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WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

VEG OUT

WHISTLER’S PREMIER P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C E 1980

M AG A Z I N E

HEAVY METAL SCULPTURES HOLLYWOOD HOTBED

SWEET SHOTS COMPLIMENTARY MAGAZINE

Please Take One

Whistler has no shortage of picture-perfect backdrops for making memories STYLE | ACTIVITIES | HOMES | PEOPLE


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES PRESENTS EXHIBITION & SALE OF NEW WORK BY TOP CANADIAN ARTISTS

Kenneth Harrison, ‘Spring Thaw,’ 48” x 60“

VISIT US IN THE UPPER VILLAGE

Fairmont Chateau Whistler | Open Daily | 604.935.1862 Worldwide Shipping

Mountain

@MntGalleries

Galleries at the Fairmont

W W W . M O U N T A I N G A L L E R I E S . C O M W H I STLE R | JAS PE R | BAN F F | STRATF O R D


CHAMPAGNE SHOWERS

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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P: Blake Jorgenson

THE OFFICIAL RENTAL DELIVERY PARTNER OF WHISTLER BLACKCOMB ON-SNOW VALET | BEST PRODUCT SELECTION | ON-MOUNTAIN EXCHANGE To reserve your next in-room fitting, visit rentskis.com/whistlerdelivery Reserve today to save up to 20% off your rental

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Modern Italian. Made with passionata.

Best New Restaurant - Where Whistler Magazine ‘19

~ Dinner nightly from 5:30 pm ~ 4242 VILLAGE STROLL | 604 932 4442 | ILCAMINETTO.CA WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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contents Heavy Metal 23

Artists find creative freedom in a hard material BY KEILI BARTLETT

Whistler Style 28 The latest fashions from Whistler retailers BY LOGAN SWAYZE

Sweet Shots 38

Locals reveal where to capture the Instagram-worthy shots BY MEGAN LALONDE

Holywood Hotbed 50 Tracing Whistler’s connection to Tinseltown BY BRADEN DUPUIS

Veg Out 74 Fine dining establishments in Whistler embrace meatless meals with creative vegetarian offerings

WWW.DAVIDMCCOLM.COM

BY ALYSSA NOEL

CONTRIBUTORS

JOEL BARDE is a writer for Pique Newsmagazine. A graduate of the UBC Graduate School of Journalism, his work has appeared in CIM Magazine and The Walrus.

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Freelance writer EMMA BASHFORD hails from the Yorkshire Pennines, U.K. Her love of the outdoors brought her to Whistler's mountains in 1998, where she thrives on the creative and sporting opportunities Whistler has to offer.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

KEILI BARTLETT was born and raised on the East Coast. Now a reporter for the Squamish Chief newspaper, she moved west after graduating from the University of King's College to chase stories and climb mountains.

DAVID BUZZARD is a commercial, architectural, and food photographer based in Whistler and Vancouver. He has won nine press awards for photojournalism for the Whistler Question and Squamish Chief.

MIKE CRANE is a freelance photographer living the dream in Whistler and beyond, wandering this incredible landscape by hike, bike, paddle, snowboard and skis. Explore, travel, create and repeat.


p: Andrew Strain

SNOW SCHOOL

HERE TO HELP.

Improve your skills and build your confidence. Enjoy priority loading on all lifts, discover hidden runs, powder stashes, and the mountain’s best kept secrets. Available to all ages and abilities, in group or private packages.

VISIT ANY SNOW SCHOOL SALES DESK, OR CALL 1.800.766.0449 TO LEARN MORE. whistlerblackcomb.com


contents FACES OF WHISTLER: Mountain Guardians 57

DEPARTMENTS

BY ALISON TAYLOR

Editor’s Greeting 10

WHISTLER HOMES: Contemporary in Kadenwood 64

Fresh Tracks 14

BY ALISON TAYLOR

Bits and bites of information about winter in Whistler

PERFECT PAIRING: From Garden to Vineyard 84 BY SAMANTHA RAHN

CASUAL DINING: A Toast to Bread Makers 87 BY GAIL JOHNSON

Events Calendar 20 Unwind Adventure Guide 47 Shopping Whistler 96 Services Directory 105

VILLAGE VIBE: Après Dinner 93 BY JOEL BARDE

SOCIAL PAGE: Scene in Whistler 106

JUSTA JESKOVA

COVER PHOTO: Elise and Mark take a selfie at the top of the Showcase T-bar at the entrance to Blackcomb Glacier, by Mike Crane

CONTRIBUTORS

BRADEN DUPUIS is a transplanted Saskatchewan flatlander lost in the Whistler mountains. He spends his days working as a reporter for Pique Newsmagazine. His mom thinks he is brilliant.

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GAIL JOHNSON is an award-winning journalist who writes regularly for the Globe and Mail, Yahoo Canada and the Georgia Straight and is a food columnist for CBC Radio.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

MEGAN LALONDE grew up in Ottawa and graduated with a degree from Carleton University's School of Journalism. She writes and handles all things social media for Pique Newsmagazine.

Originally from Alberta, ALYSSA NOEL is Pique Newsmagazine’s assistant editor. She has an M.A. in arts and culture reporting, and her work has appeared in SPIN magazine, The Province and OnEarth.

LOGAN SWAYZE is a Whistler-based photographer born and raised in the Kootenays. When not shooting, Logan is either on his bike or board, or off travelling the world.


Your adventure awaits Ziptrek Ecotours hosts a selection of breathtaking zipline tours. Our wilderness adventure area is located directly above Whistler Village, in the spectacular temperate rainforest valley between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains.

Discover eco-exhilarationÂŽ

ziptrek.com 604.935.0001


WHISTLER BLACKCOMB PATROLLERS, READY FOR ANOTHER BUSY DAY ON THE MOUNTAIN.

HEEDING THE CALL OF THE WILD UNDERSTAND YOUR ROLE AS A MOUNTAIN ADVENTURER

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HEN YOU PUT WHISTLER BLACKCOMB in context of a handful of important numbers—200 trails, 36 lifts, and 3,307 hectares (8,171 acres) of skiable terrain—you begin to understand the magnitude of skiing here. When they say Whistler is the largest ski resort in North America, they mean it—by a long shot. You only have to read our “Sweet Shots” story in this issue of Whistler Magazine to get a sense of the scale of epic places at Whistler Blackcomb that are Instagramworthy—the summit of Flute, the Crystal trees, Black Tusk, the Olympic Rings. And that’s just inbounds. Factor in the backcountry and this mountain playground becomes truly enormous. Therein lies its splendour… and its challenge. How do you keep people safe in the mountains when all they want to do is explore the majesty of Mother Nature? This issue, Whistler Magazine takes time to honour some of the men and women who put it all

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

ALISON TAYLOR Editor

on the line when things take a turn for the worse out there. They are our “Mountain Guardians”— the pro ski patrollers, the volunteers of Whistler Search and Rescue, the staff at the Whistler Health Care Centre. Without them, Whistler would not be the ski resort it is today—a place where you can test your limits, revel in nature, feel alive, and know that there are people here who have your back. Our mountain guardians understand the call of the wild; they hear it too. In fact, that’s why they call Whistler home. But there is an unspoken pact in this relationship between adventurer and rescuer. As the adventurer, you have a role to play.

Consider this: Obey the signs. Respect the ski area boundaries if the backcountry is unfamiliar. If you do venture beyond, be prepared for self-rescue—extra food, water, a fullycharged cell phone, more layers to keep you warm. Follow the Alpine Responsibility Code (you’ll see the 10-point list in bathroom stalls, among other places). At Whistler Magazine, we’re trying to do our part too, understanding that we are all part of a collective. While we’re not saving any souls, we’re actively taking steps to reduce our impact on the environment. This winter, Whistler Magazine is debuting its new eco-cover to read in your hotel room. The cover is designed to be just as sturdy as our old hard cover but the magazine is now fully recyclable. We hope you enjoy our new look and the stories of this winter season. Enjoy our mountains. Be safe out there. See you at the peak.

Alison

COURTESY WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

editor’s message


WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

“Where’s your best selfie photo in Whistler?” GENERAL MANAGER, ADVERTISING/OPERATIONS

Catherine Power-Chartrand EDITOR

Alison Taylor

By day, the top of Flute is always a great place for a selfie, and a feeling of accomplishment! By night, under any one of the Village trees, sparkling with magical Christmas lights.

ART DIRECTOR

Shelley Ackerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Joel Barde Keili Bartlett Braden Dupuis Emma Johnson Megan Lalonde Alyssa Noel Samantha Rahn Emma Bashford PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

On the Metal Dome trail cross-country skiing at Whistler Olympic Park. There's a great view of the mountains.

David Buzzard Coast Mountain Photography Mike Crane Vincent Emond Justa Jeskova Janis Nicolay Claire Ryan Logan Swayze Mitch Winton PRESIDENT, WHISTLER PUBLISHING LP

Me and my crew with a glass of wine in the foreground, at Cornucopia!

The Musical Bumps. Because there’s no better backdrop for a selfie than fresh snow, your own tracks and backcountry terrain (especially when it’s easily accessible by Whistler Mountain’s lift system). Heading up Spanky’s with a newbie on a powder day. If you’re going to queue, it’s a fun place to do it!

Sarah Strother ACCOUNTING

Heidi Rode

CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION

Denise Conway

Whistler Magazine (ISSN-0835-5460) is published twice annually by WHISTLER PUBLISHING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, a division of GLACIER MEDIA GROUP 103-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., Canada, V8E 0H9 Phone 604-938-0202 | Fax 604-938-0201 | Toll-Free 1-877-419-8866 Email: cpower@whistlermagazine.com Also publishers of Pique Newsmagazine, weekly on Thursdays, and FAQ, published twice yearly. piquenewsmagazine.com | faqwhistler.com

PRINTED IN CANADA One-year (2 issues) subscription: $20 within Canada, $30 to the USA, $45 overseas. Call to charge to VISA, MasterCard or American Express. Copyright © 2019, by Glacier Media Group. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the publisher.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020


ADVENTURES POWERED BY

Best experience ever! Booked this last minute and couldn’t be happier, such an amazing experience and well priced. Flying high above the Whistler/ Blackcomb mountain peaks and landing on rainbow glacier was absolutely amazing. The whole experience was so easy with a free shuttle service from whistler village. - Amie Q, Peterborough, United Kingdom

Carbon Neutral tourism flights since 2017

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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FRESHTRACKS

After two summer seasons delighting Whistler locals and guests, Vallea Lumina will now light up the night-time forest throughout winter evenings too. The multi-media light show tells the tale of an enchanted hidden valley near Whistler with talking trees and flying fish and sprinkles of magical stardust. To book tickets go to vallealumina.com. This is an event for the whole family, spanning roughly one kilometre through the rainforest on a mostly-levelled trail, with some elevation gain (the experience changes slightly from summer to winter to accommodate snow conditions). Plan to be outside under the night sky for roughly one hour. vallealumina.com

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SUMMER IN A SKI RESORT

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HE BEARS H AVE A L L G O NE to sleep for the winter, cuddling up in their dens while the rest of us ski overtop. But when Whistler’s unofficial harbinger of summer wakes again, locals know it’s time to trade in their skis for mountain bikes, their snowboards for swimsuits. There is an endless list of things to do in Whistler every summer: walk the Cloudraker Skybridge, hike the Blackcomb Ascent Trails, ride in the biggest mountain bike park in the world, swim in Whistler’s five valley lakes, paddle the River of Golden Dreams. And that’s just a teaser. Spend a little time this winter planning your return with a summertime bucket list.

READ ALL ABOUT IT - WHISTLER BOOKS

Whistler: Outdoor Paradise BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

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HEN THE SKI lifts close for the day, there’s still a chance to keep sliding on snow. The Coca Cola Tube Park, located at Base II on Blackcomb Mountain, offers more than 300 metres (1,000 feet) of tubing fun. There are multiple lanes which are divided into green, blue and black runs, and a special conveyor lift to take you to the top. The tube park is open until 6 p.m. whistlerblackcomb.com There is also good old-fashioned tobogganing fun at Whistler Olympic Park in the Callaghan Valley. Toboggans and helmets are free at the Day Lodge. Park entry gives you access to the toboggan hill. whistlersport legacies.com

New This Winter

WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

NO SLIDING SKILLS REQUIRED

BY ALISON TAYLOR

This collection of landscape and sports photography from Justin Fabian and David McColm captures the heart and soul of life in Whistler—its beauty, its freedom, its carefree nature. This book will remind you of your time in the Coast Mountains long after you return home. Available at Armchair Books.

Masterworks from the Audain Art Museum

Ski and Snowboard Guide to Whistler Blackcomb

Take home a little reminder of the museum’s stunning collection with this 208-page volume by Ian Thom. “Masterworks” highlights a variety of standout pieces from the museum’s permanent galleries. Find this and more at the museum’s gift shop.

If you want the inside scoop on terrain at Whistler Blackcomb (WB), this is your go-to guide. With jaw-dropping aerial photos of WB’s enviable terrain, this guide has close to 120 runs not published on the official trail map. Available at Armchair Books.


CLAIRE RYAN

BLISSED OUT

A WILDERNESS WORKOUT most beloved sporting activities in Whistler too. There are three Nordic venues, each with a distinct cross-country skiing experience—Lost Lake

Park, Whistler Olympic Park, and Callaghan Country. Combined, they account for more than 160 kilometres of trail from easy green loops to Olympic-level

trails—a great workout and a wilderness adventure rolled into one. A typical season runs from December to March/early April. whistler.com

Exploring Artist Emily Carr

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HE LARGEST PRIVATE COLLECTION of famed B.C. artist Emily Carr’s work resides in Whistler at the elegant Audain Art Museum (AAM). This fall/winter the AAM presents a special exhibit called “Emily Carr: Fresh Seeing—French Modernism and the West Coast.” This exhibit looks at three critical years in Carr’s development during which she travelled to France and expanded her artistic horizons. She returned from France a changed artist. The exhibit will showcase more than 50 paintings, watercolours and drawings by Carr as well as works by her influential instructors: English painter Henry William Phelan Gibb, Scottish painter John Duncan Fergusson and New Zealand watercolourist Frances Hodgkins. The Fresh Seeing exhibit runs until Jan. 19. It will travel to the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton, N.B., from March to May. audainartmuseum.com

JUSTA JESKOVA

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ON’T LET THE IMAGES of Olympic downhills, snowboarding halfpipes and gravitydefying ski jumps fool you. Skinny skiing is one of the

c SKIERS NEED to pay particular attention to their bodies—stretch and soak aching quad muscles, massage those tingling toes, and do everything to stay loose and nimble for tomorrow’s adventures. Have no fear: Whistler is full of professionals who can get your body prepped to ski-ready perfection! To make an afternoon of it, try out the Scandinave Spa just north of the Village on the edge of forested Lost Lake Park. Move from a eucalyptus steam room or hot tub to a numbing cold plunge under a Nordic waterfall and then cozy up again in a fireside chair. scandinave.com


FRESH TRACKS

WWW.DAVIDMCCOLM.COM

BACKCOUNTRY BOUNTY c THE KEES AND CLAIRE HUT IS OFFICIALLY OPEN

THIS winter, paving the way for a new experience in Whistler’s backcountry along the Spearhead Traverse in nearby Garibaldi Provincial Park. When the Spearhead Huts project is complete, it will be the first hut-to-hut experience on the West Coast—three backcountry huts roughly equal distance apart, making the spectacular backcountry experience more accessible. To make reservations go to spearheadhuts.org.

