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EQ

P EOP LE | TRAVEL | DES I G N | FA S H I O N | S T YL E | DÉ CO R

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2016

GLAMPING CAMPING WITH HORSES, S'MORES, AND LUXURY PLUS FOCUS ON PHILANTHROPY: EQUESTRIANS GIVING BACK

OCT/NOV 2016

DISPLAY UNTIL DEC 4 2016


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EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES O C TO B E R | NOV E M B E R 2 0 1 6

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WILDERNESS MEETS LUXURY UNDER THE BIG SKY

WILDERNESS MEETS LUXURY UNDER THE BIG SKY

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Guests arrive at Paws Up Resort in Montana to experience unique adventures and leave with memories of a luxurious escape. Read associate editor Jill Novotny’s first-hand account of her days spent immersed in all the resort had to offer.

GREER GRAMMER GETS A GREAT CHANCE

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The talented daughter of film-stylist and makeup-artist Barrie Buckner, and five-time Emmy Award winning actor Kelsey Grammer, stars in Emma’s Chance, the story of a young woman’s life forever changed after bonding with an abused horse.

BOTH SIDES OF THE SHOW WORLD

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EQLiving visits with Matt and Tiffany Morrissey in their Wellington, Florida, home, which was formerly owned by a French secret agent.

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BOTH SIDES OF THE SHOW WORLD

IN GIVING WE RECEIVE

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The scope of people, horses, and animals in need around the world is on an upward trajectory. In response, innumerable organizations and individual heroes are rising to the call.

WHAT TO WEAR WHERE

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Karen Klopp created What2WearWhere.com for the sartorially challenged. When not advising readers about what to wear to the next big fête, she can be found cheering on her family and friends at myriad equestrian events.

ARTIST JYLIAN GUSTLIN CREATIVELY MERGES ART AND SCIENCE

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Jylian Gustlin’s imaginative and vibrant pieces rendered on wood, paper, canvas, and paper showcase the successful collision of science, mathematics, and the arts.

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EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS O C TO B E R | NOV E M B E R 2 0 1 6

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EQ ESSENTIALS

TRAVEL

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A mile above sea level, the Whitepod resort offers guests a balance of luxury and adventure in the heart of the Swiss Alps. STYLE

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16

A textile designer and visual artist combine their talents and love of horses to create a series of elegant silk scarves.

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24

The ubiquitous field watch has been modernized into a stylish timepiece for men and women. FASHION

20

British country fashion is thriving at London’s J.C. Cording & Co. FAVORITES

29

The Equestrian Living editorial team selects their favorites for the 2016 gift guide.

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30

An excerpt from The Humane Economy: How innovators and enlightened consumers are transforming the lives of animals.

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100

The Washington International Horse Show, showcasing six days of championship competition in the nation’s capital, celebrates its 58th year in October. FOOD/DINING

98

Mom’s on Main serves authentic comfort food in Aubrey, Texas.

106 ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE Glamping, where luxury meets camping, is an art form at the Resort at Paws Up in Greenough, Montana.

EDITOR’S NOTE 10 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES 105 Look for to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 106 An unexpected canine friend gave Seabiscuit, the depression-era Thoroughbred champion, the comfort he needed.

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GIVING BACK

18

The Brooke, prominent royals, and high-profile equestrians join forces in their quest to alleviate equine suffering. PEOPLE

26

Olympian Boyd Martin and his rags-to-riches Thoroughbred partner, Blackfoot Mystery, are definitely starting to click.

34

Joanne Weiner is at the forefront of customized education. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

81

Fabulous farms and ranches plus building a natural pool.


EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

WELCOME

T

he welcome arrival of crisp autumn breezes after a summer of unrelenting heat can often breed inspiration. In this issue, we introduce you to international and national organizations—large and small—in which celebrities, royals, equestrians of all disciplines, and unsung heroes are doing extraordinary philanthropic work. We hope you will be as inspired as we are with their commitment to raising awareness and improving the lives and conditions of horses, humans, and other animals living in distress. The words of St. Francis of Assisi, which seem so applicable to the giving people and organizations featured in this issue, come to mind: “Start by doing what’s necessary, then do what’s possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” Just back from competing at the Rio Olympics with his off-track Thoroughbred, U.S. eventer Boyd Martin exemplifies an athlete in a perpetual state of doing the impossible. His personal story is riveting, and his emotional and physical resilience is awe inspiring. He is also a dedicated ambassador for Brooke USA, an organization dedicated to alleviating equine suffering worldwide. Our interview with actor Greer Grammer seemed perfectly timed for our philanthropy issue. She is the daughter of film stylist and makeup artist Barrie Buckner and Emmy-Award-winning actor Kelsey Grammer and stars in Emma’s Chance, a film about a young woman whose life is transformed after bonding with an abused horse. Filmed on

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location at Red Bucket Equine Rescue, it was Greer’s first foray into the efforts taking place at horse rescues. You’ll find a different sort of inspiration, this of the natural world, as you read our associate editor’s personal account of her visit to the Resort at Paws Up in Greenough, Montana. A once confirmed non-camper, she readily embraced the resort’s luxury style of camping, popularly referred to as glamping. Travel with her as she drives cattle, takes on a ropes course, and masters the art of s’more making. The EQLiving team also visits Matt and Tiffany Morrissey at their inviting home in Wellington, Florida. You’ll get to know both of them and discover an interesting tidbit about their home’s colorful past. Finally, we stopped by to visit Karen Klopp in New York City. We first met her for a feature story on Millbrook, New York. This time, we wanted to hear more about her successful fashion-advice business and her charitable equestrian events. Looking ahead, you can be assured that we’ll be taking to the road again to bring you more engaging interviews and tours of remarkable homes.

Cheers!


CAROL COHEN. SHE’S WALKED IN YOUR BOOTS. More than just a dedicated realestate advisor, Carol Cohen is a fellow equestrian who has personally built and sold two of the area’s most distinguished equestrian estates. She knows real estate from both sides of the fence. Carol is deeply committed to the Wellington equestrian community. A former hunter jumper rider turned FEI-level dressage competitor, Carol is a founding sponsor of the Global Dressage Festival and the inspiration behind the Global Dressage Visionary Awards. Carol knows horses, houses and Wellington! Whether you are interested in purchasing the property of your dreams or listing your current home to serious inquirers, contact Keller Williams real estate advisor, Carol Cohen.

CarolFCohenkw.com Direct: 561-756-4844 Office: 561-472-1236


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | T R A V E L

ECO-LUXURY IN THE ALPS A mile above sea level, WHITEPOD RESORT offers a natural retreat.

I

f you are looking for that magic balance of luxury and adventure, you may find your escape in the heart of the Swiss Alps, where the Whitepod camp sits quietly, nestled into a mountainside nearly a mile above sea level. This innovative, eco-friendly resort consists of 15 geodesic dome-shaped pods pitched on wooden platforms, luxuriously furnished, and featuring wood-burning stoves and sundecks. Created in 2004 as a basic winter campsite, Whitepod has since evolved into a year-round, luxurious, and isolated escape with fine bedding, fully outfitted bathrooms, and impressive views of the Alps. Guests have access to private ski slopes and miles of hiking and snowshoeing, as well as opportunities for

paragliding, dog-sledding, and mountain biking. The resort was created and is operated to leave as small a footprint as possible on the surrounding environment. Waste is recycled, motorized transport is limited, and designs are based on energy savings and locally sourced materials. The domes surround an 1800s wooden chalet known as the Pod House, where guests meet for breakfast, evenings of fireside drinks, socializing, or a relaxing visit to the Swedish spa. The elegant restaurant serves seasonal, local foods. The camp is designed to blend into the landscape. The pods change with each season: they are white in the winter and green in the summer. Limited lighting ensures the best

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possible views of the dramatic night sky. A true appreciation of nature requires travelers to take responsibility for themselves and their effect on their surroundings. Unlike other luxury resorts, Whitepod asks visitors to actively participate in the experience. Sleeping in a pod, heated by a wood-burning stove, means you might need to get up at night to add a log or two. Limited transport in camp means that you’ll have to walk from reception to your pod. But this is all as much a part of the experience as walking in a silent forest or skiing on a private slope. Rather than viewing this mindfulness as a limitation or disadvantage, Whitepod is built on the concept that nature is the ultimate luxury, and PAGE 105 that we should relish it.


EQ O C T O B E R / N O V E M B E R

EQ U E S TR I A N

LIVING

EQLiving.com

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VOLUME 5 NUMBER 5 EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve ASSISTANT EDITOR Abigail Googel EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTORS Geoff Oliver Bugbee, LA Pomeroy, Sue Weakley INTERN Yeting Shen PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle, Lane Press TECHNOLOGY Matt Tarsi PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer, Curtis Circulation Co. GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATIONS EQUISTYLE, Germany; HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@eqliving.com Joyce Jones, 954-796-1809, jones@eqliving.com Dick Holcomb, 770-331-7788, dickholc@bellsouth.net EQ ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. David Sloan, Conceptual Advisor, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, Fashion | LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla. EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $19.95 | Canada $36.95. Subscribe at eqliving.com/subscribe or Box One, Brownsville, VT 05037. To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQ, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: eqliving.com/manage-subscription Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com ©2016. All rights reserved, Wynnwood Media, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Living, Equestrian Quarterly, and EQ are registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.

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CONGRATULATIONS! MCLAIN WARD

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REDEFINING THE RIDE


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

SILKHORSE SCARVES Textile designer PAYAL PAREKH BUGBEE and visual artist KEITH AUERBACH combine their love of horses, art, and international fashion.

BRIAN SASSMANN

T

he Silkhorse scarf series combines East and West, modernity and tradition, and technology and artisanship into a beautiful and dramatic line that celebrates the spirit of horses. “The idea behind Silkhorse was to create a line of elegant silk scarves adorned with imaginative and innovative horse designs,” said Payal Parekh Bugbee, owner of Parekh Bugbee. “I wanted to bridge modern and traditional technologies. Each scarf is hand-printed using traditional silkscreen methods at my family-owned factory in Mumbai, India.” Payal has built a reputation through creating beautiful textiles with a combination of elegance, simplicity, and style, synchronizing exquisite design with a commitment to hand-crafted

PAREKH BUGBEE

BRIAN SASSMANN

BY GEOFF OLIVER BUGBEE

Above: (Left) Silkhorse limited edition signature scarf silkscreened on natural twill silk. (Right) Equine abstract design on natural crepe silk. Below: Designers Keith Auerbach, left, and Payal Parekh Bugbee.

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quality. Now her company has joined with noted visual artist Keith Auerbach of Louisville, Kentucky, to create a scarf series that crosses eras and artistic styles by focusing on elegant, powerful, and beautiful horses. Auerbach’s artistic visions merge with the traditional textile-print design mastery of Bharat Parekh, Payal’s father. “My father is a self-taught textile designer and has manufactured premium, fine-printed silks in India for 45 years,” said Payal. “At a very early age, and without any formal training, he literally began his business from a cardboard box. He now receives accolades in the luxurytextile industry for his original print designs and color combinations.” Payal has been fascinated by the beauty and power of horses from childhood onward, beginning with her


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

BRIAN SASSMANN

PAREKH BUGBEE

Left: (Top and middle) Silkhorse original silkscreened designs on natural twill silk with hand-rolled edges. 45" x 45".

PAREKH BUGBEE

grandmother’s tales of Manaki, a sacred steed that was reputed to remove all obstacles in life. In Kentucky, she witnessed sport horses, and, Payal said, “I was intrigued with their majestic beauty and their stoic, regal nature.” “Most equine textiles have an image of a horse as a prominent feature,” said Keith Auerbach. “I was able to achieve a unique design by making my images of horses rather subtle, embedded within a complex design. First you see the beautiful colors of the overall design, and it is only on a closer look that the horses reveal themselves. I especially like that the horse is in the background, because that is consistent with the story of Manaki. In a way, this design secretly empowers the woman wearing the scarf.” At Parekh Bugbee, the business emphasis is on ethical, sustainable, and artisan-made products. Payal elaborated, “With Silkhorse, we wanted to pay tribute to the vanishing art of traditional silkscreen printing—especially as it is fading from the textile landscape in India. Hand-printed craftsmanship will undoubtedly soon be eclipsed by digital

processes in the next few years.” This fall, she will launch an online crowd-funding campaign on Kickstarter, focusing exclusively on its first line of Silkhorse scarves—a series of 13 handmade silkscreen-printed designs. Kickstarter is a popular crowdfunding platform that supports projects that enable interested customers to get involved early. During the exclusive fourweek Silkhorse campaign, from October 11 through November 11, the public will have the opportunity to support the project by purchasing the scarves at a special rate. Meeting the funding goal will allow the inaugural scarf line to go into full production. Parekh Bugbee has plans to expand the Silkhorse line to include shawls, stoles, and men’s pocket squares. As part of the next phase, Silkhorse plans to design a tribute scarf exclusively for the Kentucky Horse Park in PAGE 105 Lexington, Kentucky.

Equine abstract design on crepe silk with bold-black borders and hand-rolled edges. 45" x 45".

OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 7


EQ G I V I N G B A C K

INVISIBLE SUFFERING nswer: The lives of millions of working equine animals and their poor owners are improved. That’s exactly what’s happening on the world scene through Brooke: Action for Working Horses and Donkeys, the world’s largest international equine-welfare charity, and their American fundraising arm, Brooke

USA.

Sir Evelyn Webb-Carter, chairman of the 82-year-old Brooke charity observed, “There are 100 million working equines who provide a living for 600 million of the world’s poorest people. The animals labor on roads, in fields and on farms, on mountaintops, in jungles and deserts, in factories, on city streets, in brick kilns, and stone quarries. They are the key means by which the agriculture and food distribution systems function in poor nations. Any work that is carried out by motorized vehicles in prosperous nations is accomplished by equines in the developing world. These animals are the backbone of the economy in developing countries, supporting poor communities where most people earn less than a dollar a day.” Working equines toil in some of the world’s toughest environments, in unrelenting heat and bitter cold, underground in mines, through filth and hordes of flies, with inadequate water or rest, to bring their owners a meager daily income. Consequently, their health and welfare directly affect the quality of life for their owners. “Unlike equines in industrialized nations, who generally enjoy reasonably high status as pets and in sport,

working animals have very low status even among the people whose lives are so critically tied to theirs,” said legendary horseman Monty Roberts, an official Brooke ambassador. “And because they labor so quietly, steadily, and efficiently, these animals are almost invisible to the rest of the world. So are their contributions and their suffering until Brooke intervenes.” Nearly 80 percent of working equines suffer from chronic malnourishment, exhaustion, dehydration, disease, and injury. They are prone to painful,

FREYA DOWSON

A

QUESTION: What happens when high-profile horsepeople, a few royals, and BROOKE join forces to alleviate equine suffering?

Top: The Dutchess of Cornwall, Queen Elizabeth II, and Monty Roberts. Above: Coal mine donkey in Pakistan.

debilitating, and often fatal wounds from improper harnessing, makeshift carts, overloading, and collisions with motorized vehicles. Additionally, 90 to 100 percent suffer from lameness and foot abnormalities while 80 percent have eye abnormalities—nearly all of which are preventable. Brooke works to improve the welfare of these animals through free veterinary

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intervention and sustainable equine welfare practices that will reduce suffering in the future. They work with individuals as well as governments and international institutions, currently in 12 countries where the numbers of working equines and people living in poverty are astronomically high. This year alone, Brooke is on target to reach two million working equine animals, benefitting 10 million people. Brooke is led by the Duchess of Cornwall, wife of Prince Charles, who is serving her third term as president. Her lifelong passion for horses led to her involvement, which has included visiting some of the Brooke’s programs in developing countries. The duchess isn’t the only member of royalty who supports the Brooke. Princess Alia bint al Hussein of Jordan is a patron, and Lady Yasmine Perreten Shaarawi, granddaughter of the late King Farouk, serves as the vice chair of Brooke Egypt. A closer look at the Brooke’s supporters reveals a long history of involvement by the who’s who not only of British society, but also of numerous equestrian celebrities in the U.S. who are bolstering Brooke’s profile. Ambassadors and advocates include Olympians Charlotte Dujardin, Laura Kraut, Debbie McDonald, Boyd Martin (see profile on page 26), and Allison Brock. Concluded Sir Evelyn, “Through this new partnership with American horsemen and their infusion of resources and enthusiasm for our mission, the goal to measurably improve the lives of five million animals each year by 2021 will be accomplished.” PAGE 105


MICHELMCNABB.COM


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

TWEEDS, TRADITION, AND A NATTILY DRESSED MUSICIAN J. C. CORDING & CO.

B

in Piccadilly, London, epitomizes UNDERSTATED BRITISH STYLE.

ritish country clothing elicits a particular allure that conjures up images of huntsmen decked out in head-to-toe tweed and Wellingtons as they face the harsh conditions of the rolling moors. It is an enduring look that is entrenched in the heritage of the British countryside. J.C. Cording & Co., London, is perpetuating this country-centric tradition of creating exquisitely tailored clothing, fashioned from the finest fabrics with street-savvy flair. Since 1839 Cordings has outfitted explorers, rock stars, and royalty

Above: (Clockwise) The entrance to the J.C. Cording & Co. flagship store on 19 Piccadilly, London; the legendary musician Eric Clapton; a rendering of the first J. C. Cording & Co. on the Strand.

in understated British style, all from their iconic store in the heart of Piccadilly. Cordings epitomizes what is special about British fashion, with a seamless blend of elegant, well-cut styles and painstaking attention to detail. It is one of a small number of long established, iconic, independent retailers that are an intrinsic part of the London landscape.

