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PE OPLE | TR AVE L | D ESI G N | FA SH I O N | ST Y L E | D É COR

EQ

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

EQLiving.com JUNE/JULY 2017

AC TOR A ND A N IMA L A DVOC AT E

WENDIE MALICK LI VES THE SI M PL E FA RM LI FE

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 7

PLUS: MEMORABLE WEDDINGS DESIGN INSIDE AND OUT

DISPLAY UNTIL AUG 8, 2017


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES J U NE | J U LY 2 0 1 7

AT HOME WITH WENDIE MALICK

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EQ Living visits the television star at her comfortable home in the Santa Monica mountains. RIVER GROVE FARM

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This Idaho farm is home to two distinguished equestrian families and a world-famous dressage horse. MEMORABLE WEDDINGS

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36 PATRICIA LYONS

AT HOME WITH WENDIE MALICK

SLAV ZATOKA

A beautiful wedding is one that reflects a couple’s style, from the venue to the details.

54

MEMORABLE WEDDINGS

INSIDE THE WORLD OF VICTORIA McCULLOUGH

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She may be little-known to the public, but this powerful woman is a major force in ending horse slaughter in America. DESIGN MASTERCLASS: Janice Parker

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The landscape architect has distinguished herself by rethinking accepted landscape practices. Vance Burke

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EQ Living’s editor at large, Carol Cohen Hodess, visits the renowned interior designer. TRAVERSE CITY, MICHIGAN

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This lakeside summer equestrian oasis is home to the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival. ALDEN CORRIGAN

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Photographer Alden Corrigan’s iconic images illuminate the highly personal bond between horse and rider.

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EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS J U NE | J U LY 2 0 1 7

10

14

EQ ESSENTIALS

FASHION

10

The up-and-coming Italian brand Iago is classic but never boring. STYLE

14

Add these seven easy pieces to your wardrobe for the equestrian look.

19

DÉCOR

19

Inviting door knockers make great first impressions. FAVORITES

22

Equestrian Living embarks on a new chapter by teaming up with US Equestrian.

24

Contemporary yet timeless gifts for any wedding couple.

30

Best-selling author Jojo Moyes’ new novel is a touching story

124

of a lost girl and her horse.

34

Two social events in Wellington, Florida, raised money for charity in style. ARTS

28

Iconic artist Sam Savitt is remembered by his son on the centennial of his birth. FOOD AND DRINK

24

122

Make Chef Ron Andrews’ honey-smoked shrimp with hoe cakes.

ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE Wendie Malick shot on location in the Santa Monica mountains of California by photographer Slav Zatoka.

124

Bartender Lara Vellocido shares one of her favorite cocktails.

EDITOR’S NOTE 8 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES 129 Look for to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 130 Piper is a canine assistant who helps her owner in all kinds of ways around her farm.

PEOPLE

20

Champion Brianne Goutal Marteau is a business woman, mother, and top rider. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

105

Fabulous farms and ranches plus sustainable paddock design. 6 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017


BEAUTY IS TIMELESS. SO IS A SUPERIOR CONCRETE FENCE.

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EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

WELCOME

Wendie Malick (left) with Senior Editor Jill Novotny in Los Angeles, California.

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enjoy discovering the unexpected and relish time spent exploring the under-the-radar aspects of life. I prefer touring off-season so I can experience out-of-theway points of interest in a more authentic state, and I savor the people, places, and events that don’t require a spotlight to shine. Thanks to a recent segment on CBS’s 60 Minutes, I discovered the nuances of the lesser-known sport of timber racing, often referred to as one of the oldest and unsung horse sports. Consider it kismet, but shortly after the airing I was invited to the 39th annual Point-to-Point at Winterthur timber race, to watch jockeys and Thoroughbreds as they jumped fixed wooden-rail fences and galloped across the course on the Winterthur estate in

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Delaware. Scheduled the day after the Kentucky Derby and two weeks before the Devon Horse Show, the event felt like an intimate gem—elegant in its presentation and authentic in its homage to the rough-and-tumble tradition of the sport. I’m also struck by the under-the-radar efforts of high-profile people who are looking for results rather than accolades; people who are focused on being heard, on taking action, and making an impact. In this case, I’m referring to those souls who are dedicated to saving the lives of thousands of horses. EQ Living is thrilled to feature two such advocates: Wendie Malick, a wellknown actor, and Victoria McCullough, chairman of Chesapeake Petroleum. Both have hugely successful professional careers, but it’s the plight of voiceless animals that fuels their passions. Their rewards are in the triumphs—large and small—that are grounded in conviction. Perhaps challenging work with little desire for public recognition generates confident people with witty and unassuming personalities. After visiting with each of them at their remarkable homes, editors Jill Novotny and Sue Weakley individually brought to light not only the advocacy efforts of Wendie and Victoria but also revealed funny and joyful demeanors that endure—even in the political trenches, in the barn, or literally up to their elbows in you-know-what. In this issue, we present our fourthannual wedding feature, which is bound to delight anyone planning a wedding or who enjoys reading about the creative efforts that go into creating a memorable

event, from the venue selection to the tiniest details. We also feature two extremely talented designers in our design master class series. Focusing on interiors, designer Vance Burke pushes the envelope with colors and ideas and provides striking examples of how to incorporate equestrian accents into modern style. As we move outside, landscape architect Janice Parker walks us through a unique farm project that was recently published in her new book, Designing a Vision. To round out the issue, we’ve compiled an engaging mix of people, fashion, dining, travel, architecture, and so much more. As many of you may know, EQ Living recently became an official media partner of US Equestrian, the governing body of equestrian sports in the U.S. We are excited about the energy and focus behind their rebranding and mission (page 22). The organization’s commitment to bringing the joy of horse sport to as many people as possible is palpable, and we applaud their emphasis on growing equestrian sports at all levels. Coming up in our next issue, we will reveal the winners of the annual EQ Gold List. Discover whom our readers chose as their favorite people, places, and brands in categories such as travel, riding apparel, dining, fashion, and competition venues. You can still vote for your favorites for a few more weeks (page 116). We’d love your input!


The Ride of Your Life. SeCure YOur pLACe nOw in AnTiCipATiOn Of The wOrLd equeSTriAn CenTer premierinG in 2018. CuSTOm eSTATe hOmeS fOr SALe And STAbLeS fOr LeASe.

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

BACK TO BASICS The up-and-coming ITALIAN BRAND IAGO is classic but never boring.

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BY RENEE SPURGE | LA SADDLERY

he equestrian retail industry has quickly evolved over the last few decades, and even more so over the last few years. Not too long ago, you had a handful of tried and true brands that all the high-profile hunter jumpers and dressage riders sported at the show. However, with mega online superstores trying to take over the retail world, small boutiques like my own are constantly looking to reinvent our inventory and remain relevant by introducing new brands and starting our own exciting trends in equestrian fashion to ensure diversity in the arena. Always on the hunt for that rising young brand, I took to the barn aisles in Italy to find out what the most fashionable riders had in their closets. A little over a year ago, I was introduced to an up-and-coming company whose core objective is refining the basic elements of riding and show apparel. The lovely folks at Iago are dedicated to creating quality equestrian apparel using their 10 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

own local designers and manufacturers, with only the finest quality fabrics available. At first look, the breeches and show coats are remarkably similar to other well-known Italian brands; however the cut, fabric, and fit are uniquely Iago’s own. This is also true for their simple and sophisticated sporty show shirts. The shirts have a laundry list of special features, including UV protection, which is a must-have living in our globally warmed nation. It is also noteworthy that the stitching, grip technology, and zippers are far superior to many of the other competitive brands. The Iago breeches, show shirts, and coats will literally shape to your body, regardless of your shape. They are supremely comfortable to ride in, easy to care for, and have passed the test of time through my repeated abuse. This spring, Iago has introduced some stunning color options in their show coats, as well as new colors and styles in breeches. And, because the Italians know that basic doesn’t have to be boring, they have even added a little bling. PAGE 129


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EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen Hodess CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rebecca Baldridge, Sue Weakley DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson SOCIAL MEDIA & WEB CONTENT Maggie Carty EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jewel Connelly, Jessica Greene, Roger Savitt, Renee Spurge, Ryan Waterfield

B ARN S FO R HO R SES , B ARN S FO R PEO PLE SIDESADDLE RIDES AGAIN TODAY'S GRAND PRIX STAR S A S KIDS

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AT HOME WITH JILL RAPPAPORT:

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EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY (EQ) became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $24.95 | Canada $39.95. SUBSCRIBE AT EQliving.com/subscribe To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQLiving, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: Web: eqliving.com/manage-subscription Tel: 212-699-3636 Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com or mail to 41 East 11th St., 11th Flr., New York, NY 10003

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River Grove Farm

One Amazing Property | Three Great Options This one-of-a-kind five lot estate property was developed by Parry and Peggy Thomas, owners of renowned dressage horses, Brentina and Wizard, for the purpose of accommodating their passion and aspirations for horses and the dressage and hunter jumper communities. Peggy Thomas calls River Grove Farm a “heaven on earth” for the horses and people that have the privilege of living or training on the property. Located 15 minutes south of the ski and summer resort of Sun Valley, Idaho, and ten minutes north of a year-round airport (SUN) with private and commercial air service, this world-class estate and equestrian property is available with three acquisition options. The first option, acquire the entire property, five lots totaling 42+ acres with 1,000’+ of river frontage, all residences, buildings and facilities for $10.555mm. The second option, purchase the extensive equestrian facilities on 13+ acres for $4.95mm. The third option, procure the residence on 21+ acres with 1,000’+ of river frontage for $4.895mm. Please contact Jay for details.

Jay Emmer

208.720.4282

jay.emmer@sothebysrealty.com


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

SEVEN EASY PIECES FOR THE EQUESTRIAN LOOK Add these TIMELESS CLASSICS to everyday

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A WAXED JACKET. The classic jacket from BARBOUR, originally introduced for riding, is now a seasonal staple in town and country alike, with a medium-weight, waxedcotton outer that’s comfortable to wear and offers robust weather protection. $399.

wear.

ICONIC JEWELRY. The GUCCI HORSEBIT bracelet in 18K yellow gold. $5,950.

2

RIDING BOOTS. Equestrian Living readers continually vote ARIAT as one of their favorite tall boots. The FEI Monoco LX features French baby-calf leather, a stretch panel, and full leather lining. $1,050.

BREECHES AND A WHITE SHIRT. From the EQGirl Riding Collection, taupe ANGIE breech with Italian cotton lavender-plaid pockets. $219. Angie show shirt with matching plaid collar details. $99.95.

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3

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A TWEED JACKET. The Amenia, New York, tack shop, HORSE LEAP, offers a large selection of antique and vintage hunting apparel.

AN EQUESTRIANTHEMED SILK SCARF. RÖNNER’S Montpelier silk satin scarf printed in vintage gold and blue. 50 centimeters square. $58.

7

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A BRIDLE-LEATHER BELT. The spur belt in glazed cognac by FREEDMANS. Glazed Italian bridle leather with a solid-brass spur buckle. Available in brown with brass buckle or black with chrome buckle. 1.75 inches wide. $149. PAGE 129


QUALITY & EXCELLENCE WITHIN REACH Spruce Meadows is proud to showcase its top quality competition horses, for all levels of experience. Committed to excellence, Spruce Meadows invites you to meet our prospects available for 2017, we are confident you will find your next champion. For Sales and Information, Please contact the Spruce Meadows Horse Program at 1(403) 974-4200 or visit us at sprucemeadows.com/horses

HORSE PROGRAM


Matt Johnson is one of our best. Ranked #3 in the US and among our Top 10 advisors in the world. “Engel & Völkers has established a solid reputation of premium international real estate service because we continue to attract top performers who share our commitment to quality and professionalism.” -Anthony Hitt, CEO Engel & Völkers North America

Buying or Selling contact: Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367 • Fax +1 561-828-2761 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com • www.mattjohnson.evusa.com

©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


MattJohnson.evusa.com



Wellington, FL. - 10 Acre equestrian estate with direct bridle path access, within true hacking distance to WEF. 5 bedrooms, 5 full and 3 half bathrooms, top quality details & finishes. 14 stall center-aisle stable with all the amenities including: two studio apartments, one 1Br/1Bth managers’ apartment and riders’ lounge with kitchenette. The property also boasts a riding arena, grand prix grass riding field, round pen and 10 grass paddocks. Three years new and meticulously maintained. Offered at $11,900,000

Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com ©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


Portfolio of Fine Properties in Wellington 

Grand Prix Village - Exceptional equestrian facility located in the esteemed Grand Prix Village of Wellington. With 6.4-acres of land across two lots, this farm is well planned with a single-story 30-stall barn, that also houses an owners’ lounge, manager’s apartment, commercial laundry, tack and feed rooms, and plenty of storage. The grounds include eight paddocks, a world-class riding arena, and walker. Mature landscaping adorns the boundary lines providing privacy and shade. This custom facility was designed by top-notch horsemen and took every detail into consideration. On the market for the first time since being built in 2007, this property is an equestrian’s dream and enjoys the rare advantage of touching the Winter Equestrian Festival’s show grounds; be within steps of the world-renowned PBIEC. Offered at $16,000,000

Palm Beach Polo • Mizner Estates - Elegant property located in the heart of Palm Beach Polo, with four bedrooms, five full and one-half bathrooms, and a three car garage. Impact glass French doors can be found in most rooms opening up to the expansive back patio, that enjoys open and covered areas, and an in-ground pool with pond views. The home has a large kitchen, with a nearby Butler’s pantry, includes a breakfast nook and flows into the family room. The second floor has the remaining three bedrooms, each with an en-suite. Offered at $2,195,000

Amy Carr • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-662-0728 Amy.Carr@evusa.com

Download Amy Carr’s mobile real estate app

To get FREE access to all local listings from your smartphone or tablet

©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D É C O R

A WARM WELCOME Unique and inviting DOOR KNOCKERS AND HANDLES make great first impressions. Shown in polished brass, the elegant ANASTASIA door knocker is sand cast by the master artisans of Baltica Hardware in Europe. The knocker beautifully coordinates with additional hardware within the Anastasia series. Available in 12 finishes. As shown, $1,073.

The TELLURIDE HT thumb latch by Baltica was designed to commemorate a client’s horse. Realistic and functional, and handcrafted in Europe, it is designed so the horse looks right or left depending upon the door swing. Shown in antique brass. Exterior trim only, $1,215, exterior and interior trim, $1,890.

Patricia Borum’s classical equestrian HORSE HEAD door knocker dresses up any door. Made from hand-cast pewter with a silverybrushed finish, it is also available in cast bronze and brass or bronze plating. $165.

Door Knockers and Bell’s VICENZA CAVALLO door knocker reflects its old-world Italian heritage. Made from solid pewter, and available in 12 finishes, this knocker will accent any door in flawless style. As shown, $325.

The DAVIDE LEAF door knocker by Baltica is hand crafted in Europe. Sand cast of the finest brass, it is also available in sand-cast bronze, in 12 finish options. A full series of coordinating Davide Leaf hardware complements the knocker. As shown, $1,434.

The FOX door knocker from FabbriCreations of Etsy will accentuate any door of your home. Shown in bronze finish, the resin compound sounds like a metal door knocker, is easy to install, and is available in seven finishes. $280.

The solid brass FOX HEAD door knocker by Jefferson Brass is a classic American design and representative of the hunt country. It includes a heavy brass striker button. Polished finish, $140, lacquered, $160.

Horse & Hound Gallery adds a touch of antiquity to its VERDIGRIS HORSE door knocker. A noble horse head emerges from a decorative, oval knocker cast in solid bronze and finished with a verdigris patina. $118.

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EQ P E O P L E

A ROLE MODEL Champion BRIANNE GOUTAL MARTEAU inspires her students.

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Brianne winning the American Gold Cup in 2013..

the Prevention of Animals (ASPCA) Equine Welfare Ambassador. The ASPCA is national non-profit organization whose mission is to protect animals, and through the ASPCA Brianne has become an inspiration to horse lovers worldwide. She is committed to stopping equine cruelty, a cause that is very near and dear to her heart. Brianne’s commitment to the equine world doesn’t stop there. A few years ago, Brianne added training to her list of skill sets. The idea of becoming a trainer was sparked by her own trainer, Max Amaya. Amaya suggested that she take on another talented rider, Sydney Shulman, who is now a full-time client and one of the reasons Brianne started her business. “I believe in beginning your training with a solid ground of the basics and then working your way up from there,” said Brianne. “I am a simple person and don’t believe in yelling at

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students when they make a mistake, but correcting them and being calm around them.” When Brianne started her business, her goal was to build her clientele while simultaneously focusing on her riding, winning grand prixs, going to the Olympics, and buying and selling

horses. Having a barn full of clients to train was not in her original plan; however, her business has evolved, and now she has a talented group of girls that she trains, many of whom resemble Brianne at a young age. They are very focused and dedicated; they see what she has accomplished, and they aspire to be like her. They include Cloe and Lili Hymowitz and Sydney Shulman. All are showing multiple horses and bringing home ribbons. Somehow Brianne manages to do it all—juggling getting to their competitions and barns, with being a wife, mother, and business woman.