STEP BACK IN TIME

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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COURTESY MADE IN WHISTLER MARKET

HECK OUT THE LOCAL CRAFT talent at the Made in Whistler Market. More than a dozen local vendors will display their wares on select Sundays throughout the winter season. The market takes place along the ground-level foyer of the Westin Resort & Spa and runs from noon to 5 p.m. There is something to tempt everyone from sweet treats and scented candles to art and jewelry. On select dates, one vendor will demonstrate how they make their wares in a program called The Artist Experience. madeinwhistlermarket.com

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

A Look Back: The Olympic Connection

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

MADE IN WHISTLER

HISTLER MAY BE ON THE cutting edge of all things skiing and snowboarding but it’s not afraid to go a little oldschool too. Step back in time in a pair of snowshoes and experience winter at a different pace. Rent a pair and set off to explore the network of trails at Whistler’s Nordic facilities—Whistler Olympic Park in the Callaghan Valley and Lost Lake Park close to the Village. There are also tours for those that would like someone to show them the way. whistler.com

c WHISTLER’S OLYMPIC RINGS AREN’T JUST a catchy photo opportunity! While this large-scale emblem (found at Whistler Blackcomb and in the Village at Whistler Olympic Plaza) commemorates Whistler’s role as Host Mountain Resort for the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, the rings also serve as a reminder that Whistler’s history is intricately connected to the Games. Had it not been for the Olympics, Whistler Blackcomb may never have existed. Sixty years ago, a group of Vancouver businessmen created Garibaldi Lifts Limited with Franz Wilhelmsen as president. Its goal was two-fold: finance studies required for a future Olympics, and build lifts on London Mountain (later renamed Whistler because of the whistling sound of the resident hoary marmots). It was a lofty ambition: At the time, there was no road

access to speak of, no hydro, no water, no sewage system; just a handful of fishing lodges and a hardy pioneering community. The company lost the bid for the 1968 Games due in part to the lack of regional development and highway access. The same was true for the bid to host the 1976 Olympics. It would take 50 years for Whistler to finally realize its Olympic dream. The rest, as they say, is history. Learn more about Whistler’s unique history at the Whistler Museum, located beside the library on Main Street whistlermuseum.org. Or take Olympic sightseeing tours through Whistler Sport Legacies at whistlersportlegacies.com


LOGAN SWAYZE

Ambassadors: Showcasing First Nations

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HE AMBASSADORS AT THE SQUAMISH LIL’WAT Cultural Centre (SLCC) are its heart and soul. Based out of the stunning facility in the centre of Whistler Village, the SLCC ambassadors are made up of youth from both Squamish and Lil’wat Nations. In a special exhibit this winter called Ambassadors, guests can get to know more about the first peoples of this area through its young people of today. Ambassadors celebrates the family and faces of the SLCC staff, highlighting the two distinct cultures of the Squamish and Lil’wat Nations and well as their strong connections to the land and to each other. Curator Mixalhíts’a7 (Alison Pascal) says: “Our ambassadors are the heart of the SLCC. They bring to life the stories of our people; they share with our visitors what’s important to the Squamish and Lil’wat Nations.” The two nations built the beautiful SLCC to showcase their unique art, history and culture. The Ambassadors exhibit is also part of the SLCC’s signature guided tour called What We Treasure. The tour is offered on the hour, every hour, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., daily. This tour includes a traditional welcome song, 15-minute film, tour of the exhibits and an optional craft activity. Even without a tour, don’t forget to stop in at the Thunderbird Café and the gift shop. slcc.ca

Follow, like or read us online! W whistlermagazine.com

@whistlersmag

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FRESH TRACKS MOUNTAIN ROOTS COURTESY MOUNTAIN MYSTERY GAMES

BUY LOCAL, BUILD COMMUNITY

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o visit to Whistler would be complete without checking out the latest local innovation or new business. Read on to discover more of what is on offer in this creative mountain hub. —Emma Bashford

MURDER MYSTERY FUN ENGAGE IN SOME INTERACTIVE, IN-COSTUME FUN WITH A LIVE MURDER MYSTERY adventure from Mountain Mystery Games. Mother-daughter duo Jaqueline Maartense and 13-year-old Ciara Giesebrecht’s flagship product is “Avalanche”—a Whistler-themed mystery designed for parties of eight to 100 people, 10 years old and above. The host assigns each guest a character or the role of detective. One person is the killer—but that remains a mystery, even to the host, until the very end. The game begins with audio and video from your phone (which you’re encouraged to put away after the initial message and character assignments). Then guests spend the evening interviewing each other, in costume, about motives, means, and finally attempt to guess the killer. Twenty per cent of all Mountain Mystery Games’ profits go to support female entrepreneurs in developing countries through the non-profit organization Kiva. Downloadable from any device. mountainmysterygames.com

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WILD CRAFT ’BOOCH WET YOUR TASTE BUDS WITH CLAUDE Monet or Blue Ninja—names of Whistler’s hippest and healthiest brews—wild craft kombucha from Whistler Elixir. Born out of founder Diane Mitchell’s passion for brewing the fizzy, fermented tea at home, she and partner Arjuna Veeravagu started the business in summer 2018, opening their tap house in Function Junction to a glowing local response. Handcrafted in small batches, 100 per cent organic and with zero artificial sweeteners or flavours, their kombucha ferments for longer using whole botanicals and fruits for higher nutrition. Available at many Whistler establishments including The Whistler Grocery Store and Creekside Market and on-tap at Olives Community Market, Cranked Espresso Bar and more. Special orders available. whistlerelixir.com

WOODN'T IT BE NICE HUSBAND AND WIFE DUO JOHN AND Kris Skoupas of Whistler Rustics create handcrafted furniture and home decor from their Whistler home studio, all made from recycled/reclaimed wood. Check out their beautiful custom furniture, Whistler-themed signs, sleds, picture frames, mirrors and more, all made from locally sourced materials. Many of their heavy timbers and wood slabs are over 10 years old—adding to that Coast Mountain look. Specializing in custom orders, Whistler Rustics can cater to any space and decor, size or colour. Find their products at Skitch , Home Hardware in Whistler’s Function Junction and Cool as a Moose (Canada-wide). Also look for them at Arts Whistler Holiday Market Nov. 30 Dec. 1. whistlerrustics.com 18

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

COURTESY WHISTLER ELIXIR

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COURTESY STINKY’S ON THE STROLL

COURTESY WHISTLER RUSTICS

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OLD-SCHOOL HANGOUT c JEREMY “STINKY” PETERSON KNOWS what makes a good bar. The owner-operator of Stinky’s on the Stroll pulled pints in Whistler for 24 years before opening the latest sports bar and eatery on Village Stroll in summer 2019. Expect friendly faces and a slice of times gone by with classic rock, a decorative wall of skis and snowboards, and good local vibes. Cozy up for après-ski with a pitcher of craft beer from Coast Mountain Brewing or Pemberton Brewing Co. and be sure to check out the popular smoked meat, jerk chicken tacos or wrap with tater tots served in different delectable ways. See Facebook page for details. W


WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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EVENTS CALENDAR FESTIVALS

SPORTS & RECREATION

SEASONAL

DEC. 4-8

NOV. 30-DEC.1

WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL

ARTS WHISTLER HOLIDAY MARKET

JAN. 26-FEB.2

WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL

People from around the world come to Whistler for this longrunning festival full of parties and group ski days. This is Canada’s biggest LGBTQ ski and snowboard week. whistlerpride.com

SUNDAY NIGHTS

FEB. 21-22

FIRE & ICE SHOW

PEAK TO VALLEY RACE

The perfect way to start the week as skiers and snowboarders jump through blazing rings of fire at the base of Whistler Mountain. Sunday evenings from Dec. 23-March 24. whistlerblackcomb.com TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL

WSSF SAUDAN COULOIR RACE EXTREME

APRIL - TBA

MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY AFTERNOONS

FAMILY APRÈS

Family-friendly fun après at Whistler Olympic Plaza from 3 to 6 p.m. Family après kicks off on Dec. 9 and runs twice weekly until March 25. whistler.com THURSDAYS

WORLD SKI AND SNOWBOARD FESTIVAL

KOKANEE VALLEY RACE SERIES

Recreational race series open to all—skiers, telemarkers and snowboarders. whistlerblackcomb.com

Whistler always caps off the ski season with a five-day party to end all parties in the mountains. The WSSF brings together sport, arts and culture, and music for the ultimate winter send-off. whistler.com

NOV. 28

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB OPENING DAY

whistlerblackcomb.com

WORLD SKI AND SNOWBOARD FESTIVAL

DEC.13-14

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

VIESSMANN LUGE WORLD CUP AND BMW SPRING WORLD CUP

More than 100 of the world’s fastest luge athletes from more than 20 countries will be hurtling down one of the fastest sliding tracks at the Whistler Sliding Centre. Cheer on these competitors from around the world as they reach speeds of more than 130 kilometres per hour. whistlerslidingcentre.com

For 36 years, amateur racers have been taking on one of the longest races in the world, starting at the top of Whistler Mountain and ending at the bottom, with roughly 80 leg-burning gates in between. whistlerblackcomb.com FEB. 22

COAST OUTDOORS PAYAK 2020

A “Payak,” is an event for all ages and levels of cross country skiers. In addition to the loppets for youth and adults, the Payak mini allows kids to take part. whistlersportlegacies.com MARCH 6-7

TELUS WINTER CLASSIC

Join in as Whistler takes part in one of its biggest fundraising weekends of the year, including the annual ski race and party at the Roundhouse. whistlerblackcomb foundation.com APR. 15-19

WHISTLER CUP

Cheer on the next generation of ski racers as athletes ages 12 to 15 suit up and put their skills to the test. whistlercup.com APR. 19

BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN CLOSING DAY

whistlerblackcomb.com MAY 25

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN CLOSING DAY

whistlerblackcomb.com

TOURISM WHISTLER/KARINA ERHARDT

“Canada’s Coolest Film Festival” is back for its 19th year with more than 90 films, industry events and red carpet premières. whistlerfilmfestival.com

Get all your holiday presents and goodies at this annual artisan market. New location this year at the Westin Resort & Spa. artswhistler.com NOV. 30-DEC.1

BRATZ BIZ

Celebrating Whistler’s youngest artists in conjunction with established artisans, Bratz Biz is the perfect complement to the Holiday Market. artswhistler.com DEC. 12

HOLIDAY SINGAPALOOZA WITH BARBED CHOIR

Get in the holiday spirit with a festive community singalong. Rock choir leader Jeanette Bruce will lead the audience in some holiday favourites. At Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com DEC. 15

WINTER LIGHTS WITH THE WHISTLER SINGERS

Join the Whistler Singers at Our Lady of the Mountains Church as they celebrate the winter in song. artswhistler.com DEC. 21-JAN.5 (WITH SOME EXCEPTIONS)

WHISTLER HOLIDAY EXPERIENCE

A large indoor family zone that will keep kids entertained for hours with bouncy castles, a mini putt, and more. At the Whistler Conference Centre. Free for 15 days over the holiday season. whistler.com DEC. 24

CHRISTMAS EVE CAROL SERVICE

Join the community at the Westin Resort & Spa for this interdenominational celebration. whistler.com DEC. 31

NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATIONS

Join in the festivities throughout the Village in this family-friendly outdoor party held throughout the Village Stroll. whistler.com


MARK YOUR CALENDARS! WINTER IN WHISTLER IS PACKED FULL OF FUN AND ACTION. THESE ARE JUST THE HIGHLIGHTS.

ANDREW COLLINS TRIO TO JAN. 19

JAN. 8

This exhibit looks at three critical years in Carr’s development during which she travelled to France. The exhibit will showcase more than 50 paintings, watercolours and drawings. audainartmuseum.com

Attention all Star Wars fans! Love in Alderaan Places celebrates your favourite stories and Star Wars characters with dancing, comedy and cheeky satire. At Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

TO MARCH 2020

FEB. 5

This temporary exhibit at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre celebrates the family and faces of the SLCC staff, highlighting their strong sense of connection to their land, their cultures and to each other. slcc.ca

Master of the mandolin Andrew Collins hits the stage with Mike Mezzatesta and James McEleney, showcasing different styles and instruments on stage. At Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com

EMILY CARR: FRESH SEEING — FRENCH MODERNISM AND THE WEST COAST

AMBASSADORS

DEC. 8

MCGREGOR-VERDEJO DUO

This flute and guitar duo performs major classical works for flute and guitar as well as a variety of genres. This is a performance filled with energy and passion. At Our Lady of the Mountains Catholic Church. whistlerchambermusic.ca DEC. 13

EMILY CARR’S BIRTHDAY PARTY

Head to the Audain Art Museum to celebrate Carr’s 148th year. There will be additional tours of the Emily Carr: Fresh Seeing – French Modernism and the West Coast exhibition as well as activities and refreshments. audainartmuseum.com

COURTESY ANDREW COLLINS TRIO

ARTS & MUSIC

LOVE IN ALDERAAN PLACES

ANDREW COLLINS TRIO

Find your bus in real-time

bctransit.com/nextride Use NextRide to plan your journey and experience Whistler your way.

