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Issue 2 • 2012

Departments

Features

President’s Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Great Comebacks ® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Regional News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training . . . . . . . 26

Public Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Member Benefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Member Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

World Ostomy Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Director’s Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Combat Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Cover Story The Society recently launched a membersonly Empowerment section. Learn more about what the section has to offer and how it will benefit you on page 28.

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President’s Letter

President’s Letter Kate Lawrence, MSN, RN, CWOCN President, WOCN® Society

The Wound Ostomy and Continence Society™ (WOCN®) is an Organizational Affiliate of the American Nurses Association (ANA®). This collaboration affords our Society the opportunity to participate and collaborate with other nursing specialty organizations in communications pertaining to nursing practice, public policy and advocacy, and patient centered care issues. This year the Organizational Affiliate group developed key messages to support the ANA Nurse week theme “Nurses: Advocating, Leading, and Caring.” The main themes are as follows:

• Nurses are key to quality care in a transformed health care system. • Nurses’ knowledge and expertise are in demand. • Nurses can influence the health care system. • Every nurse has a role in transforming nursing. • Your professional association is a partner on this journey. Celebrating nursing and the power of nursing is a perfect time to reflect on how the WOC nurse can align their professional practice to influence outcomes within their practice setting. The Society is work-

ing on providing resources, and tools that will assist in building professional value for the WOC nurse.

WOC Nursing and Quality

WOC nurses are a key to quality of care in all settings. The changes in reimbursement, quality measurement, and technology have been met head on by our members. This is clearly demonstrated by the exciting work presented at the WOCN Society’s annual conference and published in JWOCN. Continued on page 4

WOCN Bulletin Board: WOCN Society’s 44 th Annual Conference June 9 – 13, 2012 Fall Scholarship Deadline November 1, 2012 WOCN Society’s 45 th Annual Conference June 22 – 26, 2013 2

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Issue 2 • 2012


WOCN® Society Board and Committee Chairs Board

Committee Chairs

President 2011 – 2013 Kathleen G. Lawrence, MSN, RN, CWOCN Rutland, Vt. etnurse@rrmc.org

Accreditation Committee Jody Scardillo, MS, RN, ANP-BC, CWOCN Albany, N.Y. s4392521@capital.net

President-Elect 2011 – 2013 Phyllis T. Kupsick, MSN, FNP-BC, CWOCN Albemarle, N.C. phylliskupsick@carolina.rr.com

Continence Committee Laurie Callan, MSN, RN, ARNP, CWOCN Clinton, Iowa llcallan@msn.com

Secretary 2011 – 2012 Mary Arnold-Long, MSN, RN, CRRN, CWOCN-AP, ACNS-BC North Charleston, S.C. skinhorse2011@hotmail.com

Development Committee Laurie L. McNichol, MSN, RN, GNP, CWOCN Greensboro, N.C. mcnichol@triad.rr.com

Treasurer 2010 – 2012 Ben Peirce, BA, RN, CWOCN Plantation, Fla. benjamin.peirce@gentiva.com Immediate Past President, 2011-2012 Phyllis Bonham, PhD, MSN, RN, CWOCN, DPNAP, FAAN Mt. Pleasant, S.C. pbonham1@comcast.net

Directors

2010 – 2012 Carole Bauer, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, OCN, CWOCN Detroit, Mich. bauerc@karmanos.org 2011 – 2013 Mary Jo Conley, BSN, RN, CWOCN Hackensack, N.J. mjc998@comcast.net 2011 – 2013 Jennifer Gavin-Hess, BSN, RN, CWON Fremont, Calif. Jennifer.B.Hess@kp.org

Education Committee Shawneen Schmitt, MSN, MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN Menomonee Falls, Wis. sschmitt@ . communitymemorial.com Marketing and . Communications Committee Diane Maydick Youngberg, EdD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN New York, N.Y. drm9016@nyp.org Membership Committee Barbara Dale, RN-BC, CWOCN, CHHN Livingston, Tenn. bdale@ . qualityhomehealth.com National Conference . Planning Committee Joyce Pittman, PhD, FNPBC, CWOCN Indianapolis, Ind. jpittma3@iuhealth.org

National Public . Policy Committee Suzanne Collins, MS, BSN, RN, CWOCN Norcross, Ga. suzanne.collins@ . molnlyckeus.com Nominations Committee Margaret T. Goldberg, MSN, RN, CWOCN DelRay Beach, Fla. margoldb@comcast.net Ostomy Committee Mary Mahoney, BSN, RN, CWON Urbandale, Iowa mahonemf@ihs.org Professional Practice . Committee Sonya Perry, MSN, RN, CWON Charleston, W.Va. sonya.perry@camc.org Scholarship Committee Kevin R. Emmons, DrNPc, RN, CWCN Philadelphia, Pa. ke35@drexel.edu Wound Committee Karen Keaney Gluckman, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWOCN Paterson, N.J. karengfnp@aol.com Wound Treatment . Associate Committee Dorothy Doughty, MN, RN, FNP, CWOCN, FAAN Stone Mountain, Ga. ddought@emory.edu

WOCN® Society Mission The WOCN® Society is a professional nursing organization that supports its members by promoting educational, clinical, and research opportunities to advance the practice and guide the delivery of expert health care to individuals with wounds, ostomies and incontinence. Executive Director Nicolette Zuecca, MPA, CAE nzuecca@wocn.org WOCNews is a publication of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ (WOCN®) 15000 Commerce Parkway Suite C Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054 888/224-WOCN www.wocn.org www.wocnfoundation.org Publication Date: May 2012

2010 – 2012 Regina F. Holmes, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWOCN, CFCN Loris, S.C. rholmes@lorishealth.org www.wocn.org

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President’s Letter

Changes in reimbursement are expected to move health care from a volume driven payment system to a quality outcome focused integrated system. Quality of care in the future of a transformed system places the WOC nurse directly in the forefront. Our expertise in preventive care and management of wound, ostomy and continence issues allows us to be involved and eloquent at the bedside. The future demands that WOC nurses have that same eloquence in the meeting room and the boardroom about the vital role of the WOC nurse in managing the quality of care to meet better outcomes. This change involves moving the specialty nurse from the daily patient care activities, to the management and planning of quality patient care.

