education system designed for seasonal, traveling, and full-time young athletes. Clementine considers charity and academics to be equally important and has developed initiatives to inspire students to participate in charitable endeavors. Beyond the philanthropy realm, I travel to Chateau de Courtomer in Normandy, France, to immerse myself in an appealing mix of relaxing indulgence and invigorating exploration. Although not on my bucket list, I took to the air on my first hot air balloon ride for an aerial view of the surrounding Normandy countryside. We also meet Andreas Helgstrand, a world-class dressage rider and founder of Helgstrand Dressage in Denmark; discover polo isn’t just for the fabulously rich at Hobe Sound Polo; and get to know some of equestrian sport’s next generation. Like so many of our issues, we’ve balanced out the magazine with a colorful mix of fashion, art, style, and engaging people. I didn’t intend to devote so much of my letter to philanthropy and the inspiring work that transpires daily, but it’s fall and I’m motivated to inspire others to ask: How can I help?


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

SLEEK ENHANCEMENTS Classic EQUESTRIAN ELEMENTS are reimagined with a modern twist. Zadeh New York’s Flynn braided pendant on parachute cord in sterling silver with an oxidized polish. Pendant length is 24 inches. $430.

The Asli Classic Chain Link hinged cuff by John Hardy is inspired by the classic woven chain featuring a design that subtly twists and turns to reveal a sculptural form. $1,295.

This finely detailed sterling silver Snaffle Bit bracelet by Caracol has gold tones of brass that blend beautifully with gold and silver jewelry. $85.

The Big Luck on Pearls necklace by Sally Lowe showcases a solid, sterling silver two-inch tall horseshoe suspended from an adjustable, 22-inch string of knotted Swarovski pearls. $225.

A rich bay horse with burgundy tinted brown colors inspired Caracol’s Bay Horse bracelet featuring smokey quartz, tiger eye, leather buttons, and vintage heirloom reproductions. $430. 

The 16-centimeter Sitana bracelet by Helgstrand Denmark is shown in white gold with brilliant pavé set and 0.16-carat total weight. $8,900. Also available in 18 and 20 centimeters.

Tory Burch Pearl Horsehair charm earring. $228. Available at Tory Burch boutiques.

The Derby Stirrup bracelet by Vincent Peach features hand-braided premium leather, a sterling silver stirrup, and a steely Tahitian pearl clasp. $370. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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Distinctly Virginia 1. Windsor Farm Jericho Road, Flint Hill, VA | 954 Acres over multiple parcels $3,75,000-$12,500,000 2. Sunnyside John Mosby Highway, Upperville, VA | 254 Acres over multiple parcels $999,500-$6,500,000 3. Tulip Tree Landmark Road, The Plains, VA | 150 Acres $3,000,000 4. Rock Ford Crest Hill Road, Hume, VA | 100 Acres $5,900,000 5. Lakeview Trappe Road, Upperville, VA | 166 Acres $4,125,000 6. Dawnwood Elmwood Road, Upperville, VA | 50 Acres $3,850,000

Gloria Rose Ott

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©2019 Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. SIR1


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EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

VOLUME 8 NUMBER 5

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EQLiving.com

EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters SENIOR EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper

JUNE/JULY 2O19

THE

DESIGN I SSUE

CARSON KRESSLEY SAYS GET A ROOM

J U N E / J U LY 2 O 1 9

DEC 2018 / JAN 2019

PLUS WEDDING TRENDS

DISPLAY UNTIL FEB 10 2019

TULLSTORP DRESSAGE, SWEDEN A NEW VIEW OF PETS

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JENNIFER GATES DISPLAY UNTIL AUG 12, 2019

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EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen-Hodess CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rebecca Baldridge, Judy Richter DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SOCIAL MEDIA & WEB CONTENT Maggie Carty EDITORIAL MANAGER Theresa Cardamone EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer UK & LONDON EDITOR Bridget Arsenault CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lindsay Brock, Emily Holowczak, Emily Riden, Lenore Phillips, Carrie Wirth

11/10/18 4:03 PM

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger PUBLISHING CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle DIGITAL Daniel Flint, Matt Tarsi PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Ann Marie Barrera

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ADVERTISING SALES General: 929-262-0347, info@eqliving.com Joyce Jones, 954-796-1809, jones@eqliving.com Dick Holcomb, 770-331-7788, dickholc@bellsouth.net Blaire Baron, 215-439-8259, baron@eqliving.com Europe: Rosa Zampini, zampini@eqliving.com

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EQ LIVING ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Connecticut Deborah Deutsch, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Wellington, Fla. Carson Kressley, New York, N.Y. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Bedford, N.Y. Victoria McCullough, Wellington, Florida Colleen and Tim McQuay, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Los Alamos, Calif. David Sloan, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif Kim Tudor, Wellington, Fla. Chester Weber, Ocala, Fla.

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

DISPLAY UNTIL OCT 10, 2018

2018 WINNER: Favorite Polo Player, Nacho Figueras.

UPGRADE YOUR COFFEE TABLE. Subscribe and get America’s premier equestrian-lifestyle magazine delivered right to your mailbox. And your inbox will be brightened too with a complimentary subscription to the magazine’s digital edition and the EQ Inner Circle e-Newsletter. You’ll get behind-the-scenes looks at what’s coming up in the magazine and also special event invitations and giveaways.

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EQliving.com/subscribee Or mail the coupon on PAGE 97 with your check to: EQ LIVING MAGAZINE BOX ONE BROWNSVILLE, VT 05037

EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY (EQ) became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $24.95 | Canada $39.95.

Subscribe Print Magazine: eqliving.com/subscribe Free EQ InnerCircle eNewsletter: eqliving.com/ic To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQLiving, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: Web: eqliving.com/manage-subscription Tel: 929-262-0347 Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com or mail to 41 East 11th St., 11th Flr., New York, NY 10003 ©2019. All rights reserved, Wynnwood Media, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ®Equestrian Living, Equestrian Quarterly, and EQ are.registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.....

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

WALK WESTERN STYLE This selection of stylish and high-quality footwear offers FASHION, AND FUNCTIONALITY to boot.

Cody James: This men’s two-toned, ostrich-leg boot makes a bold statement. $349.99

Tony Lama: A tooled, square toe gives this boot a unique look. $193.00

Shyanne: This women’s boot has a full-quill ostrich foot with a striking snip toe and cowboy heel. $399.99

Ariat: The Heritage R-toe boot has a classic look with a comfortable ATS bed. $169.95

Lucchese: Unmissable in ruby red, the Kirby is higherheeled for the woman looking to blend fashion with tradition. $1495.00

Shyanne: The Hialeah features a feather and arrow embroidery on full-grain leather. $169.99

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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EQ H O L I D A Y G I F T G U I D E

O CTOBER D ESI G N

RI D E S TAR R X

LEATHER FRAMED MIRROR

FARRIER COLLECTION

Handcrafted mirrors detailed with new and vintage tack. Available in an array of colors and sizes up to 30”. Custom designs also available: provide your own tack and we can create a unique, bespoke piece for you. Shown: 24” with mahogany buffalo leather. $320

Nail the holidays! Deck the neck, or put a ring on it! Featuring the Farrier Collection Customized in diamonds & golds

MAKE SOMEONE HAPPY Fabulous Gift Ideas for Equestrians.

October Design Fine Equestrian-Themed Décor Hudson, New York 347 671-9249 info@stephanopolis.com OctoberDesign.com

Admire Farrier Collection RideStarRx.Com Ride Star Rx FB 616 634-2802

U S EQUEST R IA N TE AM FOUN DAT I ON

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28 YEARS OF TEAM MEDALS AND MEMORIES

ORIGINAL MOLASSES COOKIES

Riding ForTthe Team chronicles the lives of those who dreamed about competing for their country and “made it,” sharing inspirational stories from the athletes who have dominated American equestrian sport over the past 28 years. $45.

Softer cookie, wheat, corn, soy, and alfalfa free. Great for youngster, but also great for more mature horse with few teeth. Also, a great horse pill popper!

D E S O RI HO RS E DOUBLE DOH BROWN LEATHER BELT Hand cut, sewn and edged by local artisans in Venice, Italy. Gold rhodium-plated brass buckle with double horse head. Refined and elegant to use both in the field of competition and an elegant dinner.

United States Equestrian Team Foundation 908 234-1251 uset.org

Desori Horse USA 3460 Fairlane Farms Rd, Suite 15 Wellington, FL 561 880-8920 desorihorseusa.com

AtoZ Horse Cookies a2zhorsecookies.com 650 288-2448 a2zhorsecookies@gmail.com OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 5


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

EIGHT APPS FOR EQUESTRIANS We last looked at phone apps two years ago. They keep getting BETTER AND BETTER.

Learn your dressage tests inside and out! You can save money by buying the TESTPRO USDF and TESTPRO FEI DRESSAGE as a bundle from the app store. The interactive test learning method allows you to draw movements with your finger, tap forwards and backwards to move through the test, and watch the test play through. You can even close your eyes and listen to the movements read aloud.

STALLER allows horse owners to list, search for, and rent stalls for their horses anywhere in the country, and soon in Europe. The platform is the first of its kind to offer a streamlined process for barn and horse owners to connect, including the legal paperwork and payment. Traveling with your horse just got a lot easier.

The TURNOUT GUIDE by Horseware Ireland might seem like a bit of a gimmick, but it can come in handy. By gathering weather forecasts for the next three days, the app makes an approximate recommendation for which of their products will best suit the conditions and your horse. Also, the app lets you “try on” different blankets with a photo of your horse. Of course, it might be to sell more of their turnouts, but it is still fun to use.

The PONYAPP was created by riders for riders. It works like a stable manager to track the horses’ daily activities, log expenses, and add reminders. They recently reached a database of over 100,000 horses. Some of the newer features include the ability to share the horses’ activities, follow top-ranked horses and riders, and “toss apples” (likes) to friends. The features allow users to share information about the horses with their team or with the greater PonyApp community.

FEI RULEAPP allows you to take all of the FEI rules and regulations with you, even without an internet connection. A search feature makes it possible to find whatever you’re looking for in an instant.

Watch hundreds of horse shows from every discipline right on your phone with the FEI TV app. It includes live streaming, which is the next best thing when you can’t attend a show in person.

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Just as you track your workouts with MyFitnessPal or Runkeeper, now you can track your rides, including the time, distance, gait, beat, and stride with EQUILAB. Tracking your progress can lend accountability as well as identify patterns that can help you and your horse succeed. The ability to log rides allows others to see what’s happening with your horse, even from afar. A scheduler can help you and your team ensure a seamless and comprehensive plan for your horse from rest days to farrier visits.

You will be confident and prepared in the start box with the CROSS COUNTRY app, which allows you to record and measure a course by creating a course map with obstacles, photos, videos, text, voice comments, and minute markers. You can also download pre-recorded courses and guided course walks from around the world.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95


Equestrian Art Today

Papilio / 44x55 by Sandra Meyer

www.san d ra mey ergalle ry . co m


EQ F A V O R I T E S

BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY The WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW returns to the streets of D.C. BY LINDSAY BROCK

A

PHOTOS: SHAWN MCMILLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

fixture in the Washington, D.C., community and an equestrian tradition since 1958, the Washington International Horse Show (WIHS) is the leading metropolitan indoor show in the U.S. and has stolen the hearts of competitors and horse-sport fans alike. The show, presented by Mars Equestrian, possesses a dedication to bringing horse sport to the masses. The WIHS thrives on introducing equestrian sport to those who may have never seen a horse, touched a horse, or watched a horse perform.

A Celebration of the Horse WIHS has always been more than just a horse show. It features the fan-favorite

Barn Night, presented by the Lindsay Maxwell Charitable Fund, on Thursday, October 24. Kids’ Day Saturday, October 26, includes the WIHS Shetland Pony Steeplechase Championship Series, presented by Charles Owen, and, featured this year, is the $35,000 International Jumping Accumulator Costume Class.

