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Annual Report 2009

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One World One Hope! The Millennium Development Goals is Common Vision and Global Commitments

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WFWO"s mission is to assure help for the world"s most vulnerable people to contribute to the Millennium Development Goals

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Table of Contents

WFWO Mission, Vision, Objectives, Value ...............................5 Preface by the Executive President ..........................................7 Introduction ...............................................................................11 The Main Activities to contribute to the MDGs ......................16 Review Operations and Partnership .......................................18 WFWO"s Operations Overview in Brief ..................................19 Program Results .......................................................................21 Highlights of Main Achievements ...........................................29 Grant Making the Year in Review.............................................33 WFWO strengthen its Partnership with NGOs, CBOs, LC.....37 Guideline !of Conduct..............................................................47 WFWO strengthen its Partnership with NGOs, CBOs, LC.....51 WFWO Global Advocacy Activities Report ............................66 Operations Program Around the World since 2002 ..............73 WFWO and the MDGs ..............................................................74 WFWO Achievements to Raise Public Awareness around the World ..................................................................................76 Intl. Meetings, Roundtable, Seminars, Briefing Sessions....78 WFWO Organizational Chart...................................................81 WFWO Networks......................................................................82 Financial Analysis & Statement .............................................84 WFWO"s Success.....................................................................90 Major Funders ..........................................................................91

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OUR MISSION WFWO"s mission is to overcome poverty by enabling the world"s poorest people to gain the hope for better future and improve their quality of life through the access to food security, drinking water, health, education, poverty, HIV-AIDS programs, micro credit, using local skills and practical, sustainable technologies to support development humanitarian projects on relief and rehabilitation programs, to secure the empowerment of indigenous peoples, local communities, women, groups and individuals in developing countries.

OUR VISION WFWO's vision is of a world where everyone has access to food security, health, childhood, drinking water, education, environmental issue and promote the right of every women and man and child to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity.

OUR OBJECTIVES WFWO"s objectives is to increase public awareness about global development issues and focuses and development cooperation"s, and resources mobilizations through fundraising campaigns, to support to achievements and the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) targets by 2015.

OUR VALUES The WFWO Main Value and Approach, we believes on People, and shared responsibility among People, dialogue among cultures, and commitment to development issues, diversities and peace and justice for Global Change.

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“All Together We Can Achieve Our Global Commitments To End The Poverty ..!”

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FOREWORD Preface by the Executive President One World One Hope We have no more excuses, we need to take action, since 2000 the world leaders committed and set far-sighted goals to free a major population of humanity from the shackles of extreme poverty, hunger, health and education. They established of eight targets for achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women, environmental sustainability and a global partnership for development for working together for a better world, and pledged to spare no effort in fulfilling that vision and commitments. We began 2009 with even greater challenges, but with the confidence that ending poverty is possible with the solidarity of all. We will continue the way we work in close cooperation with all our partners and supporters to meet the needs to contribute to the end poverty as efficiently and effectively as possible to find a long-term poverty solutions for change as matter of urgency. The WFWO shown that will still fighting again poverty and justice with is limited resource, but we were able to targeted responses to contribute to the MDGs in order to achieve our common objectives. The review of the year 2009 for us was one of the most challenging and very difficult tasks to be reached, due to the global issue faced with the triple threat of the food, natural disasters and financial crises. The global financial crisis has pushed millions of peoples into extreme poverty and increased of number of peoples who they lost their jobs!and they have no income to earn enough for themselves and their families to rise above the poverty.!The major advances in the fight against extreme poverty from 1990 to 2005, for example, are likely to have stalled. During that period, the number of people living on less than $1.25 a day decreased from 1.8 billion to 1.4 billion. In 2009, an estimated 55 million to 90 million more people will be living in extreme poverty than anticipated before the crisis.! We have no doubt about it, we are all suffering during the current economic recession. In particularly the nonprofit sector has been hit harder than most the 40% of resources not reached some organizations working very hard to assist populations around the world, for this reason we are experiencing reduced contributions so far the year coming. We need to take action as matter of urgency of addressing extreme hunger and poverty Goal 1, in the face of a multiplicity of crises—of food, fuel and finance as much as of the economy, ecology and the environment. These crises continue to pose daunting challenges to the global economy and to national recovery efforts, especially of developing countries. Unless greater multilateral means and more improved development cooperation mechanisms that are transparent and accountable are in place to address these challenges, the achievement of internationally agreed development goals, including the MDGs, are ever more imperiled and their achievement and commitments can be ! failed. We ! have no more excuses, with respect to the allocation of resources for sustainable development, among many other competing needs for sure, will determine the success or the failure of the targets assigned to each of the MDGs. We must not fail. For failure means that we have failed the many poor, hungry and marginalized peoples of the world who look up to more improved development cooperation and a more just, equitable and sustainable sharing of resources, for their survival. We will have failed them if the MDGs that held up so much great promise is going to remain in words and rhetoric and not actual cooperation in the financing of necessary development. Indeed, it is time, more than ever, for those economies, which by scale and historic burden and responsibility have the resources and chance to really improve upon our world to match their rhetoric with decisive action.!

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We note that some countries take the right policies and actions on eight MDGs, backed by adequate funding and strong political commitment, can yield results. Fewer people today are dying of AIDS, and many countries are implementing proven strategies to combat malaria and measles, two major killers of children. The world is edging closer to universal primary education, and way to meeting the target for safe drinking water. !We also!notes that many challenges remain and are likely to become even more difficult in the current financial economic crisis and climate. Early indications are that, not surprisingly, the numbers of poor populations have suffered most from the natural disasters of the past year, they lost their homes, lands, and living in extreme poverty.! Achieving the MDGs will require that targeting areas and population groups that have clearly been left behind — rural communities, the poorest households and ethnic minorities, all of whom will have a hand in shaping our common future and the development agenda be fully integrated into efforts to jumpstart growth and rebuild the global economy. At the top of the agenda is the climate change problem, which will have to be regarded as an opportunity to develop more efficient "green# technologies and make the structural changes needed that will contribute to sustainable growth. Today without the solidarity and effort of all,!nothing less than the viability of our planet we share and the future of humanity are at stake, ! all international community has no more excuses for keeping their promises, plunging millions of poor peoples more into poverty.!! We must avoid at all costs achieving our common objectives targeted by 2015.!We cannot allow an unfavorable economic climate to undermine the commitments made, we need more ! efforts to restore economic growth should be seen as an opportunity to take some of the hard decisions needed to create a more equitable and sustainable future. We should investing in the poor and most vulnerable must be part of our solution to the economic crisis.! The Millennium Development Goals alone will not be enough to lift them out of poverty.!We also need stable financial markets and a favorable economic environment. Moreover, political will is just as important as economic resources in our efforts to end poverty. Lets!take action towards the eradication of poverty from all over the world.!They are: the need to support country-led development; foster inclusive economic growth; improve opportunities for women and girls; target investments in poverty, health and education, in clean water and sanitation, and in scale up social protection and employment programs and other targeted interventions, such as!mobilizing resources to finance the MDGs; and the international community delivering on the official development assistance (ODA) commitments it has made and improving the predictability and effectiveness of aid.!WFWO will continue to “sharpen its tools” and work closely with a wide range of partners within and beyond the UN system to support the world#s poorest and most vulnerable people and communities and to help countries meet their development goals, if we want to see a beautiful world tomorrow. This It#s not only United Nations, government, institution, NGO responsibility to erase poverty from world, but also a responsibility of all individuals who is thinking about a better tomorrow. ! “At WFWO, We know that poverty can be eradicated and is solvable, only with all your support " We Can”…!! Let me take this opportunity to express my gratitude to these successes belong to the generous Resource Mobilization Team Task Force, !donors, supporters and friends of the WFWO. It is the programs of the grants we fund that enable WFWO to continue its mission of assuring help for the world#s most vulnerable people and to work for sustainable progress against poverty. let us commit, each one of us, to building the political will to make poverty history.!To ensuring that in 2010, we can look forward to achieving the Millennium Development Goals five years later. Your contributions make it happen. We hope that you will continue to support the WFWO to achieve its mission. Executive President Sidi Cherif

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�We believe, that a breakthrough in achieving the MDGs will require abandoning the current and failed models of eradicating poverty that relied on technical inputs and a growth–oriented approach based on economic injustice, disparity and exploitation. In short, the achievement of the MDGs targets requires a holistic approach that is human rights based, social justice oriented, and cognizant of the interconnected gender dimensions of all the MDGs.�

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I. INTRODUCTION

Highlighted on the World Summit on Food Security in 2009 Special Report by WFWO"s Communications Team

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Highlighted on the World Summit on Food Security in 2009 The World Summit on Food Security took place from 16-18 November 2009 at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) headquarters in Rome, Italy. The Summit brought together over 4,700 delegates from 180 countries, including 60 Heads of State and Government as well as representatives of governments, UN Agencies, intergovernmental and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), the private sector, and the media. Delegates met throughout the Summit both for a High-Level Segment and for a series of four round tables, which addressed the following topics: minimizing the negative impact of the food, economic and financial crises on world food security; implementation of the reform of global governance of food security; climate change adaptation and mitigation: challenges for agriculture and food security; and measures to enhance global food security, including rural development, smallholder farmers and trade considerations. The outcomes of the Summit include a Report of the World Summit on Food Security and a Declaration of the World Summit on Food Security. The Declaration outlines strategic objectives, commitments and actions, and establishes the Five Rome Principles for Sustainable Global Food Security.

Path to the WORLD SUMMIT on Food Security High-Level Expert Forum: How to Feed the World in 2050: Over 300 international specialists met in Rome, Italy, from 12-13 October 2009 to address the challenge of meeting global demand for food up to 2050, with a view to contributing to the debate at the ensuing World Summit on Food Security. These specialists highlighted that global demand for food, feed and fibre is projected to increase by some 70% in the first half of this century. They noted that agriculture in developing countries would require net investments of US$83 billion annually (an increase of approximately 50%) if there is to be sufficient food to feed a projected population of 9.1 billion people in 2050. Experts addressed the challenges of climate change, demand for biofuels, and competing demands for land and water, and discussed appropriate investment and policy options to address food security over the next forty years. Thirty-fifth Session of the Committee for World Food Security: is the UN#s forum for reviewing and following up on policies concerning world food security. At its thirty-fifth session, held in Rome, Italy, from 14-17 October 2009, CFS members agreed on wide-ranging reforms that would make the CFS the foremost inclusive international and intergovernmental platform dealing with food security and nutrition, and a central component of the evolving Global Partnership for Agriculture, Food Security and Nutrition. The CFS reforms are designed to focus the Committee#s vision and role on the global coordination of efforts to eliminate hunger and ensure food security for all. Pre-Summit and connected events: Three special events preceded the World Summit on Food Security: The World For World Organization (WFWO) participation and a civil society forum for NGOs, civil society organizations and farmers# organizations held in Rome, Italy, between 14-16 November 2009; a private sector forum held in Milan, Italy, on 12-13 November 2009; and a parliamentary meeting of national parliaments, held in Rome, Italy, on 13 November 2009. Additionally, the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) held the Second NAM First Ladies Summit on Sunday 15 November 2009, in the FAO Headquarters in Rome, Italy.

Remarks on the Summit ! The World Summit on Food Security (the Summit) opened in Rome on 16 November 2009. The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Director-General, Jacques Diouf, welcomed delegates to the Summit and expressed gratitude to Saudi Arabia for providing funding to host the Summit. Renato Schifani, President of the Italian Senate, emphasized that food and water access are universal rights, and encouraged renewed multilateralism to eliminate hunger and inequality. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said there can be no food security without climate security and emphasized the importance of the upcoming Copenhagen climate negotiations and of agreement on a legally-binding climate treaty. 11


Diouf warned that international interest in the issue of hunger is waning, as indicated by the absence of some key world leaders at the Summit. He called for greater investment in agriculture to overcome hunger. He expressed hope that the reformed FAO Committee for World Food Security (CFS) will serve as the foremost international platform for effectively addressing food security. Delegates regretted that participants to the Summit were not on target to meet a goal established at the 1996 World Food Summit to halve the number of undernourished people by 2015. Several noted that the number of people affected by hunger has in fact increased by 100 million since 2008. While some applauded the increased attention to food security since 2008, others pointed to the absence of several rich countries from the Summit as a sign of the lack of urgency around this issue. Many delegates agreed that food is not only fundamental to human survival but also a basic human right. Some countries insisted that food and nutritional security be considered a legal right, and eradication of hunger a norm of international law. Noting the proliferation of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer in developing countries, one delegate stressed the criticality of food quality and ensuring that populations in developing countries have access to food that is rich in both energy and nutrients. He said this requires investment in agricultural intensification and diversification. Some delegates highlighted the importance of fish protein to the diets of many of the world#s poor, and said deteriorating marine environments threaten food security. While delegates frequently noted the correlation between economic, financial and food crises, how these crises were linked remained disputed. Most delegates agreed, however, that neglect of agriculture and rural development on the part of developed and developing countries and donor agencies over the past decades has been a major contributor to food insecurity and called for increased investments. One delegation stated that food security and rural development are the responsibilities of many ministries, not just those of agriculture. Many stressed that agriculture is one of the most powerful growth engines in developing countries but that budgets have declined over the last decades. They argued that investment in this sector should not be reduced because of the financial crisis. Representatives from several African countries noted they were striving to dedicate 10% of their national budgets to agriculture, as laid out in the 2003 African Union Maputo Declaration. They highlighted different areas where investment is required, stressing the need to invest in smallholder farmers, and in particular women farmers. Although delegates agreed that food security is a national, regional and global problem that requires coordinated action across all levels, they differed in their analysis of who should take responsibility for addressing food security, or what role different actors should play. Some developing countries evoked the debt owed to them for years of colonial exploitation of their resources, while others blamed the global capitalist system. Some said developed countries should take the lead in providing financial and technical assistance to address food security, and that developing countries must ensure a friendly environment for investment. Other delegates suggested that the duty of developed countries is not to provide aid, but to create conducive conditions for development, emphasizing technology transfer, capacity building and market access. Several European countries said increased resources should be coupled with good governance. Delegates from developed and developing countries alike called for country-led programs that contribute to food security. Developing countries discussed approaches to mobilizing investments, with some noting that economic progress in poor countries will have positive effects on international trade. One country delegate suggested campaigning for the attention of people in developed countries to build the required political will to provide funding to the developing world. Another said many of developing countries# food needs can be packaged as commercial and bankable proposals that will appeal to developed countries. Others agreed that developing countries should focus on trade and business transactions, not aid. 12


In their statements, developing country representatives outlined the support they required from developed countries. Several noted the importance of South-South or triangular cooperation. Developing countries called for support for: mechanisms to boost technology transfer; capacity-building to process primary products for increased export revenues; and targeted programs for increased agricultural production for the least developed countries. One country delegate called on FAO to give special support to scientific research for agriculture in developing countries, and another to establish improved seed banks to address food security. Some speakers stressed the need for international food stockpiles available to all countries in times of emergency. Asian countries highlighted the Association of Southeast Asian Nations# recent agreement to establish an East Asian Emergency Rice Reserve. Some African delegates encouraged production of inputs, such as fertilizers, within Africa. Many developing countries highlighted successful national actions and programs to tackle food insecurity and promote agricultural and rural development and nutrition. They described, inter alia: country strategies to achieve the MDG to halve poverty and hunger by 2015; food security strategies that comprise economic diversification, sustainable agriculture, social security programs and inter sectoral platforms to integrate civil society; land reform strategies; tax incentives, subsidies to smallholder farmers, equipment provision programs; and credit provision programs for farmers. Some delegates described investments in rural infrastructure and various types of technologies suited for different conditions. Others described regional partnerships in which they have engaged to protect against food insecurity. The Detailed Program for the Development of African Agriculture was highlighted. Many developed countries highlighted bilateral and multilateral commitments to addressing food security, including: increased aid for food security, agricultural and rural development, and nutrition; making food security one of their country#s top aid priorities; and untying food aid. Some developing countries said they had committed a portion of their food exports to countries in need. The Islamic Development Bank highlighted its agreement with FAO, made on 15 November 2009, to commit US$1 billion to agricultural development in poor countries that belong to both organizations. Trade was the subject of significant debate, with many speakers stressing its indivisibility from food security. Calling hunger the cruelest and most tangible sign of poverty, His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI lamented the weakness of current food security mechanisms, and urged better market access for poor countries. Several developing country representatives noted their potential to be food exporters but said lack of market access, in addition to weak regional organization and insufficient assistance from the international community, hinders this potential. Some delegates argued that food should be produced where it is best and most efficient to do so, which requires a trade system that allows food to move freely. Cautioning that policies to bolster food security on the basis of self-sufficiency reduces purchasing power – which is critical to reducing poverty – some stressed that trade is an essential component of a comprehensive package to achieve food security. Many countries urged: transparent and non-discriminatory trade regulations; combating speculation around food pricing; access to markets for developing countries; and elimination of subsidies. Some stressed that food security is a national responsibility. Developed and developing countries alike called for a successful conclusion to the Doha round of WTO negotiations. Some developing countries opposed the World Bank and International Monetary Fund#s call to reduce the share of agriculture in national economies, and urged revision of the World Bank classification of economies to reflect on-the-ground realities. Many delegates highlighted the links between food and global security, with some stating that social stability and the rule of law cannot be achieved if people are hungry. Some also outlined challenges surrounding transboundary water sharing, particular within a growing context of water scarcity. Noting that global cooperation among governments in response to the financial crisis averted a depression, some stressed the need for cooperation on food security to prevent social disaster. 13


Many speakers emphasized the indivisibility of food security from sustainable development. They also noted links to biodiversity, desertification and land degradation. The connection between food security and climate change stimulated significant discussion. Delegates emphasized both the impacts of climate change on agriculture and food security as well as the role that agriculture can play in mitigating climate change. Many countries highlighted the devastating impacts of natural disasters on their populations, with small island developing states and countries with arid regions stressing that they are particularly affected. On biofuels, some delegates emphasized their potentially harmful impacts on food security, while others argued that controlled production and use of second generation biofuels could help mitigate climate change and boost rural development. Some delegates argued that the upcoming Copenhagen climate change negotiations must address food security, with several stating that mobilizing additional financing for food security must be a key outcome. A number of developing countries said they required funding to adapt their food production systems within the context of a changing climate. A developed country delegation emphasized the need for enhanced research and knowledge exchange on agriculture, especially related to the consequences of climate change. Many developed and developing country delegates alike expressed hope for a positive outcome at the Copenhagen climate negotiations, with a few insisting that a legally binding agreement must be reached. On the Summit Declaration, many noted that it had been significantly watered down from the original draft. Others, however, welcomed the Declaration#s principles and argued that it was a good starting point that has the potential to usher in a new and promising era of global commitment. Referring to the proliferation of summits and declarations, others said the Declaration can – and must – serve as a stepping-stone to establish measurable targets and timeframes for concrete actions in relation to short, medium and long-term approaches to food security. Delegates pointed out weaknesses in the Declaration on issues including: speculation on futures markets; agro fuels; farmer wages and work conditions; and the adverse effects that export-driven agriculture can have on smallholder farmers. Some applauded the Declaration#s recognition of the FAO 2004 voluntary guidelines to support the progressive realization of the right to adequate food in the context of national food security. Some stressed the need for comprehensive and action-oriented approaches to addressing food security, with clear responsibilities for civil society, UN agencies, the private sector, multilateral organizations and other relevant stakeholders. Others highlighted the need for a participatory global governance system based on the centrality of the UN. They emphasized that good governance is necessary to ensure lasting effects of investments. In these regards, delegates welcomed the reform of the CFS, although several stressed the need for oversight of the reforms to ensure improved global governance. Some expressed hope that the CFS will become the main international forum to develop food security solutions, while many emphasized the need to expand the number and types of actors involved to ensure bottom-up policies oriented to the needs of regions and communities. Noting that concrete action requires concrete investment, many countries commended the pledges made at L#Aquila to raise US$20 billion over three years for food security, however some argued that these funds alone are insufficient to tackle the problem and are yet to materialize. Developing countries urged developed countries to make the funds available in a timely manner. Some delegations stressed the need to define principles for investing funds, while others emphasized that the funding must not be distributed as donations of food relief or agricultural transfers.