John Charles Cording opened his first store in the Strand in 1839, and from the start the emphasis was on functional clothing designed to offer protection against the elements. Cordings pioneered the production of fully waterproof outerwear for use on horseback, at sea, on expeditions, and later for the increasingly popular motorcar industry. In 1871 Cordings kitted out Henry Morton Stanley on his quest through Africa to find Dr. Livingstone. In 1877, the store relocated to 19 Piccadilly, a stone’s throw from Eros— the famous statue in Piccadilly Circus and an iconic symbol of London—and Continued on page 22

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N Continued from page 20

Left: The lush, oak-paneled interior of J. C. Cording & Co.; an archive image of the current store’s exterior.

has remained there ever since. The store is an enduring icon in an everchanging retail scene. To step from the hustle and bustle of Piccadilly through its heavy oak doors is to enter a different world. The interior feels like a gentlemen’s club, with its oak paneling, silk-damask wall hangings, and sporting prints. The old leather boots and ledgers that can be seen around the store are all original Cordings creations, a remembrance of when Cordings made riding and walking boots in the basement—boots that graced the feet of Wallis Simpson, Edward VIII, and the Queen Mother.

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he store moved out of the hands of the original family in 1971, and the next few decades saw Cordings pass through two more owners. As the new millennium approached, its position had weakened. The current management team approached Cordings’ best customer in 2003 and asked if he would assist in a management buyout. A presentation was prepared for him and after listening for 3 minutes, he declared he would support the buyout without even hearing the remaining 17 minutes. That best customer was Eric Clapton. Clapton first became aware of Cordings in his mid-teens while walking the West End of London, where a window display caught his eye. In a Cordings-produced video,

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Clapton spoke of his early impressions of the store. “It stuck in my mind as a place of tradition. It had something to do with the heritage of England,” he said. “I am a big fan of English traditional tailoring and have always been intrigued by the balance between functionality and style in the development of men’s fashion.”

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ne of the changes introduced since Clapton bought into the company is the shop's first women's collection, which is designed with the quintessential British woman in mind. Cordings shoppers can still find jackets made with keeper’s tweed, a 28-ounce wool that is resistant to the harsh weather and vigorous activities of the English countryside. Harris-tweed clothing abounds, and corduroys—from Brisbane Moss— are available in as many as 20 colors. Most notable is Cording’s Covert coat, which was originally designed to mask horsehair as countrymen rode into the city. The signature lines on the cuffs and hems reflect the hunting heritage, and today it remains the preferred coat of both royals and rock stars. Traditional British clothing may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but if it’s appealing enough for the Queen Mother and reigning musician Eric Clapton, it might be worth giving it PAGE 105 a go.


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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

A MATTER OF TIME The APPEAL AND DURABILITY of the iconic FIELD WATCH is modernized with an abundance of designs.

1. Helgray Field Officer

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Tudor Heritage Ranger

oday’s modern interpretations of field watches seem to be everywhere. TUDOR HERITAGE They were adapted in RAnGER T U D O R P RWorld E S S K I TWar – BAS L W O Ra LD 2014 I Efrom ladies wristwatch into a tool a German officer could use in monitoring the precise movement of troops and artillery. Originally using a pocket watch to carry out these operations, the wristwatch quickly became the lighter and faster watch of choice. Quick readability is essential to a practical field watch, typically accomplished with a hacking second hand, high-contrast numbers, illuminated hands, and a glare-proof crystal. Added practicality comes with an easy-to-change canvas or leather strap. The popularity of field watches has spread, and they have evolved into suitable timepieces for men and women that can easily transition from the rigors of rugged outdoor adventures to a businesscasual setting.

2. Tudor Heritage Ranger

imbued with the pioneering spirit of the far north and epic tales of sled dogs braving solitary frozen lands and infused with the exploits of unsung adventurers daily defying their hostile environment to explore new frontiers, the tUdor Heritage ranger brings the conquests of the last century into the present. a concentrate of heroic deeds, it offers modern urbanites a window on the legendary world of a bygone era.

Inspired by a historic model, also named Ranger, which the brand produced in the late 1960s, this new model embodies the unique creative approach developed by TUDOR to showcase its

heritage in 2010 with the launch of its Heritage Chrono. Far from being a mere re-edition, it is a distinct reinterpretation, a true temporal and stylistic encounter of past, present and future. The

aesthetic codes that contributed to the renown of the historic models are preserved and injected with modern touches to update the iconic spirit of the models. By applying this approach,

devoting exceptional attention to detail and creating a particularly strong narrative universe to

accompany it, TUDOR’s Style Workshop has endowed the Heritage Ranger with timeless force, an essential prerequisite for achieving iconic status.

3. Nixon 42-20

5. Victorinox Swiss Army Alliance small

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4. Ralph Lauren RL Automotive 39mm

6. Vortic Rockford 002


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

7. Shinola Runwell 47mm

9. Luminox Atacama Field Day

11. Hamilton Khaki Field Titanium

1. The Field Officer II watch by Helgray is one of the most classic military pieces. The large illuminated numbers and hands on the dial provide enhanced legibility. $229. 2. The Tudor Heritage Ranger line draws inspiration from the most emblematic models in the brand. It features a 41mm steel case with satin finish and Bund leather strap. Price upon request. 3. The women’s 42-20 Chrono by Nixon has classic-tank styling and loads of features to boot. Includes a 42mm stainless steel case, a leather strap, and quartz movement. $375. 4. Ralph Lauren’s RL Automotive 39mm unisex watch features a black, gunmetal steel timepiece on a black alligator strap with burlwood bezel and contrasting numerals. $15,400. 5. The midnight blue Victorinox Swiss Army Alliance is a small, yet impeccably designed, 35mm timepiece. A diamond orbits around 6 o’clock below the date aperture. Accented with mother-of-pearl and a leather strap $495. 6. The Rockford 002 by Vortic Watch Company contains an authentic pocket watch movement originally made in 1906. The 51mm outer casing is made from a 3D-printed mixture of bronze and steel. All parts are made in the U.S. $1,295. 7. Built to last, the Runwell 47mm by Shinola is built from the finest components. Includes a sapphire crystal, Super-LumiNova printed-dial details, a stainless-steel case, and high-accuracy quartz movement. $550. 8. Vortic Watch Company’s Roxbury 002 contains an authentic pocket watch movement originally made in the early 1900s. The 51mm outer casing is made from a 3D-printed mixture of bronze and steel. All parts are made in the U.S. $1,395. 9. Built to provide perfect visibility and accuracy in extreme conditions, the Atacama Field Day Date 1920 watch by Luminox features a day-date display, and boasts unfailingly reliable and precise performance. Includes a 45mm stainless-steel case. $625. 10. The Filson Mackinaw Field Watch, built by Shinola, is designed to withstand the demands of the field. Features quartz movement, brushed stainless-steel 43mm case, scratch-resistant crystal, and a leather strap. $650. 11. The rugged Khaki Field Titanium by Hamilton features bold and easy-to-read numbers on a black dial and cased in titanium. The tough canvas strap is designed for the adventurous, active wearer. $995. 12. Effortlessly cool, TOKYObay’s watch by Orvis is centered on an Italian leather band with a subtle-vintage patina. The classically styled timepiece features a bold, full-numbered dial and Japanese quartz movement. $98.

8. Vortic Roxbury 002

10. Filson Mackinaw Field Watch

12. Orvis TOKYObay

PAGE 105

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EQ P E O P L E

DESTINED AND DETERMINED For Olympian BOYD MARTIN and his OFF-TRACK THOROUGHBRED, it’s just the beginning. INTERVIEW WITH JILL NOVOTNY

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“We haven’t had that long to get to know each other,” he continued. “We’ve been together about a year now. But with my riding style, I really think we just clicked.” Martin’s previous off-track Thoroughbred, Neville Bardos, made headlines after Martin himself rescued him from their burning barn. Neville made an incredible recovery to finish seventh at Burghley that year, just three months after the tragedy. OLYM PIC GENES

RARE AIR PHOTOGRAPHY

oyd Martin embodies the Olympic spirit. He is adventurous, worldly, fearless, and endlessly motivated. When he and his wife, Silva, left their business behind in Australia to move to the United States, they started from scratch. The bold decision was rewarded with mounting success, despite injuries, tragedies, and setbacks. In less than a decade, Martin has already achieved the highest levels of international competition representing the U.S. And his career has only just begun. Martin’s mount in the Rio Olympics was a 12-year-old off-track Thoroughbred named Blackfoot Mystery. Red, as he’s now known, has a rags-to-riches story in the eventing world. As a racehorse, Red lost nearly every race he entered. Today, he is an Olympic athlete that represents his country among the best in the world. The 17-hand gelding caught Martin’s eye immediately. “I didn’t go looking for an off-track Thoroughbred specifically,” he said. “They are my favorite breed, but I didn’t choose Red just for his pedigree. He is a beautiful specimen of a horse. He’s a big, tall, rangy, classic-looking American Thoroughbred, and a very intelligent horse.

AS A RACEHORSE, RED LOST NEARLY EVERY RACE HE ENTERED. TODAY, HE IS AN OLYMPIC ATHLETE.

The Olympics seem to be written in the stars for Martin. His parents, an American speed skater and an Australian crosscountry skier, met 48 years ago in the Olympic village at the Grenoble Games. “It was never talked about much in our house growing up,” said Martin. “But sport was always a huge part of our family.” Like most kids in Australia, Martin took part in many sports, including tennis, cricket, surfing, and, of course, horseback riding. “I was lucky, I suppose, because both of my parents were professional athletes, since when I wanted to take my sport to the next level to make it my career, they were 110-percent behind me,” he continued. “I think other families would have encouraged university or a profession, but my parents continued on page 28

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EQ P E O P L E

BOYD MARTIN continued from page 26

were completely fine with me moving into a bunk house and becoming a working student at the New South Wales Equestrian Center.” RARE AIR PHOTOGRAPHY

S E T B AC K S

RIO AND BEYOND

Boyd and Silva have faced huge challenges throughout their careers training horses. In addition to losing six of their horses in a tragic barn fire in 2011, Sylva experienced a nearly fatal fall that resulted in a brain bleed and several other serious injuries. While Silva recovered, Boyd fell on course and broke his leg. In the years since, he has experienced a laundry list of major injuries and surgeries, but each time he recovered faster than expected. His physiotherapist, Chris Daugherty, listed Boyd’s injuries in Story of Greatness, a documentary about Martin produced by Purina. “Just since 2013, he has had a broken leg, a dislocated elbow, a broken collarbone, a separated shoulder, torn ligaments in his ankle, and then a lot of other little things,” he explained. “We all heal at roughly the same rate, but I think for Boyd, it’s the mental makeup that makes him heal faster. He will really push limits to get back.” Earlier this year, Martin broke his collarbone again. “To be quite frank, I’ve been injured so many times in my career, I don’t get too emotional about it,” he said. “I take it as part of the job. I’ve broken the same bone before, so I knew the timeline of getting back to my best. I took it as a short vacation more than anything.” TE A MMAT E S AN D FR I E N DS The U.S. Olympic Eventing Team in

Rio included Phillip Dutton, Martin’s friend and teacher. When Boyd first came

I’VE BEEN INJURED SO MANY TIMES IN MY CAREER, I DON’T GET TOO EMOTIONAL ABOUT IT. See video at: eqliving.com/boyd-martin/

to America to compete at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event, he met Dutton, a master horseman and fellow Australian. Dutton encouraged Martin to move to the U.S. and work together. “When I first came over from Australia, I was a working student with Phillip,” explained Martin. “It’s been an interesting journey. This is the fifth successive U.S. team we’ve been on together. It’s been quite a good partnership. Obviously, we’ve got a lot in common, both coming from Australia and changing countries to ride for America. We started out as workmates and developed a friendship, and maybe he’s evolved into a bit of a father figure over the years.” At competitions Dutton advises Martin, walking the course with him and discussing strategies and schedules for his jumping and cross-country rides. “We’re polar-opposite personalities,” laughed Martin. “He’s quite reserved and quiet, and I’m probably a bit more eccentric and enthusiastic, but it’s a partnership that works well.”

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As he prepared to fly to Rio, he said his goals for the games were to do his best. “If I go there and put down a personal best, I’d be satisfied. If I ride the best dressage test I’ve ever ridden, and Red and I go clear on course, I think that would be a huge contribution to the team.” The cross-country course at this year’s Olympics was widely considered to be one of the most difficult ever designed. The completion rate of 40.6 percent was the lowest ever recorded. In a field of the best competitors in the world, Martin and Red finished the course with a clean score in sixth place. The pair finished 16th overall and were the second-best Americans in individual eventing. Phillip Dutton competed as the United States’ oldest competitor, and he took home the individual bronze medal. Now, after Rio, Martin has much to look forward to. In addition to being an Olympian, he’s also a new father and a business owner. “The Olympics are great, but it’s not my only goal. I am enjoying life. A brand new thing to me is raising a kid, so that’s changed things around,” he said. “I get enjoyment and feelings of success in producing young horses and competing in the domestic scene, and we bought a farm. I’m getting enjoyment out of improving it, making it bigger and better, so there are a number of things that keep me going and turn me on.” No matter what’s next for Martin, he is sure to take it in stride with the enthusiasm and drive that has become his trademark.


Pewter champagne bucket with horse, by Vagabond House. Subtle, brushed finish encircled by gadroon band that recalls a halter rope. $605.

, as r nv l l a ca co a s a m g ra do n h be og r to n g o n xt e u i t d c a c h i n M a V t n In e B uis g a ma in a th o L ck by by r b a e d i e th pan lea m co 5. ac $34 d.

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The Hunting Dream Bag by Rönner. Printed-cotton canvas bag with Cabalina motifs. 100 percent leather handles. $329.

ld go s . d . te hi on 50 w m k dia $4,2 18 h in wit ,100 s 4 ng ld $ ri go t te bi hi se w or 18k H a ; in or es Fl h i r c i pp uc sa G ith w EDITOR’S CHOICES

OF EQUESTRIAN LIVING. FROM THE PAGES

2016 GIFT GUIDE Hoorsenbuhs Phantom Cuffs (l to r): in 18k yellow gold; with diamonds in 18k rose gold; with diamonds in 18k white gold. $23,500 to $55,000.

Shra der Le a t her ’s steel bit o n crea m pi l l ow is han d on he made r Virg inia fa r m . 1 $250 8” x 18” .

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

ANIMAL PROTECTION 2.0 OK

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How innovators and enlightened consumers are TRANSFORMING THE LIVES OF ANIMALS

From the leader of the nation’s most powerful animal-protection organization comes a frontline account of how conscience and creativity are driving a revolution in American business that is changing forever how we treat animals and create wealth. Wayne Pacelle of the Humane Society of the United States reveals how entrepreneurs, Fortune 500 CEOs, world-class scientists, philanthropists, and a new class of political leaders are driving the burgeoning, unstoppable growth of the “humane economy.” Every business grounded on animal exploitation, Pacelle argues, is ripe for disruption. Indeed each one of us is, and will be, touched by this far-reaching transformation in food and agriculture; in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and cosmetics industries; in film, television, and live entertainment; in tourism and wildlife management; in the pet trade for dogs and cats and exotic wildlife; and in fur and leather fashions. Collectively it promises to relieve or end the suffering of billions of creatures, while allowing businesses aligned with the best instincts and values of their customers to flourish. Excerpted with permission from William Morrow Publishers.