MARCH 8

JUMARALIS TRIO

A chamber music ensemble made up of one clarinet, one cello and one piano. At Our Lady of the Mountains. whistlerchambermusic.ca MARCH 22

ARTS WHISTLER LIVE! COMEDY DOUBLE-HEADER

Two stars of Canadian comedy take the stage in Whistler—Charlie Demers and Ivan Decker, favourites from CBC’s The Debaters. At Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com For up-to-date event listings and information, visit piquenewsmagazine.com or whistler.com

9392

Transit Info 604·932·4020 bctransit.com/whistler

@WhistlerTransit

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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Come see the whole picture Discover the unexpected side of Whistler with a transformative visual journey through art from BC and around the world

photo by Scott Brammer

audainartmuseum.com Located between Day Lots 3 & 4 in the centre of Whistler Village Rodney Graham, The Drywaller (detail), 2012, AAM Collection

“A plan was forming in my head ... I was saving to go to Paris” -Emily Carr

M rnisM sM st ast coast

Emily Fresh Carr seeing

21 septeMber 2019 January 2020 21 septeMber 21 septeMber 2019 2019 ——19 —19 19 January January 2020 2020 French ModernisM and the West coast

exhibition partners exhibition exhibition partners partners presented presented by:

21 septeMber 2019 — 19 January 2020

WhistLer, Bc

exhibition partners presented by:

this project is funded in part by the Government of canada:

major sponsors:

Tom & Teresa GauTreau

exclusive transportation provider:

hotel partner:

Image credIt: Le Paysage (Brittany Landscape) (detail), 1911. Audain Art Museum Collection; purchased with funds provided by the Audain Foundation

major presented major major sponsors: sponsors: by: sponsors:

this project is funded in partin part exclusive hotel this project is this funded project in part is funded exclusive exclusive hotel hotel byGovernment the Government of canada: by the by the of Government canada: of canada: transportation transportation transportation provider:provider: provider: partner: partner: partner:

Tom & Teresa Tom & Teresa Tom & Teresa GauTreau GauTreau GauTreau

credIt: Image credIt: Image LeImage Paysage credIt:LeLePaysage Paysage (Brittany Landscape) (Brittany (detail), Landscape) 1911. (detail),1911. 1911. (Brittany Landscape) (detail), Audain Art Museum Audain Collection; MuseumCollection; Collection; Audain ArtArt Museum

purchased with purchased funds purchased provided with by fundsprovided providedby by with funds

the Audain Foundation Audain Foundation thethe Audain Foundation


arts scene

SNOWBOARDING BEAR IN BRONZE BY JAMIE SUMMERS, FROM ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY.

HEAVY METAL

ARTISTS FIND CREATIVE FREEDOM IN A HARD MATERIAL STORY BY KEI LI B ART L E T T

T

HE FIRST ARTIST MOUNTAIN GALLERIES EVER REPRESENTED WAS Arnt Arntzen, whose work is made up of recycled aviation parts—a propeller here, a helicopter door there. It may seem surprising for an upscale gallery, located in the Fairmont Chateau Whistler, to showcase metalwork, but in Whistler, where the mountains stand strong and timeless, the medium doesn’t seem so out of place. In fact, it’s rather fitting. “I think through how you treat the metal—there is an opportunity to really create a level of elegance and sophistication within the pieces,” says Ben McLaughlin, communications director of Mountain Galleries. “Somebody that gravitates to painting or stone sculptures or glass may not necessarily gravitate towards metalwork or bronze castings and vice versa. We try to have something that appeals to quite a wide demographic, being as Whistler is such an international resort.” Mountain Galleries also represents artist Carl Sean McMahon, of Salt Spring Island, who often constructs remarkably life-like animals out of recycled cutlery, as well as Squamish’s Fran Solar who uses traditional weaving and stitching methods, but with colourful copper. >>

OSPREY XIV BY CARL SEAN MCMAHON, FROM MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT.


JERI, BY JAMES STEWART, IS

COURTESY ADELE CAMPBELL GALLERY

INSTALLED IN THE VILLAGE.

HONING THEIR CRAFT

EMILY 3 BY PAUL REIMER, FROM ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

Artists can spend years fine-tuning their techniques with metal to get a desired outcome. “The skill, time taken and technique behind each sculpture, and the artists’ ability to manipulate metal, is a truly impressive feat,” says Charlotte Webber, assistant gallery director at Adele Campbell Gallery. Of their 40 artists, six have the ability to transform the often challenging material, all to different effect. Jamie Summers finds humour and whimsy in local animals, inspiring smiles with snowboarding bears or whistling marmots, sculpted in bronze. Meanwhile, Paul Reimer has used his 22 years of experience as a blacksmith to turned forged metal into art—inspired, in part, by the work of renowned B.C. artist Emily Carr, transforming Carr’s distinctive trees back to threedimensional figures. For James Stewart, also represented at Adele Campbell, the choice of bronze is simple. Stewart first began his creative career in computer graphics; you can see some of his work in the likes of Shrek, Narnia and the Harry Potter movies. The movie industry, Stewart says, comes with tremendous freedom, untethered by real-world limitations. “There’s really only one sort of end product that can match that freedom, and that’s bronze. Stone, for example, you’re limited by the supporting structures. Ceramic is faster and easier and cheaper, but you try and balance a person on one ski or something and there’s just no way; it’ll fold.” Stewart gravitates to bronze and specifically to the human form, characters he’s found during his extensive travels. “I’m always amazed by how they choose to stand. It’s always quite stoic, quite proud. I choose people who are not that famous—they tend to be common people—and turn them into bronze, making them this fine art.” Take one of his most well-known pieces in Whistler, perched over Fitzsimmons Creek in the Village. This piece of public art, called Jeri, is a Capoeira dancer/fighter from Jericoacoara, Brazil. The dancer is at rest, his rounded back bowed in a meditative stance, a nod to The Thinker, also fashioned in bronze in 1904, by Auguste Rodin. Stewart acknowledges his subject or material may not fit the typical Whistler aesthetic, but like the many tourists who visit the area, his characters have travelled from far and wide to be here. Like Jeri. (Most of his pieces are named after the place where they’re made.) “Every single time I go back and look at it (Jeri), there's someone sitting between his arms reading or writing in their journal, some photos being taken, people sitting on his shoulders,” Stewart says. “It has become an interactive sculpture, and I never would have expected this crouching figure to attract such a communication within the tourists and the people of the Village.”


A AD DE E LL E E C CA AM MP PB BE E LL LL F F II N NE E A A RT, RT, W WH H II SS T TL LE ER R

ART OF WINTER November 30

COURTESY JOE SAUVE

PAUL PAQUETTE January 25

JOE SAUVE CREATES HIS PIECES FROM REPURPOSED SCRAP METAL.

SCRAP METAL For Joe Sauve, metalworking runs in the family. Sauve was 13 years old when, while helping out in his father’s welding workshop in Georgian Bay, Ontario, he began scavenging scrap metal for his own projects. Always fascinated with wildlife, especially birds, he began developing his techniques to bring what he saw in his head to life. “There were a lot of failed attempts of things before they started looking like what I was wanting them to,” he says. The learning process wasn’t always easy, he admits, but Sauve’s skills, both artistic and industrial, have melded to create a cohesive practice. In the past year, Sauve has set up a more permanent shop in the industrial park in Pemberton and is in the process of getting his certification from the Canadian Welding Bureau so he can pursue structural residential work as well. You can see Sauve’s artistic work around Whistler, notably in the Raven Room restaurant—the home roost for Sauve’s larger-than-life raven— as well as the metal firepits that warm various Village patios. An idea still on Sauve’s workbench is found-object sculptures, coming full circle to those pieces of scrap metal lying on the floor of his father’s welding shop. His goal remains the same all these years later: “Being able to repurpose (scrap pieces) in an interesting way to make a sculpture that’s turned junk into a usable piece of art that people enjoy.” >>

ANGELA MORGAN February 15 SUSIE CIPOLLA February 22

PAINTINGS

WOMEN IN THE SPOTLIGHT March 6 - 18 JENNIFER SPARACINO March 21 THE MASTERS SPOTLIGHT March 30 - April 12

SCULPTURE

JEWELLERY

c e l e b r at i n g c a n a d i a n a rt

v i s i t u s at t h e w e s t i n, w h i s t l e r

ADELECAMPBELL.COM WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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ON THE MARKET

DAVID BUZZARD

With only three years of welding experience under his belt, Whistler Metal Work’s Jack Fawcett has helped expand his family’s business, begun showing his work at markets and found his passion—all since he graduated high school. What began as a summer job welding with his dad, working on structural jobs like staircases, has now branched into the art world. While he creates smaller pieces that are the perfect size to take home in a suitcase, Fawcett also crafts larger-than-life metal trees—anywhere from six inches to 16 feet tall; the sky's the limit. His inspiration comes from the natural landscape he finds himself in when he's not in the workshop. "I think it really captures where we are and who we are as well," he says. Fawcett’s work has been featured in markets for two years now and he is planning to return to the Westin’s “Made in Whistler” winter market for his second year. W

JACK FAWCETT WORKS ON A CUSTOM PIECE AT HIS FAMILY’S WHISTLER METAL WORKS SHOP.

Revived. Body & Mind. Scandinave Spa Whistler offers a traditional Scandinavian baths and massage experience surrounded by a spruce and cedar forest. Located five minutes from Whistler Village.

S CA N DINAVE.COM | 1 8 8 8 935 24 23 8010 Mons Road, Whistler, BC

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WHISTLER GALLERIES AUDAIN ART MUSEUM Open Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday 4350 Blackcomb Way 604-962-0413 ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY Open daily in the Westin Resort & Spa 604-938-0887

THIS WINTER, ENJOY

The Champagne Lounge

ART JUNCTION GALLERY & FRAME STUDIO Open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. 1068 Millar Creek Road, Function Junction 604-938-9000 FATHOM STONE ART GALLERY & STUDIO In the Westin Resort & Spa 604-962-7722 MARK RICHARDS GALLERY Open daily from noon in the Hilton Resort 604-932-1911 MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT Open daily at 9 a.m. Fairmont Chateau 604-935-1862 THE PLAZA GALLERIES Open daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 22-4314 Main Street 604-938-6233 THE GALLERY AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE Open daily from 10 a.m. 4335 Blackcomb Way 604-935-8410 SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Monday 4584 Blackcomb Way 1-866-441-SLCC (7522) SUZANNE JOHNSTON STUDIO GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. In the Westin Resort & Spa 604-935-3444

APRÈS-SKI | FRESHLY SHUCKED OYSTERS TRADITIONAL CHEESE FONDUE | DAILY FROM 3 PM *

VINCENT MASSEY STUDIO 8605 Forest Ridge Drive 604-905-8363 WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Hilton Resort 604-938-3001 (main) Four Seasons Resort 604-935-3999

LATE NIGHT COCKTAILS | LIVE JAZZ NIGHTLY 4121 VILLAGE GREEN | ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM * Dec 15 to March 29, 2020 Times vary in the spring.

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fashion

WHISTLER STYLE WINTER IN WHISTLER IS ALL ABOUT GETTING OUTSIDE IN THE snow and ice, and then curling up by a fire with a creamy coffee or a cocktail when it’s time to slow down and warm up. Why not do both of those things while looking your best? With so many great shops and boutiques in Whistler, you won’t have any problems finding what you need. Here’s some inspiration to get you started.

PHOTO S BY LOGAN SWAYZE

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JACK WEARS A LA MARQUE BOMBER JACKET, A SAXX TEE, AND MAVI MARCUS DENIM, ALL FROM OC2. HIS BULLE GREY BOOTS ARE FROM SOLES OF WHISTLER. THE 14K INUKSHUK WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SCENE CANADIAN GOLD BAND IS FROM KEIR FINE JEWELLERY. MICHELLE WEARS A MACKAGE LEATHER JACKET, A RAILS TOP AND MAVI ALISSA DENIM, ALL FROM OC2. HER LUCKY BRAND BASEL BOOTS ARE FROM SOLES OF WHISTLER. THE 14K CANADIAN DIAMOND “JEANIE THE WHISTLER” BEAR RING IS FROM KEIR FINE JEWELLERY. SHOT ON LOCATION AT NITA LAKE LODGE.

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fashion

HILLARY WEARS A GENTLE FAWN COSMO SWEATER, A COAL "THE WALDEN" WHITE BEANIE, AND MAVI ADRIANA ANKLE DENIM, ALL FROM SHOWCASE. HER MULTI-CIRCLE NECKLACE FROM THE "RUNNING IN CIRCLES" LINE AND HAMMERED SPINNER RING FROM THE SAME COLLECTION ARE ALL FROM RUBY TUESDAY.

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exclusively at

exclusively at


fashion HILLARY WEARS A BURTON PROSPECT BACKPACK, SPY MARSHALL GOGGLES, A COAL "THE FRENA" CHARCOAL BEANIE, DAKINE BRENTWOOD BIB PANTS, AND A DAKINE SILCOX GORETEX JACKET, AND CARRIES A LIB TECH DYNAMISS C3 SNOWBOARD, ALL FROM SHOWCASE.

PAUL WEARS A BURTON KILO 2.0 BACKPACK, SPY ACE GOGGLES, THE NORTH FACE "SALTY DOG" BEANIE, BURTON SOUTHSIDE PANTS, DAKINE EXCURSION GLOVES AND A BURTON AK GORE SWASH JACKET. HE'S CARRYING A UNIQUE BURTON CUSTOM SNOWBOARD, ONLY SOLD AT SHOWCASE WHISTLER.

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CAN-SKI Village CAN-SKI Blackcomb Bogner Whistler

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fashion

JACK WEARS A HERSCHEL LITTLE AMERICA BACKPACK, DAKINE TECH FLANNEL, BURTON TIDEWELL T-SHIRT AND COAL "THE STANLEY" CHARCOAL BEANIE, ALL FROM SHOWCASE. HIS 14K INUKSHUK WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SCENE CANADIAN GOLD BAND IS FROM KEIR FINE JEWELLERY.

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SNOWMOBILE ADVENTURES

B L AC KC O MB & CALL AG H AN

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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fashion

MICHELLE ENJOYS A CAPPUCCINO AT THE CURE LOUNGE AT NITA LAKE LODGE, IN AN INDI & COLD SWEATER AND MAVI TESS DENIM, BOTH FROM OC2. HER 14K CANADIAN DIAMOND SNOWFLAKE PENDANT SUSPENDED ON AN 18-INCH WHEAT CHAIN, 14K CANADIAN DIAMOND SNOWFLAKE RING AND 14K TENNIS BRACELET ARE ALL FROM KEIR FINE JEWELLERY.

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DOGSLED ADVENTURES IN THE CALLAGHAN VALLEY

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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cover story

SWEET SHOTS

VINCE

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MIKECRA

EMOND

NEPHOT OG

RAPHY.C

OM

OND VINCE EM

TOURISM WH ISTLER/VIN

CE EMOND

LOCALS REVEAL WHERE TO CAPTURE THE INSTAGRAM-WORTHY SHOTS


S

STORY BY ME GAN L ALO ND E

QUINTESSENTIAL WHISTLER BACKDROP. RIGHT: THE VIEW OF THE TANTALUS RANGE FROM THE SUMMIT OF FLUTE.

