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INSIDE: FALSE CREEK’S DIRTY SECRET

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More Summer Fun We Found It! Vancouver’s Best Ice Cream The Other Roller Coaster That’s Built to Thrill The Best Campsite in B.C.

JULY/AUGUST 2016 // $4.99

Beachwear Looks You’ll Love

PM40068973

It’s

Patio S e a s o n! O ur 5 Faves

! t o H 24 Ways to Have the Most Fun Under the Sun


DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER YALETOWN ELEVATED ABOVE THE PARK. SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTS.

VISIT OUR PRESENTATION CENTRE AT 1149 HAMILTON ST NOW OPEN DAILY 12-6 604 801 6861

8xonthepark.com EMERY BARNES PARK RICHARDS STREET

HOMER STREET PRESENTATION CENTRE 1149 HAMILTON ST HAMILTON STREET

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*THIS IS NOT AN OFFERING FOR SALE. ANY SUCH OFFERING CAN ONLY BE MADE WITH A DISCLOSURE STATEMENT. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ARTIST’S RENDERINGS AND MAPS ARE REPRESENTATIONS ONLY AND MAY NOT BE ACCURATE. E.&O.E.

8X ON THE PARK offers a rare opportunity to live with an expansive park just outside your door. From this peaceful parkside setting you’re just steps from the best of the city: destination dining, nightlife, cafes, shopping and cultural venues. With a SkyFitness Centre, SkyLounge, 24/7 concierge at your service, all homes complete with air-conditioning, and the finest features and finishes, 8X will change how you view downtown living.


Step into summer with this oh-sotropical Native Verona shoe. Pg 57

#J UST BE T T E R

JULY / AUGUST V O L U M E 4 9 // N U M B E R 6

DE PA RT M E N T S

City

The pipeline war rages on; local culture that rocks; the intersection that first defined Kitsilano; Vancouver’s water addiction; the many meanings of affordability. Pg 11

Taste

Two new knife stores hit the DTES (and chefs rejoice); determining, once and for all, where to find the best ice cream cone in Vancouver; why white port is having a moment; and Cafe Orso’s menu makeover is a revelation. Pg 21

Play

A roller coaster in the heart of the forest that will get your heart pounding; why the picturesque town of Lillooet should be your next weekend getaway; beachwear looks you’re sure to love. Pg 55

feature story PG 31

EXTRAS

DAVID NIDDRIE

SU M M E R OF YOU We’ve plotted out the ultimate Vancouver summer to-do list, from paddleboard biking (what?!) to jogging in the buff. Plus, our topranked patios, Grouse Grind alternatives, and swimming holes to help make the most of every moment of our favourite season

ALSO

Splash Zone

As coastal creatures, we’re intimately connected to water. So this issue, we’re diving in and exploring the political and social ramifications of our water obsession. When the drought comes, will Vancouver be ready? Pg 44

Vancouver Specialist Columnist Charles Demers explains why last year’s fires could be a smoke signal for what lies ahead. Pg 58

ON THE COVER

j Photo by Aaron Dyer

VA N M A G . C O M J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

3


Client: C|Prime / Size: 4.6” X 4.9” / CMYK / Vancouver Magazine

Editorial Director Anicka Quin Art Director Paul Roelofs Senior Editor Trevor Melanson Assistant Art Director Jenny Reed

A NEW YORK ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE

Assistant Editor Julia Dilworth

IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER

Online Coordinator Kaitlyn Gendemann

Reflected in its carefully crafted menu, C|Prime puts a premium on locally sourced and curated ingredients. Using the finest cuts of BC-raised meats, fresh seafood, vegetables and cheeses paired with innovative, rich sauces and salts, the restaurant offers incomparable dishes that showcase both Italian and New York inspired flavours.

Videographer Mark Philps Contributing Writers Jessica Barrett, Charlie Demers, Neal McLennan, Fiona Morrow, Amanda Ross, D.B. Thompson, Eagranie Yuh

Located in the Century Plaza Hotel

Contributing Photographers and Artists Eydís Einarsdóttir, Clinton Hussey, Evaan Kheraj, Joe McKendry (contributor illustrations), Andrew Querner, Carlo Ricci, John Sinal, Martin Tessler, Milos Tosic, Luis Valdizon

1015 Burrard Street Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y5

Editorial Interns Dominika Lirette, Willem Thomas

T (604) 684 3474 F (604) 682 5790

W W W. C P R I M E . C A

Art Intern Megan Patrick Editorial Email mail@vanmag.com

tled-3 1

2016-06-08 4:15 PM

Vancouver Office Suite 560, 2608 Granville St. Vancouver, B.C., V6H 3V3 604-877-7732

OLD WORLD ELEGANCE...NEW WORLD EDGE!

Saturn 2013

Signature 2012

Look for our wines at your favourite wine shop or restaurant. Buy from our OnLine store: closdusoleil.ca Visit our tasting room: 2568 Upper Bench Rd, Keremeos, BC Open 7 days a week | 250-499-2831 @Closdusoleil

VANCOUVER MAGAZINE is published 10 times a year by Yellow Pages Homes Ltd. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the publisher’s written permission. Not responsible for unsolicited editorial material. Privacy Policy: On occasion, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened organizations whose product or service might interest you. If you prefer that we not share your name and address (postal and/or email), you can easily remove your name from our mailing lists by reaching us at any of the listed contact points. You can review our complete Privacy Policy at Vanmag.com. Indexed in the Canadian Magazine Index by Micromedia Ltd. and also in the Canadian Periodical Index. International standard serial no. ISSN 0380-9552. Canadian publications mail product sales agreement #40068973. Printed in Canada by Transcontinental Printing G.P. (LGM Graphics), 737 Moray St., Winnipeg, MB, R3J 3S9. All reproduction requests must be made to: COPIBEC (paper reproductions) 800-7172022, or CEDROM-SNi (electronic reproductions) 800-563-5665. Distributed by Coast to Coast Ltd.


SPONSORED REPORT

Summer

City Guide 2016 Explore Vancouver and discover its many adventures and activities.

Senior Sales Manager, Western Canada Edwin Rizarri Account Managers Deanna Bartolomeu, Judy Johnson Sales Coordinators Karina Platon, Theresa Tran Production Manager Lee Tidsbury Advertising Designer Swin Nung Chai Marketing & Events Manager Dale McCarthy Event Coordinator Laura Lilley

BARD ON THE BEACH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL June 3 to September 24 Four popular productions staged in modern theatre tents on the waterfront in Vanier Park. 2016 Season – The Merry Wives of Windsor, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, and Pericles. Reserved Seating - Tickets from $20 Bard Box Office: 604-739-0559 Festival details: bardonthebeach.org

Marketing Assistant Kaitlyn Lush Administrative Assistant Kaitlyn Gendemann

Vancouver Office Suite 560, 2608 Granville St. Vancouver, B.C., V6H 3V3 604-877-7732

Merry Wives of Windsor, 2016

ypnexthome.ca

MUSEUM OF VANCOUVER AT VANIER PARK

President Jacky Hill

Vancouver’s story begins here. Visit MOV to gain a greater understanding of the city’s history. Experience our feature exhibition: ALL TOGETHER NOW: Vancouver Collectors & Their Worlds, and explore our history galleries filled with local treasures, neon signs, and First Nations culture. Open 10am-5pm daily and 10am-8pm Thursdays & Fridays through Labour Day.

Director, National Sales & Channel Management, Lifestyle Nadine Starr

1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver 604-736-4431 | museumofvancouver.ca

Yellow Pages NextHome Head Office 500–401 The West Mall Etobicoke, Ontario, M9C 5J5 855-626-4200 Fax: 416-789-9705

THE FAIR AT THE PNE August 20-September 5 This year’s Fair at the PNE is full of returning favourites like SuperDogs and Craft Beer Fest plus NEW AND ONLY THIS YEAR shows and attractions like the marquee show UNBELIEVABLE: A Magical Experience, Angry Birds™ Universe Exhibition, Alien Worlds and Androids Exhibit and nightly concert acts. See this year’s exciting line-up of shows, attractions, food and rides at pne.ca!

National Sales Manager, Channel Management, Lifestyle Ian Lederer National Sales Director Moe Lalani Director of Content Susan Legge

U.S. Sales Representation, Media-Corps 1-866-744-9890 info@media-corps.com subscriptions enquiries 800-363-3272

Yellow Pages Digital and Media Solutions Ltd. Vice-President & Chief Publishing Officer Caroline Andrews


Letters

@VA N M AG

ROCKING ON THE ROOF

Tweet, message, ’gram, or email us at mail@vanmag.com— we love to hear from our readers!

Swiss retailer Strellson celebrated the launch of its new Vancouver store with a luxe rooftop party downtown

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N AT ION A

aft Cr A

BE ER

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Meet the pilsner that’ll make your summer (and 39 other refreshing pours) pg.37

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The Best Beer in the City

INT

Letters, etc. WA R DS·2

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T H E C R A F T B E E R AWA R D S I S S U E

I like Andy Yan’s practical and researched answers. Here’s the real info on what is happening with Vancouver.

term to affordable rentals in the future. —Anonymous

@sandyjamesplan

JUNE 2016

They earn less, owe more, and can only dream about owning a home. Is it any wonder that Vancouver’s young and educated are leaving town for good? Pg. 53

Great article. Employers want everything but your left kidney and only want to pay $14/hour. @themsteri

YOUNG, SMART, GONE Re: “The Departed” cover story, June 2016 Eerily similar to #Auckland and #NZ. The brain drain is happening here in Van too, it seems. @sj_hitchings

Let free-market economics dictate as we always have. The West Coast of North America has a housing cost problem. Why are we any different? By building more condos, that will trickle down in the long

Thanks @jmv! for sharing this vintage Vancouver Magazine issue from 1977

ONLINE THIS MONTH

Find these web exclusives at vanmag.com CITY

OPINION

TASTE

#Design + friends + mesmerizing vistas of downtown #Vancouver at the stylish Strellson rooftop party. @FocalJourney

Fashionable and stylish with amazing views! @745 Thurlow rooftop #Strellsonrooftop party. @FredAboutTown

@Mike_Killeen @CTVNorma have fun on the roof. Models!

WHY YOUR VANCOUVER WAGE SUCKS

Q&A: Lauded urban planner Andy Yan tells us why Vancouver’s educated workers make less than everyone else in Canada.

