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Issue 1 • 2012

Departments

Features

President’s Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Regional News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Great Comebacks ® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Combat Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Public Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Member Benefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Director’s Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Member Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Cover Story Recognizing the everincreasing demand for wound care services, including in the military, the WOCN ® Society has identified a need for increased patient access to skilled wound care providers. The Society is pleased to announce a new educational program, the Wound Treatment Associate (WTA) Program. www.wocn.org

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President’s Letter

The Importance of Being Earnest Kate Lawrence, MSN, RN, CWOCN President, WOCN®

One of my favorite plays is a Victorian farce written by Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest. This is a delightful satire on mistaken identity and romance. In the story line the confusion is between the name Ernest and its attachment to two different fellows. The author, Oscar Wilde continues to play with words with the use of Ernest as a name and earnest

(definitely worthy of serious attention) in the title of the play. The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ marked on a campaign to clarify our acronym in an effort to avoid mistaken identity. The WOCN® Society acronym is now a registered trademark owned by the Society. The WOCN® Society acronym is being utilized inap-

“I am sure together, we can continue to work on the clarity, identity and branding of the WOCN ® Society.”

Continued on page 4

WOCN ® Bulletin Board: Nurse Week April 8 – 14, 2012 Early Bird Registration Deadline April 27, 2012 Call for Volunteers Deadline April 30, 2012 Spring Scholarship Deadline May 1, 2012 Housing Deadline May 11, 2012 WOCN ® Society’s 44 th Annual Conference June 9 – 13, 2012 WOCN ® Society’s 45 th Annual Conference June 22 – 26, 2013 2

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Issue 1 • 2012


WOCN® Society Board and Committee Chairs Board

Committee Chairs

President 2011 – 2013 Kathleen G. Lawrence, MSN, RN, CWOCN Rutland, Vt. etnurse@rrmc.org

Accreditation Committee Jody Scardillo, MS, RN, ANP-BC, CWOCN Albany, N.Y. s4392521@capital.net

President-Elect 2011 – 2013 Phyllis T. Kupsick, MSN, FNP-BC, CWOCN Albemarle, N.C. phylliskupsick@carolina.rr.com

Continence Committee Laurie Callan, MSN, RN, ARNP, CWOCN Clinton, Iowa llcallan@msn.com

Secretary 2011 – 2012 Mary Arnold-Long, MSN, RN, CRRN, CWOCN-AP, ACNS-BC North Charleston, S.C. skinhorse2011@hotmail.com

Development Committee Laurie L. McNichol, MSN, RN, GNP, CWOCN Greensboro, N.C. mcnichol@triad.rr.com

Treasurer 2010 – 2012 Ben Peirce, BA, RN, CWOCN Plantation, Fla. benjamin.peirce@gentiva.com Immediate Past President, 2011-2012 Phyllis Bonham, PhD, MSN, RN, CWOCN, DPNAP, FAAN Mt. Pleasant, S.C. pbonham1@comcast.net

Directors

2010 – 2012 Carole Bauer, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, OCN, CWOCN Detroit, Mich. bauerc@karmanos.org 2011 – 2013 Mary Jo Conley, BSN, RN, CWOCN Hackensack, N.J. mjc998@comcast.net 2011 – 2013 Jennifer Gavin-Hess, BSN, RN, CWOCN Fremont, Calif. Jennifer.B.Hess@kp.org

Education Committee Shawneen Schmitt, MSN, MS, RN, CWOCN, CFCN Menomonee Falls, Wis. sschmitt@ . communitymemorial.com Marketing and . Communications Committee Diane Maydick Youngberg, EdD, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN New York, N.Y. drm9016@nyp.org Membership Committee Barbara Dale, RN-BC, CWOCN, CHHN Livingston, Tenn. bdale@ . qualityhomehealth.com National Conference . Planning Committee Joyce Pittman, PhD, FNPBC, CWOCN Indianapolis, Ind. jpittma3@iuhealth.org

National Public . Policy Committee Suzanne Collins, MS, BSN, RN, CWOCN Norcross, Ga. suzanne.collins@ . molnlyckeus.com Nominations Committee Margaret T. Goldberg, MSN, RN, CWOCN DelRay Beach, Fla. margoldb@comcast.net Ostomy Committee Mary Mahoney, BSN, RN, CWON Urbandale, Iowa mahonemf@ihs.org Professional Practice . Committee Sonya Perry, MSN, RN, CWON Charleston, W.Va. sonya.perry@camc.org Scholarship Committee Kevin R. Emmons, DrNPc, RN, CWCN Philadelphia, Pa. ke35@drexel.edu Wound Committee Karen Keaney Gluckman, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWOCN Paterson, N.J. karengfnp@aol.com

WOCN® Society Mission The WOCN® Society is a professional nursing organization that supports its members by promoting educational, clinical, and research opportunities to advance the practice and guide the delivery of expert health care to individuals with wounds, ostomies and incontinence. Executive Director Nicolette Zuecca, MPA, CAE nzuecca@wocn.org Assistant Executive Director Vincent Gangemi III vgangemi@wocn.org WOCNews is a publication of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ (WOCN®) 15000 Commerce Parkway Suite C Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054 888/224-WOCN www.wocn.org www.wocnfoundation.org Publication Date: March 2012

2010 – 2012 Regina F. Holmes, MSN, RN, FNP-BC, CWOCN, CFCN Loris, S.C. rholmes@lorishealth.org www.wocn.org

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President’s Letter

propriately by our members, our industry partners and in publications. This misuse although innocent and unintended is placing the Society at risk for being responsible for actions and activities that are not sanctioned neither by the Society nor under the purview of the Board of Directors. I draw your attention to the accompanying Position Statement regarding WOCN® Society’s registered trademark guidelines. This document was created by the Society in collaboration with the Wound, Ostomy Continence

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Certification Board (WOCNCB®) who share many of the same letters as the Society in title and acronym. The letters “WOCN®” have come to mean several things in our current professional culture. Trade marking the acronym is in the legal best interest of the Society to avoid mistaken identity. But identity is important for all of us in different ways! We know from our work defining the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, having a clear identity is vital for the


profession gaining us recognition as a specialty practice in all elements of our scope of care. Our identity as a Society is also closely linked to our branding and name which is linked to our acronym. Success in our efforts to market our “brand” includes marketing our professionals, so the importance of clarity of identity is paramount for both the Society and to each of our members who provide wound, ostomy and continence care. The Board of Directors understand that efforts to avoid using “WOCN®” as a term for

a professional role may be a distinct change for some of our professionals and we turn to our Scope & Standards of Practice and offer WOC nurse as an option for role description, or to our sister organization WOCNCB® with their credential options as an assist in describing role. Indeed this is a subject worth serious attention. I am sure together, we can continue to work on the clarity, identity and branding of the WOCN® Society and the profession which will lead to a very happy ending!

www.wocn.org

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Regional News

Southeast Region (SER)

Save the date: Sept. 27-30, 2012, Savannah, Ga. The Georgia Conference Planning Committee under the direction of Conference Co-Chairs Merrill Frasier and Cynthia Timms is organizing a spectacular four day conference. Many nationally renowned speakers have already committed to speak at this event. Encourage your nonmember colleagues to join WOCN® Society. Mark sure to mark your calendar and join us! Let’s make this conference the biggest and best attended ever.

