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CHLOE EUDALY WANTS TO EVICT STEVE NOVICK. CAN SHE DEFY HISTORY? PAGE 8

WILLAMETTE WEEK PORTLAND’S NEWSWEEKLY

“HE WAS LITERALLY A WALKING PIECE OF ART.” P. 27

THE

guide WWEEK.COM

VOL 42/47 9. 21 . 2016


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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com


joe riedl

FINDINGS

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WHAT WE LEARNED FROM READING THIS WEEK’S PAPER VOL. 42, ISSUE 47.

Actually, men’s rights activism appears to be a thing now in the visual arts community. 4 Some low-level members of the notorious Bundy Gang held a “Unindicted Co-Conspirators BBQ” in Burns. 13 If you want to see strippers enact scenes from the Vietnam War, there is a place. 18 If you want pastrami tacos, there is a place. 21

At least one Japanese pop star is a white kid from Hillsboro. 23 Grapefruit will “bleach out” hormones, according to a woman who saw us drinking Stiegl Radlers on a stoop. 33 There’s an island near Canada where pirates are “a common worry.” 34 You’ve never heard of ORELAP, but it’s going to be hassling your weed guy soon. 42

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ON THE COVER: PULLOUT COVER:

“HE WAS LITERALLY A WALKING PIECE OF ART.”

Photo by thomas teal.

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Photo by henry Cromett.

OUR MOST TRAFFICKED STORY ONLINE THIS WEEK:

guide

A well-meaning white woman moved to East Portland to help refugees, but they are now being gentrified out.

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STAFF Editor & Publisher Mark Zusman EditORiAL News Editor Aaron Mesh Arts & Culture Editor Martin Cizmar Staff Writers Nigel Jaquiss, Rachel Monahan, Beth Slovic Copy Chief Rob Fernas Copy Editors Matt Buckingham, Maya McOmie Stage Editor Shannon Gormley Screen Editor Walker MacMurdo Projects Editor Matthew Korfhage Music Editor Matthew Singer Web Editor Sophia June

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LIVING AMONG CITY’S REFUGEES

This author has focused on the neediness of refugees, but I think there needs to be more awareness of their strengths [“Set Adrift,” WW, Sept. 14, 2016]. I know some of the people D.L. Mayfield talks about in her article. They wouldn’t make it this far if they were slackers, and they have a lot to teach our entitled, privileged populace about what the world is really like outside of comfy America. I am very happy to welcome these folks as my neighbors. —Nancy Molina WILLAMETTE WEEK

“IT’S A VERY SAD DAY IN THE UNIVERSE FOR ME.” P. 43

I moved to an apartment building at the edge of Portland to help refugees.

But they can’t afford to live here anymore.

tality that exist within U.S. police departments. —“jwight” If you still don’t understand the incredible disconnect between the police and the community, particularly the African-American community, then you serve only to perpetuate the illusion that equality exists in America and the police are fair and just. —Alan Graf

HEY, IT’S 1999 ALL OVER AGAIN!

RECONSIDERING BLINK-182’S OEUVRE. NEW PROSECUTOR DRAWS IRE.

BY D.L. MAYFIELD

FEMALE-ONLY GALLERY

I am responding to the story “Portland’s Newest Gallery Is Only Representing Female Artists” [wweek.com, Sept. 7, 2016], which addresses the “Refugees practices of one of PortThis is not a new thing. Immigrants have a lot to exclusionary land’s newest galleries, Wolff Gallery. have been coming to America for Co-curators Zemie Barr and Shannon 300-plus years. They settle in one teach our O’Connor claim that, by exclusively place thinking it will fit their needs, entitled, showing works by female artists, they only to find they need to move on. privileged are correcting the imbalance in repIn almost every case, they go on to populace.” resentation of male vs. female in conthrive and fit in. Rather than feeling defeated, Ms. Mayfield temporary galleries. I recognize gender inequality is a very real should realize that her life is not static. She has a young family and it will need different attentions issue and that creating a safe space can be over the short and long haul. She sounds like she empowering to those involved, but I feel the practices of Barr and O’Connor are myopic too is growing up and will thrive as well. and blatantly discriminatory. And I’m curious —“TC” to know how they would react to a gallery that EX-OFFICER HIRED BY COUNTY D.A. touted representing only male artists. As a gay man, I have dealt with discrimination There is no doubt we need to address racial injustice in this country, but this was not one my entire life. It’s past time for being exclusive of those instances [“Another Round,” WW, and time to be more inclusive. Exclusionary business practices—no matter Sept. 14, 2016]. Keaton Otis was pulled over. He grabbed a gun and shot a cop. Mental ill- the justification—need to stop now. ness or not, he was a clear threat to the officers —Dan Pillers and the community. Cody Berne was doing his job that day. He LETTERS TO THE EDITOR must include the author’s street address and phone number for verification. did the same thing any reasonable person would Letters must be 250 or fewer words. have done in that situation. Move on, people, Submit to: 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. and focus on the real issues of injustice and bru- Email: mzusman@wweek.com. WWEEK.COM

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CANNABIS | EDIBLES Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of marijuana. Keep marijuana out of the reach of children. 4

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4 am: Dog snarling at something yipping and scuffling. Get up—a raccoon. In the dining room. Now what? Call Dove Lewis; they say leave it alone. Vector Control doesn’t open until 8. Do you have any experience with this? —Animal Lover I must say, Animal, I admire your patience. It’s not just anyone in this day and age whose first thought, when confronted with the immediate peril of a wild animal in the home, is to dash off a quick note to a weekly newspaper’s advice column. So, how ’s the standoff coming along ? I assume by now either you or the raccoon has starved to death—or possibly perished of old age—thereby solving your problem. But let’s try to find an answer anyway, if only for the benefit of future generations. As it happens, I had raccoons in my attic (don’t say it) a few years ago. (You can tell it’s not squirrels because a raccoon actually makes the ceiling boards groan under its weight, like a fat guy carrying a piano.) Really all you can do in this case is call a wildlifecontrol company. Even then, if your raccoon has already had baby raccoons, you have to LET THEM

LIVE THERE FOR ANOTHER MONTH until they’re big enough to follow their mom out of your attic. (This is partly to be nice and partly not to have dead baby raccoons rotting above your ceiling.) If you merely have a childless, single raccoon freeloading on your couch, you just have to harass it until it leaves, using bright lights, loud noises, and acrid, chemical-like smells. (Many of these techniques are also effective on adult children.) Once it’s gone, go snuffling around your house on all fours to find the hole where it got in. (If you leave your windows wide open at night, frankly you were asking for it.) When you find the hole, cover it with sheet metal or half-inch wire mesh. BE SURE THERE ARE NO RACCOONS ALREADY INSIDE WHEN YOU DO THIS. Or adult children, for that matter—better safe than sorry. QUESTIONS? Send them to dr.know@wweek.com


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In the past year, Multnomah County’s criminal justice system has been under scrutiny for racial inequities. One report found that black Portlanders are disproportionately represented in the county’s jails, and another report, produced within the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, found that, once in the jails, black inmates are disproportionately subject to the use of force. In an apparent attempt to address bias, the county’s Department of Community Justice, which oversees juvenile offenders and adults on

parole and probation, this week offered employees training to “promote healing from toxic whiteness” and “liberate themselves from white supremacy.” County spokesman Dave Austin says although the county believes strongly in equity, the training was not officially sanctioned, nor were taxpayer dollars used.

Portland’s Bicycle Lobby is Inflating

The Bicycle Transportation Alliance is changing its name and expanding its mission. Now in its 26th year, the BTA will become the Street Trust, with a focus on bicyclists, walkers and transit users, and is adding a new 501(c) (4) arm that eventually will allow it to endorse candi-

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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

WIll CORWIN

County Justice Department Offers “Toxic Whiteness” Training

dates, says Rob Sadowsky, executive director. “We’ve promised this won’t take resources away from bikes,” he says. “Its intent is to grow our constituency base so we can do more, not less.” The Street Trust will unveil its new logo Sept. 24 at its annual Alice Awards fundraiser.

Appeals Court Reverses SAIF Decision

There has been a sudden U-turn in the long-running saga of John Plotkin, who was fired from his $320,000-a-year job running the state-owned workers’ compensation insurer SAIF Corp. in May 2014 after just three months on the job (“House of Cards, WW, July 1, 2014). In a Sept. 8 decision, the Oregon Court of Appeals reversed an earlier ruling in Marion County Circuit Court in which a judge threw out Plotkin’s lawsuit against his predecessor as CEO, Brenda Rocklin, awarding Rocklin attorney fees and dismissing Plotkin’s claim that she conspired to undermine him. The Court of Appeals ruled the Marion County decision failed to consider abundant evidence of a “furtive and unorthodox” campaign against Plotkin involving Rocklin and senior SAIF officials. “It was a great victory,” says Dana Sullivan, one of Plotkin’s attorneys. Bill Gary, Rocklin’s attorney, says the decision was wrong and he’s considering an appeal to the Oregon Supreme Court.


NEWS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS WEEK

Rent Control?

Last week, House Speaker Tina Kotek (D -Portland) announced she’ll try to repeal Oregon’s ban on rent control next year. That ban has been in place since 1985, and bars cities and counties from setting limits on how much and how fast landlords can increase monthly rents. But complaints about rent hikes pushing people out of Portland—along with a growing tenants’ rights movement—are putting pressure on state leaders.

JOE RIEDL

ONE QUESTION

Kotek becomes the most prominent Oregon official to back a change at the state level. Portland City Council candidate Chloe Eudaly has made rent control—and an emergency rent freeze—the centerpiece of her campaign against City Commissioner Steve Novick (see page 8). We asked other Oregon office seekers: Do you support changing state law to allow rent control? Do you want Portland to adopt a rent cap? RACHEL MONAHAN and JULIA COMNES.

BUD PIERCE, GOP nominee for governor: No to both.

ERIC ZIMMERMAN, candidate for Multnomah County Commission, District 1: Yes to state. No in Portland. “I don’t think rent control is the answer, but I don’t have a philosophy of state preemption. I’m not in favor of enacting rent control in Multnomah County, but the state shouldn’t keep local jurisdictions from deciding to enact it. I’m more focused on reducing nocause evictions.”

SHARON MEIERAN, candidate for Multnomah County Commission, District 1: Yes to the state. Won’t say in Portland. “We are experiencing a housing crisis, and the state’s pre-emption should be lifted so individual jurisdictions can have a meaningful conversation about how to address the issue—with all options on the table—at the local level. I am concerned about some of the unintended consequences we’ve seen in other areas where certain rent control strategies have been implemented, but clearly there needs to be some mechanism of stabilization for the unprecedented rent increases our community is facing.”

STEVE NOVICK, city commissioner: Yes to the state. Won’t say in Portland.

T E D W H E E L E R , m ayo r elect: Yes to the state. No in Portland.

“Rent increases we’ve seen in the last few years in Portland are insane. Virtually every economist says that rent control leads to unintended consequences, a black market, etc. There are times when all the economists are wrong, but I would want to study the issue carefully before adopting something, but we should certainly be allowed to have that conversation.”

“Yes, the Legislature should give local jurisdictions as much flexibility as possible to address their own housing challenges in a manner that is consistent with local conditions. In Portland, there are other strategies (outlined in my Tenants Bill of Rights) I’d implement first to ensure a supply of housing that is affordable to average- and lower-income residents.”

“Rent control has a poor record of controlling rent. In the short term, it’s been proven effective at freezing rents, but it doesn’t work well in the long term.”

KATE BROWN, governor: Won’t say. “Skyrocketing rents are a b s o l u te l y a n i ss u e fo r Oregonians in every corner of the state, not just urban areas,” says Brown’s spokeswoman, Melissa Navas. “As we head into the 2017 legislative session, all proposals are worth considering.”

EQUILIBRIO FALSOS: Piñatas in the shape of Donald J. Trump have become a common sight in Portland this election cycle. But the Mexican grocery Tortilleria y Tienda de Leon sells an unusual companion to its Trump piñata: a Hillary Rodham Clinton piñata, clad in an orange jumpsuit and handcuffs. The Clinton figure, about 3 feet tall, sells for $40 at the East Portland store and deli. “People like them,” says store owner Anselmo de Leon, with his grandson Mario translating from Spanish. “They were asking for Clinton. We drove down to California to get them.” But Trump remains the more popular commodity, de Leon says. “Everybody wants Trump so they can knock the candy out of him.” (Nick Zukin, who has held Trump piñata-smashing parties at his own Mexican restaurant, reviews Tienda de Leon on page 21.) JOHANNA BERNHARD.

FAST FIVE

Bud Pierce Dr. William “Bud” Pierce is the Republican nominee for governor. The Salem oncologist, 59, upset the better-known Allen Alley in the May primary and will debate incumbent Gov. Kate Brown in Bend on Sept. 25 in the first of five scheduled debates. Here are five things voters should know about him. NIGEL JAQUISS.

1. He’s from California. Pierce grew up in Moreno Valley east of Los Angeles, and attended the University of California-Riverside and earned a Ph.D. and M.D. in pathology at UCLA. 2. He runs a chain of cancer clinics. In 1994, Pierce opened an oncology

practice in Salem. It’s expanded to include three clinics in the city. 3. He’s a Portlander, sometimes. Pierce lives in the same modest Salem home he bought in 1994, but purchased a $1.45 million condo in the Pearl in 2008. 4. He likes to bake. Carrot cake is his speciality.

5. This week, he yanked his endorsement of Donald Trump. Pierce has a history of working with Democrats: He’s given at least $35,000 to Democratic legislative candidates since 2010, including $17,500 to Senate President Peter Courtney (D-Salem).

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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christine dong

NEWS

Sign of the timeS: Portland’s housing crunch motivated Chloe eudaly, a longtime renter and small-business owner, to run for the Portland City Council. “in four years, i’ve gone from being able to make a pretty comfortable life on a modest income to just really being devastated by rent increases,” she says.

The Eudaly Show

CHLOE EUDALY IS RUNNING A POPULIST CAMPAIGN TO BEAT STEVE NOVICK AND PRESERVE A DISAPPEARING PORTLAND. By B e th s lov i c

bslovic@wweek.com

On paper, Chloe Eudaly would seem to have zero chance of unseating Portland City Commissioner Steve Novick. Eudaly, 46, is a high school dropout with a GED who never finished community college. She has never previously run for elected office. Her central qualifications are running a barbed online forum about housing costs and keeping a tiny, independent bookstore afloat for 22 years. “I know that I’m not the traditional candidate,” Eudaly acknowledges. But elections aren’t held on paper. And Eudaly, who finished second in a field of 10 candidates in May with 15 percent of the vote, has already advanced further than any Portland insurgent candidate since a bartender named Bud Clark sought to become mayor—and did. What’s more, her campaign has two distinct advantages as the race speeds toward the Nov. 8 election. Novick, who also lacked experience managing complex bureaucracies when he first won election in 2012, alienated many of his supporters in his first three years in office. Fifty-seven percent of May voters picked a candidate other than him. And on the single biggest issue animating voters—Port8

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

land’s skyrocketing rents—Novick has largely been absent. That single issue motivated Eudaly to enter the race and call for a citywide rent freeze. “She should have a chance,” says Stephen Kafoury, a lobbyist for taxi drivers who tangled with Novick when the commissioner helped ride-hailing giant Uber to enter Portland. “Steve is enormously vulnerable.” Novick has long billed himself as a progressive who stands up for the little guy—a motto made quirkier by his own short stature. Eudaly is running to his left. In a year when Portland Democrats rallied behind Bernie Sanders for president, Eudaly echoes his socialist rhetoric. She says she’s never paid herself more than $36,000 a year running her bookstore, Reading Frenzy. She says political insiders like Novick are in thrall to Silicon Valley and real estate developers, and have lost touch with people like her: a renter dealing with the rising costs of housing and a single mother raising a physically disabled child. “I am the little guy,” says Eudaly. “For years, I felt like I had what I wanted and what I needed living here and running my business, and now I’m acutely aware of the fact that I am low-income by new Portland standards.” In Eudaly, voters have a chance to register their dis-

taste with the establishment and to vote for a candidate who seems to embody a Portland that’s disappearing amid tech money and new apartment towers. “I don’t see that kind of passion coming from our current council,” says John Mulvey, a Eudaly supporter. “She’s got a keen sense of what we’re losing.” Eudaly lacks a conventional biography for a candidate. Her parents christened her Clover Delight Esther Eudaly, taking her second middle name from their landlord at the time, Esther Dayman Strong, a prominent Portland educator. Born in Portland, Eudaly spent her childhood in Gales Creek, Ore., near Forest Grove, where her parents aspired to a back-to-the-land lifestyle, then Sherwood. As a fourth-grader, Eudaly recalls telling classmates her favorite TV show was 60 Minutes. When Eudaly was 13, her father died in a car crash, leaving her pregnant mother to care for Eudaly and another child in preschool. She attended Tigard High School before finagling a spot at Portland’s alternative Metropolitan Learning Center. One day in 1986, when she was 16 and on her way to a Psychedelic Furs concert, Eudaly walked past the Big Bang, a vintage store downtown, and was drawn to the


“This thing I’d mostly been suffering in silence with, feeling like I’m a personal failure for not being able to keep up with these extraordinary rent increases, was not just me,” she says. The Shed is a showcase for Eudaly’s unapologetic defense of renters and her sarcastic jabs at Portlanders who support the idea, backed by economists and developers, that Portland can build its way out of the rental crunch. In her frequent postings, she takes aim at landlords, short-term rental website Airbnb and the fellow renters who think they’ve earned what they can afford. “Our bans on rent control and mandatory inclusionary zoning (only partially overturned) feel like economic eugenics,” she wrote in an Aug. 24 post. “It’s survival of the fittest. Never mind age, disability, racism, income inequality or that wages haven’t kept pace with rents. Can’t pay? Get out. Nowhere to go? Sucks to be you.” Joe Cortright, a Portland economist who supports

“this thing i’d mostly been suffering in silence with, feeling like i’m a personal failure for not being able to keep up with these extraordinary rent increases, was not just me.” —Chloe eUDAlY original storefront was 150 square feet and cost $150 a month to rent. She and a partner launched the business with only $4,000—about $6,500 in today’s dollars. “We parlayed that into a small but bustling little book shop,” says Eudaly. “That really is one of my skills, turning ideas into reality and DIY-ing everything and making my resources stretch a really long way.” A review of public records reveals minor financial hiccups at Reading Frenzy and nothing more significant than parking tickets for Eudaly. In 2001, Eudaly gave birth to a son, Henry, who was later diagnosed with cerebral palsy. She split with his dad when the boy was 3. Henry’s birth launched her on a path of advocacy for children such as hers with significant disabilities. When Henry was ready for kindergarten, he couldn’t go to Chapman Elementary School in his neighborhood because it didn’t have an elevator. In 2008, Eudaly helped launch a districtwide Parent Teacher Association for parents with children in special education as a way to amplify their voices. “We weren’t getting any traction trying to have our voices heard in our own PTA,” says Stephanie Hunter, who joined Eudaly in helping to launch the group. “I’ve always felt a little bit marginalized and on the outside,” says Eudaly. “Henry became this bridge to the rest of the world, and he also made me want to do bigger things with my life.” Eudaly found that route accidentally in 2015, while scrolling through Craigslist looking for a new place to live. She stumbled onto a listing for a 165-square-foot “tiny home” in the backyard of somebody’s house near Hawthorne Boulevard. The landlord wanted $950 per month— plus help with chores in the main house—a setup Eudaly found outrageous. She posted the notice on Facebook. “That’s a goddamn shed,” a friend responded. Eudaly snickered. (A Google search revealed an identical dwelling for sale at Home Depot.) She then created a Facebook group as a joking homage—calling it “That’s a Goddamn Shed.” She invited friends, who invited others. “It really quickly snowballed into something really unexpected,” she says. “People started talking about what was really happening in their lives. It became this sort of clearinghouse for information and resources and promoting events and organizing.” The Facebook group, now called the Shed, has close to 2,500 members, many of whom are pushing for tenants’ rights.