GEORGE KAMPER

CARRIE WIRTH

hat originally started out as a hobby has turned into a passion and career for Brianne Goutal Marteau. Riding since the age of 4, Brianne made history in 2005 by becoming the first equestrian to win all four finals on the junior circuit: the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) Talent Search, the Washington International Horse Show, the USEF Medal, and the Maclay. Over the years, Brianne has won many accolades, including being the 2007 winner of the Maxine Beard Show Jumping Developing Rider Award, given by the United States Equestrian Team Foundation, along with the 2013 American Gold Cup Grand Prix, and the 2014 Old Salem Farm Grand Prix. Most recently, Brianne and her horse, Onira, dominated the 2017 $6,000 Horseware Ireland CSI 2* class at Tryon, leading the longstanding pair to take the blue ribbon. While her countless wins were applauded and rewarded, Brianne felt that she could do more within the horse world. After winning the Maclay, Brianne became the first official American Society for

BY JESSICA GREENE


ANDY SCOTT SCULPTURE

studios in Philadelphia USA and Glasgow Scotland www.andyscottsculptor.com


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

UNITING THE HORSE WORLD The new US EQUESTRIAN is moving from an organization that people have to join to an organization that people want to belong to. BY SUE WEAKLEY

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orse lovers generally integrate the vision of US Equestrian into their everyday lives: to bring the joy of horse sports to as many people as possible. Nearly fanatical in our dedication, we horse people spread the word to friends, family, and co-workers at every possible turn, and our social media channels proclaim our love of all things equine. Equestrian Living readers who compete in hunter jumper, dressage, reining, and breed shows were already familiar with the U.S. Equestrian Federation (USEF), but there are other many other horse lovers, including polo players, fox hunters, and trail riders, who don’t compete in those disciplines or breeds. In an effort to be more inclusive, the USEF has re-imagined itself as US Equestrian, the governing body of equestrian sports in the U.S., in hopes of uniting the equestrian community. With the renaming and rebranding of the USEF to US Equestrian, newly elected US Equestrian president, Murray Kessler, sought to appeal to a host of horse enthusiasts by adding the word enjoyment to the USEF mission statement of providing fairness and safety to equestrian sports. “Adding enjoyment means moving from an organization that people have to join to an organization that people want to belong to,” Kessler says. 22 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

Born in 1917, US Equestrian is dedicated to pursuing excellence and promoting growth, all while providing and maintaining a safe and level playing field for equine and human athletes. Not only that, but US Equestrian assists in protecting equine welfare in crisis situations and natural disasters, as well as in daily competition. Additionally, US Equestrian helps select, train, and fund the United States Equestrian Teams. As an official media partner of US

Equestrian, Equestrian Living will be at all the organization’s events; moreover discount subscriptions to the magazine are a perk to all US Equestrian members. Membership has never been easier, and with the new designation of a “fan” membership level, it’s inexpensive to join. The $25 fan membership allows fans as well as competing members access to myriad features, including the new Learning-Center videos and the USEF Network’s live-streaming events. With videos from some of the top equine experts in the country, including superstar competitors McLain Ward, Laura Graves, and Boyd Martin, along with tips on everything from how to clip a horse to an introduction to the 29 breeds and disciplines recognized by US Equestrian, the Learning Center offers an ever-expanding database of information. The Learning Center and the USEF Network’s live streams shine the spotlight on the number of ways people can get involved with horses from the grassroots up though top-level competition. Other membership perks include discounts on items from tractors to fencing and, for an extra charge, $1 million in liability insurance. Join EQ Living as we partner with US Equestrian to help unite the equestrian community.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

WEDDING GIFT IDEAS Contemporary yet TIMELESS ITEMS for the wedding couple.

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1. L’Objet’s Deco Leaves bowl recalls the grand serving traditions of the early 20th century. It is a richly textured marriage of handcrafted stainless steel and 24K gold-plated accents. $175. 2. With the cocktail movement in full swing and alcoholic punches in vogue, it’s time to invest in a proper punch bowl. The ultra-modern silver-plated Silver Time version by Christofle is a lovely addition to any beverage service. It includes a ladle and can also be used for soup. $2,550.

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3. With geometric patterns and graceful styling, L’Objet’s trays are modern and sophisticated. The Dedale rectangular tray boasts shifting shapes created from black, white, and grey natural shells. Beautifully handcrafted, this larger tray features brass-detailed handles. $1,250. 4. The Edgey round bowl, by Annieglass, features handchipped and smoothed-edged glass, finished with handpainted 24K gold or platinum. $305. 5. Inspired by traditional leather and metal bridles, the modern Preston ice bucket with tongs from Ralph Lauren Home is crafted from sleek, nickel-plated stainless steel and features a saddle leather trimmed handle. $175. 24 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

WE D D I N G G I FT I D E A S continued from page 24

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6. Simon Pearce’s large handblown Gretchen bowl is a stunning choice for displaying fruit or other picturesque objects. The low sides, angular rim, and unique silhouette are inspired by 2,000-year-old Roman vessels. $235. 7. The Mosaique au 24 platinum tart platter by Hermès. $490. 8. The Steeplechase serving bowl is exclusive to L.V. Harkness. The pattern is made from vintage prints discovered by the store’s owner while visiting her favorite print shop in Paris. $143. 9. The Christofle Paris silver-plated punch bowl with pedestal base in the Maimaison pattern, exemplifies Empire style with a frieze of delicate palm, lotus leaves, and symmetrical design. $3,400. 10. Keeneland Gift Shop’s Match Pewter spirits decanter. $175.

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | A R T S

REMEMBERING SAM SAVITT The artist’s son, ROGER SAVITT, recalls life with his beloved father on the centennial of his birth.

The Guide to Horses, Savitt’s first in a series of horse information charts, is now in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution. Below, he is with his dog, Jenny, in 1978.

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ou could say that my father, Sam Savitt, took an improbable journey in life. Born exactly 100 years ago to a cash-strapped family in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, there was nothing to suggest that he would someday become this country’s preeminent equestrian artist—except perhaps for one thing: his announcement at age 12 that when he grew up, he wanted to paint and draw horses. To those around him, this revelation must have sounded almost comical. Wilkes-Barre of the 1920s and 1930s was a lot better known for coal-mining than art or horses. And no doubt my father had little exposure to either one. But he stuck to his childhood ambitions, and when he reached high school, his art teacher suggested that if he really wanted to be a professional artist, he should enroll in Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute.

On his application to Pratt, he submitted drawings in crayon. I’m not sure whether the selection of medium was naive or inspired, but the artwork got him accepted. This new student from Wilkes-Barre soon realized that some of his peers were so good he wondered if his acceptance to

Pratt had been a clerical error. No, it was not. And before long he realized that, as good as they were, none of the other students could match his skill at drawing a horse. Why the fascination with horses? My father said he didn’t really know, though it’s safe to say that for him Hollywood westerns were a childhood attraction that simply never went away. Given the timing of my father’s graduation from Pratt—1941—his career would have to wait. In another year he was in the jungles of south Asia as a first lieutenant for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Lt. Savitt remained with the army until the end of the war, and he kept his artistic skills sharp with sketches of what he saw—everything from exotic animals to quiet villages to soldiers with machine guns. By the 1950s, he was married with two children (my sister and I) and living in New York state, first in Levittown, then Yorktown Heights, and finally—for the last 44 years of his life—in North Continued on page 118

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Left: Take the Man First is part of a collection of watercolors on the fast-paced sport of polo.

Below: An oil painting of a mare and foal in Mother Love became a limited edition print.

Above: This untitled drawing of a horse being readied for the Irish Grand Prix highlights Savitt’s extraordinary skill with a pencil.

Above: Last Race of the Day nicely conveys horse racing’s drama and action. Right: With a pen and ink, the wild ride on a bronco is depicted in Out of the Chute.

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THE HORSE DANCER

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oo was not a horse you might usually find in the backstreet yards of East London. He was neither a heavy, feather-legged dray nor a ewe-necked thoroughbred pacer, the kind backed rapidly into a sulky so that illegal races could take place on the dual carriageway, trotting their way into private record books and prompting the transfer of thick wads of illegal betting cash. He was not a well- mannered riding-school hack from Hyde Park or one of the many varieties of short, stout pony, black and white or mulish, which tolerated, with varying degrees of good humor, being ridden down steps, scrambled over beer barrels, or taken into lifts so that, with shrieks of laughter, their owners might canter along the balconies of their blocks of flats. Boo was a Selle Français, a largeboned Thoroughbred, his legs sturdier and his back stronger than that breed might suggest. He was athletic but surefooted. His short-coupled back made him good at jumping and his sweet, almost doglike nature made him tolerant and Continued on page 32 30 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

Excerpted from THE HORSE DANCER by Jojo Moyes, published on April 11, 2017 by Penguin Books, an imprint of Penguin Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC. Copyright © 2017 by Jojo’s Mojo Limited.

JO JO MOY ES is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Me Before You (now a major motion picture), After You, One Plus One, The Girl You Left Behind, The Last Letter from Your Lover, Silver Bay, and The Ship of Brides. She was born in 1969 and grew up in London. She recieved a degree at Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, London University. In 1992, she won a scholarship financed by The Independent newspaper to attend the postgraduate newspaper journalism course at City University. She worked as a journalist for 10 years, including a year at the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong, and nine years at The Independent. Jojo has been a full-time novelist since 2002, when her first book, Sheltering Rain, was published. Since then she has written 11 more novels, all of which have been widely critically acclaimed. She has won the Romantic Novelist’s Award twice, and Me Before You has been nominated for Book of the Year at the UK Galaxy Book Awards. It has since gone on to sell over 8 million copies worldwide. The film adaptation starring Sam Claflin (The Hunger Games) and Emilia Clarke (Game of Thrones) was released in June 2016 and was a box-office success. The screenplay was written by Jojo. Jojo lives (and writes) on a farm in Essex, England, with her husband, journalist Charles Arthur, and their three children.


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friendly. He was unfazed by the heaviest traffic, and a fool for company. He was also easily bored, and Papa had hung so many balls from ropes in his stable to entertain him that Cowboy John would mutter that the old man must be trying to get him a place in the basketball leagues. The other kids at Sarah’s school or in the projects got their highs in little paper wraps or plastic bags, skidding stolen cars around shrinking patches of wasteland, or spending hours dressing up like celebrities, studying their magazines with far more attentiveness than they ever did their schoolbooks. She didn’t care about any of it. From the moment Sarah put on the saddle and breathed in the familiar scent of warm horse and clean leather, she forgot everything else.

R SHOW STOPPERS

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iding Boo lifted her away from everything that was annoying and grubby and depressing. It helped her forget that she was the skinniest girl in her class, and the only one with little justifiable reason to wear a bra, that only she—and Renee, the Turkish girl nobody spoke to—didn’t have a mobile phone or a computer. She forgot that it was just her and Papa. This was what she felt for her horse on their good days: awe at his majesty, the sheer power beneath her, and what he would do for her. He behaved badly only when she failed to ask him properly— her mind still lodged in school, or thirst, or tiredness— and the sweetness that radiated from him when they got it right brought a lump to her throat. Boo was hers, and he was special. Papa told people who didn’t know about horses that he was like a Rolls-Royce after a tractor: everything was finely tuned, responsive, elegant. You communicated quietly, rather than flapping and shouting. You achieved a communion of minds, of wills. She asked Boo: he collected himself, his quarters gathering under him, his great head dropping into his chest, and he gave. His only limits, said Papa, were Sarah’s limits. He said Boo had the biggest heart of any horse he had ever known. It hadn’t always been like that: Sarah had two


BORN LEADERS moon-shaped scars on her arm from where he had bitten her, and when they had broken him, there had been days when he would snap off the lunge

A child would give you a second chance because it hoped to be loved. A dog would return to you slavishly, even after you’d beaten it. A horse would never let you—or anyone else—near him again. rein and go tearing across the park, his tail up like a banner, while the mothers shrieked and bolted with their prams and Papa prayed aloud in French that he wouldn’t hit a car. Papa told her every time that it was her fault, to the point at which she wanted to scream at him, but now she knew a little more and understood that he had been right.

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orses, perhaps more so than any other creature, were made by man. They might be naturally spooky, or fearful, or bolshie, but their reactions to their world were shaped entirely by what was done to them. A child would give you a second chance because it hoped to be loved. A dog would return to you slavishly, even after you’d beaten it. A horse would never let you—or anyone else—near him again. So Papa never shouted at him. He never lost his temper, or got frustrated, even when it was clear that Boo was being as mischievous or unruly as any teenager. And now he was eight years old, grown. He was educated enough to have manners, clever enough that his paces floated, elegant enough, if Papa had judged this as correctly as he seemed to judge everything else, to carry Sarah away from this chaotic city and on to her future. PAGE 129

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

CELEBRATING WHILE HELPING Two social events in Wellington, Florida, raised money for BROOKE USA and the EQUESTRIAN AID FOUNDATION. Nic Roldan’s second Sunset Polo & White Party in March to benefit Brooke USA was a true success. Nearly 1,000 guests, attired in white, raised more than $275,000 for the welfare of working equines and the humans who depend on them in some of the world’s underprivileged countries. Former Cavalia performers brought Althea to the Global Dressage Festival Stadium of Palm Beach International Equestrian Center for a performance that was created exclusively for the night in February. The sold-out event raised money to support Equestrian Aid Foundation programs for those in the equestrian community suffering from chronic illness and injury. Clockwise from top left: Sunset Polo photos by Alex Pacheco: Nic Roldan having fun; Nic Manifold going to hook Justin Daniels; Jessica Spingsteen and Her Majesty’s Consul, General David Prodger; Mark, Paige, and Katherine Bellissimo; Nic Roldan and Jessica Springsteen; Grant Ganzi, Nic Roldan, Darren Marotta, and Chris Kampsen. Althea photos by Meg McGuire: Chris Welling and Ryan Beckett; Stephanie Riggio Bulger, Scot Evans, and Lindsay Maxwell; Robert Ross, Robert Dover, Ron Davis, and Patrick Lent. Althea performance photo by Diana De Rosa.

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BY JILL NOVOTNY | PHOTOS SLAV ZATOKA

AT H O M E W I T H

WENDIE MALICK The busy actress lives a country life in chic, city style.

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he drought was officially over in California. Out of the car window we could see rushing streams as we scaled the Santa Monica mountains on a narrow, winding road, made narrower still by the encroaching greenery. After cresting the mountain and pulling into a gravel driveway, we rolled down the windows to breathe in sea air mixed with a lush farm aroma of animals and vegetation. A pair of dogs barked a cordial welcome. A workshop with its barn doors open stood on one side of the driveway revealing an array of farm tools hanging inside. A horse-shaped weather vane atop its cupula spun lazily in the warm breeze. A house wrapped around the other side of the gravel driveway in a comfortable, complimentary style. On the deck, a row of hooks held raincoats, ropes, and hats above a row of boots in various shapes and colors. It was immediately apparent that the house wasn’t a showpiece, but a lived-in home—warm, spacious, and charming. “Hello!” came a familiar voice from the doorway. Wendie stepped out to greet us, calming the dogs with an easy friendliness. “This is Miles,” she said, leaning down to tousle the black lab’s coat with both hands. She led us inside, where an open kitchen spilled into a spacious dining room soaked with sun from wide windows. She insisted we stay hydrated, and gave us each a glass of water, which we drank as we wandered the kitchen, admiring paintings and soaking in the details of the decor. Continued on page 40 JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 7


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The house was designed and built by Wendie’s husband, Richard, in the early ‘90s. “We bought this property from our neighbors, who were good friends of ours, and then we bought the 40 acres beyond this,” Wendie explained. “Richard always wanted to build what looks like a prairie ranch—a series of barn-like buildings.” The property includes the workshop, the house, a guesthouse, and two small barns, all of which flow from one to another with decks and walkways. Dark wood exteriors and a simplicity of design gave the feeling they had sprung organically on this spot atop the mountain. “We went up to Sundance one year, and I was like, ‘Oh, that’s what Richard keeps talking about!’” laughed Wendie. “Those big decks and barn doors you can close to keep the light out, it’s really great. “Building it took about seven years, start to finish,” continued Wendie. “But I couldn’t wait. I was so excited, I moved into the workshop building before they had finished the house.” Inside the home, everything was naturally in its place—without the feeling that anything had been pushed aside or laid out on display for our visit. The delicate orchid on the dining room table, the bunch of asparagus in a bowl on the windowsill, and the dog beds arrayed on the deck felt as much a part of the house as the walls or windows. Much like Wendie, the home was elegant, relaxed, sophisticated, and unpretentious. Separated from the main house by a small pool, the guesthouse overlooked a two-stall barn with a run-in shelter, where Luca, a miniature donkey, and his pal Jeb, a handsome old Quarter horse, were relaxing in the shade of a tree. “Jeb was in a Marlboro commercial,” she told us proudly. “Isn’t he handsome?” Luca has been with Jeb since the donkey was a baby, and both were adopted by Wendie and Richard a few years ago. Pointing to Luca, Wendie smiled, “So,

I’m his mom, and Jeb’s his dad.” After some photos with her, Wendie gave them each a grateful pat. “Thanks for posing, you guys,” she told them with fond sincerity.