Closing of the SUMMIT The representatives from the pre-Summit events summarized their contributions to the Summit and to tackling food insecurity. The outcome from the meeting of parliamentarians includes recommendations to: adopt legal and legislative frameworks to protect the right to food; empower women, including by ensuring their access to land, credit and markets; budget for food security; and to strive to meet the MDGs by 2015. 14


II. Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Plan for 2009

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The Main Activities Achieved to Contribute to the MDGs as per Strategy Plan for 2009 Seeking to contribute to the Eight!!Millennium Development Goals adopted by the international community, WFWO#s strategy plan and orientation, pursuit of development objectives locally, nationally and internationally, the WFWO will continue to place highest priority on initiatives in the following areas: (a) Sustainable development program, improvement of food security, health, drinking water, education, with particular emphasis on the needs of women and youth; (b) developing rural financial services through our local partners NGOs, and CBOs that reach isolated populations without previous access to infrastructure and financial facilities and are well integrated into the national financial sector framework; (c) capacity building in support of decentralized decision-making processes for participatory rural development; (d) natural resources management and the environment, with emphasis on supporting anti-decertification initiatives; (e) provide grant; (f) raise public awareness; (g) resource mobilizations; (h) Communications Support Programs; (h) Portal facilities for NGO Network, to support the MDGs;

WFWO to achieve these targets needs close collaborations, with its partners will continue to stress the importance of gender-differentiated target group participation in defining program objectives and priority activities; maximizing the use of local knowledge and experience; and pursuing a strategic orientation to!! WFWO#s investments through strengthened partnership and support of the! !United Nations NGO Branch DESA (UN NGO IRENE Western Europe), governments, civil society and!!private sector and other donors to ensure that project interventions fit closely within the context of overall economic and sectorial development strategies plan for individual countries. The main challengers review activities and programs contributed by WFWO for 2009, as per strategy plan focusing on sustainable development programs and grants provided by WFWO already operating to contribute to the MDGs objectives, as well as campaign to raise public awareness on global development issues.!

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III. Review Operations and Partnership for 2009

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Review Operations for 2009 In 2009 WFWO#s programs for grant were reported that grants request received for 2008/09 is approximately more than 545, for more than 45 countries, showing that 120% increase over 2008. We are grateful for Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (RMTTF) and to all our partners supporters for their contributions, from private funds, commodities, bilateral contributions co.-financing programs, volunteers staff, services. The WFWO#s will continue to expand our donor base and increase partnerships with the private sector, in order to raise public awareness to support a global development issues, through the Goodwill Ambassador for Developments and Friends of WFWO networks, as well as special events such as, Charity Day 2009 organized by our partner 888 Holding, Terra Finance New York (USA), and other fundraising campaign, to support the WFWO#s activities worldwide.

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The WFWO Strategy Framework Plan (SFP) for 2009, was revised by the WFWO#s Board Directors and established an International Task Force (RMT/TF) in charge of Resource Mobilizations, to straighten the mobilization of resources through effective partnerships among all stakeholders and to play a catalytic role to give more importance of targeting grants assistance for 2009/15 to implement the WFWO#s activities in developing countries that population needs assistance focusing on: improving development effectiveness of food security, health, drinking water educations, HIV/AIDS, environment issues, grants, to support sustainable development programs with particular emphasis on the needs of women and children and straighten our relations with our partners, countries local Communities, NGOs,!CBOs networks as a result of opportunities to improve our common programs and objectives as per strategy frame work plan and WFWO policy and $ Project Cycle Design Procedure Guidelines (PCMDPG).

WFWO Strategy Framework Plan (SFP) for 2010/15 will focus on areas with the potential for high-impact, sustainable solutions that can reach a lost of communities. We work closely with RMT/TF and partners to respond to our needs and our financial partners to support innovative approaches and expand existing ones so they reach the people who need them most to help themselves in order to contribute to the eight MDGs targets. We also support policy and advocacy efforts to accelerate progress against the world#s most acute poverty. Our mission will continue to work closely with our financial partners and communities to achieve our common objectives to increase opportunities and investing on poor people in developing countries to overcome their hunger and poverty. More effort needed and only with the solidarity of all "We Can end the poverty". Nearly 2.5 billion people live on less than $2 a day, and more than 1 billion suffer from chronic hunger. Three quarters of the 1.1 billion people living on less than $1 a day live in rural areas, and most rely on agriculture for their food and income. We work to help these small farmers boost their productivity, increase their incomes, and build better lives for their families. We believe that progress is possible on a large scale and in very poor countries. Fewer than 10 percent of the world's poor have access to safe, affordable financial services. We are working with a wide range of based organizations Communities and financial partners to help make grant, micro-finance facilities widely accessible to poor people throughout the developing world.

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IV. WFWO"s Operations Overview for 2009 1. The World For World Organization (WFWO) is!dedicated and concerned to support! NGOs, CBOs and Communities in developing ! countries (DCs) to contribute to the achievement of the ! Eight Millennium! Development Goals (MDGs), with only five years left to reach 2015 MDG deadline and many DCs struggling!to meet the targets. WFWO launched its campaign to raise awareness focused!on MDGs under slogan "One World One Hope, ! the Millennium Development Goals Is Common Vision and Global Commitments", this commitments is more relevant!than ever for all. 2. WFWO works in close cooperation with its partners to contribute to reduce poverty in the DCs by! strengthening local communities, NGOs, CBOs services and increasing access to grant facilities to contribute to MDGs, in practically to main priority is! !to MDG 1: Eradicate extreme!poverty and hunger as well!MDGs 2/3/4: Health, Education and promote gender equality and empower women, !MDG 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability. 3. WFWO ! operates in more than 42 DCs Roughly 50% of its ! program portfolio is in countries poor and also emerging from natural disaster and crisis or conflict. In 2009, local sustainable development programs accounted for 70% of its program delivery; grant programs !for 40% !to 70% of WFWO#s overall portfolio is in Africa; 35% is in Asia ! 30% and Latin America 10%. ! Over 80% of the supported ! programs, by ! NGOs, CBOs! partners are included the components of the gender equality to empowerment of women, ! WFWO's Gender Equality ! Local sustainable! Development program, designed to ensure that funding ! spending is ! to contribute to women, is now fully operational in Africa and Asia DCs. 4. Since the financial crisis the WFWO#s straight its partnership with NGOs, CBOs, local authorities has also grown is reached 90%.!of WFWO activities in the field !are joint programs with partners NGOs, CBOs, local authorities, WFWO#s new Strategy Framework Plan(SFP) ! 2010-2015 with the funding contribution and commitments !and Development Accords Agreement signed !between the WFWO Executive President and by Executive Chairman of the RMT/TF !and financial !partners in the earlier 2010 to focus on !sustainability programs worldwide ! (e.g. ! support key WFWO priorities focusing on ! the eight MDGs, including poverty reduction, health, drinking water, education, emergency operation, gender equality, indigenous people rights, environment !protection, !and support !to natural disasters and post-conflict in developing countries (DCs). 5. This report 2009, WFWO#s programmatic, managerial and financial ! performance in 2009 against established targets. The organization#s performance is ! measured through its Strategy Framework Plan (SFP), which supports the larger objectives of MDGs targets – the main priorities goals are Goal 1: achieving the MDGs and reducing human poverty, and the other Goals 2/3/4/5/6/7/8 to contribute to the implementation of the MDGs objectives as per grant making enclosed. 6. This report also highlights the results of an internal reflection begun in late 2008 ! with a view to ensuring that WFWO can continue to keep going after finical crisis, with growing in DCs!demand for its assistance. The process of reflection led to refined priorities for the period !2010-2015, including increasing operational effectiveness aids, responding to NGOs, CBOs, and local communities in DCs demand!for new technical assistance support, and strengthening strategic partnerships to contribute to our common objectives.

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V. Program Results

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V.1. WFWO"s Program Results: WFWO in the field of action on sustainable development programs and raise public awareness# to contribute to !eight MDGs: 1. There is an increasing consensus that accelerated progress toward the MDGs and to increased attention at all !levels locally nationally and internationally in!particularly !in !DCs, where the majority of people still leave!in rural!areas, and where local services are often weaker!inadequate needs more attention. 2. WFWO works to strengthen and contribute to local communities NGOs, CBOs that assist!direct poor people and community to meet their basic needs and pursue!new opportunities !focuses on MDGs and local governments, ! encouraging involvement and participation of community empowerment and democratic accountability. At the local and national level it supports decentralized systems and procedures designed to fully empower local communities, NGOs, CBOs, and authorities to facilitate the sustainability development !program and !to ensure that local governments can make ! capital investments – focusing on MDGs targets: poverty elevation, health, drinking water supply, education, job creation, infrastructural !facilities!to build, schools, houses, hospital. irrigation schemes, feeder, roads, that are financially sustainable and respond to the needs of the poor communities, in ways that can be! scaled up by WFWO/RMT/TF and other financial development partners.! WFWO#s work closely with its partners at!the local level with NGOs, CBOs and local government to implement its mission and to contribute to assist !communities in !DCs and !adapt to new challenges in order to achieve our common objectives to contribute to!MDGs in particularly Goal 1 and the others Goals 2/3/4/5/6/7. 3. WFWO is support the planning processes of!grants program !to be implemented by NGOs, CBO and local authorities (either directly or via national authorities). ! Within the context of a larger WFWO Local sustainable development Program!grants, which will vary from activity to country to!an other, this will assist country to act as a capacity building incentive, enabling local authorities to immediately put their strategy!plans into action!that, given the means!can respond effectively to the!need to communities (e.g: for a new health centre, refurbished school, village infrastructure facilities, water supply by providing local authorities with grant program aid until ! project proposal for funding from the local government to be submitted for review! to the WFWO).

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V.2. WFWO Sustainable Development Program to contribute to MDGs 1. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals requires that the financing and delivery of social services and infrastructure is well managed at all levels. NGOs, CBOs and Local authorities are in the front line of delivering such services, !WFWO and its financial partners through !RMT/TF funding approach is helping to improve their!capacity to manage public expenditures effectively. This will ensure that the money spent at local level truly reflects the development priorities of population and communities!and maximize the outreach of the local service and infrastructure delivery with the available financial resources to contribute to MDGs targets. WFWO is working in consultation with its partners NGOs, CBOs, as well ! as to respond the requirement of governments in African countries and other region.! The assistance provided by WFWO for sustainability development program to contribute to MDG 1, and to provide assistance on infrastructure facilities for communities and to ! implement their strategy plan development activities in service and infrastructure delivery, in a manner that responds to local!communities needs and!towards!the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. 2. WFWO mission and program in the field of action is to contribute local communities on sustainable development program and raise public awareness on the MDGs. WFWO#s work in close consultations !with local NGOs, CBOs and local community to raise awarenes to vest decision-making power directly in the hands of the local authorities to call attention on !pro-poor investment decisions for communities needs. Based on local communities input, local authorities themselves decide whether to pursue the food!security aspect of MDG 1: Eradicate extreme!poverty and hunger, or the water and sanitation aspect of MDG 7: Ensure environmental sustainability or both in a given locality in either case, WFWO resources, as well as!the resources they catalyze, help achieve the goals given highest priority by the local !communities themselves. 3. WFWO experience learned results shows that these local communities giving clear priority !to economic infrastructure and food security (MDG 1: 50%) Water and sanitation come next (MDG 7: 30%),!followed by education (MDG 2: 10%) and health (MDG 4:10%). In 2009, WFWO and Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force worked together with !WFWO, NGOs, CBOs and local community in preparatory activities for global action strategy plan ! program. ! “To contribute toward ! MDGs at all Levels locally, nationally and internationally� WFWO and its financial partners !and Resource Mobilizations efforts for the new plan of sustainable development programs of action for !Africa, Asia, Latin America, !are !currently underway to be implemented between 2010-2015. 4. WFWO!Emergency Operation!in post-crisis environments natural disasters countries WFWO provides assistance !no food, !only !logistical assistance such as tends, first aid emergency hospital in tends, water supply !and on building the capacity of local communities, for example, participatory planning !processes leading to the delivery of much needed basic !socio-economic infrastructure have contributed to restoring dialogue between the population,!and therefore contributing to the !re-integration of displaced populations. Recently the ! WFWO#s worked with its partners NGOs, CBOs ! in ! Sudan, Chad, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Philippines has helped to build social cohesion 5. WFWO /Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (RMT/TF) is mandated to do resource mobilize trough investment and ten research trough its financial partners and donors, the funding for WFWO activities and! NGOs, CBOs !partners to enable them to be more responsive to community needs, enhance the impact of their interventions, and thus strengthen the NGOs , CBOs, sector as a whole, through its programs. WFWO provides a distinctive combination of direct grants and capacity building assistance to NGOs in order to help them perform with improved quality and with better directed outcomes, whilst increasing access to services to poor and marginalized. WFWO uses different granting tools to allow NGOs with various capacities and magnitudes to focus on sectors and themes where they have a comparative advantage. Currently, WFWO manages a number of programs focusing on improving social services in elate developing countries who are affected by the deteriorating socioeconomic conditions; providing technical assistance support; and promoting, supporting, protecting, and monitoring the observance of human rights and good governance in the African and Asian region and Latin America & Caribbean, through its various programs, WFWO is reaching more than 550 NGOs, CBOs in different regions around the world. 22


Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women!program, MDG 3

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V.3. WFWO Strategic Plan Outcome to Strengthened Capacity of Local NGOs, CBOs, Governments, Stakeholders to foster participatory of women to contribute to MDGs 1. WFWO is concerned on women gender equality, and is working with its NGOs, CBOs partners locally to !develop program on MDG 3 !“Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women!program, is under preparation !in different African and Asian countries partners. The program will be focusing on MDG 3 and!to ensure that funding provided by WFWO to, NGOs, CBOs, and !local !authorities help to empower women. This implies a strong !WFWO#s plan strategy locally to !develop and implement to contribute to the !MDG 3: Promote gender equality and empower women. This essential that the component of women in the! WFWO program to be achieved !and!has stress and !commitments from its !donors for their !interest !to !expand !the !program !beyond !the current pilot phase.! 2. The !MDG 3: Promote gender equality and empower women. Is one of the priorities of the WFWO, the !role of women are the essential towards the MDGs are built on in most cultures and communities it is the women who manage the home, work the fields, rear the children!and keep abreast of local news. NGO, CBO or authorities who fail to consult women in their communities about infrastructure improvements and local investment often fail to take advantage of the ! best informed, most reliable development perspectives available by women participation to contribute to sustainability program. 3. WFWO Strategy Plan of Action Program on Gender Equality Program (APGEP) to contribute to the MDG 3. The GEP pogrom through NGOs, CBOs partners, will focus on two strategic levels: first, it strengthens local governments# institutional capacity to create a supportive environment where gender responsive policy planning, project cycle design management and public expenditure is aligned with women#s priorities. These changes are particularly important in the health,!education, agriculture sectors, as well as investment in infrastructure; and second, APGEP program will support skills training for women to allow them to better access,!engage and influence their local governments# policy formulations, investment approaches, processes and outcomes to ensure that they accurately reflect their own priorities and concerns. 4. Significant results were achieved in the area of accountability and transparency (outcome indicators), although variations in performance across regions continued to be observed. In Africa, over 80% of WFWO supported programs through NGOs, CBOs and local authorities introduced arrangements facilities ! for greater communities involvement and transparency in projects planning/budgeting, procurement, implementation and monitoring; just over 60% of target local governments. In the region of ! Asia-Pacific, however, showed that significant improvement in communications and the dissemination of information to local constituents in the ! region, such targets on MDGs 1/2/3/7!were fully achieved. 5. WFWO and other partners institutions have placed new emphasis on the centrality of women#s participation at all levels of development planning and project cycle design management.!WFWO Gender Equality and empowerment of women at Local sustainable development program initiative, has demonstrated it is both possible and desirable to place gender equality and women#s empowerment actions at the centre of the local development agenda. The programs initiative demonstrated that have been proved that women#s representation and contribution yields better results in developed countries than when they are excluded. In particular, women#s skills building for effective participation combined with facilitating their access to resources such as information, credit and other basic services has been proven to contribute towards the achievement of gender equality and justice and other goals. WFWO planning pilot programs will begin !by the end of !2009 were !will be implemented in !African countries: Republic of Congo, Senegal, Republic of Gabon. Republic of Senegal and Republic of ! Tanzania and Morocco, the program will be implemented !upon the funding has been located by RMT/TF in the year coming.

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V.4. WFWO Human Rights (HR) and Good Governance (GG) Since 2007 WFWO is working with its partner NGOs experts on HR in close cooperation with ONCHR to presented different jointly written statement and declaration to the United Nations General Assembly related to Human Rights !for Peace .!The first phase of this program, committed and agreed jointly by a pool of donors including EBRMT, Foundation from New Zealand, Canadian Indigenous, this fund is committed by the end of December 2010. This grant enabled WFWO to fund the core programs of 16 NGOs working on human rights in Asia and Pacific region to support for good governance (HR/NGOs) related issues, such as ensuring the adequate documentation of violations of human rights and indigenous people rights, by proving training NGO's, CBOs in child protection rights, through the small grants ! program facility, a window of opportunity was provided for 6 NGOs to appeal for funds to cover specific urgent ad hoc requirements. The success and smooth operation of!the way for ongoing talks on the signing of the second phase of this program for an estimated period of four years, in an effort to enhance networking and the exchange of experiences among the HR/NGO organizations, an accessible resources has been developed ! through the! !Civil Society Section,!Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Right. The website info page, to be launched in ! 2010, is designed for NGOs, researchers, students, media and activists seeking information on human rights and good governance and support indigenous rights.