Novick, says rent control is probably the one thing his fellow economists agree is a bad solution. “The root of our housing affordability problem is a lack of housing supply,” he says. The Shed gave Eudaly a louder voice. But she didn’t limit her activism to social media. Eudaly has testified before the Oregon Legislature for renter protections, and is a familiar sight at Portland Tenants United protests shaming landlords. “She has been a very effective advocate for housing,” says Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer (D-Portland), who is staying neutral in the race. “She’s reached a lot of people in a short amount of time.” The idea that Portland is a divided city, one that serves its well-to-do residents at the expense of everyone else, emerged in the 2012 election for mayor, when it was raised by candidate Jefferson Smith. It grew in 2014 when housing activist Nick Caleb challenged Commissioner Dan Saltzman, drawing close to 20 percent of the vote but failing to force Saltzman into a runoff. “I was on the front end of ringing some alarm bells,”

says Caleb. “Chloe is starting to tap into that sentiment.” She’s racked up some high-profile endorsements from former Mayor Tom Potter, former City Auditor LaVonne Griffin-Valade and environmentalist Bob Sallinger. Last week, the second-most powerful woman in Oregon politics echoed Eudaly’s calls for a rent freeze. “I support a temporary ban on rent increases above a certain percentage until the housing crisis subsides,” tweeted House Speaker Tina Kotek (D-Portland). Yet other signs point to Novick surviving Eudaly’s populist challenge. Novick championed the passage of a 10-cent-pergallon gas tax in May, which gives him a much-needed accomplishment to trumpet. But he’s still making panicky leftward gestures—like a demand to tax companies where CEOs draw big salaries. Eudaly’s hostility to moneyed interests also means that she’s at a distinct financial disadvantage. She won’t take money from groups that have business interests in front of the City Council, meaning she had to turn down donations from a taxi industry still burned by Novick’s embrace of Uber. Novick didn’t join her in limiting donations. He had $95,000 on hand, and she had under $7,000, as of Sept. 19. In some ways, Eudaly is a mirror image of Novick— including the impulse to pick public fights with selfappointed enemies. Last week, on Sept. 14, Eudaly attended a meeting with the Portland Metropolitan Association of Realtors, a lobbying group that is allied with home builders. She took to the Shed to vent her frustration. “Oh Shedizens,” she wrote. “Today I walked into the belly of the beast—the HQ of a certain association of realtors—where I got to listen to the sad tale of a speculative real estate investor who doesn’t always make money on her properties, mom and pop landlords who might get out of the business if they can’t treat their tenants like human ATMs, and of course how rent control doesn’t work. Let’s just say they won’t be cutting me a check.” Jane Leo, an association lobbyist, declined to address Eudaly’s visit, saying the meeting was confidential. Eudaly called the meeting “the highlight of the campaign” so far for her, because she could confront the representatives with the “reality of their practices” on the 25 percent of Portlanders who pay too much in rent. But Eudaly maintains she’s willing to work with people she disagrees with. “I’m not a know-it-all, and I’m not coming into council with this sense that I know better than everyone on everything,” she says. “When it comes to the lives of at least a quarter of our population, it’s OK to be very assertive.” christine dong

elegant mannequins. “I just marched over there and said, ‘I want to work here,’” she says now. “‘I know all about this stuff. I’ll work for free.’” “Can you be here at 9 o’clock?” she recalls one of the owners replying. She dropped out of MLC a few months later. No one tried to stop her, she says. “I felt failed by the public school system and I had a definite chip on my shoulder about it,” she says. “I was proud of being a dropout.” For years, Eudaly lived a comfortable life in Portland—a life many of her supporters say is no longer possible here. At 18, Eudaly moved into a 1907 Craftsman with five bedrooms and 1½ bathrooms in Northwest Portland, where she and two roommates each paid about $170 a month. (When she left 19 years later, in 2007, she was paying $1,100.) Six years later, after stints working in retail and as a junior travel agent, Eudaly opened Reading Frenzy at Southeast 37th Avenue and Hawthorne Boulevard. Her

Face to Face: chloe eudaly talks to supporters at a campaign rally Sept. 10 in Lents Park. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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thomas teal

NEWS

Yard Sign AN ENTIRE FLOOR OF A PORTLAND APARTMENT HIGH-RISE CAN BE RENTED OUT FOR THE NIGHT. By R ac h e l M o n a h a n

rmonahan@wweek.com

The 21-story, dark glass tower looming above the east end of the Burnside Bridge is supposed to help solve Portland’s housing shortage. The apartment building known as Yard opened in late July. It was already a target of grousing from Portlanders who don’t like how it changed the skyline and dodged a city design-review process. But the tower was intended to ease Portland’s housing crunch by adding 284 apartments to a city where low vacancy rates are driving up rent. That’s why the Portland Housing Bureau offered tax credits to the real estate developers that bought the property from the Portland Development Commission in 2014. City officials chipped in a one-time waiver of system development fees worth $666,720 and tax credits worth $771,079 the first year so the developers would set aside 57 apartments in the luxury building as affordable housing for working-class families—who competed in a lottery for the chance to rent a $734-a-month studio. City officials praised Yard’s backers, Key Development and Guardian Real Estate Services. “To solve the affordable-housing crisis facing our city,” City Commissioner Dan Saltzman told the Portland Business Journal last year, “we need more developers like Key Development stepping forward to help.” But other apartments at Yard have also been set aside. The entire 11th floor is available as a short-term rental. For up to $7,215 a night (not including taxes and fees), you can rent all 18 apartments on the 11th floor, via online rental marketplaces, including Airbnb and Vacasa. The decision to create short-term rentals out of a whole floor of a city-subsidized apartment complex raises questions about the city’s use of scarce housing dollars and its failure to enforce the rules for companies like Airbnb. The 11th floor also could serve as a lightning rod for fears that Portland is turning into a playground for the rich. “This whole project from the inception was sold to the public as something in the public interest,” says Portland Tenants United spokesman Gabriel Erbs. “It was going to add housing, so it got advantageous financing and tax credits. That was the social contract. In the end, it’s serving the single most problematic use in the housing crisis.” The worry that Portland residents are competing with tourists for apartments has grown as rents continue to rise. The Portland Housing Bureau’s director has estimated 1,000 otherwise affordable units have been turned into short-term rentals. In the last month, WW has also reported on flagrant scofflaws who operate on the Airbnb website while the city has refused to fine the company. The case of Yard is different. It sits in a retail zone, where none of the city’s limits on listing apartments as short-term rentals applies. The city’s only rule: Get a change of occupancy permit for the de facto hotel. Yard’s owners have yet to do so. Thomas Brenneke, president of Guardian Real Estate Services, says the impact of the 18 units on the larger Portland housing market is “insignificant.” “We’re in a lease-up period here at Yard, 284 units to lease,” he says. “If someone walks in the door and wants to lease 18 units, that’s attractive.” Guardian rented out the entire floor to Portland-based vacation rental management company Vacasa, which in

ROOM WITH A VIEW: A city-subsidized high-rise has a full floor of hotel rooms—like the one WW rented, dubbed “Thimbleberry.” It’s $99 a night, plus taxes and fees.

turn rents out the apartments through its own site or advertising on Airbnb and elsewhere. “Could these theoretically in some universe be properties that someone could rent? Yes. Would it help the current crisis we’re in? No,” says Scott Breon, Vacasa’s chief revenue officer. “Our focus is creating middle-income jobs and providing tax revenue to support the communities we operate in.” Breon says Vacasa is an “amenity” for luxury buildings, where residents might need extra space for guests: “It’s a denser use of limited resources.” And it’s not just at Yard, but across the Willamette River at Park Avenue West, the 30-story downtown tower that opened earlier this year. It rents out 20 apartments through Vacasa and another four or six through short-term rental company Stay Alfred, according Vacasa and TMT Development, which manages Park Avenue West. Yard’s 11th floor wouldn’t directly provide affordable housing. The building ’s sixth through eighth floors— directly above the five-floor parking garage—have been priced for working families, and all of those units are full. In all, 310 prospective tenants applied to rent the 57 apartments, according to Guardian. “It won’t be taking the affordable units off the market, but it is a decrease in housing stock,” says Saltzman, who oversees the Housing Bureau. He says the city may need to strengthen its rules for short-term rentals in commercial zones.

“We expect all hosts, whether his or her listing is in a commercial zone or not, to comply with city regulations,” says Airbnb spokeswoman Laura Rillos. Renting a hotel room at Yard turns out to be a breeze. We went shopping on a recent Friday afternoon, and found a vacancy for the following Sunday night. A two-bedroom on Yard’s 11th floor rents for up to $535 a night during peak times, not including fees and taxes. But we found a less expensive option: $99, plus another $97 in taxes and fees. The room, known as the “Thimbleberry,” has a small balcony that boasts stunning views of eight bridges across the Willamette. Big Pink glows in the sunset, seeming close enough to touch as the “Made in Oregon” sign shines at eye level. The fully stocked kitchen came complete with beer mugs in the freezer and a Portlandia cookbook. There was a flat-screen TV and Vacasa-branded playing cards for those with no desire to leave the views visible from floorto-ceiling windows. Traffic hummed below on I-5, but it didn’t detract from sleep on a memory-foam mattress. “This entire floor dedicated to Airbnbs speaks to the fallacy of the argument of ‘build, build, build and the market will provide something that’s affordable,’” says housing advocate Justin Buri, a former head of Community Alliance of Tenants. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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Thomas Teal

NEWS

buffer zone: Deborah Jordan says she disagreed with seizing the Malheur national Wildlife refuge in January. “I respect Ammon bundy,” Jordan says. “I just thought it was foolish.”

Candid Camera

DEBORAH JORDAN WENT TO EASTERN OREGON TO FILM A PROTEST. NOW HER FOOTAGE IS AT THE CENTER OF THE BUNDY TRIAL. By ka r i n a B r ow n

@karinaPDX

On Sept. 10, Deborah Jordan got the hell out of Portland. She’d been living in town for much of this year—first at a motel, then in an Airbnb on Southeast Division Street. It was a bus ride away from the Multnomah County Jail, where Pete Santilli—her boyfriend, YouTube co-host and partner in provocation—awaited trial on federal conspiracy charges. He’d been arrested Jan. 26 for his role as documenter and hype man for anti-government militant Ammon Bundy’s seizure of Eastern Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in January. On Sept. 6, federal prosecutors dropped the charges against Santilli. He was shipped to a prison in Nevada, to face nearly two dozen charges related to another Bundy family standoff with the feds. Jordan followed him to Las Vegas. Yet Jordan and Santilli remain an outsized presence in Portland’s federal courthouse—thanks to the hundreds of hours of footage they broadcast from the wildlife refuge as part of a web series called The Pete Santilli Show. On Sept. 19, federal prosecutors played footage of Santilli interviewing a militant named Jon Ritzheimer— dressed in full body armor—about rumors the FBI intended to storm the refuge, and the occupiers’ plans to fight back. There’s more where that came from: The U.S. attorney for Oregon has introduced 15 episodes of The Pete Santilli Show as evidence against Ammon Bundy and his seven co-defendants. Jordan helped produce much of the tape—including a sickening clip from 2013 played in court Jan. 31 in which Santilli declared Hillary Clinton “should be arrested, tried for treason and shot in the vagina.” The woman who worked alongside Santilli as he broadcast such shows—what he describes as shock-jock entertainment and others call treason—has received little attention compared to the brash men at the front of the Malheur takeover. Yet she was on the front lines of the standoff, and has no regrets about recording it for posterity and the feds.

“There wasn’t one person up there who was camera-shy,” Jordan says. “And we keep the cameras rolling. It’s a doubleedged sword. These guys wanted to speak. I don’t know why they would be ashamed of what they had to say now.” Santilli filmed constantly during the occupation, with Jordan lining up interviews and handling the technical aspects of the show. He reported the events of the occupation for his viewers, but he also appeared entangled with the inner workings, conferring in whispered conversations with Ammon Bundy and yelling through a bullhorn to drown out the voices of counterprotesters and reporters who asked questions he didn’t like.

human as we are.’ And that’s when the truth comes out.” For five years, Jordan, 56, has helped Santilli arrange those confrontations. She’s traveled with him from their home in Cincinnati to Arizona, Washington, D.C., Cleveland and Baltimore—the latter two locations for Black Lives Matter protests, which the couple covered sympathetically. “We got a lot of flak from the patriot community for covering those protests,” Jordan says. But the duo likes any demonstration against governmental power—and Santilli was able to provoke Geraldo Rivera into calling him a “fascist.” Those moments also pay the bills, via ads for trucks and power tools, as well as anonymous donors. Jordan met Santilli, 51, in 2011 through the online virtual world Second Life, where Jordan was publicizing her career as a singer in the Cincinnati rock band White Star. “You get to the age where you don’t want to sing in a bar anymore,” Jordan says. Jordan says it was Santilli’s brash honesty that originally attracted her to him. “I liked that he actually had the nerve to call it like it was,” she said. “He pushed the First Amendment right to the edge. This is unpopular speech, which is what the Constitution protects, at its best.” Jordan became a kind of Robin Quivers to Santilli’s Howard Stern. “I’m that buffer,” she says. “I smooth things over. I’m the person who’s like, ‘Oh my God, why are you saying this?’ But I also think it’s hilarious.” Santilli, reached by phone at the Multnomah County Detention Center, called Jordan his “counterbalance.” “I’m extremely passionate and energetic,” Santilli said. “She’s much more thoughtful. I think the listeners have really taken to her, and they’ve embraced the show because somebody that’s thoughtful, kind and reserved like her would even hang out with somebody as rambunctious as me.” Others who’ve encountered the couple are less complimentary. “As broad as the definition of a journalist might be, there’s no definition that includes assault of a federal officer or preventing people from speaking at a press conference,” says Suckling. “The First Amendment doesn’t give you the right to break the law.” Jordan says Ammon Bundy invited her and Santilli to cover the Jan. 2 protest in Burns, Ore., against the imprisonment of local ranchers Dwight and Steven Hammond. But she says Bundy didn’t mention anything about taking over a refuge. Even so, it was clear from the beginning that what was happening was very different from a protest, Jordan says. “It was pretty scary,” she says. “There was so much

“These guys wanTed To speak. I don’T know why They would be ashamed of whaT They had To say now.”—Deborah Jordan He used that bullhorn to howl down Kierán Suckling, director of Portland-based environmental group the Center for Biological Diversity, who tried to speak to reporters at the refuge during a press conference. “Pete holds his bullhorn one inch from my face and screams through it that I’m a liar and a sodomist,” Suckling recalls. “Then he blew the airhorn in my face.” Those moments are exactly what the show’s viewers want to see. Jordan estimates that viewers watched 44 million minutes of the live-streamed footage the couple posted to their YouTube channel during the occupation. “Pete and Kierán had a pissing match,” Jordan says. “And that’s great for live streaming. That’s what our audience wants to see. Pete will make people lose their composure, and he will film it and say, ‘See? They are just as

confusion. I went over our videos from the rally again and again. I could hear the panic in my voice. We’re livestreamers, so those moments are captured for eternity. We capture history. That’s what we do.” Jordan has done only sporadic broadcasting with Santilli behind bars. On her way down to Nevada, she stopped in Burns for an “Unindicted Co-Conspirators BBQ” held in her honor. She said the FBI never interviewed her. “They never talked to me, not one time,” Jordan says. She says she and Santilli will resume their show. But it may sound a little different. “One thing is for sure—he’s not going to be poking at the FBI quite so much,” Jordan says. “I think he learned his lesson. We all have. Because this is about them not liking Pete, not about him breaking the law.” Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 SIGUR RÓS Depending on your perspective, the music of Sigur Rós is either as breathtaking as an Arctic glacier or as boring as watching one melt. Regardless, the Icelandic trio is one of the most unique entities in pop, and any chance to immerse in their slo-mo post-rock should always be taken. Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St., 503-248-4335. 8:30 pm. $59.50-$79.50. All ages.

FRESH-HOP POP-UP The pop-up Fresh Hop Beer Fest in the Burnside Brewing parking lot continues with Laurelwood beers. Breakside is Thursday, and Fort George is Friday. Burnside Brewing, 701 E Burnside St., fresh-hops.com. 11 am-8 pm (5-7 pm featured tappings). Through Sept. 24.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 REEL ROCK 11 If a 5.14 finger crack in the Canadian Bugaboos gets you excited, hit up this annual festival of climbing films. This year's fest includes Brette Harrington’s epic free solo in Patagonia and a 15-year-old tackling a V15 boulder in Japan. Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark St., 971-808-5094. 7 pm. $20. All ages.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23

NORTHWEST HESH FEST Three days of denim-vestwearing, airbrushed-van-driving, weed-scented—and surprisingly hummable—hard rawk comes to Dante's. Portland sludge-pop titans Red Fang, stoner heavies Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats, and pastel-metal insurrectionists Deafheaven headline each night. Dante's, 350 W Burnside St., danteslive.com. 9 pm. $25 per day, $91 three-day pass. 21+. Through Sept. 24.

Get Busy

PORTLAND NIGHT MARKET Like an artisan piñata exploding inside a train depot, the quarterly Night Market is a mecca of Portland-made spirits, boozy popsicles, pop-up cabaret performances, feminist T-shirts and dozens of hot sauces. Produce Row warehouse, 100 SE Alder St., 503-974-6717. 4-11 pm. Free entry. All ages. Through Sept. 24.

THE BEST THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK SEPTEMBER 21-27

ADULT SWIM'S DAVID LIEBE HART The veteran of Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! performs a oneman, multimedia show with puppets, music from spazzy DJ Jonah Th’ Mole Mociun, and Hart's favorite video clips. High Water Mark, 6800 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 503-286-6513. $13. 21+.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 PORTLAND GERMAN FILM FESTIVAL Watch the German version of Taken, where Til Schweiger (Inglorious Basterds) channels Liam Neeson and tries to save his daughter from an organ-harvesting clinic in Moscow. If Schweiger's not your schnitzel, there’s a coming-of-age drama screening before and a skiing documentary after. Cinema 21, 616 NW 21st Ave., 503-223-4515. 7 pm. $10. Through Sept. 27.

PORTLAND OKTOBERFEST Go to the German version of Thanksgiving at Oaks Park, where beer gods Paulaner, owner of the best tent on the Wiese in Munich, will serve up its beers—albeit in penny-ante, 12-ounce sizes—while the kids hit the skating rink or rides. Oaks Park, 7805 SE Oaks Park Way, oaksoktoberfest.com. 11 am-midnight. $3-$5. All ages. Through Sept. 25.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25 NAO On her debut full-length, For All We Know, East London singer Nao Jessica Joshua congeals a wealth of reference points—’90s electro-pop, the alien R&B of FKA Twigs, the retro polyglot of Blood Orange—into a delicious brand of ear candy she calls "wonky funk." Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison St., 503-239-7639. 8 pm. $15. 21+.

GABE DINGER'S GOING AWAY COMEDY SPECTACULAR Gabe Dinger is one of the Portland standup scene's most Portlandy comics, a native with jokes about growing up in a spider-infested "historic" home and treating the sun like a deadbeat dad. Now he's moving to L.A. Bri Pruett, Nariko Ott and other local notables help send him off. The Secret Society, 116 NE Russell St., 503-493-3600. 9 pm. $10 advance, $15 day of show. 21+.

MONDAY, SEPT. 26 CANNIBALS IN LOVE READING

This might be the only time pantsuits, micro-penises and pneumonia are a winning combination. $7 for one bingo card, $15 for three. All prices include beer, thank God. Lagunitas Community Room, 237 NE Broadway, eventbrite.com. 5 pm. $7-$15.

Mike Roberts' much-touted, angstymillennial coming-of-age novel—set, of course, in Portland, Austin and Brooklyn—is the love story of a kind of shitty but charming dude. The book, however, leans more toward charming than shitty. Powell's City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., powells.com. 7:30 pm. Free.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 27 LUSH Of all the great 4AD bands of the late ’80s and early

’90s, Lush never quite got its due stateside—which is a shame, because songs like “Tiny Smiles” and “Kiss Chase” should have been staples on lovelorn teenage mixtapes. Twenty years later, the London band is back with new music that's beautiful and familiar, a dash of Cocteau Twins mystery that’s softer than a kiss. Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside St., 503-225-0047. 8 pm. $25 advance, $30 day of show. All ages.

THE JEWISH OREGON STORY: 1950-2010 Ever wonder why Hillsdale has the country's hugest Ten Commandments display? Or how Portland got so damn progressive? Turns out the two intertwine. Historian Ellen Eisenberg has tracked the Jewish history of Oregon, and she'll share the Cliffs Notes version. Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Ave., ohs.org. 6-8 pm. Free. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 14, 2016 wweek.com

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D J D I C K H E N N E S S y/ y O u T u B E

B I T E - S I Z E D P O RT L A N D C U LT U R E N E W S

BOO(BS): Last year, Portland got its first-ever strip club haunted house, from local adult entertainment mainstay DJ Dick Hennessy. As far as we know, it was the first strip club haunted house anywhere. This year, the Strip Club Haunted House is coming back. Instead of three nights, it will be up for five in Chinatown’s Spyce Gentleman’s Club. Last year’s theme was “Seven Deadly Sins.” This year, it’s time travel. “The premise is that we love strip clubs to death, so we decide to go in a time machine and experience what they were like in the past, but things take a turn for the worse,” DJ Dick tells WW. He says guests can experience what strip clubs may have been like in different time periods. There will even be Vietnam War- and Salem witch trials-themed rooms, he says.

THE CANNABIS CORNER

LITTLE BIT MORE 18

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

The PORTLAND ONe: Kasey Anderson, the local singersongwriter convicted of bilking $600,000 from investors in a fraudulent benefit album, is out of prison and trying to relaunch his music career. A fixture in the Portland roots scene, Anderson had solicited the money for what he claimed was a star-studded LP dedicated to the West Memphis Three, three men falsely imprisoned for murder in the ’90s. He told investors that Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, Lady Gaga and other major names had agreed to contribute songs to the record and participate in a series of charity concerts, falsifying emails and bank statements along the way. In 2014, Anderson pleaded guilty to five counts of wire fraud and was sentenced to four years in federal prison. He was released last October, and has quietly started playing gigs again. In an interview with the blog Farce the Music published Sept. 7, Anderson discussed battling addiction and bipolar disorder at the time he committed the crimes, making amends to those he defrauded, and getting back to performing. “I was without my freedom for a couple of years, and I’ll probably be paying restitution for as long as I live, and that’s well-deserved,” he said. “And if you think I’m an asshole or don’t like the songs, that’s fine. But I’m gonna keep writing and playing, whether it’s in my basement or in front of a bunch of people onstage.” Anderson’s next show is at Kelly’s Olympian on Thursday, Sept. 22. COMING SOON: Two closed Southeast Portland spots will get new life as upscale Vietnamese bars. Oso Market and Bar, which closed this month, will reopen as an intimate Vietnamese-inflected cocktail bar run by Lake Oswego High grads Eric Mann and Will Storey; Mann opened Aji Tram Vietnamese restaurant in Lake Oswego after travels in Vietnam, and according to Storey, the many-lantern theme of the restaurant is based on the lantern city of Hoi An. They hope to open by November. >> The former Bar Dobre looks to be turning into a bar and Saigon street-food spot called Short Round. Ben Bui, co-owner of high-end Vietnamese spot Fish Sauce, filed for a liquor license for the Hawthorne Boulevard location. FLIPPeD OFF: Portland’s biggest food festival, Feast, happened last week. Mostly, that meant well-heeled out-of-towners consuming massive quantities of rich foodstuffs without locals noticing. But the event is also home to several notable afterparties, including the fourth annual ChefStable Flip Cup tournament. This year’s tourney took place at the Evergreen. Beer-bro bar Loyal Legion made good use of its home-court advantage, fielding an all-dude team that beat Willamette Week in the final four on the way to the cup. We congratulate them.


The Bump

Taco bowl

TRUMPAGE

DRESS UP THE DONALD FOR MONDAY’S DEBATE. Illustration by Austin Kowitz

The wall

Grandfather’s Ku Klux Klan hood

Doctor’s note about good health and Tenuate Dospan prescription for weight loss

Bankruptcy filings

Kentucky Fried Chicken

WATCH IT: Donald J. Trump will debate Hillary Clinton at 6 pm Monday, Sept. 26. Most channels. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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FOOD & DRINK = WW Pick. Highly recommended. By MATTHEW KORFHAGE. Editor: MARTIN CIZMAR. Email: dish@wweek.com. See page 3 for submission instructions.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 Fresh-Hop Pop-Up

A pop-up fresh-hop beer fest will be held in the Burnside Brewing parking lot through Saturday, Sept. 24. They’ll be tapping essential fresh-hop brewery Laurelwood today, and will follow up Thursday with Breakside, whose liquid-nitrogen-shattered Simcoe was our Beer of the Year in 2015. Fort George and a mystery brewer will follow. Also expect schnitzel, kraut and other Oktoberfest things—but remember in your heart that fresh hops are an Oregon tradition. The parking lot closes at 8 pm nightly. Burnside Brewing, 701 E Burnside St., 503-946-8151. 11 am-8 pm (5-7 pm featured tappings).

