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WHISTLER’S PREMIER P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C E 1980

WINTER/ SPRING 2018

M AG A Z I N E

OFF-SLOPE ADVENTURES HIGH-FLYING FASHION ALL-STAR SPORTS BARS

love

DINING | HOMES EVENTS | SHOPPING

WHY WE

WHISTLER

Tips from Olympians and long-time locals

COMPLIMENTARY MAGAZINE

Please Take One www.whistlermagazine.com


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES PRESENTS EXHIBITION & SALE OF NEW WORK BY SHANNON FORD

Shannon Ford

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Galleries at the Fairmont

W W W . M O U N T A I N G A L L E R I E S . C O M

Jasper Park Lodge | Banff Springs | Chateau Whistler


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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018


MORE THRILL, MORE PL AY TIME You’re always dreaming of getting to the slopes and making the most of your day. The XDR collection was designed to maximise your play both on and off-piste, check it out at salomon.com

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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contents High Flying Fashion. 30 A tour of upscale options from Whistler retailers BY MIKE CRANE

An Eternal Flame. 44 From local Olympians to the millions of annual visitors, the resort’s magic speaks to all BY ALISON TAYLOR

A Worldy Haven. 60

Adorned with European furnishings and custom fixtures, this contemporary chalet is a warm, sophisticated retreat BY LISE BOULLARD

A Winter’s Bounty. 68

How the resort’s top chefs keep things fresh during Whistler’s favourite season BY BRANDON BARRETT

CONTRIBUTORS

A passionate writer, editor and multiplatform content producer, LISE BOULLARD covers all things luxury as Managing Editor of Vancouver Luxury Living magazine.

WWW.DAVIDMCCOLM.COM

BRANDON BARRETT is a reporter and features editor with Pique Newsmagazine. Originally from Ontario, he arrived from Medellin in 2012 where he was reporting South American news for Colombia Reports.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

DAVID BUZZARD i s a commercial, architectural, and food photographer based in Whistler and Vancouver. He has won nine press awards for photojournalism for the Whistler Question and Squamish Chief.

MIKE CRANE is a freelance photographer living the dream in Whistler and beyond, wandering this incredible landscape by hike, bike, paddle, snowboard and skis. Explore, travel, create and repeat.

BRADEN DUPUIS is a transplanted Saskatchewan flatlander lost in the Whistler mountains. He spends his days working as a reporter for Pique Newsmagazine. His mom thinks he is brilliant.

MEGAN LALONDE is a transplant from Ottawa and a graduate of Carlton University. She writes for the Whistler Question. You can find her on the mountain or cruising Instagram for the next great hiking spot.


SAM ANTHAMATTEN

Mt. Ushba, Georgia _ Photo: Tero Repo

Engineered from the ground up in partnership with our athletes — this is one kit for any mission.

AVAILABLE AT:

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Deer Lodge, Across from the Brewhouse, Whistler Village 604-938-7432


contents ARTS SCENE: Mountain Moods Reflected. 25

DEPARTMENTS

BY BRIGITTE MAH

Editor’s Greeting. 12

WHISTLER ACTIVITIES: A Day Off the Slopes. 41

Fresh Tracks. 16

BY DEE RAFFO

Bits and bites of information about winter in Whistler

FAMILY FUN: The Playground Rules. 53

Events Calendar. 22

BY LISA RICHARDSON

SKIING & SNOWBOARDING: A Well-Tuned Carve. 55

Recreation Guide. 57

BY VINCE SHULEY

Shopping Whistler. 90

CASUAL DINING: Whistler’s All-Star Sports Bars. 81

Services Directory. 97

BY MEGAN LALONDE

COVER PHOTO: Whistler’s Olympic gold medal-winning athletes: Ashleigh McIvor DeMerit and Marielle Thompson, by Logan Swayze

AFTER HOURS: Have It Their Way. 87 BY BRADEN DUPUIS

SOCIAL PAGE: Scene in Whistler. 98

CONTRIBUTORS

After university, DEE RAFFO decided she needed a break from the books and headed to the French Alps. Subsequently falling in love with the mountain lifestyle, she followed the snow to Whistler.

JUSTA JESKOVA

BRIGITTE MAH is a writer living the dream in Squamish, B.C. When she isn't pecking at her keyboard, she can be found climbing rock somewhere high.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

LISA RICHARDSON writes about global mountain culture and local awesomeness for leading outdoor publications, and credits her four year old with the reminder that it’s important to play as hard as you work.

VINCE SHULEY is a freelance writer and photojournalist who too often finds excuses to leave his home office to go play in the mountains. He also enjoys creature comforts and managing deadlines.

ALISON TAYLOR is a freelance writer based in Whistler, where the people and the stories are a constant source of inspiration and fun. She moved here from Toronto on the one-year plan; that was 15 years ago.

Freelance writer EMMA TAYLOR hails from the Yorkshire Pennines, U.K. Her love of the outdoors brought her to Whistler's mountains in 1998, where she thrives on the creative and sporting opportunities Whistler has to offer.


BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

editor’s message

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Whistler is the main attraction INTER IS IN WONDERLAND

mode in Whistler. Look outside; look up the mountain. Take the gondola up and feel the sheer joy that comes from carving out powder on top of a thick base of snow. This is the stuff we love best, the flakes falling and taking shape, the skiing and snowboarding — and in this issue’s cover story, we are paying tribute to these core values by speaking to champion athletes, a long-time ski instructor, and a relative newcomer about what has made them flourish here. Each looks at Whistler and Blackcomb mountains differently, providing a snapshot of the many ways the resort can be enjoyed. Homegrown Olympic gold medallists Ashleigh McIvor DeMerit and Marielle Thompson travelled the world in competitive

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

CATHRYN ATKINSON, Editor

ski cross, but Whistler remains where their hearts are. Ski instructor and guide Stephanie Reesor teaches guests the skills to enjoy the mountains, where the best runs are, and talks about how living here changed her life. And Irishman Kevin Niland is a passionate newcomer, joining a local ski and snowboard manufacturing company. There is a lot more to Whistler than this, though. Our other stories look at what is fun on and off the slopes for families and interesting places to check out around Whistler, how fine-dining restaurants keep their offerings fresh and local over the winter months, what cocktails our

bartenders are serving up, and the best sports bar food in Whistler. These offerings are among the reasons why, in 2016, Whistler won Ski Magazine’s “Best Ski Resort in North America” for the third year in a row — we’ve got the terrain, the facilities and services, and the après that keeps us on top. There is an elegance about the Whistler experience and a casualness in embracing its fun nature, whether it is a pulse-pounding adventure by ziplining or snowmobiling, or world-class art and culture at our commercial galleries or the Audain Art Museum. If you want peace and pampering, our spas are there for warmth and relaxation. And if you want to party, check out our nightlife. Whatever you are looking for, we have you covered. Enjoy!

Cathryn


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WINTER/SPRING 2018 What made you decide to call Whistler home? GENERAL MANAGER, ADVERTISING/OPERATIONS

Catherine Power-Chartrand EDITOR

I came for one winter and never left — it’s an AWESOME place to live!

The mountains and the beer.

Cathryn Atkinson ART DIRECTOR

Shelley Ackerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Brandon Barrett Lise Boullard Braden Dupuis Megan Lalonde Brigitte Mah Dee Raffo Lisa Richardson Vince Shuley Alison Taylor Emma Taylor PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

Lindsey Ataya David Buzzard Of all the things to keep me Coast Mountain Photography Mike Crane here — the mountains, the fresh Justa Jeskova air, the lifestyle — it's really the David McColm people and the community that Claire Ryan made this place my "home." Logan Swayze Adam Taber

I wanted to get back on the slopes after years of living in Britain.

"I wanted to experience life in a different part of the country - and see what all the hype around B.C. was about, for myself!"

When my three-year old went off to ski school midweek instead of daycare, I thought “this is where I want to raise a family.”

PRESIDENT, WHISTLER PUBLISHING LP

Sarah Strother ACCOUNTING

Heidi Rode

CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION

Denise Conway

Whistler Magazine (ISSN-0835-5460) is published twice annually by WHISTLER PUBLISHING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, a division of GLACIER MEDIA GROUP 103-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., Canada, V0N 1B1 Phone 604-938-0202 | Fax 604-938-0201 | Toll-Free 1-877-419-8866 Email: cpower@whistlermagazine.com Also publishers of The Question, weekly on Tuesdays, Pique Newsmagazine, weekly on Thursdays, and FAQ, published twice yearly. whistlerquestion.com | piquenewsmagazine.com | faqwhistler.com

PRINTED IN CANADA

FSC One-year (2 issues) subscription: $20 within Canada, $30 to the USA, $45 overseas. Call to charge to VISA, MasterCard or American Express. Copyright © 2018, by Glacier Media Group.

All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the publisher.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018


FRESH TRACKS ATTENTION

SLED HEADS

JUSTA JESKOVA

c Imagine an ice cave with hues of whites and blues, pretty enough to compete with the sky, the ceiling a cavernous cathedral-like expanse overhead. Awesome is the right word. Imagine walking through such a place, watching the light from outside rendering nature into art. Now make it reality! Such caves are just a short helicopter ride away from Whistler to Canada’s southernmost ice field, the Pemberton Ice Cap, which is accessible to anyone — families, friends, weddings, private groups, or corporate events. Head-Line Mountain Holidays offers several guided ice-cave expeditions with tours taking up to four hours, and collaborates with the Four Seasons Resort Whistler to offer luxury tours. www.headlinemountainholidays.com

WARM TO WHISTLER SPAS INDEPENDENT AND HOTEL-based spas around the resort offer guests every kind of pampering. As the snow falls outside, the tension wears off inside, thanks to treatments such as hot-rock massage, mud wraps, hydrotherapy, manicures and skin care. Outdoor heated and cold plunge pools, saunas, steam rooms and couples’ spa experiences are also available. Whether you are aching from a day on the slopes or needing to caress away the tensions of city living and busy work days, there is a spot waiting for you. Whistler spas cater to groups as well as individuals. For a wide range of wellness care, try Scandinave Spa (scandinave.com) or the Fairmont Chateau Whistler (fairmont.com).

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FOXY MORON

DJ BILLY THE KID

HISTLER COULD RUN its entire power grid on the energy released by dancers in its pubs and clubs. It takes great music to get people going; there are dozens of DJs — resident and visitors — who are up to the task. Meet three: DJ Peacefrog is long-time resident DJ at Buffalo Bills, playing several nights a week; Foxy Moron performs at local festivals and events, with drop-in gigs at the Garibaldi Lift Company and other venues; and DJ Billy the Kid is a busy Aussie at clubs around the resort, including Merlin’s, Tommy Africa’s and Garfinkel’s. gibbonswhistler.com/venues, whistlerblackcomb.com, tommyafricas.com.

COURTESY GIBBONS WHISTLER, FACEBOOK, FACEBOOK

BEAT KEEPERS!

DJ PEACEFROG

JUSTA JESKOVA

TOURISM WHISTLER/SCANDINAVE SPA

NATURAL ICE PALACES

H

IT OUR winter trails for daytime or après jaunts by snowmobile, one of Whistler’s favourite ways to get around in the snow that doesn’t involve skis or snowboards. Sled among old-growth forests, or ride to a vista point and look out onto breathtaking views. There are options with candlelit fondue dinners, skills clinics, backcountry trips, and experienced guides. Pro-tip: look out for e-sleds — all-electric snowmobiles — this year on the slopes and trails around the Whistler region. canadianwilderness. com, blackcombsnowmobile.com and tagwhistler.com

BY CATHRYN ATKINSON


ZIP CODE ILLUSTRATION: LINDSEY ATAYA

an eagle. Harnessed in and travelling along secured cables, with guides at every step, the experience is both fun and unforgettable. Whistler zipline tours are among the highest, fastest and longest in

the world. Two companies offer very different experiences. Ziptrek Eco Tours has lines through the forest at the base between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains, while Superfly Ziplines is

located on nearby Cougar Mountain. Tours can range from two-and-a-half to four-and-a-half hours. There are also ziplining trips at dusk. Ziptrek.com and superflyziplines.com

FEED THE NEED FOR SPEED

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HISTLER SLIDING CENTRE is a track of high-speed magic that speaks to the child in all of us — especially those who like tobogganing as fast as possible, and who maybe entertained dreams of becoming an Olympian. One of Whistler’s key 2010 Winter Games venues, it offers a rare sporting opportunity for the public to try out the facility, since there are few such sliding track

locations in North America. Whistler Sliding Centre allows visitors to try bobsledding, luge and skeleton. For those wanting full guidance on the course, professional bobsled drivers take groups of three through 10 of the track’s 16 corners at up to 125 kilometres per hour. For those wanting more thrills, the luge, essentially an open sled on blades, allows solo participants a chance to lie down and trust gravity.