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JUSTA JESKOVA

BACKGROUND PHOTO: BLACK TUSK IS THE

MITCHELL WIN TON

OND VINCE EM

K I P H OTO S C A N B E T H E ST U F F O F D R E A M S . Those Insta-images of powder-filled fun on mountain peaks can instantly channel a fleeting feeling of floating over soft snow or of ripping down fast corduroy tracks. Combine those photos with local Whistler lore—hiking for turns in Flute Bowl, climbing the epic Spanky’s Ladder, staring down the barrel of the Saudan Couloir— and it’s easy to see why Whistler draws well over a million visitors from around the world each winter. They all come for a taste of what’s in those snaps and to experience the legendary stories for themselves. Whether you’re here for a day, a week, a season or for a lifetime, we’ve rounded up advice from some local pros to help you capture the essence of winter on Whistler and Blackcomb mountains. Take home a phone full of photos to remember your time here.


GRAHAM WINSLET, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

LEFT: THE VIEW FROM THE TOP OF SAUDAN COULOIR LOOKING TOWARDS HARMONY CHAIR ON WHISTLER, WITH THE TANTALUS RANGE IN THE BACKGROUND. RIGHT: 7TH HEAVEN’S INUKSHUK, SEEN ON THE LOWER LEFT, IS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES FOR A WHISTLER PHOTO

MITCHELL WINTON

OPPORTUNITY.

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POWER -CHAR TRAND

I T G O E S W I T H O U T S AY I N G T H AT I T ’ S H A R D T O beat the view from the top. Not only do the peaks provide the most expansive views in town, but the high alpine also showcases some of Whistler’s most recognizable landmarks— most notably, Black Tusk. “When you look at Black Tusk, that’s not a mountain that you see when you go anywhere else,” says long-time local photographer Logan Swayze. On a clear day, the striking spire of volcanic rock jutting into the sky from Garibaldi Provincial Park steals your focus the second you glide off Whistler Mountain’s Peak Express Chair. It’s also visible from the top of Blackcomb’s 7th Heaven chairlift—just one reason why Tourism Whistler’s manager of social media & promotions, Bree Proctor, calls 7th Heaven her favourite spot to snap a photo at Whistler Blackcomb. “The reason why I love it is the panoramic views it offers,” she says. “You really get an awe-inspiring feel.” Both peak locations offer photo-friendly Inukshuks (another can be found beside Whistler’s Umbrella Bar, behind the Roundhouse). These large stones, stacked to resemble a human, were traditionally used by Inuit people as a landmark. Whistler adopted the symbol as part of the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games and it has endured. “This shot is one our visitors seem to post again and again,” Proctor adds. If you’re not distracted by the view, you’ll notice a team of yellow-ski-jacket-clad photographers from Coast Mountain

Photography, offering no-obligation souvenir portraits at the top of both lifts. “You’re never really going to beat [Whistler] Peak or the top of 7th Heaven,” agrees Brad Kasselman, photographer and co-founder of Coast Mountain Photography. “Those are the two most iconic spots. They’re not just the top (spots) because they’re at the top; they’re actually the most dynamic background.” While Coast’s expert photographers are equipped with the necessary gear to get you the perfectly lit professional portrait, despite challenging lighting conditions—“An iPhone flash doesn’t do you much good at the top of a mountain, with the amount of light you’re competing with,” Kasselman explains— if you’re the one snapping the photo, Swayze recommends practicing patience. “People’s mistake is they get off the lift, they see the Tusk, and they go ‘oh cool’ and pull their phone out,” Swayze says. “There are people sitting down, doing up their bindings in the foreground.” Instead, he recommends “getting up a little higher, and maybe using the zoom feature on your phone to zoom in on the Tusk,” or heading a few metres down the run for an uninterrupted view. For an even more magnificent view, head left off Peak Chair and traverse towards Symphony Amphitheatre. From there, you can spot Cheakamus Lake, hundreds of metres below on your right. >>

VINCE EMOND

CATHER INE

VIEW FROM THE TOP

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MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

JUSTA JESKO VA

OND VINCE EM

EASY ACCESS

TOP: THE OLYMPIC RINGS IN WHISTLER VILLAGE ARE A PHOTO FAVOURITE. CENTRE: PEAK 2 PEAK GONDOLA OFFERS GREAT VIEWS FOR SIGHTSEERS AND SKIERS. BOTTOM: TAKE A SNAP OF CHEAKAMUS LAKE FROM THE PEAK OF WHISTLER MOUNTAIN.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

WHISTLER MAY BE KNOWN FOR TERRAIN AS EXTREME AS ITS VIEWS, but have no fear: you don’t need to be able to shred a double-black to get a sweet shot. Better yet, you don’t even have to click into a pair of bindings. All you need is a sightseeing pass to access Whistler Blackcomb’s Peak 2 Peak Gondola. This engineering marvel spans 4.4-kilometres and cruises 436 metres above the valley floor to link the two mountains, all while providing eye-popping views of Fitzsimmons Creek and the Spearhead Range beyond. “It’s definitely a ’gram worthy shot inside the gondola,” says Proctor. “A trip on the Peak 2 Peak is one of the most iconic experiences here in Whistler…I think it’s pretty cool too that it’s available to not only skiers and riders (snowboarders) during the wintertime, but sightseers can also experience it and get that shot.” Unbothered by heights? Wait a few extra minutes to grab a glass-bottomed cabin to really amp up your sightseeing experience. Sightseers, as well as skiers and snowboarders, can also grab the opportunity to stand atop an Olympic podium and fuel their inner champion ski racer. You’ll find a set of Olympic Rings located just outside Whistler’s Roundhouse, a constant reminder of the resort’s Olympic legacy. The rings still serve as inspiration to up-and-coming athletes (and a reminder that you might be shredding the same slopes that made Olympic champions) just as the 2010 Games did for Whistler’s Simon d’Artois, who went on to compete at the 2018 Olympics in PyeongChang in halfpipe. “I think for a lot of kids who are interested in sports…to have that at your front door and see how attainable it really is, is great fuel for the fire,” says d’Artois. >>


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SNOWSHOE

LOGAN SWAYZE

THE MEDICINE TRAIL

LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHERS SUGGEST SHOOTING THE CRYSTAL TREES IN BLACK AND WHITE.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH LOTS OF FRESH POWDER IN WHISTLER (MORE THAN 10 metres or 35 feet every year, on average) means lots of mighty snowstorms, blowing their fury on the mountains. So, how can you grab that iconic Whistler shot when the alpine lifts close due to wind? Head for the trees. More specifically, the Crystal trees. That’s where you’ll find approximately 28 hectares (70 acres) of gladed terrain accessible from Blackcomb’s Crystal Ridge Express that was burnt in a lightningtriggered blaze a decade ago. “I think it’s got such a beautiful, almost…monochromatic feel to it,” says Swayze. “With the very white snow and very black trees, it almost looks like a black-and-white photo when you’re standing there.” Kasselman recommends taking one step further, converting your photo to black and white with editing software to create, “a really unique, almost eerie-looking shot that you’re probably not going to be able to replicate almost anywhere in the world,” he says. “How often do you get to ski through a forest fire site?” When X-Games gold medallist and amateur photographer d’Artois heads up the mountain to indulge in his side hobby, he also chooses the Crystal zone for its “nice mid-mountain terrain vibe.” “It’s challenging terrain, but also a lot of fun,” he says. “You can go from some pretty wicked groomers—like the best turns on both mountains—and then you can dip into the trees and get some wicked off-piste skiing and some good snow on the pow days.” The mid-mountain trees create a “magic zone,” located between mid-station and the high alpine that is “uniquely Whistler,” agrees Wendell Moore, manager of the long-running Senior Ski Team. >>

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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MADE FOR MISSIONS AVAILABLE NOW AT Whistler Village

ALWAYS IN SEASON. E D I E R I D SH T L RE KE of l G & F R f u l nd y

TO MA and us a udl nd IN T. cal at’s pro d a ing g S o h e e r n

l T ’r n b i r. h, s. e o w to p p t l e s e e s .W y d o is Fr p r i e i l i l l e s h h m m r d W r o s u n s f a t h fo o to C e B e ly w c e t e n th lu a n rie o s pe ab ex 4330 Northlands Blvd, Whistler, BC

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020


STEEP & DEEP FOR ADVANCED SKIERS, WHISTLER HAS JUST AS MANY ICONIC experiences to document as it has iconic views. Take a break from the lifts to hike up Flute Bowl, one of the three "Musical Bumps" summits that link Whistler Mountain and Singing Pass. Your legs and lungs might protest, but the trek will be forgotten the second you hit the untracked powder left over after a snowstorm. Don’t forget to take a photo with Flute’s summit sign to prove you made it. On Blackcomb, don’t miss Spanky’s Ladder on a powder day. Follow the steep bootpack (you’ll see the line-up from the Glacier Express chairlift on any powder day) to reach the ridge that provides entry to a series of expert-only bowls and chutes. Four-time Olympian Mercedes Nicoll, a born-and-raised Whistlerite and halfpipe snowboarder who now leads Whistler Blackcomb’s “Ride with an Olympian” tours during the winter months, chooses West Cirque when she wants to give her more advanced clients a thrilling experience. “I really love that run,” says Nicoll of one of Whistler Mountain’s steepest chutes. “It kind of scares people a little, and they get that view of looking down on Whistler.”

TIPS AND TRICKS

unwind

LIFESTYLE & ADVENTURE GUIDE

cross country connection

Rentals Skills Tours

whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

BELIEVE IT OR NOT, THE PHYSICAL LANDSCAPE ISN’T THE ONLY thing worthy of a photo. As Nicoll and d’Artois prove, the local talent is just as impressive. To that end, Nicoll encourages visitors to check out Blackcomb’s XL terrain park—known colloquially to locals as the “Black Park”—to watch the pros soar off some of the largest jumps on the planet. “That’s something else to take a photo of because you don’t get that anywhere else,” she says. “The national team has training camps here so often that you’ll be able to see people training…for the X-Games.” If you’re looking to be the subject of your own action shot, “patience with it is huge,” adds Nicoll. “If you’re trying to get an action shot, it’ll humble you, because you’ll realize how difficult it actually is.” In the event that patience isn’t your strength, Coast Mountain Photography offers private action photography or extensive portraiture sessions with their team of advanced skiing and riding photographers to “capture people in the elements, ripping it up on the mountain,” says Kasselman. But the photographer’s biggest tip for visitors? Find a stunning view, then put the phone away. Cross Country Connection Advertisement “The best thing you can do to really make the most of that opportunity Winter 2019-2020 season is to grab a quick shot—sure, I’m all for that—and then put away your Ad # CXC-W2020-Ad-4 phone and enjoy it and take it in,” says Kasselman. Publication: Whistler Magazine, “Although Unwind Recreation Guide photographs have ad size: (new) (1/6 page, 3.8 W x 2.8 H) an incredible power Date: October, 2019 of helping you recall and evoke memories that you may have forgotten…be present in the moment and appreciate our good fortune for getting to experience places like this.” W

Files in PDF format, greyscale or CMYK confirmation: 604.905.0071

technical concerns: Brian Hydesmith design@hydesmith.com or call 204.487.0067

4584 Blackcomb Way In Whistler’s Upper Village

Book Online: SLCC.CA/Feast

TOURIS

M WHIST LE

R/CHAD

CHOMLA

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FIRST NATIONS WINTER FEAST

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unwind

LIFESTYLE & ADVENTURE GUIDE

Step back in time for an

unforgettable experience!

Covered sleigh gliding with lap blankets and the sound of jingle bells. Enjoy hot chocolate around the fire with magical views of Whistler Village.

BLACKCOMB SLEIGHRIDES 604-932-7631

blackcombsleighrides.com

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2019-09-04 1:25 PM


whistler works

WHISTLER

HOLLYWOOD HOTBED TRACING WHISTLER’S CONNECTION TO TINSELTOWN STORY BY BRADEN DUP UIS

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T F I R ST GL ANCE, T H ERE’S NOT H ING OUT OF T HE ordinary about Henry. For close to an hour, the avalanche rescue dog lays quietly in the corner of a room while his owner engages in conversation. A reddish brown border collie, the unassuming Henry is now Whistler’s latest movie star. “When you see the film, it really is all about Henry,” says pro ski patroller Ian Bunbury, Henry’s trainer. The duo is part of the Canadian Avalanche Rescue Dog Association; Henry is one of only 25 specially trained avalanche dogs in the country. And … the camera loves him. He stars in Superpower Dogs—an IMAX spectacular that showcases Henry, and canines like him, in their element. For Henry, that means dangling from helicopter longlines and riding on Bunbury’s skis as they patrol the slopes in Whistler (among other daring tasks). For those who have seen him on the big screen, Henry—voiced by Captain America, Chris Evans, in the film—is an instant superstar. “People literally come out of the theatre, full-on tears running down their faces, and wrap their arms around the dog. It’s amazing,” Bunbury says. “It’s as big as it gets in the business.” But it’s hardly Whistler’s first brush with the silver screen—big or small. >>

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SUPERPOWER DOG HENRY, PICTURED HERE WITH HIS TRAINER, PATROLLER IAN BUNBURY, IS WHISTLER’S

DAVID BUZZARD

NEWEST MOVIE STAR.

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HELICOPTER PILOT STEVE GRAY HAS WORKED ON SEVERAL DAVID BUZZARD

BIG-BUDGET FILMS IN WHISTLER AND BEYOND.

COURTESY MEREDITH HODDER

TAPPING TALENT

MEREDITH HODDER, OWNER OF WHISTLER PEAK PRODUCTIONS, SCOUTS LOCATIONS IN THE SEA-TO-SKY REGION.