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oday, with the carrier pigeon and, to a considerable degree, the working horse in our rearview mirror, we must wonder what other animals might be spared their particular burdens by the powerful forces of innovation. Given the intensity and scale of animal exploitation today, in so many different sectors of the economy, why wouldn’t we make urgent efforts to harness innovation to make cruel uses of animals obsolete? Our human creativity and our increasingly alert moral

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temperament make this a world rife with opportunity, one that’s swirling with the spirit of reinvention and social, technological, and economic reform. In Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, the eminent economist Joseph Schumpeter described capitalism as “a perennial gale of creative destruction,” the process by which entrepreneurs and innovators introduce new goals, new means of production, and new products in support of their visions. The old businesses often make apocalyptic predictions about the new approaches. But changes in business attitudes and practices, as Schumpeter noted, drive growth and are the lifeblood of the economy: businesses that do not adapt are left behind, while

innovators claim a larger share of the market. When it comes to the humane economy, making money and doing good is precisely the point. If ideas about compassion are going to prevail, they must triumph in the marketplace. We can produce high-quality goods, services, or creative content and also honor animal-protection values in the process. We can feed the world’s surging population without resorting to extreme confinement of animals. We can validate the safety of cosmetics and chemicals without poisoning mice or rabbits. We can solve human–wildlife conflicts without resorting to bursts of violence. Just about every enterprise built on harming animals today is ripe for disruption. Where there is a form of commercial exploitation, there is an economic opportunity waiting for a business doing less harm or no harm at all. Factory farming, for example, is the creation of human resourcefulness detached from conscience. What innovations in agriculture might come about by human resourcefulness guided by conscience? With this book, I ask you to join me in meeting some of the pathfinders in the twenty-first century’s humane economy, the people who are helping to usher in a series of transformations that will rival changes we’ve seen in the transportation sector within the last century or in information technology within the last two decades. Some of the biggest names in egg and pork production—once synonymous with Continued on page 32

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HUMANE ECONOMY O K

intensive confinement of animals and part of the old, inhumane economic order—are tearing out the cages and crates. They’re now converts and contributors to the humane economy. I’ll show you how visionary entrepreneurs are at the leading edge of a tectonic shift in food production and retail—as twenty-first century business leaders and their customers demand that industry do better. For those who want to take the animals out of the equation entirely, we’ll go behind the scenes with the people cracking the code. They’re creating facsimiles of eggs and chicken, with the taste and texture of the real thing but none of the cruelty. In a blind taste test, you’d be hard pressed to distinguish them, but when it comes to a moral test, there’s no comparison. Two penniless street performers Wayne Pacelle had a vision of entertaining people by showcasing beautifully choreographed feats of human strength and agility; and their company, Cirque du Soleil, has now made competitors featuring dancing elephants or snarling tigers perfectly outdated and archaic. While the Cirque du Soleil founders didn’t explicitly have animal welfare on their minds when developing their new enterprise, Betsy Saul was all about saving lives when she developed Petfinder.com. Her virtual shelter has helped millions of people in the market for a dog or cat find the pet of their dreams and save lives in the process. And it’s not just the entrepreneurs. Scientists are part of this new humane economy, too, including several doing their best to perfect growing meat in a lab, 885 E 149th St Bronx, NYwith 10455 without raising a full-bodied creature a heart and 888-473-3386 brain. I’ll take you out on the open ranges of Colorado’s mileatruck.com Sand Wash Basin, where the fertility control work pioneered by Jay Kirkpatrick offers the prospect of saving American’s wild horses and providing a solution


to satisfy key stakeholders who’ve never seen eye-toeye on the management decisions. And I’ll tell you about reformers from within science, such as National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins, who played the central role in ending the era of using chimpanzees in invasive experiments and is now calling into question the reliability of animal tests for millions of mice, rats, and rabbits and urging his fellow scientists to embrace alternative methods where they can. While we celebrate the innovators and the scientists, you’ll also meet the investors—the people who recognize that capital drives the humane economy, producing profits for society alongside a range of other social benefits. You’re unlikely to see headlines about billionaire Jon Stryker, but he’s putting millions into protecting our closest living relatives in nature—chimps and other great apes—while Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is financing anti–wildlife trafficking campaigns in order to save endangered species. Both men realize that elephants, gorillas, and other African wildlife are worth more alive than dead, and their investments return profits to people who need the income most and provide local people an incentive to join in saving them too. The adopters and the emulators also are crucial to the humane economy. The smartest of businesses mimic and even improve upon the work of innovators who have shaken up their field and upended conventional thinking. When Whole Foods Market adopted a new look and feel to its stores and started offering organic foods and humanely sourced animal products, it didn’t take long for competitors to start changing their offerings and their aisles. When one fast-food restaurant goes cage free or crate free, others in the sector want to get in on the act too. When there’s a big new idea, there’s first a recoil and maybe a reverberation followed by an adjustment or a correction or two; and then, if it works, broad acceptance—and later, we wonder how we ever managed to do things the old way. PAGE 105

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EQ P E O P L E

A 21st-CENTURY EDUCATOR A mother’s story about a VERY SPECIAL SCHOOL. BY CAROL COHEN

Whether equestrians, tennis players, or those committed to other sports, today’s student athletes have demanding schedules, both on and off the field. Joanne Weiner’s schools customize an educational plan so the students can achieve their highest potential in both their sports and their academics. The daughter of Equestrian Living’s editor-at-large, Carol Cohen, is a graduate, and she wanted to share their great experience.

culture and the colorlessness that often accompanies it became the Technicolor version of what Joanne felt she could create by catering to each child and their individual strengths. “Color was very important to me, so I incorporated much of that into the surroundings,” she says. “We were so comfortable at our first

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oanne Weiner is the founder and executive director of private tutoring services at Boca Raton Academy and Palm Beach International Academy, as well as a new satellite school at the Tryon, North Carolina, International Equestrian Center. She is a woman immersed in her mission: to provide K-through-12 children a blendedlearning model, unbound by the structure of traditional brick and mortar. Joanne’s magic, her love of children, her ability to connect, and her great business sense have made a huge impact on both me and my daughter, just as she has on many other adoring parents and their children. With studies in art, literature, English, and women’s studies and a B.A. from the University of Rochester (New York), and having come from a family of educators, Joanne moved to Florida to become an artist. Then a friend asked her if she wanted to tutor some high-school athletes. Many of these first students were tennis players from the area, and her artist studio quickly became less an atelier and more a classroom. Joanne’s dislike of traditional school

Joanne (center right in black) and Tuesday seminar group at PBIA.

location,” she smiles. “The kids would just come and hang out. We had dinners together. It was really fun.” In 1999, Susan Bloomberg asked Joanne if she could tutor her daughter, Georgina. That was Joanne’s introduction to the young competitors of the Wellington equestrian world. “At first, we had trailers at the show grounds, and we worked with riding students and their traditional schools in distance learning and private tutoring,” Joanne recalls. “Then Mark Bellissimo bought the Winter Equestrian Festival. We leased two floors in his building on Wellington’s South Shore Boulevard, and that became Palm Beach International Academy’s (PBIA) home.

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“We concentrate on our individual students’ strengths,” she explains. “If they are strong in computer science or English or history, for example, we create a concentration in that. We don’t believe in making kids learn things just ‘because.’ All of our students are college bound, and we have a 99.9 percent acceptance rate.” When visitors are buzzed into PBIA in Wellington, Joanne’s dog Monty, adopted from Danny and Ron’s Rescue, will often greet them at the door. Inside, they are instantly enveloped by a cacophony of color, children’s laughter, a front-desk welcome wagon, and many smiling faces. They may be a tutor, teacher, student, intern, or any of the plethora of parents who come and go and are part of the school’s experience. One of the smiles may belong to Joanne herself, peeking her head out from her office. There is a kitchen with everything that kids like to eat, a library, computer work stations, and even computerized treadmills. Downstairs you’ll find kindergarten and grade-school-age children. The theme stays the same with younger students: The school caters to the individual child, strengthens their individuality, fills their sense of imagination and creativity, and, as always, surrounds them with color and art. I have much more to say about Joanne Weiner and her creation, yet the one common thread for both children and parents is inspiration. Every child is an inspiration in her artist’s eye. Indeed, they are her masterpieces. PAGE 105


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STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY JILL NOVOTNY

WILDERNESS MEETS LUXURY UNDER THE BIG SKY We go GLAMPING at Montana’s PAWS UP Resort.

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amping has an undeniable appeal. Who doesn’t love campfire stories, hikes, s’mores, kayaking, and bigsky stars? But when the suggestion of a camping trip is brought up, I usually hesitate. I picture myself wringing out wet socks or gathering the courage to venture out of the tent in the middle of the night. With precious little vacation time, a luxury hotel, gourmet food, and perhaps a massage begins to sound more inviting. Glamping, a portmanteau of glamour and camping, has become a popular draw for travelers in search of a luxurious outdoor experience. Paws Up Resort in Greenough, Montana, claims to have coined the term. After experiencing the resort first-hand with a group of other journalists, I can attest that they have, at the very least, fully mastered it. Continued on page 40

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The Cook Shack features a variety of Montana-inspired meeting facilities, as well as two gourmet restaurants and the bar.

PHOTOS COURTESY THE RESORTS AT PAWS UP

The Buffalo Jump tent at Cliffside camp includes two bedrooms, a chandelier, and a luxurious, heated-floor bathroom.

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Many of the tents at Paws Up have walls that open up completely, offering unrivaled enjoyment of the natural surroundings. The Blackfoot tent at River Camp offers all the luxury of a fine hotel suite deep in the Montana wilderness.

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Continued from page 37

The Saddle Club at Paws Up is the largest privately owned equestrian center in Montana and home to owner Nadine Lipson’s western saddle collection.

The sprawling 37,000-acre property sits on the banks of the Blackfoot River, 30 miles northeast of Missoula, Montana. When Captain Meriwether Lewis passed through the area in 1806, evidence suggests that he paused to look out over the vast views of the Blackfoot and Clearwater rivers before continuing west. Today, Paws Up guests peer out from that same high vantage point and post selfies to Instagram with nervous smiles in front of the dizzying view. The Lipson family, who owns Paws Up, bought the property nearly 20 years ago. They moved from Colorado with their horses and a strong desire to found a Black Angus cattle operation. The ranch’s name was inspired by the family’s happy dogs, who would greet them with bounding enthusiasm and their paws in the air. The name Paws Up was meant as a symbol of the warm welcome extended to all visitors. That feeling permeated the experience from the moment we arrived.

WELCOM E TO TH E R A NC H

Equestrian Living magazine’s associate editor, Jill Novotny, after a trail ride.

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A seven-foot-tall stuffed grizzly bear stood in a silent growl over the woven rugs and dark-wood floors of the reception area. We ducked under his huge paws to get the keys to our house. The Wilderness Estates are a cluster of large houses tucked into the woods off a dirt road almost a half-mile from the resort’s village area. Though the privacy of the homes was lovely, I wondered how we would make it all the way back to the village for dinner. That was, until we were dropped off at our house next to a little green Kia Sportage, ours for shuttling between the sites at Paws Up. We entered the house, a palatial 3,200-square-foot, wood-beam structure. Inside, we scattered to choose from the three master suites. We each explored our bathrooms, which were outfitted with rain showers, spa-jet tubs, and heated-tile floors. Then we joined each other under the vaulted ceiling by the stone fireplace,


Paws Up staff members help guests to wrangle cattle, learn to use a branding iron, and perform “cowboy poetry” at the chuck-wagon dinner.

sipped wine, and enjoyed the breathtaking vista of the ranch’s expansive fields and Montana’s wooded mountains. Later, we hopped into our Kia to join other guests for dinner at Pomp, one of the resort’s gourmet restaurants, run by executive chef Ben Jones. Pomp combines rustic ranch cuisine with the creative use of locally sourced ingredients. From our outdoor table, we watched the sun set over the fields and enjoyed delicate appetizers, steaks, and more wine. I spoke with Scott Schaefer, the resort’s special-events manager, about some of the events that the resort has hosted, such as the Canine Classic, a dog-friendly race across the resort that benefits the Humane Society of Western Montana; Montana Master Chef, an annual event that brings together James Beard winners and finalists; as well as a wide range of concerts, workshops, and festivities.

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fter dinner, we adjourned to a nearby fireplace. A team of young, enthusiastic staff members stopped by at intervals to offer us drinks and platters of s’more makings and to tend the fire. Tank, the bar at Paws Up, is famous for its signature cocktail, the Huckleberry Hound, an incredible blend of premium vodka and fresh huckleberries picked on the ranch’s hills. After one cocktail, I was ready to try my enormous bed. AT HOM E ON THE RANGE

The next day, we rose early for a breakfast buffet served at the resort’s second restaurant, Trough. I was dazzled by the array of Mason jars full of goodies like parfaits and fruit-juice smoothies, each tucked into the ice in galvanized metal buckets, labeled with chalkboard signs. “It’s like a Pinterest board brought to

life,” said a guest. I finally decided on the omelet bar and took my custom-made breakfast out to the porch. After breakfast, we headed to the Wilderness Outpost, a new building on the ranch that is part boutique, part gift shop, and part activity center. Here we met the resort’s equestrian manager, Dustin Call, who assigned us to our horses and helped us mount up. We walked and trotted for hours through the pastures and up into the ponderosas, stopping to watch buffalo in their pastures or to allow a group of guests riding ATVs to pass through. After our long ride, we arrived at one of the resort’s remote vista spots. Waiters met us with ice-cold lemonade and escorted us to a long, mahogany banquet table surrounded by leather chairs for a “pop-up” banquet deep in the Montana wilderness. Continued on page 44

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PAWS UP PHOTO

Whitewater rafting on the Blackfoot river offers serene views and a splashing good time.

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PHOTO COURTESY THE RESORTS AT PAWS UP

There’s no need for serene music in the treatment rooms at Spa Town at Paws Up. The chirping birds and rustling winds are all you need to relax.

PHOTO COURTESY THE RESORTS AT PAWS UP

Fly fishing is one of the resort’s most popular activities and one of Montana’s favorite pastimes.

The Skyline ropes course is an aerial adventure that offers guests a thrilling challenge, including a heart-pounding 40-foot harnessed free-fall.


A Huckleberry Mule is just one of many ways to enjoy the fresh huckleberries picked right on the property.

Once the sun sets at Paws Up, s’more makings are never very far away.

The view from Lookout Rock is thought to be a stopping point for Meriwether Lewis on his journey west.

PHOTO COURTESY THE RESORTS AT PAWS UP

Fine dining at Pomp includes delicate combinations of local flavors under Executive Chef Ben Jones.

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Continued from page 41

THE A DV E N T U R E CON T I N U E S

The next day was a whirlwind of more ranch activities: a whitewater raft excursion down the Blackfoot River and a spin on the Sky Line ropes course. Others in the group tried fly-fishing, yoga, and sporting clays. I also visited the Saddle Club, the ranch’s equestrian center and the largest private center in Montana. The venue hosts several events each year, including the annual Cowgirl Spring Roundup, a three-day event that is hosted by Paws Up and the Cowgirl Hall of Fame, in which horsewomen come together to take workshops and trail rides and to learn to ride, wrangle, and shoot from the very best. The huge indoor arena is surrounded by spectator seating and a viewing area complete with leather couches and a full bar. When we were showered and ready for our chuck-wagon dinner, we boarded a cart pulled by a pair of Norwegian fjords named Pete and Repeat, famous on the ranch. A bartender poured us more Huckleberry cocktails, and we sat down to a dinner of Black Angus and elk steaks cooked over a fire along the river. A staff member played an acoustic guitar, while others demonstrated how to lasso and use a branding iron on pieces of leather. CAT T L E D RI VI N G

Because the ranch is both a resort and a working cattle ranch, guests can get the full home-on-the-range experience by joining the daily cattle drive. Wranglers take guests on horses out on the range to move the herd from one pasture to another. Unlike the tail-to-nose trail rides offered at many guest ranches, this ride offered something for every level of rider. As an experienced (English) rider, I was matched with a horse named C.J., one of the special horses that the wranglers use to work the cows. I was excited to try my hand at cow-girling. Our

group formed a U-shaped line, and we turned into the herd, pressing the cattle slowly uphill. Some of the riders allowed their horses to carry them, enjoying the view and snapping photos, while others practiced trying to catch stragglers from the herd. Calves and their mothers mooed at each other and trotted away from our horses. When a calf fell behind the herd, my horse turned instinctively to gather it. I allowed him to take me, learning what I could about his methods and his moods and feeling the unfamiliar length of my stirrups and the deep seat of the western saddle. By the time we had traversed the first pasture, C.J. and I were in a rhythm. Encouraged by the wranglers to see what C.J. could do, we trotted up behind the cows, C.J.’s nose touching the slowest to urge them onward.

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he leaders held the cows in a small area against a fence. One at a time, we practiced cutting a head from the herd (separating one mother and baby from the group). Most of us tried, few of us succeeded, but everyone enjoyed the experience.

LU XURY IN NATURE

For our final night, we moved to the Creekside Camp, one of five campsites situated around the resort. Each site has six tents, each with one or two bedrooms, surrounding a dining pavilion that is

shared by only the guests at that campsite. A butler and chef are on-site at each camp to ensure that any guest’s needs are accommodated. After the long day, we settled ourselves with blankets around the fire, which is kept burning in case guests want to warm up or have a s’more. Once the sun sets at Paws Up, a s’more is never very far away. I decided to explore my tent. The dim light felt warm and natural, and the luxurious linens on the huge bed looked welcoming. I was tired and chilly. I slid between the heated covers and fell quickly asleep to the sound of the babbling creek. REFRESH AND RE NEW

Before departing the following morning, I was treated to a massage at the resort’s spa, a cluster of white-canvas tents in a wide, open field. Wooden walkways connected the tents, and canvas walls separated the treatment rooms, each with rustic, dark-wood furniture and fresh white linens and towels. Although the spa is isolated from the other buildings on the resort, I was skeptical that the canvas walls would offer the privacy I needed to fully relax. But the instant the massage began, I forgot about the tents, the fields, and even the ranch itself. My surroundings were all put on hold for an hour of warm, quiet therapy. Apparently my muscles were more exhausted and knotted from my variety of activities than I had realized. My arms had paddled a raft and pulled me up along the ropes course. My legs had guided horses across the range and along the trails. My neck had craned to see a bald eagle flying above or watch ground squirrels burrowing by my feet. Stepping out of the spa tent onto the wooden walkway, I was renewed and energized. If only the adventure could continue for a few more days. PAGE 105

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The decor of each guest room on the huge property is hand-selected by owner Nadine Lipson.

The reception barn welcomes guests to the resort’s village.

PAWS UP PHOTO

A “pop-up” banquet awaited us out on the range.

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BY L A POMEROY

GREER GRAMMER GETS A GREAT CHANCE

BENJOARWAS PHOTOGRAPHY

THIS TALENTED ACTOR IS ONE CLASS ACT.

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PHOTO MICHAEL MORIATIS.

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he 24-year-old daughter of film-stylist and makeup-artist Barrie Buckner, and five-time Emmy Award winning actor Kelsey Grammer, has tapped into the strong core she has developed as a dancer to balance two impressive new achievements: her first starring role in a major film and learning to ride. Emma's Chance, from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment and directed by Anna Elizabeth James, is based on a story by James and Tyler W. Konney and shot on location at Red Bucket Equine Rescue in Chino Hills, California. The movie used real-life rescue horses including Paidraig; the film's namesake, Chance; Rubix, who was featured on the cover of the DVD released in July; Waikiki; and Willow. OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 7


SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT.

WHEN YOU’RE AN ACTOR AND OFFERED A PART YOU SAY, “YES.” THEN YOU FIGURE IT OUT.

