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Annual Report 2011 - 2012 Working together for Sustainable Development We Want

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One World One Hope The Millennium Development is Common Vision & Global Commitments

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WFWO “Making a difference on results to contribute to Peoples and to the MDGs Objectives

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WFWO’s Mission is to Assure Help for the World’s Most Vulnerable People to Help Themselves to Overcome Their Poverty

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Contents: About the Annual Report

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Our Mission,Vision, Objectives,Values,

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Forward

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Preface by the Executive President

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Highlighted the WFWO’s Activities 2011-12

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Key success factors to achieve our common Goals

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Outcome of the Conference Rio+20

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WFWO Engagement and Commitment

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Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs

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Review Operations and programs Results 2011-12

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WFWO and Millennium Development Goals

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WFWO Contribution to the eight MDGs

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International Meetings, Roundtable, Seminars, Special Events

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Strategic Framework Plan Directions for 2012-15

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Financial Analysis and Statements

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WFWO success and experience

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Major funders and partners

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About the Annual Report Year 2011-12 Our Annual Report provides an overview of the work of the WFWO Team from March 2011 – December 2012. The report covers the work of the WFWO Executive Secretariat, detailing our joint advocacy campaigns in order to raise the public awareness around the world to contribute to the Eight MDGs, and also illustrates general activities as per strategy plan with supports of our partners and Resource mobilizations Task force including bilateral contributors for the programs implemented in years 2011-12.

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Our Mission WFWO future and improve their quality of life through the access to food security, drinking water, health, education, poverty, HIV-AIDS programs, micro credit, using local skills and practical, sustainable technologies to support development humanitarian projects on relief and rehabilitation programs, to secure the empowerment of indigenous peoples, local communities, women, groups and individuals in developing countries.

Our Vision WFWO's vision is of a world where everyone has access to food security, health, childhood, drinking water, education, environmental issue and promote the right of every women and man and child to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity.

Our Objectives WFWO development cooperation achievements and the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) targets by 2015.

Our Values The WFWO Main Value and Approach, we believes on People, and shared responsibility among People, dialogue among cultures, and commitment to development issues, diversities and peace and justice for Global Change.

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I. Forward

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“Working Together, We Can Achieve Our Global Commitments to End the Poverty!�

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Preface by the Executive President 2011-12 was also difficult years for our planet. It is our pleasure to present the WFWO Annual Report on operations and activities to build awareness to contribute to WFWO mandate. The year 2011-12 I noted that first-hand the devastation caused by hunger, in which I had the opportunity to visited different refugees camp in Africa, Kenya, Benin, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Burkina Faso, Somalia for more than 6 months to review WFWO’s humanitarian work in action."The East African food crisis, which affected 13 million people, was a humanitarian catastrophe caused by a combination of conflict and sustained drought. I can report that WFWO’s with limited resources response was effective and large-scale."

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Preface by the Executive President /cont. 2 The years 2011-12 mark as a year of instability and security for our planet. As well an eventful year in development, which saw"changes,"a new deal on aid effectiveness, a food crisis in the"Horn of Africa, an economic downturn globally. However, this was also a year which proved that global partnership and solidarity"to respond to these global challenges. WFWO and its partners set up a new plan of action agenda, how we would refocus our aid to help those most in need – prioritizing certain sectors and tailoring"our support to the world’s poorest countries – to"make sure that it has as great an impact as possible to contribute to the eight MDGs."The catastrophe and conflict like the food crisis in the Horn of Africa put a sharp focus on the continuing need to adapt the global aid and respond to crises as they occur on the ground. WFWO and its partners were able to provide additional support through the"new partnership; set up to help the region better respond to future crises in"order to contribute to MDGs Goal 1.

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Preface by the Executive President /cont. 3 As WFWO concerned on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) come close to their target date by 2015, a new transformative and “people-centred” development agenda is being discussed in a world far different from that, which contextualized the Millennium Declaration. The unresolved problems of poverty and underdevelopment are compounded by financial, food and environmental crises, which are presenting new challenges for people all over the world. Therefore, we underscore the pressing need for a wholly new development agenda that produces concrete processes to achieve outcomes framed by principles such as equity, social justice, human rights, participation, accountability and non-discrimination. Half of the world’s population lives on less that US$2.00 per day. Nearly one in seven people live in hunger while one in five are obese, and some 2 billion live in multidimensional poverty, a measure incorporating nutrition, education and sanitation. Inequality, discrimination, and widespread human rights violations, especially against marginalized groups such as women, workers, small-scale farmers, indigenous peoples, children, youth, disabled persons, ethnic and religious minorities are blight on the world and a rebuttal to proclamations of progress on poverty made under the MDGs. The wealthiest 20 percent of humankind enjoy more than 80 percent of total world’s wealth while the bottom 20 percent share only 1 percent. Global economic expansion for the minority, and the unsustainable modes of production and consumption especially in Northern industrialized countries, have brought us to the brink of a planetary emergency – humanity’s ecological footprint now exceeds the planet’s bio-capacity by over 50%. Persisting inequalities and pressure on resources are driving injustice, insecurity, poverty and conflict across the world. People’s movements have risen up in protest at the absence of respect, protection and fulfillment of human rights, stark inequality, persisting discrimination and an absence of opportunity as well as full and effective participation in the decision-making processes that govern their lives and livelihoods. Social and economic inequalities are mirrored in the

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Preface by the Executive President /cont. 4 The neoliberal framework of development has been discredited, and it is time to step-up to the challenge of committing to a truly transformative agenda that prioritizes processes to redress the inequities, injustices and discrimination of the current development paradigm – crucially, these processes must be of, for, and by the people. It is the world’s poorest and most marginalized who are the targets of sustainable agenda, and it is their goals that must shape sustainable development; it is their ability to claim their rights that must be a marker; it is their voice that must be heard in a people-centred agenda. The WFWO participation and contribution to Rio+20, for advocacy around sustainable development, which integrates economic, environmental and social justice and policy. We urge at Rio+20 participants to live up to the challenges of our era by laying down a bold and visionary agenda for transforming our societies and the international system." While the hard choices will ultimately be made by the member states of the United Nations, the Rio+20 has the unique opportunity and duty to call attention to the fundamental challenges we are facing and the need for far-reaching changes that address the structural barriers to a decent life and a sustainable future for all of humanity.

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Preface by the Executive President /cont. 5 The WFWO participation and contribution to Rio+20, for advocacy around sustainable development, which integrates economic, environmental and social justice and policy. We urge at Rio+20 participants to live up to the challenges of our era by laying down a bold and visionary agenda for transforming our societies and the international system." While the hard choices will ultimately be made by the member states of the United Nations, the Rio+20 has the unique opportunity and duty to call attention to the fundamental challenges we are facing and the need for far-reaching changes that address the structural barriers to a decent life and a sustainable future for all of humanity. In 2011-12"WFWO is contributed and supporting more than"27 partners NGOs, CBOs in 25 countries and territories to empower people to build a better future for themselves and their families and to build resilience to withstand crises, whether they are natural or man-made, environmental or financial to contribute to the Eight MDGs. We work within our mission to support the eight MDGs and focus areas: poverty reduction; Social Justice, Health, Water, Education, Good governance; resource mobilizations, crisis prevention and recovery; and energy and environment. Each area is a critical component of sustainable development."Our common future depends on resource-efficient, low-emission development. How access to energy is obtained will play an important part in that. Achieving sustainable energy for all will reduce energy poverty and can help combat climate change. Today, 1.4 billion people are still without electricity access, and three billion use firewood and other biomass and coal as fuel"for cooking and heat, causing indoor pollution and leading to illnesses, which kill two million people every year. WFWO will continue to focus on advocacy and stress international communities for a need for a renewal Global partnership that enables a transformative, people-centered and planet-sensitive development agenda, which is realized through the equal partnership of all stakeholders. Such partnership should be based on the principals of equity, sustainability, solidarity, respect for humanity and shred responsibilities in accordance with respective capabilities. Our vision is to end extreme poverty in all its forms in the context of sustainable development and to have in place the building blocks of sustained prosperity for all."

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Preface by the Executive President /cont. 6 The international development sector will continue to face challenging times with the impact of the global economic crisis and increased questions over the effectiveness of international aid. As a community, we must continue to challenge our decisions, our work and our role in the world is to ensure we learn from our experiences, are providing"the best solutions and are accountable to those who support us. WFWO is meeting this challenge, and accountability to our donors and those who we are seeking to help is a hugely important part of our credibility. WFWO will continue questioning itself and adapting its work towards reaching WFWO’s objectives – to ensure that people living in"poverty have the opportunity and tools to take control of their lives and obtain a future free from the injustice of poverty.

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Preface by the Executive President /cont. 7 WFWO believes that it is critical for growth both to be equitable and to respect planetary boundaries. We need to straighten a global partnership and to "work "the main actor United Nations agencies, alongside national, regional and local-level government, civil society and development partners enable us to play a unique role in supporting the achievement "of our common global agenda, such as the eight MDGs , and inclusive world which our future we want. In conclusion I’m very proud to be part of the WFWO team that is made up of people from all over the world who have such different backgrounds, but who share this global common agenda. "I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude to all to make it happened and in particularly a special thanks go to our supporters, donors, partners, NGOs. CBOs, Board Directors, Task Force RM, Goodwill Ambassadors around the world, staff, volunteers and campaigners for"everything you’ve helped us to achieve our common objectives to contribute to peoples, and planet. I thank you again every one for all your contribution to the life-changing work that you can read about in this report. Your strengthening support to the WFWO activities can make the difference, in order to help us to make the greatest possible, long-term impact on the lives of women and men in poverty to contribute to MDGs"objectives.

Sidi Cherif, Executive President

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II. Introduction Highlighted the WFWO Activities 2011-12 Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs

1. WHY ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL JUSTICE ? Powerful economic, social and political forces will be working against social justice in coming years – increasing competition, new patterns of human settlement and changing roles for government. By supporting local communities and NGOs, CBOs have the potential to address the root causes of injustice through cross-community dialogue and collaborative action. Together, they can adopt strategies for systemic change for places, for people and for public policy to contribute to social justice. WFWO is working with its partners to foster inter-NGO and CBO including local communities "collaboration. When vulnerable people living in poverty situations is reaching the majority of populations in developing countries are " facing "multiple barriers, they will likely need support on several fronts – Poverty ,health, water ,sanitary , job, housing, capacity building , It may be more efficient to create a coalition of social "that work together to provide these supports, and thus take advantage of existing strengths in the local communities and NGOs, CBOs.

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 2 WFWO are also convene cross-community dialogue and host emerging alliances. What many communities need is an opportunity for open dialogue to break down the barriers across sectors, ethno-cultural groups, and socioeconomic classes. People who never meet to share perspectives on an issue will never get a chance to engage in joint problem-solving. And as a result, they will be unlikely to make a commitment to join the battle for greater social justice. Focus our efforts and policies to address the root causes of poverty and to provide for the basic needs of all. These efforts should include the elimination of hunger and malnutrition; the provision of food security, education, employment and livelihood, primary health-care services including reproductive health care, safe drinking water and sanitation, and adequate shelter; and participation in social and cultural life. Special priority will be given to the needs and rights of women and children, who often bear the greatest burden of poverty, and to the needs of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups and persons;

2. WHY FOOD SECURITY ? The eradication of hunger is clearly reflected in the target set at the World Food Summit to reduce the number of undernourished people to half their present level no later than 2015 and as agreed by the Millennium Summit to “halve the proportion of people who suffer from hunger� by the same year." Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control. As per Universal declaration of Human Rights. WFWO has taken into account relevant international instruments, in particular those instruments in which the progressive realization of the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living, including adequate food, is enshrined.

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 3 WFWO is committed to strengthening its capacity, with the help of its partners, to assist "local "NGOs, CBOs and local communities to looks forward to cooperating with governments and other key actors that wish to pursue rights-based approaches to poverty reduction and are interested in realizing the right to adequate food in the context of national food security by implementing their plan of action. Striving to ensure that every child, woman and man enjoy adequate food on a regular basis is not only a moral imperative and an investment with enormous economic returns; it also signifies the realization of a basic human right.

3. WHY WATER AND SANITARY ? Water is a limited natural resource and a public good fundamental for life and health of populations in developing countries. The human right to water is indispensable for leading a life in human dignity. It is a prerequisite for the realization of other human rights. WFWO and its partners has been confronted continually with the widespread denial of the right to water in developing as well as developed countries. Over one billion persons lack access to a basic water supply, while several billion do not have access to adequate sanitation, which is the primary cause of water contamination and diseases linked to water WFWO and its partners acknowledging and raising public awareness "to call attention about "the importance of equitable access to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as an integral component of the realization of all human rights, to reaffirming the responsibility for all "the promotion and protection of all human rights, which are universal, indivisible, interdependent and interrelated, and must be treated globally, in a fair and equal manner, on the same footing and with the same emphasis,"Bearing in mind the commitment made by the international community to fully achieve the Millennium Development Goals, and stressing, in that context, the resolve of Heads of State and Government, as expressed in the United Nations Millennium Declaration, to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people who are unable to reach or afford safe drinking water and, as agreed in the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (“Johannesburg Plan of Implementation�),"to halve the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation,

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 4 WFWO is working with its partners to provide the basic assistance to"the right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life and all human rights; WFWO will continue "to raise public awareness in order to calls attention"to all international communities and international organizations to provide financial resources, capacity-building and technology transfer, through international assistance and cooperation, in particular to developing countries, in order to scale up efforts to provide safe, clean, accessible and affordable drinking water and sanitation for all; 4. WHY CHILDREN EDUCTION & PROTECTION ? Child protection issues intersect with every one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – from poverty reduction to getting children into school, from eliminating gender inequality to reducing child mortality. Most of the MDGs simply cannot be achieved if failures to protect children are not addressed. Child labour squanders a nation’s human capital and conflicts with eradicating extreme poverty (MDG 1); armed conflict disrupts efforts to achieve universal primary education (MDG 2); child marriage leads to the removal of girls from school and"thus prevents gender equality (MDG 3); children separated from their mothers, particularly if they remain in institutional settings, are at greater risk of early death, which hinders efforts to reduce child mortality (MDG 4); female genital mutilation/cutting undermines efforts to maternal health (MDG 5); and sexual exploitation and abuse ham-"per efforts to combat HIV infection (MDG 6). In addition, environmental disasters make children vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, hence the need for environmental sustainability (MDG 7). Overall, protecting children requires close cooperation between different partners, which consolidates the need for a global partnership for development (MDG 8).

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 5 5. WHY GENDER EQUALITY JUSTICE ? The Millennium Declaration and the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) collectively herald a vision for a more just and equal world. Social, political and economic equality for women is integral to the achievement of all Millennium Development Goals. WFWO hence, gender justice entails ending the inequalities between women and men that are produced and reproduced in the family, the community, the market and the state. It also requires that mainstream institutions — from justice to economic policy-making — are accountable for tackling the injustice and discrimination that keep too many women poor and excluded Gender Justice shows how addressing inequalities, including gender inequality, will be essential to achieving the MDGs. WFWO and its partners is focusing on the "recommendations of these initiatives to call for urgent action in four areas that are critical to both gender justice and the MDGs: • Expanding women-friendly public services: to meet women and girls’ rights to education, health and food; • Guaranteeing land and jobs for women: ensuring the right to a decent livelihood, through access to economic assets; • Increasing women’s voice in decision-making: full participation of women in society, starting from autonomy in the household, to voice in all political processes at community, national and international levels; and • Ending violence against women and girls: a scourge that too many women and girls face in daily life, stunting their opportunities, curtailing their mobility and denying them rights • Ending discrimination and enhancing gender justice are key to meeting MDG commitments and the principles embodied in the Millennium Declaration

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 6 6. WHY CRISIS AND RECOVERY (EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE) ?

