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"That was an OK film, but she wasn't Ripley." P. 26 WWEEK.COM

VOL 47/21 03.24.2021

MAKE IT WORK

These six Oregonians had their careers sideswiped by the pandemic. Here's what they did to stay afloat. Page 10

NEWS

Parks as Homeless Shelters? P. 8

COURT S

Why Prison Guards Hate Masks. P. 9

F OOD

Ho w the Chocolate Gets Made. P. 20


FULL HEARTS SIX FEET APART Make a plan to stay safe.

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Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com


FINDINGS WESLEY LAPOINTE

The Oregon Historical Society Presents

2021 HATFIELD LECTURE SERIES Featuring:

Amanda L. Tyler

Co-author with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of Justice, Justice Thou Shalt Pursue: A Life’s Work Fighting for a More Perfect Union

BROOKSIDE WETLANDS, PAGE 8

WHAT WE LEARNED FROM READING THIS WEEK’S PAPER

Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 7pm PT

VOL. 47, ISSUE 21 COVID-19 deaths increase 2.2% two months after reopening indoor dining. 6 Four agencies will investigate who leaked a false claim that Jo Ann Hardesty was the driver in a hit-and-run. 7

Living in the Brookside Wetlands is “shitty,” says one resident. 8 Many Oregon prison guards live in Idaho. 9 A potential post-pandemic consulting job? Helping remote workers get used to “corporate cultures.” 11 It only took Thuy Pham six months to go from self-employed hairstylist to nationally recognized restaurateur. 12 Grandpa Guero’s hot sauce has “white people heat.” 14

About 75% of Americans believe automation will destroy jobs, but only 25% think it will destroy their job. 16

Jon Meacham

Author of His Truth is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope

At least one Portlander had a really horrible experience working as a caregiver. 17

Tuesday, May 11, 2021 at 7pm PT

The Trail Blazers got COVID-19 vaccines from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. 18

Learn more and purchase virtual lecture tickets at ohs.org/hatfield

Boba and booze, together at last. 23

A company sells a creative journal meant to be used while stoned for $30. 25 Opera singer Lisa Neher feels a weird kinship with octopi. 26 Roseburg’s Umpqua Dairy has a cameo in the new Netflix film Moxie. 27

OUR MOST TRAFFICKED STORY ONLINE THIS WEEK:

ON THE COVER: Six who dared in the dark days of a pandemic, including Thuy Pham (right). Photos by Chris Nesseth.

A Portland police precinct commander suggested residents should vote out the district attorney for being soft on crime.

MASTHEAD EDITOR & PUBLISHER

Mark Zusman

EDITORIAL

News Editor Aaron Mesh Arts & Culture Editor Matthew Singer Assistant A&C Editor Andi Prewitt Music & Visual Arts Editor Shannon Gormley Staff Writers Nigel Jaquiss, Latisha Jensen, Rachel Monahan, Tess Riski Copy Editor Matt Buckingham

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DIALOGUE In January, East Precinct Commander Erica Hurley attended a Lents neighborhood crime group in full uniform during work hours on behalf of the Portland Police Bureau. Hurley told attendees that if they wanted to reduce crime, they should vote Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt out of office (“About Schmidt,” WW, March 17, 2021). In her remarks, Hurley seemed to conflate Schmidt’s election with voter approval of Ballot Measure 110, which decriminalized drug possession. Her statements could be a violation of bureau directives, which prohibit officers from supporting politicians or ballot measures while in uniform. Here’s what our readers had to say: Andy Palmquist via wweek.com: “Dear Erica, no one cares about low-level arrests for drug prevention. That’s why the state legalized low levels of drugs. The [Portland Police Association] has made such a big deal out of the amount of officers they’re hamstrung with; why would you want to dedicate police officers to arresting people with small amounts of drugs instead of focusing on deadly violence in the city? Stop politicking on the city’s time. We don’t pay you to promote political candidates.” Dustmopp via wweek.com: “Low-level drug arrests are definitely not where I want my tax money going towards. It is criminal how little the police care about actual violence. PPB is a useless drain on our funds.” Mon-Sat 10-6pm Sunday 11-5pm Now Open for In-Store Shopping

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@mojojodi8 via Twitter: “She seems to say in the same breath that there’s nothing we can do about the drug ‘crimes,’ yet [police] are overworked and underfunded. That’s a huge part of their job that’s now obsolete. Perhaps they can focus on real crimes now.” Truman Grandy via Facebook: “’Nice little community you got here. Be a real shame if, PPB forbid! something should happen to it.’ Un-policing. Held hostage.”

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Dr. Know

Barbara Bennett via Facebook: “The police are stuck between a rock and a hard place. It has to be horrible to risk your life every day but then have the DA, mayor and other city/county officials not have your back.” David R Shapiro via Facebook: “I voted for [Schmidt], but his revolving door policy for destructive activism was extremely politically biased and frustrating to the police. When Mike is up for reelection, I will reconsider my vote.” TK via wweek.com: “There are so many disingenuous correlations here it would be laughable if it weren’t unethical. Calls for pitchforks and torches for the DA when discussing not being able to make minor drug arrests, a result of the ballot measure. If that wasn’t dishonest enough, she fails to mention the police didn’t waste their time busting homeless people for minor drug offenses BEFORE the ballot measure. But hey, don’t waste an opportunity to grind that ax.” @UselessPouch via Twitter: “The fact that she didn’t even know who the [Portland Bureau of Transportation] commissioner is just proves the cops don’t live in, or give an actual fk about, our city. They just want our money and power over us.” @RufusT_Firefly_ via Twitter: “The crime problems in Portland were happening prior to Mike Schmidt, prior to drug legalization, prior to riots… the entire country is seeing spikes in crimes since the COVID pandemic, and PPB have been criticized for being ineffective prior to it. PPB is gaslighting us.” LETTERS TO THE EDITOR must include the author’s street address and phone number for verification. Letters must be 250 or fewer words. Submit to: 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Email: mzusman@wweek.com

BY MART Y SMITH @martysmithxxx

Every night, I see a drone tracing the same rectangular route in the dark, over and over. The rectangle runs roughly from Southeast 122nd to 116th and from Southeast Division to Powell. My neighbors have seen it, too. Is this police surveillance or something else? —Drone Patrol Patroller Rumors that the Portland Police Bureau has a drone program are likely inspired by a drone seen hovering over last summer’s Black Lives Matter protests—folks assumed it must be cops creepily stalking the crowd. To be clear: PPB doesn’t use drones to spy on people. That protest drone actually belonged to a private citizen sympathetic to BLM; the cops were creepily stalking the crowd from a fixed-wing aircraft much higher up. Don’t you feel stupid now for being so paranoid? Anyway, if you think your zombie robot drone is spooky, imagine how people felt in early 2020 when multiple drones—6 feet across and flying in formations of three or more—started appearing in the night sky over eastern Colorado. Sightings tailed off after a few weeks (thank God). A few weeks after that there was a global pandemic and interest in the drones faded. Still, to this day no one—not local police, not the FAA, not

now-former U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.), who promised to “closely monitor the situation”—has ever been able to figure out where they came from or what they were doing. As with your drone, Patroller, most of the more benign explanations for these flights—land surveying, mapmaking, aerial photography—don’t add up at night. (It’s also illegal to fly drones at night, though I suppose when you’ve come halfway across the galaxy in search of Infinity Stones you can’t be bothered with the niceties.) Now, the more astute among you may have noticed that this column is almost over and I, like now-former U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner, still haven’t actually answered the question. But that’s only because I’m leaving it to you, dear readers! There are probably dozens of you out there—dozens! Somebody has to know somebody who knows something. The correct/most convincing answer will win eternal glory and a Dr. Know T-shirt. In the meantime, don’t antagonize the drone. If it does start to approach you, put on a nice outfit, lie on the ground, and drape a lead mask over your eyes. Works every time! QUESTIONS? Send them to dr.know@wweek.com.


MURMURS VIDEO STILL

ERICA HURLEY

SECRETARY OF STATE OPENS INVESTIGATION OF POLICE COMMANDER: The Elections Division of the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office has opened an investigation into comments made by East Precinct Commander Erica Hurley of the Portland Police Bureau, who said at a neighborhood meeting in January that residents should vote out Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt if they want to reduce crime. The investigation follows a WW story about Hurley’s comments (“About Schmidt,” March 17, 2021). SOS spokesman Aaron Fiedler said the Elections Division received a complaint March 17 from a lawyer who alleged Hurley’s comments violated state law relating to solicitation by public employees. Hurley attended the Jan. 14 meeting of the Lents Neighborhood Livability Association in full uniform, including badge and gun, during work hours on behalf of the Police Bureau. But the city’s Independent Police Review, which investigates allegations of police misconduct, says it will not probe Hurley’s actions, because it doesn’t believe she violated the bureau’s directive on political activity. “This doesn’t appear to be about anything that’s pending on the ballot, so it’s not a violation of a directive,” said Ross Caldwell, director of IPR. “In my experience, this is not anything new that officers [are] doing this. I’ve seen it happen for years and years and years with different DAs, different police.” D.A. SCHMIDT TESTIFIES AGAINST MANDATORY SENTENCES: Meanwhile, Mike Schmidt testified March 23 in support of Senate Bill 401, which would do away with mandatory minimum sentences for felonies other than murder and allow courts to impose lesser sentences. “Senate Bill 401 is a tremendously important bill, arguably the most important public safety bill in recent memory,” the Multnomah County district attorney said. In 1994, Oregon voters passed Measure 11, which set mandatory sentences for serious felonies, barring reduced prison time for such factors as good behavior. “In the 27 years that have followed the passage of Ballot Measure 11, we have learned much about what works in criminal justice,” Schmidt said. “We’ve learned that much of what we believed was true nearly three decades ago was not only untrue but actively harmful, creating deep systems of inequity that we are still wrestling with today.” The bill is sponsored by Sens. Floyd Prozanksi (D-Eugene) and James Manning (D-Eugene). It is one of at least three bills introduced during the 2021 legislative session that seek to dismantle Measure 11.

OPEN 24/7 FOR YOUR HUNGER NEEDS

OREGON HOUSE SENT HOME BY COVID CASE: The lower chamber of the Oregon Legislature won’t again meet in person until at least March 29 after Speaker Tina Kotek (D-Portland) learned someone with COVID-19 entered the House chamber on March 15 and 16. The two-week pause is Kotek’s effort to avert an outbreak similar to that in Idaho, where at least six lawmakers contracted the virus during that state’s legislative session. It’s also likely to further inflame tensions between House Democrats and Republicans over the scope and location of the session. PROUD BOYS RESURFACE IN SANDY: The far-right men’s fraternity the Proud Boys has made itself scarce in Oregon for the two months since its members participated in storming the U.S. Capitol in a failed bid to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. But the group’s distinctive yellow-collared Fred Perry polos were spotted last weekend in Sandy, where the Proud Boys joined a Pentecostal church for a rally “to celebrate the natural heterosexual family.” It was the first public appearance by the extremist group in the Portland region this year. Pastor Russell Collier of the Rivers of Living Water United Pentecostal Church told WW he didn’t invite the Proud Boys to his March 20 rally, but he appreciated their presence given the threats he said he’s received online for planning the event.

@plaidpantryofficial #keepportlandplaid www.plaidpantry.com Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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CROSS-EXAMINATION

BLACK AND WHITE IN OREGON

BRIAN BURK

MICK HANGLAND-SKILL

NEWS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS WEEK

SACK LUNCH: Bagging groceries in the Burlingame neighborhood.

GHOST TOWN: Portland bars sat empty for much of the holiday season.

The Ballad of Dean Sidelinger Liquor commissioners grill the Oregon epidemiologist why bars can’t reopen faster. BY AA RO N M E SH

amesh@wweek.com

You know the old Western cliché about the hated lawman who walks into an outlaw saloon? The piano player stops the music. Angry eyes stare out over shot glasses. Someone hawks into a spittoon. That’s what it felt like when Dr. Dean Sidelinger arrived March 18 at the virtual meeting of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. That panel regulates the sale of alcohol at bars and restaurants. It also is the sounding board for complaints from booze slingers—and often a friendly ear, given that one of the commissioners owns Amalfi’s Italian Restaurant in Southeast Portland, and another is an heir to the Maletis beer distribution empire. For more than a year, the commission has been hearing about the misery of Oregon’s shuttered bars and restaurants. The hospitality industry lost 25 years of job growth in the nine months after the COVID-19 pandemic descended. Restaurateurs place much of the blame on Gov. Kate Brown and her health officials, who repeatedly ordered dining rooms shut down and are now gradually reopening them. Among those officials? Sidelinger, the state’s epidemiologist. So he was in for a grilling. For the better part of an hour, in unusually confrontational terms between state agencies, OLCC commissioners demanded he justify keeping bars and restaurants closed. The thrust of their questions: If Oregon can’t trace COVID outbreaks back to restaurants, where’s the evidence that such establishments present a public health risk? Epidemiologists like Sidelinger are in broad agreement: Bars spread COVID-19. Publicans feel they’re being scapegoated while they lose their shirts. That was the setup for a clash between public health and the bar business, which played out in the form of questions and answers. To listen to the full meeting, visit wweek.com. This exchange—between Commissioner Jennifer Currin, a lawyer from Pendleton, and Sidelinger—is a good sample of how the hour went. It has been edited for brevity and clarity. Jennifer Currin: My understanding, from what I’ve heard from the governor, has been that the top super-spread areas would not be bars and restaurants. We’ve heard of a lot of workplace outbreaks, large family home gatherings, 6

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Super Bowl parties, New Year’s parties, Thanksgiving holidays, prison outbreaks. Those types of things have been the largest reasons for the spread. Can you confirm any of that? Dean Sidelinger: You’re right that bars and restaurants aren’t near the top of the list. And I think that’s because we’ve really limited the indoor activities in those places. The restrictions have had tremendous negative economic impacts on businesses but have limited that spread. Currin: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website makes recommendations about what’s more risky. You know: Outdoor dining is less risky, this is more risky. But is there a way to quantify that? It’s one thing to say it’s more risky. Can you quantify that risk for us? Sidelinger: Indoor dining shows a significant association with increase in cases starting at 41 days. And a subsequent increase in deaths after that. The association with restarting indoor dining and increase in cases is not seen with the restarting of other sectors. Currin: I didn’t hear a quantification, such as: We will see 2% more community spread. I want to know. We’re putting in policies that will reduce the spread and reduce the risk of indoor dining. We limit table sizes. Stay apart, wear masks, sanitize. Why isn’t that enough? Sidelinger: But some of the tools we can’t use in the setting of a bar or a restaurant. Someone who comes in to eat or drink has to remove their mask while they’re eating or drinking. I will say that we see an increase in deaths 41 days after opening indoor dining by 1.1%. It goes up to 2.2% 61 days after. And a 3% increase in deaths 81 days after reopening indoor dining. Currin: Dr. Sidelinger, I have to tell you, our bars and restaurants were shut down in November and our spike— the state of Oregon—continued well after that. We can’t blame bars and restaurants for that dramatic increase. Sidelinger: Oregon continues to lead the way with low cases and death rates in this pandemic. And it’s because of those restrictions that were in place. Otherwise, that dramatic increase that we saw through the month of November—when bars and restaurants were open—would have continued into the winter. And we would have been in a much different place right now and not talking about reopening additional activity.