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 Fresh Harvest Festival

So you know that huge Hood River fresh-hop fest on the weekend? There are also options for the lazy. And locally inclined. At least 20 fresh-hop beers will tap at the hall of geek-roguery Green Dragon, including Laurelwood and Breakside, which are both mandatory. Also, fresh-hop Cider Riot? Whoa. Green Dragon, 928 SE 9th Ave., 503-517-0660. 5-10 pm.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 Hood River Hops Fest

This is the big one—the fresh-hop fest to rule them all, with an ungodly number of fresh-hop beers from

breweries all over the state, tastin’ like lupulin like a mofo. More than 40 brewers will be represented, whether Gorge locals like Pfriem and Solera or Portland-area breweries like Coin Toss, Ex Novo and Breakside. You want the most hop flavor, the farmiest it gets? This is the spot. $15 admission includes five tasters. Extra tastes $1. 5th and Columbia streets, Hood River, 541-386-2000. Noon.

Beers for Breakfast

Now you can get drunk at 9 am without having to go to an East Portland strip club! Great Notion— home to a blueberry-muffin beer that tastes like blueberry muffins, and a pancake beer that tastes kinda like pancakes—will do what comes naturally and host a breakfast beerfest with seatings at 9 and 11 am. It costs $50 for a pancake breakfast and 12 tasters (about 3 pints). Minors pay $25. Great Notion Brewing, 2204 NE Alberta St., No. 101, 503-548-4491. 9 am.

MONDAY, SEPT. 26 Straight Outta Dough Pizza Pop-Up

Hey, remember when Portland had a hip-hop pizza pop-up on Mondays, with great pies steaming out of the Ned Ludd ovens? And it was called P.R.E.A.M., which is like this cool play on a Wu-Tang album? Well, apparently Straight Outta Dough remembers too, but likes N.W.A. better. Old-school funk, soul and hip-hop plays. “Gourmet pizza” is $2. The Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont St., 503-754-7782. 9 pm-midnight.

3. Poke Mon

What to eat this week. 1. Smallwares

4605 NE Fremont St., 971-229-0995, smallwarespdx.com. Sept. 24 is the restaurant’s final day. Crowds have been thick, but brave them to wish well to chef Johanna Ware, not to mention eat her fried kale and transcendent mapo dofu. $$-$$$.

2. Oyatsupan Bakers

Experience Lebanese cuisine at its best Call us for your event party & catering needs! Belly dancing Friday and Saturday evenings

223 SW STARK STREET PORTLAND, OR 503-274-0010 ALAMIRPORTLAND.COM 20

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

TREAT YOURSELF

WITH A DUBDUBDEAL! We’ve got plenty of affordable offers to start the year off right. Find certificate discounts to some of your favorite Portland restaurants.

wweek.com/ dubdubdeals

16025 SW Regatta Lane, Beaverton, 503-941-5251, oyatsupan.com. Oyatsupan is Portland’s first introduction to the estimable Japanese baking tradition—but savory lunch dishes are even better, with British-style pork tonkatsu tea sandwich ($6.80) and curry in a lightly glazed pastry. $.

1485 SE Hawthorne Blvd., 503-894-9743. Poke Mon is both peak Portland and peak poke, serving up delicious, sauced-up, sashimi-style albacore or octopus at an affordable price, with a side of sake or La Croix. $$.

4. Rue

1005 SE Ankeny St., 503-231-3748, ruepdx.com. French “neo-bistro” Rue toes the line on two very dangerous ingredients and wins big with a terrific Sharknana banana cocktail and delicate lavender carrots. $$$.

5. Jacqueline

2039 SE Clinton St., 503-327-8637, jacquelinepdx.com. Chef Derek Hansen—who made Broder’s excellent dinner menu (RIP)—has moved to Clinton Street with beautiful wild-mushroom small plates, cheap oysters and fine cioppino thick with shells. $$$.

DRANK

2015 Pét-Nat

(GAMINE WINES)

Kate Norris is half of the winemaking team behind Division Winemaking Co. and the Southeast Wine Collective, but a new project—Gamine Wines—is hers alone. Norris’ take on pétillant-naturel, a style of bottle-fermented sparkling wine, turned heads last year in its first season of release. This year’s release of the Gamine pét-nat is every bit as good. Made from the red grenache grape, this is a straw-colored sparkling white wine, a neat trick of winemaking that’s become something of a calling card here in Oregon. In the glass, look for Italian sparkling lemonade and raisin bread, with an elegant bubble structure that elevates the wine from pét-nat’s farmhouse roots. Most of this wine was snapped up pre-release by top wine bars and shops in New York and Los Angeles. Your best bet is to order directly from Southeast Wine Collective, where dosage and zero-dosage bottles are still available. Recommended. JORDAN MICHELMAN.


joe riedl

ROUND-UP

The 9 Best

Chile Relleno Burritos in Portland

WE SENT MEXICAN-FOOD EXPERT NICK ZUKIN TO EAT 50 DIFFERENT LOCAL VERSIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA VEGGIE BURRITO. THESE ARE THE VERY BEST. BY NI C K Z UK I N

@extramsg

Mexico has a great tradition of meatless eating. Prior to the Spanish conquest, meat was scarce in Mexico, yet Mexicans created one of the world’s most vibrant ancient cuisines. Meat has always been plentiful on this side of the border— we’re awash in fajitas, chili con carne, extruded tamales, and even the Whopperito. For my money, the best Chicano vegetarian option is the chile relleno burrito: quite literally, a burrito with a chile relleno inside. While there doesn’t appear to be any clear evidence, it seems to originate from Los Angeles. In Portland, finding cheese-and-pepperstuffed burritos is relatively easy, especially if the joint has an L.A. pedigree—look for carne asada fries, California burritos (often renamed “Oregon burritos” here), or pastrami. In Los Angeles, chile relleno burritos can be as simple as a tortilla and refried beans wrapped around a chile relleno. In Portland, you find more complex incarnations, corrupted by Mission burritos. Few, if any, have merely beans and a relleno inside, unfortunately. Most have rice, too, along with salsa or pico de gallo, sometimes lettuce or even sour cream and runny guacamole. Too many ingredients, though, and the flavor of the chile relleno can get lost. (You can optimize your relleno burrito by ordering it without rice and with extra cheese.) Rellenos can use the thinner-fleshed and wider poblano chiles or the thicker-fleshed and narrower, but more assertive, Anaheims. Some are battered in egg; all are stuffed with cheese. I tried more than 50 chile relleno burritos around town (full disclosure, I own two Mexican restaurants in Portland, though we don’t sell relleno burritos) and went back to about a dozen of the best, just to make sure. Here are my favorites, ranked from top to bottom. All of them are good. The rankings are based on the eateries’ default burritos, some of which have larded beans, as noted in each review.

1. Tortilleria y Tienda de Leon 3. Rigoberto’s 16223 NE Glisan St., 503-255-4356, salsaslocas.com.

Tienda de Leon is known for its Mexican stews, but it might be tough for a carnivore to pass up the barbacoa or achiote-braised pork. Unfortunately for a vegetarian, the refried beans, which are some of the best in PDX, are cooked in lard. To get a vegetarian version of a chile relleno burrito, ask for the vegan black beans. The burritos are all customized on the fly and wrapped in housemade flour tortillas. Ask for one of the excellent egg-battered chile rellenos in the burrito, and the kitchen will chop it up and mix it with whatever fillings you like. A little beans, some extra cheese, and a squirt of salsa is all you need. This would probably drop below the next best burrito if you insisted on having vegetarian beans. $10.

2. La cocina 3939 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 503-278-5414.

The size of the menu and casual ambience of this place belie a commitment to quality akin to gourmet Mexican restaurants. The menu says whole-wheat tortillas and Cotija cheese for the chile relleno burrito, but on both visits, thankfully, it was a fresh poblano chile stuffed with lots of gooey, white cheese with very good rice and decent beans in a white-flour tortilla. A large helping of delicious guacamole, along with pickled carrots and pico de gallo, comes on the side. $8.75.

15855 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Milwaukie, 503-659-8124, rigobertostacoshop.com.

The San Diego lineage is clear in both the name and the menu at this Milwaukie taqueria. And like its cousins, Javier’s and Muchas Gracias, it’s open 24 hours. But this is the cousin that knows how to cook. Everything is proportioned and seasoned well, and the bit of extra cheese and red sauce makes for a tasty burrito. Take note: The refried beans have lard, so if you want a vegetarian burrito, ask for the whole pintos. It’s better with the larded beans. And Rigoberto’s has a drive-thru. $6.50.

4. Taqueria hermanos Ochoa’s 943 SE Oak St., Hillsboro, 503-640-4755.

Every tacoholic in Portland knows about this Hillsboro institution. Quality has fluctuated through the many years it has been open, but currently, things are looking up. You could forgive a place like this that mostly serves Mexican immigrants for not knowing how to make a good California burrito. Yet, Ochoa’s needs no excuses. The beans, rice, chile—even the egg on the chile—all taste great on their own and still harmonize like a Los Tres Ases bolero. Note: Ochoa’s does not have vegetarian beans. $7.

The champ: De Leon’s chile relleno is portland’s best.

5. La Bonita

9. Tito’s Burritos

2839 NE Alberta St., 503-281-3662, labonitarestaurant.com.

1921 SW 6th Ave,, 971-319-6650.

Since before hipsters “discovered” tacos and white faces outnumbered brown ones on Alberta, this family-run taqueria decorated with murals has been serving high-quality tacos, burritos, tamales and pozole. The large chile relleno oozes a slow tidal wave of cheese and is the star of the burrito, despite too much bland rice and lettuce. $6.95.

6. el Burrito Loco

With two carts and a full-sized restaurant on the Portland State campus, Tito’s has already proved itself in the marketplace. So has Chipotle. But Chipotle doesn’t have a chile relleno burrito, and if it did, like its other burritos, it wouldn’t taste as good as the one from Tito’s. A blistered-brown tortilla wraps an Anaheim chile filled with cheese that stretches to your chin with each bite. More cheese, along with pico de gallo, and a bit too much rice and beans fill the rest of the tortilla. $6.99.

3126 NE 82nd Ave., 503-252-1343.

This is a little slice of SoCal taco culture on 82nd Avenue. The shop even has pastrami sandwiches and carne asada fries. In true L.A. style, the chile relleno burrito is served sin arroz. The beans could be seasoned better, but El Burrito Loco doubles up on the Anaheim chiles. A splash of salsa and a little pico de gallo wrapped up in a nicely toasted tortilla rounded out a solid burrito. And there’s a drive-thru. $5.75.

7. La Jarochita Southwest 5th Avenue and Stark Street, 503-421-9838.

It’s not surprising that the best Mexican food cart downtown also makes an enjoyable chile relleno burrito. The rice and beans were both underseasoned, but the poblano chile was big and full of cheese, the egg was fresh-tasting, and there were great salsas to cover up any flaws. La Jarochita is close to opening a brick-andmortar spot to join its multiple downtown carts. $6.

8. Santeria 703 SW Ankeny St., 503-956-7624.

As famous for the restroom it shares with Portland’s oldest strip club (and the chance to see some chichis) as it is for its food, Santeria knows how to make a burrito. The chile relleno can be a bit fridge-flavored, but a nicely grilled tortilla, good pintos, an avocado salsa and, especially, lots of cheese save it. It’s open late. $10.50.

Also tried: El Brasero, El Burrito Azteca, Casa del Sol, La Catrina, Chavez Express, Chuy’s (Gresham), Don Chilito’s (Aloha), Don Taco (Vancouver), La Fuente (Tigard), Gonazlez (Newberg), Los Gorditos, El Guajillo (Tigard), El Guero, Hacienda Real (Beaverton), Javier’s, King Burrito, Lindo Michoacan, Luna, Mi Burrito, La Mixteca (Fairview), La Morenita, Muchas Gracias, Nayar, El Nutri, Ole Frijole, Ole Ole, El Pato Feliz, Pepitas (Beaverton), Pepitos Locos, Peppers (Hillsboro), Rose City, Sabor Mexicano (Vancouver), Sanchez (Tigard), Santo Domingo, La Sirenita, Super Burrito Express (Milwaukie), Super Torta, Supermercado Mexico (Hillsboro), Taco del Sol (Tigard), El Tapatio, Taqueria Portland, Taquieros, Los Taquitos, Tecos, Los Temos (Milwaukie), Tienda Santa Cruz.

BeST SaLSaS

Supermercado Mexico (Hillsboro) Tortilleria y Tienda de Leon Taqueria Hermanos Ochoa’s La Bonita Rigoberto’s

BeST SocaL TReaT Asada fries from Don Taco (Vancouver) Pastrami quesadilla from El Burrito Loco Asada tots from Tecos

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21,2016 wweek.com


MUSIC

Big in Japan

Editor: MATTHEW SINGER. TO BE CONSIDERED FOR LISTINGS, go to wweek.com/ submitevents and follow submission directions. All shows should be submitted two weeks or more in advance of event. Press kits, CDs and especially vinyl can be sent to Music Desk, WW, 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Please include show or release date information with all physical mailings. Email: msinger@wweek.com. Fax: 243-1115.

Guerilla Toss, Don Gero, Consumer

[AVANT-WEIRD] Guerilla Toss’ unsettling racket might stem from no-wave takes on dance music, but it could just be a twisted 21st-century revision of what the X-Ray Spex angled at. Whatever the source for the New York quintet’s grating pulsations, it’s released scads of recordings since 2010, including a live disc, a batch of remixes and Eraser Stargazer, the troupe’s DFA debut that seems to find all involved amid some hardy George Clinton worship. Trying to dig out meaning from Kassie Carlson’s lyrics further enlivens all the janky dance tunes, but it’s not always necessary when those rhythms kick in. DAVE CANTOR. Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water Ave. 9:30 pm. $8. 21+.

[TWO-TONE SKA] Anyone who was a teenager in the late 90s when the minor ska-punk craze hit will no doubt remember band geeks with bad haircuts trying to pull off mall-punk James Bond poses against atrocious cartoonneon bullshit. What’s unfortunately not a tangible memory is the music’s real inception with the Specials, a racially mixed group from a destitute English industrial town who fused the Jamaican rhythms of their immigrant families with punk sensibility born of the social tumult and created a genre so infectious and fashionable it topped the U.K. charts. The band hasn’t released a new album since 2001, and lost a few original members in that time, but it’s recruited some impressive temps, like Libertines drummer

TOP

5

The Specials, The Far East

THE FIVE GREATEST SIDEKICKS IN MUSIC

J-POP STAR NYK EDWARDS COMES HOME TO PORTLAND. BY MATTHEW SIN GER

CONT. on page 25

COURTESY OF ARTGARFUNKEL.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21

ART GARFUNKEL

Big Boi

Like Phife before him, Big Boi kept OutKast tethered to earth with his streetwise smooth talk, allowing his more abstract partner to achieve transcendence. And he’s worked his ass off the last decade to keep the brand alive, making it easier for Andre to drift around, blowing minds with random guest verses, without everyone badgering him for an album. Now that’s a wingman.

2 Mick Jones Joe Strummer was the heart, soul and restless leg of the Clash, but Jones had the pop sense, the coke habit and the rock-star swagger that elevated the group from snaggletoothed punks to the Only Band That Matters. 3 Paul McCartney Yeah, I said it. Obviously, the Lennon-McCartney dynamic was less Jordan-Pippen than Kobe-Shaq. (In this analogy, George Harrison was Rick Fox and Ringo is Slava Medvedenko.) But someone always has to be No. 2—even if it’s really more like No. 1B—and historically, that’s Sir Paul and his silly love songs. Come at me, bro. 4 Bez An inspiration to untalented hangers-on everywhere, the Happy Mondays’ human mascot made a whole career of shaking maracas, skipping in place and scoring drugs for the actual musicians, and bless him for it. Without him, we may never have gotten Joel Gion of the Brian Jonestown Massacre, the dancing guy from the Mighty Mighty Bosstones, or Fred Nemo of Portland’s own Hazel. 5 Art Garfunkel Yes, he was the lesser half of one of the more lopsided superstar pairings in music, but that creative unbalance is what ultimately came to define them. In other words, you can’t have Simon without the G-Funk. And his turtleneck-and-Jewfro swag? Second to none. MATTHEW SINGER. SEE IT: Art Garfunkel plays Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark St., No. 110, on Sunday, Sept. 25. 8 pm. $49.50-$100. All ages.

C O U R T E S Y O F N Y K E D WA R D S

PROFILE

= WW Pick. Highly recommended. Prices listed are sometimes for advance ticket sales. At-the-door increases and socalled convenience charges may apply. Event lineups are subject to change after WW’s press deadlines.

msinger@wweek.com

An uncomfortable number of people in Japan know how Nyk Edwards likes his Big Macs. “People tweet my McDonald’s order and stuff, and I’m like, ‘Dude,’” the 24-year-old singer says over Skype from Tokyo. “I don’t like pickles on my burger, so whenever I go to a McDonald’s and order no pickles, someone who works there is like, ‘Nicholas Edwards just ordered a no-pickles double cheeseburger.’ I swear to God, every single time.” Such is the peculiar nature of fame in the socialmedia age. But Edwards can’t complain. As he often reminds himself, this is exactly what he wanted. In 2010, the day after graduating from Glencoe High I was going to do,” he says. “I didn’t have a visa, I School in Hillsboro, Edwards boarded a plane to didn’t have a place to stay.” After a few months Tokyo, determined to make it as a pop star in crashing the lobbies of every record label in the a country he’d only visited once before. Within city, his YouTube videos landed him an invite to three years, he found an agent, won a televised the international singing pageant Nodo Jiman Za! singing competition, starred in a movie, signed to a World. On his first appearance, he finished third; major record label and went on a nationwide tour. on his second, he won. (He’s won a total of three He doesn’t quite have a gauge on the level of his times, more than any other repeat contestant.) His celebrity—he’s not Justin Bieber, but he still has to career fast-tracked from there. A film based loosely leave the house in disguise or risk a mob scene— on his life, Hinomaru Dream, premiered in 2012. but regardless, he’s living a dream he willed into In 2013, he signed with Warner Music, put out existence. As far as he’s concerned, a few invasions his debut single and went on a promotional tour, playing for 30,000 fans in 10 days. of dietary privacy is a fair tradeoff. It was a dizzying ascent. But as a songwriter, How does a white kid from the farm town of Cornelius, Ore., end up as a pop star on the other Edwards wanted to be known for more than just side of the world? Where does someone even get a his voice. Shortly after the release of his first album, Skies, he split from Warner, which was pushing him dream like that? Speaking with Edwards—who returns to the to record a covers album—a trend made popular by Nodo Jiman Za! World. Instead, he wanted States for his first-ever Portland show to explore what he calls “the four pinthis week—he comes off like someone “ANYONE nacles of human emotion: happiness, who’s been prepping to be intersadness, anger and fun.” He’s since viewed since childhood, with an CAN RELATE released two albums, The Strange easygoing maturity beyond his TO BEING OUT and Hardspice, on a label started years. And indeed, his perforOF YOUR ELEMENT, by his management company. mative streak started young. “I AND TRYING TO While the music is broad and remember, when I was about BUILD YOURSELF bombastic—ranging from acous3, at my dad’s birthday party, INTO WHAT YOU tic ballads to chugging rockers to everybody was going to sing electronic rave-ups—Edwards sings ‘Happy Birthday,’ and I just got DESIRE.” with an honesty he says is rare among up on the counter and I was like, —Nyk Edwards his peers. He often draws from his own ‘No, I’m going to sing it myself, and autobiography, tapping into the excitement you’re all going to listen,” he says. In high school, exchange students from Hillsboro’s and confusion of coming of age in a place wildly sister city of Fukuroi spent a week at his fam- different from where he grew up. Not many people ily’s house and introduced him to J-pop. He was anywhere can claim to have had the same experience, already learning Japanese, which he chose to but according to Edwards, his is a more universal study because “it seemed like the most difficult” story than it might seem. “Obviously, people in Japan may not have moved language class offered at his school. Singing lyrics then became a study tool. “I didn’t have anyone to another country to chase a dream, but I think to speak to,” he says, “so I would record myself anyone can relate to being out of your element, your singing in Japanese and put it on YouTube, and comfort zone and the environment you’re used to, use it as a way to practice the knowledge I’d gained and trying to build yourself into what you desire,” studying in a real-life situation—as real as I could he says. “I think that’s an experience everyone goes through, whether they’re moving down the block or get, living in Hillsboro.” By the end of his senior year, Edwards was across the country or across the world.” fluent in both the language and history of Japanese popular music. With $800 in the bank, he left for SEE IT: Nyk Edwards plays Roseland Theater, 8 NW 6th Ave., on Sunday, Sept. 25. 3:30 pm Tokyo while his mortar board was practically still and 7 pm. $33 general admission, $90 VIP, $210 in the air. “I was not thinking very much about what meet-and-greet. All ages. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21,2016 wweek.com


MUSIC track to keep the brain’s engine humming. PETE COTTELL. Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E Burnside St. 9 pm. $15 advance, $17 day of show. 21+.

Gary Powell. And luckily, crucial participants like founding vocalist Terry Hall, bassist Sir Horace Gentleman and guitarist Lynval Golding remain. CRIS LANKENAU. Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside St. 8 pm. $35. All ages.

Khruangbin, Luz Elena Mendoza

[SOUTHEAST ASIAN PSYCHEDELIA] Name a style of psychedelic music from anywhere on earth, and a band from Texas has probably gone all-in on it. Such is the case with Khruangbin, a Houston-area trio whose sonic gaze has been averted toward Thai funk from the 1960s. It’s the Mark Knopfler of psych—mellow and groovy comedown music with soothing guitars and rare vocal melodies using Thai scales that are simultaneously exotic and easy to digest. The band’s latest record, 2015’s The Universe Smiles Upon You, feels timeless, with warm blankets of funk that might even have your middle-aged father ask, “What’s this?” PARKER HALL. Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi Ave. 9 pm. $12 advance, $14 day of show. 21+.