ALBERT SHVILLY

Top Competition A ribbon earned at WIHS is undoubtedly a cherished one with championships, recognitions, and special awards being bestowed upon some of the nation’s top hunter horses and ponies. In addition, the Lindsay Maxwell Charitable Fund WIHS Equitation Final proudly serves as one of the most prestigious year-end equitation finals and takes place on Saturday, October 26, before the level of horse sport climbs even higher later that evening. Also taking up the spotlight on Saturday, the $136,300 Longines FEI Jumping World Cup Washington for the President’s Cup is a coveted qualifier for the 2020 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final in Las Vegas, NV, next April. Purchase a ticket, which starts as low as $2.

Above: Aaron Vale and Finou 4 beat the challenge of the puissance wall when it stood just shy of 7-feet; Beezie Madden and Breitling LS; the Shetland Pony Steeplechase.

Modern Day Tradition While some of the world’s most celebrated riders have competed at WIHS, the show is also a historic social event. Many notable guests have made their way to WIHS over the years, including Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Gerald R. Ford. Embrace D.C. culture on Military Night, presented by Caterpillar Inc., and enjoy the $50,000 Speed Final and iconic $25,000 Land Rover Puissance on Friday, October 25.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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SETTING THE STANDARD FOR 40 YEARS Complete design services and fine craftmanship Custom barns, arenas, garages and living quarters

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THOMAS WINTER

HOBE SOUND POLO Polo isn’t just for the fabulously rich. PABLO DORIGNAC intends to make sure everyone has a chance to play.

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JACQUIE PORCARO

BY REBECCA BALDRIDGE


T

Lindsay Taylor Vance and Tyler Vance.

STEVEN MARTINE

PHILIPPA DAVIN

STEVEN MARTINE

THOMAS WINTER

Hobe Sound boasts seven polo fields, two stables with a total 36 here’s nothing like a bracing chukker of polo stalls, and temporary stalls for another 80-100 horses. to lift the spirits, and if you’re playing polo at Hobe After making significant capital investments in the fields, Sound Polo Club, you can toss the bottle of Prozac. including a new irrigation system last year, the owners were You won’t find a friendlier or happier place to engage ready to take the final step of hiring a new manager. Pablo in the sport of kings. Indeed, one of the joys of playing at Hobe Dorignac, a 5-goal player (formerly 7), Sound is that club manager Pablo who has been playing polo professionDorignac doesn’t believe that polo is the THERE’S NOTHING WRONG ally since 1992, joined Hobe Sound in sport of kings; in his view there’s scope WITH YOU A LITTLE PROZAC November 2018. Dorignac has played for almost everyone to enjoy polo at around the world and won many tournatheir own level. You don’t have to sponAND A POLO MALLET ments, including the East Coast Open sor a high goal team or hobnob with WOULDN’T CURE. and the Abierto de Tortugas. Polo is Prince Harry to participate in the sport –Larry Lipton to his wife in Pablo’s blood, as he comes from a and have a walloping good time. in Manhattan Murder Mystery. family that has played a leading role Hobe Sound Polo Club is the newin Argentine polo for three generaest addition to the polo community in tions. His father, Gaston, a 10-goal player, won three Argentine South Florida, creating an opportunity just outside Wellington Opens and reached the finals in 17 more. He is also one of for players of all levels to enjoy world-class facilities. The clubArgentina’s foremost authorities on polo field maintenance and house, stables, and polo fields—situated on a former citrus management, and will be lending his expertise to Hobe Sound. grove—were completed in 2007. Following the great recession, Pablo’s brother, also named Gaston, has been one of the leading Becker Holdings, the previous owners, took the club back and umpires in high goal polo for more than 18 years. made a commitment to invest in the property and to create a polo club that met the highest standards for facilities. Today

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Rick Melchiori, general manager of Becker All of the tournaments slated for 2020 will Holdings, the owner of Hobe Sound, has great be 8 goal or below, giving Hobe Sound’s lower hopes for the 1,500-acre property, particularly handicap players an opportunity to participate with Dorignac in charge. “In the short term,” in USPA-sanctioned matches. The tournahe says, “our goal is to make sure that Pablo ment lineup includes the Governor’s Cup (0-6 has everything he needs. Over time, we’d like goals), the Congressional Cup (6-8 goals), the to expand the event space and clubhouse to Master’s Cup (8 goals), a women’s challenge help build a sense of community. We may also (using women’s handicaps), the Constitution consider offering residential lots.” Cup (6 goals), and the 4-8 goal General S. In geographic terms, the club is well situBrown, in which each team will have one ated. It’s a short drive from the West Palm member with a military connection. Beach airport, boasts access to I-95, and is just After one season with Dorignac, current 30 minutes from Wellington. Should the ownclub members are already envisioning a long ers opt to move ahead with limited residential and happy future at Hobe Sound. Lindsay development in the future, the property offers Taylor Vance, who plays at the club with her all the benefits of country living without husband Tyler Vance, has a lot to say about being too remote. playing with Dorignac. “Pablo is an incredible Dorignac has big plans to develop coach and teacher, and has done so much “PABLO MAKES A GREAT the club into a polo community that to help me as a player. But the thing welcomes low-to-medium goal players that stands out most about Pablo is his EFFORT TO CREATE A FAMILY and gives them the chance to play on incredible devotion to the horses and the ATMOSPHERE AT THE CLUB.” fields equal to anything in Wellington. care he lavishes on them. To me, that’s –David Sloan He feels strongly about making polo the mark of a true professional.” In fact, available and affordable to everyone. “I Lindsay and Tyler have such an affinity want to create a real community at Hobe Sound, where beginfor Hobe Sound that they chose the club as the site for their ners can find an affordable option to learn the sport and more engagement photographs. advanced players can play at a more challenging level. We want to offer something for everyone to enjoy.” avid Sloan, a founding member and the club’s In that spirit, Dorignac also notes that the club is adjacent USPA representative, is also a fan of Hobe Sound’s to the Atlantic Ridge State Park, which includes a vast netinclusiveness. “Pablo makes a great effort to crework of riding trails. For those not quite ready to pick up a ate a family atmosphere at the club, and every mallet, there will be ample opportunity for hacking out and Saturday there’s an asado at the end of the day. Sometimes he’ll enjoying 5,800 acres of pristine wetlands and uplands. The even set up a volleyball net and encourage everyone to play. He park is one of the largest areas of natural land remaining near wants all the members to get to know each other.” the Florida coast, and provides a habitat for a variety of animals Looking forward, Dorignac has an ambitious strategy to including some endangered species. Just a short ride can reveal develop the club that includes building additional stables and anything from a multitude of waterfowl to a herd of wild boar. expanded clubhouse facilities. He’ll offer practice fields and stabling for high goal teams, which is a great way to expose tarting with the 2020 season, Hobe Sound will also lower goal players to the sport’s elite. Finally, next season Hobe be playing host to a number of United States Polo Sound will host corporate and social polo events suitable for Association (USPA) sponsored tournaments. USPA entertaining clients, team building, birthdays, and family parpresident Tony Coppola emphasizes that every club ties. The club will be able to create bespoke packages suited to must meet a range of strict criteria to sponsor USPA tournaevery taste and budget. ments. He says, “Pablo is a talented and seasoned professional, For far too long, polo has been viewed as the preserve of and Hobe Sound has beautiful facilities. Demand for polo is princes and wealthy playboys. Pablo Dorignac intends to increasing and with the growth in Wellington we need more change that perception. The warm atmosphere he’s created clubs. Hobe Sound is close enough to make sense, with a great at Hobe Sound welcomes experienced players and neophytes location.” Coppola further notes that even with approximately alike. In Pablo’s words, “Everyone should be able to play polo.” 100 polo fields in Wellington, demand for fields is still outpacing availability. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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Capone oil ©cnygrenart

CARRIE NYGREN | SAA www.cnygrenart.com cnygrenart@gmail.com

sporting & equestrian art | commissions welcome


T H E B RO O KE U S A PHOTO COMPE TI TIO N

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rooke USA launched its inaugural summer photo competition on June 15, 2019, raising both awareness and funds in a new and exciting way for working equines and the people who depend on them in the developing world. The competition was open to budding amateurs and professional photographers alike. The top 12 photos will be featured in Brooke USA’s first annual calendar, which will be released November 2019. The calendar can be purchased at BrookeUSA.org. The finalists were chosen by judges who exemplify both the photography and the equestrian world: Kasey Perry-Glass / Brooke USA Ambassador; Enrique Urdaneta-Alamo / Equestrian & Animal Photographer; Hannah Selleck / Brooke USA Ambassador; and David Erdek / Equestrian Photographer. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS

Camera: Shelly Schmidt Smartphone: Allison Clark

Shelly Schmidt (Camera) Learning to Fly

Allison Clark (Phone) Mooney Maguire 26 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2019

Cheryl Broumley (Camera) Nevada Wild Horse

Lisa Dickman (Camera) Sisterly Love


Jacqueline Stewart (Phone) Strawberry Roan Forever

Lisa Dickman (Camera) Gossiping in the Schoolyard

Shelly Schmidt (Camera) Grace

Morgan Lance (Phone) Pure Love

Jim McLlean (Camera) Pony Sulkie Race

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

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FALL ROOT VEGETABLE SALAD & CHAMPAGNE HONEY VINAIGRETTE Ingredients 1 celery root (approximately 1½ pounds) 1 golden beet, large 1 carrot, medium 1 cucumber 2 radish 2 ounce crème fraiche, whipped till soft peaks ½ ounce sesame seeds, toasted 1 orange, cut into segments Fresh petit herbs, basil, mint, amaranth, chervil, chive as needed. Vinaigrette 2 ounce Champagne vinegar 6 ounce extra-virgin olive oil 1 ounce honey Preparation 1. Wash and peel all the vegetables. 2. Once clean, carefully slice on the mandolin as thin as possible. 3. Roll each of the vegetables into a consistent form. Champagne Honey Vinaigrette: 1. In a bowl whisk together vinegar, honey, and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Plating 1. Place the whipped crème fraiche in the bottom of a bowl. 2. Place the rolled vegetables in the crème fraiche. 3. Drizzle with the Champagne vinaigrette and then lightly garnish with the petit herbs. 4. Finish with the citrus segments and toasted sesame seeds.

Twin Farms is an intimate, all-inclusive country hideaway set amidst 300 acres of meadow and in woodlands in an unspoiled valley, 15 minutes north of Woodstock in Barnard, Vermont. The Relais & Châteaux property and only five-star resort in Vermont has a culinary program incomparable to anywhere else in the Northeast. Guests forgo menus, trusting Executive Chef Nathan Rich and his team to exceed their culinary expectations with specially curated meals for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The cuisine reflects the changing seasons, inspired by Vermont’s finest produce, and Twin Farms’ estate-grown herbs, fruits, and vegetables.

Executive Chef Nathan Rich A New Hampshire native, Chef Rich joined the Twin Farms team in 2013 from Lake Placid Lodge. Chef Rich’s culinary expertise was recognized when he was one of only three chefs in the world to be awarded the Relais & Châteaux 2013 Rising Chef Trophy. Chef Rich sharpened his culinary skills for several years at premier establishments including Mandarin Oriental, Boston, The Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club, Taj Boston, and The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in New Hampshire. A seasoned chef with extensive luxury hotel experience, Rich believes in cooking quality foods that have been naturally grown or raised, which mirrors Twin Farms’ culinary philosophy. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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S A L LY S L AT E R P R E S E N T S

THE BEST OF EQUESTRIAN LIVING

STEEPLE CHASE FARM | Greenwich, CT | $14,750,000 | Web# CT106431 Impeccably designed horse farm with indoor and outdoor riding rings, 8 paddocks, a state-of-the-art 8-stall stable and staff housing for grooms/trainer. The award-winning, custom built, Shingle style home features 5 bedrooms, all en-suite, an expansive tiered patio with an outdoor fireplace, perennial gardens and a gorgeous pool with spectacular sunsets.