Who Has Enough to Eat?

The COVID-19 pandemic increased hunger in Oregon’s communities of color. Hunger in Oregon grew as a result of the pandemic, and for some communities more than others: Black people are nearly six times more likely to be food insecure than white people. A food sufficiency survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau between Feb. 17 and March 1 asked Oregonians about their eating habits for the previous seven days to get a snapshot of who was getting enough to eat. The number of respondents varied each week, but despite differences, disparities were still present. The Census Bureau asked residents to choose from four options: 39% of Black people marked that they had enough to eat the previous week—the most food-secure option— compared with 62% of non-Hispanic white people. Surveys conducted before the pandemic found that 51% of Black people reported they had enough to eat while 77% of white people did. So both groups experienced higher rates of hunger during the pandemic. For the least food-secure selection, 5.5% of Black people said that they did not have enough to eat, while only 1% of white people checked this option, a steep disparity. The Oregon Food Bank and other service providers report a huge increase in demand during the pandemic. This is Phase 3 of a survey by the Census Bureau, and its data shows a food insecurity gap between white and Black people before the pandemic that worsened throughout. Ibeth Hernandez oversees SUN Community School Food Pantries, a program that provides families with groceries a couple of times a week at different high schools. Most of these are east of 82nd Avenue, where need tends to be higher. She says most families the pantries serve are people of color. The need increased so much during the pandemic, it was a challenge to keep up. “You don’t realize how much manpower is needed until you’re there and you see the amount of work and then realize it’s a lot more than you can handle,” Hernandez says. “I can’t imagine what some people would do without it.” She is not at all surprised by the disparity in food sufficiency. “When you think about the fact that a lot of them, especially the immigrant community, do essential work which was low paying even before the pandemic,” Hernandez says, “and then you add so many other barriers— like having to still pay rent, feed kids who are at home all day and things like that—just adds to that pressure. So it’s not surprising at all.” LATISHA JENSEN.


NEWS AARON WESSLING

LINEUP

Samuel W. Hagerman On February 28th, after a long illness, Sam died peacefully at his home, surrounded by family. He is survived by his son, Dexter Hagerman, Dexter’s wife Cassandra, and their baby daughter Isabella Renee Hagerman, as well as a large extended family, and an even larger group of friends world wide.

THE USUAL SUSPECTS: Portland riot police guard the East Precinct during a June 2020 protest.

Detective Squad

Four investigations will probe the leak of damaging claims against Jo Ann Hardesty. On March 5, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler called for an investigation into the leak of an incident report that incorrectly implicated Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty in a hit-and-run fender bender. Why stop at one investigation? The city now has four. On March 19, the mayor’s office announced the hiring of an outside firm to review how Hardesty’s name moved from an incident report into rightwing media. There’s plenty to investigate. On March 3, a Portland woman called 911 and claimed Hardesty had rear-ended her car on East Burnside and fled the scene. The next morning, a right-wing political action committee, the Coalition to Save Portland, published details from the report, and The Oregonian picked up the story. Police later learned by reviewing TriMet security footage that the suspect was in fact a Vancouver woman, whom the 911 caller apparently mistook for Hardesty. By then, attention had shifted to who leaked the false claim against Hardesty, a longtime police critic and the first Black woman on the Portland City Council. A surprise announcement added another wrinkle: On March 16, the Portland Police Association announced the abrupt resignation of president Brian Hunzeker for a “serious, isolated mistake related to the Police Bureau’s investigation into the alleged hit-and-run by Commissioner Hardesty.” What exactly Hunzeker did remains unclear. A Police Bureau spokesman says Hunzeker has been reassigned to the patrol unit in the North Precinct. Here is an overview of the investigations: 1. Portland Police Bureau, Internal Affairs: On March 5, Deputy Chief Chris Davis initiated an internal affairs investigation into the leak. The

bureau declined to comment on the status of the investigation. 2. Bureau of Emergency Communications: BOEC, which fields 911 calls, initiated an investigation shortly after it learned of the incident, said spokesman Dan Douthit. He declined to share the date that the investigation began or provide any additional details. “It is ongoing,” Douthit said. “As soon as there is something to share, we want to make sure to get it out there.” 3. Outside Review of the Leak: On March 17, the city inked a $50,000 contract with California-based OIR Group to investigate the “unauthorized and inappropriate release of information.” In other words, OIR will scrutinize the leak itself. The firm has previously investigated officer-involved shootings in Portland. 4. Broader Cultural Review: On March 11, Hardesty called for an investigation into “the role of white supremacy and connections to far-right media and organizations within the Portland Police Bureau.” She and Wheeler are still ironing out details of this investigation. Their offices said in a joint statement March 19 that the scope of the investigation would include political and racial bias and “resistance to change” within the Police Bureau. The mayor’s office says the first three investigations are seeking accountability for the leak itself. The fourth, broader investigation has loftier goals. “We want to get to the bottom of the incident involving the leak of information that falsely implicated Commissioner Hardesty. You can’t really move forward on trust until you’ve accomplished that,” says Jim Middaugh, a spokesman for the mayor. “The broader review is the one that presents the least certainty right now, but the most promise in terms of meaningful change. We want to have the best police department in the nation and that’s ultimately the goal.” TESS RISKI.

Samuel W. Hagerman was born in Billings, Montana on October 3, 1966 to Benson B. Hagerman and Mary Lou Powers Hagerman. He spent a significant part of his childhood at “the cabin” on the East Rosebud River. He also loved visiting the ranch near Wyola, MT where he learned much about livestock and life from his Uncle Bud. He learned about business from Uncle Jick who owned and ran Chief Mountain Services. He adored all his cousins! From first grade on Sam excelled in school. When he began playing saxophone in 4th grade, he excelled at that too. In high school he participated in an international student exchange program (AFS) in Kenya. Sam went to Reed which proved to be seminal for his education, and provided a bedrock of friends with whom he was connected throughout his life. While in college, Sam and some other ‘Reedies” formed SLACK which toured all over the US, and made two albums, Bigger Than Breakfast and Deep Like Space. After college Sam co-founded his construction company Hammer and Hand with another Reed alum, Daniel. They built a highly respected company which became a leader in green/sustainable, net zero and passive house construction. He mentored his employees to become consummate professionals who continue to build the legacy that Sam envisioned. Sam was elected the first President of the Passive House Alliance United States. Under Sam’s leadership Hammer and Hand received many awards including the 2015 Housing Innovation Award, from the U.S. Department of Energy. Utilizing historic building science, he was honored to work on a commission for the Royal Family of Bhutan, building a law library and college. While building his company, gathering awards, raising his son, and geeking out on building science, he enjoyed other things including: beehives, saxophones, remodeling, saunas, pickling, Halloween, Koi, lunar eclipses, rooftop gardens, and fishing. Sam loved to travel to Hawaii, the Oregon Coast, Costa Rica, California, and while in Europe and Asia participated in international building science events. In 2008 Sam conquered non-Hodgkins lymphoma. We will miss Sam’s wit, his warmth, his music and merriment, his intelligence and wisdom. Rest in Peace, brother….. In Sam’s honor, one can make a donation to the Isabella Renee Hagerman Education Fund: gofund.me/1578ad5d

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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WESLEY LAPOINTE

NEWS

FAMILY MEAL: Sandra Sadlier passes food to her husband, Gary, in their home at Brookside Wetlands. These two are part of a small, close community who look out for one another by providing emotional support and making sure everyone gets fed.

Whose Woods Are These? Portlanders are furious at the prospect of city parks being used as temporary homes.

BY L ATISH A J E N SE N

ljensen@wweek.com

Amanda Fritz was supposed to be retired. On Jan. 1, she completed her third and final term on the Portland City Council, her 12 years distinguished by her efforts to expand the city’s parks system into eastside neighborhoods with little greenspace. But last Wednesday, she was back—alarmed that a new city policy could turn her beloved parks into outdoor homes. “The city has invested millions in development, maintenance and restoration of parks and open spaces,” she warned. “Allowing people to live there and harm the resources will waste taxpayers’ money.” Her concern: a line of regulatory language, buried in an overhaul of the city’s zoning code, that would allow people to erect “temporary shelter” in any open space in Portland— including parks, wetlands and trails. The sentence is a small part of the Shelter to Housing Continuum, an ambitious plan to ease the creation of homeless shelters across the city. Sanctioning people sleeping in parks is a detail of the larger plan, crafted by staff at the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. But the idea has drawn remarkable outcry, including from leaders who helped build the city’s park system. Fritz has been joined in her opposition by two former directors of Portland Parks & Recreation, the founder of the private foundation that funds park improvements, and Mike Lindberg, a onetime city commissioner who, like Fritz, once oversaw the parks bureau. The return of Fritz to testify before her former colleagues displayed how upset parks advocates are. “[Fritz] put all of her personal capital on the line,” says Mary Anne Cassin, a former bond program manager for Portland Parks & Recreation who has led opposition to the zoning change. “She doesn’t like doing these things, but it’s personal to her. In a way, it’s her legacy, and she sees the train wreck coming.” After Fritz’s March 17 testimony, and after WW asked questions about the plan, all five city commissioners released a joint statement to the newspaper, saying they were discussing a way to rewrite the code change. They declined to give details. “As the commissioners and mayor indicated last Wednesday, they intend to be responsive to the testimony 8

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they heard last week, and to the written testimony that they continue to receive—including regarding open spaces,” the commissioners’ offices wrote. “They have been working to find common ground on how best to incorporate the public feedback. That is ongoing and between the commissioners, but you’re welcome to check back with our offices closer to the end of the week after Wednesday’s council hearing.” Portland: Neighbors Welcome, the housing nonprofit that has championed the zoning changes, tells WW it wants to use appropriate outdoor spaces to create permanent organized shelters while low-income housing is built. “I don’t just want people to go camping on Mount Tabor. That’s not what we’re advocating for,” says Trisha Patterson, a board member of Portland: Neighbors Welcome. “We’re saying remove that blanket ban so that the city isn’t taking potential good sites off the table and limiting our ability to respond.” Portland is nearly as divided on homeless camping as it is united in its belief that verdant, fir-dappled parks are a civic crown jewel. That makes the idea of turning Mount Tabor into a homeless shelter as galvanizing as it is farfetched. But in fact, the uproar over parks illuminates a reality that already exists at the edges of the city, in North and East Portland, where large-scale camps regularly grow along sloughs and in woods. Those campsites are a symbol of the city’s repeated failure to address a housing and addiction crisis. And the idea of sanctioning them, even for six months, struck some Portlanders as giving up, shoveling desperate people out of sight—and into nature that City Hall has also pledged to protect. Parks advocate Mike Houck, a retired PP&R board member, says what is already happening in out-of-the-way parks is devastating to everyone involved. “They are totally removed from social services and medical access—it’s inhumane,” Houck says. “[Mayor Ted] Wheeler says our intention is not to have shelters in natural areas. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. If your intention is not to do something, then state it.” Brookside Wetlands is home to many houseless Portlanders, but not by choice. Blue and gray tents are tucked away in brush along muddy Johnson Creek, where drenched clothes, teddy

bears and litter lie. One of those places, along Southeast Foster Road near its intersection with 110th Avenue, is where Veronica lives with her partner and a few other Portlanders who are like family to her. Veronica, 32, hadn’t heard of the proposed zoning change until she spoke with WW, but for her, if it meant that park rangers wouldn’t kick her out of the wetlands every couple of weeks, it would be worth it. She and her neighbors were sitting around a fire with their dog Boltz, eating dinner when WW dropped by. They had a deep blue tarp draped over their home, held up by an old fireworks box, to shield their tents and fire from the rain. What Veronica ultimately wants is to be indoors after three years of being shuffled around Brookside Wetlands. “It gets hard to pack up every two weeks or every three weeks all the time. Being homeless, it destroys everybody,” she says. “It’s shitty being out here. I’d rather be inside.” In 1997, the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services spent millions of dollars to restore the Johnson Creek floodplain at Brookside Wetlands, reducing the number of floods that inundated residential properties and creating an ecosystem for waterfowl that students can tour. “It’s amazing work they’ve done,” Houck says, “and that’s the sort of work being undone by all this illegal, unsanctioned camping that’s not being addressed. It’s an incredibly difficult issue we need to do something about, and providing alternatives is a moral step.” For housed people living in East Portland, the city’s plan to allow six months of temporary shelters on parkland was a signal that camping in places like Brookside Wetlands was permissible—and probably permanent. “It will be a disaster. It just opens up every park space,” says East Portland parks advocate Linda Robinson, who lives in Hazelwood. “[The city] will probably end up in a court case. Park advocates will push for a change. We can’t stand the way it is.” For evidence of impending disaster, parks advocates point to Minneapolis, where the city council changed policy last summer to allow people to camp in parks. The city reversed the policy three months later because camps grew too large and officials received complaints about drug use, sex work and untreated mental illness. Minneapolis park board commissioner Londel French tells WW that allowing camping in park space did not work well. “A lot of that stuff that happened in that park, it happened all the time and no one gave a shit, but when it’s in your face, they don’t want to see it,” French says. “There’s no way to do it in a long-term way that can handle the type of issues [homeless people] face. We didn’t know how this would work, we tried to deal with it as best we could, some people got hurt, some crimes were committed.” Opponents of the Portland plan fear that, unlike the Minneapolis experiment, a zoning code change would be difficult to reverse. “These people did it in a softer way. In this case, if this happens the way it could, it is a permanent zone change,” says Cassin, the former parks official. “In this case, we’re really setting ourselves up: We haven’t tried this, but were making a permanent zone change. That’s scary.” Housing advocates backing the Shelter to Housing Continuum are focused on passing the larger plan—among the biggest victories for creating shelter space in city history— and appear to mostly be in agreement with parks advocates. The City Council is now huddled, looking to placate the residents who complained. For Fritz, the mere consideration of the idea was baffling. She points to Portland voters’ overwhelming approval in November of Measure 26-213—a $45 million annual property tax levy to maintain the city parks system—as a signal of what citizens want, and a promise City Hall made. “To pass a levy promising to provide better maintenance to parks and natural areas and then to allow an activity that is going to be more challenging for maintenance, that doesn’t make any sense at all,” Fritz says. “It’s now up to the planning staff and the council to figure out a more carefully crafted solution, and I am confident they will be able to do so.”


NEWS

Off Guard

Oregon’s prison guards called COVID-19 the “plandemic” and spread vaccine myths to inmates, lawyers say. BY TE SS R I S K I

tess@wweek.com

A four-day civil trial in Malheur County last month provided a window into one potential reason Oregon prisons have seen the state’s largest outbreaks of COVID-19: Some of the guards don’t believe the pandemic is real. “I’m at a war right now trying to get people to vaccinate over the anti-vaccine information,” testified Dr. Garth Gulick, chief medical officer at Snake River Correctional Institution in Ontario, Ore., during the February trial. “I also live in a part of the country where the staff is incredibly ingrained that ‘masking is stupid, this virus doesn’t hurt.’ Especially back in September [and] October, it was a major problem convincing staff, and even some of the inmates, that this wasn’t a conspiracy.” Sworn testimony by Snake River prison administrators, reviewed for the first time by WW, display the difficulties the Oregon Department of Corrections faces in vaccinating a workforce responsible for introducing the virus into prisons that subsequently became the sites of enormous COVID outbreaks. To date, more than 3,500 of Oregon’s roughly 13,000 inmates, and at least 830 prison staffers, have tested positive for the coronavirus. Forty-two prisoners have died after contracting the virus. Snake River staff described a culture among prison guards who flout mask mandates by their employer and believe COVID-19 is no worse than the flu. Plenty of Americans share those views, even after more than half a million deaths from the virus. But the opinions of Oregon prison guards matter because they oversee a confined population. The department’s infectious disease doctor testified in November that all but one COVID outbreak in Oregon prisons had been introduced by staff. Many of the corrections officers guarding Oregon’s inmates at Snake River are not Oregonians. Instead, they live in Idaho—a hotbed of COVID skepticism. “We live in a very conservative part of the country,” said Gulick, who also lives in Idaho. “The staff here tend to listen much more to the conservative news media that’s really minimized the benefits of masking, vaccines.”