tings. We trust this productivity template will enable the practitioner to easily collect information that will inform and support the activities that comprise their The WOCN Society continues to practice. There is also a CNO work hard with the guidance of presentation available for downthe membership, the Board and load that discusses the vital role committees to develop strateof the WOC nurse and access gies and products to assist in to the brochure “Recognize the supporting quality of practice Difference” which highlights the and support the role of the strength of the WOC specialty WOC nurse in health care. Dr. nurse. The most recent salary Bonnie Westra and colleagues and productivity survey is also from the University of Minnesota located in this section, which will have the final analysis of is a vital reference for all memthe the WOCN Society funded, bers to use for benchmarking outcome study looking at the productivity, salary and benefit influence of WOC nursing in information in like settings. organizational and patient outcomes in the home care setFinally, the WOCN Clinical Practing. The results from the study tice Guideline Series are now all will be presented at the WOCN updated with the most recent Society’s annual conference and edition of the Management of published in the JWOCN. Wounds in Patients with LowerExtremity Neuropathic Disease The role of the WOC nurse con- In addition, the Membership (LEND) being finalized this sultant in any setting is perfect Committee developed a new spring. We continue to adhere for demonstrating the care opmembers’ only benefit called to the process of reviewing and portunities and system changes the Empowerment Section updating our guidelines every needed for payment reform op- located on the WOCN website. five years and have our guidetions such as bundled payment Housed in this section are tools lines posted on the National programs for care improvement, to support the member work Guidelines Clearinghouse. With global payments, and account- towards improved professional a five-year review our guidelines able care initiatives. As a nurse practice. The Empowerment are current and well resourced specialist or advanced practice Section includes a data collec- as companion products to adnurse, your role demonstrates tion tool that is Excel based and vise your quality based practice. that chronic disease managemodifiable for different care set-

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ment and prevention can be cost saving and that proper management of acute illness can be cost contained.


WOC Nurse Knowledge and Expertise is in Demand

Now, more then ever the presence of a WOC nurse as an educator is needed. With the function of the WOC nurse specialist being management of care, the support of an informed staff team is crucial for effective practice management and good outcomes. The WOCN Society is launching the Wound Treatment Associate (WTA) Program as an effort to show case the knowledge and expert status of the WOC specialist as well as provide a venue to educate bedside care providers in the basics of wound care in a method that is flexible and timeless. The WOC nurse as an influencer in health care reform is being achieved at the national and local level in small but steady steps. WOC Nurse in Washington occurred this April with leaders from the WOCN Board of Directors and regions and affiliates sharing knowledge and expertise with our Congress regarding patient access to care and supplies. This is the second

year of the program and we are slowly increasing knowledge of our Society leadership in public policy and advocacy issues. The goal over the next year is to harness that knowledge and enthusiasm by building a functional communication system between national and regional and affiliate groups. With health care reform actions looming we will find changes at the state level in funding for our patients. This has already happened in California and New York. It is imperative that we build a supportive resourceful structure for each member to have available when politics come local. The updated WOCN Advocacy and Grassroots Toolkit is now available on the WOCN website and updating and rehabbing our Advocacy web page is underway. We will be posting our Health Care Agenda with linked resources. This Agenda will guide the Society in its Public Policy and Advocacy endeavors and serve as a repository of resources related to our Agenda items. The WOCN Society continues with its alliance with the ANA and have updated the Magnet Recognition and the Role of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurse document to

speak to the role of the WOC nurse in the Magnet journey. We contribute sign ons with ANA and the Alliance and work with ANA regarding requests for participation with NQF. The WOCN Society has a seat at the ANA house of delegates and the Congress of Nursing Practice and Economics where we are well represented by Barbara Sadler, BSN, RN, CWOCN. This fall the WOCN Society will engage in a Strategic Planning Session to develop a three year plan to guide the direction of the organization and resources. It is vital that we have the memberships’ voice at the table as we look to the future. To achieve this, the WOCN Society will be sending out a Member Needs Assessment Survey. I ask you to please contribute to the future of the Society by participating in this information gathering exercise. I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible in Charlotte, and hearing from all of you with our Member Needs Assessment Survey as we learn and continue to build this important profession of WOC nursing.

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Regional News

Updates From the WOC World Baltimore Affiliate Central Illinois The Baltimore Affiliate is workAffiliate ing on a communication tool across the continuum of ostomy patients. The Pressure Ulcer conference was May 17, 2012 at the Crown Plaza in Timonium, Md. Visit our website to learn more: marwocn.org/af-baltimore.html Welcoming new officers: • President: Maria Hardinger • President-Elect: Colleen Simpson • Secretary: Patricia Hynes • Treasurer: Judy Stasuk We’re always looking for new members to join our Affiliate!

Blue Ridge Affiliate

In Central Virginia, the Blue Ridge Affiliate continues to grow deeper and broader. We strengthened our connection to nurses and other professionals working in the field. Members of the Blue Ridge Affiliate participated in programs and meetings with the Mid-Atlantic Region and at the National level. Our most recent meeting occurred May 15, 2012 in Charlottesville, Va. Contact Jane Fellows at dancingdeer.fellows@gmail.com for more information.

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Iowa Affiliate

We awarded the Iowa Affiliate Volunteer Reimbursement Fund The Central Illinois Affiliate teamed up with Southern Illinois to Renee Visser for her volunteer work at Youth Rally 2011 University School of Medicine and its 17th Annual Wound Care and the Iowa Affiliate Education Scholarship to Michelle WenSymposium for their spring zel for her completion of the meeting, which occurred April requirements for certification in 26, 2012 at Memorial Medical wound and ostomy. Michelle is Center. currently employed at St. Lukes in Cedar Rapids.

Central New York Affiliate

The Central New York Affiliate continues to mentor students and WOC nursing students. We continue to plan for WOCN® Society’s and the Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) 2013 joint conference. Past meetings include the planning conference meeting, April 21, 2012 and the spring affiliate meeting, April 27, 2012.

Delaware Valley Affiliate

We are currently planning our regional conference, which will be filled with keynote speakers to educate our WOC nurses, networking opportunities and fun times with our members. The regional conference will be held Oct. 19-21, 2012 in Princeton, N.J. at the Abington Memorial Hospital.

Welcoming new officers 20122014: • President: Barbara Rozenboom • President-Elect: Sandy Rohr Our most recent meeting on April 13, 2012 focused on honoring our mentors and preceptors and to welcome new and potential WOC nurses. The 4th Annual Ostomy Patient Education Day will be held May 5, 2012 in Des Moines providing education and support to people with ostomies. The Iowa Affiliate Annual Fall Conference will be held Sept. 20-21, 2012 in West Des Moines. Visit www. iowawocn.org for more details.

Metro New York

Our affiliate completed the certification review online with Dorothy Doughty. We also planned the events listed below. The


Scholarship Committee will look • The 9th Annual Colon Cancer at the Maureen Dailey ScholarChallenge in Central Park ship Fund for new WOC nurses NYC – April 1, 2012. in the NYC area who completed o Learn more about Lisa a WOCNEP (preliminary stages). Hoberman’s battle with nd • N.Y. Presbyterian 2 Annual colon cancer featured Wound and Vascular Sympoon the NY Colon Cancer sium – March 21, 2012. Challenge website: http:// • N.Y. Hospital of Queens bit.ly/Hxzm5Y (case senOstomy Support Seminar – sitive). March 23, 2012. • Fort Hamilton Army Base • Metro N.Y. Spring Meeting Brooklyn BCAN Bladder Keans Steakhouse NYC – Cancer Awareness Walk – March 29, 2012. May 5, 2012.