This takes riders around six corners of the track at up to 100 km/h. As a sport, skeleton is, well, more bare bones, with riders also going it alone and heading down the track face first at up to 100 km/h. Participants in all three sports go through a safety orientation, and wear helmets. Public sliding starts for the winter season on Dec. 16, 2017, and runs rain, snow or shine. whistlerslidingcentre.com

c Cross-country skiing is the ticket to seeing some of the prettiest places in the region, and getting fit by using skinny skis on trails along the valley bottom instead of up on the slopes. Whistler gained much terrain for this sport thanks to the 2010 Winter Games, now for the enjoyment of locals, visitors, and athletes alike. There are two designated parks for some great Nordic

action: Lost Lake, on the edge of Whistler Village, with 32 km of trails, and Whistler Olympic Park (WOP), located 23 km south of the resort, which has 130 km of trails. Biathlon and ski jumping are also available at WOP. Whistlerolympicpark.com, whistler.ca, and crosscountryconnection.ca

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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TOURISM WHISTLER/DAVID MCCOLM

yet so surprising, Whistler zip-trekking takes people of all ages on a ride through forests, over rivers and soaring like

EMMANUEL MENDES DOS SANTOS, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

S

O SAFE AND

CROSSCOUNTRY CHECK-UP


FRESH TRACKS

MAGNETIC MOUNTAINS E

ROBIN O’NEILL FOR WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

very moment we spend in these hills is a reward.” These are some of the truest words to be said about Whistler, and they can be heard in Magnetic: A Whistler Blackcomb Movie, a new film about what draws people from all over the world to the resort. The hills are alive with the sound of serious shredding, as the film stars over 20 Whistler ski and snowboarding legends, including Stan Rey, Mike Douglas, Jesse Millen, Helen Schettini and Justin Lamoureux — all showing off their considerable skills within the boundaries of Whistler Blackcomb (WB). “Whistler is perhaps the only place in the world that has this much talent — male and female, young and old," says the film’s co-director Jeff Thomas. With cliffs, pillows, deep powder and the terrain park, it is the first-ever ski and snowboard movie filmed entirely at one resort, proving that Whistler offers every possibility for visitors, and it provides a tantalizing glimpse of what is possible on the slopes. Shot a year ago during the record-breaking snowfall of the winter of 2016-17, Magnetic will be a central part of Whistler Blackcomb’s promotion of its stunning beauty and spectacular athletes. The film comes in at 37 minutes. Watch Magnetic: A Whistler Blackcomb Movie online at whistlerblackcomb.com

WHERE THE EAGLES FLY

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TOURISM WHISTLER/ MIKE CRANE

RACKENDALE, SOUTH OF WHISTLER, welcomes salmon by the thousands — and where there are salmon, there are bald eagles. From late November until mid-January, the community has hundreds (sometimes thousands) of wintering eagles along the Squamish River and other tributaries. If you’re lucky, you might see feeding seals and sea lions, too. The Eagle Run viewing area has fine views across the river to Brackendale Eagles Provincial Park, where the raptors sit in cottonwood trees and feed on the banks in the early morning. Enthusiasts can also visit during the annual Brackendale Eagle Festival and Count, which takes place at the Brackendale Art Gallery in early January. brackendaleartgallery.com As a different way to take in the eagle experience, why not coast quietly among them? There are Eagle Float Tours offered by Sunwolf, located in the Squamish Valley. Here, visitors glide along the river in inflatable boats, getting closer to the birds without disturbing them. sunwolf.net. 18

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

SKATING, SUN AND STARS c CANADIANS TAKE skating outdoors for granted; in winter we usually have the cold conditions and the frozen expanses, such as a lake or a rink, that would satisfy any skater. People from around the world come to Whistler and are able to try out our beloved pastime. Whistler Olympic Plaza is home to the resort’s outdoor rink from Dec. 9 until the end of March. Instructors are available to teach beginners, and it’s very family friendly. The rink is free daily, from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., with music playing and colourful lighting at night. Skate rentals are available for $6 and helmets are available at no charge. whistler.ca

ADAM TABER


TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

AFTER THE MELT

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TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

TOURISM WHISTLER/ MIKE CRANE

HISTLER IS A four-season resort, and just a few months from now summer returns with alpine flowers replacing the snowpack. Here is your invitation to come back to this gorgeous place in the warm weather and breathe the mountains’ sweet, fragrant air. The great outdoors remain alluring and active, with action from mountain biking, hiking, swimming, ATVing, canoeing and kayaking, and even summer skiing on a glacier. Those wanting a rest will find it on Whistler’s lakeside beaches (yes, beaches!), in peaceful parks, at nearby waterfalls, and on the patios of restaurants and pubs. The variety of options is surprising and tempting whether for friends, couples, or families. As in the winter, visitors are welcome to Whistler’s two mountaintop lodges — the Roundhouse and the Rendezvous. There you will find restaurants, shops, activities and views of mile after mile of glorious peaks. Mountains as far as the eyes can see. Don’t forget to try the Peak 2 Peak Gondola, which glides between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains a kilometre off the ground. Summer also means outdoor festivals like Wanderlust and Crankworx, and sporting events such as Ironman, Tough Mudder, and the 120-km Gran Fondo bike race in early September, which brings thousands up the highway from Vancouver.

Follow, like or read us online! W whistlermagazine.com WhistlerMagazine @whistlersmag whistlermag

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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FRESH TRACKS MOUNTAIN ROOTS BUY LOCAL, BUILD COMMUNITY

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COURTESY HAMMER COFFEE ROASTING

RIGHTEN YOUR DAY. Beneath Whistler’s brand-name veneer, a wealth of community-minded small businesses await your discovery. Seemingly casual encounters in our friendly grassroots stores, cafés, and markets create smiles and memories that last. — Emma Taylor

FRESHEST JOE IN TOWN, HAMMER STYLE c SMALL-BATCH MICRO ROASTERS — Hammer Coffee Roasting — roasts coffee beans to order and delivers to your Whistler doorstep (or hotel concierge) every Friday afternoon, ensuring the freshest cuppa joe in town. Husband and wife team, Mat Peake and Chrissy Hay, hobby roasted at home for 10 years before setting up their Function Junction micro-roastery in fall 2016. Renowned for its dark chocolate overtones and caramel finish, Hammer’s dark-roast coffee has quickly garnered an enthusiastic local following. Check out the three standard roasts: Brazil Seven Falls, Guatemala Carrizal and the Brazil/Guatemala blend. Order anytime before Friday for Friday afternoon delivery via Instagram @HammerRoasting, Facebook page Hammer Coffee Roasting or simply text 778-251-6797.

ROBIN O’NEILL PHOTOGRAPHY

WEST COAST CANDLE ART c EVOKE THE HEADY SCENT of the Pacific

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

STOLEN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY

c MAMA MIA! Enjoy a flavour of Italy in Whistler with long-time locals’ favourite Lucia Gelato. Delicious gelato and sorbet handcrafted in Whistler in the “artisan” style using the freshest natural ingredients. Inspired by vacations to Italy, founder Kathryn Shepherd turned her passion for gelato into a business in 2007, learning the art of gelato making from Italian masters in Bologna. Gelato flavours include the mouthwatering Chocolate Raspberry Truffle, Banana Caramel Fudge and Double Chocolate Mint. Buy it at many Whistler stores, including The Whistler Grocery Store, Nesters Market, Olives Community Market and Creekside Market. For winter scooping, visit Garbanzo Bike & Bean and Gnarlyroots Pizza and Cafe. Also available for dessert in many Whistler restaurants. Online at luciagelato.com with custom orders available.

CRACKER SNACKS

CHRISTIAN WATSON

TEN YEARS OF FLAVOUR

Northwest’s wild rainforests (and light up your life) with a Hollow Tree candle. Ex-forester Tobias Douglas hand-pours her candle artistry in her Whistler studio, using premium coconut wax and nature-inspired fragrances. Choose from four collections that encompass the magnificent splendour of B.C.’s West Coast wilderness — Library of Trees, 1871, Botanical and Backpacker. A simple and stylish ceramic mason vessel cradles each, and is designed to glow warmly as it burns for up to 60 hours. Available throughout Whistler at the Audain Art Museum, 3 Singing Birds or order online at hollowtree.ca.

c EVE LAIRD COOKS UP wholesome, healthy and nutritious crackers from her kitchen in Whistler’s Function Junction. These aren’t your average crackers — Eve’s Crackers are plant-based, seed-laden, crunchy snacks that nourish the body with good fats, fibre and protein, and fill you up for longer. Packing a powerful nutritional punch with every bite, each artisanal cracker is free from dairy, eggs, wheat, refined sugar and added oil. Choose from Black Sesame, Chili Pepper Pumpkin Seed or Eve’s personal favourite (and bestseller) Savoury Sunflower. Buy in retail stores Nesters Market, Olives Community Market, Purebread and Blackcomb Liquor Store. Available online at evescrackers.com.


The floodlit Coca-Cola® Tube Park offers tons of snow sliding fun! OPEN DAILY FROM MID-DECEMBER TO MID-APRIL

Located at Base II on Blackcomb Mountain

/

Fresh Tracks Mountain Top Breakfast

p: Paul Morrison

Buy tickets at Guest Services or visit whistlerblackcomb.com/freshtracks

/ WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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EVENTS CALENDAR FESTIVALS

SPORTS & RECREATION

SEASONAL

Nov. 29 – Dec. 3

Nov. 25 – 26

WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL

ARTS WHISTLER HOLIDAY MARKET

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

One of Canada’s leading film festivals, with over 60 original films, celebrity speakers, red carpet premieres, industry events and special screenings. whistlerfilmfestival.com Jan. 21 – 28

WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL

Music, parties, performers and a large pride parade at Canada’s biggest LGBTQ ski and snowboard week, which takes place over eight days. whistlerpride.com March 9 – 10

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB FOUNDATION’S TELUS WINTER CLASSIC

This is Whistler’s major social and fundraising event of the year. There are ski events, food and drink, the famous and infamous live and silent auction, and plenty of entertainment. whistlerblackcombfoundation.com WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL

SIGGE’S P’AYAKENTSUT

Sunday nights

Jan. 4 – 7

Skiers and snowboarders perform big-air jumps through blazing rings at the base of Whistler Mountain; Sunday evenings from mid-Dec. to late March. whistlerblackcomb.com

Whistler Olympic Park hosts the Canadian Youth/Junior World Championships Trials and the Biathlon NorAm Cup #2. biathloncanada.ca

Monday and Wednesday afternoons

PEAK TO VALLEY RACE

FIRE & ICE SHOW

Feb. 23 – 24

Family-friendly activities at Whistler Olympic Plaza. Free. whistler.com

The legendary race starts off at the Saddle on Whistler Mountain and finishes up at Dusty’s Bar & Grill in Creekside. whistlerblackcomb.com

Thursdays

Feb. 24

FAMILY APRÈS

KOKANEE VALLEY RACE SERIES

Recreational series open to skiers, telemarkers and snowboarders of all ages. whistlerblackcomb.com Nov. 23

SIGGE’S P’AYAKENTSUT 2018 CROSS-COUNTRY SKI EVENT

The largest cross-country skiing event in B.C., with 15-km, 30-km and 50-km courses. callaghanxcski.ca

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB OPENING DAY

March 31

Nov. 24 – 25

This slopestyle event is Canada’s longest-running snowboard competition. whistlerblackcomb.com

whistlerblackcomb.com BMW IBSF WORLD CUP

Two-day event at the Whistler Sliding Centre, with bobsleigh and skeleton races. whistlersportslegacies.com Dec. 7 – 10

FIS CUP SKI JUMPING 2017

Whistler Olympic Park in the Callaghan Valley hosts women’s and men’s events. whistlersportslegacies.com TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

BIATHLON NORAM CUP #2

Dec. 20, 27, Jan. 3

21ST ANNUAL SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN

Apr. 12–15

MACKENZIE INVESTMENTS WHISTLER CUP

The biggest race of its kind in North America for athletes ages 12 to 15. whistlercup.com April 22

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN CLOSING DAY

KING OF THE RAIL PRESENTED BY SHOWCASE

whistlerblackcomb.com

A series of rail jam contests at the base of Whistler Mountain. whistlerblackcomb.com

BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN CLOSING DAY

May 21

whistlerblackcomb.com

Whistler’s favourite artisan market takes place over two days at the Whistler Conference Centre with shopping, carols, fine art and more. artswhistler.com Nov. 25 – 26 BRATZBIZ

Young entrepreneurs make lovely items to purchase at the annual pre-holiday sale at the Whistler Conference Centre Grand Foyer. bratzbiz.ca December TBA

WHISTLER HOLIDAY EXPERIENCE

The Whistler Conference Centre becomes a family fun zone with bouncy castles, crafts, mini putt and more. Adults can relax in the lounge area and let the kids play. whistler.com Dec. 2

THE NADEAU ENSEMBLE: A PRAIRIE CHRISTMAS

Melodies performed by harpists Janelle Nadeau and Kim Robertson, joined by medieval instrumentalist Joaquin Ayala, at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre. artswhistler.com Dec. 21

CANADA 150 WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATIONS

A night of lanterns, lights and entertainment to brighten the darkest day of the year. The parade starts at the Maury Young Arts Centre at 5 p.m., and winds through the Village. artswhistler.com Dec. 24

CHRISTMAS EVE CHURCH SERVICE

Whistler Community Church’s non-denominational celebration of Christmas, at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler at 6:30 p.m. fairmont.com/whistler Dec. 31

NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATIONS

From 6 p.m. to midnight Whistler Village turns into a familyfriendly outdoor party. Alcohol-free youth activities and fun-filled events throughout the Village Stroll. whistler.com


ARTS & MUSIC STONE AND SKY: CANADA’S MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE

The Audain Art Museum’s Canada 150 project explores how this country’s most celebrated artists interpreted the vastness of mountain vistas. audainartmuseum.com Dec. 15

THE PAPERBOYS

Juno Award-winning Vancouver folk band, playing music with influences from Celtic and bluegrass at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com Jan. 12

STONE AND SKY

Feb.3

FRED PENNER

The much-loved children’s performer puts on two shows at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com Feb. 14

RICK SCOTT AND NICO RHODES

Vancouver four-piece pop band at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

A self-taught dulcimer player and classically trained pianist blur the boundaries of folk, blues and soul, at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

Jan. 25

Feb. 18

THE BELLE GAME

VANCOUVER THEATRESPORTS

Where live theatre becomes play as talented actors perform improv, at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

COURTESY AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

To Feb. 26

Explore Whistler 365 days a year

TH’OWKIYA (AXIS THEATRE)

Six storytellers from the Kwantlen First Nations Village of Squa’lets, spin the tale of Th’owxiya: the Hungry Feast Dish. At the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

Enjoy the Village or venture further. Take transit and experience Whistler your way.

March 10

BRAIN AND OTHER STORIES

A hilarious, heartbreaking monologue by Brendan McLeod, at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

Leave the driving to us.

March 31 – June 11

BEAU DICK: REVOLUTIONARY SPIRIT

AXISTHEATRE.COM

TH’OWKIYA

The Audain Art Museum’s retrospective of the innovative Indigenous artist Beau Dick looks at his work as a sculptor, regalia maker and print maker. audainartmuseum.com For up-to-date event listings and information, visit piquenewsmagazine.com or whistler.com

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Transit Info 604·932·4020 www.bctransit.com

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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Ski. Board. Art. Step inside and see the rest of BC.

Ski. Board. Art. Step inside and see the rest of BC. 4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler

604.962.0413

Bill Reid, Killer Whale, 1984, Audain Art Museum Collection, Gift of Michael Audain and Yoshiko Karasawa, 2015.012

audainartmuseum.com

Special Exhibitions: Stone and Sky: Canada’s Mountain Landscape Sat, November 11, 2017 - Mon, February 26, 2018

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler

604.962.0413

Come and experience a trans-continental Bill Reid, Killer Whale, 1984, Audain Art Museum Collection, Gift of Michael Audain and Yoshiko Karasawa, 2015.012 journey that explores the richness, vitality and diversity of Canada’s alpine landscapes. Beau Dick: Revolutionary Spirit Fri, March 30 – Mon, June 11, 2018

A critically important art historical project honouring the legacy of the remarkable artist, Beau Dick. The retrospective will provide insight into the complexities of traditional and contemporary Indigenous approaches to the creation of art on the West Coast. New Audain Après Hours Launching Thu, November 16, 2017 10am – 5pm Mon, Wed, Sat, Sun; 10am – 7pm Thu, Fri; Closed Tue Location 4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC T: 604.962.0413 Photo: Michael Elkan


arts scene

CLOUDPLAY BY MICHAEL O’TOOLE, FROM ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY.

