Page 1

Annual Report 2010

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 Page 1


Annual Report 2010

One World One Hope

Goals The Millennium Development is Common Vision and Global Commitments

.

Page 2


Annual Report 2010

“WFWO - Making a Difference and Focused on Results to Contribute to Peoples and to MDGs Objectives”

Page 3


Annual Report 2010

WFWO’s Mission is to Assure Help for the World’s Most Vulnerable People to Help Themselves to Overcome their Poverty

Page 4


Annual Report 2010

Table of Contents: WFWO Mission, Vision, Objectives, Value.................................6 Preface by the Executive President..........................................8 Introduction................................................................................11 The Main Activities to contribute to the MDGs......................21 Operations and programs results.............................................51 Operations Program Around the World since 2002..............68 WFWO and the MDGs.................................................................69 WFWO Achievements to Raise Public Awareness around the World............................................................................................72 Intl. Meetings, Roundtable, Seminars, Briefing Sessions.....73 WFWO Organizational Chart.....................................................77 WFWO Networks.........................................................................78 Financial Analysis & Statement..............................................80 WFWO’s Success.........................................................................87 Major Funders............................................................................88

.

Page 5


Annual Report 2010

OUR MISSION WFWO future and improve their quality of life through the access to food security, drinking water, health, education, poverty, HIV-AIDS programs, micro credit, using local skills and practical, sustainable technologies to support development humanitarian projects on relief and rehabilitation programs, to secure the empowerment of indigenous peoples, local communities, women, groups and individuals in developing countries.

OUR VISION WFWO's vision is of a world where everyone has access to food security, health, childhood, drinking water, education, environmental issue and promote the right of every women and man and child to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity.

OUR OBJECTIVES WFWO development cooperation achievements and the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) targets by 2015.

OUR VALUES The WFWO Main Value and Approach, we believes on People, and shared responsibility among People, dialogue among cultures, and commitment to development issues, diversities and peace and justice for Global Change.

.

Page 6


Annual Report 2010

“Working Together, We Can Achieve Our Global Commitments to End the Poverty!”

Page 7


Annual Report 2010

FOREWORD Preface by the Executive President 2010

was also a difficult year throughout the world. Problems caused by the food crisis were exacerbated by the financial and economic crisis, which hit all of us hardly, in particularly most of all poor developing countries. This meant that we have to take effective response from the WFWO and its partners. Our response was ambitious and wide-ranging were committed to help more than 90 NGOs and CBOs and more than 8 programs in Africa, Asia Latin America and Caribbean regions, due to reduce of funding aid and for their shortfalls budget on food and financial crises.!WFWO shown that will still fighting again poverty and justice with is limited resource, but we were able to targeted responses to contribute to the poor people in order to achieve the international agreed commitments MDGs objectives. The review of the year 2010 for us was one of the most challenging and very difficult tasks to be reached, due to the global issue faced with the triple threat of the food, conflicts, natural disasters and financial crises.!The global financial crisis has pushed millions of peoples into extreme poverty and increased of number of peoples who they lost their jobs, land, they have no income to earn enough for themselves and their families to rise above the poverty. It is critically important how this aid is delivered and with which impact. We continued to make aid more effective through the increased use of countries’ local systems to channel aid, better coordination among donors and better quality technical assistance program and cooperation. In this context, the WFWO Operations Team has been in the forefront of initiatives adopted by WFWO strategy fame work on aid effectiveness and acted as catalyst role in order to improve synergies among!local communities and NGOs, CBOs and! governments in developing countries in particularly in African region. This is seen clearly in our long-term development framework too: while our programs might concentrate on improving water and sanitation, education, health care or livelihoods, at its heart is our commitment to empowering women and to ensuring poor people are heard. Poverty can only end when decision-makers listen to poor people and take their needs into account, and when women have equal representation in political and economic life, imbalance between rich and poor people, and between men and women, we can make the biggest possible impact on poverty with our limited resources to contribute to the eight MDGs.

Page 8


Annual Report 2010

Preface by the Executive President /cont.2 We are working closely with our partners to increase our impact at al levels: the main aims of this year, will be focusing on the appointment of the new members of the Task Force of Resources Mobilizations Team, as well as to the step was taken as the WFWO partners, NGOs, CBOs, WFWO Friends, Goodwill Ambassador and others voluntary advocacy programs around the world which make up the WFWO agreed to work much more closely with its partners in the field where we are present. This will involve working as one WFWO Team. This decision taken by our Executive President and the Board Directors, will increase and facilitate of our strategy of the external relations with stakeholders, financial partners and to influence the policy makers on the effectiveness aid, global campaigns, advocacy, development programs and humanitarian response, and will lead to greater coherence, cost-efficiency, and agility, in order to achieve our common objectives. In conclusion I’m very proud to be part of the solution of the WFWO as Organization that is made up of people from all over the world who have such different backgrounds and life experiences, but who share this global common goals. Let me take this opportunity to express my gratitude to all WFWO team and special thanks will go to the volunteers all over the world for their contributions through their day-to day work and also to our local NGOs, CBOs partners in the field who provides all their technical assistance to ensure that WFWO is governed effectively; and to the tireless campaigners who believe change can happen; to the many donors and fundraisers whose contributions enable us to get funds where they are needed. I thank you again every one for all your contribution to the life-changing work that you can read about in this report. Your strengthening support to the WFWO actives can make the difference, in order to help us to make the greatest possible, long-term impact on the lives of women and men in poverty to contribute to MDGs objectives. Sidi Cherif, Executive President

Page 9


Annual Report 2010

�We believe, that a breakthrough in achieving the MDGs will require abandoning the current and failed models of eradicating poverty that relied on technical inputs and a growth–oriented approach based on economic injustice, disparity and exploitation. In short, the achievement of the MDGs targets requires a holistic approach that is human rights based, social justice oriented, and cognizant of the interconnected gender dimensions of all the MDGs.�

Page 10


Annual Report 2010

I. INTRODUCTION Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 Focus on Raise Public Awareness & Recommendation/Implementation - Report by WFWO’s Communications Team

Page 11


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 Summary Results Report focus on Public Awareness & Recommendations to international community to Toward to!UN MDGs Review Summit 2010 Introduction What are the Millennium Development Goals? 1) Eradicate extreme hunger and poverty 2) Achieve universal primary education 3) Promote gender equality and empower women 4) Reduce child mortality 5) Improve maternal health 6) Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases 7) Ensure environmental sustainability 8) Develop a global partnership for development Where do we stand on the MDGs? The number of people living under the international poverty line of $1.25 a day declined from 1.8 billion to 1.4 billion between 1990 and 2005. The proportion of people living in extreme poverty in developing regions dropped from 46 per cent to 27 per cent — on track to meet the target globally. The economic crisis is expected to push an estimated 64 million more people into extreme poverty in 2010. About one in four children under the age of five is underweight in the developing world, down from almost one in three in 1990. Achievements in the MDGs are due largely as a result of extraordinary success in Asia, mostly East Asia, where the poverty rate in East Asia fell from 60 per cent to under 20 per cent in the last 25 years. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in reducing extreme poverty in sub- Saharan Africa, where the poverty rate declined only slightly, from 58 to 51 per cent between 1990 and 2005. The proportion of people suffering from hunger is declining, but at an unsatisfactory pace. The estimated number of people who will suffer chronic hunger this year is 925 million. While it is down from 1.023 billion in 2009, it is still more than the number of undernourished people in 1990 (about 815 million). Source of UN/PR/DPI/ WFWO reporter

Page 12


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.1 Summary Results Report focus on Public Awareness & Recommendations to international community to Toward to!UN MDGs Review Summit 2010 Joint writhing recommendations by WFWO and its NGOs partners to raise public awareness’ to call attention to the international community to take action Towards the United Nations MDG Review Summit 2010! Summary of Recommendations Since 2000 the United Nations set the Eight !Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and committed by more than 190 Head of states and by!the international community to eradicate extreme poverty by 2015. In years !2008/09/10!There have been many substantial changes in the global economic and financial crisis, a food crisis and accelerated environmental degradation.!However the MDG report of 2009 states that !some progress on many of the eight MDGs is under good track, but the prospective will be very difficult of fully achieving any of the Goals in the target year by 2015.! The summit in September 2010, is an opportunity to all !member states of the United Nations will work together at United to discuss, in order !to implement !what progress has been made towards the MDGs and agree which actions will need to be taken to ensure that the Goals are met by 2015. WFWO and its NGOs partners is working towards and to contribute to the MDGs by 2015. In this context we urge international community !to take the lead in preparing a successful UN summit in September to ensure that the steps needed to halve poverty by 2015 are taken by all concerned.!In order to meet target we!must: We call attention to all in MDGS Summit to be held in September 2010, that the international community and member states of the United Nations will work together at United Nations Headquarters to discuss, in order !to implement !what progress has been made towards the MDGs and agree which actions will need to be taken to ensure that the Goals are met by 2015. We need!to take action to accelerate progress towards the MDGs and to strengthen the global partnership for development to achieve the eight MDGs.

Page 13


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.2 Summary Results Report focus on Public Awareness & Recommendations to international community to Toward to!UN MDGs Review Summit 2010 We urge international community to: We need to increase both the quantity and quality of global aid and make greater efforts to implement the financing for development global agenda. !The international community must recommit to giving 0.7% ODA/GNI by 2015, in order to meet their aid commitments, during the !MDGs Summit in !2010.!This would not be enough however to deal with new global challenges such as climate change, food and energy crises and the effects of the financial crisis. The UN and the international community and the international financial institutions !should introduce innovative sources of finance (in addition to traditional ODA) to have the financing to deal with these international agreed commitments. The OECD and OPEC in particularly !the Scandinavian countries, who are the major donors up to 70% of global aid flows, and as a major trading partner for some of the world’s poorest nations, should take the lead in preparing a successful UN Summit on MDGS !in September 2010 to ensure that the steps and action needed to halve poverty by 2015; We urge international community to take action needed to halve poverty by 2015: • Adopt a MDG rescue plan at Summit by the international community, United Nations, members, Heads of States summit. The plan should be concrete and action-oriented and should include monitoring mechanisms. The UN and international community !should also use its influence to ensure that a similar plan is adopted at the UN MDG Review Summit in September 2010. • Fulfil the commitments made by the international communities at the UN focus on !Consensus on Development Aid, and at UN International conferences including: !The Paris Declaration, the Accra Agenda for Action, the Beijing Platform for Action, the Cairo Agenda for Action and the fair, ambitious and binding commitments on sustainability development in Johannesburg, the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. Commitment to and achievement of these internationally agreed upon agendas would go some way towards achieving the Eight MDGs objectives .

Page 14


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.3 Summary Results Report focus on Public Awareness & Recommendations to international community to Toward to!UN MDGs Review Summit 2010 We urge international community to take action needed to halve poverty by 2015: • Implement the !Agenda for Action and reach the targets on specific eight !MDGs included in the Agenda. • Adopt a human rights based and a gender equality approach, ensuring that vulnerable and marginalised people are the clear beneficiaries and there is long term, predictable investment in social and human development. • Recognise the importance of tackling the MDGs as one holistic package with synergies between all the Goals and take into account environmental sustainability as a cross cutting issue that underpins!all of the other MDGs, and human security by investing in greater integration of armed violence prevention and reduction strategies into development programming. • Recognise that the MDGs can not be achieved without the international communities and its member states engaging in meaningful and strong partnership with a wide range of stakeholders including civil society organisations in the North and the South, the private sector, UN agencies and other actors. • Ensure that all policies elaborated at all levels nationally and internationally !are consistent with the UN legally binding development objectives by effective implementation of policy coherence for development, Pro-poor and sustainable development must fulfilment of human rights form the basis for UN/MDGS policy-making and implementation of the MDGs targets. !•!Use its influence (as the largest donor) to push other donors to perform better at the UN Summit in September and through discussion in other international fora (G8, G20, IMF, World Bank).

Page 15


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.4

Results Summary Report on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010! The High Level Plenary Meeting of the United Nations on the Millennium Development Goals (MDG Summit) concluded with the adoption of an Outcome Document representing a global action plan to achieve the eight anti-poverty goals by their 2015 target. Announcement of major new commitments and initiatives to accelerate MDG progress were made in support of the global action plan by Governments, international organizations and partners as well as NGOs, and by!business representatives. This matrix constitutes a compilation of initiatives and commitments relating to the 2010 High-level Meeting, which were made during the six General Assembly Plenary Sessions, six high-level roundtables and over 80 partnership events, as well as the UN Global Compact Private Sector Forum. The commitments were drawn from the records provided by the organizers. The matrix though comprehensive is not exhaustive. In his report “Keeping the Promise� the Secretary-General highlighted that keeping our past promises, including the Gleneagles commitments, in spite of the more difficult international environment will bring us a long way in achieving the MDGs. This matrix therefore includes both old and new commitments. While financial support by donors is necessary and crucial to meet the deadline for the achievement of the MDGs by 2015, developing countries have primary responsibility for their own development. Many have to put the MDGs at the heart of the national agenda. This matrix therefore also includes several of the important commitments made by developing countries to prepare MDG Strategies and create the necessary enabling environment to accelerate MDG progress.