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Go to www.serwocn.org for the latest conference information. Our very own Joanna Burgess, RN, CWOCN was named the 2011 Great Comebacks South Region Award recipient. She was presented with this award at the last SER WOCN® Conference. Congratulations Joanna.

St. Louis Affiliate

The St. Louis Affiliate held a regional conference on Oct. 4, 2011 at St. Louis University Eric P. Newman Center, 100 nurses attended earning 6.5 CEU credits. Topics at the conference included Wound, Ostomy, and

Legalities. The election of Chapter officers for the 2012 term include: Janette Ditzler continuing as President, Pam Bowman incoming secretary, and Roxy Lupien incoming treasurer. Thank you to retiring Secretary Kay Gundy and Treasurer Linda Newberry, your hard work and dedication to make the St. Louis Affiliate successful is very much appreciated by the members!

Northwest Region The 2012 regional conference is set for Oct. 25-27, 2012 at the Marriott downtown Portland. Cathy Potts is serving as chair. The Northwest Region website


www.nwregionwocn.org is up and running. We ask that each chair and board member update their job description to make it easier for new members to serve and enhance their experience. We are looking for a legislative contact and chair who would keep our region posted on new legislative actions that may impact us as nurses. They would also help with mentoring and membership activities. If interested, please contact a board member (http://www.nwregionwocn.org/about/officers).

We are saying farewell to board member, Martie Hawkins. She did a fantastic job with our Youth Rally Committee. We appreciate her many years of service! Sue Thompson will move into this position as we change the role to fundraising chair to focus on youth rally, scholarship, and all fundraising activities.

Iowa Affiliate

Our 13th Annual Fall Conference was held Sept. 15-16, 2011. We had a nice mix of local and national speakers that covered a variety of topics. The group recognized the attendance and

support of our corporate vendors by presenting them with certificates of appreciation. Without their participation, fall conference would not be possible. Mary Gloeckner, CWOCN from the Quad Cities received the Iowa WOC Nurse of the Year Award for 2011. Mary has been an active member of the Iowa Affiliate for many years and currently serves on the WOCNB速 Board. Congratulations Mary! New officers for 2012-2013 were announced. Barb Rozenboom will assume the office of president in January and Sandy Rohr was elected to the office of president-elect. Our very popular Ostomy Education Day, offered to people with ostomies, will be held on Saturday, May 5, 2012 in Des Moines. Visit our website for details: www.iowawocn.org

Blue Ridge Affiliate

The Blue Ridge Affiliate was resurrected in October 2011 and our next meeting is Jan. 24, 2012. We have been networking to expand our reach into the Central Virginia community and to include all practitioners working in the field. Within this large group, only a few of us know each other. Our next meeting

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Regional News

we will focus on learning more about each other and the practice setting in which we all work. In addition, we will talk about ways to better coordinate care between the practice settings. We will have participants from Acute Care, Long-term Acute Care, Rehabilitation Facilities, Skilled Nursing Facilities, Nursing Homes, Out Patient Care, Home Care, graduate students in the WOCN® Program, and community members who serve on a local initiative to prevent pressure ulcers. We are very pleased to see the interest and enthusiasm that our group is generating and are looking forward to 2012.

Rocky Mountain Region (RMR)

Western Maryland Eastern Shore Affiliate Affiliate The Western Maryland Affiliate wishes all a very happy and prosperous new year!!!

We finished off the year with a very successful regional fall conference in the beautiful mountain resort of Rocky Gap in Flintstone, Md. Many timely presentations were provided and we were fortunate to have wonderful speakers such as Courtney Lyder to educate and entertain us! Many industry representatives were on hand to show new products and provide education to help us provide the best care options to the patients that we serve.

The affiliate is very sad to have lost our friend and colleague, Over this past Holiday Season, Jane Carson, RN, CWOCN. Jane was a WOC nurse at Winthe RMR raised over $800 for chester Medical Center in Winscholarship funding. The RMR plans to help send a child to os- chester, Va. She had a passion tomy camp this year with some for WOC nursing and was active in the affiliate as treasurer. Jane of the funds raised. was a fun loving person and a The RMR Conference Planning wonderful WOC nurse. We will Committee is planning our next all remember her fondly and miss her very much. regional event to be held in Phoenix, Sept. 13-15, 2012. Our focus will be on advancing the professional role of the WOC nurse.

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Out with 2011 and in with 2012...the Eastern Shore Affiliate has an exciting new year planned. We celebrated our Christmas Party with Abbott Nutrition at Abbott’s grille on Dec. 16, 2011. The meal and education was exceptional and the picture provided is from the dinner/presentation. This year, we are hosting the 2012 MAR conference, Oct. 2528, 2012, at the Clarion Resort Hotel in Ocean City, Md. Planning has started, and we are excited about our speakers and the education we will provide the participants and the communities we serve. We hope to see you there! We hope that more local nurses will continue their education and pursue their certification as a CWOCN. We are always looking for new members to mentor and join the Eastern Shore Affiliate.

Mid-Atlantic Region (MAR)

The MAR wishes everyone a Healthy and Happy 2012. We have a vibrant region with ongoing communication between


our affiliates. Check out our new Legislative: Barry Bontempo, BSN, RN, CWCN, COCN, CN website: www.marwocn.org Our fall conference at Rocky Gap, Md. was a tremendous success – sold out! Kudos to the conference chairs: Ann Roney, Dot Goodman, and the Western Maryland Affiliate for their continued commitment to excellence. Congratulations to Cindy Walker, 2011 MAR WOC Nurse of the Year. Sue Currence was elected member-at-large for fundraising. Mary Haddow was re-elected treasurer.