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t was hard to avoid feeling like I already knew Wendie. I had seen her on television hundreds of times, in Just Shoot Me, Frasier, Seinfeld, and many other shows and movies, her various characters all displaying an elegance and wit that was clearly Wendie’s own. But as I watched her untangle a piece of hay from the donkey’s forelock and then wipe her dirty hands on her jeans, it struck me how different she was from her characters. “I know, I get that a lot!” she said with a sideways smile. “Everyone thinks I’m a glamour-puss. Then I’ll walk into a room and someone will say, ‘Why does it smell like horses in here?’ Well, that’s kind of my life. Like today, I spent the morning wiping off this guy’s butt.” She laughed, patting Jeb heartily on the rump. “But I’m from New York and I miss that whole thing sometimes,” she continued. “The city feeds me, but this is my sanctuary. I get to come back here and refuel.” Our tour continued, and we walked up the path, followed closely by her two dogs. We paused for a photo, but Zoe, her timid rescue mixed-breed, wouldn’t stay. “She’s a bit harder to wrangle,” said Wendie, “but it’s all the better when she comes to trust you.” Miles, on the other hand, flopped clumsily onto his side, licking her face as he pushed her off balance. “Miles, sit,” she laughed. “No—not lean—sit!” When asked how she ended up living the farm life, she explained, “I’ve always loved animals—a Collie named Bonnie was my first best friend.” Since then, Wendie has built a reputation as an animal lover, adopting many and advocating for all. Her work with the Humane continued on page 44

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Society of the United States has spanned decades and includes raising awareness for all types of issues, from animal adoption to protecting wild horses.

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hough she has always loved dogs, her love of horses developed a bit more recently. “I didn’t start riding until I was 40,” she explained. “I took English riding lessons—I loved the clothes—and I ended up buying the horse I was taking lessons on. His name was Butch, and he was a madman, a Thoroughbred lunatic from the racetrack. He would break into a sweat the second we would go out on the trail, but I learned so much from that horse. That’s where I got my seat. “For a while, my friend who lived on the property down below, we’d ride together,” she remembered. “It was great. I would ride every day before going into

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work on Just Shoot Me.” These days, Wendie rides the trails, mostly on Cassidy, a buckskin gelding that she birthed here on the farm. “I slept in the barn for three nights,” she recounted. “On the third night, he was born, and I imprinted with him and cleaned up the afterbirth and all that stuff. It was really incredible.” In addition to Cassidy, Wendie’s herd also includes two mustangs, Bo and Stuart. “Their mothers were rounded up when they were pregnant with these guys,” explained Wendie. “They ended up on a ranch in Idaho, and when Neda DeMayo of Return to Freedom was able to take on the herd, we got them. They were just shy of two years old.” Return to Freedom is a project that aims to preserve the freedom, diversity, and habitat of America’s wild horses and burros through sanctuary, education, advocacy, and conservation. They operate the American Wild Horse Sanctuary

and work for innovative alternatives in land management that will preclude wild horses from being removed from the range. “To see these magnificent creatures just running free, and then that helicopter drives them into pens, there are deaths and injuries, they rip the herds apart. It’s just awful.” Wendie said, pausing for a moment and remembering the sight with obvious pain. “It’s such a waste of money, and it seems so shortsighted that we don’t honor them as part of our heritage.” Wendie and others have pitched a movie about the story of Wild Horse Annie, an animal-rights activist who worked to end the removal and slaughter of American mustangs from public lands, which has so far been stuck in the early stages of pre-production. “They wanted it to have a happy ending, which unfortunately seems unlikely,” said Wendie. “But we’re not giving up. We’re just working on other things for now.”


Everyone thinks I’m a glamour-puss. Then I’ll walk into a room, and someone will say, ‘Why does it smell like horses in here?’

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endie playfully donned an elegant blue gown for the second half of our photoshoot, and we walked down the hill toward a second barn, where three horses stood silhouetted in front of the dramatic California mountains. The sun was setting, and their dinner had been delayed—not the perfect recipe for an orderly photoshoot, but just right for capturing some personality. The mustangs spun and snorted, gently nudging Wendie toward the gate. They swirled around her like sidewalk traffic on a busy city street. She opened the gate, and the horses galloped dramatically up to their feed buckets. Wendie followed, dropping hay and meting out tomorrow’s worming meds in her slinky eveningwear. In addition to her recent appearances on a number of TV shows, including the popular series Grace and Frankie on Netflix, CBS’s hit comedy Mom, and an upcoming appearance on the new $100,000 Pyramid on ABC, Wendie is also busy acting in theater productions and participating in a wide range of charity work for the ASPCA, Return to Freedom, and the Humane Society. It’s hard to imagine she has time to tend to her farm, but her comfort in the routines of farm life is obvious. It’s clear she is the primary caregiver to the animals, fluently mentioning small details of their routines and diet. She has no apparent barn staff, except for a close friend

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that pops by to help her dump feeds. As a vocal supporter of so many causes, I wondered if Wendie had ever seen herself in a more political role. “Honestly, I think I’d be frustrated at how slowly things move,” she said. “For me, the big challenge has always been to speak up for the causes that I care about, but to do it in a thoughtful and respectful way, because I think without diplomacy all you do is rally your own troops, and no one can hear you. “That’s very hard to do, especially when it comes to animals,” she continued. “I went to an event called Horses on the Hill years ago with the Humane Society. We were outside the Department of the Interior, and there was a rally going on. They were making so much noise and screaming, calling the Secretary of Agriculture names. I thought ‘This is so not the way we’re going to get them to invite us in to talk about what we can do.’ This is part of why I love Neda DeMayo of Return to Freedom, Nancy Perry at the ASPCA, and Wayne Pacelle of the Humane Society: They’re all really smart, really passionate people who are solutionoriented, and they know that in order to move this forward, you have to take in all the pieces and you have to listen. Those people are the ones I try to gravitate towards. I learn a lot just watching them in action.”

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s we wrapped up the tour, we passed a wall of photos, and I realized the pictures weren’t of Wendie, or even people— they were all photos of her animals. That represented the truth about Wendie and her home. I thought back to the earnest way she’d introduced the dogs, as if they were the subjects of our story, and how sincerely she’d spoken to Jeb as she patted his face. It’s a matter of respect. Her animals are her family, her friends, and her equals. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 7


BY RYAN WATERFIELD, SUN VALLEY PROPERTY NEWS

RIVER GROVE FARM

Home to Peggy and Parry Thomas, Bob and Debbie McDonald, and Brentina, the two-time Olympian, World-Cup Champion, and most decorated dressage horse in America.

Parry Thomas, the man behind some extremely significant contributions and achievements in dressage in the United States, passed away last year at the age of 95. The following feature is derived from a 2012 article about the long relationship that Parry and Peggy Thomas had with Bob and Debbie McDonald—a relationship that continues to this day with Peggy, and is perpetuated by the Thomas family’s adult children. This is the story of a great, synergistic relationship between the Thomases and the McDonalds that led to a storied horse in the dressage world, Brentina, and a property that the Thomases developed to fulfill their equestrian passions and goals. EDITOR’S NOTE:

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Brentina, the McDonalds and the Thomases.

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hen I walked into the main barn at River Grove Farm near Sun Valley, Idaho, to meet with Parry Thomas, the owner, and Bob McDonald, the manager of the farm, I was greeted by Parry, a gentleman who had just celebrated his 90th birthday, walking along the stalls greeting his horses, some champions past and some sure to be champions in the future. As this stately man stood among his horses, he introduced each of them

with fatherly pride, slipping in details about each, information that hinted at the special place they held in his heart. But, when we got to the end of the line, standing with her groom, was this proud papa’s very favorite—Brentina, the two-time Olympian, World Cup Champion, and the most decorated dressage horse in America—and River Grove Farm’s pride and joy. Parry Thomas owes a lot to horses. When he was in college at the University of Utah, he lucked into a blind date with his now wife, Peggy, who told me as an aside that she “never would have considered going on a blind date under normal circumstances, but he was into horses,” so she reconsidered. Years later, they bought a four-year-old Thoroughbred named Bo Valentine straight off the racetrack for their young daughter, Jane. As we strolled past indoor and outdoor arenas, grooms, tack rooms, and


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1. The viewing lounge overlooks the indoor arena. 2. European-style indoor hot-walker with a videomonitoring system. 3. The 200-by-70-foot indoor arena. 4. Irrigated outdoor performance arena with compression matting and shredded athletic-shoe-sole footing. 5. The main barn boasts 16 stalls, all heated and cross-ventilated to accommodate year-round training and riding, plus a farrier stall, and icing and heat bays.


AN UNRIVALED PARTNERSHIP DEBBIE McDONALD AND BRENTINA 1999 Gold Medal for Individual Dressage, Pan Am games in Mar del Plata, Argentina

In 1994 the Thomas/McDonald team traveled to Verden, Germany, in search of the young horse that might eventually take them to the Olympics. They had one horse in mind, Brentina. However, they knew they had stiff competition. Margit Otto Crepin, an Olympic dressage champion, who rode for France in the 1988 Seoul Olympics, was also there to bid for Brentina. It wasn’t a dramatic bidding war that won Brentina; Rather, it was fate. Because the auction organizers like to begin the auction with one of the star horses as a way to ensure high bids throughout the event, Brentina was the first auction lot. Thanks to traffic on the Autobahn, Margit Otto Crepin was late to the auction and missed her chance. That’s how Brentina came to call Idaho home.

1999 Gold Medal for Team Dressage, Pan Am games in Mexico City, Mexico 2002 Silver Medal for Team Dressage, World Equestrian Championships in Jerez, Spain 2003 Dressage World Cup Champion, Goteborg, Sweden—the first American to ever win a world cup in dressage 2004 Bronze Medal for Team Dressage, Olympic Games in Athens, Greece 2006 Bronze Medal for Team Dressage, World Equestrian Championships in Aachen, Germany Debbie is currently the U.S. Developing Dressage coach.

walls and walls lined with photos of champion riders atop champion horses— it’s hard to imagine Parry in his other life. There’s been a book written about him entitled The Quiet Kingmaker of Las Vegas, by Jack Sheehan that illuminates the ways that Parry Thomas the banker forever changed the way things were done in Las Vegas—for the better. As one of the city’s favorite sons, Thomas’ generosity and stewardship set new standards for philanthropy. But that’s not the Thomas I’m here to meet. I’m here to meet the Parry Thomas who has helped realize this dream of a farm, and he’s the first to recognize that he couldn’t have done it alone. With a meaningful glance across the table, Parry points to the visionary behind the operation. Bob McDonald laughs, thinking about a nine-year-old with a Thoroughbred off the racetrack saying, “Bo Valentine. That was a lot of horse for

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a little girl.” At this point Peggy walks into the office, and Parry doesn’t miss a beat; he gestures toward his wife of 64 years and credits her for finding Bob. Bob laughs quietly, signaling a charming humility. Peggy takes her cue and tells me about setting off on a quest to find the right trainer for her daughter and her new horse. Parry chimes in, “She came back after that first day during which she visited five different barns to watch five different trainers at work and announced that she had found the trainer for Jane.”

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urious about the qualities she saw in a 19-year-old Bob that first day, I asked her how she knew he was their choice. She didn’t hesitate before saying, “I was looking for someone who used subtle aids and not a lot of punishment and not a lot of strong reign. I wasn’t all

that knowledgeable, but I knew the kind of people I wanted Jane to be around.” Parry adds, “Bob was the most direct, the most understanding of children.” I look around the walls, and it sinks in that Bob is the man behind most of the trophies and the pictures of champions. He’s the man with the eye for a good horse, and Parry is the first to tell you that Bob is the man with the Midas touch when it comes to horses. The barn is really a cathedral to what Bob has achieved, and it’s a testament to the absolute faith Peggy and Parry Thomas have in him. Parry is quick to point out that Bob is the architect behind the entire layout of the farm and the designer of the world-class barn. “There’s not another working barn like it,” he says as he looks around the world they’ve created together. Bob adds, “Some barns are show barns, but this one is a working barn— it’s about practicality. This farm may be


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1. The main house has 4,733 square feet of living space with three bedrooms, three baths, two half-baths, and an 812-square-foot two-car garage. 2. One of several large pastures. 3. A maintained path winds through designated wetlands and an old-grove timber forest near the river, provided to give horses exposure to different terrains and offer riders somewhere to ride other than an arena. 4-7. Water throughout the property flows naturally yearround. There is a pond outside the main house fed by a live canal. The property has historic water rights dating back to the 19th century.

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the secret to Peggy and Parry’s longevity and health. They are out here every day walking the grounds, checking on the horses. It’s kept them young.” In their horse venture, this partnership isn’t complete without Bob’s wife, Debbie McDonald, the decorated hunter-jumper-turned-dressage champion, who is Brentina’s other half. Officially retired from competition since 2009, Debbie was away during the course of our interviews, but she’s always at the heart of every story about their horse venture.

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arry says, “What makes this relationship work is that Bob and Debbie are absolutely trustworthy. Add that to their talents.” Parry points out that they did not make a life out of buying “made” horses—horses already trained

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and ready for competition. Bob specialized in recognizing young horses with the athletic potential to be champions. In fact, when Parry first entertained the idea that they might one day take a horse and rider team to the Olympics, he approached Bob to ask if such a dream were possible and how they might do it. Bob’s response? “We’re going to start with buying three young horses, the low one sells until we have the right one. That was our plan, anyway. We didn’t know how long it would take us to find the right horse who responded to both the training and the rider. Brentina was in that first group of horses.” RIVER G ROV E FA RM Available through: Sun Valley Sotheby’s International Realty Jay Emmer, Realtor 208 720-4282 jay.emmer@SothebysRealty.com www.sunvalleysir.com

1. The den. The house was originally a garage with two bedrooms above. In the 1990s, Peggy and Parry completely remodeled the house. 2. The master bedroom. 3. The entry hall. 4. The outdoor dining room, just one of several spaces for enjoying the outdoors.


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MEMORABLE WEDDINGS BY JILL NOVOTNY

BY JILL NOVOTNY

THE FLEXIBILITY TO TRANSFORM A VENUE INTO A SPACE THAT PERFECTLY REFLECTS A COUPLE’S STYLE ENHANCES AN EVENT TO REMEMBER.

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AS HARD AS YOU MIGHT WORK to consider every detail as you curate a beautiful wedding day, there is no way to know how each guest will experience it. While some guests may notice the small choices you’ve made

in the place settings or the wording of your vows, other guests might soak up the atmosphere, connect with old friends, or just dance the night away. The only aspect of your wedding that you can be certain everyone will experience is the venue you choose. A venue is arguably the most important choice that couples make about their wedding. The best venues reflect the vision that the couple has for their special day or share a piece of their story with their guests. For equestrians, an equestrian center or farm can be a personal way to demonstrate your love for each other and your shared passion for horses. Whether you’ve dreamed of a certain venue your entire life or decide to build a venue of your own (see

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TANISHA STROMBERG PHOTOGRAPHY

interview with Ben Esh of B&D Builders on page 61), the setting for a wedding is the first step toward making lasting memories.

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NORTH WALES FARM, VIRGINIA

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eighbors in Charlottesville, Virginia, Kennedy and Greg had a long friendship before falling in love. When they decided to tie the knot, the choice of venue was easy. Her family’s 1,466-acre estate in the heart of Virginia horse country was perfect. North Wales Farm’s rich history stretches back to the Revolutionary War and played a role in some milestones for the couple’s history as well. Not only did Kennedy train as a hunter-jumper rider on the property, but it was also where Greg proposed with a bottle of champagne atop an old steeplechase tower overlooking the fields and the Blue Ridge Mountains. A vintage car brought Kennedy and her father to the ceremony, which was held in front of the big windows of a century-old hay barn in front of 250 guests. The invitations were designed using a Jefferson-era architectural drawing of the manor house, along with 18thcentury cursive calligraphy. Matching handmade, deckle-edge paper was used for the menus, which were finished with a wax seal. Matchboxes with table numbers tucked inside served as unexpected escort cards; the matches were used by guests to light the candles inside the tent as the sun began to set. “It was 100 percent illuminated by candlelight!” said Kennedy.