Page 16


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.5

UN Summit concludes with adoption of global action plan to achieve Development Goals by 2015 Secretary-General secures more than $40 billion for women’s and children’s health At the United Nations Summit on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) held in New Uork 20-22 September 2010 , concluded !with the adoption of a global action plan to achieve the eight anti-poverty goals by their 2015 target date and the announcement of major new commitments for women’s and children’s health and other initiatives against poverty, hunger and disease. The outcome document of the three-day Summit – Keeping the Promise: United to Achieve the Millennium Development Goals – reaffirms world leaders’ commitment to the MDGs and sets out a concrete action agenda for achieving the Goals by 2015. Based on examples of success and lessons learned over the last ten years, the document spells out specific steps to be taken by all stakeholders to accelerate progress on each of the eight Goals. It also affirms that, despite setbacks due to the economic and financial crises, remarkable progress has been made on fighting poverty, increasing school enrolment and improving health in many countries, and the Goals remain achievable. In a major push to accelerate progress on women’s and children’s health, a number of Heads of State and Government from developed and developing countries, along with the private sector, foundations, international organizations, civil society and research organizations, pledged over $40 billion in resources over the next five years. The Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health – a concerted worldwide effort initiated by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon – has the potential of saving the lives of more than 16 million women and children, preventing 33 million unwanted pregnancies, protecting 120 million children from pneumonia and 88 million children from stunting due to malnutrition, advancing the control of deadly diseases such as malaria and HIV/AIDS, and ensuring access for women and children to quality health facilities and skilled health workers.

Page 17


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.6

Results Summary Report on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010! “We know what works to save women’s and children’s lives, and we know that women and children are critical to all of the MDGs” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said. “Today we are witnessing the kind of leadership we have long needed.” In addition, a number of other significant commitments on each of the eight Goals were made by Governments, international organizations and partners as well as by business representatives at the Private Sector Forum organized by the UN Global Compact. Below is a selection, based on information available as of mid-afternoon on 22 September: Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger •" The World Bank will increase its support to agriculture to between $6 billion and $8 billion a year over the next three years, up from $4.1 billion annually before 2008, under its Agriculture Action Plan to help boost incomes, employment and food security in many low-income areas. •" Chile announced an Ethical Family Income initiative, to be launched in 2011, to supplement the income of the poorest families and those in the vulnerable middle class. •" Monster.com committed to expand access to job opportunities for rural youth in India by promoting access to Rozgarduniya.com, an Internet job portal, in 40,000 villages across nine states in India. Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education •" Japan will provide $3.5 billion over five years for education in developing countries, beginning in 2011. •" The World Bank will increase its zero-interest and grant investment in basic education by an additional $750 million, with a focus on the countries that are not on track to reach the education MDGs by 2015,especially in sub-Saharan Africa. •" Dell committed to give $10 million towards education technology initiatives this year.

Page 18


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.7

Results Summary Report on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010! Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women •" The Earth Institute, Ericsson and Millennium Promise launched Connect To Learn, a non-profit global education initiative to improve the access to and quality of secondary education for children around the world — especially girls. Connect To Learn provides three-year scholarships to attend secondary school and covers tuition, books, uniforms as well as access to broadband technology. The first 100 scholarships will be provided in Millennium Villages in Ghana and Tanzania within the next 100 days. •" UPS International pledged $2 million to the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts to empower women through leadership and environmental sustainability programs in 145 countries. •" ExxonMobil committed to $1 million in a partnership with Ashoka’s Change makers, the International Council for Research on Women and Thunderbird Emerging Markets Laboratory to support technologies that help women increase their productivity and participate more effectively in the economy. The program is expected to directly benefit more than 13,500 people, with indirect benefits reaching more than 475,000 in the next two years. Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality and Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health •" See the detailed list of commitments for the $40 billion in resources pledged for the Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health. •" Canada reaffirmed its commitment to mobilize more than $10 billion from G8 and non-G8 leaders, key donors and private foundations over the next five years through the Muskoka Initiative for maternal, newborn and child health. •" Trinidad and Tobago announced the launch of a Children's Life Fund to provide emergency medical care and surgery for children for medical procedures that cannot be accessed in Trinidad and Tobago. •" Life Spring Hospitals committed to provide an estimated 82,000 Indian women and their families with access to quality healthcare. Over the next five years, Life Spring will increase the number of hospitals serving mothers and children throughout India from 9 to 200, which will improve standards of care and reduce maternal and childhood deaths.

Page 19


Annual Report 2010

Highlighted on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010 /cont.8

Results Summary Report on the MDGs Summit 20-22 September 2010! Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability The United States announced a commitment of $50.82 million over the next five years for a Global Alliance for Clean Cook stoves, a public-private partnership led by the United Nations Foundation seeking to install 100 million clean-burning stoves in kitchens around the world. •" Cameroon’s Energy Sector Development Program will double energy production by 2015 and triple it by 2020.! •" The Asian Development Bank plans to double its financing for clean energy to $2 billion a year by 2013. •" Water Health International committed to build 75 water purification plants in Bangladesh and expand its existing!network of water purification plants to an additional 100 villages in India, providing access to clean water for!175,000 people in under-served communities in Bangladesh and India.! •" PepsiCo committed to ensure access to clean water for 3 million people around the world by 2015. •"

Goal 8: Global Partnership for Development The European Union offered funding amounting to #1 billion to the most committed and needy countries to make progress on the goals they are furthest from achieving. •" Belgium pledged #400,000 for the UN Conference on Least Developed Countries, to take place in Turkey in 2011.! •" China committed to give zero-tariff treatment to more products from Least Developed Countries and to continue to!cancel debts. •"

Source of UN/PR/DPI/ WFWO reporter

Page 20


Annual Report 2010

II. Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010

Page 21


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 Seeking to contribute to the Eight Millennium Development Goals adopted by the international community, WFWO’s strategy plan and orientation, pursuit of development objectives locally, nationally and internationally, the WFWO will continue to place highest priority on initiatives in the following areas: (a) Sustainable development program, improvement of food security, health, drinking water, education, with particular emphasis on the needs of women and youth; (b) developing rural financial services through our local partners NGOs, and CBOs that reach isolated populations without previous access to infrastructure and financial facilities and are well integrated into the national financial sector framework; (c) capacity building in support of decentralized decision-making processes for participatory rural development; (d) natural resources management and the environment, with emphasis on supporting anti-decertification initiatives; (e) provide grant; (f) raise public awareness; (g) resource mobilizations; (h) Communications Support Programs; (h) Portal facilities for NGO Network, to support the MDGs;

Page 22


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.2 WFWO to achieve these targets needs close collaborations, with its partners will continue to stress the importance of gender-differentiated target group participation in defining program objectives and priority activities; maximizing the use of local knowledge and experience; and pursuing a strategic orientation to! WFWO’s investments through strengthened partnership and support of the United Nations NGO Branch DESA (UN NGO IRENE Western Europe), governments, civil society and private sector and other donors to ensure that project interventions fit closely within the context of overall economic and sectorial development strategies plan for individual countries. The main challengers review activities and programs contributed by WFWO for 2010, as per strategy plan focusing on sustainable development programs and grants provided by WFWO already operating to contribute to the MDGs objectives, as well as campaign to raise public awareness on global development issues.

Page 23


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.3 How we approach our work to contribute to Eight MDGs? We work with our local NGOs, CBOs partners, communities to be hired the voices of the poor people and to assist them to helps them self in 45 countries, which we believe gives us a greater understanding of the main causes of poverty and suffering, and enables us to have a greater impact focusing on raise public awareness and sustainable development programs to contribute to Eight MDGs. How we works with others Partners to overcome poverty and suffering in

population in developing countries?

Who we are? WFWO is an NGO international organization. We have partners, NGOs, CBOs, and volunteers, supporters and Team of many nationalities; we are all part of solutions for a global development issues to build a just and safer world in the order to contribute the United Nations Millennium Developments Goals agreed international commitments and to the United Nations ECOSOC/UN/DESA. What we do? The causes of poverty can be local, national or global, so we work at all levels, with governments and global institutions, and with local communities, NGOs, CBOs government and individuals. We are committed to the principle that we should work with partners and people to promote self-reliance rather than dependency. To achieve the greatest impact we work on three mutually reinforcing fronts to contribute to the Eight MDGs objectives.

Page 24


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.4 How we act on the Humanitarian Emergency Operations Programs ? We save lives by responding swiftly to provide support and protection during emergencies. Our particular expertise lies in the provision of clean water and sanitation as first aid facilities, which are vital in preventing the spread of disease; we can also provide rehabilitation programs, tends, shelter and essential equipment to people whose lives have been shattered by conflict or natural disaster. When an initial crisis is over, WFWO/EOP stays to support people as they rebuild their lives. We work with vulnerable communities to assist them to help themselves to be prepared for pre post conflict, and minimize the impact of, natural disasters. How we Sustainable Development Programs? We are working with local partner organizations, NGOs, CBOs and communities; we empower people to work their own way out of poverty. For example, WFWO/OT provides support, training and grants to enable people to earn a better and more secure living. We also enable communities to overcome obstacles to prosperity – such as a lack of education and health care, and the effects of climate change. WFWO/OT also helps people to work together so they can raise public awareness and policy makers locally and nationally for their rights for food, water, health, education – including the human rights, to a life free from violence against women and children, and to basic infrastructural services to be provided for local communities. How we Raise Public Awareness & Campaigns focusing on themes of 8 MDGs ? The WFWO’s campaigns tackle the underlying policies and practices which create and sustain poverty MDGs Goal 1. The focus of our campaigning is Eighth MDGs, including sustainable development programs on the environment, climate change, because it is hitting the world’s poorest people first and hardest. As well as this, our For All campaign is pressing for better health, education, and water and sanitation, infrastructural facilities in developing countries. Our work in emergencies informs our constant lobbying for the emergency operations and rehabilitation programs aid, to support the population during and after the post conflict and natural disasters.

Page 25


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.5 How the WFWO Makes a Difference in Day to Day life within its Limited Resources ? In Focus: Poverty and Sustainable Development Programs in Developing countries Sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs to help themselves. The programs of the WFWO and its partners NGOs, CBOs in the fields which are focus on sustainable development takes into account that the needs of the future depends on how well-balanced are the social, economic, and environmental needs of today. How do we decide how these needs are met and distributed equal to respect to venerable people needs assistance? WFWO works with its partners, NGOs, CBOs, local authorities and communities, governments to find the best solutions locally an development issues’ challenges, working to reach both national and international agreed-upon goals and needs. While helping developing countries attract and use aid effectively support with our limited resources, thanks to the support of our financial partners WFWO encourages the protection of all human rights for food security, health, education, drinking water and peace trough sustainable development programs and promotes a capacity building for a good governance. WFWO advocates for social change trough the support of our local NGOs, CBOs, partners and WFWO Friends around the world to support and connecting countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build a better life. Please see in this report how are our approach to work with our main beneficiaries and targets.

Page 26


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.6 Our main Objectives To overcome poverty and suffering of the most vulnerable peoples , we work to ensure that the rights of women and men are fulfilled and protected. All our work focuses on people’s basic rights and falls within the eighth MDGs objectives. The right to a sustainable livelihood We are working for a our world in which every person has a secure income and supply of food, water, health, sanitary, education, and has the opportunity to earn a living in decent working conditions. Climate change is already threatening livelihoods, so we’re helping people to prepare and adapt to achieve our common international agreed commitments by 2015. How we Approach for addressing the Special Needs of the Most Vulnerable Peoples needs our assistance? WFWO seeking contributions to the eight MDGs for the most vulnerable countries and people risk being left behind in achieving the MDGs. Addressing the special needs of vulnerable communities and people will help protect their basic human rights and ensure that they benefit from progress made in attaining the MDGs. Special assistance is required to help the most vulnerable countries achieve more progress. WFWO focusing on the vulnerable communities and peoples include those who are traditionally disadvantaged, marginalized or excluded based on geography, gender, age, disability, ethnicity and other vulnerabilities. They are disproportionably among the poorest and are often victims of violence, ,exploitation, traffiking, descrminiation and other abuses. Vulnerable countries include the least devloped countries (LDCs), landloked developing countries (LLDCs), some small island developing States (SIDS), countries emerging from conflict and those that are vulnerable to the recurrence of armed violence or to natural harzards.

Page 27


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.7 WFWO and its partners is working together to responds by providing assistance to the most vulnerable people in developing countries needs with its limited resources can make the difference. We also raise public awareness trough workshops approach and campaigns to call attention to international communities and policy makers to contribute to international agreed commitments focusing on the Eight MDGs targets, by following the international guidelines and WFWO strategy framework and policy: What more should be done to address the special needs of the poorest countries? The exports of LDCs are still highly concentrated and remain exposed to the high volatility of international commodity markets and other external economic shocks. Official Development Assistance (ODA) to LDCs has not yet reached the target of between 0.15 and 0.20 per cent of Gross National Income (GNI) and has neglected productive sectors. Addressing the needs of the poorest countries involves: •" The speedy implementation of duty-free, quota-free access pledges for LDC exports which were agreed to at the WTO Ministerial Review in Hong Kong in 2005. Additional measures by donors to expand and implement the Enhanced Integrated Framework for LDCs to enhance their productive and export capacity, including the technical capacity necessary to meet the complex rules of origin. •" Priority attention to agricultural development and support to small farmers to improve access to seeds and fertilizers and to introduce more stress-resistant agricultural varieties. •" For landlocked LDCs, which have more difficulty in forging trade links with world markets because they depend on transit countries, access to transport networks, better infrastructure and trade facilitation are key for development. •" International community support for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change.