V.5. WFWO and Climate Change 1. Climate change is a global phenomenon, demanding varied responses from countries and communities around the world. Few areas are more vulnerable than Africa, which has undergone for more than 25 years of disastrous temperature swings and extreme weather issue. In 2009,!1 more than 20 !West African and Asian and Caribbean region nations experienced heavy flooding, leaving more than 1. million !of peoples without homes, work, land or services, the poor and isolated peoples suffer disproportionately from natural disasters. The !climate change is not new to!Africa, and the impact of hotter or wetter seasons and heavier storms is often predictable. In the past, human systems!and ecosystems have been resilient enough to adjust, but now, conditions are changing faster, and with greater intensity, accentuating the vulnerability of farmers and others dependent on the climate and natural resources. 2. The climate change declaration need action, the!! international agreements and national strategies are vital responses to climate change, but local governments are often in the position to have the most impact on their communities. Therefore, it is urgent that they are fully sensitized on the climatic challenges facing the region, and can take action to enhance the local level of preparedness. WFWO strategy plan for the up coming years !starting from 2009, will focus on sustainability development programs and!to contribute for building the capacity of local communities and ! governments to mitigate the impact of climate change on the most vulnerable populations through NGOs, CBOs partners. (e.g; provide logistical support and assist!to control flooding:!infrastructure facilities, houses, hospital, schools, water supply, the roads mitigate the combined effects of climate change by protecting the land from floods,!! including the indigenous people, but it also contributes to the achievement of MDGs by addressing poverty and promoting environmental sustainability, ! pilot programs on desertification, deforestation and water improvement, energy solar, ect, ! is underway. Despite the efforts by local governments, and development partners, civil society and the private sector, progress has been uneven, especially in the Developed Countries.

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V.6. WFWO MDGs - Private Sector Support 1.

WFWO work with its partners, private sector to implement its programs, are designed to catalyze larger-scale investments by the private sector, development partners in the selected country interested, this has an !significant impact !to contribute to the MDGs.!This approach combines rigorous training in public expenditure management with investment grants that allow NGOs, CBO and local community,!governments to immediately put acquired skills to implement the WFWO policy in the context of the PCDMPG. The strategy allows local officials to manage funds responsibly and deliver basic services. It also promotes functioning and encourages a culture of civic engagement, and community participation at all stages of the project cycle design management to avoid the possibility of corruption by ensuring that resources are spent efficiently and directed towards the most pressing local needs to contribute to the MDGs. 2. WFWO continue to contribute through its NGOs, CBOs, to build accountable institutions in the most challenging environments, including those struggling with entrenched poverty or emerging!from violent conflict or recovering from natural disasters. Most donors and agencies working in these countries choose to deliver development assistance!directly or through NGOs, CBOs. This ensures speedy relief but often undermines emerging local government. This method can compound the problem of state fragility, and prevent “buy in� or a feeling of personal investment within the community. Channeling funds or kinds directly to embryonic local governments is not always easy or without risk, but technical assistance and community participation can provide a powerful mechanism for accountability. The objectives !is to prepare local authorities !to take a more active role in community development, and build a system that all stakeholders can have!confidence. In an independent evaluations have demonstrated that WFWO#s unique advantage in laying the groundwork for investment by other partners in order to!built local systems and institutions that were up scaled by other donors. WFWO's Independent Evaluation Team recently judged its own technical support to NGOs, CBOs and !local !governments most successful in countries where WFWO had already provided in-depth policy basic on PCDMPG and developed performance-based grant systems to contribute to MDGs. 3. WFWO is working with its partners around the world to test new models for economic development in developed countries, working primarily through local governments to improve living conditions and opportunities in their own communities. If properly empowered, and when responsive and accountable, local government can move beyond the provision of basic services to contribute to the sustainable development programs and!economic to achieve the MDGs (see !below table 1 of result).

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Table 1. 2009 Results in Local Sustainable Development Programs supported by WFWO and its bilateral co-financing partners.

Region

Plan

Actual

%

Achievement

Description of Assessment of

Performance

WFWO Strategic Plan Outcome : Strengthened capacities of local communities and governments and other stakeholders to foster participatory local sustainable development program to contribute of achieving the MDGs.

Outcome indicator 1: Number of WFWO sustainable development programs supported local communities , NGOs, CBOs with technical assistance plans and budgets reflecting a sectorally pro-poor focus on community services, and/or actions for economic infrastructure investments and improving the local business enabling environment.

Africa

16

22

28

Not satisfactory

Asia & Pacific

13

9

40

Partially achieved

30

Partially achieved

Latin America & Caribbean

2

5

Total

31

36

98 Fully achieved

Outcome indicator 2: Number of WFWO grant program supported local communities , NGOs, CBOs and technical assistance with plans implemented in a timely and efficient manner

Africa

24

14

Partially achieved

Asia & Pacific

19

6

Partially achieved

Caribbean

5

2

Partially achieved

Total

48

22

Latin America &

Fully achieved

Performance assessment scores: Fully Achieved: 0-100%; Partially achieved: 50-75%; Not satisfactory: * Only the Asia and Pacific region established relevant targets for 2009.

50%.

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VI. Highlights of Main Achievements for 2009

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VI.1. Highlights of Main Achievements in Brief: ! ! WFWO ! disbursed USD 10.5 Million as grant through its combined programs to improve the socio economic conditions of the poor and vulnerable and develop the NGO sector in Africa. ! WFWO developed a pilot programs in Africa Sahel region Senegal, Mauritania to fight again desertification and deforestation !in the region.! ! WFWO ! setup and ! emergency aid medical services provided by 7 health centre in Africa and Asia region by adding new units and medical equipment to help provide specialized services for patients local communities. !! WFWO ! setup new emergency operations guidelines and exclusive material under the name of WFWO to respond to the emergency operations: natural disasters, ! post conflict, WFWO ! support a logical support by provided tends, first aid emergency hospital, water supply to countries heated by this natural disasters and catastrophic matter in 2009, Sri Lanka, Philippines, Pakistan.! ! ! WFWO ! successfully gathered 52 NGOs from Africa region to sign the WFWO!NGOs Guidelines of Conduct. !! WFWO!launched the “resource kit� to assist NGOs better apply the principles of the guide in their daily operations, and provided tailored on good governance, accountability and transparency and project cycle design management procedure and guidelines (PDCMPG). ! WFWO ! completed 16 projects in Africa sub-Saharan ! and 11 projects in Asia in various sectors on sustainability !development programs to contribute to MDGs targets 1/2/3/4/5. ! WFWO!supported the core programs of 16 NGOs working in the human rights sector and supported 6 initiatives by these NGOs in response to arising urgent and emergency situations, including indigenous people rights in Asia and Pacific.

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VI.2. WFWO"s Outreach

VI.3. WFWO"s!Sustainable Development Programs WFWO#s Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (RMT/TF) is mandated to do resource mobilize trough investment and ten research trough its financial partners and donors, the funding is for WFWO activities and for NGOs, CBOs to enable them to be more responsive to community needs, enhance the impact of their interventions, and thus strengthen the NGOs, CBOs, sector as a whole, through its programs. WFWO provides a distinctive combination of direct grants and capacity building assistance to NGOs in order to help them perform with improved quality and with better directed outcomes, whilst increasing access to services to poor and marginalized. WFWO uses different granting tools to allow NGOs with various capacities and magnitudes to focus on sectors and themes where they have a comparative advantage. Currently, WFWO manages a number of programs focusing on improving social services in elate developing countries who are affected by the deteriorating socioeconomic conditions; providing technical assistance support; and promoting, supporting, protecting, and monitoring the observance of human rights and good governance in the African and Asian region, through its various programs, WFWO is reaching more than 550 NGOs in different regions around !the world.

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VI.4. WFWO Emergency Operations WFWO - Emergency Preparedness and Response to: a) Emergencies Operations Programs (EOP) b) Relief & Rehabilitation Programs (RRP)

WFWO#s Emergency Response Operations Team (EROT) and its partners is often faced with a sudden emergency requiring an immediate response - an eruption of fighting causing tens of thousands of people to flee their homes, perhaps, or a massive earthquake displacing hundreds of thousands

$

$

$ $ $

$ $

The Drinking Water Plant for Water Supplied in developing countries for the WFWO's Emergency First AID and for Rural Area Program. The Drinking - Water Plant process of direct osmosis in nature is essential for any single to living being. On the other hand cell dwelling is any animal or vegetable body feed on osmosis. A well known phenomenon of direct osmosis is the one taking place in the roots of trees: both plants and flora generally absorb substances necessary for life from the ground.

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VII. Grant Making the Year in Review

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VII.1. Grant-Making Facility In 2009 a continuing effort to alleviate the conditions of the people in Africa and Asia and Latin America, WFWO !has!pledged and confirmed an additional funding committed by !the RTM/TF to be allocated entirely to African and Asian NGOs, CBOs !for 2010. The rationale behind this move was the ever-increasing need to assistance, which has endured a serious decrease in the provision of fuel and humanitarian assistance as per development accords. The RMT/TF and its partners, as part of its efforts to contribute to early recovery and reconstruction of countries heated by natural disasters, showed its willingness to examine, discuss, and finally approve a financing agreement, under the framework of the RMT/TF Trust Fund, for an additional funding of amount committed of US$ 10 ml. This is a significant achievement for WFWO and will increase its contribution towards the WFWO activities and !for its grant program. The additional amount will be disbursed rapidly and effectively through 124 NGOs in pending, working in various areas, principally, Poverty, food security, water supply, !health, and !agriculture !to contribute to the MDGs. The WFWO/RMT/TF grant making program in 2009 continued to reflect the austerity brought on by the lingering global recession that took root in 2008. The WFWO held to its revised giving guidelines throughout the year, restricting new grants to programs focusing on the Eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) sustainable!development programs focused on poverty elevation, health, drinking water, education, women gender equality,!(housing, food security, and renewed its emergency operation and assistance), workforce development, and after-school programs for low-income children and youth. While honoring all pre-existing pledges in 2009, the WFWO awarded no new grants to!organizations—unless the projects were deemed to be critically and emergency support needed !related to economic development opportunities. Since 2008, the financial crisis, !WFWO has change its strategy and policy regarding funding mechanism,!a research project on “Tracking External Donor Funding to NGOs, CBOs, as well as to local communities and !governments !in developing countries. All programs !to be funded through WFWO#s Resource Mobilizations Task Force. WFWO/RMT Task Force developed an Effective Mechanism for Providing funding for ! grant program to! support to NGOs, CBO's and local communities in Africa, Asia and Latin America. WFWO/RMT/TF as an Effective Mechanism for Providing Financial and Technical Support to NGOs, CBOs !and local communities in developing countries. The implementation of the WFWO Resource Mobilizations-funded projects continued to progress smoothly throughout the year, reaching a total number of 124 NGOs, CBOs! in the Africa, Asia. More than 110 of the grant was disbursed by the end of 2009 on projects that were implemented according to community needs, and more than 90% of sub-grant beneficiaries receiving support were poor and vulnerable. A number of granting schemes were implemented, including the “Empowerment Grants” scheme through which 28 experienced NGOs were supported both in Africa and Asia to provide innovative social services in the community. The NGO, CBO !programs were designed based on needs identified by the community to help them cope with the current crisis, focusing on ! MDGs objectives, ! by sectors and thematic areas including, Food, Health, Drinking Water, Education, Youth Development, Early Childhood Development, and Social and Environmental Protection Services. The “Mentoring Grants” scheme, the objective of which is to transfer thematic knowledge from lead NGOs, CBOs operating on a national scale to those that are community-based, facilitated the partnership of 8 "Mentoring NGOs with 45 CBOs, providing each of which with a grant and the relevant technical assistance, accordingly, NGOs, CBOs have improved their planning, procurement, financial and reporting capacities. WFWO successfully completed five of these grants and assessments have shown that 85% of the beneficiaries stemmed from vulnerable groups, these include the elderly, youth, farmers, women, children and community with special needs.

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The “Specialized Health Services Centre!” continued implementing by !NGOs, CBOs despite the challenges that this specific type of grant entails. The objective of this type of grant was to reduce the number of medical ! referrals abroad and encourage the seeking of treatment locally, ! assisted in establishing or upgrading unit including x-ray, neurosurgery, diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cardiac cases. They are now able to extend specialized health care within the territories and serve as main reference points throughout Africa and Asia Region, supported by selected partners ! in ! partnerships between the Local Authorities (LA) were implemented through the “LA, NGOs, CBOs Partnership grant programs” with the aim of increasing multilateral cooperation, coordination and planning, and hence improving social service delivery.! Given the dramatic reduction in the WFWO/RMT/TF ! investments due to the recession, fiscal prudence guided grant making program in 2009, resulting in a total grants outlay of USD 12 ml for the year. This represented about 30% less than the 2008 year-end total of USD 3.6 ml, and 35% less than the 2007 year-end total of USD 4.2 ml. Grant payments already committed in prior years represented over 80% of all grant funds in 2009, a significant increase over the typical ratio of approximately 65% of grant dollars USD 6.930 ml being committed before the beginning of the year. New grant making program in 2009 totaled USD 12 ml representing 195 grants disbursed within that year or ensuing years. The WFWO/RMT/TF disbursed on 375 grants to 202 different NGOs, CBOs, and local communities in 2009. Individual grant payments made in 2009 ranged from $1,000 to $150 with a mean payment of $52,780 and a median grant payment of $20,000. The mean and median figures rose to $57,750 and $25,000 respectively, when Grant Assistance Program (GAP) mini-grants were deducted from the totals. Of the 275 grants disbursed !out during the year, 22 grants (or 11% of the total) were awarded to new grantee organizations and 91 grants represented multi-year pledges. The WFWO/RMT/TF Grants Program continued to represent the largest area of giving in 2009, receiving $6,720 or 56% of the WFWO#s total outlay for the year. That amount was down slightly from the previous year in which the WFWO program (which targets, NGOs, CBOs and local communities working to contribute to the MDGs in developing countries) represented 70% of all Organization giving. WFWO Program grants totaled $6,720 in 2009, representing a slight increase from the previous year#s giving under the program. The WFWO Grant program, which funds unsolicited grants awarded, represented 42% of the Organization#s overall funding. The WFWO continued its support of !funding programs at levels consistent with previous years# allocations, each representing about 1% of total giving for the year.!Of the new grants awarded in the WFWO Grants Program in 2009, the WFWO committed a larger percentage of its giving to cover grantees# general operating expenses than ever before, providing to many WFWO NGOs, CBOs and local communities !partners with core funding needed to address increasing caseloads and decreasing revenues from other sources. Grants designated for general operating expenses increased to 10% of WFWO program giving in 2009, growing from 8% in 2008 and 7% in 2007. The WFWO Program accounted for 550 of the 375 grants the Organization made in 2009 with project support and management assistance grants the most common type of grant awarded. However, building and renovation grants accounted for the largest share of all grant dollars allocated by category at $2,235 or 27% of all funds awarded in the program. This is a notable shift from the prior year, primarily due to a number of large disbursed made in 2009 on the WFWO#s, as well as final disbursed towards several previously-committed for WFWO projects.! The WFWO#s Grant Assistance Program (GAP) awarded 42 grants in 2009 totaling $784,200, an increase of $144,500 over the 2008 allocation in this category. Of the 52 GAP grants awarded, 28 were mini-grants, totaling $166,400 and representing a significant decrease of 56% from the $297,700 awarded in 2008. Under the GAP category, the WFWO also awarded 15 grants totaling $277,800 through the Strategic Restructuring Initiative (SRI). This represents an increase of 36% from $204,500 in 2008. The WFWO also made $350,000 in disbursements on an unusually large restructuring grant to support emergency operations and building capacity workshops. $$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) !of Development !Accords !commitment signed between WFWO and the Foundation of New Zealand / Canadian Community authority ! and RMT/TF ! this important commitment Lending Fund to WFWO will help in jointly addressing the needs and priorities poor communities in developing countries to contribute to MDGs !to be implemented in the year coming. 34


Within the context the contribution of the Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (RMT/TF) committed to additional funding 2010/2015 as per Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) ! of Development ! Accords commitment signed between WFWO and the Foundation of New Zealand / Canadian Community authority!and RMT/TF to contribute funding as per promissory note commitment of $110 ml for upcoming years.

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VIII. WFWO Strengthen its Partnership with NGOs, CBOs and Local Communities

36


# VIII.1. WFWO's Ongoing Pilot Programs on Environment Issues WFWO Strengthen its Partnership with NGOs, CBOs and government to contribute to MDG 7 1. The WFWO Strategic framework on Sustainability Development Program on !Environment Protection issues, is one of the priorities of the WFWO and its partners.!It serves as an overarching framework to support those targeted programs with dedicated funding to pilot programs new approaches!with potential for scaled-up, transformational action aimed at a specific climate change challenge or sectoral response to contribute to Millennium Development Goals 1/2/3/7, the implementation of the first pilot ! program on deforestation and desertification !is under !completion since in 2009 (see brief report why pilot program on desertification and! causes ) !the other programs, including water improvement, desertification, deforestation and renewal energy !is under way for 2010.

2. WFWO#s sustainable development programs, planning interventions activities after its identification mission in different countries in Africa vary in according to local contexts, in countries in Africa region such as the Republic of Senegal, Republic Islamic of Mauritania where the local government system is in a relatively!early stage of development, WFWO is working via pilot projects in a number ! of projects that the objective is to build the capacity of targeted local communities, local authorities, NGOs, CBOs to manage their infrastructure !facilities and to contribute to MDGs targets effectively, and in a manner that responds to local needs.!

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VIII.2. What is desertification and Why WFWO Pilot program ? The UNCCD defines desertification as the degradation of land in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas. Desertification occurs in arid, semi-arid and sub-humid areas - where the soils are especially fragile, vegetation is sparse and the climate particularly unforgiving. These areas are inhabited by one fifth of the world’s population. 1/3 of the earth#s land surface (4 billion hectares) is threatened by desertification, and over 250 million people are directly affected by desertification. 24 billion tons of fertile soil disappear annually. From 1991 to 2000 alone, droughts have been responsible for over 280,000 deaths; they accounted for 11% of the total water-related disasters.!

What are the causes of desertification? Desertification comes mainly from variations in climate and from human activities, but many other causes can interact to create conditions likely to lead to desertification. These include the movement of refugees during periods of conflict, inappropriate land use or environmental management, specific socio-economic and political factors.!

Climatic variations! High temperatures lasting for months create droughts that prevent the vegetation from growing.!