• Team WOCN Ostomy Symposium on June 7, 2012 – Maimonides Medical Center and Metro N.Y. – Fort Hamilton Army Base Brooklyn. • “Heal the Healer” wellness program in July (exact date TBD).

Mid-Atlantic Region (MAR)

The MAR has been very active in updating our website. We approved in conjunction with our

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Regional News

webmaster “e-voting.” Many of our affiliates are presenting programs for nurses interested in ostomy and wound care. Our continuing education committee has been busy planning our fall conference. Dot Goodman and Ann Williams are our co-chairs along with the Eastern Shore Affiliate. The Mid-Atlantic Region Fall Conference, Navigating the Changing Tides in Wound, Ostomy and Continence Practice, is set for Oct. 25- 27, 2012 at the Clarion Resort in Ocean City, Md. Visit www.marwocn. org/ for more information.

Northeast Region (NER)

The NER is proud to announce two members will represent NER at the WOC in Washington. NER donated to three charities: • The National Association for Continence and their Danja Fistula Center. • Colon Cancer Challenge in NYC. Many members (specifically from Metro N.Y. Affiliate) made a presence at this event. • Lunch and Learns with CEU’s.

presentation topic. Debbie Siddi and Barry Bontempo are both very active in the NER. The NER Regional Conference, “Learning from our Journey” is set for Oct. 19-21, 2012 at the Princeton Hyatt in Princeton, N.J.

Northwest Region

We planned out events for the year and set a budget to support the plan. We want to regulate activity to support the WOCN® Scholarship fund. We voted on how to handle our scholarship funds and are Manage, Assess, Plan, Interpleased to be pooling with the vene, Train for Health Skin national committee over this. (MAP-IT) is a project aimed to North Central Our new website that is better prevent and treat health care acquired pressure ulcers across than ever. We will continually Region (NCR) add to and update the website. the continuum throughout our The NCR surveyed membership regarding the improvement collaboration of acute and post- Our regional conference at the Portland Marriott Downtown acute care providers. Dawn of our website and regional Waterfront Hotel (easy access Carson and Jamie Tamburino conferences. We will analyze the results shortly. Our regional are part of the kick-off events in from the airport) in Portland, Ore. will be held Oct. 25- 27, conference is set for Oct. 26-27, Blue Bell and Davidsville, Pa. 2012. So far, Tod Brindle and 2012 in Minneapolis. Joyce Black will speak on deep At our last few meetings we tissue injury, among other great discussed a lot of information. North Central speakers. Conference chair, We reviewed the WOCN NER Affiliate Cathie Potts, is working very Bylaws and made recommenThe North Central Affiliate is dations for changes. We plan to hard and almost has everything continuing to provide education poll membership to decide on a ready to submit for the CNE’s. to nursing staffs. topic for an educational presen- We appreciate her hard work as we had a shortfall with part of tation. The May 2, 2012 meetour CNE’s at the Boise confering revealed the educational

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ostomy education and activities that improve the quality of life for the ostomate. The committee will meet on April 14, 2012 to announce the winner. The 2012 Youth Rally will be held July 9-14, 2012 at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colo. The deadline for applications was April 15, 2012. Other than teleconferences and a board meeting this year, our next conference isn’t until February 2013. ence. We remind our membership that those who attended last year may receive a tuition break at this year’s conference if they need the CNE’s for their RN license or for PGP portfolio. Contact Lisa Hansen, lisahans@ sarmc.org, for more information. Sue Thompson, our new youth rally chair, is filled with energy and ideas to pump up new fundraising ideas for the region. She fundraised over Christmas time to raise funds for the cost of travel to the Youth Rally this year.

Pacific Coast Region (PCR)

We just had our annual conference in Napa, Calif. in February. The conference included

a pre-conference debridement workshop and as always, addressed the full spectrum of WOC nursing. At the conference we awarded five lucky members with complimentary registration to the 2013 conference in Pasadena, Calif. Congratulations to the winners: • Michaella Cavarlex-Sarinas • Delphine Davidson-Mangan • Valarie Marron • Linda Minnaugh • Marilyn Magoffin

We keep an active and up-todate website (www.pcr.org). For those who are considering a move to our Region, check out our job postings.

Reno Support Group

Congratulations to Jennifer Lee who became a CWOCN March 16, 2012! Betty Razor joined Shelly Taylor on a missionary trip to Honduras with the goal that nurses in Honduras beWe have four applicants for the come certified in Foot and Nail care. What an adventure! They Gene Galindo Memorial Fund, encourage you to join in next which was established in August 2006 to honor an individual year. Marilee Katz has returned to the fold in Reno. Welcome who was dedicated to improvback, we missed you! ing the life of those with ostomies. The award is to support

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Regional News

This group decided to meet for monthly dinner meetings, with the exception of luncheon meetings during the winter. All meetings are rep sponsored; provide 30 minutes of networking announcements and a one and a half hour presentation (CEU provided by Nevada Nurses Association). We average 20-25 attendees.

Erlinda Tom recently completed a mission to the Philippines. Learn more about her trip at www.rmr-wocn.com. Arizona raised money to donate to the Youth Rally in a memorial fund for Mary Ludwig, a member who recently passed away. Colorado raised $1,068 to the national WOCN scholarship fund. Wendy Miller of Colorado was nominated for the Nightingale Award.

We recently joined Facebook: www.facebook.com/serwocn The SER Annual Conference, WOC Nurses Embracing Change with Southern Grace, will be held Sept. 27-30, 2012 at the Hyatt Regency Savannah in Savannah, Ga.

Tucson Affiliate

We’re always looking for people to join us! Contact Betty Razor at etbetty@sbcglobal.net

The Tucson Affiliate members are busy as usual meeting The RMR Conference will be monthly and providing educaheld Sept. 14-15, 2012 in Phoe- tion to local nurses, students, nix, Ariz. and patients, participating in research and networking with The following RMR members each other. Members also have submitted and presented volunteer monthly to attend the posters: Tucson Ostomy Support Group. • Lindsay Moll and Janie Arndt • Janice Hughes Oct. 8, 2011 was our Fall Con• Judy Madura and Pat Gil ference, which was well re• Pat Gill, Deb Lehker, Judy ceived and attended. We had Madura, and Denise Manley fabulous speakers including

Rocky Mountain Region (RMR)

Southeast Region (SER)

The group decided a long time ago to open our meeting to all RNs, LPNs, PTs, & MDs with interest in the topic. This has increased WOC nurses in the area from three to 14. At the last meeting many non-WOC nurses expressed an interest in the new WOC nursing role.

We enhanced the RMR website to better appeal and meet members’ needs. New forms and information now available online including state events. We restructured the RMR scholarship program and added the WOC Education Program scholarship.