MOUNTAIN MOODS REFLECTED THE TALENTED ARTISTS WHOSE WORKS ARE FOUND IN WHISTLER BRING US SO MUCH CLOSER TO THE LANDSCAPES WE LOVE

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ITH ITS MAJESTIC MOUNTAINS, dramatic valleys and quintessential lakes, Whistler is a source of inspiration for many artists, both British Columbian and international. Though the town’s numerous art galleries vary in purpose, art styles, and mediums, all are celebrating the wonders of the Canadian landscape this winter as a nod to our nation’s 150th anniversary. >>

STO RY BY B RI GITTE MAH WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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AUDAIN ART MUSEUM AS WHISTLER’S NEWEST ADDITION to a vibrant art scene, the Audain Art Museum is a repository for historical and contemporary B.C. art. The museum shows its mountain-culture appeal by hosting Stone and Sky: Canada’s Mountain Landscape, which runs until Feb. 26. The exhibition brings together the work of art icons Lawren Harris, Emily Carr, W.P. Weston, Edward Burtynsky, Gordon Smith and Kenojuak Ashevak. Mountains have long been the source of inspiration for Canadian artists, and with the nation’s 150th anniversary in 2017, Stone and Sky exhibits works created since Confederation — pondering the challenges of nationalism, plus the relationship between nature and Canada’s urban environment. “With over 100 artworks from well-known artists such as Carr and Burtynsky, the Group of Seven, John Hartman, Ann Kipling and Toni Onley, we are creating an indelible visual art experience for our visitors,” said Darrin Martens, the Audain’s chief curator. You’ll find a passion for the natural environment in each piece; collectively the show looks at the relationship humans have with it, questioning whether one dwarfs or overpowers the other. “Photographs, watercolours, prints, oil and acrylic paintings drawn from over 20 different institutions and lenders comprise Stone And Sky, and allow us to look deeper at our environment and how it has changed,” said Martens. The Audain’s follow-up touring exhibition, Beau Dick: Revolutionary Spirit, runs from March 31 to June 11. For details visit audainartmuseum.com.

ARTS WHISTLER

TOP: NOBLE BUFFALO BY SHANNON FORD IS STUDDED WITH GEMSTONES INCLUDING RUBIES AND GARNETS, FROM MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT.

“THE EMPHASIS OF THIS COLLECTION IS INSPIRED BY LOCAL

ABOVE: IN EVERY DETAIL ED. /6,

SCENERY THAT

BY JAY KELLY, MIXED MEDIA

CAPTURES THE

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

By November, Arts Whistler — the resort’s arts council — is in the middle of Fall for Arts, which celebrates events all over the resort and runs until early December. It offers visual arts exhibitions, live performances, and art classes led by talented instructors at the Maury Young Arts Centre. The Great White runs from Dec. 7 to Jan. 7, and features mountain photography, winter landscapes, and Canadian icons such as hockey sticks. As part of this, discover the finest handmade gifts from regional artists and artisans at the Arts Whistler Holiday Market on Nov. 25 and 26. The Whistler Film Festival rounds out the Fall For Arts season and heralds at the start of the winter ski season, taking place from Nov. 29 to Dec. 3. For more information, visit artswhistler.com.

MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT This season, Mountain Galleries at the Fairmont is celebrating 25 years in Canadian art across their three locations in Western Canada. The Fairmont Chateau Whistler gallery hosts Wild and Sacred Places, an ongoing exhibition that includes top artists Nicholas Bott, Shannon Ford, Karel Doruyter, Doria Moodie, Brent Lynch and Charlie Easton, among others. “The collection constantly revolves and we expect to receive new works in daily,” said communications director Benjamin McLaughlin. “The emphasis of this collection is inspired by local scenery that captures the powerful essence of Whistler and British Columbia. “All the artists are people who we feel are doing something innovative with their craft.”


The artists experience the landscape for themselves by hiking out to it, and doing plein air studies, which then become the inspiration for later paintings. “It’s a very authentic process,” said McLaughlin. “They are actually out there.” From Feb. 10 to 18 the gallery also hosts a solo exhibition featuring works that literally sparkle, from Okanagan artist Shannon Ford. “In the two years that we have represented her she has become one of the top-selling artists,” said McLaughlin. “We think she is doing something with the medium that we haven’t seen before.” “Shannon has a background in jewelry and (she) infuses gemstones into her colourful wildlife paintings,” said McLaughlin. For details on the gallery and its exhibitions, visit mountaingalleries.com.

The Ketel One Ice Room

EXPERIENCE

ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY The Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery kicks off the season with its opening of the 25th annual Art of Winter Group Exhibition on Saturday, Nov. 25. Many of the artists in the show have been with the gallery since its opening — a testament to the success of the gallery, and the popularity of its artists. Featuring works from Rick Bond, Rod Charlesworth, John Ogilvy, Jennifer Sparacino and Mike Svob, among others. “I try to exhibit an array of styles throughout the season, some contemporary abstract, some figurative, some quintessentially Canadian landscape,” said owner and director Liz Harris. “While many are more established artists with the gallery, I always try to highlight some emerging artists as well.” In Jan. 2018, the gallery shines a spotlight on David Langevin and Michael O’Toole, showcasing new works. A series of solo exhibitions follow, with Angela Morgan opening on Feb. 3, Laura Harris opening on February 10, Cameron Bird opening on Feb. 17, and Susie Cipolla opening on March 17. For more detailed gallery information, visit adelecampbell.com.

WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Whistler Contemporary Gallery brings in Canadian and internationally recognized contemporary artwork of distinction, from painting, sculpture, to glass. “Our endeavour is to bring on contemporary, cutting-edge artwork of significance that people would be proud to have in their collection,” said director Jeanine Messeguer. This winter, the gallery showcases established artists with international reputations, along with some new talents who have made limited editions specifically for the gallery. Expect to see a variety of subjects, from large silk butterfly installations to the powerful animal images of Jay Kelly, to the colourful iconic three-dimensional pieces of renowned artist Jane Waterous, a recipient of the prestigious SOLO Artexpo New York award in 2012. “As most galleries do, during these prime winter months we feature our most popular artists such as Jane Waterous,” said Messeguer. Waterous is known for her signature Gatherings series, where tiny figures convey and capture a different moment of joy and wonder. Both Waterous and Kelly have a large international following. For more details on the gallery, visit whistlerart.com. W

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BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

WHISTLER’S CANADIAN ART DESTINATION AT THE SHOPS AT THE WESTIN

THE AUDAIN ART MUSEUM.

ADELE CAMPBELL F I N E A RT, W H I S T L E R

whistler galleries AUDAIN ART MUSEUM Open Wednesday to Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4350 Blackcomb Way, 604-962-0413 ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. in the Westin Resort, 604-938-0887 ART JUNCTION GALLERY & FRAME STUDIO Open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. 1068 Millar Creek Road, Function Junction, 604-938-9000 BLACK TUSK GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. in the Hilton Resort, 1-877-905-5540

UPCOMING EXHIBITONS ALL ARE WELCOME

ART OF WINTER NOVEMBER 25, 2017 WINTER SPOTLIGHT DAVID LANGEVIN & MICHAEL O’TOOLE JANUARY 20, 2018 ANGELA MORGAN FEBRUARY 3, 2018 LAURA HARRIS FEBRUARY 10, 2018 CAMERON BIRD & VANCE THEORET FEBRUARY 17, 2018

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FATHOM STONE ART GALLERY & STUDIO In the Westin Resort, 604-962-7722 MARK RICHARDS GALLERY Open daily from noon in the Hilton Resort, 604-932-1911 MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT Open weekdays at 9 a.m. and weekends at 8 a.m., in the Fairmont Chateau, 604-935-1862 THE PLAZA GALLERIES Open daily from 10 a.m., 22 – 4314 Main Street, 604-938-6233 THE GALLERY AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE Open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m., Sunday from 4 p.m. at 4335 Blackcomb Way, 604-935-8410 SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE Open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4584 Blackcomb Way, 1 866 441 SLCC (7522) SUZANNE JOHNSTON STUDIO GALLERY In the Westin Resort, 604 -935 -3444

SUSIE CIPOLLA MARCH 17, 2018

VINCENT MASSEY STUDIO 8605 Forest Ridge Drive, 604-932-6455

www.adelecampbell.com

WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Hilton Resort, 604-938-3001 (main) Four Seasons Resort, 604-935-3999

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018


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whistler style

HIGH-FLYING

FASHION IT’S IMPORTANT TO DRESS APPROPRIATELY WHEN HEADING TO THE TOP OF A MOUNTAIN, WHETHER YOU’RE TAKING A HELICOPTER OR A GONDOLA. MARK WEARS A MEN’S VOLCAN PANT AND SUPREME GLOVES FROM PEAK PERFORMANCE, A BOGNER MEN’S FLINN DOWN JACKET FROM CAN SKI, AND CLARKS BOOTS FROM SOLES OF WHISTLER. BRITT WEARS A WOMEN’S TETON JACKET, WOMEN’S HELO LINER, WOMEN’S CHANI PANT AND HESTRA MITT, ALL FROM PEAK PERFORMANCE, AND BOS & CO. WATERPROOF BOOTS FROM SOLES OF WHISTLER. SHOT ON LOCATION AT RAINBOW MOUNTAIN, WITH BLACKCOMB HELICOPTERS.


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HISTLER IS A WORLD-CLASS resort that attracts visitors from near and far. With its casual atmosphere, you can get away with Gor Tex and fleece much of the time, but it’s always nice to kick it up a notch or two. Whistler Olympian Britt Janyk and her husband, Whistler Mountain Ski Club executive director Mark Tilston, take us on a short tour of some of the more upscale options available at Whistler retailers for both on- and off-piste. PH OTO S BY M I K E C R ANE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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whistler style

MARK WEARS A MEN’S VOLCAN PANT, SUPREME GLOVES AND CARRIES A CRUZE BAG FROM PEAK PERFORMANCE, WITH A NEVE GUNNAR SWEATER AND A MOUNTAIN FORCE MEN’S MONTGOMERY DOWN JACKET, BOTH FROM CAN SKI.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018


WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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whistler style

A LITTLE SHOPPING IS IN ORDER, SO BRITT HEADS TO KEIR FINE JEWELLERY’S FAIRMONT LOCATION, IN A CASHMERE WOOL HOODED CAPE WITH FOX FUR TRIM FROM SNOWFLAKE AND A JOSEPH RIBKOFF TOP FROM OPEN COUNTRY. BRITT SPARKLES IN A NATURAL CANADIAN DIAMOND AND WHITE-GOLD SNOWFLAKE PENDANT, NATURAL CANADIAN BRILLIANT-CUT DIAMOND WHITE-GOLD STUD EARRINGS, A NATURAL CANADIAN EMERALDCUT DIAMOND PLATINUM-SET THREE-ACROSS RING, A ROUND BRILLIANT-CUT DIAMOND FOURROW ANNIVERSARY BAND SET IN CANADIAN GOLD, AND A ROUND BRILLIANT-CUT ILLUSION 3CT TENNIS BRACELET IN WHITE GOLD.


WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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whistler style

BRITT STARTS OFF THE EVENING AT QUATTRO, WITH A CLASSIC MARTINI IN A JOSEPH RIBKOFF DRESS FROM OPEN COUNTRY, AND TRIPLE RING EARRINGS, A COURAGE, STRENGTH, LOVE BRACELET, AND 20" MULTI LOOP NECKLACE, ALL FROM RUBY TUESDAY.


WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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whistler style

QUATTRO IS ALWAYS AN EXCELLENT CHOICE FOR DINNER, WITH ITS INVITINGLY WARM ATMOSPHERE AND CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN CUISINE . BRITT WEARS A JOSEPH RIBKOFF TOP AND TYLER MADISON PANTS FROM OPEN COUNTRY, AS WELL AS ROCKPORT TOTAL MOTION POINTY TOE PUMPS FROM SOLES OF WHISTLER. HER JEWELRY IS A NATURAL CANADIAN DIAMOND AND CANADIAN WHITE GOLD INUKSHUK PENDANT, NATURAL CANADIAN DIAMOND AND CANADIAN WHITE GOLD INUKSHUK DROP EARRINGS, AND NATURAL CANADIAN DIAMOND AND YELLOW GOLD/ STERLING SILVER INUKSHUK BANGLE, ALL EXCLUSIVE TO KEIR FINE JEWELLERY. MARK SPORTS 34 HERITAGE PANTS, A BUGATCHI SHIRT, A BUGATCHI BLAZER AND A LINDBERG BELT, ALL FROM OPEN COUNTRY, WITH HUSH PUPPIES BROGUES FROM SOLES OF WHISTLER. W


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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018


whistler activities

A DAY OFF THE SLOPES

TAKING A BREATHER FROM THE SKI RUNS? THERE IS NO LIMIT TO OFF-MOUNTAIN ADVENTURES IN THE VALLEY

WHISTLER OFFERS DIFFERENT ZIPLINE COMPANIES TO FLY YOU THROUGH THE FORESTS AND OVER THE RIVERS.

P

EOPLE THINK THAT A DAY OFF THE SLOPES

means a day spent in the hot tub or perhaps propping up the hotel bar — and if that’s what you want to do, be our guest! However, if you like throwing sharp objects, channelling your inner Indiana Jones, or getting crafty in your spare time, you’re in luck. Ten minutes’ drive south of Whistler Village is Function Junction. There’s a lot more in this industrial park area than meets the eye. Keeping Whistler’s mountain pads in style is The Daily Planet and Camp Lifestyle & Coffee Co., while foodies can be found chowing down on pastries and buying bread at Purebread and 200 Degrees Bakery, and supping the seasonal beers at Whistler Brewing Co. and Coast Mountain Brewery. In true mountain style, we suggest earning your brew first, and the team at Forged Axe Throwing in Function can help you. Hurling an axe through the air is a daunting prospect, but you’d be surprised at the number of people who walk out having hit a bullseye. Friends James Anderson and Brett Easton founded Forged on the belief that adults deserve a bit of competitive fun, and they’ve literally nailed it. With some gentle coaching, they guide even the most tentative person through overhead, onehanded, and underarm throws. It is oddly empowering to see the blade sink into the wood, especially if you’re on the leaderboard. >>

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

STORY BY DEE RAFFO

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SHEA MACNEIL, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

ABOVE: FIND A CONNECTION WITH THE REGION’S FIRST NATIONS PEOPLES AT THE SQUAMISH LIL'WAT CULTURAL CENTRE. LEFT: THE MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE OFFERS WORKSHOPS AND HOSTS A RANGE OF PERFORMANCES

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

DURING THE WINTER.