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ALL PHOTOS THIS SPREAD PATRICIA LYONS

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KENNEDY AND GREG


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NICOLA AND NIALL

RENVYLE HOUSE HOTEL, IRELAND

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ALL PHOTOS THIS PAGE CHRISTINA BROSNAN

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icola and Niall’s wedding took place in Renvyle House Hotel and Resort in Connemara County, Galway, which is an old manor house with stables. Connemara Equestrian Escapes organizes equestrianthemed weddings and vacations at the resort. When the couple considered their wedding, it was important to them that it felt timeless. “I had a fear of looking back on our wedding pictures in 20 years and cringing,” said Nicola, “So I poured over every little detail to create a timeless feel.” They chose a black, white, and gray palette, and they used their creative family to help them put together a personal wedding from top to bottom, including the flower and table arrangements, favors, and a homemade cake. “I designed and made our wedding invitations using an antique printing press,” explained Nicola. “We even made bespoke sashes for the chair covers because I couldn’t find ones I liked.” The couple used baby’s breath for all the flower arrangements, including the bouquets, so they had a light, airy feel against a backdrop of antique wooden panels and herringbone wooden flooring. “It was casual enough to be comfortable but formal enough to be something really special, and that is exactly the blend we were going for,” said Nicola.


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ORIANA AND PATRICK

WHISPERING ROSE RANCH, CALIFORNIA

ALL PHOTOS THIS PAGE MARK BROOKE PHOTOGRAPHY

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riana and Patrick’s summer soiree, designed by Wild Heart Events, was inspired by the rustic beauty and equestrian character of the venue, Whispering Rose Ranch. As an ode to the bride’s Cherokee heritage, the couple said their vows under a bohemian-style arch overlooking the pastures while their guests sat on hay bales covered in bright blankets. Oriana wore a crown of air plants, succulents, and feathers as her headdress. Afterwards, everyone enjoyed specialty cocktails and passed appetizers under the trees shading the sycamorelined drive. When the dinner bell rang, guests found their seats by means of horseshoe favors hung on the fence surrounding the arena. Tables were covered with bright textiles and textured florals and had antler chandeliers overhead. The barbeque dinner included tri-tip steak, mac ’n cheese, and fresh-grilled corn. Later in the evening, guests enjoyed s’mores and churros instead of the traditional cake. In addition to dancing, guests played corn hole and horseshoes and lounged on hay bales. Oriana and Patrick, who are adorned with many amazing tattoos, had custom temporary tattoos designed as their wedding favors. It was a dream wedding for this hip couple, personalized with details unique to their heritage, character, and the history of the venue.

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his wedding party was held at the Scuderie Palandri, a Western equestrian center in the Italian countryside of Prato, belonging to the bride’s family. The party included an imperial dining table set just inside the stable and a riding paddock converted into a lounge area with hay bales, arranged as benches, candles and lanterns casting a warm glow, and country music playing all night long. “The whole event felt like a warm and friendly country feast,” said photographer Agnese Morganti of LoveFolio Photography. “Everyone enjoyed both the location and the long night of dancing.”

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SCUDERIE PALANDRI, ITALY

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LISA AND ANGEL

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isa and Angel’s wedding was set at Bella Terrace Estate, a horse ranch just outside San Diego, California, with panoramic views of the Peninsular Mountains, Coronado Island, and downtown San Diego. The estate is home to Lucky Kid Farms, a premier hunterjumper equestrian facility. Lisa got her hair and makeup done in a special room, while the groom and his party got ready in a guesthouse on the lower half of the property and played some billiards. Guests enjoyed a three-tiered cake, and each received a hangover kit, including Advil, mints, and Band-Aids, in case they had too much fun! 60 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

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BELLA TERRACE ESTATE, CALIFORNIA


WEDDING BARNS Ben Esh, owner of B&D Builders, says A BARN CAN BE AS CASUAL, ELEGANT, OR COUNTRY as the couple wants it to be.

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s trends turn increasingly toward barn weddings and parties, EQ Living chatted with Ben Esh about why many property owners consider building their own venue and what they should think about. What can you tell us about the current enthusiasm for barn weddings? The wedding barn popularity began a few years ago and has continued to grow in demand as more and more couples are favoring the rustic charm of the classic American barn. Why should someone with a farm consider turning it into a wedding venue? For barn owners, landowners, or just savvy entrepreneurs, starting a barn-wedding venue could be a lucrative business venture, as one open space can easily be transformed to match the style of the bride and groom. A wedding barn can be as casual, country, or elegant as the couple wants it to be. A wedding barn venue offers a truly flexible space with relatively low maintenance and upkeep.

What considerations should be made before launching the building project? Building a wedding-barn venue is major construction that requires serious consideration before starting. The most important aspect is selecting a custom builder with proven barnbuilding experience, backed by a strong financial standing. It’s also important to check references. Because the barn will be used for commercial purposes, commercial zoning and grading permits are required. Additionally, storm-water

management and parking accommodations must be addressed. While we help walk our customers through the permitting and approval process, we recommend our customers take the lead in contacting their municipality and in knowing the specific requirements. Other factors to consider include lot size, projected capacity, barn layout, and setting. While the land does not need to be flat, the surrounding view and impact on neighboring properties should be considered. What wedding trends seem to be popular among couples that lead them to choose a barn for their wedding? How do you take these things into consideration when designing? The biggest draw for brides is the flexibility to transform the barn into a space that perfectly reflects their style. Extra amenities like a working kitchen, spacious bathrooms, bride and groom quarters, and a dance floor help make a wedding barn more marketable. It really does come down to the experience and making the day as stress-free as possible for the bride.

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THE BREAKERS, FLORIDA

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ver since Ali was a little girl, she had imagined getting married at the Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida. “It’s not like most hotels,” she said. “Each room has its own story, its own look.” Though Ali and Jeremy live primarily near New York City, the Florida wedding wasn’t considered a destination wedding. “I’ve been going to Palm Beach my entire life,” Ali continued. “For my friends and family, it wasn’t considered a destination. And Jeremy’s family and friends understood why we chose the venue and were happy to oblige.” The day was not just a celebration of love between Ali and Jeremy; it was also the blending of families, as Ali became stepmother to Jeremy’s children. “I wasn’t just marrying Jeremy; I was also pledging to spend the rest of my life as a loving stepmom to Lylah and Eli,” said Ali. “It was very important to me that the kids be included in the wedding. The day was about the four of us coming together.” Ali wrote vows to the kids that she read at the ceremony, which included promises to always be there for them and to look out for them. “I couldn’t possibly be more honored to be your stepmom,” the vows concluded.

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With just under 150 guests at their June wedding, the celebration was an elegant yet intimate affair. Ali and Jeremy wanted something timeless, and the Breakers was the perfect choice. “They allowed us to execute my vision with its one-of-a-kind ballrooms, impeccable service, gilded décor, and delicious food,” Ali said. “Each room that we used was unique. We played up each room’s features by using colors and flowers that complemented the décor.” The day was emotional and stunning. “Seeing Jeremy’s expression as I walked down the aisle to him will be forever in my mind. He’s not a very publicly emotional person, so for him to get choked up and have a hard time getting through his vows tugged at my heart strings.” Unfortunately, Ali ended up with a bad cold just a few days before the wedding. “Anyone who knows me knows I love to talk. I ended up losing my voice on Friday before the rehearsal dinner,” Ali said. “I had to go almost my entire wedding weekend in silence. Thank goodness for the AV system; I had a microphone so I could whisper my vows to Jeremy and the kids. Of course, as soon as we landed in Italy for our honeymoon, it started to come back.”

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF MISSION POINT PHOTOS COURTESY OF ADARE MANOR

VENUES ADARE MANOR

MISSION POINT RESORT

One of Ireland’s most historically renowned five-star resort hotels with an endless list of prestigious accolades, Adare Manor is set to re-open in Autumn 2017 following the largest restoration project of its kind in Ireland. The transformation will honor the building’s architectural heritage as a neo-Gothic masterpiece and embody the hotel’s signature style. An expansive ballroom will also be added, with capacity for 350 guests for weddings and special events. When it comes to making wedding memories, the 840acre grounds are filled with spectacular scenery for the perfect photographs. In addition to the endless assortment of trees, including magnificent cedars of Lebanon along the bank of the river Maigue, there are fifth-century Ogham stones dotted throughout the woods, as well as the Dunraven family’s pet cemetery. Equestrian facilities are available to guests just 15 minutes from the grounds.

Set on 18 acres of manicured gardens along gorgeous shoreline and surrounded by the beauty of Lake Huron and Mackinac Island, Mission Point Resort is a picturesque and unique choice for a destination wedding. The remote island is a pristine locale where transportation comes in the form of bicycles and horse-drawn buggies. The 239-room resort has been the premier site for wedding ceremonies and receptions for generations. Spectacular lake views, lush lawns and gardens, refreshing lake breezes, and a deep sense of history make Mission Point a truly unforgettable venue. The property offers waterfront ceremony and reception locations for parties of any size. The front lawn can accommodate up to 1,000 guests, while Tranquility Point is perfect for smaller weddings. The signature wedding gazebo is surrounded by gardens and overlooks the lake. In addition to the ceremony locations, Mission Point Resort has many locations for the reception, from its famous sound stage to the Summit Room, which offers a 180-degree view of the lake.

IRELAND

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MICHIGAN


SEAN LEBLANC PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: BEALL + THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHY

SPRUCE MEADOWS

BLACKBERRY FARM

Spruce Meadows’ 400-acre property is elegance and sophistication at its finest. As one of the top equestrian venues in North America, it is an exciting choice as a wedding location. Bathed in the shadows of the Canadian Rockies, the picturesque grounds offer a wide range of venues for weddings, from regal to rustic. Congress Hall, for example, offers an elegant and warm ambiance, and, with a patio overlooking the private grounds, it can be combined to include outdoor entertainment. Another choice is the CP Canada house, which offers a more intimate venue with an impressive balcony and floor-to-ceiling windows with views of the International Ring. The Gallery on the Green boasts a charming setting, featuring grand crystal chandeliers, an open floor plan, and rustic elegance. The wedding ceremony can be held in various scenic and tranquil settings around the property, such as the Grand Staircase’s dramatic stone-washed walls or the pond’s wide green space and bridge.

The Great Smoky Mountains provide the perfect backdrop for romance and celebration at Blackberry Farm in Walland, Tennessee. The intimate luxury hotel, situated on a pastoral 4,200-acre estate, offers an all-inclusive wedding package that includes gourmet meals, event coordination, and even a Blackberry Farm cookbook as a welcome gift for each guest. Famous for its farm-to-table cuisine, Blackberry Farm’s fare is rooted in what comes from their own farm as well as the surrounding region. Often described as Foothills Cuisine, it wanders the line between refined and rugged, borrowing from haute cuisine and the foods indigenous to Blackberry’s Smoky Mountain heritage. Various activities allow guests to take part in life on the farm, from talks by its master gardener to a tour of the farm and a tasting of its farmstead products. Before and after the celebration, guests can also enjoy swimming, hiking, biking, tennis, lawn games, billiards, puzzles, and a club room.

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TENNESSEE

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CANADA

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INSIDE THE WORLD OF

VICTORIA McCULLOUGH

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She may be little-known to the public, but this powerful woman is a major force in ending horse slaughter in America.

Victoria McCullough is soft-spoken, but in Washington, D.C., she’s acutely savvy and a born diplomat. She’s well-known inside the Beltway, sweetly twisting arms to end horse slaughter in the U.S. A horse rescuer with more than 10,000 horses and burros re-homed from the kill pen, she’s an advocate for recycling unwanted equines. The only child of the late Rexford Davis, founder of the country’s largest privately held petroleum company, she’s an accomplished pianist as well as the architect and engineer for her sprawling estate in Wellington, Florida. McCullough generally guards her privacy with the tough tenacity she shows in Washington—until Equestrian Living was invited for a glimpse of the home and stables she has lovingly restored and built. Welcome to the private world of Victoria McCullough. BY SUE WEAKLEY MAJOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGE KAMPER

THE HOUSE

McCullough’s estate was purchased in 2012; renovations began the following year and have continued for three years and counting. “It was for sale for years and no one would touch it, and I mean no one,” Victoria says. “In fact, Hunter Continued on page 75

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Charlotte and her mount, Vitalis, share a laugh. Her shirt, from Kastel’s Charlotte collection, has mesh inner sleeves for comfort and offers protection from the sun. 68 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2016


ROBERT HANSEN

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ADVOCACY HAS NOT FIGURED OUT HOW TO MAKE ITSELF POWERFUL INSTEAD OF EMOTIONAL. EMOTION DOES NOT WIN HERE.

EQ LIVING INTERVIEW:

WORKING TOGETHER TO END HORSE SLAUGHTER

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ictoria McCullough might have personally rescued more horses than any one else in America. Florida Senator Joseph Abruzzo works with Victoria as her Washington lobbyist. Equestrian Living publisher C. Wynn Medinger spoke with them in February 2017, and edited excerpts appear here. See more of the interview at eqliving.com/mccullough.

Florida Senator Joseph Abruzzo: Victoria and I met

in a buffet line at the Jacobs’ home (Deeridge Farm) here in Wellington about two years before I was elected. She started to educate me on the equine issues of our state. When I got elected, one of the first bills I worked on was the Ivonne Rodriguez and Victoria McCullough Horse Protection Act. If it passed, it would be one of the first laws in the nation making it a felony to abuse, neglect, or abandon an equine. It also said that if

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a Florida restaurant put horse meat on the menu, it would automatically be shut down. We spent a lot of time traveling the state trying to get people and groups involved, and I’m proud to say, it passed unanimously, and it is now the law in the State of Florida. Victoria McCullough: Then what happened is that other states like California and Texas started to copy it. Next the senator got passed Nicole’s Law that required mandatory helmets for young riders. It was named after Nicole Hornstein, a 12-year-old girl

who was riding a horse without a helmet, when the animal stumbled and fell. Nicole died in 2006 after 20 days in a coma. Abruzzo: As Victoria and I started to work together, we talked about Washington, D.C. I was going to line up some prominent lobbyists to work with us, and I realized that Victoria could do this in her sleep. She is just as good as any top lobbyist, so we decided to team up and do it ourselves. McCullough: We’re lucky because we have friends. The senator works across the aisle,


both here in Florida and in Washington, where he is my lobbyist. He’s not my advocate. He is my lobbyist. There’s a difference. Congress doesn’t work. If you have to wait for Congress, it will never happen. You have to go to the top, work the pieces together, find your friends and relationships, and turn the key. You have to do it so people want to help. We need the White House and we need the Senate Appropriations Committee. Abruzzo: It’s very rare that someone who works in advocacy gets taught by their client. But Victoria is so much more than a client. We’re truly a family. She is held in such high regard in Washington, where it’s about respect and the relationships we build. She has taught me how to operate in Washington—how to actually get things accomplished. McCullough: When we wanted to end horse slaughter, we had to question, how do you really end it? How do you really stop each state from applying to the Department of Agriculture to open a facility? The senator had a brilliant idea when we visited Vice President Joe Biden. Biden is just so dear to us, and we love him so much. We walked into his residence, and he greeted us in his jeans with his German shepherd and dog toys all over. He said, “OK, guys, you are preaching to the choir. But just give me something. Give me a legality, something I can win with.” And we said, “OK. Here it is.