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www.elliman.com/equestrian

elliman.com/connecticut EQmedia.agency CONNECTICUT | NEW YORK CITY | LONG ISLAND | 612-209-0310 THE HAMPTONS | WESTCHESTER | NEW JERSEY | FLORIDA | CALIFORNIA | COLORADO | MASSACHUSETTS TEXAS | INTERNATIONAL Follow us| @douglaselliman 88 FIELD POINT ROAD, GREENWICH, CT 06830 203.622.4900 © 2019 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


EQ P E O P L E

MEET THE EXPERT SUZANNE PERKINS

knows equestrian real estate in SANTA BARBARA horse country.

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ith an envied location on California’s Central Coast and long referred to as the American Riviera, Santa Barbara has been a haven for some of America’s wealthiest families for nearly 130 years. Boasting a perfect year-round climate, the Santa Barbara region sits within one of the most fertile agricultural zones in the world with cattle-ranching, farming, and world-renowned wineries. It’s also a great place for equestrians as one of the few places on earth where you can ride on residential horse trails that lead to the beach, and take a ride in the remote backcountry, all in the same day. Santa Barbara is also known for the Polo and Racquet Club, the third-oldest polo facility in the U.S. and an exciting place to watch international competitions. Suzanne Perkins has been an influential leader in Santa Barbara and Montecito real estate for 28 years, first with Sotheby’s International Realty and now with Compass. She’s consistently recognized by the Wall Street Journal as one of America’s top 250 real estate agents and the number one agent in sales volume for Santa Barbara County. In 2008, she earned the title of number-one agent in America for transaction sides when she represented El Cojo and Jalama Ranches, the largest non-commercial transaction in California history. Born with a love of horses, Suzanne is a third-generation horsewoman from Lexington, Kentucky. She and her husband, Perry, have bred, trained, and shown four generations of champion

Top: Suzanne with Davincis Ebony GA Above: 237-acre Rancho San Carlos.

Arabian and half-Arabian horses, which included several national champions. Nearly every year, one or more of their horses reach the winner’s circle at the U.S. Nationals. Suzanne was an accomplished former international horse-show judge, a licensed United States Equestrian Federation judge, and has held multiple judges’ cards for three decades. The historic Rancho San Carlos is an interesting property offered by Suzanne. It is an approximately 237acre estate that, for 100 years, has been under the ownership of one family. The main residence, designed by Reginald

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Johnson in 1931, is 29,483 square feet comprised of over 30 rooms. Additional features include 10 residential cottages, an office, producing orchards, and extensive equestrian facilities, and is offered at $75,000,000. Suzanne’s extensive knowledge of all things equestrian make her uniquely qualified to assist clients looking for special equestrian operations or ranch properties. In 2008, she was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to the Santa Barbara Fair and Exposition Board of Directors, which oversees the 19th Agricultural Association. She was a past president of the Montecito Trail Foundation, and she has served as a commissioner of the Santa Barbara County Parks Commission since 1992. “Every day, I’m doing what I love and enjoy,” says Suzanne. “Finding the perfect home for our clients requires great service, skill, and local market knowledge. That I get to represent some of the most incredible properties and people in the world in the spectacular surroundings of Santa Barbara, Montecito, and the Santa Ynez Valley, is a blessing. My integrity and work ethic enable me to deliver a personalized level of service to my clients that is remarkable in today’s real estate market. I also have a sophisticated team to offer clients support and to make the buying process as easy and enjoyable as possible. It’s all about the clients and what they need from us. Then it’s our job to do the best we can to ensure a successful relationship.” CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

THE GREAT SWEEPSTAKES OF 1877 OK

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A true story of southern grit, Gilded Age tycoons, and a RACE THAT GALVANIZED THE NATION.

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ctober 24, 1877, was a day of minimal activity in the halls of Congress. The US Senate was not in session, having adjourned the previous day and calendared no activity until the 25th; the House of Representatives was largely empty, and in any event was scheduled to address only a few items, primarily a variety of petitions and claims remaining from the Civil War, which had concluded some twelve years earlier. That small group of Congressmen—and they were all men; Congress had broken the color barrier in 1870 with the seating of Senator Hiram Rhodes Revels of Mississippi and House Member Joseph Rainey of South Carolina, but it would be nearly forty years before Montana’s Jeannette Rankin would become the first female member of Congress—considered the petitions and motions dispiritedly. With so few members in attendance, Congress would accomplish nothing of note on October 24. One can readily imagine the few remaining legislators’ voices echoing eerily in the cavernous, nearly empty halls of the House of Representatives.

Reprinted with permission. ©2016 Lyons Press

The handful of legislators in Congress on October 24 was well aware of the reason so few were present for the day’s session. Some may have glanced resentfully at the empty desks of their absent colleagues, but most participated resignedly, performing the work of the nation as they had been selected to do. Finally, at 3:25 p.m., the Honorable Fernando Wood, perhaps best known as the Civil War mayor of New York who had suggested that his city secede from the Union rather than sacrifice its profitable business relationship with the Confederacy, rose to move that the House adjourn. Upon passage of the motion, Congress called a merciful end to its unproductive day. While October 24, 1877, represented something less than a shining example of the US Congress at its finest, the date nevertheless earned a unique place in history. It was on this date that the nation’s senators and nearly all representatives abandoned the halls of Congress to attend an occasion of less repute but considerably more sporting interest—a specially arranged and long-anticipated horse race at nearby Pimlico Racetrack involving three of the nation’s best-known thoroughbreds. It marked Continued on page 34

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hamptons legendary equestrian estate Set on 20.3 /- acres this facility incorporates 27 stalls with drainage system, 14 paddocks, 3 outdoor rings, viewing stands, a 15,000+/- sq. ft. indoor ring with second floor viewing and entertaining lounge, 2 tack rooms, bathing stalls, managerial offices and staff housing. +

Priced separately is an adjacent vacant 1.44+/- acre building lot, able to accommodate a residence with pool, pool house and tennis.

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the first time in the nation’s history that either house of America’s most august legislative body had adjourned specifically so that its members could attend a horse race. It was a race of enormous national interest, both to elected officials and to America’s common folk. The race involved two high-profile “Eastern” thoroughbreds, Parole and Tom Ochiltree, one hailing from the New Jersey headquarters of one of the nation’s preeminent sportsmen and industrialists, the other from the New York stable of his brother. The third starter was Ten Broeck, an invader from the “West,” in this case the state of Kentucky, whose unrivaled record on the turf had already made him legendary in his own time. The opportunity to partake of this East vs. West rivalry, and perhaps extract a profit through a few well-placed wagers, proved far more enticing to many of the legislators than the essential but less exciting business of Congress.

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THE GREAT SWEEPSTAKES

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lthough East and West were the compass points discussed in the day’s newspapers, and in polite conversation in Congress and on the street, many would have recognized that the race also symbolized the North vs. South hostilities that had so recently and profoundly shaped the nation’s racial relations, its family structures, its international relations, and its domestic politics. New York and New Jersey had, of course, been squarely pro-Union during the Civil War, even given the draft riots that had shattered the peace of the Empire State, even given the sentiments of Mayor Wood. Kentucky had been a slave state whose legislators had declared it a neutral party, doubtless in the hopes of doing

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Kentucky’s Ten Broeck set records at almost every distance. (Keeneland Library)

“It is the GREATEST EVENT that has ever been seen on the American turf. It is beyond the descriptive powers of the most facile pen to present any idea of the scene that ensued.” —Baltimore American and Commercial Advertiser, October 25, 1887.

MARK SHRAGER is a prolific turf writer, having published several hundred articles in magazines such as Turf & Sport Digest, American Turf Magazine, and others. His article “1,001 Surefire Ways to Lose a Horse Race” was published in the annual Best Sports Stories anthology. Shrager has also published two books of Breeders’ Cup handicapping information. Six years of research, including stretches in Kentucky and at the Library of Congress, have led to The Great Sweepstakes of 1877. He lives in Altadena, California.

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business with both sides, Union and Rebel. The Civil War had been the deadliest conflict in American history. It had long been estimated that the War Between the States cost the lives of at least 625,000 combatants—360,222 on the Union side and roughly 258,000 Confederates—but recent scholarly recounting of census records suggests that the toll may have been substantially higher—perhaps upwards of 850,000. More soldiers on both sides died of non-battle causes— primarily disease and hunger—than of gunshots, bayonet strikes, or other human violence. Multiples of these numbers were left permanently debilitated. More than 150 years after the war’s end, after two World Wars, after Korea and Vietnam, after two Gulf Wars and a protracted American presence in the Middle East, the Civil War remains the deadliest conflict in the history of a nation that has, by dint of its economic and military might, been among the combatants in many an armed struggle. Owing to the slow communications of the times, overt hostilities between North and South continued even after the war was diplomatically concluded; the final Confederate general to surrender was Cherokee leader Stand Watie, who conceded defeat at Doaksville in the Choctaw Nation (now Oklahoma) on June 23, 1865, some two and a half months after Lee laid down his sword. The regional rivalries that had existed long before the Civil War had been nurtured in the years that followed the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. The surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House had formally ended the war, but while most of the conflagration’s nonfatal physical wounds were slowly healing, America’s emotional scars remained and, in some


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

cases, festered. The disputed presidential election of 1876, pitting Republican Rutherford B. Hayes against Democrat Samuel J. Tilden and decided by a single electoral vote after four states’ electoral slates were claimed by both political parties, exacerbated tensions that were already near the breaking point.

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t is no exaggeration to suggest that Hayes’s hairsbreadth victory in the Electoral College, awarded to the Republican candidate despite Tilden’s sizable margin in the popular vote, brought the nation to the brink of a second Civil War. When an election commission, established by Congress to sort out the votes in the four disputed states, awarded each of the states to Hayes by a strictly partisan eight-to- seven vote—the commission comprised eight Republicans and seven Democrats—Congressional Democrats threatened a filibuster to delay Hayes’s inauguration. It is questionable whether an elected president could be denied his office because of a political maneuver in Congress, but the possibility was there. More ominously, one frustrated Democrat vowed that “a hundred thousand Kentuckians would see justice done to Tilden” and the Republicans reportedly considered using the army to enforce the election commission’s rulings. Only when cooler heads prevailed, creating the “Compromise of 1877,” was what historian James Truslow Adams described as “the filthy mess of 1876” brought to a conclusion. A deeply divided nation was still seeking to implement—or subvert— the changes wrought by the deadly years of brother vs. brother hostility. The issues that created these lingering scars unquestionably played no small part in the desire of the elected representatives

Wyndham Walden trained Tom Ochiltree for the Great Sweepstakes. (Keeneland Library)

Billy Walker piloted Ten Broeck in the Great Sweepstakes. (Keeneland Library)

to participate, even if only by rooting for their particular regional favorite, in this East vs. West contest. It was, however, not merely public officials who availed themselves of the opportunity to attend the Great Sweepstakes while shirking official duties. The October 25, 1877, edition of the Chicago Tribune noted that “the Stock Board early adjourned till tomorrow to allow the members to attend the race. At the Corn and Flower exchange very few members were present, and little business done.” Businesses operated with skeleton crews that day; both managers and employees wanted to be nowhere but at Pimlico. This was an iconic, must-see occasion; if one’s circumstances allowed it, he or she was going to the races. And while Congress—and the Stock Board and the Corn and Flower Exchange and the rest of the nation—awaited the confrontation of the three great horses with fevered anticipation, discussed the horses’ relative merits for weeks beforehand, argued the race’s results heatedly for months afterward, and demanded a rematch in letters to the editors of hundreds of newspapers, it may well be that the horses were the least interesting of the cast of characters that came together on that cool October afternoon in Baltimore. Certainly, the horse’s owners were without peers as objects of public curiosity; the jockeys were men of accomplishment, each with a unique perspective on the race, on life; and the trainers ran the gamut from enormously successful and publicly revered to practically unknown. All of their stories will be told in these pages. As our tale begins, the nation awaits the arrival from Nantura Stock Farm, in the heart of the Kentucky Bluegrass, of Ten Broeck, quite possibly America’s greatest racehorse to that point in time. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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BOOK S OF NOTE

CABIN STYLE A fresh look at refined cabin-home design from destination mountain resorts to pristine rural and rustic locales.