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RACISM AND REAL ESTATE

As Prime Minister Trudeau apologizes for a horrendous act of racism in the past, are we creating the conditions for more of them in the future?

VA N M A G . C O M J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

VIETNAMESE IS REBORN ON MAIN STREET

Who knew hole-in-the-wall Pho Hoang would re-emerge as the restaurant to try this summer? We interview the brother-sister team behind upscale Anh and Chi.

ANH AND CHI: AMANDA OSTER

@CTVMcLaughlin


Picture life in Coal Harbour, Downtown Vancouver’s most iconic neighbourhood—steps from the legendary seawall, moments from Stanley Park. Out of this extraordinary setting rises Cardero by Bosa Properties: a limited collection of 119 bespoke luxury residences, raising the bar for architecture and innovation in Canada.

When you’re here, you’ve arrived.

AVAILABLE THIS SUMMER

bosaproperties.com

This is not an offering for sale. Cardero is developed by Bosa Properties (Cardero) Inc. Renderings, sketches, layouts and finishes are representational only. E&OE.


TULALIP MY GAME IS UNRIVALED LUXURY AND EXCITEMENT.

Indulge your senses, and escape to Washington’s premier gaming destination. Luxury and excitement combine to promise a n e xpe rie nc e truly more tha n a fe e ling This is My Tulalip.

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City

VANMAG .COM/CITY

LOCAL CULTURE THAT ROCKS / THE LONG-BEATING HEART OF KITSILANO / VANCOUVER’S WATER ADDICTION / THE MANY MEANINGS OF AFFORDABILIT Y

AT I S S U E

The Fight of the Century

MARK KLOTZ

k Protestors gather on Burnaby Mountain to oppose Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW ANY BETTER, you might think that the National Energy Board had rejected Kinder Morgan’s proposed expansion of its Trans Mountain pipeline project. After all, its May 19 decision found that any additional tanker traffic would have “significant adverse effects” on both the southern resident killer whale population and the aboriginal cultural use associated with it. More importantly, perhaps, the three-person panel reviewing the project noted that while the odds of a large spill from either the pipeline or any tanker that had been fed by it were “of very low probability,” it could not rule out a spill—or the consequences that would quite literally flow from one. And yet, despite those adverse effects, the NEB panel hearing the application ended up giving it their support—albeit with 157 conditions. Now, a new panel will spend the summer consulting with affected communities and interested parties on the

VA N M A G . C O M J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

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City

AT I S S U E

broader environmental impacts of the pipeline project, with a decision by the federal cabinet expected by the end of 2016. But for Rueben George, a ceremonial chief and spokesperson for the Tsleil-Waututh nation, those risks are intolerable for his community and the other First Nations who share the Salish Sea. “It’s not if a spill would happen, it’s when. That’s the biggest risk. That’s why we’re doing the work that we’re doing—we have to rehabilitate what we have.” What they have, he says, is an inlet that’s the foundation of their sense of identity, their cultural practice, and their traditional way of life—one George says they’ve been working to restore. “For the first time in 30 years, we’re going to have a clam harvest because we’re already cleaning our inlet.” The pipeline could also jeopardize the burgeoning salmon populations in the Indian River, ones whose annual counts have risen from 10,000 a decade ago to more than 10 million today. “It’s amazing what they’re doing, and the tankers counter that work.” That’s why, George says, the NEB’s recommendation doesn’t change the strategy of local (and potentially affected) First Nations. “I’m not worried about it. It’s work as usual. We’re going to continue to go to court and do everything we can to make sure this doesn’t happen.” Kai Nagata, the Dogwood Initiative’s communications director, is taking a different approach. He says he wasn’t surprised by the decision, noting that the Harper government’s 2012 move to vest final authority in the federal cabinet effectively neutered the NEB. “Even if it was a no, or a ‘go back and do more homework,’ the feds could still override that,” Nagata says. That’s why he’s not leaving it to the feds—or the province, for that matter. Instead, he wants to put the matter in the hands of British Columbians. “There are some

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VA N M A G . C O M J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 6

decisions that have decades-long consequences and trade-offs that should not be made by people who are operating on a four-year political cycle,” he says. “And this might be one of them.” His organization has relaunched its letbcvote.ca website and will begin collecting signatures of support for what he hopes is an eventual province-wide vote. “It’s a very high bar to cross,” Nagata says, “but we feel we’re better prepared than any group has been in B.C.” UBC political science professor Richard Johnston isn’t so sure. “I think the odds that they would successfully clear the qualification thresholds for an initiative on this one are pretty long,” he says. Indeed, the only initiative that’s met that threshold within the last 20 years was the one to kill the HST, a harmonization of the province’s sales tax with the federal GST—and that was the product of a bizarre alliance between former Socred premier Bill Vander Zalm and the organized labour movement. “Until the HST referendum, every earlier attempt didn’t even come close, and people basically gave up until the HST came along,” Johnston says. Still, despite those odds, Johnston thinks Dogwood has picked the right issue to run on. Never mind that the chance of a major tanker spill is, relatively speaking, negligibly low, or that many of the conditions imposed by the NEB relate to improved operational safety. “It’s really the fear of tanker spills that drives opinion in the Lower Mainland,” he says. Nagata, meanwhile, thinks giving that opinion a chance to express itself might actually be good for everyone involved, given that the current process hasn’t done any favours for either the proponents of the project or the politicians who are being forced to pick a side on it. “If you want a clear answer,” Nagata says, “that might be the way to do it.”—Max Fawcett

L O C A L C U LT U R E

READ Citizen City

Gregory Henriquez (one of last year’s Power 50) and Marya Cotten Gould have coauthored a book that examines progressive ways to develop Vancouver—ones that merge private interests with the greater good. If nothing else, it’ll give you something to say about real estate other than “Gee, why is it so expensive?” Available August 16

LISTEN White Lung Paradise

Local punk band White Lung have released their fourth album, Paradise, and going by the reviews (a solid 8.4 on Pitchfork and four stars in The Guardian), this one lives up to its title. And don’t be turned off by the genre—this is mellow punk, not D.O.A. $9.99

WATCH Rock of Ages

It’s a love story, it takes place in 1987, and it features the music of Twisted Sister, Journey, and Bon Jovi. What more could you ask for? As an added bonus, you get to spend the evening on Granville Island. Rock on. Granville Island Stage, June 16 to July 30; prices vary


THE 2016 BMW 7 SERIES. Driving Luxury.

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City

I N T E R S E C T ION S

*

West Fourth The numbered street plotted by CPR land commissioner Lauchlan Hamilton on Lot 526, a large area given to the CPR south of False Creek in 1886.

Northeast In 1910, two years after the streetcar line came in, the Canadian Bank of Commerce (now CIBC) built a grand, neoclassical bank to service the area. More recently, the heritage building has been home to Le Château and now Urban Outfitters.

Hamilton also decided every north-south street on this plot (spanning Heather to Vine) would be named after trees.

VINE

ARBUTUS

W 2nd

Northwest

W 3rd

WEST FOURTH

Southeast

YEW

Whether you love or loathe medium-density, mixeduse, eco-friendly, block-long developments, you can blame (or credit) the Capers Building for starting the trend. Built in 1993 and named for the original flagship tenant (bought by Whole Foods in 2007), the building’s Yew Street end now houses a Semperviva Yoga studio, among others.

Yew

W 5th

Southwest Home to Spa Ethos for many years, the building now houses Synergy BeauCare Clinic, which offers laser hair removal, facelifts, and spa treatments to help you feel your very best for your next jaunt around Kits—or to look your very best on the beach just five blocks down the street.

*

For 17 years, Kits Coffee served simple brews in an unpretentious setting. After it shut down in 2012 (with a Comic Sansfont announcement on its front door), 49th Parallel Coffee Roasters took over. Yes, it’s busy and flashy—but you’ll be too busy enjoying the salted caramel from Lucky’s Doughnuts inside to care.

In 1909, a new streetcar line connecting False Creek to the wilderness of Kitsilano opened up the west side of Vancouver to the masses—in particular, this business-friendly high point in Kits. The streetcar is long gone, but West Fourth Avenue and Yew Street have remained at the centre of commercial life in Kitsilano ever since. And just like the neighbourhood itself, the intersection’s makeup has evolved considerably. By D.B. THOMPSON

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ELINA GRESS

West Fourth and Yew


CenturyLink Field Event Center seattleartfair.com


City

T H E E X PL A I N E R

Super Soakers By ANDREW FINDLAY

Vancouverites love a luscious green lawn. It’s a hallmark of a city with a voracious thirst for water. It’s also why it could be difficult for us to meet some of the goals contained in the Greenest City 2020 Action Plan, which include a reduction in consumption by one-third from 2006 levels by 2020. In 2014, per capita daily water use was 483 litres, a figure that’s twice that of the average European city and a third more than they use in neighbouring Portland and Seattle.

SAME AS IT EVER WAS

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As far back as 1922, Ernest Cleveland, the architect of the Greater Vancouver Water District and its first chief commissioner following incorporation in 1926, called out Vancouver for its wasteful water ways. In a report, he estimated per capita water use in Vancouver at a whopping 175 to 200 gallons (796 to 909 litres) per day. For comparison, that’s more than three times what the citizens of Winnipeg were using.


Total water consumption (cubic metres per day)

NO

R TH

BU

A RN

BY

T)

T TL SE A

162,533,212

109,749,176

SU

EY RR

VE

RIC

E

PO

A R TL

ND

117,257,850

TA DE L

OU

T DI S R(

42,452,658

U

C VAN

18,852,279

VA

O NC

VER

66,726,602

OU

23,815,634

M

E TR

C AN V O

VER

THAI RESTAURANT

DELTA

k Source: Water Planning Lab, UBC

389,890,265

632 NORTH VANCOUVER (DISTRICT)

578

BURNABY

501 477

METRO VANCOUVER SURREY

367

PORTLAND

344

SEATTLE

307

Catering, Take-out and Delivery orders available. Fully Licensed. Semi-Private & Private Room Booking Options.

VANCOUVER

448

Immerse yourself in the great tradition of classic and authentic Thai dining.