Sigur Rós

[POST NEW-AGE] With the exception of a supposed reissue of its classic self-titled 2002 record, little is known about what this mysterious gang of Icelandic crescendo kings has been up to since 2013’s Kveikur. With a promise of two full sets and no opening act this time around, Sigur Ros diehards should expect a feast of classics accompanied by an expected mind-boggling dystopian wonderland of a stage setup that adds a whole new dimension to the band’s peculiar brand of inimitable and otherworldly post-rock. PETE COTTELL. Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St. 8:30 pm. $59.50-$111. All ages.

Warpaint, Facial, Goldensuns

St. Paul and the Broken Bones, Seratones

[DREAM ROCK] It seems odd to say, but Warpaint is well into its second decade of existence. The L.A. dreamrock quartet really entered the sonic radar with its 2014 self-titled album—a clean, catchy and creative stab at pop rock, marked with heavenly effects, shimmering multipart harmonies and just enough grit to give it a natural feel. With the forthcoming Heads Up, the band goes a tad more in the Phantogram direction, with percussive hooks and fist-pumping choruses. It’s a somewhat safe move for a bona fide pop act. But fear not—there’s still plenty of experimental detail to nerd out about. MARK STOCK. Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell St. 9 pm. $25. All ages.

[NEW VINTAGE] St. Paul and the Broken Bones are a throwback to the glory days of Motown and Stax, with a taste for brass-touched laments and sweat-stained jolts of soul. On second album Sea of Noise, frontman Paul Janeway and his six-piece band delve into orchestral pop, with a tinge of electronica and lyrics that reflect on our country’s ongoing racial tensions. In the end, it’s Janeway’s conviction that sells it. BRANDON WIDDER. Roseland Theater, 8 NW 6th Ave. 8:30 pm. $25 general admission, $40 reserved balcony seating. 21+.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22

Foals, Bear Hands

[INDIE-ROCK WONDERS] It wasn’t until after the original founder and

Northwest Hesh Fest: Red Fang, Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats, Deafheaven, more

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 El Ten Eleven, Mylets

[MODULAR MATH ROCK] With an array of effects and gadgetry at its employ, L.A.’s El Ten Eleven is hellbent on shaking as many booties as possible with the absolute minimum number of hands on deck. At their best, the knotty guitar work and elastic bass that glue 2015’s Fast Forward together approach an alternate instrumental universe that LCD Soundsystem and Hot Chip would find rather comfortable, while the record’s more subdued cuts are perfectly acceptable post-rock for anyone who needs a steady sound-

Steve Gunn and the Outliers, Nap Eyes

[NOODLE MAESTRO] There’s an understated brilliance to Steve Gunn’s latest pastoral contemplations, so much so that the guitar slinger’s Eyes on the Lines—along with its spectacular predecessor, Way Out Weather— could almost serve as a benchmark for modern folk rock. The manner in which the former Kurt Vile sideman addresses his subject matter is lax and breezy, alive with ambling drums and six-string wanderings designed to showcase Gunn’s familiarity with ragas and traditional music from locales far removed from his native Brooklyn. He incorporates everything from country to psychedelic rock in doing so, and though his lyrics are rarely explicit, their ambiguity paints a portrait that’s as open to interpretation as his jammy, muscular solos. BRANDON WIDDER. Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi Ave. 9 pm. $13 advance, $15 day of show. 21+.

CONT. on page 26

PREVIEW COURTESY OF SONY MUSIC

[HESHER HEAVEN] A summit meeting for those still reveling in the stylistic movement where long hair, acid-washed jeans and patched-up outerwear converge with the heavy pace of metal and thrash, Northwest Hesh Fest has returned, in all of its grimy glory. Over the course of three days, a fiery epicness will arise from the stage at Dante’s by way of the finest in headbanging acts around. Thursday headliners Red Fang are sure to play material from their upcoming album, Only Ghosts, whose lead single, “Flies,” calls back on the Portland band’s older, sludgier sound. It serves as a good indicator of what to expect from the festival as a whole. Day 2 is a twofer of domination between local faction Danava and U.K.’s best in modern stoner rock, Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats. Though Danava hasn’t released an album’s worth of new material in a few years, Uncle Acid’s recent music and fairly recent cover of Iron Maiden’s “Remember Tomorrow” should quench your thirst. If not, the blend of black metal and shoegaze offered by Saturday closers Deafheaven is premium enough to close out any metal festival. CERVANTE POPE. Dante’s, 350 W Burnside St. 9 pm. $25-$35 per show, $91 three-day pass. Through Sept. 24. See facebook.com/ NorthWestHeshFest for complete schedule.

lead singer Andrew Mears quit and guitarist Yannis Philippakis took over as the frontman in 2006 that Oxford five-piece Foals started picking up traction in their native U.K. While earlier albums betrayed Phillippakis and drummer Jack Bevan’s mathrock background, their most recent songs, like the chart-topping “Mountain At My Gates” from newest album What Went Down, have the quality of great rock hits alternative radio stations love to blast, with slow-building verses erupting into a chorus that crashes in a deeply satisfying way. Combined with the beautiful, atmospheric harmonies delivered by Phillippakis’ mournful voice, it proves why British music magazine Q voted them the “Best Act in the World Today.” MAYA MCOMIE. Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside St. 7:30 pm. $29 advance, $30 day of show. All ages.

Nao, Kweku Collins

[NU R&B] No current musician embodies the sound that has come to define the new version of underground cool as well as Nao Jessica Joshua. The young London singer, who goes by the name Nao, makes the EDM-accented R&B music of our dreams— expertly crafted, insistently catchy, ideal for both the dance floor and your Lyft ride home. Her sound is What a Time to Be Alive come to life, a near-perfect blend of woozy electro, ’90s R&B and new funk. After releasing two great EPs, So Good and February 15, Nao has made good on the immense hype with the wonderful debut record For All We Know. It crackles from the opening hits of “Get to Know Ya” to penultimate ballad “Girlfriend,” with the searing music never outshining her soulful voice. Better yet, the slinky, razor-sharp “Trophy,” Nao’s second collaboration with the mysterious A.K. Paul, is one of the R&B songs of the year. It’s like Janet Jackson’s “Rhythm Nation” reimagined for kids who grew up listening to grime instead of new jack swing. MICHAEL MANNHEIMER. Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison St., 503-239-7639. 8 pm Sunday, Sept. 25. $15. 21+. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

25


MUSIC Skylar Grey, Morgxn

[TOO-COOL POP] Skylar Grey’s most well-known work is perhaps the hook to Eminem and Rihanna’s “Love the Way You Lie,” which she earned a Grammy nomination for writing. But she’s also a gifted performer herself, and she’s been performing since she was a kid. And while there are definitely some darker themes to her music—“Final Warning” warns an ex-lover “someone’s gonna get hurt/and it’s not gonna be me”—her confessional style of singing blends both vulnerability and strength. Her voice shifts effortlessly from soft and low to high and fluttering in her more tender songs like “Glow in the Dark” and “Come Up for Air,” a single on forthcoming album Natural Causes. MAYA MCOMIE. Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell St. 8 pm. $20-$99. All ages.

Laura Marling

[BRIT FOLK] You can change the instrument, but the sharp songs of Laura Marling will always be devastating. Last year, the British folk singer released Short Movie, her first album written and recorded with an electric guitar instead of an acoustic, though the shift doesn’t distort her core sound as much as enhance it. It’s Marling’s California record, dreamy and breezy in stages but still grounded by her wit and acerbic humor. This is Brit folk at its apex, and a show not to be missed. MICHAEL MANNHEIMER. Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta St. 8 pm. $20 advance, $23 day of show. Under 21 permitted with legal guardian.

Lush

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25 Echo and the Bunnymen, Ester Drang [RABBITS AT REST] Post-punk poster boys borne aloft through five landmark LPs of legendary influence and chiming, jagged beauty, Echo and the Bunnymen bestrode the U.K. in the ‘80s as proto-alternative gods. But, aside from the requisite John Hughes soundtrack appearance (“Bring On the Dancing Horses” in Pretty In Pink), they never quite broke apart from the old New Wave stable this side of the pond. Whatever the reasons, this tour, in support of 2014 album Meteorites—a crowdfunded stroll through enervated tropes—marks the act’s first extensive stateside tour in decades, which begs unkind comparisons. Though still capable of assembling full-throated majesty for a tune or two, frontman Ian McCulloch’s brand of dewy disaffection was never bound to age well. They shoot dancing horses, don’t they? JAY HORTON. Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside St. 8 pm. $30 advance, $35 day of show. All ages.

MONDAY, SEPT. 26 Nick Waterhouse

TUESDAY, SEPT. 27

Modern Baseball, Chris Farren, Walter Etc., Jank

[DEPRESSION POP] Moshing away your mental misfortune has been trending hard for the past year or so, and no record of 2016 encapsulates the healing properties of power chords better than Modern Baseball’s latest LP, Holy Ghost. Driven by diary-shredding vocals laid over dueling power-pop guitars and pogo-worthy rhythms, the record’s two sides offer tandem takes on the incapacitating inertia and heartbreak that singers Brendan Lukens and Jacob Ewald wrestle with on a daily basis. It’s over before you realize the group employs a two-pronged approach to hit the same feels from two separate angles, but you won’t notice you’ve listened to it six times in a row until it’s too late ever to get it out of your head. PETE COTTELL. Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez Blvd. 8 pm. $19 advance, $22 day of show. All ages.

MIA KIRBY

[OLD SOUL] The polymath otherwise known as Nick Waterhouse rarely has a dull day. He’s played with Ural Thomas, collaborated with Leon Bridges and done his share of days in the production booth. As his own eponymous act, he’s as old school as they come, with a specialized skill set rooted in traditional soul, R&B and jazz. His latest effort, Never Twice, is revival music at its best—rich and full of homage without sounding kitschy. Being pals with Thomas and a host of other Portland musicians, expect a few special guests onstage tonight. MARK STOCK. Star Theater, 13 NW 6th Ave. 8 pm. $15. 21+.

[HEAVENLY NOBODIES] Of all the great 4AD bands of the late ’80s and early ’90s, Lush is the one that never quite got its due stateside. Maybe it’s because the London quartet didn’t really fit squarely in one scene—it wasn’t loud enough to be shoegaze, not “pop” enough to catch the Britpop wave. Led by guitarist-vocalists Miki Berenyi and Emma Anderson, Lush had an unimpeachable threealbum run from 1992 to 1996, including the still near-perfect Spooky. Twenty years later, the band is back with a tour and foursong EP, Blind Spot. For its first song released since the Clinton administration, “Out of Control” is both beautiful and familiar, a dash of Cocteau Twins mystery that’s softer than a kiss. MICHAEL MANNHEIMER. Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside St. 8 pm. $25 advance, $30 day of show. Tickets from rescheduled April 19 date will be honored. All ages.

chill zone: Warpaint plays Wonder Ballroom on Wednesday, Sept. 21. 26

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com


[MANGY BLUES] His finest work to date, Cass McCombs’ Mangy Love is a triumphant record that sees the Californian stretch beyond the comfortable grounds of folk rock. It’s an interesting mashup of blues, singersongwriter bravado, Americana and poetic license. McCombs’ command of the guitar—he comes off as a skilled jazz session player at times—is perhaps the most striking element on an album that will probably make a lot of year-end lists. MARK STOCK. Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi Ave. 9 pm. $13 advance, $15 day of show. 21+.

Alberta Rose Theatre

PROFILE COURTESY OF SUB POP

Cass McCombs, Hush Arbors

(503) 764-4131 • 3000 NE Alberta

ELIZA GILKYSON

YOGOMAN’S ROCK STEADY REVUE STARRING WINSTON JARRETT

SEPT 23

+ NINA GERBER 30

CLASSICAL, JAZZ & WORLD

SEPT 22

HUUN HUUR TU

WITH GUESTS

NICOLE BYER MISHA COLLINS DR. EMBRIETTE HYDE

Cappella Romana

[CHORAL REPRISE] A quarter-century ago, Portland grad student Alexander Lingas gathered some friends he’d sung with over the years and drove down to San Francisco to perform a benefit concert for the city’s earthquake-devastated Greek Orthodox Cathedral. They enjoyed the trip so much that they kept going. Cappella Romana has gone on to international recognition. Just back from a second trip to Europe’s most prestigious early-music festival in Utrecht, the superb vocal ensemble reprises that very first concert that set the diverse blueprint for the group ever since—not just traditional Byzantine chants but also excerpts from Rachmaninoff’s early20th-century Russian Orthodox masterpiece “All-Night Vigil,” music by Stravinsky and Orthodox “mystical minimalist” composer John Tavener, and contemporary GreekAmerican composers, including Lingas himself. BRETT CAMPBELL. Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, 147 NW 18th Ave. 4 pm Saturday, Sept. 24. $22-$44. All ages.

Bluebeard’s Castle

[BLOODY BARTÓK] The great Hungarian composer Béla Bartók’s sanguinary symbolist psychodrama (dedicated to his wife!), Bluebeard’s Castle, lasts only an hour, has little stage action and needs only two singer-actors—which makes it suitable for this semi-staged performance (sung in English) whose real star is likely to be the glass sculptures designed by the world’s most famous glass artist, Tacoma’s Dale Chihuly. Before the bloody doings, the orchestra plays Mozart’s exuberant “Paris” symphony and—woo hoo!—a new piece the symphony commissioned from Chris Rogerson, the emerging young American composer whose works impressed audiences at Chamber Music Northwest last year. BRETT CAMPBELL. Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway, 248-4335. 7:30 pm Sunday, Sept. 25. $23-$105. 21+.

Creative Music Guild 25th Anniversary

[IMPROV PARTY] Hard to believe it’s been a quarter-century since Creative Music Guild began providing a home for all those improvoriented performers who roam the strange and mysterious territories touching the shifting musical borderlands of jazz, experimental contemporary classical, rock, electronic, noise and beyond. This celebration, which also honors composer-improviser Ben Kates, features veteran and recent performers at CMG’s many concerts, including jazz great Rich Halley; John Gross and Reed Wallsmith from Blue Cranes’ sax duo; the Tenses, featuring members of Smegma and Italian sound-artist Marta Zapparoli; and saxophonist Kates himself in, appropriately, a duo with his successor as CMG head honcho, guitarist Mike Gamble. BRETT CAMPBELL. Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth St. 8 pm Sunday, Sept. 25. Donations accepted. 21+.

For more Music listings, visit

AND MUSICAL GUEST:

The Monkeywrench FRIDAY, SEPT. 23

A reckless dismissal of expectations shrieks through the music and art of Austin’s Tim Kerr. Beginning with the Big Boys—a band generally tossed into the lumpen mass of early-’80s hardcore— and into his increasingly skronky garage bands of the following decade, Kerr’s guitar was inevitably able to summon the thrum of punk and the voodoo of funk. By the time he linked up with Mudhoney’s Mark Arm and Steve Turner in the Monkeywrench, Kerr hadn’t quite yet internalized the lessons of free jazz, but it was coming. “Self-expression isn’t about rules and uniforms,” he says. “You’re supposed to do whatever you can think of.” Releasing its first disc, 1992’s Clean as a Broke-Dick Dog, on Sub Pop, the Monkeywrench turned in a batch of slight updates on garage rock’s initial era. But when the band reconvened at the turn of the millennium, blues references found themselves slotted into a heavier palette. “The second and third records [are] kind of all of us putting ideas together, as opposed to me just having a bunch of stuff,” Kerr says, explaining that the troupe’s first album was basically a third disc of material from another blues-punk outlet he steered during the ’80s, Poison 13. “By the time Monkeywrench got back together, I was coming from a completely different place—feedback all over the place. We would finish a song when we were recording, and all of them would be like, ‘I don’t remember you being this noisy.’” Kerr’s widening appreciation of sound led to his seeing noisy, disruptive acts and their perpetrators as worthy of lionization— not through homage on guitar, but in portraits. For more than a decade, he has painted images of his music-world heroes, as well as figures like Rosa Parks and Jim Thorpe. There’s a Basquiat feel to it all, something that approaches abstraction but pulls back at the precise moment it needs to—the same as Kerr’s guitar-playing. “I want to hopefully show people that all of this stuff comes from the same DIY thing,” he says about portraits being shown at Portland’s Also Known As gallery beginning Oct. 1. “Something needed to be done at that moment in time, and that person addressed it. They didn’t do it to be famous.” Neither did Kerr, who, it should be noted, had nothing to do with the defunct Portland record label Tim/Kerr that flourished in the ’90s. But while in the Big Boys, the guitarist did help expand what people perceived to be hardcore. And while the Monkeywrench probably won’t do the same for punk, garage and blues, Kerr has continued to find himself in rarefied company, whether playing alongside Mark Arm or late Big Boys frontman Randy “Biscuit” Turner. “You had no clue what was going to happen when he walked up on that stage,” Kerr says of Turner. “He’d wake up on Saturday and get dressed up in some way you couldn’t even think up and walk around the neighborhood, just to do it. He was literally a walking art piece, total Dada. Mark’s visual in his own way, but he’s not coming out draped in Christmas lights.” DAVE CANTOR. Tim Kerr isn’t a household name, but in the punk world, he has found himself in elite company.

SEE IT: The Monkeywrench plays the Star Theater, 13 NW 6th Ave., with Audios Amigos and DRC3, on Friday, Sept. 23. 9 pm. $10. 21+.

DAVID BAZAN

SEPT 24

SEPT 29

BLACKSTAR RISING 2

AN EVENING WITH

JONATHA BROOKE

THREE CLASSIC BOWIE ALBUMS PERFORMED LIVE!

OCT 2

SEPT 30

OCT 12

OTTMAR LIEBERT

RICHARD SHINDELL

+ SUZZY ROCHE & LUCY WAINWRIGHT-ROCHE

+ LUNA NEGRA OCT 9

OCT 18

JON MCLAUGHLIN

LED KAAPANA

+ MARC SCIBILIA + BRAD RAY OCT 17

OCT 23

+ DA UKULELE BOYZ

SIERRA HULL

OCTOBER 28 - 30 THE SALOON ENSEMBLE’S

NITEMARE B4 XMAS GLEN PHILLIPS OF TOAD THE WET SPROCKET

NOVEMBER 25 - 26 - 27 PORTLAND’S ALL STAR TRIBUTE TO THE BAND’S “LAST WALTZ”

NOV 9

SUZANNE VEGA NOV 15 UPCOMING SHOWS 9/27 - LAURA MARLING 10/4 - MORTIFIED TV SERIES TAPING 10/7 - THE MYSTERY BOX SHOW 10/13 - LIVE WIRE RADIO WITH LUKE BURBANK 10/15 - EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL 10/16 - KANDACE SPRINGS

for info and tickets visit

AlbertaRoseTheatre.com Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

27


WILLAMETTE WEEK & HOLOCENE PRESENT

FEATURING:

PHONE CALL A L B U M R E L E A S E PA R T Y ! FRINGE CLASS

OCT 13TH

RASHEED JAMAL DJ LAMAR LEROY

8:30PM

FREE

21+

HOLOCENE - 1001 SE MORRISON 28

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21,2016 wweek.com


MUSIC

DATES HERE

ALBUM REVIEWS

Mic Capes

CONCRETE DREAMS (Self-Released) [ST. JOHNS RAP] There are two very important musical statements Mic Capes conveys on his long-awaited album, Concrete Dreams. In one skit, the North Portland MC asks a group of kids what they want when they grow up. They talk excitedly about everything from being like Damian Lillard to owning a Bugatti. The following track, “Magic 8 Ball,” finds Capes painting a vivid picture of the struggles he faced growing up in St. Johns, but never letting realities like “Daddy sold dope to pay the rent” tear down his spirit. Elsewhere, Capes wears his 2Pac and Ice Cube influences on his sleeve, addressing the black experience of being a target of police brutality on “One 4 O’Shea,” a militant protest song that doesn’t sugarcoat his message. As a body of work, Concrete Dreams will potentially shift Portland’s overwhelmingly white identity, pushing forward the idea that artists like Capes—who performed at the first Portland Black Music Festival this month—are changing the status quo. Over 18 tracks, including a bonus cut dedicated to the street he grew up on (“Fessenden Flow”), Capes is vulnerable, revealing and bold, letting brash and colorful production bring a heartiness to listeners. While Capes got our attention with the lyrical barrage of “Razor Tongue,” Concrete Dreams offers a sizable sampling of his gift for creating meaningful conversations that travel outside the city. ERIC DIEP. HEAR IT: Concrete Dreams will be available on iTunes and Bandcamp on Sept. 22.

Johanna Warren GEMINI I (Spirit House)

[SPIRITS IN THE FOREST] Johanna Warren’s introspective Gemini I delves a little deeper into the soul-searching murk she first waded into with last year’s Numun. It is the maiden release of Warren’s own femalecentric Spirit House label and serves as a prequel to its forthcoming mirrorimage counterpart, Gemini II. The records are themed after polarized lover and devil tarot cards and the effect of otherworldly influences over human romance. “Let Me Stay” reflects on a tumultuous love affair in dreamy, atmospheric tones, but it’s the intro of overdubbed “oohs” that elevate it to transcendence. Somber piano chords propel the eerie, simplistic “circlenot astraight” and reveal a tone just as ingratiating in another context. As is the case overall with Gemini I, the most inviting quality is Warren’s soothing timbre, somewhere between Jenny Lewis and lofty British singer Kate Walsh. “Hungry Ghost” stands out immediately by contrast among the slower numbers, with its catchy tempo and infectious one-word coda. But the sonic set dressing of alternate tunings and steel-string acoustic guitar work best on the spooky, minor-key lullabies that populate most of Gemini I. The meditation is presumably intentional, considering this is the record that focuses on the devil card, so it’ll be glorious to see where Warren goes under a more divine inspiration. CRIS LANKENAU. SEE IT: Johanna Warren plays Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison St., with WL, Ilyas Ahmed & Jonathan Sielaff, Kya Bliss and DJ Jen O, on Wednesday, Sept. 21. 8:30 pm. $7. 21+.