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The SER extended access to Dorothy Doughty’s online certification course for clinicians in the process of recertifying. We will offer SER conference scholarships to three active members and one scholarship to a nurse interested in WOC nursing in an effort to increase membership.

Rinda Moore and Karen Lou Kennedy-Evans. Thank you to the speakers, Tucson membership and our vendor partners who through their hard work made this educational event possible! Marty Cobb and Nancy Tallman are participating in research regarding colostomy irrigation. Both are also involved in a research study on quality of


life for persons with ostomies. Karen Lou Kennedy Evans is participating in research regarding WOCN consensus in the description and management of specific wounds. We would like to recognize Kathy Mehaffey on completion of the Emory University Program. Tonda Franklin and Julie Gilles were nominated as Tucson Fabulous Fifty Nurses.

A big thank you to the previous leadership for all their hard work. We’re always looking for new members to join our affiliate!

Western PA Affiliate

Our last meeting was March 15, 2012. We had a speaker

from Hill-Rom who talked about three of their pressure reducing beds and brought demos to show. Our next meeting is May 17, 2012 where we will have a Vendor Fair. The July 19, 2012 meeting will feature a speaker from 3M. The Sept. 20, 2012 meeting will include Competencies and voting for presidentelect.

We will sponsor a table at the Tucson Healthy Fair, an annual community nurse’s conference held in honor of Nurse’s Week. We will educate regarding our WOC nurse specialty and promote our Pressure Ulcer Workshop and Ostomy Workshop Programs. The Tucson Affiliate is planning on having a table at the WOCN Society’s 44th Annual Conference in Charlotte, N.C. We are also busy planning our next fall conference. Welcoming new officers: • President: Julie Gilles • President-Elect: Kathy Mehaffey • Treasurer: Kay Lehman • Secretary: Anna Braden

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Education

Empowering the WOC Nurse: Role of the Course Coordinator for the Online Wound Treatment Associate Education Program Phyllis Bonham, PhD, MSN, RN, CWOCN, DPNAP, FAAN Immediate Past President, WOCN® Society Phyllis Kupsick, MSN, FNP-BC, CWOCN President-Elect, WOCN® Society Kim Karagosian Director of Marketing, WOCN® Society

Leader. Mentor. Advocate.

titis and skin tears; monitoring and documentation of wound status and response to treatThe ability to provide leadership, ment (including lower extremity mentoring and advocacy are all wounds); principles and prodqualities of the WOC specialty ucts for wound care; ankle branurse. The WOCN® Society’s chial index (ABI) measurement, Wound Treatment Associate calculation, and interpretation; (WTA) educational program will sensory testing with Semmesfurther empower our nurses to Weinstein monofilaments; and improve patient outcomes by application of 4-layer compresenhancing their wound team. sion wraps. Launching this June, the WTA online educational program will give the WOC nurse the ability to coordinate a WOCN Society endorsed wound course in their own facility to enhance the knowledge and skills of their staff (i.e., nurses, medics or corpsmen). Learners will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and skills in the following areas: pressure ulcer risk assessment; pressure ulcer prevention; basic management of incontinence associated derma-

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months to complete the online education module, skills instructions, the online written comprehensive examination, and an evaluation of competencies in clinical skills in simulated experiences.

Role of the WTA Online Course Coordinator

The didactic instruction (i.e., narrated PowerPoint slides and WTA Online review questions) will be preProgram sented online by WOC nurse The WTA online program can specialists who are experienced be presented in any setting, educators to ensure consisunder the direction of a WOCN tency in delivery of the course’s Society approved WOC nurse content. In follow-up discus(see box for eligibility criteria). A sions and group work with facility, group or individual can learners, the course coordinapurchase a two-year license to tors may use additional case the WTA educational course for studies or examples to clarify $2,500 plus an additional $100 areas of the didactic content or registration fee for every nurse address questions from learnthat participates in the program. ers. The online course coordinaWTA participants will have three tors will also be responsible for


Criteria for a WTA Online Course Coordinator 1. 2. 3. 4.

Current member of WOCN Society. Currently certified as CWCN, CWON, or CWOCN. Minimum of one year of clinical experience in wound care, post certification Clinical experience and expertise in the following areas: risk assessment; pressure ulcer prevention; wound management; differential assessment and management lower limb ulcers; ABI measurement, calculation, and interpretation; sensory testing with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments; compression therapy using 4-layer wraps. 5. Strong interpersonal skills. 6. Experience/expertise in small group work and instruction (e.g., participation in staff development programs, new staff orientation, in-service program presentations). the onsite competency evaluaand application of 4-layer tions. Following is a list of recompression wraps. sponsibilities for the WTA Online 5. Evaluation, scoring, and Course Coordinator: reporting of participants’ grades on competency test1. Recruitment and orientation ing (based on established of participants to the online criteria) in the following course. areas: pressure ulcer risk 2. Face to face or conference assessment; pressure ulcer call meetings as needed to prevention plan; wound asreinforce key points and to sessment and management answer any questions posed plan; differential assessment by participants (content and and management of lower discussion to be based on limb ulcers; ABI measuredocuments included in Inment, calculation, and instructor’s Packet). terpretation; sensory testing 3. Assistance to students in with Semmes-Weinstein analysis of clinical practice monofilaments; applicascenarios. tion of 4-layer compression 4. Demonstration and assiswrap. tance/guidance to students 6. Validation of completion of in the correct technique for the theory posttest. ABI measurement, calcula7. Counseling to any partion, and interpretation; senticipants who fail to obtain a sory testing with Semmespassing score on the postWeinstein monofilaments; test or competency testing.

Please note that there will be a “Wound Treatment Associate Train the Trainer” session at the WOCN Society’s 44th Annual Conference in Charlotte, N.C., Saturday, June 9, 2012 from 2-4 p.m. The session will provide an orientation to the role and responsibilities of WTA course coordinators and an opportunity for hands-on practice in the skills that are taught and evaluated during WTA competency testing. Please refer to the annual conference website at: http://2012.wocn.org/

Empowering the WOC Nurse: Leading a Winning Team

Why introduce the WTA program to a facility? The benefits are endless. Patient outcomes improve with more skilled pro-

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Education

viders. Wound treatment associates can extend the services of the WOC specialty nurse to achieve such goals as eliminating avoidable pressure ulcers and preventing wound complications/infections through clinically effective and cost effective wound management by a highly skilled and coordinated team. In addition, by coordinating the WTA online educational program, the WOC nurse will further expand his/her leadership role and enhance the recognition of the expertise and value of nurses to an organization. Lastly, because of the flexible nature of the online technology and conducting the course onsite, the facility will benefit from learners needing less time off from work and substantial savings for travel/housing costs that would be incurred if workers attended an offsite, wound course.

Empowering the WOC Nurse: Leader, Mentor and Advocate

The WOCN Society supports its members in educational activities to advance WOC nursing practice and the delivery of ex-

pert care to persons with WOC needs.

Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing Scope & Standards of Practice (WOCNSSP) The WOCN Society is dediapproved by the ANA and cated to assuring the availpublished by the Society ability of appropriate care (WOCN®, 2010). For example, for individuals with wound, the following standards from the ostomies and incontinence WOCNSSP serve as reminders because patients deserve of the professional obligation to health care that assists them educate others for the ultimate in maximizing their functional goal of achieving positive pastatus. The Society recogtient outcomes: nizes that to fulfill its mission of ensuring access to qualStandard 7. Quality of ity care to growing numbers practice. “The WOC nurse of patients with wound care systematically enhances the needs, there is a need to quality and effectiveness of extend education to other wound, ostomy and contiproviders (WOCN, 2011). nence nursing.”

“WOC nursing adheres to the belief that each nurse is accountable for life-long learning and maintaining current knowledge and skills within the specialty practice” (WOCN, 2010). In addition, WOC nurses are committed to educating other nurses and health care providers to ensure that all patients receive the best possible care. Coordinating an online WTA educational program provides an opportunity for the WOC specialty nurse to demonstrate competency in the standards of practice as outlined in the

Standard 10. Collegiality. “The WOC nurse interacts with and contributes to the professional development of peers and colleagues”: Identifies gaps in knowledge; develops curriculums/programs to meet educational needs; develops evidencebased education programs to standardize delivery of WOC care. Standard 15. Leadership. “The WOC nurse provides leadership in the professional practice setting and the profession”: Engages Continued on page 21

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Great Comebacks ®

Great Comebacks® Recipients Give a Special Thank-You to WOC Nurses In June 2012, Great Comebacks® will honor four regional award recipients at the WOCN® Society’s 44th Annual Conference – and once again their stories of remarkable comebacks from ostomy surgery highlight the important role that WOC nurses play in patient care. One person honored this year, Joanna Burgess, is an ostomy nurse herself! According to Joanna, “WOC nurses have shown me not only how to live with an ostomy but also how life can be lived even better with health and hope. They encouraged me to reach for my dream of becoming a WOC nurse and supported me every step of the way.” Our Great Comebacks recipients Jenn Stahl, Karen Lewis and Randy Henniger thank the WOC nurses who made a positive difference in their recoveries: Jenn Stahl didn’t even want to look at her new stoma, until her WOC nurse joined her and her husband for their first lesson on how to change an appliance. “She made me stronger because she encouraged me to move on with my life. After I met my nurse, I created a list titled

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‘What I can do after surgery’ and hung it in front of my hospital bed. Because of my nurse and the support of family and friends, I was able to fill up the entire poster!” said Jenn.

me that fit great and gave me the courage to travel home. She was not just a nurse, she was my angel,” said Karen.

“When we arrived at the store, I was so upset and panicked that I just broke down and cried in the aisle. The sales woman was an ostomy nurse. She helped me up and put a new bag on

Join Joanna, Jenn, Karen and Randy at the Great Comebacks National Event in Charlotte! Visit www.2012.wocn.org and click Great Comebacks to register.

Only one week after his diagnosis with stage 3 colon cancer, Soon after her ostomy surgery, Randy Henniger was scheduled Karen Lewis went on vacation for ostomy surgery. Thanks to a to Disney World. She had been special WOC nurse, he was releaking the entire trip and ran laxed and calm during this trauthrough her supplies very quick- matic period. “My nurse took ly. When it came time to get on care of my children and many the plane, she had run out of of my relatives who visited. She bags and was frantically calling even gave me sponge baths. medical supply stores until she Because of her, my niece wants found one that answered. to be a nurse!” said Randy.


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Public Policy

2012 WOC Nurse in Washington Rosemary Kates, MSN NP CWOCN How Rosemary Kates and other WOCN leaders prepared for the 2012 WOC in Washington event. On April 16-17, 2012, 12 leaders from regional and affiliate levels of the WOCN® Society will attend the second WOC Nurse in Washington program in Washington, DC, along with representatives from the Society Board of Directors. WOC Nurse in Washington was developed and implemented in 2011 by the Public Policy and Advocacy Committee in collaboration with the WOCN Society’s legislative consultants, Bryan Cave. Due to the success of the 2011 program, the WOCN Society Board of Directors supported repeating the program this year. An important objective for the 20122013 year for the Public Policy and Advocacy Committee is to strengthen the communication regarding public policy and advocacy between the region and affiliate groups and the Society. This is an effort to build a foundation at the state and regional level for patient advocacy and the role of the WOC nurse. It is expected that the WOC Nurse in Washington participants will share what they learn through their ex-

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perience in our nation’s capital at the grassroots levels of our organization. They will be provided with the education for an increased understanding of the political process and the strategies to reach out to effectively communicate with members of the House and Senate, as well as their State representatives. Attendees will fly into Washington, DC on the evening of April 15, 2012 and have a chance to meet and greet each other. Monday is the didactic day with sessions conducted by Chris Rorick and Bill Applegate, the WOCN Society’s legislative consultants. The participants will be provided with education on the “basics” of Washington’s political process, and how to deliver the WOCN Society’s message. Teaching will focus on the current political environment and how it relates to the Society’s Health Care agenda. Time will be provided to discuss conducting a visit in a legislative office with a chance for participants to practice the WOCN Society’s message through role play. Participants are honored this year to have added to our agenda, a presentation by Liana

Orsolini-Hain, PhD, RN, a Robert Woods Johnson Fellow in Public Policy. She will discuss her experiences in the office of the Secretary of Health and Human Services and her role in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Her visit is a step in establishing an understanding of the current focus of HHS.

the WOCN Society’s health care agenda. These issues include patient access to wound, ostomy, and continence supplies, payment reform that will increase patient access to WOC nurse services, and funding for nursing education.

Attendees participated in two conference calls in order to Participants will need to get prepare themselves for the their “walking shoes” on for the WOC Nurse in Washington second day of the workshop! experience; they are reading the Along with our legislative conGrassroots Toolkit, and taking sultants; the participants will go the opportunity to contact a to Capitol Hill for the planned state legislator who represents face to face meetings with legis- their district. It is the hope of lators and their legislative asthe Public Policy and Advocacy sistants. These meetings target Committee that these pre-conthose legislators that lead the ference assignments will better charge in health policy. These prepare them to make the most meetings give the WOC Nurse of the two days in Washington, in Washington participants a as well as serve as practice for chance to introduce themselves their future endeavors in patient to these lawmakers and their advocacy. assistants, identify for them what makes wound, ostomy, The results of the 2012 WOC and continence nursing such a Nurse in Washington experience unique discipline in patient care, will be expressed by regional and relate what services WOC and affiliate participants and nurses as health care providpublished in regional newsleters and patient advocates can ters and in presentations at offer, not only to patients and affiliate functions. Please stay their families, but to the legisla- tuned for their feedback on this tors themselves. We will discuss event! identified “asks” that support www.wocn.org