Water consumption per capita (litres per day)

102-888 Burrard Street 604.683.7999 www.salathai.ca Friday-Saturday 11:30am-10:30pm Sunday-Thursday 11:30am-10:00pm


City

CIT Y SEEN

By TREVOR MELANSON

Affordability vs. Affordability Affordable housing is not just a low-income issue, and our policies should reflect that

W

WHEN IT comes to Vancouver’s housing market, there are two things we all agree on: it’s bloody expensive, and there’s no single solution to that problem that will make everyone happy. But there’s also a third thing we can’t agree on: what the word “affordable” actually means. Consider the Affordable Home Ownership Pilot Program that the City of Vancouver announced in April. Working with developers, the city will acquire a 20-percent stake in 300 new units around town and then will sell those condos to homebuyers at a discounted price. But if you’re thinking of applying, know this: for childless couples, your combined income can’t be higher than $67,540,

while parents who need at least two bedrooms can’t pull in more than $96,170. I don’t mean to sound like an elitist jerk here, but that’s not exactly a ton of money. When the #donthaveamillion proponents say Vancouver is unaffordable, they don’t just mean for those earning minimum wage. They mean it’s unaffordable for everyone, including doctors, lawyers, engineers, and entrepreneurs—the kind of people we need to grow our economy, sustain our tax base, and support our community. Given that, it’s worth watching what happens down in Silicon Valley (the region, not the television show). That’s because the suburb of Palo Alto is facing an affordability challenge not unlike ours, and it’s examining the possibility of creating affordable housing options for families earning up to $250,000 in order to address them. Yes, it’s an unconventional (and controversial) idea, but it’s also one that should at least give us a reason to reconsider what we mean by affordability here—and whether it’s time to substantially expand that definition.

Portrait of a First-Time Buyer Household income: $73,390 (the Vancouver median in 2013) Down payment: $20,000 Amortization period: 25 years Interest rate: 3% Property tax: $1,300/year Condo fees: $300/month Heating: $50/month

Maximum purchase price*

Median condo price in Greater Vancouver as of March 2016

$356,282

$462,800 (Townhouse: $589,100; House: $1,342,500)

k *According to Vancity’s mortgage calculator. Source: Vancity; MLS Home Price Index

C A S E I N P OI N T

A Better High m Given its reputation for widespread heroin use, the Downtown Eastside is the perfect place to study and ultimately find a solution for that problem. And that’s exactly what Dr. Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes did in a four-year study in which her team gave addicts hydromorphone in lieu of pharmaceuticalgrade heroin. The study, published in Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry in April, found that hydromorphone (a type of pain medication often used in palliative care) was equally effective in curbing heroin abuse and related criminal activities. Unlike prescription heroin, however, hydromorphone is readily available in Canada, making it a more efficient way to literally save lives.

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Living on the water is a lifestyle like no other... it features unique communities in a close to nature environment. Call me now to discover more about this amazing lifestyle. Dream home

John Wayne Special

Character & Comfort

The River House

Ladner $479,000

Vancouver $299,000

Richmond $269,000

Richmond $399,000


BEST DECKS IN VANCOUVER Vancouver’s Favourite Restaurants for Summer Patio Dining and Fresh Seafood ENGLISH BAY • KITSILANO • NEW WESTMINSTER WHITE ROCK • HORSESHOE BAY • PORT MOODY • RICHMOND Voted Top 100 Outdoor Dining in Canada – OpenTable 2015

Horseshoe Bay

English Bay

boathouserestaurants.ca

Kitsilano


Taste

V A N M A G .C O M /T A S T E

K N I F E F I G H T I N T H E D T E S / TA S T E T E S T: I C E C R E A M / W H Y W H I T E P O R T I S H AV I N G A M O M E N T

o Tomato and cheddar melt with arugula and blueberry balsamic ($11)

THE DISH

ANDREW QUERNER

Get Toasted

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WHETHER IT’S renting a kayak and paddling up Indian Arm or just splashing around with the kids at the water’s edge, there are plenty of reasons to make a trip to Deep Cove this summer. But whatever brings you there, there’s also a good meal to be had at Cafe Orso after you’re done. “We’re a coffee house trying to do nicer food,” says owner Jonathan Hayward. But he’s being modest, because both the coffee and food are leagues better than nice.

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CAMPB E LL AV E

HAWKS AV E

E . PENDER ST

H E AT L E Y AV E

E. HASTINGS ST

JACKSON AV E

GORE

THE DISH

MAIN ST

Taste

AV E

E . COR DOVA ST

KEEFER ST

Picture-perfect avocado toast is served with curried apple preserves, and Liège waffles come sweet (with fresh berries and cream) and savoury (with beef bresaola and arugula). But it’s the tomato and cheddar melt that’s worth lingering over, with fresh tomatoes on crusty bread, swaddled under melted cheddar, then topped with arugula and a drizzle of blueberry balsamic. The inspiration for Cafe Orso’s menu came a few years ago, when the Newfoundlandborn Hayward and his wife were hiking in Northern Italy and stopped at an unassuming cafe for a meat and cheese plate. “We asked ourselves, why is this so good? It was just really good ingredients. It didn’t need anything else.” In his own pursuit of simplicity, Hayward doesn’t try to make everything from scratch. Instead, he sources the best ingredients he can, like bread from Nelson the Seagull, croissants from Chez Christophe, and preserves from Vista D’oro. The cafe slings caffeine all day but also has beer, cider, and wine on tap. Every other Sunday, meanwhile, there’s live jazz in the evenings. To Hayward, Cafe Orso is more than a coffee house: it’s a place for locals to commune and visitors to linger. “This has been a great way to meet a lot of people,” he says. “I love being part of this community.” If the cafe’s popularity is any indication, they’re happy to have him, too. — Eagranie Yuh Cafe Orso

4316 Gallant Ave., North Vancouver, 778-340-3222; cafeorso.ca

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C O M M ON D E NO M I NAT O R

Ai & Om 129 E. Pender St.

Knife Fight

Knifewear 845 E. Hastings St.

Like beautiful knives? Then you’re going to love these two new stores By MAX FAWCETT

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The Cutting Edge For those who are just starting their own knife collection (or who haven’t experienced the pleasures of working with knives made from Japanese steel), it’s probably best to start with a standard gyuto, or chef’s knife. “It’s your multi-purpose knife,” says Knifewear owner Kevin Kent, “the one you could do all of your jobs with.”

n

HIGH “We can go crazy and get a knife that’s hand-made by Mr. Fujiwara, who’s one of the greatest blacksmiths in the world. A chef’s knife is about $800. But when you use it, you’ll say things like ‘Holy bananas!’ because it’s awesome.” 210 mm, $795

p

LOW(ER) “We’ve got a line called Kasumi Uchi, which is a factory-made knife but looks like it’s been handhammered. It has dimples all over the blade, a Western handle so it doesn’t feel too forward or weird, and it’s going to perform like crazy.” 210 mm, $185

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, sharpen your edges. Vancouver’s knife trade has never been lacking for selection, but it’s about to get a whole lot more competitive with the arrival of two new players. Ai & Om will showcase the affection that owner Douglas Chang, a local chef who’s done stints at Bambudda and Sai Woo, has for Japanese knives. But his new shop is going to face competition from, fittingly enough, the east (the near east, anyway). After running a series of popular pop-up shops, Calgary’s Knifewear has finally set down roots in Vancouver, starting with a store on East Hastings next door to Les Amis du Fromage. What’s the appeal of Japanese knives? For Knifewear owner Kevin Kent, it’s all about performance. “If you like cooking, the knives just make it easier because they go where you tell them to.” They’re becoming more common in kitchens across the city, too, a function of the fact that Japanese knives have some very powerful (and unpaid) celebrity spokespeople: local chefs. Knifewear, for example, counts Quang Dang, the executive chef at West, as one of its more loyal local customers. “They’re the ones who are most excited and kind of rabid about the whole thing,” Kent says. “But as we’re in a market longer, they become about 20 percent of the customer base, and the other 80 percent is people who have a kitchen at home. Which, by the way, is most people.”


Taste

T H E TA S T E T E S T

Photos + styling by PAGE AND PAPER

Vancouver’s

Ice Cream BE S T

Best in Show & Best Sweet

ROOSTER’S ICE CREAM BAR

Fresh Lemon & Poppyseed One judge described this as “pure PNE summer,” and no wonder—its refreshing (but not tart) flavour is the quintessence of a long and enjoyable summer day.

Ice cream falls into that rare category that even when it comes in a bucket, it’s still pretty good. But when ice cream leaves you speechless, you know it’s entered into the realm of truly great. And that’s what our judges found among the offerings served up by these eight fantastic competitors, who were selected from an even longer list of candidates. They did the work—now you get to enjoy the fruits of their “labour.”

1039 E. Broadway roostersicecreambar.com

BELLA GELATERIA

Black Sesame Bella has been wowing local gelato lovers for years, and this flavour sums up why they’re great: sophisticated, nuanced, and supremely satisfying.

1089 Marinaside Ct. bellagelateria.com

RAIN OR SHINE

Blueberry Balsamic If you like something that’s on the sweeter side, Rain or Shine’s ice cream is probably for you. One judge described it as “the safe word ice cream.” We don’t know what that means, but we think it’s positive.

3382 Cambie St. rainorshineicecream.com

AMATO GELATO White Chocolate Raspberry

Mario’s Gelati is an institution in Vancouver, and the Amato Gelato Cafe serves up 72 rotating flavours of the stuff. If you want variety and selection, this is your best bet.

78 E. First Ave. amatogelato.com

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Find out how our judges made their decisions—and why something they tested drove them to profanity —at vanmag.com

EARNEST ICE CREAM Whiskey Hazelnut

People routinely line up around the block for Earnest Ice Cream—its flavours (like this whiskey hazelnut) are both experimental and accessible. And its vegan varieties are remarkably un-vegan-tasting, too.

1829 Quebec St. earnesticecream.com

Best Chocolate

BROWN PAPER PACKAGES Chocolate Balsamic

Perfect texture, “grown-up flavours,” and real pieces of chocolate made it the best of the bunch in this category. Its other non-chocolate offerings are just as good, too.

620 Quebec St. brownpaperpackages.ca

DOOLAMI DESSERT Mango

Have you had Chinese ice cream yet? If not, head down to Marpole and grab a scoop of this mango goodness. And if you’re feeling brave, try the durian (but don’t say we didn’t warn you).