Page 28


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.8 What should be done to better identify and address the special needs of the most vulnerable countries, communities and people? The most vulnerable countries, particularly some of the SIDS, are highly susceptible to external shocks. While some countries have made notable progress towards meeting the MDGs, those gains have often been undermined by the adverse impacts of natural disasters, climate change and the recent food, fuel and global economic and financial crises. Additional support from the international community is necessary to improve vulnerable countries’ ability to face such challenges. This could include strengthening their capacity to identify risks, to assess vulnerabilities and sources of resilience, particularly by improving national data and information systems and fostering monitoring and evaluation to inform policy-making. The most vulnerable communities and peoples not only lack opportunities and resources to participate in decision-making processes but also are often invisible in national statistics and are therefore ignored by policy-makers. While access to social services has been expanding in many countries, the coverage remains uneven and often excludes the most vulnerable. Addressing the needs of vulnerable communities and people involves: The most vulnerable countries and people risk being left behind in achieving the MDGs. Addressing the special needs of vulnerable communities and people will help protect their basic human rights and ensure that they benefit from progress made in attaining the MDGs. Special assistance is required to help the most vulnerable countries achieve more progress. •" Strengthening national capacity to identify the most vulnerable in order to address their needs and protect their rights. Establishing a social protection floor and increasing access to education and decent work. •" Implementing effective measures to combat all forms of discrimination and social exclusion.

Page 29


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.9 What can be done to break the cycle of poverty, political and economic exclusion and civil violence? The intergenerational transmission of poverty and exclusion, armed violence, civil or criminal conflict, and the resulting breakdown of the rule of law, justice and security are major challenges to achieving the MDGs. Because marginalized groups suffer from multiple vulnerabilities, addressing the structural causes of chronic poverty and social exclusion in a holistic manner is important. This can be done by: •" Addressing the root causes of poverty, all forms of discrimination and exclusion, violence, civil or criminal conflict, especially because they are often inter-related. •" Removing existing social, economic and legal barriers to meeting the basic needs of the most vulnerable. •" Strengthening the institutions that promote justice, monitor the fulfillment of human rights and mitigate conflicts, crime and violence, and promoting citizen’s participation. Increasing access of the most vulnerable people to information and to the justice system.

Page 30


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.10 What is the developmental potential of humanitarian, disaster relief and peace building efforts? The risk of natural and human-made disasters, which is higher in many middle- and low-income countries, can lead to social tensions, armed violence, civil unrest, polarization and social disintegration. Reducing that risk and increasing societal resilience to potential hazards or sudden shocks can prevent backsliding in the achievement of the MDGs and accelerate progress. •" Post-conflict or disaster relief interventions that are inclusive and participatory, that address the specific needs of vulnerable communities and peoples, promote transparency and give voice and representation to underrepresented communities, will promote social inclusion and equitable outcomes. •" Risk reduction strategies that build resilience and improve the capacity of communities to face hazards or that promote the reduction of violence and conflict management can empower vulnerable communities and enhance outcomes. •" Developing an early warning system, pursuing early economic recovery after disasters or conflicts, supporting the development of democratic institutions, strengthening institutions of governance and re-engaging countries in the global architecture without undermining national ownership of development strategies are all measures that can contribute to reduce vulnerabilities and lay a sound foundation for development. How can we ensure that new and existing commitments, by all stakeholders are adequately monitored and met? The challenge is to design and implement effective policies and institutional mechanisms to: •" Honour the accountability mechanism between developed and developing countries (as agreed in the 2003 Monterrey Consensus and the 2008 Accra Agenda for Action) and between Governments and their citizens regarding MDG commitments. •" Involve all relevant stakeholders in the formulation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes. This increases transparency, accountability and enhances the sense of ownership.

Page 31


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.11 How we focus on Health and Education Program? Health and education are integral to the attainment of all the MDGs. Although significant progress has been made towards the attainment of the education and health-related MDGs, accelerated efforts are required if all targets are to be met by 2015. How do we enhance access to Public Health Care? Ensuring that public health care systems deliver affordable, good quality services and respond to the needs of each community is necessary to achieve MDGs 4, 5 and 6. Strengthening health systems involves: •" Ensuring that the health system is well governed and regulated. Improving governance and stewardship including by seeking to ensure that the resources of local governments, civil society and the private sector contribute to the achievement of better health outcomes. An approach that puts the responsibility for health in all sectors and in all government agencies in order to address effectively the social determinants of health, including gender inequality, stigma and discrimination, poverty and unemployment. Setting priorities is a national responsibility. •" Maintaining and expanding infrastructure and services, especially in under-served areas such as rural areas or urban slums as well as for particularly vulnerable or marginalized populations. Attracting, training and retaining health workers is needed to address human resources gaps. •" Expanding access to health care services to ensure universal and equitable coverage, including through social protection and cash transfer programs, and through reforms to extend health coverage to all. Enhancing the quality of the services delivered and tailoring them to the needs of specific groups to protect the health of communities and the right of everyone to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. Sponsoring a comprehensive approach to health maintenance and the treatment of disease, by fostering, for instance, a continuum of care from mothers to children. •" Sufficient allocation of domestic resources and donor assistance as well as innovative partnerships and sustained financing to scale-up successful interventions to strengthen health systems and to provide the technical support needed to train additional personnel and implement new technologies.

Page 32


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.12 What cost-effective key interventions in health are needed, especially to improve maternal health? How can national policies and international partnerships overcome the current institutional and resource constraints? Cost-effective interventions exist to achieve the health-related MDGs: •" Maternal health and accelerating the reduction of maternal mortality: ensuring skilled birth attendance and access to emergency obstetric care, expanding access to family planning and providing antenatal care and nutrition programs to all pregnant women. The prevention and treatment of life-threatening infections, such as HIV, will also improve maternal health. •" Child mortality: immunization programs, vitamin supplements, oral rehydration therapy, expanded access to safe water and sanitation, the mass distribution of insecticide-treated bed nets, mass drug administration for the prevention and treatment of neglected tropical diseases are all effective measures to reduce mortality among children and to improve health generally. •" Malaria, TB, HIV/AIDS: improving access to effective drug treatment for malaria and tuberculosis, promoting the prevention of HIV infection, voluntary testing for the disease and access to anti-retroviral therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS, and addressing stigma and discrimination. Health and education are integral to the attainment of all the MDGs. Although significant progress has been made towards the attainment of the education and health-related MDGs, accelerated efforts are required if all targets are to be met by 2015. Although effective interventions are known, obstacles remain. Ways to overcome these include: •" Partnerships with the private sector and non-governmental organizations and others, can reduce funding constraints and ensure that effective health interventions reach the communities with the greatest disease burdens, especially in conflict situations. Partnerships can also help in prioritizing specific regions or vulnerable and marginalized groups—such as the poor, rural populations, pregnant women and young people.

Page 33


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.13 •" A review of national policies can help ease institutional constraints, particularly those related to the expansion of access to health care and education. A national health policy and strategy can ensure complementarities between all the elements needed to improve health outcomes. What are the best strategies to overcome institutional and resource deficiencies in achieving education for all? Persisting inequalities are a major barrier to the achievement of universal primary education. Considerable obstacles in accessing good quality education are faced by poor children, especially those living in rural areas, slums and areas affected by conflict or emerging from it, as well as child laborers, children with disabilities and children from indigenous and minority groups. Such groups are most affected by a shortage of trained teachers and the lack of adequate learning environments. Key barriers to girls’ education, especially for rural girls, need to be removed and investment in girls’ enrolment in and continued attendance at secondary school must be scaled up. •" Generating and maintaining a strong political commitment to universal education is crucial. The root causes of disparities and marginalization are usually unrelated to the education system. Measures that expand entitlements and promote social cohesion related to education should be considered. Completion and attendance rates need to be tracked. •" Policy measures with a proven track record include abolishing school fees, providing subsidies for other school costs, using cash transfers conditional on school attendance, improving the nutritional status of school-age children through school feeding programs, as well as providing key health interventions at school. •" Making progress towards universal education requires more resources, more equitable allocation and effective use of existing resources especially for marginalized groups. More equitable spending and targeted strategies to make quality education available, accessible and affordable can go a long way in furthering progress towards universal primary education. Strengthening the capacity of non-governmental organizations to reach marginalized children, especially those living in remote areas or in areas affected by conflict, merits consideration.

Page 34


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.14 How can we ensure that new and existing commitments, by all stakeholders, are adequately monitored and met? Slow progress towards achieving the MDGs is often due to unmet commitments, inadequate resources, lack of prioritization and a lack of recognition of rights and accountability. As a result, improvements in the lives of the poor have been slow and some hard-won gains are being eroded. Developing countries have committed to mobilizing and allocating more resources to health and education services. In addition, it will be important to improve the quality, effectiveness and predictability of official development assistance. It is important to reduce the fragmentation of assistance, limit conditionality’s and ensure that ODA supports national development strategies. Innovative financing mechanisms at the international level offer new opportunities to finance MDG-related investments. National-level capacity to track and report on progress, gaps and opportunities should be improved through adequate investment in the systems and institutions that generate, analyze and disseminate information on health and education outcomes. Better monitoring and disaggregation of data are vital for policy making, as well as for ensuring mutual accountability. How We are Promoting Sustainable Development ? To reach all the Goals requires concerted effort within a more integrated and strategic framework based on a sustainable development approach. Sound and equitable management of the environment is integral to inclusive growth and evidence shows that investing in the environment is critical to expanding the opportunities for poor people to lift themselves out of poverty. What are the most cost-effective national policies to increase the availability of safe drinking water on a sustainable basis and to improve sanitation? A sustainable development approach incorporates environmental sustainability issues such as increased access to basic services, including safe drinking water and sanitation, addressing biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation, slum rehabilitation, along with managing the natural resource base ! into the design and implementation of coherent and effective national development strategies.

Page 35


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.15 Achieving universal access to clean drinking water and sanitation is critical for reducing poverty and malnutrition, and realizing the gender and health-related MDGs. While notable progress has been made in increasing access to improved water sources, explicit efforts are needed to monitor water safety, accessibility, affordability and reliability (or continuity). Greater emphasis on sanitation is particularly urgent as access to sanitation is still far from being achieved in many countries. The most effective national policies are those that catalyze, facilitate and support effective local action. Local management and community initiatives play a key role in ensuring and sustaining the success of enhancing water supply and sanitation services to poor communities. National strategies can prioritize sanitation and water coverage by, for instance, setting norms and targets, and locating them within the framework of integ rated water resource management. Successful policies have focused on: •" Building local community arrangements and capacity for developing, maintaining and expanding new systems to ensure sustainability of the benefits. •" Mobilizing local leadership and participation of community women in local water management institutions as well as training local people in maintenance and repair. • Establishing management committees or groups that manage water systems beyond the completion of projects, instituting user fee arrangements, as appropriate, to ensure financing for management, maintenance and repair.

Page 36


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.16 What are the most cost-effective ways of improving the welfare of slum-dwellers and of ensuring their access to basic services on a sustainable basis? Successful programs include: •" Mobilizing key stakeholders - including local authorities, civil society, local communities and the private sector - to collaborate in the provision of services that both enhance the quality of life in the slums and create employment and business opportunities. •" Sound urban planning and making urban areas resilient to emergencies and disasters. •" Incorporating rural development strategies into the framework for improving slum dwellers’ welfare can reduce pressures for rural-urban migration and address other rural-urban linkages. •" Ensuring participatory governance and community development. Compiling lessons learned and sharing for others to use. Ensuring the security of tenure and women’s rights to land, property ownership and inheritance. To reach all the Goals requires concerted effort within a more integrated and strategic framework based on a sustainable development approach. Sound and equitable management of the environment is integral to inclusive growth and evidence shows that investing in the environment is critical to expanding the opportunities for poor people to lift themselves out of poverty.

Page 37


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.17 What institutions and reforms will protect biodiversity and forest cover? The target to reduce biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met. Every year 7 million hectares of forest cover are being lost. The major drivers of biodiversity loss include over-consumption, population pressure, habitat loss, pollution and climate change. The International Year of Biodiversity (2010) and Forests (2011) as well as the establishment of post-2010 targets on biodiversity, provide valuable opportunities to reinvigorate efforts to address biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation. Studies show that effective conservation can bring species back from the brink of extinction. Protected areas are widely recognized as cornerstones of biodiversity management and sustainable development. A comprehensive, effectively managed and ecologically representative global network of protected areas is crucial to reduce biodiversity loss. Successful strategies include: •" A national policy framework for sustainable development that strengthens participatory local governance and institutions capable of delivering conservation and poverty reduction benefits through capacity development efforts. •" Recognition of land and property rights, including the rights of indigenous peoples and of women to equal ownership and inheritance. •" Technical support and support for community management of forests and biodiversity. •" Financial incentives for conservation. Mobilization of international financial support for local conservation efforts. Focus on livelihoods, creating employment and nature--based enterprises • Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) is a promising mechanism to protect biodiversity and forest cover.

Page 38


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.18 What international partnerships and resources are needed to support national efforts? National policies, existing technical capacities and financial resources will be insufficient for achieving the MDGs in the poorest countries. Actions needed include: •" The proportion of ODA dedicated to water and sanitation should be increased to cover both investment and operational costs to restore and sustain ecosystem goods and services in ways that drive rural growth, poverty reduction and improved resilience of populations. •" The effectiveness of such resources can be maximized through adequate and predictable financial support, a coherent policy framework and mechanisms to promote the transfer of skills, knowledge and technology. Partnerships can leverage mutual learning, including South- South learning, promote lessons learned from best practices, facilitate the adaptation of new technologies, encourage cost-effective methods, and enable broad stakeholder participation. How can we ensure that new and existing commitments, by all stakeholders, are adequately monitored and met? • " Establish robust monitoring frameworks to ensure the accountability of all partners. Accountability mechanisms at all levels can provide redress where rights are not met. •" Disaggregate data on access to clean water and sanitation by gender, rural/ urban disparities, and upper and lower income quintiles. •" Strengthen governance at the national and local levels to ensure the durability of commitments made. Integrate policy approaches such as national sustainable development strategies to serve as both planning and monitoring frameworks. •" Strengthen institutional infrastructure to improve national capacity for implementation, delivery of services and strengthen national development management, and where appropriate establish indigenous structures for monitoring and evaluation of progress.