Did you know that close to the base of Whistler Mountain there’s a buried cabin and a pirate ship? A fun activity for thrill seekers is Escape! Whistler. Armed with only your wits, you have 45-minutes to “escape” from a buried cabin, the brig, or work your way out of a rabbit warren. Owner Kori Klusmeier describes it as being inside a real-life video game where you’ve got to work together to solve the clues, puzzles and riddles to set yourselves free. The rooms are designed for groups of two to six people so it’s ideal for a family or group of friends looking for a unique challenge. Fancy a bit of arts and culture? Head over to the Maury Young Arts Centre to see what’s happening. A hub for everything arts, they host their own ArtLab workshops ranging from macramé, pyrography (wood burning), and lantern making. 42

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

If you’d rather see than do, head over to the Audain Art Museum and join one of their hour-long tours, where a trained docent will walk you through the permanent collection and touring exhibition galleries, providing insight and historical context, before you continue exploring on your own. Another cultural must-see is the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre where you can find a connection to First Nations peoples, both past and present, who have called this region home since time immemorial. Tours happen hourly and include an Indigenous welcome song, film, and craft activity you can take home with you. Exploring with a knife and fork is a delicious option — tick-off some of Whistler’s yummiest culinary spots while guided by pros. Whistler Tasting Tours is a multi-course, progressive dining experience

that can be taken at lunchtime or dinner. For those with a sweet tooth, there is a desserts-only tour. Owners Joe Facciolo and Skai Dalziel simply had a love of food and wine that they wanted to share. Since 2008, they’ve developed a dining experience that connects foodies with a guide who knows the restaurateurs, chefs, and winemakers. Even if you fancy a bit of time off the slopes, it might not mean you’ve had enough mountain adventure. If you’re a speed demon, have a look at backcountry snowmobiling or zipline adventures. The slower option would be to grab a pair of snowshoes and take your time exploring old trappers trails, or let a group of sled dogs do the work while you take in the 360-degree views of frozen waterfalls and snow-capped mountains. Head to the Scandinave Spa if you truly want a quiet time. Nestled among towering Douglas firs, this steamy haven is a dream for those seeking rest and relaxation. To get the blood flowing, they suggest at least three hydrotherapy laps, where you heat your body up in the steam, sauna, or hot pools and then use the cold plunges or waterfalls to cool off and rejuvenate. With so many adventures to be had, it’s over to you to decide where to start. W


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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

cover story

TWO OF WHISTLER’S OLYMPIC GOLD MEDAL-WINNING ATHLETES: ASHLEIGH

LOGAN SWAYZE, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

MCIVOR DEMERIT AND MARIELLE THOMPSON.


AN ETERNAL FLAME FROM LOCAL OLYMPIANS TO THE MILLIONS OF ANNUAL VISITORS, THE RESORT’S MAGIC SPEAKS TO ALL STO RY BY A LI S O N TAY LO R

A

S OLYMPIC GOLD MEDAL-WINNING athletes, Ashleigh McIvor DeMerit and Marielle Thompson have travelled the world in competitive skiing and one thing is clear: nothing compares to Whistler. From the Alps to the Andes, nothing beats the feeling of getting on skis and racing top to bottom, through the trees and gullies, in powdery storm days and on sun-kissed bluebird days on their old familiar stomping ground.

“I’ve travelled to so many different ski resorts and people always ask me: ‘What’s your favourite?’ And I always come back to ‘home,’” says Thompson who captured ski-cross gold at the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. “Home” is Whistler — the same place that yearly attracts over two million skiers and snowboarders from around the world; the same place where people come for a season and never leave; the place that draws people into the West Coast mountains with the promise of adventure and a life less ordinary. You don’t have to be an elite ski-cross athlete to enjoy it. >>

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

FUN AND GAMES

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These join long-time favourites alpine skiing and snowboarding, bobsledding, figure skating, ski jumping and ice hockey (of course!). One change for men’s hockey is that for the first time in 20 years, the NHL is not accommodating its players who wish to compete in PyeongChang, so many of its stars may not be there. A large roster of veteran athletes and hopeful newcomers from the Sea to Sky region want to represent Canada in the upcoming Games. Two expected to compete in PyeongChang are Whistler-based athletes Marielle Thompson, defending her Sochi 2014 ski-cross gold medal, and halfpipe skier Cassie Sharpe.

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AKE IT FROM ski instructor “Princess” In 1997 her son was born. “Raising your kid in Stephanie Reesor. “I find a lot of people Whistler — it’s got to be one of the best places in get here and they want to do something the world,” she says. extreme… for them. They want to do something There are the obvious benefits for children, that they wouldn’t do in their normal 9-to-5 lives.” such as making the most of the outdoors, but Reesor teaches private lessons throughout there is another added bonus to growing up in the the winter season, attracting clients who become No. 1 ski resort in North America — a small-town annual regulars. Her story is familiar. She feel of a community of 11,800 was supposed to come to permanent residents, coupled Whistler to check it out. with a decidedly international That was 1991. She never flavour of destination tourism. went back to her hometown Kids in Whistler are exposed to of Ottawa, instead happily the world. cramming into a oneReesor’s son, Zac Moxley, is bedroom condo at Creekside now 21 years old. Last summer LE Y & Z AC M OX R EE S O R IE ST EP H A N with seven others that first he travelled through Europe, season. “I think I lived on a box staying with some of Reesor’s ski clients of Kraft Dinner for a month!” she recalls along the way. Then there’s his burgeoning fondly, with a nod to ski-bum fortitude. cinematographer career. Reesor believes It wasn’t just the skiing that spoke to her. Whistler nurtured his passion to forge a path There was the lifestyle, too, then and now. “I love as a filmmaker. resort living,” she says. “I like that it’s not 9 to 5, We’ve grown beyond ski town stature. Reesor get in your car, drive through the traffic, go into points to the Audain Art Museum and the the office… It’s not that, it’s a resort community. Scandinave Spa as a must for visitors, proving You can have any day off in the week. And there’s there’s more than just skiing. Things have always something to do and people to do it with.” changed a lot since that 1991 winter season. .COM

The PyeongChang Games will feature 102 events in 15 sports, with four new disciplines, including big air snowboarding, mixed doubles curling, mass start speed skating, and mixed team alpine skiing.

GOODBYE, ORDINARY

FACEBOOK

HIS WINTER, the sporting action will also be indoors — on TV and online — during the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, from Feb. 9 to Feb. 25.

Pyeongchang, located 180km from South Korea’s capital Seoul, is a county in the mountainous Gangwon province, known for its outdoor activities and stunning Buddhist temples.

The Winter Games will be broadcast on CBC (cbc.ca).

JUSTA JESKOVA

The 2018 Paralympic Winter Games will follow the Winter Games, running from March 9 to 18.

TWO FAVOURITE WHISTLER AMENITIES: ABOVE, THE AUDAIN ART MUSEUM, AND BELOW, THE SCANDINAVE SPA.


TIME FOR A CHANGE

AND KEVIN NIL

“In my eyes, it was a perfect season to start here,” he says. That year, Niland took a factory tour of Prior Snowboards and Skis, seeing where the company’s handcrafted skis and snowboards are made in Whistler’s industrial area, Function Junction. Not long after, the company was looking for an accountant. Niland got the job and is now finance and operations manager. It combines his skills and passion, not to mention the fact, he says: AND “It has a four-day work K EV IN N IL week and a 20-cm rule.” (If 20-cm of snow falls, staff can hit the mountains.) His three-month season has turned into three years; winters morph into summers, as snowboarding is temporarily replaced with climbing and kayaking. Niland’s mantra has become: “Any day in the mountains is a good day.” As for the future, Niland isn’t saying. This past summer he got his permanent residency for Canada. “For my mother’s sake,” says Niland, “I’m not going to say one way or the other.” >>

WHISTLERBLACKCOMB.COM

COURTESY

I

RISHMAN KEVIN NILAND felt the call on his first visit, even though the mountains were closed for skiing and snowboarding. He was in Vancouver, on summer holidays from university, when he made the trip up the Sea to Sky Highway. He returned to Ireland, finished a degree in business, went on to get a master’s in accounting, then landed a job in Dublin. Still, there were those mountains in Canada. “I always had it in the back of my mind I wanted to come back,” Niland admits. At 25, he decided it was time for a change, a season in Whistler, and then perhaps a job in Vancouver. It was the winter of 2015 — a fairly abysmal year for snow. While locals lamented, Niland went snowboarding every chance he could, learning the mountains, honing his skills and wedging Whistler in his heart. This was a far cry from his week-long trips to France and Italy where he was first introduced to snowboarding.

WHAT’S NEW AT WB

I

T’S NOT EASY staying on top. For three years in a row, Whistler Blackcomb (WB) has been ranked the No. 1 ski resort in North America in the SKI Magazine Resort Survey. It is always striving to remain at the top by pushing boundaries, making improvements and honing systems. This year is no exception as the company gets ready

to unveil a new suspension bridge at the peak of Whistler Mountain. The bridge will span approximately 130 metres. It begins at the top of the Peak Chair, stretching across Whistler Bowl and end at a rock outcrop called the West Ridge. There will be a cantilevered viewpoint from there looking north/ northwest over Whistler. WB believes it could be higher

than any other suspension bridge in North America — the peak of Whistler Mountain is at 2.182 metres (7,160 feet). The bridge is set to open for the 2017/18 winter season and will remain open year round. In the summer, it will link into Whistler Mountain’s extensive hiking trail system. As if you needed another reason to come back!

Discover an extraordinary world of vacations.

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34841_EMBARC_WHISTLER_MAGAZINE_ACTIVITY_CENTRAL_AD.indd 10/13/17 10:10 AM 1


tonisailer.com 48

Available at:

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

CAN-SKI Blackcomb • Glacier Lodge Blackcomb Base

604.938.7744


The Champagne Lounge

JUSTA JESKOVA

JUSTA JESKOVA

EXPERIENCE

ASHLEIGH MCIVOR DEMERIT RECOMMENDS VISITING THE ANCIENT CEDARS, ABOVE, FOR GETTING BACK TO NATURE, AND PARTICIPATING IN APRÈS FOR A BIT OF RELAXATION AND BONDING.

HELLO, EXTRAORDINARY

N

OT EVERY TOWN can boast two back-to-back gold-medal athletes at consecutive Winter Olympics. Whistler can. Two homegrown girls have made it to the very top. First it was Ashleigh McIvor DeMerit in the 2010 Winter Games, winning a gold medal for women’s ski cross on home turf. Was that a boost for Whistler high school student Marielle Thompson? She says she remembers thinking: “If Ashleigh can win a gold medal, maybe I can do that someday.” At the Sochi Olympics four years later Thompson stood atop the podium in Russia. Is it something in the water? More like something in the collective Whistler psyche — work hard, push your limits, have fun, get out there, make the most of it, and surround yourself with like-minded people. McIvor DeMerit muses on the role her parents played, adding that the town attracts those who want to challenge the status quo. “Those of us who have been brought up in the community by these thrill-seeking, recreation enthusiasts naturally thrive on freeskiing and freeriding,” she says. Ski cross is less formal and disciplined than its alpine downhill racing cousin, and more free-spirited. That free-spiritedness is like Whistler itself, and what people are looking for when they come >>

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to visit. “It’s the opportunity to get back to nature, back to the essence of what makes you tick, and have time to reflect and just focus on who you’re with, the scenery and healthy activities… with a little bit of adrenalin mixed in!” says McIvor DeMerit. That can be racing down the mountain from top to bottom or snowshoeing through the Ancient Cedars, another favourite haunt of McIvor DeMerit’s. The views can put everything in perspective, from the snow-covered rainforest in the valley to the soft pinks of alpenglow settling over the peaks at sunset. Then there’s the Whistler “vibe.” Thompson describes it as that feeling when you’re walking through the Village, with everyone bundled up against the cold, skiers and riders enjoying après in fading daylight. “I like to think we’re a very welcoming community,” she says. Thompson is gearing up for a shot at gold again in the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea. She draws on the legacies of the 2010 Games surrounding her, from the big rings at Whistler Olympic Plaza, to the state-of-the-art athlete gymnasium in Cheakamus. “It’s an indescribable feeling,” Thompson says of Whistler’s tangible connection to the Games. McIvor DeMerit, who retired not long after her 2010 triumph, has carved out a new life, splitting her time between Vancouver, Whistler and Pemberton. Recently, as she spends more time in Whistler, raising her young son with her husband, she says she realizes where she wants to be and what she wants to be doing.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

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O UNDERSTAND THE Whistler vibe, McIvor DeMerit suggests talking to locals. Don’t be afraid to chat on the chairlift or during après. Whistlerites love to share their passion, she adds. Après, that moment of relaxation with a drink and some nibbles after a day out in the mountains, is also a great chance to relive a day doing something extraordinary. “It’s a real bonding experience,” she says. Reesor also has advice: Don’t forget to look up and all around you. “Every single day, I am blown away by the beauty of my town,” she says. “On the mountain, all the time, I stop and show the guests because I don’t want to forget how lucky I am to be in, what I believe, is the most beautiful place in the world.” W 50

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Whistler’s Premier Shopping Centre

Grocery Store

Whistler Kitchen Works The Royal Taste of India

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER’S PREMIER SHOPPING CENTRE. OFFERING A VARIETY OF SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES, RESTAURANTS AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. Owned and Managed by

www.headwaterprojects.ca

YUKON BREAKFAST

SNOWMOBILE ADVENTURE

SPROATT CABIN, CALLAGHAN VALLEY

604.938.1616 I CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM 604.938.1616 I CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK:DESK: CARLETON LODGE, Mountain ADVENTURE CARLETON LODGE, MountainSquare Square

CANADIAN WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

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family fun

THE PLAYGROUND RULES SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING. CHECK. BUT WHAT ELSE CAN WE DO WITH THE KIDS? HERE ARE A FEW GREAT IDEAS STO RY BY LI SA R I C H A R DS O N

WEE ONES

TWEENS

TEENAGERS

Kids as young as three can participate in Whistler Blackcomb’s Snow School lessons. The surge in a youngster’s confidence, independence, and agility on skis after a stint with the inexhaustibly patient and fun Snow School Kids pros, is mind-blowing. Tiny feet better suited to booties than ski boots can still reach great heights. Once the peak upload time on the mountains has passed around 11 a.m., ride the gondola to the Roundhouse, and let them run around the restaurant in socks before bundling up for a ride back down. For snow play, head over to Whistler Olympic Plaza’s Snow Zone, where snow is stockpiled and sculpted into sledding tracks and castles fit for a Snow King or Queen. During the Christmas holidays (Dec 17 to 30) visit the Whistler Conference Centre for The Whistler Holiday Experience, when the facility is made-over as a Playapalooza micro-festival, replete with bouncy castles, dance parties, a putting zone, air hockey, and movies.