Natural disasters, conflicts and large swings in economic conditions threaten to reverse hard-won development gains. Armed conflict, high food prices, the lingering effects of the economic and financial crises and the increasing frequency and intensity of natural disasters are hampering development efforts around the world. WFWO’s contribute in crisis prevention and recovery helps communities "prevent armed conflict, alleviate the effects of natural disasters and build back"better and stronger when crises happen, by providing he first aid emergency assistance to the populations, such as tends, water, medicine, doctors, volunteers ect." A critical part of WFWO’s work includes placing gender, children at the centre of all of its crisis strategies. For example, WFWO programs strengthen "local communities , with the support of NGOs, CBOs partners"so they are able to respond to gender-based violence. They make increasing women’s"civic engagement and leadership in crisis prevention, ongoing crisis and post-crisis settings a key priority in post - emergency situations in order""to ensure that "have the ability to deliver improved the first assistance with the support of all partners actors.

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 7 7. WHY ENERGY ? WFWO and its partners aims to increase international attention on the gender equality dimensions of energy access in the run-up to Rio+20 and contribute to the Sustainable Energy for All. "This " initiative and its goal of ensuring universal access to modern energy services by 2030. It conceptualizes gender and energy in development from a gender and rights perspective and presents an analysis of energy system governance at household, national and global levels. In this context "WFWO and its partners developed a program primarily focuses on experience emerging from Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, given the severity of energy poverty in those regions.""Energy "poverty "is "gendered "-"One of the most critical development challenges is to overcome the energy poverty of billions of people in developing countries who face inadequate and unreliable access to modern energy services and rely on biomass for cooking and heating. People deprived of such basic energy services are less likely to earn a living, stay healthy and have time for learning and fulfillment. Energy poverty therefore undermines the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. WFWO experience shown that women in most developing countries experience energy poverty differently and more severely than men. Without access to modern energy services, women and girls spend most of their day performing basic subsistence tasks including time-consuming and physically draining tasks of collecting biomass fuels. Access to energy is gendered: it is determined by intra-household decision about. Unequal - making at all levels of the energy system.""Access "to "energy "services "is "a "right -"Individual energy users "men and women - are rights-holders who have a legitimate claim on the State as the primary duty bearer to protect, promote and uphold their rights to access basic energy services. Members of the international community also have duty bearer responsibilities in assisting rights-holders in realizing their energy rights.

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 8 7. WHY ENERGY/2 ? Energy and Life - WFWO is more concerned in program learned that"is a close relationship between energy and electricity which are necessary for sustaining life. Agricultural activities necessarily require energy driven equipment in order to produce a good yield. Energy for irrigation helps increase food production and access to nutrition."The access to energy and its efficient use leads to higher food production, which is recognized as a fundamental responsibility of Governments under Universal Declaration on the Eradication of Hunger and Malnutrition."Energy is the key component of a functional health system, providing lights for operating rooms, refrigeration for life-saving vaccines and life-saving drugs, and power for communication systems."“Cheap accessible energy would decrease deforestation, reduce air borne pollutants, and prevent injuries and desertification arising from the search for"fuel, food, and water in semi-desert climates."�Due to absence of quality control of the biomass used as a fuel in rural households, the families are exposed to various health hazards."Almost one-fifth of the fuel carbon of household fuels used in rural area is converted into health damaging pollutants."Due to absence of easy access to energy, in many rural areas women and children have to go far remote places in search of fuel which exposes them to increased risk of assault and other natural hazards."Inferior fuels like grass and twigs produce more hazardous smoke and are incapable of cooking nutritious foods like cereals and grains."Various ailments that are caused in rural households due to use of inefficient solid fuel includes acute respiratory infection, tuberculosis, chronic respiratory disease, lung cancer, cardiovascular (heart) disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Energy and Livelihood -"WFWO experience learned "describes that "the linkage between achievement of social goals and energy".The goal of reducing poverty cannot be achieved without the availability of energy because energy is required in basic forms of income-generating activities, like agriculture and small businesses, need energy to power machines for milling or grinding, for transportation to market goods and services, for telecommunications, and for education."Electricity can provide illumination to permit longer working hours and power for irrigation, both of which help yield high-value crops.

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Highlighted the WFWO Activities: Focusing on Public Awareness & Programs to Contribute to the Eight MDGs /cont. 9 8. WHY SUSTAINABILITY DEVELOPMENT ? MDG 7 - ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY To accelerate progress on ensuring environmental sustainability, we are committing to: A. # Promoting alternative renewable energy sources and low-emission technologies through policy reforms that reduce subsidies for carbon-intensive development and create positive incentives, appropriate taxes and other initiatives that will encourage the adoption of renewable energy sources and low-emission technologies. B. # Support the implementing national action plans that lead to investment in access to energy for all, increased energy efficiency and extended use of renewable energy in order to shift to a green economy. C. # Continuing to increase sustainable access to safe drinking water by linking water management and water efficiency plans to national planning, budgeting and priority setting. D. # Ensuring that all improved sources are providing drinking water that is safe, including by exploring innovative ways of improving the tracking and monitoring of water quality. E. # Redoubling efforts to close the sanitation gap through scaled-up groundlevel action, supported by strong political will and increased community participation and resources. F. # Reducing slum populations by prioritizing national slum improvement and prevention strategies, including undertaking sound urban planning that stipulates the roles of the key stakeholders. WFWO call for a new approach is required to reduce, or reverse, the negative impacts of our food production systems on the environment, which are contributing to land degradation, pollution and the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services on which we all depend. Many of the 2 billion small-holders who live in developing countries are adversely affected by climate change—drought, erratic weather and increased outbreaks of crop pests and diseases. Through our work with these farmers, research partners and"conservation agencies, Bio Diversity International contributes to global understanding about the use and conservation of agricultural biodiversity. This resource can increase the productivity, resilience and sustainability of small-scale food production systems and"has potential for development. Highlights from 2011 include a global effort to support scaled-up approaches to sustainability, research on using agricultural biodiversity to minimize pest and disease damage, and work with local communities in the forests in Africa

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“WFWO believe that a breakthrough in achieving the MDGs will require abandoning the current and failed models of eradicating poverty that relied on technical inputs and a growth–oriented approach based on economic injustice, disparity and exploitation. In short, the achievement of the MDGs targets requires a holistic approach that is human rights based, social justice oriented, and cognizant of the interconnected gender dimensions of all the MDGs.�

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III. Key Success Factors to Achieve our Common Goals

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Poverty Reduction and Contributing to the Achieving of the Eight MDGs Objectives WFWO believes that countries and their communities including NGOs, CBOs are best positioned to create their own poverty eradication strategies, based on local needs and priorities. As a result, WFWO sponsor innovative pilot projects and locally-based sustainable development programs. In 2011-12, WFWO’s and its partners support 2 countries, adopted programs promoting small entreprises and women’s entrepreneurship and power energy and drinking water including houses and health centre; in Somalia, cameron and other countries introduced social protection schemes that specifically included youth, women and other vulnerable groups. WFWO and its partners is focusing to contribute to the achievement of the MDGs - a set of human development targets agreed to by world leaders, with the deadline of 2015 - by helping communities, NGOs, CBOs, as they work toward them. Finally, in recognition of the devastating toll HIV and AIDS and other communicable diseases can take on human development gains, WFWO also partners with countries and NGOs to strengthen their national response to these diseases. Socioeconomic Development focusing on Africa Poverty can only be effectively tackled through the promotion of democracy, good governance, peace and security as well as the development of human and physical resources. Key socio-economic thrusts such as promoting gender equality as well as allocation of appropriate funds to a social sector and promoting new partnership between governments and the private sector and civil society are essential in this area. There are five key objectives pursued namely: Promote self-reliance in development and build capacity for selfsustaining development. Accelerate socio-economic development to achieve sustainable development and poverty eradication. Strengthen policies, delivery mechanisms and outputs in key social development areas (including education for all, combating of HIV/AIDS and other communicable disease. Ensuring affordable access to water, energy, finance (including micro-finance) markets and ICT to all citizens, especially the rural poor. Progress towards gender equality, particularly equal access to education for girls at all levels. Encourage broad based participation in development by all stakeholders at all levels.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.2 1. Effective government leadership and national ownership of development strategies. 2. Effective policies to support implementation, defined here as laws, regulations, standards, administrative procedures and guidelines (general or MDG specific) that affect private behavior and the conduct of service providers and others with whom they must interact. 3. Improved quantity, quality and focus of investments, financed both by domestic sources and international development assistance, based on a holistic approach including smallholder agriculture, health, education, infrastructure, business development and environmental conservation. 4. Appropriate institutional capacity to deliver quality services equitably at national scale, such as adequate facilities, competent staff, appropriate supplies and equipment and effective monitoring and evaluation. 5. Civil society and community involvement and empowerment, which enhances the likelihood of success by giving individuals and communities the ability to take charge of their own lives. 6. Effective global partnerships, involving all relevant stakeholders, including donor governments, local communities, NGOs, the private sector and foundations, with mutual accountability of all stakeholders. 7. Good governance by donors and recipients, which - inter alia involves timely and predictable delivery of aid by donors, on the one hand, and enhanced state and societal capacity of recipient countries to manage scaled-up resource flows transparently and with accountability on the other. One significant achievement of the past decade is that national governments and their partners - even in countries lagging far behind on many MDGs - have a good sense of the programs and interventions required to meet the MDGs. The three critical challenges, in most cases, have been a feasible national scale-up plan, adequate financing based on both domestic and foreign sources, including development assistance, and well-functioning delivery mechanisms for public investments and service delivery. The success stories highlights, for each MDG, how these critical success factors came together to produce remarkable results. While country characteristics (geographic, demographic, economic, cultural etc) inevitable vary and the specific interventions that have been successfully implemented differ with country specificities, the country examples demonstrate these common success factors.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.3 The success stories underscore furthermore the imperative of a holistic approach and confirm that positive results across the Goals and the broader enabling environment enhance the likelihood of sustained progress towards each of the Goals. They help define our collective accountability, but must be seen holistically. The synergies among the MDGs are clear and indisputable, as demonstrated in the Millennium Villages. Taking advantage of these will reduce costs, increase effectiveness and catalyze local action. The education target, for example, requires progress on health. The health targets require progress on hunger and nutrition, and so on. there are many positive examples of integrated approaches to the MDGs yielding tremendous success. We must learn from these examples and scale up success interventions. The Goals targets and indicators of the MDGs were conceived to reflect an integrated approach to development as worded in the Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit Outcome document. Accelerating Progress 1. The critical question before us today is how to dramatically increase the pace of change on the ground in the remaining five years so that the promises of 2000 translate into real progress for the world’s poorest people, particularly at this time of global economic downturn. In light of the 2015 deadline, accelerating progress is essential and with barely half a decade left, much more accelerated progress is required, especially for the poorest countries. 2. Significant gaps still remain and many targets are not on track to being achieved in a good number of countries. Moreover, challenges persist in areas such as environmental sustainability, even in countries that have made impressive gains in reducing poverty over the part decade, including large parts of Asia. Rollbacks on compounded the challenge. Delayed job recovery from the global economic downturn remains a major challenge for poverty reduction in the years to come and climate change is likely to have devastating impacts on vulnerable countries and communities. 3. Although the primary focus of MDGs is developing countries where deprivation is most stark, deficits in human development are to be found in developed countries as well, especially among particular marginalized communities. Vulnerability, discrimination and social exclusion and gender disparities still persist in advanced countries and must not be overlooked.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.4 4. As the country success stories demonstrate, targeted, near-term, “acceleration� interventions - such as subsidizing crucial agriculture inputs, immunization, eliminating user fees for education and health services and addressing human resource constraints in health - are still of paramount importance to speed up progress where current trends make achievement of the MDGs unlikely. New technologybased solutions, that did not exist when the MDGs were endorsed, can and should be leveraged to allow for rapid scaling up. The most important of these new technologies are mobile phones, broadband internet, and other information and communications technologies. 5. At the time, these interventions need to be framed in the context of national development strategies that define actions to ensure sustainability of the results in the long term. Especially, even if not exclusively, in times of global economic, food and climate volatility, when MDG reversals are a real possibility, creating the enabling environment essential to sustaining progress towards the Goals can be just as important as accelerating achievements. While a short-term perspective, focused on securing immediate gains, can be effective in saving lives and alleviating suffering, it should not be understood as exclusive of, or even incompatible with, longer term structural changes necessary to sustain progress over time. 6. The very fact that the challenges of poverty, food, energy, global recession and climate change are all interrelated has presented the global community with a unique opportunity to tackle them together. The critical requirement for a Global Green New Deal is a commitment by all to front load large public investments in renewable energy in order to achieve economics of scale and learning, generate employment in both rich and poor countries, and lay the foundation for a new phase of a global economic and technological advancement. Besides benefiting the poor, such investment would also lay the basis for sustainable development, stimulate complementary investment in infrastructure and agriculture, and help raise agricultural productivity, thus enhancing food security and creating decent jobs for the rural poor. 7. The main elements of this framework include ensuring that responses to the economic downturn provide support for what has worked in the past,especially protecting the growth momentum in developing countries, sustaining support for integrated poverty eradication programmes, enhancing the reach of targeted interventions, laying the infra-structural foundations for a new era of