Best Savoury

8030 Granville St.

TANGRAM CREAMERY

Hojicha (roasted green tea) This flavour won’t be for everyone. But if your palate’s sophisticated enough, it might just blow your mind—or someone else’s. “That’s third-date ice cream,” one of the judges said. “That’ll seal the deal.” 2729 Arbutus St.

As rated by these expert judges Joie Alvaro Kent

is a freelance food writer hopelessly smitten with peanut butter and chocolate ice cream.

Lee Man

is a Restaurant Awards judge who believes, like Marco Polo, that the Chinese invented ice cream.

Anya Levykh

is the Westender’s restaurant critic, a Restaurant Awards judge, and an unreformed cookbook junkie.


Taste

LAST CALL

By NEAL McLENNAN

Port of Call

T T H E B OT T L E

Fine White Port

TAYLOR FLADGATE $19.50 Here’s a happy coincidence: the best white port in the province is also the only white port available in the province. This is a sweet take on the wine, so for drinks it either needs some citrus or some power to keep it from being cloying. Also, keep your eyes out for Fonseca’s Siroco, which lands here in July. Once you open either one, remember to keep it in the fridge, where it’ll last for a few weeks.

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THE PAST DECADE has not been kind to port. Nor the decade before that. Nor the decade before that. The truth is, the great fortified wine—once de rigueur at the end of any gathering of swells—has been on a slow path to irrelevance since The Wonder Years premiered. (As of yet, no connection between the two has been proven.) But the irony in port’s decline is that the stuff in the bottle has never been better, and where it used to be one of the priciest wines in the world, now a good bottle can be had for the cost of a bottle of domestic rosé. And here’s the kicker: while the idea of drinking port during the hottest month of the year probably sounds about as appealing as joining an octogenarian nudist club, there’s a little-known subset of the genre that’s perfect for summer. White port follows the same process as its red brethren: grapes are picked, wine is made and brandy is added to fortify. The only differences are that white grapes are used instead of red, and it’s aged for less time. It comes in two basic styles: dry, which isn’t really all that dry, and classic, which is downright sweet. And while both are great drinks when served chilled on their own, it’s in cocktails where their pedigree really shines. The dry version lends itself perfectly to a glass of tonic and a handful of mint (a combination that’s actually quite common on many European patios and called, not surprisingly, port tonic), while the sweet one is a great dance partner for some stiffer pours: scotch, bourbon, or even tequila. But no matter how you take it, you can raise a glass knowing you’ve done your part to help restore the legacy of this great drink. Take that, Kevin Arnold.

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T H E DR I N K BY BRAD STANTON

Bartender, Prohibition

Original Sin 1½ oz Cazadores Reposado tequila 1 oz Amaro Montenegro ½ oz Taylor Fladgate Fine White Port 1 dash Angostura orange bitters 5 drops Scrappy’s chocolate bitters Stir ingredients over ice and strain over a large cube into a chilled old fashioned glass. Garnish with a nice big orange twist.

E YDÍS EINARSDÓT TIR

Why it’s time to give this different kind of port a chance to shine


To fully appreciate our wines, you need to see where they come from. Wine Tastings, Vineyard Walks and Winery Tours Daily Vineyard Terrace Restaurant Open Daily for lunch and dinner Visit cedarcreek.bc.ca or call 778 738 1027 We look forward to seeing you this Summer! 20160608

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Made to order ice cream.

Van Mag.pdf

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2016-06-08

Kelowna, B.C.

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2016-06-17 2:17 PM


SPONSORED REPORT

2.

27 TH ANNUAL RESTAURANT AWARDS Presented by

O

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n April 13, the city’s top chefs and restaurateurs gathered in the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre for the de facto Oscars of Vancouver’s restaurant industry: the 2016 Vancouver Magazine Restaurant Awards. Here’s a peek behind the curtain.

1. Culmina’s Decora and Saignée wines staying perfectly chilled for guests 2. Guests mingle during the pre-reception at the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre 3. Vancouver Magazine’s editor-in-chief Max Fawcett poses with the Bufala team who are the winners of Best Pizzeria 4. Rose Nguen from Mr. Red Café humbly accepts her award for Best Vietnamese 5. Students from VCC put their culinary skills to the test during the Knife Skills competition sponsored by Knifewear and Restaurants Canada 6. A guest snaps a pic of Instagram-worthy food at the Chefs’ Showcase 7. YP Dine demonstrate their cutting edge restaurant app 8. Gloria Macarenko congratulates David Gunawan from Royal Dinette for winning Best New Restaurant and Chef of the Year 9. Mark Singson, Kevin Brownlee, Mike Robbins, and Jeff Parr from Anna Lena 10. The Dream Team winners pose with their awards. From left to right: Vancouver Magazine’s Max Fawcett, Jenna Briscoe, Ben De Champlain, Kristi Linneboe, Michel Durocher and Tara Thom 11. Grant Sceney, head bartender from Fairmont Pacific Rim, accepts his Bartender of the Year award 12. Okanagan Crush Pad serves up a glass of rose to party-goers 13. Guests enjoy a chilled glass of prosecco upon arrival at the JOEY after party 14. A JOEY chef entertains the guests as he prepares sushi 15. Angus An, owner of Maenam, accepts the award for Restaurant of the Year 16. Rob Feenie from Cactus Club with Michel Jacob from Le Crocodile 17. The hosts for the evening, Stephen Quinn and Gloria Macarenko from CBC, with Vancouver Magazine’s Publisher Tom Gierasimczuk 18. A Sheraton chef plates hot hors d’oeuvres for the attendees 19. Taylor Mikasko and Chad Clark from Hawksworth

6.

5. 10.

16. 15.

PRESENTING SPONSOR

HOST SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

KNIFE SKILLS SPONSORS


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4. 7.

8.

9.

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A/V SPONSOR

RENTAL SPONSOR

EVENT PRODUCTION

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FLORAL SPONSOR

WATER SPONSOR

SHOWCASE SPONSORS Authentic Wine and Spirit Merchants BRB Brewing Burrowing Owl Charton-Hobbs

Constellation Brands Culmina Family Estate Winery Desert Hills Estate Winery McClelland Beer

Okanagan Crush Pad Okanagan Spring Brewery Peacock & Martin Poplar Grove Richard Massey Wine and Spirits

Russell Brewing Company Russell Food Equipment Stanley Park Brewing Summit Fine Wines

Tinhorn Creek Trimpac Sysco Unsworth Vineyards Yaletown Distilling Company


WATER FIGHT: DUNCAN RAWLINSON; BOT TLES: RUTH HARTNUP

The Summer of You 24 ways to make the next two months the best you’ve ever had

The rain, the endless conversations about real estate, the middling public transit—on a warm summer day in Vancouver they can all feel like such minor inconveniences, entirely reasonable costs of doing business in a city that’s so darn gorgeous. There is no better season than summer in this city and no shortage of ways to take advantage of it. Spoiled for choice? Gripped by a paralyzing case of FOMO? Relax. We’ve done the work of planning your summer for you.

Food & Drink

Culture

Experience

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Cool Down Like a Cool Kid 1

Indulge Your Inner Hippie 3

When future anthropologists seek to encapsulate Vancouver in 2016, they’ll note that the city had not one, but two artisan popsicle purveyors who toured the city by bicycle. What will be lost on future generations is just how refreshing the bars from Johnny’s Pops (we dig the Vietnamese coffee flavour) and Nice Pops (basil nectarine, please) are. Find their locales at johnnys-pops.com and nicepopsyvr.com.

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The Summer of You

Hike for Doughnuts 4

Fish Farmers They Have Sea Lice, 2014 Acrylic on canvas. 162.6 x 244 cm. Private collection

2

Get Culture Shocked

It might be a scorcher outside, but there’s even more heat to be found at the Museum of Anthropology. Until October 16, it’s hosting the work of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, one of Canada’s most important and outspoken artists. His solo show exposes the colonialist suppression of First Nations peoples and challenges our understanding of their place in Canadian society. The art is beautiful, the ideas are provocative, and it’ll give you plenty to talk—and think—about after you leave.

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L The Quarry Rock hike in Deep Cove isn’t a secret anymore, but it remains a heavy favourite for good reason. It’s quick—the whole thing takes about 80 minutes round-trip— and it’s easier than the Chief. (Fewer stairs, not nearly as steep—it’s a walk your spry grandmother and small children could do.) To avoid crowds, take the trail from Mt. Seymour. And when you get to Quarry Rock, a sweeping view of Indian Arm is the big payoff. Top the experience off (and replace the calories you just burned) with a decadent piece of fried dough from Honey Doughnuts & Goodies.

POPSICLE: SOPHIA HSIN PHOTOGRAPHY; FISH FARMERS THE Y HAVE SEA LICE: PHOTO BY KEN MAYER; QUARRY ROCK: KELEN LOEWEN / @K APTURETHELIGHT

L Folk Fest weekend is an annual rite of passage for some people, and if you’re not one of them, then this is your year. On July 15, join the annual opening-day sprint to secure your spot by the main stage (big blankets essential). Expect crowds for Montreal’s Land of Talk—on a comeback tour after a half-decade hiatus—and hometown heroes The New Pornographers, but don’t miss the smaller stages and workshops that bring several artists together: that’s where the real magic happens. On Sunday, be sure to head up (and then down) to Wreck Beach for the annual Bare Buns Run (see “How to Drop Trou in Public,” page 33). Yes, going nude in public can be a challenge, to say the least. But if you’re wearing something you picked up at the Folk Fest bazaar, you might already be itching to take it off.


How to Drop Trou in Public

Bare Buns Run July 17

DANIEL JACKSON, A.K.A. “VAN TAN DAN” PR OFFICER, VAN TAN NATURIST CLUB

Walk (Okay, Bike) on Water

FOLK FEST: DAVID NIDDRIE; BARE BUNS RUN: DARYL DYCK /CP

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L They’re part bike, part paddle board, and possibly the most Vancouver thing ever invented. Grab a group of friends, head over to Vanier Park, and mount up your own Hydrobike Explorer, a watercraft that allows you to bicycle on water (and reach speeds of up to 15 km/hr). Cruise east through False Creek or west to Kits Beach and beyond.

Take Yourself Out to the Ball Games 6

“Start out by sleeping naked and walking around the house naked. Then, find a safe place with trusted people—maybe on vacation or at a recognized nudist spot. In terms of local options, Crescent Rock Beach has become a place that people are liking because it’s a bit more reverent than Wreck Beach. And I doubt anybody in B.C. would get too offended if you were way out on Crown land somewhere. Just remember to make yourself known to any of the groups—every one of them would be happy to converse with a newcomer. But the big positive comes after you take the leap. The feel of the sun and the wind on bare skin, and swimming naked, is the best.”