The story of a young woman’s life changing forever when she forms an unlikely bond with an abused horse, stars Greer, known for her roles on MTV’s Awkward, and as Leslie Van Houten in Lifetime’s Manson’s Lost Girls, as Emma, who must complete community service at a horse rescue when a late night dare at a stable goes wrong. Working at “the ranch that the horses own,” Emma bonds with Chance, an abused show horse labeled an unridable rogue. When the facility is threatened by a predatory buyer, Emma hatches a plan to save the rescue and horses she’s come to love. Calling it her most important role yet as an actor, Greer hopes its story raises awareness for the good and important work by non-profit equine rescues. Yes, she’s been bitten by the horse bug. “Reading the script and filming directly at the rescue—a real place—was very special. This is a compassionate story about taking care of something bigger than just yourself,” Greer said.

“I didn’t know about horse rescue or realize how many are thrown away or slaughtered. My first introduction to this world was Red Bucket’s heartbreaking and heartwarming stories. Filming there daily, while volunteers worked around us, we watched incredible transformations they made in horses’ lives. “You can look into the eyes of these horses and tell how relieved they are, that they know they’re safe.”

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ompelling words from someone that had never ridden before. Now she plays a hunter equitation competitor in the film’s climactic Summer Classic Junior Jamboree. “When you’re an actor and offered a part you say, ‘Yes.’ Then you figure it out,” she grinned. Other than casual trail rides growing

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up, Greer’s experience was virtually nil aside from a brief fourth-grade infatuation with riding lessons. Greer said, “My dad rode and owned horses on his property. He loves them and was so happy when I told him I was doing the movie. “I tried signing up for lessons with hand-me-down riding clothes, but I think it was just the early actress in me. I was in love with the riding helmets,” she laughed. Greer’s introduction to riding had her working in two disciplines at once. She filmed as a hunt-seat rider while taking lessons from Emma’s Chance stunt coordinator, Western horseman and stunt performer Shawn Patrick Nash, who is known for his work on other films such as Django Unchained and The Lone Ranger. “He really helped me,” Greer commented. “We trained on my days off, and on breaks between scenes we’d ride. The women at Red Bucket Equine Rescue were also wonderful about helping with my posture and reins.”


SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT PHOTO COURTESY OF GREER GRAMMER

SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT

Greer and fellow cast member, Jennifer Taylor, on location at Red Bucket Equine Rescue. OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 9


WHEN A HORSE SAID “WE’RE DONE,” I HAD TO LEARN TO SAY “NO, WE’RE NOT.”

“While ‘Emma’ was the imagination of its writer/director, she elegantly represents over 400 volunteers who selflessly serve the horses in our care,” adds Red Bucket Equine Rescue founder, Susan Peirce. “A large portion of the movie was based on the reality of the day-to-day at Red Bucket. Many parts are spot-on accurate. The extras and background actors were real volunteers. The ranch and props are real, as is Keely, the orphan foal saved from slaughter. The majority of horses used were real rescue horses.” The real Chance is a former show jumper, portrayed by four different rescue horses. “Paidrig is a character,” Susan says. “He only likes one rider, and, like the movie, paws to get attention. His favorite treat is a root-beer barrel.”

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ubix, the DVD cover horse, is the bay Greer used most, including the non-over fences scenes. “We called Rubix ‘The Tank.’ He did not want to move! I had to constantly squeeze so hard because the moment I let go, he’d stop” Greer said, “As a dancer, I had a ‘stabilizing core’ and was happy when Susan [Peirce] said you'd never know I wasn’t a rider because of my posture. I mainly had to learn control, but the difference between dancing and riding was in my legs. In dancing you don’t squeeze so much.” Willow, however, was a legs off kind of mare. Greer said, “She was fun and 50 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016

Learn more about Red Bucket Equine Rescue, a global federation of animal sanctuaries, and the upcoming fourth-annual Ruby Red Help a Horse Day fundraiser on November 12, 2016 at redbucketrescue.org.

spicy! She always wanted to go and not sit and wait. A lot of the movie is walking and trotting. Willow wanted to run so I had to whoa a lot.” “I had Shawn and Susan right by me in the scenes,” explained Greer. “They could see if I was struggling, or if a horse was getting antsy. That’s when I'd get nervous. I was told my feelings control my horse, but sitting on top of one I didn’t always feel in control. When a horse said ‘we’re done,’ I had to learn to say ‘no, we’re not.’” Because this actor has a lot going on: She’s playing the new girlfriend of Axl Heck (Charlie McDermott) on ABC’s The Middle and—on another end of the character spectrum—a terrorist in the action thriller, Altitude, set to release in theaters March 2017. She won’t soon forget the chance this movie and its horses have given her. “I was as fortunate to get this first lead as the horses who get a second chance.” Greer added, “It was a film that I had to carry. That gave me independence and confidence, and working with the horses gave me respect for animals. I learned to be the voice for the horse.” If Greer has it her way, the story of Emma’s Chance will speak to more happy endings. “We’ve joked about a sequel,” smiled Greer. “I’d love to do another film like this. Adding the element of rescue takes the usual horse movie about love and bonds and adds a third element about helping those who can’t help themselves. That’s what makes this film so special.” PAGE 105 Definitely a class act.


SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT

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At home with MATT AND TIFFANY MORRISSEY. He’s a third-generation horse-show producer, and she’s a top competitor and trainer.

BOTH SIDES OF THE SHOW WORLD

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PHOTOS: GEORGE KAMPER

THE HOME’S PREVIOUS OWNER WAS A FRENCH SECRET AGENT AND MINI-SUBMARINE BUILDER.

he Wellington, Florida, house certainly didn’t look like a James Bond set. Matt and Tiffany Morrissey bought their home last fall, and they’ve been gradually making improvements. “The house was pretty eccentric when we first bought it,” Tiffany laughed. “There were Corinthian columns, metallic-gold molding, and shiny marble floors. I later found out the home was owned by an interesting man.” The previous owner was a former French secret agent and mini-submarine builder named Herve Jaubert who moved to Dubai to set up a submarine-manufacturing company for the Sultan and was later accused of embezzlement. The book, Escape from Dubai, tells the dramatic story of his escape, which included wearing a smuggled frogman outfit under a woman’s abaya and swimming into international waters to meet a fellow spy, who took him to Mumbai. OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 3


CATIE STASZAK

DIANA HADSALL

“It’s not quite as exciting as that here anymore, but we’ve done a lot of renovation to the house,” Matt explained. “We took pillars out, redid the floors, painted over the bright colors, updated the kitchen, put in new landscaping to modernize it, and got professionals to open a safe we found built into the walls. We may redo some more in the future, but right now, it feels pretty perfect. It’s a great feeling to want to go home at the end of the day and enjoy your house.”

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att is a thirdgeneration horse-show producer, following in the footsteps of the legendary Gene Mische and Matt’s father, Michael Morrissey. Today Morrissey Management (MMG) is involved with top equestrian events,

Above: Tiffany riding Belucci; Tiffany riding Carpriccio. Opposite above: East Wind Farms in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Previous Pages: Matt and Tiffany at their Wellington home. Lower left, the Eugene Mische American International trophy.

including the American Gold Cup, the American Invitational at the Longines Global Champions Tour, the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival, Palm Beach Masters at Deeridge Farm, the National Horse Show, Lake Placid, and many others. Tiffany knows the other side of the show world. She owns East Wind Farms, a full-service boarding and training facility in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Her riders regularly compete at the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF), Devon, the Hampton Classic, Kentucky, Lake Placid, and all four of the major equitation finals. The couple met through horse shows and have been married for eight years.

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“But,” Tiffany added, “we were together multiple years before that.” Tiffany started riding when she was 7 years old. “Nobody in my family rode, but I was just drawn to it,” she said. “I just wanted to ride. I started locally and ended up at a big show barn where I rode with Lisa Rex, a well-regarded trainer on Long Island. I got to ‘catch ride’ a lot, and I had a lot of great owners along the way to help me succeed in the equitation division. “The highlight came in my last junior year,” she continued, “when I was second in the United States Equestrian Team (USET) Finals. I won 20 USET classes and earned my gold medal, so I got to do the developing-riders tour at the USET headquarters in Gladstone, New Jersey, with George Morris.” Her plan was always to become a professional, so she went to school at night and rode during the day. She won her first grand prix in 2007, and she has won multiple championships in both the hunter and jumper divisions on


GEORGE KAMPER

clients’ horses and her own. In 2007, Tiffany started East Wind Farms, and the business has grown to where she now boards 42 horses and has a full staff. “We have a large, beautiful riding arena, five lush paddocks, a treadmill, and more,” she said. “We offer a show facility for people from Miami and Fort Lauderdale, so that they don’t have to drive all the way up to Wellington. I have a great group of clients. Most of them live in the area. We’ve definitely found our niche here.” She added, “When I’m pairing horses and riders, character is important. I look at the person and the horse together. Will their styles mesh? What are their goals— short term and long term? What do they want to achieve? If you think about it, it makes sense. Would you take your Ford Focus and go to a NASCAR race? Your horse has to be able to help facilitate your goals. It’s a team effort.”

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iffany competes at many of the Morrissey Management shows, and if she is not showing at one, she tries to attend as many as she can. She said, “I went to the Wellington Masters, I had a student ride at the Global Champions Tour of Miami Beach, and I spent five weeks at the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival in Traverse City, Michigan, this summer. Going to Michigan is something I look forward to all year. It’s a fantastic show in a great town. Last year was the first time I showed there—it was the first time MMG got involved—and I absolutely loved it. This year we had 17 horses there.” Matt is excited about Traverse City, too. “We took over the Michigan shows last year at the last minute,” he said. “For the August series, we have added FEI

sanctioning, which is a first for shows in Traverse City. We’ve gotten a great response from competitors. Our purchase option on the property allowed us to improve the footing in the various rings. In the future we will most likely bid on bringing in some additional FEI international competitions and look into adding other disciplines.” Although not well known outside the Midwest as a summer resort, Matt explained, “Traverse City is an unbelievable town during July and August.” It was named one of America’s best beach towns by both Travel & Leisure and Coastal Living. Condé Nast Traveler called it “one of the most beautiful towns in America.” Matt and Tiffany are sure to continue having fun and succeeding in their respective pursuits. And maybe one day, they’ll reveal what they found in that PAGE 105 French spy’s safe.

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BY SUE WEAKLEY AND JILL NOVOTNY

IN

GIVING WE R E C EI V E “YOU’VE GOT TO GIVE SOMETHING BACK . YOU CAN’T JUST SIT THERE.” —PRINCE HARRY OF WALES

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questrians demonstrate an unparalleled generosity of spirit. Whether because of the love of animals or the sensitivity needed to connect with them, horse lovers are often the first to respond to a call for help. When banded together, their amalgamated energy harnesses the power of strength in numbers, and this chemistry provides opportunities for veterans, people with different abilities, animals in need, and disadvantaged children and adults. Horse people provide the resources for countless programs and projects. To compile a comprehensive list of these people and causes would be impossible. So we asked some well-known equestrians for their favorites. While we know that we can barely scratch the surface, what follows is a just a peek into some of the philanthropic endeavors equestrians hold dear. Equine rescue often tops the list of favorite causes for horse lovers to champion. Rescue from abuse and slaughter runs the gamut from grassroots organizations to breed- and disciplinespecific endeavors. In order to provide a set of guidelines Continued on page 60

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THE G RE AT CHARITY CHALLENG E

T H E H UM A N E S O CIE T Y F ORE V E R F OUN DATION

The Humane Society of the United States has created the Forever Foundation, a program that offers a ready-made, adaptable training template for equine rescue organizations across the United States. This guide gives horse rescues special training throughout the year to help horses be more adoptable and to make those adoptions last. The program involves online courses as well as in-person clinics across the country. They conclude in November with a hands-on clinic held at the

Doris Day Horse Rescue Center in Texas. The Forever Foundation is producing results—Rainbow Meadows Equine Rescue in Kansas had an almost 50-percent increase in adoptions after participating in the program.

Founded by Equestrian Sport Productions’ CEO Mark Bellissimo and his daughter Paige and presented by Fidelity Investments, the Great Charity Challenge is held during the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, Florida. It began as a way to help smaller charities keep their doors open and help those in need in Palm Beach County during the recession. The event has grown to see the equestrian community take charitable giving to a new level. The first event raised over $500,000 and was a resounding

success, leading to more money raised with each consecutive year. In its seventh year, more than $1.6 million was raised, bringing it to $9.2 million that has been distributed to 197 Palm Beach County charities. The Great Charity Challenge brings together a unique blend of sport and philanthropy with teams of three equestrians competing in a relay to see who is fastest and who can win the largest portion of the prize money for their randomly paired charity.

TC U E Q UE S T R I A N T E A M

During their time at college, most students are having fun, making friends, and finding themselves buried in school work. At Texas Christian University (TCU), the equestrian team, called the TCU Frogs, have added not only riding to their schedules, but also a wide range of community service. There is no requirement for community service at the school, but last year the team completed over 200 hours. The team members donated their time and efforts for many causes including the Human Society of North Texas and Saint Thomas More Hospital. They send care packages to soldiers abroad

and collect for a Marine Corps toy drive. There is very little guidance from the team or school, and upperclassmen help to set things up and track hours. “There is definitely a lot of pride and a sense of accomplishment,” says equestrian coach Haley Schoolfield. “They are initiating everything on their own, and that just shows what wonderful people they are.”

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ROBERT RED FORD

Actor and environmentalist Robert Redford has long been known as a philanthropist. In 2007, Time magazine named Redford a hero of the environment. He has supported the American Wild Horse Preservation campaign as well as Return to Freedom, which works to end horse slaughter, protect wild horses, and to offer sanctuary, education, advocacy, and conservation.

His other charity work includes Greenpeace, the Jackie Robinson Foundation, and the Sundance Institute, which supports emerging directors and screenwriters. The institute also brings together artists, scientists, and policymakers to discuss solutions to climate change and to broadcast environmentally themed television programs.


P R I S C I L L A PR E SLE Y

Priscilla Presley has always loved animals, but her passion for horses began when Elvis surprised her with a horse named Domino for Christmas in 1967. After discovering the truth about the cruelty involved in training Tennessee walking horses, she has taken a stand and fought hard to end soring (the deliberate inflic-

FE ATURE D CH AR I T Y

tion of pain to gaited horses in order to produce an unnatural, high-stepping gait). Today, the Graceland stables are a haven for rescued horses. She visited Capitol Hill and lobbied lawmakers to pass a protections bill called the Prevent All Soring Tactics Act (PAST). Although the law didn’t pass, it found a wide base of support, and she has continued her mission. Presley has travelled across the country, drawing attention and

headlines to the issue. Though soring is already illegal, there are many who continue the practice. Presley and other animal welfare advocates hope to end soring for good. Even if congress won’t act on the legislation, the Obama administration might. “The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced in July it is proposing changes to an existing federal law, the Horse Protection Act, that would effectively eliminate the practice,” USA Today reported in August. Presley hopes to see these changes take place before the administration leaves office. Last year, the Humane Society named Priscilla horsewoman of the year for her work.

What happens when a group of high-profile American horsemen, a few royals, and a dynamic organization join forces to aim their collective fire power toward alleviating suffering? The lives of millions of working equine animals and their poor owners are improved. That’s exactly what’s happening on the world scene through THE BROOKE: Action for Working Horses and Donkeys, the world’s largest international equine welfare charity, and their American fundraising arm, Brooke USA. (See page 18)

ELISSA MARKOWITZ

W E N DI E M A L I CK

Television star Wendie Malick is an animal advocate in every sense. She has rescued a wide variety of animals, including horses, a cheetah, dogs, and miniature donkeys. Malick is on the board of directors for the Environmental Media

Association, which is a nonprofit that works with the entertainment industry to raise public awareness of environmental issues. She has also worked consistently with the Humane Society of the United States to encourage animal rescue.

In 2012, a 12-year-old rider from Los Angeles named Elissa Markowitz learned about substandard schools in El Salvador. She set out on a mission to make a difference for kids who needed it most. Partnering with the charity One Kid One World in Los Angeles, she hosted her first fundraiser, a silent auction that generated $20,000. A U.S. Agency for International Development program matched her donation, and that $40,000 was able to fund construction of a new school building.

Today 16-year-old Elissa hasn’t stopped in her quest to improve education for kids. In February, she visited the school that she raised the funds to build and then spent time at another, refurbishing classrooms and helping to plant a sustainable garden. Over the summer of 2016, Elissa returned to El Salvador for two weeks with Glasswing, the largest charity in Central America dedicated to addressing the root causes of poverty through education. Glasswing works to create a community-based school system in villages in which everyone benefits from the improvements. On this trip, Elissa expanded her mission and focused much of her time on female-empowerment programs. She is working on another fundraiser for early 2017, and she has no plans to slow down her efforts to raise funds for and awareness of poverty in Central America.

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S A DDL E BR E D R E SC UE

New Jersey-based Saddlebred Rescue Inc. (SBR) is a unique rescue organization that incorporates the thinking and practices of a show stable with the realities of the plight of unwanted horses today. SBR buys all the horses in their program from auctions and sales from which many horses would have been bound for slaughter. The horses are evaluated by professional trainers before being placed in homes across the country. Each horse’s health is assessed by the staff and a veterinarian, and urgent health issues are treated. Each horse is considered a lifetime member of the program. There is always an option to return a horse to SBR should the adopter’s circumstances change. The SBR rehabilitation center in New Jersey welcomes visitors to meet horses and search for their new animal. Potential adopters who can’t make the trip are guided by the staff to find the perfect match.