DOC spokeswoman Vanessa Vanderzee said the agency has used an array of communication methods to provide accurate COVID information to inmates. “DOC team members have the same hopes, fears and hesitations associated with the vaccine as the rest of Americans,” Vanderzee said. “DOC has worked hard to listen to staff concerns, combat popular myths, and provide informative materials about the vaccine from the experts: the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Oregon Health Authority.” The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees told WW the vast majority of the corrections officers it represents recognize that the COVID-19 pandemic is real and dangerous. “A few offhand comments or statements of personal opinions that may have been unduly or improperly influenced by political individuals’ rhetorical misdirection regarding the COVID-19 pandemic are certainly not indicative of the beliefs of our nearly 3,500 members in corrections,” AFSCME said in a a statement. Those opinions were discussed during the February trial for a legal petition filed by a Snake River inmate, Mark Lawson, who contends the Department of Corrections violated the Eighth Amendment with its “deliberate indifference to [his] serious medical needs” during the pandemic. (The case is ongoing.) Lawson initially refused the COVID vaccine. His attorney, Katharine Edwards, argues that Lawson was misinformed when he signed a waiver not to get the shots, because he didn’t get the chance to speak with a doctor about his concerns, she alleges. That is why Edwards and the state spent hours dissecting the politicization of COVID-19 in Oregon prisons. Jason Bell, assistant superintendent at Snake River, testified Feb. 23 that he decided against sharing an educational video of himself getting vaccinated, for fear it would cause a backlash. “I was going to put it out for people to see, and then I’m like, I don’t know if that’s the best idea,” Bell said. “Politics sometimes can come into play. This side of the state is probably mostly Republican, and the other side of the state in Oregon is Democratic.”

Snake River Correctional Institution is located in Malheur County, nearly 400 miles east of Portland and about an hour’s drive west of Boise. It has the highest COVID rate per capita of any Oregon county—about 10,560 cases per 100,000 people, according to the Oregon Health Authority. It also has the highest test positivity rate in the state, at 18%. (In contrast, Multnomah County has under 4,000 cases per 100,000 people and a positivity rate of 5%.) That’s excluding the positive cases of Idaho residents who work at Snake River, state officials say. The prison is the largest employer in Malheur County, the Malheur Enterprise reported. And 71% of the 870 employees at Snake River live in Idaho, Vanderzee said. Bell described enforcing mask use among both staff and inmates as a “constant issue” that requires “constant reminders.” He said a couple of staffers outright refused. Gulick said the same. “[At] Snake River, we struggle with both [inmate] mask compliance and with staff mask compliance,” he said. “I’m called a ‘mask Nazi’ here.” That perception is backed up by a January civil complaint against the corrections department signed by more than 70 inmates. The complaint alleges DOC staff have referred to the coronavirus as a “hoax, an election scare, a ‘plandemic’ or otherwise indicat[ed] allegiance with unhinged conspiracy theories and lies about the COVID-19 virus.” John David Burgess, an attorney on that case, says about half of the 140 inmates he’s spoken to during the pandemic tell him prison staff has expressed views discounting or undermining the seriousness the virus. One of the plaintiffs was transferred to Snake River in October from East Oregon Correctional Institution, in Pendleton, to be treated for COVID-19. “Staff told plaintiff Wayne Woodruff that ‘the quicker everyone got [COVID19] the better,’” the complaint alleges. “Many corrections staff called the pandemic an ‘election scare’ and a hoax.” Misinformation can transmit rapidly in state prisons, where the people in custody have scant access to outside channels. “Word of mouth is the primary way in which inmates learn any information,” Burgess says. “They have extremely limited access to the news. The first information they’re going to get is from staff, so if somebody says something, it’s immediately going to be circulated throughout the inmates.” In early February, Burgess says, two women inmates at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville told him corrections staff had said the vaccine could cause infertility. Two other Oregon prison lawyers told WW they heard the same claim. “The infertility one is a big one that I’ve heard over and over,” said Edwards, the attorney in the Malheur suit. In a different federal lawsuit, led by the Oregon Justice Resource Center, the plaintiffs said in a February court filing that male inmates had heard the vaccine would “make them sterile.” In February, a federal judge ordered Oregon prisons to vaccinate all inmates “as soon as possible.” To date, at least 70% of DOC’s inmates have accepted first doses of the vaccine, although the rates are lower at some prisons. This month, active cases have dropped significantly to less than 20 statewide. Vaccination rates of DOC staff, however, are unclear. The department stopped tracking that information earlier this year. The burden to convey the safety and efficacy of vaccines to prisoners typically falls on the shoulders of medical staff, like Gulick. “You definitely try to pick the ones that you think you can change their mind,” Gulick said. “I’d rather spend extra time with somebody who has valid complaints than somebody [who] is dead set that this is a government conspiracy and there’s a nanochip in the vaccine.” Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

9


MAKE IT WORK The light at the end of the tunnel is approaching. What’s on the other side isn’t entirely clear. It’s no great revelation that the coronavirus pandemic was as much an economic disaster as a public health crisis. Millions of jobs were lost, the country plunged into a recession, and there might still be people on hold with the unemployment department today. As vaccinations ramp up, though, a blurry image of everyday normalcy is coming into focus—it’s getting easier to imagine summer day drinking on a patio, taking in a play in the fall and maybe, by winter, seeing a real live concert in a packed club again. As for the job market? That’s still unknown. In Oregon, the short-term prognosis is one of incremental recovery—the most recent report from the employment office shows the state added almost 14,000 jobs in February, the most growth coming from the beleaguered hospitality industry as bars and restaurants gradually ramp back up (see graph, next page). But when it comes to the long view, many questions remain. What occupations are coming back, and which have disappeared completely? Will remote working become the norm, and how will that impact those who don’t have the option of working from home? Are the robots that were already threatening our jobs now even closer to replacing us?

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The answers aren’t obvious, but we went looking for them anyway. We asked two of the state’s leading economists what work will look like in the post-COVID world (page 11). And we spoke to a New York Times tech reporter who’s written a book about automation and what humans can do to protect their livelihoods from the rise of the machines (page 16). One thing we know for sure, though: For many, the grind never stops. It’s something we’ve already seen over the past year. In this issue, we talked to six Portlanders who hustled and scraped to stay afloat after the pandemic interrupted their careers. There’s the hairstylist who reinvented herself as a vegan restaurateur and the aspiring zoologist that went from working with cheetahs in Africa to pet-sitting for frontline workers. A software engineer shifted to building a whole sci-fi universe, beginning with an innovative podcast. A barbecue chef switched to bottling his own hot sauce after his hours got cut, while a laid-off customer service rep turned to supplying restaurants with microgreens grown in his garage. As with any disaster, it’ll take some time to sift through the damage of COVID-19. But as these stories show, whatever’s on the other side, there are those who will always find a way to make it work. —Matthew Singer, A&C Editor


WW: What industries are coming out ahead post-pandemic?

the other side What does the jobs landscape look like post-pandemic? Two Oregon economists weigh in. BY M AT T H E W S I NGE R

When the pandemic first hit Oregon last year, economists watched it like scientists observing an asteroid hurtling toward Earth—a once-in-a-lifetime disaster they couldn’t help but study with fascination. A year later, it’s time to assess the damage. Was this an event that has forever changed the economy, or merely an extended interruption? WW asked two of the state’s top economists, Tim Duy and Josh Lehner, about what the job market looks like going forward. Somewhat surprisingly, both are fairly optimistic about what happens next.

Josh Lehner: We are still in the stage where the pain we were seeing a year ago, or certainly 10 months ago, in the sector impact is really the same as what we’re seeing today. Some of those bars and restaurants have reopened a little bit, so their employment’s up. But there’s still a big hole. In that big picture, the sectors that are doing better is really anything that doesn’t require a lot of in-person service. If you want to talk about e-commerce-related stuff, like couriers and messengers, stuff like that is through the roof. Tim Duy: I’m trying to think of other sectors in the economy that will be persistently changed, and I’m actually drawing a blank because many of the jobs that were lost were [because of ] the supply-side issue—basically, they weren’t able to be made safe during the pandemic, and then as soon as we can get rid of the pandemic, they should be safe again, and we should see large shifts back into the kinds of jobs that were disproportionately negatively affected. The end results are probably going to be more marginal as far as whether the economy looks similar to what it did prior to the pandemic or after it. What jobs aren’t coming back post-pandemic? Duy: I guess I’m kind of an optimist, because I’m not sure what behavior changes. There might be less small retail. Some of that, [because of ] online shopping, I don’t think it’s going to shift back, so those kinds of jobs could be switched out for the warehouse-slash-delivery-type jobs. No in-person dining could get swapped out for more takeout dining. Those are the kinds of transitions that I would be looking for.

What we’ll see immediately—and whether it goes beyond this, I don’t know—is people will continue to work from home a day or two or maybe three a week. They won’t commute into the office every single day like they did before. And what does that mean? Well, I think one thing that means is we’re going to see less foot traffic in our downtowns. And if you don’t have that commuter base coming in every day, or only 80% of them are coming in every day, that reduces the lunch crowd, that reduces the window shopping. That will hurt the cluster that’s built up in our downtown cores around the country. If you had kids just entering the job market, where would you steer them? Duy: We’re going to have a shortage of trade workers. If you’re a plumber or electrician, all of those jobs seem likely to really bloom here in the coming years. I’d probably point to an industry that’s likely to be in demand and also had an aging workforce. Lehner: Frankly, it depends upon your skill set and your educational attainment. If you’re a fresh college graduate, there’s probably nearly just as many job opportunities today as there was a year or two ago. Those office-based, white-collar professional type jobs, I’m not sure those are going away tomorrow. And so to be close to the job, and going into the office when it’s safe to do so, there’s still going to be some benefits associated with that, particularly for young people starting their career.

OREGON UNEMPLOYMENT RATE SEASONALLY ADJUSTED 14 13 12

Lehner: We have a return to full health and the economy in about two years. It could be faster than that. We’ve seen less economic scarring or permanent damage than we first thought might happen in terms of business closures. They’re severe, but they’re less severe than we thought.

11 10 9 8 7 6 5

Are we going to be working from home permanently, and what are the implications? Duy: I don’t think that we’ll all go back to 100% work from home or 100% work in the office. The future of work is going to be a more flexible business model. What this will reveal is that there’s more room for that flexibility than we thought before. I have had in the back of my mind that the next business consulting opportunity is integrating new work-from-home employees into your work culture. Lehner: I heard somebody make the analogy that if remote work is going to be this really big societal change, they likened it to the internet. We’re 1997 today—we don’t know what the next 10 years is going to look like because it’s so new. But it could have profound impacts if we really do see people spread out more across the country, or even around the state, and not as clustered in the larger cities. Humankind is more and more clustered. Over our existence, the benefits of cities have been really profound in shaping society and the economy. If we start to undo that a little bit from a physical space perspective, it can have profound impacts.

4 3 2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Oregon Employment Department

CONTINUED UI CLAIMS BY AGE GROUP Workers claiming unemployment benefits 16 -19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ unknown 0

2K

4k

6K

8K

10K

12K

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Oregon Employment Department

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

11


DO THE HUSTLE

These six Oregonians had their careers sideswiped by the pandemic. Here’s what they did to stay afloat.

CHRIS NESSETH

THE VEGAN RESTAURATEUR

A year after the pandemic shut down her work as a hairstylist, Thuy Pham is busier than ever.

“TO BE HONEST, IT Before COVID-19 hit, Pham was working out of a studio in her home. She had developed a stable, dedicated customer base that would fly in from as far away as L.A. But when she had to stop working due to health and safety concerns, she made a sharp career change that surprised even Pham herself—on a whim, she started selling vegan pork belly out of her home. Less than six months after that, Pham opened her first brick-and-mortar restaurant, Mama Dut, on Southeast Morrison Street. Pham never expected she’d open her own restaurant, let alone one that blew up so quickly. Even during the pandemic, while the restaurant is open for takeout only, Mama Dut regularly sells out of its fresh, hearty Vietnamese vegan fare, and has already received attention from local and national press, including The New York Times. “People would tell me, ‘Oh, you’re food’s so good. Why don’t you open a restaurant?’” Pham says. “It was never something that I felt like I could do. So this is very surreal, this whole experience.” It started last April, when a friend sent Pham a YouTube video of Vietnamese Buddhist monks making heo quay chay, a meatless version of the crispy, fatty pork roast that’s a staple in Vietnam. After watching the video, Pham decided to make her own soy-based heo quay chay with her daughter, Kinsley. At Kinsley’s suggestion, Pham livestreamed the process on her Instagram, including the part where the pair first savored the rich, chewy center and crispy outer layer. The stream caused a flood of DMs from former hair clients asking if they could buy some. Pham came up with a logo and a name—which means “Mama, feed,” a phrase Kinsley started saying as a toddler. From then on, Mama Dut continued to grow with demand, and often to Pham’s surprise. A week after the Instagram stream, she realized her kitchen couldn’t accommodate the volume of orders she was receiving. In late

DOESN’T REALLY FEEL LIKE THIS IS MINE,” SHE SAYS. “IT FEELS LIKE THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A COMMUNITY COMES TOGETHER.” —THUY PHAM April, on Pham’s 40th birthday, she moved into her first commissary kitchen and then expanded into a pop-up, offering bao buns and vegan fish sauce wings. Last November, after a summer of sellouts, Mama Dut moved into the former Fermenter space. It’s easy to see why customers and Portland food media have been so quick to rally around Mama Dut. Pham employs long-established techniques to create vegan food that’s as comforting as it is decadent. And on top of making some of Portland’s best vegan food, she’s used Mama Dut’s platform from the very beginning to speak out against racism, supporting the protests against police brutality that began last summer. More recently, she asked for space to heal from the trauma of the Atlanta shootings, and the generational pain it brought to the surface, and closed the restaurant for a day last week. Pham says she’s still processing the rapid success of Mama Dut. “To be honest, it doesn’t really feel like this is mine,” she says. “It feels like this is what happens when a community comes together.” SHANNON GORMLEY.

Mama Dut owner Thuy Pham finishes preparing a new pandan croissant waffle dish she is trying out. 12

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com


CHRIS NESSETH

PDX'S PREMIER JAZZ CLUB 529 SW 4TH AVE / IN THE RIALTO

WWW.JACKLONDONREVUE.COM

live music returns to the jacklondon this april! 25%capacity-100%soul!