The Scavenger Hunt Challenge is a great way to discover a wealth of trivia and key Whistler landmarks (starting, obviously, with the candy store). Info is available free from the Visitor Centre located in Whistler Olympic Plaza. For a taste of the Olympic vibe, take in Family Après at Whistler Olympic Plaza, every Monday and Wednesday afternoon for snowman-building contests, live performers, street hockey, music, and snacks. Even if one has outgrown an addiction to Frozen, the Olympic Plaza Outdoor Ice Skating rink still works like a charm. Free helmets and push bars help Bambi-legs lose their wobbles. Skates are available for $6. (11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.) Kids eat for free at Dusty’s Bar and BBQ at Creekside and at Merlin’s on Blackcomb from a special Under-12 Menu — when accompanied by a paying adult with a fullgrown appetite.

Boogie board on snow. Let loose down a 1.5-kilometre-long hill on a bodyboard at Bromley Baseboarding at Whistler Olympic Park (for eight to 18 year olds). There’s a 200-metre-long learning area to kick off the progression, before riders head up the chairlift for the mega-hill. Tickets are $29 for youth, on top of the $15 park entry fee per vehicle. Open weekends from noon until 3 p.m., conditions permitting. Tackle the terrain. Ride Tribe offers snowschool lessons without any mention of the word “school.” The Sunday night Fire & Ice show, in the evenings from mid-December until late March at Skiers’ Plaza at the base of Whistler Mountain, sees local pro skiers and snowboarders fly from a custombuilt jump through rings of fire — there are fire-spinners, fireworks, DJs and an enthusiastic crowd. The event has become an exciting way for our top athletes to show off their talents. W

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

ILLUSTRATION: CLAIRE RYAN

Hey kids! Welcome to the playground. The rules are simple. Play. Interact. Muck about. Sculpt and shape. You know what to do. It comes naturally. The aim of the game, regardless of your age, is to fall asleep still mostly dressed vigorously protesting “but I’m not sleeeeeepy,” only to wake up raring to go again. Everyone wins, and the rule for parents is help make that possible. Here are a few of the best (and best value) places in Whistler for the little ones (and for the growing-up-too-fasts).

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skiing & snowboarding

A WELLTUNED CARVE TAKE CARE OF YOUR SKIS AND SNOWBOARDS AND THEY WILL TAKE CARE OF YOU

STORY BY V INCE SHU L EY

DEREK RHODES OF PROFILE SKI & SNOWBOARD SERVICES.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

W

HEN TRAVELLING ACROSS THE COUNTRY,

a continent, or even the world for a ski holiday, the last thing skiers and snowboarders want to worry about is how well their gear is performing. Ski and board bases dry out over time (both with use and in storage), creating extra sliding friction against the snow, which is no fun. And edges develop burs and begin to corrode, reducing the effectiveness of a carve. Skiing on untuned gear can be a bit like driving a race car without air in the tires. “When you're spending so much time and money to come to Whistler to go skiing, it makes sense to get the full performance out of your gear,” says Derek Rhodes, a ski tech for 25 years and owner of Profile Ski & Snowboard Services.>>

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SNOWSHOE THE MEDICINE TRAIL C AL L AG HAN VA L L EY

E ALSO HAVE some pretty unique snow conditions in Whistler. We can go from melt-freeze crusts to high moisture content snow really quickly, and it pays to have some local knowledge on how to prepare gear for those conditions.” So how often should you tune your skis and boards? That all depends on how often you use them and the kind of conditions you ski in. A week of powder skiing may only require a light wax afterwards, whereas a few days of carving on icy slopes and hitting the occasional rock in off-piste areas may require getting your bases repaired and edges sharpened. “There are so many benefits to heading out with well-tuned skis and snowboards,” says Yohann Sheetz, a 20-year ski tech veteran and owner of Underground Tuning. “By reducing the sliding resistance it saves you energy and gives you better control. That allows improved balance, and lets you keep a centred stance more easily, making sliding more fun as well as more efficient.” Underground Tuning maintains the old-school tradition of tuning by hand rather than using automated machinery like many other tuning operations. This manual method is the only way high performance athletes will tune their gear, but recreational skiers will notice the difference, too. “We use very high-end, precise tools that a machine can't quite replicate,” says Sheetz. “We also use specialty waxes for specific conditions. A skilled hand application and scraping will make a ski slide faster than any machine.” Edge filing, hot waxing and scraping is a messy chore and likely not one you want to tackle in your hotel room. So when bringing your well-worn ski gear on holiday, it's worth hiring the professionals to give you a well-tuned carve. whistlerskituning.com, www.underground-tuning.com W

MORE WAYS TO STAY IN TUNE THERE ARE SKI AND SNOWBOARD tuners all around Whistler, literally smoothing the way to get you down the slopes. Whistler Blackcomb (WB) has many tuning locations. Carleton Lodge Core Shop, Creekside Core Shop, and Blackcomb Daylodge Core Shop are strategically located near the lifts and gondolas taking visitors up the mountain. Located on the slopes are Whistler On-Mountain Tuning outside the Roundhouse Lodge, and Blackcomb On-Mountain Tuning outside the Rendezvous Lodge.

CANADIAN WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

WB’s CAN-SKI has five locations around Whistler, including the new CAN-SKI Performance store in Marketplace, focusing on highprecision equipment. Black Tie Ski Rentals, along with its core rental services, offers pick-up and drop-off ski and snowboard tuning to anyone requiring it. Other tuning services in Whistler include CSM Whistler Ski and Snowboard Services, and Spicy Sports.

604.938.1616 I CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK: CARLETON LODGE, Mountain Square

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whistlerblackcomb.com, whistler.blacktieskis.com, csmwhistler.com, spicysport.com —Cathryn Atkinson


recreation GUIDE

To advertise in Whistler Magazine, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

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recreation GUIDE Step back in time for an

unforgettable experience!

cross country connection

Rentals Skills Tours

Covered sleigh gliding with lap blankets and the sound of jingle bells. Enjoy hot chocolate around the fire with magical views of Whistler Village.

604-932-7631

www.blackcombsleighrides.com

whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

Cross Country Connection Advertisement Winter 2016-2017 Ad # 1289-CCC-Ad-2017-1 Publication: Whistler Magazine, Recreation Guide ad size: (3.5 W x 2.75 H) Date: October 2016

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Files in PDF format, greyscale or CMYK

confirmation: call Ian Goldstone at 604.9

technical concerns: Brian Hydesmith design@hydesmith.com or call 204.487.0


To advertise in Whistler Magazine, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

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P: Paul Morrison

Classic Canadian Heli-Skiing

N EXCLUSIVE TERRAIN. Proudly operating on 432,000 acres and 173 glaciers with exclusive rights to most of the glacial terrain in the region. N PACKAGE VARIETY. Day heli-skiing packages, utilizing 5 and 10 passenger helicopters. N RIGHT IN WHISTLER. Conveniently located in Whistler’s vibrant pedestrian-only village.

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An award-winning attraction and National Historic Site that offers a rare glimpse inside a little-seen world that fascinates all ages. • Underground Tour & Train • Mineral Exhibit • Gold Panning • Interactive Exhibits & Film

604.905.DEEP (3337) whistlerheliskiing.com

/ WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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whistler homes

A wordly Haven ADORNED WITH EUROPEAN FURNISHINGS AND CUSTOM FIXTURES DESIGNED BY THE FRENCH OWNER, THIS CONTEMPORARY CHALET IS A WARM, SOPHISTICATED RETREAT.

STORY BY LISE B O UL L ARD P H OTO S BY J USTA J ES KOVA

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INSTALLING THE CUSTOM-MADE STEEL FIREPLACE IN THE LIVING ROOM TO REPLACE THE EXISTING GRANITE FIREPLACE REQUIRED THE HELP OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS. “WE HAD TO BRING IN BEAMS AND THEY COME DOWN ALL THE WAY TO THE GARAGE DOWN BELOW. AND WE DECIDED TO PUT IN SKYLIGHTS WITH THE OPENING; IT BRINGS IN LOTS OF NATURAL LIGHT,” DESIGNER KAREN RIPPER EXPLAINS.

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ABOVE AND RIGHT: ONE OF THE MAIN ASPECTS OF THE RENOVATION WAS FLIPPING THE DINING ROOM AND THE KITCHEN AREA, AND ADDING A DIVIDER TO MAINTAIN PRIVACY AND QUELL ANY KITCHEN NOISE DURING THE OWNER’S FAMED DINNER PARTIES. OPPOSITE PAGE: A PORTRAIT BY CHINESE PAINTER CHIU YATSAI DRAWS THE EYE AS YOU WALK ALONG THE MAIN FLOOR HALLWAY CONNECTING THE LIVING ROOM TO THE KITCHEN, DINING ROOM, SECOND LIVING ROOM, MAIN STAIRCASE AND GUEST SUITES. THE LARGE SQUARE BEAMS AND WINDOW FRAMES SEEN THROUGHOUT THE HOME WERE GIVEN A SOFT ROSE HUE, THANKS TO SANDING AND A WHITEWASH FINISH.

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L

OCATED SLOPESIDE ON A PRIVATE road in the Blackcomb Benchlands area, The Haven chalet is unlike any property you’ll find in Whistler.

That’s because the owner, a Hong Kong-based French businessman who winters in Whistler, has a taste for fine art and had a hand in every aspect of the 14-month renovation of the 6,000-square-foot (560-square-metre) space. Those who have been lucky enough to tour the property or stay there can see and feel how special the residence is. This includes Whistler interior designer Karen Ripper, who assisted Paris-based lead interior designer Dillon Garris on the renovation, and myself, who on a sunny Friday was given a tour by Ripper and Katherine Currall of Thornhill Real Estate. Contemporary in architecture and filled with art pieces, furniture and textiles sourced from Europe and Asia, the space is made homey and comfortable with personalized design touches, fine millwork and craftsmanship at every turn. “When I first walked in here it was like unwrapping a gift (because of all) the nooks and crannies of custom-made and refined items,” says Currall. When Ripper greets me at the front entrance I almost gasp at the beauty of the living room, visible from the entryway. Standing in the space, gazing up at its 30-foot (9.1-metre) cathedral-style pinewood ceiling as sunlight streams through the skylights, is a humbling experience. Floor-to-ceiling windows on three sides, some flanked by Hermès-inspired cashmere drapes, create a sense of oneness with the surrounding forest. >> WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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B

TOP: A BARN DOOR IN YVES KLEIN

ABOVE: ONE OF THREE UPSTAIRS

BLUE (AN ELECTRIC SHADE CREATED BY

BEDROOMS FEATURES VINTAGE FACTORY

THE LATE FRENCH ARTIST) SEPARATES

LIGHTS, CUSTOM WALL ART BY WHISTLER

THE MASTER BEDROOM FROM THE

ARTISTS CARY AND PAULO LOPEZ AND A

MASTER BATH, WHICH BOASTS A

CHANDELIER PENDANT FROM POW POW

HANDMADE CARRERA MARBLE SINK

LIGHT IN GERMANY.

AND STEAM SHOWER.

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UILT WITHIN A back wall of windows is the home’s most unique component; a custom-made cylindrical steel-and-glass fireplace designed by the owner and Garris, and mirrored by a similarly cylindrical bookshelf by sculptor Rhonda Raad, which divides the living room and the entry area. Along with being an engineering feat to install, the fact that the fireplace is built into a wall of glass allows for impressive après-ski views. “When you’re sitting (in the living room) at night and there’s snow coming down, the woods are lit up,” says Ripper. The home boasts many other pre- and après-ski amenities: three additional fireplaces (one outside), soaker tubs in every bedroom ensuite, an industrialstrength clothes dryer in the carport to dry ski gear, and, of course, the access to Blackcomb Mountain via Home Run ski-in, ski-out trail. Next, Ripper and Currall lead me down a long hallway, past a stairwell connecting the three bedrooms upstairs with the caretaker’s suite and media room downstairs, to the kitchen area. Along the way, my eyes are drawn to a teal oilon-canvas portrait by Chinese artist Chiu Yatsai displayed at the end of the hallway near the entrance to the two guest suites. >>


cabinfeverinteriors.com

PANTHER ENTERPRISES LTD.

is proud to have built some of Whistler’s largest and finest custom homes from preparing the land to arranging custom furnishings. We are pleased to be the original “Attention to Details” builder from Whistler to Vancouver, including re-decorating and renovating the fine home in this magazine. Soon offering new homes at scenic Westview Heights above the sea in beautiful Powell River.

PANTHER ENTERPRISES LTD. Ph. (604) 483-1202 Isador (Issy) Hawryluk issy@pantherenterprisesltd.com

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A “

ABOVE: A HEMLOCK AND FIR FOREST SURROUNDS THE HALF-ACRE PROPERTY, PROVIDING JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF COZINESS AND PRIVACY, WHILE LETTING THE LIGHT STREAM THROUGH THE HOME’S MANY WINDOWS AND SKYLIGHTS. RIGHT: THE EXPANSIVE BASEMENT MEDIA ROOM PROVIDES A TRANQUIL RESPITE AFTER A LONG DAY ON THE SLOPES, THANKS IN PART TO ROCHE BOBOIS’ ICONIC MAH JONG SOFA.

t night when we have parties, we always have (the light above the painting) on, and it’s just so cool,” says Ripper. I look to the left and am struck by the dining space, the focal point of which is a long custom-made, white-tile-topped table surrounded by colourful “mosaic-like” wooden chairs by Dutch furniture designer Pien Hein Eek and illuminated by pendant lamps by Dunlop Lighting. Reclaimed wood wall panels sourced from barns in Ontario provide a neutral backdrop in this unpretentious, yet elegant space, where the owner has hosted dinner parties and enjoyed many bottles of wine from the cellar hidden behind one of the room’s sliding barn doors. We walk through the guest suites, made cosy by felt walls by Weitzner, wool carpets from Crucial Trading in England, and a bedroom with a large window looking out onto the forest which, come nightfall, will be sprinkled with tiny lights. All these stunning details create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. The Haven, with its warmth and grandeur, lives up to its name. W

Escape the Routine Scandinave Spa Whistler offers a traditional Scandinavian baths and massage experience in a natural environment on the edge of Lost Lake Park just 5 minutes from Whistler Village.