Human activities! Human activities leading to desertification are mainly related to agriculture:! - overgrazing removes the vegetation cover that protects it from erosion;! - overcultivation exhausts the soil;! - deforestation destroys the trees that bind the land to the soil. Wood is the principal source of domestic energy for lighting and cooking in many arid areas;! - poor irrigation practices raise salinity, and sometimes dry the rivers that feed large lakes: the Aral Sea and Lake Chad have shrunk dramatically in this way; The intensification of human activities brings an increased greenhouse effect, causing global warming. Drylands are likely to be especially vulnerable to rises of temperature during the 21st Century.!

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Poverty and desertification: the vicious circle Economic pressures can lead to the over-exploitation of land, and usually hit the poorest hardest. Forced to extract as much as they can from the land for food, energy, housing and source of income, they are both the causes and the victims of the desertification. International trade patterns are based on the short-term exploitation of local resources for export, acting against the long-term interests of the local people. Poverty leads to desertification, which in turn leads to poverty.!

The impacts of desertification Desertification affects all aspects of life, highlighting how much environment and livelihoods are interlinked.!

Environmental impacts! Because of the vegetation loss, desertification makes areas more flood-prone. It also causes the salt level in soil to rise, results in deteriorating quality of water, and silting of rivers, streams and reservoirs.!

Economic impacts! Desertification has huge economic consequences – the World Bank estimates that at the global level, the annual income foregone in the areas affected by desertification amounts to US$ 42 billion each year, while the annual cost of fighting land degradation would cost only US$ 2.4 billion a year.!

Poverty and mass migration! Land degradation brings hunger and poverty. People living in areas threatened by desertification are forced to move elsewhere to find other means of livelihood. Usually they migrate towards urban areas or go abroad. Mass migration is a major consequence of desertification.!From 1997 to 2020, some 60 million people are expected to move from the desertified areas in Sub-Saharan Africa towards Northern Africa and Europe.!

What are the regions most threatened ? In all, more than 110 countries have drylands that are potentially threatened by desertification. Africa, Asia and Latin America are the most threatened by desertification.!

Africa! 2/3 of the continent is desert or drylands in Africa. There are extensive agricultural drylands, almost three quarters of which are already degraded to some degree. The region is afflicted by frequent and severe droughts. Many African countries depend heavily on natural resources for subsistence. Africa's desertification is strongly linked to poverty, migration, and food security.!

Asia! Asia contains some 1.7 billion hectares of arid, semi-arid, and dry sub-humid land reaching from the Mediterranean coast to the shores of the Pacific.!Degraded areas include expanding deserts in China, India, Iran, Mongolia and Pakistan, the sand dunes of Syria, the steeply eroded mountain slopes of Nepal, and the deforested and overgrazed highlands of the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In terms of the number of people affected by desertification and drought, is the most severely affected continent.!

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Latin America and the Caribbean! Although better known for their rain forests, Latin America and the Caribbean are actually about one-quarter desert and drylands. Poverty and pressure on land resources are causing land degradation in many of these dry areas.!

Other regions and countries affected by desertification! Much of the Northern Mediterranean region is semi-arid and subject to seasonal droughts. It is also marked by high population densities, heavy concentrations of industry, and intensive agriculture. Mediterranean land degradation is often linked to poor agricultural practices.! The level of soil degradation is high through much of Central and Eastern Europe, and very high in some parts, for example along the Adriatic.! 30% of the land in the United States is affected by desertification.!

How can we act against desertification? Restore and fertilize the land! A simple and cheap way to fertilize the land is to prepare compost, that will become humus and will regenerate the soil with organic matter.!

Combat the effects of the wind! By constructing barriers and stabilising sand dunes with local plant species.!

Reforestation! Trees play several roles: they help fix the soil, act as wind breakers, enhance soil fertility, and help absorb water during heavy rainfall.! Because the burning of land and forests increases dangerous greenhouse gases, afforestation – planting new trees - can help reduce the negative impacts of resulting climate change.!

Develop sustainable agricultural practices! Drylands are home to a large variety of species, that can also becomeimportant commercial products: for example, they provide 1/3 of the plant-derived drugs in the United States. Agriculture biodiversity must be preserved. Land overexploitation shall be stopped by leaving the soil "breathe# during a certain-time period, with no cultivation, nor livestock grazing.

Traditional lifestyles! Traditional lifestyles as practiced in many arid zones offer examples of harmonious living with the environment. In the past, nomadism was particularly adapted to drylands conditions; moving from one waterhole to another, never staying on the same land, pastoral peoples didn#t exert much pressure on the environment. However, changing lifestyles and population growth are putting increasing pressure on scarce resources and vulnerable environments. The Silk Road in Asia and the Trans-Saharan route in Africa are good examples of the vigourous economic and cultural exchanges developed by nomadic societies.!! 40


"Working !Together in the Field!!of Sustainable Development Programs to Contribute to MDGs"

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VIII.3. Targeted Pilot programs under the WFWO include: ! " The Pilot Program Deforestation Forest, pilot program fight desertification in Africa, ! Senegal and Mauritania approved in!2009 is under implementation,!aims to support developing countries# efforts to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation by providing scaled-up financing for readiness reforms and public and private investments.! It will finance programmatic efforts to address the underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation and to overcome barriers that have hindered past efforts to do so. " The Pilot Program on water improvement,!was the first program under the WFWO to become operational upon the funds provided by RMT/TF. Its objective is to pilot and demonstrate ways to integrate climate risk and resilience into core development planning on water improvement to local communities in low income !developing countries, while complementing other ongoing activities. ! ! " The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience,!approved in!2009, was the first program under the WFWO to become operational.! Its objective is to pilot and demonstrate ways to integrate climate risk and resilience into core development planning, while complementing other ongoing activities.!!!! " The Program for Scaling-Up Renewal Energy in Low Income Countries approved in 2009, is aimed at demonstrating the social, economic, and environmental viability of low carbon development pathways in the energy sector. It seeks to create new economic opportunities and increase energy access through the production and!use of renewable energy.! " The Sustainable development program!to support communities in rural areas!in Africa, Asia and Latin America, is under way. Through its targeted programs, WFWO is designed to:! !! ! !1. Support local communities, NGOs, CBOs, with a new technology approach;! !! ! !2. Provide grant program;! !! ! !3. Building capacity at gross level;! !! ! !4. Provide infrastructure facilities;! !! ! !5. Provide experience and lessons through learning-by-doing; !! ! !6.!Channel new and additional financing for climate change mitigation and adaptation; !! ! !7. Provide incentives for scaled-up and transformational action in the context of poverty reduction; !! ! 8. Provide incentives to maintain, restore and enhance carbon-rich natural ecosystems and maximize $ the co-benefits of sustainable development programs; !! ! !9. Water improvement;! !! ! 10. Provide a new technology through its partners; !! ! 11. Green building houses; !! ! 12. !Emergency Operation respond !to natural distress and post conflict.! WFWO is working with its partners to contribute to find the best solutions to communities on environment protection the desertification, water ! in Africa, Senegal, Mauritania the pilot !program is launched in 2009 in close consolations and support of ! local authorities in order to achieve our common objectives !to contribute to MDGs 1/2/3/7.

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WFWO"s activities on progress (e.g!: 1- ongoing Pilot Program on water Improvement) The water improvement to communities is one most target of the WFWO the water essential and is right for all, is essential for human being, but also contribute to food security and health. WFWO stressed its support to focus! to this important component of sustainable development program initiative is one of priority of the WFWO, through the support by RMT/TF also reached out to donors and multilateral partner in an effort to mitigate the impact of !approached with a request to fund project in the agricultural sector, through a grant program this project emerged and a strategy to rehabilitate the damaged water wells was put into action, to implement this project, WFWO chose !partner NGOs, CBOs work !in field of water development program in Africa region, they have each undergone a thorough assessment to select the most needy beneficiaries as per results: Rehabilitation of Water Wells 22 Water wells rehabilitated in damage-stricken areas in Africa, shared by 245 farmers; 3,100 Dunums of land was irrigated; 245 Direct beneficiaries; Integrated Water Management Pilot project in Africa Water is a critical resource, whether for human consumption, agricultural use or sanitation, and one that is in increasingly short supply in Africa and sub-Saharan countries. A serious water crisis faces us, if more sustainable ways of managing water are not put into place without delay. In most parts of rural areas, groundwater is saline and polluted by chemicals. In addition, it is overexploited and its replenishment is limited by poor rainfall and ecological degradation. This state of affairs directly affects village health and prosperity, making water management crucial to any developmental activity.

Promoting water literacy The WFWO Operation Team and its local partners NGOs, CBOs, conducts water awareness campaigns to inform the villagers about: • The precarious groundwater conditions • The risks of excessive bore well and tube well extraction • The causes of land degradation and the benefits of forestations • Long-term health effects of contaminated water Building check dams By collecting rainwater, check dams help replenish groundwater, provide extra water for irrigation and animals and protect crops from flooding. Constructing and renovating wells Open wells are a source of drinking water; however, they are also used for other activities such as washing clothes and watering animals. Consequently, well water can easily become contaminated. In order to prevent this, open wells should have raised platforms around them, and dirty water should be channeled to a soak pit. A number of wells also need to be deepened and made safer. Wastewater disposal wells help improve cleanliness of the village. Recharge wells direct the muddy runoff rainwater flowing in the villages to the groundwater table. The water then emerges in potable water wells located nearby. Constructing roof-water harvesting structures Roof-water harvesting systems collect rainwater and channel it to a well for community use. Excess water is directed to the groundwater table for replenishment. So far, roof-water harvesting structures have been installed on schools, mosques and community centers.

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Recycling water through soak pits Typically, public water supply outlets in the villages are tap-less pipes, which let water flow freely in to the streets? When there is water supply. Converting these outlets to a system of taps, stand posts and soak pits effectively cut down water wastage, slush, and water contamination. It also improves water pressure for the entire village. Conserving water and soil Farmers can reduce their water usage by using drip irrigation and by chiseling agricultural land before the onset of monsoons to improve percolation of rainwater. Other sound agricultural practices such as integrated pest management and integrated nutrient management help limit the excessive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, thus reducing water pollution.

(e.g :! 2 - ongoing !Pilot Program in Africa to respond to the problem of !the a Desertification and deforestation in Africa and Sahel – Republic of Mauritania and Republic of Senegal! (WFWO:!"DESERT FOREST") Pilot Program of desertification and a forestation in Africa Sahel Objectives: The main objective of WFWO pilot program is to support the region of Africa Sahel and other countries in order to contribute to MDGs goal 7. As WFWO concerned that environmental protection such as desertification and deforestation, the trees and forests are sources of life for people and if we manage to introduce the forestation of the Sahel, then all people will be freed from most of their ills and we can provide them with remedies to live in better conditions (family, work, health, hygiene, education). WFWO/ Local! Authorities Partnership WFWO is working close consultation with ! local stakeholders, regional or national in some cases. Any intervention of the WFWO requires a clear framework in which to intervene is based on WFWO policy, in order to implement the pilot program in Senegal and Mauritania. In this context the WFWO has support from of the Competent Authority Administrative ! of both countries for the implementation of this pilot program the first phase start in! December 2009 !and second phase !January 2010 to give the best chance of acclimatization to trees planted in order to achieve our common objectives. The!Monitoring is under the supervision of the Local Authority, all information and results should notified the WFWO Executive Coordinator of the project, by providing progress report, including!notes and photos by the locations identified and listed on a topographical map of the pilot area to reflect the evolution of the condition of trees during their growth ect. The Implementation of Pilot Program Areas ! Several pilot areas should be determined so that eventually a large a forestation plan to emerge on the world through different countries in Africa Sahel.!Several applications have already been identified worldwide to allow pilots to validate and confirm the choice of the tree to begin the massive campaign of a forestation of deserts on the planet.

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The Main Objectives and Challenge of the WFWO Pilot Program in Africa Sahel

The implementation of the pilot program of" Paulownia Trees" seedlings planted on four pilot sites (three in Senegal and Mauritania). Desert encroachment is inevitable for decades: only an effective, concerted and scope will consider the slowdown to preserve the city of Nouakchott and silting in the longer term, the burial of the Senegal River which defines the geographic border between Mauritania and Senegal. If this argument is accepted as a priority, the forestation of the desert could begin its implementation by the North of the River Senegal.!The both Ministries of the environment of each country they supports this initiative of the WFWO pilot program implementation, including all other stakeholders participation. The local communities, are expect a lot of results on the adaptation of this species is the hope of seeing the forest reborn in the Sahel countries motivates all social consensus in support of this program. The determination and identification of locations scrupulously referenced to : •

The excavation of soils;

•

The planting of Paulownia;

•

Watering for eighteen months;

An essential condition for guaranteeing the perfect pilot program, It is therefore important to build a forest weaving from existing water points. However, in cases of absolute necessity, WFWO will defray the digging of wells in the day to supply water using the new technology revolutionaries with the support of its partners (Operation: One Day Water ") The seedlings will be distributed in a very precise method of planting that will fully enjoy the various capacities (human, soils, temporal, of Paulownia to integrate into the pilot environment program chosen to show its effectiveness: 1. Rebuild the soil ecosystem. The loss of Paulownia leaves plenty allows the soil to form an ecosystem rich with partial retention of freshness which the quickly tissue insect reappears as any form of vegetation. 2. Demonstrate the ability to hold water. Gradually, as the Paulownia grows, the ground cools slightly and becomes more able to contain the freshness and water vapor in shaded areas. 3. Allow the crop according to the orientation of line spaced planting. Once the trees reach two years, the ground at their feet is fertile and therefore conducive to the resumption of certain vegetables or cereals. 4. Develop intensive farming and gardening activities. An agricultural plantations with broad gauge (5 to 6 meters) so you can grow grain in the early years and then make pasture for cattle. 5. Develop crafts and industries related to wood 6. See volatile return or fertilize 7. View wildlife areas reinstate reproductive Local communities will have to assess their ability to consider this type of project to regulate the economic system by ensuring that the proposed model comes in harmony with all segments of the population in order to make a better life for all actors in the pilot area without discrimination or exclusion, but in respect of common rules of life.

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The Target to be Achieved The WFWO initiative of the pilot program of forestation of the desert is primarily to create a synergy between different actors. These pilot projects should help to bring all those who have chosen to leave their land and they will hope to build a better future by becoming involved personally for the survival of his culture, his family or his ancestors. The beneficiaries of such a pilot program can ensure sustainable social, environmental and economic objectives with related important issues concerning education and training for women or children fro more than 900.000 communities of leave in the region The construction of new protected wooded areas to complement the harshness of life in the desert areas will improve the diversification of human resources to achieve greater autonomy within a new framework of life improved for the first phase for! more than 900.000 communities in Africa! Sahel. Social progress will be quickly responsive, access to education will be preferred and more humane conditions met. All these perspectives are obviously related to the commitment of funding from WFWO in partnership with government given the results of growth and adaptability of this species in the Sahel zone or Saharan Africa. This perspective will provide an opportunity for governments to consider setting up their environmental projects jointly with the project "Forest of the Desert" !to be completed by the end of 2010, under the WFWO coordination and support to contribute to MDGs 1/2/3/7.

Pilot Program Coordination! The pilot ! program is WFWO initiative coordinated by its the Executive Coordinator of the Operation Team, ! and financed by WFWO.

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Guideline !of Conduct (GC) - Project Design Cycle Management Procedure & Guidelines (PCDMPG)

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VIII.4. Enhancing Democratic Governance of NGOs, CBOs: A Voluntary Guidelines of Conduct to contribute to the eight !MDGs Targets. The success of the GC/PCDMPG, a milestone in WFWO#s history, can be tracked from the early days of its inception, the idea of convening all stakeholders working in the developing countries, NGOs, CBOs partners to discuss the project from the very start, due to WFWO#s networking and participatory approach, all representatives of the major networks!were involved and, under the guidance and leadership of WFWO, this group, which later came to be known as the “Guideline of Conduct Coalition”, worked together to finalize the Guidelines ! and the accompanying Resource Kit as well as, PCDMPG and ! MDGs plan of action Kit. The painstaking participatory process, which lasting over two years, paved the way for the successful implementation of the Guide currently taking place. The GC/PDCMPG is a milestone as, for the first time, it has introduced ethical principles NGOs, CBOs and local communities to follow, combined with sound administrative and managerial systems, procedures and tools. Once an NGOs, CBOs, it voluntarily commits to complying with the Guideline Code#s! principles. A Resource Kit was also annexed to the GC in order to help the NGOs, CBOs put best practices into operation. The Resource Kit includes!guidelines on PCDMPG • In ! 2009, after the launch of the ! GC and PCDMPG as well as Advocacy program on MDGs, the Resource Kit was disseminated in a highly visible event, accompanied by a comprehensive promotional campaign also on line. • ! By the end of 2009, more than 200 NGOs, CBOs across the world had received ! and reviewed the Guideline. This high number reflects a high level of awareness and maturity among the sector on the necessity to implement best practices. This can also be attributed to the participatory process in which the Guideline !was finalized and results. •!The WFWO NGOs, CBOs networks promoted the Guideline among their own member organizations. • Training on accountability and transparency principles for more than one hundred NGOs, CBOs has been provided in order to further help them comply with the Guide of Conduct principles. •!During the year 2009, WFWO conducted various survey consultations with the NGOs, CBOs sector and other stakeholders to put forward a mechanism to ensure the compliance of the sector to the Guide:

The main objectives of the Guideline of Code principles: Compliance with Covenants and Law; Priorities of Development Goals; Participation; Networking; Transparency; Accountability; Equality and Inclusiveness; !Good Governance; Prevent Conflict of Interest; Influence; NGOs or CBOs Integrity; Dispute Resolution; Cooperation and Partnership; Communications support Aspect; Technical Assistance Program; Project !Cycle Design Management Procedure Guidelines; Evaluation System; Plan Event; Promo Material for MDGs;

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As part of WFWO#s strategy plan efforts to strengthen good governance within the NGOs, CBOs !sector, technical assistance was aimed at helping NGOs , CBOs to upgrade their systems to meet the requirements of the Guidelines on !Knowledge !Workshop Capacity Assessment Toll (KWCAT) to support this intuitive, this was made possible through ! RMT/TF ! financing ! an agreement program signed with WFWO entitled “Knowledge !Workshop Program on Strengthening Good Governance within the NGO Sector in Africa, Asia and Latin America to be !completed !in 2010�. With regards to the GC principles and practices, WFWO assessed the compliance of the participating NGOs, CBOs !using the Knowledge Workshop Capacity Assessment Tool (KWCAT). The assessment was followed by the preparation of development plans which set milestones and clear interventions for each NGOs, CBOs. The Resource Kit of manuals and training material developed under the umbrella of WFWO and its external !expert consultants partners in the field was used as a solid base for this exercise, not only did the WFWO grant prove that efforts can be consolidated among various donors to carry out complementary activities, but it also provided an excellent platform for NGOs, CBOs to engage in dialogue and exchange experiences. WFWO reached 65 NGOs in Africa, Asia !and providing them with comprehensive technical assistance

Networking - Coordination and Information Exchange Since thematic and umbrella networks also constitute a major part of civil society, WFWO has foreseen to assist them in improving their performance. Given their lack of resources historically, the networks have suffered from poor coordination and communication with their own members. As part of its efforts to improve the performance of the sector as a whole, WFWO worked to define the roles of WFWO networks and increase their accountability to their constituencies. Within this framework, WFWO also engaged with a number of umbrella and thematic networks to support them in coordinating with their member NGOs, CBOs Various interventions were designed for the networks including to contribute to !eight MDGs objectives: ! Advocacy program on MDGs Campaign ! Goodwill Ambassador for Development ! Friends of the WFWO ! Plan Event, Partnership and Cooperation Program ! Communications Project !Support ! News Bulletin! ! News Report! ! Capacity building programs for member NGOs and CBOs; Development of their websites and databases to allow for information exchange (this increased the level of satisfaction of members with the networks). ! Development of the networks# organizational and financing strategies to enhance the sustainability of the networks (the change in average sustainability indicator improved from ! the thematic networks and there were slight improvements for the umbrella networks).