Horsemeat is not agriculture. It’s not a USDA food product. It is filled with the drugs that are banned in Title 21. Horses are being shipped secretly in the evening in an unregulated industry for people to eat, with a toxin that is forbidden by the FDA for any of our food animals. Here’s the idea: It’s our liability if we knowingly sell horses to kill buyers— knowing where they are going—let’s say to a Belgian company that sells horsemeat. Therefore if it is not a viable product, we are liable.” And Biden said, “OK, I get it.” Horse slaughter is legal in Canada, and they are a large meat exporter. We spoke in front of Parliament there and told them that no member of Parliament can say to their constituents that the horse meat they export is safe. That’s because it’s ours. Seventyfive percent of the horsemeat exported from Canada comes from the U.S. Abruzzo: You know the horse world and the chemicals and drugs that are given to horses. If people abroad knew what they were truly eating... McCullough: In 2013, Biden authored the agricultural defund mechanism within the national budget to deny funding for horse slaughterhouse inspections, thereby shuttering these facilities. Another friend of ours, Senator Udall, authored and passed our Udall Kirk Amendment in the Senate in 2015-16 to protect wild horses and burros from slaughter. And in October we joined one of our favorite allies, Fleet of

Angels, to save over 800 mustangs from an overburdened sanctuary in blizzard conditions in South Dakota. Now, fewer than 200 remain, safely housed in Colorado waiting for new homes. Then there were 150 wild burros that the Bureau of Land Management had that had no protection, and they sent them to me. I have two of them here in the barn. McCullough: We plan on having many friends and allies in the new (Trump) administration. The attorney general of Florida is a great animal lover. She has a Saint Bernard that goes to work with her every day. She’s wonderful and helpful, and also close to President Trump. I know Trump; he has been to my rescue. And I’m also in the petroleum industry, and that helps a lot. Some Republicans are pro-slaughter, but I don’t think they are pro having this served to people as food. Even the ranching mentality isn’t always aware of where the product goes. It’s just a matter of economy. How many horses do you keep when they are old or infirm? Euthanasia should be a responsibility that goes with horse ownership. Owners need to be responsible for the end of life, too. We have wonderful friends on both sides of the aisle. The trick is how many friends can you make. You put the (antislaughter) pieces together so that it’s such a perfect argument that you can’t even debate it. So we won’t have setbacks. To truly save equines

it takes a network of reliable resources. The U.S. is blessed to have so many warriors for our horses. In order to end slaughter and transportation, you need to build up the pieces of the pyramid. What have we done since 2013? We’ve been able to show that the country doesn’t want to eat horsemeat. We have made serving it an automatic felony in several states. We have shown that there is a health risk in eating it and a liability in selling it. And I’m just this close in proving that it is in U.S. food sources. Abruzzo: I believe the vast majority of the American public stands with us in protecting horses and making sure they are treated in a humane way. But this will be an ongoing issue. Thank God for Victoria. We have to keep the fight going. Victoria understands how the government works, how the agencies work, where the bills and loopholes are. I can’t say enough. Working with her has been the ride of my life. McCullough: Advocacy has a place, but the real truth to where power lies in the U.S. is the White House and the Senate Appropriations Committee. Those are not advocacy accessible. Advocacy has not figured out how to make itself powerful instead of emotional. Emotion does not win here. This is a game of leverage and relationships. And we don’t plan on losing—I guarantee it. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 1


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Hunter Harrison said to me, “Kid (that house) is the biggest money pit in the world.�

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The Sloans’ living room in Wellington. 74 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017


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That’s why I bought the house. I’ve always loved the light and sound. Continued from page 67

Harrison (Double H Farm) said to me, ‘I think you are crazy to get that house. Kid, it’s the biggest money pit in the world, and the house is ugly.’” The house had lain empty for seven years while the South Florida weather fueled mold and mildew damage, but McCullough loved the light streaming in through the windows, the limestone flooring imported from France, and the building’s acoustics, so she overlooked the rest, recognizing the hidden gem. “That’s why I bought the house,” she quietly explains. “I’ve always loved the light and the sound. The acoustics were modified, and we really had fun with it. We had specialists on acoustics work here because I am a pianist. That’s a 1928 Steinway concert grand. The best acoustics are based on barriers every 13 inches, so that’s what we did to the ceiling.” McCullough personally designed the renovations, melding her Northern California roots with antiques purchased in England, Belgium, and France. It took six months to remove the mold and mildew, and 99 windows were removed and replaced, along with 10 air conditioners, the ductwork, the ceilings, the roof, and the electrical system. “When we built the windows, in order to have wind-impact windows to hold the weight of the glass, we had to have a cross beam,” she says. “So, the sign of the cross is in all the windows.” Along with new windows, cypress paneling was installed in the library with a nod toward California. The doors throughout are Honduran mahogany. The former master bedroom was made into a guest wing, and the impressive circular-staircase was moved to the bathroom in the new master suite. “It’s very Harry Potter, isn’t it?” she asks. “The owner bought the stairs in London and he installed it here. I thought, of course he would take it with him, but he knew I loved it, so he left it.” The copper bathtub was reinstalled.

Victoria was riding in Europe with equestrian Jan Tops for several years and took inspiration for her house from entrances to the vineyards she saw in Europe. “I would open up the show program for some jumping event, and I would see an ad for the sponsor of the tour,” she says. “I would see the pillars like you see here at the entrance gate to some vineyard in Italy. “The thing about the house is that inside it looked kind of like a Ritz Carlton, so we added the flying buttresses and all the columns to give it a little bit of dimension but not close it in,” she says, adding that she also introduced the ivy inching its way up the outside of the building. McCullough sounds a bit like Scarlet O’Hara when she describes her love for her personal Tara. “It wasn’t the house I loved,” she says. “I was excited about the land. It’s the land. The house is OK, but the property is so special.” THE GROUNDS

Above: The controls on the kitchen stove are chess pieces; the Harlequin Great Dane, Tsavo; A view of the pool; Basset hound, The Mouth. Opposite: The “Harry Potter” bathroom.

Victoria’s barn houses two world champion Clydesdales, titles won at the Royal Horse Show in Canada and the World Clydesdale Show. It is also home to her two stallions she says are worth their weight in gold. When she is away in Washington for weeks at a time, they are “mothballed,” and when she returns, they are just as wonderful to ride as if she had never been away. She also eschewed the use of an architect for the barn. “Everybody builds a stable with these stupid roofs that can come off in a hurricane,” she says. “I’ve never figured out why they keep doing the same thing. Why aren’t they evolving? I’m used to fighting, and I want my stable to hold up and fight in a hurricane. So, we built a garrison. It has a flat roof with a mansard top. It has a vee trough, so when the winds cross the top of it, they drop into the vee and shoot up the sides. There’s nothing to pull off.” Continued on page 79 JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 5


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I get about 6,000 racehorses a year. One in my barn is a $975,000 yearling from Keeneland that was being sold for slaughter. Continued from page 75

McCullough shows off two wild burros she adopted. Part of a herd of 150 that former VicePresident Joe Biden helped save, her two are randomly branded with the initials F and U. “They were in the wholesale authority, which means they were slated to go to Guatemala,” she explains. “I had 12 here in Florida. These two girls were inseparable, and they didn’t want to be part of the other group. What would be the chance of my two being branded FU?” Nearby is Buddy, a Charolais and Angus hybrid from the Montgomery County Fair in Maryland. He was purchased through a program that guarantees a prepaid college education to the University of Maryland for a lucky recipient. “He put a little girl through college,” she says, ever mindful that she is lucky enough to help others, including the horses she has saved from slaughter. HO RS E RE S C U E

Of the 10,000-plus horses she has rescued, most are Thoroughbreds. “They are from a little bit of everywhere,” she says. “I usually get them at the auctions, but once I got pretty proficient at that, the very good Thoroughbred trainers called me. From Kansas to Kentucky, I get about 6,000 racehorses a year. One in my barn is a $975,000 yearling from Keeneland that was being sold for slaughter. When the economy takes a hit, if there is any little glitch, hay prices or a drought, then adoption is stymied. It’s all predicated on the economy.” When it comes to the new administration in

Above: Victoria in the barn with Walter, a mustang gelding. Opposite: (Clockwise from top) Clydesdales Skye and Master; Biden the Brahman steer; the two burros came branded F and U; Skye, a Clydesdale; and a sheep named Matilda.

Washington, McCullough isn’t sure where President Trump stands on horse slaughter and rescue, but she just received a contract for 5,000 re-homed horses over the next two years to be used for border patrol. Meanwhile, when McCullough goes to Washington, she counts on support from friends like Senator Tom Udall from New Mexico and Florida State Senator Joseph Abruzzo, whom she met at a party in Wellington. She began educating Abruzzo, who is an animal lover, about equine issues, and he set the wheels in motion for Florida to be the first state to make neglecting or abusing an equine a felony. In 2010, the Florida legislature unanimously passed the Horse Protection Bill, also making it a felony to slaughter horses for personal or commercial use. They helped pass Nicole’s Law, a Florida statute signed in 2009 mandating that children in Florida must wear a helmet when riding. Abruzzo, who became her Washington lobbyist, says McCullough is as good as any top lobbyist (see page 70). McCullough relies on no fund raising, no website, no press releases. Everything is paid for courtesy of the Davis McCullough Foundation. And the shoe leather on the streets of Washington and the strategy on Capitol Hill? Those are courtesy of Victoria McCullough. “It’s a chess game,” she says. “Although there are many options, a pathway to victory always exists.” . JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 9


JANICE PARKER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT THE DESIGNER AND AUTHOR OF A NEWLY RELEASED BOOK, DESIGNING A VISION, WALKS US THROUGH A FEATURED PROJECT.

INTERVIEW BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOGRAPHY BY NEIL LANDINO, JR. 80 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017


DESIGN MASTER CLASS

LEARN FROM A M E R I C A’ S PREMIER DESIGNER S

Janice Parker

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n her well-rounded career as a landscape architect, horticultural specialist, garden consultant, teacher, floral designer, and speaker, Janice Parker has distinguished herself by rethinking accepted landscape practices and developing inventive, personal solutions for difficult problems. Janice has extensive hands-on experience in every facet of landscape and design, so she intimately understands how it all works. Since creating Janice Parker Landscape Architects in 1984, Janice has cultivated the firm to one of national prominence. The firm has conceptualized and directed innovative landscape architecture for national, private, and public clients across the United States. Janice Parker Landscape Architects has established a reputation for conceiving, planning, and installing thoughtful landscapes and is dedicated to excellent design, full documentation, and project coordination. Under her guidance, the firm has been honored with multiple awards, including the 2016 Stanford White Award for Garden Design, the 2015 Professional Merit Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects, and the 2012 National Palladio Award for Landscape Architecture.

Weaving the beauty of old and new landscapes together creates a cohesive experience throughout the property.

The inspiration to publish the book After a lifetime of working in landscape design and with people who desired a beautifully designed garden, I realized that the story of landscape design, as I understand it, is a story about what is asked of us, the designers, by our culture, our training, and our passion for the natural world. It is the story of our clients and what landscapes mean to them. This book is the story of how I see design work, teamwork, and discipline to communicate the answers that are found in a good landscape design. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 1


The work depicted in Designing a Vision is realistic and inspiring. Containing first-hand accounts of Janice’s experience and practice, this beautiful volume is replete with case studies, anecdotes, and insights. Verdant photography mixes with a blend of color renderings, watercolors, plans, and illustrations.

Can you tell us a little bit about this project?

This was a wonderful experience with great clients and an interesting and historically significant property in upstate New York. After decades of use as an active Christmas tree farm, the land was neglected for several years before the current homeowners obtained it. During the design process there was careful consideration of the ways in which farmers shape the land in a practical way, which often results in a disciplined agrarian beauty. Inspiration for the form and the placement of the outdoor spaces was drawn from the remnants of the site’s past agricultural use. What is the function of the barn on the property?

Besides looking absolutely beautiful behind the white pine tree line, it holds farm equipment. Did you plan the landscape around it, or as part of a focal point?

We planned the landscape around the existing large trees and used as many of the small Christmas trees as possible. Fortunately, the barn was in just the right place. How do you approach designing a property that is vast?

Once we have a topographic survey of the property, we analyze the land carefully, and we look to understand the history of the land and the surrounding area for cultural reference points as well as current uses and conditions. We want to find the story of the land, and if there is not a strong story, we look to find a way to create one. All good landscape design will take you on a journey. We look to find the areas that we can humanize and cozy up as well as the areas where we can work with the large scale and vistas. Do you create visual “rooms” that people would utilize or rather vistas to be looked out upon?

The key to a great design is to use both. Outdoor rooms create intimate and elegant settings for people to enjoy a variety of 82 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

The tree farm’s original barn was integrated into the landscape design.


spatial experiences. Vistas are aspirational. On this project, a central axis runs through the rooms, starting with the vegetable and flower garden at the eastern end, through the “urn room” with the iron arched stone urn set in the lawn, and continuing to the “pool room” before dispersing into the fields. A long green space functions as a “hall” and separates the urn room from the pool room, while crisp hedges form walls with a grass carpet extending from the entry court up stone-in-lawn steps, which transition the architecture of the hedges into the open fields. An apple orchard stretches along the eastern edge of the residence area, providing fresh organic fruit for the homeowners and their guests. Between the orchard and residence, a graceful lilac hedge arches around a lawn area for the children off the back porch. Tall and low hedges, fieldstone walls, and planted fences create a variety of comfortably scaled spaces and allow for the appreciation of the framed vistas outward. Do you intentionally set a tone, such as playful, formal, or traditional, to the design?

More often than not, the land combined with the client’s wishes will help us set the tone. We respect the cultural heritage of sites while looking at the present and provide a blending of the two—of course playful is always a good way to go! How would you describe the tone of this project?

I would say traditionally respectful, with rustic yet elegant styling. Have you ever landscaped a working horse farm? How would one differ from other large properties that you’ve designed?

Yes, I have created site plans and designs for working horse farms. They present very unique challenges. There are a lot of site requirements, and understanding the horse-management plan and how best to accommodate the horses, the people, the maintenance, and the equipment, as well as the paddocks and the circulation, is a puzzle that is always pleasant to solve. Working farms are properties with great spaces, great architecture, and opportunity to use them in different ways. If there are existing architectural structures or trees on the property, do they automatically become a focal point?

Automatically? No. However, when working with the clients, we are careful to preserve where we can when appropriate for the desired end result. Often a wonderful existing tree will drive the house placement and design. On this site, the bold move to salvage the Christmas trees into green walls-hedges instead of cutting them, speaks to the industry as a whole; adapting site materials is not limited to specimen species of plant or even to hardscape materials. Approaching site continued on page 86

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Pergolas, fences, and hornbeam trees create a variety of framed views on the property. 84 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017


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continued from page 83

challenges with an open and creative attitude can turn the most unwieldy features into key gestures of a design. What design devices or elements do you use to transition from intimate to wide-open spaces?

Tight and congested spaces, sometimes created by overhead tree canopies, will always be great moments of stagecraft. Going in and out of these shaded spaces is even more satisfying when you come out into a large vista and view you did not expect. Like a good architectural floor plan, a garden plan must flow–you should always know where you are in a garden. You should have surprises and moments of contemplation, but it should not be confusing. So as you transition in and out of spaces, views, and vistas, you should still understand the land and where you are. Is water, whether decorative or environmental, an important factor in your design?

Water is always magnetic, and often aspirational. It is a wonderful element to bring in to all gardens, be they small or large. We try to work water features and reflecting pools into most gathering spaces. I understand you are a strong proponent of using color in your design. What approach did you take in incorporating it into this project?

An iron-arched stone urn is set off by a transitional long green hall.

More, more, more. Saturate with color is one of my core design values. The landscape and the natural light can handle color. You have to remember that at 100 feet away, all colors but yellow or red turn gray. There is no reason to be hesitant with color. Color will add interest to all outdoor spaces. Currently I cannot get enough of deep garnet red! Is long-term maintenance one of your major concerns when initiating your designs?

Yes! It is a major concern. We plan for it from the beginning and discuss the expense and the complexity of this during the design process. All of our construction details are created with the awareness of how they will hold up over time and how easy they are to maintain. We are very involved in the creation of the maintenance plans for all the properties we design. The last thing we want to do is leave people with lots of puppies and kittens to take care of with no directions! What best describes your landscape architecture philosophy?

Every element of a design matters–edges and transitions, corners, intersections, plants, scents, sounds, and, importantly, the quality of the light. It is a goal to have a sense of focused simplicity and a care for site-specific, distinctive detailing. PAGE 129

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Stone-in-lawn steps transition the architecture of the hedges into open fields.


Color is an integral component in the tree farm project. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 7


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DESIGN MASTER CLASS

LEARN FROM A M E R I C A’ S PREMIER DESIGNER S

VA N CE

B U RK E The well-known designer talks about incorporating an equestrian feel into modern interiors.

INTERVIEW WITH CAROL COHEN HODESS

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The dramatic interior landscape of the Martini Lounge features a contrast of textures, colors, and art. The overscaled, moon-inspired custom fixture from a German manufacturer hangs above a black cowhide B&B Italia ottoman. The surrounding Ligne Roset chairs allow for enjoyment of a David Mann painting on a black glass wall. On the opposing wall is a series of portraits titled 25/50 by photographer Lindsay McCrum.

s Equestrian Living magazine visits the homes of horse lovers around the country for our well-known photography features, we’ve grown accustomed to the expected English hunt-country look that we all know so well: heirloom oriental carpets, leather club chairs, hunt prints, and antiques, with perhaps some overstuffed chintz couches thrown in. But after visiting several beautiful homes created in a striking, modern style that also incorporates equestrian-accented design, we began to see a common thread: designer Vance Burke. As The Huffington Post’s “Finephilia” blog noted, “Not many people can say they were classmates with Tom Ford in Paris and have remained friends since. As two young men, interior designer Vance Burke and fashion designer Tom Ford would admire the rise of Yves Saint Laurent and Karl Lagerfeld and how they were peers and also friendly rivals. Burke and Ford would often joke with each other that they, too, would be famous one day. Their paths proved to be similar in spirit yet different in design direction. Ford made his way into fashion, while Burke took the interiors path.” Burke is based in Santa Monica, California, and divides his time between the beach town and his midcentury-modern home in Palm Springs that he calls his design lab, where, he says, he “pushes the envelope with new colors and ideas.” The desert home has been widely published in design magazines. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 9


The Florida home of Carol Cohen Hodess. Above: Horsepower (1948) by Israeli artist Zadok. Right: A playful rift on black and white, the sculptural quality of the handcarved Balinese chair and coffee table contrast with an Italian Piero Fornasetti acrobat screen from the 1950s. Over the sofa is an abstract cityscape painting the client discovered at Miami’s Art Basel. The handmade resin floor lamp echoes the street lights in the painting.