$

70

SCANDINAVIAN BATHS

SC ANDINAVE S PA WH IST L ER S C ANDINAV E S PA WH I STLE R

SCANDINAVE.COM | 1 888 935 2423

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8010 Mons Road, Whistler BC V0N 1B8


Bobsleigh or Skeleton

experience $ 179 + tax

in info@whistlerslidingcentre.com whistlerslidingcentre.com /whistlerslidingcentre

604-964-0040

w

Whistler Sport Legacies is a non-profit organization responsible for Whistler Olympic Park, the Whistler Sliding Centre, and the Whistler Athletes’ Centre. Each facility plays a unique role to grow sport for the benefit of athletes, residents, and visitors.

/

6

DOGSLED

info@whistlerslidingcentre.com whistlerslidingcentre.com

I N T H E C A L L A/whistlerslidingcentre G H A N VA L L E Y

604.938.1616 I CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK: CARLETON LODGE, Mountain Square

604-964-0040

CANADIAN WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

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fine dining

JAMES WALT, FORMER EXECUTIVE CHEF AT ARAXI RESTAURANT + OYSTER BAR, WITH A DISPLAY OF VEGETABLES AT NORTH ARM FARM IN PEMBERTON, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE SOURCES FOR SEASONAL PRODUCE.


A WInter’s Bounty

HOW THE RESORT’S TOP CHEFS KEEP THINGS FRESH DURING WHISTLER’S FAVOURITE SEASON STORY BY B RAND O N B ARRE T T P H OTO S BY DAV I D B U Z Z A R D

E

VERY YEAR, AS MUCH OF Canada hunkers down for another long and dreary winter season, Whistler gets ready to welcome the world to its snowy wonderland. A veritable feast for the senses, winter here has plenty to offer. There’s the refreshingly crisp mountain air, the mounds of pillowy white snow and the thrill of cutting fresh tracks on a bluebird day. After an exhilarating day on the slopes, those sensory pleasures extend into the dining room, thanks to Whistler’s internationally renowned culinary scene. But once the chill of winter sets in, local chefs have to work a little harder to continue delivering the top-quality, seasonal fare that this bountiful part of the world has become known for. So how exactly do the resort’s top fine-dining restaurants keep things fresh during Whistler’s favourite season? We spoke with a handful of local chefs to find out just that. >>


BRAISED HERITAGE BEEF CHEEKS SERVED WITH SUNCHOKE PURÉE, CROSNES, AND PICKLED MUSHROOMS, FROM ARAXI.

“AS A CHEF, THE BIG PART IS THE COMMITMENT. WHEN YOU DECIDE YOU’RE USING CELLARED ROOT VEGETABLES ALL WINTER, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING FOR THE NEXT SIX MONTHS.”

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JAMES WALT, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT ARAXI RESTAURANT + OYSTER BAR

A

S A PIONEER of Canada’s farm-to-table movement, James Walt has made locally inspired, sustainable cuisine the foundation of a remarkable 14-year career at Araxi (Walt moved to Araxi’s sister restaurant, Il Caminetto, in October, after this interview). Cooking seasonally is simply a part of Walt’s DNA, but it certainly doesn’t hurt having the fertile soils of the Pemberton Valley just a 30-minute drive away. So when Pemberton’s farms stop producing for the season, Walt relies on the cache of root vegetables suppliers like North Arm Farm and Rootdown Organics have cellared to last through the winter. “As a chef, the big part is the commitment,” Walt says. “When you decide you’re using cellared root vegetables all winter, that’s what you’re doing for the next six months. So you’ve got to really buy into it; try using beets and sunchokes and turnips and potatoes. There’s actually a good variety that will store well.” The key to maintaining the high standard that Araxi has become known for as Whistler’s longest-

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

running fine-dining restaurant is recognizing how guests’ appetites change with the seasons. Walt tends to focus on heartier meats, like duck, lamb and Wagyu beef, and emphasizes different cooking techniques — the winter, for example, is prime time for charcuterie, which Araxi cures in-house, and Walt loves to braise his meats to give them that juicy, succulent quality that would be right at home at any holiday feast. “The thing about Whistler, especially, is that guests eat differently in the summer. You’re riding your bike and doing all these things, and it’s hot, so people seem to eat more fish and lighter dishes,” explains Walt. “In the winter, you’re up earlier, you’re skiing super hard. It’s cold out, and people generally eat soup, game, and heavier dishes. Your body moves a certain way, and the menu reflects that. It’s a fairly easy transition between seasons.” A favourite dish of Walt’s that perfectly reflects Araxi’s winter menu is the braised heritage beef cheeks served with a sweet and earthy sunchoke purée, Crosnes (a Chinese artichoke), and pickled mushrooms to cut through the fat. “It’s rich but tender,” Walt says. >>


6:34 PM

The moment you realized what it meant to savour every Whistler experience.

Just in time for another epic winter, everybody’s favourite Upper Village eatery will re-open mid-December after an extensive $2-million renovation. An elevated casual dining experience delivered by an animated open kitchen, Portobello’s made-to-order sandwich selection and gourmet pastry and coffee operation will be expanded to include open-flame rotisserie chicken, pork ribs, and delectable smoked brisket. From the rustic, modern alpine design and expanded full-service bar focusing on local craft beers, to the new market-style retail space, Portobello is coming back bigger, better and hotter than ever.

P O R T O B E L L O

VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER/DINING


“WE KNOW, FOR EXAMPLE, THAT WHITE ALBA TRUFFLES (FROM NORTHERN ITALY) GO WONDERFULLY WITH SALSIFY FROM NORTH ARM FARM.”

MELISSA CRAIG, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT BEARFOOT BISTRO

A

SUNCHOKE CARPACCIO, FEATURING RAW JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES, BLACK TRUFFLES, ARTICOKE HEARTS AND QUEBECOIS CHEESE, FROM BEARFOOT BISTRO.

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NYONE WHO HAS sampled Melissa Craig’s wildly creative and decadent cuisine knows she has no problem importing a slew of luxury ingredients from afar — think Perigold truffles, Wagyu beef and beluga caviar — if it means satiating diners’ distinct cravings. But like most elite chefs, Craig stays a little closer to home when crafting the perfect dish. “I know it sounds totally untrue, but it is true: I think first about what I can use from around here and what that would lend itself to,” she says. Through the years, Craig has turned this seemingly unlikely marriage of the local and the global into her own sumptuous style of cuisine that is sure to delight hedonists from anywhere. “I definitely have a balance,” she says. “Of course, the clientele that comes to Whistler is very international in the winter, so I’ll fly in truffles, but maybe I’ll balance it with some cool Pemberton root vegetables. “We know, for example, that white Alba truffles (from northern Italy) go wonderfully with salsify (also known as oyster plant) from North Arm Farm.” Craig also loves playing with texture, often combining raw, roasted and braised vegetables into one dish. Take the textural smorgasbord of her sunchoke carpaccio, a dish that features raw Jerusalem artichoke topped with fragrant black truffles, artichoke hearts and a bold Quebecois cheese, Le Cru du Clocher. “It’s crazy earthy and vegetarian,” she notes. “It’s very interesting and focuses on what we have here.” >>


Araxi: Roots to Shoots, Farm Fresh Recipes

Cookbook Authored by Executive Chef James Walt

POWDER DAYS ARE BACK. YOUR MOUNTAIN HIGH DINING EXPERIENCES AWAIT. Araxi Restaurant + Oyster Bar

Best Whistler Gold ‘17 - Vancouver Magazine Apres 3pm-5pm | Bar 3pm-late | Dinner from 5pm 110 - 4222 Village Square 604 932 4540 | araxi.com

Bar Oso

Spanish-influenced tapas, craft cocktails Best Whistler Bronze ‘17 - Vancouver Magazine Lunch from 11:30am | Dinner from 3pm 150 - 4222 Village Square 604 962 4540 | baroso.ca

The Cellar by Araxi

Private events for 60+ guests 150 - 4222 Village Square 604 932 4540 | thecellarbyaraxi.com

Whistler’s iconic Italian restaurant Reimagined. Dinner nightly from 5pm @ ilcaminettowhis

4242 VILLAGE STROLL | 604 932 4442 | ILCAMINETTO.CA

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ALBONDIGAS, OR TRADITIONAL SPANISH MEATBALLS IN TOMATO SAUCE WITH GRATED MANCHEGO CHEESE, FROM BAR OSO.

“WE ALSO USE THE ADVANTAGE OF SUMMER TO GROW (THE PRODUCE THAT) WE USE IN THE WINTER, BY SERVING PICKLED VEGETABLES, AND PRESERVING FOOD FOR THE WINTER.”

JORGE MUÑOZ SANTOS, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT BAR OSO

A

S A FORMER Araxi sous chef and James Walt disciple, you can be sure that Jorge Muñoz Santos has a strong commitment to cooking seasonally. But when you’re trying to share the traditional flavours of Spain, sometimes sourcing ingredients from the Iberian Peninsula can be a challenge. In the summer months, for instance, Santos has been lucky enough to find a grower in Lillooet who grows a beloved Spanish pepper, the Padrón. But in the winter, he’s had no such luck, instead using the sweeter Asian shishito pepper in its place. 74

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“We also use the advantage of summer to grow (the produce that) we use in the winter, by serving pickled vegetables (made in-house), and preserving food for the winter,” says Santos, adding that Spaniards, “love to pickle everything!” The Madrid native has been introducing diners to the vibrant culinary culture of Spain since presiding over the opening of Bar Oso along the Village Stroll in 2015. At first, Santos says he was hesitant to go full-bore on the more traditional elements of Spanish cooking, but as time has passed, the focus has veered back to his homeland. “I make diners’ feel the experience of Spain. I’ve been saying that Bar Oso is Spanishinfluenced, but through the months, I’m going

a little bit more (traditionally) Spanish, of course, with the limitation of my kitchen, which is really, really tiny,” he says. “It makes it easier to be able to put ourselves into the food a little bit more, and trying to make it a little bit better each time.” Santos’ recommended dish is a staple of tapas bars’ across Spain: albondigas, a filling shared plate of lamb meatballs bursting with flavour and slathered in an old-fashioned tomato sauce he borrowed from his grandmother’s recipe book. One of Bar Oso’s bestsellers, the meatballs are made from slow-cooked lamb shoulder and Serrano ham, and topped with buttery manchego cheese and toasted almonds for a bit of crunch. >>


A fork, a glass, a drop of magic...

Experience the Bearfoot Bistro MODERN CANADIAN CUISINE OPEN FROM 3 PM* · DINNER FROM 5:30 PM* COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING Addictive Italian cuisine since 1996 Inviting service Two private dining rooms Dinner nightly

4121 VILLAGE GREEN · ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 · BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM

4319 Main Street at the Whistler Pinnacle Hotel 604.905.4844 Reservations recommended quattrorestaurants.com

* winter season

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KING SCALLOPS WITH ROAST VENISON AND RUSTIC ROOT VEGETABLES, FROM LEGS DIAMOND.

“IT’S EASY TO COOK SEASONALLY AROUND HERE. WE’RE LUCKY THAT WAY.”

GREG PETTIT, OWNER OF LEGS DIAMOND BISTRO

N

ESTLED INTO THE Upper Village at the base of Blackcomb Mountain, Legs Diamond Bistro may be Whistler’s best-kept secret. Open for just over two years, the restaurant serves up an eclectic mix of global cuisine. “We like to have a varied menu,” explained owner Greg Pettit. “We’ve gone all around 76

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the world, actually. We have Italian, French, Moroccan, Korean, West Coast. So it’s a little bit of everything.” That diversity means the Legs Diamond team can mould the menu to fit the season — although Petit admits the restaurant is lucky enough to be situated in a part of the world that has no shortage of quality ingredients available. “It’s easy to cook seasonally around here.

We’re lucky that way,” he said. Pettit is keeping his flavours close to home with his signature winter dish: juicy king scallops with succulent roast venison, a twist on the classic surf and turf served with a rotating purée of the day and a medley of rustic root vegetables. “It’s comforting, healthy, hearty, and colourful,” Pettit said, calling it the perfect dish to warm up and wind down at the end of a powder day. W


Amazing restaurant in Whistler! An incredible evening! So enjoyable to have the open concept kitchen and watch such harmony between the chef and all the staff. Food was beautifully plated and did not disappoint in the great mix of flavours and textures. Can’t wait to get back. - Laureen H, Kelowna BC

grillandvinewhistler.com | 604.935.4344 | Level 1, The Westin Resort & Spa, Whistler Breakfast: 7am - 11:30am | Dinner: 5pm - 10pm

WHY NOT

TONIGHT?

Located in Whistler Village at 4429 Sundial Place | 604.932.5151 Reservations available 7 days a week | kegsteakhouse.com

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The Nijjar family is pleased to have the Royal Taste of India in its fifth successful year. Our chefs provide the essence of traditional Indian Cuisine with a modern touch, preparing each dish to your specifications. Our sister company Kismet Estate Winery, located in Oliver BC, produces VQA quality red & white wine to pair with our exotic menu. Fine Dining & Take Out Catering Available WHISTLER MARKETPLACE

604-932-2010 Open ALL DAY from 11am to late

WWW.THEROYALTASTEOFINDIA.COM

Fiesta Apres specials everyday!

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604.932.3330 • info@sushivillage.com in the mtn. square

Classical References Lunch Fri-Sun from 11:00 am Happy Hour / Dinner 5 pm nightly and Casual Style. Wood fired pizza, steak, pasta and seafood, prepared in traditional mediterranean ways.

DAILY SPECIALS / TAKEOUT / 95% OF MENU GLUTEN FREE

4314 Main St. Next to the Gazebo in Town Plaza.

Ph: (604) 938-1879 www.carambarestaurant.com


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Indian cuisine that uses a palette of flavours ~ you’ll feel as if you’re halfway around the world! Open 7 days a week for Lunch & Dinner NEW! CANADIAN BREAKFAST served daily from 7 AM to 12 PM. NEW IN THE HILTON WHISTLER RESORT Overlooking Mountain Square, Whistler Village | 604-932-9900

www.indianmasalabistro.com

LOCALS’ FAVOURITE SINCE 1982!