Page 39


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.19 How We Focus on Emerging Issues Progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals is threatened by a number of emerging issues, including climate change, the global financial and economic crisis, food security and armed conflict. Mitigating the adverse effects of these challenges presents an opportunity to design and deploy more coherent, inclusive, sustainable and equitable approaches to development. How should climate change mitigation and adaptation be incorporated into broader efforts to enhance sustainable development? Climate change poses an obstacle to the achievement of all the MDGs. Extreme weather events caused by climate change will particularly impact land productivity and water availability, undermining rural livelihoods, with a disproportionate impact on women and vulnerable populations. Climate change can also destroy fragile homesteads in coastal and mountainous areas, and it threatens the very existence of Small Island Developing States. Mitigation and adaptation will require domestic policy change and resource allocation, together with major increases in international support. Actions include: • Raising investment levels and channeling resources towards renewable energy and in developing resilience to climate impacts, as well as strengthening institutional capacities and delivering appropriate technological solutions to respond to climate change. • Switching to low greenhouse gas emitting, high-growth is both necessary and feasible. Provide economic incentives to accelerate a transition to cleaner technologies, especially for low-income countries. Encourage and support approaches such as large scale use of solar power or the restoration of heavily degraded or unused land. • Partnerships for greater global and regional integration need to be broadened and strengthened.

Page 40


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.20 The risk of natural disasters is increasing globally and is highly concentrated in middle- and low-income countries. Scientific evidence suggests that climate change is one driver of this trend. Accelerating progress towards the MDGs also depends in part on reducing the risk of natural disasters and increasing resilience to natural hazards in different development sectors. Ensuring sufficient infrastructure investments in areas on which the poor depend for their livelihoods offers a way to achieve three objectives at once: providing financing for growth and full and productive employment, decreasing the cost of climate change adaptation, and increasing resilience to natural disasters. How should the international financial system and international economic governance be reformed to better support sustainable and equitable development? The global financial and economic crisis has undermined hard-won gains towards the MDGs and exacerbated shortfalls in progress. Although the response to the crisis has thus far prevented a deeper recession, the recovery remains fragile and uneven. A long-term solution will require a better-coordinated and more comprehensive response that addresses the impact of the crisis on developing countries. Further consideration is needed on: •" Reform of the international financial system for improved regulatory oversight, higher buffer capital requirements for financial institutions, measures to deal with financial institutions deemed “too big to fail”, and reduced volatility in financial markets. Progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals is threatened by a number of emerging issues, including climate change, the global financial and economic crisis, food security and armed conflict. Mitigating the adverse effects of these challenges presents an opportunity to design and deploy more coherent, inclusive, sustainable and equitable approaches to development. •" New measures for debt relief and restructuring to assist countries facing severe financial distress resulting from the crisis. •" Reform of the global financial and economic architecture to better enable it to prevent and respond to emergencies, and to promote more sustainable and equitable development, driven by employment-intensive pro-poor growth.

Page 41


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.21 What are the most effective measures to enhance food security? •" A sustainable increase in agricultural output to address hunger and improve rural livelihoods. •" A significant scaling-up of investment to improve the capacities of small farmers, in particular women farmers, to expand the use of efficient water management technologies, to restore soil nutrients, increase access to stress-resistant plant varieties and improve market opportunities for small farmers. •" Social programs that translate increased food availability into improved nutrition by ensuring that the most vulnerable and those most in need of nutritious food have access to it, including very young children. •" Cost-effective innovations need to be scaled-up, such as complementary and supplementary nutritious food items to address the specific needs of young children and the ill, including people living with HIV, and more diversified production of local nutritious foodstuffs. How should the international community address new emerging issues that are intimately linked with the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals such as security and armed violence? Some of the most formidable challenges to progress towards the MDGs confront countries affected by armed violence, conflict (inter-State, civil and criminal) and the resulting breakdown of the rule of law, justice and security. Address the causes of conflict: •" Identify the root causes of conflict and armed violence: including the underlying drivers, risk factors and tensions. •" Advance people-centered solutions: engage all stakeholders, empowering women and including under represented communities. ! Meaningful$ participation non-discrimination and accountability can better address the root causes of poverty and conflict.

Page 42


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.22 •" Strengthen institutions that monitor and mitigate conflicts, crime and violence. In post-conflict situations: •" Post-conflict and development strategies must be nationally owned. •" Strategies are needed that promote the rule of law, justice and security and human rights. Adhering to the fundamental norms and values of the Millennium Declaration, including human rights, gender equality and governance accelerates progress towards the achievement of all the MDGs •" Nurture democratic institutions and ensure institutions and policies are grounded in national and international human rights frameworks to strengthen engagement and accountability of all stakeholders. •" Ensure equal access to resources and opportunities, generate early economic recovery and rebuild capacities, while implementing policies that reduce the necessity of armed violence How we Focus on Widening and Strengthening Partnerships Effective global partnerships are crucial to achieving the MDGs. They require the mutual accountability of all stakeholders’ ! donor and developing country governments, non-governmental actors, the private sector and foundations. Additional progress is needed in all the components of MDG 8 as well as to address other emerging issues that have significant impact on progress in achieving all the Goals. How do we ensure that aid commitments are met and what else can be done to improve aid predictability? Increases in aid (Official Development Assistance) have had a significant impact on MDG achievement. However, current ODA targets are unlikely to be met as well as commitments made at international summits, including the 2005 Gleneagles G8 Summit. There is considerable scope for improving the distribution and allocation of existing ODA including faster progress on aid effectiveness as made under the Paris and Accra commitments. •" Donors and recipient countries could further develop and apply the concept of mutual accountability in accordance with the 2008 Accra Agenda for Action •" National aid policies and joint performance frameworks can greatly improve mutual accountability by engaging stakeholders in an ongoing dialogue, by assigning responsibilities and by making commitments on development targets and transparency more tangible.

Page 43


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.23 •" New commitments on ODA should specify how and when they are to be delivered, with clear timelines and targets; that debt relief and funds towards addressing climate change are additional to ODA; that aid is better aligned to country objectives; and that, if donors earmark aid, they define how such funds fit into their overall commitments. How do we ensure debt sustainability through enhanced international cooperation? What are the best ways to facilitate debt relief and debt workouts? Despite progress, several low- and middle-income countries with critically high debt ratios have not benefited from the Highly-Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) scheme and Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI). The financial and economic crisis has also eroded some progress in achieving the MDGs and as a result, many developing countries have had to borrow both internally and externally, thus increasing public debt and reducing their ability to finance achievement of the MDGs. •" Creditors should consider extending debt relief to low- and middle-income countries that are experiencing debt difficulties. Where appropriate and feasible, new resources could be provided in the form of grants and other grant-like innovative sources of financing to assist Governments in reaching the MDGs without becoming overburdened with public debt. •" The HIPC Initiative should be extended in time and in coverage to include all low-income and lower-middleincome vulnerable countries. HIPC/MDRI debt relief can be increased or tailored to the specific circumstances of pre-completion-point countries that experience higher debt vulnerabilities. •" The United Nations and the Bretton Woods institutions could convene an expert group to examine proposals for fairer and more equitable debt restructuring and other debt arrangements and to make recommendations on debt relief and debt restructuring. How do we ensure that the Doha Round of World Trade Organization trade negotiations realizes its development promise? Effective global partnerships are crucial to achieving the MDGs. They require the mutual accountability of all stakeholders ! donor and developing country governments, non-governmental actors, the private sector and foundations.

Page 44


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.24 Additional progress is needed in all the components of MDG 8 as well as to address other emerging issues that have significant impact on progress in achieving all the Goals. Nearly nine years after the launch of the Doha Round, trade negotiations remain stalled. Calls are being made to conclude the Doha Round with a strong development focus, especially with regard to the Least Developed Countries (LDCs). •" Trade-distorting agricultural support should be reduced in order to increase the competitiveness of products exported by developing countries and to reduce the potentially harmful impacts of agricultural support on food security. Improve market access to agricultural and manufactured exports from developing countries and enhance special and differential treatment. •" Continued donor commitment to Aid for Trade is essential to improve the trading capacity of developing countries, especially to LDCs. Donor countries need to provide adequate trade- related assistance to mitigate the detrimental effects of trade reforms. How do we ensure easier and cheaper access to medicines and new agricultural and renewable energy technology? Many essential medicines are inaccessible to the poor in developing countries because their prices remain high. It is urgent for developing countries to strengthen their health systems and increase pharmaceutical expenditures, supported by ODA where necessary. Governments of developed countries can facilitate the export of more affordable medicines to developing countries. Governments of developing countries can facilitate the importation or, where the capacity exists, the production of generic versions of patented medicines taking advantage of exceptions provided in international trade agreements so as to increase the availability and reduce the prices of medicines.

Page 45


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.25 Agriculture’s contribution to economic growth and poverty reduction could be greatly increased through investments in agricultural technology research and infrastructure, coupled with policies to improve and sustain the productivity of smallholder farmers consistent with environmentally sustainable practices. The development and transfer of technologies for the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change in developing countries should be promoted. E-Government applications would improve the delivery of services in health, education and the environment in ways that reduce costs and transaction time. How can stakeholders work more effectively together to prevent conflict and armed violence and to strengthen the rule of law, justice and security? •" Governments need to ensure efficacy, transparency and inclusion in the delivery of public services which will contribute to peace building and the prevention of violent conflict. • The United Nations system should ensure the integration of its peace and development objectives and further mainstream gender and human rights in all areas of its work, especially activities that are interlinked across departments and agencies. •" Greater efforts are needed to address the socio-economic and institutional causes of potential violence and armed conflict and formulate strategies with appropriate analysis, research, advocacy and outreach to ensure sustainable peace building based on the interdependence of human rights, gender equality, governance, development and peace and security. How can we ensure that new and existing commitments, by all stakeholders, are adequately monitored and met? •" Clear, numerical and measurable targets and timelines in all areas relative to MDG 8 need to be set and agreed to by all stakeholders. National statistical systems should be improved to monitor progress made towards achieving the MDGs and other development indicators in order to inform and guide policy interventions. $ The increasing use of e-Government in the planning and execution of national development strategies in developing countries and in development cooperation by donor countries could be the basis for the establishment of a mutual accountability framework to keep track of commitments fulfilled and program delivery.

Page 46


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.26 “Progress in implementing the Paris Declaration Commitments” Aid effectiveness 2005-10: an overview of progress What about Aid Effectiveness 2005-10: Progress in implementing the Paris Declaration ? Executive Summary In 2005, over 100 donors and developing countries committed to make aid more effective in supporting the achievement of development results when they agreed to the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. One of the distinguishing features of the Paris Declaration was the commitment to hold each other to account for implementing its principles at the country level through a set of clear indicators, with targets to be achieved by 2010. To what extent have the commitments been realised? Is aid being delivered in a more effective way than five years ago? This report provides some answers to these questions. Aid Effectiveness 2005-10: Progress in Implementing the Paris Declaration draws on the results of the 2011 Survey on Monitoring the Paris Declaration, building on similar surveys undertaken in 2006 and 2008. A total of 78 countries and territories volunteered to participate in the final round of surveys, which look at the state of play in 2010. The results are sobering. At the global level, only one out of the 13 targets established for 2010 – co-ordinated technical co-operation (a measure of the extent to which donors co-ordinate their efforts to support countries’ capacity development objectives) – has been met, albeit by a narrow margin. Nonetheless, it is important to note that considerable progress has been made towards many of the remaining 12 targets. Globally, the survey results show considerable variation in the direction and pace of progress across donors and partner countries since 2005. For the indicators where responsibility for change lies primarily with developing country governments, progress has been significant. For example, improvements have been made in the quality of tools and systems for planning and for financial and results management in a number of developing countries, often requiring deep reforms that go beyond aid management to broader aspects of government processes.

Page 47


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.27 “Progress in implementing the Paris Declaration Commitments” Aid effectiveness 2005-10: an overview of progress While progress against many indicators requires joint efforts by both developing countries and donors, in some areas it depends mainly on donors’ efforts (e.g. untying aid; donor co-ordination). Stakeholders at the country level frequently cite constraints imposed by donor headquarters as bottlenecks to further progress, suggesting that many of the challenges are political in nature. As well as examining progress in implementing the Paris Declaration commitments, this report also looks at many of the recommendations from the Accra Agenda for Action. Based on the progress evidenced by the 2008 Survey, the Accra Agenda for Action set out priorities for accelerating and deepening the implementation of the Paris Declaration principles. It also accorded greater recognition to the role played by a range of stakeholders, beyond donor and developing country governments. The first chapter of the present report provides an overview of findings on the implementation of the Paris Declaration, drawing extensively on the 2011 Survey (Box). Chapters 2 through 6 examine in more detail, respectively, the progress in implementing commitments related to: developing country ownership of policies and strategies; alignment of aid to developing countries’ priorities and systems; efforts among donors to harmonise aid practices; predictability and transparency; and results and mutual accountability. Chapter 7 offers insights and lessons from five years of experience in monitoring the effectiveness of aid. The 78 country chapters – detailing the evidence of progress and challenges from each of the countries and territories participating in the 2011 Survey.