CARING HEARTS FOR CANINES

F LY P UP S

While the number of dogs euthanized each day is tragic, what’s worse is the knowledge that many of these dogs would be welcomed into loving homes if only they could be relocated. FlyPups is dedicated to transporting dogs from desperate situations to non-kill shelters where they can be nurtured and prepared for adoption. The use of aircraft to transport dogs decreases travel time in some cases from days on the road to hours in the air. Often the

dogs being transported have been through circumstances rendering them fragile, and the stresses of a lengthy road trip could compromise their physical and emotional health. FlyPups transports dogs trained to aid U.S. veterans who suffer from PTSD; they have partnered with some local nonprofits who provide service dogs for soldiers; and they stand ready to aid in relocating dogs after natural disasters.

In 2014, Jennifer Chopping established Caring Hearts for Canines, a rescue organization based in Southern Pines, North Carolina, in an effort to save dogs from high-kill shelters. “Our mission is to rescue and re-home as many dogs as possible and to give them a second chance at a life filled with the love and compassion they deserve,” says Chopping. To date, the charity has rescued over 700 dogs. The organization’s operations include providing veterinary care, including spay/neuter services and vaccinations, foster care, socialization, and transportation for dogs. Caring Hearts for Canines also educates the public through community outreach about proper care of canine companions.

Continued From page 57

to horse rescue operations located throughout the country, the Humane Society of the United States has created the Forever Foundation, a successful program to increase adoption rates of abused or unwanted animals. Horse-crazy celebrities often use their name recognition to help a variety of causes. From crowned princes to the king of rock ‘n roll, the power and prestige of royalty is truly remarkable when it comes to fundraising and raising awareness. When royals and a group of high-profile equestrians teamed up with the Brooke: Working Horses and Donkeys, they created the world’s largest welfare charity. The group champions working equines toiling in some of the world’s toughest environments (see page 18). Not only is the health of the animals at risk, but 60 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016

without their equine partners, the people who own them would suffer. Led by the Duchess of Cornwall—aka the former Camilla Parker Bowles—the group works in 12 countries where poverty affects the welfare of horses and donkeys. Horse lovers Prince Harry of Wales and Prince Seeiso of Lesotho are other crown jewels of the horse world, using their status to help those people affected by HIV/AIDS through charity polo matches, while Priscilla Presley, once the wife of the late king of rock ‘n’ roll, champions the fight against soring techniques used in the Tennessee walking horse industry. Although not blue-blooded, Georgina Bloomberg lends her celebrity status and time to help a variety of charities, from animal rescue groups to organizations fighting animal


S E N T E BA L E

In 2004, when Prince Harry traveled during his gap year, he worked in the African kingdom of Lesotho in an area with the third-highest HIV rate in the world. With the help of Prince Seeiso of the Lesotho royal family, Prince Harry set up Sentebale to attract attention and funding for local organizations that were finding it difficult to get help. Sentebale means “forget me not” in Sesotho,

the language of Lesotho. “This charity is a way in which Prince Seeiso and I can remember our mothers, who both worked with vulnerable children and people affected by AIDS,” Prince Harry says. “I really feel that by doing this I can follow in my mother’s footsteps and keep her legacy alive.” The Sentebale Polo Cup, played each year since 2010, raises money and awareness

of Sentebale’s work in providing health care and education to vulnerable children in Lesotho, many of whom are victims of extreme poverty and Lesotho’s HIV/AIDs epidemic. A number of Prince Harry’s other polo matches benefit Sentebale as well, including the Audi Polo Challenge earlier this year, which raised over $160,000. VINCEREMOS RID ING CENTER

The Vinceremos Riding Center in Loxahatchee, Florida, offers therapeutic riding, hippotherapy, therapeutic driving, and equine-assisted learning to those with limitations. Vinceremos, which means “to overcome” in Latin, was founded by Ruth Menor and has received many awards and accolades in its 35-year history.

In 2012, Vinceremos opened a 45,500-square-foot arena with stabling for 25 horses. The arena provides shelter to as many as 140 riders a week and allows the center to reach more of the community by offering evening riding. The center’s Taking the Reins program of equine-assisted learning is customizable for individuals, families, or even corporate teambuilding and focuses on using the horse as a partner in exploring positive communication, self respect, confidence, and trust.

GA LLOP N YC

GallopNYC is a therapeutic horsemanship program in New York City that serves 350 urban riders each week in five locations across the city. The award-winning program serves children, adults, and veterans with disabilities. That

abuse, horse slaughter, and puppy mills. She also created the Rider’s Closet to help equestrians who can’t afford the high price of riding togs get outfitted in proper gear. Paul Newman, the heartthrob actor in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, was a horse lover who created the Newman’s Own Foundation. Funded by the sale of his own brand of food and beverage products from salad dressing to lemonade, the foundation continues to provide funds to thousands of charities. The Vinceremos Riding Center in South Florida, located in the winter capital of the equestrian world, is the perfect location to entice movers and shakers in the horse industry to help. The respected nonprofit organization provides a variety of

it has a waiting list of over 900 riders—built almost entirely by word of mouth—is a testament to the quality and efficacy of its work. To meet this demand, the organization has embarked on a fundraising program to grow. As of August 2016, GallopNYC has a license to

operate Gemini Stables at a city park in Howard Beach, Queens. With the new facilities, GallopNYC is moving closer to their vision that every child with a disability in New York City has access to therapeutic horseback riding programs.

programs to children and adults with a range of different abilities. Farther north, the New York City-based Gallop NYC serves hundreds of riders with disabilities every week, and the demand for their programs continues to grow. Leg Up Farm is another therapeutic riding center that has grown to include a myriad of services, including physical, occupational, speech and aquatic therapy as well as health services and recreational programming for more than 1,600 children. Among the services available to veterans and their families is the Jinx McCain Horsemanship Program offered by the Semper Fi Fund, where the bond between humans and horses helps heal service members and their families. The Semper Fi Fund Continued on page 64

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REIN IN CANCER

AN N E ’ S N I G H T

Anne Heyman was many things to many people: a fellow equestrian, a friend, a wife, a daughter, a mother, a co-worker, and, to hundreds of orphans in Rwanda (resulting from genocide), a lifesaver in the form of the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village, which she founded. Anne passed away after a tragic fall while competing on her horse in Wellington in 2014. Devastated by the loss of this remarkable woman, several equestrians got together and came up with the idea for a night in her honor. The inaugural Anne’s Night took place in September 2014

and became a sold-out event that raised a significant amount of money for her charity. The Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village is now home to more than 500 students, each of whom graduate from Agahozo-Shalom able to care for themselves and their families, committed to making their community, their country, and their world a better place.

Cheryl Magoteaux Cody has long been one of the western performance-horse industry’s most-published and award-winning writers and photographers. Her company, Pro Management Inc., provides management, media, and publicity services for some of the giants of the industry, including the National Reining Breeders Classic. Perhaps the accomplishment that Cheryl is the most proud of is helping to create Rein In Cancer, an equine-based nonprofit that raises money to fight cancer and help cancer patients. She serves as president and has been instrumental in raising funds at different

equine events across the country. Most notably, the organization raised $500,000 to create and endow the Nutrition Clinic at the Charles and Peggy Stephenson Cancer Center in Oklahoma City, which provides free nutritional counseling to cancer patients. Rein in Cancer also provides direct payments to cancer patients in the horse industry. “We’ve all been touched by this disease,” said Cheryl. “Rein In Cancer was created because we believed in the big hearts of the horse community. The events have been successful because the horse people care enough to give generously.”

U S E T F O UN DAT I ON

The mission of the United States Equestrian Team Foundation is to provide resources to make equestrian competitive excellence possible, now and in the future. The foundation supports the competition, training, coaching, travel, and educational needs of America’s riding elite and developing international high-performance athletes and horses in partnership with the United States Equestrian Federation. High-performance programs are developed in the eight international equestrian disciplines of dressage, eventing, jumping, driving, endurance, reining, para equestrian, and

vaulting. These programs train and support top athletes to compete in the Olympics, world championships, Pan American Games, and other top international competitions. Their programs provide support for world-class coaches, training grants, and talent search programs to identify future elite equestrian athletes. In addition, the foundation helps dressage athletes with disabilities participate in paralympic and world champion competition.

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SEMPER FI FUND

The Semper Fi Fund provides immediate financial assistance and lifetime support to those members of the U.S. armed forces and their families that have been wounded or are critically ill or injured, ensuring that they have the resources they need during their recovery and transition back to their communities. One of Semper Fi Fund’s newest programs is the Jinx McCain Horsemanship Program,

named after a highly decorated Marine from Iwo Jima. It offers camaraderie and healing through the magical animal-human bond during recovery from visible and invisible wounds, post war. Since it was established in 2004, the Semper Fi Fund has provided 119,000 grants, totaling more than $133 million in assistance to over 16,800 heroes and their families.


JUS T WO R L D I NTE RN ATION A L

At the age of 22, Jessica Newman decided to stop riding as an equestrian athlete and to dedicate herself to humanitarian work. She founded JustWorld International in 2003. The organization is devoted to breaking the cycle of poverty by funding local partners around the world that help children thrive. By mobilizing the international equestrian community, JustWorld funds and sustains basic needs like education, nutrition, health and

SHOWS THAT G IVE BACK

hygiene, and cultural development programs for more than 6,500 children in impoverished communities in Cambodia, Guatemala, and Honduras. Two founders of the organization’s partner projects have been named among CNN’s Top 10 Heroes. JustWorld ambassadors, from five-year-old pony riders to Olympic champions, serve as spokespeople for the cause, organizing fundraisers, encouraging others to join, making donations, and wearing the JustWorld colors in the ring. These ambassadors have the job of informing others about what JustWorld stands for and helping the community grow through participation in different activities at local and international horse shows around the world.

BLOWING ROCK CHARITY HORSE SHOW supports many local organizations, including the Blowing Rock Fire and Rescue, the Rotary Club, Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation, Danny & Ron’s Rescue, Saddlebred Rescue, Watauga County Humane Society, Appalachian State University Equestrian Team, and Horse Helpers of the High Country.

volunteers have raised over $14,000,000 in their efforts to ensure that Bryn Mawr Hospital remains one of the top community hospitals in the country.

DEVON

THE HAMPTON CLASSIC is one of the largest outdoor horse shows in the United States and a premier destination for horse people. Its Jump for Charity initiative supports many organizations. MENLO CHARITY HORSE SHOW supports Vista Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired by holding a six-day nationally renowned horse show. PIN OAK CHARITY HORSE SHOW was the first donor to Texas Children’s Hospital and has given over $5.5 million to date.

G EORG INIA BLOOMBERG

PA R L A N T I / K A S K

Parlanti USA has partnered with JustWorld International to support its efforts to educate children at the Stung Mean Chey School in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Portions of revenues from both KASK equestrian helmet and Parlanti boot purchases made throughout 2016 will help fund teacher salaries and provide student uniforms and shoes to children in grades K-6 at the school. “We are still two relatively young companies in the U.S., but

part of our mission has always been to give back at any level,” said Gianluca Caron, North American brand manager of KASK and CEO of Parlanti USA. “JustWorld is a pillar of philanthropy in the equestrian industry, and we are very proud to join them in doing some good around the world,” added Caron.

Georgina Bloomberg has long been known for her work with a variety of philanthropic missions. As an ambassador for the ASPCA, Georgina has helped rescue animals, stop puppy mills, and end animal abuse and horse slaughter. “I believe I was put on this earth to make a difference in animals’ lives. I’m very lucky I have been afforded that luxury,” she told Haute Living earlier this year. The Rider’s Closet, a program founded by Georgina, celebrates its 10th anniversary this year. This successful grass-roots program makes riding clothes more accessible to therapeutic-riding programs, pony clubs, intercollegiate-riding programs, and individual riders who are in need. Georgina’s mission in founding the program was

to help ensure that riding is an accessible sport for everyone, especially riders financially unable to acquire the riding apparel they need to pursue their equestrian dreams. In 2010, Georgina relocated the Rider’s Closet’s operations from her home to a nearby nonprofit, Pegasus Therapeutic Riding, whose volunteers manage the program and keep it running. Through this association, Georgina has formed a special bond with Pegasus riders (left), attending their horse shows and special events, as well as inviting them to her home and to watch her compete. The organization accepts individual and corporate donations of all new and gently used riding gear, then donates the items to anyone in the U.S. who requests them. All equestrian clothing and boots except helmets are accepted. Ariat International recently donated $200,000 in brand-new women’s and youth apparel to the program.

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B R I DG E T PA R K E R

Over 20 years ago, Bridget Parker cofounded the Simunye Project, a charity that operates in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. The project is primarily funded by donations from people involved in the horse industry. The KwaZulu Natal area is over 40 percent HIV positive, and many people are infected with tuberculosis and other diseases. Working closely with the local health department and KwaZulu chief Inkosi Biyela, the the Simunye Project provides food, garden plots, clothing, housing, medications, and transportation for some of the most disenfranchised people in the area. PA L M BE AC H E Q U IN E C LIN IC

Palm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC) is one of the nation’s top equine medical centers. PBEC provides exceptional care to the horses it serves, and it is equally committed to strengthening relationships within the local community. Encouraged by PBEC president Dr. Scott Swerdlin, the team of talented veterinarians donates their time and expertise to many philanthropic community projects each year.

One local organization that PBEC supports annually is the Vinceremos Therapeutic Riding Center. Dr. Swerdlin sits on its board of directors and serves on the organization’s executive committee. Several PBEC veterinarians also donate their time to care for the therapeutic horses there. The clinic also donates to JustWorld International and to the Great Charity Challenge, which is hosted each year during the Winter Equestrian Festival to raise money for different Palm Beach County charities.

D UT TA CORPORATION

Since 1988, the Dutta Corporation, an international horse-shipping company, has been flying horses across the globe. Founder Tim Dutta is an accomplished show jumper and polo player, grateful to work in an industry that is his passion. Dedicated to giving back to the sport, the Dutta Corp. currently sponsors a huge range of events, including the U.S. Dressage

Team, the American Gold Cup, the Winter Equestrian Festival, the Dutta Corp. Fair Hill International, and the Adequan Global Dressage Festival. Tim says, “It’s a privilege to fly any horse, including the top athletes in the world. Supporting our elite and up-and-coming athletes through events and teams helps to grow and strengthen our sport.”

Continued From page 61

provides financial assistance and support to veterans who need help transitioning back into their communities after serving in our country’s military. Many programs are begun in the name of friends and family whose lives were shared with horses. Friends of Anne Heyman, a rider who died after a fall from her horse, continue her legacy of providing help and hope to orphans in Rwanda by organizing Anne’s Night to benefit the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village. Other international programs funded by people within the horse industry help those in need. The Simunye Project assists people in the KwaZulu Natal area of South Africa with health issues and also provides food, garden plots, clothing, housing, and education to people in the area. When 12-year-old student 64 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016

and rider Elissa Markowirtz learned about substandard schools in El Salvador, she decided to help. Through her fundraising efforts, she helped construct a new school building, plant a sustainable garden, and champion female empowerment in the Central American country. Another international program addresses the problems of poverty by providing funds to help children thrive across the globe. Former competitive rider Jessica Newman hung up her show clothes and brought equestrians together to raise awareness and provide for the basic needs of impoverished children through JustWorld International. JustWorld uses the help of equestrian ambassadors to spread the word about its humanitarian causes. KASK helmets and Parlanti USA have joined


N E W M A N ’ S OW N

Together, Paul Newman and Newman’s Own Foundation have supported equine therapy and special riding programs for more than 30 years. The majority of their funding is provided to the camps and programs of SeriousFun Children’s Network. Founded by Paul Newman with a single camp in 1988, SeriousFun provides

enriching, life-changing experiences for children facing serious illness, always free of charge. Horseback riding and other challenging activities help foster confidence, independence, and resilience for these children.

The foundation is also a long-time funder of the Equus Foundation, which promotes the use of horses to enrich the lives of those in need; Green Chimneys, a special education school that offers humane animal education and therapy; and many other charities that work to improve the lives of children and adults with special needs through equineassisted activities.

Newman’s Own Foundation was created by Paul Newman to sustain the legacy of his philanthropic work. It is supported entirely through profits and royalties from Newman’s Own food and beverage products. Since the company was founded in 1982, all profits and royalties from the sale of Newman’s Own products have gone to charitable organizations. To date, over $470 million has been provided to thousands of charities around the world.