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.5 sustainable economic development and protecting poor countries and communities from the adverse impacts of global crises. 8. Both acceleration and sustainability of progress must therefore be pursued concomitantly. Accelerated and sustainable progress towards achievement of the MDGs will be contingent on our combined efforts to do three things much more effectively than we have been able to do in the past. - Scale-up implementation of proven and innovative interventions in such key domains as gender, sustainable agriculture (including inputs for small-holders and sustainable environmental management) energy, education and health. This effort needs to be backed by targeted investments, informed community participation, adequate institutional capacities to effectively mobilize and manage financial resources and deliver public services. - Build the structural and economic foundations to support and sustain progress and mitigate risks of MDGs reversal through effective social and economic policies and institutions grounded in universal rights and supportive of structural changes and social cohesion, improved conditions for peace, security and good governance, public and private investments that lead to faster pro-poor growth and effective measures to ensure environmental sustainability. - Broaden and strengthen partnership to ensure greater global and regional integration, a supportive international framework for trade, technology transfer and climate change mitigation and adaptation to sustain long-term human development; and sufficient, predictable, and well-coordinated financing for development, including national budgets, official development assistance (ODA), philanthropy, debt relief, and new financing instruments. This third element builds on the recognition that both within and across countries, no single stakeholder can achieve the first two strategic priorities on their own.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.6 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Poverty and Hunger (MDG 1) - Poor countries with large agriculture sectors should focus on bolstering agricultural productivity and output quality. A sharp increase of agricultural productivity can accomplish several things simultaneously: (1) reduced hunger; (2) reduced child mortality through improved nutrition; (3) reduced maternal mortality through improved nutrition; and (4) higher household incomes and economic growth. - To boost productivity, small-holder farmers must gain immediate access to inputs - such as fertilizer, high-yield seeds, equipment, small- scale irrigation, technical extension, and post-harvest storage - in order to modernize and commercialize traditional farming. At the same time, sustainable agriculture practices need to be introduced. Intensive farming, if not properly regulated, can lead to the depletion of water sources, pollution by chemical fertilizers and pesticides, and a loss of biodiversity. - Producing more food directly affects only one aspect of food security (i.e. availability) and must be complemented by other interventions to address inequities of access to food and to bolster nutrition. Food security programs should therefore also address issues of access to adequate nutritious food (taking into account local food consumption preferences and different nutritional requirements), implement integrated nutrition programs for the poor and vulnerable. In the short term, hunger hotspots within countries should be a top priority. Prevention-based interventions such as the distribution of vital micro-nutrient fortification and supplementation, as well as targeted support of children through the provision of school based meals, must also be complemented by treatment-based interventions such as the treatment of severe and moderate acute malnutrition and mass de-worming for children. - Access to decent and productive employment as well as promotion of entrepreneurship is fundamental to pro-poor growth and efforts to address poverty and hunger. Successful programs, especially employment-intensive initiatives, small and medium-enterprise promotion, employment guarantee schemes and conditional cash transfer as well as as vocational and technical training and entrepreneurial skills development, especially for unemployed youth, can yield positive results in reducing poverty and should be more widely applied to cover largest parts of the population especially women and rural areas. - Close attention should be given to the recommendations contained in the Global Jobs Pact, adopted by the governments employers’ and workers’ delegates of the ILO’s 183 Member States. The Pact proposes a range of tested crisisresponse and recovery measures that focus on employment and social protection. It is not a one size-fits-all solution, but a portfolio of tried and tested policy options that countries can adopt to their specific needs and situation.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.7 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Education (MDG 2) - National education system need to be strengthened by addressing infrastructure, human resource and governance constraints, backed by international donor support; - When scaling up education budgets inequalities across income, gender, geographical, linguistic and ethnic lines should be addressed when allocating resources. Interventions should address problems of access to schooling from the supply and demand side. On the supply side, adequate services need to be provided and made accessible based on a robust needs analysis. On the demand side, targeted measures need to be put in place to attract children from poor household, rural areas or minority ethnic groups to school. Successful examples include making primary education more available, accessible and affordable include abolishing school fees, subsidiaries for other costs (e.g. textbooks, uniforms and transportation) and innovative approaches to school (e,g, community schools, mobile schooling and distance learning, multi grade teaching). Programs strengthening linkages between education, health and nutrition, such as school feeding programs and social protection measures (e.g. cash transfer, social insurance) have also proven successful. - Progression through the school system - retention, completion and learning achievement - is another challenge which needs to be urgently addressed. Appropriate learning environments and quality of education can be ensured through the development of child friendly schools, effective and comprehensive teacher strategies (e.g. recruitment and retention policies, underpinned by initial and in-service teacher education and development, teacher status and working conditions), enhanced pedagogical support and learner-relevant curriculum, educational materials and languages of instruction.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.8 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Gender Equality (MDG 3) - Remove key barriers to girls education, including by providing scholarship, cash transfer and eliminating user fees; expand support for girls especially at the secondary level, where all too many girls are forced to leave school because of school expenses; tracking completion and attendance rates: improving the quality of education; and scaling up investments in girls’ enrollment in secondary school. - Make the generation of full and productive employment and the creation of decent work and income the primary goal of macroeconomic, social and development policies, for those beyond school age, including by promoting equal skills development and employment opportunities, reducing wage gaps between women and men. - Introduce social protection measures and labour laws and policies that are gender responsive, and introducing and enforcing legal protections for the most vulnerable women workers. particular attention should be paid to gender gaps in school-to-work transition for youth, making education and training relevant to labour market demand, based on a life-cycle and rights-based approach. - Introduce positive action to improve the numbers and influence of women in all political decision-making, including by investing in women’s leadership in local decision-making structures and by creating an even playing field for men and women within political parties. With few exceptions, the 26 countries that have achieved or surpassed the goal of women securing 30 per cent of seats in national assemblies over the past five years have introduced some form of positive action. - Improve national level capacity to track and report on progress, gaps and opportunities through better generation and use of sex-disaggregated data and statistics, including on time use. - Reduce women’s work burden through investments in infrastructure, labour saving technologies and gender responsive economic stimulus packages; - Strengthen accountability for enhancing women’s rights and ending gender discrimination - in line with commitments in Commission for the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the Beijing Platform for Action (BPfA), adn relevant ILO Conventions - including through eliminating inequalities in access to land and property and by investing in implementation of laws, policies and programs to prevent and address violence against women. - Scale up investments for gender equality, including by institutionalizing “genderresponsive budgeting”, as part of public financial management reforms to ensure that financial commitments advance gender equality.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.9 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Health (MDGs 4, 5 and 6) - Strengthening national health system with the active participation of civil society organizations can significantly improve both maternal and child health. Strengthening health system involves addressing human resource constraints, building new infrastructure, upgrading and improving supply systems, improving governance and stewardship through a larger role in informal, formal and decentralized system of health protection. Additional international development assistance is vital for health-systems scale-up in low-income countries. - Targeted interventions in key areas - such as immunization programs, increasing the number of trained midwives or the use of insecticidetreated bed-nets, are known to have strong positive impacts but are more sustainable when embedded in a strategy aiming at providing comprehensive universal primary healthcare. - Interventions which have the greatest impact on health related MDG target, such as universal access to sexual and reproductive health, immunization and key child survival interventions, HIV prevention, mitigation and treatment, prevention and treatment of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), prevention and treatment services for Malaria and TB, and low cost access to safe water and sanitation should be urgently scaled-up and made universal to accelerate progress on the health MDGs. - There is a need for a scale up of global financing, but it needs to be done in predictable ways. Targeted disease-control program have been highly successful. - Prioritizing regions, vulnerable and marginalized groups (with special attention to the poor, rural and populations, women and youth) with a view to extending health protection to those in need and the excluded. - Strengthening the capacity of all stakeholders to address issues of gender equality and delivery of health services as well as promoting partnership with civil society organizations including women’s groups, NGOs and with the private sector.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.10 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Promoting Sustainable Development (MDG 7) - One of the difficulties in making progress towards the overall MDG7 objective is lack of a framework or means of integrating different components of environmental sustainability. While MDG7 contains elements that contribute to environmental sustainability, when added together, they do not provide a full picture. This weakness can be exacerbated at the national level if countries mechanically adopt the global set of targets and indicators without explicitly linking or tailoring them to national priorities. What is needed is for countries to adopt the principle of environmental sustainability and then adopt that principle to national priorities and policies, the local context, and subnational or ecosystem specificities. Ecological sustainability and addressing climate change: - Efforts to accelerate progress towards the MDGs must take account of the rapidly changing development landscape transformed by ecosystem decline including the challenges posed by climate change, propoor development centred on natural resources can be pursued at a local, community-level or at a national scale. Both approaches are necessary for maximum poverty reduction. Comprehensive and coherent development planning frameworks, including national sustainable development strategies, are a useful means of integrating all of the aspects related to environmental sustainability that are relevant to any given country in a balanced manner. This is one of the conclusions drawn from the indicators that are making good progress. Successful strategies further tend to build on the active involvement of local and municipal authorities and population, as well as all relevant stakeholders in the planning, programming and budgeting cycle as well as the adoption of strong national legislation with mandatory targets and commitments towards the attainment of the objectives. It is important that public-private partnership ensure genuine contributions by the private sector that would otherwise not have been occurred without such partnerships.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.11 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Promoting Sustainable Development (MDG 7) Ecological sustainability and addressing climate change: - Greater efforts are needed in both development and developing countries to promote alternative renewable energy sources and low-emission technologies. Policy reforms to substantially reduce perverse subsidies for carbon-intensive development, and to create positive incentives, appropriate taxes and other initiatives (such as a global feed-in tariff arrangement to encourage renewable energy sources and low-emission technologies, are urgently needed. the internationally subsidized generation of renewable energy as the basis for development in developing countries will address the perceived trade-off between addressing climate change at the expense of development besides providing major new opportunities for private investments to come out of the economic crisis and generate considerable employment. - Greatly expanded investments in sustainable ecosystem management to reduce the vulnerability of the poor, and to maximize the contribution of natural resources to rural development. Poor people need secure resource rights and other enabling conditions for poverty reduction. Biodiversity protection measures must respect indigenous peoples traditional rights to marine and forest based livelihoods. - National action plans and investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy will be key to shifting to low carbon growth, creating “green� employment and reduce poverty.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.12 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Promoting Sustainable Development (MDG 7) Safe drinking Water and Sanitation: - Considering the lack of progress on sanitation, delivering on sanitation targets will require considerable political will together with significant financial, technical and human resources. Past experience suggests that the main problems have been over-reliance on supply-driven approaches, neglect of user needs and emphasis on large scale projects, often due to public sector neglect or relinquishment of responsibility, often due to fiscal constrains. A demand-responsive approach is almost always constrained by poor people not having enough purchasing power to pay for improved sanitation. retaining public provisioning of such services often conserves scarce governance and regulatory capabilities in developing countries, while achieving more universal access. - Integrated national water strategies addressing the four main user of fresh water - agricultural, households, industry and ecosystem services - must robustly respond to the growing water shortage, exacerbated by climate change. Reducing slum populations - Cities in developing countries around the world are home to rising numbers of poor people and do not have the capacity to create jobs to sustainably absorb the population influx and achieve the necessary progress needed to meet the MDGs. In the face of rapid urbanization, these challenges are only going to become more acute unless adequate corrective actions are taken. These measures should include sound urban planning, essential for the sustainable growth of urban centres. They should stipulate the roles of the key stakeholders - local authorities, organizations of the urban poor, private sector (formal and informal) central government, district/state/provincial authorities, and line ministries. ultimately, more balanced growth, including rural development, in the only long term solution in so far as addresses the pull and push factors involved in rural-urban migration.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.13 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Expanding and strengthening international partnerships (MDG 8) 1. In the countdown to 2015, amidst a global economic crisis, the need to accelerate delivery on MDG8 commitments has now reached emergency proportions, rather than simply being a matter of urgency. Official development assistance 2. Although ODA reached its highest level ever in 2008, there remain large gaps in meeting existing and long-standing commitments. The Gleneagles G8 ODA target for 2010 is approximately $154 billion in present values, and additional flows of $35 billion by 2010 will need to be delivered this yeas to achieve this target. Africa would need an extra $20 billion of the increase in ODA in 2010 in order to reach the Gleneagles target level of $63 billion for the region by 2010. In 2007, ODA to the least developed countries (LDCs) was equivalent to 0.09 per cent of OECD countries’ GNI, with less than half the OECD/DAC countries meeting the 0.15-0.20 per cent target for aid to the LDCs. 3. The distribution of development assistance remains highly skewed. Although the share of ODS flows allocated to the poorer countries increased somewhat between 2000 and 2007, with Sub-Saharan Africa continuing to be the largest recipient of ODA, having more than doubled receipts in current dollar terms, most of the increase in ODS since 2000 has been limited to a few post-conflict countries, including Iraq and Afghanistan. Together, these two countries received about a sixth of country allocations from DAC countries, even through they account for less than two per cent of the total population of the developing countries. African aid lags far behind commitments and far behind needs. Detailed analyses by the IMF and the UNDP have shown that highly worthy MDG-based programs are unfunded because of non-delivery of promised donor funding. 4. There is an urgent need to improve the quality, predictability and durability of aid, in addition to the quantity. Developing countries and their partners will have to reduce the fragmentation of assistance, and ensure that ODS support national development strategies. Pooling of donor resources into multi-donor funds has proved time and again to be a fruitful approach, with great successes, for example in the control of several infectious disease.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.14 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Expanding and strengthening international partnerships (MDG 8) Trade and development 1. The failure to reach agreement in the Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations represents a major gap in strengthening the global partnership for achieving the MDGs by depriving developing countries of the benefits of more timely completion of a truly developmental Round 2. Donors need to deliver on commitments to substantially increase technical, financial and political support for Aid for Trade and the Enhanced Integrated Framework initiative. Aid for Trade is especially vital to finance export-oriented infrastructure (roads, ports, power, etc) to support the export competitiveness of low-income countries. Developed countries also need to honor the 2005 pledge to eliminate by 2013, all export subsidies, including on agriculture, which remain a major distortion affecting trade and farm production in developing countries. Debt sustainability 1. Substantial progress has been made with regard to debt relief, but full delivery on the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative requires continued efforts from the international community. By September 2009, 35 out of 40 eligible countries had qualified for debt relief under the HIPC Initiative, 26 of whom had qualified for irrevocable debt relief under the HIPC Initiative and the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI). 2. In the light of the global crisis, measures such as additional concessional financing, standstills on debt obligations, debt relief and debt restructuring should considered to help countries facing severe financial distress as a consequence of the crisis to avoid harsh domestic adjustments jeopardizing the achievement of the MDGs and avoid public indebtedness reaching unsustainable levels.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.15 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Expanding and strengthening international partnerships (MDG 8) Access to affordable essential medicines 1. Many essential medicines are inaccessible to the poor in developing countries for two main reasons. First there are large gaps in the availability of medicines in both the public and private sectors; Second, the prices of the medicines that are available are high in relation to their international reference prices. The multinational drug companies, based mostly in developed countries, should be encouraged to practice dual pricing policies - lower prices for developing countries. 2. Access to affordable essential medicines remains a concern, particularly as the response to outbreaks of contagious diseases and the development of resistant strains of infections create new difficulties. Basic packages of essential medical services require more adaptation to local needs, and better alignment to MDG health targets. The affordability of medicines is expected to deteriorate as a result of the global economic crisis. Incomes for many are falling and currency depreciations are further pushing up the cost of imported medicines. The situation is most difficult for countries with poorly founded or inefficiently run public sector procurement and distribution systems, countries where poorer households have no access to health insurance or public supplies of medicines, and countries where medicines are mostly brand names, rather than generic. Actions are needed to protect low-income families from increases in the costs of medicines brought about by the crisis.

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Key Success Factors to Achieve Our Common Goals /cont.16 Specific MDGs will require specific acceleration efforts: Expanding and strengthening international partnerships (MDG 8) Access to new technologies 1. Advances in technology provide an opportunity to accelerate poverty reduction through pathways not available to countries that developed earlier. Reducing the technology gap can accelerate “leapfrogging� to innovative and low-cost development solutions. Such technology facilitates communication and information exchange. Simple access to mobile phone translates into reductions in mortality rates through provision of information about prevention and treatment and improvement of transport to vital interventions (e.g. emergency obstetric care), long-distance learning, better chances of survival and adaptation by sharing information on the location of pastures and water using mobile telephony, and empowerment of community health workers and other health personnel. 2. Considerable progress had been made in access to information and communications technologies (ICT), especially in cellular telephony, in recent years. Use of the Internet increased steadily, with almost one fourth of the world’s population online. However, less than 18 per cent of the population in developing countries was using the Internet (and only 4 per cent in the least developed countries), compared with over 60 per cent in developed countries. Greater efforts are needed, especially through strengthened public-private partnership, to close the large gaps that remain in access and affordability across countries and income groups. 3. Addressing the challenges of climate change has necessitated further access to new technologies. For both climate change mitigation and adaptation, massive investments are needed in research, development and deployment of technologies.

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IV. The Outcome of the Conference Agenda Item 10 Held in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil 20-22 June 2012 “Realizing the Future We Want for All”

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Highlighted the Global Vision & Commitment by all for “The Future We Want”

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“One World One Hope, the Millennium Development Goals is Our Common Vision & Global Commitments” Advocacy for People’s Goals for Sustainable Development for Social Justice WFWO participation and contribution to Rio+20 and at the high level representatives, having met at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 20-22 june 2012, with full participation of civil society, renew our commitment to sustainable development, and to ensure the promotion of economically, socially and environmentally sustainable future for our planet for present and future generations. We, WFWO of the Campaign for advocacy around People’s Goals for Sustainable Development for Social Justice, we are coming from grassroots and field experiences with people, and as non- governmental organization, we make the following urgent call to international communities to take the necessary action and to focus on MDGs in which is come close only 3 years left to achieve our common target date. At the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) come close to their target date, a new, transformative and “people-centred” development agenda is being discussed in a world far different from that which contextualized the Millennium Declaration. WFWO participation with all its partners to joined hand to contributions to Rio+20 for advocacy around sustainable development, which integrates economic, environmental and social justice and policy, with the support of all civil society. We urge at Rio+20 all participants to live up to the challenges of our era by laying down a bold and visionary agenda for transforming our societies and the international system. While the hard choices will ultimately be made by the member states of the United Nations, the Rio+20 has the unique opportunity and duty to call attention to the fundamental challenges we are facing and the need for far-reaching changes that address the structural barriers to a decent life and a sustainable future for all of humanity.