L Our prediction? Sunday, July 10, will be the day you finally succumb to the joy of an afternoon baseball game. The sun, the beer, and the feeling of throwing peanut shells on the ground will work their magic in one of the world’s (yes, world’s) most charming ballparks. Our Vancouver Canadians (who may very well contain a future Toronto Blue Jay or two) will square off against the Tri-City Dust Devils. In order to really maximize your experience, be sure to buy seats in the lower-numbered rows of sections 9 and 10. It’ll give you the best odds of both catching a fly ball and heckling the largest number of players possible—all for the princely sum of $14.

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The Summer of You

7

Bond with the Bard

All summer long, Bard on the Beach will be serving up a combination that’s tough to beat: a beautiful outdoor setting in Vanier Park, a few glasses of wine, and some classic Shakespeare (and some not-so-classic Shakespeare: this year, The Merry Wives of Windsor is set in 1960s Windsor, Ontario). Pre-order picnics are available but a little pricey, so we prefer to hit the Whole Foods at the top of the hill first to build a killer spread of our own. You’ll be the envy of everyone in Bard Village.

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Viva L’Italia

Italian Day may have come and gone, but it’s not too late to experience a taste of la dolce vita here in Vancouver. Rent a ride (Vespa or Piaggio, preferably) from Metro Scooter Rentals, wrap yourself in your best silk scarf, and putter around town in style. Drive over to Railtown and have lunch at Ask for Luigi, then scoot down to Commercial Drive for an espresso at Turk’s Coffee Bar and gelato at Dolce Amore. But be forewarned: you might have so much fun, you’ll want a scooter of your own.

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Top Three Happy Hours

Cactus Club

$5 passion fruit bellinis

The Flying Pig

$6 crispy salmon cakes

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Make a Pilgrimage to Galiano

L There are few restaurants in Canada that are attracting more buzz right now than Galiano Island’s Pilgrimme, a

cozy and quaint farm-to-table restaurant that serves some of the most singular food in the country. It’s the first stop on the ferry from Tsawwassen ($19.80 as a walk-on) and, as this is truly terroir-driven cuisine, you really should stay the night and soak up the island vibe: you can go luxe at Galiano Inn & Spa (doubles from $249) near the terminal or keep it real and hitch up island (you’ll get a ride immediately) to the supremely chill Bodega Ridge (cabins from $275). Don’t be relaxed about reservations, though—you’ll need them well in advance for both the restaurant and the ferry.

Chewies Steam & Oyster Bar

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Buck-a-shuck oysters + $5 beer + the prettiest patio


Winery & Vineyard • Tastings & Tours Summer Concerts• Wine Club 537 Tinhorn Creek Road /@TinhornCreek

Oliver, British Columbia /TinhornCreek

250.498.3743

/TinhornCreek

tinhorn.com

/TinhornCreek


The Summer of You

Do a DIY Brewery Tour

Mount Pleasant is filled with craft breweries, and you can hit them all (and burn off a few of the calories you’re consuming along the way) by crafting your own walking tour. Start at 33 Acres before moving on to Brassneck Brewery and Main Street Brewing, wrapping up on the Red Truck Beer Company’s patio, which has a habit of hosting some great live music. Added bonus: you can now justify all future benders by describing them as “self-guided brewery tours.”

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Nerd Out at the Museum

L Maybe you grew up collecting baseball cards. Maybe it was Cabbage

Patch Kids. Either way, it probably didn’t match the dedication that’s behind the collections on display at the All Together Now exhibit at the Museum of Vancouver, which celebrates all things geeky and includes everything from pinball machines to prosthetics—yes, prosthetics. If the former get you in the mood, find your way to Pub 340’s pinball room, which has one of the widest—and most nostalgia-inducing—selections in the city. If you’re more into the prosthetics? Well, you’re on your own there.

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Do Some Required Reading

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Channel Your Chakras

Okay, so the whole yoga-on-the-bridge idea didn’t exactly go over all that well. But you can still partake in some yogic group therapy this summer when the SeaWheeze Sunset Festival rolls into town in August. Yes, there’s a half-marathon attached to it, but it’s the sunset yoga in Stanley Park—just you and a few thousand of your neighbours—and the ensuing concert that’s the real draw. It’s backed by a licensed area and gourmet eats, and the vibe is unambiguously positive—you know, if you’re into that sort of thing.

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L A summer isn’t complete unless you knock off a few good books in the process, and there are few more interesting than Fraser Nixon’s Straight to the Head. It’s set in pre-Expo Vancouver and takes you back to a time when real estate speculation wasn’t the only game in town. Our suggestion: bring it, and your beverage of choice, to Habitat Island to fully appreciate just how much things have changed in that part of the city.

33 ACRES BOT TLE: E YDÍS EINARSDÖT TIR; MUSEUM: REBECCA BLISSET T; PRIDE: TOURISM VANCOUVER/MICHAEL SONG

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Play a Round of Disc Golf L 14

Disc golf is a fun, free way to enjoy our fine parks, and you get the benefits of golf without the cost or dubious sartorial choices. Abbie’s Sports Shop on Main sells the requisite discs. But remember: calling it “frolf” will dramatically increase the odds of your having one of said discs bounced off the back of your skull. Where to go: Queen Elizabeth Park (4600 Cambie St.), Jericho Hill (4196 W. Fourth Ave.), Quilchena Park (4590 Magnolia St.), and there’s also Grouse Mountain’s 18-hole course, but it’ll cost you $43.95 for an Alpine Experience Ticket (6400 Nancy Greene Way).

Pride Parade

July 31

How to Maximize Your Fun at Pride PAIGE FREWER, A.K.A. PONYBOY QUEER PART Y PRODUCER AND DRAG PERSONALIT Y

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Watch the Ponies at Hastings Park

L Put on your finest seersucker suit, make yourself a mint julep, and

head out to the track to watch some of the best horse racing you’ll see all summer. The B.C. Cup, which is held on August 1, features dozens of bred-in-B.C. horses participating in a day’s worth of races—enough to let you make your share of wagers and drink your share of cocktails.

“For folks looking for an exhilarating first-time Pride experience, definitely make it to a drag show. I highly recommend Man Up. We do fun and outrageous gender performances of many varieties. I swear, almost every show I have someone coming up to me saying either they’ve never been to the Cobalt before, or they’ve never been to Man Up before, and they’re overwhelmed by the welcoming, diverse, and positive crowd there. It’s always a swelteringly hot weekend, so bring lots of sunscreen. I’d also recommend as much glitter and spandex as possible. It’s hard to not have fun in glitter and spandex, and that’s definitely Pride’s vibe— making people smile.”

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The Summer of You

Get Really High 16

L No, not that kind. Instead, take to the skies—literally—in order to get a new perspective on the city you’ve probably taken for granted. Harbour Air’s tours take off from Coal Harbour and soar above the city and Stanley Park before touching down in front of the Convention Centre, and for airplane enthusiasts—the Twin Otter planes are Canadian legends—the landing alone makes it worth the price of admission, which is $85 for a 10-minute flight, $185 for 35 minutes.

Top Three Swimming Holes

Water Fight!

It’s August, which means it’s hot—obnoxiously, make-you-wish-for-rain hot. And on August 6, the city’s largest water fight will kick off at 1:00 p.m. at Lumberman’s Arch. Feel free to arm yourself to the teeth—we’d suggest either the Nerf Super Soaker Arctic Shock or the STR 75 Saturator Uzi Water Blaster—but remember that regardless of what you’re packing, the object of the exercise is still to cool off and have fun. Speaking of which, you’ll want to book off a day to head out to Tsawwassen for one last landing at Splashdown Park, which is closing at the end of this summer after 33 years in business. Come for the sliding—it’s still pretty stellar, by the way—and stay for the memories of field trips and summers gone by.

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Pool 99

Worth hopping a fence or two

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Reach for the Top

Knocking off the iconic Black Tusk can be done in one day, but you’ll have to wake up early. The trailhead is at the Rubble Creek parking lot, just off Daisy Lake Road, which is 30 minutes south of Whistler. From there it’s 28 kilometres that move through a typical West Coast forest and past fascinating geological formations before reaching the crumbling volcanic rock whose jagged, toothlike appearance gives the trail its name. You’ll gain 1,740 metres, so it’s not for the flip-flop crowd, but the reasonably fit can do the return trip in eight to 10 hours. Those who want to break it into more manageable chunks can camp overnight at Garibaldi Lake.

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Granny’s Cove

Cliff jumping!

Whyte Lake

Picnic on the floating pier

SEAPL ANE: TOURISM VANCOUVER/PATRICK KUSCHFELD/HARBOUR AIR SEAPL ANES; WATER FIGHT: EARL MAYUGA; WHISTLER: BRUCE MARCHFELDER; POOL: JASON HARGROVE; COVE: GUILHEM VELLUT; L AKE: K YLE PEARCE

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5 ON 5 STREETBALL | TENNIS | BEACH VOLLEYBALL LULULEMON SUNSET YOGA OLD SCHOOL MUSIC REVIVAL | BASELINE BISTRO ZUMBA | WATER POLO

KITS BEACH TENNIS CLUB MAIN IDENTITY

OS DESIGN MARCH 2014

© OSDESIGN

magazine


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Spend a Night in a Slice of History

L It’s a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma, located on an unremarkable

stretch of Kingsway. And given the land upon which it sits, it’s something of a miracle that the 2400 Motel is still standing. Its status as a heritage property, one that serves as a visual reminder of how people used to travel—and how Vancouver used to look—has given it some cover from real estate developers, but it probably won’t be around forever. Before it meets the business end of a bulldozer, you should indulge your inner film noir fetish and experience its, uh, charms, by staying a night (starting at $85).