Page 48


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.28 “Progress in implementing the Paris Declaration Commitments” Aid effectiveness 2005-10: an overview of progress Substantial progress •" The proportion of developing countries with sound national development strategies in place has more than tripled since 2005. •" High-quality results-oriented frameworks to monitor progress against national development priorities are in place in one-quarter of the developing countries first surveyed in 2005, with statistics related to the Millennium Development Goals becoming increasingly available. Moderate or mixed progress •" While non-state actors are more involved in the design of national development strategies in many developing countries, there are still challenges to providing an enabling environment for civil society activities in some others. •" Efforts to improve support for capacity development have been mixed. While donors met the target on co-ordinated technical co-operation, support for capacity development often remains supply-driven, rather than responding to developing countries’ needs. •" Over one-third of all developing countries participating in the 2011 Survey showed an improvement in the quality of their public financial management systems over the period 2005-10. At the same time, one-quarter of them saw setbacks in the quality of these systems. •" Donors are using developing country systems more than in 2005, but not to the extent agreed in Paris. In particular, donors are not systematically making greater use of country systems where these systems have been made more reliable. •" Overall, donors did not make progress in further untying aid across the countries participating in the 2011 Survey. •" aid.

There are some promising examples of efforts to improve transparency around

Page 49


Annual Report 2010

The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Working Plan for 2010 /cont.29 “Progress in implementing the Paris Declaration Commitments” Aid effectiveness 2005-10: an overview of progress Little or no progress •" Aid for the government sector is not captured systematically in developing country budgets and public accounts. •" Little progress has been made among donors to implement common arrangements or procedures and conduct Joint missions and analytic works •" Aid is becoming increasingly fragmented, despite some initiatives that aim to address this challenge. •" The medium-term predictability of aid remains a challenge in developing countries because donor communication of information on future aid to individual developing country governments remains isolated rather than being the norm. •" Most developing countries have yet to implement through mutual (government-donor) reviews of performance that benefit from broad participation.

Page 50


Annual Report 2010

III. Operations and Programs Results for 2010

Page 51


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 WFWO is working for results The World For World Organization (WFWO) is working for the results and is dedicated and concerned to support! NGOs, CBOs and local Communities in developing countries (DCs) in order to contribute to the achievement of the Eight Millennium! Development Goals (MDGs), with only five years left to reach 2015 MDG deadline and many DCs struggling to meet the targets. WFWO is continue to strengthen its campaigns to raise awareness focused on MDGs under slogan "One World One Hope, the Millennium Development Goals Is Common Vision and Global Commitments", this commitments is more relevant than ever for all. WFWO works in close cooperation with its partners to contribute to reduce poverty in the DCs by supporting and strengthening the local communities, NGOs, CBOs services and increasing access to grant facilities to contribute to MDGs. The high priority of the WFWO is MDG Goal 1: Eradicate extreme! Poverty and hunger as well MDG Goals 2/3/4: Health, Education and promote gender equality and empower women, MDG Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability. WFWO operates in more"than" 45 DCs Roughly 90% of its program portfolio is in poor countries and also emerging from natural disaster and crisis or conflict. In 2009/2010, local sustainable development programs accounted for 70% of its program delivery; grant programs for 40% to 70% of WFWO’s overall portfolio is in Africa; 35% is in Asia 30% and Latin America 10%. Over 80% of the supported sustainable programs, by NGOs, CBOs partners are included the components of the poverty elevation, food, water, health, sanitary, education ,gender equality to empowerment of women, WFWO's Gender Equality Local sustainable development program, designed to ensure that grants is to contribute to women, is now fully operational in Africa and Asia DCs.

Page 52


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 2 WFWO is working for results The global humanitarian review context in year 2009/10 and up coming years needs an urgent assessments and attention related to resources to respond to this urgent matter to save life of peoples, in all likelihood, evolve along the trends that have been seen in recent years, namely an increase in humanitarian needs, both those related to protracted or recurrent humanitarian crises, such as long-term post conflict or droughts, and those resulting from sudden new emergencies. In line with the WFWO Emergency Operations Guidelines (EOG) on the Humanitarian First Aid (HFA) in principles, it is important that the response to sudden new emergencies, such as natural disasters, climate change, earthquakes or conflicts, does not detract from addressing existing or recurrent humanitarian crises. The WFWO Operations Team (OT) related to Emergency Operations Programs (EOP) Evaluation Progress Review Report (EPRR) and recommendations related to Emergency Operations Programs (EOP) for 2009/10 is constantly increasing global needs are the result of a combination of factors, notably the larger number of refugees and displaced persons resulting from man-made crises, the impact of natural disasters which is increasing, partly as a result of climate change, the continued impact of the economic crisis affecting particularly the most vulnerable populations and a tightening of the humanitarian area that make the delivery of aid and access to beneficiaries more and more difficult and risk of lost life of our OP staff and voluntary Team (VT) due to no security is guarantee in the field. In this context WFWO/OT for each emergency operation crisis, for specific country/region needs to evaluate any risk to be indentified by OT/ EOP and our experts partners in the field including NGOs, CBOs, local authorities under general coordination of the WFWO’s Executive President (EP) in order to provide all necessary road map of the action for first aid program and to give an insight into the nature and the depth of needs. This is combined with a Global Needs Assessment, based on two sets of indicators (crisis and vulnerability) and the Forgotten Crisis Assessment (FCA). These evaluations and tools provide the framework to determine the areas and (EPRR) locations of greatest plan of action needs and to provide an appropriate allocation of funds accordingly. We are sharing only one world for any catastrophe held in one country will affect the other and all this humanitarian crises, is created by mankind resulting from wars or outbreaks of fighting, also called complex or protracted crises, account for a large proportion of humanitarian needs in the world. Such crises remain the main source of humanitarian needs in poor countries.

Page 53


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 3 WFWO is working for results All this catastrophes and post conflict crisis is created by the mankind, such as Sudan, Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, the WFWO/OT Humanitarian Emergency Operations, which takes place alongside development, such as the First Aid and rehabilitation program, water, sanitary, capacity-building interventions, is needed to address life-saving needs of several thousands of vulnerable people, including notably refugees, internally displaced as well as host communities, and to protect them. Where possible, it should also prepare conditions for a proper transition towards longer-term interventions (Emergency Relief Rehabilitation Program- (ERRP). It is in those contexts that access and security problems make the delivery of aid particularly difficult or dangerous. The needs resulting from such crises may be further exacerbated by natural disasters, such as drought or floods, as is the case in Chad, Somalia, Afghanistan or Pakistan, Philippines, Such natural disasters and extreme weather conditions may restrict some interventions and may also require rapid reorientation of other activities to meet new priority needs of the affected populations. The WFWO/OT Emergency Operation Program (EOP) Review Progress Report (RPR) and recommendations for 2009/10 needs assessments and resources for the up coming years to be focus on the human and economic losses caused by natural disasters are devastating. These natural disasters, be they of sudden or slow onset, that entail major loss of life, physical and psychological or social suffering or infrastructural facilities damage are constantly increasing and with them so is the number of victims. In this respect, vulnerable populations affected by natural disasters and climate change relies on humanitarian emergency assistance. Recurrent acute humanitarian needs have been identified in various situations, such as the drought-affected areas in the Sahel or the Horn of Africa, that the WFWO is already working with its partners in Mauritania and Senegal for the pilot project related to desertification and sustainable development programs in the region

Page 54


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 4 WFWO is working for results WFWO EO review report also stress that the increasing needs have also been identified in so-called forgotten crisis situations, which are, limited donor interest and weak political commitment to resolving the crisis. WFWO/EO assistance and its partners remains crucial to meet the humanitarian needs of vulnerable people in situations where international attention is insufficient and no interest in that country or region. WFWO/OT review report and recommendations for 2009/10 and the up coming years on Emergency humanitarian needs aggravated by the recurrence of disasters, even those of small-scale or those requiring a limited and isolated intervention, should not remain unmet . This will covers all the mankind created such as natural disasters requiring a small-scale humanitarian response, as well as epidemic outbreaks. In such cases, a flexible humanitarian intervention should be sought in order to meet the most urgent humanitarian needs and enhance at their local level the preparedness of the most vulnerable populations, in particular local communities, affected by these disasters where there are significant unmet needs trough our local NGOs, CBOs partners in the filed country. WFWO/OT recommendations on the review report stress that the Access (security and logistical) constraints are often a key obstacle to reaching beneficiaries, which can be partially overcome by supporting humanitarian logistics, in this context needs more attention and action on the purpose in order to facilitate to work of the WFWO/OT to reached the its target.

Page 55


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 5 WFWO is working for results Humanitarian aid should be developed in partnership through WFWO’s partners in the fiesl country in crisis , such as NGOs, CBOs, local communities, governments Specialized Agencies, international organizations including United Nations (UN). WFWO takes Pains to measure the impact of its development cooperation actions to implement its program committed for 2009/10. This assistance is an important priority committed by all donors and resource mobilizations Team, in order to provide the humanitarian aid and assistance as per commitments!to direct aid to where it is most effective, but the!major bilateral contributors and resources mobilizations team committed of funding for 2009/2011, this funds still not yet provided is only as promissory note, in which has delayed some of our programs and grants implementation for 2009/10, this has also created a drastic change of our planning, and also to focus on input, spending and technical assistance and less on programs results and impact. Measurement of results, impact and sustainability of projects and programs is pivotal to assess the effects of aid on actual poverty eradication. In practice, the WFWO Operation Team (OT) has sought to raise its standards in recent years in aid implementation, quality control, accountability and results monitoring. It has engaged in a reform of its processes in order to make them simpler, more focused on quality and results, and in line with internationally agreed objectives on aid effectiveness. The OT has also developed more dynamic forms of partnership with beneficiaries and with other donors and has simplified its procedures and clarified the rules for delivery and implementation. In 2009/10 efforts concentrated on: The WFWO implementation of the guidelines and strategy of resource mobilization task force to improve aid effectiveness. The key elements at this stage were to develop guidance and to establish a system for monitoring the results! of the reform; the adoption of a number of methodology instruments in 2009/10 in order to simplify and streamline the implementation of WFWO programs external aid; the development of skills and capacity of resource mobilization team (RMT) involved in delivering external assistance to WFWO.

Page 56


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 6 WFWO is working for results WFWO/OT and senior managements level; a revision of the main quality tool implemented at the design phase in the project's lifecycle, which is a peer review mechanism of project cycle guidelines and which in 2009/10 covered nearly 90% of eligible projects and programs. WFWO has an active program of External Evaluation Team (EET) : EEFT evaluations were reviewed and approved in 2009. The main conclusions from completed evaluations are that programming, implementation and effectiveness are good in most cases. Efficiency and sustainability are still considered the weakest elements. WFWO interventions do generate positive impacts but ownership by partner countries should be increased. The Results for 2009/10 show that project performance improved compared to 2008 In summary, the WFWO/OT/RMT has acted rapidly to address the problems caused by the crises of 2008-2009 and to ensure that the impact of its resources is maximized. The RMT has shown the capacity to innovate and to adapt its aid instruments to meet new challenges for the year coming. The dynamics of this process have created new synergies and more effective results to be implemented as soon as possible. The WFWO will continue to work towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals which are to be the subject of a major international review in 2010 as per the MDGs.

Page 57


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 7 WFWO is working for results Partnership Cooperation with poor income developing countries The WFWO is working in close partnership for its lending programs for 2009 -2010 are more than 10 poor Income in developing countries in particularly in Africa, and Asia. They account for about half the world’s population and are home to one third of people living on less than $2 per day. They cover a wide income range, and differing paces of socio-economic growth. Overall however they are characterized by large internal income disparities and widespread social exclusion. For these reasons, they still benefit from WFWO development assistance. On the other hand, their size and level of economic development mean that they also play an increasingly central role as partners in tackling global issues such as climate change, promoting global economic growth, security, and others. The goal of WFWO assistance to these countries is to enhance sustainable development and poverty reduction in pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals. The RMT uses a variety of financial instruments mechanism like co-financing of programs as grant or loan to facilitate as well as bilateral contribution with the different actors for the Development Cooperation to achieve our common objectives. The present cooperation between the WFWO and Africa and Asia acknowledges that all 7 African countries are recognized as partners in this program , while accepting the need for a differentiated approach that corresponds to the level of development of each country. For the Lower Middle Income. For example Countries ($1 000-$3 700 GNI per capita), cooperation concentrates support on policies aimed at reducing poverty, inequality and exclusion. This cooperation includes the use of budget and sec- tor support programs, aimed mainly at social sectors and public management. Other countries benefit mostly from cooperation on the promotion of good governance, stability and institution building. For Upper Middle Income Countries more emphasis is placed on economic and trade cooperation, the promotion of sectoral dialogues and support for higher education.

Page 58


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 8 WFWO is working for results WFWO makes a similar distinction in its assistance to Asian countries. Regional poverty levels have diminished throughout the last decade thanks mainly to the continued economic growth of the largest Asian countries. Stimulus programs in China, Japan, South Korea and ASEAN countries managed to preserve positive growth rates in most of Asia. Yet a large number of people working in export industries remain vulnerable, because western markets have stagnated during the global financial crisis. It remains to be seen however whether these stimulus programs created sustainable growth or mostly contributed to new speculative bubbles through excess liquidity. The Asian countries which are less integrated into world markets have weathered the global crisis of 2008-2009 surprisingly well, and many have benefited from a decline in the price of food, raw material and energy. In countries with high population growth, like Pakistan, Bangladesh, the Philippines and Nepal, however, their limited economic expansion was fully offset by the unsustainable increase in population numbers. With regard to South Africa, high levels of poverty and inequality persist. WFWO programs are focused on poverty elevation and employment creation and capacity development for service delivery and social cohesion, with a number of programs focusing also on governance support. While poverty in the region has been reduced, significant social inequalities and exclusion persist. Introducing and increasing assistance in the form of grants support added to the efficiency of WFWO assistance. The southern Mediterranean region is also affected by poverty, and 2009/10 was marred in several areas by social unrest. In some countries with particularly high poverty levels,! assistance focused accordingly on developing the basic social infrastructure.