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Rio+20 Outcomes for “The Future We Want” Our Common Vision “The Future We Want” (Summary)

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THE FUTURE WE WANT I. Our Common Vision 1. We, the heads of State and Government and high levels representatives, having met at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 20-22 June 2012, with full participation of civil society, renew our commitment to sustainable development, and to ensure the promotion of economically, socially and environmentally sustainable future for our planet for present and future generations. 2. Eradicating poverty is the greatest global challenge facing the world today and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. In this regard we are committed to free humanity from poverty and hunger as a matter of urgency. 3. We therefore acknowledge the need to further mainstream sustainable development at all levels integrating economic, social and environmental aspects and recognizing their interlink ages, so as to achieve sustainable development in all its dimensions. 4. We recognize that poverty eradication, changing unsustainable and promoting sustainable patterns of consumption and production and protecting and managing the natural resource base of economic and social development are the overarching objectives of and essential requirements for sustainable development. we also reaffirm the need to achieve sustainable development by: promoting sustained, inclusive and equitable economic growth, creating greater opportunity for all, reducing inequalities, raising basic standards of living: fostering equitable social development and inclusion; and promoting integrated and sustainable management of natural resources and ecosystems that supports inter alia economic, social and human development while facilitating ecosystem conservation, regeneration and restoration and resilience in the face of new and emerging challenges. 5. We reaffirm our commitment to making every effort to accelerate the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. 6. We recognize that people are at the center of sustainable development and in this regard, we strive for a world which is just, equitable and inclusive, and we commit to work together to promote sustained and inclusive economic growth, social, development, environmental protection and thereby to benefit all. As per Rio+20 Declaration

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THE FUTURE WE WANT /cont.2 7. We reaffirm that we continue to be guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and with full respect for international law and its principles. 8. We also reaffirm the importance of freedom, peace and security, respect for all human rights, including the right to development and the right to an adequate standard of living, including the right to food, the rule of law, gender equality and women’s empowerment and the overall commitment to just and democratic societies for development. 9. We reaffirm the importance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as other international instruments relating to human rights and international law. We emphasize the responsibilities of all States, in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations, to respect!� protect and promote human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, whitout distinction of any kind to race, color, sex, language or religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth, disability or other status. 10. We acknowledge that democracy, good governance and the rule of law, at the national and international levels, as well as an enabling environment are essential for sustainable development, including sustained and inclusive economic growth, social development, environmental protection and the eradication of poverty and hunger. We reaffirm that to achieve our sustainable development goals. We need institutions at all levels that are effective, transparent, accountable and democratic. 11. We reaffirm our commitment to strengthening international cooperation to address the persistent challenges related to sustainable development for all, in particular in developing countries. In this regards, we reaffirm the need to achieve economic stability and sustained economic growth, promotion of social equity, and protection of the environment, while enhancing gender equality and women’s empowerment, and equal opportunities for all, and the protection, survival and development of children to their full potential, including through education.

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THE FUTURE WE WANT /cont.3 12. We resolve to take urgent action to achieve sustainable development. we therefore renew our commitments to sustainable development, assessing the progress to date and the remaining gasp in the implementation of the outcomes of the major summits on sustainable development and addressing new and emerging challenges. We express our determination to address the themes of the Conference, namely a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication, and the institutional framework for sustainable development. 13. We recognize that people’s opportunities to influence their lives and future, participate in decision making and voice their concerns are fundamental for sustainable development. We underscore that sustainable development requires concrete and urgent action. It can only be achieved with a broad alliance of people, governments, civil society and private sector, all working together to secure the future we want for present and future generation.

II. Renewing Political Commitment A. Reaffirming Rio principals and past action plans 14. We recall the Stockholm Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment adopted at Stockholm on 16 June 1972. 15. We reaffirm all the principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, including, iter alia, the principles of common but differentiated responsibilities, as set out in principle 7 of the Rio Declaration

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THE FUTURE WE WANT /cont.4 16. We reaffirm all the principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21, the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development and the Plan of Implementation) of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the Barbados Programme of Action and the mauritius Strategy for Implementation. We also reaffirm our commitment to the full implementation of the Istanbul Programme of Action for Least Developed Countries (IPOA) the Almaty Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries, the Political declaration on Africa’s development needs, and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development. We recall as well our commitments in the outcomes of all the major United Nations Conferences and Summits in the economic, social and environmental fields, including the UN Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit outcome, the Monterrey Consensus and the Doha Declaration on Financing for Development, the outcome document of the High-Level Plenary Meeting of the UN General Assembly on the MDGs, the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Key Actions for further Implementation of the Programme of Action, and the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. 17. We recognize the importance of the three Rio Conventions to advancing sustainable development and in this regard we urge all Parties to fully implement their commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), in accordance with their respective principle and provisions, as well as to take effective and concrete actions and measures at all levels, and to enhance international cooperation. 18. We are determined to reinvigorate political will and to raise the level of commitment by the international community to move the sustainable development agenda forward, through the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals including the Millennium Development Goals. We further reaffirm our respective commitments to other relevant internationally agreed goals in the economic, social and environmental fields since 1992. We therefore resolve to take concrete measures that accelerate implementation of sustainable development commitments.

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V. WFWO Engagement and Commitment The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12

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WFWO Engagement & Commitment to Contribute to the Eight MDGs In 2011-12, WFWO Contributed to

Results and Action

Raising Awareness

a) Campaign on Eight MDGs Change the altitude about gender inequality, rights for social justice;

Regions

Worldwide

b) The brokering of successful partnership for development between communities, NGOs, CBOs, civil society, government to focus on social justice and human rights for security and peace Strengthening Partnership and Resilience

Building resilience between local communities, NGOs, CBOs and man made crisis to contribute to social justice locally and nationally with the support of bilateral partners

Europe and Development countries

Implementing Programs

a) Develop programs and Pilot programs that can contribute to the eight MDGs that demonstrated effectiveness and results for vulnerable populations in LDC

Developing countries

b) The partnership of public / private partnership ensuring that low-income households and small businesses have access to a broad range of financial resources with our partnership.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 1. Seeking to contribute to the Eight Millennium Development Goals adopted by the international community, WFWO’s strategy plan and orientation, pursuit of development objectives locally, nationally and internationally, the WFWO will continue to place highest priority on initiatives in the following areas: Sustainable development program, improvement of food security, health, drinking water, education, with particular emphasis on the needs of women and youth; (b) developing rural financial services through our local partners NGOs, and CBOs that reach isolated populations without previous access to infrastructure and financial facilities and are well integrated into the national financial sector framework; (c) capacity building in support of decentralized decisionmaking processes for participatory rural development; (d) natural resources management and the environment, with emphasis on supporting anti-decertification initiatives; (e) provide grant; (f) raise public awareness; (g) resource mobilizations; (h) Communications Support Programs; (h) Portal facilities for NGO Network, to support the MDGs; 2. WFWO to achieve these targets needs close collaborations, with its partners will continue to stress the importance of genderdifferentiated target group participation in defining program objectives and priority activities; maximizing the use of local knowledge and experience; and pursuing a strategic orientation to! WFWO’s investments through strengthened partnership and support of the United Nations NGO Branch DESA (UN NGO IRENE Western Europe), governments, civil society and private sector and other donors to ensure that project interventions fit closely within the context of overall economic and sectorial development strategies plan for individual countries. The main challengers review activities and programs contributed by WFWO for 2011-12, as per strategy plan focusing on sustainable development programs and grants provided by WFWO already operating to contribute to the MDGs objectives, as well as campaign to raise public awareness on global development issues

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 "One World. One Hope the Millennium Development Goals is Our Common Vision & Global Commitments� 3. WFWO Advocacy for People's Goals for Sustainable Development for Social Justice"WFWO of around "People’s Goals for Sustainable Development for Social Justice in particularly in Africa, we are coming from grassroots and field experiences with people, and as "nongovernmental organizations, we make the following urgent call to international communities "to take the necessary action and to focus on MDGs in which is come close only 3 years left to achieve our common target date. 4. WFWO "Report and Recommendations During the Recent Identification & Appraisal "Mission in Africa Need Action and Attention The WFWO's report on the identification and appraisal mission held 2012 in Western Africa for more than six months under the slogan One World One Hope Goals affirms that sustainable development must be based on the principles of human rights, equality and nondiscrimination, self-determination, social, gender, and ecological justice, and culturally sensitive approaches that value diversity, harmony and wellbeing. We call international communities and to recall and prioritize positions made by civil society at various consultations, in particular civil society and partners NGOs, CBOs calls for:" A coherent framework for post-2015 that is open, inclusive, transparent, consultative, and transformative a new development agenda that is based on the principles of social justice, ecological justice, solidarity, human dignity, and freedom from all forms of discrimination a rightsbased approach that strengthens citizenship, participation and empowerment of people, especially from disadvantaged and marginalized communities (children, women, youth, disabled persons, small-scale farmers, indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities and workers) to become agents of change. An agenda for addressing inequalities within and between countries that also guarantees decent employment and universal social protection for all." We also called at Rio+20 participants to address the injustices of the multilateral system, and ensure that there are more equitable partnerships between countries and between institutions and countries. This requires universal commitment to a new and fairer international economic architecture which benefits all countries.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 Indeed one of the major criticisms of the MDGs was that it placed the

burden of achievement on developing countries without fully taking into account the role of the international system in undermining countries’ abilities to meet the needs of their citizens, especially the poorer countries. For instance financial speculation is one of the leading drivers of food price inflation; illicit financial flows are bleeding many of the poorest countries of resources for development; the intellectual property rights regime is preventing many countries from fostering infant industries including low-carbon alternatives; unfair trade rules have led to the bankruptcy of millions of small farmers and entrepreneurs in developing countries; and investment liberalization has encouraged a race to the bottom in labour rights and working conditions. Economic policies and plans have been imposed in a one size fits all approach developed and led by international financial institutions which have restricted states from being able to respond to economic crises in a manner suitable to their political and economic context. This has in fact led to underdevelopment in many countries which followed IFI prescriptions." Thus the themes of the Rio +20 and the WFWO report on Africa mission in 2012 need more attention and are central to creating an international framework for a new development agenda. Global partnerships are necessary for a just, democratic and sustainable development agenda. However, global partnerships must be based on principles of solidarity, common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capacities, and democratic participation and accountability." They should also be grounded on universal human rights norms and standards including the Right to Development. Make Finance Work for the People and the Planet Neoliberal policies have advanced financial liberalization and deregulation and increased the flow of credit for short term and speculative purposes and not for long-term sustainable development in the real economy." Financial liberalization and deregulation has encouraged excessive risk-taking and fraud and has increased the instability and volatility which is linked to the financial crises of 2008. The neoliberal policies which informed the current financial system were promoted by the IMF and World Bank which fail to represent the interests of developing countries.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 Create a strict global regulatory framework for banks and financial activities. Finance must be controlled to serve the real economy. There must be strict limits to commodity price speculation. There should be a work plan to abolish tax havens."Resources for sustainable development should be mobilized through progressive taxation, debt cancellation, debt restructuring, financial transactions taxes, new taxes on polluting and harmful corporate activities, redirecting harmful subsidies, the creation of a sustainable development fund, and others."Banks and financial institutions that are “too big to fail� should be placed under public control." Alternative monetary and development lending organizations must be established which respond primarily to broad development objectives. They should be established based on fair lending terms, transparent and accountable practices and equal voting and negotiating rights."Multilateral development banks, international financial institutions, and the Basel Committee on Banking Regulation should be reformed to increase transparency, accountability and decision making democratized instead of remaining under the control of bankers and shareholders. Sovereign debts should be subjected to social audits. Countries should not be forced to pay for illegitimate debt."The global financial system must move to a global reserve and payments system which is not based on one country’s currency and which supports countries out of payment crises through growth and employment. Establish Fair and Equitable International Trade and Investment Rules! Unfair trade rules have restricted policy space for poor countries to use trade and investment policies to promote domestic economic development as well as social and environmental goals. The current trade regime has permitted rich countries to maintain significant protection of their domestic sectors while opening developing countries to their exports. The trade regime has also strengthened the monopoly protection of corporations over medicines and allowed patenting biodiversity and increased the freedom of multinational firms to profit and exploit labour and exploit the environment. Patterns of trade and restrictive trade rules lock developing countries in activities which keep them poor.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 We need to reform trade agreements and regulations to ensure that they are pro-poor and development oriented. Trade agreements which unduly restrict poor country policy space must be revised. Countries must be able to choose appropriate trade, investment and industrial policies along with social and environmental policies. Infant industries in developing countries must be supported in multilateral trade agreements and as necessary, developing countries must be allowed to protect their fledgling industries. Intellectual property rights should not interfere with open access to technology, information or other resources that are deemed essential for development or for meeting sustainable development goals and there must be open sharing of technology and knowledge between countries to support sustainable development. All trade agreements must comply with an international human rights assessment and trade agreements which will breach human rights agreements must be revised. Trade agreements must support decent work conditions and protect and promote labour rights. Trade agreements which repress labour standards must be revisited. Democratize Global Governance! The global governance system, despite being a major proponent of ‘good governance’, is hindered by a critical democratic deficit –the wealthiest countries dictate the global governance agenda, its norms, targets, and implementation, whether through bilateral or multilateral relations or institutions. This imbalance of power, absence of transparency and accountability, and inequity in participation in global governance is distorting multilateral processes and limiting their ability to respond to the needs of developing countries.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 There needs to be major reform global governance systems to make them responsive to the demands of sustainable development, which are equitable, democratic and based on human rights for all institutions."The United Nations." Issues affecting the common good of humanity must be ultimately addressed at the UN General Assembly, not the G8, the G20, the international financial institutions or the Security Council. This includes protection and management of the global commons and global public goods. At the same time, the UN should be reformed to ensure full and effective participation of civil society, transparency and accountability to citizens." Public Participation Create mechanisms for public participation and co-determination in global governance structures. Ensure that civil society has full and effective participation free from discrimination in the new high level political forum a model example is the new Global Partnership for Development Effectiveness Cooperation. Create the means for effective consultation and participation in policy development and implementation for traditionally underrepresented groups including small-holder farmers, women, workers, indigenous peoples, youth, LGBT persons, disabled persons, religious minorities, migrants, refugees and other marginalized groups"Transparency: Global governance institutions should ensure public access to information. Ensure that the decision-making process for agreeing development agendas at all levels is transparent, and all negotiation texts and agreements are published and widely accessible. Accountability Mechanisms: Mechanisms for compliance to Human Rights norms and standards should be strengthened with penalties and means of redress at the national, regional and international levels." Freedom of expression and assembly is a prerequisite for developing effective accountability mechanisms and there must be global commitment to protect and achieve these rights at all levels. Establish participatory accountability mechanisms through which the people’s voice, including small-holder farmers, women, workers, indigenous peoples, youth, LGBT persons, disabled persons, migrants, refugees, religious minorities, can be reflected, and independent monitoring of goals, targets and indicators can be conducted at national, regional and global levels."

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 Recent international summits have failed to address the critical sustainable development challenges faced by the world. Individual states’ short-term interests have superseded strong, decisive outcomes; commitments made on paper going back 20 years have not been adhered to in practice; the world is failing to meet the needs of current generations and imperiling the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Developed States are also increasing backtracking on commitments to promote genuine sustainable development as seen on negotiations to reverse climate change. The world is at a critical juncture and we must all rise up to the challenge of our time." The world is looking to the Rio+20 on MDGs target by 2015, to produce bold and visionary recommendations to inspire a transformative development agenda."The people request from all International Communities from over the global, no less from Rio+20 outcome and results to the Peoples' Goals needs to be implemented in order to achieve the eight MDGs target by 2015: •Human Rights •Poverty & Inequality •Food Sovereignty •Full Employment & Decent Work •Universal Social Protection •Gender Justice - Environmental Sustainability •New Trade, Monetary & Financial Architecture •Democracy & Governance •Peace & Security based on Justice 5. WFWO in the Field in Action in Africa WFWO Identification & Appraisal Mission"to Africa, in July –November 2012, WFWO has an identification & appraisal mission to Africa"composed by the Executive President and resources mobilizations Team from financial and expert, including"institution and private sector, to the following countries:"Republic of Ghana, Republic of Sera Leone, Republic of Liberia, Republic of Nigeria, Republic of Togo, Republic of Benin, Republic of Burkina Faso. Objectives for!the Mission:" The purpose"of the identification mission study is to assess what elements are needed and"what steps will have to deployed in order to develop a partnership agreement"to enter in direct negotiation with the"governments and local communities in the"countries mentioned above, the"mission is to contribute"to the work of ECOSOC in implementing Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)"related to human security. More specifically, the mission aims is to address"the"human security needs of the disadvantaged population in the following"areas: Education, Heath, Drinking Water, Poverty Elevation, Environment, and"Infrastructures, energy, and support refugees camps.