Photography by Audrey Hall Text by Chase Reynolds Ewald Gibbs Smith Publisher, August 6, 2019

Chase Reynolds Ewald has been writing about design, travel, and lifestyle for 25 years. A graduate of Yale and the Graduate School of Journalism at U.C. Berkeley, she is currently the senior editor of Western Art & Architecture magazine. She lives in Tiburon, California. Audrey Hall’s images about culture, style, and travel are featured from social media to television. This is her eleventh book. She lives in Livingston, Montana.

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Cabin Style gives us an up-close look at some of the most exclusive architect-designed cabins, ranch houses, and lodges located in popular resort areas. Stunning cabin exteriors and interiors, combined with well-told stories of the homes and their owners, take readers into the living rooms of cozy log, wood, and rock homes in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, California, and Tennessee. Luxurious cabins lure the owners of second homes to relaxing weeks in isolated landscape settings or upscale enclaves—always within reach of ski resorts, fly-fishing rivers, and outdoor recreation of all types. OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 9 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 7


Lakeside Cabin Style Situated on a private, spring-fed lake in Tennessee, this graceful structure offers unimpeded views of the lake and a glass-walled bridge access to the all-season, visually floating porch. The interior inset showcases the furnishings, which were selected to match the desired, old feel of the house. 38 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2019


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Hot Springs Hideaway The Northern Idaho home was designed to have a rustic style, be simple and quiet in tone, and lightly ornamented.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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MIA

BY BRIDGET ARSENAULT

ia Suki didn’t learn to ride until late into her teens. Unlike most little girls who dream of pudgy ponies and pony club, Mia began riding to overcome a fear of animals. “I decided that I wanted to go riding to get rid of this fear,” explained Mia. Fast forward to 2008 when Mia graduated from London’s King’s College having

studied business management, but this was, in fact, her plan B. Previously Mia had been completing a Master’s degree in fashion entrepreneurship at the London College

of Fashion, but part way through she got sick and never finished. While recovering and thinking to herself, “What now?’ Mia picked up riding again. And she had a lightbulb moment. She said, “I realized there is such a lack of properly fitting clothes for women and good equestrian clothes for women. Honestly, I couldn’t find any. At the same time I was seeing it myself, I was talking to other women and everyone had the same problems. The older equestrian brands weren’t trying to solve these issues. They are still pushing products onto the market that are very masculine in shape and fittings that are just not designed for a woman, more for young girls.” Mia was on to something. “Athleisure” wear is a multi-billion-dollar business. Practically everything on the market right now is sportswear. But equestrian apparel is more of a challenge. Designers are still bound to a fairly rigid and traditional blueprint, especially when it comes to competition apparel. The idea was to create a collection that honored the equestrian heritage, while modernizing it for today’s women. “We’ve designed a cape,” she said. “In our collection, we’ve designed the jackets with the belt on the outside, for example.”

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SUKI

Amelia jacket, Chrissie short -sleeve polo, Linda pants

Pegasus jacket, Poppy shirt, Nara pants

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Pandora jacket and Arabella shirt with the Nadia full-seat pants and rider helmet.

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iminutive with straight black hair, wearing minimal, natural makeup, and test-driving her latest wares, Mia looks strong and graceful. She is precisely how you would imagine someone who designs this line of clothing. “I am the type of personality that I just go for it. I am stubborn but with sharp focus, so hopefully something good comes out from the other end!” Mia understands the pragmatics of style. Stocked at Harrods and sold online via her e-commerce site, each piece is crafted and designed to fit a female-equestrian-athlete’s body and movement. The pieces are laboriously tested to ensure the best technical performance—ultimately riding is a dynamic and rigorous sport. Crafted in Italy, each item is effortlessly beautiful. Hand-sewn silks and buttery lambs leather are just a few of her staples. With flattering shapes and timeless designs, Mia has managed to design a collection that is not only athletically sound but also has the sartorial elegance you might wear to see friends or to a meeting.

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The brand is growing and evolving. This autumn/winter Mia is releasing Free Rider, an equestrian-inspired capsule collection of skiwear. “I’ve been wearing some Mia Suki stuff on the ski slope for a few years now,” Mia said, “and I noticed how well it performs. I’ve been trying to expand the collection to be much more lifestyle, beyond equestrian technical competition stuff. The ski jacket is inspired by our equestrian jackets. It’s very fitted. We are using country colors. We have a greentweed-printed nylon; we use a moss color, and we have bits of dark gray and black. The pieces are very form-fitting, following the equestrian silhouette. We also have some oversized cashmere ponchos. On the inside there is an inlay with our signature horsehead-quilted nylon.” As the brand matures into this next season, Mia is staying curious, keeping her mind open to the ways fashion and retail are constantly evolving, and she’s poised for her next round of success. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95


Pearl ski jacket, Dulcie turtleneck sweater, Remy ski pants, Gina over-the-knee boots

Pearl ski jacket, Erika winter sports bodysuit, Gina over-the-knee boots, Powder snowboard jacket, Dulcie turtleneck sweater, Flicka multi-purpose bodysuit, Gina over-the-knee boots

Snow ski jacket, Dulcie turtleneck sweater, Flicka multi-purpose bodysuit, Gina over-the-knee boots

Marte bodysuit

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A SEAL OF APPROVAL The EQUUS FOUNDATION’S GUARDIAN PROGRAM screens charities to ensure they are transparent and operating at the highest levels of horse care.

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ll horses, “Prior to our estabeven chamlishing the Guardian pions of the program, equine racetrack and organizations seeking show ring, are only one financial support from unlucky sale away from the EQUUS Foundation an uncertain future,” completed a traditional said Lynn Coakley, grant application,” said founder of the EQUUS Coakley. “Over the years, Foundation. The founit became apparent that dation, which works many of these organizato promote all types of tions not only needed collaboration between financial support, they humans and horses, needed direction and also works to protect training to improve their and save increasing operations and pracnumbers of horses at tices. The information risk of abuse, neglect, required to receive the and slaughter, in large Guardian seal serves as a part through the support of organizations guide to best practices in governance, finanLynn Coakley, Georgina Bloomberg, nationwide. cial management, program operations, and and EQUUS Foundation vice president, “To ensure a future for America’s horse care. The program is a critical compoValerie Angeli with the staff and volunhorses, it is critical to identify and invest nent of our commitment to not only increase teers from Rising Starr Horse Rescue and an adoptable horse at a parade of in the most effective equine charities in adoptions of at-risk horses and provide a adoptable horses held at the opening the U.S.—those that operate at the highsafe haven for aged horses, but also increase ceremonies of the Hampton Classic 2018. est standards,” Coakley explained. “With opportunities for all people to partner with the internet and social media, it is easy for horses in innovative ways.” people to be misinformed and misled, so the need for transparHelping spread the EQUUS message are the EquuStars, an ency is more important now than ever before.” inspirational group of equestrians who work with the foundaIn 2017 the EQUUS Foundation established the Guardians tion to motivate fellow equestrians and horse lovers to take program, which recognizes organizations that have made action on behalf of horses. They include Georgina Bloomberg, themselves transparent and accountable for their programs, Brianne Goutal-Marteau, Hayley Barnhill, Paige Johnson, horse care practices, and governance. Jessica Springsteen, and Clementine Goutal (see page 48). In order for an organization to earn the EQUUS Foundation The foundation has highlighted some of their Guardian Guardian designation, the organization must first join the charities at the annual Animal Adoption Day at the Hampton EQUUS Foundation Equine Welfare Network, an online Classic. The event, sponsored by Georgina Bloomberg, also nationwide network of equine nonprofits and government included adoptable dogs, cats, and rabbits. “This is one of our entities where people can search and connect to the organimost anticipated and joyful events of the year, when horse lovers zations in their community. Afterwards, they must submit and the horse community come out to the beautiful Hampton information regarding all aspects of their organization. Classic with the sole purpose of supporting at-risk and transiOnly charities that undergo this comprehensive and unique tioning horses that need our help and to learn what they can verification process receive the EQUUS Foundation’s seal of do to make all horses feel like champions!” said Valerie Angeli, transparency and are eligible to receive financial support. EQUUS Foundation vice president. KILEY BATES FOR THE HAMPTON CLASSIC

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MARTY LEMOS

KRISTIN GRAY/ TISCHMANPETS PHOTOGRAPHY

GRIFFIN AND RISING STARR HORSE RESCUE

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TEDDY AND OMEGA HORSE RESCUE

sides and on his face and lower legs,” said Kelly Stackpole, the organiza-

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tion’s founder. “He was generally healthy, but he had been abused, and

help a horse in need. The foundation put Georgina in touch with one of

needed help learning to trust people. We rescued him, and then rehabili-

their Guardian charities, the Omega Horse Rescue in Airville, Pennsylvania.

tated and retrained him.”

Kelly Smith, the founder and president of the rescue, had recently rescued

riffin was taken in by Rising Starr Horse Rescue (RSHR) from a kill pen waiting to be shipped to Mexico. After seven days in the pen, Griffin had contracted pneumonia. “He had scars on both

RSHR was founded in 2015 by Kelly and a group of friends and school-

hen renowned equestrian Georgina Bloomberg began her search for her five-year-old son, Jasper’s, first pony, she contacted the EQUUS Foundation for help. It was no surprise

that the animal welfare advocate would take the opportunity to find and

a miniature horse named Teddy from a tragic fate. Held in a kill-buyer’s

age children, and it took some time before they were able to raise enough

facility, he was headed to slaughter. Smith described him as sweet and doc-

money to start rescuing horses. When the opportunity to rescue Griffin

ile, trained for both riding and driving, with a thick and scruffy winter coat.

came along in 2016, the group saw their chance to rescue their first horse.

In January, Teddy was shipped to Gotham South, the Bloombergs’ winter

“The money to rescue him was raised by our school-age volunteers,” said

home in Wellington, Florida. There, Teddy received a haircut and an instant

Kelly, who is a professional riding instructor and horse trainer.

best friend in young Jasper. The pair have been taking lessons together, and

So far, RSHR has rescued 16 horses and re-homed 13 horses. “Our programs have also expanded to include educating the public on the real-

have even jumped some small fences. “Thanks to the EQUUS Foundation and Omega Horse Rescue, watch-

ity and responsibility of horse ownership. We welcome volunteers of all

ing Jasper take his first riding lesson with Teddy was one of the most joyful

ages and have training programs for them,” Kelly continued. “We’re look-

moments of my life,” Bloomberg told Tap Into Horses. “This is the perfect

ing to expand our rescue and programs, and EQUUS has been absolutely

match. Teddy and Jasper will have many happy moments and a lifetime

instrumental in our growth.”

together.”

As an EQUUS Guardian, RSHR has been invited each year to the Hampton Classic Animal Adoption Day where rescue organizations feature adoptable horses, dogs, and cats. It was at the event in 2017 that Griffin found his forever home with a loving family from Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Today, he is a well adjusted member of their family and a best friend to his young rider.

Above left, Georgina Bloomberg, Valerie Angeli, and a volunteer for Rising Starr Horse Rescue riding Griffin at Adoption Day at the Hampton Classic in 2017, the day Griffin got adopted. Above right, Jasper and Georgina Bloomberg with Teddy and Crown. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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W H AT ’ S N E X T F O R

CLEMENTINE GOUTAL? BY EMILY HOLOWCZAK PHOTOS ERIC STRIFFLER

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ducator. Philanthropist. Equestrienne. Clementine Goutal seamlessly weaves together a passion for learning, charitable initiative, and an intense love for horses. Like many involved in equestrian sport, Clementine eats, sleeps, and breathes horses. Her older sister, Brianne Goutal-Marteau is a champion jumper and trainer. But Clementine also has other passions which extend beyond the horse world. Growing up, Clementine not only took her equestrian pursuits very seriously, but also her education. As a young athlete, she studied at Chapin and The Professional Children’s School in New York City in order to pursue a riding career at the same time. Not only did Clementine’s experience as a student-athlete feed her appetite for learning, but it also sparked a desire for a better education system for students like her. Clementine believes that every athlete should have access to quality instruction without having to compromise their active lifestyle outside the classroom. She founded Upper Echelon Academy (UEA) in 2013 for this exact purpose. Based in Wellington, Florida, UEA’s educators offer individualized instruction across the globe for seasonal, traveling, and full-time young athletes. The academy specializes in subjects ranging from literacy and mathematic competency to test preparation and college applications. UEA is also unique in its philanthropic initiatives. The UEA Social

Equestrian Living sat down with Clementine at her family’s home in New York’s Hamptons for an interview. Energetic and animated, she eagerly talked about what inspires her commitment to UEA and the EQUUS Foundation, as well as her plans for the future. When, where, and how did you start riding? Was Brianne first?