Congratulations to GSA member, Cheryl Isgrow, in receiving her Master of Science in nursing degree as an Adult Acute Clinical Nurse Specialist through Liberty University.

Capitol Region Affiliate

Our group hosted our regional conference in October with a wonderful turnout. An early Northeaster dropped snow and frigid temperatures on the first day of conference. Despite bad roads and scary trips everyone We lost one of our peers in came and enjoyed. Our first December. Jane Carson worked meeting for the 2012 year is in at Winchester Hospital and February. We will be focused on was also treasurer of the Westclinical sharing. ern Maryland Affiliate. May her memory be a blessing.

We lost one of our peers in December. Jane Carson worked at Winchester Hospital and was also treasurer of the Western Maryland Affiliate. May her memory be a blessing.

Baltimore Affiliate

Garden State Affiliate (GSA)

Congratulations to the newly elected GAS officers serving 2012-2014 terms: Trustee/President: Debra Siddi, BS, RN, CWON New Secretary: Stephanie D’Andrea, BS, RN, CWOCN New Treasurer: Barry Bontempo, BSN, RN, CWCN, COCN, CN

tinence Care.” Attendees were enlightened with new knowledge and the latest research as well as validated current knowledge. The Muhammad Ali Center was the highlight of Friday evening activities. Attendees Mideast Region were able to tour the facility. (MER) The Great Comeback’s program Louisville, Ky. was host to the was the dinner feature. Grand 2011 regional conference of the Rapids, Mich. will host the 2012 MER: “Be the Greatest Champi- MER conference. ons for Wound, Ostomy, ConThe Baltimore Affiliate will have new officers for 2012: President Maria Hardinger, President-elect Colleen Simpson, and Secretary Pat Hynes.

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Regional News

Several members of MER were recognized. Elaine Rogozan a WOC nurse was recognized for her dedication to her profession and the patient population and received the MER Manufacturer’s Representative Award. Stephanie Kearney was recognized for her dedication to WOC nursing and her patient population, receiving the MER Shining Star of the Year Award.

developing a strategic vision for a research nursing department in a premier clinical research hospital. Our New York Affiliate once again invites all WOC nurses to come and join them for the 2012 Colon Cancer Challenge run/walk, April 1, 2012 in Central Park.

Save the date: NER regional Results of the MER Election: conference Oct. 19-21 2012, in Deanna Boyd, reelected as trea- Princeton, N.J. surer; newly elected trustees: Sue Kohl and Monica Koch; Ce- Congratulations to the New cilia Krusling new government NER Officers! affairs chair and Michele Kessie became webmaster. President Michelle C. Quigel, BSN, RN, CWOCN; PresidentElect Vashti Livingston, MS, Northeast CNS, CWOCN; Website CoorRegion (NER) dinator Bill Falone, MSN, RN, The NER would like to congratCWOCN ulate: Juliet Poyser – winner of the New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia Nursing Leader- North Central ship Winner; Mary Brennan – for Region (NCR) concluding her joint research Congratulations to Sandy project titled “Prelude to Death Bentley-Williams, NCR’s newly or Practice Failure,” which has appointed public policy chair! been accepted for publicaThe NCR initiated a drawing to tion in the journal of Hospice promote new members. Weland Palliative Medicine; Diane come and congratulations to Maydick – on her new role as 2011 new member Julie NiederCNO at Rockefeller University meyer from Wisconsin who won Hospital. This is an opportunity an all expenses paid trip to the for Diane to use her creativity in 2012 NCR regional conference!

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“Louisville, Ky. was host to the 2011 regional conference of the MER. Attendees were enlightened with new knowledge and the latest research as well as validated current knowledge.”


Pacific Coast Region (PCR)

The PCR enjoyed their annual conference this year in the beautiful Napa Valley, Calif. at the Embassy Suites on Feb. 10-11, 2012. The attendees also participated in a pre conference debridement workshop which was held on Thursday, Feb. 9. The speakers will cover topics associated with wounds, ostomies, and continence. The attendees also met with vendors on Friday, Feb. 10. Our next conference will be held in southern California. Please watch our website for details.

Hampton Roads Affiliate

The Hampton Roads Affiliate congratulates Kristyn Fox, CWCN, and Ginny Armstrong, COCN on having passed their certification exams and acknowledges the contribution of an excellent poster presentation entitled “Fistula Management of Complex Wounds” by Corrine Alvey, RN, CWOCN and Kathy Merkh, RN, CWOCN at the MAR WOCN® Conference in Maryland this fall. For Thanksgiving this past year, we donated $500 to the Hampton Roads Food Banks. u

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Education Furthering WOCN® Society’s Mission of Being the Premier Provider of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Education – Introducing the Wound Treatment Associate Program

Kim Karagosian • Director of Marketing, WOCN® Society Phyllis Bonham, PhD, MSN, RN, CWOCN, DPNAP, FAAN • Immediate Past President, WOCN® Society Dorothy Doughty, MN, RN, FNP, CWOCN, FAAN • Wound Treatment Associate Committee Chair, WOCN® Society Phyllis Kupsick, MSN, FNP-BC, CWOCN • President-Elect, WOCN® Society

Recognizing the ever-increasing demand for wound care services, including in the military, the WOCN® Society has identified a need for increased patient access to skilled wound care providers. The Society prides itself on being the premier provider of wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) education, and in response to the need for more skilled nurses providing wound care, the Society has developed a new educational program for the non-specialty provider.

the program, the wound treatment associate will receive a certificate of completion and be an integral and valuable team member. As WOC nurse extenders, they will have the WOCN® Society approved education to enable them to assist with daily patient monitoring, pressure ulcer prevention, and basic wound management.

You see your opponent, think about the desired outcomes ahead, and formulate a plan that will result in a victory. To have a victory under your belt in chess, you need to utilize your pieces in the most strategic way.

The wound treatment associates are the pieces that will help you care for your patient. Let’s relate That in essence is what the WTA to a WTA Program is about. It is chess game… an educational course in basic ® The art of chess strategy conwound care, taught by a WOC The WOCN Society is proud to sists of formulating a plan, nurse, aka the “chess master.” present the Wound Treatment thinking a number of moves The wound treatment associate Associate (WTA) Program. ® ahead, and arranging the pieces will not become a chess master WTA is a WOCN Society ento best outwit your opponent. by completing the WTA Prodorsed wound care educational As a WOC specialty nurse, gram, but he or she will become program geared to non-Bachyou are the chess master, and an important member of the elor of Science degree nurses “winning team” and will contriband medics. After completion of the wound is your opponent.