SUN SPONTANEOUS CREATIVE IMPROV FROM FINNISH QUARTET FEAT MEMBERS OF EFTERKLANG

ART GARFUNKEL:

25

SEP

LIIMA

$13 ADVANCE

THURSDAY SEPT 22

EXPERIMENTAL WALL-OF-SOUND POST-ROCK FROM CALIFORNIA DUO

EL TEN ELEVEN

In Close-Up

BRUCE HORNSBY

WED

28

& THE NOISEMAKERS

FRI

An Evening with Genre-bending Celtic Rockers

SEP

GAELIC STORM

30

SEP

+ MYLETS $15 ADVANCE

FRIDAY SEPT 23 J-FELL AND 105.9 THE BREW PRESENT

RAMBLE ON

(LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE)

+ THE LAST DRAW $15 ADVANCE

SATURDAY SEPT 24 DEAD BLUE TOUR

TUE

ANDREW W.K.

4

THE POWER OF PARTYING 50-STATE SPEAKING TOUR

OCT

Chart-topping Soulful Pop

THU

ERIC HUTCHINSON

6

OCT

w/ Magic Giant, Anya Marina

FRI STILL CORNERS: DEAD BLUE TOUR

$12 ADVANCE

TUESDAY SEPT 27

GARAGE ROCK POWER POP FROM CHICAGO

JERRY DOUGLAS BAND

7

OCT

TWIN PEAKS

WED

Feminist pop punk from Seattle

+ WHITE REAPER + MODERN VICES

OCT

W/ COCKEYE, THE BEDROOMS

$13 ADVANCE

WEDNESDAY SEPT 28

AN EVENING OF HEARTFELT MUSIC FROM NASHVILLE SINGER / SONGWRITER

MATT WERTZ

12

TACOCAT

THU-SAT

NEW YEAR’S RUN

DEC

THREE NIGHTS! ON SALE FRIDAY!

RAILROAD EARTH

29-31

+ CAPPA + AARON KRAUSE

$15 ADVANCE

THURSDAY SEPT 29

9/30 : CALEB KLAUDER 10/1 : MICK JENKINS / SMINO 10/2 : JEREMY ENIGK 10/3 : CYMBALS EAT GUITARS 10/4 : KING

NEW SHOWS ON SALE COSMONAUTS 10/24 NO VACANCY 025 FEAT BLOND:ISH 11/19 DRAGONETTE 11/26 WHITEHORSE 12/5 * UNCHAINED 1/21 THE RADIO DEPT 2/27

T SISTERS / MOOREA MASA 11/3 KIIARA 11/9 EL PERRO DEL MAR 11/19 FOXY LEMON 11/25 SIMS 12/3 JERRY JOSEPH & THE JACKMORMONS 12/30 & 12/31

FULL BAR ~ PATIO ~ SANDWICHES ~ VITTLES ~ ESPRESSO

* = ON SALE FRI 9/23

ADVANCE TICKETS AT TICKETFLY.COM SUBJECT TO SERVICE CHARGE & / OR SERVICE FEE ALL SHOWS: 8PM DOORS / 9PM SHOW 21+ UNLESS NOTED BOX OFFICE OPENS 1/2 HOUR BEFORE DOORS ROOM PACKAGES AVAILABLE AT JUPITERHOTEL.COM

THURS-FRI, 9/22-9/23: ROOFTOP BAR OPEN 5-10PM. Weather permitting.

SAT, 9/24: PORTLAND TIMBERS @ HOUSTON DYNAMO 5:30PM & ROOFTOP BAR OPEN 5-10PM. Weather permitting. THURS, 9/29: ROOFTOP BAR OPEN, 5-10PM. Weather permitting.

WWW.REVOLUTIONHALL.COM Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

29


ECLECTIC FOLK AMERICANA DUO

A BENEFIT FOR

MANDOLIN ORANGE

VICTORY ACADEMY

W/ LEIF VOLLEBEKK

AT THE

ALADDIN THEATER

AT WONDER BALLROOM

ON SALE FRIDAY!

MODERN IRISH SINGER-SONGWRITER

SEP FOY VANCE 27 THE WILD SWAN WORLD TOUR AS SEEN AND HEARD ON TRUE DETECTIVE SEP LERA LYNN 28 W/WILLIAM WILD CONTEMPORARY COUNTRY SEP BUZZWORTHY COREY SMITH 29 W/LUKE COMBS AMERICAN IDOL FINALIST OCT CRYSTAL BOWERSOX 1 W/ LENORE W/TREVOR SENSOR

TICKETS AT WONDERBALLROOM.COM

OCTOBER 5

OCT ELIZABETH COOK 4 W/LEE HARVEY OSMOND RETURN OF BELOVED FOLK ARTIST OCT THECLASSIC 7 GREG BROWN MUSIC HALL OF FAME OCT OREGONINDUCTION AND CONCERT FEAT. DUFFY BISHOP, 8 FERNANDO W/ PETE KREBS, THREE LEG TORSO OCT TAL WILKENFELD 10 W/ STEVEN TAYLOR CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED AMERICANA

ICONIC AUSTRALIAN BASS GUITARIST SUPPORTING HER DEBUT ALT-ROCK VOCAL ALBUM

RALPHIE MAY - 10/15 | MARC BROUSSARD - 10/16 | W. KAMAU BELL: LATE SHOW ADDED! - 10/21 30

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21,2016 wweek.com


MUSIC CALENDAR WED. SEPt. 21 Ash Street Saloon 225 SW Ash St Haken, Thank You Scientist

Bunk Bar

1028 SE Water Ave. Guerilla Toss, Don Gero, Consumer

Crystal Ballroom

1332 W Burnside St The Specials

Doug Fir Lounge

830 E Burnside St. Ezra Bell, Redray Frazier, Evolfo

Hawthorne theatre

1507 SE César E. Chávez Blvd. Art Of Dying

Holocene

1001 SE Morrison St. WL, Johanna Warren, Ilyas Ahmed + Jonathan Sielaff, Kya Bliss

Jimmy Mak’s

221 NW 10th Ave. Mel Brown Quartet; The Christopher Brown Quartet

Keller Auditorium

222 SW Clay St Sigur Rós

Kelly’s Olympian

426 SW Washington St. Husky Boys, People With Bodies, TBA

Laurelthirst Public House

2958 NE Glisan St Little Big Lions, The Heritage; Love Gigantic

Mississippi Pizza

3552 N Mississippi Ave Tallulah’s Daddy

Star theater

13 NW 6th Ave. Mad Professor

the Analog Cafe

720 SE Hawthorne Blvd. Garcia Birthday Band; Lizzy Rose, Dim Wit, Furnss, Bread Pilot

the Liquor Store

3341 SE Belmont St, Times Infinity, Earth World, The Siren and The Sea

the Old Church 1422 SW 11th Ave Rich Hinrichsen

Valentines

232 SW Ankeny St Lion in the Grass, The Voltures

Wonder Ballroom 128 NE Russell St. Warpaint, Facial, Goldensuns

tHURS. SEPt. 22 Alberta Rose

3000 NE Alberta St Eliza Gilkyson with special guest Nina Gerber

Alberta Street Pub

1036 NE Alberta St Matty Charles & Katie Rose w/ Anna Hoone

Ash Street Saloon

225 SW Ash St Dysgenia, Joan and the Rivers, Now Set Fire, Juliet Tango

Crystal Ballroom

1332 W Burnside St OAR

Dante’s

350 West Burnside Northwest Hesh Fest: Red Fang, American Sharks, Witch Mountain

Doug Fir Lounge 830 E Burnside St. Liima

Duff’s Garage

[SEPT. 21-27]

For more listings, check out wweek.com.

LAST WEEK LIVE COLIN MCLAUgHLIN

= WW Pick. Highly recommended.

Editor: Matthew Singer. TO HAVE YOUR EVENT LISTED, send show information at least two weeks in advance on the web at wweek.com/ submitevents. Press kits, CDs and especially vinyl can be sent to Music Desk, WW, 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Please include show or release date information with all physical mailings. Email: music@wweek.com.

2530 NE 82nd Ave John Nemeth

Holocene

1001 SE Morrison St. Beaty Heart

Jimmy Mak’s

221 NW 10th Ave. Mel Brown B3 Organ Group

Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall

1037 SW Broadway Oregon Symphony plays Bluebeard’s Castle

Ash Street Saloon

225 SW Ash St Dwight Church, Dwight Dickinson

Jimmy Mak’s

221 NW 10th Ave. Dan Balmer Trio

Kelly’s Olympian

426 SW Washington St. Kasey Anderson, Fells Acres, Mercy Graves

Laurelthirst Public House 2958 NE Glisan St Kung Pao Chickens; Portland Country Underground

Laurelthirst Public House

2958 NE Glisan St Lewi Longmire & the Left Coast Roasters; JT Wise Band

Mississippi Pizza

3552 N Mississippi Ave Mr. Ben

Muddy Rudder Public House

Star theater

8105 Se 7th Ave. Jack Dywer and Bobby Winstead

13 NW 6th Ave. Nick Waterhouse

Valentines

the Analog Cafe

232 SW Ankeny St Rough Church, Sam Fowler

720 SE Hawthorne Blvd. X Day, Ascent

the Goodfoot

2845 SE Stark St Cascade Crescendo, The Hollerbodies

the Know

2026 NE Alberta St Blesst Chest, LKN, Sam Humans

the Liquor Store

3341 SE Belmont St, Lower 48, No Lala

the O’Neil Public House

6000 NE Glisan St. Harvest Gold (Neil Young tribute)

the Secret Society

116 NE Russell St Thursday Swing! Featuring Doug & Dee’s Hot Lovin’ Jazz Babies, Stumptown Swing

Valentines

232 SW Ankeny St Cool Schmool, mr. wrong, Homies

Vie de Boheme

1530 SE 7th Ave. Woodshed Jazz Orchestra

FRI. SEPt. 23 Alberta Rose

3000 NE Alberta St Yogoman’s Rock Steady Revue starring Winston Jarrett

Alberta Street Pub 1036 NE Alberta St Fantastic Mr. Fox

Ash Street Saloon

225 SW Ash St ASW, Danny Paul II, Super Honey, Olivia Awbrey

Bunk Bar

1028 SE Water Ave. Jackson Boone, And And And

Dante’s

350 West Burnside Northwest Hesh Fest: Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats, Danava

Doug Fir Lounge

830 E Burnside St. El Ten Eleven, Mylets

Duff’s Garage

2530 NE 82nd Ave High Water Jazz Band

Hawthorne theatre

1507 SE César E. Chávez Blvd. Moosh & Twist

High Water Mark Lounge

6800 NE MLK Ave David Liebe Hart, Jay Shingle, Anna Vo

Holocene

1001 SE Morrison St.

tUES. SEPt. 27 Aladdin theater

CALL ME SHIRLEY: Weirdly, considering the band’s rarefied legacy as a bridge between the last days of grunge and our electronica-dappled future, no one else has ever sounded remotely like Garbage. As a result, though resolutely fixed on a bygone sonic checkpoint, Garbage somehow doesn’t seem dated, and at Roseland Theater on Sept. 18, cuts from its latest release, Strange Little Birds, fit seamlessly between the greatest hits. Casual fans couldn’t have expected so many past FM staples to ring familiar, nor—given the recordings’ densely layered flourishes of tape-op delirium—how unabashedly rawk they’d seem when performed live. Garbage has mastered that hardest trick for veteran groups: maintaining the lockstep cohesion of continuous interplay without ever betraying the timeworn weariness of a millionth run through the songbook. If anything, 50-year-old frontwoman Shirley Manson has blossomed with age. Powers undimmed, the Edinburgh expat can still shatter the rafters with a weaponized brittleness or glide breathless along a tempered fragility. At every moment, she commanded the stage—stalking petulantly away from the mic, gushing liquid before applause, plopping down for a bout of “just-we-girls” candor, physically wringing every ounce of rage and despair from songs of seduction. Whatever the band’s current process may entail, the music of Garbage now seems indistinguishable from the spirit of Shirley Manson. JAY HORTON. Chrome Sparks, Roland Tings

Jimmy Mak’s

221 NW 10th Ave. LaRhonda Steele’s Nina Simone Tribute

Kelly’s Olympian

426 SW Washington St. MOsley WOtta, Speaker Minds

Laurelthirst Public House

2958 NE Glisan St Lynn Conover & Little Sue; Student Loan

Lombard Pub (formerly the Foggy Notion)

the Secret Society

116 NE Russell St Redray Frazier, The Frequence, The Resolectrics, DJ Klavical; Pete Krebs and his Portland Playboys

Valentines

232 SW Ankeny St Entresol, Dalembert, Chad Bandit

SAt. SEPt. 24 Alberta Rose

3000 NE Alberta St Huun Huur Tu

3416 N Lombard St Two Moons-Penalty KickSynaptic

Alberta Street Pub

Mississippi Pizza

Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall

3552 N Mississippi Ave Purusa, Elbo Finn; Down Home Music

Mississippi Studios

3939 N Mississippi Ave. Khruangbin, Luz Elena Mendoza

Roseland theater

8 NW 6th Ave St. Paul and the Broken Bones, Seratones

Star theater

13 NW 6th Ave. The Monkeywrench, Audios Amigos, DRC3

the Analog Cafe

720 SE Hawthorne Blvd. 9 Fly Points, Teva Orita (Dance Troop), Now Set Fire; Northeast Senate

the Firkin tavern

1937 SE 11th Ave The Vardaman Ensemble, No More Parachute, Motorcoat

1036 NE Alberta St Grupo Masato

1037 SW Broadway Oregon Symphony plays Bluebeard’s Castle

Ash Street Saloon

225 SW Ash St Die Like Gentlemen, Elephant Gun, Wölflaut, Saola

Crystal Ballroom

1332 W Burnside St Foals, Bear Hands

Dante’s

350 West Burnside Northwest Hesh Fest: Deafheaven, The Blood Royale, Diesto, Banquet & Greenbeard

Hawthorne theatre

the Secret Society

Jimmy Mak’s

116 NE Russell St Pink Lady Presents The Cat’s Meow One Year Anniversary Show

1507 SE César E. Chávez Blvd. Dance Gavin Dance 221 NW 10th Ave. The Bobby Torres Ensemble

Kelly’s Olympian

426 SW Washington St. The Hoons, Stubborn Son, Space Shark

Laurelthirst Public House

2958 NE Glisan St Kory Quinn, Portland Country Underground & friends; The Yellers; Billy Kennedy (all ages!)

Mississippi Studios 3939 N Mississippi Ave. Steve Gunn and the Outliers, Nap Eyes

Nordia House

8800 SW Oleson Rd. Portland Chamber Orchestra presents The Spirit of Youth

Roseland theater

8 NW 6th Ave Destructo, Ilovemakonnen, Ganz, Sita Abellan

the Analog Cafe

720 SE Hawthorne Blvd. Keeper Keeper, Wild Animal, Low Flyers; Lake Oswego School of Rock

the Firkin tavern

830 E Burnside St. Ramble On

1937 SE 11th Ave The Outcome, Dancing Plague Of 1518, Paisley Devil

Duff’s Garage

the Know

Doug Fir Lounge

2530 NE 82nd Ave Kris DeLane and the Hurt

2026 NE Alberta St Casual Hex, Mo Troper and the Assumptions, Fountain, U SCO

trinity Episcopal Cathedral 147 NW 18th Ave. Cappella Romana

Wonder Ballroom

128 NE Russell St. Skylar Grey, Morgxn

SUN. SEPt. 25 Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall

1037 SW Broadway Oregon Symphony plays Bluebeard’s Castle

Ash Street Saloon

225 SW Ash St Vegetable Revival Project, Cosmic Butter, The Struggle

Crystal Ballroom

1332 W Burnside St Echo and the Bunnymen, Ester Drang

Holocene

1001 SE Morrison St. NAO, Kweku Collins

Laurelthirst Public House

2958 NE Glisan St Freak Mountain Ramblers; Pagan Jug Band (all ages!)

Lewis and Clark College

0615 SW Palatine Hill Rd Portland Chamber Orchestra presents The Spirit of Youth

Lombard Pub

3416 N Lombard St

Mo Troper, Fountain, Casual Hex, U Sco

Mississippi Pizza

3552 N Mississippi Ave The American West, Frankie Boots & the County Line

Revolution Hall

1300 SE Stark St #110 Art Garfunkel: In Close-Up

Rontoms

600 E Burnside St Blossom, My Body

Roseland theater

8 NW 6th Ave Nyk Edwards

Star theater

13 NW 6th Ave. The Rise of Eva O, Deathcharge, Adrian H and the Wounds

the Know

2026 NE Alberta St Shameover, Cockeye, Brave Hands, The I’m in a Bad Moods

the Liquor Store

3341 SE Belmont St, Tall Women, Broodmare, Dyslexics The

turn! turn! turn!

8 NE Killingsworth St Creative Music Guild 25th Anniversary

Valentines

232 SW Ankeny St Naked Hour, Justus Proffit, Waister

MON. SEPt. 26 Aladdin theater

3017 SE Milwaukie Ave Brian Culbertson Funk! Tour

3017 SE Milwaukie Ave Foy Vance

Alberta Rose

3000 NE Alberta St Laura Marling

Ash Street Saloon

225 SW Ash St Ease Up, Tunnel Vision, The Late Ones, Chris Carpenter & The Collective

Crystal Ballroom

1332 W Burnside St Lush

Dante’s

350 West Burnside Hatebreed

Duff’s Garage

2530 NE 82nd Ave Joh Till

Hawthorne theatre

1507 SE César E. Chávez Blvd. Modern Baseball, Chris Farren, Walter Etc., Jank

Jimmy Mak’s

221 NW 10th Ave. Mel Brown Septet; AJAM

Kelly’s Olympian

426 SW Washington St. All the Apparatus

Laurelthirst Public House 2958 NE Glisan St Mick Overman & the Maniacs; Jackstraw

Mississippi Studios

3939 N Mississippi Ave. Cass McCombs, Hush Arbors

Revolution Hall

1300 SE Stark St #110 LANY

Star theater

13 NW 6th Ave. RX Bandits

the Goodfoot 2845 SE Stark St Farnell Newton and The Othership Connection

the Know

2026 NE Alberta St We the Wild, The Globalist, Dead Tropics, Goddamned Animals

the Raven

3100 NE Sandy Blvd The Foreign Resort, Shadowlands, NITE

Valentines

232 SW Ankeny St The Hague, Co Founder, Bitter Buddha, Castles

Wonder Ballroom 128 NE Russell St. Marian Hill

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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MUSIC COURTESY OF DEAFCHILD

NEEDLE EXCHANGE

DeafChild Years DJing: 16. Genre: All things acid, psychedelic techno, psy-trance. Where you can catch me regularly: Up and down the West Coast at festivals and parties that specialize in weirder, more tripped-out sounds and styles, and any event put together by the Sunrise Social Club out of Portland and the Get Weeerd series of acid-music parties in PDX. Craziest gig: In 2012, I played a festival at the massive pyramid ruins of Palenque, Mexico, for the end of the Mayan calendar. People came from all over the world, and no one really knew what was going to happen. The mesh of cultures and people was really crazy. I played sunrise on the first day of the dawning of the new era, according to the Mayans. People were freaking out as the sun came up. When we didn’t get sucked into a black hole or die via flaming comet, we ended up having one wicked dance party in the jungle and a killer Mexican Christmas. Feliz Navidad indeed! My go-to records: Spartaque, “Mantequilla”; Neurodriver, “Satellite (James Harcourt Remix)”; Nanoplex, “Baby Gravy (Tongue and Groove Remix).” I always have a copy of Mory Kante’s “Yeke Yeke (Hardfloor Remix)” in case the time ever comes up to play it. There’s something about that track I just love. Don’t ever ask me to play…: Trap music, a remix of “Sweet Dreams” by Eurythmics, or any remix of a Nirvana song. NEXT GIG: DeafChild spins at Flight at the Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont St., with Sean Murray, Electrokid and Mark Pharoah, on Friday, Sept. 23. 9 pm. $5. 21+.

The Lovecraft Bar

421 SE Grand Ave Shadowplay (goth, industrial, EBM)

Whiskey Bar

WED. SEPT. 21 Dig A Pony

736 SE Grand Ave. Chazz Madrigal (soul, r&b)

Ground Kontrol

511 NW Couch St. ZentroniX

Dig A Pony

736 SE Grand Ave. Strange Babes (post-punk, soul)

FRI. SEPT. 23 45 East

315 SE 3rd Ave James Zabiela, Johnny Monsoon, Jak

Black Book

Gold Dust Meridian

20 NW 3rd Ave The Cave (rap)

Whiskey Bar

Moloko

736 SE Grand Ave. Cooky Parker

31 NW 1st Ave Contact, with Insight, LSV, Suma

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

315 SE 3rd Ave FIGURE & Protohype: Outta This World Tour

421 SE Grand Ave Event Horizon (darkwave, industrial, synthpop)

The Lovecraft Bar

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THURS. SEPT. 22 45 East

31 NW 1st Ave Sublimate Records Presents: IVY LAB

3267 SE Hawthorne Blvd. DJ Gregarious 3967 N. Mississippi Ave. Benjamin (international disco, modern dad)

Dig A Pony

Gold Dust Meridian

3267 SE Hawthorne Blvd. DJ Bad Wizard


The Old Church Concert Hall Presents

JOE RIEDL

BAR REVIEW

Where to drink this week. 1. Dame 2930 NE Killingsworth St., damerestaurant.com. The wine list at Dame, which opened last week, already makes it Portland’s most interesting wine destination, home to the finest natural-wine list within 500 miles.

Curtis Eller’s American Circus

2.

10/7 • 8pm

Rae’s Lakeview Lounge

1900 NW 27th Ave., 503-719-6494. Rae’s offers $1 mimosas Saturday and Sunday mornings, which means if you can’t see the lake from the patio, you only have to wait until the lake is in your mind.

Woody Guthrie NW Songs Tribute Show

10/22 • 2pm + 8pm featuring

3.

Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons Jon Neufeld Darrin Matthew Craig Timberbound Bill Murlin & Fine Company Caitlin Belem Romtvedt David Romtvedt George Rezendes

Rum Club 720 SE Sandy Blvd., 503-265-8807, rumclubpdx.com. You know what’s back at Rum Club? Peach blendies. If you haven’t had them, you’re an objectively inferior person to everyone who has. And you’re definitely unhappier. But we’ve also discovered the treat, recently, of the $5 happy-hour gin with bright house tonic.