THERE IS NO REASON THESE ARDENT, TALENTED, YOUNG ATHLETES SHOULD HAVE TO GIVE UP A FULFILLING COLLEGE EXPERIENCE, OR THEIR PASSIONS.

My parents had a house in the Hamptons when we were kids, and there was a little organic farm stand that used to offer pony rides in the back. Brianne and I would go grocery shopping with my mom and hold her hostage, begging for turn after turn on the little ponies. My mom started bringing Bri to a local barn for lessons, and I basically wanted to copy whatever Brianne did, so I went to pony camp. Were you and Brianne competitive?

Impact Committee works with students to raise funds and awareness for the charitable programs they care about. One cause UEA is closely associated with is the EQUUS Foundation (Page 46). UEA sponsors the #RideForHorses Rally to support the EQUUS Foundation’s mission to protect America’s horses and strengthen the bond between horses and people. In addition to general academic curriculum, Clementine considers charity to be equally as important for her students to understand.

Above: Clementine with Lulu (Hallelujah).

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Honestly, never. My relationship with Bri (and my other sisters, but for other reasons) is something I am immeasurably proud of and grateful for. I think Brianne’s talent and ability are in a league of their own, which would have made competitiveness even sillier. Also, we have always wanted to help each other, both in and out of the horse world, and I continue to see her aptitude and expertise as an invaluable resource. Why did you found the Upper Echelon Academy?

Even though I have always been passionate about riding and horses, my


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academics were never a lesser priority. I was lucky enough to go to a high school that was actively supportive of my equestrian pursuits. They taught me how to manage my time, and organized tutors for extended absences so I could ride without sacrificing my education. Balancing school and horses became second nature, and I did so throughout college without any problem. I was really sad to observe so many of my peers fail to do this. Some stopped riding altogether and immersed themselves in college life. Others chose to continue riding but attend online universities, or none at all. I founded UEA to help other students achieve the balance I was so lucky to have. There is no reason these ardent, talented, young athletes should have to give up a fulfilling college experience, or their passions. UEA really takes the time to get to know our clients and develop a relationship with every single one, and that enables us to truly tailor our services to their unique needs. When a student comes to us and is juggling their demanding academic schedule, exacting equestrian goals, and a thousand other pressures, he or she knows I have been in the same shoes, and our team knows how to help them thrive. What is your primary role at UEA? Are you hands on with instructing or is your primary focus on the business and marketing side of things?

Definitely the latter. I’m not a certified teacher so it’s rare that I’m ever actually delivering material. I work on partnerships, branding, growth, and marketing, as well as holistic initiatives. For example, I formed the UEA social impact board which gives students a platform to present a cause close to their heart and then learn how to raise funds and awareness for that organization. Also, I put together an annual Q&A panel to bring together students and their mentors over discussion topics they otherwise might shy away from. These range from mental health and sports performance to the college application process. One of the most fun days of the year is the annual EQUUS | 2018 52 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC J U NTOB E/ J UER/ LY N OVEMB ER | 2019


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THE EQUUS FOUNDATION IS AN INCREDIBLE CAUSE... ITS WORK TOUCHES SO MANY LIVES, BOTH HUMAN AND EQUINE.

party hosted by UEA, during which students help organize and host an event. Nothing is more exciting than seeing our students become passionate about philanthropy, which I consider one of the most crucial aspects of a wellrounded education. What led you to select the EQUUS Foundation to support? What do you think makes them special? I think what makes the EQUUS

Foundation special to me is the multifaceted effects of their work. As the only national US charity 100-percent dedicated to horses, EQUUS supports organizations taking equines out of danger and placing them in nurturing environments. Further, these horses are often repurposed and serve as life-saving therapy animals, disability support, and other invaluable partners to people in need. When they first spoke to me about getting involved, it was a no-brainer

because from a personal standpoint, I relished the opportunity to simply give back to the animals that are central to my happiness and wellbeing. Upon reflection, I realized that UEA and the foundation had great potential working together: helping these young equestrians tap into their drive and ability to give back would bring in a new generation of horse lovers to EQUUS while Above (l-r): Penny, a rescue dog, is gradually becoming more comfortable with people; Clementine and Wirma at the farm in Water Mill, NY; Clementine on her way to winning the M. Michael Meller Style of Riding Award at Live Oak aboard Darlon van Groenhove and competing at WEF.

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further enhancing the well-rounded educational experience offered by UEA. Obviously, I’m a passionate horse lover. I’ve ridden all of my life and felt the direct effects of their magic through ups and downs, however, the EQUUS Foundation is an incredible cause even if you’re not. Its work touches so many lives, both human and equine, and is an honor to be a part of. Tell us about the “Bouncy Horse Olympics” that UEA sponsored at Victoria McCullough’s farm? Each year UEA hosts an event to raise funds and awareness for the EQUUS

Foundation, and we structure it depending on the current climate observed by the UEA team. This year, EQUUS president Lynn Coakley spoke to me about tapping into a younger age range—more elementary—to continue inspiring the next generation of horse protectors. Many of the teenagers who have previously


BARRE DUKES THE BOOK LLC

participated in UEA x EQUUS events are now fervent advocates for this incredible charity. They were integral in helping plan and host the Bouncy Horse Olympics, and it was truly a pleasure to watch these young teens essentially pass on their passion to younger children. Toddlers and elementary-aged kids were interacting with rescues ranging from mini horses to high performance Clydesdales. They played games, took pony rides, and learned about simple ways to get involved and make a difference. Next is graduate business school in NYC? Is business in your genes, with your family’s background?

My great grandfather was a visionary investor [founder of Allen & Company, a privately held boutique investment bank best known for hosting the annual Sun Valley media-finance conference] and while—unfortunately—none of us inherited his love of the financial services

industry, we’ve all been inspired by his hard work, perseverance, and willingness to take risks. All of my sisters have impressive careers and I hope to build and expand my own. I just started my MBA at Columbia Business School, during which I’ll focus on entrepreneurship.

unable to ride she will take over. I’m excited to see my young mare develop under Bri as well.

Will you continue riding during school? Will your horses be nearby? I’m committed to getting the full MBA

I’m thrilled to hear you watched the video. This year’s panel was one of my favorites thus far, and we loved being able to share the wonderful footage with those who couldn’t attend in person. We’ve hosted a discussion about balancing academics and riding and the decisions young athletes face when deciding what to do after high school. Another year’s panel focused on riding on a team in college: how to best position yourself for recruitment, how to manage all your commitments, and how this may differ from a typical college experience. All of the panels are tied to our core value of balance, with a unique twist each year.

experience so it really depends on how that unfolds. I’ve heard that certain semesters are incredibly intense—particularly the first half of year one—and during these times I’ll do my best to stay away from the barn. Other, less timeconsuming semesters might permit me to ride a bit more. I’m so lucky to have my sister, Brianne, in the industry I trust entirely with my horses, who will keep them fit, happy, improving, and ready for me. We actually own “my” horses together, and planned that while I’m

I watched a video of UEA’s mental strength workshop. What have been some of the other topics you’ve focused on?

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INTERVIEW BY CAROL COHEN-HODESS STORY BY EMILY HOLOWCZ AK

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HELGSTRAND DRESSAGE

ANDREAS HELGSTRAND LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

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ndreas Helgstrand’s awe-inspiring performances in the dressage arena have earned him accolades around the world. From European Championships and FEI World Cup Finals to Olympic and World Equestrian Games, Helgstrand has run the gamut of international dressage. His elegant displays and daring patterns in the arena have secured him a reputation as

both a fierce competitor and a crowd favorite. Following his Olympic debut in Athens in 2004, Helgstrand went on to travel and build his own business, aptly named Helgstrand Dressage. Based in Vodskov, Denmark, Helgstrand’s top sales and training farm launched in 2008 and features expansive stables, two indoor arenas, outdoor arenas, a stallion station, machine walking, and aqua training. The business has seen great success since its establishment with about 500 elite dressage horses to its name. Most recently, Helgstrand Dressage has gone global, boasting a new stallion station in Germany and the addition of a sales branch based in Wellington, Florida.

Continued on page 60

Above: Andreas Helgstrand and Revolution and Severo Jurado Lopez and D’avie.

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Meike Lang and Atterupgaards Barcelo. Severo Jurado Lopez and Springbank II VH.

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Helgstrand Dressage’s facilities include two indoor arenas, outdoor arenas, a stallion station, stables for 150 horses, walk machine, and aqua training.

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continued from page 57

two, but nobody has a bigger presence.” Helgstrand aims to bring a larger selection of horses to America to meet the demands of the market. Buyers will no longer have to travel to many different farms in order to look at prospects. Certainly, there have been some learning moments as Helgstrand begins to navigate the market in America. “It is a little bit different [in America]” he admits, “Last year, for example, we brought some really top young horses and nobody wanted them. They were too green. This year, we thought we’d take some older horses with a little bit more experience. That was the way to do it.” Helgstrand also offers his expertise in training. Last year, Helgstrand Dressage USA hosted an open training day where the public was invited to watch a day of training and ask questions of Helgstrand and Möller. The event was held within the first few weeks of Helgstrand Dressage’s landing in America and piqued the interest of the Wellington community. Helgstrand stresses the importance of working with quality. “People want the best,” he shares, “I want to do this. I want to really try to do it properly. A lot of people told me they tried but it was not working out and it was difficult, but I want to try.”

Helgstrand’s interest in creating his own business began during the years when he was competing regularly at the highest level. “I had an idea when I rode these big championships,” Helgstrand shares, “I just said to myself, I don’t want to do this the rest of my life, traveling all the world around, horse shows every weekend. It’s fun to ride; I love to ride, but it’s also fun to build something up for later.” He began to think differently about his career and decided to take a chance and hit the ground running. “I thought, okay, if I should do something, I should do it now, when I’m on top and have a name, and I won’t do it like all the others.”

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ithin the first few years of its founding, Helgstrand Dressage became one of the world’s most recognized sales and training facilities for dressage horses, and in November of 2017, Helgstrand officially expanded his business to America. A select number of horses were transported to the new farm in Wellington, which is managed by Dr. Ulf Möller. While Helgstrand’s main business in Europe offers hundreds of horses to choose from, he opted to bring about 25 horses to Wellington. Helgstrand chose Wellington for its breadth of clients and showing opportunities. After all, it is known as the horse capital of the world. “Why isn’t anybody having a good sales barn here?” he asks, “There are a lot of trainers that are selling a horse or

MARIANNE HELGSTRAND, (opposite upper left) is the woman behind the jewelry brand, Helgstrand Denmark. Marianne’s interest in jewelry began when, as a child, she saw her grandmother’s brooch glitter in the jewelry box. Marianne has worn that brooch to many equestrian shows since. She found her inspiration in the beautiful shapes of riding equipment.

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he name Helgstrand not only lends itself to the horse business. Marianne Helgstrand, Andreas’ wife, created a luxury jewelry line called Helgstrand Denmark in 2015. “I had an idea that we missed


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PHOTOS: GEORGE KAMPER

some real jewelry in the equestrian sport, especially the brooch that all dressage riders are riding with,” she shares. The collection is inspired by the shapes of riding equipment such as the rings of a horse bit. Timeless pieces of silver and gold include brooches, earrings, rings, and necklaces. Series of jewelry are named after horses of great importance to Marianne and Andreas. The first series was named after Matiné, with whom Andreas brought home a silver medal from the World Championships in Aachen. Marianne states, “I had been following Andreas for such a long time, and I felt that it would be great having something for myself that was my business.” While he may have retired from

international competition, one can still see Helgstrand in the show ring with his young horses. In 2018, Helgstrand and Zhaplin Langholt won the Championship for Young Horses in Herning, Denmark. This year, he won the title again with Queenspark Wendy. In addition to their successful youngsters, the stallions of Helgstrand Dressage have also received high marks for their quality from judges in recent years. Andreas Helgstrand’s world-class team provides horses that are in a league of their own. His incredible passion for the sport of dressage is reflected in the care he takes with his business. “I have the best job, the best horses,” Helgstrand exclaims, “I love what I’m doing.” Dr. Ulf Möller.