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VI. The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 WFWO in the Field in Action in Africa

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 "One World. One Hope the Millennium Development Goals is Our Common Vision & Global Commitments� WFWO in the Field in Action in Africa 6. WFWO approach for Right to Assistance to peoples WFWO and its partners and other organizations "we are more concerned "during any"emergency humanitarian aid for peoples have the right to receive life sustaining assistance when crisis hits. In crisis situations people often lose their homes, their means of income, access to food and clean water. Sometimes assistance may be in the form of food aid, water provision and shelter, tends. Other times it may be more appropriate to respond by providing the basic materials "items to meet their assistance needs directly. Often this enables the flexibility for people to address their own needs directly, although this is only appropriate in circumstances where there is a viable local economy. At present there is simply not enough funding for humanitarian aid agencies to meet the needs of people around the world. Inadequate funding means that people in crisis situations can be left without life sustaining assistance such as water, food and shelter. Tragically, people often die after a crisis has passed waiting for life sustaining food, water, shelter or healthcare."WFWO is working closely with other humanitarian agencies and"non-government organizations local partners to improve coordination and effectiveness of humanitarian responses. No life should be lost waiting for humanitarian aid."WFWO is calling for the international community and mobilize resources and "first Aid materials "to provide more humanitarian aid, of the right kind, in the right place at the right time. Only then will the rights of people in crisis situations be fulfilled. 7. WFWO approach for Right to Assistance to peoples How We Raise Public Awareness ? The extent of common knowledge about disaster risks, the factors that lead to disasters and the actions that can be taken individually and collectively to reduce exposure and vulnerability to hazards.""WFWO take the necessary action to raise public awareness "focusing on "a key factor in effective disaster risk reduction and for recovery for the population after the disaster. Its development is pursued, for example, through the development and dissemination of information through "our partners NGOs, CBOs, media and educational channels, our networks, and community or participation actions, and advocacy by senior public officials and community leaders.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 . How We Do Recovery!Assistance ? The restoration, and improvement where appropriate, of facilities, livelihoods and living conditions of disaster-affected communities, including efforts to reduce disaster risk factors."The recovery task of rehabilitation and reconstruction begins soon after the emergency phase has ended, and should be based on pre-existing strategies and policies that facilitate clear institutional responsibilities for recovery action and enable public participation. Recovery programs, coupled with the heightened public awareness and engagement after a disaster, afford a valuable opportunity to develop and implement disaster risk reduction measures and to apply the “build back better” principle. Residual Risk The risk that remains in unmanaged form, even when effective disaster risk reduction measures are in place, and for which emergency response and recovery capacities must be maintained."The presence of residual risk implies a continuing need to develop and support effective capacities for emergency services, preparedness, response and recovery together with socio-economic policies such as safety nets and risk transfer mechanisms with the support of other Humanitarian agencies and partners . Resilience The ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate to and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures and functions."Resilience means the ability to “resile from” or “spring back from” a shock. The resilience of a community in respect to potential hazard events is determined by the degree to which the community has the necessary resources and is capable of organizing itself both prior to and during times of need. Response The provision of emergency services and public assistance during or immediately after a disaster in order to save lives, reduce health impacts, ensure public safety and meet the basic subsistence needs of the people affected.""Disaster response is predominantly focused on immediate and short-term needs and is sometimes called “disaster relief”. The division between this response stage and the subsequent recovery stage is not clearcut. Some response actions, such as the supply of temporary housing and water supplies, may extend well into the recovery stage.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 . Retrofitting Reinforcement or upgrading of existing structures to become more resistant and resilient to the damaging effects of hazards.""Retrofitting requires consideration of the design and function of the structure, the stresses that the structure may be subject to from particular hazards or hazard scenarios, and the practicality and costs of different retrofitting options. Examples of retrofitting include adding bracing to stiffen walls, reinforcing pillars, adding steel ties between walls and roofs, installing shutters on windows, and improving the protection of important facilities and equipment including tends, "emergency first aid health centre ect. A. WFWO Child Protection and Eliminating Gender Inequality Issues Need Action! Child protection issues intersect with every one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – from poverty reduction to getting children into school, from eliminating gender inequality to reducing child mortality. Most of the MDGs simply cannot be achieved if failures to protect children are not addressed. Child labour squanders a nation’s human capital and conflicts with eradicating extreme poverty (MDG 1); armed conflict disrupts efforts to achieve universal primary education (MDG 2); child marriage leads to the removal of girls from school and"thus prevents gender equality (MDG 3); children separated from their mothers, particularly if they remain in institutional settings, are at greater risk of early death, which hinders efforts to reduce child mortality (MDG 4); female genital mutilation/cutting undermines efforts to maternal health (MDG 5); and sexual exploitation and abuse ham-"per efforts to combat HIV infection (MDG 6). In addition, environmental disasters make children vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, hence the need for environmental sustainability (MDG 7). Overall, protecting children requires close cooperation between different partners, which consolidates the need for a global partnership for development (MDG 8).

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 . B. Key Outcome Expected for Action for the Up Coming Years • Ensuring that government decisions are increasingly influenced by better knowledge and awareness of child protection rights and improved data and analysis on child protection issues • Supporting effective legislative and enforcement systems – along with improved protection and response capacity – to protect children from all forms of abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence, including exploitative child labour • Improving mechanisms to protect children from the impact of armed conflict and natural disasters • Addressing national justice systems to ensure that mechanisms are in place to provide protection for children and adolescents as victims, witnesses and offenders • Reducing the number of children separated from their families and strengthening national capacities to ensure access by poor families to services and safety nets needed to protect and care for their children." Building A Protective Environment For Children Need Action Building a protective environment for children that will help prevent and respond to violence, abuse and exploitation involves eight essential components: Strengthening government commitment and capacity to fulfill children’s right to protection; promoting the establishment and enforcement of adequate"legislation; addressing harmful attitudes, customs and practices; encouraging open discussion of child protection issues that includes media"and civil society partners; developing children’s life skills, knowledge and participation; building capacity of families and communities; providing essential services for prevention, recovery and reintegration, including basic health, education and protection; and establishing and implementing ongoing and effective monitoring, reporting and oversight. C. Strategies Approach To Strengthen The Protective Environment For Children The work "will includes: • International advocacy, often with the use of inter- national human rights mechanisms • National advocacy and initiating dialogue at all levels – from government to communities, families and children themselves – in order to promote attitudes and practices protective of children • Inclusion of child protection issues in national development plans • Law-based approaches, emphasizing the importance of knowing, understanding, accepting and enforcing legal standards in child protection • Community-based approaches that promote and strengthen the capacity of families and communities to address child protection issues •"Partnerships with governments, non-governmental and faith-based organizations, other United Nations organizations, professional associations, children and youth, and the media

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 8. WFWO Responds To Support the !Horn Of Africa Famine In 2011, following consecutive seasons of inadequate rainfall, countries in the Horn of Africa — including Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia — faced their worst drought in 60 years, with 13 million people affected. This, in turn, led to the largest food crisis in 20 years and the world’s first famine of the 21st century. WFWO firmly believes that investing more effectively in reducing poverty and building resilience"is essential to help those affected by ongoing cycles of disaster."The famine in Somalia in particular sparked an increased flow of refugees into neighboring Kenya, with camps near the border areas hosting more than 400,000 refugees. An additional 3.5 million Kenyans were affected by the drought themselves. With resources scarce, it was very difficult for WFWO and other humanitarian aid organizations scaled up critical programming to improve living conditions in"Kenya’s north. "By the end of 2011 and "the "beginning of 2012, WFWO and its partners "has contributed to some "3000 people living near the camps saw support to access to water and first aid and tends." More than 490,000 Congolese refugees were scattered throughout neighboring countries. The number of internally displaced people increased from 1.7 million in December 2011 to more than 2.6 million in the coming years "source of UN agency- the majority in North Kivu, South Kivu and Oriental provinces. The majority first seek refuge in the forest close to their fields and property. But there they are often vulnerable to attack, and hunger and lack of shelter force them to seek help elsewhere."Most people end up living with host families, who themselves struggle to make ends meet. Aid agencies often cannot reach the displaced because they are sheltering in areas which are very remote or surrounded by insecurity."Local women's groups offer shelters in local towns and help survivors learn new skills, but their resources are limited. In some cases, survivors pool their resources and rent accommodation together."" A. Highlighted Internal Displacement and causes in Africa need more attention and action There were over 10.4 million IDPS""in the 18 Sub-Saharan countries IDMC"monitored in 2012, almost a third of the global total. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Sudan and Somalia continued to have Africa’s largest internally displaced populations, and among the largest in the world. Displacement in Nigeria was also known to be significant, but no reliable figures were available.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 There were more highly violent conflicts in Africa in 2010-2012 than at any time since 1945 The sharp increase in the number of IDPS, up 7.5 per cent from 9.7 million at the end of 2011, reversed a steady downward trend in the region since 2004, and was linked to worsening"conflict and violence throughout subSaharan Africa. According to authoritative sources, there were more highly violent conflicts in Africa in 2012 than at any time since 1945. The conflict in eastern DRC intensified dramatically during 2012, and a new one broke out in northern Mali at the beginning of the year. Violence by militant groups increased in Nigeria, and South Sudan experienced tensions, both internal over natural resources and with Sudan over contested border areas and the Higlig region. The causes of these and other conflicts, and more localised clashes, violence and human rights abuses that led to displacement include struggles for political power, ideological domination and natural resources, inter-communal violence often linked to land disputes and criminal activity."Sudden and slow-onset natural hazards also forced people to flee, in some cases affecting those already displaced by conflict"and violence. Unprecedented floods caused massive displacement in Chad, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Sudan and Sudan. Drought and resource depletion caused the displacement of pastoralists in northern Kenya, and compounded the dynamics of violence throughout the region. The famine in the Horn of Africa was declared over in 2012, but extended drought in the Sahel caused food insecurity in eight countries, coinciding with the spread across borders of violence and instability. (source of IDMC/ Refworld) B. WFWO!and its Partners in Action The launch, "WFWO " One World One Hope campaign around the world, "six years ago, "in order to raise public awareness "on eight "MDGs Goals, with "participation of more than 4000 networks , was a hopeful moment for the international community. After years of working to lower the world’s alarming death rates among women and children, and conflicts "and violence, an inspiring multi-stakeholder partnership promised to accelerate action against this terrible injustice. Droughts are threatening food security in West Africa; sea level rise might take away the livelihoods of Small Island Developing States (SIDS); flash floods and mudslides inflict death and destruction on informal settlements in cities of a number of developing countries; severe heat waves have swept across Europe and Russia in recent years; and strong hurricanes have caused large economic losses in the USA and the Caribbean. Environmental degradation and climate change contribute to the increasing occurrence of disasters linked to natural hazards. No country is immune, regardless of the level of economic and social development. However, the vulnerability of communities and societies to disasters caused by natural hazards is closely and inversely related to the level of social and economic development. Sound disaster risk management has been recognized as an area deserving

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 In this context "WFWO is more concerned "that every human being "was designed to yield measurable results, means "has right for basic assistance. It combines the best thinking on how to proceed with concrete pledges for action. Moreover, the international community committed itself to a robust process of monitoring and accountability to ensure that promises would be kept and targets would be reached by 2015. In 2012 WFWO and its partners seeing the very real results and progress, through support of our "partners private sector, including, WFWO Goodwill Ambassador for development, WFWO fiends and "more than 60 NGOs, CBOs, have joined the effort. An accountability framework has been developed. Networks around the world are bringing together different players, generating new technologies and new business models to be implemented by end of 2012 and the Road Map will be launched in "March 2013 in Dubai,UAE. WFWO and its partners aims will be focusing on overview of the existing international commitments "on the Eight MDGs "and "also in the area of : food security, health, education, , water , sanitary, energy and "disaster risk reduction and resilience building looking into progress of implementation, remaining gaps and proposed goals within the context of humanitarian first aid and rehabilitations on sustainable development, with a view to facilitating the implementation action plan of year 2012 -15 as per plan of action and Road Map: 9. Peace & Security to the People A. Towards this end we will act to right of people to peace & social justice WFWO has join hands with its partners Networks in tracking and responding to the submission of the draft Declaration on Right of Peoples to Peace to United Nations. WFWO campaigning on aid will include the review and critically highlight military goals and spending undertaken as part of foreign aid"Information campaigns on the Declaration on the Right of People’s to Peace’ will be undertaken across Global Peace Alliance Partners.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 While it is widely recognized that"security is necessary for development, that underdevelopment can lead to insecurity and that freedom from violence is fundamental to effective development, still there is little analysis on how security can enhance human development. Although initiatives such as the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development (2006)"and the Oslo Commitments on Armed Violence and Development (2010) show that increased attention is being given to this issue, the international community needs to do more in order to effectively understand and address the issue of insecurity and armed violence and its linkages to"development. We have seen in the last decades that the number of large global conflicts is decreasing constantly.Yet, violence and insecurity are growing at worrying pace around the world becoming a primary development challenge and many thriving economies remain plagued by epidemic levels of"armed violence. Evidence shows that insecurity and violence are not confined to conflict zones, nor to countries defined as fragile or failing. In fact, two out of every three people killed by armed violence die in countries which are considered at peace. B. Needs Action to Intensifying Responses to Humanitarian Crisis