Executive Chef Julian Owen-Mold re-invents traditional gastro pub fare by infusing the freshest regional ingredients into classic comfort food favourites. Unwind with a cool beverage on our sunny patio or catch the game on the big screen inside. Fuel up for your day with a hearty breakfast available from 7am or enjoy a delicious meal any time of day. Located at the Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa

HILTON WHISTLER RESORT & SPA t: 1 604 932 1982 4050 Whistler Way hiltonwhistler.com

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casual dining

WHISTLER’S ALL-STAR SPORTS BARS FROM THE WINTER OLYMPICS TO NFL PLAYOFFS, THERE’S NO SHORTAGE OF LOCAL-APPROVED HAUNTS TO GO GRAB A BITE AND CHEER ON YOUR TEAM

ROLAND'S BAR MANAGER RICH POEHLMANN WITH THE SANDWICH NAMED AFTER HIM, THE BIG RICH BEEF DIP.

W

HAT IS IT ABOUT A LOCAL watering hole that prompts sports fans to gather to watch their favourite teams battle? For Joe Rustige, the answer is simple: Sports brings people together and create a unique atmosphere. Good snacks and cold beverages don’t hurt, either. “Sports is social interaction… People feel very passionate about their teams; the same as their food and beverage,” explained Rustige, the director of food and beverage at the Hilton Whistler Resort. That is often on display at the CINNAMON BEAR BAR & GRILLE. Located in the Hilton, the sports bar has been a beloved local hangout since opening in 1982, with pool tables and a massive projector screen. “What we’re trying to do here is have great food at a good, accessible price”, he said. “A lot of the time in Whistler, you don’t necessarily have both of those together.” >>

STO RY BY M EGA N LA LO N DE

PH OTO S BY DAV I D B U Z Z A R D


THE WORKS BURGER AT THE CINNAMON BEAR BAR & GRILLE IN THE WHISTLER HILTON RESORT AND SPA.

T

HE MENU CAN BE classified as traditional bar fare, with mainstays like cornmealcrusted chicken wings, nachos, burgers, Cobb salads and pizza — though guests can also sample some more inventive creations on their seasonal menu. “We focus on classic comfort food,” Rustige explained, adding that the Hilton’s chef aims to use as many ingredients from the coastal region as possible. Take The Works burger, with a patty of Pemberton Meadows beef, topped with mushrooms, crispy bacon, caramelized onions, tomato chutney and even an onion ring. Food and drink specials accompany specific matches, such as “home-run hotdogs” — when the Toronto Blue Jays score a homerun in the playoffs, patrons get a free round of ’dogs — or a Swedishthemed menu during the bar’s legendary après, held every Wednesday during ski season. On any given day, the ROLAND’S CREEKSIDE PUB — decked out with dartboards, covered in sports memorabilia and packed with regulars — hosts a large contingent of long-term residents and diehard sports fans. Even the menu has a community twist. Named for the pub’s longtime manager Rich Poehlmann, the Big Rich beef dip offers guests the option to try out his preferred spin on the sandwich. It features bacon, cheddar, sauteed onions and mushrooms, mayo and lettuce atop thinly-sliced Alberta beef on a toasted, garlicbuttered baguette. Wash it down with a cocktail named for friends and regulars: a Stinky (vodka and iced tea), a Pascal’s Green Tea (bottled Heineken, priced 25 per cent less than it is on the beer menu), or a Gail’s Old Fashioned. “It’s not a regular Old Fashioned, so we call it a Gail’s Old Fashioned,” Poehlmann said of his fellow manager’s creation: a drop of bitters, Bulleit bourbon and a little cherry juice. “It’s a bit rougharound-the-edges, if you’re not used to it.” Although the menu and its prices match the bar’s no-fuss demeanour, you can be sure quality is something to be fussed about. The menu was created by chef RD Stewart, the man behind Roland’s next-door establishment, the highlypraised Red Door Bistro. The vast majority of Roland’s culinary offerings are homemade, from the fries to the hollandaise sauce used during weekend brunch service. “That’s a huge difference,” Poehlmann said. “I think that’s what sets us apart.” >>

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FREE DELIVERY

Buy two LARGE pizzas with four toppings each, get 10 chicken wings FREE

PIZZA BY THE SLICE

PIZZA • PASTA • PANINIS • SOUPS SANDWICHES • SALADS • BREAKFAST AND MORE! • NOW LICENSED

GNARLYROOTS PIZZA & CAFE Open 11am to 10pm, 7 days a week Located across from the Olympic rings 604-962-2255 gnarlyroots.ca

CRYSTAL HUT

FONDUE B L A C KC O M B M T N

604.938.1616 I CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM 604.938.1616 I CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK:DESK: CARLETON LODGE, Mountain ADVENTURE CARLETON LODGE, MountainSquare Square

CANADIAN WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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THE TAPLEY’S NEIGHBOURHOOD PUB FLATBREAD PLATTER.

F

OR THOSE WANTING a classic dining experience without missing the big game, BRANDY’S AT THE KEG has you covered. The sports bar within a steakhouse has been a Whistler staple for 35 years — guests can relax in one of the lounge’s three rooms and enjoy the full Keg menu. “That’s why we put up $10,000 TVs,” said general manager Casper Richters with a laugh. “You’re paying good money for your meal, so you should have the best viewing experience.” Brandy’s patrons can also enjoy an extensive wine and cocktail list while taking in a match on 80-inch televisions. Each of the 17 TV sets is equipped with an individual cable box and two satellite dishes, meaning no sports fan will miss their favourite team. The menu matches this attention to detail. Perfectly executed steakhouse favourites ranging from shrimp cocktail to prime rib have made the Keg a successful franchise around North America, although the Whistler sports bar also features additional casual offerings. For example, the everpopular beef dip is paired with a pint of beer and offered for $17 during the ski season’s 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. happy hour, while, during NFL Sundays, the bar also opens at 10 a.m. for brunch service. On Thursdays through Sundays, some of Whistler’s top DJs even drop by to spin a few tunes. “Being the only bar that stays open until 2 (a.m.), it tends to get a little spirited here from late night on,” Richters explained. A local favourite since 1981, TAPLEY’S NEIGHBOURHOOD PUB patrons’ camaraderie extends to some of its most popular menu items. If you’re going to bond over cheering for the same team, why not bond over a basket of nachos or a flatbread perfectly designed to share? The flatbreads have proven a popular addition to Tapleys’ menu, with BBQ chicken, pulled pork and veggie varieties, while the classic, triple-layered nachos haven’t budged as a crowd favourite. Tapley’s general manager Courtney Date said yam fries keep drawing his buddies to the bar after a long day at work or playing on the mountain — in some cases, even from overseas. “There’s something in them that makes them addictive,” he said. “The yam fries and chipotle mayo are to die for… I have friends calling from England asking if they’ll still be on the menu when they come back.” But like any good sports bar, the atmosphere is as big, if not a bigger draw, than the menu. W

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OPEN LATE

Mon. to Sat. till 3 a.m. Sun. till 2 a.m.

(604) 932-0410 4368 Main Street

CURE

LOUNGE &PATIO

10003 Whistler Mag AD 3.5 x 4.75.indd 1

14-04-02 9:37 AM

RUSTIC. URBAN. LAKESIDE.

Pioneering Whistler's urban-rustic food scene, CURE transports the authenticity and soul of local, farm-fresh producers and their flavorful ingredients to Whistler’s Creekside. Pop in for a craft cocktail or beer and taste our delicious winter menu featuring innovative share plates. An urban feel in a lakeside setting, stage a great night with friends at CURE. Open from 11.30 am - late, daily. Complimentary village shuttle and underground parking available.

Nita Lake Lodge, 2131 Lake Placid Road, Whistler BC | 1 888 755 6482 | 604 966 5700 www.nitalakelodge.com/dining | @CureLoungeandPatio| #CureCocktails

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6:34 PM

4:07 PM

The moment you decided to cultivate a new afternoon ritual.

One of Whistler’s liveliest spots for après and evening entertainment, The Mallard Lounge is an iconic destination for visitors and locals alike. Live music, a roaring fireplace and master mixologists with their signature blends of house-infused spirits have created a legendary following. Whether for lunch, dinner, an evening nightcap or a refined afternoon, The Mallard Lounge presents a warm, casual experience at the base of Blackcomb Mountain. Try our Mountain Burger with savoury truffle fries, fresh organic salads and decadent selections from the Chocolate Bar. Ski-in, ski-out or stop by The Mallard Lounge, slopeside at Fairmont Chateau Whistler.

OPEN DAILY 11:00 AM TO 12:00 AM VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER


after hours

HAVE IT THEIR WAY S O M E C H O I C E COCKTAIL OFFERINGS F R O M A F E W O F W H I ST L E R ’S B E ST FIREROCK LOUNGE BARTENDER CRAIG EVANS POURS A CARDAMOMIUM COCKTAIL, WHICH INCLUDES SAGE AND CARDAMOMINFUSED GIN, TAVERNA, EGG WHITES AND CARDAMOM BITTERS.

O

FFERING UP THE PERFECT cocktail is simple, says Nick Copestake, head bartender at the FIREROCK LOUNGE in the Westin Resort and Spa. “You need to know what you’re talking about,” he says. And that means getting to know your guest. “It’s how the bartender dissects the person in front of them. Always break it down. Whether they prefer a sweet or a sour, if they enjoy that sort of booze-heavy drink or a citrus- or fruit-

STORY BY BRADEN DUP UIS

heavy drink — I think within that simple breakdown, as a bartender you can always come up with flavour profiles that are going to work.” The FireRock boasts a versatile craft cocktail menu, masterfully compiled from the various palates and passions of the men and women behind the bar. “I think I speak for every bartender when I say that one of the most satisfying things is going to work, even on a day off, and just playing around with different garnishes and different combinations of liquor,” Copestake says. “The possibilities are endless.” Swing by the FireRock while in Whistler and have their expert mixologists work their magic — they may know what you want before you do. >>

P H OTO S BY DAVID B UZ Z A R D WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2018

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Being in charge of the many drinks that flow at THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER is no easy task. “There are restaurants, bars, inroom dining, banquets — there’s lots of alcohol being poured here, there and everywhere in the hotel, so it’s good to have somebody who has his eyes on everything,” says Guillaume Noel, who oversees the hotel’s beverage program. If you’re looking for cocktails, it’s the Mallard and The Wildflower where you’ll find the best options, Noel says. If Noel has to choose just one drink he’s going to keep it simple for you — the signature gin and tonic. “It’s kind of a gin and tonic that isn’t really a gin and tonic,” he says. “Even if you don’t like gin and tonic, this is kind of something else. It has a beautiful orange colour. It’s really a beautiful cocktail.” The gin is infused with cardamom pods as well as lemon and grapefruit peels, and shaken with Grand Marnier before the trademark splash of tonic. Noel also recommends the Cask Old Fashioned, or the winter-spiced Hennessy Cognac. “It’s hard to come up with a Christmassy cocktail without it tasting like a candy cane, so this one really works,” he says of the cognac. “It’s just a bunch of winter spices — cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and a lot more, with some orange peels as well.”

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In assembling a winter cocktail menu, STONESEDGE’s bar manager Angus Douglas likes to incorporate bolder flavours than might be found in summer. “Cocktails can generally be a lot stiffer, because you’re going to warm up a bit with a stronger cocktail,” he says. “You’ll have some variations of old fashioneds, old-fashioned martinis… stronger, more sipping-style cocktails.” Douglas’s recommendation was cooked up with (and even named after) his bartender friend Matty — the Mattchu Pichu Sour. “We use an ounce of pisco, threequarters of an ounce of barrel-aged gin, which we barrel age ourselves, and then half an ounce of Antica Formula which is a very, very good quality sweet vermouth,” he says. The Mattchu Pichu also includes the signature lemon juice and frothed egg white, and fig syrup for sweetener. What can you expect? “’Bold’ would be the first word that comes to mind. It’s like a bartender’s favourite drink,” Douglas says. “All the flavours are quite strong. There’s nothing that really mellows it out too much. I feel like you can taste each individual aspect of it, which is one of the things that I love.” If you’re looking for an alternative, Douglas recommends the espresso martini — X Marks the Spot. “I’ve probably had 20 to 30 people say it’s the best they’ve ever had, which is really fantastic to hear,” he says.

LEFT TO RIGHT: THE MATTCHU PICHU SOUR FROM STONESEDGE, THE CARDAMOMIUM FROM THE FIREROCK, THE SIGNATURE GIN AND TONIC FROM THE MALLARD LOUNGE IN THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER, AND THE B.C. SOUR FROM BASALT WINE & SALUMERIA.