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"Working!Together with our Partners in the field!of Sustainable Development Programs to Contribute to the Achievements of the eight MDGs Targets"

IX. WFWO Strengthen its Partnership with Local Communities, NGOs, CBOs

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$

IX.1.# How are Partnerships reflected in WFWO"s Strategy Plan for 2009 - 2015 related to NGOs and CBOs and Local Communities ? WFWO#s new Strategic Plan reflects the latest changes in the matter of the Grant Assistance Program: it marks WFWO#s historic shift from humanitarian aid ! to NGOs, CBOs to resource mobilization and sustainable development programs assistance to NGOs, CBOs. One of the core principles of the Strategic Plan is to design and implement WFWO#s activities “in order to ensure the coherent and optimal use of overall resources, including through partnerships and hand-over to communities, governments, non-governmental organizations, or other international institutions whenever they can meet the short- and long-term needs of the assistance focus on the eight MDGs to contribute to the poor more effectively and efficiently�. In particular, the new Strategic Plan plainly states that "partnerships are essential for WFWO in order to accomplish its mission and achieve its objectives". NGOs, CBOs !are described as "instrumental in increasing WFWO's ! field presence through the partnership with; local NGOs, CBOs partners this will strengthen and to respond to the assistance needed and to ! save time and resources this ! to also is! "essential in both short-term and long-term responses to programs focused on MDG 1 poverty". Particular emphasis has been given to the importance of national and local communities as key actors on the front line of poverty elevations, success in saving the lives of the most vulnerable will depend not only on WFWO#s own capacity, but also on the extent to which WFWO manages to be a partners with other stockholders and in particularly local communities, NGOs, CBOs in order to contribute to our common objectives.

IX.2. Why WFWO and Community Partnership Program ? WFWO work in close consultation with NGOs, CBOs !and local communities !to involves the development of marginalized communities toward a social, educational, and economically sustainable future. These development subjects overlap with each other to provide a holistic web of capacity and resources that address local needs in a sustainable manner. Critical to the success of our work is community awareness, involvement, and ownership. In order to cultivate community participation, WFWO supports initiatives that gather people together to build cohesion and retain local values that are constantly threatened by globalization. By strengthening community interaction, we increase awareness of the development solutions being implemented by WFWO and our partner organizations. Most importantly, however, we foster the belief that change is possible. Once this belief is in place, individuals are drawn to participating in solutions that transform their communities. WFWO works with local organizations that understand how to catalyze individuals toward community participation. The community development work we support varies greatly by region. Frequent topics we address involve: creating and supporting community resource centers; establishing peer education networks to distribute information and resources; constructing housing, water systems, roads, and other infrastructure; providing workshops in carpentry, adult literacy; computer skills, HIV/AIDS awareness, etc.; creating focus groups to discuss community issues and social stigmas; and more.

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IX.3. What are our Approach for Development ? The WFWO works with its partners focusing on eight MDGs to contribute to local communities, NGOs, CBOs, in developing countries, the main sustainable development programs is! in Africa and Asia and Latin America. Together, these development subjects make up the prominent social, health, environmental and economic obstacles that prevent communities from rising out of poverty. By understanding how these issues and their related solutions build upon each other, WFWO is able to facilitate development in a sustainable and culturally appropriate manner. We work with over 500 NGOs, CBOs !local communities!whose programs reflect a comprehensive understanding of these development subjects.! The !WFWO experience learned that !in field of action show that, local NGOs, CBOs and local communities group action took form to represent the voice and needs of marginalized peoples through local communities NGOs, CBOs to help themselves. These examples represent a powerful transformation of collective and individual perspective. At the root of this transformation is empowerment—the belief that political, social, economic, and spiritual change is achievable. The strategy with each of the grassroots groups above was to work from the "bottom-up" to support marginalized peoples' belief in collective change, while collaboratively finding ! sustainable solutions. Empowered individuals form empowered communities that are capable of growth and change. However, without an empowered and engaged community base, government and international (or "top-down") interventions do not succeed. The WFWO follows the path taken by these successful "bottom-up" movements. We work directly at the community level to support the empowerment and capacity of grassroots organizations and the individuals they serve. !WFWO partners with locally managed NGOs. CBOs and local communities!who understand and represent the voice of their communities. Through building solid relationships and working side-by-side with local community leadership, WFWO produces collaborative solutions that offer the greatest chance for sustainable results. To optimize community representation and cultural insight, our programs are directed by seasoned development leaders from the local communities. For several years, each of our!Program Directors!has been ingrained in grassroots action for the betterment of their communities. They have successfully built a network of relationships with local leaders and organizations, and knowledge about best practices. These invaluable resources are formed into a local communities and NGOs,!CBOs that partner with WFWO to sustainably improve their communities. In all, WFWO works with over 500, NGOs,!CBOs!to supply a new technology and !capacity, training, funding, and human resources.

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IX.4. Why WFWO, Poverty alleviation, Grant Program Aid ? The most common issue affecting neglected communities in the developing world is a lack of economic opportunity. WFWO works to support these communities with the !grant support and tools they need to acquire employment and build successful businesses. We partner with over 500 NGOs. CBOs !to offer three primary services: vocational/business training and technical assistance, microfinance and access to markets. Training opportunities differ between regions and organization, but common training topics include: locally applicable vocational skills, business plan development, integrating technology, bookkeeping and business management, and marketing/outreach. Training is offered through various methods such as workshops, individual counseling, peer networking and mentoring programs. Grant program aid !is a major aspect of microenterprise development provide more opportunities !fro poor people to help themselves . Since traditional lending does not reach underserved communities, but through WFWO grant program facilities a collective solution will contribute to the increments of capital to local businesses. Along with grant program, WFWO support communities to effectively integrate the management and savings principles into their business growth and to !overcome their poverty.

IX.5. Why!WFWO and Health Program ? Good health is the first building block of community development. Without proper care, communities are caught in a brutal poverty cycle that is nearly impossible to overcome. Diseases that kill millions of people each year, such as malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrhea, can be prevented and treated with basic medical care. Over 40 million people live with HIV/AIDS—95 percent of which live in developing countries that offer little testing, support, or educational outreach. Similarly, the effects of war and poverty produce a range of mental health problems that debilitate communities to a much greater extent than commonly recognized. Because these problems are not easily visible, they receive almost no government attention. Without stable health, marginalized communities are unable to plan, implement, and/or maintain sustainable growth. WFWO partners with over 500 NGOs, CBOs that provide a wide spectrum of local health services that are crucial to community growth. These include: direct medical care and training at hospitals and clinics, and in the field; HIV/AIDS testing, counseling and preventative outreach; psychological and social services for women and children; educational outreach that addresses reproductive care, nutrition, disease prevention, sanitation, etc.; and many other services tailored toward local community needs. Critical to our health initiatives is cultivating the capacity and empowerment necessary for communities to maintain their own physical and mental health. WFWO Operation Team, expert consultant, interns, volunteers, and donors create a powerful source of support for our partner organizations and the people they serve, while helping to stabilize the most critical ingredient to community growth.

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IX.6. Why WFWO and Youth and Education Program ? Working with our local partners to support to caring for the developmental needs of children is essential for long term community development. Severe economic conditions and a lack of educational opportunities result in: • Nearly 220 million children under the age of 12 working long hours in mining, factories, agriculture, and other activities that threaten a child's health and future; • Over 18 million children orphaned due to HIV/AIDS, requiring many to fend for their siblings by working under brutal conditions; • Over 10 million children trapped in slavery, trafficking, prostitution, military service, and other horrid forms of child labor; • 1 billion illiterate people across the world. The lack of opportunity for children to develop in a nourishing environment is rooted in poverty and its cultural manifestations. Desperate families need their children to produce immediate income and the subsequent denial of education creates a cycle that traps families in poverty. Proper schooling is prohibitively expensive or inaccessible to much of the developing world due to a lack of government support. Education is also undervalued in many parts of the world, particularly for young girls because there is little immediate return. The WFWO works to counteract the effects of poverty on youth development and education so that our partner communities can sustain growth from one generation to the next. We recognize that caring for youth and providing academic and vocational tools allow them to be contributing members of their communities. Without sufficient support, children and their families cannot overcome the abusive cycle of poverty and exploitation. We work with over 500 NGOs, CBOs to provide !grant program and services to marginalized children of all ages and the families that struggle to raise them. These include: building schools; teaching, tutoring, and vocational training; childcare for a network of orphanages and centers; support for families suffering extreme hardship; emergency services for children suffering from abuse or neglect; social activities such as soccer and basketball; educational workshops on relevant social topics; and much more.

IX.7. Why WFWO and Women"s Empowerment Program ? Women across the world have fewer opportunities and suffer from exponentially more rights violations simply because they are female. In some countries, women are the legal property of their husbands, are unable to receive inheritance, cannot borrow money, and do not have rights. It is common for women to not receive an education, be allowed to make decisions on how to care for their children, or decide when and how to be touched. With these restrictions, women must depend entirely on their husbands for survival. Without a husband, women have little to support them. The resulting statistics of this highly abusive cycle are staggering: • Women work two-thirds of the world#s working hours and produce half of the world#s food, yet earn only 15 percent of the world#s income and own less than one percent of the world#s property; • Domestic violence is the biggest cause of injury and death to women around the globe, killing more women aged 12-45 than cancer, malaria, traffic accidents, and war; • 80 percent of the one billion illiterate people around the world are women; Fighting gender discrimination is extremely challenging due to embedded cultural traditions that benefit patriarchal systems. However, these exploitive traditions oppress half the world's population, inhibiting women's right to equality, education, and economic opportunity. Without women's empowerment, communities do not have the resources to overcome poverty. 54


By working at the community level with local leadership, WFWO is able to integrate women's empowerment solutions that are culturally sensitive and benefit the entire community. We partner with over 500 local organizations that provide opportunity for women in a variety of tested methods. These include: vocational skills and grant program aid and micro-enterprise development training; microfinance opportunities; self-help groups; community workshops on rights, reproductive health, gender sensitivity, leadership, life skills, literacy, empowerment, etc.; legal and psychological counseling for victims of abuse; advocacy campaigns; and much more.

IX.8. Why WFWO and Human Rights Program ? The WFWO works with its partners Organizations and commissions working on HR , ! in accordance with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to protect and promote civil, political, and socioeconomic rights for marginalized people in our partner communities including indigenous people !right,! These rights are frequently excluded from underserved communities in the developing world due to race, gender, religion, and—most commonly—the pursuit of economic gain. We work at the local level with over 20 grassroots organizations dedicated to preventing and ending human rights violations that drastically affect the men, women, and children in their community. Together, we provide a platform for communities and individuals to understand their rights, voice their plight, and take effective action. Interns, volunteers, and donors work together with WFWO to address a wide spectrum of rights issues that cause and exacerbate poverty. These include: direct legal counseling; intra-familial violence prevention; publications and advocacy campaigns; conflict resolution; rights education workshops; child labor prevention; migratory labor protection; and many more.

IX.9. Why!WFWO and Environment Program ? The exploitation and destruction of natural resources poses an enormous threat to developing nations. Overpopulation, waterborne diseases, air pollution, toxic chemicals, soil erosion, and unsustainable use of resources are prominent global issues. Yet these problems most severely affect developing countries who depend on natural surroundings for their survival. The scale and extent of environmental degradation, coupled with the lack of attention it receives in development planning, make it a primary issue that WFWO works to address. We partner with over 500 NGOs, CBOs that work at the local level to integrate environmental solutions. By reconstructing economic practices to meet the natural order of the earth's rules and limitations, we are able to live in a sustainable relationship to our environment. WFWO supports a diverse group of topics related to environmental development. Examples include organic agriculture, sustainable water management, forest regeneration, biodiversity, renewable technology, and advocacy. Essential to our work is empowering local communities to understand the environmental threats that affect them and to place prominent values on sustainable resource management. 55


IX.10. How do NGOs partner with WFWO at the policy level ? Although WFWO mainly partners with NGOs, CBOs on an operational level, since 2002 the WFWO work closely in consultations with its main local operational NGOs, or CBO partners to discuss issues of common interest and to share views on the latest developments !countries in the humanitarian issues and other activities that can contribute and support the local communities through our local NGOs, CBOs partners. The ! WFWO ! policy is to work ! ! on directly in close partnership with NGOs, CBOs are registered with !WFWO!!and submitted request for partnership!assistance to be reviewed! and approved by !WFWO. WFWO#s!called upon NGOs, CBOs !partners for feedback on local issues and programs needs assistance. In view on WFWO#s new Strategic Plan. Throughout the finalization process, NGOs, CBOs !submitted grant program application and program, enabling WFWO to take into account the NGOs, CBOs !activity while laying out the framework for its work 2010 - 2015 in order to support local communities and programming, social protection and enhanced collaboration, to achieve our common objectives to contribute to the eight MDGs.!

IX.11.

In which new sectors are NGOs partnering with WFWO ?

WFWO#s shift from NGOs, CBOs!!to sustainable development!!programs assistance required it to develop a more nuanced and robust set of tools to respond to assistance requested by local community, ! NGOs, CBOs!!partners!!needs. Among these, will represent the best knowledge of how WFWO relies strongly on its NGOs, CBOs partners to reach those in need through innovative mechanisms as per guidelines and policy of the WFWO. Partnership relations! !with NGOs, CBOs working! !in the field, focused on eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in particularly: poverty alleviation, health, education, drinking water, environment issues, emergency operations, grant assistance program and sector may include: • strengthening the capacity of farmers# organizations, especially in the areas of management and marketing skills, and value addition; • enhancing the participation of women in farmers# organizations and their access to input and marketing services, including through literacy programs; • strengthening quality control and assurance of the program; • developing storage and post-harvest handling capacity; • facilitating the access of farmers# organisations to, grant and !micro!!credit and agricultural inputs; •! building capacity training!!for communities; • raise public awareness !sustainability on the environment !and prevention to support local community;! • advocacy program to support communities; • coordinate project or program supported by the WFWO;! • focal point for the WFWO in the field;! • emergency Operations support; •!!coordinate grant program Aid to NGOs, CBOs or local community;

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IX.12. How does WFWO formalize its agreements with NGOs, CBOs Partners in the field? The standard agreement between WFWO and its NGOs, CBOs !partners is the Partnership Agreement (PA) is drawn up at the country level for each project or special operation that WFWO and the NGOs, CBOs ! ! partners are involves on the activities of the area of the project in the field of ! ! the country!! beneficiaries or local communities. The PA !outlines: • official application!!request; •! WFWO eligibility and policy application; •! due diligence; • approval confirmation; •! the objectives of the partnership; •! WFWO and the NGOs, CBOs specific roles and responsibilities; •! partnership agreement; •! reporting and financial management requirements; •! grant disbursement !procedures; • !grant agreement; •!!monitoring and evaluation; • progress report; • !media field visit; •!!general missions !in the field; •!!logistical assistance in the field;

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IX.13. Who are WFWO"s international NGOs Partners ? WFWO#s international NGO partners come from 12 countries, of which 5% percent are in Europe (mainly France, Italy, Ireland, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom), Asia and Pacific,(1) Australian, (2) New Zealand, ! (1) Japanese NGO, (2) from China, (1) India ! (1) from Vietnam NGO, Gulf region !(1) from United Arab Emirates, (4) Latin America & Caribbean, (2) North America, (3)!Canada 3 NGOs, (2) United States !partnered with WFWO.!

IX.14. In which regions did WFWO work and partnership with NGOs ? Since 2002, WFWO is working in close partnership in the following regions of the world: Africa, Asia and Pacific, Latin America and Caribbean, !Middle East. The WFWO with most of the partners in the field, were NGOs, CBOs, local communities, predominantly in developing countries.

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Regional Latin America and the Caribbean!12 International NGOs with local networks of more than 100 Local NGOs. As in previous years, India was the country with the highest number of NGO partners in ! 2008/2009, collaborating with a total number of 340 NGOs (15 international NGOs and local NGOs). This figure has increased by almost 70 % percent when compared to 2008. WFWO will continue to straighten its partnership with BGOs, CBOs, due to they play an catalytic role to support the WFWO activities in the field including the emergency operations involved rehabilitation program activities for which local NGO partners proved to have the best capacities, especially in targeting and reaching the most affected beneficiaries in a transparent manner. Local NGOs proved to be flexible in adopting WFWO monitoring and reporting methods; capable of developing their capacities in program implementation; efficient in humanitarian aid in a timely manner; and able to submit innovative training and knowledge support activity to communities. The close relationship many local NGOs have with affected families also proved an invaluable asset for WFWO#s work in promoting community participation to respond to communities needs. Countries with most NGO partners are African and Asian WFWO#s particular approach, built on creating partnerships with a very broad range of local organizations and developing locally-adapted programming, has been crucial to managing the country#s complex situation of displacement, in which WFWO beneficiaries are widely dispersed. In addition, the number of WFWO staff is relatively limited, compared to the number of locations in which vulnerable people are assisted. Collaboration with partners is based on cooperation agreements in which WFWO commits the commodities and partners commit both in-kind and cash resources. Partners are responsible for receiving the food and distributing it to beneficiaries through their own resources without receiving cash contributions from WFWO. WFWO#s partnership approach in Africa and Asia offers many additional advantages in the of technical assistance, including access to marginalized, vulnerable populations in difficult-to-reach locations, enhanced community participation, security and protection. The aim of the WFWO is to extend assistance to Internally Displaced Persons who are not included in official registers by identifying them through local-level organizations. Through the multiple partnerships approach, WFWO drew advantage from its vast network of cooperating partners, whom through their knowledge and analysis of the local context allowed for highly effective targeting, local communities, and pertinent complementary activities with a strong gender focus.