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provided in any setting, under the direction of a WOCN® Society approved WOC nurse. Major content areas covered through the WTA Program include:

vention, basic management of incontinence associated dermatitis and skin tears, documentation of wound status, application of a four-layer compression wrap, and measuring an ankle brachial index.

• Role and responsibilities of the wound treatment associute significantly to positive cliniate (WTA). cal outcomes. Wound treatment • Strategies for maintaining associates will obtain valuable healthy skin and preventing education and skills that prepressure ulcer development. pare them to work under the • Basic wound healing physidirection of a WOC advanced ology and implications for practice registered nurse, WOC wound management. specialty nurse or physician. • Monitoring and documenting The WTA Program also provides wound status and response for enhanced recognition of the to treatment. “value” of WOC specialty nurs- • Principles and products for es (i.e., masters of the game), wound care. who can lead and facilitate the • Leg ulcer management. program in their own settings. • Nutritional support.

For additional information about the WTA Program, please review the November 2011, Wound Treatment Associate Webinar and the Role & Scope of Practice for Wound Care Providers: Position Statement that are available on the home page of the Society’s website at: www. wocn.org. Society members will be notified as further specifics and details are available about the regional event, the online program, costs, and the qualifications/process for applying to be a WTA Program facilitator.

Registered nurses, licensed practical/vocational nurses or military medics can take part in the WTA Program in one of two ways, either by attending the WOCN® Society’s first regional event, May 7-11, 2012 at Indiana University Health Center – Methodist Hospital, or by participating in an online educational program followed by on-site competency evaluations; these online/on-site programs can be

As a Society, we continue to look for opportunities to promote our specialty practice and serve our members. Chaired by Dorothy Doughty, the Wound Treatment Associate Committee looks forward to sharing more information about the WTA Program and if there are any immediate questions, please contact the WOCN® Society’s National Office at: wocn_info@ wocn.org u

Please note that the WTA Program is not a certification program. It is a continuing education course offering contact hours upon completion. To receive the completion certificate and contact hours, learners must pass a written comprehensive posttest and satisfactorily demonstrate competency (i.e., in clinical simulations) in the following skills: performing risk assessment, pressure ulcer pre-

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Conference

Live from Charlotte Debi Maines, CMP • Director of Meetings, WOCN® Society Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society Once again, the WOCN® Society will be streaming annual conference sessions live from the WOCN® Society’s 44th Annual Conference in Charlotte! For those of you unable to attend conference, this is an excellent opportunity to stay connected to the conference and receive the quality education you need to advance your practice. You can earn 1.0 contact hour for each hour of education that is presented, live. And best of all…thanks to the generous support of ConvaTec, Inc., the WOCN® Society is providing these LIVE webcast sessions free of charge! Sunday, June 10, 2012 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. GS (1.0 Contact Hour): The WOC Nurse’s Role in Leading the Charge to Improve Health Care Linda Burns Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. GS (1.0 Contact Hour): Healthcare Reform: Impact on Performance Measurement and Hospital Reimbursement Katherine Wallace, RHIA

1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. GS: (1.5 Contact Hours) Research Paper Presentations (Oral Abstract Presentations) • Staff Nurse Confidence and Barriers in Caring for Ostomy Patients o Heidi H. Cross, MSN, RN, FNPBC, CWOCN • Ostomy Complications and Associated Risk Factors: Development and Testing of Two Instruments o Joyce Pittman, PhD, FNP-BC, CWOCN • Symptom and Environmental Cues Related to Urinary Urgency and Urinary Urgency Incontinence o Kathleen A. O’Connell, PhD, RN, FAAN • The Efficacy of Gum Chewing in Reducing Postoperative Ileus o Janet Doyle-Munoz, BSN, RN, CWON

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In order to receive credit for attending We will live stream the sessions listed these LIVE sessions, you must view below. the session live, as it is being broadcast. If you register to attend the live Key broadcast, but for some reason are General Session not able to attend during that specific GS time, you will be able to attend the W Wound Track session, for credit, at a later date in O Ostomy Track 2012. After their live broadcast, each C Continence Track webcast session will be re-purposed ® as an enduring activity on the WOCN PP Professional Practice Society’s continuing education website. All times are listed in EDT. More information will be posted on 2012.wocn.org as it becomes available. u •

Ear Pulse Oximeters as a Cause of Pressure Ulcers o Teresa Goodell, PhD, RN, CNS, CCRN, ACNS-BC

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. W (1.0 Contact Hour): Biofilms: A Micro-Revolution Randall Wolcott, MD

4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. PP (1.0 Contact Hour): Mining the Research Gold: “Treasure” in Your Own Backyard Janice Beitz, PhD, RN, CS, CNOR, CWOCN, CRNP Barbara Dale, RN, CWOCN, CHHN Colleen Drolshagen, RN, CNS, CWOCN Laurie McNichol, MSN, RN, GNP, CWOCN

Monday, June 11, 2012 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. C (1.0 Contact Hour): Tubes Beyond the Indwelling Urethral Catheter Diane Newman, DNP, FAAN, BCB-PMD

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. O (1.0 Contact Hour): Prevention and Management of Peristomal Hernias Kathryn Baxter, MS, FNP-BC, CWOCN Janet Rafferty, MD

2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. GS (1.0 Contact Hour): Moisture Associated Skin Damage in the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Patient Janice Colwell, MS, RN, CWOCN, FAAN Mikel Gray, PhD, CUNP, CCCN, FAAN Karen Lou Kennedy-Evans, RN, FNP, APRN-BC

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. W (1.0 Contact Hour): Management of the Post-op Open Abdominal Wall Wound C. Tod Brindle, MSN, RN, ET, CWOCN

4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m. C (1.0 Contact Hour): Continence Primer Dorothy Doughty, MN, RN, FNP, CWOCN, FAAN

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

GS (1.0 Contact Hour): Empowerment by Policy and Reimbursement Kaye Martin, RN

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

O (1.0 Contact Hour): Norma Gill Lecture: Sexual Recovery after Ostomy Surgery Cindi Mosher, MSN, RN, ANP

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

W (1.0 Contact Hour): LEND Guidelines Penny Crawford, MSN, RN, FNP, BC, CWOCN

O (1.0 Contact Hour): Prevention and Management of Gastrointestinal Fistulas Richard Miller, MD

* You can only earn contact hours if you view the session live.