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Public Policy

Thank You to the North Central Region and the WOCN® Society for Supporting the WOC in Washington Program Rosemary Kates, MSN NP CWOCN Respectfully submitted by Sandy Bentley-Williams, public policy chair for the North Central Region of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™. I was the very fortunate recipient of a scholarship to attend this enlightening and empowering internship (WOC in Washington Program) this spring (April 16-17, 2012). For those of you who have not heard of the program, WOC nurses from across the country gather for an intense day of learning about the legislative process and how to influence public policy followed by a full day of meeting with legislators on Capitol Hill. The future of wound, ostomy and continence nursing is dependent on policy decisions that preserve our practice, our health care facilities and the patients we serve. The focus of our efforts on the Hill this year was on H. Res. 152 which recognizes that since ostomy products are customizable and complex, they should be reimbursed by Medicare as prosthetic devices

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rather than medical supplies. H. Res. 152 also recognizes the value of skilled ostomy specialty nurses (that would be us) who recommend and customize those products. We urged members of congress to co-sponsor this bipartisan resolution while in Washington, D.C. on April 17, 2012. If you have not done so already, I would like to encourage you to take a moment

to read H. Res. 152 and follow up with a brief personal note to your specific senators and representatives encouraging them to sign on as co-sponsors. If you are active in your local UOAA group, please encourage the membership to contact their congressmen regarding this very important resolution. As you are well aware, most private insurers follow Medicare guide-


lines regarding reimbursement. So, this resolution is relevant to everyone who has an ostomy. In addition to soliciting support for H. Res. 152, we asked members of Congress to provide monetary support for the Nursing Workforce Development programs authorized under Title VIII of the Public Health Service Act, for the National Institute of Nursing Research, and for Nurse Managed Health Clinics under Title III of the Public Health Service Act. With so many nurses and WOC nurses

approaching retirement age, there will be limited access to quality nursing care if education and innovation are not supported on the national level. Finally, I would like to encourage WOCN membership to get involved and voice your concerns related to WOC nursing practice to your congressmen and state legislators. They don’t know how you feel about issues if you don’t tell them. Not sure how to go about contacting your public officials? Go to the WOCN website (www.

wocn.org), on the left side of the homepage go to “ABOUT US,” “ADVOCACY & POLICY,” and download the “GRASSROOTS TOOLKIT UPDATED.” This document will give you clear guidance about the most effective ways to communicate with public officials as well as important websites to access. In the near future, there will be a template to make letter writing even easier. Take a peek at the ADVOCACY & POLICY NEWS section on the WOCN website. You will see how our national organization is working for you.

Empowering the WOC Nurse, continued from page 14 as a team member, builder and leader; demonstrates a commitment to continuous, lifelong learning for self and others; directs/coordinates care across settings with oversight of other personnel; promotes communication of information/advancement of the profession through presentations.

further specifics and details are the WOCN Society’s National available about the online proOffice at: wocn_info@wocn.org gram and the qualifications/process for applying to be a WTA References Online Course Coordinator. Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurse Society™. (2010). Wound, ostomy and continence nursing scope & standards of practice. Mt. Laurel, NJ: Author.

As a Society, we continue to look for opportunities to promote our specialty practice and serve our members. Chaired by Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurse Society™. (2011). PosiDorothy Doughty, the Wound tion statement about the role and Treatment Associate Committee scope of practice for wound care For additional information about looks forward to sharing more providers. Retrieved from: http:// www.wocn.org/?page=position_ the WTA Program, please visit information about the WTA Prostatements www.wocn.org/wta. Society gram and if there are any immemembers will be notified as diate questions, please contact

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WOCN ® Conference

What to do in Charlotte, North Carolina Debi Maines, CMP • Director of Meetings, WOCN® Society Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society

Charlotte, also known as the ing surfaces and a 1,100 ft. “The Hornet’s Nest,” offers an Mega Zip line. abundance of activities for you to do while there. Give your • www.discoveryplace.org – brain a break and network on a Explore a popular attraction non-educational level with your in the Carolina’s. Recently fellow nurses by exploring the renovated, Discovery Place beautiful city of Charlotte. The is filled with interactive scifollowing are some inexpensive ence lab stations, deep sea activities we think you will enjoy: aquariums and a digital 3-D theatre. • www.nascarhall.com – The NASCAR Hall of Fame is • www.artsandscience.org open daily 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 – Take a tour of Charlotte’s p.m. Present your attendee public artworks with a downbadge for $3 off the regular loadable iPod walking tour. $19.95 admission price. The Arts & Science Council of Charlotte provides a map • www.epicentrenc.com – to accompany and shows The EpiCentre located just off public art gems like two blocks from the ConvenRaymond Kaskey’s Sculption Center is full of retailers, tures on the Square and Ben restaurants, nightlife and Long’s frescoes. more! The “Alive After Five” is a summer concert series • www.museumofthenewsthat is sure to be a good outh.org – Brush up on your time! history at the Levine Museum of the New South. Ex• www.usnwc.org – Enjoy the perience its award-winning outdoors different from your “Cotton Fields to Skyscrapown backyard at the U.S. ers” exhibit along with others National Whitewater Center. and learn more about the Filled with class III-IV rapids, history of the city. hiking and biking trails, one of the nation’s largest climb24

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• www.dsbg.org – The Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden features 110 acres of themed gardens, 12 sparkling fountains and a visit pavilion. Admission to see this beautiful scenery is only $12! • Visit the SouthPark Mall. Some of the most sought after and luxurious brands at the mall include Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus in addition to favorites like Juicy Couture, Michael Kors, Burberry, Kate Spade and Louis Vuitton. Or get deals at Concord Mills, home to more than 200 outlets and retailers including the only Bass Pro Shops in the Carolinas. Can’t find something on this list that peaks your interest? Visit http://www.charlottesgotalot. com/resources/pdfs/101-thingsto-do-letter.pdf to read more about 101 Things to do in Charlotte. While buzzing around “The Hornet’s Nest,” take pictures of everything you do and share them with the Society. Email them to wocn_info@wocn.org or upload them to Facebook.