The Summer of You

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VA N M A G . C O M

Eat the Richmond Night Market

L Even with the crowds, commute, and epic entrance lineup, not visiting one of Richmond’s two Asian night markets this summer is a crime against stomachs. The traffic is painful, so ditch the car and Canada Line-it to the Richmond Night Market (our pick because it’s a short walk from Bridgeport Station and it has more food stalls). Blow past the iPhone cases and keep walking until you see signs like “deep-fried squid,” “dim sum,” and “takoyaki.” This open-air street market has more than 100 food vendors cooking up every kind of meat on sticks, dumplings, and sweets for respectable prices, so the big queue for hurricane potatoes isn’t worth it—instead, try Squid Feast’s deep-fried offerings, any panfried pork buns, and The Taiyaki’s sweet custard-filled waffles in the shape of fish (caution: in the first few minutes, these are hot pockets of molten lava). Admission for the RNM is $3.25 and it runs nights, Friday through Sunday, until October.

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IMAGE CREDIT

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Top Five Patios

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Slay the King

L There’s something about the taste of eating

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MOTEL: PETER LEWIS; NIGHT MARKET FOOD: GOTOVAN

Get Your Buzz On

Yes, this summer is all about personal gratification and fulfillment, but there are few better ways to achieve both than by giving your time to a worthy cause. And while there are all sorts of human-focused charities out there, it’s worth remembering that humans wouldn’t be able to survive in the first place if it weren’t for bees. Give them some love by volunteering with Hives for Humanity, a local not-forprofit that uses beekeeping as a therapeutic tool to help at-risk populations build self-esteem and community pride. You can chip in by showing up at the Hastings Urban Farm on a Tuesday or Thursday between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Prepare to get dirty and work up a thirst—one you can quench with a glass of mead at the Storm Crow Tavern on Commercial Drive.

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a piece of salmon you caught yourself that even the freshest fish in the world can’t quite measure up to. But you don’t need to retreat to some quiet mountain lake or wait patiently for hours in a canoe in order to tap into that feeling. Instead, charter a fishing boat for the day with a few like-minded friends and get your line into the water within minutes of leaving downtown. Mid-to-late August is ideal for catching a chinook—also known as king salmon, for reasons that become immediately obvious when you put it in your mouth—since they’re all returning to the Fraser River to spawn. You can expect to bring in one that’s somewhere between 10 and 25 pounds if you’re fishing in the right waters, and if you book with a company like Pacific Angler or the delightfully named Bon Chovy Fishing Charters (where four of you can take in five hours of fishing for $625), you will be. Bragging rights are, of course, included.

The Galley Patio and Grill at Jericho Beach Killer sunsets

Tap & Barrel (Olympic Village)

Best spot for people watching

The Vancouver Art Gallery Café

Prosecco + Robson = perfection

Say Hello to Halo-Halo L 23

Meet your new favourite summer indulgence. Halo-halo means “mix-mix” in Tagalog, and it has everything you never knew you needed in a sweet treat: sweet jelly, ice cream, crushed ice, tropical fruit, sweet beans. But while it’s unquestionably a rewarding experience, eating halo-halo can also be a bit of a challenge for the uninitiated. Joie Alvaro Kent, a Vancouver Magazine Restaurant Awards judge, says that the secret is eating it from the bottom up rather than the top down. “Don’t bring your spoon completely up and out too soon, or you’ll end up with a quarter of your halo-halo on the table,” she says. “As the layers become more combined, make sure that you incorporate the crushed ice and some of the ice cream down into the mixture.” In terms of where to practise your halo-halo eating technique, give Pinpin (pinpinrestaurant.com) or Little Ongpin (604-278-4667) a try.

The Roof at Black and Blue

Gorgeous room, late-night fun

Reflections at the Hotel Georgia South Beach meets West Coast

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The Summer of You

The 1908 1½ oz Empress tea–infused vodka ¾ oz fresh lemon juice ¾ oz simple syrup ¾ oz egg white (½ of one egg white) Combine all ingredients and shake vigorously with ice. Strain into martini glass with a half sugar rim.

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Extreme Makeover—Capital Edition

L We’re all for heritage, but let’s be frank—Victoria’s Empress Hotel was showing its age hard. Then came Vancouver’s Nat and Flora Bosa, who’ve plowed a mountain of dough into the ol’ gal, and she looks amazing enough to warrant a trip over. There’s no better vantage point to revel in her makeover than a stool at the just-opened Q Bar (above), all soaring ceilings with a killer view of the Inner Harbour. Van Mag’s Bartender of the Year, Grant Sceney, consulted on the menu but this is the place for a classic: the hotel’s entry into the cocktail canon, the 1908 (see recipe).

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SPONSORED REPORT

VANCOUVER’S HOTTEST SUMMER

DISHES & AL FRESCO DINING

And what to order when you snag a table at one of these destination restaurants.

COOK BY YOURSELF FRENCH MACARONS Fancy learning how to make those delicate French sweets? Whether you are a wannabe pastry chef or simply looking for something fun to do with your friends, join us on this hands-on class led by our Pastry Chef Ricardo. Being held every Tuesday from 10am to 2pm at Faubourg Kerrisdale, breakfast and lunch are included. Looking for a great Team Building event! We also organize Corporate Macaron Classes for 15 to 20 people at our commissary location. 604.322.3446 | info@faubourg.com faubourg.com

Textured Central Thailand cuisine plays with classic spicy, sour, sweet, salty and bitter combinations, all beautifully prepared with the pride, dedication and artistry of the Thai people. SalaThai is located on the cusp of the Entertainment District, on the corner of Smithe and Burrard. THAI RESTAURANT

Featured Dish: Chicken Satay, Papaya Salad & Sticky Rice

102-888 Burrard Street, Vancouver 604.683.7999 | salathai.ca

Chic exposed-brick space serving creative Belgian cuisine & sustainable seafood plus plus beer, wine & cocktails. 568 Beatty Street, Crosstown, Vancouver 604.879.7119 | chambar.com @chambar_restaurant

Nestled beside the seawall and False Creek on the edge of Yaletown, Provence Marinaside offers one of Vancouver’s most delicious, social, and refined dining experiences. Provence has an Award winning wine list with over 100 wines by the glass. It’s like a visit to the South of France without the jet lag. 1177 Marinaside Crescent, Vancouver 604.681.4144 | provencemarinaside.ca


Wealthy Californians have long viewed Vancouver as an attractive travel destination. But as the effects of climate change continue to intensify, we might have a hard time getting them to leave

BY MARKHAM HISLOP ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE MURRAY

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IMAGE CREDIT

WHEN IN DROUGHT


IMAGE CREDIT

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I

f you think the recent wave of offshore investors has hollowed out moneyed diaspora, wait until you see what climate change might do. Beca melting Santa’s workshop, it also means that wealthy American climate m our unspoiled water and clean air—and buy our real estate. And if you beli

the richmond author’s 2014 book, American Exodus: Climate Change and the Coming Flight for Survival, describes a dystopian North America not far in the future. It’s one in which the American southwest is ravaged by a drought far worse than the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and a tidal wave of “climate refugees” heads north to knock on Canada’s door. But this time it won’t be Okies in clappedout Model Ts with mattresses strapped to the roof. “I think it’s a bit like the late 1920s or very early 1930s under fascism in Germany,” Slade says in an interview. “The smart, the bold, and the rich move first because they see the trend or they can see that conditions are much more attractive elsewhere.” And there won’t be many places with conditions more attractive than B.C. Why will climate migrants forsake the sunny states of California, Arizona, or Nevada—places that until recently were a mecca for sun-starved retirees? In a word: water. In Slade’s view, civilization is like a giant game of Jenga, interrelated systems all stacked upon each other so that if you pull out a strategic block—in this case, water—the rest come tumbling down. If the California economy and environment collapse, and the wealthy light out for literally greener pastures, one of those pastures could easily be B.C., according to Slade. No, B.C. won’t be immune to the effects of climate change, such as more frequent seasonal droughts, rising sea levels, and longer (and more intense) fire seasons. But Vancouver has a big advantage over Californian cities: namely, the wet winters that generally keep the three regional water reservoirs full. Combined with Metro Vancouver and B.C. government strategies to mitigate

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climate impact, which include water conservation measures, the chances are pretty good that the West Coast of Canada won’t be nearly as hard hit as its southern neighbours. As such, Slade’s doomsday hypothesis for the States isn’t entirely without merit. The most obvious piece of supporting evidence, according to SFU geography professor Simon Donner, is the fact that the American southwest, and California in particular, is already in the grip of a crushing drought. “The key concern is declining water levels in the rivers and the groundwater, due to extreme heat, changes in rainfall, and declining snowpack in the mountains,” he says. The Colorado River Basin, which supplies 16 percent of California’s surface water via two huge aqueducts that cut through mountains, is entering its 16th consecutive year of drought. Over two-thirds of water from the river is used by farmers, who have thus far resisted Governor Jerry Brown’s attempts to reform the water allocation system. What happens if Brown and his successors continue to fail? Consider Steve Yuhas, a resident of affluent Rancho Santa Fe who was made (in)famous by the Washington Post after he complained on social media that he and his neighbours paid a lot of property tax and “should not be forced to golf on brown lawns.” There are plenty of Steve Yuhas in California. The state is home to 131 billionaires, and it created 23 of them in 2014 alone, according to Forbes. A third of those entrepreneurs made their fortunes in the tech industry—which also has a thriving pod in Vancouver—while many others made theirs in film, media, and culture. California also has the largest