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Public Policy

Examining Reimbursement for WOC Nursing Services Janice C. Colwell, MS, RN, CWOCN, FAAN Chair, WOCN® Reimbursement Task Force In 2009, the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™ Board of Directors developed a strategic plan to guide the Society for the following three years. This ambitious plan included a mandate for the National Public Policy Committee to develop an action plan and a section of this mandate included the following: “Expand reimbursement for WOC nursing services.” A task force of the WOCN® Society’s members from the National Public Policy Committee, as well as, past leadership was called into action to address a work plan to meet the mandate of expanding reimbursement opportunities for WOC nursing services.

searched, and examined current reimbursement opportunities and road blocks. Two issues became clear: one being that reimbursement for some services a WOC advanced practice nurse provided was available in The National Public Policy Com- some settings and some locamittee Chair Suzanne Collins tions and reimbursement for directed the group in a discusnon-advanced practice nurses sion of tactics and opportunimight be available under “inties for WOC nurses to seek cident to billing.” Thus, two reimbursement. The Reimburse- fact sheets were developed to ment Task Force membership introduce these topics to the included Chair Jan Colwell, Sue WOCN® Society membership Hill, Cecilia Krusling, Phyllis as a starting point to examine Kupsick, Nancy Scott, and Leg- billing issues within one’s own islative Consultant Chris Rorick. work environment. The task force discussed, re-

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The Reimbursement of Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Services: Fact Sheet can be found in the Member Library, Public Policy section. The fact sheet is intended to provide an overview of reimbursement and issues related to billing for Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) services. This 20 page fact sheet contains many issues related to reimbursement for APRN services, covering Medicare billing regulations (many insurers will follow Medicare guidelines, but insurers may regulate reimbursement in their own way). Keep in mind that the regulatory environment


is complex and this fact sheet contains the best interpretation of the APRN reimbursement issues as of the date it was written. We hope that it will provide a starting point for the APRN to become acquainted with billing issues.

tion, and certification are necessary components of an overall approach to preparing an APRN for practice; the licensing boards governed by state regulations and statutes are the final arbiters of who is recognized to practice within a given state. It is therefore not a guarantee that The following is a brief synopall APRNs have the ability to sis into what is contained in bill; the first step in working on the APRN reimbursement fact billing issues is an examination sheet. of the state regulations in the state or states where one will Reimbursement for APRNS may practice. be done if the APRN has the legal authority under state law to Medicare defines an APRN with perform the service to be billed the following qualifications (a (“Balanced Budget,” 1997). more comprehensive definition The American Nurses Associa- will be found in the fact sheet): tion (http://nursingworld.org) definition of an advanced prac- • Is an RN currently licensed tice nurse is: “The APRN has to practice in the State a master’s or doctoral degree where he/she practices and concentrating in a specific area is authorized to furnish the of advanced nursing practice, services of a CNS or a NP in had supervised practice duraccordance with State law. ing graduate education and has • Has a master’s degree or ongoing clinical experiences. doctor of nursing practice APRNs include clinical nurse in a defined clinical area of specialists, nurse practitioners, nursing from an accredited nurse anesthetists, and nurse educational institution and midwives” (http://nursingworld. • Is certified as a CNS or NP org). While education, accreditaby a recognized national cer-

tifying body that has established standards for CNSs and NPs. In order to bill Medicare, the APRN must obtain a national provider identifier (NPI), which is used for payment and must enroll in the Medicare program to be eligible to receive Medicare payment for covered services. APRN services covered must be medically necessary and reasonable, performed in collaboration with a physician (depending upon state law), and are the type of services considered physician services. The services provided by the APRN can be in the outpatient area or in the inpatient setting. The hospital can bill for the APRNs services if the salary and benefits of the APRN are not reimbursed under the hospital’s cost report. The hospital cannot bill Medicare if the APRN’s salary is being reimbursed under Part A of Medicare (“Balanced Budget,” 1997; Buppert, 2007). The Reimbursement of Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Services: Fact Sheet will

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Public Policy

provide you with background information on the acquisition of billing privileges for APRNs, further define the APRN, speak to credentialing and privileging, briefly cover current procedural terminology codes and cover charting issues related to billing.

(Medicare Benefit Policy Manual, 2011). The provider must initiate a course of treatment (develop the plan of care) and the service of providing the follow up care, assisting in providing the plan of care is done by the auxiliary staff (for instance a non APRN WOC nurse). The The Understanding Medicare provider can include an APRN, a Part B Incident to Billing: A Fact physician, and other providers. Sheet can be found in the Mem- The services provided must be ber Library, Public Policy secdelivered under the provider’s tion, covers issues involved in direct supervision; the provider Medicare Part B billing that may must be in the area where the be considered for use in billing care is delivered and available wound, ostomy and continence to provide assistance and sunursing services in the outpapervision. Certain requirements tient setting. “Incident to” billmust be meet (in addition to ing maybe considered to cover the ones previously mentioned the services provided to an – see Understanding Medicare outpatient by a non-advanced Part B Incident to Billing: A Fact practice nurse (or auxiliary per- Sheet) and reimbursement is sonnel). The services could be based upon 100 percent of the provided by auxiliary personnel providers fee schedule amount. and billed under a provider’s national provider number. Incident The purpose of the article was to the provider’s professional to introduce you to the content services means that the servic- in both fact sheets. The two es are furnished as an integral, fact sheets developed by the although incidental part of the Reimbursement Task Force providers’ professional services should serve as a starting point in the course of diagnosis or for you to begin to understand treatment of an injury or illness the issues involved in seek-

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ing reimbursement for wound, ostomy, and continence services. The fact sheets include the best information available at the time of development and are not meant to be a final official document; rather they will be reference sheets to begin to seek out reimbursement opportunities in various care settings. Both sheets contain numerous citations as well as further reading on the subjects. I encourage you to seek out the fact sheets to further clarify what you have read in this article.

References: Balanced budget act of 1997. (1997). Retrieved from http://www.gpo. gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-105publ33/ pdf/PLAW-105publ33.pdf Buppert, C. (2007). Billing for nurse practitioner services-update 2007: Guidelines for NP’s, physicians, employers and insurers, Medscape nurses. Retrieved July 26, 2010, from http://www.medscape.org/ viewarticle/562664_print Medicare Benefit Policy Manual. (2011). Chapter 15, Section 60.1. In Medicare IOM publication 10002. Retrieved from https://www. cms.gov/manuals/Downloads/ bp102c15.pdf u


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Great Comebacks ®

Introducing the Great Comebacks® Regional Recipients This past fall, Great Comebacks® proudly recognized the accomplishments of the four 2011 Regional Award recipients at WOCN® Society conferences across the country. You are invited to join the National Awards Event on June 9 in Charlotte to hear more about their inspirational stories of hope and encouragement. Read more about the four 2011 Regional Award recipients below:

Joanna Burgess, RN, Apex, N.C.