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Member Spotlight

3M Excellence in Skin Safety Award Winners Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society The WOCN® Society teamed up with 3M Skin and Wound division this winter for the 3M Excellence in Skin Safety Award. Sponsored by 3M, the company agreed to provide financial support for a team of up to four people to attend the WOCN Society’s 44th Annual Conference in Charlotte, N.C. This award will recognize the significant contributions of an individual or team for creating and sustaining a skin damage prevention program in their facility that has demonstrated positive patient outcomes. The Society announced the competition at the end of January and submissions had to be made by March 16. Twenty-one teams submitted their skin damage prevention programs. Submissions had to include: • An abstract of no more than 650 words describing the facility, program objectives, methods and outcomes. • Sufficient supporting documentation that demonstrated various program elements including:

o Senior management is engaged and committed to the program, o Clinical champion shows strong qualifications and demonstrates leadership of program, o Program has a designated, engaged, interdisciplinary skin team that includes representation from multiple, relevant disciplines, departments, and care settings, o Front line staff is empowered for decision making and accountability, o Program has specific targets and outcome metrics, o Program has specific, understandable, acces-

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sible written prevention protocols, Product formulary is comprehensive, staff accessible, and userfriendly with a process for ongoing review, Program delivers creative and effective staff education, Program delivers creative and effective patient education, and Program shows sustained results for at least one-year post implementation.

The competition was extremely close. Three reviewers analyzed the 21 detailed reports and narrowed it down to one winner; a team of four from Strong Memorial Hospital. Strong Memorial Hospital is a teaching hospital Continued on page 35

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Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training to Treat Urinary Incontinence in Females Linda R. Droste, MSN, RN, CWOCN, CBIS Bridget Mezia, MSN, RN, CWOCN, APRN

A press release from the U.S. Department of Health Agency reported, “A type of exercise called pelvic floor muscle training is effective for treating adult women with urinary incontinence (the involuntary loss of urine) without risk of side effects, according to a new report from the department’s Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).” The report also found that drug-based treatments can be effective, but “the degree of benefit is low and side effects are common.”

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The 1,208 page AHRQ document validates the practice and teaching that wound, osotmy and continence (WOC) nurses have supported for years. WOC nurses teach pelvic floor muscle training to patients as a safe, drug free, natural treatment for women with urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor muscle training helps women to privately and independently treat their urinary stress incontinence. Over time this noninvasive treatment may help to decrease the

fear of public embarrassment, promote self esteem and allow women to function in society without the worry that others will know their guarded secret. General incontinence questions can be easily included during any female check-up/exam. It is easy to ask any female patient benign questions about the number of pregnancies and children they have, previous pelvic surgeries including a hysterectomy, age of menopause, coughing and smoking.


From these general queries, risk factors can be identified and a general segue to ask about lose of urine is provided. Asking a patient about urine leakage with simple activities, coughing, or the need to wear pads for leakage protection allows the WOC nurse to begin teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises that can help to change a patient’s life. During the exam, the WOC nurse shows the patient how to correctly isolate the pelvic floor muscles so that immediate treatment for stress incontinence can be initiated. The wonder of learning the correct exercise technique is that the patient can call and report on her progress without a return trip to the clinic unless needed. Many patients call to offer thanks and to report an improvement in their symptoms. Support and encouragement can be provided by telephone allowing the patient to continue with their daily exercise regimen. Urinary stress incontinence is estimated to affect 15-million adult women in the U.S. This condition is often ignored, overlooked or undiagnosed as a normal part of the aging pro-

Urinary stress incontinence is estimated to affect 15-million adult women in the U.S. [It] can significantly impact the patient as well as the family. cess. Urinary incontinence can significantly impact the patient as well as the family. It is estimated that the cost of incontinence care in the U.S. averaged $19.5 billion in 2004 (AHQR, 2012). With these statistics, it is easy to see the number of females who are affected and deal daily with urinary incontinence. When asked in an interested and nonthreatening manner, most women are more than willing to discuss their incontinence and, as always, are willing to do what is necessary to allow many of them to return to a normal and active life.

It is important to remember how easy it can be to ask general questions to female patients that will help garner information regarding urinary incontinence. Simple questions can allow the WOC nurse to assist the patient in returning to a lifestyle that does not include outings based on the location of public restrooms. Muscle Training Effective in Treating Urinary Incontinence for Women. Press Release, April 9, 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http:// www.ahrq.gov/news/press/ pr2012/muscleuipr.htm

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Member Benefit

Tie it All Together – Strengthen your Development Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society The Merriam-Webster dictionary definition of empowerment is “to promote the self-actualization or influence of.” There are many factors that influence your career, such as education, continuing education, family life, practice setting, and much more. Joining the WOCN® Society gives you access too much of the information you need in order to grow within your role as a wound, ostomy and continence (WOC) nurse.

How else can you feel empowered?

The Society recently announced the launch of its empowerment section for members only. This member benefit is designed to put all materials you need to grow as a WOC nurse in one place, making it your one-stop shop for various tools that can help keep your career on the right path.

The Society will continually add materials to the section. The How does the section is currently comprised Society empower of documents, survey analyses, data collection and more. We you now? gathered this collection of tools The member benefits of the in one place to empower you in WOCN Society add up to strengthen your development - such a way that you can use it to educate others to impact the personally and professionally. delivery of health care for indiFrom position statements and white papers to WOCN Society- viduals with wounds, ostomies and incontinence. accredited educational programs and research grants, the How does this WOCN Society offers multiple products and publications to add up? assist in your career growth. The Society developed this section to be a one-stop shop for information WOC nurses can use to advocate for the profession. Using all of the tools

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allows members to demonstrate the value of a WOC nurse. The Chief Nursing Office (CNO) presentation is a prime example of how members can show the worth of a WOC nurse in their facility. Pulling slides specific to the needs of their practice setting can show the management team how adding this specialty nurse can decrease costs and increase better patient outcomes. WOC nurses will also know the appropriate compensation based on their location and level of expertise through the data collection of the Salary and Productivity Survey. The productivity template justifies adding another FTE to a department. The tools in this section as a whole will help you better your career and work environment as a WOC nurse. A rewarded career as a WOC nurse can positively lead to a rewarding personal life. Visit www.wocn.org, log in as a member and click on the Empowerment section tab.


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World Ostomy Day

World Ostomy Day Margaret Goldberg, MSN, RN, CWOCN Board of Trustees Member, UOAA Past President, WOCN® Society On Oct. 6, 2012 the world community will join together to celebrate World Ostomy Day (WOD). The worldwide campaign is designed to highlight to the general public the challenges faced by ostomates (persons with a colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy) and to improve the reintegration of ostomates worldwide. Many national ostomy associations are conducting public events to celebrate WOD. The United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) provides support in helping to eliminate the ostomates feeling of ‘aloneness’, and speaking with others who have ‘been there’ is both comforting and therapeutic. The information exchange by fellow ostomates, both clinical and practical, encourages the ostomates and helps them experience a better quality of life. The theme for WOD 2012 is “LET’S BE HEARD” and as part of this observance there is a WOD website (www.ostomyeurope.org/Events/WOD-2012/ WOD.htm) and there will be frequent updates of events on the

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UOAA webpage (www.ostomy. org).

allied agencies and professional health associations.