4. Gil’s Speakeasy Tavern

609 SE Taylor St., 503-234-8991, gils-speakeasy.com. It’s easy to forget about Gil’s, the basement lounge hidden under an apartment building in a residential complex. But when you remember, you end up there on $1 sloppy joe night— which is an unturndownable dare if we ever heard one.

5. Century 930 SE Sandy Blvd., centurybarpdx.com. Century is the sports bar with the best hair in all of Portland, and also the best shirts and pants, the best roof, and the best late-hours nightclub.

Killingsworth Dynasty

CONVENIENCE PARKING: On the one hand, Sizzle Pie’s new Mini Mini (638 E Burnside St.) is a mini-mart. Like the Plaid Pantry a few blocks down East Burnside, Mini Mini will happily sell you American Spirits or Parliament Lights, and some D-cell batteries for your presumed ’80s boom box. And if you’re in a deodorant pinch, it’s got Old Spice and Sure Solid to gum up your sweat glands. But at the same time, it’s an art project, a mini-mart in air quotes—the retro trucker hat of mini-marts. Warm cans of Rainier and empty Mini Mini-brand crowlers nonsensically line its front shelving as if anyone would ever actually buy warm Rainier or an open-topped crowler. An entire fridge case is taken up by blue cartons of water that say “JUST WATER,” just because. Other cool cases sport rows of multifarious Occidental and Royale beers whose colorful labels look nice through the glass. Fashioned by celebrity designer Aaron Draplin, the store is as bright-white and blank as the waiting room in the afterlife. Well, fuck it: If it’s gonna be a Gus Van Sant dream-world midcentury mini-mart, we’re gonna have a stoop beer. Because that’s what Matt Dillon would do. We left behind the Jones Soda crowlers ($5) and kombucha crowlers ($9) and Double Mountain crowlers ($7) and got some Stiegl grapefruit radler and a Sizzle Pie hot pocket ($3.50)—fluffier and with better cheese than the freezer versions, though just as greasy and prone to hot oil spills—and took our cans to the old, abandoned restaurant next door. The former Farm has a perfect stoop, shaded by trees. The day was sunny. Life was perfect. Then, from the parking lot behind us, we heard a voice: “How you doin’?” asked a woman who’d set up camp in the parking lot, calling us by a racial slur we don’t print in the paper without good reason. The slur—which didn’t easily apply to anyone within eyeshot—seemed less hostile than an aggressive form of camp. As a peacekeeping gesture, we offered her one of our Stiegls. But seeing the can, she demurred. “I don’t do grapefruit,” she said. “That stuff will bleach out my hormones.” Turned out we weren’t in a Van Sant movie after all—it was Richard Linklater. MATTHEW KORFHAGE. Crystal Ballroom

The Analog Cafe

3967 N. Mississippi Ave. Monkeytek & Friends (records from the Jamaican regions of outer space)

Holocene

The Liquor Store

421 SE Grand Ave Softcore Mutations w/ DJ Acid Rick (new wave, dark, weird, hunkwave)

The Goodfoot

The Lovecraft Bar

The Lovecraft Bar

832 N Killingsworth St Twerk

Moloko

1332 W Burnside St 80s VDA Presents: The Cure VS Depeche Mode

Killingsworth Dynasty

3341 SE Belmont St, Renegade Rhythms (house & techno)

2845 SE Stark St Soul Stew (funk, soul, disco)

832 N Killingsworth St Dynasty A Go-Go! (60s soul, r&b, mod)

The Liquor Store

Moloko

421 SE Grand Ave Electronomicon (goth, industrial, 80s)

3341 SE Belmont St, Flight (acid house)

The Lovecraft Bar 421 SE Grand Ave Club Kai Kai

SAT. SEPT. 24 45 East

315 SE 3rd Ave Laidback Luke, Sidestep, Eddie Pitzul

1001 SE Morrison St. Main Squeeze Dance Party

720 SE Hawthorne Blvd. ANDAZ: A Bhangra Bollywood Dance Party

3967 N. Mississippi Ave. Lamar Leroy (jams of all types)

Quarterworld

4811 SE Hawthorne Blvd ElecTRON DanseARC4D3

Sandy Hut

1430 NE Sandy Blvd. DJ Montel Spinozza

Star Bar

639 SE Morrison St. DJ Truhn Juice

SUN. SEPT. 25 Dig A Pony

736 SE Grand Ave. Dear Mama Presents “Do Right Sunday” (throwback rap, electro, r&b)

The Embers Avenue 100 NW Broadway Latino Night (latin, cubono, salsa)

The Lovecraft Bar

MON. SEPT. 26

Dan Bern

10/21 • 8pm

THEOLDCHURCH.ORG UNCLE ACID & THE DEADBEATS

Appearing at Music Millennium to Meet Fans and Sign Autographs

Friday, September 23rd at 6PM

Uncle Acid & the Deadbeats exist in their own self-created world, hoovering up trash/pop culture and spitting it back out in hot chunks of finely-hewn riffola and righteous rock ‘n roll noise. Make no mistake though they are a pop band too: a pop band of the most fuzzed-up, subversive kind. One with three part harmonies that sing of death and murder. But a pop band all the same. Splattered with nods to slasher flicks and pulp horror, The Night Creeper chronicles the depraved life of a Jack the Ripper-style killer and drug fiend—an oppressive portrait of homicidal delirium rendered in doomy psychedelia.

TRACY FORDICE & THE 8-BALLS

Monday, September 26th at 7PM

Tracey Fordice has a beautiful and powerful voice that can rock you like a tornado of trouble in Tennessee, or soothe your soul with a sweet, sultry tone that is as deep as the mighty Mississippi. Tracey’s unique voice, piano playing, and songwriting talents are a blend of creativity that solidifies her place at the vanguard of the Portland blues scene. Whether barrel-housing in the juke joints and road houses of the Pacific Northwest, or playing on the big festival stages, Tracey Fordice and the 8-Balls can deliver Rockin Blues and Soulful Ballads utilizing a broad repertoire ranging from Etta James to Bonnie Raitt and Willie Dixon to J.J. Grey and Mofro.

421 SE Grand Ave Black Mass (goth dance)

TUES. SEPT. 27 Club 21

2035 NE Glisan St. DJ Over Cöl

Holocene

1001 SE Morrison St. Taking Back Tuesday

The Lovecraft Bar

421 SE Grand Ave BONES w/ DJ Aurora & friends (goth, synth)

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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S H AW N L E E

PERFORMANCE = WW Pick. Highly recommended. Most prices listed are for advance ticket sales. At-the-door increases and so-called convenience charges may apply, so it’s best to call ahead. Editor: SHANNON GORMLEY. Theater: SHANNON GORMLEY (sgormley@wweek.com). Dance: SHANNON GORMLEY (dance@wweek.com). TO BE CONSIDERED FOR LISTINGS, submit information at least two weeks in advance to: espitz@wweek.com.

THEATER NEW LISTINGS

The Trump Card

Monologists don’t quite draw the kind of crowds that they used to in like the 1850s or whenever it was that orators were popular. But Mike Daisey is an exception. Daisey has toured a number of controversial monologues, but this time, he’s taking on the unfortunate enigma that is Donald Trump. Daisey’s show isn’t built on the kind of easy jabs that could be made about any of Trump’s recent nonsense, though. Instead, Daisey starts at the beginning of Trump’s life in an attempt to get behind the psychology of the presidential candidate, and honestly (though also humorously) tries to get to the bottom of how Trump has gained this much support. Newmark Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway, 503-248-4335. 7:30 pm Sunday, Sept. 25. $20.50-$30.50.

Weird: Uncanny Tales of Terror and Romance

Funhouse pays homage to the early days of horror with a series of vignettes inspired by Poe, Shelley and Lovecraft. The Funhouse Improvisors will tell tales of all things strange, sublime, and spooky. Funhouse Lounge, 2432 SE 11th Ave., 503-8416734. 9:30 pm Thursday, Sept. 22-Oct. 15, 7 pm Saturday, Oct. 8, 7 pm FridaySaturday, Oct. 14-15. $10 in advance, $15 day of show. 21+.

ALSO PLAYING

Boeing Boeing

North Portland’s community theater goes both retro and exotic with a farcical 1960s French play about a lothario with a things for airline stewardesses. Barnard is a self-made Parisian bachelor with three fiancees. One Italian, one German and one American—all stewardesses. When one fateful layover brings them together in his apartment, merde hits the fan. 8 pm Thursday-Saturday and 3 pm Sunday, Sept. 9-24. $15. Twilight Theater Company, 7515 N Brandon Ave., 847-9838. 8 pm ThursdaySaturday, Sept. 22-24. $15.

Trevor

From Orange is the New Black writer Nick Jones, this comi-drama centers around a 200-pound chimp. As the animal, who was once a famous performer, tries to communicate with the people around him, both he and the humans speak in broken English and gibberish to highlight the animal/ human communication barrier. Trevor once starred beside Morgan Fairchild. He now has a human mom and family. It’s hilarious to watch...until it’s really, really not. With “Trevor,” Jones takes aim at the lies we humans tell ourselves with the adamancy of Palahniuk circa Fight Club and the inventiveness of Enda Walsh. The theater already extended the show’s run once. We suggest buying your tickets in advance. Artists Repertory Theatre, 1515 SW Morrison St., 503-241-1278. 7:30 Wednesday-Saturday and 2 and 7:30 pm Sunday, Sept. 21-Oct. 9. $25 under 25, $50.

DANCE Therapy

Layne Fawkes’ newest darkly themed cabaret is personal: Therapy deals with Fawkes’ own psyche, with Una Solitaire and Birdie Le Tramp personifying her insecurities and Noah Mickens as her thoughts. In true introverted form, the show will also use moody music of all kinds, from Nine Inch Nails to Florence and the Machine. Dante’s, 350 W Burnside, danteslive.com. 9 pm Wednesday Sept. 21. $10-$15. 21+.

COMEDY & VARIETY WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 The Brody Open Mic

Full Gallop

Triangle Productions takes on the immense personality that was fashion tastemaker Diana Vreeland. But instead of focusing on her decadespanning work at the likes of Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue, the play is a snapshot of Vreeland at a dinner party with friends after getting fired from Vogue and returning from a soulsearching trip to Europe. Full Gallop celebrates a powerful, charismatic woman who lived in a time when women were supposed to aspire to be June Cleaver. It’s also an optimistic show: the audience knows that its main character will emerge from her unemployment and uncertainty to do great things. The Sanctuary at Sandy Plaza, 1785 NE Sandy Blvd., trianglepro.org. 7:30 pm Thursday-Friday, Sept. 22-Oct. 8, 2 pm Sunday, Sept. 25 and Oct. 2, no show Friday, Sept. 30. $15-$35.

Steel Magnolias

A Southern beauty salon filled with lightning-fast repartee and verbal jousting becomes a surrogate for the entire world in this classic by Robert Harling. We get hen fights, tragedy

34

and moral uplift. That’s from the script. From Clackamas Rep, you can expect consistency and family-friendly entertainment. At this point in the summer, if you’re not up for existential crisis at Imago Theater, this might be your best bet on stage. Osterman Theatre, 9600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City. 7:30 pm Thursday-Saturday and 2:30 pm Sunday, Sept. 22-Oct. 2. $30.

Twice-weekly, Portland’s most prolific improv venue opens its stage to everyone for 3-minute bits. Sign up online day of before 1 pm. Brody Theater, 16 NW Broadway, 224-2227. 8:30 pm Tuesday-Wednesday. Free.

Earthquake Hurricane

Some of WW’s favorite funny Portlanders showcase famous and not-so-famous, local and not-solocal comedians. Hosted by Curtis Cook, Alex Falcone, Anthony Lopez and Bri Pruett inside a pretty epic bike shop. Velo Cult Bike Shop, 1969 NE 42nd Ave., 922-2012. 9 pm every Wednesday. Free, $5 suggested donation. 21+.

The Ranger Station Open Mic

Sign ups start at 8 pm for a weekly open mic night hosted by Victor Johnson, set in the whiskey-heavy bar WW once compared to “a Rooseveltera public works cabin.” The Ranger Station, 4260 SE Hawthorne Blvd., 894-8455. 8:30 pm. Free. 21+

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

OPEN DIALOGUE: Actor Vin Shambry channels stories of gun violence.

REVIEW

Don’t Shoot the Messenger THE GUN SHOW IS AS MUCH ABOUT YOU AS IT IS ABOUT GUNS.

there is a twist here that challenges the traditional fabric of a performance piece. Shambry’s performance is the only strictly theatrical part of the show. After his story, the The Gun Show’s title makes the play sound like any microphone voyaged around to any members of other celebratory gathering of gun owners. But the audience who had something they wanted to instead of a proud display of America’s most mas- say about gun violence. Most men who contributed culine firearms, it’s a dutiful ode to gun violence in were old and white, with experience in pastoral setthe U.S. With such contentious subject matter, the tings where home invasion or natural predators are artistic accomplishment behind this show’s politics tangible fears. Their dissent was crucial to the play, is that it doesn’t take any vocal posieven though there was no guarantee they’d tion. Part one-man play, part combe there. One older man had lived on munity meeting, and part gritty an island near Canada where pirates gun wound lecture, CoHo’s were a common worry, while PEOPLE SEE production of The Gun Show another spoke of a sibling who by Oregon playwright E.M. committed suicide in his early WHAT THEY Lewis is a hands-on educa20s. Both continue to advertise WANT TO SEE, BUT the Second Amendment. Still, tion for the visual learner, demonstrating its weight SOME ARE BLINDED I’m proud of both of these dudes through its insecurities. for confiding in strangers; we BY WHAT THEY’VE needed I n t h e p r o d u c t i o n ’s their stories, and they WITNESSED. theatrical narrative, actor were offered with grace. The third and final part of The Vin Shambry breaks down his history with gun violence by Gun Show involved a Portland State prefacing it with his homegrown University professor who once worked love for freedom; this guy goes shooting with hospitalized victims of gun violence. in the lush Oregon countryside on his days off. He This part was essentially a straight-up lecture, relays his shooting adventures as romantic experi- and though it would be simply false to call this ences with his adoring husband, of whom there man entertaining, he opted to disagree with a few are endearing photos via a hovering slideshow. of the men who spoke before him, invalidating the The political juxtaposition of a pro-gun, same-sex- personal in favor of the gritty reality of gun viomarried man presumably enlists sympathy from a lence and its victims. partisan audience. Still, The Gun Show doesn’t pick sides or leave But ultimately, The Gun Show is not Shambry’s you with any answers. If there’s one takeaway, story. Several times throughout his performance, it’s this: People see what they want to see, but Shambry literally shines a light on a discreet, some are blinded by what they’ve witnessed. cardigan-toting middle-aged woman from the JACK RUSHALL. audience. At first, it seems Shambry is shamelessly humiliating some rando, but there’s much more to SEE IT: The Gun Show plays at CoHo, 2257 NW Raleigh St. 7:30 pm Thursday-Saturday, through this audience member than meets the eye. Indeed, Oct. 1. $20-$28.


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AL REGION RE PREMIE sometimes made-up knowledge of heavy-metal music. Funhouse Lounge, 2432 SE 11th Ave., 503-8416734. 10 pm every second to last Friday. $8. 21+.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 Thursday Night Throwdown

Curious’ twice-monthly competition pits teams that apply in advance online against one another for a chance to compete in Friday Night Fights the next week. It’s first come, first served, and every groups gets 17 minutes. Curious Comedy Theater, 5225 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 477-9477. 9:30 pm every second and fourth Thursday. Free.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 The Big COEN’incident

The Brody Theater improvises a whole show with homage to the comedy of the Coen Brothers as the show’s sole premise. Brody Theater, 16 NW Broadway, brodytheater.com. 7:30 pm. Through Oct. 1. $12.

Open Court

Kurt Braunohler

This weekly, long-form improv show combines performers from many Portland theaters and troupes. Newbies are welcome and teams are picked at random, then coached by an improv veteran before taking the stage. Curious Comedy Theater, 5225 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 477-9477. 7:30 pm Thursdays. $5.

Kurt Braunohler’s comedic set up is pretty simple: you can make any banal situation awkward if you just don’t do what you’re supposed to. His most common targets are social norms, which he points out the strangeness of by doing even stranger things. This might sound like it could be pretty brainy, but really, it’s mainly just absurd. Braunohler’s social experiments include responding “It’s been too long” when a store owner greets him with “Nice to see you,” or continuing to text wrong numbers under the alias “Doctor Depends” about a magazine mysteriously called Tinkle Digest. Braunohler’s

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 Al’s Den Comedy Night

David Liebe Hart

You might not laugh at David Liebe Hart’s standup right away. You will eventually, but first you have to completely unhinge yourself from reality and adjust to a complete lack of structured communication. Hart’s standup is equally nonsensical and almost as terrifying as the puppet segments he did on the Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! He rambles through a shit ton of nonsense that seems like a parody of standup comedy while utterly lacking the set-up-topunchline structure that’s so crucial to standup comedy. Basically, it looks and sounds like someone losing their mind, and will probably leave you feeling just as insane. This time, he’s bringing his freaky puppets along with him, so you can expect that his show will be particularly madcap. The High Water Mark, 6800 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 503-286-6513. 9 pm Friday Sept. 23. $10 advance, $13 day of show. 21+.

Faizon Love

Remember when Faizon Love lent his support to Bill Cosby amid the increasing rape allegations? Or maybe even that was recently eclipsed in your memory by Love trying to “out” Katt Williams, while throwing in some offensive things about Caitlyn Jenner along the way. But if you’re going to see Faizon Love’s standup, that’s what you’re going to get —extremely politically incorrect stuff. Though he’s never been particularly PC, his recent comments make the line of offensiveness he toys with in his standup more than a little uncomfortable, an unfortunate turn in an otherwise appreciable career. Helium Comedy Club, 1510 SE 9th Ave., 888-6438669. 8 pm Thursday, 7:30 pm and 10 pm Friday-Saturday, Sept. 22-24. $20-$25. 21+.

Who’s Metal As Fuck?

Who among us is metal as fuck? Wendy Weiss and Dan Weber host a brutal, hardcore game show where contestants compete to see who holds the most obscure and

seas

on

prolific career includes his own podcast, frequent collaborations with Kristen Schaal, and guest appearances on Radiolab and Bob’s Burgers. Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark St., 503-288-3895. 7:30 and 9:30 pm. Free with RSVP. 18+.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25 Sunday School

Workshop students, veteran crews and groups that pre-register online perform long form improv every Sunday. Curious Comedy Theater, 5225 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., 477-9477. 6 pm. $5 suggested donation.

MONDAY, SEPT. 26

A NEW ROCK FABLE

Helium Open Mic

Sign-ups start at 6 for Helium’s weekly Open Mic and the line-up drops at 7:30. No guarantees on stage time, but the bar’s always open. Helium Comedy Club, 1510 SE 9th Ave., 8 pm every Monday. Free. 18+.

For more Performance listings, visit

REVIEW O W E N WA L Z

A late night weekend showcase of comics, mostly local stand-up comedians and Seattleites passing through. Sometimes the best part is watching Crystal Hotel guests awkwardly sidle by the stage, wearing only a swimsuit and towel, on their way to the pool behind this basement bar. Al’s Den, 303 SW 12th Ave., 503-972-2670. 10:30 pm Fridays and Saturdays. Free. 21+.

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Sometimes It Takes a Blackout To See the Light.

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How I Learned What I Learned (Portland Playhouse)

There’s a number of reasons why How I Learned What I Learned stands out in August Wilson’s repertoire. First of all, it’s his most personal: The monologue recounts Wilson’s life growing up in Pittsburgh, and shows our country’s deeply rooted racial issues through the playwright’s own experiences more explicitly than any of Wilson’s other plays. But as one of his final works, it also addresses how those experiences inspired him to create the body of work he is so esteemed for. Wilson’s play is in good hands: Victor Mack, the play’s sole actor, has acted in all but one of Wilson’s other plays. Director Kevin Jones (and founder of the August Wilson Red Door Project) has dealt with his fair share of Wilson’s works, too, and is one of the strongest voices in the effort to make Portland’s theater scene more inclusive. Perhaps most significantly, this play has never before been performed by a black actor and directed by a black director, according to Portland Playhouse. Considering that the play is about the personal experience of a black man, it’s as strange as it is crucial that Jones and Mack will be the first. SHANNON GORMLEY. SEE IT: How I Learned What I Learned is playing at Portland Playhouse, 602 NE Prescott St., portlandplayhouse.org. 7:30 pm Wednesday-Saturday, 2 pm Sunday, Sept. 21-Oct. 23. No show Saturday, Sept. 24. $34. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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C O U R T E S Y O F S A M A N T H A WA L L

VISUAL ARTS = WW Pick. Highly recommended. By JENNIFER RABIN. TO BE CONSIDERED FOR LISTINGS, submit show information—including opening and closing dates, gallery address and phone number—at least two weeks in advance to: Visual Arts, WW, 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Email: jrabin@wweek.com.

Morocco Photos 2015

There is a place in northern Morocco nicknamed “the blue city” because of the cobalt wash applied to the exteriors of homes. It is believed that the tradition began when the Jews immigrated there, applying the pigment as a way to mirror the heavens, reminding them to live a life of reverence. Portland-based photographer Stu Levy brings back from the blue city a series of photographs suffused with that impossibly rich color and with the history of place. Augen Gallery, 716 NW Davis St., 503-546-5056. Through Oct. 1.

Escape

We have all fantasized about running away, about leaving behind our troubles and shedding the conventions of society. Russian documentary photographer Danila Tkachenko’s tells the story of a group of men who have done just that, who have fled civilization for the wilderness of Eastern Europe to live in hermitic solitude. Tkachenko’s series of color portraits captures each individual in their surroundings, and gives the viewer a window into the ways that they live, apart from the rest of us. Blue Sky Gallery, 122 NW 8th Ave., 503-225-0210. Through Oct. 2.

See Me See You

Artist Samantha Wall, who was included in this year’s Contemporary Northwest Art Award exhibition at Portland Art Museum, continues her arresting large-scale work with a new series of portraits. The lifesized monochromatic drawings and prints seek to explore the discordant nature of being a woman of color, specifically the experience of being simultaneously invisible and hypervisible. Wall, who is of Korean descent, experiments with materials, making aqueous drawings into which black ink is introduced. The resulting lines and waves and eddies created when the pigment hits the water give the figures a texture not unlike the surface of the earth. Laura Russo Gallery, 805 NW 21st Ave., 503-2262754. Through Oct. 1.