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Left: A circa-1929 Steinway and an Alexander Calder artwork are lit by a chandelier by David Weeks Studio. The shelves hold Cohen-Hodess’ collection of Greek and Egyptian antiques.

When we learned that Equestrian Living magazine’s Editor at Large, Carol Cohen Hodess, has worked with Burke on several of her homes, we invited her to interview the designer. You were brought up in the Midwest, in Kansas?

Smack dab in the middle of nowhere. I wanted to move to New York, so I went to a design school in the city, and then I went to Paris for a while. That’s when Tom (Ford) and I got to be good friends. And, in fact, later when I moved to L.A., he hired me to help with his house in Texas. He was also one of my first clients. We don’t really see each other that much anymore, but he is a great friend. After school, I started doing design work in New York. First I worked for Donghia Associates for a couple of years, and next I went to Parish-Hadley, which was an old, blue-blood decorating firm that actually re-did the upstairs of the White House when the Kennedys lived there. Next I went to work for the designer Jed Johnson, who, as you may know, lived with Andy Warhol for a long time, and he helped shape some of Andy’s collection. Naturally, through Andy, Jed had some great clients such as Mick Jagger and Richard Gere. After Jed was killed in a planne crash, I moved out to Los Angeles, and I started working for myself. I was lucky that I got some good commissions right off the bat. I did some work for Ellen DeGeneres and Michael Richards, who played Kramer on

Seinfeld. I also got several great commissions with some art collectors, too, which took me in another direction. I always call myself a decorator, not in a derogatory way, but in a really good way that some people don’t understand. I don’t think it’s a negative. I always see the trilogy of art, architecture, and decoration going together. I don’t see the hierarchy of one being better than another—I think there’s a combination of all in everything. How do you work?

It’s a collaboration between architect and decorator, and decorator and client. It’s a constant collaboration, all throughout the whole process. I always try to make it nice and fun and unstressful. I know that building a house or decorating can be stressful because the time and money involved can cause a little friction, so I try never to bring any friction to the table. Everyone has different priorities as to what’s important to them, and I want to listen to what makes them happy and what could be an issue for them. I get on board with what’s important to the client versus what’s important to me. There are multiple versions of what’s right. There’s not just one version. Obviously, there are some things that are wrong—that I try to steer people away from—but there’s not one right solution to any problem solving when it comes to design. In design, I always think it’s important to create an JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 1


experience that’s consistent. If you have an old house, you don’t automatically have to have old furniture inside—or the opposite—you can do something brand new and put antiques in it. You want to create an experience from the moment you drive up and hear the crunch of gravel, and look at the landscaping, and see the architecture, and go inside and see the upholstery and the rugs and the art. You want it to all feel like one unique, special, experience, and that changes over time and also changes with where you are in location or where you are in your life. How do you approach adding “equestrian” into modern interior design?

Why start telling the story in the middle or near the end? In my experience, horse people are allin right from the beginning. I would literally start from the ground up with reclaimed-wood floors or a rough-cut stone—something that has an earthy, organic integrity. I would juxtapose slick modern walls with a high-contrast, dressage-inspired color story—perhaps saddle leather, off-white linen 92 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

with dark navy or black accents, or lacquered walls. When we do get to the accessories, my mantra in modern design is fewer, bigger, better. This is where we would continue the story with the artwork selected—a Deborah Butterfield sculpture, maybe a Susan Rothenberg drawing, minimalist black and white photography, or even the Zen of a Tang dynasty horse. Is there anything unique about equestrian clients? Top: The kitchen features a backsplash and limestone fireplace by Hagan Flynn of Los Angeles. The countertop is by Caesarstone, and the barstools are from A. Rudin. Above: Vance Burke. Opposite: A front hallway welcomes guests with a black chest by James Mont and a painting by Julio Larraz.

We all live in a bubble, most of us one of our own making. But perhaps the group most excelling at this condition is the horse world. I always find it to be a fun project when the client is really passionate about something, and I’m more than happy to jump aboard and be the conductor of their fantasy train. I understand that their horses are sometimes more family than their family. They live with the horses, travel with them. But it’s always perplexing to me when the spaces, architectural details, finishes, and fixtures in the barn are nicer than in the main house.


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The bright room features a modern mix of custom upholstery and vintage 1960 American Laurel lamps, 1970 Italian cantilevered chairs covered in Tibetan Lamb, and a green chaise by Paolo Lenti. The painting at right is Damien Hirst’s Beautiful Galactic Exploding (2001), while at left is an abstract painting by John McCafferty.

Fashion typically leads the way, especially when it comes to color stories. Think of the 1980s equestrian style. Dark, heavy, jewel-tone colors spring to mind—burgundy and emerald, and patterns in paisley and plaid. But fashion, like decorating, is about robbing the past to create the future, or combining the past with the present to be both modern and classic, simultaneously. This, I think, is something that Hermès does very well. Is that a cape or a horse blanket?

of Survivor, and she and I were terrified. We laughed and said we could always get a car service back to New Delhi, but somehow we made it through. The first night we got there, it was around 5:00, the sun was setting, and they were deciding which horse we were going to have for two weeks. They had everyone ride a horse so they could see what our abilities were, and then they matched us up with horses they thought were best. Only at the very end of the trip did we find out it actually had nothing to do with our ability. It was all about our weight, and I was put on one of the most aggressive horses.

One of your only personal horse experiences was a ride-athon in India.

Have you been riding since? That sort of put an end to my riding.

Do you encounter equestrian-fashion trends in interior design?

I had only taken a few riding classes in Burbank, California, to get ready to go to India and ride horses for two weeks. We rode Marwari horses, which were formerly used as war horses. It was an incredible trip, but there was obviously a big difference between riding around a raked ring in Los Angeles and riding in the middle of India, with potholes.

Now you are designing furniture and products?

Yes. We’re going to do a fabric line, and we’ve put the palette together that we’re going to use. We have some of the design in the preliminary state, and then we’re going to start printing them as strike-offs and determine what we really want to fabricate.

Was it scary?

Yes, it was scary! My friends are accomplished riders, but there was a woman along who works for Mark Burnett, the producer 94 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

What’s your retirement plan?

To die early.

PAGE 129


The polished terrazzo floor of a light-filled kitchen reflects the expansive windows. The custom lucite and glass counter-height island reinforces the airy theme of the room. Artwork by Heidi Van Wieren hangs over the fireplace.

Chiseled-limestone walls set the tone for this living room, which also features a Carrara marble cocktail table by Pierre Charpin and Mark Sheinkman’s painting, Plymouth (2014). At left is one of two early 1960s Martez glazed-ceramic lamps that flank the sofa. Two of Robert Kuo yellow Peking glass vases sit on a cream lacquer coffee table.

Contemporary art in bright colors lends a playful note to this breakfast alcove. A Tim Bavington painting, Heart Above Head (2004), hangs behind a vintage Murano vase. Sarah Morris’ Taurus (2009), mirrors the clerestory above.

A vibrant vignette in the master dressing room features artist Omar Chacon’s Mayoyoque (2010), and a vintage Venini art-glass bowl in chartreuse. JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 5


BY JEWEL CONNELLY

TRAVERSE CITY, MICHIGAN AN EQUESTRIAN SUMMER OASIS MAJOR PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRAVERSE CITY TOURISM RACHEL KRAMER

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everyone come and enjoy Traverse City and the community, but also enjoy showing their horses. I work hard to ensure that everyone is safe but also having a good time. It is such an interesting community of artists, athletes, and families, and everybody is very open-minded to the horse show and loves having all the visitors come.” Known as the cherry capital of the world, Traverse City hosts the worldrenowned annual National Cherry Festival featuring the fruits of its thriving cherry trees cultivated from nearby orchards on Old Mission Peninsula. This region provides a breathtaking, natural environment for visitors to explore during any season of the year. If you’re seeking a place to relax in good company and enjoy local spirits, Traverse City is a prime destination with the wide variety of wineries, taverns, and distilleries in the northern Michigan area. Established in 1995, North Peak Brewing Company brews their craft beers with locally grown ingredients. The company has come a long way since its BECKY HARDIN

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estled on the edge of Lake Michigan’s Grand Traverse Bay, enchanting Traverse City is a picturesque oasis abundant with stops for the avid outdoorsmen, the connoisseur of fine wines, and everyone in between. With a backdrop of sprawling vineyards, idyllic lakes, and tranquil beaches, is the equestrian paradise known as the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival (GLEF). Held annually at the Flintfields Horse Park during July and August, GLEF attracts equestrian athletes from all across the United States to participate in nationally and internationally rated hunter-jumper competitions. The showgrounds of the Flintfields Horse Park are situated on expansive rolling hills dotted with lush pines and blooming flowers. A favorite destination among exhibitors and their families, summer visits to GLEF offer relaxing days off basking and boating on the shimmering lake and its shores. “The Great Lakes Equestrian Festival has been a labor of love,” said Karin Flint, the charismatic woman behind Flintfields Horse Park. “I love having

THE AREA OFFERS A UNIQUE MIX OF GOLF, EQUESTRIAN, AND WATER SPORTS

Torch Lake rivals the Caribbean in vibrancy and clarity.


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Margie Engle and Indigo at GLEF.

COURTESY OF KARIN FLINT

inception in an abandoned candy factory in downtown Traverse City and has received dozens of awards for its food and craft beers. Menu items include artisan pizza, steak, ribs, sandwiches, fresh fish, salads, and soups. For an authentic experience, make your way to the original brewpub housed inside the historic Big Daylight Candy Factory, just steps from Grand Traverse Bay.

TAYLOR RENNER

TAYLOR RENNER

Karin Flint

Leadline at the horse show.

ollow the scent of fragrant cherries down onto Old Mission Peninsula for more local gems at the historic Bowers Harbor Inn Estate, featuring the Mission Table and Tasting Room and the Jolly Pumpkin restaurant, microbrewery, and distillery. Remodeled from the former Bowers Harbor Inn restaurant dating back to the 1880s, Mission Table retains its original charm with warm, rustic, wooden dĂŠcor and stone fireplaces that create an inviting, homey atmosphere. Feast on local

TRAVERSE CITY IS HOME TO THE GREAT LAKES EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL.

artisan fare from Chef Paul Olson and try something new, as the farm-to-fork menu changes daily. A large dinner party can admire the spectacular views of the West Grand Traverse Bay from the Harbor Room or go upstairs to the library, which overlooks the scenic gardens and vineyards. However, keep an eye out while roaming the premises, as legend has it that the ghost of the original owner, Genevive Stickney, still haunts Bowers Harbor Inn Estate to this day. Located in a historic nineteenthcentury mansion, the Jolly Pumpkin is another great spot to enjoy artisan pizza, unique sandwiches, house-smoked ribs, and local fish. Sustainability and locally creating good craft beer is important to the team, as evidenced by the quality of their brews. Take a peek at the small-batch distillery and brewery onsite and try the Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales and North Peak drafts on tap. If fine wine is your pursuit, a visit to Black Star Farms is a must. Settled in the heart of Michigan JUNE /JULY | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 7


MARADA

COURTESY OF BLACK STAR FARMS

Black Star Farms is a delight for wine aficionados.

Traverse city at dusk.

Draft horses at Black Star Farms.

COURTESY OF BLACK STAR FARMS

The warm, rustic decor of Mission Table restaurant.

wine country, the farm is a unique equestrian retreat spread across 160 acres of gorgeous rolling hills and spacious vineyards on Leelanau Peninsula. A day trip is barely enough time to take in all the grandeur this family-owned estate has to offer: wine-tasting rooms, delicious and locally sourced dishes crafted by executive chef Cole Thornton, hiking alongside orchards, and trail riding throughout the expansive property. Black Star Farms provides a serene backdrop of pastoral farmland and miles of thriving greenery to rejuvenate guests during their stay. It’s a delight for wine aficionados as well as competitive equestrians seeking a tranquil escape from the show ring. Whether you are single or vacationing with the entire family, Traverse City has you covered in the activities department, and you might even discover new interests. At Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, regarded as one of Michigan’s premier vacation destinations, guests have their choice of three beautiful championship golf courses, tennis courts, spa 98 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

treatments, casinos, world-class dining, and much more to fill their days. After a day on the green, venture to the 16th floor of the tower and dine at the luxurious Aerie Restaurant and Lounge while enjoying panoramic views of picturesque Grand Traverse Bay. This resort truly is grand; spanning 900 acres of beautiful Michigan landscape, it exudes a spirit of adventure and love for the great outdoors.

TRAVERSE CITY HOSTS THE WORLDRENOWNED ANNUAL CHERRY FESTIVAL.

E

xperience the village lifestyle in Traverse City at the Village at Grand Traverse Commons, a 63-acre site developed from a unique renovation of dozens of historic buildings formerly known as the Traverse City State Hospital, and before that, the Northern Michigan Asylum. Pedestrian-friendly walkways and expansive lawns, surrounded by a historic arboretum, are perfect for a relaxing stroll or picnic. Visit the village’s Mercato, with its ever-changing, art-adorned walls and expansive, indoor marketplace with a vast array of eclectic shops, unique eateries,


COURTESY OF GRAND TRAVERSE RESORT AND SPA

The Village at Grand Traverse Commons. Left: One of the charming shops at the commons.

and professional services. Gorgeous hiking and biking trails along Kid’s Creek and through 480 acres of preserved parkland, make the area a must-visit attraction during your visit to Traverse City. For those of us who crave being immersed in nature, it can’t get any better than the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, which ABC’s Good Morning Guests enjoy the stables America named the most beautiful place in at Black Star Farms. America. Here you don’t have to choose between the beach and the lake, you can LODGING AND experience both. It is a unique place suitable for all AMENITIES seasons, and the park itself is only the beginning. If RANGE FROM you are in the mood to explore, hop on a ferry and RUGGED AND visit two islands in Lake Michigan, South Manitou QUAINT TO and North Manitou, or learn about maritime navigaUPSCALE. tion while visiting the lighthouses. If you enjoy a more cultural experience over physical exploration, museums, wineries, and shopping are abundant. There are a great deal of lodging options throughout Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, ranging from a rugged, quaint lodge to an upscale resort with dining options to satisfy all cravings.

If Traverse City is known for anything it is its beautiful lakes. Torch Lake, boasting turquoise blue and green waters that rival the Caribbean in vibrancy and clarity, is Michigan’s longest inland lake and a popular fishing destination. In addition to casting a line to hook one of the many trout, bass, pike, or Atlantic Salmon that inhabit the lake, activities such as canoeing, paddle boarding, and diving can also be enjoyed. You don’t have to drive far when traveling to and from Traverse City; the city’s nearby Cherry Capital Airport is serviced by airlines such as American, Delta, and United. The ambiance of the city begins here, in this natural setting, combined with the efficient technologies of the terminal to ensure uninterrupted transit. Upon arriving at this airport, passengers will feel as though they have stepped into a north-woods lodge with a comforting stone fireplace in the style of American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Leave your stresses behind and be transformed by the limitless wonders to be found PAGE 129 in Traverse City! COURTESY OF BLACK STAR FARMS

COURTESY OF GRAND TRAVERSE RESORT AND SPA

The Bear golf course at Grand Traverse Resort and Spa. Below: The resort’s Aerie Restaurant and Lounge.

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Quintol’s Tail


ALDEN CORRIGAN

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lden Corrigan began her career with horses under the tutelage of industry icons Ronnie Mutch and Emerson Burr. After graduating from Garrison Forest School, Alden worked for Champ and Linda Hough while attending Sweet Briar College, then she set off on a highly successful 30-year career in high-end specialty-store management at Ralph Lauren, Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Hugo Boss on Beverly Hills’ Rodeo Drive. Toward the end of her retail career Alden wrote and photographed for PhelpsSports, which lead to the launch of the Devon Horse Show eNewsletter and lifestyle photography for reining shows on the West Coast. Recognition of her unique perspective increased demand for her work, which grew to the point that she retired from the fashion industry completely to pursue her passion. Alden is known for her ability to capture the moment. Her iconic images illuminate passion, emotion, and the highly personal bond between horse and rider. In 2014 Alden combined her love of horses with her business acumen and launched Alden Corrigan Media, specializing in equestrian consulting, bespoke marketing strategies, and curated photography across all equestrian disciplines. Today, Alden Corrigan Media counts 36 major competitions, as well as associations, corporations, and PAGE 129 publications among its clients.

All images: ŠAlden Corrigan Media

JUNE /JULY | 201 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 1


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Florida Light.

Verdades sees himself on the jumbotron, causing coach Debbie McDonald and the gallery to break into laughter.

Western Artwork

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Eventer Energy, Effort, Determination

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Hunter Silhouette


T H E F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM E Q U E ST R I A N L I V I N G

EQ U E STR IAN EQLiving.com

PRO PERTI ES JUNE/JULY 2017

SONOMA WINE COUNTRY P O LO ES TAT E PAGE 106

®


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

WHITE OAK An unparalleled equestrian estate in the heart of Northern California’s Wine Country.