An ostomy journey of 45 years began when Joanna, only three, was diagnosed with bladder cancer and urostomy surgery saved her life. Certified in 2008 as a WOC nurse, newlywed Joanna is now establishing an outpatient ostomy clinic where she works. “Sharing your story is important,” she says, “because it not only gives hope and healing to others, it also helps you heal yourself.”

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Randy Henniger, Folsom, Calif.

When he was only 30 years old, recently married and the father of two boys, Randy was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer. One week after his diagnosis, he underwent colostomy surgery that would save his life. Today he serves as a mentor to other patients and their families and as a surf coach for many service members with special challenges.

Karen Lewis, Brighton, Mich.

“I knew if I could run marathons, I could beat colon cancer,” says Karen. Since her ileostomy, Karen has remained cancer-free and now she inspires others to run for good health or a good cause. In 2011 she co-founded the American Cancer Society’s Feet and Friends Fighting Colon Cancer run/walk event, which had 564 participants and raised over $60,000!

Jenn Stahl, Perryville, Md.

For 22 years, Jenn tried many different medications and surgeries to treat her Crohn’s disease symptoms. Through these challenges Jenn was determined to keep fighting. She married and started a family and is now raising three active boys. In 2009 she had no choice but to have ileostomy surgery to end her chronic pain. “I want to help others see what a blessing ostomy surgery can be,” says Jenn. You can connect with Joanna, Randy, Karen and Jenn on the Inspire.com ostomy support group: http://www.inspire.com/ inspire/group/ostomy/ Read more about their stories at: www.greatcomebacks.com Great Comebacks is a registered trademark of ConvaTec Inc. AP-012186-US u


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Combat Care

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy – One of the Single Most Significant Wound Management Interventions in the US Military David Crumbley MSN, CWCN, CDR, NC, USN The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the U.S. Government. Citations of commercial organizations and trade names in this report do not constitute an official Department of the Navy, or Department of Defense endorsement or approval of such products or services of these organizations. The number one cause for injury and death among U.S. troops in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts (Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and New Dawn) has been the Improvised Explosive Device (IED). The IED is a concealed improvised device with an explosive charge, which generates a destructive, high-energy blast with resulting extensive soft-tissue, vascular and bone injuries. Advances in individual body armor (IBA) along with an

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enhanced trauma care system have improved the survival rate of today’s war wounded who suffer an IED blast injury. IBA protects the eyes, head chest, and abdomen reducing the incidence of life-threatening injury but as a consequence, those surviving an IED blast have an increased incidence and severity of complicated soft-tissue extremity injuries. In the past two years injuries suffered in Afghanistan have been the most complex of the two conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is due in part to the increased incidence of “dismounted patrols” (walking patrols), and the inability to detect the IED until the Member is directly over the device. The resulting injuries are frequently bilateral high above the knee amputations with possible uro-trauma, abdominal injuries, and loss of one or both upper extremities. With large soft-tissue wounds to both lower extremities, to one or both upper extremities

“An understanding of the characteristics for the wound created by an IED or other high energy blast will illustrate the benefits of using NPWT in this type wound/injury.” and possibly the abdomen, and extensive blood loss, the Wounded Marine, Soldier, Sailor, or Airman is now in a battle for his life. Fortunately rapid evacu-


ation, extensive trauma/critical care capabilities, and expertly trained personnel have significantly increased the survivability of these devastating injuries. In addition to advances in the trauma/critical care arena, there have been advances in military wound care for the traumatic soft-tissue injury which have not only improved wound healing in these seriously Wounded, but have contributed to survivability, quality of life, and wound healing research. One of the single most significant wound management interventions for the combat wounded with large soft-tissue injuries has been Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT). From 2003-2008 in the military casualty care system NPWT was used primarily within the United States and Germany at large military treatment facilities due in part to the fact that NPWT devices had not yet been approved for aeromedical evacuation. NPWT was used sporadically within Iraq and Afghanistan, but resupply of disposables was not always

available. In 2007 the first portable NPWT device was approved for air-worthiness. In 2008 a feasibility study was undertaken to determine if it were possible to utilize NPWT in transcontinental flight (Germany to U.S.). By 2009 the feasibility study was completed and NPWT devices were approved for flight from Germany to the U.S. Once air-worthiness was confirmed and the feasibility study was complete NPWT units became standard equipment on all aeromedical evacuation flights. Prior to 2009 infrequently would a Wounded member fly from Germany to the U.S. with a NPWT device attached. By 2009 NPWT devices became one of the most common devices used on the Wounded being medically evacuated out of Germany to the U.S. An understanding of the characteristics for the wound created by an IED or other high energy blast will illustrate the benefits of using NPWT in this type wound/injury. Large soft-tissue injuries from high energy blasts typically have:

• Large irregular surfaces not easily closed or covered with skin graft • Significant amounts of tissue loss • Heavily contaminated with soil and debris driven deep into tissue • Heavily exudative • Extremely painful • Probable orthopaedic injuries with exposed bone • Significant tissue edema within the first few days Ideally, the wound management solution would be one that addresses most of the characteristics listed above. NPWT effects wound healing positively by providing a warm moist healing environment, stimulating cell reproduction through tissue deformation, increasing blood flow by reducing local tissue edema, and by removing wound fluid and inflammatory cytokines. Other benefits of NPWT include containment of wound effluent, wound temporization (providing protection from the elements and allowing delayed closure),

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and reduction in painful dressing changes.