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CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95


In December 2017, Helgstrand expanded to Wellington, Florida.

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THE ADEQUAN/FEI NORTH AMERICAN YOUTH CHAMPIONSHIPS

ompetitive riding’s greatest up-and-coming talent gathered for this year’s Adequan/ FEI North American Youth Championships (NAYC) at picturesque Old Salem Farm in North Salem, New York, July 30-August 4. Show jumping took center stage at this prestigious competition, which offers children, junior, and young riders ages 12 to 21 the chance to contend for team and individual medals under Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) rules. This one-of-a-kind show is the only FEI championship held every year in

BY EMILY HOLOWCZAK

THE NEXT GENERATION 1. Annelise Klepper and Happy Texas Moonlight, the USDF North American Junior Dressage Individual Champions. In addition, Annelise was the youngest athlete in the class at 14-years-old. 2. Mexican team members. 3. Nicole Weatherall. 4. Sisters Sophie and Mimi Gochman. 5. Sam Walker and Coralissa. 6. Mia Albelo and Cassandra Dreams.

North America. The athletes attending the NAYC represent the future generation of equestrian sports for the United States. New this year, the event introduced expanded prizes including the $50,000 Junior Jumping Championship and $75,000 Young Rider Championship. Among the developing young talent, two titles were notably claimed by sisters Sophie and Mimi Gochman. The duo earned individual gold in their respective age groups: Sophie in the Young Rider Division and Mimi in the Junior Rider Division. Meanwhile, NAYC’s youngest rider Isaac Parada, age 12 from Guadalajara, Mexico, clinched top honors in the children’s jumping. Photo gallery courtesy of Andrea Evans/US Equestrian and Lindsay Brock/Jump Media.

USET FOUNDATION

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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A PERSONAL

TRAVEL DIARY

BY STEPHANIE PETERS

NORMANDY, FRANCE

THE QUIET GRANDEUR OF

Chateau de Courtomer

PHOTOS THIS PAGE COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

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HE SOUND OF GRAVEL beneath the tires roused me from a semi-state of slumber as my driver navigated to the wide-open doors of Chateau de Courtomer, my final destination. I had flown all night and was driven from Paris through a cluster of quaint Normandy villages, offering me my first foray into the allure of this pastoral region of France. I was warmly greeted by Heather Pane, the property manager, who settled me into my room with a welcoming cup of tea and cookies. It was a splendid way to reinvigorate after 11 hours of travel and before I was to meet the other arriving guests. My hosts had aptly selected a spacious, sun-filled room with en-suite bath and equestrian-themed toile de Jouy curtains framing floor-to-ceiling windows giving way to the chateau’s vast expanse of lawn. The 17,500-square-foot chateau, located in Courtomer and roughly two hours west of Paris, was originally inspired by the Palace of Versailles and was completed on the eve of the French Revolution in 1789. Throughout its storied history, the chateau has hosted a bevy of regal events and notable guests. OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 9 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 7


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Today, this glorious chateau and 350acre property is owned by the Bonner family and continues to welcome guests to enjoy its splendor and blissfully peaceful environment. One has no choice but to abandon any stress at the door. I was fortunate enough to share an alfresco lunch and conversation with Elisabeth Bonner while we grazed on a light repast of salad, local cheeses, and a crisp white wine. I had read a sampling of her colorful comments describing the restoration after their purchase in 2005: “When we stumbled across it, the chateau was like a beautiful woman in shabby clothing. Ragged, but luminous.” Elisabeth has been the driving force and visionary behind the extensive and on-going renovation, which has rendered a home that is simultaneously elegant and inviting. Furnishings, carefully selected fabrics—particularly 18thcentury reproductions—a soothing paint palette of glazed lemony yellows, greens, and grays, beckon guests to sit fireside with a good book and locally aged Calvados. Her effort and attention to detail, which entailed countless visits to Paris fabric houses and days at Drouot, the famed auction house of Paris, has infused this impressive chateau with an environment conducive to creating unforgettable experiences. She admitted, “There is something exhilarating about restoring a great house to its former splendor.” I’m an easy target for secreted legends and tales of thwarted loves, so I was especially interested to hear about unique discoveries during the deconstruction. While investigating a roof leak, a packet of love letters dating back to the 14th

PHOTO STEPHANIE PETERS

“There is something exhilarating about restoring a great house to its former splendor.”

COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

Above: Elisabeth Bonner in front of her beautifully restored chateau. Bottom: (1906) Count Albert and Countess Henriette de Pelet resided at the chateau and were lifelong riders.

century was found tucked into the attic beams. Also uncovered was an 18th-century marriage contract tied with ribbon, and stacks of black and white photographs of racehorses owned by the Compte de Pelet, a former owner of the estate. H ORSES AND CHATE AU DE C OURTOM ER

Horses were an integral mainstay of the chateau. “The cour d’entrée, the grassy courtyard between the two moats on the property, is surrounded by a circular

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driveway. Here at the chateau, it has always been called a manège, which is a circular outdoor riding space,” explained Elisabeth. “At Courtomer, it may have been used to exercise horses or to gather mounted riders for drinks before heading out to the hunt.” Elisabeth shared a bit about the local hunts, which are called equipe. “They don’t fox hunt here, they stag hunt, and it’s a great ritual,” she said. “It’s very different than American or English fox hunting. I was always taught that you never pass the master. Ha! Here everybody is on their own! It’s a very funny thing and seems disorganized. People are just all over the place finding their way. I was always lost,” she laughed. She explained that the hunt is purposeful and respectful, and that it serves to control the deer populations. They hunt with Poitevin, a breed of long-legged, tricolor scent hounds, developed in France and capable of proficiently hunting large animals. “They keep the hounds on the stag; they never hunt the female,” Elisabeth added. Normandy is an idyllic region for horse breeding as well as horse sport across several disciplines. The Haras du Pin, the aristocratic and oldest of the 23 French national studs, was built by Louis the XIV in 1714 because of the mineralrich “French bluegrass” as it’s called. There is a famous saying in Normandy that emphasizes the breeding-friendly conditions: “They say a man can hear the grass growing.” At one time the Haras du Pin had seven different horse breeds, but now they are primarily focused on Percherons and racehorses. (See The Horses of Normandy, page 86).


COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER PHOTO STEPHANIE PETERS

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Visual nods to the esteem for horses at the chateau are both subtle and dramatic. In the library, scattered between leather-bound tomes, are annals of horse racing in France, books about equine veterinary matters, and framed blackand-white photos of horses, prominently displayed on shelves. Less understated is an imposing portrait of the chateau’s builder, Marquis de Saint Simon de Courtomer, mounted on his white warhorse, hung at the top of the majestic staircase.

COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

Normandy is an idyllic region for horse breeding as well as horse sport across several disciplines.

COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

The location of the chateau is perfect for exploring the lush countryside and surrounding villages of Normandy, offering opportunities to tour and sample the gastronomic bounty of this region. Embracing my inner gourmand, I relished the visit to Le Village Fromage in Livarot, where we watched various stages of cheese making from behind glass walls. Although no longer able to step directly onto the floor of the factory due to European rules, I was delighted to taste their house Pont L’Évêque. On subsequent occasions during my stay, I was introduced to Livarot, Camembert, Neufchâtel, and other delicious cheeses of the area. The exceptional quality of local cheeses, butter, and fresh cream are attributed to the region’s much-revered Norman cows. Should you find yourself on the cider route and a touch thirsty, a visit to Pierre-Huet in Cambremer to tour the cider-making process and sample barrel-aged Calvados—a strong apple brandy—will be a memorable stop.

PHOTO STEPHANIE PETERS

O U T A N D A B OU T I N NORMA N DY

Above: A portrait of the chateau’s builder, Marquis de Saint Simon de Courtomer, mounted on his white warhorse. Middle: Fresh flowers abound in the foyer. Below: Each spacious bedroom with modern en-suite baths has a unique decor.

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Bottles of the finest aged Calvados were buried throughout the region during World War II, and local lore asserts that some of those bottles are yet to be found. While in the village of Cambremer, a meal at the mother-and-daughter owned Au P’tit Normand, a charming café with flawlessly prepared bistro fare, will also be an experience to savor. The timing of my trip coincided with the 75th anniversary of D-Day. It’s hard to ignore the impact of World War II and the significant loss of life that occurred throughout this quiet countryside. The Memorial de Montormel in the Orne region of Normandy nobly honors the site where Germany surrendered to allied forces in 1944. The memorial’s photos of local villages after the war illustrate the resilient character of the region’s residents. Rebuilt towns in traditional Norman-style architecture once again display their unique charm and ingenuity. RELAX IN SPLEND OR WI T H FRIENDS AND FA MI LY

For those wishing not to venture far afield, the chateau and its extensive grounds offer much to explore. There is the quaint village of Courtomer, just a short walk or bike ride away, and 350 acres of private parkland to meander through. A hot-air balloon ride can be arranged to conveniently launch from the chateau’s front lawn. The experience of quietly drifting across the lush green Normandy landscape of farms, century-old chapels, and myriad animals grazing below is an adventure I won’t soon forget. Returning at dusk and warming up by a crackling


COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

ROBERT HANSEN

PHOTO STEPHANIE PETERS

PHOTO STEPHANIE PETERS

This page: The chateau offers an abundance of options for gathering with friends or family, whether in the grand salon, the library, or a small study.

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PHOTO STEPHANIE PETERS

COURTESY OF CHATEAU DE COURTOMER

fire in the library was the ultimate homecoming. The 25-bedroom rental chateau is idyllic for destination weddings, family gatherings, or off-site business retreats. The outstanding staff can offer the highest level of assistance and service in creating the perfect event—whether recommending private chefs or caterers, or directing you to local markets and giving you access to their fully equipped chef’s kitchen. The chateau can comfortably host intimate dinners for 15 or receptions for 50. There are a variety of dining spaces on the property that range from formal dining rooms to casual outdoor spaces or the relaxed orangerie. Chef Franke Ete served delectable meals throughout my brief stay. Breakfasts in the airy dining room had generous offerings of yogurts, fresh fruits, cereals, and baked goods, and eggs of any style could instantly be prepared

Above: Guests can enjoy relaxing time by a crackling fire. Below: A garden sculpture by the property’s orangerie.

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to order. Dinners ran the gamut from an alfresco shellfish extravaganza with mounded plates of oysters, oversized prawns, urchins, and crab, to a relaxed barbeque topped off with Franke’s famous cheesecake and Heather’s edible chocolate bowls, and to an impeccable formal dinner. Our final gathering at the chateau was in the formal dining room where Chef Franke presented a lavish sevencourse dinner replete with sorbet palate cleansers. It was bittersweet knowing, as people sipped wine and chatted in the flickering candlelight, that the fascinating group gathered at the table would soon be going their separate ways. That’s the thing about Chateau de Courtomer—guests may arrive as strangers or loose acquaintances, but after shared experiences and heartfelt stories told, most will depart as friends. Continued on page 86


PHOTOS THIS PAGE STEPHANIE PETERS

Clockwise from top left: The orangerie is the perfect location for casual get-togethers; chef Franke’s delectable hors d’oeuvres; a varied wine selection at Au P’tit Normand in Cambremer; Percheron mares and foals at Elevage des Forges; traditional Norman architecture.

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STROKES OF WONDER KAREN BEZUIDENHOUT’S ABSTRACT CANVASES REFLECT HER LOVE OF HORSES, NATURE, AND WIDE-OPEN LANDSCAPES. AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST BY STEPHANIE PETERS

Equus 5, mixed media on panel with resin finish, 48" x 36"

5 White Horses, acrylic on canvas, 36 inches x 36 inches

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Sea Horse, acrylic on canvas, 36 inches x 36 inches

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Your paintings are often described as soulful, primitive, and yet sophisticated. Is that your objective, or do these characteristics emerge organically?