Vancouver and turned it into a grossly unaffordable wasteland for a global use in addition to swamping island nations, killing off coral reefs, and igrants could start arriving at the Peace Arch border, clamouring to share eve Giles Slade, there could be an awful lot of them headed our way. population of millionaires in the U.S., with more than 13,000 of them as of 2015. In other words, there are going to be plenty of folks peeking over the fence at Vancouver when things get too hot in their own backyard. This is important, given that the capital currently driving Vancouver’s real estate market to new (and increasingly ludicrous) heights also comes largely from the super rich. They’re people who UBC sociologist Rima Wilkes calls “cosmopolitans” because they can afford to live in global cities like New York and London (and Los Angeles and San Francisco, too). The first wave of wealthy Chinese immigrants may have come to take advantage of Canada’s generous immigrant investor program, which was suspended in 2012 and cancelled two years later (except in Quebec, where it still operates), but the last few years have seen a full-on capital flight from that region. Investors and companies took $676 billion out of China in 2015, according to the Institute of International Finance, and plowed much of it into foreign real estate—including, it stands to reason, in Vancouver. California isn’t as big as China, of course, and so the impact of its residents moving into the Vancouver real estate market won’t be nearly as profound. But it still has nearly 39 million people, and all those millionaires (and billionaires) and their potential migration could apply pressure to a housing market that’s already being hit from all sides. And that, Wilkes says, is the danger. Right behind one wave of immigrant investors could come another, not just from the southwestern U.S. but also from other regions around the world ravaged by climate change. That would almost certainly exacerbate all the negative

side effects that have already been created—and continue to be created—by record-high real estate prices. “I think the issue is that, globally, it’s this elite that can just keep buying stuff, second homes and all that, when [middleclass] people in Vancouver can’t get anything, can hardly rent an apartment,” Wilkes says. That said, American immigration from southwestern states like California could have a more positive economic impact than the current wave of investors, which some worry is more interested in parking capital rather than building successful businesses in B.C. “I think the kind of businesses that are trying to relocate out of California, out of San Francisco and Los Angeles, now will start to consider B.C.,” Slade says, referring to the migration of more than 9,000 businesses from the Golden State over the past seven years. Some of those firms pulled up stakes for neighbouring Oregon and Washington, and the combination of the climate crisis in California and Vancouver’s drive to become the world’s greenest city might be enough to lure some environmentally conscious entrepreneurs north of the border. For his part, Slade thinks the American exodus has already begun, albeit in a minor way. But he believes it has the potential to become much bigger if the southwestern U.S. doesn’t resolve its water and drought issues—and he’s not optimistic that it will. “I think as the economy collapses, and there’s not much room for amelioration, then people will start considering moving to other places,” he says. If they do, we might have to add another casualty to the growing list associated with climate change: the last shreds of aspiration of young Vancouver homeowners.

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DIRTY DEEDS

Why our city’s open waters are so frequently closed— and how we’re almost certainly making the problem worse BY STEVEN THRENDYLE

FISHERMAN’S ENEMY According to a recent report out of UBC, a marina at Fishermen’s Wharf by Granville Island had E. coli readings far higher than the rest of the inlet.

HOLES IN THE DATA The Vancouver Park Board has no idea how many paddlers, swimmers, and sunbathers go into the water.

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THE SCIENCE Near Science World, water quality is especially bad. Waterborne bacteria was over 5,000 units per 100 mL of water last summer (200 is considered the the cutoff for safe swimming).

TREATING THE PROBLEM The city is upgrading its storm sewers and sewage treatment facilities to minimize contamination during spring runoff.

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F

ew rites of the short Canadian summer are as refreshing as dunking one’s body in bracing, crystal-clear water. But good luck finding some here: Vancouver’s beaches, which are dotted along inlets and bays, are perhaps better suited for volleyball than they are for a long-distance swim. Choppy waves churned up by westerly winds often turn the water from brown ale to cloudy Hefeweizen, with a top layer of seagull feathers, stray logs, and perhaps the odd jellyfish-like condom struggling to the surface. It was so bad in 2014 that a month-long closure of many North Shore beaches was required—one that resulted in a house call being made to the West Vancouver District council by North Shore medical health officer Dr. Mark Lysyshyn. He had the unenviable task of trying to explain why E. coli counts were more than quadruple the allowable level (830, to be exact) on the shore of Canada’s richest postal code, and his answer was hardly reassuring. “We aren’t sure of the source of the bacteria. But we can pretty much guarantee that at some point in the summer, Lower Mainland swimming beaches will be unsafe to enter.” He was right. Whytecliff Park—a destination popular with neophyte divers—was again closed last summer when E. coli levels crested the 200 barrier (the limit for safe swimming). But while it might be tempting to blame that and other beach closures on the gigantic cruise ships that routinely set up shop in our harbour, the evidence doesn’t support that conclusion.

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“Sewage on cruise ships is treated to a higher standard than Metro Vancouver’s treatment facility below the Lions Gate Bridge,” Lysyshyn says. And indeed, cruise ships and container vessels cannot discharge any waste until they are 12 nautical miles from the outer limit of our coastal waters, somewhere beyond the northern tip of Vancouver Island. Instead, the blame almost certainly belongs to us. If you want some proof of that, well, all you need to do is head down to False Creek.

O

n a crystalline May evening, members of an elite 20-person team from the False Creek Canoe Club strike a noble pose as the prow of their dragon boat surges into a stiff breeze. In the bow, Teresa Dobson is getting soaked as spray flies off the bow and paddles. She’s not terribly worried about the water quality now. But later in the summer— especially if the crew ventures toward Science World—they’ll be splashed by waterborne bacteria that was over 5,000 units per 100 mL of water last summer (25 times the allowable amount). It’s not coming from the dragon boaters, either. Some of the most recent data on the health of False Creek waters was compiled in a 30-page report by fourth-year UBC students Aneeta Antony, Daisy Hsu, Eric Chen, Jiayun Chen, and Owen Sondergeld. Their team collected water samples from various points in False Creek, and one location raised plenty of red flags: a marina at Fishermen’s Wharf had E. coli readings far higher than the rest of the


Even in one of Canada’s wealthiest, most scenic cities, unswimmable water has become par for the course in the summer months

NO SWIMMING Water quality became so bad in 2014 that many North Shore beaches were closed for an entire month during the summer season.

RECURRING PROBLEM Whytecliff Park, a destination popular with divers, was again closed last summer when E. coli levels crested the 200 barrier. OFF THE CHARTS Two years ago, the E. coli count along the shore of West Vancouver hit 830, which is fully four times the allowable level.

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eastern, central, and western parts of the inlet. Christianne Wilhelmson, executive director of the Georgia Strait Alliance—which, incidentally, recently awarded the operator of Fishermen’s Wharf with its coveted Five Anchors certification for environmental best practices—says she wasn’t aware of the UBC study. But, she says, it’s not fair to blame the problem solely on boaters. “There can be many factors in why levels are high at one location and not another. There might have been an accidental discharge at the time.” Wilhelmson concedes that there is a tradition of “liveaboard” boats in False Creek, but she points out that they exist elsewhere. “We don’t want to paint boaters with a broad brush,” she says. “We need a conversation about being a responsible boat owner.” The GSA has worked to educate both boaters and marina owners on the best green practices, but apparently the habits of some old salts die hard. One person down in the brine is marine diver Stephen Paetkau from Skookum Yacht Services. “I use a wetsuit, but in the summer months my face and hands are exposed for long periods of time,” he says. Over the years, he’s simply accepted high levels of E. coli as an occupational hazard and places blame on both the city and the federal Ministry of Transport for not enforcing its guidelines on recreational boaters. “The city does not give a shit about water quality. For one thing, it takes two hours to pump out your holding tank into a pumping station. For another, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans knows that there are a lot of sneak-aboard tenants who are pumping effluent overboard.” Paetkau’s proposed solution is to have a marina employee inspect any boats coming into False Creek and dump dye into their holding tank. “Then, you could tell who the offenders are and deal with them. It would cost time and moorage costs would rise, but it would solve some of the problem,” he says.

D

ragon boat paddler Andrea Dillon lives on a floating home moored in Sea Village on False Creek and has had a love affair with the sea life, right down to being able to tell you that a dozen sea otters and over 300 crabs frolic in the waters nearby. Still, even that relationship has its limits. “I would

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far rather be on the surface of False Creek than be swimming in it,” she says. She’s not alone. On this particular Thursday night, False Creek is a nautical parade of self-propelled, low-tech craft. There are three dragon boat crews, several outrigger canoes and, later, more than a hundred sea kayakers, stand-up paddle boarders, and surf skiers taking part in the weekly MEC Big Chop paddle race. Dillon believes data is what’s needed to ensure that Vancouver’s marine health is taken seriously. Right now, she says, the park board has no idea of how many paddlers, swimmers, or sunbathers frequent Vancouver waters. She has her own estimates, though. “I would bet that in the course of a summer it’s in the tens, maybe hundreds of thousands.” False Creek isn’t as toxic as it used to be. The city is upgrading its storm sewers and sewage treatment facilities to minimize contamination during spring runoff, and Dillon says the water is cleaner than it was back in Vancouver’s industrial age. Then there’s divers like Paetkau, who could be considered living proof that it’s not necessarily dangerous. “I’ve been diving underneath boats for almost 15 years and have never gotten sick or had an ear infection. Heck, I might even be a poster boy for the health of False Creek,” he says. At the height of the E. coli outbreak last summer, meanwhile, Vancouver’s director of water, sewers, and energy argued that if boaters would do their part and use the free pumping stations, False Creek might one day be clean enough for swimming. “We’d like it to be one day,” Brian Crowe told the Huffington Post, “but we’re not there yet.” Until we are, there’s going to be a certain amount of risk that comes with being in that water. “You’ve got 20 paddlers stroking at the same time,” Teresa Dobson says, her top and shorts soaked in sea water after a night’s worth of paddling. “There’s a lot of water that comes off the bow and from the paddles.” She notes that there are dragon boat teams made up of people such as cancer survivors and even a team of organ transplant survivors. “These are people who have really been through a lot,” Andrea Dillon says. “We want to make sure that the water quality on False Creek is absolutely safe for everybody, and the fact is that there are people at risk.”


reflecting V ancouver

BOOK YOUR NEXT HOLIDAY AT A HOTEL THAT TRULY REFLECTS VANCOUVER

(604) 331-1000 reservations@wallcentre.com www.sheratonvancouver.com

2016VanMag.July.indd 1

09/06/2016 9:09:38 AM


SPONSORED REPORT

27 TH ANNUAL RESTAURANT AWARDS Presented by

Sour Cherry Crystal, Mescal and Carmelia Ganache from Mosquito

Thanks

to our chef’s showcase restaurants for not only making the 2016 Restaurant Awards possible—but also delicious.

A vast array of food from Vancouver’s top restaurants for guests to sample

The generous spread of hors d’oeuvres from nominated restaurants such as SalaThai, Cactus Club, and Blue Water Café was enjoyed alongside local wines. As for who won, visit vanmag.com/ra2016 for the full list of winners.