Additional benefits of NPWT use in this population/injury type relate to research and survivTherefore, the following attriability. In recent years with the butes make NPWT very effecincreased incidence of these tive in the management of the high-level traumatic amputahigh-energy blast, soft-tissue tions, some of which resulting injury: in hemi-pelvectomies, there has a) Ability to stimulate granulabeen an increased incidence of tion in the wound bed and fill soft-tissue infections with viruin irregular wounds allowing lent fungal organisms mucorales for wound closure, and aspergillis terreus. Because b) removal of inflammatory of the significant concomitant cytokines in these hyper-in- injuries, the systemic inflammaflammatory, heavily contami- tory response, and the potential nated wounds, for harm by adding another c) the ability to control exudate high-potency pharmacologic in confined environments agent, additional solutions were reducing risk of cross connecessary that did not include tamination, systemic agents. The recomd) the reduction of painful mendation was to add a topidressing changes, cal agent to the wound bed to e) provides a systematic apassist in the eradication of these proach to wound managevirulent organisms. The problem ment in which dressing was how to do this and continue changes occur every two to to provide NPWT. The solution three days during debridewas to utilize a NPWT device ments and washouts in the which had the capability to prooperating room under anes- vide intermittent instillation of thesia, and a dilute Dakin’s solution (0.025 f) the reduction of tissue percent) that was non-cytotoxic edema at the wound bed but would be effective against enhancing capillary perfuthe mucor and aspergillis organsion, which is significant in isms. While further studies are the early stages of this type warranted to validate the use injury as it facilitates tissue of Dakin’s solution with NPWT, resuscitation. as a standard of care, it has been used regularly and suc-

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cessfully to augment this type of wound care at our institution. Interestingly, this process mirrors the Carrol-Dakin technique used in the early 1900s where every two hours Dakin’s solution was instilled into the wound by specially trained nurses and physicians via rubber tubing. On an additional note, in the aftermath of the Joplin tornados during 2011 there were several deaths associated with soft tissue infection from mucormycosis. The causative factor was the contamination of these large soft-tissue wounds with soil and other organic matter. This is an example of the similarities between soft tissue wounds caused by high-energy explosives, and soft-tissue wounds caused by high-energy forces associated with natural disasters. Finally, because NPWT allows for the collection of the wound effluent researchers have been able to sample and analyze the wound environment. This has allowed multiplex molecular biology assays to begin to determine the suitability for wound closure as well as a further understanding of the local wound environment. This has lead to several advances in wound healing and


sets the stage for a personalized medicine approach. Chapter 31: Traumatic wounds: bullets, blasts, and vehicle crashes. In Bryant R Acute and Chronic Wounds Current Management Concepts 4th edition; 2011: 434435. Webb LX, Dedmond B, Schlatterer D, Laverty D. The contaminated highenergy open fracture: a protocol to prevent and treat inflammatory mediator storm-induced softtissue compartment syndrome (IMSICS). J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2006;14(10):S82-S86. D. Crumbley, J. Perciballi. Negative pressure wound therapy in a contaminated soft tissue wound. J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2007;34(5):507-512. Joint Theater Trauma System Clinical Practice Guideline: Management of high bilateral amputations, 2011. Clinical practice at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda.

Kakarala K, Richmon JD, Lin DT, Deschler DG. Vacuum-assisted closure in revision free flap reconstruction. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2011 June 1;137(6):622-4.

Pollak AN. Use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam for lower extremity trauma. J Orthop Trauma 2008 November 1;22(10 Suppl):S142S145.

Bonner TJ, Mountain A, Allison K, Sargent I, Adedapo S. Management of a complex hind foot war injury with negative pressure wound therapy: a case study. Foot 2009 September 1;19(3):177-80.

Herscovici D, Sanders RW, Scaduto JM, Infante A, DiPasquale T. Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC therapy) for the management of patients with high-energy soft tissue injuries. J Orthop Trauma 2003 November 1;17(10):683-8. Geiger S, McCormick F, Chou R, Wandel AG. War wounds: lessons learned from Operation Iraqi Freedom. Plast Reconstr Surg 2008 July 1;122(1):146-53.

Norbury K, Kieswetter K. Vacuumassisted closure therapy attenuates the inflammatory response in a porcine acute wound healing model. Wounds 2007 April 1;19(4):97-106. Labler L, Mica L, Harter L, Trentz O, Keel M. [Influence of V.A.C.-therapy on cytokines and growth factors in traumatic wounds]. Zentralbl Chir 2006 April 1;131(Suppl 1):S62-S67. Labler L, Rancan M, Mica L, Harter L, Mihic-Probst D, Keel M. Vacuumassisted closure therapy increases local interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in traumatic wounds. J Trauma 2009 March; 1;66(3):749-57.

Kumar AR, Grewal NS, Chung TL, Bradley JP. Lessons from the modern battlefield: successful upper extremity injury reconstruction in the subacute period. J Trauma 2009 October 1;67(4):752-7. Wackenfors A, Sjogren J, Gustafsson R, Algotsson L, Ingemansson R, Malmsjo M. Effects of vacuum-assisted closure therapy on inguinal wound edge microvascular blood flow. Wound Repair Regen 2004 November 1;12(6):600-6.

Hahm G, Glaser JJ, Elster EA. BioMorykwas MJ, Argenta LC, Sheltonmarkers to predict wound healing: Banwell PE, Musgrave M. Topical Brown EI, McGuirt W. Vacuumthe future of complex war wound negative pressure therapy: mechaassisted closure: a new method management. Plast Reconstr Surg. nisms and indications. Int Wound for wound control and treatment: 2011 Jan;127 Suppl 1:21S-26S. J 2004 June 1;1(2):95-106. animal studies and basic foundaPMID: 21200268 tion. Ann Plast Surg 1997 June Leininger BE, Rasmussen TE, Smith 1;38(6):553-62. TS Brown, S Safford, J Caramanica, DL, Jenkins DH, Coppola C. EA Elster. Biomarker use in tailored Experience With Wound VAC combat casualty care. Biomark and Delayed Primary Closure of Med Contaminated Soft Tissue Injuries in Iraq. J Trauma 2006 November 1;61(5):1207-11.

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Director’s Corner

WOC Nursing Education in the United States Mary Jo Conley, BSN, RN, CWOCN Director, WOCN® Society I attended a WOCN®-accredited WOC Nursing Education Program (WOCNEP) 1,200 miles away from home and chose to complete the clinical portion of the program with local preceptors. Those preceptors have remained not only mentors to me, but friends. I continue to reflect on the programs I’ve attended and the wonderful people I met who continue to inspire me. Currently, eight WOCNEPs operate throughout the United States. Students often find it difficult to find and obtain preceptors. We have all experienced the student role and appreciate the time and effort put forth by our preceptors to ensure we learn everything possible to become independent and confident practitioners. Many of us have also had the experience of precepting the new WOC nurse and know first hand the rewards and challenges. The rewards are both obvious and long lasting. Some of the rewards include the ability to step back and watch someone you’ve mentored perform a

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spot-on assessment, to listen to them teach a patient with growing self confidence, to read their documentation and gain some tips from what they’ve written, and to go back and research topics you never would have thought of exploring before. Most importantly, we gain a colleague and often a friend; someone who we remain in touch

with throughout our careers and who will forever be grateful to us for sharing our knowledge and experience. Many challenges make it difficult to be a preceptor. The lack of time remains the single highest reason that most of us avoid precepting. Our jobs are extremely busy, most of the


time leaving us on a good day, feeling as though we are trying to accomplish the impossible. Adding a student to the mix is sometimes unthinkable. We know that providing the clinical education and guidance for a new WOC nurse requires not only tremendous planning, but requires additional hours each day to accomplish our own job requirements long after the student has gone home.

nearly enough to provide the services needed by our patients. For this reason alone, it is so important that each of us consider the opportunity of precepting.