The Soul of Black Art: A Collector’s View

Upfor’s third anniversary exhibition is guest curated by collector John Goodwin, who presents to us a survey of the depictions of black culture over the past century. The pieces range from abstract expressionist collage to black-and-white photos and the artists stretch from Andy Warhol to Portland’s own Arvie Smith who currently has a solo exhibition at Portland Art Museum. Through the work of these artists,

who are separated by race, era and geography, we get a deeper understanding of how the passing of time changes our perceptions and our culture. Upfor Gallery, 929 NW Flanders St., 503-227-5111. Through Oct. 15.

Rhetorical Geometry

Geometry is defined as the investigation of “shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space.” It is finite and quantifiable. Chicago-based artist Liz Mares is interested in all of the same questions, but her inquiry is abstract and intuitive. “Everything starts with a line as the base, then each placement after is a relationship to the first,” she says. “There is never a plan, rather a feeling of connection. How does each line, color and form speak to the other? The end result is either a harmony or a conflict.” Mares works with acrylic and ink in her small-scale 2-D pieces to explore ideas of relational balance and discord. Wolff Gallery, 618 NW Glisan St., Suite R1, 971-413-1340. Through Oct. 1.

Selected Works

If ever there was a love poem to the sea, it is José Diniz’s series of photographs, Selected Works . By making only black-and-white images of the ocean, Diniz eliminates the distraction of color, the turquoises and teals and aquas that draw our minds to memories of vacations or postcards or surf magazines. Instead, he gives us images of people and land through the eyes of the water, and images of water—broody, frothing, calm, rippled—through the eyes of people and the land. Blue Sky Gallery, 122 NW 8th Ave., 503-225-0210. Through Oct. 2.

In the Eye of the Beholder

The sculpture facing the door in Tanya Batura’s exhibition looks like a classical bust shrouded in white fabric, tied at the neck with a bow, head tilted to one side. It offers no indication of the gorgeous monstrosities waiting beyond. Keep walking through the gallery and you will see heads that look like pathology textbooks come to life. Batura plays with form and deformity, managing to create graceful lines that are pleasing to the eye and will simultaneously cause you to recoil. Batura’s body of work calls aesthetics into question as you reconcile the beauty in the grotesque. Hap Gallery, 916 NW Flanders St., 503-444-7101. Through Oct 1.

For more Visual Arts listings, visit

ADDIE

What’s Gone, What’s Left

RACE MEETS AGENCY IN SAMANTHA WALL’S SOLO EXHIBITION AT LAURA RUSSO GALLERY. Some of the most striking elements of Samantha Wall’s show See Me See You are the things that aren’t there. In a series of graphite drawings of women of color, Wall renders her subjects’ eyes, nose and lips—the features that most often telegraph race— in photorealistic detail. They jump from the paper, perfectly rendered, while the rest of the figure disappears into the whiteness of the background, into the whiteness of the world. Wall, who is of Korean descent, brings forward the things that we use to categorize each other, leaving the essential nature of each woman to our imaginations or assumptions. She wanted to make a statement about the simultaneous invisibility and hypervisiblity that women of color experience on a daily basis: “It affects all of my interpersonal relationships. It affects my work. Sometimes I feel like it’s difficult to talk about it.” In another series as part of the solo exhibition, Wall uses her own body as the subject of monochromatic life-size portraits. She draws herself from head to toe using water and India ink on translucent sheets of Dura-Lar film. When the black ink hits the surface of the water, it meanders into alluvial networks so astonishing the figures look as if they could have only been created by an act of nature.

Even though she is the model, Wall is clear that these are not self-portraits. “I become an archetype, a stand-in,” she says. “The bodies I see represented in galleries and in museums don’t look like me. I’m re-creating the idea of what a universal body can look like.” The series was made during a short period during which Wall was dealing with great loss. “That work is sitting so close to my grief that it’s hard to give it words,” she says. “Making it is a way of recording.” The scale of the pieces, all titled “Undercurrent,” is representative of the enormity of that task, but the figures themselves appear strong and steadfast. “I feel like I’ve lost too much already,” says Wall. “At least within my work I have the power to prevent that from happening.” Wall’s images have a certainty to them that is, perhaps, born of her loss. “It’s causing me to hold on tighter to the things I do have control over—my body my voice, my agency—trying to find a way to bring them to the forefront.” JENNIFER RABIN. SEE IT: See Me See You is at Laura Russo Gallery, 805 NW 21st Ave. Through Oct. 1.

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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com


BOOKS = WW Pick. Highly recommended. BY ZACH MIDDLETON. TO BE CONSIDERED FOR LISTINGS, submit lecture or reading information at least two weeks in advance to: WORDS, WW, 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Email: words@wweek.com. Fax: 243-1115.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 Unchaste Readers

The Unchaste Reading Series is devoted to making room for the stories of “finding and losing all of the things that women find and lose.” Readers for this installment include Sarah Miner, Angela Braxton-Johnson and Ashley Toliver. Literary Arts, 925 SW Washington St., 503-227-2583. 7 pm. Free.

Erin Judge

Millennials are having less sex than their Gen X counterparts, and Erin Judge’s new novel, Vow of Celibacy, follows two friends—a secretly virgin blogger, and a plus-size model—who forgo fornication for reasons that are bigger than a purity ring. Judge will be joined by comics Jenny Chalikian, Barbara Holm, Belinda Carroll and Laura Anne Whitley. Powell’s City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 800-878-7323. 7:30 pm. Free.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 Frontier Grit

The need to settle the American West enticed some badass women. One woman hid her gender and became a legendary stagecoach driver after escaping a life of poverty. Another, a freed slave, reunited with her daughter almost a full lifetime after they were separated. In her new book, Frontier Grit, Oregon author Marianne Monson has found a dozen stories that show women as trailblazers during the pioneer epoch. Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway, 503-246-0053. 7 pm. Free.

Wendy Gordon

Long Island in the mid-1980s: where housewives took the Volvo to aerobics, kids in Converse threw rocks at cars along the L.I.E., and Guns N’ Roses made sense. It’s also the setting for Wrong Highway, the debut novel from Portland author and journalist Wendy Gordon. When a woman’s wild nephew runs away from home and shows up on his aunt’s doorstep, generations of secrets start boiling up like a lava lamp. Broadway Books, 1714 NE Broadway, 284-1726. 7 pm. Free.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 Naomi Pomeroy

Naomi Pomeroy founded Portland restaurants Beast, Clarklewis and Expatriate, and she’s done so without the help of a culinary-school education. Now, the James Beard Awardwinning chef has written her first cookbook, Taste and Technique. Powell’s City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 800-878-7323. 7:30 pm. Free.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25 Holy Moli: Albatross and Other Ancestors A visit in a dream from an ancestor led Hob Osterlund to Hawaii, where she discovered the unusual beauty of the albatross. Osterlund explores the bird’s life in her memoir Holy Moli. Osterlund will be joined by The River Why author David James Duncan and Brian Doyle, author of Mink River. Powell’s City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 800-878-7323. 7:30 pm. Free.

MONDAY, SEPT. 26 Alexander Maksik

After his mom goes to jail for murdering a stranger with a hammer, Joseph moves with his family to be near her prison. But as his own mental health

deteriorates, he gets swept up in a violent plot. Shelter in Place is the newest from author Alexander Maksik. Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd., 800-878-7323. Monday. 7:30 pm. Free.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 27 The Jewish Oregon Story

Oregon’s current reputation for progressivism and sustainability may actually be part of local Jewish history, according to Willamette University history professor Ellen Eisenberg. Her previous work, Embracing a Western Identity, told the story of Oregonian Jews from 1849 to 1950, and with her new book, The Jewish Oregon Story, she uses more than 500 oral histories to continue the story through 2010. Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Ave., 503-222-1741. 6 pm. Free.

Banned Books Week: Diversity Panel Discussion

People come up with all sorts of dumb reasons to ban books. But an estimated half of these books are either written by or about people of color. You really want to stand next to the group clutching its pearls around a burning pile of Toni Morrison books? Candace Morgan, who coordinates Celebrate the Freedom to Read in Oregon, will moderate a panel on the Banned Books Week theme of diversity, featuring Charles Brownstein, director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund; authors Cory Doctorow, Cathy Camper and MK Reed; and illustrator Jonathan Hill. Powell’s City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 800-878-7323. 7:30 pm. Free.

For more Books listings, visit

REVIEW

Mike Roberts, CANNIBALS IN LOVE Reading Cannibals in Love, the debut novel from Mike Roberts (FSG Originals, 352 pages, $16), is like dumping a memory box on the table and feeling the gut-panging nostalgia ooze out from every concert ticket, old photo and letter. In 18 vignettes, Roberts takes us through the life of a guy in his 20s, also named Mike, as he pingpongs between Buffalo, New York City, Washington, D.C., Portland and Austin. He counts lamp posts for a summer, pens spam emails and, in Portland, baby-sits a rich, 13-year-old compulsive liar—all while working on his novel, an allegory about the U.S.’s invasion of Iraq set on a dairy farm. But through it all, one thing remains the same. His love for a woman named Lauren Pinkerton. The book is structured as a series of snapshots. In one, Mike comes out of a blackout in Manhattan to find himself puking in the street while two cops watch. In another, he watches three “long-haired kids” snort coke off the white piano from “Imagine” at Sean Lennon’s house. On the one hand, these are coming-of-age clichés. But Roberts doesn’t seem to glamorize them, and that’s part of the reason the book gets away with it. Other sections, however, read like hot takes from Holden Caulfield via Chuck Klosterman. “In three days, I’d argued with my brother that 9/11 proved Buffalo was in the Midwest,” Roberts writes. “I’d ruined a perfectly nice dinner by explaining some revolting fact I’d read about turkey farms. And I cited widespread pederasty in the Catholic Church as the reason I would not attend Midnight mass (or any church service) with the family.” These bits fade as the character becomes more self-critical and develops a more adult vulnerability I’ve seen portrayed so accurately by very few authors—especially in the sections about Lauren. “Part of the charm of our relationship was the fact that we engaged these parts of each other’s personalities that no one wanted to touch…parts that are small and petty and drive normal people away,” he writes. The relationship is compelling enough that I wanted to find the reality behind the novel, which Roberts himself has said is semi-autobiographical. I even went so far as to tweet the author with my guess as to the real Lauren Pinkerton. He wouldn’t say. But the mystery still swirled in my mind that night as I went to sleep. I knew the book was fiction, but Roberts’ characters were so alive I refused to let them stay on the page. SOPHIA JUNE. SEE IT: Mike Roberts reads at Powell’s City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 503-228-4651, powells.com, on Monday, Sept. 26. 7:30 pm. Free. Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com


C O U R T E S Y O F A L E X C R AW F O R D

MOVIES

Killer Season

HOW 25-YEAR-OLD PORTLAND RADIO PRODUCER ALEX CRAWFORD GOT HIS FIRST FILM ON NATIONAL TELEVISION. BY WA L K E R M AC M U R DO

tied No. 2 UCLA. The Beavers earned the moniker “Giant Killers,” a name that is common parlance to OSU graduates and The Beavers aren’t Oregon’s most glamor- Corvallisians. ous football team. Oregon State isn’t a top “The ethos of Oregon State that’s repdestination for five-star recruits, it isn’t resented by the Giant Killers is that we’re closely tied to the state’s largest company, going to outwork you and we’re going to and it doesn’t have a $68 million trainout-tough you,” Crawford says. “You ing palace garish enough to give a might have O.J. Simpson, the best kleptocrat a migraine. running back in college footBut the Beavers do have a ball, but our field is muddy, lot of heart, and a curious disand we’re going to get down position for smashing their in the trenches. We’re going top-ranked rivals into the to go to work.” chilly turf of Reser Stadium. Crawford negotiated with “A question I asked peoPac-12 Networks to get Legend ple in our original interviews broadcast nationally. To celCRAWFORD was, ‘Do you think one game ebrate, Crawford is taking Legend can define a season, and do you on a tour of West Coast theaters. It think one season can define a program?’” kicks off Thursday, Sept. 22, at Portland’s says filmmaker and OSU graduate Alex Mission Theater. Crawford, 25. A producer for Portland’s If you watch Legend of the Giant KFXX 1080 The Fan by day, Crawford Killers, you’ll see why Pac-12 Networks and director Riley Hayes debuted Legend picked it up. The film is astonishingly of the Giant Killers, an hourlong docu- professional, building the Beavers’ mentary chronicling the 1967 Oregon scrappy, underdog narrative by weaving State football team, on Nov. 6, 2015. dozens of interviews with Giant Killers Under coach Dee Andros, the 1967 players, their opponents (sadly, O.J. was Beavers became the only team in his- not available) and contemporary Beavers tory to, over the course of four weeks, go football personalities with archived 16 unbeaten against three top-two teams in mm footage of the ’67 team, much of one season. They defeated the No. 1-ranked which, according to Crawford, is from USC Trojans led by superhuman running the personal collections of various Giant back O.J. Simpson, beat No. 2 Purdue and Killers players. wmacmurdo@wweekcom

In 2013, Crawford found himself with some free time while he was interning with 1080 The Fan. His father, who attended OSU’s ’67 upset over USC at then-Parker Stadium, suggested he look into the Giant Killers team, providing him with a scrapbook of photographs from the season and the email address of ’67 halfback Billy Main. “I got in touch with Billy, and it turns out there’s a lot more to the Giant Killers’ story than just a football game,” Crawford says. “I’d call him from my internship when I didn’t have anything to do and we’d talk for an hour. He gave me some of his teammates’ phone numbers and I started making arrangements to interview some of these guys.” Crawford enlisted director Riley Hayes to create a 12-minute concept video to be shown to members of the team. “They didn’t know who the hell we were, but they liked the video and told us they wanted us to tell the story of the team,” Crawford says. “They gave us some money, and we did some fundraising through our own website. Eventually, OSU and a lot of people in the OSU community hopped on.” Production of Legend kicked off June 21, 2014, with an interview with the Beavers’ then-coach, Mike Riley. “We would go and film as many as 10 interviews in a week,” Crawford says. “As we got in touch with more people and crafted the story more, we reached out to different people, ultimately 41 total.” Throughout this process, Crawford was in touch with potential buyers of the film, including OSU, Pac-12 Networks and Comcast SportsNet. “When we started in fall 2013, we reached out to everyone whose email address we could get,” Crawford says. As unknown filmmakers fresh out of college, Crawford and Hayes got little traction. “Everyone was like, ‘We don’t know who you are, you’re 24 years old and you’ve never made a movie. We had to finish it and get people to like it first.” In April 2014, Crawford emailed the trailer for Legend to Patrick Phillips, director of archives at Pac-12 Networks, to gauge the network’s interest. “They told us they were definitely interested in our film, but that they didn’t know us or what Legend would look like,” Crawford says. Legend of the Giant Killers was completed Nov. 4, 2015. Two days later, Crawford and Hayes premiered the film at Portland’s Academy Theater with sev-

eral members of the Giant Killers and the film’s donors in attendance. Crawford wasn’t prepared to give up on getting Legend to a wider audience. This past spring, he reconnected with Phillips, who put him in touch with Patrick Griffin, the Pac-12 Networks’ director of programming. “When we had Legend finished, we came back to them and they told us it was really good, that they still wanted to air it,” Crawford says. “It grew into a discussion of ‘We want to sell Legend to you.’ ‘Well, we can’t pay you for it.’ ‘Well, what can you give us?’” Crawford says. “At the back of our minds, we knew we weren’t going to turn them down, but we wanted to try to at least be pseudo-businessmen so we could make another film in the future.” Crawford negotiated to get Legend played 10 to 15 times on both the regional Pac-12 Oregon channel and the nationally broadcast Pac-12 Networks HD, along with a short commercial that directs viewers to the filmmakers’ website. “We felt we got a pretty good deal,” Crawford says. “We’re getting a huge, captive audience of college football fans, plus we’re getting an insane amount of exposure because Pac-12 Networks reaches people across the nation.” Legend’s television debut was Sept. 17, with Crawford watching with friends from a bar in Pacific City. “As much as I had dreamed about a moment like this, there were a ton of times when I did not think we would finish the project,” Crawford says. “But during those times, I just put one foot in front of the other and focused exactly on what I could do to inch toward the end goal. All that hard work manifested on the TV on Saturday, and I said, ‘Whoa, we really did it.’ “My mom texted me during the movie and told me that my dad teared up when he saw his old newspaper clippings on national television, and my dad isn’t the kind of guy to tear up watching a movie. Taking an experience my dad had in 1967, an experience shared by thousands, and bringing it back to life nearly 50 years later, not only for him but for the Giant Killers players, made me feel like I was doing what I was put on this planet to do. It made me feel like a Giant Killer myself. As [’67 defensive tackle] Jess Lewis said about his drive-killing tackle of O.J. Simpson, ‘That’s kind of neat.’” SEE IT: Legend of the Giant Killers is not rated. It screens at 7:30 pm Thursday, Sept. 22, at the Mission Theater.

GET YOUR R EPS I N

Medium Cool

Haskell Wexler isn’t just considered one of the most important cinematographers of all time. His 1969 political thriller, Medium Cool, was filmed onsite in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, blending real-life footage of protesters being assaulted by Mayor Richard Daley’s notorious Chicago police into his story of a news cameraman who learns that his footage is being used by the FBI to identify suspects. Part

of the NW Film Center’s Print the Legend series on film and the media, Wexler’s commentary on the relationship between the news media, race and the police was 50 years ahead of its time. NW Film Center’s Whitsell Auditorium. 7 pm Thursday, Sept. 22.

Drive-In at Zidell Yards

For the past four years, the NW Film Center and Zidell Yards have teamed up to bring the South Waterfront

a week of good, old-fashioned fun. The films in this year’s five-day program are all crowd pleasers. The Coen brothers’ I-promise-notto-write-about-this-every-timesomeone-plays-it classic The Big Lebowski (1998) kicks things off Sept. 22, followed by Guy Hamilton’s surprisingly problematic spy classic Goldfinger (1964). On Saturday, you have ’90s-nostalgia supernova Space Jam (1997), and Sunday brings Cameron Crowe’s beloved high-

school love story Say Anything... (1989). Cool Hand Luke (1967), starring a historically handsome Paul Newman, wraps up things Monday. Zidell Yards. All showings at 7:30 pm Sept. 22-26.

Metropolis with live music

I’ll try not to throw the words “timeless classic” around too many times, but Fritz Lang’s timeless classic Metropolis (1927) is one of the true

must-watch films. Its modernist and art-deco set and costume design have aged perfectly into a reflection of the aesthetics of the 1920s, while its depictions of workers toiling to their deaths are made all the creepier by the film’s age. Oaks Park organist Dean Lemire will provide a live soundtrack to this silent film. Hollywood Theatre. 2 pm Saturday, Sept. 24.

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

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MOVIES RICK VODICKA

= WW Pick. Highly recommended. Editor: WALKER MACMURDO. TO BE CONSIDERED FOR LISTINGS, send screening information at least two weeks in advance to Screen, WW, 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210. Email: wmacmurdo@wweek.com. Fax: 243-1115.

OPENING THIS WEEK Argentina

A- Nearly two decades after Tango,

Carlos Saura follows up his Oscarwinning drama with an ode to lessfamiliar forms of Argentine dance: la Zamba of the north, the coastal Chamamé, and the Malambo of the south, among others. But unlike Tango, the ethereal Argentina has no plot or discernible narrative structure. At one point, dancers dressed up as cats put on makeup in a dressing room that the camera pans out to reveal as part of the stage itself. Billed as a documentary, Tango is more of a series of events ostensibly unconnected vignettes and performances. The vignettes are connected, though— visually through Saura’s habit of enlarging and distorting imagery, and spiritually through his unabashed love of his subject. GRACE CULHANE. NW Film Center’s Whitsell Auditorium. Sept. 25-27.

Fukushima Mon Amour

B+ Wrapping up this year’s Portland

German Film Festival is a black-andwhite traumedy of extremes. This reimagining of Hiroshima Mon Amour stars Rosalie Thomass as Marie, a German woman fleeing heartbreak for charitable validation as a volunteer clown in Fukushima’s radiation zone. She meets Satori, an aging geisha (Kaori Momoi) determined to salvage her family’s flooded home. Director Doris Dörrie uses natural moments like the different way each woman folds her legs before sitting to drink tea to deftly juggle the cultural ticks between German and Japanese people. Walking a tightrope between absurdist comedy and sincere mourning, Dörrie forces the viewer to deal with death and life all at once. LAUREN TERRY. Cinema 21.

STILL SHOWING Absolutely Fabulous

C Unfortunately for fans of the old

BBC series, Ab-Fab’s film reboot magnifies the inabilities of Britcom director Mandie Fletcher to stage set pieces and sketch queen Jennifer Saunders to craft a proper screenplay. PG-13. JAY HORTON. Academy.

Bad Moms

C Hangovers loom large in the films of Jon Lucas and Scott Moore (The Change-Up, The Hangover). Cue the inexplicably raucous party, supermarket-destruction and montage. R. JAY HORTON. Bridgeport, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Fox Tower, Moreland, Vancouver.

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week

A See Ron Howard’s new feature doc-

umentary on the Fab Four’s touring years to witness the highest-quality versions of some exceptionally rare performances. NR. NATHAN CARSON. Cinema 21.

B- Like all Roald Dahl books, it’s an ecstatic mix of the sentimental and cruel—the story of a young orphan named Sophie abducted by a lovable Big Friendly Giant who catches and releases dreams. PG. MATTHEW KORFHAGE. Academy, Avalon, Vancouver.

Ben-Hur

B- Even if the third filmic spectacular adapted from the 19th-century bestseller Ben-Hur is unlikely to leave the same cultural sandal print, it’s surely the fastest and most furious. PG-13. JAY HORTON. City Center, Jubitz.

James Donahue ventures to the woods of Burkittsville, Md., to track down his missing sister, Heather, after footage of her surfaces on the internet. Not

40

Bridget Jones’s Baby

C The third installment of the Bridget Jones franchise is wearily formulaic both in storyline and characterization. R. MICHELLE DEVONA. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Living Room Theaters, Lloyd, Oak Grove, Pioneer Place, Tigard, Vancouver.