Page 59


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 9 WFWO is working for results WFWO sectoral policy developments WFWO and Human development Aid

In the area of human development Aid, health, education and gender equality as core MDG areas were the focus of attention in 2010, with extensive preparations carried out by the WFWO through OT and RMT are working to develop a different policy mechanisms of financing to contribute to the MDGs objectives in developing countries selected by WFWO . These policy will play a catalytic role to the WFWO to raise public awareness and recommendations to international community to the contribution to the UN’s MDG Review summit in September 2010. The report “Progress on the WFWO program for action to confront on poverty and!health assistance program through External Action (2008- 2009)” adopted in May 2009 and subsequent RMT Board Directors Conclusions in November 29 call for stronger, more effective and more concerted efforts by the EBDRMT in confronting on this the two issues. In this context, the WFWO/OT action teams led by the EBDRMT respectively have been launched to foster concerted action for resources committed. Based on consultation with WFWO/OT and its financial partners and other stakeholders, the EBDRMT will prepare a geographically comprehensive program for action to confront on poverty and health assistance program through external action for 2012 and beyond.

Page 60


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 10 WFWO is working for results In 2008/10, the WFWO resources was limited due to the former EBDRMT , failed to maintain its commitments, the Executive President(EP) and Board Directors, decided to select to new members representatives from different countries for the new management board of the International financial Partnership in which the EBDRMT has been involved since its inception in 2008. This partnership aims at strengthening resource mobilizations and financial mechanism to contribute to the WFWO/OT programs through joint work at country level under WFWO programs focusing on food security, health, education, drinking water, gender quality, sustainable development, and monitoring framework to contribute to the MDGs objectives. In the Education for All (EFA) – The WFWO Task force Initiative, the WFWO raises public awareness on education for all and signed a partnership agreement with world leader University working on long distance learning to contribute substantially to the work of resource mobilizations trough the EBDRMT on the evaluation, replenishment of the resources mechanism and optimization of the Initiative’s fund structure and operating modalities to contribute to MDGs. The EBDRMT as a permanent member of the task force board since May 2008 will reinforce the WFWO’s program focus of the initiative as a platform for better aid effectiveness and catering better for the needs of fragile states in developing countries. In this context in 2010 the executive board members of the WFWO delegation visited for identification mission purpose in the following countries: Republic of Congo, Republic of Gambia, Republic of Senegal, Republic of Mauritania, including the Republic of Yemen. The EBDRMT is task force is a voluntary global partners working to address needs –!in terms of policies, capacities and financing – through cooperation, both South-South and North-South.

Page 61


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 11 WFWO is working for results The EBDRMT secured funding to support the WFWO humanitarian projects worldwide, along with its financial partners, the EBDRMT task force’s secretariat and its first three years of activities not yet achieved its commitments this create to the WFWO/OT drastic problem of delayed of some grants and programs lending for 2008/11. The WFWO/OT also reinforced partnership with the local NGOs, CBOs, working for the Development of Education, health, and sustainable development programs in Africa. Asia to promote good political dialogue and good governance supported by the WFWO in the African, Asian partners to contribute to the MDGs objectives. In the G8 framework, the WFWO and its partners raised public awareness to call attention on the international agreed commitment MDGs during the G8 experts groups in health and education. Reports of the groups widened the scope of G8 concerns on addressing system issues and comprehensive sector approaches and highlighting the need to focus on the most vulnerable. On gender equality, the WFWO raised the public awareness to call international community in particularly OECD countries to support an international colloquium on ‘Women’s empowerment, leadership, development, international peace and security’ in. A set of actions and priorities were adopted at the second ministerial conference on gender equality within the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership, which took place in Morocco in November 2009.

Page 62


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 12 WFWO is working for results The WFWO has been at the forefront of efforts to raise public awareness and participate with clear statement to call attention to international community to react of gender equality during the women summit held in New York on commission on 2010. The WFWO/Operation Team, headed by the Executive President has visited on the purpose of official identification and appraisal mission in the following countries to implement and review its lending programs in close cooperation partnership with high level of the governments: Republic of Senegal Republic of Mauritania Republic Democratic of Congo Republic of Gabon Republic of Yemen (meeting and singed agreement in Dubai) Republic of Sudan Republic of Cameroun Republic of Guinea The main aims of the appraisal mission is to : To establish relations and to enter in negotiation the opportunities with government in order to provide grants to support local communities sustainable development programs, over come their poverty, food, water, health, education, women gender equality, houses, hospital, school, capacity building, including the infrastructural facilities to contribute to the Eight MDGs. The results the WFWO have signed a partnership with some countries eligible for grants and for the success of the identification and appraisal mission recommendations report.

Page 63


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 13 WFWO is working for results (Programs Expenditures)

20

%

The right to life and security. We believe everyone has a fundamental right to a life free from fear and danger. We respond to emergencies – such as the earthquake in Haiti in January 2010 – by working to save and protect people’s lives when conflict or natural disaster strikes.

42

%

The right to basic services. Health care, education, clean water and sanitation are basic rights to which every person is entitled. But millions of people are still denied these rights. We lobby at a national and global level for state investment in health care!and education.

9

%

The right to be heard. WFWO enables people to speak out together, so that their views are heard and taken into account. This means raising people’s awareness of their rights and helping them lobby their government and other decision-makers.

Page 64


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 /cont 14 WFWO is working for results

8

%

The right to equity: gender and diversity. WFWO works to overcome discrimination and inequality – major causes of poverty. In particular, in a world where more than two-thirds of those living in poverty are women, we aim to encourage women’s participation in all aspects of society.

11

%

Estimate percentage for sustainable development programs in developing countries in particularly Africa and Asia Our work programs reached with the support of our bilateral partners: 65.000 - Families!;! People living in poverty in 45 countries; Programs and grants expenditures increased by 8% from 2008/09 and !estimated !and 10 % in 2010; 2010 it was very difficulty year for us !in the aspect of the financial crisis, but the WFWO with the support of its financial partners !continue to work for the results : We provide grant and! financial support program to more than!105 partner NGOs, CBOs, organisations around the world working in the field.

Page 65


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010-2015 WFWO Strategy Framework Plan (SFP) for 2010-2015 on Resources Mobilisations, was revised by the WFWO’s Board Directors,due to since 2008 no commitment maintained and lost of the investments!!by the former !Executive Board Resource Mobilisations Team (EBDRMT)!!this has created a lots of delay to implement!!WFWO lending programs and grants for SFP 2009/10/11. In this context the WFWO/BD has taken a drastic decision to end the contract to the former EBDRMT Chairman and team who they not provide any concrete results as per agreement adn commitments signed by the parties. ! WFWO/BD/EP is working to find the best solutions to select and nominate as soon as possible the new !WFWO/Resource Mobilisations Team /International Task Force (RMT/TF) in order to take the necessary action to straighten the mobilization of resources through effective partnerships among all stakeholders and to play a catalytic role to give more importance of targeting grants assistance for 2010/15 to implement its lending programs in developing countries needs assistance focusing on: improving development effectiveness of food security, health, drinking water, educations, HIV/AIDS, environment issues, grants, to support sustainable development programs with particular emphasis on the needs of women and children and straighten our relations with our partners, countries local Communities, NGOs, CBOs networks as a result of opportunities to improve our common programs and objectives as per strategy frame work plan and WFWO policy and Project Cycle Design Procedure Guidelines !(PCMDPG). WFWO Strategy Framework Plan (SFP) for 2010-2015, will focus on areas with the potential for high-impact, sustainable solutions that can reach local communities, NGOs, CBOs. We work closely with the new RMT/TF and !financial partners to respond to our needs to support innovative approaches and programs to expand existing ones so they reach the people who need them most to help themselves in order to contribute to the eight MDGs targets. We also support policy and advocacy efforts to accelerate progress against the world’s most acute poverty. Our mission will continue to work closely with our financial partners and communities to achieve our common objectives!to increase opportunities and investing on poor people in developing countries to overcome their poverty.

Page 66


Annual Report 2010

Operations Overview for 2010 The WFWO and its Partners, are closely interrelated and integrated the components of the project!!! activities and objectives on “Promoting UN Partnership initiatives with Local NGOs, CBOs by Regions and Strengthening their Capacity to Enhance their Contribution to the MDGs for Human Security and Local Sustainable Development�, as shown by the following diagram: Interrelation of the Project components, activities & objectives outputs and results:

The Main WFWO Partnership Group:

Page 67


Annual Report 2010

WFWO Operations Programs Around the world since 2002

Page 68


Annual Report 2010

IV. WFWO and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

Page 69


Annual Report 2010 WFWO Contribution to the Eight MDGs 2007

2008

2009

2010

Change

KEY FIGURES

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 1 – Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger BENEFICIARIES 2,300

27,245

3,675

thousands of poor people in 46 countries (44 countries in 2008, 38 countries in 2007 and 2009/2010) thousand of women and children

78,867

1,789

!

5,354

8,930

1,205

! thousand

of

1,876

3,756

21,390

4,478

!

programs thousand

of internally displaced people

1,234

3,234

4,815

1,080

!

program thousand

of

345

767

300

!

program

1,835

rehabilitation

returnees

assistance

rehabilitation

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 2 - Achieve Universal Primary Education thousand of schoolchildren school meals/take-home rations 4,380

18,123

44,300

1,981

receiving

! percent who were girls

25.1

35,3

43.1

6

!

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 3 – Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women BENEFICIARIES 38.2

47.1

121

148

2.670

6.900

1,234

2,765

51.4

198

10

47

!

!

18,970

450

!

4,815

256

!

percent of beneficiaries who were women or girls in the program thousand of women were in leadership positions on association management committees of program thousand of women receiving household food assistance program at distribution points in general food distributions thousand of household food entitlements program were issued in women!s names for general food distributions and support as focal points coordination

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 4 – Reduce Child Mortality Thousand of children were assisted by WFWO NGOs, CBOs partners operation program 10,323

10,245

151,23

22,780

243.10

146,200

78

1,985

!

!

Page 70

thousand of children diagnosed with malnutrition received special nutritional support by WFWO, NGOs, CBOs partners operations programs


Annual Report 2010

2007

2008

2009

2010

Change

KEY FIGURES

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 5 – Improve Maternal Health BENEFICIARIES

2,845

7,800

10,438

879

thousand of vulnerable women receiving additional nutritional support through maternal child health programs by WFWO through NGO, CBO partners

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 6 – Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases Special program to support of 3 highest HIV and AIDS prevalence countries receiving assistance through WFWO NGOs, CBOs programs 2,323

101,23

2,200

89,345

10,245

22,780

243.10

149.367

146,200

456

289

2,356

!

!

!

thousand of people affected by HV and AIDS receiving by WFWO and its partners health and prevention assistance countries receiving assistance under tuberculosis and HIV and AIDS prevention activities through WFWO, NGOs, CBOs operation

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 7 – Ensure Environmental Sustainability BENEFICIARIES

5,000

36

50

17,800

178

23

!

123,970

1,870

!

thousand of people receiving assistance program focusing on the environmental prevention as an incentive to build assets, attend training, build resilience to shocks and preserve livelihoods including the ingenious people Raise public awareness program at all levels locally, nationally and internationally to contribute to the environmental issue, water, sanitary, energy in developing countries

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 8 – Develop a Global Partnership for Development stand- and supported by WFWO co -financiers partners

1,4

351,23

2,1

778

2,3

5,1

110

322,780

▲"

Increase;

!

No change;

!

Decrease;

743.10

1,267

!

987

12

!

6,8

4

!

546,200

46

!

Page 71

emergency operations joint assessment missions conducted by WFWO and its partners, NGOs, CBOs, local authorities corporate and private entities donating cash and in-kind gifts worth this year non-governmental organizations working with WFWO in the field operations to save time and money


Annual Report 2010

WFWO’s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World: WFWO achievements!to raise a public awareness on global development issue for 2010, thanks to the innovative solutions and partnerships developed with our partners to support the MDGs, as well as to WFWO’s Goodwill Ambassadors and WFW Friends for more that 4000 networks around word, including private sector, and other non-profit organizations, governments around the world, to raise public awareness and resource mobilizations, in order to build a diverse, action-oriented, global coalition to meet the promise of our generation—the end of extreme poverty and to implement the Eight MDGs objectives to be reached by 2015: WFWO highlighted that will continue to work closely with its partners NGOs, CBOs from Africa, Asia and Latin America region, in order to implement and to achieve the objective of the Millennium Development Goals (7) and to maintain the human right for the indigenous people sustainable development programs, is essential for the numbers of the world's indigenous peoples can truly live in dignity, justice, prosperity and peace. The 2010 it was a negative and failed year for hall world, due to the global food and financial crisis, we raised public awareness around the world in the occasion of the World Food Day 2010, comes at a time of food security crisis. Global Financial Crisis and turmoil is exacerbating concerns about rising food and fuel costs, which have already driven 75 million people deeper into the abyss of hunger and poverty.” The aims of the WFWO to focus on the public Awareness to promote a global development issues in order to call attention to the international communities trough WFWO’s networks, to raise public awareness and observe the United Nations activities that need more attention and action in particularly the eight MDGs such as the World Food Day, World AIDS Day, World Malaria Day, World Environment Day, United Nations Day, World Women’s Day, World Water Day, World Humanitarian Day, World’s Indigenous People Day, International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. For further information please visit the WFWO’s website at Media and Publications. WFWO’s campaign under slogan "One World One Hope - The Millennium Development Goals Millennium is!Common Vision and Global Commitments", !we are very proud with the results and we will continue to work in this direction with all our supporters and partners to ensure these goals are achieved through innovation, inspiration and partnership of all forms contributions to make the!difference to our world we share.