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ACCORDING TO THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER, the general trend is about two productions per month—everything from travel shows, documentaries and commercials to reality TV, catalogue shoots and even feature films (and the trend isn’t new: the 1991 sex comedy Ski School was partially filmed in Whistler, and, coincidentally, featured Bunbury as an extra). Through her company Whistler Peak Productions, Meredith Hodder is often involved with such film projects, from location scouting and planning logistics to booking hotels and sourcing models. Hodder came to Whistler in 2007 from a job in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles, where she worked on TV productions like Survivor and The Amazing Race. “I moved up to Whistler to marry a Canadian, and have a family,” she recalls. “And then people just started calling from L.A., saying, ‘Hey, you live up there, we want to come and film, can you help us?’ “And then it kind of snowballed into a business.” Whistler Peak Productions launched in 2010 and Hodder hasn’t looked back. “I like bringing crews to places that they’re like, ‘Oh my god, this is the most amazing place I’ve ever shot.’ You’re not going to get that if you’re filming inside a school gym,” she says. Hodder has been involved in some big-budget film shoots locally (like a recent Planet of the Apes film and an upcoming Disney movie called Noelle, both of which were filmed in part at Whistler Olympic Park in the


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FULL-LENGTH MOVIES FILMED ON LOCATION IN WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Callaghan Valley), and worked with some big-name celebrities like Woody Harrelson, Anna Kendrick and Bill Hader. “I think the nice part, too, about being in Canada filming is that there’s no paparazzi following them … A lot of times [celebrities] will be here and you won’t know until they’ve left,” she says. “So I think that offers a lot of appeal for people as well, because they can just be themselves and go about their work and their downtime without being bothered.” Of course, if Hollywood isn’t your scene, Whistler also produces all the ski and bike movies you could ever hope to watch. “Whistler is one of the big hubs of sports, and outdoor adventure sports, in the world,” says Mike Douglas, founder of local production company Switchback Entertainment. “We’ve obviously got amazing physical assets, but also just a really progressive group of people around here that are always doing cool stuff, and so it’s not hard to find a subject— for example, someone in the valley who has just got a story to tell and is doing something pretty cool.” And if it’s happening in Whistler, you can bet someone will be there to capture it with a camera. Douglas points to people like Jeff Thomas, Blair Richmond or the crew at Sherpas Cinema. “There’s some really top-notch creative professionals,” he adds. >>

THE GODFATHER OF FREESKIING, MIKE DOUGLAS, TRANSITIONED FROM BEING IN FRONT OF THE LENS, TO

WHIST

Skiing in the Mind's Eye (1975) Different Slopes (1979) Ski School (1990) Carving the White (1993) Ski School 2 (1994) White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf (1994) Ski Hard (1996) Snowriders II (1997) Freeriders (1998) The X Files (1998) Further (2000) Ride (2000) Kevin of the North (2001) Ski Movie III: The Front Line (2002 Video) Storm (2002) D-Tox (2002) Ski Bums (2002) The Mountain (2004–2005) The Pipe Dream (2006) Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) Why Did I Get Married? (2007) Hot Rod (2007) Under the Influence (II) (2008) Commit to the Line (2008) Life as a Movie (2008) The Story (2010) 2 Frogs dans l'Ouest (2010) The Big Year (2011) One for the Road (II) (2011) Dream House (2011) Vance and Pepe (2011) Wake Up: A Snowboard Film (2012) Into the Mind (2013) Far from Home: Uganda to the Tetons (2014) Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story (2014) UnReal (2015) Cold Zone (2017) Jasper Jones (2017) War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Fifty Shades Freed (2018) Noelle (2019) Call of the Wild (2019) — IMDB

BEHIND IT.

DEC 4 - 8, 2019

WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL

F

or almost two decades, Whistler has been on the map as one of the go-to festivals for filmmakers and film lovers around the world. Known as Canada’s “coolest film fest,” the Whistler Film Festival is about so much more than movie premieres and A-list parties. This is a festival that creates and nurtures talent and a forum for industry insiders to make connections. The five-day festival takes place Dec. 4-8, 2019 in Whistler. Check out the line-up at whistlerfilmfestival.com.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020


WHISTLER Take Douglas himself. Known as the “Godfather of Freeskiing” for his talents on the snow, not to mention credited for the design of the modern twin-tip ski, Douglas parlayed his career on the mountains into a successful career behind the lens more than a decade ago. Switchback now has numerous award-winning titles to its name including the documentary feature film Snowman as well as other commercial-branded content such as the web series, Salomon Freeski TV. Key to Switchback’s success is the combination of telling stories from far-flung locations around the world—Greenland’s second highest peak, for example, or the Arctic to capture skiing during a solar eclipse—with compelling characters who have a story to tell.

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FROM SKI FILMS TO BIG BUDGET S T E V E G R AY, P I LOT W I T H B L A C KC O M B H E L I C O P T E R S , has been flying since 1992, and in Whistler since 2006. He knows exactly what Whistler can offer in terms of background shots because he gets the bird’s eye view. “I was able to progress from doing local ski film projects and small commercials, up to larger commercials, ultimately into TV and feature film, which is mainly what I do now,” Gray says. His IMDb (Internet Movie Database) page shows the extent of his expertise: Gray is credited with working on such big-budget films as The A-Team, Deadpool 2, Star Trek Beyond and even two Fifty Shades of Grey films (“which is kind of amusing,” he says, “because I have a similar last name.”) “I enjoyed Fifty Shades of Grey because I acted as a stunt pilot in that,” he says. “We took almost two weeks to complete a long helicopter crash sequence, which took us to the Othello caves in Hope, the Ashlu canyon in Squamish, and Mount St. Helens in Washington, all to perform one crash sequence.” More recently, Gray has taken on the role of aerial coordinator in addition to his pilot work, putting him in charge of managing multiple helicopters and the associated staff for an upcoming film starring John Cena and Keegan-Michael Key, Playing With Fire. Gray says that the local area is popular for productions for more than one reason: its proximity to the film hub of Vancouver, the ample accommodation for film crews, and the fact that it has a heliport with fuel and facilities on hand. But “the biggest thing is the location itself,” he says. “We have mountains that can double as the Himalayas, as the Rockies, as the coastal mountains B.C., as the Alps, (and) we can also use areas like the Pemberton Icefield in the summer to act as the Arctic in the winter. “There are a lot of upsides to productions coming to Whistler.” W

shop.getthegoods.ca @get_the_goods_whistler 604-935-7878 210-2059 Lake Placid Road, Creekside Village WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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faces of whistler

MOUNTAIN GUARDIANS THE MEN AND WOMEN AT THE HEART OF WHISTLER’S EMERGENCY WORK STORY BY ALI SO N TAY LO R PHOTOS BY MI K E CRANE

DOUG ARNOTT AND DR. RENATA LEWIS RESPOND TO SEARCH AND RESCUE CALLS FOR LOST AND INJURED MOUNTAIN ADVENTURERS.

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WORKING IN THE WHISTLER HEALTH CARE CENTRE FOR MORE THAN A DECADE, NURSE LYNDA COWAN IS PART OF WHISTLER’S TEAM OF MEDICAL RESPONDERS.

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T IS A SIMPLE FACT OF geography, and human nature, that fresh untracked powder can lure even the savviest skier into uncharted terrain. It’s this inexorable pull beyond the ski area boundaries, as tempting as the Sirens’ call to unwitting sailors, that so often leads to trouble. And that’s just how eight skiers found themselves “cliffed out” last winter in an area known as the Cake Hole, an alluring but treacherous out-of-bounds area off the backside of Whistler Mountain. The first was a party of out-of-country tourists, the second a duo who simply followed them past the ski area boundary. Unable to ski down and now impossible to hike back up, the skiers were stuck. They were scared. And, they were totally ill-equipped to spend a night outdoors in plummeting temperatures. An awesome day in the mountains had turned dangerous with one momentary lapse in judgment. Enter Whistler’s emergency responders: those uniquely skilled men and women who have a hand at saving people in the mountains, from Search and Rescue volunteers and helicopter pilots to ski patrol and emergency room nurses. Each has their own role to play in the daily drama of mountain rescue. Together they make up a tight-knit community of mountain guardians.

SEARCH AND RESCUE THERE WERE 45 MINUTES OF DAYLIGHT LEFT when that call came in last winter, recalls Blackcomb Helicopters pilot Doug Arnott—eight people cliffed out on the Cake Hole. As with every mountain rescue, time was of the essence. Arnott is one of a handful of local pilots trained in HETS, or Helicopter External Transport System. That means he can carry people over the mountains dangling on a long line beneath his machine—it seems extreme but it’s often the safest and most efficient way to save people. This particular evening, Dr. Renata Lewis, a long time SAR volunteer and ski patrol doctor, was 58

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020


THE KETEL ONE ICE ROOM

hanging at the end of his line. Lewis and Arnott are no strangers to this unique dynamic, with dozens of long line rescues under their belts. They’ve also been married for almost 20 years. “We know what each other is thinking without it being said,” says Lewis of the implicit trust between them when just 50 metres (160 feet) of death-defying rope separates them high above the mountains. She knows how he flies and the time pressures he’s under as daylight fades; he knows that she is compelled to do everything she can to save people who are injured or lost and scared in the mountains. It is a deep and abiding connection under tense and often difficult circumstances. And there is nothing better than working together to help people, says Arnott who has been flying for 17 years. “I always wanted to fly in the mountains,” he adds. “I always wanted to do rescue work. When it goes well, there’s no better feeling.” The same is true for Lewis who was a SAR volunteer in Nelson and Revelstoke before the family moved to Whistler eight years ago. As the main doctor volunteer for Search and Rescue, Lewis can provide a higher level of care than most other volunteers. She tends to go to every call that she can attend. Having her there can make a significant difference to someone suffering in the backcountry. “I love the ‘drop everything and go’ aspect of it,” she says, “not knowing what you’re dropping into, having to make decisions and critical interventions on the fly…literally. That I get to do it with Doug, I love it.” They made four trips over Whistler Mountain to the Cake Hole that evening, bright ski suits huddled together marking their journey on one side of the mountain, the flashing red and blue RCMP lights guiding the way back to safety on the other side as darkness closed in. All made it home safely that night. >>

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WHISTLER HEALTH CARE CENTRE

P: Andrew Strain

NOT EVERYONE MAKES IT HOME SAFELY. THE FIRST port of call for the injured is the small Whistler Health Care Centre (WHCC), a rural centre providing urgent and emergency care for residents and visitors in the Sea to Sky corridor. It comes as no surprise, given its location, that the centre sees a disproportionate share of orthopedic work—broken wrists, dislocated shoulders, strained knees—as well as serious trauma. Lynda Cowan has been a nurse there for 12 years. A Whistler “weekend warrior” since she was three years old, Cowan began teaching skiing in Whistler when was 15. “I loved being up here,” she says, of all of those weekend journeys from the city to the mountains as a kid. Ski school morphed into volunteer patrolling on the mountain. But what about a career? Though entry-level service jobs abound in the resort, Whistler isn’t the easiest place to find one’s true calling. Then, Cowan got the chance to shadow the nurses at the clinic and immediately realized this is the kind of work she wanted to do. She comes by it naturally—her mom was a pediatric operating room nurse in the city. “It was a coveted place to work,” she says of the rural emergency centre. Cowan went to university, commuting to Whistler as often as possible. And eventually landed back here, giving herself ten years. “I thought I would burn out,” she smiles. More than a decade on, it remains challenging and rewarding and fun to go to work. Every shift can be different. “You have to be comfortable with the unknown of what’s going to walk through the door,” she admits. The weather is often a clue for the day ahead. Cold, icy days can herald broken wrists while powder-filled days can deliver lots of strained muscles. And then there are the other patients too: the ones who are quickly stabilized in Whistler and rushed to the city for more advanced care. “I feel like we’re a well-oiled machine dealing with that stuff,” she says, the flow of communication and compassion transferred from one level of care to the other. Knowing that we’re all in it together brings us together,” says Cowan. “It affects us when big things happen in a small town.”

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THE ONLY CONSTANT OF GAVIN REED’S JOB AS A SENIOR ski patroller at Whistler Blackcomb is that things can change from one minute to the next. One of his jobs as a senior avalanche technician is to make the ski area safe before guests upload, whether that’s with explosives, avalanche guns or ski cutting the slopes by moving across the top of the mountain to test the snow stability. “We systematically go out and manage Mother Nature the best we can,” Reed explains. And it never gets old—the chilly, dark mornings, the somewhat solitary role. “It’s one of the best jobs out there,” he adds. Reed got the ski bug early on, cutting his teeth at Seymour, Grouse and Cypress Mountains in the Lower Mainland, working in ski shops to fuel his passion. The move to Whistler was a natural evolution. >>


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“I T WAS J U ST T HE BI G ADV EN T U RE,” he says, and the skiing was massive, with no end of things to do here. It wasn’t long before he made the move from retail to patrol, hired full-time in 2000: “I’ve had the same locker ever since.” After patrol readies the mountain for skiing, the job switches to more of a reactive role, tending to WB guests who need assistance. The mountains are an unstable environment. “The goal is getting them to the next level of care,” he says. Reed, a SAR volunteer, is also a long-line specialist instructor, teaching throughout the region and the province. Lying underneath a helicopter with a critically injured patient, he has often thought to himself: How did I end up here? That question is quickly followed with the realization that he wouldn’t change it for a thing. “You’re able to do your best work,” he says simply. “And help people while doing it.” W

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CONTEMPORARY IN KADENWOOD

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LOCAL BUILDER CREATES A MODERN MOUNTAIN SANCTUARY STO RY BY AL IS O N TAY LO R

AWARD-WINNING DESIGNER DENISE ASHMORE, OF PROJECT 22 DESIGN, SETS THE TONE FOR THIS ANCIENT

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JANIS NICOLAY

CEDARS LANE HOME.


FLOOR-TO-CEILING WINDOWS BATHE JANIS NICOLAY

THE DINING ROOM IN NATURAL LIGHT.

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JANIS NICOLAY

ABOVE: CUSTOM WHITE OAK MILLWORK IS FEATURED THROUGHOUT THE HOME. RIGHT: CONTEMPORARY CABINETS PROVIDE A CLEAN, SOPHISTICATED LOOK.

T

here were only a few choice neighbourhoods in Whistler that builder Brian Gavan considered when he was looking to build his next home.

JANIS NICOLAY

In the end, the elegant enclave of Kadenwood, nestled high on Whistler Mountain amid old-growth trees, won him over. And, it’s easy to see why. Kadenwood is an oasis above the hustle and bustle of an international ski resort, the peace and calm of this mountain sanctuary settling over you as soon as you pass under a timber archway and climb the three-kilometre road up to the quiet subdivision. “It’s so quiet here. The first night we spent here I slept in to 8 a.m.,” he says with a smile. Not bad waking up to the view from the master bedroom too, high over the forested valley, snow-capped mountains rising in the background. >>

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JANIS NICOLAY

ABOVE: MASSIVE ROCKS WERE BLASTED TO ACCOMMODATE THE BUILD. LEFT: ALL SEVEN BEDROOMS IN THE HOME

JANIS NICOLAY

INCLUDE AN ENSUITE.

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GAVAN , WHO START ED GAVAN C O N ST R UCT IO N Company seven years ago, could see the huge potential in one of the empty lots, despite the massive rocks that had to be blasted on site; he could envision the perfect spot for a swimming pool and hot tub, the southwest exposure bathing the area in afternoon sunlight. Then, there was the private Kadenwood gondola, sweeping residents to and from Creekside with all of its amenities—groceries, liquor store, award-winning restaurants—in a matter of minutes. Not to mention, the ski in/ski out bonus, clicking into your skis minutes from your front door and swooshing right into your backyard after a day’s skiing. Kadenwood ticked all the boxes for a home for his family… and for an investment. It was also the perfect fit to build the kind of home he wanted to build—a contemporary Whistler design, all right angles and clean lines and stylish geometry. You can feel the muted grandeur of the seven-bedroom, eight-bathroom home as soon as you step through the front door with its polished-concrete entry floor and sweeping ceiling. >>


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IS SURROUNDED BY CONCRETE.