Thuy Pam flips a pandan croissant waffle at her restaurant Mama Dut. Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

13


THUMB

It took losing his job for Donnell Coats to rediscover his green thumb. He’d only recently quit his five-year job in customer service at Nordstrom and was looking forward to being his own boss. By early 2020, he was picking up odd jobs, reselling clothes, shoes and collector’s items, and had just landed a material handling gig. Then, like many, he was let go. To soothe the uncertainty and fill his newfound time, he turned to his plants. Coats, now 31, got into growing in his early 20s when a friend gave him their marijuana grow boxes to babysit for a week. Since that introduction, he’s grown flora of his own: cannabis to begin, and soon tomatoes, peppers, dragon fruit plants, and lemon and orange trees. Now, he’s mass-producing microgreens. He stumbled upon microgreens— y o u n g, n u tri e n t-ri ch ve g eta b le shoots—while researching care practices for his other plants on the internet. After purchasing a few seeds to grow, he came to appreciate the short life cycle of the plant. “I like to experiment,” Coats says. “Microgreens are cool because you get to learn quick—a plant only takes 10 to 21 days to grow.” Now, Coats grows cantaloupe, corn and wasabi microgreens under artificial lights in his two-car garage in Beaverton. It’s not just a hobby: In October, he and his girlfriend, Kaitlyn Murray, began building partnerships with local restaurants under the name 503 Microgreens. Now, you can find his product topping spicy jackfruit rolls at Yoshi’s Sushi in Multnomah Village, sprinkled between seeded buns at Cliff ’s on Northeast Russell Street, and mixed into ceviche at Mestizo. Most recently, the greens found their way to plates at Fair Weather, the new brunch spot formerly known as Jacqueline. (Customers can purchase online, too.) Coats has his eye on a warehouse space to rent and urban farming grants so he can turn 503 Microgreens into fully realized form. Eventually, Coats wants to incorporate education into his work, with workshops geared toward communities who can use the growing process as therapy, like veterans returning from military service or inmates coming home from prison. “I need to help those people out,” Coats says, “’cause that could have been me.” ELIZA ROTHSTEIN.

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CHRIS NESSETH

MICK HANGLAND-SKILL

THE GREEN

THE HOT SAUCE

MAKERS Ricky Bella knew he had to do something. It was early in the pandemic, and the 30-year-old chef de cuisine at Bullard had taken a significant pay cut to help the lauded Portland barbecue restaurant keep the burners on. He was one of the lucky ones: Most of the rest of the staff was laid off. His girlfriend wasn’t so fortunate, either. She’d lost her job at a downtown wine shop, and having to take care of their 8-year-old daughter after schools shut down precluded her from even searching for another. “Being full time with the kiddo,” Bella says, “there was a lot of sitting around, wondering and waiting and feeling hopeless.” That’s when it dawned on him: hot sauce. In his previous gig as the head chef at Bit House Saloon, Bella slathered the bar’s chicken wings in a housemade concoction that still makes him salivate: jalapeno, serrano, fresno and ancho chilies with onion, garlic, vinegar and butter. If he could figure out the logistics of bottling it, it would open an extra revenue stream for both of them. “The dynamic between the two of us is that I’m very spontaneous,” says Angela Gravelle, 33. “He came at me with the idea and he was half-serious about it, but behind the scenes, I got to work on ordering labels and looking into licensing fees and what it would really take to start the business and run with it.” It took three batches to achieve what Bella calls “white people heat”—an accessible balance between spice and sweetness. He named it Grandpa Guero’s, the nickname for his actual paleskinned grandfather, “a grumpy old Mexican” who put hot sauce on everything. While Bella made the sauce, using the kitchen at Bullard after his shifts, Gravelle did pretty much everything else, from running the Shopify account and designing the packaging to pouring the product into bottles and driving them to UPS for shipping. After getting its name out with a series of pop-ups, Grandpa Guero’s has sold 1,500 bottles between the brand’s three flavors, Bella estimates—enough to meet the modest goal of supplementing the couple’s income with a few hundred dollars each month. It’s also enough to convince them to keep going, even after Bella had his hours restored. Bella and Gravelle are currently trying to get Grandpa Guero’s into grocery stores—and, from there, maybe hire another employee or two. “It’s not at the point yet where we’re paying for labor or anyone else to do it,” Bella says. “That’s the scary next step.” MATTHEW SINGER.


sitter

CHRIS NESSETH

CHRIS NESSETH

THE pet

THE

PODCASTER

A year ago, Nikkola Hadley was in Africa, working with wild cheetahs.

Ghan Patel spent quarantine building a new universe.

Today, their job still entails getting up close with cats—only when these felines get hungry, the worst they can do is whine. Pet sitting isn’t precisely what Hadley, 24, intended to do with their degree in zoology. But as someone whose lifelong dream is to tend to animals for a living, it’s at least in the same ballpark. “I’ve worked with animals all of my life,” Hadley says. “Being able to roll with that versatility, with animal behavior, sizes, personalities, species, etc., is really essential, especially working within animal husbandry.” For their last term at Oregon State University in early 2020, Hadley landed an internship at the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia, observing how rural communities in Africa care for the big cats they share the land with. When the pandemic hit, Hadley was forced to return to Portland early, moving in with their partner, a tuxedo cat named Lady Maria, a snake named Linnaeus, and a tank of unnamed potato bugs. After four months of quarantine, Hadley took a job at a veterinary clinic in Lake Oswego—a stopgap before moving toward their goal of working at the Oregon Zoo. They also signed up for Hot Diggity, a dog-walking and pet-sitting service. Then the clinic made staffing cuts. Suddenly, “my side gig turned into my main profession,” Hadley says. Again, though, at least it still involves animals. And in the midst of the pandemic, the job took on some added importance: Most of Hadley’s clients right now are health care professionals working long hours who might need them to stop by and feed their pets dinner, or breakfast, or even stay overnight. Hadley, of course, has developed favorites: Namely, there’s a West Highland terrier named Celeste they describe as “the highlight of my week.” Hadley is still hoping to get in at the zoo, but the pandemic has made a competitive field even harder to break into. “I’ve been looking into leaving the state,” they say, “or even leaving the country, to have a better chance of finding jobs.” MATTHEW SINGER.

At the start of the pandemic, the 38-year-old software engineer had a contract gig get cut off unexpectedly. He took it as an opportunity to indulge an idea that had long been kicking around in his head: an immersive sci-fi musical he called Spacetime Diaries. “It was a pretty special time for me last year,” he says. “I would wake up, 100% devoted to the project.” Patel—who moved from New York to Portland specifically to give himself more space for creativity—wasn’t entirely sure what form the project would take at first. He ended up settling on a podcast. Described as a “cinematic, bedroom pop scifi adventure,” the inaugural first season features a protagonist named Karima who finds herself caught up in a war on a faraway planet. It takes place in the distant future, but the themes— climate change, invasive technology and, yes, global health crises—are distinctly 2020. Patel collaborated with writers, musicians and voice actors from New York and elsewhere. He did the sound design and wrote the songs “I’d be sitting at a piano for hours at a time,” he says, “trying to find the emotional nugget of what the character would feel for this song.” Without a day job, Patel spent the year “making decisions that support the artist-first model,” living off savings until that became untenable. He’s since started freelancing again, but he’s far from done with the world of Spacetime Diaries. He imagines sprawling the story out across multiple platforms—the next installment is a series of guided meditations placing the listener inside the head of a super-intelligent space fungus. And then from there? Figuring out how to monetize the whole thing, so he can live the “artist-first model” without going broke. “I’m in a much worse financial position now,” he says, “but I don’t regret it.” MATTHEW SINGER.

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

15


Rise of the

Machines The pandemic has us hurtling toward an era of automation. Author Kevin Roose says that doesn’t have to be bad for humanity.

BY A N T H O N Y EFFI NGE R

Kevin Roose spends a lot of time thinking about how to stay ahead of the robots. The New York Times technology columnist describes his new book, Futureproof, as a “guide to surviving the technological future”—a future that, due to the events of the past year, is coming at us even faster than before. Even before the pandemic, it was getting harder to make the case for hiring humans for many jobs. Then, COVID-19 hit and humans became huge liabilities. Any in-person interaction became a potential brush with death. Researchers at the Brookings Institution say the pandemic is going to accelerate the pace of automation, both because of infection dangers and because the resulting recession will drive employers to cut costs more aggressively. It sounds scary, like something along the lines of Battlestar Galactica or The Matrix. But Roose is actually optimistic about how tech can improve our lives. It just depends on whether humans make the right moves.

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WW: The three things that scare me most in the world are climate change, job automation, and partisan gerrymandering, in that order. After reading your book, I think I’d better make job automation number one. What do you think?

The American middle class was built in large part on well-paying factory jobs, which are being automated by the thousand every day. Are we going to be able to replace those jobs with everybody becoming a comedian or an influencer or something?

Kevin Roose: Climate change is probably more dire, but it’s good to have some healthy concern about all three of those things. I think it’s important to balance pragmatism and realism with the understanding that all is not lost and there are actually things that we can do. Sometimes I feel a little paranoid worrying about this because for centuries people have been predicting that machines would replace us. But, before the pandemic at least, unemployment was at record lows, even as the machines rose to greater power. The thing that’s different this time is the pace of change, and the nature of it. Automation and AI are happening really, really fast. Compared with previous tech transformations, which took decades, this one is happening in years. The typical defense is that AI is going to do all the worst parts of your job, and the parts that are left over are going to be the fun parts. But in practice, that’s not how it works. There’s a whole genre of software that I call “bossware” that uses AI to track worker productivity. It’s putting workers at the mercy of these algorithms, and a lot of jobs are getting worse rather than better. If you’re a worker in an Amazon warehouse, you are taking instructions from machines. You wear a bracelet that tracks your productivity.

The thing that created the middle class in the 20th century was not technology, it was how workers responded to technology. Unions could say to factory owners, “OK, you’re making many more cars, steel pipes and whatever because of these new factory robots. We, the workers, should see some of that.” It wasn’t just the technology that made those workers better off. It was their ability to advocate for themselves. That’s what you’re seeing at Amazon warehouses right now. Workers are saying, “You guys are making so much money with automation, and we need that money to be fairly distributed.”

You write in the book that we all need to make sure we’re not endpoints. What does that mean? In software development, an endpoint is something that connects one machine to another. It’s the connective tissue between one algorithm and another, and that’s essentially the role that a lot of workers are playing in the economy today. Whether it’s DoorDash delivery people or workers in Amazon warehouses, or even journalists, there are people whose job it is to take information from one machine and plug it into a different machine. The journalism thing is hitting a little close to home, Kevin. People are very overconfident about their own irreplaceability. Something like 75% of Americans think that automation will destroy jobs, but only 25% think that it will destroy their job. I have a friend who’s an actuary. He had to go to school for a really long time, and now he makes really good money trying to figure out how long people are going to live for big pension funds. After reading your book, I got to believe he is in the Borg’s crosshairs. Oh yeah. I’m actually shocked that his job hasn’t been automated already. It feels like saying you have a friend who’s in buggy-whip sales. My kids are 17 and 15. What should they study in school? There isn’t any one degree that is more robot-proof than another, but there are more robot-proof skills than others. People working in technology often believe that the only employable workers will be engineers, computer scientists, and math majors. That’s just not true. It lulls people into a false sense of security into those in those fields. The things that are going to be durable are what machines can’t do: the softer, human skills like leadership, collaboration, effective communication and public speaking. That’s where we should be focusing our educational system.

So, if we get the political part of this right, it’s going to be a worker’s paradise? I think it could be amazing. We could be working three days a week. We could be more prosperous. We could be less stressed out at work. We could have many more fulfilling hours in our day. It matters how we do this. I don’t think we should stop using technology and start farming by hand again. But I do think we need to understand that this technology is coming and set up systems that are going to allow workers to benefit from it. The technology is not the issue here. It’s the humans who are using the technology to exploit other humans. Sometimes I think, in this economy, you need other things working for you. You need rental houses kicking off rental income, stocks kicking off dividends, and an army of bots doing…what? Mining Bitcoin? Is there way for an individual to create a droid army and turn the tables on the machines and the huge companies that control them? We all have them. I’ve got Siri and Alexa and the Netflix algorithm. We all have armies of robots that we encounter every day. It’s interesting to ask who is actually in charge in those relationships. Am I Netflix’s boss, or is Netflix my boss? Is Netflix telling me what to watch and what I’ll enjoy? Are we letting the robots choose things that we actually want to buy and pay attention to, or are they sort of steering us in ways that maybe we don’t want? You talk about avoiding “machine drift,” where we are shaped by recommendation engines, where, if I read it correctly, our personalities become determined by Instagram and TikTok. I can see how avoiding these things is important to having a fulfilling, self-actualized life, but does it also help us keep the machines from taking our jobs? We are making ourselves easier for robots to replace, full-stop. We are not making it very hard on them because we have outsourced so many of our decisions, personality traits, and values to machines already. There’s an entire generation of kids who have grown up internalizing the incentives of algorithms, behaving in certain ways because it will get them more views, likes and shares. Part of making yourself hard to replace in the labor market is making yourself more human and distinctive and not behaving in formatted and predictable ways. “Machine-directed” is the shorthand I use for turning your free will over to algorithms and AI. I think we’ve all done that already to a certain extent. Clawing that back is important. You have to know yourself better than the machines know you.


STREET WHATS THE WORST JOB YOU’VE EVER HAD? Photos by Wesley Lapointe @wlapointe_photo

“Caregiving.”

“Little Big Burger.”

“McDonald’s.”

“Wendy’s.”

“Door-to-door canvassing.” “A seasonal job at Victoria’s Secret.”

“A job is a job. As long as they pay you, it’s better than no job.”

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

17


STARTERS

THE MOST IMPORTANT PORTLAND CULTURE STORIES OF THE WEEK—GRAPHED.

R E A D M O R E A B O U T TH E S E STO R I E S AT WW E E K .CO M .

RIDICULOUS PORTLAND POLICE BUREAU

GAGE SKIDMORE

Police and the Audubon Society offer a reward for information about the poisoning of a sequoia tree in the Sabin neighborhood.

A new TBS sitcom starring Damon Wayans Jr. as a man out for revenge on the bear that ate his girlfriend is shooting in Portland in May.

B R U C E E LY/ P O R T L A N D T R A I L B L A Z E R S

SUPPORT

Central Bowl is reopening.

WESLEY LAPOINTE

CENTRAL BOWL

BECOME A FRIEND OF WILLAMETTE WEEK WWEEK.COM/SUPPORT

A viral video by University of Oregon women’s player Sedona Prince reveals the gender disparity at the NCAA basketball tournament.

AWFUL

INDEPENDENT JOURNALISM

AWESOME

LOCAL

C J M O N S E R R AT

A dozen Blazers, including Jusuf Nurkić, receive COVID-19 vaccinations from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde.

Timbers and Thorns fans will be allowed back in Providence Park this spring.

Most major Portland Rose Festival events have been postponed to 2022.

SAMGEHRKE

D O U G L A S D E F E L I C E - U S A T O D AY S P O R T S

COURALD

Portland director Skye Fitzgerald’s Hunger Ward nabs an Oscar nomination for Best Documentary Short Subject.

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Kachinka, Kachka’s sister restaurant, will not reopen following a lengthy closure that predated COVID.