LYNN JAYNE / CAROLINE W EED E N

L E G UP FA R M

The vision for Pennsylvania’s Leg Up Farm began in 1997, when Louis Castriota and his wife, Laurie, began plans to construct a therapeutic riding center for children with disabilities. Six months later, their daughter, Brooke, was diagnosed with mitochondrial disease, which causes both cognitive and motor-function delays. Consequently, their vision for Leg

Up Farm was expanded to create the ultimate pediatric-therapy center. Since its opening, over 1,600 children have received services. Leg Up Farm is the only facility in the country to provide therapeutic riding; physical, occupational, speech and aquatic therapy; counseling and nutrition services; and educational and recreational programming all under one roof.

forces with JustWorld International to support education in Cambodia, with portions of their proceeds helping pay teacher salaries and providing students with uniforms and shoes. Palm Beach Equine Clinic, a highly respected veterinary center in Wellington, Florida, donates to JustWorld International, and many of its talented vets offer their time to Vinceremos Therapeutic Center. Tim Dutta, the owner of international horse shipping company Dutta Corporation, is an advisory board member of JustWorld International. His company sponsors a wide range of events, and his son Timmy is keeping it in the family as a JustWorld ambassador. Equestrians also champion health issues closer to home with Rein In Cancer, created by Cheryl Magoteaux Cody, a

Lynn Jayne and Caroline “Carl” Weeden are perhaps best known for their accomplishments in the saddle as skilled riders and trainers, but their achievements and positive impact don’t stop once they leave the arena. For nearly 10 years, the two Chicago-based equestrians have turned their passion and careers as professional horsewomen into a way to give back to the community through Chicago Equestrians

for a Cause, an organization that has hosted the Chicago Hunter Derby since 2007. The derby showcases high-level equestrian sport while raising a cumulative total of more than $500,000 for the USHJA Foundation, the University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation, and the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. The Chicago Hunter Derby, presented by Canadian Pacific, just celebrated its ninth successful year at the Weeden’s Annali-Brookwood Farm in Antioch, Illinois.

celebrated writer and photographer within the western horse world. Through a variety of fun events, Cody and Rein In Cancer help cancer patients with everything from rent to gas money. The charity also founded and endowed a clinic that provides free nutritional counseling to cancer patients. Although far from comprehensive, this list of charities championed by horse lovers is merely a jumping-off point to suggest how you can get involved. Whether an animal welfare program, a charity to knock out cancer, a nonprofit serving our veterans, or a fund supporting human welfare and education, there are a variety of ways compassionate equestrians can help. SEE PAGE 105 FOR CONTACT INFORMATION.

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BY STEPHANIE PETERS

WHAT TO WEAR WHERE

W

Just ask KAREN KLOPP. She is firmly planted in the worlds of fashion and equestrian sport. E VISITED KAREN KLOPP twice, and we were greeted by Jasper and Paris on both occasions. They are two handsome Brittany spaniels enjoying the good life with Karen Klopp and her family. This type of energetic canine welcome typically sets the tone for a relaxed and enjoyable visit, and during each of our interviews with Karen, this proved to be true. We first met Karen while we were assembling a feature on the equestrian community and bucolic hunt country of Millbrook, New York. She had just arrived from New York City, where she had been attending fashion week—an essential event for the fashion forward. In spite of her hectic schedule, she was welcoming, gracious, and more than happy to chat about Millbrook and take us on a walking tour of their 220-acre Millbrook property.

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Karen Klopp in her New York City apartment with Brittany spaniels Paris and Jasper.

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I

“I never really looked at myself as a fashion expert but more of a lifestyle expert.”

She, her husband John, and their three children, Adam, Jake, and Kell, are fully immersed in equestrian pursuits. Although Karen prefers enjoying equestrian sport from terra firma, she describes herself as the equestrian facilitator of the family. “Everybody fox hunts, and everybody plays polo,” she says. John Klopp fell in love with polo at the age of 43 and has been competing ever since. It was his enthusiasm for the sport that led the family to Millbrook. In addition to his integral role of saving and restoring the famed Mashomack Polo Club in Pine Plains, New York, he added a three-man polo field to the family’s Amenia, New York, home and created his own team, Smithfield Farms. “We hold a polo tournament here called the Annual Smithfield Open,” Karen says. It’s three against three, which John calls the ménage à trois. The men get a big kick out of that.” A F L A I R F O R FA SH I ON

Not all of Karen’s time is spent cheering on the polo players or watching the hounds in relentless pursuit. She also manages her successful business, What2WearWhere, an online site offering tasteful advice about what to wear to a diverse mix of events and destinations. She has also written the book Packing for Travel, an adjunct to her fashion-advice focus.

Above: Small vignettes in the New York City apartment, including a vivid fox hunt painting, a cluster of momentos, a photo given to Karen as a gift following her work on a documentary film based in Africa.

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Karen acquired some of her fashion savvy from observing. “I’ve had the chance to travel, do a lot of interesting things, and attend lots of lovely and different events, such as charity balls and fancy luncheons,” Karen explains. “I never really looked at myself as a fashion expert but more of a lifestyle expert. I call it practical fashion on my site. If you have this event to go to, wear that. It isn’t about entering a room and knocking them dead, it’s about entering a room with confidence. “The business started because I might have been one of the first online shoppers. I took to it immediately,” she laughs. “I could go online late at night after the children were in bed and surf the web. It was click, click, click, and then the boxes arrived. And then I started sending ideas and suggestions to friends. That’s sort of how it evolved. I’m also a nut for packing lists. I did them for my children, my husband, and myself.” Karen claims it’s pretty formulaic. “If you are going to a cocktail party, you wear a cocktail dress. It’s about simplifying your choices,” she says. What really inspired her was a quote she read in the Economic Times. It stated that women spend a year of their lives trying to figure out what to wear. “There are a lot of other things you can do for a whole year,” Karen smiles. Her company’s 9-year-old motto, “we take the guesswork out of


ROBERT HANSEN

This page: The open flow and inviting living and dining rooms are idyllic for entertaining in New York City.

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accessory. “Borrowing from my friend Frederic Fekkai, a women’s best accessory is her hair,” she adds. With charity at the forefront of so many of Karen’s endeavors, she selects 1 or 2 charities a month to receive 10 percent of the What2WearWhere website’s commissions and sales of Packing for Travel. She also donates $1 for each sign-up for the What2WearWhere online newsletter. T H E BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

While Karen may not be chasing down a fox on horseback or swinging a mallet atop a polo pony, she has tremendous

Henkels, followed by the Millbrook Horse Trials, which is a great event with over 500 horses.” Karen embodies the best of Millbrook’s relaxed, hunt-country flavor and the energetic vigor of Manhattan. This duality of lifestyle seems to suit her just fine. She currently splits her time between the family’s yellow Dutch colonial farmhouse in Millbrook and their spacious, upper-east-side apartment in New York City. “The Millbrook home, known as Smithfield Farms, was the original farmhouse for the entire valley and was probably owned by one family,” Karen

HEATHER C. MILNE

dressing, the legwork out of shopping, and the panic out of packing,” continues to address this age-old quandary. Karen works with a variety of talented editors who specialize in a bevy of topics within the fashion realm. “The great part about having different editors and different ages is that they can all bring their own unique styles,” Karen explains. “The young girls who just arrive in New York City love to read the site. They want to know what to wear to the winter ball or to the zoo party. They may not shop the site, but they know they’ll find reliable information.” In Packing for Travel, the advice runs

the gamut from what to pack for an equestrian adventure, or a trip to a dude ranch, to what to bring on a cruise, a fly-fishing excursion, and more. “People constantly write to me asking what to wear where,” Karen says. “I get several questions every week, and sometimes the website posts come out of those. Out of all those questions, 99 percent were about travel. The book was an offshoot of that.” When asked if Karen had any fashion pet peeves, she quickly responds, “Never wear stockings with open-toe shoes.” She considers chewing gum to be the worst

impact in the charitable arena. Her fundraising efforts are prominent throughout the equestrian competition season in Millbrook and remain a priority. Most recently, she chaired the Mashomack International Polo Challenge, which benefits the Pine Plains fire and rescue squad, Ronald McDonald House Charities, and the New York State Troopers Benefit Fund. “The event drew 700 people under the tent and 1,000 tailgaters,” Karen smiles. “From that event, we go to Fitch’s Corner Horse Trials, the big eventing competition started by Fernanda Kellogg and Kirk

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explains. “The whole valley was part of a deed that ran all the way west to the Hudson River. Between its huge Camperdown elm tree and the 1700s paneling, we fell in love with it. The front of the house is from 1762, and the 1700s Vermont paneling wasn’t original to the house but was relocated during an early 1920s renovation.” Shading the home’s expansive bluestone terrace, the Camperdown elm was recently featured in a Wall Street Journal article noting the unique real-estate value of mature trees. John and Karen diligently watch over the tree and take great


Opposite: John Klopp (right) playing in the Mashomack International Polo Challenge; the Klopp’s Anniversary garden. This page: The Klopp’s charming Millbrook, New York, yellow Dutch colonial; Karen on their Millbrook home’s polo field.


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J

“Just by virtue of being part of the community in Millbrook, you are part of the preservation effort.”

measures to ensure its health and longevity, not for the monetary value but for the sentimental memories it holds. “We still shovel the snow off that tree,” Karen tells us. “We use a ladder and a broom.” The Millbrook farm affords her the enjoyment of the close-knit equestrian community and the camaraderie between disciplines. She can also continue with her lifelong interest in environmental issues. Karen explains, “Just by virtue of being part of the community in Millbrook, you are part of the preservation effort. You just want to see the beautiful properties, the farms, open lands, and hunts all preserved.” Karen’s early career included writing and filmmaking, with a focus on ecology, wildlife, and environmental issues. One of her films, Amazon Diary, was nominated for an Academy Award in the short feature category. She remains involved with Riverkeeper, a watchdog organization that patrols the Hudson River for polluters. Robert Kennedy Jr. proudly serves as Riverkeeper’s chief prosecuting attorney. U RB A N L I V I N G

During the week, Karen is frequently based in her stylish Manhattan apartment, which is located right around the corner from the offices of What2WearWhere. “We had moved to Connecticut for five years and knew we were coming back to New York City. We looked for something that needed work because we had

Above: A collection of trophies showcase the family’s equestrian accomplishments, a silver ice bucket balanced on a mallet-styled tripod was a gift from friends visiting from Equador.

the luxury of time,” Karen muses. “We found this 10 years ago, and it was just a gem. I really liked the outdoor space [which recently accommodated a party for 50 guests], so we made it work.” The two-story floor plan is open and idyllic for entertaining. The original dining room is now broken into two spaces—a bar and a seating area. Karen points out a table that expands to seat 16. “I typically do buffets here,” she explains. “Sit-downs are more for the country.” The apartment walls are adorned with sophisticated paintings and prints. “My husband and I like to collect contemporary art,” Karen tells us. “We like the juxtaposition of contemporary art with the more seasoned art.” Karen seems happily engaged in her life, brimmed with variety—a life of fashion, travel, family, and equestrian sport. She convincingly balances her passion for fashion and her business with the equestrian community that she loves. “I have to laugh,” Karen says. “Even though I don’t ride, the community is so welcoming. If you love the land, country sport, and the horses and animals, you are totally welcomed.” She considers this impassioned lifestyle a sort of global brotherhood. Perhaps she is welcomed because the community can rely on her to show up, make a charitable difference, and look effortless doing it, with grace and style and with Jasper and Paris at her side. PAGE 105. OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 3


ARTIST

JYLIAN GUSTLIN

CREATIVELY MERGES ART AND SCIENCE

Equus 5, mixed media on panel with resin finish, 48" x 36"

AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST BY STEPHANIE PETERS

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Equus 71, mixed media on panel with resin finish, 48" x 48"

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Your body of work includes figurative and abstract paintings. What inspires you about each?

Jylian Gustlin is a native Californian and grew up in the San Francisco Bay area. The technology explosion of Silicon Valley shaped her, and her art reflects her in-depth knowledge of that technology. “Technology was emerging as an art medium just as I was completing my B.F.A. at the Art Academy in San Francisco. I became a graphics programmer and art director for Apple Computer by merging my understanding of computers and my love for art. I am now a full-time artist and still design and draw many of my preliminary designs on the computer. Today’s technology is so advanced, which allows me to paint and draw with precision and create complex layered effects in computer programs such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.” —Jylian Gustlin

In my work, figures have always been an important part and the foundation of the art; however, abstract paintings with Fibonacci sequence numbers produce complex and layered paintings. The figurative characters are frequently set in an alien-like landscape, temperamental and ominous, yet simultaneously depicting a sense of future self-reflection. I have always been influenced by a lifelong love of the Bay Area figurative artists and use their work as inspiration and guidance in my paintings. The strong shapes flow in a landscape full of enigmatic and ambiguous elements and colors. The contemporary process is redefined, and I take the complex patterns and forms and try to bring them to life. How does your background in computer science and mathematics impact your work?

My background has given me a heightened understanding of how to create patterns and layers on the computer screen. These mock-ups are my printed templates that I use as a jumping off point for a new painting. This process I developed helps me lay down the bones of a painting while remaining loose enough to maintain an organic and painterly presence. Combining my love of the Fibonacci math series and the mediums of art was a natural collision of science and the arts— using intense, complicated color palettes and textures.  The Fibonacci numbers and the Fibonacci sequence are prime examples of how mathematics is connected to seemingly unrelated things. These numbers were first introduced in 1202 in Fibonacci’s book, Liber Abaci. The ratio of consecutive Fibonacci numbers (1, 1, 2,

3, 5, 8, 13, each number being the sum of the previous two numbers) approaches the golden ratio (a common mathematical ratio found in nature), as the sequence gets infinitely long. After studying the movement of horses, I noticed that their gait could be defined by the Fibonacci sequence. The 2-beat trot averages 13 kilometers per hour and the 3-beat gait averages 21 kilometers per hour. These are all Fibonacci numbers and give the horses the grace and gait of the golden ratio, which is very pleasing to observe.  When did you realize you wanted to pursue your life as an artist?

Art is all I can ever remember wanting to do. Do you approach your figurative paintings from a mathematical or an emotional perspective?

For the last several years, I have been working on a series of paintings, both abstract and representational, that are based on the Fibonacci mathematical theories. Fibonacci mathematical calculations create rectangles and shell spirals based on the incrementally increasing numbers. However, when I am painting, I paint with emotion, allowing my personal experiences to flow through the paintbrush and onto the canvas. This extension beyond mathematics and science is the creative language of art. Your paintings have a wonderful textural quality. Can you briefly describe how you accomplish the effect?

After building up several layers of paint consisting of acrylic, charcoal, wax, gold leaf, pastel, graphite, and oils, I dig and scratch the surface, revealing vibrant colors from the deep layers of paint. There may also be dirt from nearby fields, cat continued on page 80

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Equus 75, mixed media on paper, 30" x 36"

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Equus 17, mixed media on panel with resin finish, 48” x 48”

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Equus 55, mixed media on panel with resin finish, 48” x 48”

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Equus 47, mixed media on panelwith resin finish, 48” x 37” continued from page 76

prints, hair, and animal fur on the wet paint. The final layers are made of a twopart epoxy resin that seals and protects the work, giving a depth and dimension to the final piece.

allows my mind to create and capture a well-defined atmosphere.

I particularly like your diverse color palettes. Is color integral to evoking a desired mood?

Horses are one of the most glorious and beautiful animals, with a muscular structure that an artist must study in depth to effectively capture their grace. I love horses and ride as often as I can.

My artwork spans many styles and media. The base media is also broad, with most works on wood panel, but I also work with canvas, fabric, paper, photographic collage, sculpture, and recycled materials. Color is a fascinating medium, and the variety of colors is achieved by hand mixing colors based upon a color palette for each new work. By mixing my own colors, I can change the hue or intensity while working on the painting, which in turn creates a desired mood in my paintings. The flexibility of paint

Your breadth of work includes the Equus series. Do you have a special affinity for horses?

What unique equine traits emerged as you developed this series of paintings?

When you study horses, and sit and watch their movements while sketching, you begin to see the tiniest of changes. The hoof may scratch the ground, the whiskers may twitch, or the horse will simply stop and watch you— seemingly studying you as much as you are studying them.

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You notice horse ballet right in front of you. It’s the graceful movement of their gait, their playful jumping and galloping, and the interaction between horse and rider. It is a special moment between animal and painter when their gestural movements can be perfectly captured in a painting. Have you had the opportunity to spend much time with horses?

Yes. I live in a rural community, and I am surrounded by various Thoroughbred training centers. There are always horses out in a pasture, running on the hills, or standing under the shade of a tree. I am a trail runner in the mountains, and there are plenty of horseback riders on the trails. I always draw from the side of the fence, observing, studying, and learning about this magnificent animal. PAGE 105


A M E R I C A’ S F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM EQUESTR IAN LIVING

EQU E STR I A N P R O P E RT I E S EQLiving.com

O C TO B E R / N OV E M B E R 2 0 1 6

GRAND PRIX VILLAGE WELLINGTON, FLORIDA’ S E XCLUSIVE GATED COMMUNITY

SEE PAGE 82


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

GRAND PRIX VILLAGE Wellington is the leading destination for THE WORLD’S TOP EQUESTRIANS.

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or the serious equestrian, this is one of the finest estates available in prestigious Grand Prix Village, in the heart of Wellington’s horse community. A short hack from the Winter Equestrian Festival show grounds, the facility boasts the largest parcel of land and stables available for purchase in G.P. Village. Extensive thought and care was used in its design which includes more than sixty stalls, fourteen shaded paddocks, and an oversized hunter and jumper arena with the finest of footing. The luxurious equestrian amenities include hot walker, treadmill, lunging area, wash racks, and

ample storage, all set within beautifully manicured grounds surrounded by mature trees and privacy hedges. In addition to world class facilities for horses there are exceptional amenities for owner, riders and staff. Thirteen-plus bedrooms in five apartments are available for staff. The owners’ accommodations are on the second level of the center building with an oversized balcony overlooking the facility and grounds. Wellington is the leading destination for the world’s top equestrians, drawing competitors each season for the Winter Equestrian Festival which features hunter and jumper competitions as well as dressage at the Global Dressage Festival and

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polo at nearby International Polo Club. All three venues offer every level of horsemanship from youth competition to adult amateurs as well as the highest level of Olympic competition. Grand Prix Village is desirable for its proximity to the Winter Equestrian Festival Show Grounds and includes some of the finest equestrian facilities in the area. Wellington is located twenty minutes to Palm Beach International Airport, thirty minutes to the beach, and an hour to Miami. $24,000,000 Offered By Keller Williams ROBERT ROSS, P.A. 561-758-6185 | robsross@aol.com www.RobertRealtyGroup.com


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

PA L M B E A C H

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WELLINGTON

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PA L M B E A C H G A R D E N S

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D E L R AY B E A C H

14471 EQUESTRIAN WAY Saddle Trail This extremely well designed professional standard equine facility has it all. Perfectly situated on 4+ acres with a state-of-the-art 15 stall barn, 210’ x 160’ riding ring, grass field, 6 paddocks, 6 horse Kraft walker and gated access to Bridle path. Two fully appointed staff apartments. Everything a discerning equestrian could desire with 5 bedrooms, 6 full baths, and a theatre room. Funishings available. $8,750,000.