W

hite Oak is an incomparable equestrian estate bordering Sonoma County’s premier polo fields, located in the Valley of the Moon. The property overlooks breathtaking views of the pristine polo fields, surrounding hills and mountain ranges. Just a stone’s throw away from some of Sonoma Valley’s most famed vineyards, the setting is magical. Situated amongst rolling pastures of a remarkable equestrian facility, the estate offers a grand main residence overlooking a serene pond, generous guest house, gorgeous pool and spa, stoneclad pool house and caretaker’s cottage. Reminiscent of a traditional farmhouse, the main residence maintains timeless aspects such as field stone chimneys, cedar shingles, a traditional gabled roof and dormer windows that capture the essence of the original development of the traditional farm buildings that were first on the property. 10 6 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC J U NTOB E/ J UER/ LY N | 2017 OVEMB ER | 2016

Featuring the crème de la crème of equestrian facilities to include: two barns to collectively board twenty-plus horses, a 65-foot round lunging hall constructed of pine and cedar shingles, lighted outdoor arena, jumping arena, turn-out paddock and multiple pastures. Each barn includes tie stalls, hot/cold showers, heat lamps throughout and cushioned rubber matting flooring. A hot walker accommodates four to five horses at a time with three tie stalls in close proximity. A custom, hollowed out rock serves as a water trough, with the water remaining cool all hours of the day. The immaculately landscaped grounds include a perennial walk with a variety of gardens and native plantings, such as lavender, roses and azaleas. An assortment of trees decorate the grounds, not limited to olive, elm, maple, sycamore and redwood as well as pear, nectarine, persimmon, peach and apple. Please visit www.568WhiteOak.com to view additional photography and a film of the property.


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY POLO ESTATE

Wine Country Equestrian Estate Bordering Wild Oak Saddle Club | $17,000,000 | Visit 568WhiteOak.com

CH UCK L A M P 415.298.6687 | CHARLES.LAMP@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM | CAL BRE 858966

WINE COUNTRY BROKERAGE | 25 EAST NAPA STREET SONOMA, CA

95476 | 707.935.2288 | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/NORCAL

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

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E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

DESIGN BEYOND THE BARN Incorporating paddocks to create a more natural environment.

BY CLAY NELSON

W

hen it comes to equinefacility planning and design, the barn is often the center of attention. For many horse facilities, however, a well-designed paddock can be equally as important to overall horse health and environmental protection of your land. Often called a dry-lot by those who consider its primary funcA laneway paddock. tion on the farm, it deserves equal thought and attention. Horses are designed to move, often traveling upwards of 15-30 miles per day in the wild for food and water. They rely on this regular movement for a variety of health benefits, including digestion and proper circulation, with the hoof acting as a pump that moves blood from the extremities back to the heart (this only works when horses are moving). Horses prevented from regular movement by over-confinement in stalls, even spacious ones, are at risk of circulatory and digestive health issues such as diminished hoof growth and reoccurring ulcers. Excessive stabling has also been shown to contribute to increased stress levels in horses, which manifest in a variety of vices and stereotypic behaviors such as cribbing.

CLAY NELSON, principal of Sustainable Stables LLC, is an expert in the planning and design of sustainable equestrian facilities. He is also a professional scientist and researcher in environmental health and soil chemistry. Clay holds degrees in environmental biology from Dartmouth College and environmental health from Duke University. Rooted in the enjoyment horseback riding provides in getting outside and connecting with nature, he is passionate about assisting horse owners improve the stewardship of their land for the benefit of horses, communities, and the environment alike.

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Simply increasing pasture turnout, however, is hardly a universal solution, particularly for limited acreage farms, or for equestrian facilities where safety and convenient access to horses are paramount. Advances in paddock design offer solutions to increase day-to-day movement in horses in a manner that also helps protect the environment. One design concept gaining popularity involves incorporating a central paddock with a series of adjacent, connected pastures for rotational grazing. Shelter and water are available only in the central paddock, which the horses always have access to when not stalled, encouraging them to walk between pastures to graze and the paddock to seek water, shelter, or hay. An advantage of this layout concept is that it is chore-efficient and can reduce the amount of time spent catching your horses out in pasture when turned out. Horses are creatures of habit, and when acclimated to a regular routine will often be waiting in the paddock to meet you when it is time for feeding, grooming, or riding. Continued on page 114


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S EQ

E S S E N T I A L S | T R AV E L

Steeple ChaSe Farm - Wellington, Fl | $6,950,000 10 Acres | 24 stAlls | chicAgo Brick | 5 horse WAlker | 11 PAddocks | exercise trAck | stAff QuArters

palm BeaCh point | Wellington, Fl 10 Acres | 22 stAlls | hAck to Wef | $3,999,500

aero CluB | Wellington, Fl AircrAft hAngAr | on tAxi WAy | $1,495,000

grindStone Farm | Wellington, Fl

5 Min hAck to Wef | 17 stAlls | grAss field | 6.3 Acres | $9,995,000

indian mound | Wellington, Fl

11 Acres | 19 irrigAted PAddocks | 24 stAlls | $6,394,500

DaviD Welles, P.a. 12180 South Shore Boulevard, Suite 102, Wellington, Florida 33414

dwelles@equestriansir.com www.wellesrealestate.com OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | c: 561.313.9123

109


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR PROVIDING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE SERVICE

FOR THE GLOBAL EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

WINDSOME ESTATES PROPERTY. Long regarded as one of the most prestigious equestrian estates in Wellington, a portion of Windsome Estates has been redeveloped into four of the finest 10acre lots the area has to offer. Phase one has been completed, and site plans have been drawn up for a grand farm that can be ready for next season. $3,600,000

CHATEAU-INSPIRED EQUESTRIAN ESTATE. This stunning chateau-inspired estate sits on 5.44 acres and boasts a large covered patio with a summer kitchen and an infinity pool. For equestrians, the property delivers in all regards with 5 turnout paddocks, a 120x230 foot all-weather Riso arena, a walker, and a fully-equipped 12-stall stable. $7,950,000

PALM BEACH POINT ESTATE. An ideal blend of rustic and Mediterranean styles, this beautiful estate sits on 5.4 meticulously landscaped acres. The completely redone home boasts a split bedroom floor plan, a covered patio with summer kitchen and pool, a 120x230 foot riding arena, 7 paddocks, and an 8 stall center aisle barn. $5,900,000

PROFESSIONAL EQUESTRIAN FACILITY. This fabulous 15-acre property includes a large covered arena complete with GGT footing, an outdoor GGT all-weather arena, 42 stalls, 18 spacious paddocks, walker, and round pen. The 3 bedroom/2.5 bath main home and 1 bedroom/1 bath, and numerous staff quarters overlook a beautiful lake with a sunset view. $7,750,000

Martha W. Jolicoeur, PA

marthasproperties.com | martha@marthasproperties.com 11199 Polo Club Road, Wellington, FL 33414

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561 797 8040


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR PROVIDING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE SERVICE

FOR THE GLOBAL EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

NEWLY RENOVATED IN PALM BEACH POLO. Don’t miss the opportunity to own this impeccably renovated and decorated bungalow with water views. Completely remodeled, this wellappointed 2 bedroom, 2 bath bungalow boasts new wood floors, a new kitchen, and all-new baths. Guest cottage features an additional bedroom and bathroom. $765,000

RENOVATED SADDLE TRAIL PARK HOME. This single-family home features marvelous renovations with land to spare for a barn and ring. The community offers miles of bridle paths to be enjoyed. This incredible 3 bedroom, 2 bath home features brand new kitchen and baths, impact glass, wood floors, and a stunning pool with builtin spa. $1,350,000

AERO CLUB ESTATE. Sleek, stunning, and completely renovated, this Aero Club home features 4 bedrooms and 4 full baths. Light and bright, with vaulted ceilings, wood beams, and an abundance of new impact glass windows. Other features include gorgeous wood floors, a brand new kitchen with gas cooking, and a large chef’s island. Exterior renovations include a new roof, new pool, a marble patio area, and a completely fenced spacious backyard. This luxurious and well appointed home is located just a short golf cart ride from the Wellington Horse Show Grounds. $1,695,000

AERO CLUB ESTATE. If hopping on a jet in your own backyard sounds like a dream come true, it’s time that you make your move to this fabulous, beautifully renovated 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom home at Wellington Aero Club. The property offers the unique opportunity to build your own hangar for your jet, and features its own personal taxiway lot. $1,450,000

1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

RobeRt Ross, P.A.

www.BarbaraVisions.com

561.758.6185 | Robsross@aol.com | www.RobertRealtyGroup.com

H omes for H orses

roan Court | PAddock PARk | Offered at

$1,570,000

soutHfields | Wellington, Fl | Offered at

$5,900,000

Colonial-Style Home With Modern Florida Appeal | 3 Large Grassy Paddocks | Mirrored Regulation-Size Dressage Ring | Three 14x14 Stalls | Feed Room | Storage Garage

12-Stall Courtyard Barn | 8 Paddocks | Mirrored Dressage Arena & Viewing Lounge | 4-Bedroom / 4.5 Bath Home | 1 / 1 Guest Cottage | Pool | Close to 3 Horse Shows

draft Horse | PAddock PARk ii | Offered at

$1,245,000

aPPaloosa trail | sAddle tRAil | Offered at

$5,795,000

Well Designed & Fully Appointed Dressage Farm located at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac and featuring full-sized regulation arena with mirrors and show-quality footing

5 Acres | 5-Stall Barn With Room for Up To 20 Stalls | Tack Room | Feed Area | Center-Isle Pavers | 7 Paddocks | 5 - 10 Minutes to WEF Showgrounds

Grand Prix VillaGe | Wellington, Fl | Call for price!

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60 Stalls | 14 Paddocks | Hot Walker | Treadmill | Lunging Area | Hunter Arena | Oversized Jumping Arena | Owner’s Apt | Manager’s Apt | Riders’ Apts | Multiple Gooms’ Apts


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

RobeRt Ross, P.A.

www.BarbaraVisions.com

561.758.6185 | Robsross@aol.com | www.RobertRealtyGroup.com

Pr

ic

e

R

ed

uc

ed

H omes for H orses

equestrian Way | sAddle tRAil | Offered at

Homeland | Wellington, Fl | Offered at

Grand Prix VillaGe | Offered at

$2,750,000

Hacking distance to WEF on the horse show side of Greenbriar Blvd. | 5-BR Main House | 2 BR, 1 BA, Barn Apartment | Riders Lounge w/ half bathroom | 8-Stall Barn | Sand Ring

$2,850,000

Two Adjoining 5-Acre Farms | Pine-Shaded Paddocks | 12-Stall Barn | Riding Trails

$9,980,000

Built in 2015, beautifully thought out 24-stall barn with 4 tack rooms, 4 feed rooms, up to 12 grooming stalls, 8 wash stalls, a GGT arena, 6 paddocks, and ample parking

ocean Breeze | PAlm beAch Point | Offered at

WelinGton PreserVe | Offered at

$1,165,000

Very Private Location | 5+ Acres | Cul-De-Sac Location Close to WEF

$6,380,000

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6+ Acres w/a large portion raised and padded for the addition of a Barn | 6 Bedrooms | 7.5 Baths | 10-Seat Theatre | Resort-Style Pool | 3 Attached Garage Spaces plus a Mechanic’s Garage


E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

DESIGN BEYOND THE BARN Continued from page 108

Track-style paddocks that run along the edge or perimeter of a pasture, often incorporating strategically placed hay feeding stations, also allow freedom of movement. In addition to providing an alternative to pasture turnout, they can be used as laneways to strategically connect pastures as part of a rotational-grazing system. Paddock layout and design is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. Rather, optimal

design must be customized to the specific needs and unique environmental features of the individual farm. Site topography, location of creeks, drainage swales, or other water features, and soil type must all be considered. Available budget is another factor. A well-designed paddock, often including a base material of compacted stone with a top footing of sand or stone screenings, can cost approximately $2 per square

foot, which can add up quickly for larger designs. However, depending on the layout, local soil conditions, and frequency of use, some areas of a paddock may not require improved footing to function properly. Working with an experienced equestrian facility design professional can be a worthwhile investment, ensuring efficient, cost-effective design. PAGE 129

A NEW RATING SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPES

A

coalition of sustainability leaders, led by the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Austin, Texas, and the United States Botanic Garden, recently developed the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES), a broad-based resource and rating system to advance and recognize sustainable landscapes. This new rating system offers an opportunity for horse facilities to be recognized as contributors to sustainable landscape design and management. Even for farms that do not participate in the rating system, the guidelines developed by SITES can inform aspects of horse facility design and management critical for sustainability. In short, sustainable landscape

SITES-certified HORSESHOE FARM NATURE PRESERVE in Raleigh, North Carolina, is situated above a dramatic oxbow formed by the Neuse River and is a showcase for innovation in sustainability and low impact park development and management practices. The 115-acre site, designated a State Natural Heritage Area, has a rich cultural history. The large open meadow, mature forested slopes, wetlands, and shoreline environment have been preserved and enhanced. All park structures are designed off-the-grid, served by green, alternative energy systems, wastewater treatment terraces, and on-site water sources to present unique interpretive and demonstration opportunities. Stormwater runoff is treated in a decentralized fashion, utilizing bioretention rain gardens, porous pavements, and vegetated swales.

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design starts with good planning. Identify land features in need of protection, including flood plains, wetlands, or even areas designated as prime farmland. Protect water quality by reducing potable water use, managing water run-off, and preserving riparian buffers along streams, rivers, and lakes. Promote plant diversity using horse-safe native plants for landscaping. For barns, homes, or outbuildings, use salvaged, recycled, or eco-friendly materials to reduce your environmental impact, and employ solar, wind, or geothermal forms of renewable energy. Finally, and this is the easiest directive for horse farms, help promote interactions with nature by incorporating outdoor activities on your property and by creating viewscapes for enjoying nature’s beauty.


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S EQ

E S S E N T I A L S | T R AV E L

Virginia Genuine. Cindy Polk, David O’Flaherty & Brandy Greenwell +1 703 966 9480 | cpolk@ttrsir.com www.horsefarmsandcountryhomes.com Representing the Best of the Virginia Countryside Specializing in Horse Farms and Country Homes

Salem Oaks PIEDMONT HUNT Marshall, VA $3,995,000

The Grange ORANGE COUNTY HUNT The Plains, VA $2,975,000

Hastening Farm PIEDMONT HUNT Middleburg Area, VA $2,295,000

©2017 TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, licensed real estate broker. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office Is OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M Independently Owned And Operated. Equal housing opportunity. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Price and availability subject to change.

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

KiamaLise Herres

WRE/Bellevue Commons, Inc 206.679.5322 kiama@windermere.com EnchantingHomesandFarms.com

Aimee Mills

WRE/Southeast, Inc 206.909.9655 aimee@windermere.com aimee-mills.com

Lynette Thomas

WRE/Mill Creek, Inc 425.953.4090 lynette@windermere.com lynettethomas.com

Sara Vowels

WRE/Bellevue Commons, Inc 206.276.8990 saravowels@windermere.com saravowels.withwre.com

Elise Miller

WRE/Southeast, Inc. 425.442.3090 elisem@windermere.com elisem.withwre.com

Ashley Farrington

WRE/Woodinville, HLC 425.890.0025 afarrington@windermere.com ashleyfarrington.com

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | A R T S

REMEMBERING SAM SAVIT T Continued from page 28

Salem, a rural equestrian oasis 60 miles north of New York City. His career was off to a vigorous start as he began getting assignments illustrating books and magazines. At all points, he was helped mightily by my ever-supportive mother, who also had the business acumen freelancers need but my father lacked. In 1956, he wrote his first book, Step-a-Bit: The Story of a Foal. It had about 60 pages of pencil drawings and just enough text to string them together, tracing the growth of a foal from birth to adulthood. The New York Times Book Review lauded its illustrative style for having “spontaneity and charm.” My father never set out to be an author, yet he would go on to write another 14 books and co-author two more. A sampling of his subjects: the U.S. Equestrian Team (which named him their official artist), wild horses, rodeo, fiction (about horses of course) and, appropriately, the definitive book on how to draw horses. His writing style was conversational and down-to-earth. Like his books, his artistic pursuits were both diverse and single-minded: fox hunting, polo, horseracing, steeple chasing, rodeo, horses in history, and backyard horses. If there was a horse involved, it was fair game for his pencils, watercolors, acrylics, oils and charcoal. As far back as I can remember, which is somewhere in the early 1960s, my father was never idle. By that point, his reputation was secure and assignments were usually waiting. There were books to illustrate (more than 100); posters, 11 8 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

prints and charts to create; portraits to paint. His fluid and precise brush strokes imparted remarkable energy and authenticity to his subjects. While his oil and acrylic painting was more complex, I was often most impressed with his pencil sketches, because I could see exactly what he did, how a thousand pencil strokes hit their marks with unerring precision.