Page 72


Annual Report 2010

V. International Meetings, Roundtable, Seminars, Briefing Sessions and Special Events Achieved for 2010

Page 73


Annual Report 2010 WFWO’s International Events aims organized and contributions for 2010:

WFWO’s events in 2010 was focused on the International Meetings and Roundtable - Seminars - Briefings Sessions, in order to promote the Millennium Development Goals and to raise public awareness’ on global development issues and to call international leaders and communities to react and to implement the MDGs targets to be reached by 2015. The majority of events is organized and sponsored by the WFWO’s and its Partners, under the patronage of local Authorities and hosting selected countries in different Regions around the world. The objectives of the WFWO Roundtables/Seminars, Briefing Sessions organized by WFWO in 2010, in close partnership with the Universities, Schools, Private Sectors, Group and Government, on a global learning process that has on learning from successful and efforts to reduce poverty in developing countries and to contribute to the achievement international agreed goals. See below the highlighted events organized in 2010 by WFWO’s networks around the world:

COMMISSION ON THE STATUS 1-12 March 2010, New York (USA)

OF

WOMEN

54th

SESSION,

From 1-12 March 2010, the Commission on the Status of Women undertook a fifteen-year review of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcomes of the twenty-third special session of the UN General Assembly.!

WORLD WATER DAY 2010 “CLEAN & QUALITY WATER FOR PEOPLE” 22 March 2010, Geneva (Italy) The World Water Day 2010 campaign is envisaged to raise awareness about sustaining healthy ecosystems and human well-being through addressing the increasing water quality challenges in water management and to raise the profile of water quality by encouraging governments, organizations, communities, and individuals around the world to actively engage in proactively addressing water quality e.g. in pollution prevention, clean up and restoration.

17th CONFERENCE OF COPEAM, 8-11 April 2010, Paris (France) The conference was focused on the theme "The Mediterranean Audiovisual Stake”. A stake embodied in a series of concrete and ambitious projects aiming at drawing the Mediterranean audiovisual landscape.

DUBAI INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 20-21 April 2010, Dubai (U.A.E)

ON

ECO-TOURISM

Conference focusing on “Conservation of nature and human heritage for Sustainable Tourism” organized by our partner Zayed International Prize, to support the MDGs objectives Goal 7 in presence of UN Representative, Local Authorities, NGOs and Media.

6 t h M D G s R O U N D T A B L E M D G + 10 a n d 20-23 April 2010, Xiamen (China) - Danang (Vietnam)

B E I J I N G + 15 ,

The Round Table was focused on the theme: “Implementing the internationally agreed goals and commitments in regard to gender equality and empowerment of women”. The Round Table was organized by UN NGO IRENE.

Page 74


Annual Report 2010 2010 ANNUAL MINISTERIAL REVIEW (AMR) HELD DURING THE HIGH-LIVEL SEGMENT OF THE ANNUAL SESSION OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL, 28 June - 2 July 2010, New York (USA) The 2010 Annual Ministerial Review (AMR), held during the high-level segment of the annual session of the Economic and Social Council, focused on "“Implementing the Internationally Agreed Goals and Commitments in regard to Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women”, while the theme for the DCF will be “Development Cooperation in Times of Crises: New Commitments to Reach the MDGs”. MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS SUMMIT, HIGH-LEVEL PLENARY MEETING OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 20-22 September 2010, New York (USA) The Round Table sessions was focused on: “Poverty, hunger and gender equality”, “Health and education”, “Promoting sustainable development”, “Emerging issues” and “Biodiversity”

BRIEFING SESSIONS: Universities and Schools in Rome (Italy) To mark the United Nations Agenda including, 16 October World Food Day, 17 October Eradication of Poverty and 24 October 2010 United Nations Day. WFWO organized in cooperation with the local authorities a special Briefing Sessions, was also organized for more than 18 Schools and Universities, to promote the MDGs objectives and Global development issues to raise public awareness for youth generations in 2010.

WORKSHOP ON ENVIRONMENTAL POLICING FOCUSING ON MDGs 27-28 September 2010, Dubai (U.A.E.) Workshop on Environmental Policing, to Strengthening institutions to improve its land control tasks and implement a highly advanced and far-reaching technological tool designed for protecting the quality of the environment and consequently enhance environmental crime prevention and enforcement activities.

GLOBAL AIDS CAMPAIGN, 1 December 2010, Rome (Italy) To mark the important of the World Aids Day, 1st December 2010, the WFWO in close partnership with its partners, organized a special event and briefing session, the main aims is to promote the Millennium Development Goals objectives against HIV/AIDS, Goal 6, with participations of more than 850 persons, in presence of the Authorities, Academic personality, NGOs, Public, Media and by the WFWO’s networks around the world.

WORLD PEACE GAMES TO PROMOTE PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT TO CONTRIBUTE TO MDGs, 8 - 12 December 2010, Rome (Italy) The aims of the World Peace Games were to promote the Eight Millennium Development Goals, Peace and Development as per UNESCO declaration “Year of Peace and Culture 2010”. The Rome Municipality, AIG, WFWO under the patronage of Italian government, organized the Event.

Page 75


Annual Report 2010

Strategic Framework Plan Directions for 2011-2015 WFWO’s key future challenges being able to respond effectively to growing partners demand for its assistance in local sustainable development program and grant to contribute to MDGs and this challenge implies three central priorities for the period 2011–2015. To strengthening WFWO’s operations activities the recent growth level of activities has nearly doubled over the past 9 years In the last 2 years alone the number of Financial Service Providers supported by WFWO and its financial partners has more than doubled keeping responding to this demand means that WFWO must place high priority on maintaining strong and effective operational mechanisms for up coming activities for 2011 - 2015 has already produced an overall framework strategy plan for strengthening WFWO’s operations, including its resource base Implementing this framework will be a high priority for 2011 – 2015. Remarks:!The 2010 it was a very difficult !year for us for resources mobilisations,!since!2008 the Chairman of the WFWO/Executive Board Director of the Resource Mobilisations Team ( EBDRMT) committed and confirmed by accord of the development agreement and approved by the other financial !partners and the signed by parties !WFWO Executive President (Unfortunately this funding committed by the EBDRMT Chairman, no yet reached the WFWO since 2008. This caused a lot of problems and delayed all WFWO planning lending programs and grants and lost of the investment. In this context in the end of 2010 the WFWO Board Directors has decided to end the contract to all former !members of the EBDRMT, due to no results as per commitments. However the WFWO EBD is selecting a new team as Task Force on Resource Mobilisations !Team to be nominated shortly in order to archive the WFWO’s objectives.

Annex I: WFWO Global Project Portfolio 2011/2015

COUNTRY/PROJECT

Morocco (the first Pilot Project)

PROJECT AREA

FINANCIAL PARTNERS

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

TOTAL PROJECT COST IN US$

DURATION

Local development Region

RMT/TF WFWO!s Sustainable Bilateral Co-Financing Development Village Partners Project (SDVP)“

18

5 years

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Egypt Rep. Congo Ghana Gabon Senegal Sudan Mauritania Tanzania

For more details please visit global Project Portfolio on going WFWO ‘s activities

Page 76


Annual Report 2010

Note : WFWO’s Team for 2010 was composed by staff (10) professional and support staff, including (25) expert consultants international by Gender 50/50 % and by geographical distributions, and only by contract when is necessary and needed for project approved, this will help us to save money fund to put in for program not for administration budget, the major support is provided by voluntary staff (45).

Page 77


Annual Report 2010

Page 78


Annual Report 2010 The WFWO Goodwill Ambassador for Development !for 2010 by Country Representative: The ADN representative they are !playing a catalytic !role !to support the WFWO to raise the public awareness !in their respective country to contribute to the !eight MDGs objectives.!

Assadulah Khan$

$

$

Md Biozid Jessorey$ $

Mahitab Mekkawi$ $

$

Benjamin Amankwaa$

Musthafa Rahman$ $

$

Bolade Jimoh

Ayomi Meneko

Arjun Dhakal$

$

Mohamad Musthafa $

Wendy Ford

$

Page 79

$

Amr Moghazy

Franklin Dadzie


Annual Report 2010

VI. Financial Analysis and Statements

Page 80


Annual Report 2010 Financial Analysis and Statements 2010 contributions to WFWO regular and other resources WFWO’s total 2010 income was about $600 in regular or core, funds; and $1.5 ml grant for Africa in earmarked, or non-core, funds provided directly under WFWO grant program from bilateral contributions partners. Development partners increased their contributions to WFWO 2010 regular resources by $700. The main donors substantially increased their contributions to support direct programs through the resource mobilizations task force by more than 90%. The increase was largely a result of a decision to convert earmarked resources to regular resources. Since year’s 2008/09/10, all funding commitments by EBDRMT/ TF were secured for the up coming years as per agreement signed in 2009. Although other donors slightly decreased its contribution in 2009/10, it remained the largest contributor is the EBDRMT/TF to WFWO regular resources committed for 2009-2015, is about $50 ml. There was an overall decrease in other resources from $10 ml in 2008 to $700 in 2010 distributed for grants programs. In 2009, WFWO signed a New Development Accords Agreements with Canadian and New Zealand Partners Foundations and EBDRMT/TF to contribute to the MDGs. These funds of $110 ml committed for 2009-2015, by promissory notes to support WFWO’s activities around the world on sustainable development programs and inclusive financing programs in the Least Developed Countries to contribute to the MDGs. (But this commitments no yet reached the WFWO). While continuing to rely on a relatively small of donors to regular resources contributions to WFWO earmarked resources are becoming increasingly diverse. In addition to bilateral partners, WFWO enjoys support from development and financial institutions , foundations, and also contributors from the private sector: are Holding 888.com, Terra Finance USA for an grant, including the logistical of kinds support to emergency operations. Contributions WFWO for 2010

WFWO continues to be overly dependent on too few donors to regular resources WFWO’s donors contribute 90% or Regular Resources. Continuing to diversify and expand the regular resource base remains a top priority to strengthening its partnership thought EBDRMT/TF for the organization of the most funding direct resources for its programs worldwide under the WFWO, from other donors on the other hand, are becoming increasingly diverse, from Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force EBDRMT/TF) and bilateral and multilateral cooperation, WFWO support from development financial institutions, foundations, the private sector, in order to contribute to the achievement of the eight MDGs.

Page 81


Annual Report 2010 Table 1. Expenditure trends 2006-2009 (in thousand /millions of USD) 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Expenditures Program expenditures

600

800

900

980

16

- of which regular resources

800

900

900

700

21

- of which other resources

300

600

734

845

24

WFWO Support

900

650

721

784

12

Total

2.6

2.95

3.25

3.30

73

Source: Financial statements for WFWO as of 31 December 2010 before closing of accounts. *Both years include approximately Expenditures in 2008 and 2009 include respectively other funding provided by other bilateral cooperation donors partners under the WFWO programs directly or in directly and fund committed by EBDRMT Task Force since 2008.

The main WFWO’s program of resources will continue its effort of funding through EBDRMT/TF and its financial partners to be allocated and focusing to Africa and Asia & Pacific. In 2010, 50% of country program expenditures went to Africa, followed by Asia and the Pacific at 30% Africa also accounted for the majority of expenditure within WFWO’s global activities, which in 2010 accounted for 10% share of program expenditures, up from 5% in 2010. This growth in global activities was largely a result of the grant program becoming fully operational in 4 developing countries in Africa and Asia, 20% that are emergency operation, natural disasters and post-conflict countries. The global program figure also includes the Gender Equality and workshops and public awareness’ campaigns to contribute to MDGs. The local sustainable development programs, is jointly cost sharing by EBDRMT/TF and other financial partners to be implemented by year’s 2010-2015. Table 2. 2010 Program expenditures per region and Local development practice area (in thousand, million USD) building capacity

Sustainable development program

Grant Program

Emergency Operations

Regions/specific purposes

"

Africa

50

200

200

250

Asia & Pacific

50

200

200

250

Latin America & Caribbean

25

100

100

150

Global activities

100

200

200

200

Capacity building & Workshops, knowledge management MDGs Awareness & Campaign

150

150

150

150

100

120

50

50

Total

475

970

900

1,050

Source: Financial statements for WFWO as of 31 December 2010 before final closing of accounts.

Page 82


Annual Report 2010 WFWO at a glance WFWO will continue its effort with the financial partners to provide grants program aid and technical support to help local communities and NGOs, CBOs in order to reach more poor households and small businesses, and local governments. Provide co-financing sustainable development programs focus on poverty alleviation, health, education water improvement, infrastructure facilities, hospital, feeder roads, schools, that will improve poor peoples’ lives and to contribute to eight MDGs.