Prevention

and

1. Disaster risk is increasing globally, and is highly concentrated in middle- and low-income countries. 31 Reducing disaster risk and increasing resilience to natural hazards in different development sectors can have multiplier effects and accelerate achievement of the MDGs. The Hyogo Framework for Action (2005-15) endorsed by UN Member States commits all countries to make major efforts to reduce their disaster risk by 2015. The horrific loss of life in Haiti underscores and the Horne of Africa Famine the need to ensure that the human built environment is resilient in the face of an array of potential hazards, both seismic and climatic and conflict. 2. Armed conflicts (inter-state and civil) are also a major threat to human security as well as to the hard-won MDG gains. Thus, there is urgent need for focusing on the root causes of these conflicts and advancing people-centred solutions. This requires strengthening institutions that mitigate conflicts as well as identifying and resolving existing tensions before they turn into armed conflicts and lead to humanitarian crises.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 Reforms to strengthen institutions should include promoting transparency and giving voice and representation to previously underrepresented communities to make them stakeholders in the peace process. 3. Post-conflict resolution steps are also vital. These should include promoting the rule of law, early economic recovery support, rebuilding capacities, building democratic institutions and reengaging countries in the global architecture without undermining national ownership of these strategies. This period must be used more effectively to eliminate inequalities and discrimination in law and in practice, and to guarantee equal access to resources and opportunities. C. Needs action to addressing the special needs of the most vulnerable 1. Attention must be focused on the special needs of the most vulnerable and the large and increasing inequalities in various economic and social dimensions including geography, sex, age, disability, ethnicity and other vulnerabilities. Some urgent issues are highlighted below: • Children from poor households, rural areas, slums and other disadvantaged groups face major obstacles in access to a good quality education. The literacy gap between the children from the wealthiest 20 percent of households and those from the poorest 20 per cent is more than forty percentage points. Children with disabilities remain among the most marginalized and least likely to go to school. •Very young children are especially vulnerable. Children who are stunted at age 2 tend to suffer severe life-long consequences in terms of reduced health, cognitive development and economic opportunities. •Indigenous people are over-represented among the poor, with their levels of access to adequate health and education services well below national averages; they are especially vulnerable to environmental degradation. Indigenous peoples make up 15 per cent of the world’s poor and a third of the world’s 900 million extremely poor rural people. •Around 1,8 million children under 15 in Sub-Saharan Africa live with HIV while some 12 million children under age 18 have lost one or both parents to HIV. In 56 countries for which recent household survey data are available, orphans who had lost both parents were 12 per cent less likely to be in school, and often become heads of enormous responsibilities at an early age. The impact of being orphans may be especially severe for girls, who are generally more likely than boys not be in school.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 •Children without the guidance and protection of their primary caregivers are more at risk of becoming victims of violence,"exploitation, trafficking, discrimination or other abuses resulting in malnutrition, illness, physical and psychosocial trauma, and impaired cognitive and emotional development. Unaccompanied girls are at especially high risk of sexual abuse." •Women and girls represent 47 per cent of refugees and asylumseekers, and half"of all internally displaced persons and returnees. 44 per cent of refugees and asylum-seekers are children below 18 years of age. More than 5.7 million refugees trapped in protracted situations for which there is limited hope of finding a solution in the near future, including some 70 per cent"of refugees in Africa."Seven out of ten refugees in Sub-Saharan Africa reside in often isolated and insecure refugee camps, with restrictions on movements affecting employment, education and limited health and other services. They become dependent on subsistence-level assistance, or"less, and lead lives of poverty, frustration and unrealized potential." D. The way we should forward 1. The MDGs work by engaging national and global society as a whole. The actions of individuals, organizations, private companies and governments in the cause of international development cooperation should be guided by the following key principles. Guiding principles for action agenda • National ownership and leadership complementary by supportive global programmes, measures and policies that align with national priorities and respect national sovereignty are essential. • The interdependence of human rights, gender equality, governance, development and peace and security must be recognized to attain success and sustainability. • The need to look at the MDGs through a gender lens is critical, since women and girls typically face the greatest burdens of extreme poverty, hunger and disease. All of the action areas need to include specific strategies for tackling challenges faced by girls and women. On top of this, critical actions are needed to focus on overarching priorities for gender equality, including challenges of women’s political representation and the intolerance ongoing epidemic of violence against women. • The norms and values embedded in the Millennium Declaration and international human rights instruments must continue to provide the foundation for engagement, in particular the key human rights principles of non-discrimination, meaningful participation and accountability. • The need to empower the poor; through scaled-up efforts focused on citizen monitoring of MDG delivery, capacity building and improving access to financial and legal services.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 Action oriented agenda for all stakeholders 1. Creating the policy and fiscal space to accelerate and sustain progress. Achieving the MDGs will need accelerated interventions in key areas. These interventions should be framed within the broader development framework of National Development Strategies for long-term equitable and sustainable growth and structural change. The immediate priority would be to ensure the sustainability of economic recovery, rising rural productivity, and decent work generation in a period in which economic growth is likely to be slower than before the current crisis. 2. National governments, with the full involvement of civil society organizations and supported by supported by the international community must take urgent measures to implement Growth and trade strategies enabling accelerated reduction in poverty, inequality and marginalization. this means promoting the fiscal space for delivery of key public services adverse effects of capital mobility, which has severely undermined domestic resource mobilization and monetary and exchange rate management. Without sustained employment and income growth all measured MDG progress will prove to be short-lived. Expanded global partnership to support the MDG agenda 1. Working in partnership with all stakeholders, the international community must support national development strategies, expand national policy space, accelerate investments in developing countries, minimize the likelihood of crisis and conflict and substantially improve the international"response to humanitarian, rehabilitation and recovery needs, and encourage and sustain reforms for a more conducive international environment for development. In the coming months, concrete steps will be taken at all levels to improve coordination and management in support of the"MDGs. 2. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have triggered the largest cooperative effort in world history to fight poverty, hunger, and disease. They have become a rallying cry in poor and rich countries alike, and a standard for non-governmental organizations and corporations as well."Nearly ten years after they were adopted, they are alive and stronger than ever, which is a rarity among global goals. The world wants them to work.

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2011-12 3. The United Nations has affirmed the right to development in addition to the other economic, social and cultural rights stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights approach affirms human rights to social protection as well as rejection of social exclusion, thus contributing"to overall security and well-being. Fulfilling the rights of each and every citizen requires adequate resources. The MDG framework has identified stakeholders and duty-bearers with well-defined responsibilities, establishing accountability for development outcomes.

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VII. Review operations and Programs Results 2011-12

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!Review

#

#

#

operations and Programs Results

Towards This End We Will Act to Right Of # People to Peace & Social Justice

WFWO and its partners working for results WFWO is an NGO international organizations networked together in 45 countries, as part of a global networks for change. We work directly with, NGOs, CBOs, communities, and we seek to influence those in power to ensure that people living in poverty can improve their lives and livelihoods and have a say in decisions that affect them. Our Focus Commitments We are committed and responsible with our partners to fight the poverty and injustice in the developed countries to contribute to eight MDGs. We must challenge unjust policies and practices and respect people’s rights to leave in dignity. Together we can achieve a world without hunger. With partners and supporters, we will act in solidarity with people living in poverty, especially women, children, to achieve their rights and assert their dignity as full rights for all communities in developed countries . WFWO’s work is framed by our commitment to seven broad rights-based aims: Additionally, a high priority for WFWO in 2011-12 and beyond continues to contribute to the acceleration of the Eight MDG progress. WFWO developed the MDG Acceleration Framework, which is now being in process to be implemented in developing countries in particularly Africa, more "will be in the process of implementing their tailor-made acceleration action plans for 2012-15. Within this framework we will work together on narrower “change goals” – the specific areas in which we aim to achieve common objectives in the positive change. Our eight targets for the up coming years starting from 2013 we will be focusing on : 1. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL JUSTICE 2. FOOD SECURITY 3. WATER AND SANITARY 4. CHILDREN EDUCTION & PROTECTION 5. GENDER EQUALITY JUSTICE 6. CRISIS AND RECOVERY (EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE) 7. ENERGY 8. SUSTAINABILITY DEVELOPMENT

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!Review

#

#

#

operations and Programs Results

Towards This End We Will Act to Right Of # People to Peace & Social Justice

WFWO and its partners working for results World For World Organization (WFWO) and its partners is working for the results and is dedicated and concerned to support! NGOs, CBOs and local Communities in developing countries (DCs) in order to contribute to the achievement of the Eight Millennium! Development Goals (MDGs), with only three years left to reach 2015 MDG deadline and many DCs struggling to meet the targets. WFWO is continue to strengthen its campaigns to raise awareness focused on MDGs under slogan "One World One Hope, the Millennium Development Goals Is Common Vision and Global Commitments", this commitments is more relevant than ever for all. " WFWO works in close cooperation with its partners to contribute to reduce poverty in the DCs by supporting and strengthening the local communities, NGOs, CBOs services and increasing access to grant facilities to contribute to MDGs. The high priority of the WFWO is MDG Goal 1: Eradicate extreme! Poverty and hunger as well MDG Goals 2/3/4: Health, Education and promote gender equality and empower women, MDG Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability. " WFWO operates in more than 45 DCs roughly 90% of its program portfolio is in poor countries and also emerging from natural disaster and crisis or conflict. In 2011/2012, local sustainable development programs accounted for 70% of its program delivery; grant programs for 40% to 70% of WFWO’s overall portfolio is in Africa; 35% is in Asia 30% and Latin America 10%. Over 80% of the supported sustainable programs, by NGOs, CBOs partners are included the components of the poverty elevation, food, water, health, sanitary, education, gender equality to empowerment of women, WFWO's Gender Equality Local sustainable development program, designed to ensure that grants is to contribute to women, children, is now fully operational in Africa and Asia DCs.

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!Review

#

#

#

operations and Programs Results

Towards This End We Will Act to Right Of # People to Peace & Social Justice

WFWO and its partners working for results WFWO Operations Team (OT) related to Emergency Operations Programs (EOP) Evaluation Progress Review Report (EPRR) and recommendations related to Emergency Operations Programs (EOP) for 2011-12 is constantly increasing needs are the result of a combination of factors, notably the larger number of refugees and displaced persons resulting from man-made crises in Africa and Asia, the impact of natural disasters which is increasing, partly as a result of climate change, the continued impact of the economic crisis affecting particularly the most vulnerable populations and a tightening of the humanitarian area that make the delivery of aid and access to beneficiaries more and more difficult and risk of lost life of our OP staff and voluntary Team (VT) due to no security is guarantee in the field. In this context WFWO/OT for each emergency operation crisis, for specific country/region needs to evaluate any risk to be identified by OT/ EOP and our experts partners in the field including NGOs, CBOs, local authorities under general coordination of the WFWO’s Executive President (EP) in order to provide all necessary road map of the action for first aid program and to give an insight into the nature and the depth of needs. WFWO/ OT recommendations on the review report stress that the access (security and logistical) constraints are often a key obstacle to reaching beneficiaries, which can be partially overcome by supporting humanitarian logistics, in this context needs more attention and action on the purpose in order to facilitate to work of the WFWO/OT to reached the its target. In 2011-12 in Horne of Africa, WFWO/OT Humanitarian Emergency Operations, which takes place alongside development, such as the First Aid and rehabilitation program, water, sanitary, capacity-building interventions, is needed to address life-saving needs of several thousands of vulnerable people, including notably refugees, internally displaced as well as host communities, and to protect them, also possible prepare conditions for a proper transition towards longer-term interventions (Emergency Relief Rehabilitation Program- (ERRP).

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!Review

#

#

#

operations and Programs Results

Towards This End We Will Act to Right Of # People to Peace & Social Justice

WFWO and its partners working for results The WFWO/OT Emergency Operation Program (EOP) Review Progress Report (RPR) and recommendations for 2011-12 needs assessments and resources for the up coming years to be focus on the human and economic losses caused by natural disasters are devastating and conflicts as priority. Recurrent acute humanitarian needs have been identified in various situations, such as the drought-affected areas in the Sahel or the Horn of Africa, that the WFWO is already working with its partners, in Cameroon, Senegal, Somalia, and Nigeria and Ivory Coast for the pilot project related to sustainable development programs in the region. The WFWO is working in close partnership for its lending programs for 2011-15 are more than 10 poor Income in developing countries in particularly in Africa, and Asia. The goal of WFWO assistance to these countries is to enhance sustainable development and poverty reduction in pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals. The Task Force resource mobilizations team uses a variety of financial instruments mechanism like co-financing of programs as grant or loan to facilitate as well as bilateral contribution with the different actors for the Development Cooperation to achieve our common objectives. In 2011-12, WFWO/Operation Team and expert, headed by the Executive President has visited on the purpose of official identification and appraisal mission results in more than 7 countries in Africa is to implement and review its lending programs in close cooperation partnership with high level of the governments is to: To establish relations and to enter in negotiation the opportunities with government in order to provide grants to support local communities sustainable development programs, over come their poverty, food, water, health, education, women gender equality, houses, hospital, school, energy capacity building, including the infrastructural facilities to contribute to the Eight MDGs The results the WFWO have signed a partnership with some countries eligible for grants and for the success of the identification and appraisal mission recommendations report.

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!Review

operations and Programs Results

WFWO Strategy Framework Plan for 2012-15 WFWO Strategy Framework Plan (SFP) for 2012-2015 on Resources Mobilizations , was revised by the WFWO’s Board Directors, due to since 2008 no performance maintained and lost of the investments by the former "Executive Board Resource Mobilizations Team (EBDRMT)" this has created a lots of delay to implement "WFWO lending programs and grants for SFP 2008/09/10/11/12. In this context the WFWO/BD/EP has taken a drastic decision to end the contract to the former EBDRMT task force. " WFWO/BD/EP is working to find the best solutions to select and nominate as soon as possible the new WFWO/Resource Mobilizations Team /International Task Force (RMT/TF) for 2013, in order to take the necessary action to straighten the mobilization of resources through effective partnerships among all stakeholders and to play a catalytic role to give more importance of targeting grants assistance for 2011-15 to implement its lending programs in developing countries needs assistance focusing on: improving development effectiveness of food security, health, drinking water, educations, HIV/AIDS, environment issues, grants, to support sustainable development programs with particular emphasis on the needs of women and children and straighten our relations with our partners, countries local Communities, NGOs, CBOs networks as a result of opportunities to improve our common programs and objectives as per strategy frame work plan and WFWO policy and Project Cycle Design Procedure Guidelines "(PCMDPG). WFWO Strategy Framework Plan (SFP) for 2012-15, will focus on areas with the potential for high-impact, sustainable solutions that can reach local communities, NGOs, CBOs. We work closely with the new RMT/TF and financial partners to respond to our needs to support innovative approaches and programs to expand existing ones so they reach the people who need them most to help themselves in order to contribute to the eight MDGs targets. We also support policy and advocacy efforts to accelerate progress against the world’s most acute poverty. Our mission will continue to work closely with our financial partners and communities to achieve our common objectives"to increase opportunities and investing on poor people in developing countries to overcome their poverty.

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!Review

operations and Programs Results

WFWO and its Partners, are closely interrelated and integrated the components of the project activities and objectives on “Promoting UN Partnership initiatives with Local NGOs, CBOs by Regions and Strengthening their Capacity to Enhance their Contribution to the MDGs for Human Security and Local Sustainable Development”, as shown by the following diagram: Interrelation of the Project components, activities & objectives outputs and results:

WFWO and its Partners, are closely interrelated and integrated the components of the project activities and objectives on “Promoting UN Partnership initiatives with Local NGOs, CBOs by Regions and Strengthening their Capacity to Enhance their Contribution to the MDGs for Human Security and Local Sustainable Development”, as shown by the following diagram: The Main WFWO Partnership Group:

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!Review

operations and Programs Results

WFWO and its Partners, are closely interrelated and integrated the components of the project activities and objectives on “Promoting UN Partnership initiatives with Local NGOs, CBOs by Regions and Strengthening their Capacity to Enhance their Contribution to the MDGs for Human Security and Local Sustainable Development�, as shown by the following diagram: WFWO Operations Programs around the worlds since 2002:

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VIII. WFWO & Millennium Development Goals

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!WFWO

& Millennium Development Goals

2012 is an Opportunity Towards to World We Want Beyond 2015 WFWO and Civil Society around the world emphasizes the need for a new global vision for the people and the planet that is radical, ambitious and universal: •that is strongly rooted in and uses International Human Rights instruments as the basis for accountability •that is universal in its application across the north and the south and addresses the redistribution of wealth •that empowers communities on the ground to claim their entitlements traditionally excluded groups •that is holistic and addresses the issues of human rights, inequality, gender justice and environmental sustainability •that is led by the United Nations (as opposed to other global fora such as the G20) Between now and the end of 2015, we will work together to develop a unifying, coherent global agenda and take action to influence the positions of national governments and the United Nations. Moreover, we call on the UN Secretary General to provide personal leadership on the post - 2015 Agenda. WFWO and its Partners and Civil Society, stressed the world leaders must renew their commitments to cooperating to meet and exceed the MDGs, while also using the year 2012, especially the opportunity of Rio+20, to start dialogues for a bold and progressive Development Goals for the post-2015 era, which aim at the pro-poor transformation of social relationships from the protection and enhancement of public goods at all levels, as well as meeting specific numerical targets in key areas that matter most to the women, men and children living in poverty. To do these, the mobilization of necessary resources, domestic and international, must be made systematic, automatic and mandatory rather than continuing to relay on voluntary and arbitrary goodwill contributions by governments and corporations.

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!WFWO

& Millennium Development Goals

2012 is an Opportunity Towards to World We Want Working with Partners WFWO is strongly active in the “voluntary and collaborative relationships between various parties, both public and non-public, in which all participants agree to work together to achieve a common purpose on undertake a specific task and, as mutually agreed, to share risks and responsibilities, resources and benefits”. We leverage these partnerships in support of gender equality and right for social justice goals. WFWO aims to exercise its strengths in partnership to promote equal outcomes for social justice for man, women and children: poverty, education, health, water, energy, technical expertise and efficient procurement; and the ability to contribute to catalyze policy and social change, make innovations accessible to partners and provide financial support. All these provide significant opportunities to advance gender equality for rights for social justice. WFWO integrates the commitment to gender equality into its activities with global, regional and national partners, and also enters into partnership specifically to advance gender equality goals, where this is necessary or has potential bring about attention to girls as well as boys in policy advocacy and dialogue, program cooperation and joint action, and/or to empower women and girls. Where formal agreements are made among partners, such as Memorandum of Understanding and Program Cooperation and bilateral contribution. We understand gender equality to be a pre-condition for the attainment of the MDGs and integral to poverty reduction. WFWO works for gender equality across all Focus Areas, as set out in the MDGs and WFWO strategy plan and its Foundation on Social Justice and Gender Equality. WFWO undertakes emergency/humanitarian response, including in post conflict situations, in a gender-equal manner as part of its overall commitments to national development and realization of human rights. Preparedness and risk reduction activities that take full account of gender differences enable partners to respond more completely when emergency strikes, and to “build back better” through the immediate establishment of rights-based processes and enhanced gender equality in the early post crisis and recovery phases, so that any opportunity for positive transformative change is seized.