H

is mentor was Harold Von Schmidt, best known for his realistic renderings of the Old West. My father, who hitchhiked out West for two summers during the Great Depression, shared Von Schmidt’s love of the place—even if the Northeast was his home of choice. He was also influenced by the casual but careful drawing style of his friend and fellow illustrator Paul Brown. The daily Sam Savitt schedule was a comfortable and immensely disciplined routine: He fed his horses and ate breakfast by 8:00 am, then headed for his third-floor studio. By 11:00, he had latemorning tea, and then back to the studio. Lunch fell somewhere between noon and

In the oil painting The Mustangs, Savitt portrayed wild horses amid scrubland of the far west. He was long interested in the plight of wild horses and even wrote a book on the subject.

1:00, followed by another trip to the studio, which he half-jokingly dubbed his “torture chamber”—his nod to the emotion and focus he invested in his work. The work day usually ended by 4:00 with afternoon coffee, a fast-paced walk with his dog, and a second visit to the horses— or a third if he’d ridden one earlier in the day. Suffice it to say, my father was all about horses. He joined in fox hunts and horse shows, and rode on the North Salem trails nearby. If he met other horseback riders he knew, he usually remembered their names, but he always remembered the name of their horse. On occasion, he trained horses (one made it onto the U.S. Equestrian Team), he gave lectures on drawing horses, and spent time with friends who also had horses. At every meal I ever ate with my parents, horses were an inevitable topic of conversation. My dad once observed that since many people write and paint when they retire, retirement for him would be pointless. And, for him, the work never lost its enduring appeal. Even at the kitchen table he was apt to turn over an old envelope and sketch a couple of horse heads while my mother prepared a meal. For my father, “equestrian artist” was the career in which he excelled and for which he was honored, but most importantly, it meant doing for a living what he truly loved to do in life. You can purchase original Savitt artwork directly from the estate of Sam Savitt at SamSavittArt.com


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

CASA FARM 2905 Old Frankfort Pike, Lexington, Kentucky www.2905oldfrankfortpike.com Casa Farm was originally claimed by Isaac Shelby (Kentucky’s first Governor) for his Father because of the abundance of dependable water, rich Maury soils and proximity to Camp Lexington at McConnell Springs! In 1788 the main house, one of Kentucky’s first brick homes, was constructed for Major Henry Payne. The residence has 4560 sq. ft. and was completely renovated in 2005, with all paved roads, barns renovated, new roofs and new fencing! The barns host 92 stalls and all utilities on the farm are underground. The aesthetic result is spectacular west orientated panoramas of rolling bluegrass hills and unobstructed views of flat

bottom lands. The varied topography of this farm has contributed to the conditioning of many successful racehorses. Several Kentucky Derby winners been foaled and raised on this ground. The present owner has raised and campaigned many notable stakes winners! The farm has 4,213 feet of road frontage with two historic and abundant springs as well as Towne Branch Creek. The farm presently has Kentucky American water lines to all paddocks, fields and barns. It has been a continuously operating Thoroughbred operation since 1820. The farm is offered as an exclusive listing of Offutt Realty, Inc. and can be seen by appointment only!

“Listing and Selling distinctive properties throughout the Bluegrass” Greg Martelli, Associate Broker, (859-338-4292) OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M Jane Allen Offutt, Principal Broker, (859-421-5222) | janeallen@offuttrealty.com

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

AN INVITATION TO REALTORS REACH PROSPECTIVE BUYERS OF

LUXURY EQUESTRIAN REAL ESTATE A M E R I C A’ S F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM EQUESTR IAN LIVING

EQU E STR I A N P R O P E RT I E S EQLiving.com

Febrauary/March 2016

LUXURY LIVING IN WELLINGTO N SEE INSIDE BACK COVER

PR IN T

EQ UES TRIA N PRO PERTIES

D IG ITAL MAGA Z INE

E-NEWSLET TER

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CH I NA PARTNER

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LEARN HOW EQLIVING CAN HELP: JOYCE JONES | JONES@EQLIVING.COM | 954-796-1809

TOUR EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES ALL ACROSS AMERICA

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AMERICA’S FINEST EQUESTRIAN REAL ESTATE LUXEQUESTRIAN.COM ® 12 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 2 1


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

LOWCOUNTRY CUISINE F L AVO

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Chef RON ANDREWS of BRAYS ISLAND PLANTATION shares one of his favorite recipes.

TR UN CO TES SE ORI R H O FAV

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HONEY SMOKED SHRIMP WITH JALAPEÑO APPLE BUTTER AND HOE CAKES Honey Smoked Shrimp Ingredients 2 pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1½ cup water 1½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 tablespoon honey Zest from 1 lemon 1 ounce sweet-tea vodka Preparation 1. Mix water with salt, sugar, honey, zest and vodka. Stir until dissolved. 2. Add shrimp and leave at room temperature for 30 minutes. 3. Smoke at 300 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until shrimp are fully cooked. Jalapeño Apple Butter* Ingredients 2 pounds apples, peeled and diced ¼ cup light-brown sugar *It’s difficult to make a small batch of apple butter, so I make a large batch and preserve it in mason jars. 12 2 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

¼ cup cider vinegar 2 tablespoon molasses Zest and juice from 1 lime or lemon 1 cup water 2-4 tablespoon minced jalapeño peppers 2 tablespoon minced shallots 1 teaspoon kosher salt Preparation 1. Mix all ingredients in a non-reactive pot. Bring to a boil and cook until apples are tender and liquid just starts to thicken. 2. Puree in a blender until smooth. Hoe Cakes Ingredients 2 cups cornmeal 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt ½ cup all-purpose flour 2 eggs 2 cups buttermilk 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Preparation 1. Combine dry ingredients in mixing bowl. Incorporate egg, oil, and buttermilk. 2. Cook as you would pancakes.

Executive Chef Ron Andrews, Brays Island Plantation Chef Andrews just celebrated his 10th anniversary with Brays Island Plantation and is versed in a number of American regional cuisines as well as Asian and European. Since joining the Brays Island culinary program, Chef Andrews has won medals in culinary competitions including the 2015 Seafood Chef of the Year for the state of South Carolina, and in 2013 he was inducted into the American Academy of Chefs. PAGE 129


PHOTO: KRISTIN LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

2017 SHOW SCHEDULE

SAVE THE DATE

SANTA BARBARA SURFSIDE CLASSIC

HUNTINGTON BEACH SUMMER CLASSIC

SANTA BARBARA SUNSHINE CLASSIC

FLINTRIDGE AUTUMN CLASSIC

Feb 22 - 26, Santa Barbara, CA

March 1 - 5, Santa Barbara, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA WELCOME CLASSIC

March 8 - 12, Paso Robles, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA ZINFANDEL CLASSIC

March 15 - 19, Paso Robles, CA

August 10 - 13, Huntington Beach, CA Sept 28 - Oct 1, La Cañada Flintridge, CA

SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL WELCOME WEEK

Sept 27 - Oct 1, Rancho Murieta, CA

SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL WORLD CUP WEEK October 4 - 8, Rancho Murieta, CA

LA EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL

DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL WELCOME WEEK

96TH ANNUAL FLINTRIDGE HORSE SHOW

DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL WORLD CUP WEEK

DEL MAR NATIONAL

DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL SEASON FINALE

April 20 - 23, Burbank, CA

April 27 - 30, La Cañada Flintridge, CA May 2 - 7, Del Mar, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA MEMORIAL DAY CLASSIC

May 24 - 28, Paso Robles, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA CLASSIC May 31 - June 4, Paso Robles, CA

HUNTINGTON BEACH SURF CLASSIC

October 11 - 15, Del Mar, CA

October 18 - 22, Del Mar, CA

October 25 - 29, Del Mar, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FALL CLASSIC

November 1 - 5, Paso Robles, CA

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OAK TREE CLASSIC

November 8 - 12, Paso Robles, CA

July 6 - 9, Huntington Beach, CA

WWW.WESTPALMSEVENTS.COM


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

LUXE LIBATIONS

F L AVO

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Bartender LARA VELLOCIDO of MILLE FLEURS in Rancho Santa Fe, California, shares one of her favorite cocktails.

TR UN CO TES SE ORI R H O FAV

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Lara Vellocido

THE BROWN DERBY Ingredients 1½ ounces of fine-quality Bourbon or Rye of your choice 1 splash of fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice 1 dash of honey syrup

M

ille Fleurs is in the heart of San Diego horse country, just minutes from the Showpark of San Diego, Del Mar venues, and the San Diego Polo Club. The restaurant’s rich history and impeccable service are the perfect complement to spending a day at equestrian pursuits. Mille Fleurs has been a premier dining destination for over 30 years. Always with a focus on seasonality and embracing Southern California’s endless bounty, the market-driven menu is often sourced directly from neighboring Chino Farms. Dishes rotate at Chef Martin Woesle’s whim to 12 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

Preparation 1. Put all ingredients in a shaker with ice. 2. Serve straight up in a chilled martini glass.

showcase the best and freshest ingredients of the moment. The restaurant’s attention to detail and relationship with the community translates to a unique dining experience—one that is approachable while still being exceptional. Additionally, the restaurant’s immersion in horse culture is often reflected in subtle ways on their menu such as the themed cocktails in the Brasserie Room or at the Piano Bar, including Lara’s Brown Derby cocktail. Lara says that simplicity reigns in this classic mix, making it a favorite in her repertoire of libations. PAGE 129


e

xperience xcitement

September 13 - 17, 2017 •Boutique Shopping • Pony Rides • Gourmet Dining • Shopping • Live Music • Face Painting • VIP Seating • Johnny Res Concert Benefiting JustWorld Int.

©The Book LLC

www..eAmericanGoldCup.com


GEORGE KAMPER

A LONG ST R I DE B E YO N D T H E E XP E C TE D Planning and Strategy

Email Marketing

Public Relations

Social Media

Marketing

Websites

Branding

Graphic Design

Event Promotions

Video Production

Event Press Centers

Podcasts Sponsorship Support Product Launches Book Tours

SUE WEAKLEY

EQ M E D I A The full-service media agency with an equestrian focus EQmedia.agency J UN E / J ULY | 2016 | E Q LIV IN G .C O M | 612-209-0310

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EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services. FA SH I ON Page 10 iagousa.com lasaddlery.com STY L E Page 14 EQGirl Riding Collection lasaddlery.com Ariat ariat.com Barbour barbour.com Freedman’s freedmanharness.com Gucci gucci.com Horse Leap horseleap.com Rönner rönnerdesign.com DÉC OR Page 19 Door knockers and handles Baltica Hardware balticacustomhardware.com Patricia Borum patriciaborum.com Door Knockers and Bells doorknockersandbells.com FabbriCreations etsy.com Horse & Hound Gallery horseandhound.com Jefferson Brass jeffersonbrass.com FAVOR IT ES Page 24 Wedding Gift Ideas Annieglass annieglass.com Christofle christofle.com Hermès hermes.com Keeneland Gift Shop keenelandgiftshop.nrostores. com L’Objet l-objet.com L.V. Harkness lvharkness.com Ralph Lauren Home ralphlaurenhome.com Simon Pearce simonpearce.com Book Page 30 The Horse Dancer by Jojo Moyes penguin.com WEDDINGS Page 54 Kennedy&Greg

Easton Events eastonevents.com Patricia Lyons Photography patricialyonsphotography. blogspot.com Beehive Events beehiveevents.com Rock Paper Scissors thinkrockpaperscissors.com Vintage Car from Albermarle Limousine albemarlelimousine.com Tara Jones Calligraphy tarajones.com North Wales Farm Warrenton, Virginia Nicola&Niall Connemara Equestrian Escapes connemaraequestrianescapes. com Brosnan Photographic brosnanphotographic.com Renvyle House Hotel & Resort Galway, Ireland renvyle.com Oriana&Patrick Wild Heart Events  wildheartevents.com Whispering Rose Ranch whisperingroseranchwedding. com Pure Joy Catering purejoycatering.com Mark Brooke Photography  markbrooke.com The Little Branch Florists thelittlebranch.com Borrowed Blu borrowedblu.com Bella Vista Designs bellavistadesigns.com Eleanora&Alessandro Love Folio Photography Lovefolio.biz Italian Wedding Designer italianweddingdesigner.com Location Scuderie Palandri, Oste (Prato) Lisa&Angel Will You Marry Me Photography Willyoumarrymephotography. com Bella Terrace Estate, Jamul, CA bellaterraceestate.com Wedding Barns B&D Builders custombarnbuilding.com/ wedding-events-barns Ali&Jeremy The Breakers Palm Beach, FL thebreakers.com

Christian Oth Studio christianothstudio.com Always Flowers alwaysflowers.net Tracy Taylor Ward Design tracytaylorward.com Venues Adare Manor Limerick, Ireland adaremanor.com Mission Point Resort Mackinac Island, MI missionpoint.com Spruce Meadows Calgary, Alberta, Canada sprucemeadows.com Blackberry Farm Walland, Tennessee blackberryfarm.com D E S I G N M A S TE R CL AS S Page 80 Janice Parker janiceparker.com Page 88 Vance Burke vanceburke.com

Visit us at

T RAV E L Page 96 Traverse City Black Star Farms blackstarfarms.com Grand Traverse Resort and Spa grandtraverseresort.com Great Lakes Equestrian Festival greatlakesequestrianfestival. com Mission Table restaurant missiontable.net The Village at Grand Traverse Commons thevillagetc.com

Saugerties, NY DURING

THE $1 MILLION GRAND PRIX SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th

GAL LE RY Page 100 Alden Corrigan Media facebook.com/alden.corrigan

Enjoy our Wine at THE TAVERN AT DIAMOND MILLS

E Q UE S TR IA N P RO PE RTIE S Page 108 Design Beyond the Barn Sustainable Stables sustainablestables.com F O O D + DR IN K Page 122 Bray’s Island Plantation braysisland.com Page 124 Mille Fleurs millefleurs.com

H U D S O N

R I V E R

R E G I O N

Staatsburg, New York mileaestatevineyard.com JUNE /JULY | 2 0 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 2 9


EQ B A R N D O G S

MEET PIPER This golden retriever-Labrador service dog is a Milk-Bone DOG WHO CHANGES THE WORLD because of her work on a New Jersey farm.

E

ach year, Milk-Bone conducts a nationwide search for canines that have made an extraordinary impact on the lives of the individuals they love and the communities that need them. In their third annual list of dogs who change the world, Milk-Bone included Piper, who comes from Canine Assistants, a non-profit that provides service pups for kids and adults with physical disabilities and special needs. Canine Assistants service dogs assist in a variety of ways. Some of the tasks the dogs perform include turning lights on and off, opening and closing doors, pulling wheelchairs, retrieving dropped objects, summoning help, and providing secure companionship. While all of these functions are vitally important in helping a person obtain greater freedom, perhaps the most impressive gift the dogs provide is social, rather than physical, in nature. The dogs can help eliminate feelings of fear, isolation, and loneliness. The golden retriever-Labrador cross is trained to assist her owner, Kate Miller, when she experiences seizures. Miller was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 13 and received her first service dog at 15. Today, she runs an all-inclusive riding stable for children and adults on her farm, Bayou Riding and Sales, in Monroe, New Jersey. Besides her job with Miller, Piper has taken on many roles around the farm as well, including helping students feel more comfortable and confident during their lessons. “Piper helps students become more at ease around new people and the barn,” 13 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2017

Miller told the EB Sentinal News in nearby East Brunswick. “She will help with picking up brushes or just by being their cheerleader. She also helps with students that are worried about opening up to others, by lending an ear or paw for them to vent, without fear of judgment.” Miller can understand what her students experience, and she knows the importance of the help that Piper can offer. For her, Piper is more than just a companion; she is a necessity. “What people need to understand about service dogs is that they are like prosthetic limbs: when they are not near you, you feel like a part of you is missing,” said Miller. “Because I have epilepsy, I often feel like I am misunderstood. I don’t look physically sick, but people often come up to me because of Piper and ask me why I have a service dog, and then I explain that I have epilepsy. Piper helps me break out of my shell, because when people meet us, they are more fascinated by this amazing dog than the fact that I have epilepsy.” Despite Piper’s obvious value around the farm, Miller was still surprised to find out Piper had made the MilkBone winners list. “Honestly, I am flabbergasted for Piper to get this recognition. The work that service dogs do is often not recognized, so it’s awesome that Piper was noticed for her work, not just for helping me, but for the work that she does for others,” Miller said. As part of the contest, Piper has received a year’s supply of Milk-Bone treats.


Hermès Cavale jumping saddle medium-deep seat

HERMÈS RYAN, SIMON DELESTRE AND THEIR HERMÈS CAVALE SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR.

June/July 2017  

The June/July 2017 issue of Equestrian Living includes a visit with television star Wendie Malick, powerful philanthropist Victoria McCullou...

June/July 2017  

The June/July 2017 issue of Equestrian Living includes a visit with television star Wendie Malick, powerful philanthropist Victoria McCullou...