Ceviche from The Mexican

Guests enjoy the food at the Chefs’ Showcase

Crispy Okra from Chang’An

Chicken Nanban Bao Bun by Chef Jin Kim at Gyoza Bar

Chau Veggie Express’s Hand Cut Chips and Spiced Parika Organic Tofu Dip

Chang’An’s Cucumber and Cold Noodle Hors D’oevres

The Union’s Betel Leaf Wrapped Prawns with Coconut, Roasted Peanuts, Ginger, Shallots, Lime and Palm Sugar

THANK YOU TO THESE PARTICIPATING CHEFS’ SHOWCASE RESTAURANTS Ancora AnnaLena Bacchus Bauhaus Bistro Sakana Blue Water Cafe

Bufala and Widebeest Cactus Club Chang’An Chau Veggie Express Cocoru

La Boheme Las Tortas Five Sails Gyoza Bar Hoi An Cafe

Jitlada Kishimoto Masayoshi Molli Cafe Mosquito

Mr. Red Cafe Pilgrimme Royal Dinette Sai Woo SalaThai

Royal Seoul House Thai Cuisine by Montri The Mexican The Union Zest


Play

V A N M A G .C O M /G O

WHY WE LOVE LILLOOET / CAMPING / BEACHWEAR 101

T H E D E S T I NAT I ON

Easy Rider

IAN HOUGHTON

GETTING AMPED UP about riding a new roller coaster is something that’s reserved for teenagers, right? Well, you might change your mind after watching a video of the Pipe Mountain Coaster in Revelstoke— and yes, a “mountain coaster” is exactly what you think it is. It’s the first of its kind in North America, and can reach peak speeds of 42 km/hr as it traverses more than a kilometre of twists and turns and drops 279 metres into the Columbia Valley (you can slow it down with the hand brake if the fun is a little too much). And while that might sound like an invitation to disaster in an area that’s full of wildlife (and sharp rocks and trees), Revelstoke Mountain Resort VP of operations Peter Nielsen says that you have nothing to fear. “The noise should keep the wildlife away, and the cart has no way of going off the track,” he says. “There’s a seat belt to strap you in as well. It’s completely safe.” Tickets for the ride (which lasts around two and a half minutes) start at $19, and the coaster will be open through to Thanksgiving weekend.

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T H E D E S T I NAT I ON Lillooet

Va n c o u v e r

Kaoham Shuttle

Northern Exposure Why this tiny town up the Fraser is the perfect place for a summer getaway

—Tanya Lee Procyshyn

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EAT

Start the day with a dose of caffeine and freshly baked pastries (like the gooey cinnamon buns) at The Rugged Bean Café (854 Main St., facebook .com/ruggedbeancafe). The Kitchen at the Fort Berens Estate Winery (1881 Hwy. 99 North, fortberens.ca), which is open for lunch every day and for dinner on Friday and Saturday, is the highlight of the local dining scene, with a menu celebrating farm-fresh B.C. ingredients along with gourmet burgers. There’s also Dina’s Place (690 Main St., dinasplacerestaurant .ca), a local favourite for hearty Greek fare like spanakopita, souvlaki, and roast lamb, along with pizzas that are the best in town.

SLEEP

In the heart of town, The Reynolds Hotel (1237 Main St., reynoldshotel. com) has hosted Lillooet’s travellers for more than 75 years, with recently renovated rooms that will transport you back to the Gold Rush era ($89–$179). The Sturgeon Bay Bed & Breakfast (130 Haylmore Pl., sturgeonbaybb.com) offers cozy accommodations, warm hospitality, and a spectacular location along the Fraser River for fishing or nature walks. The self-contained suites are ideal for families and have their own living room and kitchen ($90–$160).

boating, and fishing for sturgeon and salmon in the Fraser River. The Lillooet Museum and Visitor Centre (790 Main St., lillooetbc.ca) is an excellent source for local information and trail maps. And for those who just can’t go more than a few days without a round of golf, there’s the Lillooet Sheep Pasture Golf Course (5000 Texas Creek Rd., lillooetgolf.com), a smallbut-challenging nine-hole green where hazards include the local wildlife.

STAY (FOR FREE)

Ask any camper what makes a perfect camping trip and you’re sure to hear a common refrain: ”No rain.” Lillooet’s semi-arid climate is a major reason why it ranks as a top B.C. camping destination, although the complete absence of mosquitoes and the rate (it’s free) also come into play. Visitors can pitch a tent or park a camper at any of the 45 sites at the Seton Dam BC Hydro campground, and while the facilities are definitely rustic—think picnic tables, fire rings, drinking water, and pit toilets—you can’t (or, at least, shouldn’t) complain at this price.

PLAY

The natural wonders of Lillooet make it the perfect destination for outdoor enthusiasts, with a range of potential activities that includes alpine hiking, backcountry camping, mountain biking, Hiking up the riverbanks of the Fraser River in Lillooet

SETON L AKE: MIKE THOMAS; HIKING: BL AKE JORGENSON

At just two hours north of Whistler, you may not have visited Lillooet before, but you probably guessed that it’s gorgeous. Set against towering mountains and aquamarine glacier lakes, it’s a wonder this slice of unspoiled backcountry along the Fraser River has been kept on the down low for so long—but word is getting out. The BBC recently named Lillooet’s rustic two-car Kaoham Shuttle “Canada’s greatest hidden rail trip.” (And they wouldn’t be wrong, either.) The shuttle is a relic of the days of passenger rail service, when the Pacific Great Eastern Railway took people from North Vancouver to Prince George and stopped at any number of smaller communities along the way. Today, the 32-passenger train ride is a partnership between CN Rail and the Seton Lake Indian Band, and the two-hour ride follows a precariously curving track along sparkling Seton Lake and craggy mountains up to the even tinier town of Seton Portage. It’s best to ride the Kaoham Shuttle on a Friday, when more frequent departures mean you can do the return trip in one afternoon. Reservations are recommended: call 250-259-8300 and leave a message with personal details, the dates you would like to travel, and the number of people ($10 each) you’re bringing.

m

Seton Lake


Play

By AMANDA ROSS

Beachwear 101

i Swimsuits can be scary, but local shop Nettle’s Tale swimwear takes the sting out of it with Britney, a versatile and flattering suit with a reversible top that can be worn six different ways. $139, nettlestale.com

Hot accessories to see you through a full season of beaches, boats, and bocce

k Linen says, “I report to no one”; ditto T-shirts, in the right context. The made-in-Vancouver LLOYD clothing’s unisex linen tee, in black or white, combines the two in style. $100, lloydclothing.com

n These Paul & Joe lipstick refills, made using a Japanese candy-making technique called Kintaro-ame, include an outer column made with cocoa butter and lavender oil. A cat-shaped interior column, meanwhile, showcases new, limited-edition summer pigments like Catamaran, Smooth Sailing, and Ahoy. $20, beautyboutique.ca

i Whether you’re a dame or a dork, straw hats have the power to create a look. Aritzia gets it right with this hand-woven Talula straw fedora that’s both packable and crushable, making it the perfect sunny getaway necessity. $28, aritzia.com

T H E HO T TA K E

l Are unisex shoes a thing? Native thinks so. Their waterproof Verona shoes in Pigeon Grey and floral-print Arizona pattern are environmentally friendly and odour-resistant—values shared by both genders (we hope). $79.99 (unisex sizing), nativeshoes.com

The Splurge OWNING A YACHT IS EXPENSIVE. Looking like you do is more accessible, which makes St. John’s perfectly shipshape, soft bouclé striped knit shift dress something of a bargain (at least that’s what you can tell yourself—and your credit card balance). $597, stjohnknits.com

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Vancouver Specialist

O

Up in Smoke Why last year’s fires could be a sign of what lies ahead 58

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By CHARLES DEMERS

ONE YEAR AGO, Vancouver was a valley of smoke. Surrounded by a province crisping under the flames of perfectly normal, nothing-to-seehere, unprecedented forest fires, North America’s most picturesque big city felt like a snow globe filled with barbecue dry-rub spices. Social media wits pointed out that the heavy haze looked like 4/20—which it did, minus the joie de vivre but still with the panic attacks. Perhaps appropriately, the crunch of dry, brown grass underfoot during the drought and the water restrictions that followed felt intimately related to the infernal July skies that seemed straight out of Blade Runner. In imagining the maybe-alreadystarted apocalypse wrought by our carbon corpulence, two of the biggest fears are cities underwater and cities up in smoke. In Vancouver, a city that has always defined itself primarily by its relationship to water—an identification far predating the arrival of most of its current inhabitants, or the decision to name huge swaths of unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh land after a British sea captain— we’ve tended not to worry too much about the flames (except during the playoffs...remember those?). If there’s a primary anxiety, it’s that, after the arrival of the sea levels we’ve been promised, we’ll end up below our beloved sea. That’s why Jeffrey Linn’s speculative map of the “Vancouver Archipelago” went viral on Facebook when he posted it in 2014. The terror of the image, which showed what the region could come to look like over the next millennium or 10, was just barely muted by the whimsy of what The Tyee called “more appropriate names [for] his altered landscape”: the “islets of Brentwood” off the coast of “Coquitlam Island”

North America’s most picturesque big city felt like a snow globe filled with barbecue dry-rub spices. were just a few minutes from “Condo Reef,” as the fish swims. But the city was, in fact, born burning. The Great Fire of 1886 nearly swallowed up the nascent civic/colonial-settler project of Vancouver—the flames didn’t lick, they slurped, giving us the inciting incident in the story of our town, retold dozens of ways since (but most perfectly in Lee Henderson’s terrific novel The Man Game). Famously, many Squamish paddled over from the other side of the water to help the fleeing settlers. That’s why Vancouverites have always been so humble and decent with the Squamish since—you know, gratitude. Some of the descendants of those brave souls, along with their neighbours and allies, have been leading the charge in this corner of the world against expanding the carbon economy. This has primarily taken the form of defending the water and their sovereignty over it—objecting to new and bigger pipelines, which would draw more tankers to their shores just as surely as more bridge lanes bring extra minivans. Like their greatgrandparents, they’re doing their part to save the rest of the world from the pyre. I’m grateful for it—happy that somebody’s got their eyes on the horizon through all that smoke. Charles Demers is a local comedian, writer, and the author of Vancouver Special.


UNIQUE AS WE ARE

T H E PA N D O R A S T O R E AT

WILLOWBROOK SHOPPING CENTRE • RICHMOND CENTRE METROPOLIS AT METROTOWN • PACIFIC CENTRE • PARK ROYAL

Vancouver magazine,julaug2016  

Engaging articles, reviews and stories all about Vancouver Vancouver Magazine informs, guides...

Vancouver magazine,julaug2016  

Engaging articles, reviews and stories all about Vancouver Vancouver Magazine informs, guides...