Please join with these committed organizations and ostomates and find a way to lead the WOD celebration in your community. Don’t forget to share that information with the rest of the ostomy community; perhaps you will give ideas to the rest of us. Go to the WOD website and submit a description of your activity for WOD to the webmaster – It could be an educational program, seminars, supporting meetings and demonstrations/displays; electronic information networks, newspaper and magazine announcements/advertisements, and articles. Publication of informative handout materials and brochures: audio and video announcements and films; personal visits and lobbying activities; official government proclamations and joint activities with

Organizations supporting the WOD include:

Ostomy Associations of the Americas (OAA) – North and Central America and Caribbean Ostomy Association (NCACOA) and the Asociación Latino Americana de Ostomizados (ALADO or the South American Ostomy Association). The OAA contact office is situated at the UOAA office in Northfield, Minn., US www.ostomyamericas.org (English) and www.ostomiaamericas.org (Spanish). United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA) – www.ostomy.org, become a member or donate today! United Ostomy Association of Canada (UOA Canada) – www.ostomycanada.ca


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Combat Care

The WOCN® Society is “Joining Forces” to Support the Troops Kim Karagosian • Director of Marketing, WOCN® Society Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society

One percent of Americans may be fighting our wars, but we need 100 percent of Americans to be supporting our troops and their families. Mrs. Obama and Dr. Biden are asking Americans to get involved in any way they can. (www.whitehouse.gov/joiningforces) The WOCN Society recently signed the “Joining Forces” pledge, a comprehensive national initiative, led by the White House and First Lady Michelle Obama, to mobilize all sectors of the community to service Veterans, Military Service members and their families. On the health care front, the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have committed to “touch every nurse” in the country to raise awareness of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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For more than 10 years, our Nation’s veterans, service members and their families have dedicated their lives to ensuring the safety of our Nation. The sacrifices they have made are significant and it is estimated that PTSD and TBI have impacted one in six troops as a result of their service to our country.

The Joining Forces pledge commits the nursing profession to educate current and future nurses on how to recognize and care for veterans impacted by post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other combat-related issues, in ways appropriate to each nurse’s practice setting.

While the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) cares for over 8 million veterans, the returning veteran may or may not have access to the VA experts in their local community. Only 50 percent of returning military receive care in a military or VA system and the rest are cared for in their home communities. Because nursing is the largest health care workforce and is present in every community, nurses care for our military service members, veterans, and their families in every professional setting.

Through a coordinated effort, more than 150 state and national nursing organizations and over 500 nursing schools have committed to further educate our nation’s 3 million nurses so they are prepared to meet the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families. In an April 2012 press conference, Dr. Jill Biden remarked, “This commitment is essential to ensuring our returning service men and women receive the care they deserve.” The WOCN Society is proud to be one of the national nursing organizations committed to this care and education.


Some military service members, veterans and families may avoid seeking care for TBI, PTSD and post combat depression because of a stigma, or because they live far away from military or veterans’ health care facilities. This initiative wants to change that and ensure that nurses in every community have access to the most current, evidence based treat-

ments and resources on PTSD and TBI. Nursing leaders have also committed to disseminating effective models for care and to sharing the most up-to-date information on these conditions across academic and practice settings. By working to expand the body of clinical knowledge in this arena and by partnering

with other health care providers and institutions, nursing leaders across the country will continue to advance high quality treatment for these conditions in every community. For more information, please visit www.whitehouse.gov/joiningforces and www.ANAJoiningForces.org

3M Award Winners, continued from page 24 comprised of three patient care centers. It has 739 beds and is the largest most specialized of hospitals within the western New York region.

The Winners

Cathy Van Houten, BSN, RN, CWON, Wound/Ostomy Nurse, Critical Care Service Nancy Freeland, MS, RN, CCRN, Critical Care Educator The team received a score of 90 Mark Ott, MS, RN, Coordinator for their program, Adult Critical Critical Care Outcomes Care Skin Care. The purpose of Nicole Leach, BSN, RN, Nurse the program is to provide the Leader, Surgical PCU/ICU adult intensive care bedside nurses with around-the-clock Honorable support implementing evidenceMention based pressure ulcer and skin The WOCN Society and 3M injury prevention interventions, would like to congratulate two, wound assessments and apsecond place teams that each plication of topical treatments by creating a highly functioning received a score of 89. The team of nurses. Nurses receive competition was extremely education from the Critical Care close and these teams should WOC nurse and complete “skin be recognized for their hard work to promote skin safety. rounds” on all patients, completing skin, risk and wound assessments with the WOC nurse.

Team 1: Megan Greenman, MS, RN, CCNS, CWCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist Jessica Palmer, MS, RN, FNP, CWCN, Wound/Ostomy Nurse Practitioner Heidi Cross, MS, RN, FNP, CWON, Wound/Ostomy Nurse Practitioner Pat Burnham, BSN, RN, CWOCN, Wound/Ostomy Nurse Team 2: Paula Gipp, BSN, RN, CWOCN, Lead CWOCN – Inpatient Department Mary Beth Flynn, PhD, RN, CNS, CCNS, Research Nurse Scientist Anne Pirzedeh, BSN, RN, CWOCN, Inpatient CWOCN Carol Ruscin, BSN, RN, Senior Quality Improvement Specialist

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Director’s Corner

Director Thoughts Jennifer Hess, BSN, RN, CWON • Director, WOCN® Society

“Oh no! What have I done?” Were my thoughts after becoming the Director at Large Area 1 last June. My life is very similar to all of you – overflowing with commitments to work, friends, parents, husband and children. The commitments of a director (monthly three hour Board call and two monthly two hour committee meetings) seemed to be overwhelming. How would I ever be able to learn all that I needed to know as a director, meet all of these commitments and do them well? I felt very inadequate as I embarked on this leadership position. My fears were alleviated thanks to the guidance and invaluable support of the WOCN® leadership team and National Office staff. They have been great teachers as I have tried to understand the role of the director, oversee the financial decisions and assist with guiding the strategic plan for the organization. I have been impressed with many of our organization’s

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our organization. It is a level of commitment that is rarely seen and exemplified. I am truly humbled by the work that so many are doing to create educational materials, tools and policies in wound, ostomy and continence care.

strengths. Are you aware that our Journal is one of the most respected and trusted sources for wound, ostomy and continence information? Did you know that our membership continues to increase each year? We hope to reach 5,000 members this year. But with all of these accomplishments what has brought me the most inspiration and awe has been the talent and commitment of our volunteers. They are truly the backbone of our organization! The research, dedication to excellence and development of useful products and tools has not only impressed me but every advisor to

I have been amazed at the amount of time, talent and valuable work that is done by all of the volunteers at all levels. The effort continually elevates the success and professionalism of our organization. I have 14 months left in my current term as a director. The strategic planning session that will be held this fall and will help guide the direction of the organization for the next three years. I would welcome any thoughts, comments or constructive suggestions from any members as we prepare for the meeting. I feel so very fortunate to be part of such a valuable organization and I am grateful for the privilege of working with so many talented and dedicated people.



WOCNews Issue 2 - 2012