JANIS NICOLAY

THE WINE CELLAR AND TASTING ROOM

THE HOME IS BUILT LIKE A SMALL HOTEL, WITH bedrooms on three floors. Every bedroom has an en suite and there is an elevator to take you from the ground floor to the top. There are also several communal gathering spaces including the ground-floor media room, perfect for entertaining. Reflecting on this home, Gavan could highlight any number of things that stand out for him: the custom white-oak millwork throughout that sets a tone of understated elegance, for example, or the concrete wine cellar and tasting room for an added flare. Instead, however, he gives a builder’s answer: the timeline. The Ancient Cedars home took 13 months from start to finish, from breaking ground and blasting thousands of pounds of rock to putting the finishing touches on the interior— not an easy feat in Whistler where builders are hampered by winters, the unavoidable and inevitable challenge of building in a ski resort. “I was here every day except for the days we were away from Whistler,” he explains of the push to completion. It wouldn’t have been possible either without the solid crew he has built up at GCC over the years and the reliable subtrades who were involved too. >>

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AT FIRST GLANCE, THE MODERN DESIGN LOOKS LIKE A SIMPLE yet refined rectangle box. That belies, however, the subtle intricacies of the build: the 12-foot cantilevered western side, for example, with its floorto-ceiling windows capturing the Coast Mountains in all their glory. This cantilevered feature, made possible with thousands of pounds of steel, creates covered overhangs on the ground floor without any supports. Gavan chose to work again with local architect Brent Murdoch, with his extensive portfolio of luxury Whistler homes to his name, as well as Denise Ashmore of Project 22 Design, Western Living’s interior designer of the year in 2017. For Gavan, however, it’s now time to sell this Kadenwood sanctuary. There is little doubt it will be hard to say goodbye. W


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IL CAMINETTO EXECUTIVE CHEF JAMES WALT WITH THEIR POPULAR CAULIFLOWER STEAK DISH.


VEG OUT FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENTS IN WHISTLER EMBRACE MEATLESS MEALS WITH CREATIVE VEGETARIAN OFFERINGS STO RY BY A LYS SA N O EL

I DAVID BUZZARD

T WA S N ’ T LO N G A G O T H AT D I N I N G O U T as a vegetarian was a lacklustre event. From boring pasta to bland risotto, fine dining establishments seemed to view plant-based meals as an afterthought. “I’ve been cooking for 20 years,” says Derek Bendig, executive sous chef at The Wildflower located in the Fairmont Chateau Whistler. “When I first started, vegetarians were pretty few and far between. It wasn’t nearly as popular as it is now. (As a chef) you were looking for meat, you were looking for fish.” >>


COURTESY FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER

THE B.C. MUSHROOM DISH FROM THE WILDFLOWER RESTAURANT IN THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER.

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BUT THAT’S ALL CHANGED IN THE last decade. According to a study from Dalhousie University released in 2018, vegetarians and vegans make up nearly 10 per cent of Canada’s population—with the most residing in B.C.—and that shift is reflected in kitchens too, Bendig says. “Now getting excellent vegetables is just as important as protein. Our diet is changing too. It’s more in the forethought of (menu) development now—and the produce is better. You’re getting more heirloom varieties, carrots, leeks, all sorts of things. That makes it more exciting.” His goal is to create a balanced meal that’s as equally nutritious—and tasty—as the restaurant’s meat dishes.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

“YOU’RE LOOKING FOR TEXTURES AND FLAVOURS THAT COMPLEMENT EACH OTHER, PRESENTATION AND COLOUR THAT ALL WORK TOGETHER.” — Derek Bendig

“You’re looking for textures and flavours that complement each other, presentation and colour that all work together,” he says. “Same as if you were using animal protein.” The most popular example of that on The Wildflower menu: the B.C. Mushroom dish. With a mushroom and cashew nut paté, beluga lentils, pickled mushrooms, wilted kale, spruce-infused King Oyster mushrooms, spring peas and grilled onions, it’s not hard to imagine why it’s been a favourite. “Chefs now have opened their minds to that creativity and what we can get out of a vegetarian dish,” Bendig says. >>


7:24 PM

The moment you discovered how enchanting an evening can be. Twinkling lights and a crackling fire set the stage for a magical winter dining experience at The Chalet. Featuring European-inspired alpine cuisine, The Chalet’s menu offers the perfect collection of warm and welcoming dishes you’d expect in North America’s favourite mountain resort. Indulge in savoury fondues, house-made pâté, schnitzel, rösti and artisan charcuterie platters. Be sure to save room for the chocolate fondue dessert and an after-dinner selection from the schnapps wagon. Complimentary shuttle available from Fairmont Chateau Whistler.

VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER/DINING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 604 938 8000 OR BOOK ONLINE WITH OPENTABLE.COM AT FA I R M O N T C H AT E A U W H I S T L E R


DAVID BUZZARD

IL CAMINETTO’S CAULIFLOWER STEAK DISH, WITH EGGPLANT PUREE, TOASTED HAZELNUTS AND GORGONZOLA.

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AT I L C A M I N E T T O , E X E C U T I V E C H E F James Walt—who also oversees the kitchens at Araxi and Bar Oso—says their number of vegan and vegetarian diners reflects the national average almost perfectly. “Plant-based eating is off the charts,” he says. “We have to make sure the menus have broad appeal for everybody.” That trend has chefs digging into traditionally plant-based cultures—think curries and spices— and exploring new types of protein, like nut milk. “These sorts of things are the norm nowadays,” he says. “If restaurants aren’t doing a good form of vegetarian cookery, it’s not great.” To that end, he describes Il Caminetto’s cauliflower steak, which has even brought meat eaters back for a second helping.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

“OUR APPROACH HAS BEEN “SEASON FIRST”—(USING) THE FRESHEST PRODUCE THAT TIME OF YEAR.” — James Walt

The half head of the vegetable is cooked in brown butter, thyme and olive oil then slow roasted until it’s tender. Then it’s plated with eggplant puree, toasted hazelnuts and a creamy gorgonzola. “This has been our most successful vegetarian dish. It’s going out like gangbusters,” Walt says. “We have staff who come in every day asking for it as well.” Cooking with vegetables also fits with the restaurant’s ethos of using fresh, local food, he adds. “We’ve always done a lot of good vegetarian cookery. It’s mainly because it’s something I like doing. It also lends itself to our mission statement with utilizing local produce from Pemberton. “Our approach has been “season first”—(using) the freshest produce that time of year,” he says. >>


Best Fine Dining

Araxi: Roots To Shoots, Farm Fresh Recipies by Executive Chef James Walt

Where Whistler Magazine ‘19

Farm to Table

Seasonally Crafted

araxi.com | 604 932 4540 | 4222 village square thecellarbyaraxi.com | private events for up to 60 guests

Be st C asua l Dining W he re W his tler M agazine ‘ 1 9

Spanish-Influenced Mountain Inspired

BAROSO.CA | 604 962 45 40 | 42 2 2 VILLA GE SQ UA RE


“A LOT OF CHEFS WHO HAVE BEEN IN THE INDUSTRY FOR 30-PLUS YEARS HAVE HAD TO CHANGE THEIR MINDSET WITH REGARDS TO VEGETARIAN/VEGAN DISHES.” — Josh Kelly

THE BUTTERNUT SQUASH FARRO AURA AT THE NITA LAKE LODGE.

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DAVID BUZZARD

RISOTTO, FROM

WHILE VEGETARIANS AND VEGANS HAVE different reasons for eschewing meat— ranging from health to animal welfare to the environment—Aura at Nita Lake Lodge had two clear motivations for launching a Meatless Monday menu. The first was to fit with the restaurant’s initiative to become greener. “The production of meat involves huge amounts of pesticides, fertilizer, fuel and water, and its distribution releases greenhouse gases into the air,” says senior sous chef Josh Kelly. “This is why we have decided to join the global effort of Meatless Monday to minimize meat consumption and do our part to reduce our environmental impact.” The second reason: “To create a unique vegetarian/vegan offering for the Whistler community.” The response has been encouraging—which isn’t hard to imagine with a butternut squash farro risotto, complete with leeks, spaghetti squash, toasted hazelnuts, frisée lettuce and picked pear salad. Kelly introduced that now well-loved dish to executive chef James Olberg—and he loved it. “When you are creating a vegetarian dish, you have to approach it very differently than you would a meat dish,” Kelly says. “It’s definitely a challenge, but it is an enjoyable one in the sense that it’s an opportunity to explore a lot of different creative avenues in terms of ingredients used and methods of cooking and plating the dish.” In that way, chefs the world over have started to see the value in appealing to vegetarian and vegan diners. “With that demand there is a focus on maintaining that standard of creativity and taste. A lot of chefs who have been in the industry for 30-plus years have had to change their mindset with regards to vegetarian/vegan dishes,” Kelly says. >>


A RA fresh. modern. lakeside.

Inspired Lakefront Dining

A fork, a glass, a drop of magic...

aura restaurant at nita lake lodge whistler creekside open daily for breakfast & dinner complimentary village shuttle & parking available 604 966 5711 www.nitalakelodge.com/dining

MODERN CANADIAN CUISINE OPEN DAILY FROM 3 PM * | DINNER FROM 5:30 PM * COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING 4121 VILLAGE GREEN | ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM * Dec 15 to March 29, 2020 Times vary in the spring.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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THE YAM AND BLACK BEAN ROLL DAVID BUZZARD

WRAPPED IN SHREDDED FILO, FROM BEARFOOT BISTRO.

M E L I S S A C R A I G , C H E F AT B E A R F O O T Bistro, takes that challenge one step further and ensures every vegetarian dish in her kitchen is first made vegan. “All of my purees, all my bases of almost everything, I keep vegan until the last minute and then add butter. We make everyone very aware we can have vegans and vegetarians,” she says. “We’ve had just as many vegans as vegetarians—if not more—in the last five years.” While some chefs have had to push themselves to embrace meatless meals, Craig says she’s always enjoyed creating vegetable-based food. “I’ve been here 15 years—I’ve always had that approach,” she says. “I could be vegetarian; I eat meat once a week, so I appreciate that.” While her winter menu wasn’t set at press time, Craig highlighted a yam and black bean roll wrapped in shredded filo from last winter. “It was really filling. It was delicious,” she says. “(The winter vegetarian dish) will be something with a bean or root vegetable.” Then, of course, there are always the soups— which have historically featured vegan-friendly options like sunchoke soup with hazelnuts and truffles. “It’s a very healthy way of eating,” she says. “That’s why I respect it.” W

The Nijjar family is pleased to introduce you to the Royal Taste of India. Our chefs provide the essence of traditional Indian Cuisine with a modern touch, preparing each dish to your specifications. Our sister company Kismet Estate Winery, located in Oliver BC, produces VQA quality red & white wine to pair with our exotic menu.

Fine Dining & Take Out WHISTLER MARKETPLACE

604-932-2010 Open ALL DAY from 11am to late

WWW.THEROYALTASTEOFINDIA.COM 82

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CRYSTAL HUT

FONDUE

ON BLACKCOMB MTN BY SNOWMOBILE & SNOWCAT

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

WH Y NOT

TONIGHT? OPEN DAILY AT 3 PM

4429 Sundial Place | 604.932.5151 | kegsteakhouse.com

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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MATCHING WINE WITH VEGETARIAN CUISINE

F

– Tandoor Oven – – Great Vegetarian/Vegan Selection –

Tandoori Grill Indian Cuisine 4368 Main St. # 201, UPSTAIRS, at corner of Northlands

604 .905.4900 ENTREES FROM $16 We serve free-run chicken dishes from the Fraser Valley Farm (raised with no added hormones or steroids), grass-fed lamb and OCEAN WISE (TM) Prawns and Fish

MENU AND ONLINE OPTIONS: RESERVATIONS AND PICK-UP ORDERS: TandooriWhistler.com DINNER DELIVERY: WhistlerDineIn.com VANCOUVER VENUE: OriginalTandooriKitchens.com

Winner 2014-2019

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LUNCH FROM 11:30 AM DINNER FROM 5 PM

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BONNY MAKAREWICZ

FROM GARDEN TO VINEYARD PERFECT PAIRING BY SAMANTHA RAHN

ULL DISCLOSURE: Your wine girl is an omnivore but also a near-commercial-scale vegetable grower and lover. And while pairing wine to vegetarian cuisines opens a world of exciting flavours, it’s not without its challenges. Here’s a quick guide to make food and wine magic from garden to vineyard to table. Winter squash is a real treat at the table, whether in a heart-warming soup, simply roasted, or in a main dish like Chef Kelly’s risotto at Aura. The natural sweetness of the squash, and other root vegetables like carrots and beets, pose a challenge that is well met with rich, oaked Chardonnay. Upper Bench Winery, on the gorgeous Naramata Bench in B.C.’s Okanagan Valley, produces a Chardonnay with the right mix of richness, ripe tree-fruit flavours, carefully balanced oak and enough fresh acidity to pair seamlessly with root veggies. Chef Walt’s cauliflower dish at Il Caminetto, and other veggie dishes accented with full-flavoured cheese or herbs, benefit from a savoury white wine, such as Villa Sparina Gavi di Gavi. This unique white hails from Piedmont in northwest Italy, from the region of Gavi and is produced from the Gavi grape. It is less about being a fruit-forward wine, and expresses herb-tinged peach and pineapple notes with an underlying salty minerality that begs for another sip, and another bite. Mushroom dishes work beautifully with so many wines, notably reds that play off their earthy profile. Pinot Noir works well here, and Meyer Family Vineyards in the Okanagan consistently produces some of B.C.’s best. Young, fruity versions bring out the mushrooms, while aged wines can echo some of the umami-laden, or savoury, characteristics on the plate. Like mushroom dishes, tomato-based dishes can be savoury too but are also high in acidity. To pair successfully, match like with like, and try a higher acid Italian red. Brancaia “Tre,” from Tuscany, blends the classic grape from Chianti, Sangiovese, known for its natural acidity, with Merlot and Cabernet from the Tuscan coast. It is full bodied and bold enough to handle the most intense dishes and will even satisfy any carnivores at your table. —Samantha Rahn is the Fine Wine Ambassador for Select Wines, 2013 VIWF Sommelier of the Year, and longtime Whistler/Pemberton local. W


8:16

Elevate your dining experience tonight. Showcasing signature seasonings, a masterful use of flame, and the finest quality, locally-sourced Canadian beef, game and seafood, The Grill Room promises evening fine dining beyond the traditional Whistler steak house. Intimate. Personal. Absolutely unforgettable. Your table is waiting.

VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER/DINING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 604 938 8000 OR BOOK ONLINE WITH OPENTABLE.COM

AT FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER


Indian cuisine that uses a palette of flavours ~ you’ll feel as if you’re halfway around the world! Open 7 days a week for Lunch & Dinner

Join us for Brunch, Après or Dinner!

NEW IN THE HILTON WHISTLER RESORT Overlooking Mountain Square, Whistler Village | 604-932-9900

Check out our website for more information www.themexicancorner.ca 12-4340 Sundial Crescent • 604 962 4450

www.indianmasalabistro.com

OPEN LATE

Mon. to Sat. till 3 a.m. Sun. till 2 a.m.

(604) 932-0410 4368 Main Street

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casual dining

A TOAST TO BREAD MAKERS WHISTLER FINDS NEW WAYS TO PRESENT AN OLD STAPLE

STORY BY GAIL J O HNS O N

T

COURTESY BRED

HERE ARE FEW FOODS IN THE WORLD that are as commonplace and comforting than bread. It’s also one of the world’s oldest foods, the act of breaking it a cornerstone of human connection. Behind this seemingly simple staple, however, is a highly scientific process involving microorganisms and fermentation. Even the smallest variation in temperature or time can lead to wildly different outcomes—or total flops. As humble as a loaf may be, bread-making is often best left to the experts. Whistler is home to several bakeries that excel in the art and science of bread. Here are a few to check out the next time you’re searching for freshly baked sustenance. >>

SOURDOUGH POPPYSEED BOULES FROM BReD, MADE FROM RED FIFE, SPELT, RYE AND BREAD FLOURS.

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DAVID BUZZARD

200 DEGREES

200 DEGREES BAKERY

BAKERY OWNER

AFTER NEARLY SEVEN YEARS IN I.T., 200 DEGREES Bakery founder Jen Park pursued her dream of a culinary career. She studied at Vancouver Community College before working as assistant pastry chef at Bearfoot Bistro. “In my training, I got to do chocolate work, modern pastry work, plated desserts, and so on, but I always loved bread baking the most,” Park says. “I feel a connection to Mother Earth, and in this busy and distracting, noisy world, I can connect myself to something very simple that is the essence of life. It also gives me a freedom to express myself.” Park uses organic Canadian flour to make several types of sourdough, such as kamut, walnut, and rye, fermenting, soaking, and sprouting the grains. She also makes buttermilk brioche, focaccia, bagels, and pretzel buns. (200 Degrees makes scones, muffins, sandwiches, and sweets, too.) Based in Function Junction, 200 Degrees supplies its sourdough breads to Whistler’s Four Seasons Resort and Residences, Brew Creek Centre, and Red Door Bistro. It has a partnership with Pemberton’s Rootdown Organic Farm, which allows people to subscribe to loaves through their weekly CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) box. Park also owns and operates the Bread Bunker Café at Nesters Market. Four Seasons’ executive chef Eren Guryel says the hotel has been purchasing bread from 200 Degrees since it opened

JEN PARK PULLS LOAVES OF BREAD FROM THE OVEN THAT ARE DESTINED FOR THE FOUR SEASONS HOTEL.

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in 2016. “The focaccia she produces makes the best delicate sandwiches,” Guryel says. “The brioche is our mainstay for French toast. The buttermilk adds a tartness that really comes through in the dish. “I like to support the local small-business community as much as we can,” he adds. “She has certainly mastered her craft, and that’s something to be celebrated.”

BReD W H AT W A S S U P P O S E D T O B E A S I X - M O N T H snowboarding holiday has turned into a six-year stay for Ed and Natasha Tatton, the husband-and-wife duo behind BReD, Whistler’s first and only fully plant-based bakery. Originally from the United Kingdom, the vegan couple wants to rekindle Canadians’ love of bread while proving that baked goods don’t need butter to be delicious. You’ll likely smell the aromas of loaves, like rye sourdough or walnut-fig, wafting out of their Creekside shop long before you step inside, the bread made daily by hand in small batches. “For North Americans, bread has gotten a bit of a bad rap over the years,” Ed says. “For us, we’re doing sourdough the traditional way: fermenting grains and soaking them overnight. We don’t add any yeast or preservatives. It’s a long process, but it means it’s a healthier food that you can eat and enjoy and not feel bloated.” >>


LOCALS’ FAVOURITE SINCE 1982!

Join us for après at Whistler’s most iconic bar, just steps from the Whistler Village Gondola Crowd around the cozy fireplace, taking in the mountain views while enjoying Daily Happy Hour Specials to start your après off right! Amazing Appetizers, Big Screen TVs & Pool Tables Breakfast, Lunch, Après & Dinner

HILTON WHISTLER RESORT & SPA t: 1 604 932 1982 4050 Whistler Way

hiltonwhistler.com

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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WHISTLER PUREBREAD MANAGERS ALISHEA MARTINS AND BARBARA MURAWSKA WITH A SELECTION OF FRESH LOAVES OF BREAD.

DAVID BUZZARD

“WE STARTED MAKING THE KIND OF BREAD WE LIKED TO EAT OURSELVES. WE HAD TROUBLE FINDING BREAD WE REALLY LOVED.” —Mark Lamming

BReD goes back to basics by using simple ingredients: its sourdough, for instance, consists of organic Canadian flour (most of it from B.C.), salt from Vancouver Island Salt Co., and water. Rather than add flavours for other selections, the Tattons turn to ancient grains such as einkorn, emmer, and red fife, milling some grains themselves and sprouting grains in house. Then there are cinnamon rolls, cookies, and scones. “There’s an old-fashioned stigma around vegetarian or vegan food being not as tasty as animal-based food,” Natasha says. “We feel it’s not necessary to use animal products. A lot of our customers are omnivores or don’t even realize we’re plant-based at first.” BReD is located in Creekside. The organic sourdough can also be found at the Velvet Underground in Function Junction and Ecologyst in the Village.

PUREBREAD WITH MORE THAN 150 TYPES OF SWEET AND savoury items on Purebread’s menu, in addition to about two dozen kinds of bread, it’s hard to believe that the Whistler-born bakery started a decade ago out of Paula and Mark Lamming’s home kitchen. Friends of the married couple were making and 90

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selling balsamic vinegars and needed bread to give out samples. “We started making the kind of bread we liked to eat ourselves,” Mark says. “We had trouble finding bread we really loved.” As their friends’ business took off, blossoming into a range of balsamic vinegars called Nonna Pia’s, the Lammings found themselves getting more and more requests for their sourdough. They began offering it at farmers’ markets throughout the Sea to Sky region and couldn’t keep up with demand. Purebread’s Function Junction location was its first; it now has outlets in Whistler Village and Vancouver’s Gastown, Kitsilano, and Mount Pleasant neighbourhoods. Other outlets are in the works, including one at Vancouver International Airport. Variety is what sets Purebread apart. Besides white and whole-wheat sourdough, its bread selections include Walnut Raisin, Hazelnut Fig, Chocolate Cherry, Cranberry Ginger, Cheddar Jalapeno, and Lavender Rosemary. When people step into Purebread and see so many different forms of deliciousness on display, their eyes widen. Mark jokes: “It’s what we call the Willy Wonka effect.” W


AVOCADO Fries Featuring a fresh variety of share friendly snacks and entrées, the new après-style menu from Grill & Vine will satisfy your cravings and give you energy to pursue your next Whistler adventure! Available daily for lunch and dinner at Grill & Vine and the FireRock Lounge, located at The Westin Resort & Spa, Whistler

reservations via opentable.ca or call 604.935.4344 and visit grillandvinewhistler.com for our latest dining offers

YUKON BREAKFAST

BY SNOWMOBILE

SPROATT CABIN, CALLAGHAN VALLEY

604-938-1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM CARLETON LODGE, MOUNTAIN SQUARE

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5:56 PM The moment you realized what it meant to savour every Whistler experience. After an incredible day exploring the slopes, come savour a uniquely Whistler winter experience at The Mallard Lounge and Terrace. In a spectacular setting, enjoy signature cocktails made from house-infused spirits with ingredients from our rooftop garden. Relax to the soothing sounds of live entertainment that have created a legendary following among visitors and locals alike. Casual, refined and nestled at the base of Blackcomb Mountain, Fairmont Chateau Whistler’s Mallard Lounge is one of Whistler’s most iconic destinations.

OPEN DAILY FROM 11:00AM - MIDNIGHT OPEN DAILY FROM 11:00 AM - MIDNIGHT FORDRINKS LUNCH, DINNER AND DRINKS FOR LUNCH, DINNER AND VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER/DINING


village vibe

APRÈS-DINNER RAISE A GLASS TO THE EUROPEAN TRADITION OF AFTER-DINNER DRINKS

STO RY BY J O EL BARD E

A AND SPA FOOD-ANDBEVERAGE MANAGER TIM KOSHUL POSES WITH A MUG OF HIS WIFE'S GRANDMOTHER'S SWEDISH GLOGG AT THE CINNAMON BEAR BAR & GRILLE.

DAVID BUZZARD

HILTON WHISTLER RESORT

S ANY GOOD FOODIE knows, dining is an experience. So why not draw it out and savour every moment? A post-meal drink can be the perfect cap to a delicious dinner. You can go old-school with a traditional digestif—those strong after-dinner drinks, designed to aid in digestion and help settle a full stomach. Think sherry, schnapps or port. Or try something warm with an international flare. The key is to have a little fun after your meal. Try something new. Relish in the unknown. And just see where the night takes you. >>

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THE CHALET, AT FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER GOLF CLUB

SCHNAPPS AT THE CHALET O P E N D U R I N G W I N T E R M O N T H S O N LY, The Chalet is the perfect place to drink traditional schnapps. "In North America, schnapps is known as a sweet beverage that you will do as a shot in a bar,” says manager Nicholas Humphreys, explaining an important distinction. “But they are actually supposed to be drank as an after-dinner beverage—as a digestif.” Located in the clubhouse of the Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Club, The Chalet specializes in fondue, serving a cheese and broth version in a beautiful, fire-lit environment. Following dinner, staff wheel a handmade liveedge “schnapps wagon” around the restaurant, offering guests a wide variety of post-dinner drinks, including pear brandy, raspberry framboise, and a sour cherry brandy. All are made in B.C.’s Okanagan Valley, putting a local twist on a timeless European drink. "They’re all made from organic, hand-picked fruit," says Humphreys. And the drinks are a big hit with customers. "People love them,” he adds. “They will go from not wanting an after-dinner drink to being all about it—and wanting to try two or three different flavours." 94

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NOTHING SAYS WINTER LIKE MULLED WINE— and the Cinnamon Bear Bar & Grille is well known for its version. Based off manager Tim Koshul’s (Swedish) mother-in-law’s recipe, the drink—known as Swedish glogg—is flavoured with ginger, cardamom pods, grated orange peel and sugar. According to Koshul, glogg is a huge hit with the eatery’s European clientele. "The feedback I get is that it tastes like winter at home,” he says. “It's very European." The drink, moreover, has a direct link to Swedish Afterski, the restaurant’s legendary weekly après-ski party, which takes place on Tuesdays during the ski season. Koshul had heard about Sweden’s hardcharging après scene for years and wanted to bring something similar to Whistler. "I was asking every Swede I met for years, 'Do you know any DJs or bands that are here for the season? I’d like to do Swedish après-ski,’” he recalls. Then he spotted a group of young men at Cinnamon Bear—drinking glogg. So he asked them too. It turns out they were indeed Swedes— and the perfect people to launch the event. Asked to describe the parties, Koshul puts it simply: "It's like going to a night club or disco in the afternoon." But even if an afternoon disco isn’t your scene, try a glass of glogg after your meal and channel your inner Swede.

FIREROCK LOUNGE

AN OLD FASHIONED (WITH A TWIST) Over at the FireRock Lounge, bar manager Anthony Fleming recommends a classic Old Fashioned—with a FireRock twist. The cocktail is made with beeswaxwashed bourbon, Crème de Cacao, chocolate bitters, Firewater (a habanero extract), and Demerara syrup. "It is a traditional Old Fashioned, so it is quite booze forward," says Fleming, adding that the beeswax-washed bourbon gives the drink a “velvety texture” and ups the viscosity. Moreover, the chocolate bitters and firewater are married together in a “chili, chocolatey” kind of way, giving the drink a “dessert-like feel.” The drink has been on the restaurant’s menu for years, tweaked to perfection over time. Fleming says that ordering a post-dinner drink is more and more common at the restaurant. “People are having an aperitif before their meal, and then they are having something desserty, or a digestif, after." The practice, he adds, has a long tradition across the pond. “If you've ever been to Italy or France, they really know how to celebrate dining,” he remarks. “And one of the ways they do that is by pairing drinks and food, and really making an experience of the evening." W

DAVID BUZZARD

SWEDISH GLOGG

DAVID BUZZARD

COURTESY FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER

CINNAMON BEAR BAR & GRILLE


ADD SOME SPIRIT

TO YOUR NIGHT

4429 Sundial Place | 604.932.5151 | kegsteakhouse.com

OLD FRIENDS, NEW VIBES Special Guest DJs bringing you House, Top 40 and Classic Hits all winter long.

www.tommyswhistler.com @tommyswhistler For VIP Table Reservations, Corporate Bookings and Guest List Inquiries 4204 Village Square, Whistler | 604.902.6090

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shopping whistler

WINTER WISHLIST Whistler might be best known as a ski town, but its shopping scene is nothing to be scoffed at. From high-end fashions to hightech snow gear, Whistler retailers have you covered this winter— especially when it comes to timeless, handcrafted local goods. Here are a few of our favourite items to consider adding to your winter wish list. — Megan Lalonde

LARGE BANFF BAG If you came to Whistler on holiday and find yourself with a few more souvenirs than can comfortably fit in your suitcase, don’t fret—we’ve all been there. Thankfully, Roots’ iconic leather Banff Bag, available in black and tribe, serves as the perfect extra carry-on, or alternatively, the perfect overnight bag for a weekend trip to Whistler. Handcrafted in Canada, the leather bag features a large main compartment, interior pockets, a luggage tag and an adjustable, removable shoulder strap. The beautiful Italian leather will only soften with age. $548

THE SUPER PUFF Winter’s trendiest jacket (as spotted on Kendall Jenner, Hailey Bieber and Bella Hadid) is back this season and available in a variety of colours, lengths and finishes, including matte, glossy and neon. This garment, from Vancouver-based retailer Aritzia, is filled with 100 per cent responsiblysourced goose down and engineered to deliver warmth to -30 C. $250

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MOUNTAIN PENDANT Take Whistler’s snowy peaks with you wherever you go with this stunning creation from Keir Fine Jewellery. Crafted from sterling silver and gorgeous rose gold plating, this pendent depicts Whistler’s winter alpenglow, set with a natural Canadian diamond. This piece will be a beloved addition to your jewelry collection long after this winter’s snow melts. $275 (Also available as drop earrings for $500)


Shopping Areas Nesters

UPPER VILLAGE

Village North

WHISTLER VILLAGE

cou

ver

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

FUNCTION JUNCTION

To Va n

HERO 8 GOPRO Whether you’re shredding Whistler’s steepest slopes or just looking to get as many peaks in the shot as possible, GoPro’s newly released HERO8 is one of the most versatile tools on the market to capture every second spent outside this winter. Available at McCoos, the tiny, waterproof action camera features a streamlined design, while swapping mounts takes just seconds, thanks to built-in folding fingers. Features include voice control, live streaming and three microphones with advanced wind noise reduction, as well as game-changing HyperSmooth 2.0 stabilization. $529.99

OAKLEY FLIGHT DECK GOGGLES If visibility is a priority for you on the slopes, look no further than these Oakley goggles available at Can-Ski, featuring Prizm Snow High Intensity pink lenses. The goggles’ design was inspired by fighter pilots’ helmet visors, with a large-sized fit intended to maximize the field of view. Oakley’s Prizm™ lens technology is based on “decades of colour science research” to maximize contrast and visibility. $245

Whistler Village is the hub of

activity at the base of the mountains. A pedestrian-only paradise, it offers over 200 stores, galleries, restaurants and bars.