I don’t specifically paint horses in a soulful, primitive way. I always knew that I wanted to paint them, but in a unique sort of way. My style has emerged in an organic way. It’s the only way I know how. How integral are horses in your daily life, and how often do you ride?

Karen Bezuidenhout was born and raised in the wine country of Stellenbosch, South Africa. It was there that her lifelong love of nature, riding horses, and sense of adventure began. Sketching and drawing throughout her life, she joined a small art school situated in an old wine cellar. In 1999, Karen relocated with her family to California. She attended a course in color and painting at the College of Marin, in Marin County, and soon after moved to Santa Barbara. Her palettes are inspired by the earthy tones of Africa and the vivid blues and greens of the California beaches. Her paintings, mostly acrylic and mixed media, are featured in Robert Redford’s Sundance Catalog and in homes around the world.

Nature appears to be a strong focus in your work. Can you explain what aspects specifically inspire you?

Simply being outdoors in the fresh air and being surrounded by nature is nourishment for my soul. It brings me back to basics and simplicity and that’s what I like to convey in my paintings. You’ve written that painting horses in rich, earthy tones is your first love. Can you elaborate?

I can remember being fascinated by a book on how to draw horses when I was around 5 years old. Everything about the shape and feel of horses conveys a sense of strength, freedom, and comfort to me. I paint them in an abstract manner and then fill in the shapes with colors to harmonize the painting.

Horses have been around my life ever since I can remember. My grandfather was a racehorse breeder in Cape Town, South Africa, back in the 1920s. I ride about three times a week here in Santa Barbara. I’ve read that you enjoy extended safari trips on horseback. How do these experiences and locations impact your canvases?

My sister and I have been doing longdistance safari horse rides with an outfit in Namibia, Africa, for the past seven years. These experiences have impacted me enormously. Being outdoors and so remote in the Namibian desert is a profound experience. We slept under the stars with the horses next to us on a picket line. We’ve had some really wild and crazy experiences. The experience changes your core, and you find out what you’re capable of, and what you can endure. It strengthens you on the inside. An amazing bond is formed between you and your horse. And, of course, the stunning scenery influences my paintings. It’s like being in a huge, epic movie. You’ve been painting for 20 years with very little formal training. What initially drew you to painting? Were there pivotal experiences that led you to this medium?

I went to an art exhibition in South Africa where my sister was showing her paintings. I walked into the exhibition, and knew with every fiber of my being that I wanted to paint. I signed up with the school the next day and began to

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learn to paint in oils. Other than that I have had no formal training. Have there been artists whose work has had a major impact on you?

I was introduced to Bill Woolway, a wonderful painter in Santa Barbara. He was in his 80s at the time. His work had a profound influence on me, and he was like a mentor to me. A few people told me that my work was similar to that of Milton Avery. Coming from South Africa, I had never heard of Milton Avery, so I purchased books on his work and fell in love with his paintings. I would say I’m also very influenced by his work. Your paintings are in the homes of people around the world. What would be the most desired feedback you could get from people living with your work?

I often receive emails from people who have bought my paintings. It is so amazing and rewarding to hear how much they love and treasure their paintings. I’ve been told that the paintings exude a sense of peace or make them feel good. I’ve also been told that they are healing and medicinal. Sometimes the paintings touch people because something reminds them of a loved one they have lost. If a painting touches the viewer’s heart in a good way, then that is a wonderful thing. What was the first validation that painting was the right path for you?

The first validation was when friends began buying paintings in my house. The second major validation was when a friend sent my portfolio to the Sundance Catalog, and they accepted me and put three paintings on the cover. When you aren’t painting you are…

I’m hiking with my dogs, horse riding, or at the beach. I also love interior design and help with the merchandising at Upstairs at Pierre Lafond, a beautiful home-décor store in Santa Barbara, which also carries my work. PAGE 95


Desert Horses, acrylic on canvas, 40 inches x 40 inches

Irish Horses, acrylic on canvas, 48 inches x 48 inches

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Midnight in Harlem, acrylic on canvas, 60 inches x 48 inches

White Horse by the Sea, acrylic on canvas, 48 inches x 60 inches

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DAVID WELLES, P.A. Founding Associate 561.313.9123 dwelles@equestriansir.com 12180 South Shore Blvd. Suite 102, Wellington, FL OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 1


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MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR, PA BROKER ASSOCIATE 561 797 8040 www.marthasproperties.com 82 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


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FOR THE GLOBAL EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY 1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2019 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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EQ M CO A SNTSEERRIVNI G N GP ATRHTEN LE AR N SH DI P

WHY IS MY HORSE HEAD-SHY? Learning the THE MASTERSON METHOD builds trust with the horse.

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A PHYSICAL OR TRAINING ISSUE?

If it is relatively easy to train your horse through head-shyness, then it may only be a behavioral issue, meaning the horse can learn not to do it. But if it’s a challenge to train the horse through it, or it is persistent, then it’s likely a physical discomfort issue. WHAT CAUSES EXCESSIVE TENSION AND DISCOMFORT IN THE POLL?

Direct trauma as a result of hitting the head or going over backwards in the past can be a cause. A horse that panics and pulls back when hard-tied, especially repeatedly, can have pain and tension in the poll. It’s not easy for the horse’s body to release this tension on its own.

There are also related issues that can create painful tension in the poll. Soreness in a front foot or feet will create tension in the poll, often more on the same side as the sore foot. A dental issue can create temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, which radiates into the poll. A sore back, for example a saddle pinching behind the withers, can create pain on the top of the poll as the horse tenses along the topline. Often a horse will brace or pull against the bit in order to protect discomfort in the poll, or to protect whatever’s causing it. In cases of extreme soreness, it’s important that a vet be consulted to determine the possible cause. HELENA YANKOVSKA

im Masterson says that the majority of head-shyness is caused by physical tension and discomfort in the poll. It’s frustrating and disturbing when your horse is head-shy. As an owner or handler, you want to establish a bond with your horse. When your horse doesn’t allow you to touch his head or it’s uncomfortable for him when you put on the halter or bridle, it creates a hinderance to your relationship and partnership. Jim Masterson says that the cause of 95 percent of head-shyness is excessive tension and discomfort in the poll. The good news is that there are things that you can do to help your horse release this tension and ease his discomfort.

BY CARRIE WIRTH

JIM MASTERSON is the author of Beyond Horse Massage, The Dressage Horse Optimized and is the producer of many instructional videos. He began his career working with equine athletes competing in elite hunter jumper and FEI grand prix ranks. He was the official equine massage therapist for the 2006-2014 U.S. Endurance Team and for clientele competing in FEI World Cup, Pan Am, and World Equestrian Games. He has worked with members of the U.S. Singles Driving Team and U.S. Jumping Team. Jim is a featured presenter at Equitana in Australia, Europe, and Asia; Equine Affaire; Western States Expo; Midwest Horse Fair; Your Horse Live in the UK; and more. He teaches horse owners, trainers, and therapists. The Masterson Method has a network of hundreds of practitioners, coaches, and instructors in the U.S., Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, New Zealand, and Australia.

WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT IT?

“There are a few simple bodywork techniques that you can do that can help,” Jim said. “Releasing pain that creates head-shyness is one of the most rewarding things that you can do for your horse.” The Masterson Method bladder meridian and the lateral cervical flexion techniques are simple but powerful techniques that can give your horse relief from the discomfort of poll tension. They bypass the horse’s survival/defense responses and connect directly with the part of the horse’s nervous system that releases tension. They are easy to use and require no special training or strength. (Web links on page 95) Try these techniques on your head-shy horse. Your horse will thank you. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95

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C H AT E AU DE C O U RTOMER Continued from page 72

lines,” explains Le Courtois. All the horses born on his stud farm have a first name plus an affix, “Mail.” His most famous stallion, Jaguar Mail, is considered the best stallion in France, and the second best in the world, to produce eventers. Currently, Le Courtois’ breeding focus is 90 percent selle français show jumpers or eventers and 10 percent Thoroughbred racing.

THE HO RS E S OF N OR MA N DY

Sport Horses | A visit with Bernard Le Courtois We first visited Brullemail. “I am like Maurice Chevalier with my French accent,” laughs owner Bernard Le Courtois. “I am a horse breeder.” Forty years ago he was a journalist for a French magazine, but now he is a renowned sport-horse breeder. Following 10 years in the publishing industry, he had an opportunity to syndicate two stallions: Laudanum and the famous Almé. “When I bought these two stallions I decided to realize my childhood dream to become a breeder,” smiles Le Courtois. In his youth, Bernard was an accomplished rider and able to jump national grand prix. He stopped his university studies for one year to see if he could compete professionally at this level. “I worked with two professional riders, but eventually I understood I wasn’t very talented or marketable. I discovered there are only two ways to become a professional rider: be exceptionally talented and courageous, or marry a rich woman or come from a very rich family who can pay for horses and coaching,” he laughs. “I was not rich or talented enough, so at 20 years old I decided I had to find another way. “I met a very famous French breeder, Madame Colette Lefranc-Ducornet, who was the breeder of Galoubet A, one of the best sons of Almé and syndicated for $2 million in America 40 years ago,” says Le Courtois. “She decided to stop breeding when she felt she was too old, and she gave me all of her brood mares. “When I arrived here the farm was in ruins,” admits Le Courtois. “The house had no windows, the roof was broken, and I rented the farm for the first 20 years. But I worked with everything and the first horses started to arrive in 1986. The first stallion was I Love You, who was a selle

PHOTOS THIS PAGE STEPHANIE PETERS

I embarked on an afternoon of visits to area breeding farms with Dominique Eudier, our knowledgeable Normandy tour guide and avid equestrian. Not only was she fluent in English, she was also well versed in the equestrian culture of Normandy.

Above: Sport-horse breeder, Bernard Le Courtois. Below: Dominique Eudier, our knowledgeable Normandy tour guide and equestrian.

français, a French sport horse, and jumped for the American team with Norman Dello Joio. He won the world cup final in Vienna in 1983 and was the horse of the year in America. I Love You moved back to France after finishing his jumping career and I syndicated him for many years. I imported another selle français who jumped in America. His name was Noren and he was ridden by Katie Monahan, a famous rider on the American team. Noren was also the horse of the year,” adds Le Courtois. “I started here in 1986 with two stallions and the brood mares and that was the beginning,” says Le Courtois. “All of the breeding is done here. The farm started as 120 acres and has expanded to 250 acres. I chose this area because of the quality of the bluegrass. I am from Brittany, but this part of Normandy is the best ground to breed horses,” he admits. He has improved his selection generation after generation. “I began with 12 or 15 different brood mares from different lineage and now I am working with 5 different dam

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Trotters From there we traveled to Haras De Sassy, a sophisticated breeding facility for trotters, which boasted a modern insemination center and a state-of-the-art balneotherapy rehabilitation facility. Dominique explained that French trotters have to be strong enough to carry a jockey or a sulky. The U.S. harness racers are thinner and faster. “Years ago, Haras du Pin had a U.S. trotter come to the stud farm to mate with local trotter mares to give their French trotters the speed that was lacking,” explains Dominique. “That trotter was called Workaholic and he had a long list of fiancés!” Percherons Our final stop was at the Percheron stud farm, Elevage des Forges, owned by Martine Michaux. Originally starting with a single horse, the farm has built that number to 200. The farm’s Percherons, known for their strength and physical characteristics, are currently sold around the world. Again, the French looked to the U.S. to regain the Percheron’s original physical traits. “Once tractors appeared and took over the Percheron’s jobs, they got bigger and bigger,” says Dominique. “We had modified the physical characteristics of our Percherons by making them too fat and they lost their elegance and physical capacity. In the 19th century, our Percherons were sent to America to work and they kept the true characteristics of our horses. The mission of the Haras du Pin was to improve the breed of our horses. They mated Silver Shadows Sheik, a U.S. Percheron stallion, with a French Percheron mare and the offspring became progressively more like him,” smiles Dominique. “He greatly improved our CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95 Percheron breed.”