 WATCH: Waxahatchee Livestream Released a year ago this week, Waxahatchee’s Saint Cloud became an accidental quarantine soundtrack. An album about the joys and sorrows of just trying to get yourself through the day, there’s no way the musician born Katie Crutchfield could have known how appropriate it would sound, but the twangy, textured songs felt tailor-made for the time: Crutchfield sings about taking walks to pull herself out of a rut, wilting flowers that mark the passing of time, and hardwon optimism. A year after the pandemic canceled Waxahatchee’s Saint Cloud tour, Crutchfield and her band will play the album in its entirety from a venue in Kansas. 7 pm Saturday, March 27. Tickets via Wonder Ballroom, wonderballroom. com. $15.

OMSI

GET INSIDE

WHAT TO DO WHILE YOU’RE STUCK AT HOME THIS WEEK.

GO: Dinosaurs Revealed Like Jim Morrison, Crystal Pepsi and the XFL, the dinosaurs died young, and thus will never get old. Every properly raised child still goes through a period of obsession with prehistoric creatures, and any adult who grows tired of gazing at massive animatronic versions of them might as well take a long, slow walk out into the ocean. OMSI’s new exhibit offers up the classic museum dino experience: 25 lifesized re-creations of the big-name beasts, plus displays of real-life fossils and other geological ephemera. If you’re older than the age of, say, 5, you’ve likely seen this kind of thing before, but after a year of staring our own collective mortality in the face, you might view the concept of extinction in a whole different light. OMSI, 1945 SE Water Ave., omsi.edu. Through Sept. 6. $8-$12, free for OMSI members.



STREAM: Ancient Recipes With Sohla Hosted by Sohla El-Waylly, the History Channel’s new YouTube series is a deep dive into the tangled international history of food. Not only is the series full of fun facts—did you know the origins of pizza can be traced back to sixth century BCE Persia, or that pre-colonial Aztec tacos were cooked without any fat?—but it’s also deeply entertaining to watch El-Waylly attempt to cook with ancient utensils, whether it’s an usu from feudal Japanese or a giant sword. Sure, you’re probably never going to cook pizza on a Persian soldier’s shield, and watching other people pound rice into mochi is enough to make your own arms tired. But El-Waylly’s sense of humor about each inconvenient process is infectious, and the fact that the recipes are never perfectly planned only adds to the series’ charm. Plus, it doubles as reassurance that even professional chefs struggle through new recipes. Streams on YouTube. New episodes every Saturday.

 WATCH: Irma Vep Maggie Cheung stars as a semi-fictionalized version of herself: a Chinese movie star on location in Paris to shoot a remake of the 1915 silent film Les Vampires, despite the fact she doesn’t speak French. Directed by Olivier Assayas, this 1996 French New Wave-inspired drama delves into motifs of alienation, identity and the fine line between fantasy and reality. Streams on Criterion Channel and HBO Max. JEFF FORBES

 WATCH: March Madness After getting COVID’d last year, it’s once again that time of year when millions of Americans gather together to do some light gambling on the fortunes of a bunch of teenagers who aren’t getting paid anything at all. But hey, if you can put aside the corruption of the NCAA and simply enjoy the symphony of bricked threes and missed point-blank layups, then this is truly the greatest sporting event of the year. We kid! Sort of. Anyway, by the time you read this, it’ll be the Sweet Sixteen and your bracket will likely be busted, but maybe Oregon State’s Cinderella story will still be ongoing, giving us all something to root for even if you’re dead last in your virtual office pool. Streams at ncaa.com/march-madness-live/watch.

 LISTEN: There’s a Riot Goin’ On Sly & the Family Stone’s classic, the best funk album ever made, turns 50 this year. Sly Stone’s self-loathing portrait of a politically apathetic coward numbing himself through times of turmoil (“feels so good, don’t wanna move”) is expressed through guttural shrieks that foreshadow both the hieroglyphics of Young Thug and Playboi Carti and the early 2020s’ struggle between staying woke and staying sane. Larry Graham’s performance is funk bass before it had seen itself, his slaps and growls vocalizing discontent rather than a good time. Stream on Spotify.



WATCH: Moxie

NETFLIX

 STREAM: Single Pink Klaud Portland choreographers Linda Austin and Allie Hankins have always pushed the boundaries of dance, so it’s no surprise they continue to create abstract, idiosyncratic work during the pandemic. Austin and Hankins’ collaborative, virtual piece is inspired by surrealism and attempts to grapple with our strange, liminal existence over the past year. Performance Works Northwest, pwnw-pdx. org. 7:30 pm Friday-Sunday, March 26-28.

 CATCH UP ON: Superstore Historically, television shows have reacted to the loss of primary characters with varying levels of success: Cheers carried on without a hitch after Shelley Long departed, whereas The Office probably should have called it quits once Steve Carell left. Count NBC’s Superstore among the sitcoms whose quality did not diminish following the exit of America Ferrera last year. That’s a testament to the talented and diverse cast playing the hilariously flawed employees of St. Louis big box store Cloud 9. Like any good workplace comedy, this one finds humor in gathering together people who wouldn’t normally associate and then observing them trying to get along. Shoppers are largely relegated to the background, except during one of the show’s best features: the customer interstitial, in which we see everything from a grown man using a display toilet to a child destroying the dishware section. If you haven’t caught on to this underrated sitcom, now’s a good time—the series finale airs March 25. Streams on Hulu and Peacock.

The latest film directed by multihyphenate Amy Poehler, Moxie is a coming-of-(r)age teen dramedy adapted from Jennifer Mathieu’s eponymous novel about the positive power of punk. Hadley Robinson plays Vivian, a shy teen who’s sick and tired of the ingrained misogyny she and the other girls at her high school are forced to endure daily. After Vivian discovers her mother (Poehler) was a third-wave feminist in the ’90s, she taps her knowledge about riot grrrl music and culture. That inspires the creation of a rebellious zine called MOXIE!, which Vivian distributes in the girls’ bathrooms at school. And since you can’t make a riot grrrl movie without paying homage to the Pacific Northwest, the story is set around Portland. Eagleeyed Oregonians will spot the Umpqua Dairy stickers on Vivian’s laptop, University of Oregon memorabilia in the classrooms, and the implausibility of the students attending an outdoor high school. (In this climate? As if!). Streams on Netflix. Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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FOOD & DRINK CHRIS NESSETH

FEATURE

BAR ASSOCIATION

PHOTO: Caption tktktk

A LOOK INSIDE HONEY MAMA’S CHOCOLATE FACTORY.

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BY ELIZA R OTHSTEIN

A worker folds and prepares packaging at Honey Mama’s.

@saltynectar

At the Honey Mama’s factory on North Williams Avenue, production workers double as DJs. Each day, it’s another employee’s turn to mash up the whirs of a centrifuge and the periodic slice of a guillotine with a curated queue of beats. The songs maintain pace, energy and morale in the production kitchen, where the brand’s health-forward cocoa truffle bars are churned out. “Music completely affects the mood and tone of any experience,” says Honey Mama’s founder Christy Goldsby. “We have always had music in the manufacturing space as a bridge to connect the team.” Since 2017, that space has occupied a full square block at the corner of Williams and Northeast Tillamook Street. Commuters who rip past the warehouse on bikes and buses each day are sure to miss the innocuous gray-green box to their right. Until recently, it had no sign indicating what was being made inside—Goldsby was concerned that announcing Honey Mama’s presence might actually lead hungry consumers to the factory doorstep. It took Goldsby four years to graduate to this 12,000-square-foot facility. When she made her first bar in 2013, she was renting hours at a bakery and sharing iterations of the hand-pressed treat with her aerobics class. That year, she sold 24,000 bars in coffee shops, co-ops and farmers markets. By 2017, she expanded to a team of 20 employees and sold 500,000 bars across the Western U.S. In 2020, sales climbed to 2.5 million bars across the nation with each bar retailing for $5.99.

An employee at Honey Mama’s packages Cocoa Truffle Bars.


FOOD & DRINK “Music completely affects the mood and tone of any experience. We have always had music in the manufacturing space as a bridge to connect the team.” —FOUNDER CHRISTY GOLDSBY

Before each new batch of Cocoa Truffle Bars is set into the machine, a large roll is removed and perfectly cut bars begin to appear.

CHRIS NESSETH

The company is now up to 40 employees. But the core ingredients remain the same as Goldsby used in 2013. Each Honey Mama’s bar contains raw honey, coconut oil, alkalized cocoa powder, Himalayan pink salt and some sort of fatty, thickening binder. In the earliest rendition of the bar, sprouted almonds gave form to “Original Dutch,” a rich chocolate flavor that warms the throat and has pockets of crunch, like biting into the crystals of a good Parmesan cheese. When the brand expanded to meet the needs of non-nut eaters, it chose coconut meat to bind flavors like “Ginger Cardamom.” Recently, the company experimented with ground sesame seeds. Honey Mama’s latest flavor, “Tahini Tangerine,” tastes like an orange sherbet Push Pop. It’s the ninth flavor in Honey Mama’s arsenal, which is devised across the street from the factory in a Craftsman-style house, where bedrooms serve as corporate offices and a residential kitchen countertop as the R&D lab. When a winning flavor is identified, the bar is turned into reality back at the factory by a team of production workers, QA specialists, and operational efficiency professionals. “I love process engineering—figuring out how to make things faster, more efficient and safe,” says Melody Doris, Honey Mama’s director of manufacturing. One Monday morning, workers mix and mold “Peruvian Raw” bars to the electronic beats and wailing vocals of “Sisters,” a song from the First Nations DJ collective A Tribe Called Red. They grind homemade tahini almond paste and coconut butter in a “disintegrator” and stir vats of thick, dark brown dough. To the percussive, buoyant tang of a steel drum, they “plop” mounds of the mixture onto trays for refrigeration and hoist hunks of chilled product into sausage makers that extrude the blend in its signature square shape. As if following a time signature, they lift bars from a cocoa-powdered conveyor belt and line them on a sheet pan. From here, bars are taken to the “flow wrapper” for packaging. Musical benefits aside, Honey Mama’s pays its production workers between 27% and 50% above Oregon’s minimum wage and offers merit-based pay increases each year. When COVID hit, the company introduced hazard pay and intends to keep it. The team cites strong employee satisfaction practices as the reason 77% of the staff, many of whom live together as roommates, partners or family, have been with the company for more than two years. “I plan on staying for the next few years,” says Brittany Mendoza, who joined Honey Mama’s in March 2019 as a packager and now manages shipping. “It’s like a family, and that’s a big reason why I stay.” Continued expansion is on the horizon. Honey Mama’s expects to outgrow its current space by 2023. In July 2020, Honey Mama’s accepted its first round of venture capital funding to undergo a brand refresh. And for the first time since its inception, the factory swapped its hand-folded, rustic envelope packaging for a machine-sealed version. The bars now come in eco-conscious individual boxes in colors unique to each flavor. Stacked together, they look like collectible issues of a magazine. One feature of the packaging has hung on through the aesthetic transition—a note on the wrapper: “Made while dancing to great music.”

Cocoa Truffle Bars move down a conveyor belt and are inspected and put on a tray before moving to the packaging process.

Cocoa Truffle Bars are ready to be packaged at Honey Mama’s.

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

21


FOOD & DRINK TOP 5

BUZZ LIST

Where to get drinks this week, one way or another.

1. Blind Ox Taphouse

4765 NE Fremont St., 503-841-5092, blindoxpdx.com. Noon-9 pm Monday-Thursday, noon-10 pm Friday, 10 am-10 pm Saturday, 10 am-9 pm Sunday. Portland’s Beaumont-Wilshire neighborhood is home to a micro version of the ever-popular food hall. Divvying up the building means that Blind Ox has a unique array of painkillers almost anyone could appreciate following a tense year. Need to lick your way into a sweet, blissful oblivion? There’s whippedto-order ice cream blasted with liquid nitrogen. Want to spend the afternoon knocked out on the couch? One of Nacheaux’s fried-and-smothered odes to both Mexican and Cajun cooking will induce a nap. And if you simply need a beer to take the edge off, there is also a well-curated, 20-deep tap list.

2. Known Associates Social Club

ORDER: Buddy’s Lounge, 8220 SE Harrison St., Unit 125, 971-288-5186, buddys-lounge.business. site. 1-11 pm daily.

615 SE Alder St., Suite B, 971-334-4997. 5-11 pm Wednesday-Sunday. As spring arrives and herd immunity no longer seems like a far-off dream, it’s time for an energy cleanse. Known Associates Social Club, a new bar, restaurant and, someday, music venue across from Loyal Legion on Southeast Alder, has got your chakras covered. The Excommunicado is a take on an old fashioned via Central America, which comes with a stick of fragrant palo santo to burn and “infuse” into the drink. It’s not just a gimmick: The sweet pine flavor really does stay and heighten the spirits.

3. Bit House Collective

727 SE Grand Ave., 503-954-3913, bithousesaloon. com. 4-11 pm Tuesday-Saturday, 2-9 pm Sunday. Pandan is the little leaf that could. At the new Bit House Collective, the tropical Southeast Asian flavoring is being stirred into the inventive cocktails by Natasha Mesa, formerly of acclaimed cocktail bar Deadshot. When ordering takeaway, go with Mesa’s twist on an old fashioned: the Padam, Pandan,

TOP 5

Buddy’s Lounge’s Boozy Boba Milk tea with balls. Tapioca balls. chewy tapioca balls—with a kick of whiskey for just $8. Served with its usual wide straw, the typical sealed plastic cup that boba usually comes with makes it the ideal takeout container, and the drink stays cool long enough to make it home without getting watered down. Subtly sugary, with just the right amount of chew to the tapioca, this is the kind of drink that would sneak up on you if you had more than one. Buddy’s sells $3 nachos to make the state liquor commission happy, but the clutch move would be to make a smorgasbord of the strip mall: succulent barbecue duck from Yang Kee BBQ Noodle, pho ga from Teo Bun Bo Hue, and a curry beef shao-bing from Pot & Spicy, with that boozy boba for dessert. ANDREA DAMEWOOD.

HOT PLATES Where to get food this week.

1. Chamorro Chicken

Order through Instagram @ramon.cooks. With stints at Le Pigeon, Crown Paella and Beaker and Flask, Ramon Navarro has a Portland kitchen pedigree. But it was quarantine-driven stagnation that brought out the inspiration to make Guamanianstyle Chamorro barbecue chicken. Navarro takes orders on his Instagram, @ramon.cooks, for pickup on Sundays and Mondays. Your $20 gets you half a barbecued chicken juicy enough to do Cardi B proud, a mound of spiced red rice, and a side of finadene, cucumber and onions in a soy and vinegar sauce that perfectly complements the rich, smoky bird.

2. Toki

580 SW 12th Ave., 503-312-3037, tokipdx.com. Dinner served 4-8 pm Wednesday-Sunday, brunch 11 am-3 pm Friday-Sunday. At the moment, Toki is for all intents and purposes Han Oak, with a menu that includes both greatest hits and revised versions of other old favorites. But there’s also food that chef Cho was not inclined to cook much in the past, including bibimbap and a steamed bao burger, maybe the world’s first reheating-friendly cheeseburger. The star item, though, is the Gim-bap Supreme, which takes its inspiration from both Taco Bell and the TikTok “wrap” trend, in which a tortilla is partially cut into four quadrants, topped with four different ingredients, folded into layers, and griddled.