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!WFWO

& Millennium Development Goals

2012 is an Opportunity Towards to World We Want In 2012 WFWO shows that all partners have an essential role to play in improving sustainable development programs focusing on: humanitarian aids, poverty, food security, health, education, drinking water, sanitary, energy in particular for women’s and children’s health. But we urgently need to step up progress including through the involvement new partners and increased delivery of new commitments, if we are to meet the ambitious of the Millennium development Goals and our aim to save 1 million lives by 2015. there is no single format for commitments. Example include: a) Policy commitments that put women and children at the center, mobilize resources, raise public awareness to support and improve accountability. b) Service delivery commitments that ensure sustainable development programs focusing on women and children have access to life-saving prevention, quality treatment and care when and where they need it. c) campaign and call international communities and support to commitments that increase domestic resources or support governments and other key actors in a country. WFWO and its Partners, and Civil Sociality called for an urgent need to ensure all the necessary action - political commitment, funding, leadership - so the world can accelerate progress and reach the Millennium Development Goal sanitation target. The world can turn around and transform the lives of millions that still do not have access to basic sanitation. The rewards would be immense for health, ending poverty at its source, and well-being. The Fundamental challenge of our time is to end poverty in this generation and significantly narrow the global gap between rich and poor without ruing the environmental basis for our survival of our planet, in order to integrate the three dimensions of sustainable developmentnamely economic, social and environmental. We need more energy, water not less, to end poverty and raise global living standards, by highlighting the link between water, energy, health, sanitary and poverty to stressed the need to invest in innovative technologies and strategies to ensure countries can continue growing economically without harming the environment, to contribute to the eight MDGs target by 2015.

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!WFWO

& Millennium Development Goals

In 2012 WFWO and its Partners, and Civil Sociality continue to called for an urgent need to ensure all the necessary action - political commitment, funding, leadership - so the world can accelerate progress and reach the eight Millennium development Goal, in practically, food security, health. drinking water, sanitation, energy and ending the poverty target. The world can turn around and transform the lives of millions that still do nor have access to basic services. The rewards would be immense for health, ending poverty at its source, and well-being. But our work is not done yet, with the limited resources, WFWO continue to contribute to the MDGs as per action programs below for 2011-12. To respond to commitment and engagement to contribute to the eights MDGs. WFWO and its partners signed Memorandum of Understanding in December 2012 to implement and to work to further progress will require equity - and impact-focused sustainable development programs and aggressive resource mobilization efforts at all levels to close vital funding gaps to approve and to contribute to the eight MDGs programs keys: poverty, food security, health, water, education, sanitary, energy and infra-structural facilities.

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IX. WFWO Contribution to the eight MDGs

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88


2009

2010

2011

2012

Change

KEY FIGURES

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 1 – Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger BENEFICIARIES

78,867

1,789

2,067

2,345

8,930

1,205

1,356

1,567

21,390

4,478

5,045

5,489

4,815

1,080

1,250

1,534

1,835

300

420

510

thousands of poor people in 46 countries (44 countries in 2 008, 38 countries in 2007 and 2009/2010) thousand of women and children

thousan d

of

rehabilitation

a ssistance

programs thousand

of

internally displaced people

program thousand

of

returnees

rehabilitation

program

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 2 - Achieve Universal Primary Education thousand of schoolchildren school meals/take-home rations 44,300

1,981

2,967

3,789

receiving

▲ percent who were girls

43.1

6

45

20

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 3 – Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women BENEFICIARIES

51.4

10

55.5

15

percent of beneficiaries who were women or girls in the program thousand of w omen were in leadership positions on association management committees of program

231

55

198

47

18,970

450

22,987

511

4,815

256

5780

367

thousand of women receiving household food assistance program at d istribution points in general food distributions thousand of household food entitlements program were issued in women!s names for general food distributions and support as focal points coordination

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 4 – Reduce Child Mortality Thousand of c hildren were assisted by WFWO NGOs, CBOs partners operation program 243,10

146,200

78

1,985

321

136,700

98

1,845

▲ thousand of children diagnosed with malnutrition received special nutritional support by WFWO, NGOs, CBOs partners operations programs

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89


2009

2010

2011

2012

Change

KEY FIGURES

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 5 – Improve Maternal Health BENEFICIARIES

10,438

879

11,643

987

thousand of vulnerable women receiving additional nutritional support through maternal child health programs by WFWO through NGO, CBO partners

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 6 – Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases Special program to support of 3 highest HIV and AIDS prevalence countries receiving assistance throug h WFWO NGO, CBO programs 243.10

465

250.10

511 thousand of peo ple affected by HV and AIDS receiving by WFWO and its partners health and prevention assistance

149.367

289

143.151

245 countries receiving assistance u n der tuberculosis and HIV and AIDS prevention activities through WFWO, NGO, CBO operation

146,200

2,356

140,167

2,110

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 7 – Ensure Environmental Sustainability BENEFICIARIES thousand of pe ople receiving assistance program focusing on the environmental prevention as an incentive to build assets, attend training, build resilience to shocks and preserve livelihoods including the ingenious people 178

123.970

23

1,870

345

198,345

46

2,634

Raise public awareness program at all levels locally, nationally and internationally to contribute to the environmental issue, water, sanitary, energy in developing countries

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 8 – Develop a Global Partnership for Development stand- and supported by WFWO co -financiers partners

743.10

1,267

1,087

1,437

987

12

1,091

20

6,8

4

8,3

6

546,200

emergenc y operations joint assessment missions conducted by WFWO and its partners, NGO, CBO , local authorities corporate and private entities donating cash and in-kind gifts worth this year non-governmental organizations working with WFWO in the field operations to save time and money

46 589,400

49

Annual Report 2011-2012

90


!WFWO’s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World:

Our achievements"to raise a public awareness on global development agenda for 2011-12, with support of our partners, including the contributions of WFWO’s Goodwill Ambassadors, WFWO Friends for more than 8000 networks around word, including private sector, in order to contribute to the end of extreme poverty and to implement the Eight MDGs objectives to be reached by 2015: WFWO highlighted that will continue to work closely with its partners NGOs, CBOs from Africa, Asia and Latin America region, in order to implement and to achieve the objective of the Millennium Development Goals (1/2/3/4/7) and to maintain the human right for the indigenous people sustainable development programs, is essential for the numbers of the world's indigenous peoples can truly live in dignity, justice, prosperity and peace. The aims of the WFWO to focus on the public Awareness to promote UN MDGs and global development issues is to call attention to the international communities through WFWO’s networks, to promote Global development agenda and to observe the United Nations activities that need more attention and action in particularly the eight MDGs such as the World Food Day, World AIDS Day, World Malaria Day, World Environment Day, United Nations Day, World Women’s Day, World Water Day, World Humanitarian Day, World’s Indigenous People Day, International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. For further information please visit the WFWO’s website at Media and Publications. WFWO’s campaign under slogan "One World One Hope - The Millennium Development Goals Millennium is!Common Vision and Global Commitments". We are very proud with the results and we will continue to work in this direction with all our supporters and partners to ensure these goals are achieved through innovation, inspiration and partnership of all forms contributions to make the"difference to our world.

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X. International Meetings, Roundtable, Seminars, Briefing Sessions and Special Events Achieved for 2011-12

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92


!WFWO’s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World:

WFWO’s events in 2011-12 was focused on the International meeting and Roundtable - Seminars - Briefing Sessions, in order to promote the Millennium Development Goals and to raise public awareness on global development issues and to call international leaders and communities to react and to implement the MDGs targets to be reached by 2015. The majority of events is organized and sponsored by the WFWO’s and its Partners, under the patronage of local Authorities and hosting selected countries in different Regions around the world. The main objectives of the WFWO Roundtables/Seminars, Briefing Sessions organized in 2011-12, in close partnership with the Universities, Schools, Private Sectors, Group and Governments, on a global learning process that has on learning from successful and efforts to reduce poverty in developing countries and to contribute to the achievement international agreed goals. See below the highlights events organized in 2011-12 by the WFWO’s network around the world:

Grand Gala of Solidarity to Support the Children, 5 January 2011 Rome (Italy)

World Future Energy Summit 17-19 January 2011, Abu Dhabi (UAE)

Arab Health Congress 24-27 January 2011, Dubai (UAE)

United Nations Commission for Social Development 9-18 February 2011, New York (USA)

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!WFWO’s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World:

Commission on the Status of Women 22 February - 8 March 2011, New York (USA)

CSD-19 IPM and UNCSD Prepcom II 28 February - 8 March 2011, New York (USA)

The International Observatory of the Human Right to Peace 9 March 2011, Geneva (Switzerland)

International Year for Youth Briefing Session 9 March 2011, New York (USA)

Building peace: reconciliation through the Power of Education, the science, culture and communication 11 March 2011, New York (USA)

World Water Day 22 March 2011

Special Event to raise public awareness on the occasion of the World Water Day 25 March 2011, Rome (Italy)

Youth Open Day “Gioventu Ribelle” 17 April 2011

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!WFWO’s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World:

Sustainable Energy Week 17 April 2011, Rome (Italy) 4th Annual Convergences 2015 Forum Solidarity and Responsibility: Investing and Working towards the Millennium Development Goals 2015” 3-5 May 2011, Paris (France) 18th Conference Copeam “A shared Mediterranean Audiovisual, Landscape, New Challenges for Copeam after 15 Years of Action” 12-15 May 2011, Ayia Napa (Cyprus)

World Summit on the Information Society 16-20 May 2011, Geneva (Switzerland)

Human Rights in a Globalized World Challenges for the Media 20-22 June 2011, Bonn (Germany)

6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathologenesis Treatment and Prevention 17-20 July 2011, Rome (Italy)

6th World Environmental Education Congress 19-23 July 2011, Brisbane (Australia)

World Family Summit +7 5-7 December 2011, Abu Dhabi (UAE)

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!WFWO’s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World:

Confimea Conference to support the Private Sector, crucial for Italy Economy with the Support of the WFWO towards MDGs (8) 21 December 2011, Rome Italy

Commission on the Status of Women 27 February - 9 March 2012, New York (USA)

United Nations on Sustainable Development 20-22 June 2012, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

ECOSOC - High Level Segment 2 - 9 July 2012, UN New York (USA)

Summit on Food Security 14-15 November 2012, Doha (Qatar)

ARTs for Development 25-27 November 2012, Dubai (UAE)

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XI. Strategic Framework Plan Directions for 2012-15

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!Strategic Framework Plan Directions for 2012-15 WFWO’s key future challenges being able to respond effectively to growing partners demand for its assistance in local sustainable development program and grant to contribute to MDGs and this challenge implies three central priorities for the period 2012–15. To strengthening WFWO’s operations activities the recent growth level of activities has nearly doubled over the past 9 years In the last 2 years alone the number of Financial Service Providers supported by WFWO and its financial partners has more than doubled keeping responding to this demand means that WFWO must place high priority on maintaining strong and effective operational mechanisms for up coming activities for 2011-15 has already produced an overall framework strategy plan for strengthening WFWO’s operations, including its resource base Implementing this framework will be a high priority for 2012–15. Remarks: The Chairman of the EBDRMT since 2008 committed and confirmed by agreement and approved by the Resource Mobilizations Task Force Executive Chairman of the Board Directors of RMT/TF/representatives of more than 10 nations and partners of WFWO (Unfortunately this funding committed by the EBDRMT Chairman, no yet reached to WFWO since 2008. This regards delay caused a lot of problems to WFWO planning lending programs and grants. In this context in the end of 2010 the WFWO Board Directors has decided to revoked the nominations of all members of the EBDRMT, due to no perform and results. However the WFWO EBD is selecting a new team for of Task Force on Resource Mobilizations to be nominated shortly in order to archive the WFWO objectives for the up coming years. Annex I. WFWO Global Project Portfolio 2012-15 Country Project

Project Area

Financial Partners

Project description

Morocco first pilot project

Local Development Region

RMT/TF Bilateral Co-financing Partners

WFWO’s Sustainable Development Village Project (SDVP

10

5 years

Rep. Congo

-

-

-

-

-

Ghana

-

-

-

-

-

Sudan

-

-

-

-

-

Philippine

-

-

-

-

-

Morocco

-

-

-

-

-

Nigeria

-

-

-

-

-

Annual Report 2011-2012

Total Project Cost US$

Duration

98


Note : WFWO’s Team for 2011/12 was composed by staff (10) professional and support staff, including (25) expert consultants international by Gender 50/50 % and by geographical distributions, and only by contract when is necessary and needed for project approved, this will help us to save resources for administration issues ,in order to be included in for program budget. The major support is provided by voluntary staff (45)

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XII. Financial Analysis and Statements

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100


!Financial Analysis

and Statements

2011-12 contributions to WFWO regular and other resources WFWO’s total 2011-12 income was about $ 700 in regular or core, funds; and $700 ml grant for Africa in earmarked, or non-core, funds provided directly under WFWO grant program from bilateral contributions partners. Development partners increased their contributions to WFWO 2011-12 regular resources by $700. The main donors substantially increased their contributions to support direct programs through the resource mobilizations task force by more than 90%. The increase was largely a result of a decision to convert earmarked resources to regular resources. Since year’s 2008/09/10, all funding commitments by EBDRMT/TF were secured for the up coming years as per agreement signed in 2009. Although other donors slightly decreased its contribution in 2009/10, it remained the largest contributor is the EBDRMT/ TF to WFWO regular resources committed for 2009-15. There was an overall decrease in other resources from $300 in 2008 to $700 in 2011/12 distributed for grants programs. In 2012, WFWO signed a New Development Accords Agreements (MOU) with our partners WWH and EBDRMT/TF to contribute to the MDGs. These funds of $12 ml committed for 2012-2015, by promissory notes certificate (NASDAK) to support WFWO’s activities around the world on sustainable development programs and inclusive financing programs in the Least Developed Countries to contribute to the MDGs. (But this commitments no yet reached the WFWO) While continuing to rely on a relatively small of donors to regular resources contributions to WFWO earmarked resources are becoming increasingly diverse. In addition to bilateral partners, WFWO enjoys support from development and financial institutions, foundations, private sector: are Holding 888.com, Terra Finance USA for an grant, including the logistical of kinds support to emergency operations. WFWO continues to be overly dependent on too few donors to regular resources WFWO’s donors contribute 90% or Regular Resources. Continuing to diversify and expand the regular resource base remains a top priority to strengthening its partnership thought EBDRMT/TF for the organization of the most funding direct resources for its programs worldwide under the WFWO, from other donors on the other hand, are becoming increasingly diverse, from Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force EBDRMT/TF) and bilateral and multilateral cooperation, WFWO support from development financial institutions, foundations, the private sector, in order to contribute to the achievement of the eight MDGs. !

! !

!

!

!

!

Contributions WFWO for 2011/12

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!Financial Analysis

and Statements

Table 1. Expenditure trends 2010 -2011-2012 (in thousand of USD) 2010

2011

2012

Expenditu r e s Program expenditures

160

210

250

- of which regular resources

210

230

250

- of which other resources

240

240

320

WFWO Support

120

140

160

Total

730

840

880

Source: Financial statements for WFWO as of 31 December 2012 before closing of accounts. *Both years include approximately Expenditures in 2008 and 2009 include respectively other funding provided by other bilateral cooperation donors partners under the WFWO programs directly or in directly and fund committed by EBDRMT Task Force.