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IX.15. With which NGOs did WFWO!collaborate the most ? WFWO#s main NGO partners in 2008/2009 were, as in previous years, (Asia & Pacific 28 countries and 19 projects of collaboration) and Africa Region !(15 countries and 24 projects of collaboration). The collaboration in terms of countries of collaboration!was lower than in 2008 (30 countries of collaboration), while there was a significant!increase in the figure for Africa (19 countries of collaboration in 2008). Plan International also increased its collaboration with WFWO, from partnerships in 10 countries in 2008 to 13 in 2009. The number of NGOs partnering with WFWO in more than 42 countries remained the same as in 2008. The major !NGO partners of WFWO have remained the same as in 2008. This continuity demonstrates the high quality of the partnerships, most of which have continued for several years. Most of WFWO#s major operational NGO partners are also active at the policy level, thus further strengthening the relationship with WFWO through the exchange of views and ideas (see paragraph on policy-level collaboration). NGOs by number!42!Number of countries of collaboration!of countries of collaboration!Trends.

IX.16. In Which Sectors Did WFWO Partner most with NGOs ? Main Sectors of Collaboration NGOs Projects Countries As in 2006, the main sector of collaboration in 2009 was sustainability development programs: !poverty elevation !(55 NGOs, or 76% percent of all NGO partners), mostly working in rural areas followed by other health (37 NGOs) water improvement , education (47 NGOs). NGOs worked mainly in the sectors of emergency operations and! !relief and rehabilitation !assistance (24 NGOs) and mother-and-child health (17 NGOs), while local NGOs worked mainly in primary schools (75 NGOs). The main sectors are: • Sustainability development programs focusing on MDGs targets; • Poverty elevation:!agricultural crop production/promotion, agro-forestry, animal husbandry and pisciculture, fishery, land or water development and improvement, other food !security, communities amenities/schools/ housing, settlement/resettlement, transportation (e.g. infrastructure facilities, access roads, rural roads, etc.) • Education:!primary schools, secondary schools, nurseries and kindergartens, literacy and numeracy, other for training and knowledge program for farmers • Health:!mother-and-child health, HIV/AIDS, public health/eradication of diseases • Environment protection for communities, including indigenous people! • Emergency Operations !! • Grant program!

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IX.17. Which activities did NGOs carry out for WFWO ? Close to 80% percent of WFWO#s NGOs, CBOs partners carried out !activities (565 with NGO collaboration). Monitoring activities involved 10% percent of WFWO#s NGO partners in 42 country, while WFWO activities were carried out by !percent of WFWO#s NGO partners in 46 countries. Compared to 2007, the number of NGOs involved in sustainable development program increased slightly while the number of NGOs working in evaluation, monitoring, and technical assistance !and project design decreased. Main activities carried out by NGO partners: • Focal point for WFWO in the field! • Technical assistance in the field • Provide logistical support to WFWO mission • Coordinate WFWO program! • Monitoring • Raise public awareness!

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IX.18. How did NGOs engage in complementary relationships with WFWO ? In 2008, as in 2009, over 50% percent of all NGOs, CBOs, partners entered into a complementary relationship with WFWO. The main sector of complementary collaboration was again sustainable development programs focusing on the MDGs; poverty, health, education, women gender equality, !primary schools (involving 10 complementary NGO partners in 12 projects), followed by mother-and-child health (13 NGOs in 9 projects) and other !capacity building training (5 NGOs in 12 projects). Despite the increase in complementary NGO engagement in the area of poverty, health , education, the number of complementary NGOs involved in the nurseries/kindergartens and literacy/ numeracy sectors decreased.

IX.19. Which program categories involved NGO collaboration ? The program category that involved most NGO partners was protracted relief and recovery and rehabilitation operations (PRROs). Over 12 NGOs partnered with WFWO in 9 PRRO projects, an increase in the overall number of NGOs despite the reduction in the number of PRRO projects. The number of NGOs working as partners on development projects decreased from 11 NGOs in 2007 to 9 in 2008, and 2009 to 5 while the number in emergency operations remained approximately the same (24 NGOs).

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IX.20. Principles of Partnership!a Statement of Commitment Annex II!Endorsed by the Global Humanitarian Platform networks.! The Global Humanitarian Platform, established in ! 2001, and WFWO policy and guidelines of project PCDMPG and code of conduct under the umbrella of the UN NGO IRENE Network terms of reference, brings together United Nations and non-United Nations humanitarian organizations on an equal footing. • Striving to enhance the effectiveness of humanitarian action, based on an ethical obligation and accountability to the populations we serve; • Acknowledging diversity as an asset of the humanitarian community and recognizing the interdependence among humanitarian organizations; • Committed to building and nurturing an effective partnership, with!the organizations participating in the Global Humanitarian Platform agree to base their partnership on the following principles:

Equality! Equality requires mutual respect between members of the partnership irrespective of size and power. The participants must respect each other's mandates, obligations and independence and recognize each other's constraints and commitments. Mutual respect must not preclude organizations from engaging in constructive dissent. Transparency Transparency is achieved through dialogue (on equal footing), with an emphasis on early consultations and early sharing of information. Communications and transparency, including financial transparency, increase the level of trust among organizations. Result-oriented approach Effective humanitarian action must be reality-based and action-oriented. This requires result-oriented coordination based on effective capabilities and concrete operational capacities. Responsibility Humanitarian organizations have an ethical obligation to each other to accomplish their tasks responsibly, with integrity and in a relevant and appropriate way. They must make sure they commit to activities only when they have the means, competencies, skills, and capacity to deliver on their commitments. Decisive and robust prevention of abuses committed by humanitarians must also be a constant effort. Complementarily The diversity of the humanitarian community is an asset if we build on our comparative advantages and complement each other#s contributions. Local capacity is one of the main assets to enhance and on which to build. Whenever possible, humanitarian organizations should strive to make it an integral part in emergency response. Language and cultural barriers must be overcome.

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The WFWO and its Partners, are closely interrelated and integrated the components of the project!!!activities and objectives on “Promoting UN Partnership initiatives with Local NGOs, CBOs by Regions and Strengthening their Capacity to Enhance their Contribution to the MDGs for Human Security and Local Sustainable Development�, as shown by the following diagram:

Interrelation of the Project components, activities & objectives outputs and results:

The Main WFWO Partnership Group:

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X. WFWO Global Advocacy Activities Report around the world for 2009

Goodwill Ambassador for Development Activities achieved for 2009 by Country Representative

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WFWO ADN Afghanistan: Mr. Asadullah Khan Acknowledgement: I am extremely grateful and wish to thank the WFWO management team for considering me the Volunteer Representative/AND Afghanistan in January 2009. The position gives me a chance to think positively and put my shares for the development of the country at local and as well as national level. When I start work to arrange a meeting with my friends this was just a first step and now WFWO Afghanistan Volunteer Network members individuals and local organizations are more the 100 (7 local organizations with 35 members and 75 individuals). I also wish to thank the volunteers and the catering staff of local organizations for rendering their best services providing to the community in the field of education, health and poverty reduction in the most neglected part of the country. In addition I would like to appreciate the contribution and cooperation of local community for supporting the volunteers work through appreciation and encouraging them for their holy mission. I am deeply thankful to all Volunteers, NGOs/INGOs and local government departments, particularly The Asian Management Institute for arranging Workshops in partnership with WFWO ADN for their active participation in the volunteer activities of the WFWO AVN. Introduction: Volunteerism is a kind of demonstration sharing different better application of social development methodologies in shape of entertainment. It#s a form of education for local community in improving their knowledge regarding work for good without compensation in term of money. It#s a type of connectivity among individuals, Local NGOs government departments and community for making better working relationships. This type of event brings changes in behavior and is cost effective way of promoting social interaction as a development tools for the growth and stability of the country. It also provides an enhanced learning environment for the community. Objectives:

• •

To create awareness regarding volunteerism among the local population.

To provide a common platform to NGOs, Government departments and other stakeholders working in the social & economic development of the country.

To provide human resources to a local NGOs, schools, colleges and civil societies including semi-government non for profit organizations by supporting grass roots alternative livelihoods, education, health and vocational trainings projects.

WFWO AND Activities 2009: (1) Planning: WFWO AVN is the key volunteer team in the Eastern Province of Nangarhar Afghanistan providing services to local NGO#s in implementing grass roots education, health and Alternative Livelihood including poverty alleviation projects. The methodology adopted to organize this approach is a WFWO supported idea and is cost effective social development system supporting One World One Hope of the World for World Organization Planning for this started from February 2009. ADN/ ANV invited individuals, Local NGOs and members of other organizations and institutions for a planning meeting to organize a volunteer team which fill the gap of human resources needs local organizations for project implementations in a cost effective. In planning meeting it was decided that the volunteer will continuously support the local NGO#s in consultation with civil society and ADN to support their work and arranging different meeting, seminars and workshops to highlight the mission of WFWO “One World One Hope”, in Afghanistan in a continuous basis. 7 organizations came forward voluntarily and 4 sub committees were formed. Each committee had 5-6 members and was responsible for a particular component of the WFWO mission achievement in 2009, in 2010 the AND with Volunteer network in consultation with local organizations and civil society members will arrange a seminar and will highlighted the plan for 2010, the pilot phase of the 2009/program was successfully implemented and attract more than 100 members including 7 local NGO#s. In 2010 we are planning to register a website, which include the activities of the Network like trainings, workshops, seminars and volunteers profile interested to support the projects under Afghanistan UN MDGs priorities in the country. In 2009 total 15 projects were supported by the Volunteer network implemented by 7 local NGO#s in the country, due to lack of funding availability in the first two quarter we face some problems, however in the second half of 2009, the volunteer team under “One World One Hope” successfully achieve the target, the team is now in the position to arrange programs with their own financial support. The team is also looking to attract more organizations interested to work in Afghanistan, and the volunteer will support their activities on continuous basis supporting WFWO mission and vision/UN MDG#s in the country. It is also decided that ADN in consultation with WFWO, Local NGO#s and civil society support will arrange a seminar and trainings program on the climate change and environmental protection in April/May 2010.

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10th May 2009$

$

Mother#s Day in Partnership with ARAEP (Afghan Rehabilitation Agriculture and

$

$

Education Program) a local NGO

17-21 May 2009$

$

Education for All, in Partnership with Asian Management Institute Kabul Afghanistan

5th June 2009$

$

World Environment Day celebrated with the help of

$

July 2009$ August $

Supported IHSAN (Local NGO) Hygiene Education Program/Project in District Behsood/Kama and Chaparhar of Nangarhar Province (10 Volunteers) 2009

$ $$$ S u p p o r t e d AWA K E N H e a l t h a n d E d u c a t i o n Upper Kunar, Laghman and Mohmand Dara (12 Volunteers)

Projects

in

Behsood

$$

September 2009$

AIDS awareness raising program with the help of AMAN Foundation Nangarhar Afghanistan

16th October 2009$

World Food Day celebrated with the help of ARAEP (Afghan Rehabilitation Agriculture and Education Program) a local NGO

November 2009$

Awareness raising Seminar on One Billion Hunger

November 2009$

Special Meeting on WFWO in Afghanistan

December 2009$

Meeting held in AWAKEN health clinic for a campaign on Women & Children Hepatitis Control through awareness rising

Attract more than 100 volunteers in the area including 7 local NGO#s and conduct several meeting on the topic to work jointly for the achievement of One World One Hope slogan of the WFWO in Afghanistan. After launching a website on NGO resource, WFWO AVN office will be a resource centre for local NGO#s, civil society and community and our team will fulfill the human resource and information gap of the organizations interested to take support from our WFWO AVN/AND and volunteers. One among the 4 sub committees had the responsibility of pre event publicity. Posters (A4 size) were distributed and pasted on walls widely. The programs were also publicized by individual campaign. A press release regarding Volunteer team support was advertised in the local radio channel in the area, the reason behind this publicity was to create awareness in the area and attract more and more people to the team to support different projects and local initiatives with the help of local volunteers. In the campaign some government employees, local leaders, civil society members are also mobilized and attract their attention to the point that without their help and support a development, free of poverty society, peace and sustainability will be only an idea.

WFWO ADN Arab Republic of Egypt: Dr. Amr Moghazy As this was the first year as AND, I was trying to understand my role and test the surrounding community for cooperation and participation in the intend activities. Through a contact with one of the prestigious NGOs; Science and Scientists Lovers Organization, I presented a lecture about the prevention of Burns and Fire accidents. I emphasized the important role of NGOs in preventing Burns (more than 75% of its causes are domestic; therefore the most common victims are women and children). By the end, I asked the audience of possible participation in awareness activities concerning environmental protection and safe community. They demonstrated the will, but not financing, such activities. Nevertheless, the meeting was good as they had an idea about WFWO and its activities. The second endeavor was through a Community Development NGO working in the poor and deprived district. The plan was through humanitarian action (medical and prevention campaigns). They accepted to participate through hosting the Medical Team and providing the Hospital but not the medications. I contacted Kareen, Head of the Communications Team, who confirmed that medications should be assured from our part. As the time was very short (the mission was planned within two months from the notification), the negotiations reached a dead-end. In this regard, I have a good idea that would assure the supply the medications through WFWO without any payments either from the organization or the Pharmaceutical companies (I#ll be sending it soon to include Egypt in the coming missions within two months). This was the most serious and reasonable offer I#ve received through the year. Through a congress about environmental protection and promotion, I made a presentation about the role of NGOs in this regard. The presentation was a real success and audience was impressed by the activities of the organization. Again, the various demands of cooperation were very limited and were in the wrong direction (most of them asked for fund) From my point of view, this year strategy will be through two axes. The first is to demonstrate the role of the NGOs in community service to different stakeholders. The second will be through a practical proof of the ability to organize a fruitful activity by a health campaign that would assure the donors to participate actively in supporting the WFWO#s activities.

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WFWO ADN Arab Republic of Egypt: Ms. Mahitab Mekkawi First of all, I would like to express my deep gratitude for giving me the opportunity to live such a wonderful experience, being an ambassador for a prestigious organization such as yours, the World for World having noble goals to achieve around the world. What was more fascinating about it is that your activities are directly related to my work, so you made my job much easier. Then, I would like to summarize my activities throughout the year 2009: Publishing an article (in Arabic) on my new position, in Al Ahram newspaper, which is one of the main journals in Egypt, on Sunday 12 April 2009 – p.27. (Reference available upon request). A number of my work colleagues called me after reading the journal and asked me about the organization and its activities. Circulating the WFWO brochure which you have sent me in the different conferences and workshops which I have attended (whether organized by UN agencies, NGO's or educational institutions) besides distributing my new business card as well as giving a briefing on your activities. Presenting a training proposal to your esteemed organization to be implemented by my Co. (Egyptian Co. For Development Consultations) in Egypt as a mean to raise more awareness on your activities. (By the way, the offer is still available if you would like to implement it). Organizing a number of awareness sessions on your activities besides distributing your brochure as well as my new business card. These include: 1- A session in Rotary in February 2009 attended by more than 20 members. (In Arabic). 2- A session in Awlad Masr Association (Sons and Daughters of Egypt) in April 2009 attended by 15 members. (In Arabic). 3A session in RotarAct club attended by also 15 members in May 2009. 4A session in my Co. (Egyptian Co for Development Consultations) in September 2009 attended by nearly 25 persons. (In Arabic).

WFWO ADN Ghana: Mr. Benjamin Amankwaa The Ghana Ambassador for Development of World For World Organization has had a tremendous impact on the Ghanaian disadvantaged and underprivileged in a massive way. Over the past 12 months, the ADN has undertaken the following projects: A) WFWO"s ADN Ghana"s Technical Education for street children, the poor, the disabled, single parents, and commercial sex workers The World For World#s Ambassador For Development Network, Ghana, established Technical Education for street children, the poor, the disabled, single parents, and commercial sex workers middle of March, 2009. The project initially was started with 8 people, and by end of March, attracted over 59 people in the categories defined above. The first batch of the trainees graduated in August and was employed by partners such as AMG, GCBA, Kyei Akomea Ventures, and International Cultural Exchange Concern Group. The next batch of Trainees is expected to graduate in February this year. Now, many people are increasingly looking for the chance to register. However, limited number of computers as well as inadequate office space is causing the ADN Ghana to turn many of these people down. The ADN Ghana is looking for more computers and larger office space to register more trainees. In pursue of this, WFWO#s ADN Ghana is seeking partnerships with concern organizations and individuals to raise funds to buy more computers as well as rent a large training facility to accommodate the hundreds of these people who are hungry to get some employable skills for selfreliance and economic productivity. Those organizations that can donate computers are highly welcome to join us. It is the vision of WFWO#s ADN Ghana to build a large facility equipped with adequate computers as well as volunteer educators and instructors to offer the training to the thousands of these people across the country. B) ADN Northern Ghana initiative The ADN Ghana initiated a special approach in partnership with WFWO in 2009 to embark on a fact-finding trip to the nation#s most impoverished region. The fact-finding trip was meant to establish partnership with the Government#s representatives, chiefs and local leaders, NGOs, and the Media houses in the region to create awareness on the lack of basic human needs such as clean drinking water, health care, schools, etc, and to join forces to ring the bell in the ears of the Government and other concern organizations and individuals to come to the aid of the people in the region. In the process, the ADN met with the Government appointed coordinator for the region who in turn linked us with the Regional Minister, Mr. Nanyina. Due to some unavoidable inconveniences, the fact-finding trip was postponed for April this year.