ONE REMAINING

SOLD IN ONE MONTH

15590 SEA MIST LANE Wellington

520 ISLAND DRIVE Palm Beach

PALAZZO VILLAS Palm Beach

This 5.73 acre property features a 5 bedroom, 4.1 bathroom home with a 4 car garage, courtyard back patio with summer kitchen overlooking the elegant pool & spa and a 6 stall barn. Listed at $2,500,000.

This planned 7 bedroom, 10 bathroom will sit on .9 acres with two master bedrooms, a central courtyard and two swimming pools. Ready for March 2018. Offered at $40,000,000. Chris Deitz / James Pefanis

This newly constructed villa offers the ultimate in lifestyle and features 5 bedrooms, a deluxe master suite, summer kitchen, and a private heated pool and spa. Offered at $7,150,000. Chris Deitz / James Pefanis

Doing more for our clients is the way we do business. James Pefanis | 561-704-0213 | jpefanis@fitegroup.com OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 3


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Bridle Path | Palm Beach Polo & CC | $8,950,000 | Truly one of the finest estate homes within Palm Beach Polo & CC. Elegant style, sought after location, and neutral décor, make this fine property a classic. Rarely does an exquisite home of this magnitude become available in the gated, Bridle Path neighborhood of Palm Beach Polo.

Stables Way | Palm Beach Point East | $4,050,000 | Pristine 18 stall barn, with large fiber ring and 10 paddocks. Two aisles of 9 stalls each with their own tack room, wash stalls, and laundry. 2BR Owner’s quarters, plus a 2 bedroom staff quarters as well. Freshly painted inside and out with new landscaping. Short hack to show grounds. A wonderful facility for the serious equestrian.

Paddock Park 2 | Wellington | $3,789,000 | Newer construction and quality throughout, make this farm an equestrian’s dream. Impact glass, large salt water pool & spa, whole house generator and one-of-a-kind granite counters are just a few of the features. A quaint guest cottage and 7 stall center aisle barn with an all-weather arena complete this amazing property.

Saddle Trail | Wellington | $1,650,000 | Great renovation on Appaloosa Trail with updated home and new pool, plus room for a barn and ring. Impact glass, wood floors, new baths and pogeun pull kitchen are just completed. Wonderful views and a short walk to the show, make this property a must see!

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR, P.A. WELLINGTON, FLORIDA BROKER ASSOCIATE 561.797.8040 www.marthasproperties.com

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Bridle Path | Palm Beach Polo & CC | $8,950,000 | Truly one of the finest estate homes within Palm Beach Polo & CC. Elegant style, sought after location, and neutral décor, make this fine property a classic. Rarely does an exquisite home of this magnitude become available in the gated, Bridle Path neighborhood of Palm Beach Polo.

Stables Way | Palm Beach Point East | $4,050,000 | Pristine 18 stall barn, with large fiber ring and 10 paddocks. Two aisles of 9 stalls each with their own tack room, wash stalls, and laundry. 2BR Owner’s quarters, plus a 2 bedroom staff quarters as well. Freshly painted inside and out with new landscaping. Short hack to show grounds. A wonderful facility for the serious equestrian.

Paddock Park 2 | Wellington | $3,789,000 | Newer construction and quality throughout, make this farm an equestrian’s dream. Impact glass, large salt water pool & spa, whole house generator and one-of-a-kind granite counters are just a few of the features. A quaint guest cottage and 7 stall center aisle barn with an all-weather arena complete this amazing property.

Saddle Trail | Wellington | $1,650,000 | Great renovation on Appaloosa Trail with updated home and new pool, plus room for a barn and ring. Impact glass, wood floors, new baths and pogeun pull kitchen are just completed. Wonderful views and a short walk to the show, make this property a must see!

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR, P.A. WELLINGTON, FLORIDA BROKER ASSOCIATE 561.797.8040 www.marthasproperties.com

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E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

RETURN TO NATURE Natural POOLS AND PONDS are a beautiful addition to your property. BY JILL NOVOTNY

T

A natural pool by Total Habitat.

aking a dip in a pond was once the only way to pass a hot summer day in the country. Today, concerns for health and safety, liability, land ownership, and pollution have made swimming in a natural pond much less likely. Many children growing up today have only had the opportunity to swim in the bright blue, chlorinated swimming pools that have become the norm. A growing desire for access to natural water has emerged in the last few decades. Beginning in Europe, a number of people became conscious of the health benefits of natural water, springs, and baths. In 1985, Peter Petrich founded a company in Austria called Biotop, which makes self-cleaning biosystems for swimming pools. These were widely adopted in Europe, including at many fine hotels and resorts.

A Natural Aquatics pool.

“It has taken nature millions of years to create this amazing world,” says Vincenzo Torcasio, founder of Natural Aquatics in Bethel, Connecticut, an American partner company of Biotop. “A very important part of this is the perfect balance of plants, soils, and bacteria that have been created and combined to create clean, living water.” There are many variations in the design of natural pools, ranging from the cleaning systems to the materials used. Generally, these pools require no chemicals at all. Most natural swimming pools are a combination of a swimming area and an aquatic plant garden, which offers natural bio-filtration. By combining these elements with other filtration and skimming systems, the pools remain clean and safe without the use of chemicals. Waterfalls offer a pleasant look plus valuable aeration, a pond skimmer collects large debris, and a jet system keeps Continued on page 92

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Aspen Glen - Private 15 acre custom designed home with top equestrian facilities, unmatched in quality, design & finishes. Every detail was meticulously considered. Stunning stable with exposed wood beams, grooming bays, wash & storage areas. Private hacking paths throughout which compliment the subdivision’s trail system. Offered at $11,000,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Wellington Equestrian Oasis - Stunning 15 acre equestrian estate in a private gated enclave. Designed with an eye for detail and tranquility, the property offers a 4Br/4Ba main residence, 2Br/2Ba manager’s home with two additional staff apartments, totaling 4 bedrooms. Infinity pool with private water vistas. Offered at $8,500,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Saddle Trail - This private 5-acre property has a residence that includes four bedrooms, three full bathrooms, a large kitchen with gorgeous views overlooking the pool area. The property currently has a 5-stall barn, large grass paddocks and riding arena with the ability to have up to 20-stalls. Offered at $5,975,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Palm Beach Point - Contemporary design meets function on 5.4 acres. Stunning half-circle, courtyard barn concept provides the ultimate efficient work space & healthy living for your horses with 7 to 11 stalls depending on your desired use. Natural light brings the outside in through expansive windows and doors, while being energy efficient. Offered at $4,750,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Entrada Acres - This wonderful 3/2 home with a bonus fourth bedroom is a tranquil setting for a working farm. The property has 2 barns, 3 wash stalls, 1 oversized tack room/ storage unit. The larger barn has 14 oversized stalls (13x14) and the second barn has 4 stalls with recovery foam flooring. Entire property is irrigated, with great drainage. Offered at $1,200,000 Amy Carr +1 561-662-0728

Palm Beach Polo ∙ Muirfield - Beautiful concrete floors flow throughout the 3 bed, 3 bath home with vaulted ceilings and tons of natural light. The modern and sleek kitchen is masterfully equipped with all of the bells and whistles. Open space with large windows and doors to enjoy gorgeous sunsets over the lake. Offered at $695,000 Amy Carr +1 561-662-0728

Polo West - 5Br, 3.5Ba home with a 3-car garage. Tucked back quietly away from all noise and main roads. Polo West is a wonderful golf course community in the heart of equestrian venues such as dressage, jumping & polo. Beautiful landscaping, custom kitchen and baths. Offered at $684,000 Joyce Bashein +1 561-389-3901

Palm Beach Polo • Shady Oaks - Open and airy 3 bed, 3 bath town home with a split floor plan, volume ceilings, and comfortable living spaces. Both the living room and master bedroom have French doors leading out to a spacious screened-in patio area. Offered at $549,000 Amy Carr +1 561-662-0728

Palm Beach Polo • Hurlingham - This lovely two bedroom, two bathroom condo has recently undergone a complete renovation. Beautiful hardwood floors flow throughout the living spaces and bedrooms. The doors and windows have all been replaced and are now hurricane impact glass. Offered at $445,000 Amy Carr +1 561-662-0728

The real estate agency with the international network: wellington.evusa.com

©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should90 be independently Engel its TOB independent Partners Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. | E Q UE Sverified. TRIAN L I&VVölkers I N G |and OC ER/ NLicense OVEMB ER |are 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Grand Prix Village - There’s a 16-stall barn that includes a half-bathroom, two tack rooms, two feed rooms, and wash stations. A one-bedroom grooms’ apartment is on the second floor of the building, and includes a full bathroom and kitchen. Connected to the barn is a full owners’ home with vaulted ceilings and a gourmet kitchen. Offered at $13,950,000

Grand Prix Village - With six-acres of land, an 18-stall center aisle barn, gorgeous lake views, and hacking distance to the Winter Equestrian Festival, this property has everything a discerning equestrian could desire. There’s a spacious owners’ lounge with vaulted ceilings and skylights. Grass Grand Prix field and all weather ring in place. Offered at $12,750,000

Across from Horse Show - 4.5 acre farm boasts solar tunnel lighting, solar panel power, gorgeous bamboo wood Rower & Rub Stalls, Nelson automatic waters, and a luxurious detached owners lounge overlooking the ring. The home has a pool with outdoor kitchen and balcony that overlooks the farm. Offered at $12,750,000

Grand Prix Village - Newly constr ucted 20-stall equestrian facility with spacious 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom owner’s quarters upstairs and amazing kitchen with topof-the-line appliances. Downstairs viewing room opens to the riding arena. Full bathroom and office with plenty of storage, 4 wash stalls, laundry, tack and feed rooms. Offered at $10,900,000

Palm Beach Point East - Situated on five wellmaintained acres, this property is within hacking distance to the WEF show grounds. The 12-stall center aisle barn includes a one bedroom, one bathroom groom’s apartment and a comfortable tack room with ample storage and laundry. Newly installed 220' x 130' all weather arena. Price Upon Request

Grand Prix Village - Situated on 4-acres of lush land, is an amazing 20-stall barn with 4 wash stalls, 2 tack rooms, a laundry room, and a feed room. The owners’ lounge has a beautiful fireplace as the focal point, as well as a kitchen with great room for entertaining and a wonderful view of the 220’ x 120’ competition ring with superior custom footing. Offered at $11,900,000

Saddle Trail - Customizable 30 stall farm with 3bedroom, 3 bathroom pool home on 6.25 acres in Saddle Trail. This superbly designed professional farm is complete with a huge sub-irrigated (Riso System) Ring with Martin Collins CLOPF Footing, grand prix jump field, lounging ring and a 6 horse covered walker. Short hack to WEF showgrounds. Offered at $8,000,000

Las Palmas Equestrian - Stunning 10 or 15 acre equestrian estate in private gated enclave. The property offers a 4Br/4Ba main residence, 2Br/2Ba managers home with two additional staff apartments, totaling 4 bedrooms. The equine amenities offered are a 12 stall stable, jumping arena, grass grand prix or hunter field & large turnouts and room for a covered riding arena. Offered at $8,500,000

Saddle Trail - 30 stall equestrian facility with 5bedroom, 3.5 bath pool home on 6.2 acres in Saddle Trail. Farm is complete with a new Olympic all weather sub-irrigated ring, grass jump field, 6 horse Kraft covered walker and a detached storage garage. Offered at $7,250,000

Carol A. Sollak, P.A. • Phone +1 561-818-9476 • Fax +1 561-791-2221 www.carolsollak.evusa.com • Wellington, Florida • Carol.Sollak@evusa.com

©2016 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 1 OC TOB


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NATURAL POOLS Continued from page 86

A Natural Aquatics pool under construction.

water moving. From there, designers can create any number of features—from beaches and piers to staircases or stone details. When chlorine is added to water, the safety of the water depends on it being completely dead. No living organisms can be allowed to survive there, which results in an surprisingly unpleasant swimming experience. Pungent chemical odors, eye irritation, and dry skin are just a few of the side effects of such treatments. Natural pools have only clean, clear water, but without the muddy bottom of a pond. There are several advantages to a natural pool in addition to chemicalfree swimming. Natural pools are more affordable than many people assume. Often, initial costs are a bit higher than those for a traditional in-ground pool, but the ongoing maintenance time and chemicals costs are much lower, because there is no need to winterize or treat the water. No winterizing means there are no unattractive covers, plus there may be the added fun of ice skating. Instead of water that must be kept chlorinated and dead in order to be safe and clean, a natural pool attracts wildlife.

A “

natural pool is more than just a swimming pool; it’s a sanctuary, a breathtaking water feature, and a fragrant garden. It’s the centerpiece of your backyard all year long and your own private nature preserve,” explains Mick Hilleary, founder of Total Habitat. “You can swim as nature intended it, without stinging eyes and a chemical odor, in water that is clean and chemical free.” The Kansas-based company began by building animal habitats for zoos. “After building an otter habitat and watching them joyfully swim about in the crystalclear water of their exhibit, we thought, ‘we need to do this for humans!’” says Hilleary.

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Today, his company builds and designs natural pools and ponds and has been at the forefront of natural pools in North America for over 20 years. Using a built-in biological filtration system that is engineered to handle a wide range of climates, they have developed formulas for pools based on location, temperature, wind, sun exposure, fish population, and the number of gallons that need to be turned over in the system each day. These formulas have resulted in the ability to install the filter anywhere in the pool, which means the ponds no longer need large regeneration areas separate from the swimming area. “The fact is, wherever you may be, there are billions of invisible microorganisms, only a few microns in size, right next to you, in you, in the ground you’re standing on, in the water you drink, in your food, and in the air you’re inhaling,” explains Natural Aquatics’ Torcasio. “Your water should be alive to be healthy. Like the human body, we are creating an immune system for your swimming pool, a world for good bacteria to thrive in and an environment where the bad bacteria will be removed by the good. They are living pools for living people.” P. 105


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Havelok Hill

Sayer Woods

Black Dog Farm

Havelok Hill offers 600 acres of exquisite Vermont land, a Post and Beam main lodge on a site with dramatic long range 360 degree views and a separate Cape residence and barn.

Prominent equestrian estate boasts a 6800 sq.ft. main residence, a 2400 sq.ft. caretaker residence, two barns, two ponds, 396 acres and 13 miles of riding trails with views.

A wonderfully modern farmhouse with barns sited on 130 acres. Huge horse barn and separate toy barn. 40 acres cleared with 20 acres fenced. Views to Mount Sunapee and beyond.

STRAFFORD, VT | $4,750,000 | MLS#4511337 RICK HIGGERSON | 802.291.0436

BARNARD, VT | $4,150,000 STAN BUTLER | 603.276.1348

UNITY, NH | $2,750,000 | MLS#4472201 LINDA ROSENTHALL | 603.455.1252

Fabulous Estate Property

Secluded and Timeless

Vershire Riding School

This location can not be beat. Living in the country, on your own 26.47 acre farm, yet so close to everything. A fabulous estate property that works as a horse, hobby and/or gentleman’s farm.

This unique stone and log home sits on 245 acres overlooking the Green Mountains of Vermont. Conveniently located in the historic town of Chester, Vermont.

Own a piece of Vermont History. This extraordinary property has been in the same family for over 46 years. The farm is a successfully run equestrian riding and artist camp.

WILLISTON, VT | $1,395,000 | MLS#4509854 JAY STRAUSSER | 802.578.2094

CHESTER, VT | $985,000 | MLS#4487332 JACK MENZIE | 252.944.6859

VERSHIRE, VT | $789,900 | MLS#4510800 KATE CASSIDY | 802.299.6509

Live in an Inspiring Setting

82 Acre Equestrian Property

Vermont Equestrian Paradise

Lovingly maintained 58 acre farm in the heart of the Green Mountains. Barns, outbuildings, pastures and its own personal swimming hole. An Equestrians Delight!

The facility includes two barns with 23 stalls, an attached 60 x 120 indoor riding arena, two tack rooms, one with heated viewing room, and 100 x 225 fenced outdoor sand arena.

Great opportunity to fulfill your dreams of owning an equestrian property in the heart of the Northeast Kingdom. Beautiful, custom home with fully equipped horse barn and ring.