Consider the challenges are short lived. Contracts with the WOCNEPs need not wait to be initiated until a student contacts us. We can act proactively by contacting the WOCNEPs closest to us, initiating dialogue, Obtaining contracts between informing the schools of our infacilities and the WOCNEPs is terest to act as a clinical site for often times difficult and poses them, developing professional another challenge. This is a relationships, and coordinating daunting process, which can be the necessary steps to obtain time consuming and confusing. and maintain contracts acceptEach facility strives to protect able to both facilities. To faciliitself from liability and at the tate this process, it is important same time, ensures a solid clini- to enlist the assistance of a cal experience for the student. representative from your facility’s education department who The WOCN® Society has aphandle contractual agreements proximately 4,800 members. with other schools of nursing We are extremely proud of that and/or legal representation for number, which is constantly contract review. Often, the congrowing. However, consider tracts require some negotiating the number of hospitals, longbetween the facilities and it may term care facilities, and home take several months to reach an care agencies within the United agreement. States. Our numbers are not

You will be extremely busy, but it is short lived. Your student will be with you for what will seem like a whirlwind of an experience that will make your days busier and longer than usual. Once over, you will look back and begin to consider lifelong rewards which greatly outweigh the short lived challenges. I encourage each of you to consider precepting. It is the most important way of giving back to our Society and to the patient populations we serve. It is a great responsibility to ensure that our knowledge and our skills continue through the nurturing and education of our newest members. They can learn much from the classroom; however the clinical skills can only be obtained from hands on experience. To be included in the WOCN® Society Preceptor Database, please click “yes” in the additional information section of your member profile on the WOCN® Society website. u

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Member Spotlight

Long-Time WOCN® Member Inducted as a Fellow in the College of Physicians of Philadelphia Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society Kim Karagosian • Director of Marketing, WOCN® Society Congratulations are in order for WOCN® Member, Dr. Ilene Warner-Maron, for her induction as a Fellow in the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. A member of the Society since 1995 and frequent attendee of our annual conferences, Ilene is currently the president of Alden Geriatric Consultants, Inc. and owns the Institute for Continuing Education and Research (ICER) at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. The College of Physicians of Philadelphia is the nation’s oldest professional medical organization. Founded by 24 physicians in 1787, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia now has more than 1,500 Fellows who have been chosen for their work improving medical education, scientific medicine and public health.

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Ilene is a researcher, teacher, and court-appointed guardian to a number of at risk individuals in the Philadelphia area, and it is apparent why she was one of the eight Fellows inducted in the College of Physicians of Philadelphia this year. “It is a tremendous honor to be chosen as a Fellow of the Philadelphia College of Physicians,” says Ilene. “It is humbling to be included with researches and practitioners who have shaped the face of medicine and public health in America since the nation’s earliest days.” Beginning her career in health care 19 years ago, Ilene has earned numerous degrees, with her most recent being a PhD in health policy from the University of the Sciences. Her background covers multiple areas in

health care helping her conduct thorough research and projects. She credits much of her success in wound care to a former nursing peer, Marie Brown-Etris, also a member of the Society. Marie taught her imperative wound care skills, seeing as she was already well-established in her wound care practice. Ilene’s expert malpractice work revolves around issues with long term care and/or the development of wounds in geriatric patients. Seeing nearly 3,000 cases in her 19 years of work, Ilene recently proposed an investigation on the relationship between pressure ulcers and an anti-seizure medication. The WOCN® Society is excited to see what Ilene will accomplish next. Congratulations Ilene! u


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Member Benefit

WOCN® Membership Pays Off Sarah Penn • Marketing Coordinator, WOCN® Society Heather Martinek • Director of Member Services, WOCN® Society

The WOCN® Society gives you the tools to further your education, network with your peers, advance your career, and advocate for your life’s work for a small fee. Many benefits to joining the Society exist, but nothing is better than getting something at a low cost. The small membership fee you pay provides great materials for free or at a discounted price, compared to nonmembers. Learn about some of the great benefits and how you can stay connected with education, networking, career advancement, and advocacy below:

Education

Gaining new perspectives and educating yourself is imperative to a successful career as a WOC nurse. The Society supplies you with multiple outlets to learn more information and stay up-to-date in the WOC nursing field: • Discounted registration for annual conference • Subscription to the Journal of WOCN®

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• Discounts on publications • Unlimited access to the online Image Library • Member Library • Discount on Global Learning Center courses

Networking

Networking with others whose life’s work is the same as yours gives you different perspectives on topics in WOC nursing and acts as another form of education. You can teach others while they teach you through the following venues: • Member forums located in the Member Center • Regions and Affiliates • Membership Directory

Career Advancement

Continuing to network and educate yourself leaves plenty of room for career advancement in your future. The WOCN® Society provides you with the tools to advance your career:

• Salary and Productivity Survey Results (2008) • Research grants • WOCN® Business Plan Template Workbook (2011) • Policy and Procedure Manual (2011)

Advocacy

The Society provides you with multiple documents developed to protect and strengthen the profession. As a member, you have access to these documents as they are updated with fresh, new content. When they become outdated, nonmembers are able to see them; however you’ll receive the new updated versions: • WOCNews • Unrestricted access to new position statements • Unrestricted access to new white papers • Fact sheets including, Reimbursement of Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Services and Understanding Medicare Part B Incident to Billing u


JOB POSTINGS Coming Soon: Advanced Practice Certification Exam from WOCNCB 速 The Highest Recognition of Achievement in WOC Nursing

The highly-anticipated launch date of the Advanced Practice Wound, Ostomy and Continence certification exam is June 2012. If you are an AP nurse, consider taking one or more of the new exams when your current WOCNCB速 certification comes due for renewal. Content outlines for the AP exam are now available for download on the WOCNCB速 web site: http://www. wocncb.org/become-certified/advanced-practice/

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