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EQ P E O P L E

CLEMENTINA BROWN Carrying on TRADITION from the hunt field to the Alltech Arena.

C

was my honor to do so,” said Brown. “I competed at the National Horse Show as a junior, in the ASPCA Maclay [Championship] and the junior hunters. I later competed in the amateur/owner divisions. I have shown at Madison Square Garden and the Meadowlands, and then back at the garden again. It was always very exciting, as it was the most prestigious show of the year.” Since joining the ranks of other prominent equestrian figures that make up the National Horse Show board of directors, Tina has helped to guide the historic horse show into a new era, one that tries to seamlessly blend tradition with the future, and places more emphasis on the hunter and equitation divisions, making them equal in importance to the FEI show-jumping competition. “Bringing a classic horse show into the 21st century is no small feat and working with the team at the National Horse Show to make the vision a reality has been a very meaningful experience,” said Tina. When not riding or caring for her retired competition horses that take up residence at her two properties, Tina is actively engaged in directing a variety of family business ventures and serves on the board of Hagley Museum in Wilmington, Delaware. She also teaches gyrotonic, pilates, and dance in Washington D.C., Florida, and Pennsylvania to students of all ages and from all walks of life. ALBERT SHVILLY

SHAWN McMILLEN ALBERT SHVILLY

lementina ‘Tina’ Rittenhouse Brown’s life has always been filled with horses. Born into a family passionate for riding and fox hunting, a deep appreciation for the equestrian lifestyle was instilled in Tina from a young age. As many prominent equestrians do, Tina got her start in the leadline classes, progressing into the equitation and then the hunter rings as she grew up. She has since parlayed her passion for horses and riding into her lifestyle and philanthropy, while splitting her time between her farms in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, and Loxahatchee, Florida. “My mother was the Master of the West Chester Hunt, and she had followed in the footsteps of my great aunt, who was also a master of the hunt. Several of my cousins were Olympians and horsemen of the year, so we grew up in that strong atmosphere and took that feeling to our horses and hunting ponies,” remarked Tina. As an adult, Tina was introduced to the current National Horse Show president, Jennifer Burger, by their mutual friend and trainer Louise Serio of Derbydown Farm, and the two women hit it off. Jennifer felt that because of her unique equestrian heritage and obvious passion for the sport, Tina would be an excellent addition to the board of directors at the National Horse Show, which was growing at the time. “When Jennifer Burger approached me about participating on the board, it

BY LENORE PHILLIPS

Above: Clementina Brown competing on Eagle at the National Horse Show; Brown’s farm in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Elite Equestrian Properties located in the heart of Hunterdon County, NJ Thornewood Farm

Offered for sale at $3,900,000

Welcome to Thornewood Farm, this awe-inspiring equestrian property makes a great country home as an escape from city life, or a full-time residence. Located just 50 miles from either NYC or Philadelphia, this home offers an easy commute. Encompassing 36 acres of pristine grounds the estate was thoughtfully designed to comfortably accommodate family, friends, and guests along with multiple offices with private entrances, making entertaining and working from this “great escape” a dr dream come true. No expense was spared when designing the equestrian facilities. Every aspect of this astounding facility was well thought out by experienced owners. The two story, custom built, B&D barn has been impeccably designed with horse health, airrow, and safety in mind. 19 box stalls each fully matted with automatic waterers, a wash stall, feed and tack room, private heated office/medicine room, bathroom and inset rubber brick center aisle. Step outside the barn directly into the outdoor arena, carefully designed for superior drainage. Thornewood Farm provides the idyllic setting for every equestrian with close proximity to some of the nest equine medical care, top trainers and sought after shows in the country.

The Stable at Riding Mill

Offered for sale at $2,695,000

This Picturesque State Of The Art Facility is set upon 24+ private level acres. The King constructed stable is adorned with six cupolas and boasts twenty 12' x 12' box stalls, inset rubber matted oors, European Loddon stall fronts and exterior windows. Within the stable are two wash stalls, two grooming stalls, drive up vet/farrier access, feed room, laundry room & heated tack room. The heated observation room looks out onto the adjoining 90'x200' indoor arena featuring "travelright" footing. Additional in interior features include a private office, full bathroom, y spray system and re safety measures. Walk up hayloft equipped with hay drops and additional nishable space. This magniicent facility offers a Professional 100x200 outdoor arena, storage barn, 8 interconnected grass paddocks & easy in/out access for shipping trailers. A 4 bedroom septic is in place so you may complete your dream estate by building a custom home on this exceptional property perfectly suited for horse shows, clinic, veterinary business and much more. A World Class Stable, just minutes from 78 and within 1 Hour of NYC/Philly.

Morgan Gonzalez

661.733.3832 morgan@morgangonzalez.com MorganGroupRealEstate.com

Contact us today to recieve a full marketing package or set up your private showing.

Tara Stone

908.209.9277 tara.stone@exprealty.com TheStoneTeamNJ.com

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 9


Mario Deslauriers on Bardolina 2, winner of the $300,000 DOHA.INC Grand Prix

Congratulations to all 2019 Competitors! See you next year August 23-30, 2020 www.hamptonclassic.com

Jon Kassel photo

The Hampton Classic Horse Show


Magicalnight!

Join us for a

Phot os: Alde n Corr igan Med

ia, McC ool, Sma shbooth

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2019

South Point Equestrian Arena – Doors open 5pm, Competition begins 7pm Admission only $20, includes the horse show and all activities • Free for ages 10 & under Tickets & info: thelasvegasnational.com • southpointarena.com/events AON/USHJA NATIONAL

CHAMPIONSHIPS AT THE LAS VEGAS NATIONAL, CSI4*-W


BLENHEIM EQUISPORTS PRESENTS

THE LAS VEGAS NATIONAL HORSE SHOW PROUD HOST OF THE 2ND ANNUAL

AON/USHJA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

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United States Equestrian Team Foundation Philanthropic Partner of US Equestrian

Supporting Athletes Promoting International Excellence Building for the Future

GO TEAM USA Where Olympic & Paralympic Journeys Begin

Support your team at USET.org Photos by Shannon Brinkman and Phelps Media Group


EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

STYLE Page 10 Sleek Enhancements Caracol Silver caracolsilver.com Helgstrand Denmark helgstranddenmark.com John Hardy johnhardy.com Sally Lowe Design sallylowe.com Tory Burch toryburch.com Vincent Peach vincentpeach.com Zadeh New York zadehny.com FASHION Page 14 Boot All shown available at Boot Barn bootbarn.com Ariat ariat.com/western Cody James bootbarn.com/codyjames Lucchese lucchese.com Shyanne bootbarn.com/shyanne Tony Lama tonylama.com FAVORITES Page 16 Apps Available on the Apple Store and Google Play Cross Country crosscountryapp.com Equilab equilab.horse FEI RuleApp inside.fei.org/news/ fei-ruleapp-launched-applestore-and-google-play FEI TV tv.fei.org

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THE NEXT GENERATION Page 64 Adequan FEI North American Youth Championships usef.org/events/ youth-championships Old Salem Farm oldsalemfarm.net

A SEAL OF APPROVAL Page 46 The EQUUS Foundation equusfoundation.org/guardians CLEMENTINE GOUTAL Page 48 Upper Echelon Academy upperechelonacademy.com

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Where they go next is up to us Tens of thousands of horses become at-risk for abuse, neglect and an untimely and inhumane end of life each year. Over 81,000 of America’s horses were shipped across our borders to be slaughtered in 2018. Most were young, healthy and had untapped potential. Yet, while there are over 48 million people with disabilities in the US, and even more who would benefit from magic and power of horses, only 7,900 horses are currently serving only 69,000 people with special needs. The EQUUS Foundation is committed to putting an end to the abuse and neglect of America’s horses by increasing opportunities for horses to share their magic as athletes, companions, teachers and healers. The EQUUS Foundation is the only national animal welfare charity in the United States 100% dedicated to protecting America’s horses and strengthening the bond between horses and people.

Join us at equusfoundation.org


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EQ B A R N D O G S

MEET DOOBERT The cat that inspired an ANIMAL RESCUE game changer.

A

By CHRIS ROY, founder of doobert.com, a website that connects animal rescue organizations to volunteers and transports.

fter graduating from college in 1994, I knew that I wanted to get a companion but with my work schedule, I couldn’t commit to having a dog. Instead, I chose to adopt a cat and named him Jeanluc after the Star Trek Next Generation character. But Jeanluc seemed lonely, so my colleagues encouraged me to get him a friend, and one of them knew of a farmer who had a litter of kittens. When we got to the farm, they plucked the runt of the litter from under a bush and handed him to me. He literally fit into the palm of my hand, though they assured me he was 8 weeks old. I took this orange-and-white tabby home, and the next day at work everyone was asking me what I was going to name him. I settled on ‘Q’, since that was Jeanluc Picard’s nemesis in the series. Years later, after meeting my wife, we slowly started calling him Qbert, from the ‘80s video game, and eventually Qbert morphed into Doobert. Just like people call “shotgun” to get the front seat of a car, we’d call “Doobert” to claim who got to snuggle with him when we got home. He taught us what it meant to care for something beyond ourselves. I never thought a cat could change my life, but Doobert awakened me to the love that these beings can bring into our lives. My wife, Daphne, was a corporate and securities attorney, when at the age of just 37, she had three strokes in 42 hours. In a short span of time our lives were upended forever. All of our priorities and goals changed in the blink of an eye. Through it all Doobert was the

Roy and Doobert.

reminder to us about what matters in life. During Daphne’s recovery his loyalty grew, and you could feel the love and support emanating from every ounce of his 17-pound frame. Doobert encouraged Daphne to take the naps needed to help her brain recover by doing what he did best: snuggling and holding her down. He never asked for anything in return besides a warm body to snuggle up with. He will forever hold a special place in our hearts. I got into flying animals when a friend asked me to fly to Kentucky to pick up three dogs and a crate of puppies to bring back to a local rescue here in Milwaukee. I remember saying, “I get to fly and play with dogs? Sign me up!” It was the longest flight I had ever flown— three hours each way—I will never forget landing at the airport and taxiing off the runway to see a line of people clapping, taking pictures, and cheering as we pulled up. The people from the rescue all came out to meet us and shower us with hugs and attention for what we did to help. Right then and there I was hooked. As I started flying more animals, I was getting calls from people in other parts of the country asking me to help them. I kept saying, “There needs to be

98 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2019

a system where people can put in their location, the days they are available, and then get notifications for transports.” When I realized it didn’t exist, I created it. I spent hours and days trying to find the right web domain for this new system, until one day I spotted a picture of Doobert and thought, “Why not Doobert?” A quick check showed that the domain was available, and in honor of Doobert, the platform was born. To this day, doobert.com is still unique in the animal transport space and the only automated tool custom-built for the purpose. Volunteers can choose how they want to be involved, and the system will automatically notify them when qualifying requests are put in the system. It’s a bit like a volunteer-based Uber for animals, and we support drivers, pilots, fosters, and even photographers. Like so many other people helping animals, I still work a full-time job. I’m a global director for Johnson Controls managing $120 million of IT projects annually. Doobert is my passion, but I need to work the day job in order to afford my nights and weekends job. Doobert was bootstrapped for the first four years and has continued to grow through generous partnerships with Best Friends Animal Society. They took a chance on injecting funding and support in Doobert to help us grow and evolve the software to support even more organizations. I can’t wait to see where we will go next. It is my dream that someday I will be able to quit my day job and do this full time, as I have so many ideas for how we can revolutionize the world helping both animals and people. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 95


Congratulations to Sarah Lockman and First Apple on winning individual gold as well as the U.S. Dressage Team on their silver medal at the Lima 2019 Pan American Games.


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Profile for Equestrian Living

Oct/Nov 2019  

The October/November 2019 issue features a visit to the home of Clementine Goutal, an equestrian and founder of the Upper Eshalon Academy. W...

Oct/Nov 2019  

The October/November 2019 issue features a visit to the home of Clementine Goutal, an equestrian and founder of the Upper Eshalon Academy. W...

Profile for wynnwood