STRAFFORD, VT | $759,900 | MLS#4488192 KATE CASSIDY | 802.299.6509

NEW HAVEN, VT | $599,500 | MLS#4502094 LIZ MARINO | 802.385.1116

ST. JOHNSBURY, VT | $595,000 | MLS#4503315 ROBIN JACOBS | 802.274.0212

HANOVER - S. MAIN ST. 603.643.6400 | WEST LEBANON 603.298.5155 | BEDFORD 603.413.7600 SO. BURLINGTON 802.864.0541 | OKEMO 802.228.4537 | ST. JOHNSBURY 802.751.7582 | MIDDLEBURY 802.388.1000 Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 3


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

571 439-4027 discoverloudounhomes@gmail.com

Exquisite equestrian estate in Lincoln, VA on 32+ acres. Beautifully appointed 7000+sf home, pool, private gardens, barn, ring, 2BR guest cottage. Proudly offered at $1,950,000. Additional 25 acres available

18812 Harmony Church Rd. Historic farmhouse on 25+ acres in Loudoun Hunt territory. Offered at $999,000

Turnkey horse farm in Hamilton. 4700+sf custom home with pool, barn and indoor arena. Offered at $1,200,000

www.discoverloudounhomes.com | www.novahorseproperty.com 50 Catoctin Cir NE, Suite 101, Leesburg, VA 20176 | 703 669-0099

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STUNNING MIDWEST ESTATE

CENTRAL MISSOURI -- 4BR luxury home with new 12-stall barn, indoor arena, permanent round pen and add’l outbuildings on 50 cross-fenced acres. Just minutes from Univ of MO equine hospital, convenient to St. Louis and KC airports, and an easy drive to the National Equestrian Center (StL), KY Horse Park, etc. Perfect for breeding or training. $999,999 Add’l equestrian properties of all sizes available for your consideration.

BETSY WOODRUFF | STACEY SWALLA, REALTORS® | 573-823-5680 | 573-446-6767 | woodruff-group.com OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 5


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Extraordinary Country Estate Mendham Township, New Jersey Stone and Clapboard Colonial. Warm and inviting interior features 6 bedrooms en suite, 7 fireplaces, luxurious master suite, chef’s kitchen. Resort like pool, spa, 16± private acres, 4-stall barn, paddock, bank barn 3-car garage with loft. Stone walls, professionally landscaped, bluestone terraces. Offered at $6,750,000

John V. Schott & Holly Suminski Sales Associates Office: 973.543.7400, x622 & x639 jschott@turpinrealtors.com hsuminski@turpinrealtors.com

www.TurpinRealtors.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

THE DIVIDE AT BALD ROCK

A Civilized Wilderness

20 Continental Drive | Sapphire, North Carolina (828) 743-7077 | www.dividenc.com |

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Discover our premier North Carolina mountain property in Cashiers. Let our mountain community be your secure sanctuary in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The Divide is located adjacent to the 6700-acre preserve, Panthertown National Forest, and the prestigious Bald Rock community along the Eastern Continental Divide. Ownership in The Divide entitles residents to year-round amenities with Sapphire Valley Resort, managed equestrian facilities, including stables and pastures, and the miles of trails through Bald Rock and Panthertown National Forest for hikers, horseback riders, mountain bikers, and nature lovers. At 4000+’ elevation, The Divide offers pleasant summer temperatures for horse and rider alike. Our mountain property presents all the best North Carolina and the Blue Ridge Mountains can offer. Each lot takes advantage of its mountain features, be it bold streams, cascading falls, grand mountain views or the simple beauty of a Blue Ridge mountain wilderness.


the las vegas national horse show,csi 4 *-w

4 Stars, 4 FEI Ranking Classes, 2 Rings,

1 Championship Show... November 15–20, 2016


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D I N I N G

MOM’S HOME COOKIN’ F L AVO

LOC

L

R

A

In Aubrey, Texas, horse country, MOM’S ON MAIN offers comfort food.

T UN CO ITES E RS OR H O FAV

RY

MOM’S MAC & CHEESE Ingredients

S

everal years ago we joined reining legends Tom and Mandy McCutcheon for lunch at an authentic nearby home-cookin’ cafe, and lots of their friends dropped by to join us. This is what you hope small-town dining would be but rarely is. If it’s your first visit to Mom’s, they’ll welcome you with what might be the best macaroni and cheese and chocolate cake you’ve ever tasted.

½ cup milk 1  12-ounce can evaporated milk ¾ pound shredded cheddar cheese ½ pound melting cheese, such as Velveeta 2 eggs ½ cup butter ¼ cup sour cream ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon white pepper 1 pound elbow macaroni

PREPARATION 1. Whisk eggs, milk, and evaporated milk

together until smooth. 2. Place over low heat. Add butter, both

cheeses, sour cream, salt, and pepper. 3. Stir and cook until smooth. 4. Boil macaroni until al dente. 5. Drain macaroni. 6. Pour sauce over macaroni, stir until smooth, and serve. SERVING SUGGESTION

Delicious all by itself or add toppings, if you wish. Crumbled bacon, fried onions, and sliced green olives are favorites.

Top, front left: Tom McCutcheon and Mandy McCutcheon; front right, EQ editor Stephanie Peters and some McCutcheon friends; Above, Mom’s owners, Steve and Krys Murray. PAGE 105

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The 133rd

National Horse Show

November 1-6, 2016 ~ Kentucky Horse Park

• Cheer on members of the 2016 Rio Olympic Show Jumping team! • Friday, Nov. 4 is Barn Night! • Saturday, Nov. 5 join us for a Breeders’ Cup Viewing Party followed by the Longines FEI World CupTM Jumping Lexington at 8PM • ASPCA Maclay Championships • Miles for Miraclefeet 5k • The Lexington Bourbon Experience • Shop at over 40 boutique vendors

www.NHS.org


EQ F A V O R I T E S

A HORSE SHOW SHOPPING GUIDE Something for fans and riders alike at the WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW. BY LINDSAY BROCK | JUMP MEDIA

A

D RE S S T HE RIDE R

It’s not a horse show without breeches, boots, and shadbellies. From one-stop tack stores to luxury equestrian brands, boutiques for the rider are plentiful at WIHS whether that rider is searching for their first pair of custom boots from Der Dau or Fabbri boots, or hoping to find a pair of breeches they will want to live their lives in at JODS. It is not,

Sport Innovations, LLC. Point Two offers the only U.S.-based option for air safety vests, while Sport Innovations boasts ever-popular electromagnetic massage therapy machines.

PHOTO JUMP MEDIA

INDULGE

PHOTO ALDEN CORIGAN

s the weather cools and fall approaches in downtown Washington, D.C., the concourse at Verizon Center is most commonly filled with hockey fans and foam fingers. However, for six days in October, it is nirvana for show-jumping fans. The Washington International Horse Show (WIHS), now in its 58th year, not only transforms Verizon Center into a hotspot for top-caliber show jumping competition, it is also a shopaholic’s paradise. “The Washington International Horse Show has become one of North America’s most cherished horse shows, but we also take pride in the fact that it is iconic among riders and fans alike,” said Bridget Love Meehan, Executive Director of WIHS. “Thanks to shopping, special events, and competition we have actively engaged the D.C. community and beyond with our celebrated sport. You don’t have to be a rider to enjoy the WIHS experience; you just have to love horses.” Here’s a sneak preview of the shopping experience at WIHS:

however, just popular North American shops that have a presence; boutiques like Von Dornberg-Munich offer a taste of European style as well. E QUINE INNOVATIONS

Just like many of the rising stars of show jumping who make a name for themselves at WIHS, many innovations in equestrian technology first reach the market at horse shows. Must-see examples of equine innovations exist at WIHS with vendors like Point Two Air Jackets and

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Horse show shopping at WIHS also offers many opportunities for retail therapy. If high-end jewelry, fine art, or a fashion update are on the holiday wish-list this year, WIHS boutiques can help grant those wishes. Hunt, Ltd. is a long-time WIHS boutique and a popular choice among horse-savvy women looking to stay stylish around the barn. In addition, shops like Zadeh will add a little sparkle to any outfit with handmade jewelry and accessories. And, it is never the wrong time to stop by Lady Ann Candies to indulge the shopper’s sweet tooth. In addition to traditional boutiques, the WIHS Silent Auction is a favorite among the show’s patrons each and every year. Past auction items have included tickets to New York City’s Saturday Night Live, a riding lesson from Olympian Beezie Madden, and so much more. Bidding takes place onsite at Verizon Center, but also online thanks to innovative digital bid technology. WIHS is the country’s leading metropolitan indoor horse show and has successfully combined the fanfare of the world’s top riders with the attraction of seeing internationally known horses in the heart of the nation’s capital. Whether it is for the shopping, for the atmosphere, or for the competition, there is something for every horse-sport fan at WIHS.


Harrie Smolders and Emerald

Š2016 Discovery Communications


Art by Stephanie Revennaugh


A M E R I C A’ S F I N E S T E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Tour hundreds of amazing horse properties. C O M PA R E A M E R I C A’ S B E S T H O R S E TOW N S . V I S I T M I L L I O N S O F D O L L A R S O F AVA I L A B L E E Q U E S T R I A N E S TAT E S , R A N C H E S , A N D H O R S E FARM S , FROM NE W ENGL AND ANTIQUES TO WA R M - W E AT H E R G E TAWAY S .

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W W W. L U X E Q U E S T R I A N . C O M THE LEADING RESOURCE FOR BOTH BUYER S AND SELLER S O F F I N E H O R S E P RO P E RT I E S

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Milea > Ads > Equestrian Living Magazine > 06_June (0628_hpv_ShintoFarm_138111.indd) Walter / 4c / 4" x 10.125" EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

TRAVEL Page 12 Whitepod Hotel Valais, Switzerland whitepod.com STYLE Page 16 Silkhorse Scarves parekhbugbee.com GIVING BACK Page 18 The Brooke thebrooke.org FASHION Page 20 J.C. Cording & Co. cordings.co.uk FAVORITES Page 24 Watches Orvis orvis.com Ralph Lauren ralphlaurenwatches.com Shinola shinola.com Swiss Army Swissarmy.com Tourneau tourneau.com Tudor Watch tudorwatch.com Vortic Watch Company vorticwatches.com GIFT GUIDE Page 29 Ariat ariat.com Gucci gucci.com Hoorsenbuhs hoorsenbuhs.com Louis Vuitton louisvuitton.com Ralph Lauren ralphlauren.com Rönner ronnerdesign.com Shrader Leather shraderleather.com Vagabond House vagabondhouse.com FAVORITES Page 30 The Humane Economy by Wayne Pacelle William Morrow, 2016 amazon.com PEOPLE Page 34 Joanne Weiner privatetutoringservices.com

PAWS UP Page 36 Greenough, MT pawsup.com GREER GRAMMER Page 46 sonypictures.com/movies/ emmaschance MORRISSEY Page 52 Morrissey Management Group mmg.management EastWind Farms eastwindfarmsllc.com PHILANTHROPY Page 56 Anne’s Night annesnight.com ASPCA aspca.org Blowing Rock Horse Show blowingrockhorses.com Caring Hearts for Canines caringheartsforcanines.com Chicago Hunter Derby chicagoequestriansforacause. com Devon Horse Show devonhorseshow.net Dutta Corporation timdutta.com Environmental Media Association green4ema.org Forever Foundation hsusforeverfoundation.org FlyPups flypups.org Gallop NYC GallopNYC.org Glasswing glasswing.org Great Charity Challenge gcc.coth.com The Human Society of the United States humanesociety.org The Hampton Classic hamptonclassic.com JustWorld International justworldinternational.org Kask kask.it Menlo Charity Horse Show menlocharityhorseshow.com Newman’s Own Foundation newmansownfoundation.org OneKid OneWorld onekidoneworld.org Palm Beach Equestrian Clinic EquineClinic.com

Parlanti parlanti.com Pegasus Therapeutic Riding pegasustr.org Pin Oak Charity Horse Show pinoak.org PAST Act, Humane Society Sign the petition here: goo.gl/iwmqkS Return to Freedom returntofreedom.org Rein in Cancer reinincancer.com The Rider’s Closet pegasustr.org/riders-closet/ Sentebale sentebale.org Saddlebred Rescue saddlebredrescue.com The Simunye Project thesimunyeproject.com Semper Fi Fund semperfifund.org Texas Christian University Equestrian Team gofrogs.com/ sports/w-equest USET Foundation uset.org Vinceremos Therapeutic Riding Center vinceremos.org Wild Horse Preservation Campaign wildhorsepreservation.org

NOW OPEN SHINTO FARM Shinto Farm/CB Dressage is Bedford Hill’s premier state-ofthe-art dressage facility on 18 stunning acres. It has a history of horsemanship passed down through five generations of dedicated equestrians. Shinto Farm is amateur-friendly and offers boarding, training and sales, as well as professionally-taught dressage clinics throughout the year. We take competitors to FEI competitions as well as regional & national championships.

KAREN KLOPP Page 66 what2wearwhere.com GALLERY Page 74 Jylian Gustlin jyliangustlin.com EQ PROPERTIES Page 86 Natural Pools BioTop Klosterneuburg-Weidling, Austria gb.bio.top Natural Aquatics Bethel, CT aquascapespool.com Total Habitat Lawrence, KS totalhabitat.com DINING Page 98 Mom’s on Main Aubrey, TX worldfamousmoms.com

Trainer Michelle Winsett Dinneen riding Krafty. Training staff also includes Courtney Bolender and Trish Helmer. Krafty owned by Carol Samaras; photo by Jason Banister

SHINTO FARM/CB DRESSAGE Dressage Horses For Sale or Lease Lessons – Full Training 145 Broad Brook Road, Bedford Hills, NY 10507 845-797-4419 | cbwalkerstables.com OC TOB E R/NOVE M B E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 5


EQ B A R N D O G S

SEABISCUIT AND POCATELL An unexpected friendship gave the horse THE COMFORT HE NEEDED to become a legend.

A

lthough he was descended from Man o’ War, a legend in the sport of racing, Seabiscuit was not the fine specimen that his breeders had hoped for. His gait was awkward and his temperament stubborn. “His body was thick, his legs were stubby, and his tail was stunted. His left foreleg jabbed out wildly when he ran, in a motion many called an ‘egg beater gait,’” explained the narrator of “Seabiscuit” on PBS’s American Experience. James Fitzsimmons, Seabiscuit’s first trainer, called him “dead lazy,” and his early showings on the track did little to inspire confidence in the young horse’s future. He seemed to have no interest in running his hardest, which was, in retrospect, most likely due to overwork. He ran a record-setting 43 races by the age of 3, a number most horses run during their entire career. To get the few wins they did, his trainers whipped him relentlessly and worked him sore. By the time he was won by Charles Howard after winning a claiming race at Saratoga, Seabiscuit was tired, underweight, and disagreeable. He refused his food and paced nervously around his stall. He charged at people, both in the barn and at the starting gates. His new trainer, Tom Smith, was an experienced cowboy with a steady hand and a knack for communicating with horses. He understood that Seabiscuit was in need of some rehabilitation. He also knew that horses need company. So, he went about the task of finding a companion for the temperamental stallion. First, Smith brought in a nanny goat named Whiskers. Goats are often

BY JILL NOVOTNY

Seabiscuit’s dog pal, Pocatell

used as a soothing presence for nervous racehorses, but Seabiscuit disagreed. He picked the goat up by the scruff and threw her clear out of the stall. Whiskers was quickly taken to safety and relieved of her duties. Next, they found a companion pony named Pumpkin. The two found an immediate attachment and enjoyed a lifetime together. But it was decided that Seabiscuit needed more. Laura Hillenbrand describes what happened next in her bestselling biography of Seabiscuit, which became the 2003 hit movie. “Somewhere along the way, a little spotted stray dog fell in with the Howard barn and began to travel with it,” she writes. “Named Pocatell, the dog had curiously upright ears that were round as platters and roughly three times normal size. Pocatell took a liking to Seabiscuit and began sleeping in his stall at night.” Eventually, the Howard family also adopted a spider monkey named Jo Jo. It’s not known where or how

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they acquired the monkey, but it was clear that the monkey took a shine to Seabiscuit as well. “Sleeping with Pumpkin a few feet away, Jo Jo in the crook of his neck, and Pocatell on his belly, Seabiscuit began to relax,” says Laura Hillenbrand. It was only after the odd entourage was formed that Seabiscuit began to take a turn for the better. Between the care of Smith, Howard, Pocatell, and Pumpkin, Seabiscuit began to flourish. He returned to the track with new jockey Red Pollard and started to win. A second-place finish in the 1937 Santa Anita Handicap brought Seabiscuit onto the national stage. The following year, after rocketing to the top of the field, he faced War Admiral, beating him by four lengths at Maryland’s Pimlico Racecourse in what many called the race of the century. Just six weeks later, Seabiscuit stumbled, rupturing his suspensory ligament. Most expected it to end his career, but he recovered to race again. In March of 1940, Pollard mounted Seabiscuit, now seven years old, to race the Santa Anita Handicap one last time. The pair became boxed in through the final turn of their final race, with nowhere to go. When a gap opened, they flew through it, galloping to win in the second-fastest time ever recorded on an American track for that distance. Seabiscuit retired a legend, living the rest of his life comfortably at the Howard’s farm, beloved by his owners, by his dog-friend Pocatell, and by the entire country. His wins are surely the result of his bloodline and training, but it seems likely that his comeback story was made possible by the friendship of his peculiar group of animal friends.


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CUSTOMIZING YOUR JOURNEY TO OPTIMAL HEALTH For nearly 25 years, Hotze Health & Wellness Center has helped thousands of patients get their lives back, naturally and effectively. Our comprehensive 8-point treatment program addresses the many health issues that affect women and men as they age such as fatigue, weight gain, headaches, depression, insomnia, joint and muscle pain, loss of interest in sex, and allergies to name a few. Our philosophy is simple: the more strides we make in helping you achieve optimal health, the more time you’ll have to enjoy it.

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Hermès Arpège dressage saddle extra-deep seat

UNEE BB, JESSICA VON BREDOW-WERNDL AND THEIR HERMÈS ARPÈGE SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR.

Oct/Nov 2016  
Oct/Nov 2016