The main WFWO’s program of resources will continue its effort of funding through EBDRMT/TF and its financial partners to be allocated and focusing to Africa and Asia & Latin America. In 2011-12, 50% of country program expenditures went to Africa, followed by Asia and the Latin America 30% Africa also accounted for the majority of expenditure within WFWO’s global activities, which in 2011 accounted for 5% share of program expenditures, up from 5% in 2012. This growth in global activities was largely a result of the grant program becoming fully operational in 4 developing countries in Africa and Asia, 20% that are emergency operation, natural disasters and post-conflict countries. The global program figure also includes the Gender Equality and workshops and public awareness’ campaigns to contribute to MDGs. The local sustainable development programs, is jointly cost sharing by EBDRMT/TF and other financial partners to be implemented by year’s 2012-15.

Table 2. 2011/12 Program expenditures per region Local development building capacity and practice area (in thousand, USD)

Sustainable development program

Emergency Operations Grant Program

Regions/specific purposes Africa

50

200

200

250

Asia & Pacific

50

200

200

250

Latin America & Caribbean

25

100

100

150

Global activities

100

200

200

200

Capacity building & Workshops, knowledge management

150

150

150

150

MDGs Awareness & Campaign

100

120

50

50

Total

425

970

850

900

Source:Financial statements for WFWO as of yeas ! 2011, !31 December and 31 December !2012 !before final closing of accounts

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!Financial Analysis

and Statements

WFWO at a glance WFWO will continue its effort with its financial partners to provide grants program aid and technical support to help local communities and NGOs, CBOs in order to reach more poor households and small businesses, and local governments. Provide co-financing sustainable development programs focus on poverty alleviation, health, education water improvement, infrastructure facilities, hospital, feeder roads, schools, that will improve poor peoples’ lives and to contribute to eight MDGs.

Annex II: Financial Statements

WFWO Income and Expenditures 2011-2012(Thousands of USA)

2011

2012

Voluntary Contributions

1

1

Cost Sharing Contributions

700

700

Sub-trust funds bilateral contributions grant program

300

300

Sub Total

1.1

1.1

Interest Income

3

4

Reimbursable Support Services

10

10

Other Income

10

10

TOTAL INCOME

13

14

EXPENDITURE

10

10

Program

25

30

Regular- Resources

700

700

Cost -Sharing

350

350

Sub Trust funds (Bilateral contributions)

975

1.3

Sub Total

976

1.3

Supplementary Budget- net

25

25

Management & Administration costs

20

22

Technical Support costs

20

22

Reimbursable support Services costs

30

25

Sub Total

90

94

Other expenditure

100

200

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

190

294

EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE)

-

-

Savings on prior biennium obligations

--

--

Transfer to/from/ a supplementary funds

10

10

Refunds to donors & transfer to/from/other funds

2.000

5

Funds balances 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2012

15.000

10

FUNDS BALANCES, 31 DECEMBER

18.000

10

INCOME

Report date as of 31 July 2011 to 31 December 2012

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!Financial Analysis

and Statements

Annex III: Financial Statements WFWO Balance Sheet 2011/12 (Thousands of USA)

2011

2012

Cash

10

15

Investments by EBDRMT/TF

12

250

Grants to NGOs, CBOs,

250

350

Operating funds provided from EBDRMT/TF directly to programs

250

50

Operating funds provided by bilateral & Cooperation donors partners

15

20

Operating funds provided from EBDRMT/TF for executing agencies partners (PN)

250

250

Other accounts receivable and deferred charges

1

1

Accrued interest

1

1

TOTAL ASSETS

789

937

LIABILITIES

-

--

250

250

Operating Fund payable to Executing agencies

12

15

Promissory note obligations and commitments (PN)

12.

12

Accounts payable

--

--

Supplementary Budget for emergency operations

30

45

Deferred Income

2

3

TOTAL LIABILITIES

306

325

COMMITTED FUND BALANCES

12

12

Operational funds committed by RTM/TF

12

12

Unexpended Resources

--

--

Regular Resources

700

700

Cost Sharing

350

350

Sub trust funds from direct program under the WFWO

10

20

Sub Total

1,084

1,094

Reimbursable Support Services

20

20

Total Unexpended Resources

10

20

TOTAL COMMITTED FUND BALANCES, 31 DECEMBER BT RMT/TF/Promissory Note

12.000

12.000

TOTAL LIABILITIES, COMMITTED FUND BALANCES BY RMT/TF/Promissory Note

12.030

12.40

ASSESTS

Operating Fund by RMT/TF payable to NGOs. CBOs

(PN)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

Notes to the Financial Statements Since the financial crisis WFWO has established an Task Force as Resource mobilizations Team composed by its Executive Chairman and Board Directors, dealing directly and coordinating all the financial resource to support the WFWO’s activities a round world in order to contribute to the eight MDGs. The Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force is the trustee of the executive board members and its Financial partners has an clear mandate and terms of reference as resource mobilizations Team and responsible of resources as trustee: and to maintain its commitment for all resources to the WFWO.

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!Financial Analysis

and Statements

Mandate and goals objectives on the EBDRMT/TF: The EBDRMT/TF has a clear mission is to assist the WFWO mandate in developing countries, in order to contribute to eight MDGs targets, amongst them, “in the development of their economies by supplementing existing sources of capital assistance by means of grants and loans and cofinancing projects under WFWO name and working throughout developing countries and making full use of its capital investment mandate and flexible financial instruments, WFWO’s goals are to reduce poverty and the achievement of the eight Millennium Development Goals by: a) Increasing access by poor people and NGOs, CBOs and local communities to grant microfinance credit b) Improving the delivery of pro-poor services and infrastructure at the local level and support government c) Supporting the WFWO grant and sustainable development program to implement in developing countries d) Managing the resources and provide all support to WFWO’s activities e) The RMT/TF Chairman serves simultaneously as the Managing Executive Director of Global Project Management and other members of Board. The Executive Chairman of the RMT/TF report to Executive President of the WFWO. f) Since the financial crisis the Executive President and the Secretary General did not receive any remuneration from the WFWO during the current financial year. Committed Contributions by RMT/TF/USD

2012

2013

Committed contributions from RMT/TF by promissory note

12

12

Total

12

12

g) Grants Grants balances pending have been restated to include US$ 700 in outstanding grant at end of 31 December 2012 due to no funding received yet as per commitment of the EBDRMT/TF and other donors, the grants had initially been recorded as grants the outstanding grants actually is pending as balance shown in the statements reflect current that are scheduled to be disbursed in the year coming. Grants to the NGOs, CBOs

2011

2012

Grants

700

850

Total

700

850

Financial Highlights – 2011-12 The members of the WFWO Board of Trustees confirm that the summarized financial statements on this page are a summary of the information extracted from the full annual financial statements, which were approved on"30 September 2011 and 2012. The summarized financial statements may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the Organization. For further information, please consult the full annual financial statements, the auditors’ report and the Trustees’ Report. The summarized financial statements do not constitute full financial statements within the meaning of the Organization policy. A copy of the statutory financial statements of WFWO, upon which the auditors have reported with Approved by the members of the Board of Trustees and signed and committed by the Chairperson of EBDRMT/TF. Independent Auditors’ Statement/EBDRMT/TF Trustees" We have examined the summarized financial statements of the WFWO for the year July 2011 ended 31 December 2012. Respective responsibilities of trustees and auditors is under :

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!Financial Analysis

and Statements

The members of the Board of Trustees are responsible for preparing the summarized financial statements in accordance with the recommendations of the WFWO policy. Our responsibility is to report to you our opinion on the consistency of the summarized financial statements with the full financial statements and the trustees’ report. We also read the other information contained in the summarized annual report and considered the implications for our report if we became aware of any apparent misstatements or material inconsistencies with the summarized financial statements. Basis of opinion We conducted our work in accordance with international standards on auditing issued by the Auditing Practices Board for use internationally. Opinion In our opinion, the summarized financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements and the Trustees’ Report of the WFWO for the year July 2011 ended 31 December 2012. Funding from Supporters to the !WFWO’s activities" WFWO gratefully acknowledges support from our financial partners, private sector corporations, and individuals in 2010. We are enormously grateful to all of our donors,"including those whose gifts under $1.00 Can Make"the Difference." Every contribution is very important to WFWO." Funding commitments for 2012-15! The Establishment of the Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (EBDRMT/TF) "Trustee will play an catalytic "role on the future WFWO resources"(but unfortunately we do not yet reached any funding committed by EBDRMT for 2013.) Keeping our promises:! Your contributions are in good hands! World For World Organization (WFWO), is committed to addressing the vital need for food security, education, drinking water and health, environment. We aim to increase our impact both directly on the ground through our partner organizations, and indirectly by influencing others and promoting best practice in the field in developing countries,"any resources entrusted to us has the potential to be transform on specific projects to be directed to " rural communities"and population, women, children and families needed." Program Services! - Honoring our Partners and Donators in all we do " The WFWO’s, believes the resources at our disposal are a sacred trust of our partners, donors and supporters"on behalf of the poor. Due to it is our faith that motivates us to serve the poor, we are accountable not only to our partners and donors and supporters"Our commitment to stewardship means we optimize and distribute resources where they are needed most. Programs and costs are carefully monitored and reviewed, donations and grants are used for their intended purposes, and funds are leveraged for maximum impact. Overhead rate is one of several metrics WFWO uses to evaluate the efficiency of our work." We also"recognize that Humanitarian programs effectiveness should not be judged by its overhead alone. To successfully carry out our mission of freeing children, women, indigenous and poor peoples around the world from poverty, WFWO regularly monitors and evaluates our programs to"ensure the highest quality and efficiency and evaluations, as per WFWO’s policy and lending"criteria. Resource Governance" In order to increase the transparency and accountability of WFWO, we hereby outline our main practices and"mechanisms on resource governance." Fund and Project Cycle Design Management Procedures and Guidelines!" WFWO manages all projects and donations itself and there are rigorous procedures to ensure the proper use of"donations. Before confirming support to a project, WFWO ensures the availability of ministry funding and appraises the project plans and budgets based on the needs assessments. All funding and budget commitments follow WFWO's standard policies and procedures and are monitored by WFWO’s Resource Mobilization Team. After a project is completed, an evaluation is performed to assess the"effectiveness and efficiency of the project for future"improvement as per WFWO’s policy and"procedures guidelines." Operations Cost Control" Our operations are bounded by strict cost controls. Internal policies and procedures on expenditure are in place to ensure that every dollar raised is properly used. During this past year, only 5% of annual income was spent on"administration and fund-raising, while 80% to up 90% of our income was used for global relief and"sustainable development programs and grants."

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WFWO's !Success and experience leaned Small and beautiful: WFWO"is the organization of its kind, promising to"contribute to the Millennium Development Goals Objectives and support NGOs, CBOs in the provision of quality sustainable development programs, and helping them advocate the development global issues. Responsive: WFWO Team"has proved it is able to adjust to the changing economic, political and social situations in combining both development and emergency interventions. Trustworthy: WFWO"has established it- self as a professional, reliable and accountable organization. Through its hard work it has been able to gain the trust of both donors and local partners. Respected: WFWO’s board of directors includes experts in civil society; representatives of umbrella NGO networks and unions; scholars; and private sector representatives. Together, they add value and expertise. Effective:"Since 2002, WFWO has been expanding its operations throughout the least developed countries; Africa, Asia, Latin America to reach out to the needy, poor and vulnerable, and target NGOs and CBOs of varying capacities. WFWO’s interventions help thousands every year in various on granting and sustainable development "programs to contribute to"eight Millennium Development Goals Objectives. Committed: WFWO"is committed to spending its funds in an efficient and transparent manner. Its highly qualified team are dedicated and committed to its values, principles and community needs. WFWO experience leaned that we can archive our common objectives only with the support and participation of our stakeholders and beneficiaries .

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107


!Major

Funders & Partners 2011-12

! Individual Donors:! Sunita Bhudia, Paul Bloemendal,!Elena David, Sofya Taing, Shazia Khan, Eric Goh Polly Glover, Christhopher Morgan, Jamie Johnstone, Robert Scott, Lance Redpath Kathy Compton, Ciara Kenny, Ash Day, Catherine Lopez, Terry Chiu, Guillaume Godin, Agnes Malaty, Michael Ashton, Abdullah Al Shafi! Fabrizio Martelli, Anna Kupka, Kathryn Carlisle, Paul McGovern, Sean Doherty! Sebastian Ford, Creeda Mahon, Donal O'Dea, Sam Price, Florent Carlo Kaiser, Mario Spadari, Anonymous; ! Executive Board Members: WFWO Team Cherif Sidi, Alina Clocotan, Diego Pizzicaroli, Karima Cherif, Eric Deneve Fati Wane, Georgia Spaccapietra, Michelangelo Gressani, Micheal Diego; ! WFWO Friends: The WFWO is composed by more than 8000 members network around the world ! Members: My Huynh Cong, Howard Halyard, Andrew Gittins, Ankit Srivastava Mohamed Cherif, Antonio Gianmarco, Giorgio Amatucci, Davide Cesarini Reda Bourayou, Serban Vornicel, Mihaela Clocotan, Fabiana Santorelli, Giulia Giorgi, Camillo Guilavogui; ! Goodwill Ambassador for Development Network: Asadullah Khan, Md Biozid Jessorey, Arm Moghazy, Mahitab Mekkawi Benjamin Amankwaa, Arjun Dhakal, Wendy Ford, Geraude Kounde, Louis Ndifon, Franklin Dadzie, Mustafa Rahman, Bolade Jimoh, Ayomi Meneko, Kahabi Isangula; ! Executive Resource Mobilizations Task Force Team: 12 New members of committee will be elected in 2013 ,from 12 countries representative: USA, UAE, KSA, IT, FR, SP, SZ, KO,UK,CH,AUS,JOR, BL; ! Foundations: United Nations Federal Credit Union (UNFCU), UN NGO Branch UN NGO IRENE Global, Zayed Foundation International Prize fro the Enviroment Willy Brandt Fondation, Ammado Foundation, Emirates House Group Arts For Development, Matt lamb LTD, Chicago ! Corporations: Google Inc, CONFIMEA, CHIROPRO Italia, L.P.D. Italy, The Best Raffaello Finmarge Counsulting & Travel, Siarco, Cooperlat, Acquaphor Financial Institutions (Bank-SG), Medic4All, Non Profit Shopping Mall Change, Fly for Good, Caffe Press

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WFWO's main "works and objectives "is to contribute "to the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) "to reduce poverty in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) by strengthening local communities, NGOs, CBOs and increasing access to grant program facilities. This Annual Report details its program, management and financial performance in 2010. While management targets were largely met, strengthening WFWO’s operational effectiveness will remain a key priority." A process of internal reflection since the financial crisis in late 2008 led to refined priorities and resources for WFWO"for the period 2010-15, by"the launched of the Resource Mobilizations Task Force and accords of development "with other financial"partners. These include increasing operational effectiveness, responding to LDC demand for new kinds of support, and strengthening strategic partnerships to contribute to the MDGs targets by 2015.

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Report and Photos credits This report was prepared by the WFWO Communications team with support from Operation Team of the WFWO. Designed by Communications Team The WFWO’s 2011-12 Annual Report uses data, photos and stories from the field visit by WFWO Communications and Operations" Teams in Mexico, Republic of Congo," Republic of Ghana, Brazil, Republic of Gabon, Republic Islamic of Mauritania, Republic of Senegal, Burkina Faso, Somalia, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Morocco, during calendar year 2010-12. Photo description, man, women and children in rural area and WFWO Team in the field of action. Keep up to date "with WFWO at www.worldforworld.org Get Involved:You can "be a Goodwill Ambassador for Development, Friend of WFWO our daily e-news bulletin has all the latest information on our work around the world to meetings, to updates on our programs. Sign up online Get involved at www.worldforworld.org" Follow us on : Face book or Twitter WFWO/AR/11/RB Ref. number: AR/E6/11/BT Printed on recycled paper, using vegetable-based inks

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Annual Report 2011-2012  

The World For World Organization (WFWO) is working for the results and is dedicated and concerned to support NGOs, CBOs and Local Communitie...

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