Café Society

C- The annual Woody Allen production machine has assembled 90 very recognizable minutes here, with selfaware industry commentary, platitudes about New York and L.A., and a male ingénue looking for approval. R. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. Fox Tower, Kiggins.

Captain Fantastic

A Viggo Mortensen is mud-splattered,

idealistic and good at killing things... again. But this time with six kids in tow. R. ENID SPITZ. Fox Tower.

Don’t Breathe

B+ A trio of serial burglars gets trapped in an isolated Detroit home after their mark, a blind vet played with quiet menace by Stephen Lang, turns out to be a brutally efficient badass. R. AP KRYZA. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Lloyd, Oak Grove, Pioneer Place, Tigard, Vancouver.

Don’t Think Twice

A- Already called his Annie Hall, the

newest feature from comedian Mike Birbiglia follows members of a comedy troupe yearning to get on Weekend Live, a thinly veiled SNL surrogate. R. ZACH MIDDLETON. Cinema 21.

Finding Dory

B+ For 13 years, the entire world eagerly awaited the return of Ellen DeGeneres as the forgetful Dory. There’s tears to fill a tide pool, wit to keep adults amused, and laughs for any audience with a short attention span. PG. AMY WOLFE. Academy, Avalon,

Beaverton, Vancouver.

Florence Foster Jenkins

B Making fun of terrible singing is cheap and easy, but Florence Foster Jenkins avoids cheap shots. PG-13. JOHN LOCANTHI. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Eastport, Fox Tower, Oak Grove.

For the Love of Spock

B Directed by his son, Adam, this feature-length doc provides an extensive look into Leonard Nimoy’s life, both on and off the Star Trek set. NR. CURTIS COOK. Kiggins.

Ghostbusters

A Ghostbusters is maximalist, it’s glo-

The BFG

Blair Witch

screened for critics. R. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Lloyd, Oak Grove, Pioneer Place, St. Johns 1 & 2, Tigard, Vancouver.

rious, and if it ruins your childhood, sorry bro. PG-13. ZACH MIDDLETON. Eastport, Jubitz, Tigard.

Hell or High Water

B+ Loved the gunfights and the mis-

anthropic cowboy glamour of No Country for Old Men, but maybe Javier Bardem’s haircut made you uncomfortable? Try Jeff Bridges’ new Western. R. GRACE CULHANE. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, Cinemagic, City Center, Clackamas, Fox Tower, Hollywood, Vancouver.

The Hollars

C John Krasinski (The Office) directs and stars in this cutesy dramedy that misunderstands David O. Russell’s dysfunctional family movies as being only about their spirit. The Hollars has a winning cast on its side, but it’s just doing a broad-strokes approximation of

Willamette Week SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 wweek.com

YOU PLAY A GOOD GAME, BOY: The Tall Man

REVIEW

J.J. Abrams Reanimates Phantasm in a Good Way

DON COSCARELLI’S HORROR CLASSIC STANDS TALL ON ART HOUSE THEATER DAY. BY N ATHA N CA R SON

Independent horror has a long and remarkable history, from George A. Romero’s genre-defining zombie flick Night of the Living Dead (1968), to John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978), which introduced the world to Jamie Lee Curtis and the masked killer Michael Myers, to future Spider-Man (2002) director Sam Raimi’s gore-splattered The Evil Dead (1981). It’s a durable format with a rabid fan base that is generally unconcerned with marketing or popularity. What these independent productions sacrifice in budget is often more than compensated for by a lack of studio oversight, and the passion of a hungry cast and crew. In 1979, Phantasm became the first hit film for writer, director and editor Don Coscarelli. Since then, he’s gone on to fame as the man behind swordsand-sorcery deep cut The Beastmaster (1982) and Bubba Ho-Tep (2002), starring The Evil Dead’s Bruce Campbell as an aged Elvis Presley. Back in 1979, Coscarelli was a young maverick with few resources. He borrowed money from his father and a few doctors and lawyers, and hired a cast of actors with few credits among them. With $300,000 and gallons of blood, sweat and tears, Coscarelli forged a lasting legacy with an atmospheric horror film about two resourceful orphan teens who pit themselves against the sinister Tall Man portrayed by the iconic, and recently deceased, Angus Scrimm. Set in the imaginary small town of Morningside, Ore., Phantasm is a gruesome buddy flick. Two brothers, Mike (Michael Baldwin) and Jody (Bill Thornbury), team up with the local ice-cream man, Reggie (Reggie Bannister), to try their damndest to figure out why the people of Morningside are mysteriously dying. All signs lead to the local mausoleum, an austere and chilling battleground for a series of confrontations with the Tall Man, who wields deadly chrome orbs to dispatch townsfolk and reanimate them into dwarf-sized undead minions. Critics didn’t love Phantasm upon release. At the time, Roger Ebert called it “a labor of love, if not a terrifically skillful one.” Phantasm’s production was a notoriously disorganized affair, with a cast heav-

ily reliant on aspiring professionals and Coscarelli’s friends. The script was changed scene by scene and relied heavily on improvisation, and Coscarelli edited the film under duress down to about 90 minutes from three hours’ worth of film. But there has been a serious reappraisal of Phantasm over the years. The editing resulted in the film progressing with a nonlinear, dreamlike quality that has drawn comparisons to the work of Dario Argento, Luis Buñuel, and Alejandro Jodorowsky. It’s now considered a classic of the horror genre, landing at No. 14 on Wired’s “25 Best Horror Films of All Time,” with Moviepilot.com calling it “one of the best least-known horror movies.” Despite the lukewarm reception, the original Phantasm returned nearly $12 million on its minuscule budget. Home video kept the film alive for decades, spawning three sequels, with a fourth on the way, One of its most significant fans is J.J. Abrams, who went so far as to name Star Wars: The Force Awakens character Captain Phasma as a tribute to Coscarelli. Phantasm’s original print suffered in the interim. When Abrams asked Coscarelli for a highquality reel to view, it was revealed that no such print existed. Abrams enlisted the technicians at Bad Robot to assemble a 4k digital restoration. As a result, the release of the fourth and final sequel, Phantasm V: Ravager has been delayed until October to enjoy a wider release after the buzz the remastered original is now receiving. Phantasm is showing around the country as a top-billed feature of the inaugural Art House Theater Day. This Saturday, Phantasm: Remastered is being projected at the Hollywood Theatre for a single showing whose cult following should ensure that the theater sells out in advance. The screening will be followed by a pre-recorded Q&A with Coscarelli and select cast members. Phantasm delivers the requisite sex and violence, but also the mood, atmosphere, mystery and cosmicism that has come to define indie horror. Even if you saw the original Phantasm on 35 mm at a drive-in back in ’79, there’s no chance it looked or sounded as good as this. A SEE IT: Phantasm: Remastered is rated R. It plays at 7 pm Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Hollywood Theatre.


something more thoughtful, a Little Miss Sunshine without the character detail. PG-13. CHANCE SOLEMPFEIFER. Fox Tower, Hollywood.

Jason Bourne

A- Director Paul Greengrass and

Matt Damon deliver on-brand thrills via hand-held footage of riots in Athens and many scenes in which assassins splash cold water on their faces and reflect in a mirror. PG-13. ENID SPITZ. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Fox Tower, Tigard.

Kubo and the Two Strings

A Laika’s late-summer bid for animation domination is an original story that feels lived in, a kidfocused fable with real stakes, and a high-octane spectacle full of white-knuckle action that’s matched every step of the way by heart. PG. AP KRYZA. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Lloyd, Moreland, Pioneer Place, St. Johns Pub and Theater, Tigard, Vancouver.

The Light Between Oceans

B Derek Cianfrance adapts M.L.

Stedman’s novel in which a couple (Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander) tending a remote lighthouse is embattled over returning a beached baby to her mother. PG-13. CHANCE SOLEM-PFEIFER. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Living Room Theaters.

Lo and Behold

A Werner Herzog’s new movie about the internet is more interested in fringe stories than in developing a line of hard criticism. Herzog films aren’t about criticism. They are about Herzog’s sense of wonder. NR. ZACH MIDDLETON. Academy, Laurelhurst.

politics. R. AP KRYZA. Clackamas, Eastport, Pioneer Place, Tigard, Vancouver.

The Secret Life of Pets

Louis C.K. voices a pampered terrier who gets sucked from his NYC home into a tough gang of pets set on punishing the people who’ve wronged them. PG. Beaverton, Bridgeport, Clackamas, Eastport.

Snowden

C- Oliver Stone’s biopic about Edward Snowden doesn’t offer any insights beyond what you can get from Wikipedia. Stick to 2014’s Citizenfour. MICHELLE DEVONA. R. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Fox Tower, Lloyd, Oak Grove, Tigard, Vancouver.

Suicide Squad

reotypes turn what could have been a humorous tale of Bush-era ineptitude into a haphazard rehashing that’s probably really funny if you’ve never smoked marijuana before. R. CRYSTAL CONTRERAS. Bridgeport, City Center, Division, Living Room Theaters, Tigard.

hype. Effortlessly evoking the triumphant emotions of Disney’s best live-action outings, it also provides a somber examination of the death of innocence. PG. MIKE GALLUCCI. City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Oak Grove, Tigard.

Sausage Party

A- Sometimes, a dick joke is just

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C+ Dull narration and racist ste-

When the Bough Breaks

A young couple who can’t conceive decide to hire a surrogate mother, who becomes dangerously obsessed with the husband in this psychological thriller, written by crime journalist Jack Olsen. PG-13. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Lloyd, Vancouver.

For more Movies listings, visit

COURTESY OF HANNO LENTZ / MAJESTIC

a dick joke. But sometimes a dick joke can be an existential meditation on atheism butting up against organized religion, false gods and

JENNY SLATE

ROMANTICALLY CHALLENGED.

C- Clint Eastwood’s worst movie since 2011’s J. Edgar, his tale of Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger’s 2009 emergency landing of a commercial jetliner in the Hudson River is weighed down by too many familiar actors and rote dialogue. EZRA JOHNSON-GREENOUGH. PG-13. Bagdad, Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Lloyd, Oak Grove, Pioneer Place, Roseway, St. Johns 1 & 2, Tigard, Vancouver.

life of Grammy-nominated soul singer Sharon Jones after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. NR. CURTIS COOK. Living Room Theaters.

Pete’s Dragon

AND

Sully

War Dogs

A Pete’s Dragon deserves the

ADAM SCOTT NICK KROLL

C- Suicide Squad rushes through an incoherent two hours of superhero mayhem, pureeing everything into a slush of clichés. PG-13. MATTHEW SINGER. Bridgeport, Cedar Hills, City Center, Clackamas, Division, Eastport, Fox Tower, Lloyd, Oak Grove, Tigard, Vancouver.

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B This documentary follows the

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CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

BY LAU R EN TER RY

@LaurenYTerry

Few people know what the Oregon Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program is, but it’s about to have a profound effect on the state’s cannabis industry. On Aug. 26, Gary K. Ward, administrator of the agency, known as ORELAP, sent a memo to industry insiders saying his organization was “on the precipice of collapse.” Come Oct. 1, that collapse could cause a bottleneck that results in empty dispensary shelves as massive amounts of freshly harvested, outdoor-grown flower sits in storage. The fallout of that collapse could even extend to the safety of the drinking water at Oregon schools. Here’s the situation: Rules adopted by the Oregon Health Authority state that any cannabis products transferred from producers to shops must be tested through newly approved labs verified by ORELAP. As it stands, only two labs have been approved, and there are thousands of growers funneling their product through them. ORELAP has only a handful of employees, and recent issues with air contaminants and lead-tainted drinking water in public schools have kept it busy with labs not involving cannabis. The OHA set the Oct. 1 deadline for lab certification, but it didn’t give ORELAP more resources. In Ward’s memo, first reported by The Oregonian, he said he requested three fulltime employees to handle cannabis-testing lab accreditation, and received none. Accreditation requires the review of hundreds of pages outlining equipment and processes, as well as a thorough inspection of the lab itself. Approved labs will have to be audited in a few months, and those needing improvements will require extra inspections to verify that updates have been made. That means the overall process of approving a lab’s setup to analyze potency, mold, pesticides and residual solvents in processed oils can take several weeks. Add the fact that the OHA is requiring more from certified labs. New sampling requirements multiply the number of tests each grower will have to perform for a single crop. Each strain must have its own set of test results, and a new test for every batch of 10 pounds within that strain.

If you’re growing a few wimpy Sour Diesel plants, you’ll only need to pay for one test. However, most growers who transfer product to dispensaries have a varied strain menu, meaning multiple tests every harvest, and multiple tests per strain if you’ve got hearty plants. Croptober is coming, but while sun-grown cannabis is typically harvested once a year in the fall, indoor grows or greenhouses using lightdeprivation techniques can harvest their plants four times a year. The longer it takes labs to do their jobs, the longer pot will be waiting in line to get tested. Nelson & Company Organics, a longtime medical marijuana farm in the final stages of inspection before recreational approval from the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, is concerned about the fast-approaching pileup of untested weed. “This could push everything forward,” says an employee of Nelson & Company. “There are already hundreds of pounds harvested and ready from recreational growers who haven’t been able to transfer anything to shops yet. None of that can move until the labs are sorted out.” The delay adds to the wall of challenges facing experienced medical growers making the transition to the recreational market. They’ve already had to update their growing techniques and security practices. Now, the state is having them sit on harvests while waiting for verification. It’s another reason for impatient growers with underground connections to unload their product elsewhere. On Sept. 9, the state said “it has temporarily assigned three Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality workers to help with pot-lab certification.” Unless a dozen more labs are magically approved in the next week, you can expect a very different selection on dispensary shelves this fall. Your favorite edible brand may be missing from the medical lineup because the next batch is waiting to get through a lab, or it’s been redirected to the recreational market. The grower you’ve favored because of the way she cultivates Cherry Kush could vanish because of new zoning rules, making her grow illegal in that municipality. Just know it isn’t the stoners messing this one up.


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Across 1 Made some brownies 6 Alert heard in the night, maybe 11 Fire dept. ranks 14 GE competitor 15 Former emperor Selassie 16 Granola granule 17 First #1 hit for the Black Eyed Peas 19 “___ gotta go now ...” 20 “Fatal Instinct” actor Armand 21 It’s not worth a dime

23 Charges 26 6 or 9, but not 69 27 Big-headed? 30 Can’t help but 32 Healing plant 33 Peninsula in the news 35 Big galoot 38 “I’ll take that as ___” 39 Cocktails with umbrellas 40 Like borrowed library books, eventually 41 Limbo prop 42 Favorable trend 43 M’s associate

44 Certain Sooner Stater 46 Pipsqueaks 47 Canine complaint 49 Gives lip 52 Arrive by horse 54 Hypothetical questions 58 Abbr. on military mail 59 Band with the 1998 #1 hit “Iris” 62 Co. big shot 63 Item dropped in Road Runner cartoons 64 Disney film set in China

Down 1 Rum-soaked cake 2 ___ Lee (singer with the album “Mission Bell”) 3 “Get Smart” enemy org. 4 All together 5 Coleman of “Boardwalk Empire” and “9 to 5” 6 Kicks 7 Words before “Spock” and “Not Spock,” in autobiography titles 8 Tombstone inscription 9 Musk of Tesla Motors 10 What traditionalists may be averse to 11 Befit, like clothes 12 “Star Trek” actor who came out in 2005 13 Long-legged marsh bird 18 12-time All-Star Mel 22 Op. ___ (footnote abbr.) 24 Yellowfin, alternatively 25 Singer/TV personality Braxton 27 “Born From Jets” car company 28 Forearm component 29 Salesman’s selling style, way back when

31 Mineral deposit 33 Salary maximums 34 Awards presented by the Romance Writers of America 36 Patty or Selma, to Maggie 37 Government agents 39 Do-over shot 43 Make a prison break 45 Much-maligned director ___ Boll 46 File with software instructions 47 2016 “America’s Got Talent” winner VanderWaal 48 More ready to be picked 50 Massively ripped 51 “Dexter” airer, for short 53 Fourth piggy’s portion 55 ___ J (rapper/ producer and brother of the late J Dilla) 56 Like a pancake 57 IDs with two hyphens 60 Fertility clinic specimens 61 Hodges of baseball fame

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Week of September 22

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Even if you are a wild-eyed adventure-seeker with extremist views and melodramatic yearnings, you’ll benefit from taking a moderate approach to life in the coming weeks. In fact, you’re most likely to attract the help and inspiration you need if you adopt the strategy used by Goldilocks in the fairy tale “Goldilocks and the Three Bears”: neither excessive nor underdone, neither extravagant nor restrained, neither bawdy, loud, and inyour-face nor demure, quiet, and passive -- but rather just right. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Some of my readers love me but also hate me. They are drawn to my horoscopes in the hope that I will help relieve them of their habitual pain, but then get mad at me when I do just that. In retrospect, they feel lost without the familiar companionship of their habitual pain. It had been a centerpiece of their identity, a source of stability, and when it’s gone, they don’t know who they are any more. Are you like these people, Taurus? If so, you might want to avoid my horoscopes for a while. I will be engaged in a subtle crusade to dissolve your angst and agitation. And it all starts now with this magic spell: Your wound is a blessing. Discover why. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) In my dream last night, bad guys wearing white hats constrained you in a canvas straitjacket, then further wrapped you up with heavy steel chain secured by three padlocks. They drove you to a weedy field behind an abandoned warehouse and left you there in the pitch dark. But you were indomitable. By dawn, you had miraculously wriggled your way out of your confinement. Then you walked back home, free and undaunted. Here’s my interpretation of the dream: You now have special skills as an escape artist. No cage can hold you. No riddle can stump you. No tangle can confuse you. (P.S.: For best results, trust yourself even more than you usually do.) CANCER (June 21-July 22) The next four weeks will be a favorable time to come all the way home. Here are nine prompts for how to accomplish that: 1. Nourish your roots. 2. Strengthen your foundations. 3. Meditate about where you truly belong. 4. Upgrade the way you attend to your self-care. 5. Honor your living traditions. 6. Make a pilgrimage to the land where your ancestors lived. 7. Deepen your intimacy with the earth. 8. Be ingenious about expressing your tenderness. 9. Reinvigorate your commitment to the influences that nurture and support you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) What tools will work best for the tasks you’ll be invited to perform in the coming weeks? A sledgehammer or tweezers? Pruning shears or a sewing machine? A monkey wrench or a screwdriver? Here’s my guess: Always have your entire toolbox on hand. You may need to change tools in mid-task -- or even use several tools for the same task. I can envision at least one situation that would benefit from you alternating between a sledgehammer and tweezers. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) I’m confident that I will never again need to moonlight as a janitor or dishwasher in order to pay my bills. My gig as a horoscope columnist provides me with enough money to eat well, so it’s no longer necessary to shoplift bread or scavenge for dented cans of beets in grocery store dumpsters. What accounts for my growing financial luck? I mean besides the fact that I have been steadily improving my skills as an oracle and writer? I suspect it may in part have to do with my determination to cultivate generosity. As I’ve become better at expressing compassion and bestowing blessings, money has flowed to me in greater abundance. Would this strategy work for you? The coming weeks and months will be a good time to experiment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Here’s my translation of a passage from the ancient Gospel of Thomas, a gnostic text about the teachings of Je-

sus: “If you do not awaken and develop the potential talents that lie within you, they will damage you. If you do awaken and develop the potential talents that lie within you, they will heal you.” Whether you actually awaken and develop those talents or not depends on two things: your ability to identify them clearly and your determination to bring them to life with the graceful force of your willpower. I call this to your attention, Libra, because the coming months will be a highly favorable time to expedite the ripening of your talents. And it all starts NOW. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You can’t completely eliminate unhelpful influences and trivial saboteurs and debilitating distractions from your life. But you’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when you have more power than usual to diminish their effects. To get started in this gritty yet lofty endeavor, try this: Decrease your connection with anything that tends to demean your spirit, shrink your lust for life, limit your freedom, ignore your soul, compromise your integrity, dishonor your reverence, inhibit your self-expressiveness, or alienate you from what you love. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Work too much and push yourself too hard, Sagittarius. Eat corn chips for breakfast, ice cream for lunch, and French fries for dinner -- every day, if possible. And please please please get no more than four hours’ sleep per night. If you have any extra time, do arduous favors for friends and intensify your workout routine. JUST KIDDING! Don’t you dare heed any of that ridiculous advice. In fact, I suggest you do just the opposite. Dream up brilliant excuses not to work too much or push too hard. Treat yourself to the finest meals and best sleep ever. Take your mastery of the art of relaxation to new heights. Right now, the most effective way to serve your long-term dreams is by having as much fun, joy, and release as possible.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) I propose that you and I make a deal. Here’s how it would work: For the next three weeks, I will say three prayers for you every day. I will ask God, Fate, and Life to send you more of the recognition and appreciation you deserve. I will coax and convince them to give you rich experiences of being seen for who you really are. Now here’s what I ask of you in return: You will rigorously resolve to act on your core beliefs, express your noblest desires, and say only what you truly mean. You will be alert for those times when you start to stray from the path with heart, and you will immediately get yourself back on that path. You will be yourself three times stronger and clearer than you have ever been before. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) If you loosen yourself up by drinking an alcoholic beverage, don’t drive a forklift or ride a unicycle. If you have a hunch that your luck at gambling is peaking, don’t buy lottery tickets or play the slot machines. If you’re drawn to explore the frontiers of intimacy, be armed with the ancient Latin maxim, Primum non nocere, or “First, do no harm.” And if you really do believe it would be fun to play with fire, bring a fire extinguisher with you. In presenting this cautionary advice, I’m not saying that you should never push the limits or bend the rules. But I want to be sure that as you dare to experiment, you remain savvy and ethical and responsible. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) I invite you to explore the healing power of sex. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to do so. You are also likely to generate good fortune for yourself if you try to fix any aspect of your erotic life that feels wounded or awkward. For best results, suspend all your theories about the way physical intimacy should work in your life. Adopting a beginner’s mind could lead you to subtly spectacular breakthroughs. (P.S. You don’t necessarily need a partner to take full advantage of this big opening.)

Homework Name the one thing you could change about yourself that would improve your love life. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

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42 47 willamette week, september 21, 2016  
42 47 willamette week, september 21, 2016  
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