Village North is centred around

Whistler Marketplace, which offers a supermarket, liquor store and many fine shops and amenities.

Upper Village, situated at the

base of Blackcomb Mountain, is another walking-only area with many wonderful stores, restaurants and galleries.

Nesters is just two minutes north SPYDER BOYS’ MINI LEADER SKI JACKET Invest in this jacket that will suit your little skier for seasons to come, courtesy of Spyder’s room to grow feature—it allows sleeves to extend an additional 1.5 inches when stitch is released. Available at Mountain Kids Outfitters, the jacket also features a removable helmet-compatible hood with an inner hood gaiter. $239.95 >>

of Whistler Village and offers a variety of shops and restaurants, with a liquor store, grocery store and restaurants.

Rainbow Plaza, a five-minute

drive north of the Village, has a grocery store, liquor store, coffee shop, gas station and more.

Whistler Creekside, a

five-minute drive south of the Village, is a shopping area near the base of Whistler Mountain.

Function Junction is just 10

minutes south of Whistler Village and offers hardware, organic groceries, breweries, bakeries and many more shops and services.


shopping whistler ARC’TERYX FISSION SV GLOVE Nothing ruins a stormy ski day quite like freezing hands. The Arc’teryx Fission SV glove, available in unisex sizing, makes sure that won’t be an issue. After all, SV does stand for “severe weather.” Featuring insulation and GORE-TEX weatherproofing, Ar’teryx’s warmest glove will keep your paws toasty while maintaining the durability and versatility you’ve come to expect from the brand, whether your outdoor pursuits include skiing, snowboarding or other winter sports. $230

PATAGONIA MEN’S ISTHMUS QUILTED SHIRT JACKET IN INDUSTRIAL GREEN In Whistler, style is just as important as function. That’s why this versatile, wind-and weather-resistant shirt jacket from Patagonia is the perfect layer to have on hand when the lifts shut down. This piece is lined with high-pile fleece, features a recycled nylon shell and, like other Patagonia products, is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. $209

X-TREME ORGANICS WINTER ESSENTIALS Treat the effects of winter’s harsh conditions with X-Treme Organics Winter Essentials. The local brand’s products provide “X-treme” moisture for climate-ravaged skin and instant, chemical-free relief from sunburn, windburn, cracked lips, split fingertips, blisters, aching feet and more. Each product contains only natural and certified organic ingredients without fillers, sulfates, parabens, chemical preservatives, GMOs or pesticide residues. Find these products at most major retailers around town, including the Roundhouse, Salomon, and The North Face, as well as Ecologyst, Get the Goods and more. LIPS Balm $8.95, RELIEF on-the-go moisturizing and cleansing face stick, $18.95, Winter Balm $8.95 per 7-gram tin

98

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

KERF WOOD BOW TIE IN WALNUT Head to Get The Goods in Creekside for a variety of carefully curated treasures from around the world and right here in Whistler. Though Whistler style tends to remain on the more casual side of the spectrum, every once in a while the opportunity arises to get dressed up. When it does, strike the perfect balance with these unique, handmade wooden bow ties made by Kerf Accessories. Every wooden bow tie is created by hand from reclaimed wood from British Columbia and comes with an adjustable, one-size-fits-all leather neck piece. $105 >>


WHISTLER'S OUTDOOR STORE FOR KIDS & TEENS

We've got

ING EVERYTnH eed for

your kids e an awesome tim in Whistler!

FIND US IN MOUNTAIN SQUARE, JUST STEPS FROM LULULEMON | WWW.MOUNTAINKIDS.CA | 604 932 2115


shopping whistler

DALE OF NORWAY 140TH ANNIVERSARY MASCULINE SWEATER Head to Amos & Andes, Whistler’s favourite sweater shop for 25 years, to get your hands on this Dale of Norway heritage piece, released in celebration of the brand’s 140th anniversary. Comprised of 100 per cent long-lasting Norwegian wool, this classic sweater pays tribute to the Norwegian knitting tradition with braided side panels and Norwegian-made pewter buttons. The sweater proudly displays a Norwegian eight-petal rose combined with a pattern from the Setesdal male folk costume, as well as the Roman numerals for 140 discreetly integrated into the design. $379.99

MANITOBAH MUKLUKS SNOW OWL GRAIN LEATHER WATERPROOF BOOTS Mukluks are some of Canada’s original winter boots (and some of the softest, coziest footwear you can slip into after a full day in ski boots). Today, this Indigenous-owned company is continuing to build upon the tradition their ancestors began thousands of years ago with their carefully crafted boots. Available at Soles of Whistler, these mukluks are designed from sheepskin shearling, grain leather and rabbit fur and boast complete waterproofing to a height of four inches from the bottom. $300 >>

Located at the base of the Whistler Village Gondola 604.932.4100 O P E N

100 WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

L A T E


Fresh Produce Fresh Bakery Organic Food Delicous Seafood Specialty Meats

Bulk Foods Delivery Service Friendly Pharmacist Nutritional Advisors Health Foods

Getthe theGoods Goodsisisan anemporium emporiumofof Get wonderthat thatoffers offersover over3,000 3,000products products wonder thatare aresourced sourcedglobally. globally. that

Where the Locals Shop! Located 1km north of Whistler Village at 7019 Nesters Rd. Phone: 604-932-3545 Pharmacy: 604-905-0429 Save time by shopping online:

www.nestersmarket.com

2018

Open Every Day 8am – 10pm (Pharmacy 9am –7pm)

Whistler’s only fashion footwear store LOCATED IN THE WESTIN

shop.getthegoods.ca shop.getthegoods.ca @get_the_goods_whistler @get_the_goods_whistler 110-4090 Whistler Way 604.905.0036

solesofwhistler.com

604-935-7878 604-935-7878 210-2059Lake LakePlacid PlacidRoad, Road,Creekside CreeksideVillage Village 210-2059 WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

101


shopping whistler

NESTERS LIQUOR STORE - GLASS VODKA Having trouble deciding between vodka and wine? Why not give Glass Vodka a try. This smooth, award-winning spirit is crafted at Glass Distillery, just over the border in Seattle, Washington, and distilled from grapes harvested from the rich soils of the Pacific Northwest. It’s not just what’s on the inside that counts, either—the artisanal spirit is contained by a 100 per cent crystal bottle artistically designed with a one-of-a-kind stopper. $89.99

W camplifestyle.ca camplifestyle.ca

1066 Millar Creek Rd, Function Junction

Whistler’s Premier Shopping Centre

Grocery Store

Whistler Kitchen Works The Royal Taste of India

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER’S PREMIER SHOPPING CENTRE. OFFERING A VARIETY OF SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES, RESTAURANTS AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. Owned and Managed by

102 WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

www.headwaterprojects.ca


Function Junction

accessories ltd.

It’s not what you need...

Discover the Locals’ Secret 8 minutes south of the Village

It’s what you want.

We are purebread, a nice little bakery in Function Junction. Our aim is a simple one: to make really great bread and great tasty treats. Open 7 days 8.30am - 5pm

Proudly supporting local designers.

Also visit us at our Village location on Olympic Plaza, open 7 days 8am - 6pm Follow us on Twitter @purebreadwhis

1-1040 Millar Creek Road

1

1-604-938-3013 function junction

functionalpie.ca

2

purebread.ca

111-1085 MILLAR CREEK DR. 604-962-3141

Whistler Town Plaza 604.905.6290

Whistler's first and only distillery! Superior Craft Vodka & Gin. Tours and tastings by appt.

3

montis@montisdistilling.com

4

Award-winning craft beers, ice-cold off-sales, special events, beer-inspired food & live music every Friday from 6-9pm TAPHOUSE HOURS: Sun–Wed, noon–8pm Thurs –Sat, 11am–10pm BREWERY TOURS: Every Day @ 2:30 & 4:00pm 1045 Millar Creek Road 604.962.8889 whistlerbeer.com

5

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604-932-7202 www.whistlersweatershop.com

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

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the handcrafted & discovered

A Charming & Unique Selection of Gifts & Kitchenware Dinnerware • Linens • Gadgets Candles • Glassware Practical Kitchen Accessories & More

a small gathering of design companies that make beautiful products with a mindful and fair trade philosophy, emphasizing the unique lifestyle of the pacific northwest

en& VisWitoorrsks stvoleriter ofKitLoch Whi cals A Fa Since 1994

ketplace 604-938-1110

Located in Whistler’s Mar

located in the fairmont chateau and 122-4340 lorimer road, whistler

104 WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

www.3singingbirds.com info@3singingbirds.com


2018

services Directory

To advertise in the Services Directory, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

Everything you need for your Health, Beauty and Convenience, right in the heart of Whistler Village

Voted Best Dental Clinic

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome For appointments call: 604-938-1550 #317 – 2063 Lake Placid Rd., Whistler (next to Creekside Market)

Prestigious Beauty Boutique Full Service Pharmacy offering Travel Vaccinations & Medication Reviews Prescription Deliveries and much more Whistler Village (near The Keg & Movie Theatre)

604-905-5666 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

PROVEN RESULTS –

Whistler Reception Services Whistler Reception Services Care & Resort Property & Resort Property Care

I’m with you every step of the way Specializing in Residential and Investment property in Whistler

Carolyn Hill, ASSOCIATE BROKER PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

www.whistlerreception.com info@whistlerreception.com 604-932-0990

Unique Central Check-in & Concierge

Delivering the Dream – Whistler

Your in-resort contact for guests, owners and managers

email: chill@whistlerbuyer.com www.whistlerbuyer.com

MAKING YOUR GUEST EXPERIENCE EXCEPTIONAL SINCE 2004

cel: 604-907-0770

Whistler Reception Services & Resort Property Care

www.whistlerreception.com | info@whistlerreception.com A unique central check-in, concierge service

604-966-0999

and in-resort contact for guests, owners and

Voted Whistler’s Best Realtor

managers of vacation rentals and Whistler properties. www.whistlerreception.com

cross country connection

Rentals Skills Tours

Whistler Reception Services & Resort Property Care

Private Whistler and Vancouver Transfers and Tours

A unique central check-in, concierge service and in-resort contact for guests, owners and managers of vacation rentals and Whistler properties. www.whistlerreception.com

whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

@luxurytransport www.luxbus.com 604.522.8484

SERVING WHISTLER FOR OVER YEARS

25

massage clinic & spa

CLINIC SERVICES OFFERED:

Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Acupressure, Therapeutic Massge, Reflexology, Aromotherapy & Hot Stone Massage Registered Massage Therapy, Counselling, Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Advanced Environ Skin Care & Micro Needling INNOPEN are available upon request

www.bluehighways.ca • 604-938-0777 • #206 - 4368 Main St., Market Pavilion

WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

105


SCENE in whistler

COURTESY WHISTLER BLACKCOMB FOUNDATION

ROB PERRY

Back in Whistler again, actor Jason Mamoa hit the Longhorn patio for some après fun in December.

Former Olympians Rob Boyd and Britt Janyk, and Whistler Mountain Ski Club executive director Mark Tilston at the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation’s Havana de la Noches Mountaintop Gala, in March at the Roundhouse Lodge.

The Three Tenors performed at Whistler Olympic Plaza on Canada Day, pictured here with Whistler mayor Jack Crompton.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

COURTESY WHISTLER FILM FESTIVAL

Juno award winning musician Barney Bentall (second from right) and world-champion freestyle skier Lauralee Bowie (second from left) attended a Zero Ceiling fundraiser at Quattro in September.

COURTESY RMOW

CATHERINE POWER-CHARTRAND

KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN — YOU NEVER KNOW WHO YOU MIGHT SEE!

Juno-award winning children’s entertainer Norman Foote delighted students at Myrtle Philip Community School this fall.

Henry goes to Washington! Whistler Mountain avalanche rescue dog Henry, star of Superpower Dogs, travelled to Washington for the Smithsonian premiere of the movie.

A black bear made an appearance at the Canstar booth during the Whistler Chamber of Commerce golf tournament, on the Fairmont course in May.

106 WHISTLER MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 2019/2020

Musician, humanitarian and filmmaker Michael Franti gave a free performance at Main Stage Skiers Plaza during the World Ski and Snowboard Festival.

DAN FALLOON

Emil Johansson of Sweden won the Red Bull Joyride at Crankworx Whistler in August with gravity-defying tricks.

SHELLEY ACKERMAN

CATHERINE POWER-CHARTRAND

Professional freeride mountain biker and ex World Cup Team Canada snowboard racer Brett Tippie, second from left, at the Longhorn in August, celebrating Crankworx.

COURTESY BEARFOOT BISTRO

ROB PERRY

IAN BUNBURY

Canadian media personality George Stroumboulopoulos and actor Tantoo Cardinal at the Whistler Film Festival.

Olympic legacy Jon Montgomery—best known as the Olympic skeleton champion who celebrated his gold-medal win by swigging beer from a pitcher on Whistler's Village Stroll in 2010—went for a repeat performance while hosting the Bearfoot Bistro World Oyster Invitational and Bloody Caesar Battle at Cornucopia. W


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Our Strength is in Our Numbers #

1

in Agents

#

1

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#

1

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This information is deemed to be accurate and is based on Whistler Listing System year to date statistics for 2018 & 2019.

Profile for Whistler Publishing

Whistler Magazine Winter 2020  

Whistler's premier publication since 1980

Whistler Magazine Winter 2020  

Whistler's premier publication since 1980