1-

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C) Current Project: The ADN Ghana has submitted a proposal to the headquarters regarding its current project meant to be started by April 2010. The Ambassador For Development#s proposed project is significantly an imperative tool that has the tendency to reduce malnourishment among children in the targeted segment of the Ghanaian society. The statement of the problem as well as the project#s overview has been summarized below to give the headquarters a fair view as to the significance the project carries and its ultimate impact through the lens of our experience in the area: Background Information/Statement of the Problem Major obstacles to child survival in the developing world include infections, parasitic diseases, malnutrition and the risks associated with low birth weight and high fertility. (UN Informational Letter #37-435) A serious problem exists in the rural villages of Ejisu–Dwaben District of Ghana of children dying from common illness and infections that are attributable to poor nutrition. Though high nutrition foods are available in the villages, it is apparent that mothers do not have an understanding of exactly what foods contain the most value for their children. (Ministry of Health, 2006) The most significant person in the life of the young child is the child's mother. Research has shown that the children of mothers who have an understanding of how to provide good nutrition to their children stand a significantly greater chance of survival during the first three years of life (87% survival rate) as compared to children of mothers who do not know how to provide good nutrition (43% survival rate). Project overview: ADN Ghana is establishing an office in a form of a community-based mothers and infant#s center called "Healthy Moms for Healthy Kids" (HMHK). HMHK will be established at Ejisu, the center of the community villages, close to the KN University of Science & Technology to serve this purpose for the “Ejisu–Dwaben District” of Ghana where the problem has been identified. HMHK will focus on providing nutritional education and counseling for mothers, especially those from the extremely low-income areas. It is expected that through the provision of information to the mothers that it will be possible to have a direct and positive effect on the well being of the young children of the community. HMHK will utilize volunteers who are students at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and technology#s (KNUST) Faculty of Agriculture Studies, as well as community nursing assistance. Students will be expected to successfully participate in a 4-week training program at the beginning of their work with HMHK. This training program will provide basic nutritional information for mothers and information on adult teaching methods. Student volunteers who demonstrate proficiency during the initial training program will be invited to participate in an advanced training program to learn effective nutritional counseling techniques. Each student volunteer will be expected to contribute 3-5 hours each week and to continue with HMHK for a period of not less than 6 months. HMHK will operate with 6 full and part time volunteer members. In addition, a Governing Board made up of community leaders and university staff will operate to provide overall sanctioning of the Center's operation. Periodic evaluations will be conducted to assess the value of HMHK on a) helping the student volunteers to become effective educators, b) the development of new understandings on the part of local mothers and c) the improvement of the well being of children. The use of volunteers to provide community service is a new concept in the District and can be capitalized upon as a viable way to provide trained manpower for the offering of educational services. The first student service scheme, Service HMHK, will be created to serve this purpose. This will initially be operated by KNUST, but will be operated by the various Universities after a year of successful implementation. Ministry of Education and ministry of women and children Affair will be contacted and involved in many phases of the project#s implementation and development.! The need to undertake this project is imperative as we seek to help prevent infant death as a result of malnourishment. The challenge at this stage is to seize the opportunity, to take the risk, to realize an innovative, new, rewarding and productive future for the children in the community targeted. With the strength, which WFWO#s Ghana Ambassador for Development is working towards the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals, in line with the visions of World For World Organization, the choice is an easy one – help educate mothers of food of nutritional quality to eradicate infant death due to malnourishment. The ADN Ghana has had a significant, fruitful, worthwhile, life-changing, events and projects in Ghana for the year 2009, and very much looking forward to an exciting, life-changing projects and events for 2010.

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WFWO ADN Nepal: Mr. Arjun Dhakal

Date:

Activities

March 11, 2009 CAS, Kathmandu, Nepal April 22, 2009 Regional Training Center of NFN, Biratnagar, Nepal June 10, 2009, Dhangadi, Nepal

Provide a lecture to the university studentsUniversity student and media people on MDGs and role of leader !at Organize a half day training workshop withLocal level political leaders, CSOs activist, NFN on MDGs and role of civil society tomedia people, other networks achieve them by 2015 Organize a half day training workshop withLocal level political leaders, CSOs activist, NFN on MDGs and role of civil society tomedia people, other networks achieve them by 2015 Give a orientation programmes to the mediaNational level reporters and radio and TV people on MDGs and role of media organ-journalists ized by NEFEJ Interview at Radio Sagarmatha on the status! of MDG progress Organize a half day training workshop withLocal level political leaders, CSOs activist, NFN on MDGs and role of civil society tomedia people, other networks achieve them by 2015 ! Give a interview on MDGs in local radio

August 7, 2009 Kathmandu, Nepal September 7, 2009 Kathamndu, Nepal November 6, 2009 Pokhara , Nepal

Participant

WFWO ADN United States of America: Ms. Wendy Ford I would summarize this past year by saying it was year of great financial upheaval for one of the wealthiest countries in the world. Many people were unemployed, with the unemployment rate in Florida soaring above 10%. I was fortunate enough to have a part time teaching job and a part time church job but was unable to pay my bills to support a family of 4 and went heavily into debt. Nonetheless, I sought to use my time wisely and became involved in several projects of my own volition, without assignment from WFWO. I probably spent more time publicizing WFWO in general and assisting in local projects as there was so great a need. However I feel that my experience will be valuable in contributing to further efforts for global development. Unfortunately I did not receive a tailored program of activities as stated in point 6 if Terms and Conditions. However I hope I did succeed in raising some awareness. I did receive one invitation to travel and campaign on WFWO's behalf, but was unemployed at the time it was received, so could not leave my family until a means of support had been secured. I probably could have used more direction this year; but I did all in my power with available means to publicize the mission of WFWO in my community and at state and national levels. Alleviation of country-level poverty / health concerns: 1. Working through U.S. Democratic party I campaigned on behalf of universal health care so no individual would be without access to health care. I assisted the party to register 1000's of new voters for the 2008 election, giving voice to the concerns of many who had been intimidated into silence for years. In ensuing months I helped organize many signatures to petitions for the health bills before Congress.

70


At our first general meeting for 2009 a vote was taken of the priority issue to be addressed by the new Administration. I spoke on behalf of WFWO and put forth poverty and homelessness as a priority issue in addition to health care. As you are aware, health care became the priority issue, and I campaigned and built grassroots support for a universal health care program. I brought to the discussion my personal experience with Australia, where I lived for 17 years. This experience could be relevant in organizing people in other nations to demand proper health care through peaceful organizing, petitions and letters. 2. As a teacher in a public charter school in 2008 - 2009, I publicized the Millennium Development Goals and mission of the WFWO. With the goal of supporting universal primary education I taught a unit on the Mexican school project in Spanish class and attempted to gain school administration support for a fund raiser. As I was "only" a part time employee supporting a family of 4 living on the poverty line myself, my voice was not heard as loudly as I had hoped. However the school community was made aware of WFWO activities and students were eager to participate. At the community level o behalf of WFWO, to support environmental sustainability, I authored, rehearsed and presented a spring time show about ecological issues ("A Breath of Spring") with over 100 school children. The event included the local energy companies who demonstrated ways of saving water, creating mulch, recycling, etc. Hundreds of people were in attendance and left with better ideas of how to "go green" and live in an environmentally friendly manner. 3. I promoted the goals of WFWO to UNITY Churches who espouse self-empowerment and sustainable lifestyles with the objective of global peace and understanding. I also raised awareness at Florida Holistic Schools, who assisted with research on food cooperatives. 4. I assisted to build, set up and volunteer-staff Lake Cares food pantry for the many homeless and hungry in Central Florida region. This is a project I could discuss on behalf of WFWO in other areas with similar needs. 5. I performed research in conjunction with Florida Holistic School on the creation and operation of successful food coops with the objective of building a successful cooperative farming venture in the Southeast US. I will continue in this venture and could use this experience to present or train in other WFWO serviced countries. Perhaps my work this year has been too research-oriented and too localized to be of value. However if you wish, I will spend this new year simply promoting the aims of WFWO and maybe initiate a fund raiser targeting a specific project if this is what you would like me to do. The guidelines provided by the communications team are very useful, I just did not know how best to direct my energies! Already this year I have solicited emergency relief for Haiti under auspices of WFWO in The Villages, Florida, a privately-run community with a vast community and media network. This week I have been encouraging people to participate in Lake Sumter Emergency Rescue's packaging of 30,000 meals to send to Haiti, which will take place later in the week. I will be bringing my children aged 10 and 12. What a lesson in humanity! I can't wait. I am also soliciting signatures for the international community to release Haiti of its international debt, as per your request via the ONE organization of which I am also a part. Thank you for this opportunity. I sincerely hope that with a bit of direction this year I will achieve great things for you. I am a community entertainer and will perform an original song to spread the word! I could not locate a special form to make this report. Please advise if there is one. Blessings and prayers for unity and peace, Wendy Ford

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XI. WFWO Operations Programs Around the World since 2002

72


WFWO Operations Programs Around the world since 2002 ! AFRICA Region ! ASIA Region ! EASTERN EUROPE Region ! LATIN AMERICA ! CARIBBEAN Region ! Special Programs & Emergency Operations

! !

XII. WFWO and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 73


WFWO Contribution to the Eight MDGs 2007

2008

2009

2007-2009

Change

KEY FIGURES

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 1 – Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger BENEFICIARIES 2,300

27,245

78,867

3,675

5,354

8,930

thousands of poor people in 46 countries (44 countries in 2008, 38 countries in 2007) thousand of women and children

1,876

3,756

1,234

3,234

345

767

21,390 4,815 1,835

▲ ▲ ▲

thousand

of

rehabilitation

programs thousand

of internally displaced people

program thousand

of

returnees

assistance

rehabilitation

program

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 2 - Achieve Universal Primary Education thousand of schoolchildren school meals/take-home rations 4,380

18,123

44,300

receiving

▲ percent who were girls

25.1

35,3

43.1

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 3 – Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women BENEFICIARIES 38.2

121

47.1

148

2.670

6.900

1,234

2,765

51.4

198

18,970

4,815

percent of beneficiaries who were women or girls in the program thousand of women were in leadership positions on association management committees of program thousand of women receiving household food assistance program at distribution points in general food distributions thousand of household food entitlements program were issued in women"s names for general food distributions and support as focal points coordination

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 4 – Reduce Child Mortality Thousand of children were assisted by WFWO NGOs, CBOs partners operation program 10,323

151,23 243.10

10,245

22,780

146,200

!

thousand of children diagnosed with malnutrition received special nutritional support by WFWO, NGOs, CBOs partners operations programs

74


2007

2008

2009

2007-2009

Change

KEY FIGURES

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 5 – Improve Maternal Health BENEFICIARIES

2,845

7,800

10,438

thousand of vulnerable women receiving additional nutritional support through maternal child health programs by WFWO through NGO, CBO partners

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 6 – Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases

! 2323

101,23

2.200

89.345

10,245

22,780

Special program to support of 3 highest HIV and AIDS prevalence countries receiving assistance through WFWO NGO, CBO programs

243.10

149.367

146,200

!

!

thousand of people affected by HV and AIDS receiving by WFWO and its partners health and prevention assistance countries receiving assistance under tuberculosis and HIV and AIDS prevention activities through WFWO, NGO, CBO operation

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 7 – Ensure Environmental Sustainability BENEFICIARIES

5,000

36.

50,

17,800

178.

123,970

thousand of people receiving assistance program focusing on the environmental prevention as an incentive to build assets, attend training, build resilience to shocks and preserve livelihoods including the ingenious people Raise public awareness program at all levels locally, nationally and internationally to contribute to the environmental issue, water, sanitary, energy in developing countries

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOAL 8 – Develop a Global Partnership for Development stand- and supported by WFWO co -financiers partners

1,4

351,23

2,1

778,

2,3

5,1

110

322,780

▲#

Increase;

!

No change;

!

Decrease;

743.10

987,

6,8

546,200

emergency operations joint assessment missions conducted by WFWO and its partners, NGO, CBO , local authorities corporate and private entities donating cash and in-kind gifts worth $ 12.ml in 2009 non-governmental organizations working with WFWO in the field operations to save time and money

75


XIII. WFWO"s Achievements to Raise Public Awareness Around the World: WFWO achievements!to raise a public awareness on global development issue for 2009, thanks to the innovative solutions and partnerships developed with our partners to support the MDGs, as well as to WFWO#s Goodwill Ambassadors and WFW Friends for more that 1600 networks around word, and we are working with private sector, and other non-profit organizations, governments around the world and leading financial institutions, to raise public awareness and resource mobilizations, and to build a diverse, action-oriented, global coalition to meet the promise of our generation—the end of extreme poverty and to implement the Eight MDGs objectives to be reached by 2015: The WFWO highlighted that will continue to work closely with its partners and with indigenous people group from New Zealand and Latin America region, in order to implement and to achieve the objective of the Millennium Development Goals 7 and to maintain the human right of indigenous people sustainable development programs, is essential so that increasing numbers of the world's indigenous peoples can truly live in dignity, justice, prosperity and peace. In 2008 it was a negative and failed year for hall world, due to the global food and financial crisis, we raised public awareness around the world in the occasion of "This year#s World Food Day 2009, comes at a time of crisis. Global Financial Crisis and turmoil is exacerbating concerns about rising food and fuel costs, which have already driven 75 million people deeper into the abyss of hunger and poverty.� The aims to raise public Awareness to promote a global development issues to call attention and to inform trough WFWO#s networks the International communities about the maggiore activities to mark and observe the United Nations activities need more attention and action in particularly the eight MDGs are: World Food Day, World AIDS Day, World Malaria Day, World Environment Day, United Nations Day, World Women#s Day, World Water Day, World Humanitarian Day, World#s Indigenous People Day, International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. For further information please visit the WFWO#s website at Media and Publications. WFWO#s campaign under slogan "One World One Hope - The Millennium Development Goals Millennium is!Common Vision and Global Commitments",!we are proud to continue to work with all our supporters and partners to ensure these goals are achieved through innovation, inspiration and partnership of all forms contributions to make the!difference to our world we share.

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XIV. International Meetings, Roundtable, Seminars, Briefing Sessions and Special Events Achieved for 2009

77


WFWO"s International Events aims organized and contributions for 2009: 1) The main aims of International Meetings and Roundtable - Seminars - Briefings for 2009, are to promote the Millennium Development Goals and raise public awareness# on global development issues and to call international leaders and communities to react and to implement the MDGs targets to be reached by 2015. The majority of events is organized and sponsored by the WFWO#s and its Partners, under the patronage of local Authorities and hosting selected countries in different Regions around the world. 2) The objectives of Roundtables/Seminars, Briefing Sessions organized by WFWO in 2009, in the Universities, Schools, Private Sectors, Group and Government, focussed on a global learning process that has focused on learning from successful and less than successful efforts to reduce poverty throughout the world and the implementation of the MDGs and other global development issues, by the WFWO#s networks around the world as follows:

6th FESTIVAL FOR INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONSHIP 2009 TO SUPPORT WOMEN EMPOWERMENT - MDGs 3 29 January - 4 February 2009, Dubai (UAE) The WFWO in partnership with its partners, organized a special event, to promote the Millennium Development Goals objectives against women Goal 3, with participations of more than 2000 persons, in presence of Local Authorities, Sport Personality, Public and Media.

WORLD CIVIC FORUM 2009 “Building our Humanitarian Planet", 5-8 May 2009 Seoul (Republic of Korea) The World Civic Forum 2009, a joint initiative of the United Nations DESA, under the main theme of “Building Our Humanitarian Planet.” The WCF 2009 emerges from the leading collaboration between the UN and institutions of higher learning, and aims to develop into an ongoing global institution with the partnership of like-minded actors such as NGOs, international organizations, governments, private enterprise, and the media.

5th WORLD ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATIONAL 10-14 May 2009, Montreal (Canada)

CONGRESS

(5WEEC),

Special conference focusing on environmental and education program organized by our partner to support the MDGs objectives Goal 7, with participation of delegation from over 120 countries and for more than 3000 delegates.

WORLD HEALTH CONFERENCE, 15-16 May 2009, Gorizia (Italy) Special conference focusing on “Boarders and Public Health” organized by our partner to support the MDGs objectives Goal 6 with participation of delegation from Africa, Asia and Europe in presence of UN Representative, Italian Authorities, NGOs, Health Institutions and Media.

78


2009 ANNUAL MINISTERIAL REVIEW (AMR) HELD DURING THE HIGH-LIVEL SEGMENT OF THE ANNUAL SESSION OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL, 6-9 July 2009, Geneva (Switzerland) The 2009 Annual Ministerial Review (AMR), held during the high-level segment of the annual session of the Economic and Social Council, focused on "Implementing the internationally agreed goals and commitments in regard to global public health". It provided an opportunity to: Assess the state of implementation of the United Nations Development Agenda; Explore key challenges in achieving the international goals and commitments in the area of global public health; Recommendations and proposals for action, including new initiatives.

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BROADCAST MEDIA AND CLIMATE CHANGE, 4-5 September 2009, Paris (France) 'Broadcast Media and Climate Change: A Public Service Remit' was an international conference which brought together representatives from over 100 broadcasters from across the world. The UNESCO and the UN Environmental Program (UNEP) organised the event in order to build momentum towards the critical climate change negotiations at the Conference of Parties Climate Change Conference (COP15) in Copenhagen this December.

BRIEFING SESSIONS: Universities and Schools in Rome (Italy) To mark the United Nations Agenda including, 16 October World Food Day, 17 October Eradication of Poverty and 24 October 2009 United Nations Day. WFWO organized in cooperation with the local authorities a special briefing sessions, was also organized for more than 20 Schools and Universities, to promote the MDGs objectives and Global development issues to raise public awareness for youth generations in 2009.

UN-NGO-IRENE

BOARD

DIRECTORS

MEETING,

2-5

November

2009,

Paris (France) The Meeting will focus on a review of the Strategic Framework on MDGs through UN NGO IRENE network. The Meeting will also discuss the theme of the next ECOSOC HLS meeting Sustainable Development with all coordinators from other regions. The Meeting will also focusing on the UN NGO a special side meeting for strategy plan among the global UN NGO IRENE Coordinators.

WORLD FAMILY SUMMIT +5 "Families in Balance" Achieving Gender Equality and Empowering Women, 4-7 December 2009, Istanbul (Turkey) The aims of the World Family Summit +5 to reviewing the current global and national trends and challenges and their impact on Gender Equality, highlighting the roles, rights, responsibilities and obligations of women and men and their capacity for reducing poverty focusing on Family Policies for empowering the women in all cultures.

GLOBAL AIDS CAMPAIGN, 1 December 2009, Rome (Italy) To mark the important of the World Aids Day, 1st December 2009, the WFWO in close partnership with its partners, organized a special event and briefing session, the main aims is to promote the Millennium Development Goals objectives against HIV/AIDS, Goal 6, with participations of more than 1000 persons, in presence of the Authorities, Academic personality, NGOs, Public, Media and by the WFWO#s networks around the world.

79


Strategic Framework Plan Directions for 2010-2015 WFWO#s key future challenges being able to respond effectively to growing DC demand for its assistance in local sustainable development program and grant to contribute to MDGs and this challenge implies three central priorities for the period 2010–.2015 To strengthening WFWO#s operations activities the recent growth level of activities has nearly doubled over the past 5 years In the last 2 years alone the number of Financial Service Providers supported by WFWO and its financial partners has more than doubled keeping responding to this demand means that WFWO must place high priority on maintaining strong and effective operational mechanisms for up coming activities for 2010 has already produced an overall framework strategy plan for strengthening WFWO#s operations, including its resource base Implementing this framework will be a high priority for 2010 – 2015, to be implemented with the contribution of resources committed and confirmed and Approved by the Resource Mobilizations Task Force Executive Chairman of the Board Directors of RMT/TF/Canadian Partners and WFWO Executive President in the end of 2009.

Annex I: WFWO Global Project Portfolio 2010/2015 COUNTRY/PROJECT

Morocco (the first Pilot Project)

PROJECT AREA

FINANCIAL PARTNERS

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

TOTAL PROJECT COST IN US$

DURATION

Local development Region

RMT/TF WFWO#s Sustainable Bilateral Co-Financing Development Village 18 Partners Project (SDVP)“

4 years

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Egypt Rep. Congo Ghana Gabon Senegal Sudan Mauritania Tanzania

For more details please visit global Project Portfolio on going WFWO "s activities

80


WFWO Organizational Chart!!