Heading into its third year of operation, BASALT WINE + SALUMERIA has become a fast favourite on the Village Stroll. “We’ve got a really good team who love the product and love serving it, so that’s the No. 1 thing for us,” says director of food and beverage Michael Guy. Guy says Basalt’s B.C. Sour is a favourite with members of his team. It features a merlot/ cab franc sourced from Kaleden, B.C., in the province’s famed Okanagan. “It’s just delicious and customers love it — it goes great with a lot of our food menu items, and our bartender thought that was the perfect wine to float on there,” Guy says. The unique take on a New York Sour also includes 1.5 ounces of Forty Creek Canadian Whiskey, an ounce of lime juice and a half ounce of simple syrup, shaken and strained over ice, then floated with the red wine. “It’s pretty cool because it looks a bit layered. You get that orange and gold, amber whiskey, and then you get the red on top — and it’s tasty,” Guy says. W


at The Keg

Daily Happy Hour Specials

3pm-4:30pm food & drinks 10pm-1am drinks

10pm No Cover

FUNK NIGHT

ALL LOVE NO CLUB

DAKOTA

TIM LIVINGSTONE & TyMETAL

Thursdays

Fridays & Saturdays

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY TyMETAL

4 4 2 9 Sundi al Pl ace. 604- 932- 5151 w hi st l ersportsbar.com

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shopping whistler

GIVE IN TO TEMPTATION Welcome to Whistler! Have you left some space in your suitcase? While it is important to bring what you need from home, you will be very tempted by our shops and galleries. Check out what’s on offer below, and feel that irresistible urge to tour the town and shop for yourself or for loved ones. ­— Brigitte Mah

The Novella Pearl Petite Earrings by Valentine Rouge balances the West Coast new-world nature of Whistler with the oldworld style of a European village. Made with clear quartz, freshwater pearls, and 18k gold vermeil, these earrings reflect luxury, style and a modern aesthetic. They suit any occasion: a wedding, a fine dinner or a day out on the Village Stroll. Available at RUBY TUESDAY ACCESSORIES LTD. $149.95

Take home a piece of Canadian gold with the Mountain Design Rings, exclusive to Keir Fine Jewellery. These signature rings echo the majestic power of the mountains and the jeweled delicacy of the finest snowflake. Available in 14k or 18k Canadian gold for men or women. Available at KEIR FINE JEWELLERY. Men’s rings start from $1,925 and women’s start from $1,150

Boots are the best-foot-forward fashion statement when it comes to taking on the Whistler winter. The Lea Wedge Boot by Canadian brand Sorel blends form and functionality with its stylish waterproof fullgrain leather upper and stretchy side panels. This boot will keep you walking in any weather, whether it’s to the spa, the restaurant, the Village, or home. Available at SOLES OF WHISTLER. $240

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Kids will be both safer and cooler with the new Auric Cut POCito SPIN helmet that puts a new spin on safety — literally. Using POC’s rotational impact protection system, the helmet reduces the effects of an oblique fall with pads that shear and cushion the head. Top it off with an LED panel of lights at the back so you don’t lose your little one, some reflective stickers, and an integrated Recco reflector and your shredding sweetie is ready for everything. Available at MOUNTAIN KIDS OUTFITTERS LTD. $199.99

SHOPPING AREAS To RAINBOW PLAZA Nesters

UPPER VILLAGE

Village North

WHISTLER VILLAGE

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

FUNCTION JUNCTION

To Va n

cou

ver

Stylish and powerful, the Hania leather jacket (left) by Canadian brand Mackage shows everyone that the girls play just as hard as the boys — but look better. Its biker-style lambskin leather shell and notched lapel, combined with the asymmetrical front-zip closure and soft sage colour, take strength and elegance to a new level. It can be paired with a feminine dress, your favourite skinny jeans or a business skirt, and will reflect a personality that’s as sharp as the edge of your ski. Available at OPEN COUNTRY and OC2. $850

Whistler Village is the hub of activity at the base of the mountains. A pedestrian-only paradise, it offers over 200 stores, galleries, restaurants and bars. Village North is centred

around Whistler Marketplace, which offers a supermarket, liquor store and many fine shops and amenities.

All the toughness of GORE-TEX in a feminine cut is found in Patagonia’s Powder Bowl Jacket. This insulated jacket is bombproof enough for Canada’s West Coast weather, yet breathable so you aren’t overheating in your first run through moguls. The helmet-compatible hood lets you tackle any environment in the world. Available at PATAGONIA WHISTLER. $544

Nothing says Whistler like a shiny new pair of skis. The Salomon QST 92 is an all-mountain machine that excels in any playground. Made with Salomon’s C/FX technology that combines the power and lightness of carbon fibre with impressive dampening prowess, this ski is wide enough for deep-powder days in the backcountry, yet still narrow enough underfoot to ski any terrain in the resort. The skis are available at the SALOMON STORE in Whistler. $549.99 >>

Upper Village, situated at the base of Blackcomb Mountain, is another walking-only area with many wonderful stores, restaurants and galleries. Nesters is just two minutes north of Whistler Village and offers a variety of shops and restaurants, with a liquor store, grocery store and restaurants. Rainbow Plaza is five minutes north of the Village. Brand new with grocery store, liquor store, coffee shop, gas station and more.

Whistler Creekside, just a

five-minute drive south of the Village, is a shopping area near the base of Whistler Mountain.

Function Junction is just 10 minutes south of Whistler Village and offers hardware, organic grocery, breweries, bakeries and many more shops and services.


shopping whistler Created by Canadian artist Brian Street, this heavy cedar bowl is refined and grooved, embodying a strong yet graceful form. It is turned with utmost delicacy and expertise by an exceptionally skilled wood sculptor. The masculine form combined with intricate feminine detail make this gift an appealing addition to anyone’s home. Measuring approximately 30 x 30 inches (76 x 76 cm), it is the perfect size to fit in a suitcase. Available at ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY. $450

Organic Smoothies Juice and Coffee Bar Fresh and Local Organic Produce Organic Grocery and Convenience Needs

Organic Salad Bar for All Diets Organic Soup of the Day and Sandwich Combos

House Made Salad Dressings and Dips Fresh Baked Goods Daily – GF and VE Available

Self-Serve Frozen Yogurt Bar

Specialty Desserts for all Diets

Take home a piece of Whistler’s story with this contemporary 30-centimetre steel totem called Big Flood. It is a miniature version of the 4.9-metre aluminum totem by Squamish Nation artist Xwalacktun, which stands at the entrance porch to the Audain Art Museum. The sculpture tells the Coast Salish legend of a great flood, when people took refuge at the peak of Mount Garibaldi and were nourished by salmon brought by the raven. Available at the AUDAIN ART MUSEUM. $350

Preservative-Free, Delicious Meats and Pepperonis

Catering Available

Function Junction rd ham Lyn Al

ph

aL

ake

Whistler Village

Rd

Sea

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Olives Community Market Vancouver

Open every day from 8am to 7pm 101-1200 Alpha Lake Road | 604.932.3484 info@olivesmarketwhistler.com www.olivesmarketwhistler.com

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Often it’s the ones who live in the town who can show the town’s best, and renowned local potter Vincent Massey does so in this masterful platter, which combines his iconic handcrafted style of exhibition with functionality. Massey mixes and ages his own clay in his Whistler studio, and experiments with glaze recipes. This piece is available, along with other artworks, at the MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE, or visit his home studio nearby at 8605 Forest Ridge Drive. $600 >>


2014 2016 NEXT TO THE VISITOR INFO CENTRE & KEIR FINE JEWELLERY

604-932-7202 www.whistlersweatershop.com

Located at the base of the Whistler Village Gondola 604.932.4100 O P E N

L A T E

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shopping whistler accessories ltd.

It’s not what you need...

In a town where Nature dominates, reusing and reducing are core practices. A quintessential embodiment of both upcycling and economics, these Repurposed Tote Bags from socially conscious brand We Are Stories are made from vintage money bags from the Royal Canadian Mint and make a statement without saying a word. Available at CAMP LIFESTYLE AND COFFEE CO. $88

It’s what you want. Proudly supporting local designers. Whistler Town Plaza 604.905.6290

It’s a longtime alpine tradition to savour the rich flavour of a cheese fondue, and Swissmar’s nine-piece Gruyère fondue set, adorned with an etched gondola and mountain peak, will bring back memories of a wonderful time in the mountains. Made from Swiss clay, this fondue pot is fireproof and an elegant yet rustic way to enjoy the warm gooey goodness of the cheese with chunks of artisan bread. Available at WHISTLER HOME HARDWARE. $110

102-4295 Blackcomb Way

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Some gifts need little explanation, and Now Designs’ Hit The Slopes Mug is one of those. Made from porcelain, this 12-ounce mug features a chalet and gondola that will recall an idyllic snowy holiday. Its bright colours beg for the mug to be filled with steaming cocoa or a delicious hot toddy. Available at WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS. $12.95 W


Function Junction Whistler’s only fashion footwear store LOCATED IN THE WESTIN

Discover the Locals’ Secret 8 minutes south of the Village ANTIQUES ORIGINAL ART FURNITURE HOME DECOR COOL STUFF

solesofwhistler.com

TAPHOUSE HOURS: Sun–Wed, noon–8pm • Thurs –Sat, 11am–10pm

Open 7 days, 11am – late 1-1030 Millar Creek Road 604.938.6336

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110-4090 Whistler Way 604.905.0036

Award-winning craft beers, ice-cold off-sales, complete keg sale packages, special events & beer-inspired food

BREWERY TOURS: Tues–Sun, 2:30 or 4:00pm

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dailyplanetwhistler.com

We are purebread, a nice little bakery in Function Junction. Our aim is a simple one: to make really great bread and great tasty treats.

'Gently~used' & new clothing, footwear & accessories for guys & gals!

Open 7 days 8.30am - 5pm Also visit us at our village location on Olympic Plaza, open 7 days 8am - 6pm

Come down and Deja Vogue with us, we'd love to see YOU! 604-932-DEJA [3352]

Follow us on Twitter @purebreadwhis

1-1040 Millar Creek Road

1-604-938-3013 function junction

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1045 Millar Creek Road 604.962.8889 whistlerbeer.com

purebread.ca

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#104~1055 Millar Creek Road

VINTAGE SKI COLLECTION A charming & whimsical selection of ski-inspired tableware & linens Mugs • Coasters • Dinner Plates Platters • Bowls • Placemats Guest Towels • Soap Dispensers

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Fuel yourself and your family.

Over 1000 different kinds of candy! Giant Bulk Candy Selection Jelly Belly British Specialties Novelty Candy Helium Balloons Gourmet Popcorn Awesome Greeting Cards Too!

Whistler’s Largest Grocery Store

Marketplace, Whistler. Open 9am - 9pm daily. Free Parking.

604-938-2850 • www.marketplaceiga.com

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Find us at Marketplace Lodge - Whistler Olympic Plaza (604) 935-1076

www.GreatGlassElevatorCandyShop.com


2016

services DIRECTORY Voted Best Dental Clinic

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome For appointments call: 604-938-1550 #317 – 2063 Lake Placid Rd., Whistler

(next to Creekside Market) www.smilewhistler.com

To advertise in the Services Directory, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

WHISTLER RECEPTION SERVICES Providing a World Class Greeting in a World Class Resort

Now available - Luxury Home Management and Care A unique central check-in – concierge and in-resort contact for guests, owners and managers of vacation rentals and properties WHISTLER VILLAGE IN DEER LODGE AND UPPER VILLAGE IN GLACIER LODGE

Call 604-966-0999 to set up a free consultation! www.whistlerreception.com / info@whistlerreception.com

PROVEN RESULTS –

I’m with you every step of the way Specializing in Residential and Investment property in Whistler

Carolyn Hill, ASSOCIATE BROKER PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

Delivering the Dream – Whistler cel: 604-907-0770

email: chill@whistlerbuyer.com www.whistlerbuyer.com Voted Whistler’s Best Realtor

ACUPUNTURE | TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE LASER ACUPUNCTURE | OSTEOPATHY REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPY HOURS: OPEN FROM 10– 6, MON-SAT 208-4368 Main Street (next to the Whistler Eye Clinic) 604.962.8828 | whistlerintegrative.com

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STUDIOS

Yoga and wellness services in the heart of Whistler Village! We offier many different styles to suit all levels of practice. Our class cap of 15 maintains personalized attention and a sense of community. BOOKING ONLINE OR BY PHONE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

604-935-2020 info@whistleryogacara.com www.whistleryogacara.com

Everything you need for your Health, Beauty and Convenience, right in the heart of Whistler Village Prestigious Beauty Boutique Full Service Pharmacy offering Travel Vaccinations & Medication Reviews Free Prescription Deliveries and much more Whistler Village (near The Keg & Movie Theatre)

604-905-5666 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

MASSAGE CLINIC

604-938-0777 www.bluehighways.ca

SERVING WHISTLER FOR 25 YEARS

bookings@bluehighways.ca

2nd Floor, #206-4368 Main Street, Market Pavilion LOCATED IN THE HEART OF WHISTLER VILLAGE

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DAVID BUZZARD

Quixotic performs in the Whistler Olympic Plaza to open the 2017 Whistler Wanderlust Festival in August.

DAVID BUZZARD

COURTESY ERIN CEBULA

DAVID BUZZARD

54-40 lead singer Neil Osbourne performs in Whistler Village as part of the annual GO fest in May.

DAVID BUZZARD

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra conductor Bramwell Tovey leads the orchestra in O Canada during the Canada Day concert in the Whistler Olympic Plaza on July 1.

DAVID BUZZARD

2017 Crankworx Festival Deep Summer winner Daniel Ronnback takes the big cheque in August.

DAVID BUZZARD

Maureen Thom, the mother of late Whistler artist Chili Thom, gets a hug from Chili’s younger brother Jeremy Thom as they accept an award on his behalf at the Whistler Chamber of Commerce Excellence Awards in May.

From left, Shawn Lee, former Entertainment Tonight Canada reporter Erin Cebula, Olympian Julia Murray, and Olympian Davey Barr enjoy the Ketel One vodka shotski at Bearfoot Bistro in May.

Bob Deeks of Whistler’s RDC Construction gives TV home improvement star Mike Holmes a tour around one of his houses under construction in April.

DAVID BUZZARD

Canadian authors Grant Lawrence, Cea Sunrise Person and Paul Shore at the Whistler Writer’s Festival Spring Reading Series in May.

Whistler mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden is interviewed by the Unstoppable Connie Smudge during the dedication for Whistler’s new rainbow crosswalk in September.

Heather Paul was awarded Whistler Citizen of the Year at the Whistler Chamber of Commerce Excellence Awards in May.

DAVID BUZZARD

DAVID BUZZARD

Singer Alan Doyle (formerly of Great Big Sea) and Village Host Linda Epp, before his show at Whistler Olympic Plaza in August.

KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN — YOU NEVER KNOW WHO YOU MIGHT SEE!

DAVID BUZZARD

in whistler COURTESY LINDA EPP

SCENE

Former Governor General David Johnston, right, hands out the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers to Whistler Singers executive director Alison Hunter, centre, with councillor John Grills in June. W


WE WILL COME TO YOUR LIVING ROOM... OR YOU CAN COME TO OURS! DON’T WAIT IN LINE! Reserve a fitting time in our private fitting lounge at Le Chamois, across from the Fairmont Chateau at the base of Blackcomb Mountain.

FREE DELIVERY INCLUDING IN-ROOM FITTING & SLOPESIDE SERVICE

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LOCALLY OWNED blacktie_front_door_47629

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RENTAL LOCATIONS

Premium Service without the Premium Price Tag

LE CHAMOIS AAVA HOTEL FUNCTION JUNCTION

604-966-2122 whistler.blacktieskis.com

blacktie_indoor_fitting_47076

#1 Ranked Ski & Board Rental Service "Service and Convenience That Can't be Beat!" April 2017


Profile for Whistler Publishing

Whistler Magazine Winter 2018  

Whistler’s premier publication since 1980

Whistler Magazine Winter 2018  

Whistler’s premier publication since 1980

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