4. Hammer & Stitch

2377 NW Wilson St., 971-254-8982, hsbrew.co. Noon-6 pm Wednesday-Thursday and Sunday, noon-8 pm Friday-Saturday. A visit to the Hammer & Stitch taproom will remind you of an earlier era of craft beer, when breweries often popped up on the industrial fringes, and tracking them down felt like a scavenger hunt. The brewery’s motto is “Keep it simple, stupid,” but “simple” does not equate with dull. The lager stands out for its bracing minimalism—each straw-yellow sip is light and crisp, and offers a quick burst of bubbles.

5. Kachka

960 SE 11th Ave., 503-235-0059, kachkapdx.com. Market 9 am-6 pm daily, restaurant 5-8 pm daily. If you’ve finished all of your pandemic jigsaw puzzles, Kachka’s Baba Sima Tonic is a drink that’s also an activity. First, you pour the brandy into a heatproof vessel. Then, balance a spoon across the top, put down the sugar cube, and hit it with the rum, while also spilling some into the glass. Break out your lighter and—settle down, Beavis—FIRE! FIRE! The blue flame dances high above the spoon, caramelizing the sugar. If we get another winter storm, or you’ve somehow managed to catch a cold despite all the mask-wearing, it’s definitely what you want. a “this feels like we are in a restaurant” frisson than Gumba’s beet, cabbage and endive salad, pappardelle with braised beef sugo, pan-roasted steelhead trout, and eggplant olive oil cake.

4. Noodle Gang

Order via instagram.com/chuckdanger. Just like his other industry comrades, Isaac Ocejo found himself reeling when his job at Jackknife evaporated and his catering business with his wife also dried up. Ocejo got to thinking about the year he spent working at dearly departed Wafu, learning ramen at the hip of sous chef Jane Hashimawari. When the owners of Jackknife offered the use of their kitchen, he jumped in, making chewy wheat noodles by hand, curing his own pork belly and building out the tare, or flavor base, all himself. Bowls run $20 for pickup, or he’ll deliver for an extra $5.

5. Poppyseed

1331 N Killingsworth St., 503-489-7449, poppyseedpnw.com. Noon-8 pm Thursday-Sunday. What kind of food cart serves a duck country pâté with roasted hazelnuts, cranberries and parsnip purée, and also a grilled peanut butter and jelly sandwich? The kind of food cart started by a trained pastry chef and a Le Pigeon alum. Poppyseed makes fancyish, local and seasonal food that’s both takeout-friendly and affordable. The leading player on the menu is brisket, which has been available both as a sandwich or as an entree with a Parmesan potato cake and vegetables. @CHUCKDANGER

Like chocolate and peanut butter, Mary Kate and Ashley, or Twitter and bad hot takes, Buddy’s Lounge has brought another iconic duo to Portland: booze and boba tea. Located at Southeast Harrison Street and 82nad Avenue in the best little strip mall in town, Buddy’s Lounge closed for a portion of the pandemic. But when cocktails to go were finally approved, owners Brian Jiang and Neil Chan built an entire drink menu around the famous Taiwanese treat. Jiang told Eater Portland that he traveled to Taiwan himself to learn how to make the perfect boba tea, and it shows. Some of the fruity flavors stray a bit sweet, but classic cocktails like the greyhound also get a nod with vodka and rainbow jellies. The best so far is also the classic: milk tea boba—black tea, milk and

Pandan O.F. ($11), a stiff little elixir in a square bottle with cork top. Mixed with vodka, bourbon, pandan, blueberry, galangal root and bitters, the green of the pandan is beat out by the violet blueberry, but the flavor is still very much there. CHRIS NESSETH

WESLEY LAPOINTE

DRINK MOBILE

3. Gumba

1733 NE Alberta St., 503-975-5951, gumba-pdx.com. 4:30-8 pm Wednesday, 4:30-8:30 pm Thursday-Monday. As a food cart, Gumba punched above its weight, serving fresh pastas, handmade burrata and ambitious snacks that made you want to linger at an outdoor table. Now it’s a brick-and-mortar in a time of takeout only—but you’ll still want to break out the candles, placemats and cloth napkins once you get the food home: No meal in 2020 provided more of Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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TELL POLITICIANS:

STOP THREATENING ACCESS TO INNOVATIVE TREATMENTS & VACCINES Government price setting means politicians can arbitrarily decide that some patients and diseases are worth more than others—potentially discriminating against seniors, those with a disability and the chronically ill. Politicians could put government in the way of personal health decisions that should be made by patients and their doctors. Medicines could be subject to a political process and priorities that change with elections. Investments in life saving research, patient access to medicines and future innovation could be at risk. Tell Oregon politicians:

Stop threatening access to innovative treatments & vaccines.

LEARN MORE AT

www.ProtectOregonCures.com 24 Willamette Willamette Week xMarch 24, 2021 wweek.com Week_9.639" 12.25"_PhRMA_OR_Innovation.indd 1

3/17/21 11:47 PM


POTLANDER PRODUCT REVIEW

PHOTO

Spliff Notes

RIAN S BY B EE NA WH

For the creatively blocked stoner, the Pilgrim Soul Creative Thinking Journal can unlock self-reflection—or at least inspire some cool doodles.

LER

BY BRIANNA WHEELER

The Pilgrim Soul Creative Thinking Journal’s first prompt is for its users to just go get high. The cover of the book literally reads, “Please Use This Journal While You Are High” in a font larger and bolder than any other text. While this would make any stoned teenager squee with excitement, my current weed-mom exterior wondered how a structured journal meant to stoke creativity could possibly compare to my own self-prompted stoned sketchbook buffoonery. But if you don’t have a lifetime of creative journals already taking up valuable bookcase space, the Pilgrim Soul Creative Thinking Journal might actually change your life. Obviously, it is not a traditional journal. It’s more like an activity book filled with creative prompts meant to activate latent imagination. Cannabis is a theme throughout, but even teetotalers could find themselves inspired by some of the suggestions. WW spent a week getting high and working through some of the journal’s least constrictive prompts. The results were a mixed bag, but for bored stoners who’ve exhausted the creative fulfillment of adult coloring books and are looking for a different outlet, this feels like it was made especially for y’all.

How to Use It:

Right off the bat, a William Butler Yeats poem introduces the phrase Pilgrim Soul before 15 more pages outline the generalities of the creative process. A graphic interpretation of right brain function versus left brain function, a satellite chart of pop culture’s most famous cannabis users from Shakespeare to Obama, and a few mindset-process explainers all precede any actual prompting. The journal is broken up into four sections: Creative Imagination, Creative Focus, Creative Awareness and Creative Reflection, each section containing 15 to 20 exercises. A particularly ambitious person could probably complete the entire book over the course of a day, stoned or nah.

Part I: Creative Imagination

In this section, prompts are themed around invention: a Three Lies and a Truth-style writing exercise, an activity drafting meanings for absurdist road signs, and a few simple abstract drawing and slogan-structuring prompts all stood out as fun time wasters reminiscent of Mad Libs or even exquisite corpses if done with a pal. My favorite pages were squiggle birds, a meditative exercise wherein users attach beaks, eyes and feet to random doodles to create birdlike creatures, and the Three Lies and a Truth game where I felt challenged to match my most outrageous truths to equally audacious lies. (Do I have slutty gay dads, gay insta-stoner grandmas, closeted gay trucker grandpas or gay ghost moms? Who knows?) On a strangely sour note, the final exercise in this chapter asks users to recall the last 10 solicitations they received and imagine what might occur if they said “Yes to Everything.” All 10 of mine were either heartrending asks from my houseless neighbors or delivered in the form of sloppy, invasive catcalls. For women and femmes, this exercise was a tad tone deaf.

DEAR DIARY: Brianna Wheeler gets sketchy.

room?” or to complete phrases like “Love is…” or “Possessions are…” There is as much room in these exercises for deep philosophizing as there is for lowbrow high jinks. The introduction to semiotics (the relationship between words and symbols), a formidable game of word linking, and an exercise prompting users to plunge down the rabbit hole of a chain of benefits were additional chapter standouts. This section is particularly writing-heavy, and could offer additional value to novice writers looking to strengthen their linguistic chops in addition to wheeze-laughing with buddies over each other’s contributions.

Part III: Creative Awareness

The third section of the journal urges users to establish mindful awareness of details, with prompts that cue users to, for example, describe the bejesus out of imaginary talk-show guests, hypothetical stacks of junk mail, and the assumed penmanship of a handful of personality archetypes. This chapter felt extraneous for me: It was difficult to drum up the enthusiasm necessary to reimagine a college admissions process or a more creative way to take a nap. An exercise wherein users come up with a dozen weird cat names lightens the mood, but not enough to make this chapter super-appealing to a person who wants to get high and doodle. Also, it occurs to me that many of the creative tasks in this chapter feel geared more toward career marketers searching for some new brand-messaging perspective than bored stoners looking to occupy themselves for a few afternoons. An exercise prompting users to employ technical writing skills to write guides for esoteric concepts and an activity that requires imagining snarky comments for wholesome hypothetical Instagram accounts feel like an inconspicuous lesson in social media marketing for olds.

Part IV: Creative Reflection

The final chapter asks users to invest in some self-discovery and potentially navigate some trauma in order to access their empathy. These prompts are more diarylike than anything in the other chapters, which all felt like alternative ways to pass time that might otherwise be spent in front of a screen. In the Reflection chapter, however, users are asked to write letters to past selves, isolate their negative internal monologues, and construct their own eulogies. Where the previous chapters all seemed full of giggly, sharable content, this chapter alone felt like it had the potential to be revelatory in regards to my own creative processes. In the Reflection section, users are prompted to reflect on their most influential fictional characters, unpack the motivations of their negative self-talk, and finally pour their heart into a Proust Questionnaire, the famously revealing self-interview made popular by Vanity Fair magazine. The remaining pages are dedicated to visual riddles like rabbit versus duck, false depth perception, and how many black dots do you see? An appropriately benign palate cleanser considering the aggressive self-discovery the previous chapter required.

The Bottom Line:

This journal feels like a primer for people who may be intimidated by their own creativity, or perhaps haven’t found a safe place to explore the possibilities of their own imagination. Or maybe middle-aged marketing execs looking to diversify their antiquated persuasion tool kits. Either way, Pilgrim Soul Creative Thinking Journal’s structure offers specific tools that extend beyond the page, and can result in a future bright with blank Moleskines, ready to accept all manner of creative thinking.

Part II: Creative Focus

Deep thinking and creative problem solving are at the root of the activities contained in this chapter, and the prompts are vague enough to be as complex or as lighthearted as the user desires. Exercises like Creative Metaphors and Abstract Analogies ask the user to answer questions like “How is being in a relationship like cleaning the bath-

BUY IT: The Pilgrim Soul Creative Thinking Journal is available at pilgrimsoul.com. $29.95. Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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PERFORMANCE

Editor: Andi Prewitt | Contact: aprewitt@wweek.com MIKE NEWMAN

1. Family and friends

A lot of my friends and family members love board games, and so we’ve found Board Game Arena and some other virtual platforms that let us play, either in real time or a couple times a day spread out over a week. Which is a really nice way to have an activity, because a lot of times during the pandemic, it’s mostly talking on the phone or video chatting, and sometimes there’s nothing left to say or it’s rehashing all of our anxieties.

2. Aliens

It’s just really inspiring and my go-to movie if I’m happy, if I’m sad, if I want to celebrate, if I’m heartbroken. I still am always looking and comparing it to today’s films. “Is this as feminist as Aliens?” “Well, that was an OK film, but she wasn’t Ripley.”

3. Running

I wrote an opera for myself to perform for the festival about Kathrine Switzer’s running of the Boston Marathon in 1967 as the first registered woman competitor, and we decided the best thing for me to do was to actually go outside and run. I laid down the vocal track first, and so I’m lip-syncing in the film. My fiancé had a Bluetooth speaker as he was running beside me and filming. We were quite the pair on the streets of downtown Tigard filming a couple days ago.

4. The Cascade Mountains

GOING THE DISTANCE: Lisa Neher wrote an opera about the first woman registered to run the Boston Marathon, so she hit the road, too.

My Essential Seven:

Lisa Neher

The composer behind the One Voice Project Virtual Micro Opera Festival discusses deep-sea creatures, dark chocolate, sci-fi and more. BY BE N N E T T C A M P B E L L FE RGUS O N

For opera singer and composer Lisa Neher, the battle between Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) and the Alien Queen in James Cameron’s 1986 sci-fi blockbuster Aliens isn’t just kickass. It’s inspiring. “I love the fierce mama power of Ripley and that motherly love that she acts on,” says Neher. “I get so much comfort from watching Ripley take down this really horrible, horrible alien villain—who is the most iconic villain—and also the corporate villain. She just calls it.” Neher may not be a slayer of many-tentacled beasts, but she shares Ripley’s tenacity. Defying the daunting obstacles presented by COVID-19 in order to perform opera, she composed the music for the One Voice Project Virtual Micro Opera Festival, a series of five-minute unaccompanied operas that emanate from three themes: the lives of musicians during the pandemic, women in sports, and resilience in the face of obstacles. Before the debut of the festival, a collaboration between Neher and librettist Kendra Leonard, Neher spoke to WW about her offstage passions, which spring from places as different as the darkness of outer space to the depths of the ocean. 26

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens—these are the mountains that my parents took us to as kids. Life just kind of floats away and you feel the gravitational pull of geologic things living on a different time scale then you are. I find that kind of cosmically grounding.

5. Cephalopods—octopuses, squids, cuttlefish and nautiluses

I grew up south of Seattle. [My parents] loved to tell us and teach us about different creatures, and the giant Pacific octopus living in Puget Sound was a particular source of pride for them. I think what’s really, really fascinating to me is that these are not vertebrates—these are really different animals than we are. I can’t understand what life is like for them, but then you see an octopus learning how to open a jar and feel this weird kinship with it.

6. Cuddly stuffed animals

I never grew out of it, and I don’t think adults should feel like they have to grow out of it. It connects with childhood, but also it connects with a tender part of, I think, all of us that yearn for something gentle and something that’s present and tactile—especially now, when we can’t hug our families.

7. Dark chocolate

My mom and I actually have a term for hot chocolate that doesn’t taste very hot chocolaty because it’s too light, and that is “brown-crayon hot chocolate,” because it just looks sort of like you melted a brown crayon. If I’m ordering a hot chocolate, I better taste that dark chocolate. SEE IT: Sign up to access the One Voice Project Virtual Micro Opera Festival at lisanehermusic.com/operafestival.html. A link to each day’s programming will be emailed to you, and videos will stream after the scheduled showings. Through Friday, March 26. There will also be a Q&A at 5 pm Friday, March 26.