Note : WFWO#s Team for 2009 was composed by staff (10) professional and support staff, including (25) expert consultants international by Gender 50/50 % and by geographical distributions, and only by contract when is necessary and needed for project approved, this will help us to save money fund to put in for program not for administration budget. the major support is provided by voluntary staff (45)

81


WFWO Networks

82


XV. Financial Analysis and Statements

83


Financial Analysis and Statements 2009 contributions to WFWO regular and other resources WFWO#s total 2009 income was about $1 ml: $1.2 ml in regular or core, funds; and $10.5 ml grant for Africa in earmarked, or non-core, funds provided directly under WFWO grant program from bilateral contributions partners. Development partners increased their contributions to WFWO 2009 regular resources by $1 ml. The main donors substantially increased their contributions to support direct programs through the resource mobilizations task force by more than 100%. The increase was largely a result of a decision to convert earmarked resources to regular resources. In 2009, multi-year commitments by RMT/TF were secured for the up coming years as per agreement signed in 2009. Although other donors slightly decreased its contribution in 2009, it remained the largest contributor is the RMT/TF to WFWO regular resources with $1 ml. There was an overall decrease in other resources from $10 ml in 2008 to $5 ml in 2009 distributed for grants programs.

In 2009, WFWO signed a New Development Accords Agreements with Canadian and New Zealand Partners Foundations and RMT/TF to contribute to the MDGs. These funds of $110 ml committed for 2010-2015 promissory note to support WFWO#s activities around the world on sustainable development programs and inclusive financing programs in the Least Developed Countries to contribute to the MDGs. While continuing to rely on a relatively small of donors to regular resources contributions to WFWO earmarked resources are becoming increasingly diverse. In addition to bilateral partners, WFWO enjoys support from development banks, foundations, the main contributors from the private sector for 2009: are Holding 888.com, Terra Finance USA for an grant, including the logistical of kinds support to emergency operations.

WFWO continues to be overly dependent on too few donors to regular resources WFWO#s donors contribute 90% or Regular Resources. Continuing to diversify and expand the regular resource base remains a top priority to strengthening its partnership thought RMT/TF for the organization of the most funding direct resources for its programs worldwide under the WFWO, from other donors on the other hand, are becoming increasingly diverse, from Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force (RMT/TF) and bilateral and multilateral cooperation, WFWO support from development banks, foundations, the private sector, in order to contribute to the achievement of the eight MDGs.

84


Table 1. Expenditure trends 2006-2009 (in thousand /millions of USD) 2006

2007

2008

2009

Program expenditures

600

800

900

980

- of which regular resources

800

900

900

700

- of which other resources

300

600

734

845

WFWO Support

900

650

721

784

Total

2.6

2.95

3.25

3.30

Expenditures

Source: Financial statements for WFWO as of 31 December 2009 before closing of accounts. *Both years include approximately Expenditures in 2008 and 2009 include respectively other funding provided by other bilateral cooperation donors partners under the WFWO programs directly or in directly.

The main WFWO#s program of resources will continue its effort of funding through RMT/TF and its financial partners to be allocated and focusing to Africa and Asia & Pacific. In 2009, 50% of country program expenditures went to Africa, followed by Asia and the Pacific at 30% Africa also accounted for the majority of expenditure within WFWO#s global activities, which in 2009 accounted for 8% share of program expenditures, up from 5% in 2009. This growth in global activities was largely a result of the grant program becoming fully operational in 8 developing countries in Africa and Asia, 3 that are emergency operation, natural disasters and post-conflict countries. The global program figure also includes the Gender Equality and workshops and public awareness# campaigns to contribute to MDGs. The local sustainable development programs, is jointly cost sharing by RMT/TF and other financial partners to be implemented in 2010. Table 2. 2009 Program expenditures per region and practice area (in thousand, million USD)

Local development building capacity

Sustainable development program

Grant Program

Emergency Operations

Africa

500

1.2

10.5

800

Asia & Pacific

300

1.2

1

700

Latin America & Caribbean

200

800

700

500

Global activities

600

700

500

700

Capacity building & Workshops, knowledge management MDGs Awareness & Campaign

400

600

700

400

200

200

200

200

Total

2.2

2.30

2.11

3.30

Regions/specific purposes

$

Source: Financial statements for WFWO as of 31 December 2009 before final closing of accounts.

85


WFWO at a glance WFWO will continue with its effort and its financial partners to provides grants program aid and technical support to help local communities and NGOs, CBOs to reach more poor households and small businesses, and local governments co-financing sustainable development programs on poverty alleviation, health, education water improvement, infrastructure facilities, hospital, feeder roads, schools, that will improve poor peoples# lives and to contribute to eight MDGs.

Annex II: Financial Statements WFWO Income and Expenditures 2009 (Thousands of United States dollars)

2009

2008

Voluntary Contributions

550

400

Cost Sharing Contributions

500

300

Sub-trust funds bilateral contributions grant program

10.5

2

Sub Total

11.550

2.7

Interest Income

350

200

Reimbursable Support Services

800

785

Other Income

600

450

TOTAL INCOME

1.75

1.435

EXPENDITURE

150

200

Regular- Resources

1.1

1.2

Cost -Sharing

450

900

Sub Trust funds (Bilateral contributions)

1.2

1.5

Sub Total

2.9

3.8

Supplementary Budget- net

150

100

Management & Administration costs

100

100

Technical Support costs

20

20

Reimbursable support Services costs

680

789

Sub Total

950

1.0

Other expenditure

220

130

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

220

130

Savings on prior biennium obligations

-

-

Transfer to/from/ a supplementary funds

1,000

1.500

Refunds to donors & transfer to/from/other funds

2.000

3.000

Funds balances 1 January 2010

15.000

21.000

FUNDS BALANCES, 31 DECEMBER

18.000

25.500

INCOME

Program

EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE)

Report date as of 1st July 2010

86


Annex III: Financial Statements

WFWO Balance Sheet 2009 (Thousands of United States dollars)

2009

2008

Cash

1.1

1.2

Investments by RMT/TF

5

6

Grants to NGOs, CBOs,

5

4

Operating funds provided from RMT/TF directly to programs

550

550

Operating funds provided by bilateral & Cooperation donors partners

5

2

Operating funds provided from RMT/TF for executing agencies partners

550

150

Other accounts receivable and deferred charges

200

270

Accrued interest

11

131

TOTAL ASSETS

28.400

14.301

LIABILITIES

-

-

Operating Fund by RMT/TF payable to NGOs. CBOs

171

131

Operating Fund payable to Executing agencies

183

183

Promissory note obligations and commitments

10

10

Accounts payable

-

-

Supplementary Budget for emergency operations

187

200

Deferred Income

23

-

TOTAL LIABILITIES

33.541

10.514

Operational funds committed by RTM/TF

10

10

Unexpended Resources

-

-

Regular Resources

1

1

Cost Sharing

500

700

Sub trust funds from direct program under the WFWO

1

895

Sub Total

12.500

12.595

Reimbursable Support Services

895

1

Total Unexpended Resources

387

298

TOTAL COMMITTED FUND BALANCES, 31 DECEMBER BT RMT/TF/Promissory Note

100

10

TOTAL LIABILITIES, COMMITTED FUND BALANCES BY RMT/TF/Promissory Note

101.282

11.298

ASSESTS

COMMITTED FUND BALANCES

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

Notes to the Financial Statements Since the financial crisis WFWO has established an Task Force as Resource mobilizations Team composed by its Executive Chairman and Board Directors, dealing directly and coordinating all the financial resource to support the WFWO#s activities a round world in order to contribute to the eight MDGs. The Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force is the trustee of the executive board members and its Financial partners has an clear mandate and terms of reference as resource mobilizations Team and responsible of resources as trustee:

87


Mandate and goals objectives on the RMT/TF: The RMT/TF has a clear mission is to assist the WFWO mandate in developing countries, in order to contribute to eight MDGs targets, amongst them, “in the development of their economies by supplementing existing sources of capital assistance by means of grants and loans and co-financing projects under WFWO name and working throughout developing countries and making full use of its capital investment mandate and flexible financial instruments, WFWO#s goals are to reduce poverty and the achievement of the eight Millennium Development Goals by: a) Increasing access by poor people and NGOs, CBOs and local communities to grant microfinance credit b) Improving the delivery of pro-poor services and infrastructure at the local level and support government c) Supporting the WFWO grant and sustainable development program to implement in developing countries d) Managing the resources and provide all support to WFWO#s activities e) The RMT/TF Chairman serves simultaneously as the Managing Executive Director of Global Project Management and other members of Board. The Executive Chairman of the RMT/TF report to Executive President of the WFWO. f) Since the financial crisis the Executive President and the Secretary General did not receive any remuneration from the WFWO during the current financial year. Committed Contributions by RMT/TF/USD

2009

2008

Committed contributions from RMT/TF by promissory note

100

10

Total

100

10

g) Grants Grants balances pending have been restated to include US$1 ml in outstanding grant at end of 31 December 2009 due to no funding received committed by RMT/TF and other donors, the grants had initially been recorded as grants the outstanding grants actually is pending as balance shown in the statements reflect current that are scheduled to be disbursed in the year coming. Grants to the NGOs, CBOs

2009

2008

Grants

3.1

1.2

Total

3.1

1.2

Financial Highlights - 2009! The members of the WFWO Board of Trustees confirm that the summarised financial statements on this page are a summary of the information extracted from the full annual financial statements, which were approved on!30 September !2009. The summarised financial statements may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the Organization. For further information, please consult the full annual financial statements, the auditors# report and the Trustees# Report. The summarised financial statements do not constitute full financial statements within the meaning of the Organization policy. A copy of the statutory financial statements of WFWO, upon which the auditors have reported with Approved by the members of the Board of Trustees and signed !by the Chairperson of RMT/TF. Independent Auditors# Statement/RMT/TF Trustees! We have examined the summarised financial statements of the WFWO for the year ended 31 December 2009. Respective responsibilities of Trustees and Auditors

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The members of the Board of Trustees are responsible for preparing the summarised financial statements in accordance with the recommendations of the WFWO policy. Our responsibility is to report to you our opinion on the consistency of the summarised financial statements with the full financial statements and the Trustees# Report. We also read the other information contained in the summarised annual report and considered the implications for our report if we became aware of any apparent misstatements or material inconsistencies with the summarised financial statements. Basis of opinion We conducted our work in accordance with International Standards on Auditing issued by the Auditing Practices Board for use internationally. Opinion In our opinion, the summarised financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements and the Trustees# Report of the WFWO for the year ended 31 December 2009. Funding from Supporters to the !WFWO"s activities! WFWO gratefully acknowledges support from our financial partners, private sector corporations, and individuals in 2009. We are enormously grateful to all of our donors,! including those whose gifts under $1.00 Can Make! the Difference.! Every contribution is very important to WFWO.! Funding commitments for 2010/2015! The Establishment of the Resource Mobilizations Team Task Force !Trustee will play an catalytic !role on the future WFWO resources! Keeping our promises:! Your contributions are in good hands! World For World Organization (WFWO), is committed to addressing the vital need for food security, education, drinking water and health, environment. We aim to increase our impact both directly on the ground through our partner organizations, and indirectly by influencing others and promoting best practice in the field in developing countries,! any resources entrusted to us has the potential to be transform on specific projects to be directed to ! rural communities! and population, women, children and families needed.!

Program Services! - Honoring our Partners and Donators in all we do ! The WFWO#s, believes the resources at our disposal are a sacred trust of our partners, donors and supporters! on behalf of the poor. Due to it is our faith that motivates us to serve the poor, we are accountable not only to our partners an donors and supporters! Our! commitment to stewardship means we optimize and distribute resources where they are needed most. Programs and costs are carefully monitored and reviewed, donations and grants are used for their intended purposes, and funds are leveraged for maximum impact. Overhead rate is one of several metrics WFWO uses to evaluate the efficiency of our work.! We also! recognize that Humanitarian programs effectiveness should not be judged by its overhead alone. To successfully carry out our mission of freeing children, women, indigenous and poor peoples around the world from poverty, WFWO regularly monitors and evaluates our programs to! ensure the highest quality and efficiency and evaluations, as per WFWO#s policy and lending! criteria. Resource Governance! In order to increase the transparency and accountability of WFWO, we hereby outline our main practices and!mechanisms on resource governance.! Fund and Project !Cycle Design Management Procedures and Guidelines!! WFWO manages all projects and donations itself and there are rigorous procedures to ensure the proper use of! donations. Before confirming support to a project, WFWO ensures the availability of ministry funding and appraises the project plans and budgets based on the needs assessments. All funding and budget commitments follow WFWO's standard policies and procedures and are monitored by WFWO#s Resource Mobilization Team. After a project is completed, an evaluation is performed to assess the! effectiveness and efficiency of the project for future! improvement as per WFWO#s policy and! procedures guidelines.! Operations Cost Control! Our operations are bounded by strict cost controls. Internal policies and procedures on expenditure are in place to ensure that every dollar raised is properly used. During this past year, only 5% of annual income was spent on! administration and fund-raising, while 85% to up 95% of our income was used for global relief and! sustainable development programs and grants.!

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WFWO's !Success Small and beautiful: WFWO ! is the organization of its kind, promising to ! contribute to the Millennium Development Goals Objectives and support NGOs, CBOs in the provision of quality sustainable development programs, and helping them advocate the development global issues. Responsive: WFWO Team!!has proved it is able to adjust to the changing economic, political and social situations in combining both development and emergency interventions. Trustworthy: WFWO ! has established it- self as a professional, reliable and accountable organization. Through its hard work it has been able to gain the trust of both donors and local partners. Respected: WFWO"s board of directors includes experts in civil society; representatives of umbrella NGO networks and unions; scholars; and private sector representatives. Together, they add value and expertise. Effective:!Since 2002, WFWO has been expanding its operations throughout the least !developed countries; Africa, Asia, Latin America to reach out to the needy, poor and vulnerable, and target NGOs and CBOs of varying capacities. WFWO"s interventions help thousands every year in various on granting and sustainable development ! programs to contribute to ! eight Millennium Development Goals Objectives. Committed: WFWO!is committed to spending its funds in an efficient and transparent manner. Its highly qualified team are dedicated and committed to its values, principles and community needs.

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MAJOR FUNDERS & PARTNERS 2008-2009

" Individual Donors:!

" Executive Board Members:

Paul Bloemendal! See Knai, Eric Goh Elena David Hohepa Charles Fauzia Sharif Fabbri Bruna Maestri Mauro Cheryl Yepez Arash Zahedinia Paulo Azzolini Lesley Truong! Rory Niland Reza Putra! Elkas Miah! Patricia Mwangi! Polly Glover Christhopher Morgan Jamie Johnstone Robert Scott Lance Redpath Kathy Compton! Ciara Kenny! Ash Day! Catherine Lopez Terry Chiu Guillaume Godin! Agnes Malaty! Michael Ashton! Abdullah Al Shafi! Fabrizio Martelli! Anna Kupka! Kathryn Carlisle! Paul McGovern! Sean Doherty! Sebastian Ford! Lucio Piombetti Creeda Mahon Donal O'Dea! Sam Price Florent Carlo Kaiser Mario Spadari Anonymous

WFWO Team Cherif Sidi Alina Clocotan Diego Pizzicaroli Karima Cherif Eric Deneve Fati Wane Georgia Spaccapietra Michelangelo Gressani

" Members: My Huynh Cong Howard Halyard Andrew Gittins Ankit Srivastava Mohamed Cherif Lucio Piombetti Antonio Gianmarco Elisabeth Marascalchi Giorgio Amatucci Davide Cesarini Salvatore Pensabene Reda Bourayou Serban Vornicel

" Goodwill Ambassador for Development Network: Asadullah Khan Md Biozid Jessorey Arm Moghazy Mahitab Mekkawi Benjamin Amankwaa Arjun Dhakal Wendy Ford

" Executive Resource Mobilizations Team: Charles Hohepa Mazen Bitar Rafat Al-Rashidi Maris Abolins Edwin White Adrian Warren

" Foundations: United Nations Federal Credit Union (UNFCU) UN NGO Branch UN NGO IRENE Global Sovereign Squamish Government Matuakaranga Foundation Zayed International Prize Willy Brandt Fondation Ammado Foundation

" Corporations: Google Inc 888 Holding Terra Finance USA Air France CONFIMEA CHIROPRO Italia Lega Pallavolo Seria A Femminile Tally L.P.D. Italy The Best Raffaello Finmarge Counsulting & Travel Siarco I.G.G.P. Italy Cooperlat Acquaphor Financial Institutions (Bank-SG) Medic4All Non Profit Shopping Mall Change Fly for Good Caffe Press El Dorado High Scool, The Petographer Giosport Pro Arte

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Annual Report 2009 WFWO's main !works and objectives !is to contribute !to the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) !to reduce poverty in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) by strengthening local communities, NGOs, CBOs and increasing access to grant program facilities. This Annual Report details its program, management and financial performance in 2009. While management targets were largely met, strengthening WFWO"s operational effectiveness will remain a key priority.! A process of internal reflection since the financial crisis in late 2008 led to refined priorities and resources for WFWO ! for the period 2010-2015, by ! the launched of the Resource Mobilizations Task Force and accords of development !with other financial!partners. These include increasing operational effectiveness, responding to LDC demand for new kinds of support, and strengthening strategic partnerships to contribute to the MDGs targets by 2015.

One World One Hope “We need a solidarity of all, a new assessments and frameworks to protect the right to food; empower women, including by ensuring their access to land, credit and markets; grant facilities for food security; and to strive to meet the MDGs by 2015”

Report and Photos credits This report was prepared by the WFWO Communications team with support from Operation Team of the WFWO. Designed by Communications Team. The WFWO’s 2009 Annual Report uses data, photos and stories from the field visit by WFWO Communications and Operations! Teams in Mexico, Republic of Congo,! Republic of Gabon , Republic Islamic of Mauritania, Republic of Senegal during calendar year 2008/09. Photo description, man, women and children! in! rural area! and WFWO Team in the field of action. Keep up to date !with WFWO at www.worldforworld.org Get Involved: You can !be a Goodwill Ambassador for Development, Friend of WFWO our daily e-newsbulletin has all the latest information on our work around the world to meetings, to updates on our programmes. Sign up online Get involved at www.worldforworld.org! Follow us on Facebook or Twitter WFWO/AR/09/RB Ref. number: AR/E6/09/BT Printed on recycled paper, using vegetable-based inks © World For World Organzation (WFWO) 2010

World For World Organization (WFWO) Executive Secretariat - Via Andrea Millevoi, n°35, Rome-00178 (Italy) Tel: + 39 0651530985 - Fax: +39 0651960227 E-mail: info@worldforworld.org - Website: www.worldforworld.org

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Annual Report 2009  

The World For World Organization (WFWO) is working for the results and is dedicated and concerned to support! NGOs, CBOs and Local Communiti...

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