Annex II: Financial Statements WFWO Income and Expenditures 2009 (Thousands of United States dollars)

2009

2010

Voluntary Contributions

550

50

Cost Sharing Contributions

500

50

Sub-trust funds bilateral contributions grant program

10.5

700

Sub Total

11.550

800

Interest Income

350

1

Reimbursable Support Services

800

3

Other Income

600

2

TOTAL INCOME

1.75

1,1

EXPENDITURE

150

50

Program

-

-

Regular- Resources

1.1

10

Cost -Sharing

450

10

Sub Trust funds (Bilateral contributions)

1.2

15

Sub Total

2.9

20

Supplementary Budget- net

150

50

Management & Administration costs

100

70

Technical Support costs

20

5

Reimbursable support Services costs

680

9

Sub Total

950

239

Other expenditure

220

2

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

220

30

INCOME

EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE)

-

Savings on prior biennium obligations

-

-

Transfer to/from/ a supplementary funds

1,000

5

Refunds to donors & transfer to/from/other funds

2.000

5

Funds balances 1 January 2010

15.000

10

FUNDS BALANCES, 31 DECEMBER

18.000

10

Report date as of 1st July 2010

Page 83


Annual Report 2010 Annex III: Financial Statements

WFWO Balance Sheet 2009 (Thousands of United States dollars)

2009

2010

Cash

1.1

20

Investments by RMT/TF

5

500

Grants to NGOs, CBOs,

5

500

Operating funds provided from RMT/TF directly to programs

550

50

Operating funds provided by bilateral & Cooperation donors partners

5

100

Operating funds provided from RMT/TF for executing agencies partners

550

100

Other accounts receivable and deferred charges

200

50

Accrued interest

11

1

TOTAL ASSETS

28,400

10

LIABILITIES

-

-

Operating Fund by RMT/TF payable to NGOs. CBOs

171

10

Operating Fund payable to Executing agencies

183

10

Promissory note obligations and commitments

10

10

Accounts payable

-

-

Supplementary Budget for emergency operations

187

10

Deferred Income

23

10

TOTAL LIABILITIES

33,541

1,381

ASSESTS

COMMITTED FUND BALANCES

-

Operational funds committed by RTM/TF

10

50

Unexpended Resources

-

-

Regular Resources

1

200

Cost Sharing

500

100

Sub trust funds from direct program under the WFWO

1

2

Sub Total

12.500

352

Reimbursable Support Services

895

10

Total Unexpended Resources

387

10

TOTAL COMMITTED FUND BALANCES, 31 DECEMBER BT RMT/TF/Promissory Note

100

50

TOTAL LIABILITIES, COMMITTED FUND BALANCES BY RMT/TF/Promissory Note

101,282

100

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

Notes to the Financial Statements Since the financial crisis WFWO has established an Task Force as Resource mobilizations Team composed by its Executive Chairman and Board Directors, dealing directly and coordinating all the financial resource to support the WFWO’s activities around the world in order to contribute to the eight MDGs. The Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force is the trustee of the executive board members and its Financial partners has an clear mandate and terms of reference as resource mobilizations Team and responsible of resources as trustee: and to maintain its commitment for all resources to the WFWO.

Page 84


Annual Report 2010 Mandate and goals objectives on the EBDRMT/TF: The EBDRMT/TF has a clear mission is to assist the WFWO mandate in developing countries, in order to contribute to eight MDGs targets, amongst them, “in the development of their economies by supplementing existing sources of capital assistance by means of grants and loans and co-financing projects under WFWO name and working throughout developing countries and making full use of its capital investment mandate and flexible financial instruments, WFWO’s goals are to reduce poverty and the achievement of the eight Millennium Development Goals by: a) Increasing access by poor people and NGOs, CBOs and local communities to grant microfinance credit b) Improving the delivery of pro-poor services and infrastructure at the local level and support government c) Supporting the WFWO grant and sustainable development program to implement in developing countries d) Managing the resources and provide all support to WFWO’s activities e) The RMT/TF Chairman serves simultaneously as the Managing Executive Director of Global Project Management and other members of Board. The Executive Chairman of the RMT/TF report to Executive President of the WFWO. f) Since the financial crisis the Executive President and the Secretary General did not receive any remuneration from the WFWO during the current financial year. Committed Contributions by RMT/TF/USD

2009

2010

Committed contributions from RMT/TF by promissory note

100

50

Total

100

50

g) Grants Grants balances pending have been restated to include US$1 ml in outstanding grant at end of 31 December 2010 due to no funding received yet as per commitment of the EBDRMT/TF and other donors, the grants had initially been recorded as grants the outstanding grants actually is pending as balance shown in the statements reflect current that are scheduled to be disbursed in the year coming. Grants to the NGOs, CBOs

2009

2010

Grants

3.1

890

Total

3.1

890

Financial Highlights - 2010 The members of the WFWO Board of Trustees confirm that the summarized financial statements on this page are a summary of the information extracted from the full annual financial statements, which were approved on!30 September 2010; The summarized financial statements may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the Organization; For further information, please consult the full annual financial statements, the auditors’ report and the Trustees’ Report; The summarized financial statements do not constitute full financial statements within the meaning of the Organization policy. A copy of the statutory financial statements of WFWO, upon which the auditors have reported with Approved by the members of the Board of Trustees and signed and committed by the Chairperson of EBDRMT/TF; Independent Auditors’ Statement/EBDRMT/TF Trustees;! We have examined the summarized financial statements of the WFWO for the year ended 31 December 2010; Respective responsibilities of Trustees and Auditors;

Page 85


Annual Report 2010 !The

members of the Board of Trustees are responsible for preparing the summarized financial statements in accordance with the recommendations of the WFWO policy. Our responsibility is to report to you our opinion on the consistency of the summarized financial statements with the full financial statements and the Trustees’ Report. We also read the other information contained in the summarized annual report and considered the implications for our report if we became aware of any apparent misstatements or material inconsistencies with the summarized financial statements. Basis of opinion We conducted our work in accordance with International Standards on Auditing issued by the Auditing Practices Board for use internationally. Opinion In our opinion, the summarized financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements and the Trustees’ Report of the WFWO for the year ended 31 December 2010. Funding from Supporters to the !WFWO’s activities! WFWO gratefully acknowledges support from our financial partners, private sector corporations, and individuals in 2010. We are enormously grateful to all of our donors,!including those whose gifts under $1.00 Can Make!the Difference.! Every contribution is very important to WFWO.! Funding commitments for 2010/2015! The Establishment of the Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (EBDRMT/TF) !Trustee will play an catalytic !role on the future WFWO resources!(but unfortunately we do not yet reached any funding committed by EBDRMT for 2010.) Keeping our promises:! Your contributions are in good hands! World For World Organization (WFWO), is committed to addressing the vital need for food security, education, drinking water and health, environment. We aim to increase our impact both directly on the ground through our partner organizations, and indirectly by influencing others and promoting best practice in the field in developing countries,!any resources entrusted to us has the potential to be transform on specific projects to be directed to ! rural communities!and population, women, children and families needed.! Program Services! - Honoring our Partners and Donators in all we do ! The WFWO’s, believes the resources at our disposal are a sacred trust of our partners, donors and supporters!on behalf of the poor. Due to it is our faith that motivates us to serve the poor, we are accountable not only to our partners and donors and supporters!Our! commitment to stewardship means we optimize and distribute resources where they are needed most. Programs and costs are carefully monitored and reviewed, donations and grants are used for their intended purposes, and funds are leveraged for maximum impact. Overhead rate is one of several metrics WFWO uses to evaluate the efficiency of our work.! We also!recognize that Humanitarian programs effectiveness should not be judged by its overhead alone. To successfully carry out our mission of freeing children, women, indigenous and poor peoples around the world from poverty, WFWO regularly monitors and evaluates our programs to!ensure the highest quality and efficiency and evaluations, as per WFWO’s policy and lending!criteria. Resource Governance! In order to increase the transparency and accountability of WFWO, we hereby outline our main practices and!mechanisms on resource governance.! Fund and Project !Cycle Design Management Procedures and Guidelines!! WFWO manages all projects and donations itself and there are rigorous procedures to ensure the proper use of!donations. Before confirming support to a project, WFWO ensures the availability of ministry funding and appraises the project plans and budgets based on the needs assessments. All funding and budget commitments follow WFWO's standard policies and procedures and are monitored by WFWO’s Resource Mobilization Team. After a project is completed, an evaluation is performed to assess the!effectiveness and efficiency of the project for future! improvement as per WFWO’s policy and! procedures guidelines.! Operations Cost Control! Our operations are bounded by strict cost controls. Internal policies and procedures on expenditure are in place to ensure that every dollar raised is properly used. During this past year, only 5% of annual income was spent on!administration and fund-raising, while 80% to up 90% of our income was used for global relief and!sustainable development programs and grants

Page 86


Annual Report 2010

WFWO's !Success and experience leaned Small and beautiful: WFWO!is the organization of its kind, promising to!contribute to the Millennium Development Goals Objectives and support NGOs, CBOs in the provision of quality sustainable development programs, and helping them advocate the development global issues. Responsive: WFWO Team!has proved it is able to adjust to the changing economic, political and social situations in combining both development and emergency interventions. Trustworthy: WFWO!has established itself as a professional, reliable and accountable organization. Through its hard work it has been able to gain the trust of both donors and local partners. Respected: WFWO’s board of directors includes experts in civil society; representatives of umbrella NGO networks and unions; scholars; and private sector representatives. Together, they add value and expertise. Effective:!Since 2002, WFWO has been expanding its operations throughout the least developed countries; Africa, Asia, Latin America to reach out to the needy, poor and vulnerable, and target NGOs and CBOs of varying capacities. WFWO’s interventions help thousands every year in various on granting and sustainable development !programs to contribute to!eight Millennium Development Goals Objectives. Committed: WFWO!is committed to spending its funds in an efficient and transparent manner. Its highly qualified team are dedicated and committed to its values, principles and community needs. WFWO experience leaned that we can archive our common objectives only with the support and participation of our stakeholders and beneficiaries.

Page 87


Annual Report 2010

MAJOR FUNDERS & PARTNERS 2010

" Individual Donors:!

" Executive Board Members:

Sunita Bhudia Paul Bloemendal! Elena David Sofya Taing Shazia Khan Eric Goh Polly Glover Christhopher Morgan Jamie Johnstone Robert Scott Lance Redpath Kathy Compton! Ciara Kenny! Ash Day! Catherine Lopez Terry Chiu Guillaume Godin! Agnes Malaty! Michael Ashton! Abdullah Al Shafi! Fabrizio Martelli! Anna Kupka! Kathryn Carlisle! Paul McGovern! Sean Doherty! Sebastian Ford! Creeda Mahon Donal O'Dea! Sam Price Florent Carlo Kaiser Mario Spadari Anonymous

WFWO Team Cherif Sidi Alina Clocotan Diego Pizzicaroli Karima Cherif Eric Deneve Fati Wane Georgia Spaccapietra Michelangelo Gressani " Members: My Huynh Cong Howard Halyard Andrew Gittins Ankit Srivastava Mohamed Cherif Lucio Piombetti Michela Vornicel Antonio Gianmarco Giorgio Amatucci Davide Cesarini Reda Bourayou Serban Vornicel Fabiana Santorelli Giulia Giorgi Camillo Guilavogui

" Goodwill Ambassador for Development Network: Asadullah Khan (Afghanistan) Md Biozid Jessorey (Bangladesh) Arm Moghazy (Egypt) Mahitab Mekkawi (Egypt) Benjamin Amankwaa (Ghana) Bolade Jimoh (Nigeria) Ayomi Meneko (Nigeria) Arjun Dhakal (Nepal) Wendy Ford (U.S.A)

Page 88

" Executive Resource Mobilizations Team: Asher Mazen Bitar Rafat Al-Rashidi (all members of committee will be elected in 2012)

" Foundations: United Nations Federal Credit Union (UNFCU) UN NGO Branch UN NGO IRENE Global Zayed International Prize Willy Brandt Fondation Ammado Foundation

" Corporations: Google Inc CONFIMEA CHIROPRO Italia The Best Raffaello Finmarge Counsulting & Travel Siarco I.G.G.P. Italy Cooperlat Acquaphor Financial Institutions (Bank-SG) Medic4All Non Profit Shopping Mall Change Fly for Good Caffe Press


Annual Report 2010

WFWO's main !works and objectives !is to contribute !to the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) !to reduce poverty in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) by strengthening local communities, NGOs, CBOs and increasing access to grant program facilities. This Annual Report details its program, management and financial performance in 2010. While management targets were largely met, strengthening WFWO’s operational effectiveness will remain a key priority.! A process of internal reflection since the financial crisis in late 2008 led to refined priorities and resources for WFWO!for the period 2010-2015, by!the launched of the Resource Mobilizations Task Force and accords of development !with other financial!partners. These include increasing operational effectiveness, responding to LDC demand for new kinds of support, and strengthening strategic partnerships to contribute to the MDGs targets by 2015.

Page 89


Annual Report 2010

Report and Photos credits This report was prepared by the WFWO Communications team with support from Operation Team of the WFWO. Designed by Communications Team. The WFWO’s 2010 Annual Report uses data, photos and stories from the field visit by WFWO Communications and Operations! Teams in Mexico, Republic of Congo,! Republic of Gabon , Republic Islamic of Mauritania, Republic of Senegal during calendar year 2009/10 Photo description, man, women and children! in! rural area! and WFWO Team in the field of action. Keep up to date !with WFWO at www.worldforworld.org Get Involved: You can !be a Goodwill Ambassador for Development, Friend of WFWO our daily e-news bulletin has all the latest information on our work around the world to meetings, to updates on our programs. Sign up online Get involved at www.worldforworld.org! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter WFWO/AR/10/RB Ref. number: AR/E6/10/BT

World For World Organization (WFWO) Executive Secretariat - Via Andrea Millevoi, n°35, Rome-00178 (Italy) Tel: + 39 0651530985 - Fax: +39 0651960227 E-mail: info@worldforworld.org - Website: www.worldforworld.org

Page 90

Annual Report 2010  

The World For World Organization (WFWO) is working for the results and is dedicated and concerned to support! NGOs, CBOs and Local Communiti...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you