MUSIC Written by: Daniel Bromfield | @bromf3

Now Hear This

Listening recommendations from the past, present, Portland and the periphery. SOMETHING OLD Sly & the Family Stone’s There’s a Riot Goin’ On, the best funk album ever made, turns 50 this year. Sly Stone’s self-loathing portrait of a politically apathetic coward numbing himself through times of turmoil (“feels so good, don’t wanna move”) is expressed through guttural shrieks that foreshadow both the hieroglyphics of Young Thug and Playboi Carti and the early 2020s’ struggle between staying woke and staying sane. Larry Graham’s performance is funk bass before it had seen itself, his slaps and growls vocalizing discontent rather than a good time. SOMETHING NEW Hendrik Weber is best known for his bell-obsessed techno records as Pantha du Prince, but his new album under his own name strips his sound down to its organic elements: eerie woodblocks, sawing strings and, of course, tons and tons of bells. 429 Hz Formen von Stille (Forms of Silence) is named for a frequency that’s said to be in sympathy with the universe. But 429 Hz isn’t great because of some arcane cosmology—it’s because of Weber’s raw talent and knack for sound design. SOMETHING LOCAL “Lo-fi house” belongs to the Internet now, but its genesis lies in mid2010s Pacific Northwest labels like Mood Hut and 1080p. Steel Clouds, a new split by local producers Dorosoto and Body San, reminds us what a fertile environment this rainy corner of the country is for earthy, wet-sounding house music. The kick drums sound like feet splashing through puddles, the chords are like clouds gathering overhead, and the production makes the whole album sound as if it’s been buried for a few days and unearthed. SOMETHING ASKEW Florian Hecker and Okkyung Lee’s new split album groups together two of the world’s most interesting sound artists. Hecker’s “Statistique Synthetique” is all whitecaps of static avalanching into each other. And Lee’s piece, “Teum (The Silvery Slit),” uses the tension of her bow on the cello to create a world that’s seemingly being pulled apart. It’s a little like standing on the surface of Venus, and for those who thrive in extreme conditions, it doesn’t get hotter than this.


Editor: Andi Prewitt / Contact: aprewitt@wweek.com C O U R T E S Y O F C O L L E E N H AY E S / N E T F L I X

screener

MOVIES

GET YO UR REPS I N While local rep theaters are out of commission, we’ll be putting together weekly watchlists of films readily available to stream. In the wake of a year that has seen a horrific spike in violent rhetoric and physical attacks against Asians in this country, we’re highlighting five films that aim to uplift and amplify the myriad voices of Asian American women.

Slaying the Dragon (1988) This 58-minute documentary by Deborah Gee uses interviews and archival footage to grapple with the history of the media’s harmful portrayals of Asian and Asian American women, and how these depictions perpetuate stereotypes of exoticism and submissiveness. Kanopy.

Irma Vep (1996) TEENAGE ZINE: Hadley Robinson stars as Vivian, who responds to sexism in her school by creating a feminist publication in Moxie.

Rebel Girl

Moxie pays homage to the ’90s feminist punk movement and the Pacific Northwest. BY M IA V I C I N O

The Pillow Book (1996) “I am certain that there are two things in life which are dependable: the delights of the flesh and the delights of literature. I have had the good fortune to enjoy them both equally.” Nagiko (Vivian Wu) is so obsessed with words, she develops a fetish for writing calligraphy on people’s bodies. A Trainspotting-era Ewan McGregor co-stars in this drama directed by Peter Greenaway. Apple TV, Google Play, Hoopla, iTunes, Ovid, Vudu, YouTube.

H O L LY W O O D P I C T U R E S

The latest film directed by multihyphenate Amy Poehler is Moxie, a coming-of-(r)age teen dramedy adapted from Jennifer Mathieu’s eponymous novel about the positive power of punk. Hadley Robinson plays Vivian, a shy teen who’s sick and tired of the ingrained misogyny she and the other girls at her high school are forced to endure daily— everything from boys creating objectifying and cruel lists about their female classmates’ looks to the snide principal (Marcia Gay Harden) enforcing archaic dress codes. After Vivian discovers her mother (Poehler) was a third-wave feminist in the ’90s, she taps her knowledge about riot grrrl music and culture. That inspires the creation of a rebellious zine called MOXIE!, which Vivian distributes in the girls’ bathrooms at school. With the support of her friends (Alycia Pascual-Peña and Lauren Tsai), Vivian channels their collective anger and frustration into effecting positive and radical change on campus. And since you can’t make a riot grrrl movie without paying homage to the Pacific Northwest—this specific feminist punk movement began in early ’90s Olympia, Wash.—the story is set around Portland. Little bits of Oregon are “sprinkled throughout the film,” according to Robinson, who said the production shot for about two weeks on location in our state. Eagle-eyed Oregonians will spot the Umpqua Dairy stickers on Vivian’s laptop, University of Oregon memorabilia in the classrooms, and the implausibility of the students’ attending an outdoor high school (with our perpetually drenched climate? As if!). Nevertheless, Moxie begins with a forested nightmare sequence that very clearly was filmed here. Vivian runs through the woods, desperately opening her mouth to scream, but nothing comes out. It’s a helpless, hopeless feeling that many young women can relate to. It’s also incredibly redolent of the opening scene from another Pacific Northwestern staple, 2008’s Twilight, but Robinson said this tribute was unintentional, even though she admitted she had the same thought while filming. What was intentional, however, was the artfully curated soundtrack punctuated by prominent women artists, ranging from the classics (Sleater-Kinney, the Julie Ruin) to the contemporary (Tacocat, Cherry Glazerr). In the film, there’s a wonderful moment where Vivian discovers her passion for punk by watching a YouTube video of Kathleen Hanna from Bikini Kill performing their hit song “Rebel Girl.”

“I love that scene. It’s one of my favorite scenes in the movie,” says Robinson, who adds that it was the same exact YouTube video that introduced her to this genre of music in real life. “It is an overwhelming experience to hear her [Hanna] for the first time. She does speak to the mind, body, soul—the whole being of a human.” It’s a uniquely validating feeling to finally get the chance to commune with like-minded women in the traditionally male-dominated space that is rock ’n’ roll; this cathartic euphoria is best exemplified by the concert scene, in which Vivian and her friends raucously sing and dance along to the Linda Lindas, a real riot grrrl band made up of preteens. “You hear the passion, and you hear the vigor in the song,” says Pascual-Peña. “It was dope as hell to have all of these women in a room, with Amy yelling and cheering us on to go hard and headbang.” Both behind and in front of the camera, Poehler attempts to grapple with the limitations of third-wave feminism. In one pivotal moment, her character admits that the movement erred by not being intersectional enough. On the surface, one could accuse Moxie of perpetuating those same mistakes: the script was written by a team of white women, the story centers on a white girl, and the characters of color are pushed to the sidelines. But Pascual-Peña, who is Afro-Latina, noted that Poehler was careful to cultivate an inclusive set environment that encouraged the girls to express their authentic selves. For example, Pascual-Peña incorporated her fluency in Spanish into her character, despite the fact that the trait was not specifically included in the script. “We had a lot of conversations about my own personal, cultural and racial identity,” Pascual-Peña says. “She was always open and willing to make changes, and always willing for the vernacular to be specific to who I am, and my culture.” For Robinson and Pascual-Peña, having this therapeutic atmosphere was crucial, especially considering the intimidating responsibilities of these roles being their very first feature leads. “It’s still hard to fathom that my first feature was a project with such amazing women, and then directed and produced by the one-and-only Amy Poehler, who I’ve always looked up to,” says Pascual-Peña. “Every day on set there was a joyful, infectious energy, and I fell in love with the people that I got to work with.”

Maggie Cheung stars as a semi-fictionalized version of herself: a Chinese movie star on location in Paris to shoot a remake of the 1915 silent film Les Vampires, despite the fact that she doesn’t speak French. Directed by Olivier Assayas, this French New Wave-inspired drama delves into motifs of alienation, identity and the fine line between fantasy and reality. Criterion Channel, HBO Max.

The Joy Luck Club (1993) Adapted from the seminal novel by Amy Tan, Wayne Wang’s affecting drama centers on the intricate relationships between four Chinese immigrant mothers, who made great sacrifices to come to America, and their Chinese American daughters, who struggle with fears of inadequacy. Over time, the women learn to understand and empathize with each other. Amazon Prime, Apple TV, Google Play, Hoopla, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube.

Over the Moon (2020) Recently nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, this musical fantasy follows a 13-year-old girl named Fei Fei (Cathy Ang) who builds a rocket ship in the hope of blasting off to meet magical moon goddess Chang’e (Philippa Soo). Sandra Oh, John Cho, Ken Jeong and Margaret Cho co-star. Netflix.

SEE IT: Moxie streams on Netflix. Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

MOVIES TOP PICK OF THE WEEK

Nomadland Filmmaker Chloé Zhao’s work has always sought to uplift voices that have been pushed to the margins. Her previous features, The Rider (2017) and Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015), both focused on Native American reservation culture, and she now sets her sights on documenting the lives of older Americans who travel in campers across the country in search of employment. The result is an awe-inspiring, dexterous hybrid of impromptu documentary and scripted drama, of nature and nurture, of ethos and pathos. Nomadland is anchored by multi-Oscar winner Frances McDormand, here playing Fern, a widow who lost her job at a gypsum plant in Empire, Nev., two years after the Great Recession officially came to an end. With nothing left to lose, Fern decides to sell her belongings, buy a van and hit the road in search of work. Along the way, she meets a litany of real-life nomads, most playing semi-fictionalized versions of themselves. These characters ground the film in a sober reality, reminding us it’s possible to live and thrive in a community outside of traditional society. Though the story is technically manipulated for narrative purposes, it never once feels manipulative, emotionally or otherwise. It feels human. It is human. And it’s the best film of the year. R. MIA VICINO. AMC Dine-In Progress Ridge 13, AMC Vancouver Mall 23, Century 16 Cedar Hills Crossing, Century 16 Eastport Plaza, Cinemagic, Hulu, Liberty, Living Room.

OUR KEY

: T H I S M O V I E I S E X C E L L E N T, O N E O F T H E B E S T O F T H E Y E A R. : T H I S M O V I E I S G O O D. W E R E C O M M E N D YO U WATC H I T. : T H I S M O V I E I S E N T E R TA I N I N G B U T F L AW E D. : THIS MOVIE IS A STEAMING PILE.

ALSO PLAYING The Father The play-to-film transition often lacks formal ingenuity. Regardless of quality, you know the type: static cameras, actors gnawing on scenery, wordy dialogue carrying protracted scenes. But French playwright Florian Zeller adapting his acclaimed dementia drama to cinema has the opposite effect. The Father either eludes or busts multiple movie norms of perspective, setting and unreliable narrators, and then cinches into a harrowing but not exploitative puzzle box. As the dementia-ridden Anthony, 83-years-young Anthony Hopkins resists the pleas of his daughter Anne (Olivia Colman) to accept an in-home caretaker and grant the family some freedom. That’s as much plot as can be said for certain, as scenes loop, rooms mutate in almost imperceptible ways, and basic facts aren’t what they were five minutes ago. Robbed of truth but not his showy, sparring personality, Anthony isn’t an unexpected character from Hopkins, but the performance is a gauntlet and his best in 10 years. Unfortunately, The Father doesn’t offer Colman anywhere near the same material, but it does allow the audience to see things from her perspective, as well as Anthony’s. You’re fighting for understanding one moment, sure you’ve got it the next, rebuffed just after that, and then mercifully, fittingly ready to give in. PG-13. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. AMC Vancouver Mall 23, Bagdad, Century 16 Cedar Hills Crossing, Century 16 Eastport Plaza, Liberty, Living Room.

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Boogie The debut film directed by Fresh Off the Boat creator (and then disowner) Eddie Huang follows a Chinese American basketball star, Boogie (newcomer Taylor Takahashi), who’s shooting for a college scholarship. Replete with sports drama clichés—a needlessly dickish crosstown rival (played by late rapper Pop Smoke), parental pressures, a befuddled coach preaching teamwork, a blooming romance bigger than sports— it’s the finer strokes that still merit Boogie a watch. Not just a vessel of his parents’ professional dreams, Boogie is the evolution of their specific cultural expressions; he’s portrayed as the product of a marriage (Dragon + Dog = Snake on the Chinese zodiac chart) destined to distress the son. Making sense of that legacy—explaining both this movie’s swagger and genuinely foul mood—is more important than Boogie learning a pat American lesson about claiming his own path. To his credit, Takahashi can genuinely ball, though he looks about 12 years too old for high school and routinely falls flat in emotional scenes. It’s Taylour Paige (star of the forthcoming Zola) as Boogie’s beloved and Perry Yung as his ne’er-do-well father who shoulder the humanity. Ultimately, if most every other variation on these hoop dreams has been told, Boogie at least deserves the court time. R. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. AMC Vancouver Mall 23, Century 16 Cedar Hills Crossing, Century 16 Eastport Plaza, Living Room, On Demand.

The Courier During the Cold War, British businessman Greville Wynne had a secret life. While exporting indus-

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

trial engineering products, he worked as a courier for Col. Oleg Penkovsky, a Soviet military intelligence officer who was an informant for MI6 and the CIA. Wynne’s espionage career ended with his capture in 1962, but he survived 18 months in a Moscow prison and later wrote two memoirs, The Man From Moscow and The Man From Odessa. It would take more than a facile film to diminish his heroic legacy, but it’s still dispiriting to watch The Courier, a movie so bland it’s barely fit for the BBC. Under the direction of Dominic Cooke (The Hollow Crown), a tale that should have been scary and suspenseful turns into a stately British period piece, complete with a surprisingly shapeless score by the brilliant Polish composer Abel Korzeniowski. As Wynne, Benedict Cumberbatch is exquisitely vulnerable—the prison scenes are haunted by images of his increasingly skeletal frame—but The Courier’s cheery conclusion obscures painful realities, including the real Wynne’s MI6 training, which he said was more brutal than the KGB beatings he endured. Greville Wynne risked his life to prevent nuclear war. The least The Courier could have done was risk being honest. PG-13. BENNETT CAMPBELL FERGUSON. AMC Vancouver Mall 23, Century 16 Cedar Hills, Century 16 Eastport Plaza, Living Room.

Nobody His centrality to this hyperstylized shoot-’em-up notwithstanding, Bob Odenkirk shares one other crucial trait with the Bruce Willises and Dolph Lundgrens of the world—his head. That Easter Island chin. Those granite cheekbones. Stubble the color and texture of iron filings. Every time Odenkirk growls, broods or ironically luxuriates in the battering he takes in this half-comedic John Wick knockoff, that mug draws all attention away from the stunt men overselling his unremarkable punches and gunplay. Ilya Naishuller’s debut feature is essentially Death Wish with dads who collect vinyl and cultivate man caves they would never deign to call man caves. The spree of (maybe righteous?) violence

by suburban accountant Hutch Mansell (Odenkirk) begins when he freezes up during a home invasion, much to the chagrin of his wife and teenage son. From there, Hutch is on a collision course with the criminal underworld as Nobody becomes a bloody romp but skirts questions of wounded modern masculinity raised by the inciting incident. Nobody can’t get over the fact that it cast Bob Odenkirk instead of letting the incredibly versatile actor tangle with the meaning of all this carnage. If only it took its own premise more seriously. R. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. AMC Vancouver Mall 23, Century 16 Cedar Hills, Century 16 Eastport Plaza, Cornelius 10 Cinemas.

Playing With Power: The Nintendo Story There are surely tales yet to be told about the 19th century playing card company destined to conquer the uncharted realms of digital home entertainment, but Crackle’s new five-part docuseries, Playing With Power: The Nintendo Story, never quite levels up. Sean Astin’s narration leans hard into the wellworn clichés of business school triumph to recount company highs and lows that are all gravely intoned amid a flurry of headlines absent any larger economic context. And the dawn of each decade triggers a pointless nostalgia package for anyone except perhaps the most hardcore Nintendo fans. Neckbearded arcade historians overexplain the importance of each gaming milestone while professional nerd icons (Alison Haislip, Wil Wheaton) overshare personal reveries—two-bit sound bites celebrating 8-bit soundscapes on endless replay. Admittedly, given how much of Nintendo’s rise seems at first arbitrary and then inevitable, there’s something sort of sweet about the corporate overlords’ desperate efforts to invent a creation myth steeped in the daft whimsy of their de facto mascot. Whether or not the barrel-dodging antics of a plucky Italian plumber truly represented a leap forward in narrative gameplay, the all too human irreverence at the heart of Donkey Kong

still charms, but writer-director Jeremy Snead gleaned the wrong lessons nonetheless. While audiences will helplessly ascribe emotional resonance to the flimsiest of plot points, nobody roots for the monkey. NR. JAY HORTON. Crackle.

Zack Snyder’s Justice League A death in the family. Dueling directors. Wrathful fans. Zack Snyder’s Justice League may be a slab of bloated mediocrity, but the story of its creation is a saga of epic, tragic proportions. In 2017, Snyder surrendered his superhero mashup Justice League to director Joss Whedon (The Avengers), who reshot multiple scenes while Snyder grieved for his daughter, Autumn, who had died by suicide at age 20. Enraged by Whedon’s revisions, some fans demanded to see Snyder’s version of the film, unleashing a campaign that included a Times Square billboard and an airplane banner. Zack Snyder’s Justice League is the answer to their prayers: a restoration supervised by Snyder himself. It is also a four-hour bore that subjects us to a lifeless Batman (Ben Affleck), an apathetic Superman (Henry Cavill) and an appallingly clichéd screenplay (sample line: “The great darkness begins!”). The Justice League’s more charismatic recruits—Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot), Aquaman (Jason Momoa), the Flash (Ezra Miller), and Cyborg (Ray Fisher)—provide spark and spunk, but not enough to elevate the interminable action scenes, which are clogged with sluggish slow motion, a Snyder trademark. None of this will faze Snyder’s fans, who care about him so passionately they have donated half a million dollars to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. There are plenty of reasons to loathe Zack Snyder’s Justice League, but it is important to acknowledge that it has meaning beyond its artistic failures—and to hope that finishing it brought some solace to a bereaved father. R. BENNETT CAMPBELL FERGUSON. HBO Max.


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NON STATE RESIDENTS: MUST PAY $118 PER COIN - IF ANY REMAIN DO NOT CALL BEFORE 5:00 PM TOMORROW: 1-800-929-8898 RWL1554 if you are a resident living outside of the state of Oregon you are required to pay $118 for each silver walking liberty for a total of $1,770 plus shipping and handling for each state of Oregon restricted bank roll loaded with fifteen u.s. gov’t issued silver walking liberty half dollars. NATIONAL MINT AND TREASURY, LLC IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE U.S. MINT, THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, A BANK OR ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM SHIPMENT YOU ARE DISSATISFIED, RETURN THE PRODUCT FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND RETURN POSTAGE. THIS SAME OFFER MAY BE MADE AVAILABLE AT A LATER DATE OR IN A DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION. OH RESIDENTS ADD 6.5% SALES TAX. NATIONAL MINT AND TREASURY, PO BOX 35609, CANTON, OH 44735 ©2020 NATIONAL MINT AND TREASURY. R1018

Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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ART N’ COMICS!

Be a Willamette Week featured artist! Any art style is welcome! Let’s share your art! Contact us at art@wweek.com.

FEATURED ARTIST: GRETCHEN PETERSON

Gretchen Peterson utilizes drawing, writing, watercolor, and calligraphy to create Art from the Micro (one-inch-square paintings) to the Macro (an entire country, complete with maps, heraldry, royal genealogy, a 1,000-year history, an alphabet, and a language). As a Storyteller, Gretchen is a member of Portland Storytellers Guild, and she has written and performed two one-woman shows at Portland’s Fertile Ground Festival: Persephone Xoa Iris and Gretchen Peterson: A Name from a Fairy Tale. Her preferred pronouns are “Her Majesty” and “Her Royal Highness”.

Website: www.lemonwoodcourt.com

JACK KENT’S

Jack draws exactly what he sees n’ hears from the streets. IG @sketchypeoplepdx kentcomics.com

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Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com


JONESIN’

Week of April 1

©2021 Rob Brezsny

by Matt Jones

"Miss Statement"--don't worry, it's all here.

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Playwright August Strindberg (1849–1912) was a maverick innovator who loved to experiment with plot and language. One of his stories takes place in a dream and the hero is the Christ-like daughter of a Vedic god. He once said that he felt "an immense need to become a savage and create a new world." Given your current astrological potentials, Aries, I suspect that might be an apt motto for you right now. APRIL FOOL! I halflied. There's no need for you to become a savage. In fact, it's better if you don't. But the coming weeks will definitely be a good time to start creating a new world.

Here are affirmations that will serve you well in the coming days. 1. "I am willing to make mistakes if someone else is willing to learn from them." 2. "I am grateful that I'm not as judgmental as all the shortsighted, self-righteous people." 3. "I assume full responsibility for my actions, except those that are someone else's fault." 4. "A good scapegoat is as welcome as a solution to the problem." APRIL FOOL! All the preceding affirmations are total bunk! Don't you dare use them. Use these instead: 1. "I enjoy taking responsibility for my actions." 2. "Rather than indulging in the reflex to blame, I turn my attention to fixing the problem." 3. "No one can make me feel something I don't want to feel." 4. "I'm free from believing in the images people have of me."

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Who says all Tauruses are gentle, risk-avoidant, sensible, and reliable? Taurus author Mary MacLane (1861–1929), known as the "Wild Woman of Butte, Montana," authored shocking, scandalous books. In *I Await the Devil's Coming*, she testified, "I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not generous. I am merely a creature of intense passionate feeling. I feel— everything. It is my genius. It burns me like fire." Can I convince you, Taurus, to make her your role model for the coming weeks? APRIL FOOL! I don't think you should be EXACTLY like MacLane. Please leave out the part about "I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not generous," as well as the "I await the devil's coming" part. But yes, do be a creature of intensely passionate feeling. Let your feelings be your genius, burning in you like a fire.

60 Smoke detector?

29 Like some IPAs

1 46 was his veep

61 "The Oracle of _ _ _" (Warren Buffett nickname)

30 Actress Falco

9 Abacus counters

62 Trait of trashy talking, perhaps

14 "Go _ _ _!"

64 Madagascar mammal

32 _ _ _ Dingbats (picturebased font)

15 "Dangerous Liaisons" name

65 "_ _ _ making sense?"

16 "Don't do that!"

67 Expert

17 T, A, or Fiesta, e.g.

68 "_ _ _ voyage!"

19 Drops in the mailbox

69 "All I Want for Christmas _ _ _"

6 Gridlock problem

20 Hydroxyl-bearing compound

66 Super-_ _ _

31 Sales agents

33 Double Stuf cookie 34 Handy 39 Gymnast Korbut and comedian Koch, for two 40 Old Domino's mascot to "avoid" 43 Condiment in a packet

DOWN

46 Really abominable

22 As a maximum

1 Bid

48 Words directly before "Radio" or "Media"

23 Go back in a stream, maybe

2 Kentucky frontiersman Daniel

49 Bridal cover

25 Nonprofit that now focuses on ages 50 and older

3 Elevator button symbol

53 "Bony" prefix

26 Certain caretaker of children

4 Time for a crisis

54 Beatles' jacket style

5 Convenience store device

55 Actress Negri of silent movies

21 Fort _ _ _, N.J.

32 City regulator 35 Like some fails 36 "No Ordinary Love" singer 37 "My hands _ _ _ tied" 38 Season with heavy rainfall 41 Address ender 42 Do no better 44 Asian country with no coastline 45 "Now I get it!" 47 Film that's probably subtitled 50 "_ _ _ said ..." 51 Menlo Park name 55 Twelfth zodiacal sign 58 Pre-weekend day, for short

6 Dame _ _ _ Dench

52 Comedian Sales

7 "Don't leave home without it" card, briefly

56 Chatted online

8 "Honi soit qui _ _ _ y pense"

58 Exclusionary anxiety acronym, and a hint to the four theme answers

9 Casual eatery 10 Gives immunity to 11 Part of A.D. 12 Root beer brand 13 Pt. of GPS 18 Betting probabilities 22 Transmission repair company with a "beep beep" in its ads 24 "Cheers" regular 25 Short melodic solo 27 Rent payer 28 Salts source

57 Equivalent

59 Archaeological dig site 62 "Groovy" 63 1,501, to Nero

last week’s answers

According to author Kahlil Gibran, "If we were all to sit in a circle and confess our sins, we would laugh at each other for lack of originality." But I challenge you Scorpios to refute that theory in the coming days. For the sake of your sanity and health, you need to commit highly original sins—the more, the better. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Save your novel, imaginative sinning for later. The truth is that now is an excellent time to explore the joyous and healthy practice of being *extremely* virtuous. Imitate author Susan Sontag: "My idolatry: I've lusted after goodness. Wanting it here, now, absolutely, increasingly."

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

GEMINI (May 21-June20)

ACROSS

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Poet Emily Dickinson had a good sense of humor, so she was probably making a wry joke when she wrote, "The lovely flowers embarrass me. They make me regret I am not a bee." But who knows? Maybe Emily was being a bit sincere, too. In any case, I advise you to make a list of all the things you regret not being—all the qualities and assets you wish you had, but don't. It's a favorable time to wallow in remorse. APRIL FOOL! I was totally lying! In fact, I hope you will do the reverse: Engage in an orgy of self-appreciation, celebrating yourself for being exactly who you are.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Provocation specialist Lydia Lunch is a singer and poet who's skilled at generating interesting mischief. She testifies, "My daily existence is a battlecade of extreme fluctuations where chaos clobbers apathy, which beats the s--- out of depression which follows irritability which slams into anger which eclipses ecstasy which slips through my fingers far too often." In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I recommend you adopt her melodramatic approach to living the intense life. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Please don't be like Lydia Lunch in the near future. On the contrary: Cultivate regal elegance, sovereign poise, and dynamic equanimity.

The coming months would be a great time to start your own university and then award yourself a PhD in Drugless Healing or Mathematical Reincarnation or Political Metaphysics—or any other subject you'd like to be considered an expert in. Hey, why not give yourself three PhDs and call yourself a Professor Emeritus? APRIL FOOL! I'm just joking. The coming months will indeed be an extremely favorable time to advance your education, but with real learning, not fake credentials.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) After his Nirvana bandmate Kurt Cobain committed suicide, Capricorn drummer Dave Grohl was depressed for months. To cheer himself up, he wrote and recorded an album's worth of songs, playing almost all the instruments himself: drums, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, bass, and vocals. I think you should try a similar spectacularly heroic solo task in the coming weeks. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Here's my true and actual advice: Now is a time when you should gather all the support and help and cooperation you can possibly garner for an interesting project.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

In 1692, a Swedish man named Thiess of Kaltenbrun was put on trial for being a werewolf. He claimed to be a noble werewolf, however. He said he regularly went down to Hell to do holy combat against the Devil. I suggest you make him your inspirational role model in the coming weeks. Be as weird as you need to be in order to fight for what's good and right. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. What I really meant to say was: Be as weird as you need to be to fight for what's good and right, but without turning into a werewolf, zombie, vampire, or other supernatural monster.

Argentine poet Alejandra Pizarnik told her psychoanalyst León Ostrov that if she were going to steal something, it would be "the façade of a certain collapsed house in a little town called Fontenay-auxRoses [near Paris]." What was so special about this façade? Its windows were made of "magical" lilaccolored glass that was "like a beautiful dream." In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you, too, to decide what marvel you would steal—and then go steal it! APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. Yes, definitely decide what you would steal—it's important to give your imagination permission to be outrageous—but don't actually steal it.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

"I want to hear raucous music, to brush against bodies, to drink fiery Benedictine," wrote author Anais Nin. "Beautiful women and handsome men arouse fierce desires in me. I want to dance. I want drugs. I want to know perverse people, to be intimate with them. I want to bite into life. "All that sounds like perfect counsel for you to consider right now, dear Virgo! APRIL FOOL! I lied. Nin's exuberant testimony might be an interesting perspective to flirt with—*if* the COVID-19 virus had been completely tamed. But it hasn't. So I must instead suggest that you find ways to express this lively, unruly energy in safe and sublimated ways.

I've never understood the appeal of singer-songwriter Morrissey, especially since he began endorsing bigoted far-right politicians. However, I want to recommend that you adopt the attitude he once expressed in a letter to a friend. "It was a terrible blow to hear that you actually worked," he wrote. "It’s so old-fashioned to work. I’d much rather lounge about the house all day looking fascinating." Be like that in the coming weeks, Pisces! APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, you'd be making a silly mistake to lie around the house looking fascinating. It's a highly favorable time for you to find ways to work harder and smarter.

HOMEWORK: Send the secrets you could only tell a stranger. FreeWillAstrology.com Check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes & Daily Text Message Horoscopes

©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #JNZ990.

freewillastrology.com The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700 Willamette Week MARCH 24, 2021 wweek.com

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By Rachel Monahan By Rachel PageMonahan 13 Page 13

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CANNABIS: WHAT WE LOST IN THE FIRES. P. 25

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“DO I WANT TO DROP DEAD NEXT WEEK? NOT REALLY.” P. 29

OUTDOORS

Will Oregon Hike Wine Taxes? P. 10

VOL VOL 46/47 46/45 09.16.2020 09.02.2020

COPS: TRUMP'S POLICE OCCUPY DOWNTOWN. NEWS: REMEMBER TERESSA RAIFORD’S NAME. P. 9 NEWS: AN ELECTION? THIS ECONOMY? RESTAURANTS: WHO’LLIN STOP THE RAIN? P. 21

“WE’D SPRAY AND VACUUM, BUT NOTHING’S PERFECT.’’ P. 28

      

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CASH for INSTRUMENTS

MISS AN ISSUE RESPECT NEVER MISS AN ISSUE Mark Zuckerberg is despoiling a tiny coastal village and Oregon’s natural treasures. The state invited him. 13

VOL 46/44 VOLWWEEK.COM 46/48 08.26.2020 09.23.2020 VOL 46/43

Sarah Iannarone?

VOL 46/47 09.16.2020

By Nigel Jaquiss | Page 13

“WE’D SPRAY AND VACUUM, BUT NOTHING’S PERFECT.’’ P. 28

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In a nation succumbing to COVID-19, where does Oregon stand? These 9 charts will show you.

VOL 46/36 WWEEK.COM 07.01.2020 VOL 46/38 07.15.2020

BEST NEW BAN "THEY ARE KILLING US. AND Y'ALL MISS A PARADE?"

By Rachel Monahan Page 13

SAY YOU'VE GOT TO HEAR. PAGE 10

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Willamette Week, March 24, 2021 - Volume 47, Issue 21 - Make It Work  

These six Oregonians had their careers sideswiped by the pandemic. Here's what they did to stay afloat.

Willamette Week, March 24, 2021 - Volume 47, Issue 21 - Make It Work  

These six Oregonians had their careers sideswiped by the pandemic. Here's what they did to stay afloat.